WorldWideScience

Sample records for proficient deaf readers

  1. How Deaf American Sign Language/English Bilingual Children Become Proficient Readers: An Emic Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mounty, Judith L.; Pucci, Concetta T.; Harmon, Kristen C.

    2014-01-01

    A primary tenet underlying American Sign Language/English bilingual education for deaf students is that early access to a visual language, developed in conjunction with language planning principles, provides a foundation for literacy in English. The goal of this study is to obtain an emic perspective on bilingual deaf readers transitioning from…

  2. How deaf American Sign Language/English bilingual children become proficient readers: an emic perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mounty, Judith L; Pucci, Concetta T; Harmon, Kristen C

    2014-07-01

    A primary tenet underlying American Sign Language/English bilingual education for deaf students is that early access to a visual language, developed in conjunction with language planning principles, provides a foundation for literacy in English. The goal of this study is to obtain an emic perspective on bilingual deaf readers transitioning from learning to read to reading to learn. Analysis of 12 interactive, semi-structured interviews identified informal and formal teaching and learning practices in ASL/English bilingual homes and classrooms. These practices value, reinforce, and support the bidirectional acquisition of both languages and provide a strong foundation for literacy. © The Author 2013. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. Understanding Deaf Readers: An Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelstone, Aaron Weir

    2013-01-01

    The development of reading skills, beyond a functional level, is difficult for most deaf readers. Standardized testing demonstrates a median 4th grade reading level that remains consistent even after national norming of the Stanford Achievement test on the population of deaf school children. Deaf education continues to generate various educational…

  4. Moving Readers from Struggling to Proficient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolter, Deborah

    2017-01-01

    If we want to move children from struggling to read to being proficient readers, we must address the disparate ways that teachers respond to readers with varying abilities. Restorative practices, akin to restorative justice, build relationships, make connections, and foster a reader's sense of ownership and empowerment. What would happen if…

  5. A Sign Language Screen Reader for Deaf

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Ghoul, Oussama; Jemni, Mohamed

    Screen reader technology has appeared first to allow blind and people with reading difficulties to use computer and to access to the digital information. Until now, this technology is exploited mainly to help blind community. During our work with deaf people, we noticed that a screen reader can facilitate the manipulation of computers and the reading of textual information. In this paper, we propose a novel screen reader dedicated to deaf. The output of the reader is a visual translation of the text to sign language. The screen reader is composed by two essential modules: the first one is designed to capture the activities of users (mouse and keyboard events). For this purpose, we adopted Microsoft MSAA application programming interfaces. The second module, which is in classical screen readers a text to speech engine (TTS), is replaced by a novel text to sign (TTSign) engine. This module converts text into sign language animation based on avatar technology.

  6. Chinese deaf readers have early access to parafoveal semantics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Ming; Pan, Jinger; Bélanger, Nathalie N; Shu, Hua

    2015-01-01

    In the present study, we manipulated different types of information available in the parafovea during the reading of Chinese sentences and examined how deaf readers make use of the parafoveal information. Results clearly indicate that although the reading-level matched hearing readers make greater use of orthographic information in the parafovea, parafoveal semantic information is obtained earlier among the deaf readers. In addition, a phonological preview benefit effect was found for the better deaf readers (relative to less-skilled deaf readers), although we also provide an alternative explanation for this effect. Providing evidence that Chinese deaf readers have higher efficiency when processing parafoveal semantics, the study indicates flexibility across individuals in the mechanisms underlying word recognition adapting to the inputs available in the linguistic environment. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved.

  7. Phonological Awareness and Reading Proficiency in Adults with Profound Deafness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furlonger, Brett; Holmes, Virginia M.; Rickards, Field W.

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated differences in the phonological knowledge and reading skill of deaf adults using three experimental conditions that tested sensitivity to syllables, rhyme, and phonemes. Analysis of response latencies and accuracy in the three awareness tasks demonstrated that skilled deaf readers had superior phonological awareness skill…

  8. Morphological sensitivity in deaf readers of Dutch

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoogmoed, A.H. van; Verhoeven, L.T.W.; Schreuder, R.; Knoors, H.E.T.

    2011-01-01

    Deaf children experience difficulties with reading comprehension. These difficulties are not completely explained by their difficulties with the reading of single short words. Whether deaf children and adults lag behind in the morphological processing of longer words is therefore examined in two

  9. Visual matching test-taking strategies used by deaf readers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaSasso, C

    1985-03-01

    Earlier investigations of deaf students' test-taking strategies have described visual matching strategies consisting generally of locating a word in the question, locating the same word in the text, and selecting a response in visual proximity to that word. Studies to date have utilized multiple-choice measures. The present investigation sought to confirm and extend earlier findings by (a) determining whether visual matching test-taking strategies are used by deaf students in testing situations requiring them to generate responses; (b) describing these strategies, if found; (c) determining whether visual matching is related to overall test performance of deaf readers; and (d) determining whether there are differences between the strategies used by deaf and hearing readers with comparable SAT-HI reading comprehension test performance. The results of this investigation indicate extensive use of visual matching test-taking strategies by deaf subjects but not by hearing subjects. The extent of strategy use was not related to deaf subjects' overall performance on the lookback test. Nine variations of strategy were identified and described. Implications are drawn for teachers, researchers, and other practitioners working with deaf children.

  10. An Analysis of the Reading Strategies Used by Adult and Student Deaf Readers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banner, Alyssa; Wang, Ye

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify and examine effective reading strategies used by adult deaf readers compared with student deaf readers. There were a total of 11 participants: 5 deaf adults ranging from 27 to 36 years and 6 deaf students ranging from 16 to 20 years. Assessment methods included interview and think-aloud procedures in which…

  11. Visual Word Recognition in Deaf Readers: Lexicality Is Modulated by Communication Mode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barca, Laura; Pezzulo, Giovanni; Castrataro, Marianna; Rinaldi, Pasquale; Caselli, Maria Cristina

    2013-01-01

    Evidence indicates that adequate phonological abilities are necessary to develop proficient reading skills and that later in life phonology also has a role in the covert visual word recognition of expert readers. Impairments of acoustic perception, such as deafness, can lead to atypical phonological representations of written words and letters, which in turn can affect reading proficiency. Here, we report an experiment in which young adults with different levels of acoustic perception (i.e., hearing and deaf individuals) and different modes of communication (i.e., hearing individuals using spoken language, deaf individuals with a preference for sign language, and deaf individuals using the oral modality with less or no competence in sign language) performed a visual lexical decision task, which consisted of categorizing real words and consonant strings. The lexicality effect was restricted to deaf signers who responded faster to real words than consonant strings, showing over-reliance on whole word lexical processing of stimuli. No effect of stimulus type was found in deaf individuals using the oral modality or in hearing individuals. Thus, mode of communication modulates the lexicality effect. This suggests that learning a sign language during development shapes visuo-motor representations of words, which are tuned to the actions used to express them (phono-articulatory movements vs. hand movements) and to associated perceptions. As these visuo-motor representations are elicited during on-line linguistic processing and can overlap with the perceptual-motor processes required to execute the task, they can potentially produce interference or facilitation effects. PMID:23554976

  12. Visual word recognition in deaf readers: lexicality is modulated by communication mode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barca, Laura; Pezzulo, Giovanni; Castrataro, Marianna; Rinaldi, Pasquale; Caselli, Maria Cristina

    2013-01-01

    Evidence indicates that adequate phonological abilities are necessary to develop proficient reading skills and that later in life phonology also has a role in the covert visual word recognition of expert readers. Impairments of acoustic perception, such as deafness, can lead to atypical phonological representations of written words and letters, which in turn can affect reading proficiency. Here, we report an experiment in which young adults with different levels of acoustic perception (i.e., hearing and deaf individuals) and different modes of communication (i.e., hearing individuals using spoken language, deaf individuals with a preference for sign language, and deaf individuals using the oral modality with less or no competence in sign language) performed a visual lexical decision task, which consisted of categorizing real words and consonant strings. The lexicality effect was restricted to deaf signers who responded faster to real words than consonant strings, showing over-reliance on whole word lexical processing of stimuli. No effect of stimulus type was found in deaf individuals using the oral modality or in hearing individuals. Thus, mode of communication modulates the lexicality effect. This suggests that learning a sign language during development shapes visuo-motor representations of words, which are tuned to the actions used to express them (phono-articulatory movements vs. hand movements) and to associated perceptions. As these visuo-motor representations are elicited during on-line linguistic processing and can overlap with the perceptual-motor processes required to execute the task, they can potentially produce interference or facilitation effects.

  13. Visual word recognition in deaf readers: lexicality is modulated by communication mode.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Barca

    Full Text Available Evidence indicates that adequate phonological abilities are necessary to develop proficient reading skills and that later in life phonology also has a role in the covert visual word recognition of expert readers. Impairments of acoustic perception, such as deafness, can lead to atypical phonological representations of written words and letters, which in turn can affect reading proficiency. Here, we report an experiment in which young adults with different levels of acoustic perception (i.e., hearing and deaf individuals and different modes of communication (i.e., hearing individuals using spoken language, deaf individuals with a preference for sign language, and deaf individuals using the oral modality with less or no competence in sign language performed a visual lexical decision task, which consisted of categorizing real words and consonant strings. The lexicality effect was restricted to deaf signers who responded faster to real words than consonant strings, showing over-reliance on whole word lexical processing of stimuli. No effect of stimulus type was found in deaf individuals using the oral modality or in hearing individuals. Thus, mode of communication modulates the lexicality effect. This suggests that learning a sign language during development shapes visuo-motor representations of words, which are tuned to the actions used to express them (phono-articulatory movements vs. hand movements and to associated perceptions. As these visuo-motor representations are elicited during on-line linguistic processing and can overlap with the perceptual-motor processes required to execute the task, they can potentially produce interference or facilitation effects.

  14. Proficient Readers' Reading Behavior in Taiwan: The Study of Young Chinese Readers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Li-Chun

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the reading behavior of young proficient Chinese readers at preschool age. Especially, the roles of phonetic skill and Chinese Character recognition in reading comprehension were explored. 10 kindergartens were recruited to participate in the study. Subjects were 72-98 kindergarten children. Instruments…

  15. Deaf College Students' Mathematical Skills Relative to Morphological Knowledge, Reading Level, and Language Proficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Ronald R.; Gaustad, Martha G.

    2007-01-01

    This study of deaf college students examined specific relationships between their mathematics performance and their assessed skills in reading, language, and English morphology. Simple regression analyses showed that deaf college students' language proficiency scores, reading grade level, and morphological knowledge regarding word segmentation and…

  16. Frequency and Predictability Effects in Eye Fixations for Skilled and Less-Skilled Deaf Readers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bélanger, Nathalie N; Rayner, Keith

    2013-01-01

    The illiteracy rate in the deaf population has been alarmingly high for several decades, despite the fact that deaf children go through the standard stages of schooling. Much research addressing this issue has focused on word-level processes, but in the recent years, little research has focused on sentence-levels processes. Previous research (Fischler, 1985) investigated word integration within context in college-level deaf and hearing readers in a lexical decision task following incomplete sentences with targets that were congruous or incongruous relative to the preceding context; it was found that deaf readers, as a group, were more dependent on contextual information than their hearing counterparts. The present experiment extended Fischler's results and investigated the relationship between frequency, predictability, and reading skill in skilled hearing, skilled deaf, and less-skilled deaf readers. Results suggest that only less-skilled deaf readers, and not all deaf readers, rely more on contextual cues to boost word processing. Additionally, early effects of frequency and predictability were found for all three groups of readers, without any evidence for an interaction between frequency and predictability.

  17. Parafoveal activation of sign translation previews among deaf readers during the reading of Chinese sentences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Jinger; Shu, Hua; Wang, Yuling; Yan, Ming

    2015-08-01

    In the present study, we manipulated the different types of information available in the parafovea during the reading of Chinese sentences and examined whether deaf readers could activate sign translations of Chinese words during reading. The main finding was that, as compared to unrelated previews, the deaf readers had longer fixation durations on the target words when sign-phonologically related preview words were presented; this preview cost effect due to sign-phonological relatedness was absent for reading-level-matched hearing individuals. These results indicate that Chinese deaf readers activate sign language translations of parafoveal words during reading. We discuss the implications for notions of parafoveal processing in reading.

  18. Syllabic Processing in Deaf Readers of French: A Second-Language Question?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daigle, Daniel; Ammar, Ahlem; Berthiaume, Rachel; Besse, Anne-Sophie.; Bastien, Michel

    2010-01-01

    This study aims at investigating syllabic processes in deaf readers (n = 35) who were compared to readers of French as a second language (n = 23) and to expert readers (n = 40). Two experimental tasks varying in their degree of phonological awareness were created: one awareness- task and one awareness+ task. Results show that all participants have…

  19. Young Skilled Deaf Readers Have an Enhanced Perceptual Span in Reading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bélanger, Nathalie N; Lee, Michelle; Schotter, Elizabeth R

    2017-04-27

    Recently, Bélanger, Slattery, Mayberry and Rayner (2012) showed, using the moving window paradigm, that profoundly deaf adults have a wider perceptual span during reading relative to hearing adults matched on reading level. This difference might be related to the fact that deaf adults allocate more visual attention to simple stimuli in the parafovea (Bavelier, Dye & Hauser, 2006). Importantly, this reorganization of visual attention in deaf individuals is already manifesting in deaf children (Dye, Hauser & Bavelier, 2009). This leads to questions about the time course of the emergence of an enhanced perceptual span (which is under attentional control; Rayner, 2014; Miellet, O'Donnell, & Sereno, 2009) in young deaf readers. The present research addressed this question by comparing the perceptual spans of young deaf readers (age 7-15) and young hearing children (age 7-15). Young deaf readers, like deaf adults, were found to have a wider perceptual span relative to their hearing peers matched on reading level, suggesting that strong and early reorganization of visual attention in deaf individuals goes beyond the processing of simple visual stimuli and emerges into more cognitively complex tasks, such as reading.

  20. Lexical noun phrases in texts written by deaf children and adults with different proficiency levels in sign language

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beijsterveldt, E.M. van; Hell, J.G. van

    2010-01-01

    We report an analysis of lexical noun phrases (NPs) in narrative and expository texts written by Dutch deaf individuals from a bimodal bilingual perspective. Texts written by Dutch deaf children and adults who are either proficient in Sign Language of the Netherlands (SLN) or low-proficient in SLN

  1. The Influence of Textbook Format on Postsecondary Proficient and Remedial Readers: Designing Information Using Visual Language

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tetlan, W. Lou

    2009-01-01

    This study examined whether the design of textbook material affects comprehension and memory of textbook material under certain cognitive conditions for proficient and remedial readers. Using quantitative and qualitative research methods, format was found to significantly affect comprehension and memory. Proficient Male scored significantly…

  2. Limited English Literacy Proficiency in Deaf People: A Review of Deafness and Hearing Perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodda, Michael; Eleweke, C. Jonah; Chapman, Jonathan

    1998-01-01

    This article examines the deafness and hearing perspectives concerning people with deafness and English literacy. Because literacy is important for people with deafness, it is suggested that carefully developed bilingual-bicultural programs could facilitate the development of English literacy skills in individuals who are deaf. (Contains…

  3. Machine-Translated Text: Is It Comprehensible to Proficient Readers?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leffa, Vilson J.

    1994-01-01

    This paper examines the development and testing of a machine-translation program designed to translate English text into Portuguese. A comparison of machine- and human-translated texts, using Brazilian secondary school students as readers, found that they were equally understood, both in terms of main ideas and details. (six references) (MDM)

  4. Bilingual Word Recognition in Deaf and Hearing Signers: Effects of Proficiency and Language Dominance on Cross-Language Activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morford, Jill P.; Kroll, Judith F.; Piñar, Pilar; Wilkinson, Erin

    2014-01-01

    Recent evidence demonstrates that American Sign Language (ASL) signs are active during print word recognition in deaf bilinguals who are highly proficient in both ASL and English. In the present study, we investigate whether signs are active during print word recognition in two groups of unbalanced bilinguals: deaf ASL-dominant and hearing…

  5. Using the TOEFL to measure the reading proficiency levels of deaf college applicants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LoMaglio, L J

    1991-07-01

    The TOEFL is widely used by colleges and universities in the United States and Canada to measure the English language proficiency levels of hearing international applicants. At the National Technical Institute for the Deaf, a faculty committee recommended that this popular test instrument be used to measure the English reading skills of deaf international applicants to the National Technical Institute for the Deaf. This study examined the merits of using the TOEFL to measure the English reading ability of hearing post-secondary international students seeking admission to English-based colleges and universities. Forty-one hearing foreign students were tested in the fall of 1989 at the English Language Institute at SUNY Buffalo. The instruments chosen were both the TOEFL and the California Achievement Test of reading ability. The majority of the research subjects who scored between 400 and 500 on the TOEFL achieved a grade level of less than 8.0 on the California Achievement Test.

  6. A comparison of the letter-processing skills of hearing and deaf readers: evidence from five orthographies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guldenoglu, Birkan; Miller, Paul; Kargin, Tevhide; Hauser, Peter; Rathmann, Christian; Kubus, Okan

    2014-04-01

    This study was designed to examine the letter-processing skills of prelingually deaf and hearing students recruited from five different orthographic backgrounds (Hebrew, Arabic, English, German, and Turkish). Participants were 128 hearing and 133 deaf 6th-7th graders. They were tested with a same/different paradigm that assessed their ability to process letters under perceptual and conceptual conditions. Findings suggest that the letter-processing skills of deaf readers from some orthographic backgrounds may be underdeveloped in comparison to hearing counterparts. The finding that such letter-processing deficits were restricted to readers of some but not all of the tested orthographies warrants the conclusion that prelingual deafness, per se, does not impede the development of effective letter processing. Evidence for this study is discussed with reference to potential orthography-inherent and educational factors that may explain the existence of letter-processing deficits found in some of the prelingually deaf readers examined in this study.

  7. Longitudinal patterns of emerging literacy in beginning deaf and hearing readers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyle, Fiona E; Harris, Margaret

    2011-01-01

    The emerging reading and spelling abilities of 24 deaf and 23 hearing beginning readers were followed over 2 years. The deaf children varied in their language backgrounds and preferred mode of communication. All children were given a range of literacy, cognitive and language-based tasks every 12 months. Deaf and hearing children made similar progress in literacy in the beginning stages of reading development and then their trajectories began to diverge. The longitudinal correlates of beginning reading in the deaf children were earlier vocabulary, letter-sound knowledge, and speechreading. Earlier phonological awareness was not a longitudinal correlate of reading ability once earlier reading levels were controlled. Only letter name knowledge was longitudinally related to spelling ability. Speechreading was also a strong longitudinal correlate of reading and spelling in the hearing children. The findings suggested that deaf and hearing children utilize slightly different reading strategies over the first 2 years of schooling. © The Author 2011. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved.

  8. Phonological-Lexical Feedback during Early Abstract Encoding: The Case of Deaf Readers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel Perea

    Full Text Available In the masked priming technique, physical identity between prime and target enjoys an advantage over nominal identity in nonwords (GEDA-GEDA faster than geda-GEDA. However, nominal identity overrides physical identity in words (e.g., REAL-REAL similar to real-REAL. Here we tested whether the lack of an advantage of the physical identity condition for words was due to top-down feedback from phonological-lexical information. We examined this issue with deaf readers, as their phonological representations are not as fully developed as in hearing readers. Results revealed that physical identity enjoyed a processing advantage over nominal identity not only in nonwords but also in words (GEDA-GEDA faster than geda-GEDA; REAL-REAL faster than real-REAL. This suggests the existence of fundamental differences in the early stages of visual word recognition of hearing and deaf readers, possibly related to the amount of feedback from higher levels of information.

  9. Algumas considerações sobre o desenvolvimento da atividade de leitura e a constituição do leitor surdo/Some aspects on the development of the activity of reading and the constitution of the deaf reader

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    Heloísa Andréia Vicente de Matos

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Este trabalho aponta alguns aspectos teóricos sobre a questão da leitura e seus desdobramentos e, por conseguinte, sobre os aspectos relacionados à constituição do leitor também nas condições da surdez. Do mesmo modo, destaca questões do letramento e as implicações desse processo na constituição do leitor Surdo, também através de narrativas de sujeitos adultos (com pouca influência da oralização e relativa proficiência na leitura do Português, no presente sobre seus movimentos de formação, configurados na noção de espaço e tempo construídos pela memória dos mesmos. This paper points some theoretical aspects on the question of the reading and its unfoldings and, therefore, on the aspects related to the constitution of the reader also in the conditions of the deafness. In a similar way, it detaches questions of the literacy and the implications of this process in the constitution of the Deaf reader, also through narratives of adult deaf people (with little influence of the oralism and relative proficiency in the reading of the Portuguese, at the current moment on its movements of formation, configured in the notion of space and time constructed by the memory of the same ones.

  10. The Language Proficiency Profile-2: Assessment of the Global Communication Skills of Deaf Children Across Languages and Modalities of Expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bebko, James M.; Calderon, Rosemary; Treder, Robert

    2003-01-01

    Data are presented from two studies that investigate the developmental trends and concurrent validity of a measure of language and communication skills for deaf children, the Language Proficiency Profile-2 (LPP-2), developed by Bebko and McKinnon (1993). The LPP-2 was designed to evaluate the overall linguistic/communicative skills of deaf children, independent of any specific language or modality of expression. It focuses on the totality of the children's communication skills. Experiment 1 investigated developmental trends of the LPP-2 for both deaf and hearing children, studying a combined sample of deaf and hearing children from the United States and Canada. Experiment 2 investigated the relationship between the LPP-2 and two commonly used measures to assess deaf children on language development (Preschool Language Scale-3) and early reading skills (Test of Early Reading Ability-Deaf/Hard-of-Hearing). Results from the two studies indicate that the LPP-2 has good utility not only as a measure of overall language development but also as a predictor of achievement for English language and early reading skills.

  11. The contribution of phonological knowledge, memory, and language background to reading comprehension in deaf populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirshorn, Elizabeth A.; Dye, Matthew W. G.; Hauser, Peter; Supalla, Ted R.; Bavelier, Daphne

    2015-01-01

    While reading is challenging for many deaf individuals, some become proficient readers. Little is known about the component processes that support reading comprehension in these individuals. Speech-based phonological knowledge is one of the strongest predictors of reading comprehension in hearing individuals, yet its role in deaf readers is controversial. This could reflect the highly varied language backgrounds among deaf readers as well as the difficulty of disentangling the relative contribution of phonological versus orthographic knowledge of spoken language, in our case ‘English,’ in this population. Here we assessed the impact of language experience on reading comprehension in deaf readers by recruiting oral deaf individuals, who use spoken English as their primary mode of communication, and deaf native signers of American Sign Language. First, to address the contribution of spoken English phonological knowledge in deaf readers, we present novel tasks that evaluate phonological versus orthographic knowledge. Second, the impact of this knowledge, as well as memory measures that rely differentially on phonological (serial recall) and semantic (free recall) processing, on reading comprehension was evaluated. The best predictor of reading comprehension differed as a function of language experience, with free recall being a better predictor in deaf native signers than in oral deaf. In contrast, the measures of English phonological knowledge, independent of orthographic knowledge, best predicted reading comprehension in oral deaf individuals. These results suggest successful reading strategies differ across deaf readers as a function of their language experience, and highlight a possible alternative route to literacy in deaf native signers. Highlights: 1. Deaf individuals vary in their orthographic and phonological knowledge of English as a function of their language experience. 2. Reading comprehension was best predicted by different factors in oral deaf and

  12. The contribution of phonological knowledge, memory, and language background to reading comprehension in deaf populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirshorn, Elizabeth A; Dye, Matthew W G; Hauser, Peter; Supalla, Ted R; Bavelier, Daphne

    2015-01-01

    While reading is challenging for many deaf individuals, some become proficient readers. Little is known about the component processes that support reading comprehension in these individuals. Speech-based phonological knowledge is one of the strongest predictors of reading comprehension in hearing individuals, yet its role in deaf readers is controversial. This could reflect the highly varied language backgrounds among deaf readers as well as the difficulty of disentangling the relative contribution of phonological versus orthographic knowledge of spoken language, in our case 'English,' in this population. Here we assessed the impact of language experience on reading comprehension in deaf readers by recruiting oral deaf individuals, who use spoken English as their primary mode of communication, and deaf native signers of American Sign Language. First, to address the contribution of spoken English phonological knowledge in deaf readers, we present novel tasks that evaluate phonological versus orthographic knowledge. Second, the impact of this knowledge, as well as memory measures that rely differentially on phonological (serial recall) and semantic (free recall) processing, on reading comprehension was evaluated. The best predictor of reading comprehension differed as a function of language experience, with free recall being a better predictor in deaf native signers than in oral deaf. In contrast, the measures of English phonological knowledge, independent of orthographic knowledge, best predicted reading comprehension in oral deaf individuals. These results suggest successful reading strategies differ across deaf readers as a function of their language experience, and highlight a possible alternative route to literacy in deaf native signers. 1. Deaf individuals vary in their orthographic and phonological knowledge of English as a function of their language experience. 2. Reading comprehension was best predicted by different factors in oral deaf and deaf native

  13. ASL Handshape Stories, Word Recognition and Signing Deaf Readers: An Exploratory Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gietz, Merrilee R.

    2013-01-01

    The effectiveness of using American Sign Language (ASL) handshape stories to teach word recognition in whole stories using a descriptive case study approach was explored. Four profoundly deaf children ages 7 to 8, enrolled in a self-contained deaf education classroom in a public school in the south participated in the story time five-week…

  14. Deaf Readers and Phrasal Verbs: Instructional Efficacy of Chunking as a Visual Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atwell, William R.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effectiveness of a visual strategy that of chunking or visually bracketing phrasal verbs in sentences in short stories. A descriptive case study design was used for this study to compare the two instructional strategies. In this study, stories were presented to 14 severely and profound deaf students…

  15. The contribution of phonological knowledge, memory, and language background to reading comprehension in deaf populations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth Ann Hirshorn

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available While reading is challenging for many deaf individuals, some become proficient readers. Yet we do not know the component processes that support reading comprehension in these individuals. Speech-based phonological knowledge is one of the strongest predictors of reading comprehension in hearing individuals, yet its role in deaf readers is controversial. This could reflect the highly varied language backgrounds among deaf readers as well as the difficulty of disentangling the relative contribution of phonological versus orthographic knowledge of spoken language, in our case ‘English’, in this population. Here we assessed the impact of language experience on reading comprehension in deaf readers by recruiting oral deaf individuals, who use spoken English as their primary mode of communication, and deaf native signers of American Sign Language. First, to address the contribution of spoken English phonological knowledge in deaf readers, we present novel tasks that evaluate phonological versus orthographic knowledge. Second, the impact of this knowledge, as well as verbal short-term memory and long-term memory skills, on reading comprehension was evaluated. The best predictor of reading comprehension differed as a function of language experience, with long-term memory, as measured by free recall, being a better predictor in deaf native signers than in oral deaf. In contrast, the measures of English phonological knowledge, independent of orthographic knowledge, best predicted reading comprehension in oral deaf individuals. These results suggest successful reading strategies differ across deaf readers as a function of their language experience, and highlight a possible alternative route to literacy in deaf native signers.

  16. Implicit co-activation of American Sign Language in deaf readers: An ERP study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meade, Gabriela; Midgley, Katherine J; Sevcikova Sehyr, Zed; Holcomb, Phillip J; Emmorey, Karen

    2017-07-01

    In an implicit phonological priming paradigm, deaf bimodal bilinguals made semantic relatedness decisions for pairs of English words. Half of the semantically unrelated pairs had phonologically related translations in American Sign Language (ASL). As in previous studies with unimodal bilinguals, targets in pairs with phonologically related translations elicited smaller negativities than targets in pairs with phonologically unrelated translations within the N400 window. This suggests that the same lexicosemantic mechanism underlies implicit co-activation of a non-target language, irrespective of language modality. In contrast to unimodal bilingual studies that find no behavioral effects, we observed phonological interference, indicating that bimodal bilinguals may not suppress the non-target language as robustly. Further, there was a subset of bilinguals who were aware of the ASL manipulation (determined by debrief), and they exhibited an effect of ASL phonology in a later time window (700-900ms). Overall, these results indicate modality-independent language co-activation that persists longer for bimodal bilinguals. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. The neural underpinnings of reading skill in deaf adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emmorey, Karen; McCullough, Stephen; Weisberg, Jill

    2016-09-01

    We investigated word-level reading circuits in skilled deaf readers (N=14; mean reading age=19.5years) and less skilled deaf readers (N=14; mean reading age=12years) who were all highly proficient users of American Sign Language. During fMRI scanning, participants performed a semantic decision (concrete concept?), a phonological decision (two syllables?), and a false-font control task (string underlined?). No significant group differences were observed with the full participant set. However, an analysis with the 10 most and 10 least skilled readers revealed that for the semantic task (vs. control task), proficient deaf readers exhibited greater activation in left inferior frontal and middle temporal gyri than less proficient readers. No group differences were observed for the phonological task. Whole-brain correlation analyses (all participants) revealed that for the semantic task, reading ability correlated positively with neural activity in the right inferior frontal gyrus and in a region associated with the orthography-semantics interface, located anterior to the visual word form area. Reading ability did not correlate with neural activity during the phonological task. Accuracy on the semantic task correlated positively with neural activity in left anterior temporal lobe (a region linked to conceptual processing), while accuracy on the phonological task correlated positively with neural activity in left posterior inferior frontal gyrus (a region linked to syllabification processes during speech production). Finally, reading comprehension scores correlated positively with vocabulary and print exposure measures, but not with phonological awareness scores. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  18. Evaluative expression in deaf children's written narratives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beijsterveldt, E.M. van; Hell, J.G. van

    2009-01-01

    Background: Deaf children vary in the use of and proficiency in signed language. The majority of studies on writing skills of children who are deaf did not assess deaf children's proficiency in signed language and/or grouped together deaf children with varying sign language skills. Aims: Adopting a

  19. Evaluative Expression in Deaf Children's Written Narratives

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Beijsterveldt, Liesbeth Maria; van Hell, Janet G.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Deaf children vary in the use of and proficiency in signed language. The majority of studies on writing skills of children who are deaf did not assess deaf children's proficiency in signed language and/or grouped together deaf children with varying sign language skills. Aims: Adopting a bimodal bilingual perspective, we examined…

  20. American Sign Language Syntactic and Narrative Comprehension in Skilled and Less Skilled Readers: Bilingual and Bimodal Evidence for the Linguistic Basis of Reading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamberlain, Charlene; Mayberry, Rachel I.

    2008-01-01

    We tested the hypothesis that syntactic and narrative comprehension of a natural sign language can serve as the linguistic basis for skilled reading. Thirty-one adults who were deaf from birth and used American Sign Language (ASL) were classified as skilled or less skilled readers using an eighth-grade criterion. Proficiency with ASL syntax, and…

  1. Self-Correction Patterns and Metalinguistic Awareness: A Proposed Typology for Studying Text-Processing Strategies of Proficient Readers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francis, Norbert

    1999-01-01

    Presents an exploratory investigation of six case study subjects (bilingual 4th and 6th grade students, speakers of Spanish and Nahuatl from Central Mexico) that seeks to develop a typology of one aspect of text processing by second language readers that would be difficult to assess by other evaluation approaches that do not require oral reading:…

  2. READERS: Rapid English Assimilation Developing English Reading and Speaking; Social and Academic Implications of English Proficiency amongst Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seaton, Russell

    2017-01-01

    The READERS (Rapid English Assimilation Developing English Reading and Speaking) program is designed to facilitate teachers and students in rapid English assimilation, focusing on grammar and verbal recall as pertaining to the English language. The purpose of this qualitative method case study was to investigate the effects of rapid English…

  3. Evaluative expression in deaf children's written narratives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Beijsterveldt, Liesbeth Maria; van Hell, Janet G

    2009-01-01

    Deaf children vary in the use of and proficiency in signed language. The majority of studies on writing skills of children who are deaf did not assess deaf children's proficiency in signed language and/or grouped together deaf children with varying sign language skills. Adopting a bimodal bilingual perspective, we examined evaluative expression, an important narrative tool in both oral/written languages and signed languages, in narratives written in Dutch by deaf children who are proficient in Sign Language of the Netherlands (SLN) and deaf children who are low-proficient in SLN, and hearing monolingual and bilingual children. We hypothesized that deaf children who are proficient in signed language use their knowledge of evaluative expression in signed language to enrich their narratives in written Dutch, and more so than deaf children who are low-proficient in signed language and hearing monolingual and bilingual children. We examined the use of eight different evaluative devices in narratives written by deaf proficiently and low-proficiently signing children, and hearing monolingual and bilingual children. Narratives were also examined for morpho-syntactic errors and use of complex sentences. The results show that proficiently signing deaf children's narratives contain more evaluative devices that enrich the referential structure of the narrative than narratives of low-proficiently signing deaf children, and hearing bilingual and monolingual children. We propose that proficiently signing deaf children use their knowledge of SLN to convey evaluation in their written narratives, and thus have an advantage in enriching their narratives. This study also shows that in order to gain insight into deaf people's writing, it is important to take variations in sign language proficiency into account.

  4. Academic Achievement of Deaf and Hard-of-Hearing Students in an ASL/English Bilingual Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilbur, Ronnie B.

    2016-01-01

    There has been a scarcity of studies exploring the influence of students’ American Sign Language (ASL) proficiency on their academic achievement in ASL/English bilingual programs. The aim of this study was to determine the effects of ASL proficiency on reading comprehension skills and academic achievement of 85 deaf or hard-of-hearing signing students. Two subgroups, differing in ASL proficiency, were compared on the Northwest Evaluation Association Measures of Academic Progress and the reading comprehension subtest of the Stanford Achievement Test, 10th edition. Findings suggested that students highly proficient in ASL outperformed their less proficient peers in nationally standardized measures of reading comprehension, English language use, and mathematics. Moreover, a regression model consisting of 5 predictors including variables regarding education, hearing devices, and secondary disabilities as well as ASL proficiency and home language showed that ASL proficiency was the single variable significantly predicting results on all outcome measures. This study calls for a paradigm shift in thinking about deaf education by focusing on characteristics shared among successful deaf signing readers, specifically ASL fluency. PMID:26864688

  5. Processos logográficos, alfabéticos e lexicais na leitura silenciosa por surdos e ouvintes Silent reading by deaf and hearing readers: logographic, alphabetical and lexical processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Capovilla

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available O estudo empregou o Teste de Competência de Leitura de Palavras (TCLP para analisar estratégias ideovisuais, perilexicais e lexicais de leitura por 805 escolares surdos de 6-45 anos, da 1ª série do ensino fundamental à 1ª série do médio. Identificou aumento sistemático na competência de leitura de 1ª a 5ª séries, além de aumentos assistemáticos até a 1ª série do ensino médio, e comparou padrões de erros nos subtestes. Resultados revelaram dissociações duplas entre leitores surdos e ouvintes quanto ao padrão de erros nos subtestes: enquanto ouvintes se deixam enganar mais pela semelhança fonológica, surdos se deixam enganar mais pela visual. Enquanto ouvintes privilegiam a forma ortográfica em detrimento da correção semântica, surdos fazem o oposto. Devido à dificuldade de surdos em fazer conferência perilexical, sua leitura mostrou-se dependente de mecanismos visuais diretos de reconhecimento e acesso ao significado. O TCLP revelou-se instrumento válido para avaliar a leitura de surdos.The study used Word Reading Competence Test to analyze ideovisual, perilexical and lexical reading strategies by 805 6-45 year-old deaf students from 1st to 9th grade (1st grade elementary school to 1st grade high school. It identified a systematic increase in reading competence from 1st to 5th grade, and non-systematic increases until 9th grade. Results revealed double dissociation between deaf and hearing readers regarding error patterns across subtests: Hearing readers tended to be fooled more by phonological similarity than by visual similarity, whereas the opposite was found with deaf readers. Also, the hearing readers relied more on orthographic form than on semantic adequacy, whereas deaf readers did the opposite. Therefore, deaf reading was shown to depend essentially upon visual direct word recognition and semantic access mechanisms due to poor efficacy of perilexical checking mechanisms. Word Reading Competence Test was

  6. Library Services to Hospital Patients and Handicapped Readers Libraries and the Deaf--The Hidden Society [and] Social Achievements of the RSFSR in Providing the Blind with Books.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, William; Zharkov, D. S.

    The first of two papers presents suggestions on library services for the deaf by a British university lecturer, and the second provides an enumeration of Russian achievements in providing the blind with books. Based on an outline of the personal and social implications of deafness and unawareness of the deaf on the part of libraries and the…

  7. Leitura de estudantes surdos: desenvolvimento e peculiaridades em relação à de ouvintes/Reading by deaf students: development and peculiarities in comparison to hearing readers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando C. Capovilla

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available O Teste de Competência de Leitura de Palavras foi aplicado a 805 estudantes surdos da 1a. série do Ensino Fundamental até a 1a. série do Ensino Médio. Resultados mostraram crescimento significativo da competência de leitura ao longo das séries escolares. O estudo demonstrou que: 1 leitores ouvintes deixam-se enganar mais pela semelhança fonológica, ao passo que leitores surdos deixam-se enganar mais pela semelhança visual; 2 leitores ouvintes deixam-se enganar mais pela homofonia que pela semi-homofonia , ao passo que leitores surdos não; 3 leitores ouvintes deixam-se enganar mais por palavras ortográfica e fonologicamente familiares, ainda que semanticamente inadequadas às figuras, do que por pseudopalavras ortográfica e fonologicamente estranhas, ao passo que leitores surdos privilegiam o processamento semântico-ortográfico do que o ortográfico-fonológico, com melhor detecção de inadequação semântica de palavras conhecidas do que de pseudopalavras. Word Reading Competence Test was applied to 805 deaf students from 1st to 9th grade. Results showed that reading competence increased significantly as a function of school grade. The study demonstrated that: 1 hearing readers were fooled by phonological similarity, whereas deaf readers were fooled by visual similarity; 2 hearing readers were fooled by homophonic items than by semi-homophonic ones, whereas deaf readers were not; 3 hearing readers were more fooled by nonwords that are orthographically and phonologically familiar, even if they were semantically incompatible to the associated pictures, than by non-words that are orthographically and phonologically strange, whereas deaf readers were more focused on semantic-orthographic processing than on orthographic-phonologic one, so as to be superior at detecting the semantic inadequacy of known words.

  8. Apartheid in deaf education: examining workforce diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simms, Laurene; Rusher, Melissa; Andrews, Jean F; Coryell, Judy

    2008-01-01

    A survey of 3,227 professionals in 313 deaf education programs found that 22.0% of teachers and 14.5% of administrators were deaf--a less than 10% increase in deaf professionals since 1993. Additionally, 21.7% of teachers and 6.1% of administrators were professionals of color. Of these minority teachers, only 2.5% were deaf persons of color. Only 3 deaf administrators of color were identified. The study describes how "apartheid" or "intellectual oppression" may result from unchanged hiring practices in K-12 programs for the deaf and in postsecondary institutions. Using a bottle metaphor, the researchers describe how deaf persons of color are often stuck in "a bottleneck on the highway to opportunity." Relevant data underscore that the field of deaf education must diversify its professional force in order to utilize the intellectual, linguistic, and multicultural proficiencies of hearing teachers of color, deaf teachers, and deaf teachers of color.

  9. An Analysis of the Reading Strategies Used by Deaf and Hearing Adults: Similarities and Differences in Phonological Processing and Metacognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silvestri, Julia A.

    2016-01-01

    This study is a mixed methods analysis of reading processes and language experiences of deaf and hearing readers. The sample includes four groups each with fifteen adults--identified as: deaf/high-achieving readers, deaf/struggling/non-academic readers, hearing/high-achieving readers, and hearing/non-academic readers. The purpose of this study is…

  10. Engaging Struggling Adolescent Readers through Situational Interest: A Model Proposing the Relationships among Extrinsic Motivation, Oral Reading Proficiency, Comprehension, and Academic Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paige, David D.

    2011-01-01

    Reading ability and motivation among adolescents across the country continues to be problematic, as only slightly more than one-third read at a proficient level (Grigg, Donahue, & Dion, 2007; Unrau & Schlackman, 2006). Hidi and Renninger (2006) have proposed a four-phase model of situational interest that suggests how activities involving…

  11. Sample Proficiency Test exercise

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alcaraz, A; Gregg, H; Koester, C

    2006-02-05

    The current format of the OPCW proficiency tests has multiple sets of 2 samples sent to an analysis laboratory. In each sample set, one is identified as a sample, the other as a blank. This method of conducting proficiency tests differs from how an OPCW designated laboratory would receive authentic samples (a set of three containers, each not identified, consisting of the authentic sample, a control sample, and a blank sample). This exercise was designed to test the reporting if the proficiency tests were to be conducted. As such, this is not an official OPCW proficiency test, and the attached report is one method by which LLNL might report their analyses under a more realistic testing scheme. Therefore, the title on the report ''Report of the Umpteenth Official OPCW Proficiency Test'' is meaningless, and provides a bit of whimsy for the analyses and readers of the report.

  12. Reread-adapt and answer-comprehend intervention with Deaf and hard of hearing readers: effect on fluency and reading achievement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schirmer, Barbara R; Schaffer, Laura; Therrien, William J; Schirmer, Todd N

    2012-01-01

    The researchers investigated the effect of the Reread-Adapt and Answer-Comprehend intervention (Therrien, Gormley, & Kubina, 2006) on the reading fluency and achievement of d/Deaf and hard of hearing elementary-level students. Children in the third, fifth, and sixth grades at a state school for d/Deaf and hard of hearing students received a fluency intervention that was supplemental to their regular reading instruction. Significant improvement was found on a generalized measure of reading fluency after intervention. Though the researchers found no significant improvement in performance on a generalized measure of comprehension after intervention, the students demonstrated consistently good comprehension on both literal and inferential questions during the intervention sessions. The findings support the importance of incorporating a comprehension monitoring strategy in fluency instruction.

  13. How do profoundly deaf children learn to read?

    OpenAIRE

    伊藤, 泰子

    2013-01-01

    We know that children who were born profoundly deaf have much difficulty to learn to speak English or Japanese. But is it possible that profoundly deaf children learn to read written English or Japanese? Some researchers mention that early exposure to fingerspelling actually helps deaf children become better readers. Then I tried to find the reason why fingerspelling helps deaf children develop their reading ability and examined how to develop deaf children’s reading ability with fingerspelli...

  14. Helping Reluctant Readers

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCormick, Montana K.; Segal, Pamela H.

    2016-01-01

    University educators work with preservice teachers who often feel overwhelmed when facing high school science classrooms full of reluctant readers. These struggling students often have various special-education modifications or are English language learners (ELLs) with different degrees of language proficiency. Teachers report that these students…

  15. Canine deafness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strain, George M

    2012-11-01

    Conductive deafness, caused by outer or middle ear obstruction, may be corrected, whereas sensorineural deafness cannot. Most deafness in dogs is congenital sensorineural hereditary deafness, associated with the genes for white pigment: piebald or merle. The genetic cause has not yet been identified. Dogs with blue eyes have a greater likelihood of hereditary deafness than brown-eyed dogs. Other common forms of sensorineural deafness include presbycusis, ototoxicity, noise-induced hearing loss, otitis interna, and anesthesia. Definitive diagnosis of deafness requires brainstem auditory evoked response testing. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Children, Deaf, of Deaf Parents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baker, A.E.; van den Bogaerde, B.; Gertz, G.; Boudreault, P.

    2016-01-01

    Deaf children with Deaf parents usually grow up in the Deaf community, that is if their parents offer them a sign language and are active members of the community. These Deaf children are similar to other children of linguistic and cultural minorities in many ways. They are also different in that

  17. Deaf Epistemology: Deafhood and Deafness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauser, Peter C.; O'Hearn, Amanda; McKee, Michael; Steider, Anne; Thew, Denise

    2010-01-01

    Deaf epistemology constitutes the nature and extent of the knowledge that deaf individuals acquire growing up in a society that relies primarily on audition to navigate life. Deafness creates beings who are more visually oriented compared to their auditorily oriented peers. How hearing individuals interact with deaf individuals shapes how deaf…

  18. Deaf epistemology: Deafhood and Deafness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauser, Peter C; O'Hearn, Amanda; McKee, Michael; Steider, Anne; Thew, Denise

    2010-01-01

    Deaf epistemology constitutes the nature and extent of the knowledge that deaf individuals acquire growing up in a society that relies primarily on audition to navigate life. Deafness creates beings who are more visually oriented compared to their auditorily oriented peers. How hearing individuals interact with deaf individuals shapes how deaf individuals acquire knowledge and how they learn. Aspects of the Deaf episteme, not caused by deafness but by Deafhood, have a positive impact on how deaf individuals learn, resist audism, stay healthy, and navigate the world. Research on psychology, health, and education are reviewed to illustrate how visually oriented beings think and view the world differently from the majority. The article provides support to the theory of multiple epistemologies,and has implications for families, teachers, and researchers.

  19. Planning Behaviour in Good and Poor Readers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahapatra, Shamita

    2016-01-01

    A group of 50 good readers and a group of 50 poor readers of Grade 5 matched for age and intelligence and selected on the basis of their proficiency in reading comprehension were tested for their competence in word reading and the process of planning at three different levels, namely, perceptual, memory and conceptual in order to study the…

  20. A Comparison of Deaf and Hearing Children's Reading Comprehension Profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyle, Fiona E.; Cain, Kate

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Although deaf children typically exhibit severe delays in reading achievement, there is a paucity of research looking at their text-level comprehension skills. We present a comparison of deaf and normally hearing readers' profiles on a commonly used reading comprehension assessment: the Neale Analysis of Reading Ability II. Methods:…

  1. A Developmental Model Applied to Problems of Deafness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlesinger, Hilde S.

    2000-01-01

    This "classic" article (1972) in the field of deaf studies includes some interpretive notes for current readers. The article examines the effect of deafness on basic developmental tasks at each of the eight developmental stages of Erik Erikson's theory of psychosocial development and explains the more successful passage through these…

  2. Adapting health education material for deaf audiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollard, Robert Q; Dean, Robyn K; O'Hearn, Amanda; Haynes, Sharon L

    2009-05-01

    The deaf population is an often-overlooked limited English proficiency (LEP) group at risk for health disparities associated with low health literacy. Lack of access to health information conveyed via radio, television, or ambient auditory sources such as public conversation further aggravates this population's low health literacy. Methods of adapting health education material for hearing LEP populations do not reach deaf audiences with equal effectiveness. We adapt health education material for deaf audiences by first determining the "learning points" contained in vetted source material. A dialog-based film script covering those learning points is created. Supplemental content addressing common deaf population knowledge gaps and sociocultural experiences is added. Deaf actors are filmed following the adapted American Sign Language (ASL) script. Their ASL is back-translated into English to yield vocal track and subtitle scripts. The source material author(s) are consulted throughout the process to assure the film's adherence to the learning point list. Users report that the adapted product is more relevant, engaging, and effective for deaf audiences. This adaptation approach may aid in reducing deaf population health disparities. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2009 APA, all rights reserved).

  3. Deaf Epistemology: The Deaf Way of Knowing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holcomb, Thomas K.

    2010-01-01

    The standard epistemology requires the use of hard science to gain knowledge and discover the truth. In contrast, Deaf epistemology relies heavily on personal testimonies, personal experiences, and personal accounts to document knowledge. In recent years, a number of deaf schools have adopted deaf-centric policies shaped by Deaf epistemology in an…

  4. The Report and Analysis of the First U21 European Deaf Football Championship Men, Wroclaw, Poland 2016

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Szulc Adam Michał

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The First U21 European Deaf Football Championship Men was played in August 2016 in Wroclaw, Poland. No studies have documented or analysed sporting events for deaf players at the elite level. The aim of the study was to bring deaf football closer to the reader and analyse selected offensive actions recorded during the U21 Championship.

  5. Reader's Companion

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    Reader's Companion. Chapters 1–3: The Physical Properties of Fluids, ... Section 2.3 in Chapter 2 has a detailed analysis of the kinematics of local relative motion2. In Chapter 3, the Newtonian ..... Section 5.7 discusses the concept of a boundary layer and the leading-order parabolized equations are obtained via standard ...

  6. Reader's Companion

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 15; Issue 4. Reader's Companion. Ganesh Subramanian. Book Review Volume 15 Issue 4 April 2010 pp 366-383. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: http://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/015/04/0366-0383. Author Affiliations.

  7. Test Item Linguistic Complexity and Assessments for Deaf Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cawthon, Stephanie

    2011-01-01

    Linguistic complexity of test items is one test format element that has been studied in the context of struggling readers and their participation in paper-and-pencil tests. The present article presents findings from an exploratory study on the potential relationship between linguistic complexity and test performance for deaf readers. A total of 64…

  8. Deaf People Can!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wixtrom, Christine

    1987-01-01

    Activities designed to increase deaf students' self-esteem and positive attitudes toward their deafness included a bulletin board displaying the different things deaf children and adults could do; and a trip to see actors from the National Theater of the Deaf. (CB)

  9. Overview on Deaf-Blindness

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Topics About Deaf-Blindness > What is Deaf-Blindness Definitions of Deaf-Blindness Causes of Deaf-Blindness National Child Count & Demographics Communication > Communication Overview Early Communication Prelinguistic Communication Object Communication ...

  10. Sudden Deafness

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... hearing loss of 30 decibels would make conversational speech sound more like a whisper. Many people notice that ... Adobe Reader . Last Updated Date: March 6, 2017 Languages Español ... Topics Balance Disorders Balance Problems and Disorders - National Institute on Aging ...

  11. Academic Achievement of Deaf and Hard-of-Hearing Students in an ASL/English Bilingual Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hrastinski, Iva; Wilbur, Ronnie B.

    2016-01-01

    There has been a scarcity of studies exploring the influence of students' American Sign Language (ASL) proficiency on their academic achievement in ASL/English bilingual programs. The aim of this study was to determine the effects of ASL proficiency on reading comprehension skills and academic achievement of 85 deaf or hard-of-hearing signing…

  12. Academic Achievement of Deaf and Hard-of-Hearing Students in an ASL/English Bilingual Program

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hrastinski, Iva; Wilbur, Ronnie B

    2016-01-01

    ...) proficiency on their academic achievement in ASL/English bilingual programs. The aim of this study was to determine the effects of ASL proficiency on reading comprehension skills and academic achievement of 85 deaf or hard-of-hearing signing students...

  13. Sociological Aspects of Deafness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    World Federation of the Deaf, Rome (Italy).

    Nine conference papers treat the sociological aspects of deafness. Included are "Individuals Being Deaf and Blind and Living with a Well Hearing Society" by A. Marx (German Federal Republic), "A Deaf Man's Experiences in a Hearing World" by A. B. Simon(U.S.A.), "Problem of Text Books and School Appliances for Vocational…

  14. Does Deafness Affect Resilience?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmadi

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background Resilience is a positive psychological characteristic that contributes to mental health and adjustment under challenging conditions, such as deafness. Deafness is a traumatic experience and causes communication disorders; it may also affect resilience. Objectives We compared the resilience of deaf signers to that of a matched group of hearing individuals. Materials and Methods This comparative study was performed to assess self-evaluated resilience in 45 deaf signers and in 76 matched hearing subjects from Hamadan, Iran. Resilience scores were measured using a modified connor-davidson resilience scale. Results The average resilience score was 61.20 in deaf signers and 62.8 in hearing subjects; however, this difference was not statistically significant. The resilience score was different in female and male deaf participants. It was 65.22 for male deaf participants (SD = 10.4 and 55.17 for female deaf participants (SD = 16.1, and this difference was statistically significant (P = 0.014. The gender difference between the resilience scores of hearing participants (male, 66.24 [SD = 16.7] and female, 59.36 [SD = 13.9] was not significant (P = 0.057. Discussion Similar resilience scores in deaf and hearing participants may be due to appropriate interaction of deaf signers with family members and society. Male deaf subjects were more resilient than female ones; studies should be done to examine the effects of cultural characteristics that may provide females with less communication opportunities than males.

  15. THE DEAFNESS, THE DEAF AND HIS DISCURSE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neuma Chaveiro

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: The knowledge of LIBRAS – Brazilian Sign Language – is determining to the process of structuring the discursive formations and to the constitution of the deaf one. The present work aims to discuss the LIBRAS as an important tool of structuring the discursive of the deaf individual an as a facilitating factor in the description of his health problems. The data constitute two texts, one of them wrote by a deaf skilled in LIBRAS and the other wrote by a deaf who does not express himself in this kind of language. It was verified that the first text’s author is consistent, has mobility and moves easily through the discursive formations, but otherwise is the text belonging to the other patient. It can be stated that the Brazilian sign language – LIBRAS – is a decisive tool in the working out of the deaf discursive formations and the comprehension of his discourse by the health area professionals provide a larger understanding of the constitution of the deaf identity, a fundamental aspect for an improvement in the services offered in the health area. KEYWORDS: Deafness; Communication; Sign Language.

  16. What Can Readers Read after Graded Readers?

    Science.gov (United States)

    McQuillan, Jeff

    2016-01-01

    Nation (2014) concluded that most of the vocabulary one needs to read challenging texts in English can be acquired incidentally through voluminous reading. This study examines possible texts that second language (L2) readers can use to move from controlled-vocabulary materials such as graded readers, which go up through approximately the…

  17. Superordinate Precision: An Examination of Academic Writing Among Bilingual Deaf and Hard of Hearing Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Jessica A; Hoffmeister, Robert J

    2017-12-08

    Academic English is an essential literacy skill area for success in post-secondary education and in many work environments. Despite its importance, academic English is understudied with deaf and hard of hearing (DHH) students. Nascent research in this area suggests that academic English, alongside American Sign Language (ASL) fluency, may play an important role in the reading proficiency of DHH students in middle and high school. The current study expands this research to investigate academic English by examining student proficiency with a sub-skill of academic writing called superordinate precision, the taxonomical categorization of a term. Currently there is no research that examines DHH students' proficiency with superordinate precision. Middle and high school DHH students enrolled in bilingual schools for the deaf were assessed on their ASL proficiency, academic English proficiency, reading comprehension, and use of superordinate precision in definitions writing. Findings indicate that student use of superordinate precision in definitions writing was correlated with ASL proficiency, reading comprehension, and academic English proficiency. It is possible that degree of mastery of superordinate precision may indicate a higher overall level of proficiency with academic English. This may have important implications for assessment of and instruction in academic English literacy. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. Libraryservice for the deaf

    OpenAIRE

    Forssell, Beatrice

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this two years master thesis is to explore the relationship between public libraries and deaf adults. I want to know if deaf adults are a prioritized group in Swedish public libraries. Deaf adults use Swedish sign language witch is a visual language and differs from Swedish. I discuss the difference in Swedish Sign Language and Swedish and the importance of Sign Language literature. I also explore what methods can be used for mak-ing the library service towards the deaf group more ...

  19. Googling "Deaf": Deafness in the World's English-Language Press

    Science.gov (United States)

    Power, Des

    2007-01-01

    An Internet search tool, Google Alert, was used to survey the global English-language press July-December 2005 for references to deaf people. The survey found that such references focus on people who are deaf rather than the disability itself, thus demonstrating how well deaf people fit into the mainstream. Derogatory terminology such as "deaf and…

  20. Negotiating Deaf Bodies and Corporeal Experiences: The Cybernetic Deaf Subject

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas P. Horejes

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Deaf people negotiate their embodiment through corporeal experiences to provide a perception of what it means to be human. Some deaf people search for a framework where being deaf is human, not a disability. Other deaf people experience their deafness as a disability and use technology as a means to negotiate their embodiment and experiences. The role of technology or cybernetics, particularly cochlear implants, for the deaf will be examined as a way to understand cultural identities and diverse ideological perspectives concerning what it means to be deaf and normal. Then, this paper focuses on social constructed ‘bodies’ for the deaf using embodied theory and action as a part of a theoretical framework to showcase theoretical ideas and actualities of some deaf people’s lives and experiences. These discussions are ways to open dialogues and collaborative inquiries on larger important issues such as what it means to be deaf and, in essence, human.

  1. Nurturing Lifelong Readers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Judkins, Gerri

    2010-01-01

    In this paper the author relates how the thing he enjoys most about his job as a school librarian is nurturing lifelong readers, in particular readers of children's literature. In talking about nurturing lifelong readers and, referring to students, staff and school librarians, the author discusses: (1) The Southwell Library Programme; (2) The Lit…

  2. Teaching Early Readers to Self-Monitor and Self-Correct

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pratt, Sharon M.; Urbanowski, Melena

    2016-01-01

    Proficient readers self-monitor and self-correct to derive meaning from text. This article reviews research on how students learn to self-monitor and self-correct and describes a Reciprocal Teaching (RT) instructional routine that was successfully used with early readers to build their metacognitive processes. The RT routine included teacher…

  3. Comparing Motor Development of Deaf Children of Deaf Parents and Deaf Children of Hearing Parents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lieberman, Lauren J.; Volding, Lori; Winnick, Joseph P.

    2004-01-01

    Deaf children of Deaf parents perform better academically (Ritter-Brinton & Stewart, 1992), linguistically (Courtin, 2000; M. Harris, 2001; Vaccari & Marschark, 1997), and socially (Hadadian & Rose, 1991; M. Harris, 2001) than Deaf children of hearing parents. Twenty-nine Deaf children in residential schools were assessed to determine if a…

  4. Language and cognitive development in deaf children: deaf children with deaf and deaf children with hearing parents

    OpenAIRE

    Ajda Pfifer

    2011-01-01

    The article reviews the current studies regarding language and cognitive development in children who are deaf. Deaf communicate orally and with sign language. 90 % of deaf children are born into hearing families and hearing parents in most cases do not know the sign language. Besides, hearing parents usually want for their child to become "normally" speaking. Most of the deaf children born into hearing families have very poor early communication. It is now well established that deaf children ...

  5. Deaf Education Teacher Preparation: A Phenomenological Case Study of a Graduate Program With a Comprehensive Philosophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engler, Karen S; MacGregor, Cynthia J

    2018-01-01

    At a time when deaf education teacher preparation programs are declining in number, little is known about their actual effectiveness. A phenomenological case study of a graduate-level comprehensive deaf education teacher preparation program at a midwestern university explored empowered and enabled learning of teacher candidates using the Missouri Department of Elementary and Secondary Education educator pillars: (a) commitment to the profession, (b) proficiency in practice, and (c) learning impact, all deemed critical to developing quality teachers. A strong connection was found between the program's comprehensive philosophy and its practice. Embracing diversity of d/Deafness and differentiated instruction were the most prevalent themes expressed by participants. Teacher candidates displayed outstanding commitment to the profession and high proficiency in practice. The findings suggest that additional consideration should be given to classroom and behavior management, teacher candidate workload, teaching beyond academics, and preparation for navigating the public school system.

  6. An Analysis of Reading Skill Development using E-Z Reader

    OpenAIRE

    Mancheva, Lyuba; Reichle, Erik D.; Lemaire, Benoît; Valdois, Sylviane; Ecalle, Jean; Guérin-Dugué, Anne

    2015-01-01

    Previously reported simulations using the E-Z Reader model of eye-movement control suggest that the patterns of eye movements observed with children versus adult readers reflect differences in lexical processing proficiency (Reichle et al., 2013). However, these simulations fail to specify precisely what aspect(s) of lexical processing (e.g., orthographic processing) account for the concurrent changes in eye movements and reading skill. To examine this issue, the E-Z Reader model was first us...

  7. Hearing Disorders and Deafness

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... enough to enjoy talking with friends or family. Hearing disorders make it hard, but not impossible, to ... often be helped. Deafness can keep you from hearing sound at all. What causes hearing loss? Some ...

  8. Language skills and nonverbal cognitive processes associated with reading comprehension in deaf children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daza, María Teresa; Phillips-Silver, Jessica; Ruiz-Cuadra, María del Mar; López-López, Francisco

    2014-12-01

    The main aim of this study was to examine the relationship between language skills (vocabulary knowledge and phonological awareness), nonverbal cognitive processes (attention, memory and executive functions) and reading comprehension in deaf children. Participants were thirty prelingually deaf children (10.7 ± 1.6 years old; 18 boys, 12 girls), who were classified as either good readers or poor readers by their scores on two reading comprehension tasks. The children were administered a rhyme judgment task and seven computerized neuropsychological tasks specifically designed and adapted for deaf children to evaluate vocabulary knowledge, attention, memory and executive functions in deaf children. A correlational approach was also used to assess the association between variables. Although the two groups did not show differences in phonological awareness, good readers showed better vocabulary and performed significantly better than poor readers on attention, memory and executive functions measures. Significant correlations were found between better scores in reading comprehension and better scores on tasks of vocabulary and non-verbal cognitive processes. The results suggest that in deaf children, vocabulary knowledge and nonverbal cognitive processes such as selective attention, visuo-spatial memory, abstract reasoning and sequential processing may be especially relevant for the development of reading comprehension. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Vocabulary Use by Low, Moderate, and High ASL-Proficient Writers Compared to Hearing ESL and Monolingual Speakers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singleton, Jenny L.; Morgan, Dianne; DiGello, Elizabeth; Wiles, Jill; Rivers, Rachel

    2004-01-01

    The written English vocabulary of 72 deaf elementary school students of various proficiency levels in American Sign Language (ASL) was compared with the performance of 60 hearing English-as-a-second-language (ESL) speakers and 61 hearing monolingual speakers of English, all of similar age. Students were asked to retell "The Tortoise and the Hare"…

  10. Inattentional deafness in music.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koreimann, Sabrina; Gula, Bartosz; Vitouch, Oliver

    2014-01-01

    While inattentional blindness is a modern classic in attention and perception research, analogous phenomena of inattentional deafness have been widely neglected. We here present the first investigation of inattentional deafness in and with music under controlled experimental conditions. Inattentional deafness in music is defined as the inability to consciously perceive an unexpected musical stimulus when attention is focused on a certain facet of the piece. Participants listened to a modification of the first 1'50″ of Richard Strauss' Thus Spake Zarathustra; while the control group just listened, the experimental group had to count the number of timpani beats. An e-guitar solo served as the unexpected event. In Study 1, experimental data from n = 115 participants were analyzed. Non-musicians were compared with musicians to investigate the impact of expertise. In Study 2 (n = 47), the scope of the inattentional deafness effect was investigated with a more salient unexpected stimulus. Results demonstrate an inattentional deafness effect under dynamic musical conditions. Quite unexpectedly, the effect was structurally equivalent even for musicians. Our findings clearly show that sustained inattentional deafness exists in the musical realm, in close correspondence to inattentional blindness with dynamic visual stimuli.

  11. Facets of Speaking Proficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Jong, Nivja H.; Steinel, Margarita P.; Florijn, Arjen F.; Schoonen, Rob; Hulstijn, Jan H.

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the componential structure of second-language (L2) speaking proficiency. Participants--181 L2 and 54 native speakers of Dutch--performed eight speaking tasks and six tasks tapping nine linguistic skills. Performance in the speaking tasks was rated on functional adequacy by a panel of judges and formed the dependent variable in…

  12. Evaluation by Proficiency Certification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerby, Dale

    1977-01-01

    Albuquerque Technical-Vocational Institute's system for grading business courses by proficiency certification in place of the traditional A through F system is described. A certificate is developed for each course, with evaluation of student performance in each area. This system requires a greater volume of paper work and skill analysis but it is…

  13. Facets of speaking proficiency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jong, N.H.; Steinel, M.P.; Florijn, A.F.; Schoonen, R.; Hulstijn, J.H.

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the componential structure of second-language (L2) speaking proficiency. Participants—181 L2 and 54 native speakers of Dutch—performed eight speaking tasks and six tasks tapping nine linguistic skills. Performance in the speaking tasks was rated on functional adequacy by a panel

  14. Bilingual Education and English Proficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jepsen, Christopher

    2010-01-01

    In 2001, California instituted a statewide test measuring English proficiency for English learners, students who are not proficient in English. In 2003 and 2004, nearly 500,000 English learners in grades 1-5 took this test each year. The relationship between bilingual education receipt and English proficiency is estimated using value-added…

  15. Learning from Graded Readers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wodinsky, Marilyn; Nation, Paul

    1988-01-01

    A word frequency study of two graded readers and an unsimplified text indicated that graded readers facilitated better foreign-language reading and vocabulary learning than did unsimplified texts. It was found that students needed to read several same-level texts to master vocabulary, and that vocabulary mastery was not necessary for successful…

  16. Language and cognitive development in deaf children: deaf children with deaf and deaf children with hearing parents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ajda Pfifer

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The article reviews the current studies regarding language and cognitive development in children who are deaf. Deaf communicate orally and with sign language. 90 % of deaf children are born into hearing families and hearing parents in most cases do not know the sign language. Besides, hearing parents usually want for their child to become "normally" speaking. Most of the deaf children born into hearing families have very poor early communication. It is now well established that deaf children of deaf parents generally exhibit normal patterns of development in social, linguistic and cognitive domains relative to their hearing peers. One of the longest-running debates in the field of deaf education was whether introducing young deaf children to sign language impairs their ability and motivation for learning spoken language. Today we have no evidence supporting the hypothesis of a negative effect of sign language on development of spoken langugage.

  17. Cortical deafness in multiple sclerosis

    OpenAIRE

    Tabira, T; Tsuji, S; Nagashima, T.; Nakajima, T.; Kuroiwa, Y

    1981-01-01

    Cortical deafness in a patient with multiple sclerosis is reported. Complete recovery from total deafness was seen following stages of auditory agnosia and pure word deafness. The otological and neurophysiological studies suggested lesions in subcortical white matter. This report stresses the rarity of the condition, its subcortical origin and good prognosis.

  18. Meeting global deaf peers, visiting ideal deaf places: deaf ways of education leading to empowerment, an exploratory case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Clerck, Goedele A M

    2007-01-01

    In a flemish case study, deaf role models revealed a moment of awakening, indicated by the Flemish sign WAKE-UP Contact with deaf cultural rhetoric made them wake up, and deconstruct and reconstruct their lives, a process represented by a circle of deaf empowerment. Flemish deaf leaders mentioned acquiring this rhetoric during visits to deaf dream worlds (in Flemish Sign Language, WORLD DREAM): places with ideal conditions for deaf people. Such global deaf encounters (Breivik, Haualand, & Solvang, 2002) lead to the "insurrection of subjugated [deaf] knowledges" (Pease, 2002, p. 33). Whereas deaf education had never provided them with deaf cultural rhetoric and was depositing upon them oppressive societal conventions (Jankowski, 1997), a common sign language (Mottez, 1993) and global deaf experience (Breivik et al., 2002; Murray, in press) in barrier-free environments (Jankowski, 1997) provided deaf ways of deaf education (Erting, 1996; Reilly, 1995).

  19. Diversity of deaf identities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bat-Chava, Y

    2000-12-01

    Social Identity Theory (Tajfel, 1981) posits that members of minority groups achieve positive social identity by (a) attempting to gain access to the mainstream through individual mobility or (b) working with other group members to bring about social change. Some people may use a combination of both strategies. Through the use of cluster analysis, the existence of three identities associated with these strategies was discerned in a sample of 267 deaf adults: culturally hearing identity, culturally deaf identity, and bicultural identity, each comprising about a third of the sample. A subset of 56 people were interviewed in depth; excerpts are presented to illustrate the identity types. Qualified support was found for the prediction that people with culturally deaf and bicultural identities would have higher self-esteem.

  20. The Bakhtin Reader The Bakhtin Reader

    OpenAIRE

    Helen Reid Thomas

    2008-01-01

    The publication of Caryl Emerson’s book The First Hundred Years of Mikhail Bakhtin in December 1997 is an indication that interest in Bakhtin continues to flourish, among both Russian and Western scholars. Emerson’s book traces the interesting differences of attitude and emphasis between these two groups of critics and provides a broad-ranging and scholarly history of Bakhtin studies. The book I am concerned with here, The Bakhtin Reader, though of a different nature and designed for a d...

  1. A dual-route cascaded model of reading by deaf adults: evidence for grapheme to viseme conversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, Eeva A; Braun, Mario; Kuhlmann, Michael; Jacobs, Arthur M

    2012-01-01

    There is an ongoing debate whether deaf individuals access phonology when reading, and if so, what impact the ability to access phonology might have on reading achievement. However, the debate so far has been theoretically unspecific on two accounts: (a) the phonological units deaf individuals may have of oral language have not been specified and (b) there seem to be no explicit cognitive models specifying how phonology and other factors operate in reading by deaf individuals. We propose that deaf individuals have representations of the sublexical structure of oral-aural language which are based on mouth shapes and that these sublexical units are activated during reading by deaf individuals. We specify the sublexical units of deaf German readers as 11 "visemes" and incorporate the viseme set into a working model of single-word reading by deaf adults based on the dual-route cascaded model of reading aloud by Coltheart, Rastle, Perry, Langdon, and Ziegler (2001. DRC: A dual route cascaded model of visual word recognition and reading aloud. Psychological Review, 108, 204-256. doi: 10.1037//0033-295x.108.1.204). We assessed the indirect route of this model by investigating the "pseudo-homoviseme" effect using a lexical decision task in deaf German reading adults. We found a main effect of pseudo-homovisemy, suggesting that at least some deaf individuals do automatically access sublexical structure during single-word reading.

  2. Emotional recognition of dynamic facial expressions before and after cochlear implantation in adults with progressive deafness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambert-Dahan, Emmanuèle; Giraud, Anne-Lise; Mecheri, Halima; Sterkers, Olivier; Mosnier, Isabelle; Samson, Séverine

    2017-10-01

    Visual processing has been extensively explored in deaf subjects in the context of verbal communication, through the assessment of speech reading and sign language abilities. However, little is known about visual emotional processing in adult progressive deafness, and after cochlear implantation. The goal of our study was thus to assess the influence of acquired post-lingual progressive deafness on the recognition of dynamic facial emotions that were selected to express canonical fear, happiness, sadness, and anger. A total of 23 adults with post-lingual deafness separated into two groups; those assessed either before (n = 10) and those assessed after (n = 13) cochlear implantation (CI); and 13 normal hearing (NH) individuals participated in the current study. Participants were asked to rate the expression of the four cardinal emotions, and to evaluate both their emotional valence (unpleasant-pleasant) and arousal potential (relaxing-stimulating). We found that patients with deafness were impaired in the recognition of sad faces, and that patients equipped with a CI were additionally impaired in the recognition of happiness and fear (but not anger). Relative to controls, all patients with deafness showed a deficit in perceiving arousal expressed in faces, while valence ratings remained unaffected. The current results show for the first time that acquired and progressive deafness is associated with a reduction of emotional sensitivity to visual stimuli. This negative impact of progressive deafness on the perception of dynamic facial cues for emotion recognition contrasts with the proficiency of deaf subjects with and without CIs in processing visual speech cues (Rouger et al., 2007; Strelnikov et al., 2009; Lazard and Giraud, 2017). Altogether these results suggest there to be a trade-off between the processing of linguistic and non-linguistic visual stimuli. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  3. How do deaf signers of LSQ and their teachers construct the meaning of a written text?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ducharme, D A; Arcand, Isabelle

    2011-01-01

    Many studies have investigated why learning to read is so problematic for deaf individuals. However, we still know very little about how to teach reading to signing students. In this article, we report on an exploratory qualitative study of deaf LSQ (Langue des signes québécoise) signers learning to read with two teachers, in an effort to better understand what strategies might be most useful in constructing the meaning of a text. By videotaping reading sessions between each teacher and student, then conducting recall interviews, we found that both students and teachers used a number of strategies to construct meaning. The list of strategies observed was categorized as word attack or global meaning types. Developing readers showed different patterns of strategy use, with more global meaning strategies being used by the more independent reader. We also found that the deaf teacher and hearing teacher had different patterns of strategy use, although both favored global meaning types. Finally, our findings indicate that both teachers adapted their strategy use to the needs of the students, but with a different focus. Namely, the deaf teacher used more global meaning strategies with the weaker reader and less with the more independent reader, whereas the hearing teacher showed the opposite pattern.

  4. Children of Deaf Adults

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Bogaerde, B.; Baker, A.E.; Gertz, G.; Boudreault, P.

    2016-01-01

    The hearing children of Deaf parents grow up in two cultures with two languages. They are similar to other bilingual, bicultural children in many ways but are special also. They can be in conflict between two worlds and often carry an extra burden of responsibility in functioning as a bridge between

  5. Research on Deafness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Annals of the Deaf, 1997

    1997-01-01

    Lists doctoral dissertations that were completed during 1996 that relate to children and adults with hearing impairments, including the education of children who are deaf or hard of hearing, early intervention, hearing loss, teacher inservice training, cochlear implants, substance abuse, sign language, and socialization. (CR)

  6. Sampling the Deaf Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teller, Henry E.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Two graduate students in deaf education wore ear plugs for two months to simulate hearing loss, and recorded their experiences and feelings. Excerpts from their journals are presented, commenting on such daily activities as shopping at a mall, watching television, driving, babysitting, and attending a football game. (JDD)

  7. Test-taking skills: a missing component of deaf students' curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaSasso, C J

    1999-03-01

    Often, conclusions about what students have learned in school are based on their performance on standardized or informal tests. For several reasons, these tests may not accurately reflect deaf students' learning. The author discusses the limitations of tests and other "products" administered to students during or after reading that are interpreted as reflecting comprehension of what is read. The author also reviews documented differences in test-taking abilities of deaf and hearing students, and describes specific compensatory test-taking strategies used by deaf readers. A rationale is provided for including a formal test-taking skills component in the curriculum for deaf students. Finally, the author discusses portfolio assessment and contemporary societal forces working against academic testing.

  8. Modeling reading vocabulary learning in deaf children in bilingual education programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermans, Daan; Knoors, Harry; Ormel, Ellen; Verhoeven, Ludo

    2008-01-01

    The acquisition of reading vocabulary is one of the major challenges for deaf children in bilingual education programs. Deaf children have to acquire a written lexicon that can effectively be used in reading. In this paper, we present a developmental model that describes reading vocabulary acquisition of deaf children in bilingual education programs. The model is inspired by Jiang's model of vocabulary development in a second language (N. Jiang, 2000, 2004a) and the hierarchical model of lexical representation and processing in bilinguals (J. F. Kroll & E. Stewart, 1988). We argue that lexical development in the written language often fossilizes and that many words deaf readers acquire will not reach the final stage of lexical development. We argue that this feature is consistent with many findings reported in the literature. Finally, we discuss the pedagogical implications of the model.

  9. Genetics Home Reference: deafness and myopia syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Health Conditions Deafness and myopia syndrome Deafness and myopia syndrome Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable ... view the expand/collapse boxes. Description Deafness and myopia syndrome is a disorder that causes problems with ...

  10. American Sign Language and Academic English: Factors Influencing the Reading of Bilingual Secondary School Deaf and Hard of Hearing Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Jessica A; Hoffmeister, Robert J

    2017-01-01

    For many years, researchers have sought to understand the reading development of deaf and hard of hearing (DHH) students. Guided by prior research on DHH and hearing students, in this study we investigate the hypothesis that for secondary school DHH students enrolled in American Sign Language (ASL)/English bilingual schools for the deaf, academic English proficiency would be a significant predictor of reading comprehension alongside ASL proficiency. Using linear regression, we found statistically significant interaction effects between academic English knowledge and word reading fluency in predicting the reading comprehension scores of the participants. However, ASL remained the strongest and most consistent predictor of reading comprehension within the sample. Findings support a model in which socio-demographic factors, ASL proficiency, and word reading fluency are primary predictors of reading comprehension for secondary DHH students. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@.com.

  11. Capacitive label reader

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arlowe, H. Duane

    1985-01-01

    A capacitive label reader includes an outer ring transmitting portion, an inner ring transmitting portion, and a plurality of insulated receiving portions. A label is the mirror-image of the reader except that identifying portions corresponding to the receiving portions are insulated from only one of two coupling elements. Positive and negative pulses applied, respectively, to the two transmitting rings biased a CMOS shift register positively to either a 1 or 0 condition. The output of the CMOS may be read as an indication of the label.

  12. Clinical Wisdom among Proficient Nurses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Uhrenfeldt, Lisbeth; Hall, Elisabeth

    2007-01-01

    This paperexamines clinical wisdom which has emerged from a broader study anout nurse managers´influence on proficient registered nurse turnover and retention. The purpose of the study was to increase understanding of proficient nurses´experience and clinical practice by giving voice to the nurses...

  13. Effects of reading proficiency on embedded stem priming in primary school children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beyersmann, Elisabeth; Grainger, Jonathan; Casalis, Séverine; Ziegler, Johannes C

    2015-11-01

    Prior evidence from masked morphological priming has revealed conflicting findings regarding the acquisition of morpho-orthographic segmentation mechanisms in developing readers. Here, we examined changes in masked morphological priming across grade within a large sample of French primary school children (n = 191, Grades 2-5) and how these effects are modulated by individual differences in reading proficiency, spelling proficiency, and morphological awareness. Target words were preceded by either (a) a suffixed word prime (e.g., tristesse-TRISTE), (b) a suffixed nonword prime (e.g., tristerie-TRISTE), (c) a non-suffixed nonword prime (e.g., tristald-TRISTE), or (d) an unrelated prime (e.g., direction-TRISTE) using very short prime durations (50 ms). Moreover, a frequency manipulation was included for suffixes and non-suffixes. The results revealed robust suffixed word priming across all children independent of grade and proficiency. On the other hand, priming in the suffixed and non-suffixed nonword conditions was modulated by reading proficiency, with high-proficiency children showing facilitation and low-proficiency children showing inhibition. The effects of suffix and non-suffix frequency were modulated by grade, with decreasing effects as grade increased. None of the observed priming effects were modulated by grade, spelling proficiency, or morphological awareness. The results suggest that reading proficiency is an important predictor for embedded stem activation mechanisms in primary school children, which we discuss in the context of recent theories of morphological processing. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Making Cancer Health Text on the Internet Easier to Read for Deaf People Who Use American Sign Language.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kushalnagar, Poorna; Smith, Scott; Hopper, Melinda; Ryan, Claire; Rinkevich, Micah; Kushalnagar, Raja

    2016-06-08

    People with relatively limited English language proficiency find the Internet's cancer and health information difficult to access and understand. The presence of unfamiliar words and complex grammar make this particularly difficult for Deaf people. Unfortunately, current technology does not support low-cost, accurate translations of online materials into American Sign Language. However, current technology is relatively more advanced in allowing text simplification, while retaining content. This research team developed a two-step approach for simplifying cancer and other health text. They then tested the approach, using a crossover design with a sample of 36 deaf and 38 hearing college students. Results indicated that hearing college students did well on both the original and simplified text versions. Deaf college students' comprehension, in contrast, significantly benefitted from the simplified text. This two-step translation process offers a strategy that may improve the accessibility of Internet information for Deaf, as well as other low-literacy individuals.

  15. Understanding Readers' Differing Understandings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kucer, Stephen B.

    2015-01-01

    This research examines the characteristics of reader understandings that vary from those stated in the text. Eighty-seven fourth graders orally read complex academic literary and scientific texts, followed by probed retellings. Retold ideas not directly supported by, or reflective of, the texts were identified. These differing understandings…

  16. Advanced Tagalog Reader.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, Teresita V.

    A Tagalog reader designed for adult students beyond the intermediate level contains 30 lessons in agriculture, art, economics, education, history, language, literature, medicine, music, political science, religion, and sociology. Each unit contains four sections: (1) a reading passage with numbered paragraphs and underlined vocabulary words, for…

  17. The Reluctant Reader.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chambers, Aidan

    This book is concerned with the approximately 60% of capable adolescent readers who have little or no inclination to read creative literature. The possible causes of this reluctance to read are examined and various solutions to the problems are discussed. Chapters focus on the reading interests and motivations of teenagers, on the reasons that…

  18. GREEK, INTERMEDIATE READER.

    Science.gov (United States)

    SAPOUNTZIS, P.; AND OTHERS

    THIS READER IS DESIGNED TO FOLLOW A BASIC INTRODUCTORY COURSE IN COMMONLY SPOKEN GREEK (DHIMOTIKI). THE SELECTIONS REPRESENT VARIOUS DEGREES OF THE SPOKEN LANGUAGE LEADING FROM DHIMOTIKI TO THE FORMAL GREEK (KATHAREVUSA). THE TEXTS OF EACH UNIT ARE MEANT TO PRESENT VARIOUS ASPECTS OF GREEK LIFE AND THOUGHT. THE DRILL SENTENCES (BOTH VOCABULARY AND…

  19. Bytes, Books and Readers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Krista Stinne Greve

    2016-01-01

    In diesem Beitrag werden Ergebnisse aus der Dissertation der Autorin Bytes, Books, and Readers. A Historical Analysis of the Transition from Printed to Digital Scholarly Editions Focusing on ‘The Writings of Søren Kierkegaard’ (2015) vorgestellt. Dabei wird dem Wechselverhältnis zwischen der...

  20. Our Readers Write ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    which it is desirable to correct, keeping in mind young readers of the journal: 1) Fermi developed his theory of the weak interactions in 1934. However he won the 1938. Physics Nobel Prize, not for this theory, but for his discovery that neutron irradiation could create radioactive elements, and for the effects of slow neutrons.

  1. Vibrotactile masking experiments reveal accelerated somatosensory processing in congenitally blind braille readers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharjee, Arindam; Ye, Amanda J; Lisak, Joy A; Vargas, Maria G; Goldreich, Daniel

    2010-10-27

    Braille reading is a demanding task that requires the identification of rapidly varying tactile patterns. During proficient reading, neighboring characters impact the fingertip at ∼100 ms intervals, and adjacent raised dots within a character at 50 ms intervals. Because the brain requires time to interpret afferent sensorineural activity, among other reasons, tactile stimuli separated by such short temporal intervals pose a challenge to perception. How, then, do proficient Braille readers successfully interpret inputs arising from their fingertips at such rapid rates? We hypothesized that somatosensory perceptual consolidation occurs more rapidly in proficient Braille readers. If so, Braille readers should outperform sighted participants on masking tasks, which demand rapid perceptual processing, but would not necessarily outperform the sighted on tests of simple vibrotactile sensitivity. To investigate, we conducted two-interval forced-choice vibrotactile detection, amplitude discrimination, and masking tasks on the index fingertips of 89 sighted and 57 profoundly blind humans. Sighted and blind participants had similar unmasked detection (25 ms target tap) and amplitude discrimination (compared with 100 μm reference tap) thresholds, but congenitally blind Braille readers, the fastest readers among the blind participants, exhibited significantly less masking than the sighted (masker, 50 Hz, 50 μm; target-masker delays, ±50 and ±100 ms). Indeed, Braille reading speed correlated significantly and specifically with masking task performance, and in particular with the backward masking decay time constant. We conclude that vibrotactile sensitivity is unchanged but that perceptual processing is accelerated in congenitally blind Braille readers.

  2. The Relationship between FL Reading Strategies and FL Reading Proficiency: A Study on Turkish EFL Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gönen, Ipek Kuru

    2015-01-01

    Reading in FL possesses certain challenges for FL readers such as difficulty in inferring underlying messages in texts and dealing with unfamiliar cultural load. All these challenges may be associated with FL learners' reading proficiency and their use of FL reading strategies especially while reading academic materials. This study aims at…

  3. Some Functions and Uses of Literacy in the Deaf Community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maxwell, Madeline

    1985-01-01

    Analyzes the ways writing is used among the deaf and between deaf and hearing communicators by four groups; deaf adults who sign, families in which parents are hearing and at least one child is deaf, families in which parents are deaf and children are hearing or deaf, and deaf and hearing schoolteachers. (SED)

  4. NaturalReader: A New Generation Text Reader

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flood, Jacqueline

    2007-01-01

    NaturalReader (http://www.naturalreaders.com/) is a new generation text reader, which means that it reads any machine readable text using synthesized speech without having to copy and paste the selected text into the NaturalReader application window. It installs a toolbar directly into all of the Microsoft Office[TM] programs and uses a mini-board…

  5. : A Critical Reader

    OpenAIRE

    Fassin, Didier; Lézé, Samuel

    2013-01-01

    This Reader is the first anthology to cover the growing field of moral anthropology and will be an essential resource for students and scholars interested in exploring the important issues involved. Morality and ethics are increasingly invoked in the most diverse domains, from politics to economics, from war to sexuality, from international justice to biological research. To interpret this phenomenon from a critical standpoint, anthropology offers unique perspectives. This volume includes cla...

  6. Crash course in readers' advisory

    CERN Document Server

    Orr, Cynthia

    2014-01-01

    One of the key services librarians provide is helping readers find books they'll enjoy. This ""crash course"" will furnish you with the basic, practical information you need to excel at readers' advisory (RA) for adults and teens.

  7. Perceived Stress among Deaf Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Elaine G.; Ouellette, Sue E.; Kang, Youngmi

    2006-01-01

    The Present Article describes the effectiveness of stress management classes in decreasing perceived stress among Deaf adults. Deaf adults may experience unique stressors, in addition to circumstances associated with increased stress in the general population. The Perceived Stress Scale (S. Cohen, Kamarck, & Mermelstein, 1983) was used as a…

  8. Identity development in deaf adolescents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kunnen, E. Saskia

    2014-01-01

    We studied identity development during 5 years in 11 deaf adolescents who attend a school for deaf children in the highest level of regular secondary education (age between 14 and 19 years). Identity development is conceptualized by the processes of exploration and commitment formation, as

  9. Overview on Deaf-Blindness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miles, Barbara

    2008-01-01

    It may seem that deaf-blindness refers to a total inability to see or hear. However, in reality deaf-blindness is a condition in which the combination of hearing and visual losses in children cause "such severe communication and other develop mental and educational needs that they cannot be accommodated in special education programs solely for…

  10. Anger communication in deaf children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rieffe, C.J.; Meerum Terwogt, M.

    2006-01-01

    In this study, we investigated how deaf children express their anger towards peers and with what intentions. Eleven-year-old deaf children (n = 21) and a hearing control group (n = 36) were offered four vignettes describing anger-evoking conflict situations with peers. Children were asked how they

  11. Social Connectedness of Deaf Retirees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Sherry; Roberson, Len

    2013-01-01

    The intergenerational connectedness that has traditionally bound members of the Deaf community to each other is changing amidst the current technological and cultural landscape. This study explores perceptions of Deaf retirees concerning their usefulness to younger generations and their need to stay connected to each other despite increasing…

  12. Are Deaf Students Visual Learners?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marschark, Marc; Morrison, Carolyn; Lukomski, Jennifer; Borgna, Georgianna; Convertino, Carol

    2013-01-01

    It is frequently assumed that by virtue of their hearing losses, deaf students are visual learners. Deaf individuals have some visual-spatial advantages relative to hearing individuals, but most have been linked to use of sign language rather than auditory deprivation. How such cognitive differences might affect academic performance has been…

  13. Programs for the Deaf-Blind.

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Annals of the Deaf, 1991

    1991-01-01

    This directory lists contact information for programs for the deaf-blind in the United States in 3 categories: (1) programs for deaf-blind children and youth (29 programs listed); (2) Helen Keller National Center for Deaf-Blind Youth and Adults (1 national and 10 regional offices); and (3) programs for training teachers of the deaf-blind (4…

  14. Proficiency Effect on L2 Pragmatic Competence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Feng

    2015-01-01

    This paper synthesizes cross-sectional studies of the effect of proficiency on second language (L2) pragmatics to answer the synthesis question: Does proficiency affect adult learners' pragmatic competence? Findings have revealed an overall positive proficiency effect on pragmatic competence, and in most cases higher proficiency learners have…

  15. Are Deaf Students Visual Learners?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marschark, Marc; Morrison, Carolyn; Lukomski, Jennifer; Borgna, Georgianna; Convertino, Carol

    2013-01-01

    It is frequently assumed that by virtue of their hearing losses, deaf students are visual learners. Deaf individuals have some visual-spatial advantages relative to hearing individuals, but most have been are linked to use of sign language rather than auditory deprivation. How such cognitive differences might affect academic performance has been investigated only rarely. This study examined relations among deaf college students’ language and visual-spatial abilities, mathematics problem solving, and hearing thresholds. Results extended some previous findings and clarified others. Contrary to what might be expected, hearing students exhibited visual-spatial skills equal to or better than deaf students. Scores on a Spatial Relations task were associated with better mathematics problem solving. Relations among the several variables, however, suggested that deaf students are no more likely to be visual learners than hearing students and that their visual-spatial skill may be related more to their hearing than to sign language skills. PMID:23750095

  16. Fostering Positive Deaf Identity Development in a K-2 Deaf Classroom /

    OpenAIRE

    Hipskind, Courtney

    2014-01-01

    All Deaf children deserve to have opportunities to openly explore, examine, and affirm their own Deaf identities at school, yet there is a shortage of curricula and resources dedicated to this basic need. The aim of this thesis is to provide Deaf children with such opportunities. The curriculum within- Fostering Deaf Identity Development in a K-2 Deaf Classroom- consists of two units that address positive Deaf identity formation. The first unit focuses on the characterization and affirmation ...

  17. Computer proficiency questionnaire: assessing low and high computer proficient seniors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boot, Walter R; Charness, Neil; Czaja, Sara J; Sharit, Joseph; Rogers, Wendy A; Fisk, Arthur D; Mitzner, Tracy; Lee, Chin Chin; Nair, Sankaran

    2015-06-01

    Computers and the Internet have the potential to enrich the lives of seniors and aid in the performance of important tasks required for independent living. A prerequisite for reaping these benefits is having the skills needed to use these systems, which is highly dependent on proper training. One prerequisite for efficient and effective training is being able to gauge current levels of proficiency. We developed a new measure (the Computer Proficiency Questionnaire, or CPQ) to measure computer proficiency in the domains of computer basics, printing, communication, Internet, calendaring software, and multimedia use. Our aim was to develop a measure appropriate for individuals with a wide range of proficiencies from noncomputer users to extremely skilled users. To assess the reliability and validity of the CPQ, a diverse sample of older adults, including 276 older adults with no or minimal computer experience, was recruited and asked to complete the CPQ. The CPQ demonstrated excellent reliability (Cronbach's α = .98), with subscale reliabilities ranging from .86 to .97. Age, computer use, and general technology use all predicted CPQ scores. Factor analysis revealed three main factors of proficiency related to Internet and e-mail use; communication and calendaring; and computer basics. Based on our findings, we also developed a short-form CPQ (CPQ-12) with similar properties but 21 fewer questions. The CPQ and CPQ-12 are useful tools to gauge computer proficiency for training and research purposes, even among low computer proficient older adults. © The Author 2013. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. THE ETHICS OF READER

    OpenAIRE

    Guerrero Gallardo, Reynaldo

    2003-01-01

    We have long been critics of the creative work of philosophers and culture at the tender touch of his words, written or verbal, are both with the "hammer" that whoever owns the Ethics in writer-reader relationship is the first, called "comprehensive architect of the word" but inveterate dominant ideals of multiple anonymous.With this statement suggests that the second of this connection is nothing but a later, perhaps a "so and so" incognito benefits from its "home on earth", and who succeeds...

  19. Chipless RFID reader architecture

    CERN Document Server

    Karmakar, Nemai Chandra; Kalansuriya, Prasanna

    2013-01-01

    In the era of information communication technology (ICT), radio frequency identification (RFID) has been going through tremendous development. RFID technology has the potential of replacing barcodes due to its large information carrying capacity, flexibility in operations, and applications. The deployment of RFID has been hindered by its cost. However, with the advent of low powered ICs, energy scavenging techniques, and low-cost chipless tags, RFID technology has achieved significant development. This book addresses the new reader architecture, presents fundamentals of chipless RFID systems,

  20. Fingerspelling as a Novel Gateway into Reading Fluency in Deaf Bilinguals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Adam; Kartheiser, Geo; Hauser, Peter C; Petitto, Laura-Ann; Allen, Thomas E

    2015-01-01

    Studies have shown that American Sign Language (ASL) fluency has a positive impact on deaf individuals' English reading, but the cognitive and cross-linguistic mechanisms permitting the mapping of a visual-manual language onto a sound-based language have yet to be elucidated. Fingerspelling, which represents English orthography with 26 distinct hand configurations, is an integral part of ASL and has been suggested to provide deaf bilinguals with important cross-linguistic links between sign language and orthography. Using a hierarchical multiple regression analysis, this study examined the relationship of age of ASL exposure, ASL fluency, and fingerspelling skill on reading fluency in deaf college-age bilinguals. After controlling for ASL fluency, fingerspelling skill significantly predicted reading fluency, revealing for the first-time that fingerspelling, above and beyond ASL skills, contributes to reading fluency in deaf bilinguals. We suggest that both fingerspelling--in the visual-manual modality--and reading--in the visual-orthographic modality--are mutually facilitating because they share common underlying cognitive capacities of word decoding accuracy and automaticity of word recognition. The findings provide support for the hypothesis that the development of English reading proficiency may be facilitated through strengthening of the relationship among fingerspelling, sign language, and orthographic decoding en route to reading mastery, and may also reveal optimal approaches for reading instruction for deaf and hard of hearing children.

  1. Early Interactions with Children Who Are Deaf-Blind

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Topics About Deaf-Blindness > What is Deaf-Blindness Definitions of Deaf-Blindness Causes of Deaf-Blindness National Child Count & Demographics Communication > Communication Overview Early Communication Prelinguistic Communication Object Communication ...

  2. HSP and deafness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donkervoort, Sandra; Bharucha-Goebel, Diana; Yun, Pomi; Hu, Ying; Mohassel, Payam; Hoke, Ahmet; Zein, Wadih M.; Ezzo, Daniel; Atherton, Andrea M.; Modrcin, Ann C.; Dasouki, Majed; Foley, A. Reghan

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To identify the underlying genetic cause in 2 sisters affected with progressive lower extremity spasticity, neuropathy, and early-onset deafness. Methods: Whole-exome sequencing was performed, and segregation testing of variants was investigated using targeted Sanger sequencing. An inherited paternal mosaic mutation was further evaluated through quantitative analysis of the ratio of mutant vs wild-type allele in genomic DNA from various tissues, including blood, dermal fibroblasts, and saliva. Results: A novel heterozygous nonsense mutation (c.1140C>A; p.Y380X) in SOX10 was identified in the affected sisters. Paternal mosaicism was suspected based on a small chromatogram peak, which was less than the heterozygous peak of the mutated allele. Consistent with mosaicism, the mosaic paternal samples had notable variability in the ratio of mutant vs wild-type allele in various tissues (compared with the fully heterozygous daughter), with the highest paternal mutant levels in saliva (32.7%) and lowest in dermal fibroblasts (13.9%). Targeted clinical re-examination of the father revealed a sensorimotor neuropathy that was previously clinically unrecognized. Conclusions: These findings expand the phenotypic spectrum of SOX10-related neurocristopathy. Mutations in SOX10 should be considered in patients presenting with a complicated form of hereditary spastic paraplegia that includes neuropathy and deafness. Diagnostic workup may be complicated, as SOX10 mutations can present in a mosaic state, with a mild clinical manifestation. PMID:28534044

  3. Deaf not Daft: The Deaf in Mental Subnormality Hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Chris

    1982-01-01

    Case studies of deaf or hearing impaired persons in institutions for the mentally retarded illustrate the ways in which the "invisible handicap" can mask cognitive ability, causing unnecessary institutionalization. (CL)

  4. Acceptability judgments still matter: Deafness and documentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Matthew L; Mayberry, Rachel I; Ferreira, Victor S

    2017-01-01

    The target article's call to end reliance on acceptability judgments is premature. First, it restricts syntactic inquiry to cases were a semantically equivalent alternative is available. Second, priming studies require groups of participants who are linguistically homogenous and whose grammar is known to the researcher. These requirements would eliminate two major research areas: syntactic competence in d/Deaf individuals, and language documentation. (We follow the convention of using deaf to describe hearing levels, Deaf to describe cultural identity, and d/Deaf to include both. Our own work has focused on Deaf signers, but the same concerns could apply to other deaf populations.).

  5. Language proficiency and nursing registration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Amanda

    2016-02-01

    This discussion paper focuses on English proficiency standards for nursing registration in Australia, how Australia has dealt with the issue of language proficiency, and the factors which have led to the establishment of the current language standards. Also, this paper will provide a comparison of the two language tests that are currently accepted in Australia (OET and IELTS), including the appropriateness of these tests and the minimum standards used. The paper will also examine the use of educational background as an indicator of language proficiency. Finally, communication-based complaints in the post-registration environment will be explored, and some discussion will be provided about why pre-registration measures might have failed to prevent such problematic situations from occurring. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Teaching manual communication to preservice teachers of the deaf in an accredited comprehensive undergraduate teacher preparation program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman, Carol A

    2006-01-01

    NOTING THAT there are no standardized manual communication curricula or proficiency assessments available to teacher preparation programs, the author used a case study to describe how preservice teachers of the deaf are taught to incorporate American Sign Language and various forms of signed English as effective communication tools for students who are deaf and hard of hearing. An accredited undergraduate teacher preparation program located in a rural area was selected for the study. Eight curricular components were examined, and data were triangulated from observations, interviews, and document analyses. The author found (a) that manual communication was taught in three required courses making up 6.57% of the overall curriculum, (b) direct application to the classroom was limited, and (c) there was minor misalignment across the eight curricular components examined. The program did not require an exit-level proficiency exam.

  7. Becoming a Reader: Significant Social Influences on Avid Book Readers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merga, Margaret K.

    2017-01-01

    Understanding how social influences can foster avid book reader identification is a key research goal that warrants further investigation beyond a limited early-years lens. The author's 2015 International Study of Avid Book Readers (ISABR) explored, as one of its key research questions, the influence positive social agents can have on avid book…

  8. Hearing, Deaf, and Hard-of-Hearing Israeli Adolescents' Evaluations of Deaf Men and Deaf Women's Occupational Competence

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Amatzia Weisel; Rachel Gali Cinamon

    2005-01-01

    This study examined 74 deaf and hard-of-hearing (D/HH) and 91 hearing high school students regarding their own occupational aspirations and their evaluations of occupational competence (EOCs) for deaf adults...

  9. What We Should Teach Deaf Children: Deaf Teachers' Folk Models in Britain, the USA and Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutton-Spence, Rachel; Ramsey, Claire

    2010-01-01

    Deaf teachers around the world have folk models and beliefs that reflect their understanding of what deaf children need to learn in order to develop healthy identities as deaf people. In this research we report what teachers from England, the USA and Mexico have told us about using creative signing with deaf children. Themes emerging from our data…

  10. Deaf Liberation Theology and Social Justice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hannah Lewis

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Deaf Liberation Theology is a branch of theology that has been developed over the past twenty years, with the book Deaf Liberation Theology published by Ashgate in 2007 (Lewis 2007 as a focal point of this development. This article briefly looks at the roots of Deaf Liberation Theology in both the concept of Deaf people as an oppressed linguistic minority and the principles of Liberation theology as an engaged contextual theology using the methodology of the hermeneutical circle. It then seeks to examine the impact of Deaf Liberation Theology in practice over the past decade, in particular the impact especially through increasing self-confidence and self-esteem so that deaf people themselves feel empowered to work for social justice. It will use personal reflections by a number of deaf individuals in the UK as source material, and look at how this experience and developments in Deaf studies might develop into the future to further develop social justice.

  11. The Routledge Applied Linguistics Reader

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Li, Ed.

    2011-01-01

    "The Routledge Applied Linguistics Reader" is an essential collection of readings for students of Applied Linguistics. Divided into five sections: Language Teaching and Learning, Second Language Acquisition, Applied Linguistics, Identity and Power and Language Use in Professional Contexts, the "Reader" takes a broad…

  12. Proficiency and the Bilingual Lexicon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woutersen, Mirjam; And Others

    A study investigated lexical decision-making among Dutch-English bilinguals in the auditory modality. Subjects, bilinguals at three proficiency levels (intermediate, high, and near-native) were presented with 40 cognate and 40 non-cognate word pairs, a similar number of English and Dutch distractors, and a similar number of nonsense words in each…

  13. A French Speaking Proficiency Test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pimsleur, Paul

    An attempt to test students objectively in a five-part, French, speaking proficiency test is described and discussed. Concrete nouns, abstract words, pronunciation, syntax, and fluency are tested with a combination of tape and picture stimuli. Reliability, validity, and practical questions are raised; and previous aural-oral testing procedures are…

  14. Second Language Proficiency Assessment and Program Evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunan, David

    A discussion of the role of second language proficiency assessment in the evaluation of language programs argues that for four reasons, the use of proficiency is inappropriate as a central element in evaluation. The reasons are: (1) the construct of proficiency has not been operationalized in a way that enables it to be used usefully; (2)…

  15. Professor's Page: Is Understanding a Proficiency?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Askew, Mike

    2012-01-01

    The everyday use of "proficient" carries connotations of having reached a level of expertise. One would not describe someone stumbling through a rendition of "Chopsticks" as a proficient piano player; but novice pianists work on musical proficiencies--practicing scales or playing a polka--in parallel. They do not put off…

  16. Films about the deaf: the representations of deaf and sign languages

    OpenAIRE

    Carolina Hessel Silveira

    2009-01-01

    This paper analyzes two films about deafness which have not been investigated in the Brazilian academic context. They are Mandy (directed by Alexander Mackendrick, 1952, England) and After the Silence (by Fred Gerber, 1996, USA). The analysis is supported by Cultural Studies and Deaf Studies, especially on the concepts of cultural pedagogies, deaf culture, deaf identities, sign language, as well as on the analysis of other films about deaf people conducted by Thoma (2004). Both films are clas...

  17. Telehealth and the Deaf: A Comparison Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Jaime A. B.; Wells, M. Gawain

    2009-01-01

    Within the deaf population, an extreme mental health professional shortage exists that may be alleviated with videoconferencing technology--also known as telehealth. Moreover, much needed mental health education within the deaf population remains largely inaccessible. Researchers have warned that the deaf population may remain underserved if…

  18. Deaf child sexual education and family leadership

    OpenAIRE

    García, Mirna Maura

    2010-01-01

    This paper is an approach to the study of the role of the family in sexual education of deaf children and adolescents. The difference between hearing and deaf families is taken into consideration. Likewise, hints that favor communication between deaf children and hearing parents are given.

  19. Deaf Parents and Their Hearing Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singleton, Jenny L.; Tittle, Matthew D.

    2000-01-01

    This literature review begins with a description of the deaf community, their language and culture; then describes communication patterns and parenting issues in deaf-parented families; examines the role of the hearing child in a deaf family and how that affects their functioning in the hearing world; and finally discusses considerations and…

  20. Deaf child sexual education and family leadership

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    García, Mirna Maura

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper is an approach to the study of the role of the family in sexual education of deaf children and adolescents. The difference between hearing and deaf families is taken into consideration. Likewise, hints that favor communication between deaf children and hearing parents are given.

  1. Development of Deaf Identity: An Ethnographic Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIlroy, Guy; Storbeck, Claudine

    2011-01-01

    This ethnographic study explores the identity development of 9 deaf participants through the narratives of their educational experiences in either mainstream or special schools for the Deaf. This exploration goes beyond a binary conceptualization of deaf identity that allows for only the medical and social models and proposes a bicultural…

  2. Representations of Sound in American Deaf Literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosen, Russell S.

    2007-01-01

    Sound plays a prominent role in narrative description of characters and environs in mainstream American literature. A review of American Deaf literature shows that the representations of sound held for deaf writers are in extensional and oppositional terms. American deaf writers, in their descriptions of entities, characters, functions, and…

  3. No Dummies: Deafness, Baseball, and American Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, R. A. R.

    2012-01-01

    This article begins by examining the historical and social factors that led to 1901 being the "deafest" year in major league baseball history with four deaf players. In particular, the author discusses the career of William Ellsworth "Dummy" Hoy, a deaf man from Ohio who became the most celebrated deaf player in history and…

  4. Teaching deaf learners. Psychological and developmental foundations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Knoors, H.E.T.; Marschark, M.

    2014-01-01

    Teaching Deaf Learners: Psychological and Developmental Foundations explores how deaf students (children and adolescents) learn and the conditions that support their reaching their full cognitive potential -- or not. Beginning with an introduction to teaching and learning of both deaf and hearing

  5. Vocational Evaluation of Severely Disabled Deaf Clients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Douglas

    Research and practice in deafness rehabilitation show that evaluation services for severely disabled deaf clients can best be provided within a "total adjustment environment" which incorporates a number of special program considerations associated with the evaluation of deaf clients. Four of these considerations are (1) a rehabilitation…

  6. Family Therapy with Deaf Member Families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sloman, Leon; And Others

    1987-01-01

    Examines how family therapists can be more responsive to the unique needs and problems of deaf family members. Compares methods of training in communication for deaf children, addressing the conflicts that may accompany the adoption of a given method. Stresses the pivotal role of communication problems between hearing and deaf family members in…

  7. Pages from the Past: Causes of Deafness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, W. W.

    1997-01-01

    This reprint of an historical article from 1847 discusses the principal causes of congenital deafness, including constitutional tendency to deafness in the parents, mental impressions of the mother previous to the birth of her child, and intermarriage of near relations. Causes of accidental deafness are also discussed, including injuries from…

  8. The Relationship between Multiple Intelligence Profiles and Reading Strategy Use of Successful English as a Foreign Language (EFL) Readers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iyitoglu, Orhan; Aydin, Hasan

    2015-01-01

    This study relied on Sheorey and Mokhtari's (2001) metacognitive knowledge about reading strategies,which was influenced by a number of factors, including previous experiences, beliefs, culture-specific instructional practices and proficiency in a second language (L2). This study is thereby built on the premise that EFL readers' metacognitive…

  9. Deafness and motor abilities level

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Zwierzchowska

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available The audition injury hinders some motor motions and the organised coordination at the higher level and may be a cause of disturbances and disorder in some motor abilities adoption. It was assumed that deafness including its aetiology and injury mechanism may significantly influence the motor development of human being. The study aimed in checking if the deafness, as a result of various unfavourable factors, determines the motor development of children and youngsters. Consequently the dependency between qualitative features i.e.: signed motor level and aetiology, audition injury mechanism and the deafness degree was examined. The mechanism and aetiology of hearing correlated with the motor abilities displayed statistically significant dependencies in few motor trials only. Revealed correlations regarded mostly the coordination trials excluding the flexibility one. Statistically significant dependencies between the audition diminution and the motor abilities level were not found.

  10. How orthographic transparency affects morphological processing in young readers with and without reading disability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lázaro, Miguel; García, Laura; Burani, Cristina

    2015-10-01

    This study investigates how orthographic modifications to the stems of complex words affect morphological processing in proficient young Spanish readers and children with reading deficits. In a definition task all children, irrespective of their reading skill, were worse at defining derived words that had an orthographic alteration of the base stem than words with no orthographic alteration. In a go/no-go lexical decision task, an interaction between base frequency and orthographic alteration was found: base frequency affected derived words with no orthographic alteration more than words with alterations, irrespective of reading skill. Overall, results show that all children benefit from a high frequency base, skilled children outperform children with reading deficits and morphological processing is affected by orthographic alterations similarly in proficient and impaired readers. © 2015 Scandinavian Psychological Associations and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Deaf children learning to sign

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jim Kyle

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available It used to be thought that deaf children had a language difficulty. Research we have carried out on deaf children in deaf families from the age of three months, indicates that deaf children learn sign language as effectively as hearing children learn to speak. In contrast, deaf children from hearing homes, even in signing programmes at school lag behind in the acquisition of sign language even up to the age of 11 years. Some initial intervention work has been carried out with families to introduce sign language earlier and several possible means of improving the language environment of deaf children are explored in this paper. Costumava-se pensar que as crianças surdas tinham dificuldade de linguagem. Uma pesquisa que realizamos com crianças surdas, de famílias surdas, a partir de 3 meses de idade, indica que crianças surdas aprendem a língua de sinais tão eficazmente quanto crianças ouvintes aprendem a falar. Em contraste, crianças surdas, de lares ouvintes, mesmo estando em programas para o aprendizado de sinais na escola, ficam atrás na aquisição da língua de sinais até a idade de 11 anos de idade. Alguns trabalhos iniciais de intervenção, que têm sido realizados com as famílias para introduzir a língua de sinais mais cedo, bem como vários meios possíveis de enriquecer o meio lingüístico de crianças surdas são explorados nesse artigo.

  12. Motor Proficiency in Young Children

    OpenAIRE

    Fotini Venetsanou; Antonis Kambas

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to examine motor proficiency in young children, focusing on potential gender differences. For that purpose, the Bruininks-Oseretsky Test of Motor Proficiency–Long Form (BOTMP-LF) was administered to 540 children (272 boys), 4½ to 6 years old. First, the 2 (sex) × 4 (age groups) ANOVA computed on children’s total BOTMP-LF scores showed that age had a statistically significant effect, whereas gender did ...

  13. Measuring with the spiral reader

    CERN Multimedia

    1974-01-01

    The spiral reader shown here was at the time, together with the Shivamatic scanning system, the basic equipment used for measuring bubble chamber pictures. Anne Anton sits at the table. (See Photo Archive 7408343.)

  14. Chinese Writing of Deaf or Hard-of-Hearing Students and Normal-Hearing Peers from Complex Network Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Huiyuan; Liu, Haitao

    2016-01-01

    Deaf or hard-of-hearing individuals usually face a greater challenge to learn to write than their normal-hearing counterparts. Due to the limitations of traditional research methods focusing on microscopic linguistic features, a holistic characterization of the writing linguistic features of these language users is lacking. This study attempts to fill this gap by adopting the methodology of linguistic complex networks. Two syntactic dependency networks are built in order to compare the macroscopic linguistic features of deaf or hard-of-hearing students and those of their normal-hearing peers. One is transformed from a treebank of writing produced by Chinese deaf or hard-of-hearing students, and the other from a treebank of writing produced by their Chinese normal-hearing counterparts. Two major findings are obtained through comparison of the statistical features of the two networks. On the one hand, both linguistic networks display small-world and scale-free network structures, but the network of the normal-hearing students' exhibits a more power-law-like degree distribution. Relevant network measures show significant differences between the two linguistic networks. On the other hand, deaf or hard-of-hearing students tend to have a lower language proficiency level in both syntactic and lexical aspects. The rigid use of function words and a lower vocabulary richness of the deaf or hard-of-hearing students may partially account for the observed differences.

  15. Chinese Writing of Deaf or Hard-of-Hearing Students and Normal-Hearing Peers from Complex Network Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Huiyuan; Liu, Haitao

    2016-01-01

    Deaf or hard-of-hearing individuals usually face a greater challenge to learn to write than their normal-hearing counterparts. Due to the limitations of traditional research methods focusing on microscopic linguistic features, a holistic characterization of the writing linguistic features of these language users is lacking. This study attempts to fill this gap by adopting the methodology of linguistic complex networks. Two syntactic dependency networks are built in order to compare the macroscopic linguistic features of deaf or hard-of-hearing students and those of their normal-hearing peers. One is transformed from a treebank of writing produced by Chinese deaf or hard-of-hearing students, and the other from a treebank of writing produced by their Chinese normal-hearing counterparts. Two major findings are obtained through comparison of the statistical features of the two networks. On the one hand, both linguistic networks display small-world and scale-free network structures, but the network of the normal-hearing students' exhibits a more power-law-like degree distribution. Relevant network measures show significant differences between the two linguistic networks. On the other hand, deaf or hard-of-hearing students tend to have a lower language proficiency level in both syntactic and lexical aspects. The rigid use of function words and a lower vocabulary richness of the deaf or hard-of-hearing students may partially account for the observed differences. PMID:27920733

  16. Health literacy and the disenfranchised: the importance of collaboration between limited English proficiency and health literacy researchers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKee, Michael M; Paasche-Orlow, Michael K

    2012-01-01

    Inadequate health literacy and limited English proficiency are associated with poor health care access and outcomes. Despite what appears to be an interaction phenomenon--whereby the rate of inadequate health literacy is particularly high among limited English proficiency populations--researchers in health literacy and limited English proficiency rarely collaborate. As a result, few health literacy instruments and interventions have been developed or validated for smaller linguistic populations. Interventions to improve health outcomes for people with low health literacy and limited English proficiency show great potential to alleviate many of the health disparities currently experienced by some of the most disenfranchised individuals in our health care system, those from smaller linguistic minority groups, including Deaf American Sign Language users. It is critical for health literacy and limited English proficiency researchers to work together to understand how culture, language, literacy, education, and disabilities influence health disparities and health outcomes. It is important to ensure that research is collaborative and inclusive in order to broaden the reach of future interventions to smaller linguistic minority populations.

  17. Readers Theatre: A different approach to English for struggling readers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ion Drew

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available This article presents a study of the use of Readers Theatre in English lessons with groups of academically-challenged pupils in a Norwegian lower secondary school. The study is based on the teacher’s logs, interviews with the teacher, a questionnaire answered by the pupils, and lesson observations. Readers Theatre, a group reading activity that can be used with a wide range of texts, was successfully incorporated into the curriculum with relatively small ‘fordypning’ (specialisation groups in English. These pupils had opted for more English lessons instead of learning a second foreign language. Most of them struggled with English as their first foreign language and were struggling readers. However, the majority of the pupils experienced Readers Theatre as both enjoyable and educational. The experience had a positive effect on their confidence and motivation to read. It also helped to improve their reading fluency and accuracy, for example pronunciation, and facilitated growth in vocabulary. The experience of practising and performing as a group was especially satisfying and motivating for the pupils involved. The majority were keen to participate in other Readers Theatre projects.

  18. Chinese Writing of Deaf or Hard-of-hearing Students and Normal-hearing Peers from Complex Network Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huiyuan Jin

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Deaf or hard-of-hearing individuals usually face a greater challenge to learn to write than their normal-hearing counterparts, because sign language is the primary communicative skills for many deaf people. The current body of research only covers the detailed linguistic features of deaf or hard-of-hearing students. Due to the limitations of traditional research methods focusing on microscopic linguistic features, a holistic characterization of the writing linguistic features of these language users is lacking. This study attempts to fill this gap by adopting the methodology of linguistic complex networks. Two syntactic dependency networks in order to compare the macroscopic linguistic features of deaf or hard-of-hearing students and those of their normal-hearing peers. One is transformed from a treebank of writing produced by Chinese deaf or hard-of-hearing students, and the other from a treebank of writing produced by their Chinese normal-hearing counterparts. Two major findings are obtained through comparison of the statistical features of the two networks. On the one hand, both linguistic networks display small-world and scale-free network structures, but the network of the normal-hearing students’ exhibits a more power-law-like degree distribution. Relevant network measures show significant differences between the two linguistic networks. On the other hand, deaf or hard-of-hearing students tend to have a lower language proficiency level in both syntactic and lexical aspects. The rigid use of function words and a lower vocabulary richness of the deaf or hard-of-hearing students may partially account for the observed differences.

  19. Outcomes of cochlear implantation in deaf children of deaf parents: comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassanzadeh, S

    2012-10-01

    This retrospective study compared the cochlear implantation outcomes of first- and second-generation deaf children. The study group consisted of seven deaf, cochlear-implanted children with deaf parents. An equal number of deaf children with normal-hearing parents were selected by matched sampling as a reference group. Participants were matched based on onset and severity of deafness, duration of deafness, age at cochlear implantation, duration of cochlear implantation, gender, and cochlear implant model. We used the Persian Auditory Perception Test for the Hearing Impaired, the Speech Intelligibility Rating scale, and the Sentence Imitation Test, in order to measure participants' speech perception, speech production and language development, respectively. Both groups of children showed auditory and speech development. However, the second-generation deaf children (i.e. deaf children of deaf parents) exceeded the cochlear implantation performance of the deaf children with hearing parents. This study confirms that second-generation deaf children exceed deaf children of hearing parents in terms of cochlear implantation performance. Encouraging deaf children to communicate in sign language from a very early age, before cochlear implantation, appears to improve their ability to learn spoken language after cochlear implantation.

  20. Deaf Community Mobilization in Uruguay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lockwood, Elizabeth

    2010-01-01

    There are more than 50 million (or approximately 15%) persons with disabilities living in Latin America and the Caribbean: 80 percent live in impoverished conditions, lack employment, and encounter social exclusion. Deaf and hard of hearing persons are particularly impacted as they are frequently denied access to most sectors of society. This…

  1. Considerations on Deafness and Homosexuality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phaneuf, Jean

    1987-01-01

    The article reviews the literature and discusses emotions, attitudes, and general reactions toward homosexuality in deaf individuals. The "coming out" process is discussed, with related social, familial, and personal implications, as well as the role of professional counseling and intervention. (Author/DB)

  2. Deafness and Autistic Spectrum Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vernon, McCay; Rhodes, Anthony

    2009-01-01

    An orientation to autistic spectrum disorders (ASD), also known as autism, is provided, and the specific syndrome of autism and deafness is addressed. The two conditions have in common a major problem: communication. Case histories are provided, the development of treatment for autism is discussed, and the separate disorders that make up ASD are…

  3. Writing in Young Deaf Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Cheri; Mayer, Connie

    2015-01-01

    The authors conducted an integrative review of the research literature on the writing development, writing instruction, and writing assessment of young deaf children ages 3 to 8 years (or preschool through third grade) published between 1990 and 2012. A total of 17 studies were identified that met inclusion criteria. The analysis examined research…

  4. Interpreting Hymns for Deaf Worshippers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maxwell, Madeline M.; Boster, Shirley

    1982-01-01

    Discusses the special problems of interpreting hymns written in archaic English and then matching words of a translation to music. Addresses the question of whether competence in ASL and knowledge of signs for religious terms are sufficient for hymns to be of value to deaf worshippers. (EKN)

  5. The Consequence Deafness has on the Psychological and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Consequence Deafness has on the Psychological and Academic Development of deaf students. The case of Alpha special school for the deaf in Addis Ababa, Hermata and Mendera Junior School at Jimma Town.

  6. Aesthetics of reception, Jauss, implied reader and actual reader.

    OpenAIRE

    Jefferson Cleiton de Souza

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to discuss how Hans Robert Jauss, the creator of the aesthetics of reception, has introduced the category of the reader into the literary studies especially when it comes to the importance of the reader to the understanding of the text, and to the history of a society and its literary system or, in other words to the way the formal elements of a literary work are organized and how they are related to aesthetic, ethic and moral evaluations. To do so, it is necessary to...

  7. Toward a theory of deaf ethnos: deafnicity -- D/deaf (Homaemon - Homoglosson - Homothreskon).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckert, Richard Clark

    2010-01-01

    Should ethnicity be used to interpret relations between the Deaf community and the hearing people? Recent scholarship questioning the merits of Deaf ethnicity suggests a need to reexamine the use of ethnicity when describing Deaf identity and culture. This article provides an overview of key contributions to race and ethnicity discourse in the 20th century, identifies epistemological and ontological errors to avoid, suggests adherence to the classical Greek concept of ethnos as an alternative to ethnie, and argues for the continuing significance of Deaf ethnicity. Specifically, I propose that Deaf ethnicity is a triadic relational nexus that approximates communities of origin, language, and religion. This is expressed as Deafnicity approximately D/deaf (Hómaemon * Homóglosson * Homóthreskon). Deafnicity offers a promising alternative for examining relations between Deaf and hearing communities, exploring variance between nationalized Deaf communities, and expanding our understanding of audism.

  8. Postural Control in Deaf Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amir-Abbas Ebrahimi

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available This cross-sectional study aimed to determine the reliability of static control evaluation with Synapsys Posturography System (SPS, Marseille, France and to compare the static postural control of deaf children with typically developing children. This study was conducted in 2 phases on 81 children of 7 to 12 years old in Tehran schools. The first phase examined the reliability of static balance evaluation with SPS. In this phase, a total of 12 children with typical development were evaluated and then do a re-test 1 week later. In the second phase, 30 children with profound sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL and high risk in their balance (selected from Baghcheban Schools for the Deaf as the experimental group, and 37 children with typical development (selected randomly from 2 primary schools for girls and boys in District 12 of Tehran Department of Education as control group were enrolled in the study. They were all placed under sensory organization test evaluation. Based on the results of intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC, the unilateral random effects model, test-retest reliability in different sensory conditions, the moderate to excellent results were obtained (ICC between 0.68 and 0.94. Also, the mean displacement of pressure center in all sensory conditions, the limits of stability (LOS area, the overall balance scores, and scores for balance sensory ratio (except the somatosensory ratio of children with typical development were better than the deaf peers (P˂0.05. The SPS has acceptable reliability to evaluate static posture in children between the ages of 7 and 12 years. Furthermore, deaf children as compared to children with typical development had a lower static postural control in all sensory conditions. This finding confirms the need to examine the postural control for identifying the extent of sensory deficit that has caused poor balance function, and also the need for early intervention to address the balance deficit in deaf

  9. Speech reading and learning to read: a comparison of 8-year-old profoundly deaf children with good and poor reading ability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Margaret; Moreno, Constanza

    2006-01-01

    Nine children with severe-profound prelingual hearing loss and single-word reading scores not more than 10 months behind chronological age (Good Readers) were matched with 9 children whose reading lag was at least 15 months (Poor Readers). Good Readers had significantly higher spelling and reading comprehension scores. They produced significantly more phonetic errors (indicating the use of phonological coding) and more often correctly represented the number of syllables in spelling than Poor Readers. They also scored more highly on orthographic awareness and were better at speech reading. Speech intelligibility was the same in the two groups. Cluster analysis revealed that only three Good Readers showed strong evidence of phonetic coding in spelling although seven had good representation of syllables; only four had high orthographic awareness scores. However, all 9 children were good speech readers, suggesting that a phonological code derived through speech reading may underpin reading success for deaf children.

  10. Suicide in deaf populations: a literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Oliver; Windfuhr, Kirsten; Kapur, Navneet

    2007-10-08

    Studies have found that deaf individuals have higher rates of psychiatric disorder than those who are hearing, while at the same time encountering difficulties in accessing mental health services. These factors might increase the risk of suicide. However, the burden of suicidal behaviour in deaf people is currently unknown. The aim of the present review was to provide a summary of literature on suicidal behaviour with specific reference to deaf individuals. The objectives of the review were to establish the incidence and prevalence of suicidal behaviour in deaf populations; describe risk factors for suicidal behaviour in deaf populations; describe approaches to intervention and suicide prevention that have been used in deaf populations. A number of electronic databases (e.g. Medline, PsycINFO, CINAHL, EMBASE, Dissertation Abstracts International, Web of Science, ComDisDome, ASSIA, Education Sage Full Text, Google Scholar, and the grey literature databases FADE and SIGLE) were explored using a combination of key words and medical subject headings as search terms. Reference lists of papers were also searched. The Science and Social Sciences Citation Index electronic databases were used to identify studies that had cited key papers. We also contacted experts and organisations with an interest in the field. Very few studies focussed specifically on suicide in deaf populations. Those studies that were included (n = 13) generally involved small and unrepresentative samples. There were limited data on the rate of suicidal behaviour in deaf people. One study reported evidence of hearing impairment in 0.2% of all suicide deaths. Another found that individuals with tinnitus seen in specialist clinics had an elevated rate of suicide compared to the general population. The rates of attempted suicide in deaf school and college students during the previous year ranged from 1.7% to 18%, with lifetime rates as high as 30%. Little evidence was found to suggest that risk factors for

  11. PROPOSING A LANGUAGE EXPERIENCE AND SELF-ASSESSMENT OF PROFICIENCY QUESTIONNAIRE FOR BILINGUAL BRAZILIAN SIGN LANGUAGE/PORTUGUESE HEARING TEACHERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ingrid FINGER

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This article presents a language experience and self-assessment of proficiency questionnaire for hearing teachers who use Brazilian Sign Language and Portuguese in their teaching practice. By focusing on hearing teachers who work in Deaf education contexts, this questionnaire is presented as a tool that may complement the assessment of linguistic skills of hearing teachers. This proposal takes into account important factors in bilingualism studies such as the importance of knowing the participant’s context with respect to family, professional and social background (KAUFMANN, 2010. This work uses as model the following questionnaires: LEAP-Q (MARIAN; BLUMENFELD; KAUSHANSKAYA, 2007, SLSCO – Sign Language Skills Classroom Observation (REEVES et al., 2000 and the Language Attitude Questionnaire (KAUFMANN, 2010, taking into consideration the different kinds of exposure to Brazilian Sign Language. The questionnaire is designed for bilingual bimodal hearing teachers who work in bilingual schools for the Deaf or who work in the specialized educational department who assistdeaf students.

  12. A Phenomenological Study of Online Learning for Deaf Students in Postsecondary Education: A Deaf Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wooten, Patricia Michelle

    2014-01-01

    This qualitative phenomenological study investigated the effects of online learning for deaf college students as opposed to the mainstream classroom setting. This study specifically analyzed the writing and reading skills of deaf students in general and the development of English literacy of prelingually deaf students and those from non-English…

  13. The Church of Deaf Sociality: Deaf Churchgoing Practices and "Sign Bread and Butter" in Bangalore, India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedner, Michele

    2014-01-01

    This article ethnographically analyzes the practices of deaf young adults in Bangalore, India. As sign language is not used by families, schools, or other institutions, the church is a crucial educational space. Churchgoing provides deaf young adults with opportunities to orient themselves toward other deaf young adults, to develop new ideas of…

  14. Toward ethical research practice with deaf participants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singleton, Jenny L; Jones, Gabrielle; Hanumantha, Shilpa

    2014-07-01

    In recent years, scholars have been critical of what they consider unethical conduct by researchers whose studies focus on members of the Deaf or signing communities. This is the first empirical study that investigates ethical concerns and recommendations from the perspective of three stakeholder groups (Deaf research participants, researchers, and Deaf studies experts). We analyzed focus group discussions using strategies from grounded theory and community-based participatory research. The themes we identified highlight the need for the broader scientific research community to include linguistically and culturally sensitive research procedures that more adequately protect the rights of Deaf research participants, as well as other marginalized groups. We address the need to increase the number of Deaf scientists and reconsider collaboration practices between Deaf and hearing researchers. © The Author(s) 2014.

  15. Inattentional deafness under dynamic musical conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Koreimann, Sabrina; Strauß, Sabine; Vitouch, Oliver

    2009-01-01

    While inattentional blindness is a modern classic in attention and perception research, analogous phenomena of inattentional deafness are less well-known. In music, inattentional deafness has never been demonstrated under controlled experimental conditions, despite of indirect evidence for related effects. We tested inattentional deafness with real music in both musicians and non-musicians. Participants listened to the first 1’50” of Richard Strauss’ Thus Spake Zarathustra, with the experimen...

  16. Suicide in deaf populations: a literature review

    OpenAIRE

    Kapur Navneet; Windfuhr Kirsten; Turner Oliver

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Background Studies have found that deaf individuals have higher rates of psychiatric disorder than those who are hearing, while at the same time encountering difficulties in accessing mental health services. These factors might increase the risk of suicide. However, the burden of suicidal behaviour in deaf people is currently unknown. The aim of the present review was to provide a summary of literature on suicidal behaviour with specific reference to deaf individuals. The objectives ...

  17. MULTIMEDIA BASED LEARNING MATERIALS FOR DEAF STUDENTS

    OpenAIRE

    Luqman Hidayat; Gunarhadi; Furqon Hidayatulloh

    2017-01-01

    Deaf students have different abilities from students who have the ability to hear a lesson at school. Barriers to hear experienced by students with hearing impairment can affect the language, academic, and social skills of deaf students. Deaf students can still obtain information from other senses that are still functioning, such as the senses of sight, touch, taste and smell or of residual hearing that still exist. In the world of education, one way to overcome this obstacle is by making mul...

  18. Stigma in Mothers of Deaf Children

    OpenAIRE

    Hossein Ebrahimi; Eissa Mohammadi; Mohammad Ali Mohammadi; Akbar Pirzadeh; Hamzeh Mahmoudi; Ismail Ansari

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: A deaf child creates a feeling of stigma in many hearing parents. Stigma in mothers can have a negative impact on a child?s treatment and rehabilitation process. Therefore, this study was conducted to evaluate the extent of stigma in mothers with deaf children. Materials and Methods: This descriptive, cross-sectional study was conducted in 2013 among 90 mothers with deaf children. The data-collection instrument included the stigma scale in the mothers of children with disabiliti...

  19. Reduced procedural motor learning in deaf individuals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justine eLévesque

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Studies in the deaf suggest that cross-modal neuroplastic changes may vary across modalities. Only a handful of studies have examined motor capacities in the profoundly deaf. These studies suggest the presence of deficits in manual dexterity and delays in movement production. As of yet, the ability to learn complex sequential motor patterns has not been explored in deaf populations. The aim of the present study was to investigate the procedural learning skills of deaf adults. A serial reaction-time task (SRTT was performed by 18 deaf subjects and 18 matched controls to investigate possible motor alteration subsequent to auditory deprivation. Deaf participants had various degrees of hearing loss. Half of the experimental group were early-deaf adults mostly using hearing aids, the remaining half were late-deaf adults using a cochlear implant. Participants carried out a repeating 12-item sequence of key presses along with random blocks containing no repeating sequence. Non-specific and sequence-specific learning was analyzed in relation to individual features related to the hearing loss. The results revealed significant differences between groups in sequence-specific learning, with deaf subjects being less efficient than controls in acquiring sequence-specific knowledge. We interpret the results in light of cross-modal plasticity and the auditory scaffolding hypothesis.

  20. Foucault and deaf education in Finland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lauri Siisiäinen

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The influence of Michel Foucault’s thinking in critical disability studies, and to social studies of deafness, can hardly be doubted. Foucault has offered valuable tools for the critical rethinking of deaf education and pedagogy with respect to normalization and disciplinary power, which are integrally related to the historical construction of deafness as deficiency and pathology by modern, medical, and psychological knowledge. This article explores the applicability and critical potential of the Foucauldian concepts of disciplinary power, surveillance, and normalization within the specific context of the history of deaf education in Finland. The article focuses on the modernization of the education of deaf children that began during the latter half of the nineteenth century in Finland, with the influence of oralism – a pedagogical discourse and deaf-education methods of German origin. Deafness was characterized as a pathology or abnormality of the most severe kind. When taken at the general level, Foucault’s well-known concepts are easily applicable to the analysis of deaf education, also in the Finnish context. However, it is argued that things become much more complex if we first examine more closely the roles played by the eye and the ear, by optic and aural experience, in these Foucauldian notions, and if we then relate this enquiry to our analysis of oralist pedagogy and deaf education.

  1. Academic Proficiency (Language and Content) and the Role of Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krashen, Stephen

    2011-01-01

    This report continues the work of Krashen and Brown (2007), developing and evaluating a set of hypotheses for the development of academic proficiency. That article defined academic proficiency as having two components: academic language proficiency and knowledge of academic content.

  2. NCES Finds States Lowered "Proficiency" Bar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viadero, Debra

    2009-01-01

    With 2014 approaching as the deadline by which states must get all their students up to "proficient" levels on state tests, a study released last week by the U.S. Department of Education's top statistics agency suggests that some states may have lowered student-proficiency standards on such tests in recent years. For the 47-state study,…

  3. Proficiency test for aflatoxin in pig feed

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elbers, I.J.W.; Nijs, de W.C.M.

    2015-01-01

    Proficiency testing is conducted to provide laboratories with a powerful tool to evaluate and demonstrate the reliability of the data that are produced. Next to validation and accreditation, proficiency testing is an important requirement of the EU Additional Measures Directive 93/99/EEC [1] and is

  4. Common Educational Proficiency Assessment (CEPA) in English

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coombe, Christine; Davidson, Peter

    2014-01-01

    The Common Educational Proficiency Assessment (CEPA) is a large-scale, high-stakes, English language proficiency/placement test administered in the United Arab Emirates to Emirati nationals in their final year of secondary education or Grade 12. The purpose of the CEPA is to place students into English classes at the appropriate government…

  5. Measuring receptive collocational competence across proficiency ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The present study investigates (i) English as Foreign Language (EFL) learners' receptive collocational knowledge growth in relation to their linguistic proficiency level; (ii) how much receptive collocational knowledge is acquired as linguistic proficiency develops; and (iii) the extent to which receptive knowledge of ...

  6. Intelligibility and Perceptions of English Proficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rooy, Susan Coetzee-Van

    2009-01-01

    More and more learners of English from the Expanding Circle are travelling to Outer Circle contexts to learn English or to improve their English proficiency. This is also the case for some Korean families who moved to Potchefstroom, South Africa. This phenomenon poses challenges in terms of assessment of English proficiency, and emphasizes the…

  7. Language proficiency: Current strategies, future remedies ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Language proficiency among young South Africans is low. This is true not only of mother tongue speakers of English and Afrikaans, but also, and especially, of non-mother tongue speakers of English, among whom language proficiency levels raise serious concern. Some examples are given to illustrate the importance of ...

  8. 14 CFR 61.98 - Flight proficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Flight proficiency. 61.98 Section 61.98... CERTIFICATION: PILOTS, FLIGHT INSTRUCTORS, AND GROUND INSTRUCTORS Recreational Pilots § 61.98 Flight proficiency... and flight training from an authorized instructor on the areas of operation of this section that apply...

  9. 14 CFR 61.187 - Flight proficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Flight proficiency. 61.187 Section 61.187... CERTIFICATION: PILOTS, FLIGHT INSTRUCTORS, AND GROUND INSTRUCTORS Flight Instructors Other than Flight Instructors With a Sport Pilot Rating § 61.187 Flight proficiency. (a) General. A person who is applying for a...

  10. 14 CFR 61.107 - Flight proficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Flight proficiency. 61.107 Section 61.107... CERTIFICATION: PILOTS, FLIGHT INSTRUCTORS, AND GROUND INSTRUCTORS Private Pilots § 61.107 Flight proficiency. (a) General. A person who applies for a private pilot certificate must receive and log ground and flight...

  11. Readers' Knowledge of Popular Genre

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixon, Peter; Bortolussi, Marisa

    2009-01-01

    This research examined readers' knowledge of popular genres. Participants wrote short essays on fantasy, science fiction, or romance. The similarities among the essays were measured using latent semantic analysis (LSA) and were then analyzed using multidimensional scaling and cluster analysis. The clusters and scales were interpreted by searching…

  12. A SECOND YEAR URDU READER.

    Science.gov (United States)

    AZIM, ABDUL; KHAN, MASUD H.

    A READER IN MODERN URDU PROSE IS PROVIDED FOR STUDENTS WHO ALREADY HAVE A BASIC COMMAND OF PAKISTANI URDU GRAMMAR, SPEECH, AND ALPHABET. FIVE SHORT STORIES ARE INCLUDED. A BRIEF INTRODUCTION DEALING WITH EACH AUTHOR PRECEDES EACH SHORT STORY. TO FACILITATE TRANSLATION, EACH STORY IS PROVIDED WITH A GLOSSARY AND A SET OF NOTES EXPLAINING DIFFICULT…

  13. Call the Struggling Reader Helpline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duke, Nell K.; Pressley, Michael

    2006-01-01

    Teachers sometimes try every intervention strategy they can think of to help struggling readers. However, some teachers still feel that they are not getting through. This article presents the reading strategies offered by two literacy researchers Michael Pressley and Nell K. Duke, of Michigan State University.

  14. Bringing Hearing to the Deaf

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shipsey, Ian (Purdue)

    2006-06-12

    In his talk, Shipsey will discuss the cochlear implant, the first device to successfully allow the profoundly deaf to regain some sense of hearing. A cochlear implant is a small electronic apparatus. Unlike a normal hearing aid, which amplifies sound, a cochlear implant is surgically implanted behind the ear where it converts sound waves into electrical impulses. These implants have instigated a popular but controversial revolution in the treatment of deafness, and they serve as a model for research in neuroscience and biomedical engineering. Shipsey will discuss the physiology of natural hearing from the perspective of a physicist. He will also touch on the function of cochlear implants in the context of historical treatments, electrical engineering, psychophysics, clinical evaluation of efficacy and personal experience. Finally, Shipsey will address the social implications of cochlear implantation and the future outlook for auditory prostheses.

  15. [Maternally Inherited Diabetes and Deafness].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampedro, A; Barbón, J J; Alvarez, J A; Andrés, M A; Baldó, C

    2009-07-01

    We described the follow up of a patient with diabetes mellitus type 2 who had a macular pattern dystrophy and bilateral neurosensory hearing loss. Electrophysiological studies revealed abnormal pattern electroretinography and impaired electro-oculogram responses. Maternally Inherited Diabetes, neurosensory Deafness and generally macular pattern distrophy (MIDD syndrome), is a rare mitochondrial disease, responsible for approximately 0.5 to 2.8% of diabetes mellitus.

  16. Films about the deaf: the representations of deaf and sign languages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina Hessel Silveira

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper analyzes two films about deafness which have not been investigated in the Brazilian academic context. They are Mandy (directed by Alexander Mackendrick, 1952, England and After the Silence (by Fred Gerber, 1996, USA. The analysis is supported by Cultural Studies and Deaf Studies, especially on the concepts of cultural pedagogies, deaf culture, deaf identities, sign language, as well as on the analysis of other films about deaf people conducted by Thoma (2004. Both films are classified as drama, and particular attention was given to how deaf characters are represented, highlighting scenes showing the difficulties deaf people face in a hearing society. It is worth noting that in the end of both films the deaf characters manage to speak and hear. The pedagogical impact of these films is questioned as they show that the deaf may be able to speak and hear after using Sign Language. Deaf representations, deaf education and sign language are present in both films, although there is a difference in approach between them.

  17. Deaf education in China: history, current issues, and emerging deaf voices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lytle, Richard R; Johnson, Kathryn E; Hui, Yang Jun

    An overview is provided of (a) deaf education in China, (b) views of deaf Chinese, and (c) recent empowering international collaborations. China's national policy focuses on oral/aural education and hearing rehabilitation. However, everyday practice in schools for deaf children includes various forms of Chinese Sign Language. Early childhood education focuses on speech and hearing. Elementary and secondary school curricula reflect low expectations for deaf students and lack the same academic content provided to hearing students. There are limited higher education opportunities. There are no support services such as note takers or interpreters for mainstreamed students. There are no deaf teacher preparation or interpreter training programs. Jobs are few; the vast majority of deaf adults are unemployed. Deaf people interviewed for the article describe their needs, their dreams, and the changes they are witnessing, which result in part from recent empowering international collaborations.

  18. PERSONAL IDENTITY IN DEAF ADOLESCENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanna KOSSEWSKA

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to investigate the factors influencing the identity deaf adolescents. The study involved 67 deaf adolescents (38 boys and 29 girls aged 16 to 19 students of secondary school. Ninety-three hearing children constituted a comparison group. The structure of identity was explored on the basis of identification references given by the subjects who were to reply in writing, 20 times running, to the question: „Who Am I?” the test, adapted from M. H. Kuhn and T. S. McPartland by Martines and Silvestre (1995 given in written and signed mode.Results showed that the hearing status as well as mode of communication influence the description of personal identity. It was found that deaf adoles­cents used more descriptions especially in the fol­lowing categories: Civil Status, Body and Physical Appearance, Tastes and Activities, Friendship and Relationships, Personal and Social Situation, Negative Personal Traits, and Neutral Personality Traits. Although this study could demonstrate im­pact independent variables on identity, the data raise the need for further, preferably longitudinal, research. This complex phenomenon has to be examined more closely.Combined self-descriptive processes lead to the development of an organized, learned and dynamic identity, and subjective description of an individ­ual has strong emotional consequences for the in­dividual in question.

  19. Exploring the use of dynamic language assessment with deaf children, who use American Sign Language: Two case studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, Wolfgang; Peña, Elizabeth D; Morgan, Gary

    2014-01-01

    We describe a model for assessment of lexical-semantic organization skills in American Sign Language (ASL) within the framework of dynamic vocabulary assessment and discuss the applicability and validity of the use of mediated learning experiences (MLE) with deaf signing children. Two elementary students (ages 7;6 and 8;4) completed a set of four vocabulary tasks and received two 30-minute mediations in ASL. Each session consisted of several scripted activities focusing on the use of categorization. Both had experienced difficulties in providing categorically related responses in one of the vocabulary tasks used previously. Results showed that the two students exhibited notable differences with regards to their learning pace, information uptake, and effort required by the mediator. Furthermore, we observed signs of a shift in strategic behavior by the lower performing student during the second mediation. Results suggest that the use of dynamic assessment procedures in a vocabulary context was helpful in understanding children's strategies as related to learning potential. These results are discussed in terms of deaf children's cognitive modifiability with implications for planning instruction and how MLE can be used with a population that uses ASL. The reader will (1) recognize the challenges in appropriate language assessment of deaf signing children; (2) recall the three areas explored to investigate whether a dynamic assessment approach is sensitive to differences in deaf signing children's language learning profiles (3) discuss how dynamic assessment procedures can make deaf signing children's individual language learning differences visible. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. How to improve communication with deaf children in the dental clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsmark, Silvia San Bernardino; García, Joaquín; Martínez, María Rosa Mourelle; López, Nuria Esther Gallardo

    2007-12-01

    It may be difficult for hearing-impaired people to communicate with people who hear. In the health care area, there is often little awareness of the communication barriers faced by the deaf and, in dentistry, the attitude adopted towards the deaf is not always correct. A review is given of the basic rules and advice given for communicating with the hearing-impaired. The latter are classified in three groups - lip-readers, sign language users and those with hearing aids. The advice given varies for the different groups although the different methods of communication are often combined (e.g. sign language plus lip-reading, hearing-aids plus lip-reading). Treatment of hearing-impaired children in the dental clinic must be personalised. Each child is different, depending on the education received, the communication skills possessed, family factors (degree of parental protection, etc.), the existence of associated problems (learning difficulties), degree of loss of hearing, age, etc.

  1. Communities of Practice: Literacy and Deaf Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristoffersen, Ann-Elise; Simonsen, Eva

    2016-01-01

    This article aims to discuss young deaf children's access to literacy within a sociocultural perspective. We introduce the concept of communities of practice as an aspect in early literacy development for young deaf children. Preschools are learning communities and thus constitute communities of practice. Our discussion on the use of communities…

  2. Deaf Teenagers and Family Alcohol Problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Raymond P.

    1987-01-01

    Deaf teenagers have more trouble coping with the effects of parental alcohol abuse than do hearing teenagers. Suggestions are made for helping the deaf teenager and other family members deal with these problems, especially in potentially violent situations. Two short case studies are provided to illustrate intervention methods and outcomes.…

  3. Burnout in Professionals Working with Deaf Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meadow, Kathryn P.

    1981-01-01

    Two hundred forty deaf education professionals completed an inventory on burnout, career motivation, and job satisfaction. Teachers of deaf students were more likely to experience burnout than teachers of nonhandicapped children and teachers aged 27 through 30 expressed the highest degree of emotional exhaustion. (CL)

  4. Metaphor Comprehension by Deaf Young Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gold, Rinat; Segal, Osnat

    2017-01-01

    In the present study, we compared the processing of both conventional and novel metaphors by deaf versus hearing young adults. Eighteen deaf participants with severe-to-profound hearing loss and 18 controls matched for age, sex, and years of education were presented with word pairs of 4 types (literal, conventional metaphors, novel metaphors, and…

  5. Depression and Suicide in Deaf Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messenger, Carolyn J.; Bibby, Mary Ann

    1998-01-01

    This article shares one mother's experiences with the depression of her son and his friend who are both deaf. Findings from interviews with the two adolescents are provided, along with recommendations for educators, peers, and professionals for helping teenagers with deafness coping with depression and thoughts of suicide. (Contains references.)…

  6. Development of Implanted Deaf Children's Conversational Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Maner-Idrissi, Gaid; Dardier, Virginie; Pajon, Cecile; Tan-Bescond, Geraldine; David, Kristell; Deleau, Michel; Godey, Benoit

    2010-01-01

    Previous studies of preverbal development have highlighted the recurrent difficulties experienced by deaf children in acquiring knowledge of the social rules and social skills pertaining to discourse. We expected cochlear implants in children with bilateral profound deafness to improve their use of verbal language, so that their communication…

  7. Feelings and Emotions in Deaf Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cambra, Cristina

    2005-01-01

    The objective of this study is to explore the feelings and emotions of deaf adolescents. The study examines the emotional domain of 34 prelingual severely and profoundly deaf adolescents, matched by sex and age with hearing class peers. A sentence completion task (Loeb and Sarigiani, 1986) is employed to assess such feelings as happiness, sadness,…

  8. Critical Literacy: Deaf Adults Speak Out

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enns, Charlotte

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to describe a variety of teaching and learning strategies that were used within a classroom of Deaf adults participating in a high school English course as part of an upgrading program. The class was conducted in a bilingual manner; that is, being Deaf and communicating with American Sign Language (ASL) was not…

  9. Genetics: advances in genetic testing for deafness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shearer, A Eliot; Smith, Richard J H

    2012-12-01

    To provide an update on recently discovered human deafness genes and to describe advances in comprehensive genetic testing platforms for deafness, both of which have been enabled by new massively parallel sequencing technologies. Over the review period, three syndromic and six nonsyndromic deafness genes have been discovered, bringing the total number of nonsyndromic deafness genes to 64. Four studies have shown the utility of massively parallel sequencing for comprehensive genetic testing for deafness. Three of these platforms have been released on a clinical or commercial basis. Deafness is the most common sensory deficit in humans. Genetic diagnosis has traditionally been difficult due to extreme genetic heterogeneity and a lack of phenotypic variability. For these reasons, comprehensive genetic screening platforms have been developed with the use of massively parallel sequencing. These technologies are also accelerating the pace of gene discovery for deafness. Because genetic diagnosis is the basis for molecular therapies, these advances lay the foundation for the clinical care of deaf and hard-of-hearing persons in the future.

  10. Literacy for Deaf People Seeking Employment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryall, Gordon

    1993-01-01

    Focuses on the literacy problems of deaf people who are seeking employment. The article argues for the provision of adequate English-as-a-Second-Language (ESL) literacy skills training, makes programming recommendations, and suggests employment strategies that deaf people need. (12 references) (Author/CK)

  11. The Significance of Deaf Identity for Psychological Well-Being

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, Madeleine; Dammeyer, Jesper

    2017-01-01

    Research has paid attention to how deaf identity affects life outcomes such as psychological well-being. However, studies are often carried out with small samples and without controlling for other variables. This study examined how different forms of identity--deaf, hearing, bicultural (deaf and hearing), and marginal (neither deaf nor…

  12. Violence against Deaf Women: Effect of Partner Hearing Status

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Melissa L.; Kobek Pezzarossi, Caroline M.

    2014-01-01

    Using a sample of Deaf female undergraduate students, the current study sought to investigate the prevalence, correlates, and characteristics of intimate partner violence victimization in hearing-Deaf and Deaf-Deaf relationships. Initial results suggest that similarities in hearing status and communication preference are associated with increased…

  13. Without Boundaries: An Inquiry into Deaf Epistemologies through a Metaparadigm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ye

    2010-01-01

    The ongoing debate on Deaf epistemologies reflects two major paradigms in deaf education: positivism and constructivism. The present article investigates Deaf epistemologies through a metaparadigm, which should blur the boundaries among different paradigms and connect the epistemological inquiry to instructional practice for d/Deaf students. The…

  14. Programs for Deaf-Blind Children and Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Annals of the Deaf, 2000

    2000-01-01

    This annual directory lists programs for deaf-blind children and adults including programs for deaf-blind children and youth (national and state level), the Helen Keller Centers for deaf-blind youth and adults, and programs for training teachers of deaf-blind students. (DB)

  15. Social Maturity and Executive Function among Deaf Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marschark, Marc; Kronenberger, William G.; Rosica, Mark; Borgna, Georgianna; Convertino, Carol; Durkin, Andreana; Machmer, Elizabeth; Schmitz, Kathryn L.

    2017-01-01

    Two experiments examined relations among social maturity, executive function, language, and cochlear implant (CI) use among deaf high school and college students. Experiment 1 revealed no differences between deaf CI users, deaf nonusers, and hearing college students in measures of social maturity. However, deaf students (both CI users and…

  16. Deaf Children and English: More Ways Parents Can Help.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katasse, Constance; Cartwright, Daisy

    1997-01-01

    Ideas to help parents of deaf children foster English language development include communicating regularly in writing, handling public encounters the "deaf" way, interacting with deaf adults, reading books by/about deaf people, learning and maintaining sign language skills, joining local and state associations, and making sure the television has a…

  17. Measuring receptive collocational competence across proficiency levels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Déogratias Nizonkiza

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The present study investigates, (i English as Foreign Language (EFL learners’ receptive collocational knowledge growth in relation to their linguistic proficiency level; (ii how much receptive collocational knowledge is acquired as proficiency develops; and (iii the extent to which receptive knowledge of collocations of EFL learners varies across word frequency bands. A proficiency measure and a collocation test were administered to English majors at the University of Burundi. Results of the study suggest that receptive collocational competence develops alongside EFL learners’ linguistic proficiency; which lends empirical support to Gyllstad (2007, 2009 and Author (2011 among others, who reported similar findings. Furthermore, EFL learners’ collocations growth seems to be quantifiable wherein both linguistic proficiency level and word frequency occupy a crucial role. While more gains in terms of collocations that EFL learners could potentially add as a result of change in proficiency are found at lower levels of proficiency; collocations of words from more frequent word bands seem to be mastered first, and more gains are found at more frequent word bands. These results confirm earlier findings on the non-linearity nature of vocabulary growth (cf. Meara 1996 and the fundamental role played by frequency in word knowledge for vocabulary in general (Nation 1983, 1990, Nation and Beglar 2007, which are extended here to collocations knowledge.

  18. FOR EVERY TIME, A READER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flávia Brocchetto Ramos

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The contemporary children’s literature is a hybrid cultural product and it also consists of the updating of other texts which precede the most recent publication. Thus it is analyzed, based on Bakhtinian assumptions, the narrative Ervilina e o Pincês or Deu a louca em Ervilina (Orthof, 2009, to discuss probable interactions between the text (verbal or visual and the reader. Based on the analysis, proposals of meaning which underlie the book are presented; relationships between the contemporary text and the source text – “The princess and the pea”, of Andersen (2004 - are discussed, as well as between both editions of Orthof. The study is part of investigations that seek to approximate literary works of the child reader, at school environment, from the teacher’s mediation, focusing on language practices that can promote the aesthetic experience and the literary literacy.

  19. Body Perception and Action Following Deafness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. S. Houde

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of deafness on sensory abilities has been the topic of extensive investigation over the past decades. These investigations have mostly focused on visual capacities. We are only now starting to investigate how the deaf experience their own bodies and body-related abilities. Indeed, a growing corpus of research suggests that auditory input could play an important role in body-related processing. Deafness could therefore disturb such processes. It has also been suggested that many unexplained daily difficulties experienced by the deaf could be related to deficits in this underexplored field. In the present review, we propose an overview of the current state of knowledge on the effects of deafness on body-related processing.

  20. Numerical Estimation in Deaf and Hearing Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bull, Rebecca; Marschark, Marc; Sapere, Patty; Davidson, Wendy A; Murphy, Derek; Nordmann, Emily

    2011-08-01

    Deaf students often lag behind hearing peers in numerical and mathematical abilities. Studies of hearing children with mathematical difficulties highlight the importance of estimation skills as the foundation for formal mathematical abilities, but research with adults is limited. Deaf and hearing college students were assessed on the Number-to-Position task as a measure of estimation, and completed standardised assessments of arithmetical and mathematical reasoning. Deaf students performed significantly more poorly on all measures, including making less accurate number-line estimates. For deaf students, there was also a strong relationship showing that those more accurate in making number-line estimates achieved higher scores on the math achievement tests. No such relationship was apparent for hearing students. Further insights into the estimation abilities of deaf individuals should be made, including tasks that require symbolic and non-symbolic estimation and which address the quality of estimation strategies being used.

  1. Environmental assessment: Deaf Smith County site, Texas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1986-05-01

    In February 1983, the US Department of Energy (DOE) identified a location in Deaf Smith County, Texas, as one of nine potentially acceptable sites for a mined geologic repository for spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste. To determine their suitability, the Deaf Smith County site and the eight other potentially sites have been evaluated in accordance with the DOE's General Guidelines for the Recommendation of Sites for the Nuclear Waste Repositories. The Deaf Smith County site is in the Permian Basin, which is one of five distinct geohydrologic settings considered for the first repository. On the basis of the evaluations reported in this EA, the DOE has found that the Deaf Smith County site is not disqualified under the guidelines. On the basis of these findings, the DOE is nominating the Deaf Smith County site as one of the five sites suitable for characterization. 591 refs., 147 figs., 173 tabs.

  2. BILINGUALISM: MULTICULTURALISM HOLOPRAXIOLOGY OF THE VENEZUELAN DEAF

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Héctor Florencio Martínez Pérez

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The formation of the child has been made regularly and without many prejudices or tbacks,  until this had some physical characteristic or perceptual, who twisted his attention.  To those who were born with the inability to listen or hear properly, excluded in all respects. At the end of the 20th century, the deaf began to defend their identity and differed between Deafness (lack of hearing of deafness, with "S", which is a socio-anthropological perspective, which includes the use of sign language and the learning of reading and writing of the Spanish (bilingualism in their training. This research had as general objective to unveil bilingualism from an intercultural intersubjectivity of the deaf in Venezuela by applying a qualitative related paradigm with methodology fenomenologica-hermeneutica of Max Van Manen. The information collected observing and interviewing in depth (12 deaf students, parents or representatives (6, (3 researchers and educational specialists deaf and listeners (12. To analyze and triangulate information, obtained the following conclusions about the bilingual deaf: their physical and intellectual abilities are exactly the same to the listeners;  they can achieve the necessary qualification for any job; is required the language of signs so that you can put into practice the language; those who have the organizational capacity to develop oral language, it should not hinder him this opportunity, without detriment to the learning of the language of signs and the systematic training of the deaf teachers and deaf family, educational managers, political and employer of the deaf is essentially required.

  3. Computational solution for the auxiliary in the literacy of deaf

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Carlos Lopes Fernandes

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The learning of the deaf is a great challenge for educators, especially in Portuguese-speaking course. Brazilian schools are not prepared for suits with deaf, because they lack trained professionals. Current Brazilian educational policies, seeking socialize all deaf and not deaf students. The Brazilian deaf community uses LIBRAS, Brazilian sign language as their main form of communication between them. Integrating LBS and Portuguese is one of the main current challenges and the use of computers has helped a lot.

  4. On the possibilities and limits of "DEAF DEAF SAME": Tourism and empowerment camps in Adamorobe (Ghana, Bangalore and Mumbai (India.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michele Ilana Friedner

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This article qualitatively analyzes the ways that the discourse of "deaf universalism" circulates within two common deaf practices: tourism and engaging in interventions. Arguing that the largely Northern-situated discipline of Deaf Studies does not adequately examine how deaf bodies and discourses travel, ethnographic data compiled in India and Ghana during transnational encounters is employed to examine how claims of "sameness" and "difference" are enacted and negotiated. Similarly, this article examines how deaf individuals and groups deploy the concepts of deaf "heavens" and "hells" to analyze their travel experiences and justify interventions. We argue that deaf travelers and those engaging in interventions, mostly from Northern countries, employ teleological concepts that they attempt to impose on deaf "others." Adopting a critical approach, this article argues for the importance of carving out a space within Deaf Studies for allowing non-Northern concepts to come to the fore. Keywords: Deaf, Development, Universalism, Discourse, India, Ghana

  5. 38 CFR 21.150 - Reader service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... reader should have an understanding of the subject matter based upon prior training or experience which... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Reader service. 21.150... Special Rehabilitation Services § 21.150 Reader service. (a) Limitations on vision. A veteran considered...

  6. Every reader his book – every book its reader?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kann-Christensen, Nanna; Balling, Gitte

    2014-01-01

    ’ advisory and audience development. This is achieved through an analysis of opinions and reflections expressed by 13 managers and librarians in all six county libraries in Denmark. The interviews are analysed through the model which merges three concepts: cultural policy, new public management......Collections are no longer the main attraction in libraries, and libraries are working to find new paths to tread. One strategy is to focus on reading and literature in new and surprising ways. The aim of this article is to enrich an understanding of activities situated in the span between readers...

  7. 14 CFR 61.127 - Flight proficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... CERTIFICATION: PILOTS, FLIGHT INSTRUCTORS, AND GROUND INSTRUCTORS Commercial Pilots § 61.127 Flight proficiency. (a) General. A person who applies for a commercial pilot certificate must receive and log ground and...

  8. Limited english proficiency accessibility program : demonstration program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-01

    In 2006, the Tri-County Metropolitan Transportation District of Oregon (TriMet) secured grant funding from the Federal Transit Administration : (FTA) that enabled the agency to launch a creative and ambitious Limited English Proficiency (LEP) demonst...

  9. An Analysis of Reading Skill Development using E-Z Reader.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mancheva, Lyuba; Reichle, Erik D; Lemaire, Benoît; Valdois, Sylviane; Ecalle, Jean; Guérin-Dugué, Anne

    Previously reported simulations using the E-Z Reader model of eye-movement control suggest that the patterns of eye movements observed with children versus adult readers reflect differences in lexical processing proficiency (Reichle et al., 2013). However, these simulations fail to specify precisely what aspect(s) of lexical processing (e.g., orthographic processing) account for the concurrent changes in eye movements and reading skill. To examine this issue, the E-Z Reader model was first used to simulate the aggregate eye-movement data from 15 adults and 75 children to replicate the finding that gross differences in reading skill can be accounted for by differences in lexical processing proficiency. The model was then used to simulate the eye-movement data of individual children so that the best-fitting lexical-processing parameters could be correlated to measures of orthographic knowledge, phonological-processing skill, sentence comprehension, and general intelligence. These analyses suggest that orthographic knowledge accounts for variance in the eye-movement measures that is observed with between-individual differences in reading skill. The theoretical implications of this conclusion will be discussed in relation to computational models of reading and our understanding of reading skill development.

  10. Literatura Surda/Deaf Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lodenir Becker Karnopp

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo do presente artigo é proceder a uma análise dos livros de literatura infantil Cinderela Surda e Rapunzel Surda, focalizando os sentidos produzidos sobre identidades e diferenças. As análises desses livros pretendem contribuir para a discussão da produção de uma literatura surda, que está vinculada às discussões sobre cultura e identidade. Na investigação desses materiais, os textos e as imagens produzidas evidenciam que os autores buscam o caminho da auto-representação do grupo de surdos, através da luta pelo estabelecimento do que reconhecem como suas identidades e suas diferenças. Tais evidências estão no uso da língua de sinais, em suas formas de narrar as histórias e/ou de adaptar histórias clássicas, tendo como base suas formas de existência, suas formas de ler, traduzir, conceber e julgar os produtos culturais que consomem e que produzem. This article aims to present an analysis of the fairy tales, Deaf Cinderella and Deaf Rapunzel, focusing on the meanings produced from identities and differences. The analyses of these two books intend to give a contribution to the discussion on the production of deaf literature, which is linked to the discussions on culture and identity. In the investigation of these books, the texts and the images produced show that the authors seek the path to self- representation of the deaf community, through the struggle for the establishment of what they recognize as their identities and differences. Such evidences are in the use of sign language, in their ways of narrating their stories and/or of adapting classic fairy tales, having as a basis their existential ways of being, their ways of reading, translating, conceiving and judging the cultural products which they consume and produce.

  11. Does deafness lead to enhancement of visual spatial cognition in children? Negative evidence from deaf nonsigners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parasnis, I; Samar, V; Bettger, J; Sathe, K

    1996-01-01

    This study investigated whether deafness contributes to enhancement of visual spatial cognition independent of knowledge of a sign language. Congenitally deaf school children in India who were born to hearing parents and were not exposed to any sign language, and matched hearing controls, were given a test of digit span and five tests that measured visual spatial skills. The deaf group showed shorter digit span than the hearing group, consistent with previous studies. Deaf and hearing children did not differ in their performance on the visual spatial skills test, suggesting that deafness per se may not be a sufficient factor for enhancement of visual spatial cognition. Early exposure to a sign language and fluent sign skills may be the critical factors that lead to differential development of visual spatial skills in deaf people.

  12. The Latin American Fashion Reader

    OpenAIRE

    Turner, Brian

    2007-01-01

    The Latin American Fashion Reader, edited by Regina A. Root, Associate Professor of Hispanic Studies at The College of William and Mary, received the Arthur P. Whitaker Prize at the MACLAS XXVII in Ponce, Puerto Rico, for the best book published by a MACLAS member in 2004-2005. The volume is the first to focus on Latin America in the Berg series “Dress, Body, Culture.” It includes seventeen essays by specialists in history, anthropology, literature, women’s studies, textiles and clothing, des...

  13. Music and Deaf Culture: Images from the Media and Their Interpretation by Deaf and Hearing Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darrow; Loomis

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of the study was threefold: (a) to examine how the visual media have portrayed the subject of music and the deaf, (b) to verify the validity of these portrayals with members of the deaf community, and (c) to compare and contrast deaf and hearing audiences' impressions of these portrayals. An additional purpose of the research was to examine the results in light of possible misconceptions that may be construed by music therapists and music educators based upon the media's representation of the relationship between music and deaf culture. Since music therapists and music educators are the primary persons responsible for the music instruction of students in school programs for deaf and hard-of-hearing students, it is particularly important that they receive accurate messages about the relationship of music to deaf culture. Fifty deaf (n = 25) and hearing (n = 25) undergraduate college students individually viewed motion picture and television excerpts related to music and the deaf. Subjects were instructed to take notes as needed regarding the content of each excerpt and their impressions. Students were then interviewed in their native language, English or American Sign Language, as to their interpretations and perceptions regarding these excerpts and their accuracy. Interviews of the deaf students were translated into English from American Sign Language by trained interpreters. Written transcriptions were then made of the interpreters' English translations of the interviews with deaf students and of the verbal interviews with hearing students. Interview transcripts from both groups were coded and analyzed for recurring themes and patterns using content analysis. Data analysis revealed cultural patterns for the two groups, impressions specific to individual subjects, and trends in communication style and content for the two groups. Implications for music therapists and music educators are given regarding the influence of the media, characteristics of deaf

  14. [Study of generational risk in deafness inflicted couples using deafness gene microarray technique].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ping; Zhao, Jia; Yu, Shu-yuan; Jin, Peng; Zhu, Wei; DU, Bo

    2011-06-01

    To explored the significance of screening the gene mutations of deafness related in deaf-mute (deaf & dumb) family using DNA microarray. Total of 52 couples of deaf-mute were recruited from Changchun deaf-mute community. With an average age of (58.3 ± 6.7) years old (x(-) ± s). Blood samples were obtained with informed consent. Their genomic DNA was extracted from peripheral blood and PCR was performed. Nine of hot spot mutations in four most common deafness pathologic gene were examined with the DNA microarray, including GJB2, GJB3, PDS and mtDNA 12S rRNA genes. At the same time, the results were verified with the traditional methods of sequencing. Fifty of normal people served as a control group. All patients were diagnosed non-syndromic sensorineural hearing loss by subjective pure tone audiometry. Thirty-two of 104 cases appeared GJB2 gene mutation (30.7%), the mutation sites included 35delG, 176del16, 235delC and 299delAT. Eighteen of 32 cases of GJB2 mutations were 235delC (59.1%). Seven of 104 cases appeared SLC26A4 gene IVS7-2 A > G mutation. Questionnaire survey and gene diagnosis revealed that four of 52 families have deaf offspring (7.6%). When a couple carries the same gene mutation, the risk of their children deafness was 100%. The results were confirmed with the traditional methods of sequencing. There is a high risk of deafness if a deaf-mute family is planning to have a new baby. It is very important and helpful to avoid deaf newborns again in deaf-mute family by DNA microarray.

  15. Peer to peer deaf literacy: working with young deaf people and peer tutors in India

    OpenAIRE

    Gillen, Julia; Panda, Sibaji; Papen, Uta; Zeshan, Ulrike

    2016-01-01

    This report of research in progress introduces the project: Literacy development with deaf communities using sign language, peer tuition, and learner-generated online content: Sustainable educational innovation. The rationale, aims, and participatory approach to learning and teaching English literacy to deaf learners in India are described. Deaf learners are particularly marginalised in the mainstream educational systems of developing countries. This project responds through designing a parti...

  16. Access to the phonological structure of language: Impact on deaf reader

    OpenAIRE

    Ana Belén DOMÍNGUEZ GUTIÉRREZ; Leybaert, Jacqueline

    2016-01-01

    La lengua escrita está basada en la fonología. Las letras representan con mayor o menor fidelidad a los fonemas y este hecho es fundamental para apren der a leer, como demuestran los actuales modelos teóricos de lectura. En el caso de las personas sordas, el acceso a la dimensión fonológica de la lengua puede estar dificultado a causa del déficit auditivo y, por lo tanto, ser causa de dificultades en la lectura. Las investigaciones actuales muestran que sigue existiendo un intenso deba te sob...

  17. Should All Deaf Children Learn Sign Language?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Napoli, Donna Jo; Mellon, Nancy K; Niparko, John K; Rathmann, Christian; Mathur, Gaurav; Humphries, Tom; Handley, Theresa; Scambler, Sasha; Lantos, John D

    2015-07-01

    Every year, 10,000 infants are born in the United States with sensorineural deafness. Deaf children of hearing (and nonsigning) parents are unique among all children in the world in that they cannot easily or naturally learn the language that their parents speak. These parents face tough choices. Should they seek a cochlear implant for their child? If so, should they also learn to sign? As pediatricians, we need to help parents understand the risks and benefits of different approaches to parent-child communication when the child is deaf [corrected]. Copyright © 2015 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  18. Stigma in Mothers of Deaf Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossein Ebrahimi

    2015-03-01

     Results: Results showed that most mothers suffer from stigma due to having a deaf child. The mean stigma score was 96.48 ±27.72. In total, 24.4% of mothers reported that they had received strange and mocking looks; 72.2% regarded child deafness as a sign of divine retribution; and 33.3% felt ashamed of their child’s deafness. There was an inverse relationship between the mother’s level of education and mean stigma scores (P

  19. Stress Deafness in Persian Speakers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehran Ghajargar

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: The current study has been designed based on the framework of the Stress Deafness Model (SDM, and aims at investigating native listeners’ general perceptual sensitivity to theacoustic correlates of stress in Persian, a language with predictable stress. According to SDM, more regularity in a language implies poorer perceptual sensitivity of its native speakers, as regular stress patterns will not require lexical encoding.Methods: The experiment was a modified method of adjustment task where subjects had to simulate stimuli played to them. A total of thirty five Persian speakers took part in the experiment and wereplaced in three groups based on their linguistic background. In addition to overall perceptual sensitivity, the effect of exposure to English and phonetic knowledge were also tested.Results: Persian speakers showed a weak perception of stress correlates. It was found, however, that exposure to English will improve stress deafness among Persian natives (p<0.0001. However, the results failed to show any significant effect by phonetic knowledge. It was also shown that the duration had the most erroneous perception by participants (p=0.0001, while there was no statistically significant difference between understanding fundamental frequency clues and intensity perception by listeners.Conclusion: Since Persian speakers showed an overall weak perception of stress correlates, the results support the predictions made by SDM.

  20. Suicide in deaf populations: a literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kapur Navneet

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Studies have found that deaf individuals have higher rates of psychiatric disorder than those who are hearing, while at the same time encountering difficulties in accessing mental health services. These factors might increase the risk of suicide. However, the burden of suicidal behaviour in deaf people is currently unknown. The aim of the present review was to provide a summary of literature on suicidal behaviour with specific reference to deaf individuals. The objectives of the review were to establish the incidence and prevalence of suicidal behaviour in deaf populations; describe risk factors for suicidal behaviour in deaf populations; describe approaches to intervention and suicide prevention that have been used in deaf populations. Methods A number of electronic databases (e.g. Medline, PsycINFO, CINAHL, EMBASE, Dissertation Abstracts International, Web of Science, ComDisDome, ASSIA, Education Sage Full Text, Google Scholar, and the grey literature databases FADE and SIGLE were explored using a combination of key words and medical subject headings as search terms. Reference lists of papers were also searched. The Science and Social Sciences Citation Index electronic databases were used to identify studies that had cited key papers. We also contacted experts and organisations with an interest in the field. Results Very few studies focussed specifically on suicide in deaf populations. Those studies that were included (n = 13 generally involved small and unrepresentative samples. There were limited data on the rate of suicidal behaviour in deaf people. One study reported evidence of hearing impairment in 0.2% of all suicide deaths. Another found that individuals with tinnitus seen in specialist clinics had an elevated rate of suicide compared to the general population. The rates of attempted suicide in deaf school and college students during the previous year ranged from 1.7% to 18%, with lifetime rates as high as 30

  1. Silencing Deafness: Displacing Disability in the Nineteenth Century

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esme Cleall

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available This article traces the way in which the language of displacement and silence were used in nineteenth-century discussions of deafness and connects this tendency to the marginalised place deaf experience occupies historically. Throughout the nineteenth century, a period which saw the consolidation of ‘the deaf and dumb’ as a social category, the word ‘forgetting’ crept into numerous discussions of deafness by both deaf and hearing commentators. Some, such as the educationalist Alexander Graeme Bell, were overt in their desire to forget deafness, demanding disability was ‘bred out’ and deaf culture condemned to the forgotten past. Others used the term ambivalently and sometimes metaphorically discussing the deaf as ‘forgotten’ by society, and ‘children of silence’. Some even pleaded that people who were deaf were not forgotten. But, though varied, the use of the imagery of forgetting and silence to evoke deafness is recurrent, and may, therefore, be seen to reveal something about how deaf experience can be approached as a displacement where deafness was spatially and imaginatively marginalised. I argue that one of the consequences of the conceptual framing of deafness through the language of forgetting was actively to silence deafness and to neutralise the idea that disability should be marginal and could be forgotten.

  2. A Teacher Takes on the Challenges of Deaf Literacy: An Interview with Jennifer Herbold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milone, Michael

    2003-01-01

    Interviews Jennifer Herbold, a deaf teacher of deaf students at the New Mexico School for the Deaf. Discusses important factors in determining Deaf students' success at learning to read. Notes that technology has enormous potential with deaf students because it provides increased exposure to English, it is often fun to use for deaf students, and…

  3. Environmental assessment, Deaf Smith County site, Texas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1986-05-01

    The Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 (42 USC sections 10101-10226) requires the environmental assessment of a proposed site to include a statement of the basis for nominating a site as suitable for characterization. Volume 2 provides a detailed statement evaluating the site suitability of the Deaf Smith County Site under DOE siting guidelines, as well as a comparison of the Deaf Smith County Site to the other sites under consideration. The evaluation of the Deaf Smith County Site is based on the impacts associated with the reference repository design, but the evaluation will not change if based on the Mission Plan repository concept. The second part of this document compares the Deaf Smith County Site to Davis Canyon, Hanford, Richton Dome and Yucca Mountain. This comparison is required under DOE guidelines and is not intended to directly support subsequent recommendation of three sites for characterization as candidate sites. 259 refs., 29 figs., 66 refs. (MHB)

  4. Environmental assessment: Deaf Smith County site, Texas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1986-05-01

    In February 1983, the US Department of Energy (DOE) identified a location in Deaf Smith County, Texas, as one of the nine potentially acceptable sites for mined geologic repository for spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste. To determine their suitability, the Deaf Smith County site and eight other potentially acceptable sites have been evaluated in accordance with the DOE's General Guidelines for the Recommendation of Sites for the Nuclear Waste Repositories. The Deaf Smith County site is in the Permian Basin, which is one of five distinct geohydrologic settings considered for the first repository. On the basis of the evaluations reported in this EA, the DOE has found that the Deaf Smith County site is not disqualified under the guidelines.

  5. Health Care Access Among Deaf People

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kuenburg, Alexa; Fellinger, Paul; Fellinger, Johannes

    2016-01-01

    .... The present study reviews literature from 2000 to 2015 on access to health care for deaf people and reveals significant challenges in communication with health providers and gaps in global health...

  6. Syllabic organization and deafness: orthographic structure or letter frequency in reading?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, A C; Nickerson, J F

    2001-05-01

    For hearing people, structure given to orthographic information may be influenced by phonological structures that develop with experience of spoken language. In this study we examine whether profoundly deaf individuals structure orthographic representation differently. We ask "Would deaf students who are advanced readers show effects of syllable structure despite their altered experience of spoken language, or would they, because of reduced influence from speech, organize their orthographic knowledge according to groupings defined by letter frequency?" We used a task introduced by Prinzmetal (Prinzmetal, Treiman, & Rho, 1986) in which participants were asked to judge the colour of letters in briefly presented words. As with hearing participants, the number of errors made by deaf participants was influenced by syllable structure (Prinzmetal et al., 1986; Rapp, 1992). This effect could not be accounted for by letter frequency. Furthermore, there was no correlation between the strength of syllable effects and residual speech or hearing. Our results support the view that the syllable is a unit of linguistic organization that is abstract enough to apply to both spoken and written language.

  7. Stigma in Mothers of Deaf Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossein Ebrahimi

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: A deaf child creates a feeling of stigma in many hearing parents. Stigma in mothers can have a negative impact on a child’s treatment and rehabilitation process. Therefore, this study was conducted to evaluate the extent of stigma in mothers with deaf children.  Materials and Methods: This descriptive, cross-sectional study was conducted in 2013 among 90 mothers with deaf children. The data-collection instrument included the stigma scale in the mothers of children with disabilities. The reliability and validity of the instrument were confirmed through content validity and Cronbach’s alpha coefficient (α=86%, respectively. Data were analyzed using SPSS-15 software.   Results: Results showed that most mothers suffer from stigma due to having a deaf child. The mean stigma score was 96.48 ±27.72. In total, 24.4% of mothers reported that they had received strange and mocking looks; 72.2% regarded child deafness as a sign of divine retribution; and 33.3% felt ashamed of their child’s deafness. There was an inverse relationship between the mother’s level of education and mean stigma scores (P

  8. Access to English Language Acquisition in Ghana Schools for the Deaf: Are the Deaf Students Handicapped?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obosu, Gideon Kwesi; Opoku-Asare, Nana Afia; Deku, Prosper

    2016-01-01

    This paper primarily discusses the challenges deaf students in Ghana are likely to grapple with as they access education provided for them in English language. The arguments discussed in this paper are supported by findings from a multiple site case study of five Schools for the Deaf purposively sampled from four regions of Ghana. Observations…

  9. Objectification Theory and Deaf Cultural Identity Attitudes: Roles in Deaf Women's Eating Disorder Symptomatology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moradi, Bonnie; Rottenstein, Adena

    2007-01-01

    This study examined the generalizability of direct and mediated links posited in objectification theory among internalization of sociocultural standards of beauty, body surveillance, body shame, and eating disorder symptoms with a sample of Deaf women. The study also examined the role of marginal Deaf cultural identity attitudes within this…

  10. "Deaf discourse": the social construction of deafness in a Bedouin community

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kisch, S.

    2008-01-01

    Among the Al-Sayyid Arab-Bedouin, the use of an indigenous sign language is widespread and provides the foundation of a signing community shared by hearing and deaf people. Cases with comparable high incidences of deafness have in recent years stimulated debates in diverse academic disciplines.

  11. Deafness and Diversity: Early Intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Rebecca L; Ammerman, Sarah B; Trautwein, Blane A

    2015-01-01

    earlier identification has increased the number of infants identified with hearing loss. A significant and growing proportion of children who are D/deaf or hard of hearing have a disability (DWD). Literature related to infants and toddlers who are DWD is scarce because of the heterogeneity of the population and because many disabilities may go undiagnosed until a child is older. Service availability, professional preparation, and use of evidence-based practices must improve to best meet the needs of these children and their families. An examination of theory, research, and practice in early intervention for children who are DWD revealed a lack of qualified professionals and a need for targeted instruction in teacher preparation programs and for technological advances paired with treatment (e.g., telepractice). Increased transdisciplinary collaboration and technology utilization in teacher preparation hold promise as ways of improving service provision to young children who are DWD.

  12. E-book Reader Devices and Libraries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pažur, I.

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Most library studies thematically related to electronic books don't consider readers of electronic books. Only in recent years librarians conduct studies in which they want to find out readers' opinions about the possibilities, advantages and disadvantages of reading using e-readers, as well as their possible application in the libraries.User studies of e-readers have shown that their opinion is generally positive, but great attachment to traditional books is still present, e-readers are still seen only as an additional tool for reading. Sony with its e-reader (the latest Reader model Daily and Reader Store online bookstore (http://ebookstore.sony.com/is the only one who cooperate with libraries and has made lending electronic books possible. Cooperation was launched in 2009th,and the New York Public Library was the first library that offered such a service.Cooperation between Sony and libraries, indicates clearly what the near future could be if other online booksellers / publishers begin to follow the model of lending e-books through the libraries over the network. However it is possible that a large online bookstores / publishers consider that the further price reduction of e-readers and electronic books will constantly increase their sales, and in that case lending e-books will be unnecessary.Are the libraries ready for this scenario?

  13. Selective targeting of epigenetic reader domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greschik, Holger; Schüle, Roland; Günther, Thomas

    2017-05-01

    Epigenetic regulators including writers, erasers, and readers of chromatin marks have been implicated in numerous diseases and are therefore subject of intense academic and pharmaceutical research. While several small-molecule inhibitors targeting writers or erasers are either approved drugs or are currently being evaluated in clinical trials, the targeting of epigenetic readers has lagged behind. Proof-of-principle that epigenetic readers are also relevant drug targets was provided by landmark discoveries of selective inhibitors targeting the BET family of acetyl-lysine readers. More recently, high affinity chemical probes for non-BET acetyl- and methyl-lysine reader domains have also been developed. Areas covered: This article covers recent advances with the identification and validation of inhibitors and chemical probes targeting epigenetic reader domains. Issues related to epigenetic reader druggability, quality requirements for chemical probes, interpretation of cellular action, unexpected cross-talk, and future challenges are also discussed. Expert opinion: Chemical probes provide a powerful means to unravel biological functions of epigenetic readers and evaluate their potential as drug targets. To yield meaningful results, potency, selectivity, and cellular target engagement of chemical probes need to be stringently validated. Future chemical probes will probably need to fulfil additional criteria such as strict target specificity or the targeting of readers within protein complexes.

  14. Beyond English proficiency: rethinking immigrant integration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akresh, Ilana Redstone; Massey, Douglas S; Frank, Reanne

    2014-05-01

    We develop and test a conceptual model of English language acquisition and the strength of the latter in predicting social and cultural assimilation. We present evidence that the path to English proficiency begins with exposure to English in the home country and on prior U.S. trips. English proficiency, then, has direct links to the intermediate migration outcomes of occupational status in the U.S., the amount of time in the U.S. since the most recent trip, and the co-ethnic residential context in the U.S. In turn, pre-migration characteristics and the intermediate characteristics work in tandem with English proficiency to determine social assimilation in the U.S., while cultural assimilation is primarily determined by pre-migration habits. A shift in focus to English use is desirable in studies of immigrant integration. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Beyond English Proficiency: Rethinking Immigrant Integration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akresh, Ilana Redstone; Massey, Douglas S.; Frank, Reanne

    2014-01-01

    We develop and test a conceptual model of English language acquisition and the strength of the latter in predicting social and cultural assimilation. We present evidence that the path to English proficiency begins with exposure to English in the home country and on prior U.S. trips. English proficiency, then, has direct links to the intermediate migration outcomes of occupational status in the U.S., the amount of time in the U.S. since the most recent trip, and the co-ethnic residential context in the U.S. In turn, pre-migration characteristics and the intermediate characteristics work in tandem with English proficiency to determine social assimilation in the U.S., while cultural assimilation is primarily determined by pre-migration habits. A shift in focus to English use is desirable in studies of immigrant integration. PMID:24576636

  16. High School Readers: A Profile of above Average Readers and Readers with Learning Disabilities Reading Expository Text

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wigent, Catherine A.

    2013-01-01

    This study examined above average high school readers and high school readers with learning disabilities in order to better understand the impact of twelve years of formal education on reading skills and strategy use while reading expository text. This study examined reading strategies related to knowledge construction, monitoring, and evaluating…

  17. "Deaf discourse": the social construction of deafness in a Bedouin community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kisch, Shifra

    2008-01-01

    Among the Al-Sayyid Arab-Bedouin, the use of an indigenous sign language is widespread and provides the foundation of a signing community shared by hearing and deaf people. Cases with comparable high incidences of deafness have in recent years stimulated debates in diverse academic disciplines. Lacking an accurate term, they are regularly referred to as "Martha's Vineyard situations" and have often been oversimplified and romanticized. This article provides an in-depth analysis of a Bedouin shared-signing community and advocates closer investigation of both facilitating and disabling social practices, which would also allow better examination of comparable cases. This article concentrates on the shared use of sign language, the asymmetry it entails, and the manifold forms of translation and mediation that take place. Whereas most hearing Al-Sayyid persons have access to both spoken and signed modes of communication, deaf people's communication remains largely restricted to the signed mode (hence, the asymmetry). However, in contrast to the common reduction of deafness to the disabling absence of speech or need for translation, deaf people's need for translation is not unusual among the Al-Sayyid; local communication patterns involve many different forms of translation between different spoken languages, written languages, discourses, and social domains. Additionally, ample translators are readily available. Moreover, the common familiarity with deaf people and sign language facilitates the production and sharing of a unique experiential knowledge, grounded in daily experiences and practices. In this context, deafness is not easily subjugated to its medical model. However, encounters with the medical and educational establishment present a series of challenges that may severely exacerbate deaf people's structure of opportunities. Finally, I consider the attempts made so far to classify comparable cases; unfortunately, these mostly attempt to classify deaf

  18. Intergenerational Communication Modes in Deaf-Parented Families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallory, Barbara L.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    This study focused on the intergenerational modes used in 15 family triads: hearing child, deaf parent, hearing grandparent. Results raise questions about the effect of mismatched language modes on intergenerational relationships in deaf-parented families. (19 references) (VWL)

  19. The Role of Parents in the Development of Deaf Children

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    IWONA JAGOSZEWSKA

    2017-01-01

    Both the parents and the deaf children live with a disability. The specificity of deafness has a significant impact on the functioning of the families which often requires support of their care and educational functions...

  20. Genetics Home Reference: autosomal dominant cerebellar ataxia, deafness, and narcolepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Twitter Home Health Conditions ADCADN Autosomal dominant cerebellar ataxia, deafness, and narcolepsy Printable PDF Open All Close ... the expand/collapse boxes. Description Autosomal dominant cerebellar ataxia, deafness, and narcolepsy ( ADCADN ) is a nervous system ...

  1. Childhood Deafness: How Big a Problem In Malawi?

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    the prevalence of childhood deafness in societies similar to Malawi's and extrapolates ... dice chances of admission (personal communication). For those becoming deaf ... people other than his I her immediate family)?. 23. 10, Compared with ...

  2. DeafSpace and the principles of universal design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Claire; Harold, Gill

    2014-01-01

    Recent debates about the epistemological origins of Universal Design (UD) have questioned how far universalist design approaches can address the particularities and diversities of the human form through a series of standardised, technical responses. This article contributes to these debates by discussing an emergent architectural paradigm known as DeafSpace, which articulates a set of design principles originating from the d/Deaf community in the US. Commentary. DeafSpace has emerged as a design paradigm rooted in an expression of d/Deaf cultural identity based around sign language, rather than as a response designed to compensate for, or minimise, impairment. It distinguishes itself from UD by articulating a more user-centred design process, but its principles are arguably rooted in notions of d/Deaf identity based around consensus and homogeneity, with less attention paid to the socio-political contexts which shape diverse experiences of d/Deafness and the exclusion(s) of d/Deaf people from the built environment. While proponents of DeafSpace argue that UD and DeafSpace are not mutually exclusive, nor DeafSpace principles applicable only to d/Deaf people, questions remain about the type of spaces DeafSpace creates, most notably whether they lead to the creation of particularist spaces of and for the d/Deaf community, or reflect a set of design principles which can be embedded across a range of different environments. Implications for Rehabilitation UD as a basis for rehabilitation has been critiqued on the basis that creates "standardised", or universal solutions, thus negating the particularities of the human form. DeafSpace is an architectural paradigm rooted in socio-linguistic understandings of Deafness and the cultural identity of the Deaf community. It challenges UD's technocratic emphasis on minimising impairment and asserts design which is rooted in a more qualitative understanding of individuals' relationship with their environment. DeafSpace seeks to

  3. Reader-Centered Technical Writing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayanan, M.

    2012-12-01

    Technical writing is an essential part of professional communication and in recent years it has shifted from a genre-based approach. Formerly, technical writing primarily focused on generating templates of documents and sometimes it was creating or reproducing traditional forms with minor modifications and updates. Now, technical writing looks at the situations surrounding the need to write. This involves deep thinking about the goals and objectives of the project on hand. Furthermore, one observes that it is very important for any participatory process to have the full support of management. This support needs to be well understood and believed by employees. Professional writing may be very persuasive in some cases. When presented in the appropriate context, technical writing can persuade a company to improve work conditions ensuring employee safety and timely production. However, one must recognize that lot of professional writing still continues to make use of reports and instruction manuals. Normally, technical and professional writing addresses four aspects. Objective: The need for generating a given professionally written technical document and the goals the document is expected to achieve and accomplish. Clientele: The clientele who will utilize the technical document. This may include the people in the organization. This may also include "unintended readers." Customers: The population that may be affected by the content of the technical document generated. This includes the stakeholders who will be influenced. Environment: The background in which the document is created. Also, the nature of the situation that warranted the generation of the document. Swiss Psychologist Jean Piaget's view of Learning focuses on three aspects. The author likes to extend Jean Piaget's ideas to students, who are asked to prepare and submit Reader-Centered Technical Writing reports and exercises. Assimilation: Writers may benefit specifically, by assimilating a new object into

  4. The effects of American Sign Language as an assessment accommodation for students who are deaf or hard of hearing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cawthon, Stephanie W; Winton, Samantha M; Garberoglio, Carrie Lou; Gobble, Mark E

    2011-01-01

    Students who are deaf or hard of hearing (SDHH) often need accommodations to participate in large-scale standardized assessments. One way to bridge the gap between the language of the test (English) and a student's linguistic background (often including American Sign Language [ASL]) is to present test items in ASL. The specific aim of this project was to measure the effects of an ASL accommodation on standardized test scores for SDHH in reading and mathematics. A total of 64 fifth- to eighth-grade (ages 10-15) SDHH from schools for the deaf in the United States participated in this study. There were no overall differences in the mean percent of items students scored correctly in the standard vs. ASL-accommodated conditions for reading or mathematics. We then conducted hierarchical linear regression analyses to analyze whether measures of exposure to ASL (home and classroom) and student proficiency in the subject area predicted student performance in ASL-accommodated assessments. The models explained up to half of the variance in the scores, with subject area proficiency (mathematics or reading) as the strongest predictor. ASL exposure was not significant with the exception of ASL classroom instruction as a predictor of mathematics scores.

  5. Inbreeding as a cause for deafness: Dadhkai study

    OpenAIRE

    Sushil Razdan; Sunil Kumar Raina; Pandita, Kamal K.; Shiveta Razdan; Renu Nanda; Rajni Kaul; Sandeep Dogra

    2012-01-01

    Background: We report on the higher prevalence of deaf-mutes from a village in Jammu and Kashmir State of India. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional study among 79 deaf mutes using pedigree analysis, audiometry, imaging and molecular analysis. Results: A high rate of hereditary deafness with 79 individuals diagnosed to be suffering from non-syndrome deafness in a total population of 2452 individuals residing in the village. Interpretation: Flourishing of intermarriages led t...

  6. Bilingual skills of deaf/hard of hearing children from Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guiberson, Mark

    2014-03-01

    This study described the first language (L1) and second language (L2) skills of a group of Spanish deaf/hard of hearing (DHH) children who were bilingual. Participants included parents of 51 DHH children from Spain. Parents completed an electronic survey that included questions on background, details on child's hearing loss, and bilingual status and L2 exposure. Parents also completed the Student Oral Language Observation Matrix, a rating scale that describes language skills. DHH bilingual children demonstrated L1 skills that were stronger than their monolingual DHH peers. Bilingual children demonstrated a wide range of L2 proficiency, and most were exposed to an L2 through parents and/or schooling. The majority of parents reported that their children demonstrated L2 skills that were either better than or at the level they had expected. These results correspond with earlier studies that indicate the DHH children are capable of becoming bilingual. Implications for clinical practice are discussed.

  7. Speech language therapy bilingual clinic, a written language therapeutical proposal to deaf people: case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guarinello, Ana Cristina; Massi, Giselle; Berberian, Ana Paula; Tonocchi, Rita; Lustosa, Sandra Silva

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to analyze the written production of a deaf person who is in the process of written language acquisition. One person with hearing disability, called R., participated in this study together with his Speech Language Pathologist. The therapist, proficient in sign language, acted as an interlocutor and interpreter, prioritizing the interactive nature of language and interfering in the written production only when it was requested. During the 3 years of work with R., a change in stance toward written language was observed. In addition, he began to reflect on his texts and utilize written Portuguese in a way that allowed his texts to be more coherent. Writing became an opportunity to show his singularity and to begin reconstructing his relationship with language. Speech language pathology and audiology therapy, at a bilingual clinic, can allow people with hearing disability early access to sign language and, consequently, enable the development of the written form of Portuguese.

  8. 77 FR 42187 - Relay Services for Deaf-Blind Individuals

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-18

    ... COMMISSION 47 CFR Part 64 Relay Services for Deaf-Blind Individuals AGENCY: Federal Communications Commission... Communications and Video Accessibility Act of 2010, Section 105, Relay Services for Deaf-Blind Individuals, Order... Services for Deaf-Blind Individuals, CG Docket No. 10-210. Form Number: N/A. Type of Review: Revision of a...

  9. Sensitivity to Conversational Maxims in Deaf and Hearing Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surian, Luca; Tedoldi, Mariantonia; Siegel, Michael

    2010-01-01

    We investigated whether access to a sign language affects the development of pragmatic competence in three groups of deaf children aged 6 to 11 years: native signers from deaf families receiving bimodal/bilingual instruction, native signers from deaf families receiving oralist instruction and late signers from hearing families receiving oralist…

  10. Reading and Deaf Individuals: Perspectives on the Qualitative Similarity Hypothesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ye; Andrews, Jean

    2014-01-01

    In this, the first article in the "American Annals of the Deaf" special issue on English reading development for individuals who are d/Deaf and hard of hearing, the coeditors aim to promote interdisciplinary dialogue among researchers regarding literacy research with d/Deaf and hard of hearing (d/Dhh) students by setting the tone for an…

  11. Education Reforms and English Teaching for the Deaf in Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quay, Suzanne

    2005-01-01

    Deaf education is in a period of great transition in Japan as a result of the "Educational Reform Plan for the 21st Century" proposed by the Japanese education ministry. Unfortunately, the communication needs of deaf students have not been taken into account in the Plan's recommendations. One area where deaf students must attain the same…

  12. Deaf and Hearing Children: A Comparison of Peripheral Vision Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Codina, Charlotte; Buckley, David; Port, Michael; Pascalis, Olivier

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated peripheral vision (at least 30[degrees] eccentric to fixation) development in profoundly deaf children without cochlear implantation, and compared this to age-matched hearing controls as well as to deaf and hearing adult data. Deaf and hearing children between the ages of 5 and 15 years were assessed using a new,…

  13. Deaf Children with Disabilities: Rights under the IDEA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raimondo, Barbara

    2010-01-01

    Parents of children who are deaf and who have disabilities often face barriers in ensuring that their children receive the services they need. Some of these barriers include lack of awareness about deafness-disability constellations, shortages of professionals knowledgeable about how deaf children learn or the impact of the disability on deaf…

  14. Deaf Children's Understanding of Other People's Thought Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edmondson, Peter

    2006-01-01

    This study focuses on the ability of deaf children to predict the behaviours of other people, based on an understanding of their beliefs. An unexpected transfer task and a deceptive box task were used with a group of 55 severely/profoundly deaf children. Results reiterate the findings of other studies that many deaf children are grossly delayed in…

  15. The Early Years: Parents and Young Deaf Children Reading Together

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lutz, Lori

    2017-01-01

    Research is just beginning to describe the role of reading in the lives of families with deaf children. While the time that deaf children spend reading or being read to represents only a small part of their lives at home, research highlights its importance for young children--hearing as well as deaf. Children whose parents read to them at home…

  16. Influences on Facial Emotion Recognition in Deaf Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidera, Francesc; Amadó, Anna; Martínez, Laura

    2017-01-01

    This exploratory research is aimed at studying facial emotion recognition abilities in deaf children and how they relate to linguistic skills and the characteristics of deafness. A total of 166 participants (75 deaf) aged 3-8 years were administered the following tasks: facial emotion recognition, naming vocabulary and cognitive ability. The…

  17. Refinement of the locus for non-syndromic sensorineural deafness ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Non-syndromic X-linked deafness is a rare form of genetic deafness in humans accounting for a small proportion of all hereditary hearing loss. Different clinical forms of non-syndromic X-linked deafness have been described, and most of these have been mapped. Here, we report a Chinese family affected by a congenital ...

  18. Reaching the Summit: Deaf Adults as Essential Partners in Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourne-Firl, Bridgetta

    2016-01-01

    How do we reach the summit in terms of supporting the best transition possible for each young deaf or hard of hearing individual in the United States? Should professionals who are hearing work alone to succeed with deaf and hard of hearing students? No matter how good the intention, if we want deaf and hard of hearing students to transition from…

  19. Programs for Deaf-blind Children and Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Annals of the Deaf, 2001

    2001-01-01

    This directory provides information on programs for deaf-blind children and adults including national and state programs, the Helen Keller Centers for Deaf-Blind Youth and Adults, and programs for training teachers of deaf-blind students. Within each broad category, programs are listed alphabetically by state and provide detailed contact…

  20. Social Factors Influencing Participation in Sport for the Deaf.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, David A.

    1987-01-01

    The article looks at social factors influencing participation in sport by the deaf including communication mode and value orientations of community, family, school, and peers of both the hearing and deaf world. A model for integration of the deaf into sports is offered. (DB)

  1. Language policy and literacy among deaf people in Lesotho ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... as yet, failed to change the trend whereby deaf learners remain the most discriminated against. The article further argues that denying deaf learners an opportunity to acquire literacy through the Lesotho Sign Language, which is their primary language, contributes to the unsatisfactory state of deaf education in Lesotho.

  2. Congenital non-syndromal deafness at Adamarobe, an isolated ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A study to determine the prevalence, incidence and audiometric characteristics of deafness was done at Adamarobe, an isolated deaf village in Ghana. The procedures adopted include collection of family histories, pedigree, otoscopy and audiometric evaluation. As it turned out, a total of 45 deaf persons were identified in ...

  3. The Use of Acquired Speech by Deaf Adults in Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mba, Peter O.

    The controversy between the oral and the total communication approach to deaf education is reviewed and a study of the use of acquired speech by 71 deaf adults in Nigeria is presented. Questionnaire results are discussed in terms of demographics, cause and age at onset of deafness, use of amplification, school achievement, type of employment,…

  4. Rubella Deaf-Blind Child: Implications of Psychological Assessment. Proceedings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouin, Carole

    Presented are proceedings of a conference involving authorities in testing and evaluating the blind, deaf, and deaf-blind. In a paper titled "Psychological Implications of Assessing the Deaf", C. Goetzinger discusses references used in audiology, anatomy and physiology of the ear, degrees of hearing impairment, and implications of the various…

  5. Reader responses to literary depictions of rape

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.M. Koopman (Emy); M. Hilscher (Michelle); G.C. Cupchik (Gerald)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractThis study explored reader responses to different literary depictions of rape. Four literary excerpts were used and divided as aesthetic versus nonaesthetic (style) and allusive versus explicit (detail). The general question was how readers would react to literary fragments depicting

  6. Advanced Hindi Reader in the Social Sciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vatuk, Ved Prakash

    This reader contains 25 selections in standard Hindi by recognized authorities in the major fields of social science; namely sociology, anthropology, folklore, economics, and political science. The writings, evenly divided both in content and style, are intended to give the reader a broad perspective of Indian culture. A 128-page Hindi-English…

  7. Reader-Response Theory and ELT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirvela, Alan

    1996-01-01

    Discusses the notion of personal response, which is a method in English-language teaching that aims to elicit learner production of discourse in the target language. The article distinguishes between reader-response and personal response approaches and demonstrates how the inclusion of reader response in literature-based communicative language…

  8. Expanding the Reader Landscape of Histone Acylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Abid; Bridgers, Joseph B; Strahl, Brian D

    2017-04-04

    In this issue of Structure,Klein et al. (2017) expand our understanding of what reader domains bind to by showing that MORF, a double PHD domain containing lysine acetyltransferase, is a preferential reader of histone lysine acylation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Secondary School Students' Opinions about Readers' Theatre

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karabag, S. Gulin

    2015-01-01

    In this article, a teaching strategy which not only blends yesterday and today in a meaningful way but also powerfully integrates literacy and history will be examined. Firstly Readers' Theatre as a technique will be introduced. Secondly, the usage guidelines of Readers' Theatre will be presented. Finally the opinions of secondary school students…

  10. The active reader: what is active?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Woerkum, van C.

    2012-01-01

    How writers can adapt to their readers is an important issue in effective communication strategies, and certainly crucial in the case of functional texts. Therefore, it is necessary to look at how readers are constructed as partners in a communication co-production. This article explores the concept

  11. Fiction Reading Strategies of College Readers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poole, Alex

    2013-01-01

    Research has shown that skilled college readers use a variety of strategies in flexible ways in order to comprehend academic texts. However, little is known about how skilled college readers use strategies when reading fiction, in spite of the fact that literature courses are required at many universities and thousands of students regularly major…

  12. Postmodern theories about readers in electronic environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivanka Kuić

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Introductory part of the paper discusses theories about readers in the last decades of the 20th century. In particular, two big theoretical schools are discussed: aesthetic reception theory and reader-response-criticism movement. Readers are a subject of very different scientific disciplines: literature theory, sociology, anthropology, book history and library science. The idea that a reader is an essential subject for future life of a literary work is common to all theorists. By constructing the theory about a reader, theorists have thought about the reader who uses the conventions of printed text. The issue whether these concepts correspond to electronic surroundings is discussed. Characteristics of the hypertext are emphasized as a new paradigm, and also the issue weather readers enjoys in hypertextual fiction. In conclusion, paper expands the virtual dimension of Isers's theory about interaction between the text and the reader, and also Fish's concept of “interpretative community” which may be constituted on the Internet as a flexible virtual community.

  13. Cyber Literature: A Reader – Writer Interactivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fathu Rahman

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Cyber Literature is a term known since the coming of the internet which brings a convenience, changing habit and world view. This study is a survey-based on respondents’ opinion about the existence of cyber literature on social media; of its benefit and impact to the reader. This study limits to the poems on Facebook group. The reason is simple; it favors the short form. For the study of a reader-writer interactivity in cyber literature is more likely on poetry. The approach is reader response literary theory with focus on the reader-writer interactivity on Facebook. This research aimed at uncovering the motivation of readers to response the uploaded text, the reasons why they love it and what its advantages. The results showed that cyber literature is successfully to introduce a new literary genre as well as to raise motivation and creativity of authors to make use the internet space.

  14. ESL Proficiency and a Word Frequency Count.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harlech-Jones, Brian

    1983-01-01

    In a study of the vocabulary proficiency of some South African ESL teacher trainees, the General Service List of English Words' validity was evaluated. It was found that mastery of this list would meet most of the vocabulary needs of the test group. Recommendations are made for practical uses of word counts. (MSE)

  15. Discrepancies between perceptions of English proficiency and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Empirical data that indicate a discrepancy between perceptions and scores on English tests among South African participants (1998-2011) are reported. A discrepancy between perceptions of English proficiency and scores on English tests is important because of its potential impact on language learner motivation. It will be ...

  16. Measuring Task Proficiency with Tailored Response Testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Herbert George; And Others

    Tailored Response Testing (TRT) is a new type of test that has demonstrated its applicability to the evaluation of human performance in a wide variety of occupations and work settings. The Navy is using TRT to measure the technical proficiency of job incumbents in three of its jobs. The methodology holds great promise for testing aboard ships as…

  17. Crime Laboratory Proficiency Testing Research Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Joseph L.; And Others

    A three-year research effort was conducted to design a crime laboratory proficiency testing program encompassing the United States. The objectives were to: (1) determine the feasibility of preparation and distribution of different classes of physical evidence; (2) assess the accuracy of criminalistics laboratories in the processing of selected…

  18. One Hundred Percent Proficiency: A Mission Impossible

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haas, Eric; Wilson, Glen; Cobb, Casey; Rallis, Sharon

    2005-01-01

    Applying microeconomic theory to No Child Left Behind predicts that its use of significant consequences for schools that do not reach 100% proficiency on rigorous standardized tests by 2014 will likely prevent most, if not all schools, from providing a high-quality education for their students. The central problem is cost. Quality assurance models…

  19. Current Proficiency Testing: A Reflection of Teaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irvine-Niakaris, Christine

    1997-01-01

    Looks at the washback effect in language testing, using as an example the new University of Michigan Examination for Certificate of Competency (ECCE), designed for intermediate- to upper-intermediate level learners. The ECCE can be considered an example of the movement toward achievement-oriented proficiency tests. (Author/VWL)

  20. 14 CFR 61.157 - Flight proficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Flight proficiency. 61.157 Section 61.157... CERTIFICATION: PILOTS, FLIGHT INSTRUCTORS, AND GROUND INSTRUCTORS Airline Transport Pilots § 61.157 Flight... and log ground and flight training from an authorized instructor on the areas of operation under this...

  1. 5 CFR 9901.364 - Foreign language proficiency pay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Foreign language proficiency pay. 9901... Foreign Language Proficiency Pay (FLPP) if they are certified as proficient in a foreign language the... annual list of foreign languages necessary for national security interests and to establish overall...

  2. Time to English Reading Proficiency. Research Brief. RB 1201

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shneyderman, Aleksandr; Froman, Terry

    2012-01-01

    The time it takes for an English Language Learner (ELL) to reach reading proficiency in English depends on the grade level of entry into the English for Speakers of Other Languages (ESOL) program and on the student's initial English proficiency level. The summary table below presents the average years to English proficiency across different grade…

  3. 34 CFR 300.27 - Limited English proficient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Limited English proficient. 300.27 Section 300.27... CHILDREN WITH DISABILITIES General Definitions Used in This Part § 300.27 Limited English proficient. Limited English proficient has the meaning given the term in section 9101(25) of the ESEA. (Authority: 20...

  4. Profiles in Bilingualism: Factors Influencing Kindergartners' Language Proficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixon, L. Quentin; Wu, Shuang; Daraghmeh, Ahlam

    2012-01-01

    Three common assumptions concerning bilingual children's language proficiency are: (1) their proficiency in two languages is usually unbalanced; (2) low socioeconomic status (SES) indicates low proficiency in both languages; and (3) encouraging parents to speak some societal language at home will promote its development. Examining the vocabulary…

  5. Segmentation and accuracy-based scores for the automatic assessment of oral proficiency for proficient L2 speakers

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    De Wet, Febe

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports on the automatic assessment of oral proficiency for advanced second language speakers. A spoken dialogue system is used to guide students through an oral test and to record their answers. Indicators of oral proficiency...

  6. Gênero e surdez / Gender and deafness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madalena Klein

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Este artigo propõe-se discutir a temática da surdez, articulando-a com discussões referentes a gênero e sexualidade, tomando por referência autores da perspectiva dosEstudos Culturais em Educação e dos Estudos Surdos. A surdez e os surdos, assim como o gênero, são entendidos a partir da diferença cultural. No mercado de trabalho em geral, as surdas são discriminadas, porém são a maioria no professorado, o que é uma conseqüência da feminização do trabalho docente. A crescente presença feminina na liderança dos movimentos surdos pode estar relacionada a essa maioria de professoras, que carregam para os movimentos características da organização escolar. Analisamos dois artigos sobre o tema, além de um encontro sobre mulheres surdas ocorrido em Pelotas – RS, onde as participantes destacaram seu papel na luta política da associação dos surdos, enquanto aos homens cabe o papel de organizar as atividades de lazer e esportes. A luta pelos direitos das mulheres surdas vem crescendo no Brasil e há necessidade de haver mais estudos sobre essa temática.Abstract This paper discusses the topic of deafness, articulating it with discussions referring to gender and sexuality, based on authors from the perspectives of Cultural Studies in Education and Deaf Studies. Deafness and deaf people, as the gender issue, are understood through a cultural difference perspective. Deaf women are discriminated inthe workplace in general, but they are the majority in the teaching profession, a consequence of the feminization of the teaching work. The increasing female presence as leaders of deaf movements may be related to this greater rate of women as teachers, who carry the features of the school organization onto the movements. Two papers onthe topic were examined, as well as a meeting on deaf women occurring in Pelotas – RS, whose participants highlighted their role in the political struggle by the deaf people’s association, while men take

  7. Stigma in Mothers of Deaf Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebrahimi, Hossein; Mohammadi, Eissa; Mohammadi, Mohammad Ali; Pirzadeh, Akbar; Mahmoudi, Hamzeh; Ansari, Ismail

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: A deaf child creates a feeling of stigma in many hearing parents. Stigma in mothers can have a negative impact on a child’s treatment and rehabilitation process. Therefore, this study was conducted to evaluate the extent of stigma in mothers with deaf children. Materials and Methods: This descriptive, cross-sectional study was conducted in 2013 among 90 mothers with deaf children. The data-collection instrument included the stigma scale in the mothers of children with disabilities. The reliability and validity of the instrument were confirmed through content validity and Cronbach’s alpha coefficient (α=86%), respectively. Data were analyzed using SPSS-15 software. Results: Results showed that most mothers suffer from stigma due to having a deaf child. The mean stigma score was 96.48 ±27.72. In total, 24.4% of mothers reported that they had received strange and mocking looks; 72.2% regarded child deafness as a sign of divine retribution; and 33.3% felt ashamed of their child’s deafness. There was an inverse relationship between the mother’s level of education and mean stigma scores (P<0.033). The stigma score was higher in mothers who were living independently of their relatives (P<0.029). The mean stigma score in mothers of children with a cochlear implant was lower than that of mothers of children with earphones (86.70 vs. 99.64), and this difference tended towards significance (P=0.057). Conclusion: This study showed that half of all mothers with deaf children were scorned and felt ashamed of having a deaf child in the family because of the stigma. The majority of mothers with deaf children felt stigmatized, and only their education and residency status affected this issue. The mothers of cochlear-implanted children perceived less stigma. Due to the various social and psychological problems caused by hearing impairment, it is necessary to consider the emotional health and psychological state of the mothers in addition to rehabilitation

  8. [Evaluation of deaf-mute patients with sensitive deafness gene screening in Shandong province].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Yu-bin; Han, Dong-yi; Wang, Da-yong; Zhou, Yu; Zhao, Cui; Wang, Hui; Lan, Lan; Wang, Qiu-ju

    2009-09-29

    To discuss how to determine the number of samples in epidemiological study about deafness genes and reveal the characteristics of GJB2, SLC26A4 and mitochondrial DNA A1555G mutations in deaf-mute patients in schools for deaf-mutes in Shandong Province. A total of 485 subjects were collected from the different schools for deaf-mutes in Shandong province. Amplified target fragments included GJB2 coding sequence, mtDNA12SrRNA and exon 8, 10, 17, 19 of SLC26A4 gene. The amplicons of mtDNA 12S rRNA were subjected to restriction enzyme Alw26I. The amplicons of patients whose enzyme reaction highly indicating A1555G mutation, amplicons of GJB2 and those exons PCR products of SLC26A4 were directly sequenced. The study revealed that 36.29% patients had two mutated alleles (homozygote & compound heterozygote) of GJB2 (24.12%) and SLC26A4 (6.60%) and mtDNA12SrRNA A1555G (5.57%). The 235delC and IVS7-2A > G were still the mutational hot spot in GJB2 and SLC26A4 respectively. The method of determining the number of sample is very important in the epidemiological study. There were about 24 thousand deaf-mute patients who were caused by three sensitive deafness genes mutations in Shandong province. Screening the sensitive deafness genes in newborn is imminent.

  9. Health promotion of families of deaf children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirna Albuquerque Frota

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To investigate the impact of hearing loss in the family dynamics of the deaf child; identify the family’s knowledge about deafness, understand how parents experience the diagnosis and treatment of child with hearing impairment. Methods: The study has aqualitative approach developed at the Center for Integrated Medical Care - NAMI, attached to the University of Fortaleza - UNIFOR located in Fortaleza - CE, Brazil. The participants were six mothers of children with hearing impairment. Data collection was carried outthrough participant observation and semi-structured interview. The Thematic Analysis of Bardin was used for processing the data. Results: After coding, some categories emerged from the discourse: Misinformation of Hearing Loss; impact of the discovery of hearingloss, caregivers and facilitators of the development of the deaf children. Conclusion: The birth of a deaf child alters the previous family balance, causing specific problems, such as the communication barrier, whose solution is related to how to handle the situation. Itis necessary to promote changes, emphasizing the involvement of caregivers and loved as facilitators of deaf child’s development. In Phonoaudiology, this attitude represents discovering new ways to identify the need for the subject, which requires strategies thatvalue their opinion, allowing the expression of expectations, perceptions, representations and feelings.

  10. Consanguinity and deafness in Omani children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khabori, Mazin Al; Patton, Michael A

    2008-01-01

    This study was based on a national retrospective analysis of 1400 questionnaires on the causes of deafness in Omani children, collected from 1986 to 2000. It was found that 70% of the deaf children were from parents of consanguineous marriages, and 30% from non-consanguineous unions. In those with consanguineous families 70.16% were first cousin marriages, 17.54% were second cousins, and 10.86% were from the same tribe. The proportion arising from first cousin marriages was higher than the background rate of first cousin marriages in Oman. In the total cohort, 45% had other family members with hearing loss. There was a greater chance of other relatives being affected in the consanguineous group as opposed to the non-consanguineous group (29.7% versus 15.3%). In most cases the affected relative was a deaf sibling (67.8%). We have demonstrated a higher rate of consanguinity amongst parents of deaf children in Oman and suggest this is associated with a higher frequency of autosomal recessive deafness in this paediatric population.

  11. Deaf Culture and Competing Discourses in a Residential School for the Deaf: "Can Do" versus "Can't Do"

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, Catherine A.; Placier, Peggy

    2015-01-01

    From an ethnographic case study of a state-funded residential school for the Deaf, the authors employed Critical Discourse Analysis to identify competing discourses in the talk of educators. These discourses are embedded in the historical oppression and labeling of deaf people as disabled and the development of Deaf culture as a counter-discourse.…

  12. Sign-Language Theatre and Deaf Theatre: New Definitions and Directions. Center on Deafness Publication Series No. 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miles, Dorothy S.; Fant, Louie J., Jr.

    Offered are guidelines to the development of theatre for, by, and about deaf persons. Various terms used for sign-language theatre and deaf theatre are defined and discussed in an introductory section, and the use of sign language as a theatrical medium is explained. The production of theatre is covered by sections on the history of deaf theatre,…

  13. Structural brain changes linked to delayed first language acquisition in congenitally deaf individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pénicaud, Sidonie; Klein, Denise; Zatorre, Robert J; Chen, Jen-Kai; Witcher, Pamela; Hyde, Krista; Mayberry, Rachel I

    2013-02-01

    Early language experience is essential for the development of a high level of linguistic proficiency in adulthood and in a recent functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) experiment, we showed that a delayed acquisition of a first language results in changes in the functional organization of the adult brain (Mayberry et al., 2011). The present study extends the question to explore if delayed acquisition of a first language also modulates the structural development of the brain. To this end, we carried out anatomical MRI in the same group of congenitally deaf individuals who varied in the age of acquisition of a first language, American Sign Language -ASL (Mayberry et al., 2011) and used a neuroanatomical technique, Voxel-Based Morphometry (VBM), to explore changes in gray and white matter concentrations across the brain related to the age of first language acquisition. The results show that delayed acquisition of a first language is associated with changes in tissue concentration in the occipital cortex close to the area that has been found to show functional recruitment during language processing in these deaf individuals with a late age of acquisition. These findings suggest that a lack of early language experience affects not only the functional but also the anatomical organization of the brain. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Attention-getting skills of deaf children using American Sign Language in a preschool classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lieberman, Amy M

    2015-07-01

    Visual attention is a necessary prerequisite to successful communication in sign language. The current study investigated the development of attention-getting skills in deaf native-signing children during interactions with peers and teachers. Seven deaf children (aged 21-39 months) and five adults were videotaped during classroom activities for approximately 30 hr. Interactions were analyzed in depth to determine how children obtained and maintained attention. Contrary to previous reports, children were found to possess a high level of communicative competence from an early age. Analysis of peer interactions revealed that children used a range of behaviors to obtain attention with peers, including taps, waves, objects, and signs. Initiations were successful approximately 65% of the time. Children followed up failed initiation attempts by repeating the initiation, using a new initiation, or terminating the interaction. Older children engaged in longer and more complex interactions than younger children. Children's early exposure to and proficiency in American Sign Language is proposed as a likely mechanism that facilitated their communicative competence.

  15. Attention-getting skills of deaf children using American Sign Language in a preschool classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    LIEBERMAN, AMY M.

    2014-01-01

    Visual attention is a necessary prerequisite to successful communication in sign language. The current study investigated the development of attention-getting skills in deaf native-signing children during interactions with peers and teachers. Seven deaf children (aged 21–39 months) and five adults were videotaped during classroom activities for approximately 30 hr. Interactions were analyzed in depth to determine how children obtained and maintained attention. Contrary to previous reports, children were found to possess a high level of communicative competence from an early age. Analysis of peer interactions revealed that children used a range of behaviors to obtain attention with peers, including taps, waves, objects, and signs. Initiations were successful approximately 65% of the time. Children followed up failed initiation attempts by repeating the initiation, using a new initiation, or terminating the interaction. Older children engaged in longer and more complex interactions than younger children. Children’s early exposure to and proficiency in American Sign Language is proposed as a likely mechanism that facilitated their communicative competence. PMID:26166917

  16. Disaster Relief and Crisis Intervention with Deaf Communities: Lessons Learned from the Japanese Deaf Community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takayama, Kota

    2017-01-01

    During natural disasters and crises, the deaf and hard of hearing community might not have full accessibility to all of the information shared with the larger hearing community. This could be due to the lack of awareness among social work professionals about these cultural and linguistic needs of this minority population. The purpose of this article is to explore the challenges faced by the deaf community and to discuss culturally and linguistically appropriate crisis intervention and mobilization to natural disaster situations based on the experiences of the Japanese deaf communities affected by the Kobe and Tohoku earthquakes.

  17. Tools Facilitating Communication for the Deaf

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luz Magnolia Tilano-Vega

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available There is a great deal of interest worldwide in serving people with diverse abilities and needs, especially in the field of education. This implies a commitment to inclusion, empowerment and creating opportunities in a range of sectors. The deaf pose a considerable challenge to any proposal for inclusion and social integration, because their difficulty affects communication. The purpose of this study is to contribute to theoretical reflection on the development of communication tools that give the deaf access to education. It is based on a review of studies found in databases, on institutional websites and in journals on disciplines such as teaching, psychology and engineering. The various tools that have been created to help members of the deaf community strengthen the social, educational, recreational and work-related aspects of their lives are listed.

  18. Rare cause of bilateral sudden deafness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vos, F I; Merkus, P; van Nieuwkerk, E B J; Hensen, E F

    2016-10-08

    In this paper, we describe the case of a 62-year-old female with recurring episodes of sudden deafness with vertigo and facial paresis. Within a month's time, this resulted in bilateral deafness and vestibular areflexia. Erroneously, the patient was diagnosed with sudden deafness of unknown origin and subsequently with neuroborreliosis (Lyme disease). The true diagnosis of relapsing polychondritis (RP) was revealed 9 months after initial presentation. The diagnostic delay is in part explained by the fact that, by definition, the disease has to relapse before the diagnosis can be made, but also by its pluriform clinical presentation. Timely identification of RP as the cause of this profound sensorineural hearing loss proved to be important. It was key in instigating adequate follow-up, and allowed for cochlear implantation before total cochlear obliteration, which might have hampered optimal hearing rehabilitation. 2016 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  19. PERVALE-S: a new cognitive task to assess deaf people’s ability to perceive basic and social emotions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mestre, José M.; Larrán, Cristina; Herrero, Joaquín; Guil, Rocío; de la Torre, Gabriel G.

    2015-01-01

    A poorly understood aspect of deaf people (DP) is how their emotional information is processed. Verbal ability is key to improve emotional knowledge in people. Nevertheless, DP are unable to distinguish intonation, intensity, and the rhythm of language due to lack of hearing. Some DP have acquired both lip-reading abilities and sign language, but others have developed only sign language. PERVALE-S was developed to assess the ability of DP to perceive both social and basic emotions. PERVALE-S presents different sets of visual images of a real deaf person expressing both basic and social emotions, according to the normative standard of emotional expressions in Spanish Sign Language. Emotional expression stimuli were presented at two different levels of intensity (1: low; and 2: high) because DP do not distinguish an object in the same way as hearing people (HP) do. Then, participants had to click on the more suitable emotional expression. PERVALE-S contains video instructions (given by a sign language interpreter) to improve DP’s understanding about how to use the software. DP had to watch the videos before answering the items. To test PERVALE-S, a sample of 56 individuals was recruited (18 signers, 8 lip-readers, and 30 HP). Participants also performed a personality test (High School Personality Questionnaire adapted) and a fluid intelligence (Gf) measure (RAPM). Moreover, all deaf participants were rated by four teachers for the deaf. Results: there were no significant differences between deaf and HP in performance in PERVALE-S. Confusion matrices revealed that embarrassment, envy, and jealousy were worse perceived. Age was just related to social-emotional tasks (but not in basic emotional tasks). Emotional perception ability was related mainly to warmth and consciousness, but negatively related to tension. Meanwhile, Gf was related to only social-emotional tasks. There were no gender differences. PMID:26300828

  20. Deafness, a Social Stigma: Physician Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taneja, M K

    2014-12-01

    Hearing is an essential sensory sense of an individual for development of speech which is crucial for verbal communication and personality development. It is the second most common form of disability after loco motor disability in India. Disabling hearing loss is more than 40 dB hearing loss in better ear in a person more than 15 years of age and greater than 30 dB hearing loss in better hearing ear below 14 years of age. WHO estimated 360 million individuals in the world with disabling hearing loss, out of which 91 % are adults and only 9 % are children. Early and accurate identification of birth asphyxia, hyperbilirubinemia, auditory neuropathy Presbyacusis and avoiding noise pollution and discouraging use of mobile phone, tobacco chewing/smoking, in those who are prone to deafness, an intervention is a must to decrease deafness from our society. Deafness prevention can only be possible with mutual cooperation with dedication of different medical and non-medical personnel and also by helping the persons with deafness. We have to focus not only on the children but also on senior citizens as most alarming, up to 40 %, incidence of deafness is in senior citizens above the age of 75 years. Timely cure and preventive measures are essential for better socio-economic state of the country. By helping the persons with deafness, we will not only be doing a great service to the Nation but also to the society at large.

  1. Deaf college students' perspectives on literacy portfolios.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nickerson, Jane Freiburg

    2003-01-01

    The study examined how literacy portfolios were used as tools in a college developmental English class in which deaf students assessed their reading comprehension as well as their writing processes and products. The students' reading and writing assignments involved reflective thinking and were grounded in authentic tasks. Immediate feedback was provided. The study was multidimensional, longitudinal, and ongoing. A variety of field research techniques were used to ascertain the uses and influences of portfolios in regard to students' reading, writing, and reflective thinking. The results support the idea that the use of literacy portfolios can positively influence students who are deaf when they assess their reading and writing abilities.

  2. Preventing disability through understanding international megatrends in Deaf bilingual education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munoz-Baell, I M; Alvarez-Dardet, C; Ruiz, M T; Ortiz, R; Esteban, M L; Ferreiro, E

    2008-02-01

    Education is a basic prerequisite for d/Deaf people's health. Deaf education varies considerably from country to country and we still know very little about the reasons for such variation. To identify international megatrends that influence the current Deaf bilingual education move (Deaf Bilingual-Bicultural education; DBiBi) worldwide. Using the Delphi technique, 41 experts in d/Deaf education (nine Deaf, 32 hearing) from 18 countries identified, ranked, and rated international megatrends in DBiBi education. The process revealed six main essential elements of the international implementation of DBiBi education and nine main barriers against it. The top five promoting forces in that list in order of priority were: (1) societal and political changes towards a growing acceptance of diversity and Deaf issues; (2) growing Deaf activism, self-awareness and empowerment; (3) scientific research in sign linguistics and bilingualism; (4) changes in the d/Deaf educational community; and (5) international cooperation. The top five hindering forces included: (1) the view of deafness as a medical condition with a technological solution; (2) phonocentrism and societal resistance to the unknown; (3) educational and d/Deaf educational policies; (4) DBiBi education weaknesses; and (5) invisibility, heterogeneity and underperformance of the d/Deaf population. The results of this study reveal that social/political changes and a medical/social model of Deaf people's health can promote or limit Deaf people's educational options much more than changes within the education system itself, and that a transnational perspective is needed in deciding how best to support DBiBi education at a national and local level in an increasingly globalised world.

  3. Adult Hispanic ESL Students and Graded Readers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Liza E.

    2013-01-01

    Adult Hispanic ESL students in rural San Luis, Arizona, face a challenging situation. Since San Luis lies on the southwestern tip of Arizona and borders with Mexico, Spanish is the predominant language. English, on the other hand, is mostly heard in classrooms. This can be a predicament for adult Hispanics who need to be proficient in English in…

  4. The N400 in beginning readers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coch, Donna; Holcomb, Phillip J

    2003-09-01

    In an event-related potentials study of brain-behavior relations during learning-to-read, girls in first grade viewed known words, unknown words, difficult words, and nonwords presented in list form. Participants were divided into low-ability and high-ability reading groups based on standardized test scores. During the 300- to 600-ms epoch, low-ability readers lacked a substantial N400 while high-ability readers evidenced a large, widely distributed negativity to all word types. During the 600- to 1,000-ms epoch, high-ability readers showed effects of repetition while low-ability readers did not. The findings indicate a less selective neurocognitive word-processing system in children as compared to adults and suggest that the N400 may serve as an oblique index of the automaticity of lower level processing. Copyright 2003 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Dev Psychobiol 43: 146-166, 2003.

  5. Cultural Journalism Publications for Reluctant Readers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatcher, Barbara

    1980-01-01

    Provides a list of cultural journalism publications (based on oral history interviews) written, edited, and produced by students around the country that provide good easy reading for older reluctant readers. (MKM)

  6. Medical training and English language proficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, S C; Farnill, D

    1993-01-01

    Concern is often expressed about the English language proficiency (ELP) of students engaged in professional training. This report assesses the ELP of the 1990 and 1991 intakes into medicine at the University of Sydney. A quick screening test and individual in-depth tests were used in a two-stage design. Admission to the course is highly competitive and most students are selected from the top 0.75% of Higher School Certificate results but 15% and 19% of the year cohorts were found to be below average in ELP. English proficiency was found to be consistently correlated with first- and second-year university results. Initiatives taken to support students with language disadvantages and to ensure that graduates will be able to communicate effectively with patients are outlined.

  7. The role of music in deaf culture: deaf students' perception of emotion in music.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darrow, Alice-Ann

    2006-01-01

    Although emotional interpretation of music is an individual and variable experience, researchers have found that typical listeners are quite consistent in associating basic or primary emotions such as happiness, sadness, fear, and anger to musical compositions. It has been suggested that an individual with a sensorineural hearing loss, or any lesion in auditory perceptors in the brain may have trouble perceiving music emotionally. The purpose of the present study was to investigate whether students with a hearing loss who associate with the deaf culture, assign the same emotions to music as students without a hearing loss. Sixty-two elementary and junior high students at a Midwestern state school for the deaf and students at neighboring elementary and junior high schools served as participants. Participants at the state school for the deaf had hearing losses ranging from moderate to severe. Twelve film score excerpts, composed to depict the primary emotions-happiness, sadness, and fear, were used as the musical stimuli. Participants were asked to assign an emotion to each excerpt. Results indicated a significant difference between the Deaf and typical hearing participants' responses, with hearing participants' responses more in agreement with the composers' intent. No significant differences were found for age or gender. Analyses of the Deaf participants' responses indicate that timbre, texture, and rhythm are perhaps the musical elements most influential in transmitting emotion to persons with a hearing loss. Adaptive strategies are suggested for assisting children who are deaf in accessing the elements of music intended to portray emotion.

  8. SYKE Proficiency Test 10/2014 Phytoplankton

    OpenAIRE

    Vuorio, Kristiina; Björklöf, Katarina; Kuosa, Harri; Jokipii, Reija; Järvinen, Marko; Lehtinen, Sirpa; Leivuori, Mirja; Niemelä, Maija; Väisänen, Ritva

    2015-01-01

    The Finnish Environment Institute (SYKE) organized in 2014 the fourth virtual phytoplankton proficiency test based on filmed material. A total of 39 analysts from 27 organizations and eight countries took part the test. The test material represented phytoplankton that typically occurs in boreal lakes and in the northern Baltic Sea. The test included three components: 1) phytoplankton species identification test, 2) phytoplankton counting test and 3) phytoplankton measurement of cell dimens...

  9. Investigating Language Proficiency and Learning Style Preference

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Bradford; Pirotto, Christopher

    2017-01-01

    Individual differences (ID) among language learners (e.g. language aptitude or motivation), are variables that are theorized to affect the degree of success one will have in acquiring a second language (L2). This study sought to add to the body of literature on learning style. 225first year students (divided into two groups based on English proficiency) at a private Japanese university were surveyed to determine their preferred learning style(s). The data obtained were then examined in relati...

  10. The English-Language and Reading Achievement of a Cohort of Deaf Students Speaking and Signing Standard English: A Preliminary Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Diane Corcoran; Luetke, Barbara; McLean, Meigan; Stryker, Deborah

    2016-01-01

    Research suggests that English-language proficiency is critical if students who are deaf or hard of hearing (D/HH) are to read as their hearing peers. One explanation for the traditionally reported reading achievement plateau when students are D/HH is the inability to hear insalient English morphology. Signing Exact English can provide visual access to these features. The authors investigated the English morphological and syntactic abilities and reading achievement of elementary and middle school students at a school using simultaneously spoken and signed Standard American English facilitated by intentional listening, speech, and language strategies. A developmental trend (and no plateau) in language and reading achievement was detected; most participants demonstrated average or above-average English. Morphological awareness was prerequisite to high test scores; speech was not significantly correlated with achievement; language proficiency, measured by the Clinical Evaluation of Language Fundamentals-4 (Semel, Wiig, & Secord, 2003), predicted reading achievement.

  11. Tone deafness: a new disconnection syndrome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loui, Psyche; Alsop, David; Schlaug, Gottfried

    2009-08-19

    Communicating with one's environment requires efficient neural interaction between action and perception. Neural substrates of sound perception and production are connected by the arcuate fasciculus (AF). Although AF is known to be involved in language, its roles in non-linguistic functions are unexplored. Here, we show that tone-deaf people, with impaired sound perception and production, have reduced AF connectivity. Diffusion tensor tractography and psychophysics were assessed in tone-deaf individuals and matched controls. Abnormally reduced AF connectivity was observed in the tone deaf. Furthermore, we observed relationships between AF and auditory-motor behavior: superior and inferior AF branches predict psychophysically assessed pitch discrimination and sound production perception abilities, respectively. This neural abnormality suggests that tone deafness leads to a reduction in connectivity resulting in pitch-related impairments. Results support a dual-stream anatomy of sound production and perception implicated in vocal communications. By identifying white matter differences and their psychophysical correlates, results contribute to our understanding of how neural connectivity subserves behavior.

  12. Educating Deaf Children: Language, Cognition, and Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marschark, Marc; Knoors, Harry

    2012-01-01

    Decades of research have demonstrated that deaf children generally lag behind hearing peers in terms of academic achievement, and that lags in some areas may never be overcome fully. Hundreds of research and intervention studies have been aimed at improving the situation, but they have resulted in only limited progress. This paper examines…

  13. Educating Deaf Children: Language, Cognition, and Learning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marschark, M.; Knoors, H.E.T.

    2012-01-01

    Decades of research have demonstrated that deaf children generally lag behind hearing peers in terms of academic achievement, and that lags in some areas may never be overcome fully. Hundreds of research and intervention studies have been aimed at improving the situation, but they have resulted in

  14. Cerebral Malaria Complicated by Blindness, Deafness and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Malaria is a parasitic disease affecting about 1 billion people globally and causing about 1.24 million deaths ... its attendant sequelae such as cerebral palsy, cortical blindness, sensory-neural deafness and rarely ... under pressure, and its analysis and culture were normal. Blood film for malaria parasite was positive for ...

  15. Deaf College Students' Perspectives on Literacy Portfolios.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nickerson, Jane Freiburg

    2003-01-01

    This study examined use of literacy portfolios in a college developmental English class in which students who are deaf assessed their reading comprehension, writing processes, and products. Assignments involved reflective thinking and were grounded in authentic tasks. Various field research techniques were used to ascertain the uses and influences…

  16. A DICTIONARY OF IDIOMS FOR THE DEAF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    BOATNER, MAXINE T.; GATES, JOHN E.

    DESIGNED FOR USE IN SECONDARY CLASSES FOR THE DEAF, THIS DICTIONARY LISTS OVER 4,000 IDIOMATIC EXPRESSIONS. FOR EACH IDIOM, THE ENTRY MAY INCLUDE VARIANT FORMS, PART OF SPEECH LABEL, STYLE LABEL, DEFINITION, USAGE NOTE, ILLUSTRATIVE SENTENCES, CROSS REFERENCES, A SYNONYM OR CONTRAST, AND ETYMOLOGY. AN APPENDIX LISTS ESSENTIAL IDIOMS. THIS DOCUMENT…

  17. Language Maintenance and the Deaf Child

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willoughby, Louisa

    2012-01-01

    For all families with deaf children, choosing communication methods is a complex and evolving business. This process is particularly complex for migrant background families, who must not only negotiate the role that speaking or signing will play in their communication practices, but also which spoken language(s) will be used--that of the host…

  18. Deaf Learners' Knowledge of English Universal Quantifiers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berent, Gerald P.; Kelly, Ronald R.; Porter, Jeffrey E.; Fonzi, Judith

    2008-01-01

    Deaf and hearing students' knowledge of English sentences containing universal quantifiers was compared through their performance on a 50-item, multiple-picture task that required students to decide whether each of five pictures represented a possible meaning of a target sentence. The task assessed fundamental knowledge of quantifier sentences,…

  19. Grapheme-Phoneme Acquisition of Deaf Preschoolers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beal-Alvarez, Jennifer S.; Lederberg, Amy R.; Easterbrooks, Susan R.

    2012-01-01

    We examined acquisition of grapheme-phoneme correspondences by 4 deaf and hard-of-hearing preschoolers using instruction from a curriculum designed specifically for this population supplemented by Visual Phonics. Learning was documented through a multiple baseline across content design as well as descriptive analyses. Preschoolers who used sign…

  20. Deaf Children's Bimodal Bilingualism and Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swanwick, Ruth

    2016-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of the research into deaf children's bilingualism and bilingual education through a synthesis of studies published over the last 15 years. This review brings together the linguistic and pedagogical work on bimodal bilingualism to inform educational practice. The first section of the review provides a synthesis of…

  1. Waardenburg syndrome in childhood deafness in Cameroon ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Two classic characteristics of WS were used as diagnostic criteria: deafness and pigmentation abnormalities (heterochromia iridis, white forelock and depigmented skin patches). In addition, to identify dystopia canthorum, a sign of WS type I, we calculated the W-index. Results. WS comprised 1% of the whole sample, 7% of ...

  2. THE DEAF BODY AND ITS SINGULARITIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aline Rodrigues

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This article refers to a section of a master dissertation held at Univates University Center from July 2013 to July 2015. Among the theories of philosophers of difference, including Deleuze and Barthes, the following research problem was taken: How a deaf body is pierced by different means other than the representation? Such a problem unfolds on the following objectives: understanding the ways in which some deaf bodies are unique and how they empower their lives; carto(photographing the affects produced by the encounter between a deaf body and the photography. These carto(photographs were held at different times, with three deaf people in the cities of Lajeado / RS and Estrela / RS, from paths which were traveled using a camera. The encounter with the work "Walking" by Lygia Clark (1964 served to think the route as a work that takes place in the act. In some cases, an unfinished body in motion of constant refusal to fix; in many others, only one body captured by stratified lines. At the end of the survey, it’s possible to see that the body's release is always difficult, so that it is more fixed in the objectivity and brevity, rather than in what a body is capable of producing as uniqueness.

  3. Deaf-Blind Bibliography. Revised Edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuckey, Kenneth A., Comp.

    The bibliography contains approximately 1500 citations (1954-1976) regarding deaf blind children. Entries are arranged alphabetically by author within the following 13 categories: the population; parents, family, and the adult community (including parent education and infant intervention); professionals/paraprofessionals; medical/neurological…

  4. Potentials of Rubella Deaf-Blind Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Benjamin F.

    Potentials of three classifications of rubella deaf blind children are discussed. Potentials for children at the middle trainable level and below are discussed for the areas of communication skills, daily living skills, mobility and orientation, vocational effort, and self-control and social interaction. For children in the upper trainable through…

  5. Hereditary congenital unilateral deafness : A new disorder?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dikkers, FG; Verheij, JBGM; van Mechelen, M

    Congenital unilateral deafness is a rare disorder. The prevalence rates are unknown. The prevalence of children with severe to profound hearing losses that are congenital (or acquired before the development of speech and language) is 0.5 to 3 per 1,000 live births. Evidently, congenital unilateral

  6. Teaching Idioms to Children Who Are Deaf.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, Kathleen M.; Hornett, Danielle

    1990-01-01

    A method is presented for helping children who are deaf to comprehend idiomatic expressions. The teaching method involves introducing the idiom, providing examples of proper usage, requiring students to give back examples for the idiom, evaluating comprehension of the idiom, and subsequently reinforcing learning through completion of a worksheet.…

  7. Developmental Social Cognitive Neuroscience: Insights from Deafness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corina, David; Singleton, Jenny

    2009-01-01

    The condition of deafness presents a developmental context that provides insight into the biological, cultural, and linguistic factors underlying the development of neural systems that impact social cognition. Studies of visual attention, behavioral regulation, language development, and face and human action perception are discussed. Visually…

  8. ATM: Restructing Learning for Deaf Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keefe, Barbara; Stockford, David

    Governor Baxter School for the Deaf is one of six Maine pilot sites chosen by NYNEX to showcase asynchronous transfer mode (ATM) technology. ATM is a network connection that allows high bandwidth transmission of data, voice, and video. Its high speed capability allows for high quality two-way full-motion video, which is especially beneficial to a…

  9. Health Care Access among Deaf People

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuenburg, Alexa; Fellinger, Paul; Fellinger, Johannes

    2016-01-01

    Access to health care without barriers is a clearly defined right of people with disabilities as stated by the UN Convention on the Rights of People with Disabilities. The present study reviews literature from 2000 to 2015 on access to health care for deaf people and reveals significant challenges in communication with health providers and gaps in…

  10. Ophthalmologic abnormalities among deaf students in Kaduna ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    [10] Difficult refractions especially in the younger age group were referred to a tertiary health facility for further management. All the children had comprehensive ear examination conducted by an Otorhinolaringologist and drugs were administered to those with treatable eye disease. Results. A total of 620 deaf students were ...

  11. Deaf Children and English: Parents Can Help.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katasse, Constance

    1997-01-01

    Describes strategies parents can use to teach English to children with deafness or those hard of hearing. Strategies include modeling reading and writing, communicating with the child in writing, providing word-rich books and writing supplies, playing word-based games, and learning special techniques for reading to and with the child. (CR)

  12. Alternatives to Teacher Testing for Deaf Candidates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, David S.

    Standardized written tests required for teacher licensure and certification often prevent or restrict qualified deaf and hard of hearing individuals from entering their chosen profession. These individuals do not have the same access to English as hearing people and the sentence structures, vocabulary, and language style in standardized tests are…

  13. Deafness and Text-Based Literacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Peter V.

    1993-01-01

    This paper argues that English text-based literacy skills (as opposed to nontext forms of communication such as audio-visual and American Sign Language) are necessary for people with deafness to succeed in the current technological, information-intensive society. (DB)

  14. Modifying Dialectical Behavior Therapy for Deaf Individuals

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Hearn, Amanda; Pollard, Robert Q., Jr.

    2008-01-01

    Therapies that rely on written materials, information, or procedures involving familiarity with the dominant culture (e.g., colloquialisms, history) often pose barriers to people who use another language, have low English literacy, or are less familiar with the dominant culture. All this applies deaf individuals. One of the most well-validated…

  15. A Money Unit for Deaf Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silvia, Evelyn

    1983-01-01

    A unit designed to teach deaf children (9 to 11 years old) about money, while covering other mathematical topics, is described. The program can either be covered in one block or infused into regular mathematics curriculum over a long period of time. (Author/SW)

  16. The management of deafness with cochlear implant – our experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jagoda Vatovec

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: The hearing impairment has an impact on the person’s capabilities and has an influence on the quality of life. In the early childhood the acoustic information is indispensable for development of speech and language. The cochlear implant is a biomedical device that enables the deaf to hear but it cannot help all the hearing impaired individuals.Patients and methods: In the period from March 1996 to August 2004 there were 110 deaf patients who were operated on for cochlear implantation. We evaluated the ethiologic factors of deafness, the age at onset of deafness and the benefits of cochlear implant use.Results: Most of the implanted patients were congenitally deaf (60.91%. The most frequent cause of deafness was hereditary hearing loss (30.00%. The period of deafness was in majority (52.72% less than five years but a few (10.00% were deaf for more than 15 years. Reimplantation was necessary in four patients. The application and the benefits vary between the individuals but only two gave up the implant all the remainders use it every day. The communication mode in 88 patients is acoustic-oral while in 22 subjects a total method is used.Conclusions: The outcome of management of deafness by cochlear implants is comparable to other centers. Good results in congenitally deaf children support the need for universal neonatal hearing screening.

  17. Some Ethical Dimensions of Cochlear Implantation for Deaf Children and Their Families

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Merv Hyde; Des Power

    A major source of controversy between Deaf people and those who support a "social/cultural" view of Deafness as "a life to be lived" and those who see deafness within a "medical model" as a "condition...

  18. 75 FR 10294 - National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-05

    ... Deafness and Other Communication Disorders; Notice of Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal... ON DEAFNESS AND OTHER COMMUNICATION DISORDERS, including consideration of personnel qualifications..., Division of Intramural Research, National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders, 5...

  19. Sexual health behaviors of Deaf American Sign Language (ASL) users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heiman, Erica; Haynes, Sharon; McKee, Michael

    2015-10-01

    Little is known about the sexual health behaviors of Deaf American Sign Language (ASL) users. We sought to characterize the self-reported sexual behaviors of Deaf individuals. Responses from 282 Deaf participants aged 18-64 from the greater Rochester, NY area who participated in the 2008 Deaf Health were analyzed. These data were compared with weighted data from a general population comparison group (N = 1890). We looked at four sexual health-related outcomes: abstinence within the past year; number of sexual partners within the last year; condom use at last intercourse; and ever tested for HIV. We performed descriptive analyses, including stratification by gender, age, income, marital status, and educational level. Deaf respondents were more likely than the general population respondents to self-report two or more sexual partners in the past year (30.9% vs 10.1%) but self-reported higher condom use at last intercourse (28.0% vs 19.8%). HIV testing rates were similar between groups (47.5% vs 49.4%) but lower for certain Deaf groups: Deaf women (46.0% vs 58.1%), lower-income Deaf (44.4% vs 69.7%) and among less educated Deaf (31.3% vs 57.7%) than among respondents from corresponding general population groups. Deaf respondents self-reported higher numbers of sexual partners over the past year compared to the general population. Condom use was higher among Deaf participants. HIV was similar between groups, though HIV testing was significantly lower among lower income, less well-educated, and female Deaf respondents. Deaf individuals have a sexual health risk profile that is distinct from that of the general population. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Sexual Health Behaviors of Deaf American Sign Language (ASL) Users

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heiman, Erica; Haynes, Sharon; McKee, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Background Little is known about the sexual health behaviors of Deaf American Sign Language (ASL) users. Objective We sought to characterize the self-reported sexual behaviors of Deaf individuals. Methods Responses from 282 Deaf participants aged 18–64 from the greater Rochester, NY area who participated in the 2008 Deaf Health were analyzed. These data were compared with weighted data from a general population comparison group (N=1890). We looked at four sexual health-related outcomes: abstinence within the past year; number of sexual partners within the last year; condom use at last intercourse; and ever tested for HIV. We performed descriptive analyses, including stratification by gender, age, income, marital status, and educational level. Results Deaf respondents were more likely than the general population respondents to self-report two or more sexual partners in the past year (30.9% vs 10.1%) but self-reported higher condom use at last intercourse (28.0% vs 19.8%). HIV testing rates were similar between groups (47.5% vs 49.4%) but lower for certain Deaf groups: Deaf women (46.0% vs. 58.1%), lower-income Deaf (44.4% vs. 69.7%) and among less educated Deaf (31.3% vs. 57.7%) than among respondents from corresponding general population groups. Conclusion Deaf respondents self-reported higher numbers of sexual partners over the past year compared to the general population. Condom use was higher among Deaf participants. HIV was similar between groups, though HIV testing was significantly lower among lower-income, less well-educated, and female Deaf respondents. Deaf individuals have a sexual health risk profile that is distinct from that of the general population. PMID:26242551

  1. Adaptive crossmodal plasticity in deaf auditory cortex: areal and laminar contributions to supranormal vision in the deaf.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lomber, Stephen G; Meredith, M Alex; Kral, Andrej

    2011-01-01

    This chapter is a summary of three interdigitated investigations to identify the neural substrate underlying supranormal vision in the congenitally deaf. In the first study, we tested both congenitally deaf and hearing cats on a battery of visual psychophysical tasks to identify those visual functions that are enhanced in the congenitally deaf. From this investigation, we found that congenitally deaf, compared to hearing, cats have superior visual localization in the peripheral field and lower visual movement detection thresholds. In the second study, we examined the role of "deaf" auditory cortex in mediating the supranormal visual abilities by reversibly deactivating specific cortical loci with cooling. We identified that in deaf cats, reversible deactivation of a region of cortex typically identified as the posterior auditory field (PAF) in hearing cats selectively eliminated superior visual localization abilities. It was also found that deactivation of the dorsal zone (DZ) of "auditory" cortex eliminated the superior visual motion detection abilities of deaf cats. In the third study, graded cooling was applied to deaf PAF and deaf DZ to examine the laminar contributions to the superior visual abilities of the deaf. Graded cooling of deaf PAF revealed that deactivation of the superficial layers alone does not cause significant visual localization deficits. Profound deficits were identified only when cooling extended through all six layers of deaf PAF. In contrast, graded cooling of deaf DZ showed that deactivation of only the superficial layers was required to elicit increased visual motion detection thresholds. Collectively, these three studies show that the superficial layers of deaf DZ mediate the enhanced visual motion detection of the deaf, while the full thickness of deaf PAF must be deactivated in order to eliminate the superior visual localization abilities of the congenitally deaf. Taken together, this combination of experimental approaches has

  2. Marital Status and Birthrate of Deaf People in Two Swedish Counties: The Impact of Social Environment in Terms of Deaf Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlsson, P. -I.; Danermark, B.; Borg, E.

    2004-01-01

    Deafness affects many social interactions. The impact of deafness depends on several factors, e.g., the type of social environment in terms of the particular Deaf community a person lives in. The authors recorded the birthrate and the proportions of married and divorced people among deaf people in two Swedish counties: Narke, which had a strong…

  3. Deaf mothers and breastfeeding: do unique features of deaf culture and language support breastfeeding success?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chin, Nancy P; Cuculick, Jessica; Starr, Matthew; Panko, Tiffany; Widanka, Holly; Dozier, Ann

    2013-11-01

    Deaf mothers who use American Sign Language (ASL) consider themselves a linguistic minority group, with specific cultural practices. Rarely has this group been engaged in infant-feeding research. To understand how Deaf mothers who use ASL learn about infant feeding and to identify their breastfeeding challenges. Using a community-based participatory research approach, we conducted 4 focus groups with Deaf mothers who had at least 1 child 0-5 years old. A script was developed using a social ecological model (SEM) to capture multiple levels of influence. All groups were conducted in ASL, filmed, and transcribed into English. Deaf and hearing researchers analyzed data by coding themes within each SEM level. Fifteen mothers participated. All had initiated breastfeeding with their most recent child. Breastfeeding duration for 8 of the mothers was 3 weeks to 12 months. Seven of the mothers were still breastfeeding, the longest for 19 months. Those mothers who breastfed longer described a supportive social environment and the ability to surmount challenges. Participants described characteristics of Deaf culture such as direct communication, sharing information, use of technology, language access through interpreters and ASL-using providers, and strong self-advocacy skills. Finally, mothers used the sign for "struggle" to describe their breastfeeding experience. The sign implies a sustained effort over time that leads to success. In a setting with a large population of Deaf women and ASL-using providers, we identified several aspects of Deaf culture and language that support breastfeeding mothers across institutional, community, and interpersonal levels of the SEM.

  4. “The Gong Gong Was Beaten” —Adamorobe: A “Deaf Village” in Ghana and Its Marriage Prohibition for Deaf Partners

    OpenAIRE

    Annelies Kusters

    2012-01-01

    Adamorobe is a village in Ghana where the historical presence of a hereditary form of deafness resulted in a high number of deaf inhabitants. Over the centuries, a local sign language emerged, which is used between deaf and hearing people in everyday life, rendering Adamorobe into a unique place of inclusion of deaf people. However, in 1975, a law was introduced to reduce the number of deaf people in Adamorobe: deaf people cannot marry each other in order to avoid deaf offspring. In the long ...

  5. Proficiency and sentence constraint effects on second language word learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Tengfei; Chen, Baoguo; Lu, Chunming; Dunlap, Susan

    2015-07-01

    This paper presents an experiment that investigated the effects of L2 proficiency and sentence constraint on semantic processing of unknown L2 words (pseudowords). All participants were Chinese native speakers who learned English as a second language. In the experiment, we used a whole sentence presentation paradigm with a delayed semantic relatedness judgment task. Both higher and lower-proficiency L2 learners could make use of the high-constraint sentence context to judge the meaning of novel pseudowords, and higher-proficiency L2 learners outperformed lower-proficiency L2 learners in all conditions. These results demonstrate that both L2 proficiency and sentence constraint affect subsequent word learning among second language learners. We extended L2 word learning into a sentence context, replicated the sentence constraint effects previously found among native speakers, and found proficiency effects in L2 word learning. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Measuring the Games Influence on Improving English Proficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reni Dwi Pertiwi

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available English is now used as an international language, so that every person in order to communicate at the international level are required this language. To improving english proficiency, people used native speaker, course, story book, film game and etc. Games or better known as PC gaming is another alternative in improving the English proficiency. Beside this is fun, player required to read and listen the story game to finish the game. So that player can improve English proficiency while the player play game. In this paper, author present what game are fun and not boring also can improving English proficiency. The measuring improving English proficiency is observed from reading,writing, listening and grammar Keyword: English, Game, improving ,Proficiency

  7. Cochlear implantation (CI) for prelingual deafness: the relevance of studies of brain organization and the role of first language acquisition in considering outcome success.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Ruth; MacSweeney, Mairéad; Woll, Bencie

    2014-01-01

    Cochlear implantation (CI) for profound congenital hearing impairment, while often successful in restoring hearing to the deaf child, does not always result in effective speech processing. Exposure to non-auditory signals during the pre-implantation period is widely held to be responsible for such failures. Here, we question the inference that such exposure irreparably distorts the function of auditory cortex, negatively impacting the efficacy of CI. Animal studies suggest that in congenital early deafness there is a disconnection between (disordered) activation in primary auditory cortex (A1) and activation in secondary auditory cortex (A2). In humans, one factor contributing to this functional decoupling is assumed to be abnormal activation of A1 by visual projections-including exposure to sign language. In this paper we show that that this abnormal activation of A1 does not routinely occur, while A2 functions effectively supramodally and multimodally to deliver spoken language irrespective of hearing status. What, then, is responsible for poor outcomes for some individuals with CI and for apparent abnormalities in cortical organization in these people? Since infancy is a critical period for the acquisition of language, deaf children born to hearing parents are at risk of developing inefficient neural structures to support skilled language processing. A sign language, acquired by a deaf child as a first language in a signing environment, is cortically organized like a heard spoken language in terms of specialization of the dominant perisylvian system. However, very few deaf children are exposed to sign language in early infancy. Moreover, no studies to date have examined sign language proficiency in relation to cortical organization in individuals with CI. Given the paucity of such relevant findings, we suggest that the best guarantee of good language outcome after CI is the establishment of a secure first language pre-implant-however that may be achieved, and

  8. Factors impacting participation of European elite deaf athletes in sport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurková, Petra; Válková, Hana; Scheetz, Nanci

    2011-03-01

    This study examine 53 European elite deaf athletes for their family's hearing status, use of hearing aids, communication preference, education in integrated or segregated settings, family members' encouragement for participation in sports, coach preference (hearing or deaf), and conditions for competitive events with deaf or hearing athletes. These data were gathered through semi-structured interviews administered in the athlete's native language. Deaf athletes reported that when given the opportunity to compete with hearing athletes, it enhanced their opportunity for competition. Participating in sports with hearing athletes played an important role in the integration of deaf athletes into mainstream society. If adaptations to communication can be made in these integrated settings, the ability of deaf athletes to participate in such settings will increase.

  9. Representations of deaf characters in children's picture books.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golos, Debbie B; Moses, Annie M

    2011-01-01

    Picture books can influence how children perceive people of different backgrounds, including people with disabilities whose cultures differ from their own. Researchers have examined the portrayal of multicultural characters with disabilities in children's literature. However, few have specifically considered the portrayal of deaf characters, despite increased inclusion of deaf characters in children's literature over the past two decades. The present study analyzed the portrayal of deaf characters in picture books for children ages 4-8 years. A content analysis of 20 children's picture books was conducted in which the books were analyzed for messages linked to pathological and cultural categories. Results indicated that these books did not portray Deaf characters from a cultural perspective but, rather, highlighted aspects of deafness as a medical condition, one that requires fixing and that perpetuates stereotypes of deafness as a disability.

  10. Deaf/LGBTQ Intersectional Invisibility in Schools: The Lived Experiences of Deaf Lesbian Students of Color at a School for the Deaf

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunne, Courtney M.

    2013-01-01

    Historically, American society has had conflicting views on the nature and nurture of Deaf people and Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, Queer (LGBTQ) people. In the context of majority cultures and societies in history, the reality of Deaf and LGBTQ people's lives has often been summarized in general terms such as invisibility and oppression.…

  11. Measuring receptive collocational competence across proficiency ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Kate H

    extent to which receptive knowledge of collocations of EFL learners varies across word frequency bands. ..... language through in-class reading and conversation tasks which totalled 75 hours. The .... 4 Readers are referred to Wray (2002) and Barfield and Gyllstad (2009) for more details on how to teach collocations.

  12. Investigating the Relationship Between Metalinguistic Knowledge and L2 Proficiency

    OpenAIRE

    飯田, 毅; Tsuyoshi, IIDA; Doshisha Women's College of Liberal Arts

    2012-01-01

    Although numerous studies have examined the relationship between metalinguistic knowledge and L2 proficiency, this relationship has not been sufficiently clarified yet. The present study examined the relationship between metalinguistic knowledge and L2 proficiency among different groups of learners. Also, it clarified to what extent metalinguistic knowledge contributes to L2 proficiency. The participants were 50 Japanese undergraduates comprising instructed-only EFL learners, returnees who ha...

  13. The differential effects of position, ad and reader characteristics on readers' processing of newspaper ads

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smit, E.G.; Neijens, P.C.; Heath, R.

    2013-01-01

    Building on previous research on the processing of newspaper ads, this comprehensive field study, with 26,556 newspaper readers and 290 unique advertisements, investigated the combined effects of position in the newspaper, ad characteristics and reader characteristics. The results show a

  14. Intelligence assessment of deaf students with TONI 3

    OpenAIRE

    Barbosa,Anna Carolina Cassiano; Lukasova,Katerina; Mecca,Tatiana Pontrelli; Macedo,Elizeu Coutinho

    2013-01-01

    The intelligence assessment of deaf and hard-of-hearing students has been a challenge for Brazilian psychologists, due to the lack of standardized and validated instruments for this population. The objective of this study was to assess the intelligence of deaf and hard-of-hearing students with the Test of Nonverbal Intelligence, Third Edition (TONI-3: Forma A) according to external variables: age, education, gender, type of deafness, use of hearing aid and communication mode. Study participan...

  15. Communication with deaf patients. Knowledge, beliefs, and practices of physicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebert, D A; Heckerling, P S

    1995-01-18

    To assess physicians' knowledge and beliefs regarding communication with deaf people and compare their knowledge and beliefs with their methods of communicating with deaf patients in their practices. Survey. University medical center. Attending physicians in an internal medicine department. Physicians were surveyed regarding prior contacts with deaf patients and with deaf people outside the medical setting, and regarding their knowledge and beliefs concerning methods of communicating with deaf people. Physicians were asked to estimate the fraction of encounters in which they communicated with deaf patients by lipreading, writing, translation by a relative or friend, a sign language interpreter, or other methods. Writing was the method used most frequently in communicating with deaf patients. Although 63% of physicians knew that signing should be the initial method of communicating with deaf patients who sign, only 22% used sign language interpreters more frequently than other methods in their practices. Past contact with deaf people (P = .05), belief that communication by signing was the best means of communication (P = .04), and knowledge of the inefficiency of lipreading (P = .04) were predictors of the use of sign language interpreters for deaf patients. Physicians who used sign language interpreters more frequently than other methods believed that much more time and effort were involved in caring for deaf than for hearing patients compared with those who used interpreters less frequently (P = .08). Although most physicians believed that use of sign language interpreters was preferable, only a minority used them in their practices. Greater recognition of the advantages of signing over other methods and greater availability of sign language interpreters should lead to more effective communication between deaf patients and physicians.

  16. The Role of Parents in the Development of Deaf Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    IWONA JAGOSZEWSKA

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Both the parents and the deaf children live with a disability. The specificity of deafness has a significant impact on the functioning of the families which often requires support of their care and educational functions. Therefore, it is vital to establish a cooperation between parents and proper institutions and specialists. Hearing dysfunction requires intensification of parents actions in the field of recognizing and developing the strong sides of deaf child

  17. Further Education of Deaf and Hard of Hearing People

    OpenAIRE

    Broncová, Kateřina

    2017-01-01

    This thesis deals with further education of deaf and hard of hearing people. Focus of the thesis is on possibilities of further education for these people in the Czech Republic and identification of their participation in it. Theoretical knowledge of hearing impairment is used in the thesis. Emphasis is put on differences among deaf and hard of hearing people. These differences are caused by diverse severity and type of hearing impairment and different communication systems used by deaf and h...

  18. Comparing practical knowledge storage of deaf and hearing teachers of students who are deaf or hard of hearing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marlatt, Edward A

    2004-01-01

    Especially in the education of students who are deaf or hard of hearing, teachers' practical knowledge storage is almost never measured. The Survey of Practical Knowledge was used to compare the practical knowledge storage of deaf and hearing teachers of these students. Surveyed were 48 deaf and 115 hearing individuals at the preservice and in-service experience levels. Practical knowledge storage was defined as images, rules of practice, and practical principles. Results indicate that deaf teachers tend to view students as equals but are more likely to emphasize control over classroom behavior than hearing teachers. Hearing teachers tend to stress efforts to engage students in subject matter by providing variety and relating it to life experiences. Given the trend toward high-stakes testing of teachers, further research is encouraged on role differences between deaf and hearing teachers working with students who are deaf or hard of hearing.

  19. Baby talk - analyse of the deaf child speech

    OpenAIRE

    Hronová, Anna

    2008-01-01

    This work throws light upon the communication in the sign language which is held in a deaf family. Theoretical part of the work is focused on description of the features of language acquisition. General psycholinguistic knowledge i s given parallely with the results of research of sign language acquisition of the the deaf children from deaf families. The largest part of this work i s analyse of a five years old deaf boy speech. The author based her research on the M.A.K. Halliday language acq...

  20. Consanguinity analysis of congenital deafness in Northern Israel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costeff, H; Dar, H

    1980-01-01

    Consanguinity analysis of heterogeneous populations was performed on a group of 82 Israeli Jewish families with congenitally deaf probands, including 37 multiplex families with normal parents, 10 multiplex families with deaf parents, and 35 simplex families with deafness of unknown cause. Representative gene frequency was estimated as .0198, with two to four major gene loci per ethnic group. In both the simplex families and those with deaf parents, the only significant etiology found was homozygosity for pathologic recessive genes. Comparison of these findings in Israeli isolates with those in panmictic populations seems to imply that the genetic loci are not identical in the various isolates. PMID:7361765

  1. Emergency Department utilization among Deaf American Sign Language users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKee, Michael M; Winters, Paul C; Sen, Ananda; Zazove, Philip; Fiscella, Kevin

    2015-10-01

    Deaf American Sign Language (ASL) users comprise a linguistic minority population with poor health care access due to communication barriers and low health literacy. Potentially, these health care barriers could increase Emergency Department (ED) use. To compare ED use between deaf and non-deaf patients. A retrospective cohort from medical records. The sample was derived from 400 randomly selected charts (200 deaf ASL users and 200 hearing English speakers) from an outpatient primary care health center with a high volume of deaf patients. Abstracted data included patient demographics, insurance, health behavior, and ED use in the past 36 months. Deaf patients were more likely to be never smokers and be insured through Medicaid. In an adjusted analysis, deaf individuals were significantly more likely to use the ED (odds ratio [OR], 1.97; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.11-3.51) over the prior 36 months. Deaf American Sign Language users appear to be at greater odds for elevated ED utilization when compared to the general hearing population. Efforts to further understand the drivers for increased ED utilization among deaf ASL users are much needed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Behavioral problems in deaf populations: a literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guita Movallali

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Studies have found that deaf individuals have higher rates of psychiatric disorders, such as behavioral problems, than those who can hear. The aim of this review was to provide a summary of the literature on behavioral problems, with specific reference to deaf individuals. The objectives of the review were to establish the prevalence of behavioral problems in deaf populations; describe the risk factor for behavioral problems in deaf populations; and describe approaches to intervention and behavioral problems prevention that have been used in deaf populations.Recent Findings: A review of articles published between 1991 and 2013 showed that the prevalence of behavioral problems in deaf people is higher than that of hearing people. Risk factors for behavioral problems in deaf populations include language impairments, communication problems, the role of parents, and the community’s beliefs and attitudes regarding the issue.Conclusion: Given the high prevalence of behavioral problems in deaf people, the effectiveness of prevention strategies should be examined. Consequently, it would be advantageous to increase the availability of specialist mental health services, promote deaf awareness including their abilities, promote awareness and skills development among teachers, staff, and specialists and implement behavior change programs.

  3. Psycho-physical development of deaf school-age children.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Statiev S.I.

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Examined the psycho-physical development of deaf children and their adaptation to the world, analyzed the studies earlier. Shows the analysis of publications of various experts, we concluded that the problem is poorly understood and requires a solution, as it is currently very topical. Proved that the psycho-physical development of deaf children is low in comparison with hearing and speech development of many deaf people is not coming. It is established that such children find it difficult to adapt to the conditions of modern life and the need to develop different ways to improve the lives of deaf children.

  4. Validating English Language Proficiency Assessment Uses for English Learners: Academic Language Proficiency and Content Assessment Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Mikyung Kim; Faulkner-Bond, Molly

    2016-01-01

    States use standards-based English language proficiency (ELP) assessments to inform relatively high-stakes decisions for English learner (EL) students. Results from these assessments are one of the primary criteria used to determine EL students' level of ELP and readiness for reclassification. The results are also used to evaluate the…

  5. Differences in Less Proficient and More Proficient ESL College Writing in the Philippine Setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gustilo, Leah E.

    2016-01-01

    The present study aimed at characterizing what skilled or more proficient ESL college writing is in the Philippine setting through a contrastive analysis of three groups of variables identified from previous studies: resources, processes, and performance of ESL writers. Based on Chenoweth and Hayes' (2001; 2003) framework, the resource level…

  6. Beck's Song Reader: An Unbound Music Book

    OpenAIRE

    Maxwell, Kate

    2016-01-01

    This article is under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial No Derivatives License. This article is also available via DOI:10.7202/1038035ar The pop/alternative musician Beck created a stir in the music world when he released his 2012 “album” Song Reader as a book compilation of individual pieces of sheet music. This included a guide to reading music notation, together with an introduction describing the work’s intentions and inviting readers to perform their own ...

  7. The contribution of proficiency testing to improving laboratory performance and ensuring quality patient care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Paul R

    2004-01-01

    The idea of comparing laboratories' test results against one another predated federal regulations by decades (1) and was initially used as an educational tool. The introduction of federal regulations altered the proficiency testing (PT) environment (2,3) and today there is concern that the regulatory requirements do not address extraneous factors that may adversely affect a laboratory's PT performance (6). This article aims to address these concerns and hopes to convince the reader that while the scope of PT has expanded beyond its original intent as an educational tool for the laboratory, PT can still function in that capacity. Improvements in laboratory performance and laboratory medicine as a whole continue to be supported by proficiency testing for numerous reasons. Several mistakes laboratories have made in the past are addressed and suggestions for improvement are given. Laboratory managers who take proactive steps to ensure quality patient test results should experience fewer PT failures, and in turn can focus more attention on the educational benefits that participating in PT can offer.

  8. The galvanic treatment of deafness and the trials at the Berlin Royal Deaf-Mute Asylum in 1802.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Söderfeldt, Ylva

    2013-05-01

    In 1802, the director of the Berlin Royal Deaf-Mute Asylum, Ernst Adolph Eschke, performed an experiment to investigate the possibility of curing deafness by means of galvanism. This article explores the hope for a cure for deafness that was connected to the voltaic pile, and concludes that the treatment was based on insufficient knowledge of the aetiology of deafness. Furthermore, it uncovers the competition between the medical and the pedagogic approach to deafness that resulted from the purported cure. Comparing the approaches of different directors of galvanic experiments, divergences in attitudes between the medical and pedagogic realms are revealed. This is explained with reference to the contrasting motives and experiences of educational and medical professionals: the former had reasons to resist a cure to protect their profession, whereas the latter hoped for a medical breakthrough. Since the former had personal and long-lasting relationships to deaf people, while the latter only had brief encounters with deaf patients, the physicians were also more prone to objectify their trial subjects. The report from Eschke's trials is presented as an early document of deaf reactions to attempts to restore their hearing, showing that resistance to medical interventions were prevalent among the deaf already in the early nineteenth century.

  9. Improving Cancer Literacy for the Deaf Using Deaf-Tailored Educational Interventions: a Review of the Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    NaseriBooriAbadi, Tahereh; Sadoughi, Farahnaz; Sheikhtaheri, Abbas

    2017-04-27

    To date, there have been many strategies, including educational interventions, for cancer prevention and control, but most of them are not deaf-tailored ones. This narrative review aimed to examine cancer educational programs to improve the deaf individuals' knowledge and attitude toward cancer. The design of this study is a narrative review. We searched ISI Web of Science, Scopus, Science Direct, and MEDLINE/PubMed using the following search strategy: ("cancer education" AND "deaf") OR ("cancer" AND "deaf" AND literacy). Publication years ranged from 1983 to 2016 for studies on cancer educational interventions for the deaf. Included studies were analyzed regarding research methodologies, types of intervention, and major findings. In total, 12 included studies were classified into three research methodologies. Although short-term and long-term knowledge improvement has been reported, since there is limited evidence on the types of cancer-related educational interventions and there are insufficient studies, longterm effectiveness of educations in improving cancer knowledge of the deaf has to be reported cautiously. Current deaf-tailored education interventions are limited, but included functional features which facilitate communicating cancer health information to the deaf community. In fact, cancer literacy might improve considering deaf community preferences such as using a short open caption, sign language, and plain language in educational interventions, but further research is recommended.

  10. Proficiency test in the accreditation system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legarda, F.; Herranz, M.; Idoeta, R.

    2008-08-01

    In the accreditation process of a radioactivity measurements laboratory, according to ISO standard 17025, proficiency tests play a fundamental role. These PTs constitute an irreplaceable tool for the validation of measuring methods. In the case of Spain, ENAC, which is the Spanish accreditation national body, requires that the laboratory has to take part in a PT for each one of the accredited measuring methods in the period of time between two reassessments of the accreditation, what happens every 4-5 years. In specific areas of determination procedures, among which radioactive measurements could be included, the number of methods which can be accredited is very large. The purpose of the present work is to establish a classification into families of the different radioactivity measurement procedures, as well as to establish complementary actions that guarantee that carrying out periodically proficiency-tests on any of the included procedures in each family, every measurement procedure include in that family is controlled, complying with the criteria established by ENAC.

  11. Evaluation of Mycology Laboratory Proficiency Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reilly, Andrew A.; Salkin, Ira F.; McGinnis, Michael R.; Gromadzki, Sally; Pasarell, Lester; Kemna, Maggi; Higgins, Nancy; Salfinger, Max

    1999-01-01

    Changes over the last decade in overt proficiency testing (OPT) regulations have been ostensibly directed at improving laboratory performance on patient samples. However, the overt (unblinded) format of the tests and regulatory penalties associated with incorrect values allow and encourage laboratorians to take extra precautions with OPT analytes. As a result OPT may measure optimal laboratory performance instead of the intended target of typical performance attained during routine patient testing. This study addresses this issue by evaluating medical mycology OPT and comparing its fungal specimen identification error rates to those obtained in a covert (blinded) proficiency testing (CPT) program. Identifications from 188 laboratories participating in the New York State mycology OPT from 1982 to 1994 were compared with the identifications of the same fungi recovered from patient specimens in 1989 and 1994 as part of the routine procedures of 88 of these laboratories. The consistency in the identification of OPT specimens was sufficient to make accurate predictions of OPT error rates. However, while the error rates in OPT and CPT were similar for Candida albicans, significantly higher error rates were found in CPT for Candida tropicalis, Candida glabrata, and other common pathogenic fungi. These differences may, in part, be due to OPT’s use of ideal organism representatives cultured under optimum growth conditions. This difference, as well as the organism-dependent error rate differences, reflects the limitations of OPT as a means of assessing the quality of routine laboratory performance in medical mycology. PMID:10364601

  12. THE DEAF PERSON INCLUSION OF HIGHER EDUCATION

    OpenAIRE

    Rose Mery Gómez Tovar

    2013-01-01

    The research that is presented in this study is based on my experience with deaf students from the Psicology and therapist faculty of human communication which is an academic unit from the Juarez University of the Durango state. This article compiles and analyzes the process of inclusive and educational settings that the institution has.  This study is executed from the adoption of the analysis model of the biographic narrative investigation seen from the cualitative paradigm. In this project...

  13. Congenitally deaf children following cochlear implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Donoghue, G M; Nikolopoulos, T; Archbold, S M; Tait, M

    1998-01-01

    The aim of this study is to determine the auditory performance of congenitally deaf children following cochlear implantation. A prospective study is undertaken of 71 such children who have been implanted in a dedicated paediatric cochlear implant centre and who have been followed up to 3 years following implantation. All children are aged less than 8 years at the time of implantation and all receive a multichannel cochlear implant system. No child meeting these criteria has been excluded from the study. The average age at implantation is 56.5 months (range 27 to 93 months, standard deviation 15.9 months). Auditory performance is assessed by using the Categories of Auditory Perception (CAP) scale which is developed primarily as a clinical tool for evaluating profoundly deaf young children following cochlear implantation. The median score prior to implantation on this scale is Category 0 (no awareness of environmental sound), at the 1 year interval is Category 4 (discrimination some speech sounds without lip-reading), and at the 2 and 3 year interval, the median score on the CAP scale is Category 5 (understanding of common phrases without lip-reading). These results indicate the ability of cochlear implants to provide significant auditory receptive skills to young congenitally deaf children.

  14. DEVELOPING WRITING MATERIALS FOR DEAF STUDENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamdan Anwari

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available This research is aimed at finding out the suitable writing material for deaf students. This research belongs to research and development. The participants of this research were the eleventh graders of SLB Muhammadiyah Dekso Kalibawang of semester 1 in academic year 2013/2014 which consisted of two students. The instruments used in collecting data were questionnaires. The questionnaires were used in the need analysis, material evaluation and students’ response. The data were analyzed descriptively by using percentage. Based on the need analysis, it was found out that students’ need is suitable with material for writing. In developing  syllabus, existing syllabus must be added with some exercises. In developing material is in the form of hand out. The hand out is writing material for the deaf students. The developed material is for the first semester academic year of 2013/2014. It consists of  three  units, five topics and nineteen activities. In the material evaluation from two experts, the developed materials facilitate the deaf students to write. Based on the student’s response, the developed material is appropriate with their English level competence.

  15. Conversion Deafness Presenting as Sudden Hearing Loss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying-Piao Wang

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Conversion deafness is a somatoform disorder characterized by hearing loss without an anatomic or pathophysiologic lesion. Clinically, discrepancies between behavior hearing thresholds and objective electrophysiologic examinations, such as impedance audiometry, otoacoustic emissions (OAE, and auditory brainstem response (ABR, will raise the suspicion of this disorder. It is judged to be due to psychological factors and that patients do not intentionally produce the symptom. Conversion deafness is sometimes reported in children but is extremely rare among adults. Two young adults with this disease are presented. These 2 patients were both under enormous stress from the national entrance examinations for universities. Pure tone audiometry showed bilateral hearing deterioration, but OAE and ABR were normal. The hearing of both patients recovered after treatment. The diagnosis, prognosis and treatment of this disorder are also discussed. It is important to discover the psychological stress in patients with conversion deafness. This report aims to increase awareness of this condition and avoid unnecessary steroid use in its treatment.

  16. Deafness--the neglected and hidden disability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackenzie, I; Smith, A

    2009-10-01

    The problem of deafness or hearing loss is increasing world-wide. In countries rich and poor, people are living longer, and presbyacusis, the deafness of old age, is becoming more frequent. Hearing loss is a chronic and often life-long disability that, depending on the severity and the frequencies affected, can cause profound damage to the development of speech, language, and cognitive skills in children, especially if commencing prelingually. That damage, in turn, affects the child's progress in school and, later, his or her ability to obtain, keep, and perform an occupation. For all ages and for both sexes, hearing loss causes difficulties with interpersonal communication and leads to significant individual social problems, especially isolation and stigmatization. All of these difficulties are much magnified in developing countries, where there are generally limited services for the hard of hearing, few people trained to help those with hearing loss, and little awareness about how to deal with the difficulties associated with such loss. Although deafness and hearing impairment are likely to have huge economic effects in such countries, in most areas these effects remain to be quantified.

  17. Collaboration between SSMJ and its readers

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    All of us in the healthcare professions throughout the world can learn much from each other. This has been demonstrated so well by the collaboration between the editors, authors, medical experts and readers of the South Sudan Medical Journal. The Editor-in-Chief recently sent out a request for photographs and received a ...

  18. The Expectant Reader in Theory and Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowler, Lois Josephs; McCormick, Kathleen

    1986-01-01

    Offers a method of using reader response theory that emphasizes the expectations about a text and how those expectations are fulfilled or deflated. Specifically, students read traditional fables, fairy tales, and parables, and compare them to contemporary works such as Kafka's "Metamorphosis" and Marquez's "The Very Old Man With Enormous Wings."…

  19. Character and Moral Education: A Reader

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeVitis, Joseph L., Ed.; Yu, Tianlong, Ed.

    2011-01-01

    Against a formidable national discourse that emphasizes academic standardization, accountability, and high-stakes testing in educational policy, "Character and Moral Education: A Reader" seeks to re-introduce and revive the moral mission of education in public conversation and practices in America's schools. With contributions from a…

  20. The Emergent Reader's Working Kit of Stereotypes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackey, Margaret

    2013-01-01

    This article draws on a careful study of series fiction read in the 1950s to explore how stereotypes feature in the development of a young reader's competence in learning to process stories in print. Five categories of stereotype are teased out: "embodied stereotypes," understood through physical experience; "working stereotypes," discerned…

  1. Shakespeare and Reader's Theatre: Fellow Traveling Companions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratliff, Gerald Lee

    2010-01-01

    Whether constructed on literary analysis models or inspired by conventional acting theories, Reader's Theatre performance techniques are an invaluable instructional tool available to teachers who want their students to see, hear and feel Shakespeare texts in classroom discussion and performance. These exercises are designed to promote both a…

  2. Reader Reactions to Color in Newspapers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohle, Robert H.; Garcia, Mario R.

    In order to discover reader reactions to color on a newspaper page, specifically eye movement and overall opinion of the paper, identical pages were created and printed by the "St. Petersburg Times" (Florida). The content of fifteen front pages, six lifestyles pages, and three sports front pages were nearly identical, differing only in the kind…

  3. Teaching Social Studies Using Basal Readers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Jesus; Logan, John W.

    1983-01-01

    A lesson, "Harriet Tubman: A Most Successful Conductor," illustrates how to employ a basal reader in social studies instruction in the elementary grades. This approach offers students a relevant curriculum, greater opportunities for concept development, practice in skills areas, and activities that offer greater opportunity to master…

  4. Storytelling in Miniature: Microfiction and Reader Participation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan Irving

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This article proposes that Iser’s work on gaps and blanks, as well as recent enactivist-inspired cognitive-narratological extensions of Iser’s work, can enlighten an under-theorized genre of experimental narrative, microfiction, typically identified as stories under 300 words (though often considerably shorter. The extreme brevity of microfiction results in stories that are similar, to a degree, to short stories, though experientially quite different; in the most thorough narratological treatment, William Nelles (2012 makes the case for a generic distinction between microfiction and the traditional short story. As I have argued elsewhere (Author 2016, borderline-narrative texts (microfiction included make for oddly compelling reading experiences, largely due to the increased degree of reader participation necessary in narrativization. A main point of investigation here is as follows: while there is general agreement that Iser at least somewhat underestimates the extent to which narratives are perpetually fraught with gaps to be filled in by readers, there is still arguably a noticeably greater gap-per-capita (in a manner of speaking in microfiction set against higher-narrativity texts; readers need to do more, in other words, to narrativize the typical piece of microfiction. Further, the extreme brevity of microfiction potentially affords readers a uniquely full experience of perceptual presence over the course of the micro-story.

  5. The Author as Reader and Writer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Tom

    2012-01-01

    This article presents contemporary commentary on the previously published articles "Writing for the Reader: A Problem-Solution Approach" and "Motivating Learners at South Korean Universities." Having been out of the field of English as a foreign language for several years, the author was surprised and pleased when he was asked to write some…

  6. Technological Images and the Child Reader.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandergrift, Kay E.

    1988-01-01

    Describes technological images presented to children through television, movies, and science fiction, and explores the possible effects of these images on meanings derived by young readers. The use of speculative fiction to explore personal and social values is discussed. (Five references) (CLB)

  7. Understanding readers' understanding theory to practice

    CERN Document Server

    Tierney, Robert J; Mitchell, Judy Nichols

    2013-01-01

    This collection features papers addressing current issues in reading comprehension from cognitive and linguistic perspectives. Organized into three sections, the volume investigates text considerations and reader-text interactions. Each paper presents a substantial and comprehensive review of theory and research related to cognition and reading comprehension.

  8. Towards a Culturally Situated Reader Response Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, Wanda; Browne, Susan

    2012-01-01

    This article describes a theory of how culture enables literary interpretations of texts. We begin with a brief overview of the reader response field. From there, we introduce the theory and provide illustrative participant data examples. These data examples illustrate the four cultural positions middle grade students in our research assumed when…

  9. Eliciting Dyslexic Symptoms in Proficient Readers by Simulating Deficits in Grapheme-to-Phoneme Conversion and Visuo-Magnocellular Processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tholen, Nicole; Weidner, Ralph; Grande, Marion; Amunts, Katrin; Heim, Stefan

    2011-01-01

    Among the cognitive causes of dyslexia, phonological and magnocellular deficits have attracted a substantial amount of research. Their role and their exact impact on reading ability are still a matter of debate, partly also because large samples of dyslexics are hard to recruit. Here, we report a new technique to simulate dyslexic symptoms in…

  10. Effects of Readers Theatre on fluency, content mastery, motivation and gender with 9th grade biology students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purdy, Jill E.

    This study determined the effects of Readers Theatre when used with ninth grade biology students. The independent variable was the intervention of Readers Theatre and the dependent variables were fluency (reading rate and prosody), composite (vocabulary and content) science scores and student motivation, using both quantitative and qualitative research methods. This study also examined the outcomes by gender, but only in the outcome variable of science composite score. An exploratory analysis examined class type (college preparatory and general) and PSSA reading level (below basic, basic, proficient and advanced) for each dependent variable. Four ninth grade college preparatory biology classrooms and three general biology classes participated. The students involved are from a suburban school district located in the eastern portion of Pennsylvania. Outcomes were analyzed separately by using an ANCOVA. Posttest scores were the dependent variable and pretest scores were the covariate. Using qualitative methodology, participants' questionnaire responses were analyzed to supplement quantitative results and to explore trends in motivation. Significant increases were found in words per minute and prosody in the area of prosody, general classes benefited to a larger extent than college preparatory classes. No significance was found in science composite, vocabulary or content test scores. Indications from students and teachers questionnaires were that Readers Theatre is a motivational technique. In this study, Readers Theater was proven to increase both fluency and prosody, while being motivating to the biology students.

  11. Relationship between Language Proficiency and Growth during Reading Interventions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Matthew K.; Frederick, Amy; Helman, Lori; Pulles, Sandra M.; McComas, Jennifer J.; Aguilar, Lisa

    2017-01-01

    Many English language learners (ELLs) experience difficulties with basic English reading due in part to low language proficiency. The authors examined the relationship between English language proficiency and growth during reading interventions for ELLs. A total of 201 second- and third-grade students with a variety of home languages participated.…

  12. Variables Affecting Proficiency in English as a Second Language

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santana, Josefina C.; García-Santillán, Arturo; Escalera-Chávez, Milka Elena

    2017-01-01

    This study explores different variables leading to proficiency in English as a second language. Level of English on a placement exam taken upon entering a private university in Mexico was correlated to several variables. Additionally, participants (N = 218) were asked their perception of their own proficiency. A linear regression and a one-factor…

  13. The Relationship between Cognitive Development and Foreign Language Proficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobus, Everett Franklin, Jr.

    Based on research relating William Perry's scheme of cognitive development to foreign language proficiency, a developmental hypothesis concerning language ability is proposed. This approach suggests that lower developmental stages in the cognitive domain retard the achievement of communicative language proficiency, while higher developmental…

  14. 285 Teachers‟ Experience and Students‟ Numerical Proficiency in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    First Lady

    2013-01-28

    Jan 28, 2013 ... Five null hypotheses were formed and tested at 5% level of significance. Results show that numerical proficiency of students taught by experienced teachers were better than those taught by less experienced teachers. There was no significant difference in the numerical proficiency of male and female ...

  15. Piano Proficiency: The Perfect Accompaniment for Successful Music Educators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobetsky, Victor V.

    2004-01-01

    Do prospective music teachers with piano proficiency have an advantage in the job market? Can playing the piano well help practicing teachers achieve greater success in the classroom? In this article, the author stresses that piano proficiency is a necessary survival tool for music teachers regardless of their primary instrument or vocal specialty…

  16. Motor Proficiency Predicts Cognitive Ability in Four-Year-Olds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez, Amanda Martinez; Caçola, Priscila

    2015-01-01

    Research has shown links between motor proficiency and cognition in school-age children, however, few have explored earlier ages. We aimed to determine the association between motor proficiency and cognitive ability in four-year-olds. Motor and cognitive skills were examined in 32 (15 males, 17 females) four-year-olds (±5.59 months) using the…

  17. Communication Strategies: An Interplay between Proficiency and Gender

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shokouhi, Hussein; Angameh, Farzad

    2008-01-01

    This paper is intended to investigate the interplay between proficiency and gender in the use of communication strategies. Sixty Iranian university male and female subjects studying English took part in the experiment and performed two tasks: word recognition and picture-story narration. The results indicate that proficiency had a more perceptible…

  18. Proficiency test for tropane alkaloids in food en feed

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pereboom-de Fauw, D.P.K.H.; Elbers, I.J.W.; Mulder, P.P.J.; Nijs, de W.C.M.

    2014-01-01

    Proficiency testing is conducted to provide laboratories with a powerful tool to evaluate and demonstrate the reliability of the data that are produced. Next to validation and accreditation, proficiency testing is an important requirement of the EU Additional Measures Directive 93/99/EEC [1] and is

  19. Test Reviews: GEPT--General English Proficiency Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roever, Carsten; Pan, Yi-Ching

    2008-01-01

    The General English Proficiency Test (GEPT) was developed in 1999, commissioned by the Ministry of Education in Taiwan. The purpose of the test is to provide individuals with a gauge of their English language proficiency and assist employers and educational institutions in selection and placement. Also, it aims to encourage the study of English…

  20. Restructuring a Traditional Foreign Language Program for Oral Proficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camara-Norman, Filisha; And Others

    The restructuring of the Romance language program at Howard University to improve oral proficiency involved modification of goals, syllabi, classroom activities, and testing. Goals were adapted to American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages (ACTFL)/Educational Testing Service (ETS) guidelines for oral proficiency. Assessment of French…

  1. The correlation between motor proficiency and physical activity in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: One of the risks associated with low physical activity levels is the insufficient development of motor proficiency, which in turn has an impact on participation in physical activity and sport during adolescence. Objectives: To determine the relationship between motor proficiency and physical activity levels in ...

  2. Measuring Language Dominance and Bilingual Proficiency Development of Tarahumara Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paciotto, Carla

    This paper examines the language dominance and oral bilingual proficiency of Tarahumara-Spanish speaking students from Chihuahua, Mexico, within the framework of Cummins' model of bilingual proficiency development. Cummins' model distinguishes between basic interpersonal communicative skills (BICS) and cognitive academic language proficiency…

  3. Proficiency-Based Curriculum Design: Principles Derived from Government Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowe, Pardee, Jr.

    1985-01-01

    Describes principles for designing a proficiency-based course to prepare students for the ACTFL/ETS Advanced Plus/Superior level according to Interagency Language Roundtable guidelines. Proposes ways to combine grammatical and "functional/notional" syllabuses with a proficiency approach. Examines the implications of these principles for…

  4. Across the Threshold: A Call for ILR Proficiency Descriptor Banks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holman, Don

    2017-01-01

    Whereas the Interagency Language Roundtable Language Skill Level Descriptions broke new ground for assessing proficiency in foreign languages, the need for user-oriented (rather than assessment-oriented) proficiency scales has led, especially in Europe, to the creation of scales consisting of positively formulated "can-do" statements,…

  5. Knowledge and Processes That Predict Proficiency in Digital Literacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulger, Monica E.; Mayer, Richard E.; Metzger, Miriam J.

    2014-01-01

    Proficiency in digital literacy refers to the ability to read and write using online sources, and includes the ability to select sources relevant to the task, synthesize information into a coherent message, and communicate the message with an audience. The present study examines the determinants of digital literacy proficiency by asking 150…

  6. Proficiency test for heavy metals in compound feed

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pereboom, D.P.K.H.; Elbers, I.J.W.; Jong, de J.; Lee, van der M.K.; Nijs, de W.C.M.

    2016-01-01

    The here described proficiency test for heavy metals in compound feed was organised by RIKILT, Wageningen UR in accordance with ISO 17043. RIKILT Wageningen UR has an ISO/IEC 17043 accreditation for proficiency tests of residues in products of animal origin. However, this specific test is not part

  7. Teaching English through English: Proficiency, Pedagogy and Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Jack C.

    2017-01-01

    Most of the world's English language teachers speak English as a second or third language rather than as their first language. For many, their level of proficiency in English may not reach benchmarks established by their employers, raising the issue that is the focus of this article, namely, what kind of proficiency in English is necessary to be…

  8. Second Language Proficiency and Cross-Language Lexical Activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Hell, Janet G.; Tanner, Darren

    2012-01-01

    Although research has consistently shown that a bilingual's two languages interact on multiple levels, it is also well-established that bilinguals can vary considerably in their proficiency in the second language (L2). In this paper we review empirical studies that have examined how differences in L2 proficiency modulate cross-language…

  9. The Development of ESL Proficiency and Pragmatic Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roever, Carsten; Al-Gahtani, Saad

    2015-01-01

    ESL learners can find it challenging to use English in a way that is pragmatically appropriate to the situation and interlocutor. In this article, we explore the impact of increased proficiency on learners' pragmatic performance. ESL learners in Australia at four proficiency levels completed three role plays, and we analysed how the learners…

  10. Second Language Grammatical Proficiency and Third Language Acquisition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moghtadi, Laleh; Koosha, Mansour; Lotfi, Ahmad Reza

    2014-01-01

    The main concern of the present study was to investigate the probable correlation between the bilinguals' second language grammatical proficiency level and their third language grammatical proficiency level. The current study was implemented on selecting a total of 100 Iranian female high school students studying at second grade from two…

  11. On the Relationship between Multiple Intelligences and Language Proficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razmjoo, Seyyed Ayatollah

    2008-01-01

    The intent of the present study was to examine the strength of the relationship between language proficiency in English and the 9 types of intelligences. As such, the objectives of this study were three-folded. The primary objective of the study was to investigate the relationship between multiple intelligences and language proficiency among the…

  12. Communication Anxiety and Its Effect on Oral Proficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurshberger, Lisa

    A study investigated the bipolar tension/relaxation factors that affect a second language learner's oral proficiency. While the traditional assumption in the field of second language acquisition is that negative attitudes toward communicative interaction naturally predicate low proficiency, the data gathered from 50 subjects studying English as a…

  13. Examining the Relationship between Math Scores and English Language Proficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, Denfield L.; Nistor, Nicolae; Baltes, Beate

    2016-01-01

    Multiple studies propose that English proficiency dictates English language learners' (ELLs) performances on mathematics assessments. The current study investigates the predictive power of English proficiency on mathematics scores, while controlling for gender, socioeconomic status (SES), and grade level among ELLs at a south Florida elementary…

  14. Proficiency testing for sensory profile panels : measuring panel performance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mcewan, J.A.; Hunter, E.A.; Gemert, L.J. van; Lea, P.

    2002-01-01

    Proficiency testing in sensory analysis is an important step towards demonstrating that results from one sensory panel are consistent with the results of other sensory panels. The uniqueness of sensory analysis poses some specific problems for measuring the proficiency of the human instrument

  15. Childhood Deafness: How Big a Problem In Malawi?

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    among children, severe educational handicap. This is all the more serious in societies where infectious diseases with possible sequelae in deafness are common, yet which lack the resources for screening and special educational services. This short paper reviews what is known about the prevalence of childhood deafness ...

  16. The Horror of Being Deaf and in Prison

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vernon, McCay

    2010-01-01

    Being deaf and in prison is a horror. The main fear of prison inmates, whether Deaf or hearing, is that they will be raped, killed, or subjected to other forms of violence. Such fears are based in reality. The recent overcrowding of jails and prisons has increased these problems significantly. A major reason for this situation is the blatant…

  17. Deaf College Students' Perceptions of Their Social-Emotional Adjustment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukomski, Jennifer

    2007-01-01

    This study examined differences between deaf and hearing students' perceptions of their social emotional adjustment as they transition to college. The 16PF-Adolescent Personality Questionnaire Life Difficulties Scale was completed by 205 deaf students and 185 hearing students. A multivariate analyses of variance and subsequent univariate tests…

  18. 77 FR 20553 - Relay Services for Deaf-Blind Individuals

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-05

    ... COMMISSION 47 CFR Part 64 Relay Services for Deaf-Blind Individuals AGENCY: Federal Communications Commission... individuals in a timely manner. DATES: This document is effective May 7, 2012, except the modified reporting... Relay Services for Deaf-Blind Individuals, Report and Order, document FCC 11-56, published at 76 FR...

  19. 76 FR 31261 - Relay Services for Deaf-Blind Individuals

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-31

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ] FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION 47 CFR Part 64 Relay Services for Deaf-Blind Individuals AGENCY: Federal Communications Commission... environments shall be considered when determining whether the individual is deaf-blind under clauses (c)(2)(i...

  20. Interpreted Writing Center Tutorials with College-Level Deaf Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babcock, Rebecca Day

    2011-01-01

    Deaf students are attending mainstream postsecondary institutions in increasing numbers. This study attempts to fill a gap in the literature regarding deaf students' writing tutorials with hearing tutors and interpreters. It consists of observation of tutoring sessions, interviews, and collection and grounded theory analysis of relevant documents…

  1. Informed Choice and Deaf Children: Underpinning Concepts and Enduring Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Alys; Carr, Gwen; Hunt, Ros; McCracken, Wendy; Skipp, Amy; Tattersall, Helen

    2006-01-01

    This article concerns the first stage of a research and development project that aimed to produce both parent and professional guidelines on the promotion and provision of informed choice for families with deaf children. It begins with a theoretical discussion of the problems associated with the concept of informed choice and deaf child services…

  2. Process and Product: Creating Stories with Deaf Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enns, Catherine; Hall, Ricki; Isaac, Becky; MacDonald, Patricia

    2007-01-01

    This article describes the implementation of one element of an adapted language arts curriculum for Deaf students in a bilingual (American Sign Language and English) educational setting. It examines the implementation of writing workshops in three elementary classrooms in a school for Deaf students. The typical steps of preparing/planning,…

  3. Complex word reading in Dutch deaf children and adults

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoogmoed, A.H. van; Knoors, H.E.T.; Schreuder, R.; Verhoeven, L.T.W.

    2013-01-01

    Children who are deaf are often delayed in reading comprehension. This delay could be due to problems in morphological processing during word reading. In this study, we investigated whether 6th grade deaf children and adults are delayed in comparison to their hearing peers in reading complex

  4. Complex Word Reading in Dutch Deaf Children and Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Hoogmoed, Anne H.; Knoors, Harry; Schreuder, Robert; Verhoeven, Ludo

    2013-01-01

    Children who are deaf are often delayed in reading comprehension. This delay could be due to problems in morphological processing during word reading. In this study, we investigated whether 6th grade deaf children and adults are delayed in comparison to their hearing peers in reading complex derivational words and compounds compared to…

  5. Reading comprehension of deaf children with cochlear implants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vermeulen, A.M.; Bon, W.H.J. van; Schreuder, R.; Knoors, H.E.T.; Snik, A.F.M.

    2007-01-01

    The reading comprehension and visual word recognition in 50 deaf children and adolescents with at least 3 years of cochlear implant (0) use were evaluated. Their skills were contrasted with reference data of 500 deaf children without CIs. The reading comprehension level in children with CIs was

  6. Implicit Sequence Learning in Deaf Children with Cochlear Implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conway, Christopher M.; Pisoni, David B.; Anaya, Esperanza M.; Karpicke, Jennifer; Henning, Shirley C.

    2011-01-01

    Deaf children with cochlear implants (CIs) represent an intriguing opportunity to study neurocognitive plasticity and reorganization when sound is introduced following a period of auditory deprivation early in development. Although it is common to consider deafness as affecting hearing alone, it may be the case that auditory deprivation leads to…

  7. Acoustics for the Deaf: Can You See Me Now?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vongsawad, Cameron T.; Berardi, Mark L.; Neilsen, Tracianne B.; Gee, Kent L.; Whiting, Jennifer K.; Lawler, M. Jeannette

    2016-01-01

    Although acoustics examples and demonstrations can be an effective tool for engaging students in introductory physics classes and outreach, teaching principles of sound and vibration to the deaf and hard of hearing needs to be approached carefully. The deaf and hard of hearing have less intuition with sound but are no strangers to some of the…

  8. Metric Education for Deaf and Hard-of-Hearing Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Harry G.

    1979-01-01

    A diagnostic test of metric measurement skills was administered to 283 summer Vestibule Program students in 1978 at the National Technical Institute for the Deaf. Results of the testing showed that most of the deaf students lacked an understanding of the information needed for metric living. (Author)

  9. Casefinding Criteria for Use in Identifying Deaf-Blind Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Catherine E.

    The study was undertaken to develop casefinding criteria for identifying deaf-blind children. Referral sources and investigative potentials were obtained from a demographic survey of 164 cases of deaf-blind persons in Louisiana. Inquiry sheets on the possible sources of casefinding twice were sent to and ranked by a panel of 20 persons, including…

  10. Innovative and Experimental Happenings in Deaf-Blind Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baud, Hank, Ed.; Garrett, Jeff, Ed.

    Presented are 14 papers delivered at the First Annual Spring Workshop for Professionals Serving Deaf Blind Children in the Mid-Atlantic Region (1974). Covered are the following topics regarding deaf blind children: adapted physical education, a summer day camp program, vocational and prevocational services, audiological and visual evaluations, a…

  11. A Vision Guide for Teachers of Deaf-Blind Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Efron, Marvin; DuBoff, Beth Reilly

    The guide for teachers of deaf blind children deals with visual functioning, evaluation, and instruction. An overview of the fundamentals of visual functioning in deaf blind children includes concepts basic to an understanding of the process. Assessment and evaluation of the child's visual functioning is discussed, and procedures for determining…

  12. The Institute for Deaf-Blind Studies: Proceedings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheffler, Joye A.; And Others

    The document contains 16 papers from the Institute for Deaf Blind Studies, a program to bring together many disciplines and to place emphasis on every aspect of the learning and teaching activity involved in the development of deaf-blind children. The following titles and authors are included: "Current Status of the Rubella Problem" (P. Ziring);…

  13. EEG Alpha and Beta Activity in Normal and Deaf Subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldron, Manjula; And Others

    Electroencephalogram and task performance data were collected from three groups of young adult males: profoundly deaf Ss who signed from an early age, profoundly deaf Ss who only used oral (speech and speedreading) methods of communication, and normal hearing Ss. Alpha and Beta brain wave patterns over the Wernicke's area were compared across…

  14. KRITERIA DIAGNOSIS DAN DIAGNOSIS BANDING SUDDEN DEAFNESS (SSNHL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arvindan Subramaniam

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Sudden deafness or sudden sensorineural hearing loss (SSNHL is defined as sensorineural hearing loss of more than 30 dB at three consecutive frequencies within 3 days of onset, often unilateral and idiopathic. Etiology of sudden deafness is still not known, but there are many theories put forward by the experts as a risk factor for sudden deafness. The prevalence of sudden deafness 5-30 per 100,000 people per year. Distribution of men and women almost equally, with the peak age of 50-60 years. Sudden deafness diagnosis is made based on history, physical examination and audiometry. Sudden deafness has three characteristics; acute, sensorineural hearing loss and unknown etiology. Additional characteristics may include vertigo, tinnitus and the absence of cranial nerve involvement. Management of sudden deafness include conservative therapy with multiple modalities. Case: Patient male, 40 years, Bali, Hindu present with hearing loss since ± 2 weeks ago. Patients previously complained of heat in the ear ± 2 days ago accompanied by a downward hearing and ears. A history of vomiting, coughs and colds denied. History of treatment at the hospital and was hospitalized for ± 2 weeks. Patients had never suffered from the same disease. No history of sinusitis, allergy, anemia, autoimmune and other systemic diseases. Patients also had never experienced trauma and underwent nasal surgery before. Keywords:sudden deafness, sensorineural, audiometry.

  15. Deaf Cultural Production in Twentieth-Century Madrid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraser, Benjamin R.

    2007-01-01

    This article chronicles the recent processes of identity formation among deaf people in Spain, both analyzing Spanish-language poetry published in the journal Faro del Silencio and outlining new directions for research of Deaf culture in Spain in terms of film, theater, visual poetry. It draws attention to the significant connections between the…

  16. Emotion Understanding in Deaf Children with a Cochlear Implant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiefferink, Carin H.; Rieffe, Carolien; Ketelaar, Lizet; De Raeve, Leo; Frijns, Johan H. M.

    2013-01-01

    It is still largely unknown how receiving a cochlear implant affects the emotion understanding in deaf children. We examined indices for emotion understanding and their associations with communication skills in children aged 2.5-5 years, both hearing children (n = 52) and deaf children with a cochlear implant (n = 57). 2 aspects of emotion…

  17. Awareness and Regulation of Emotions in Deaf Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rieffe, Carolien

    2012-01-01

    In this study, deaf children's understanding of their own emotions was compared with that of hearing peers. Twenty-six deaf children (mean age 11 years) and 26 hearing children, matched for age and gender, were presented with various tasks that tap into their emotion awareness and regulation (coping) regarding the four basic emotions (happiness,…

  18. Personal Factors that Influence Deaf College Students' Academic Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albertini, John A.; Kelly, Ronald R.; Matchett, Mary Karol

    2012-01-01

    Research tells us that academic preparation is key to deaf students' success at college. Yet, that is not the whole story. Many academically prepared students drop out during their first year. This study identified entering deaf college students' personal factors as assessed by their individual responses to both the "Noel-Levitz College…

  19. Text Revision in Deaf and Hearing Bilingual Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teruggi, Lilia A.; Gutiérrez-Cáceres, Rafaela

    2016-01-01

    In this study we explored the revision process and strategies implemented by deaf and hearing students who attend the same bilingual school context (LIS and Italian). For that we analysed and compared the types and quality of revisions made by deaf and hearing participants to their first draft of a narrative text ("Frog, Where Are You?")…

  20. (Meta)Communication Strategies in Inclusive Classes for Deaf Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelman, Celeste Azulay; Branco, Angela Uchoa

    2009-01-01

    How can an inclusive classroom for deaf students be successful? The use of metacommunication strategies by teachers and hearing peers seems promising. Schools that promote this approach tend to improve deaf students' psychosocial development and academic achievement. However, this is not a general rule. The present study identifies the elements of…

  1. What We Can Learn from Hearing Parents of Deaf Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flaherty, Mary

    2015-01-01

    Hearing parents of deaf children face stresses and demands related to parenting a deaf child, including difficult choices about language, technologies, education and identity for their children (Marschark, 1997). To date, few researchers have discussed the unique challenges faced by this group. Through a series of semistructured, in-depth…

  2. Teachers' Perceptions of Communication Needs of Deaf Children in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Teachers' Perceptions of Communication Needs of Deaf Children in Kenyan School System. ... Nigerian Journal of Clinical and Counselling Psychology ... It is believed that teachers being the major service deliverer in the school system, their opinion on this matter will have long-lasting effects on their deaf pupils, as it will ...

  3. Family Quality of Life Following Early Identification of Deafness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Carla W.; Wegner, Jane R.; Turnbull, Ann P.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Family members' perceptions of their quality of life were examined following early identification of deafness in children. Method: A questionnaire was used to solicit ratings of satisfaction from the family members of 207 children who were deaf and younger than 6 years of age. Results: Results indicated that families were generally…

  4. A Sociolinguistic Profile of the Peruvian Deaf Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parks, Elizabeth; Parks, Jason

    2010-01-01

    A sociolinguistic survey of the sign language used by the deaf communities of Peru was conducted in November and December of 2007. For eight weeks, our survey team visited six deaf communities in the cities of Lima, Arequipa, Cusco, Trujillo, Chiclayo, and Iquitos. Using sociolinguistic questionnaires and recorded text testing (RTT) tools, we…

  5. The Child Who Is Deaf and Hearing Parents

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, J. Freeman

    2010-01-01

    A majority of parents who have a child who is deaf are hearing and usually have had no experience with deafness. The impact on the parents can unequivocally alter their lives. The professional advice given to the parent regarding their child is often accepted as irrefutable fact, and can lead to the emotional, social, linguistic, and educational…

  6. The Position of the Deaf in the Swedish Labor Market

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rydberg, Emelie; Gellerstedt, Lotta Coniavitis; Danermark, Berth

    2010-01-01

    The position of deaf people in the Swedish labor market is described and analyzed. A population of 2,144 people born from 1941 to 1980 who attended special education programs for the deaf was compared to 100,000 randomly chosen individuals from the total Swedish population born during the same period. Data on these individuals consisted of…

  7. An Examination of Health Information Management by the Deaf

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karras, Elizabeth

    2010-01-01

    Little is known about how Deaf people perceive, access, and utilize interpersonal and media sources for health information. In light of the scarcity of research on health information management among this group, a two-phase study was conducted that included eight focus groups (N=39) and survey data (N=366) with Deaf participants to determine the…

  8. A National Survey of Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Training for the Deaf.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Kenneth H.; Tomasetti, James A.

    1983-01-01

    Responses to a national survey by regional directors of the American Heart Association, American National Red Cross, and continuing education programs for the deaf indicated that little is done to train the deaf in cardiopulmonary resuscitation and that communication barriers and inadequate training resources are major reasons. (Author)

  9. Haptic spatial configuration learning in deaf and hearing individuals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dijk, R; Kappers, A.M.L.; Postma, A.

    2013-01-01

    The present study investigated haptic spatial configuration learning in deaf individuals, hearing sign language interpreters and hearing controls. In three trials, participants had to match ten shapes haptically to the cut-outs in a board as fast as possible. Deaf and hearing sign language users

  10. Orange Eyes: Bimodal Bilingualism in Hearing Adults from Deaf Families

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop, Michele; Hicks, Sheery

    2005-01-01

    Hearing children from deaf families, Codas, represent a relatively invisible linguistic and cultural minority. Many hearing people are unaware of the fact that American Sign Language (ASL) is a separate language with its own grammatical structure unlike that of English. This misconception has led to an emphasis on oral education for deaf people in…

  11. Vocabulary Knowledge of Deaf and Hearing Postsecondary Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarchet, Thomastine; Marschark, Marc; Borgna, Georgianna; Convertino, Carol; Sapere, Patricia; Dirmyer, Richard

    2014-01-01

    Deaf children generally are found to have smaller English vocabularies than hearing peers, although studies involving children with cochlear implants have suggested that the gap may decrease or disappear with age. Less is known about the vocabularies of deaf and hard-of-hearing (DHH) postsecondary students or how their vocabulary knowledge relates…

  12. Solving Word Problems: More than Reading Issues for Deaf Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Ronald R.; Mousley, Keith

    2001-01-01

    Thirty-three college students with deafness and 10 typical students were given 30 mathematics problems to solve, 15 that were word problems. As the complexity of the descriptive information in the word problems increased along with the complexity of the problem situations, the performance of students with deafness decreased. (Contains references.)…

  13. Parenting Practices and Behavior Problems among Deaf Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szakowski, Amy; Brubaker, Robert G.

    2000-01-01

    Parents of 39 deaf and 37 hearing children (ages 3-8) completed the Alabama Parenting Questionnaire and the Eyberg Child Behavior Inventory. Inconsistent discipline was positively correlated with behavior problems for both groups. There was no evidence that greater prevalence of problems among deaf children resulted from inadequate parenting.…

  14. Effect of Peer Education on Deaf Secondary School Students' HIV ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study evaluated the effect of an AIDS education program on deaf secondary school students' knowledge, attitude and perceived susceptibility to AIDS using peer education. Two secondary schools matched for ownership (government), composition (mixture of hearing and deaf) and teaching arrangement (separate ...

  15. Coping and Late-Deafness: An Examination of Two Measures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Jill M.; Kashubeck-West, Susan

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To examine the psychometric properties of two measures of coping in a sample of individuals with acquired hearing loss, specifically late-deafness. Methods: Using a quantitative descriptive design, coping of participants (N = 277) with late-deafness was measured to examine the reliability and validity of the Ways of Coping Questionnaire…

  16. The Deaf-Blind Child and the Vocational Rehabilitation Counselor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouin, Carole

    Provided are four papers from a national conference, titled "The Deaf-Blind Child and the Vocational Rehabilitation Counselor", designed to identify and present possible solutions to some of the problems facing the deaf-blind child as he or she matures and moves from a basic educational setting into the realm of the vocational counselor. Entries…

  17. Signs of Resistance: Peer Learning of Sign Languages within "Oral" Schools for the Deaf

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anglin-Jaffe, Hannah

    2013-01-01

    This article explores the role of the Deaf child as peer educator. In schools where sign languages were banned, Deaf children became the educators of their Deaf peers in a number of contexts worldwide. This paper analyses how this peer education of sign language worked in context by drawing on two examples from boarding schools for the deaf in…

  18. The 2008 National Child Count of Children and Youth Who Are Deaf-Blind

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Consortium on Deaf-Blindness, 2009

    2009-01-01

    The "National Child Count of Children and Youth who are Deaf-Blind" is the first and longest running registry and knowledge base of children who are deaf-blind in the world. It represents a 25 year collaborative effort between the National Consortium on Deaf-Blindness (NCDB), its predecessors and each state/multi-state deaf-blind project…

  19. The 2010 National Child Count of Children and Youth Who Are Deaf-Blind

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Consortium on Deaf-Blindness, 2011

    2011-01-01

    The National Child Count of Children and Youth who are Deaf-Blind is the first and longest running registry and knowledge base of children who are deaf-blind in the world. It represents a 25-plus year collaborative effort between the National Consortium on Deaf-Blindness (NCDB), its predecessors and each state deaf-blind project throughout the…

  20. An Investigation of School Psychologists' Assessment Practices of Language Proficiency with Bilingual and Limited-English-Proficient Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ochoa, Salvador Hector; And Others

    1996-01-01

    A study of the language proficiency assessment practices of 859 school psychologists, when working with bilingual or limited English proficient students, found that 62 percent of school psychologists conducted their own assessments and most often used the Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test-Revised or the Test de Vocabulario en Imagenes Peabody.…