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Sample records for professionally applied fluoride

  1. Professionally applied fluoride gel in low-caries 10.5-year-olds.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Truin, G.J.; Hof, M.A. van 't

    2005-01-01

    The question has been raised whether low-caries children regularly using fluoride toothpaste will benefit from the professional application of additional fluoride gel. To investigate the caries-reducing effect of semi-annually-applied neutral 1% sodium fluoride gel, we carried out a double-blind

  2. Assessment of the Influence of Meal Type on Fluoride Absorption due to Ingestion of professionally Applied Gels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavalli, Andreany M; Rebouças, Adriana G; Zanin, Luciane; Flório, Flávia M

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this study is to assess the influence of eating, prior to application of professionally used gels, on the rate of fluoride absorption due to the ingestion of 1.23% acidulated phosphate fluoride (APF). After fasting for 12 hours, 16 adult volunteers (> 65 kg) ingested two types of meal: Breakfast (n = 8) and Lunch (n = 8). Accidental ingestion of fluoride gel used in molding trays was simulated (12,300 ppm; 61.5 mg F; pH = 4.65) 15 minutes after eating. After ingestion of the fluoride solution, 3 mL of venous blood were collected at the following times: Zero (before ingestion) and 15, 30, 45 minutes, 1, 2, and 3 hours. Fluoride concentrations in blood plasma were determined using an ion selective electrode. With the exception of time 0 (p > 0.05), the average blood plasma concentration of the breakfast group (BG) (0.34 ± 0.04 mg/L) was higher than that of the lunch group (LG) (0.24 ± 0.03 mg/L), with the moment of peak concentration being 2 hours after ingestion for both groups (BG = 0.4 mg/L; LG = 0.28 mg/L). Results reinforce the idea that eating before undergoing professional application of fluoride is a factor of extreme importance regarding its safety, and that the time following a patient's heaviest meal should be the time of choice for planning clinical care. Our results should be considered when planning collective action that involves the application of the gel on children in a school environment, thus ensuring the procedure's safety.

  3. Fluoride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fluoride is used to prevent tooth decay. It is taken up by teeth and helps to strengthen ... and block the cavity-forming action of bacteria. Fluoride usually is prescribed for children and adults whose ...

  4. Effect of professional cleaning and dental brushing with or without fluoridated dentifrice on enamel remineralization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marta, Sara Nader; Lima, José Eduardo de Oliveira; Vono, Bernardo Gonzales; Silva, Salete Moura Bonifácio da; Machado, Maria Aparecida Andrade Moreira; Pin, Maria Ligia Gerdullo

    2005-09-01

    An in situ evaluation of the potential rehardening effect of fluoridated and non-fluoridated toothpastes with or without air polishing was conducted. Ten volunteers, using acrylic palatal appliances containing two bovine enamel blocks with artificial carious lesions, took part in this study. Four times a day, after the main meals and at night, the volunteers, in a habitual way, brushed their natural teeth with the dentifrice indicated to the experimental design and after that the appliances were put again into the mouth. They were divided into 4 different groups: G1 - control - non-fluoridated dentifrice; G2 - fluoridated dentifrice; G3 - non-fluoridated dentifrice, but having a previous prophylaxis using air polishing; G4 - fluoridated dentifrice and previous air polishing. The effects of treatments on enamel rehardening were evaluated in the blocks that were assessed by surface microhardness, and the percentage of surface microhardness change (%reh) was calculated in relation to the baseline values. The results showed that %reh was higher in the groups with fluoridated dentifrice, and professional prophylaxis did not have an additional effect in the groups of fluoridated dentifrices (p<0.05). The data suggested that, in the absence of fluoride, removal of dental plaque helped to increase the process of enamel rehardening.

  5. Applying Intersubjectivity for Professional Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uvaldina Montoya Janecek

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This is an intersubjective review of Loewen, G. V. (2012. Hermeneutic Pedagogy: Teaching and learning as dialogue and interpretation. Alcoa, TN, USA. Old Moon Academic Press. The four authors of the review used a reflective-reflexive, dialogic process to interpret and analyze Loewen’s text. Their review is presented in a dialogue format that resulted after analyzing a much longer set of narrative data.[1][1] Editorial Note: This is a very unusual review! There are four points of interest that make this review an interesting read. The first one concerns the subject of the review: the book on hermeneutics. The second point is the form of the review: it is dialogue between the authors presented in its development. The third point of interest is the personal nature of the contents: the authors masterly show how their work on the review of the book penetrates their lives thus showing the real life with its changes, happiness, sadness, struggles and tribulations. The last point of interest that makes this review worth to be read  is the pioneering character of the work behind this review. Glenda Moss used this review as a tool for professional development for the colleagues in her department. In my humble opinion, this review is the result of the very courageous, pioneering and inspirational work! (Mikhail Gradovski

  6. ECONOMIC ETHICS: APPLIED AND PROFESSIONAL CHARACTER

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    Ella Gordova

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In given article economic ethics are considered as set of norms of behavior of the businessman, the requirements shown by a cultural society to its style of work, to character of dialogue between participants of business, to their social shape. The conclusion becomes that economic ethics have applied character in relation to theoretical, to obschenormativnoy ethics, hence, represent section of applied ethics. On the other hand, the specific standard maintenance characterizes economic ethics as ethics professional.

  7. Applying the Theory of Optimising Professional Life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lesley Margaret Piko

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Glaser (2014 wrote that “the application of grounded theory (GT is a relatively neglected topic” (p. 1 in the literature. Applying GT to purposely intervene and improve a situation is an important adjunct to our knowledge and understanding of GT. A recent workshop of family doctors and general practitioners provides a useful example. The theory of optimising professional life explains that doctors are concerned about sustainment in their career and, to resolve this concern, they implement solutions to optimise their personal situation. Sustainment is a new, overarching concept of three needs: the need for self-care to sustain well-being, the need for work interest to sustain motivation, and the need for income to sustain lifestyle. The objective of the workshop was to empower doctors to reinvent their careers using this theory. Working individually and in small groups, participants were able to analyse a problem and to identify potential solutions.

  8. Identifying and Applying for Professional Development Funding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyden, Christel; Escoffery, Cam; Kenzig, Melissa

    2015-07-01

    Participation in ongoing professional development can be critical for maintaining up-to-date knowledge in your field, as well as preparing for promotions and job changes. Career development activities may include formal classroom education, web-based courses, on-the-job training, workshops and seminars, professional conferences, and self-study programs. Developing a career development plan, cultivating a team to support your goals, and actively pursuing continuing education and skill-building opportunities are important across all career stages. However, the financial cost of these opportunities can often place them beyond reach. In this commentary, we summarize several potential sources for career development funding as well as best practices for completing the application process. © 2015 Society for Public Health Education.

  9. Dental visits and professional fluoride applications for children 72 to 108 months old.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamasha, Abed A; Levy, Steven M; Warren, John J

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to report patterns of dental visits and fluoride applications longitudinally during ages 7 to 9. A cohort recruited at birth was followed in the Iowa Fluoride Study, with pretested questionnaires-sent to participants at 3- to 6-month intervals--concerning children having a dental (or dental hygiene) appointment or a fluoride application during the period. The percentages with dental visits were stable during these years (92%-93%), however, the percentages reporting fluoride applications increased from 68% (seventh year) to 74% (ninth year). Among children with complete data for 72 to 108 months of age, 99% visited the dentist and 84% received fluoride applications. Dental visits were significantly more frequent with a higher socioeconomic status, and fluoride applications were significantly more frequent in children with primary dentition caries experience. The prevalence of visits and fluoride applications during these years are stable, with most children having at least 1 visit per year.

  10. Signal integrity applied electromagnetics and professional practice

    CERN Document Server

    Russ, Samuel H

    2016-01-01

    This textbook teaches how to design working systems at very high frequencies. It is designed to introduce computer engineers to the design of extremely high speed digital systems. Combining an intuitive, physics-based approach to electromagnetics with a focus on solving realistic problems, the author presents concepts that are essential for computer and electrical engineers today. The book emphasizes an intuitive approach to electromagnetics, and then uses this foundation to show the reader how both physical phenomena can cause signals to propagate incorrectly; and how to solve commonly encountered issues. Emphasis is placed on real problems that the author has encountered in his professional career, integrating problem-solving strategies and real signal-integrity case studies throughout the presentation. Students are challenged to think about managing complex design projects and implementing successful engineering and manufacturing processes. Each chapter includes exercises to test concepts introduced.

  11. Methodology of students' professionally-applied physical training in universities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pylypey L.P.

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Real system of physical education that exists in Ukraine is considered; the ineffectiveness of physical training of students for future life and production activities is shown. In modern conditions the structure of physiological requirements and working conditions is changing and, accordingly, there are additional requirements for professionally-applied physical training. The model of the educational process for credit-module system in high school is given. Theoretical and methodological reasoning of professionally-applied physical training methodology in university of economic profile is carried out. Management options for physical training of students are proposed. The systems of computer technology of professionally-applied physical training are considered.

  12. Preventing Tooth Decay: A Guide for Implementing Self-Applied Fluoride in Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Inst. of Dental Research (NIH), Bethesda, MD.

    This guidebook was developed to assist citizens in initiating programs to prevent tooth decay in young children through the use of fluoridation. It contains outlines for determining the needs of the school and community for fluoride in drinking water, and presents the various steps and activities that are necessary for developing and implementing…

  13. Skeletal PET with 18F-fluoride: applying new technology to an old tracer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, Frederick D; Fahey, Frederic H; Packard, Alan B; Davis, Royal T; Alavi, Abass; Treves, S Ted

    2008-01-01

    Although (18)F-labeled NaF was the first widely used agent for skeletal scintigraphy, it quickly fell into disuse after the introduction of (99m)Tc-labeled bone-imaging agents. Recent comparative studies have demonstrated that (18)F-fluoride PET is more accurate than (99m)Tc-diphosphonate SPECT for identifying both malignant and benign lesions of the skeleton. Combining (18)F-fluoride PET with other imaging, such as CT, can improve the specificity and overall accuracy of skeletal (18)F-fluoride PET and probably will become the routine clinical practice for (18)F-fluoride PET. Although (18)F-labeled NaF and (99m)Tc-diphosphonate have a similar patient dosimetry, (18)F-fluoride PET offers shorter study times (typically less than 1 h), resulting in a more efficient workflow, improved patient convenience, and faster turnarounds of reports to the referring physicians. With the widespread availability of PET scanners and the improved logistics for the delivery of (18)F radiopharmaceuticals, prior limitations to the routine use of (18)F-fluoride bone imaging have largely been overcome. The favorable imaging performance and the clinical utility of (18)F-fluoride PET, compared with (99m)Tc-diphosphonate scintigraphy, support the reconsideration of (18)F-fluoride as a routine bone-imaging agent.

  14. Organization of professional and applied physical training and applied specifically oriented undergraduate students of forestry professions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martirosova T.A.

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The questions of the use of facilities are examined professionally-applied physical preparation of students. The necessity of more rapid and high-quality mastering of certain labour abilities and skills, increase of the labour productivity, prophylaxis of professional diseases is marked. It is marked that forms and facilities of physical education of students of forestry specialities are determined features professionally-labour to activity of this industry. Employments of the special applied orientation are plugged in itself: theoretical employments, practical employments, sports and fitness measures, individual independent professionally-applied physical exercises, special applied types of sport. The features of forming professionally of important qualities of future specialist are certain in the process of physical education in the institute of higher.

  15. In vitro assessment of an experimental coat applied over fluoride varnishes

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    Alberto Carlos Botazzo Delbem

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The time of contact between the product and enamel surface is important in ensuring the efficacy of fluoride varnishes. Thus, some alternatives could avoid fluoride loss to saliva and improve the anticariogenic action of the product. This study evaluated the effect of an experimental coat on the anticariogenic action of fluoride varnishes. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Enamel bovine blocks were selected by evaluating surface microhardness and randomized into five groups (n=24: placebo, DuraphatTM, DuraphatTM with coat, DuofluoridTM and DuofluoridTM with coat. Twelve blocks from each group were used to analyze calcium fluoride (CaF2 formed on enamel after treatment. The other 12 blocks were subjected to pH cycling for 7 days. The varnishes were kept on enamel for 6 h. Next, the percentage change of surface microhardness (%SMHC and mineral loss (ΔZ were calculated. CaF2 retained and fluoride present in the pH-cycled solutions were also measured. RESULTS: The use of the coat did not decrease %SMHC and ΔZ, but all fluoride varnishes had better results when compared to the placebo (ANOVA and Kruskal-Wallis, respectively. The values from CaF2 formed were higher compared to the values of CaF2 retained (non-paired t test, p<0.05. There was a trend to decrease the amount of F in the solutions at the end of pH cycling (Kruskal-Wallis, p<0.05. CONCLUSIONS: Although the experimental coat increased the formation of CaF2 on the enamel surface, it did not significantly improve the anticariogenic action of fluoride varnishes.

  16. Professional applied physical training of future specialists of agricultural production

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    Karabanov Y.A.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose : develop and experimentally prove the contents, methods and forms of physical training of future specialists of agricultural production. This takes into account advanced course of professional applied physical preparation means kettlebell sport. Material : The study involved 141 students. Duration of study is 5 years. Results : It was found that a significant increase in indicators of flexibility, strength, coordination abilities of students promoted the use of exercises using weights of different weights. Confirmed the legitimacy of the use of such means of physical education for the development of muscle strength of the upper body, back, legs, abdominals. These muscles are the most loaded in the performance of professional activities of mechanical engineers. Conclusions : The program meets the basic criteria for the formation of curriculum for physical education. The program promotes the development of professional applications of physical qualities, motor skills and improve physical performance of students.

  17. Topical use of fluorides for caries control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pessan, Juliano Pelim; Toumba, Kyriacos Jack; Buzalaf, Marília Afonso Rabelo

    2011-01-01

    Since the early findings on the protective effects of fluoride present in drinking water upon caries incidence and prevalence, intensive research has been conducted in order to determine the benefits, safety, as well as the cost-effectiveness of other modalities of fluoride delivery. The present chapter reviews the various forms of topical fluoride use - professionally and self-applied - with special emphasis on clinical efficacy and possible side effects. The most widely used forms of fluoride delivery have been subject of several systematic reviews, providing strong evidence supporting the use of dentifrices, gels, varnishes and mouth rinses for the control of caries progression. Dentifrices with fluoride concentrations of 1,000 ppm and above have been shown to be clinically effective in caries prevention when compared to a placebo treatment, but the evidence regarding formulations with 450-550 ppm is still subject of debate. Therefore, the recommendation for low-fluoride dentifrice use must take into account both risks and benefits. The evidence for the combined use of two modalities of fluoride application in comparison to a single modality is still inconsistent, implying that more studies with adequate methodology are needed to determine the real benefits of each method. Considering the currently available evidence and risk-benefit aspects, it seems justifiable to recommend the use of fluoridated dentifrices to individuals of all ages, and additional fluoride therapy should also be targeted towards individuals at high caries risk. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  18. [Enamel fluoride uptake following fluoride application and fluoride precipitation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchalla, Wolfgang; Lennon, Aine M; Trage, Katrin; Becker, Klaus; Attin, Thomas

    2007-01-01

    This study is on fluoride uptake into enamel following fluoride precipitation with calcium hydroxide. Five specimens each from 12 bovine incisors were polished, covered with a salivary pellicle, and distributed into five groups (n=12). A fluoride solution (43,500 ppm F from magnesiumfluorosilicate, copper-(II)-fluorosilicate and sodium-fluoride, pH 2; Tiefenfluorid Touchierlösung, Humanchemie) and Ca(OH)2-solution (Tiefenfluorid Nachtouchierlösung) were applied subsequently in group TN. "Touchierlosung" only was used in group T, sodium-fluoride (43,500 ppm F, pH 2) in group NaF, and aminefluoride (Elmex fluid, 10,000 ppm F, pH 4) in group EF. No fluoride was used in group NK (negative control). Following rinsing and 24 h storage in artificial saliva surface KOH-soluble fluoride content (KOHF), and structurally bound fluoride content (SBF) from three layers (0-33, 33-66 and 66-99 pm) was determined by fluoride electrode procedures. KOHF (median in microg/cm2) of NK was below the lower limit of quantification of the fluoride electrode. The other group values were significantly higher (Mann-Whitney test, p precipitation reaction with Ca(OH)2 following fluoridation did not increase enamel fluoride uptake.

  19. The history of public health use of fluorides in caries prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Šket, Tea; Kukec, Andreja; Kosem, Rok; Artnik, Barbara

    2017-06-01

    The aim of our study was to chronologically analyse various public health measures of fluoride use in caries prevention. We systematically searched the PubMed database on the preventive role of fluorides in public health, published from 1984 to 2014. The search process was divided into four steps, where inclusion and exclusion criteria were defined. Qualitative methodology was used for the article analysis. In the research process, the described forms of F use, diversity of the described F agents, and the observed population group were analysed. In our systematic review, 40 relevant reviews were revealed. Fluorides have been used in many different forms, but only a few studies showed their significant role in public health. Water fluoridation was the most important public health measure. In the recent decades, the number of studies on topical fluorides is constantly rising. The most extensively described topical forms of fluorides are professionally applied fluoride agents and fluoride toothpaste for home-use. The use of fluoride containing toothpaste in caries prevention is a safe and successful public health measure (PHM) if their use is widespread, and it is recommended for all. The results on other topical forms of fluorides are insufficient to be suggested as an important PHM. The role of fluorides in public health prevention has changed in accordance with the knowledge about the fluoride cariostatic mechanism. Previously the most important pre-eruptive effect of fluorides was supplemented by the post eruptive effect. Abundant evidence exists to show the effectiveness of systemic and topical fluorides.

  20. Caries-inhibiting effect of professional fluoride gel application in low-caries children initially aged 4.5-6.5 years.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rijkom, H.M. van; Truin, G.J.; Hof, M.A. van 't

    2004-01-01

    It was the purpose of the study to investigate the caries-reducing effect of semi-annual professional fluoride gel application in a low-caries child population initially aged 4.5-6.5 years during a 4-year follow-up period. In a double-blind randomised controlled trial (n = 773) the effect of sodium

  1. Fluoride: its role in dentistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Livia Maria Andaló Tenuta

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In spite of decades of research on fluoride and the recognition of its role as the cornerstone of dental caries reduction in the last fifty years, questions still arise on its use at community, self-applied and professional application levels. Which method of fluoride delivery should be used? How and when should it be used? How can its benefits be maximized and still reduce the risks associated with its use? These are only some of the challenging questions facing us daily. The aim of this paper is to present scientific background to understand the importance of each method of fluoride use considering the current caries epidemiological scenario, and to discuss how individual or combined methods can be used based on the best evidence available.

  2. Fluoridated Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Genetics Services Directory Cancer Prevention Overview Research Fluoridated Water On This Page What is fluoride, and where is it found? What is water fluoridation? When did water fluoridation begin in the ...

  3. Use of fluorides in dental caries management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, C H; Mei, May L; Lo, Edward C M

    2010-01-01

    Fluoride is commonly and widely used to prevent and even arrest caries. The clinical effects of fluorides depend on the chemical compounds utilized and the methods used to apply the fluoride ion to the surface of the tooth. Fluorosis has been reported in conjunction with increased doses of fluoride. A coordinated approach to fluoride delivery is essential to avoid the risk of fluorosis.

  4. Knowledge, attitude, and practice of parents of 7-12-year-old children regarding fissure sealant therapy and professional fluoride therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tahani, Bahareh; Yadegarfar, Ghasem; Ahmadi, Azimeh

    2017-01-01

    To increase the utilization of preventive dental care, it is essential to improve the knowledge and attitude of parents about such cares. The aim of this study was to evaluate the knowledge, attitude, and practice of school children's parents toward fissure sealant (FS) and professional fluoride therapy in Isfahan. In this cross-sectional study, school children's parents ( n = 637) were selected based on proportional cluster sampling. A valid and reliable questionnaire was designed, including demographic section, questions about parents' experience and their knowledge and attitude about professional fluoride and FS therapy. Data were analyzed by ANOVA, regression, Chi-square, and correlation coefficient tests. The means of total knowledge and knowledge about fluoride therapy and FS were 5.9 ± 4.1 out of 19, 3.3 ± 2.0 out of 9 and 2.6 ± 2.7 out of 10, respectively. The mean of attitude was 33.7 ± 5.8. The mean of knowledge toward FS therapy was significantly higher in academically educated parents ( P = 0.023). The mean of total knowledge among those who received their knowledge by their dentist was also significantly higher than that of other resources such as mass media ( P = 0.003). Total knowledge was positively correlated with attitude ( P knowledge regarding professional preventive care in this study and the effectiveness of knowledge acquired through dentists and mass media consultations, it might be effective to require them to consider such training more seriously.

  5. 34 CFR 263.2 - Who is eligible to apply under the Professional Development program?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... GRANT PROGRAMS Professional Development Program § 263.2 Who is eligible to apply under the Professional... 34 Education 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Who is eligible to apply under the Professional Development program? 263.2 Section 263.2 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education...

  6. THE IMPORTANCE OF APPLIED TO BIO-SECURITY PROFESSIONAL RADIOLOGY

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    Mauro Trevisan

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available This study highlights the importance of biosecurity in the work of technicians and technologists in Radiology. As a means of motivation research, it was observed that despite the investment of the hospitals and clinics for the improvement of radiological techniques, little has been done to prevent the spread of diseases among the professionals in radiology. To do so, held the same direction by quantitatively and qualitatively, using the analytical method and a questionnaire as the technique of analysis, with the sample of 29 professionals located in public hospitals, the School LS and in private practice. The results demonstrated that there is knowledge of biosafety among radiology professionals, but there is no understanding of the relevance of the subject by some a good portion of them.

  7. An Innovation Framework Applied to a Military Cyber Professionals Association

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-01

    Associations, Military Cyber Professionals Association, Cyber Command, Innovation, Innovation Adoption, Innovation Model, Non Profit, Entrepreneur ...of such organizations is demonstrated by their pervasiveness, including across the American defense ecosystem . Examples of such military related...innovation. This narrative records observations and insights of interest to 15 innovators, entrepreneurs , intrapreneurs, extrapreneurs, policy makers, and

  8. Cashing In Stars: Does the Professional Ethic Apply in Retirement?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Congress and the public at large. As Melanie Sloan, executive director of CREW, mentions, the political and public apathy is attributed to the high...begin with the premise of military of- ficers as “professionals.” As students of civil-military relations are aware, Samuel Huntington’s The Soldier and

  9. Applying Constructionist Principles to Online Teacher Professional Development

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    Nathaniel Ostashewski

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available This report explores the first iteration of a teacher professional development courselet grounded in constructionist theory and activities. This online teacher professional development (oTPD courselet provided opportunities for teachers to engage in just-in-time, ongoing TPD within a social networking site for educators. The topic of the oTPD was Robotics and Hands-on Activities in the Classroom. The courselet was designed for teachers who are interested in integrating constructionist pedagogies into their practice. Key findings of the first delivery of the oTPD courselet point to a need for flexible access, sharing of resources, and support for constructionist pedagogical activities as a PD value for participants. Findings further support the potential for an ongoing online community of practice around robotics in the classroom. The approach taken in this oTPD courselet of study continues to inform a model of oTPD delivery within a social-networking-enabled environment.

  10. Knowledge, attitude, and practice of parents of 7–12-year-old children regarding fissure sealant therapy and professional fluoride therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tahani, Bahareh; Yadegarfar, Ghasem; Ahmadi, Azimeh

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: To increase the utilization of preventive dental care, it is essential to improve the knowledge and attitude of parents about such cares. The aim of this study was to evaluate the knowledge, attitude, and practice of school children's parents toward fissure sealant (FS) and professional fluoride therapy in Isfahan. MATERIALS AND METHODS: In this cross-sectional study, school children's parents (n = 637) were selected based on proportional cluster sampling. A valid and reliable questionnaire was designed, including demographic section, questions about parents’ experience and their knowledge and attitude about professional fluoride and FS therapy. Data were analyzed by ANOVA, regression, Chi-square, and correlation coefficient tests. RESULTS: The means of total knowledge and knowledge about fluoride therapy and FS were 5.9 ± 4.1 out of 19, 3.3 ± 2.0 out of 9 and 2.6 ± 2.7 out of 10, respectively. The mean of attitude was 33.7 ± 5.8. The mean of knowledge toward FS therapy was significantly higher in academically educated parents (P = 0.023). The mean of total knowledge among those who received their knowledge by their dentist was also significantly higher than that of other resources such as mass media (P = 0.003). Total knowledge was positively correlated with attitude (P knowledge regarding professional preventive care in this study and the effectiveness of knowledge acquired through dentists and mass media consultations, it might be effective to require them to consider such training more seriously. PMID:29296607

  11. Direction improvements professionally-applied physical preparation of students of economic specialities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salatenko I.A.

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The aspects of improvement are considered professionally - the applied physical preparation of students of economic specialities taking into account the features of pedagogical process. It is set that in the process of professional - the applied physical preparation the complex of psychophysiological qualities, necessary a worker in his professional activity is successfully formed. The analysis of publications of the Russian and Ukrainian scientists is resulted about the varieties of facilities of improvement professionally - the applied physical preparation of students of higher educational establishments. Some features of professional preparation of future economists are found out. The necessity of search of new technologies of perfection of process of physical education of students is well-proven higher educational establishments of economic specialities. Directions of education the harmoniously developed personality of student are recommended, which will allow to improve a health, form important psychophysical qualities professionally.

  12. Microradiography and confocal laser scanning microscopy applied to enamel lesions formed in vivo with and without fluoride varnish treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ogaard, B; Duschner, H; Ruben, J; Arends, J

    The aim of the present investigation was to combine 2 techniques suitable for lesion characterization: quantitative microradiography (TMR) and confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) on in vivo induced lesions with and without a fluoride varnish (Duraphat(R)) treatment. Orthodontic bands were

  13. Pit and fissure sealants or fluoride varnishes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paglia, L

    2016-09-01

    Despite the general advances in dental care, dental caries is still a global health problem affecting many children. Occlusal surfaces of first permanent molars are the most susceptible sites in the developing permanent dentition. Dentists should use sealants or fluoride varnish - as well as other means - to limit the onset of tooth decay. Application of sealants is a recommended procedure to prevent or control caries. Sealing occlusal surfaces of newly erupted permanent molars in children and teenagers delays caries onset up to 48 months compared with unsealed teeth. However longer follow-ups shows a reduction of the preventive effect [Tikhonova et al., 2015]. A review of 2013 pointed out how sealants are effective in high risk children, however information about the benefits of sealing in other conditions is still scant [Ahovuo-Saloranta et al., 2013]. Fluoride varnishes are frequently used to prevent early childhood caries and reduce caries increment in very young children [Weintraub et al., 2006] and in the most vulnerable populations, where the prevalence of caries is higher and specialist visits are occasional [Chu et al., 2010]. Many studies have reported the effectiveness of different types and forms of fluoride agents in preventing dental caries among children and adolescents [Divaris et al., 2013]. A review clarifies that professional application of a 5% sodium fluoride varnish leads to remineralisation of early enamel caries in children. Solutions of 38% silver diamine fluoride are effective in arresting active dentine caries [Gao et al., 2016]. The last systematic review [Ahovuo-Saloranta et al., 2016], comparing pit and fissure sealants with fluoride varnishes explains that the pooled estimate slightly favours resin sealants over fluoride varnishes at two years. At four and nine years, the only comparative study (with high drop-out rates) found more caries on fluoride-varnished occlusal surfaces than on resin-sealed surfaces. There is evidence

  14. The impact of professional-applied physical training to develop students' performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirko Gennadij Aleksandrovich

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available It is reviewed publications on physical education of youth and professional-applied physical training of students of economic universities. The experiment involved 256 students. Determined by means of professional-applied physical training to develop physical fitness and health. The article traces the changes that occur in the body as a result of systematic and substantial physical exercise. Shows the dynamics of development of motor abilities of students of basic medical offices I-II courses for two years of training.

  15. [Water fluoridation and public health].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barak, Shlomo

    2003-11-01

    Fluoridation in Israel was first mooted in 1973 and finally incorporated into law in November 2002 obligating the Ministry of Health to add fluoride to the nation's water supply. Epidemiology studies in the USA have shown that the addition of one part per million of fluoride to the drinking water reduced the caries rate of children's teeth by 50% to 60% with no side effects. Both the WHO in 1994 and the American Surgeon General's report of 2000 declared that fluoridation of drinking water was the safest and most efficient way of preventing dental caries in all age groups and populations. Opposition to fluoridation has arisen from "antifluoridation" groups who object to the "pollution" of drinking water by the addition of chemicals and mass medication in violation of the "Patient's Rights" law and the Basic Law of Human Dignity and Liberty. A higher prevalence of hip fractures in elderly osteoporotic women and osteosarcoma in teenagers has been reported in areas where excess fluoride exists in the drinking water. However, none of the many independent professional committees reviewing the negative aspects of fluoridation have found any scientific evidence associating fluoridation with any ill-effects or health problems. In Israel, where dental treatment is not included in the basket of Health Services, fluoridation is the most efficient and cheapest way of reducing dental disease, especially for the poorer members of the population.

  16. Story of Fluoridation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Fluoride > The Story of Fluoridation The Story of Fluoridation Main Content It started as an observation, that ... fluoridate its drinking water.The Grand Rapids water fluoridation study was originally sponsored by the U.S. Surgeon ...

  17. APA Award for Distinguished Professional Contributions to Applied Research: Cameron J. Camp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-12-01

    The Award for Distinguished Professional Contributions to Applied Research is given to a psychologist whose research has led to important discoveries or developments in the field of applied psychology. The 2017 recipient is Cameron J. Camp, whose innovative programs have informed psychologists in working with dementia patients to improve their living skills and enhance their independence. Camp's award citation, biography, and a selected bibliography are presented here. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  18. Leslie S. Greenberg: Award for Distinguished Professional Contributions to Applied Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Psychologist, 2012

    2012-01-01

    Presents a short biography of the 2012 winner of the American Psychological Association's Award for Distinguished Professional Contributions to Applied Research. Leslie S. Greenberg is an exemplary scientist-practitioner whose pioneering work has significantly altered the landscape of the field of psychotherapy research and practice. His seminal…

  19. Applying Program Theory-Driven Approach to Design and Evaluate a Teacher Professional Development Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Su-ching; Wu, Ming-sui

    2016-01-01

    This study was the first year of a two-year project which applied a program theory-driven approach to evaluating the impact of teachers' professional development interventions on students' learning by using a mix of methods, qualitative inquiry, and quasi-experimental design. The current study was to show the results of using the method of…

  20. Remineralisation and arresting caries in children with topical fluorides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gugnani, Neeraj; Gugnani, Shalini

    2017-06-23

    Data sourcesThe Cochrane Library, PubMed, Embase and the ISI Web of Science.Study selectionEnglish language clinical trials in children with outcome measures including the remineralisation or arresting effect of caries by professional fluoride treatment were considered.Data extraction and synthesisTwo reviewers screened the studies and assessed risk of bias. Random effects meta-analysis was conducted.ResultsSeventeen studies were included, ten focused on remineralisation, seven on arresting carious lesions. Meta-analysis of four studies using 5% fluoride varnish found a 63.6% (95% CI; 36.0% - 91.2%) remineralisation of early enamel caries. For five studies using 38% silver diamine fluoride solution meta-analysis found 65.9% (95% CI; 41.2% - 90.7%) of caries arrested.ConclusionsProfessionally applied 5% sodium fluoride varnish shows the capability to remineralise early enamel caries in children. Silver diamine fluoride solution at 38% is effective in arresting active dentine caries. Because the number of clinical trials that studied the arresting effect of dental caries is limited, more clinical trials should be performed.

  1. Structural-functional model of medical students’ professional-applied physical training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.V. Petryshyn

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: to work out and experimentally prove model of professional-applied physical training of medical higher educational establishments’ students. Material: in the research 80 students participated. In questioning physical education instructors of medical higher education establishments (n=20 participated. Results: influence of students’ professionally important characteristics on general physical fitness indicators and functional state has been shown. Directions of students’ physical fitness parameters’ individual diagnostic and control over physical education effectiveness have been offered. Volumes of physical exercises in the structure of training have been found: special training (15-20% and competition exercises (20-30%. Conclusions: the need in raising the level of professionally important for students’ abilities has been noted: speed power, static power endurance, power endurance, coordination of arms’ movements, static balance.

  2. Fluoridation Basics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Dental Health Care Settings Single-Use (Disposable) Devices Sterilization Cleaning Monitoring Packaging & Storage Use & Handling of Toothbrushes ... Less pain and suffering because of tooth decay. History of Fluoride in Water In the 1930s, scientists ...

  3. Facial Cosmetics and Attractiveness: Comparing the Effect Sizes of Professionally-Applied Cosmetics and Identity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Alex L; Kramer, Robin S S

    2016-01-01

    Forms of body decoration exist in all human cultures. However, in Western societies, women are more likely to engage in appearance modification, especially through the use of facial cosmetics. How effective are cosmetics at altering attractiveness? Previous research has hinted that the effect is not large, especially when compared to the variation in attractiveness observed between individuals due to differences in identity. In order to build a fuller understanding of how cosmetics and identity affect attractiveness, here we examine how professionally-applied cosmetics alter attractiveness and compare this effect with the variation in attractiveness observed between individuals. In Study 1, 33 YouTube models were rated for attractiveness before and after the application of professionally-applied cosmetics. Cosmetics explained a larger proportion of the variation in attractiveness compared with previous studies, but this effect remained smaller than variation caused by differences in attractiveness between individuals. Study 2 replicated the results of the first study with a sample of 45 supermodels, with the aim of examining the effect of cosmetics in a sample of faces with low variation in attractiveness between individuals. While the effect size of cosmetics was generally large, between-person variability due to identity remained larger. Both studies also found interactions between cosmetics and identity-more attractive models received smaller increases when cosmetics were worn. Overall, we show that professionally-applied cosmetics produce a larger effect than self-applied cosmetics, an important theoretical consideration for the field. However, the effect of individual differences in facial appearance is ultimately more important in perceptions of attractiveness.

  4. 'I take for granted that patients know' - oral health professionals' strategies, considerations and methods when teaching patients how to use fluoride toothpaste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, O; Gabre, P; Sköld, U M; Birkhed, D; Povlsen, L

    2014-05-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the oral health professionals' (OHPs') perspectives regarding their strategies, considerations and methods when teaching their patients the most effective way of toothbrushing with fluoride (F) toothpaste. A qualitative research method was used to collect data. To stimulate interactivity among the participants, interviews were performed in focus groups. Five groups of OHPs, including dentists, dental hygienists and dental nurses, were interviewed a total of 23 individuals. The interviews were analysed using manifest and latent qualitative content analysis. Data were systematically condensed and coded to the relevant phrases that identified their content. Three categories were identified in the manifest and latent content analysis: (i) strategies and intentions, (ii) providing oral hygiene information and instruction and (iii) barriers to optimal oral healthcare education. Health promotion and seeing to the patients' best interest were driving forces among the OHPs as well as personal success in their preventive work. They focused on toothbrushing techniques more than on how to use F toothpaste. Barriers to oral health information were cost to the patients and, to some extent, the opinion of the OHPs that some patients were impossible to motivate or that patients already know what to do. The OHPs described toothbrushing with F toothpaste as very important, although the plaque removal perspective dominated. They did not focus on how to use F toothpaste, because they believed that knowledge about and appropriate behaviour concerning F toothpaste were already familiar to their patients. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. The use of applied software for the professional training of students studying humanities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadchikova, A. S.; Rodin, M. M.

    2017-01-01

    Research practice is an integral part of humanities students' training process. In this regard the training process is to include modern information techniques of the training process of students studying humanities. This paper examines the most popular applied software products used for data processing in social science. For testing purposes we selected the most commonly preferred professional packages: MS Excel, IBM SPSS Statistics, STATISTICA, STADIA. Moreover the article contains testing results of a specialized software Prikladnoy Sotsiolog that is applicable for the preparation stage of the research. The specialised software were tested during one term in groups of students studying humanities.

  6. HydroShare: Applying professional software engineering to a new NSF-funded large software project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idaszak, R.; Tarboton, D. G.; Ames, D.; Saleem Arrigo, J. A.; Band, L. E.; Bedig, A.; Castronova, A. M.; Christopherson, L.; Coposky, J.; Couch, A.; Dash, P.; Gan, T.; Goodall, J.; Gustafson, K.; Heard, J.; Hooper, R. P.; Horsburgh, J. S.; Jackson, S.; Johnson, H.; Maidment, D. R.; Mbewe, P.; Merwade, V.; Miles, B.; Reeder, S.; Russell, T.; Song, C.; Taylor, A.; Thakur, S.; Valentine, D. W.; Whiteaker, T. L.

    2013-12-01

    HydroShare is an online, collaborative system being developed for sharing hydrologic data and models as part of the NSF's Software Infrastructure for Sustained Innovation (SI2) program (NSF collaborative award numbers 1148453 and 1148090). HydroShare involves a large software development effort requiring cooperative research and distributed software development between domain scientists, professional software engineers (here 'professional' denotes previous commercial experience in the application of modern software engineering), and university software developers. HydroShare expands upon the data sharing capabilities of the Hydrologic Information System of the Consortium of Universities for the Advancement of Hydrologic Sciences, Inc. (CUAHSI) by broadening the classes of data accommodated, expanding capability to include the sharing of models and model components, and taking advantage of emerging social media functionality to enhance information about and collaboration around hydrologic data and models. With a goal of enabling better science concomitant with improved sustainable software practices, we will describe our approach, experiences, and lessons learned thus-far in applying professional software engineering to a large NSF-funded software project from the project's onset.

  7. APPLYING PROFESSIONALLY ORIENTED PROBLEMS OF MATHEMATICAL MODELING IN TEACHING STUDENTS OF ENGINEERING DEPARTMENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natal’ya Yur’evna Gorbunova

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available We described several aspects of organizing student research work, as well as solving a number of mathematical modeling problems: professionally-oriented, multi-stage, etc. We underlined the importance of their economic content. Samples of using such problems in teaching Mathematics at agricultural university were given. Several questions connected with information material selection and peculiarities of research problems application were described. Purpose. The author aims to show the possibility and necessity of using professionally-oriented problems of mathematical modeling in teaching Mathematics at agricultural university. The subject of analysis is including such problems into educational process. Methodology. The main research method is dialectical method of obtaining knowledge of finding approaches to selection, writing and using mathematical modeling and professionally-oriented problems in educational process; the methodology is study of these methods of obtaining knowledge. Results. As a result of analysis of literature, students opinions, observation of students work, and taking into account personal teaching experience, it is possible to make conclusion about importance of using mathematical modeling problems, as it helps to systemize theoretical knowledge, apply it to practice, raise students study motivation in engineering sphere. Practical implications. Results of the research can be of interest for teachers of Mathematics in preparing Bachelor and Master students of engineering departments of agricultural university both for theoretical research and for modernization of study courses.

  8. The factorial structure of professionally-applied physical fitness of students of railway specialties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anzhelika Yefremova

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: to define the factorial structure of professionally-applied physical fitness of students – future electrical engineers of railway transport. Material & Methods: analysis and synthesis of references, questioning, anthropometry, testing, functional tests, and methods of mathematical statistics (the factorial analysis with application of the computer program "SPSS 17.0". 50 students (young men of Ukrainian state railway university participated in the research. Results: the ratio of means of physical culture which are expedient to use for the optimization of professionally-applied physical training of future specialists of the railway branch is defined. Conclusions: the factorial analysis allowed to distribute means of physical education as follows: physical exercises which are directed to the increase in physical working capacity and overall physical fitness – about 40%; exercises on the development of power qualities – 25%; exercises on the development of high-speed and power endurance – 15%; means which are allocated for the improvement of functions of attention and kinetic sensitivity – 10%; exercises which are directed to the increase in special working capacity – 10%.

  9. Towson University's Professional Science Master's Program in Applied Physics: The first 5 years

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolagani, Rajeswari

    It is a well-established fact that the scientific knowledge and skills acquired in the process of obtaining a degree in physics meet the needs of a variety of positions in multiple science and technology sectors. However, in addition to scientific competence, challenging careers often call for skills in advanced communication, leadership and team functions. The professional science master's degree, which has been nick-named as the `Science MBA', aims at providing science graduates an edge both in terms of employability and earning levels by imparting such skills. Our Professional Science Master's Program in Applied Physics is designed to develop these `plus' skills through multiple avenues. In addition to advanced courses in Applied Physics, the curriculum includes graduate courses in project management, business and technical writing, together with research and internship components. I will discuss our experience and lessons learned over the 5 years since the inception of the program in 2010. The author acknowledges support from the Elkins Professorship of the University System of Maryland.

  10. Urinary fluoride output in children following the use of a dual-fluoride varnish formulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olympio, Kelly Polido Kaneshiro; Cardoso, Vanessa Eid da Silva; Bijella, Maria Fernanda Borro; Pessan, Juliano Pelim; Delbem, Alberto Carlos Botazzo; Buzalaf, Marília Afonso Rabelo

    2009-01-01

    This study evaluated the bioavailability of fluoride after topical application of a dual-fluoride varnish commercially available in Brazil, when compared to Duraphat. The urinary fluoride output was evaluated in seven 5-year-old children after application of the fluoride varnishes, in two different phases. In the first phase (I), children received topical application of the fluoride varnish Duofluorid XII (2.92% fluorine, calcium fluoride + 2.71% fluorine, sodium fluoride, FGM). After 1-month interval (phase II), the same amount (0.2 mL) of the fluoride varnish Duraphat (2.26% fluorine, sodium fluoride, Colgate) was applied. Before each application all the volunteers brushed their teeth with placebo dentifrice for 7 days. Urinary collections were carried out 24 h prior up to 48 h after the applications. Fluoride intake from the diet was also estimated. Fluoride concentration in diet samples and urine was analyzed with the fluoride ion-specific electrode and a miniature calomel reference electrode coupled to a potentiometer. Data were tested by ANOVA and Tukey's post hoc test (papplication of Duraphat caused a transitory increase in the urinary fluoride output, returning to baseline levels 48 h after its use. The tested varnish formulation, which has been shown to be effective in in vitro studies, also can be considered safe.

  11. Professionally significant psychophysiological qualities of information logical group of specialties at implementation of the experimental program of professionally applied physical training of students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ostapenko Y.O.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: to improve vocational and applied physical training of students of economics. Material: the pedagogical study involved 72 male students (aged 19-20 years. Results: job study was conducted. Defined professionally significant neurobehavioral performance of students of information logical group. Matched professionally applied exercises for their development. The results showed that in the process of purposeful muscle activity improved mechanisms of regulation of neural processes, adaptive changes occur that affect the temporal parameters of sensorimotor motor responses. A comparative analysis of the psychophysiological indicators of students of the control and experimental groups was done. Conclusions: it was found that matched professionally applied exercises positively affect the development of psycho-physiological qualities of students information and logical group of specialties.

  12. Noospheric vector of management applied to the system of higher professional education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yulia A. Mishina

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the research is to substantiate the necessity, expediency of the wide use of the noospheric management approaches, and technologies applied to the system of higher professional education in modern conditions. The materials and methods. Information base of the research is formed, based on education laws in Ukraine, Russia and the Donetsk People’s Republic, educational standards of higher professional education, as well as publications of scientists on the subject matter under study. In the given research it was used such methods: textological, analysis, generalization and modeling. The results. In the research, it is comprehensively examined the concept of noosphere, analyzed the modern theories and concepts of its development in relation to the development of society, an integral part of which is the system of education. It is indicated that there is the relationship between the noosphere and management in general, and with modern system of education, in particular. The concept of noospheric education is introduced and studied its impact on holistic  development of personality. The comparative characteristic of the structure and levels of the educational system of Ukraine, the Russian Federation and the Donetsk People’s Republic is performed; the types of educational institutions of the abovementioned states are compared. The structure of educational institution of higher professional education is proposed as a socio-economic system, managed from the perspective of the concept of noospheric education. The factors of competitiveness of educational institution of the higher school from the point of view of noospheric management are considered. Special attention is given to the internal factor of competitiveness of educational institutions, such as the quality of student life, because this position, particularly from the point of view of noospheric management, has a significant influence on the rating among consumers. The

  13. Bottled Water and Fluoride

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... What's this? Submit What's this? Submit Button Bottled Water Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Consumers drink ... questions about bottled water and fluoride. Does bottled water contain fluoride? Bottled water products may contain fluoride, ...

  14. Using Insights from Applied Moral Psychology to Promote Ethical Behavior Among Engineering Students and Professional Engineers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelfand, Scott D

    2016-10-01

    In this essay I discuss a novel engineering ethics class that has the potential to significantly decrease the likelihood that students (and professionals) will inadvertently or unintentionally act unethically in the future. This class is different from standard engineering ethics classes in that it focuses on the issue of why people act unethically and how students (and professionals) can avoid a variety of hurdles to ethical behavior. I do not deny that it is important for students to develop cogent moral reasoning and ethical decision-making as taught in traditional college-level ethics classes, but as an educator, I aim to help students apply moral reasoning in specific, real-life situations so they are able to make ethical decisions and act ethically in their academic careers and after they graduate. Research in moral psychology provides evidence that many seemingly irrelevant situational factors affect the moral judgment of most moral agents and frequently lead agents to unintentionally or inadvertently act wrongly. I argue that, in addition to teaching college students moral reasoning and ethical decision-making, it is important to: 1. Teach students about psychological and situational factors that affect people's ethical judgments/behaviors in the sometimes stressful, emotion-laden environment of the workplace; 2. Guide students to engage in critical reflection about the sorts of situations they personally might find ethically challenging before they encounter those situations; and 3. Provide students with strategies to help them avoid future unethical behavior when they encounter these situations in school and in the workplace.

  15. Urinary fluoride output in children following the use of a dual-fluoride varnish formulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelly Polido Kaneshiro Olympio

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: This study evaluated the bioavailability of fluoride after topical application of a dual-fluoride varnish commercially available in Brazil, when compared to DuraphatTM. MATERIAL AND METHODS: The urinary fluoride output was evaluated in seven 5-year-old children after application of the fluoride varnishes, in two different phases. In the first phase (I, children received topical application of the fluoride varnish Duofluorid XII (2.92% fluorine, calcium fluoride + 2.71% fluorine, sodium fluoride, FGM TM. After 1-month interval (phase II, the same amount (0.2 mL of the fluoride varnish Duraphat (2.26% fluorine, sodium fluoride, ColgateTM was applied. Before each application all the volunteers brushed their teeth with placebo dentifrice for 7 days. Urinary collections were carried out 24 h prior up to 48 h after the applications. Fluoride intake from the diet was also estimated. Fluoride concentration in diet samples and urine was analyzed with the fluoride ion-specific electrode and a miniature calomel reference electrode coupled to a potentiometer. Data were tested by ANOVA and Tukey's post hoc test (p<0.05. RESULTS: There were significant differences in the urinary fluoride output between phases I and II. The use of Duofluorid XII did not significantly increase the urinary fluoride output, when compared to baseline levels. The application of Duraphat caused a transitory increase in the urinary fluoride output, returning to baseline levels 48 h after its use. CONCLUSIONS: The tested varnish formulation, which has been shown to be effective in in vitro studies, also can be considered safe.

  16. Organization and content efficiency substantiation of a strengthened professional and applied physical training course for railway higher educational institution students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anzhelika Yefremova

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: to experimentally substantiate the effectiveness of the application of the experimental program for physical education with an intensified course of professional-applied physical training (PAPT for students of I–II courses of railway specialties. Material & Methods: analysis and generalization of literary sources, pedagogical experiment, pedagogical testing, physiological and psycho-physiological methods, methods of mathematical statistics. Result: obtained data after the introduction of the experimental program on physical education with an intensified course of professional-applied physical training, students of railway universities. Conclusion: analysis and generalization of the literature sources found the absence of a scientifically based program of PAPT for students of higher education institutions of the railway profile. The introduction in the educational process of physical education of the experimental program on physical education with the strengthened course of the PAPT showed an increase in the level of physical, professionally applied physical and psycho-physiological readiness of students.

  17. Methods of the professional-applied physical preparation of students of higher educational establishments of economic type

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maliar E.I.

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Is considered the directions of professionally-applied physical preparation of students with the prevailing use of facilities of football. Are presented the methods of professionally-applied physical preparation of students. It is indicated that application of method of the circular training is rendered by an assistance development of discipline, honesty, honesty, rational use of time. Underline, that in teaching it is necessary to provide a short cut to mastering of the planned knowledge, abilities and skills, improvement of physical qualities.

  18. Using blended and guided technologies in a university course for scientist-practitioners: teaching applied behaviour analysis to autism professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roll-Pettersson, Lise; Ala'i-Rosales, Shahla

    2009-06-01

    Although the incidence of autism spectrum disorders is increasing worldwide, there is a shortage of professionals trained to provide effective interventions. The article describes an advanced university course in Applied Behaviour Analysis (ABA) and autism tailored to meet the needs of Swedish professionals from multiple disciplines. The course implemented both blended-learning technologies (web, telecommunication, and in vivo) and guided-design (problem-solving) exercises to promote the scientist-practitioner model. Overall, students advanced their skills related to identifying extant scientific literature, choosing appropriate single-subject design evaluation methods, and critically analysing the effects of attempted interventions. Students rated the course as having high social validity and predicted the course content would positively affect their professional practice. The relevance of the course and future directions are discussed in the context of meeting the global need for effective autism intervention professionals.

  19. Fluoride and Dental Health

    OpenAIRE

    Nikiforuk, Gordon

    1988-01-01

    Studies conducted under the widest variety of controlled conditions attest to the safety, efficacy, and cost benefits of fluoridation. A program that combines the use of systemic and topical fluoride results in maximum benefits. The author of this article reviews the metabolism of fluoride and its mechanism of action, and discusses practical modes of employing fluoride in caries prevention with special emphasis on the use of fluoride supplements for infants and young children in areas of non-...

  20. The influence of saliva on the dissolution of calcium fluoride after application of different fluoride gels in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellwig, Elmar; Polydorou, Olga; Lussi, Adrian; Kielbassa, Andrej M; Altenburger, Markus J

    2010-10-01

    To determine the formation and dissolution of calcium fluoride on the enamel surface after application of two fluoride gel-saliva mixtures. From each of 80 bovine incisors, two enamel specimens were prepared and subjected to two different treatment procedures. In group 1, 80 specimens were treated with a mixture of an amine fluoride gel (1.25% F-; pH 5.2; 5 minutes) and human saliva. In group 2, 80 enamel blocks were subjected to a mixture of sodium fluoride gel (1.25% F; pH 5.5; 5 minutes) and human saliva. Subsequent to fluoride treatment, 40 specimens from each group were stored in human saliva and sterile water, respectively. Ten specimens were removed after each of 1 hour, 24 hours, 2 days, and 5 days and analyzed according to potassium hydroxide-soluble fluoride. Application of amine fluoride gel resulted in a higher amount of potassium hydroxide-soluble fluoride than did sodium fluoride gel 1 hour after application. Saliva exerted an inhibitory effect according to the dissolution rate of calcium fluoride. However, after 5 days, more than 90% of the precipitated calcium fluoride was dissolved in the amine fluoride group, and almost all potassium hydroxide-soluble fluoride was lost in the sodium fluoride group. Calcium fluoride apparently dissolves rapidly, even at almost neutral pH. Considering the limitations of an in vitro study, it is concluded that highly concentrated fluoride gels should be applied at an adequate frequency to reestablish a calcium fluoride-like layer.

  1. Health professionals and the meaning they apply to women‟s remaining in violent conjugal relationships

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadirlene Pereira Gomes

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The authors aim to investigate the meanings attributed by health professionals working in the Family Health Strategy to women‟s remaining in violent conjugal relationships. The research is based in the method of Grounded Theory. Interviews were held between May and August 2012 with 52 professionals who work in Family Health in a city in the Brazilian state of Santa Catarina. It is indicated that violence is related to the threats made, to the partner‟s involvement in drug trafficking, to economic and emotional dependence, to the valuing of marriage, to the belief in female submission, and to shame. The professionals indicate the need for strategies in defense of a life free from violence for women: psycho-social support; educational activities regarding the social construction of gender; and articulation of policies based on intersectoriality.

  2. Fluorescent Sensing of Fluoride in Cellular System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, Yang; Zhu, Baocun; Chen, Jihua; Duan, Xiaohong

    2015-01-01

    Fluoride ions have the important roles in a lot of physiological activities related with biological and medical system, such as water fluoridation, caries treatment, and bone disease treatment. Great efforts have been made to develop new methods and strategies for F- detection in the past decades. Traditional methods for the detection of F- including ion chromatography, ion-selective electrodes, and spectroscopic techniques have the limitations in the biomedicine research. The fluorescent probes for F- are very promising that overcome some drawbacks of traditional fluoride detection methods. These probes exhibit high selectivity, high sensitivity as well as quick response to the detection of fluoride anions. The review commences with a brief description of photophysical mechanisms for fluorescent probes for fluoride, including photo induced electron transfer (PET), intramolecular charge transfer (ICT), fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET), and excited-state intramolecular proton transfer (ESIPT). Followed by a discussion about common dyes for fluorescent fluoride probes, such as anthracene, naphalimide, pyrene, BODIPY, fluorescein, rhodamine, resorufin, coumarin, cyanine, and near-infrared (NIR) dyes. We divide the fluorescent probes for fluoride in cellular application systems into nine groups, for example, type of hydrogen bonds, type of cleavage of Si-O bonds, type of Si-O bond cleavage and cylization reactions, etc. We also review the recent reported carriers in the delivery of fluorescent fluoride probes. Seventy-four typical fluorescent fluoride probes are listed and compared in detail, including quantum yield, reaction medium, excitation and emission wavelengths, linear detection range, selectivity for F-, mechanism, and analytical applications. Finally, we discuss the future challenges of the application of fluorescent fluoride probes in cellular system and in vivo. We wish that more and more excellent fluorescent fluoride probes will be developed

  3. Managing the professional nurse. Part II. Applying management theory to the challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClure, M L

    1984-03-01

    In Part I of this article, the author reviewed the ideas of some of the major administrative thinkers over the past 30 years. Having set the stage with an overview of current thinking in the general area of management theory, the author here examines some of the specific challenges involved in managing the professional nurse. Often, these problems are unique and the management theorists offer only limited help. In other instances, management theory is directly relevant. The author addresses the following four broad categories that are unique to the profession of nursing: nursing as a female profession, professionalism and the lack of it, stress and burnout, and expectancy congruence.

  4. A Mixed-Methods Analysis in Assessing Students' Professional Development by Applying an Assessment for Learning Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peeters, Michael J; Vaidya, Varun A

    2016-06-25

    Objective. To describe an approach for assessing the Accreditation Council for Pharmacy Education's (ACPE) doctor of pharmacy (PharmD) Standard 4.4, which focuses on students' professional development. Methods. This investigation used mixed methods with triangulation of qualitative and quantitative data to assess professional development. Qualitative data came from an electronic developmental portfolio of professionalism and ethics, completed by PharmD students during their didactic studies. Quantitative confirmation came from the Defining Issues Test (DIT)-an assessment of pharmacists' professional development. Results. Qualitatively, students' development reflections described growth through this course series. Quantitatively, the 2015 PharmD class's DIT N2-scores illustrated positive development overall; the lower 50% had a large initial improvement compared to the upper 50%. Subsequently, the 2016 PharmD class confirmed these average initial improvements of students and also showed further substantial development among students thereafter. Conclusion. Applying an assessment for learning approach, triangulation of qualitative and quantitative assessments confirmed that PharmD students developed professionally during this course series.

  5. 34 CFR 263.3 - What definitions apply to the Professional Development program?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... post-baccalaureate degree awarded by an institution of higher education beyond the undergraduate level... an organized Indian group that received a grant under the Indian Education Act of 1988 as it was in... trained under the Professional Development program. Payback means work-related service or cash...

  6. Brushing abrasion of eroded bovine enamel pretreated with topical fluorides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vieira, A; Lugtenborg, M; Ruben, JL; Huysmans, MCDNJM

    2006-01-01

    Topical fluorides have been proposed for the prevention of erosive dental wear. This study evaluated the in vitro effect of a single professional application of 4% titanium tetrafluoride (TiF4), 1% amine fluoride (AmF) and 0.1% difluorosilane varnish (FV) in preventing wear due to combined erosion

  7. Hair as Biomarker of Fluoride Exposure in a Fluoride Endemic Area and a Low Fluoridated Area

    OpenAIRE

    Parimi, Nalini; Viswanath, V; Kashyap, Bina; Patil, Pavan Uday

    2013-01-01

    Aim: The aim of the present study was to determine whether hair could be used as biomarker of fluoride exposure. Materials and Methods: The study was carried out on 30 people living in an endemically fluoridated area and a low fluoridated area. Samples of hair from the occipital were taken and subjected to fluoride analysis by a fluoride ion electrode. Results: Lower fluoride levels in water supplies correlated with lower levels of fluoride in hair and more over higher fluoride levels in wate...

  8. Fluoride in diet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diet - fluoride ... bones and teeth. Too much fluoride in the diet is very rare. Rarely, infants who get too ... of essential vitamins is to eat a balanced diet that contains a variety of foods from the ...

  9. Fluoride glass fiber optics

    CERN Document Server

    Aggarwal, Ishwar D

    1991-01-01

    Fluoride Glass Fiber Optics reviews the fundamental aspects of fluoride glasses. This book is divided into nine chapters. Chapter 1 discusses the wide range of fluoride glasses with an emphasis on fluorozirconate-based compositions. The structure of simple fluoride systems, such as BaF2 binary glass is elaborated in Chapter 2. The third chapter covers the intrinsic transparency of fluoride glasses from the UV to the IR, with particular emphasis on the multiphonon edge and electronic edge. The next three chapters are devoted to ultra-low loss optical fibers, reviewing methods for purifying and

  10. The impact of staff training on special educational needs professionals' attitudes toward and understanding of applied behavior analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smyth, Sinéad; Reading, Benjamin E; McDowell, Claire

    2017-01-01

    Research-based evidence points to the efficacy and value of applied behavior analysis (ABA) in meeting the needs of individuals with learning disabilities and autism. Nonetheless, public, government, and professional perception of ABA can be negative. The current study was designed to measure the impact of a short intervention on professionals' attitudes toward, and knowledge of, ABA. Teachers and classroom assistants from two separate schools for children with severe learning difficulties completed a self-report survey on knowledge of and attitudes toward ABA. They were then presented with a 90-min training module designed to increase their knowledge of the history of ABA and their functional assessment skills. Following training, the self-report was readministered. The mean scores for each group increased only after the training had been delivered. Further research is needed to address the impact of training on classroom practice.

  11. Retention Improvement in Fluoride Application with Cold Atmospheric Plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Y M; Lee, H Y; Lee, H J; Kim, J B; Kim, S; Joo, J Y; Kim, G C

    2017-09-01

    This study aimed to apply fluoride formulations to enamel with cold atmospheric plasma (CAP) and analyze the fluoride uptake, retention, and acid resistance quantitatively. Human enamel specimens were divided randomly into 2 groups: group APF1, 1.23% acidulated phosphate fluoride (APF) gel; group APF2, 1.23% APF gel with CAP. Fluoride and CAP were applied to the samples 4 times at 1-wk intervals. The specimens were also stored in artificial saliva for 4 wk to evaluate the retention of fluoride. The fluoride content on the fluoride-treated enamel was measured by an electron probe microanalyzer. To detect the resistance to demineralization, the calcium-to-phosphate ratio of the enamel samples was measured after the application of APF gel with or without CAP, followed by soaking in the demineralization solution. In groups APF1 and APF2, the amount of fluoride detected increased depending on the application frequency, and more fluoride was detected in group APF2 than in group APF1. In the experiment examining the maintenance effect, fluoride was not detected in group APF1, whereas fluoride was detected in group APF2 up to the fourth week. As for the resistance to demineralization, the calcium-to-phosphate ratio of the enamel treated with APF and CAP was higher than that treated with APF alone, and it increased with the frequency of treatment. This study suggests that the combination treatment of CAP and fluoride improves retention of fluoride on the enamel and resistance to demineralization when compared with treatment with fluoride alone.

  12. Reconstructing temporal variation of fluoride uptake in eastern grey kangaroos (Macropus giganteus) from a high-fluoride area by analysis of fluoride distribution in dentine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kierdorf, Horst; Rhede, Dieter; Death, Clare; Hufschmid, Jasmin; Kierdorf, Uwe

    2016-04-01

    Trace element profiling in the incrementally formed dentine of mammalian teeth can be applied to reconstruct temporal variation of incorporation of these elements into the tissue. Using an electron microprobe, this study analysed fluoride distribution in dentine of first and third mandibular molars of free-ranging eastern grey kangaroos inhabiting a high-fluoride area, to assess temporal variation in fluoride uptake of the animals. Fluoride content in the early-formed dentine of first molars was significantly lower than in the late-formed dentine of these teeth, and was also lower than in both, the early and the late-formed dentine of third molars. As early dentine formation in M1 takes place prior to weaning, this finding indicates a lower dentinal fluoride uptake during the pre-weaning compared to the post-weaning period. This is hypothetically attributed to the action of a partial barrier to fluoride transfer from blood to milk in lactating females and a low bioavailability of fluoride ingested together with milk. Another factor contributing to lower plasma fluoride levels in juveniles compared to adults is the rapid clearance of fluoride from blood plasma in the former due to their intense skeletal growth. The combined action of these mechanisms is considered to explain why in kangaroos from high-fluoride areas, the (early-formed) first molars are not affected by dental fluorosis while the (later-formed) third and fourth molars regularly exhibit marked to severe fluorotic lesions. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Effectiveness of sodium fluoride mouthrinses on the prevention of dental caries: A systematic review

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jagan, P; Fareed, Nusrath; Khanagar, Sanjeev; Bhat, Manohara; Basapathy, Rajeev; Battur, Hemanth

    2015-01-01

    Background: Caries inhibitory effect of fluoride has been known for about a century. The use of mouthrinses as a vehicle for applying fluoride in a self-administered preventive program was first proposed by Bibby et al. in 1946...

  14. Fluorides and non-fluoride remineralization systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Amaechi, B.T.; van Loveren, C.

    2013-01-01

    Caries develops when the equilibrium between de- and remineralization is unbalanced favoring demineralization. De- and remineralization occur depending on the degree of saturation of the interstitial fluids with respect to the tooth mineral. This equilibrium is positively influenced when fluoride,

  15. Fluoride release and uptake abilities of different fissure sealants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poggio, Claudio; Andenna, Gianluigi; Ceci, Matteo; Beltrami, Riccardo; Colombo, Marco; Cucca, Lucia

    2016-07-01

    The long-term capability of resin sealants and glass ionomer cements to release fluoride is associated to a reduction in pit and fissure caries. The regular use of fluoride varnishes/toothpastes can result in the absorption of fluoride into the sealant. The objective of the present study was to assess the fluoride release/uptake capacities of different fissure sealants. Three different fissure sealants (Fuji Triage/GC, Fissurit FX/Voco and Grandio Seal/Voco) were examined. Ten discs of each material were prepared. Each disc was incubated with distilled water and then the solution analyzed for diluted for fluoride concentration, using a combination of fluoride electrode (OrionGP 1 S/N 13824, Orion Research Inc, Boston, MA, USA) connected to an expandable ion analyzer (Orion 720A, Orion Research Inc, Boston, MA, USA). Standard curves between 1 and 100 ppm F- were used to calibrate the electrode. Cumulative fluoride release was measured on days 1, 2, 3, 5, 7, 21, 35 and 49, then two different fluoride varnishes/pastes (Profluorid Varnish/Voco, MI Paste Plus/GC), were applied to the sealants tested, and fluoride release (after reuptake) was measured on days 56, 70 and 84. Kruskal Wallis test confirmed significant differences in fluoride release between Fuji Triage/GC and Fissurit FX/Voco and Grandio Seal/Voco from day 1 (P sealants (P sealants except for Fuji Triage/GC (P > 0.05). The GIC-based sealant (Fuji Triage/GC) released significantly more fluoride than the resin sealants tested. The exposure to the fluoridated varnish (Profluorid Varnish) significantly recharged the sealants tested more than the CPP-ACPF toothpaste (MI Paste Plus). Fissure sealants, fluoride release, fluoride uptake, glass ionomer cements.

  16. Professional growth of trainees: applying teacher training models to the training of GPs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavriel, George; Gavriel, Jennifer

    2011-10-01

    Study of professional growth is useful for reflective purposes at any time during a career. The concept of known knowns and unknowns with a training twist can be used to summarise the overall stages of any trainee. At the start of vocational training the trainee does not know what they do not know, they have not yet recognised how much they have to learn. This happens in the second stage (that could be equated to survival) when they begin to understand the vast array of skills they must develop to make it look easy. With time and practice they will reach the point where they know what they have to do--not always getting it right but then who does? Finally, and it is particularly important that trainers recognise this, an individual will reach the point where everything is so automatic they are no longer aware of the intricacies of the skills they have acquired. This is where most trainers, both for teachers and GPs, find themselves and this can be frustrating for both trainee and trainer as they find they are unable to communicate effectively. A good trainer will spend time dissecting and 'unlearning' their skills so they are able to teach their trainees successfully. Trainees, meanwhile, must realise that, one day, they will have their own unknown knowns, but they cannot expect it to happen overnight or without substantial effort. In moving forward from our training it is how we deal with repeated survival stages that determines if we can keep doing the job, it is how we deal with the plateau that determines if we will be any good at it--effective on-the-job training leads to lifelong on-the-job learning.

  17. A Comparative Analysis of Models of Bachelors of Arts' Professional Training in Applied Linguistics at the Universities of Ukraine and the USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korniienko, Vita

    2014-01-01

    The analysis of scientists' researches from different countries dealing with different aspects of training in the educational systems of developed countries was carried out. The models of Bachelors of Arts in Applied Linguistics professional training in Ukraine were considered. It was analyzed a professional training of Bachelor of Arts in Applied…

  18. Psychological and pedagogical grounds for applying communicative method of teaching foreign languages in higher school with the purpose of realization of students professional orientation

    OpenAIRE

    Yavoruk, O.; Gridneva, S.

    2010-01-01

    The article deals with the notion of “professional orientation”, its components and levels. The principles of communicative method of teaching foreign languages are analyzed from psychological and pedagogical point of view. Expediency of applying the given method with the purpose of realization of students’ professional orientation is substantiated.

  19. Fluoride and Oral Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Mullane, D M; Baez, R J; Jones, S; Lennon, M A; Petersen, P E; Rugg-Gunn, A J; Whelton, H; Whitford, G M

    2016-06-01

    The discovery during the first half of the 20th century of the link between natural fluoride, adjusted fluoride levels in drinking water and reduced dental caries prevalence proved to be a stimulus for worldwide on-going research into the role of fluoride in improving oral health. Epidemiological studies of fluoridation programmes have confirmed their safety and their effectiveness in controlling dental caries. Major advances in our knowledge of how fluoride impacts the caries process have led to the development, assessment of effectiveness and promotion of other fluoride vehicles including salt, milk, tablets, toothpaste, gels and varnishes. In 1993, the World Health Organization convened an Expert Committee to provide authoritative information on the role of fluorides in the promotion of oral health throughout the world (WHO TRS 846, 1994). This present publication is a revision of the original 1994 document, again using the expertise of researchers from the extensive fields of knowledge required to successfully implement complex interventions such as the use of fluorides to improve dental and oral health. Financial support for research into the development of these new fluoride strategies has come from many sources including government health departments as well as international and national grant agencies. In addition, the unique role which industry has played in the development, formulation, assessment of effectiveness and promotion of the various fluoride vehicles and strategies is noteworthy. This updated version of 'Fluoride and Oral Health' has adopted an evidence-based approach to its commentary on the different fluoride vehicles and strategies and also to its recommendations. In this regard, full account is taken of the many recent systematic reviews published in peer reviewed literature.

  20. Academic freedom and the professional responsibilities of applied ethicists: a comment on Minerva.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawson, Angus; Herington, Jonathan

    2014-05-01

    Academic freedom is an important good, but it comes with several responsibilities. In this commentary we seek to do two things. First, we argue against Francesca Minerva's view of academic freedom as presented in her article 'New threats to academic freedom' on a number of grounds. We reject the nature of the absolutist moral claim to free speech for academics implicit in the article; we reject the elitist role for academics as truth-seekers explicit in her view; and we reject a possible more moderate re-construction of her view based on the harm/offence distinction. Second, we identify some of the responsibilities of applied ethicists, and illustrate how they recommend against allowing for anonymous publication of research. Such a proposal points to the wider perils of a public discourse which eschews the calm and careful discussion of ideas. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Fluoride concentration from dental sealants: a randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campus, G; Carta, G; Cagetti, M G; Bossù, M; Sale, S; Cocco, F; Conti, G; Nardone, M; Sanna, G; Strohmenger, L; Lingström, P

    2013-07-01

    A randomized clinical trial was performed in schoolchildren (6-7 yrs) to evaluate fluoride concentration in interproximal fluid after the placement of 3 different sealants. The sample consisted of 2,776 children randomly divided: 926 in the high-viscosity Glass-ionomer Cement group (GIC group), 923 in the fluoride Resin-based group (fluoride-RB group), and 927 in the no-fluoride Resin-based group (RB group). In total, 2,640 children completed the trial. Sealants were applied following manufacturer's instructions. Interproximal fluid samples were collected at baseline and 2, 7, and 21 days after application of sealants, by insertion of a standardized paperpoint into the interproximal mesial space of the sealed tooth for 15 seconds. Fluoride concentration was evaluated by means of a fluoride ion-selective electrode. At 2 days after sealant application, fluoride concentration was significantly higher in GIC and fluoride-RB groups compared with that in the RB group (p sealants increased the fluoride concentrations in interproximal fluid more than did a Resin-based sealant containing fluoride.

  2. Fluorides and non-fluoride remineralization systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amaechi, Bennett T; van Loveren, Cor

    2013-01-01

    Caries develops when the equilibrium between de- and remineralization is unbalanced favoring demineralization. De- and remineralization occur depending on the degree of saturation of the interstitial fluids with respect to the tooth mineral. This equilibrium is positively influenced when fluoride, calcium and phosphate ions are added favoring remineralization. In addition, when fluoride is present, it will be incorporated into the newly formed mineral which is then less soluble. Toothpastes may contain fluoride and calcium ions separately or together in various compounds (remineralization systems) and may therefore reduce demineralization and promote remineralization. Formulating all these compounds in one paste may be challenging due to possible premature calcium-fluoride interactions and the low solubility of CaF2. There is a large amount of clinical evidence supporting the potent caries preventive effect of fluoride toothpastes indisputably. The amount of clinical evidence of the effectiveness of the other remineralization systems is far less convincing. Evidence is lacking for head to head comparisons of the various remineralization systems. Copyright © 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  3. Organizational methods conditions of formation of motivation at corresponding pedagogical skills to professional-applied physical training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victorya Tsybul’ska

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: to develop organizational and methodological conditions of formation and motivation of students to determine their effectiveness. Materials and Methods: the study was conducted by third year student of the correspondence department of the Faculty of Primary Education (53 people. We used the following methods: survey of theoretical knowledge, motor tests, evaluation methods of physical health (G. Apanasenko, psychological methods of training motivation (T. Ilyina, motivation to succeed (T. Elers, rapid diagnosis empathy (I. Yusupova, methods of mathematical statistics. Results: the factors that affect the state of professionally-applied physical fitness of students of the correspondence department of the Faculty of Primary Education. Conclusions: the proposed organizational and methodological conditions activation independent of external students is the basis for providing in centives for self-study educational materials, improving theoretical knowledge in the field of physical education, increased motor activity through various forms of regular exercise.

  4. How Does Fluoride Work?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... A Movies & More Quizzes Kids' Dictionary of Medical Words En Español What Other Kids Are Reading How Does Fluoride Work? Is ... There's fluoride in your toothpaste and even in your water. But how does it work to keep teeth ...

  5. Other Fluoride Products

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Health Basics Children’s Oral Health Protecting Your Child’s Teeth Brush Up on Healthy Teeth Adult Oral Health Oral Health for Older Americans ... benefit to persons not at high risk for tooth decay, especially those who drink ... with fluoride toothpaste. Fluoride Varnish Form Varnishes ...

  6. Fluoride varnish or fluoride mouth rinse?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keller, M K; Klausen, BJ; Twetman, S

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: In many Danish communities, school-based fluoride programs are offered to children with high caries risk in adjunct to tooth brushing. The purpose of this field trial was to compare the caries-preventive effectiveness of two different fluoride programs in 6-12 year olds. BASIC RESEARCH...... week (FMR). All children received oral hygiene instructions and comprehensive dental care at the local Public Dental Clinics throughout the study period. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Increment of caries lesions in permanent teeth at both cavitated and initial caries levels. RESULTS: The groups were balanced...

  7. Fluoride varnishes and enamel caries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruyn, Hugo de

    1987-01-01

    Topical fluoride applications have the aim of increasing the fluoride uptake in enamel and consequently reducing caries. In the early ‘60s fluoride varnishes were introduced because they had a long contact period with the enamel which resulted in a higher fluoride uptake than from other topical

  8. Preparing nursing students to be competent for future professional practice: applying the team-based learning-teaching strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Ching-Yu; Liou, Shwu-Ru; Hsu, Tsui-Hua; Pan, Mei-Yu; Liu, Hsiu-Chen; Chang, Chia-Hao

    2014-01-01

    Team-based learning (TBL) has been used for many years in business and science, but little research has focused on its application in nursing education. This quasi-experimental study was to apply the TBL in four nursing courses at a university in Taiwan and to evaluate its effect on students' learning outcomes and behaviors. Adult health nursing, maternal-child nursing, community health nursing, and medical-surgical nursing were the 4 designated courses for this study. Three hundred ninety-nine students in 2-year registered nurse-bachelor of science in nursing, and regular 4-year nursing programs enrolled in the designated courses were contacted. Three hundred eighty-seven students agreed to participate in the data collection. Results showed that the TBL significantly improved the learning behaviors of students in both programs, including class engagement (p learning (p learning behaviors and academic performance. These learning behaviors are important and beneficial for the students' future professional development. The TBL method can be considered for broader application in nursing education. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Fluoride retention by kaolin clay

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kau, P. M. H.; Smith, D. W.; Binning, Philip John

    1997-01-01

    To evaluate the potential effectiveness of kaolin clay liners in storage of fluoride contaminated waste, an experimental study of the sorption and desorption behaviour of fluoride in kaolin clay was conducted. The degree of fluoride sorption by kaolin was found to depend on solution p......H and available fluoride concentration with equilibrium being achieved within 24 h. A site activation process involving the uptake of fluoride was also observed at the initial stages of sorption. This behaviour was attributed to a layer expansion process of the clay during sorption. The maximum fluoride sorption...

  10. Water Fluoridation Statistics - Percent of PWS population receiving fluoridated water

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — 2000-2014. Water Fluoridation Statistics is a biennial report of the percentage and number of people receiving fluoridated water from 2000 through 2014, originally...

  11. Water Fluoridation Statistics - Percent of PWS population receiving fluoridated water

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — 2000-2014 Water Fluoridation Statistics is a biennial report of the percentage and number of people receiving fluoridated water from 2000 through 2014, originally...

  12. Fluoride removal from diluted solutions by Donnan dialysis using full factorial design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boubakri, Ali; Helali, Nawel; Tlili, Mohamed; Amor, Mohamed Ben [Center of Researches and Water Technologies, Soliman (Turkey)

    2014-03-15

    Excessive fluoride concentration in potable water can lead to fluorosis of teeth and bones. In the present study, Donnan dialysis (DD) is applied for the removal of fluoride ions from diluted sodium fluoride solutions. A four factor two level (2{sup 4}) full factorial design was used to investigate the influence of different physico-chemical parameters on fluoride removal efficiency (Y{sub F}) and fluoride flux (J{sub F}) through anion exchange membrane. The statistical design determines factors which have the important effects on Donnan dialysis performance and studies all interactions among the considered parameters. The four significant factors were initial fluoride concentration, feed flow rate, temperature and agitation speed. The experimental results and statistical analysis show that the temperature and agitation speed have positive effects on fluoride removal efficiency and the initial fluoride concentration has a negative effect. In the case of fluoride flux, feed flow rate and initial concentration are the main effect and all factors have a positive effect. The interaction between studied parameters was not negligible on two responses. A maximum fluoride removal of 75.52% was obtained under optimum conditions and the highest value of fluoride flux obtained was 2.4 mg/cm{sup 2}·h. Empirical regression models were also obtained and used to predict the flux and the fluoride removal profiles with satisfactory results.

  13. Studies on fluoridated toothpicks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashani, H

    1998-01-01

    The aim of this thesis was to evaluate the wooden toothpick as a vehicle for the delivery of fluoride to the approximal area. After two minutes use in vivo, the release of fluoride from the pointed section of a toothpick impregnated in 4% NaF was estimated to 0.15 mg. Toothpicks produced similar or somewhat higher fluoride concentrations in the approximal area compared with other fluoride-containing products, like dentifrice, mouthrinse solution and tablet. The mean fluoride concentration in an approximal area treated for two minutes with a toothpick impregnated in 4% NaF was around 11 mM/l. Toothpicks impregnated in 4% NaF, 8% SnF2 or 2% chlorhexidine had an effect on the proportion of mutans streptococci and on the decline of pH in dental plaque, but it was small and only of short duration. The recolonization of mutans streptococci was, however, slower after using the SnF2- and chlorhexidine-impregnated toothpicks than after using the NaF- and non-impregnated toothpicks. The effect of fluoridated toothpicks on the degree of de- and remineralization of enamel and dentine was measured using transversal microradiography in an in situ study. Four weeks' use of toothpicks, especially of NaF-impregnated toothpicks, reduced the degree of demineralization of enamel and dentine at approximal sites. Secondary ion mass spectrometry was also used to determine the fluoride content in the outer surface of dentine, which increased more than 10 times after using fluoride toothpicks compared with non-impregnated toothpicks. In a second in situ study, 4% NaF-, 2% chlorhexidine- and non-impregnated toothpicks had a similar effect on sound and demineralized enamel and on demineralized dentine. However, the NaF toothpicks were superior in terms of their effect on sound dentine. The effect on mutans streptococci and plaque-pH, on the other hand, was the same for all three types of toothpicks. The main conclusion from this thesis is that the wooden toothpick is a suitable vehicle for

  14. Private Well Water and Fluoride

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... fluoride, such as drinking water at school or daycare, and fluoride toothpaste. It is not currently feasible ... 2015 Content source: Division of Oral Health , National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion Email ...

  15. Prediction for new magnetoelectric fluorides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nenert, G.; Palstra, T. T. M.

    2007-01-01

    We use symmetry considerations in order to predict new magnetoelectric fluorides. In addition to these magnetoelectric properties, we discuss which among these fluorides are the ones susceptible to present multiferroic properties. We emphasize that several materials exhibit ferromagnetic properties.

  16. Effect of professional cleaning and dental brushing with or without fluoridated dentifrice on enamel remineralization Efeito da profilaxia profissional e da escovação com dentifrício com ou sem flúor na remineralização do esmalte dental

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Nader Marta

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available An in situ evaluation of the potential rehardening effect of fluoridated and non-fluoridated toothpastes with or without air polishing was conducted. Ten volunteers, using acrylic palatal appliances containing two bovine enamel blocks with artificial carious lesions, took part in this study. Four times a day, after the main meals and at night, the volunteers, in a habitual way, brushed their natural teeth with the dentifrice indicated to the experimental design and after that the appliances were put again into the mouth. They were divided into 4 different groups: G1 - control - non-fluoridated dentifrice; G2 - fluoridated dentifrice; G3 - non-fluoridated dentifrice, but having a previous prophylaxis using air polishing; G4 - fluoridated dentifrice and previous air polishing. The effects of treatments on enamel rehardening were evaluated in the blocks that were assessed by surface microhardness, and the percentage of surface microhardness change (%reh was calculated in relation to the baseline values. The results showed that %reh was higher in the groups with fluoridated dentifrice, and professional prophylaxis did not have an additional effect in the groups of fluoridated dentifrices (pO objetivo deste estudo foi avaliar, in situ, o potencial de remineralizaçaão do dentifrício fluoretado ou não, isoladamente ou associado à profilaxia profissional com jato de bicarbonato de sódio, em esmalte bovino com lesão superficial artificial de cárie. Utilizou-se 80 blocos de esmalte (4X4X2mm, nos quais foram realizadas medidas de microdureza superficial antes e após a desmineralização artificial e após o tratamento, com um penetrador, Knoop carga de 50/7s, para o cálculo do percentual de recuperação de dureza (%reh. Após as tomadas das 2 medidas de microdureza iniciais (antes e após a desmineralização, os blocos de esmalte foram incluídos em dispositivos intrabucais palatinos (2 blocos/aparelho. Dez jovens voluntários usaram estes

  17. Fluoride resistance in Streptococcus mutans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liao, Ying

    2017-01-01

    Fluoride has been used as the most effective anti-caries agent for over five decades. It functions not only on the dental hard tissues, but also as an antimicrobial agent. It is known that oral bacteria are able to develop resistance to fluoride, which may affect the effectiveness of fluoride in

  18. Fluoride Rinses, Gels and Foams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Twetman, Svante; Keller, Mette K

    2016-01-01

    AIM: The aim of this conference paper was to systematically review the quality of evidence and summarize the findings of clinical trials published after 2002 using fluoride mouth rinses, fluoride gels or foams for the prevention of dental caries. METHODS: Relevant papers were selected after an el...... brushing with fluoride toothpaste....

  19. Magnetic interactions through fluoride

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Kasper Steen; Sigrist, Marc; Weihe, Høgni

    2014-01-01

    The nature of the magnetic interaction through fluoride in a simple, dinuclear manganese(III) complex (1), bridged by a single fluoride ion in a perfectly linear fashion, is established by experiment and density functional theory. The magnitude of the antiferromagnetic exchange interaction...... and the manganese(III) zero-field-splitting parameters are unambiguously determined by inelastic neutron scattering to yield J = 33.0(2) cm(-1) (Ĥ = JŜ1·Ŝ2 Hamiltonian definition) and single-ion D = -4.0(1) cm(-1). Additionally, high-field, high-frequency electron paramagnetic resonance and magnetic measurements...... support the parameter values and resolve |E| ≈ 0.04 cm(-1). The exchange coupling constant (J) is 1 order of magnitude smaller than that found in comparable systems with linear oxide bridging but comparable to typical magnitudes through cyanide, thus underlining the potential of fluoride complexes...

  20. Preparation and optimization of calcium fluoride particles for dental applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koeser, Joachim; Carvalho, Thiago Saads; Pieles, Uwe; Lussi, Adrian

    2014-07-01

    Fluorides are used in dental care due to their beneficial effect in tooth enamel de-/remineralization cycles. To achieve a desired constant supply of soluble fluorides in the oral cavity, different approaches have been followed. Here we present results on the preparation of CaF2 particles and their characterization with respect to a potential application as enamel associated fluoride releasing reservoirs. CaF2 particles were synthesized by precipitation from soluble NaF and CaCl2 salt solutions of defined concentrations and their morphology analyzed by scanning electron microscopy. CaF2 particles with defined sizes and shapes could be synthesized by adjusting the concentrations of the precursor salt solutions. Such particles interacted with enamel surfaces when applied at fluoride concentrations correlating to typical dental care products. Fluoride release from the synthesized CaF2 particles was observed to be largely influenced by the concentration of phosphate in the solution. Physiological solutions with phosphate concentration similar to saliva (3.5 mM) reduced the fluoride release from pure CaF2 particles by a factor of 10-20 × as compared to phosphate free buffer solutions. Fluoride release was even lower in human saliva. The fluoride release could be increased by the addition of phosphate in substoichiometric amounts during CaF2 particle synthesis. The presented results demonstrate that the morphology and fluoride release characteristics of CaF2 particles can be tuned and provide evidence of the suitability of synthetic CaF2 particles as enamel associated fluoride reservoirs.

  1. Urinary fluoride excretion after application of fluoride varnish and use of fluoride toothpaste in young children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lockner, Frida; Twetman, Svante; Stecksén-Blicks, Christina

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The efficacy and safety of combined use of topical fluoride products are essential issues that must be monitored. AIM: To assess urinary excretion of fluoride after application of two different dental varnishes containing 2.26% fluoride in 3- to 4-year-old children and to compare the ...

  2. Salt fluoridation and oral health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas M. Marthaler

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to make known the potential of fluoridated salt in community oral health programs, particularly in South Eastern Europe. Since 1922, the addition of iodine to salt has been successful in Switzerland. Goiter is virtually extinct. By 1945, the cariesprotective effect of fluorides was well established. Based on the success of water fluoridation, a gynecologist started adding of fluoride to salt. The sale of fluoridated salt began in 1956 in the Swiss Canton of Zurich, and several other cantons followed suit. Studies initiated in the early seventies showed that fluoride, when added to salt, inhibits dental caries. The addition of fluoride to salt for human consumption was officially authorized in 1980-82. In Switzerland 85% of domestic salt consumed is fluoridated and 67% in Germany. Salt fluoridation schemes are reaching more than one hundred million in Mexico, Colombia, Peru and Cuba. The cost of salt fluoridation is very low, within 0.02 and 0.05 € per year and capita. Children and adults of the low socio-economic strata tend to have substantially more untreated caries than higher strata. Salt fluoridation is by far the cheapest method for improving oral health. Conclusions. Salt fluoridation has cariostatic potential like water fluoridation (caries reductions up to 50%. In Europe, meaningful percentages of users have been attained only in Germany (67% and Switzerland (85%. In Latin America, there are more than 100 million users, and several countries have arrived at coverage of 90 to 99%. Salt fluoridation is by far the cheapest method of caries prevention, and billions of people throughout the world could benefit from this method.

  3. The effect of different fluoride application methods on the remineralization of initial carious lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byeon, Seon Mi; Lee, Min Ho; Bae, Tae Sung

    2016-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the effect of single and combined applications of fluoride on the amount of fluoride release, and the remineralization and physical properties of enamel. Each of four fluoride varnish and gel products (Fluor Protector, FP, Ivoclar Vivadent; Tooth Mousse Plus, TM, GC; 60 Second Gel, A, Germiphene; CavityShield, CS, 3M ESPE) and two fluoride solutions (2% sodium fluoride, N; 8% tin(ii) fluoride, S) were applied on bovine teeth using single and combined methods (10 per group), and then the amount of fluoride release was measured for 4 wk. The electron probe microanalysis and the Vickers microhardness measurements were conducted to assess the effect of fluoride application on the surface properties of bovine teeth. The amount of fluoride release was higher in combined applications than in single application (p < 0.05). Microhardness values were higher after combined applications of N with FP, TM, and CS than single application of them, and these values were also higher after combined applications of S than single application of A (p < 0.05). Ca and P values were higher in combined applications of N with TM and CS than single application of them (p < 0.05). They were also increased after combined applications of the S with A than after single application (p < 0.05). Combined applications of fluoride could be used as a basis to design more effective methods of fluoride application to provide enhanced remineralization.

  4. Health Effects Associated with Water Fluoridation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richmond, Virginia L.

    1979-01-01

    Discussion is presented concerning fluoridation of water supplies. Correlation between fluoride in drinking water and improved dental health is reviewed. Relationship is expressed between fluoridation and reduced tooth decay. Use of fluoride in treating skeletal disorders is discussed. Author advocates fluoridating water supplies. (SA)

  5. Sorption of sulfuryl fluoride by food commodities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sriranjini, Venkata-rao; Rajendran, Somiahnadar

    2008-08-01

    The use of sulfuryl fluoride, a structural fumigant for termite and woodborer control, has recently been expanded to treating stored food commodities and food facilities. There is, however, a lack of data on the sorption of sulfuryl fluoride by food commodities. Knowledge about sorption is important in the context of effective treatment and residues. When sulfuryl fluoride was applied at a dose of 50 g m(-3) to various food commodities (total 68) with 300 g per replicate in 0.75 L gas wash bottles (fumigation chambers) at 25 +/- 1 degrees C, in most cases (81%) the gas concentrations in the free space of the commodities exceeded 50 g m(-3) (range 51-80 g m(-3)) at the end of 24 h exposure. In chambers without the substrate, an average concentration of 49.7 g m(-3) was recorded. About 54% of the commodities showed low-level ( sulfuryl fluoride, 34% showed medium-level (26-50%) sorption and only 12% were highly sorptive (>50%). The latter include white oats (terminal gas concentration 17.8 g m(-3)), some of the decorticated split pulses (24.0-29.3 g m(-3)), chickpea flour (26.3 g m(-3)), dried ginger (29.0 g m(-3)), refined wheat flour (30.3 g m(-3)) and coriander powder (40.5 g m(-3)). In unfumigated control commodities, owing to interfering volatiles, Fumiscope readings in the range 0-13 were noted. Sulfuryl fluoride has the advantage of a low or moderate level of sorption with the majority of the food commodities.

  6. Comparison of Fluoridated Miswak and Toothbrushing with Fluoridated Toothpaste on Plaque Removal and Fluoride Release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baeshen, Hosam; Salahuddin, Sabin; Dam, Robel; Zawawi, Khalid H; Birkhed, Dowen

    2017-04-01

    Dental caries and periodontal diseases are all induced by oral biofilm (dental plaque). This study was conducted to evaluate if fluoride-impregnated miswak is as effective in plaque removal and fluoride release as toothbrushing with fluoride toothpaste. This single-blind, randomized, crossover study was conducted at the Department of Cariology, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden, from February 2010 to January 2011. Fifteen healthy subjects participated in this study. The participants were instructed to use the following: (1) 0.5% NaF-impregnated miswak, (2) nonfluoridated miswak, (3) toothbrush with nonfluoride toothpaste, and (4) toothbrush with 1450 ppm fluoride toothpaste. Each method was used twice a day for 1 week after which plaque amount and fluoride concentration in resting saliva were measured. There was a 1-week washout period between each method. No significant difference between miswak and tooth-brushing was found regarding plaque removal on buccal and lingual surfaces. A somewhat higher fluoride concentration in resting saliva was found after using impregnated miswak when compared with toothbrushing with fluoride toothpaste (p toothbrushing showed the same plaque removing effect on buccal and lingual surfaces. Miswak impregnated with 0.5% NaF resulted in a higher concentration of fluoride in saliva than brushing with 1450 ppm fluoride toothpaste. Miswak impregnated with 0.5% NaF and toothbrushing results in comparable plaque removal and about the same fluoride concentration in saliva even it was somewhat higher for impregnated miswak.

  7. In vitro evaluation of fluoride products in the development of carious lesions in deciduous teeth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucineide de Melo Santos

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of the application of fluoride products on the development of enamel caries in deciduous teeth. A total of 108 deciduous teeth were chosen for the study. Acid-resistant varnish was applied on the teeth, leaving only one area of 5 mm x 1 mm of dental enamel exposed. The teeth were allocated randomly to one of the following groups: 1 control - toothpaste without fluoride; 2 1.23% fluoride gel; 3 Duraflur fluoride varnish; 4 Duraphat fluoride varnish; 5 Fluorniz fluoride varnish; 6 Fluorphat fluoride varnish; 7 varnish with Duofluorid; 8 12% silver fluoride diamine (Cariestop; 9 children's fluoride toothpaste (500 ppm. The tested products were applied on the teeth according to the manufacturer's recommendations and the teeth were stored in a moist environment for 24 hours. Each group of teeth was then subjected to a pH cycling model for 14 days, after which the teeth were cut through the center for an analysis of the depth of the carious lesion by polarized light microscopy. Comparisons were made between the treatments and the control group. The mean lesion depth values were 318 μm ± 39 (control, 213 μm ± 27 (fluoride gel, 203 μm ± 34 (Duraflur, 133 μm ± 25 (Duraphat, 207 μm ± 27 (Fluor-niz, 212 μm ± 27 (Fluorphat, 210 ± 28 (Duofluorid, 146 ± 31 (Cariestop and 228 ± 24 (fluoride toothpaste. None of the products used here was able to completely prevent the formation of lesions. The highest cariostatic effect was achieved by fluoride varnish Duraphat and the lowest by the fluoride toothpaste.

  8. In vitro evaluation of fluoride products in the development of carious lesions in deciduous teeth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Lucineide de Melo; Reis, José Ivo Limeira dos; Medeiros, Maria Perolina de; Ramos, Sheyla Moreira; Araújo, Juliane Mendes de

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of the application of fluoride products on the development of enamel caries in deciduous teeth. A total of 108 deciduous teeth were chosen for the study. Acid-resistant varnish was applied on the teeth, leaving only one area of 5 mm x 1 mm of dental enamel exposed. The teeth were allocated randomly to one of the following groups: 1) control - toothpaste without fluoride; 2) 1.23% fluoride gel; 3) Duraflur fluoride varnish; 4) Duraphat fluoride varnish; 5) Fluorniz fluoride varnish; 6) Fluorphat fluoride varnish; 7) varnish with Duofluorid; 8) 12% silver fluoride diamine (Cariestop); 9) children's fluoride toothpaste (500 ppm). The tested products were applied on the teeth according to the manufacturer's recommendations and the teeth were stored in a moist environment for 24 hours. Each group of teeth was then subjected to a pH cycling model for 14 days, after which the teeth were cut through the center for an analysis of the depth of the carious lesion by polarized light microscopy. Comparisons were made between the treatments and the control group. The mean lesion depth values were 318 microm +/- 39 (control), 213 microm +/- 27 (fluoride gel), 203 microm +/- 34 (Duraflur), 133 microm +/- 25 (Duraphat), 207 microm +/- 27 (Fluor-niz), 212 microm +/- 27 (Fluorphat), 210 +/- 28 (Duofluorid), 146 +/- 31 (Cariestop) and 228 +/- 24 (fluoride toothpaste). None of the products used here was able to completely prevent the formation of lesions. The highest cariostatic effect was achieved by fluoride varnish Duraphat and the lowest by the fluoride toothpaste.

  9. Opinion of residents from the Gold Coast, Queensland, on community water fluoridation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroon, Jeroen; Reid, Kate Emily; Cutting, Jenna Renae; Lalloo, Ratilal; Chiu, Kandy Chien

    2014-02-01

    To investigate opinions and concerns of Gold Coast residents regarding fluoridation of community water supplies. Anonymous data were collected in four major shopping centers from approximately 500 Gold Coast residents. Eighty-one percent of participants were aware of the addition of fluoride to the water supply. More than half obtained information on water fluoridation through the print and electronic media. Sixty percent of respondents supported water fluoridation. The majority preferred the public and/or health professionals to have made the decision on water fluoridation rather than the government. The percentage of residents supporting water fluoridation was lower than that found in other Queensland, Australian, and worldwide surveys. In this study, only age and the highest level of education attained were factors significantly related to levels of support for water fluoridation. The Queensland Government's decision to implement water fluoridation without a referendum caused disquiet amongst some Gold Coast residents. Future public health initiatives therefore may be assisted by more consultation with, and involvement from, health professionals in the relevant fields. Public health campaigns may benefit more from interaction with the community in order to address their specific concerns. © 2012 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  10. Alkali-soluble fluoride deposition on enamel after professional application of topical fluoride in vitro Formação de flúor fracamente ligado ao esmalte após a aplicação tópica profissional de flúor in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitsue Fujimaki Hayacibara

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available Since the efficacy of topical fluoride products is related to the fluoride (F availability and its reactivity with enamel, this study was conducted. The F concentration of the following materials was verified: I- acidulated phosphate fluoride (APF gel (1.23% F, II- APF foam (1.23% F and III- Varnish (2.26% F. Forty blocks of bovine enamel were divided into 4 groups and treated according to the materials described, being one of them used as control. Loosely bound fluoride (''CaF2'' was determined on enamel after extraction with 1.0M KOH and analyzed by ion-selective electrode. Total F concentration found in gel was 12,642, in foam 12,755 and in varnish 23,183 mg F/g. All products formed statistically higher amounts of ''CaF2'' on enamel compared to the control group (p 0.05. Thus, ''CaF2'' formation was not proportional to the total F content in the products, suggesting that the pH and the vehicle used are more important.Considerando que a eficácia dos produtos para aplicação tópica profissional de flúor (géis, espumas e vernizes está relacionada com a reatividade do flúor (F com o esmalte e sendo esta dependente da disponibilidade do F em cada produto, este estudo foi conduzido. A concentração de F nos seguintes produtos foi estudada: I - Flúor Fosfato Acidulado (FFA gel (1,23% F, II - FFA espuma (1,23% F e III- Verniz fluoretado (2,26% F. Foram confeccionados 40 blocos de esmalte bovino, tratados de acordo com os grupos descritos, sendo um deles utilizado como controle. O F fracamente ligado (''CaF2'' ao esmalte foi determinado após a extração com 1.0 M KOH e analisado em eletrodo específico. A concentração de F encontrada no gel foi de 12.642, na espuma 12.755 e no verniz 23.183 mg F/g. Todos os produtos formaram uma quantidade significantemente maior de ''CaF2'' na superfície do esmalte, comparado ao grupo controle (p 0,05. Assim, a formação de ''CaF2'' na superfície do esmalte não foi proporcional ao conteúdo de F nos

  11. Development of an empirical model for fluoride removal from photovoltaic wastewater by electrocoagulation process

    KAUST Repository

    Drouiche, Nadjib

    2011-05-01

    Electrocoagulation experiments were conducted with bipolar aluminium electrodes to determine the optimum conditions for the fluoride removal from synthetic photovoltaic wastewater. A high fluoride concentration in community water supplies can cause fluorosis which has a detrimental effect on human health in particular on teeth and bones. A full 23 factorial design of experiments was used to obtain the best conditions of fluoride removal from water solutions. The three factors considered were initial fluoride concentration, applied potential, and supporting electrolyte dosage. Two levels for each factor were used; supporting electrolyte (0 and 100), applied potential (10 and 30 V), and initial fluoride concentration (20 and 25 mg/L). Results showed that the optimum conditions for fluoride removal from photovoltaic wastewater containing an initial fluoride concentration of 20 mg/L were a supporting electrolyte dose of 100 mg/L and an applied potential of 30 V. These gave a residual fluoride concentration of 8.6 mg/L which was below the standard discharge limit. A mathematical equation showing the relation between residual fluoride concentration and the effective variables was also developed. © 2011 Desalination Publications. All rights reserved.

  12. Development Strategy for Continuous Professional Education in the Field of Traditional Applied Arts and Crafts of Russia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O V Fedotova

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The major factors of the development and perfection of the education system in the field of traditional applied arts and crafts in view of modern requirements are considered in the article.

  13. Recurrent hamstring muscle injury: applying the limited evidence in the professional football setting with a seven-point programme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brukner, Peter; Nealon, Andrew; Morgan, Christopher; Burgess, Darren; Dunn, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Recurrent hamstring injuries are a major problem in sports such as football. The aim of this paper was to use a clinical example to describe a treatment strategy for the management of recurrent hamstring injuries and examine the evidence for each intervention. A professional footballer sustained five hamstring injuries in a relatively short period of time. The injury was managed successfully with a seven-point programme—biomechanical assessment and correction, neurodynamics, core stability, eccentric strengthening, an overload running programme, injection therapies and stretching/relaxation. The evidence for each of these treatment options is reviewed. It is impossible to be definite about which aspects of the programme contributed to a successful outcome. Only limited evidence is available in most cases; therefore, decisions regarding the use of different treatment modalities must be made by using a combination of clinical experience and research evidence. PMID:23322894

  14. Drinking water fluoridation and bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allolio, B; Lehmann, R

    1999-01-01

    Drinking water fluoridation has an established role in the prevention of dental caries, but may also positively or negatively affect bone. In bone fluoride is incorporated into hydroxylapatite to form the less soluble fluoroapatite. In higher concentrations fluoride stimulates osteoblast activity leading to an increase in cancellous bone mass. As optimal drinking water fluoridation (1 mg/l) is widely used, it is of great interest, whether long-term exposition to artificial water fluoridation has any impact on bone strength, bone mass, and -- most importantly -- fracture rate. Animal studies suggest a biphasic pattern of the effect of drinking water fluoridation on bone strength with a peak strength at a bone fluoride content of 1200 ppm followed by a decline at higher concentrations eventually leading to impaired bone quality. These changes are not paralleled by changes in bone mass suggesting that fluoride concentrations remain below the threshold level required for activation of osteoblast activity. Accordingly, in most epidemiological studies in humans bone mass was not altered by optimal drinking water fluoridation. In contrast, studies on the effect on hip fracture rate gave conflicting results ranging from an increased fracture incidence to no effect, and to a decreased fracture rate. As only ecological studies have been performed, they may be biased by unknown confounding factors -- the so-called ecological fallacy. However, the combined results of these studies indicate that any increase or decrease in fracture rate is likely to be small. It has been calculated that appropriately designed cohort studies to solve the problem require a sample size of >400,000 subjects. Such studies will not be performed in the foreseeable future. Future investigations in humans should, therefore, concentrate on the effect of long-term drinking water fluoridation on bone fluoride content and bone strength.

  15. Amine and tin fluoride inhibition of Streptococcus sanguis adhesion under continuous flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Embleton, J V; Newman, H N; Wilson, M

    2001-06-01

    This study evaluated the ability of topically applied amine fluoride (AmF) and AmF-tin fluoride to inhibit the adhesion of Streptococcus sanguis within a parallel plate flow cell system. One of three AmF compounds and two tin fluoride preparations significantly reduced the net bacterial adhesion to conditioned glass over a 1-h period. Tin(IV) fluoride inhibited S. sanguis adhesion to the greatest extent, and this was shown to be dependent on the formation of the conditioning film prior to agent application.

  16. Personal interests as incentive for professional writing; Towards a writing pedagogy for Dutch universities of applied sciences

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.A. Coppen; dr Marianne Boogaard; Marleen Claessens; P.H. van de Ven

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study is to find design criteria for a writing pedagogy for Dutch universities of applied sciences (also: HBO schools). We analyzed policy and educational documents and interviewed lecturers of three writing courses in three HBO schools. This enabled us to characterize their writing

  17. Water fluoridation for the prevention of dental caries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iheozor-Ejiofor, Zipporah; Worthington, Helen V; Walsh, Tanya; O'Malley, Lucy; Clarkson, Jan E; Macey, Richard; Alam, Rahul; Tugwell, Peter; Welch, Vivian; Glenny, Anne-Marie

    2015-06-18

    Dental caries is a major public health problem in most industrialised countries, affecting 60% to 90% of school children. Community water fluoridation was initiated in the USA in 1945 and is currently practised in about 25 countries around the world; health authorities consider it to be a key strategy for preventing dental caries. Given the continued interest in this topic from health professionals, policy makers and the public, it is important to update and maintain a systematic review that reflects contemporary evidence. To evaluate the effects of water fluoridation (artificial or natural) on the prevention of dental caries.To evaluate the effects of water fluoridation (artificial or natural) on dental fluorosis. We searched the following electronic databases: The Cochrane Oral Health Group's Trials Register (to 19 February 2015); The Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL; Issue 1, 2015); MEDLINE via OVID (1946 to 19 February 2015); EMBASE via OVID (1980 to 19 February 2015); Proquest (to 19 February 2015); Web of Science Conference Proceedings (1990 to 19 February 2015); ZETOC Conference Proceedings (1993 to 19 February 2015). We searched the US National Institutes of Health Trials Registry (ClinicalTrials.gov) and the World Health Organization's WHO International Clinical Trials Registry Platform for ongoing trials. There were no restrictions on language of publication or publication status in the searches of the electronic databases. For caries data, we included only prospective studies with a concurrent control that compared at least two populations - one receiving fluoridated water and the other non-fluoridated water - with outcome(s) evaluated at at least two points in time. For the assessment of fluorosis, we included any type of study design, with concurrent control, that compared populations exposed to different water fluoride concentrations. We included populations of all ages that received fluoridated water (naturally or artificially

  18. Organizational aspects of an experimental program for physical education with a strengthened course in professional and applied physical training of future electrical engineers in the railway sector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anzhelika Yefremova

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: to develop an optimized program for physical education with a strengthened course in professional and applied physical training (PAPT for students of railway universities. Material & Methods: analysis and generalization of scientific sources and program-normative documentation on physical education of the higher educational institution of railway transport, survey. Results: the results of the survey of railroad specialists are given. Pilot studies have determined the nature and conditions of professional activity of electrical engineers of railway transport. The experimental program on physical education with the strengthened course of the PAPT of students of railway universities was developed and theoretically justified. Conclusion: structure of the experimental program on physical education with the strengthened course of the PAPT included a theoretical section (8 hours, methodical and practical exercises (6 hours, a practical section (114 hours and a control section (12 hours. The program focuses on improving professionally important physical and psycho-physiological qualities and functions, psychomotor skills and physical performance. The basis of the practical section was the physical exercises from different sections of the current basic curriculum.

  19. Treating hypersensitivity with fluoride varnish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaffar, A

    1999-01-01

    Dentinal hypersensitivity results when stimulation causes the fluid in open dentinal tubules to undergo pressure changes, which activates mechanoreceptor nerves and results in pain. Treatment with fluoride varnish forms a protective layer of calcium fluoride that prevents this fluid flow, thereby reducing dentinal sensitivity.

  20. Treating hypersensitivity with fluoride varnishes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaffar, A

    1998-11-01

    Dentinal hypersensitivity results when stimulation causes the fluid in open dentinal tubules to undergo pressure changes, which activates mechanoreceptor nerves and results in pain. Treatment with fluoride varnish forms a protective layer of calcium fluoride that prevents this fluid flow, thereby reducing dentinal sensitivity.

  1. Prediction for new magnetoelectric fluorides

    OpenAIRE

    Nenert, G.; Palstra, T. T. M.

    2007-01-01

    We use symmetry considerations in order to predict new magnetoelectric fluorides. In addition to these magnetoelectric properties, we discuss which among these fluorides are the ones susceptible to present multiferroic properties. We emphasize that several materials exhibit ferromagnetic properties. This ferromagnetism should enhance the interplay between the magnetic and dielectric properties in these materials.

  2. Synthesis of glycosyl fluorides from (phenylthio)glycosides using IF5-pyridine-HF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunigami, Masataka; Hara, Shoji

    2015-11-19

    IF5-pyridine-HF, an air- and moisture-stable fluorinating reagent, was applied to the synthesis of glycosyl fluorides from (phenylthio)glycosides. Common protecting groups of alcohol and diol can tolerate the reaction conditions performed, and therefore, the present method is applicable to the synthesis of various glycosyl fluorides. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Comparison of fluoride uptake into tooth enamel from two fluoride varnishes containing different calcium phosphate sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schemehorn, B R; Wood, G D; McHale, W; Winston, A E

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this in vitro study was to compare two 5% sodium fluoride varnishes, each containing different sources of calcium and phosphate, for their ability to deliver fluoride into treated sound tooth enamel and adjacent, but untreated demineralized enamel. Six sets of 12 bovine enamel cores were mounted in plexiglass rods and the exposed surfaces were polished. Synthetic lesions were formed in the surface of three sets by soaking in thickened, pH 5.0, 1M lactic acid, 50% saturated with calcium hydroxyapatite. A fluoride varnish containing tri-calcium phosphate (TCP) was applied to one set of sound enamel cores, and a second, delivering amorphous calcium phosphate (ACP), was applied to another. A third set of sound enamel cores was water-treated. Each treated sound core was paired with an untreated lesioned core, and the pairs were soaked in artificial saliva for 24 hours at 37 degrees C. The treated cores, but not their lesioned counterparts, were initially soaked in 1.0 N KOH saturated with calcium phosphate for 18 hours. Each core was separately etched with 1.0 N perchloric acid for exactly 15 seconds, and fluoride measured by an ion-sensitive electrode after neutralizing with NaOH and buffering in TISAB II. The amount of calcium extracted was also determined by atomic absorption spectrophotometry as a measure of etch depth. Fluoride uptake average was 1677 +/- 193 ppm, 455 + 38 ppm, and 44 +/- 5 ppm for the sound enamel cores treated with ACP varnish, TCP varnish, and water treatment, respectively. Fluoride uptake into the demineralized enamel averaged 5567 +/- 460 ppm, 2126 +/-126 ppm, and 49 -/+ 4 ppm for demineralized enamel paired with the sound cores treated with ACP varnish, TCP varnish, and water, respectively. The differences between the ACP varnish, the TCP varnish, and the water treatments were statistically significant (p < 0.05). The ACP varnish formulation delivers statistically significantly more fluoride to both intact and demineralized

  4. Urinary Fluoride Concentration in Children with Disabilities Following Long-Term Fluoride Tablet Ingestion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hsiu-Yueh; Chen, Jung-Ren; Hung, Hsin-Chia; Hsiao, Szu-Yu; Huang, Shun-Te; Chen, Hong-Sen

    2011-01-01

    Urine is the most commonly utilized biomarker for fluoride excretion in public health and epidemiological studies. Approximately 30-50% of fluoride is excreted from urine in children. Urinary fluoride excretion reflects the total fluoride intake from multiple sources. After administering fluoride tablets to children with disabilities, urinary…

  5. Applying findings from a systematic review of workplace-based e-learning: implications for health information professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Booth, Andrew; Carroll, Christopher; Papaioannou, Diana; Sutton, Anthea; Wong, Ruth

    2009-03-01

    To systematically review the UK published literature on e-learning in the health workplace and to apply the findings to one of the most prolific UK e-learning initiatives in the health sector--the National Library for Health Facilitated Online Learning Interactive Opportunity (FOLIO) Programme. Sensitive searches were conducted across ASSIA, Australian Education Index, British Education Index, cinahl, CSA Abstracts, Dissertation Abstracts, Emerald, ERIC, IBSS, Index to Theses, LISA, MEDLINE, PSYCINFO and Social Science Citation Index. Additional citations were identified from reference lists of included studies and of relevant reviews; citation tracking and contact with experts. Twenty-nine studies met the inclusion criteria and were coded and analysed using thematic analysis as described by Miles & Huberman (Qualitative Data Analysis: A Sourcebook of New Methods. Newbury Park, CA: Sage, 1984). Five broad themes were identified from the 29 included studies: (i) peer communication; (ii) flexibility; (iii) support; (iv) knowledge validation; and (v) course presentation and design. These broad themes were supported by a total of eleven sub-themes. Components from the FOLIO Programme were analysed and existing and proposed developments were mapped against each sub-theme. This provides a valuable framework for ongoing course development. Librarians involved in delivering and supporting e-learning can benefit from applying the findings from the systematic review to existing programmes, exemplified by the FOLIO Programme. The resultant framework can also be used in developing new e-learning programmes.

  6. Bioactivity and fluoride release of strontium and fluoride modified Biodentine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simila, Hazel O; Karpukhina, Natalia; Hill, Robert G

    2018-01-01

    Biodentine™ is a novel tricalcium silicate based material used both as a coronal dentine replacement and in pulp therapy. Its multiple use in sealing perforations, pulp capping and as a temporary restoration arises from its ability to promote dentine formation and to confer an excellent marginal seal. However, there is still room for improvement of this cement as it lacks the anticariogenic effect typically conferred by fluoride ion release as seen in glass ionomer cement based dental materials. Therefore, this study was conducted to investigate the impact of bioactive glass addition to Biodentine™. was to compare the apatite formation capacity, specificity of the apatite type formed and fluoride ion release by Biodentine™ cements that have been modified by three different compositions of bioactive glasses. High fluoride, high strontium and high fluoride plus strontium containing bioactive glasses were synthesized, incorporated into Biodentine™ powder and four types of cements prepared. These cements were immersed in phosphate buffered saline solution and incubated for a period of 3 and 24h, 3, 7 and 14 days. Fourier transform infra-red spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance and fluoride ion release studies were performed. Bioactive glass addition to Biodentine™ led to pronounced formation of apatite. Where the bioactive glass contained fluoride, fluorapatite and fluoride ion release were demonstrated. Eliciting fluorapatite formation and fluoride ion release from Biodentine™ is an important development as fluoride is known to have antibacterial and anticariogenic effects. Copyright © 2017 The Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Fluorides in dental public health programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Jayanth V; Moss, Mark E

    2008-04-01

    The use of fluorides in dental public health programs has a long history. With the availability of fluoridation and other forms of fluorides, dental caries have declined dramatically in the United States. This article reviews some of the ways fluorides are used in public health programs and discusses issues related to their effectiveness, cost, and policy.

  8. 49 CFR 173.163 - Hydrogen fluoride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Hydrogen fluoride. 173.163 Section 173.163... Hydrogen fluoride. (a) Hydrogen fluoride (hydrofluoric acid, anhydrous) must be packaged as follows: (1) In... filling ratio of 0.84. (b) A cylinder removed from hydrogen fluoride service must be condemned in...

  9. When Theory Meets Practice: Applying Cambourne’s Conditions for Learning to Professional Development for Elementary School EFL Teachers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cadavid Múnera Isabel Cristina

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available

    This article presents a reflection on an action research project carried out by a group of teachers and students at Universidad de Antioquia. The action research project aimed at etermining the impact of a professional development proposal for elementary school English teachers in Medellin, Colombia. In the first section, the article describes the previous study that supported this project as well as its design and implementation. In the second part, Cambourne’s conditions for learning are discussed from a theoretical and practical perspective. Researchers found that participant teachers improved both their use of the foreign language and their pedagogical practices as a result of having the opportunity to take risks and reflect as learners and teachers on holistic strategies for teaching and learning English as a foreign language.

    Este artículo presenta una reflexión acerca de un proyecto de investigación llevado a cabo por un grupo de profesoras y estudiantes de la Universidad de Antioquia. Este proyecto de investigación acción tuvo como objetivo principal determinar el impacto de una propuesta holística de desarrollo profesional para maestros de inglés de la básica primaria, en Medellín, Colombia. En la primera sección del artículo se describen el diseño y la implementación del proyecto así como el estudio anterior que dio origen al presente proyecto. En la segunda parte se discuten las condiciones para el aprendizaje y propuestas por Cambourne, desde una mirada teórica y práctica. Se encontró que los profesores participantes mejoraron en su uso de la lengua extranjera, así como en sus prácticas pedagógicas, como resultado de la toma de riesgos y la reflexión como aprendices y docentes acerca de estrategias holísticas para la enseñanza y el aprendizaje del inglés como lengua extranjera.

  10. Recommendations for using fluoride to prevent and control dental caries in the United States. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-08-17

    Widespread use of fluoride has been a major factor in the decline in the prevalence and severity of dental caries (i.e., tooth decay) in the United States and other economically developed countries. When used appropriately, fluoride is both safe and effective in preventing and controlling dental caries. All U.S. residents are likely exposed to some degree to fluoride, which is available from multiple sources. Both health-care professionals and the public have sought guidance on selecting the best way to provide and receive fluoride. During the late 1990s, CDC convened a work group to develop recommendations for using fluoride to prevent and control dental caries in the United States. This report includes these recommendations, as well as a) critical analysis of the scientific evidence regarding the efficacy and effectiveness of fluoride modalities in preventing and controlling dental caries, b) ordinal grading of the quality of the evidence, and c) assessment of the strength of each recommendation. Because frequent exposure to small amounts of fluoride each day will best reduce the risk for dental caries in all age groups, the work group recommends that all persons drink water with an optimal fluoride concentration and brush their teeth twice daily with fluoride toothpaste. For persons at high risk for dental caries, additional fluoride measures might be needed. Measured use of fluoride modalities is particularly appropriate during the time of anterior tooth enamel development (i.e., age <6 years). The recommendations in this report guide dental and other health-care providers, public health officials, policy makers, and the public in the use of fluoride to achieve maximum protection against dental caries while using resources efficiently and reducing the likelihood of enamel fluorosis. The recommendations address public health and professional practice, self-care, consumer product industries and health agencies, and further research. Adoption of these

  11. Reducing exposure to high fluoride drinking water in Estonia-a countrywide study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Indermitte, Ene; Saava, Astrid; Karro, Enn

    2014-03-14

    Fluoride is a naturally occurring contaminant in groundwater in Estonia. There are several regions in Estonia with fluoride contents in public water supplies as high as 7 mg/L. Long-term exposure to high-fluoride drinking water may have several adverse health effects, primarily dental fluorosis. The opportunities for exposure reduction rely highly on water treatment technologies. Since 2004 public water suppliers in Estonia have made efforts to diminish fluoride content in drinking water systems. A follow-up study on a country level was carried out in 2004-2012 to analyze the changes in population exposure to excessive (over 1.5 mg/L) fluoride in drinking water and to get information about the reduction methods applied by public water supplies (PWS) to optimize the fluoride levels in public water system. The results showed that bigger PWS have been more effective in fluoride reduction measures than small PWS. The main methods used to lower the fluoride content were reverse osmosis technology and replacement of water sources with new ones (new drilled wells). As a result of all the measures taken the overall high-fluoride exposure has been reduced substantially (82%).

  12. Soil fluoride spiking effects on olive trees (Olea europaea L. cv. Chemlali).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zouari, M; Ben Ahmed, C; Fourati, R; Delmail, D; Ben Rouina, B; Labrousse, P; Ben Abdallah, F

    2014-10-01

    A pot experiment under open air conditions was carried out to investigate the uptake, accumulation and toxicity effects of fluoride in olive trees (Olea europaea L.) grown in a soil spiked with inorganic sodium fluoride (NaF). Six different levels (0, 20, 40, 60, 80 and 100mM NaF) of soil spiking were applied through NaF to irrigation water. At the end of the experiment, total fluoride content in soil was 20 and 1770mgFkg(-1) soil in control and 100mM NaF treatments, respectively. The comparative distribution of fluoride partitioning among the different olive tree parts showed that the roots accumulated the most fluoride and olive fruits were minimally affected by soil NaF spiking as they had the lowest fluoride content. In fact, total fluoride concentration varied between 12 and 1070µgFg(-1) in roots, between 9 and 570µgFg(-1) in shoots, between 12 and 290µgFg(-1) in leaves, and between 10 and 29µgFg(-1) in fruits, respectively for control and 100mM NaF treatments. Indeed, the fluoride accumulation pattern showed the following distribution: roots>shoots>leaves>fruits. On the other hand, fluoride toxicity symptoms such as leaf necrosis and leaf drop appeared only in highly spiked soils (60, 80 and 100mM NaF). Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Reducing Exposure to High Fluoride Drinking Water in Estonia—A Countrywide Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Indermitte, Ene; Saava, Astrid; Karro, Enn

    2014-01-01

    Fluoride is a naturally occurring contaminant in groundwater in Estonia. There are several regions in Estonia with fluoride contents in public water supplies as high as 7 mg/L. Long-term exposure to high-fluoride drinking water may have several adverse health effects, primarily dental fluorosis. The opportunities for exposure reduction rely highly on water treatment technologies. Since 2004 public water suppliers in Estonia have made efforts to diminish fluoride content in drinking water systems. A follow-up study on a country level was carried out in 2004–2012 to analyze the changes in population exposure to excessive (over 1.5 mg/L) fluoride in drinking water and to get information about the reduction methods applied by public water supplies (PWS) to optimize the fluoride levels in public water system. The results showed that bigger PWS have been more effective in fluoride reduction measures than small PWS. The main methods used to lower the fluoride content were reverse osmosis technology and replacement of water sources with new ones (new drilled wells). As a result of all the measures taken the overall high-fluoride exposure has been reduced substantially (82%). PMID:24637908

  14. Adverse Effects of Silver Diamine Fluoride Treatment among Preschool Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duangthip, D; Fung, M H T; Wong, M C M; Chu, C H; Lo, E C M

    2017-12-01

    This randomized clinical trial aimed to compare the adverse effects and parental satisfaction following the different regimes of silver diamine fluoride (SDF) treatment among preschool children. A total of 888 preschool children who had active dentin caries received different SDF application regimes: group 1, 12% SDF applied annually; group 2, 12% SDF applied semiannually; group 3, 38% SDF applied annually; and group 4, 38% SDF applied semiannually. Information on adverse effects-including tooth or gum pain, gum swelling, gum bleaching, and systemic toxicity-was collected through a parent-reported questionnaire within 1 wk after every SDF or placebo application. Information of parental satisfaction on children's dental appearance was collected at baseline and 30-mo examination. At the 30 mo, 799 children (90%) remained in the study. No acute systemic illness or major adverse effect was reported. No differences of all minor adverse effects among the 4 groups were found ( P > 0.05). Overall, prevalence of tooth and gum pain as perceived by patients and reported by parents was 6.6%, while gum swelling and gum bleaching were 2.8% and 4.7%, respectively. Blackening of carious lesions was common among all groups, with 36.7%, 49.5%, 65.6% and 76.3% in groups 1 to 4, respectively (χ2 test, P 0.05). Based on parental reporting, SDF does not cause acute systemic illness. Tooth or gum pain, gum swelling, and gum bleaching were uncommon and not significantly different among the study groups. Parental satisfaction with children's dental appearance was similar among all groups. The use of SDF following the study protocol for caries arrest is safe for preschool children. Collecting information on parental satisfaction and adverse effects is beneficial for dental professionals when deciding to adopt SDF treatment for preschool children (ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02385474).

  15. Portland Water Fluoridation: A Newspaper Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianchi, Allison; Bergren, Martha Dewey; Lewis, Patricia Ryan

    2017-03-01

    Portland, Oregon is the largest city in the United States without community water fluoridation (CWF). A newspaper analysis was conducted of the failed 2013 CWF campaign to evaluate anti-fluoridation and pro-fluoridation messaging provided by newspapers during the campaign. News content was categorized by type and slant (pro-fluoridation, anti-fluoridation, or neutral) and 34 variables were tabulated (23 anti-fluoridation, 11 pro-fluoridation). Results showed overall messaging was slightly pro-fluoridation, as compared to anti-fluoridation or neutral content (35%, 32%, and 33% respectively). Editorial content was 85% pro-fluoridation and 15% anti-fluoridation. The most frequent anti-fluoridation variables were alternatives to water fluoridation, mass/forced medication and concerns about the political process. Conversely, tooth decay and social justice were the most commonly cited pro-fluoridation variables. Newspapers can be influential in shaping public policy opinions in the fight for community water fluoridation. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Fluoride and Water (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... toothpaste that carries the ADA's seal of acceptance. Brush babies' teeth as they come in with an infant toothbrush. ... locked cabinet. Also, supervise young kids when they brush their teeth to prevent swallowing of toothpaste or other fluoridated ...

  17. Removal of excess fluoride from water by aluminum hydroxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beneberu Shimelis

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available The efficiency of untreated hydrated alumina (UHA and thermally treated hydrated alumina (THA obtained from hydrolysis of locally manufactured aluminum sulfate to remove fluoride from aqueous solution has been investigated in batch and continuous operation. The parameters considered were contact time and adsorbent dose, thermal pre-treatment of adsorbent, initial fluoride concentration and pH. The adsorption was rapid during the initial 20 min, but significant amount (> 90 % was removed within one hour at an optimum adsorbent dose of 1.6 g/L for initial F- concentration of 20 mg/L. The removal efficiency of F was increased with adsorbent dosage. Fluoride adsorption efficiencies increase with increase in the thermal treatment temperature up to 200 °C, but further increase in temperature resulted in decreased removal efficiency. For application in continuous packed bed column, treatment at 300 °C was taken as an optimum value. Fluoride adsorption capacity increases linearly with increase in F- concentration. High defluoridation efficiency was achieved using both UHA and THA within a pH range of 4.0 to 9.0. The adsorption data at ambient pH were well fitted to the Freundlich isotherm model with a minimum capacity of 23.7 mg F-/g and 7.0 mg F-/g for THA and UHA, respectively. The kinetic studies showed that the adsorption reaction of fluoride removal by hydrated alumina can be well described by a pseudo-second-order rate equation. Continuous packed bed column experiment using THA indicated that 4.5 g of THA could treat 6 L of water containing 20 mg/L fluoride before breakthrough. Hence, both UHA and THA can be applied for the treatment of water with high fluoride content.

  18. Are topical fluorides effective for treating incipient carious lesions?: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenzi, Tathiane Larissa; Montagner, Anelise Fernandes; Soares, Fabio Zovico Maxnuck; de Oliveira Rocha, Rachel

    2016-02-01

    This systematic review and meta-analysis evaluated the effectiveness of professional topical fluoride application (gels or varnishes) on the reversal treatment of incipient enamel carious lesions in primary or permanent dentition. Literature searching was carried out by the authors in PubMed (MEDLINE), Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, Turning Research Into Practice, and ClinicalTrials.gov to verify the clinical trials available about the outcome. From 754 potentially eligible studies, 21 were selected for full-text analysis, 5 were included for review, and 3 for meta-analysis. The statistical analysis was performed only for studies assessing fluoride varnish; there were insufficient data to perform it for fluoride gel studies. Two reviewers independently selected the studies, extracted the data, and assessed the risk of bias. Pooled-effect estimates were expressed as the weighted mean difference between groups. The therapeutic methods ranged considerably regarding the fluoride application protocols. There was a significant trend of effectiveness of fluoride varnish on the reversal of incipient enamel carious lesions (P Fluoride varnish seems to be an effective treatment for the reversal of incipient carious lesions in primary and permanent dentition; however, further clinical trials concerning efficacy of topical fluorides for treating those lesions are still required, mainly regarding the fluoride gel. Considering the scientific evidence on topical fluorides, pediatric dentists can use fluoride varnishes as an adjuvant for the treatment of active white-spot lesions in primary or permanent dentition. Copyright © 2016 American Dental Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Fluoride in groundwater: toxicological exposure and remedies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jha, S K; Singh, R K; Damodaran, T; Mishra, V K; Sharma, D K; Rai, Deepak

    2013-01-01

    Fluoride is a chemical element that is found most frequently in groundwater and has become one of the most important toxicological environmental hazards globally. The occurrence of fluoride in groundwater is due to weathering and leaching of fluoride-bearing minerals from rocks and sediments. Fluoride when ingested in small quantities (1.5 mg/L) may cause fluorosis. It is estimated that about 200 million people, from among 25 nations the world over, may suffer from fluorosis and the causes have been ascribed to fluoride contamination in groundwater including India. High fluoride occurrence in groundwaters is expected from sodium bicarbonate-type water, which is calcium deficient. The alkalinity of water also helps in mobilizing fluoride from fluorite (CaF2). Fluoride exposure in humans is related to (1) fluoride concentration in drinking water, (2) duration of consumption, and (3) climate of the area. In hotter climates where water consumption is greater, exposure doses of fluoride need to be modified based on mean fluoride intake. Various cost-effective and simple procedures for water defluoridation techniques are already known, but the benefits of such techniques have not reached the rural affected population due to limitations. Therefore, there is a need to develop workable strategies to provide fluoride-safe drinking water to rural communities. The study investigated the geochemistry and occurrence of fluoride and its contamination in groundwater, human exposure, various adverse health effects, and possible remedial measures from fluoride toxicity effects.

  20. High Fluoride and Geothermal Activities In Continental Rift Zones, Ethiopia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weldesenbet, S. F.; Wohnlich, S.

    2012-12-01

    strongly correlated with the concentrations in groundwaters in the local vicinity. The readily leachable hot spring deposits and local lacustrine sediments, which were leached easily as high as three fold of other sediments leachability, are considered as the reservoir for the potential fluoride contamination of the rift groundwater. Leaching of fluoride in the sub-surface system is simulated with sediment-packed column leached by flowing water and applying temporary interruption of flow during the experiment. The result indicated that a sharp increase of fluoride concentration (up to 58mg/kg) observed in leachates before one pore-volume of water eluted from the column. The concentration of leached fluoride consequently declined with the increased flowing pore-volume of water and finally the lowest concentrations of leached fluoride occurred in the end of the experiment. Flow interruption during column leaching experiment causes a noticeable fluoride concentration perturbation due to the heterogeneity of the sediment.

  1. Fluoride and Geothermal Activities In Continental Rift Zones, Ethiopia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weldesenbet, S. F.

    2012-12-01

    strongly correlated with the concentrations in groundwaters in the local vicinity. The readily leachable hot spring deposits and local lacustrine sediments, which were leached easily as high as three fold of other sediments leachability, are considered as the reservoir for the potential fluoride contamination of the rift groundwater. Leaching of fluoride in the sub-surface system is simulated with sediment-packed column leached by flowing water and applying temporary interruption of flow during the experiment. The result indicated that a sharp increase of fluoride concentration (up to 58mg/kg) observed in leachates before one pore-volume of water eluted from the column. The concentration of leached fluoride consequently declined with the increased flowing pore-volume of water and finally the lowest concentrations of leached fluoride occurred in the end of the experiment. Flow interruption during column leaching experiment causes a noticeable fluoride concentration perturbation due to the heterogeneity of the sediment.

  2. Fluoride removal from brackish groundwater by direct contact membrane distillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Deyin; Wang, Jun; Zhao, Changwei; Wang, Baoqiang; Luan, Zhaokun; Sun, Xiangcheng

    2010-01-01

    The direct contact membrane distillation applied for fluoride removal from brackish groundwater was investigated. The self-prepared polyvinylidene fluoride membrane exhibited high rejection of inorganic salt solutes. The maximum permeate flux 35.6 kg/(m2 x hr) was obtained with the feed solution at 80 degrees C and the cold distillate water at 20 degrees C. The feed concentration had no significant impact on the permeate flux and the rejection in fluoride. The precipitation of CaCO3 would clog the hollow fiber inlets and foul the membrane surface with increasing concentration factor when natural groundwater was used directly as the feed, which resulted in a rapid decline in the module efficiency. This phenomenon was diminished by acidification of the feed. The experimental results showed that the permeate flux and the quality of obtained distillate kept stable before concentration factor reached 5.0 with the acidified groundwater as feed. The membrane module efficiency began to decline gradually when the feed continued to be concentrated, which can be mainly attributed to the formation of CaF2 deposits on the membrane surface. In addition, a 300 hr continuous fluoride removal experiment of acidified groundwater was carried out with concentration factor at 4.0, the permeate flux kept stable and the permeate fluoride was not detected.

  3. Detection of chemicals by a reporter immunoassay: application to fluoride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagot, Marie-Astrid; Heutte, Florence; Renard, Pierre-Yves; Dollé, Frédéric; Pradelles, Philippe; Ezan, Eric

    2004-08-01

    This report describes a concept in which an immunoassay is used indirectly to quantify a nonantigenic very low molecular weight compound participating in a chemical reaction with a haptenic reporter. The detection limit of each reagent is, therefore, governed only by the affinity of the antibodies toward the reporter. Fluoride was used as a model, and silylated estradiol was used as a reporter. Upon silylation with N-O-bis(trimethylsilyl)trifluoroacetamide (BSTFA) or N-O-bis(dimethylterbutylsilyl) trifluoroacetamide (MTBSTFA), estradiol is no longer recognized by antibodies specific to estradiol. After reaction with hydrofluoric acid (HF) or fluoride salts (KF, CsF, NaF), its immunoreactivity is restored, and native estradiol is formed and is detected by immunoassay. The level of synthesized estradiol is dependent on the concentration of fluoride. A fluoride detection limit of 0.3 microg/L (15 nM) is obtained. Potential interference with other acids has been eliminated by choosing the silyl group (trimethylsilyl vs tert-butyldimethylsilyl) and by selecting optimal reaction conditions for the desilylation. The method has been applied to the detection of fluoride salts in natural waters (range 0.28-9.0 mg/L) and in an atmosphere artificially contaminated with HF between 8 and 160 microg/m(3) in the parts-per-billion range. This indirect immunoassay combines simplicity and high sensitivity and, therefore, can be used in field monitoring. Finally, the extension of the concept to other chemicals is discussed.

  4. Fluoride varnish reduces white spot lesions during orthodontic treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafi, Imran

    2008-01-01

    This was a randomised controlled trial (RCT) set in a community dental practice. The test varnish was a commercially available product, Fluor Protector (Ivoclar Vivadent, Schaan, Liechtenstein), containing 0.1% fluoride as difluorosilane in a polyurethane varnish base. The placebo varnish applied had an identical composition but without fluoride. The incidence and prevalence of white spot lesions (WSL) on the upper incisors, cuspids and premolars were recorded, as scored from digital photographs by two independent examiners. In the case of disagreement, cases were re-examined until a consensus was achieved. The incidence of WSL during the treatment period was 7.4% in the fluoride varnish group compared with 25.3% placebo group (P <0.001). The mean progression score was significantly lower in the fluoride varnish group than in the placebo group, (0.8 +/- 2.0 vs 2.6 +/- 2.8; P <0.001). The absolute risk reduction was 18% and the number-needed-to-treat was calculated to be 5.5 (95% confidence interval, 3.7-10.9). The results strongly suggest that regular topical fluoride varnish applications may reduce the development of WSL adjacent to the bracket base during treatment with fixed appliances.

  5. The improved remineralization and fluoride uptake in vivo of triclosan/copolymer/sodium fluoride toothpaste vs. sodium fluoride toothpaste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yun Po; Blake-Haskins, Jake; Din, Carol S; Gaffar, Abdul

    2003-01-01

    It has been shown that the twice-daily use of the triclosan/copolymer/sodium fluoride toothpaste can significantly reduce caries formation. The objective of this report was to review human studies comparing a triclosan/copolymer/sodium fluoride toothpaste to a placebo toothpaste (no fluoride), and a sodium fluoride toothpaste (positive control) for their ability to enhance remineralization of tooth enamel and increase the retention of fluoride by dental plaque for extended periods (up to 12 hours) after treatment. Two human plaque fluoride studies were conducted, measuring fluoride levels before brushing (baseline) and at two, six and twelve hours after brushing. An in situ enamel remineralization study, using microhardness measurements, was conducted as well. In the first study, the triclosan/copolymer/sodium fluoride toothpaste group was associated with a two-times increase of mean plaque fluoride as compared to the placebo control dentifrice. This increase was statistically significant at p < 0.05. In the second study, the triclosan/copolymer/sodium fluoride toothpaste group was associated with a 38% increase of mean plaque fluoride as compared to the sodium fluoride toothpaste group. This increase was statistically significant at p < 0.05. In the enamel remineralization study, the triclosan/copolymer/sodium fluoride toothpaste was significantly better (p < 0.05) than the sodium fluoride toothpaste (positive control) at promoting percent mineral recovery. The results obtained from the plaque fluoride studies and in situ remineralization study corroborated the findings of a recently completed two-year caries clinical study, which demonstrated that the triclosan/copolymer/sodium fluoride toothpaste provided superior cavity protection over the sodium fluoride toothpaste.

  6. Kinetic desorption of fluoride in a granitic soil column: Experiments and reactive transport modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padhi, S.; Tokunaga, T.

    2016-12-01

    The transport of fluoride or other contaminants in subsurface largely depends on their interaction with mineral surfaces of contact. Hence, the methods to evaluate and predict the extent of these interactions are of great importance. The commonly used distribution coefficient (Kd) model does not account for temporally and spatially variable geochemical conditions (Curtis et al., 2006). This study aims to investigate the reactive transport of fluoride in a natural soil column by laboratory experiments and solute transport modeling by introducing surface complexation of fluoride to the transport simulation. For our purpose, column experiments for fluoride sorption and desorption under saturated conditions were conducted in the laboratory on a granitic soil from Tsukuba, Japan. Stable isotopes of water (δ18O and δ2H) were used as conservative tracers to evaluate the flow and transport properties. Existence of physical and chemical nonequilibrium during fluoride transport was evaluated by applying stop flow events. Long tailing during fluoride desorption was observed, and the linear Kd model failed to explain this phenomenon. Hence, a geochemical model considering fluoride sorption in soil by surface complexation was developed to explain fluoride transport in the column. The intrinsic surface complexation constants for fluoride sorption reactions and surface site protonation and deprotonation reactions were corrected from that of the optimized results from batch experiments based as suggested by Sverjensky (2003). The model with fluoride sorption defined by surface complexation explained the observed fluoride desorption data quite satisfactorily, especially the long tailing. An overshoot in the breakthrough curve observed by the simulation during early period of desorption could be due to competitive desorption, which need to be further analyzed. References: (1) Curtis, JP, Davis, JA, Nafiz, DL 2006. Wat. Res. Res., 42, W04404, doi:10.1029/2005WR003979; (2

  7. Cadet lawyers applied professional training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrey B. Mednikov

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The article studies balance of successive protective actions against armed criminals relative to general physical fitness, emotional stability and will activity, experimentally justifies possibility of protective actions effectiveness improvement by means of cadet lawyers volitional qualities development.

  8. Fluoride release of glass ionomer restorations after bleaching with two different bleaching materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baroudi, Kusai; Mahmoud, Rasha Said; Tarakji, Bassel

    2013-01-01

    Objective: This study was designed to evaluate the effect of two bleaching agents on the fluoride release of three types of glass ionomer materials. Materials and Methods: A total of 90 specimens of the tested materials (Ketac Fil, Photac Fil and F2000) were prepared by a split Teflon ring with an internal diameter of 5 mm and thickness of 2 mm. The tested materials were applied and bleached according to manufacturer instructions. Fluoride release measurements were made by using specific ion electrode. Results: Results revealed that bleaching with opalescence Xtra caused little increase in fluoride release from Ketac Fil and Photac Fil but has no effect on F2000. However, Opalescence Quick had no significant effect on the three tested materials. Conclusions: Bleaching effect on fluoride release is material dependent and time has a significant role on fluoride release. PMID:24883026

  9. Removal of fluoride and uranium by nanofiltration and reverse osmosis: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Junjie; Schäfer, Andrea

    2014-12-01

    Inorganic contamination in drinking water, especially fluoride and uranium, has been recognized as a worldwide problem imposing a serious threat to human health. Among several treatment technologies applied for fluoride and uranium removal, nanofiltration (NF) and reverse osmosis (RO) have been studied extensively and proven to offer satisfactory results with high selectivity. In this review, a comprehensive summary and critical analysis of previous NF and RO applications on fluoride and uranium removal is presented. Fluoride retention is generally governed by size exclusion and charge interaction, while uranium retention is strongly affected by the speciation of uranium and size exclusion usually plays a predominant role for all species. Adsorption on the membrane occurs as some uranium species interact with membrane functional groups. The influence of operating conditions (pressure, crossflow velocity), water quality (concentration, solution pH), solute–solute interactions, membrane characteristics and membrane fouling on fluoride and uranium retention is critically reviewed.

  10. Chronic fluoride toxicity: dental fluorosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denbesten, Pamela; Li, Wu

    2011-01-01

    Dental fluorosis occurs as a result of excess fluoride ingestion during tooth formation. Enamel fluorosis and primary dentin fluorosis can only occur when teeth are forming, and therefore fluoride exposure (as it relates to dental fluorosis) occurs during childhood. In the permanent dentition, this would begin with the lower incisors, which complete mineralization at approximately 2-3 years of age, and end after mineralization of the third molars. The white opaque appearance of fluorosed enamel is caused by a hypomineralized enamel subsurface. With more severe dental fluorosis, pitting and a loss of the enamel surface occurs, leading to secondary staining (appearing as a brown color). Many of the changes caused by fluoride are related to cell/matrix interactions as the teeth are forming. At the early maturation stage, the relative quantity of amelogenin protein is increased in fluorosed enamel in a dose-related manner. This appears to result from a delay in the removal of amelogenins as the enamel matures. In vitro, when fluoride is incorporated into the mineral, more protein binds to the forming mineral, and protein removal by proteinases is delayed. This suggests that altered protein/mineral interactions are in part responsible for retention of amelogenins and the resultant hypomineralization that occurs in fluorosed enamel. Fluoride also appears to enhance mineral precipitation in forming teeth, resulting in hypermineralized bands of enamel, which are then followed by hypomineralized bands. Enhanced mineral precipitation with local increases in matrix acidity may affect maturation stage ameloblast modulation, potentially explaining the dose-related decrease in cycles of ameloblast modulation from ruffle-ended to smooth-ended cells that occur with fluoride exposure in rodents. Specific cellular effects of fluoride have been implicated, but more research is needed to determine which of these changes are relevant to the formation of fluorosed teeth. As further

  11. Chronic Fluoride Toxicity: Dental Fluorosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    DenBesten, Pamela; Li, Wu

    2012-01-01

    Dental fluorosis occurs as a result of excess fluoride ingestion during tooth formation. Enamel fluorosis and primary dentin fluorosis can only occur when teeth are forming, and therefore fluoride exposure (as it relates to dental fluorosis) occurs during childhood. In the permanent dentition, this would begin with the lower incisors, which complete mineralization at approximately 2–3 years of age, and end after mineralization of the third molars. The white opaque appearance of fluorosed enamel is caused by a hypomineralized enamel subsurface; with more severe dental fluorosis, pitting and a loss of the enamel surface occurs, leading to secondary staining (appearing as a brown color). Many of the changes caused by fluoride are related to cell/matrix/mineral interactions as the teeth are forming. At the early maturation stage, the relative quantity of amelogenin protein is increased in fluorosed enamel in a dose-related manner. This appears to result from a delay in the removal of amelogenins as the enamel matures. In vitro, when fluoride is incorporated into the mineral, more protein binds to the forming mineral, and protein removal by proteinases is delayed. This suggests that altered protein/mineral interactions are in part responsible for retention of amelogenins and the resultant hypomineralization that occurs in fluorosed enamel. Fluoride also appears to enhance mineral precipitation in forming teeth, resulting in hypermineralized bands of enamel, which are then followed by hypomineralized bands. Enhanced mineral precipitation with local increases in matrix acidity may affect maturation stage ameloblast modulation, potentially explaining the doserelated decrease in cycles of ameloblast modulation from ruffleended to smooth-ended cells that occur with fluoride exposure in rodents. Specific cellular effects of fluoride have been implicated, but more research is needed to determine which of these changes are relevant to the formation of fluorosed teeth. As

  12. Fluoride content of tank water in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cochrane, N J; Hopcraft, M S; Tong, A C; Thean, H l; Thum, Y S; Tong, D E; Wen, J; Zhao, S C; Stanton, D P; Yuan, Y; Shen, P; Reynolds, E C

    2014-06-01

    The aims of this study were to: (1) analyse the fluoride content of tank water; (2) determine whether the method of water collection or storage influenced fluoride content; and (3) survey participant attitudes towards water fluoridation. Plastic tubes and a questionnaire were distributed through dentists to households with water tanks in Victoria. A midstream tank water sample was collected and fluoride analysed in triplicate using ion chromatography All samples (n = 123) contained negligible amounts of fluoride, with a mean fluoride concentration of fluoride content and variables investigated such as tank material, tank age, roof material and gutter material. Most people did not know whether their tank water contained fluoride and 40.8% preferred to have access to fluoridated water. The majority thought fluoride was safe and more than half of the respondents supported fluoridation. Fluoride content of tank water was well below the optimal levels for caries prevention. People who rely solely on tank water for drinking may require additional exposure to fluoride for optimal caries prevention. © 2014 Australian Dental Association.

  13. Permeability of eroded enamel following application of different fluoride gels and CO2 laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lepri, Taísa Penazzo; Colucci, Vivian; Turssi, Cecília Pedroso; Corona, Silmara Aparecida Milori

    2013-01-01

    This study evaluated the combined effect of fluoride compounds and CO(2) laser in controlling the permeability of eroded enamel. Bovine enamel slabs (3 × 2 mm) were cycled twice through an alternating erosion and remineralization regimen. Slabs were immersed in 20 ml of orange juice (pH 3.84) for 5 min under agitation, rinsed with deionized water, and stored in artificial saliva for 4 h to form erosive lesions. Specimens were then divided into four groups (n = 10), which were treated for 1 min with either a control or with one of the following gels: amine fluoride (AmF), titanium tetrafluoride (TiF(4)), or sodium fluoride (NaF). Half of the specimens were irradiated with a CO(2) laser (λ = 10.6 μm; 2.0 W). Specimens were cycled two more times through the aforementioned erosion-remineralization regimen and were subjected to permeability assessment. ANOVA demonstrated a significant interaction between fluoride and laser treatment (p = 0.0152). Tukey's test showed that when fluoride was applied alone, TiF(4) resulted in lower enamel permeability than that observed after application of the placebo gel. Intermediate permeability values were noted after NaF and AmF had been used. A significant reduction in enamel permeability was obtained when fluoride was combined with CO(2) laser treatment, with no difference between fluoride gels. Permeability of eroded enamel may be reduced by combining the application of fluoride gels with CO(2) laser irradiation.

  14. Water Fluoridation Reporting System (Public Water Systems)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Water Fluoridation Reporting System (WFRS) has been developed to provide tools to assist states in managing fluoridation programs. WFRS is designed to track all...

  15. Ultrastructural changes in the cemento-enamel junction after vital tooth bleaching with fluoride and fluoride-free agents - a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasic, Jovanka; Kesic, Ljiljana; Popovic, Jelena; Mitić, Aleksandar; Nikolic, Marija; Stankovic, Sasa; Barac, Radomir

    2012-03-01

    The impact of bleaching on the cemento-enamel junction (CEJ) is not well known. Due to frequent sensitivity of the cervical region of teeth after the vital bleaching, the aim of the present study was to evaluate the morphological features of the CEJ of human teeth after application of fluoridated and fluoride-free bleaching agents, as well as post-bleaching fluoridation treatment, by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis. Thirty-five extracted permanent human teeth were longitudinally cut, yielding 70 specimens. Thirty specimens were randomly divided into the 3 experimental groups, and 20 specimens, were used as (2) control groups, each: negative (untreated) control group; positive control group treated with 35% hydrogen peroxide; experimental group 1, bleaching with 10% carbamide peroxide (CP); experimental group 2, treatment with a mixture of 10% CP and fluoride; and experimental group 3, treatment with 10% CP and 2% sodium fluoride gel applied 30 minutes after bleaching. Experimental groups were treated 8 h per day for 14 days. The samples were examined by SEM. The bleaching materials tested caused morphological changes to the surface of the CEJ. There was a statistically significant difference between experimental groups (Kruskal Wallis Test chi-square=11,668; p<0.005). Mean value of experimental group 2 scores showed statistically significant difference from groups 1 and 3. Bleaching gel with fluorides does not significantly change morphological appearance of the CEJ and represents a better choice than the hard tissue fluoridation process after bleaching.

  16. Effect of Fluoride, Casein Phosphopeptide-Amorphous Calcium Phosphate and Casein Phosphopeptide-Amorphous Calcium Phosphate Fluoride on Enamel Surface Microhardness After Microabrasion: An in Vitro Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadi Zenouz, Ghazaleh; Ezoji, Fariba; Enderami, Seyede Anese; Khafri, Soraya

    2015-10-01

    This study aimed to assess the effect of applying casein phosphopeptide- amorphous calcium phosphate (CPP-ACP) paste, casein phosphopeptide-amorphous calcium phosphate fluoride (CPP-ACPF) paste and sodium fluoride gel on surface microhardness of enamel after microabrasion. Thirty freshly extracted human premolars were selected. All samples were subjected to hardness indentations made with the Vickers hardness machine and the average value was recorded as the initial surface microhardness. The specimens were then randomly divided into three groups (n=10) of CPP-ACPF, fluoride and CPPACP. The teeth were micro-abraded with Opalustre. Microhardness test was performed to assess the post-abrasion hardness. Three remineralization modalities were performed on samples of each group. The enamel surface microhardness measurements were performed. To compare the difference between groups, the rehardening and softening values were defined. One-way ANOVA and Tukey's post hoc test at a significance level of 5% were used for statistical analysis. The mean microhardness value (MMV) had a significant decrease after microabrasion from baseline. The MMV had a significant increase after remineralization in all groups. The MMV of CPP-ACPF group was significantly more than that of fluoride group (P=0.027). The rehardening value of fluoride group was significantly more than that of other groups (Pmicroabrasion. The CPP-ACP and CPP-ACPF pastes are effective, but to a lesser extent than neutral sodium fluoride gel in remineralizing enamel surface. Incorporation of fluoride to CPP-ACP formulation does not provide any additional remineralizing potential.

  17. Parent Refusal of Topical Fluoride for Their Children: Clinical Strategies and Future Research Priorities to Improve Evidence-Based Pediatric Dental Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi, Donald L

    2017-07-01

    A growing number of parents are refusing topical fluoride for their children during preventive dental and medical visits. This nascent clinical and public health problem warrants attention from dental professionals and the scientific community. Clinical and community-based strategies are available to improve fluoride-related communications with parents and the public. In terms of future research priorities, there is a need to develop screening tools to identify parents who are likely to refuse topical fluoride and diagnostic instruments to uncover the reasons for topical fluoride refusal. This knowledge will lead to evidence-based strategies that can be widely disseminated into clinical practice. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Use of the theoretical domains framework to further understanding of what influences application of fluoride varnish to children's teeth: a national survey of general dental practitioners in Scotland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gnich, Wendy; Bonetti, Debbie; Sherriff, Andrea; Sharma, Shilpi; Conway, David I; Macpherson, Lorna M D

    2015-06-01

    Despite recent improvements in the oral health of Scotland's population, the persistence of childhood dental caries underscores a need to reduce the disease burden experienced by children living in Scotland. Application of fluoride varnish (FV) to children's teeth provides an evidence-based approach to achieving this goal. Despite policy, health service targets and professional recommendations supporting application, not all children receive FV in line with guidance. The objective of this study was to use the theoretical domains framework (TDF) to further an understanding of what may influence fluoride varnish application (FVA) in General Dental Practice in Scotland. A postal questionnaire assessing current behaviour (frequency of FVA) and theoretical domains (TDs) was sent to all General Dental Practitioners (GDPs) in Scotland. Correlations and linear regression models were used to examine the association between FVA and the TDs. One thousand and ninety (53.6%) eligible GDPs responded. Respondents reported applying FV more frequently to increased risk and younger children (aged 2-5 years). Higher scores in eight TDs (Knowledge, Social/professional role and identity, Beliefs about consequences, Motivation and goals, Environmental context and resources, Social influences, Emotion and Behavioural regulation) were associated with greater frequency of FVA. Four beliefs in particular appear to be driving GDPs' decision to apply FV (recognizing that FVA is a guideline recommended behaviour (Knowledge), that FVA is perceived as an important part of the GDPs' professional role (Professional role/identity), that FV is something parents want for their children (Social influences) and that FV is something GDPs really wanted to do (Emotion). The findings of this study support the use of the TDF as a tool to understand GDPs application of FV and suggest that a multifaceted intervention, targeting dental professionals and families, and more specifically those domains and items

  19. High-fluoride groundwater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, N Subba

    2011-05-01

    Fluoride (F(-)) is essential for normal bone growth, but its higher concentration in the drinking water poses great health problems and fluorosis is common in many parts of India. The present paper deals with the aim of establishment of facts of the chemical characteristics responsible for the higher concentration of F(-) in the groundwater, after understanding the chemical behavior of F(-) in relation to pH, total alkalinity (TA), total hardness (TH), carbonate hardness (CH), non-carbonate hardness (NCH), and excess alkalinity (EA) in the groundwater observed from the known areas of endemic fluorosis zones of Andhra Pradesh that have abundant sources of F(-)-bearing minerals of the Precambrians. The chemical data of the groundwater shows that the pH increases with increase F(-); the concentration of TH is more than the concentration of TA at low F(-) groundwater, the resulting water is represented by NCH; the TH has less concentration compared to TA at high F(-) groundwater, causing the water that is characterized by EA; and the water of both low and high concentrations of F(-) has CH. As a result, the F(-) has a positive relation with pH and TA, and a negative relation with TH. The operating mechanism derived from these observations is that the F(-) is released from the source into the groundwater by geochemical reactions and that the groundwater in its flowpath is subjected to evapotranspiration due to the influence of dry climate, which accelerates a precipitation of CaCO(3) and a reduction of TH, and thereby a dissolution of F(-). Furthermore, the EA in the water activates the alkalinity in the areas of alkaline soils, leading to enrichment of F(-). Therefore, the alkaline condition, with high pH and EA, and low TH, is a more conducive environment for the higher concentration of F(-) in the groundwater.

  20. Using Maslow's hierarchy to highlight power imbalances between visiting health professional student volunteers and the host community: An applied qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Tracey; Akporuno, Orezioghene; Owens, Katrina M; Lickers, Brittany; Marlinga, Jazmin; Lin, Henry C; Loh, Lawrence C

    2017-01-01

    Health professional students from high-income countries increasingly participate in short-term experiences in global health (STEGH) conducted abroad. One common criticism of STEGH is the inherent power differential that exists between visiting learners and the local community. To highlight this power differential, this paper explores perceived benefits as described by volunteer and community respondents and applies Maslow's hierarchy of needs to commonly identified themes in each respondent group. A semistructured survey was used to collect qualitative responses from both volunteers and community members located in a Dominican Republic community, that is, a hotspot for traditionally conducted STEGH. Thematic analysis identified themes of perceived benefits from both respondent groups; each group's common themes were then classified and compared within Maslow's hierarchy of needs. Each respondent group identified resource provision as a perceived benefit of STEGH, but volunteer respondents primarily focused on the provision of highly-skilled, complex resources while community respondents focused on basic necessities (food, water, etc.) Volunteer respondents were also the only group to also mention spiritual/religious/life experiences, personal skills development, and relationships as perceived benefits. Applying Maslow's hierarchy thus demonstrates a difference in needs: community respondents focused on benefits that address deficiency needs at the bottom of the hierarchy while volunteers focused on benefits addressing self-transcendence/actualization needs at the top of the hierarchy. The perceived difference in needs met by STEGH between volunteers and the host community within Maslow's hierarchy may drive an inherent power differential. Refocusing STEGH on the relationship level of the hierarchy (i.e., focusing on partnerships) might help mitigate this imbalance and empower host communities.

  1. Anhydrous hydrogen fluoride electrolyte battery. [Patent application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Not Available

    1972-06-26

    It is an object of the invention to provide a primary cell or battery using ammonium fluoride--anhydrous hydrogen fluoride electrolyte having improved current and power production capabilities at low temperatures. It is operable at temperatures substantially above the boiling point of hydrogen fluoride. (GRA)

  2. Fluoride in African groundwater: Occurrence and mitigation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vasak, S.; Griffioen, J.; Feenstra, L.

    2010-01-01

    Fluoride in groundwater has both natural and anthropogenic sources. Fluoride bearing minerals, volcanic gases and various industrial and agricultural activities can contribute to high concentrations. High intake of fluoride from drinking water is the main cause of fluorosis and may lead to many

  3. Fluoride Consumption and Its Impact on Oral Health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Fernando Jacinto-Alemán

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. The purpose of this study was to evaluate caries and dental fluorosis among Mexican preschoolers and school-aged children in a non-endemic zone for fluorosis and to measure its biological indicators. Methods. DMFT, DMFS, dmft, dmfs, and CDI indexes were applied. Fluoride urinary excretion and fluoride concentrations in home water, table salt, bottled water, bottled drinks, and toothpaste were determined. Results. Schoolchildren presented fluorosis (CDI = 0.96 and dental caries (DMFT = 2.64 and DMFS = 3.97. Preschoolers presented dmft = 4.85 and dmfs = 8.80. DMFT and DMFS were lower in children with mild to moderate dental fluorosis (DF. Variable fluoride concentrations were found in the analyzed products (home water = 0.18–0.44 ppm F, table salt = 0–485 ppm F, bottled water = 0.18–0.47 ppm F, juices = 0.08–1.42 ppm F, nectars = 0.07–1.30 ppm F, bottled drinks = 0.10–1.70 ppm F, toothpaste = 0–2,053 ppm F. Mean daily fluoride excretion was 422 ± 176 µg/24 h for schoolchildren and 367 ± 150 µg/24 h for preschoolers. Conclusions. Data from our study show that, despite values of excretion within an optimal fluoride intake range, the prevalence of caries was significant in both groups, and 60% of the 11- to 12-year-old children presented with dental fluorosis. In addition, variable fluoride concentrations in products frequently consumed by children were found.

  4. Fluoride Consumption and Its Impact on Oral Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez-Farfán, María Dolores; Hernández-Guerrero, Juan Carlos; Juárez-López, Lilia Adriana; Jacinto-Alemán, Luis Fernando; de la Fuente-Hernández, Javier

    2011-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to evaluate caries and dental fluorosis among Mexican preschoolers and school-aged children in a non-endemic zone for fluorosis and to measure its biological indicators. Methods DMFT, DMFS, dmft, dmfs, and CDI indexes were applied. Fluoride urinary excretion and fluoride concentrations in home water, table salt, bottled water, bottled drinks, and toothpaste were determined. Results Schoolchildren presented fluorosis (CDI = 0.96) and dental caries (DMFT = 2.64 and DMFS = 3.97). Preschoolers presented dmft = 4.85 and dmfs = 8.80. DMFT and DMFS were lower in children with mild to moderate dental fluorosis (DF). Variable fluoride concentrations were found in the analyzed products (home water = 0.18–0.44 ppm F, table salt = 0–485 ppm F, bottled water = 0.18–0.47 ppm F, juices = 0.08–1.42 ppm F, nectars = 0.07–1.30 ppm F, bottled drinks = 0.10–1.70 ppm F, toothpaste = 0–2,053 ppm F). Mean daily fluoride excretion was 422 ± 176 μg/24 h for schoolchildren and 367 ± 150 μg/24 h for preschoolers. Conclusions Data from our study show that, despite values of excretion within an optimal fluoride intake range, the prevalence of caries was significant in both groups, and 60% of the 11- to 12-year-old children presented with dental fluorosis. In addition, variable fluoride concentrations in products frequently consumed by children were found. PMID:21318021

  5. METHOD OF PREPARING METAL FLUORIDES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, J.J.; Sheft, I.

    1959-08-11

    A method is presented for preparing the halides of elements which are relatively non-reactive with halogenating agents. The method involves reacting a mixture of an oxygen containing salt of a difficulty halogenated metal with an oxygen containing salt of an easily halogenated metal with a halogenating agent. Accordingly plutonium tetrafluoride is produced by reacting a mixture of plutonium dioxide and uranium octaoxide with bromine trifluoride. The reaction proceeds smoothly at moderate temperatures and the resulting plutonium trifluoride may be readily separated from many impurities which form volatile fluorides by volatilizing these volatile fluorides from the reaction chamber.

  6. fluoride iontophoresis versus topical fluoride application in the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Material and Methods: Test teeth received a 2% neutral solution of sodium fluoride using Desensitron I1 Iontophoresis device with current and the control teeth received the solution on the device without current. Thirteen patients comprising eight females and five males who complained of tooth hypersensitivity participated ...

  7. Fluoride Iontophoresis Versus Topical Fluoride Application In The ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Material and Methods: Test teeth received a 2% neutral solution of sodium fluoride using Desensitron II Iontophoresis device with current and the control teeth received the solution on the device without current. Thirteen patients comprising eight females and five males who complained of tooth hypersensitivity participated in ...

  8. Removal of fluoride ions from aqueous solution using modified attapulgite as adsorbent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jing; Xie, Shaodong; Ho, Yuh-Shan

    2009-06-15

    Adsorption of fluoride ions from water using modified attapulgite with magnesium and aluminum salts was conducted by batch experiments. The effects of temperatures and mass ratios of attapulgite, magnesium and aluminum salts were investigated. Linear and non-linear methods were applied for fitting the adsorption data with Langmuir, Freundlich, and Redlich-Peterson isotherms. Modified attapulgite with a mass ratio attapulgite:Mg Cl(2)x6H(2)O:AlCl(3)x2H(2)O=2:1:2 had higher fluoride adsorption capacity. In addition, the fluoride adsorption using the modified attapulgite included an anion exchange process.

  9. The influence of different fluoride compounds and treatment conditions on dental enamel: a descriptive in vitro study of the CaF(2) precipitation and microstructure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petzold, M

    2001-01-01

    Electron and atomic force microscopy techniques have been applied to characterize both the in vitro deposition intensity and the microstructure of the KOH-soluble fluoride precipitates on human dental enamel. The study was focused on the effects of amine fluoride, sodium fluoride and sodium monofluorophosphate having a fluoride concentration of 0.1% F in acidulated and aqueous solutions. Under certain conditions, fluoride globules were formed within an initiation time of less than 20 s. This result supports the potential significance of this process for the cariostatic action of fluorides during dentifrice use. The deposition intensity seems to be dependent on the availability of Ca and F ions on the dental surface. A nanocrystalline calcium fluoride-like microstructure was revealed, with an additional phosphorus and oxygen incorporation as a function of the treatment time. Copyright 2001 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  10. Evaluation of a new hardness tester (Cariotester): Comparison with transverse microradiography for assessing the inhibitory effect of fluoride application on bovine root dentin demineralization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugawara, Toyotaro; Nakashima, Syozi; Shimizu, Akihiko; Tagami, Junji; Momoi, Yasuko

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the correlation between CT depth, indentation depth determined by a new hardness tester (Cariotester), and the transverse microradiography (TMR) parameters, i.e., lesion depth and mineral loss. For that purpose, this study evaluated the feasibility of using Cariotester as a root caries diagnostic system and capability of Cariotester to detect effect of fluoride application on inhibiting dentin demineralization. Fluorides were applied to bovine root dentin specimens, which were subsequently demineralized for 1-21 days and then CT depth and TMR parameters were assessed. There were significant correlations between CT depth and TMR parameters in fluoride and non-fluoride groups. There were significant differences between fluoride and non-fluoride groups for CT depth and TMR parameters respectively. Current results suggested that Cariotester may be capable of providing an objective evaluation of root caries progression and the fluoride effect on inhibiting dentin demineralization.

  11. Fluoridering af drikkevandet i Danmark?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arvin, Erik; Spliid, Henrik; Bruvo, M.

    2010-01-01

    -tilsætning til drikkevandet (fluoridering). Siden da er emnet ikke taget op. Formålet med dette indlæg er at besvare spørgsmålene: 1. Er der behov for fluoridering af drikkevandet i Danmark? 2. Er der alternativer? Hvordan påvirker blødgøring af vand og andre vandbehandlingsmetoder dental caries hos børn og unge...... drikkevandet. Blødgøring af vand er kommet på dagsordenen i den danske vandsektor. Teknikken vil medføre adskillige fordele for forbrugerne, men uden supplerende fluoridering af drikkevandet vil forekomsten af dental caries hos børn og unde stige. Hvis man f.eks. fjerner 80 mg/l calcium fra drikkevandet gennem...... blødgøringen skal man supplere med tilsætning af ca. 0,5 mg/l af fluorid for at processen er dental caries neutral. Det er næsten dobbelt så meget som der i forvejen er i drikkevandet mange steder i Danmark....

  12. Special Report: Fluoridation of Water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hileman, Bette

    1988-01-01

    Reviews the controversy regarding water fluoridation in the United States during the last 50 years. Discusses the current status; benefits; and health risks including skeletal fluorosis, kidney disease, hypersensitivity, mutagenic effects, birth defects, and cancer. Presents statistics and anecdotal accounts. (CW)

  13. Musculoskeletal imaging using fluoride PET.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Dorothee Rita

    2013-11-01

    The convenience of (18)F-fluoride imaging is undeniable both because of its favorable tracer and because of its technical characteristics, including high image quality and short examination times leading to increased patient comfort. Depending on the activity administered, the radiation dose to patients is about comparable to higher using (18)F-fluoride for bone imaging compared with conventional scintigraphy using 99mTc-methylene diphosphonate. In times of molybdenum shortage, (18)F-fluoride represents a good alternative to 99mTc-based bone tracers. Besides malignant skeletal disease(18)F-fluoride PET/CT has in the last decade been investigated in a variety of non-oncologic musculoskeletal disorders of all parts of the skeleton. Studies included imaging of the skull with a special focus on bisphosphonate-induced osteonecrosis of the jaw in patients treated with bisphosphonates due to benign or malignant bone changes. Further studies evaluated the appendicular skeleton with emphasis on postsurgical changes including patients after knee and hip surgery and patients having received bone grafts of their limbs. Also, therapeutic effect of (18)F-fluoride PET/CT on patients with unclear foot pain was investigated. Finally imaging of the axial skeleton was analyzed including patients with ankylosing spondylitis and with Paget disease as well as patients after spine surgery including assessment of cage incorporation after cervical and lumbar spine fusion surgery. Furthermore, children suspected of child abuse as well as young patients with back pain were investigated by either (18)F-fluoride PET or PET/CT. Regarding its favorable technical aspects as well as study results presented, it is imaginable that (18)F-fluoride PET/(CT) will be increasingly used for non-oncologic musculoskeletal imaging in the future either as an adjunct or alternative to so far established imaging modalities and seems to be promising regarding decision making in the therapeutic management of

  14. Urinary fluoride excretion in preschool children after intake of fluoridated milk and use of fluoride-containing toothpaste

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Norman, M; Twetman, S; Hultgren Talvilahti, A

    2017-01-01

    toothpaste. The fluoride content in the piped drinking water was 0.5 mg F/L. Main outcome measure: Urinary fluoride excretion. Results: The 24-hour urinary fl uoride excretion/kg body weight varied from 0.014 mg F for the placebo intervention and non-fluoride toothpaste to 0.027 mg F for the 0.375 mg.......05). Conclusions: All sources of fluoride must be considered when designing community programs. With 0.5 mg F/L in the drinking water and daily use of fluoride toothpaste, most children had a fluoride intake optimal for dental health. In this setting, additional intake of fluoride milk was within safe limits up......Objective: To assess the urinary fluoride excretion in preschool children after drinking fluoridated milk with 0.185 mg F and 0.375 mg F and to study the impact of use of fluoride toothpaste. Basic research design: Double-blind cross-over study. Participants: Nine healthy children, 2.5-4.5 years...

  15. The effect of fluoride gel on incipient carious lesions in a low-caries child population.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Truin, G.J.; Hof, M.A. van 't

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Secondary analyses were performed to study the cariostatic efficacy of semi-annual professional fluoride gel application on incipient carious lesions in low-caries children initially aged 9.5-11.5 years. METHODS: Double-blind randomized controlled clinical trial. RESULTS: The mean

  16. Synthesis of a Novel Ce-bpdc for the Effective Removal of Fluoride from Aqueous Solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Changqing Zhao

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Ce-1,1′-biphenyl-4,4′-dicarboxylic acid (Ce-bpdc, a novel type of metal organic framework, was synthesized and applied to remove excessive fluoride from water. The structure and morphology of Ce-bpdc were measured by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The effects, such as saturated adsorption capacity, HCO3-, and pH, were investigated. The optimal pH value for fluoride adsorption was the range from 5 to 6. The coexisting bicarbonate anions have a little influence on fluoride removal. The fluoride adsorption over the Ce-bpdc adsorbent could reach its equilibrium in about 20 min. The Ce-bpdc coordination complex exhibited high binding capacity for fluoride ions. The maximum adsorption capacity calculated from Langmuir model was high up to 45.5 mg/g at 298 K (pH = 7.0 and the removal efficiency was greater than 80%. In order to investigate the mechanism of fluoride removal, various adsorption isotherms such as Langmuir and Freundlich were fitted. The experimental data revealed that the Langmuir isotherm gave a more satisfactory fit for fluoride removal. Finally, the tested results of ground water samples from three places, Yuefang, Jiangji, and Sanyi which exhibited high removal efficiency, also demonstrate the potential utility of the Ce-bpdc as an effective adsorbent.

  17. Fluoride Intake through Consumption of Tap Water and Bottled Water in Belgium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Herman van Oyen

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available There is a tendency to align higher levels of fluoride in natural mineral water with the existing higher levels in tap water. Treatment of natural mineral waters could harm the preservation of their natural character. In this study fluoride intake through bottled and tap water consumption in the Belgian adult population was assessed, taking into account regional differences. A deterministic approach was used whereby consumption quantities of tap water and different brands of bottled water were linked with their respective fluoride concentrations. Data from the national food consumption survey (2004 were used and the Nusser methodology was applied to obtain usual intake estimates. Mean intake of fluoride through total water consumption in Flanders was 1.4±0.7 mg/day (97.5th percentile: 3.1 mg/day, while in the Walloon region it was on average 0.9±0.6 mg/day (97.5th percentile: 2.4 mg/day. The probability of exceeding the UL of 7 mg per day via a normal diet was estimated to be low. Consequently, there is no need to revise the existing norms, but higher fluoride concentrations should be more clearly indicated on the labels. Reliable data about total dietary fluoride intake in children, including intake of fluoride via tooth paste and food supplements, are needed.

  18. Fluoride toothpaste utilization behaviour among preschool children in Perlis, Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tay, H L; Zainudin, I S; Jaafar, N

    2009-12-01

    Very mild fluorosis is quite prevalent in children and one of the sources may be attributed to poor fluoride toothpaste utilization habits. To investigate the frequency of toothbrushing, parental supervision, the person who usually applied the toothpaste, toothpaste swallowing and spitting habits, size of toothbrush, type of toothpaste used and amount of toothpaste used by shape and weight. Observational cross-sectional study of a representative random sample of 373 children aged 5-6 year-old. The children were interviewed using a structured close ended questionnaire. Direct observations were made on their toothpaste dispensing habit during a toothbrushing exercise. All children reported practising toothbrushing with 90% on a daily basis. Almost all used fluoridated toothpaste (91.4%). About one-half (50.7%) reported that their parents never supervised them. More than one-third of children used adult toothpaste and 60.1% of the toothpaste was flavoured. Most (92%) used toothbrush meant for children. About 40% applied a pea-sized amount of toothpaste. The mean weight of toothpaste applied was 0.43 g (SID + 0.35 g). The majority used the recommended child-sized toothbrush and toothpaste that contained fluoride but less than one-half of the parents supervised their children. Most children used flavoured children's toothpaste but a sizable proportion used toothpastes meant for adults. The amount applied by shape and weight exceeded the amount recommended by experts.

  19. The CATFISH study protocol: an evaluation of a water fluoridation scheme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodwin, Michaela; Emsley, Richard; Kelly, Michael; Rooney, Eric; Sutton, Matthew; Tickle, Martin; Wagstaff, Rebecca; Walsh, Tanya; Whittaker, William; Pretty, Iain A

    2016-02-01

    Tooth decay is the commonest disease of childhood. We have known for over 90 years that fluoride can prevent tooth decay; it is present in nearly all toothpastes and can be provided in mouthwashes, gels and varnishes. The oldest method of applying fluoride is via the water supply at a concentration of 1 part per million. The two most important reviews of water fluoridation in the United Kingdom (the York Review and MRC Report on water fluoridation and health) concluded that whilst there was evidence to suggest water fluoridation provided a benefit in caries reduction, there was a need to improve the evidence base in several areas. This study will use a natural experiment to assess the incidence of caries in two geographical areas, one in which the water supply is returned to being fluoridated following a discontinuation of fluoridation and one that continues to have a non-fluoridated water supply. The oral health of two discrete study populations will be evaluated - those born 9 months after the water fluoridation was introduced, and those who were in their 1st year of school after the introduction of fluoridated water. Both populations will be followed prospectively for 5 years using a census approach in the exposed group along with matched numbers recruitment in a non-exposed control. Parents of the younger cohort will complete questionnaires every 6 months with child clinical examination at ages 3 and 5, whilst the older cohort will have clinical examinations only, at approximately 5, 7 and 11 years old. This project provides a unique opportunity to conduct a high quality evaluation of the reintroduction of a water fluoridation scheme, which satisfies the inclusion criteria stipulated by the York systematic review and can address the design issues identified in the MRC report. The research will make a major contribution to the understanding of the costs and effects of water fluoridation in the UK in the 21st Century. Its findings will help inform UK policy on

  20. Focus on fluorides: update on the use of fluoride for the prevention of dental caries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carey, Clifton M

    2014-06-01

    Improving the efficacy of fluoride therapies reduces dental caries and lowers fluoride exposure. Fluoride is delivered to the teeth systemically or topically to aid in the prevention of dental caries. Systemic fluoride from ingested sources is in blood serum and can be deposited only in teeth that are forming in children. Topical fluoride is from sources such as community water, processed foods, beverages, toothpastes, mouthrinses, gels, foams, and varnishes. The United States Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the American Dental Association (ADA) have proposed changes in their long standing recommendations for the amount of fluoride in community drinking water in response to concerns about an increasing incidence of dental fluorosis in children. Current research is focused on the development of strategies to improve fluoride efficacy. The purpose of this update is to inform the reader about new research and policies related to the use of fluoride for the prevention of dental caries. Reviews of the current research and recent evidence based systematic reviews on the topics of fluoride are presented. Topics discussed include: updates on community water fluoridation research and policies; available fluoride in dentifrices; fluoride varnish compositions, use, and recommendations; and other fluoride containing dental products. This update provides insights into current research and discusses proposed policy changes for the use of fluoride for the prevention of dental caries. The dental profession is adjusting their recommendations for fluoride use based on current observations of the halo effect and subsequent outcomes. The research community is focused on improving the efficacy of fluoride therapies thus reducing dental caries and lowering the amount of fluoride required for efficacy. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Focus on Fluorides: Update on the Use of Fluoride for the Prevention of Dental Caries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carey, Clifton M.

    2014-01-01

    Declarative Title: Improving the efficacy of fluoride therapies reduces dental caries and lowers fluoride exposure. Background Fluoride is delivered to the teeth systemically or topically to aid in the prevention of dental caries. Systemic fluoride from ingested sources is in blood serum and can be deposited only in teeth that are forming in children. Topical fluoride is from sources such as community water, processed foods, beverages, toothpastes, mouthrinses, gels, foams, and varnishes. The United States Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the American Dental Association (ADA) have proposed changes in their long standing recommendations for the amount of fluoride in community drinking water in response to concerns about an increasing incidence of dental fluorosis in children. Current research is focused on the development of strategies to improve fluoride efficacy. The purpose of this update is to inform the reader about new research and policies related to the use of fluoride for the prevention of dental caries. Methods Reviews of the current research and recent evidence based systematic reviews on the topics of fluoride are presented. Topics discussed include: updates on community water fluoridation research and policies; available fluoride in dentifrices; fluoride varnish compositions, use, and recommendations; and other fluoride containing dental products. This update provides insights into current research and discusses proposed policy changes for the use of fluoride for the prevention of dental caries. Conclusions The dental profession is adjusting their recommendations for fluoride use based on current observations of the halo effect and subsequent outcomes. The research community is focused on improving the efficacy of fluoride therapies thus reducing dental caries and lowering the amount of fluoride required for efficacy. PMID:24929594

  2. Fluoride retention in saliva and in dental biofilm after different home-use fluoride treatments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Correia Cavalcante SOUZA

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available This single-blind, randomized, crossover study aimed at assessing the long-term fluoride concentrations in saliva and in dental biofilm after different home-use fluoride treatments. The study volunteers (n = 38 were residents of an area with fluoridated drinking water. They were administered four treatments, each of which lasted for one week: twice-daily placebo dentifrice, twice-daily fluoride dentifrice, twice-daily fluoride dentifrice and once-daily fluoride mouthrinse, and thrice-daily fluoride dentifrice. At the end of each treatment period, samples of unstimulated saliva and dental biofilm were collected 8 h after the last oral hygiene procedure. Fluoride concentrations in saliva and dental biofilm were analyzed using a specific electrode. The fluoride concentrations in saliva and dental biofilm 8 h after the last use of fluoride products did not differ among treatments. The results of this study suggest that treatments with home-use fluoride products have no long-term effect on fluoride concentrations in saliva and in dental biofilm of residents of an area with a fluoridated water supply.

  3. Fluoride retention in saliva and in dental biofilm after different home-use fluoride treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza, Daniela Correia Cavalcante; Maltz, Marisa; Hashizume, Lina Naomi

    2014-01-01

    This single-blind, randomized, crossover study aimed at assessing the long-term fluoride concentrations in saliva and in dental biofilm after different home-use fluoride treatments. The study volunteers (n = 38) were residents of an area with fluoridated drinking water. They were administered four treatments, each of which lasted for one week: twice-daily placebo dentifrice, twice-daily fluoride dentifrice, twice-daily fluoride dentifrice and once-daily fluoride mouthrinse, and thrice-daily fluoride dentifrice. At the end of each treatment period, samples of unstimulated saliva and dental biofilm were collected 8 h after the last oral hygiene procedure. Fluoride concentrations in saliva and dental biofilm were analyzed using a specific electrode. The fluoride concentrations in saliva and dental biofilm 8 h after the last use of fluoride products did not differ among treatments. The results of this study suggest that treatments with home-use fluoride products have no long-term effect on fluoride concentrations in saliva and in dental biofilm of residents of an area with a fluoridated water supply.

  4. Estimation of fluoride concentration in drinking water and common beverages in United Arab Emirates (UAE).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walia, Tarun; Abu Fanas, Salem; Akbar, Madiha; Eddin, Jamal; Adnan, Mohamad

    2017-07-01

    To assess fluoride concentration in drinking water which include tap water of 4 emirates - Abu Dhabi, Dubai, Sharjah and Ajman plus bottled water, commonly available soft drinks & juices in United Arab Emirates. Five different samples of tap water collected from each of the four emirates of UAE: Ajman, Sharjah, Abu Dhabi and Dubai; twenty-two brands of bottled water and fifteen brands of popular cold beverages, purchased from different supermarkets in U.A.E were tested using ion selective electrode method and the fluoride concentration was determined. The mean fluoride content of tap water samples was 0.14 mg F/L with a range of 0.04-0.3 mg F/L; with Ajman tap water samples showing the highest mean fluoride content of 0.3 mg F/L. The mean fluoride content for both bottled drinking water and beverages was 0.07 mg F/L with a range of 0.02-0.50 mg F/L and 0.04-0.1 mg F/L respectively. Majority (68.2%) of the bottled water are produced locally within U.A.E while a few (31.8%) are imported. The tap water, bottled water and beverages available in U.A.E show varying concentrations of fluoride, however none showed the optimal level necessary to prevent dental caries. Dental professionals in U.A.E should be aware of the fluoride concentrations before prescribing fluoride supplements to children.

  5. Effect of Fluoride, Casein Phosphopeptide–Amorphous Calcium Phosphate and Casein Phosphopeptide–Amorphous Calcium Phosphate Fluoride on Enamel Surface Microhardness After Microabrasion: An In Vitro Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghazaleh Ahmadi Zenouz

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: This study aimed to assess the effect of applying casein phosphopeptide–amorphous calcium phosphate (CPP-ACP paste, casein phosphopeptide–amorphous calcium phosphate fluoride (CPP-ACPF paste and sodium fluoride gel on surface microhardness of enamel after microabrasion.Materials and Methods: Thirty freshly extracted human premolars were selected. All samples were subjected to hardness indentations made with the Vickers hardness machine and the average value was recorded as the initial surface microhardness. The specimens were then randomly divided into three groups (n=10 of CPP-ACPF, fluoride and CPP-ACP. The teeth were micro-abraded with Opalustre. Microhardness test was performed to assess the post-abrasion hardness. Three remineralization modalities were performed on samples of each group. The enamel surface microhardness measurements were performed. To compare the difference between groups, the rehardening and softening values were defined. One-way ANOVA and Tukey’s post hoc test at a significance level of 5% were used for statistical analysis.Results: The mean microhardness value (MMV had a significant decrease after microabrasion from baseline. The MMV had a significant increase after remineralization in all groups. The MMV of CPP-ACPF group was significantly more than that of fluoride group (P=0.027. The rehardening value of fluoride group was significantly more than that of other groups (P<0.001.Conclusion: All the remineralizing agents were effective for rehardening the enamel after microabrasion. The CPP-ACP and CPP-ACPF pastes are effective, but to a lesser extent than neutral sodium fluoride gel in remineralizing enamel surface. Incorporation of fluoride to CPP-ACP formulation does not provide any additional remineralizing potential.Keywords: Casein phosphopeptide-amorphous calcium phosphate nanocomplex; Enamel Microabrasion; Hardness; Sodium Fluoride

  6. [Dental fluorosis and dental caries prevalence in Senegalese children living in a high-fluoride area and consuming a poor fluoridated drinking water].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faye, M; Diawara, C K; Ndiaye, K R; Yam, A A

    2008-01-01

    The role of fluoride in dental caries prevention when applied at optimal levels is well established. However, ingestion of excessive fluoride during tooth development can cause structural changes in tooth enamel named fluorosis. At Gandiaye a city situated in the Senegalese endemic fluorosis area, the main water supply provided by a unique drilling with highly fluoridated water has broken down in 1996. Since then, the drinking water comes from wells which have poor levels of fluorides. The aims of this study were to evaluate the prevalence and severity of dental fluorosis and tooth decays in children born and reared continuously at Gandiaye after the stoppage of the drills and who were drinking water well. Water samples were collected from two wells and analyzed using a spectrometer and a specific fluoride electrode. The prevalence and severity of dental fluorosis was evaluated according to Dean's method, and the caries experience was measured using the DMF teeth index in 150 children aged from 6 to 8 years. The fluoride levels in the water well were comprised between 0.03 ppm and 0.09 ppm according to the method used. The prevalence of dental fluorosis was 39.33% with the predominance of the very low to low fluorosis forms. The tooth decay prevalence was 48.66% and the mean DMF tooth was 0.98. A significant relationship was found between the dental fluorosis and the low caries levels. A low to moderate dental fluorosis associated with a significant decrease of caries prevalence was found in children living in a high-fluoride area and consuming poorly fluorided water.

  7. [Fluoride in drinking water in Cuba and its association with geological and geographical variables].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luna, Liliam Cuéllar; Melián, Maricel García

    2003-11-01

    To determine the association between different concentrations of the fluoride ion in drinking water and some geological and geographical variables in Cuba, by using a geographic information system. From November 1998 to October 1999 we studied the fluoride concentration in the sources of drinking water for 753 Cuban localities that had at least 1 000 inhabitants. For the information analysis we utilized the MapInfo Professional version 5.5 geographic information system, using the overlaying method. The study variables were the concentration of the fluoride ion in the water sources, the geological characteristics of the area, the alignments (geological characteristics that were found together), the types of water sources, and whether an area was a plain or mountainous. The results were grouped by locality and municipality. In 83.1% of the localities, the water samples were collected from wells and springs, and the remaining 16.9% came from dams and rivers. Of the 753 localities studied, 675 of them (89.6%) had low or medium fluoride concentrations (under 0.7 mg/L). The eastern region of the country was the one most affected by high fluoride concentrations in the waters, followed by the central region of the country. The majority of the localities with high natural fluoride concentrations were in areas located on Cretaceous volcanic arc rocks. The presence of fluoride in the drinking waters was related to the alignments with the earth's crust, in rock complexes of volcanic-sedimentary origin and of intrusive origin and also in carbonate rocks. However, the highest fluoride concentrations generally coincided with rock complexes of volcanic-sedimentary origin and of intrusive origin. All the localities with high fluoride concentrations in the water were associated with wells. The fluoride concentration is low or medium in the drinking water sources for 89.6% of the Cuban localities with at least 1 000 inhabitants. Geological and geographical characteristics can help

  8. DISSOLUTION OF LANTHANUM FLUORIDE PRECIPITATES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fries, B.A.

    1959-11-10

    A plutonium separatory ore concentration procedure involving the use of a fluoride type of carrier is presented. An improvement is given in the derivation step in the process for plutonium recovery by carrier precipitation of plutonium values from solution with a lanthanum fluoride carrier precipitate and subsequent derivation from the resulting plutonium bearing carrier precipitate of an aqueous acidic plutonium-containing solution. The carrier precipitate is contacted with a concentrated aqueous solution of potassium carbonate to effect dissolution therein of at least a part of the precipitate, including the plutonium values. Any remaining precipitate is separated from the resulting solution and dissolves in an aqueous solution containing at least 20% by weight of potassium carbonate. The reacting solutions are combined, and an alkali metal hydroxide added to a concentration of at least 2N to precipitate lanthanum hydroxide concomitantly carrying plutonium values.

  9. Computer simulation of superionic fluorides

    CERN Document Server

    Castiglione, M

    2000-01-01

    experimentally gives an indication of the correlations between nearby defects is well-reproduced. The most stringent test of simulation model transferability is presented in the studies of lead tin fluoride, in which significant 'covalent' effects are apparent. Other similarly-structured compounds are also investigated, and the reasons behind the adoption of such an unusual layered structure, and the mobility and site occupation of the anions is quantified. In this thesis the nature of ion mobility in cryolite and lead fluoride based compounds is investigated by computer simulation. The phase transition of cryolite is characterised in terms of rotation of AIF sub 6 octahedra, and the conductive properties are shown to result from diffusion of the sodium ions. The two processes appear to be unrelated. Very good agreement with NMR experimental results is found. The Pb sup 2 sup + ion has a very high polarisability, yet treatment of this property in previous simulations has been problematic. In this thesis a mor...

  10. Groundwater fluoride contamination: A reappraisal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amlan Banerjee

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Dissolution of fluorite (CaF2 and/or fluorapatite (FAP [Ca5(PO43F], pulled by calcite precipitation, is thought to be the dominant mechanism responsible for groundwater fluoride (F− contamination. Here, one dimensional reactive–transport models are developed to test this mechanism using the published dissolution and precipitation rate kinetics for the mineral pair FAP and calcite. Simulation results correctly show positive correlation between the aqueous concentrations of F− and CO32− and negative correlation between F− and Ca2+. Results also show that precipitation of calcite, contrary to the present understanding, slows down the FAP dissolution by 106 orders of magnitude compared to the FAP dissolution by hydrolysis. For appreciable amount of fluoride contamination rock–water interaction time must be long and of order 106 years.

  11. Caries affected by calcium and fluoride in drinking water and family income

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arvin, Erik; Jensen, Allan Bardow; Spliid, Henrik

    2017-01-01

    , independently against caries. From the model, the relative importance of fluoride and calcium to protect against caries is quantified. The relationship between caries and family income is also highly significant. It is illustrated how the linear model can be applied in planning and analyzing drinking water...... and fluoride can be described as independent effects of the two ions or, alternatively, in the form of saturation with respect to fluorite (CaF2). A general linear model describes this relationship with high significance and the model confirms the important protective effect of calcium and fluoride......Water quality and socioeconomics influence caries in populations. This study broadens previous studies on how caries is associated with fluoride and calcium in drinking water and with family income by quantifying the combined effect of the three independent variables. The effects of calcium...

  12. Estuarine response of fluoride - Investigations in Azhikode Estuary

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Balachandran, K.K.; Joseph, T.; Sankaranarayanan, V.N.

    Concentrations of fluoride in Azhikode estuarine region (Kerala, India) were measured as a function of chlorinity during the different seasons. The type of behaviour indicated that fluoride was regulated by sea water incursion alone. Fluoride...

  13. PRECIPITATION OF URANIUM PEROXIDE OF LOW FLUORIDE CONTENT FROM SOLUTIONS CONTAINING FLUORIDES

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, E.J.; Clark, H.M.

    1958-08-12

    S>A method is described for the preparation of fluoride free uraniunn peroxide precipitates, even though the solution from which the precipitation is made is contaminated with fluorides. This is accomplished by add ing aluminum ions to the solution, where they complex any fluoride present and prevent its precipitation with the uramum peroxide.

  14. Fluoride removal by adsorption on thermally treated lateritic soils

    OpenAIRE

    Kefyalew Gomoro; Feleke Zewge; Bernd Hundhammer; Negussie Megersa

    2012-01-01

    The ability of lateritic soils to remove fluoride from water has been studied. Important issues considered in the study include the relation between the mineral composition of soils and their ability to remove fluoride, the effect of thermal treatment of the soil on fluoride removal; the predominant fluoride containing species remain in the treated water and the possible mechanism of fluoride removal by lateritic soils. The fluoride removal capacity of thermally treated lateritic soils used i...

  15. Capillary electrophoresis with contactless conductivity detection for the quantification of fluoride in lithium ion battery electrolytes and in ionic liquids-A comparison to the results gained with a fluoride ion-selective electrode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyschik, Marcelina; Klein-Hitpaß, Marcel; Girod, Sabrina; Winter, Martin; Nowak, Sascha

    2017-02-01

    In this study, an optimized method using capillary electrophoresis (CE) with a direct contactless conductivity detector (C(4) D) for a new application field is presented for the quantification of fluoride in common used lithium ion battery (LIB) electrolyte using LiPF6 in organic carbonate solvents and in ionic liquids (ILs) after contacted to Li metal. The method development for finding the right buffer and the suitable CE conditions for the quantification of fluoride was investigated. The results of the concentration of fluoride in different LIB electrolyte samples were compared to the results from the ion-selective electrode (ISE). The relative standard deviations (RSDs) and recovery rates for fluoride were obtained with a very high accuracy in both methods. The results of the fluoride concentration in the LIB electrolytes were in very good agreement for both methods. In addition, the limit of detection (LOD) and limit of quantification (LOQ) values were determined for the CE method. The CE method has been applied also for the quantification of fluoride in ILs. In the fresh IL sample, the concentration of fluoride was under the LOD. Another sample of the IL mixed with Li metal has been investigated as well. It was possible to quantify the fluoride concentration in this sample. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Professional ethics and professional etiquette in dentistry: are they compatible?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newbrun, Ernest

    2007-01-01

    In keeping with the theme of this colloquium, two aspects of ethics in dentistry are addressed: its evolution and its future. With respect to its evolution, two examples of changes in the design of clinical trials in dentistry are discussed. These concern the current requirement of informed consent from the subjects in the trial, now taken for granted, but not necessarily observed before 1964. The Vipeholm dental caries study is one example of pre-Helsinki Declaration experimentation. The second example, also drawn from caries research design, concerns the stricture on the use of placebo-controlled trials in the face of a proven drug. For example, the design of clinical trials of fluoride dentifrices has evolved since the mid 1970s. The use of a placebo-inactive control group is no longer acceptable as it would deprive its subjects of a proven caries-preventive agent and would expose its subjects to increased caries risk. While definitions of professional ethics in dentistry may vary, the ADA Code of Ethics includes five principles: patient autonomy ("self-governance"), non-maleficence ("do no harm"), beneficence ("do good"), justice ("fairness") and veracity ("truthfulness"). Professional etiquette refers to the way dentists relate to one another and is governed by the ADA Code of Professional Conduct which expresses specific types of conduct that are either required or prohibited. Sometimes, ethics and etiquette may conflict. The problem of financial issues that conflict with ethical ones is discussed along with the problem of commercialism in the practice of dentistry. Debts from dental school may adversely affect the professional behavior of young dentists, while general dentists might succumb to "goodies" provided by specialists. These often include continuing education courses, gifts, trips, and kickbacks. Specialists may fail to inform patients of improper or poor quality treatment by the referring general practitioner, fearing loss of referrals. Of course

  17. Effect of sodium fluoride on apple trees in pots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pelikanova, I.

    1968-01-01

    Various concentrations of NaF solution (15, 30, 60, 120 mg/100 g soil) were applied to the apple trees James Grieve grafted on M IV, cultivated in pots. Sodium fluoride was applied once to the soil. During the growing period pathogenic changes were observed. These could be classified as acute, chronic and invisible symptoms, according to the time between NaF application and symptoms development. Content of fluoride in leaves and in wood was determined, and also the content of N, P, K, Mg and Ca, together with the length of one year shoots. It was found that lower (15, 30) NaF concentrations were stimulatory, and higher (60, 120) concentrations were toxic. During the next growing season a striking regeneration effect was observed. The content of fluoride in leaves was reduced and no visible symptoms occurred. The content of essential nutrient elements approached the control, and in some cases were even higher. The inhibition effect was reduced, especially in growth of one year shoots and was found only by planimetrical measurements of leaf blades. Stimulatory effects were observed in trees treated with the lowest concentrations of NaF.

  18. Fluor determination by alkaline hydrolysis of the uranium and thorium fluorides; Determinacion de fluor por hidrolisis alcalina en fluoruros de uranio y torio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barrachina Gomez, L.; Gasco Sanchez, L.

    1961-07-01

    The alkaline hydrolysis of the uranium and thorium fluorides is studded and a new method for the determination of the fluoride, on the basis of a indirect volumetric titration with standard soda, is proposed. The compounds that may influence the hydrolysis of the uranium fluoride and that may be occasionally found in it as impurities are also studied. the method can be applied to the uranium fluoride except when there is a great quantity of F{sub 2}UO{sub 2} or UO{sub 3} present in the sample. (Author) 20 refs.

  19. 40 CFR 142.61 - Variances from the maximum contaminant level for fluoride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ...) Activated alumina absorption, centrally applied (2) Reverse osmosis, centrally applied (b) The Administrator... treatment methods (1) to determine the probability that any of these methods will significantly reduce the level of fluoride for that system, and (2) if such probability exists, to determine whether any of these...

  20. In vitro comparison of the cariostatic effect between topical application of fluoride gels and fluoride toothpaste Comparação in vitro do efeito cariostático entre a aplicação tópica de flúor e dentifrício fluoretado

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Carlos Botazzo Delbem

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to compare the effect of topical fluoride products [acidulated phosphate fluoride (APF or neutral gel (NF x fluoride toothpaste (MFP], in respect to fluoride uptake and anticariogenic action. One hundred and twenty five blocks of human teeth, sorted in 5 groups according to the treatment, were submitted to pH cycling for ten days. The parameters analyzed were: fluoride uptake before and after pH cycling and surface (SMH and cross-sectional (CSMH microhardness of the enamel blocks. The results of fluoride concentration in enamel after the pH cycling showed an enhancement of fluoride uptake for all groups compared to sound control. No significant differences between APF and MFP were observed for surface microhardness, percentage change of surface microhardness and mineral loss. The volume percent mineral obtained from cross-sectional microhardness demonstrated that APF has a different lesion progression rate regarding subsurface carious lesion. The results suggest that professionally applied fluoride gel or frequent fluoride application in low concentration is a positive preventive measure for the control of dental caries.O objetivo do presente estudo foi comparar in vitro o efeito da aplicação tópica de flúor na forma de gel acidulado (FFA ou neutro (FFN com um dentifrício fluoretado (MFP, na incorporação e ação anticariogênica do flúor. Foram utilizados 125 blocos obtidos de esmalte humano, divididos em 5 grupos de acordo com o tratamento e submetidos à ciclagem de pH durante dez dias. Analisou-se o flúor incorporado antes e depois da ciclagem de pH; a microdureza superficial (SMH e a microdureza interna do esmalte (CSMH. Os resultados da concentração de flúor no esmalte após a ciclagem indicou uma maior quantidade de flúor incorporado para todos os grupos comparados ao grupo controle sadio. A microdureza superficial entre APF e MFP, assim como a porcentagem de alteração da microdureza superficial e

  1. The effective use of fluorides in public health

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jones, Sheila; Burt, Brian A; Petersen, Poul Erik

    2005-01-01

    , systematic reviews summarizing these extensive databases have indicated that water fluoridation and fluoride toothpastes both substantially reduce the prevalence and incidence of dental caries. We present four case studies that illustrate the use of fluoride in modern public health practice, focusing on......: recent water fluoridation schemes in California, USA; salt fluoridation in Jamaica; milk fluoridation in Chile; and the development of "affordable" fluoride toothpastes in Indonesia. Common themes are the concern to reduce demands for compliance with fluoride regimes that rely upon action by individuals...... and their families, and the issue of cost. We recommend that a community should use no more than one systemic fluoride (i.e. water or salt or milk fluoridation) combined with the use of fluoride toothpastes, and that the prevalence of dental fluorosis should be monitored in order to detect increases in or higher...

  2. STUDY OF FLUORIDE GLASSES DEVITRIFICATION-BASED ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    4 mars 2013 ... ABSTRACT. The kinetics of devitrification of fluoride glasses stabilized by magnesium fluoride when heated for some time between the glass transition and melting temperatures. The crystallization kinetics of AlF3-YF3-PbF2-CdF2-MgF2 glass prepared by melting the halide powders were studied by.

  3. Fluoride ions vs removal technologies: A study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jagvir Singh

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Literature reported that drinking water is a precious and scarce resource and it has to be protected and kept free from any kind of contamination. Further, it has to be used carefully without wasting. Literature also reported that fluoride bearing rocks are abundant in India, as a result, fluoride leaches out and contaminates the adjacent water and soil resources. A high concentration of fluoride ions in ground water increases up to more than 30 mg/L. This high concentration of fluoride ions causes many harmful and dangerous effects on our datum. Fluoride ions in larger quantities i.e. 20–80 mg/day taken over a period of 10–20 years result in crippling and skeletal fluorosis, severely damaging the bone. In the present scenario, there is a continuously increasing worldwide concern for the development of fluoride treatment technologies. Possibilities of reducing the high fluorine content in groundwater are by defluorination process/dilution with the surface water which is a very simple technique but the addition of Ca2+ ions to a solution in contact with fluorite when experimented in distilled water caused an appreciable decrease in fluoride concentration. In this review article, we emphasized the relationship between high concentrations of fluoride ions and their compounds and their health impact.

  4. HOUSEHOLD PURIFICATION OF FLUORIDE CONTAMINATED MAGADI (TRONA)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Joan Maj; Dahi, Elian

    1997-01-01

    Purification of fluoride contaminated magadi is studied using bone char sorption and calcium precipitation. The bone char treatment is found to be workable both in columns and in batches where the magadi is dissolved in water prior to treatment. The concentrations in the solutions were 89 g magadi...... treatment method. A procedure for purification of fluoride contaminated magadi at household level is described....

  5. Hydrogeochemical framework and factor analysis of fluoride ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Fluoride contamination of groundwater within the Savelugu-Nanton District was assessed using hydrogeochemical framework and multivariate statistical approach. Eighty-one (No) boreholes were sampled for quality assessment in May and June 2008. The main objective of this study was to assess the fluoride levels in ...

  6. Solvothermal chemistry of luminescent lanthanide fluorides

    OpenAIRE

    Jayasundera, Anil

    2009-01-01

    Exploration of novel lanthanide fluoride framework materials in inorganic-organic hybrid systems under solvothermal conditions towards development of new luminescent materials is discussed. X-ray single crystal and powder diffraction methods have been used as crystallographic characterisation techniques. Determination and study of luminescence properties for selected hybrid materials has also been carried out. The first organically templated luminescent lanthanide fluoride fram...

  7. Fluoride removal by calcite: evidence for fluorite precipitation and surface adsorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Brett D; Binning, Philip; Stipp, S L S

    2005-12-15

    Fluoride contamination of groundwater, both anthropogenic and natural, is a major problem worldwide. In this study, fluoride removal by crushed limestone (99% pure calcite) was investigated by batch studies and surface-sensitive techniques from solutions with fluoride concentrations from 150 micromol/L (3 mg/L) to 110 mM (approximately 2100 mg/L). Surface-sensitive techniques, including atomic force microscopy (AFM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) as well as zeta potential measurements, confirm that, in addition to precipitation reactions, adsorption of fluoride also occurs. Results indicate that fluoride adsorption occurs immediately over the entire calcite surface with fluorite precipitating at step edges and kinks, where dissolved Ca2+ concentration is highest. The PHREEQ geochemical model was applied to the observed data and indicates that existing models, especially at low fluoride concentrations and high pH (>7.5) are not equipped to describe this complex system, largely because the PHREEQ model includes only precipitation reactions, whereas a combination of adsorption and precipitation parameters are required.

  8. Development of a fluoride chronic effects benchmark for aquatic life in freshwater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McPherson, Cathy A; Lee, Danny H Y; Chapman, Peter M

    2014-11-01

    Canada has an interim water-quality guideline for fluoride for protection of freshwater aquatic life that dates from 2002, and 1 Canadian province has a different interim water-quality guideline for fluoride that dates to 1995. The United States does not have a national benchmark for fluoride in freshwater, and only 1 US state has such a benchmark. There are no other national or regional benchmarks for fluoride chronic toxicity in freshwater. In the present study, available data on the acute and chronic toxicity of fluoride to freshwater aquatic life were compiled and reviewed. Acute toxicity was reported to occur at concentrations ranging from 11.5 to >800 mg/L fluoride (F(-) ). The majority of chronic effects occur at concentrations between 1.8 mg/L and 195 mg/L. A total of 10 chronic studies representing 16 species (5 fish, 7 invertebrates, and 4 algae/aquatic plants) were used to derive a chronic effects benchmark of 1.94 mg/L F(-) , applying the species sensitivity distribution approach. © 2014 SETAC.

  9. Invitro Evaluation of Fluoride Release from Hydroxyapatite Reinforced Glass Ionomer with or without Protective Coating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiwari, Shilpi; Nandlal, Bhojraj

    2016-04-01

    Glass Ionomer Cement (GIC) is well known for its fluoride releasing property but has its own drawbacks of poor mechanical properties, sensitivity to initial desiccation and moisture contamination. To overcome these, search led to the reinforcement of hydroxyapatite and application of surface coating agent but their effect on fluoride release is still not clear. To evaluate and compare the release of fluoride from Hydroxyapatite Reinforced Glass Ionomer (HA-GIC) with and without protective coating. Specimens were prepared as follows- Eight percent by weight conventional glass ionomer was replaced by hydroxyapatite powder (HA) and an indigenous product was prepared (HA-GIC). This powder was mixed with liquid of conventional GIC and allowed to set, then G coat plus coating agent was applied in surface coated group and light cured. Fluoride release of the sample was measured every 24 hrs for seven days and weekly from 7(th) to 21(st) day using combination ion selective electrode. Mean values clearly reveal a significant decrease in the fluoride release from day 1 to day 21 for both the groups. Results of repeated measure ANOVA revealed statistically significant difference between two groups (p glass ionomer will allow for slow and steady release of fluoride for a long period of time into oral environment.

  10. Drinking water fluoridation in South East Queensland: a cost-effectiveness evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciketic, Sadmir; Hayatbakhsh, Mohammad R; Doran, Chris M

    2010-04-01

    The aim of this study is to examine cost-effectiveness of fluoridation of drinking water supplies for Brisbane and South East Queensland. The benefits conveyed are expressed in reduced costs of dental treatment and years of life with dental caries as a disability. The analysis utilises a developed life table modelling initial cohort of 36,322 newborns, which when applied to the target population equals to 181,925 persons in the age group 2-100 years, 338,617 persons in the age group 7-100 years and 390,524 persons in the age group 12-100 years respectively. The analysis was conducted using a real discount rate of 3%. Sensitivity analyses investigated the effects of varying the parameters such as: discount rate, costs of dental treatment and costs of fluoridation plant. Uncertainty analysis was also conducted on costs and the measure of ratio of decayed, missing, filled teeth surfaces in deciduous dentition between the cities of Brisbane (non-fluoridated) and Townsville (fluoridated). If fluoridation was implemented there would be a total saving of $10,437.43 (95% CI 6,406.50- 14,035.35) disability-adjusted life years (DALYs) and AU$ 665,686,529 (95% CI -$973,573,625- $381,322,176). This result is both desirable and dominant as more DALYs are saved along with significant cost savings. Fluoridation remains still a very cost-effective measure for reducing dental decay.

  11. Effect of the widespread use of fluorides on the occurrence of hidden caries in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashizume, Lina N; Mathias, Telma C; Cibils, Débora M; Maltz, Marisa

    2013-01-01

    It has been suggested that the widespread use of fluorides could interfere in the prevalence of clinically undetected occlusal dentine caries. The objective of this study was to determine the role of public water fluoridation and fluoride dentifrice on the prevalence of hidden caries in 8-10-year-old children. Clinical and radiographic data on schoolchildren collected in an epidemiologic study in Porto Alegre, Brazil, at two moments, 1975 (n = 228) and 1996 (n = 213), were analysed. Only the first permanent molars were studied. Only children of the 1996 examinations had benefited from fluoridated water soon after birth and had regular access to fluoride dentifrices. The criterion applied for hidden caries, when data from 1975 to 1996 were compared, was clinical sound surfaces that presented a radiolucent zone in the dentine. The prevalence of clinically sound surfaces and percentage of hidden caries was 0.51 and 26.4% in 1975 and 2.67 and 12.9% in 1996, respectively. The prevalence of hidden caries differed statistically between the two periods (P fluoride via public water supply and dentifrices decreases the prevalence of hidden caries. © 2012 The Authors. International Journal of Paediatric Dentistry 2012 BSPD, IAPD and Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  12. Dental fluorosis: concentration of fluoride in drinking water and consumption of bottled beverages in school children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Pérez, N; Torres-Mendoza, N; Borges-Yáñez, A; Irigoyen-Camacho, M E

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to identify dental fluorosis prevalence and to analyze its association with tap water fluoride concentration and beverage consumption in school children from the city of Oaxaca, who were receiving fluoridated salt. A cross-sectional study was performed on elementary public school children. Dean's Index was applied to assess dental fluorosis. The parents of the children who were studied completed a questionnaire about socio-demographic characteristics and type of beverages consumed by their children. A total of 917 school children participated in this study. Dental fluorosis prevalence was 80.8%. The most frequent fluorosis category was very mild (41.0%), and 16.4% of the children were in the mild category. The mean water fluoride concentration was 0.43 ppm (±0.12). No association was detected between tap water fluoride concentration and fluorosis severity. The multinomial regression model showed an association among the mild fluorosis category and age (OR = 1.25, [95% CI 1.04, 1.50]) and better socio-economic status (OR = 1.78, [95% CI 1.21, 2.60]), controlling for fluoride concentration in water. Moderate and severe fluorosis were associated with soft drink consumption (OR = 2.26, [95% IC 1.01, 5.09]), controlling for age, socio-economic status, and water fluoride concentration. The prevalence of fluorosis was high. Mild fluorosis was associated with higher socio-economic status, while higher fluorosis severity was associated with soft drink consumption.

  13. The investigation of kinetic and isotherm of fluoride adsorption onto functionalize pumice stone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asgari, Ghorban; Roshani, Babak; Ghanizadeh, Ghader

    2012-05-30

    In this research work, pumice that is functionalized by the cationic surfactant, hexadecyltrimethyl ammonium (HDTMA), is used as an adsorbent for the removal of fluoride from drinking water. This work was carried out in two parts. The effects of HDTMA loading, pH (3-10), reaction time (5-60 min) and the adsorbent dosage (0.15-2.5 g L(-1)) were investigated on the removal of fluoride as a target contaminate from water through the design of different experimental sets in the first part. The results from this first part revealed that surfactant-modified pumice (SMP) exhibited the best performance at dose 0.5 g L(-1), pH 6, and it adsorbs over 96% of fluoride from a solution containing 10 mg L(-1) fluoride after 30 min of mixing time. The four linear forms of the Langmuir, Freundlich, Temkin and Dubinin-Radushkevich isotherms model were applied to determine the best fit of equilibrium expressions. Apart from the regression coefficient (R(2)), four error functions were used to validate the isotherm and kinetics data. The experimental adsorption isotherm complies with Langmuir equation model type 1. The maximum amount of adsorption (Q(max)) was 41 mg g(-1). The kinetic studies indicated that the adsorption of fluoride best fitted with the pseudo-second-order kinetic type 1. Thermodynamic parameters evaluation of fluoride adsorption on SMP showed that the adsorption process under the selected conditions was spontaneous and endothermic. The suitability of SMP in defluoridation at field condition was investigated with natural groundwater samples collected from a nearby fluoride endemic area in the second part of this study. Based on this study's results, SMP was shown to be an affordable and a promising option for the removal of fluoride in drinking water. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Ultrastructural changes in the cemento-enamel junction after vital tooth bleaching with fluoride and fluoride-free agents – a pilot study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasic, Jovanka; Kesic, Ljiljana; Popovic, Jelena; Mitić, Aleksandar; Nikolic, Marija; Stankovic, Sasa; Barac, Radomir

    2012-01-01

    Summary Background The impact of bleaching on the cemento-enamel junction (CEJ) is not well known. Due to frequent sensitivity of the cervical region of teeth after the vital bleaching, the aim of the present study was to evaluate the morphological features of the CEJ of human teeth after application of fluoridated and fluoride-free bleaching agents, as well as post-bleaching fluoridation treatment, by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis. Material/Methods Thirty-five extracted permanent human teeth were longitudinally cut, yielding 70 specimens. Thirty specimens were randomly divided into the 3 experimental groups, and 20 specimens, were used as (2) control groups, each: negative (untreated) control group; positive control group treated with 35% hydrogen peroxide; experimental group 1, bleaching with 10% carbamide peroxide (CP); experimental group 2, treatment with a mixture of 10% CP and fluoride; and experimental group 3, treatment with 10% CP and 2% sodium fluoride gel applied 30 minutes after bleaching. Experimental groups were treated 8 h per day for 14 days. The samples were examined by SEM. Results The bleaching materials tested caused morphological changes to the surface of the CEJ. There was a statistically significant difference between experimental groups (Kruskal Wallis Test chi-square=11,668; p<0.005). Mean value of experimental group 2 scores showed statistically significant difference from groups 1 and 3. Conclusions Bleaching gel with fluorides does not significantly change morphological appearance of the CEJ and represents a better choice than the hard tissue fluoridation process after bleaching. PMID:22367139

  15. Effect of Fluoride, Casein Phosphopeptide–Amorphous Calcium Phosphate and Casein Phosphopeptide–Amorphous Calcium Phosphate Fluoride on Enamel Surface Microhardness After Microabrasion: An in Vitro Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadi Zenouz, Ghazaleh; Ezoji, Fariba; Khafri, Soraya

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: This study aimed to assess the effect of applying casein phosphopeptide– amorphous calcium phosphate (CPP-ACP) paste, casein phosphopeptide–amorphous calcium phosphate fluoride (CPP-ACPF) paste and sodium fluoride gel on surface microhardness of enamel after microabrasion. Materials and Methods: Thirty freshly extracted human premolars were selected. All samples were subjected to hardness indentations made with the Vickers hardness machine and the average value was recorded as the initial surface microhardness. The specimens were then randomly divided into three groups (n=10) of CPP-ACPF, fluoride and CPPACP. The teeth were micro-abraded with Opalustre. Microhardness test was performed to assess the post-abrasion hardness. Three remineralization modalities were performed on samples of each group. The enamel surface microhardness measurements were performed. To compare the difference between groups, the rehardening and softening values were defined. One-way ANOVA and Tukey’s post hoc test at a significance level of 5% were used for statistical analysis. Results: The mean microhardness value (MMV) had a significant decrease after microabrasion from baseline. The MMV had a significant increase after remineralization in all groups. The MMV of CPP-ACPF group was significantly more than that of fluoride group (P=0.027). The rehardening value of fluoride group was significantly more than that of other groups (Pmicroabrasion. The CPP-ACP and CPP-ACPF pastes are effective, but to a lesser extent than neutral sodium fluoride gel in remineralizing enamel surface. Incorporation of fluoride to CPP-ACP formulation does not provide any additional remineralizing potential. PMID:27252753

  16. Diethylenetriaminium hexafluoridotitanate(IV fluoride

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Lhoste

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available The title compound, (C6H21N4[TiF6]F, was synthesized by the reaction of TiO2, tris(2-aminoethylamine, HF and ethanol at 463 K in a microwave oven. The crystal structure consists of two crystallographically independent [TiF6]2− anions, two fluoride anions and two triply-protonated tris(2-aminoethylamine cations. The Ti atoms are coordinated by six F atoms within slightly distorted octahedra. The anions and cations are connected by intermolecular N—H...F hydrogen bonds.

  17. Topographic assessment of human enamel surface treated with different topical sodium fluoride agents: Scanning electron microscope consideration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gurlal Singh Brar

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Continuous balanced demineralization and remineralization are natural dynamic processes in enamel. If the balance is interrupted and demineralization process dominates, it may eventually lead to the development of carious lesions in enamel and dentine. Fluoride helps control decay by enhancing remineralization and altering the structure of the tooth, making the surface less soluble. Methodology: One hundred and twenty sound human permanent incisors randomly and equally distributed into six groups as follows: Group I - Control, II - Sodium fluoride solution, III - Sodium fluoride gel, IV - Sodium fluoride varnish, V - Clinpro Tooth Crème (3M ESPE, and VI-GC Tooth Mousse Plus or MI Paste Plus. The samples were kept in artificial saliva for 12 months, and the topical fluoride agents were applied to the respective sample groups as per the manufacturer instructions. Scanning electron microscope (SEM evaluation of all the samples after 6 and 12 months was made. Results: Morphological changes on the enamel surface after application of fluoride in SEM revealed the presence of globular precipitate in all treated samples. Amorphous, globular, and crystalline structures were seen on the enamel surface of the treated samples. Clear differences were observed between the treated and untreated samples. Conclusion: Globular structures consisting of amorphous CaF2precipitates, which acted as a fluoride reservoir, were observed on the enamel surface after action of different sodium fluoride agents. CPP-ACPF (Tooth Mousse and Tricalcium phosphate with fluoride (Clinpro tooth crème are excellent delivery vehicles available in a slow release amorphous form to localize fluoride at the tooth surface.

  18. Ion release from, and fluoride recharge of a composite with a fluoride-containing bioactive glass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Harry B; Gwinner, Fernanda; Mitchell, John C; Ferracane, Jack L

    2014-10-01

    Materials that are capable of releasing ions such as calcium and fluoride, that are necessary for remineralization of dentin and enamel, have been the topic of intensive research for many years. The source of calcium has most often been some form of calcium phosphate, and that for fluoride has been one of several metal fluoride or hexafluorophosphate salts. Fluoride-containing bioactive glass (BAG) prepared by the sol-gel method acts as a single source of both calcium and fluoride ions in aqueous solutions. The objective of this investigation was to determine if BAG, when added to a composite formulation, can be used as a single source for calcium and fluoride ion release over an extended time period, and to determine if the BAG-containing composite can be recharged upon exposure to a solution of 5000ppm fluoride. BAG 61 (61% Si; 31% Ca; 4% P; 3% F; 1% B) and BAG 81 (81% Si; 11% Ca; 4% P; 3% F; 1% B) were synthesized by the sol-gel method. The composite used was composed of 50/50 Bis-GMA/TEGDMA, 0.8% EDMAB, 0.4% CQ, and 0.05% BHT, combined with a mixture of BAG (15%) and strontium glass (85%) to a total filler load of 72% by weight. Disks were prepared, allowed to age for 24h, abraded, then placed into DI water. Calcium and fluoride release was measured by atomic absorption spectroscopy and fluoride ion selective electrode methods, respectively, after 2, 22, and 222h. The composite samples were then soaked for 5min in an aqueous 5000ppm fluoride solution, after which calcium and fluoride release was again measured at 2, 22, and 222h time points. Prior to fluoride recharge, release of fluoride ions was similar for the BAG 61 and BAG 81 composites after 2h, and also similar after 22h. At the four subsequent time points, one prior to, and three following fluoride recharge, the BAG 81 composite released significantly more fluoride ions (p0.05) for the two composites. These results show that, when added to a composite formulation, fluoride-containing bioactive glass

  19. Effects of periodic fluoride treatment on fluoride ion release from fresh orthodontic adhesives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Bum-Soon; Lee, Shin-Jae; Lim, Young-Jun; Ahn, Sug-Joon

    2011-11-01

    Periodic fluoride treatment may contribute to the ability of fresh orthodontic adhesives to provide long-term F(-) release. The effects of periodic fluoride treatment on the amount of F(-) release from fresh orthodontic adhesives was investigated. F(-) release was measured from a nonfluoride-releasing composite, a fluoride-releasing composite, a polyacid-modified composite (compomer), and two resin-modified glass-ionomer cements (RMGICs) at 1, 2, and 5 days after one of the following treatments: 225 ppm F(-) solution, 900 ppm F(-) solution, acidulated phosphate fluoride gel (APF), fluoridated dentifrice, and deionised water (control). F(-) release was measured in a 5-day cycle, which was repeated 9 consecutive times. The amount of F(-) release for each group was analysed using the repeated measures analysis of variance. Statistical significance was set at a level of α=0.05. Periodic fluoride treatment temporarily increased F(-) release in fresh fluoride-releasing orthodontic adhesives, but not in fresh nonfluoride-releasing composite. The order of effective fluoride-release was RMGICs>compomer>fluoride-releasing composite>nonfluoride-releasing composite. The application of APF or 900 ppm F(-) solution was the most effective way to maintain F(-) release from fresh orthodontic adhesives. However, the amount of F(-) release gradually decreased with increasing specimen age. Given the difficulty of routine use of APF at home, the results of this study show that a combination of RMGICs and high-dose fluoride mouth rinse is the most effective protocol to maintain F(-) release from fresh orthodontic adhesives. Most studies have investigated fluoride-uptake abilities using aged materials in which fluoride had been lost for at least 1 month. This study has found that periodic fluoride treatment altered the conventional F(-) release pattern of fresh fluoride-releasing materials and type of fluoride-containing medium plays a more critical role in fluoride recharging of the

  20. Fluoride in saliva and dental biofilm after 1500 and 5000 ppm fluoride exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staun Larsen, Line; Baelum, Vibeke; Tenuta, Livia Maria Andaló; Richards, Alan; Nyvad, Bente

    2017-09-01

    The aim of this randomized, double-blind, crossover study was to measure fluoride in saliva and 7-day-old biofilm fluid and biofilm solids after rinsing three times per day for 3 weeks with 0, 1500, or 5000 ppm fluoride (NaF). Following the 3-week wash-in/wash-out period, including 1 week of biofilm accumulation, saliva and biofilm samples were collected from 12 participants immediately before (background fluoride), and 10, 30, and 60 min after a single rinse. Biofilm samples were separated into fluid and solids, and samples were analyzed using a fluoride electrode (microanalysis). The background fluoride concentration was statistically significantly higher in the 5000 compared to the 1500 ppm F rinse group in all three compartments (22.3 and 8.1 μM in saliva, 126.8 and 58.5 μM in biofilm fluid, and 10,940 and 4837 μmol/kg in biofilm solids). The 1-h fluoride accumulation for the 5000 ppm F rinse was higher than for the 1500 ppm F rinse in all three compartments, although not statistically significant for saliva and biofilm solids. Regular exposure to 5000 ppm fluoride elevates background fluoride concentrations in saliva, biofilm fluid, and biofilm solids compared to 1500 ppm fluoride. Increasing the fluoride concentration almost 3.5 times (from 1500 to 5000 ppm) only elevates the background fluoride concentrations in saliva, biofilm fluid, and biofilm solids twofold. Even though fluoride toothpaste may be diluted by saliva, the results of the present study indicate that use of 5000 ppm fluoride toothpaste might lead to improved caries control.

  1. Studies on the comparative effect of sodium fluoride on collagen ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Fluoride is an essential element for the normal development and growth of human beings. The main source of fluoride for humans is the intake of groundwater. At high levels, fluoride causes dental and skeletal fluorosis. In this study, control and sodium fluoride (NaF) treated groups of rats had significant (p < 0.05) higher ...

  2. Studies on the comparative effect of sodium fluoride on collagen ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    use

    2011-12-12

    Dec 12, 2011 ... protein concentration in lungs (Stawiarska-Pieta et al.,. 2009). Fluoride exerts diverse cellular effects in a time-, concentration-, and cell-type-dependent manner. The main toxic effect of fluoride in cells consists of its interact- tion with enzymes. In most cases, fluoride acts as an enzyme inhibitor, but, fluoride ...

  3. Fluoridation and Defluoridation. Training Module 2.230.2.77.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMullen, L. D.

    This document is an instructional module package prepared in objective form for use by an instructor familiar with fluoridation and fluoride feeding equipment. Enclosed are objectives, an instructor guide, student handouts and transparency masters. The module considers the principles and purposes of fluoridation, methods of feeding fluoride,…

  4. Fluoride removal by adsorption on thermally treated lateritic soils ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The ability of lateritic soils to remove fluoride from water has been studied. Important issues considered in the study include the relation between the mineral composition of soils and their ability to remove fluoride, the effect of thermal treatment of the soil on fluoride removal; the predominant fluoride containing species ...

  5. Parental preference for fluoride varnish: a new concept in a rapidly developing nation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hendaus MA

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Mohamed A Hendaus,1,2 Hibaq A Jama,1 Faisal J Siddiqui,1,3 Sohair A Elsiddig,1 Ahmed H Alhammadi1,2 1Department of Pediatrics, General Academic Pediatrics Section, Hamad Medical Corporation, Doha, 2Department of Clinical Pediatrics, Weill Cornell Medical College, 3Pediatric Residency Program, Hamad Medical Corporation, Doha, Qatar Objective: The objective of this study was to investigate parental preference for fluoride varnish in a country where the average percentage of dental caries in young children is up to ~73%. Consequently, the aim of this study, despite being a pilot, was to create a nationwide project in the State of Qatar to promote oral health in children. Methods: A cross-sectional perspective study was conducted at Hamad Medical Corporation in Qatar. Parents of children aged ≤5 years were offered an interview survey. A total of 200 questionnaires were completed (response rate =100%. The study was conducted between December 1, 2014 and March 30, 2015, and included all children aged >1 year and <5 years who came to the outpatient clinics for well-child and sick visits. We also included children who were admitted to the inpatient wards. Results: The mean age of participant children was 2.8±1.1 years. When inquiring regarding parents’ knowledge and awareness of dental health, we found that >90% of families were aware that dental health affects the health of the whole body. The study showed that ~70% of parents were not aware of the existence of fluoride varnish, but would allow a health provider to apply fluoride varnish. Furthermore, ~80% of parents would not stop brushing their child’s teeth and would not skip dentist appointments if varnish was to be applied. Approximately 40% of parents conveyed some concerns regarding the safety of fluoride varnish, despite being considered as a new concept. The main concern was that the child might swallow some of the fluoride. Another important concern expressed by parents was the

  6. [Influence of natural fluoride concentration in drinking water on dental health of first class pupils in an area with enhanced fluoride content at the beginning of the 21st century].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinmeyer, R

    2011-08-01

    Since the end of the first half of the 20 (th) century it is well-known that fluoride concentrations in drinking water of about 1 ppm reduce the prevalence of dental caries by about 40-60%. This knowledge led to the fluoridation of drinking water during the second half of the 20 (th) century in many countries, including East Germany. Although the natural F (-) content in drinking water in Germany is usually very low, the eastern Eifel is one of the few larger areas in Germany with (nearly) optimal (0.7-1.0 ppm) or moderately enhanced (0.3-0.7 ppm) natural fluoride concentrations in drinking water. 30 years ago, in 1977, the caries prevalence of children of various age groups in the fluoride-rich areas of the eastern Eifel was established by Einwag to be about 40% lower than in adjacent fluoride-poor regions (0.1 ppm). Meanwhile fluoride has become available from many different sources for children of any age: e. g., toothpaste (with 500 ppm fluoride even for very young children who just got the first tooth), fluoridated salt, professional fluoride applications (paid by health insurances), the rising consumption of mineral waters (many of which have a fluoride content >0.3 ppm). This poses the question of the current influence of enhanced natural drinking water fluoride concentrations on caries prevalence in children. The results of the dental examinations of 9 555 pupils (6 or 7 years old) of the first classes of all 63 primary schools in the Landkreis Mayen-Koblenz from 5 years (2004/2005-2008/2009) are compared to the fluoride content of the drinking water. The data show no obvious correlation between dental health and fluoride concentration for any of the dental health parameters investigated. However, in spite of the low geographic resolution of social parameters, there was a notable connection between dental health status and sociodemographic indicators for the respective region. 30 years after the study by Einwag in the same region, the

  7. Eight-year evaluation of a combined fluoride program in a nonfluoride area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horowitz, H S; Meyers, R J; Heifetz, S B; Driscoll, W S; Li, S H

    1984-10-01

    The purpose of this study is to measure the long-term effects of a combination of self-applied fluoride methods among schoolchildren living in a rural area with low concentrations of fluoride in drinking water. Participating children rinse weekly with a 0.2% sodium fluoride solution and ingest daily a 1-mg fluoride tablet in school under supervision of their teachers, and received fluoride toothpaste and toothbrushes for use at home. In 1980, dental examinations of children ages 6-14, who had continuously participated in the program for 1 to 8 years, depending on their school grade, had an overall mean caries prevalence of 3.22 DMFS, 49% lower than the corresponding mean score of 6.31 DMFS for children of the same ages at the baseline examination. The preventive program inhibited decay in all types of tooth surfaces: 37% in occlusal, 41% in buccolingual, and a striking 86% in mesiodistal. At each succeeding follow-up survey, benefits have continued to improve; the reductions in caries prevalence were 18% after 2 years, 35% after 4 years, 45% after 6 years, and 49% after 8 years. Findings in approximal tooth surfaces have also continued to improve as the length of the program has increased; reductions in caries in mesiodistal surfaces were 32%, 69%, 85%, and 86% after 2,4,6, and 8 years, respectively. Internal analyses of data indicate that the decline in dental caries prevalence resulted from the fluoride program and not from an unexplained natural decline in caries prevalence. The self-applied combined fluoride regimen used in this program has been shown to produce a pronounced anticaries effect.

  8. Evaluation of toxic action of fluorides on agricultural plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. N. Grishko

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available The toxicity of potassium fluoride, sodium fluoride and ammonium fluoride for pea, maize, oat and onion was studied. It was found that the level of the toxic influence had grown with increase of fluoride concentration in the media of growth (from 5 to 100 mg of F–/l. By increase of the toxic influence the agricultural crops are disposed in the following row: oat < onion < maize < pea. Ammonium fluoride demonstrates lesser toxicity, than potassium and sodium fluorides. Under low concentrations of fluoride compounds (5 and 10 mg of F–/l stimulation of roots growth is noted only for the oat.

  9. A Framework for Understanding Lapses in Professionalism Among Medical Students: Applying the Theory of Planned Behavior to Fitness to Practice Cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jha, Vikram; Brockbank, Susannah; Roberts, Trudie

    2016-06-28

    Fitness to practice decisions are often based on a student's digression from the regulations, with limited exploration of the reasoning behind the student's behavior. However, behavior is underpinned by complex, "hidden" variables, including an individual's attitudes and social norms. Examining hidden determinants of professionalism, such as context, interpersonal relationships, social norms, and local cultures, then allows medical educators to develop a richer understanding of unprofessional behavior.In this article, the authors propose the use of the theory of planned behavior (TPB) as a framework to help evaluate unprofessional behavior in students. The TPB is a deliberative processing model that explains how an individual's behavior is underpinned by his or her cognitions, with behavior being primarily dependent on the intention to perform the behavior (behavioral intention). Intention, in turn, is determined by three variables: attitude, subjective norm, and perceived behavioral control.To understand the practical use of the TPB, the authors present four complex, anonymized case studies in which they employed the TPB to help deal with serious professionalism lapses among medical students. The outcomes of these cases as well as the student and program director perspectives, all explained via the TPB variables, are presented. The strengths and limitations of the TPB are discussed.

  10. Physiologic Conditions Affect Toxicity of Ingested Industrial Fluoride

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Sauerheber

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The effects of calcium ion and broad pH ranges on free fluoride ion aqueous concentrations were measured directly and computed theoretically. Solubility calculations indicate that blood fluoride concentrations that occur in lethal poisonings would decrease calcium below prevailing levels. Acute lethal poisoning and also many of the chronic effects of fluoride involve alterations in the chemical activity of calcium by the fluoride ion. Natural calcium fluoride with low solubility and toxicity from ingestion is distinct from fully soluble toxic industrial fluorides. The toxicity of fluoride is determined by environmental conditions and the positive cations present. At a pH typical of gastric juice, fluoride is largely protonated as hydrofluoric acid HF. Industrial fluoride ingested from treated water enters saliva at levels too low to affect dental caries. Blood levels during lifelong consumption can harm heart, bone, brain, and even developing teeth enamel. The widespread policy known as water fluoridation is discussed in light of these findings.

  11. Fluoride Removal from pretreated Photovoltaic Wastewater by Electrocoagulation: An Investigation of The Effect of Operational Parameters

    KAUST Repository

    Drouiche, Nadjib

    2012-03-20

    In this paper, application of electrocoagulation using common iron electrode to a simulated photovoltaic wastewater after precipitation with lime (Ca(OH)2) was investigated. Electrocoagulation process delivers the coagulant in situ as the sacrificial anode corrodes, while the simultaneous evolution of hydrogen at the cathode allows pollutant removal by flotation. Several working parameters, such as initial pH, applied potential and distance between the electrodes, were studied in an attempt to achieve higher fluoride removal efficiency. The optimum conditions for the process were identified as pH = 6, the distance between electrodes = 1 and an applied potential of 30 V. Furthermore fluoride removal is under the direct discharge standards.Results showed high effectivenessof the electrocoagulation method in removing fluoride from aqueous solutions.

  12. Influence of Individual Saliva Secretion on Fluoride Bioavailability

    OpenAIRE

    E. A. Naumova; Gaengler, P.; Zimmer, S.; Arnold, W. H.

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this preliminary investigation was to compare the individual saliva secretion rate with the fluoride bioavailability in saliva after using sodium fluoride and amine fluoride. Methods: To assess oral fluoride kinetics 10 highly trained volunteers brushed their teeth with one of the formulations and saliva was collected. The amount of saliva was measured, and the fluoride content was determined. Data underwent statistical analysis using the Mann-Whitney-U test and Pearson correlation...

  13. A study of fluoride groundwater occurrence in Nathenje, Lilongwe, Malawi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Msonda, K. W. M.; Masamba, W. R. L.; Fabiano, E.

    A study was carried out to determine fluoride concentration in groundwaters of Nathenje area situated in Lilongwe District in the central region of Malawi. Water samples were collected from 176 boreholes and shallow wells during different months in 2001 and 2002. Samples were then analysed for fluoride by using a fluoride electrode and an ion selective meter. The results showed that fluoride concentrations for the rainy season varied from dental fluorosis in areas where the fluoride concentration was high.

  14. Enamel silicon and fluoride relationships demonstrating a surface silicon effect that facilitates fluoride uptake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, J S; Koritzer, R T

    1976-01-01

    This study indicated that a clear relationship exists between silicon and fluoride. We have also demonstrated a probable surface enamel silicon effect that increases fluoride uptake. The complex set of relationships described in the surface chemistry of calcium, tin, and zirconium with fluoride, hydroxide, phosphate, and other surface-occurring ions need not be considered to confuse the specific silicon-fluoride relationship presented here because in this computation we are relating the changes in the silicon and fluoride ion values only. We have, however, considered the thermodynamics of such reactions and intend to elaborate on it in a later publication. We are aware of the small depth of fluoride penetration into enamel after topical treatment Health Foundation, Research Unit at the National Bureau of Standards, Washington, DC 20034, USA.

  15. PROCESS FOR TREATING VOLATILE METAL FLUORIDES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudge, A.J.; Lowe, A.J.

    1957-10-01

    This patent relates to the purification of uranium hexafluoride, made by reacting the metal or its tetrafluoride with fluorine, from the frequently contained traces of hydrofluoric acid. According to the present process, UF/sub 6/ containing as an impurity a small amount of hydrofluoric acid, is treated to remove such impurity by contact with an anhydrous alkali metal fluoride such as sodium fluoride. In this way a non-volatile complex containing hydrofluoric acid and the alkali metal fluoride is formed, and the volatile UF /sub 6/ may then be removed by distillation.

  16. Model of recreational and training sessions based on the use of funds aqua professionally applied in the preparation of students of economics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petrenko N. V.

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Purpose : study, develop and test a model of health-training exercises with the use of aqua. Material: in the experiment involved 69 students aged 17-18 years. Results : It was found that the developed model has a positive effect on physical performance of students promotes adaptive processes to the future professional activity and improve the learning process. Should consider the following: 1 the means and methods should be adequate aqua morphofunctional features and enhance the activity of the cardiovascular system, general endurance, power capabilities, flexibility, neurobehavioral performance, and 2 as a means of aqua aerobic exercise is advisable to use orientation and moderate intensity, and 3 use tools and techniques aqua should foster interest in a systematic and independent physical activities. Conclusions : the model promotes the development and improvement of the skills and abilities necessary to the future experts in economics.

  17. Effect of clinic experience on pre-service professionals perceptions of applied special needs services. DOI: 10.5007/1980-0037.2011v13n2p145

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chris Carpenter

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available With the understanding that the attitudes and expectations a teacher carries into the classroom directly affect student achievement, this study was administered to evaluate the cognitive affect that clinical experience incorporating individuals with disabilities had on pre-service exercise science professionals. University Students with and without experience in an adapted clinical environment were given surveys covering attitudes and perceptions towards classroom atmosphere, teachers’ instructional techniques, inclusion, and self-efficacy. Data were analyzed and used to determine pedagogical implications. Findings suggest that pre-service educators tend to feel unprepared and ill-equipped to work in an inclusive educational environment. Therefore, pre-service teacher programs should ideally include coursework in adaptive education and experiential components such as practicum, field experience, and clinical experience. In addition, a school-university collaborative relationship can facilitate beneficial outcomes to future educators as well as special needs populations.

  18. Effect of clinic experience on pre-service professionals perceptions of applied special needs services. DOI: 10.5007/1980-0037.2011v13n2p145

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chris Carpenter

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available With the understanding that the attitudes and expectations a teacher carries into the classroom directly affect student achievement, this study was administered to evaluate the cognitive affect that clinical experience incorporating individuals with disabilities had on pre-service exercise science professionals. University Students with and without experience in an adapted clinical environment were given surveys covering attitudes and perceptions towards classroom atmosphere, teachers’ instructional techniques, inclusion, and self-efficacy. Data were analyzed and used to determine pedagogical implications. Findings suggest that pre-service educators tend to feel unprepared and ill-equipped to work in an inclusive educational environment. Therefore, pre-service teacher programs should ideally include coursework in adaptive education and experiential components such as practicum, field experience, and clinical experience. In addition, a school-university collaborative relationship can facilitate beneficial outcomes to future educators as well as special needs populations.

  19. Model of recreational and training sessions based on the use of funds aqua professionally applied in the preparation of students of economics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. V. Petrenko

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Purpose : study, develop and test a model of health-training exercises with the use of aqua. Material: in the experiment involved 69 students aged 17-18 years. Results : It was found that the developed model has a positive effect on physical performance of students promotes adaptive processes to the future professional activity and improve the learning process. Should consider the following: 1 the means and methods should be adequate aqua morphofunctional features and enhance the activity of the cardiovascular system, general endurance, power capabilities, flexibility, neurobehavioral performance, and 2 as a means of aqua aerobic exercise is advisable to use orientation and moderate intensity, and 3 use tools and techniques aqua should foster interest in a systematic and independent physical activities. Conclusions : the model promotes the development and improvement of the skills and abilities necessary to the future experts in economics.

  20. Fluoride exposure and reported learning disability diagnosis among Canadian children: Implications for community water fluoridation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barberio, Amanda M; Quiñonez, Carlos; Hosein, F Shaun; McLaren, Lindsay

    2017-09-14

    Recent studies have connected increased fluoride exposure with increased risk of neurodevelopmental-related outcomes, such as ADHD (attention deficit hyperactivity disorder) and lower IQ in children. Our primary objective was to examine the association between fluoride exposure and reported diagnosis of a learning disability among a population-based sample of Canadian children aged 3-12 years. We analyzed data from Cycles 2 and 3 of the Canadian Health Measures Survey. Four measures of fluoride exposure were available: 1) urinary fluoride (μmol/L), 2) creatinine-adjusted urinary fluoride (μmol/mmol), 3) specific gravity-adjusted urinary fluoride (μmol/L), and 4) fluoride concentration of tap water (mg/L) (Cycle 3 only). Diagnosis of a learning disability (yes/no) was based on parental- or self-report. Associations were examined using logistic regression (where possible), unadjusted and adjusted for covariates. When Cycles 2 and 3 were examined separately, reported learning disability diagnosis was not significantly associated with any measure of fluoride exposure in unadjusted or adjusted models. When Cycles 2 and 3 were combined, a small but statistically significant effect was observed such that children with higher urinary fluoride had higher odds of having a reported learning disability in the adjusted model (p = 0.03). However, the association was not observed in models that used creatinine-adjusted urinary fluoride and specific gravity-adjusted urinary fluoride, which are believed to be more accurate measures due to their correction for urinary dilution. Overall, there did not appear to be a robust association between fluoride exposure and parental- or self-reported diagnosis of a learning disability among Canadian children.

  1. Saliva fluoride before and during 3 years of supervised use of fluoride toothpaste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, A; Machiulskiene, V; Nyvad, B; Baelum, V

    2013-12-01

    The purpose of the study was to examine pre-brushing saliva fluoride concentrations before and during a large, 3-year, prospective toothpaste study on the effect of post-brushing rinsing on dental caries. The aims were to study saliva fluoride over time and the effect of rinsing on saliva fluoride and to relate saliva fluoride to caries increments and accumulation of plaque. Saliva samples (baseline and 1, 2, and 3 years) were collected from 11-year-old children attending two schools (A and B) in Kaunas, Lithuania, who refrained from brushing the evening and morning before saliva collection. Numbers of saliva samples collected varied from 264 at baseline to 188 at the 3-year follow-up. Children in school A rinsed with water after daily brushing, while children in school B did not rinse. Total caries and visible plaque were registered at baseline and after 3 years. Mean saliva fluoride concentrations at baseline and after 1, 2, and 3 years from school A (rinsing) were 0.014, 0.026, 0.029, and 0.034 ppm and from school B (no rinsing) were 0.013, 0.028, 0.031, and 0.031 ppm, respectively. Increases in saliva fluoride from baseline were significant (Wilcoxon's test, p Saliva fluoride did not increase beyond year 1 and did at no time point differ between schools. Reductions in numbers of tooth surfaces with dental plaque were significantly positively related to the number of caries reversals over the 3 years. Background saliva fluoride concentration is increased by brushing at least once daily on schooldays, does not increase further over 3 years, and is not affected by rinsing after brushing. Continuous use of fluoride toothpaste produces ambient saliva fluoride levels similar to saliva fluoride in areas with fluoridated water.

  2. Fluoride exposure and indicators of thyroid functioning in the Canadian population: implications for community water fluoridation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barberio, Amanda M; Hosein, F Shaun; Quiñonez, Carlos; McLaren, Lindsay

    2017-10-01

    There are concerns that altered thyroid functioning could be the result of ingesting too much fluoride. Community water fluoridation (CWF) is an important source of fluoride exposure. Our objectives were to examine the association between fluoride exposure and (1) diagnosis of a thyroid condition and (2) indicators of thyroid functioning among a national population-based sample of Canadians. We analysed data from Cycles 2 and 3 of the Canadian Health Measures Survey (CHMS). Logistic regression was used to assess associations between fluoride from urine and tap water samples and the diagnosis of a thyroid condition. Multinomial logistic regression was used to examine the relationship between fluoride exposure and thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) level (low/normal/high). Other available variables permitted additional exploratory analyses among the subset of participants for whom we could discern some fluoride exposure from drinking water and/or dental products. There was no evidence of a relationship between fluoride exposure (from urine and tap water) and the diagnosis of a thyroid condition. There was no statistically significant association between fluoride exposure and abnormal (low or high) TSH levels relative to normal TSH levels. Rerunning the models with the sample constrained to the subset of participants for whom we could discern some source(s) of fluoride exposure from drinking water and/or dental products revealed no significant associations. These analyses suggest that, at the population level, fluoride exposure is not associated with impaired thyroid functioning in a time and place where multiple sources of fluoride exposure, including CWF, exist. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  3. REDUCTION OF FLUORIDE TO METAL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, O.N.; Schmidt, F.A.; Spedding, F.H.

    1960-08-30

    A process is given for making yttrium metal by reducing yttrium fluoride with calcium plus magnesium. Calcium is added in an excess of from 10 to 20% and magnesium in a quantity to yield a magnesium--yttrium alloy containing from 12 to 25% magnesium when the reaction mass is heated in an inert atmosphere at from 900 to 1106 deg C, but preferably above the melting point of the alloy. Calcium chloride may be added so as to obtain a less viscous slag containing from 30 to 60% calcium chloride. After removal of the slag the alloy is vacuum-heated at about 1100 deg C for volatilization of the magnesium and calcium.

  4. Participatory tools working with crops, varieties and seeds. A guide for professionals applying participatory approaches in agrobiodiversity management, crop improvement and seed sector development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boef, de W.S.; Thijssen, M.H.

    2007-01-01

    Outline to the guide Within our training programmes on local management of agrobiodiversity, participatory crop improvement and the support of local seed supply participatory tools get ample attention. Tools are dealt with theoretically, are practised in class situations, but are also applied in

  5. Creating a Minor in Applied Data Science: Case Western Reserve University Engages Business Leaders to Produce T-Shaped Professionals. A BHEF Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Business-Higher Education Forum, 2016

    2016-01-01

    This case study examines how Business-Higher Education Forum (BHEF) member Case Western Reserve University is integrating T-shaped skills into a minor in applied data science. Through the collaboration of its business and higher education members, BHEF launched the National Higher Education and Workforce Initiative to create new undergraduate…

  6. Characterization of cerium fluoride nanocomposite scintillators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stange, Sy [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Esch, Ernst I [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Brown, Leif O [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Couture, Aaron J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mckigney, Edward A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Muenchausen, Ross E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Del Sesto, Rico E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Gilbertson, Robert D [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mccleskey, T Mark [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Reifarth, Rene [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    Measurement of the neutron capture cross-sections of a number of short-lived isotopes would advance both pure and applied scientific research. These cross-sections are needed for calculation of criticality and waste production estimates for the Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative, for analysis of data from nuclear weapons tests, and to improve understanding of nucleosynthesis. However, measurement of these cross-sections would require a detector with a faster signal decay time than those used in existing neutron capture experiments. Crystals of faster detector materials are not available in sufficient sizes and quantities to supply these large-scale experiments. Instead, we propose to use nanocomposite detectors, consisting of nanoscale particles of a scintillating material dispersed in a matrix material. We have successfully fabricated cerium fluoride (CeF{sub 3}) nanoparticles and dispersed them in a liquid matrix. We have characterized this scintillator and have measured its response to neutron capture. Results of the optical, structural, and radiation characterization will be presented.

  7. Evaluation of simplified oral hygiene index of the elementary school students before fluoride mouthwash - doi: 10.4025/actascihealthsci.v35i2.13205

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatriz Rosana Gonçalves de Oliveira

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The State Program of fluoride mouthwashes for caries control was established in 1980 in elementary schools of Paraná State covering children 7-11 years old. Knowing the importance of removing bacterial plaque to reach the maximum desired effect of prevention, this study aimed to evaluate the Simplified Oral Hygiene Index, before applying the solution of Sodium Fluoride (NaF; 0.2% in children from an elementary school in the city of Nova Aurora, Paraná State, by using disclosing dental plaque. This is a quantitative research, descriptive and exploratory whose data were obtained through a specific form, with 61 children and analyzed using descriptive statistics with distribution of absolute and percentage frequencies. Most children (60% showed the worst results - regular and bad - with presence of plaque and risk of dental caries. Therefore, we should establish a prevention program in oral health that must involve parents and students. This program should be developed by health professionals inside the school, explaining about the etiologic factors, causes and consequences of plaque, the techniques of cleaning and maintenance of hygiene instruments, and the risks of the lack of proper hygiene in the oral cavity.

  8. Well waters fluoride in Enugu, Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogbu, I Si; Okoro, O Io; Ugwuja, E I

    2012-04-01

    Abnormal fluoride levels in drinking water have been associated with adverse health effects. To determine the fluoride content of well waters in Enugu, southeastern Nigeria, water samples from 50 artisan wells chosen by multistage sampling procedure from the 5 zones of Enugu municipality were analyzed in duplicates for their fluoride content. The zonal mean values were 0.60, 0.70, 0.62, 0.62, and 0.63 mg/L for Abakpa Nike, Achara Layout, Obiagu/ Ogui, Trans Ekulu and Uwani, respectively (pwaters in the municipality in view of the increasing industrial activities going on in the city and heavy reliance on well water for domestic purposes and the widespread use of consumer products containing fluoride.

  9. Suicide by exposure to sulfuryl fluoride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheuerman, E H

    1986-07-01

    The insecticide fumigant, sulfuryl fluoride, was used as an instrument of self destruction in at least two of the three fatal exposures detailed in this report. The autopsy findings, while nonspecific, have a confirmatory value. Toxicologic analysis should include a plasma and a urine fluoride level, since the toxic effects of exposure are probably related to this ion. Concentrations of fluoride in our cases were: 50.42 mg/L (Case 1) and 20 mg/L (Case 3). However, the values must be interpreted in light of all known information as a result of the paucity of reported cases of fatal sulfuryl fluoride exposures. The cases described provide a model for the investigation of tent fumigation deaths. Proper investigation of fumigant deaths requires knowledge of the insecticide, the fumigation procedure, and the implementation of warning devices. Guidelines are offered along with a procedural checklist for the investigation of tent fumigation deaths.

  10. Study of fluoride corrosion of nickel alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunther, W. H.; Steindler, M. J.

    1969-01-01

    Report contains the results of an investigation of the corrosion resistance of nickel and nickel alloys exposed to fluorine, uranium hexafluoride, and volatile fission product fluorides at high temperatures. Survey of the unclassified literature on the subject is included.

  11. A Professional Learning Community Journey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana Maliszewski

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Four teachers (three classroom teachers and a teacher-librarian explain how their school applied a professional learning community framework to its operational practices. They discuss the process, the benefits, and the challenges of professional learning communities.

  12. Fluoride: Is It Worth to be added in Pit and Fissure Sealants?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahake, Prasanna T; Raju, OS; Basappa, N

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background and objectives: Fluoride is being used for the prevention of dental caries since a long time. Incorporation of fluoride in pit and fissure sealants has been found to reduce initiation and progression of pit and fissure caries. Authors conducted this study to evaluate and compare the effect of fluoride releasing pit and fissure sealants on the inhibition of demineralization of adjacent enamel and to reduce wall lesion frequency. Materials and methods: A total of 60 caries-free human third molars were randomly assigned into three groups receiving conventional resin sealant without fluoride (Group A), fluoride releasing resin sealant (Group B), glass ionomer pit and fissure sealant (Group C). Fissure cavities of 5 × 2 × 1.5 mm were prepared on buccal surfaces of teeth using fissurotomy bur and sealants were applied onto the cavities. The teeth were then thermocycled and exposed to acidified gelatin gel for 6 weeks to induce caries like lesions. A 150 μ m section was taken from each tooth and observed under polarized light microscope to measure the depth of advancing front of outer enamel lesion. The outer lesion depths of all three groups were compared. Results: Enamel demineralization was least in glass ionomer pit and fissure sealant while the demineralization exhibited by nonfluoridated resin and fluoridated resin were comparable. Wall lesion frequency was found to be 0% in all groups. Conclusion and interpretation: The glass ionomer pit and fissure sealant exhibited highest anticariogenic efficacy and hence can be advocated as a means of preventing dental caries. How to cite this article: Prabhakar AR, Dahake PT, Raju OS, Basappa N. Fluoride: Is It Worth to be added in Pit and Fissure Sealants?. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2012;5(1):1-5. PMID:25206126

  13. Column-mode fluoride removal from aqueous solution by magnesia-loaded fly ash cenospheres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xiaotian; Li, Qin; Cui, Hao; Pang, Jianfeng; An, Hao; Wang, Wei; Zhai, Jianping

    2012-06-01

    Column experiments in a fixed bed reactor packed with a certain amount of magnesia-loaded fly ash cenospheres (MLC) were conducted to examine the effects of adsorbent mass, flow velocities, influent concentrations and coexisting anions on fluoride removal. The breakthrough time increased with an increase in adsorbent mass, but decreased with increasing influent fluoride concentration. The exhaustion time decreased with the increase in the influent fluoride concentration. The capacity at the breakthrough point increased with an increase in adsorbent mass, flow velocity and the influent fluoride concentration. The capacity at the exhaustion point increased with an increase in flow velocity, but showed no specific trend with an increase in the initial fluoride concentration. The bed volumes at breakthrough point increased with an increase in adsorbent mass, flow velocity and the influent fluoride concentration. The empty bed contact time decreased with an increase in flow velocity. The coexisting anions reduced the adsorption capacity of the fixed bed reactor in the order: mixture of all three anions > dihydric phosphate > nitrate > sulfate. The adsorbent exhaustion rate decreased with the increase in flow velocity and adsorbent mass, whereas it increased with increasing influent fluoride concentration. Columns with large amounts of MLC are preferable in order to obtain optimal results during the adsorption process, and the higher the flow velocity, the better the column performance. The Bohart and Adams model and the Thomas model were applied to the experimental results. Column adsorption was reversible and the regeneration operation was accomplished by pumping 0.2 M NaOH through the loaded MLC column.

  14. Fluoride release, recharge and mechanical property stability of various fluoride-containing resin composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naoum, S; Ellakwa, A; Martin, F; Swain, M

    2011-01-01

    To determine the fluoride release and recharge of three fluoride-containing resin composites when aged in deionized water (pH 6.5) and lactic acid (pH 4.0) and to assess mechanical properties of these composites following aging. Three fluoride-containing resin composites were analyzed in this study; a new giomer material named Beautifil II, Gradia Direct X, and Tetric EvoCeram. A glass ionomer cement, Fuji IX Extra, was also analyzed for comparison. Specimens were fabricated for two test groups: group 1 included 10 disc specimens initially aged 43 days in deionized water (five specimens) and lactic acid (five specimens). The fluoride release from these specimens was measured using a fluoride-specific electrode on nine specific test days during the aging period. Following 49 days of aging, each specimen was recharged in 5000 ppm neutral sodium fluoride solution for 5 minutes. Specimen recharge was then repeated on a weekly basis for 3 weeks. The subsequent fluoride rerelease was measured at 1, 3, and 7 days after each recharge episode. Group 2 included six disc specimens aged for 3 months in deionized water (three specimens) and lactic acid (three specimens). The hardness and elastic modulus of each specimen was measured using nano-indentation at intervals of 24 hours, 1 month, and 3 months after fabrication. Two-way factorial analysis of variance (ANOVA) and post-hoc (Tukey) testing was used to assess the influence of storage media (two levels) and composite type (three levels) on the fluoride release, fluoride rerelease, hardness, and elastic modulus of the assessed materials. The level of significance was set at p=0.05. All three composites demonstrated fluoride release and recharge when aged in both deionized water and lactic acid. The cumulative fluoride released from Beautifil II into both media was substantially greater than the fluoride released from Gradia Direct X and Tetric EvoCeram after 43 days aging and was significantly (precharge ability of the three

  15. THE USE OF FLUORIDE AND ITS EFFECT ON HEALTH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Domen Kanduti

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Appropriate oral health care is fundamental for any individual’s health. Dental caries is still one of the major public health problems. The most effective way of caries prevention is the use of fluoride. Fluoride occurs naturally in our environment and is always present in our lives. However, the concentration differs from area to area. Exposure can occur through diet, respiration and fluoride supplements. During pregnancy, the placenta acts as a barrier. The fluoride, therefore, crosses the placenta in low concentrations. Drinking water in Slovenia is not fluoridated; the amount of naturally present fluoride is very low. Fluoride can be toxic in extremely high concentrations. The most important effect of fluoride on caries incidence is through its role in the process of remineralisation and demineralisation of tooth enamel. The European Academy of Paediatric Dentistry (EAPD recommends a preventive topical use of fluoride supplements because of their cariostatic effect. 

  16. Well Waters Fluoride in Enugu, Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ISI Ogbu

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abnormal fluoride levels in drinking water have been associated with adverse health effects. To determine the fluoride content of well waters in Enugu, southeastern Nigeria, water samples from 50 artisan wells chosen by multistage sampling procedure from the 5 zones of Enugu municipality were analyzed in duplicates for their fluoride content. The zonal mean values were 0.60, 0.70, 0.62, 0.62, and 0.63 mg/L for Abakpa Nike, Achara Layout, Obiagu/ Ogui, Trans Ekulu and Uwani, respectively (p<0.05. The mean value for the whole city was 0.63 mg/L. Although, the mean level of fluoride recorded in this study is currently within safe limits (1.5 mg/L, WHO 2011, it is important to monitor continuously the fluoride content of well waters in the municipality in view of the increasing industrial activities going on in the city and heavy reliance on well water for domestic purposes and the widespread use of consumer products containing fluoride.

  17. Debating Water Fluoridation Before Dr. Strangelove

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    In the 1930s, scientists learned that small amounts of fluoride naturally occurring in water could protect teeth from decay, and the idea of artificially adding fluoride to public water supplies to achieve the same effect arose. In the 1940s and early 1950s, a number of studies were completed to determine whether fluoride could have harmful effects. The research suggested that the possibility of harm was small. In the early 1950s, Canadian and US medical, dental, and public health bodies all endorsed water fluoridation. I argue in this article that some early concerns about the toxicity of fluoride were put aside as evidence regarding the effectiveness and safety of water fluoridation mounted and as the opposition was taken over by people with little standing in the scientific, medical, and dental communities. The sense of optimism that infused postwar science and the desire of dentists to have a magic bullet that could wipe out tooth decay also affected the scientific debate. PMID:26066938

  18. Drinking water quality and fluoride concentration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frazão, Paulo; Peres, Marco A; Cury, Jaime A

    2011-10-01

    This paper aimed to analyze the fluoride concentration in drinking water, taking into account the balance between the benefits and risks to health, in order to produce scientific backing for the updating of the Brazilian legislation. Systematic reviews studies, official documents and meteorological data were examined. The temperatures in Brazilian state capitals indicate that fluoride levels should be between 0.6 and 0.9 mg F/l in order to prevent dental caries. Natural fluoride concentration of 1.5 mg F/l is tolerated for consumption in Brazil if there is no technology with an acceptable cost-benefit ratio for adjusting/removing the excess. Daily intake of water with a fluoride concentration > 0.9 mg F/l presents a risk to the dentition among children under the age of eight years, and consumers should be explicitly informed of this risk. In view of the expansion of the Brazilian water fluoridation program to regions with a typically tropical climate, Ordinance 635/75 relating to fluoride added to the public water supply should be revised.

  19. Fluoride contents of some Nigerian dentifrices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ndiokwelu, E; Zohoori, V

    2010-06-01

    To analyze the fluoride content of different brands of toothpastes and powders commercially available in Nigerian markets, to compare the claims of the manufacturers with the objectively obtained results of the analysis and to make recommendations to the Regulatory Agencies based on the results of analysis. Standard Operating Procedures (SOP) were used to measure the concentration of fluoride in randomly selected samples using fluoride ion selective electrode. Of the twelve samples analyzed, two toothpastes were purchased at Newcastle. Ten samples (eight toothpastes and two powders) were brought over from Nigeria. Three of the twelve were found to be deficient in the quantity of fluoride contained. All the deficient three samples found wanting were from Nigeria--a thirty per cent (30%) of the Nigerian samples. The importance of fluoride in caries prevention has been well documented and appreciated as public health measure. All efforts geared towards making fluoride available to the public especially through the dentifrices should be encouraged and guarded against mercantilism and abuse. To this end, the Nigerian Dental Association and the National Agency for Food and Drug Administration and Control (NAFDAC) should increase their surveillance over the quality of the products marketed.

  20. Electrochemical Extraction of Rare Earth Metals in Molten Fluorides : Conversion of Rare Earth Oxides into Rare Earth Fluorides Using Fluoride Additives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abbasalizadeh, A.; Malfliet, Annelies; Seetharaman, Seshadri; Sietsma, J.; Yang, Y.

    2017-01-01

    In the present research on rare earth extraction from rare earth oxides (REOs), conversion of rare earth oxides into rare earth fluorides with fluoride fluxes is investigated in order to overcome the problem of low solubility of the rare earth oxides in molten fluoride salts as well as the formation

  1. Micro-finite element analysis applied to high-resolution MRI reveals improved bone mechanical competence in the distal femur of female pre-professional dancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, G; Rajapakse, C S; Diamond, M; Honig, S; Recht, M P; Weiss, D S; Regatte, R R

    2013-04-01

    Micro-finite element analysis applied to high-resolution (0.234-mm length scale) MRI reveals greater whole and cancellous bone stiffness, but not greater cortical bone stiffness, in the distal femur of female dancers compared to controls. Greater whole bone stiffness appears to be mediated by cancellous, rather than cortical bone adaptation. The purpose of this study was to compare bone mechanical competence (stiffness) in the distal femur of female dancers compared to healthy, relatively inactive female controls. This study had institutional review board approval. We recruited nine female modern dancers (25.7±5.8 years, 1.63±0.06 m, 57.1±4.6 kg) and ten relatively inactive, healthy female controls matched for age, height, and weight (32.1±4.8 years, 1.6±0.04 m, 55.8±5.9 kg). We scanned the distal femur using a 7-T MRI scanner and a three-dimensional fast low-angle shot sequence (TR/TE=31 ms/5.1 ms, 0.234 mm×0.234 mm×1 mm, 80 slices). We applied micro-finite element analysis to 10-mm-thick volumes of interest at the distal femoral diaphysis, metaphysis, and epiphysis to compute stiffness and cross-sectional area of whole, cortical, and cancellous bone, as well as cortical thickness. We applied two-tailed t-tests and ANCOVA to compare groups. Dancers demonstrated greater whole and cancellous bone stiffness and cross-sectional area at all locations (p0.08). At all locations, the percent of intact whole bone stiffness for cortical bone alone was lower in dancers (p0.07), but adjustment for cortical bone cross-sectional area did not (pfemur compared to controls. Elevated whole bone stiffness in dancers may be mediated via cancellous, rather than cortical bone adaptation.

  2. Fluoride - is it capable of fighting old and new dental diseases? An overview of existing fluoride compounds and their clinical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brambilla, E

    2001-01-01

    Since researchers first became aware of the anticaries action of fluoride, they have been investigating the effect of this preventive agent in inhibiting or arresting caries development. Many forms of systemic or topical fluoride have been studied and tested for clinical application. Water, salt, milk fluoridation and the use of fluoride supplements were introduced for systemic fluoridation mainly using sodium fluoride. Solutions, gels, toothpastes and rinses of sodium fluoride, stannous fluoride, amine fluorides, acidulated phosphate fluoride and monofluorophosphate were used for topical fluoridation. More recently nonaqueous fluoride varnishes in an alcoholic solution of natural resins and difluorosilane agents in a polyurethane matrix were introduced. Although all of these fluoridation methods have a caries-preventive action, these benefits and the ease of application is variable. As fluoride is a key component of oral health promotion a coordinated approach on a community and individual basis seems to be needed to maximize the cost-benefit ratio of prevention. Copyright 2001 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  3. Effect of radiant heat and ultrasound on fluoride release and surface hardness of glass ionomer cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolidis, Kosmas; Dionysopoulos, Dimitrios; Gerasimou, Paris; Sfeikos, Thrasyvoulos

    2016-11-02

    The purpose of this investigation was to evaluate the influence of radiant heat and ultrasound on fluoride release and surface hardness of 3 glass ionomer cements (GICs). There were 3 experimental groups for each GIC; in group 1, the specimens were left to set without any treatment; in group 2, the specimens were irradiated for 2 minutes using a LED unit; and in group 3, ultrasound was applied using a scaler for 55 seconds on the specimen surface. Fluoride release measurements were performed daily for 7 days and at days 14 and 28. Surface hardness of the tested GICs was determined using Vickers method. The measurements were performed 24 hours and 7 days after mixing. Statistical analysis of the data was made using 1-way ANOVA and Tukey's and Bonferroni post hoc tests (α = 0.05). Radiant heat during setting reduced the fluoride release and increased the surface hardness of GICs (p<0.05). Ultrasonic treatment also reduced the fluoride release and increased the surface hardness (p<0.05) of GICs but in lower extent. Among the GICs there were differences in fluoride release and surface hardness properties depending on their composition (p<0.05). Radiant heat and ultrasonic treatments may be useful methods for GIC restorations in order to achieve faster adequate initial mechanical properties.

  4. Results of a promising open trial to prevent baby bottle tooth decay: a fluoride varnish study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinstein, P; Domoto, P; Koday, M; Leroux, B

    1994-01-01

    One hundred thirty-three farm worker children with an average age of 17 months participated in a study of a fluoride varnish in WIC programs in the Yakima Valley of Central Washington. After parents were interviewed, the child was examined and a fluoride varnish applied to the maxillary incisors. At the six-month recall 62 children and their parents returned. Results indicated a significant decrease in decalcification from 35 percent to 21 percent and an increase in decay from 3 percent to 16 percent. The rate of decay was lower than the 30 percent found in this age-group in this population. Of 130 sound teeth at baseline, 13 percent were decayed or decalcified in six months; of 73 decalcified teeth at baseline, 51 percent were found to be sound in six months. Additional experimentation with fluoride varnish is warranted.

  5. Fluoride release and cariostatic potential of orthodontic adhesives with and without daily fluoride rinsing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chin, Yeen; Sandham, John; Rumachik, Elena N.; Ruben, Jan L.; Huysmans, Marie-Charlotte D. N. J. M.

    2009-01-01

    Introduction: In this study, we aimed to evaluate the fluoride-release profiles and caries lesion development in an enamel model with brackets cemented with 4 orthodontic adhesives with and without daily fluoride exposure. Methods: Four orthodontic adhesives (Ketac Cem mu, 3M ESPE, Seefeld, Germany;

  6. Effect of titanium tetrafluoride, amine fluoride and fluoride varnish on enamel erosion in vitro

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vieira, A; Ruben, JL; Huysmans, MCDNJM

    2005-01-01

    This study aimed at evaluating the effect of 1 and 4% titanium tetrafluoride (TiF4) gels, amine fluoride (AmF) 1 and 0.25% and a fluoride varnish (FP) on the prevention of dental erosion. Two experimental groups served as controls, one with no pretreatment and another one pre-treated with a

  7. Plaque formation and lactic acid production after use of amine fluoride/stannous fluoride mouthrinse

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gerardu, V.A.M.; Buijs, M.; Loveren, C. van; Cate, J.M. ten

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study was lo determine the effects of 3 wk of daily rinsing with amine fluoride/stannous fluoride (AmF/SnF2) mouthrinse on plaque formation at buccal and interproximal sites, and on the acid production in plaque. in a randomized clinical trial with 30 participants. The amount of

  8. Fluoride release, recharge and flexural properties of polymethylmethacrylate containing fluoridated glass fillers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Bakri, I A; Swain, M V; Naoum, S J; Al-Omari, W M; Martin, E; Ellakwa, A

    2014-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of fluoridated glass fillers on fluoride release, recharge and the flexural properties of modified polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA). Specimens of PMMA denture base material with various loading of fluoridated glass fillers (0%, 1%, 2.5%, 5% and 10% by weight) were prepared. Flexural properties were evaluated on rectangular specimens (n = 10) aged in deionized water after 24 hours, 1 and 3 months. Disc specimens (n = 10) were aged for 43 days in deionized water and lactic acid (pH 4.0) and fluoride release was measured at numerous intervals. After ageing, specimens were recharged and fluoride re-release was recorded at 1, 3 and 7 days after recharge. Samples containing 2.5%, 5% and 10% glass fillers showed significantly (p glass fillers specimens. All experimental specimens exhibited fluoride release in both media. The flexural strength of specimens decreased in proportion to the percentage filler inclusion with the modulus of elasticity values remaining within ISO Standard 1567. The modified PMMA with fluoridated glass fillers has the ability to release and re-release fluoride ion. Flexural strength decreased as glass filler uploading increased. © 2014 Australian Dental Association.

  9. Cancer incidence and mortality in workers exposed to fluoride

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grandjean, P; Olsen, J H; Jensen, O M

    1992-01-01

    Although a recent bioassay showed increased frequency of bone cancer in rats with high oral intake of fluoride, the data are reported as equivocal evidence of carcinogenicity. In humans, occupational fluoride exposure may cause skeletal fluorosis, and our earlier follow-up of fluoride-exposed wor......-exposed workers showed increased incidence of respiratory cancers.......Although a recent bioassay showed increased frequency of bone cancer in rats with high oral intake of fluoride, the data are reported as equivocal evidence of carcinogenicity. In humans, occupational fluoride exposure may cause skeletal fluorosis, and our earlier follow-up of fluoride...

  10. Removal of fluoride from fluoride contaminated industrial waste water by electrolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Vijaya A; Nanoti, Madan V

    2003-01-01

    Wastewater containing fluoride are generally treated with lime or calcium salt supplemented with aluminium salts. Wastewater generated from different industries does not always behave in the same way due to the presence of interfering contaminants. A number of techniques have been developed and studied for the removal of excessive fluoride. Most of these are based on use of aluminium salt. In alum coagulation the sorption properties of product of hydrolysis of aluminium salts and capacity of fluoride for complex formation plays a very important role. These hydrolysis products of aluminium can be produced by passing direct current through aluminium electrode. The text presented in the paper deals with the various aspect of removal of fluoride by electrolysis using aluminium electrode from fluoride chemical based industrial wastewater.

  11. Alternatives to fluoride in the prevention and treatment of dental erosion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buzalaf, Marília Afonso Rabelo; Magalhães, Ana Carolina; Wiegand, Annette

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, different agents have been discussed as potential alternatives to fluoride in the prevention of dental erosion. These agents are intended to form acid-resistant layers on the surface, to induce repair of eroded lesions by mineral precipitation or to prevent the enzymatic degradation of demineralised collagen. The application of adhesives and/or fissure sealants is considered to be an effective alternative to fluoride, but requires professional application and, depending on the product used, a re-sealing of the surface every several months. Studies testing film-forming products, such as polymers, have suggested the potential effectiveness of some of these approaches, such as chitosan, although further studies are needed to confirm the effectiveness of this approach. Other studies have demonstrated that products designed to deliver calcium and/or phosphate have not been successful at providing a significant anti-erosive effect. In advanced erosive lesions, the demineralised collagenous dentine matrix can be degraded by host enzymes such as matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs). As well as fluorides, epigallocatechin gallate and chlorhexidine have been identified as effective MMP inhibitors, with the potential to reduce the progression of dentine erosion. While fluoride compounds have been shown to have an anti-erosive potential, particularly those containing tin, alternative approaches that provide even greater protective capacity still need to be developed and proven to be effective. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  12. Global Measurements of Atmospheric Sulfuryl Fluoride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mühle, J.; Harth, C. M.; Salameh, P.; Miller, B. R.; Weiss, R. F.; Porter, L. W.; Fraser, P. J.; Greally, B. R.; O'Doherty, S.

    2006-12-01

    Sulfuryl fluoride (SO2F2) is used increasingly as a fumigant, but information about its emissions to the atmosphere is limited. Its atmospheric fate and lifetime are uncertain, with hydrolysis in the basic surface waters of the oceans a likely dominant sink, and its roles as a greenhouse gas and as a sulfur source to the stratosphere are unknown. We present here the first results of two years of high-frequency high-precision in situ observations of sulfuryl fluoride in the AGAGE (Advanced Global Atmospheric Gases Experiment) global measurement program. At La Jolla, California, baseline conditions are rarely achieved, and pollution events of up to 1.7 ppb (the exposure limit is 5 ppm) from nearby structural fumigation are common. At the Mace Head, Ireland, and Cape Grim, Tasmania, AGAGE stations, baseline conditions are observed with mixing ratios at the beginning of 2005 of ~1.0 ppt and ~0.9 ppt, respectively. Measured growth rates at these stations are ~0.06 ppt per year and ~0.04 ppt per year, respectively. Using these preliminary results and assuming no significant emissions in the southern hemisphere, a simple 2-box model can be used to estimate the tropospheric lifetime of sulfuryl fluoride as about one and a half decades, which is substantially longer than previous industry estimates. The corresponding modeled sulfuryl fluoride flux to the troposphere is ~2 x 109 g per year. Based on these initial measurements, the current global warming contribution of sulfuryl fluoride is likely small. Although the lifetime of sulfuryl fluoride is longer than that of carbonyl sulfide, sulfuryl fluoride is likely less important as source of sulfur to the stratosphere, due to its low atmospheric mixing ratio.

  13. Chronologic Trends in Studies on Fluoride Mechanisms of Action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, H J; Oh, H W; Lee, D W; Kim, C H; Ahn, J Y; Kim, Y; Shin, H B; Kim, C Y; Park, S H; Jeon, J G

    2017-11-01

    Fluoride has been widely used for the prevention of dental caries since the mid-20th century. The aim of this study was to investigate the chronologic trends in studies on fluoride mechanisms of action against dental caries during the years 1950 to 2015. To this aim, queries such as "fluoride," "fluoride and demineralization," "fluoride and remineralization," "fluoride and (plaque or biofilms)," and "fluoride and (bacteria or microbials)" were submitted to PubMed to collect research article information, including titles, abstracts, publication dates, author affiliations, and publication journals. The article information that PubMed produced was then collected by an automatic web crawler and examined through informetrics and linguistic analyses. We found that the number of articles concerned with fluoride mechanisms of action against dental caries was 6,903 and gradually increased over time during the years 1950 to 2015. They were published by 1,136 journals-most notably, Caries Research and Journal of Dental Research. Of the articles published, those related to bacteria/microbials had a higher percentage (44%) than those dealing with plaque/biofilms, demineralization, and remineralization. With regard to the geographic distribution of authors, Europe and North America accounted for 65% of the articles during the years 1987 to 2015, although the number of authors in Asia sharply increased in recent years. Among the fluoride compounds, NaF was mentioned more frequently than SnF2, Na2PO3F, amine fluoride, and acidulated phosphate fluoride during the years 1986 to 2015. Water fluoridation received the most attention among the various fluoride application methods (toothpastes, mouthwashes, fluoride varnishes, and fluoride gels) during the same period. These results, obtained from employing informetrics and linguistic analyses, suggest that in studies on fluoride mechanisms of action, 1) the unbalanced geographic distribution of articles and 2) the heavy concentration of

  14. The investigation of kinetic and isotherm of fluoride adsorption onto functionalize pumice stone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asgari, Ghorban [Department of Environmental Health Engineering, School of Health, Hamadan University of Medical Sciences, Hamadan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Roshani, Babak, E-mail: babak.roshani@gmail.com [Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, University of Saskatchewan, 57 Campus Drive, Saskatoon, SK, S7N 5A9 (Canada); Ghanizadeh, Ghader [Health Research Center and Health School, Baqiyatallah University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2012-05-30

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Removal of fluoride from drinking water. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Pumice as adsorbent functionalized by the cationic surfactant. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Effects of HDTMA loading. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Best fit of equilibrium expressions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Maximum amount of adsorption. - Abstract: In this research work, pumice that is functionalized by the cationic surfactant, hexadecyltrimethyl ammonium (HDTMA), is used as an adsorbent for the removal of fluoride from drinking water. This work was carried out in two parts. The effects of HDTMA loading, pH (3-10), reaction time (5-60 min) and the adsorbent dosage (0.15-2.5 g L{sup -1}) were investigated on the removal of fluoride as a target contaminate from water through the design of different experimental sets in the first part. The results from this first part revealed that surfactant-modified pumice (SMP) exhibited the best performance at dose 0.5 g L{sup -1}, pH 6, and it adsorbs over 96% of fluoride from a solution containing 10 mg L{sup -1} fluoride after 30 min of mixing time. The four linear forms of the Langmuir, Freundlich, Temkin and Dubinin-Radushkevich isotherms model were applied to determine the best fit of equilibrium expressions. Apart from the regression coefficient (R{sup 2}), four error functions were used to validate the isotherm and kinetics data. The experimental adsorption isotherm complies with Langmuir equation model type 1. The maximum amount of adsorption (Q{sub max}) was 41 mg g{sup -1}. The kinetic studies indicated that the adsorption of fluoride best fitted with the pseudo-second-order kinetic type 1. Thermodynamic parameters evaluation of fluoride adsorption on SMP showed that the adsorption process under the selected conditions was spontaneous and endothermic. The suitability of SMP in defluoridation at field condition was investigated with natural groundwater samples collected from a nearby fluoride endemic area

  15. Molecular anions sputtered from fluorides

    CERN Document Server

    Gnaser, H

    2002-01-01

    The emission of negatively charged ions from different fluoride samples (LiF, CaF sub 2 , LaF sub 3 and HfF sub 4) induced by sputtering with a 14.5-keV Cs sup + ion beam was studied. Sputtered ions were detected in a high-sensitivity double-focusing mass spectrometer. In particular, the possible existence of small doubly charged negative molecular ions was investigated. But whereas singly charged species of the general type MF sub n sup - (where M represents a metal atom) were detected with high abundances, stable dianions were observed in an unambiguous way only for one molecule: HfF sub 6 sup 2 sup -. The flight time through the mass spectrometer of approx 35 mu s establishes a lower limit with respect to the intrinsic lifetime of this doubly charged ion. For singly charged anions abundance distributions and, in selected cases, emission-energy spectra were recorded. For two ion species (Ca sup - and HfF sub 5 sup -) isotopic fractionation effects caused by the (velocity dependent) ionization process were d...

  16. Protocol for a randomized controlled dismantling study of a brief telephonic psychological intervention applied to non-professional caregivers with symptoms of depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vázquez, Fernando L; Torres, Ángela; Díaz, Olga; Otero, Patricia; Blanco, Vanessa; Hermida, Elisabet

    2015-11-23

    Although depression is a common problem in caregivers and there are effective cognitive-behavioral interventions for its prevention, the ability of caregivers to attend these treatments is often limited by logistics. Furthermore, the efficacy of the components of these interventions is unknown. The objectives of this study are to (a) evaluate the efficacy of a telephone-administered cognitive-behavioral intervention to prevent depression with all its components (cognitive and behavioral) and only with behavioral activation, and to (b) analyze the mediators of the change in depressive symptoms. A randomized controlled clinical trial was designed to dismantle the components of a cognitive-behavioral intervention. Caregivers with elevated depressive symptoms will be randomly assigned to a cognitive-behavioral intervention, an intervention with only the behavioral activation component, or a usual care control group. Each condition will consist of approximately 60 participants. The two interventions will consist of five sessions lasting 90 min each, applied to groups of about 5 participants at a time via conference call. Trained interviewers, blind to the experimental conditions, will conduct the assessments at the pre-treatment, post-treatment and 1-, 3-, 6- and 12-month follow-ups. This study will provide evidence of the efficacy of a cognitive-behavioral intervention to prevent depression in caregivers with elevated depressive symptoms administered via conference call, and on the impact of the behavioral activation component on the overall efficacy of the program. If we find favorable results, it would mean that we have developed a program of prevention of depression of higher clinical utility and efficacy than those currently available, which would make it possible for a large number of caregivers to have access to such resources. ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT02292394. Registered 6 November 2014.

  17. Influences of charcoal and bamboo charcoal amendment on soil-fluoride fractions and bioaccumulation of fluoride in tea plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Hongjian; Zhang, Zhengzhu; Wan, Xiaochun

    2012-10-01

    High levels of fluoride in tea plants pose a potential health risk to humans who drink tea. It has been demonstrated that tea plant fluoride is closely related to the available fluoride in soil. But approaches that could be used to regulate the availability of fluoride in soil have been rarely seen. This study aims to investigate how the addition of charcoal and bamboo charcoal affected soil fluoride availability and bioaccumulation of fluoride in tea plants. In a microcosm experiment, tea plants were grown in the tea garden soil mixed with different amounts of charcoal and bamboo charcoal [that is, 0.5, 1.0, 2.5, and 5.0 % (w/w)]. Soil-fluoride fractions and fluoride accumulated in tea plants were determined using the sequential extraction and ion selective electrode method. Obtained results showed that both charcoal and bamboo charcoal additions significantly enhanced the concentrations of Fe/Mn oxide-bound fluoride, but significantly reduced the concentrations of water-soluble and exchangeable fluoride (p Charcoal and bamboo charcoal additions also significantly decreased the amounts of fluoride in tea roots and tea leaves (p charcoal and bamboo charcoal had no impacts on the tea quality, as indexed by the concentrations of polysaccharides, polyphenols, amino acids, and caffeine in tea leaves. These results suggested that application of charcoal and bamboo charcoal may provide a useful method to reduce the availability of fluoride in soil and the subsequent fluoride uptake by tea plants.

  18. Synthesis of nanocrystalline mixed metal fluorides in nonaqueous ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    , thermal analysis, SEM and TEM. Monophasic cubic phases were obtained for the central ... The fluoride content was determined by titrimetry and found to be nearly stoichiometric. Some of these fluorides were found to be thermally stable up ...

  19. State and National Water Fluoridation System (Public Water Systems)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Water Fluoridation Reporting System (WFRS) has been developed to provide tools to assist states in managing fluoridation programs. WFRS is designed to track all...

  20. Potential fluoride toxicity from oral medicaments: A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rizwan Ullah

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The beneficial effects of fluoride on human oral health are well studied. There are numerous studies demonstrating that a small amount of fluoride delivered to the oral cavity decreases the prevalence of dental decay and results in stronger teeth and bones. However, ingestion of fluoride more than the recommended limit leads to toxicity and adverse effects. In order to update our understanding of fluoride and its potential toxicity, we have described the mechanisms of fluoride metabolism, toxic effects, and management of fluoride toxicity. The main aim of this review is to highlight the potential adverse effects of fluoride overdose and poorly understood toxicity. In addition, the related clinical significance of fluoride overdose and toxicity has been discussed.

  1. Chemically modified field effect transistors with nitrite or fluoride selectivity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Antonisse, M.M.G.; Ruel, Bianca H.M.; Engbersen, Johannes F.J.; Reinhoudt, David

    1998-01-01

    Polysiloxanes with different types of polar substituents are excellent membrane materials for nitrite and fluoride selective chemically modified field effect transistors (CHEMFETs). Nitrite selectivity has been introduced by incorporation of a cobalt porphyrin into the membrane; fluoride selectivity

  2. Emissions of fluorides from welding processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szewczyńska, Małgorzata; Pągowska, Emilia; Pyrzyńska, Krystyna

    2015-11-01

    The levels of fluoride airborne particulates emitted from welding processes were investigated. They were sampled with the patented IOM Sampler, developed by J. H. Vincent and D. Mark at the Institute of Occupational Medicine (IOM), personal inhalable sampler for simultaneous collection of the inhalable and respirable size fractions. Ion chromatography with conductometric detection was used for quantitative analysis. The efficiency of fluoride extraction from the cellulose filter of the IOM sampler was examined using the standard sample of urban air particle matter SRM-1648a. The best results for extraction were obtained when water and the anionic surfactant N-Cetyl-N-N-N-trimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) were used in an ultrasonic bath. The limits of detection and quantification for the whole procedure were 8μg/L and 24μg/L, respectively. The linear range of calibration was 0.01-10mg/L, which corresponds to 0.0001-0.1mg of fluorides per m(3) in collection of a 20L air sample. The concentration of fluorides in the respirable fraction of collected air samples was in the range of 0.20-1.82mg/m(3), while the inhalable fraction contained 0.23-1.96mg/m(3) of fluorides during an eight-hour working day in the welding room. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  3. Thermodynamic data-base for metal fluorides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoo, Jae Hyung; Lee, Byung Gik; Kang, Young Ho and others

    2001-05-01

    This study is aimed at collecting useful data of thermodynamic properties of various metal fluorides. Many thermodynamic data for metal fluorides are needed for the effective development, but no report of data-base was published. Accordingly, the objective of this report is to rearrange systematically the existing thermodynamic data based on metal fluorides and is to use it as basic data for the development of pyrochemical process. The physicochemical properties of various metal fluorides and metals were collected from literature and such existing data base as HSC code, TAPP code, FACT code, JANAF table, NEA data-base, CRC handbook. As major contents of the thermodynamic data-base, the physicochemical properties such as formation energy, viscosity, density, vapor pressure, etc. were collected. Especially, some phase diagrams of eutectic molten fluorides are plotted and thermodynamic data of liquid metals are also compiled. In the future, the technical report is to be used as basic data for the development of the pyrochemical process which is being carried out as a long-term nuclear R and D project.

  4. Investigation of Chemical Durability Mechanisms and Structure of Fluoride Glasses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-03-01

    were analysed by plasma -30 -25 -.0 -15 -10 -05 0 emission spectroscopy and the fluoride anions by log (time in daysi potentiometry with a F...glass - 4. surface during the corrosion. Fluoride ion concentration . 4 was measured from potentiometry by using fluoride ion -, selective electrodes...each raw material was measured by potentiometry with a pH electrode. Excess amount of each fluoride compound was also put in different pH buffer

  5. Fluoridation Status of U. S. Army Conus Installations

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-09-30

    water source and date the water was analyzed. 3. The process of fluoridating or defluoridating water . a. Are chemicals used in the fluoridation... defluoridated ? Some installations are supplied water which is naturally fluoridated above optimal limits and there is need to remove a portion of the...Seven reported using no chemicals with 4 recording below 0.7 ppm levels of fluoride in the drinking water . Defluoridation was used at two installations

  6. Evidence-based tailoring of behavior-change campaigns: increasing fluoride-free water consumption in rural Ethiopia with persuasion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huber, Alexandra C; Tobias, Robert; Mosler, Hans-Joachim

    2014-03-01

    Two hundred million people worldwide are at risk of developing dental and skeletal fluorosis due to excessive fluoride uptake from their water. Since medical treatment of the disease is difficult and mostly ineffective, preventing fluoride uptake is crucial. In the Ethiopian Rift Valley, a fluoride-removal community filter was installed. Despite having access to a fluoride filter, the community used the filter sparingly. During a baseline assessment, 173 face-to-face interviews were conducted to identify psychological factors that influence fluoride-free water consumption. Based on the results, two behavior-change campaigns were implemented: a traditional information intervention targeting perceived vulnerability, and an evidence-based persuasion intervention regarding perceived costs. The interventions were tailored to household characteristics. The campaigns were evaluated with a survey and analyzed in terms of their effectiveness in changing behavior and targeted psychological factors. While the intervention targeting perceived vulnerability showed no desirable effects, cost persuasion decreased the perceived costs and increased the consumption of fluoride-free water. This showed that altering subjective perceptions can change behavior even without changing objective circumstances. Moreover, interventions are more effective if they are based on evidence and tailored to specific households. © 2013 The International Association of Applied Psychology.

  7. Spatial analysis of fluoride concentrations in drinking water and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Namibia, the driest country in sub-Saharan Africa, is largely reliant on groundwater for its potable water demand and groundwater is a major source of naturally-occurring fluoride. This study assessed the spatial distribution of fluoride in potable water and appraised the population at risk for high fluoride intake. Analysis of ...

  8. Modelling the Effects of Competing Anions on Fluoride Removal by ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Fe2O3 nano particles supported on functionalized poly-acrylonitrile was prepared. PAN-oxime-nano Fe2O3 was characterized by XRD, FTIR andTEMand used for fluoride adsorption. The adsorption capacity increased with increasing initial fluoride concentration and reaction time. Fluoride-removal performance of ...

  9. Fluoride concentrations in groundwater and impact on human health ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Temperature and pH were measured in the field while fluoride and calcium in groundwater were analysed in the laboratory. A survey was conducted to obtain information on the impact of fluoride on human health. 40% of the households and 1 primary school in Siloam Village were interviewed. Fluoride concentrations in ...

  10. Geographical mapping of fluoride levels in drinking water sources in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Knowledge of fluoride levels in drinking water is of importance in dental public health, yet this information is lacking, at national level, in Nigeria. Objective: To map out fluoride levels in drinking water sources in Nigeria. Materials and Methods: Fluoride levels in drinking water sources from 109 randomly ...

  11. Fluoride removal from aqueous solution by pumice: case study on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The fluoride removal from synthetic water by pumice was studied at batch experiments in this study. The effect of pH, contact time, fluoride concentration and adsorbent dose on the fluoride sequestration was investigated. The optimum conditions were studied on Kuhbonan water as a case study. The results showed that ...

  12. COMPLEX FLUORIDES OF PLUTONIUM AND AN ALKALI METAL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seaborg, G.T.

    1960-08-01

    A method is given for precipitating alkali metal plutonium fluorides. such as KPuF/sub 5/, KPu/sub 2/F/sub 9/, NaPuF/sub 5/, and RbPuF/sub 5/, from an aqueous plutonium(IV) solution by adding hydrogen fluoride and alkali-metal- fluoride.

  13. comparative study of fluoride in alcornea cordifolia and commercial ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Quantum

    2013-07-31

    Jul 31, 2013 ... cleaning the teeth was by chewing a stick. Alcornea cordifolia is the most widely chewed tooth-cleaning stick and has continued to be used despite availability of varieties of commercial .... Salivary fluoride content after tooth brushing a sodium fluoride and an amine fluoride dentifrice followed by different.

  14. Fluoride levels in commercially available rice in Ethiopia | Tegegne ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Alkaline fusion was used for sample preparation of six varieties for both the raw rice and rice cooked with tap water and fluoridated water. Fluoride levels ... A statistical analysis of variance at 95% confidence level for fluoride determination indicated significant difference between the mean of each variety of rice samples.

  15. 21 CFR 177.2510 - Polyvinylidene fluoride resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Polyvinylidene fluoride resins. 177.2510 Section... as Components of Articles Intended for Repeated Use § 177.2510 Polyvinylidene fluoride resins. Polyvinylidene fluoride resins may be safely used as articles or components of articles intended for repeated use...

  16. The accuracy of fluoride measurement in water and its implications ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The accurate measurement of the fluoride concentration in water is an essential prerequisite to stay within the allowable dosing tolerances required by the South African water fluoridation legislation. In the absence of reliable error estimates for fluoride measurement in natural water samples, a study was conducted utilising ...

  17. An inter-laboratory comparative study of fluoride determination in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    South Africa is on the brink of implementation of mandatory fluoridation of municipal water following the final approval by Parliament in 2001. The ability to accurately measure fluoride in water is an obvious prerequisite for the safe and effective implementation of water fluoridation. This paper evaluates the current status of ...

  18. Fluoride distribution in different environmental segments at Hirakud ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Fluoride distribution in different environmental segments at Hirakud Orissa (India) ... African Journal of Environmental Science and Technology ... A detailed investigation undertaken during 2005 - 2006 on fluoride status of Hirakud environment reveals that the fluoride content varied from a minimum of 0.5 to a maximum of ...

  19. 40 CFR 60.212 - Standard for fluorides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Standard for fluorides. 60.212 Section... Industry: Superphosphoric Acid Plants § 60.212 Standard for fluorides. (a) On and after the date on which... facility any gases which contain total fluorides in excess of 5.0 g/megagram (Mg) of equivalent P2O5 feed...

  20. 40 CFR 60.222 - Standard for fluorides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Standard for fluorides. 60.222 Section... Industry: Diammonium Phosphate Plants § 60.222 Standard for fluorides. (a) On and after the date on which... facility any gases which contain total fluorides in excess of 30 g/megagram (Mg) of equivalent P2O5 feed (0...

  1. 40 CFR 60.232 - Standard for fluorides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Standard for fluorides. 60.232 Section... Industry: Triple Superphosphate Plants § 60.232 Standard for fluorides. On and after the date on which the... gases which contain total fluorides in excess of 100 g/megagram (Mg) of equivalent P2O5 feed (0.20 lb...

  2. Health effects of fluoride pollution caused by coal burning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ando, M.; Tadano, M.; Yamamoto, S.; Tamura, K.; Chen, X. [Regional Environment Division, National Institute for Environmental Studies, Tsukuba, 305-0083 Ibaraki (Japan); Asanuma, S. [Japan Institute of Rural Medicine, Usuda, Nagano (Japan); Watanabe, T. [Saku Central Hospital, Usuda, Nagano (Japan); Kondo, T. [Matsumoto Dental College, Shiojiri, Nagano (Japan); Sakurai, S. [Otsuma Women' s University, Tama, Tokyo (Japan); Ji, R.; Liang, C.; Cao, S. [Institute of Environmental Health and Engineering, Beijing (China); Hong, Z. [Shanxi Maternity and Children' s Hospital, Taiyuan (China)

    2001-04-23

    Recently a huge amount of fluoride in coal has been released into indoor environments by the combustion of coal and fluoride pollution seems to be increasing in some rural areas in China. Combustion of coal and coal bricks is the primary source of gaseous and aerosol fluoride and these forms of fluoride can easily enter exposed food products and the human respiratory tract. Major human fluoride exposure was caused by consumption of fluoride contaminated food, such as corn, chilies and potatoes. For each diagnostic syndrome of dental fluorosis, a log-normal distribution was observed on the logarithm of urinary fluoride concentration in students in China. Urinary fluoride content was found to be a primary health indicator of the prevalence of dental fluorosis in the community. In the fluorosis areas, osteosclerosis in skeletal fluorosis patients was observed with a high prevalence. A biochemical marker of bone resorption, urinary deoxypyridinoline content was much higher in residents in China than in residents in Japan. It was suggested that bone resorption was stimulated to a greater extent in residents in China and fluoride may stimulate both bone resorption and bone formation. Renal function especially glomerular filtration rate was very sensitive to fluoride exposure. Inorganic phosphate concentrations in urine were significantly lower in the residents in fluorosis areas in China than in non-fluorosis area in China and Japan. Since airborne fluoride from the combustion of coal pollutes extensively both the living environment and food, it is necessary to reduce fluoride pollution caused by coal burning.

  3. Modelling the Effects of Competing Anions on Fluoride Removal by ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    NICOLAAS

    Fe2O3 nano particles supported on functionalized poly-acrylonitrile was prepared. PAN-oxime-nano Fe2O3 was characterized by. XRD, FTIR and TEM and used for fluoride adsorption. The adsorption capacity increased with increasing initial fluoride concen- tration and reaction time. Fluoride-removal performance of ...

  4. Fluoride in drinking water and its removal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meenakshi; Maheshwari, R C

    2006-09-01

    Excessive fluoride concentrations have been reported in groundwaters of more than 20 developed and developing countries including India where 19 states are facing acute fluorosis problems. Various technologies are being used to remove fluoride from water but still the problem has not been rooted out. In this paper, a broad overview of the available technologies for fluoride removal and advantages and limitations of each one have been presented based on literature survey and the experiments conducted in the laboratory with several processes. It has been concluded that the selection of treatment process should be site specific as per local needs and prevailing conditions as each technology has some limitations and no one process can serve the purpose in diverse conditions.

  5. The role of fluoride and chlorhexidine in preserving hardness and mineralization of enamel and cementum after gamma irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdalla, Rowida; Niazy, Maha A; Jamil, Wael E; Hazzaa, Hala A; Elbatouti, Amal A

    2017-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of 0.05% sodium fluoride and 0.12% chlorhexidine mouthwashes on the micro-hardness of tooth enamel and cementum that was exposed to therapeutic doses of gamma radiation. Sixty extracted human teeth were divided into two groups, one was irradiated, the other was not irradiated. The two groups were further subdivided into three subgroups, which were each treated either with 0.05% sodium fluoride or with 0.12% chlorhexidine; the third subgroup served as a control. After demineralization-remineralization cycling, teeth from the irradiated groups showed a significantly lower micro-hardness when compared to those from the non-irradiated groups. Both in the irradiated and non-irradiated groups, teeth from the control subgroups showed a significantly lower micro-hardness, as compared to teeth treated with sodium fluoride and chlorhexidine. For non-irradiated enamel samples, those treated with chlorhexidine showed a significantly less micro-hardness compared to those treated with sodium fluoride. In contrast, irradiated enamel showed no significant difference in micro-hardness, whatever treatment (chlorhexidine or sodium fluoride) was applied. For cementum, treatment with chlorhexidine resulted in a significantly lower micro-hardness compared to sodium fluoride, both for the irradiated and non-irradiated groups. It is concluded that gamma irradiation with therapeutic doses typically used for head and neck carcinoma treatment has a direct effect in reducing micro-hardness of tooth enamel and cementum. Mouthwash protocols including, for example, application of 0.05% sodium fluoride or 0.12% chlorhexidine three times per day for 6 weeks, can protect enamel and cementum against the reduction in hardness and demineralization caused by gamma irradiation. Sodium fluoride offers more protection compared to chlorhexidine.

  6. Simulating cost-effectiveness of fluoride varnish during well-child visits for Medicaid-enrolled children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quiñonez, Rocio B; Stearns, Sally C; Talekar, Bhavna S; Rozier, R Gary; Downs, Stephen M

    2006-02-01

    To examine the cost-effectiveness of fluoride varnish application by medical providers when implemented within a well-child periodicity schedule for Medicaid-enrolled children. Cost-effectiveness was analyzed using published probabilities and costs. Input parameters included the effectiveness of fluoride varnish (35.4%) applied according to the well-child periodicity schedule up to 3 years of age at $16.00 per application, annual caries increment (14%), age-specific dental care usage rates (0.2% at 9 months to 19% at 42 months), and age-related nonhospital treatment costs ($292.00-$503.00) and hospital treatment costs ($2191.00-$2940.00). Sensitivity analysis was conducted to assess the effects for varying input parameters. Well-child visits during primary care. Children aged 9 to 42 months. Application of universal fluoride varnish (fluoride varnish-all) at 9, 18, 24, and 36 months vs no intervention (fluoride varnish-none) was compared. Cost per month without cavities and treatment averted during the first 42 months of life from a Medicaid payer's perspective. Fluoride varnish improved clinical outcomes by 1.52 cavity-free months but at a cost of $7.18 for each cavity-free month gained per child and $203 for each treatment averted. Considerable uncertainty existed for some parameters. Fluoride varnish was cost saving when dental services and nonhospital treatment costs were 1.5 to 2 times greater, respectively, than our base case estimate. Based on these assumptions, fluoride varnish use in the medical setting is effective in reducing early childhood caries in low-income populations but is not cost saving in the first 42 months of life. Potential total cost reductions with varying parameters suggest that evaluations using a longitudinal cohort are needed.

  7. Saliva substitutes in combination with highly concentrated fluorides and brushing: in vitro effects on enamel subsurface lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tschoppe, P; Siegel, A; Meyer-Lueckel, H

    2010-01-01

    Hyposalivation is often associated with high caries activity, in particular in patients undergoing irradiation in the head/neck area. Besides the use of saliva substitutes to relieve the oral symptoms, daily application of fluoride gels or toothpaste (5,000 μg F⁻/g) is recommended for caries prevention. The aim of this study was to evaluate potentially remineralising effects of these fluoride agents in combination with saliva substitutes on enamel subsurface lesions. Demineralised bovine specimens were either stored in mineral water [control; saturation with respect to octacalcium phosphate (S(OCP)): 0.8], a demineralising saliva substitute (Glandosane; S(OCP): 0.3) or in a modified (with respect to S(OCP)) saliva substitute [Saliva natura (SN); S(OCP): 1.9] for 5 weeks (37°C). The following treatments were applied twice daily (11-13/group): no treatment (0), ProSchmelz fluoride gel (PS; 10 min application), Duraphat toothpaste (DP; 10 s; brushing with toothpaste/storage solution slurry), combination of DP+PS. Mineral parameters before/after storage were evaluated from microradiographs. Storage in Glandosane led to significant demineralisation (p fluoride agents neutralised the demineralising effect (p > 0.05). Storage in water alone resulted in no changes in mineral parameters (p > 0.05), whereas in combination with fluorides remineralisation could be shown (p fluorides were detected. Under the conditions chosen, the fluoride agents reduce the demineralising effects of Glandosane and promote the remineralisation of specimens stored in water. Remineralising effects of SN could not be enhanced by the fluorides. Copyright © 2010 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  8. Do conventional glass ionomer cements release more fluoride than resin-modified glass ionomer cements?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabral, Maria Fernanda Costa; Martinho, Roberto Luiz de Menezes; Guedes-Neto, Manoel Valcácio; Rebelo, Maria Augusta Bessa; Pontes, Danielson Guedes

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to evaluate the fluoride release of conventional glass ionomer cements (GICs) and resin-modified GICs. Materials and Methods The cements were grouped as follows: G1 (Vidrion R, SS White), G2 (Vitro Fil, DFL), G3 (Vitro Molar, DFL), G4 (Bioglass R, Biodinâmica), and G5 (Ketac Fil, 3M ESPE), as conventional GICs, and G6 (Vitremer, 3M ESPE), G7 (Vitro Fil LC, DFL), and G8 (Resiglass, Biodinâmica) as resin-modified GICs. Six specimens (8.60 mm in diameter; 1.65 mm in thickness) of each material were prepared using a stainless steel mold. The specimens were immersed in a demineralizing solution (pH 4.3) for 6 hr and a remineralizing solution (pH 7.0) for 18 hr a day. The fluoride ions were measured for 15 days. Analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Tukey's test with 5% significance were applied. Results The highest amounts of fluoride release were found during the first 24 hr for all cements, decreasing abruptly on day 2, and reaching gradually decreasing levels on day 7. Based on these results, the decreasing scale of fluoride release was as follows: G2 > G3 > G8 = G4 = G7 > G6 = G1 > G5 (p < 0.05). Conclusions There were wide variations among the materials in terms of the cumulative amount of fluoride ion released, and the amount of fluoride release could not be attributed to the category of cement, that is, conventional GICs or resin-modified GICs. PMID:26295024

  9. Electrodialytic removal of fluoride and calcium ions to recover phosphate from fertilizer industry wastewater

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arseto Yekti Bagastyo

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The fertilizer industry generates wastewater rich in phosphate and fluoride content, with concentration as high as 4540 and 9720 mg L−1, respectively. The untreated wastewater may enhance the growth of algae, promote eutrophication, and create serious effects on environmental health and aquatic life. Therefore, this wastewater has to be treated before releasing into the environment. This study evaluates the performance of a three-compartment electrodialysis reactor to remove fluoride and calcium ions, and recover phosphate present in the wastewater, for possible further use in the fertilizer industry. The experiments were conducted in a batch system at room temperature. A 4 L of wastewater was electrodialysed using three different electrical current (i.e., 0.5, 0.75, and 1.0 A and two different membrane surface areas (i.e., 100 and 200 cm2. The highest removal of fluoride ions was up to 260 mg L−1 (2.7% by applying 1 A of current and 100 cm2 membrane area. No substantial increase of fluoride and calcium removal was observed for 200 cm2 membrane area. Interestingly, the amount of the remaining phosphate was high (i.e., only 1% removal, implying a very efficient recovery in the feed. The energy required for fluoride ion transfer was much lower than for phosphate ion, i.e., up to 6 vs. 0.12 mol kWh−1, suggesting that a higher removal of fluoride can possibly be achieved by limiting migration of phosphate ion through the membrane.

  10. Do conventional glass ionomer cements release more fluoride than resin-modified glass ionomer cements?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Fernanda Costa Cabral

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Objectives The aim of this study was to evaluate the fluoride release of conventional glass ionomer cements (GICs and resin-modified GICs. Materials and Methods The cements were grouped as follows: G1 (Vidrion R, SS White, G2 (Vitro Fil, DFL, G3 (Vitro Molar, DFL, G4 (Bioglass R, Biodinâmica, and G5 (Ketac Fil, 3M ESPE, as conventional GICs, and G6 (Vitremer, 3M ESPE, G7 (Vitro Fil LC, DFL, and G8 (Resiglass, Biodinâmica as resin-modified GICs. Six specimens (8.60 mm in diameter; 1.65 mm in thickness of each material were prepared using a stainless steel mold. The specimens were immersed in a demineralizing solution (pH 4.3 for 6 hr and a remineralizing solution (pH 7.0 for 18 hr a day. The fluoride ions were measured for 15 days. Analysis of variance (ANOVA and Tukey's test with 5% significance were applied. Results The highest amounts of fluoride release were found during the first 24 hr for all cements, decreasing abruptly on day 2, and reaching gradually decreasing levels on day 7. Based on these results, the decreasing scale of fluoride release was as follows: G2 > G3 > G8 = G4 = G7 > G6 = G1 > G5 (p < 0.05. Conclusions There were wide variations among the materials in terms of the cumulative amount of fluoride ion released, and the amount of fluoride release could not be attributed to the category of cement, that is, conventional GICs or resin-modified GICs.

  11. ANALYSIS OF FLUORIDE RELEASED FROM GIC AND RMGIC IN SALIVA AND DENTINO-ENAMEL SUBSTANCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Endang Suprastiwi

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Glass Ionomer Cement (GIC and Resin Modified Glass Ionomer Cement (RMGIC are two restorative materials in dentistry that have the capacity of releasing fluoride to saliva, dentino-enamel substance, and the ability to form fluoroapatite crystal. The aim of this study is to compare the amount of fluoride release in saliva and dentino-enamel substance. A total of 48 caries free premolar teeth were prepared to form a cavity with the dimension of 4 X 4 X 2 mm on the buccal surfaces. These teeth were then divided into 3 groups, each containing 16 samples. The first group was determined as the control group, and therefore no restorative material was applied to the teeth in this group; the teeth in the second group were filled with GIC, the third group was filled with RMGIC. These teeth were then soaked in artificial saliva without fluoride content and were incubated at room temperature (37 0Celcius. Each group was divided again into 4 sub groups, each consisting of 4 samples. Each of 4 subgroups received different periods of soaking, namely 1 day, 3 days, 10 days, and 20 days. The fluoride content of saliva was analyzed using ion chromatography, and fluoroapatite on dentino-enamel substance was analyzed using X-Ray Diffraction or XRD. Data obtained from the experiments were analyzed using ANOVA, and the level of significance was set at p ≤ 0,05. There was a significantdifference in the analysis of fluoride release in saliva within the 3 groups: GIC, RMGIC, and the control group, and there was no significant difference in the analysis of fluoroapatite formation on dentino-enamel substance within 3 groups. The fluoride content in saliva showed a significant difference within the 3 groups of GIC, RMGIC, and control. No significant difference was found in the fluoroapatite content on dentino-enamel substance.

  12. Parents' interpretation of instructions to control the dose of fluoridated toothpaste used with young children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huebner, Colleen E; Thomas, Ameera; Scott, JoAnna; Lin, Jenn-Yih

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the average amounts of fluoridated toothpaste applied by parents to a child's toothbrush in response to instructions to limit the quantity to a "pea-sized" or "smear" amount. Fifty parents of 12- to 71-month-old children participated in this study. They were presented with three toothbrushes and asked to apply the amount of toothpaste they use typically with their child-a smear or a pea-sized quantity. The results were compared to the recommended weights of 0.25 g (pea-sized) and 0.125 g (smear). The mean amount applied in response to a "smear" weighed 0.21 ± 0.19 g, which differed from the recommended weight of 0.125 g (P=.002). The mean amount applied in response to a "pea" weighed 0.30 ± 0.21 g, which was greater than but not statistically significantly different from the recommended weight of 0.25 g (P=.10). Parents applied, on average, 0.33 ± 0.24 g of toothpaste when instructed to apply the amount they typically use with their child. Most parents use more fluoridated toothpaste than is recommended for young children and verbal instructions to limit the dose are ineffective. Education by demonstrating a smear and pea-sized amounts of fluoridated toothpaste is recommended.

  13. Fluoride removal using lanthanum incorporated chitosan beads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bansiwal, Amit; Thakre, Dilip; Labhshetwar, Nitin; Meshram, Siddharth; Rayalu, Sadhana

    2009-11-01

    Highly selective material based on naturally occurring biomaterial namely chitosan has been designed for the defluoridation of water. Lanthanum incorporated chitosan beads (LCB) were prepared using precipitation method. The synthesis was optimized by varying different synthesis parameters namely lanthanum loading, complexation and precipitation time, strength of ammonia solution used for precipitation, drying time, etc. Lanthanum incorporated chitosan beads were characterized using SEM, FTIR, XRD and EDX. Surface area of LCB was observed to be 2.76 m(2)g(-1). The equilibrium adsorption data fitted well to Langmuir adsorption isotherm and showing maximum fluoride adsorption capacity of 4.7 mg g(-1) with negligible lanthanum release. Kinetic study reveals that adsorption of fluoride is fast and follows pseudo-first-order kinetics. The effect of pH was also studied and the best efficiency was observed at pH 5. Presence of sulphate, nitrate and chloride marginally affected the removal efficiency, however drastic reduction in fluoride uptake was observed in the presence of carbonate and bicarbonate. Negative value of change in free energy (DeltaG degrees) and positive value of change in entropy (DeltaS degrees) suggest the adsorption of fluoride by LCB is feasible and spontaneous process. Positive value of change in enthalpy (DeltaH degrees) suggests the process of fluoride adsorption is endothermic in nature. Regeneration study reveals that 1M ammonium chloride solution appears to be the promising regeneration media showing 81.22% regeneration. The adsorption capacity of LCB was similar in fluoride-contaminated ground water collected from Dhar district of Madhya Pradesh, India, as compared to simulated water.

  14. The caries-reducing benefit of fluoride-release from dental restorative materials continues after fluoride-release has ended

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shiiya, T.; Mukai, Y.; ten Cate, J.M.; Teranaka, T.

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: This study tested the hypothesis that the benefit of fluoride-releasing restorative materials continues even after their reserve of fluoride has been depleted. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Pits in perspex blocks simulating cavities were filled with either a fluoride-releasing or a

  15. Effect of fluoride ion on the stability of DNA hairpin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chao; Zhai, Weili; Gong, Hongling; Liu, Yanhui; Chen, Hu

    2017-06-01

    Fluoride prevents tooth decay as an additive in oral hygiene products, while high dose intake of fluoride from contaminated drinking water leads to fluorosis. Here we studied the effect of fluoride ion on the stability of DNA double helix using magnetic tweezers. The equilibrium critical force decreases with increasing concentration of fluoride in the range from 1 mM to 100 mM. Our results give the first quantitative measurement of DNA stability in the presence of fluoride ion, which might disturb DNA-related biological processes to cause fluorosis.

  16. Fluorides - mode of action and recommendations for use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lussi, Adrian; Hellwig, Elmar; Klimek, Joachim

    2012-01-01

    Various authors have shown that the caries decline in the industrialized countries during recent decades is based on the use of fluorides, of which local fluoride application in the form of fluoridated toothpastes is of primary importance. The caries-protective potential of fluorapatite is quite low; in contrast, dissolved fluorides in the vicinity of enamel are effective both in promoting remineralization and inhibiting demineralization. Considering the fact that the caries decline occurred at the same time that local fluoridation measures became widely used, the conclusion seems justified that regular application of F⁻ can inhibit caries.

  17. Fluorine uptake into the human enamel surface from fluoride-containing sealing materials during cariogenic pH cycling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yasuhiro, Matsuda, E-mail: matsuda@den.hokudai.ac.jp [Department of Restorative Dentistry, Graduate School of Dental Medicine Hokkaido University (Japan); Katsushi, Okuyama [Department of Restorative Dentistry, Graduate School of Dental Medicine Hokkaido University (Japan); Hiroko, Yamamoto [Graduate School of Dentistry, Osaka University (Japan); Hisanori, Komatsu [Department of Restorative Dentistry, Graduate School of Dental Medicine Hokkaido University (Japan); Masashi, Koka; Takahiro, Sato [Takasaki Advanced Radiation Research Institute, JAEA (Japan); Naoki, Hashimoto; Saiko, Oki; Chiharu, Kawamoto; Hidehiko, Sano [Department of Restorative Dentistry, Graduate School of Dental Medicine Hokkaido University (Japan)

    2015-04-01

    To prevent the formation of caries and reduce dentin hypersensitivity, sealing materials, either with or without fluoride, are generally applied on the tooth in clinical practice. Application of fluoride-free sealing materials results in the formation of an acid-resistant layer on the tooth surface. On the other hand, fluoride-containing sealing materials might not only form an acid-resistant layer but could possibly further provide fluoride to enhance remineralization and reduce demineralization. In this study, the demineralization prevention ability and fluorine uptake rate in human enamel of fluoride-containing sealing materials [“MS coats F” (MSF)] and fluoride-free sealing materials (“hybrid coats 2” [HI]) were evaluated using an automatic pH cycling system. Each material was applied to the original tooth surface, the cut surfaces were covered with sticky wax, and the automatic pH-cycling system simulated daily acid changes (pH 6.8–4.5) occurring in the oral cavity for 4 weeks. Caries progression was analyzed using transverse microradiography (TMR) taken pre and post the 4 weeks of pH cycling. The fluorine and calcium distributions in the carious lesion in each specimen were evaluated using the proton-induced gamma emission (PIGE) and proton-induced X-ray (PIXE) techniques, respectively. TMR analysis showed that both MSF and HI had a caries-preventing effect after 4 weeks of pH cycling. PIGE/PIXE analysis demonstrated that only MSF resulted in fluoride uptake in the enamel surface. Therefore, MSF can help to form an acid-resistant layer and provide fluoride to the enamel surface. The presence of fluoride on the enamel surface suggested that MSF could prevent demineralization, even if the acid-resistant layer was removed, in clinical settings. The data obtained using the PIGE and PIXE techniques are useful for understanding the benefits of the use of a fluoride-containing sealing material for preventing caries.

  18. Fluoride geochemistry of thermal waters in Yellowstone National Park: I. Aqueous fluoride speciation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Y.; Nordstrom, D.K.; Blaine, McCleskey R.

    2011-01-01

    Thermal water samples from Yellowstone National Park (YNP) have a wide range of pH (1–10), temperature, and high concentrations of fluoride (up to 50 mg/l). High fluoride concentrations are found in waters with field pH higher than 6 (except those in Crater Hills) and temperatures higher than 50 °C based on data from more than 750 water samples covering most thermal areas in YNP from 1975 to 2008. In this study, more than 140 water samples from YNP collected in 2006–2009 were analyzed for free-fluoride activity by ion-selective electrode (ISE) method as an independent check on the reliability of fluoride speciation calculations. The free to total fluoride concentration ratio ranged from 99% at high pH. The wide range in fluoride activity can be explained by strong complexing with H+ and Al3+ under acidic conditions and lack of complexing under basic conditions. Differences between the free-fluoride activities calculated with the WATEQ4F code and those measured by ISE were within 0.3–30% for more than 90% of samples at or above 10−6 molar, providing corroboration for chemical speciation models for a wide range of pH and chemistry of YNP thermal waters. Calculated speciation results show that free fluoride, F−, and major complexes (HF(aq)0">HF(aq)0, AlF2+, AlF2+">AlF2+and AlF30">AlF30) account for more than 95% of total fluoride. Occasionally, some complex species like AlF4-">AlF4-, FeF2+, FeF2+">FeF2+, MgF+ and BF2(OH)2-">BF2(OH)2- may comprise 1–10% when the concentrations of the appropriate components are high. According to the simulation results by PHREEQC and calculated results, the ratio of main fluoride species to total fluoride varies as a function of pH and the concentrations and ratios of F and Al.

  19. Risk perception, psychological heuristics and the water fluoridation controversy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrella, Andrea M L; Kiss, Simon J

    2015-04-29

    Increasingly, support for water fluoridation has come under attack. We seek an explanation, focusing on the case of Waterloo, Ontario, where a 2010 referendum overturned its water fluoridation program. In particular, we test whether individuals perceive the risks of water fluoridation based not on 'hard' scientific evidence but on heuristics and cultural norms. A sample of 376 residents in Waterloo were surveyed in June 2012 using random digit dialing. We use factor analysis, OLS regression, as well as t-tests to evaluate a survey experiment to test the credibility hypothesis. Perceptions of fluoride as a risk are lower among those who perceive fluoride's benefits (B = .473, p < 0.001) and those whose cultural view is 'egalitarian' (B = .156, p < 0.05). The experiment shows a lower level of perception of fluoride's benefits among respondents who are told that water fluoridation is opposed by a national advocacy group (Group A) compared to those who are told that the government and the World Health Organization support fluoridation (Group B) (t = 1.6547, p < 0.05), as well as compared to the control group (t = 1.8913, p < 0.05). There is no difference between Group B and the control, possibly because people's already general support for fluoridation is less prone to change when told that other public organizations also support fluoridation. Public health officials should take into account cultural norms and perceptions when individuals in a community appear to rise up against water fluoridation, with implications for other public health controversies.

  20. Adverse effects of fluoride towards thyroid hormone metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enggar Abdullah Idris MZ

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available An easily ionized fluoride compound like Sodium Fluoride (NaF has been used thus far as a dental caries prevention substance. However, fluoride ions also have a negative effect because it is very toxic. Several types of research on the effect of fluoride on guinea pigs and human beings indicate the presence synthesis obstruction of T3 and T4 that causes declined production, known as hypothyroidism. Hypothyroidism condition may obstruct tissue growth process and metabolism so as to impact various body organ systems. Preventive efforts against hypothyroidism caused by fluoride include avoiding diffusible fluoride compound intake, like NaF, in a long run systemic use, whereas efforts to overcome fluoride intoxication include consuming food that is rich in calcium, vitamin D, and antioxidant.

  1. FLUORIDE CONTENT OF COMMERCIALLY AVAILABLE SOY MILK PRODUCTS IN THAILAND.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rirattanapong, Opas; Rirattanapong, Praphasri

    2016-01-01

    Abstract. In Thailand, the consumption of soy milk products is common but there is limited data about their fluoride content. The purpose of this study was to es- timate the fluoride content of soy milk products available in Thailand. Fluoride content was determined for 76 brands of soy milk using a F-ion-specific electrode. The fluoride concentrations ranged from 0.01 to 3.78 μg/ml. The fluoride content was not related to sugar content, soy bean content or the sterilization process. Among 3 brands of soy milk containing tea powder extract, the fluoride content was high (1.25 to 3.78 μg/ml). Most brands of soy milk tested in our study had fluoride content below the optimal daily intake but brands containing tea powder extract if consumed by children may increase their risk for fluorosis.

  2. [Fluoride emission from different soil minerals at high temperatures].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, W; Xie, Z; Xu, J; Liu, C

    2001-03-01

    The emission characteristics of fluoride pollutants from montmorillonite, kaolinite, vermiculite, geothite and allophane were studied to elucidate the mechanism of fluoride-releasing from soils during brick and tile making at high temperatures from 300 degrees C to 1000 degrees C. The rate of fluoride emission varied with temperature, mineral type, heating time, specific surface area and cations added to minerals. The escape of crystalline water resulting from crystal lattice collapse at a certain high temperature was found to affect the rate of fluoride emission. Calcium compounds could decrease fluoride emission rate from montmorillonite. At 800 degrees C, the rate of fluoride emission from Ca-treated montmorillonite decreased by 59.6% compared to untreated montmorillonite. The order for fluoride-fixing capacity of the 5 calcium compounds at 800 degrees C was as follows: CaCO3 > CaO > Ca3(PO4)2 > Ca(OH)2 > CaSO4.

  3. [The impact of tap water fluoridation on human health].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero, Verena; Norris, Frances J; Ríos, Juvenal A; Cortés, Isel; González, Andrea; Gaete, Leonardo; Tchernitchin, Andrei N

    2017-02-01

    The purpose of this review is to describe the osteological, neurological, endocrine and dermatological effects of fluoride ingestion. Additional aims are to evaluate whether the Chilean tap water fluoridation program has had any impact on dental health, and analyze the basis for the Chilean elementary school milk fluoridation program, which is targeted at children living in places where tap water has a fluoride concentration less than 0.3 mg/L, without any artificial fluoridation process. We discuss the finding that both public measures have no direct or remarkable effect on dental health, since topical dental hygiene products are the main and most effective contributors to the prevention of dental decay. We also suggest that the permanent and systematic ingestion of fluorides imposes health risks on the population. Therefore, we recommend reevaluating the national fluoridation program for public tap water and the elementary school milk program.

  4. Prevention of dental caries through the effective use of fluoride

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Poul Erik

    2016-01-01

    , lifestyles, and the existence of preventive oral health programmes. Research conducted in high income countries documents that systematic use of fluoride reduces the burden of dental caries; such research is scarce in low and middle income countries. Objectives: This article reviews the evidence on effective...... use of fluoride, highlights the public health approach to fluoridation, and clarifies how automatic fluoridation contributes to breaking social inequities in dental caries. Data collection: Scientific publications on fluoride administration stored in PubMed/Medline and caries data from the WHO...... databank. Outcome: Dental caries identified from national surveys or country relevant data; extraction of scientific reports is based on their public health relevance. Conclusions: The article outlines the history of fluoridation programmes and describes the sound evidence on automatic fluoridation through...

  5. Effective use of fluorides in the People's Republic of China--a model for WHO Mega Country initiatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, P E; Kwan, S; Zhu, L; Zhang, B X; Bian, J Y

    2008-12-01

    Poor dental health has been reported in the Chinese National Surveys of Oral Health. With the changing lifestyle and growing consumption of sugars, the incidence of dental caries may well continue to rise, compounded by limited access to professional care. The increasing oral disease burden could become a major public health problem in China, leading to considerable personal and health service costs. There is a desperate need for systematic implementation of preventive programmes. Currently, China is strengthening the prevention of chronic diseases, which provides an excellent opportunity to integrate oral disease prevention into the overall non-communicable disease (NCD) prevention programmes. In order to address this growing public health problem, the World Health Organization (WHO) Global Oral Health Programme advocates the effective use of fluoride as an essential approach to prevent dental caries in the 21st century--part of the WHO Global Oral Health Strategy. Population-wide automatic fluoridation measures are considered the most effective, complemented by appropriate use of toothpastes containing fluoride. There are wide variations of fluoride levels in drinking water in China and, in many areas, the levels of fluoride in drinking water are lower than the recommended levels. The use of toothpaste containing fluoride is still too low in some areas and decreases with age. Those who live in rural areas have limited access to affordable toothpastes containing fluoride. In March 2006, as part of the WHO Mega Country Health Promotion Network initiatives, the WHO Global Oral Health Programme organised a three-day symposium in Beijing, People's Republic of China. The aim of the symposium was to bring together international experience and Chinese expertise to facilitate policy development for effective use of fluoride in China, highlighting the benefits of, and barriers to, the implementation of different fluoridation programmes at the strategic levels as well as

  6. Compressive strength, surface roughness, fluoride release and recharge of four new fluoride-releasing fissure sealants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavaloglu Cildir, Sule; Sandalli, Nuket

    2007-05-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the compressive strength and surface roughness of two glass ionomer cements and two resin-based fissure sealants before and after fluoride release and recharge. Twenty-one specimens were prepared and divided into three groups for each material. First group was loaded in compression until failure. Fluoride released was measured from the remaining specimens, and then the second group of seven specimens was loaded at 28th day. The remaining seven specimens were exposed to 0.05% NaF solution and 1.23% APF gel. Fluoride amount was measured, and the last group was loaded at 70th day. Surface roughness measurement of five more disk-shaped specimens from each material was also carried out. After exposure to APF gel, all materials were recharged. At the end of experimental period, it was found that surface roughness increased, whereas compressive strength decreased, over time. In conclusion, fluoride-releasing fissure sealants could act as show, rechargeable fluoride release systems. However, if a fissure sealant exhibited high fluoride release, it had inferior mechanical properties.

  7. Estimated Fluoride Doses from Toothpastes Should be Based on Total Soluble Fluoride

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaime A. Cury

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The fluoride dose ingested by young children may be overestimated if based on levels of total fluoride (TF rather than levels of bioavailable fluoride (total soluble fluoride—TSF in toothpaste. The aim of the present study was to compare doses of fluoride intake based on TF and TSF. Fluoride intake in 158 Brazilian children aged three and four years was determined after tooth brushing with their usual toothpaste (either family toothpaste (n = 80 or children’s toothpaste (n = 78. The estimated dose (mg F/day/Kg of body weight of TF or TSF ingested was calculated from the chemical analysis of the toothpastes. Although the ingested dose of TF from the family toothpastes was higher than that from the children’s toothpastes (0.074 ± 0.007 and 0.039 ± 0.003 mg F/day/Kg, respectively; p 0.05. The fluoride dose ingested by children from toothpastes may be overestimated if based on the TF of the product. This finding suggests that the ingested dose should be calculated based on TSF. Dose of TSF ingested by children is similar whether family or children’s toothpaste is used.

  8. Actinide measurements by AMS using fluoride matrices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cornett, R.J., E-mail: Jack.Cornett@uottawa.ca [André E. Lalonde AMS Laboratory, University of Ottawa, 150 Louis Pasteur, Ottawa, ON K1N 6N5 (Canada); Department of Earth Sciences, University of Ottawa, 150 Louis Pasteur, Ottawa, ON K1N 6N5 (Canada); Kazi, Z.H. [André E. Lalonde AMS Laboratory, University of Ottawa, 150 Louis Pasteur, Ottawa, ON K1N 6N5 (Canada); Department of Earth Sciences, University of Ottawa, 150 Louis Pasteur, Ottawa, ON K1N 6N5 (Canada); Zhao, X.-L. [André E. Lalonde AMS Laboratory, University of Ottawa, 150 Louis Pasteur, Ottawa, ON K1N 6N5 (Canada); Department of Physics, University of Ottawa, 150 Louis Pasteur, Ottawa, ON K1N 6N5 (Canada); Chartrand, M.G. [André E. Lalonde AMS Laboratory, University of Ottawa, 150 Louis Pasteur, Ottawa, ON K1N 6N5 (Canada); Department of Earth Sciences, University of Ottawa, 150 Louis Pasteur, Ottawa, ON K1N 6N5 (Canada); Charles, R.J.; Kieser, W.E. [André E. Lalonde AMS Laboratory, University of Ottawa, 150 Louis Pasteur, Ottawa, ON K1N 6N5 (Canada); Department of Physics, University of Ottawa, 150 Louis Pasteur, Ottawa, ON K1N 6N5 (Canada)

    2015-10-15

    Actinides can be measured by alpha spectroscopy (AS), mass spectroscopy or accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS). We tested a simple method to separate Pu and Am isotopes from the sample matrix using a single extraction chromatography column. The actinides in the column eluent were then measured by AS or AMS using a fluoride target matrix. Pu and Am were coprecipitated with NdF{sub 3}. The strongest AMS beams of Pu and Am were produced when there was a large excess of fluoride donor atoms in the target and the NdF{sub 3} precipitates were diluted about 6–8 fold with PbF{sub 2}. The measured concentrations of {sup 239,240}Pu and {sup 241}Am agreed with the concentrations in standards of known activity and with two IAEA certified reference materials. Measurements of {sup 239,240}Pu and {sup 241}Am made at A.E. Lalonde AMS Laboratory agree, within their statistical uncertainty, with independent measurements made using the IsoTrace AMS system. This work demonstrated that fluoride targets can produce reliable beams of actinide anions and that the measurement of actinides using fluorides agree with published values in certified reference materials.

  9. CORRELATION AMONG FLUORIDE AND METALS IN IRRIGATION ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Preferred Customer

    emissions from volcanoes and in marine aerosols. The main natural source of inorganic fluorides in soil is the parent rock. Anthropogenic sources of .... mm polyethylene sieve to remove large debris, stones, and pebbles. The part of the sample which passes through the sieve was collected in to the plastic bag and stored for ...

  10. FLUORIDE REMOVAL BY ADSORPTION ON THERMALLY ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Preferred Customer

    I. M.Sc. Thesis, Addiss Ababa University, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, 1999. 30. Bulusu, K.R.; Sundaresan, B.B. J. Environ. Eng. 1979, 60, 1. 31. Commis, B.T. Control of Excessive Fluoride Levels for Small Community Water Supplies with Particular Reference to Developing Countries: an interim brief Report, Maidenhead,.

  11. Fluoride treatment in corticosteroid induced osteoporosis.

    OpenAIRE

    Rejou, F; Dumas, R; Belon, C; Meunier, P J; Edouard, C

    1986-01-01

    Severe osteoporosis with multiple vertebral fractures occurred in two girls receiving prolonged high dose corticosteroids for relapsing dermatomyositis. Sodium fluoride, supplemented with calcium and vitamin D, helped control secondary osteoporosis in one case and should be considered as part of the curative treatment of corticoid induced osteoporosis.

  12. CORRELATION AMONG FLUORIDE AND METALS IN IRRIGATION ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Preferred Customer

    include the following: the industrial production and use of chemicals and phosphate fertilizers. Phosphate fertilizers are the major source of fluoride contamination of agricultural soils [1]. Available quantitative ..... The liquid phase F- concentrations were determined by mixing equal volumes (10 mL) of soil, water samples or ...

  13. Innovative Monitoring of Atmospheric Gaseous Hydrogen Fluoride

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano Dugheri

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Hydrogen fluoride (HF is a basic raw material for a wide variety of industrial products, with a worldwide production capacity of more than three million metric tonnes. A novel method for determining particulate fluoride and gaseous hydrogen fluoride in air is presented herewith. Air was sampled using miniaturised 13 mm Swinnex two-stage filter holders in a medium-flow pumping system and through the absorption of particulate fluoride and HF vapours on cellulose ester filters uncoated or impregnated with sodium carbonate. Furthermore, filter desorption from the holders and the extraction of the pentafluorobenzyl ester derivative based on solid-phase microextraction were performed using an innovative robotic system installed on an xyz autosampler on-line with gas chromatography (GC/mass spectrometry (MS. After generating atmospheres of a known concentration of gaseous HF, we evaluated the agreement between the results of our sampling method and those of the conventional preassembled 37 mm cassette (±8.10%; correlation coefficient: 0.90. In addition, precision (relative standard deviation for n=10, 4.3%, sensitivity (0.2 μg/filter, and linearity (2.0–4000 μg/filter; correlation coefficient: 0.9913 were also evaluated. This procedure combines the efficiency of GC/MS systems with the high throughput (96 samples/day and the quantitative accuracy of pentafluorobenzyl bromide on-sample derivatisation.

  14. Polyvinylidene fluoride film as a capacitor dielectric

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dematos, H. V.

    1981-01-01

    Thin strips of polyvinylidene fluoride film (PVDF) with vacuum deposited electrodes were made into capacitors by conventional winding and fabrication techniques. These devices were used to identify and evaluate the performance characteristics offered by the PVDF in metallized film capacitors. Variations in capacitor parameters with temperature and frequence were evaluated and compared with other dielectric films. Their impact on capacitor applications is discussed.

  15. Fluoride in Dental Biofilm Varies across Intra-Oral Regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staun Larsen, Line; Baelum, Vibeke; Tenuta, Livia Maria Andaló; Richards, Alan; Nyvad, Bente

    2017-01-01

    Information on differences in biofilm fluoride concentration across intra-oral regions may help explain the distribution of caries within the dentition. The aim of this cross-sectional study was to describe the fluoride concentration in saliva and in biofilm fluid and biofilm solids across 6 intra-oral regions. Unstimulated whole saliva was collected from 42 participants and biofilm harvested from the buccal sites in the 4 molar and 2 anterior regions. Samples were collected at least 1 h after use of fluoride dentifrice. No attempt was made to control the participants' food consumption or use of other topical agents. Centrifuged saliva, biofilm fluid, and biofilm solids were analysed for fluoride using a fluoride ion-selective electrode, adapted for microanalysis. Fluoride in biofilm varied across intra-oral regions. The mean biofilm fluid fluoride concentrations across the oral cavity ranged from 11.6 to 16.8 µM, being statistically significantly higher in the upper anterior region than in any other region. In all regions the fluoride concentration in biofilm fluid was higher than in saliva. For biofilm solids the fluoride concentration was highest in the lower anterior region (2,461 μmol/kg) and lowest in the lower molar regions (388 and 406 μmol/kg, respectively). Within biofilm, the solids contained most of the fluoride (81 to >99%). The biofilm fluid fluoride concentration was significantly positively associated with salivary fluoride and only marginally associated with that of biofilm solids. In conclusion, this study has shown pronounced differences in fluoride distribution across intra-oral regions and compartments. This shows that the sampling site is a crucial factor for studies of biofilm fluoride. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  16. Effects of fluoridated milk on root dentin remineralization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wolfgang H Arnold

    Full Text Available The prevalence of root caries is increasing with greater life expectancy and number of retained teeth. Therefore, new preventive strategies should be developed to reduce the prevalence of root caries. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of fluoridated milk on the remineralization of root dentin and to compare these effects to those of sodium fluoride (NaF application without milk.Thirty extracted human molars were divided into 6 groups, and the root cementum was removed from each tooth. The dentin surface was demineralized and then incubated with one of the following six solutions: Sodium chloride NaCl, artificial saliva, milk, milk+2.5 ppm fluoride, milk+10 ppm fluoride and artificial saliva+10 ppm fluoride. Serial sections were cut through the lesions and investigated with polarized light microscopy and quantitative morphometry, scanning electron microscopy (SEM and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS. The data were statistically evaluated using a one-way ANOVA for multiple comparisons.The depth of the lesion decreased with increasing fluoride concentration and was the smallest after incubation with artificial saliva+10 ppm fluoride. SEM analysis revealed a clearly demarcated superficial remineralized zone after incubation with milk+2.5 ppm fluoride, milk+10 ppm fluoride and artificial saliva+10 ppm fluoride. Ca content in this zone increased with increasing fluoride content and was highest after artificial saliva+10 ppm fluoride incubation. In the artificial saliva+10 ppm fluoride group, an additional crystalline layer was present on top of the lesion that contained elevated levels of F and Ca.Incubation of root dentin with fluoridated milk showed a clear effect on root dentin remineralization, and incubation with NaF dissolved in artificial saliva demonstrated a stronger effect.

  17. Fluoride content of bottled waters available in Northern Greece.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahiropoulos, V

    2006-03-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the fluoride content of bottled drinking waters commercially available in northern Greece and to report on the accuracy of the labelling of fluoride concentration. Twenty-two randomly selected commercial brands of bottled water were obtained from three supermarkets in Thessaloniki, Greece. Three bottles of each brand were purchased. Following calibration, six tests were conducted on each bottle using a combination fluoride-ion selective electrode (Orion, 96-09-00, MA, USA). The average reading for each brand was estimated and also compared with the fluoride content printed on the label. The mean (+/- SD) fluoride content of the bottled water samples was 0.35 (+/- 1.00) mg F/L with a range from 0.05 to 4.8 mg F/L. Only 18% (N = 4) of brands tested mention the fluoride concentration on the label, and 90% (N = 22) had a tested fluoride between 0.05 and 0.21 mg F/L. Of the remaining two brands, one was found to contain 0.3 mg F/L without having the fluoride concentration indicated on the label, and the other was labelled at 6 mg F/L, whereas the concentration was estimated as 4.8 mg F/L. The use of bottled water may be a significant source of systemic fluoride and therefore be considered as a risk factor for dental fluorosis in young children. This article shows that bottled drinking waters contain differing concentrations of fluoride. The manufacturers' labelling of fluoride concentrations may be inaccurate. When prescribing fluoride supplements, dentists should be aware of the fluoride content of bottled waters used by paediatric patients, especially brands with a concentration higher than 0.3 mg F/L. In view of the wide variation of fluoride concentration in the tested bottled waters, regulatory guidelines for controlling concentration in order to prevent dental fluorosis are recommended.

  18. Water fluoridation in 40 Brazilian cities: 7 year analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzely Adas Saliba MOIMAZ

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives Fluoride levels in the public water supplies of 40 Brazilian cities were analyzed and classified on the basis of risk/benefit balance. Material and Methods Samples were collected monthly over a seven-year period from three sites for each water supply source. The samples were analyzed in duplicate in the laboratory of the Center for Research in Public Health - UNESP using an ion analyzer coupled to a fluoride-specific electrode. Results A total of 19,533 samples were analyzed, of which 18,847 were artificially fluoridated and 686 were not artificially fluoridated. In samples from cities performing water fluoridation, 51.57% (n=9,720 had fluoride levels in the range of 0.55 to 0.84 mg F/L; 30.53% (n=5,754 were below 0.55 mg F/L and 17.90% (n=3,373 were above 0.84 mg F/L (maximum concentration=6.96 mg F/L. Most of the cities performing fluoridation that had a majority of samples with fluoride levels above the recommended parameter had deep wells and more than one source of water supply. There was some variability in the fluoride levels of samples from the same site and between collection sites in the same city. Conclusions The majority of samples from cities performing fluoridation had fluoride levels within the range that provides the best combination of risks and benefits, minimizing the risk of dental fluorosis while preventing dental caries. The conduction of studies about water distribution systems is suggested in cities with high natural fluoride concentrations in order to optimize the use of natural fluoride for fluoridation costs and avoid the risk of dental fluorosis.

  19. Water fluoridation in 40 Brazilian cities: 7 year analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    MOIMAZ, Suzely Adas Saliba; SALIBA, Nemre Adas; SALIBA, Orlando; SUMIDA, Doris Hissako; de SOUZA, Neila Paula; CHIBA, Fernando Yamamoto; GARBIN, Cléa Adas Saliba

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: Fluoride levels in the public water supplies of 40 Brazilian cities were analyzed and classified on the basis of risk/benefit balance. Material and Methods: Samples were collected monthly over a seven-year period from three sites for each water supply source. The samples were analyzed in duplicate in the laboratory of the Center for Research in Public Health - UNESP using an ion analyzer coupled to a fluoride-specific electrode. Results: A total of 19,533 samples were analyzed, of which 18,847 were artificially fluoridated and 686 were not artificially fluoridated. In samples from cities performing water fluoridation, 51.57% (n=9,720) had fluoride levels in the range of 0.55 to 0.84 mg F/L; 30.53% (n=5,754) were below 0.55 mg F/L and 17.90% (n=3,373) were above 0.84 mg F/L (maximum concentration=6.96 mg F/L). Most of the cities performing fluoridation that had a majority of samples with fluoride levels above the recommended parameter had deep wells and more than one source of water supply. There was some variability in the fluoride levels of samples from the same site and between collection sites in the same city. Conclusions: The majority of samples from cities performing fluoridation had fluoride levels within the range that provides the best combination of risks and benefits, minimizing the risk of dental fluorosis while preventing dental caries. The conduction of studies about water distribution systems is suggested in cities with high natural fluoride concentrations in order to optimize the use of natural fluoride for fluoridation costs and avoid the risk of dental fluorosis. PMID:23559106

  20. Reaction of 1,2-orthoesters with HF-pyridine: a method for the preparation of partly unprotected glycosyl fluorides and their use in saccharide synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López, J Cristóbal; Ventura, Juan; Uriel, Clara; Gómez, Ana M; Fraser-Reid, Bert

    2009-09-17

    Glycosyl fluorides can be prepared in an efficient manner by treatment of pyranose- or furanose-derived 1,2-orthoesters, with hydrogen fluoride pyridine (HF-py). The method is compatible with the presence of a variety of protecting groups, including tert-butyldiphenyl silyl ethers, and can be applied to sugar derivatives with free hydroxyl groups, thus avoiding the need for the protection-deprotection steps.

  1. Metal fluoride complexes of Na,K-ATPase: characterization of fluoride-stabilized phosphoenzyme analogues and their interaction with cardiotonic steroids

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Cornelius, Flemming; Mahmmoud, Yasser A; Toyoshima, Chikashi

    2011-01-01

    .... Metal fluorides like magnesium-, beryllium-, and aluminum fluoride act as phosphate analogues and inhibit P-type ATPases by interacting with the phosphorylation site, stabilizing conformations...

  2. The effect of repeated fluoride recharge and storage media on bond durability of fluoride rechargeable Giomer bonding agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naoum, S; O'Regan, J; Ellakwa, A; Benkhart, R; Swain, M; Martin, E

    2012-06-01

    For a restorative material or adhesive to exhibit caries inhibitive potential through fluoride release, it must be capable of fluoride recharge. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of repeated fluoride recharge and different storage media on dentine bond strength durability. Two self-etch adhesive systems (two-step) were evaluated: fluoride-rechargeable Giomer FL-Bond II and non-fluoride-containing UniFil Bond. For each adhesive 32 human dentine specimens were prepared for shear bond strength testing. The specimens were randomly allocated to one of four storage groups: Group 1 - 24-hour water ageing; Group 2 - four-month water ageing; Group 3 - four-month water ageing with weekly fluoride recharge (5000 ppm for 10 minutes); and Group 4 - four-month acid ageing with weekly fluoride recharge. Weekly fluoride recharge over four months ageing did not significantly (p > 0.05) reduce the dentine shear bond strength of FL-Bond II or UniFil Bond. Storage media did not significantly (p > 0.05) affect bond durability. The adhesion between fluoride rechargeable FL-Bond II and dentine maintained durability despite regular fluoride recharge over the four months ageing. Clinicians prescribing the fluoride recharge regime used in the present study to reduce recurrent caries incidence associated with Giomer FL-Bond II restorations can do so without compromising dentine bond strengths. © 2012 Australian Dental Association.

  3. Water fluoridation: a critical review of the physiological effects of ingested fluoride as a public health intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peckham, Stephen; Awofeso, Niyi

    2014-01-01

    Fluorine is the world's 13th most abundant element and constitutes 0.08% of the Earth crust. It has the highest electronegativity of all elements. Fluoride is widely distributed in the environment, occurring in the air, soils, rocks, and water. Although fluoride is used industrially in a fluorine compound, the manufacture of ceramics, pesticides, aerosol propellants, refrigerants, glassware, and Teflon cookware, it is a generally unwanted byproduct of aluminium, fertilizer, and iron ore manufacture. The medicinal use of fluorides for the prevention of dental caries began in January 1945 when community water supplies in Grand Rapids, United States, were fluoridated to a level of 1 ppm as a dental caries prevention measure. However, water fluoridation remains a controversial public health measure. This paper reviews the human health effects of fluoride. The authors conclude that available evidence suggests that fluoride has a potential to cause major adverse human health problems, while having only a modest dental caries prevention effect. As part of efforts to reduce hazardous fluoride ingestion, the practice of artificial water fluoridation should be reconsidered globally, while industrial safety measures need to be tightened in order to reduce unethical discharge of fluoride compounds into the environment. Public health approaches for global dental caries reduction that do not involve systemic ingestion of fluoride are urgently needed.

  4. Water Fluoridation: A Critical Review of the Physiological Effects of Ingested Fluoride as a Public Health Intervention

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Fluorine is the world's 13th most abundant element and constitutes 0.08% of the Earth crust. It has the highest electronegativity of all elements. Fluoride is widely distributed in the environment, occurring in the air, soils, rocks, and water. Although fluoride is used industrially in a fluorine compound, the manufacture of ceramics, pesticides, aerosol propellants, refrigerants, glassware, and Teflon cookware, it is a generally unwanted byproduct of aluminium, fertilizer, and iron ore manufacture. The medicinal use of fluorides for the prevention of dental caries began in January 1945 when community water supplies in Grand Rapids, United States, were fluoridated to a level of 1 ppm as a dental caries prevention measure. However, water fluoridation remains a controversial public health measure. This paper reviews the human health effects of fluoride. The authors conclude that available evidence suggests that fluoride has a potential to cause major adverse human health problems, while having only a modest dental caries prevention effect. As part of efforts to reduce hazardous fluoride ingestion, the practice of artificial water fluoridation should be reconsidered globally, while industrial safety measures need to be tightened in order to reduce unethical discharge of fluoride compounds into the environment. Public health approaches for global dental caries reduction that do not involve systemic ingestion of fluoride are urgently needed. PMID:24719570

  5. Sequence of stannous and sodium fluoride solutions to prevent enamel erosion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Toole, Saoirse; Mistry, Miten; Mutahar, Mahdi; Moazzez, Rebecca; Bartlett, David

    2015-12-01

    Investigate the timing of stannous (SnF2) and sodium fluoride (NaF) application with and without salivary pellicle to prevent enamel erosion. Human buccal molar enamel samples (n=120, REC ref 12/LO/1836) were randomly assigned to three groups testing SnF2 and NaF basic fluoride formulation and commercial mouthrinses with and without the presence of human saliva. Samples were randomly allocated to 2 subgroups: immersion in either fluoride for 1 min either before or after citric acid immersion (0.3%, pH 3.2, 10 min), and the cycle repeated 5 times. For human saliva group, samples were immersed in 80 ml of natural saliva for 24 h prior to the experiment. Analysis was done using non-contacting profilometry and microhardness change. Data were not normal and were log transformed. A linear model tested statistical differences between the groups. SnF2 application before erosion statistically reduced step height compared to application after erosion for all groups (solutions: 6.5 μm (±1.2), 7.5 μm (±0.8); p=0.01, mouthrinses: 3.2 μm (±0.6), 4.2 μm (±0.7); perosion increased step height compared to application after, but this was only statistically significant for the saliva group (before: 5.6 μm (±0.3) and after: 4.9 μm (±0.3); p=0.023). Presence of saliva increased microhardness change (perosion and when NaF was applied after erosion (SnF2: 156.6KHN (±32.8), 123KHN (±20.1); p=0.02. NaF: 119.5KHN (±33.5), 218KHN (±24.9), before, and after respectively). SnF2 reduced step height formation overall when compared to NaF, but particularly when applied before citric acid immersion. In contrast, NaF reduced step height when applied after citric acid immersion, but only in the presence of saliva. Stannous fluoride can be recommended over sodium fluoride to patients at risk of dental erosion and is optimally applied before erosion occurs. If sodium fluoride is to be used in the presence of saliva it is optimally applied after erosion has occurred. Copyright © 2015

  6. Developing professional competence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wahlgren, Bjarne

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of university programs for professionals is to qualify the students to act competently in a subsequent job situation. Practical experiences as well as comprehensive research studies have shown that only a limited part of what is learned during the coursework is applied in the subsequent...... professional practice. There is too little transfer from the training programs to application in the workplace. Based on Danish research the relation between school and professional work, between scholastic knowledge and practical knowledge, is analyzed. Guideline for a new and more efficient curricula...

  7. Comparison of Citrate Buffer with Sodium Fluoride as Additives in Determining Glycemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toro-Crespo, Maria de; Maesa-Marquez, Jose M; Sanchez-Margalet, Victor; Gonzalez-Rodriguez, Concepcion; Fernandez-Riejos, Patricia

    2017-11-01

    The objectives of this study are to compare the effect of sodium fluoride and citrate on the stability of glucose in samples maintained at room temperature up to three hours, and to assess the clinical impact in the O'Sullivan test results after changing the additives in the collecting tubes. The selected population was pregnant women between the 24th and 28th week of gestation, who were at the health center to undergo the O'Sullivan test as part of the screening program for GDM (gestacional diabetes mellitus). Two blood samples were extracted from each patient: one using a tube with citrate and sodium fluoride buffer (tubes Vacuette Glucomedics citrate, 2 mL, Ref 454347) (tube C) and another containing just sodium fluoride (BD Vacationer tubes FX fluoride, 2 mL, Ref 368920) (tube F). The statistical treatment of the data was performed using SPSS version 24 and Method validator. Finally, we assessed the real clinical impact of replacing tubes C for tubes F in the classification of pregnant women. To do so, we collected the results of O'Sullivan tests conducted in our hospital during a year, all of them done in tubes F, and we applied the mean difference calculated in T = 1 to estimate the number of pregnant women that should be reclassified. The average glycaemia in tubes C are significantly greater than average glycaemia in tubes F (p diabetes mellitus.

  8. Grounding a natural background level for fluoride in a potentially contaminated crystalline aquifer in south India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sajil Kumar, P J

    2017-12-01

    Fluoride contamination is one of the most alarming issues for those countries that depend on groundwater drinking water supply. A careful examination of the hydrogeochemical conditions and routine monitoring of fluoride level are therefore quintessential. Estimation of natural background level (NBL) of fluoride becomes significant information for assessing the current and future contamination episodes. Vellore District in Tamil Nadu is a hard rock terrain known for its F-rich groundwater. In this study, we attempted to form a benchmark for fluoride using hydrochemical pre-selection (based on TDS and NO3) and cumulative probability plots (CPP). Principle components analysis is (PCA) applied to evaluate the corresponding factor grouping of the total of 68 samples, which is later mapped using geostatistical tool in ArcGIS. From the CPP, we derived the NBL of F as 0.75 mg/L. This value is compared with the observed concentration in each sample and they were spatially plotted based on the NBL. Resultant plot suggests that W-NW part of the study area has exceeded and E-EW regions are below the NBL of F. Spatial variation of the factor scores also supported this observation. Grounding an NBL and extending it to other parts of the potential contaminated aquifers are highly recommended for better understanding and management of the water supply systems.

  9. Effect of Sodium Fluoride Mouthwash on the Frictional Resistance of Orthodontic Wires

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allahyar Geramy

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The friction between the brackets and orthodontic wire during sliding mechanics inflicts difficulties such as decreasing the applied force and tooth movement and also the loss of anchorage. Therefore, many studies have focused on the factors that affect the friction. The purpose of this study was to assess the effect of 0.05% sodium fluoride mouthwash on the friction between orthodontic brackets and wire.Materials and Methods: Four types of orthodontic wires including rectangular standard stainless steel (SS, titanium molybdenum alloy (TMA, nickel-titanium (NiTi and copper-nickel-titanium (Cu-NiTi were selected. In each group, half of the samples were immersed in 0.05% sodium fluoride mouthwash and the others were immersed in artificial saliva for 10 hours. An elastomeric ligature was used for ligating the wires to brackets. The frictional test was performed in a universal testing machine at the speed of 10 mm/minute. Two-way ANOVA was used for statistical analysis of the friction rate.Results: The friction rate was significantly higher after immersion in 0.05% sodium fluoride mouthwash in comparison with artificial saliva (P=0.00. Cu-NiTi wire showed the highest friction value followed by TMA, NiTi and SS wires.  Conclusions: According to the results of the current study, 0.05% sodium fluoride mouthwash increased the frictional characteristics of all the evaluated orthodontic wires.

  10. Effect of saliva substitutes in combination with fluorides on remineralization of subsurface dentin lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zandim, Daniela Leal; Tschoppe, Peter; Sampaio, José Eduardo C; Kielbassa, Andrej M

    2011-08-01

    Saliva substitutes are prescribed to patients suffering from radiation-induced hyposalivation to alleviate oral complaints; however, some available products have shown to demineralize dentin. The purpose of this in vitro study was to evaluate the effects of two saliva substitutes in combination or not with fluoridation on remineralization of bovine dentin subsurface lesions. Dentin specimens were demineralized, and stored in either mineral water (control; volvic, danone), Glandosane (cell pharm), or modified Saliva natura (SN, Medac) for 5 weeks (37° C). The following treatments were applied twice daily (n = 12/group): (1) no treatment; (2) immersion in pure Elmex sensitive mouthrinse (250 ppm F-; 10 min; Gaba); (3) brushing with Duraphat toothpaste (5,000 ppm F-; Colgate)/storage solution slurry (5 s; ratio 1:3); (4) combination of treatments 2 and 3. Differences in mineral parameters before and after storage/treatment were microradiographically evaluated. After 5 weeks, Glandosane-induced a significant demineralization of dentin specimens. The mineral loss of specimens stored in Glandosane was significantly higher compared to all other solutions (p fluoride products (p fluoride products (p fluorides in dentate patients.

  11. Effects of different amine fluoride concentrations on enamel remineralization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naumova, E A; Niemann, N; Aretz, L; Arnold, W H

    2012-09-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of decreasing fluoride concentrations on repeated demineralizing challenges on human enamel. In 24 teeth, 3mm×3mm windows were prepared on the buccal and lingual sides and treated in a cycling demineralization-remineralization model. Remineralization was achieved with 100, 10 and 0.1 ppm fluoride from anime fluoride. Coronal sections were cut through the artificial lesions, and three sections per tooth were investigated using polarized light microscopy and scanning electron microscopy with quantitative element analysis. The morphology of the lesions was studied, and the extensions of the superficial layer and the body of the lesion were measured. Using element analysis, the Ca, P and F content were determined. The body of the lesion appeared remineralized after application of 100 ppm fluoride, while remineralization of the lesion was less successful after application of 10 and 0.1 ppm fluoride. The thickness of the superficial layer increased with decreasing fluoride concentrations, and also the extension of the body of the lesion increased. Ca and P content increased with increasing fluoride concentrations. The effectiveness of fluoride in enamel remineralization increased with increasing fluoride concentration. A consistently higher level of fluoride in saliva should be a goal in caries prevention. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. [Fluoride urinary excretion in Mexico City's preschool children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juárez-López, María Lilia Adriana; Hernández-Guerrero, Juan Carlos; Jiménez-Farfán, Dolores; Molina-Frechero, Nelly; Murrieta-Pruneda, Francisco; López-Jiménez, Georgina

    2008-01-01

    The assessment of urinary fluoride excretion during dental developing stage has been reported for different countries with community fluoride programs. Also, one of the factors that could influence on retention and excretion of fluoride is the deficient nutrition so the aim of this study was to determine fluoride urinary excretion by a group of preschool children with and without malnutrition. Urinary samples from 24 hours were collected from 60 preschool children selected by convenience from Iztapalapa area of Mexico City, 30 with malnutrition and 30 with standard nutritrional status by weight for age. The samples were analyzed by fluoride especific electrode. Orion 720A. The average concentration of fluoride in urine from preschool children with and without malnutrition were 0.89 +/- 0.4 mg/L and 0.80 +/- 0.3 mg/L, respectively. The mean of 24 hours total fluoride excreted were 367 +/- 150 microg/24 hrs. in malnutrition children and 355 +/- 169 microg/24 hrs. for those with standard nutritional status. There were no differences statistically significant between groups. The urinary fluoride excretion for children with and without malnutrition were in the optimal range of fluoridation for the prevention of caries decay. Malnutrition was no associated with changes on fluoride orine concentration and excretion rates.

  13. A comparative study of fluoride release from two different sealants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ananda, Shimoga-Raju; Mythri, Halappa

    2014-12-01

    The introduction of fluoride releasing sealants and glass ionomer cements as fissure sealants adds another dimension to prevention of pit and fissure caries. The ability of resin sealants and glass ionomer cements to release fluoride on a long term basis to the sealed enamel and the adjacent unsealed pit and fissure and cuspal incline enamel may allow for further reduction in pit and fissure caries experience for children. Hence, the study was conducted to compare the amount of fluoride release in the plaque after placing fluoride releasing pit and fissure sealants and glass ionomer fissure sealants used in Atraumatic Restorative Treatment (ART) approach. To compare the fluoride release of both the materials at the different time intervals. A total of 60 school going children were included in this study. Before application of the sealants, baseline plaque fluoride levels were estimated from all the study subjects. After application of sealants again the same was estimated at an interval of 24 hour, 9 days, 2 weeks and 4 weeks. The peak plaque fluoride levels were achieved at 24 hours after application of fissure sealants in all the groups. Within the limitation of the study, the present study indicated that fluoride releasing fissure sealants may act as a source of fluoride in plaque which will help in preventing pit and fissure and smooth surface caries in the tooth sealed with fissure sealants. Key words:Plaque fluoride, pit and fissures sealants, dental caries.

  14. Caries prevention through the fluoridation of milk. A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bánóczy, Jolán; Rugg-Gunn, Andrew J

    2007-10-01

    The aim of this review is to give an overview of 50 years experience of milk fluoridation and draw conclusions about the applicability of the method. Fluoridated milk was first investigated in the early 1950s, almost simultaneously in Switzerland, the USA and Japan. Stimulated by the favourable results obtained from these early studies, the establishment of The Borrow Dental Milk Foundation (subsequently The Borrow Foundation) in England gave an excellent opportunity for further research, both clinical and non-clinical, and a productive collaboration with the World Health Organization from the early 1980s onwards. Numerous peer-reviewed publications in international journals showed clearly the bioavailability of fluoride in milk, and increased concentrations of fluoride in saliva, dental plaque, dental enamel and dentine, and urine, after consumption of fluoridated milk. Clinical trials were initiated in the 1980s--some of these can be classed as randomised controlled trials, while most of the clinical studies were community preventive programs. These evaluations showed clearly that the optimal daily intake of fluoride in milk is effective in preventing dental caries. At present, milk fluoridation programs are running continuously in about ten countries of the world. Fluoridation of milk can be recommended as a caries preventive measure where the fluoride concentration in drinking water is suboptimal, caries experience in children is significant, and there is an existing school milk program. The program should aim to provide fluoridated milk for at least 200 days per year and should commence before the children are 4 years of age.

  15. Community water fluoridation on the Internet and social media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mertz, Aaron; Allukian, Myron

    2014-01-01

    In the United States, 95 percent of teens and 85 percent of adults use the Internet. Two social media outlets, Facebook and Twitter, reach more than 150 billion users. This study describes anti-fluoridation activity and dominance on the Internet and social media, both of which are community water fluoridation (CWF) information sources. Monthly website traffic to major fluoridation websites was determined from June 2011 to May 2012. Facebook, Twitter, and YouTube fluoridation activity was categorized as "proCWF" or "anti-CWF." Twitter's anti-CWF tweets were further subcategorized by the argument used against CWF. Anti-CWF website traffic was found to exceed proCWF activity five- to sixty-fold. Searching "fluoride" and "fluoridation" on Facebook resulted in 88 to 100 percent anti-CWF groups and pages; "fluoridation" on Twitter and YouTube resulted in 64 percent anti-CWF tweets and 99 percent anti-CWF videos, respectively. "Cancer, " "useless, " and "poisonous" were the three major arguments used against fluoridation. Anti-fluoridation information significantly dominates the Internet and social media. Thousands of people are being misinformed daily about the safety, health, and economic benefits of fluoridation.

  16. Effects of long term exposure to hydrogen fluoride on grapevines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murray, F.

    1984-01-01

    Grapevines Vitis vinifera L. Shiraz were exposed to hydrogen fluoride in open-top chambers for 189 days at mean atmospheric fluoride concentrations of 0.27, 0.17 or 0.07 ..mu..g HFm/sup -3/. Grapevines growing under ambient conditions outside the chambers were exposed to a mean atmospheric fluoride concentration of 0.08 ..mu..g HFm/sup -3/. The maximum leaf fluoride concentrations associated with these treatments were 62, 27, 9 and 15 ..mu..g Fg/sup -1/, respectively. Foliar necrosis was first observed on grapevines exposed to 0.27 and 0.17 ..mu..g HFm/sup -3/ after 83 and 99 days, respectively. Exposure to fluoride increased the fluoride content of berries and peduncles, and reduced leaf chlorophyll a and total chlorophyll concentration at both mid-season and harvest. Exposure to 0.17 ..mu..g HF m/sup -3/ was associated with higher total acid content of grapes than other treatments. Fluoride had no significant effect on bunch weight, number of bunches, grape yield, grape water or potential alcohol content, leaf chlorophyll b or leaf protein concentration. The high accumulation of fluoride in peduncles, but low fluoride accumulation in berries, suggests that the peduncle acts to block the translocation of fluoride from sites of uptake to the fruit. 42 references, 1 figure, 5 tables.

  17. [Fluoridation of drinking water, why is it needed?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zusman, S P; Natapov, L; Ramon, T

    2004-01-01

    Dental caries is a widespread disease. It causes irreversible damage, pain and considerable expense. Fluoride is the only known substance that raises the tooth's resistance to acid attack. Natural drinking waters contain fluoride at different concentration. The most effective method of fluoride administration to the community level is by adjustng the fluoride concentration in the drinking water to about 1 part per million. To describe the mode of action of fluoride, methods of administration and to describe water fluoridation, advantages and disadvantages. Fluoridation of drinking water started in 1945 in the world and in 1981 in Israel. Today more then 300 million people in some 60 countries enjoy the defending effect of fluoride in drinking water. This is the most effective method for decreasing incidence of caries, as well as being cost effective. Over the years there were many attempts to 'blame' fluoridation with negative side effects to human health. Till today, none of the allegations passed scientific scrutiny. There is overwhelming scientific support for the Regulations that oblige the Water supplier to adjust fluoride levels to 1 ppm in every town or municipality with more then 5,000 inhabitants.

  18. Arsenic from community water fluoridation: quantifying the effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Emily; Shapiro, Howard; Li, Ye; Minnery, John G; Copes, Ray

    2016-04-01

    Community water fluoridation is a WHO recommended strategy to prevent dental carries. One debated concern is that hydrofluorosilicic acid, used to fluoridate water, contains arsenic and poses a health risk. This study was undertaken to determine if fluoridation contributes to arsenic in drinking water, to estimate the amount of additional arsenic associated with fluoridation, and compare this to the National Sanitation Foundation/American National Standards Institute (NSF/ANSI) standard and estimates from other researchers. Using surveillance data from Ontario drinking water systems, mixed effects linear regression was performed to examine the effect of fluoridation status on the difference in arsenic concentration between raw water and treated water samples. On average, drinking water treatment was found to reduce arsenic levels in water in both fluoridated and non-fluoridated systems by 0.2 μg/L. However, fluoridated systems were associated with an additional 0.078 μg/L (95% CI 0.021, 0.136) of arsenic in water when compared to non-fluoridated systems (P = 0.008) while controlling for raw water arsenic concentrations, types of treatment processes, and source water type. Our estimate is consistent with concentrations expected from other research and is less than 10% of the NSF/ANSI standard of 1 μg/L arsenic in water. This study provides further information to inform decision-making regarding community water fluoridation.

  19. Knowledge, attitude and use of fluorides among dentists in Texas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bansal, Ritu; Bolin, Kenneth A; Abdellatif, Hoda M; Shulman, Jay D

    2012-05-01

    The centers for disease control and prevention (CDC) recommendations on fluoride use were published in 2001. This study examines how this information has diffused to practicing dentists and the level of fluoride knowledge and use among Texas dentists. A questionnaire was sent to dentists who self-identified as being in pediatric (343), dental public health (72), and general practices (980); a 12% sample of registered dentists in Texas. Response rate was 42.9%. About 90% of surveyed dentists reported using fluorides routinely. Only 18.8% reported fluoride varnish as the topical fluoride most often used. About 57% incorrectly identified primary effect of fluoride. 'Makes enamel stronger while tooth is developing prior to eruption' was the most commonly cited wrong answer (44%). Only 5% identified that posteruptive effect exceeds any preeruptive effect. Despite the evidence for fluoride varnish preventing and controlling dental caries being Grade I, its use is still uncommon. Dentists are expected to be knowledgeable about products they use, but this study reflects lack of understanding about fluoride's predominant mode of action. More accurate understanding enables dentists to make informed and appropriate judgment on treatment options and effective use of fluoride based on risk assessment of dental caries. Lack of knowledge of, or failure of adherence to evidence based guidelines in caries prevention by use of appropriate fluoride regimens may adversely affect caries incidence in the population.

  20. Effects of different kinds of fluorides on enolase and ATPase activity of a fluoride-sensitive and fluoride-resistant Streptococcus mutans strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Loveren, C; Hoogenkamp, M A; Deng, D M; ten Cate, J M

    2008-01-01

    Enolase and ATPase are sensitive to fluoride. It is unclear whether this sensitivity differs for F-sensitive and F-resistant cells or for different types of fluoride. Permeabilized cells of the fluoride-sensitive strain Streptococcus mutans C180-2 and its fluoride-resistant mutant strain C180-2 FR were preincubated at pH 7 or 4 with NaF, the amine fluorides Olaflur and Dectaflur and amine chloride controls. After preincubations, enolase and ATPase activities of the cells were assessed. Enolase activity was more inhibited after preincubation at pH 7 with NaF than with Olaflur. Amine chloride stimulated, although not with statistical significance, the enolase activity of both strains. After preincubation at pH 4 the enolases were strongly inactivated, but the fluoride-resistant strain's enolase to a lesser extent. The results suggested that amine acts to protect enolase activity against the detrimental low pH effect. Gene sequencing showed that the enolase genes of the fluoride-resistant and fluoride-sensitive strain were identical. ATPase activity was not reduced after NaF preincubation at either pH 7 or pH 4. The amine fluorides and their chloride controls in the preincubation mixture reduced the ATPase activity significantly at both pH values. In conclusion, our results showed that preincubation with amine fluoride did not inhibit enolase activity more effectively than NaF. The amine part of the molecule may protect enolase activity against preincubations at low pH. ATPase activity was not inhibited by NaF preincubation but was significantly inhibited after preincubation with amine fluorides and amine chlorides. (c) 2008 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  1. Parabens do not increase fluoride uptake by dental enamel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanessa Silva Tramontino

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate whether methylparaben and propylparaben, which present a similar chemical structure, increase fluoride uptake by demineralized dental enamel when present in buffered solutions. Methods: The study comprised an in vitro experiment using blocks of bovine dental enamel with artificial carious lesions. Enamel blocks were exposed to the following treatment (n=12: fluoride solution (200 ppm fluoride - control; solution containing fluoride and 13 mM methylparaben; solution containing fluoride and 13 mM propylparaben in 35% propylene glycol; solution containing fluoride in 35% propylene glycol. All solutions were buffered (0.01 M cacodilate and the pH was adjusted to 6.27. The blocks were exposed to the treatment solutions in the proportion of 2 ml per mm2 of exposed enamel area and fluoride formed was estimated after removing an enamel layer by acid etching. Fluoride extracted was determined by ion specific electrode and the amount of enamel removed was estimated by phosphorus analysis. ANOVA followed by Tukey’s test were used for statistical analysis, with significance level at 5%. Results: The dental blocks of treatment groups containing both parabens and the control group presented similar fluoride concentration in enamel and no statistical difference was observed among them (p>0.05. The dental blocks of treatment group containing fluoride and propylene glycol showed the lowest value of fluoride present in enamel, which was significantly different from the control and fluoride and methylparaben groups (p<0.05. Conclusion: Methyl and propylparaben in a buffered solution do not enhance fluoride uptake by demineralized dental enamel.

  2. Nonlinear dynamics of thin film polyvinylidene fluoride cantilevers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukla, Amit

    2004-07-01

    Design and development of electro-active polymeric devices for sensing and actuation requires accurate characterization of its nonlinear dynamic behavior and performance characteristics. Thin film cantilevers are being applied for numerous sensor and actuator applications. A nonlinear model of a piezoelectric thin plate cantilever is developed in this work using a two-mode approximation developed by Galerkin's method. This reduced order model is then studied using perturbation method for the nonlinear dynamic response due to a harmonic excitation. The results obtained demonstrate the nonlinear nature of the dynamic behavior of thin plates made of polymer polyvinylidene fluoride. The exhibited nonlinear behavior includes parameter dependent amplitude modulation, nonlinear jump and nonlinear dependence on excitation frequency and excitation amplitude. This study is a step forward in understanding the associated dynamics so as to utilize these geometries in various transducer applications.

  3. Effect of fluoride on photosynthesis, growth and accumulation of four widely cultivated rice (Oryza sativa L.) varieties in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondal, Naba Kumar

    2017-10-01

    Long-term use of fluoride contaminated groundwater to irrigate crops; especially paddy rice (Oryza sativa L.) has resulted in elevated soil fluoride levels in Eastern India. There is, therefore, growing concern regarding accumulation of fluoride in rice grown on these soils. A laboratory experiment was conducted to investigate the effect of F on germination and phytotoxicity of four varieties of rice (Orzya sativa L.) (MTU-1010; IET-4094; IET-4786 and GB-1) grown in petri dish in a green house with inorganic sodium fluoride (NaF). Three different levels (0, 5, 10 and 20mg/L) of NaF solution were applied. At the end of the experiment (28 days), biochemical analysis (pigment, sugar, protein, amino acid and phenol), lipid peroxidation, root ion leakage and catalase activity along with fluoride accumulation and fresh and dry weight of roots and shoots of four cultivars were measured. The results revealed that all the four studied varieties exhibited gradual decrease of germination pattern with increasing concentration of F. Pigment and growth morphological study clearly demonstrated that the variety IET-4094 was the least influenced by F compare to the other three varieties of rice. The translocation factor (TF) was recorded to be the highest for variety IET-4786 (0.215 ± 0.03) at 5mg/L F concentration. All the four varieties showed higher level of fluoride accumulation in root than in shoot. Variable results were recorded for biochemical parameters and lipid peroxidation. Catalase activity and relative conductivity (root ion leakage) gradually increased with increasing F concentration for all the four varieties. It is speculated that fluoride accumulation in rice straw at very high levels will affect the feeding cattle and such contaminated straw could be a direct threat to their health and also, indirectly, to human health via presumably contaminated meat and milk. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  4. Fluoride intake in children living in a high-fluoride area in Ethiopia - intake through beverages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malde, M K; Zerihun, L; Julshamn, K; Bjorvatn, K

    2003-01-01

    The present study was conducted in Wonji Shoa, a sugar estate in the Ethiopian Rift Valley. Drinking water in the area is provided either by the Awash River or by high-fluoride ground water wells. Defluoridation plants have been installed, but are not in regular use, and fluorosis, dental as well as skeletal, is endemic. The aim of this study was to assess daily fluoride intake from drinking water and beverages in children from neighbouring villages with varying fluoride concentration in the drinking water. Thirty families were selected from two of the plantation villages (A and K). The criterion for being included in the project was the presence in the household of at least one child, fully weaned and below the age of 5 years. For sampling of beverages, the duplicate portion technique was used. The fluoride concentration in the beverage samples was determined using standard methods, using a fluoride ion-selective electrode. Ten of the selected households in Village A fetched water from the Awash River (1.8 mg F-/L) while five relied upon water from a local well (2.1 mg F-/L). All 15 households in Village K used water from a local well with fluoride concentration of 14.4 mg/L. The mean daily fluoride intake from drinking water and beverages during the four days, varied from 1.2 to 1.5 mg and 5.9 to 8.8 mg in Village A and K, respectively. Low variety in types of beverages consumed was reported both during the study period and through the questionnaire. Only local water was used for beverage preparation. Children who consumed milk had a reduced fluoride intake. Tea, which was part of the children's diet, was not found to be a main source of fluoride. A2n effective defluoridation of the drinking water or a change of water source would seem to be the only options for avoidance of dental and possibly skeletal fluorosis.

  5. Spatial distribution mapping of drinking water fluoride levels in Karnataka, India: fluoride-related health effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowdhury, Chitta R; Shahnawaz, Khijmatgar; Kumari, Divya; Chowdhury, Avidyuti; Bedi, Raman; Lynch, Edward; Harding, Stewart; Grootveld, Martin

    2016-11-01

    (1) To estimate the concentrations of fluoride in drinking water throughout different zones and districts of the state of Karnataka. (2) To investigate the variation of fluoride concentration in drinking water from different sources, and its relationships to daily temperature and rainfall status in the regional districts. (3) To develop an updated fluoride concentration intensity map of the state of Karnataka, and to evaluate these data in the context of fluoride-related health effects such as fluorosis and their prevalence. Aqueous standard solutions of 10, 100 and 1,000 ppm fluoride (F - ) were prepared with analytical grade Na + /F - and a buffer; TISAB II was incorporated in both calibration standard and analysis solutions in order to remove the potentially interfering effects of trace metal ions. This analysis was performed using an ion-selective electrode (ISE), and mean determination readings for n = 5 samples collected at each Karnataka water source were recorded. The F - concentration in drinking water in Karnataka state was found to vary substantially, with the highest mean values recorded being in the north-eastern zone (1.61 ppm), and the lowest in the south-western one (only 0.41 ppm). Analysis of variance (ANOVA) demonstrated that there were very highly significant 'between-zone' and 'between-districts-within-zones' sources of variation (p water source F - levels within this state. The southern part of Karnataka has low levels of F - in its drinking water, and may require fluoridation treatment in order to mitigate for dental caries and further ailments related to fluoride deficiency. However, districts within the north-eastern region have contrastingly high levels of fluoride, an observation which has been linked to dental and skeletal fluorosis. This highlights a major requirement for interventional actions in order to ensure maintenance of the recommended range of fluoride concentrations (0.8-1.5 ppm) in Karnataka's drinking water

  6. Analysis of differentially expressed genes between fluoride-sensitive and fluoride-endurable individuals in midgut of silkworm, Bombyx mori.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Heying; Li, Gang; He, Qingling; Zhang, Huaguang; Xu, Anying

    2016-08-15

    Fluoride tolerance is an economically important trait of silkworm. Near-isogenic lines (NILs) of the dominant endurance to fluoride (Def) gene in Bombyx mori has been constructed before. Here, we analyzed the gene expression profiles of midgut of fluoride-sensitive and fluoride-endurable individuals of Def NILs by using high-throughput Illumina sequencing technology and bioinformatics tools, and identified differentially expressed genes between these individuals. A total of 3,612,399 and 3,567,631 clean tags for the libraries of fluoride-endurable and fluoride-sensitive individuals were obtained, which corresponded to 32,933 and 43,976 distinct clean tags, respectively. Analysis of differentially expressed genes indicates that 241 genes are differentially expressed between the two libraries. Among the 241 genes, 30 are up-regulated and 211 are down-regulated in fluoride-endurable individuals. Pathway enrichment analysis demonstrates that genes related to ribosomes, pancreatic secretion, steroid biosynthesis, glutathione metabolism, steroid biosynthesis, and glycerolipid metabolism are down-regulated in fluoride-endurable individuals. qRT-PCR was conducted to confirm the results of the DGE. The present study analyzed differential expression of related genes and tried to find out whether the crucial genes were related to fluoride detoxification which might elucidate fluoride effect and provide a new way in the fluorosis research. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Effects of tannin-fluoride and milk-fluoride mixture on human enamel erosion from inappropriately chlorinated pool water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boonviriya, Sumalee; Tannukit, Sissada; Jitpukdeebodintra, Suwanna

    2017-01-01

    This in vitro study aimed to investigate the efficacy of tannin-fluoride and milk-fluoride mixtures on human enamel erosion after exposure to inappropriately chlorinated pool water. Enamel specimens were immersed in swimming pool water (pH 2.7) for 30 min and in each test reagent for 4 min once a day for 60 consecutive days (group I: control, group II: tannin-fluoride, group III: milk-fluoride, group IV: tannin-fluoride before and milk-fluoride after erosive challenge, and group V: milk containing tannin-fluoride before and after erosive exposure). Surface microhardness was assessed on days 0, 30, and 60. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and electron probe microanalysis (EPMA) were performed after treatment of samples for 60 days. Surface microhardness of experimental groups was ranked as follows: group III > group IV-group V > group II > group I (P EPMA profiles showed decrease of phosphorus and increase of fluoride content in groups II and IV. In conclusion, we demonstrated that treatment with fluoridated milk with or without tannin-fluoride has protective effects against enamel erosion caused by low-pH swimming pool water.

  8. Effect of a chlorhexidine/thymol and a fluoride varnish on caries development in erupting permanent molars

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Flamee, S; Gizani, S; Caroni, C

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To compare the caries preventive effect of a chlorhexidine/thymol-containing antibacterial varnish with a fluoride varnish when topically applied during the eruption of permanent molars. METHODS: The study group consisted of 189 patients, 5-14 years of age, with one 1st or 2nd permanent mola...

  9. The Effect of Calcium Pre-Rinse on Salivary Fluoride After 900 ppm Fluoride Mouthwash: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nahid Ramazani

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Calcium fluoride deposit during fluoride application. Uptake and retention of fluoride by saliva depends generally on the concentration of calcium. In this study, the ef-fect of calcium pre-rinse on salivary fluoride concentration after a 900 ppm fluoride mouthwash was investigated.Materials and Methods: This cross-over double-blind randomized clinical trial was con-ducted in a girls' dormitory in Zahedan University of Medical Sciences, southeast Iran. In this study, 42 female dental students were chosen using simple randomization. During the first phase, 21 subjects (group A used fluoride rinse (F regimen and the remaining (group B used calcium pre-rinse followed immediately by fluoride rinse (Ca + F regi-men. In the second phase, participants rinsed using the mouthwashes not previously used. Prior to each phase prophylaxis was performed and no fluoridated product was used dur-ing a two-week interval between the phases. Salivary samples were taken immediately be-fore (baseline, 1 and 12 hours after rinsing. The salivary fluoride concentration was de-termined using fluoride sensitive electrode. Repeated measures ANOVA was used for sta-tistical analysis and the significance level was set at P<0.05.Results: There was significant difference between fluoride concentrations at different time points (P< 0.001. Significant differences were observed when the different time points of two regimens were examined. In contrast to this, the baseline before using F regimen and the baseline before using Ca + F regimen did not show any significance (P= 0.070.Conclusion: Pre-rinsing with calcium before fluoride is recommended because of signifi-cant increases in salivary fluoride concentration.

  10. Professional Certification

    Science.gov (United States)

    WaterSense recognizes certification programs for irrigation professionals that meet the specification criteria. Certification programs cover three areas: irrigation system design, installation and maintenance, and system auditing.

  11. Changing use and knowledge of fluoride toothpaste by schoolchildren, parents and schoolteachers in Beijing, China

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Min; Zhu, Ling; Zhang, BoXue

    2007-01-01

    toothpaste was 88%, 86%, and 87%, respectively, and 74-78% of the respondent groups brushed their teeth twice a day or more. 64% of schoolchildren, 73% of parents, and 74% of schoolteachers confirmed the caries preventive effect of fluoride toothpaste. Toothpaste recommended by oral health professional...... organisations was preferred by respondents - particularly by schoolchildren - when purchasing toothpaste (86%). 93% of parents and 56% of schoolteachers recognised their important role in promoting children's oral health; however, their lack of knowledge seemed to be a major obstacle in fulfilling this role...

  12. Effectiveness of fluoride sealant in the prevention of carious lesions around orthodontic brackets: an OCT evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matheus Melo Pithon

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective: This article aimed to evaluate in vitro the efficiency of Pro Seal fluoride sealant application in the prevention of white spot lesions around orthodontic brackets. Material and Methods: Brackets were bonded to the buccal surface of bovine incisors, and five groups were formed (n = 15 according to the exposure of teeth to oral hygiene substances and the application of enamel sealant: G1 (control, only brushing was performed with 1.450 ppm fluoride; G2 (control brushing associated with the use of mouthwash with 225 ppm fluoride; G3, only Pro Seal sealant application was performed with 1.000 ppm fluoride; G4 Pro Seal associated with brushing; G5 Pro Seal associated with brushing and mouthwash. Experimental groups alternated between pH cycling and the procedures described. All specimens were kept at a temperature of 37 °C throughout the entire experiment. Both brushing and immersion in solutions were performed within a time interval of one minute, followed by washing in deionized water three times a day for 28 days. Afterwards, an evaluation by Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT of the spectral type was performed. In each group, a scanning exam of the white spot lesion area (around the sites where brackets were bonded and depth measurement of carious lesions were performed. Analysis of variance (ANOVA was applied to determine whether there were significant differences among groups. For post hoc analysis, Tukey test was used. Results: There was statistically significant difference between groups 1 and 2 (p = 0.003, 1 and 3 (p = 0.008, 1 and 4 (p = 0.000 and 1 and 5 (p = 0.000. The group in which only brushing was performed (Group 1 showed deeper enamel lesion. Conclusion: Pro Seal sealant alone or combined with brushing and/or brushing and the use of a mouthwash with fluoride was more effective in protecting enamel, in comparison to brushing alone.

  13. Fluorides for the prevention of early tooth decay (demineralised white lesions) during fixed brace treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benson, Philip E; Parkin, Nicola; Dyer, Fiona; Millett, Declan T; Furness, Susan; Germain, Peter

    2013-12-12

    to the protocol regarding inclusion criteria. Fourteen studies included in the previous version of the review were excluded from this update for the following reasons: five previously included studies were quasi-randomised, a further five were split-mouth studies, three measured outcomes on extracted teeth only and in one, the same fluoride intervention was used in each intervention group of the study.Three studies and 458 participants were included in this updated review. One study was assessed at low risk of bias for all domains, in one study the risk of bias was unclear and in the remaining study, the risk of bias was high.One placebo-controlled study of fluoride varnish applied every six weeks (253 participants, low risk of bias), provided moderate-quality evidence of an almost 70% reduction in DWLs (risk ratio (RR) 0.31, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.21 to 0.44, P value fluoride toothpaste and mouthrinse prescribed for participants undergoing orthodontic treatment (97 participants, unclear risk of bias) and found no difference between an amine fluoride and stannous fluoride toothpaste/mouthrinse combination and a sodium fluoride toothpaste/mouthrinse combination for the outcomes of white spot index, visible plaque index and gingival bleeding index.One small study (37 participants) compared the use of an intraoral fluoride-releasing glass bead device attached to the brace versus a daily fluoride mouthrinse. The study was assessed at high risk of bias because a substantial number of participants were lost to follow-up, and compliance with use of the mouthrinse was not measured.Neither secondary outcomes of this review nor adverse effects of interventions were reported in any of the included studies. This review found some moderate evidence that fluoride varnish applied every six weeks at the time of orthodontic review during treatment is effective, but this finding is based on a single study. Further adequately powered, double-blind, randomised controlled trials

  14. Professionalism and professional quality of life for oncology nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Insil; Kim, Yuna; Kim, Kyunghee

    2016-10-01

    To identify the relationship between professionalism and professional quality of life among oncology nurses working at tertiary hospitals in Korea. Oncology nurses are combined with core competencies and qualities required in cancer patient care. Professionalism that means compassion satisfaction and compassion fatigue is a main concept in problem-solving strategies as motivation. Their satisfaction is representative of professionalism and professional quality of life. However, little research has focused on professionalism and professional quality of life. A cross-sectional study with self-administered questionnaires. A total of 285 nurses from two tertiary hospitals were included. Data collection was undertaken using Korean version of professionalism scale derived from the Hall Professional Inventory Scale and professional quality of life. Data were analysed by spss 21.0 for Windows Program using t-test, anova, and multiple regression. The mean score of professionalism in oncology nurses was 77·98 ± 7·31. The mean professional quality of life score for compassion satisfaction, compassion fatigue and secondary traumatic stress was 33·84 ± 5·62, 28·38 ± 5·36 and 28·33 ± 5·48. Compassion satisfaction was affected by factors of professionalism with an explanatory power of 49·2%. Burnout and secondary traumatic stress were affected by factors of professionalism with an explanatory power of 39·3% and 4·8%. The higher the professionalism leads to the higher the compassion satisfaction, the lower the compassion fatigue. The relationship between professionalism and professional quality of life for a health work environment requires further investigation. Our study supports the idea that enhancing professionalism can increase professional quality of life. It is necessary to develop professionalism by recognised qualifications and applied rewards in advanced nursing organisational culture. Furthermore, compassion satisfaction is increased by

  15. Fluoridation and tooth wear in Irish adults.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Burke, F M

    2010-10-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of tooth wear in adults in Ireland and its relationship with water fluoridation. The National Survey of Adult Oral Health was conducted in 2000\\/2001. Tooth wear was determined using a partial mouth examination assessing the upper and lower anterior teeth. A total of 2456 subjects were examined. In this survey, increasing levels and severity of tooth wear were associated with ageing. Men were more affected by tooth wear and were more likely to be affected by severe tooth wear than women. It was found that age, and gender were significant predictors of tooth wear (P < 0.01). Overall, there was no significant relationship between fluoridation and tooth wear in this study.

  16. Revisiting the thermochemistry of chlorine fluorides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez, Hernán R

    2017-08-15

    In this work, accurate calculations of standard enthalpies of formation of chlorine fluorides (ClFn, n = 1-7; Cl2 F and Cl3 F2 ) were performed through the isodesmic reactions scheme. It is argued that, for many chlorine fluorides, the gold standard method of quantum chemistry (CCSD(T)) is not capable to predict enthalpy values nearing chemical accuracy if atomization scheme is used. This is underpinned by a thorough analysis of total atomization energy results and the inspection of multireference features of these compounds. Other thermodynamic quantities were also calculated at different temperatures. To complement the energetic description, elimination curves were studied through density functional theory as a computationally affordable alternative to highly correlated wave function-based methods. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Fluoride in dental biofilm and saliva

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Line Staun

    Dette ph.d.-projekt bidrager med ny viden om fordelingen af fluorid i dental biofilm og saliva. For at udforske koncentrationen af fluorid i naturlig (in vivo) biofilmvæske, biofilmsediment og i saliva, blev der udført to meget forskellige kliniske studier. Resultaterne fra tværsnitsstudiet (Studie...... mellem fluoridkoncentrationerne i biofilmsediment og fordeling af caries mellem regioner. Forskere anbefales at være opmærksomme på de intra-orale forskelle i fluoridkoncentrationer mellem regioner samt sikre balancering af effekten af region, når der indsamles dental biofilm til fluoridanalyse. I det...... I), hos en stor gruppe mennesker (n=42) der konsulterede en tandklinik for behandling, bekræfter tidligere viden, at der findes en naturlig biologisk variation i fluoridkoncentrationerne i biofilm fra forskellige intra-orale regioner samt mellem biofilmvæske, biofilmsediment og saliva...

  18. Revisiting the thermochemistry of chlorine fluorides

    CERN Document Server

    Sánchez, H R

    2016-01-01

    In this work, accurate calculations of standard enthalpies of formation of chlorine fluorides (ClF$_n$, n=1--7; Cl$_2$F and Cl$_3$F$_2$) were performed through the isodesmic reactions scheme. It is argued that, for many chlorine fluorides, the gold standard method of quantum chemistry (CCSD(T)) is not capable to predict enthalpy values nearing chemical accuracy if atomization scheme is used. This is underpinned by a thorough analysis of total atomization energy results and the inspection of multireference features of these compounds. Other thermodynamic quantities were also calculated at different temperatures. In order to complement the energetic description, elimination curves were studied through density functional theory as a computationally affordable alternative to highly correlated wave function-based methods.

  19. Fluoride and the caries lesion: interactions and mechanism of action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, C

    2009-09-01

    To review the mechanisms of action of fluoride (F). Narrative review of the literature. Fluoride can reduce tooth mineral solubility by exchanging for hydroxyl groups and reducing carbonate content. Thus its presence in solution facilitates mineral precipitation or reprecipitation by lowering solubility products of precipitating calcium phosphates. While sound enamel tends to lose fluoride with age, it accumulates at stagnation sites where caries lesions develop indicating this as a site of action. Fluoride in the lesion will encourage remineralisation [Robinson et al., 2000] such that penetration of the lesion by fluoride is pivotal. Access from plaque, however, is limited due to restricted penetration. Maintaining a very thin plaque layer is thus important in delivering fluoride to the lesion.

  20. [Problems of fluoride dosing to infants for dental fluorosis prevention].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davydov, B N; Borinskaia, E Iu; Kushnir, S M; Borinskiĭ, Iu N; Beliaev, V V

    2011-01-01

    Fluoride content in drinking water, breast milk, cow milk, additional food for newborns prepared with water containing different amount of fluoride was determined. Fluoride excretion in urine since the first days of birth and up to 4 months of postnatal development was investigated in breast and artificially fed infants. When a neonate was fed with breast milk, fluoride was received in the amount no more than 20 mkg/day. The additional food contained fluoride which water mainly had. Water with high level of fluorine increased its content in the additional food up to the values not comparable to those in breast milk that presented danger of dental fluorosis development. Data on fluorine content in drinking water were absolutely necessary to calculate daily fluorides consumption by infants and to prevent dental fluorosis.

  1. Perspectives in the effective use of fluoride in Asia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, P E; Phantumvanit, P

    2012-01-01

    and evaluation of fluoride toothpastes and rinses and, to a lesser extent, to alternatives to water fluoridation, such as salt and milk fluoridation. Most recently, efforts have been made to summarize this extensive database through systematic reviews of fluoride administration (McDonagh et al., 2000; Marinho et...... services, in particular, exposure to disease prevention programs (Petersen, 2003, 2008a). Benefits of fluoride for caries prevention have been substantiated in many countries (Petersen and Lennon, 2004; Jones et al., 2005). In the second half of the 20th century, this focus shifted to the development...... al., 2003; Australian Government, 2007). The Asian workshop held in Phan-Nga, Thailand, during March 22-24, 2011, aimed to discuss current information on fluoride and dental caries, as well as to try identifying barriers and opportunities that countries of Asia may have for implementing such programs...

  2. Health protection: Fluoridation and dental health.

    OpenAIRE

    1983-01-01

    Tooth decay, which affects 95 percent of Americans, is our most common health problem, costing an estimated +2 billion yearly for treatment. By the time children reach 17 years of age, 94 percent have experienced caries and 36 percent have lost one or more permanent teeth due to caries. Dental disease prevention embodies the spectrum of many activities from the fluoridation of community and school water supplies to the dental health education of the child and adult. At this stage of our knowl...

  3. Effect of fluoride toothpastes on enamel demineralization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gintner Zeno

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It was the aim of this study to investigate the effect of four different toothpastes with differing fluoride compounds on enamel remineralization. Methods A 3 × 3 mm window on the enamel surface of 90 human premolars was demineralized in a hydroxyethylcellulose solution at pH 4.8. The teeth were divided into 6 groups and the lower half of the window was covered with varnish serving as control. The teeth were immersed in a toothpaste slurry containing: placebo tooth paste (group 1; remineralization solution (group 2; Elmex Anticaries (group 3; Elmex Sensitive (group 4; Blend-a-med Complete (group 5 and Colgate GRF (group 6. Ten teeth of each group were used for the determination of the F- content in the superficial enamel layer and acid solubility of enamel expressed in soluble phosphorus. Of 6 teeth of each group serial sections were cut and investigated with polarization light microscopy (PLM and quantitative energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX. Results The PLM results showed an increased remineralization of the lesion body in the Elmex Anticaries, Elmex Sensitive and Colgate GRF group but not in the Blend-a-med group. A statistically significant higher Ca content was found in the Elmex Anticaries group. The fluoride content in the superficial enamel layer was significantly increased in both Elmex groups and the Blend-a-med group. Phosphorus solubility was significantly decreased in both Elmex groups and the Blend-a-med group. Conclusion It can be concluded that amine fluoride compounds in toothpastes result in a clearly marked remineralization of caries like enamel lesions followed by sodium fluoride and sodium monofluorophosphate formulations.

  4. Imaging of Fluoride Ion in Living Cells and Tissues with a Two-Photon Ratiometric Fluorescence Probe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinyue Zhu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A reaction-based two-photon (TP ratiometric fluorescence probe Z2 has been developed and successfully applied to detect and image fluoride ion in living cells and tissues. The Z2 probe was designed designed to utilize an ICT mechanism between n-butylnaphthalimide as a fluorophore and tert-butyldiphenylsilane (TBDPS as a response group. Upon addition of fluoride ion, the Si-O bond in the Z2 would be cleaved, and then a stronger electron-donating group was released. The fluorescent changes at 450 and 540 nm, respectively, made it possible to achieve ratiometric fluorescence detection. The results indicated that the Z2 could ratiometrically detect and image fluoride ion in living cells and tissues in a depth of 250 μm by two-photon microscopy (TPM.

  5. Effective use of fluorides for the prevention of dental caries in the 21st century

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Poul Erik; Lennon, Michael A

    2004-01-01

    , due to changing living conditions and dietary habits, and inadequate exposure to fluorides. Research on the oral health effects of fluoride started around 100 years ago; the focus has been on the link between water and fluorides and dental caries and fluorosis, topical fluoride applications, fluoride...... toothpastes, and salt and milk fluoridation. Most recently, efforts have been made to summarize the extensive database through systematic reviews. Such reviews concluded that water fluoridation and use of fluoride toothpastes and mouthrinses significantly reduce the prevalence of dental caries. WHO recommends...... for public health that every effort must be made to develop affordable fluoridated toothpastes for use in developing countries. Water fluoridation, where technically feasible and culturally acceptable, has substantial advantages in public health; alternatively, fluoridation of salt and milk fluoridation...

  6. Analysis of fluoride concentration in commercial bottled waters

    OpenAIRE

    BIZERRIL,Davi Oliveira; ALMEIDA, Janaína Rocha de Sousa; SALDANHA, Kátia de Góis Holanda; CABRAL FILHO,Ronaldo Emilio; Almeida, Maria Eneide Leitão de

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Evaluate fluoride concentration in 500ml commercial brands of bottled water and compare it to the amount printed on the label. Methods: A descriptive, cross-sectional epidemiological study was conducted. Samples of nine different commercial brands of 500ml bottled water were collected at authorized distribution points in the city of Fortaleza, CE, Brazil, in 2013. Fluoride concentration was determined in duplicate using a fluoride ion-selective electrode. The results were obtain...

  7. 40 CFR 60.202 - Standard for fluorides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Standard for fluorides. 60.202 Section... Industry: Wet-Process Phosphoric Acid Plants § 60.202 Standard for fluorides. (a) On and after the date on... facility any gases which contain total fluorides in excess of 10.0 g/Mg of equivalent P2O5 feed (0.020 lb...

  8. 40 CFR 60.192 - Standard for fluorides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Standard for fluorides. 60.192 Section... Plants § 60.192 Standard for fluorides. (a) On and after the date on which the initial performance test... total fluorides, as measured according to § 60.195, in excess of: (1) 1.0 kg/Mg (2.0 lb/ton) of aluminum...

  9. Combinatorial Effects of Arginine and Fluoride on Oral Bacteria

    OpenAIRE

    Zheng, X.; Cheng, X.; Wang, L.; Qiu, W.; Wang, S.; Zhou, Y.; Li, M.; Li, Y.; Cheng, L.; Li, J.; Zhou, X.; Xu, X.

    2015-01-01

    Dental caries is closely associated with the microbial disequilibrium between acidogenic/aciduric pathogens and alkali-generating commensal residents within the dental plaque. Fluoride is a widely used anticaries agent, which promotes tooth hard-tissue remineralization and suppresses bacterial activities. Recent clinical trials have shown that oral hygiene products containing both fluoride and arginine possess a greater anticaries effect compared with those containing fluoride alone, indicati...

  10. Biological effects data: Fluoride and sulfur dioxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McMechan, K.J. (ed.); Holton, R.L.; Ulbricht, R.J.; Morgan , J.B.

    1975-04-01

    The Alumax Pacific Aluminum Corporation has proposed construction of an aluminum reduction facility near Youngs Bay at Warrenton, Oregon. This report comprises one part of the final report to Alumax on a research project entitled, Physical, Chemical and Biological Studies of Youngs Bay.'' It presents data pertaining to the potential biological effects of fluoride and sulfur dioxide, two potentially hazardous plant-stack emissions, on selected aquatic species of the area. Companion volumes provide a description of the physical characteristics the geochemistry, and the aquatic animals present in Youngs Bay and adjacent ecosystems. An introductory volume provides general information and maps of the area, and summarizes the conclusions of all four studies. The data from the two phases of the experimental program are included in this report: lethal studies on the effects of selected levels of fluoride and sulfur dioxide on the survival rate of eleven Youngs Bay faunal species from four phyla, and sublethal studies on the effects of fluoride and sulfur dioxide on the rate of primary production of phytoplankton. 44 refs., 18 figs., 38 tabs.

  11. Professional psychology in Portugal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fagulha, T; Dana, R H

    1997-12-01

    This paper describes the history and current status of professional psychology in Portugal where a unique perspective combines training, research, and practical contributions from Europe and the Americas with their own history of psychological tradition and expertise. Training in professional psychology includes Social Psychology and Educational and Vocational Guidance specializations in addition to Clinical Psychology and Psychotherapy and Counseling for the professional degree, Licenciatura. Advanced degrees are offered in Environmental Psychology, Career Development, Social Cognition, and other areas, primarily for academic positions. Research in all of these areas is expected to have applied outcomes that contribute to individual well being and an improved quality of life for the entire population. The result has been a rapid development of an indigenous professional psychology to address mental health, social, and environmental concerns that compel psychological attention and resources worldwide as well as those problems of local and national origins.

  12. Formulation and characterization of antibacterial fluoride-releasing sealants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Yuwei; Townsend, Janice; Wang, Yapin; Lee, Eun Chee; Evans, Katie; Hender, Erica; Hagan, Joseph L; Xu, Xiaoming

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to formulate and characterize experimental antibacterial fluoride-releasing sealants and compare them with commercial sealants for fluoride release, recharge, adhesion, and microleakage. Two experimental sealants (Exp-1, Exp-2) containing a synthesized antibacterial fluoride-releasing monomer and fluoride-releasing filler were formulated. Exp-2 also contained NovaMin nanoparticles. Commercial sealants Clinpro (CL) FluroShield (FS), and SeLECT Defense (E34) were also included. Fluoride release from disk samples in deionized water was measured daily using an ion-selective electrode for 14 days, and after recharging with Neutra-Foam (2.0% sodium fluoride), fluoride was measured for 5 days. Microtensile bonding strengths (MTBS) to enamel were tested after 24-hour storage in water at 37°C or thermocycling 5-55°C for 1,000 cycles. A microleakage test was conducted on extracted teeth using a dye-penetration method. The data were analyzed using analysis of variance with the Tukey's honestly significant difference test and Kruskal-Wallis test. Exp-1 and Exp-2 had significantly higher fluoride release and recharge capabilities than CL and FL (Psealants had similar MTBS before and after thermocycling. Exp-2 and Exp-1 had significantly lower microleakage scores (Psealants had higher fluoride release and recharge capabilities and similar or better retention than commercial sealants.

  13. [Allergy caused by sodium fluoride glycerin: a case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Jihong

    2012-04-01

    In recent years, though more and more ulcerations of oral mucosa caused by allergy to drug occurred clinically, allergy to sodium fluoride glycerin is extremely rare. A case of allergy to sodium fluoride glycerin occurred in Qianfoshan Campus Hospital of Shandong University. After treatment by sodium fluoride glycerin, there was mucosal edema, a large number of red miliary granules in buccal and palatal mucosa. After 3 hours, there were swallowing difficulties, but no breathing difficulties. Next day large ulcers of oral mucosa developed. The patient was cured 7 days after treatment. Fluoride-sensitive test result was positive.

  14. 4-phenylbutyrate Mitigates Fluoride-Induced Cytotoxicity in ALC Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maiko Suzuki

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Chronic fluoride over-exposure during pre-eruptive enamel development can cause dental fluorosis. Severe dental fluorosis is characterized by porous, soft enamel that is vulnerable to erosion and decay. The prevalence of dental fluorosis among the population in the USA, India and China is increasing. Other than avoiding excessive intake, treatments to prevent dental fluorosis remain unknown. We previously reported that high-dose fluoride induces endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress and oxidative stress in ameloblasts. Cell stress induces gene repression, mitochondrial damage and apoptosis. An aromatic fatty acid, 4-phenylbutyrate (4PBA is a chemical chaperone that interacts with misfolded proteins to prevent ER stress. We hypothesized that 4PBA ameliorates fluoride-induced ER stress in ameloblasts. To determine whether 4PBA protects ameloblasts from fluoride toxicity, we analyzed gene expression of Tgf-β1, Bcl2/Bax ratio and cytochrome-c release in vitro. In vivo, we measured fluorosis levels, enamel hardness and fluoride concentration. Fluoride treated Ameloblast-lineage cells (ALC had decreased Tgf-β1 expression and this was reversed by 4PBA treatment. The anti-apoptotic Blc2/Bax ratio was significantly increased in ALC cells treated with fluoride/4PBA compared to fluoride treatment alone. Fluoride treatment induced cytochrome-c release from mitochondria into the cytosol and this was inhibited by 4PBA treatment. These results suggest that 4PBA mitigates fluoride-induced gene suppression, apoptosis and mitochondrial damage in vitro. In vivo, C57BL/6J mice were provided fluoridated water for six weeks with either fluoride free control-chow or 4PBA-containing chow (7 g/kg 4PBA. With few exceptions, enamel microhardness, fluorosis levels, and fluoride concentrations of bone and urine did not differ significantly between fluoride treated animals fed with control-chow or 4PBA-chow. Although 4PBA mitigated high-dose fluoride toxicity in vitro, a diet

  15. Formulation and Characterization of Antibacterial Fluoride-releasing Sealants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Yuwei; Townsend, Janice; Wang, Yapin; Lee, Eun Chee; Evans, Katie; Hender, Erica; Hagan, Joseph L.; Xu, Xiaoming

    2013-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to formulate and characterize experimental antibacterial fluoride-releasing sealants and compare them with commercial sealants for fluoride release, recharge, adhesion, and microleakage. Methods Two experimental sealants (Exp-1, Exp-2) containing a synthesized antibacterial fluoride-releasing monomer and fluoride-releasing filler were formulated. Exp-2 also contained NovaMin nanoparticles. Commercial sealants Clinpro (CL) FluoroShield (FS), and SeLECT Defense (E34) were also included. Fluoride release from disk samples in deionized water was measured daily using an ion-selective electrode for 14 days, and after recharging with Neutra-Foam (2.0% sodium fluoride), fluoride was measured for 5 days. Microtensile bonding strengths (MTBS) to enamel were tested after 24-hour storage in water at 37°C or thermocycling 5-55°C for 1,000 cycles. A microleakage test was conducted on extracted teeth using a dye-penetration method. The data were analyzed using analysis of variance with the Tukey’s honestly significant difference test and Kruskal-Wallis test. Results Exp-1 and Exp-2 had significantly higher fluoride release and recharge capabilities than CL and FL (P<.05). All tested sealants had similar MTBS before and after thermocycling. Exp-2 and Exp-1 had significantly lower microleakage scores (P<.05) than other groups. Conclusion The experimental sealants had higher fluoride release and recharge capabilities and similar or better retention than commercial sealants. PMID:23635887

  16. Survey of fluoride levels in vended water stations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jadav, Urvi G; Archarya, Bhavini S; Velasquez, Gisela M; Vance, Bradley J; Tate, Robert H; Quock, Ryan L

    2014-01-01

    This study sought to measure the fluoride concentration of water derived from vended water stations (VWS) and to identify its clinical implications, especially with regard to caries prevention and fluorosis. VWS and corresponding tap water samples were collected from 34 unique postal zip codes; samples were analyzed in duplicate for fluoride concentration. Average fluoride concentration in VWS water was significantly lower than that of tap water (P water ranged from drinking water may not be receiving optimal caries preventive benefits; thus dietary fluoride supplementation may be indicated. Conversely, to minimize the risk of fluorosis in infants consuming reconstituted infant formula, water from a VWS may be used.

  17. The dentist’s role in promoting community water fluoridation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melbye, Molly L.R.; Armfield, Jason M.

    2013-01-01

    Background and Overview Community water fluoridation is an important public health intervention that reduces oral health disparities and increases the health of the population. Promotion of its safety and effectiveness is critical to maintaining its widespread acceptance and ensuring its continued use. Dentists are a potentially important source of knowledge regarding the oral health benefits and safety of water fluoridation. However, few dentists regularly discuss fluorides, and water fluoridation in particular, with patients. The authors aim to describe and discuss the role and importance of dentists’ promotion of public water fluoridation, barriers to dentists’ involvement and some approaches that might influence dentists to promote water fluoridation more actively. Conclusions and Practice Implications Ongoing promotion of fluoridation by dentists is a key factor in ensuring sustained municipal water fluoridation. However, current undergraduate dental curricula do not adequately prepare dentists for this role, and continuing dental education may be insufficient to change clinical practice. Although smoking-cessation literature can shed some light on how to proceed, changing dentists’ practice behavior remains a largely unstudied topic. Dental associations are a key resource for dentists, providing information that can assist them in becoming advocates for water fluoridation. PMID:23283928

  18. The effects of fluoride, strontium, theobromine and their combinations on caries lesion rehardening and fluoridation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lippert, Frank

    2017-08-01

    The aim was to investigate the effects of fluoride, strontium, theobromine and their combinations on caries lesion rehardening and fluoridation (EFU) under pH cycling conditions. Human enamel specimens were demineralized at 37°C for 24h using a pH 5.0 solution containing 50mM lactic acid and 0.2% Carbopol 907 which was 50% saturated with respect to hydroxyapatite. Lesions were assigned to nine treatment groups (n=16) based on Knoop surface microhardness indentation length. aqueous solutions were: placebo, 11.9mM sodium fluoride (F), 23.8mM sodium fluoride (2×F), 1.1mM strontium chloride hexahydrate (Sr), 1.1mM F theobromine, Sr+theobromine, F+Sr, F+theobromine, F+Sr+theobromine. Lesions were pH cycled for 5d (daily protocol: 3×1min-treatment; 2×60min-demineralization; 4×60min & overnight-artificial saliva). Knoop indentation length was measured again and%surface microhardness recovery (%SMHr) calculated. EFU was determined using the acid-etch technique. Data were analysed using ANOVA. Model showed fluoride dose-response for both variables (2×F>F>placebo). For%SMHr, F+Sr+/-theobromine resulted in more rehardening than F, however less than 2×F. F+theobromine was similar to F. For EFU, F+Sr was inferior to F, F+theobromine and F+Sr+theobromine which were similar and inferior to 2×F. In absence of fluoride, Sr, theobromine or Sr+theobromine were virtually indistinguishable from placebo and inferior to F. It can be concluded that a) strontium aids rehardening but not EFU and only in presence of fluoride; b) theobromine does not appear to offer any anti-caries benefits in this model; c) there are no synergistic effects between strontium and theobromine in the presence or absence of fluoride. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Fluoridated milk for preventing dental caries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeung, C Albert; Chong, Lee Yee; Glenny, Anne-Marie

    2015-09-03

    Dental caries remains a major public health problem in most industrialised countries, affecting 60% to 90% of schoolchildren and the vast majority of adults. Milk may provide a relatively cost-effective vehicle for fluoride delivery in the prevention of dental caries. This is an update of a Cochrane review first published in 2005. To assess the effects of milk fluoridation for preventing dental caries at a community level. We searched the Cochrane Oral Health Group Trials Register (inception to November 2014), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Library, 2014, Issue 10), MEDLINE via OVID (1946 to November 2014) and EMBASE via OVID (1980 to November 2014). We also searched the U.S. National Institutes of Health Trials Register (https://clinicaltrials.gov) and the WHO International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (http://apps.who.int/trialsearch) for ongoing trials. We did not place any restrictions on the language or date of publication when searching the electronic databases. Randomised controlled trials (RCTs), with an intervention and follow-up period of at least two years, comparing fluoridated milk with non-fluoridated milk. Two authors independently assessed trial risk of bias and extracted data. We used standard methodological procedures expected by The Cochrane Collaboration. We included one unpublished RCT, randomising 180 children aged three years at study commencement. The setting was nursery schools in an area with high prevalence of dental caries and a low level of fluoride in drinking water. Data from 166 participants were available for analysis. The study carried a high risk of bias. After three years, there was a reduction of caries in permanent teeth (mean difference (MD) -0.13, 95% confidence interval (CI) -0.24 to -0.02) and in primary teeth (MD -1.14, 95% CI -1.86 to -0.42), as measured by the decayed, missing and filled teeth index (DMFT for permanent teeth and dmft for primary teeth). For primary teeth

  20. PREPARATION AND CHARACTERIZATION OF STRONTIUM FLUORIDE POWDERS ACTIVATED BY NEODYMIUM FLUORIDE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. V. Kuznetsov

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Subject of Study. The paper deals with preparation processes of ultradisperse, homogeneous powder Sr1-хNdхF2+х (х= 0.003-0.2, with use of ammonium fluoride as the fluorinating agent taken over 114-120 % from stoichiometry. Method. Nitrate of strontium, neodymium nitrate hexahydrate, with the content equal to 99. 99 % of the basic substance and ammonium fluoride were used as the source of substances. Activated powders of strontium fluoride were obtained by the method of deposition from aqueous solutions by washing the precipitate with a solution of ammonium fluoride, taken over 114 - 120% from stoichiometry. The washed precipitate was centrifuged for 5-7 min, dried in the air at 30-350 C. Heat treatment of the dried precipitate was carried out in two stages: the first stage at the temperature of 200- 2500 C for 0.5-1 hour, the second one at 550- 6000 C for 2-3 hours. X-ray analysis of the synthesized samples was carried out on a Bruker D8 Advance diffractometer, radiation Cu K. The size and shape measuring of the particles of activated strontium fluoride was carried out by means of electron microscope Carl Zeiss NVision 40. The content of neodymium in activated powders of strontium fluoride was determined by the method of spectral emission analysis on the device LEA - S500. Chemical analysis for determination of ammonium ion (NH4+ content in the obtained samples was performed by the method of Kjeldahl. Calculations of lattice parameters, size of coherent scattering regions and the values of micro-deformations were carried out by TOPAS program. Main Results. Preparation processes of ultradisperse, homogeneous powder Sr1-хNdхF2+х (х= 0.003-0.2, with use of ammonium fluoride as the fluorinating agent taken over 114-120 % from stoichiometry, provides obtaining the firm solution Sr1-x-yNdx(NH4yF2+x-y of the cubic fluorite structure. It has been found out that the morphology and size of the resulting product depend on the quantity of

  1. Formulation of microemulsion propolis fluoride (PF) as varnish topical agent to stop activity of teeth caries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahlan, Muhamad; Prakoso, Chandra Dwi; Darwita, Risqa Rina; Hermansyah, Heri

    2017-02-01

    Topical fluoride is proven to have higher efficacy in preventing dental caries with low production cost and easy to apply. The objective of this research is to formulate alternative agent topical fluoride NH4F 5% mixed with extract ethanol propolis (EEP) in the micro-emulsion system that has high stability, antimicrobial activity, and remineralization capability to arrest teeth caries activity. By using total plate count (TPC) analysis, formulation 2.7% EEP; 6,3% surfactant; and 90,9% NH4F shows good perform to inhibit cariogenic bacteria development around 78-80%. Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and Energy Dispersive X-Ray (EDX) result also showed that sample successfully remineralized enamel surface. In addition, sample showed good pH, flavonoid, and polyphenol stability for 40 days.

  2. Professional Synergy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, P. R.

    1981-01-01

    True professionals develop and create together a better future by their human endeavors in synergy. They must operate comfortably in two cultures--the industrial culture which is disappearing, and the superindustrial or cyberculture which is emerging. (CT)

  3. Irradiation effects on microhardness of fluoridated and non-fluoridated bovine dentin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kielbassa, A.M.; Beetz, I.; Hellwig, E. [Albert-Ludwigs-Univ., Univ. Clinic of Dentistry, Dept. of Operative Dentistry and Periodontology, Freiburg (Germany); Schendera, A. [Albert-Ludwigs-Univ., Univ. Clinic of Radiotherapy, Freiburg (Germany)

    1997-10-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of irradiation on microhardness of dentin. Dentin blocks from the cervical region of bovine incisors were treated as follows: 1) no irradiation; 2) irradiation of specimens up to 60 Gy (2Gy/day, 5 days/week); 3) no irradiation, but fluoridation of specimens for 5 min/d; 4) irradiation of specimens and daily fluoridation. Knoop hardness number (KHN) of the control specimens was 62.63{+-}14.75 (mean{+-}SD). This was significantly different from the irradiated dentin samples (8.74{+-}2.59 KHN). Hardness of the fluoridated dentin specimens was 11.19{+-}1.95 KHN in the non-irradiated group and 10.03{+-}2.75 KHN in the irradiated groups, respectively. Within the limitations of an in vitro study, it is concluded that dentin is severely affected by irradiation. This could be an explanation for the frequently observed side-effects of irradiation like loss of enamel, gap formation at the amelodentinal junction, and caries of the cervical region. Fluoridation with acidic gels decereases microhardness of dentin surface, and does not prevent softening due to radiation, when saliva is absent. (au). 23 refs.

  4. CAN FLUORIDATION AFFECT LEAD (II) IN POTABLE WATER? HEXAFLUOROSILICATE AND FLUORIDE EQUILIBRIA IN AQUEOUS SOLUTION

    Science.gov (United States)

    Recent reports have attempted to show that fluoridating potable water is linked to increased levels of lead(II) in the blood. We examine these claims in light of the established science and critically evaluate their significance. The completeness of hexafluorosilicate hydrolysi...

  5. PROFESSIONAL CATEGORIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sorin Fildan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The transition process which Romanian commercial law underwent has affected both the term of ‘trader’, by redefining it, and the classification of professional categories. Currently, the term of ‘professional’ is conveyed by a descriptive listing of the categories of persons it comprises: traders, entrepreneurs, business operators, as well as any other person authorized to carry out economic or professional activities.

  6. Corrosion behaviour of TiN and ZrN in the environment containing fluoride ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joska, Ludek; Fojt, Jaroslav; Hradilova, Monika [Department of Metals and Corrosion Engineering, Institute of Chemical Technology, Technicka 5, 166 28 Prague 6 (Czech Republic); Hnilica, Frantisek [UJP, Prague (Czech Republic); Cvrcek, Ladislav, E-mail: joskal@vscht.c [HVM Plasma, Prague (Czech Republic)

    2010-10-01

    Nowadays, a wide range of materials for human implants is used. To reach the required properties of implants, coatings are applied in some cases. This contribution is focused on the corrosion properties of TiN and ZrN layers on cp-titanium (commercially pure titanium) under environment modelling conditions in an oral cavity. Measurements were done in artificial saliva and a physiological solution unbuffered and buffered to a pH value of 4.2 with the addition of fluoride ions up to 4000 ppm. Standard corrosion electrochemical techniques were applied. Both types of layers were stable in both model saliva and physiological solution with non-adjusted pH. The decrease in pH to 4.2 resulted in a minor decrease of corrosion resistance in all cases, but polarization resistance was still in the order of 10{sup 5} {Omega} cm{sup 2}. An important change in a specimens' behaviour was noticed in the presence of fluoride ions. TiN was stable in the highest concentration of fluorides used. The ZrN layers were destabilized in an environment containing a few hundred ppm of fluoride ions. As for TiN, the decisive factor is the influence of porosity; the corrosion resistance of ZrN is limited. From the corrosion point of view, the application of the TiN-based barrier layers in dental implantology is more advisable than the use of ZrN, provided that the application of a barrier is inevitable.

  7. Nanostructural effect of acid-etching and fluoride application on human primary and permanent tooth enamels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheong, Youjin [Department of Biomedical Engineering and Healthcare Industry Research Institute, College of Medicine, Kyung Hee University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Samjin [Department of Biomedical Engineering and Healthcare Industry Research Institute, College of Medicine, Kyung Hee University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Department of Orthodontics, College of Dental Medicine, Kyung Hee University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, So Jung [Department of Pediatric Dentistry, College of Dental Medicine, Kyung Hee University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, Hun-Kuk, E-mail: sigmoidus@khu.ac.kr [Department of Biomedical Engineering and Healthcare Industry Research Institute, College of Medicine, Kyung Hee University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Program of Medical Engineering, Kyung Hee University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-07-01

    This study examined the nanostructural effects of fluoride application and the acid-etching time with respect to the time elapsed after fluoride application on the primary and permanent tooth enamel layers using atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). 192 non-carious teeth were assigned to sixteen experimental groups (n = 12) including primary (1 to 8) and permanent (9 to 16) teeth, based on the timing of acid-etching with 37% phosphoric acid after an acidulated phosphate fluoride (APF) pre-treatment. The APF pre-treatment led to a decrease in surface roughness in both the primary and permanent teeth. After the APF treatment, the roughness in both primary and permanent teeth increased with the time elapsed. An acid-etching time of 40 s led to increased nanostructural changes in the enamel surfaces compared to the conventional acid-etching time of 20 s. This acid-etching process led to a higher roughness changes in the primary teeth than in the permanent teeth. To obtain proper enamel adhesion of a sealant after APF pre-treatment, it is important to apply acid-etching two weeks after pre-treatment. In addition, the acid-etching time should be prolonged to apply etching more quickly than two weeks, regardless of the primary and permanent teeth. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer APF pre-treatment led to decreased surface roughness in the enamel. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer After APF treatment, the more roughness increased with increasing time elapsed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Acid-etching should be performed two weeks after fluoride application.

  8. Sirt1 overexpression suppresses fluoride-induced p53 acetylation to alleviate fluoride toxicity in ameloblasts responsible for enamel formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Maiko; Ikeda, Atsushi; Bartlett, John D

    2017-11-28

    Low-dose fluoride is an effective caries prophylactic, but high-dose fluoride is an environmental health hazard that causes skeletal and dental fluorosis. Treatments to prevent fluorosis and the molecular pathways responsive to fluoride exposure remain to be elucidated. Previously we showed that fluoride activates SIRT1 as an adaptive response to protect cells. Here, we demonstrate that fluoride induced p53 acetylation (Ac-p53) [Lys379], which is a SIRT1 deacetylation target, in ameloblast-derived LS8 cells in vitro and in enamel organ in vivo. Here we assessed SIRT1 function on fluoride-induced Ac-p53 formation using CRISPR/Cas9-mediated Sirt1 knockout (LS8Sirt/KO) cells or CRISPR/dCas9/SAM-mediated Sirt1 overexpressing (LS8Sirt1/over) cells. NaF (5 mM) induced Ac-p53 formation and increased cell cycle arrest via Cdkn1a/p21 expression in Wild-type (WT) cells. However, fluoride-induced Ac-p53 was suppressed by the SIRT1 activator resveratrol (50 µM). Without fluoride, Ac-p53 persisted in LS8Sirt/KO cells, whereas it decreased in LS8Sirt1/over. Fluoride-induced Ac-p53 formation was also suppressed in LS8Sirt1/over cells. Compared to WT cells, fluoride-induced Cdkn1a/p21 expression was elevated in LS8Sirt/KO and these cells were more susceptible to fluoride-induced growth inhibition. In contrast, LS8Sirt1/over cells were significantly more resistant. In addition, fluoride-induced cytochrome-c release and caspase-3 activation were suppressed in LS8Sirt1/over cells. Fluoride induced expression of the DNA double strand break marker γH2AX in WT cells and this was augmented in LS8Sirt1/KO cells, but was attenuated in LS8Sirt1/over cells. Our results suggest that SIRT1 deacetylates Ac-p53 to mitigate fluoride-induced cell growth inhibition, mitochondrial damage, DNA damage and apoptosis. This is the first report implicating Ac-p53 in fluoride toxicity.

  9. The Routledge Applied Linguistics Reader

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Li, Ed.

    2011-01-01

    "The Routledge Applied Linguistics Reader" is an essential collection of readings for students of Applied Linguistics. Divided into five sections: Language Teaching and Learning, Second Language Acquisition, Applied Linguistics, Identity and Power and Language Use in Professional Contexts, the "Reader" takes a broad…

  10. Fluoride concentrations in groundwater and impact on human health ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2010-07-04

    Jul 4, 2010 ... tal fluorosis in the Free State, North West, KwaZulu-Natal and. Western Cape Provinces was also assessed by Ncube and ... of fluoride-rich groundwater in the North-West and Limpopo. Provinces of South Africa. High fluoride ..... water of South Korea. Sci. Total Environ. 385 272–283. CLARKE S (2000) ...

  11. Fluoride release/recharging ability and bond strength of glass ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2015-08-17

    Aug 17, 2015 ... and erosion of GICs during the early setting period, followed by a rapid .... fluoride ions released from each specimen were measured at. 1, 2, 4, 8, 15, .... adhesion to enamel and dentin tissues and fluoride release are some of ...

  12. Fluoride release by glass ionomer cements, compomer and giomer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sayed Mostafa Mousavinasab

    2009-01-01

    Conclusion:Fuji IX, Fuji VII, Fuji IX Extra, and Fuji II LC released higher amounts of fluoride compared to Beautifil and Dyract Extra in this study. It seems that the extent of the glass ionomer matrix plays an important role in determining the fluoride releasing ability of glass ionomer cement materials.

  13. Study of Fluoride Glasses Devitrification-Based Magnesium ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The kinetics of devitrification of fluoride glasses stabilized by magnesium fluoride when heated for some time between the glass transition and melting temperatures. The crystallization kinetics of AlF3-YF3-PbF2-CdF2-MgF2 glass prepared by melting the halide powders were studied by differential scanning calorimetry ...

  14. The occurrence of fluoride in South African groundwater: A water ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The fluoride data were obtained by extracting fluoride groundwater quality data from DWAF's Water Management Systems (WMS) database. STATISTICA and ARCVIEW were used to process the data. The dental fluorosis data were obtained from a field study conducted by the Department of Health. The degree of dental ...

  15. Fluoride in black and green tea ( Camellia sinensis ) infusions in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The fluoride contents in the infusions of 21 commercially available Ethiopian and imported black and green tea brands; in leaf and bag forms was determined by a fluoride ion-selective electrode method. Of the samples analyzed twelve were products from Ethiopia and the remaining nine were imported tea brands.

  16. Fluoride Contamination in Drinking Water in the Rift Valley, Kenya ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A survey of the amount of Fluoride in ground, potable water in Njoro division, Nakuru district and some parts outside the division was conducted to determine the concentration of Fluoride the residents are consuming through water. This area is situated in the Great Rift Valley of East Africa, which is known to have high levels ...

  17. FLUORIDE IN BLACK AND GREEN TEA (CAMELLIA SINENSIS ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Preferred Customer

    ... mg/kg in black tea bags originated from United Kingdom, India, China, Japan, and ... salts are the main sources of the total fluoride intake of the population [20]. ..... older dust tea leaves which accumulate higher fluoride level through aging, ...

  18. Equilibrium Studies of Fluoride Adsorption onto a Ferric Poly ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    African countries along the Great Rift Valley are among areas of the world where excess fluoride in water sources is a major public health problem. In this work, the removal of fluoride (F) from water solutions using a ferric poly-mineral (FPM) from Kenya was therefore studied using batch adsorption experiments. The effect of ...

  19. Fluoride release/recharging ability and bond strength of glass ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    release as well as greater fluoride recharge capacity. Key words: Bond strength, caries-affected dentin, fluoride release, glass ionomer cements. Date of Acceptance: 17-Aug-2015. Introduction. The current concept of restorative dentistry is characterized by the preservation of tooth structure during cavity preparation and less ...

  20. Fluoride inhibits the response of bone cells to mechanical loading

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Willems, H.M.E.; van den Heuvel, E.G.H.M.; Castelein, S.; Buisman, J.K.; Bronckers, A.L.J.J.; Bakker, A.D.; Klein-Nulend, J.

    2011-01-01

    The response of bone cells to mechanical loading is mediated by the cytoskeleton. Since the bone anabolic agent fluoride disrupts the cytoskeleton, we investigated whether fluoride affects the response of bone cells to mechanical loading, and whether this is cytoskeleton mediated. The

  1. Carbide-fluoride-silver self-lubricating composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sliney, Harold E. (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    A self-lubricating, friction and wear reducing composite material is described for use over a wide temperature spectrum from cryogenic temperature to about 900 C in a chemically reactive environment comprising silver, barium fluoride/calcium fluoride eutectic, and metal bonded chromium carbide.

  2. Carbide/fluoride/silver self-lubricating composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sliney, Harold E. (Inventor)

    1988-01-01

    A self-lubricating, friction and wear reducing composite material for use over a wide temperature spectrum from cryogenic temperature to about 900.degree. C. in a chemically reactive environment comprising silver, barium fluoride/calcium fluoride eutectic, and metal bonded chromium carbide.

  3. Spectrophotometric determination of fluoride in drinking water using ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A sensitive spectrophotometric determination of fluoride in drinking water has been developed using aluminium complexes of triphenylmethane dyes (chrome azurol B and malachite green) as spectrophotometric reagents. The method allowed a reliable determination of fluoride in the range of 0.5–4.0 mg·l-1 for chrome ...

  4. Optical detection of sodium salts of fluoride, acetate and phosphate ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    cal systems and they are also of health concern.1,2 Many synthetic chromogenic and/or fluorogenic sensors for fluoride ... not applicable in many bio-analytical applications. Of course, colourimetric detection of fluoride in ..... Hursthouse M B, Light M E, Shi A J 2002 Chem. Commun. 758; (c) Camiolo S, Gale P A, Hursthouse.

  5. Examination of Reviews-Outcomes of Community Water Fluoridation ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Examination of Reviews-Outcomes of Community Water Fluoridation in Dental Caries Prevention. ... West African Journal of Industrial and Academic Research ... The purpose of this paper is to examine the different reviews of the outcomes of fluoridation of community water in the prevention of dental caries in Cochrane ...

  6. Fluoride removal studies in water using natural materials : technical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Excess fluoride in water causes health hazards to the natural environment. The removal of fluoride was attempted using natural materials such as red soil, charcoal, brick, fly-ash and serpentine. Each material was set up in a column for a known volume and the defluoridation capacities of these materials were studied with ...

  7. Fluoride removal from water by zirconium (IV) doped chitosan bio ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This bio-composite was at par with commercial alumina to mitigate water fluoride limit up to 1 to 1.5 mg/L. Effect of parameters namely pH, adsorbent dose, contact time and initial fluoride concentration were studied in batch scale. Kinetic data showed a rapid adsorption, indicated practicable operations in packed column.

  8. Spectrophotometric determination of fluoride in drinking water using ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2011-03-14

    Mar 14, 2011 ... A sensitive spectrophotometric determination of fluoride in drinking water has been developed using aluminium complexes of triphenylmethane dyes (chrome azurol B and malachite green) as spectrophotometric reagents. The method allowed a reliable determination of fluoride in the range of 0.5–4.0 ...

  9. Organometallic fluorides of main group and transition elements

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    Organometallic fluorides of main group and transition elements. HERBERT W ROESKY. University of Gottingen, Gottingen, Germany. Me3SnF, Ph2PbF2 and Ph3BiF2 are used for the preparation of organometallic fluorides. Their different properties in fluorination reactions are discussed. The application of organometallic ...

  10. Potential groundwater contamination by fluoride from two South ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A study to investigate the fluoride content in two South African phosphogypsums, Kynoch and Omnia, and the potential threat to water sources was undertaken. Kynoch and Omnia phosphogypsums were found to consist of fluoride in the region of 0.12% and 0.03% by mass, respectively. The phosphogypsum samples were ...

  11. Combined aluminium sulfate/hydroxide process for fluoride removal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The fluoride removal efficiency of the combined process was also tested for real water sample from selected community water supply system in the Rift Valley Region of Ethiopia. The removal of fluoride was rapid in the first 15 min. The combined process efficiency was about 93% with an optimum combined alum/AO dose ...

  12. Fluoride Analysis. Training Module 5.200.2.77.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkwood Community Coll., Cedar Rapids, IA.

    This document is an instructional module package prepared in objective form for use by an instructor familiar with fluoride analysis procedures. Included are objectives, an instructor guide, student handouts, and a list of reference material. This module considers the determination of fluoride in water supplies using the SPANDS and electrode…

  13. Hydrolysis of iron and chromium fluorides: mechanism and kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gálvez, José L; Dufour, Javier; Negro, Carlos; López-Mateos, Federico

    2008-06-15

    Fluoride complexes of metallic ions are one of the main problems when processing industrial effluents with high content of fluoride anion. The most important case is derived from pickling treatment of stainless steel, which is performed with HNO3/HF mixtures to remove oxides scale formed over the metal surface. Waste from this process, spent pickling liquor, must be treated for recovering metallic and acid content. Conventional treatments produce a final effluent with high quantity of fluoride complexes of iron and chromium. This work proposes a hydrolysis treatment of these solid metal fluorides by reacting them with a basic agent. Metal oxides are obtained, while fluoride is released to solution as a solved salt, which can be easily recovered as hydrofluoric acid. Solid iron and chromium fluorides, mainly K2FeF5(s) and CrF3(s), obtained in the UCM treatment process, were employed in this work. Optimal hydrolysis operating conditions were obtained by means of a factorial design: media must be basic but pH cannot be higher than 9.5, temperature from 40 to 70 degrees C and alkali concentration (potassium hydroxide) below 1.1 mol L(-1). Secondary reactions have been detected, which are probably due to fluoride adsorption onto obtained oxides surface. Mechanism of reaction consists of several stages, involving solid fluoride dissolution and complexes decomposition. Hydrolysis kinetics has been modeled with classical crystal dissolution kinetics, based on mass transfer phenomena.

  14. Computational investigation of the role of fluoride in Tamao oxidations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mader, Mary M.; Norrby, Per-Ola

    2002-01-01

    The Tamao oxidation of alkoxysilanes was investigated computationally to determine the role of fluoride. a key additive. in this reaction. A sequence of fluoride equilibria as well as possible transition states. mediated by basic and neutral peroxide, respectively, were examined, and a potential...

  15. Poisoning by coal smoke containing arsenic and fluoride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    An, D.; He, Y.G.; Hu, Q.X. [Guizhou Sanitary and Epidemiological Station, Guiyang (China)

    1997-02-01

    An investigation was made into a disease involving skin pigmentation, keratosis of the hands and feet, dental discoloration, and generalized bone and joint pain, stiffness and rigidity, in the village of Bazhi, Zhijin County, Ghizhou Province, People`s Republic of China. Measurements were made of the arsenic and fluoride levels of coal, water, air, food, urine and hair in Bazhi and a control village, Xinzhai, in which coal with a low arsenic content was used. Up to 188 people, including children, in Bazhi and 752 in Xinzhai, were examined for the presence of chronic arsenium, skeletal fluorosis, dental fluorosis and electrocardiogram abnormalities. The coal in Bazhi was found to contain high levels of arsenic and fluoride resulting, after burning in homes without an adequate chimney systems, in pollution of air and food with arsenic and fluoride. The coal in Xinzhai did not cause arsenic pollution but did produce a higher level of fluoride pollution. It was concluded that the endemic disease in Bazhi was caused by pollution by coal smoke containing arsenic and fluoride. It is suggested that arsenic may act synergistically with fluoride so that a lower level of fluoride may produce fluoride toxicity with dental and skeletal fluorosis.

  16. Mechanisms of action of fluoride for caries control

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buzalaf, M.A.R.; Pessan, J.P.; Honório, H.M.; ten Cate, J.M.; Buzalaf, M.A.R.

    2011-01-01

    Fluoride was introduced into dentistry over 70 years ago, and it is now recognized as the main factor responsible for the dramatic decline in caries prevalence that has been observed worldwide. However, excessive fluoride intake during the period of tooth development can cause dental fluorosis. In

  17. Household water sources and their contribution towards fluoride ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Fluoride is regarded as an essential element for the formation of healthy bones and teeth. However, high fluoride levels in drinking water have been associated with high incidences of dental fluorosis. A 1996–1997 study in Njoro Division, Nakuru District, established that the groundwater used for cooking and drinking, ...

  18. Characteristics of selective fluoride adsorption by biocarbon-Mg/Al layered double hydroxides composites from protein solutions: kinetics and equilibrium isotherms study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Wei; Lv, Tengfei; Song, Xiaoyan; Cheng, Zihong; Duan, Shibo; Xin, Gang; Liu, Fujun; Pan, Decong

    2014-03-15

    In the study, two novel applied biocarbon-Mg/Al layered double hydroxides composites (CPLDH and CPLDH-Ca) were successfully prepared and characterized by TEM, ICP-AES, XFS, EDS, FTIR, XRD, BET and pHpzc. The fluoride removal efficiency (RF) and protein recovery ratio (RP) of the adsorbents were studied in protein systems of lysozyme (LSZ) and bovine serum albumin (BSA). The results showed that the CPLDH-Ca presented remarkable performance for selective fluoride removal from protein solution. It reached the maximum RF of 92.1% and 94.8% at the CPLDH-Ca dose of 2.0g/L in LSZ and BSA system, respectively. The RP in both systems of LSZ and BSA were more than 90%. Additionally, the RP of CPLDH-Ca increased with the increase of ionic strengths, and it almost can be 100% with more than 93% RF. Fluoride adsorption by the CPLDH-Ca with different initial fluoride concentrations was found to obey the mixed surface reaction and diffusion controlled adsorption kinetic model, and the overall reaction rate is probably controlled by intra-particle diffusion, boundary layer diffusion and reaction process. The adsorption isotherms of fluoride in BSA system fit the Langmuir-Freundlich model well. The BSA has synergistic effect on fluoride adsorption and the degree increased with the increase of the initial BSA concentration. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Experiencias de profesionales de enfermería en terapias alternativas y complementarias aplicadas a personas en situaciones de dolor Experiences of nursing professionals in alternative and complementing therapies applied to people in pain situations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BLANCA CECILIA VANEGAS DE AHOGADO

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Para conocer las experiencias de profesionales de enfermería en el uso de terapias alternativas y complementarias aplicadas durante el cuidado de la salud a personas en situación de dolor, se realizó un estudio cualitativo, como trabajo de grado de un grupo de estudiantes -de pregrado- de Enfermería de la Uni-versidad El Bosque, entre los años 2005 y 2007, en el que participaron cuatro profesionales de enfermería, con varios años de experiencia en la utilización de Terapia Floral, Acupuntura, Homeopatía, Quiromasaje y Naturopatía; es decir, aquellas terapias que, además permiten una acción sinérgica al combinarse con los procedimientos terapéuticos médico-farmacológicos-quirúrgicos convencionales, a los cuales complementan; la selección de participantes se hizo mediante la técnica de bola de nieve. La información se recogió a través de entrevistas profundas semiestructuradas. El análisis de los resultados, permitió conocer que dichas experiencias no tienen como único propósito aliviar determinado tipo de dolor, sino, por lo general, valorar el estado de salud y hacer las intervenciones con enfoque integral, considerando a la persona como un ser holístico; por otra parte, este trabajo les ha proporcionado a las participantes gran satisfacción y posibilidades de desarrollo personal.To know the experiences of nursing professionals on the use of alternative and complementing therapies applied during health care to people in pain situations, a qualitative study was carried out, as a graduation project for a group of nursing students -undergraduates- from the Universidad del Bosque, between 2005 and 2007, in which four nursing professionals took part. They had several years of experience in the use of floral therapy, acupuncture, homeopathy, chiropractic massage therapy and naturopathy; in other words, those therapies that also enable a synergic action when combined with the conventional therapeutic medical

  20. Experiences of nursing professionals in alternative and complementing therapies applied to people in pain situations Experiencias de profesionales de enfermería en terapias alternativas y complementarias aplicadas a personas en situaciones de dolor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MARÍN ARIZA DIEGO ANDRÉS

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available To know the experiences of nursing professionals on the use of alternative and complementing therapies applied during health care to people in pain situations, a qualitative study was carried out, as a graduation project for a group of nursing students –undergraduates– from the Universidad del Bosque, between 2005 and 2007, in which four nursing professionals took part. They had several years of experience in the use of floral therapy, acupuncture, homeopathy, chiropractic massage therapy and naturopathy; in other words, those therapies that also enable a synergic action when combined with the conventional therapeutic medical-pharmacologic-surgical procedures, which they complement; the selection of participants wasmadeusing the "snow ball" technique. The information was gathered by means of semi-structured deep interviews. The analysis of the results enabled us to learn that said experiences do not have as sole purpose to relieve a determined type of pain, but, generally, to evaluate the health condition and to intervene with an integral focus, considering the individual as a holistic human being; on the other hand, this work has given the students great satisfaction and possibilities for personal development.Para conocer las experiencias de profesionales de enfermería en el uso de terapias alternativas y complementarias aplicadas durante el cuidado de la salud a personas en situación de dolor, se realizó un estudio cualitativo, como trabajo de grado de un grupo de estudiantes –de pregrado– de Enfermería de la Uni-versidad El Bosque, entre los años 2005 y 2007, en el que participaron cuatro profesionales de enfermería, con varios años de experiencia en la utilización de Terapia Floral, Acupuntura, Homeopatía, Quiromasaje y Naturopatía; es decir, aquellas terapias que, además permiten una acción sinérgica al combinarse con los procedimientos terapéuticos médico-farmacológicos-quirúrgicos convencionales, a los cuales

  1. Comparative effect of a stannous fluoride toothpaste and a sodium fluoride toothpaste on a multispecies biofilm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Xingqun; Liu, Jinman; Li, Jiyao; Zhou, Xuedong; Wang, Lijiang; Liu, Jiquan; Xu, Xin

    2017-02-01

    This paper aimed to compare the mode of action of a stannous fluoride-containing toothpaste with a conventional sodium fluoride-containing toothpaste on anti-biofilm properties. A three-species biofilm model that consists of Streptococcus mutans, Streptococcus sanguinis and Porphyromonas gingivalis was established to compare the anti-biofilm properties of a stannous fluoride-containing toothpaste (CPH), a conventional sodium fluoride-containing toothpaste (CCP) and a negative control (PBS). The 48h biofilms were subjected to two-minute episodes of treatment with test agents twice a day for 5 consecutive days. Crystal violet staining and XTT assays were used to evaluate the biomass and viability of the treated biofilm. Live/dead staining and bacteria/extracellular polysaccharides (EPS) double-staining were used to visualize the biofilm structure and to quantify microbial/extracellular components of the treated biofilms. Species-specific fluorescent in situ hybridization and quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) were used to analyze microbial composition of the biofilms after treatment. The biomass and viability of the biofilms were significantly reduced after CPH toothpaste treatment. The inhibitory effect was further confirmed by the live/dead staining. The EPS amounts of the three-species biofilm were significantly reduced by CCP and CPH treatments, and CPH toothpaste demonstrated significant inhibition on EPS production. More importantly, CPH toothpaste significantly suppressed S. mutans and P. gingvalis, and enriched S. sanguinis in the three-species biofilm. In all experiments CPH had a significantly greater effect than CCP (pbiofilm, but was also able to modulate microbial composition within multi-species biofilm compared with conventional sodium fluoride-containing toothpaste. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Anti Streptococcus mutans non fluoride and fluoride containing sealants after adding nano-silver particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Ghasempour

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available   Background and Aims: Since recurrent caries are one of the major causes of failure in resin restorations, the production of antibacterial resin composites was always under investigation. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of fissure sealants containing nanosilver particles against the Streptococcus mutans.   Materials and Methods: In this experimental study, the antibacterial properties of two sealants (with fluoride (Clinpro 3M and without fluoride (Concise 3M was investigated with 0, 0.01, 0.02, 0.03, 0.04, 0.05% w/w after adding nano-silver using direct contact test. Sealants formed on the walls of 500ml micro tube and after curing, they left in contact with bacterial suspension. In periods of 3, 24, 48h, a 10 µl volume of liquid medium was placed in blood agar culture and after 24 h incubation at 37ºC, the number of S.mutans colony was counted by colony counter. Data were analyzed using ANOVA andT-test.   Results: Results reported sealants with fluoride comparing to non fluoride ones had significant effect on inhibition of S.mutans growth (P<0.001. The direct contact test demonstrated that by increasing the amount of nano particles, the bacterial growth was significantly diminished (P<0.001.   Conclusion: While sealants with fluoride demonstrated antibacterial effect, sealants with incorporation of higher weight percentage of nanosilver particles, had stronger and more significant antibacterial effect in direct contact test.

  3. Enzymatic Activity of Glutathione S-Transferase and Dental Fluorosis Among Children Receiving Two Different Levels of Naturally Fluoridated Water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonola-Gallardo, Irvin; Irigoyen-Camacho, María Esther; Vera-Robles, Liliana; Campero, Antonio; Gómez-Quiroz, Luis

    2017-03-01

    This study was conducted to measure the activity of the enzyme glutathione S-transferase (GST) in saliva and to compare the activity of this enzyme in children with and without dental fluorosis in communities with different concentrations of naturally fluoridated water. A total of 141 schoolchildren participated in this cross-sectional study. Children were selected from two communities: one with a low (0.4 ppm) and the other with a high (1.8 ppm) water fluoride concentration. Dental fluorosis was evaluated by applying the Thylstrup and Fejerskov Index (TFI) criteria. Stimulated saliva was obtained, and fluoride concentration and GST activity were measured. The GST activity was compared among children with different levels of dental fluorosis using multinomial logistic regression models and odds ratios (OR). The mean age of the children was 10.6 (±1.03) years. Approximately half of the children showed dental fluorosis (52.5 %). The average GST activity was 0.5678 (±0.1959) nmol/min/μg. A higher concentration of fluoride in the saliva was detected in children with a higher GST activity (p = 0.039). A multinomial logistic regression model used to evaluate the GST activity and the dental fluorosis score identified a strong association between TFI = 2-3 (OR = 15.44, p = 0.007) and TFI ≥ 4 (OR = 55.40, p = 0.026) and the GST activity level, compared with children showing TFI = 0-1, adjusted for age and sex. Schoolchildren with higher levels of dental fluorosis and a higher fluoride concentration in the saliva showed greater GST activity. The increased GST activity most likely was the result of the body's need to inactivate free radicals produced by exposure to fluoride.

  4. Fluoride microresonators for mid-IR applications

    CERN Document Server

    Grudinin, Ivan S; Yu, Nan

    2016-01-01

    We study crystalline fluoride microresonators for mid-infrared applications. Whispering gallery mode resonators were fabricated with BaF$_2$, CaF$_2$ and MgF$_2$ crystals. The quality factors were measured at wavelengths of 1.56 {\\mu}m and 4.58 {\\mu}m. The impacts of fabrication technique, impurities, multiphonon absorption and surface water are investigated. It is found that MgF2 resonators have room temperature Q factor of $8.3\\times 10^6$ at wavelength of 4.58 {\\mu}m, limited by multiphonon absorption.

  5. Fluoride use in Controlling Dental Caries and Fluorosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaurav Solanki

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Policy were introduced to control fluoride exposure and to reduce the prevalence of fluorosis. The study aimed of describing the prevalence, severity and risk factors for fluorosis, and to describe the trend of fluorosis among Indian children. The study also aimed of exploring the effect of the change in fluoride exposure on dental fluorosis and caries. Establishing an appropriate use of fluoride toothpaste could be successful in reducing fluorosis without a significant increase in caries experience. The use of fluorides for oral health has always involved a balance between the protective benefit against dental caries and the risk of developing fluorosis. The link between fluoride and dental health was established to determining the causes of dental fluorosis or enamel mottling. Fluorosis in Indian children was highly prevalent in the early 1990s.

  6. Prevention of dental caries through the effective use of fluoride

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Poul Erik

    2016-01-01

    Background: The World Health Organization (WHO) emphasizes that dental caries is a severe public health problem across the world. The current global and regional patterns of dental caries reflect distinct risk profiles of countries which relate to the structure of the society, living conditions......, lifestyles, and the existence of preventive oral health programmes. Research conducted in high income countries documents that systematic use of fluoride reduces the burden of dental caries; such research is scarce in low and middle income countries. Objectives: This article reviews the evidence on effective...... use of fluoride, highlights the public health approach to fluoridation, and clarifies how automatic fluoridation contributes to breaking social inequities in dental caries. Data collection: Scientific publications on fluoride administration stored in PubMed/Medline and caries data from the WHO...

  7. Fluorides in groundwater and its impact on health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shailaja, K; Johnson, Mary Esther Cynthia

    2007-04-01

    Fluoride is a naturally occurring toxic mineral present in drinking water and causes yellowing of teeth, tooth problems etc. Fluorspar, Cryolite and Fluorapatite are the naturally occurring minerals, from which fluoride finds its path to groundwater through infiltration. In the present study two groundwater samples, Station I and Station II at Hyderabad megacity, the capital of Andhra Pradesh were investigated for one year from January 2001 to December 2001. The average fluoride values were 1.37 mg/l at Station I and 0.91 mg/l at Station II. The permissible limit given by BIS (1983) 0.6-1.2 mg/l and WHO (1984) 1.5 mg/l for fluoride in drinking water. The groundwaters at Station I exceeded the limit while at Station II it was within the limits. The study indicated that fluoride content of 0.5 mg/l is sufficient to cause yellowing of teeth and dental problems.

  8. Professionals vs. role-professionals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Milana, Marcella; Skrypnyk, Oleksandra

    2010-01-01

    several occupations in the field of adult education that position themselves along a continuum. Consequently the authors suggest that professionalization among adult education practitioners should be assessed in light of the knowledge about adult learning theories practitioners possess, the ethical...

  9. The fractional urinary fluoride excretion of adults consuming naturally and artificially fluoridated water and the influence of water hardness: a randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villa, A; Cabezas, L; Anabalón, M; Rugg-Gunn, A

    2009-09-01

    To assess whether there was any significant difference in the average fractional urinary fluoride excretion (FUFE) values among adults consuming (NaF) fluoridated Ca-free water (reference water), naturally fluoridated hard water and an artificially (H2SiF6) fluoridated soft water. Sixty adult females (N=20 for each treatment) participated in this randomized, double-blind trial. The experimental design of this study provided an indirect estimation of the fluoride absorption in different types of water through the assessment of the fractional urinary fluoride excretion of volunteers. Average daily FUFE values (daily amount of fluoride excreted in urine/daily total fluoride intake) were not significantly different between the three treatments (Kruskal-Wallis; p = 0.62). The average 24-hour FUFE value (n=60) was 0.69; 95% C.I. 0.65-0.73. The results of this study suggest that the absorption of fluoride is not affected by water hardness.

  10. Milk fluoridation for the prevention of dental caries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jolán Bánóczy

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this review is to give an overview of 55 years experience of milk fluoridation and draw conclusions about the applicability of the method. Fluoridated milk was first investigated in the early 1950s, almost simultaneously in Switzerland, the USA and Japan. Stimulated by the favourable results obtained from these early studies, the establishment of The Borrow Dental Milk Foundation (subsequently The Borrow Foundation in England gave an excellent opportunity for further research, both clinical and non-clinical, and a productive collaboration with the World Health Organization which began in the early 1980s. Numerous peer-reviewed publications in international journals showed clearly the bioavailability of fluoride in various types of milk. Clinical trials were initiated in the 1980s – some of these can be classed as randomised controlled trials, while most of the clinical studies were community preventive programmes. Conclusion. These evaluations showed clearly that the optimal daily intake of fluoride in milk is effective in preventing dental caries. The amount of fluoride added to milk depends on background fluoride exposure and age of the children: commonly in the range 0.5 to 1.0 mg per day. An advantage of the method is that a precise amount of fluoride can be delivered under controlled conditions. The cost of milk fluoridation programmes is low, about € 2 to 3 per child per year. Fluoridation of milk can be recommended as a caries preventive measure where the fluoride concentration in drinking water is suboptimal, caries experience in children is significant, and there is an existing school milk programme.

  11. Milk fluoridation for the prevention of dental caries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bánóczy, Jolán; Rugg-Gunn, Andrew; Woodward, Margaret

    2013-11-01

    The aim of this review is to give an overview of 55 years experience of milk fluoridation and draw conclusions about the applicability of the method. Fluoridated milk was first investigated in the early 1950s, almost simultaneously in Switzerland, the USA and Japan. Stimulated by the favourable results obtained from these early studies, the establishment of The Borrow Dental Milk Foundation (subsequently The Borrow Foundation) in England gave an excellent opportunity for further research, both clinical and non-clinical, and a productive collaboration with the World Health Organization which began in the early 1980s. Numerous peer-reviewed publications in international journals showed clearly the bioavailability of fluoride in various types of milk. Clinical trials were initiated in the 1980s - some of these can be classed as randomised controlled trials, while most of the clinical studies were community preventive programmes. These evaluations showed clearly that the optimal daily intake of fluoride in milk is effective in preventing dental caries. The amount of fluoride added to milk depends on background fluoride exposure and age of the children: commonly in the range 0.5 to 1.0 mg per day. An advantage of the method is that a precise amount of fluoride can be delivered under controlled conditions. The cost of milk fluoridation programmes is low, about € 2 to 3 per child per year. Fluoridation of milk can be recommended as a caries preventive measure where the fluoride concentration in drinking water is suboptimal, caries experience in children is significant, and there is an existing school milk programme. Copyright © 2013 by Academy of Sciences and Arts of Bosnia and Herzegovina.

  12. Influence of Growth Mode and Sucrose on Susceptibility of Streptococcus sanguis to Amine Fluorides and Amine Fluoride-Inorganic Fluoride Combinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Embleton, J. V.; Newman, H. N.; Wilson, M.

    1998-01-01

    This study evaluated the susceptibility to amine fluorides (AmFs) of planktonic and biofilm cultures of Streptococcus sanguis grown with and without sucrose. Cultures were incubated with AmFs (250 mg of fluoride liter−1) for 1 min. The susceptibility of biofilms was less than that of the planktonic form and was further decreased by growth in the presence of sucrose. PMID:9726905

  13. Industrial Applications of Graphite Fluoride Fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Ching-Cheh; Kucera, Donald

    1991-01-01

    Based on fluorination technology developed during 1934 to 1959, and the fiber technology developed during the 1970s, a new process was developed to produce graphite fluoride fibers. In the process, pitch based graphitized carbon fibers are at first intercalated and deintercalated several times by bromine and iodine, followed by several cycles of nitrogen heating and fluorination at 350 to 370 C. Electrical, mechanical, and thermal properties of this fiber depend on the fluorination process and the fluorine content of the graphite fluoride product. However, these properties are between those of graphite and those of PTFE (Teflon). Therefore, it is considered to be a semiplastic. The physical properties suggest that this new material may have many new and unexplored applications. For example, it can be a thermally conductive electrical insulator. Its coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) can be adjusted to match that of silicon, and therefore, it can be a heat sinking printed circuit board which is CTE compatible with silicon. Using these fibers in printed circuit boards may provide improved electrical performance and reliability of the electronics on the board over existing designs. Also, since it releases fluorine at 300 C or higher, it can be used as a material to store fluorine and to conduct fluorination. This application may simplify the fluorination process and reduce the risk of handling fluorine.

  14. Susceptibility of Freesia to hydrogen fluoride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wolting, H.G.

    1973-01-01

    Freesia's are very sensitive to hydrogen-fluoride. If they are exposed for a long period to concentrations between 0.5 and 0.9 part per billion several cultivars may show a severe damage. Differences in susceptibility between the varieties appear to exist. Some varieties that were heavily injured by HF had almost no flowers and a much lower yield of corns. After fumigation during a long period with very low concentrations of HF, besides the damage characteristic for HF (necrotic leaf tips and margins) there appeared oblong brown spots and stripes between the veins, which mimic the symptoms caused by the third freesia virus, also called bladnecrose. Some of the cultivars show this effect rather generally, in others it occurs only in a few plants. It could be demonstrated with the cultivars Rose Marie and Royal Blue that the sensitivity for HF increases by the presence of bladnecrose. This points to a synergistic action of hydrogen fluoride and the bladnecrose virus.

  15. Teaching Professional Engineering Skills

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersson, Niclas; Andersson, Pernille Hammar

    2010-01-01

    evaluations, a questionnaire, and discussions with students confirm a genuinely positive attitude towards the role play simulation. The students engage in the role play and express an increased understanding of the requirements and the implicit rules of real-life engineering. The interaction between students....... The underlying argument for this approach is to establish a realistic learning environment that will foster the learning of professional skills. The role play simulation has been applied and reviewed in two engineering courses, i.e. at Lund University in Sweden and at the Technical University of Denmark. Course...... and the professional engineers act as a prime mover for the students to perform their best, which in turn strengthens the learning of the technical content. The study concludes that role play with participation of representatives from the industry can facilitate the teaching of professional skills in engineering...

  16. Speciation analysis of aluminium and aluminium fluoride complexes by HPIC-UVVIS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frankowski, Marcin; Zioła-Frankowska, Anetta

    2010-10-15

    The study presents a new analytical method for speciation analysis in fractionation of aluminium fluoride complexes and free Al(3+) in soil samples. Aluminium speciation was studied in model solutions and soil extract samples by means of high performance ion chromatography (HPIC) with UV-VIS detection using post-column reaction with tiron for the separation and detection of aluminium fluoride complex and Al(3+) forms during one analysis. The paper presents particular stages of the chromatographic process optimization involving selecting the appropriate eluent strength, type of elution or concentration and quantity of derivatization reagent. HPIC was performed on a bifunctional analytical column Dionex IonPac CS5A. The use of gradient elution and the eluents A: 1M NH(4)Cl and B: water acidified to pH of eluent phase, enabled full separation of fluoride aluminium forms as AlF(2)(+), AlF(3)(0), AlF(4)(-) (first signal), AlF(2+) (second signal) and form Al(3+) in a single analytical procedure. The proposed new method HPIC-UVVIS was applied successfully in the quantitative and qualitative analysis of soil samples. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Indirect voltammetric detection of fluoride ions in toothpaste on a comb-shaped interdigitated microelectrode array.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cernanská, Monika; Tomcík, Peter; Jánosíková, Zuzana; Rievaj, Miroslav; Bustin, Dusan

    2011-02-15

    A novel technique based on dynamic electrochemistry for the detection of fluoride ions was developed. It is based on its strong complexation with ferric ion. Formed fluoroferric complex is cathodically inactive at the potential of the reduction of free ferric aquo ion. The voltammetric and amperometric response of platinum comb-shaped interdigitated microelectrode array is decreased after fluoride addition. This decrease serves for the quantification of fluoride ions added to the solution. The detection limit of 4.5×10(-5) mol dm(-3) was achieved when one of the segments of interdigitated microelectrode array (IDA) was used as an indicating electrode. The detection limit is about one order of magnitude lower than in the case of conventional platinum macroelectrode. In comparison with ISE electrodes this method is faster and also avoiding large error resulting from the antilogarithmization of ISE Nerstian response. The method was applied to the analysis of toothpaste. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Efficacy of fluoride varnishes for preventing enamel demineralization after interproximal enamel reduction. Qualitative and quantitative evaluation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ascensión Vicente

    Full Text Available To evaluate quantitatively and qualitatively the changes produced to enamel after interproximal reduction and subjected to demineralization cycles, after applying a fluoride varnish (Profluorid and a fluoride varnish containing tricalcium phosphate modified by fumaric acid (Clinpro White.138 interproximal dental surfaces were divided into six groups: 1 Intact enamel; 2 Intact enamel + demineralization cycles (DC; 3 Interproximal Reduction (IR; 4 IR + DC; 5 IR + Profluorid + DC; 6 IR + Clinpro White + DC. IR was performed with a 0.5 mm cylindrical diamond bur. The weight percentage of calcium (Ca, phosphorous (P and fluoride (F were quantified by energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometry (EDX. Samples were examined under scanning electron microscopy (SEM.The weight percentage of Ca was significantly higher (p0.05. The weight percentage of P was similar among all six groups (p>0.05. F was detected on 65% of Group 6 surfaces. SEM images of Groups 4 and 6 showed signs of demineralization, while Group 5 did not.Profluorid application acts as a barrier against the demineralization of interproximally reduced enamel.

  19. [Differential approach to spring water choice regarding fluoride content for caries prevention].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makeeva, I M; Protsenko, A S; Svistunova, E G

    2013-01-01

    The research includes an investigation of the tap water in different districts of Moscow. It was found out that Moscow tap water contains little fluoride, the difference between districts and okrugs is of no consequence. There is no centralized water fluoridization in Moscow therefore the authors suggest using bottled potable water with sufficient fluoride level. The fluoride concentration in one hundred of the most popular and wide-spread bottled potable water labels was examined. High in fluoride and low in fluoride labels were identified as well as the labels with the optimal fluoride content. Some practical guidelines for selection of bottled potable water depending on the quantity of liquid consummation were elaborated.

  20. [Ethical aspects of the fluoridation of water, salt, and milk].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rippe, K P

    2009-05-01

    The article discusses two ethical aspects of the fluoridation of water, salt, and milk. First, it considers whether fluoridation contradicts the right of self-determination. Second, it discusses the chances and risks of fluoridation. The answer to the first question depends on whether people can choose other options. Freedom of choice is not simply the right to choose between different options. It is a right which defends the moral integrity of persons. Nobody should be coerced to eat or drink something which he or she rejects morally. In the political sphere, personal rights of persons can be restricted if and only if it is necessary, if there is a public interest, and if the restriction of the right is reasonable. Regarding fluoridation, even in the best risk-chance scenario, some persons have to expect a net harm. Therefore, the reasoning in favor of fluoridation has to have a specific purpose. The proclaimed reasoning is that fluoridation will benefit the worst off and is therefore a demand of justice. But this argument fails as there are other options to benefit the worst off. Even in the best risk-chance scenario, only one option is morally permissible: the fluoridation of salt, which respects the freedom of choice.

  1. Chitosan microparticles for the controlled delivery of fluoride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keegan, Gemma M; Smart, John D; Ingram, Matthew J; Barnes, Lara-Marie; Burnett, Gary R; Rees, Gareth D

    2012-03-01

    To manufacture and characterise chitosan/fluoride microparticles prepared by spray drying and assess their utility as controlled release vehicles for fluoride. Microparticles were manufactured from dispersions containing 1.0% and 2.0% (w/v) chitosan and 0.20% or 0.40% (w/v) NaF in the absence/presence of glutaraldehyde. Particle size distributions were determined using laser diffraction; fluoride loading and release were determined by ion-selective electrode. Release profiles were studied in isotonic media (pH 5.5) over 360 min; microparticles exhibiting greatest cumulative fluoride release were further evaluated at pH 4.0 and 7.0. Particle morphology was investigated using environmental scanning electron microscopy. Bioadhesion parameters were determined with a texture-probe analyser. Microparticles exhibited low polydispersity and volume mean diameters (VMDs) products to provide increased protection against caries, however further work is required to demonstrate this principle in vivo. Spray-drying is a low-cost route for the manufacture of bioadhesive chitosan/fluoride microparticles which can be exploited as controlled fluoride release agents to aid fluoride retention in the oral cavity. The potential exists to optimise release profiles to suit the delivery format thereby maximising the cariostatic benefits. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. High Fluoride Dentifrices for Elderly and Vulnerable Adults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ekstrand, Kim Rud

    2016-01-01

    The primary aim of this work is to present the available evidence that toothpastes containing >1,500 ppm fluoride (2,500-2,800 and 5,000 ppm F) provide an additional caries preventive effect on root caries lesions in elderly patients compared to traditional dentifrices (1,000-1,450 ppm F). The se......The primary aim of this work is to present the available evidence that toothpastes containing >1,500 ppm fluoride (2,500-2,800 and 5,000 ppm F) provide an additional caries preventive effect on root caries lesions in elderly patients compared to traditional dentifrices (1,000-1,450 ppm F......). The secondary aim of this paper is to discuss why high fluoride dentifrices in general should perform better than traditional F-containing toothpaste. When examining the few studies that have considered the preventive benefits of high fluoride products on root caries the relative risk appears to be around 0.......5, and the risk can thus be halved by exchanging traditional F-containing toothpaste for toothpaste containing 5,000 ppm F. There is reasonable evidence that high fluoride dentifrices significantly increase the fluoride concentration in saliva during the day and the fluoride concentration in plaque compared...

  3. US drinking water: fluoridation knowledge level of water plant operators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lalumandier, J A; Hernandez, L C; Locci, A B; Reeves, T G

    2001-01-01

    We determined the knowledge level of water plant operators who fluoridate drinking water, and we compared small and large water plants. A pretested survey was sent to 2,381 water plant operators in 12 states that adjust the fluoride concentration of drinking water. A z-test for proportion was used to test for statistical difference between small and large plants at alpha = 0.05. Small water plants were those treating less than 1 million gallons of water daily. Eight hundred small and 480 large water plant operators responded, resulting in a response rate of 54 percent. Two-thirds of water plant operators correctly identified the optimal fluoride level, but more than 20 percent used a poor source for choosing the optimal level. Only one-fourth of operators were able to maintain the fluoride concentration to within 0.1 mg/L of the optimal concentration. A significantly greater proportion of operators at large water plants than at small water plants reported that they were able to maintain a fluoride concentration to within 0.1 mg/L of the optimal concentration (33.5% vs 21.3%, z = 4.74, P fluoride level, small water plant operators were less likely to use accurate reasoning for choosing that level and in maintaining fluoride concentrations within 0.1 mg/L of that level than large water plant operators.

  4. Amelioration of Fluoride Toxicity with the Use of Indigenous Inputs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maitra A.

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available An assessment was undertaken to study the efficacy of bacterial consortia isolated from different sources viz. rhizosphere of rice plant, oil spill sites of a petrol pump and from the sludge of a pharmaceutical waste water drain against the impact of fluoride. The experiments were conducted with two crops. In this mung bean experiment Vigna radiata was selected as a test crop. The seeds were sown in the field with bacterial consortia, compost and reduced dose (25% less nitrogen than recommended dose of chemical fertilizer. After 30days of seed sowing (DAS, plants were collected from the field and dipped into the sodium fluoride solution with different concentrations for 48 hours. Thereafter, the impact of fluoride on chlorophyll, sugar, proline and relative water content (% were evaluated. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM of the stem section was performed. SEM studies revealed that anatomical structure deformed with 1.5 mg/l sodium fluoride solution. It was observed that such treatment combination during the sowing of crops leads to combat the impact of lower doses of sodium fluoride (0.2 mg/l. Another experiment was also conducted within plastic pots with and without bacterial consortia isolated from rhizosphere of rice plant and oil spilled soil of petrol pump with the same field soil. Each pot was filled with 5 kg of soil + 2lt of water (on the basis of soil saturation. Oryza sativa seedlings were transplanted with different strength of sodium fluoride solution (25 mgNaF/kg, 50 mgNaF/kg, 100 mgNaF/kg and 500mgNaF/kg within the above pots. In second experiment, rice plants dried in all pots after 500 mgNaF/kg concentration of sodium fluoride. In this pot experiment bacterial strain are capable of reducing fluoride content in soil as noted by measuring fluoride in the pot soil after the experiment.

  5. Fluoride induced endoplasmic reticulum stress and calcium overload in ameloblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ying; Zhang, KaiQiang; Ma, Lin; Gu, HeFeng; Li, Jian; Lei, Shuang

    2016-09-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the involvement of endoplasmic reticulum stress and intracellular calcium overload on the development of dental fluorosis. We cultured and exposed rat ameloblast HAT-7 cells to various concentrations of fluoride and measured apoptosis with flow cytometry and intracellular Ca2+ changes using confocal microscopy, investigated the protein levels of GRP78, calreticulin, XBP1 and CHOP by western blotting, and their transcriptional levels with RT-PCR. We also created an in vivo model of dental fluorosis by exposing animals to various concentrations of fluoride. Subsequently, thin dental tissue slices were analyzed with H&E staining, immunohistochemical staining, and transmission electron microscopy, TUNEL assay was also performed on dental tissue slices for assessment of apoptosis. High fluoride concentration was associated with decreased ameloblast proliferation, elevated ameloblast apoptosis, and increased intracellular Ca2+ in vitro. The translation and transcription of the proteins associated with endoplasmic reticulum stress were significantly elevated with high concentrations of fluoride. Based on immunohistochemical staining, these proteins were also highly expressed in animals exposed to high fluoride concentrations. Histologically, we found significant fluorosis-like changes in tissues from animals exposed to high fluoride concentrations. Transmission electron microscopy cytology indicated significant apoptotic changes in tissues exposed to high concentrations of fluoride. These results indicate that exposure to high levels of fluoride led to endoplasmic reticulum stress which induced apoptosis in cultured ameloblasts and in vivo rat model, suggesting an important role of calcium overload and endoplasmic reticulum stress triggered by high concentrations of fluoride in the development of dental fluorosis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Monitoring of fluoride in water samples using a smartphone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levin, Saurabh [Akvo Foundation (Netherlands); Krishnan, Sunderrajan [INREM Foundation (India); Rajkumar, Samuel; Halery, Nischal; Balkunde, Pradeep [Akvo Foundation (Netherlands)

    2016-05-01

    In several parts of India, groundwater is the only reliable, year round source for drinking water. Prevention of fluorosis, a chronic disease resulting from excess intake of fluoride, requires the screening of all groundwater sources for fluoride in endemic areas. In this paper, the authors present a field deployable colorimetric analyzer based on an inexpensive smartphone embedded with digital camera for taking photograph of the colored solution as well as an easy-fit, and compact sample chamber (Akvo Caddisfly). Phones marketed by different smartphone makers were used. Commercially available zirconium xylenol orange reagent was used for determining fluoride concentration. A software program was developed to use with the phone for recording and analyzing the RGB color of the picture. Linear range for fluoride estimation was 0–2 mg l{sup −1}. Around 200 samples, which consisted of laboratory prepared as well as field samples collected from different locations in Karnataka, India, were tested with Akvo Caddisfly. The results showed a significant positive correlation between Ion Selective Electrode (ISE) method and Akvo Caddisfly (Phones A, B and C), with correlation coefficient ranging between 0.9952 and 1.000. In addition, there was no significant difference in the mean fluoride content values between ISE and Phone B and C except for Phone A. Thus the smartphone method is economical and suited for groundwater fluoride analysis in the field. - Highlights: • Fluoride is an inorganic pollutant in ground water, affecting human health. • A colorimetric method for measurement of fluoride in drinking water with smartphone • Measurement is by mixing water with zirconyl xylenol orange complex reagent. • Results are comparable with laboratory-based ion selective fluoride electrode method.

  7. Drinking water fluoridation and oral health inequities in Canadian children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLaren, Lindsay; Emery, J C Herbert

    2012-02-01

    One argument made in favour of drinking water fluoridation is that it is equitable in its impact on oral health. We examined the association between exposure to fluoridation and oral health inequities among Canadian children.PARTICIPANTS, SETTING AND INTERVENTION: We analyzed data from 1,017 children aged 6-11 from Cycle 1 of the Canadian Health Measures Survey, a cross-sectional, nationally representative survey that included a clinic oral health examination and a household interview. The outcome measure was a count of the number of decayed, missing (because of caries or periodontal disease) or filled teeth, either deciduous or permanent (dmftDMFT). Data were analyzed using linear (ordinary least squares) and multinomial logistic regression; we also computed the concentration index for education-related inequity in oral health. Water fluoridation status (the intervention) was assigned on the basis of the site location of data collection. Fluoridation was associated with better oral health (fewer dmftDMFT), adjusting for socio-economic and behavioural variables, and the effect was particularly strong for more severe oral health problems (three or more dmftDMFT). The effect of fluoridation on dmftDMFT was observed across income and education categories but appeared especially pronounced in lower education and higher income adequacy households. dmftDMFT were found to be disproportionately concentrated in lower-education households, though this did not vary by fluoridation status. The robust main effect of fluoridation on dmftDMFT and the beneficial effect across socio-economic groups support fluoridation as a beneficial and justifiable population health intervention. Fluoridation was equitable in the sense that its benefits were particularly apparent in those groups with the poorest oral health profiles, though the nature of the findings prompts consideration of the values underlying the judgement of health equity.

  8. Metal Fluoride Complexes of Na,K-ATPase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornelius, Flemming; Mahmmoud, Yasser A.; Toyoshima, Chikashi

    2011-01-01

    The Na,K-ATPase belongs to the P-type ATPase family of primary active cation pumps. Metal fluorides like magnesium-, beryllium-, and aluminum fluoride act as phosphate analogues and inhibit P-type ATPases by interacting with the phosphorylation site, stabilizing conformations that are analogous to specific phosphoenzyme intermediates. Cardiotonic steroids like ouabain used in the treatment of congestive heart failure and arrhythmias specifically inhibit the Na,K-ATPase, and the detailed structure of the highly conserved binding site has recently been described by the crystal structure of the shark Na,K-ATPase in a state analogous to E2·2K+·Pi with ouabain bound with apparently low affinity (1). In the present work inhibition, and subsequent reactivation by high Na+, after treatment of shark Na,K-ATPase with various metal fluorides are characterized. Half-maximal inhibition of Na,K-ATPase activity by metal fluorides is in the micromolar range. The binding of cardiotonic steroids to the metal fluoride-stabilized enzyme forms was investigated using the fluorescent ouabain derivative 9-anthroyl ouabain and compared with binding to phosphorylated enzyme. The fastest binding was to the Be-fluoride stabilized enzyme suggesting a preformed ouabain binding cavity, in accord with results for Ca-ATPase where Be-fluoride stabilizes the E2-P ground state with an open luminal ion access pathway, which in Na,K-ATPase could be a passage for ouabain. The Be-fluoride stabilized enzyme conformation closely resembles the E2-P ground state according to proteinase K cleavage. Ouabain, but not its aglycone ouabagenin, prevented reactivation of this metal fluoride form by high Na+ demonstrating the pivotal role of the sugar moiety in closing the extracellular cation pathway. PMID:21708939

  9. Fluoride Levels in Water, Animal Feeds, Cow Milk, Cow Urine and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The mean (0.25mg F/L) fluoride concentration in water for all the societies was below the tolerance level of fluoride for dairy cows of 3-6mgFL-1.one hundred and thirty dairy milk and 106 urine samples of dairy cattle were obtained for fluoride analysis. The mean fluoride level in milk was 0.0066 + 0.14mgF/kg. Milk fluoride ...

  10. Effect of fluoride varnishes on color stability of esthetic restorative materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Autio-Gold, Jaana T; Barrett, Allyson A

    2004-01-01

    Fluoride varnish applications were applied to two hybrid resin composite materials, Z-100 (3M Dental Products, St Paul, MN, USA) and Esthet-X (Dentsply Caulk, Milford, DE, USA), shades A1 and A2 and a glass ionomer, GC Fuji IX GP Fast (GC Corporation, Tokyo, Japan), shade A2, to evaluate color stability. Specimens (12.6-mm dia x 2.3 mm) were prepared using a polyethylene frame, light-cured and polished through a 1-microm alumina finish. After the initial baseline color measurements, the discs were suspended in Fusayama artificial saliva (FAS) solution at 37 degrees C for 48 hours. Post immersion, the specimens were divided into five groups (n=15 each). The following fluoride varnishes were applied to four groups of test specimens: Duraphat (Colgate Oral Pharmaceutical, Inc, Canton MA, USA), Cavity Shield (OMNII Oral Pharmaceuticals, West Palm Beach, FL, USA), Duraflor (Pharmascience Inc, Montreal, Canada) and Fluor Protector (Vivadent, Ivoclar North America, Amherst, NY, USA). The varnish was allowed to dry for five minutes before immersion. The control group was not coated with varnish, although the specimens were immersed in FAS. All specimens were incubated in newly prepared FAS at 37 degrees C for 24 hours, cleaned with an electric toothbrush and the process repeated using newly prepared FAS. CIE L*a*b* color measurements were recorded five times: at baseline, after 48 hours FAS immersion, after cleaning the first and second fluoride varnish applications and after the final brushing using a commercial toothpaste (Crest). A Minolta CR-300 tristimulus colorimeter with an 8-mm aperture (Ramsey, NJ, USA) was used to record color measurements with the daylight (D65) setting. Calculations were performed for using CIE parameters deltaE*, deltaL*, delta a*, delta b*. Analysis of variance (ANOVA) and post-hoc test (Fisher's PLSD) were used for statistical analysis. After immersion in saliva, the tested glass ionomer (Fuji IX) produced the most significant color changes

  11. Comparative antiplaque effectiveness of an essential oil and an amine fluoride/stannous fluoride mouthrinse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riep, B G; Bernimoulin, J P; Barnett, M L

    1999-03-01

    The adjunctive use of antimicrobial mouthrinses to help control supragingival plaque and gingivitis has been shown to contribute significantly to patients' daily oral hygiene regimens. This controlled clinical study used an observer-blind, randomized, cross-over design in a 4-day plaque regrowth model to determine the relative efficacies of an essential oil-containing mouthrinse (Listerine Antiseptic) and an amine fluoride/stannous fluoride-containing mouthrinse (Meridol) in inhibiting the development of supragingival plaque. A 0.1% chlorhexidine mouthrinse (Chlorhexamed-Fluid) was used as a positive control, and a 5% hydroalcohol solution was used as a negative control. Dosing for each of the test mouthrinses was based on the manufacturers' label directions. Because the volume and rinse time for each of the test mouthrinses were different, each test mouthrinse had its own negative control group. On day 1 of each test period, subjects received an oral soft and hard tissue examination and a dental prophylaxis to remove all plaque, calculus, and extrinsic stain. Starting the same day, subjects refrained from all mechanical oral hygiene procedures for the next 4 days and rinsed 2x daily under supervision with their randomly-assigned mouthrinse. On day 5, each subject received a plaque assessment as well as an oral examination to assess side effects. Each test period was separated by a 2-week washout period. 23 volunteers with a median age of 26 years completed the study. Compared to the respective placebos, the median percent plaque reductions at 5 days were 23.0%, 12.2%, and 38.2% for the essential oil, amine/stannous fluoride, and chlorhexidine rinses, respectively. The plaque reductions seen in the essential oil and chlorhexidine rinse groups were statistically significant (p 0.05). Additionally, the essential oil rinse was significantly more effective (p < 0.001) than the amine/stannous fluoride rinse in inhibiting plaque accumulation in this clinical model.

  12. Micronutrients in parenteral nutrition: boron, silicon, and fluoride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Forrest H

    2009-11-01

    Boron may be beneficial for bone growth and maintenance, central nervous system function, and the inflammatory response, and silicon may be beneficial for bone maintenance and wound healing. Fluoride is not an essential element but amounts provided by contamination may be beneficial for bone strength. Fluoride toxicity may be a concern in parenteral nutrition. Further studies are warranted to determine whether there are optimal amounts of boron and silicon that should be delivered to typical and special population patients receiving parenteral nutrition. In addition, further studies are needed to determine whether providing the dietary guideline of adequate intake amounts of fluoride parenterally would prevent or treat parenteral nutrition osteopenia.

  13. KINETICS OF SORPTION OF FLUORIDE ON CALCINED MAGNESITE IN BATCH

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Singano, J. J.; Mashauri, D. A.; Mtalo, F. W.

    1997-01-01

    on first-order reaction with respect to the concentration of fluoride. The rate constant is directly proportional to the dosage. The model takes into accounts the lag time observed. The kinetical model can be described for any given dosage and initial fluoride concentration in the water. The reaction rate...... parameter, K, varies however slightly for different initial concentrations of fluoride in the water and different dosage of calcined magnesia. These relationships are described separately by two linear equations. It is discussed that the observed lag time is due to the fact that magnesia cannot remove...

  14. Fluoride gases damages on agricultural and ornamental plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grasso, V.; Padalino, O.

    1968-01-01

    Reports are presented concerning fluoride gases from a brick furnace, damaging agricultural and ornamental plants: Prunus armeniaca L. var. Reale d'Imola, Vitis vinifera L. var. Cardinal, Gladiolus spp., Pinus pinea L., Iris germanica L., that are particularly sensitive to these gases. There are descriptions of the morphological alterations and the authors have proven the presence of fluoride in the chemically analyzed samples. There is a list of plants found near the brick furnace that have been classified as (I) highly sensitive; (II) moderately sensitive; (III) very little sensitivity; (IV) immune to fluoride gases. 10 references, 9 figures.

  15. Nitrogen Trifluoride-Based Fluoride- Volatility Separations Process: Initial Studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McNamara, Bruce K.; Scheele, Randall D.; Casella, Andrew M.; Kozelisky, Anne E.

    2011-09-28

    This document describes the results of our investigations on the potential use of nitrogen trifluoride as the fluorinating and oxidizing agent in fluoride volatility-based used nuclear fuel reprocessing. The conceptual process uses differences in reaction temperatures between nitrogen trifluoride and fuel constituents that produce volatile fluorides to achieve separations and recover valuable constituents. We provide results from our thermodynamic evaluations, thermo-analytical experiments, kinetic models, and provide a preliminary process flowsheet. The evaluations found that nitrogen trifluoride can effectively produce volatile fluorides at different temperatures dependent on the fuel constituent.

  16. High-resolution continuum source graphite furnace molecular absorption spectrometry compared with ion chromatography for quantitative determination of dissolved fluoride in river water samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ley, Philip; Sturm, Manfred; Ternes, Thomas A; Meermann, Björn

    2017-10-03

    In addition to beneficial health effects, fluoride can also have adverse effects on humans, animals, and plants if the daily intake is strongly elevated. One main source of fluoride uptake is water, and thus several ordinances exist in Germany that declare permissible concentrations of fluoride in, for example, drinking water, mineral water, and landfill seepage water. Controlling the fluoride concentrations in aqueous matrices necessitate valid and fast analytical methods. In this work an alternative method for the determination of fluoride in surface waters based on high-resolution continuum source graphite furnace molecular absorption spectrometry (HR-CS-GFMAS) was applied. Fluoride detection was made possible by the formation of a diatomic molecule, GaF, and detection of characteristic molecular absorption. On HR-CS-GFMAS parameter optimization, the method was adapted to surface water sample analysis. The influence of potential main matrix constituents such as Na+, Ca2+, Mg2+, and Cl- as well as surface water sampling/storage conditions on the molecular absorption signal of GaF was investigated. Method validation demonstrated a low limit of detection (8.1 μg L-1) and a low limit of quantification (26.9 μg L-1), both sufficient for direct river water sample analysis after 0.45-μm filtration. The optimized HR-CS-GFMAS method was applied for the analysis of real water samples from the rivers Rhine and Moselle. For method validation, samples were also analyzed by an ion chromatography (IC) method. IC and HR-CS-GFMAS results both agreed well. In comparison with IC, HR-CS-GFMAS has higher sample throughput, a lower limit of detection and a lower limit of quantification, and higher selectivity, and is a very suitable method for the analysis of dissolved fluoride in river water. Graphical abstract High-resolution continuum source graphite furnace molecular absorption spectrometry (HR-CS-GFMAS) was applied for the quantitative analysis of dissolved fluoride in river

  17. Fluoride intake from meals served in daycare centres in municipalities with different fluoride concentrations in the water supply.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagliari Tiano, Ana Valéria; Moimaz, Suzely Adas Saliba; Saliba, Orlando; Saliba, Nemre Adas; Sumida, Dóris Hissako

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was (1) to determine the fluoride content in the meals served to children aged up to 36 months in daycare centres of two municipalities with different levels of fluoride in the water supply, (2) to calculate the mean fluoride ingested daily by the children when consuming those meals and (3) to analyse the contribution of this consumption to the development of dental fluorosis. Samples of the meals served to the children were collected during a whole week. The fluoride content of the samples of solid foods and milk was analysed using an ion-specific electrode combined with reference electrode after diffusion facilitated by hexamethyldisiloxane. Samples of beverages were buffered with an equal volume of total ionic strength adjustment buffer and analysed using a combined electrode. The results were compared using the Mann-Whitney test. Mean fluoride contents of the meals were of 0.204 +/- 0.179 and 0.322 +/- 0.242 microg F/mL (P 0.05). The children were not exposed to dental fluorosis in the daycare centres. However, the risk cannot be ignored, considering the meals and the use of fluoridated dentifrices at home may also contribute to fluoride intake.

  18. Information professionals: core competencies and professional development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flávia Ferreira

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. We discuss the concept of core competencies applied to policies for teaching and training information professionals, particularly librarians. Method. Sixty graduates of the Institute were employed as information professionals. These sixty were asked to attribute degrees of importance to specific items associated with knowledge and skills that, within the scope of this research, were considered core competencies for meeting the demands of their jobs. Participants were also asked to cite knowledge they acquired in school and knowledge they use in exercising their profession, the skills that they consider necessary but that they did not gain in school, and the difficulties they encounter in exercising their profession and for which they were not sufficiently well prepared. Analysis. Both quantitative and qualitative data analyses were performed. The data were tabulated using Access and several reports and cross-tabulations were generated. Results. The results suggest a gulf between knowledge and skills acquired in library school and those that are required by the job market. In particular, participants lacked the skills they needed to work with information and communication technologies. Conclusion. The concept of core competencies is increasingly taken into account by the productive sector of the economy. The educational system ought to keep up with this change. The empirical research described shows that there is a need to establish advanced and modern policies for the education of librarians, participants in the market for information professionals.

  19. Crystallization of heavy metal fluoride glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bansal, Narottam P.; Bruce, Allan J.; Doremus, R. H.; Moynihan, C. T.

    1984-01-01

    The kinetics of crystallization of a number of fluorozirconate glasses were studied using isothermal and dynamic differential scanning calorimetry and X-ray diffraction. The addition of the fluorides LiF, NaF, AlF3, LaF3 to a base glass composition of ZrF4-BaF2 reduced the tendency to crystallize, probably by modifying the viscosity-temperature relation. ZrF4-BaF2-LaF3-AlF3-NaF glass was the most stable against devitrification and perhaps is the best composition for optical fibers with low scattering loss. Some glasses first crystallize out into metastable beta-BaZr2F10 and beta-BaZrF6 phases, which transform into the most stable alpha-phases when heated to higher temperatures. The size of the crystallites was estimated to be about 600 A from X-ray diffraction.

  20. Electrocrystallisation of tantalum in molten fluoride media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Massot, L. [Laboratoire de Genie Chimique UMR 5503, Departement Procedes Electrochimiques et Materiaux, Universite Paul Sabatier, 118 route de Narbonne, 31062 Toulouse Cedex (France)]. E-mail: massot@chimie.ups-tlse.fr; Chamelot, P. [Laboratoire de Genie Chimique UMR 5503, Departement Procedes Electrochimiques et Materiaux, Universite Paul Sabatier, 118 route de Narbonne, 31062 Toulouse Cedex (France); Palau, P. [Pechiney CRV-UR GP, Parc Economique Centr' Alp, BP27, 38340 Voreppe (France); Taxil, P. [Laboratoire de Genie Chimique UMR 5503, Departement Procedes Electrochimiques et Materiaux, Universite Paul Sabatier, 118 route de Narbonne, 31062 Toulouse Cedex (France)

    2005-09-20

    The electrochemical nucleation of tantalum in molten alkaline fluoride media is investigated using chronoamperometry in the 670-750 deg C temperature range to optimize the operating conditions for preparing tantalum coatings for anode materials. Chronoamperometric results show that the electrodeposition process involves progressive nucleation with diffusion-controlled growth of the nuclei, which was confirmed by scanning electron microscopy. The influence of the temperature and the overpotential on the nucleation site densities is considered. Once the deposit has been obtained, plotting the roughness of the tantalum coatings as a function of the current densities reveals a minimum at about 80 mA/cm{sup 2}. This minimum is considered by the authors as a consequence of the progressive nucleation.

  1. Exraction and separation of CERIUM(IV/FLUORINE in fluoride-bearing cerium sulfate solution with fluoride coordination agent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Li

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available In this paper the extraction and separation of cerium/fluorine in fluoride-bearing cerium sulfate solution with fluoride coordination agent has been studied. The UV-vis spectra suggest that Zr6+ and Al3+ can scrub the F- from [CeF2] 2+ complex. The separation and conductivity studies show that aluminum salt is the most suitable fluoride coordination agent, and an ion-exchange reaction is involved between Ce4+/ [CeF2] 2+ and hydrogen ion.

  2. Evaluation of sulfuryl fluoride as a soil fumigant in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Aocheng; Guo, Meixia; Yan, Dongdong; Mao, Liangang; Wang, Qiuxia; Li, Yuan; Duan, Xiayu; Wang, Peisheng

    2014-02-01

    Root-knot nematodes and soil-borne diseases constrain the rapid development of protected agriculture in China, especially while phasing out methyl bromide (MB). The fumigant sulfuryl fluoride (SF) is currently used as an alternative to MB for the disinfestation of buildings and post-harvest commodities. Our experiments aimed to evaluate a novel application of SF as a soil fumigant in greenhouses in China. Dose-response experiments indicated that SF has good efficacy on root-knot nematodes (Meloidogyne spp.) and moderate activity against Fusarium spp. and weeds (Digitaria sanguinalis (L.) Scop. and Abutilon theophrasti Medicus). The field trials indicates that SF has good efficacy, between 80 and 94%, on Meloidogyne spp., and Fusarium spp. at the rates of 25-50 g m(-2) in tomato and cucumber in Beijing and Shandong Province. Marketable yield and plant vigour was not significantly different in SF and MB treatments. SF has lower emissions than MB during the fumigation operation. It is simple to apply, can be used at low temperature, and has a short plant-back time. SF was found to be an economically feasible alternative to MB for nematode control in China. SF can be used as a soil fumigant to control root-knot nematodes and to reduce the levels of key soil pathogens. © 2013 Society of Chemical Industry.

  3. Comparison of Fluoride Levels in Tap and Bottled Water and Reported Use of Fluoride Supplementation in a United States?Mexico Border Community

    OpenAIRE

    Beamer, Paloma I.; Victory, Kerton R; Cabrera, Nolan L; Daniela Larson; Kelly A. Reynolds; Joyce Latura; Thomson, Cynthia A.

    2017-01-01

    Background Compared to the general United States (U.S.) population, Arizona counties along the U.S.–Mexico border have a higher prevalence of dental caries, which can be reduced with adequate fluoride exposure. Because of concern regarding local tap water quality, fluoride-free bottled water consumption is common in this region, raising concern that families are not receiving adequate fluoride to promote dental health. Objective To evaluate the levels of fluoride in tap and bottled...

  4. Being Professional

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Anne Winther

    The paper discusses students' process of acquiring a feeling of being professionals within a vocational education programme for elderly care in Denmark. The focus is on what seems to be a paradox within the programme: the future care helper being constructed within the overall term ‘the professio......The paper discusses students' process of acquiring a feeling of being professionals within a vocational education programme for elderly care in Denmark. The focus is on what seems to be a paradox within the programme: the future care helper being constructed within the overall term ‘the...... professional care helper’ in the school setting but the job being closely related to daily life's routine tasks; the paper points to difficulties for students in identifying the exact content of the term ‘professional’. Furthermore students seem to be uncertain about their ‘professionalism’ in relation...... ‘storyline’, c.f. Bronwyn Davies and the empirical material consists of observations and interviews in the theoretical periods and in the traineeships....

  5. Study on the treatment of photovoltaic wastewater using electrocoagulation: Fluoride removal with aluminium electrodes-Characteristics of products

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drouiche, N., E-mail: nadjibdrouiche@yahoo.fr [Silicon Technology Development Unit (UDTS), 2, Bd Frantz Fanon BP140, Alger-7-merveilles, 16200 (Algeria); Laboratory of Environmental Biotechnologies, Ecole Polytechnique d' Alger - 10, Avenue Pasteur El-Harrach (Algeria); Aoudj, S.; Hecini, M. [Silicon Technology Development Unit (UDTS), 2, Bd Frantz Fanon BP140, Alger-7-merveilles, 16200 (Algeria); Ghaffour, N. [Middle East Desalination Research Center, P.O. Box 21, P.C.133, Muscat (Oman); Lounici, H.; Mameri, N. [Laboratory of Environmental Biotechnologies, Ecole Polytechnique d' Alger - 10, Avenue Pasteur El-Harrach (Algeria)

    2009-09-30

    In this work, treatment of synthetic fluoride-containing solutions by electrocoagulation method using aluminium electrodes has been studied. Electrocoagulation was investigated for applied potential (10-30 V), electrolysis time and supporting electrolyte (NaCl) concentration (0-100 mg/L). The results showed that with increasing applied potential and electrolysis time, the Al{sup 3+} dosage increases, and thereby favouring the fluoride ions removal. It was also observed that defluoridation is dependant on the concentration of supporting electrolyte. Finally, X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive spectroscopy of X-rays and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy were used to characterize the solid products formed by aluminium electrodes during the EC process.

  6. Preparation and Characterization of Rare Earth Doped Fluoride Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy A. DeVol

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper reviews the synthesis, structure and applications of metal fluoride nanoparticles, with particular focus on rare earth (RE doped fluoride nanoparticles obtained by our research group. Nanoparticles were produced by precipitation methods using the ligand ammonium di-n-octadecyldithiophosphate (ADDP that allows the growth of shells around a core particle while simultaneously avoiding particle aggregation. Nanoparticles were characterized on their structure, morphology, and luminescent properties. We discuss the synthesis, properties, and application of heavy metal fluorides; specifically LaF3:RE and PbF2, and group IIA fluorides. Particular attention is given to the synthesis of core/shell nanoparticles, including selectively RE-doped LaF3/LaF3, and CaF2/CaF2 core/(multi-shell nanoparticles, and the CaF2-LaF3 system.

  7. Fluoride distribution in different environmental segments at Hirakud ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administrator

    768019, Orissa, India. 2Rajib Gandhi National Fellow, India. 3Environment Engineer, NTPC, Kaniha, Talcher, Orissa, India. Accepted 10 August, 2009. Fluoride is a major pollutant originating from aluminium smelting polluting the air, water and ...

  8. Baltimore and the Beginnings of the Fluoride Controversy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daws, Steven

    2015-01-01

    The fluoridation of municipal water as a preventive dental health measure has proven to be a contentious issue from its very outset. In 1952, Baltimore became the first major city in the United States to artificially add fluoride to its water supply. This study draws largely on print media sources as a means of discerning public sentiment, in order to evaluate the nature of Baltimore's fluoride controversy in its infancy. Initial response was influenced by prior exposure to the substance within the context of dentistry, as well as a continued trend of conservatism within the community. Logistical issues during implementation due to the necessary upscale of established practices to accommodate Baltimore's population served to further exacerbate concerns. Much of the opposition was predicated on the breadth of the measure, as evidenced by the myriad of personal concerns put forth in objection. Personal concerns developed into demands for personal autonomy, providing a philosophical foundation for the anti-fluoridation movement that persists today.

  9. Fluoride-responsive organogelator based on oxalamide-derived anthraquinone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dzolić, Zoran; Cametti, Massimo; Dalla Cort, Antonella; Mandolini, Luigi; Zinić, Mladen

    2007-09-14

    Anthraquinone derived oxalamide gelator 1 forms with aromatic solvents and alcohols very stable gels which selectively respond to the presence of fluoride anion by colour change and/or gel-to-sol transition.

  10. Oral microflora in preschool children attending a fluoride varnish program

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Anderson, Maria; Grindefjord, Margaret; Dahllöf, Göran

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: To compare the oral microflora in preschool children attending a fluoride varnish program with a reference group receiving a standard oral health program without fluoride varnish applications. A second aim was to relate the microbial composition to the caries prevalence. METHODS: Five...... hundred seven 3-year-old children were enrolled from a cohort of 3403 preschool children taking part in a community based oral health project. Two hundred sixty-three of them had attended caries-preventive program with semi-annual applications of a fluoride varnish since the age of 1 year (test group......-annual fluoride varnish applications did not seem to significantly influence the oral microflora in preschool children. TRIAL REGISTRATION: www.controlled-trials.com (ISRCTN35086887) 20131216 'retrospectively registered'....

  11. Visual sensing of fluoride ions by dipyrrolyl derivatives bearing ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    withdrawing quinone or dicyano functionalities in their architecture permit the detection of fluoride ions under visual (naked-eye) as well as optical (absorption and fluorescence) and electrochemical conditions in organic solvents.

  12. Fluoride-assisted synthesis of bimodal microporous SSZ-13 zeolite

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhu, Xiaochun; Kosinov, Nikolay; Hofmann, Jan P.; Mezari, Brahim; Qian, Qingyun; Rohling, Roderigh; Weckhuysen, Bert M.; Ruiz-Martinez, Javier; Hensen, Emiel J. M.

    The presence of small amount of fluoride in alkaline hydrothermal synthesis of SSZ-13 zeolite yields bimodal microporous particles with substantially improved performance in the methanol-to-olefins (MTO) reaction. Hydrocarbon uptake measurements and fluorescence microspectroscopy of spent catalysts

  13. Toxic fluoride gas emissions from lithium-ion battery fires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsson, Fredrik; Andersson, Petra; Blomqvist, Per; Mellander, Bengt-Erik

    2017-08-30

    Lithium-ion battery fires generate intense heat and considerable amounts of gas and smoke. Although the emission of toxic gases can be a larger threat than the heat, the knowledge of such emissions is limited. This paper presents quantitative measurements of heat release and fluoride gas emissions during battery fires for seven different types of commercial lithium-ion batteries. The results have been validated using two independent measurement techniques and show that large amounts of hydrogen fluoride (HF) may be generated, ranging between 20 and 200 mg/Wh of nominal battery energy capacity. In addition, 15-22 mg/Wh of another potentially toxic gas, phosphoryl fluoride (POF3), was measured in some of the fire tests. Gas emissions when using water mist as extinguishing agent were also investigated. Fluoride gas emission can pose a serious toxic threat and the results are crucial findings for risk assessment and management, especially for large Li-ion battery packs.

  14. Readying Community Water Fluoridation Advocates through Training, Surveillance, and Empowerment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veschusio, C; Jones, M K; Mercer, J; Martin, A B

    2017-11-10

    This paper describes the Community Water Fluoridation Advocacy Training Project that was designed to develop networks of community water fluoridation advocates in rural communities. The South Carolina (SC) Department of Health and Environmental Control Division of Oral Health staff and the SC Dental Association were responsible for developing and facilitating the training sessions for key policy influencers, which included medical and dental providers, early childhood educators, and water system operators and managers. Findings from the post-training survey indicate that participants increased their knowledge and skills to discuss the impact of water fluoridation on the dental health of community residents. Participants identified a need for online access to water fluoridation education and advocacy materials. Dental public health competencies illustrated: communication and collaboration with groups and individuals, and advocate, implement and evaluate public health policy, legislation and regulations. Copyright© 2017 Dennis Barber Ltd.

  15. Study of fluoride in polluted and unpolluted estuarine environments

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Zingde, M.D.; Mandalia, A.V.

    estuary, significant deviation from the theoretical dilution line (TDL) in the chlorinity range 0.5-8ppt was observed in Mindhola River estuary due to the externally added fluoride which largely remained in solution. The excess of fluroide over...

  16. Graphite fluoride as a solid lubricant in a polyimide binder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fusaro, R. L.; Sliney, H. E.

    1972-01-01

    Polyimide resin (PI) was shown to be a suitable binder material for the solid lubricant graphite fluoride, (CF(1.1))n. Comparisons were made to similar tests using PI-bonded MOS2 films, graphite fluoride rubbed films, and MOS2 rubbed films. The results showed that, at any one specific temperature between 25 and 400 C, the wear life of PI-bonded graphite fluoride films exceeded those of the other three films by at least a factor of 2 and by as much as a factor of 60. Minimum friction coefficients for the PI-bonded films were 0.08 for graphite fluoride and 0.04 for MOS2. The rider wear rates for the two PI-bonded films at 25 C were nearly equal.

  17. Ratiometric fluorescence signalling of fluoride ions by an ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... Lecture Workshops · Refresher Courses · Symposia. Home; Journals; Journal of Chemical Sciences; Volume 119; Issue 2. Ratiometric fluorescence signalling of fluoride ions by an amidophthalimide derivative. Moloy Sarkar Raghavendra Yellampalli Bhaswati Bhattacharya Ravi Kumar Kanaparthi Anunay Samanta.

  18. Latest developments in non-fluoridated remineralizing technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goswami, M; Saha, S; Chaitra, T R

    2012-01-01

    The goal of modern dentistry is to manage non-cavitated carious lesions non-invasively through remineralization in an attempt to prevent disease progression, and to improve strength, esthetics, and function of teeth. The emphasis currently is being given to new technologies for enamel remineralization which suggest the changes in the understanding of dental caries. The aim of this paper is to review the contemporary non-fluoridated systems available for remineralization therapy and ideas for their implementation into clinical practice. A search of articles from "Pubmed" and "Medline" with the keywords Remineralization-demineralization, Casein derivatives, Non-fluoridated remineralizing agents was conducted. A total of 526 abstracts were collected, out of which 172 articles that discussed current technologies of non-fluoridated remineralizing agents were read and 33 most relevant articles were included in this paper. Casein phosphopeptide based technology has been established as a strong non-fluoridated remineralizing agent fulfilling all the criteria of an ideal remineralizing material.

  19. Fluoride supplementation. A survey of pediatricians and pediatric dentists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, K F; Berg, J H

    1992-12-01

    To determine the protocol and use of prescriptions of fluoride supplementation by primary care pediatricians and pediatric dentists in the Houston (Tex) area. Survey mailed to all primary care pediatricians and pediatric dentists listed in the Yellow Pages of the Greater Houston telephone directory. 153 pediatricians and 47 pediatric dentists. Ninety-six percent of the participants prescribed fluoride supplements. Fifty-one percent of the pediatricians and 61% of the dentists considered that the fluoride content of the water was important. Seventy percent of the pediatricians and 30% of the dentists discontinued the use of supplements by age 7 to 10 years. Pediatricians and pediatric dentists should consider the need for water analysis prior to supplementation and should continue the use of fluoride supplements until 16 years of age.

  20. Fluoride sensing by catechol-based π-electron systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Byeong-Kwan; Wang, Xin; Burn, Paul L; Meredith, Paul

    2010-11-15

    We have developed new catechol-based sensors that can detect fluoride via fluorescence or optical absorption even in the presence of other halides. The level and sensitivity of detection of the sensing molecules is dependent on the chromophore length, which is controlled by the number of thiophene units (one to three) within the chromophore. The sensor with three thiophene units, (E)-2-(2,2'-terthiophen-5-yl)-3-(3,4-dihydroxyphenyl)acrylonitrile, gives the best response to fluoride. By using fluorescence measurements fluoride is detectable over the concentration range 1.7 μM to 200 μM. Importantly, when adsorbed onto a solid support the fluorescent catechol dye can be used to detect the presence of fluoride in aqueous solution.