WorldWideScience

Sample records for profound hearing impairment

  1. Multisensory Speech Perception by Profoundly Hearing-Impaired Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, Michael P.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Eight profoundly hearing-impaired children, aged 5-11, received tactual word recognition training with tactual speech perception aids. Following training, subjects were tested on trained words and new words. Performance was significantly better on both sets of words when words were presented with a combined condition of tactual aid and aided…

  2. Frequency compression hearing aid for severe-to-profound hearing impairments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakamoto, S; Goto, K; Tateno, M; Kaga, K

    2000-10-01

    Objective of this study is to know how a frequency compression hearing aid with new concepts is beneficial for severe-to-profound hearing impairments. (2) Clinical trials of this hearing aid were conducted for 11 severe-to-profound hearing impaired listeners. These 11 wore the frequency compression hearing aid in their daily life and reported subjectively on its performance. Speech recognition tests with five listeners and audio-visual short sentence recognition tests with three listeners were also conducted. This hearing aid can separately adjust the fundamental frequency from the spectral envelope of input speech and can adjust frequency response by use of a post-processing digital filter. (3) Five listeners out of these 11 came to prefer this hearing aid in their daily life and are still wearing it. The results of the speech recognition tests show that the speech recognition scores were not improved for all listeners and the results of the audio-visual short sentence recognition tests do that the audio-visual recognition scores were improved for two listeners. (4) There were some severe-to-profound hearing impaired listeners who preferred the frequency compression hearing aid finally. It is also suggested that the benefits of this hearing aid may be evaluated correctly using not only speech but also visual materials.

  3. Static and Dynamic Balance in Congenital Severe to Profound Hearing-Impaired Children

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    Farideh HajiHeydari

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Research conducted since the early 1900s has consistently identified differences between deaf and hearing children on performance of a wide variety of motor tasks, most notably balance. Our study was performed to test static and dynamic balance skills in congenital severe to profound hearing impaired children in comparison with normal age-matched children.Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted on 30 severe to profound hearing impaired and 40 normal children with age 6 to 10 years old. Bruininks-Oseretsky test of motor proficiency 2, balance subset with 9 parts was used for evaluation of balance skills.Results: Hearing-impaired children showed 16.7 to 100% fail results in 7 parts of the balance subset. In normal children fail result was revealed just in 3 parts of the balance subset from 2.5 to 57.5%, and differences between two groups were significant (p<0.0001. There was a significant difference between two groups in two static balance skills of standing on one leg on a line and standing on one leg on a balance beam with eyes closed (p<0.0001.conclusion: It seems that development of static balance skills are longer than dynamic ones. Because severe to profound hearing-impaired children showed more weakness than normal children in both static and dynamic balance abilities, functional tests of balance proficiency can help to identify balance disorders in these children.

  4. Developmental dysgraphia with profound hearing impairment: intervention by auditory methods enabled by cochlear implant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukushima, Kunihiro; Kawasaki, Akihiro; Nagayasu, Rie; Kunisue, Kazuya; Maeda, Yukihide; Kariya, Shin; Kataoka, Yuko; Nishizaki, Kazunori

    2008-06-01

    Learning disability combined with hearing impairment (LDHI) is a poor prognostic factor for the language development of hearing impaired children after educational intervention. A typical example of a child with LDHI and effective interventions provided by cochlear implants are presented in this report. A case of congenital cytomegaloviral infection that showed dysgraphia as well as profound deafness was reported and an underlying visual processing problem diagnosed in the present case caused the patient's dysgraphia. The dysgraphia could be circumvented by the use of auditory memory fairly established by a cochlear implant.

  5. Oral Communication Development in Severe to Profound Hearing Impaired Children After Receiving Aural Habilitation

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    Soleimani Farin

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Communication, cognition, language, and speech are interrelated and develop together. It should come as no surprise to us that the key to intervention with deaf children is to establish, as early as possible, a functional communication system for the child and the parents. Early intervention programs need to be multidisciplinary, technologically sound and most important, it should take cognizance of the specific context (community, country in which the child and family function. The main aim of this study was to obtain oral communication development regarding current status of the intervention (aural habilitation and speech therapyfor children with severe to profound hearing impairment in Iran. A prospective longitudinal study was undertaken on a consecutive group of children with severe to profound deafness. Nine severe to profound hearing-impaired children out of the primer 42 cases, who were detected below two years old, had been selected in the previous study to receive aural habilitation. The average of their speech intelligibility scores was near 70% at age 6, which was accounted as poor oral communication and only two of them were able to communicate by spoken language. An integrated intervention services continued again for one year and their oral communication skill was assessed by their speech intelligibility. The intelligibility test of children was recorded on audio-tape, when they read 10 questions such as where is your home. This can be answered only in one word. Each tape was presented to10 normal hearing listeners, and their task was to write down, the answers in Persian orthography. At the beginning (at age 6 the average speech intelligibility score of these children was 72% and only two of them had score of 90% and 100%. At age 7, all of the severe groups were over 90%, and only two profound ones achieved the score of 48% and 62%. All of severe groups develop oral communication, but profound ones had a semi-intelligible speech

  6. Noonan Syndrome: An Underestimated Cause of Severe to Profound Sensorineural Hearing Impairment. Which Clues to Suspect the Diagnosis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziegler, Alban; Loundon, Natalie; Jonard, Laurence; Cavé, Hélène; Baujat, Geneviève; Gherbi, Souad; Couloigner, Vincent; Marlin, Sandrine

    2017-09-01

    To highlight Noonan syndrome as a clinically recognizable cause of severe to profound sensorineural hearing impairment. New clinical cases and review. Patients evaluated for etiological diagnosis by a medical geneticist in a reference center for hearing impairment. Five patients presenting with confirmed Noonan syndrome and profound sensorineural hearing impairment. Diagnostic and review of the literature. Five patients presented with profound sensorineural hearing impairment and molecularly confirmed Noonan syndrome. Sensorineural hearing impairment has been progressive for three patients. Cardiac echography identified pulmonary stenosis in two patients and was normal for the three other patients. Short stature was found in two patients. Mild intellectual disability was found in one patient. Inconspicuous clinical features as facial dysmorphism, cryptorchidism, or easy bruising were of peculiar interest to reach the diagnosis of Noonan syndrome. Profound sensorineural hearing impairment can be the main feature of Noonan syndrome. Associated features are highly variable; thus, detailed medical history and careful physical examination are mandatory to consider the diagnosis in case of a sensorineural hearing impairment.

  7. SPEECH INTELLIGIBILITY DEVELOPMENT IN SEVERE TO PROFOUND HEARING-IMPAIRED CHILDREN ESTABLISHMENT OF A DATA COLLECTION FOR EARLY INTERVENTION IN HEARING-IMPAIRED CHILDREN IN IRAN

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    N. Daneshman P. Borghei

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available The main goal of early detection of hearing impairment in children is early intervention. There is growing interest in early detection of hearing impairment in developing countries. The main purpose of this study was to investigate the spoken language development in severe to profound hearing impaired children and compared their speech intelligibility with normal hearing children at the same age. Nine severe to profound hearing impaired children below 2 years old out of the primer 42 cases were selected for this survey. They receive aural habilitation and also speech therapy after beginning the speech production. Speech intelligibility test of these children was recorded on audio-tape, when they read five questions which can be answered with one word only, at the age of 4, 5 and 6 in comparison with 27 normal hearing children at the same age. At the age of 4 the mean speech intelligibility score of the studied group was 31.77% (SD 12.17 and the control was %96 (SD 2.23. At the age of 5, this score was %51.22 (SD 14.42, the control one 97.85% (SD 1.93. Finally at age 6 it was 72% (SD 18.97 for hearing–impaired group and 99.22% (SD 1.18 in control one. Severe to profound hearing impaired children acquired spoken language but not at the same level. In general, their speech development showed about 2 to 3 years delay. Their speech intelligibility was acceptable for severe group around the age 6 but almost semi–intelligible for profound group at the same age.

  8. Comparison of Reading Comprehension Skill of Students with Severe to Profound Hearing Impairment from Second up to Fifth Grade of Exceptional Schools with Normal Hearing Students

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    Maryam Jalalipour

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Reading is known as one of the most important learning tools. Research results consistently have shown that even a mild hearing impairment could affect the reading skills. Due to the reported differences in reading comprehension skills between hearing impaired students and their normal hearing peers, this research was conducted to compare the differences between the two groups. The other aim was to find any changes in the reading ability of hearing impaired group during elementary school. Methods: This study is a cross-sectional (descriptive–analytic one in which reading comprehension ability of 91 students with severe and profound hearing impairment (33 girls and 58 boys from 2nd up to 5th grade of exceptional schools were compared with 50 2nd grade normal hearing students in Ahvaz, Iran. The first section of Diagnostic Reading Test (Shirazi – Nilipour, 2004 was used in this study. Then the mean reading scores of hearing impaired students in each grade was compared with control group using SPSS 13 with Mann Whitney test. Results: There was a significant difference between average scores of hearing impaired students (boys and girls in 2nd to 5th grade with normal hearing students of 2nd grade (P<0.001. Reading comprehension scores of students with hearing impairment in higher grades had improved slightly, but it was still lower than that of the normal hearing students in the 2nd grade. Conclusion: It appears that reading comprehension skill of students with significant hearing impairment near the end of elementary school years becomes weaker than normal hearing students in the second grade. Therefore, it is essential to find and resolve the underlying reasons of this condition by all professionals who work in the field of education and rehabilitation of these students.

  9. Understanding minds: early cochlear implantation and the development of theory of mind in children with profound hearing impairment.

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    Sundqvist, Annette; Lyxell, Björn; Jönsson, Radoslava; Heimann, Mikael

    2014-03-01

    The present study investigates how auditory stimulation from cochlear implants (CI) is associated with the development of Theory of Mind (ToM) in severely and profoundly hearing impaired children with hearing parents. Previous research has shown that deaf children of hearing parents have a delayed ToM development. This is, however, not always the case with deaf children of deaf parents, who presumably are immersed in a more vivid signing environment. Sixteen children with CI (4.25 to 9.5 years of age) were tested on measures of cognitive and emotional ToM, language and cognition. Eight of the children received their first implant relatively early (before 27 months) and half of them late (after 27 months). The two groups did not differ in age, gender, language or cognition at entry of the study. ToM tests included the unexpected location task and a newly developed Swedish social-emotional ToM test. The tests aimed to test both cognitive and emotional ToM. A comparison group of typically developing hearing age matched children was also added (n=18). Compared to the comparison group, the early CI-group did not differ in emotional ToM. The late CI-group differed significantly from the comparison group on both the cognitive and emotional ToM tests. The results revealed that children with early cochlear implants solved ToM problems to a significantly higher degree than children with late implants, although the groups did not differ on language or cognitive measures at baseline. The outcome suggests that early cochlear implantation for deaf children in hearing families, in conjunction with early social and communicative stimulation in a language that is native to the parents, can provide a foundation for a more normalized ToM development. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Hearing Screening in a School for the Severely-Profoundly Intellectually-Impaired and Multiply-Handicapped Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaffe, Linda

    1981-01-01

    Results were considered significant in that 11 percent of the students screened were identified as potentially hearing impaired as compared to 4 percent of the regular Baltimore City School student population who failed hearing screenings. (Author)

  11. A Comparison between Morphological and Syntactic Features of 4 to 5 Years Old in Education Severe to Profound Hearing Impaired and Normal Children

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    Leila Golpour

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Learning Language is a skill which is acquired in early childhood. So, language gradually developed and new words and new structures slowly added to language knowledge. Hearing sense is the most important acquisition for of language and hearing disorder is a barrier for natural language acquiring .The purpose of this study is comparison between morphological and syntactic features of 4 to 5 years old severe to profound hearing impaired and normal children. Materials and Method: This cross-sectional study performed on 10 normal-hearing children with mean age of 4-5, from Gazvin kindergartens and 10 hearing impaired children with similar IQ and age from Nioosha Rehabilitation Center. The language and non language information was received by spontaneous and descriptive speech, and questionnaire, respectively and for comparing syntax comprehension, Specific language impairment test was used. Then these results were compared between two groups. Results: Difference between spontaneous speech and descriptive speech in hearing impaired child is just like normal child. These differences are that the number of utterance, the mean of lexical morpheme, functional morpheme in spontaneous speech is greater than descriptive speech but the mean length of utterance and richness of vocabulary in descriptive speech is greater than spontaneous speech. Mean of lexical morpheme, functional morpheme and richness of vocabulary related to morphological part and the number of utterance, the mean length of utterance and syntax comprehension related to syntax, in spontaneous and descriptive speech of normal children speech is greater than hearing impaireds`. Conclusion: According to recent researches, compared with normal child, the hearing impaired child nearly never to reach equal level, and for this reason, training for this group is necessary. It is concluded that although these children have severe to profound hearing loss they are developing their

  12. Effects of early identification and intervention on language development in Japanese children with prelingual severe to profound hearing impairment.

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    Kasai, Norio; Fukushima, Kunihiro; Omori, Kana; Sugaya, Akiko; Ojima, Toshiyuki

    2012-04-01

    Early identification and intervention for prelingual bilateral severe to profound hearing loss is supposed to reduce the delay in language development. Many countries have implemented early detection and hearing intervention and conducted regional universal newborn hearing screening (UNHS). However, the benefits of UNHS in later childhood have not yet been confirmed, although language development at school age has a lifelong impact on children's future. Our Research on Sensory and Communicative Disorders project attempted to reveal the effects of UNHS and those of early intervention on the development of verbal communication in Japanese children. In this study, 319 children with prelingual bilateral severe to profound hearing loss, 4 to 10 years of age, were evaluated with the Test of Question-Answer Interaction Development used as an objective variable. Participation in UNHS and early intervention were used as explanatory variables. The adjusted odds ratio (AOR) was calculated after adjusting several confounding factors with use of logistic regression analysis. In addition, caregivers' answers were obtained by a questionnaire, and the process of diagnosis with and without UNHS was analyzed retrospectively. Early intervention was significantly associated with better language development (AOR, 3.23; p identification leads directly to early intervention.

  13. Hearing Impairments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavender, Anna; Ladner, Richard E.

    For many people with hearing impairments, the degree of hearing loss is only a small aspect of their disability and does not necessarily determine the types of accessibility solutions or accommodations that may be required. For some people, the ability to adjust the audio volume may be sufficient. For others, translation to a signed language may be more appropriate. For still others, access to text alternatives may be the best solution. Because of these differences, it is important for researchers in Web accessibility to understand that people with hearing impairments may have very different cultural-linguistic traditions and personal backgrounds.

  14. Hearing Impairment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Fitness Diseases & Conditions Infections Drugs & Alcohol School & Jobs Sports Expert Answers (Q&A) Staying Safe Videos for ... known as noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL) . Personal music players are among the chief culprits of NIHL ...

  15. Concerns of Indian Mothers with Children Having Severe-to-Profound Hearing Impairment at Diagnosis and after 1–3 Years of Therapy

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    Nachiketa Rout

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Counseling training in graduate programs continues to be underrepresented. If parental queries are not addressed adequately, they keep visiting one doctor after another. Objective. The aim of the study is to identify maternal needs of children with hearing impairment at two stages of habilitation, that is, just after diagnosis (group I and after receiving 1 to 3 years of language therapy (group II. Methods. Two groups of mothers were asked to speak their queries about aural habilitation of their children. Queries were recorded, summarized, and categorized as per their priorities. Results. Group I mothers wanted to know about how the child would learn to listen and speak (45%, causes of hearing loss (33.7%, understanding the ear and hearing (10.2%, understanding the audiogram (7%, and coping with emotional aspects of hearing loss (5%, while group II parents had priorities concerning speech development (24.5% followed by child independence and employment (17.3%, schooling (15.6%, problem behaviors (11%, amplification device (9.4%, duration of therapy (8%, future of the child (8%, and questions about how can my child get adjusted to the “normal” world (6%. Conclusions. Culture- and language-specific materials to explain these issues need to be developed.

  16. The Relationship between Communication Problems and Psychological Difficulties in Persons with Profound Acquired Hearing Loss.

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    Knutson, John F.; Lansing, Charissa R.

    1990-01-01

    Twenty-seven adults with postlingually acquired profound deafness were administered the Communication Profile for the Hearing Impaired and several tests of psychological functioning and adjustment. Inadequate communication strategies and poor accommodations to deafness were associated with depression, social introversion, loneliness, and social…

  17. Visual impairment in the hearing impaired students

    OpenAIRE

    Gogate Parikshit; Rishikeshi Nikhil; Mehata Reshma; Ranade Satish; Kharat Jitesh; Deshpande Madan

    2009-01-01

    Background : Ocular problems are more common in children with hearing problems than in normal children. Neglected visual impairment could aggravate educational and social disability. Aim : To detect and treat visual impairment, if any, in hearing-impaired children. Setting and Design : Observational, clinical case series of hearing-impaired children in schools providing special education. Materials and Methods : Hearing-impaired children in selected schools underwent detailed vis...

  18. Visual impairment in the hearing impaired students.

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    Gogate, Parikshit; Rishikeshi, Nikhil; Mehata, Reshma; Ranade, Satish; Kharat, Jitesh; Deshpande, Madan

    2009-01-01

    Ocular problems are more common in children with hearing problems than in normal children. Neglected visual impairment could aggravate educational and social disability. To detect and treat visual impairment, if any, in hearing-impaired children. Observational, clinical case series of hearing-impaired children in schools providing special education. Hearing-impaired children in selected schools underwent detailed visual acuity testing, refraction, external ocular examination and fundoscopy. Ocular motility testing was also performed. Teachers were sensitized and trained to help in the assessment of visual acuity using Snellen's E charts. Refractive errors and squint were treated as per standard practice. Excel software was used for data entry and SSPS for analysis. The study involved 901 hearing-impaired students between four and 21 years of age, from 14 special education schools. A quarter of them (216/901, 24%) had ocular problems. Refractive errors were the most common morbidity 167(18.5%), but only 10 children were using appropriate spectacle correction at presentation. Fifty children had visual acuity less than 20/80 at presentation; after providing refractive correction, this number reduced to three children, all of whom were provided low-vision aids. Other common conditions included strabismus in 12 (1.3%) children, and retinal pigmentary dystrophy in five (0.6%) children. Ocular problems are common in hearing-impaired children. Screening for ocular problems should be made mandatory in hearing-impaired children, as they use their visual sense to compensate for the poor auditory sense.

  19. Visual impairment in severe and profound sensorineural deafness.

    OpenAIRE

    Armitage, I M; Burke, J. P.; Buffin, J T

    1995-01-01

    The frequency of reversible and irreversible visual impairment was determined in children with severe and profound sensorineural deafness, as subnormal vision can adversely affect their educational and social development. Eighty three of 87 such children attending an audiology service were examined to assess the incidence and severity of visual impairment. Each child underwent a detailed ophthalmic assessment. The criteria for visual impairment were visual acuity < 6/9 Snellen or equivalent a...

  20. The management of children with Down syndrome and profound hearing loss.

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    Phelan, E; Pal, R; Henderson, L; Green, K M J; Bruce, I A

    2016-01-01

    Although, the association between Down syndrome (DS) and conductive hearing loss is well recognized, the fact that a small proportion of these children may have a severe to profound sensorineural hearing loss that could benefit from cochlear implantation (CI) is less well understood. The management of significant co-morbidities in children with DS can delay initial diagnosis of hearing impairment and assessment of suitability for CI can likewise be challenging, due to difficulties conditioning to behavioural hearing tests. We performed a retrospective case note review of three children with DS referred to the Manchester Cochlear Implant Programme. Three illustrative cases are described including CI in a 4 years old. Using conventional outcome measurement instruments, the outcome could be considered to be suboptimal with a Categories of Auditory Performance score of 4 at 6 months post-op and at last follow up. In part, this is likely to reflect the delay in implantation, but the role of cognitive impairment must be considered. The cases described emphasize the importance of comprehensive radiological and audiological assessment in children with DS being considered for CI. The influence of cognitive impairment upon outcome of CI must be taken into account, but should not be considered a contra-indication to implantation in children with DS. Benefit that might be considered limited when quantified using existing general outcome measurement instruments, may have a significant impact upon psychosocial development and quality of life in children with significant cognitive impairment, or other additional needs.

  1. Experience with cochlear implants in Greenlanders with profound hearing loss living in Greenland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Homøe, Preben; Andersen, Ture; Grøntved, Aksel

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Cochlear implant (CI) treatment was introduced to the world in the 1980s and has become a routine treatment for congenital or acquired severe-to-profound hearing loss. CI treatment requires access to a highly skilled team of ear, nose and throat specialists, audiologists and speech...... years are in need of a CI every second year in Greenland often due to sequelae from meningitis, which may cause postinfectious deafness. Screening of new-borns for hearing has been started in Greenland establishing the basis for early diagnosis of congenital hearing impairment and subsequent...... intervention. The logistics and lack of availability of speech therapists in Greenland hampers possibilities for optimal language and speech therapy of CI patients in Greenland. This study aims at describing the results of CI treatment in Greenlanders and the outcome of the CI operations along...

  2. Cancer Prevention Knowledge of People with Profound Hearing Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meador, Helen E.; Reed, Barbara D.; Sen, Ananda; Gorenflo, Daniel W.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND Deaf persons, a documented minority population, have low reading levels and difficulty communicating with physicians. The effect of these on their knowledge of cancer prevention recommendations is unknown. METHODS A cross-sectional study of 222 d/Deaf persons in Michigan, age 18 and older, chose one of four ways (voice, video of a certified American Sign Language interpreter, captions, or printed English) to complete a self-administered computer video questionnaire about demographics, hearing loss, language history, health-care utilization, and health-care information sources, as well as family and social variables. Twelve questions tested their knowledge of cancer prevention recommendations. The outcome measures were the percentage of correct answers to the questions and the association of multiple variables with these responses. RESULTS Participants averaged 22.9% correct answers with no gender difference. Univariate analysis revealed that smoking history, types of medical problems, last physician visit, and women having previous cancer preventive tests did not affect scores. Improved scores occurred with computer use (p = 0.05), higher education (p English in multiple situations (p English use (p = 0.01) and believing that smoking was bad (p = 0.05) were associated with improved scores. CONCLUSION Persons with profound hearing loss have poor knowledge of recommended cancer prevention interventions. English use in multiple settings was strongly associated with increased knowledge. PMID:19132325

  3. The Effect of Frequency Transposition on Speech Perception in Adolescents and Young Adults with Profound Hearing Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gou, J.; Smith, J.; Valero, J.; Rubio, I.

    2011-01-01

    This paper reports on a clinical trial evaluating outcomes of a frequency-lowering technique for adolescents and young adults with severe to profound hearing impairment. Outcomes were defined by changes in aided thresholds, speech perception, and acceptance. The participants comprised seven young people aged between 13 and 25 years. They were…

  4. Prelinguistic Vocal Development in Infants with Typical Hearing and Infants with Severe-to-Profound Hearing Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iyer, Suneeti Nathani; Oller, D. Kimbrough

    2008-01-01

    Delays in the onset of canonical babbling with hearing loss are extensively documented. Relatively little is known about other aspects of prelinguistic vocal development and hearing loss. Eight infants with typical hearing and eight with severe-to-profound hearing loss were matched with regard to a significant vocal development milestone, the…

  5. Visual impairment in the hearing impaired students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gogate Parikshit

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background : Ocular problems are more common in children with hearing problems than in normal children. Neglected visual impairment could aggravate educational and social disability. Aim : To detect and treat visual impairment, if any, in hearing-impaired children. Setting and Design : Observational, clinical case series of hearing-impaired children in schools providing special education. Materials and Methods : Hearing-impaired children in selected schools underwent detailed visual acuity testing, refraction, external ocular examination and fundoscopy. Ocular motility testing was also performed. Teachers were sensitized and trained to help in the assessment of visual acuity using Snellen′s E charts. Refractive errors and squint were treated as per standard practice. Statistical Analysis : Excel software was used for data entry and SSPS for analysis. Results : The study involved 901 hearing-impaired students between four and 21 years of age, from 14 special education schools. A quarter of them (216/901, 24% had ocular problems. Refractive errors were the most common morbidity 167(18.5%, but only 10 children were using appropriate spectacle correction at presentation. Fifty children had visual acuity less than 20/80 at presentation; after providing refractive correction, this number reduced to three children, all of whom were provided low-vision aids. Other common conditions included strabismus in 12 (1.3% children, and retinal pigmentary dystrophy in five (0.6% children. Conclusion : Ocular problems are common in hearing-impaired children. Screening for ocular problems should be made mandatory in hearing-impaired children, as they use their visual sense to compensate for the poor auditory sense.

  6. Multisensory speech perception of young children with profound hearing loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kishon-Rabin, L; Haras, N; Bergman, M

    1997-10-01

    The contribution of a two-channel vibrotactile aid (Trill VTA 2/3, AVR Communications LTD) to the audiovisual perception of speech was evaluated in four young children with profound hearing loss using words and speech pattern contrasts. An intensive, hierarchical, and systematic training program was provided. The results show that the addition of the tactile (T) modality to the auditory and visual (A+V) modalities enhanced speech perception performance significantly on all tests. Specifically, at the end of the training sessions, the tactile supplementation increased word recognition scores in a 44-word, closed-set task by 12 percentage points; detection of consonant in final position by 50 percentage points; detection of sibilant in final position by 30 percentage points; and detection of voicing in final position by 25 percentage points. Significant learning over time was evident for all test materials, in all modalities. As expected, fastest learning (i.e., smallest time constants) was found for the AVT condition. The results of this study provide further evidence that sensory information provided by the tactile modality can enhance speech perception in young children.

  7. [Hearing impairment and dementia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilimann, I; Óvari, A; Hermann, A; Witt, G; Pau, H W; Teipel, S

    2015-07-01

    The World Health Organization (WHO) burden of disease study identified dementia and hearing problems as leading causes of loss of quality of life in the industrial world. The prevalence of dementia and hearing problems increases in aging societies. Comorbidity of these two diseases causes increasing demands on healthcare systems. The similarity and possible interaction of symptoms renders diagnosis and therapy of dementia and hearing loss a challenge for neurologists, psychiatrists, ear, nose and throat (ENT) and hearing specialists. Knowledge of both diseases enables an early intervention and helps preserve participation in society and thereby reducing the risk of developing dementia. This paper focuses on the characteristics of the diagnosis and therapy of hearing problems and dementia.

  8. Cochlear implantation in autistic children with profound sensorineural hearing loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lachowska, Magdalena; Pastuszka, Agnieszka; Łukaszewicz-Moszyńska, Zuzanna; Mikołajewska, Lidia; Niemczyk, Kazimierz

    2016-11-19

    Cochlear implants have become the method of choice for the treatment of severe-to-profound hearing loss in both children and adults. Its benefits are well documented in the pediatric and adult population. Also deaf children with additional needs, including autism, have been covered by this treatment. The aim of this study was to assess the benefits from cochlear implantation in deafened children with autism as the only additional disability. This study analyzes data of six children. The follow-up time was at least 43 months. The following data were analyzed: medical history, reaction to music and sound, Ling's six sounds test, onomatopoeic word test, reaction to spoken child's name, response to requests, questionnaire given to parents, sound processor fitting sessions and data. After cochlear implantation each child presented other communication skills. In some children, the symptoms of speech understanding were observed. No increased hyperactivity associated with daily use cochlear implant was observed. The study showed that in autistic children the perception is very important for a child's sense of security and makes contact with parents easier. Our study showed that oral communication is not likely to be a realistic goal in children with cochlear implants and autism. The implantation results showed benefits that varied among those children. The traditional methods of evaluating the results of cochlear implantation in children with autism are usually insufficient to fully assess the functional benefits. These benefits should be assessed in a more comprehensive manner taking into account the limitations of communication resulting from the essence of autism. It is important that we share knowledge about these complex children with cochlear implants. Copyright © 2016 Associação Brasileira de Otorrinolaringologia e Cirurgia Cérvico-Facial. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  9. Hearing Instruments for Unilateral Severe-to-Profound Sensorineural Hearing Loss in Adults: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitterick, Pádraig Thomas; Smith, Sandra Nelson; Lucas, Laura

    2016-01-01

    different devices was sparse but a statistically significant advantage was observed for rerouting speech signals using abutment-mounted bone conduction devices when compared with outcomes after preoperative trials of air conduction devices when speech and noise were colocated (mean benefit, 1.5 dB). Patients reported significant improvements in hearing-related quality of life with both rerouting devices and following cochlear implantation. Only two studies measured health-related quality of life and findings were inconclusive. Devices that reroute sounds from an ear with a severe to profound hearing loss to an ear with minimal hearing loss may improve speech perception in noise when signals of interest are located toward the impaired ear. However, the same device may also degrade speech perception as all signals are rerouted indiscriminately, including noise. Although the restoration of functional hearing in both ears through cochlear implantation could be expected to provide benefits to speech perception, the inability to synthesize evidence across existing studies means that such a conclusion cannot yet be made. For the same reason, it remains unclear whether cochlear implantation can improve the ability to localize sounds despite restoring bilateral input. Prospective controlled studies that measure outcomes consistently and control for selection and observation biases are required to improve the quality of the evidence for the provision of hearing instruments to patients with unilateral deafness and to support any future recommendations for the clinical management of these patients.

  10. Hearing impairment in Estonia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Teek, R; Kruustük, K; Zordania, R

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Purpose: The present study was initiated to establish the etiological causes of early onset hearing loss (HL) among Estonian children between 2000-2009. Methods: The study group consisted of 233 probands who were first tested with an arrayed primer extension assay, which covers 199 mutat...

  11. Postural control in children with typical development and children with profound hearing loss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monteiro de Sousa AM

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Aneliza Maria Monteiro de Sousa,1 Jônatas de França Barros,2 Brígido Martins de Sousa Neto31Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Brasilia, Brasilia, Federal District, Brazil; 2Department of Physical Education at the Federal University of Rio Grande do Norte, Natal, Rio Grande do Norte, Brazil; 3University Center UNIEURO, Brasilia, Federal District, BrazilPurpose: To describe the behavior of the postural control in children with profound sensorineural hearing loss and compare the results of experimental tests with hearing children aged 7 to 10 years.Patients and methods: This is a cross-sectional study where 100 children were divided into experimental and control groups. We used a force platform, AccuSway Plus, where the tests were conducted under the experimental conditions: open base, eyes open (OBEO; open base, eyes closed (OBEC; closed base, eyes open (CBEO; closed base, eyes closed (CBEC. The body sway velocity (V of the center of pressure, the displacement in the anteroposterior direction (COPap and mediolateral (COPml of the center of pressure were the parameters to evaluate the postural control. For statistical analysis we used the nonparametric Mann–Whitney U test, with a significance level of 5%.Results: In comparisons of variables between the groups, the experimental group outperformed by at least 75% of the control group values. In terms of global trends, the experimental group shows higher values of body oscillations in all experimental conditions and variables evaluated. Children with hearing loss had poorer balance performance compared to the group of hearing. The inferential analysis revealed a statistically significant difference in the balance between deaf and hearing children in the OBEC experimental condition in relation to the COPml parameter (P = 0.04. There were no statistically significant differences in comparisons between the sexes when the groups were analyzed separately. The prevalence of unknown etiology

  12. Is Hearing Impairment Associated with Rheumatoid Arthritis?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Emamifar, Amir; Bjoerndal, Kristine; Jensen Hansen, Inger Marie

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a systemic, inflammatory disease that affects 1% of the population. The auditory system may be involved during the course of disease; however the association of RA and hearing impairment has not been clearly defined. OBJECTIVE: The objective of this review...... is to evaluate published clinical reports related to hearing impairment in patients with RA. Furthermore, we discuss possible pathologies and associated factors as well as new treatment modalities. METHOD: A thorough literature search was performed using available databases including Pubmed, Embase, Cochrane...... and ComDisDome to cover all relative reports. The following keywords were used: hearing loss, hearing difficulties, hearing disorders, hearing impairment, sensorineural hearing loss, conductive hearing loss, mixed hearing loss, autoimmune hearing loss, drug ototoxicity, drug-induced hearing loss, hearing...

  13. Syntactic Movement in Orally Trained Children with Hearing Impairment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedmann, Naama; Szterman, Ronit

    2006-01-01

    This study explored the comprehension and production of sentences derived by syntactic movement, in orally trained school-age Hebrew-speaking children with moderate to profound hearing impairment, aged 7;8?9;9 years. Experiments 1 and 2 tested the comprehension of relative clauses and topicalization sentences (with word orders of OVS [object,…

  14. Persistence--A Father's Response to His Son's Hearing Impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulakowski, Joseph J.

    1984-01-01

    The father of a profoundly hearing impaired 4-year-old describes his initial anger upon discovering his child's problem and ways in which he translated those feelings to action on his child's behalf. He describes a program of intensive speech therapy and parent training that has resulted in progress in speech. (CL)

  15. Adjustment Problems of Hearing and Hearing-Impaired Students in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study examined the social and academic adjustment problems of some mainstreamed hearing and hearing-impaired students who were randomly selected from two integrated schools in Ibadan metropolis. The sample consisted of 232 junior secondary school students. 125 of them are hearing while 107 are hearing ...

  16. A Study of Rate of Speech and Intelligibility of Speech in Hearing impaired Pupils of Baghcheban School of Zahedan, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahla SAEDI

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Hearing loss results in disruption of coordination in muscles and structures engaged in speech timing tasks and consequently acquisition of speech sounds is affected. The purpose of this study is to investigate and compare the speed and intelligibility of speech in hearing impaired and normal hearing Persian speaking elementary school boys and girls. 33 hearing impaired students are randomly selected from three hearing impaired groups (profound, severe and moderately-severe and compared with 60 normal hearing students. The speed of speech was measured according to reading Words Per Minute (WPM, and speech intelligibility was tested by a 5-rank scale method. As expected, the normal hearing had more speed and intelligibility of speech in contrast to the hearing impaired group. Also hearing impaired boys had a better speed and intelligibility of speech compared to hearing impaired girls but in normal hearing group, girls had better speed. The amount of P-value for moderately-severe and sever hearing impaired was 0.006 and this amount for profound and moderately-severe hearing impaired was 0.002, so p-value is <0.05 and significantly important. Profound hearing impaired group read the text more slowly and had lower speech intelligibility than other two hearing impaired groups.

  17. Story retelling skills in Persian speaking hearing-impaired children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarollahi, Farnoush; Mohamadi, Reyhane; Modarresi, Yahya; Agharasouli, Zahra; Rahimzadeh, Shadi; Ahmadi, Tayebeh; Keyhani, Mohammad-Reza

    2017-05-01

    Since the pragmatic skills of hearing-impaired Persian-speaking children have not yet been investigated particularly through story retelling, this study aimed to evaluate some pragmatic abilities of normal-hearing and hearing-impaired children using a story retelling test. 15 normal-hearing and 15 profound hearing-impaired 7-year-old children were evaluated using the story retelling test with the content validity of 89%, construct validity of 85%, and reliability of 83%. Three macro structure criteria including topic maintenance, event sequencing, explicitness, and four macro structure criteria including referencing, conjunctive cohesion, syntax complexity, and utterance length were assessed. The test was performed with live voice in a quiet room where children were then asked to retell the story. The tasks of the children were recorded on a tape, transcribed, scored and analyzed. In the macro structure criteria, utterances of hearing-impaired students were less consistent, enough information was not given to listeners to have a full understanding of the subject, and the story events were less frequently expressed in a rational order than those of normal-hearing group (P < 0.0001). Regarding the macro structure criteria of the test, unlike the normal-hearing students who obtained high scores, hearing-impaired students failed to gain any scores on the items of this section. These results suggest that Hearing-impaired children were not able to use language as effectively as their hearing peers, and they utilized quite different pragmatic functions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Does hearing aid use affect audiovisual integration in mild hearing impairment?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gieseler, Anja; Tahden, Maike A S; Thiel, Christiane M; Colonius, Hans

    2018-02-16

    There is converging evidence for altered audiovisual integration abilities in hearing-impaired individuals and those with profound hearing loss who are provided with cochlear implants, compared to normal-hearing adults. Still, little is known on the effects of hearing aid use on audiovisual integration in mild hearing loss, although this constitutes one of the most prevalent conditions in the elderly and, yet, often remains untreated in its early stages. This study investigated differences in the strength of audiovisual integration between elderly hearing aid users and those with the same degree of mild hearing loss who were not using hearing aids, the non-users, by measuring their susceptibility to the sound-induced flash illusion. We also explored the corresponding window of integration by varying the stimulus onset asynchronies. To examine general group differences that are not attributable to specific hearing aid settings but rather reflect overall changes associated with habitual hearing aid use, the group of hearing aid users was tested unaided while individually controlling for audibility. We found greater audiovisual integration together with a wider window of integration in hearing aid users compared to their age-matched untreated peers. Signal detection analyses indicate that a change in perceptual sensitivity as well as in bias may underlie the observed effects. Our results and comparisons with other studies in normal-hearing older adults suggest that both mild hearing impairment and hearing aid use seem to affect audiovisual integration, possibly in the sense that hearing aid use may reverse the effects of hearing loss on audiovisual integration. We suggest that these findings may be particularly important for auditory rehabilitation and call for a longitudinal study.

  19. Eye problems in children with hearing impairment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hadi Ostadimoghaddam

    2015-03-01

    Conclusion: In a comparison of children of the same ages, hearing-impaired children have significantly more eye problems; therefore, a possible relation between deafness and eye problems must exist. Paying attention to eye health assessment in hearing-impaired children may help prevent adding eye problems to hearing difficulties.

  20. A preliminary study of some pragmatic skills of hearing and hearing-impaired children by story retelling test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farnoush Jarollahi

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Pragmatics refers to speech interactions and the social aspect of communication in language contexts. Due to the crucial role of hearing in language skill development, hearing-impaired children have problems with all aspects of language, including pragmatics. These skills are crucial in children's daily life. There is a lack of Persian studies on hearing-impaired children. Therefore, the purpose of the present study is to describe some pragmatic skills of hearing and hearing-impaired children.Methods: This descriptive case study was conducted on five hearing-impaired and two normal-hearing 6 year old children. Their pragmatic language skills were studied by the Persian story retelling test. in a quiet room. The children's re-told story was recorded, analyzed, and scored.Results: There was no difference between the scores of hearing and severe hearing-impaired children. However, children with severe hearing loss and cochlear implant, and hearing children were different in maintaining the subject and sequence of events. Children with profound hearing loss and hearing aid, and hearing children had a significant difference in all aspects except main information. All subjects used conjunctions correctly.Conclusion: The pragmatic skills of hearing-impaired children are weaker than hearing children. There are also differences between hearing-impaired children's abilities. This difference in pragmatic skills shows the difference in amount of hearing loss, kind of assistive device, effective use of remaining hearing, onset and quality of aural rehabilitation program, and other factors. Therefore, a research with a greater sample size is necessary to explain these differences.

  1. Eye problems in children with hearing impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostadimoghaddam, Hadi; Mirhajian, Hanieh; Yekta, AbbasAli; Sobhani Rad, Davood; Heravian, Javad; Malekifar, Azam; Khabazkhoob, Mehdi

    2015-01-01

    To compare the prevalence of refractive errors, amblyopia, and strabismus between hearing-impaired and normal children (7-22 years old) in Mashhad. In this cross-sectional study, cases were selected from hearing-impaired children in Mashhad. The control group consisted of children with no hearing problem. The sampling was done utilizing the cluster sampling method. All of the samples underwent refraction, cover test, and visual examinations. 254 children in the hearing-impaired group (case) and 506 children in the control group were assessed. The mean spherical equivalent was 1.7 ± 1.9 D in the case group, which was significantly different from the control group (0.2 ± 1.5) (P hearing-impaired children have significantly more eye problems; therefore, a possible relation between deafness and eye problems must exist. Paying attention to eye health assessment in hearing-impaired children may help prevent adding eye problems to hearing difficulties.

  2. Prevalence of visual and hearing impairment in a Dutch institutionalized population with intellectual disability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evenhuis, H M; Theunissen, M; Denkers, I; Verschuure, H; Kemme, H

    2001-10-01

    A screening of hearing and visual function was performed using clinical assessment methods in a Dutch institutionalized population of 672 people with mild to profound intellectual disability (ID). Because the studied population was not comparable to the total Dutch population with ID, subgroups were distinguished according to level of ID, age younger and older than 50 years, and the presence or absence of Down's syndrome (DS). The prevalences of both hearing and visual impairment were considerably increased in all subgroups, as compared with the general population. In the least affected group, i.e. those or = 50 years. To a lesser extent, young adults with severe or profound ID had an increased risk of hearing impairment. Visual impairment and blindness were specifically highly prevalent in people with severe or profound ID (51% or = 50 years were also significant risk factors for visual impairment. There was an alarmingly high prevalence of combined sensory impairment, especially in those with severe or profound ID (20%). Although hearing impairment had been diagnosed prior to this screen in 138 people and visual impairment in 65 individuals, a first diagnosis of hearing impairment was made in 128 subjects and of visual impairment in 90 cases. This highlights the tendency for sensory impairments to go unnoticed in people with ID, which is not restricted to those with severe or profound ID. Therefore, the present authors stress the importance of regular screening as outlined in the existing IASSID international consensus statement.

  3. Allan-Herndon-Dudley syndrome with unusual profound sensorineural hearing loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagliardi, Lucia; Nataren, Nathalie; Feng, Jinghua; Schreiber, Andreas W; Hahn, Christopher N; Conwell, Louise S; Coman, David; Scott, Hamish S

    2015-08-01

    The Allan-Herndon-Dudley syndrome is caused by mutations in the thyroid hormone transporter, Monocarboxylate transporter 8 (MCT8). It is characterized by profound intellectual disability and abnormal thyroid function. We report on a patient with Allan-Herndon-Dudley syndrome (AHDS) with profound sensorineural hearing loss which is not usually a feature of AHDS and which may have been due to a coexisting nonsense mutation in Microphthalmia-associated transcription factor (MITF). © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Hearing Impairment in Children

    OpenAIRE

    Mori, Toshiko; MAEJIMA, Takako

    1995-01-01

    This paper surveys the speech therapy methods used with hearing-impaired children.Several problems in the development of hearing-impaired children are explained, including speech therapy by auditory training to alleviate the problems. The validity of Mon's check-list and Mori's language ability test were demonstrated using four sample cases. Finally, the important points of speech therapy in hearing-impaired children are discussed.

  5. Assessing the Efficacy of an Academic Hearing Peer Tutor for a Profoundly Deaf Student.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burley, Suzanne; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Evaluation of using a hearing peer tutor to provide daily 20-minute math instruction for a profoundly deaf sixth-grade girl indicated that the peer tutoring intervention was highly successful, with the tutee meeting accuracy criteria for each of 4 curriculum objectives after only a brief period of intervention. (Author/DB)

  6. Localization training results in individuals with unilateral severe to profound hearing loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Firszt, Jill B; Reeder, Ruth M; Dwyer, Noël Y; Burton, Harold; Holden, Laura K

    2015-01-01

    Adults with unilateral hearing loss often demonstrate decreased sound localization ability and report that situations requiring spatial hearing are especially challenging. Few studies have evaluated localization abilities combined with training in this population. The present pilot study examined whether localization of two sound types would improve after training, and explored the relation between localization ability or training benefit and demographic factors. Eleven participants with unilateral severe to profound hearing loss attended five training sessions; localization cues gradually decreased across sessions. Localization ability was assessed pre- and post-training. Assessment stimuli were monosyllabic words and spectral and temporal random spectrogram sounds. Root mean square errors for each participant and stimulus type were used in group and correlation analyses; individual data were examined with ordinary least squares regression. Mean pre-to post-training test results were significantly different for all stimulus types. Among the participants, eight significantly improved following training on at least one localization measure, whereas three did not. Participants with the poorest localization ability improved the most and likewise, those with the best pre-training ability showed the least training benefit. Correlation results suggested that test age, age at onset of severe to profound hearing loss and better ear high frequency audibility may contribute to localization ability. Results support the need for continued investigation of localization training efficacy and consideration of localization training within rehabilitation protocols for individuals with unilateral severe to profound hearing loss. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. [The assessment of hearing impairment in patients over 60 years of age using hearing aids].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skrzypek, Aleksandra; Sekula, Alicja; Deryło, Maria Bratumiła; Kuśmierczyk, Joanna; Talar, Marcin

    2014-01-01

    To assess the hearing impairment in people over 60 years old using hearing aids. This was a single-center study, but it is planned to extend it further to the whole country. The study was focused on patients with hearing aids. During the assessment 57 people were included in the observation in order to control the status of their hearing loss and benefit from traditional hearing aids as well as the possibility to apply the auditory implants in case of a little benefit from hearing aids. The otoscopy and pure tone audiometry were performed as well as the questionnaires on demographic and epidemiological data of patients were collected as well as the quality of their life with hearing aids was subjectively assessed. The results show that 91% of patients have sensorineural hearing loss (SHL), the remaining 9%--severe mixed hearing loss. Severe SHL was found in 22 patients, the moderate hearing loss was observed in 37%, and the profound SHL was the case in 5 patients. Minimal SHL was observed in 7% of patients (n=4). More than 73% of the study subjects were male (n=38). The average age of the patients who completed the survey was 74 years old. Thirty-five patients used their hearing aid over 3 years and less than 70% of them used it every day all day. Hearing aid was not actively used by 10 patients. Over the last year 51.92% of the patients underwent a hearing examination. The bone anchored hearing aid was suggested to 2% of subjects and the cochlear implant was offered to 10 patients. The data analysis shows the need to educate and inform the elderly about alternative methods of hearing loss treatment. Copyright © 2013 Polish Otorhinolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery Society. Published by Elsevier Urban & Partner Sp. z.o.o. All rights reserved.

  8. Preferred low- and high-frequency compression ratios among hearing aid users with moderately severe to profound hearing loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keidser, Gitte; Dillon, Harvey; Dyrlund, Ole; Carter, Lyndal; Hartley, David

    2007-01-01

    This study aimed to determine the low- and high-frequency compression ratios of a fast-acting device that were preferred by people with moderately severe to profound hearing loss. Three compression ratios (1:1, 1.8:1, and 3:1) were combined in the low and high frequencies to produce nine schemes that were evaluated pair-wise for three weeks in the field using an adaptive procedure. The evaluation was performed by 21 experienced hearing aid users with a moderately severe to profound hearing loss. Diaries and an exit interview were used to monitor preferences. Generally, the subjects preferred lower compression ratios than are typically prescribed, especially in the low frequencies. Specifically, 11 subjects preferred linear amplification in the low frequencies, and 14 subjects preferred more compression in the high than in the low frequencies. Preferences could not be predicted from audiometric data, onset of loss, or past experience with amplification. The data suggest that clients with moderately severe to profound hearing loss should be fitted with low-frequency compression ratios in the range 1:1 to 2:1 and that fine-tuning is essential.

  9. Experience with cochlear implants in Greenlanders with profound hearing loss living in Greenland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Preben Homøe

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Cochlear implant (CI treatment was introduced to the world in the 1980s and has become a routine treatment for congenital or acquired severe-to-profound hearing loss. CI treatment requires access to a highly skilled team of ear, nose and throat specialists, audiologists and speech-language pathologists for evaluation, surgery and rehabilitation. In particular, children treated with CI are in need of long-term post-operative auditory training and other follow-up support. Design. The study is retrospective with updated information on present performance. Results. Since 2001, a total of 11 Greenlandic patients living in Greenland have been treated with CI, 7 children and 4 adults. Of these children, 4 use oral communication only and are full-time CI-users, 2 with full-time use of CI are still in progress with use of oral communication, and 1 has not acquired oral language yet, but has started auditory and speech training. Six children attend mainstream public school while one child is in kindergarten. Of the adults, only 1 has achieved good speech perception with full-time use of CI while 3 do not use the CI. Discussion. From an epidemiological point of view, approximately 1–3 children below 6 years are in need of a CI every second year in Greenland often due to sequelae from meningitis, which may cause postinfectious deafness. Screening of new-borns for hearing has been started in Greenland establishing the basis for early diagnosis of congenital hearing impairment and subsequent intervention. The logistics and lack of availability of speech therapists in Greenland hampers possibilities for optimal language and speech therapy of CI patients in Greenland. This study aims at describing the results of CI treatment in Greenlanders and the outcome of the CI operations along with the auditory and speech/language outcomes. Finally, we present a suggestion for the future CI treatment and recommendations for an increased effort in the

  10. Controversies in the Field of Hearing Impairment: Early Identification, Educational Methods, and Cochlear Implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samson-Fang, Lisa; Simons-McCandless, Marsha; Shelton, Clough

    2000-01-01

    This article discusses the incidence of infant hearing impairments, auditory screening tests, and available intervention choices for infants with severe to profound congenital hearing loss, including methods for communication and cochlear implantation. American Sign language, manually coded English, fingerspelling, total communication, and…

  11. New speech tests reveal benefit of wide-dynamic-range, fast-acting compression for consonant discrimination in children with moderate-to-profound hearing loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marriage, Josephine E; Moore, Brian C J

    2003-10-01

    Fast-acting, wide-dynamic-range compression (WDRC) has been shown to give better discrimination of soft speech and shouted speech than linear amplification for moderately hearing-impaired young adults. For severe and profound hearing losses, higher compression ratios are needed. The resultant distortion of the temporal envelope and reduced modulation depth may offset improvements in audibility offered by WDRC. This study compares the effectiveness of WDRC and linear amplification for children with different degrees of hearing loss. Pre-recorded tests of closed-set consonant confusions and open-set word recognition were developed to assess performance. Three groups of subjects (aged 4-14 years) with moderate (51-70 dB), severe (71-90 dB) and profound (91-115 dB) hearing loss were fitted with hearing aids programmed with WDRC or linear amplification. The frequency response was adjusted to match each child's own hearing aid prescription. For each group, stimuli were presented both in quiet and in noise at levels chosen to avoid floor and ceiling effects. Consonant confusion scores for the profound and severe groups combined and for the moderate group were significantly better with WDRC than with linear amplification. Open-set test results showed greater variability. Although mean scores were higher for WDRC than for linear processing, the effects were of marginal statistical significance.

  12. Hearing Impairment CausedbyOccupational Noise*

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1971-08-28

    Aug 28, 1971 ... ing age (presbycusis). The data of the Research Centre of the Committee on Conservation of Hearing USA (Table. IV)' shows that 40 % of the population who have not had habitual exposure to noise above 80 dBA nevertheless surpass the thre-shold of significant hearing impairment by the age of 65 years.

  13. Psychopathology in hearing-impaired children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Theunissen, Stephanie Carla Petra Maria

    2013-01-01

    Children with hearing loss are at risk for developing psychopathology, which has detrimental consequences for academic and psychosocial functioning. Therefore, the aims of this thesis were to objectify levels of psychopathology in hearing-impaired children, and to investigate the influence of

  14. Surdez infantil Childhood hearing impairment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Oliveira

    2002-05-01

    Full Text Available A Surdez Infantil é considerada actualmente um verdadeiro problema de Saúde Pública devido não só à sua elevada prevalência, mas sobretudo às múltiplas conseqüências que acarreta sob os mais variados prismas. Trata-se de um tema em constante evolução, sendo necessárias freqüentes actualizações por forma a acompanhar os avanços da técnica e do conhecimento. Este trabalho visa abordar de uma forma global mas sucinta o problema Surdez Infantil, dando particular ênfase aos Modelos de Rastreio e aos Métodos utilizados com esse fim.Childhood Hearing Impairment is nowadays considered as a Health Care matter due to its high prevalence and to its multiple consequences. As a developing subject, frequent updates are justified to keep up with the evolution of techniques and knowledge. This paper aims to discuss the matter from a global point of view, paying particular attention to the Screening Models and Instruments available.

  15. Noise-induced hearing impairment and handicap

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-01-01

    A permanent, noise-induced hearing loss has doubly harmful effect on speech communications. First, the elevation in the threshold of hearing means that many speech sounds are too weak to be heard, and second, very intense speech sounds may appear to be distorted. The whole question of the impact of noise-induced hearing loss upon the impairments and handicaps experienced by people with such hearing losses was somewhat controversial partly because of the economic aspects of related practical noise control and workmen's compensation.

  16. Profound mixed hearing loss: bone-anchored hearing aid system or cochlear implant?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verhaegen, Veronique J O; Mulder, Jef J S; Mylanus, Emmanuel A M; Cremers, Cor W R J; Snik, Ad F M

    2009-10-01

    We evaluated 5 patients who were changed over from a Baha Cordelle to a cochlear implant (CI). Moreover, the level of phoneme score was determined at which a Baha Cordelle user was better helped with a CI. We offer descriptive case reports and a retrospective evaluation of speech recognition in Baha Cordelle users and CI users. In the CI users with noncompromised cochleas, the 10th percentile of the aided phoneme score in quiet at 65 dB sound pressure level (PS65) was 42%. We consider this PS65 as the cutoff level for switching from a Baha Cordelle to a CI. When patients with mixed hearing loss were using the Baha Cordelle, the PS65 of 42% was obtained at a mean sensorineural hearing loss component of about 70 dB hearing level (HL). This 70-dB HL component was used to consider Baha Cordelle users for cochlear implantation. The results of the 5 patients support these transition criteria. A CI is a valuable option in patients with mixed hearing loss when the sensorineural hearing loss component exceeds 70 dB HL or when the PS65 with a Baha Cordelle is less than about 40%. In such patients, the implantation procedure should be individualized on the basis of the clinical findings in the middle ear and mastoid cavity.

  17. Image and Video for Hearing Impaired People

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Burger

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available We present a global overview of image- and video-processing-based methods to help the communication of hearing impaired people. Two directions of communication have to be considered: from a hearing person to a hearing impaired person and vice versa. In this paper, firstly, we describe sign language (SL and the cued speech (CS language which are two different languages used by the deaf community. Secondly, we present existing tools which employ SL and CS video processing and recognition for the automatic communication between deaf people and hearing people. Thirdly, we present the existing tools for reverse communication, from hearing people to deaf people that involve SL and CS video synthesis.

  18. Image and Video for Hearing Impaired People

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aran Oya

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a global overview of image- and video-processing-based methods to help the communication of hearing impaired people. Two directions of communication have to be considered: from a hearing person to a hearing impaired person and vice versa. In this paper, firstly, we describe sign language (SL and the cued speech (CS language which are two different languages used by the deaf community. Secondly, we present existing tools which employ SL and CS video processing and recognition for the automatic communication between deaf people and hearing people. Thirdly, we present the existing tools for reverse communication, from hearing people to deaf people that involve SL and CS video synthesis.

  19. Psychoacoustics of normal and impaired hearing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Brian C J

    2002-01-01

    Recent developments in the field of psychoacoustics are presented, focusing on areas which have application in the diagnosis and understanding of impaired hearing. Cochlear hearing loss often results in a loss of the compressive non-linearity that operates in normal ears; this loss is probably the main cause of loudness recruitment. Forward masking can be used as a tool to assess the strength of cochlear compression in human listeners. Hearing impairment can sometimes be associated with complete loss of function of inner hair cells over a certain region of the cochlea, resulting in a 'dead region'. Two psychoacoustic methods for detecting dead regions and defining their limits are described. The implications of the results for fitting hearing aids are discussed. Finally, the effect of cochlear hearing loss on the perception of rapid sequences of sounds (stream segregation) is described.

  20. Loss of CIB2 Causes Profound Hearing Loss and Abolishes Mechanoelectrical Transduction in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanfei Wang

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Calcium and integrin-binding protein 2 (CIB2 belongs to a protein family with four known members, CIB1 through CIB4, which are characterized by multiple calcium-binding EF-hand domains. Among the family members, the Cib1 and Cib2 genes are expressed in mouse cochlear hair cells, and mutations in the human CIB2 gene have been associated with nonsyndromic deafness DFNB48 and syndromic deafness USH1J. To further explore the function of CIB1 and CIB2 in hearing, we established Cib1 and Cib2 knockout mice using the clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR-associated Cas9 nuclease (CRISPR/Cas9 genome editing technique. We found that loss of CIB1 protein does not affect auditory function, whereas loss of CIB2 protein causes profound hearing loss in mice. Further investigation revealed that hair cell stereocilia development is affected in Cib2 knockout mice. Noticeably, loss of CIB2 abolishes mechanoelectrical transduction (MET currents in auditory hair cells. In conclusion, we show here that although both CIB1 and CIB2 are readily detected in the cochlea, only loss of CIB2 results in profound hearing loss, and that CIB2 is essential for auditory hair cell MET.

  1. Loss of CIB2 Causes Profound Hearing Loss and Abolishes Mechanoelectrical Transduction in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yanfei; Li, Jie; Yao, Xuerui; Li, Wei; Du, Haibo; Tang, Mingliang; Xiong, Wei; Chai, Renjie; Xu, Zhigang

    2017-01-01

    Calcium and integrin-binding protein 2 (CIB2) belongs to a protein family with four known members, CIB1 through CIB4, which are characterized by multiple calcium-binding EF-hand domains. Among the family members, the Cib1 and Cib2 genes are expressed in mouse cochlear hair cells, and mutations in the human CIB2 gene have been associated with nonsyndromic deafness DFNB48 and syndromic deafness USH1J. To further explore the function of CIB1 and CIB2 in hearing, we established Cib1 and Cib2 knockout mice using the clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR)-associated Cas9 nuclease (CRISPR/Cas9) genome editing technique. We found that loss of CIB1 protein does not affect auditory function, whereas loss of CIB2 protein causes profound hearing loss in mice. Further investigation revealed that hair cell stereocilia development is affected in Cib2 knockout mice. Noticeably, loss of CIB2 abolishes mechanoelectrical transduction (MET) currents in auditory hair cells. In conclusion, we show here that although both CIB1 and CIB2 are readily detected in the cochlea, only loss of CIB2 results in profound hearing loss, and that CIB2 is essential for auditory hair cell MET.

  2. Nonlinear spectrum compression for the hearing impaired via a frequency-domain processing algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paarmann, Larry D

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, the results of both normal-hearing, and profoundly hearing-impaired adults, tested with spectrum compressed speech via the modified chirp-z algorithm, with and without visual stimuli, are reported. Ten normal-hearing adult listeners and five profoundly hearing-impaired adult listeners were asked to identify nonsense syllables presented auditorily and bimodally (audition and vision) via video tape in two conditions: lowpass filtered or unprocessed, and spectrum compressed. The lowpass filtered and spectrum compressed speech occupies the same spectrum width of 840 Hz; at 900 Hz and above, the attenuation is at least 60 dB. The spectrum compression is performed by means of a modified chirp-z algorithm, and is described in this paper. The testing results are significant and are reported in this paper. While the signal processing approach is somewhat intensive, the realtime throughput delay is small. Recent advances in hardware speed suggest that realization in a hearing aid is feasible.

  3. Associations and Dissociations between Psychoacoustic Abilities and Speech Perception in Adolescents with Severe-to-Profound Hearing Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kishon-Rabin, Liat; Segal, Osnat; Algom, Daniel

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To clarify the relationship between psychoacoustic capabilities and speech perception in adolescents with severe-to-profound hearing loss (SPHL). Method: Twenty-four adolescents with SPHL and young adults with normal hearing were assessed with psychoacoustic and speech perception tests. The psychoacoustic tests included gap detection…

  4. Narrative competence among hearing-impaired and normal-hearing children: analytical cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra Dezani Soares

    Full Text Available CONTEXT AND OBJECTIVE: Oral narrative is a means of language development assessment. However, standardized data for deaf patients are scarce. The aim here was to compare the use of narrative competence between hearing-impaired and normal-hearing children. DESIGN AND SETTING: Analytical cross-sectional study at the Department of Speech-Language and Hearing Sciences, Universidade Federal de São Paulo. METHODS: Twenty-one moderately to profoundly bilaterally hearing-impaired children (cases and 21 normal-hearing children without language abnormalities (controls, matched according to sex, age, schooling level and school type, were studied. A board showing pictures in a temporally logical sequence was presented to each child, to elicit a narrative, and the child's performance relating to narrative structure and cohesion was measured. The frequencies of variables, their associations (Mann-Whitney test and their 95% confidence intervals was analyzed. RESULTS: The deaf subjects showed poorer performance regarding narrative structure, use of connectives, cohesion measurements and general punctuation (P < 0.05. There were no differences in the number of propositions elaborated or in referent specification between the two groups. The deaf children produced a higher proportion of orientation-related propositions (P = 0.001 and lower proportions of propositions relating to complicating actions (P = 0.015 and character reactions (P = 0.005. CONCLUSION: Hearing-impaired children have abnormalities in different aspects of language, involving form, content and use, in relation to their normal-hearing peers. Narrative competence was also associated with the children's ages and the school type.

  5. INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATIONS TECHNOLOGIES – THE WAY OF SOCIALIZATION OF PEOPLE WITH PROFOUND VISUAL IMPAIRMENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serhii I. Netosov

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The article analyzes the software and hardware, that give people with profound visual impairments the opportunity to work on the computer. Attention is drawn to the Braille printers, relief-dot displays, voice synthesizers, scanners that can read, adaptation and correction programs and so on. It is emphasized that ICT for the blind is a factor of their inclusion in the life as the subjects of action. For solving this problem people with profound visual impairments need systemic help of the state and civil society in getting programs and equipment, because they are high-tech, and therefore expensive. It is important to spread the information about the activity of the centers of tiflo-computerization, to organize the laboratories of correction and socialization of people with profound visual impairments, to provide the training of the specialists.

  6. Acute profound sensorineural hearing loss as the initial manifestation of acute leukemia--report of a case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harada, T; Namiki, S; Kawabata, I

    2000-10-01

    This paper reports an unusual case in which acute lymphocytic leukemia presented acute profound sensorineural hearing loss as the initial manifestation of the disease. The patient is a 55-year-old woman who complained of left hearing loss of sudden onset. Pure tone audiometry revealed profound sensorineural hearing loss of the left ear at mid and low frequencies. The patient was tentatively diagnosed as idiopathic sudden deafness and admitted for the treatment, but her laboratory data indicated that she was at an advanced stage of leukemia. The patient's hearing loss did not improve subjectively until she deceased 1 year after the admission. The mechanism producing acute hearing loss in leukemic patients is reviewed and discussed, and the importance of differentiating possible underlying diseases before we diagnose idiopathic sudden deafness is stressed.

  7. Binaural auditory outcomes in patients with postlingual profound unilateral hearing loss: 3 years after cochlear implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mertens, Griet; Kleine Punte, Andrea; De Bodt, Marc; Van de Heyning, Paul

    2015-01-01

    The value of cochlear implants (CI) in patients with profound unilateral hearing loss (UHL) and tinnitus has recently been investigated. The authors previously demonstrated the feasibility of CI in a 12- month outcome study in a prospective UHL cohort. The aim of this study was to investigate the binaural auditory outcomes in this cohort 36 months after CI surgery. The 36-month outcome was evaluated in 22 CI users with postlingual UHL and severe tinnitus. Twelve subjects had contralateral normal hearing (single-sided deafness - SSD group) and 10 subjects had a contralateral, mild to moderate hearing loss and used a hearing aid (asymmetric hearing loss - AHL group). Speech perception in noise was assessed in two listening conditions: the CIoff and the CIon condition. The binaural summation effect (S0N0), binaural squelch effect (S0NCI) and the combined head shadow effect (SCIN0) were investigated. Subjective benefit in daily life was assessed by means of the Speech, Spatial and Qualities of Hearing Scale (SSQ). At 36 months, a significant binaural summation effect was observed for the study cohort (2.00, SD 3.82 dB; p binaural effect was not significant 12 months after CI surgery. A binaural squelch effect was significant for the AHL subgroup at 12 months (2.00, SD 4.38 dB; p < 0.05). A significant combined head shadow and squelch effect was also noted in the spatial configuration SCIN0 for the study cohort (4.00, SD 5.89 dB; p < 0.01) and for the AHL subgroup (5.67, SD 6.66 dB; p < 0.05). The SSQ data show that the perceived benefit in daily life after CI surgery remains stable up to 36 months at CIon. CI can significantly improve speech perception in noise in patients with UHL. The positive effects of CIon speech perception in noise increase over time up to 36 months after CI surgery. Improved subjective benefit in daily life was also shown to be sustained in these patients. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  8. Modeling Speech Intelligibility in Hearing Impaired Listeners

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scheidiger, Christoph; Jørgensen, Søren; Dau, Torsten

    2014-01-01

    speech, e.g. phase jitter or spectral subtraction. Recent studies predict SI for normal-hearing (NH) listeners based on a signal-to-noise ratio measure in the envelope domain (SNRenv), in the framework of the speech-based envelope power spectrum model (sEPSM, [20, 21]). These models have shown good...... agreement with measured data under a broad range of conditions, including stationary and modulated interferers, reverberation, and spectral subtraction. Despite the advances in modeling intelligibility in NH listeners, a broadly applicable model that can predict SI in hearing-impaired (HI) listeners...... is not yet available. As a firrst step towards such a model, this study investigates to what extent eects of hearing impairment on SI can be modeled in the sEPSM framework. Preliminary results show that, by only modeling the loss of audibility, the model cannot account for the higher speech reception...

  9. Validity of hearing impairment calculation methods for prediction of self-reported hearing handicap

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Andrew B John; Brian M Kreisman; Stephen Pallett

    2012-01-01

    .... The present study evaluated the ability of various arithmetic hearing impairment calculations to predict a self-reported hearing handicap in a sample of presenting with sensorineural hearing loss. 204 adults (127 male, 77 female...

  10. The effect of hearing impairment on educational achievement of hearing-impaired students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Asghar Kakojoibari

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Hearing is one of the most vital sensational abilities. Learning, which is the most basic ability for human compatibility to mental development, is affected by hearing ability. The main goal of this article was to review the effect of hearing impairment on educational achievement of hearing-impaired students, especially in the field of basic learning skills (reading, writing, and mathematics.Methods: In this article, the researches on the effect of hearing impairment on educational achievement were reviewed. There were 37 articles extracted from different databases such as Iran Medex, Scopus, PubMed, Magiran, Iran Journal, Google Scholar, and 12 credible books published from 1944 to 2013. In order to search in these databases, educational achievement and other related keywords were used.Conclusion: Hearing impairment affects listening skills, which is a mental process and is known as the first lingual skill. Subsequently, other lingual skills and learning abilities like educational achievement are affected as well. In order to decrease the educational gap in hearing-impaired students, it is very important to interfere in early stages and use of presentation methods to improve lingual skills in educational system.

  11. Visual impairments in people with severe and profound multiple disabilities: An inventory of visual functioning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Broek, E.G.C.; Janssen, C.G.C.; van Ramshorst, T.; Deen, L.

    2006-01-01

    Background: The prevalence of visual impairments in people with severe and profound multiple disabilities (SPMD) is the subject of considerable debate and is difficult to assess. Methods: In a typical Dutch care organization, all clients with SPMD (n = 76) participated in the study and specific

  12. Protein energy malnutrition associates with different types of hearing impairments in toddlers: Anemia increases cochlear dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamel, Terez Boshra; Deraz, Tharwat Ezzat; Elkabarity, Rasha H; Ahmed, Rasha K

    2016-06-01

    This work aimed to highlight a challenging asymptomatic problem which is early detection of hearing impairment in toddlers with protein energy malnutrition (PEM) as a neuro-cognitive effect of PEM on developing brain in relation to hemoglobin level. 100 toddlers, aged 6-24 months, fifty with moderate/severe PEM and fifty healthy children, were included in study. Both TEOAEs and ABR testing were used to assess auditory function. Study reported an association between malnutrition and hearing impairment, 26% of cases had conductive deafness secondary to otitis media with effusion using tympanometry; 84.6% showed type B and 15.4% type C which may suggest developing or resolving otitis media. Their ABR showed 46% mild and 53% moderate impairment. 32% of PEM cases had sensory neural hearing loss and with type (A) tympanometry. Those were assessed using ABR; 58% had mild, 34% moderate and 8% profound impairment. 10% of PEM cases had mixed hearing loss with 50% type B and 50% type C tympanometry and their ABR showed moderate to profound impairment. TEOAEs latencies at different frequencies correlate negatively with hemoglobin level. Toddlers with moderate/severe PEM had hearing impairments of different types and degrees. Neuro-physiological methods could be early and safe detectors of auditory disorders especially in high-risk toddlers. Anemia increases risk for auditory dysfunction. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Balance assessment in hearing-impaired children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walicka-Cupryś, Katarzyna; Przygoda, Łukasz; Czenczek, Ewelina; Truszczyńska, Aleksandra; Drzał-Grabiec, Justyna; Zbigniew, Trzaskoma; Tarnowski, Adam

    2014-11-01

    According to the scientific reports the postural stability is inseparably associated with hearing organ's correct functioning. The aim of the study was to evaluate the degree of disorders occurring in balance reactions in this group of children with profound hearing loss compared to their healthy peers. The study worked with a total of 228 children, including 65 who are deaf (DCH) and 163 subjects without any hearing deficits (CON) in the control group. Stabilometric measurements were performed with the use of a force distribution platform. The results indicate statistically significant differences in terms of one parameter (the total path length) recorded in the test with the eyes open and a whole range of parameters recorded when the subjects had their eyes closed (the width, height, and area of the ellipse, the total path length, and the horizontal and vertical sway). The study results showed better values of the static balance parameters in deaf children as compared to their peers without hearing disorders and the differences were particularly evident in the test with the subject's eyes closed. The results suggest significantly better processing of sensory stimuli in postural reactions particularly from propioception, and to a lesser extent, from the vision system observed in the subjects as compared to their peers in the control group. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. The factors associated with a self-perceived hearing handicap in elderly people with hearing impairment--results from a community-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Hsin-Pin; Ho, Chin-Yu; Chou, Pesus

    2009-10-01

    Elderly persons with a physiologic hearing deficit (hearing impairment) are not necessarily socially or emotionally disturbed by the deficit in everyday life (hearing handicap). The self-perception of a hearing handicap in elderly people is a key element in seeking consultation for a hearing impairment or using hearing aids. Thus, it is important to determine the factors associated with the self-perception of a hearing handicap. The aims of the present study were to report the relation between a hearing impairment and the self-perception of a hearing handicap, and the factors associated with a self-perceived hearing handicap among a group of randomly recruited, community-dwelling elderly persons, aged 65 yr and older, in Taipei, Taiwan. A cross-sectional survey of community-dwelling elderly persons aged 65 yr and older (N = 1220) participating in an annual general purpose geriatric health examination in 2005 in Taipei. Pure-tone audiometry and a questionnaire including the Hearing Handicap Inventory for the Elderly-Screening Version (HHIE-S) were administered, after obtaining the subject's consent to participate in the study. Demographic information, lifestyle, self-report health status, and biochemical data were also collected. There was a moderate association (gamma(s) = 0.52) between hearing impairment and self-perceived handicap. Only 21.4% of the study subjects with moderate to profound hearing impairment (M4 >or=41 dB HL, N = 555) perceived themselves as hearing-handicapped (HHIE-S total score >or=10). Besides hearing level, marital status (widowed) and self-perceived general health (bad or neutral) were factors that are significantly associated with a self-perceived hearing handicap among elderly subjects with moderate to profound hearing impairment. For study subjects with moderate to profound hearing impairment (M4 >or=41 dB HL), 5.0% of those with HHIE-S or=10 used or felt that they required hearing aids (chi2 test, p handicap (HHIE-S >or=10) is an

  15. Linking hearing impairment, employment and education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garramiola-Bilbao, I; Rodríguez-Álvarez, A

    2016-12-01

    To analyse the impact that hearing impairment and other relevant variables have on the education and employment situation of those affected by it in the Principality of Asturias, Spain. To achieve this objective, two discrete choice models (probit) are presented. The first one associates, among other variables, hearing impairment with the individual's employment status and in the second model, an ordered multinomial probit model is used to analyse, among other variables, how the impairment affects the individual's level of studies. Although the levels of statistical significance are low, the model's estimates appear to indicate that hearing impairment in Spain increases the probability of being unemployed by 18.4% (P = 0.09). Additionally, the people suffering from such a disability are, compared with the rest of the population, 10.2% (P = 0.05) more likely to have only completed elementary studies without pursuing any further education. If an individual is able to reach a level of secondary or higher education thus enabling a future incorporation to the work place, a benefit is obviously generated for both the individual as well as society (which has additionally incurred an investment in human capital). In this regard, encouraging the education of hearing-impaired students would profit both the individual (who receives an early integration as a child), which may contribute positively to family and social factors, as well as society who have incurred the investment. Therefore, our result could indicate that programmes created to support individuals with this type of disability represent an increase of welfare both individually and socially. Copyright © 2016 The Royal Society for Public Health. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Visual Impairment and Ocular Findings among Deaf and Hearing ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Visual Impairment and Ocular Findings among Deaf and Hearing Impaired School Children in Central Region, Ghana. ... The overall prevalence of visual impairment was 5.8% among hearing impaired school children in the Central Region of Ghana. ... Keywords: Disability, eye, ear, refractive error, ocular deviation .

  17. 38 CFR 4.85 - Evaluation of hearing impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... impairment. 4.85 Section 4.85 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS SCHEDULE FOR RATING DISABILITIES Disability Ratings Impairment of Auditory Acuity § 4.85 Evaluation of hearing impairment. (a) An examination for hearing impairment for VA purposes must be conducted by a state-licensed...

  18. Hearing screenings on children under three years at risk of hearing impairment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelino Lizano Rabelo

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available This article presents the results of newborn hearing screenings on infants under three years at risk of hearing impairment at Paediatric Hospital of Sancti Spíritus¸on from 2008 to 2010. All children at risk of hearing impairment were tested by an auditory brainstem response (ABR for the positive diagnosis of hearing impairment. Results: Over the period, 398 infants were screened, among whom 36 (8,98% were diagnosed as deaf or hard of hearing. twenty seven children (6,8% had a sensorineural hearing impairment, The most important risk factors for sensorineural hearing loss were: severe birth asphyxia; mechanic ventilation, and antibiotics.Conclusion: Our hearing screening on infants at risk allowed 36 children diagnosed as hearing impairment, all of then received early management.

  19. Communication problems of hearing-impaired patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hines, J

    The main objective of this national survey was to check the findings of an earlier pilot survey. This had found that patients who had a hearing-impairment and were in hospital were often seriously disadvantaged by their disability. The survey was conducted by questionnaire and the sampling frame confined to hearing-impaired patients who had been in hospital during the previous three years. A total of 359 completed and valid questionnaires were returned. The responses confirmed the finding of the pilot survey. They indicated that there were serious shortcomings in the ability of many hospital staff to cope with the problems of hearing-impaired patients. Common causes of the problems were identified. The major factor was inadequate training of both nurses and doctors in deaf awareness and the associated communication skills. Other significant factors included patients concealing their disability, pressure of work and poor communication between staff. Appropriate training at all staff levels should eliminate a high proportion of these problems.

  20. The Parental Experiences of Mothers of Adolescents with Hearing Impairments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan-Redshaw, M.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Five hearing mothers of hearing-impaired adolescents were interviewed on their experiences in rearing a hearing-impaired child. Using qualitative analysis, six major themes were identified: the mothers' personal growth, the mother-child relationship, parent-professional relationships, concerns about educational programing, the importance of fluent…

  1. Experiences of Girls with Hearing Impairment in Accessing

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    AJRH Managing Editor

    Zazove P, Niemann LC, Gorenflo DW, Carmach C, Mehr. D, Coyne JC and Antonucci T. 1993. “The Health. Status and Health Care Utilization of Hearing impaired and Hard-of-Hearing Persons.” Arch Fam. Med 1993; 2: 745–52. 17. Ebert DA, and Heckerling PS. Communication with. Hearing impaired Patients: Knowledge, ...

  2. PSYCHOSOCIAL INFLUENCE OF HEARING IMPAIRMENT ON THE INTERPERSONAL BEHAVIOR OF YOUTHS WITH HEARING IMPAIRMENT IN OYO STATE, NIGERIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osisanya AYO

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Individuals with hearing impairment are confronted with a lot of problems due to the condition of their disability. This has a negative impact on their social and psychological well-being with multiplying effect on their interpersonal relationship. Therefore, this study investigated the psycho-social influence of hearing impairment on interpersonal behavior of youths with hearing loss.MethodologyThe study adopted a survey research design. A sample consisting of 211 participants with hearing loss were purposively selected from the Federal College of Education (Special Oyo, Nigeria. A questionnaire, part of Psycho-social Competence Scale (PCS, was used for data collection with reliability coefficient of 0.72.ResultsThe findings revealed that hearing impairement affects social interaction of youths with hearing impairment, hearing loss affects emotional well-being of youths with hearing impairment and youths with hearing impairment feel inferior in company of persons without hearing impairment. Based on this, it was recommended that a friendly home environment should be made and youths with hearing impairment should be advised to accept their loss and take it as a challenge that can be used to achieve a better end and the society should have right attitude and beliefs toward youths with hearing impairment.

  3. Surgery to improve hearing of a preschool child with profound bilateral deafness

    OpenAIRE

    井口,郁雄; 増田,游; 高塚,ま由; 小倉, 義郎; 藤本, 明子

    1987-01-01

    Hearing loss in children under school age adversely effects speech and personality development. It is possible to improve conductive hearing loss by surgery, but difficult to improve combined hearing loss. The authors succeeded surgically improving the hearing of a 5 year-old boy suffering from speech retardation due to bilateral congenital combined hearing loss. The improvement in hearing aided speech training. He has graduated from schools for the deaf (primary, middle and senior high schoo...

  4. Road Traffic Noise Exposure and Hearing Impairment Among Traffic Policemen in Surat, Western India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tandel, B. N.; Macwan, J. E. M.

    2017-06-01

    Among all of the sources responsible for noise pollution, traffic related sources are of great environmental concern and increasing level of discomfort in urban areas with increasing traffic concentration. It will be a larger and serious problem in the future, if effective precautions are not taken addressed and attended to. Hence, a study was undertaken to measure the levels of road traffic noise at major intersections of Surat city, located in Western India and assess the hearing impairment among the exposed group of population i.e. the traffic policemen. Manual noise measurements and vehicle counts were performed at three of the busiest traffic intersections in the city for a period of 12 h. Audiometric screening was done on 46 policemen working at these intersections to determine the occurrence of hearing impairment. At all the three intersections, Leq measured was well above the permissible levels of 65 dBA for daytime. The Lmax recorded for three intersections were 84.6 dBA (07:36 pm), 87.3 dBA (06:32 pm) and 85.6 dBA (11:41 am). Audiometric screening showed that only 10 policemen (22%) had normal hearing. Slight, moderate and severe hearing impairment was recorded among 13 (28%), 18 (39%) and 5 (11%) policemen respectively. Of the total 46 policemen, none had profound impairment (deafness, hearing loss >81 dB). Of the 36 policemen having hearing impairment, 27 had bilateral impairment.

  5. Students with hearing impairment at a South African university: Self-identity and disclosure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Diane; Carl, Arend; Swart, Estelle

    2016-01-01

    A growing number of students with hearing loss are being granted access to higher education in South Africa due to the adoption of inclusive educational policies. However, available statistics indicate that participation by students with hearing impairments in higher education remains low and research suggests that support provisioning for those who do gain access is inadequate. This article aims to illustrate that the assumed self-identity of students with hearing impairment influences their choice to disclose their disability. The choice not to disclose their hearing loss prevents them from accessing the necessary reasonable accommodations and this in turn may affect their eventual educational success. Reported here is a qualitative descriptive case study at a South African university. Purposive sampling methods were employed. Data were gathered from in-depth interviews with seven students with hearing impairment ranging from moderate to profound, using spoken language. Constructivist grounded theory was used as an approach to the process of generating and transforming the data, as well as the construction of theory. All the student participants identified as having a hearing rather than a D/deaf identity cultural paradigm and viewed themselves as 'normal'. Linked to this was their unwillingness to disclose their hearing impairment and thus access support. It is crucially important for academic, support and administrative staff to be aware of both the assumed 'hearing' identity and therefore subsequent non-disclosure practices of students with a hearing impairment using the oral method of communication. Universities need to put measures in place to encourage students to voluntarily disclose their hearing impairment in order to provide more targeted teaching and learning support. This could lead to improved educational outcomes for students.

  6. Self-reported hearing problems among older adults: prevalence and comparison to measured hearing impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannula, Samuli; Bloigu, Risto; Majamaa, Kari; Sorri, Martti; Mäki-Torkko, Elina

    2011-09-01

    There are not many population-based epidemiological studies on the association between self-reported hearing problems and measured hearing thresholds in older adults. Previous studies have shown that the relationship between self-reported hearing difficulties and measured hearing thresholds is unclear and, according to our knowledge, there are no previous population-based studies reporting hearing thresholds among subjects with hyperacusis. The aim was to investigate the prevalence of self-reported hearing problems, that is, hearing difficulties, difficulties in following a conversation in noise, tinnitus, and hyperacusis, and to compare the results with measured hearing thresholds in older adults. Cross-sectional, population-based, and unscreened. Random sample of subjects (n=850) aged 54-66 yr living in the city of Oulu (Finland) and the surrounding areas. Otological examination, pure tone audiometry, questionnaire survey The prevalence of self-reported hearing problems was 37.1% for hearing difficulties, 43.3% for difficulties in following a conversation in noise, 29.2% for tinnitus, and 17.2% for hyperacusis. More than half of the subjects had no hearing impairment, or HI (BEHL[better ear hearing level]0.5-4 kHzhearing problems. Subjects with self-reported hearing problems, including tinnitus and hyperacusis, had significantly poorer hearing thresholds than those who did not report hearing problems. Self-reported hearing difficulties predicted hearing impairment in the pure-tone average at 4, 6, and 8 kHz, and at the single frequency of 4 kHz. The results indicate that self-reported hearing difficulties are more frequent than hearing impairment defined by audiometric measurement. Furthermore, self-reported hearing difficulties seem to predict hearing impairment at high frequencies (4-8 kHz) rather than at the frequencies of 0.5-4 kHz, which are commonly used to define the degree of hearing impairment in medical and legal issues. American Academy of Audiology.

  7. Hearing Impairment, Social Networks, and Coping: The Need for Families with Hearing-Impaired Children To Relate to Other Parents and to Hearing-Impaired Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hintermair, Manfred

    2000-01-01

    A survey of 317 German parents of children with hearing impairments found parents who frequently met with other parents had warm, accepting, trusting relationships with their children. Parents who had many contacts with adults with hearing impairments had a strong sense of competence in regard to their child's upbringing. (Contains extensive…

  8. Hearing help-seeking and rehabilitation: Perspectives of adults with hearing impairment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laplante-Levesque, A.; Knudsen, L.V.; Preminger, J.E.; Jones, L.; Nielsen, C.; Oberg, M.; Lunner, T.; Hickson, L.; Naylor, G.; Kramer, S.E.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: This study investigated the perspectives of adults with hearing impairment on hearing help-seeking and rehabilitation. Design: Individual semi-structured interviews were completed. Study sample: In total, 34 adults with hearing impairment in four countries (Australia, Denmark, UK, and

  9. Depth of reading vocabulary in hearing and hearing-impaired children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Coppens, K.M.; Tellings, A.E.J.M.; Verhoeven, L.T.W.; Schreuder, R.

    2011-01-01

    The main point of our study was to examine the vocabulary knowledge of pupils in grades 3-6, and in particular the relative reading vocabulary disadvantage of hearing-impaired pupils. The achievements of 394 pupils with normal hearing and 106 pupils with a hearing impairment were examined on two

  10. 38 CFR 4.86 - Exceptional patterns of hearing impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... hearing impairment. 4.86 Section 4.86 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS SCHEDULE FOR RATING DISABILITIES Disability Ratings Impairment of Auditory Acuity § 4.86 Exceptional patterns of hearing impairment. (a) When the puretone threshold at each of the four specified...

  11. Performance Visualization for Hearing-Impaired Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rumi Hiraga

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available We have been teaching computer music to hearing impaired students of Tsukuba College of Technology for six years. Although students have hearing difficulties, almost all of them show an interest in music. Thus, this has been a challenging class to turn their weakness into enjoyment. We thought that performance visualization is a good method for them to keep their interest in music and try cooperative performances with others. In this paper, we describe our computer music class and the result of our preliminary experiment on the effectiveness of visual assistance. Though it was not a complete experiment with a sufficient number of subjects, the result showed that the show-ahead and selected-note-only types of performance visualization were necessary according to the purpose of the visual aid.

  12. Awareness of Academic Writing among Hearing Impaired Students

    OpenAIRE

    Hosoya, Miyoko

    2006-01-01

    This paper addresses the teaching of academic writing to hearing impaired (Deaf) students. The study assesses awareness of academic writing by students and covers 135 students at the Division for the Hearing Impaired at Tsukuba College of Technology. The study shows that; 1. the interest and motivation of hearing impaired students in academic writing is very high 2. students are aware of their inability, but cannot recognize where they experience problems.

  13. Students with hearing impairment at a South African university: Self-identity and disclosure

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Background A growing number of students with hearing loss are being granted access to higher education in South Africa due to the adoption of inclusive educational policies. However, available statistics indicate that participation by students with hearing impairments in higher education remains low and research suggests that support provisioning for those who do gain access is inadequate. Objectives This article aims to illustrate that the assumed self-identity of students with hearing impairment influences their choice to disclose their disability. The choice not to disclose their hearing loss prevents them from accessing the necessary reasonable accommodations and this in turn may affect their eventual educational success. Method Reported here is a qualitative descriptive case study at a South African university. Purposive sampling methods were employed. Data were gathered from in-depth interviews with seven students with hearing impairment ranging from moderate to profound, using spoken language. Constructivist grounded theory was used as an approach to the process of generating and transforming the data, as well as the construction of theory. Findings All the student participants identified as having a hearing rather than a D/deaf identity cultural paradigm and viewed themselves as ‘normal’. Linked to this was their unwillingness to disclose their hearing impairment and thus access support. Conclusion It is crucially important for academic, support and administrative staff to be aware of both the assumed ‘hearing’ identity and therefore subsequent non-disclosure practices of students with a hearing impairment using the oral method of communication. Universities need to put measures in place to encourage students to voluntarily disclose their hearing impairment in order to provide more targeted teaching and learning support. This could lead to improved educational outcomes for students. PMID:28730053

  14. Students with hearing impairment at a South African university: Self-identity and disclosure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diane Bell

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: A growing number of students with hearing loss are being granted access to higher education in South Africa due to the adoption of inclusive educational policies. However, available statistics indicate that participation by students with hearing impairments in higher education remains low and research suggests that support provisioning for those who do gain access is inadequate.Objectives:  This article aims to illustrate that the assumed self-identity of students with hearing impairment influences their choice to disclose their disability. The choice not to disclose their hearing loss prevents them from accessing the necessary reasonable accommodations and this in turn may affect their eventual educational success.Method: Reported here is a qualitative descriptive case study at a South African university. Purposive sampling methods were employed. Data were gathered from in-depth interviews with seven students with hearing impairment ranging from moderate to profound, using spoken language. Constructivist grounded theory was used as an approach to the process of generating and transforming the data, as well as the construction of theory.Findings: All the student participants identified as having a hearing rather than a D/deaf identity cultural paradigm and viewed themselves as ‘normal’. Linked to this was their unwillingness to disclose their hearing impairment and thus access support.Conclusion: It is crucially important for academic, support and administrative staff to be aware of both the assumed ‘hearing’ identity and therefore subsequent non-disclosure practices of students with a hearing impairment using the oral method of communication. Universities need to put measures in place to encourage students to voluntarily disclose their hearing impairment in order to provide more targeted teaching and learning support. This could lead to improved educational outcomes for students.

  15. Bone-anchored hearing aid system application for unilateral congenital conductive hearing impairment: audiometric results.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kunst, S.J.W.; Leijendeckers, J.M.; Mylanus, E.A.M.; Hol, M.K.S.; Snik, A.F.M.; Cremers, C.W.R.J.

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To study the audiologic outcome of bone-anchored hearing aid (BAHA) application in patients with congenital unilateral conductive hearing impairment. STUDY DESIGN: Prospective audiometric evaluation on 20 patients. SETTING: Tertiary referral center. PATIENTS: The experimental group

  16. Newborn hearing screening vs later hearing screening and developmental outcomes in children with permanent childhood hearing impairment.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Korver, A.M.; Konings, S.; Dekker, F.W.; Beers, M. van; Wever, C.; Frijns, J.H.; Oudesluys-Murphy, A.M.; Cremers, C.W.R.J.; Kunst, H.P.M.; Admiraal, R.J.C.

    2010-01-01

    CONTEXT: Newborn hearing screening programs have been implemented in many countries because it was thought that the earlier permanent childhood hearing impairment is detected, the less developmentally disadvantaged children would become. To date, however, no strong evidence exists for universal

  17. [Directional hearing of unilaterally hearing impaired--especially sense of sound direction in monaural hearing impairment and monaural deafness].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oikawa, T

    1990-03-01

    I. OBJECTIVE. The present study was undertaken in order to determine the onset of monaural deafness, especially whether it is congenital or acquired, making an investigation into the sense of sound direction in monaural hearing impairment and monaural deafness and comparing them between hearing-impaired patients and normal hearers. II. SUBJECTS. This study was carried out on 26 patients with monaural hearing impairment, 22 patients with monaural deafness and 10 normal hearers. III. METHODS. A circle with a radius of 1.3m was drawn around a fixed patient's position in a sound proof room, and the circle was divided into 16 directions at an equal angle of 22.5 degrees. A blindfolded hearer was instructed to listen to a speaker for white noise of 60dB (A) for one second and verbally answer in which direction he heard the noise. The normal hearers were tested in 4-, 8-, and 16-directions, and the hearing-impaired patients were tested in only 8-directions. IV. RESULTS. 1. Normal Hearers The rate of correct answers decreased with increasing directions of sound. The incorrect answers in 4-direction testing were only confusion between forward and backward directions, and similar incorrect answers were made in 8- and 16-direction testing. All other incorrect answers were errors of less than 45 degrees. 2. Monaurally Hearing-impaired Patients The rate of correct answers on the whole was low. There was such a relationship between the rate of correct answers and the mean hearing level of patients that the total rate of correct answers decreased with increasing hearing impairment. This correlation was statistically significant, and there was a still more significant correlation between the degree of hearing impairment and the rate of correct answers as to the right and left directions. Incorrect answers were errors of 90 degrees or less on the healthy side, while errors were made for all directions on the affected side. 3. Monaurally Deaf Patients The rate of correct answers was

  18. Comparison of Reading Literacy in Hearing Impaired and Normal Hearing Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr. Ali Asghar Kakojoibari

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: listening, speaking, reading and writing are considered the lingual skills. These skills are in direct relation with each other. Listening is the first skill learnt by the individual through development. If damaged by hearing impairment, listening can cause serious defect to lingual skills. The goal of our research was to study the effect of hearing loss on reading literacy in hearing impairment students in comparison with normal hearing students.Methods: Study was performed using the examination booklets of Progress in International Reading Literacy Study (PIRLS 2001. 119 hearing impairment students of 4th grade primary school, last year guidance school, and last year high school levels in schools providing exceptional student education were included. These individuals were compared to 46 normal hearing students of 4th grade primary school of ordinary schools. Comparative statistical analysis was performed using t-test.Results: Reading literacy and literal contents understanding was shown to have a significant difference between normal hearing and whole hearing impaired student (p<0.05, except the ones in high school level with moderate hearing loss. There was also seen a significant difference between normal hearing and hearing impairment students in understanding of information contents (p=0.03.Conclusion: Hearing loss has a negative effect on reading literacy. Consequently, curriculum change and evolution of educational programs in exceptional centers is needed, in order to promote reading literacy and to enhance rest hearing

  19. Sensorineural Hearing Impairment is a Common Feature of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... so, prevention is essential to reduce the incidence of genetic hearing loss. Premarital and antenatal screening should be applied whenever possible, at least for those at risk of developing genetic diseases including hearing impairement. Keywords: Consanguinity; hearing disorders; preventive medicine. Egypt. J. Hum.

  20. Attitude and help-seeking for hearing impairment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    vandenBrink, RHS; Wit, HP; Kempen, GIJM; vanHeuvelen, MJG

    1996-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate help-seeking for hearing impairment in the elderly, and to compare groups showing dissimilar help-seeking on their attitude toward hearing loss and hearing aids. Attitude factors were based on a revised version of the Health Belief Model, and included

  1. Relationship between maternal emotional intelligence and theory of mind in students with hearing impairment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abbas Sheikhmohammadi

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Students with hearing impairment show delayed development of theory of mind (ToM compared with normal children. One factor impacting development of theory of mind is parent-child interaction. The present study investigated the relationship between maternal emotional intelligence and theory of mind in students with hearing impairment.Methods: The present study employed correlational research. 40 students with profound hearing impairment (age range: 8-14 years and their mothers were selected to participate. Measurement instruments included the false belief task and emotional intelligence questionnaire. The questionnaire was completed by mothers. Correlational analysis and multiple regression methods were used for data analysis.Results: Results indicated no significant correlation between the total score on false belief task and the emotional intelligence score and its components (p>0.01. Multiple regression analysis showed that maternal emotional intelligence and its components cannot predict student's scores in false belief tasks (p>0.01.Conclusion: The results show that there is no significant correlation between maternal emotional intelligence and theory of mind in students with hearing impairment. Therefore, maternal emotional intelligence cannot predict the development of theory of mind in students with hearing impairment.

  2. Gender differences in coping skills of parents with hearing-impaired children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Md Daud, M K; Noor, S S M; Yusoff, M N C M; Abd Rahman, N; Zakaria, M N

    2013-01-01

    To assess differences between the coping strategies of the mothers and fathers with hearing-impaired children. A cross-sectional study was conducted looking at parents of children with moderate to profound hearing impairment. The parents with more than one child with a hearing impairment, the parents of children with additional disabilities and syndromes, single parents, and parents with their own hearing impairments were excluded from the study. A Brief COPE Scale questionnaire translated into Malay was used to assess the coping strategies. The questionnaire includes 28 items and was rated using a four-point Likert scale. Independent t-testing was used to compare the coping strategies of mothers and fathers. Simple linear regression was used to determine the association between age and coping strategies. There were 72 participants. The number of mothers and fathers was equal. Religion, active coping and acceptance were the highest three scores in the domains, while substance use and behavioural disengagement were least used in both groups. The domains of religion, seeking emotional support and seeking instrumental support scored significantly higher in mothers than in fathers (p coping strategies among parents with hearing-impaired children. These are important factors that should be considered when counselling and establishing support groups for the parents of these children.

  3. Refining a model of hearing impairment using speech psychophysics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jepsen, Morten Løve; Dau, Torsten; Ghitza, Oded

    2014-01-01

    The premise of this study is that models of hearing, in general, and of individual hearing impairment, in particular, can be improved by using speech test results as an integral part of the modeling process. A conceptual iterative procedure is presented which, for an individual, considers measures...... of sensitivity, cochlear compression, and phonetic confusions using the Diagnostic Rhyme Test (DRT) framework. The suggested approach is exemplified by presenting data from three hearing-impaired listeners and results obtained with models of the hearing impairment of the individuals. The work reveals...

  4. Syllabic compression and speech intelligibility in hearing impaired listeners

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verschuure, J.; Dreschler, W. A.; de Haan, E. H.; van Cappellen, M.; Hammerschlag, R.; Maré, M. J.; Maas, A. J.; Hijmans, A. C.

    1993-01-01

    Syllabic compression has not been shown unequivocally to improve speech intelligibility in hearing-impaired listeners. This paper attempts to explain the poor results by introducing the concept of minimum overshoots. The concept was tested with a digital signal processor on hearing-impaired

  5. Project LITERACY-HI: Hypermedia for Readers with Hearing Impairments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horney, Mark; And Others

    This paper describes Project LITERACY-HI, an ongoing 3-year federally funded study of the benefits of electronically enhanced text for mainstreamed students with hearing impairments. Preliminary information documents the ongoing difficulties with reading experienced by most students with hearing impairments. The project is creating electronic…

  6. Teaching Strategies for Economics to the Hearing Impaired | Adu ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study sought to look at the teaching strategies for economics to the hearing impaired. Economics is said to be a living and dynamic subject, which is a vehicle of strict intellectual discipline, that involves looking at the world in a way which is for most, if not all of us quite new. Hearing impairment in a generic term covering ...

  7. Childhood Hearing Impairment: How do Parents Feel about it?

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DATONYE ALASIA

    of communication, and cognitive skills. This study was carried out to evaluate and ascertain the perception and attitude of parents of children with hearing impairment. Material and Method: This was a questionnaire based study of parents' perception and attitude about children with hearing impairment in the Port-Harcourt st.

  8. Captioned and Nonverbal Films for the Hearing-Impaired.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parlato, Salvatore J.

    1978-01-01

    Library film services for the hearing-impaired are discussed. Captioned and nonverbal films are defined, and a discussion of changing attitudes that resulted in integrated showing of these films is presented. Pointers on how to integrate, and sources of information on films for the hearing-impaired are also included. (MBR)

  9. Classroom Discourse and the Hearing-Impaired Child.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Amy L.

    1986-01-01

    A review of research on conversational competencies of hearing impaired students who rely on oral language as their predominant means of communication suggests that while much remains unknown, similarities exist in the ways learning disabled and hearing impaired children cope with the conversational demands of the classroom. (CL)

  10. Subjective hearing impairment after subarachnoid haemorrhage : Prevalence and risk factors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vos, Erik M.; Greebe, Paut; Visser-Meily, J. M Anne; Rinkel, Gabriel J E; Vergouwen, Mervyn D I

    2017-01-01

    Background Sensorineural hearing impairment is a key symptom in patients with superficial siderosis of the central nervous system, a disease caused by chronic or intermittent haemorrhage into the subarachnoid space. We investigated the prevalence and risk factors of subjective hearing impairment

  11. Timbre perception and object separation with normal and impaired hearing

    OpenAIRE

    Emiroglu, Suzan Selma

    2007-01-01

    Timbre is a combination of all auditory object attributes other than pitch, loudness and duration. A timbre distortion caused by a sensorineural hearing loss not only affects music perception, but may also influence object recognition in general. In order to quantify differences in object segregation and timbre discrimination between normal-hearing and hearing-impaired listeners with a sensorineural hearing loss, a new method for studying timbre perception was developed, which uses cross-fade...

  12. The Differential Effects of Attentional Focus in Children with Moderate and Profound Visual Impairments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott W. T. McNamara

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available It has been consistently reported that an external focus of attention leads to better motor performance than an internal focus, but no research to date has explored this effect in a population with visual impairments (VI. External focus statements typically reference something in the environment (e.g., target that may be difficult to conceptualize for people with VI since they cannot generate a visual representation of the object of focus. Internal focus statements could be more closely identifiable with proprioception that is not impaired in this population. Recent studies have reported that sighted adults with temporarily obstructed vision are able to receive an external focus benefit when performing discrete tasks (i.e., golf putt and vertical jump, however, it is unclear if those with VI would experience the same benefit. The purpose of this investigation was to compare how an internal focus and external focus impact the balance of children with VI. Eighteen children with VI were grouped into a moderate (n = 11 and a profound VI group (n = 7. Participants completed a familiarization trial, an internal focus trial (i.e., focusing on feet and an external focus trial (i.e., focusing on markers in a counterbalanced order. The moderate VI group had a lower root mean square error while using an external focus (p = 0.04, while the profound VI group did not differ between conditions (p > 0.05. These results suggest that while performing a task reliant on sensory feedback, an external focus benefit may be dependent on the severity of VI. Further research is needed to examine whether external focus statements can be presented in a way that may be more intuitive to those with profound VI. These findings may help to influence how professionals in health-related fields (e.g., physical therapist and physical educators give instructions on motor performance to populations with VI.

  13. Prevalence and Social Risk Factors for Hearing Impairment in Chinese Children—A National Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunfeng Yun

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Hearing impairment may affect children’s communication skills, social development, and educational achievement. Little is known about the prevalence of hearing impairment among Chinese children. Data were taken from the 2006 second China National Survey on Disability (CNSD. Hearing impairment was defined as moderate (41–60 dB HL, severe (61–80 dB HL, profound (81–90 dB HL, or complete (>91 dB HL. Logistic regression was used to estimate the odds ratio (OR and 95% confidence intervals (CI. A weighted number of 567,915 hearing impairment children were identified, yielding a prevalence of 17.49 per 10,000 people (95% CI: 16.90–18.08, with prevention or treatment options possible for 64.6% of hearing impairment children. The main causes of hearing impairment were hereditary, tympanitis, and drug intoxication. Illiteracy in one or both parents (mother: OR = 1.388, 95% CI: 1.125–1.714, p < 0.0001; father: OR = 1.537, 95% CI: 1.152–2.049, p < 0.0001 relative to no school or primary school, annual family income lower than national average (OR = 1.323, 95% CI: 1.044–1.675, p = 0.0203, relative to higher than national average, household size larger than three people (OR = 1.432, 95% CI: 1.164–1.762, p = 0.0007, relative to smaller than three people and single-mother family (OR = 2.056, 95% CI: 1.390–3.042, p = 0.0176, relative to intact family were the independence risk factors for hearing impairment among Chinese children. Lower annual family income, male children, larger household size, single-mother family, and lower levels of maternal and paternal education were independent risk factors for hearing impairment for Chinese children. Further studies on hearing impairment prevention and the relationship between parental social factors and the risk of hearing impairment are needed.

  14. [Speech audiometry in expert assessment of hearing impairment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batsoulis, C; Lesinski-Schiedat, A

    2017-03-01

    In the assessment process of hearing impairment the medical expert has to verify its causality and to quantify its severity as hearing loss in percentage. Based on the determined hearing loss in percentage, the degree of impairment/disability or, in the case of work-related noise-induced hearing loss, the reduction in earning capacity is estimated. In Germany the guideline for the expert assessment of work-related noise-induced hearing loss is the Königstein Guideline. Currently, the 5th edition from 2012 is used. Here, the hearing loss quantification depends mainly on the results of speech audiometry. Based on the Freiburg speech test, the hearing loss in percentage is determined using approved tables. For patients with a mild hearing loss, typically characterized by a high-frequency hearing loss, tone audiometry results are consulted additionally. Speech-in-noise tests are available and are frequently used to measure the benefit of hearing systems. They allow for the detection of these patients' hearing impairment, which generally occurs in noisy environments. The first suggestions for a table to determine hearing loss in noise in percent are available. In experimental studies it was shown that tests in quiet, other than the Freiburg speech test, can be used and the same tables can be applied. In this article the current use of speech audiometry for expert assessment is presented, and options of using further developed speech test material are discussed.

  15. CONTEMPOPARY VIEWS TO SIGN LANGUAGE OF HEARING IMPAIRED

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bojka TATAREVA

    1998-04-01

    Full Text Available The place of the sign language in education of hearing impaired children in Denmark, USA and Sweden.Hearing impaired people ought to have a possibility of access to vital information, so they can move step by step, to live as useful members of society.Sign language is nonverbal communication which appears as a kind of compensation of the language lack, a means of development of that activity an opinion of unlimited human communicative nature.Mimic sign language in the system of education of hearing impaired children in Denmark, USA and Sweden take a primary place. The school with Hearing impaired children are bilingual. In the schools sign language is taken as a training language and it is available to every child.Contemporary views and practice tell us that teaching of hearing impaired children with sign language is more effective and more available.

  16. Satisfaction with Hearing Aids Based on Technology and Style among Hearing Impaired Persons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faraji-Khiavi, Farzad; Dashti, Rezvan; Sameni, Seyyed-Jalal; Bayat, Arash

    2016-09-01

    Hearing loss is one of the most disabling impairments. Using a hearing aid as an attempt to improve the hearing problem can positively affect the quality of life for these people. This research was aimed to assess satisfaction of hearing impaired patients with their hearing aids regarding the employed technology and style. This descriptive-analytic cross-sectional research was conducted on 187 subjects with hearing loss who were using a hearing aid. The subjects were over 18 years of age and were using a hearing aid for at least 6 months. The Persian version of Satisfaction with Amplification in Daily Life (SADL) questionnaire was the instrument which was used for assessing satisfaction with the hearing aid. Cronbach's alpha was calculated to be 0.80 for instrument reliability. A significant difference was observed among satisfaction subscales' mean scores with hearing aid technology. Also a significant difference was observed between the total satisfaction score and the hearing aid model. With respect to the analysis of satisfaction with the hearing aid and its style, cost and services was the only subscale which showed a significant difference (P=0.005). Respondents using hearing aids with different technology and style were estimated to be quite satisfied. Training audiologists in using more appropriate and fitting hearing aids in addition to using self-reporting questionnaires like SADL for estimating patients' social condition and participation in their life can essentially change their disability condition and countervail their hearing loss.

  17. Type 2 Diabetes and Hearing Impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helzner, Elizabeth Purchase; Contrera, Kevin J

    2016-01-01

    Hearing impairment (HI) and type 2 diabetes are both highly prevalent disabling conditions. Type 2 diabetes has been modestly associated with a higher likelihood of HI in many, but not all, population-based studies, with stronger associations found in studies that included younger age groups. Pathophysiologic studies suggest that persons with diabetes are predisposed to HI in the higher frequencies. Proposed mechanisms underlying the association between diabetes and HI include the combined contributions of hyperglycemia and oxidative stress to cochlear microangiopathy and auditory neuropathy. In this review, we highlight recent population-based studies of type 2 diabetes and HI and examine evidence for diabetes-induced pathophysiologic changes that may result in damage to the auditory system.

  18. Effects of Multisensory Speech Training and Visual Phonics on Speech Production of a Hearing-Impaired Child.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaccagnini, Cindy M.; Antia, Shirin D.

    1993-01-01

    This study of the effects of intensive multisensory speech training on the speech production of a profoundly hearing-impaired child (age nine) found that the addition of Visual Phonics hand cues did not result in speech production gains. All six target phonemes were generalized to new words and maintained after the intervention was discontinued.…

  19. Demographic Characteristics and Impairments of Louisiana Students with Usher's Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, S. C.

    1987-01-01

    Of 51 Louisiana students with Usher's Syndrome (a genetic condition characterized by hearing loss and progressive blindness), 71 percent manifested visual impairment and hearing loss, 9 percent had neither, 10 percent had visual impairments but a less-than-profound hearing loss, and 10 percent had profound hearing loss and no visual impairment.…

  20. Nonverbal sensitivity of normal-hearing and hearing-impaired older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigo, T G; Lieberman, D A

    1989-06-01

    The study compared the nonverbal decoding abilities of normal-hearing and hard-of-hearing older adults using the Profile of Nonverbal Sensitivity (PONS). The PONS test allowed the measurement of subjects' decoding accuracy for a variety of nonverbal cues presented under two auditory, three visual, and six audiovisual conditions. Nonverbal perceptual scores were lower for the hearing-impaired group under all presentation conditions. Perception of prosodic features of speech by hearing-impaired subjects was significantly related to low-frequency hearing sensitivity. Between-group differences in the decoding of visually transmitted nonverbal cues varied across visual presentation conditions. Results are compared to past deaf studies and related to processing strategies used by normal-hearing and hearing-impaired persons.

  1. Recognition of telegraphy in hearing-impaired telegraph operators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montnemery, P; Harris, S

    1995-01-01

    Recognition of Morse signs masked by noise was measured in five hearing-impaired telegraph operators with a high-frequency hearing loss. They all described problems typical for subjects with high-frequency hearing loss, i.e. problems with recognition of speech in noisy environments. Telegraphy speed, listening level, bandwidth of the masking-noise, frequency and interaural phase were systematically varied. At narrow-band masking with a bandwidth of 230 Hz (1/3 octave 891-1121 Hz) centred at 1000 Hz no statistical significant difference in recognition of telegraphy signs was found between the hearing-impaired subjects and the normal-hearing subjects investigated in our earlier studies at any telegraphy speed or at any S/N ratio. All hearing-impaired subjects improved in recognition when the telegraphy speed was lowered. When a broad-band noise (100-2500 Hz) was used as a masker all the hearing-impaired subjects improved in recognition when the frequency was lowered from 2000 to 500 Hz. At 40 signs/min telegraphy speed the hearing-impaired subjects showed a significantly lower recognition (p < 0.05) at low S/N ratios both at 2000 and 500 Hz frequency compared to the normal-hearing subjects investigated in our earlier studies. At monaural listening the normal-hearing subjects were significantly better (p < 0.01) in recognition. When the telegraphy signs were presented 180 degrees out of phase between the two ears, all subjects improved in recognition compared to when the telegraphy signs were presented in phase. This improvement was equal in hearing-impaired subjects and in the normal-hearing subjects investigated in our earlier studies.

  2. Inflectional morphology in German hearing-impaired children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penke, Martina; Wimmer, Eva; Hennies, Johannes; Hess, Markus; Rothweiler, Monika

    2016-01-01

    Despite modern hearing aids, children with hearing impairment often have only restricted access to spoken language input during the 'critical' years for language acquisition. Specifically, a sensorineural hearing impairment affects the perception of voiceless coronal consonants which realize verbal affixes in German. The aim of this study is to explore if German hearing-impaired children have problems in producing and/or acquiring inflectional suffixes expressed by such phonemes. The findings of two experiments (an elicitation task and a picture-naming task) conducted with a group of hearing-impaired monolingual German children (age 3-4 years) demonstrate that difficulties in perceiving specific phonemes relate to the avoidance of these same sounds in speech production independent of the grammatical function these phonemes have.

  3. Hearing help-seeking and rehabilitation: perspectives of adults with hearing impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laplante-Lévesque, Ariane; Knudsen, Line V; Preminger, Jill E; Jones, Lesley; Nielsen, Claus; Öberg, Marie; Lunner, Thomas; Hickson, Louise; Naylor, Graham; Kramer, Sophia E

    2012-02-01

    This study investigated the perspectives of adults with hearing impairment on hearing help-seeking and rehabilitation. Individual semi-structured interviews were completed. In total, 34 adults with hearing impairment in four countries (Australia, Denmark, UK, and USA) participated. Participants had a range of experience with hearing help-seeking and rehabilitation, from never having sought help to being satisfied hearing-aid users. Qualitative content analysis identified four main categories ('perceiving my hearing impairment', 'seeking hearing help', 'using my hearing aids', and 'perspectives and knowledge') and, at the next level, 25 categories. This article reports on the densest categories: they are described, exemplified with interview quotes, and discussed. People largely described hearing help-seeking and rehabilitation in the context of their daily lives. Adults with hearing impairment rarely described clinical encounters towards hearing help-seeking and rehabilitation as a connected process. They portrayed interactions with clinicians as isolated events rather than chronologically-ordered steps relating to a common goal. Clinical implications of the findings are discussed.

  4. Murine malaria is associated with significant hearing impairment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephan Kurt

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Plasmodium falciparum malaria has been suspected to cause hearing loss. Developmental, cognitive and language disorders have been observed in children, surviving cerebral malaria. This prospective study aims to evaluate whether malaria influences hearing in mice. Methods Twenty mice were included in a standardized murine cerebral malaria model. Auditory evoked brainstem responses were assessed before infection and at the peak of the illness. Results A significant hearing impairment could be demonstrated in mice with malaria, especially the cerebral form. The control group did not show any alterations. No therapy was used. Conclusion This suggests that malaria itself leads to a hearing impairment in mice.

  5. Dimensions for hearing-impaired mobile application usability model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nathan, Shelena Soosay; Hussain, Azham; Hashim, Nor Laily; Omar, Mohd Adan

    2017-10-01

    This paper discuss on the dimensions that has been derived for the hearing-impaired mobile applications usability model. General usability model consist of general dimension for evaluating mobile application however requirements for the hearing-impaired are overlooked and often scanted. This led towards mobile application developed for the hearing-impaired are left unused. It is also apparent that these usability models do not consider accessibility dimensions according to the requirement of the special users. This complicates the work of usability practitioners as well as academician that practices research usability when application are developed for the specific user needs. To overcome this issue, dimension chosen for the hearing-impaired are ensured to be align with the real need of the hearing-impaired mobile application. Besides literature studies, requirements for the hearing-impaired mobile application have been identified through interview conducted with hearing-impaired mobile application users that were recorded as video outputs and analyzed using Nvivo. Finally total of 6 out of 15 dimensions gathered are chosen for the proposed model and presented.

  6. Comparison of general health status in mothers of hearing and hearing-impaired children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Movallali

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: The birth of a hearing-impaired child and raising him/her often brings special psychological feelings for parents, especially mothers who spend more time with the child. This study aimed to compare the general health status in mothers of hearing-impaired and hearing children. Methods: This was a descriptive-analytic study. General Health Questionnaire was used to identify general health status; and data were analyzed with independent-t test. Results: The general health level of mothers of hearing-impaired children was lower than mothers of normal hearing children (p=0.01 . The average scores of anxiety (p=0.01, depression (p= 0.01 and physical (p=0.02 symptoms and social function (p=0.01 of mothers of hearing-impaired children was higher than mothers of normal hearing ones (p=0.01. Conclusion: Having a child with hearing impairment affects mothers’ general health status. Our findings show that it’s necessary to provide psychological and social support for mothers of hearing-impaired children.

  7. Prevalence and causes of hearing impairment in Fundong Health District, North-West Cameroon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrite, Silvia; Mactaggart, Islay; Kuper, Hannah; Oye, Joseph; Polack, Sarah

    2017-04-01

    To estimate the prevalence and causes of hearing impairment in Fundong Health District, North-West Cameroon. We selected 51 clusters of 80 people (all ages) through probability proportionate to size sampling. Initial hearing screening was undertaken through an otoacoustic emission (OAE) test. Participants aged 4+ years who failed this test in both ears or for whom an OAE reading could not be taken underwent a manual pure-tone audiometry (PTA) screening. Cases of hearing impairment were defined as those with pure-tone average ≥41 dBHL in adults and ≥35 dBHL in children in the better ear, or children under age 4 who failed the OAE test in both ears. Each case with hearing loss was examined by an ear, nose and throat nurse who indicated the main likely cause. We examined 3567 (86.9%) of 4104 eligible people. The overall prevalence of hearing impairment was 3.6% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 2.8-4.6). The prevalence was low in people aged 0-17 (1.1%, 0.7-1.8%) and 18-49 (1.1%, 0.5-2.6%) and then rose sharply in people aged 50+ (14.8%, 11.7-19.1%). Among cases, the majority were classified as moderate (76%), followed by severe (15%) and profound (9%). More than one-third of cases of hearing impairment were classified as unknown (37%) or conductive (37%) causes, while sensorineural causes were less common (26%). Prevalence of hearing impairment in North-West Cameroon is in line with the WHO estimate for sub-Saharan Africa. The majority of cases with known causes are treatable, with impacted wax playing a major role. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Describing the trajectory of language development in the presence of severe-to-profound hearing loss: a closer look at children with cochlear implants versus hearing aids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshinaga-Itano, Christine; Baca, Rosalinda L; Sedey, Allison L

    2010-10-01

    The objective of this investigation was to describe the language growth of children with severe or profound hearing loss with cochlear implants versus those children with the same degree of hearing loss using hearing aids. A prospective longitudinal observation and analysis. University of Colorado Department of Speech Language and Hearing Sciences. There were 87 children with severe-to-profound hearing loss from 48 to 87 months of age. All children received early intervention services through the Colorado Home Intervention Program. Most children received intervention services from a certified auditory-verbal therapist or an auditory-oral therapist and weekly sign language instruction from an instructor who was deaf or hard of hearing and native or fluent in American Sign Language. The Test of Auditory Comprehension of Language, 3rd Edition, and the Expressive One Word Picture Vocabulary Test, 3rd Edition, were the assessment tools for children 4 to 7 years of age. The expressive language subscale of the Minnesota Child Development was used in the infant/toddler period (birth to 36 mo). Average language estimates at 84 months of age were nearly identical to the normative sample for receptive language and 7 months delayed for expressive vocabulary. Children demonstrated a mean rate of growth from 4 years through 7 years on these 2 assessments that was equivalent to their normal-hearing peers. As a group, children with hearing aids deviated more from the age equivalent trajectory on the Test of Auditory Comprehension of Language, 3rd Edition, and the Expressive One Word Picture Vocabulary Test, 3rd Edition, than children with cochlear implants. When a subset of children were divided into performance categories, we found that children with cochlear implants were more likely to be "gap closers" and less likely to be "gap openers," whereas the reverse was true for the children with hearing aids for both measures. Children who are educated through oral-aural combined with

  9. Prevalence of Mutations in Deafness-Causing Genes in Cochlear Implanted Patients with Profound Nonsyndromic Sensorineural Hearing Loss in Shandong Province, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Jianfen; Bai, Xiaohui; Zhang, Fengguo; Xiao, Yun; Gu, Lintao; Han, Yuechen; Fan, Zhaomin; Li, Jianfeng; Xu, Lei; Wang, Haibo

    2017-11-01

    The mutations of GJB2, SLC26A4, and mtDNA12SrRNA are the most common inherited causes of nonsyndromic sensorineural hearing loss (NSHL) in China, yet previous genetic screenings were mainly carried on patients with moderate-to-profound impairment. We aimed to detect the mutation frequencies in NSHL population within a more specified range of severity. Patients with profound NSHL who had undergone cochlear implantation in the Shandong Provincial Hospital (Shandong, China) were recruited. The majority (n  =  472) were between 0.7 and 6 years old, and the remaining (n  =  63) were between 6 and 70 years old. In total, 115 mutation alleles of the three genes were screened with SNP scan assay. Of the patients, 19.44% (104/535) were found to have GJB2 mutations, and the most common allele was c.235delC, followed by c.299_300delAT and c.109G>A. SLC26A4 mutations were detected in 13.46% patients (72/535), and the most common allele was c.919-2A>G (IVS7-2A>G), followed by c.1174A>T and c.2168A>G. Seven patients (1.31%) carried mutations in mtDNA12SrRNA, with the alleles of m.1555A>G and m.1494C>T. We found the allele frequency of c.109G>A (GJB2) was relatively lower in the profound NSHL population in comparison to the moderate-to-profound ones, and the c.1174A>T (SLC26A4) relatively higher. It suggests those mutations may be connected with the degree of deafness, which needs more observations and analyses to support. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd/University College London.

  10. Comparison of Consanguinity between Parents of Hearing Impaired and Public School Children with Estimation of Risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sattar, M A; Sultana, M T

    2015-10-01

    Deafness is the hidden disability and the most common human sensory defects which lead to poor educational and employment prospects of childhood. Is there any association of consanguinity and hearing loss or are there any difference of association of consanguinity and hearing loss in specialized and public school children and how much risk is associated?--were the research questions of this study. Total 428 participants have been selected randomly. Hearing impaired were 186 participants and 242 participants were normal hearing school boy. This was a case control, analytical, hypotheses testing study. In normal public school children group, consanguinity was present in 2.5% parents. The rest were married with non relatives. In parents of hearing impaired children group, consanguinity was very high (17.2%). Pearson chi-square test and Odds ratio analysis was done. The value was less than 0.05 and ratio was 8.173. The 'p' value of Pearson chi-square test was less than 0.05. So, the test was highly significant at 95% confidence interval. Odds ratio showed that the risk of profound sensorineural hearing loss in the baby of parents of consanguineous marriages 8.173 times higher than that of non consanguineous marriages.

  11. Binaural pitch perception in normal-hearing and hearing-impaired listeners

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Santurette, Sébastien; Dau, Torsten

    2007-01-01

    The effects of hearing impairment on the perception of binaural-pitch stimuli were investigated. Several experiments were performed with normal-hearing and hearing-impaired listeners, including detection and discrimination of binaural pitch, and melody recognition using different types of binaural...... pitches. For the normal-hearing listeners, all types of binaural pitches could be perceived immediately and were musical. The hearing-impaired listeners could be divided into three groups based on their results: (a) some perceived all types of binaural pitches, but with decreased salience or musicality...... compared to normal-hearing listeners; (b) some could only perceive the strongest pitch types; (c) some were unable to perceive any binaural pitch at all. The performance of the listeners was not correlated with audibility. Additional experiments investigated the correlation between performance in binaural...

  12. Externalization versus Internalization of Sound in Normal-hearing and Hearing-impaired Listeners

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ohl, Björn; Laugesen, Søren; Buchholz, Jörg

    2010-01-01

    The externalization of sound, i. e. the perception of auditory events as being located outside of the head, is a natural phenomenon for normalhearing listeners, when perceiving sound coming from a distant physical sound source. It is potentially useful for hearing in background noise......, but the relevant cues might be distorted by a hearing impairment and also by the processing of the incoming sound through hearing aids. In this project, two intuitive tests in natural real-life surroundings were developed, which capture the limits of the perception of externalization. For this purpose...... listeners in the hearing-impaired group. Partly, there was an influence by the direction of sound incidence. On average across subjects, the dynamic range available to perceive externalization was reduced compared to normal-hearing subjects. Overall, it was shown that hearing-impaired listeners are able...

  13. Association of Hearing Impairment and Anxiety in Older Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contrera, Kevin J; Betz, Josh; Deal, Jennifer; Choi, Janet S; Ayonayon, Hilsa N; Harris, Tamara; Helzner, Elizabeth; Martin, Kathryn R; Mehta, Kala; Pratt, Sheila; Rubin, Susan M; Satterfield, Suzanne; Yaffe, Kristine; Simonsick, Eleanor M; Lin, Frank R

    2017-02-01

    The objective of the study is was investigate the association between hearing impairment and anxiety. We conducted a cross-sectional analysis of 1,732 community-based adults aged 76 to 85 years who participated in the Health Aging and Body Composition (ABC) study. Logistic regression models were adjusted for demographic and cardiovascular risk factors. Hearing impairment was defined by the speech-frequency pure tone average. Anxiety was defined as reporting two symptoms of at least "a little" or one symptom "quite a bit" on the three-item Hopkins Symptom Checklist. Compared with individuals with no hearing impairment, the odds of prevalent anxiety were higher among individuals with mild hearing impairment (odds ratio [OR] = 1.32, 95% confidence interval [CI] = [1.01, 1.73]) and moderate or greater hearing impairment (OR = 1.59, 95% CI = [1.14, 2.22]). Hearing aid use was not significantly associated with lower odds of anxiety. Hearing impairment is independently associated with greater odds of anxiety symptoms in older adults.

  14. Adults with mild hearing impairment: Are we meeting the challenge?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timmer, Barbra H B; Hickson, Louise; Launer, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    Acquired hearing impairment is recognized by the World Health Organization as the third leading cause of disability, with a mild impairment being the most prevalent. The aim of this study was to review research literature concerned with adults with acquired mild hearing impairment; the definitions and prevalence, the resulting activity limitations and participation restrictions, and hearing-aid interventions. This study involved a systematized review of research literature identified through searches in citation databases and through reference checking. A total of 151 papers were identified and of these, 33 papers were included in this review. Prevalence rates are significantly influenced by the definition used for mild hearing impairment, and range from 1 in 3 to 1 in 5 adults. The weak correlations between audiological assessments and self-reported difficulties suggest that further assessment of individuals with mild hearing impairment is warranted. The most common intervention is the provision of hearing aids with varying rates of use, benefit, and satisfaction. The development of appropriate audiological assessment in the clinic, and further evaluation of the real-world listening needs and performance of people with mild hearing impairment is required to provide a more effective pathway for this clinical population.

  15. Comparison of reading comprehension and working memory in hearing-impaired and normal-hearing children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Rezaei

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Reading is the most important human need for learning. In normal-hearing people working memory is a predictor of reading comprehension. In this study the relationship between working memory and reading comprehension skills was studied in hearing-impaired children, and then compared with the normal-hearing group.Methods: This was a descriptive-analytic study. The working memory and reading comprehension skills of 18 (8 male, 10 female sever hearing-impaired children in year five of exceptional schools were compared by means of a reading test with 18 hearing children as control group. The subjects in the control group were of the same gender and educational level of the sample group.Results: The children with hearing loss performed similarly to the normal-hearing children in tasks related to auditory-verbal memory of sounds (reverse, visual-verbal memory of letters, and visual-verbal memory of pictures. However, they showed lower levels of performance in reading comprehension (p<0.001. Moreover, no significant relationship was observed between working memory and reading comprehension skills.Conclusion: Findings indicated that children with hearing loss have a significant impairment in the reading comprehension skill. Impairment in language knowledge and vocabulary may be the main cause of poor reading comprehension in these children. In hearing-impaired children working memory is not a strong predictor of reading comprehension.

  16. The impact of cochlear implantation on speech understanding, subjective hearing performance, and tinnitus perception in patients with unilateral severe to profound hearing loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Távora-Vieira, Dayse; Marino, Roberta; Acharya, Aanand; Rajan, Gunesh P

    2015-03-01

    This study aimed to determine the impact of cochlear implantation on speech understanding in noise, subjective perception of hearing, and tinnitus perception of adult patients with unilateral severe to profound hearing loss and to investigate whether duration of deafness and age at implantation would influence the outcomes. In addition, this article describes the auditory training protocol used for unilaterally deaf patients. This is a prospective study of subjects undergoing cochlear implantation for unilateral deafness with or without associated tinnitus. Speech perception in noise was tested using the Bamford-Kowal-Bench speech-in-noise test presented at 65 dB SPL. The Speech, Spatial, and Qualities of Hearing Scale and the Abbreviated Profile of Hearing Aid Benefit were used to evaluate the subjective perception of hearing with a cochlear implant and quality of life. Tinnitus disturbance was measured using the Tinnitus Reaction Questionnaire. Data were collected before cochlear implantation and 3, 6, 12, and 24 months after implantation. Twenty-eight postlingual unilaterally deaf adults with or without tinnitus were implanted. There was a significant improvement in speech perception in noise across time in all spatial configurations. There was an overall significant improvement on the subjective perception of hearing and quality of life. Tinnitus disturbance reduced significantly across time. Age at implantation and duration of deafness did not influence the outcomes significantly. Cochlear implantation provided significant improvement in speech understanding in challenging situations, subjective perception of hearing performance, and quality of life. Cochlear implantation also resulted in reduced tinnitus disturbance. Age at implantation and duration of deafness did not seem to influence the outcomes.

  17. Peripheral auditory processing and speech reception in impaired hearing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Strelcyk, Olaf

    One of the most common complaints of people with impaired hearing concerns their difficulty with understanding speech. Particularly in the presence of background noise, hearing-impaired people often encounter great difficulties with speech communication. In most cases, the problem persists even...... if reduced audibility has been compensated for by hearing aids. It has been hypothesized that part of the difficulty arises from changes in the perception of sounds that are well above hearing threshold, such as reduced frequency selectivity and deficits in the processing of temporal fine structure (TFS......) at the output of the inner-ear (cochlear) filters. The purpose of this work was to investigate these aspects in detail. One chapter studies relations between frequency selectivity, TFS processing, and speech reception in listeners with normal and impaired hearing, using behavioral listening experiments. While...

  18. Hearing Impairment Caused by Occupational Noise | Mets | South ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Occupational noise-induced hearing impairment is an insidiously developing injury which only becomes apparent when it affects the hearing of conversational speech. As no remedy is possible, prevention is the only answer. In view of the impending legislation in South Africa a review of the literature is presented. This is ...

  19. Characteristics of hearing-impairment among patients in Ghana ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The causes, and characteristics of hearing-impairment were determined prospectively among six thousand, four hundred and twenty-eight (6,428) patients who reported at the Komfo Anokye Teaching Hospital (KATH) with hearing problems. The purpose of the study was to determine the characteristics and some causes of ...

  20. Noise-Induced Hearing Impairment As An Occupational Risk Factor ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Noise pollution in workplaces poses serious health risks including that of cardiovascular disturbances and impairment of hearing. The objective of this study was to assess the effects of occupational noise on hearing among selected industrial workers in Benin City, Nigeria. Male and female workers (n=150) in sawmills, ...

  1. Hearing aid fitting in older persons with hearing impairment: the influence of cognitive function, age, and hearing loss on hearing aid benefit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meister, Hartmut; Rählmann, Sebastian; Walger, Martin; Margolf-Hackl, Sabine; Kießling, Jürgen

    2015-01-01

    To examine the association of cognitive function, age, and hearing loss with clinically assessed hearing aid benefit in older hearing-impaired persons. Hearing aid benefit was assessed using objective measures regarding speech recognition in quiet and noisy environments as well as a subjective measure reflecting everyday situations captured using a standardized questionnaire. A broad range of general cognitive functions such as attention, memory, and intelligence were determined using different neuropsychological tests. Linear regression analyses were conducted with the outcome of the neuropsychological tests as well as age and hearing loss as independent variables and the benefit measures as dependent variables. Thirty experienced older hearing aid users with typical age-related hearing impairment participated. Most of the benefit measures revealed that the participants obtained significant improvement with their hearing aids. Regression models showed a significant relationship between a fluid intelligence measure and objective hearing aid benefit. When individual hearing thresholds were considered as an additional independent variable, hearing loss was the only significant contributor to the benefit models. Lower cognitive capacity - as determined by the fluid intelligence measure - was significantly associated with greater hearing loss. Subjective benefit could not be predicted by any of the variables considered. The present study does not give evidence that hearing aid benefit is critically associated with cognitive function in experienced hearing aid users. However, it was found that lower fluid intelligence scores were related to higher hearing thresholds. Since greater hearing loss was associated with a greater objective benefit, these results strongly support the advice of using hearing aids regardless of age and cognitive function to counter hearing loss and the adverse effects of age-related hearing impairment. Still, individual cognitive capacity might

  2. The Effectiveness of Social Skill Training on Hearing Impaired Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abas Mahvash-Vernosfaderani

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: The hearing impairment child is at risk the loneliness living and the lost of social discussion coequals partnership. The purpose of this research was to determine the effectiveness of social skills training on decreasing the social phobia of students with hearing impairment. Materials and Methods: In this study, students with hearing impairment were randomly selected and the pre-test of SPIN was completed by them. Post-test for SPIN were administered immediately after intervention. To evaluate participant’s performance after a period of one month from the end of the instruction, both groups were reassessed. Results: Result of the follow-up scores show that after removing the effect of pre-test, there is statistically significant difference (F=11.371, p<0.001 between the scores of both group in follow-up position. Conclusion: Social skills training significantly decreased the social phobia in students with hearing impairment.

  3. Nonverbal Communication: Perspectives for Teachers of Hearing-Impaired Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammermeister, Frieda; Timms, Marjorie

    1989-01-01

    Teachers of hearing-impaired students need to be aware of their own and their students' nonverbal communication signals, including posture, gestures and other body movements, facial expressions, eye contact, appearance, and the nonverbal aspects of speech. (Author/DB)

  4. Hearing impairment and deafness among HIV infected children and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Hearing impairment and deafness among HIV infected children and adolescents in Harare, Zimbabwe. C Chidziva, J Matsekete, T Bandason, S Shamu, T Dzongodza, N Matinhira, HA Mujuru, C Kunzekwenyika, M Wellington, R Luthy, C Prescott, RA Ferrand ...

  5. The Learning Disabled, Hearing Impaired Students: Reality, Myth, or Overextension?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laughton, Joan

    1989-01-01

    This paper focuses on definitions, incidence, and characteristics of the multihandicapping condition known as "learning disabled, hearing impaired," in order to provide a means of identifying these children and determining whether or not they require different teaching strategies. (JDD)

  6. Neurodevelopmental Disorders in Children with Severe to Profound Sensorineural Hearing Loss: A Clinical Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chilosi, Anna M.; Comparini, Alessandro; Scusa, Maria F.; Berrettini, Stefano; Forli, Francesca; Battini, Roberta; Cipriani, Paola; Cioni, Giovanni

    2010-01-01

    Aim: The effects of sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL) are often complicated by additional disabilities, but the epidemiology of associated disorders is not clearly defined. The aim of this study was to evaluate the frequency and type of additional neurodevelopmental disabilities in a sample of children with SNHL and to investigate the relation…

  7. Evaluating tactile aids for speech perception and production by hearing-impaired adults and children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisenberger, J M; Kozma-Spytek, L

    1991-01-01

    The type and degree of benefit provided by tactile aids for the hearing-impaired varies from device to device, as a function of such variables as the number of tactile transducers, type of stimulation, location of stimulation, and the nature of processing of the input acoustic waveform. In this paper the results from evaluations of tactile devices in our laboratory are discussed, to provide some insights into the amount of assistance that might be expected from the use of different tactile aids in different listening tasks. A number of perceptual tasks have been evaluated, ranging from simple detection of a stimulus to the tracking of connected speech. The results of these evaluations suggest that tactile aids, particularly multichannel devices that employ a number of tactile transducers and convey information about the spectral content of the speech signal, can be of significant benefit in speech perception. Further studies with profoundly hearing-impaired children indicate that aspects of speech production can also be improved through the use of a multichannel tactile aid, as evidenced from judgments of videotaped productions shown to teachers of the hearing-impaired. These findings suggest that even a relatively brief period of training with a tactile aid can lead to improvements in speech production by hearing-impaired children.

  8. A novel splice-site mutation in the GJB2 gene causing mild postlingual hearing impairment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Gandía

    Full Text Available The DFNB1 subtype of autosomal recessive, nonsyndromic hearing impairment, caused by mutations affecting the GJB2 (connexin-26 [corrected] gene, is highly prevalent in most populations worldwide. DFNB1 hearing impairment is mostly severe or profound and usually appears before the acquisition of speech (prelingual onset, though a small number of hypomorphic missense mutations result in mild or moderate deafness of postlingual onset. We identified a novel GJB2 splice-site mutation, c. -22-2A>C, in three siblings with mild postlingual hearing impairment that were compound heterozygous for c. -22-2A>C and c.35delG. Reverse transcriptase-PCR experiments performed on total RNA extracted from saliva samples from one of these siblings confirmed that c. -22-2A>C abolished the acceptor splice site of the single GJB2 intron, resulting in the absence of normally processed transcripts from this allele. However, we did isolate transcripts from the c. -22-2A>C allele that keep an intact GJB2 coding region and that were generated by use of an alternative acceptor splice site previously unknown. The residual expression of wild-type connexin-26 [corrected] encoded by these transcripts probably underlies the mild severity and late onset of the hearing impairment of these subjects.

  9. Citizenship among a Sample of Hearing and Hearing Impaired Kindergarten's Children in Al-Riyadh Saudi Arabia "Comparative Study"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turkestani, Maryam Hafez; Bahatheg, Raja' Omar

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed at identifying statistically significant differences in citizenship between Saudi hearing and hearing impaired children. The study sample consisted of (167) hearing and (42) hearing impaired children at public kindergartens in Al-Riyadh city, (82) of whom were males and (127) were female children. Data was collected using…

  10. Enjoyment of music by elderly hearing-impaired listeners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leek, Marjorie R; Molis, Michelle R; Kubli, Lina R; Tufts, Jennifer B

    2008-06-01

    Anecdotal evidence suggests that hearing loss interferes with the enjoyment of music, although it is not known how widespread this problem currently is. To estimate the prevalence of music-listening difficulties among a group of elderly hearing aid wearers. Interview. Telephone interviews were conducted with patients who wore hearing aids. Questions regarding several aspects of music listening were included. Sixty-eight hearing-impaired people served as subjects. They had all been seen in the audiology clinic for hearing aid evaluation during the previous year. Subjects were asked questions concerning their use of hearing aids, the importance of listening to music in their lives, their habits and practices concerning music, and difficulties they experienced in listening to music. Almost 30% of the respondents reported that their hearing losses affected their enjoyment of music. About half of the respondents indicated that music was either too loud or too soft, although only about one-third reported difficulties with level contrasts within musical pieces. In contrast to a similar survey carried out 20 years ago, there were many fewer complaints about listening to music. This result may be due in large part to improvements in hearing aids, especially with regard to nonlinear compression. Although new hearing aid technologies have somewhat reduced problems of music enjoyment experienced by hearing-impaired people, audiologists should be aware that some 25-30% of patients may have difficulties with listening to music and may require extra attention to minimize those problems.

  11. Syntactic development in Japanese hearing-impaired children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujiyoshi, Akie; Fukushima, Kunihiro; Taguchi, Tomoko; Omori, Kana; Kasai, Norio; Nishio, Shinya; Sugaya, Akiko; Nagayasu, Rie; Konishi, Takayuki; Sugishita, Syuuhei; Fujita, Jyunpei; Nishizaki, Kazunori; Shiroma, Masae

    2012-04-01

    This study examined syntactic development of auditory comprehension of sentences in Japanese-speaking school-age children with and without hearing impairment. In total, 592 preschool and school-age children (421 normal-hearing and 171 hearing-impaired) were included in this cross-sectional observation study conducted using the Syntactic Processing Test for Aphasia for Japanese language users. Linear regression analysis was used to determine the estimated age at which each syntactic structure was acquired. Acquisition of syntactic structures was observed in hearing-impaired and normal-hearing children. Basic word order sentences of agent-object-verb and the goal benefactive construction were acquired at preschool age (earlier group), whereas reverse word order sentences of object-agent-verb, source benefactive construction, passive voice, and relative clauses were acquired at school age (later group). The results showed that many hearing-impaired children may not acquire Japanese grammatical structures until the age of 12 years. Adequate screening for language development for school-age hearing-impaired children is required for an effective intervention.

  12. [neurologic Semiology In A Population Of Hearing Impaired Children].

    OpenAIRE

    V. M. Gonçalves; Piovesana, A M; Moura-Ribeiro, M V

    2015-01-01

    A random sample of 42 sensorineural hearing impaired children (severe and bilateral) was studied, from special classes in Campinas, with chronological ages varying between 4 and 7 years old. The children of this sample were compared with two control groups of 42 children of the same chronological age, from regular classes of private and public schools. All of them were submitted to the traditional neurological examination. Hearing impaired children showed differences as to head circumference ...

  13. Are Auditory Steady-State Responses Useful to Evaluate Severe-to-Profound Hearing Loss in Children?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Signe Schuster Grasel

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To evaluate Auditory Steady-State Responses (ASSR at high intensities in pediatric cochlear implant candidates and to compare the results to behavioral tests responses. Methods. This prospective study evaluated 42 children with suspected severe-to-profound hearing loss, aged from 3 to 72 months. All had absent ABR and OAE responses. ASSR were evoked using binaural single frequency stimuli at 110 dB HL with a 10 dB down-seeking procedure. ASSR and behavioral test results were compared. Results. Forty-two subjects completed both ASSR and behavioral evaluation. Eleven children (26.2% had bilateral responses. Four (9.5% showed unilateral responses in at least two frequencies, all confirmed by behavioral results. Overall 61 ASSR responses were obtained, most (37.7% in 500 Hz. Mean thresholds were between 101.3 and 104.2 dB HL. Among 27 subjects with absent ASSR, fifteen had no behavioral responses. Seven subjects showed behavioral responses with absent ASSR responses. No spurious ASSR responses were observed at 100 or 110 dB HL. Conclusion. ASSR is a valuable tool to detect residual hearing. No false-positive ASSR results were observed among 42 children, but in seven cases with absent ASSR, the test underestimated residual hearing as compared to the behavioral responses.

  14. Effect of Cognitive and Central Auditory Impairments on Satisfaction of Amplification in Hearing Impaired Older Adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Younes Lotfi

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Older adults show many difficulties of speech perception in noisy situations due to peripheral and central auditory impairments, and cognitive dysfunctions. One of the most common rehabilitative procedures for older adults with hearing loss is amplification. However, there is some evidence of dissatisfaction of amplification in older adults. Methods & Materials: We assessed cognitive station, central auditory function, and satisfaction of 19 participants with hearing aids using mini-mental state examination (MMSE, dichotic digits test (DDT, and the satisfaction with amplification in daily life scale respectively. Our cases had moderate sensory hearing loss in both ears. Results: Kruskal-Wallis statistics showed significant correlation between cognitive impairments (MMSE scores and satisfaction of amplification (P0.05. Conclusion: We showed central auditory processing impairments in hearing impaired older adults with cognitive dysfunctions. It is indicated that older adults with hearing loss might have cognitive impairments inducing dissatisfaction of amplification.

  15. Effectiveness of videos improving cancer prevention knowledge in people with profound hearing loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zazove, Philip; Meador, Helen E; Reed, Barbara D; Sen, Ananda; Gorenflo, Daniel W

    2012-06-01

    Deaf persons have a poorer understanding of cancer prevention, which is felt to be partly due to communication barriers. One hundred ninety-seven d/Deaf persons completed a survey and video on cancer prevention. Half viewed a spoken English program designed for hearing persons (control group); the other half viewed an amended program that had American Sign Language, captions, and printed English options added (experimental group). Knowledge was measured before and after the video, including 1 and 6 months later. Respondents were primarily Caucasian, had low incomes, lost hearing at young ages, and had d/Deaf spouses. Although overall knowledge improved after viewing the video, the presence of culture-specific communications (American Sign Language, captions) did not improve scores compared to the control group, either immediately after the intervention or over time. Moreover, percentage correct on all pretest, and almost all post-test, questions was <50% for both experimental and control groups. For all subjects, regardless of which group they were in, a hearing spouse (p  < 0.001) and more healthcare information sources (p = 0.001) improved knowledge, while African-Americans showed a trend to lesser improvement (p = 0.06). Using culture-specific language did not improve cancer prevention knowledge in this d/Deaf population, and overall knowledge remained low. More study is needed to determine the best way to increase cancer prevention knowledge in this population.

  16. Prevalence and causes of hearing impairment in Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulwafu, W; Kuper, H; Ensink, R J H

    2016-02-01

    To systematically assess the data on the prevalence and causes of hearing impairment in Africa. Systematic review on the prevalence and causes of hearing loss in Africa. We undertook a literature search of seven electronic databases (EMBASE, PubMed, Medline, Global Health, Web of Knowledge, Academic Search Complete and Africa Wide Information) and manually searched bibliographies of included articles. The search was restricted to population-based studies on hearing impairment in Africa. Data were extracted using a standard protocol. We identified 232 articles and included 28 articles in the final analysis. The most common cut-offs used for hearing impairment were 25 and 30 dB HL, but this ranged between 15 and 40 dB HL. For a cut-off of 25 dB, the median was 7.7% for the children- or school-based studies and 17% for population-based studies. For a cut-off of 30 dB HL, the median was 6.6% for the children or school-based studies and 31% for population-based studies. In schools for the deaf, the most common cause of hearing impairment was cryptogenic deafness (50%) followed by infectious causes (43%). In mainstream schools and general population, the most common cause of hearing impairment was middle ear disease (36%), followed by undetermined causes (35%) and cerumen impaction (24%). There are very few population-based studies available to estimate the prevalence of hearing impairment in Africa. Those studies that are available use different cut-offs, making comparison difficult. However, the evidence suggests that the prevalence of hearing impairment is high and that much of it is avoidable or treatable. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Exploration of a physiologically-inspired hearing-aid algorithm using a computer model mimicking impaired hearing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jürgens, Tim; Clark, Nicholas R; Lecluyse, Wendy; Meddis, Ray

    2016-01-01

    To use a computer model of impaired hearing to explore the effects of a physiologically-inspired hearing-aid algorithm on a range of psychoacoustic measures. A computer model of a hypothetical impaired listener's hearing was constructed by adjusting parameters of a computer model of normal hearing. Absolute thresholds, estimates of compression, and frequency selectivity (summarized to a hearing profile) were assessed using this model with and without pre-processing the stimuli by a hearing-aid algorithm. The influence of different settings of the algorithm on the impaired profile was investigated. To validate the model predictions, the effect of the algorithm on hearing profiles of human impaired listeners was measured. A computer model simulating impaired hearing (total absence of basilar membrane compression) was used, and three hearing-impaired listeners participated. The hearing profiles of the model and the listeners showed substantial changes when the test stimuli were pre-processed by the hearing-aid algorithm. These changes consisted of lower absolute thresholds, steeper temporal masking curves, and sharper psychophysical tuning curves. The hearing-aid algorithm affected the impaired hearing profile of the model to approximate a normal hearing profile. Qualitatively similar results were found with the impaired listeners' hearing profiles.

  18. Laryngeal Aerodynamics in Children with Hearing Impairment versus Age and Height Matched Normal Hearing Peers

    OpenAIRE

    Barshapriya Das; Suman Kumar; Indranil Chatterjee

    2013-01-01

    Lack of proper auditory feedback in hearing-impaired subjects results in functional voice disorder. It is directly related to discoordination of intrinsic and extrinsic laryngeal muscles and disturbed contraction and relaxation of antagonistic muscles. A total of twenty children in the age range of 5–10 years were considered for the study. They were divided into two groups: normal hearing children and hearing aid user children. Results showed a significant difference in the vital capacity, ma...

  19. An update on hearing impairment in patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Emamifar, Amir; Jensen Hansen, Inger Marie

    2018-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a systemic, autoimmune disease that present with intra-articular and extra-articular manifestations. Auditory system may be involved during the course of RA disease due to numbers of pathologies. The link between hearing impairment and RA has been discussed in the pre......Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a systemic, autoimmune disease that present with intra-articular and extra-articular manifestations. Auditory system may be involved during the course of RA disease due to numbers of pathologies. The link between hearing impairment and RA has been discussed...... in the previous literature. In this study we provide an update on the clinical aspect of hearing impairment in RA. We suggest to test hearing in all newly diagnosed RA patients at diagnosis as well as regularly during the course of disease....

  20. Concurrent Speech Segregation Problems in Hearing Impaired Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossein Talebi

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This study was a basic investigation of the ability of concurrent speech segregation in hearing impaired children. Concurrent segregation is one of the fundamental components of auditory scene analysis and plays an important role in speech perception. In the present study, we compared auditory late responses or ALRs between hearing impaired and normal children. Materials & Methods: Auditory late potentials in response to 12 double vowels were recorded in 10 children with moderate to severe sensory neural hearing loss and 10 normal children. Double vowels (pairs of synthetic vowels were presented concurrently and binaurally. Fundamental frequency (F0 of these vowels and the size of the difference in F0 between vowels was 100 Hz and 0.5 semitones respectively. Results: Comparing N1-P2 amplitude showed statistically significant difference in some stimuli between hearing impaired and normal children (P<0.05. This complex indexing the vowel change detection and reflecting central auditory speech representation without active client participation was decreased in hearing impaired children. Conclusion: This study showed problems in concurrent speech segregation in hearing impaired children evidenced by ALRs. This information indicated deficiencies in bottom-up processing of speech characteristics based on F0 and its differences in these children.

  1. Vowel Formant Values in Hearing and Hearing-Impaired Children: A Discriminant Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozbic, Martina; Kogovsek, Damjana

    2010-01-01

    Hearing-impaired speakers show changes in vowel production and formant pitch and variability, as well as more cases of overlapping between vowels and more restricted formant space, than hearing speakers; consequently their speech is less intelligible. The purposes of this paper were to determine the differences in vowel formant values between 32…

  2. Functional hearing in the classroom: assistive listening devices for students with hearing impairment in a mainstream school setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanin, Julien; Rance, Gary

    2016-12-01

    To assess the benefit of assistive listening devices (ALDs) for students with hearing impairment in mainstream schools. Speech recognition (CNC words) in background noise was assessed in a typical classroom. Participants underwent testing using four device configurations: (1) HA(s)/CI(s) alone, (2) soundfield amplification, (3) remote microphone (Roger Pen) on desk and (4) remote microphone at the loudspeaker. A sub-group of students subsequently underwent a 2-week classroom trial of each ALD. Degree of improvement from baseline [HA(s)/CI(s)] alone was assessed using teacher and student Listening Inventory for Education-Revised (LIFE-R) questionnaires. In all, 20 students, aged 12.5-18.9 years, underwent speech recognition assessment. In total, 10 of these participated in the classroom trial. Hearing loss ranged from mild-to-profound levels. Performance in each ALD configuration was higher than for HAs/CIs alone (p results indicated significant improvement in listening/communication when using the remote microphone in conjunction with HAs/CIs (p  0.05). Speech recognition improvements were demonstrated with the implementation of both remote microphones and soundfield systems. Both students and teachers reported functional hearing advantages in the classroom when using the remote microphone in concert with their standard hearing devices.

  3. Comparison of the Speech Syntactic Features between Hearing-Impaired and Normal Hearing Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Reza PahlavanNezhad

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The present study seeks to describe and analyze the syntactic features of children with severely hearing loss who had access to the hearing aids compared with children with normal hearing, assigning them to the same separate gender classes.   Materials and Methods: In the present study, eight children with severe hearing impairment who used a hearing aid and eight hearing children matched for age and gender were selected using an available sampling method based on the principles of auditory-verbal approach. Hearing children had an average age of 5.45 ±1.9 years and subjects had a mean age of 5.43±2.17 years and their rehabilitation had begun before they were 18 months old. The assessment instrument of the study included the language development test, TOLDP-3. The syntactic skills of these children were analyzed and compared with the hearing children of the same age based on gender.   Results: There was a significant difference between the syntactic scores of the hearing-impaired children and the scores of the hearing children of the same age in the “sentence imitation” (t=−2/90, P

  4. A framework for communication between visually impaired, hearing impaired and speech impaired using arduino

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sujatha, R.; Khandelwa, Prakhar; Gupta, Anusha; Anand, Nayan

    2017-11-01

    A long time ago our society accepted the notion of treating people with disabilities not as unviable and disabled but as differently-abled, recognizing their skills beyond their disabilities. The next step has to be taken by our scientific community, that is, to normalize lives of the people with disabilities and make it so as if they are no different to us. The primary step in this direction would be to normalize communication between people. People with an impaired speech or impaired vision or impaired hearing face difficulties while having a casual conversation with others. Any form of communication feels so strenuous that the impaired end up communicating just the important information and avoid a casual conversation. To normalize conversation between the impaired we need a simple and compact device which facilitates the conversation by providing the information in the desired form.

  5. Profound Expressive Language Impairment in Low Functioning Children with Autism: An Investigation of Syntactic Awareness Using a Computerised Learning Task

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGonigle-Chalmers, Maggie; Alderson-Day, Ben; Fleming, Joanna; Monsen, Karl

    2013-01-01

    Nine low-functioning children with profound expressive language impairment and autism were studied in terms of their responsiveness to a computer-based learning program designed to assess syntactic awareness. The children learned to touch words on a screen in the correct sequence in order to see a corresponding animation, such as "monkey…

  6. Hearing impairment and renal failure associated with RMND1 mutations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ravn, Kirstine; Neland, Mette; Wibrand, Flemming

    2016-01-01

    of the RMND1 homopolymeric complex was highly impaired. The two siblings had a markedly milder phenotype and longer survival compared to previously reported patients. In addition, they had renal failure and hearing impairment. These two newly described patients contribute to delineation of the clinical...

  7. Speech perception, production and intelligibility in French-speaking children with profound hearing loss and early cochlear implantation after congenital cytomegalovirus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laccourreye, L; Ettienne, V; Prang, I; Couloigner, V; Garabedian, E-N; Loundon, N

    2015-12-01

    To analyze speech in children with profound hearing loss following congenital cytomegalovirus (cCMV) infection with cochlear implantation (CI) before the age of 3 years. In a cohort of 15 children with profound hearing loss, speech perception, production and intelligibility were assessed before and 3 years after CI; variables impacting results were explored. Post-CI, median word recognition was 74% on closed-list and 48% on open-list testing; 80% of children acquired speech production; and 60% were intelligible for all listeners or listeners attentive to lip-reading and/or aware of the child's hearing loss. Univariate analysis identified 3 variables (mean post-CI hearing threshold, bilateral vestibular areflexia, and brain abnormality on MRI) with significant negative impact on the development of speech perception, production and intelligibility. CI showed positive impact on hearing and speech in children with post-cCMV profound hearing loss. Our study demonstrated the key role of maximizing post-CI hearing gain. A few children had insufficient progress, especially in case of bilateral vestibular areflexia and/or brain abnormality on MRI. This led us to suggest that balance rehabilitation and speech therapy should be intensified in such cases. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  8. Temporal Resolution of the Normal Ear in Listeners with Unilateral Hearing Impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Srikanta K; Dey, Ratul; Davessar, Jai Lal

    2015-12-01

    Unilateral hearing loss (UHL) leads to an imbalanced input to the brain and results in cortical reorganization. In listeners with unilateral impairments, while the perceptual deficits associated with the impaired ear are well documented, less is known regarding the auditory processing in the unimpaired, clinically normal ear. It is commonly accepted that perceptual consequences are unlikely to occur in the normal ear for listeners with UHL. This study investigated whether the temporal resolution in the normal-hearing (NH) ear of listeners with long-standing UHL is similar to those in listeners with NH. Temporal resolution was assayed via measuring gap detection thresholds (GDTs) in within- and between-channel paradigms. GDTs were assessed in the normal ear of adults with long-standing, severe-to-profound UHL (N = 13) and age-matched, NH listeners (N = 22) at two presentation levels (30 and 55 dB sensation level). Analysis indicated that within-channel GDTs for listeners with UHL were not significantly different than those for the NH subject group, but the between-channel GDTs for listeners with UHL were poorer (by greater than a factor of 2) than those for the listeners with NH. The hearing thresholds in the normal or impaired ears were not associated with the elevated between-channel GDTs for listeners with UHL. Contrary to the common assumption that auditory processing capabilities are preserved for the normal ear in listeners with UHL, the current study demonstrated that a long-standing unilateral hearing impairment may adversely affect auditory perception--temporal resolution--in the clinically normal ear. From a translational perspective, these findings imply that the temporal processing deficits in the unimpaired ear of listeners with unilateral hearing impairments may contribute to their overall auditory perceptual difficulties.

  9. [Rehabilitative measures in hearing-impaired children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Wedel, H; von Wedel, U C; Zorowka, P

    1991-12-01

    On the basis of certain fundamental data on the maturation processes of the central auditory pathways in early childhood the importance of early intervention with hearing aids is discussed and emphasized. Pathological hearing, that is acoustical deprivation in early childhood will influence the maturation process. Very often speech development is delayed if diagnosis and therapy or rehabilitation are not early enough. Anamnesis, early diagnosis and clinical differential diagnosis are required before a hearing aid can be fitted. Selection criteria and adjustment parameters are discussed, showing that the hearing aid fitting procedure must be embedded in a complex matrix of requirements related to the development of speech as well as to the cognitive, emotional and social development of the child. As a rule, finding and preparing the "best" hearing aids (binaural fitting is obligatory) for a child is a long and often difficult process, which can only be performed by specialists who are pedo-audiologists. After the binaural fitting of hearing aids an intensive hearing and speech education in close cooperation between parents, pedo-audiologist and teacher must support the whole development of the child.

  10. Communication between hearing impaired and normal hearing students: a facilitative proposal of learning in higher education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krysne Kelly de França Oliveira

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: There has been an increase in the number of hearing impaired people with access to higher education. Most of them are young people from a different culture who present difficulties in communication, inter-relationship, and learning in a culture of normal hearing people, because they use a different language, the Brazilian Sign Language - LIBRAS. Objective: The present study aimed to identify the forms of communication used between hearing impaired and normal hearing students, verifying how they can interfere with the learning process of the first. Methods: A qualitative study that used the space of a private university in the city of Fortaleza, Ceará state, Brazil, from February to April 2009. We carried out semi-structured interviews with three hearing impaired students, three teachers, three interpreters, and three normal hearing students. The content of the speeches was categorized and organized by the method of thematic analysis. Results: We verified that the forms of communication used ranged from mime and gestures to writing and drawing, but the most accepted by the hearing impaired students was LIBRAS. As a method of communication, it supports the learning of hearing impaired students, and with the mediation of interpreters, it gives them conditions to settle in their zones of development, according to the precepts of Vygotsky. Conclusion: Thus, we recognize the importance of LIBRAS as predominant language, essential to the full academic achievement of hearing impaired students; however, their efforts and dedication, as well as the interest of institutions and teachers on the deaf culture, are also important for preparing future professionals.

  11. The economics of screening infants at risk of hearing impairment: an international analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Martyn J; Shenton, Ruth C; Taylor, Matthew J

    2012-02-01

    Hearing impairment in children across the world constitutes a particularly serious obstacle to their optimal development and education, including language acquisition. Around 0.5-6 in every 1000 neonates and infants have congenital or early childhood onset sensorineural deafness or severe-to-profound hearing impairment, with significant consequences. Therefore, early detection is a vitally important element in providing appropriate support for deaf and hearing-impaired babies that will help them enjoy equal opportunities in society alongside all other children. This analysis estimates the costs and effectiveness of various interventions to screen infants at risk of hearing impairment. The economic analysis used a decision tree approach to determine the cost-effectiveness of newborn hearing screening strategies. Two unique models were built to capture different strategic screening decisions. Firstly, the cost-effectiveness of universal newborn hearing screening (UNHS) was compared to selective screening of newborns with risk factors. Secondly, the cost-effectiveness of providing a one-stage screening process vs. a two-stage screening process was investigated. Two countries, the United Kingdom and India, were used as case studies to illustrate the likely cost outcomes associated with the various strategies to diagnose hearing loss in infants. In the UK, the universal strategy incurs a further cost of approximately £2.3 million but detected an extra 63 cases. An incremental cost per case detected of £36,181 was estimated. The estimated economic burden was substantially higher in India when adopting a universal strategy due to the higher baseline prevalence of hearing loss. The one-stage screening strategy accumulated an additional 13,480 and 13,432 extra cases of false-positives, in the UK and India respectively when compared to a two-stage screening strategy. This represented increased costs by approximately £1.3 million and INR 34.6 million. The cost

  12. Association between hearing and vision impairments in older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneck, Marilyn E; Lott, Lori A; Haegerstrom-Portnoy, Gunilla; Brabyn, John A

    2012-01-01

    To determine which, if any, vision variables are associated with moderate bilateral hearing loss in an elderly population. Four hundred and forty-six subjects completed a hearing screening in conjunction with measurements on a variety of vision tests including high contrast acuity, low contrast acuity measured under a variety of lighting conditions, contrast sensitivity, stereopsis, and colour vision. Logistic regression analyses were used to assess the relationship between various vision variables and hearing impairment while controlling for demographic and other co-morbid conditions. In this sample of older adults with a mean age of 79.9 years, 5.4% of individuals were moderately visually impaired (binocular high contrast VA worse than 0.54 logMAR, Snellen equivalent 6/21 or 20/70) and 12.8% were moderately bilaterally hearing impaired (hearing none of the 40 dB tones at 500, 2000 or 4000 Hz in either ear). Three measures of low contrast acuity, but not high contrast acuity or other vision measures, were significantly associated with hearing loss when controlling for age, cataract surgery history, glaucoma history and self reported stroke, all of which were significantly associated with hearing loss, although the association of glaucoma with hearing loss was negative. Poorer vision for low contrast targets was associated with an increased risk of hearing impairment in older adults. Audiologists and optometrists should enquire about the other sense in cases in which a deficit is measured as individuals with dual sensory loss are at a marked disadvantage in daily life. Ophthalmic & Physiological Optics © 2011 The College of Optometrists.

  13. Is cognitive function in adults with hearing impairment improved by the use of hearing AIDS?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, A Young; Shim, Hyun Joon; Lee, Sung Hee; Yoon, Sang Won; Joo, Eun-Jeong

    2011-06-01

    In the present study, we investigated whether speech-related cognitive function and speech recognition ability under background noise in adults with hearing impairment are improved with the use of hearing aids. Participants were recruited from the ENT Department of Eulji Hospital from September 2008 to July 2009. The study group comprised 18 participants (mean age, 69.5±8.3 years) with sensorineural hearing loss who were fitted with hearing aids, and the control group comprised 11 participants of equivalent age (mean age, 63.1±11.8 years) who were not fitted with hearing aids. All participants were assessed using the computerized Korean visual verbal learning test (VVLT) and words-in-noise (WIN) test prior to fitting of hearing aids for the study group and initially for the control group. Both groups were reassessed in both tests after 6 months. For each group, differences in the results between the two assessments were compared using the Friedman test. There was no difference in mean age between the study group and control group. In the study group, total VVLT score (reflecting short-term memory) was significantly improved from before hearing aid use to 6 months after hearing aid use (Plearning ability) was also significantly improved from before hearing aid use to 6 months after hearing aid use (P0.05). The speech-related cognitive function of individuals with hearing impairment improved after using hearing aids. This finding indicates that hearing aids may induce acclimatization of the central auditory system.

  14. Perceptions Toward Internet-Based Delivery of Hearing Aids among Older Hearing-Impaired Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandra, Navshika; Searchfield, Grant D

    2016-06-01

    Despite evidence that hearing aids can improve the social and psychological functioning of older hearing-impaired adults, hearing aid uptake is low. High cost of hearing aids and poor access to audiology services in rural areas are potential barriers to hearing aid acquisition. Methods of hearing aid delivery deviating from the traditional clinician-based model have been available to consumers for many years. One such method is Internet hearing aid sales. However, research exploring Internet-based hearing aid delivery, as a method to improve hearing aid uptake in this population, is limited. The purpose of this study was to explore the perceptions of older hearing aid users (aged ≥65 yr) toward Internet-based hearing aid delivery. A qualitative approach was adopted to investigate older adults' perceptions of buying hearing aids online. The sample consisted of 18 participants aged between 64 and 81 yr. Fourteen men and four women participated in this study. Participants were all experienced hearing aid users. Face-to-face semistructured interviews were conducted. An interview schedule guided the interview. Interviews were recorded with a voice recorder and transcribed verbatim. Thematic analysis of the data was carried out. Seven main themes emerged from the data. A general lack of awareness, but willingness to learn more about Internet hearing aid sales, was found. Two perceived benefits of Internet-based hearing aid delivery were identified: lower cost of hearing aids and greater convenience or physical accessibility. Numerous concerns and limitations were communicated. Concerns regarding the availability of clinical procedures, such as hearing tests, obtaining the correct-sized earmolds, and fine-tuning of hearing aids, were expressed. Participants conveyed distrust in online retailers. However, trust in and a preference for audiologists' expertise, which was not perceived to be available online, was found. Participants further conveyed a preference for face

  15. Objective Scaling of Sound Quality for Normal-Hearing and Hearing-Impaired Listeners

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Lars Bramsløw

    A new method for the objective estimation of sound quality for both normal-hearing and hearing-impaired listeners has been presented: OSSQAR (Objective Scaling of Sound Quality and Reproduction). OSSQAR is based on three main parts, which have been carried out and documented separately: 1......) Subjective sound quality ratings of clean and distorted speech and music signals, by normal-hearing and hearing-impaired listeners, to provide reference data, 2) An auditory model of the ear, including the effects of hearing loss, based on existing psychoacoustic knowledge, coupled to 3) An artificial neural...... network, which was trained to predict the sound quality ratings. OSSQAR predicts the perceived sound quality on two independent perceptual rating scales: Clearness and Sharpness. These two scales were shown to be the most relevant for assessment of sound quality, and they were interpreted the same way...

  16. Association Between Hearing Impairment and Albuminuria in the Korean Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Jae Won; Ku, Cheol Ryong; Noh, Jung Hyun; Kim, Dong-Jun

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Although the associations between albuminuria and renal and cardiovascular diseases, including diabetes and hypertension, have been extensively studied, few studies have investigated the association between albuminuria and hearing impairment. In this study, we assessed the relationship between albuminuria and hearing impairment in 9786 adult Korean subjects, using data from the Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (KNHANES) performed in 2011–2012. The range of urinary albumin-to-creatinine ratio (UACR) was divided into 4 grades: grade 1 (first tertile of low-grade albuminuria [LGA]), 0.00 to 1.99 mg/g Cr; grade 2 (second tertile of LGA), 2.00 to 5.49 mg/g Cr; grade 3 (third tertile of LGA), 5.50 to 29.99 mg/g Cr; grade 4 (albuminuria), ≥30.00 mg/g Cr. The age- and sex-adjusted weighted UACR was higher in subjects with hearing impairment compared with those without hearing impairment (26.2 ± 4.7 mg/g Cr vs 14.1 ± 1.5 mg/g Cr, P = 0.020). The age- and sex-adjusted weighted prevalence of albuminuria was also higher in subjects with hearing impairment compared with subjects without hearing impairment. (8.3 ± 0.9% vs 5.8 ± 0.4%, P = 0.013) The age- and sex-adjusted weighted percentage of hearing impairment increased as UACR increased (18.0% ± 0.6%, 20.0% ± 0.8%, 22.2% ± 0.9%, 25.3% ± 2.0%, respectively; P albuminuria, with age, sex, tobacco use, heavy alcohol use, educational background, occupational noise exposure, obesity, hypertension, diabetes, total serum cholesterol, and estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) albuminuria is associated with hearing impairment in the Korean general population, using nationally representative data. Screening for albuminuria would allow for interventions for the prevention of hearing impairment. PMID:26512589

  17. Perceived contrastive stress production in hearing-impaired and normal-hearing children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, A L; Carney, A E; Leonard, L B

    1985-03-01

    Contrastive stress production patterns of 20 moderate-to-severely hearing-impaired children, aged 4:5-18:2 (years:months), were compared with those of 20 normal-hearing children, aged 3:7-6:7. The groups were matched on the basis of a linguistic measure, mean length of utterance. Analyses of judges' responses to the speakers' audiotapes recorded during a conversation-based task yielded evidence of similar production patterns for the groups although considerable individual performance variation was noted. This finding supports the view that language-matched normal and hearing-impaired children may not be very different in their production of this prosodic cue. Results of this study further support the idea that prosodic features of the speech signal enhance intelligibility, a factor which merits consideration in the intelligibility assessment and training of hearing-impaired children.

  18. Recognition of sine wave modeled consonants by normal hearing and hearing-impaired individuals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balachandran, Rupa

    Sine wave modeling is a parametric tool for representing the speech signal with a limited number of sine waves. It involves replacing the peaks of the speech spectrum with sine waves and discarding the rest of the lower amplitude components during synthesis. It has the potential to be used as a speech enhancement technique for hearing-impaired adults. The present study answers the following basic questions: (1) Are sine wave synthesized speech tokens more intelligible than natural speech tokens? (2) What is the effect of varying the number of sine waves on consonant recognition in quiet? (3) What is the effect of varying the number of sine waves on consonant recognition in noise? (4) How does sine wave modeling affect the transmission of speech feature in quiet and in noise? (5) Are there differences in recognition performance between normal hearing and hearing-impaired listeners? VCV syllables representing 20 consonants (/p/, /t/, /k/, /b/, /d/, /g/, /f/, /theta/, /s/, /∫/, /v/, /z/, /t∫/, /dy/, /j/, /w/, /r/, /l/, /m/, /n/) in three vowel contexts (/a/, /i/, /u/) were modeled with 4, 8, 12, and 16 sine waves. A consonant recognition task was performed in quiet, and in background noise (+10 dB and 0 dB SNR). Twenty hearing-impaired listeners and six normal hearing listeners were tested under headphones at their most comfortable listening level. The main findings were: (1) Recognition of unprocessed speech was better that of sine wave modeled speech. (2) Asymptotic performance was reached with 8 sine waves in quiet for both normal hearing and hearing-impaired listeners. (3) Consonant recognition performance in noise improved with increasing number of sine waves. (4) As the number of sine waves was decreased, place information was lost first, followed by manner, and finally voicing. (5) Hearing-impaired listeners made more errors then normal hearing listeners, but there were no differences in the error patterns made by both groups.

  19. The BAHA hearing system for hearing-impaired postirradiated nasopharyngeal cancer patients: a new indication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soo, Gordon; Tong, Michael C F; Tsang, Willis S S; Wong, Terence K C; To, Ka-fai; Leung, Sing-fai; van Hasselt, C Andrew

    2009-06-01

    Radiation for patients who have nasopharyngeal cancer (NPC) often renders them hearing challenged and facing difficulties from treatment sequelae such as chronic suppurative otitis media and osteoradionecrosis. Conventional hearing aids aggravate otorrhea, and ear moulds traumatize osteoradionecrosis ulcers in the ear canal. The bone-anchored hearing aid (BAHA) hearing system might represent an excellent hearing solution. To investigate the BAHA benefit and osseointegration results for hearing-impaired postirradiated NPC patients. A prospective longitudinal study. Tertiary university center. Eleven hearing-impaired postirradiated NPC patients were studied from October 2002 to October 2006. Two-stage BAHA surgeries were performed. Assessments include pure-tone and speech audiometry, implant integrity, periabutment audit, and patient satisfaction analysis during a 24-month period. Radiation dosimetric analysis and bone sampling at the fixture implant sites were studied. No implant fixtures were lost (follow-up, 13-58 mo). Average patient satisfaction scores were 84.4%, with 80% using their BAHA everyday and 90% using their devices for more than 8 hours. Dosimetric analysis of the implant site revealed that all fixtures were outside the irradiated field. There was a reduction in otorrhea rates after BAHA use over the course of the study. Successful osseointegration was demonstrated in postirradiated NPC patients. Improved subjective hearing clarity, reduced ear discharge rates, and extended BAHA usage times accounted for high patient satisfaction with the BAHA hearing system. This is the first study to demonstrate long-term osseointegration and hearing benefit in postirradiated NPC patients. We recommend the BAHA hearing system for the treatment of chronic suppurative otitis media-related hearing problems in NPC patients.

  20. A new nonsyndromic X-linked sensorineural hearing impairment linked to Xp21.2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lalwani, A.K.; Brister, J.R.; Fex, J.; Grundfast, K.M.; Pikus, A.T.; Ploplis, B.; San Agustin, T.; Skarka, H.; Wilcox, E.R. [National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States)

    1994-10-01

    X-linked deafness is a rare cause of hereditary hearing impairment. We have identified a family with X-linked dominant sensorineural hearing impairment, characterized by incomplete penetrance and variable expressivity in carrier females, that is linked to the Xp21.2, which contains the Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) locus. The auditory impairment in affected males was congenital, bilateral, profound, sensorineural, affecting all frequencies, and without evidence of radiographic abnormality of the temporal bone. Adult carrier females manifested bilateral, mild-to-moderate high-frequency sensorineural hearing impairment of delayed onset during adulthood. Eighteen commercially available polymorphic markers from the X chromosome, generating a 10-15-cM map, were initially used for identification of a candidate region. DXS997, located within the DMD gene, generated a two-point LOD score of 2.91 at {theta} = 0, with every carrier mother heterozygous at this locus. Recombination events at DXS992 (located within the DMD locus, 3{prime} to exon 50 of the dystrophin gene) and at DXS1068 (5{prime} to the brain promoter of the dystrophin gene) were observed. No recombination events were noted with the following markers within the DMD locus: 5{prime}DYS II, intron 44, DXS997, and intron 50. There was no clinical evidence of Duchenne or Becker muscular dystrophy in any family member. It is likely that this family represents a new locus on the X chromosome, which when mutated results in nonsyndromic sensorineural hearing loss and is distinct from the heterogeneous group of X-linked hearing losses that have been previously described. 57 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  1. A new nonsyndromic X-linked sensorineural hearing impairment linked to Xp21.2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lalwani, A. K.; Brister, J. R.; Fex, J.; Grundfast, K. M.; Pikus, A. T.; Ploplis, B.; San Agustin, T.; Skarka, H.; Wilcox, E. R.

    1994-01-01

    X-linked deafness is a rare cause of hereditary hearing impairment. We have identified a family with X-linked dominant sensorineural hearing impairment, characterized by incomplete penetrance and variable expressivity in carrier females, that is linked to the Xp21.2, which contains the Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) locus. The auditory impairment in affected males was congenital, bilateral, profound, sensorineural, affecting all frequencies, and without evidence of radiographic abnormality of the temporal bone. Adult carrier females manifested bilateral, mild-to-moderate high-frequency sensorineural hearing impairment of delayed onset during adulthood. Eighteen commercially available, polymorphic markers from the X chromosome, generating a 10-15-cM map, were initially used for identification of a candidate region. DXS997, located within the DMD gene, generated a two-point LOD score of 2.91 at theta = 0, with every carrier mother heterozygous at this locus. Recombination events at DXS992 (located within the DMD locus, 3' to exon 50 of the dystrophin gene) and at DXS1068 (5' to the brain promoter of the dystrophin gene) were observed. No recombination events were noted with the following markers within the DMD locus: 5'DYS II, intron 44, DXS997, and intron 50. There was no clinical evidence of Duchenne or Becker muscular dystrophy in any family member. It is likely that this family represents a new locus on the X chromosome, which when mutated results in nonsyndromic sensorineural hearing loss and is distinct from the heterogeneous group of X-linked hearing losses that have been previously described. PMID:7942846

  2. Use of nouns and verbs in the oral narrative of individuals with hearing impairment and normal hearing between 5 and 11 years of age

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erica Endo Amemiya

    Full Text Available CONTEXT AND OBJECTIVE: Nouns and verbs indicate actions in oral communication. However, hearing impairment can compromise the acquisition of oral language to such an extent that appropriate use of these can be challenging. The objective of this study was to compare the use of nouns and verbs in the oral narrative of hearing-impaired and hearing children. DESIGN AND SETTING: Analytical cross-sectional study at the Department of Speech-Language and Hearing Sciences, Universidade Federal de São Paulo. METHODS: Twenty-one children with moderate to profound bilateral neurosensory hearing impairment and twenty-one with normal hearing (controls were matched according to sex, school year and school type. A board showing pictures was presented to each child, to elicit a narrative and measure their performance in producing nouns and verbs. RESULTS: Twenty-two (52.4% of the subjects were males. The mean age was 8 years (standard deviation, SD = 1.5. Comparing averages between the groups of boys and girls, we did not find any significant difference in their use of nouns, but among verbs, there was a significant difference regarding use of the imperative (P = 0.041: more frequent among boys (mean = 2.91. There was no significant difference in the use of nouns and verbs between deaf children and hearers, in relation to school type. Regarding use of the indicative, there was a nearly significant trend (P = 0.058. CONCLUSION: Among oralized hearing-impaired children who underwent speech therapy, their performance regarding verbs and noun use was similar to that of their hearing counterparts.

  3. Auditory-verbal therapy for children with hearing impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, S Y C; Simser, J

    2005-05-01

    The new millennium has brought about great innovation and advancement in hearing technology, early detection and intervention. This in turn has altered expectations of what children with hearing impairment are really capable of in terms of listening, developing spoken language, and academic and social performance. In Singapore, with Universal Newborn Hearing Screening in place, babies with hearing impairment can be detected early and early intervention implemented by 6 months of age. To benefit from the "critical periods" of acoustic neurological and linguistic development, early identification of hearing impairment, medical intervention, use of appropriate amplification technology and effective habilitation are vital. Auditory-Verbal practice emphasises listening to access auditory information, so that these children have the opportunity to develop intelligible speech and spoken language. Auditory-Verbal practice supports ongoing individualised diagnostic therapy with parent participation, guidance, education and support by an Auditory-Verbal specialist. The goal of Auditory-Verbal therapy is to enable children with hearing loss to grow up in regular learning and living environments so that they can become independent, participating and contributing citizens in mainstream society.

  4. Genetic frequencies related to severe or profound sensorineural hearing loss in Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongzhi Liu

    Full Text Available Abstract The aim was to study the frequencies of common deafness-related mutations and their contribution to hearing loss in different regions of Inner Mongolia. A total of 738 deaf children were recruited from five different ethnic groups of Inner Mongolia, including Han Chinese (n=486, Mongolian (n=216, Manchurian (n=24, Hui (n=6 and Daur (n=6. Nine common mutations in four genes (GJB2, SLC26A4, GJB3 and mitochondrial MT-RNR1 gene were detected by allele-specific PCR and universal array. At least one mutated allele was detected in 282 patients. Pathogenic mutations were detected in 168 patients: 114 were homozygotes and 54 were compound heterozygotes. The 114 patients were carriers of only one mutated allele. The frequency of GJB2 variants in Han Chinese (21.0% was higher than that in Mongolians (16.7%, but not significantly different. On the other hand, the frequency of SLC26A4 variants in Han Chinese (14.8% was lower than that in Mongolians (19.4%, but also not significantly different. The frequency of patients with pathogenic mutations was different in Ulanqab (21.4%, Xilingol (40.0%, Chifeng (40.0%, Hulunbeier (30.0%, Hohhot (26.3%, and in Baotou (0%. In conclusion, the frequency of mutated alleles in deafness-related genes did not differ between Han Chinese and Mongolians. However, differences in the distribution of common deafness-related mutations were found among the investigated areas of Inner Mongolia.

  5. Perceptions of adults with hearing impairment regarding the promotion of trust in hearing healthcare service delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preminger, Jill E; Oxenbøll, Maria; Barnett, Margaret B; Jensen, Lisbeth D; Laplante-Lévesque, Ariane

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes how trust is promoted in adults with hearing impairment within the context of hearing healthcare (HHC) service delivery. Data were analysed from a previously published descriptive qualitative study that explored perspectives of adults with hearing impairment on hearing help-seeking and rehabilitation. Interview transcripts from 29 adults from four countries with different levels of hearing impairment and different experience with the HHC system were analysed thematically. Patients enter into the HHC system with service expectations resulting in a preconceived level of trust that can vary from low to high. Relational competence, technical competence, commercialized approach, and clinical environment (relevant to both the clinician and the clinic) influence a patient's resulting level of trust. Trust is evolving rather than static in HHC: Both clinicians and clinics can promote trust. The characteristics of HHC that engender trust are: practicing good communication, supporting shared decision making, displaying technical competence, offering comprehensive hearing rehabilitation, promoting self-management, avoiding a focus on hearing-aid sales, and offering a professional clinic setting.

  6. Psychopathology among a sample of hearing impaired adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosaku, Kolawole; Akinpelu, Victoria; Ogunniyi, Grace

    2015-12-01

    Hearing impairment is a recognized cause of emotional and psychological disturbances worldwide, however little is known about this condition in Nigeria. The aim of this study is to compare the prevalence of psychopathology between hearing impaired adolescents and healthy adolescents. Students attending two special schools for the hearing impaired were assessed for psychopathology with the help of a trained signer and their teacher, using the International Classification of Diseases Diagnostic Criteria (ICD 10). Fifty two hearing impaired students and 52 age and sex matched controls from the same school were also interviewed using the same instrument. The mean age of the hearing impaired students was 16 (sd=3.8), while for the controls the mean age was 16 (sd=2.5). Psychopathology was present in 10 (19%) of the hearing impaired adolescents compared to 2 (4%) among the control group, this difference was statistically significant (χ(2)=4.62 p=0.03). The most common diagnosis was generalized anxiety disorder 4 (8%), followed by depression 2 (4%). Years spent in school (t=4.81, p=0.001), primary guardian (χ(2)=18.3, p=0.001) and mean income of guardian (t=7.10, p=0.001) were all significantly different between the two groups. Psychopathology is relatively common in this population. Proper assessment and treatment should be made available for this population group. A limitation to this study is communication difficulty which made only a third party assessment possible; this may affect the generalizability of the findings. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. [Neurologic semiology in a population of hearing impaired children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonçalves, V M; Piovesana, A M; de Moura-Ribeiro, M V

    1993-09-01

    A random sample of 42 sensorineural hearing impaired children (severe and bilateral) was studied, from special classes in Campinas, with chronological ages varying between 4 and 7 years old. The children of this sample were compared with two control groups of 42 children of the same chronological age, from regular classes of private and public schools. All of them were submitted to the traditional neurological examination. Hearing impaired children showed differences as to head circumference and muscle tonus. In the other examined items we found motor hyperactivity, cerebellar and ocular syndromes although there were no significant differences between the groups.

  8. The global burden of disabling hearing impairment: a call to action

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumann, Katrin J; Saunders, James E

    2014-01-01

    Abstract At any age, disabling hearing impairment has a profound impact on interpersonal communication, psychosocial well-being, quality of life and economic independence. According to the World Health Organization’s estimates, the number of people with such impairment increased from 42 million in 1985 to about 360 million in 2011. This last figure includes 7.5 million children less than 5 years of age. In 1995, a “roadmap” for curtailing the burden posed by disabling hearing impairment was outlined in a resolution of the World Health Assembly. While the underlying principle of this roadmap remains valid and relevant, some updating is required to reflect the prevailing epidemiologic transition. We examine the traditional concept and grades of disabling hearing impairment – within the context of the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health – as well as the modifications to grading that have recently been proposed by a panel of international experts. The opportunity offered by the emerging global and high-level interest in promoting disability-inclusive post-2015 development goals and disability-free child survival is also discussed. Since the costs of rehabilitative services are so high as to be prohibitive in low- and middle-income countries, the critical role of primary prevention is emphasized. If the goals outlined in the World Health Assembly’s 1995 resolution on the prevention of hearing impairment are to be reached by Member States, several effective country-level initiatives – including the development of public–private partnerships, strong leadership and measurable time-bound targets – will have to be implemented without further delay. PMID:24839326

  9. The global burden of disabling hearing impairment: a call to action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olusanya, Bolajoko O; Neumann, Katrin J; Saunders, James E

    2014-05-01

    At any age, disabling hearing impairment has a profound impact on interpersonal communication, psychosocial well-being, quality of life and economic independence. According to the World Health Organization's estimates, the number of people with such impairment increased from 42 million in 1985 to about 360 million in 2011. This last figure includes 7.5 million children less than 5 years of age. In 1995, a "roadmap" for curtailing the burden posed by disabling hearing impairment was outlined in a resolution of the World Health Assembly. While the underlying principle of this roadmap remains valid and relevant, some updating is required to reflect the prevailing epidemiologic transition. We examine the traditional concept and grades of disabling hearing impairment - within the context of the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health - as well as the modifications to grading that have recently been proposed by a panel of international experts. The opportunity offered by the emerging global and high-level interest in promoting disability-inclusive post-2015 development goals and disability-free child survival is also discussed. Since the costs of rehabilitative services are so high as to be prohibitive in low- and middle-income countries, the critical role of primary prevention is emphasized. If the goals outlined in the World Health Assembly's 1995 resolution on the prevention of hearing impairment are to be reached by Member States, several effective country-level initiatives - including the development of public-private partnerships, strong leadership and measurable time-bound targets - will have to be implemented without further delay.

  10. Novel Mutations and Mutation Combinations ofTMPRSS3Cause Various Phenotypes in One Chinese Family with Autosomal Recessive Hearing Impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Xue; Yuan, Yong-Yi; Wang, Guo-Jian; Xu, Jin-Cao; Su, Yu; Lin, Xi; Dai, Pu

    2017-01-01

    Autosomal recessive hearing impairment with postlingual onset is rare. Exceptions are caused by mutations in the TMPRSS3 gene, which can lead to prelingual (DFNB10) as well as postlingual deafness (DFNB8). TMPRSS3 mutations can be classified as mild or severe, and the phenotype is dependent on the combination of TMPRSS3 mutations. The combination of two severe mutations leads to profound hearing impairment with a prelingual onset, whereas severe mutations in combination with milder TMPRSS3 mutations lead to a milder phenotype with postlingual onset. We characterized a Chinese family (number FH1523) with not only prelingual but also postlingual hearing impairment. Three mutations in TMPRSS3 , one novel mutation c.36delC [p.(Phe13Serfs⁎12)], and two previously reported pathogenic mutations, c.916G>A (p.Ala306Thr) and c.316C>T (p.Arg106Cys), were identified. Compound heterozygous mutations of p.(Phe13Serfs⁎12) and p.Ala306Thr manifest as prelingual, profound hearing impairment in the patient (IV: 1), whereas the combination of p.Arg106Cys and p.Ala306Thr manifests as postlingual, milder hearing impairment in the patient (II: 2, II: 3, II: 5), suggesting that p.Arg106Cys mutation has a milder effect than p.(Phe13Serfs⁎12). We concluded that different combinations of TMPRSS3 mutations led to different hearing impairment phenotypes (DFNB8/DFNB10) in this family.

  11. Hearing aid fitting in older persons with hearing impairment: the influence of cognitive function, age, and hearing loss on hearing aid benefit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meister H

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Hartmut Meister,1 Sebastian Rählmann,1 Martin Walger,2 Sabine Margolf-Hackl,3 Jürgen Kießling3 1Jean Uhrmacher Institute for Clinical ENT-Research, University of Cologne, Cologne, Germany; 2Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, University of Cologne, Cologne, Germany; 3Department of Othorhinolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, University of Giessen, Giessen, Germany Purpose: To examine the association of cognitive function, age, and hearing loss with clinically assessed hearing aid benefit in older hearing-impaired persons.Methods: Hearing aid benefit was assessed using objective measures regarding speech recognition in quiet and noisy environments as well as a subjective measure reflecting everyday situations captured using a standardized questionnaire. A broad range of general cognitive functions such as attention, memory, and intelligence were determined using different neuropsychological tests. Linear regression analyses were conducted with the outcome of the neuropsychological tests as well as age and hearing loss as independent variables and the benefit measures as dependent variables. Thirty experienced older hearing aid users with typical age-related hearing impairment participated.Results: Most of the benefit measures revealed that the participants obtained significant improvement with their hearing aids. Regression models showed a significant relationship between a fluid intelligence measure and objective hearing aid benefit. When individual hearing thresholds were considered as an additional independent variable, hearing loss was the only significant contributor to the benefit models. Lower cognitive capacity – as determined by the fluid intelligence measure – was significantly associated with greater hearing loss. Subjective benefit could not be predicted by any of the variables considered.Conclusion: The present study does not give evidence that hearing aid benefit is critically associated with cognitive

  12. A preliminary study of some pragmatic skills of hearing and hearing-impaired children by story retelling test

    OpenAIRE

    Farnoush Jarollahi; Yahya Modarresi; Zahra Agharasouli; Salimeh Jafari

    2013-01-01

    Background and Aim: Pragmatics refers to speech interactions and the social aspect of communication in language contexts. Due to the crucial role of hearing in language skill development, hearing-impaired children have problems with all aspects of language, including pragmatics. These skills are crucial in children's daily life. There is a lack of Persian studies on hearing-impaired children. Therefore, the purpose of the present study is to describe some pragmatic skills of hearing and heari...

  13. COMMUNICATION, WORK PERFORMANCE AND HEARING IMPAIRMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Héctor Florencio Martínez Pérez

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this research is to describe the work performance of employees with hearing disabilities in education and their communication style. Theoretically, Karns, Dow and Neville (2012, postulated that the deaf processed Visual and tactile stimuli in their tasks. In job performance there are the contributions of Treviño et al (2010, Chiavenato (2009, 2011 and Robbins and Judge (2009. Venezuelan laws are included as basis and strengthening of inclution-participation of the deaf. The methodology is phenomenological-hermeneutical (Van Manen, 2003, using techniques and tools as participant observation, interview and questionnaire, respectively. As a result it was obtained that deaf people role is skillfully in their jobs, provided they do not involve hearing and his style of communication is respected; they are more responsible, punctual, and collaborators. It is recommended to avoid understatement, pity and increase knowledge about the skills of the deaf; all capabilities are so valued.

  14. COMMUNICATION, WORK PERFORMANCE AND HEARING IMPAIRMENT

    OpenAIRE

    Héctor Florencio Martínez Pérez

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this research is to describe the work performance of employees with hearing disabilities in education and their communication style. Theoretically, Karns, Dow and Neville (2012), postulated that the deaf processed Visual and tactile stimuli in their tasks. In job performance there are the contributions of Treviño et al (2010), Chiavenato (2009, 2011) and Robbins and Judge (2009). Venezuelan laws are included as basis and strengthening of inclution-participation of the deaf. T...

  15. Laryngeal Aerodynamics in Children with Hearing Impairment versus Age and Height Matched Normal Hearing Peers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Barshapriya; Chatterjee, Indranil; Kumar, Suman

    2013-01-01

    Lack of proper auditory feedback in hearing-impaired subjects results in functional voice disorder. It is directly related to discoordination of intrinsic and extrinsic laryngeal muscles and disturbed contraction and relaxation of antagonistic muscles. A total of twenty children in the age range of 5-10 years were considered for the study. They were divided into two groups: normal hearing children and hearing aid user children. Results showed a significant difference in the vital capacity, maximum sustained phonation, and fast adduction abduction rate having equal variance for normal and hearing aid user children, respectively, but no significant difference was found in the peak flow value with being statistically significant. A reduced vital capacity in hearing aid user children suggests a limited use of the lung volume for speech production. It may be inferred from the study that the hearing aid user children have poor vocal proficiency which is reflected in their voice. The use of voicing component in hearing impaired subjects is seen due to improper auditory feedback. It was found that there was a significant difference in the vital capacity, maximum sustained phonation (MSP), and fast adduction abduction rate and no significant difference in the peak flow.

  16. Modeling auditory perception of individual hearing-impaired listeners

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jepsen, Morten Løve; Dau, Torsten

    Models of auditory signal processing and perception allow us to generate hypotheses that can be quantitatively tested, which in turn helps us to explain and understand the functioning of the auditory system. Here, the perceptual consequences of hearing impairment in individual listeners were...... investigated within the framework of the computational auditory signal processing and perception (CASP) model of Jepsen et al. [ J. Acoust. Soc. Am., in press]. Several parameters of the model were modified according to data from psychoacoustic measurements. Parameters associated with the cochlear stage were...... forward masking. The model may be useful for the evaluation of hearing-aid algorithms, where a reliable simulation of hearing impairment may reduce the need for time-consuming listening tests during development....

  17. Experiences of Girls with Hearing Impairment in Accessing ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Of these 6.2% and 4.6% went for treatment of STIs and pregnancy termination respectively; 36.7% were embarrassed to ask questions in the presence of an interpreter, communication (40.5%) and cost (10.8%) were key barriers to access and 85.6% would use facility if hearing impairment-friendly services are provided.

  18. Vocabulary Developing Strategies Applied to Individuals with Hearing Impairments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karasu, Guzin; Girgin, Umit; Uzuner, Yildiz; Kaya, Zehranur

    2016-01-01

    The general purpose of this research was to investigate the strategies utilized for vocabulary development of ten individuals (first year college students) in Graphic Art Department, School for The Handicapped, Anadolu University with hearing impairment. The reflective and cyclical data were consisted of videotape recordings of the actual lessons,…

  19. Self-reported occupational visual and hearing impairment among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To determine the prevalence of occupational visual and hearing impairment among dental professionals in Edo State, Nigeria. Materials and Methods: A questionnaire based cross-sectional survey of dental surgeons, dental surgery assistants (DSA), dental therapists and dental technologists was conducted in ...

  20. Personal Experiences of Hearing-impaired People in Higher ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This qualitative paper analyses the personal experiences of hearing-impaired people in accessing, participating and completing higher education in Zimbabwe, and the authors' experiences in the education of students with disabilities. A 6As' framework is informed by the 4As framework of Tomaševski (2001), namely ...

  1. External ear anomalies and hearing impairment in Noonan Syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Trier, D.C. van; Nierop, J. van; Draaisma, J.M.T.; Burgt, I. van der; Kunst, H.P.; Croonen, E.A.; Admiraal, R.J.C.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: This is the first cohort in which hearing impairment and external ear anomalies in Noonan Syndrome are described extensively. METHODS: Retrospective analysis of the otorhinolaryngological and clinical genetic data from 97 Noonan Syndrome (NS) patients. Forty-four NS patients were seen by

  2. New Developments in Captioned Television for Hearing-Impaired Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shulman, Jill; Decker, Nan

    Television is of limited value to hearing-impaired children, who cannot benefit from the soundtrack. Traditional caption writing techniques, which involve editing of the audio track, have been based primarily on the captioner's empirical knowledge and intuition and aim the captions at a presumed average language and reading ability of the target…

  3. HIV/AIDS among Adolescents with Hearing Impairment in Nigeria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Toshiba

    inclusion into programmes involving health and life-threatening issues. With these, it is ... people with disabilities especially those with hearing impairment are .... disabilities. Groce (2004) observes that lack of education is a key concern for most disabled young people in the developing world,. Nigeria inclusive. The view of ...

  4. Phenotypic characterization of DFNA24: prelingual progressive sensorineural hearing impairment.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Santos, R.L.; Hafner, F.M.; Huygen, P.L.M.; Linder, T.E.; Schinzel, A.; Spillmann, T.; Leal, S.M.

    2006-01-01

    This article describes the hearing impairment (HI) phenotype which segregates in a large multi-generation Swiss-German family with autosomal dominant nonsyndromic HI. The locus segregating within this pedigree is located on chromosome 4q35-qter and is designated as DFNA24. For this pedigree,

  5. Childhood Hearing Impairment: How Do Parents Feel About It?

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    TNHJOURNALPH

    Britannica. Encyclopredia Britannica. Ultimate Reference Suite. Chicago: Encyclopredia Britannica, 2011. 12. "Mortality and Burden of Disease. Estimates for WHO Member States in. 2002". 13. Pimperton H, Kennedy CR. The impact of early identification of permanent childhood hearing impairment on speech and language ...

  6. Narrative Skills Following Early Confirmation of Permanent Childhood Hearing Impairment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worsfold, Sarah; Mahon, Merle; Yuen, Ho Ming; Kennedy, Colin

    2010-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this study was to compare spoken language production in children with permanent childhood hearing impairment (PCHI) whose PCHI was confirmed either early or late. Method: Audio-taped spoken narrative was assessed for syntax, phonology, morphology, and narrative in transcripts from a population-based sample of 89 children (49 males,…

  7. E-Learning Environment for Hearing Impaired Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashim, Hisyamuddin; Tasir, Zaidatun; Mohamad, Siti Khadijah

    2013-01-01

    The usage of technology within the educational department has become more vital by each year passing. One of the most popular technological approaches used is the e-learning environment. The usage of e-learning environment in education involves a wide range of types of students, and this includes the hearing impaired ones. Some adjustment or…

  8. The Dilemma of Identifying Learning Disabled Hearing-Impaired Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powers, Ann

    1988-01-01

    A teacher, speech-language pathologist, school principal, and audiologist rated 27 hearing-impaired elementary students on effective use of language, speech, and sign language and on presence of a learning disability and/or behavior problem. Ratings were compared with each other and with test scores purporting to identify learning disabilities or…

  9. Solar-powered hearing aids for children with impaired hearing in Vietnam: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vo, Quang Thanh; Pham, Dung; Choi, Kevin J; Nguyen, Uyen T T; Le, Lan; Shanewise, Trudy; Tran, Lien; Nguyen, Nga; Lee, Walter T

    2017-01-25

    Hearing loss is a barrier to speech and social and cognitive development. This can be especially pronounced in children living in low- and middle-income countries with limited resources. To determine the feasibility, durability and social impact of ComCare GLW solar-powered hearing aids provided for Vietnamese children with hearing impairment. A retrospective review of data from an international, multi-discipline humanitarian visit was performed. Hearing aids were given to 28 children enrolled at the Khoai Chau Functional Rehabilitation School, Hung Yen Province, Vietnam. Device inspection and observational assessments were performed by teachers using a modified Parents' Evaluation of Aural/Oral Performance of Children and an Infant Hearing Program Amplification Benefit Questionnaire. Qualitative interviews were undertaken to assess the study aims. Hearing aids were well tolerated for use during regular school hours. All units remained functional during the study period (12 months). Teachers noted increased student awareness and responsiveness to surrounding sounds, but the degree of response to amplification varied between children. There was no significant improvement in speech development as all subjects had prelingual deafness. Teachers felt confident in troubleshooting any potential device malfunction. A solar-powered hearing aid may be a viable option for children in low- and middle-income countries. This study demonstrates that device distribution, maintenance and function can be established in countries with limited resources, while providing feasibility data to support future studies investigating how similar devices may improve the quality of life of those with hearing loss.

  10. Speech intelligibility for normal hearing and hearing-impaired listeners in simulated room acoustic conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arweiler, Iris; Dau, Torsten; Poulsen, Torben

    Speech intelligibility depends on many factors such as room acoustics, the acoustical properties and location of the signal and the interferers, and the ability of the (normal and impaired) auditory system to process monaural and binaural sounds. In the present study, the effect of reverberation...... on spatial release from masking was investigated in normal hearing and hearing impaired listeners using three types of interferers: speech shaped noise, an interfering female talker and speech-modulated noise. Speech reception thresholds (SRT) were obtained in three simulated environments: a listening room...... intelligibility and when binaural cues are effective. (Poster). Partly from HEARCOM project....

  11. Clinical Services: Hearing Impaired, Visually Impaired, Deaf-Blind (Multi-Handicapped).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohio State Dept. of Education, Columbus. Div. of Special Education.

    Briefly described are educational and medical clinical services and evaluation procedures for hearing impaired, visually impaired, and deaf-blind children in Ohio. The services are said to assess individual student needs and to facilitate educational placement and programing in special education classes or at state schools for the blind or the…

  12. Navigating Uncertainty: Health Professionals’ Knowledge, Skill, and Confidence in Assessing and Managing Pain in Children with Profound Cognitive Impairment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernie Carter

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available There is limited evidence to underpin the assessment and management of pain in children with profound cognitive impairment and these children are vulnerable to poor pain assessment and management. Health professionals working with children with profound cognitive impairment from a single paediatric tertiary referral centre in England were interviewed to explore how they develop and acquire knowledge and skills to assess and manage pain in children with cognitive impairment. The interviews were transcribed and subjected to thematic analysis. Nineteen health professionals representing different professional groups and different levels of experience participated in the study. A metatheme “navigating uncertainty; deficits in knowledge and skills” and two core themes “framing as different and teasing things out” and “the settling and unsettling presence of parents” were identified. Uncertainty about aspects of assessing and managing the pain of children with cognitive impairment tended to erode professional confidence and many discussed deficits in their skill and knowledge set. Uncertainty was managed through engaging with other health professionals and the child’s parents. Most health professionals stated they would welcome more education and training although many felt that this input should be clinical and not classroom oriented.

  13. Visual function and ocular status of children with hearing impairment in Oman: A case series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khandekar, Rajiv; Al Fahdi, Mohammed; Al Jabri, Bushra; Al Harby, Saleh; Abdulamgeed, Talat

    2009-01-01

    Visual functions of children with hearing disability were evaluated in a school of Muscat, Oman in 2006. Two hundred and twenty-three children were tested for near vision, distant vision, contrast sensitivity, color vision, field of vision, motion perception and crowding. Profound and severe hearing loss was noted in 161 and 63 students respectively. Thirty-five (81%) students with refractive error were using spectacles. Color vision and field of vision was defective in one student each. In 286 (64.1%) eyes, contrast sensitivity was defective. Abnormal contrast sensitivity was not associated with the severity of hearing loss [RR = 1.04 (95% CI 0.91 to 1.29)]. Children with hearing impairment should be assessed for visual functions. Refractive error and defect in contrast sensitivity were unusually high among these children. In addition to visual aids, we recommend environmental changes to improve illumination and contrast to improve the quality of life of such children with double disability. PMID:19384020

  14. Age-related Hearing Impairment and the Triad of Acquired Hearing Loss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao-Hui eYang

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Understanding underlying pathological mechanisms is prerequisite for a sensible design of protective therapies against hearing loss. The triad of age-related, noise-generated, and drug-induced hearing loss ¬¬displays intriguing similarities in some cellular responses of cochlear sensory cells such as a potential involvement of reactive oxygen species and apoptotic and necrotic cell death. On the other hand, detailed studies have revealed that molecular pathways are considerably complex and, importantly, it has become clear that pharmacological protection successful against one form of hearing loss will not necessarily protect against another. This review will summarize pathological and pathophysiological features of age-related hearing impairment (ARHI in human and animal models and address selected aspects of the commonality (or lack thereof of cellular responses in ARHI to drugs and noise.

  15. Age-related hearing impairment and the triad of acquired hearing loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chao-Hui; Schrepfer, Thomas; Schacht, Jochen

    2015-01-01

    Understanding underlying pathological mechanisms is prerequisite for a sensible design of protective therapies against hearing loss. The triad of age-related, noise-generated, and drug-induced hearing loss displays intriguing similarities in some cellular responses of cochlear sensory cells such as a potential involvement of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and apoptotic and necrotic cell death. On the other hand, detailed studies have revealed that molecular pathways are considerably complex and, importantly, it has become clear that pharmacological protection successful against one form of hearing loss will not necessarily protect against another. This review will summarize pathological and pathophysiological features of age-related hearing impairment (ARHI) in human and animal models and address selected aspects of the commonality (or lack thereof) of cellular responses in ARHI to drugs and noise. PMID:26283913

  16. Phonemic restoration by hearing-impaired listeners with mild to moderate sensorineural hearing loss

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baskent, Deniz; Eiler, Cheryl L; Edwards, Brent

    The auditory system is capable of perceptually restoring inaudible portions of speech. This restoration may be compromised as a result of hearing impairment, particularly if it is combined with advanced age, because of degradations in the bottom-up and top-down processes. To test this hypothesis,

  17. Impact of early intervention on comprehensive language and academic achievement in Japanese hearing-impaired children with cochlear implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugaya, Akiko; Fukushima, Kunihiro; Kasai, Norio; Kataoka, Yuko; Maeda, Yukihide; Nagayasu, Rie; Toida, Naomi; Ohmori, Shyuhei; Fujiyoshi, Akie; Taguchi, Tomoko; Omichi, Ryotaro; Nishizaki, Kazunori

    2015-12-01

    Early hearing detection and intervention (EHDI) is critical for achievement of age-appropriate speech perception and language development in hearing-impaired children. It has been 15 years since newborn hearing screening (NHS) was introduced in Japan, and its effectiveness for language development in hearing-impaired children has been extensively studied. Moreover, after over 20 years of cochlear implantation in Japan, many of the prelingual cochlear implant (CI) users have reached school age, and the effect of CI on language development have also been assessed. To identify prognostic factors for language development, audiological/language test scores and demographic factors were compared among prelingual severe-to-profound hearing-impaired children with CI divided into subgroups according to age at first hearing aid (HA) use and whether they received NHS. Prelingual severe-to-profound deafened children from the Research on Sensory and Communicative Disorders (RSCD) project who met the inclusion criteria were divided into groups according to the age (in months) of HA commencement (before 6 months: group A, after 7 months: group B), and the presence or absence of NHS (groups C and D). Language development and socio-economic data were obtained from audiological/language tests and a questionnaire completed by caregivers, respectively. In total, 210 children from the RSCD project participated in this study. Group A (n=49) showed significantly higher scores on comprehensive vocabulary and academic achievement (pgroup B (n=161), with no difference in demographics except for significantly older age in group B. No differences in language scores were observed between group C (n=71) and group D (n=129), although participants of group D was significantly older and had used CIs longer (pacademic achievement among CI users with prelingual deafness. A long-term follow-up is required to assess the usefulness of NHS for language development. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd

  18. Social skill, life satisfaction and locus of control in normal-hearing and hearing-impaired students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iran Davoudi

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Some evidence suggests that hearing impairment has negative effect on psychological characters of hearing-impaired adolescences and they are more vulnerable to mental health problems than their hearing peers are. This was a comparative study of social skills, life satisfaction and external and internal locus of control in normal-hearing and hearing-impaired students.Methods: T his multi-stage random sampling method consisted of 50 students with hearing impairment (boy and girls and 50 matched normal-hearing students. The participants completed Matson evaluation of social skills with youngster, students life satisfaction, and Levenson multidimensional locus of control scales.Results: The results of multivariate analysis of variance showed statistically meaningful differences in social skills , life satisfaction and locus of control between the two groups (p=0.002 for all.Conclusion: Social skills in normal-hearing students were higher than students with hearing impairment and locus of control in normal student was more internally. Training the parents and school-staff on development of locus of control and making it more internally in hearing-impaired students is suggested.

  19. Aided and unaided speech perception by older hearing impaired listeners.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David L Woods

    Full Text Available The most common complaint of older hearing impaired (OHI listeners is difficulty understanding speech in the presence of noise. However, tests of consonant-identification and sentence reception threshold (SeRT provide different perspectives on the magnitude of impairment. Here we quantified speech perception difficulties in 24 OHI listeners in unaided and aided conditions by analyzing (1 consonant-identification thresholds and consonant confusions for 20 onset and 20 coda consonants in consonant-vowel-consonant (CVC syllables presented at consonant-specific signal-to-noise (SNR levels, and (2 SeRTs obtained with the Quick Speech in Noise Test (QSIN and the Hearing in Noise Test (HINT. Compared to older normal hearing (ONH listeners, nearly all unaided OHI listeners showed abnormal consonant-identification thresholds, abnormal consonant confusions, and reduced psychometric function slopes. Average elevations in consonant-identification thresholds exceeded 35 dB, correlated strongly with impairments in mid-frequency hearing, and were greater for hard-to-identify consonants. Advanced digital hearing aids (HAs improved average consonant-identification thresholds by more than 17 dB, with significant HA benefit seen in 83% of OHI listeners. HAs partially normalized consonant-identification thresholds, reduced abnormal consonant confusions, and increased the slope of psychometric functions. Unaided OHI listeners showed much smaller elevations in SeRTs (mean 6.9 dB than in consonant-identification thresholds and SeRTs in unaided listening conditions correlated strongly (r = 0.91 with identification thresholds of easily identified consonants. HAs produced minimal SeRT benefit (2.0 dB, with only 38% of OHI listeners showing significant improvement. HA benefit on SeRTs was accurately predicted (r = 0.86 by HA benefit on easily identified consonants. Consonant-identification tests can accurately predict sentence processing deficits and HA benefit in OHI

  20. The impact of visual impairment on the ability to perform activities of daily living for persons with severe/profound intellectual disability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dijkhuizen, Annemarie; Hilgenkamp, Thessa I M; Krijnen, Wim P; van der Schans, Cees P; Waninge, Aly

    2016-01-01

    The ability to perform activities of daily living (ADL) as a component of participation is one of the factors that contribute to quality of life. The ability to perform ADL for persons experiencing severe/profound intellectual disability (ID) may be reduced due to their cognitive and physical capacities. However, until recently, the impact of the significantly prevalent visual impairments on the performance of activities of daily living has not yet been revealed within this group. The purpose of this prospective cross-sectional study was to investigate the impact of visual impairment on the performance of activities of daily living for persons with a severe/profound intellectual disability. The Barthel Index (BI) and Comfortable Walking Speed (CWS) were used to measure the ability of performing activities of daily living (ADL) in 240 persons with severe/profound ID and having Gross Motor Functioning Classification System (GMFCS) levels I, II or III; this included 120 persons with visual impairment. The impact of visual impairment on ADL was analyzed with linear regression. The results of the study demonstrated that visual impairment slightly affects the ability of performing activities of daily living (BI) for persons experiencing a severe/profound intellectual disability. GMFCS Levels II or III, profound ID level, and visual impairment each have the effect of lowering BI scores. GMFCS Levels II or III, and profound ID level each have the effect of increasing CWS scores, which indicates a lower walking speed. A main effect of visual impairment is present on CWS, but our results do show a substantive interaction effect between GMFCS level III and visual impairment on Comfortable Walking Speed in persons with a severe/profound intellectual disability. Visual impairment has a slight effect on ability to perform ADL in persons experiencing severe/profound ID. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Vision and hearing impairments, cognitive impairment and mortality among long-term care recipients: a population-based cohort study

    OpenAIRE

    Mitoku, Kazuko; Masaki, Naoko; Ogata, Yukiko; Okamoto, Kazushi

    2016-01-01

    Background Vision and hearing impairments among elders are common, and cognitive impairment is a concern. This study assessed the association of vision and hearing impairments with cognitive impairment and mortality among long-term care recipients. Methods Data of 1754 adults aged 65 or older were included in analysis from the Gujo City Long-Term Care Insurance Database in Japan for a mean follow-up period of 4.7?years. Trained and certified investigators assessed sensory impairments and cogn...

  2. Association of Hearing Impairment and Emotional Vitality in Older Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contrera, Kevin J.; Betz, Josh; Deal, Jennifer A.; Choi, Janet S.; Ayonayon, Hilsa N.; Harris, Tamara; Helzner, Elizabeth; Martin, Kathryn R.; Mehta, Kala; Pratt, Sheila; Rubin, Susan M.; Satterfield, Suzanne; Yaffe, Kristine; Garcia, Melissa; Simonsick, Eleanor M.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To better understand the potential impact of hearing impairment (HI) and hearing aid use on emotional vitality and mental health in older adults. Method: We investigated the cross-sectional association of HI with emotional vitality in 1,903 adults aged 76–85 years in the Health ABC study adjusted for demographic and cardiovascular risk factors. Hearing was defined by the speech frequency pure tone average (no impairment 40 dB). Emotional vitality was defined as having a high sense of personal mastery, happiness, low depressive symptomatology, and low anxiety. Results: Compared with individuals with no HI, participants with moderate or greater HI had a 23% lower odds of emotional vitality (odds ratio [OR] = 0.77; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.59–0.99). Hearing aid use was not associated with better emotional vitality (OR = 0.98; 95% CI: 0.81–1.20). Discussion: HI is associated with lower odds of emotional vitality in older adults. Further studies are needed to examine the longitudinal impact of HI on mental health and well-being. PMID:26883806

  3. Acoustics and sociolinguistics: Patterns of communication in hearing impairing classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKellin, William; Shahin, Kimary; Jamieson, Janet; Hodgson, Murray; Pichora-Fuller, Kathleen

    2005-04-01

    In elementary school classes, noise during student led activities is often taken as evidence of successful interaction and learning. In this complex social environment of elementary school classrooms, acquisition of complex language and social skills-the focus of activities in early education-is expected to take place in hearing-hostile environments. Communication and language processing in these contexts requires interactive strategies, discourse forms, and syntactic structures different from the educationally desired forms used in acoustically advantageous environments. Recordings were made of the interaction of groups of students in grades 1-3, 5, and 7 during collaborative group work in their regular classrooms. Each student wore microphones at the ear level and head-mounted video cameras. Each group as a whole was also audio- and videotaped and noise level readings were recorded. Analysis of the acoustical and phonological properties of language heard by each student has demonstrated that the language variety used in these noisy and reverberant settings is similar to that of individuals with hearing impairments. This paper reports similarities between the syntactic structures and pragmatic strategies used by hearing impaired children and normally hearing children in noisy contexts. [Work supported by Peter Wall Institute for Advanced Studies, University of British Columbia.

  4. Effects of Hearing Impairment and Hearing Aid Amplification on Listening Effort: A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohlenforst, Barbara; Jansma, Elise P.; Wang, Yang; Naylor, Graham; Lorens, Artur; Lunner, Thomas; Kramer, Sophia E.

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: To undertake a systematic review of available evidence on the effect of hearing impairment and hearing aid amplification on listening effort. Two research questions were addressed: Q1) does hearing impairment affect listening effort? and Q2) can hearing aid amplification affect listening effort during speech comprehension? Design: English language articles were identified through systematic searches in PubMed, EMBASE, Cinahl, the Cochrane Library, and PsycINFO from inception to August 2014. References of eligible studies were checked. The Population, Intervention, Control, Outcomes, and Study design strategy was used to create inclusion criteria for relevance. It was not feasible to apply a meta-analysis of the results from comparable studies. For the articles identified as relevant, a quality rating, based on the 2011 Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation Working Group guidelines, was carried out to judge the reliability and confidence of the estimated effects. Results: The primary search produced 7017 unique hits using the keywords: hearing aids OR hearing impairment AND listening effort OR perceptual effort OR ease of listening. Of these, 41 articles fulfilled the Population, Intervention, Control, Outcomes, and Study design selection criteria of: experimental work on hearing impairment OR hearing aid technologies AND listening effort OR fatigue during speech perception. The methods applied in those articles were categorized into subjective, behavioral, and physiological assessment of listening effort. For each study, the statistical analysis addressing research question Q1 and/or Q2 was extracted. In seven articles more than one measure of listening effort was provided. Evidence relating to Q1 was provided by 21 articles that reported 41 relevant findings. Evidence relating to Q2 was provided by 27 articles that reported 56 relevant findings. The quality of evidence on both research questions (Q1 and Q2) was very low

  5. Use of Adaptive Digital Signal Processing to Improve Speech Communication for Normally Hearing aand Hearing-Impaired Subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Richard W.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    A two-microphone adaptive digital noise cancellation technique improved word-recognition ability for 20 normal and 12 hearing-impaired adults by reducing multitalker speech babble and speech spectrum noise 18-22 dB. Word recognition improvements averaged 37-50 percent for normal and 27-40 percent for hearing-impaired subjects. Improvement was best…

  6. Design and Implementation of Application for the Hearing Impaired People

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim ChoulWoo

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available With the development of various information and communication technologies, numerous applications are being developed and used in various fields in this modern society. However, these applications are mostly designed to provide convenience to general users, and applications for people with disabilities are small in number and inconvenient to use. Therefore, this study designed and implemented an application for the hearing impaired in particular. This application is intended to enable users with hearing impairment to communicate more easily with other people and to provide convenience in everyday life and emergency situations. We believe that many applications should be developed in various fields to provide the convenience of life to those who are experiencing information gap due to disability.

  7. Processing of Binaural Pitch Stimuli in Hearing-Impaired Listeners

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Santurette, Sébastien; Dau, Torsten

    2009-01-01

    Binaural pitch is a tonal sensation produced by introducing a frequency-dependent interaural phase shift in binaurally presented white noise. As no spectral cues are present in the physical stimulus, binaural pitch perception is assumed to rely on accurate temporal fine structure coding and intact...... binaural integration mechanisms. This study investigated to what extent basic auditory measures of binaural processing as well as cognitive abilities are correlated with the ability of hearing-impaired listeners to perceive binaural pitch. Subjects from three groups (1: normal-hearing; 2: cochlear...... hearingloss; 3: retro-cochlear impairment) were asked to identify the pitch contour of series of five notes of equal duration, ranging from 523 to 784 Hz, played either with Huggins’ binaural pitch stimuli (BP) or perceptually similar, but monaurally detectable, pitches (MP). All subjects from groups 1 and 2...

  8. Accessibility assessment of assistive technology for the hearing impaired.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Áfio, Aline Cruz Esmeraldo; Carvalho, Aline Tomaz de; Caravalho, Luciana Vieira de; Silva, Andréa Soares Rocha da; Pagliuca, Lorita Marlena Freitag

    2016-01-01

    to assess the automatic accessibility of assistive technology in online courses for the hearing impaired. evaluation study guided by the Assessment and Maintenance step proposed in the Model of Development of Digital Educational Material. The software Assessor and Simulator for the Accessibility of Sites (ASES) was used to analyze the online course "Education on Sexual and Reproductive Health: the use of condoms" according to the accessibility standards of national and international websites. an error report generated by the program identified, in each didactic module, one error and two warnings related to two international principles and six warnings involved with six national recommendations. The warnings relevant to hearing-impaired people were corrected, and the course was considered accessible by automatic assessment. we concluded that the pages of the course were considered, by the software used, appropriate to the standards of web accessibility.

  9. Profound vision loss impairs psychological well-being in young and middle-aged individuals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garcia GA

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Giancarlo A Garcia,1,2 Matin Khoshnevis,1,3 Jesse Gale,1,4 Starleen E Frousiakis,1,5 Tiffany J Hwang,1,6 Lissa Poincenot,1 Rustum Karanjia,1,7–9 David Baron,6 Alfredo A Sadun1,7 1Doheny Eye Institute, Los Angeles, CA, USA; 2University of California, Irvine School of Medicine, Irvine, CA, USA; 3Department of Ophthalmology, Temple University, Philadelphia, PA, USA; 4Wellington School of Medicine and Health Sciences, University of Otago, Wellington, NZ; 5Department of Ophthalmology, New York Medical College, Valhalla, NY, USA; 6Department of Psychiatry & The Behavioral Sciences, Keck School of Medicine, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA, USA; 7Doheny Eye Centers, Department of Ophthalmology, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Los Angeles California, CA, USA; 8Department of Ophthalmology, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, ON, Canada; 9Ottawa Hospital Health Research Institute, Ottawa, ON, Canada Purpose: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of profound vision loss on psychological well-being in adolescents, young adults, and middle-aged adults with regard to mood, interpersonal interactions, and career-related goals. In addition, we assessed the significance of the resources that may be used to enhance psychological well-being in cases of profound vision loss, and in particular, examined the utility of low vision aids and the role of the ophthalmologist as a provider of emotional support.Methods: A questionnaire was issued to individuals aged 13–65 years with profound vision loss resulting from Leber’s hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON. Depression prevalence was evaluated with questions regarding major depressive disorder symptomatology. Participants appraised the effects of vision loss on their interpersonal interactions and career goals by providing an impact rating (IR on a 21-point psychometric scale from −10 to +10. Social well-being index was defined as the average of interpersonal IR and career IR

  10. FREQUENCY OF HEARING IMPAIRMENT IN METAL INDUSTRY AND REPERCUSSION ON PROFESSIONAL ENABLING OF DEAF

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Husnija Hasanbegović

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The survey has been done on sample of 1252 people. The target was to estimate damage of noise on professional rehabilitation of deaf population, which is mostly directed to professions in heavy industry, for professions in metal industry. Sample has been divided to 3 sub samples: 137 hearing people in metal industry; 106 hearing impaired adults with different professions and control group of 1000 hearing people. The results of survey point that work conditions contribute to hearing damage at employers in metal industry by comparison with hearing impairment of usual population. By comparative analysis of registered hearing impairments concerning age, statistically important difference in frequency of hearing impairment of two sub samples (t= 3.27, sing=.05. The relation between hearing impairment and years of working has been identifi ed at employers in heavy industry, (r=.37.

  11. Frequency of Hearing Impairment in Metal Industry and Repercussion on Professional Enabling of Deaf

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Husnija Hasanbegovic

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The survey has been done on sample of 1252 people. The target was to estimate damage of noise on professional rehabilitation of deaf population, which is mostly directed to professions in heavy industry, for professions in metal industry. Sample has been divided to 3 sub samples: 137 hearing people in metal industry; 106 hearing impaired adults with different professions and control group of 1000 hearing people. The results of survey point that work conditions contribute to hearing damage at employers in metal industry by comparison with hearing impairment of usual population. By comparative analysis of registered hearing impairments concerning age, statistically important difference in frequency of hearing impairment of two sub samples (t= 3.27, sing=.05. The relation between hearing impairment and years of working has been identify ed at employers in heavy industry, (r=.37.

  12. Self-perception of the hearing-impaired elderly before and after hearing-aid fittings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbosa, Mirna Rossi; Medeiros, Daniel de Sousa; Rossi-Barbosa, Luiza Augusta Rosa; Silveira, Marise Fagundes; de Barros Lima Martins, Andrea Maria Eleutério; Caldeira, Antônio Prates

    2015-08-01

    To evaluate the impact of hearing aid (HA) fittings among elderly patients through the Hearing Handicap Inventory for the Elderly (HHIE). The present study was carried out with 125 hearing-impaired individuals over aged 65 years in the northern region of Minas Gerais, Brazil. The instrument used was the HHIE self-assessment questionnaire. HHIE were completed before and after HA fittings. Data were analyzed using the non-parametric Wilcoxon test and the McNemar χ(2)-test. There were significant decreases in general, social and emotional handicap after HA use (P < 0.001). The percentage of patients with severe hearing handicap decreased from 45.6% to 8.8% with HA use. The greatest difficulty reported by respondents, both before and after HA use, was "hearing when someone whispers". Although HA use significantly improves the hearing handicap, some older adults still maintain social and emotional limitations. The HHIE instrument can be a great ally in helping professionals understand and rehabilitate the difficulties that remain after amplification. © 2014 Japan Geriatrics Society.

  13. Adiponectin deficiency exacerbates age-related hearing impairment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanigawa, T; Shibata, R; Ouchi, N; Kondo, K; Ishii, M; Katahira, N; Kambara, T; Inoue, Y; Takahashi, R; Ikeda, N; Kihara, S; Ueda, H; Murohara, T

    2014-01-01

    Obesity-related disorders are closely associated with the development of age-related hearing impairment (ARHI). Adiponectin (APN) exerts protective effects against obesity-related conditions including endothelial dysfunction and atherosclerosis. Here, we investigated the impact of APN on ARHI. APN-knockout (APN-KO) mice developed exacerbation of hearing impairment, particularly in the high frequency range, compared with wild-type (WT) mice. Supplementation with APN prevented the hearing impairment in APN-KO mice. At 2 months of age, the cochlear blood flow and capillary density of the stria vascularis (SV) were significantly reduced in APN-KO mice as compared with WT mice. APN-KO mice also showed a significant increase in terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL)-positive apoptotic cells in the organ of Corti in the cochlea at 2 months of age. At the age of 6 months, hair cells were lost at the organ of Corti in APN-KO mice. In cultured auditory HEI-OC1 cells, APN reduced apoptotic activity under hypoxic conditions. Clinically, plasma APN levels were significantly lower in humans with ARHI. Multiple logistic regression analysis identified APN as a significant and independent predictor of ARHI. Our observations indicate that APN has an important role in preventing ARHI. PMID:24763046

  14. Hearing handicap, rather than measured hearing impairment, predicts poorer quality of life over 10 years in older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopinath, Bamini; Schneider, Julie; Hickson, Louise; McMahon, Catherine M; Burlutsky, George; Leeder, Stephen R; Mitchell, Paul

    2012-06-01

    We aimed to determine the prospective association between measured hearing impairment, self-reported hearing handicap and hearing aid use with quality of life. 829 Blue Mountains Hearing Study participants (≥ 55 years) were examined between 1997-1999 and 2007-2009. The shortened version of the hearing handicap inventory was administered. Hearing levels were measured using pure-tone audiometry. Quality of life was assessed using the 36-Item Short-Form Survey (SF-36); higher scores reflect better quality of life. Hearing impairment at baseline compared with no impairment was associated with lower mean SF-36 mental composite score 10 years later (multivariable-adjusted p=0.03). Physical composite score and mean scores for seven of the eight SF-36 domains after 10-year follow-up were significantly lower among participants who self-reported hearing handicap at baseline. Differences in the adjusted means between participants with and without hearing handicap ranged from 2.7 (physical composite score) to 10.4 units ('role limitations due to physical problems' domain). Individuals who developed incident hearing impairment compared to those who did not, had adjusted mean scores 9.5- and 7.7-units lower in the 'role limitation due to physical problems', and 'bodily pain' domains, respectively, at the 10-year follow-up. Hearing aid users versus non-users at baseline showed a 1.82-point (p=0.03) and 3.32-point (p=0.01) increase in SF-36 mental composite score and mental health domain over the 10-year follow-up, respectively. Older adults with self-perceived hearing handicap constitute a potential risk group for overall deterioration in quality of life, while hearing aid use could help improve the well-being of hearing impaired adults. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Validation of the Korean Version of the Spatial Hearing Questionnaire for Assessing the Severity and Symmetry of Hearing Impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Tae Hoon; Park, Yoon Ah; Bong, Jeong Pyo; Park, Sang Yoo

    2017-07-01

    Spatial hearing refers to the ability to understand speech and identify sounds in various environments. We assessed the validity of the Korean version of the Spatial Hearing Questionnaire (K-SHQ). We performed forward translation of the original English SHQ to Korean and backward translation from the Korean to English. Forty-eight patients who were able to read and understand Korean and received a score of 24 or higher on the Mini-Mental Status Examination were included in the study. Patients underwent pure tone audiometry (PTA) using a standard protocol and completed the K-SHQ. Internal consistency was evaluated using Cronbach's alpha, and factor analysis was performed to prove reliability. Construct validity was tested by comparing K-SHQ scores from patients with normal hearing to those with hearing impairment. Scores were compared between subjects with unilateral or bilateral hearing loss and between symmetrical and asymmetrical hearing impairment. Cronbach's alpha showed good internal consistency (0.982). Two factors were identified by factor analysis: There was a significant difference in K-SHQ scores for patients with normal hearing compared to those with hearing impairment. Patients with asymmetric hearing impairment had higher K-SHQ scores than those with symmetric hearing impairment. This is related to a lower threshold of PTA in the better ear of subjects. The hearing ability of the better ear is correlated with K-SHQ score. The K-SHQ is a reliable and valid tool with which to assess spatial hearing in patients who speak and read Korean. K-SHQ score reflects the severity and symmetry of hearing impairment.

  16. Linguistic profiles of children with CI as compared with children with hearing or specific language impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Hoog, Brigitte E; Langereis, Margreet C; van Weerdenburg, Marjolijn; Knoors, Harry E T; Verhoeven, Ludo

    2016-09-01

    The spoken language difficulties of children with moderate or severe to profound hearing loss are mainly related to limited auditory speech perception. However, degraded or filtered auditory input as evidenced in children with cochlear implants (CIs) may result in less efficient or slower language processing as well. To provide insight into the underlying nature of the spoken language difficulties in children with CIs, linguistic profiles of children with CIs are compared with those of hard-of-hearing (HoH) children with conventional hearing aids and children with specific language impairment (SLI). To examine differences in linguistic abilities and profiles of children with CIs as compared with HoH children and children with SLI, and whether the spoken language difficulties of children with CIs mainly lie in limited auditory perception or in language processing problems. Differences in linguistic abilities and differential linguistic profiles of 47 children with CI, 66 HoH children with moderate to severe hearing loss, and 127 children with SLI are compared, divided into two age cohorts. Standardized Dutch tests were administered. Factor analyses and cluster analyses were conducted to find homogeneous linguistic profiles of the children. The children with CIs were outperformed by their HoH peers and peers with SLI on most linguistic abilities. Concerning the linguistic profiles, the largest group of children with CIs and HoH children shared similar profiles. The profiles observed for most of the children with SLI were different from those of their peers with hearing loss in both age cohorts. Results suggest that the underlying nature of spoken language problems in most children with CIs manifests in limited auditory perception instead of language processing difficulties. However, there appears to be a subgroup of children with CIs whose linguistic profiles resemble those of children with SLI. © 2016 Royal College of Speech and Language Therapists.

  17. The effect of symmetrical and asymmetrical hearing impairment on music quality perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Yuexin; Zhao, Fei; Chen, Yuebo; Liang, Maojin; Chen, Ling; Yang, Haidi; Xiong, Hao; Zhang, Xueyuan; Zheng, Yiqing

    2016-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of symmetrical, asymmetrical and unilateral hearing impairment on music quality perception. Six validated music pieces in the categories of classical music, folk music and pop music were used to assess music quality in terms of its 'pleasantness', 'naturalness', 'fullness', 'roughness' and 'sharpness'. 58 participants with sensorineural hearing loss [20 with unilateral hearing loss (UHL), 20 with bilateral symmetrical hearing loss (BSHL) and 18 with bilateral asymmetrical hearing loss (BAHL)] and 29 normal hearing (NH) subjects participated in the present study. Hearing impaired (HI) participants had greater difficulty in overall music quality perception than NH participants. Participants with BSHL rated music pleasantness and naturalness to be higher than participants with BAHL. Moreover, the hearing thresholds of the better ears from BSHL and BAHL participants as well as the hearing thresholds of the worse ears from BSHL participants were negatively correlated to the pleasantness and naturalness perception. HI participants rated the familiar music pieces higher than unfamiliar music pieces in the three music categories. Music quality perception in participants with hearing impairment appeared to be affected by symmetry of hearing loss, degree of hearing loss and music familiarity when they were assessed using the music quality rating test (MQRT). This indicates that binaural symmetrical hearing is important to achieve a high level of music quality perception in HI listeners. This emphasizes the importance of provision of bilateral hearing assistive devices for people with asymmetrical hearing impairment.

  18. Early ERP signature of hearing impairment in visual rhyme judgment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisabet eClasson

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Postlingually acquired hearing impairment is associated with changes in the representation of sound in semantic long-term memory. An indication of this is the lower performance on visual rhyme judgment tasks in conditions where phonological and orthographic cues mismatch, requiring high reliance on phonological representations. In this study, event-related potentials (ERPs were used for the first time to investigate the neural correlates of phonological processing in visual rhyme judgments in participants with acquired hearing impairment (HI and normal hearing (NH. Rhyme task word pairs rhymed or not and had matching or mismatching orthography. In addition, the interstimulus-interval (ISI was manipulated to be either long (800 ms or short (50 ms. Long ISIs allow for engagement of explicit, top-down processes, while short ISIs limit the involvement of such mechanisms. We hypothesized lower behavioural performance and N400 and N2 deviations in HI in the mismatching rhyme judgment conditions, particularly in short ISI. However, the results showed a different pattern. As expected, behavioural performance in the mismatch conditions was lower in HI than in NH in short ISI, but ERPs did not differ across groups. In contrast, HI performed on a par with NH in long ISI. Further, HI, but not NH, showed an amplified N2-like response in the non-rhyming, orthographically mismatching condition in long ISI. This was also the rhyme condition in which participants in both groups benefited the most from the possibility to engage top-down processes afforded with the longer ISI. Taken together, these results indicate an early ERP signature of hearing impairment in this challenging phonological task, likely reflecting use of a compensatory strategy. This strategy is suggested to involve increased reliance on explicit mechanisms such as articulatory recoding and grapheme-to-phoneme conversion.

  19. Effects of assistance dogs on persons with mobility or hearing impairments: a pilot study

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rintala, Diana H; Matamoros, Rebeca; Seitz, Laura L

    2008-01-01

    .... Hearing dogs alert persons with hearing impairments to environmental sounds. We conducted a pre-post, wait list-controlled pilot study to assess the impact of the dogs on the lives of recipients...

  20. Installation and impact of sound field systems on hearing and hearing impaired children and their teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dockrell, Julie; Rigby, Kate; Shield, Bridget; Carey, Anne

    2005-04-01

    An evaluation of the installation and use of sound field systems in ten schools in England has been carried out. The evaluation included noise surveys of classrooms, questionnaire surveys of pupils and teachers and experimental testing of children with and without the use of SFS. The aim of this project was to investigate the impact of SFS on teaching and learning in elementary school classrooms, in particular, to ascertain whether the SFS differentially benefited children with hearing impairments. Barriers to teachers use of SFS were found in terms of equipment placement and maintenance, appropriate training, and teacher's knowledge. Nonetheless positive reports are recorded from both teachers and pupils. Teachers' and pupils' perceptions are compared with objective data evaluating change in performance when SFS are used for language and cognitive tasks. Data from children with hearing impairments and additional learning needs are analyzed for comparative purposes. The results are discussed in terms of effective practice for the use of SFS with elementary school pupils.

  1. Language ability in the intermediate-scoring group of hearing-impaired children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugaya, Akiko; Fukushima, Kunihiro; Kasai, Norio; Fujiyoshi, Akie; Taguchi, Tomoko; Omori, Kana; Ojima, Toshiyuki; Nishizaki, Kazunori

    2012-04-01

    Language development is a key issue in hearing-impaired children. However, interpersonal differences complicate our understanding of the situation. The bimodal or trimodal distribution of language scores in our other reports in this publication imply the presence of fundamental differences among these groups. The characteristic aspects of each group were profiled according to language data. We divided 268 children with prelingual severe to profound hearing impairment into 3 groups according to their trimodal distribution observed on histogram-based analysis of their responses to the Test of Question-Answer Interaction Development. Test results in several language domains, including productive and comprehensive vocabulary, productive and comprehensive syntax, and academic achievement, were profiled and compared among these 3 groups. Significant differences were observed in the results of the Word Fluency Test, the Picture Vocabulary Test-Revised, and the Syntax Test of Aphasia among the 3 groups. No significant difference was observed between groups who were lower-scoring and intermediate-scoring on the academic achievement tests referred to as Criterion Referenced Test-II and the Standardized Comprehension Test for Abstract Words. Only the higher-scoring group showed excellent results. The demographic factors were not significantly different among the 3 groups. Relatively poor academic achievement despite fair language production was the dominant feature of the intermediate-scoring group. This profile might correlate with academic failure in school.

  2. Auditory externalization in hearing-impaired listeners: The effect of pinna cues and number of talkers

    OpenAIRE

    Boyd, Alan W.; Whitmer, William M; Soraghan, John J.; Akeroyd, Michael A

    2012-01-01

    Hearing-aid wearers have reported sound source locations as being perceptually internalized (i.e., inside their head). The contribution of hearing-aid design to internalization has, however, received little attention. This experiment compared the sensitivity of hearing-impaired (HI) and normal-hearing (NH) listeners to externalization cues when listening with their own ears and simulated BTE hearing-aids in increasingly complex listening situations and reduced pinna cues. Participants rated t...

  3. Quality of life in older Chinese-speaking adults with hearing impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Lena L N; Cheng, Lai Ki

    2012-01-01

    General and hearing-specific health-related quality of life (HRQoL) was examined in elderly Chinese with hearing impairment. Sixty-four Chinese speakers aged ≥65 years and did not use hearing aids were evaluated using Chinese versions of the Short-Form 36 health survey (SF-36) and the Hearing Handicap Inventory for the Elderly (Screening Version) (HHIE-S). Results on the SF-36 were compared to norms obtained in a general elderly Chinese population. The relationships between HRQoL and degree of hearing impairment, and between SF-36 and HHIE-S were also evaluated. Elderly Chinese speakers with hearing impairment rated six of the eight scales of the SF-36 poorer, compared to a general elderly Chinese population. When average hearing impairment in the better ear exceeded 40 dB HL, SF-36 ratings were poorer than those with better hearing. Poorer better ear hearing was significantly related to poorer ratings on the Vitality scale of the SF-36 and the three scales of the HHIE-S, after controlling for age, gender and number of coexisting chronic health problems. Ratings on SF-36 and HHIE-S did not correlate. Elderly Chinese who are hearing impaired experienced poorer general and hearing-specific HRQoL, and HRQoL is reduced further among those with greater hearing impairment.

  4. The Investigation of Physical Performance Status of Visually and Hearing Impaired Applying Judo Training Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karakoc, Onder

    2016-01-01

    It was aimed to investigate the physical performances of visually and hearing impaired doing judo training in this study. 32 male athletes, who were doing judo training, volunteer and, visually and hearing impaired, participated in this study. The investigation was applied to visually impaired (N = 12, mean ± SD; age: 25.75 ± 3.55 years, height:…

  5. Auris System: Providing Vibrotactile Feedback for Hearing Impaired Population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felipe Alves Araujo

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Deafness, an issue that affects millions of people around the globe, is manifested in different intensities and related to many causes. This impairment negatively affects different aspects of the social life of the deaf people, and music-centered situations (concerts, religious events, etc. are obviously not inviting for them. The Auris System was conceived to provide the musical experimentation for people who have some type of hearing loss. This system is able to extract musical information from audio and create a representation for music pieces using different stimuli, a new media format to be interpreted by other senses than the hearing. In addition, the system defines a testing methodology based on a noninvasive brain activity recording using an electroencephalographic (EEG device. The results of the tests are being used to better understand the human musical cognition, in order to improve the accuracy of the Auris musical representation.

  6. Auris System: Providing Vibrotactile Feedback for Hearing Impaired Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves Araujo, Felipe; Lima Brasil, Fabricio; Candido Lima Santos, Allison; de Sousa Batista Junior, Luzenildo; Pereira Fonseca Dutra, Savio; Eduardo Coelho Freire Batista, Carlos

    2017-01-01

    Deafness, an issue that affects millions of people around the globe, is manifested in different intensities and related to many causes. This impairment negatively affects different aspects of the social life of the deaf people, and music-centered situations (concerts, religious events, etc.) are obviously not inviting for them. The Auris System was conceived to provide the musical experimentation for people who have some type of hearing loss. This system is able to extract musical information from audio and create a representation for music pieces using different stimuli, a new media format to be interpreted by other senses than the hearing. In addition, the system defines a testing methodology based on a noninvasive brain activity recording using an electroencephalographic (EEG) device. The results of the tests are being used to better understand the human musical cognition, in order to improve the accuracy of the Auris musical representation.

  7. Factors influencing speech and language outcomes of children with early identified severe/profound hearing loss: Clinician-identified facilitators and barriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulcher, Anne Nivelles; Purcell, Alison; Baker, Elise; Munro, Natalie

    2015-06-01

    Early identification of severe/profound childhood hearing loss (HL) gives these children access to hearing devices and early intervention to facilitate improved speech and language outcomes. Predicting which infants will go on to achieve such outcomes remains difficult. This study describes clinician identified malleable and non-malleable factors that may influence speech and language outcomes for children with severe/profound HL. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with six experienced auditory verbal clinicians. A collective case study design was implemented. The interviews were transcribed and coded into themes using constant comparative analysis. Clinicians identified that, for children with severe/profound HL, early identification, early amplification and commencing auditory-verbal intervention under 6 months of age may facilitate child progress. Possible barriers were living in rural/remote areas, the clinicians' lack of experience and confidence in providing intervention for infants under age 6-months and belonging to a family with a culturally and linguistically diverse (CALD) background. The results indicate that multiple factors need to be considered by clinicians working with children with HL and their families to determine how each child functions within their own environment and personal contexts, consistent with the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) framework. Such an approach is likely to empower clinicians to carefully balance potential barriers to, and facilitators of, optimal speech and language outcomes for all children with HL.

  8. Profound expressive language impairment in low functioning children with autism: an investigation of syntactic awareness using a computerised learning task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGonigle-Chalmers, Maggie; Alderson-Day, Ben; Fleming, Joanna; Monsen, Karl

    2013-09-01

    Nine low-functioning children with profound expressive language impairment and autism were studied in terms of their responsiveness to a computer-based learning program designed to assess syntactic awareness. The children learned to touch words on a screen in the correct sequence in order to see a corresponding animation, such as 'monkey flies'. The game progressed in levels from 2 to 4 word sequences, contingent upon success at each stage. Although performance was highly variable across participants, a detailed review of their learning profiles suggested that no child lacked syntactic awareness and that elementary syntactic control in a non-speech domain was superior to that manifest in their spoken language. The reasons for production failures at the level of speech in children with autism are discussed.

  9. Implicit Mentalizing Persists beyond Early Childhood and Is Profoundly Impaired in Children with Autism Spectrum Condition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuwerk, Tobias; Jarvers, Irina; Vuori, Maria; Sodian, Beate

    2016-01-01

    Implicit mentalizing, a fast, unconscious and rigid way of processing other's mental states has recently received much interest in typical social cognitive development in early childhood and in adults with autism spectrum condition (ASC). This research suggests that already infants implicitly mentalize, and that adults with ASC have a sustained implicit mentalizing deficit. Yet, we have only sparse empirical evidence on implicit mentalizing beyond early childhood, and deviations thereof in children with ASC. Here, we administered an implicit mentalizing eye tracking task to assess the sensitivity to false beliefs to a group of 8-year-old children with and without ASC, matched for chronological age, verbal and non-verbal IQ. As previous research suggested that presenting outcomes of belief-based actions leads to fast learning from experience and false belief-congruent looking behavior in adults with ASC, we were also interested in whether already children with ASC learn from such information. Our results provide support for a persistent implicit mentalizing ability in neurotypical development beyond early childhood. Further, they confirmed an implicit mentalizing deficit in children with ASC, even when they are closely matched to controls for explicit mentalizing skills. In contrast to previous findings with adults, no experience-based modulation of anticipatory looking was observed. It seems that children with ASC have not yet developed compensatory general purpose learning mechanisms. The observed intact explicit, but impaired implicit mentalizing in ASC, and correlation patterns between mentalizing tasks and executive function tasks, are in line with theories on two dissociable mentalizing systems.

  10. An overview of motor skill performance and balance in hearing impaired children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roy Finita

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Childhood hearing impairment is a common chronic condition that may have a major impact on acquisition of speech, social and physical development. Numerous literature states that injury to the vestibular organs may result in accompanying balance and motor development disorders. But still postural control and motor assessments are not a routine procedure in hearing impaired children. Hence, we aim to provide an overview on motor skill performance and balance in hearing impaired children.

  11. Implicit mentalizing persists beyond early childhood and is profoundly impaired in children with autism spectrum conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tobias Schuwerk

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Implicit mentalizing, a fast, unconscious and rigid way of processing other's mental states has recently received much interest in typical social cognitive development in early childhood and in adults with autism spectrum conditions (ASC. This research suggests that already infants implicitly mentalize, and that adults with ASC have a sustained implicit mentalizing deficit. Yet, we have only sparse empirical evidence on implicit mentalizing beyond early childhood, and deviations thereof in children with ASC. Here, we administered an implicit mentalizing eye tracking task to assess the sensitivity to false beliefs to a group of 8-year-old children with and without ASC, matched for chronological age, verbal and nonverbal IQ. As previous research suggested that presenting outcomes of belief-based actions leads to fast learning from experience and false belief-congruent looking behavior in adults with ASC, we were also interested in whether already children with ASC learn from such information. Our results provide support for a persistent implicit mentalizing ability in neurotypical development beyond early childhood. Further, they confirmed an implicit mentalizing deficit in children with ASC, even when they are closely matched to controls for explicit mentalizing skills. In contrast to previous findings with adults, no experience-based modulation of anticipatory looking was observed. It seems that children with ASC have not yet developed compensatory general purpose learning mechanisms. The observed intact explicit, but impaired implicit mentalizing in ASC, and correlation patterns between mentalizing tasks and executive function tasks, are in line with theories on two dissociable mentalizing systems.

  12. Early language development in children with profound hearing loss fitted with a device at a young age: part II--content of the first lexicon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nott, Pauline; Cowan, Robert; Brown, P Margaret; Wigglesworth, Gillian

    2009-10-01

    Lexical content is commonly understood to refer to the various categories of words that children produce and has been studied extensively in children with normal hearing. Unlike the hearing child, however, little is known about the word categories that make up the first lexicon of children with hearing loss (HL). Knowledge of the first lexicon is increasingly important, as infants with HL are now being detected through universal newborn hearing screening programs and fitted with hearing aids and cochlear implants in before 12 months of age. For these children, emergence of the first spoken words is a major milestone eagerly awaited by parents and one of the first verbal language goals of teachers and therapists working with such children. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the lexical content of the first 50 and 100 words produced by children with HL and to contrast this with that of a group of hearing children. Lexical content was compared in two groups of children: one group composed of 24 participants with severe profound or profound HL and a second group composed of 16 participants with normal hearing. Twenty-three participants in the HL group were fitted with a cochlear implant and one with bilateral hearing aids. All were "switched on" or fitted before 30 months of age. The Diary of Early Language (Di-EL) was used to collect a 100-word lexicon from each participant. All single word and frozen phrase data from each child's Di-EL were allocated to 1 of 15 word types grouped into four word categories (noun, predicate, grammatical, and paralexical), and the results were compared for both groups. The hearing and HL groups showed similar distributions of word categories, with nouns constituting the largest portion of the lexicon followed by predicates and paralexicals. Grammaticals made up the smallest portion of the lexicon. However, several significant differences were evident between the two groups. In both the 50- and 100-word lexicons, the hearing group

  13. Early Detection of Hearing Impairment Among High Risk Neonates in a Tertiary Care Hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gurudutt Joshi

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Hearing impairment has a devastating, detrimental and an invariably adverse impact on the development of the newborns and the psychological well-being of their families. It also adversely affects development of the central auditory nervous system, and can affect speech perception that interferes with growth in social, emotional, behavioural and cognitive spheres, academic achievement, vocational options, employment opportunities and economic selfsufficiency. Objectives: To find out incidence of hearing impairment in high risk neonates in Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU, prevalence of hearing impairment with and without high risk factors in newborns and to correlate the risk factors with hearing impairment. Material and Methods: A cohort study was carried out at a tertiary care hospital of Surat, Gujarat, India consisting of 190 normal newborns and 163 newborns with high risk factors. These newborns underwent a systematized Transient Otoacoustic Emissions Examination (TOAE and Brain Stem Evoked Audiometry (BERA examination according to designed protocol and were followed up with repeated ear examinations. Data were recorded and analyzed statistically. Results: The incidence of hearing impairment in NICU, newborns were 3.6% and the prevalence of hearing impairment was 13%. Hearing impairment was statistically significant in newborns with high risk factors such as low birth weight, preterms 5 days when compared to normal newborns. Conclusion: Presence of risk factors in newborns predisposes them to hearing impairment more as compared to normal newborns and the more the number of risk factors they are exposed to, the more will be the chances of hearing impairment.

  14. Effects of Age and Hearing Impairment on the Ability to Benefit from Temporal and Spectral Modulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Joseph W.; Buss, Emily; Grose, John H.; Roush, Patricia A.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives At poor signal-to-noise ratios, speech understanding may depend upon the ability to combine speech fragments that are distributed across time and frequency. The goal of this study was to determine the effects of development and hearing impairment on this ability. Design Listeners in the present study included adults and children with normal hearing and with hearing impairment. The children with normal hearing included a younger group (4.6 to 6.9 years of age, n=10) and an older group (7.3 to 11.1 years of age, n=11). The adults with normal hearing were 19–27 years of age (n=10). Adults (19–54 years of age, n=9) and children (7.2 to 10.7 years of age, n=8) with hearing impairment were also tested. The two groups with hearing impairment had comparable mild/moderate bilateral sensorineural hearing impairment. Masked speech reception thresholds for sentences were determined in a baseline condition of steady speech-shaped noise and in noise that was either temporally modulated, spectrally modulated, or both temporally and spectrally modulated. Results The results of normal-hearing listeners indicated higher masked speech reception thresholds for children than adults in steady noise. Adults and children showed the same magnitude of masking release for spectral modulation. Adults showed more masking release than the younger children for temporal modulation, and showed more masking release than both the younger and older children for combined temporal/spectral modulation. Comparing normal-hearing and hearing-impaired listeners, the hearing-impaired listeners had higher masked speech reception thresholds (SRTs) in the steady noise condition and reduced masking release in the modulated noise conditions. Neither the two-way interaction between age and hearing impairment nor the three-way interaction between age, hearing impairment, and masking configuration was significant. Conclusions Although the reduced masking release for temporal modulation shown by the

  15. Homozygosity Mapping Reveals Mutations of GRXCR1 as a Cause of Autosomal-Recessive Nonsyndromic Hearing Impairment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schraders, Margit; Lee, Kwanghyuk; Oostrik, Jaap; Huygen, Patrick L.M.; Ali, Ghazanfar; Hoefsloot, Lies H.; Veltman, Joris A.; Cremers, Frans P.M.; Basit, Sulman; Ansar, Muhammad; Cremers, Cor W.R.J.; Kunst, Henricus P.M.; Ahmad, Wasim; Admiraal, Ronald J.C.; Leal, Suzanne M.; Kremer, Hannie

    2010-01-01

    We identified overlapping homozygous regions within the DFNB25 locus in two Dutch and ten Pakistani families with sensorineural autosomal-recessive nonsyndromic hearing impairment (arNSHI). Only one of the families, W98-053, was not consanguineous, and its sibship pointed toward a reduced critical region of 0.9 Mb. This region contained the GRXCR1 gene, and the orthologous mouse gene was described to be mutated in the pirouette (pi) mutant with resulting hearing loss and circling behavior. Sequence analysis of the GRXCR1 gene in hearing-impaired family members revealed splice-site mutations in two Dutch families and a missense and nonsense mutation, respectively, in two Pakistani families. The splice-site mutations are predicted to cause frameshifts and premature stop codons. In family W98-053, this could be confirmed by cDNA analysis. GRXCR1 is predicted to contain a GRX-like domain. GRX domains are involved in reversible S-glutathionylation of proteins and thereby in the modulation of activity and/or localization of these proteins. The missense mutation is located in this domain, whereas the nonsense and splice-site mutations may result in complete or partial absence of the GRX-like domain or of the complete protein. Hearing loss in patients with GRXCR1 mutations is congenital and is moderate to profound. Progression of the hearing loss was observed in family W98-053. Vestibular dysfunction was observed in some but not all affected individuals. Quantitative analysis of GRXCR1 transcripts in fetal and adult human tissues revealed a preferential expression of the gene in fetal cochlea, which may explain the nonsyndromic nature of the hearing impairment. PMID:20137778

  16. Hearing impairment affects older people's ability to drive in the presence of distracters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hickson, Louise; Wood, Joanne; Chaparro, Alex; Lacherez, Philippe; Marszalek, Ralph

    2010-06-01

    To investigate the effects of hearing impairment and distractibility on older people's driving ability, assessed under real-world conditions. Experimental cross-sectional study. University laboratory setting and an on-road driving test. One hundred seven community-living adults aged 62 to 88. Fifty-five percent had normal hearing, 26% had a mild hearing impairment, and 19% had a moderate or greater impairment. Hearing was assessed using objective impairment measures (pure-tone audiometry, speech perception testing) and a self-report measure (Hearing Handicap Inventory for the Elderly). Driving was assessed on a closed road circuit under three conditions: no distracters, auditory distracters, and visual distracters. There was a significant interaction between hearing impairment and distracters, such that people with moderate to severe hearing impairment had significantly poorer driving performance in the presence of distracters than those with normal or mild hearing impairment. Older adults with poor hearing have greater difficulty with driving in the presence of distracters than older adults with good hearing.

  17. [Basic knowledge on the efficacy of hearing aids depending on the type of hearing impairment for Ear, Nose & Throat specialists].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steffens, T; Marcrum, S C

    2017-12-13

    For Ear, Nose & Throat specialists, the physiological and psychoacoustical deficits related to hearing impairment and the compensatory capabilities of hearing aids are topics of prime importance. In conductive hearing loss, the foremost deficit is decreased audibility, for which hearing aids can compensate almost entirely through the use of level independent gain. In the instance of sensorineural hearing loss, however, the irreversible loss of outer and inner hair cells causes a distorted sound perception, which is particularly troublesome when trying to understand speech in noisy environments. Unfortunately, this distortion cannot be compensated through the use of hearing aids. Nevertheless, in particular listening environments, its effects can be lessened by reducing background noise levels through the use of directional microphones and, to a lesser extent, digital noise reduction. Noise reduction is in many cases also the main effect to improve speech discrimination in retrocochlear hearing loss.

  18. Benefit and quality of life after bone-anchored hearing aid fitting in children with unilateral or bilateral hearing impairment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wolf, M.J. de; Hol, M.K.S.; Mylanus, E.A.M.; Snik, A.F.M.; Cremers, C.W.R.J.

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the benefits of a bone-anchored hearing aid (BAHA) in the daily lives of hearing-impaired children. DESIGN: Retrospective questionnaire study. SETTING: Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen, the Netherlands. PATIENTS: Thirty-eight BAHA users with a minimum age of 4 years at BAHA

  19. Judgments of Emotion in Clear and Conversational Speech by Young Adults with Normal Hearing and Older Adults with Hearing Impairment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Shae D.; Ferguson, Sarah Hargus

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: In this study, we investigated the emotion perceived by young listeners with normal hearing (YNH listeners) and older adults with hearing impairment (OHI listeners) when listening to speech produced conversationally or in a clear speaking style. Method: The first experiment included 18 YNH listeners, and the second included 10 additional…

  20. Client labor: adults with hearing impairment describing their participation in their hearing help-seeking and rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knudsen, Line V; Nielsen, Claus; Kramer, Sophia E; Jones, Lesley; Laplante-Lévesque, Ariane

    2013-03-01

    The uptake and use of hearing aids is low compared to the prevalence of hearing impairment. People who seek help and take part in a hearing aid rehabilitation process participate actively in this process in several ways. In order to gain more knowledge on the challenges of hearing help-seeking and hearing aid use, this qualitative study sought to understand the ways that people with hearing impairment describe themselves as active participants throughout the hearing aid rehabilitation process. In this qualitative interview study we examined the hearing rehabilitation process from the perspective of the hearing impaired. In this article we describe how the qualitative interview material was interpreted by a pragmatic qualitative thematic analysis. The analysis described in this article focused on the efforts, initiatives, actions, and participation the study participants described that they had engaged in during their rehabilitation. Interviews were conducted with people with hearing impairment in Australia, Denmark, the United Kingdom, and the United States. The 34 interview participants were distributed equally between the sites, just as men and women were almost equally represented (56% women). The average age of the participants was 64. All participants had a hearing impairment in at least one ear. The participants were recruited to represent a range of experiences with hearing help-seeking and rehabilitation. With each participant one qualitative semistructured interview ranging between 1 and 2 hr was carried out. The interviews were transcribed verbatim, read through several times, and themes were identified, defined, and reviewed by an iterative process. From this thematic focus a concept called "client labor" has emerged. Client labor contains nine subthemes divided into three overarching groups: cognitive labor, emotional labor, and physical labor. The participants' experiences and meaning-making related to these conceptual types of efforts is described

  1. [Study on hearing impairment among elderly population in the community of Taiyuan city, Shanxi province].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Fei; Qu, Cheng-Yi; Wang, Ting; Yin, Jiong; Zhang, Xiao-Dong; Meng, Jun; Zhang, Cai-Ping

    2009-03-01

    To study the characteristics and influencing factors on hearing impairment among elderly population in the community of Taiyuan city. 384 ageing people above 60 years old were selected from Chaoyang and Guandi community in Taiyuan city by multi-stage sampling. Data on influencing factors of hearing impairment were collected by questionnaire. 5 ml fasting blood samples were drawn to detect the level of glucose, triglyceride and cholesterin in the blood samples. All the objects were tested with binaural hearing. The level of binaural hearing threshold at 0.5 kHz, 1 kHz, 2 kHz, 3 kHz, 4 kHz, 8 kHz were measured by GVSLN-TC-GK2000 hearing-assistant evaluative apparatus. The level of 3 kHz, 4 kHz, average hearing threshold from ear with better audition was chosen as dependent variable. Socio-demographic data, environmental factors and biochemical indicator were chosen as independent variables, t test, ANOVA and accumulative logistic regression were performed to analyze the influencing factors on hearing impairment by software SPSS 13.0. The prevalence of hearing impairment among elderly population was 90.9%. The hearing disorder was 78.6% with 1.3% of them using hearing-assistant apparatus. Results from single factor analysis showed that the average levels of 3 kHz, 4 kHz, 8 kHz hearing thresholds were significantly different among elderly with different age, sex, education background and the levels of glucose and cholesterin (P cholesterin in blood were risk factors causing hearing impairment. Higher education level seemed to be a preventive factor. Hearing impairment appeared in higher prevalence among the elderly population, suggesting that proper measures should be taken. It is beneficial for abating hearing impairment to decrease the level of glucose and cholesterin in blood.

  2. Spectral Tilt Change in Stop Consonant Perception by Listeners with Hearing Impairment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, Joshua M.; Kluender, Keith R.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate how perceptual importance of spectral tilt is altered when formant information is degraded by sensorineural hearing loss. Method: Eighteen listeners with mild to moderate hearing impairment (HI listeners) and 20-23 listeners with normal hearing (NH listeners) identified synthesized stimuli that varied in second formant…

  3. The effect of specific compression settings on phoneme identification in hearing-impaired subjects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dreschler, W. A.

    1988-01-01

    In this study, some aspects of single-channel compression have been investigated in 15 hearing-impaired subjects and 4 normal-hearing listeners. Phoneme perception as a function of the compression-threshold level was measured for two hearing aids with input-dependent compression, differing in

  4. Subjective benefit after BAHA system application in patients with congenital unilateral conductive hearing impairment.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kunst, S.J.W.; Hol, M.K.S.; Mylanus, E.A.M.; Leijendeckers, J.M.; Snik, A.F.M.; Cremers, C.W.R.J.

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To study whether unilateral Bone-anchored Hearing Aid (BAHA) fitting led to subjective hearing benefit in patients with congenital unilateral conductive hearing impairment. STUDY DESIGN: Prospective evaluation on 20 patients. SETTING: Tertiary referral center. PATIENTS: Ten adults and 10

  5. Spoken and Written Narratives in Swedish Children and Adolescents with Hearing Impairment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asker-Arnason, Lena; Akerlund, Viktoria; Skoglund, Cecilia; Ek-Lagergren, Ingela; Wengelin, Asa; Sahlen, Birgitta

    2012-01-01

    Twenty 10- to 18-year-old children and adolescents with varying degrees of hearing impairment (HI) and hearing aids (HA), ranging from mild-moderate to severe, produced picture-elicited narratives in a spoken and written version. Their performance was compared to that of 63 normally hearing (NH) peers within the same age span. The participants…

  6. Members of Faculty with Hearing Impairments in Academia: What Are Their Needs?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roufs, Kathleen S.

    2011-01-01

    Seventeen percent of adults in the United States suffer from some degree of hearing loss, and this impairment can pose considerable personal, professional, social, and psychological challenges, often, to people reluctant to seek help (Hearing Loss Association, 2011). Post-secondary faculty members with hearing loss are among us, and most of them…

  7. Narrative spoken language skills in severely hearing impaired school-aged children with cochlear implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boons, Tinne; De Raeve, Leo; Langereis, Margreet; Peeraer, Louis; Wouters, Jan; van Wieringen, Astrid

    2013-11-01

    Cochlear implants have a significant positive effect on spoken language development in severely hearing impaired children. Previous work in this population has focused mostly on the emergence of early-developing language skills, such as vocabulary. The current study aims at comparing narratives, which are more complex and later-developing spoken language skills, of a contemporary group of profoundly deaf school-aged children using cochlear implants (n=66, median age=8 years 3 months) with matched normal hearing peers. Results show that children with cochlear implants demonstrate good results on quantity and coherence of the utterances, but problematic outcomes on quality, content and efficiency of retold stories. However, for a subgroup (n=20, median age=8 years 1 month) of deaf children without additional disabilities who receive cochlear implantation before the age of 2 years, use two implants, and are raised with one spoken language, age-adequate spoken narrative skills at school-age are feasible. This is the first study to set the goals regarding spoken narrative skills for deaf children using cochlear implants. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Vibrotactile Presentation of Musical Notes to the Glabrous Skin for Adults with Normal Hearing or a Hearing Impairment: Thresholds, Dynamic Range and High-Frequency Perception.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carl Hopkins

    Full Text Available Presentation of music as vibration to the skin has the potential to facilitate interaction between musicians with hearing impairments and other musicians during group performance. Vibrotactile thresholds have been determined to assess the potential for vibrotactile presentation of music to the glabrous skin of the fingertip, forefoot and heel. No significant differences were found between the thresholds for sinusoids representing notes between C1 and C6 when presented to the fingertip of participants with normal hearing and with a severe or profound hearing loss. For participants with normal hearing, thresholds for notes between C1 and C6 showed the characteristic U-shape curve for the fingertip, but not for the forefoot and heel. Compared to the fingertip, the forefoot had lower thresholds between C1 and C3, and the heel had lower thresholds between C1 and G2; this is attributed to spatial summation from the Pacinian receptors over the larger contactor area used for the forefoot and heel. Participants with normal hearing assessed the perception of high-frequency vibration using 1s sinusoids presented to the fingertip and were found to be more aware of transient vibration at the beginning and/or end of notes between G4 and C6 when stimuli were presented 10dB above threshold, rather than at threshold. An average of 94% of these participants reported feeling continuous vibration between G4 and G5 with stimuli presented 10dB above threshold. Based on the experimental findings and consideration of health effects relating to vibration exposure, a suitable range of notes for vibrotactile presentation of music is identified as being from C1 to G5. This is more limited than for human hearing but the fundamental frequencies of the human voice, and the notes played by many instruments, lie within it. However, the dynamic range might require compression to avoid the negative effects of amplitude on pitch perception.

  9. Vibrotactile Presentation of Musical Notes to the Glabrous Skin for Adults with Normal Hearing or a Hearing Impairment: Thresholds, Dynamic Range and High-Frequency Perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopkins, Carl; Maté-Cid, Saúl; Fulford, Robert; Seiffert, Gary; Ginsborg, Jane

    2016-01-01

    Presentation of music as vibration to the skin has the potential to facilitate interaction between musicians with hearing impairments and other musicians during group performance. Vibrotactile thresholds have been determined to assess the potential for vibrotactile presentation of music to the glabrous skin of the fingertip, forefoot and heel. No significant differences were found between the thresholds for sinusoids representing notes between C1 and C6 when presented to the fingertip of participants with normal hearing and with a severe or profound hearing loss. For participants with normal hearing, thresholds for notes between C1 and C6 showed the characteristic U-shape curve for the fingertip, but not for the forefoot and heel. Compared to the fingertip, the forefoot had lower thresholds between C1 and C3, and the heel had lower thresholds between C1 and G2; this is attributed to spatial summation from the Pacinian receptors over the larger contactor area used for the forefoot and heel. Participants with normal hearing assessed the perception of high-frequency vibration using 1s sinusoids presented to the fingertip and were found to be more aware of transient vibration at the beginning and/or end of notes between G4 and C6 when stimuli were presented 10dB above threshold, rather than at threshold. An average of 94% of these participants reported feeling continuous vibration between G4 and G5 with stimuli presented 10dB above threshold. Based on the experimental findings and consideration of health effects relating to vibration exposure, a suitable range of notes for vibrotactile presentation of music is identified as being from C1 to G5. This is more limited than for human hearing but the fundamental frequencies of the human voice, and the notes played by many instruments, lie within it. However, the dynamic range might require compression to avoid the negative effects of amplitude on pitch perception.

  10. How Hearing Impairment Affects Sentence Comprehension: Using Eye Fixations to Investigate the Duration of Speech Processing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wendt, Dorothea; Kollmeier, Birger; Brand, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    The main objective of this study was to investigate the extent to which hearing impairment influences the duration of sentence processing. An eye-tracking paradigm is introduced that provides an online measure of how hearing impairment prolongs processing of linguistically complex sentences......: in quiet and in two different noise conditions. Participants with hearing impairment spent more time processing sentences, even at high levels of speech intelligibility. In addition, the relationship between the proposed online measure and listener-specific factors, such as hearing aid use and cognitive...... abilities, was investigated. Longer processing durations were measured for participants with hearing impairment who were not accustomed to using a hearing aid. Moreover, significant correlations were found between sentence processing duration and individual cognitive abilities (such as working memory...

  11. Assistive technology for relieving communication lumber between hearing/speech impaired and hearing people

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rini Akmeliawati

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This study proposes an automatic sign language translator, which is developed as assistive technology to help the hearing/speech impaired communities to communicate with the rest of the world. The system architecture, which includes feature extraction and recognition stages is described in detail. The signs are classified into two types: static and dynamic. Various types of sign features are presented and analysed. Recognition stage considers the hidden Markov model and segmentation signature. Real-time implementation of the system with the use of Windows7 and LINUX Fedora 16 operating systems with VMware workstation is presented in detail. The system has been successfully tested on Malaysian sign language.

  12. Comparison of Different Levels of Reading Comprehension between Hearing-Impaired Loss and Normal-Hearing Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azam Sharifi

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Reading skill is one of the most important necessities of students' learning in everyday life. This skill is referred to the ability of comprehension, comment and conclusion from texts and receiving the meaning of the massage which is composed. Educational development in any student has a direct relation with the ability of the comprehension. This study is designed to investigate the effects of hearing loss on reading comprehension in hearing-impaired students compared to normal-hearing ones.Methods: Seventeen hearing-impaired students in 4th year of primary exceptional schools in Karaj, Robatkarim and Shahriyar, Iran, were enrolled in this cross-sectional study. Seventeen normal-hearing students were randomly selected from ordinary schools next to exceptional ones as control group. They were compared for different levels of reading comprehension using the international standard booklet (PIRLS 2001. Results: There was a significant difference in performance between hearing-impaired and normal- hearing students in different levels of reading comprehension (p<0.05.Conclusion: Hearing loss has negative effects on different levels of reading comprehension, so in exceptional centers, reconsideration in educational planning in order to direct education from memorizing to comprehension and deeper layers of learning seems necessary.

  13. The Sign Language of Music: Musical Shaping Gestures (MSGs in Rehearsal Talk by Performers with Hearing Impairments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Fulford

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The first part of this paper reviews literature on the use of gesture in musical contexts and reports an investigation of the gestures (spontaneous gesticulation made by musicians with different levels of hearing impairment in rehearsal talk. Profoundly deaf musicians, who were also users of British Sign Language, were found to produce significantly more gestures than moderately deaf and hearing musicians. Analysis also revealed the presence of underlying spatial and cross-modal associations in the gestural representations produced by all the musicians. The second part of the paper discusses the results of the study and addresses some wider theoretical questions. First, a classification of 'musical shaping gestures' (MSGs according to existing taxonomies is attempted. Second, the question of how a standardised 'sign language of music' could be formed is addressed and, finally, the potential uses of such a system are considered.

  14. Simultaneous Labyrinthectomy and Cochlear Implantation for Patients with Single-Sided Ménière’s Disease and Profound Sensorineural Hearing Loss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Doobe

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To investigate the treatment outcome of a simultaneous labyrinthectomy and cochlear implantation in patients with single-sided Ménière’s disease and profound sensorineural hearing loss. Study Design. Prospective study. Method. Five patients with single-sided Ménière’s disease with active vertigo and functional deafness were included. In all cases, simultaneous cochlear implantation combined with labyrinthectomy surgery was performed. The outcome has been evaluated by the Dizziness Handicap Inventory (DHI and speech recognition. Results. The combined labyrinthectomy and cochlear implantation led in all patients to a highly significant reduction of dizziness up to a restitutio ad integrum. After activation of the cochlear implant and rehabilitation, a mean monosyllabic speech understanding of 69% at 65 dB was observed. Conclusion. For patients with single-sided Ménière’s disease and profound sensorineural hearing loss the simultaneous labyrinthectomy and cochlear implantation are efficient method for the treatment of vertigo as well as the rehabilitation of the auditory system.

  15. 38 CFR 21.152 - Interpreter service for the hearing impaired.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Interpreter service for... Employment Under 38 U.S.C. Chapter 31 Special Rehabilitation Services § 21.152 Interpreter service for the hearing impaired. (a) General. The main purpose of interpreter service for the hearing impaired is to...

  16. Development and Evaluation of Computer-Aided Music-Learning System for the Hearing Impaired

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, H.-J.; Lay, Y.-L.; Liou, Y.-C.; Tsao, W.-Y.; Lin, C.-K.

    2007-01-01

    A computer-assisted music-learning system (CAMLS) has been developed to help the hearing impaired practice playing a musical melody. The music-learning performance is evaluated to test the usability of the system. This system can be a computer-supported learning tool for the hearing impaired to help them understand what pitch and tempo are, and…

  17. 45 CFR 1308.11 - Eligibility criteria: Hearing impairment including deafness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... CHILDREN, YOUTH AND FAMILIES, HEAD START PROGRAM HEAD START PROGRAM PERFORMANCE STANDARDS ON SERVICES FOR CHILDREN WITH DISABILITIES Health Services Performance Standards § 1308.11 Eligibility criteria: Hearing impairment including deafness. (a) A child is classified as deaf if a hearing impairment exists which is so...

  18. Using Modality Replacement to Facilitate Communication between Visually and Hearing-Impaired People

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moustakas, K.; Tzovaras, D.; Dybkjaer, L.

    2011-01-01

    Using sign language, speech, and haptics as communication modalities, a virtual treasure-hunting game serves as an entertainment and educational tool for visually-and hearing-impaired users.......Using sign language, speech, and haptics as communication modalities, a virtual treasure-hunting game serves as an entertainment and educational tool for visually-and hearing-impaired users....

  19. Analyzing the Subjective Consciousness of the Hearing-Impaired Students in Fine-Art Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yang

    2009-01-01

    Initiative plays an important role in special fine art education. Teachers should take into full consideration the profile of the hearing-impaired students. For better teaching achievement, it is the teachers who shoulder the responsibility to activate the subjective role and consciousness of the hearing-impaired students by arousing their sense…

  20. Determination of Hearing-Impaired Students' Requirements for Editing and Revision of Written Texts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karasu, H. Pelin

    2014-01-01

    The editing and revision stages are an important part of the writing process. This study documented the types of revisions, revision units, and revision methods used during writing conferences with hearing-impaired students. The study included seventeen hearing-impaired students educated with the auditory/oral approach and enrolled in grades six…

  1. A Review of Self-Esteem of the Hearing Impaired Football Players

    Science.gov (United States)

    Açak, Mahmut; Kaya, Oktay

    2016-01-01

    The current study aimed at reviewing the level of self-esteem of the hearing impaired football players. The sample of the study was composed of 95 football players who played in the 1st hearing impaired football league. To gather the study-data; a Personal Information Form and Self-esteem Scale were used. The data obtained were analyzed through…

  2. How Students with Hearing Impairments: Can Learn and Flourish in Your Music Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Maureen

    2004-01-01

    Activities in music class allow students, especially students with hearing impairments, to explore new means of expression and to enhance existing ones. Additional benefits may include increases in auditory awareness, cognitive ability, attention span, memory recall, and vocabulary. Students with hearing impairments can learn and flourish in music…

  3. GJB2 (Connexin-26) mutations are not frequent among hearing impaired patients in east Greenland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Homøe, Preben; Koch, Anders; Rendtorff, Nanna Dahl

    2012-01-01

    Investigate genetic causes of HI among the Inuit populations in the Arctic with a high prevalence of hearing impairment (HI).......Investigate genetic causes of HI among the Inuit populations in the Arctic with a high prevalence of hearing impairment (HI)....

  4. Perception of Quality of Life for Adults with Hearing Impairment in the LGBT Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly-Campbell, Rebecca J.; Atcherson, Samuel R.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of the this study was to examine the perception of both generic and disease-specific quality of life (QoL) in adults with hearing impairment who are members of the lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) community. Eighty-three adults who self-identified as having hearing impairment and as being members of the LGBT community and…

  5. Learning Not to Listen: The Experiences of Musicians with Hearing Impairments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulford, Robert; Ginsborg, Jane; Goldbart, Juliet

    2011-01-01

    The journey from playful musical exploration in childhood to an adult identity as a skilled musician is likely to be problematic for people with hearing impairments. Although a number of subjective accounts have been published, there is a lack of empirical research in the area. In this study, twelve musicians with hearing impairments were…

  6. Opening the World of Television for the Hearing Impaired Through Closed Caption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caldwell, Doris C.

    A producer of captioned films for the deaf describes the role of The Public Broadcasting System (PBS) in providing captioned television programming for the hearing impaired. It is explained that PBS has been working on a closed-caption production and transmission system for the hearing impaired. Recounted are Federal Communications Commission…

  7. The effect of hearing aids and frequency modulation technology on results from the communication profile for the hearing impaired.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, M Samantha; Valente, Michael; Horn, Jane Enrietto; Crandell, Carl

    2005-04-01

    Hearing impairment has been associated with decline in psychosocial function. Previous investigations have reported that the utilization of hearing aids can ameliorate these reductions in psychosocial function. To date, few investigations have examined the effects of frequency modulation technology on hearing handicap, adjustment to hearing loss, and communicative strategies. The purpose of this investigation was to examine these effects and to compare them to the benefits obtained when using hearing aids alone. Subjects ranged in age from 34 to 81 years and had mean pure-tone thresholds consistent with a bilateral moderate to severe sloping sensorineural hearing loss. All subjects wore hearing aids only and hearing aids plus FM system in a randomized fashion. The Communication Profile for the Hearing Impaired (CPHI) was administered prior to fitting the study devices and once a month for three months in each of the two conditions. A statistically significant difference between device conditions was obtained for the Importance of Communication in Work Situations subscale. Additionally, statistically significant differences over time were noted in several CPHI subscales. Despite statistical significance, none of these results were clinically significant. The implications of these results will be discussed.

  8. Speech understanding and directional hearing for hearing-impaired subjects with in-the-ear and behind-the-ear hearing aids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leeuw, A. R.; Dreschler, W. A.

    1987-01-01

    With respect to acoustical properties, in-the-ear (ITE) aids should give better understanding and directional hearing than behind-the-ear (BTE) aids. Also hearing-impaired subjects often prefer ITEs. A study was performed to assess objectively the improvement in speech understanding and directional

  9. COMPARISON OF ABILITY OF OPPOSITION WORDS PROCESSING BETWEEN HEARING AND HEARING IMPAIRED STUDENT IN FIFTH GRADE IN TEHRAN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B SHAFIEI

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Hearing impaired Persons have disorders in Communication. Theu are not able to learning many aspects of language Structures in Paroper time; quantity and quality. They can not Process these factors as same as Partners. In this research we going to assess and comparison opposite word in hearing and hearing impaired Student in fifth grade. This is a semantic research.
    Methods: Subjects of this research were hearing impaired students in fifth grade in tehramwohad + 70dbheaing loss in Best Binaural Average and in order to comparison with them, we selected hearing students in fifth grade. In this research four non linguistic factors were investigated (age, sex, words of Farsi language. The subjects must read these words and write an opposite Word in front of it. In this examination the quantity of types: right, false and without answers.
    Findings: The sequence of right answers had significant different in two group. The Sequence of learned words had significant different two groups. The time of processing in hearing students was shorter than hearing impaired students. The female subjects gave right answers more than male subjects. Discussion: The differences between bearing and hearing impaired students were in the quantity of answers specially in right answers and time of doing the test. probably these differences were due to lack of proper lexicon words and/or poor of it. The hearing students had more right answers and were shorter in time of processing.

  10. Hearing impairment caused by mutations in two different genes responsible for nonsyndromic and syndromic hearing loss within a single family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niepokój, Katarzyna; Rygiel, Agnieszka M; Jurczak, Piotr; Kujko, Aleksandra A; Śniegórska, Dominika; Sawicka, Justyna; Grabarczyk, Alicja; Bal, Jerzy; Wertheim-Tysarowska, Katarzyna

    2017-11-18

    Usher syndrome is rare genetic disorder impairing two human senses, hearing and vision, with the characteristic late onset of vision loss. This syndrome is divided into three types. In all cases, the vision loss is postlingual, while loss of hearing is usually prelingual. The vestibular functions may also be disturbed in Usher type 1 and sometimes in type 3. Vestibular areflexia is helpful in making a proper diagnosis of the syndrome, but, often, the syndrome is misdiagnosed as a nonsyndromic hearing loss. Here, we present a Polish family with hearing loss, which was clinically classified as nonsyndromic. After excluding mutations in the DFNB1 locus, we implemented the next-generation sequencing method and revealed that hearing loss was syndromic and mutations in the USH2A gene indicate Usher syndrome. This research highlights the importance of molecular analysis in establishing a clinical diagnosis of congenital hearing loss.

  11. Hearing Impairment Affects Dementia Incidence. An Analysis Based on Longitudinal Health Claims Data in Germany

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teipel, Stefan; Óvári, Attila; Kilimann, Ingo; Witt, Gabriele; Doblhammer, Gabriele

    2016-01-01

    Recent research has revealed an association between hearing impairment and dementia. The objective of this study is to determine the effect of hearing impairment on dementia incidence in a longitudinal study, and whether ear, nose, and throat (ENT) specialist care, care level, institutionalization, or depression mediates or moderates this pathway. The present study used a longitudinal sample of 154,783 persons aged 65 and older from claims data of the largest German health insurer; containing 14,602 incident dementia diagnoses between 2006 and 2010. Dementia and hearing impairment diagnoses were defined according to International Classification of Diseases, Tenth Revision, codes. We used a Kaplan Meier estimator and performed Cox proportional hazard models to explore the effect of hearing impairment on dementia incidence, controlling for ENT specialist care, care level, institutionalization, and depression. Gender, age, and comorbidities were controlled for as potential confounders. Patients with bilateral (HR = 1.43, pimpairment had higher risks of dementia incidence than patients without hearing impairment. We found no significant effect for unilateral hearing impairment and other diseases of the ear. The effect of hearing impairment was only partly mediated through ENT specialist utilization. Significant interaction between hearing impairment and specialist care, care level, and institutionalization, respectively, indicated moderating effects. We discuss possible explanations for these effects. This study underlines the importance of the association between hearing impairment and dementia. Preserving hearing ability may maintain social participation and may reduce the burden associated with dementia. The particular impact of hearing aid use should be the subject of further investigations, as it offers potential intervention on the pathway to dementia. PMID:27391486

  12. Permanent Childhood Hearing Impairment: Aetiological Evaluation of Infants identified through the Irish Newborn Hearing Screening Programme

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Smith, A

    2017-11-01

    The Newborn Hearing Screening Programme (NHSP) was established in Cork University Maternity Hospital (CUMH) in April 2011. Between April 2011 and July 2014, 42 infants were identified with a Permanent Childhood Hearing Impairment (PCHI). Following this diagnosis, infants underwent a paediatric assessment according to recognised guidelines with the intention of identifying the underlying aetiology of the PCHI. The aim of this study was to assess the findings of this aetiological workup via retrospective chart review. PCHI data was obtained from the eSP database. This is a web based information system (eSP) used to track each baby through the screening and referral process A retrospective chart review of these patients was performed. Sixteen (38%) infants were diagnosed with a bilateral sensorineural hearing loss. Two infants had congenital CMV infection. A Connexin 26 gene mutation was detected in one infant. Two infants were diagnosed with Waardenburg syndrome, One with Pendred syndrome and one with Pfeiffer syndrome. Five babies underwent cochlear implantation. Through adherence to the recommended protocol a possible cause of PCHI may be determined. This study has identified areas of future improvement for this service in Ireland.

  13. Comparison of speech discrimination in noise and directional hearing with 2 different sound processors of a bone-anchored hearing system in adults with unilateral severe or profound sensorineural hearing loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wesarg, Thomas; Aschendorff, Antje; Laszig, Roland; Beck, Rainer; Schild, Christian; Hassepass, Frederike; Kroeger, Stefanie; Hocke, Thomas; Arndt, Susan

    2013-08-01

    To evaluate and compare the benefit of a bone-anchored hearing implant with 2 different sound processors in adult patients with unilateral severe to profound sensorineural hearing loss (UHL). Prospective crossover design. Tertiary referral center. Eleven adults with UHL and normal hearing in the contralateral ear were assigned to 2 groups. All subjects were unilaterally implanted with a bone-anchored hearing implant and were initially fitted with 2 different sound processors (SP-1 and SP-2). SP-1 is a multichannel device equipped with an omnidirectional microphone and relatively simple digital signal-processing technology and provides a user-adjustable overall gain and tone control with compression limiting. SP-2 is a fully channel-by-channel programmable device, which can be set with nonlinear dynamic range compression or linear amplification. In addition, SP-2 features automatic noise management, an automatic multichannel directional microphone, microphone position compensation, and an implementation of prescription rules for different types of hearing losses, one of them unilateral deafness. After at least 1-month use of the initial processor, both groups were fitted with the alternative processor. Speech discrimination in noise and localization tests were performed at baseline visit before surgery, after at least 1-month use of the initial processor, and after at least 2-week use of the alternative processor. Relative to unaided baseline, SP-2 enabled significantly better overall speech discrimination results, whereas there was no overall improvement with SP-1. There was no difference in speech discrimination between SP-1 and SP-2 in all spatial settings. Sound localization was comparably poor at baseline and with both processors but significantly better than chance level for all 3 conditions. Patients with UHL have an overall objective benefit for speech discrimination in noise using a bone-anchored hearing implant with SP-2. In contrast, there is no overall

  14. Developing a Sense of Knowing and Acquiring the Skills to Manage Pain in Children with Profound Cognitive Impairments: Mothers’ Perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernie Carter

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Children with profound cognitive impairment (PCI are a heterogenous group who often experience frequent and persistent pain. Those people closest to the child are key to assessing their pain. This mixed method study aimed to explore how parents acquire knowledge and skills in assessing and managing their child’s pain. Eight mothers completed a weekly pain diary and were interviewed at weeks 1 and 8. Qualitative data were analysed using thematic analysis and the quantitative data using descriptive statistics. Mothers talked of learning through a system of trial and error (“learning to get on with it”; this was accomplished through “learning to know without a rule book or guide”; “learning to be a convincing advocate”; and “learning to endure and to get things right.” Experiential and reflective learning was evident in the way the mothers developed a “sense of knowing” their child’s pain. They drew on embodied knowledge of how their child usually expressed and responded to pain to help make pain-related decisions. Health professionals need to support mothers/parents to develop their knowledge and skills and to gain confidence in pain assessment and they should recognise and act on the mothers’ concerns.

  15. Comparing NAL-NL1 and DSL v5 in Hearing Aids Fit to Children with Severe or Profound Hearing Loss: Goodness of Fit-to-Targets, Impacts on Predicted Loudness and Speech Intelligibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ching, Teresa Y C; Quar, Tian Kar; Johnson, Earl E; Newall, Philip; Sharma, Mridula

    2015-03-01

    An important goal of providing amplification to children with hearing loss is to ensure that hearing aids are adjusted to match targets of prescriptive procedures as closely as possible. The Desired Sensation Level (DSL) v5 and the National Acoustic Laboratories' prescription for nonlinear hearing aids, version 1 (NAL-NL1) procedures are widely used in fitting hearing aids to children. Little is known about hearing aid fitting outcomes for children with severe or profound hearing loss. The purpose of this study was to investigate the prescribed and measured gain of hearing aids fit according to the NAL-NL1 and the DSL v5 procedure for children with moderately severe to profound hearing loss; and to examine the impact of choice of prescription on predicted speech intelligibility and loudness. Participants were fit with Phonak Naida V SP hearing aids according to the NAL-NL1 and DSL v5 procedures. The Speech Intelligibility Index (SII) and estimated loudness were calculated using published models. The sample consisted of 16 children (30 ears) aged between 7 and 17 yr old. The measured hearing aid gains were compared with the prescribed gains at 50 (low), 65 (medium), and 80 dB SPL (high) input levels. The goodness of fit-to-targets was quantified by calculating the average root-mean-square (RMS) error of the measured gain compared with prescriptive gain targets for 0.5, 1, 2, and 4 kHz. The significance of difference between prescriptions for hearing aid gains, SII, and loudness was examined by performing analyses of variance. Correlation analyses were used to examine the relationship between measures. The DSL v5 prescribed significantly higher overall gain than the NAL-NL1 procedure for the same audiograms. For low and medium input levels, the hearing aids of all children fit with NAL-NL1 were within 5 dB RMS of prescribed targets, but 33% (10 ears) deviated from the DSL v5 targets by more than 5 dB RMS on average. For high input level, the hearing aid fittings of

  16. The 'patient journey' of adults with sudden-onset acquired hearing impairment: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manchaiah, V K C; Stephens, D

    2012-05-01

    A previous study examined the 'patient journey' of adults with gradual-onset acquired hearing impairment. This study examined the same for adults with sudden-onset acquired hearing impairment, and assessed differences. Data were collected from 16 audiologists, using the Ida Institute template, and from four adults with sudden-onset acquired hearing impairment, through semi-structured interviews. Data were analysed using thematic analysis and presented using a process mapping model. A patient journey template for sudden-onset acquired hearing impairment was developed based on the professionals' and patients' perspectives. The main difference between these two groups' perspectives was seen in the self-evaluation phase: some stages within this phase were recognised by the patients but not by the professionals. The main difference between the current and the previous study was the absence of a pre-awareness phase in the journey described by patients with sudden-onset acquired hearing impairment, compared with that described by patients with gradual-onset acquired hearing impairment. Patient journey templates could be useful counselling tools for ear and hearing healthcare specialists. However, such templates should be used only as a baseline; it is important to take a detailed case history to understand each patient's unique experience, including the psychosocial impact of hearing impairment.

  17. Spectral and binaural loudness summation for hearing-impaired listeners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oetting, Dirk; Hohmann, Volker; Appell, Jens-E; Kollmeier, Birger; Ewert, Stephan D

    2016-05-01

    Sensorineural hearing loss typically results in a steepened loudness function and a reduced dynamic range from elevated thresholds to uncomfortably loud levels for narrowband and broadband signals. Restoring narrowband loudness perception for hearing-impaired (HI) listeners can lead to overly loud perception of broadband signals and it is unclear how binaural presentation affects loudness perception in this case. Here, loudness perception quantified by categorical loudness scaling for nine normal-hearing (NH) and ten HI listeners was compared for signals with different bandwidth and different spectral shape in monaural and in binaural conditions. For the HI listeners, frequency- and level-dependent amplification was used to match the narrowband monaural loudness functions of the NH listeners. The average loudness functions for NH and HI listeners showed good agreement for monaural broadband signals. However, HI listeners showed substantially greater loudness for binaural broadband signals than NH listeners: on average a 14.1 dB lower level was required to reach "very loud" (range 30.8 to -3.7 dB). Overall, with narrowband loudness compensation, a given binaural loudness for broadband signals above "medium loud" was reached at systematically lower levels for HI than for NH listeners. Such increased binaural loudness summation was not found for loudness categories below "medium loud" or for narrowband signals. Large individual variations in the increased loudness summation were observed and could not be explained by the audiogram or the narrowband loudness functions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Dual sensory loss: A major age-related increase of comorbid hearing loss and hearing aid ownership in visually impaired adults

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vreeken, H.L.; van Rens, G.H.M.B.; Knol, D.L.; van Reijen, N.A.; Kramer, S.E.; Festen, J.M.; van Nispen, R.M.A.

    2014-01-01

    Aim: Despite increasing interest in visual and hearing impairment in the older population, little attention has been paid to concurrent hearing and vision loss, also known as dual sensory loss. The aim of the present study was to investigate the prevalence of comorbid hearing disability and hearing

  19. Ageing with long-standing hearing impairment and deafness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gething, L

    2000-09-01

    Until recently, ageing with a long-standing disability had not been a major consideration for governments around the world. Policy and planning for this substantial subgroup had not kept abreast with developments in regard to the growing numbers of older people in general. Consultations held in Australia provided information and recommendations for use by governments and service agencies. The focus was on the viewpoints of consumers. This article reports results for people with long-standing deafness and hearing impairment. It is believed that disadvantages throughout life act to restrict freedom of choice and well-being in old age. Important factors perceived to underlie disadvantage include lifelong restricted access to the opportunities afforded by education and employment and their concomitant effects on the ability to develop the skills, attitudes and knowledge necessary for independence in old age; attitudes of others (including service providers); and the complexity and inflexibility of service systems. However, there are positive aspects. Comparison with published reports about people who acquired hearing loss as a result of the ageing process suggests that people with long-standing disability have learned to live with their situation. In contrast, people whose loss was associated with ageing often report emotional issues and isolation.

  20. GJB2 mutations: Genotypic and phenotypic correlation in a cohort of 690 hearing-impaired patients, toward a new mutation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leclère, Jean-Christophe; Le Gac, Marie-Suzanne; Le Maréchal, Cedric; Ferec, Claude; Marianowski, Rémi

    2017-11-01

    To analyze the clinical features of hearing impairment and to search for correlations with the genotype in patients with GJB2 mutations. Case series. Collaborative study in referral centers, institutional practice. A total of 690 hearing-impaired patients were genotypically and phenotypically described. The mutations of GJB2 and GJB6 were studied. Heterozygous patients were searched for another mutation by microsatellite approach. Prevalence of GJB2 mutations, microsatellite approach, hearing-impairment. In 498 patients (72,17% of the cohort), no mutation was found. Homozygotous patients were 59 (8,55%), with 51 for c.35delG, 6 for p.M34T and 2 for GJB6. Compound heterozygous were 64 (9,28%) with 56 c.35delG-others mutations. Genotypes with biallelic non sense mutations had a high risk of severe to profound hearing impairment. It was frequently milder in compound heterozygotes than in c.35delG homozygotes. Heterozygous patients were 69 (10%) with 21 c.35delG, 20 p.M34T and 28 others mutations. We selected patients with a complete historical medical file (clinical and audiometric data). Then, we performed a microsatellite approach (multiplex PCR of short DNA fragments) to localize a new pathologic allele. Seventeen heterozygous patients were studied. Six patients (35%) showed the same haplotype. They were compound heterozygous bearing a new pathologic allele. Genotype may affect deafness severity, but environmental and other genetic factors may also modulate the severity and evolution of GJB2-GJB6 deafness. A new haplotype for GJB2 is described but the exact mutation remains unknown. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Validation of the Paediatric Hearing Impairment Caregiver Experience (PHICE) Questionnaire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Lynne H Y; Xiang, Ling; Wong, Naomi L Y; Yuen, Kevin C P; Li, Ruijie

    2014-07-01

    The paediatric hearing impairment caregiver experience (PHICE) questionnaire is a 68-item instrument that assesses the stress experienced by caregivers of children with hearing impairment (HI). While the questionnaire has been validated in the United States, it may need to be modified for use in the Singapore context due to the differing healthcare system, costing and culture related to caregiving for children with HI. This study aims to modify and validate the PHICE questionnaire to increase its relevance and ease of use in Singapore. The original PHICE questionnaire was filled out by 127 caregivers of HI children managed at the otolaryngology clinic of the National University Hospital (NUH). An expert panel was convened to assess the questionnaire for its suitability for use in Singapore. Exploratory factor analysis was conducted to evaluate the underlying factor structure of the original PHICE questionnaire. Items with high cross-loadings were removed and a new factor structure was adopted which was further analysed using confirmatory factor analysis (CFA). Cronbach's alpha (α) was computed to determine the internal consistency of the new subscales. Items that are less relevant in Singapore and those with high cross-loadings were removed. A 5-factor structure with only 42 items remaining and corresponding to the factors: " Policy", "Healthcare", "Education", "Support" and "Adaptation" was adopted. CFA suggests a good model fit for the modified questionnaire, improved from the 8-factor structure of the original PHICE. Cronbach's α were high (>0.7) for each new subscale. The original PHICE questionnaire has been shortened and reorganised in terms of the subscales composition. The resulting instrument is structurally valid and internally consistent. It is a simple and useful tool for identifying factors related to caregiving that can negatively impact rehabilitation outcomes for children with HI in Singapore. Removal of some sign language items makes this

  2. Professional Attributes in Teacher Preparation for Teaching Students with Hearing Impairment: Implications for Inclusive Education in Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onu, V. C.; Eskay, M. K.; Ugwuanyi, L.; Igbo, J. N.; Obiyo, N. O.

    2012-01-01

    This descriptive survey research study assessed the professional attributes of teacher preparation for teaching students with hearing impairment. It discussed the role of teaching competence in ensuring the smooth delivery of lessons to children with special needs, especially the hearing-impaired. THAQ (Teaching Hearing-impaired Assessment…

  3. The effect of educational level elevation on the mathematical skill in hearing-impaired students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azam Sharifi

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: There is a relation between language skills and science learning in educational approach. Hearing-impairment and delay in learning of language skills influence the progress of learning. The aim of this research was to study the effect of educational level elevation on growth of mathematical skill. Therefore, third grade hearing-impaired students of secondary school, and forth grade hearing-impaired and normal-hearing students of elementary school were compared in terms of mathematical skill.Methods: The research was cross-sectional and the internationally standardized mathematics questions (2007 were selected as the tools of the test. The sample included 31 students of 4th grade elementary and third grade of secondary school with sever hearing loss from exceptional schools, and 17 normal-hearing students were randomly selected from ordinary schools next to the exceptional schools in Robatkarim, Karaj, and Shahriyar cities, Iran.Results: According to data analysis there was a meaningful difference between hearing-impaired students of forth and third grades and normal-hearing students in the three fields of knowledge, application and argument (p0.05.Conclusion: No significant improvement was seen in the mathematical skill of hearing-impaired students by educational level elevation. Writing mathematical books for the pre-elementary courses, revision of teaching methods, and increasing teaching hours are necessary in mathematics.

  4. Auditory function and hearing loss in children and adults with Williams syndrome: cochlear impairment in individuals with otherwise normal hearing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marler, Jeffrey A; Sitcovsky, Jessica L; Mervis, Carolyn B; Kistler, Doris J; Wightman, Frederic L

    2010-05-15

    Hearing loss is common in school-age individuals with Williams syndrome (WS) and extensive in adults. Prior studies with relatively small sample sizes suggest that hearing loss in WS has an early onset and may be progressive, yet the auditory phenotype and the scope of the hearing loss have not been adequately characterized. We used standard audiometric tools: Otoscopy, tympanometry, air-conduction (bone conduction when available) behavioral testing, and distortion product otoacoustic emissions (DPOAEs) to measure hearing sensitivity and outer hair cell function. We tested 81 individuals with WS aged 5.33-59.50 years. Sixty-three percent of the school-age and 92% of the adult participants had mild to moderately-severe hearing loss. The hearing loss in at least 50% was sensorineural. DPOAE testing corroborated behavioral results. Strikingly, 12 of 14 participants with hearing within normal limits bilaterally had 4,000-Hz DPOAE input/output (DPOAE IO) functions indicative of outer hair cell damage and impaired cochlear compression. Our results indicate that hearing loss is very common in WS. Furthermore, individuals with WS who have "normal" hearing as defined by behavioral thresholds may actually have sub-clinical impairments or undetected cochlear pathology. Our findings suggest outer hair cell dysfunction in otherwise normal hearing individuals. The DPOAE IO in this same group revealed growth functions typically seen in groups with noise-induced damage. Given this pattern of findings, individuals with WS may be at increased risk of noise-induced hearing loss. Recommendations regarding audiological testing for individuals with WS and accommodations for these individuals in both academic and nonacademic settings are provided.

  5. What makes adults with hearing impairment take up hearing AIDS or communication programs and achieve successful outcomes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laplante-Lévesque, Ariane; Hickson, Louise; Worrall, Linda

    2012-01-01

    Client involvement in health decision making, or shared decision making, is increasingly being advocated. For example, rehabilitation interventions such as hearing aids and communication programs can be presented as options to adults with hearing impairment seeking help for the first time. Our previous research focused on the predictors of intervention decisions when options were presented with a decision aid. However, not all participants took up the intervention they initially decided upon. Although it is interesting to understand what informs adults with hearing impairment's intervention decisions, it is their intervention uptake and outcomes which best represent the ultimate end result of the rehabilitation process. This prospective study investigated the predictors of uptake and of successful outcomes of hearing aids and communication programs in middle-aged and older adults with hearing impairment seeking help for the first time. Using shared decision making, 153 participants with hearing impairment (average of air conduction thresholds at 0.5, 1, 2, and 4 kHz greater than 25 dB HL in at least one ear) aged 50 yr and older were presented with intervention options: hearing aids, communication programs (group or individual), and no intervention. Each participant received a decision aid and had at least 1 wk to consider intervention options before the intervention decision was made. Outcome measures for both hearing aids and communication programs at 3 mo after intervention completion were benefit (measured with the Client-Oriented Scale of Improvement), composite outcomes (measured with the International Outcome Inventory), and reduction in self-reported hearing disability (measured with the Hearing Handicap Questionnaire). Multivariate analysis (logistic and linear regression) identified predictors of intervention uptake and of successful outcomes when all other variables were held constant. Almost a quarter of the 153 participants (24%) did not take up the

  6. THE IMPORTANCE OF HABILITATION IN THE ADOPTION PROCESS OF PREPOSITIONS IN THE CHILDREN WITH HEARING IMPAIRMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vera KOVACHEVIKJ

    2000-12-01

    Full Text Available One of the importance of children habilitation with different hearing impair degree, is the time when it develop and adopt particular grammar shapes of words in process of speech developing.Our investigation had to make possible better realize of preschool year old children (4-6 years speech developing with normal hearing and children with different hearing impaired degree. The sample of investigation accepted 30 children, experimental group (E, N=15 children with different hearing impaired degree (Kostic classification I, II and III group and control group (K N=16 children with normal speech and language developed.Children are testing by Test for estimate of prepositions developing. Thanks to KSAFA-m apparatus (Kostics Selective Auditory Filter Amplification and Kostics method of the speech building in develop of auditive perception no statistical importance exist between groups (E and K in the adoption degree all tested prepositions.In the both groups E and K exist statistical importance of differences in the acceptance degree of single prepositions with are condition with growth.By KSAFA system there are no differences between hearing impaired children (different hearing impairment and children with normal hearing, but adoption degree of prepositions in hearing impaired children depends from the length of habilitation.

  7. [The problems of hearing impairment in the flying staff of commercial aviation in Russia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pankova, V B; Bushmanov, A Iu

    2014-01-01

    The authors discuss the problems pertaining to the growing incidence of hearing impairment in the members of the flying staff employed in commercial aviation of Russia and the main criteria used to elucidate the causes behind occupational diseases of the organs of hearing. Special attention is given to the principal normative documents regulating the methodological basis on which the acoustic factor in the aircraft cockpit is evaluated, peculiarities of occupational sensorineural hearing impairment and the methods for its detection. The main errors in the determination of the relationship between the working conditions and the diseases of the organs of hearing are discussed.

  8. Underlying structure of auditory-visual consonant perception by hearing-impaired children and the influences of syllabic compression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busby, P A; Tong, Y C; Clark, G M

    1988-06-01

    The identification of consonants in (a)-C-(a) nonsense syllables, using a fourteen-alternative forced-choice procedure, was examined in 4 profoundly hearing-impaired children under five conditions: audition alone using hearing aids in free-field (A), vision alone (V), auditory-visual using hearing aids in free-field (AV1), auditory-visual with linear amplification (AV2), and auditory-visual with syllabic compression (AV3). In the AV2 and AV3 conditions, acoustic signals were binaurally presented by magnetic or acoustic coupling to the subjects' hearing aids. The syllabic compressor had a compression ratio of 10:1, and attack and release times were 1.2 ms and 60 ms. The confusion matrices were subjected to two analysis methods: hierarchical clustering and information transmission analysis using articulatory features. The same general conclusions were drawn on the basis of results obtained from either analysis method. The results indicated better performance in the V condition than in the A condition. In the three AV conditions, the subjects predominantly combined the acoustic parameter of voicing with the visual signal. No consistent differences were recorded across the three AV conditions. Syllabic compression did not, therefore, appear to have a significant influence on AV perception for these children. A high degree of subject variability was recorded for the A and three AV conditions, but not for the V condition.

  9. Benefit and quality of life after bone-anchored hearing aid fitting in children with unilateral or bilateral hearing impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Wolf, Maarten J F; Hol, Myrthe K S; Mylanus, Emmanuel A M; Snik, Ad F M; Cremers, Cor W R J

    2011-02-01

    To evaluate the benefits of a bone-anchored hearing aid (BAHA) in the daily lives of hearing-impaired children. Retrospective questionnaire study. Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen, the Netherlands. Thirty-eight BAHA users with a minimum age of 4 years at BAHA fitting and 1 to 4 years of use, divided into groups with bilateral conductive or mixed hearing loss and either normal cognition or mental disability and a group with unilateral conductive hearing loss. Scores on the Glasgow Children's Benefit Inventory, Abbreviated Profile of Hearing Aid Benefit, and Health Utilities Index Mark 3. The Glasgow Children's Benefit Inventory showed a subjective overall benefit of +32, +16, and +26 in the 3 groups (on a scale of -100 to +100). The Abbreviated Profile of Hearing Aid Benefit also showed an overall mean benefit in the groups. On an individual level, a clinically significant benefit was reported by more children in the group with bilateral hearing loss and normal cognition (7 patients [70%]) than in the unilateral hearing loss group (4 patients [27%]). Overall mean health utility scores and disability index scores on the Health Utility Index Mark 3 were comparable among the 3 groups. Overall, BAHA fitting can be considered effective and beneficial in children with bilateral or unilateral hearing loss.

  10. Auditory and tactile gap discrimination by observers with normal and impaired hearing

    OpenAIRE

    Desloge, Joseph G.; Reed, Charlotte M.; Braida, Louis D.; Perez, Zachary D.; Delhorne, Lorraine A.; Villabona, Timothy J.

    2014-01-01

    Temporal processing ability for the senses of hearing and touch was examined through the measurement of gap-duration discrimination thresholds (GDDTs) employing the same low-frequency sinusoidal stimuli in both modalities. GDDTs were measured in three groups of observers (normal-hearing, hearing-impaired, and normal-hearing with simulated hearing loss) covering an age range of 21–69 yr. GDDTs for a baseline gap of 6 ms were measured for four different combinations of 100-ms leading and traili...

  11. Binaural integration of periodically alternating speech following cochlear implantation in subjects with profound sensorineural unilateral hearing loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wesarg, Thomas; Richter, Nicole; Hessel, Horst; Günther, Stefanie; Arndt, Susan; Aschendorff, Antje; Laszig, Roland; Hassepass, Frederike

    2015-01-01

    In cochlear implant (CI) recipients with unilateral hearing loss (UHL) and normal hearing (NH) in the contralateral ear, the central auditory system receives signals of different auditory modalities, i.e. electrically via the CI ear as well as acoustically via the NH ear. The present study investigates binaural integration of bimodal stimulation in the central auditory system of 10 CI subjects with UHL by applying a modified version of the Rapidly Alternating Speech Perception (RASP) test to characterise speech recognition ability under monotic and dichotic listening arrangements. Subsequently, the results for each monotic and dichotic test condition were compared to quantify the binaural benefit from CI usage. The study results demonstrate significantly improved speech recognition under dichotic compared to monotic listening conditions, providing evidence that there is binaural integration of acoustically and electrically transmitted speech segments in the central nervous system at brainstem and cortical levels. In contrast to more commonly used tests of binaural integration, such as localisation, the RASP test provides the clinical option to investigate binaural integration involving structures at the cortical level. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  12. Interactive Auroral Science for Hearing-Impaired Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samara, M.; Michell, R. G.; Jahn, J.; Pfeifer, M.; Ibarra, S.; Hampton, D. L.; Powell, D.

    2012-12-01

    Under a NASA E/PO grant, we have partnered with San Antonio's Sunshine Cottage School for Deaf Children to develop a science class experience where students directly interact with scientists and participate in a research-grade space science measurement campaign. The unique aspect of partnering with Sunshine Cottage lies in Sunshine's approach of auditory-verbal communication. Aided by technology (hearing aids, cochlear implants), a diverse student body with students of all levels of hearing loss (moderate through profound) is taught in an entirely auditory-verbal environment at Sunshine Cottage. Bringing these students into early contact with research work can lay the foundation for future careers in the STEM field that normally they might not consider as indicated by the first year of this collaboration where the student response was distinctly positive. Here we report on the first year of those activities, as they related to a ground based imaging approach to exploring the northern lights and from the point of view of the scientists that participated. The major components of that activity included a site visit to SwRI by the students and their teachers, a semester long lab at school utilizing current research tools and a real-time campaign night. The students used a number of diagnostics to first predict and then verify auroral activity. One of the tools used was the MOOSE observatory which is a community resource state of the art observatory comprised of 5 EMCCD imagers in Alaska, established through an NSF MRI grant. We will discuss the approach and lessons learned during the first year of the project and the directions that we will likely take in the second year. Lessons learned from teaching these students space science related topic can be flowed right back into mainstream classroom settings. One other significant and unexpected aspect of this first year was that we were able to connect two groups of students through skype (in the 4th to 5th grades) that

  13. Socioeconomic disparities for hearing-impaired children in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boss, Emily F; Niparko, John K; Gaskin, Darrell J; Levinson, Kimberly L

    2011-04-01

    This study aims to evaluate disparities in socioeconomic status and healthcare utilization in hearing-impaired children using a nationally representative sample. Cross-sectional analysis of stacked data from the 1997 to 2003 National Health Interview Survey, a voluntary U.S. household survey of the National Center for Health Statistics. Children were grouped according to three levels of hearing ability based on parental response to perceived hearing status. χ(2) and analysis of variance (ANOVA) models tested the association of individual sociodemographic variables with hearing status. Multivariate regression analyses examined the association of hearing impairment with family income, poverty status, and utilization of routine and specialty health services. The total sample consisted of 76,012 children, of whom 2.6% had some hearing loss and 0.43% had marked hearing loss. Families of hearing-impaired children were more likely to report poorer health status, have Medicaid, live in single-mother households, and live below the poverty level (P dental services (OR = 1.65, 95% CI, 1.36-2.02 [mild]; OR = 1.62, 95% CI, 1.09-2.41 [marked]). No difference was identified for access to routine/sick health services. Compared with families of children without hearing loss, families of hearing-impaired children live closer to the poverty level and utilize some medical services with less frequency. Further identification of causal relationships between familial socioeconomic status and childhood hearing loss may help direct policy initiatives designed to mitigate healthcare disparities and improve access to services for hearing-impaired children. Copyright © 2011 The American Laryngological, Rhinological, and Otological Society, Inc.

  14. Subjective benefit after BAHA system application in patients with congenital unilateral conductive hearing impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunst, Sylvia J W; Hol, Myrthe K S; Mylanus, Emmanuel A M; Leijendeckers, Joop M; Snik, Ad F M; Cremers, Cor W R J

    2008-04-01

    To study whether unilateral Bone-anchored Hearing Aid (BAHA) fitting led to subjective hearing benefit in patients with congenital unilateral conductive hearing impairment. Prospective evaluation on 20 patients. Tertiary referral center. Ten adults and 10 children with congenital unilateral conductive hearing impairment, with a mean air-bone gap of 50 dB, were included. Subjective bilateral hearing benefit after BAHA fitting was measured using 2 disability-specific questionnaires: Chung and Stephens and the Speech, Spatial and Qualities of hearing profile (children's version in the patients aged BAHA fitting. Chung and Stephens' questionnaire showed an overall preference for the BAHA in several specific hearing situations. The Glasgow children's benefit inventory demonstrated an overall mean improvement of +34, which was the most prominent in the learning domain. The 10 adults showed an already good score on the Speech, Spatial and Qualities of hearing scale in the unaided situation. The BAHA was well accepted by most of the patients with congenital unilateral conductive hearing impairment. A preoperative trial of the BAHA system with the BAHA on a headband is part of the preoperative procedure. In children with unilateral conductive hearing loss, with regard to possible childs' development and communication difficulties, intervention with BAHA can be considered as an option.

  15. Effect of multiple speechlike maskers on binaural speech recognition in normal and impaired hearing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bronkhorst, A W; Plomp, R

    1992-12-01

    Speech-reception thresholds (SRT) were measured for 17 normal-hearing and 17 hearing-impaired listeners in conditions simulating free-field situations with between one and six interfering talkers. The stimuli, speech and noise with identical long-term average spectra, were recorded with a KEMAR manikin in an anechoic room and presented to the subjects through headphones. The noise was modulated using the envelope fluctuations of the speech. Several conditions were simulated with the speaker always in front of the listener and the maskers either also in front, or positioned in a symmetrical or asymmetrical configuration around the listener. Results show that the hearing impaired have significantly poorer performance than the normal hearing in all conditions. The mean SRT differences between the groups range from 4.2-10 dB. It appears that the modulations in the masker act as an important cue for the normal-hearing listeners, who experience up to 5-dB release from masking, while being hardly beneficial for the hearing impaired listeners. The gain occurring when maskers are moved from the frontal position to positions around the listener varies from 1.5 to 8 dB for the normal hearing, and from 1 to 6.5 dB for the hearing impaired. It depends strongly on the number of maskers and their positions, but less on hearing impairment. The difference between the SRTs for binaural and best-ear listening (the "cocktail party effect") is approximately 3 dB in all conditions for both the normal-hearing and the hearing-impaired listeners.

  16. Lateralized speech perception with small interaural time differences in normal-hearing and hearing-impaired listeners

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Locsei, Gusztav; Santurette, Sébastien; Dau, Torsten

    2017-01-01

    Spatial release from masking (SRM) elicited by interaural timing differences (ITDs) only can be almost normal for listeners with symmetrical hearing loss. This study investigated whether elderly hearing-impaired (HI) listeners still achieve similar SRMs as young normal-hearing (NH) listeners, when...... or two-talker babble maskers. In the dichotic conditions, maskers were lateralized by delaying the masker waveforms in the left headphone channel. Multiple magnitudes of masker ITDs were tested in both noise conditions. Although deficits were observed in speech perception abilities in speechshaped noise...

  17. Cognitive skills and the effect of noise on perceived effort in employees with aided hearing impairment and normal hearing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hua, Hakan; Emilsson, Magnus; Ellis, Rachel; Widén, Stephen; Möller, Claes; Lyxell, Bjorn

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the following study was to examine the relationship between working memory capacity (WMC), executive functions (EFs) and perceived effort (PE) after completing a work-related task in quiet and in noise in employees with aided hearing impairment (HI) and normal hearing. The study sample consisted of 20 hearing-impaired and 20 normally hearing participants. Measures of hearing ability, WMC and EFs were tested prior to performing a work-related task in quiet and in simulated traffic noise. PE of the work-related task was also measured. Analysis of variance was used to analyze within- and between-group differences in cognitive skills, performance on the work-related task and PE. The presence of noise yielded a significantly higher PE for both groups. However, no significant group differences were observed in WMC, EFs, PE and performance in the work-related task. Interestingly, significant negative correlations were only found between PE in the noise condition and the ability to update information for both groups. In summary, noise generates a significantly higher PE and brings explicit processing capacity into play, irrespective of hearing. This suggest that increased PE involves other factors such as type of task that is to be performed, performance in the cognitive skill required solving the task at hand and whether noise is present. We therefore suggest that special consideration in hearing care should be made to the individual's prerequisites on these factors in the labor market.

  18. Association between hearing impairment and lower levels of physical activity in older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gispen, Fiona E; Chen, David S; Genther, Dane J; Lin, Frank R

    2014-08-01

    To determine whether hearing impairment, highly prevalent in older adults, is associated with activity levels. Cross-sectional. National Health and Nutritional Examination Survey (2005-06). Individuals aged 70 and older who completed audiometric testing and whose physical activity was assessed subjectively using questionnaires and objectively using body-worn accelerometers (N=706). Hearing impairment was defined according to the speech-frequency (0.5-4 kHz) pure-tone average in the better-hearing ear (normal physical activity and accelerometer-measured physical activity. Both were quantified using minutes of moderate-intensity physical activity and categorized as inactive, insufficiently active, or sufficiently active. Ordinal logistic regression analyses were conducted and adjusted for demographic and cardiovascular risk factors. Individuals with moderate or greater hearing impairment had greater odds than those with normal hearing of being in a lower category of physical activity as measured according to self-report (OR=1.59, 95% CI=1.11-2.28) and accelerometry (OR=1.70, 95% CI=0.99-2.91). Mild hearing impairment was not associated with level of physical activity. Moderate or greater hearing impairment in older adults is associated with lower levels of physical activity independent of demographic and cardiovascular risk factors. Future research is needed to investigate the basis of this association and whether hearing rehabilitative interventions could affect physical activity in older adults. © 2014, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2014, The American Geriatrics Society.

  19. Generational differences in the prevalence of hearing impairment in older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhan, Weihai; Cruickshanks, Karen J; Klein, Barbara E K; Klein, Ronald; Huang, Guan-Hua; Pankow, James S; Gangnon, Ronald E; Tweed, Theodore S

    2010-01-15

    There were significant changes in health and lifestyle throughout the 20th century which may have changed temporal patterns of hearing impairment in adults. In this study, the authors aimed to assess the effect of birth cohort on the prevalence of hearing impairment in an adult population aged 45-94 years, using data collected between 1993 and 2008 from 3 cycles of the Epidemiology of Hearing Loss Study (n = 3,753; ages 48-92 years at baseline) and a sample of participants from the Beaver Dam Offspring Study (n = 2,173; ages > or =45 years). Hearing impairment was defined as a pure-tone average of thresholds at 0.5, 1, 2, and 4 kHz greater than 25-dB HL [hearing level]. Descriptive analysis, generalized additive models, and alternating logistic regression models were used to examine the birth cohort effect. Controlling for age, with every 5-year increase in birth year, the odds of having hearing impairment were 13% lower in men (odds ratio = 0.87, 95% confidence interval: 0.83, 0.92) and 6% lower in women (odds ratio = 0.94, 95% confidence interval: 0.89, 0.98). These results suggest that 1) older adults may be retaining good hearing longer than previous generations and 2) modifiable factors contribute to hearing impairment in adults.

  20. Combined effect of vision and hearing impairment on depression in elderly Chinese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Kee-Lee; Chi, Iris

    2004-09-01

    Sensory impairment and depression are common in old age and the relation between depression and vision as well as hearing impairment have been established. However, few studies have directly compared their effects and examined the impact of dual sensory loss. The purpose of this study is to compare impacts of self-reported hearing and vision loss as well as the effect of double sensory impairment on depression. This article analyzes cross-sectional data collected from a representative community sample of 2,003 Chinese elderly people aged 60 or above in Hong Kong. Respondents were interviewed in a face-to-face format and data including vision and hearing impairment, socio-demographic variables, health indicators, family support, and depression were obtained. Logistic regression analyses revealed that visual impairment was significantly related to depression even after age, gender, marital status, education, self-reported health status, the presence of 11 diseases, functional limitation and family support were controlled but hearing loss was not. Hearing impairment did not add to the likelihood of depression where visual impairment was already present. The impact of visual impairment on psychological well-being among elderly Chinese is more robust than hearing loss. Therefore, aged care service practitioners must take this risk factor into consideration in their preventive intervention and treatment for psychological well-being.

  1. Mediterranean spotted fever and hearing impairment: a rare complication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raffaella Rossio

    2015-06-01

    We describe a case of Rickettsia conorii that was complicated with hearing loss and did not respond to specific treatment. Hearing loss is a rare event, but clinicians should be aware of this complication.

  2. Very good performance with bimodal stimulation in a like-hybrid modality in a patient with profound bilateral sensorineural hearing loss with low-frequencies preservation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laria, Carla; Auletta, Gennaro; Riccardi, Pasquale; Papa, Carmine; Malesci, Rita; Franzé, Annamaria; Marciano, Elio

    2014-01-01

    In this work we describe the experimental protocol set up to obtain very good results in speech performance and in time course, with a subject presenting profound bilateral sensorineural hearing loss with low-frequencies preservation. We used a bimodal stimulation with a like-hybrid modality. Auditory functions have been analyzed by standard tonal and speech audiometry tests, and verbal perception test. The fitting protocol permitted the subject to reach a perception at 65 dB of 100% in a very short time. The subject showed a sufficient recovery of the language spectral information and a good integration of verbal information with high consonantal recognition is present. This case report shows the importance to realize a correct cochlear implant fitting and that, in the case of bimodal stimulation, it is very important to obtain the mutual adjustment of the two hearing aids. Moreover, this study enhances the importance of realizing a preservative surgery to make the most of cochlear implants capacity. © 2013.

  3. Effects of parental education level and economic status on the needs of families of hearing-impaired children in the aural rehabilitation program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eyalati, Nazanin; Jafari, Zahra; Ashayeri, Hassan; Salehi, Masoud; Kamali, Mohammad

    2013-01-01

    The family of each hearing-impaired child has its own cultural, social, educational, and financial background, and its own special needs. The objectives of our study were to explore the information and support needs of parents of children with severe-to-profound hearing impairment and to investigate the effects of the parents' level of education and economic status on the score attained in the parents'-needs questionnaire. Fifty-one parents of children with severe-to-profound hearing loss (53% girls, 47% boys; mean age 47.96 months) who used the Auditory-Verbal Therapy approach were asked to complete the parents'-needs questionnaire. The questionnaire included demographic information and hearing-loss history and covered six domains which evaluated the information or support needs of parents. Parental needs with regard to different domains were evaluated separately in all participants. Statistical analysis indicated that there was a significant decrease in the score attained in the parents'-needs questionnaire with increasing level of education of the child's parents (Peducational environment by considering individualized needs. Furthermore, parents' levels of education and economic status have a significant effect on their parents' needs.

  4. Beneficios económicos del implante coclear para la hipoacusia sensorineural profunda Economic benefits of the cochlear implant for treating profound sensorineural hearing loss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Augusto Peñaranda

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Evaluar el costo-beneficio (CB, costo-utilidad (CU y costo-efectividad (CE de la implantación coclear, comparándola con el uso de audífonos en niños con hipoacusia sensorineural profunda bilateral. MÉTODOS: Se empleó la técnica no paramétrica Propensity Score Matching (PSM para realizar la evaluación de impacto económico del implante y así llevar a cabo los análisis CB, CU y CE. Se utilizó información primaria, tomada aleatoriamente a 100 pacientes: 62 intervenidos quirúrgicamente con el implante coclear (grupo de tratamiento y 38 pertenecientes al grupo de control o usuarios de audífono para tratar la hipoacusia sensorineural profunda. RESULTADOS: Se halló un diferencial de costos económicos -en beneficio del implante coclear- cercano a US$ 204 000 entre el implante y el uso de audífonos durante la esperanza de vida de los pacientes analizados. Dicha cifra indica los mayores gastos que deben cubrir los pacientes con audífono. Con este valor descontado, el indicador costo-beneficio señala que por cada dólar invertido en el implante coclear, para tratar al paciente, el retorno de la inversión es US$ 2,07. CONCLUSIONES: El implante coclear genera beneficios económicos para el paciente. También produce utilidades en salud dado que se encontró una relación positiva de CU (ganancia en decibeles y CE (ganancia en discriminación del lenguaje.OBJECTIVE: Evaluate the cost-benefit, cost-utility, and cost-effectiveness of cochlear implantation, comparing it to the use of hearing aids in children with profound bilateral sensorineural hearing loss. METHODS: The nonparametric propensity score matching method was used to carry out an economic and impact assessment of the cochlear implant and then perform cost-benefit, cost-utility, and cost-effectiveness analyses. Primary information was used, taken randomly from 100 patients: 62 who received cochlear implants (treatment group and 38 belonging to the control group who used

  5. Provision, perception and use of trainable hearing aids in Australia: a survey of clinicians and hearing impaired adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walravens, Els; Keidser, Gitte; Hickson, Louise

    2016-12-01

    This study set out to obtain information on the impact of trainable hearing aids among clinicians and hearing aid users and candidates. Two online adaptive surveys were developed to evaluate provision, uptake and experience or expectation of trainable hearing aids. Responses from 259 clinicians, 81 hearing aid users and 23 candidates for hearing aids were included. Over half of the clinicians surveyed activated trainable features in hearing aids. Most of these clinicians activated trainable features for selected users and reported positive findings. Most commonly trainable features were not activated because the hearing aid controls had already been disabled for management or client preference. One-third reported that they had no access to trainable aids or they were unsure about the presence or activation of trainable features. The remaining clinicians never activated trainable features. One in five users reported having used trainable aids and 93% would train again. Over 85% of the remaining hearing-impaired adults were interested in trainable aids. Positive reports from most providers and users who had experience with the trainable feature support the provision of trainable aids to selected clients, pending more evidence-based data to support the clinical management of such devices.

  6. Elucidation of the molecular genetic basis of inherited hearing impairment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luijendijk, Mirjam Wilhelmina Johanna

    2006-01-01

    Hearing loss is the most common sensory disorder in the human population. It affects 0.1% of all young children and by the age of 70, 30% of the population suffers from hearing loss greater than 40 dB. When early onset hearing loss is inherited, 70% is classified as nonsyndromic and 30% as

  7. The verbotonal method for management of young, hearing-impaired children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asp, C W

    1985-01-01

    The verbotonal method is effective for establishing good spoken language and listening skills. It is based on a developmental model of normal-hearing children, and emphasizes the importance of developing good rhythm, intonation and voice quality in hearing-impaired children. Specifically trained teachers/clinicians are combined with high quality amplification and vibrotactile input with System Universal Verbotonal Audition Guberina units. These units provide a wide frequency response with the option of modifying the frequency response through the cutoff frequency and slopes of filters to emphasize the optimal field of hearing of each hearing-impaired child. Through intensive intervention the rhythm and intonation patterns and the listening skills develop simultaneously. The goal is to integrate hearing-impaired children into regular educational and social situations. The integration rates are between 60 and 90%. The parents role is more supportive than therapeutic, and is designed to meet the needs and skills of each parent.

  8. Hearing Aid Use and Mild Hearing Impairment: Learnings from Big Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timmer, Barbra H B; Hickson, Louise; Launer, Stefan

    2017-09-01

    Previous research, mostly reliant on self-reports, has indicated that hearing aid (HA) use is related to the degree of hearing impairment (HI). No large-scale investigation of the relationship between data-logged HA use and HI has been conducted to date. This study aimed to investigate if objective measures of overall daily HA use and HA use in various listening environments are different for adults with mild HI compared to adults with moderate HI. This retrospective study used data extracted from a database of fitting appointments from an international group of HA providers. Only data from the participants' most recent fitting appointment were included in the final dataset. A total of 8,489 bilateral HA fittings of adults over the age of 18 yr, conducted between January 2013 and June 2014, were included. Participants were subsequently allocated to HI groups, based on British Society of Audiology and American Speech-Language-Hearing Association audiometric descriptors. Fitting data from participating HA providers were regularly transferred to a central server. The data, with all personal information except age and gender removed, contained participants' four-frequency average (at 500, 1000, 2000, and 4000 Hz) as well as information on HA characteristics and usage. Following data cleaning, bivariate and post hoc statistical analyses were conducted. The total sample of adults' average daily HA use was 8.52 hr (interquartile range [IQR] = 5.49-11.77) in the left ear and 8.51 hr (IQR = 5.49-11.72) in the right ear. With a few exceptions, there were no statistical differences between hours of HA use for participants with mild HI compared to those with moderate impairment. Across all mild and moderate HI groups, the most common overall HA usage was between 8 and 12 hr per day. Other factors such as age, gender, and HA style also showed no relationship to hours of use. HAs were used, on average, for 7 hr (IQR = 4.27-9.96) per day in quiet and 1 hr (IQR = 0.33-1.41) per

  9. The combination of vestibular impairment and congenital sensorineural hearing loss predisposes patients to ocular anomalies, including Usher syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kletke, S; Batmanabane, V; Dai, T; Vincent, A; Li, S; Gordon, K A; Papsin, B C; Cushing, S L; Héon, E

    2017-07-01

    The co-occurrence of hearing impairment and visual dysfunction is devastating. Most deaf-blind etiologies are genetically determined, the commonest being Usher syndrome (USH). While studies of the congenitally deaf population reveal a variable degree of visual problems, there are no effective ophthalmic screening guidelines. We hypothesized that children with congenital sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL) and vestibular impairment were at an increased risk of having USH. A retrospective chart review of 33 cochlear implants recipients for severe to profound SNHL and measured vestibular dysfunction was performed to determine the ocular phenotype. All the cases had undergone ocular examination and electroretinogram (ERG). Patients with an abnormal ERG underwent genetic testing for USH. We found an underlying ocular abnormality in 81.81% (27/33) of cases; of which 75% had refractive errors, and 50% of those patients showed visual improvement with refractive correction. A total of 14 cases (42.42%; 14/33) had generalized rod-cone dysfunction on ERG suggestive of Usher syndrome type 1, confirmed by mutational analysis. This work shows that adding vestibular impairment as a criterion for requesting an eye exam and adding the ERG to detect USH increases the chances of detecting ocular anomalies, when compared with previous literature focusing only on congenital SNHL. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Linguistic Profiles of Children with CI as Compared with Children with Hearing or Specific Language Impairment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoog, Brigitte E.; Langereis, Margreet C.; Weerdenburg, Marjolijn; Knoors, Harry E. T.; Verhoeven, Ludo

    2016-01-01

    Background: The spoken language difficulties of children with moderate or severe to profound hearing loss are mainly related to limited auditory speech perception. However, degraded or filtered auditory input as evidenced in children with cochlear implants (CIs) may result in less efficient or slower language processing as well. To provide insight…

  11. Linguistic profiles of children with CI as compared with children with hearing or specific language impairment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoog, B.E. de; Langereis, M.C.; Weerdenburg, M. van; Knoors, H.E.; Verhoeven, L.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The spoken language difficulties of children with moderate or severe to profound hearing loss are mainly related to limited auditory speech perception. However, degraded or filtered auditory input as evidenced in children with cochlear implants (CIs) may result in less efficient or

  12. Communicative Competence of Pre-School, Afrikaans-Speaking, Hearing-Impaired Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubin, Esther

    1988-01-01

    The communicative competence of 12 Afrikaans-speaking children (mean age 4 years), with severe to profound hearing, loss was evaluated. Among findings was that the subjects were resourceful in using the context effectively in conversational interactions and frequently used nonverbal cues such as gesture. (DB)

  13. Audiovisual Asynchrony Detection and Speech Intelligibility in Noise With Moderate to Severe Sensorineural Hearing Impairment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baskent, Deniz; Bazo, Danny

    2011-01-01

    Objective: The objective of this study is to explore the sensitivity to intermodal asynchrony in audiovisual speech with moderate to severe sensorineural hearing loss. Based on previous studies, two opposing expectations were an increase in sensitivity, as hearing-impaired listeners heavily rely on

  14. Long-term effects of congenital hearing impairment on language performance in adults

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huysmans, E.; de Jong, J.; van Lanschot-Wery, J.H.; Festen, J.M.; Goverts, S.T.

    2014-01-01

    Aim The aim of this study was to examine long-term effects of moderate to severe congenital hearing impairment (MSCHI) at an age when language development is completed, i.e., in adults. Method We studied language performance in Dutch in 10 normal-hearing (NH) adults and 20 adults with MSCHI, using

  15. Predictors of Rehabilitation Intervention Decisions in Adults with Acquired Hearing Impairment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laplante-Levesque, Ariane; Hickson, Louise; Worrall, Linda

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: This study investigated the predictors of rehabilitation intervention decisions in middle-age and older adults with acquired hearing impairment seeking help for the first time. Method: Using shared decision making, 139 participants were offered intervention options: hearing aids, communication programs (group or individual), and no…

  16. Children's and Adolescents' Moral Emotion Attributions and Judgements about Exclusion of Peers with Hearing Impairments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chilver-Stainer, Jennifer; Gasser, Luciano; Perrig-Chiello, Pasqualina

    2014-01-01

    Children and adolescents with hearing impairments are at risk of being excluded from activities with hearing peers. Moral emotion attributions may represent important indicators for children's identification with the moral norm not to exclude peers based on disability. Against this background, we investigated how 10-, 12- and 15-year-olds…

  17. Simultaneous reflection masking: dependency on direct sound level and hearing-impairment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buchholz, Jörg; Mihai, Paul Glad

    2008-01-01

    Simultaneous reflection masked thresholds (RMTs) were measured for 3 normal-hearing (NH) and 3 hearing-impaired (HI) subjects as a function of reflection delay. All stimuli were presented diotically and dichotically, using a 200 ms long broadband noise (100-50000 Hz) as input signal. For 55 dB-SL...

  18. Effects of hearing and vision impairments on the Montreal Cognitive Assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dupuis, Kate; Pichora-Fuller, M Kathleen; Chasteen, Alison L; Marchuk, Veronica; Singh, Gurjit; Smith, Sherri L

    2015-01-01

    Many standardized measures of cognition include items that must be seen or heard. Nevertheless, it is not uncommon to overlook the possible effects of sensory impairment(s) on test scores. In the current study, we investigated whether sensory impairments could affect performance on a widely used screening tool, the Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA). Three hundred and one older adults (mean age = 71 years) completed the MoCA and also hearing and vision tests. Half of the participants had normal hearing and vision, 38% impaired hearing, 5% impaired vision, and 7% had dual-sensory impairment. More participants with normal sensory acuity passed the MoCA compared to those with sensory loss, even after modifying scores to adjust for sensory factors. The results suggest that cognitive abilities may be underestimated if sensory problems are not considered and that people with sensory loss are at greater risk of cognitive decline.

  19. Working memory and novel word learning in children with hearing impairment and children with specific language impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansson, K; Forsberg, J; Löfqvist, A; Mäki-Torkko, E; Sahlén, B

    2004-01-01

    Working memory is considered to influence a range of linguistic skills, i.e. vocabulary acquisition, sentence comprehension and reading. Several studies have pointed to limitations of working memory in children with specific language impairment. Few studies, however, have explored the role of working memory for language deficits in children with hearing impairment. The first aim was to compare children with mild-to-moderate bilateral sensorineural hearing impairment, children with a preschool diagnosis of specific language impairment and children with normal language development, aged 9-12 years, for language and working memory. The special focus was on the role of working memory in learning new words for primary school age children. The assessment of working memory included tests of phonological short-term memory and complex working memory. Novel word learning was assessed according to the methods of. In addition, a range of language tests was used to assess language comprehension, output phonology and reading. Children with hearing impairment performed significantly better than children with a preschool diagnosis of specific language impairment on tasks assessing novel word learning, complex working memory, sentence comprehension and reading accuracy. No significant correlation was found between phonological short-term memory and novel word learning in any group. The best predictor of novel word learning in children with specific language impairment and in children with hearing impairment was complex working memory. Furthermore, there was a close relationship between complex working memory and language in children with a preschool diagnosis of specific language impairment but not in children with hearing impairment. Complex working memory seems to play a significant role in vocabulary acquisition in primary school age children. The interpretation is that the results support theories suggesting a weakened influence of phonological short-term memory on novel word

  20. Reading and communication skills after universal newborn screening for permanent childhood hearing impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCann, D C; Worsfold, S; Law, C M; Mullee, M; Petrou, S; Stevenson, J; Yuen, H M; Kennedy, C R

    2009-04-01

    Birth in periods with universal newborn screening (UNS) for permanent childhood hearing impairment (PCHI) and early confirmation of PCHI have been associated with superior subsequent language ability in children with PCHI. However their effects on reading and communication skills have not been addressed in a population-based study. In a follow-up study of a large birth cohort in southern England, we measured reading by direct assessment and communication skills by parent report in 120 children with bilateral moderate, severe or profound PCHI aged 5.4-11.7 years, of whom 61 had been born in periods with UNS, and in a comparison group of 63 children with normal hearing. Compared with birth during periods without UNS, birth during periods with UNS was associated with better reading scores (inter-group difference 0.39 SDs, 95% CI 0.02 to 0.76, p = 0.042) and communication skills scores (difference 0.51 SDs, 95% CI 0.06 to 0.95, p = 0.026). Compared with later confirmation, confirmation of PCHI by age 9 months was also associated with better reading (difference 0.51 SDs, 95% CI 0.15 to 0.87, p = 0.006) and communication skills (difference 0.56 SDs, 95% CI 0.12 to 1.00, p = 0.013). In the children with PCHI, reading, communication and language ability were highly correlated (r = 0.62-0.84, preading and communication abilities at primary school age. These benefits represent functional gains of sufficient magnitude to be important in children with PCHI.

  1. Performance, fatigue and stress in open-plan offices: the effects of noise and restoration on hearing impaired and normal hearing individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahncke, Helena; Halin, Niklas

    2012-01-01

    Hearing impaired and normal hearing individuals were compared in two within-participant office noise conditions (high noise: 60 L Aeq and low noise: 30 L Aeq ). Performance, subjective fatigue, and physiological stress were tested during working on a simulated open-plan office. We also tested two between-participants restoration conditions following the work period with high noise (nature movie or continued office noise). Participants with a hearing impairment (N = 20) were matched with normal hearing participants (N = 18) and undertook one practice session and two counterbalanced experimental sessions. In each experimental session they worked for two hours with basic memory and attention tasks. We also measured physiological stress indicators (cortisol and catecholamines) and self-reports of mood and fatigue. The hearing impaired participants were more affected by high noise than the normal hearing participants, as shown by impaired performance for tasks that involve recall of semantic information. The hearing impaired participants were also more fatigued by high noise exposure than participants with normal hearing, and they tended to have higher stress hormone levels during the high noise compared to the low noise condition. Restoration with a movie increased performance and motivation for the normal hearing participants, while rest with continued noise did not. For the hearing impaired participants, continued noise during rest increased motivation and performance, while the movie did not. In summary, the impact of noise and restorative conditions varied with the hearing characteristics of the participants. The small sample size does however encourage caution when interpreting the results.

  2. The Use of Vibrotactile Aids with Preschool Hearing-Impaired Children: Case Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheehy, Patti; Hansen, Susan Aaberg

    1983-01-01

    Case studies of three hearing-impaired four-year-old children revealed that vibrotactile stimulation aids were effective in teaching speech skills. The aid helped the students become more aware of sounds. (CL)

  3. The effect of cochlear implantation on nasalance of speech in postlingually hearing-impaired adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Sabah M; Malki, Khalid H; Mesallam, Tamer A; Farahat, Mohamad; Bukhari, Manal; Murry, Thomas

    2012-09-01

    Hypernasality is considered a prevalent speech abnormality that could significantly contribute to the unintelligibility of the hearing-impaired speakers. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of cochlear implantation and the duration of hearing loss on nasalance of speech of a postlingually impaired group of Saudi adult patients. Retrospective study. This study included 25 postlingually hearing-impaired patients who underwent cochlear implantation and 25 age-matched control subjects. Patients were divided into three groups according to the duration of hearing loss. The nasometric data of the hearing-impaired group were compared with the control group. Also, the preoperative values were compared with the postoperative values 6, 12, and 24 months after surgery. Significant differences were demonstrated between the preimplantation nasalance scores of the three subgroups and between the patients and control groups. There were statistically significant differences demonstrated between the pre- and the postimplantation nasalance values for the three groups of patients. Cochlear implantation appears to have significant effects on improving the nasalance of the speech of postlingually hearing-impaired adult patients. However, the degree of improvement might vary according to the duration of hearing loss the patients had preimplantation. Copyright © 2012 The Voice Foundation. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. The patient journey of adults with hearing impairment: the patients' views.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manchaiah, V K C; Stephens, D; Meredith, R

    2011-06-01

    The term 'patient journey' refers to the experiences and processes the patient goes through during the course of a disease and its treatment. The study explores the perspectives of adults with acquired hearing impairment and to further develop the patient journey template based on the Ida model. Qualitative approach using thematic analysis and process mapping. Support groups of people with hearing impairment. Thirty-two adults with acquired hearing impairment from two hearing impaired groups in Wales. All were hearing aid users. Participants worked in small groups to describe their experiences through hearing loss. These data were used to develop a template of the patients' perspective of the journey. This was then compared with the perspective of professionals, and a 'patient journey template for adults with acquired hearing impairment' was developed. This template identifies seven main phases as follows: (i) pre-awareness; (ii) awareness; (iii) movement; (iv) diagnostics; (v) rehabilitation; (vi) self-evaluation; and (vii) resolution. The study identified a number of new components. The self-evaluation component was not defined by professionals and reflects the need for patients to consider the costs, benefits and alternatives to the approach provided by audiologists. It is important for audiologists to be aware of this. The study highlighted the differences and commonalities in perspectives of professionals and patients. Use of the patient journey can help clinicians to understand the unique experiences their patients go through help them to develop patient-centred treatment. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  5. Characteristics of reading and understanding of hearing impaired students in classes VI-VIII

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustaf Morina

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Good reading has a very important role in the development of children with hearing impaired; also reading in explicit way is one of the crucial factors which affect the oral language development of children with hearing impaired. The best form and possibility of improvement, development of oral language, development of communicating, receipt of information, knowledge, and ideas over the world, is reading. When the auditory perception is damaged reading is poor. Hearing impairment causes a lot of problems in the development of personality of children with hearing impairment in these fields: poor development of vocabulary, poor quality of lexica, poor quality of sentences, and disorder in articulation. The purpose of this research is to verify the following: 1-Speed of reading of hearing impaired children, 2-The number of errors, 3-The kind of errors, 4-To understand the text in the context of the degree of hearing impairment, age (class, success in school and gender. This theoretical-experimental study was made with students from two schools; special school “Mother Teresa” in Prizren and Primary School “Elena Gjika” in Prishtina (class attached. The research included a total of 32 students (respondent 27 students (respondent from special schools “Mother Teresa” in Prizren and 5 elementary school students “Elena Gjika” Prishtina, all these students are with hearing impairment. From 32 students involved in the research, 23 were male and 9 female. The research was done by applying a text fables “The fox and the raven” watched and analyzed in terms of three dimensions. The research results have shown that students with hearing impairments have considerable problems in many aspects; in terms of speed of reading, students with hearing impairment have stagnated compared with their peers in the ratio 8/1. In terms of reading errors have stagnated considered being incomparable. In terms of understanding the text students with hearing

  6. The specifics of reading to students with hearing and speech impairment in classes VI-VIII

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustaf Morina

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Good reading has a very important role in the development of children with hearing impaired; also reading in explicit way is one of the crucial factors which affect the oral language development of children with hearing impaired. The best form and possibility of improvement, development of oral language, development of communicating, receipt of information, knowledge, and ideas over the world, is reading. When the auditory perception is damaged reading is poor. Hearing impairment causes a lot of problems in the development of personality of children with hearing impairment in these fields: poor development of vocabulary, poor quality of lexica, poor quality of sentences, and disorder in articulation. The purpose of this research is to verify the following: 1-Speed of reading of hearing impaired children, 2-The number of errors, 3-The kind of errors, 4-To understand the text in the context of the degree of hearing impairment, age (class, success in school and gender. This theoretical-experimental study was made with students from two schools; special school “Mother Teresa” in Prizren and Primary School “Elena Gjika” in Prishtina (class attached. The research included a total of 32 students (respondent 27 students (respondent from special schools “Mother Teresa” in Prizren and 5 elementary school students “Elena Gjika” Prishtina, all these students are with hearing impairment. From 32 students involved in the research, 23 were male and 9 female. The research was done by applying a text fables “The fox and the raven” watched and analyzed in terms of three dimensions. The research results have shown that students with hearing impairments have considerable problems in many aspects; in terms of speed of reading, students with hearing impairment have stagnated compared with their peers in the ratio 8/1. In terms of reading errors have stagnated considered being incomparable. In terms of understanding the text students with hearing

  7. Pioneering Strategies for Relieving Dental Anxiety in Hearing Impaired Children: a Randomized Controlled Clinical Study

    OpenAIRE

    Shalini Chandrasekhar; Ghanashyam Prasad Madu; Naga Radhakrishna Ambati; Pavani Reddy Suravarapu; Kalyani Uppu; Deepthi Bolla

    2017-01-01

    Statement of the Problem: Hearing impaired children have a problem in understanding and comprehending with dental treatments. Visual language is the sensible answer of how to improve communication with them. Purpose: To evaluate the applicability of dental sign language in Hearing impaired children in relieving anxiety during stressful dental treatment by improving their means of communication. Materials and Method: This randomized clinical trial was carried out in the Department of Ped...

  8. Motor Skills in Hearing Impaired Children with or without Cochlear Implant – A Systematic Review

    OpenAIRE

    Vidranski, Tihomir; Farkaš, Daria

    2015-01-01

    Hearing impairment is a major limitation in communication, and it can obstruct psychological development, development of social skills and motor development. Hearing impairment is the third most common contemporary chronic health condition, and it has become a public health problem. The effectiveness of problem solving in everyday life and in emergency situations depends greatly on the amount and quality of the motor programs. Therefore, it is evident that the normal motor develop...

  9. An Investigation of Sign Language as a Way of Communication in People with Hearing Impairments

    OpenAIRE

    Motoyasu, Kyoko; Sato, Rie

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to clarify how sign language is used as a way of communication among people with hearing impairments as compared to other ways such as the oral method, writing and phonetic sign. A questionnaire concerning frequency of using sign language and the degree of understanding, transmission, and satisfaction with its use was sent to 36 students of a junior and senior high school for the deaf-mute and 43 hearing impaired adults belonging to a communication suppor...

  10. [Hearing impairment and psychopathological disorders in children and adolescents. Review of the recent literature].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailly, D; Dechoulydelenclave, M-B; Lauwerier, L

    2003-01-01

    Hearing impairment is a multifaceted condition with medical and social aspects. If the neuropsychiatric impact of deafness on children has been investigated by researchers from a variety of fields and backgrounds, their conclusion is that children with hearing impairment follow many different developmental pathways. The aim of this paper is to examine the relationships between hearing impairment and mental health and the effect of impaired communication on family development. From a review of the literature, the authors examine the relationships between hearing impairment and mental disorders in children and adolescents in terms of prevalence, clinical features and etiological factors. The fami-ly dynamics and the parents-child interactions were also explored. The assessment of psychiatric disorders in hearing-impaired children sets some methodological pro-blems. Accurate evaluation is hampered by the immature language exhi-bited by many hearing-impaired children and by the difficulties that may be encountered in establishing rapport if the child does not understand the examiner's verbal exchanges. Several authors point out the lack of communication skills and experiences with hearing-impaired children on the part of many examiners. In addition, delays have been observed for the development of social maturity in hearing-impaired children and the parents' descriptions may reflect their own worries, rather than the emotional-behavioral functioning of the child. The measurement of psychiatric symptoms is then compromised insofar as many of the assessment procedures are highly verbal and were standardized for normal-hearing children. These difficulties may explain that the pre-valence rates of mental disorders in hearing-impaired children and adolescents found in the literature vary from 15% to 60%. If autism and deafness may both confound each others' dia-gnosis, several studies also point out the high comorbidity observed between these 2 conditions. The significance

  11. Hearing-impaired students' reading skills in exceptional and ordinary schools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aliasghar Kakojoibari

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Reading skills, a complicated process, should be learnt and solely is not depend on sounds conforming with the written symbols on a page. Readers will be able to understand and perceive the deeper meaning of the text based on their experiences and knowledge obtained through reading. This research aimed to compare hearing-impaired students' reading literacy in exceptional and ordinary schools in Iran.Methods: This cross-sectional study was done on 28 hearing-impaired students of the 4th year of primary exceptional and ordinary schools of Shahr-e-Ray and Shahryar cities, Iran, using the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study (PIRLS 2006 booklets. Comparative statistical analysis was performed using Student's t-test.Results: The hearing-impaired students in ordinary schools had significantly (p<0.05 higher scores [mean (SD] in reading literacy [3.67 (1.74], comprehension of informational contents [4.21 (2.48], and comprehension of literary contents [3.14(1.23] than hearing-impaired students in exceptional schools [1.78 (1.06, 1.92 (1.49, and 1.64 (1.62, respectively].Conclusion: Hearing-impaired students in ordinary schools meaningfully had higher performance of reading skills in comparison with hearing-impaired students in exceptional schools. It seems that an appropriate cultural bed should be provided in order to conduct these students and accept them in ordinary schools.

  12. The grammatical morpheme deficit in moderate hearing impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGuckian, Maria; Henry, Alison

    2007-03-01

    Much remains unknown about grammatical morpheme (GM) acquisition by children with moderate hearing impairment (HI) acquiring spoken English. To investigate how moderate HI impacts on the use of GMs in speech and to provide an explanation for the pattern of findings. Elicited and spontaneous speech data were collected from children with moderate HI (n = 10; mean age = 7;4 years) and a control group of typically developing children (n = 10; mean age = 3;2 years) with equivalent mean length of utterance (MLU). The data were analysed to determine the use of ten GMs of English. Comparisons were made between the groups for rates of correct GM production, for types and rates of GM errors, and for order of GM accuracy. The findings revealed significant differences between the HI group and the control group for correct production of five GMs. The differences were not all in the same direction. The HI group produced possessive -s and plural -s significantly less frequently than the controls (this is not simply explained by the perceptual saliency of -s) and produced progressive -ing, articles and irregular past tense significantly more frequently than the controls. Moreover, the order of GM accuracy for the HI group did not correlate with that observed for the control group. Various factors were analysed in an attempt to explain order of GM accuracy for the HI group (i.e. perceptual saliency, syntactic category, semantics and frequency of GMs in input). Frequency of GMs in input was the most successful explanation for the overall pattern of GM accuracy. Interestingly, the order of GM accuracy for the HI group (acquiring spoken English as a first language) was characteristic of that reported for individuals learning English as a second language. An explanation for the findings is drawn from a factor that connects these different groups of language learners, i.e. limited access to spoken English input. It is argued that, because of hearing factors, the children with HI are

  13. An investigation of factors that influence help-seeking for hearing impairment in older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Carly; Hickson, Louise; Lovelock, Karen; Lampert, Michelle; Khan, Asad

    2014-02-01

    To examine the influence of audiological and non-audiological factors on help-seeking for hearing impairment (HI) in older adults. A retrospective research design was employed. Participants completed 14 measures, after which two multivariate, multinomial logistic regression models were fitted to the data to determine which factors were associated with consultation for HI and hearing aid uptake. Three-hundred-and-seven individuals who were 60 years or older and who presented with a unilateral or bilateral HI participated in the study. Non-hearing aid owners were assigned to a non-consulter group (n=55) or a consulter group (n=92); hearing aid owners were assigned to an unsuccessful hearing aid owner group (n=75) or a successful hearing aid owner group (n=85). A similar combination of factors was associated with the decisions to consult a health professional about HI and/or to adopt hearing aids. The most important factors related to attitudinal beliefs (e.g. perceived benefits of hearing aids) and external cues to action (e.g. support from significant others). Greater HI also influenced consultation and adoption of hearing aids. Findings highlight the importance of non-audiological factors in hearing rehabilitation to improve consultation for HI and hearing aid adoption.

  14. The effectiveness of linguistic plays on the grammatical skills of hearing-impaired children with hearing aids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sahar Mohammad Esmaeilzadeh

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Grammatical skills development of hearing-impaired children depends on using appropriate educational rehabilitation programs. This study aims to investigate the effectiveness of linguistic plays on the grammatical skills in hearing-impaired children with hearing aids.Methods: Ten hearing-impaired children with hearing aids, aged between 5 and 7, were randomly assigned to two groups (5 children in each group. Each treatment group received 12 sessions on linguistic plays. The grammatical skills of these children were evaluated via the TOLD-P: 3 (Persian version; in addition, their level of intelligence was assessed by the Raven test.Results: The difference between the scores of both control and treatment groups revealed a statistically significant difference in grammatical skills (t=7.61, p=0.001 and three subskills of the children who participated in the linguistic plays. These subskills include syntactic understanding (t=3.16, p=0.013, sentence imitation (t=1.71, p=0.006, and morphological completion (t=6.55, p=0.001. In other words, the findings suggest that linguistic plays have a significant impact on the improvement of the aforementioned skills in hearing-impaired children.Conclusion: Results suggest that it would be beneficial to include linguistic plays as part of routine rehabilitation programs as a means of improving the grammatical difficulties of children. After partaking in linguistic plays, children significantly improved their ability to comprehend the meaning of sentences and also to recognize, understand, and use common Persian morphological forms.

  15. Mental Health of the People with Hearing Impairment in Korea: A Population-Based Cross-Sectional Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Hyun-Young; Hwang, Hee-Jin

    2017-03-01

    The prevalence of hearing impairment is increasing and an association between hearing impairment and mental health has been reported. Our study aimed to determine the association between hearing impairment and mental health in Korea. This was a cross-sectional study of data from the Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2010-2013, with a sample size of 18,563 individuals (6,395 with hearing impairment and 12,168 without hearing impairment), aged ≥20 years. The female group with hearing impairment tended to have a higher rate of stress (odds ratio [OR], 1.32; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.11 to 1.56). The association between hearing impairment and depressive symptoms was higher in elderly males (OR, 1.60; 95% CI, 1.10 to 2.32), while the association of hearing impairment with suicide ideation was higher in elderly females (OR, 1.32; 95% CI, 1.00 to 1.75). Elderly individuals with hearing impairment are easily susceptible to poor mental health status. Early targeted intervention to address mental health problems is recommended for people with hearing impairment.

  16. Determinants of communication skills development in children with hearing impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novaes, Beatriz C Albuquerque Caiuby; Versolatto-Cavanaugh, Maria Carolina; Figueiredo, Renata de Souza Lima; Mendes, Beatriz de Castro Andrade

    2012-01-01

    To establish relationships between age at onset of individual hearing aid use, functional hearing, communication skills, family involvement and family expectations regarding language development of children diagnosed with hearing loss during the first three years of life. Thirty-five babies diagnosed with moderate to severe hearing loss who were receiving treatment at the Children's Hearing Center/Derdic (CeAC) were evaluated during a period of 24 months. Assessments were carried out every six months and included: VRA--Visual reinforcement audiometry (with and without amplification); IT-MAIS; MUSS; and satisfaction of family regarding child development. Cluster analysis was performed among the subjects. Consistent use of hearing aids was the only variable that exhibited a strong relationship with hearing and language skills. Children whose parents were not satisfied exhibited severe hearing loss and limited auditory capacity even with the use of hearing aid, and, consequently, poor auditory skills and speech production. Datalogging monitoring can guide the knowledge of speech-language pathologists and audiologists and it can also be used on strategic planning. Family involvement, quality of parental participation in the intervention program as well as expectations about the future are also important aspects to consider as these can aid therapists and researchers on the assessment of deaf babies intervention effectiveness.

  17. Hearing impairment and language delay in infants: Diagnostics and genetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang-Roth, Ruth

    2014-01-01

    This overview study provides information on important phoniatric and audiological aspects of early childhood hearing and language development with the aim of presenting diagnostic and therapeutic approaches. The article first addresses the universal newborn hearing screening that has been implemented in Germany for all infants since January 2009. The process of newborn hearing screening from the maternity ward to confirmation diagnostics is presented in accordance with a decision by the Federal Joint Committee (G-BA). The second topic is pediatric audiology diagnostics. Following confirmation of a permanent early childhood hearing disorder, the search for the cause plays an important role. Hereditary hearing disorders and intrauterine cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection, probably the most common cause of an acquired hearing disorder, are discussed and compared with the most common temporary hearing disorder, otitis media with effusion, which in some cases is severe enough to be relevant for hearing and language development and therefore requires treatment. The third topic covered in this article is speech and language development in the first 3 years of life, which is known today to be crucial for later language development and learning to read and write. There is a short overview and introduction to modern terminology, followed by the abnormalities and diagnostics of early speech and language development. Only some aspects of early hearing and language development are addressed here. Important areas such as the indication for a cochlear implant in the first year of life or because of unilateral deafness are not included due to their complexity. PMID:25587365

  18. Characteristics of competitive activity of qualified basketball with hearing impairment compare to qualified healthy basketball player

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sobko I. N.

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Purpose - the comparison of competitive activity skilled basketball players with normal hearing and impaired hearing aid. The study involved female athletes Ukrainian National Team with hearing (n = 12 and healthy female athletes (n = 12. Technical protocols processed 20 games World Cup, Europe, Ukraine among deaf athletes. Processed records 20 games of the Ukrainian Championship. Found that healthy athletes for the game significantly longer perform and get into the basket fine and three point shots, fewer mistakes, but they are inferior in rebounds. Installed insignificant differences between the number of throws, entering the basket from the middle distance, interceptions in athletes with hearing impairment and healthy athletes. Recommended to increase the coherence of group and team interactions basketball with hearing during the game to use the special visual aids.

  19. Acoustic and kinematic analyses of Mandarin vowels in speakers with hearing impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Peiyun; Zhang, Xueying; Bai, Jing; Wang, ZizhongJohn

    2017-12-21

    The central aim of this experiment was to compare acoustic parameters, formant frequencies and vowel space area (VSA), in adolescents with hearing-impaired (HI) and their normal-hearing (NH) peers; for kinematic parameters, the movements of vocal organs, especially the lips, jaw and tongue, during vowel production were analysed. The participants were 12 adolescents with different degrees of hearing impairment. The control group consisted of 12 age-matched NH adolescents. All participants were native Chinese speakers who were asked to produce the Mandarin vowels /a/, /i/ and /u/, with subsequent acoustic and kinematic analysis. There was significant difference between the two groups. Additionally, the HI group produced more exaggerated mouth and less tongue movements in all vowels, compared to their NH peers. Results were discussed regarding possible relationship between acoustic data, articulatory movements and degree of hearing loss to provide an integrative assessment of acoustic and kinematic characteristics of individuals with hearing loss.

  20. French-Canadian translation and validation of four questionnaires assessing hearing impairment and handicap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincent, Claude; Gagné, Jean-Pierre; Leroux, Tony; Clothier, Audrey; Larivière, Marianne; Dumont, Frédéric S; Gendron, Martine

    2017-04-01

    Questionnaires evaluating hearing impairment are available in English but there is a need for French standardised questionnaires for researchers as well as for audiologists and other clinicians. The objective of this study is to describe the translation and validation of four questionnaires that assess different aspects of hearing impairment and handicap among elders with hearing loss, by comparing the main score and psychometric evaluation of original and French-Canadian (FC) versions of the World Health Organization Disability Assessment Scale II (WHO-DAS II), the Screening Test for Hearing Problems (STHP), the Abbreviated Profile of Hearing Aid Benefit (APHAB) and the Measure of Audiologic Rehabilitation Self-Efficacy for Hearing Aids (MARS-HA). Vallerand method: translation and back-translation by two translators, revision by a committee of experts and pre-tested with five bilingual older participants. Participants (n = 29) were 65 years of age or older including 21 with hearing aids. The psychometric properties (internal consistency, temporal stability after four weeks) indicate good reliability for most of the translated questionnaires and their subscales, especially the WHO-DAS II. The translations in FC of two hearing loss and two hearing aid questionnaires were validated. It is recommended to pursue the demonstration for temporal stability for the STHP.

  1. A Micro-Ethnographic Study of the Communication/Language Development in a Japanese Child with Profound Hearing Loss Before and After Cochlear Implantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard R. Kretschmer

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available This study described the communication and spoken language development of a Japanese girl with profound hearing loss who used a cochlear implant from 19 months of age. The girl, Akiko, was born in Belgium where her family was living at that time. After she was identified as deaf at birth, she and her parents were provided with support services. The family relocated to Japan when Akiko was 1 year 5 months of age. When she was 1 year 6 months of age Akiko underwent cochlear implantation. The cochlear implant device was activated when Akiko was 1 year 7 months of age. The parents routinely made video recordings of Akiko interacting with family members and teachers at home and at school. The video recordings taken by the parents used as the data for this study contained scenes of Akiko from the time she was 3 months of age until she was 4 years 11 months of age. Micro-ethnographic methods were used to analyze the dynamics and development of selected communicative interactions over this age span of Şfty-six months. The original pool of video recordings contained 213 scenes. As a result of video viewing and editing, Akiko’s communication development was found to follow expected patterns of development as described by other child language researchers of children with normal hearing. There were seven demarcations that represent Akiko’s communication and spoken language development: 1 perlocutionary, 2 transition of perlocutionary to illocutionary, 3 illocutionary, 4 transition of illocutionary to locutionary, 5 locutionary, 6 dialogue, and 7 narrative

  2. A Micro-Ethnographic Study of the Communication/Language Development in a Japanese Child with Profound Hearing Loss Before and After Cochlear Implantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard R. Kretschmer

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available This study described the communication and spoken language development of a Japanese girl with profound hearing loss who used a cochlear implant from 19 months of age. The girl, Akiko, was born in Belgium where her family was living at that time. After she was identified as deaf at birth, she and her parents were provided with support services. The family relocated to Japan when Akiko was 1 year 5 months of age. When she was 1 year 6 months of age Akiko underwent cochlear implantation. The cochlear implant device was activated when Akiko was 1 year 7 months of age. The parents routinely made video recordings of Akiko interacting with family members and teachers at home and at school. The video recordings taken by the parents used as the data for this study contained scenes of Akiko from the time she was 3 months of age until she was 4 years 11 months of age. Micro-ethnographic methods were used to analyze the dynamics and development of selected communicative interactions over this age span of fifty-six months. The original pool of video recordings contained 213 scenes.As a result of video viewing and editing, Akiko’s communication development was found to follow expected patterns of development as described by other child language researchers of children with normal hearing. There were seven demarcations that represent Akiko’s communication and spoken language development: 1 perlocutionary, 2 transition of perlocutionary to illocutionary, 3 illocutionary, 4 transition of illocutionary to locutionary, 5 locutionary, 6 dialogue, and 7 narrative.

  3. Auditory externalization in hearing-impaired listeners: the effect of pinna cues and number of talkers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyd, Alan W; Whitmer, William M; Soraghan, John J; Akeroyd, Michael A

    2012-03-01

    Hearing-aid wearers have reported sound source locations as being perceptually internalized (i.e., inside their head). The contribution of hearing-aid design to internalization has, however, received little attention. This experiment compared the sensitivity of hearing-impaired (HI) and normal-hearing listeners to externalization cues when listening with their own ears and simulated behind-the-ear hearing-aids in increasingly complex listening situations and reduced pinna cues. Participants rated the degree of externalization using a multiple-stimulus listening test for mixes of internalized and externalized speech stimuli presented over headphones. The results showed that HI listeners had a contracted perception of externalization correlated with high-frequency hearing loss. © 2012 Acoustical Society of America

  4. Characteristics of hearing-impairment among patients in Ghana ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    kemrilib

    Noise, Fever, Presbycusis, Sickness,. Meningitis and Meniere's diseases were the major causes of Sensorineural. Hearing Loss. Conductive Hearing Loss was attributed in the main to Wax,. Foreign Bodies, Otitis Media, and Traumas. These findings have important implications on the need of resources for rehabilitation.

  5. Munchausen Syndrome by Proxy: Mother Fabricates Infant's Hearing Impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahn, Gerri; Goldman, Ellen

    1991-01-01

    Case study reports a case of Munchausen Syndrome by Proxy, a form of child abuse in which the mother presents a child for treatment for a condition she herself has invented or created. This case study describes the ways in which a mother obtained a diagnosis of sensorineural hearing loss as well as amplification for her normally hearing infant.…

  6. Psycholinguistic abilities in cochlear implant and hearing impaired children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hatem Ezzeldin Hassan

    2014-03-01

    Conclusion: HI individuals have poor auditory short-term memory (A-STM in comparison to normal hearing individuals. Also, HI individuals have visual short-term memory (V-STM better than normal hearing individuals. So, multisensory training is needed both in therapy sessions and classrooms with more focus on visual stimuli.

  7. Characteristics of hearing-impairment among patients in Ghana ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Noise, Fever, Presbycusis, Sickness, Meningitis and Meniere's diseases were the major causes of Sensorineural Hearing Loss. Conductive Hearing Loss was attributed in the main to Wax, Foreign Bodies, Otitis Media, and Traumas. These findings have important implications on the need of resources for rehabilitation.

  8. Physiology, Psychoacoustics and Cognition in Normal and Impaired Hearing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dijk, Pim; Başkent, Deniz; Gaudrain, Etienne; de Kleine, Emile; Wagner, Anita; Lanting, Cornelis

    2016-01-01

    ​The International Symposium on Hearing is a prestigious, triennial gathering where world-class scientists present and discuss the most recent advances in the field of human and animal hearing research. The 2015 edition will particularly focus on integrative approaches linking physiological,

  9. Clinical measurement of various aspects of hearing impairment and their relation to auditory functioning: the development of an Auditory Profile

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Esch, T.E.M.

    2013-01-01

    In terms of disability and handicap, problems in auditory function involve much more than a reduced sensitivity to soft sounds, the most commonly used measure of hearing impairment. In daily life, many hearing-impaired (HI) listeners suffer more from impaired processing of audible sounds, than from

  10. Perception of a Self-Fitting Hearing Aid Among Urban-Dwelling Hearing-Impaired Adults in a Developed Country

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keidser, Gitte; Hartley, Lisa

    2011-01-01

    A self-fitting hearing aid is a personal amplification device that is designed to be assembled, programmed, and fine-tuned by the user, without the need for additional equipment or professional support. A written description of the device was presented to 80 older adults with a hearing impairment, all of whom were residents of an urban area in a developed country. In response to a structured questionnaire, the majority of participants reported that the self-fitting hearing aid concept was a good idea (83%), would be of personal benefit (60%), and could be managed independently by the user (90%). Overall, half of the participant group agreed with all three statements. Two were uncertain about the concept, but none of the participants rejected it outright. There were no significant differences between the opinions of participants with previous hearing aid experience and those without. Participant responses to open-ended questions revealed that the main benefits of a self-fitting hearing aid were thought to be the ability to self-adjust the device’s settings (reported by 33% of participants) and increased convenience (20% of participants). The main drawback, mentioned by 25% of participants, was a preference for professional guidance through the fitting process. These results suggest that the self-fitting hearing aid may present as an alternative product in developed countries for those users who prefer to be in control of the fitting process. PMID:22079900

  11. GRM7 variants confer susceptibility to age-related hearing impairment.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Friedman, R.A.; Laer, L. van; Huentelman, M.J.; Sheth, S.S.; Eyken, E. van; Corneveaux, J.J.; Tembe, W.D.; Halperin, R.F.; Thorburn, A.Q.; Thys, S.; Bonneux, S.; Fransen, E.; Huyghe, J.; Pyykko, I.; Cremers, C.W.R.J.; Kremer, H.; Dhooge, I.J.; Stephens, D.; Orzan, E.; Pfister, M.; Bille, M.; Parving, A.; Sorri, M.; Heyning, P. van de; Makmura, L.; Ohmen, J.D.; Linthicum Jr, F.H.; Fayad, J.N.; Pearson, J.V.; Craig, D.W.; Stephan, D.A.; Camp, G. van

    2009-01-01

    Age-related hearing impairment (ARHI), or presbycusis, is the most prevalent sensory impairment in the elderly. ARHI is a complex disease caused by an interaction between environmental and genetic factors. Here we describe the results of the first whole genome association study for ARHI. The study

  12. GRM7 variants confer susceptibility to age-related hearing impairment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friedman, Rick A; Van Laer, Lut; Huentelman, Matthew J

    2009-01-01

    Age-related hearing impairment (ARHI), or presbycusis, is the most prevalent sensory impairment in the elderly. ARHI is a complex disease caused by an interaction between environmental and genetic factors. Here we describe the results of the first whole genome association study for ARHI. The study...

  13. Temporal Fine-Structure Coding and Lateralized Speech Perception in Normal-Hearing and Hearing-Impaired Listeners

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Locsei, Gusztav; Pedersen, Julie Hefting; Laugesen, Søren

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the relationship between speech perception performance in spatially complex, lateralized listening scenarios and temporal fine-structure (TFS) coding at low frequencies. Young normal-hearing (NH) and two groups of elderly hearing-impaired (HI) listeners with mild or moderate...... gains to the stimuli, which were presented over headphones. The target and masker streams were lateralized to the same or to opposite sides of the head by introducing 0.7-ms interaural time differences between the ears. TFS coding was assessed by measuring frequency discrimination thresholds...

  14. Hearing-impaired adults are at increased risk of experiencing emotional distress and social engagement restrictions five years later.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopinath, Bamini; Hickson, Louise; Schneider, Julie; McMahon, Catherine M; Burlutsky, George; Leeder, Stephen R; Mitchell, Paul

    2012-09-01

    we aimed to assess both cross-sectional and temporal links between measured hearing impairment and self-perceived hearing handicap, and health outcomes. in total, 811 Blue Mountains Hearing Study participants (Sydney, Australia) aged ≥55 years were examined twice (1997-99 and 2002-04). Hearing levels were measured with pure-tone audiometry. The shortened version of the hearing handicap inventory (HHIE-S) was administered, scores ≥8 defined hearing handicap. baseline hearing impairment was strongly associated with 7 of the 10 HHIE-S questions, 5 years later. Individuals with and without hearing impairment at baseline reported that they felt embarrassed and/or frustrated by their hearing problem, and that it hampered their personal/social life, multivariable-adjusted OR: 11.5 (CI: 3.5-38.1), OR: 6.3 (CI: 2.5-15.7) and OR: 6.0 (CI: 2.1-17.5), respectively, 5 years later. Hearing-impaired, compared with non-hearing-impaired adults had a significantly higher risk of developing moderate or severe hearing handicap, OR: 3.35 (CI: 1.91-5.90) and OR: 6.60 (CI: 1.45-30.00), respectively. Cross-sectionally (at wave 2), hearing handicap increased the odds of depressive symptoms and low self-rated health by 80 and 46%, respectively. older, hearing-impaired adults were significantly more likely to experience emotional distress and social engagement restrictions (self-perceived hearing handicap) directly due to their hearing impairment.

  15. Tolerable hearing-aid delays: IV. effects on subjective disturbance during speech production by hearing-impaired subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Michael A; Moore, Brian C J

    2005-04-01

    We assessed the effects of time delay in a hearing aid on subjective disturbance and reading rates while the user of the aid was speaking, using hearing-impaired subjects and real-time processing. The time delay was constant across frequency. A digital signal processor was programmed as a four-channel, fast-acting, wide-dynamic-range compression hearing aid. One of four delays could be selected on the aid to produce a total delay of 13, 21, 30, or 40 msec between microphone and receiver. Twenty-five subjects, mostly with near-symmetric hearing impairment of cochlear origin, were fitted bilaterally with behind-the-ear aids connected to the processor. The aids were programmed with insertion gains prescribed by the CAMEQ loudness equalization procedure for each subject and ear. Subjects were asked to read aloud from scripts: speech production rates were measured and subjective ratings of the disturbance of the delay were obtained. Subjects required some training to recognize the effects of the delay to rate it consistently. Subjective disturbance increased progressively with increasing delay and was a nonmonotonic function of low-frequency hearing loss. Subjects with mild or severe low-frequency hearing loss were generally less disturbed by the delay than those with moderate loss. Disturbance ratings tended to decrease over successive tests. Word production rates were not significantly affected by delay over the range of delays tested. The results follow a pattern similar to those presented in , obtained using a simulation of hearing loss and normally hearing subjects, except for the nonmonotonic variation of disturbance with low-frequency hearing loss. We hypothesize that disturbance is maximal when the levels in the ear canal of the low-frequency components are similar for the unaided and aided sounds. A rating of 3, which is probably just acceptable, was obtained for delays ranging from 14 to 30 msec, depending on the hearing loss. Some acclimatization to the

  16. How internet telephony could improve communication for hearing-impaired individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mantokoudis, Georgios; Kompis, Martin; Dubach, Patrick; Caversaccio, Marco; Senn, Pascal

    2010-09-01

    To test, whether modern Internet telephony with a broadband transmission (0.1-8 kHz) of speech improves speech perception in comparison to conventional telephony (0.3-3.5 kHz) in hearing-impaired and normal-hearing adults. Experimental clinical study. Audiologic laboratory in a tertiary referral center in Bern, Switzerland. Twenty-one adult hearing-impaired patients consisting of 11 users of cochlear implants and 10 users of hearing aids were selected from the institution's database based on pure tone audiograms, speech perception scores, and device settings. Ten normal-hearing adults served as controls. Superiority trial of speech perception assessed with Internet versus conventional telephone quality and noninferiority trial of Internet telephone versus frequency restricted, uncompressed audio CD quality. A modern broadband codec was chosen to simulate Internet telephone quality, and ideal network conditions without packet loss were assumed. Speech perception scores of a monosyllabic word test in quiet and a sentence test in background noise assessed in different audio qualities. : Test scores were, on average, 15% (4-33) higher in the monosyllabic word and 25% (8-51) higher in the sentence test using Internet versus conventional telephone quality across all subject groups. Speech perception was not significantly different when Internet telephone quality was compared with high-cut CD quality. Internet telephony offers significantly improved speech perception to hearing-impaired and normal-hearing adults under ideal laboratory conditions through doubling the frequency range and through conserving audio quality during digital sound processing.

  17. Parents' awareness and knowledge of the special needs of their hearing-impaired child.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukari, S Z; Vandort, S; Ahmad, K; Saim, L; Mohamed, A S

    1999-03-01

    We surveyed parents of school-aged hearing impaired children to investigate their awareness and knowledge of the special needs of their child, especially in the area of the usage of hearing aids and methods of communication. Questionnaires were distributed to parents of hearing impaired children at 13 special schools for the deaf in Malaysia. Out of 1,267 questionnaires given out, 787 (62.1%) were completed and returned. Results of the survey indicated the majority of parents (68.6%) suspected hearing loss late, that is after their child's first birthday, and there was a significant time lag before the suspicion was confirmed. Over 82.8% of the children were diagnosed only after 1 year of age, with 41.3% being diagnosed after 3 years of age. Hearing aids were fitted late (mean = 5.32 years; SD = 2.66). Hearing aid ownership was influenced by the factors of socio-economic level and ethnic group (p Malaysia Kod Tangan, the sign language that is commonly used by their children. The parents' choice of communication method was not significantly influenced by socio-economic level or ethnic group. The study revealed the present inadequate state of services available for the rehabilitation of children with congenital hearing impairment.

  18. Risk behaviors and sexual abuse among men and woman with visual or hearing impairments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Susana Robles Montijo

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The present study proposed a descriptive analysis of sociodemographic and family variables, as well as risky sexual behaviors and sexual abuse in a sample of young Mexicans with hearing or visual impairments, examining differences based on gender and type of disability of the participants. 128 young persons (64 hearing impaired and 64 visually impaired of whom, 53.2% were male and 86.6% were single, were included in the study. The instruments used were adapted linguistically to be answered by young people with hearing disabilities, and translated into Braille for visually impaired young people. The results show that participants maintain an active sex life with a risk profile that is characterized by the early onset of sexual intercourse, lack of planning their first sexual encounter, underuse of condoms and victimization of some form of sexual abuse. The risk was higher in women and among those with visual disabilities.

  19. [Prevalence, Risk Factors and Diagnostics of Hearing Impairment in Preterm Infants].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franck, C; Vorwerk, W; Köhn, A; Rißmann, A; Vorwerk, U

    2017-06-01

    Introduction: The preterm birth is clearly associated with increased risk of developing congenital hearing impairment. Therefore, special attention must be paid to the postnatal control of auditory function in all preterm infants. The present work investigates if the latest scientific findings regarding prevalence, clinical diagnostics, therapy and risk factors of hearing impairment in premature infants are regularly implemented in daily practice. Methods: At the department of phoniatrics and pediatric audiology of the University Hospital of Magdeburg, the treatment data of 126 preterm children born between 2006 and 2011 were evaluated retrospectively. The additional analysis of all records available at the screening center (n=67 640) covering this period enables drawing conclusions on the total number and prevalence of hearing impairment in preterm infants in Saxony-Anhalt. Results: Almost all premature babies, like mature newborns, underwent postnatal hearing screening of both ears. The data analysis shows that the practical implementation often does not comply with the guideline of the G-BA (Gemeinsamer Bundesausschuss) in all details. For example, the recommended screening method for preterm infants (AABR) or the screening and treatment timing are not always applied in accordance with the guidelines of the G-BA. Discussion: Assessment of the practical implementation of universal newborn hearing screening was planned at the time of the introduction of the hearing screening program by the G-BA. As a part of this investigation, the practical care of vulnerable groups such as preterm infants must be given special attention. Based on the collected data, the diagnostics and therapy should be unified. Regardless of the maternity clinic where the infants were born, there should be the same opportunity for early diagnosis and thus for prognostically better treatment of congenital hearing impairment. Rapid postnatal fitting with hearing aid can stimulate the maturation

  20. Relationship between cognitive anxiety level and client variables at initial consultation for adults with hearing impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly-Campbell, R J; Parry, D C

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to use the Cognitive Anxiety Scale (CAS) to investigate relationships between state-anxiety level (cognitive anxiety) and audiometric variables in adults with hearing impairment at their initial consultation. Thirty-five adults with hearing impairment who consulted an audiologist for the first time participated in this study. An interview to obtain information about cognitive anxiety was conducted prior to the audiological assessment. The results indicated that cognitive anxiety was significantly related to an ability to understand speech in noise. Further, cognitive anxiety and ability to understand speech in noise significantly contributed to the classification of hearing aid adopters and non-adopters. These results indicate that the measure of cognitive anxiety may have clinical applications in the future. The reader will be able to: (1) discuss the relationship between anxiety and hearing impairment; (2) define cognitive anxiety; (3) state the relationship between cognitive anxiety and audiometric variables; (4) state the relationship between cognitive anxiety and the decision to adopt hearing aids; (5) identify signs of cognitive anxiety in adults with hearing impairment. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Hearing impairment after childhood bacterial meningitis dependent on etiology in Luanda, Angola.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karppinen, Mariia; Pelkonen, Tuula; Roine, Irmeli; Cruzeiro, Manuel Leite; Peltola, Heikki; Pitkäranta, Anne

    2015-11-01

    Childhood bacterial meningitis (BM) damages hearing, but the potential of different agents to cause impairment in developing countries is poorly understood. We compared the extent of hearing impairment in BM caused by Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib), Streptococcus pneumoniae or Neisseria meningitidis among children aged 2 months to 13 years in Luanda, Angola. Hearing of 685 ears of 351 (78%) survivors among 723 enrolled patients was tested by brainstem-evoked response audiometry on day 7 of hospitalization. The causative agent was sought by cerebrospinal fluid culture, PCR or the latex-agglutination test. Altogether, 45 (12%) of the survivors were deaf (threshold >80 dB), and 20 (6%) had a threshold of 80 dB. The incidence of any kind of hearing loss, with ≥60 dB, was 34% with Hib, 30% with S. pneumoniae, 19% with N. meningitidis and 33% with other bacteria. Examining all ears combined and using the ≥60 dB threshold, the agents showed dissimilar harm (P=0.005), Hib being the most frequent and N. meningitidis the most infrequent cause. Compared to other agents, S. pneumoniae more often caused deafness (P=0.025) and hearing impairment at ≥60 dB (P=0.017) in infants, whereas this level of hearing loss in older survivors was most commonly caused by Hib (P=0.031). BM among children in Angola is often followed by hearing impairment, but the risk depends on the agent. S. pneumoniae is a major problem among infants, whereas Hib is mainly a risk beyond 12 months. N. meningitidis impairs hearing less frequently. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Health related quality of life in parents of children with speech and hearing impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aras, Ivana; Stevanović, Ranko; Vlahović, Sanja; Stevanović, Siniša; Kolarić, Branko; Kondić, Ljiljana

    2014-02-01

    Hearing impairment and specific language disorder are two entities that seriously affect language acquisition in children and reduce their communication skills. These children require specific treatment and higher levels of care than healthy children. Their language abilities also strongly influence parent-child interactions. The purpose of our study was to evaluate the health-related quality of life (HRQOL) of the parents of hearing-impaired children and the parents of children with speech difficulties (specific language disorder). Our study subjects included 349 parents (182 mothers and 167 fathers) of preschool-aged children with receptive expressive language disorder and 131 parents (71 mothers and 60 fathers) of children with severe hearing impairment. A control group was composed of 146 parents (82 mothers and 64 fathers) of healthy children of the same age. HRQOL was assessed using the SF-36 questionnaire. For all groups of parents, the mothers had poorer scores compared with the fathers, but large differences were apparent depending on the child's impairment. In the control group, the scores of the mothers were significantly lower than the fathers' scores in only two (of eight) health domains. In contrast, the scores were lower in three domains for the mothers of speech-impaired children and in six domains for the mothers of hearing-impaired children, representing the greatest difference between the parents. When compared with the control group, both the mothers and fathers of speech-impaired children scored significantly worse in five health domains. Fathers of hearing-impaired children scored significantly worse than controls in three health domains. The lowest scores, indicating the poorest HRQOL, were observed for mothers of hearing-impaired children, who obtained significantly lower scores than the control mothers in all health domains except the emotional role. The parents of preschool-aged speech-and hearing-impaired children experience poorer HRQOL

  3. Auditory, Visual, and Auditory-Visual Speech Perception by Individuals with Cochlear Implants versus Individuals with Hearing Aids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Most, Tova; Rothem, Hilla; Luntz, Michal

    2009-01-01

    The researchers evaluated the contribution of cochlear implants (CIs) to speech perception by a sample of prelingually deaf individuals implanted after age 8 years. This group was compared with a group with profound hearing impairment (HA-P), and with a group with severe hearing impairment (HA-S), both of which used hearing aids. Words and…

  4. The prevalence of hearing impairment and its burden on the quality of life among adults with Medicare Supplement Insurance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawkins, Kevin; Bottone, Frank G; Ozminkowski, Ronald J; Musich, Shirley; Bai, Ming; Migliori, Richard J; Yeh, Charlotte S

    2012-09-01

    To estimate the impact of hearing impairment on quality of life from a physical and mental standpoint. Data were obtained from the Health Update Survey, which contains questions on demographics, comorbid conditions, and the Veterans RAND 12-item health status/quality of life survey. It was fielded on a random sample of 15,000 adults with an AARP(®) Medicare Supplement plan, insured by UnitedHealthcare. Respondents were divided into those with hearing impairments and others, based on their response to a survey question. Univariate and multivariate analyses were conducted to estimate the likelihood of hearing impairment and its impact on quality of life while controlling for respondent demographics and comorbid conditions. Of the 5,515 eligible respondents, 10.4% reported having hearing impairments. The strongest predictor of hearing impairment was older age, while those with 4 years of college or more were least likely to have hearing impairments. Those with hearing impairments averaged significantly lower physical component and mental component scores, exceeding those of numerous other chronic conditions. This is the first known study of hearing impairment among those with Medigap coverage. Hearing impairment was strongly associated with lower quality of life from both a physical and mental health standpoint.

  5. Working memory and referential communication – multimodal aspects of interaction between children with sensorineural hearing impairment and normal hearing peers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olof eSandgren

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Whereas the language development of children with sensorineural hearing impairment (SNHI has repeatedly been shown to differ from that of peers with normal hearing (NH, few studies have used an experimental approach to investigate the consequences on everyday communicative interaction. This mini review gives an overview of a range of studies on children with SNHI and NH exploring intra- and inter-individual cognitive and linguistic systems during communication.Over the last decade, our research group has studied the conversational strategies of Swedish speaking children and adolescents with SNHI and NH using referential communication, an experimental analogue to problem-solving in the classroom. We have established verbal and nonverbal control and validation mechanisms, related to working memory capacity (WMC and phonological short term memory (PSTM. We present main findings and future directions relevant for the field of cognitive hearing science and for the clinical and school-based management of children and adolescents with SNHI.

  6. Processing the telephone speech signal for the hearing impaired.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terry, M; Bright, K; Durian, M; Kepler, L; Sweetman, R; Grim, M

    1992-04-01

    Speech intelligibility scores from 16 subjects with sensorineural hearing loss were evaluated using a digitized version of the California Consonant Test that was presented via headphones through a 300 to 3000 Hz bandpass filter to simulate the telephone band. Each subject was tested with an unprocessed signal that was frequency-equalized to compensate for the individual's hearing loss, and a signal that was equalized and compressed by the use of a compressor compression technique. Subjects were tested at three sound pressure levels above a pure-tone average threshold for frequencies 1 and 2 kHz. Two digital signal processing techniques designed to compensate for high-frequency hearing loss were examined: frequency domain processing and time domain processing. Frequency domain involved modification of the short-term spectrum obtained through a fast Fourier transform, whereas time domain processing involved passing the signal through a bank of finite impulse response filters. Both techniques showed significant intelligibility improvements (15-30%). In a second experiment, 16 additional subjects with high-frequency hearing loss compared an amplified telephone signal to three processed signals: (1) 6 dB per octave emphasis; (2) a signal frequency equalized for their hearing loss; and (3) a signal that was equalized for their hearing loss and was compressed according to their uncomfortable loudness levels. Most subjects preferred the signal with the 6 dB per octave emphasis.

  7. Role of Intelligence Quotient (IQ) on anxiety and behavior in children with hearing and speech impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shetty, Raghavendra M; Pashine, Aditi; Jose, Nijo A; Mantha, Somasundar

    2018-01-04

    To assess and compare the role of IQ on anxiety and behavior of children with and without hearing and speech impairment. A total of 120 children of age group 7-14 years were included in the study, of which control group comprised of 60 normal healthy children and 60 hearing and speech impaired children formed the study group. The study was done in two consecutive sessions. First appointment for Culture Fair Intelligence Test and second appointment for RMS pictorial anxiety score (RMS-PS) and Frankl behavior rating which were assessed during oral prophylaxis. IQ of children with hearing and speech impairment was lower as compared to normal healthy children. There was a positive correlation between IQ and anxiety in children with hearing and speech impairment while no correlation was found with behavior. Children with hearing and speech impairment are less anxious and more cooperative compared to normal healthy child in the dental setting and are, therefore, easier to manage. © 2018 Special Care Dentistry Association and Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Sentence Writing and Perception of Written Sentences in Hearing-Impaired and Normal-Hearing Primary School Students in Hamadan, Western Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Afsaneh Yaghobi

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Learning language is acquired in early childhood and gradually developed by new words and new structures. Hearing sense is the most important acquisition for learning this skill. Hearing disorders are barriers for natural language learning. The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between writing sentences and perception of written sentences in hearing-impaired and normal-hearing students.Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted among thirty hearing-impaired students with hearing loss of 70-90 dB and thirty normal hearing students. They were selected from 3rd grade primary school students in Hamadan, a large city in Western Iran. The language skills and non language information was assessed by questionnaire, Action Picture Test, and Sentence Perception Test.Results: Results showed that there was a significant relation between writing sentences and perception of written sentences in hearing impaired students (p<0.001, (r=0.8. This significant relation was seen in normal-hearing students as well (p<0.001, (r=0.7.Conclusion: Disability of hearing-impaired students in verbal communication is not only related to articulation and voice disorders but also is related to their disability to explore and use of language rules. They suffer lack of perception of written sentences, and they are not skilled to convey their feelings and thoughts in order to presenting themselves by using language structures.

  9. Can parenting practices predict externalizing behavior problems among children with hearing impairment?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María J. Pino

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To identify possible differences in the level of externalizing behavior problems among children with and without hearing impairment and determine whether any relationship exists between this type of problem and parenting practices. Methods: The Behavior Assessment System for Children was used to evaluate externalizing variables in a sample of 118 boys and girls divided into two matched groups: 59 with hearing disorders and 59 normal-hearing controls. Results: Significant between-group differences were found in hyperactivity, behavioral problems, and externalizing problems, but not in aggression. Significant differences were also found in various aspects of parenting styles. A model for predicting externalizing behavior problems was constructed, achieving a predicted explained variance of 50%. Conclusion: Significant differences do exist between adaptation levels in children with and without hearing impairment. Parenting style also plays an important role.

  10. Can parenting practices predict externalizing behavior problems among children with hearing impairment?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pino, María J; Castillo, Rosa A; Raya, Antonio; Herruzo, Javier

    2017-11-09

    To identify possible differences in the level of externalizing behavior problems among children with and without hearing impairment and determine whether any relationship exists between this type of problem and parenting practices. The Behavior Assessment System for Children was used to evaluate externalizing variables in a sample of 118 boys and girls divided into two matched groups: 59 with hearing disorders and 59 normal-hearing controls. Significant between-group differences were found in hyperactivity, behavioral problems, and externalizing problems, but not in aggression. Significant differences were also found in various aspects of parenting styles. A model for predicting externalizing behavior problems was constructed, achieving a predicted explained variance of 50%. Significant differences do exist between adaptation levels in children with and without hearing impairment. Parenting style also plays an important role.

  11. Development of a School Adaptation Program for Elementary School Students with Hearing Impairment

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Shin-Jeong; Kwon, Myung Soon; Han, Woojae

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives Although new technology of assistive listening device leads many hard of hearing children to be mainstreamed in public school programs, many clinicians and teachers still wonder whether the children are able to understand all instruction, access educational materials, and have social skills in the school. The purpose of this study is to develop a school adaptation program (SAP) for the hearing-impaired children who attend public elementary school. Subjects and Method...

  12. Testing the binaural equal-loudness-ratio hypothesis with hearing-impaired listeners1

    OpenAIRE

    Marozeau, Jeremy; Florentine, Mary

    2009-01-01

    The primary purpose of the present experiment was to test whether the binaural equal-loudness-ratio hypothesis (i.e., the loudness ratio between monaural and binaural tones presented at the same Sound Pressure Level, SPL, is independent of SPL) holds for hearing-impaired listeners with bilaterally symmetrical hearing losses. The outcome of this experiment provided a theoretical construct for modeling loudness-growth functions. A cross-modality matching task between string length and tones was...

  13. Education, occupation, noise exposure history and the 10-yr cumulative incidence of hearing impairment in older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruickshanks, Karen J; Nondahl, David M; Tweed, Ted S; Wiley, Terry L; Klein, Barbara E K; Klein, Ronald; Chappell, Rick; Dalton, Dayna S; Nash, Scott D

    2010-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the 10-yr cumulative incidence of hearing impairment and associations of education, occupation and noise exposure history with the incidence of hearing impairment in a population-based cohort study of 3753 adults ages 48-92 yr at the baseline examinations during 1993-1995 in Beaver Dam, WI. Hearing thresholds were measured at baseline, 2.5 yr-, 5 yr-, and 10-yr follow-up examinations. Hearing impairment was defined as a pure-tone average (PTA)>25 dB HL at 500, 1000, 2000, and 4000 Hz. Demographic characteristics and occupational histories were obtained by questionnaire. The 10-yr cumulative incidence of hearing impairment was 37.2%. Age (5 yr; Hazard Ratio (HR)=1.81), sex (M vs W; HR=2.29), occupation based on longest held job (production/operations/farming vs others; HR=1.34), marital status (unmarried vs married; HR=1.29) and education (History of noisy jobs was not associated with the 10-yr incidence of hearing impairment. The risk of hearing impairment was high, with women experiencing a slightly later onset. Markers of socioeconomic status were associated with hearing impairment, suggesting that hearing impairment in older adults may be associated with modifiable lifestyle and environmental factors, and therefore, at least partially preventable. Copyright 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Evaluation of Long-Term Cochlear Implant Use in Subjects With Acquired Unilateral Profound Hearing Loss: Focus on Binaural Auditory Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mertens, Griet; De Bodt, Marc; Van de Heyning, Paul

    Cochlear implantation (CI) in subjects with unilateral profound sensorineural hearing loss was investigated. The authors of the present study demonstrated the binaural auditory outcomes in a 12- and 36-month prospective cohort outcome study. The present study aimed to do a long-term (LT) evaluation of the auditory outcomes in an analogous study group. LT evaluation was derived from 12 single-sided deaf (SSD) CI recipients and from 11 CI recipients with asymmetric hearing loss (AHL). A structured interview was conducted with each subjects. Speech perception in noise and sound localization were assessed in a CIOFF and in a CION condition. Four binaural effects were calculated: summation effect (S0N0), squelch effect (S0NCI), combined head shadow effect (SCIN0), and spatial release from masking (SRM). At the LT evaluation, the contribution of a CI or a bone conduction device on speech perception in noise was investigated in two challenging spatial configurations in the SSD group. All (23/23) subjects wore their CI 7 days a week at LT follow-up evaluation, which ranged from 3 to 10 years after implantation. In the SSD group, a significant combined head shadow effect of 3.17 dB and an SRM benefit of 4.33 dB were found. In the AHL group, on the other hand, the summation effect (2.00 dB), the squelch effect (2.67 dB), the combined head shadow effect (3.67 dB), and SRM benefit (2.00 dB) were significant at LT testing. In both the spatial challenging configurations, the speech in noise results was significantly worse in the condition with the bone conduction device compared with the unaided condition. No negative effect was found for the CION condition. A significant benefit in the CION condition was found for sound localization compared with the CIOFF condition in the SSD group and in the AHL group. All subjects wore their CI 7 days a week at LT follow-up evaluation. The presence of binaural effects has been demonstrated with speech in noise testing, sound localization

  15. Efficacy of a distinctive feature model of therapy for hearing-impaired adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subtelny, J; Snell, K B

    1988-05-01

    Extensive measures of speech production and perception were secured before and after the individualized training of 75 hearing-impaired postsecondary students to evaluate the efficacy of therapy. Additional measures of hearing, reading, writing, nonverbal intelligence, and manual and simultaneous communication reception were made to explore variables that might influence response to training. Significant improvements in vowel, word and sentence production, and word and sentence perception were observed. Pretherapy measures of speech production and perception were the most powerful factors explaining variability in posttest scores. Other variables predicting the outcome of speech therapy were residual hearing and linguistic competence. Clinical implications are discussed.

  16. Assessing DMFT index in 12 years old students attending hearing impaired schools in Tehran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahrabi M

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Extensive studies on the epidemiology of teeth and oral diseases are an important part of health care programs specially for hearing impaired groups. For adequate programming in this field, proper situation analysis is mandatory. The aim of this study was to assess the DMFT (decayed missed filled teeth of 12 years old students attending hearing impaired schools in Tehran and exploring the relation between sex, hygiene and hearing threshold with the index. Materials and Methods: This cross sectional descriptive study was based on examining 12 years old (± 6 month students (117 cases attending hearing impaired schools in Tehran. A questionnaire was filled for each case. T, Chi-square and Kruskall-Wallis tests were used to analyze the results with p<0.05 as the limit of significance. Results: The mean DMFT in these students was 3.07. Mean DMFT in students with very severe hearing loss was 2.99. Mean ranked DMFT in girls and boys was similar (56.09 in boys and 61.96 in girls. Mean ranked DMFT in students who didn’t use floss (66.40 was higher than those who used floss (46.71. Mean ranked DMFT in students who seldom brushed, was the highest (72.82 and in students who brushed once a day was the lowest (51.26. Conclusion: The DMFT index in hearing disabled children was 3.07. Regular brushing and flossing reduced the index.

  17. Discrimination and identification of vowels by young, hearing-impaired adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richie, Carolyn; Kewley-Port, Diane; Coughlin, Maureen

    2003-11-01

    This study examined the effects of mild-to-moderate sensorineural hearing loss on vowel perception abilities of young, hearing-impaired (YHI) adults. Stimuli were presented at a low conversational level with a flat frequency response (approximately 60 dB SPL), and in two gain conditions: (a) high level gain with a flat frequency response (95 dB SPL), and (b) frequency-specific gain shaped according to each listener's hearing loss (designed to simulate the frequency response provided by a linear hearing aid to an input signal of 60 dB SPL). Listeners discriminated changes in the vowels /smcapi ee eh invv æ/ when F1 or F2 varied, and later categorized the vowels. YHI listeners performed better in the two gain conditions than in the conversational level condition. Performances in the two gain conditions were similar, suggesting that upward spread of masking was not seen at these signal levels for these tasks. Results were compared with those from a group of elderly, hearing-impaired (EHI) listeners, reported in Coughlin, Kewley-Port, and Humes [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 104, 3597-3607 (1998)]. Comparisons revealed no significant differences between the EHI and YHI groups, suggesting that hearing impairment, not age, is the primary contributor to decreased vowel perception in these listeners.

  18. Auditory and tactile gap discrimination by observers with normal and impaired hearing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desloge, Joseph G; Reed, Charlotte M; Braida, Louis D; Perez, Zachary D; Delhorne, Lorraine A; Villabona, Timothy J

    2014-02-01

    Temporal processing ability for the senses of hearing and touch was examined through the measurement of gap-duration discrimination thresholds (GDDTs) employing the same low-frequency sinusoidal stimuli in both modalities. GDDTs were measured in three groups of observers (normal-hearing, hearing-impaired, and normal-hearing with simulated hearing loss) covering an age range of 21-69 yr. GDDTs for a baseline gap of 6 ms were measured for four different combinations of 100-ms leading and trailing markers (250-250, 250-400, 400-250, and 400-400 Hz). Auditory measurements were obtained for monaural presentation over headphones and tactile measurements were obtained using sinusoidal vibrations presented to the left middle finger. The auditory GDDTs of the hearing-impaired listeners, which were larger than those of the normal-hearing observers, were well-reproduced in the listeners with simulated loss. The magnitude of the GDDT was generally independent of modality and showed effects of age in both modalities. The use of different-frequency compared to same-frequency markers led to a greater deterioration in auditory GDDTs compared to tactile GDDTs and may reflect differences in bandwidth properties between the two sensory systems.

  19. National Survey of State Identification Audiometry Programs and Special Educational Services for Hearing Impaired Children and Youth United States: 1972.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallaudet Coll., Washington, DC. Office of Demographic Studies.

    Reported were descriptive data concerning identification audiometry (hearing screening) and special educational programs for the hearing impaired. Data were provided in tabular format for each state in the country and the District of Columbia. Hearing screening program data included extent of coverage, grade or ages covered annually, year and…

  20. Elements of museum mobile augmented reality for engaging hearing impaired visitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Esraa Jaffar; Bakar, Juliana Aida Abu; Zulkifli, Abdul Nasir

    2017-10-01

    Nowadays, designers are more concern with the issue of engagement and informal learning at museum and gallery sites. This has made studies to focus more on the use of Mobile Augmented Reality (MAR) at museum and gallery sites. However, most of the MAR applications for museum visitors are largely tailored to normal hearing visitors while the hearing-impaired (HI) visitors are not supported. The hearing impaired (HI) community account for over 5% of the world's populace which is about 360 million people. Thus, this paper explores the design elements of mobile augmented reality for engaging hearing impaired visitors at the museum site. The findings of this paper argues that there are eleven major elements of engagement of MAR needed for the design of an efficient museum MAR app for hearing impaired visitors. These eleven elements include Aesthetics, Curiosity, Usability, Interaction, Motivation, Satisfaction, Self-Efficacy, Perceived Control, Enjoyment, Focused Attention and Interest. This study pointed out that for an efficient and engaged MAR app for the HI community especially HI visitors to museum sites, these eleven elements are critical. This finding will help MAR designers and developers on how to design an efficient and engaged MAR app for the HI community at large and museum HI visitors specifically.

  1. Cognitive Compensation of Speech Perception With Hearing Impairment, Cochlear Implants, and Aging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deniz Başkent

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available External degradations in incoming speech reduce understanding, and hearing impairment further compounds the problem. While cognitive mechanisms alleviate some of the difficulties, their effectiveness may change with age. In our research, reviewed here, we investigated cognitive compensation with hearing impairment, cochlear implants, and aging, via (a phonemic restoration as a measure of top-down filling of missing speech, (b listening effort and response times as a measure of increased cognitive processing, and (c visual world paradigm and eye gazing as a measure of the use of context and its time course. Our results indicate that between speech degradations and their cognitive compensation, there is a fine balance that seems to vary greatly across individuals. Hearing impairment or inadequate hearing device settings may limit compensation benefits. Cochlear implants seem to allow the effective use of sentential context, but likely at the cost of delayed processing. Linguistic and lexical knowledge, which play an important role in compensation, may be successfully employed in advanced age, as some compensatory mechanisms seem to be preserved. These findings indicate that cognitive compensation in hearing impairment can be highly complicated—not always absent, but also not easily predicted by speech intelligibility tests only.

  2. Cognitive Compensation of Speech Perception With Hearing Impairment, Cochlear Implants, and Aging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Jeanne; Pals, Carina; Benard, Michel R.; Bhargava, Pranesh; Saija, Jefta; Sarampalis, Anastasios; Wagner, Anita; Gaudrain, Etienne

    2016-01-01

    External degradations in incoming speech reduce understanding, and hearing impairment further compounds the problem. While cognitive mechanisms alleviate some of the difficulties, their effectiveness may change with age. In our research, reviewed here, we investigated cognitive compensation with hearing impairment, cochlear implants, and aging, via (a) phonemic restoration as a measure of top-down filling of missing speech, (b) listening effort and response times as a measure of increased cognitive processing, and (c) visual world paradigm and eye gazing as a measure of the use of context and its time course. Our results indicate that between speech degradations and their cognitive compensation, there is a fine balance that seems to vary greatly across individuals. Hearing impairment or inadequate hearing device settings may limit compensation benefits. Cochlear implants seem to allow the effective use of sentential context, but likely at the cost of delayed processing. Linguistic and lexical knowledge, which play an important role in compensation, may be successfully employed in advanced age, as some compensatory mechanisms seem to be preserved. These findings indicate that cognitive compensation in hearing impairment can be highly complicated—not always absent, but also not easily predicted by speech intelligibility tests only.

  3. Visual and hearing impairment and retirement in older adults: A population-based cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopinath, Bamini; Liew, Gerald; Burlutsky, George; McMahon, Catherine M; Mitchell, Paul

    2017-06-01

    Impaired vision and hearing are common among older adults and have been shown to reduce functional independence and to reduce quality of life. This cohort study investigated the cross-sectional and temporal associations between objectively measured dual sensory impairment (DSI) and retirement from employment. 2409 Blue Mountains Eye Study participants aged 55+ years at baseline were included for analyses. Visual impairment was defined as visual acuity less than 20/40 (better eye), and hearing impairment as average pure-tone air conduction threshold >25dB HL (500-4000Hz, better ear). Employment status was questioned at each examination over 10 years. At baseline, 650 (27.0%) were employed and 1759 (73.0%) were retired. Cross-sectional analysis showed that participants with moderate to severe hearing loss, compared with those with normal hearing, had greater odds of being retired (multivariable-adjusted OR 1.96; 95% CI 1.05-3.66). Participants presenting with concurrent visual impairment and moderate to severe hearing loss versus participants with no sensory loss had a significantly lower mean retirement age, 57.1 versus 58.7 years (multivariable-adjusted p-value=0.04). Participants with any hearing loss at baseline had significantly higher odds of being retired by the 10-year follow-up (age-sex adjusted OR 1.82; 95% CI 1.00-3.30); this became marginally non-significant after adjusting for all other covariates (multivariable-adjusted OR 1.74; 95% CI 0.95-3.17). No associations were observed between DSI and the incidence of retirement. Sensory impairment in older adults was independently associated with the decision to retire. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Effects of self-reported hearing or vision impairment on depressive symptoms: a population-based longitudinal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, J H; Lee, H J; Jung, J; Park, E-C

    2018-02-08

    The aims of this study were to investigate the effects of either hearing, vision or dual sensory impairment on depressive symptoms and to identify subgroups that are vulnerable and significantly affected. Data from the 2006-2014 Korean Longitudinal Study of Aging (KLoSA) were used and a total of 5832 individuals were included in this study. Depressive symptoms were assessed using the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression (CES-D10) scale. Sensory impairment was assessed according to the levels of self-reported hearing or vision, which were categorised as either good (excellent, very good or good) or poor (fair or poor). The changes in hearing or vision from records of previous survey were investigated. Changes from good to poor, which indicates new onset, were defined as hearing impairment or vision impairment. Interactions of changes in hearing and vision were considered in the analysis. Dual sensory impairment was indicated when hearing impairment and vision impairment both developed at the same time. Demographic, socioeconomic and health-related factors were considered as potential confounders and were adjusted for in the generalised estimating equation model. Individuals with hearing impairment demonstrated significantly more severe depressive symptoms [β = 0.434, standard errors (s.e.) = 0.097, p impairment also showed significantly elevated depressive symptoms (β = 0.253, s.e. = 0.058, p impairment showed significantly more severe depressive symptoms (β = 0.768, s.e. = 0.197, p impairment on depressive symptoms was significant in both sexes and across age groups, except for vision impairment in male participants. Hearing, vision and dual sensory impairment are significantly associated with depressive symptoms. Our results suggest that treatment or rehabilitation of either hearing or vision impairment would help prevent depression.

  5. Performance, fatigue and stress in open-plan offices: The effects of noise and restoration on hearing impaired and normal hearing individuals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helena Jahncke

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Hearing impaired and normal hearing individuals were compared in two within-participant office noise conditions (high noise: 60 L Aeq and low noise: 30 L Aeq . Performance, subjective fatigue, and physiological stress were tested during working on a simulated open-plan office. We also tested two between-participants restoration conditions following the work period with high noise (nature movie or continued office noise. Participants with a hearing impairment (N = 20 were matched with normal hearing participants (N = 18 and undertook one practice session and two counterbalanced experimental sessions. In each experimental session they worked for two hours with basic memory and attention tasks. We also measured physiological stress indicators (cortisol and catecholamines and self-reports of mood and fatigue. The hearing impaired participants were more affected by high noise than the normal hearing participants, as shown by impaired performance for tasks that involve recall of semantic information. The hearing impaired participants were also more fatigued by high noise exposure than participants with normal hearing, and they tended to have higher stress hormone levels during the high noise compared to the low noise condition. Restoration with a movie increased performance and motivation for the normal hearing participants, while rest with continued noise did not. For the hearing impaired participants, continued noise during rest increased motivation and performance, while the movie did not. In summary, the impact of noise and restorative conditions varied with the hearing characteristics of the participants. The small sample size does however encourage caution when interpreting the results.

  6. The effect of dynamic breathing exercises on physical training of students with hearing impairments.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Кudelko V.Е.

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The program of dynamic breathing exercises that affect the development of physical qualities was developed for the hearing-impaired students. The study involved a group of students with hearing impairments that included 12 people, aged from18 to 19 years with the same diagnosis and level of physical training. The program of dynamic breathing exercises and test data results of students' physical training before and after the teaching experiment were presented. A positive increase in test results after the application of complex dynamic breathing exercises was identified.

  7. Investigation of Psychophysiological and Subjective Effects of Long Working Hours – Do Age and Hearing Impairment Matter?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verena Wagner-Hartl

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Following current prognosis, demographic development raises expectations of an aging of the working population. Therefore, keeping employees healthy and strengthening their ability to work, becomes more and more important. When employees become older, dealing with age-related impairments of sensory functions, such as hearing impairment, is a central issue. Recent evidence suggests that negative effects that are associated with reduced hearing can have a strong impact at work. Especially under exhausting working situations such as working overtime hours, age and hearing impairment might influence employees’ well-being. Until now, neither the problem of aged workers and long working hours, nor the problem of hearing impairment and prolonged working time has been addressed explicitly. Therefore, a laboratory study was examined to answer the research question: Do age and hearing impairment have an impact on psychophysiological and subjective effects of long working hours. In total, 51 white-collar workers, aged between 24 and 63 years, participated in the laboratory study. The results show no significant effects for age and hearing impairment on the intensity of subjective consequences (perceived recovery and fatigue, subjective emotional well-being and physical symptoms of long working hours. However, the psychophysiological response (the saliva cortisol level to long working hours differs significantly between hearing impaired and normal hearing employees. Interestingly, the results suggest that from a psychophysiological point of view long working hours were more demanding for normal hearing employees.

  8. Hearing Surveillance Chart--a tool for tracking serial audiometry results and predicting future hearing impairment

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    MacLurg, K; McCaughan, J; McQuillan, P

    2004-01-01

    High frequency hearing loss is related to noise-induced deafness. We decided to develop a method of recording serial audiogram results that would provide an accessible overview of trends for an individual. Health & Safety Executive (HSE...

  9. Binaural speech intelligibility in noise for hearing-impaired listeners

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bronkhorst, A.W.; Plomp, R.

    1989-01-01

    The effect of head-induced interaural time delay (ITD) and interaural level differences (ILD) on binaural speech intelligibility in noise was studied for listeners with symmetrical and asymmetrical sensorineural hearing losses. The material, recorded with a KEMAR manikin in an anechoic room,

  10. Childhood Hearing Impairment: How do Parents Feel about it?

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DATONYE ALASIA

    hearing loss improves language, other forms of communication, and cognitive skills. This study was carried out to ... delay in language acquisition, delay in cognitive development, economic and educational disadvantage .... other modalities of therapy are available. Cochlear implant is expensive and out of reach for many of ...

  11. Childhood Hearing Impairment: How Do Parents Feel About It ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This is because affected children have developmental delay in many domains including speech, cognition as well as behavioural and other aspects of psychosocial development. Early identification and effective treatment of hearing loss improves language, other forms of communication, and cognitive skills. This study was ...

  12. Hearing aid fitting for visual and hearing impaired patients with Usher syndrome type IIa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartel, B P; Agterberg, M J H; Snik, A F; Kunst, H P M; van Opstal, A J; Bosman, A J; Pennings, R J E

    2017-08-01

    Usher syndrome is the leading cause of hereditary deaf-blindness. Most patients with Usher syndrome type IIa start using hearing aids from a young age. A serious complaint refers to interference between sound localisation abilities and adaptive sound processing (compression), as present in today's hearing aids. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of advanced signal processing on binaural hearing, including sound localisation. In this prospective study, patients were fitted with hearing aids with a nonlinear (compression) and linear amplification programs. Data logging was used to objectively evaluate the use of either program. Performance was evaluated with a speech-in-noise test, a sound localisation test and two questionnaires focussing on self-reported benefit. Data logging confirmed that the reported use of hearing aids was high. The linear program was used significantly more often (average use: 77%) than the nonlinear program (average use: 17%). The results for speech intelligibility in noise and sound localisation did not show a significant difference between type of amplification. However, the self-reported outcomes showed higher scores on 'ease of communication' and overall benefit, and significant lower scores on disability for the new hearing aids when compared to their previous hearing aids with compression amplification. Patients with Usher syndrome type IIa prefer a linear amplification over nonlinear amplification when fitted with novel hearing aids. Apart from a significantly higher logged use, no difference in speech in noise and sound localisation was observed between linear and nonlinear amplification with the currently used tests. Further research is needed to evaluate the reasons behind the preference for the linear settings. © 2016 The Authors. Clinical Otolaryngology Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Exploring an educational assessment tool to measure registered nurses' knowledge of hearing impairment and effective communication strategies: A USA study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruesch, Amy L

    2018-01-01

    Poor communication between the Registered Nurse and a hearing impaired patient can affect quality of care and health outcomes. Communication skills training programs for healthcare providers are needed to improve patient centered care. A descriptive research study, using a knowledge assessment tool developed and validated by the researcher, was conducted on 339 Registered Nurses to identify knowledge deficits to be addressed in a communication skills training program being designed. The educational tool measured the Registered Nurses' knowledge across four areas - hearing impairment, hearing aids, communication strategies, and regulations regarding access to care for a person with a hearing disability. Knowledge deficits were detected in all four areas. Using this educational assessment tool may enable nurse educators to tailor communication skills training programs to specifically address the gaps identified regarding hearing impairment and how to effectively communicate with the hearing impaired patient. Post training program, nurse educators can use the tool to evaluate effectiveness. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Management of Hearing Aid Assembly by Urban-Dwelling Hearing-Impaired Adults in a Developed Country

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keidser, Gitte; Hartley, Lisa; Caposecco, Andrea; Hickson, Louise; Meyer, Carly

    2011-01-01

    A self-fitting hearing aid, designed to be assembled and programmed without audiological or computer support, could bring amplification to millions of people in developing countries, who remain unaided due to the lack of a local, professional, audiological infrastructure. The ability to assemble and insert a hearing aid is fundamental to the successful use of a self-fitting device. In this study, the management of such tasks was investigated. Eighty older, urban-dwelling, hearing-impaired adults in a developed country were asked to follow a set of written, illustrated instructions to assemble two slim-fit behind-the-ear hearing aids. Participants were allowed to access assistance with the task from an accompanying partner. A range of personal and audiometric variables was measured through the use of structured questionnaires and standardized tests of health literacy, cognitive function, and manual dexterity. The results showed that 99% of participants were able to complete the hearing aid assembly task, either on their own or with assistance. Health literacy, or the ability to read and understand health-related text, and gender most strongly influenced participants’ ability to complete the assembly task independently and accurately. Higher levels of health literacy were associated with an increased likelihood of independent and successful task completion. Male participants were more likely to complete the task on their own, while female participants were more likely to assemble the device without errors. The results of this study will inform future work regarding development of educational material for the self-fitting hearing aid as well as candidacy for such a device. PMID:22200734

  15. Vision and hearing impairments are associated with depressive--anxiety syndrome in Italian elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernabei, Virginia; Morini, Valentina; Moretti, Francesca; Marchiori, Antonella; Ferrari, Barbara; Dalmonte, Edoardo; De Ronchi, Diana; Rita Atti, Anna

    2011-05-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the association between vision and hearing impairment and depressive-anxiety syndrome in a large population participating in the Faenza Project, Northern Italy. The study population consisted of 7389 participants not affected by dementia, 4408 (59.7%), of whom were women, mean age ± standard deviation (±SD) 71.9 (±7.7) years. Information about previous or current psychiatric symptoms, including sleeping and eating habits, non-verbal language and ability in activity of daily living was used to investigate depressive and anxiety syndrome. A semi-structured interview was administered to survey the presence of sensory impairment. Logistic regression analyses were used to evaluate the association between sensory impairment and depressive-anxiety syndrome estimating Odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence interval (95% CI). The prevalence of vision and hearing impairment was 1.4% and 0.2%, respectively, with an increasing trend in people aged 75+ years (p impaired participants (20.2% vs. 9.3%, p hearing-impaired group (25.0% vs. 11.0%, p = 0.09). Vision-impaired participants, especially women and participants aged 75+ years had have a twofold higher probability to have depressive syndrome (OR = 2.03, 95% CI = 1.21-3.38), and hearing-impaired individuals showed an increased probability of presenting anxiety syndrome (OR = 2.71, 95% CI = 0.86-8.55), although these results were not statistically significant. This study's findings suggest that sensory impairment in older adults can increase their probability of experiencing depressive and anxiety syndrome. Correction of these deficits could improve the quality of life in this population.

  16. Project SKI*HI Outreach Programming for Hearing Impaired Infants and Families: Recertification Statement, Questions, Responses, and Approval.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strong, Carol J.; Clark, Thomas C.

    This program evaluation report presents information on Project SKI*HI, a home-based program for infants and young children with hearing impairments and their families. The program's major goals are early identification of hearing-impaired infants and a home program to facilitate child development. A parent advisor makes weekly home visits to each…

  17. iPads Enhance Social Interaction Skills among Hearing-Impaired Children of Low Income Families in Saudi Arabia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahatheg, Raja Omar

    2015-01-01

    This research tries to investigate the technical contribution on improving the social interaction of hearing-impaired children from low income families in Saudi Arabia. It compares the social interaction skills of hearing-impaired children who do and do not have access to iPads. To achieve the goals of the study; seventeen children aged five years…

  18. Providing Hearing-Impaired Students with Learning Care after Classes through Smart Phones and the GPRS Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chen-Chung; Hong, Yi-Ching

    2007-01-01

    Although computers and network technology have been widely utilised to assist students learn, few technical supports have been developed to help hearing-impaired students learn in Taiwan. A significant challenge for teachers is to provide after-class learning care and assistance to hearing-impaired students that sustain their motivation to…

  19. Sensory impairments in community health care: a descriptive study of hearing and vision among elderly Norwegians living at home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haanes, Gro Gade; Kirkevold, Marit; Horgen, Gunnar; Hofoss, Dag; Eilertsen, Grethe

    2014-01-01

    Hearing and vision impairments increase with age and are common risk factors for functional decline reduced social participation and withdrawal. Describe the hearing and vision of home care patients older than 80 years. Ninety-three older adults (80+ years) receiving home care were screened for hearing and vision in their homes. Data were collected using a HEINE Mini 3000(®) Otoscope to examine the eardrum and presence of earwax, an Entomed SA201-IV portable pure-tone audiometer to measure the pure-tone average (PTAV), a logarithm of the minimum angle of resolution chart to measure visual acuity (VA), and the Combined Serious Sensory Impairment interview guide. Slight and moderate hearing impairments were found in 41% and 47% of the population, respectively (mean PTAV =40.4 dB for the better ear), and 40% and 56% had impaired and slightly impaired vision, respectively (mean VA =0.45 for the better eye). The participants' self-assessments of hearing and vision were only weakly correlated with PTAV and VA values. The visual function was significantly worse in men than in women (P=0.033). Difficulty in performing instrumental activities of daily living because of hearing and vision impairments was experienced by 17% of the participants, whereas 76% experienced no difficulties. When many people were present, 72% of the participants found it difficult to understand speech. Nearly 30% found it tiring to read, and 41% could not read very small print. The patients' self-assessments of their hearing and vision did not correlate strongly with their VA and PTAV scores. Asking the elderly about their overall hearing and vision ability is not sufficient for detecting sensory impairment, and asking more specific questions about what they could not hear and see was not an adequate indicator of the patients' hearing and vision problems. To detect hearing and vision impairments among elderly home care patients, standardized measurements of their hearing and vision are necessary.

  20. The influence of a vestibular dysfunction on the motor development of hearing-impaired children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Kegel, Alexandra; Maes, Leen; Baetens, Tina; Dhooge, Ingeborg; Van Waelvelde, Hilde

    2012-12-01

    To identify the predictive ability of vestibular function test results on motor performance among hearing-impaired children. Cross-sectional study. Fifty-one typically developing children and 48 children with a unilateral (n = 9) or bilateral hearing impairment (n = 39) of more than 40 dB HL between 3 and 12 years were tested by the Movement Assessment Battery for Children-Second Edition (M ABC-2), clinical balance tests, posturography, rotatory chair testing, and vestibular evoked myogenic potential (VEMP). From the group of hearing-impaired children, 23 had cochlear implants. Balance performance on M ABC-2, clinical balance tests, as well as the sway velocity assessed by posturography in bipedal stance on a cushion with eyes closed and in unilateral stance differed significantly between both groups. Presence of a VEMP response is an important clinical parameter because comparison of the motor performance among hearing-impaired children between those with present and absent VEMPs showed significant differences in balance performance. The three most important predictor variables on motor performance by bivariate regression analyses are the vestibular-ocular reflex (VOR) gain value of the rotatory chair test at 0.01 and 0.05 Hz frequency, as well as the VEMP asymmetry ratio. Multivariate regression analyses suggest that the VOR asymmetry value of the rotatory chair test at 0.05 Hz and the etiology of the hearing loss seem to have additional predictive value. Hearing-impaired children are at risk for balance deficits. A combination of rotatory chair testing and VEMP testing can predict the balance performance. Copyright © 2012 The American Laryngological, Rhinological, and Otological Society, Inc.

  1. Preventive Audiology: Screening for Hearing Impairment in Children Having Recurrent URTI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, K; Pannu, M S; Arora, A; Sharma, V

    2016-06-01

    A late detection of hearing impairment in children can affect speech and language development. Otitis media with effusion (OME) associated with risk factors like recurrent upper respiratory tract infections (URTI) is considered the most common cause of silent hearing impairment among children. So this study was carried out to screen such at risk children for hearing impairment. The study was conducted on 1000 children in the age group of 2-12 years who presented to the OPD of ENT and Pediatrics Department, Govt Medical College with the complaint of recurrent URTI. The children were screened by history taking, general physical examination and local ENT examination. This was followed by impedance audiometry and pure tone audiometry (PTA, wherever indicated). Children with discharging ears and perforated tympanic membrane (TM) were excluded from the study. The most common presenting complaint was nasal discharge (67.9 %), followed by mouth breathing (66.3 %) and snoring (65 %). Only 16.2 % cases actually complained of some hearing impairment on exploratory history indicating the silent nature of OME. On examination 52.65 % cases had a normal looking TM whereas 41.2 % had a dull retracted TM. Results of impedance audiometry showed Type A graph in 56.75 %, Type B in 33.4 % indicating OME and Type C in 9.85 % indicating Eustachian tube dysfunction. PTA showed a mild conductive hearing loss in 26.7 % cases. OME is quite prevalent in high risk children and incidence of OME resulting in silent hearing impairment is quite high especially in young children having recurrent URTI. Impedance audiometry has been proved to be an objective screening tool for the same with a diagnostic accuracy of 87 % and thus under preventive audiology, it has a definite role in young children having recurrent URTI.

  2. Perceptual Adaptation to Room Acoustics and Effects on Speech Intelligibility in Hearing-Impaired Populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahorik, Pavel; Brandewie, Eugene

    2012-01-01

    Summary Recent evidence suggests that brief listening exposure to a reverberant room environment can improve closed-set speech intelligibility in that same environment. For normal-hearing populations, this room adaptation effect can result in improvements in intelligibility of as much as 20%, but depends strongly on the reverberation time of the room, and appears to require binaural input. Because poor speech intelligibility in reverberation is a common complaint for hearing-impaired listeners, it is important to determine how room adaptation might impact speech intelligibility for hearing-impaired populations. Here, room adaptation was quantified for a sample of listeners with sensorineural hearing loss that varied in severity and configuration. Speech reception thresholds (SRTs) were measured both with and without prior listening exposure to the room environment. Headphone-based auralization techniques were used to simulate the acoustics of various listening rooms, ranging from anechoic to highly reverberant space (broadband T60 = 3 s). Although SRTs both with and without prior room exposure were found to be generally elevated relative to normal-hearing listeners, the room adaptation effect, as defined by the relative decrease in SRT with room exposure, was comparable on average to that observed for normal-hearing listeners. This result is consistent with the view that room adaptation effects result from central auditory processing mechanisms. PMID:23455358

  3. Perceptual Adaptation to Room Acoustics and Effects on Speech Intelligibility in Hearing-Impaired Populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahorik, Pavel; Brandewie, Eugene

    2011-06-27

    Recent evidence suggests that brief listening exposure to a reverberant room environment can improve closed-set speech intelligibility in that same environment. For normal-hearing populations, this room adaptation effect can result in improvements in intelligibility of as much as 20%, but depends strongly on the reverberation time of the room, and appears to require binaural input. Because poor speech intelligibility in reverberation is a common complaint for hearing-impaired listeners, it is important to determine how room adaptation might impact speech intelligibility for hearing-impaired populations. Here, room adaptation was quantified for a sample of listeners with sensorineural hearing loss that varied in severity and configuration. Speech reception thresholds (SRTs) were measured both with and without prior listening exposure to the room environment. Headphone-based auralization techniques were used to simulate the acoustics of various listening rooms, ranging from anechoic to highly reverberant space (broadband T60 = 3 s). Although SRTs both with and without prior room exposure were found to be generally elevated relative to normal-hearing listeners, the room adaptation effect, as defined by the relative decrease in SRT with room exposure, was comparable on average to that observed for normal-hearing listeners. This result is consistent with the view that room adaptation effects result from central auditory processing mechanisms.

  4. Early Hearing-Impairment Results in Crossmodal Reorganization of Ferret Core Auditory Cortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Alex Meredith

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Numerous investigations of cortical crossmodal plasticity, most often in congenital or early-deaf subjects, have indicated that secondary auditory cortical areas reorganize to exhibit visual responsiveness while the core auditory regions are largely spared. However, a recent study of adult-deafened ferrets demonstrated that core auditory cortex was reorganized by the somatosensory modality. Because adult animals have matured beyond their critical period of sensory development and plasticity, it was not known if adult-deafening and early-deafening would generate the same crossmodal results. The present study used young, ototoxically-lesioned ferrets (n=3 that, after maturation (avg. = 173 days old, showed significant hearing deficits (avg. threshold = 72 dB SPL. Recordings from single-units (n=132 in core auditory cortex showed that 72% were activated by somatosensory stimulation (compared to 1% in hearing controls. In addition, tracer injection into early hearing-impaired core auditory cortex labeled essentially the same auditory cortical and thalamic projection sources as seen for injections in the hearing controls, indicating that the functional reorganization was not the result of new or latent projections to the cortex. These data, along with similar observations from adult-deafened and adult hearing-impaired animals, support the recently proposed brainstem theory for crossmodal plasticity induced by hearing loss.

  5. Risk factors for hearing impairment among adults with diabetes: The Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos (HCHS/SOL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathleen E. Bainbridge

    2016-12-01

    Conclusions: Current smoking, alcohol consumption, high triglycerides, and chronic kidney disease are potentially preventable correlates of hearing impairment for persons with diabetes. Low income is a marker of increased likelihood of hearing impairment.

  6. [Examination of relationship between level of hearing and written language skills in 10-14-year-old hearing impaired children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turğut, Nedim; Karlıdağ, Turgut; Başar, Figen; Yalçın, Şinasi; Kaygusuz, İrfan; Keleş, Erol; Birkent, Ömer Faruk

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to review the relationship between written language skills and factors which are thought to affect this skill such as mean hearing loss, duration of auditory deprivation, speech discrimination score, and pre-school education attendance and socioeconomic status of hearing impaired children who attend 4th-7th grades in primary school in inclusive environment. The study included 25 hearing impaired children (14 males, 11 females; mean age 11.4±1.4 years; range 10 to 14 years) (study group) and 20 children (9 males, 11 females; mean age 11.5±1.3 years; range 10 to 14 years) (control group) with normal hearing in the same age group and studying in the same class. Study group was separated into two subgroups as group 1a and group 1b since some of the children with hearing disability used hearing aid while some used cochlear implant. Intragroup comparisons and relational screening were performed for those who use hearing aids and cochlear implants. Intergroup comparisons were performed to evaluate the effect of the parameters on written language skills. Written expression skill level of children with hearing disability was significantly lower than their normal hearing peers (p=0.001). A significant relationship was detected between written language skills and mean hearing loss (p=0.048), duration of auditory deprivation (p=0.021), speech discrimination score (p=0.014), and preschool attendance (p=0.005), when it comes to socioeconomic status we were not able to find any significant relationship (p=0.636). It can be said that hearing loss affects written language skills negatively and hearing impaired individuals develop low-level written language skills compared to their normal hearing peers.

  7. Pioneering Strategies for Relieving Dental Anxiety in Hearing Impaired Children: a Randomized Controlled Clinical Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandrasekhar, Shalini; Madu, Ghanashyam Prasad; Ambati, Naga Radhakrishna; Suravarapu, Pavani Reddy; Uppu, Kalyani; Bolla, Deepthi

    2017-06-01

    Hearing impaired children have a problem in understanding and comprehending with dental treatments. Visual language is the sensible answer of how to improve communication with them. To evaluate the applicability of dental sign language in Hearing impaired children in relieving anxiety during stressful dental treatment by improving their means of communication. This randomized clinical trial was carried out in the Department of Pedodontics and Preventive Dentistry which included 40 Hearing Impaired children meeting inclusion criteria. The selected children were randomly divided into the study and control group comprising of 20 each. In the control group, initial oral examination and dental treatment (oral prophylaxis and class I restoration) were performed without the use of dental sign language. In the study group, the dental sign language specific to dental treatment was educated and during their subsequent visit to the dental clinic after dental sign language reinforcement, oral prophylaxis and class I restoration were done. Subjective and objective measurements of anxiety were recorded for both groups using facial image scale (FIS), pulse oximeter and electronic blood pressure apparatus to compare for correlation. The obtained data were subjected to statistical analysis using unpaired t-test. There was a statistically significant reduction in the anxiety levels (panxiety in children who are hard of hearing. Dental sign language was able to improve behavior positively during dental treatment and may also aid in developing a positive dental attitude among children who are hard of hearing.

  8. Low bone mineral density is associated with balance and hearing impairments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendy, Angelico; Vieira, Edgar R; Albatineh, Ahmed N; Nnadi, Augustine K; Lowry, Dana; Gasana, Janvier

    2014-01-01

    Bone demineralization affects the skeletal system, including the temporal bone, which contains the cochlea and the vestibular labyrinth. However, research on the association of bone mineral density (BMD) with balance and hearing sensitivity is limited with conflicting results. Therefore, we examined the relationship in a population representative sample. We analyzed 8863 participants to the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (1999-2004) aged 40 years and older. Total and head BMD were measured by dual energy x-ray absorptiometry. Balance was evaluated using the Romberg Test of Standing Balance on Firm and Compliant Support Surfaces condition 4, also indicative of vestibular dysfunction. Hearing condition was self-reported. The associations of total and head BMD with balance and hearing were assessed using multiple and multinomial logistic regressions adjusting for covariates. On multiple logistic regression, low total BMD was associated with balance impairment (odds ratio [OR], 2.21; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.43-4.75), especially in older adults (≥65 years old; OR, 3.72; 95% CI, 1.07-12.85). In multinomial regression, low total BMD was associated with report of significant hearing impairment in older adults (OR, 5.30; 95% CI, 1.20-23.26). Low BMD is associated with balance and hearing impairments, especially in older adults. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Ataxia and Its Association with Hearing Impairment in Childhood Bacterial Meningitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roine, Irmeli; Pelkonen, Tuula; Bernardino, Luis; Leite Cruzeiro, Manuel; Peltola, Heikki; Pitkäranta, Anne

    2015-08-01

    Ataxia, deemed usually a minor sequela, follows childhood bacterial meningitis (BM) in up to 18% of cases. Although mostly transient and benign, it can predict permanent hearing loss and vestibular dysfunction. We explored the clinical meaning of ataxia by following its course in a large number of BM patients and examining its relation with hearing loss. The presence, degree (no, mild, moderate and severe) and course (transient, prolonged and late) of ataxia in BM were registered prospectively by predefined criteria. These data were compared with several patient, disease, and outcome variables including hearing loss (none, moderate, severe and profound) on day 7 of treatment and at a follow-up visit 1 month after discharge. Ataxia was present in 243 of 361 (67%) patients on day 7, being slight in 21%, moderate in 38% and severe in 41%. Its course was transient in 41%, prolonged in 24% and late in 5%, whereas 30% of the patients did not present ataxia at any time. Ataxia associated most significantly not only with several measures of BM severity and suboptimal outcome (P ataxia correlated with the extent of hearing loss (rho, 0.37; P Ataxia is more frequent and lasts longer after BM than learned from previous studies. The presence and intensity of ataxia associate with hearing loss and its magnitude.

  10. Visual Cues Contribute Differentially to Audiovisual Perception of Consonants and Vowels in Improving Recognition and Reducing Cognitive Demands in Listeners with Hearing Impairment Using Hearing Aids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moradi, Shahram; Lidestam, Bjorn; Danielsson, Henrik; Ng, Elaine Hoi Ning; Ronnberg, Jerker

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: We sought to examine the contribution of visual cues in audiovisual identification of consonants and vowels--in terms of isolation points (the shortest time required for correct identification of a speech stimulus), accuracy, and cognitive demands--in listeners with hearing impairment using hearing aids. Method: The study comprised 199…

  11. Mental health of visually and hearing impaired students from the viewpoint of the University Personality Inventory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, T; Ichikawa, T; Ishikawa, T; Hori, M

    1998-08-01

    Tsukuba College of Technology is the first national university established as an institute of higher education for the visually and hearing impaired. We have been systematically conducting a University Personality Inventory (UPI) survey on our students since 1989 to understand their mental health. In this study, we compared the UPI scores of the new students of Tsukuba College of Technology in 1993 and 1994 with unimpaired students from the University of Tsukuba (control group), but found no significant difference in the UPI scores of the visually impaired and the control group. However, we noticed a significant difference in the average UPI scores between the hearing impaired and the control group. The visually impaired group were divided into four subgroups, UPI scores descended in order from degree 1 (total blindness), to degrees 2 and 3 (amblyopia), to degree 4 (visual acuity > or = 0.3). The UPI scores of the degree 4 subgroup were significantly lower than those of the control group. An investigation of the items for which the check rate was at least 50% showed that the visually impaired students had a variety of psychological problems, most of which seemed to concern depression or anxiety as did the normal control group. The number of affirmative responses increased with low visual acuity. The only one belonging to the 'lie' scale item was observed in the group of hearing impaired students. Thus, comparing these three groups from the viewpoint of mental health, we noticed the hearing impaired group was slightly different from the other two groups, but the visually impaired group was similar to the normal control group.

  12. Prevalence and Correlates of Hearing and Visual Impairments in European Nursing Homes: Results From the SHELTER Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yamada, Y.; Vlachova, M.; Richter, T.; Finne-Soveri, H.; Gindin, J.; van der Roest, H.G.; Denkinger, M.D.; Bernabei, R.; Onder, G.; Topinkova, E.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Visual and hearing impairments are known to be related to functional disability, cognitive impairment, and depression in community-dwelling older people. The aim of this study was to examine the prevalence of sensory impairment in nursing home residents, and whether sensory impairment is

  13. Telephone speech enhancement for hearing-impaired listeners using multi-channel compression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natarajan, Harikrishna P.; Krishnamurthy, Ashok K.; Feth, Lawrence L.

    2002-05-01

    Elderly listeners with sensorineural hearing impairment usually have difficulty with telephone communication if they do not use a hearing aid or telephone amplifier. In many cases, these devices may not be readily available or maybe uncomfortable to use. We describe here an alternative strategy to enhance the speech by pre-processing the signal before sending it over the telephone line. The pre-processing is based on a multi-channel compression algorithm that modifies the critical band spectrum of the speech signal to bring it within the dynamic hearing range of the listener, while also compensating for the effects of the telephone line. We describe the algorithm and the results of a simulation study in which the Articulation Index (AI) is used to measure the intelligibility enhancement, and the Glasberg, Moore and Stone (1999) model is used to simulate the effects of the hearing loss.

  14. Age-Related Trajectories of Memory Function in Middle-Aged and Older Adults with and without Hearing Impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Shang-Te; Chiu, Ching-Ju

    2016-01-01

    To examine age-related trajectories of memory function associated with hearing status and to explore potential confounding by sociodemographic, physiological, and behavioral factors in that link. A national representative sample of Taiwanese adults ≥50 years with and without hearing impairment in 1996 (n = 4,707) were interviewed every 3-4 years until 2007. Cross-sectional and prospective associations between hearing impairment and memory function were determined using multilevel modeling. In bivariate analyses, hearing impairment was associated not only with poor memory function but also with sociodemographic, behavioral and self-rated health status and chronic conditions. These factors, however, did not confound the relationship of hearing impairment with the level or rate of change in the modified Rey Auditory Verbal Learning Test (m-RAVLT) score - hearing impairment increased the age-related differences in the intercept of the memory function by 25.6%, and that the association was significantly greater in older people than in younger people, but hearing impairment was not associated with the slope of the cognitive trajectory over time. Hearing impairment and the m-RAVLT score at any point in time may have partially combined pathologic mechanisms with age. The vascular risk covariates we considered might also share the etiological pathways and be part of important prevention strategies for guarding against age-related memory decline in the future. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  15. Comparison of single-microphone noise reduction schemes: can hearing impaired listeners tell the difference?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huber, Rainer; Bisitz, Thomas; Gerkmann, Timo; Kiessling, Jürgen; Meister, Hartmut; Kollmeier, Birger

    2017-01-23

    The perceived qualities of nine different single-microphone noise reduction (SMNR) algorithms were to be evaluated and compared in subjective listening tests with normal hearing and hearing impaired (HI) listeners. Speech samples added with traffic noise or with party noise were processed by the SMNR algorithms. Subjects rated the amount of speech distortions, intrusiveness of background noise, listening effort and overall quality, using a simplified MUSHRA (ITU-R, 2003 ) assessment method. 18 normal hearing and 18 moderately HI subjects participated in the study. Significant differences between the rating behaviours of the two subject groups were observed: While normal hearing subjects clearly differentiated between different SMNR algorithms, HI subjects rated all processed signals very similarly. Moreover, HI subjects rated speech distortions of the unprocessed, noisier signals as being more severe than the distortions of the processed signals, in contrast to normal hearing subjects. It seems harder for HI listeners to distinguish between additive noise and speech distortions or/and they might have a different understanding of the term "speech distortion" than normal hearing listeners have. The findings confirm that the evaluation of SMNR schemes for hearing aids should always involve HI listeners.

  16. Development of a low cost assistive listening system for hearing-impaired student classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan-ngum, Setha; Soonrach, Tharapong; Seesutas, Sangvorn; Noymai, Anukool; Israsena, Pasin

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes the design, development, and tests of a low cost ALS. It was designed for hearing-impaired student classrooms. It utilised digital wireless technology and was aimed to be an alternative to a popular FM ALS. Key specifications include transmitting in 2.4 GHz ISM band with eight selectable transmission channels, battery operated and chargeable, pocket size, and ranged up to thirty metres. Audio characteristics and user tests show that it is comparable to a commercial system, currently employed in our partner school. The results also show that wearing an ALS clearly improves hearing of hearing-impaired students. Long-term usage by school children will be monitored to evaluate the system robustness and durability.

  17. Effects of assistance dogs on persons with mobility or hearing impairments: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rintala, Diana H; Matamoros, Rebeca; Seitz, Laura L

    2008-01-01

    Service dogs help persons with mobility impairments by retrieving items and performing other tasks. Hearing dogs alert persons with hearing impairments to environmental sounds. We conducted a pre-post, wait list-controlled pilot study to assess the impact of the dogs on the lives of recipients. Participants were recruited through two assistance dog training organizations and completed an initial questionnaire packet. The Experimental group completed another packet 6 months after receiving a dog. The Control group completed a second packet 6 months after the initial data collection. On average, dog recipients were very satisfied with their assistance dogs. Both service and hearing dog recipients reduced their dependence on other persons. Service dog recipients reduced hours of paid assistance. No other significant change occurred in various standardized outcome measures. Assistance dogs had a major positive impact on the lives of recipients. More appropriate measurement instruments are needed to capture the impact of these dogs.

  18. Development of a Low Cost Assistive Listening System for Hearing-Impaired Student Classroom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Setha Pan-ngum

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the design, development, and tests of a low cost ALS. It was designed for hearing-impaired student classrooms. It utilised digital wireless technology and was aimed to be an alternative to a popular FM ALS. Key specifications include transmitting in 2.4 GHz ISM band with eight selectable transmission channels, battery operated and chargeable, pocket size, and ranged up to thirty metres. Audio characteristics and user tests show that it is comparable to a commercial system, currently employed in our partner school. The results also show that wearing an ALS clearly improves hearing of hearing-impaired students. Long-term usage by school children will be monitored to evaluate the system robustness and durability.

  19. [The level of the musical loud sound and noise induced hearing impairment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ono, H; Deguchi, T; Ino, T; Okamoto, K; Takyu, H

    1986-03-20

    Recently, there has been an increasing number of reports concerning hearing impairment which musical loud sound is thought to be one of the causes. We are getting more of this musical loud sound as cassette tape recorders with head phones such as Walkman and so forth get popular as well as occasions to attending rock concerts and going to discotheques increase. This hearing impairment is generally called discotheque deafness and the following three types are considered; 1) deafness which have fixed by accumulation of loud sound over a long period of time as seen in people involved in musical performance such as rock musicians and mixing engineers; 2) abrupt noise induced hearing impairment triggered by loud sound and 3) state of deafness which is a progressing stage towards recovery of noise induced temporary threshold shift (NITTS), which occurs temporarily by a loud sound stimulus, and hearing ability recovers afterward. However, it is considered that these musical loud sounds not only changes every moment according to method of performing or type of music, but the volume of the sound actually reaching the auditory sense differs largely by locations and direction of the ear and speakers. So it becomes necessary to measure the accumulation of the noise which each individual is exposed under over a long period of time and at the same time carry out the regular medical checkups including hearing test to check the initiation and advancement of the noise induced hearing impairment. Then we can examine the relationship between loudness of the environmental noise and initiation and advancement of the hearing impairment. However, there has not been a device which is compact and measures noise exposure individually over a long period of time. So we have experimentally produced ultra compact noise dosimeter which we named Noise Badge, and with it we actually measured individual noise exposure over a long time in rock music, noise in discotheque and noisy factory. Then we

  20. Psychopathology and its risk and protective factors in hearing-impaired children and adolescents: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theunissen, Stephanie C P M; Rieffe, Carolien; Netten, Anouk P; Briaire, Jeroen J; Soede, Wim; Schoones, Jan W; Frijns, Johan H M

    2014-02-01

    Pediatric hearing impairment is a chronic handicap that can potentially lead to the development of psychopathology. Yet, for hearing-impaired children and adolescents, the exact occurrence of various forms of psychopathology and its causes are unclear, while this knowledge is essential to enable targeted screenings and interventions. To investigate the level of psychopathological symptoms in hearing-impaired children and adolescents as compared with normally hearing peers. Second, the influence of type of hearing device and possible risk and protective factors on psychopathology were examined. A systematic literature search was performed covering relevant databases, including PubMed, Embase, and Web of Science. Two independent researchers identified the relevant articles. The final search was performed on May 2, 2013, and resulted in a total of 35 articles. Literature consistently demonstrated that hearing-impaired children and adolescents were more prone to developing depression, aggression, oppositional defiant disorder, conduct disorder, and psychopathy than their normally hearing peers. Levels of anxiety, somatization, and delinquency were elevated in some, but not all, hearing-impaired participants, for reasons related to sex, age, and type of school. Divergent results were obtained for the level of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder and the influence of type of hearing device on psychopathology. Possible risk and protective factors were identified, including age at detection and intervention of hearing loss, additional disabilities, communication skills, intelligence, type of school, and number of siblings. Literature on psychopathology in hearing-impaired children and adolescents is scarce and sometimes inconsistent. To define a more precise occurrence of psychopathology, more studies are needed. These studies should have a longitudinal design to draw firmer conclusions on causality. Hopefully, this will lead to more knowledge in the future to help and

  1. Quality of life in adolescents with hearing deficiencies and visual impairments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Torres, Vanthauze Marques Freire

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The term quality of life (in Portuguese, Qualidade de Vida; QV has been expanded and modified over the years and has come to signify social development in terms of education, health, and leisure as well as economic issues. Objective: To analyze the perception of QV in adolescents with hearing and visual impairments and the effects of socio-demographic characteristics on the domains of QV. Method: This descriptive series study comprised 42 adolescents aged 10 to 19 years who were students at Recife's state schools. The World Health Organization Quality of Life-Abbreviated questionnaire was used to evaluate QV. The data were analyzed using descriptive statistics and the Mann-Whitney and Kruskal-Wallis tests with a significance level of p < 0.05. Results: The global perception of QV was higher among adolescents with visual impairments than among those with hearing impairments. Among the individual components of QV, the environment domain garnered the lowest scores independent of the type of impairment. The subjects with visual impairments reported higher scores for social relationships, while the psychological domain scored higher among those with hearing impairments. The students integrated into normal classrooms perceived better QV in the psychological and social relationships domains than did those who sat in special classrooms. Conclusion: The environmental domain was the worst component of the QV of handicapped adolescents, suggesting a need for greater investments in policies to improve the QV of this population.

  2. Quality of life in adolescents with hearing deficiencies and visual impairments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marques Freire Torres, Vanthauze; Lidianne Alencar Marinho, Christielle; Gabriela Gomes de Oliveira, Carolina; Conceição Maria Vieira, Sandra

    2013-04-01

     The term quality of life (in Portuguese, Qualidade de Vida; QV) has been expanded and modified over the years and has come to signify social development in terms of education, health, and leisure as well as economic issues.  To analyze the perception of QV in adolescents with hearing and visual impairments and the effects of socio-demographic characteristics on the domains of QV.  This descriptive series study comprised 42 adolescents aged 10 to 19 years who were students at Recife's state schools. The World Health Organization Quality of Life-Abbreviated questionnaire was used to evaluate QV. The data were analyzed using descriptive statistics and the Mann-Whitney and Kruskal-Wallis tests with a significance level of p perception of QV was higher among adolescents with visual impairments than among those with hearing impairments. Among the individual components of QV, the environment domain garnered the lowest scores independent of the type of impairment. The subjects with visual impairments reported higher scores for social relationships, while the psychological domain scored higher among those with hearing impairments. The students integrated into normal classrooms perceived better QV in the psychological and social relationships domains than did those who sat in special classrooms.  The environmental domain was the worst component of the QV of handicapped adolescents, suggesting a need for greater investments in policies to improve the QV of this population.

  3. Tactile Aids for Speech Perception and Production by Hearing-Impaired People.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisenberger, Janet

    1989-01-01

    Laboratory results are presented which suggest that hearing-impaired individuals' speech perception can be enhanced through use of tactile aids with a number of tactile transducers conveying information about the spectral content of the speech signal, and speech production can be improved through experience using a multichannel tactile aid.…

  4. Virtual Lab to Develop Achievement in Electronic Circuits for Hearing-Impaired Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baladoh, S. M.; Elgamal, A. F.; Abas, H. A.

    2017-01-01

    This paper aims to report and discuss the use of a virtual lab for developing achievement in electronic circuits for hearing-impaired students. Results from a number of studies have proved that the virtual lab allowed students to build and test a wide variety of electronic circuits. The present study was implemented to investigate the…

  5. Progressive sensorineural hearing impairment in maternally inherited diabetes mellitus and deafness (MIDD).

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hendrickx, J.J.; Mudde, A.H.; Hart, L.M. 't; Huygen, P.L.M.; Cremers, C.W.R.J.

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To study the progression of hearing impairment (HI) and audiological features in patients with the mitochondrial A to G mutation in the tRNA(LEU(RUU)) gene at position 3,243 associated with maternally inherited diabetes and deafness. DESIGN: Retrospective phenotype genotype family study.

  6. Stress in Mothers of Hearing Impaired Children Compared to Mothers of Normal and Other Disabled Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahnaz Aliakbari Dehkordi

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Stress is associated with life satisfaction and also development of some physical diseases. Birth of a disabled child with mental or physical disability (especially deaf or blind children, impose an enormous load of stress on their parents especially the mothers. This study compared stress levels of mothers with hearing impaired children and mothers of normal children or with other disabilities.Methods: In this study, cluster random sampling was performed in Karaj city. 120 mothers in four groups of having a child with mental retardation, low vision, hearing impairment and with normal children were included. Family inventory of life events (FILE of Mc Cubbin et al. was used to determine stress level in four groups of mothers.Results: The results of this research indicated a significant difference (p<0.05 between stress levels of mothers with hearing impaired children and mothers of other disabled and normal children in subscales of intra-family stress, finance and business strains, stress of job transitions, stress of illness and family care and family members "in and out''. There was no difference between compared groups in other subscales.Conclusion: Since deafness is a hidden inability, the child with hearing impairment has a set of social and educational problems causing great stress for parents, especially to mother. In order to decrease mother’s stress, it is suggested to provide more family consultation, adequate social support and to run educational classes for parents to practice stress coping strategies.

  7. Computer-Assisted Learning for the Hearing Impaired: An Interactive Written Language Enviroment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, R. D.; Rostron, A. B.

    1983-01-01

    To help hearing-impaired children develop their linguistic competence, a computer system that can process sentences and give feedback about their acceptability was developed. Suggestions are made of ways to use the system as an environment for interactive written communication. (Author/CL)

  8. Screening for Vision Problems, Including Usher's Syndrome, among Hearing Impaired Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fillman, Robyn D.; And Others

    1987-01-01

    A screening program for vision problems and Usher's Syndrome (a common cause of deaf-blindness) among 210 hearing-impaired students found 44 percent had significant vision problems and 1 percent had Usher's Syndrome. The program involved an interagency network of school, health care, and support personnel and utilized a dilated ophathalmological…

  9. Intellectual Estimates of Hearing-Impaired Children: A Comparison of Three Measures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritter, David R.

    1976-01-01

    The Arthur Adaptation of the Leiter International Performance Scale, Raven's Coloured Progressive Matrices, and Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children-Performance Section were administered to 31 children with mild to moderate hearing impairments. A comparison of test results indicated moderate convergent validity among the measures. (Author)

  10. Classification of the Hearing Impaired for Independent Living Using the Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunlap, William R.; Sands, Deanna Iceman

    1990-01-01

    The Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scale was used to classify 118 hearing-impaired persons (88 percent were ages 16-21) into groups based on their ability to be trained in independent living skills. Using cluster analysis, the subjects were placed into three groups according to four domains: communication, daily living, socialization, and maladaptive…

  11. Language Development and Impairment in Children with Mild to Moderate Sensorineural Hearing Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halliday, Lorna F.; Tuomainen, Outi; Rosen, Stuart

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: The goal of this study was to examine language development and factors related to language impairments in children with mild to moderate sensorineural hearing loss (MMHL). Method: Ninety children, aged 8-16 years (46 children with MMHL; 44 aged-matched controls), were administered a battery of standardized language assessments, including…

  12. Training of Speechreading for Severely Hearing-Impaired Persons by Human and Computer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bothe, Hans-Heinrich

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes evaluation results for a software programme that is intended to be used as a training-aid for lipreading in German. Tests were carried out in schools for hearing-impaired children in Germany which indicate that the ability to lipread increases significantly already after use...

  13. The Ohio Achievement Assessment and Deaf/Hearing Impaired Students: Have They Been Left Behind?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Tanya S. Williams

    2013-01-01

    The purposes of this study were 1) to examine Ohio Achievement Assessment data in the content areas of Reading, Science and Social Studies between the years of 2004-2010) to determine whether an achievement gap exists within the disability category of Deaf/Hearing Impaired; 2) to determine whether the trends present in the data of normal hearing…

  14. Working Memory and Speech Comprehension in Older Adults with Hearing Impairment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagaraj, Naveen K.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: This study examined the relationship between working memory (WM) and speech comprehension in older adults with hearing impairment (HI). It was hypothesized that WM would explain significant variance in speech comprehension measured in multitalker babble (MTB). Method: Twenty-four older (59-73 years) adults with sensorineural HI…

  15. Hearing Impairment in Adults with an Intellectual Disability: epidemiology and rehabilitation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Meuwese-Jongejeugd (Anneke)

    2006-01-01

    textabstractIn this thesis, the results are presented of an epidemiological study of hearing impairment in adults with an intellectual disability (ID), as well as the results of a study on the implementation of an audiological rehabilitation protocol in centres for persons with an ID. It is

  16. Current State of the Curriculum in Jordanian Kindergartens for Children with Hearing Impairments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Zboon, Eman K.

    2017-01-01

    An appropriate curriculum for children with hearing impairments (HIs) is vital in establishing effective educational programmes for such children. This study aimed to describe the current status of the kindergarten (KG) curriculum for children with HIs in Jordan. Content analysis was applied to the curriculum plans and weekly schedules and…

  17. The effect of positive parenting program on parenting stress of mothers with impaired hearing children

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    Mahnaz Aliakbari Dehkordi

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Research indicates that impaired hearing is one of the most stressful disabilities. The parenting stress involved could lead to family malfunction and improper parenting. Therefore, this study aimed to evaluate the effects of positive parenting programs on the parenting stress of mothers with impaired hearing children.Methods: The statistical population comprised mothers of all 7-12-year-old impaired hearing children in Tehran city. Thereafter, using the random sampling method, 24 individuals were shortlisted as research participants and were randomly assigned to two groups: control and experimental. The experimental group was trained with a positive parenting program based on the Sanders program (1993 over eight sessions. The measurement instrument was the Abidin parenting stress questionnaire.Results: The mean score for grades in the experimental groups’ parent and child domains at the pre- and post-test stages had reduced more than that in the control group. In addition, the results of a multivariate covariance analysis indicated that positive parenting training was effective in the reduction of parenting stress scores, reinforcement, and child mood components in the child domain, and in the feelings of competence, relationships with the spouse, and role limitation components (p<0.05 in the parent domain.Conclusion : Considering the benefits of training parents for the reduction of parenting stress of mothers with impaired hearing children, this method is recommended in all learning centers for the deaf.

  18. Relations between psychophysical data and speech perception for hearing-impaired subjects. II

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dreschler, W. A.; Plomp, R.

    1985-01-01

    Twenty-one sensorineurally hearing-impaired adolescents were studied with an extensive battery of tone-perception, phoneme-perception, and speech-perception tests. Tests on loudness perception, frequency selectivity, and temporal resolution at the test frequencies of 500, 1000, and 2000 Hz were

  19. Correcting the Enuresis of a Hearing-Impaired, Developmentally Disabled Adolescent Using an Auditory Enuresis Alarm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanson, Ronald H.

    1983-01-01

    The enuresis of a hearing-impaired, developmentally disabled adolescent was corrected through the use of an auditory alarm and specific training procedures. The young man progressed from wetting the bed every night to being consistently dry after five weeks of treatment. He has remaind dry for over two years. (Author/CL)

  20. The Relationship between Knowledge of Story Structure and Question Comprehension in Young Hearing Impaired Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kluwin, Thomas N.; Papalia, Julie

    Thirty hearing-impaired children at a residential school for the deaf, a day school for the deaf, and a day program for the deaf in a regular public elementary school were shown picture books, asked to tell the story, and asked to respond to specific questions. Results showed that the ability to process questions was related to the structure of…

  1. Hearing Impairment and Undiagnosed Disease: The Potential Role of Clinical Recommendations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marlow, Nicole M.; Malaty, John; Jo, Ara; Tanner, Rebecca J.; Beau de Rochars, Valery M.; Carek, Peter J.; Mainous, Arch G., III

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: The objective of this study was to use cross-sectional, nationally representative data to examine the relationship between self-reported hearing impairment and undetected diabetes, hypertension, hypercholesterolemia, and chronic kidney disease. Method: We analyzed the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey for the years…

  2. Affective Films for the Hearing Impaired Child: A Test of Captioned Inside/Out Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Middleton, John

    Two captioned affective films from the AIT series Inside/Out were tested with 14 intermediate (ages 13 to 15) and 39 elementary (ages 11 and 12) hearing impaired children at the Hawaii School for the Deaf and Blind. Measures of attention, post-film discussion, student comprehension, and student and teacher opinions were taken to determine the…

  3. Communication Competence: Impact of the Pragmatics Revolution on Education of Hearing Impaired Individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kretschmer, Richard R., Jr.; Kretschmer, Laura W.

    1989-01-01

    Three primary strands of pragmatic theory and research are applied to interpersonal communication research and education of hearing-impaired individuals: communication/speech act theory, conversational organization theory, and text/discourse-building theory. It is concluded that neither current research nor educational practice suggests widespread…

  4. Sexual vulnerability and HIV seroprevalence among the deaf and hearing impaired in Cameroon

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    Touko Adonis

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This quantitative cross-sectional study examines sexual behaviour of a target group of hearing-impaired persons in Yaounde, the capital city of the Republic of Cameroon. It measures their HIV prevalence to enable assessment of their sexual vulnerability and to help reduce the gap in existing HIV serology data among people with disabilities in general and the deaf in particular. Methods The snowball sampling procedure was adopted as an adequate approach to meet this hard-to-reach group. A total of 118 deaf participants were interviewed for the behavioural component, using sign language as a means of data collection, while 101 participants underwent HIV serology testing. Descriptive analyses were done for behavioural data with Epi info software, while sera were tested by health personnel, using rapid and confirmation test reagents. Results From the results, it was clear that the hearing impaired were highly involved in risky sexual practices, as observed through major sexual indicators, such as: age at first sexual intercourse; condom use; and knowledge of sexually transmitted infections and AIDS. Furthermore, it was noted that the HIV prevalence rate of the hearing impaired in the capital of Cameroon was 4%, close to the prevalence in the city's general population (4.7%. Conclusions Such results suggest that there is a need for in-depth behavioural research and serological studies in this domain to better understand the determinants of risky sexual behaviour among the hearing impaired, and to propose operational prevention approaches for this group.

  5. The Effect of iPad on School Preparedness among Preschool Children with Hearing-Impairments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turkestani, Maryam Hafez

    2015-01-01

    With modern technological developments and with the fast expansion of mobile technical equipment, conducting a field study to find out how technology influences various developmental aspects of normal and special needs children at the preschool stage was deemed appropriate and timely hearing impairment. In this study aimed at finding out the…

  6. Mother's Perspective toward Al-Quran Education for Hearing Impaired Children in Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghadim, Nafiseh Alaghehband; Jomhari, Nazean; Alias, Norlidah; Rashid, Syar Meeze Mohd; Yusoff, Mohd Yakub Zulkifli Bin Mohd

    2013-01-01

    An interview with parents of children with hearing impairment was carried out in the initial study since the coordinated effort of parents and children is essential in the education of children. Considering that this interview was appropriate for collecting qualitative-oriented data, it has been chosen as the knowledge elicitation method. In most…

  7. Science Education for Hearing-Impaired Students in the Eighties: Priorities and Projections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Harry G.; And Others

    1983-01-01

    Needs and projections in science education for hearing impaired students fall into eight areas, including needs for quality teacher education, exemplary materials, infusion of career education into science curriculum offerings, increased involvement of professional organizations, and development of fundamental mathematics skills within the context…

  8. Small Group versus Individual Speech Therapy with Hearing-Impaired Young Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albertini, John A.; And Others

    1983-01-01

    The relative effectiveness of individual speech therapy (8 students) versus small group therapy (18 students) was evaluated with hearing impaired young adults who had articulation problems. Articulation skill mastery, improvement in speech intelligibility, and quantity and type of utterances were examined. Only quantity of utterances distinguished…

  9. Effect of musical training on pitch discrimination performance in older normal-hearing and hearing-impaired listeners

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bianchi, Federica; Dau, Torsten; Santurette, Sébastien

    2017-01-01

    Hearing-impaired (HI) listeners, as well as elderly listeners, typically have a reduced ability to discriminate the fundamental frequency (F0) of complex tones compared to young normal-hearing (NH) listeners. Several studies have shown that musical training, on the other hand, leads to improved F0......-discrimination performance for NH listeners. It is unclear whether a comparable effect of musical training occurs for listeners whose sensory encoding of F0 is degraded. To address this question, F0 discrimination was investigated for three groups of listeners (14 young NH, 9 older NH and 10 HI listeners), each...... including musicians and non-musicians, using complex tones that differed in harmonic content. Musical training significantly improved F0 discrimination for all groups of listeners, especially for complex tones containing low-numbered harmonics. In a second experiment, the sensitivity to temporal fine...

  10. Association between hearing impairment and self-reported difficulty in physical functioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, David S; Genther, Dane J; Betz, Joshua; Lin, Frank R

    2014-05-01

    To determine whether hearing impairment, defined by using objective audiometry, is associated with multiple categories of self-reported physical functioning in a cross-sectional, nationally representative sample of older adults. Multivariate secondary analysis of cross-sectional data. The 2005-06 and 2009-10 cycles of the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. Adults aged 70 and older who completed audiometric testing (N = 1,669). Hearing was measured using pure-tone audiometry. Physical functioning was assessed using a structured interview. In a model adjusted for age and demographic and cardiovascular risk factors, greater hearing impairment (per 25 dB hearing level (HL)) was associated with greater odds of physical disability in activities of daily living (odds ratio (OR) = 1.4, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.1-1.9), instrumental activities of daily living (OR = 1.6, 95% CI = 1.2-2.2), leisure and social activities (OR = 1.5, 95% CI = 1.1-2.0), lower extremity mobility (OR = 1.4, 95% CI = 1.1-1.7), general physical activities (OR = 1.3, 95% CI = 1.1-1.6), work limitation (OR = 1.4, 95% CI = 1.0-1.9), walking limitation (OR = 1.6, 95% CI = 1.3-2.0), and limitation due to memory or confusion (OR = 1.4, 95% CI = 1.1-1.8). Hearing impairment was not associated with limitations in amount or type of work done (OR = 1.2, 95% CI = 1.0-1.6). Hearing impairment in older adults is independently associated with greater disability and limitations in multiple self-reported categories of physical functioning. © 2014, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2014, The American Geriatrics Society.

  11. Ildr1b is essential for semicircular canal development, migration of the posterior lateral line primordium and hearing ability in zebrafish: implications for a role in the recessive hearing impairment DFNB42.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sang, Qing; Zhang, Junyu; Feng, Ruizhi; Wang, Xu; Li, Qiaoli; Zhao, Xinzhi; Xing, Qinghe; Chen, Weiyu; Du, Jiulin; Sun, Shan; Chai, Renjie; Liu, Dong; Jin, Li; He, Lin; Li, Huawei; Wang, Lei

    2014-12-01

    Immunoglobulin-like domain containing receptor 1 (ILDR1) is a poorly characterized gene that was first identified in lymphoma cells. Recently, ILDR1 has been found to be responsible for autosomal recessive hearing impairment DFNB42. Patients with ILDR1 mutations cause bilateral non-progressive moderate-to-profound sensorineural hearing impairment. However, the etiology and mechanism of ILDR1-related hearing loss remains to be elucidated. In order to uncover the pathology of DFNB42 deafness, we used the morpholino injection technique to establish an ildr1b-morphant zebrafish model. Ildr1b-morphant zebrafish displayed defective hearing and imbalanced swimming, and developmental delays were seen in the semicircular canals of the inner ear. The gene expression profile and real-time PCR revealed down-regulation of atp1b2b (encoding Na(+)/K(+) transporting, beta 2b polypeptide) in ildr1b-morphant zebrafish. We found that injection of atp1b2b mRNA into ildr1b-knockdown zebrafish could rescue the phenotype of developmental delay of the semicircular canals. Moreover, ildr1b-morphant zebrafish had reduced numbers of lateral line neuromasts due to the disruption of lateral line primordium migration. In situ hybridization showed the involvement of attenuated FGF signaling and the chemokine receptor 4b (cxcr4b) and chemokine receptor 7b (cxcr7b) in posterior lateral line primordium of ildr1b-morphant zebrafish. We concluded that Ildr1b is crucial for the development of the inner ear and the lateral line system. This study provides the first evidence for the mechanism of Ildr1b on hearing in vivo and sheds light on the pathology of DFNB42. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. Nursing students' knowledge of and performance in communicating with patients with hearing impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adib-Hajbaghery, Mohsen; Rezaei-Shahsavarloo, Zahra

    2015-04-01

    The present study aimed to investigate nursing students' knowledge of and performance in communicating with patients with hearing impairment. A cross-sectional study was conducted on all senior nursing students (n = 71) in a nursing school in Iran in 2013. Data collection was performed with a demographics questionnaire, knowledge questionnaire, and performance assessment checklist. Two stages were designed to evaluate the students. In the first stage, students conducted an interview with a simulated patient with hearing impairment who experienced chest pain. In the second stage, students answered the knowledge questionnaire. Descriptive statistics, independent sample Student's t-test, and Pearson correlation coefficient were used to analyze the data. In total, 11.3% of participants had a history of caring for a patient with hearing impairment. The majority of students evaluated their performance in communicating with such patients at a moderate level. A significant difference was observed between the mean score of knowledge in men and women (P = 0.05), and male students gained higher scores. In total, 61.5% of the students had low to very low levels of knowledge and 87.3% of them had weak to very weak performance in communicating with patients with hearing impairment. Nursing students are lacking in knowledge and skills required for effective communication with patients with hearing impairment. Nurse educators should pay more attention to this issue as it is their responsibility to prepare nurses who are competent to deal with common issues they will face in practice. © 2014 The Authors. Japan Journal of Nursing Science © 2014 Japan Academy of Nursing Science.

  13. Murine model for congenital CMV infection and hearing impairment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tao Liu

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Congenital cytomegalovirus (CMV infection is the leading cause of sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL, and SNHL is the most frequent sequela of congenital CMV infection. But the pathogenic mechanism remains unknown, and there is no ideal CMV intrauterine infection animal model to study the mechanisms by which SNHL develops. Methods We established the congenital murine cytomegalovirus (MCMV infection model by directly injecting the virus into the placenta on day 12.5 of gestation. Then, we observed the development and the MCMV congenital infection rate of the fetuses on the day they were born. Furthermore, we detected the auditory functions, the conditions of the MCMV infection, and the histological change of the inner ears of 28-day-old and 70-day-old offspring. Results Both the fetal loss rate and the teratism rate of offspring whose placentas were inoculated with MCMV increased, and their body length, head circumference, and weight decreased. The hearing level of offspring both decreased at both 28- and 70-days post birth; the 70-day-old mice developed lower hearing levels than did the 28-day old mice. No significant inflammatory changes in the cochleae of the mice were observed. MCMV DNA signals were mainly detected in the spiral ganglion neurons and the endolymph area, but not in the perilymph area. The number of neurons decreased, and their ultrastructures changed. Moreover, with age, the number of neurons dramatically decreased, and the ultrastructural lesions of neurons became much more severe. Conclusions The results suggest that the direct injection of MCMV into the placenta may efficiently cause fetal infection and disturb the intrauterine development of the fetus, and placental inoculation itself has no obvious adverse effects on offspring. The reduction in the number of spiral ganglion neurons and the ultrastructural lesions of the neurons may be the major cause of congenital CMV infection-induced progressive SNHL.

  14. Auditory Spatial Discrimination and the Mismatch Negativity Response in Hearing-Impaired Individuals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuexin Cai

    Full Text Available The aims of the present study were to investigate the ability of hearing-impaired (HI individuals with different binaural hearing conditions to discriminate spatial auditory-sources at the midline and lateral positions, and to explore the possible central processing mechanisms by measuring the minimal audible angle (MAA and mismatch negativity (MMN response. To measure MAA at the left/right 0°, 45° and 90° positions, 12 normal-hearing (NH participants and 36 patients with sensorineural hearing loss, which included 12 patients with symmetrical hearing loss (SHL and 24 patients with asymmetrical hearing loss (AHL [12 with unilateral hearing loss on the left (UHLL and 12 with unilateral hearing loss on the right (UHLR] were recruited. In addition, 128-electrode electroencephalography was used to record the MMN response in a separate group of 60 patients (20 UHLL, 20 UHLR and 20 SHL patients and 20 NH participants. The results showed MAA thresholds of the NH participants to be significantly lower than the HI participants. Also, a significantly smaller MAA threshold was obtained at the midline position than at the lateral position in both NH and SHL groups. However, in the AHL group, MAA threshold for the 90° position on the affected side was significantly smaller than the MMA thresholds obtained at other positions. Significantly reduced amplitudes and prolonged latencies of the MMN were found in the HI groups compared to the NH group. In addition, contralateral activation was found in the UHL group for sounds emanating from the 90° position on the affected side and in the NH group. These findings suggest that the abilities of spatial discrimination at the midline and lateral positions vary significantly in different hearing conditions. A reduced MMN amplitude and prolonged latency together with bilaterally symmetrical cortical activations over the auditory hemispheres indicate possible cortical compensatory changes associated with poor

  15. Management of hearing aid assembly by urban-dwelling hearing-impaired adults in a developed country: implications for a self-fitting hearing aid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Convery, Elizabeth; Keidser, Gitte; Hartley, Lisa; Caposecco, Andrea; Hickson, Louise; Meyer, Carly

    2011-12-01

    A self-fitting hearing aid, designed to be assembled and programmed without audiological or computer support, could bring amplification to millions of people in developing countries, who remain unaided due to the lack of a local, professional, audiological infrastructure. The ability to assemble and insert a hearing aid is fundamental to the successful use of a self-fitting device. In this study, the management of such tasks was investigated. Eighty older, urban-dwelling, hearing-impaired adults in a developed country were asked to follow a set of written, illustrated instructions to assemble two slim-fit behind-the-ear hearing aids. Participants were allowed to access assistance with the task from an accompanying partner. A range of personal and audiometric variables was measured through the use of structured questionnaires and standardized tests of health literacy, cognitive function, and manual dexterity. The results showed that 99% of participants were able to complete the hearing aid assembly task, either on their own or with assistance. Health literacy, or the ability to read and understand health-related text, and gender most strongly influenced participants' ability to complete the assembly task independently and accurately. Higher levels of health literacy were associated with an increased likelihood of independent and successful task completion. Male participants were more likely to complete the task on their own, while female participants were more likely to assemble the device without errors. The results of this study will inform future work regarding development of educational material for the self-fitting hearing aid as well as candidacy for such a device.

  16. Effect of Cigarette Smoking and Passive Smoking on Hearing Impairment: Data from a Population–Based Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Jiwon; Ryou, Namhyung; Jun, Hyung Jin; Hwang, Soon Young; Song, Jae-Jun; Chae, Sung Won

    2016-01-01

    Objectives In the present study, we aimed to determine the effect of both active and passive smoking on the prevalence of the hearing impairment and the hearing thresholds in different age groups through the analysis of data collected from the Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (KNHANES). Study Design Cross-sectional epidemiological study. Methods The KNHANES is an ongoing population study that started in 1998. We included a total of 12,935 participants aged ≥19 years in the KNHANES, from 2010 to 2012, in the present study. Pure-tone audiometric (PTA) testing was conducted and the frequencies tested were 0.5, 1, 2, 3, 4, and 6 kHz. Smoking status was categorized into three groups; current smoking group, passive smoking group and non-smoking group. Results In the current smoking group, the prevalence of speech-frequency bilateral hearing impairment was increased in ages of 40−69, and the rate of high frequency bilateral hearing impairment was elevated in ages of 30−79. When we investigated the impact of smoking on hearing thresholds, we found that the current smoking group had significantly increased hearing thresholds compared to the passive smoking group and non-smoking groups, across all ages in both speech-relevant and high frequencies. The passive smoking group did not have an elevated prevalence of either speech-frequency bilateral hearing impairment or high frequency bilateral hearing impairment, except in ages of 40s. However, the passive smoking group had higher hearing thresholds than the non-smoking group in the 30s and 40s age groups. Conclusion Current smoking was associated with hearing impairment in both speech-relevant frequency and high frequency across all ages. However, except in the ages of 40s, passive smoking was not related to hearing impairment in either speech-relevant or high frequencies. PMID:26756932

  17. Effect of Cigarette Smoking and Passive Smoking on Hearing Impairment: Data from a Population-Based Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Jiwon; Ryou, Namhyung; Jun, Hyung Jin; Hwang, Soon Young; Song, Jae-Jun; Chae, Sung Won

    2016-01-01

    In the present study, we aimed to determine the effect of both active and passive smoking on the prevalence of the hearing impairment and the hearing thresholds in different age groups through the analysis of data collected from the Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (KNHANES). Cross-sectional epidemiological study. The KNHANES is an ongoing population study that started in 1998. We included a total of 12,935 participants aged ≥19 years in the KNHANES, from 2010 to 2012, in the present study. Pure-tone audiometric (PTA) testing was conducted and the frequencies tested were 0.5, 1, 2, 3, 4, and 6 kHz. Smoking status was categorized into three groups; current smoking group, passive smoking group and non-smoking group. In the current smoking group, the prevalence of speech-frequency bilateral hearing impairment was increased in ages of 40-69, and the rate of high frequency bilateral hearing impairment was elevated in ages of 30-79. When we investigated the impact of smoking on hearing thresholds, we found that the current smoking group had significantly increased hearing thresholds compared to the passive smoking group and non-smoking groups, across all ages in both speech-relevant and high frequencies. The passive smoking group did not have an elevated prevalence of either speech-frequency bilateral hearing impairment or high frequency bilateral hearing impairment, except in ages of 40s. However, the passive smoking group had higher hearing thresholds than the non-smoking group in the 30s and 40s age groups. Current smoking was associated with hearing impairment in both speech-relevant frequency and high frequency across all ages. However, except in the ages of 40s, passive smoking was not related to hearing impairment in either speech-relevant or high frequencies.

  18. Mediterranean spotted fever and hearing impairment: a rare complication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossio, Raffaella; Conalbi, Valeria; Castagna, Valentina; Recalcati, Sebastiano; Torri, Adriana; Coen, Massimo; Cassulini, Lucia Restano; Peyvandi, Flora

    2015-06-01

    Mediterranean spotted fever (MSF) is caused by Rickettsia conorii and transmitted by the brown dog tick Rhipicephalus sanguineus. It is prevalent in southern Europe, Africa and central Asia. The disease usually has a benign course and is characterized by fever, myalgia and a characteristic papular rash with an inoculation eschar ('tache noir') at the site of the tick bite. Severe forms of disease can have cardiac, neurologic or renal involvement. Nervous system complications are unusual and may develop in the early phase of disease or as a delayed complication. Neurological symptoms include headache and alterations of the level of consciousness, and some cases of meningoenchefalitis and Guillain-Barrè syndrome have been also reported. Peripheral nerve involvement is reported only in a limited number of case reports. We describe a case of Rickettsia conorii that was complicated with hearing loss and did not respond to specific treatment. Hearing loss is a rare event, but clinicians should be aware of this complication. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  19. Oral communication in individuals with hearing impairment – considerations regarding attentional, cognitive and social resources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulrike eLemke

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Traditionally, audiology research has focused primarily on hearing and related disorders. In recent years, however, growing interest and insight has developed into the interaction of hearing and cognition. This applies to a person’s listening and speech comprehension ability and the neural realization thereof. The present perspective extends this view to oral communication, when two or more people interact in social context. Specifically, the impact of hearing impairment and cognitive changes with age is discussed.In focus are executive functions, a group of top-down processes that guide attention, thought and action according to goals and intentions. The strategic allocation of the limited cognitive processing capacity among concurrent tasks is often effortful, especially under adverse communication conditions and in old age. Working memory, a sub-function extensively discussed in cognitive hearing science, is here put into the context of other executive and cognitive functions required for oral communication and speech comprehension. Finally, taking an ecological view on hearing impairment, activity limitations and participation restrictions are discussed regarding their psycho-social impact and third-party disability.

  20. Fine-structure processing, frequency selectivity and speech perception in hearing-impaired listeners

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Strelcyk, Olaf; Dau, Torsten

    2008-01-01

    Hearing-impaired people often experience great difficulty with speech communication when background noise is present, even if reduced audibility has been compensated for. Other impairment factors must be involved. In order to minimize confounding effects, the subjects participating in this study...... consisted of groups with homogeneous, symmetric audiograms. The perceptual listening experiments assessed the intelligibility of full-spectrum as well as low-pass filtered speech in the presence of stationary and fluctuating interferers, the individual's frequency selectivity and the integrity of temporal...... modulation were obtained. In addition, these binaural and monaural thresholds were measured in a stationary background noise in order to assess the persistence of the fine-structure processing to interfering noise. Apart from elevated speech reception thresholds, the hearing impaired listeners showed poorer...

  1. The Effectiveness of a Group Counseling Program on the Mental Health of Parents of Hearing Impaired Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr. Mahshid Foroughan

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Most of the studies indicates that the parents of the hearing impaired children show many mental health problems after the diagnosis of their children's hearing impairment. Counselling with the parents of the hearing impaired children is one of the most important goals of any early intervention program. This paper describes a study to determine the effectiveness of a group counselling programme for parents of hearing impaired children. Materials and Method: It was a semi-experimental study with a single group pretest-post test design. The participants were all the parents of hearing impaired children attending in an early intervention center. First the parents' mental health were assessed.Then the group counselling program was implemented. Program has involved six weekly 1.5 hour sessions. The format of each session included both lecture presentation and group discussion using cognitive behavioral procedure. Subjects were assessed before and immediately after group therapy by means of General Health Questionnaire(GHQ and Symptom Check List 90 (SCL-90 questionnaires. Resuts: The first part of the project had shown that over the half of the parents had considerable psychosocial morbidity. Comparisons showed a significant reduction from pretreatment to posttreatment in depression, anxiety and most of other psychological problems. Conclusion: The study supports the effectiveness of group therapy programs in the treatment of parents of hearing impaired children. Concerning the progress of early detection programs for the children's hearing impairment more studies should be done in the field of counseling with their parents.

  2. Hearing impairment among workers exposed to excessive levels of noise in ginning industries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamalesh J Dube

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Cotton ginning workers have a risk of hearing loss due to excessive noise levels at the workplace environment. In this study, estimates of typical sound levels prevailing at the workplace environment and its effects on hearing ability of the exposed workers were made among cotton ginning workers. Data on self-reported health status was collected by a questionnaire survey at 10 cotton ginning industries located at Jalgaon district of Maharashtra state, India. The cotton ginning workers were exposed to continuous noise levels between 89 and 106 dBA. The hearing ability of the subjects was accessed by pure tone audiometry. The results of audiometry show mild, moderate and moderately severe degree of hearing impairment among the cotton ginning workers. The data generated during the study show that hearing loss was significantly associated with period of exposure to the workplace noise (P <0.0001. The prevalence of audiometric hearing impairment defined as a threshold average greater than 25 dB hearing level was 96% for binaural low-frequency average, 97% for binaural mid frequency average and 94% for binaural high-frequency average in the cotton ginning workers. We recommend the compulsory use of personal protective equipment like ear plug by the cotton ginning workers at the workplace environment. A regular maintenance of ginning and pressing machineries will avoid the emission of excessive noise at the workplace environment of cotton gins. A regular periodic medical examination is necessary to measure the impact of workplace noise on the health of cotton ginning workers.

  3. Consanguineous Marriage Among the Parents of Hearing Impaired Students in Baghcheban Primary Schools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mansoureh Nikbakht

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Genetic studies show that consanguineous marriage can increase the probability of incidence of genetic impairments such as hearing impairments. The target of this study is to identify the prevalence of consanguinity among the parents of hearing impaired students in primary schools. Materials and Methods: We selected all of deaf students of Tehran (614 students. Their mothers answered to questionnaires. The questions were about Risk Factors of deafness in mother pregnancy or in neonatal period. Results: from 614 students, 389 parents of them (64% had consanguineous marriage and 223 person (36% didn’t have this factor. 2 person did not answer to this question. In this study we observed that there is 32.3% family history of hearing loss, 29.2%deaf sister and brother, 17% ear infection history. Other risk factors were studied too. Also there is significant correlation between consanguinity and more than one deaf children in the family (p<0.005. Conclusion: According to high incidence of consanguinity (64%that was observed in this study it may be one of most important causes of sensory neural hearing loss in children, so we should give enough information about this problem to the people.

  4. Association of Hearing Impairment and Subsequent Driving Mobility in Older Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Jerri D; Lister, Jennifer J; Lin, Frank R; Andel, Ross; Brown, Lisa; Wood, Joanne M

    2017-08-01

    Hearing impairment (HI) is associated with driving safety (e.g., increased crashes and poor on-road driving performance). However, little is known about HI and driving mobility. This study examined the longitudinal association of audiometric hearing with older adults' driving mobility over 3 years. Secondary data analyses were conducted of 500 individuals (63-90 years of age) from the Staying Keen in Later Life (SKILL) study. Hearing (pure tone average of 0.5, 1, and 2kHz) was assessed in the better hearing ear and categorized into normal hearing ≤25 dB hearing level (HL); mild HI 26-40 dB HL; or moderate and greater HI ≥41 dB HL. The Useful Field of View Test (UFOV) was used to estimate the risk for adverse driving events. Multivariate analysis of covariance compared driving mobility between HI levels across time, adjusting for age, sex, race, hypertension, and stroke. Adjusting for these same covariates, Cox regression analyses examined incidence of driving cessation by HI across 3 years. Individuals with moderate or greater HI performed poorly on the UFOV, indicating increased risk for adverse driving events (p .05), including driving cessation rates (p = .38), across time. Although prior research indicates older adults with HI may be at higher risk for crashes, they may not modify driving over time. Further exploration of this issue is required to optimize efforts to improve driving safety and mobility among older adults.

  5. Storms in Space: Bringing NASA Earth-Sun Science Educational Resources to Hearing- Impaired Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowry, K.; Sindt, M.; Jahn, J.

    2007-12-01

    Using assistive technology, children with hearing loss can actively participate in the hearing world. However, to develop the necessary skills, hearing-impaired students need to be immersed in a language-rich environment which compensates for the lack of "incidental" learning that typifies the language acquisition of their peers with typical hearing. For any subject matter taught in class, this means that the conceptual and language framework of the topic has to be provided in addition to regular class materials. In a collaboration between the Sunshine Cottage School for Deaf Children and the Southwest Research Institute, we are exploring how NASA-developed educational resources covering Space Science topics can be incorporated successfully in blended classrooms containing children with hearing loss and those with typical hearing in grades 3-5. Utilizing the extensive routine language monitoring performed at Sunshine Cottage, student progress is directly monitored during the year as well as from year to year. This allow us to evaluate the effectiveness of the resources used. Since all instruction at Sunshine Cottage is auditory-oral, our experiences in using those materials can be fed back directly into mainstream classrooms of the same grade levels.

  6. Do children enhance phonetic contrasts in speech directed to a hearing-impaired peer?

    OpenAIRE

    Granlund, S.; Hazan, V. L.; Mahon, M.

    2015-01-01

    This study examines whether normal-hearing (NH) children enhance phonetic contrasts when speaking to a hearing-impaired (HI) peer. A problem-solving ‘Grid’ task was developed to elicit frequent repetitions of /p/-/b/, /s/-/S/ and /i/-/I/ segmental contrasts and point vowels in communicative spontaneous speech. Eighteen NH children between 9 and 15 years old performed the task once with a NH friend and once with a HI friend. Both category means and within-speaker variability were analysed. Res...

  7. Audio reproduction for personal ambient home assistance: concepts and evaluations for normal-hearing and hearing-impaired persons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huber, Rainer; Meis, Markus; Klink, Karin; Bartsch, Christian; Bitzer, Joerg

    2014-01-01

    Within the Lower Saxony Research Network Design of Environments for Ageing (GAL), a personal activity and household assistant (PAHA), an ambient reminder system, has been developed. One of its central output modality to interact with the user is sound. The study presented here evaluated three different system technologies for sound reproduction using up to five loudspeakers, including the "phantom source" concept. Moreover, a technology for hearing loss compensation for the mostly older users of the PAHA was implemented and evaluated. Evaluation experiments with 21 normal hearing and hearing impaired test subjects were carried out. The results show that after direct comparison of the sound presentation concepts, the presentation by the single TV speaker was most preferred, whereas the phantom source concept got the highest acceptance ratings as far as the general concept is concerned. The localization accuracy of the phantom source concept was good as long as the exact listening position was known to the algorithm and speech stimuli were used. Most subjects preferred the original signals over the pre-processed, dynamic-compressed signals, although processed speech was often described as being clearer.

  8. Impact of cognitive and linguistic ability on gaze behavior in children with hearing impairment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olof eSandgren

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available In order to explore verbal-nonverbal integration, we investigated the influence of cognitive and linguistic ability on gaze behavior during spoken language conversation between children with mild-to-moderate hearing impairment (HI and normal-hearing (NH peers. Ten HI-NH and ten NH-NH dyads performed a referential communication task requiring description of faces. During task performance, eye movements and speech were tracked. Cox proportional hazards regression was used to model associations between performance on cognitive and linguistic tasks and the probability of gaze to the conversational partner’s face. Analyses compare the listeners in each dyad (HI: n = 10, mean age = 12;6 years, SD = 2;0, mean better ear pure-tone average 33.0 dB HL, SD = 7.8; NH: n = 10, mean age = 13;7 years, SD = 1;11. Group differences in gaze behavior – with HI gazing more to the conversational partner than NH – remained significant despite adjustment for ability on receptive grammar, expressive vocabulary, and complex working memory. Adjustment for phonological short term memory, as measured by nonword repetition, removed group differences, revealing an interaction between group membership and nonword repetition ability. Stratified analysis showed a twofold increase of the probability of gaze-to-partner for HI with low phonological short term memory capacity, and a decreased probability for HI with high capacity, as compared to NH peers. The results revealed differences in gaze behavior attributable to performance on a phonological short term memory task. Participants with hearing impairment and low phonological short term memory capacity showed a doubled probability of gaze to the conversational partner, indicative of a visual bias. The results stress the need to look beyond the hearing impairment in diagnostics and intervention. Acknowledgment of the finding requires clinical assessment of children with hearing impairment to be supported by tasks tapping

  9. Psychometric evaluation of a Swedish version of the communication strategies scale of the communication profile for the hearing impaired.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallberg, L R; Eriksson-Mangold, M; Carlsson, S G

    1992-06-01

    The Communication Strategies scale of the Communication Profile for the Hearing Impaired (CPHI) was translated into Swedish and used in several studies of people with hearing impairment (Hallberg & Carlsson, in press; Hallberg, Erlandsson, & Carlsson, 1991). In this study the scale was evaluated in terms of descriptive statistics, corrected item-total correlations, principal component analysis, and internal consistency reliability. Agreement with results from American studies is surprisingly good. Normative data based on three samples are presented: a general Swedish hearing-impaired sample with predominantly sensorineural hearing loss (N = 199), a subgroup of 105 younger subjects with noise-induced hearing loss, and a subgroup of 39 older subjects with sensorineural hearing loss due to heredity and/or old age. A significantly more frequent use of maladaptive behaviors (p less than .001) and verbal communication strategies (p less than .01) was reported by older subjects with age-related and/or hereditary hearing loss than by younger subjects with noise-induced hearing loss. The Communication Strategies scale seems to be an adequately reliable and clinically useful instrument for assessing adaptive and maladaptive strategies in hearing-impaired subjects.

  10. Markers of Overall Nutritional Status and Incident Hearing Impairment in Community-Dwelling Older Japanese: The Kurabuchi Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michikawa, Takehiro; Nakamura, Takahiro; Imamura, Haruhiko; Mizutari, Kunio; Saito, Hideyuki; Takebayashi, Toru; Nishiwaki, Yuji

    2016-07-01

    To examine the association between four markers of overall nutritional status (a serum biomarker (albumin) and three anthropometric indices (body mass index (BMI), midarm circumference (MAC), calf circumference (CC))) and incident hearing impairment in older Japanese adults. Community-based prospective cohort study. Kurabuchi Town, Gunma Prefecture, Japan. Individuals aged 65 and older (143 men, 195 women) without hearing impairment at baseline examination (2005-06) who participated in repeated examinations 4 years later (2009-10) (N = 338). The three anthropometric indices were measured at baseline, and nephelometry was used to assess serum albumin levels. Hearing impairment was defined as failure to hear a 30-dB hearing level signal at 1 kHz and a 40-dB signal at 4 kHz in the better ear on pure-tone audiometry. Over the 4-year period, 16.3% of participants developed hearing impairment. Those with lower marker values had greater risk of hearing impairment than those with higher marker values (multivariable adjusted odds ratio (aOR) = 2.18, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.05-4.57 for albumin ≤4.0 g/dL; aOR = 2.72, 95% CI = 1.10-6.71 for BMI nutritional status may help prevent age-related hearing loss in older adults. © 2016, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2016, The American Geriatrics Society.

  11. Masked speech perception across the adult lifespan: Impact of age and hearing impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goossens, Tine; Vercammen, Charlotte; Wouters, Jan; van Wieringen, Astrid

    2017-02-01

    As people grow older, speech perception difficulties become highly prevalent, especially in noisy listening situations. Moreover, it is assumed that speech intelligibility is more affected in the event of background noises that induce a higher cognitive load, i.e., noises that result in informational versus energetic masking. There is ample evidence showing that speech perception problems in aging persons are partly due to hearing impairment and partly due to age-related declines in cognition and suprathreshold auditory processing. In order to develop effective rehabilitation strategies, it is indispensable to know how these different degrading factors act upon speech perception. This implies disentangling effects of hearing impairment versus age and examining the interplay between both factors in different background noises of everyday settings. To that end, we investigated open-set sentence identification in six participant groups: a young (20-30 years), middle-aged (50-60 years), and older cohort (70-80 years), each including persons who had normal audiometric thresholds up to at least 4 kHz, on the one hand, and persons who were diagnosed with elevated audiometric thresholds, on the other hand. All participants were screened for (mild) cognitive impairment. We applied stationary and amplitude modulated speech-weighted noise, which are two types of energetic maskers, and unintelligible speech, which causes informational masking in addition to energetic masking. By means of these different background noises, we could look into speech perception performance in listening situations with a low and high cognitive load, respectively. Our results indicate that, even when audiometric thresholds are within normal limits up to 4 kHz, irrespective of threshold elevations at higher frequencies, and there is no indication of even mild cognitive impairment, masked speech perception declines by middle age and decreases further on to older age. The impact of hearing

  12. Temporal Fine-Structure Coding and Lateralized Speech Perception in Normal-Hearing and Hearing-Impaired Listeners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gusztáv Lőcsei

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the relationship between speech perception performance in spatially complex, lateralized listening scenarios and temporal fine-structure (TFS coding at low frequencies. Young normal-hearing (NH and two groups of elderly hearing-impaired (HI listeners with mild or moderate hearing loss above 1.5 kHz participated in the study. Speech reception thresholds (SRTs were estimated in the presence of either speech-shaped noise, two-, four-, or eight-talker babble played reversed, or a nonreversed two-talker masker. Target audibility was ensured by applying individualized linear gains to the stimuli, which were presented over headphones. The target and masker streams were lateralized to the same or to opposite sides of the head by introducing 0.7-ms interaural time differences between the ears. TFS coding was assessed by measuring frequency discrimination thresholds and interaural phase difference thresholds at 250 Hz. NH listeners had clearly better SRTs than the HI listeners. However, when maskers were spatially separated from the target, the amount of SRT benefit due to binaural unmasking differed only slightly between the groups. Neither the frequency discrimination threshold nor the interaural phase difference threshold tasks showed a correlation with the SRTs or with the amount of masking release due to binaural unmasking, respectively. The results suggest that, although HI listeners with normal hearing thresholds below 1.5 kHz experienced difficulties with speech understanding in spatially complex environments, these limitations were unrelated to TFS coding abilities and were only weakly associated with a reduction in binaural-unmasking benefit for spatially separated competing sources.

  13. Temporal Fine-Structure Coding and Lateralized Speech Perception in Normal-Hearing and Hearing-Impaired Listeners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lőcsei, Gusztáv; Pedersen, Julie H; Laugesen, Søren; Santurette, Sébastien; Dau, Torsten; MacDonald, Ewen N

    2016-09-05

    This study investigated the relationship between speech perception performance in spatially complex, lateralized listening scenarios and temporal fine-structure (TFS) coding at low frequencies. Young normal-hearing (NH) and two groups of elderly hearing-impaired (HI) listeners with mild or moderate hearing loss above 1.5 kHz participated in the study. Speech reception thresholds (SRTs) were estimated in the presence of either speech-shaped noise, two-, four-, or eight-talker babble played reversed, or a nonreversed two-talker masker. Target audibility was ensured by applying individualized linear gains to the stimuli, which were presented over headphones. The target and masker streams were lateralized to the same or to opposite sides of the head by introducing 0.7-ms interaural time differences between the ears. TFS coding was assessed by measuring frequency discrimination thresholds and interaural phase difference thresholds at 250 Hz. NH listeners had clearly better SRTs than the HI listeners. However, when maskers were spatially separated from the target, the amount of SRT benefit due to binaural unmasking differed only slightly between the groups. Neither the frequency discrimination threshold nor the interaural phase difference threshold tasks showed a correlation with the SRTs or with the amount of masking release due to binaural unmasking, respectively. The results suggest that, although HI listeners with normal hearing thresholds below 1.5 kHz experienced difficulties with speech understanding in spatially complex environments, these limitations were unrelated to TFS coding abilities and were only weakly associated with a reduction in binaural-unmasking benefit for spatially separated competing sources. © The Author(s) 2016.

  14. Statistical Learning, Syllable Processing, and Speech Production in Healthy Hearing and Hearing-Impaired Preschool Children: A Mismatch Negativity Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Studer-Eichenberger, Esther; Studer-Eichenberger, Felix; Koenig, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    The objectives of the present study were to investigate temporal/spectral sound-feature processing in preschool children (4 to 7 years old) with peripheral hearing loss compared with age-matched controls. The results verified the presence of statistical learning, which was diminished in children with hearing impairments (HIs), and elucidated possible perceptual mediators of speech production. Perception and production of the syllables /ba/, /da/, /ta/, and /na/ were recorded in 13 children with normal hearing and 13 children with HI. Perception was assessed physiologically through event-related potentials (ERPs) recorded by EEG in a multifeature mismatch negativity paradigm and behaviorally through a discrimination task. Temporal and spectral features of the ERPs during speech perception were analyzed, and speech production was quantitatively evaluated using speech motor maximum performance tasks. Proximal to stimulus onset, children with HI displayed a difference in map topography, indicating diminished statistical learning. In later ERP components, children with HI exhibited reduced amplitudes in the N2 and early parts of the late disciminative negativity components specifically, which are associated with temporal and spectral control mechanisms. Abnormalities of speech perception were only subtly reflected in speech production, as the lone difference found in speech production studies was a mild delay in regulating speech intensity. In addition to previously reported deficits of sound-feature discriminations, the present study results reflect diminished statistical learning in children with HI, which plays an early and important, but so far neglected, role in phonological processing. Furthermore, the lack of corresponding behavioral abnormalities in speech production implies that impaired perceptual capacities do not necessarily translate into productive deficits.

  15. Bullying victimization: A risk factor of health problems among adolescents with hearing impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akram, Bushra; Munawar, Asima

    2016-01-01

    To find bullying victimisation as a predictor of physical and psychological health problems among school-going children with hearing impairment. The co-relational cross-sectional study was conducted in Gujrat district of Pakistan's Punjab province from August 2014 to January 2015, and comprised adolescents with hearing impairment. The subjects were selected through multi-stage stratified proportionate sampling from the local schools. Two standardised instruments were administered to assess the relationship between bullying and health problems. Multidimensional Peer Victimisation Scale was used for measuring bullying behaviour, while the Health Questionnaire was used to assess physical and psychological health problems. Both scales were translated into Urdu using lexicon equivalence method of translation. Of the 286 subjects, 183(64%) were boys. A significant positive relationship was found between the four components of bullying and health problems (p0.05). Children with hearing impairment experienced bullying just like those without such an impairment. Bullying needs to be considered a significant public health issue and should be dealt with effectively.

  16. Sign-Lingo : Feasibility of a Serious Game for Involving Parents in the Language Development of their Deaf or Hearing Impaired Child

    OpenAIRE

    Schalk, I; Spruit, M

    2017-01-01

    Family involvement plays a critical factor in the language development of a deaf or hearing impaired child. Hearing parents often have major difficulties in communicating with their child when it is deaf or hearing impaired. These difficulties often lead to issues in the language development of the child. In this research we investigate the feasibility of a serious game for involving parents in the language development of their deaf or hearing impaired child by using sign language together in...

  17. Association between diet quality with concurrent vision and hearing impairment in older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopinath, B; Schneider, J; Flood, V M; McMahon, C M; Burlutsky, G; Leeder, S R; Mitchell, P

    2014-03-01

    Published literature shows that individual nutrients could influence the risk of developing vision and hearing loss. There is, however, a lack of population-based data on the relationship between overall patterns of food intake and the presence of concurrent vision and hearing impairment. We aimed to assess the associations between diet quality with the prevalence and 5-year incidence of dual sensory impairment (DSI). Cross-sectional and 5-year longitudinal analyses. Blue Mountains, Sydney, Australia. 2443 participants aged ≥50 from baseline were examined and followed over 5 years. Dietary data were collected using a semi-quantitative food frequency questionnaire. A modified version of the Healthy Eating Index for Australians was developed to determine total diet score (TDS). Visual impairment was defined as visual acuity less than 20/40 (better eye), and hearing impairment as average pure-tone air conduction threshold greater than 25 dB HL (500-4000 Hz, better ear). After adjusting for age, sex, education, noise exposure, current smoking, and type 2 diabetes, participants in the lowest compared to the highest quintile of TDS had a 2-fold increased likelihood of having prevalent DSI, odds ratio, OR, 2.62 (95% confidence intervals, CI, 1.08-6.36), P-trend=0.04. Significant associations were not observed between TDS and the prevalence of having a single sensory impairment (vision or hearing loss). Baseline TDS was not significantly associated with the 5-year incidence of DSI. Adherence to dietary guidelines was associated with a reduced likelihood of having DSI in cross-sectional, but not in longitudinal analyses. Further studies with adequate power are warranted to assess the prospective relationship between diet quality and DSI.

  18. The effects of hearing impairment, age, and hearing aids on the use of self motion for determining front/back location

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owen Brimijoin, W.; Akeroyd, Michael A.

    2016-01-01

    Background There are two cues that listeners use to disambiguate the front/back location of a sound source: high-frequency spectral cues associated with the head and pinnae, and self-motion-related binaural cues. The use of these cues can be compromised in listeners with hearing impairment and users of hearing aids. Purpose To determine how age, hearing impairment, and the use of hearing aids affects a listener’s ability to determine front from back based on both self motion and spectral cues. Research Design We utilized a previously published front/back illusion: signals whose physical source location is rotated around the head at twice the angular rate of the listener’s head movements are perceptually located in the opposite hemifield from where they physically are. In normal hearing listeners the strength of this illusion decreases as a function of low-pass filter cutoff frequency; this is the result of a conflict between spectral cues and dynamic binaural cues for sound source location. The illusion was used as an assay of self-motion processing in listeners with hearing impairment and users of hearing aids. Study Sample We recruited 40 hearing impaired subjects, with an average age of 62 years. The data for three listeners were discarded because they did not move their heads enough during the experiment. Data Collection and Analysis Listeners sat at the center of a ring of 24 loudspeakers, turned their heads back and forth, and used a wireless keypad to report the front/back location of statically presented signals and of dynamically moving signals with illusory locations. Front/back accuracy for static signals, the strength of front/back illusions, and minimum audible movement angle was measured for each listener in each condition. All measurements were made in each listener both aided and unaided. Results Hearing impaired listeners were less accurate at front/back discrimination for both static and illusory conditions. Neither static nor illusory

  19. The Effects of Hearing Impairment, Age, and Hearing Aids on the Use of Self-Motion for Determining Front/Back Location.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brimijoin, W Owen; Akeroyd, Michael A

    2016-07-01

    There are two cues that listeners use to disambiguate the front/back location of a sound source: high-frequency spectral cues associated with the head and pinnae, and self-motion-related binaural cues. The use of these cues can be compromised in listeners with hearing impairment and users of hearing aids. To determine how age, hearing impairment, and the use of hearing aids affect a listener's ability to determine front from back based on both self-motion and spectral cues. We used a previously published front/back illusion: signals whose physical source location is rotated around the head at twice the angular rate of the listener's head movements are perceptually located in the opposite hemifield from where they physically are. In normal-hearing listeners, the strength of this illusion decreases as a function of low-pass filter cutoff frequency, this is the result of a conflict between spectral cues and dynamic binaural cues for sound source location. The illusion was used as an assay of self-motion processing in listeners with hearing impairment and users of hearing aids. We recruited 40 hearing-impaired participants, with an average age of 62 yr. The data for three listeners were discarded because they did not move their heads enough during the experiment. Listeners sat at the center of a ring of 24 loudspeakers, turned their heads back and forth, and used a wireless keypad to report the front/back location of statically presented signals and of dynamically moving signals with illusory locations. Front/back accuracy for static signals, the strength of front/back illusions, and minimum audible movement angle were measured for each listener in each condition. All measurements were made in each listener both aided and unaided. Hearing-impaired listeners were less accurate at front/back discrimination for both static and illusory conditions. Neither static nor illusory conditions were affected by high-frequency content. Hearing aids had heterogeneous effects from

  20. Development and Clinical Evaluation of a Frequency Compressor for the Hearing Impaired.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Schyndel, Andre John

    The residual low-frequency sensitivity demonstrated by many severely hearing impaired persons has led to the development of various methods of presenting speech information in a lower bandwidth. Only limited success has thus far been reported. In this thesis a new frequency compression algorithm was developed and realized as a real time, portable, electronic device to be worn as a hearing aid. A clinical study incorporating optimal amplification and relatively long training times with the device indicates that although speech comprehension drops initially, it can rise well beyond that which is demonstrated with conventional hearing aids. A learning curve is presented and its features are justified by the clinical results. A full analysis of the frequency compression algorithm is presented as well as results from various speech comprehension tests administered in the clinical study. One subject is already a full time user of the device, and more may follow.