WorldWideScience

Sample records for professional voice users

  1. A Vocal Health Survey Among Amateur and Professional Voice Users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weekly, Edrie Means; Carroll, Linda M; Korovin, Gwen S; Fleming, Rachelle

    2017-09-22

    An international survey was conducted to provide insights into current practices related to vocal health among amateur and professional voice users. Vocalists of various genres completed an online survey related to their practice in seeking medical care for vocal health concerns, and their preferences for the type of medical help they seek. Specific vocal symptoms or conditions which the subjects feel would warrant evaluation was also queried, as well as their preference for voice use and management should laryngeal pathology be diagnosed during a medical examination. Participants were knowledgeable in both traditional and alternative medical approaches but showed a preference for those options most readily available, as opposed to those best suited for a vocal issue. Ideally, a combination of traditional and alternative management would appear to be the best long-term strategy for professional and amateur voice users. Copyright © 2017 The Voice Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Comparison of post menopausal voice changes across professional and non-professional users of the voice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pallavi Vishwas Sovani

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Menopause effects a permanent change in certain body functions, one of them being voice. Moreover, if the voice is used continuously as a part of one’s occupation, this may further impact postmenopausal voice changes. The present study investigated the impact of menopause and professional voice use, and their interaction effect, on the voice. 92 women were classified into reproductive (52 and postmenopausal (40. Each group was divided into Level II (teachers and Level IV (clerks of Koufman and Isaacson’s (1991 classification. Acoustic parameters were analyzed using the VisiPitch III software. Aerodynamic parameters were manually calculated. The VHI (Voice Handicap Index was also included to improve the face validity of the study. Results suggest that Fo, SFo and MPT reduce post menopause while NHR and VTI increase. Some changes are accelerated in teachers as compared to clerks while some are decelerated. VHI scores of teachers are significantly greater than clerks, though not significantly different across menopause. Thus the presence or absence of voice use in one’s profession differentially affects postmenopausal changes. The study has implications in improving the condition of teachers in India, developing norms for menopausal changes and modifying allowable limits for voice recognition systems in future.

  3. Vocal fatigue and dysphonia in the professional voice user: Bogart-Bacall syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koufman, J A; Blalock, P D

    1988-05-01

    Over the past 5 years, the authors have treated 67 adult professional voice users with a musculoskeletal tension disorder involving the larynx and supporting structures and leading to vocal dysfunction. Common clinical features in both sexes were muscle tension in the neck, poor control of the breath stream, and an abnormally low-pitched speaking voice. Most of the men sounded like Humphrey Bogart and the women like Lauren Bacall. These cases represent a discrete clinical vocal fatigue syndrome, the treatment of which is patient education and voice therapy.

  4. Response of the female vocal quality and resonance in professional voice users taking oral contraceptive pills: a multiparameter approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Lierde, Kristiane M; Claeys, Sofie; De Bodt, Marc; Van Cauwenberge, Paul

    2006-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the vocal quality and resonance (nasality and nasalance values) during the menstrual cycle in professional voice users using oral contraceptive pills (OCPs). Although professional voice users are more sensitive and aware of their vocal quality, no changes of voice and resonance characteristics were expected because OCPs create a stable hormonal balance throughout the menstrual cycle. The authors conducted a comparative study of 24 healthy, young professional voice users using OCPs. One assessment was performed between the 10th and 17th day of pill intake, when hormonal levels reached a steady state. The second assessment was performed during the first 3 days of menses, when no pills were taken and hormonal levels were minimized. Subjective (perceptual evaluation of voice and nasality) and objective (aerodynamic, voice range, acoustic, Dysphonia Severity Index [DSI], nasometer) assessment techniques were used. : The Mann-Whitney U test showed no significant difference between the perceptual evaluation of the voice and the nasality in the two assessments. The paired Student t test showed no significant difference regarding the maximum phonation time, the vocal performance, the acoustic parameters, and the DSI. These findings indicate that OCPs do not have an impact on the objective and subjective voice and resonance parameters in young professional voice users. This information is specifically relevant to professional voice users who are more aware of vocal quality changes and ear, nose and throat specialists/voice therapists who treat professional voice users with voice problems/disorders. Further research regarding the impact of increased vocal load during the premenstrual or menstrual phase in professional voice users using OCPs should be considered.

  5. Speaking and Nonspeaking Voice Professionals: Who Has the Better Voice?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chitguppi, Chandala; Raj, Anoop; Meher, Ravi; Rathore, P K

    2017-04-18

    Voice professionals can be classified into two major subgroups: the primarily speaking and the primarily nonspeaking voice professionals. Nonspeaking voice professionals mainly include singers, whereas speaking voice professionals include the rest of the voice professionals. Although both of these groups have high vocal demands, it is currently unknown whether both groups show similar voice changes after their daily voice use. Comparison of these two subgroups of voice professionals has never been done before. This study aimed to compare the speaking voice of speaking and nonspeaking voice professionals with no obvious vocal fold pathology or voice-related complaints on the day of assessment. After obtaining relevant voice-related history, voice analysis and videostroboscopy were performed in 50 speaking and 50 nonspeaking voice professionals. Speaking voice professionals showed significantly higher incidence of voice-related complaints as compared with nonspeaking voice professionals. Voice analysis revealed that most acoustic parameters including fundamental frequency, jitter percent, and harmonic-to-noise ratio were significantly higher in speaking voice professionals, whereas videostroboscopy did not show any significant difference between the two groups. This is the first study of its kind to analyze the effect of daily voice use in the two subgroups of voice professionals with no obvious vocal fold pathology. We conclude that voice professionals should not be considered as a homogeneous group. The detrimental effects of excessive voice use were observed to occur more significantly in speaking voice professionals than in nonspeaking voice professionals. Copyright © 2017 The Voice Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Disconnection: the user voice within the wound dressing supply chain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campling, Natasha; Grocott, Patricia; Cowley, Sarah

    2008-03-01

    This study examined the user voice in England's National Health Service (NHS) wound dressing supply chain. The impetus for this work came from involvement in a collaboration between industry and clinicians, entitled Woundcare Research for Appropriate Products. Experiences from that study highlighted the notable absence of research about the impact of the supply chain on the users of dressings. Interview data are presented following an outline of the grounded theory method used. These data were obtained from key stakeholders (n = 41) within the wound dressing supply chain such as nurses, manufacturers, distributors, professional organizations, government organizations and user groups. The consequences of supply disconnection revealed haphazard supply, unmet user needs and lack of information transfer between player groups. These consequences explain the lack of user voice in the supply chain and have far-reaching implications for nursing management, through purchasing decisions and nurses' management of wound care.

  7. Impact of English Regional Accents on User Acceptance of Voice User Interfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Niculescu, A.I.; White, G.M.; Lan, S.S.; Waloejo, R.U.; Kawaguchi, Y.

    2008-01-01

    In this paper we present an experiment addressing a critical issue in Voice User Interface (VUI) design, namely whether the user acceptance can be improved by having recorded voice prompts imitate his/her regional dialect. The claim was tested within a project aiming to develop voice animated

  8. METHODS FOR QUALITY ENHANCEMENT OF USER VOICE SIGNAL IN VOICE AUTHENTICATION SYSTEMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. N. Faizulaieva

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The reasonability for the usage of computer systems user voice in the authentication process is proved. The scientific task for improving the signal/noise ratio of the user voice signal in the authentication system is considered. The object of study is the process of input and output of the voice signal of authentication system user in computer systems and networks. Methods and means for input and extraction of voice signal against external interference signals are researched. Methods for quality enhancement of user voice signal in voice authentication systems are suggested. As modern computer facilities, including mobile ones, have two-channel audio card, the usage of two microphones is proposed in the voice signal input system of authentication system. Meanwhile, the task of forming a lobe of microphone array in a desired area of voice signal registration (100 Hz to 8 kHz is solved. The usage of directional properties of the proposed microphone array gives the possibility to have the influence of external interference signals two or three times less in the frequency range from 4 to 8 kHz. The possibilities for implementation of space-time processing of the recorded signals using constant and adaptive weighting factors are investigated. The simulation results of the proposed system for input and extraction of signals during digital processing of narrowband signals are presented. The proposed solutions make it possible to improve the value of the signal/noise ratio of the useful signals recorded up to 10, ..., 20 dB under the influence of external interference signals in the frequency range from 4 to 8 kHz. The results may be useful to specialists working in the field of voice recognition and speaker’s discrimination.

  9. Putting the Singing Voice on the Map : Towards Improving the Quantitative Evaluation of Voice Status in Professional Female Singers

    OpenAIRE

    Lamarche, Anick

    2009-01-01

    Diagnostic and evaluative methods used in voice care are mostly designedfor the speaking voice, and are not necessarily directly applicable to thesinging voice. This thesis investigated the possibilities of fine tuning, improvingand quantifying the voice status assessment of the singer, focusingespecially on the Western operatic female voice. In Paper I, possible singer-specific Voice Range Profile (VRP) characteristicsand tasks were explored and VRP data for 30 professional female Western op...

  10. Unheard Voices: Institutional Repository End-Users

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jean, Beth St.; Rieh, Soo Young; Yakel, Elizabeth; Markey, Karen

    2011-01-01

    This exploratory study investigates the perceptions and experiences of a group of institutional repository (IR) stakeholders seldom heard from: end-users. We interviewed twenty IR end-users recruited through five IRs to discover how they characterize the IR, how/why they use the IR, their credibility judgments in relation to the IR, and their…

  11. Harmonics to noise ratio in vocal professional voices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonetti, Luka; Bonetti, Ana; Bolfan Stosic, Natalija

    2002-05-01

    There is no arguing about the importance of voice, especially in groups of vocal professional voices. The question is what characterizes, the most, normal or pathological voice in relation to aspects of human working life. Harmonics to noise ratio, according to findings from the field of voice disorders, is the most representative method to differ normal from pathological voice. In this research significant differences were found in harmonics to noise ratio in relation to the length of the working age of 29 teachers of primary schools in Zagreb. Teachers with the longest working age (40-yr.) showed the most distorted voices. The best quality of voice with great ratio of harmonics to noise was found in the group of teachers with 10 years of professional work. Acoustical analyses were made by EZVOICEPLUSTM version 2.0 and Gram. 2.3. Significant statistical differences were established by the T test of Statistica for Windows, version 4.5. [Work supported by Ministry of Science and Technology of Republic of Croatia.

  12. Your Customer's Voice: An Innovation Roadmap for Professional Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallagher, Sean; Mishra, Seema

    2013-01-01

    In this article, Gallagher and Mishra state that "innovation" is in vogue in the increasingly competitive and globalized higher education landscape, particularly in the world of serving working professionals in continuing higher education. Too often, however, colleges and universities do not consider the voice of the consuming public--in…

  13. Voice-controlled Internet Browsing for Motor-handicapped Users

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brøndsted, Tom; Aaskoven, Erik

    2006-01-01

    The public-funded project "Indtal" ("Speak-it") has succeeded in developing a Danish voice-controlled utility for internet browsing targeting motor-handicapped users having difficulties using a standard keyboard and/or a standard mouse. The system has been designed and implemented in collaboration...... with an advisory board of motor-handicapped (potential) end-users and underlies a number of a priori defined design criteria: learnability and memorability rather than naturalness, minimal need for maintenance after release, support for "all" web standards (not just HTML conforming to certain "recommendations...

  14. VoiceYourView: anytime, anyplace, anywhere user participation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodcock, Andree; Frankova, Katerina; Garton, Laurence

    2012-01-01

    Citizens are increasingly called upon to comment on issues that directly concern them. However, such consultations may be tokenistic [1] as they occur with limited respondents, or may be at a time, or in a format which is inconvenient to the user. To encourage wider participation, the VoiceYourView project (vYv) has developed a system allowing people to make comments in a manner, time and place convenient to them. A real world trial of the prototype system was conducted at Coventry University campus to explore issues related to the system's usability and usage, as a means of enabling campus users to comment on their environment. Members of the university population were invited to comment on the university estate using one of five technologies (e-mail, online form, iPhone app, SMS message, or electronic kiosk). Although the immediate application area in this case was the design of public spaces, the approach can be transferred to other domains and thus provide a new way of gathering user information. Submitted comments were automatically analysed in terms of theme, sentiment, location and actionability and displayed online in a 2D visualisation. It is argued that that online data collection (crowd sourcing and skimming social networks) may provide a rich source of information for future ergonomists.

  15. Non-professional user`s understanding of Geographic Information

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arleth, Mette

    2003-01-01

    of digital media, including online access to a variety of GI-based services; maps, online Geographic information systems, interactive 3D models etc. However, can we expect that a citizen, who has no relevant professional basis for understanding the concept geographic information, be able to use GI......-based online services and comprehend the information contents? Using the Gi-based online services qualitatively in the participatory process obviously requires knowledge of the non-professional user`s understanding and use of GI. This paper discusses the needs for research into this field as well as relevant......Public participation in the planning process requires well developed communication between the authorities and the public; communication in wich various types of geographic information (GI) plays an important role. With the growth of the Internet this communication has been enriched with the assets...

  16. Quantitative analysis of professionally trained versus untrained voices

    OpenAIRE

    Šiupšinskienė, Nora

    2003-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare healthy trained and untrained voices as well as healthy and dysphonic trained voices in adults using combined voice range profile and aerodynamic tests, to define the normal range limiting values of quantitative voice parameters and to select the most informative quantitative voice parameters for separation between healthy and dysphonic trained voices. Three groups of persons were evaluated. One hundred eighty six healthy volunteers were divided into two g...

  17. Reported Voice Difficulties in Student Teachers: A Questionnaire Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fairfield, Carol; Richards, Brian

    2007-01-01

    As professional voice users, teachers are particularly at risk of abusing their voices and developing voice disorders during their career. In spite of this, attention paid to voice care in the initial training and further professional development of teachers is unevenly spread and insufficient. This article describes a questionnaire survey of 171…

  18. Voice user interface design for emerging multilingual markets

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Van Huyssteen, G

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Multilingual emerging markets hold many opportunities for the application of spoken language technologies, such as automatic speech recognition (ASR) or test-to-speech (TTS) technologies in interactive voice response (IVR) systems. However...

  19. The singer's voice range profile: female professional opera soloists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamarche, Anick; Ternström, Sten; Pabon, Peter

    2010-07-01

    This work concerns the collection of 30 voice range profiles (VRPs) of female operatic voice. We address the questions: Is there a need for a singer's protocol in VRP acquisition? Are physiological measurements sufficient or should the measurement of performance capabilities also be included? Can we address the female singing voice in general or is there a case for categorizing voices when studying phonetographic data? Subjects performed a series of structured tasks involving both standard speech voice protocols and additional singing tasks. Singers also completed an extensive questionnaire. Physiological VRPs differ from performance VRPs. Two new VRP metrics, the voice area above a defined level threshold and the dynamic range independent from the fundamental frequency (F(0)), were found to be useful in the analysis of singer VRPs. Task design had no effect on performance VRP outcomes. Voice category differences were mainly attributable to phonation frequency-based information. Results support the clinical importance of addressing the vocal instrument as it is used in performance. Equally important is the elaboration of a protocol suitable for the singing voice. The given context and instructions can be more important than task design for performance VRPs. Yet, for physiological VRP recordings, task design remains critical. Both types of VRPs are suggested for a singer's voice evaluation. Copyright (c) 2010 The Voice Foundation. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Reflexive Professionalism: Reclaiming the Voice of Authority in Shaping the Discourses of Education Policy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourke, Theresa; Ryan, Mary Elizabeth; Lidstone, John

    2013-01-01

    The nature and value of "professionalism" has long been contested by both producers and consumers of policy. Most recently, governments have rewritten and redefined professionalism as compliance with externally imposed "standards." This has been achieved by silencing the voices of those who inhabit the professional field of…

  1. Voice in different phases of menstrual cycle among naturally cycling women and users of hormonal contraceptives.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irena Pavela Banai

    Full Text Available Previous studies have shown changes in women's behavior and physical appearance between the non-fertile and fertile phases of the menstrual cycle. It is assumed that these changes are regulated by fluctuations in sex hormone levels across the cycle. Receptors for sex hormones have been found on the vocal folds, suggesting a link between hormone levels and vocal fold function, which might cause changes in voice production. However, attempts to identify changes in voice production across the menstrual cycle have produced mixed results. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to investigate changes in sexually dimorphic vocal characteristics and quality of women's voices in different phases of the cycle and to compare these with users of monophasic hormonal contraception. Voice samples (vowel phonation of 44 naturally cycling women were obtained in the menstrual, late follicular (confirmed by LH surge and luteal phases, and in 20 hormonal contraceptive users across equivalent stages of the monthly cycle. Results showed that voices of naturally cycling women had higher minimum pitch in the late follicular phase compared with the other phases. In addition, voice intensity was at its lowest in the luteal phase. In contrast, there were no voice changes across the cycle in hormonal contraceptive users. Comparison between the two groups of women revealed that the naturally cycling group had higher minimum pitch in the fertile phase and higher harmonics to noise ratio in the menstrual phase. In general, present results support the assumption that sex hormones might have an effect on voice function. These results, coupled with mixed findings in previous studies, suggest that vocal changes in relation to hormonal fluctuation are subtle, at least during vowel production. Future studies should explore voice changes in a defined social context and with more free-flowing speech.

  2. Voice in different phases of menstrual cycle among naturally cycling women and users of hormonal contraceptives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavela Banai, Irena

    2017-01-01

    Previous studies have shown changes in women's behavior and physical appearance between the non-fertile and fertile phases of the menstrual cycle. It is assumed that these changes are regulated by fluctuations in sex hormone levels across the cycle. Receptors for sex hormones have been found on the vocal folds, suggesting a link between hormone levels and vocal fold function, which might cause changes in voice production. However, attempts to identify changes in voice production across the menstrual cycle have produced mixed results. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to investigate changes in sexually dimorphic vocal characteristics and quality of women's voices in different phases of the cycle and to compare these with users of monophasic hormonal contraception. Voice samples (vowel phonation) of 44 naturally cycling women were obtained in the menstrual, late follicular (confirmed by LH surge) and luteal phases, and in 20 hormonal contraceptive users across equivalent stages of the monthly cycle. Results showed that voices of naturally cycling women had higher minimum pitch in the late follicular phase compared with the other phases. In addition, voice intensity was at its lowest in the luteal phase. In contrast, there were no voice changes across the cycle in hormonal contraceptive users. Comparison between the two groups of women revealed that the naturally cycling group had higher minimum pitch in the fertile phase and higher harmonics to noise ratio in the menstrual phase. In general, present results support the assumption that sex hormones might have an effect on voice function. These results, coupled with mixed findings in previous studies, suggest that vocal changes in relation to hormonal fluctuation are subtle, at least during vowel production. Future studies should explore voice changes in a defined social context and with more free-flowing speech.

  3. User participation in community mental health services: exploring the experiences of users and professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elstad, Toril Anne; Eide, Arne Henning

    2009-12-01

    Increased user participation and community integration are central aims for contemporary mental health policy in many countries. User participation in community mental health services is developed through practice; from interaction between service-users and professionals working on the ground level. Despite this, there is a lack of research exploring users' and professionals' experiences and views based on the practice of user participation. The objective of this study was to illuminate user participation in a community mental health context based on the experiences of users and professionals within the same services. A qualitative study with an explorative design was applied. Preliminary data analyses based on a field study within three community mental health centres in a Norwegian city lead to our specific focus on experiences of user participation. This theme was explored in individual interviews with 10 users and two group interviews with six professionals. This article is based on the data from these interviews. All informants valued user participation in the service and highlighted the importance of the environment. Users and professionals did, however, highlight interesting issues of user participation from different perspectives. We developed the findings into three main themes: (i) user participation--experiences and preferences, (ii) an environment that promotes user participation and (iii) professional help, responsibility and user participation. Developing service-users' influence through participation is important, not only on the political and organisational level, but also in the contexts where users and professionals meet and collaborate. Self-determination in how to use services means that there are opportunities for receiving support without being subjected to control. Community mental health services which provide flexible, accepting environments with possibilities for both support and challenges may enhance participation and give all users

  4. THE ACCOUNTANT PROFESSIONAL AS A CURRENT USER OF PROFESSIONAL JUDGMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viorica Mirela ŞTEFAN-DUICU

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Professional judgment governs the evolution of a process in the absence of any relevant procedural regulations. In this paper we will describe both the building components of the professional judgment and the accounting professional as a practitioner whom use most often the expression of the above mentioned type of judgment.

  5. Discrimination of Voice Pitch and Vocal-Tract Length in Cochlear Implant Users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaudrain, Etienne; Başkent, Deniz

    2017-08-09

    When listening to two competing speakers, normal-hearing (NH) listeners can take advantage of voice differences between the speakers. Users of cochlear implants (CIs) have difficulty in perceiving speech on speech. Previous literature has indicated sensitivity to voice pitch (related to fundamental frequency, F0) to be poor among implant users, while sensitivity to vocal-tract length (VTL; related to the height of the speaker and formant frequencies), the other principal voice characteristic, has not been directly investigated in CIs. A few recent studies evaluated F0 and VTL perception indirectly, through voice gender categorization, which relies on perception of both voice cues. These studies revealed that, contrary to prior literature, CI users seem to rely exclusively on F0 while not utilizing VTL to perform this task. The objective of the present study was to directly and systematically assess raw sensitivity to F0 and VTL differences in CI users to define the extent of the deficit in voice perception. The just-noticeable differences (JNDs) for F0 and VTL were measured in 11 CI listeners using triplets of consonant-vowel syllables in an adaptive three-alternative forced choice method. The results showed that while NH listeners had average JNDs of 1.95 and 1.73 semitones (st) for F0 and VTL, respectively, CI listeners showed JNDs of 9.19 and 7.19 st. These JNDs correspond to differences of 70% in F0 and 52% in VTL. For comparison to the natural range of voices in the population, the F0 JND in CIs remains smaller than the typical male-female F0 difference. However, the average VTL JND in CIs is about twice as large as the typical male-female VTL difference. These findings, thus, directly confirm that CI listeners do not seem to have sufficient access to VTL cues, likely as a result of limited spectral resolution, and, hence, that CI listeners' voice perception deficit goes beyond poor perception of F0. These results provide a potential common explanation not

  6. Attitudes of mental health professionals towards service user involvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kortteisto, Tiina; Laitila, Minna; Pitkänen, Anneli

    2017-08-22

    Patient-centred care and user involvement in healthcare services are much emphasised globally. This study was the first step in a multicentre research project in Finland to improve service users' and carers' opportunities to be more involved in mental health services. The aim of the study was to assess attitudes of professionals towards service user involvement. The data were collected via an online questionnaire from 1069 mental health professionals in four hospital districts. Altogether, 351 professionals responded. Data were analysed using appropriate statistical methods. According to the results, attitudes of healthcare professionals were more positive towards service users' involvement in their own treatment than in other levels of services. There were also differences in gender, age groups, working places and experiences in the attitudes of professionals concerning service users' involvement in their own treatment. These should be taken into account in the future when planning education for mental health professionals. In spite of governmental guidance on service user involvement and the growing body of knowledge of the benefits associated with it, change in attitudes towards user involvement is slow. Special attention should be paid to the attitudes of professionals working in inpatient care and of those with less working experience. © 2017 Nordic College of Caring Science.

  7. A voice service for user feedback on school meals

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Sharma Grover, AS

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available an error management strategy to assist users on time-outs (i.e. silence or no key pressed), erroneous input (e.g. when ?4? is pressed if there are only three options), and on repeated errors (i.e. an exit strategy). Lastly, the design team also...

  8. [Voice classification in professional singers: the influence of vocal fold length, vocal tract length and body measurements].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mürbe, D; Roers, F; Sundberg, J

    2011-06-01

    Professional voice performance is strongly affected by the functional adjustments of the structures involved in voice production. Generally, these functional skills are required by means of intensive training. On the other hand, the individual morphology of the larynx and vocal tract limits this functional variability. Thus, to neglect morphological conditions might result in voice problems. The present paper summarizes investigations on the influence of morphological measurements on the voice classification of professional singers. Vocal fold length, vocal tract length and body height have been found to differ systematically between sopranos, mezzosopranos, altos, tenors, baritones and basses. Although the knowledge of morphological measures does not permit a definite assignment or prediction of the individual voice classification, the data are valuable for counseling by voice teachers and phoniatricians. This might contribute to the prevention of voice disorders.

  9. [Primary health care product defined by health professionals and users].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pujol Ribera, Enriqueta; Gené Badia, Joan; Sans Corrales, Mireia; Sampietro-Colom, Laura; Pasarín Rua, María Isabel; Iglesias-Pérez, Begoña; Casajuana-Brunet, Josep; Escaramis-Babiano, Georgia

    2006-01-01

    To identify the components of the primary health care (PHC) product defined by health professionals and users in order to establish indicators for evaluation. Qualitative methodology was used with group techniques: a nominal group (health professionals) and focus groups (users). The study was performed in PHC centers in Catalonia (Spain). There were 7 groups: a) family physicians and pediatricians; b) nurses and social workers; c) staff from admissions units and customer services; d) other medical specialists; e) users; f) managers, pharmacists, pharmacologists, and technicians. Participants responded to the question: "Which features should be evaluated in the services that should be provided by PHC?". A content analysis was performed. Textual data were broken down into units and then grouped into categories, following analogy criteria. The interpretative context of the research team was taken into account. Health professionals and users identified 4 dimensions of the PHC product, coinciding with its basic attributes: a) access to services; b) coordination and continuity of the PHC teams with other levels of healthcare; c) relationship between health professionals and users, and d) scientific-technical quality of the PHC teams and the portfolio of services. Equity, satisfaction and efficiency appeared as keystones in all the components of the product identified. There was broad agreement in the product definition among health professionals and users. The relationship between health professionals and patients was a key element in all groups. The four dimensions should be included in the evaluation of PHC teams.

  10. Professional assistance to users of information retrieval tools at the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study investigated the need for professional assistance to users of information retrieval tools at the National Library of Nigeria, Enugu branch. A total of 38 (thirty-eight) users of the library were randomly selected and used for the study. It was found that most of the respondents 18(47.3%) consulted the card catalogue ...

  11. Examining High Quality Online Teacher Professional Development: Teachers' Voices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Linda J.; Liang, Xin

    2015-01-01

    Funded by Race to the Top, a federal education initiative, the Department of Education of a Midwestern state in the U.S. launched statewide implementation of online teacher professional development (OTPD) to apply formative instructional practices (FIP) to enhance classroom instruction. Central to the design and implementation of OTPD was the need…

  12. SMS versus voice messaging to deliver MNCH communication in rural Malawi: assessment of delivery success and user experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, Jessica; Larsen-Cooper, Erin; Jezman, Zachariah; Cunningham, Stacey C; Bancroft, Emily

    2014-02-01

    To determine the difference in delivery success of health messages delivered through pushed SMS, pushed voice messages sent to personal phones, and voice messages retrieved from a community phone ("retrieved voice messaging"), as well as the difference in quality of the user experience. We analyzed the project's electronic monitoring data between September 2011 and June 2013, including demographics, enrollment data, and messages sent and successfully delivered. We also collected and analyzed information from quarterly phone-based surveys with users to assess quality of the user experience, including acceptability, comprehension, new information learned, and reported behavior change. More than half of subscribers enrolled in the retrieved voice messaging service while nearly one-third enrolled in the pushed SMS service and less than 10% in pushed voice messaging. Message delivery success was highest among pushed SMS subscribers and lowest among retrieved voice subscribers. Overall, 99% of survey respondents reported trusting messages they received, and about 75% of respondents recalled the last message they received and learned something new. Almost 75% of respondents reported that they had already changed or intended to change their behavior based on received messages. Intended or actual behavior change was significantly higher among pushed SMS enrollees than among pushed or retrieved voice messaging enrollees (P = .01). All message modalities led to high levels of satisfaction, comprehension, and new information learned. Due to lower cost, higher delivery success, and higher levels of intended or actual behavior change, SMS is the preferred delivery modality. However, the majority of users included in this study did not have access to a personal phone, and retrieved voice messages provided an opportunity to access a population that otherwise could not be served. Providing multiple methods by which users could access the service was crucial in extending reach

  13. Assistive Technology User Group Perspectives of Early Childhood Professionals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parette, Howard P.; Stoner, Julia B.; Watts, Emily H.

    2009-01-01

    With the increasing usage of assistive technology (AT) usage in early childhood education settings serving children who are at-risk or who have developmental disabilities, there is a corresponding need for effective professional development experiences such as user groups to develop skills in using AT. Using a collective case study approach, 10…

  14. Comparative performance analysis of M-IMU/EMG and voice user interfaces for assistive robots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laureiti, Clemente; Cordella, Francesca; di Luzio, Francesco Scotto; Saccucci, Stefano; Davalli, Angelo; Sacchetti, Rinaldo; Zollo, Loredana

    2017-07-01

    People with a high level of disability experience great difficulties to perform activities of daily living and resort to their residual motor functions in order to operate assistive devices. The commercially available interfaces used to control assistive manipulators are typically based on joysticks and can be used only by subjects with upper-limb residual mobilities. Many other solutions can be found in the literature, based on the use of multiple sensory systems for detecting the human motion intention and state. Some of them require a high cognitive workload for the user. Some others are more intuitive and easy to use but have not been widely investigated in terms of usability and user acceptance. The objective of this work is to propose an intuitive and robust user interface for assistive robots, not obtrusive for the user and easily adaptable for subjects with different levels of disability. The proposed user interface is based on the combination of M-IMU and EMG for the continuous control of an arm-hand robotic system by means of M-IMUs. The system has been experimentally validated and compared to a standard voice interface. Sixteen healthy subjects volunteered to participate in the study: 8 subjects used the combined M-IMU/EMG robot control, and 8 subjects used the voice control. The arm-hand robotic system made of the KUKA LWR 4+ and the IH2 Azzurra hand was controlled to accomplish the daily living task of drinking. Performance indices and evaluation scales were adopted to assess performance of the two interfaces.

  15. Do Usability Professionals Think about User Experience in the Same Way as Users and Developers Do?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clemmensen, Torkil; Hertzum, Morten; Yang, Jiaoyan

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we study how usability professionals’ thinking about system use relates to that of system developers and end users. We conducted 72 repertory-grid interviews to capture how usability professionals, developers, and users describe their system use. The participants in each stakeholde...... stakeholder group and nationality independently influence how participants think about usability and user experience. We recommend that to understand users’ concerns, researchers should study context more.......In this paper, we study how usability professionals’ thinking about system use relates to that of system developers and end users. We conducted 72 repertory-grid interviews to capture how usability professionals, developers, and users describe their system use. The participants in each stakeholder...... group were from China, Denmark, and India. Our results indicate that usability professionals focus on emotion-related aspects of system use, while users focus more on context in terms of utility and degree of usage. There are no interactions between stakeholder group and nationality, although both...

  16. Caring of the voice and the use of verbal/non-verbal mode of communication in preschool teachers

    OpenAIRE

    Grebenc, Sara

    2015-01-01

    Preschool teachers as professional voice users find it difficult to do their job if they suffer from a voice disorder, while a persistent disorder means the end of their professional career. Due to the daily exposure to factors such as working with a big group of children, using voice to attract attention, speaking too loudly, bad working conditions (e.g. dry air), exposure to infections, teachers, like other voice-related occupations, suffer from vocal strain. Knowing voice care instructions...

  17. Participatory Action Research, Mental Health Service User Research, and the Hearing (our Voices Projects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Schneider

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available In this article I discuss participatory action research as a framework for enabling people diagnosed with mental health problems to carry out research and in doing so to promote health equity, citizenship, and social justice for people with a mental health diagnosis. The participatory approach to research aims to involve ordinary community members in generating practical knowledge about issues and problems of concern to them and through this promoting personal and social change. The article traces the development of participatory action research and describes its application in the mental health service user research movement. The Hearing (our Voices projects, participatory research projects carried out in Calgary, Alberta by a group of people diagnosed with schizophrenia, are described to illustrate this approach to mental health research. Participation in research to promote health equity is about inclusion and about how marginalized people can claim full and equal citizenship as participants in and contributors to society.

  18. Voice health of teachers in the north of Portugal: epidemiological indicators

    OpenAIRE

    Santos, Marisa; Araújo, André; Andrade, Ana; Amaro, Joana

    2016-01-01

    Effective communication is a fundamental requisite for teachers and other professionals in the education field. Teachers are considered professional voice users, as voice quality is central to their speech and communicative profile. In the last decades, teachers have been shown to be a risk group concerning voice disorders. Several studies have already identified specific risk factors within this population, and proposed voice health promotion measures, including prevention actions, and labou...

  19. MENTOR TEACHERS’ VOICES ON PRE-SERVICE ENGLISH TEACHERS’ PROFESSIONAL LEARNING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulus Kuswandono

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Various studies have demonstrated that the role of mentor teachers in helping pre-service English teachers (PSETs develop their professional experiences in school-based practicum is undeniably fundamental. Considering that mentor voices are still underrepresented in studies, this study aims to investigate the mentor teachers’ voices and beliefs to help the professional learning of pre-service English teachers (PSETs in their school-based practicums. This is a qualitative study which involves seven mentor teachers who teach English in senior high schools in Indonesia. Data was gathered through questionnaires and unstructured interviews carried out in the participants’ school setting and analysed using NVIVO 9 (qualitative data analysis software. The findings reveal the mentor teachers’ beliefs in guiding PSETS during the school-based practicum. The mentor teachers viewed that PSETs need to learn and experience more fundamental aspects of teaching, namely interpersonal skills and emotional engagement in teaching, including their leadership. Implications for teacher education to improve the quality of relationship between PSETs and mentor teachers are addressed.

  20. Short-Term Effect of Two Semi-Occluded Vocal Tract Training Programs on the Vocal Quality of Future Occupational Voice Users: "Resonant Voice Training Using Nasal Consonants" Versus "Straw Phonation".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meerschman, Iris; Van Lierde, Kristiane; Peeters, Karen; Meersman, Eline; Claeys, Sofie; D'haeseleer, Evelien

    2017-09-18

    The purpose of this study was to determine the short-term effect of 2 semi-occluded vocal tract training programs, "resonant voice training using nasal consonants" versus "straw phonation," on the vocal quality of vocally healthy future occupational voice users. A multigroup pretest-posttest randomized control group design was used. Thirty healthy speech-language pathology students with a mean age of 19 years (range: 17-22 years) were randomly assigned into a resonant voice training group (practicing resonant exercises across 6 weeks, n = 10), a straw phonation group (practicing straw phonation across 6 weeks, n = 10), or a control group (receiving no voice training, n = 10). A voice assessment protocol consisting of both subjective (questionnaire, participant's self-report, auditory-perceptual evaluation) and objective (maximum performance task, aerodynamic assessment, voice range profile, acoustic analysis, acoustic voice quality index, dysphonia severity index) measurements and determinations was used to evaluate the participants' voice pre- and posttraining. Groups were compared over time using linear mixed models and generalized linear mixed models. Within-group effects of time were determined using post hoc pairwise comparisons. No significant time × group interactions were found for any of the outcome measures, indicating no differences in evolution over time among the 3 groups. Within-group effects of time showed a significant improvement in dysphonia severity index in the resonant voice training group, and a significant improvement in the intensity range in the straw phonation group. Results suggest that the semi-occluded vocal tract training programs using resonant voice training and straw phonation may have a positive impact on the vocal quality and vocal capacities of future occupational voice users. The resonant voice training caused an improved dysphonia severity index, and the straw phonation training caused an expansion of the intensity range in

  1. Hearing the voices of service user researchers in collaborative qualitative data analysis: the case for multiple coding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweeney, Angela; Greenwood, Kathryn E; Williams, Sally; Wykes, Til; Rose, Diana S

    2013-12-01

    Health research is frequently conducted in multi-disciplinary teams, with these teams increasingly including service user researchers. Whilst it is common for service user researchers to be involved in data collection--most typically interviewing other service users--it is less common for service user researchers to be involved in data analysis and interpretation. This means that a unique and significant perspective on the data is absent. This study aims to use an empirical report of a study on Cognitive Behavioural Therapy for psychosis (CBTp) to demonstrate the value of multiple coding in enabling service users voices to be heard in team-based qualitative data analysis. The CBTp study employed multiple coding to analyse service users' discussions of CBT for psychosis (CBTp) from the perspectives of a service user researcher, clinical researcher and psychology assistant. Multiple coding was selected to enable multiple perspectives to analyse and interpret data, to understand and explore differences and to build multi-disciplinary consensus. Multiple coding enabled the team to understand where our views were commensurate and incommensurate and to discuss and debate differences. Through the process of multiple coding, we were able to build strong consensus about the data from multiple perspectives, including that of the service user researcher. Multiple coding is an important method for understanding and exploring multiple perspectives on data and building team consensus. This can be contrasted with inter-rater reliability which is only appropriate in limited circumstances. We conclude that multiple coding is an appropriate and important means of hearing service users' voices in qualitative data analysis. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Comparing acoustic and perceptual voice parameters in female teachers based on voice complaints

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Faghani Abukeili

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Teachers are a large group of professional voice users that several risk factors and voice demands causes various voice complaints among them. As the voice is multidimensional, the aim of this study was acoustic and perceptual measurement of teachers’ voice and comparing the findings between two groups with many and few voice complaints.Methods: Sixty female teachers of high school in Sari, north of Iran, were chosen by available sampling to participate in this cross-sectional study. According to a voice complaints questionnaire, 21 subjects located in few voice complaints and 31 in many voice complaints group. After a working day, subjects completed a voice self-assessment questionnaire. Also, teachers’voice were recorded during three tasks including sustained vowels /a/ and /i/, text reading and conversational speech. Acoustic parameters were analyzed by Praat software and 2 speech-language pathalogists performed auditory-perceptual assessment by GRBAS ( Grade, Roughness, Breathiness, Asthenia, Strain scale. Results: Comparing of the voice self-assessment between the two groups demonstrated statistically significant difference (p<0.05; however results of the acoustic and auditory-perceptual measurement did not show significant diffrence.Conclusion: Despite prevalent voice problems in teachers, there are various conditions in terms of complaints and assessments methods. In this study, only a remarkable deviation documented in the client-based assessments in many voice compliants group in comparison with few voice compliants, which would be probably related to different individual’s perception of voice problem between two groups. These results support paying attention to self-assessments in clinical process of voice problems.

  3. Occupational risk factors and voice disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilkman, E

    1996-01-01

    From the point of view of occupational health, the field of voice disorders is very poorly developed as compared, for instance, to the prevention and diagnostics of occupational hearing disorders. In fact, voice disorders have not even been recognized in the field of occupational medicine. Hence, it is obviously very rare in most countries that the voice disorder of a professional voice user, e.g. a teacher, a singer or an actor, is accepted as an occupational disease by insurance companies. However, occupational voice problems do not lack significance from the point of view of the patient. We also know from questionnaires and clinical studies that voice complaints are very common. Another example of job-related health problems, which has proved more successful in terms of its occupational health status, is the repetition strain injury of the elbow, i.e. the "tennis elbow". Its textbook definition could be used as such to describe an occupational voice disorder ("dysphonia professional is"). In the present paper the effects of such risk factors as vocal loading itself, background noise and room acoustics and low relative humidity of the air are discussed. Due to individual factors underlying the development of professional voice disorders, recommendations rather than regulations are called for. There are many simple and even relatively low-cost methods available for the prevention of vocal problems as well as for supporting rehabilitation.

  4. Educational Group Practices in Primary Care: Interaction Between Professionals, Users and Knowledge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Flavia Gazzinelli

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE To investigate the concept understood by Family Healthcare Strategy (ESF professionals of knowledge, education and subjects participating in learning activities. METHOD Qualitative study carried out with the ESF professionals with university degree, members of the healthcare staff who undertook educational health group activities at Basic Healthcare Units (UBS in Belo Horizonte. The following triangulation techniques were used: participant observation, photos and field notes; interviews with professionals; and document analysis. RESULTS We identified three interaction patterns that are different from each other. Firstly, the professional questions, listens and provides information to users, trusting in the transmission of knowledge; secondly, the professional questions and listens, trusting that users can learn from each other; thirdly, the professional questions, listens, discusses and produces knowledge with users, both teaching and learning from each other. CONCLUSION There are educational practices that include unique methods capable of creating a militant space for citizenship engagement.

  5. [Educational group practices in primary care: interaction between professionals, users and knowledge].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gazzinelli, Maria Flavia; Souza, Vania de; Fonseca, Rosa Maria Godoy Serpa da; Fernandes, Marconi Moura; Carneiro, Angélica Cotta Lobo Leite; Godinho, Luanna Kelen

    2015-04-01

    To investigate the concept understood by Family Healthcare Strategy (ESF) professionals of knowledge, education and subjects participating in learning activities. Qualitative study carried out with the ESF professionals with university degree, members of the healthcare staff who undertook educational health group activities at Basic Healthcare Units (UBS) in Belo Horizonte. The following triangulation techniques were used: participant observation, photos and field notes; interviews with professionals; and document analysis. We identified three interaction patterns that are different from each other. Firstly, the professional questions, listens and provides information to users, trusting in the transmission of knowledge; secondly, the professional questions and listens, trusting that users can learn from each other; thirdly, the professional questions, listens, discusses and produces knowledge with users, both teaching and learning from each other. There are educational practices that include unique methods capable of creating a militant space for citizenship engagement.

  6. Voice gender discrimination provides a measure of more than pitch-related perception in cochlear implant users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Tianhao; Fu, Qian-Jie

    2011-08-01

    (1) To investigate whether voice gender discrimination (VGD) could be a useful indicator of the spectral and temporal processing abilities of individual cochlear implant (CI) users; (2) To examine the relationship between VGD and speech recognition with CI when comparable acoustic cues are used for both perception processes. VGD was measured using two talker sets with different inter-gender fundamental frequencies (F(0)), as well as different acoustic CI simulations. Vowel and consonant recognition in quiet and noise were also measured and compared with VGD performance. Eleven postlingually deaf CI users. The results showed that (1) mean VGD performance differed for different stimulus sets, (2) VGD and speech recognition performance varied among individual CI users, and (3) individual VGD performance was significantly correlated with speech recognition performance under certain conditions. VGD measured with selected stimulus sets might be useful for assessing not only pitch-related perception, but also spectral and temporal processing by individual CI users. In addition to improvements in spectral resolution and modulation detection, the improvement in higher modulation frequency discrimination might be particularly important for CI users in noisy environments.

  7. Health professionals' and service users' perspectives of shared care for monitoring wet age-related macular degeneration: a qualitative study alongside the ECHoES trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Townsend, D; Reeves, B C; Taylor, J; Chakravarthy, U; O'Reilly, D; Hogg, R E; Mills, N

    2015-04-21

    To explore the views of eye health professionals and service users on shared community and hospital care for wet or neovascular age-related macular degeneration (nAMD). Using maximum variation sampling, 5 focus groups and 10 interviews were conducted with 23 service users and 24 eye health professionals from across the UK (consisting of 8 optometrists, 6 ophthalmologists, 6 commissioners, 2 public health representatives and 2 clinical eye care advisors to local Clinical Commissioning Groups). Data were transcribed verbatim and analysed thematically using constant comparative techniques derived from grounded theory methodology. The needs and preferences of those with nAMD appear to be at odds with the current service being provided. There was enthusiasm among health professionals and service users about the possibility of shared care for nAMD as it was felt to have the potential to relieve hospital eye service burden and represent a more patient-centred option, but there were a number of perceived barriers to implementation. Some service users and ophthalmologists voiced concerns about optometrist competency and the potential for delays with referrals to secondary care if stable nAMD became active again. The health professionals were divided as to whether shared care was financially more efficient than the current model of care. Specialist training for optometrists, under the supervision of ophthalmologists, was deemed to be the most effective method of training and was perceived to have the potential to improve the communication and trust that shared care would require. While shared care is perceived to represent a promising model of nAMD care, voiced concerns suggest that there would need to be greater collaboration between ophthalmology and optometry, in terms of interprofessional trust and communication. ISRCTN07479761. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  8. Continuity of care in the Health Care Network: negotiation between users and professionals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Denise Schimith

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to identify the negotiation and shared decision-making between professionals and users in a Family Health Unit and its influence on the continuity of care in the Health Care Network. Qualitative research created from a case study. One conducted 19 interviews, observation and document research. It was developed in a city in the countryside of Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil, in 2012. The results show that decisions used to happen unilaterally and that users and professionals looked for alternative ways to the continuity of care. It was not possible to identify the negotiation between professional and users and it was noticed that the user was alone looking for access. It is understood that primary care in the city researched needs to take responsibility for users and their access.

  9. Gamification in Healthcare: Perspectives of Mental Health Service Users and Health Professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopia, Hanna; Raitio, Katja

    2016-12-01

    The purpose of this descriptive qualitative study is to explore the perceptions and experiences that mental health service users (n = 10) and healthcare professionals (n = 32) have regarding the use of gamification in mental health care. Data was gathered by interviews. The mental health service users described promoting and retarding factors in the use of gamification, while professionals described the requirements for using gamification and changes occurring in the work culture. Additional research is needed on how game-playing elements could be integrated as a systematic part of mental health practice and how the digital skills of professionals could be effectively developed.

  10. How user involvement is transforming professional work, knowledge and identities –

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dybbroe, Betina; Kamp, Annette

    2017-01-01

    User involvement is currently a cornerstone in the transformation of the health sector in most Western European countries, as part of a “shared governance for health “(Kickbusch ,2011) involving citizens as co-producers with new roles, responsibilities and duties in relation to health provision...... in the health sector in Denmark in 2017, based on ethnographic field studies within psychiatry. In psychiatry users are supposed to take on a major responsibility for mastering and monitoring their own health, and so cooperation with the patient is a centerpiece for professional work in psychiatry...... and unaccountable professional knowledge, which enables user involvement. We explore how the professionals manage knowledge and quality when they engage in coproduction with patients, and we show how the balance between responsibility and risk is played out in new ways. Focus is on how the health professionals...

  11. Perfil dos profissionais da voz com queixas vocais atendidos em um centro terciário de saúde Profile of voice professionals seen in a tertiary health center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felipe Sartor Guimarães Fortes

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available As laringopatias relacionadas ao trabalho acarretam conseqüências para os profissionais da voz. OBJETIVO: Analisar o perfil destes profissionais atendidos em um hospital terciário. FORMA DE ESTUDO: Estudo de coorte histórica longitudinal. MATERIAL E MÉTODOS: Análise retrospectiva de prontuários. Os diagnósticos foram fornecidos através de videoestrobolaringoscopia. RESULTADOS: Foram atendidos 163 pacientes (119 do sexo feminino, 44 do sexo masculino, idade média de 36,5 anos. Em relação aos grupos profissionais, encontramos profissionais da voz falada (vendedores, professores, telemarketing, recepcionistas, atores e profissionais de saúde e da voz cantada. Os diagnósticos foram: alteração estrutural mínima (33%, nódulos (22%, edema de Reinke (10% e pólipos (6%. Foi observada correlação com tabagismo (p=0,002, sexo (p=0,004 e idade (pWork-related laryngopathy may have negative consequences for voice professionals. AIM: To analyze the profile of voice professionals seen in a tertiary level hospital. STUDY DESIGN: a longitudinal historical cohort. METHODS: A retrospective analysis of patient files. Diagnosis was reached using videostroboscopy. RESULTS: 163 patients (119 females and 44 males were seen. The mean age was 36.5 years. Professionals included spoken voice users (salesman, teachers, telemarketers, receptionists, health professionals and singers. The most frequent diagnoses were: minor structural changes (33%, nodules (22%, Reinke’s edema (10%, and polyps (6%. A correlation was observed between smoking, age and gender; there was an association between smoking and Reinke’s edema, leucoplasia and tabagism, females and Reinke’s edema, nodules and minor structural changes, and also between patients aged over 40 years and Reinke’s edema, and patients under 40 with nodules, laryngitis, and minor structural changes. Symptoms lasted more than 6 months in 74% of patients. CONCLUSION: The profile of voice professionals

  12. Mental health professional perception of the embracement towards psychoactive substance user in CAPSad

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daiane Bernardoni Salles

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Adherence to chemical dependency treatment is still a great challenge for both, users and health care professionals. Currently, public healthcare policy is a tool to assist in the development of a humanized care model, which advocates for the practice of user inclusion. Objective: Investigate the perception of professionals who work in the mental health field, to understand the inclusion offered to users of psychoactive substances in Psychosocial Care Centers for alcohol and drug users (CAPSad. Method: A descriptive and exploratory study conducted at the CAPSad in São Paulo. Active professionals in the mental health field working at the CAPSad participated in the present study. For data collection a semi-structured questionnaire was used with 27 self-report questions, 15 closed questions, analyzed through statistics and 12 open questions, with speech analysis. Results: The questionnaires of six professionals with a mean of 14.3 years working at the CAPSad, revealed that they had no prior training about inclusion. Five participants responded that they carried out inclusion in the presence of the family, four responded without the presence of family and just one responded according to user choice (each participant could choose more than one option. The results show ambiguity regarding the concept of user inclusion, as all reported that inclusion hampers user reception, qualified listening, guidance and making necessary referrals. Conclusion: The need to create formal spaces for knowledge exchange, case discussion, and encourage professional training, promoting the identity of the service and improving user adherence to treatment was highlighted.

  13. Incidence and risk factors for symptoms from the eyes among professional computer users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toomingas, A; Hagberg, M; Heiden, M; Richter, H; Westergren, K E; Wigaeus Tornqvist, E

    2012-01-01

    Personal computers are used by a majority of the working population in their professions. Little is known about risk-factors for incident symptoms from the eyes among professional computer users. The aim was to study the incidence and risk-factors for symptoms from the eyes among professional computer users.This study is a part of a comprehensive prospective follow-up study of factors associated with the incidence of symptoms among professional computer users. 1531 computer users of different professions at 46 companies were invited, whereof 1283 answered a baseline questionnaire (498 men; 785 women) and 1246 at least one of 10 monthly follow-up questionnaires. The computer work-station and equipment were generally of a good standard. The majority used CRT displays.During the follow-up period 329 subjects reported eye symptoms. The overall incidence rate in the whole study group was 0.38 per person-year, 0.23 in the subgroup of subjects who were symptom free at baseline and 1.06 among subjects who reported eye symptoms at baseline. In the bivariate analyses significant associations were found with all explanatory variables, except BMI. The reduced multivariate model showed significant associations with extended computer work, visual discomfort (dose-response), eye symptoms at baseline (higher risk), sex (women=higher risk) and nicotine use.The incidence of eye problems among professional computer users is high and related to both individual and work-related factors.

  14. Smart Choices for Cancer Education Professional Development: Your Voice and Visibility for Leadership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kratzke, Cynthia

    2017-01-24

    The purpose of this article is to provide reflections about the important and exciting opportunities for cancer education career advancement and professional development. Advancement in professional, personal, and career growth for clinicians and health professionals is critical to improve quality cancer care and updated health communication with patients and families. Valuable insights from my recent 2-year term as treasurer, Board of Directors, Cancer Patient Education Network, are shared inspiring others to build their rewarding professional development. The professional leadership opportunity gave me a new energy level to be invested in rapidly changing cancer education with so many diverse cancer education professionals. Professional cancer education associations are dedicated to advancing patient-centered care through professional networks. They create welcoming environments with significant networking and mentoring opportunities. Cancer education touches many lives, and the cancer education associations strongly support new advances. I encourage early or mid-career cancer education professionals to discover how their increased interest may spark leadership and inspire participation in our cancer education professional associations.

  15. Professionals' views on mental health service users' education: challenges and support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieminen, I; Kaunonen, M

    2017-02-01

    WHAT IS KNOWN ON THE SUBJECT?: Mental health service users (MHSUs) may experience disruptions in their education. However, education has been shown to have a positive influence on their recovery, potentially offering them broader employment opportunities. The literature suggests that providing support for MHSUs in their educational efforts may be beneficial and is wished for by the service users themselves. However, there is a lack of mental health professionals' views on the topic in the setting of a community mental health centre. WHAT DOES THIS PAPER ADD TO THE EXISTING KNOWLEDGE?: In the perception of mental health professionals, the predominance of disease in the life of MHSUs and their marginalization may form barriers to their success in education. Professionals can support MHSUs in their educational efforts by strengthening the MHSUs' internal resources and creating a supportive environment with professional expertise available. A service user-centred education might further help MHSUs to achieve their educational goals. Our findings confirm previous knowledge of a recovery-oriented approach to supporting MHSUs' education. This study explored the topic from the professionals' perspective in the context of community mental health centres, which is a fresh view in the research literature. WHAT ARE THE IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE?: The findings suggest which types of support professionals perceive to be required for MHSUs to advance their studies. Knowledge of adequate forms of support can be applied in the mental health nursing practice to develop support measures for service users to advance in their studies. All levels of the community mental health centres should be aware of and adopt a recovery-oriented approach. MHSUs and professionals need to have a shared opinion on the definition of recovery orientation. This requires mutual discussion and the more active involvement of MHSUs in the design of their own rehabilitation process. Introduction Studies show

  16. Exploring Teachers' Motivation for Teaching and Professional Development in Ethiopia : Voices from the Field

    OpenAIRE

    Gemeda, Fekede Tuli; Tynjälä, Päivi

    2015-01-01

    Teachers’ work, learning, and professional development are central to any effort aiming at improving schools. Consequently, teachers must consider themselves as a lifelong learner, engage in continuous professional learning and apply that learning to improve student learning and achievement. This article explores teachers’ motivation for teaching and professional development in secondary schools in Ethiopia. Data were collected via interviews and focus group discussions from 32 teachers. The ...

  17. Health system reform in rural China: voices of healthworkers and service-users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xu Dong; Li, Lu; Hesketh, Therese

    2014-09-01

    Like many other countries China is undergoing major health system reforms, with the aim of providing universal health coverage, and addressing problems of low efficiency and inequity. The first phase of the reforms has focused on strengthening primary care and improving health insurance coverage and benefits. The aim of the study was to explore the impacts of these reforms on healthworkers and service-users at township level, which has been the major target of the first phase of the reforms. From January to March 2013 we interviewed eight health officials, 80 township healthworkers and 80 service-users in eight counties in Zhejiang and Yunnan provinces, representing rich and poor provinces respectively. Thematic analysis identified key themes around the impacts of the health reforms. We found that some elements of the reforms may actually be undermining primary care. While the new health insurance system was popular among service-users, it was criticised for contributing to fast-growing medical costs, and for an imbalance of benefits between outpatient and inpatient services. Salary reform has guaranteed healthworkers' income, but greatly reduced their incentives. The essential drug list removed perverse incentives to overprescribe, but led to falls in income for healthworkers, and loss of autonomy for doctors. Serious problems with drug procurement also emerged. The unintended consequences have included a brain drain of experienced healthworkers from township hospitals, and patients have flowed to county hospitals at greater cost. In conclusion, in the short term resources must be found to ensure rural healthworkers feel appropriately remunerated and have more clinical autonomy, measures for containment of the medical costs must be taken, and drug procurement must show increased transparency and accountability. More importantly the study shows that all countries undergoing health reforms should elicit the views of stakeholders, including service-users, to avoid

  18. "We Always Want to Get Better": Teachers' Voices on Professional Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parise, Leigh M.; Finkelstein, Carla; Alterman, Emma

    2015-01-01

    Through the Innovative Professional Development (iPD) Challenge, the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation has invested in helping school districts and networks redesign their professional development systems to serve educators better and improve student performance. MDRC's evaluation of the iPD Challenge involves case studies and multiple rounds of…

  19. Teacher Professional Development outside the Lecture Room: Voices of Professionally Unqualified Practicing Teachers in Rural Zimbabwe Secondary Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukeredzi, Tabitha Grace

    2016-01-01

    Attempts to address global pressure to achieve Education for All have been hampered by two fundamental challenges in developing countries, namely an acute shortage of teachers and large rural populations in these countries. In addition, qualified, competent teachers shun working in rural settings. While recruitment of professionally unqualified…

  20. Perception Difference between Users and Information Professionals: A Case Study of TaiPower.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chyan; Wu, Ching-Yu

    2003-01-01

    Reports a case study of Taiwan Power Company on the perceived difference between information technology professionals and information systems users. Findings indicated there are significant differences regarding the required skill sets of system analysts and the expected role playing of system analysts, and no significant difference regarding the…

  1. Voice of the psychonauts: coping, life purpose, and spirituality in psychedelic drug users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Móró, Levente; Simon, Katalin; Bárd, Imre; Rácz, József

    2011-01-01

    Psychoactive drug use shows great diversity, but due to a disproportionate focus on problematic drug use, predominant nonproblematic drug use remains an understudied phenomenon. Historic and anecdotal evidence shows that natural sources of "psychedelic" drugs (e.g., mescaline and psilocybin) have been used in religious and spiritual settings for centuries, as well as for psychological self-enhancement purposes. Our study assessed a total of 667 psychedelic drug users, other drug users, and drug nonusers by online questionnaires. Coping, life purpose, and spirituality were measured with the Psychological Immune Competence Inventory, the Purpose in Life test, and the Intrinsic Spirituality Scale, respectively. Results indicate that the use of psychedelic drugs with a purpose to enhance self-knowledge is less associated with problems, and correlates positively with coping and spirituality. Albeit the meaning of "spirituality" may be ambiguous, it seems that a spiritually-inclined attitude in drug use may act as a protective factor against drug-related problems. The autognostic use of psychedelic drugs may be thus hypothesized as a "training situation" that promotes self-enhancement by rehearsing personal coping strategies and by gaining self-knowledge. However, to assess the actual efficiency and the speculated long-term benefits of these deliberately provoked exceptional experiences, further qualitative investigations are needed.

  2. Optimising the effect of noise reduction algorithm ClearVoice in cochlear implant users by increasing the maximum comfort levels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.G. Dingemanse (J. Gertjan); A. Goedegebure (Andre)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractObjective: ClearVoice is a single-microphone noise reduction algorithm in Advanced Bionics cochlear implant(CI) systems with the aim to improve performance in background noise. The present study investigated a hypothesised increased effect of ClearVoice if combined with a structural

  3. To have voice and choice : Turkish and Moroccan Dutch professionals in social work

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hans van Ewijk; Drs Peter Hendriks

    2016-01-01

    Social work in the Netherlands is attracting an increasing number of Turkish and Moroccan Dutch professionals, mostly second-generation migrant women from a Muslim background. Inspired by Amartya Sen’s capability approach, this article presents the findings of a qualitative content analysis of 40

  4. White Voice in Multiculturalism: Belonging, Professional Respect, and Role as Cultural Broker

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilder, Lynn K.

    2012-01-01

    Dr. Wilder retraces the steps of a personal journey as a White faculty member researching, publishing, and presenting at conferences in the field of multiculturalism. She shares insight into her experiences--while advocating for diversity--of overcoming the challenge to belong in collegial circles, to give and receive professional respect, and to…

  5. Make Room for Our Voices: Using Poetry in Professional Development for Secondary ESL and ELA Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulla, Amanda Nicole

    2012-01-01

    When asked by a principal to design a workshop for ELA and ESL teachers on addressing new ESL regulations, the author suggested that they offer professional development that might inspire teachers to try new practices that could help their students grow as writers. The author decided to devote a workshop not to rules and regulations, but to…

  6. Bringing Headteachers' Voices to the Professional Development Debate: A Case Study from Spain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández, María J.; Martínez, María A.

    2016-01-01

    This study seeks to broaden the existing knowledge about education and professional development in educational leadership by analysing the characteristics of "good" training programmes according to international theoretical frameworks and to educational leaders' views. To do so, 100 headteachers of infant, primary and secondary schools…

  7. Hear Our Voices: Mexican Parents and Professionals Speak about Children with Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauman, Dona C.

    2009-01-01

    In January 2004 faculty from the University of Scranton traveled to Mexico to establish relationships with universities, clinic personnel, hospital personnel, school personnel, and parents in order to increase their understanding of the role disability play in that country. This interdisciplinary group of professionals in special education,…

  8. Professional Development in the Transition to Online Teaching: the Voice of Entrant Online Instructors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adnan, Müge

    2018-01-01

    Professional development (PD) is critical for instructors who are adopting new roles and competencies in online teaching environments. This mixed-method study examines an online faculty development programme in Turkey, refecting upon participants' expectations, readiness and satisfaction. The fndings indicate a signifcant relationship between…

  9. Collaborative teacher educator professional development in Europe : different voices, one goal

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lunenberg, Mieke; Murray, Jean; Smith, Kari; Vanderlinde, Ruben

    2017-01-01

    In this article we present an embedded case study focused on the learning activities provided for and by us through our involvement in an international forum focused on the professional development of teacher educators. The aim of this research was to gain more insight into the complicated processes

  10. Voice Disorders in Occupations with Vocal Load in Slovenia

    Science.gov (United States)

    BOLTEŽAR, Lučka; ŠEREG BAHAR, Maja

    2014-01-01

    Aim The aim of this paper is to compare the prevalence of voice disorders and the risk factors for them in different occupations with a vocal load in Slovenia. Methods A meta-analysis of six different Slovenian studies involving teachers, physicians, salespeople, catholic priests, nurses and speech-and-language therapists (SLTs) was performed. In all six studies, similar questions about the prevalence of voice disorders and the causes for them were included. Results The comparison of the six studies showed that more than 82% of the 2347 included subjects had voice problems at some time during their career. The teachers were the most affected by voice problems. The prevalent cause of voice problems was the vocal load in teachers and salespeople and respiratory-tract infections in all the other occupational groups. When the occupational groups were compared, it was stated that the teachers had more voice problems and showed less care for their voices than the priests. The physicians had more voice problems and showed better consideration of vocal hygiene rules than the SLTs. The majority of all the included subjects did not receive instructions about voice care during education. Conclusions In order to decrease the prevalence of voice disorders in vocal professionals, a screening program is recommended before the beginning of their studies. Regular courses on voice care and proper vocal technique should be obligatory for all professional voice users during their career. The inclusion of dysphonia in the list of occupational diseases should be considered in Slovenia as it is in some European countries. PMID:27669516

  11. You're a What? Voice Actor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liming, Drew

    2009-01-01

    This article talks about voice actors and features Tony Oliver, a professional voice actor. Voice actors help to bring one's favorite cartoon and video game characters to life. They also do voice-overs for radio and television commercials and movie trailers. These actors use the sound of their voice to sell a character's emotions--or an advertised…

  12. [Relationships between health care professionals and users from a gender perspective].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, Romeu; Couto, Márcia Thereza

    2014-12-01

    The objective of this article is to analyze relationships between health professionals and users from a gender perspective. Using Pierre Bourdieu as a theoretical reference, we critically analyze data from two studies carried out in Brazil in which we took part as authors. The first of these studies was based in Rio de Janeiro and the second was a multicenter and ethnographical study carried out in eight health care facilities distributed throughout four Brazilian states, two in the Southeast region and two in the Northeast region. Among the principal results of the present study, we found that although the relationships between health professionals and users demonstrate varied opinions, all are marked by a gendered habitus. We conclude that, among other aspects, the construction of diverse femininities and masculinities and the way in which these are exercised in health care contexts are the product of process that is both socio-historical and personal.

  13. EQUIP training the trainers: an evaluation of a training programme for service users and carers involved in training mental health professionals in user-involved care planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraser, C; Grundy, A; Meade, O; Callaghan, P; Lovell, K

    2017-08-01

    WHAT IS KNOWN ON THE SUBJECT?: UK NHS policy highlights the importance of user and carer involvement in health professional training. We know little about service user and carer motivations and experiences of accessing training courses for delivering training to health professionals and how well such courses prepare them for delivering training to healthcare professionals. 'Involvement' in training has often been tokenistic and too narrowly focused on preregistration courses. There is limited data on how best to prepare and support potential service user and carer trainers. WHAT DOES THIS PAPER ADD TO EXISTING KNOWLEDGE?: This study adds to the international literature by highlighting service user and carer motivations for accessing a training course for delivering training to health professionals. Service users and carers wanted to gain new skills and confidence in presentation/facilitation as well as to make a difference to healthcare practice. We also learned that service users desired different levels of involvement in training facilitation - some wanted to take a more active role than others. A one-size-fits-all approach is not always appropriate. Encountering resistance from staff in training was a previously unidentified challenge to service user and carers' experience of delivering training in practice and is a key challenge for trainers to address in future. Professional training involvement can be enhanced via specialist training such as the EQUIP training the trainers programme evaluated here. WHAT ARE THE IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE?: When training service users and carers to deliver training to mental health professionals, it is important that service users are equipped to deal with resistance from staff. It is important that service user and carer roles are negotiated and agreed prior to delivering training to healthcare professionals to accommodate individual preferences and allay anxieties. Training for service users and carers must be offered

  14. Screening value of V-RQOL in the evaluation of occupational voice disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morawska, Joanna; Niebudek-Bogusz, Ewa; Wiktorowicz, Justyna; Śliwińska-Kowalska, Mariola

    2017-12-28

    Given the growing number of occupational voice users, easy and quick broad-scale screening is necessary to provide prophylaxis of voice disorders. The aim of the study was to assess applicability of the Voice Related Quality of Life questionnaire (V-RQOL) to screening occupational voice disorders. The research comprised 284 subjects divided into 3 groups: 0 - the control group of normophonic subjects, non-professional voice users (N = 60), 1 - occupational voice users with objectively confirmed voice disorders (N = 124), 2 - the non-randomized group of occupational voice users with and without voice problems (N = 100). Self-assessment of voice was performed by means of the V-RQOL in comparison to the Voice Handicap Index (VHI). The relation between the V-RQOL and VHI was determined by means of linear regression. Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC) curves were constructed and the cut-off point of the VRQOL was determined to discriminate between normophonic and dysphonic subjects. The relationship between the VHI and V-RQOL scores indicated a satisfactory coefficient of determination: R2 = 0.7266. High values of Cronbach's α confirmed high reliability of the V-RQOL test (0.867). Voice-Related Quality of Life questionnaire (V-RQOL) results were significantly worse in the study group than for normophonic controls (p V-RQOL. Results of the VRQOL differed for diagnose-based subgroups of dysphonic patients. The study gives grounds for application of the V-RQOL as a reliable tool for screening occupational voice disorders. Med Pr 2018;69(2).

  15. Voice of Users

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jessing, Carla Tønder; Vilhjàlmsdóttir, Island, Gudbjörg; Dofradóttir, Island, Andrea G.

    En undersøgelse i de fem nordiske lande af voksnes udbytte af vejledning og deres involvering i vejledningsproces og -ydelser. Undersøgelsen er gennemført vhja. fokusgruppeinterviews og elektronisk surveyundersøgelse....

  16. Social media in health professional education: a student perspective on user levels and prospective applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maloney, Stephen; Moss, Alan; Ilic, Dragan

    2014-12-01

    Social Networking Sites (SNS) have seen exponential growth in recent years. The high utilisation of SNS by tertiary students makes them an attractive tool for educational institutions. This study aims to identify health professional students' use and behaviours with SNS, including students' perspectives on potential applications within health professional curricula. Students enrolled in an undergraduate physiotherapy program were invited to take part in an anonymous, online questionnaire at the end of 2012. The survey consisted of 20 items, gathering demographic data, information on current use of SNS, and opinions regarding the application of SNS into education. Both quantitative and qualitative data were gathered. A total of 142 students, from all years of study, completed the online questionnaire. Only two participants were not current users of social media. Facebook and YouTube had been utilised for educational purposes by 97 and 60 % of participants respectively; 85 % believed that SNS could benefit their learning experience. Only five respondents were not interested in following peers, academic staff, clinicians or professional associations on Facebook. Four key themes emerged: peer collaboration, need for separation between personal and professional realms, complimentary learning and enhanced communication. Students wish to make educational connections via SNS, yet expressed a strong desire to maintain privacy, and a distinction between personal and professional lives. Educational utilisation of SNS may improve communication speed and accessibility. Any educator involvement should be viewed with caution.

  17. Experiences about HIV-AIDS preventive-control activities. Discourses from non-governmental organizations professionals and users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berenguera, Anna; Pujol-Ribera, Enriqueta; Violan, Concepció; Romaguera, Amparo; Mansilla, Rosa; Giménez, Albert; Almeda, Jesús

    2011-01-01

    The main aim of this study was to identify the experiences of professionals in nongovernmental organizations (NGO) in Catalonia (Spain) working in HIV/AIDS prevention and control activities and potential areas of improvement of these activities and their evaluation. A further aim was to characterize the experiences, knowledge and practices of users of these organizations with regard to HIV infection and its prevention. A phenomenological qualitative study was conducted with the participation of both professionals and users of Catalan nongovernmental organizations (NGO) working in HIV/AIDS. Theoretical sampling (professional) and opportunistic sampling (users) were performed. To collect information, the following techniques were used: four focus groups and one triangular group (professionals), 22 semi-structured interviews, and two observations (users). A thematic interpretive content analysis was conducted by three analysts. The professionals of nongovernmental organizations working in HIV/AIDS adopted a holistic approach in their activities, maintained confidentiality, had cultural and professional competence and followed the principles of equality and empathy. The users of these organizations had knowledge of HIV/AIDS and understood the risk of infection. However, a gap was found between knowledge, attitudes and behavior. NGO offer distinct activities adapted to users' needs. Professionals emphasize the need for support and improvement of planning and implementation of current assessment. The preventive activities of these HIV/AIDS organizations are based on a participatory health education model adjusted to people's needs and focused on empowerment. Copyright © 2010 SESPAS. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  18. Risk factors, incidence and persistence of symptoms from the eyes among professional computer users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toomingas, A; Hagberg, M; Heiden, M; Richter, H; Westergren, K E; Tornqvist, E Wigaeus

    2014-01-01

    Symptoms from the eyes are common among computer users. Knowledge is scarce about these problems, however. The aim was to study risk-factors, incidence and persistence of eye-symptoms among professionally active computer users. This was a questionnaire based prospective study where 1283 males and females from different professions and companies answered a baseline questionnaire about individual factors and working conditions, e.g. duration of daily computer work, comfort of screen work, psychosocial factors. Subjects were at baseline and 10 follow-ups asked about the number of days with eye-symptoms during the preceding month. The incidence-rate of symptoms persisting minimum three days was 0.38/person-year. A multivariate Hazard-ratio model showed significant associations with extended continuous computer work, tasks with high demands on eye-hand coordination, low level of control, visual discomfort, female sex and nicotine use. Eye-symptoms at baseline was a strong risk factor for new symptoms. The incidence of eye-symptoms among professional computer users is high and related to both individual and work-related factors. The organization of computer work should secure frequent breaks from near-work at the computer screen. The severity of vision-related problems could in field studies be quantified by asking for the persistence of symptoms.

  19. User experiences of evidence-based online resources for health professionals: User testing of The Cochrane Library

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glenton Claire

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Evidence-based decision making relies on easy access to trustworthy research results. The Cochrane Library is a key source of evidence about the effect of interventions and aims to "promote the accessibility of systematic reviews to anyone wanting to make a decision about health care". We explored how health professionals found, used and experienced The Library, looking at facets of user experience including findability, usability, usefulness, credibility, desirability and value. Methods We carried out 32 one-hour usability tests on participants from Norway and the UK. Participants both browsed freely and attempted to perform individually tailored tasks while "thinking aloud". Sessions were recorded and viewed in real time by researchers. Transcriptions and videos were reviewed by one researcher and one designer. Findings reported here reflect issues receiving a high degree of saturation and that we judge to be critical to the user experience of evidence-based web sites, based on principles for usability heuristics, web guidelines and evidence-based practice. Results Participants had much difficulty locating both the site and its contents. Non-native English speakers were at an extra disadvantage when retrieving relevant documents despite high levels of English-language skills. Many participants displayed feelings of ineptitude, alienation and frustration. Some made serious mistakes in correctly distinguishing between different information types, for instance reviews, review protocols, and individual studies. Although most expressed a high regard for the site's credibility, some later displayed a mistrust of the independence of the information. Others were overconfident, thinking everything on The Cochrane Library site shared the same level of quality approval. Conclusion Paradoxically, The Cochrane Library, established to support easy access to research evidence, has its own problems of accessibility. Health professionals

  20. Reaching a consensus on service-user involvement in courses for professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hickey, Gary; Chambers, Mary

    2014-07-01

    To describe how a workshop that used a modified nominal group technique (NGT) was used at the end of a research project to develop a standard of education and training requiring UK education providers to include service users in the design and delivery of education and training. Often the objective of a research project is to deliver a decision where there is insufficient objective evidence. In this particular instance a decision was sought on whether service users should be involved in the design and delivery of education and training for healthcare professionals and what this involvement might look like. One solution can be to use a formal approach to decision making. NGT is one of several approaches to decision making that seeks to achieve consensus among participants. A modified NGT workshop was used and included students, service users and academic staff. This paper describes the workshop, its outcomes and points to consider when using such an approach. This paper outlines a modified NGT that was used in a workshop to complement other research techniques and provides practical tips on how to maximise the chances of the success of the approach. Modifications were necessary to address the particular challenges posed in this research. The modified NGT approach outlined in this paper could be used by nurses when addressing questions and issues related to service-user involvement in planning the design and delivery of education and training.

  1. Voice and Aging

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... so professional guidance from a voice therapist or voice coach is very helpful. Some things you may do on your own though include: reading a book or paper aloud for 10-15 minutes, 2 or 3 times a day, as well as singing with the radio. Patient Health Home Copyright © 2018 ...

  2. The dual pathway of professional attitude among health care workers serving HIV/AIDS patients and drug users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Yu-Ming; Lin, Sheue-Rong; Chen, Chia-Ling; Huang, Tsuei-Mi; Huang, Yi-Hua; See, Lai-Chu; Deng, Fong-Ling

    2013-01-01

    The professional attitude of health care workers (HCWs) who serve HIV/AIDS patients and drug users is important in implementation of the harm reduction program (HRP). This study was to explore the causal relationships between education and training, AIDS-related knowledge, attitude of supporting methadone maintenance treatment (MMT), risk perception, and professional attitude of HCWs toward serving HIV/AIDS patients and drug users. We distributed a self-administered questionnaire to HCWs who have served HIV/AIDS patients and drug users due to work in Taoyuan, northern Taiwan. Structural equation modeling (SEM) was used to test various pathways regarding the professional attitudes of HIV/AIDS patients and drug users among HCWs. A total of 218 HCWs were eligible for this study. The dual pathway model was emerged: (1) have attended education and training courses regarding to HRP positively and significantly affects professional attitude via the attitude of supporting MMT. The correlation (r) was 0.27 between education and training and the attitude of SMMT, and was 0.42 between the attitude of SMMT and professional attitude. (2) AIDS-related knowledge negatively and significantly affects professional attitude via risk perception of contracting HIV. The correlation was -0.22 between AIDS-related knowledge and risk perception, and was -0.25 between risk perception and professional attitude. Various fit indices confirmed a reasonable and acceptable fit of the model. Balance theory and approach-avoidance conflict may partially explain the dual pathways of professional attitude of HCWs toward serving HIV/AIDS patients and drug users. Our result suggests that, among HCWs, education and training courses regarding to HRP are important in increasing the attitude SMMT and AIDS-related knowledge directly, thus, professional attitude serving HIV/AIDS patients and drug users can be enhanced indirectly.

  3. 25 anos de cuidados com a voz profissional: avaliando ações 25 years of professional voice care: analyzing the actions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelly Hitomi Ueda

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: analisar as informações adquiridas por profissionais da voz em ações preventivas e verificar o impacto destas para a saúde vocal. MÉTODOS: participaram 100 profissionais da voz, de ambos os sexos, entre 16 e 55 anos, sendo professores, locutores, cantores, atores e operadores de tele-serviços. Os sujeitos estudados responderam a um questionário sobre cuidados com a voz, a proveniência das orientações recebidas e a aplicação das mesmas e, ainda, a qualificação destas quanto sua eficácia. RESULTADOS: as informações mais citadas, a partir das orientações recebidas foram: hidratação, apontada por 66% (N=66 dos sujeitos e o consumo de maçã citado por 32% (N=32, não sendo, no entanto, as mais apontadas como utilizadas pelo grupo estudado. Os exercícios de aquecimento vocal são utilizados por todos os sujeitos que os referiram (12%, sendo mais praticados pelos cantores. Para 66% dos sujeitos as informações e orientações foram recebidas de diversas fontes profissionais, enquanto que 34% referiram o fonoaudiólogo. Os sujeitos que referiram seguir as orientações sobre os cuidados com a voz (58%, N=58 afirmaram observar melhora na qualidade vocal. CONCLUSÃO: o relevante desconhecimento por parte dos profissionais da voz estudados em relação aos cuidados com a saúde vocal pode ser atribuído a pouca importância dada à saúde preventiva. No entanto, os sujeitos que afirmaram seguir as orientações recebidas confirmam melhoras na voz. Conclui-se que o fonoaudiólogo pode ser considerado como referência de orientação, quando comparado com os diferentes seguimentos de profissionais.PURPOSE: to analyze the information acquired by voice professionals in preventive speech actions and check their impact in relation to vocal health. METHODS: 100 voice professionals took part in this study, men and women, between 16 and 55-year old, including teachers, announcers, singers, actors and telemarketing operators. The

  4. (Un)organizing equal collaboration between users and professionals: on management of patient education in Norway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stokken, Roar

    2013-03-01

    This is an article about how patient education is managed in Norway, but it also addresses a matter of broader relevance that of how an organization imbued with a request for rational choices is able to take on board a contradictory ideology. In Norway, patient education under the auspice of hospitals is to be conducted as an equal collaboration between users and professionals, posing challenges to the ethos of rationally justified choices within the hospital sector. This calls for an exploration of how the organization copes with the contradictory demands. A theoretical approach on the basis of theories from Scandinavian institutional theory and science and technology studies, informed by documents, interviews and experiences from national, regional and local levels in Norway. The field of patient education is divided into three decoupled domains: one at management level, one at the practical level, and in the middle a domain that acts as an interface between management and practice. This interface mediates the relationship between ideas and practice, without making overt the fact that ideas might not be possible to put into practice and that practice might not reflect ideas. The decoupling of practice and management allows patient education as equal collaboration between users and professionals to thrive as an idea, not subjugated by practical challenges. Thus, it can exist as a guiding star that both management and practitioners can attune to, but this situation might now be threatened by the demand for quality assurance in the field. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  5. (Un)organizing equal collaboration between users and professionals: on management of patient education in Norway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stokken, Roar

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background  This is an article about how patient education is managed in Norway, but it also addresses a matter of broader relevance that of how an organization imbued with a request for rational choices is able to take on board a contradictory ideology. In Norway, patient education under the auspice of hospitals is to be conducted as an equal collaboration between users and professionals, posing challenges to the ethos of rationally justified choices within the hospital sector. This calls for an exploration of how the organization copes with the contradictory demands. Methods  A theoretical approach on the basis of theories from Scandinavian institutional theory and science and technology studies, informed by documents, interviews and experiences from national, regional and local levels in Norway. Discussion  The field of patient education is divided into three decoupled domains: one at management level, one at the practical level, and in the middle a domain that acts as an interface between management and practice. This interface mediates the relationship between ideas and practice, without making overt the fact that ideas might not be possible to put into practice and that practice might not reflect ideas. Conclusions  The decoupling of practice and management allows patient education as equal collaboration between users and professionals to thrive as an idea, not subjugated by practical challenges. Thus, it can exist as a guiding star that both management and practitioners can attune to, but this situation might now be threatened by the demand for quality assurance in the field. PMID:21624027

  6. The response of mental health services to domestic violence: a qualitative study of service users' and professionals' experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trevillion, Kylee; Howard, Louise M; Morgan, Craig; Feder, Gene; Woodall, Anna; Rose, Diana

    2012-01-01

    Despite numerous policies advocating for routine enquiry of abuse by mental health professionals, it is not known if such enquiry is acceptable to service users and clinicians. Furthermore, limited evidence exists on clinicians' response to domestic violence. This study aims to explore the acceptability of routine enquiry and experiences of responding to domestic violence from service user and professional perspectives. A qualitative study design was used to conduct individual interviews with a purposive sample of community mental health service users (n = 24) and professionals (n = 25). Thematic analysis was employed to establish superordinate and subordinate themes, which were transformed into conceptual maps. All service users considered routine enquiry about domestic violence in mental health settings to be acceptable but a small minority of professionals did not. Service users described positive experiences of help seeking, including receiving acknowledgement for the abuse and support for their multiple needs, and negative experiences, including nonvalidating responses from clinicians following disclosure, discrimination, and an absence of support from services. Main themes for professionals included difficulties in assessment and management of domestic violence, reporting requirements, and unclear referral pathways. To respond to the needs of mental health service users experiencing domestic violence, services need to articulate a clear care and referral pathway.

  7. Service quality in public health clinics: perceptions of users and health professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos, Domingos Fernandes; Negromonte Filho, Rinaldo Bezerra; Castro, Felipe Nalon

    2017-10-09

    Purpose The purpose of this paper is to investigate the expectations and quality gaps in services provided at city public health clinics in the city of Natal, Brazil, from the perspective of patients and healthcare service providers. Design/methodology/approach The research sample consisted of 1,200 patients who used public health services and 265 providers - doctors, nutritionists, physiotherapists, psychologists, pharmacists and managers at three health clinics in the city of Natal, Brazil. A scale with 25 health service attributes was used in data collection. Summary statistics and t-test were used to analyze the data. Findings The results show that the providers think that users have lower levels of expectations than those indicated by the users in all attributes. Providers and users have the most approximate insights into what attributes are considered most important: explanations, level of knowledge and attention dispensed by health professionals. Users and providers perceived similar quality gaps for most of the attributes. The gaps were statistically the same, when comparing the mean quality shortcomings by means of a Student's test, considering a significance level of 5 percent, obtained independently by the manifestation of users and providers. Research limitations/implications The results reveal only a photograph of the moment. The study did not consider the differences that may exist between groups with different income levels, genders or age groups. A qualitative study could improve the understanding of the differences and coincidences of the diverse points of views. A more advanced research could even study possibilities so that health managers could promote changes in the service, some of them low cost, as the health professionals training for contact with patients. Practical implications The evaluation of the service quality complemented by the matrix of opportunities, importance × quality gaps generates information to help make decisions in the

  8. Vivência de voz com profissionais de um hospital: relato de experiência Group of voice with professionals of a hospital: experience report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Regina Zanella Penteado

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: apresentar o relato de experiência de um grupo de Vivência de Voz realizado por fonoaudiólogos com profissionais e trabalhadores de um hospital. MÉTODOS: análise retrospectiva do processo de um Grupo de Vivência de Voz realizado com 20 profissionais de um hospital do interior de São Paulo, com foco analítico nos objetivos e atividades realizadas. RESULTADOS: foram contemplados os seguintes temas e objetivos: percepções dos sujeitos acerca da própria voz; uso profissional da voz e contextos e condições de trabalho; aquecimento vocal; impactos da voz/fala/comunicação/linguagem e da expressividade nas relações profissionais; possibilidades de mudanças. As ações educativas, contextualizadas nas condições, ambiente e organização do trabalho, possibilitaram gerar espaços de descobertas e de construção coletiva do conhecimento acerca do processo de trabalho no hospital e o grupo se mostrou como espaço social importante e efetivo para a sensibilização dos profissionais e trabalhadores do hospital em relação à voz/saúde vocal e aos seus impactos nas interações e nos processos comunicativos implicados no trabalho em saúde. CONCLUSÃO: afirma-se a importância da Fonoaudiologia na promoção de ambientes saudáveis e de processos comunicativos favoráveis à humanização das relações e melhoria do acesso e qualidade no acolhimento e atendimento em saúde.PURPOSE: to submit a report on the experience of a group of Voice carried through by speech-language-pathologists with professionals and workers of a hospital. METHODS: a retrospective analysis of the process of a Group of Voice carried through with 20 professionals of a hospital of a São Paulo city, with an analytical focus in the accomplished objectives and activities. RESULTS: the following themes and objectives were contemplated: perceptions of subjects concerning their own voice; the professional use of voice and work contexts and conditions; vocal

  9. Health care provision in Brazil: A dialogue between health professionals and lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender service users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moscheta, Murilo S; Souza, Laura V; Santos, Manoel A

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this study was to encourage the development of resources to improve health care for lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender service users. Dialogues between health professionals and lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender service users (inspired by the Public Conversations Project) highlighted the need (a) to improve communication between users and health professionals; (b) to question what constitutes an expert on lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender care; (c) to reconfigure rigid notions about sexual identity; (d) to deconstruct the association between sexually transmitted diseases and lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender service users; and (e) to adopt a less judgemental attitude towards lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender people during hospital admissions. © The Author(s) 2016.

  10. Prevalence of ocular symptoms and signs among professional computer users in Isfahan, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alireza Dehghani

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available

    • BACKGROUND: This study was undertaken to detect the prevalence of ocular symptoms and signs in professional video display users (VDUs and non-users in Isfahan.
    • METHODS: This is a cross-sectional descriptive case-control study. The VDUs group was selected from among employees working with computer and the control group was selected from among employees not working with computer. Fifty seven VDUs (34 male & 23 female with mean age of 30.7 ± 6.8 and 56 employees in the control group (25 male & 31 female, mean age of 27.6 ± 7.2 were evaluated. Complete ocular examination was done for both groups.
    • RESULTS: Among VDUs, 45 cases (79% had burning eyes and tearing, 38 cases (66% had dry eye, 37 cases (65% had asthenopia, and 47 cases (82.5% had musculoskeletal pain but these values for the control group were 24 (42.8%, 18 (32.2%, 22(39.3% and 15 (26.8% respectively and the difference was statistically significant (p = 0.037, p = 0.023, p = 0.044, p = 0.013. Schirmer's test was positive in 22 VDUs (38.5% vs. 6 (10.7% of control group (p = 0.012. There was heterophoria in 19 VDUs (33.3% vs. 3 controls (5.4% (p = 0.032.
    • CONCLUSION: Eye burning and tearing, dry eye, asthenopia and musculoskeletal problems were obviously more common in VDUs. Considering the extensive use of computers at home and work, a plan is required to detect dangers and provide appropriate solutions.
    • KEY WORDS: Video Display Terminal, Video Display Users, Computer Vision Syndrome, Dry Eye, Schirmer test, Asthenopia.

  11. English Voices in "Text-to-Speech Tools": Representation of English Users and Their Varieties from a World Englishes Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karakas, Ali

    2017-01-01

    English has experienced grave transformations recently in terms of socio-demographic and geographical characteristics. While such transformations have resulted in diverse types of English uses and various English users, the existing ELT materials still fail to represent the global varieties and dynamic uses and users of English. Moving from a…

  12. Hearing performance and voice acoustics of cochlear implanted children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coelho, Ana Cristina; Brasolotto, Alcione Ghedino; Bevilacqua, Maria Cecília; Moret, Adriane Lima Mortari; Bahmad Júnior, Fayez

    2016-01-01

    The voice of hearing-impaired individuals has been described extensively, and exhibits abnormalities in quality, articulation and resonance. Having an understanding of the aspects that may have an impact on voice characteristics of cochlear implant users is important for users and for professionals in this field. To verify the existence of correlation between age, time of device use, voice detection threshold, hearing category score and language category score with acoustic data of voices of cochlear implanted children. Retrospective study. Fifty-one children ranging in age from 3 years to 5 years and 11 months who unilaterally used cochlear implants participated. Acoustic analysis of the sustained vowel/a/, sequential speech and spontaneous speech was performed. The results were correlated with demographic data and hearing test results. Children with worse voice detection threshold showed higher frequency in the sustained vowel (p≤0.001) and in the spontaneous speech (p≤0.005). There was a correlation between the voice detection threshold and the frequency values of the sustained vowel and spontaneous speech of the studied population. Copyright © 2015 Associação Brasileira de Otorrinolaringologia e Cirurgia Cérvico-Facial. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  13. Hearing performance and voice acoustics of cochlear implanted children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Cristina Coelho

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT INTRODUCTION: The voice of hearing-impaired individuals has been described extensively, and exhibits abnormalities in quality, articulation and resonance. Having an understanding of the aspects that may have an impact on voice characteristics of cochlear implant users is important for users and for professionals in this field. OBJECTIVE: To verify the existence of correlation between age, time of device use, voice detection threshold, hearing category score and language category score with acoustic data of voices of cochlear implanted children. METHODS: Retrospective study. Fifty-one children ranging in age from 3 years to 5 years and 11 months who unilaterally used cochlear implants participated. Acoustic analysis of the sustained vowel/a/, sequential speech and spontaneous speech was performed. The results were correlated with demographic data and hearing test results. RESULTS: Children with worse voice detection threshold showed higher frequency in the sustained vowel ( p ≤ 0.001 and in the spontaneous speech ( p ≤ 0.005. CONCLUSION: There was a correlation between the voice detection threshold and the frequency values of the sustained vowel and spontaneous speech of the studied population.

  14. Voice amplification for primary school teachers with voice disorders: A randomized clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Bovo

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Several studies have demonstrated a high prevalence of voice disorders in teachers, together with the personal, professional and economical consequences of the problem. Good primary prevention should be based on 3 aspects: 1 amelioration of classroom acoustics, 2 voice care programs for future professional voice users, including teachers and 3 classroom or portable amplification systems. The aim of the study was to assess the benefit obtained from the use of portable amplification systems by female primary school teachers in their occupational setting. Materials and Methods: Forty female primary school teachers attended a course about professional voice care, which comprised two theoretical lectures, each 60 min long. Thereafter, they were randomized into 2 groups: the teachers of the first group were asked to use a portable vocal amplifier for 3 months, till the end of school-year. The other 20 teachers were part of the control group, matched for age and years of employment. All subjects had a grade 1 of dysphonia with no significant organic lesion of the vocal folds. Results: Most teachers of the experimental group used the amplifier consistently for the whole duration of the experiment and found it very useful in reducing the symptoms of vocal fatigue. In fact, after 3 months, Voice Handicap Index (VHI scores in "course + amplifier" group demonstrated a significant amelioration (p = 0.003. The perceptual grade of dysphonia also improved significantly (p = 0.0005. The same parameters changed favourably also in the "course only" group, but the results were not statistically significant (p = 0.4 for VHI and p = 0.03 for perceptual grade. Conclusions: In teachers, and particularly in those with a constitutional weak voice and/or those who are prone to vocal fold pathology, vocal amplifiers may be an effective and low-cost intervention to decrease potentially damaging vocal loads and may represent a necessary form of prevention.

  15. Sustainable Consumer Voices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klitmøller, Anders; Rask, Morten; Jensen, Nevena

    2011-01-01

    Aiming to explore how user driven innovation can inform high level design strategies, an in-depth empirical study was carried out, based on data from 50 observations of private vehicle users. This paper reports the resulting 5 consumer voices: Technology Enthusiast, Environmentalist, Design Lover...

  16. Perceptions about the Unified Health System among users and health professionals in the city of Santa Cruz-RN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gleiciane da Silva Fonseca

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate the level of knowledge of users and health professionals on the Unified Health System (UHS, highlighting the prospects for enhancing citizen participation in health policy. Methods: A descriptive and exploratory study with a qualitative approach, developed between April and July 2010 through semi-structured interviews with 23 people, among them four health professionals, and 19 users, who lived in an area of the Family Health Strategy city of Santa Cruz, RN, Brazil. The collected data were analyzed using thematic analysis, one of the modalities of content analysis, through the stages of reading and exploration of material, creating categories and linking them with theoretical references. Results: The survey showed that there are differences between the knowledge of users and health professionals, because while these critiques cited based on the principles of UHS legally established, users demonstrated ignore the UHS, conceptualizing it as the National Health Card . The speeches of the participants pointed to difficulties in access to health and a lack of educational activities in health, which can make difficult to develop democratic practices in this sector policies. Conclusions: The UHS was a breakthrough in health care in Brazil, but there are still barriers to the consolidation of a universal, integrated and equanimous. From this perspective, to contribute to the realization of the public health system, stands out importance of unity of diverse social actors (educators, managers and health professionals, as well as health education for the strengthening of popular participation.

  17. An Investigation into the Prevalence of Voice Strain in Chinese University Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Gang; Niu, Xiaochun

    2015-01-01

    Vocal disorders are a very common occupation-related disease in teachers, though it has never been given enough attention in China. As a result, the occupational health care of professional voice users is surprisingly, undeveloped compared to the attention given to occupational hearing disorders or many other occupational symptoms. The aim of the…

  18. Mobile phone-based interactive voice response as a tool for improving access to healthcare in remote areas in Ghana - an evaluation of user experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brinkel, J; May, J; Krumkamp, R; Lamshöft, M; Kreuels, B; Owusu-Dabo, E; Mohammed, A; Bonacic Marinovic, A; Dako-Gyeke, P; Krämer, A; Fobil, J N

    2017-05-01

    To investigate and determine the factors that enhanced or constituted barriers to the acceptance of an mHealth system which was piloted in Asante-Akim North District of Ghana to support healthcare of children. Four semi-structured focus group discussions were conducted with a total of 37 mothers. Participants were selected from a study population of mothers who subscribed to a pilot mHealth system which used an interactive voice response (IVR) for its operations. Data were evaluated using qualitative content analysis methods. In addition, a short quantitative questionnaire assessed system's usability (SUS). Results revealed 10 categories of factors that facilitated user acceptance of the IVR system including quality-of-care experience, health education and empowerment of women. The eight categories of factors identified as barriers to user acceptance included the lack of human interaction, lack of update and training on the electronic advices provided and lack of social integration of the system into the community. The usability (SUS median: 79.3; range: 65-97.5) of the system was rated acceptable. The principles of the tested mHealth system could be of interest during infectious disease outbreaks, such as Ebola or Lassa fever, when there might be a special need for disease-specific health information within populations. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Multicentre evaluation of the Naída CI Q70 sound processor: feedback from cochlear implant users and professionals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeanette Martin

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this survey was to gather data from both implant recipients and professionals on the ease of use of the Naída CI Q70 (Naída CI sound processor from Advanced Bionics and on the usefulness of the new functions and features available. A secondary objective was to investigate fitting practices with the new processor. A comprehensive user satisfaction survey was conducted in a total of 186 subjects from 24 centres. In parallel, 23 professional questionnaires were collected from 11 centres. Overall, there was high satisfaction with the Naída CI processor from adults, children, experienced and new CI users as well as from professionals. The Naída CI processor was shown as being easy to use by all ages of recipients and by professionals. The majority of experienced CI users rated the Naída CI processor as being similar or better than their previous processor in all areas surveyed. The Naída CI was recommended by the professionals for fitting in all populations. Features like UltraZoom, ZoomControl and DuoPhone would not be fitted to very young children in contrast to adults. Positive ratings were obtained for ease of use, comfort and usefulness of the new functions and features of the Naída CI sound processor. Seventy-seven percent of the experienced CI users rated the new processor as being better than their previous sound processor from a general point of view. The survey also showed that fitting practices were influenced by the age of the user.

  20. Collaborative learning about e-health for mental health professionals and service users in a structured anonymous online short course: pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashurst, Emily J; Jones, Ray B; Williamson, Graham R; Emmens, Tobit; Perry, Jon

    2012-05-31

    Professionals are interested in using e-health but implementation of new methods is slow. Barriers to implementation include the need for training and limited awareness or experience. Research may not always convince mental health professionals (MHPs). Adding the 'voice' of mental health service users (MHSUs) in collaborative learning may help. Involving MHSUs in face-face education can be difficult. We had previously been unable to engage MHPs in online discussion with MHSUs. Here we assessed the feasibility of short online courses involving MHSUs and MHPs. We ran three e-health courses, comprising live interactive webcast, week's access to a discussion forum, and final live interactive webcast. We recruited MHPs via posters, newsletters, and telephone from a local NHS trust, and online via mailing lists and personal contacts from NHS trusts and higher education. We recruited MHSUs via a previous project and an independent user involvement service. Participants were presented with research evidence about e-health and asked to discuss topics using professional and lived experience. Feasibility was assessed through recruitment and attrition, participation, and researcher workloads. Outcomes of self-esteem and general self-efficacy (MHSUs), and Internet self-efficacy and confidence (MHPs) were piloted. Online recruiting was effective. We lost 15/41 from registration to follow-up but only 5/31 that participated in the course failed to complete follow-up. Nineteen MHPs and 12 MHSUs took part and engaged with each other in online discussion. Feedback was positive; three-quarters of MHPs indicated future plans to use the Internet for practice, and 80% of MHSUs felt the course should be continued. Running three courses for 31 participants took between 200 to 250 hours. Before and after outcome measures were completed by 26/31 that participated. MHP Internet self-efficacy and general Internet confidence, MHSU self-esteem and general self-efficacy, all seemed reliable and

  1. An investigation of users' attitudes, requirements and willingness to use mobile phone-based interactive voice response systems for seeking healthcare in Ghana: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brinkel, J; Dako-Gyeke, P; Krämer, A; May, J; Fobil, J N

    2017-03-01

    In implementing mobile health interventions, user requirements and willingness to use are among the most crucial concerns for success of the investigation and have only rarely been examined in sub-Saharan Africa. This study aimed to specify the requirements of caregivers of children in order to use a symptom-based interactive voice response (IVR) system for seeking healthcare. This included (i) the investigation of attitudes towards mobile phone use and user experiences and (ii) the assessment of facilitators and challenges to use the IVR system. This is a population-based cross-sectional study. Four qualitative focus group discussions were conducted in peri-urban and rural towns in Shai Osudoku and Ga West district, as well as in Tema- and Accra Metropolitan Assembly. Participants included male and female caregivers of at least one child between 0 and 10 years of age. A qualitative content analysis was conducted for data analysis. Participants showed a positive attitude towards the use of mobile phones for seeking healthcare. While no previous experience in using IVR for health information was reported, the majority of participants stated that it offers a huge advantage for improvement in health performance. Barriers to IVR use included concerns about costs, lack of familiarly with the technology, social barriers such as lack of human interaction and infrastructural challenges. The establishment of a toll-free number as well as training prior to IVR system was discussed for recommendation. This study suggests that caregivers in the socio-economic environment of Ghana are interested and willing to use mobile phone-based IVR to receive health information for child healthcare. Important identified users' needs should be considered by health programme implementers and policy makers to help facilitate the development and implementation of IVR systems in the field of seeking healthcare. Copyright © 2016 The Royal Society for Public Health. Published by Elsevier Ltd

  2. Dependence and resistance in community mental health care-Negotiations of user participation between staff and users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Femdal, I; Knutsen, I R

    2017-10-01

    WHAT IS KNOWN ON THE SUBJECT?: Implementation of user participation is described as a change from a paternalistic healthcare system to ideals of democratization where users' voices are heard in relational interplays with health professionals. The ideological shift involves a transition from welfare dependency and professional control towards more active service-user roles with associated rights and responsibilities. A collaborative relationship between users and professionals in mental health services is seen as important by both parties. Nevertheless, the health professionals find it challenging in practice to reorient their roles and to find productive ways to cooperate. WHAT THIS PAPER ADDS TO EXISTING KNOWLEDGE?: This study illuminates how user participation is negotiated and involves multiple and shifting subject positions in the collaboration between users and professionals in community mental health care. By taking different positions, the relationship between users and professionals develops through dynamic interaction. This study challenges understandings of equality and implicit "truths" in user participation by illuminating subtle forms of power and dilemmas that arise in user-professional negotiations. WHAT ARE THE IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE?: Instead of denying the appearance of power, it is important to question the execution of power in the interplay between users and professionals. Focusing on the negotiation processes between users and professionals is important for increasing reflection on and improving understanding of the dynamic in collaboration and speech. By focusing on negotiations, power can be used in productive ways in user-professional relationships. Introduction Implementation of user participation is considered important in today's mental health care. Research shows, however, that user participation lacks clarity and provokes uncertainty regarding shifting roles. Aim To investigate negotiation of user participation in a microstudy of

  3. End-Users' Voice in EHR Selection: Development of a Usability Questionnaire for Demonstrations in Procurement (DPUQ).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyllinen, Mari; Kaipio, Johanna; Lääveri, Tinja; Nieminen, Marko

    2017-01-01

    This paper describes the development of a questionnaire for evaluating usability during EHR system procurement (DPUQ). Established usability questionnaires can be used to gather user feedback after using the systems. However, during procurement, experimenting with real system use is practical only with a limited number of system candidates. There is a need for less resource-demanding usability evaluation in the early stages of procurement in cases with several vendors. DPUQ has been designed for usability evaluation by end-users during special scenario-based vendor demonstrations. The questionnaire includes three sets of questions to be used during and after the vendor demonstration. DPUQ delivers specific usability scores and can be used to compare system candidates in procurement complementing other evaluation methods.

  4. Objective analysis of the singing voice as a training aid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sangiorgi, T; Manfredi, C; Bruscaglioni, P

    2005-01-01

    A new tool for robust tracking of fundamental frequency is proposed, along with an objective measure of main singing voice parameters, such as vibrato rate, vibrato extent, and vocal intonation. High-resolution Power Spectral Density estimation is implemented, based on AutoRegressive models of suitable order, allowing reliable formant tracking also in vocalizations characterized by highly varying values. The proposed techniques are applied to about 1000 vocalizations, coming from both professional and non-professional singers, and show better performance as compared to classical Fourier-based approaches. If properly implemented, and with a user-friendly interface, the new tool would allow real-time analysis of singing voice. Hence, it could be of help in giving non-professional singers and singing teachers reliable measures of possible improvements during and after training.

  5. Remote programming of MED-EL cochlear implants: users' and professionals' evaluation of the remote programming experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzovkov, Vladislav; Yanov, Yuri; Levin, Sergey; Bovo, Roberto; Rosignoli, Monica; Eskilsson, Gunnar; Willbas, Staffan

    2014-07-01

    Remote programming is safe and is well received by health-care professionals and cochlear implant (CI) users. It can be adopted into clinic routine as an alternative to face-to-face programming. Telemedicine allows a patient to be treated anywhere in the world. Although it is a growing field, little research has been published on its application to CI programming. We examined hearing professionals' and CI users' subjective reactions to the remote programming experience, including the quality of the programming and the use of the relevant technology. Remote CI programming was performed in Italy, Sweden, and Russia. Programming sessions had three participants: a CI user, a local host, and a remote expert. After the session, each CI user, local host, and remote expert each completed a questionnaire on their experience. In all, 33 remote programming sessions were carried out, resulting in 99 completed questionnaires. The overwhelming majority of study participants responded positively to all aspects of remote programming. CI users were satisfied with the results in 96.9% of the programming sessions; 100% of participants would use remote programming again. Although technical problems were encountered, they did not cause the sessions to be considerably longer than face-to-face sessions.

  6. Voice complaints, risk factors for voice problems and history of voice problems in relation to puberty in female student teachers.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thomas, G.; Jong, F.I.C.R.S. de; Kooijman, P.G.C.; Donders, A.R.T.; Cremers, C.W.R.J.

    2006-01-01

    The aim of the study was to estimate voice complaints, risk factors for voice complaints and history of voice problems in student teachers before they embarked on their professional teaching career. A cross-sectional questionnaire survey was performed among female student teachers. The response rate

  7. What is a crisis?: service user, carer and professional understandings of crisis: a Q-methodological approach

    OpenAIRE

    Davies, Kerry

    2016-01-01

    Background. This topic was proposed by the Service User and Carer Advisory Panel (SUCAP) which informs and supports Clinical Psychology training at The University of Nottingham. The project developed due to their concern about the ambiguity of crisis. They suggested that their understandings may be different from that of professionals. The reconfiguration of acute mental health services influenced the nationwide implementation of community treatment alternatives. However, crisis has remained ...

  8. Involvement of end-users in multi-user solar hybrid grids - implications for professionals in the field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schweizer-Ries, P.; Villalobos Montoya, C. [Otto-von-Guericke Univ. Magdeburg, Magdeburg (Germany)

    2004-07-01

    Environmental psychology is concerned with different environments like natural, social and cultural environments, including the constructed ones as well as technical instruments, which are influencing and are influenced by people. On the use of solar energy technology, the article describes the application of the social design theory, derived from architectural psychology on the one hand and on the other hand from the socio-technical system design theory, which is originated in organizational psychology. Using a phase model, implications for professionals in the field are presented. The five different phases are: concept, contact, preparation, implementation and follow up. Social issues are important in every single phase, but nevertheless they are often ignored. Participation and action research can be very helpful: Firstly in order to further elaborate the human factor in rural energy supply and secondly in order to spread the knowledge on how to take people into account for a sustainable development into social as well as engineering sciences. (authors)

  9. Voice disorders and mental health in teachers: a cross-sectional nationwide study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gilbert Fabien

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Teachers, as professional voice users, are at particular risk of voice disorders. Among contributing factors, stress and psychological tension could play a role but epidemiological data on this problem are scarce. The aim of this study was to evaluate prevalence and cofactors of voice disorders among teachers in the French National Education system, with particular attention paid to the association between voice complaint and psychological status. Methods The source data come from an epidemiological postal survey on physical and mental health conducted in a sample of 20,099 adults (in activity or retired selected at random from the health plan records of the national education system. Overall response rate was 53%. Of the 10,288 respondents, 3,940 were teachers in activity currently giving classes to students. In the sample of those with complete data (n = 3,646, variables associated with voice disorders were investigated using logistic regression models. Studied variables referred to demographic characteristics, socio-professional environment, psychological distress, mental health disorders (DSM-IV, and sick leave. Results One in two female teachers reported voice disorders (50.0% compared to one in four males (26.0%. Those who reported voice disorders presented higher level of psychological distress. Sex- and age-adjusted odds ratios [95% confidence interval] were respectively 1.8 [1.5-2.2] for major depressive episode, 1.7 [1.3-2.2] for general anxiety disorder, and 1.6 [1.2-2.2] for phobia. A significant association between voice disorders and sick leave was also demonstrated (1.5 [1.3-1.7]. Conclusion Voice disorders were frequent among French teachers. Associations with psychiatric disorders suggest that a situation may exist which is more complex than simple mechanical failure. Further longitudinal research is needed to clarify the comorbidity between voice and psychological disorders.

  10. Voice disorders and mental health in teachers: a cross-sectional nationwide study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nerrière, Eléna; Vercambre, Marie-Noël; Gilbert, Fabien; Kovess-Masféty, Viviane

    2009-01-01

    Background Teachers, as professional voice users, are at particular risk of voice disorders. Among contributing factors, stress and psychological tension could play a role but epidemiological data on this problem are scarce. The aim of this study was to evaluate prevalence and cofactors of voice disorders among teachers in the French National Education system, with particular attention paid to the association between voice complaint and psychological status. Methods The source data come from an epidemiological postal survey on physical and mental health conducted in a sample of 20,099 adults (in activity or retired) selected at random from the health plan records of the national education system. Overall response rate was 53%. Of the 10,288 respondents, 3,940 were teachers in activity currently giving classes to students. In the sample of those with complete data (n = 3,646), variables associated with voice disorders were investigated using logistic regression models. Studied variables referred to demographic characteristics, socio-professional environment, psychological distress, mental health disorders (DSM-IV), and sick leave. Results One in two female teachers reported voice disorders (50.0%) compared to one in four males (26.0%). Those who reported voice disorders presented higher level of psychological distress. Sex- and age-adjusted odds ratios [95% confidence interval] were respectively 1.8 [1.5-2.2] for major depressive episode, 1.7 [1.3-2.2] for general anxiety disorder, and 1.6 [1.2-2.2] for phobia. A significant association between voice disorders and sick leave was also demonstrated (1.5 [1.3-1.7]). Conclusion Voice disorders were frequent among French teachers. Associations with psychiatric disorders suggest that a situation may exist which is more complex than simple mechanical failure. Further longitudinal research is needed to clarify the comorbidity between voice and psychological disorders. PMID:19799781

  11. Utilizing a Global Environmental Assessment Tool to Facilitate Professional Development: The Voices of Kindergarten Teachers in Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cecconi, Luciano; Stegelin, Dolores A.; Pintus, Andrea; Allegri, Rossana

    2014-01-01

    This international research project examined the value of utilizing an early childhood program assessment instrument as a tool for in-service professional development and self-reflection for kindergarten teachers in Parma, Italy. Teacher educators from universities in Italy and the USA conducted the study collaboratively. Goals of the study were…

  12. A Comparative Study of Iranian Female Primary School Teachers' Quality of Life With and Without Voice Complaints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aghadoost, Ozra; Moradi, Negin; Aghadoost, Alireza; Montazeri, Ali; Soltani, Majid; Saffari, Ali

    2016-11-01

    As the largest group of professional voice users, teachers are more likely to face voice disorders because of their specific job conditions. This study aimed to compare the quality of life in female teachers with and without voice complaints. This is a cross-sectional descriptive-analytical study. This was a cross-sectional study of samples of primary school female teachers with (n = 60) and without (n = 60) voice disorders. All teachers were serving in Tehran, Iran. Professional background information was obtained through interviews, and quality of life was measured using the 36-item Short Form Health Survey questionnaire. A comparison was made between the study groups to analyze the data. The mean age of teachers was 44 (standard deviation = 3.95) years. There were no significant differences between the two groups regarding their professional background. However, significant differences were observed between the two groups in all subscales of the 36-item Short Form Health Survey, including physical and social functioning, role limitations because of either physical or emotional problems, bodily pain, general health, vitality, and mental health (P effect of voice complaint on quality of life and showed that teachers with voice complaints suffer from poor health-related quality of life. Therefore, both voice-specific and unspecific assessment methods are required for clinical diagnostics. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  13. The impact of voice disorders among teachers: vocal complaints, treatment-seeking behavior, knowledge of vocal care, and voice-related absenteeism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Houtte, Evelyne; Claeys, Sofie; Wuyts, Floris; Van Lierde, Kristiane

    2011-09-01

    Teachers are at increased risk for developing voice disorders. Occupational risk factors have been extensively examined; however, little attention has been paid to the consequences of the vocal complaints. The objective of this study was to investigate the knowledge that teachers have about vocal care, treatment-seeking behavior, and voice-related absenteeism. The study group comprised 994 teachers and 290 controls whose jobs did not involve vocal effort. All participants completed a questionnaire inquiring about vocal complaints, treatment-seeking behavior, voice-related absenteeism, and knowledge about vocal care. Comparisons were made between teachers with and without vocal complaints and with the control group. Teachers reported significantly more voice problems than the control population (51.2% vs. 27.4%) (χ2=50.45, df=1, Pteachers reported significantly higher levels of voice disorders than their male colleagues (38% vs 13.2%, χ2=22.34, df=1, PTeachers (25.4%) sought medical care and eventually 20.6% had missed at least 1 day of work because of voice problems. Female teachers were significantly more likely to seek medical help (χ2=7.24, df=1, P=0.007) and to stay at home (χ2=7.10, df=1, P=0.008) in comparison with their male colleagues. Only 13.5% of all teachers received information during their education. Voice disorders have an impact on teachers' personal and professional life and imply a major financial burden for society. A substantial number of teachers needed medical help and was obligated to stay at home because of voice problems. This study strongly recommends the implementation of vocal education during the training of teacher students to prepare the vocal professional user. Copyright © 2011 The Voice Foundation. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Counselling in STD/HIV/AIDS in the context of rapid test: Perception of users and health professionals at a counselling and testing centre in Porto Alegre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Fernanda T; Both, Nalu S; Alnoch, Edi M; Conz, Jaqueline; Rocha, Katia B

    2016-03-01

    This article discusses the perceptions of professionals and users about counselling practices at a counselling and testing centre in Porto Alegre/RS based on interviews with 27 service users and 14 members of the staff. The following categories emerged from thematic analysis: professionals' perceptions on counselling, users' perceptions on counselling and changes in counselling due to the introduction of rapid test procedures. The results show that, although initially there were some imprecision and apparent contradictions in its use, rapid testing was considered an invitation to rethink practices, bringing service closer to users' needs. © The Author(s) 2016.

  15. Finding voices through writing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gehrke, P

    1994-01-01

    Assisting students to find their writing "voices" is another way to emphasize writing as a professional tool for nursing. The author discusses a teaching strategy that required students to write using a variety of styles. Students wrote fables, poetry, and letters, and used other creative writing styles to illustrate their views and feelings on professional nursing issues. Creation of a class book empowered students to see versatility with writing styles can be a powerful communication tool to use with peers, clients, and society.

  16. PROFESSIONALISM

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    , who had a well fed voice, announced himself as Dr. Ahuama. There and then he invited me to be a guest speaker for today's ceremony. I agreed straightaway. Next, on 16 instant, I received from Dr. E. U. Ikonne, The Head of. Department of ...

  17. Students' voices: the lived experience of faculty incivility as a barrier to professional formation in associate degree nursing education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Prato, Darlene

    2013-03-01

    Nursing faculty play an important role in constructing learning environments that foster the positive formation of future nurses. The students' construction of a nursing identity is grounded in social interactions with faculty and is shaped by values and norms learned in both the formal and informal curriculum. The informal curriculum is communicated in faculty teaching practices and relationships established with students. To acquire an understanding of the students' lived experience in associate degree nursing education and identify educational practices that support students' professional formation. A phenomenological design was chosen to study the lived experience of nursing education. In-depth interviews were conducted with 13 participants. Five students participated in second interviews for a total of 18 interviews. Symbolic interactionism guided data analysis. Participants represented three ADN programs in the northeastern U.S. and were diverse in terms of gender and age and to a lesser extent race, and sexual orientation. Faculty incivility included demeaning experiences, subjective evaluation, rigid expectations, and targeting and weeding out practices. Targeting practices contributed to a perceived focus on clinical evaluation and inhibited clinical learning. Faculty incivility hindered professional formation by interfering with learning, self-esteem, self-efficacy, and confidence. Faculty who model professional values in the formal and hidden curriculum contribute to the positive formation of future nurses. Nursing faculty should be formally prepared as educators to establish respectful, connected relationships with students. Faculty should role model professional values, deemphasize their evaluative role, provide constructive formative feedback, and remain open to the student's potential for growth. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Computer systems experiences of users with and without disabilities an evaluation guide for professionals

    CERN Document Server

    Borsci, Simone; Federici, Stefano; Mele, Maria Laura

    2013-01-01

    This book provides the necessary tools for the evaluation of the interaction between the user who is disabled and the computer system that was designed to assist that person. The book creates an evaluation process that is able to assess the user's satisfaction with a developed system. Presenting a new theoretical perspective in the human computer interaction evaluation of disabled persons, it takes into account all of the individuals involved in the evaluation process.

  19. User Experience Design in Professional Map-Based Geo-Portals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bastian Zimmer

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available We have recently been witnessing the growing establishment of map-centered web-based geo-portals on national, regional and local levels. However, a particular issue with these geo-portals is that each instance has been implemented in different ways in terms of design, usability, functionality, interaction possibilities, map size and symbologies. In this paper, we try to tackle these shortcomings by analyzing and formalizing the requirements for map-based geo-portals in a user experience based approach. First, we propose a holistic definition the term of a “geo-portal”. Then, we present our approach to user experience design for map-based geo-portals by defining the functional requirements of a geo-portal, by analyzing previous geo-portal developments, by distilling the results of our empirical user study to perform practically-oriented user requirements, and finally by establishing a set of user experience design guidelines for the creation of map-based geo-portals. These design guidelines have been extracted for each of the main components of a geo-portal, i.e., the map, the search dialogue, the presentation of the search results, symbologies, and other aspects. These guidelines shall constitute the basis for future geo-portal developments to achieve standardization in the user-experience design of map-based geo-portals.

  20. Wisdom in professional knowledge: Why it can be valuable to listen to the voices of senior psychotherapists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Råbu, Marit; McLeod, John

    2017-01-06

    To explore the nature of professional wisdom, through learning from the experiences of a group of highly experienced senior therapists. Twelve senior psychotherapists took part in qualitative in-depth interviews about their professional role and their views around a range of aspects of therapy theory and practice. Interview transcripts were subjected to thematic analysis. The analysis yielded nine wisdom themes, clustered within three domains. Each domain represented efforts to resolve dilemmas arising from the experience of being a therapist, around the use of theory in psychotherapy practice, the type of therapeutic relationship that is most helpful for clients, and the experience of therapeutic failure. Therapist wisdom can be viewed as a form of contextualized knowledge, which functions as a source of emergent insights that arise as responses to the limitations of prevailing ways of thinking. Research into the nature of therapist wisdom draws attention to sources of knowledge within philosophy and the humanities that have the potential to enhance therapy practice and contribute to our understanding of therapist expertise.

  1. Injury Prevention Exercise Programs for Professional Soccer: Understanding the Perceptions of the End-Users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    OʼBrien, James; Finch, Caroline F

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate the perceptions of professional soccer players and staff members toward injury prevention exercise programs (IPEPs). Self-report survey. Four professional soccer teams in 4 different countries. 126 players, coaches, physiotherapists, and fitness coaches were invited to participate, with 72 respondents. Web-based survey detailing perceptions of lower limb (LL) injury susceptibility and seriousness, the value of IPEPs in general, and more specifically the International Federation of Association Football (FIFA) 11+. The vast majority of the respondents believed that professional soccer players are at high risk of LL injuries (93%) and that players should perform evidence-based injury prevention exercises (98%). They also agreed that LL injuries can shorten a player's career (85%), cause physical problems later in life (82%), and negatively impact on team performance (77%). However, perceptions varied across teams regarding which types of injury prevention exercises are effective, who holds responsibility for injury prevention, and when IPEPs should be performed. Specific knowledge of the FIFA 11+ was very low and 47% of respondents believed the program would need modification for use in their team. Players and staff members in professional soccer teams strongly support the use of evidence-based IPEPs. However, perceptions vary considerably between teams regarding which exercises can prevent injuries, who holds the responsibility for injury prevention, and when preventive exercises should be performed. Enhancing the ultimate impact of IPEPs in professional soccer requires a detailed understanding of each team's specific implementation context.

  2. The Voice and Voice Culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eshita Chakraborty

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Voice may be regarded as the first instrument of man because mankind was endowed with voice even before the invention of instruments. It is a universal instrument of music. It is the only musical instrument common to all musical systems in the world. Voice is the medium of communication and expression. Voice is responsible for abstract creativity. A sweet, melodious, loud enough, energetic, smooth, steady, effective and flexible voice is always appreciable. Good voice helps to harmonize the head and heart, Inner and Outer, manifested and un-manifested etc. The process of enriching the voice is known as Voice Culture. This study includes traditional as well as scientific methods to improve the quality of voice for better voice modulation. This musical instrument “voice” consists of four parts namely – The vibrator, The resonator, The motor and The articulator. Many musical instruments have the first three parts in some form of or other. But the articulation is the uniqueness of humanvoice.

  3. [Significance of voice constitution as a predisposition for occupational voice disorders].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, B; Cecon, M; Hanke, G; Wehner, S; Bigenzahn, W

    2004-05-01

    Occupational voice disorders have been increasing for years. The aim of this study was to examine whether a constitutionally weak voice should be regarded as a risk factor for developing such voice disorders. In a prospective study, 15 female teacher students with a normal vocal constitution were compared with 18 students with constitutionally weak voices during teaching practice. There was a significant difference in the mean fundamental frequency of both groups after teaching for 30 min. Students with constitutionally weak voices tended to have increased values. Taking into consideration the physiological aspects of an increasing fundamental frequency as a sign of vocal fatigue, a constitutionally weak voice has to be regarded as a potential risk factor for developing a voice disorder in vocally intensive occupations. To prevent future vocal problems by appropriate prophylactic intervention (i.e. voice therapy, introduction to vocal hygiene), a phoniatric examination of vocal constitution and endurance is recommended at the beginning of a voice dependent professional career.

  4. Perceptual and Acoustic Analyses of Good Voice Quality in Male Radio Performers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warhurst, Samantha; Madill, Catherine; McCabe, Patricia; Ternström, Sten; Yiu, Edwin; Heard, Robert

    2017-03-01

    Good voice quality is an asset to professional voice users, including radio performers. We examined whether (1) voices could be reliably categorized as good for the radio and (2) these categories could be predicted using acoustic measures. Male radio performers (n = 24) and age-matched male controls performed "The Rainbow Passage" as if presenting on the radio. Voice samples were rated using a three-stage paired-comparison paradigm by 51 naive listeners and perceptual categories were identified (Study 1), and then analyzed for fundamental frequency, long-term average spectrum, cepstral peak prominence, and pause or spoken-phrase duration (Study 2). Study 1: Good inter-judge reliability was found for perceptual judgments of the best 15 voices (good for radio category, 14/15 = radio performers), but agreement on the remaining 33 voices (unranked category) was poor. Study 2: Discriminant function analyses showed that the SD standard deviation of sounded portion duration, equivalent sound level, and smoothed cepstral peak prominence predicted membership of categories with moderate accuracy (R 2  = 0.328). Radio performers are heterogeneous for voice quality; good voice quality was judged reliably in only 14 out of 24 radio performers. Current acoustic analyses detected some of the relevant signal properties that were salient in these judgments. More refined perceptual analysis and the use of other perceptual methods might provide more information on the complex nature of judging good voices. Copyright © 2017 The Voice Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. User involvement in assisted reproductive technologies: England and Portugal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samorinha, Catarina; Lichon, Mateusz; Silva, Susana; Dent, Mike

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to compare user involvement in the case of assisted reproductive technologies in England and Portugal through the concepts of voice, choice and co-production, assessing the implications for user empowerment. This qualitative study draws primarily on policy review and uses exploratory semi-structured interviews with key informants as a way of illustrating points. Data on the following themes was compared: voice (users' representativeness on licensing bodies and channels of communication between users and doctors); choice (funding and accessibility criteria; choice of fertility centres, doctors and level of care); and co-production (criteria through which users actively engage with health professionals in planning the treatment). Inter- and intra-healthcare systems variations between the two countries on choice and co-production were identified. Differences between funding and accessibility, regions, public and private sectors and attitudes towards doctor-patient relationship (paternalistic/partnership) were the key issues. Although consumer choice and indicators of co-production are evident in treatment pathways in both countries, user empowerment is not. This is limited by inequalities in accessibility criteria, dependence on doctors' individual perspectives and lack of genuine and formal hearing of citizens' voice. Enhancing users' involvement claims for individual and organizational cultures reflecting user-centred values. Effective ways to incorporate users' knowledge in shared decision making and co-design are needed to empower patients and to improve the delivery of care.

  6. Issues in forensic voice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollien, Harry; Huntley Bahr, Ruth; Harnsberger, James D

    2014-03-01

    The following article provides a general review of an area that can be referred to as Forensic Voice. Its goals will be outlined and that discussion will be followed by a description of its major elements. Considered are (1) the processing and analysis of spoken utterances, (2) distorted speech, (3) enhancement of speech intelligibility (re: surveillance and other recordings), (4) transcripts, (5) authentication of recordings, (6) speaker identification, and (7) the detection of deception, intoxication, and emotions in speech. Stress in speech and the psychological stress evaluation systems (that some individuals attempt to use as lie detectors) also will be considered. Points of entry will be suggested for individuals with the kinds of backgrounds possessed by professionals already working in the voice area. Copyright © 2014 The Voice Foundation. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. User Experience Design in Professional Map-Based Geo-Portals

    OpenAIRE

    Bastian Zimmer; Bernd Resch

    2013-01-01

    We have recently been witnessing the growing establishment of map-centered web-based geo-portals on national, regional and local levels. However, a particular issue with these geo-portals is that each instance has been implemented in different ways in terms of design, usability, functionality, interaction possibilities, map size and symbologies. In this paper, we try to tackle these shortcomings by analyzing and formalizing the requirements for map-based geo-portals in a user experience based...

  8. HEALTH PROFESSIONALS' USER EXPERIENCE OF THE INTELLIGENT BED IN PATIENTS' HOMES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Hao; Toft, Egon; Hejlesen, Ole; Hansen, John; Oestergaard, Claus; Dinesen, Birthe

    2015-01-01

    The intelligent bed is a medical bed with several home healthcare functions. It includes, among others, an "out of bed" detector, a moisture detector, and a catheter bag detector. The design purpose of the intelligent bed is to assist patients in their daily living, facilitate the work of clinical staff, and improves the quality of care. The aim of this sub-study of the iCare project was to explore how health professionals (HPs) experience and use the intelligent bed in patients' homes. The overall research design is inspired by case study methodology. A triangulation of data collection techniques has been used: log book, documentation study, participant observations (n = 45 hr), and qualitative interviews (n = 23). The data have been analyzed by means of Nvivo 9.0. We identified several themes: HP transformation from passive technology recipient to innovator; individualized care; work flow redesign; and sensor technology intruding on patient privacy. It is suggested that functions of the intelligent bed can result in more individualized care, workflow redesign, and time savings for the health professionals in caring for elderly patients. However, the technology intruded on patients' privacy.

  9. Muscle fatigue in relation to forearm pain and tenderness among professional computer users

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kryger Ann I

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To examine the hypothesis that forearm pain with palpation tenderness in computer users is associated with increased extensor muscle fatigue. Methods Eighteen persons with pain and moderate to severe palpation tenderness in the extensor muscle group of the right forearm and twenty gender and age matched referents without such complaints were enrolled from the Danish NUDATA study of neck and upper extremity disorders among technical assistants and machine technicians. Fatigue of the right forearm extensor muscles was assessed by muscle twitch forces in response to low frequency (2 Hz percutaneous electrical stimulation. Twitch forces were measured before, immediately after and 15 minutes into recovery of an extensor isometric wrist extension for ten minutes at 15 % Maximal Voluntary Contraction (MVC. Results The average MVC wrist extension force and baseline stimulated twitch forces were equal in the case and the referent group. After the fatiguing contraction, a decrease in muscle average twitch force was seen in both groups, but the decrease was largest in the referent group: 27% (95% CI 17–37 versus 9% (95% CI -2 to 20. This difference in twitch force response was not explained by differences in the MVC or body mass index. Conclusion Computer users with forearm pain and moderate to severe palpation tenderness had diminished forearm extensor muscle fatigue response. Additional studies are necessary to determine whether this result reflects an adaptive response to exposure without any pathophysiological significance, or represents a part of a causal pathway leading to pain.

  10. Has the quality of health care for the immigrant population changed during the economic crisis in Catalonia (Spain)? Opinions of health professionals and immigrant users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porthé, Victoria; Vargas, Ingrid; Ronda, Elena; Malmusi, Davide; Bosch, Lola; Vázquez, M Luisa

    2017-06-02

    To analyse changes in health professionals' and immigrant users' perceptions of the quality of care provided to the immigrant population during the crisis. A qualitative descriptive-interpretative and exploratory study was conducted in two areas of Catalonia. Semi-structured individual interviews were used with a theoretical sample of medical (n=24) and administrative (n=10) professionals in primary care (PC) and secondary care (SC), and immigrant users (n=20). Thematic analysis was conducted and the results were triangulated. Problems related to technical and interpersonal quality emerged from the discourse of both professionals and immigrants. These problems were attributed to cutbacks during the economic crisis. Regarding technical quality, respondents reported an increase in erroneous or non-specific diagnoses, inappropriate use of diagnostic tests and non-specific treatments, due to reduction in consultation times as a result of cuts in human resources. With regard to interpersonal quality, professionals reported less empathy, and users also reported worse communication, due to changes in professionals' working conditions and users' attitudes. Finally, a reduction in the resolution capacity of the health services emerged: professionals described unnecessary repeated PC visits and limited responses in SC, while young immigrants reported an insufficient response to their health problems. The results indicate a deterioration in perceived technical and interpersonal quality during the economic crisis, due to cutbacks mainly in human resources. These changes affect the whole population, but especially immigrants. Copyright © 2017 SESPAS. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  11. Muscle fatigue in relation to forearm pain and tenderness among professional computer users

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, GF; Johnson, PW; Svendsen, Susanne Wulff

    2007-01-01

    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: To examine the hypothesis that forearm pain with palpation tenderness in computer users is associated with increased extensor muscle fatigue. METHODS: Eighteen persons with pain and moderate to severe palpation tenderness in the extensor muscle group of the right forearm...... and twenty gender and age matched referents without such complaints were enrolled from the Danish NUDATA study of neck and upper extremity disorders among technical assistants and machine technicians. Fatigue of the right forearm extensor muscles was assessed by muscle twitch forces in response to low...... stimulated twitch forces were equal in the case and the referent group. After the fatiguing contraction, a decrease in muscle average twitch force was seen in both groups, but the decrease was largest in the referent group: 27% (95% CI 17-37) versus 9% (95% CI -2 to 20). This difference in twitch force...

  12. Effect of tonsillectomy on the adult voice.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Heffernan, Colleen B

    2012-02-01

    OBJECTIVES AND HYPOTHESIS: Anecdotal evidence suggests that tonsillectomy has no deleterious consequences on a person\\'s voice under normal vocal demand. However, whether the enlarged dimensions of the oropharynx after tonsillectomy impair the quality of a professional voice user remains unclear. Therefore, we designed a study to determine whether adult tonsillectomy altered the resonance characteristics of the vocal tract in any way and whether these changes were transient or permanent. STUDY DESIGN: This is a prospective observational study with full institutional ethical approval. METHODS: All adult patients presenting for tonsillectomy for recurrent tonsillitis in our institution were recruited. Their voice was recorded preoperatively, postoperatively, and at 4 weeks postoperatively. The values of the first four formants were calculated in all recordings. The oropharyngeal dimensions were measured preoperatively and postoperatively. Tonsillar weights and volumes were also measured. RESULTS: The first formant was noted to rise postoperatively. The average value of F2 and F3 did not alter postoperatively or at 4 weeks. However, it was noted that the fourth formant was not universally present preoperatively but was present in all patients postoperatively and at 4 weeks. CONCLUSIONS: Altering the dimensions of the oropharynx after tonsillectomy causes the first formant to rise but has no effect on the third and fourth formants. However, the fourth formant appears in patients who previously did not demonstrate it. The fourth formant was present in a greater proportion of male patients preoperatively than female patients, but it was universally present postoperatively and at 4 weeks in both sexes. This suggests that increasing the horizontal dimensions of the oropharynx has a nontransient effect on the higher order formants of the voice.

  13. Voice Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... on the vocal cords. Other causes of voice disorders include infections, upward movement of stomach acids into ... throat, growths due to a virus, cancer, and diseases that paralyze the vocal cords. Signs that your ...

  14. A public-professional web-bridge for vaccines and vaccination: user concerns about vaccine safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Basteiro, Alberto L; Alvarez-Pasquín, María-José; Mena, Guillermo; Llupià, Anna; Aldea, Marta; Sequera, Victor-Guillermo; Sanz, Sergi; Tuells, Jose; Navarro-Alonso, José-Antonio; de Arísteguí, Javier; Bayas, José-María

    2012-05-28

    Vacunas.org (http://www.vacunas.org), a website founded by the Spanish Association of Vaccinology offers a personalized service called Ask the Expert, which answers any questions posed by the public or health professionals about vaccines and vaccination. The aim of this study was to analyze the factors associated with questions on vaccination safety and determine the characteristics of questioners and the type of question asked during the period 2008-2010. A total of 1341 questions were finally included in the analysis. Of those, 30% were related to vaccine safety. Questions about pregnant women had 5.01 higher odds of asking about safety (95% CI 2.82-8.93) than people not belonging to any risk group. Older questioners (>50 years) were less likely to ask about vaccine safety compared to younger questioners (OR: 0.44, 95% CI 0.25-0.76). Questions made after vaccination or related to influenza (including H1N1) or travel vaccines were also associated with a higher likelihood of asking about vaccine safety. These results identify risk groups (pregnant women), population groups (older people) and some vaccines (travel and influenza vaccines, including H1N1) where greater efforts to provide improved, more-tailored vaccine information in general and on the Internet are required. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Voice examination in patients with decreased high pitch after thyroidectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sung Won; Kim, Seung Tae; Park, Hyo Sang; Lee, Hyoung Shin; Hong, Jong Chul; Kwon, Soon Bok; Lee, Kang Dae

    2012-06-01

    Decreased high pitch after thyroidectomy due to injury of the external branch of superior laryngeal nerve (EBSLN) may be a critical, especially to professional voice users. The author studied the usefulness of VRP (voice range profile) and MDVP (multi-dimensional voice program) to evaluate patients who have decreased high pitch after thyroidectomy. A study was performed with 58 females and 9 males who underwent voice assessment between January 2008 and June 2009. The patients were classified as the group of female with no decreased high pitch (group A, n = 52), decreased high pitch (group B, n = 6) and the group of male with no decreased high pitch (group C, n = 9). VRP and laryngeal electromyogram (EMG) was performed in group B. The preoperative frequency range of group A and B were statistically not different. In Group B, the result of VRP showed that the frequency range was 443.11 ± 83.97, 246.67 ± 49.41, 181.37 ± 80.13 Hz showing significant decrease after the surgery compared to that of the preoperative result. (P VRP revealed no significant difference between the preoperative and postoperative result. VRP is a noninvasive, quick, and practical test to demonstrate decreased frequency range visually and helps to evaluate EBSLN injury in patient with thyroidectomy.

  16. Keeping Your Voice Healthy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... an ENT Doctor Near You Keeping Your Voice Healthy Keeping Your Voice Healthy Patient Health Information News ... voice-related. Key Steps for Keeping Your Voice Healthy Drink plenty of water. Moisture is good for ...

  17. Prevalence of occupational voice disorders in teachers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angelillo, M; Di Maio, G; Costa, G; Angelillo, N; Barillari, U

    2009-03-01

    In Italy the number of teachers among private and public schools is around one million. Voice disorders are thought to be one of the major occupational hazards of school teaching; in fact the teachers often use their voice with high-intensity, in noisy classes, for a long time and without suitable breaks. The aim of the study was to assess the prevalence of voice problems in teachers of Naples district, identifying risk factors for developing voice pathology. In this study we evaluated 504 teachers (322 F-182 M) with an age ranging between 24 and 62 years, randomly choiced in 28 schools of the district of Naples submitted to a questionnaire to determine the prevalence of voice disorders. In our study we have also introduced a comparison group of not-teachers workers of 402 subjects (244 F-158 M); they were in the same age range as the teacher sample (range: 22-65 years). The control group was also submitted to a questionnaire regarding sociodemographic characteristics, smoking and alcohol use, a self-report of voice problems, voice symptoms, frequency of acute and chronic voice problems, absenteeism due to voice problems. The prevalence of reporting a current voice problem was significantly greater in teachers compared with not-teachers (8.7% vs 2.9%), as the prevalence of voice disorders during their lifetime too (51.4% vs 25.9%), chi2 = 86.672, p teachers group (23.01%) have been forced, during their professional activity, to miss job for problems related to voice; only 22 subjects of control group (5.47%) instead, missed job for voice troubles. This study confirms that teachers have a higher rate of self-reported voice problems than subjects working in other occupations. Teachers, compared with not-teachers, were significantly more likely to have experienced multiple voice symptoms including hoarseness, discomfort while using their voice, difficulty projecting their voice and tiring or change in voice quality after short use. Large proportion of these problems

  18. Voice and choice by delegation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van de Bovenkamp, Hester; Vollaard, Hans; Trappenburg, Margo; Grit, Kor

    2013-02-01

    In many Western countries, options for citizens to influence public services are increased to improve the quality of services and democratize decision making. Possibilities to influence are often cast into Albert Hirschman's taxonomy of exit (choice), voice, and loyalty. In this article we identify delegation as an important addition to this framework. Delegation gives individuals the chance to practice exit/choice or voice without all the hard work that is usually involved in these options. Empirical research shows that not many people use their individual options of exit and voice, which could lead to inequality between users and nonusers. We identify delegation as a possible solution to this problem, using Dutch health care as a case study to explore this option. Notwithstanding various advantages, we show that voice and choice by delegation also entail problems of inequality and representativeness.

  19. Speech masking and cancelling and voice obscuration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holzrichter, John F.

    2013-09-10

    A non-acoustic sensor is used to measure a user's speech and then broadcasts an obscuring acoustic signal diminishing the user's vocal acoustic output intensity and/or distorting the voice sounds making them unintelligible to persons nearby. The non-acoustic sensor is positioned proximate or contacting a user's neck or head skin tissue for sensing speech production information.

  20. Does a Mobile Phone Depression-Screening App Motivate Mobile Phone Users With High Depressive Symptoms to Seek a Health Care Professional's Help?

    Science.gov (United States)

    BinDhim, Nasser F; Alanazi, Eman M; Aljadhey, Hisham; Basyouni, Mada H; Kowalski, Stefan R; Pont, Lisa G; Shaman, Ahmed M; Trevena, Lyndal; Alhawassi, Tariq M

    2016-06-27

    The objective of disease screening is to encourage high-risk subjects to seek health care diagnosis and treatment. Mobile phone apps can effectively screen mental health conditions, including depression. However, it is not known how effective such screening methods are in motivating users to discuss the obtained results of such apps with health care professionals. Does a mobile phone depression-screening app motivate users with high depressive symptoms to seek health care professional advice? This study aimed to address this question. This was a single-cohort, prospective, observational study of a free mobile phone depression app developed in English and released on Apple's App Store. Apple App Store users (aged 18 or above) in 5 countries, that is, Australia, Canada, New Zealand (NZ), the United Kingdom (UK), and the United States (US), were recruited directly via the app's download page. The participants then completed the Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9), and their depression screening score was displayed to them. If their score was 11 or above and they had never been diagnosed with depression before, they were advised to take their results to their health care professional. They were to follow up after 1 month. A group of 2538 participants from the 5 countries completed PHQ-9 depression screening with the app. Of them, 322 participants were found to have high depressive symptoms and had never been diagnosed with depression, and received advice to discuss their results with health care professionals. About 74% of those completed the follow-up; approximately 38% of these self-reported consulting their health care professionals about their depression score. Only positive attitude toward depression as a real disease was associated with increased follow-up response rate (odds ratio (OR) 3.2, CI 1.38-8.29). A mobile phone depression-screening app motivated some users to seek a depression diagnosis. However, further study should investigate how other app users use

  1. The impact of an automated dose-dispensing scheme on user compliance, medication understanding, and medication stockpiles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Anna Bira; Haugbølle, Lotte Stig

    2007-01-01

    ' handling and consumption of medication in terms of compliance behavior, and how does the assumption of user benefits made by health professionals and legislators measure up to users' experiences with ADD? METHODS: The results built on a secondary analysis of 9 qualitative interviews with a varied selection...... the more frequent type of behavior. After switching to ADD, most users experienced no change in understanding of their medications. ADD did not lead to automatic removal of old medications in users' homes; in fact for some users, ADD led to even larger medication stockpiles. Overall, reports from patients...... understanding, nor does it automatically eliminate stockpiles of old medication in users' homes. The gap between the perspectives of users and health professionals makes a compelling case for considering users' voices in the development and implementation of future health technologies....

  2. Leveraging voice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frølunde, Lisbeth

    2017-01-01

    researchers improve our practices and how could digital online video help offer more positive stories about research and higher education? How can academics in higher education be better to tell about our research, thereby reclaiming and leveraging our voice in a post-factual era? As higher education...

  3. Voice Transmission Over JP Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Slavko Šarić

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available Voice transmission over JP networks (Voice over InternetProtocol represents one of the ways in which voice and datanetworks are integrated. The future development is based onthe explosion of the Internet as the means of communication,with the openness of standards and the readiness of the equipmentmanufacturers to accept such standard and to unify it.The service providers find interest in introducing new servicesthat are not based only on voice transmission, but voice becomesonly one of the applications that are realised over the JPnetworks. Voice transmission over the JP technology is at themoment not at the level of the existing quality of services, butthe coming solutions in the near future will enable Vo!P as thestandard operative solution. The advantages are reflected in theincrease of income keeping the current users and attracting newones, investments into infrastructure will maximize the opportunitiesfor packet service development, strengthen customers'loyalty and reduce operative expenditures, the services will bewidespread - long-distance international services or nationalservices of calling cards can be located at almost any European,African, or Central-Eastern count1y and directed to almost100 percent of the population. With the advantages of lowinitial costs of the new POPs (Points of Presence, the serviceproviders can suddenly expand their presence to many countriesor destinations.

  4. Is it time to abandon care planning in mental health services? A qualitative study exploring the views of professionals, service users and carers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, Helen L; Lovell, Karina; Bee, Penny; Sanders, Caroline; Rogers, Anne

    2017-11-16

    It has been established that mental health-care planning does not adequately respond to the needs of those accessing services. Understanding the reasons for this and identifying whose needs care plans serve requires an exploration of the perspectives of service users, carers and professionals within the wider organizational context. To explore the current operationalization of care planning and perceptions of its function within mental health services from the perspectives of multiple stakeholders. Participants included 21 mental health professionals, 29 service users and 4 carers from seven Mental Health Trusts in England. All participants had experience of care planning processes within secondary mental health-care services. Fifty-four semi-structured interviews were conducted with participants and analysed utilizing a qualitative framework approach. Care plans and care planning were characterized by a failure to meet the complexity of mental health needs, and care planning processes were seen to prioritize organizational agendas and risk prevention which distanced care planning from the everyday lives of service users. Care planning is recognized, embedded and well established in the practices of mental health professionals and service users. However, it is considered too superficial and mainly irrelevant to users for managing mental health in their everyday lives. Those responsible for the planning and delivery of mental health services should consider ways to increase the relevance of care planning to the everyday lives of service users including separating risk from holistic needs assessment, using support aids and utilizing a peer workforce in this regard. © 2017 The Authors Health Expectations published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. The experience in the service of Street Clinic in the view of professionals: Contributions to the care for users of alcohol and other drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viviane Cássia Aranda de Souza

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Assistance to users of alcohol and other drugs in Brazil has undergone several transformations owing to historical, social, and political phenomena. In 2009, the Ministry of Health created the ‘Street Clinic’ in order to reduce harm to the homeless and the population vulnerable to use of alcohol or other drugs. The aim of this study was to describe and analyze the experience at a ‘Street Clinic’ from the perspective of the professionals who compose the service team in a municipality located in the metropolitan region of Recife, Pernanbuco state. This is a qualitative study with data collected through semi-structured interviews with five professionals and submitted to qualitative analysis. The content of the interviews explained the dynamic character of the reality experienced by professionals and the time of implementation and consolidation of this service in the city, characterizing the objectives, clientele, user demand, and systematization of actions and difficulties in delivering the service. It was possible to identify similarities between the experiences of the research participants and what is recommended by the Ministry of Health, as well as similarities with other services described in the literature. Furthermore, the data revealed the day to day challenges experienced by the professionals expressed mainly in the difficulties reported in the interviews. The study provided a good basis for the implementation of other Street Clinic teams and the training of professionals, including occupational therapists, to work in this field.

  6. The construction of autonomy for professionals who work with drug users: An analysis of two intervention projects in the largest asylum centre in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conejo, Simone Peixoto; Lisboa, Valéria C A; Caldeira, Adriana R O; Garcia, Marcos R V

    2016-03-01

    Based on results of two intervention projects with professionals working with drug users in Sorocaba, São Paulo, the article discusses the possibilities of health promotion in the field of mental health, understood as a form of resistance to the regulatory powers of official policies. The projects proved to be promising for the construction of autonomy of these workers. The guiding principles of humanized care in health care and respect for human rights of drug users proved to be important tools for these interventions as were university extramural activities. © The Author(s) 2016.

  7. English voices in ‘Text-to-speech tools’: representation of English users and their varieties from a World Englishes perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Karakaş

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available English has experienced grave transformations recently in terms of socio-demographic and geographical characteristics. While such transformations have resulted in diverse types of English uses and various English users, the existing ELT materials still fail to represent the global varieties and dynamic uses and users of English. Moving from a World Englishes perspective, this paper investigates a corpus of online Text-to-Speech tools and software to discuss their suitability for teaching English according to the plurithic view of English, which throws focus on various users and uses of English. Analysed via quantitative content analysis, the data showed that TTS tools promoted the Inner circle (native-English varieties over the Outer and External circle (non-native varieties and non-native accents. In addition, the absolute absence of users from the Expanding circle was observed as no speakers from this circle was available in the tools analysed. The findings suggest that a satisfactory World Englishes perspective has not yet been taken into consideration in the present Text-to-Speech tools. There is, thus, a crucial need for a shift in the design of such tools to get them adjusted to represent different types of English users and uses.

  8. Construction and characterization of a portable sound booth for onsite voice recording.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Christophe E; Tarvin, John T; Richardson, Paul A; Watts, Stephen A; Castellanos, Paul F

    2011-09-01

    The negative effects of environmental noise on sound recordings are recognized in the professional literature. Sound booths and anechoic chambers are examples of controlled acoustical environments widely used in research. However, both enclosures are expensive, require substantial space, and are not portable. Our research has been directed to measuring vocal endurance and voice characteristics of singers before and after sustained voice use. Our desire to acquire high-quality onsite recordings necessitated the development of a portable recording environment. In this article, we report the design, construction, and acoustic characterization of a prototype portable sound box (PSB) to acquire high-quality voice recordings in a controlled, portable acoustical measurement. Simulations were conducted to model the intended use of the PSB by voice users, using two acoustic characterization procedures. The first method showed higher intensity variations by region and depth as frequency changed. For the modified method, intensity response was more uniform and displayed less variation with frequency change. Both methods enabled us to 1) refine the onsite recording procedure, 2) provide insight into potential sources of analysis errors, and 3) develop detailed analysis of frequency intensity response affected by equipment variability. We found that it is possible to construct a PSB for onsite high-quality voice recording.

  9. Acoustic analysis of voice in normal and high pitch phonation: a comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aithal, Venkataraja U; Bellur, Rajashekhar; John, Sunila; Varghese, Ciji; Guddattu, Vasudeva

    2012-01-01

    Comparison of acoustic parameters of voice between normal and high pitch phonation in normal adults, and comparison between genders. A total of 48 normal laryngeal speakers were considered for this study. The acoustic parameters were analyzed using the Multi-Dimensional Voice Program. Descriptive statistics were used for analysis of the acoustic parameters across tasks and genders. Paired-samples t tests were used to compare measures between tasks. Independent-samples t tests were used to compare parameters between genders. Significant differences were found across tasks in the range of fundamental frequency and average fundamental frequency. Females showed a significant difference in the frequency perturbation measures – percent jitter and relative average perturbation, while males demonstrated a significant difference in the noise-to-harmonic ratio. While comparing mean differences between genders, significant differences were observed in fundamental frequency, range of the fundamental frequency, and smoothed pitch perturbation quotient during both phonation tasks. Comparison of acoustic parameters between normal and high pitch phonation would facilitate understanding the effect of high pitch phonation on voice parameters. Subsequently, this would help clinicians to focus on important acoustic parameters while assessing professional voice users who are at risk of developing voice problems.

  10. Healthcare users' experiences of communicating with healthcare professionals about children who have life-limiting conditions: a qualitative systematic review protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekberg, Stuart; Bradford, Natalie; Herbert, Anthony; Danby, Susan; Yates, Patsy

    2015-11-01

    The objective of this review is to identify and synthesize the best international qualitative evidence on healthcare users' experiences of communication with healthcare professionals about children who have life-limiting conditions. For the purposes of this review, "healthcare users" will be taken to include children who have life-limiting conditions and their families. The question to be addressed is:What are healthcare users' experiences of communicating with healthcare professionals about children who have life-limiting conditions? The prospect of the death of a child from an incurable medical condition is harrowing, yet finding a way to discuss this prospect is crucial to maximize the quality of life for such children and their families. High-quality communication is well recognized as a core skill health care professionals need to maximize the quality of care they provide. This skill is valued by service users, who consistently rate it as one of the highest priorities for the care they receive. Evidence suggests, however, that healthcare professionals can feel ill-equipped or uncomfortable communicating with and about such children. Therefore, it is important to understand what represents high-quality communication and what is involved in accomplishing this within pediatric palliative care.In recent decades there has been an increased focus on providing palliative care for children who have life-limiting conditions. These are conditions for which no cure is available and for which the probable outcome is premature death. Palliative care may also be appropriate for children who have life-threatening conditions; these are conditions where there is not only a high probability of premature death but also a chance of long-term survival into adulthood Although pediatric palliative care is underpinned by the same philosophy as adult palliative care, children who have life-limiting conditions and their families have particular needs that distinguish them from users of

  11. Prevalence and Risk Factors of Voice Problems Among Primary School Teachers in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devadas, Usha; Bellur, Rajashekhar; Maruthy, Santosh

    2017-01-01

    Teachers are more prone to develop voice problems (VPs) when compared with other professional voice users. The aim of present study was to investigate the prevalence and risk factors of VPs among primary school teachers in India. Epidemiological cross-sectional survey. Self-reporting questionnaire data were collected from 1082 teachers. Out of 1082 teachers who participated in the present study, 188 teachers reported VPs that account for a prevalence rate of 17.4%. Tired voice after long hours of talking was the most frequently reported symptom, followed by sore/dry throat, strain in voice, neck muscle tension, and difficulty in projecting voice. The adjusted odds ratio values showed number of years of teaching, high background noise levels in the classroom, experiencing psychological stress while teaching classes, improper breath management (holding breath while speaking), poor focus of the tone (clenching jaw/teeth while speaking), upper respiratory tract infection, thyroid problems, and acid reflux as significant risk factors for the development of VPs in the current cohort of teachers. Current results suggest that teachers develop VPs due to multiple risk factors. These factors may be either biological, psychomotor, or environment-related factors. A holistic approach (which could include educating teachers about voice care during their training, and if they develop VP during their career, then managing the VP by taking into consideration different risk factors) addressing all these factors needs to be adopted to prevent VPs in primary school teachers. Copyright © 2017 The Voice Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Emerging perspectives from the hearing voices movement: implications for research and practice

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Corstens, Dirk; Longden, Eleanor; McCarthy-Jones, Simon; Waddingham, Rachel; Thomas, Neil

    2014-01-01

    The international Hearing Voices Movement (HVM) is a prominent mental health service-user/survivor movement that promotes the needs and perspectives of experts by experience in the phenomenon of hearing voices...

  13. Voice Quality Estimation in Wireless Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petr Zach

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This article deals with the impact of Wireless (Wi-Fi networks on the perceived quality of voice services. The Quality of Service (QoS metrics must be monitored in the computer network during the voice data transmission to ensure proper voice service quality the end-user has paid for, especially in the wireless networks. In addition to the QoS, research area called Quality of Experience (QoE provides metrics and methods for quality evaluation from the end-user’s perspective. This article focuses on a QoE estimation of Voice over IP (VoIP calls in the wireless networks using network simulator. Results contribute to voice quality estimation based on characteristics of the wireless network and location of a wireless client.

  14. Why service users do not complain or have 'voice': a mixed-methods study from Nepal's rural primary health care system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurung, Gagan; Derrett, Sarah; Gauld, Robin; Hill, Philip C

    2017-01-25

    Despite abundant literature on the different aspects of health care complaint management systems in high-income countries, little is known about this area in less developed health care systems and most research to date has been conducted in hospital settings. This article seeks to address this gap by reporting on research into complaint systems in primary health care (PHC) settings in Nepal. Using a mixed-methods design, qualitative interviews were conducted with key informants (n = 39) and six community focus groups (n = 56), in the Dang District of Nepal. In addition, interviewer-administered structured questionnaire interviews were held with 400 service users, health facility operation and management committee (HFMC) members and service providers from 22 of the 39 public health facilities. Qualitative data were transcribed, organized and then analyzed using the framework method in QSR NVivo 10, while quantitative data were analyzed using IBM SPSS 22. Despite service users having grievances with the health system, they did not complain frequently: 9% (n = 20) reported ever making complaints about the PHC services. Complaints made were about medicines, health facility opening hours, health facility physical environment, and service providers, and were categorized into environment/equipment, accessibility/availability, level of empathy in the care process and care/safety. Generally, complaints were made verbally to health providers or to HFMC members or female community health volunteers. Use of formal channels such as suggestion boxes or written complaints was almost non-existent. Reasons reported for not complaining included: a lack of complaint channels; lack of knowledge of service entitlements; power asymmetry between service providers and service users; lack of opportunity to choose alternative providers, lack of an established culture of complaining, and a perceived lack of responsiveness to complaints. Very few service users made complaints to

  15. Development and usability testing of a web-based decision support for users and health professionals in psychiatric services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grim, Katarina; Rosenberg, David; Svedberg, Petra; Schön, Ulla-Karin

    2017-09-01

    Shared decision making (SMD) related to treatment and rehabilitation is considered a central component in recovery-oriented practice. Although decision aids are regarded as an essential component for successfully implementing SDM, these aids are often lacking within psychiatric services. The aim of this study was to use a participatory design to facilitate the development of a user-generated, web-based decision aid for individuals receiving psychiatric services. The results of this effort as well as the lessons learned during the development and usability processes are reported. The participatory design included 4 iterative cycles of development. Various qualitative methods for data collection were used with potential end users participating as informants in focus group and individual interviews and as usability and pilot testers. Interviewing and testing identified usability problems that then led to refinements and making the subsequent prototypes increasingly user-friendly and relevant. In each phase of the process, feedback from potential end-users provided guidance in developing the formation of the web-based decision aid that strengthens the position of users by integrating access to information regarding alternative supports, interactivity between staff and users, and user preferences as a continual focus in the tool. This web-based decision aid has the potential to strengthen service users' experience of self-efficacy and control as well as provide staff access to user knowledge and preferences. Studies employing participatory models focusing on usability have potential to significantly contribute to the development and implementation of tools that reflect user perspectives. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  16. Finding the Patient's Voice Using Big Data: Analysis of Users' Health-Related Concerns in the ChaCha Question-and-Answer Service (2009-2012).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priest, Chad; Knopf, Amelia; Groves, Doyle; Carpenter, Janet S; Furrey, Christopher; Krishnan, Anand; Miller, Wendy R; Otte, Julie L; Palakal, Mathew; Wiehe, Sarah; Wilson, Jeffrey

    2016-03-09

    The development of effective health care and public health interventions requires a comprehensive understanding of the perceptions, concerns, and stated needs of health care consumers and the public at large. Big datasets from social media and question-and-answer services provide insight into the public's health concerns and priorities without the financial, temporal, and spatial encumbrances of more traditional community-engagement methods and may prove a useful starting point for public-engagement health research (infodemiology). The objective of our study was to describe user characteristics and health-related queries of the ChaCha question-and-answer platform, and discuss how these data may be used to better understand the perceptions, concerns, and stated needs of health care consumers and the public at large. We conducted a retrospective automated textual analysis of anonymous user-generated queries submitted to ChaCha between January 2009 and November 2012. A total of 2.004 billion queries were read, of which 3.50% (70,083,796/2,004,243,249) were missing 1 or more data fields, leaving 1.934 billion complete lines of data for these analyses. Males and females submitted roughly equal numbers of health queries, but content differed by sex. Questions from females predominantly focused on pregnancy, menstruation, and vaginal health. Questions from males predominantly focused on body image, drug use, and sexuality. Adolescents aged 12-19 years submitted more queries than any other age group. Their queries were largely centered on sexual and reproductive health, and pregnancy in particular. The private nature of the ChaCha service provided a perfect environment for maximum frankness among users, especially among adolescents posing sensitive health questions. Adolescents' sexual health queries reveal knowledge gaps with serious, lifelong consequences. The nature of questions to the service provides opportunities for rapid understanding of health concerns and may

  17. [A mental health awareness anti-stigma program including user-trainers has a significant impact on knowledge, beliefs and attitudes of job centre professionals in Paris].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jouet, E; Moineville, M; Favriel, S; Leriche, P; Greacen, T

    2014-04-01

    Developing programs and actions to fight stigma and discrimination against people living with mental disorders is a priority both internationally and in France. Involving mental health service users in these anti-stigma programs has proved to be a key element for effective programs. The present study evaluates the impact of user-trainers in an anti-stigma campaign with job counselors on their knowledge, beliefs, and desire for social distance with regard to mental illness and the mentally ill. Eighty-nine professionals participated in eight mental health awareness days from December 2008 to June 2009. Each training day was built around two pedagogical units: firstly, a psychiatrist providing a theoretical overview of mental illness and care and secondly, user-trainers describing their point of view on mental illness and exchanging with participants. A questionnaire administered at the beginning and at the end of the mental health awareness day assessed the impact of the day on participants' knowledge, beliefs, and desire for social distance. Answers to open questions were evaluated using thematic qualitative analysis. The intervention had statistically significant positive effects on all three training objectives: knowledge, beliefs and desire for social distance. Analysis of qualitative data confirmed participants' need for information and training with regard to providing support to clients with mental health problems; participants frequently attributed their improved self-confidence at the end of the day with regard to providing job coaching for this population group to the presence of user-trainers. A mental health awareness day using mental health service users and psychiatrists as trainers had significant positive effects in terms of reducing stigma with regard to people with mental illness. Further research is needed to understand whether the impact of such awareness approaches can be maintained in everyday professional practice over time. Copyright © 2013

  18. A cluster randomised controlled trial and process evaluation of a training programme for mental health professionals to enhance user involvement in care planning in service users with severe mental health issues (EQUIP): study protocol for a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bower, Peter; Roberts, Chris; O'Leary, Neil; Callaghan, Patrick; Bee, Penny; Fraser, Claire; Gibbons, Chris; Olleveant, Nicola; Rogers, Anne; Davies, Linda; Drake, Richard; Sanders, Caroline; Meade, Oonagh; Grundy, Andrew; Walker, Lauren; Cree, Lindsey; Berzins, Kathryn; Brooks, Helen; Beatty, Susan; Cahoon, Patrick; Rolfe, Anita; Lovell, Karina

    2015-08-13

    Involving service users in planning their care is at the centre of policy initiatives to improve mental health care quality in England. Whilst users value care planning and want to be more involved in their own care, there is substantial empirical evidence that the majority of users are not fully involved in the care planning process. Our aim is to evaluate the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of training for mental health professionals in improving user involvement with the care planning processes. This is a cluster randomised controlled trial of community mental health teams in NHS Trusts in England allocated either to a training intervention to improve user and carer involvement in care planning or control (no training and care planning as usual). We will evaluate the effectiveness of the training intervention using a mixed design, including a 'cluster cohort' sample, a 'cluster cross-sectional' sample and process evaluation. Service users will be recruited from the caseloads of care co-ordinators. The primary outcome will be change in self-reported involvement in care planning as measured by the validated Health Care Climate Questionnaire. Secondary outcomes include involvement in care planning, satisfaction with services, medication side-effects, recovery and hope, mental health symptoms, alliance/engagement, well-being and quality of life. Cost- effectiveness will also be measured. A process evaluation informed by implementation theory will be undertaken to assess the extent to which the training was implemented and to gauge sustainability beyond the time-frame of the trial. It is hoped that the trial will generate data to inform mental health care policy and practice on care planning. ISRCTN16488358 (14 May 2014).

  19. Epidemiology of Voice Disorders in Latvian School Teachers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trinite, Baiba

    2017-07-01

    The prevalence of voice disorders in the teacher population in Latvia has not been studied so far and this is the first epidemiological study whose goal is to investigate the prevalence of voice disorders and their risk factors in this professional group. A wide cross-sectional study using stratified sampling methodology was implemented in the general education schools of Latvia. The self-administered voice risk factor questionnaire and the Voice Handicap Index were completed by 522 teachers. Two teachers groups were formed: the voice disorders group which included 235 teachers with actual voice problems or problems during the last 9 months; and the control group which included 174 teachers without voice disorders. Sixty-six percent of teachers gave a positive answer to the following question: Have you ever had problems with your voice? Voice problems are more often found in female than male teachers (68.2% vs 48.8%). Music teachers suffer from voice disorders more often than teachers of other subjects. Eighty-two percent of teachers first faced voice problems in their professional carrier. The odds of voice disorders increase if the following risk factors exist: extra vocal load, shouting, throat clearing, neglecting of personal health, background noise, chronic illnesses of the upper respiratory tract, allergy, job dissatisfaction, and regular stress in the working place. The study findings indicated a high risk of voice disorders among Latvian teachers. The study confirmed data concerning the multifactorial etiology of voice disorders. Copyright © 2017 The Voice Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Vocal effort and voice handicap among teachers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampaio, Márcio Cardoso; dos Reis, Eduardo José Farias Borges; Carvalho, Fernando Martins; Porto, Lauro Antonio; Araújo, Tânia Maria

    2012-11-01

    The relationship between voice handicap and professional vocal effort was investigated among teachers in a cross-sectional study of census nature on 4496 teachers within the public elementary education network in Salvador, Bahia, Brazil. Voice handicap (the outcome of interest) was evaluated using the Voice Handicap Index 10. The main exposure, the lifetime vocal effort index, was obtained as the product of the number of years working as a teacher multiplied by the mean weekly working hours. The prevalence of voice handicap was 28.8% among teachers with high professional vocal effort and 21.3% among those with acceptable vocal effort, thus yielding a crude prevalence ratio (PR) of 1.36 (95% confidence interval [CI]=1.14-1.61). In the final logistic model, the prevalence of voice handicap was statistically associated with the professional vocal effort index (PR=1.47; 95% CI=1.19-1.82), adjusted according to sex, microphone availability in the classroom, excessive noise, pressure from the school management, heartburn, and rhinitis. Copyright © 2012 The Voice Foundation. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. About Your Voice

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... or dull pain associated with voice use. Other voice problems may accompany a change in singing ability that is most notable in the upper singing range. A more serious problem is indicated by spitting up blood or when ... Voice? Voice changes sometimes follow an upper respiratory infection ...

  2. El producto de la atención primaria definido por profesionales y usuarios Primary health care product defined by health professionals and users

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enriqueta Pujol Ribera

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Objetivo: Definir los componentes del producto de la atención primaria de salud (APS a partir de las opiniones de profesionales y usuarios, para establecer indicadores de evaluación. Métodos: Estudio con metodología cualitativa, con técnicas grupales: grupo nominal (profesionales y grupos focales (usuarios. Ámbito de realización: APS de Catalunya. Se realizaron 7 grupos: a médicos de familia y pediatras; b enfermeras y trabajadoras sociales; c personal de la unidad de admisión y atención al usuario; d otros médicos especialistas; e usuarios, y f gestores, farmacéuticos y farmacólogos y técnicos de salud. Los participantes respondieron a la pregunta: «Respecto a los servicios que debería ofrecer la APS, ¿cuáles son los aspectos que se deberían valorar?». Se realizó un análisis de contenido. Los datos textuales se descompusieron en unidades, posteriormente agrupadas en categorías, siguiendo el criterio de analogía. Se tuvo en cuenta el contexto de interpretación del equipo investigador. Resultados: Profesionales y usuarios identifican 4 dimensiones del producto de la APS, coincidentes con sus atributos básicos: a accesibilidad a los servicios; b coordinación y continuidad del equipo de APS con otros niveles asistenciales; c relación entre profesionales y usuarios, y d calidad científico-técnica de los equipos de atención primaria y cartera de servicios. Equidad, satisfacción y eficiencia aparecen en los discursos como ejes transversales de todos los componentes del producto identificados. Conclusión: Hay una gran coincidencia en la definición del producto entre profesionales y usuarios. La relación profesional-paciente aparece como un elemento clave en todos los grupos. Estas 4 dimensiones deberían formar parte de la evaluación de los equipos de APS.Objective: To identify the components of the primary health care (PHC product defined by health professionals and users in order to establish indicators for

  3. Validation and Adaptation of the Singing Voice Handicap Index for Egyptian Singing Voice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abou-Elsaad, Tamer; Baz, Hemmat; Afsah, Omayma; Abo-Elsoud, Hend

    2017-01-01

    Measuring the severity of a voice disorder is difficult. This can be achieved by both subjective and objective measures. The Voice Handicap Index is the most known and used self-rating tool for voice disorders. The Classical Singing Handicap Index (CSHI) is a self-administered questionnaire measuring the impact of vocal deviation on the quality of life of singers. The objective of this study was to develop an Arabic version of the CSHI and to test its validity and reliability in Egyptian singers with different singing styles with normal voice and with voice disorders. The interpreted version was administered to 70 Egyptian singers including artistic singers (classical and popular) and specialized singers (Quran reciters and priests) who were divided into 40 asymptomatic singers (control group) and 30 singers with voice disorders. Participants' responses were statistically analyzed to assess the validity and reliability, and to compare the patient group with the control group. Quran reciters, patients with no previous professional training, and patients with vocal fold lesions demonstrated the highest scores. The Arabic version of CSHI is found to be a reliable, valid, and sensitive self-assessment tool that can be used in the clinical practice for the evaluation of the impact of voice disorders on singing voice. Copyright © 2017 The Voice Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. The needs of people with dementia living at home from user, caregiver and professional perspectives: a cross-sectional survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miranda-Castillo Claudia

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Few reports have been published about differences in perspectives on perceived needs among community-residing people with dementia, their family caregivers, and professionals. The aim of this study was to compare these perspectives. Method During 2006 and 2007, one-hundred and fifty two interviews of people with dementia and their caregivers about the needs of the person with dementia were performed by four professionals using The Camberwell Assessment of Need for the Elderly (CANE. Professionals’ views on met and unmet needs of people with dementia were obtained for the total sample, family caregivers’ perspectives were gained for 125 people with dementia, and people with dementia’s views on their own needs were obtained for 125 persons with dementia. Results People with dementia reported fewer needs compared with the reports of their caregivers and the professionals. The most frequent unmet needs reported by people with dementia, caregivers and professionals were in the areas of daytime activities, company, and psychological distress; however, people with dementia rated psychological distress as the commonest unmet need. Conclusions Since the priorities of people with dementia can be different from those of caregivers and professionals, it is important to consider all perspectives when making care plans. Thus, compliance with treatment of people with dementia and also their quality of life could be potentially improved by a more collaborative partnership with them.

  5. Alexa, Siri, Cortana, and More: An Introduction to Voice Assistants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoy, Matthew B

    2018-01-01

    Voice assistants are software agents that can interpret human speech and respond via synthesized voices. Apple's Siri, Amazon's Alexa, Microsoft's Cortana, and Google's Assistant are the most popular voice assistants and are embedded in smartphones or dedicated home speakers. Users can ask their assistants questions, control home automation devices and media playback via voice, and manage other basic tasks such as email, to-do lists, and calendars with verbal commands. This column will explore the basic workings and common features of today's voice assistants. It will also discuss some of the privacy and security issues inherent to voice assistants and some potential future uses for these devices. As voice assistants become more widely used, librarians will want to be familiar with their operation and perhaps consider them as a means to deliver library services and materials.

  6. Evaluating voice characteristics of first-year acting students in Israel: factor analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amir, Ofer; Primov-Fever, Adi; Kushnir, Tami; Kandelshine-Waldman, Osnat; Wolf, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Acting students require diverse, high-quality, and high-intensity vocal performance from early stages of their training. Demanding vocal activities, before developing the appropriate vocal skills, put them in high risk for developing vocal problems. A retrospective analysis of voice characteristics of first-year acting students using several voice evaluation tools. A total of 79 first-year acting students (55 women and 24 men) were assigned into two study groups: laryngeal findings (LFs) and no laryngeal findings, based on stroboscopic findings. Their voice characteristics were evaluated using acoustic analysis, aerodynamic examination, perceptual scales, and self-report questionnaires. Results obtained from each set of measures were examined using a factor analysis approach. Significant differences between the two groups were found for a single fundamental frequency (F(0))-Regularity factor; a single Grade, Roughness, Breathiness, Asthenia, Strain perceptual factor; and the three self-evaluation factors. Gender differences were found for two acoustic analysis factors, which were based on F(0) and its derivatives, namely an aerodynamic factor that represents expiratory volume measurements and a single self-evaluation factor that represents the tendency to seek therapy. Approximately 50% of the first-year acting students had LFs. These students differed from their peers in the control group in a single acoustic analysis factor, as well as perceptual and self-report factors. No group differences, however, were found for the aerodynamic factors. Early laryngeal examination and voice evaluation of future professional voice users could provide a valuable individual baseline, to which later examinations could be compared, and assist in providing personally tailored treatment. Copyright © 2013 The Voice Foundation. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Veterans' voices: use of the American Customer Satisfaction Index (ACSI) Survey to identify My HealtheVet personal health record users' characteristics, needs, and preferences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazi, Kim M

    2010-01-01

    Consumer research reveals considerable interest in the use of Personal Health Records (PHRs), yet adoption remains relatively low. Both adopters and nonadopters represent important perspectives from which to understand this paradox. This study focuses on direct feedback from adopters obtained using the American Customer Satisfaction Index (ACSI) survey on the My HealtheVet PHR portal (http://www.myhealth.va.gov) of the Veterans Health Administration (VHA). The results represent a source of direct feedback with which to better understand veterans' needs and preferences. The ACSI Survey was implemented in October 2007 to measure satisfaction and elicit information about characteristics and preferences of My HealtheVet PHR adopters. The data represent a continuous random sample of site visitors who have navigated at least four pages on the site. A total of 100 617 surveys were completed (17.2%). Satisfaction with My HealtheVet is high (8.3/10.0), and users are highly likely to return to the site (8.6/10.0) and recommend the site to other veterans (9.1/10.0). The majority of system adopters are male (91%), between the ages of 51 and 70 (68%), and served in the Vietnam War (60%). Most veterans currently visit the site to utilize pharmacy-related features. VHA has used the ACSI to monitor satisfaction, and to better understand the characteristics, needs, and preferences of early adopters. The data provide an important source of direct feedback to inform program development. Future research will include monitoring the impact of enhancements and new features on satisfaction, and conducting additional research with nonadopters to identify barriers to adoption and use.

  8. Veterans' voices: use of the American Customer Satisfaction Index (ACSI) Survey to identify My HealtheVet personal health record users' characteristics, needs, and preferences

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background Consumer research reveals considerable interest in the use of Personal Health Records (PHRs), yet adoption remains relatively low. Both adopters and nonadopters represent important perspectives from which to understand this paradox. Objective This study focuses on direct feedback from adopters obtained using the American Customer Satisfaction Index (ACSI) survey on the My HealtheVet PHR portal (http://www.myhealth.va.gov) of the Veterans Health Administration (VHA). The results represent a source of direct feedback with which to better understand veterans' needs and preferences. Methods The ACSI Survey was implemented in October 2007 to measure satisfaction and elicit information about characteristics and preferences of My HealtheVet PHR adopters. The data represent a continuous random sample of site visitors who have navigated at least four pages on the site. A total of 100 617 surveys were completed (17.2%). Results Satisfaction with My HealtheVet is high (8.3/10.0), and users are highly likely to return to the site (8.6/10.0) and recommend the site to other veterans (9.1/10.0). The majority of system adopters are male (91%), between the ages of 51 and 70 (68%), and served in the Vietnam War (60%). Most veterans currently visit the site to utilize pharmacy-related features. Conclusion VHA has used the ACSI to monitor satisfaction, and to better understand the characteristics, needs, and preferences of early adopters. The data provide an important source of direct feedback to inform program development. Future research will include monitoring the impact of enhancements and new features on satisfaction, and conducting additional research with nonadopters to identify barriers to adoption and use. PMID:20190065

  9. The Role of Mental Health Professionals in the Prevention and Treatment of Child Abuse and Neglect. The User Manual Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Marilyn Strachan; Urquiza, Anthony J.

    This manual is intended to provide mental health professionals with the information needed in the evaluation and treatment of maltreated children and their families. An introductory chapter briefly considers the roles of the various mental health disciplines in child abuse intervention, including psychiatry, psychology, clinical social work,…

  10. The Continuing Saga of Professional End-Users: Law Students Search DIALOG at the University of Florida.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanderson, Rosalie M.

    1990-01-01

    Discussion of end-user searching of online systems focuses on a study conducted at the University of Florida College of Law to determine the usefulness of DIALOG in a law school setting. Training needs are discussed, and search techniques for DIALOG are compared with those for LEXIS and Westlaw. (Four references) (LRW)

  11. Student Voice in High School: An Action Research Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Termini, Lorraine

    2013-01-01

    This action research study examined the effects of student voice in one high school and the self-reflection of the researcher-administrator involved in the effort. Using three cycles of action research, the researcher-administrator completed a pilot study, implemented a student voice project in one class, and developed a professional development…

  12. A Training Model for Improving Journalists' Voice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodero, Emma; Diaz-Rodriguez, Celia; Larrea, Olatz

    2017-06-06

    Voice education is a crucial aspect for professionals (journalists, teachers, politicians, actors, etc.) who use their voices as a working tool. The main concerns about such education are that, first, there is little awareness of the importance of voice education, and second there is little research devoted to it. The consequences of this lack of training are indeed visible in professionals who suffer voice pathologies or work with little effectiveness. This study seeks to overcome this deficiency by proposing a training model tested with a control group and a pilot study. Speech samples from a group of experimental participants-journalism students-were collected before and after a training course designed to improve their main vocal and prosodic features. These samples were contrasted with a control group without training. Results indicated significant differences in all tested voice elements (breathing, articulation, loudness, pitch, jitter, speech rate, pauses, and stress) except for shimmer and harmonics. The participants were able to enhance their main vocal and prosodic elements, and therefore their expressiveness maintaining optimal vocal hygiene. Copyright © 2017 The Voice Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Reliability in perceptual analysis of voice quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bele, Irene Velsvik

    2005-12-01

    This study focuses on speaking voice quality in male teachers (n = 35) and male actors (n = 36), who represent untrained and trained voice users, because we wanted to investigate normal and supranormal voices. In this study, both substantial and methodologic aspects were considered. It includes a method for perceptual voice evaluation, and a basic issue was rater reliability. A listening group of 10 listeners, 7 experienced speech-language therapists, and 3 speech-language therapist students evaluated the voices by 15 vocal characteristics using VA scales. Two sets of voice signals were investigated: text reading (2 loudness levels) and sustained vowel (3 levels). The results indicated a high interrater reliability for most perceptual characteristics. Connected speech was evaluated more reliably, especially at the normal level, but both types of voice signals were evaluated reliably, although the reliability for connected speech was somewhat higher than for vowels. Experienced listeners tended to be more consistent in their ratings than did the student raters. Some vocal characteristics achieved acceptable reliability even with a smaller panel of listeners. The perceptual characteristics grouped in 4 factors reflected perceptual dimensions.

  14. Sounds of Education: Teacher Role and Use of Voice in Interactions with Young Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, Anette Boye

    2017-01-01

    Voice is a basic tool in communication between adults. However, in early educational settings, adult professionals use their voices in different paralinguistic ways when they communicate with children. A teacher's use of voice is important because it serves to communicate attitudes and emotions in ways that are often ignored in early childhood…

  15. Service user perspectives on palliative care education for health and social care professionals supporting people with learning disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLaughlin, Dorry; Barr, Owen; McIlfatrick, Sonja; McConkey, Roy

    2015-12-01

    Evidence from European and American studies indicates limited referrals of people with learning (intellectual) disabilities to palliative care services. Although professionals' perceptions of their training needs in this area have been studied, the perceptions of people with learning disabilities and family carers are not known. This study aimed to elicit the views of people with learning disabilities, and their family carers concerning palliative care, to inform healthcare professional education and training. A qualitative, exploratory design was used. A total of 17 people with learning disabilities were recruited to two focus groups which took place within an advocacy network. Additionally, three family carers of someone with a learning disability, requiring palliative care, and two family carers who had been bereaved recently were also interviewed. Combined data identified the perceived learning needs for healthcare professionals. Three subthemes emerged: 'information and preparation', 'provision of care' and 'family-centred care'. This study shows that people with learning disabilities can have conversations about death and dying, and their preferred end-of-life care, but require information that they can understand. They also need to have people around familiar to them and with them. Healthcare professionals require skills and knowledge to effectively provide palliative care for people with learning disabilities and should also work in partnership with their family carers who have expertise from their long-term caring role. These findings have implications for educators and clinicians. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  16. Clinical phase I/feasibility study of the next generation indwelling Provox voice prosthesis (Provox Vega).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilgers, Frans J M; Ackerstaff, Annemieke H; van Rossum, Maya; Jacobi, Irene; Balm, Alfons J M; Tan, I Bing; van den Brekel, Michiel W M

    2010-04-01

    Provox Vega prostheses demonstrate good short-term feasibility, and their optimized airflow-resistance design offers laryngectomy patients indwelling voice prostheses with more choices in outer diameters without sacrificing (too) much in voice quality. Technological progress enables improvement of in vitro airflow characteristics of voice prostheses and design of voice prostheses with smaller outer diameters. This could potentially improve voice quality in users of Provox2, and avoid diminished voice quality in users of prostheses with smaller outer diameters. This was a prospective clinical phase I/feasibility study of three newly designed indwelling voice prostheses (Provox Vega 22.5 (Provox2 successor), 20, and 17Fr). Assessments consisted of patients' self-reported voice and speech, perceptual evaluation, acoustic analysis, maximum phonation time, loudness, speech rate, pull-out force and adaptation of the tracheoesophageal (TE) puncture to smaller diameter voice prostheses. Vega 22.5 was assessed in 15 patients (all Provox ActiValve users, observation period 3 weeks), and 16 patients with Vega 20/17 (2 weeks each). No voice prostheses problems were encountered. Half of the patients with Vega 22.5 preferred that for its better voice quality. Voice and speech were considered equal to Provox2 for Vega 20, but slightly less for Vega 17. Most TE punctures adapted well to the smaller diameter voice prostheses.

  17. Toward Better Collaboration in the Education of Students with Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders: Integrating the Voices of Teachers, Administrators, Caregivers, and Allied Professionals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenelle Marie Job

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available This exploratory study addresses the call for an increased presence of key stakeholders’ perspectives in educational research involving students with Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders (FASDs (Duquette, Stodel, Fullarton, & Hagglund, 2006a. Specifically, greater understandings are necessary to support the educational success of students with FASDs. The analysis of 11 focus groups and 3 interviews with teachers, administrators, caregivers, and allied professionals (total n = 60 revealed three themes: fostering relationships, reframing practices, and accessing supports. These findings have important implications for the use of a qualitaitve approach in generating evidenced-based educational practices for stakeholders reflective of enhanced communication and collaboration that better meet the needs of students with FASDs.

  18. The Aging Voice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamrul Hassan Tarafder

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Aging of voice is an unseen issue perceived by sounding ‘old’. This involves a widespread change throughout the upper and lower airway mainly affected by the change in anatomy and physiology of vocal fold/cord. Thinning of laryngeal mucosa, atrophy of vocal muscles, reduced movement of cricoarytenoid joint, reduced lung volume and capacities; reduced movement of tongue, jaw as well systemic conditions may all affect the normal voice in older ages. Higher pitch voice in men, lower pitch voice in women, ‘thin’ voice, vocal fatigue, difficulty in being heard in noisy situations, tremor or shakiness in the voice are common changes found in old people. Various pathological conditions of larynx may cause voice change similar to aging voice. This can be differentiated endoscopically by an experienced Otolaryngologist. Avoidance of smoking, shouting, gastric reflux, resting the throat during a cold attack are simple measures that can delay aging process of our voice. ‘Voice related quality of life index’ is a quick & easy measurement of voice quality based on changes in last two weeks. Voice therapy and phonosurgery with injectable materials in vocal fold can improve the voice in advanced age.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3329/bsmmuj.v5i1.11033 BSMMU J 2012; 5(1:83-86 

  19. Qualitative and quantitative measurement of the singing voice

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Cesari, U; Iengo, M; Apisa, P

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the study was to clarify the mechanisms underlying the singing voice. Forty-eight professional opera singers underwent flexible and rigid endoscopy, spectrographic analysis and perceptual evaluation...

  20. Voice Recognition Technology: Has It Come of Age?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph R. Zumalt

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Voice recognition software allows computer users to bypass their keyboards and use their voices to enter text. While the library literature is somewhat silent about voice recognition technology, the medical and legal communities have reported some success using it. Voice recognition software was tested for dictation accuracy and usability within an agriculture library at the University of Illinois. Dragon NaturallySpeaking 8.0 was found to be more accurate than speech recognition within Microsoft Office 2003. Helpful Web sites and a short history regarding this breakthrough technology are included.

  1. The Aging Voice

    OpenAIRE

    Kamrul Hassan Tarafder; Pran Gopal Datta; Ahmed Tariq

    2012-01-01

    Aging of voice is an unseen issue perceived by sounding ‘old’. This involves a widespread change throughout the upper and lower airway mainly affected by the change in anatomy and physiology of vocal fold/cord. Thinning of laryngeal mucosa, atrophy of vocal muscles, reduced movement of cricoarytenoid joint, reduced lung volume and capacities; reduced movement of tongue, jaw as well systemic conditions may all affect the normal voice in older ages. Higher pitch voice in men, lower pitch voice ...

  2. Writing with Voice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kesler, Ted

    2012-01-01

    In this Teaching Tips article, the author argues for a dialogic conception of voice, based in the work of Mikhail Bakhtin. He demonstrates a dialogic view of voice in action, using two writing examples about the same topic from his daughter, a fifth-grade student. He then provides five practical tips for teaching a dialogic conception of voice in…

  3. Voice radio communication, pedestrian localization, and the tactical use of 3D audio

    OpenAIRE

    Nilsson, John-Olof; Schüldt, Christian; Händel, Peter

    2013-01-01

    The relation between voice radio communication and pedestrian localization is studied. 3D audio is identified as a linking technology which brings strong mutual benefits. Voice communication rendered with 3D audio provides a potential low secondary task interference user interface to the localization information. Vice versa, location information in the 3D audio provides spatial cues in the voice communication, improving speech intelligibility. An experimental setup with voice radio communicat...

  4. Prevalence of voice symptoms and risk factors in teacher students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohlsson, Ann-Christine; Andersson, Eva M; Södersten, Maria; Simberg, Susanna; Barregård, Lars

    2012-09-01

    Teacher students seem to have low awareness of the vocal demands in their future professions, and students with vocal symptoms are at risk for developing voice disorders during their professional careers. The purpose of the present study was to determine the prevalence of voice problems in teacher students at the very beginning of their education at the university. Of 1636 students approached in the first couple of days, 1250 (76%) answered two questionnaires about voice symptoms, Screen6 and Swedish Voice Handicap Index (Sw-VHI), and one questionnaire about potential risk factors. A majority of the students were women, and their mean age was 23 years (range, 18-52 years). The results showed that 208 of 1250 students (17%) had voice problems, defined as at least two symptoms weekly or more often in Screen6. The proportion of women was larger in the group with voice problems than in the group without voice problems. Significant risk factors for voice problems were vocal fold problems in childhood and adulthood, frequent throat infections, airborne allergy, smoking, hearing problems, previous work as teacher or leader, voice demanding hobbies, and previous speech therapy or voice training. There was a clear association between the number of potential vocal risk factors and the number of voice symptoms. There was also a strong association between the scores of the two questionnaires, the Sw-VHI and the Screen6. Students with voice problems according to Screen6 scored 23.1 (mean Sw-VHI) compared with 7.8 for students without voice problems. Copyright © 2012 The Voice Foundation. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. User acceptability of the diagnosis of prolonged grief disorder: How do professionals think about inclusion in ICD-11?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietl, Leonie; Wagner, Birgit; Fydrich, Thomas

    2018-03-15

    For the next edition of the International Statistical Classification of Diseases (ICD-11) it is proposed to include prolonged grief disorder as a new diagnosis. The diagnosis describes persistent intensive and disabling grief reactions to bereavement (WHO, 2016b). The aim of the present survey was to determine the extent to which the diagnosis is accepted by practitioners in the healthcare and psychosocial field. A total of 2088 German-speaking professionals in the fields of psychotherapy, psychology, counselling, medicine and palliative care completed the online survey. 42.4% of the participants felt that the advantages of including the diagnosis outweigh the disadvantages, 32.9% came to the conclusion that there are more disadvantages. The remaining 24.7% stated that advantages and disadvantages are balanced. The proposed classification as separate diagnosis was supported by 24.8%, while 60.0% preferred alternatives (e.g. as subtype of adjustment disorder). Furthermore, a time criterion of at least 12 months was voted for considerably more frequently (49.2%) than the proposed 6 months (11.3%). Objections were predominantly expressed with regard to pathologization of normal grief and to the difficulty of adequate crosscultural application of the diagnosis. Results are limited to predominantly German health-care professionals. The items did not undergo psychometric analyses. The disagreement about the diagnosis found in specialist literature is also reflected in the responses by the participants. The present results provide stimulation for future questions and validation studies carried out as part of the ICD revision. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Key messages for communicating information about BRCA1 and BRCA2 to women with breast or ovarian cancer: Consensus across health professionals and service users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Chris; Pichert, Gabriella; Harris, Jackie; Tucker, Kathy; Michie, Susan

    2017-11-01

    Genetic testing of cancer predisposing genes will increasingly be needed in oncology clinics to target cancer treatment. This Delphi study aimed to identify areas of agreement and disagreement between genetics and oncology health professionals and service users about the key messages required by women with breast/ovarian cancer who undergo BRCA1/BRCA2 genetic testing and the optimal timing of communicating key messages. Participants were 16 expert health professionals specialising in oncology/genetics and 16 service users with breast/ovarian cancer and a pathogenic BRCA1/BRCA2 variant. Online questionnaires containing 53 inductively developed information messages were circulated to the groups separately. Participants rated each message as key/not key on a Likert scale and suggested additional messages. Questionnaires were modified according to the feedback and up to 3 rounds were circulated. Consensus was reached when there was ≥75% agreement. Thirty key messages were agreed by both groups with 7 of the key messages agreed by ≥95% of participants: dominant inheritance, the availability of predictive testing, the importance of pretest discussion, increased risk of breast and ovarian cancer, and the option of risk-reducing mastectomy and bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy. Both groups agreed that key messages should be communicated before genetic testing and once a pathogenic variant has been identified. There was a high level of agreement within and between the groups about the information requirements of women with breast/ovarian cancer about BRCA1/BRCA2. These key messages will be helpful in developing new approaches to the delivery of information as genetic testing becomes further integrated into mainstream oncology services. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. The voice-hearer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods, Angela

    2013-06-01

    For 25 years, the international Hearing Voices Movement and the U.K. Hearing Voices Network have campaigned to improve the lives of people who hear voices. In doing so, they have introduced a new term into the mental health lexicon: "the voice-hearer." This article offers a "thick description" of the figure of "the voice-hearer." A selection of prominent texts (life narratives, research papers, videos and blogs), the majority produced by people active in the Hearing Voices or consumer/survivor/ex-patient movements, were analysed from an interdisciplinary medical humanities perspective. "The voice-hearer" (i) asserts voice-hearing as a meaningful experience, (ii) challenges psychiatric authority and (iii) builds identity through sharing life narrative. While technically accurate, the definition of "the voice-hearer" as simply "a person who has experienced voice-hearing or auditory verbal hallucinations" fails to acknowledge that this is a complex, politically resonant and value-laden identity. The figure of "the voice-hearer" comes into being through a specific set of narrative practices as an "expert by experience" who challenges the authority and diagnostic categories of mainstream psychiatry, especially the category of "schizophrenia."

  8. [Voice disorders in childhood].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider-Stickler, B

    2012-07-01

    Voice disorders in the pediatric population are relatively common. The education of families, teachers and clinical staff on etiology and treatment of pediatric voice disorders have led to greater attention being paid to hoarseness in childhood and improving early detection of pediatric voice disorders. Pediatric voice problems can have a number of causes. Most commonly, childhood dysphonia is caused by vocal fold nodules due vocal ab- and misuse. Other reasons might be congenital laryngeal dysplasia, vocal fold cysts and laryngeal papilloma. Medical examination is necessary in order to initiate appropriate treatment. In the case of vocal fold cysts and laryngeal papilloma, phonosurgery is indicated. Vocal fold nodules should be treated by voice therapy in order to change vocal behaviour. If voice therapy fails, phonosurgical intervention is recommended, since vocal fold nodules can persist into adulthood with a negative impact on voice quality.

  9. Users’ Perceived Difficulties and Corresponding Reformulation Strategies in Google Voice Search

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Jeng

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In this article, we report users’ perceptions of query input errors and query reformulation strategies in voice search using data collected through a laboratory user study. Our results reveal that: 1 users’ perceived obstacles during a voice search can be related to speech recognition errors and topic complexity; 2 users naturally develop different strategies to deal with various types of words (e.g., acronyms, single-worded queries, non-English words with high error rates in speech recognition; and 3 users can have various emotional reactions when encounter voice input errors and they develop preferred usage occasions for voice search.

  10. The opinions of injecting drug user (IDUs) HIV patients and health professionals on access to antiretroviral treatment and health services in Valencia, Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia de la Hera, Manuela; Davo, Maria Carmen; Ballester-Añón, Rosa; Vioque, Jesus

    2011-09-01

    The benefits of HIV treatment (Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy [HAART]) have been less apparent in injecting drug users (IDUs), most probably as a result of poor adherence to treatment. We explored factors related to HIV treatment adherence as reported by 23 IDU-HIV patients and nine health professionals from healthcare services in Alicante and Valencia, Spain. We carried out a qualitative study based on personal interviews. Health professionals reported the lack of coordination among hospital services and difficulties in accessibility to nonspecialized services for IDU-HIV patients as relevant factors for treatment adherence. Their perception of a patient's likelihood of treatment adherence was also considered to influence the decision to prescribe HAART. A better treatment adherence was reported by those IDU-HIV patients with a good doctor-patient relationship and by women with family responsibilities. Patients considered the side effects of HIV treatment, the lack of social support, and the active use of recreational drugs as relevant factors to explain incompliance. Interventions and training of health providers should be aimed at the reduction of barriers in patient-provider communication and the overcoming of stereotypes, thus avoiding discriminatory attitudes in treatment in this vulnerable population.

  11. A socially inclusive approach to user participation in higher education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simons, Lucy; Tee, Steve; Lathlean, Judith; Burgess, Abigail; Herbert, Lesley; Gibson, Colin

    2007-05-01

    This paper is a report of a study to evaluate the development of an innovative Service User Academic post in mental health nursing in relation to student learning and good employment practice in terms of social inclusion. Institutions providing professional mental health education are usually expected to demonstrate user involvement in the design, delivery and evaluation of their educational programmes to ensure that user voices are central to the development of clinical practice. Involvement can take many forms but not everyone values user knowledge as equal to other sources of knowledge. This can lead to users feeling exploited, rather than fully integrated in healthcare professional education processes. Development of the post discussed in this paper was stimulated and informed by an innovative example from Australia. An observational case study of the development and practice of a Service User Academic post was undertaken in 2005. Participants were purposively sampled and included the User Academic, six members of a user and carer reference group, 10 educators and 35 students. Data were collected by group discussions and interviews. Data analysis was based on the framework approach. The evaluation revealed tangible benefits for the students and the wider academic community. Most important was the powerful role model the Service User Academic provided for students. The post proved an effective method to promote service user participation and began to integrate service user perspectives within the educational process. However, the attempts to achieve socially inclusive practices were inhibited by organizational factors. The expectations of the role and unintended discriminatory behaviours had an impact on achieving full integration of the role. Furthermore, shortcomings in the support arrangements were revealed. The search for an optimum model of involvement may prove elusive, but the need to research and debate different strategies, to avoid tokenism and

  12. Estill Voice Training and voice quality control in contemporary commercial singing: an exploratory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fantini, Marco; Fussi, Franco; Crosetti, Erika; Succo, Giovanni

    2017-12-01

    Estill Voice Training (EVT) is a widely known programme for developing vocal skills based on partitioning the process of vocal production in order to reach control of specific structures in the vocal mechanism. The present retrospective small-scale exploratory study aims at reporting preliminary data about the efficacy of EVT - in terms of voice quality control on a specific vocal exercise - in contemporary commercial singers with a Certificate of Figure Proficiency (CFP). Thirty-five contemporary commercial singers (professional or semi-professional pop and rock singers) with no vocal complaints were recruited. The experimental group was composed of twenty singers who studied EVT and had a CFP. The control group was composed of fifteen singers who studied in Italian contemporary popular music institutions but were not familiar with EVT. Voice quality control was assessed through acoustic and perceptual analysis on a specific vocal exercise requiring sound pitch, perturbation and spectral energy distribution control. The acoustic analysis showed some significant differences between the two groups of singers both in sound perturbation control and spectral energy distribution control, suggesting a higher voice quality control ability for the experimental group. The perceptual evaluation confirmed a higher ability for the experimental group to produce recognizable voice qualities in this specific task. The reported preliminary results seem to suggest EVT as an effective educational system for developing voice quality control ability in contemporary commercial singers.

  13. Voices from Around the Globe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Birgit Schreiber

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available JSAA has been seeking to provide an opportunity for Student Affairs professionals and higher education scholars from around the globe to share their research and experiences of student services and student affairs programmes from their respective regional and institutional contexts. This has been given a specific platform with the guest-edited issue “Voices from Around the Globe” which is the result of a collaboration with the International Association of Student Affairs and Services (IASAS, and particularly with the guest editors, Kathleen Callahan and Chinedu Mba.

  14. Voices from around the globe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    The Editors

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available JSAA has been seeking to provide an opportunity for Student Affairs professionals and higher education scholars from around the globe to share their research and experiences of student services and student affairs programmes from their respective regional and institutional contexts. This has been given a specific platform with the guest-edited issue “Voices from Around the Globe” which is the result of a collaboration with the International Association of Student Affairs and Services (IASAS, and particularly with the guest editors, Kathleen Callahan and Chinedu Mba.

  15. Clinical Voices - an update

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fusaroli, Riccardo; Weed, Ethan

    Anomalous aspects of speech and voice, including pitch, fluency, and voice quality, are reported to characterise many mental disorders. However, it has proven difficult to quantify and explain this oddness of speech by employing traditional statistical methods. In this talk we will show how the t...... the temporal dynamics of the voice in Asperger's patients enable us to automatically reconstruct the diagnosis, and assess the Autism quotient score. We then generalise the findings to Danish and American children with autism....

  16. Voice discrimination in cochlear-implanted deaf subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massida, Z; Belin, P; James, C; Rouger, J; Fraysse, B; Barone, P; Deguine, O

    2011-05-01

    The human voice is important for social communication because voices carry speech and other information such as a person's physical characteristics and affective state. Further restricted temporal cortical regions are specifically involved in voice processing. In cochlear-implanted deaf patients, the processor alters the spectral cues which are crucial for the perception of the paralinguistic information of human voices. The aim of this study was to assess the abilities of voice discrimination in cochlear-implant (CI) users and in normal-hearing subjects (NHS) using a CI simulation (vocoder). In NHS the performance in voice discrimination decreased when reducing the spectral information by decreasing the number of channels of the vocoder. In CI patients with different delays after implantation we observed a strong impairment in voice discrimination at time of activation of the neuroprosthesis. No significant improvement can be detected in patients after two years of experience of the implant while they have reached a higher level of recovery of speech perception, suggesting a dissociation in the dynamic of functional recuperation of speech and voice processing. In addition to the lack of spectral cues due to the implant processor, we hypothesized that the origin of such deficit could derive from a crossmodal reorganization of the temporal voice areas in CI patients. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Face the voice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lønstrup, Ansa

    2014-01-01

    will be based on a reception aesthetic and phenomenological approach, the latter as presented by Don Ihde in his book Listening and Voice. Phenomenologies of Sound , and my analytical sketches will be related to theoretical statements concerning the understanding of voice and media (Cavarero, Dolar, La......Belle, Neumark). Finally, the article will discuss the specific artistic combination and our auditory experience of mediated human voices and sculpturally projected faces in an art museum context under the general conditions of the societal panophonia of disembodied and mediated voices, as promoted by Steven...

  18. LABORATORY VOICE DATA ENTRY SYSTEM.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    PRAISSMAN,J.L.SUTHERLAND,J.C.

    2003-04-01

    We have assembled a system using a personal computer workstation equipped with standard office software, an audio system, speech recognition software and an inexpensive radio-based wireless microphone that permits laboratory workers to enter or modify data while performing other work. Speech recognition permits users to enter data while their hands are holding equipment or they are otherwise unable to operate a keyboard. The wireless microphone allows unencumbered movement around the laboratory without a ''tether'' that might interfere with equipment or experimental procedures. To evaluate the potential of voice data entry in a laboratory environment, we developed a prototype relational database that records the disposal of radionuclides and/or hazardous chemicals Current regulations in our laboratory require that each such item being discarded must be inventoried and documents must be prepared that summarize the contents of each container used for disposal. Using voice commands, the user enters items into the database as each is discarded. Subsequently, the program prepares the required documentation.

  19. Voice and Video Telephony Services in Smartphone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Multimedia telephony is a delay-sensitive application. Packet losses, relatively less critical than delay, are allowed up to a certain threshold. They represent the QoS constraints that have to be respected to guarantee the operation of the telephony service and user satisfaction. In this work we introduce a new smartphone architecture characterized by two process levels called application processor (AP and mobile termination (MT, respectively. Here, they communicate through a serial channel. Moreover, we focus our attention on two very important UMTS services: voice and video telephony. Through a simulation study the impact of voice and video telephony is evaluated on the structure considered using the protocols known at this moment to realize voice and video telephony

  20. 'Calling executives and clinicians to account': user involvement in commissioning cancer services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, David H; Bacon, Roger J; Greer, Elizabeth; Stagg, Angela M; Turton, Pat

    2015-08-01

    English NHS guidance emphasizes the importance of involving users in commissioning cancer services. There has been considerable previous research on involving users in service improvement, but not on involvement in commissioning cancer services. To identify how users were involved as local cancer service commissioning projects sought to implement good practice and what has been learned. Participatory evaluation with four qualitative case studies based on semi-structured interviews with project stakeholders, observation and documentary analysis. Users were involved in every stage from design to analysis and reporting. Four English cancer network user involvement in commissioning projects, with 22 stakeholders interviewed. Thematic analysis identified nine themes: initial involvement, preparation for the role, ability to exercise voice, consistency and continuity, where decisions are made, closing the feedback loop, assessing impact, value of experience and diversity. Our findings on the impact of user involvement in commissioning cancer services are consistent with other findings on user involvement in service improvement, but highlight the specific issues for involvement in commissioning. Key points include the different perspectives users and professionals may have on the impact of user involvement in commissioning, the time necessary for meaningful involvement, the importance of involving users from the beginning and the value of senior management and PPI facilitator support and training. Users can play an important role in commissioning cancer services, but their ability to do so is contingent on resources being available to support them. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Exploring voice hearers’ relationships with their voices: Can voices serve an adaptive function?

    OpenAIRE

    Nevard, Teresa

    2015-01-01

    Background Voice hearers’ relationships with their voices can mirror their wider social relating (e.g. Paulik, 2012). Research has found a relationship between social isolation and beliefs about voices being benevolent (e.g. Favrod et al., 2004). Attachment style impacts on aspects on the voice hearing experience (e.g. Berry et al., 2012) but no previous study has used a measure of attachment to investigate voice hearers’ relationship with their voices. Aims To investigate whether vo...

  2. Voice and endocrinology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    KVS Hari Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Voice is one of the advanced features of natural evolution that differentiates human beings from other primates. The human voice is capable of conveying the thoughts into spoken words along with a subtle emotion to the tone. This extraordinary character of the voice in expressing multiple emotions is the gift of God to the human beings and helps in effective interpersonal communication. Voice generation involves close interaction between cerebral signals and the peripheral apparatus consisting of the larynx, vocal cords, and trachea. The human voice is susceptible to the hormonal changes throughout life right from the puberty until senescence. Thyroid, gonadal and growth hormones have tremendous impact on the structure and function of the vocal apparatus. The alteration of voice is observed even in physiological states such as puberty and menstruation. Astute clinical observers make out the changes in the voice and refer the patients for endocrine evaluation. In this review, we shall discuss the hormonal influence on the voice apparatus in normal and endocrine disorders.

  3. Borderline Space for Voice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batchelor, Denise

    2012-01-01

    Being on the borderline as a student in higher education is not always negative, to do with marginalisation, exclusion and having a voice that is vulnerable. Paradoxically, being on the edge also has positive connections with integration, inclusion and having a voice that is strong. Alternative understandings of the concept of borderline space can…

  4. Breaking the silence: Determinants of voice for quality improvement in hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nembhard, Ingrid M; Labao, Israel; Savage, Shantal

    2015-01-01

    Research suggests that staff voice-discretionary communication of ideas, suggestions, concerns, or opinions about work-related issues with the intent to improve organizational or unit functioning-is associated with quality improvement, which most agree is needed in health care. Nevertheless, health professionals often do not voice. Little research has explored their reluctance to speak up and, relatedly, the conditions under which they voice. We examine the drivers of voice for health professionals in hospitals. Specifically, we investigate the factors that influence their voice, why these factors are influential, and the purposes for which staff use their voice. We conducted a qualitative study using data from 99 in-depth interviews with diverse staff at 12 randomly sampled hospitals in the United States. Data were collected from December 2007 to December 2008, the first year of a 4-year study of improvement. By national standards, all of the hospitals had significant room for improvement in their care of patients experiencing heart attack, suggesting that there were potentially issues and suggestions for staff to voice. Factors related to individuals (e.g., tenure), work (e.g., work configuration), organizational context (e.g., culture), data (e.g., benchmarking), and the external environment (e.g., attention) influenced health professionals' voice. These factors shaped their sense of safety, efficacy, opportunity, and/or legitimacy, all of which affected their belief about the risk and benefit of voice and willingness to voice. They voiced for three purposes: to learn for themselves, inform others, and protect patients. These findings indicate that hospitals and their leaders must attend to multiple factors (e.g., work configuration, culture, etc.) if they wish to increase staff voice in service of quality improvement. The presence of many influential factors suggests that there are several levers that leaders can use to elicit voice, noting that voice can be

  5. Challenges and research issues from the Italian Hearing Voices Network.

    OpenAIRE

    Cardano, Mario; Fornace, Gino; Macario, Marcello; Pezzano, Roberto; Piona, Glenda; Poobello, Raffaella; Santoni, Alessandra

    2014-01-01

    The Association "Rete Italiana Noi e le Voci" (Italian Hearing Voices Network, IHVN) is characterized by the active collaboration between voice hearers, mental health professionals and researchers. Goal of this presentation is to share two network challenges and research issues: (1) Psychiatric drugs: Based on the insights gained from Robert Whitaker's meta-analysis on the development of psychiatric drugs use and its effects, the study on this issue has become a priority in our research agend...

  6. A Voice Operated Tour Planning System for Autonomous Mobile Robots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles V. Smith Iii

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Control systems driven by voice recognition software have been implemented before but lacked the context driven approach to generate relevant responses and actions. A partially voice activated control system for mobile robotics is presented that allows an autonomous robot to interact with people and the environment in a meaningful way, while dynamically creating customized tours. Many existing control systems also require substantial training for voice application. The system proposed requires little to no training and is adaptable to chaotic environments. The traversable area is mapped once and from that map a fully customized route is generated to the user

  7. Can a voice disorder be an occupational disease?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daša Gluvajić

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Voice disorders are all changes in the voice quality that can be detected by hearing. Some etiological factors that contribute to the development of voice disorders are related to occupation, working environment and working conditions. In modern societies one third of the labour force works in professions with vocal loading. In such professions, voice disorders influence work ability and quality of life. For an occupational disease, the exposure to harmful factors in the workplace is essential and causes the development of a disorder in a previously healthy individual. In some European countries, voice disorders in teachers, which do not improve after proper treatment are recognized as occupational diseases. In Slovenia, no organic or functional voice disorder is listed on the current list of occupational diseases. Prevention and cure of occupational voice disorders can contribute to better safety at the workplace and improve the workers’ health. Voice professionals must also know that they are responsible for their own health and that they must actively take care of it.

  8. Neural mechanisms for voice recognition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Andics, A.V.; McQueen, J.M.; Petersson, K.M.; Gal, V.; Rudas, G.; Vidnyanszky, Z.

    2010-01-01

    We investigated neural mechanisms that support voice recognition in a training paradigm with fMRI. The same listeners were trained on different weeks to categorize the mid-regions of voice-morph continua as an individual's voice. Stimuli implicitly defined a voice-acoustics space, and training

  9. Internet-Based System for Voice Communication With the ISS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamberlain, James; Myers, Gerry; Clem, David; Speir, Terri

    2005-01-01

    The Internet Voice Distribution System (IVoDS) is a voice-communication system that comprises mainly computer hardware and software. The IVoDS was developed to supplement and eventually replace the Enhanced Voice Distribution System (EVoDS), which, heretofore, has constituted the terrestrial subsystem of a system for voice communications among crewmembers of the International Space Station (ISS), workers at the Payloads Operations Center at Marshall Space Flight Center, principal investigators at diverse locations who are responsible for specific payloads, and others. The IVoDS utilizes a communication infrastructure of NASA and NASArelated intranets in addition to, as its name suggests, the Internet. Whereas the EVoDS utilizes traditional circuitswitched telephony, the IVoDS is a packet-data system that utilizes a voice over Internet protocol (VOIP). Relative to the EVoDS, the IVoDS offers advantages of greater flexibility and lower cost for expansion and reconfiguration. The IVoDS is an extended version of a commercial Internet-based voice conferencing system that enables each user to participate in only one conference at a time. In the IVoDS, a user can receive audio from as many as eight conferences simultaneously while sending audio to one of them. The IVoDS also incorporates administrative controls, beyond those of the commercial system, that provide greater security and control of the capabilities and authorizations for talking and listening afforded to each user.

  10. Speaking in Character: Voice Communication in Virtual Worlds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wadley, Greg; Gibbs, Martin R.

    This chapter summarizes 5 years of research on the implications of introducing voice communication systems to virtual worlds. Voice introduces both benefits and problems for players of fast-paced team games, from better coordination of groups and greater social presence of fellow players on the positive side, to negative features such as channel congestion, transmission of noise, and an unwillingness by some to use voice with strangers online. Similarly, in non-game worlds like Second Life, issues related to identity and impression management play important roles, as voice may build greater trust that is especially important for business users, yet it erodes the anonymity and ability to conceal social attributes like gender that are important for other users. A very different mixture of problems and opportunities exists when users conduct several simultaneous conversations in multiple text and voice channels. Technical difficulties still exist with current systems, including the challenge of debugging and harmonizing all the participants' voice setups. Different groups use virtual worlds for very different purposes, so a single modality may not suit all.

  11. EXPERIMENTAL STUDY OF FIRMWARE FOR INPUT AND EXTRACTION OF USER’S VOICE SIGNAL IN VOICE AUTHENTICATION SYSTEMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. N. Faizulaieva

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Scientific task for improving the signal-to-noise ratio for user’s voice signal in computer systems and networks during the process of user’s voice authentication is considered. The object of study is the process of input and extraction of the voice signal of authentication system user in computer systems and networks. Methods and means for input and extraction of the voice signal on the background of external interference signals are investigated. Ways for quality improving of the user’s voice signal in systems of voice authentication are investigated experimentally. Firmware means for experimental unit of input and extraction of the user’s voice signal against external interference influence are considered. As modern computer means, including mobile, have two-channel audio card, two microphones are used in the voice signal input. The distance between sonic-wave sensors is 20 mm and it provides forming one direction pattern lobe of microphone array in a desired area of voice signal registration (from 100 Hz to 8 kHz. According to the results of experimental studies, the usage of directional properties of the proposed microphone array and space-time processing of the recorded signals with implementation of constant and adaptive weighting factors has made it possible to reduce considerably the influence of interference signals. The results of firmware experimental studies for input and extraction of the user’s voice signal against external interference influence are shown. The proposed solutions will give the possibility to improve the value of the signal/noise ratio of the useful signals recorded up to 20 dB under the influence of external interference signals in the frequency range from 4 to 8 kHz. The results may be useful to specialists working in the field of voice recognition and speaker discrimination.

  12. Performer's attitudes toward seeking health care for voice issues: understanding the barriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilman, Marina; Merati, Albert L; Klein, Adam M; Hapner, Edie R; Johns, Michael M

    2009-03-01

    Contemporary commercial music (CCM) performers rely heavily on their voice, yet may not be aware of the importance of proactive voice care. This investigation intends to identify perceptions and barriers to seeking voice care among CCM artists. This cross-sectional observational study used a 10-item Likert-based response questionnaire to assess current perceptions regarding voice care in a population of randomly selected participants of professional CCM conference. Subjects (n=78) were queried regarding their likelihood to seek medical care for minor medical problems and specifically problems with their voice. Additional questions investigated anxiety about seeking voice care from a physician specialist, speech language pathologist, or voice coach; apprehension regarding findings of laryngeal examination, laryngeal imaging procedures; and the effect of medical insurance on the likelihood of seeking medical care. Eighty-two percent of subjects reported that their voice was a critical part of their profession; 41% stated that they were not likely to seek medical care for problems with their voice; and only 19% were reluctant to seek care for general medical problems (Partists are less likely to seek medical care for voice problems compared with general medical problems. Availability of medical insurance may be a factor. Availability of affordable voice care and education about the importance of voice care is needed in this population of vocal performers.

  13. The future nursing voice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tschudin, Verena

    2003-01-01

    Based on some articles in the journal Nursing Ethics, the author outlines some of the areas of major importance for nursing in the future. These areas--the care of elderly people, long-term home-based care, genetics, international research and conflict and war--demand a new voice of nursing, which is a political voice. The rationale for a political voice is the ICN Code of ethics for nurses and the fourfold responsibilities laid on nurses: to promote health, to prevent illness, to restore health, and to alleviate suffering. Some indications are given on how nurses can engage in political work.

  14. The future nursing voice

    OpenAIRE

    Tschudin,Verena

    2003-01-01

    Based on some articles in the journal Nursing Ethics, the author outlines some of the areas of major importance for nursing in the future. These areas - the care of elderly people, long-term home-based care, genetics, international research and conflict and war - demand a new voice of nursing, which is a political voice. The rationale for a political voice is the ICN Code of ethics for nurses and the fourfold responsibilities laid on nurses: to promote health, to prevent illness, to restore h...

  15. Dyscravia: voicing substitution dysgraphia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gvion, Aviah; Friedmann, Naama

    2010-06-01

    We report a new type of dysgraphia, which we term dyscravia. The main error type in dyscravia is substitution of the target letter with a letter that differs only with respect to the voicing feature, such as writing "coat" for "goat", and "vagd" for "fact". Two Hebrew-speaking individuals with acquired dyscravia are reported, TG, a man aged 31, and BG, a woman aged 66. Both had surface dysgraphia in addition to their dyscravia. To describe dyscravia in detail, and to explore the rate and types of errors made in spelling, we administered tests of writing to dictation, written naming, and oral spelling. In writing to dictation, TG made voicing errors on 38% of the words, and BG made 17% voicing errors. Voicing errors also occurred in nonword writing (43% for TG, 56% for BG). The writing performance and the variables that influenced the participants' spelling, as well as the results of the auditory discrimination and repetition tasks indicated that their dyscravia did not result from a deficit in auditory processing, the graphemic buffer, the phonological output lexicon, the phonological output buffer, or the allographic stage. The locus of the deficit is the phoneme-to-grapheme conversion, in a function specialized in the conversion of phonemes' voicing feature into graphemes. Because these participants had surface dysgraphia and were forced to write via the sublexical route, the deficit in voicing was evident in their writing of both words and nonwords. We further examined whether the participants also evinced parallel errors in reading. TG had a selective voicing deficit in writing, and did not show any voicing errors in reading, whereas BG had voicing errors also in the reading of nonwords (i.e., she had dyslegzia in addition to dyscravia). The dissociation TG demonstrated indicated that the voicing feature conversion is separate for reading and writing, and can be impaired selectively in writing. BG's dyslegzia indicates that the grapheme-to-phoneme conversion

  16. Voice disorders in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Possamai, Victoria; Hartley, Benjamin

    2013-08-01

    This article reviews the management of voice disorders in children. We describe the relevant anatomy and development of the larynx throughout childhood, which affects voice. We consider the epidemiologic data to establish the size of the problem. The assessment of the patient in the clinic is described stepwise through the history, examination, laryngoscopy, and extra tests. We then review the common voice disorders encountered and their management, concluding with discussion of future directions, which may herald advances in this field. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Prevalence and Risk Factors of Self-reported Voice Problems Among Yakshagana Artists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devadas, Usha; Hegde, Manisha; Maruthy, Santosh

    2017-10-30

    Yakshagana /jakʃaga:na/ is a form of folk theater of India. It is a blend of music, acting, dance, costume, dialogue, and stage techniques with an exclusive style and form. Even though Yakshagana artists (singers and actors) are professional voice users, no reports are available in the literature regarding the prevalence of voice problems (VPs) in these performers. The current study investigated (a) the prevalence of self-reported VPs, (b) the different risk factors associated with the development of VPs, (c) the self-reported vocal health, and (d) the effect of VP on Yakshagana folk artists. This cross-sectional survey was conducted using a self-reported questionnaire. Data for the present study were obtained through convenience sampling by distributing 160 questionnaires to Yakshagana artists in and around Udupi /uɖupi/ and Mangaluru /maŋgalu:ru/ districts of Karnataka state, India. The results of the study are analyzed and discussed based on 129 eligible questionnaires. Career prevalence of self-reported VPs in singers and actors were found to be 91.2% and 74%, respectively, with multiple symptoms of vocal attrition. Frequent throat clearing was found to have a significant association with actors reporting VPs. Around 55% of artists missed their work for 2-3 days or more with an average of 2.12 days (minimum of 1 day to maximum of 5 days). Overall, the results suggest that Yakshagana artists are at greater risk of developing VPs. Hence, there is a need for thorough understanding of factors influencing VPs and for educating the Yakshagana artists about voice care strategies. Copyright © 2017 The Voice Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Listening to the voices of important others: how adolescents make sense of troubled dating relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martsolf, Donna S; Draucker, Claire B; Bednarz, Lucy C; Lea, Joshua A

    2011-12-01

    Nearly one third of adolescents experience dating relationship maltreatment. Grounded theory methods were used to explicate a typology of ways by which adolescents incorporate views of others in making sense of their troubled dating relationships. Interviews with 90 young adults (ages 18-21 years) who had troubled adolescent dating relationships were analyzed using constant comparative techniques. A typology of ways in which adolescents "listen to the voices of important others" emerged. The six ways were "preventing challenging voices of important others," "deflecting irksome voices of important others," "succumbing to demanding voices of important others," "soliciting confirming voices of important others," "considering cautionary voices of important others," and "heeding knowing voices of important others." Professionals can use this model when deciding how to offer input about troubled adolescent dating relationships. 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Spatial inattention abolishes voice adaptation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zäske, Romi; Fritz, Christiane; Schweinberger, Stefan R

    2013-04-01

    Adaptation to male voices causes a subsequent voice to be perceived as more female, and vice versa. Similar contrastive aftereffects have been reported for phonetic perception, and in vision for face perception. However, while aftereffects in the perception of phonetic features of speech have been reported to persist even when adaptors were processed inattentively, face aftereffects were previously reported to be abolished by inattention to adaptors. Here we demonstrate that auditory aftereffects of adaptation to voice gender are eliminated when the male and female adaptor voices are spatially unattended. Participants simultaneously heard gender-specific male or female adaptor voices in one ear and gender-neutral (androgynous) adaptor voices in the contralateral ear. They selectively attended to the adaptor voices in a designated ear, by either classifying voice gender (Exp. 1) or spoken syllable (Exp. 2). Voice aftereffects were found only if the gender-specific voices were spatially attended, suggesting capacity limits in the processing of voice gender for the unattended ear. Remarkably, gender-specific adaptors in the attended ear elicited comparable aftereffects in test voices, regardless of prior attention to voice gender or phonetic content. Thus, within the attended ear, voice gender was processed even when it was irrelevant for the task at hand, suggesting automatic processing of gender along with linguistic information. Overall, voice gender adaptation requires spatial, but not dimensional, selective attention.

  20. Whose voice matters? LEARNERS

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Erna Kinsey

    Keywords: educator assessment feedback; journal entries; learner feelings; learner motivation; learners' voices; understanding of assessment feedback. Introduction. International and national studies have revealed the poor mathematics skills of South African learners. The performance of Grade 8 learners in the Trends.

  1. Voice disorders in teachers

    OpenAIRE

    Ficko, Lea

    2014-01-01

    Voice and speech are the result of coordination of many organic systems; upper and lower respiratory tract including the throat, central and peripheral nervous system and articulators. A voice disorder can become an occupational disease, including functional dysphonia which can affect the quality of life of people who talk a lot at work. Teacher and pedagogical workers belong to a group of occupations with severe vocal loading and they experience overload of speech organs. This can lead to...

  2. Exploring the potential implementation of a tool to enhance shared decision making (SDM) in mental health services in the United Kingdom: a qualitative exploration of the views of service users, carers and professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, Helen; Harris, Kamelia; Bee, Penny; Lovell, Karina; Rogers, Anne; Drake, Richard

    2017-01-01

    As a response to evidence that mental health service users and carers expect greater involvement in decisions about antipsychotic medication choice and prescribing, shared decision-making (SDM) has increasingly come to be viewed as an essential element of person-centred care and practice. However, this aspiration has yet to be realised in practice, as service users and carers continue to feel alienated from healthcare services. Existing understanding of the factors affecting the use of tools to support SDM is limited to inter-individual influences and wider factors affecting potential implementation are underexplored. To explore the potential use of a tool designed to enhance collaborative antipsychotic prescribing from the perspectives of secondary care mental health service users, carers and professionals. We conducted a qualitative study (semi-structured interviews and focus groups) using a convenience sample of 33 participants (10 mental health service users, 10 carers and 13 professionals) involved in antipsychotic prescribing in one Trust in the North of England. Participants were asked about the potential implementation of a tool to support SDM within secondary mental health services. Framework analysis incorporating the use of constant comparative method was used to analyse the data. The study identified a divergence in the views of service users and professionals, including a previously undocumented tendency for stakeholder groups to blame each other for potential implementation failure. This dissonance was shaped by meso and macro level influences relating to paternalism, legislative frameworks, accountability and lack of resources. Participants did not identify any macro level (policy or structural) facilitators to the use of the tool highlighting the negative impact of mental health contexts. Our study indicated that inter-individual factors are likely to be most important to implementation, given their potential to transcend meso and macro level

  3. Connections between voice ergonomic risk factors and voice symptoms, voice handicap, and respiratory tract diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rantala, Leena M; Hakala, Suvi J; Holmqvist, Sofia; Sala, Eeva

    2012-11-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the connections between voice ergonomic risk factors found in classrooms and voice-related problems in teachers. Voice ergonomic assessment was performed in 39 classrooms in 14 elementary schools by means of a Voice Ergonomic Assessment in Work Environment--Handbook and Checklist. The voice ergonomic risk factors assessed included working culture, noise, indoor air quality, working posture, stress, and access to a sound amplifier. Teachers from the above-mentioned classrooms reported their voice symptoms, respiratory tract diseases, and completed a Voice Handicap Index (VHI). The more voice ergonomic risk factors found in the classroom the higher were the teachers' total scores on voice symptoms and VHI. Stress was the factor that correlated most strongly with voice symptoms. Poor indoor air quality increased the occurrence of laryngitis. Voice ergonomics were poor in the classrooms studied and voice ergonomic risk factors affected the voice. It is important to convey information on voice ergonomics to education administrators and those responsible for school planning and taking care of school buildings. Copyright © 2012 The Voice Foundation. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Openphone user engagement and requirements solicitation in low literacy users

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Ndwe, J

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available SOLICITATION IN LOW LITERACY USERS Abstract: The OpenPhone project aims to design an Interactive Voice Response (IVR) health information system that enables people who are caregivers for HIV/AIDS infected children to access relevant information.... 2000), 17-20. Beyer, H. and Holtzblatt, K. 1998. Contextual Design: Defining Customer-Centered Systems. Academic Press: Kaufmann Publishers. Blake, H. and Tucker, D. 2006. User interfaces for communication bridges across the digital divide. AI Soc...

  5. Speech-Language Pathology production regarding voice in popular singing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drumond, Lorena Badaró; Vieira, Naymme Barbosa; Oliveira, Domingos Sávio Ferreira de

    2011-12-01

    To present a literature review about the Brazilian scientific production in Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology regarding voice in popular singing in the last decade, as for number of publications, musical styles studied, focus of the researches, and instruments used for data collection. Cross-sectional descriptive study carried out in two stages: search in databases and publications encompassing the last decade of researches in this area in Brazil, and reading of the material obtained for posterior categorization. The databases LILACS and SciELO, the Databasis of Dissertations and Theses organized by CAPES, the online version of Acta ORL, and the online version of OPUS were searched, using the following uniterms: voice, professional voice, singing voice, dysphonia, voice disorders, voice training, music, dysodia. Articles published between the years 2000 and 2010 were selected. The researches found were classified and categorized after reading their abstracts and, when necessary, the whole study. Twenty researches within the proposed theme were selected, all of which were descriptive, involving several musical styles. Twelve studies focused on the evaluation of the popular singer's voice, and the most frequently used data collection instrument was the auditory-perceptual evaluation. The results of the publications found corroborate the objectives proposed by the authors and the different methodologies. The number of studies published is still restricted when compared to the diversity of musical genres and the uniqueness of popular singer.

  6. Performance requirements for integrated voice/data networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruber, J. G.; Le, N. H.

    1983-12-01

    This paper addresses top-down end-to-end user-oriented performance requirements pertaining primarily to voice and digital data services. The discussion of requirements for voice parameters accounts for the performance of existing analog and mixed analog/digital networks, as well as the likely effects on performance of short, medium, and long term evolution toward the ultimate all digital ISDN. The requirements for digital data parameters necessarily reflect an evolutionary process which is less consistent than for voice, and therefore these requirements are less definitive in nature. The discussions of voice and digital data performance apply largely to a wide variety of appropriate network designs, transmission schemes, and switching architectures. Both traditional parameters, as well as contemporary parameters associated with new and evolving systems, are considered. The emphasis is on the performance of nation-wide public and private networks, but the paper also considers the constraints of international connections.

  7. Exploring expressivity and emotion with artificial voice and speech technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pauletto, Sandra; Balentine, Bruce; Pidcock, Chris; Jones, Kevin; Bottaci, Leonardo; Aretoulaki, Maria; Wells, Jez; Mundy, Darren P; Balentine, James

    2013-10-01

    Emotion in audio-voice signals, as synthesized by text-to-speech (TTS) technologies, was investigated to formulate a theory of expression for user interface design. Emotional parameters were specified with markup tags, and the resulting audio was further modulated with post-processing techniques. Software was then developed to link a selected TTS synthesizer with an automatic speech recognition (ASR) engine, producing a chatbot that could speak and listen. Using these two artificial voice subsystems, investigators explored both artistic and psychological implications of artificial speech emotion. Goals of the investigation were interdisciplinary, with interest in musical composition, augmentative and alternative communication (AAC), commercial voice announcement applications, human-computer interaction (HCI), and artificial intelligence (AI). The work-in-progress points towards an emerging interdisciplinary ontology for artificial voices. As one study output, HCI tools are proposed for future collaboration.

  8. The inner voice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony James Ridgway

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The inner voice- we all know what it is because we all have it and use it when we are thinking or reading, for example. Little work has been done on it in our field, with the notable exception of Brian Tomlinson, but presumably it must be a cognitive phenomenon which is of great importance in thinking, language learning, and reading in a foreign language. The inner voice will be discussed as a cognitive psychological phenomenon associated with short-term memory, and distinguished from the inner ear. The process of speech recoding will be examined (the process of converting written language into the inner voice and the importance of developing the inner voice, as a means of both facilitating the production of a new language and enhancing the comprehension of a text in a foreign language, will be emphasized. Finally, ways of developing the inner voice in beginning and intermediate readers of a foreign language will be explored and recommended.

  9. Voice Therapy Practices and Techniques: A Survey of Voice Clinicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Peter B.; Larson, George W.

    1992-01-01

    Eighty-three voice disorder therapists' ratings of statements regarding voice therapy practices indicated that vocal nodules are the most frequent disorder treated; vocal abuse and hard glottal attack elimination, counseling, and relaxation were preferred treatment approaches; and voice therapy is more effective with adults than with children.…

  10. Voice in early glottic cancer compared to benign voice pathology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Gogh, C. D. L.; Mahieu, H. F.; Kuik, D. J.; Rinkel, R. N. P. M.; Langendijk, J. A.; Verdonck-de Leeuw, I. M.

    The purpose of this study is to compare (Dutch) Voice Handicap Index (VHIvumc) scores from a selected group of patients with voice problems after treatment for early glottic cancer with patients with benign voice disorders and subjects from the normal population. The study included a group of 35

  11. Interface Everywhere: Further Development of a Gesture and Voice Commanding Interface Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Natural User Interface (NUI) is a term used to describe a number of technologies such as speech recognition, multi-touch, and kinetic interfaces. Gesture and voice...

  12. Smartphone App for Voice Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... on. Feature: Taste, Smell, Hearing, Language, Voice, Balance Smartphone App for Voice Disorders Past Issues / Fall 2013 ... developed a mobile monitoring device that relies on smartphone technology to gather a week's worth of talking, ...

  13. Voice Data on Female Smokers: Coherence between the Voice Handicap Index and Acoustic Voice Parameters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dionysios Tafiadis

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Voice disorders are common in the general population, affecting daily communication for nearly one-third. Prevalence of voice disorders has been studied extensively in certain professions, such as teachers, as well as students. The impact on voice characteristics of different risk factors has been studied and also correlated to cigarette smoking. This study was designed to examine the relationship between Voice Handicap Index and acoustic parameters of voice university student smokers in Greece. One hundred and ten female non-dysphonic students (aged 18 to 34 that smoked were recruited. Participants answered the Voice Handicap Index and their voice was recorded. Acoustic analysis of voice characteristics was performed with Dr. Speech software system. Results indicated that some measures were predictive of overall, functional and emotional Voice Handicap Index scores. Other voice parameters had no cohesive or predictable pattern on Voice Handicap Index scores. Significant relationships between Voice Handicap Index individual statements and smokers’ voice characteristics were also observed. Lack of correlation and subsequent clinical implications are discussed, as well as the direction for future research.

  14. Secure voice for mobile satellite applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaisnys, Arvydas; Berner, Jeff

    1990-01-01

    The initial system studies are described which were performed at JPL on secure voice for mobile satellite applications. Some options are examined for adapting existing Secure Telephone Unit III (STU-III) secure telephone equipment for use over a digital mobile satellite link, as well as for the evolution of a dedicated secure voice mobile earth terminal (MET). The work has included some lab and field testing of prototype equipment. The work is part of an ongoing study at JPL for the National Communications System (NCS) on the use of mobile satellites for emergency communications. The purpose of the overall task is to identify and enable the technologies which will allow the NCS to use mobile satellite services for its National Security Emergency Preparedness (NSEP) communications needs. Various other government agencies will also contribute to a mobile satellite user base, and for some of these, secure communications will be an essential feature.

  15. [Validation and reliability of Turkish Singing Voice Handicap index].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denizoğlu, İsmail İlter; Şahin, Mustafa; Kazancıoğlu, Alper; Dağdelen, Zibelhan; Akdeniz, Serap; Oğuz, Haldun; Kılıç, Mehmet Akif; Yücedağ, Aslı; Öğüt, Mehmet Fatih

    2016-01-01

    This study aims to constitute a valid and reliable Turkish version of the original Singing Voice Handicap Index. An authorized committee assessed the reliability and validity of the content, scope, and language of the original Singing Voice Handicap Index which underwent a back translation process. The Turkish version of the questionnaire was answered twice with a 7 to 10-day interval by two singing voice groups with or without singing voice problems. The reliability and validity analyses were performed based on these answers. Of a total of 123 individuals (64 females, 59 males; mean age 26.2±7.3 years), 81 were without a voice pathology and 42 were with a voice pathology. The total Cronbach's alpha coefficient was 0.917. The item-total correlations ranged between 0.51 and 0.89. The weighted kappa values of test-retest correlation values of the items were 0.82-0.91. The Cronbach's alpha values of two part of the questionnaire based on the split-half method were 0.89 and 0.84. The mean total scale scores were 21.8±18.5 and 53.6±28.9 in normal and pathology groups, respectively and there was a statistically significant difference in scores between these two groups (p=0.000). The Turkish version of the Singing Voice Handicap Index is a valid and reliable scale which can be used in the evaluation of voice problems of Turkish-speaking singing voice users.

  16. Kuwaiti Teachers' Perceptions of Voice Handicap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albustan, Sana A; Marie, Basem S; Natour, Yaser S; Darawsheh, Wesam B

    2017-05-30

    The study aimed to investigate the effects of age, gender, level of education, experience, and class level taught on the perception of voice handicap by Kuwaiti teachers using the Arabic version of the Voice Handicap Index (VHI-Arab). The mean VHI scores of Kuwaiti teachers were compared with those of Jordanian and Emirati teachers. The study had a cross-sectional survey design. A total of 460 individuals (100 controls and 360 teachers) participated in this study and completed the paper copy of the VHI-Arab. We recruited 360 teachers, 180 males and 180 females (age range: 20-50 years), from 60 schools in 6 Kuwaiti districts. Teachers' VHI scores were compared with 100 nonteaching voice users (50 males and 50 females, with an age range of 18-42 years). Female teachers scored significantly higher than male teachers in all subscales (ie, physical: P = 0.02; emotional: P = 0.007; total: P = 0.017), except for the functional subscale (P = 0.147). Elementary school teachers scored significantly higher than teachers of other levels (middle and high school) in all VHI subscales (physical: P = 0.047; emotional: P = 0.01; total: P = 0.039), except for the functional subscale (P = 0.47). The mean score of Jordanian teachers was higher than that of Kuwaiti and Emirati teachers in all VHI subscales. Teachers with a more favorable teaching environment scored better on the VHI. Gender differences were found in all the Arabic nationalities studied. Female teachers of the elementary level, in particular, should be the focus of attention of efforts to prevent voice damage. Copyright © 2017 The Voice Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Pegembangan Game dengan Menggunakan Teknologi Voice Recognition Berbasis Android

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franky Hadinata Marpaung

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this research is to create a new kind of game by using technology that rarely used in current games. It is developed as an entertainment media and also a social media in which the users can play the games together via multiplayer mode. This research uses Scrum development method since it supports small scaled developer and it supports software increment along the development. Using this game application, the users can play and watch interesting animations by controlling it with their voice, listen the character imitating the users’ voice, play various mini games both in single player or multiplayer mode via Bluetooth connection. The conclusion is that game application of My Name is Dug use voice recognition and inter-devices connection as its main features. It also has various mini games that support both single player and multiplayer.

  18. Perceived control and voice handicap in patients with voice disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frazier, Patricia; Merians, Addie; Misono, Stephanie

    2017-11-01

    The purpose of the study was to replicate and extend previous research on the relation between perceived present control and voice handicap and to further examine the psychometric properties of a present control scale adapted for patients with voice disorders (Misono, Meredith, Peterson, & Frazier, 2016). Sample 1 consisted of 1,129 patients recruited from a voice disorder clinic who completed measures of perceived present control, distress, and voice handicap in the clinic. Sample 2 consisted of 62 patients from the same clinic who completed measures of present control, distress, voice handicap, and general control beliefs online at baseline and measures of present control and voice handicap again 3 weeks later (n = 59). With regard to the psychometric properties of the voice-adapted present control scale, alpha coefficients were above .80 and the 3-week test-reliability coefficient was .69. There was mixed support for the hypothesized 1-factor structure of the scale. In Sample 1, present control was more strongly associated with lower voice handicap than was distress and accounted for significant variance in voice handicap controlling for distress. In Sample 2, present control at baseline predicted later voice handicap, controlling for general control beliefs and distress. Present control appears to be a promising target for adjunctive interventions for patients with voice disorders. An evidence-based online present control intervention (Hintz, Frazier, & Meredith, 2015) is being adapted for this patient population. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  19. Opening up for Many Voices in Knowledge Construction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marit Borg

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The key epistemological assumption in participatory research is the belief that knowledge is embedded in the lives and experiences of individuals and that knowledge is developed only through a cooperative process between researchers and experiencing individuals. There are various notions about the nature and processes of participation in this type of research. This paper focuses on specific processes that are used for a "genuine" participation by experiencing individuals as research participants. It also identifies processes that are critical for researchers to engage with, in order to become pro-participatory in their approaches to qualitative research. The paper draws on a particular project as an exemplar—"The Crisis Resolution and Home Treatment Project." This project uses various participatory research processes to elicit and include voices of health-care professionals, service users, and family members. The main objective of the research project is to develop knowledge for new forms of community-based practices for people experiencing mental health crisis. We present the participatory research methodology applied in this research, and discuss two sets of processes used to enhance "participation" in research—one set to encourage and elicit participation by research participants; and the other set to engage researchers in reflection within the participatory research process. This will mitigate the paucity of literature regarding the processes and approaches necessary to make participatory research truly "participatory" both for research participants and researchers. URN: http://nbn-resolving.de/urn:nbn:de:0114-fqs120117

  20. Multidimensional assessment of voice quality of future elite vocal performers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muresan RODICA-ELENA

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction and objective: This study correlates the Singing Voice Handicap Index (SVHI scores with videostrobolaryngoscopy and acoustic analysis in healthy professional singers, as a measure of self-perceived vocal health, versus actual pathology diagnosed during examination by stroboscopy, or by modification at the acoustic voice evaluation. The objectives of the study were to measure the strength of self-assessment among professional singers and to determine whether there is a benefit of combining SVHI, acoustic analysis and videostrobolaryngoscopy for the routine assessment of singers who have no obvious singing voice problem. Method: Prospective cross-sectional study. The voice quality of 40 students of the Music Academy, Cluj-Napoca, was assessed by means of a multidimensional test battery containing a singing voice handicap index (SVHI, as well as SVHI-10, videolaryngostroboscopy, maximum phonation time on vowel /a/, S/Z ratio, Jitter, Shimmer and NHR (Harmonic Noise Ratio, at lowest, highest and conversational frequency. Additionally, in a questionnaire on daily habits has been recorded for the participants, covering the prevalence of smoking, eating habits, and vocal abuse. The correlation between SVHI scores, acoustic analysis and pathologic findings seen on videostrobolaryngoscopy was analyzed using linear regression and serial t tests to draw the conclusions of this study. Results: Both SVHI and SVHI-10 scores showed, as previously expected, normal values for healthy singers (SVHI-10 being the singers preferred metric. However, although all participants self-identified as healthy, laryngeal abnormalities were relatively common. Acoustic analysis of students voices identified relative instability of pitches, problems with F0 variation, TMF (Maximum Phonation Time and S/Z ratio. No Significant correlation (P = 0.9501 between SVHI scores, acoustic analysis and videostrobolaryngoscopy findings were shown by the linear regression

  1. Multi-Frame Rate Based Multiple-Model Training for Robust Speaker Identification of Disguised Voice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prasad, Swati; Tan, Zheng-Hua; Prasad, Ramjee

    2013-01-01

    Speaker identification systems are prone to attack when voice disguise is adopted by the user. To address this issue,our paper studies the effect of using different frame rates on the accuracy of the speaker identification system for disguised voice.In addition, a multi-frame rate based multiple-......-model training method is proposed. The experimental results show the superior performance of the proposed method compared to the commonly used single frame rate method for three types of disguised voice taken from the CHAINS corpus.......Speaker identification systems are prone to attack when voice disguise is adopted by the user. To address this issue,our paper studies the effect of using different frame rates on the accuracy of the speaker identification system for disguised voice.In addition, a multi-frame rate based multiple...

  2. Soft phonation in the male singing voice : A preliminary study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Miller, DG; Schutte, H. K; Doing, T

    2001-01-01

    Sustained high notes, diminishing gradually from the loudest to the softest phonation within a maneuver called messa di voce, are examined in two contrasting professional tenor voices. Signals of the sound pressure level, electroglottograph, and mean esophageal pressure are recorded, and similar

  3. Mapping Phonetic Features for Voice-Driven Sound Synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janer, Jordi; Maestre, Esteban

    In applications where the human voice controls the synthesis of musical instruments sounds, phonetics convey musical information that might be related to the sound of the imitated musical instrument. Our initial hypothesis is that phonetics are user- and instrument-dependent, but they remain constant for a single subject and instrument. We propose a user-adapted system, where mappings from voice features to synthesis parameters depend on how subjects sing musical articulations, i.e. note to note transitions. The system consists of two components. First, a voice signal segmentation module that automatically determines note-to-note transitions. Second, a classifier that determines the type of musical articulation for each transition based on a set of phonetic features. For validating our hypothesis, we run an experiment where subjects imitated real instrument recordings with their voice. Performance recordings consisted of short phrases of saxophone and violin performed in three grades of musical articulation labeled as: staccato, normal, legato. The results of a supervised training classifier (user-dependent) are compared to a classifier based on heuristic rules (user-independent). Finally, from the previous results we show how to control the articulation in a sample-concatenation synthesizer by selecting the most appropriate samples.

  4. Library user metaphors and services

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johannsen, Carl Gustav

    How do library professionals talk about and refer to library users, and how is this significant? In recent decades, the library profession has conceived of users in at least five different ways, viewing them alternatively as citizens, clients, customers, guests, or partners. This book argues...... that these user metaphors crucially inform librarians' interactions with the public, and, by extension, determine the quality and content of the services received. The ultimate aim of the book is to provide library professionals with insights and tools for avoiding common pitfalls associated with false...... or professionally inadequate conceptions of library users....

  5. Voice application development for Android

    CERN Document Server

    McTear, Michael

    2013-01-01

    This book will give beginners an introduction to building voice-based applications on Android. It will begin by covering the basic concepts and will build up to creating a voice-based personal assistant. By the end of this book, you should be in a position to create your own voice-based applications on Android from scratch in next to no time.Voice Application Development for Android is for all those who are interested in speech technology and for those who, as owners of Android devices, are keen to experiment with developing voice apps for their devices. It will also be useful as a starting po

  6. What the voice reveals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ko, Sei Jin

    2007-01-01

    Given that the voice is our main form of communication, we know surprisingly little about how it impacts judgment and behavior. Furthermore, the modern advancement in telecommunication systems, such as cellular phones, has meant that a large proportion of our everyday interactions are conducted

  7. Mending Misused Voices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoer, Vicki L.; Swank, Helen

    1978-01-01

    This article, addressed to singing and choral teachers, examines functional voice disorders resulting from incorrect or abused functions of the laryngeal mechanism. Symptoms, testing methods, and correction techniques, short of medical help, are outlined for disorders of resonance, registration, articulation, and of the vocal fold mass.…

  8. Bodies and Voices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    A wide-ranging collection of essays centred on readings of the body in contemporary literary and socio-anthropological discourse, from slavery and rape to female genital mutilation, from clothing, ocular pornography, voice, deformation and transmutation to the imprisoned, dismembered, remembered,...

  9. I Have a Voice!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Mei-Hua

    2011-01-01

    In this article, the author describes the opportunities she had for putting her cultural and language skills to use. She shares her experiences at the Asian Voices of Organized Youth for Community Empowerment (A-VOYCE) program and at the Participatory Chinatown project. The author never thought that learning about her identity and using what she…

  10. Voices of Columbine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vickery, Emily

    2004-01-01

    In the immediate aftermath of the Columbine school shootings, Principal Frank DeAngelis felt, in his own words, "the weight of the world on my shoulders." Five years later, he still struggles for answers--and still loves his job. In this article, the author presents excerpts of her interview with DeAngelis, a man whose face and voice have become…

  11. Listen to a voice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hølge-Hazelton, Bibi

    2001-01-01

    Listen to the voice of a young girl Lonnie, who was diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes at 16. Imagine that she is deeply involved in the social security system. She lives with her mother and two siblings in a working class part of a small town. She is at a special school for problematic youth, and her...

  12. Voices of courage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noraida Abdullah Karim

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available In May 2007 the Women’s Commission for Refugee Women and Children1 presented its annual Voices of Courage awards to three displaced people who have dedicated their lives to promoting economic opportunities for refugee and displaced women and youth. These are their (edited testimonies.

  13. Political animal voices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijer, E.R.

    2017-01-01

    In this thesis, I develop a theory of political animal voices. The first part of the thesis focuses on non-human animal languages and forming interspecies worlds. I first investigate the relation between viewing language as exclusively human and seeing humans as categorically different from other

  14. Science for Two Voices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarzkopf-Trujillo, Julie; Straits, William

    2015-01-01

    During inquiry investigations with third graders, the authors urge their students not to just make observations but also to record them. Inspired by Joel Fleishman's "A Joyful Noise: Poems for Two Voices" (1988), the authors developed an activity that increases students' motivation to record accurate and detailed observations. This…

  15. Controlling Home Appliances Remotely through Voice Command

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baig, Faisal; Beg, Saira; Fahad Khan, Muhammad

    2012-06-01

    Controlling appliances is a main part of automation. The main object of Home automation is to provide a wireless communication link of home appliances to the remote user. The main objective of this work is to make such a system which controls the home appliances remotely. This paper discusses two methods of controlling home appliances one is via voice to text SMS and other is to use the mobile as a remote control, this system will provide a benefit to the elderly and disable people and also to those who are unaware of typing an SMS.

  16. Voices to reckon with: perceptions of voice identity in clinical and non-clinical voice hearers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badcock, Johanna C; Chhabra, Saruchi

    2013-01-01

    The current review focuses on the perception of voice identity in clinical and non-clinical voice hearers. Identity perception in auditory verbal hallucinations (AVH) is grounded in the mechanisms of human (i.e., real, external) voice perception, and shapes the emotional (distress) and behavioral (help-seeking) response to the experience. Yet, the phenomenological assessment of voice identity is often limited, for example to the gender of the voice, and has failed to take advantage of recent models and evidence on human voice perception. In this paper we aim to synthesize the literature on identity in real and hallucinated voices and begin by providing a comprehensive overview of the features used to judge voice identity in healthy individuals and in people with schizophrenia. The findings suggest some subtle, but possibly systematic biases across different levels of voice identity in clinical hallucinators that are associated with higher levels of distress. Next we provide a critical evaluation of voice processing abilities in clinical and non-clinical voice hearers, including recent data collected in our laboratory. Our studies used diverse methods, assessing recognition and binding of words and voices in memory as well as multidimensional scaling of voice dissimilarity judgments. The findings overall point to significant difficulties recognizing familiar speakers and discriminating between unfamiliar speakers in people with schizophrenia, both with and without AVH. In contrast, these voice processing abilities appear to be generally intact in non-clinical hallucinators. The review highlights some important avenues for future research and treatment of AVH associated with a need for care, and suggests some novel insights into other symptoms of psychosis.

  17. Voices to reckon with: Perceptions of voice identity in clinical and non-clinical voice hearers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johanna C. Badcock

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The current review focuses on the perception of voice identity in clinical and non-clinical voice hearers. Identity perception in auditory verbal hallucinations (AVH is grounded in the mechanisms of human (i.e. real, external voice perception, and shapes the emotional (distress and behavioural (help-seeking response to the experience. Yet, the phenomenological assessment of voice identity is often limited, for example to the gender of the voice, and has failed to take advantage of recent models and evidence on human voice perception. In this paper we aim to synthesize the literature on identity in real and hallucinated voices and begin by providing a comprehensive overview of the features used to judge voice identity in healthy individuals and in people with schizophrenia. The findings suggest some subtle, but possibly systematic biases across different levels of voice identity in clinical hallucinators that are associated with higher levels of distress. Next we provide a critical evaluation of voice processing abilities in clinical and non-clinical voice hearers, including recent data collected in our laboratory. Our studies used diverse methods, assessing recognition and binding of words and voices in memory as well as multidimensional scaling of voice dissimilarity judgements. The findings overall point to significant difficulties recognizing familiar speakers and discriminating between unfamiliar speakers in people with schizophrenia, both with and without AVH. In contrast, these voice processing abilities appear to be generally intact in non-clinical hallucinators. The review highlights some important avenues for future research and treatment of auditory verbal hallucinations associated with a need for care, and suggests some novel insights into other symptoms of psychosis.

  18. Risk Factors for Hyperfunctional Voice Disorders Among Teachers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swapna Sebastian

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to assess the prevalence of voice problems among teachers, and identify risk factors for developing voice pathology. In this study we evaluated 448 teachers (400 females and 48 males between the age range of 25 to 55 years, from primary school as well as secondary school which were selected randomly. A questionnaire was given to them to find out how many of them had a voice problem. All the positive cases were further evaluated by an Otorhinolaryngologist, an Audiologist and a Speech Language Pathologist. Out of the 448 teachers, 39 of them(9% had an indication of voice disorder based on the positive respose got from the questionnaire. Among the 39 cases identified 11 were males (28% and 28 were females (71%. We tried to investigate on the factors that would have contributed to voice problem in the identified 9% of cases .Detailed history was taken and was examined by an otorhinolaryngologist, an audiologist and a Speech Language Pathologist.Out of the 39 cases identified 26% had history of recurrent allergic rhinitis and laryngitis, 18% had sinusitis and post nasal drip, 18% had asthma, 26% had gastoesophageal reflux disorder, (8% had minimal sensori neural hearing loss and hypothyroidism was found in 8%. Interaction of multiple factors like hereditory, behavioral, lifestyle, medical and environmental can contribute to voice disorders in occupational voice users. Teachers need to be educated regarding vocal mechanism, vocal hygiene and effective voice use , dust free and noise free work environment, diet modification like drinking adequate water, avoiding spicy and deep fried food, regularizing meals and avoiding sleeping immediately after food. The underlying medical issues like allergy, sinusitis, laryngitis, hypothyroidism, gastroesophageal reflux, hearing loss etc also need to be addressed , since vocal hygiene alone will not help until and unless the underlying cause is taken care of.

  19. Risk factors for voice problems in teachers.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kooijman, P.G.C.; Jong, F.I.C.R.S. de; Thomas, G.; Huinck, W.J.; Donders, A.R.T.; Graamans, K.; Schutte, H.K.

    2006-01-01

    In order to identify factors that are associated with voice problems and voice-related absenteeism in teachers, 1,878 questionnaires were analysed. The questionnaires inquired about personal data, voice complaints, voice-related absenteeism from work and conditions that may lead to voice complaints

  20. Risk factors for voice problems in teachers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kooijman, P. G. C.; de Jong, F. I. C. R. S.; Thomas, G.; Huinck, W.; Donders, R.; Graamans, K.; Schutte, H. K.

    2006-01-01

    In order to identify factors that are associated with voice problems and voice-related absenteeism in teachers, 1,878 questionnaires were analysed. The questionnaires inquired about personal data, voice complaints, voice-related absenteeism from work and conditions that may lead to voice complaints

  1. Comparison of Post-therapy Dysphonic Voices and Normal Voices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaeffer, Natalie; Fuse, Akiko

    2018-02-12

    The purpose of the present investigation was to compare the voices of post-therapy dysphonic participants with participants who have normal voices to determine how close the corrected voices approached normal vocal levels. The present investigation is a follow-up to the authors' previous research in which dysphonic participants, with voices ranging from moderate-to-severe dysphonia, were evaluated pre- and post therapy using the Dysphonic Severity Percentage scale and the interval scale. In the present study, five raters, three speech-language pathologists experienced in assessing dysphonia, and two trained speech-language pathology college students evaluated 20 participants with normal voices under the same two conditions as those of the corrected participants-when reading a paragraph aloud and during spontaneous speech. While listening to the recordings of the normal voices, the raters tallied any dysphonic syllables produced by the participants to obtain a Dysphonic Severity Percentage for both paragraph reading and spontaneous speech. The raters also evaluated the normal voices on the interval scale. These data were compared with those of the post-therapy participants, who were evaluated under the same conditions and methods pre- and post therapy. The dysphonic participants' voices improved significantly post therapy in comparison with their pretherapy result; their improvement, however, was not commensurate with the voices of the normal participants, and the data showed a significant difference between the two groups. Both evaluation scales reflected a high agreement among raters. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  2. Comparison of hearing and voicing ranges in singing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, Eric J.; Titze, Ingo R.

    2003-04-01

    The spectral and dynamic ranges of the human voice of professional and nonprofessional vocalists were compared to the auditory hearing and feeling thresholds at a distance of one meter. In order to compare these, an analysis was done in true dB SPL, not just relative dB as is usually done in speech analysis. The methodology of converting the recorded acoustic signal to absolute pressure units was described. The human voice range of a professional vocalist appeared to match the dynamic range of the auditory system at some frequencies. In particular, it was demonstrated that professional vocalists were able to make use of the most sensitive part of the hearing thresholds (around 4 kHz) through the use of a learned vocal ring or singer's formant. [Work sponsored by NIDCD.

  3. Effect of training and level of external auditory feedback on the singing voice: volume and quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bottalico, Pasquale; Graetzer, Simone; Hunter, Eric J.

    2015-01-01

    Background Previous research suggests that classically trained professional singers rely not only on external auditory feedback but also on proprioceptive feedback associated with internal voice sensitivities. Objectives The Lombard Effect in singers and the relationship between Sound Pressure Level (SPL) and external auditory feedback was evaluated for professional and non-professional singers. Additionally, the relationship between voice quality, evaluated in terms of Singing Power Ratio (SPR), and external auditory feedback, level of accompaniment, voice register and singer gender was analyzed. Methods The subjects were 10 amateur or beginner singers, and 10 classically-trained professional or semi-professional singers (10 males and 10 females). Subjects sang an excerpt from the Star-spangled Banner with three different levels of the accompaniment, 70, 80 and 90 dBA, and with three different levels of external auditory feedback. SPL and the SPR were analyzed. Results The Lombard Effect was stronger for non-professional singers than professional singers. Higher levels of external auditory feedback were associated with a reduction in SPL. As predicted, the mean SPR was higher for professional than non-professional singers. Better voice quality was detected in the presence of higher levels of external auditory feedback. Conclusions With an increase in training, the singer’s reliance on external auditory feedback decreases. PMID:26186810

  4. PERCEPTION OF THEATTRIBUTES OF A PROFESSIONAL OF INNOVATION BY OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE OF A THERMAL POWER PLANT: A CASE FOR TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER TO FOCUS ON END USERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabricio Baron Mussi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available To attend Brazil‘s energy demands, considering the typical seasonality of Brazilian climates conditions, part of the energy available in the national electrical system has been generated from natural gas power plant (in the most recent years. This paper analyses a case of technology transfer with focus on end-users, observing theirs perception in relation to attributes of technological tool installed, a control and monitoring system. The case, developed in a thermoelectric power plant, has four organizations participants: the thermoelectric power plant that bought the technology, the company that will operate with the new technology, a research institution that helped out on the selection process and adjustments of technological tool to local necessities and the international supplier of the technology. This work used qualitative and quantitative methodology to arrive its purpose. Between the findings, there are some differences on perception of attributes for some users groups. Given the relevance of technological tool acquired, it‘s possible that communications actions and technical trainings would be necessaries to ensure that users know all the functionalities of new system, its advantages in relation to previous system and its compatibility with power plant‘s technical process. The technological dependency of foreign companies and necessities of adjustments to schedule of technological tool installation contributed for a partial transference of the technology observed, demanding future researches to check the overcoming of these limitations.

  5. The relative influence of team climate, team norms and social network norms on health professionals' implementation of a national recommendation to offer service-users diagnosed with schizophrenia family intervention therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanbury, A

    2013-01-01

    Social influence is an important variable influencing health professionals' adoption of clinical recommendations. Different theories conceptualise social influence in different ways. This study operationalised three different forms of social influence--team climate, team norms (descriptive and injunctive) and social network norms (descriptive and injunctive), and compared their ability to predict mental health professionals' self-reported intention to adopt a national, clinical recommendation. A cross-sectional survey was developed, measuring the constructs in relation to intention to offer service-users family an intervention therapy, as part of a larger, theory-based implementation study. The survey was administered to all mental health professionals in one mental health trust. Using multiple regression, descriptive network norms were found to be the only significant predictor of intention. This suggests that behaviour change interventions in this context may benefit from promoting descriptive network norms, for example, emphasising the adoption behaviour of influential peers. Given the high degree of overlap found between network and team members in this study, and the potential challenges of targeting behaviour-change interventions at informal, more difficult to identify networks, future research is needed to evaluate the feasibility of targeting behaviour-change interventions at social networks compared with formal teams.

  6. Voice and silence in organizations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moaşa, H.

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Unlike previous research on voice and silence, this article breaksthe distance between the two and declines to treat them as opposites. Voice and silence are interrelated and intertwined strategic forms ofcommunication which presuppose each other in such a way that the absence of one would minimize completely the other’s presence. Social actors are not voice, or silence. Social actors can have voice or silence, they can do both because they operate at multiple levels and deal with multiple issues at different moments in time.

  7. User involvement in care work

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dybbroe, Betina; Kamp, Annette

    effectiveness and shared responsibility for care pathways. While NPM position users as consumers making their free choice, the user involvement paradigm underlines the users’ active participation in the mastering of their problems and disease. Research is scarce on this theme, and has until now primarily...... addressed the way this paradigm affects the users, in specific sectors. However user involvement also affects working life. It may imply change and redistribution of tasks and identities between users and professionals, and may also transform the relations of care. In this paper we explore the possible...... implications of this for care professionals, their practices, professional identities and positions in the work organization. Based on tree explorative qualitative studies in Danish homecare, psychiatry and cardiology, we illustrate first how user involvement may assume very different forms; in some instances...

  8. Interactive Voice/Web Response System in clinical research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruikar, Vrishabhsagar

    2016-01-01

    Emerging technologies in computer and telecommunication industry has eased the access to computer through telephone. An Interactive Voice/Web Response System (IxRS) is one of the user friendly systems for end users, with complex and tailored programs at its backend. The backend programs are specially tailored for easy understanding of users. Clinical research industry has experienced revolution in methodologies of data capture with time. Different systems have evolved toward emerging modern technologies and tools in couple of decades from past, for example, Electronic Data Capture, IxRS, electronic patient reported outcomes, etc.

  9. Interactive Voice/Web Response System in clinical research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vrishabhsagar Ruikar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Emerging technologies in computer and telecommunication industry has eased the access to computer through telephone. An Interactive Voice/Web Response System (IxRS is one of the user friendly systems for end users, with complex and tailored programs at its backend. The backend programs are specially tailored for easy understanding of users. Clinical research industry has experienced revolution in methodologies of data capture with time. Different systems have evolved toward emerging modern technologies and tools in couple of decades from past, for example, Electronic Data Capture, IxRS, electronic patient reported outcomes, etc.

  10. A FRAMEWORK FOR INTELLIGENT VOICE-ENABLED E-EDUCATION SYSTEMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azeta A. A.

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Although the Internet has received significant attention in recent years, voice is still the most convenient and natural way of communicating between human to human or human to computer. In voice applications, users may have different needs which will require the ability of the system to reason, make decisions, be flexible and adapt to requests during interaction. These needs have placed new requirements in voice application development such as use of advanced models, techniques and methodologies which take into account the needs of different users and environments. The ability of a system to behave close to human reasoning is often mentioned as one of the major requirements for the development of voice applications. In this paper, we present a framework for an intelligent voice-enabled e-Education application and an adaptation of the framework for the development of a prototype Course Registration and Examination (CourseRegExamOnline module. This study is a preliminary report of an ongoing e-Education project containing the following modules: enrollment, course registration and examination, enquiries/information, messaging/collaboration, e-Learning and library. The CourseRegExamOnline module was developed using VoiceXML for the voice user interface(VUI, PHP for the web user interface (WUI, Apache as the middle-ware and MySQL database as back-end. The system would offer dual access modes using the VUI and WUI. The framework would serve as a reference model for developing voice-based e-Education applications. The e-Education system when fully developed would meet the needs of students who are normal users and those with certain forms of disabilities such as visual impairment, repetitive strain injury (RSI, etc, that make reading and writing difficult.

  11. Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) among Australian hospital-based nurses: knowledge, attitude, personal and professional use, reasons for use, CAM referrals, and socio-demographic predictors of CAM users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shorofi, Seyed Afshin; Arbon, Paul

    2017-05-01

    This study was intended to examine CAM among Australian hospital-based nurses, identifying their knowledge, attitude, personal and professional use, reasons for use, CAM referrals, and socio-demographic predictors of CAM users. Nurses holding a qualification in nursing and working in surgical wards were included using a convenience sampling technique. A self-complete questionnaire was developed to achieve the aims of the study. Descriptive and non-parametric statistics were calculated to describe and analyse data. Overall, 95.7% and 49.7% of nurses reported personal and professional use of CAM, respectively. The most popular CAM/CAM domain personally and professionally used by nurses was massage therapy and mind-body therapies. The primary reason for personal use of CAM was "[it] fits into my way of life/philosophy". Furthermore, massage therapists were the most commonly recommended CAM practitioners to patients. Only 15.8% of nurses would always ask patients about use of herbal medicines as part of nursing history taking. Over one-fifth (22.4%) of nurses rated their attitude as having a very positive, and 60.3% rated themselves as having very little or no knowledge of CAM. A positive correlation was also found between knowledge and attitude about CAM. Positive attitude and higher knowledge about CAM were positively correlated to CAM referrals. Several socio-demographic factors predicted personal and professional use of CAM. This study revealed that nurses generally believe not to have sufficient knowledge of CAM but are open to use CAM with patients. Nurses' positive attitude toward and personal use of CAM could be an indication that they are poised for further integration of evidence-based CAM into nursing practice to treat whole person. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. The Voice Handicap Index with Post-Laryngectomy Male Voices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Eryl; Carding, Paul; Drinnan, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Background: Surgical treatment for advanced laryngeal cancer involves complete removal of the larynx ("laryngectomy") and initial total loss of voice. Post-laryngectomy rehabilitation involves implementation of different means of "voicing" for these patients wherever possible. There is little information about laryngectomees'…

  13. Objective voice parameters in Colombian school workers with healthy voices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L.C. Cantor Cutiva (Lady Catherine); A. Burdorf (Alex)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractObjectives: To characterize the objective voice parameters among school workers, and to identify associated factors of three objective voice parameters, namely fundamental frequency, sound pressure level and maximum phonation time. Materials and methods: We conducted a cross-sectional

  14. Professional C++

    CERN Document Server

    Gregoire, Marc

    2014-01-01

    Master complex C++ programming with this helpful, in-depth resource From game programming to major commercial software applications, C++ is the language of choice. It is also one of the most difficult programming languages to master. While most competing books are geared toward beginners, Professional C++, Third Edition, shows experienced developers how to master the latest release of C++, explaining little known features with detailed code examples users can plug into their own codes. More advanced language features and programming techniques are presented in this newest edition of the book,

  15. Involving service users in the classroom with social work students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackay, Rob; Millar, Jeremy

    2012-02-01

    The purpose of this paper is to explore and discuss issues related to the requirement by the Scottish Social Services Council (SSSC) and the Scottish Government that service users and carers are partners and stakeholders in social work education. This requirement is one of several that are used by the SSSC in the approval of Scottish Universities to deliver social work courses. This paper explains the developmental process of involving service users and carers as partners in the planning of social work courses at the Robert Gordon University (RGU), Aberdeen. This is illustrated with reference to a group made up of young people ('The Voice of Reason') and also in relation to a group made up of adult service users (the Service User Panel). This short paper suggests there are benefits for student learning if we invite service users and carers to become partners in the teaching/learning process. There are also benefits for teaching staff and indeed for the University itself as a public institution on the basis that an ongoing relationship allows for good partnership working. This enables the University and its staff to be viewed positively and from that vantage point further developments are more likely. At the same time this paper has discussed the need to avoid tokenistic moves through ensuring a sound organisational commitment is made to providing effective support and putting in place enabling structures and processes. Lastly it discusses the broader implications for partnership working in relation to the education and training of students for professional practice. The suggestion is made that such a teaching and learning approach equips the students with good partnership skills and attitudes that will help to inform their practice post-qualification. Interest is expressed in the experiences of other professions who have adopted similar approaches to incorporating service users into students' learning experiences. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  16. Evaluation of voice control, touch panel control and assistant control during steering of an endoscope

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Punt, Marius M.; Stefels, Coen N.; Grimbergen, Cornelis A.; Dankelman, Jenny

    2005-01-01

    The increasing amount of equipment used in the Operating Room ( OR) asks for ergonomical user interfaces. The aim of this study was to investigate in a pelvi-trainer setting the efficiency, reliability and user satisfaction of voice control, touch panel control and conventional manual control by an

  17. Description and evaluation of a serious game intervention to engage low secure service users with serious mental illness in the design and refurbishment of their environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzgerald, M M; Kirk, G D; Bristow, C A

    2011-05-01

    Service user involvement in all levels of healthcare provision is the expectation of UK government policy. Involvement should not only include participation in the planning and delivery of health care but also the exercise of choice and opinions about that care. In practice, however, service user engagement is most often tokenistic, involving post hoc consultation over plans already committed to by services. This paper explores an Occupational Therapy-led initiative to use the Serious Game format to engage low secure service users with serious mental illness in the design, layout and refurbishment of their unit. Among other things how medication was to be dispensed on the new unit was explored by this game and led to significant replanning in response to service user involvement. The game format was found to be a useful tool in facilitating communication between professionals and a traditionally marginalized and powerless client group. It enabled service users to have a voice, it provided a format for that voice to be heard and made possible service-led change in the planning process. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing.

  18. Facing Sound - Voicing Art

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lønstrup, Ansa

    2013-01-01

    This article is based on examples of contemporary audiovisual art, with a special focus on the Tony Oursler exhibition Face to Face at Aarhus Art Museum ARoS in Denmark in March-July 2012. My investigation involves a combination of qualitative interviews with visitors, observations of the audience......´s interactions with the exhibition and the artwork in the museum space and short analyses of individual works of art based on reception aesthetics and phenomenology and inspired by newer writings on sound, voice and listening....

  19. Employee voice and employee retention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, D G

    1986-09-01

    This study investigates the relationship between the extent to which employees have opportunities to voice dissatisfaction and voluntary turnover in 111 short-term, general care hospitals. Results show that, whether or not a union is present, high numbers of mechanisms for employee voice are associated with high retention rates. Implications for theory and research as well as management practice are discussed.

  20. Finding a Voice, Finding Self

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macbeath, John

    2006-01-01

    The term "pupil voice" has, in recent years, become part of a wider discourse but tends to refer to a limited conception of young people "having a say" within the bounds of school convention. This article is about what Henry Giroux terms "border crossings," in which voice develops through a physical and intellectual…

  1. Effects of Medications on Voice

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... requests or policy questions to our media and public relations staff at newsroom@entnet.org . Could Your Medication Be Affecting Your Voice? Some medications including prescription, over-the-counter, and herbal supplements can affect the function of your voice. If your doctor prescribes a ...

  2. Voice, Schooling, Inequality, and Scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, James

    2013-01-01

    The rich studies in this collection show that the investigation of voice requires analysis of "recognition" across layered spatial-temporal and sociolinguistic scales. I argue that the concepts of voice, recognition, and scale provide insight into contemporary educational inequality and that their study benefits, in turn, from paying attention to…

  3. Enhancing Author's Voice through Scripting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Chase J.; Rasinski, Timothy V.

    2011-01-01

    The authors suggest using scripting as a strategy to mentor and enhance author's voice in writing. Through gradual release, students use authentic literature as a model for writing with voice. The authors also propose possible extensions for independent practice, integration across content areas, and tips for evaluation.

  4. Paralinguistic Qualifiers: Our Many Voices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poyatos, Fernando

    1991-01-01

    A case is made for the increased study of paralinguistic voice qualifiers, which include variations in breathing, laryngeal, esophageal, pharyngeal, velopharyngeal, lingual, labial, mandibular, articulatory, articulatory tension, and objectual control. It is proposed that attention to these voice qualities has a variety of practical, literary,…

  5. Effects on vocal range and voice quality of singing voice training: the classically trained female voice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pabon, Peter; Stallinga, Rob; Södersten, Maria; Ternström, Sten

    2014-01-01

    A longitudinal study was performed on the acoustical effects of singing voice training under a given study program, using the voice range profile (VRP). Pretraining and posttraining recordings were made of students who participated in a 3-year bachelor singing study program. A questionnaire that included questions on optimal range, register use, classification, vocal health and hygiene, mixing technique, and training goals was used to rate and categorize self-assessed voice changes. Based on the responses, a subgroup of 10 classically trained female voices was selected, which was homogeneous enough for effects of training to be identified. The VRP perimeter contour was analyzed for effects of voice training. Also, a mapping within the VRP of voice quality, as expressed by the crest factor, was used to indicate the register boundaries and to monitor the acoustical consequences of the newly learned vocal technique of "mixed voice." VRPs were averaged across subjects. Findings were compared with the self-assessed vocal changes. Pre/post comparison of the average VRPs showed, in the midrange, (1) a decrease in the VRP area that was associated with the loud chest voice, (2) a reduction of the crest factor values, and (3) a reduction of maximum sound pressure level values. The students' self-evaluations of the voice changes appeared in some cases to contradict the VRP findings. VRPs of individual voices were seen to change over the course of a singing education. These changes were manifest also in the average group. High-resolution computerized recording, complemented with an acoustic register marker, allows a meaningful assessment of some effects of training, on an individual basis and for groups that comprise singers of a specific genre. It is argued that this kind of investigation is possible only within a focused training program, given by a faculty who has agreed on the goals. Copyright © 2014 The Voice Foundation. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Building a Model of Early Years Professionalism from Practitioners’ Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brock, Avril

    2013-01-01

    Practitioner voice has been absent from debates regarding what constitutes professional behaviour and practice in the early years. This research identifies and uses the professional knowledge of a group of early years educators to create a typology of professionalism. The typology comprises seven inter-related dimensions of early years…

  7. Voice problems of group fitness instructors: diagnosis, treatment, perceived and experienced attitudes and expectations of the industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rumbach, Anna F

    2013-11-01

    To determine the anatomical and physiological nature of voice problems and their treatment in those group fitness instructors (GFIs) who have sought a medical diagnosis; the impact of voice disorders on quality of life and their contribution to activity limitations and participation restrictions; and the perceived attitudes and level of support from the industry at large in response to instructor's voice disorders and need for treatment. Prospective self-completion questionnaire design. Thirty-eight individuals (3 males and 35 females) currently active in the Australian fitness industry who had been diagnosed with a voice disorder completed an online self-completion questionnaire administered via SurveyMonkey. Laryngeal pathology included vocal fold nodules (N = 24), vocal fold cysts (N = 2), vocal fold hemorrhage (N = 1), and recurrent chronic laryngitis (N = 3). Eight individuals reported vocal strain and muscle tension dysphonia without concurrent vocal fold pathology. Treatment methods were variable, with 73.68% (N = 28) receiving voice therapy alone, 7.89% (N = 3) having voice therapy in combination with surgery, and 10.53% (N = 4) having voice therapy in conjunction with medication. Three individuals (7.89%) received no treatment for their voice disorder. During treatment, 82% of the cohort altered their teaching practices. Half of the cohort reported that their voice problems led to social withdrawal, decreased job satisfaction, and emotional distress. Greater than 65% also reported being dissatisfied with the level of industry and coworker support during the period of voice recovery. This study identifies that GFIs are susceptible to a number of voice disorders that impact their social and professional lives, and there is a need for more proactive training and advice on voice care for instructors, as well as those in management positions within the industry to address mixed approaches and opinions regarding the importance of voice care. Copyright © 2013

  8. Effect of Training and Level of External Auditory Feedback on the Singing Voice: Volume and Quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bottalico, Pasquale; Graetzer, Simone; Hunter, Eric J

    2016-07-01

    Previous research suggests that classically trained professional singers rely not only on external auditory feedback but also on proprioceptive feedback associated with internal voice sensitivities. The Lombard effect and the relationship between sound pressure level (SPL) and external auditory feedback were evaluated for professional and nonprofessional singers. Additionally, the relationship between voice quality, evaluated in terms of singing power ratio (SPR), and external auditory feedback, level of accompaniment, voice register, and singer gender was analyzed. The subjects were 10 amateur or beginner singers and 10 classically trained professional or semiprofessional singers (10 men and 10 women). Subjects sang an excerpt from the Star-Spangled Banner with three different levels of the accompaniment, 70, 80, and 90 dBA and with three different levels of external auditory feedback. SPL and SPR were analyzed. The Lombard effect was stronger for nonprofessional singers than professional singers. Higher levels of external auditory feedback were associated with a reduction in SPL. As predicted, the mean SPR was higher for professional singers than nonprofessional singers. Better voice quality was detected in the presence of higher levels of external auditory feedback. With an increase in training, the singer's reliance on external auditory feedback decreases. Copyright © 2016 The Voice Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Selection of a voice for a speech signal for personalized warnings: the effect of speaker's gender and voice pitch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machado, Sheron; Duarte, Emília; Teles, Júlia; Reis, Lara; Rebelo, Francisco

    2012-01-01

    There is an increasing interest in multimodal technology-based warnings, namely those conveying speech-warning statements. This type of warning may be tailored to the situation as well as to the target user's characteristics. However, more information is needed on how to design these warnings in a way that ensures intelligibility, promotes compliance and reduces the potential for annoyance. In this context, this paper reports an exploratory study whose main purpose was to assist the selection of a synthesized voice for a subsequent compliance study with personalized (i.e., using the person's name) technology-based warnings using Virtual Reality. Participants were requested to listen to speech signals, gathered from a speech synthesizer and post-processed in order to change the pitch perception, and then these were evaluated by fulfilling the MOS-X questionnaire. After that, the participants ranked the voices according to their preference. The effects of the speaker's gender and voice pitch, on both ratings and ranking were assessed. The preference of the male and female listeners for a talker's voice gender was also investigated. The results show that participants mostly prefer as first choice the high-pitched female voice, which also gathered the highest overall score in the MOS-X questionnaire. No significant influence of the participants' gender was found on the assessed measures.

  10. Bodies, Spaces, Voices, Silences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donatella Mazzoleni

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available A good architecture should not only allow functional, formal and technical quality for urban spaces, but also let the voice of the city be perceived, listened, enjoyed. Every city has got its specific sound identity, or “ISO” (R. O. Benenzon, made up of a complex texture of background noises and fluctuation of sound figures emerging and disappearing in a game of continuous fadings. For instance, the ISO of Naples is characterized by a spread need of hearing the sound return of one’s/others voices, by a hate of silence. Cities may fall ill: illness from noise, within super-crowded neighbourhoods, or illness from silence, in the forced isolation of peripheries. The proposal of an urban music therapy denotes an unpublished and innovative enlarged interdisciplinary research path, where architecture, music, medicine, psychology, communication science may converge, in order to work for rebalancing spaces and relation life of the urban collectivity, through the care of body and sound dimensions.

  11. Muscular tension and body posture in relation to voice handicap and voice quality in teachers with persistent voice complaints.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kooijman, P.G.C.; Jong, F.I.C.R.S. de; Oudes, M.J.; Huinck, W.J.; Acht, H. van; Graamans, K.

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between extrinsic laryngeal muscular hypertonicity and deviant body posture on the one hand and voice handicap and voice quality on the other hand in teachers with persistent voice complaints and a history of voice-related absenteeism. The

  12. Whistleblowing Need not Occur if Internal Voices Are Heard: From Deaf Effect to Hearer Courage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleary, Sonja R.; Doyle, Kerrie E.

    2016-01-01

    Whistleblowing by health professionals is an infrequent and extraordinary event and need not occur if internal voices are heard. Mannion and Davies’ editorial on "Cultures of Silence and Cultures of Voice: The Role of Whistleblowing in Healthcare Organisations" asks the question whether whistleblowing ameliorates or exacerbates the ‘deaf effect’ prevalent in healthcare organisations. This commentary argues that the focus should remain on internal processes and hearer courage . PMID:26673652

  13. Teachers' voicing and silence periods during continuous speech in classrooms with different reverberation times.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bottalico, Pasquale; Astolfi, Arianna; Hunter, Eric J

    2017-01-01

    The relationship between reverberation times and the voicing and silence accumulations of continuous speech was quantified in 22 primary-school teachers. Teachers were divided into a high and a low reverberation time groups based on their classroom reverberation time (higher and lower than 0.90 s). Reverberation times higher than 0.90 s implicate higher voicing accumulations and higher accumulations of the silences typical of turn taking in dialogue. These results suggest that vocal load, which can lead to vocal fatigue, is influenced by classroom reverberation time. Therefore, it may be considered a risk factor for occupational voice users.

  14. Comparing Methods for Involving Users in Ideation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nicolajsen, Hanne Westh; Scupola, Ada; Sørensen, Flemming

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we discuss how users may be involved in the ideation phase of innovation. The study compares the use of a blog and three future workshops (students, employees and a mix of the two) in a library. Our study shows that the blog is efficient in giving the users voice whereas the mixed...... workshop method (involving users and employees) is especially good at qualifying and further developing ideas. The findings suggest that methods for involving users in ideation should be carefully selected and combined to achieve optimum benefits and avoid potential disadvantages....

  15. Laryngeal biomechanics of the singing voice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koufman, J A; Radomski, T A; Joharji, G M; Russell, G B; Pillsbury, D C

    1996-12-01

    By transnasal fiberoptic laryngoscopy, patients with functional voice often demonstrate abnormal laryngeal biomechanics, commonly supraglottic contraction. Appropriately, such conditions are sometimes termed muscle tension dysphonias. Singers working at the limits of their voice may also transiently demonstrate comparable tension patterns. However, the biomechanics of normal singing, particularly for different singing styles, have not been previously well characterized. We used transnasal fiberoptic laryngoscopy to study 100 healthy singers to assess patterns of laryngeal tension during normal singing and to determine whether factors such as sex, occupation, and style of singing influence laryngeal muscle tension. Thirty-nine male and 61 female singers were studied; 48 were professional singers, and 52 were amateurs. Examinations of study subjects performing standardized and nonstandardized singing tasks were recorded on a laser disk and subsequently analyzed in a frame-by-frame fashion by a blinded otolaryngologist. Each vocal task was graded for muscle tension by previously established criteria, and objective muscle tension scores were computed. The muscle tension score was expressed as a percentage of frames for each task with one of the laryngeal muscle tension patterns shown. The lowest muscle tension scores were seen in female professional singers, and the highest muscle tension scores were seen in amateur female singers. Male singers (professional and amateur) had intermediate muscle tension scores. Classical singers had lower muscle tension scores than nonclassical singers, with the lowest muscle tension scores being seen in those singing choral music (41%), art song (47%), and opera (57%), and the highest being seen in those singing jazz/pop (65%), musical theater (74%), bluegrass/country and western (86%), and rock/gospel (94%). Analyzed also were the influences of vocal nodules, prior vocal training, number of performance and practice hours per week

  16. Stable Voice Clusters Identified When Using the Maximum versus Minimum Intensity Curve in the Phonetogram.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camarrone, Flavio; Ivanova, Anna; Decoster, Wivine; de Jong, Felix; van Hulle, Marc M

    2015-01-01

    To examine whether the minimum as well as the maximum voice intensity (i.e. sound pressure level, SPL) curves of a voice range profile (VRP) are required when discovering different voice groups based on a clustering analysis. In this approach, no a priori labeling of voice types is used. VRPs of 194 (84 male and 110 female) professional singers were registered and processed. Cluster analysis was performed with the use of features related to (1) both the maximum and minimum SPL curves and (2) the maximum SPL curve only. Features related to the maximum as well as the minimum SPL curves showed three clusters in both male and female voices. These clusters, or voice groups, are based on voice types with similar VRP features. However, when using features related only to the maximum SPL curve, the clusters became less obvious. Features related to the maximum and minimum SPL curves of a VRP are both needed in order to identify the three voice clusters. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  17. Correlations between Sportsmen’s Morpho-Functional Measurements and Voice Acoustic Variables

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rexhepi Agron M.

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Since human voice characteristics are specific to each individual, numerous anthropological studies have been oriented to find significant relationships between voice and morpho-functional features. The goal of this study was to identify the correlation between seven morpho-functional variables and six voice acoustic parameters in sportsmen. Methods. Following the protocols of the International Biological Program, seven morpho-functional variables and six voice acoustic parameters have been measured in 88 male professional athletes from Kosovo, aged 17-35 years, during the period of April-October 2013. The statistical analysis was accomplished through the SPSS program, version 20. The obtained data were analysed through descriptive parameters and with Spearman’s method of correlation analysis. Results. Spearman’s method of correlation showed significant negative correlations (R = -0.215 to -0.613; p = 0.05 between three voice acoustic variables of the fundamental frequency of the voice sample (Mean, Minimum, and Maximum Pitch and six morpho-functional measures (Body Height, Body Weight, Margaria-Kalamen Power Test, Sargent Jump Test, Pull-up Test, and VO2max.abs. Conclusions. The significant correlations imply that the people with higher stature have longer vocal cords and a lower voice. These results encourage investigations on predicting sportsmen’s functional abilities on the basis of their voice acoustic parameters.

  18. The voice clinic: an interdisciplinary approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rammage, L A; Nichol, H; Morrison, M D

    1983-10-01

    The University of British Columbia Voice Clinic provides care to patients with various types of voice disorder, and the effectiveness of therapy is enhanced by an interdisciplinary approach. The Voice Clinic team includes an otolaryngologist, speech pathologist, psychiatrist, and singing teacher consultant. This paper particularly highlights the interactions between the speech pathologist and psychiatrist in their therapy programs for voice disordered patients.

  19. User 2020

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Porras, Jari; Heikkinen, Kari; Kinnula, Marianne

    2014-01-01

    The User 2020 vision is of the changing needs and habits of a user in the future digital world. In order to understand the needs of the future users, we need to look at how users and technology have changed during recent years. The different generations of users are products of their own time...... and environment, and each has had its effect on the development of technology. The closer we come to the current generation, the bigger is the effect of technology on the characteristics of that generation. User needs guide the technology and the technology shapes the users. This WWRF Outlook analyses...... this evolutionary process. The basis of this Outlook lies in studies of user generations. Although it’s controversial to do so, users have been divided into generations based on their ability and willingness to use ICT solutions. Whether the users are digital ‘tourists’, ‘immigrants’ or ‘natives’ is mainly...

  20. Ontology-driven voiceXML dialogues generation

    OpenAIRE

    Gatius Vila, Marta; González Bermúdez, Meritxell

    2004-01-01

    This paper describes a proposal to improve the communication process and the engineering features in VoiceXML dialogues. This proposal is focused on the efficient and reusable representation of the knowledge involved in communication. In order to achieve a good dialogue design we propose the explicit representation of the conceptual information the application needs form the user in an ontology. A syntactic-semantic taxonomy is provided to facilitate the generation of the grammars and the sys...

  1. 'When you haven't got much of a voice': an evaluation of the quality of Independent Mental Health Advocate (IMHA) services in England.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newbigging, Karen; Ridley, Julie; McKeown, Mick; Machin, Karen; Poursanidou, Konstantina

    2015-05-01

    Advocacy serves to promote the voice of service users, represent their interests and enable participation in decision-making. Given the context of increasing numbers of people detained under the Mental Health Act and heightened awareness of the potential for neglect and abuse in human services, statutory advocacy is an important safeguard supporting human rights and democratising the social relationships of care. This article reports findings from a national review of Independent Mental Health Advocate (IMHA) provision in England. A qualitative study used a two-stage design to define quality and assess the experience and impact of IMHA provision in eight study sites. A sample of 289 participants - 75 focus group participants and 214 individuals interviewed - including 90 people eligible for IMHA services, as well as advocates, a range of hospital and community-based mental health professionals, and commissioners. The research team included people with experience of compulsion. Findings indicate that the experience of compulsion can be profoundly disempowering, confirming the need for IMHA. However, access was highly variable and more problematic for people with specific needs relating to ethnicity, age and disability. Uptake of IMHA services was influenced by available resources, attitude and understanding of mental health professionals, as well as the organisation of IMHA provision. Access could be improved through a system of opt-out as opposed to opt-in. Service user satisfaction was most frequently reported in terms of positive experiences of the process of advocacy rather than tangible impacts on care and treatment under the Mental Health Act. IMHA services have the potential to significantly shift the dynamic so that service users have more of a voice in their care and treatment. However, a shift is needed from a narrow conception of statutory advocacy as safeguarding rights to one emphasising self-determination and participation in decisions about care and

  2. Voice synthesis application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lightstone, P. C.; Davidson, W. M.

    1982-04-01

    The military detection assessment laboratory houses an experimental field system which assesses different alarm indicators such as fence disturbance sensors, MILES cables, and microwave Racons. A speech synthesis board which could be interfaced, by means of a computer, to an alarm logger making verbal acknowledgement of alarms possible was purchased. Different products and different types of voice synthesis were analyzed before a linear predictive code device produced by Telesensory Speech Systems of Palo Alto, California was chosen. This device is called the Speech 1000 Board and has a dedicated 8085 processor. A multiplexer card was designed and the Sp 1000 interfaced through the card into a TMS 990/100M Texas Instrument microcomputer. It was also necessary to design the software with the capability of recognizing and flagging an alarm on any 1 of 32 possible lines. The experimental field system was then packaged with a dc power supply, LED indicators, speakers, and switches, and deployed in the field performing reliably.

  3. Voice Habits and Behaviors: Voice Care Among Flamenco Singers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garzón García, Marina; Muñoz López, Juana; Y Mendoza Lara, Elvira

    2017-03-01

    The purpose of this study is to analyze the vocal behavior of flamenco singers, as compared with classical music singers, to establish a differential vocal profile of voice habits and behaviors in flamenco music. Bibliographic review was conducted, and the Singer's Vocal Habits Questionnaire, an experimental tool designed by the authors to gather data regarding hygiene behavior, drinking and smoking habits, type of practice, voice care, and symptomatology perceived in both the singing and the speaking voice, was administered. We interviewed 94 singers, divided into two groups: the flamenco experimental group (FEG, n = 48) and the classical control group (CCG, n = 46). Frequency analysis, a Likert scale, and discriminant and exploratory factor analysis were used to obtain a differential profile for each group. The FEG scored higher than the CCG in speaking voice symptomatology. The FEG scored significantly higher than the CCG in use of "inadequate vocal technique" when singing. Regarding voice habits, the FEG scored higher in "lack of practice and warm-up" and "environmental habits." A total of 92.6% of the subjects classified themselves correctly in each group. The Singer's Vocal Habits Questionnaire has proven effective in differentiating flamenco and classical singers. Flamenco singers are exposed to numerous vocal risk factors that make them more prone to vocal fatigue, mucosa dehydration, phonotrauma, and muscle stiffness than classical singers. Further research is needed in voice training in flamenco music, as a means to strengthen the voice and enable it to meet the requirements of this musical genre. Copyright © 2017 The Voice Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Modelling a Voice Activated Speaker Identification System using MFCC-Pitch-Formant Vector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sengupta, Avik; Ghosh, Rabindranath

    2012-03-01

    The paper presents the model of an automatic speaker identification system which will recognize users based on their voice. The system will be relatively independent of spoken words but will rely on the voice quality of a user i.e. use speech independent voice recognition. The basic approach was to create a front end system which will identify speech parameters of particular users and create speech feature vectors which will later be used to train a back-propagation neural network for the recognition phase. Mel-frequency cepstrum coefficients and linear predictive coding coefficients have been used, along with Pitch and Formants, for feature extraction. The main area of focus of the paper is to outline the optimum set of speech features which form the most reliable model for an automatic speaker identification system.

  5. effects of user behaviour on gsm air interface performance

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    rated software objects, called agents. (Wooldridge, 2002). The agent representing the. 'individual' is .... to using voice when the network is congested. Figure 5 compares the blocking probabilities from the basic model with those obtained from the situation where users use SMS during con- gestion. Modified. User Behaviour.

  6. Ergonomic automated anesthesia recordkeeper using a mobile touch screen with voice navigtion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanjo, Y; Yokoyama, T; Sato, S; Ikeda, K; Nakajima, R

    1999-08-01

    To develop an ergonomically designed computerized recordkeeping tool for anesthesiologists that allows the clinician to maintain visual contact with the patient while performing recordkeeping. To simplify the human interface software, we developed two general use software components. All purpose menu type 1 (APM1) was used for entering events using a tree structured menu. APM1 was designed to adapt to the limits of human memory, by using Miller's rule of 7 to guide the input process. APM1 can be considered to be a three-dimensional table list consisting of 7 vertical and 7 horizontal choices, which has further 5 tree-structured divergences. APM1 is also completely configurable by the user. All purpose menu 2 (APM2) was used to implement the system-initiated human interface where the system will prompt the user by voice for each entry. When users touch a key on APM1 and APM2, the system was designed to respond with a voice prompt. A touch-screen was also utilized and designed to fit the anesthesia machine. The screen is equipped with a small speaker for voice response and a microphone for voice recognition. The positions of the screen are adjustable supported by a long flexible limb (85 cm). After improving the design, systems were assembled for 10 operating rooms. Of the multiple features of the VOCAAR user interface, the following were well accepted by users and employed daily: touch-screen input, and voice response. The noncompulsory use rate was 87% during the initial 2 weeks, increased to 94% after 2 weeks and 100% after two months. The mean sound emission by voice response (n = 10, mean +/- SD) was 8.2 +/- 2.3 dB at the main anesthetist site (35 cm from the speaker mounted on the touch-screen), 2.2 +/- 1.3 dB at the staff site (1.5 m from the touch-screen), which was only audible for anesthesiologist but for surgeon. An EARK system was designed to allow the user to maintain visual contact with the patient while performing recordkeeping tasks. The combination

  7. Taking Care of Your Voice

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... NIDCD-funded researchers showed that, in an animal model of the aging voice, vocal training exercises helped the muscles of the larynx stay strong. Because teachers have a high incidence of vocal disorders, the ...

  8. The Christian voice in philosophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stuart Fowler

    1982-03-01

    Full Text Available In this paper the Rev. Stuart Fowler outlines a Christian voice in Philosophy and urges the Christian philosopher to investigate his position and his stance with integrity and honesty.

  9. Voice Force tulekul / Tõnu Ojala

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Ojala, Tõnu, 1969-

    2005-01-01

    60. sünnipäeva tähistava Tallinna Tehnikaülikooli Akadeemilise Meeskoori juubelihooaja üritusest - a capella pop-gruppide festivalist Voice Force (kontserdid 12. nov. klubis Parlament ja 3. dets. Vene Kultuurikeskuses)

  10. Hearing Voices and Seeing Things

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... sometimes accompanied by hallucinations or delusions (a fixed, false, and often bizarre belief). Hearing voices or seeing ... of his life such as at school, with friends, in the neighborhood, and with family. Any child ...

  11. A voice-input voice-output communication aid for people with severe speech impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawley, Mark S; Cunningham, Stuart P; Green, Phil D; Enderby, Pam; Palmer, Rebecca; Sehgal, Siddharth; O'Neill, Peter

    2013-01-01

    A new form of augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) device for people with severe speech impairment-the voice-input voice-output communication aid (VIVOCA)-is described. The VIVOCA recognizes the disordered speech of the user and builds messages, which are converted into synthetic speech. System development was carried out employing user-centered design and development methods, which identified and refined key requirements for the device. A novel methodology for building small vocabulary, speaker-dependent automatic speech recognizers with reduced amounts of training data, was applied. Experiments showed that this method is successful in generating good recognition performance (mean accuracy 96%) on highly disordered speech, even when recognition perplexity is increased. The selected message-building technique traded off various factors including speed of message construction and range of available message outputs. The VIVOCA was evaluated in a field trial by individuals with moderate to severe dysarthria and confirmed that they can make use of the device to produce intelligible speech output from disordered speech input. The trial highlighted some issues which limit the performance and usability of the device when applied in real usage situations, with mean recognition accuracy of 67% in these circumstances. These limitations will be addressed in future work.

  12. [Surgical voice rehabilitation following laryngectomy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahnke, K

    1982-06-03

    A survey is given concerning different techniques for the restoration of voice after total laryngectomy. Our experiences with tracheo-esophageal shunts without or with valve prostheses are compared and the advantages of specific surgical methods are reported. The threedimensional postoperative voice recording (fast Fourier-transformation) is demonstrated. Special attention is directed to case selection. For most of our patients (80%) who are receiving postoperative radiation therapy we recommend a two stage procedure.

  13. Voice Collection under Different Spectrum

    OpenAIRE

    Min Li; Yu-duo Wang

    2013-01-01

    According to the short-time Fourier transform theory and principle of digital filtering, this paper established a mathematical model called collection of voice signal collection at different spectrum. The voice signal was a non-stationary process, while the standard Fourier transform only applied to the periodic signal, transient signals or stationary random signal. Therefore, the standard Fourier transform could not be directly used for the speech signal. By controlling the input different t...

  14. Vocal problems of group fitness instructors: prevalence of self-reported sensory and auditory-perceptual voice symptoms and the need for preventative education and training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rumbach, Anna F

    2013-07-01

    To determine the prevalence and nature of both acute and chronic voice problems experienced by group fitness instructors (GFIs) and gather information about the level of education currently being received by fitness professionals, the source of their education, and their opinion on mandatory voice training to highlight potential training needs. Prospective self-completion questionnaire design. A total of 361 GFIs (81 males and 280 females), aged between 18 and 67 years currently active in the Australian fitness industry completed a self-report questionnaire distributed via SurveyMonkey. The prevalence of self-reported acute and chronic voice symptoms was high at 78.95% and 70.91%, respectively. Partial voice loss and hoarseness while instructing was experienced most often (57.62%), followed by partial voice loss and hoarseness immediately after instructing (46.81%). Aphonia after teaching was less frequently reported (9.97%). Over 25% of the total cohort reported chronic voice symptoms of increased hoarseness (39.61%), difficulty with high notes (31.58%), strained voice (32.13%), and limited singing range (27.7%). Only 30% of GFIs reported having received any voice education, with even fewer respondents (10%) receiving any practical voice training, despite 98.06% agreeing that formal voice education should be covered as a standard topic in all official GFI training. The results of this study confirm that voice problems represent a significant occupational hazard for GFIs. Speech-language pathologists and other voice professionals should consider taking a proactive stance in understanding the vocal demands of the profession and engage in training for instructors to prevent both acute and chronic voice problems. Copyright © 2013 The Voice Foundation. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Voice over IP in Wireless Heterogeneous Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fathi, Hanane; Chakraborty, Shyam; Prasad, Ramjee

    with the deployment of wireless heterogeneous systems, both speech and data traffic are carrried over wireless links by the same IP-based packet-switched infrastructure. However, this combination faces some challenges due to the inherent properties of the wireless network. The requirements for good quality VoIP...... communications are difficult to achieve in a time-varying environment due to channel errors and traffic congestion and across different systems. The provision of VoIP in wireless heterogeneous networks requires a set of time-efficient control mechanisms to support a VoIP session with acceptable quality....... The focus of Voice over IP in Wierless Heterogeneous Networks is on mechanisms that affect the VoIP user satisfaction  while not explicitly involved in the media session. This relates to the extra delays introduced by the security and the signaling protocols used to set up an authorized VoIP session...

  16. Understanding Types of Users on Twitter

    OpenAIRE

    Uddin, Muhammad Moeen; Imran, Muhammad; Sajjad, Hassan

    2014-01-01

    People use microblogging platforms like Twitter to involve with other users for a wide range of interests and practices. Twitter profiles run by different types of users such as humans, bots, spammers, businesses and professionals. This research work identifies six broad classes of Twitter users, and employs a supervised machine learning approach which uses a comprehensive set of features to classify users into the identified classes. For this purpose, we exploit users' profile and tweeting b...

  17. The prevalence of pediatric voice and swallowing problems in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharyya, Neil

    2015-03-01

    Determine the prevalence of pediatric voice and swallowing problems in the United States. The 2012 National Health Interview Survey pediatric voice and language module was analyzed, identifying children reporting a voice or swallowing problem in the preceding 12 months. In addition to demographic data, specific data regarding visits to health care professionals for voice or swallowing problems, diagnoses given, and severity of voice or swallowing problem were analyzed. An estimated 839 ± 89 thousand children (1.4% ± 0.1%) reported a voice problem. Overall, 53.5% ± 1.9% were given a diagnosis for the voice problem and 22.8% ± 4.6% received voice services. Laryngitis (16.6% ± 5.5%) and allergies (10.4% ± 4.0%) were the most common diagnoses. A total of 16.4% graded the voice problem as a "big" or "very big" problem. An estimated 569 ± 63 thousand children (0.9% ± 0.1%) reported a swallowing problem. A total of 12.7% ± 3.8% received swallowing services and 13.4% ± 1.6% were given a diagnosis for their swallowing problem. Neurological problems were the most common diagnoses (11.1% ± 4.5%). A total of 17.9% graded the swallowing problem as a "big" or "very big" problem. These data provide the first insight into the prevalence of childhood voice and swallowing problems, which affect approximately 1% of children annually. A relative minority seek care for their problem, despite the disease impact. © 2014 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  18. Interface Anywhere: Development of a Voice and Gesture System for Spaceflight Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Shelby; Haddock, Maxwell; Overland, David

    2013-01-01

    The Interface Anywhere Project was funded through Innovation Charge Account (ICA) at NASA JSC in the Fall of 2012. The project was collaboration between human factors and engineering to explore the possibility of designing an interface to control basic habitat operations through gesture and voice control; (a) Current interfaces require the users to be physically near an input device in order to interact with the system; and (b) By using voice and gesture commands, the user is able to interact with the system anywhere they want within the work environment.

  19. Perception and Information Behaviour of Institutional Repository End-Users Provides Valuable Insight for Future Development. A Review of: St. Jean, B., Rieh, S. Y., Yakel, E., & Markey, K. (2011. Unheard voices: Institutional repository end-users. College & Research Libraries, 72(1, 21-42.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa Shen

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective – To determine the perceptions andinformation behavior of institutionalrepository (IR end-users.Design – Semi-structured interviews.Setting – The interviews were conducted overthe telephone.Subjects – Twenty end-users of five differentIRs were interviewed for the study. Seventeenof the interviewees were recruited viarecruitment forms the researchers placed on IRhomepages and the other three intervieweeswere referred to researchers by IR managers.The interviewees’ academic backgroundsvaried, including six undergraduates, fourmasters’ students, three doctorial students, fivefaculty, and two library or museum staffmembers. They represented disciplines in Artsand Humanities (5, Science and HealthSciences (10, and Social Sciences (5. Fifteen ofthe 20 interviewees were recruited throughtheir own institution’s IR. All except two of theinterviewees had used the IR for which theywere recruited less than six times.Methods – Forty-three potential intervieweeswere recruited using web recruitment formsand IR manager recommendations.Researchers subsequently excluded 23 (53.5%of the interviewees because they wereprimarily IR contributors rather than endusers,or could not be reached by phone.Twenty interviews ranging from 17 to 60 minutes were conducted between January and June 2008. The average interview time was 34 minutes. The recordings were transcribed then analyzed using qualitative data analysis software NVivo7. Coding categories were developed using both the original research questions and emerging themes from the actual transcripts. The final coding scheme had a Holsi Coefficient of Reliability of 0.732 for inter-coder reliability.Main Results – Researchers identified six common themes from the results:How do end-users characterize IRs?While most interviewees recognized that there is a relationship between the IR and its host institution, their understandings of the function and content of IRs varied widely. Interviewees

  20. Optical voice encryption based on digital holography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajput, Sudheesh K; Matoba, Osamu

    2017-11-15

    We propose an optical voice encryption scheme based on digital holography (DH). An off-axis DH is employed to acquire voice information by obtaining phase retardation occurring in the object wave due to sound wave propagation. The acquired hologram, including voice information, is encrypted using optical image encryption. The DH reconstruction and decryption with all the correct parameters can retrieve an original voice. The scheme has the capability to record the human voice in holograms and encrypt it directly. These aspects make the scheme suitable for other security applications and help to use the voice as a potential security tool. We present experimental and some part of simulation results.

  1. Mobile user experience for voice services: A theoretical framework

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Botha, Adèle

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available . Oinas-Kukkonen, H. Mobile Electronic Commerce through the Web. in Second International Conference on Telecommunication and Electronic Commerce (ICTEC '99). 1999. Nashville, TN, USA. 15. Oinas-Kukkonen, H. and V. Kurkela, Developing Successful Mobile...

  2. Risk factors for voice problems in teachers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kooijman, P G C; de Jong, F I C R S; Thomas, G; Huinck, W; Donders, R; Graamans, K; Schutte, H K

    2006-01-01

    In order to identify factors that are associated with voice problems and voice-related absenteeism in teachers, 1,878 questionnaires were analysed. The questionnaires inquired about personal data, voice complaints, voice-related absenteeism from work and conditions that may lead to voice complaints and absenteeism. Different factors play a role in the development and consolidation of voice problems. Physical and psycho-emotional factors appear to be the most important risk factors. Remarkably, voice load and environment seem to be less important as risk factors in the development and consolidation of voice complaints. Teachers who experienced voice problems during their training reported more voice problems during their career. The results of this study stress the importance of a multifactorial approach in the diagnosis and treatment of voice problems, whereby physical and psycho-emotional aspects should be considered as sensitive to the risk of developing voice problems. Moreover, this study shows the crucial importance of adequate voice training during the teacher training programme.

  3. Mechanics of human voice production and control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhaoyan

    2016-01-01

    As the primary means of communication, voice plays an important role in daily life. Voice also conveys personal information such as social status, personal traits, and the emotional state of the speaker. Mechanically, voice production involves complex fluid-structure interaction within the glottis and its control by laryngeal muscle activation. An important goal of voice research is to establish a causal theory linking voice physiology and biomechanics to how speakers use and control voice to communicate meaning and personal information. Establishing such a causal theory has important implications for clinical voice management, voice training, and many speech technology applications. This paper provides a review of voice physiology and biomechanics, the physics of vocal fold vibration and sound production, and laryngeal muscular control of the fundamental frequency of voice, vocal intensity, and voice quality. Current efforts to develop mechanical and computational models of voice production are also critically reviewed. Finally, issues and future challenges in developing a causal theory of voice production and perception are discussed. PMID:27794319

  4. Mirroring Voices of Mother, Daughter and Therapist in Anorexia Nervosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathryn Dawn Weaver

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The experiences of women with eating disorders and the meanings drawn from these experiences are largely hidden from health care professionals and thus are poorly represented in clinical and academic discourse. This study examined interpersonal relationships in the context of anorexia nervosa between an adolescent, her mother, and therapist revealed in their private and intimate diaries, letters, and reflections. Using narrative processes, we analyzed complex communication between the daughter and mother. The results reflected their written dialogue, represented their stories, and were validated by them. The core story, mirroring voices, documents the reciprocal processing of experiences and perceptions between the daughter and mother that facilitate the daughter's recovery. Six threads of mirroring voices include "being implicitly there for each other," "writing gives us voice," "centering on ourselves," "measuring up," "anorexic bitch," and "pain has a name." The findings suggest the use of similar strategies by the daughter and mother to manage the anorexia nervosa by recasting it as an intrusion requiring their united efforts. The major implication is that health professionals consider the mother-daughter interaction as a resource. URN: http://nbn-resolving.de/urn:nbn:de:0114-fqs120363

  5. Usable SPACE: Security, Privacy, and Context for the Mobile User

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jutla, Dawn

    Users breach the security of data within many financial applications daily as human and/or business expediency to access and use information wins over corporate security policy guidelines. Recognizing that changing user context often requires different security mechanisms, we discuss end-to-end solutions combining several security and context mechanisms for relevant security control and information presentation in various mobile user situations. We illustrate key concepts using Dimitri Kanevskys (IBM Research) early 2000s patented inventions for voice security and classification.

  6. Communication resources of managers and business professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedrotti, Clarissa Araujo; Behlau, Mara

    2017-05-22

    To analyze the communication resources reported by managers in the business environment and compare the resources used to those reported by business professionals. 82 professionals volunteered to participate in the research, divided into 50 managers (MP) and 32 business professionals (BP) from industry section in Caxias do Sul and the surrounding region (Brazil). A questionnaire with 4 topics was used: personal data, self-assessment of communicative behavior, self-assessment of communicative resources, and selection of positive and negative resources influencing communication. Regarding communicative behavior, both groups reported normal voice but with significant differences regarding the use of softness in communication, 25% of MP and only 4% of BP. Both groups selected the following main positive resources: knowledge of subject, use of proper vocabulary, and objectivity. The negative resources were, similarly, the lack of subject domain, criticism or prejudgment, and improper vocabulary. Finally, analyzing the degree of influence of each communicative resource, the MP highlighted tone of voice as an important positive resource, while the BP pointed the subject domain. Still, the monotonous voice for MP and nervousness for BP were indicated as the main negative influences. Managers value more communicative resources connected to communicative attitude, such as tone of voice and expression, while business professionals worry about demonstrating security and technical understanding of the subject.

  7. Native voice, self-concept and the moral case for personalized voice technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nathanson, Esther

    2017-01-01

    Purpose (1) To explore the role of native voice and effects of voice loss on self-concept and identity, and survey the state of assistive voice technology; (2) to establish the moral case for developing personalized voice technology. Methods This narrative review examines published literature on the human significance of voice, the impact of voice loss on self-concept and identity, and the strengths and limitations of current voice technology. Based on the impact of voice loss on self and identity, and voice technology limitations, the moral case for personalized voice technology is developed. Results Given the richness of information conveyed by voice, loss of voice constrains expression of the self, but the full impact is poorly understood. Augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) devices facilitate communication but, despite advances in this field, voice output cannot yet express the unique nuances of individual voice. The ethical principles of autonomy, beneficence and equality of opportunity establish the moral responsibility to invest in accessible, cost-effective, personalized voice technology. Conclusions Although further research is needed to elucidate the full effects of voice loss on self-concept, identity and social functioning, current understanding of the profoundly negative impact of voice loss establishes the moral case for developing personalized voice technology. Implications for Rehabilitation Rehabilitation of voice-disordered patients should facilitate self-expression, interpersonal connectedness and social/occupational participation. Proactive questioning about the psychological and social experiences of patients with voice loss is a valuable entry point for rehabilitation planning. Personalized voice technology would enhance sense of self, communicative participation and autonomy and promote shared healthcare decision-making. Further research is needed to identify the best strategies to preserve and strengthen identity and sense of

  8. Introduction: Textual and contextual voices of translation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2017-01-01

    Voices – marks of the tangle of subjectivities involved in textual processes – constitute the very fabric of texts in general and translations in particular. The title of this book, Textual and Contextual Voices of Translation, refers both to textual voices, that is, the voices found within...... the translated texts, and to contextual voices, that is, the voices of those involved in shaping, commenting, or otherwise influencing the textual voices. The latter appear in prefaces, reviews, and other texts that surround the translated texts and provide them with a context. Our main claim is that studying...... both the textual and contextual voices helps us better understand and explain the complexity of both the translation process and the translation product. The dovetailed approach to translation research that is advocated in this book aims at highlighting the diversity of participants, power positions...

  9. Voicing Assimilation in Czech and Slovak Speakers of English: Interactions of Segmental Context, Language and Strength of Foreign Accent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skarnitzl, Radek; Šturm, Pavel

    2017-09-01

    This study focuses on voicing assimilation across word boundaries in the speech of second language (L2) users. We compare native speakers of British English to speakers of two West Slavic languages, Czech and Slovak, which, despite their many similarities, differ with respect to voicing assimilation rules. Word-final voicing was analysed in 30 speakers, using the static value of voicing percentage and the voicing profile method. The results of linear mixed-effects modelling suggest an effect of first language (L1) transfer in all L2 English speaker groups, with the tendency to assimilate being correlated with the strength of foreign accent. Importantly, the two language groups differed in assimilation strategies before sonorant consonants, as a clear effect of L1-based phonetic influence.

  10. Reconciling Voices in Writing an Autoethnographic Thesis

    OpenAIRE

    Dawn Johnston MSc; Tom Strong PhD

    2008-01-01

    The authors consider writing and supervising an autoethnographic thesis as a process of reconciling voices while finding one's own academic and personal voice. They draw from notions of polyphony to speak about how we negotiated with different voices (the voices of experts, research participants, personal affiliations, those used in our supervisory discussions) our way forward in the supervisory relationship, as well as in the thesis itself. They invite readers to draw their own meanings from...

  11. Pitch strength of normal and dysphonic voices

    OpenAIRE

    Shrivastav, Rahul; Eddins, David A.; Anand, Supraja

    2012-01-01

    Two sounds with the same pitch may vary from each other based on saliency of their pitch sensation. This perceptual attribute is called “pitch strength.” The study of voice pitch strength may be important in quantifying of normal and pathological qualities. The present study investigated how pitch strength varies across normal and dysphonic voices. A set of voices (vowel /a/) selected from the Kay Elemetrics Disordered Voice Database served as the stimuli. These stimuli demonstrated a wide ra...

  12. [Laryngeal registers as shown in the voice range profile].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roubeau, Bernard; Castellengo, Michèle; Bodin, Patricia; Ragot, Maryse

    2004-01-01

    Voice range profile (VRP) is a well-known vocal test. Usually, it consists of a single diagram based on the whole voice range. When practised separately in each individual laryngeal mechanism, VRP may offer much information on both the relative development of the different mechanisms used by the subject and the extension of the common area between two consecutive mechanisms. We present the results obtained from 42 subjects of both sexes who have different singing technique levels: professional singers, student and amateur singers, as well as subjects without any experience in singing. For each mechanism, the global VRP area and the dynamic range were computed. Results are discussed in relation to sex category and vocal training of subjects. Exploring systematically VRP for each mechanism gives new and valuable information on register managing in singing practice.

  13. Smart Homes with Voice Activated Systems for Disabled People

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bekir Busatlic

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Smart home refers to the application of various technologies to semi-unsupervised home control It refers to systems that control temperature, lighting, door locks, windows and many other appliances. The aim of this study was to design a system that will use existing technology to showcase how it can benefit people with disabilities. This work uses only off-the-shelf products (smart home devices and controllers, speech recognition technology, open-source code libraries. The Voice Activated Smart Home application was developed to demonstrate online grocery shopping and home control using voice comments and tested by measuring its effectiveness in performing tasks as well as its efficiency in recognizing user speech input.

  14. Voice, stress, work and quality of life of soccer coaches and physical trainers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penteado, Regina Zanella; Silva, Noelle Bernardi da; Montebello, Maria Imaculada de Lima

    2015-01-01

    To assess aspects related to work, stress and quality of life related to voice in soccer coaches (C) and physical trainers (T), comparing the categories. Qualitative and quantitative studies with 13 C and 13 T of teams competing in Phase One of the highest level (Série A ) of the 2012 Campeonato Paulista (São Paulo State Soccer Championship). The questions were open ended and related to complaints, difficulties, and/or problems regarding voice use during work and to the relations between voice, work, stress, and quality of life. Stress at work was analyzed by the Job Stress Scale (JSS) questionnaire. The perception of the impact of the voice on quality of life was evaluated by the Voice-Related Quality of Life (V-RQOL) protocol. The answers to the questions were transcribed and submitted to content analysis, and regarding the questionnaire, descriptive data and analytical statistics were used. Content analysis showed lack of preparation for voice care; voice complaints; and intense vocal use demand under stressful work, in addition to the absence of healthy habits and social/family support. The JSS dimensions showed that the Active Work situation and the high V-RQOL scores are compatible with vocal health without complaints. There were no statistical differences between the categories. Both categories reported complaints/problems linked to professional voice use and stressful workload. However, the perception of vocal impact on the quality of life was positive, and the analysis of stress at work resulted in "good" and favorable conditions. The relationship between voice, work, stress, and quality of life in both the categories require further investigations.

  15. Prevalence of Hearing Loss in Teachers of Singing and Voice Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isaac, Mitchell J; McBroom, Deanna H; Nguyen, Shaun A; Halstead, Lucinda A

    2017-05-01

    Singers and voice teachers are exposed to a range of noise levels during a normal working day. This study aimed to assess the hearing thresholds in a large sample of generally healthy professional voice teachers and voice students to determine the prevalence of hearing loss in this population. A cross-sectional study was carried out. Voice teachers and vocal students had the option to volunteer for a hearing screening of six standard frequencies in a quiet room with the Shoebox audiometer (Clearwater Clinical Limited) and to fill out a brief survey. Data were analyzed for the prevalence and severity of hearing loss in teachers and students based on several parameters assessed in the surveys. All data were analyzed using Microsoft Excel (Microsoft Corp.) and SPSS Statistics Software (IBM Corp.). A total of 158 participants were included: 58 self-identified as voice teachers, 106 as voice students, and 6 as both. The 6 participants who identified as both, were included in both categories for statistical purposes. Of the 158 participants, 36 had some level of hearing loss: 51.7% of voice teachers had hearing loss, and 7.5% of voice students had hearing loss. Several parameters of noise exposure were found to positively correlate with hearing loss and tinnitus (P teacher and age were both predictors of hearing loss (P teachers appears to be more prevalent and severe than previously thought. There is a significant association between years teaching and hearing loss. Raising awareness in this population may prompt teachers and students to adopt strategies to protect their hearing. Copyright © 2017 The Voice Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Voice Technology Using Personal Computers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-01-01

    34; options "lo"l; -. run "r"l; save "Is" escape "’lesc’"l; K /* The root sentence definition follows * Root (enter menu voice _console cmdl cmd2 cmd3...Icll options ’oll; run "r save ls"l; escape "’lesc’" /* The root sentence definition follows * Root (enter menu voice console cmdl cmd2 crnd3 cmd4...COMMANDS = cmdl , cmd2, cmd3, cmd4, cmd5, cmd6, cmd7, cmd8, cmd9, cmdlO; . cmdl ; ! cmd2; ! cmd3; ! cmd4; ! cmd5; ! cmd6; ! cmd7; ! cmd8; ! cmd9

  17. The Voice of the Customer

    OpenAIRE

    Griffin, Abbie; Hauser, John R

    1993-01-01

    In recent years, many U.S. and Japanese firms have adopted Quality Function Deployment (QFD). QFD is a total-quality-management process in which the “voice of the customer” is deployed throughout the R&D, engineering, and manufacturing stages of product development. For example, in the first “house” of QFD, customer needs are linked to design attributes thus encouraging the joint consideration of marketing issues and engineering issues. This paper focuses on the “Voice-of-the-Customer” compon...

  18. Local Voices in Creative Writing

    OpenAIRE

    Setiajid, Harris Hermansyah

    2014-01-01

    Creative writing is now on the centre stage in the world literary discourse. Beside other numerous advantages, the creative writing is also used to put forward the unheard voices hidden in the mainstream literary works. In the recent development, creative writing is also a means to unearth the local voices in order to be put in a world stage, introduced to a larger audience to achieve a better understanding between cultures.Since creative writing is no longer locked in the three literary genr...

  19. "Voice Forum" The Human Voice as Primary Instrument in Music Therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Inge Nygaard; Storm, Sanne

    2009-01-01

    Aspects will be drawn on the human voice as tool for embodying our psychological and physiological state, and attempting integration of feelings. Presentations and dialogues on different methods and techniques in "Therapy related body-and voice work.", as well as the human voice as a tool for non...... for nonverbal orientation and information both to our selves and others. Focus on training on the voice instrument, the effect and impact of the human voice, and listening perspectives...

  20. Whistleblowing Need not Occur if Internal Voices Are Heard: From Deaf Effect to Hearer Courage: Comment on "Cultures of Silence and Cultures of Voice: The Role of Whistleblowing in Healthcare Organisations".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleary, Sonja R; Doyle, Kerrie E

    2015-09-29

    Whistleblowing by health professionals is an infrequent and extraordinary event and need not occur if internal voices are heard. Mannion and Davies' editorial on "Cultures of Silence and Cultures of Voice: The Role of Whistleblowing in Healthcare Organisations" asks the question whether whistleblowing ameliorates or exacerbates the 'deaf effect' prevalent in healthcare organisations. This commentary argues that the focus should remain on internal processes and hearer courage . © 2016 by Kerman University of Medical Sciences.

  1. Whistleblowing Need not Occur if Internal Voices Are Heard: From Deaf Effect to Hearer Courage; Comment on “Cultures of Silence and Cultures of Voice: The Role of Whistleblowing in Healthcare Organisations”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonja R. Cleary

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Whistleblowing by health professionals is an infrequent and extraordinary event and need not occur if internal voices are heard. Mannion and Davies’ editorial on “Cultures of Silence and Cultures of Voice: The Role of Whistleblowing in Healthcare Organisations” asks the question whether whistleblowing ameliorates or exacerbates the ‘deaf effect’ prevalent in healthcare organisations. This commentary argues that the focus should remain on internal processes and hearer courage.

  2. Voice-Specialized Speech-Language Pathologist's Criteria for Discharge from Voice Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillespie, Amanda I; Gartner-Schmidt, Jackie

    2017-08-07

    No standard protocol exists to determine when a patient is ready and able to be discharged from voice therapy. The aim of the present study was to determine what factors speech-language pathologists (SLPs) deem most important when discharging a patient from voice therapy. A second aim was to determine if responses differed based on years of voice experience. Step 1: Seven voice-specialized SLPs generated a list of items thought to be relevant to voice therapy discharge. Step 2: Fifty voice-specialized SLPs rated each item on the list in terms of importance in determining discharge from voice therapy. Step 1: Four themes emerged-outcome measures, laryngeal appearance, SLP perceptions, and patient factors-as important items when determining discharge from voice therapy. Step 2: The top five most important criteria for discharge readiness were that the patient had to be able to (1) independently use a better voice (transfer), (2) function with his or her new voice production in activities of daily living (transfer), (3) differentiate between good and bad voice, (4) take responsibility for voice, and (5) sound better from baseline. Novice and experienced clinicians agreed between 94% and 97% concerning what was deemed "very important." SLPs agree that a patient's ability to use voice techniques in conversation and real-life situations outside of the therapy room are the most important determinants for voice therapy discharge. Copyright © 2017 The Voice Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Recovering from Hallucinations: A Qualitative Study of Coping with Voices Hearing of People with Schizophrenia in Hong Kong

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petrus Ng

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Auditory hallucination is a positive symptom of schizophrenia and has significant impacts on the lives of individuals. People with auditory hallucination require considerable assistance from mental health professionals. Apart from medications, they may apply different lay methods to cope with their voice hearing. Results from qualitative interviews showed that people with schizophrenia in the Chinese sociocultural context of Hong Kong were coping with auditory hallucination in different ways, including (a changing social contacts, (b manipulating the voices, and (c changing perception and meaning towards the voices. Implications for recovery from psychiatric illness of individuals with auditory hallucinations are discussed.

  4. Understanding users

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johannsen, Carl Gustav Viggo

    2014-01-01

    Segmentation of users can help libraries in the process of understanding user similarities and differences. Segmentation can also form the basis for selecting segments of target users and for developing tailored services for specific target segments. Several approaches and techniques have been...... tested in library contexts and the aim of this article is to identify the main approaches and to discuss their perspectives, including their strenghts and weaknesses in, especially, public library contexts. The purpose is also to prsent and discuss the results of a recent - 2014 - Danish library user...... segmentation project using computer-generated clusters. Compared to traditional marketing texts, this article also tries to identify user segments or images or metaphors by the library profession itself....

  5. Multimodal Desktop Interaction: The Face –Object-Gesture–Voice Example

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vidakis, Nikolas; Vlasopoulos, Anastasios; Kounalakis, Tsampikos

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a natural user interface system based on multimodal human computer interaction, which operates as an intermediate module between the user and the operating system. The aim of this work is to demonstrate a multimodal system which gives users the ability to interact with desktop...... applications using face, objects, voice and gestures. These human behaviors constitute the input qualifiers to the system. Microsoft Kinect multi-sensor was utilized as input device in order to succeed the natural user interaction, mainly due to the multimodal capabilities offered by this device. We...

  6. Objective Voice Parameters in Colombian School Workers with Healthy Voices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lady Catherine Cantor Cutiva

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To characterize the objective voice parameters among school workers, and to identi­fy associated factors of three objective voice parameters, namely fundamental frequency, sound pressure level and maximum phonation time. Materials and methods: We conducted a cross-sectional study among 116 Colombian teachers and 20 Colombian non-teachers. After signing the informed consent form, participants filled out a questionnaire. Then, a voice sample was recorded and evaluated perceptually by a speech therapist and by objective voice analysis with praat software. Short-term environmental measurements of sound level, temperature, humi­dity, and reverberation time were conducted during visits at the workplaces, such as classrooms and offices. Linear regression analysis was used to determine associations between individual and work-related factors and objective voice parameters. Results: Compared with men, women had higher fundamental frequency (201 Hz for teachers and 209 for non-teachers vs. 120 Hz for teachers and 127 for non-teachers and sound pressure level (82 dB vs. 80 dB, and shorter maximum phonation time (around 14 seconds vs. around 16 seconds. Female teachers younger than 50 years of age evidenced a significant tendency to speak with lower fundamental frequen­cy and shorter mpt compared with female teachers older than 50 years of age. Female teachers had significantly higher fundamental frequency (66 Hz, higher sound pressure level (2 dB and short phonation time (2 seconds than male teachers. Conclusion: Female teachers younger than 50 years of age had significantly lower F0 and shorter mpt compared with those older than 50 years of age. The multivariate analysis showed that gender was a much more important determinant of variations in F0, spl and mpt than age and teaching occupation. Objectively measured temperature also contributed to the changes on spl among school workers.

  7. Improving Scientific Voice in the Science Communication Center at UT Knoxville

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirst, Russel

    2013-01-01

    Many science students believe that scientific writing is most impressive (and most professionally acceptable) when impersonal, dense, complex, and packed with jargon. In particular, they have the idea that legitimate scientific writing must suppress the subjectivity of the human voice. But science students can mature into excellent writers whose…

  8. Voices of Zimbabwean orphans : a new vision for project management in Southern Africa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dzirikure, M.; Allen, G.

    2014-01-01

    The voices of orphans and other vulnerable children and young people and of their carers and professional development workers are documented and analysed to both criticise the inadequacies of current social development work and to create a new, alternative theory and practice of project management

  9. The Philosophy behind a (Danish) Voice-controlled Interface to Internet Browsing for motor-handicapped

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brøndsted, Tom

    2005-01-01

    The public-funded project "Indtal" ("Speak-it") has succeeded in developing a Danish voice-controlled utility for internet browsing targeting motor-handicapped users having difficulties using a standard keyboard and/or a standard mouse. The system underlies a number of a priori defined design...

  10. Twitter and Physics Professional Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadji, Taoufik

    2016-01-01

    The advent of Twitter® and other social media services of its type ushered in a new era of professional development in education. This article addresses how a group of users have been employing Twitter to conduct professional development sessions that would benefit their participants by advancing their pedagogical approaches to learning and…

  11. Playful Interaction with Voice Sensing Modular Robots

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heesche, Bjarke; MacDonald, Ewen; Fogh, Rune

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes a voice sensor, suitable for modular robotic systems, which estimates the energy and fundamental frequency, F0, of the user’s voice. Through a number of example applications and tests with children, we observe how the voice sensor facilitates playful interaction between...... children and two different robot configurations. In future work, we will investigate if such a system can motivate children to improve voice control and explore how to extend the sensor to detect emotions in the user’s voice....

  12. FILTWAM and Voice Emotion Recognition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bahreini, Kiavash; Nadolski, Rob; Westera, Wim

    2014-01-01

    This paper introduces the voice emotion recognition part of our framework for improving learning through webcams and microphones (FILTWAM). This framework enables multimodal emotion recognition of learners during game-based learning. The main goal of this study is to validate the use of microphone

  13. Voice and choice by delegation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Bovenkamp, H.; Vollaard, H.; Trappenburg, M.; Grit, K

    2013-01-01

    In many Western countries, options for citizens to influence public services are increased to improve the quality of services and democratize decision making. Possibilities to influence are often cast into Albert Hirschman's taxonomy of exit (choice), voice, and loyalty. In this article we identify

  14. The Inner Voice in Writing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chenoweth, N. Ann; Hayes, John R.

    2003-01-01

    This study explores the connection between writing and working memory, specifically the role of the subvocal articulatory rehearsal process (or inner voice). The authors asked the 18 participants to type sentences describing 24 multipanel cartoons. In some conditions, the participants were required to repeat a syllable continuously while writing.…

  15. Adolescent Leadership: The Female Voice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archard, Nicole

    2013-01-01

    This research investigated the female adolescent view of leadership by giving voice to student leaders through focus group discussions. The questions: What is leadership? Where/how was leadership taught?, and How was leadership practised? were explored within the context of girls' schools located in Australia, with one school located in South…

  16. Voices from Around the Globe

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    issue “Voices from Around the Globe” which is the result of a collaboration with the. International Association of Student Affairs and Services (IASAS), and particularly with the guest editors ... relation to changing local realities. By foregrounding Botswana, China, South Africa and the USA, a comparative discourse is set up ...

  17. Work-related voice disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Eduardo Przysiezny

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Dysphonia is the main symptom of the disorders of oral communication. However, voice disorders also present with other symptoms such as difficulty in maintaining the voice (asthenia, vocal fatigue, variation in habitual vocal fundamental frequency, hoarseness, lack of vocal volume and projection, loss of vocal efficiency, and weakness when speaking. There are several proposals for the etiologic classification of dysphonia: functional, organofunctional, organic, and work-related voice disorder (WRVD.OBJECTIVE: To conduct a literature review on WRVD and on the current Brazilian labor legislation.METHODS: This was a review article with bibliographical research conducted on the PubMed and Bireme databases, using the terms "work-related voice disorder", "occupational dysphonia", "dysphonia and labor legislation", and a review of labor and social security relevant laws.CONCLUSION: WRVD is a situation that frequently is listed as a reason for work absenteeism, functional rehabilitation, or for prolonged absence from work. Currently, forensic physicians have no comparative parameters to help with the analysis of vocal disorders. In certain situations WRVD may cause, work disability. This disorder may be labor-related, or be an adjuvant factor to work-related diseases.

  18. The Performing Voice of Radio

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lawaetz, Anna

    The ongoing international development of opening media archives for researchers as well as for broader audiences calls for a closer discussion of the mediated voice and how to analyse it. Which parameters can be analysed and which parameters are not covered by the analysis? Furthermore, how do we...

  19. A voice and nothing more

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mebus, Andreas Nozic Lindgren

    2012-01-01

    Andreas Mebus fokuserer herefter på et helt konkret aspekt af talen, nemlig ”stemmen” i sin artikel ”A voice and nothing more – en filosofisk udredning af stemmen”. Gennem Mladen Dolars teori om stemmen, redegør Mebus for de forskellige aspekter ved stemmen; som bærer af mening, som æstetisk...

  20. Giving the Customer a Voice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Van der Hoven, Christopher; Michea, Adela; Varnes, Claus

    the voice of the customer (VoC) through market research is well documented (Davis, 1993; Mullins and Sutherland, 1998; Cooper et al., 2002; Flint, 2002; Davilla et al., 2006; Cooper and Edgett, 2008; Cooper and Dreher, 2010; Goffin and Mitchell, 2010). However, not all research methods are well received...

  1. Voice, Citizenship, and Civic Action

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tufte, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    In recent years the world has experienced a resurgence in practices of bottom-up communication for social change, a plethora of agency in which claims for voice and citizenship through massive civic action have conquered center stage in the public debate. This resurgence has sparked a series...

  2. The development of the Spanish verb ir into auxiliary of voice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vinther, Thora

    2005-01-01

    spanish, syntax, grammaticalisation, past participle, passive voice, middle voice, language development......spanish, syntax, grammaticalisation, past participle, passive voice, middle voice, language development...

  3. Development of a Decision Aid for Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Involving Intensive Care Unit Patients' and Health Professionals' Participation Using User-Centered Design and a Wiki Platform for Rapid Prototyping: A Research Protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plaisance, Ariane; Witteman, Holly O; Heyland, Daren Keith; Ebell, Mark H; Dupuis, Audrey; Lavoie-Bérard, Carole-Anne; Légaré, France; Archambault, Patrick Michel

    2016-02-11

    Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is an intervention used in cases of cardiac arrest to revive patients whose heart has stopped. Because cardiac arrest can have potentially devastating outcomes such as severe neurological deficits even if CPR is performed, patients must be involved in determining in advance if they want CPR in the case of an unexpected arrest. Shared decision making (SDM) facilitates discussions about goals of care regarding CPR in intensive care units (ICUs). Patient decision aids (DAs) are proven to support the implementation of SDM. Many patient DAs about CPR exist, but they are not universally implemented in ICUs in part due to lack of context and cultural adaptation. Adaptation to local context is an important phase of implementing any type of knowledge tool such as patient DAs. User-centered design supported by a wiki platform to perform rapid prototyping has previously been successful in creating knowledge tools adapted to the needs of patients and health professionals (eg, asthma action plans). This project aims to explore how user-centered design and a wiki platform can support the adaptation of an existing DA for CPR to the local context. The primary objective is to use an existing DA about CPR to create a wiki-based DA that is adapted to the context of a single ICU and tailorable to individual patient's risk factors while employing user-centered design. The secondary objective is to document the use of a wiki platform for the adaptation of patient DAs. This study will be conducted in a mixed surgical and medical ICU at Hôtel-Dieu de Lévis, Quebec, Canada. We plan to involve all 5 intensivists and recruit at least 20 alert and oriented patients admitted to the ICU and their family members if available. In the first phase of this study, we will observe 3 weeks of daily interactions between patients, families, intensivists, and other allied health professionals. We will specifically observe 5 dyads of attending intensivists and alert

  4. Family health program user: knowledge and satisfaction about user embracement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saulo Lacerda Borges de Sá

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To assess the knowledge and satisfaction of users of a Basic Health Unit about the strategy of embracement. Methods: Descriptive study with qualitative approach, carried out in a Basic Health Unit, Fortaleza, Brazil, where practical activities of the Education Program of Work for Health of the University of Fortaleza were performed. Fifty eight service users were involved, following inclusion criteria: being present during the data collection, age over 18, regardless of sex, and voluntary participation. Data collection occurred in December 2009, through semi-structured interview. The data associated with the identification of users were processed in Microsoft Office Excel 2007, being organizedstatistically in table. Data related to qualitative aspects were analyzed according to the technique of content analysis. Results: 56 (97% were women, with ages ranging between 21 and 40 years, 34 (59% were married and 53 (91% are literate. On family income, 55 (95%received less than two minimum salaries per month. In order to facilitate understanding the speech of users, these were evaluated from the perspective of two categories: knowledge about embracement and satisfaction with embracement. Conclusion: Users have a limited view of the significance and magnitude of the embracement to provide the care. Although satisfied with the service, respondents report as negative aspects: the shortage of professionals, the professional relationship with user impaired due to constant delays of the professional, and the dehumanization of care.

  5. VOICE QUALITY BEFORE AND AFTER THYROIDECTOMY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dora CVELBAR

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Voice disorders are a well-known complication which is often associated with thyroid gland diseases and because voice is still the basic mean of communication it is very important to maintain its quality healthy. Objectives: The aim of this study referred to questions whether there is a statistically significant difference between results of voice self-assessment, perceptual voice assessment and acoustic voice analysis before and after thyroidectomy and whether there are statistically significant correlations between variables of voice self-assessment, perceptual assessment and acoustic analysis before and after thyroidectomy. Methods: This scientific research included 12 participants aged between 41 and 76. Voice self-assessment was conducted with the help of Croatian version of Voice Handicap Index (VHI. Recorded reading samples were used for perceptual assessment and later evaluated by two clinical speech and language therapists. Recorded samples of phonation were used for acoustic analysis which was conducted with the help of acoustic program Praat. All of the data was processed through descriptive statistics and nonparametric statistical methods. Results: Results showed that there are statistically significant differences between results of voice self-assessments and results of acoustic analysis before and after thyroidectomy. Statistically significant correlations were found between variables of perceptual assessment and acoustic analysis. Conclusion: Obtained results indicate the importance of multidimensional, preoperative and postoperative assessment. This kind of assessment allows the clinician to describe all of the voice features and provides appropriate recommendation for further rehabilitation to the patient in order to optimize voice outcomes.

  6. Concordant Cues in Faces and Voices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harriet M. J. Smith

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Information from faces and voices combines to provide multimodal signals about a person. Faces and voices may offer redundant, overlapping (backup signals, or complementary information (multiple messages. This article reports two experiments which investigated the extent to which faces and voices deliver concordant information about dimensions of fitness and quality. In Experiment 1, participants rated faces and voices on scales for masculinity/femininity, age, health, height, and weight. The results showed that people make similar judgments from faces and voices, with particularly strong correlations for masculinity/femininity, health, and height. If, as these results suggest, faces and voices constitute backup signals for various dimensions, it is hypothetically possible that people would be able to accurately match novel faces and voices for identity. However, previous investigations into novel face–voice matching offer contradictory results. In Experiment 2, participants saw a face and heard a voice and were required to decide whether the face and voice belonged to the same person. Matching accuracy was significantly above chance level, suggesting that judgments made independently from faces and voices are sufficiently similar that people can match the two. Both sets of results were analyzed using multilevel modeling and are interpreted as being consistent with the backup signal hypothesis.

  7. [Voice disorders caused by neurological diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamboa, J; Jiménez-Jiménez, F J; Mate, M A; Cobeta, I

    To review voice disorders in neurological diseases, with special emphasis to acoustic analysis. In the first part of this article we describe data regarding neural control of voice, physiology of phonation, and examination of the patient with voice disturbances, including the use of voice laboratory, acoustic analysis fundamentals, phonetometric measures and aerodynamic measures. In the second part, we review the voice disturbances associated to neurological diseases, emphasizing into movement disorders (specially Parkinson s disease, essential tremor, and spasmodic dysphonia). A number of neurological diseases causing alterations of corticospinal pathway, cerebellum, basal ganglia and upper and/or lower motoneurons can induce voice disturbances. Voice examination using ear, nose & throat examination, endoscopy and videorecording of laryngeal movements, acoustic analysis, elecroglottography, laryngeal electromyography, and aerodynamic measures, could be useful in the clinical examination of some neurological diseases.

  8. Temporal voice areas exist in autism spectrum disorder but are dysfunctional for voice identity recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schelinski, Stefanie; Borowiak, Kamila; von Kriegstein, Katharina

    2016-11-01

    The ability to recognise the identity of others is a key requirement for successful communication. Brain regions that respond selectively to voices exist in humans from early infancy on. Currently, it is unclear whether dysfunction of these voice-sensitive regions can explain voice identity recognition impairments. Here, we used two independent functional magnetic resonance imaging studies to investigate voice processing in a population that has been reported to have no voice-sensitive regions: autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Our results refute the earlier report that individuals with ASD have no responses in voice-sensitive regions: Passive listening to vocal, compared to non-vocal, sounds elicited typical responses in voice-sensitive regions in the high-functioning ASD group and controls. In contrast, the ASD group had a dysfunction in voice-sensitive regions during voice identity but not speech recognition in the right posterior superior temporal sulcus/gyrus (STS/STG)-a region implicated in processing complex spectrotemporal voice features and unfamiliar voices. The right anterior STS/STG correlated with voice identity recognition performance in controls but not in the ASD group. The findings suggest that right STS/STG dysfunction is critical for explaining voice recognition impairments in high-functioning ASD and show that ASD is not characterised by a general lack of voice-sensitive responses. © The Author (2016). Published by Oxford University Press.

  9. Patient-professional interactions in mental health institutions in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ringer, Agnes

    Although qualitative research within the field of mental health is growing, few studies of everyday communication between service users and multidisciplinary professionals within mental health institutions exist. This study examines the everyday interactions between mental health professionals...... by discursive and narrative approaches, the aim of the study is to shed light on how the professionals and users construct patient identities. How are the users and the professionals positioned in their interactions? How are concepts such as psychiatric diagnosis and mental illness negotiated within...

  10. Culture and conflict in urban Tanzania: Professionals' voices in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    context cultural and religious aspects and their management are important. The body of literature on conflicts in Tanzanian educational organisations and schools is very small (Mayer 2001; Mayer, Boness and Louw 2008). However, when described, conflicts are often bound to issues of language, class, poverty, economic ...

  11. Trends in musical theatre voice: an analysis of audition requirements for singers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Kathryn; Freeman, Warren; Edwards, Matthew; Meyer, David

    2014-05-01

    The American musical theatre industry is a multibillion dollar business in which the requirements for singers are varied and complex. This study identifies the musical genres and voice requirements that are currently most requested at professional auditions to help voice teachers, pedagogues, and physicians who work with musical theatre singers understand the demands of their clients' business. Frequency count. One thousand two thirty-eight professional musical theatre audition listings were gathered over a 6-month period, and information from each listing was categorized and entered into a spreadsheet for analysis. The results indicate that four main genres of music were requested over a wide variety of styles, with more than half of auditions requesting genre categories that may not be served by traditional or classical voice technique alone. To adequately prepare young musical theatre performers for the current job market and keep the performers healthily making the sounds required by the industry, new singing styles may need to be studied and integrated into voice training that only teaches classical styles. Copyright © 2014 The Voice Foundation. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Voice Over Internet Protocol (VoIP) in a Control Center Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirani, Joseph; Calvelage, Steven

    2010-01-01

    The technology of transmitting voice over data networks has been available for over 10 years. Mass market VoIP services for consumers to make and receive standard telephone calls over broadband Internet networks have grown in the last 5 years. While operational costs are less with VoIP implementations as opposed to time division multiplexing (TDM) based voice switches, is it still advantageous to convert a mission control center s voice system to this newer technology? Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) Huntsville Operations Support Center (HOSC) has converted its mission voice services to a commercial product that utilizes VoIP technology. Results from this testing, design, and installation have shown unique considerations that must be addressed before user operations. There are many factors to consider for a control center voice design. Technology advantages and disadvantages were investigated as they refer to cost. There were integration concerns which could lead to complex failure scenarios but simpler integration for the mission infrastructure. MSFC HOSC will benefit from this voice conversion with less product replacement cost, less operations cost and a more integrated mission services environment.

  13. Motorcycle Start-stop System based on Intelligent Biometric Voice Recognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winda, A.; E Byan, W. R.; Sofyan; Armansyah; Zariantin, D. L.; Josep, B. G.

    2017-03-01

    Current mechanical key in the motorcycle is prone to bulgary, being stolen or misplaced. Intelligent biometric voice recognition as means to replace this mechanism is proposed as an alternative. The proposed system will decide whether the voice is belong to the user or not and the word utter by the user is ‘On’ or ‘Off’. The decision voice will be sent to Arduino in order to start or stop the engine. The recorded voice is processed in order to get some features which later be used as input to the proposed system. The Mel-Frequency Ceptral Coefficient (MFCC) is adopted as a feature extraction technique. The extracted feature is the used as input to the SVM-based identifier. Experimental results confirm the effectiveness of the proposed intelligent voice recognition and word recognition system. It show that the proposed method produces a good training and testing accuracy, 99.31% and 99.43%, respectively. Moreover, the proposed system shows the performance of false rejection rate (FRR) and false acceptance rate (FAR) accuracy of 0.18% and 17.58%, respectively. In the intelligent word recognition shows that the training and testing accuracy are 100% and 96.3%, respectively.

  14. Voice responses to changes in pitch of voice or tone auditory feedbacka)

    OpenAIRE

    Sivasankar, Mahalakshmi; Bauer, Jay J.; Babu, Tara; Charles R Larson

    2005-01-01

    The present study was undertaken to examine if a subject’s voice F0 responded not only to perturbations in pitch of voice feedback but also to changes in pitch of a side tone presented congruent with voice feedback. Small magnitude brief duration perturbations in pitch of voice or tone auditory feedback were randomly introduced during sustained vowel phonations. Results demonstrated a higher rate and larger magnitude of voice F0 responses to changes in pitch of the voice compared with a trian...

  15. A user's manual to the PMBOK guide

    CERN Document Server

    Stackpole Snyder, Cynthia

    2013-01-01

    The must-have manual to understand and use the latest edition of the Fifth Edition The professional standard in the field of project management, A Guide to the Project Management Body of Knowledge (PMBOK® Guide-Fifth Edition) published by the Project Management Institute (PMI) serves as the ultimate resource for professionals and as a valuable studying and training device for students taking the PMP® Exam. A User''s Manual to the PMBOK® Guide takes the next logical step to act as a true user''s manual. With an accessible format and easy-to-understand language, it helps to not only distill es

  16. Supporting Student-Teacher Researchers’ Quest for Their Voice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rigoberto Castillo

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This article deals with teacher identity development of students enrolled in the teacher training program. The authors, who advocate inquiry-based teaching practices, propose reflective and organizational strategies to support these. In order to gain insights into the experiences and values of student-teacher-researchers (STRs here on to shape a professional teaching identity, a pre-service teacher and a professor in a second language (L2 program joined efforts to share their reflections on the process of inquiry and on the quest to find a voice when conducting and reporting their inquiry.

  17. The relationship between voice climate and patients' experience of timely care in primary care clinics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nembhard, Ingrid M; Yuan, Christina T; Shabanova, Veronika; Cleary, Paul D

    2015-01-01

    Aspects of the patient care experience, despite being central to quality care, are often problematic. In particular, patients frequently report problems with timeliness of care. As yet, research offers little insight on setting characteristics that contribute to patients' experience of timely care. The aims of this study were to assess the relationship between organizational climate and patients' reports of timely care in primary care clinics and to broadly examine the link between staff's work environment and patient care experiences. We test hypotheses about the relationship between voice climate--staff feeling safe to speak up about issues--and reported timeliness of care, consistency in reported voice climate across professions, and how climate differences for various professions relate to timely care. We conducted a cross-sectional study of employees (n = 1,121) and patients (n = 8,164) affiliated with 37 clinics participating in a statewide reporting initiative. Employees were surveyed about clinics' voice climate, and patients were surveyed about the timeliness of care. Hypotheses were tested using analysis of variance and generalized estimating equations. Clinical and administrative staff (e.g., nurses and office assistants) reported clinics' climates to be significantly less supportive of voice than did clinical leaders (e.g., physicians). The greater the difference in reported support for voice between professional groups, the less patients reported experiencing timely care in three respects: obtaining an appointment, seeing the doctor within 15 minutes of appointment time, and receiving test results. In clinics where staff reported climates supportive of voice, patients indicated receiving more timely care. Clinical leaders' reports of voice climate had no relationship to reported timeliness of care. Our findings suggest the importance of clinics developing a strong climate for voice, particularly for clinical and administrative staff, to support better

  18. User Experimentation with Terminological Ontologies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pram Nielsen, Louise

    This paper outlines work-in-progress research suggesting that domain-specific knowledge in terminological resources can be transferred efficiently to end-users across different levels of expertise and by means of different information modes including articles (written mode) and concept diagrams...... (graph mode). An experimental approach is applied in an eye-tracking laboratory, where a natural user situation is replicated for Danish professional potential end-users of a ter-minology and knowledge bank in a chosen pilot domain (taxation)....

  19. User-Centered Agile Methods

    CERN Document Server

    Beyer, Hugh

    2010-01-01

    With the introduction and popularization of Agile methods of software development, existing relationships and working agreements between user experience groups and developers are being disrupted. Agile methods introduce new concepts: the Product Owner, the Customer (but not the user), short iterations, User Stories. Where do UX professionals fit in this new world? Agile methods also bring a new mindset -- no big design, no specifications, minimal planning -- which conflict with the needs of UX design. This lecture discusses the key elements of Agile for the UX community and describes strategie

  20. Storytelling Voice Conversion: Evaluation Experiment Using Gaussian Mixture Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Přibil, Jiří; Přibilová, Anna; Ďuračková, Daniela

    2015-07-01

    In the development of the voice conversion and personification of the text-to-speech (TTS) systems, it is very necessary to have feedback information about the users' opinion on the resulting synthetic speech quality. Therefore, the main aim of the experiments described in this paper was to find out whether the classifier based on Gaussian mixture models (GMM) could be applied for evaluation of different storytelling voices created by transformation of the sentences generated by the Czech and Slovak TTS system. We suppose that it is possible to combine this GMM-based statistical evaluation with the classical one in the form of listening tests or it can replace them. The results obtained in this way were in good correlation with the results of the conventional listening test, so they confirm practical usability of the developed GMM classifier. With the help of the performed analysis, the optimal setting of the initial parameters and the structure of the input feature set for recognition of the storytelling voices was finally determined.

  1. The Role of Occupational Voice Demand and Patient-Rated Impairment in Predicting Voice Therapy Adherence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebersole, Barbara; Soni, Resha S; Moran, Kathleen; Lango, Miriam; Devarajan, Karthik; Jamal, Nausheen

    2017-07-11

    Examine the relationship among the severity of patient-perceived voice impairment, perceptual dysphonia severity, occupational voice demand, and voice therapy adherence. Identify clinical predictors of increased risk for therapy nonadherence. A retrospective cohort study of patients presenting with a chief complaint of persistent dysphonia at an interdisciplinary voice center was done. The Voice Handicap Index-10 (VHI-10) and the Voice-Related Quality of Life (V-RQOL) survey scores, clinician rating of dysphonia severity using the Grade score from the Grade, Roughness Breathiness, Asthenia, and Strain scale, occupational voice demand, and patient demographics were tested for associations with therapy adherence, defined as completion of the treatment plan. Classification and Regression Tree (CART) analysis was performed to establish thresholds for nonadherence risk. Of 166 patients evaluated, 111 were recommended for voice therapy. The therapy nonadherence rate was 56%. Occupational voice demand category, VHI-10, and V-RQOL scores were the only factors significantly correlated with therapy adherence (P occupational voice demand are significantly more likely to be nonadherent with therapy than those with high occupational voice demand (P 40 is a significant cutoff point for predicting therapy nonadherence (P Occupational voice demand and patient perception of impairment are significantly and independently correlated with therapy adherence. A VHI-10 score of ≤9 or a V-RQOL score of >40 is a significant cutoff point for predicting nonadherence risk. Copyright © 2017 The Voice Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Inter professionalization and the breakaway from classic concepts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borgnakke, Karen; Nielsen, Cathrine Sand

    2014-01-01

    strategies the paper further identifies the changing professional collaborative culture and demands for combining mono professional competences with the inter professional competences. Finally, the paper summarizes challenges and perspectives referring to the professional debate and different voices...... and patients is challenged. Skills and framework to coordinate efforts in the healthcare system has become a theme in health professional education to ensure that health professionals can meet the demands of tomorrow's health care system. As research based evaluation the project will explore the embedded...... of professional learning • Classroom research related to inter-professional meetings • Participant logbooks, synopsis made on the case study as well as videos of presentations. Theoretically, the project ranges from organisational learning to health professional research and identity issue until professional...

  3. Voicing children's critique and utopias

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Husted, Mia; Lind, Unni

    The aim is to present and discuss methods of how to voice children's own perspectives on everyday life in daycare followed by reflections on the significance of such perspectives for pedagogical knowledge and practice. Empowering children's participation is substantiated by methods that enable...... and restrictions, Call for aesthetics an sensuality, Longings for home and parents, Longings for better social relations Making children's voice visible allows preschool teachers to reflect children's knowledge and life word in pedagogical practice. Keywords: empowerment and participation, action research...... with participants (children and pedagogues) round research activities and their participation in rendering results. The children bring up critique and wishes that touch upon structural difficulties, dilemmas and ambivalence in pedagogical work. Some of the more challenging findings addresses, Bodily harm...

  4. Voice disorders in mucosal leishmaniasis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Cristina Nunes Ruas

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Leishmaniasis is considered as one of the six most important infectious diseases because of its high detection coefficient and ability to produce deformities. In most cases, mucosal leishmaniasis (ML occurs as a consequence of cutaneous leishmaniasis. If left untreated, mucosal lesions can leave sequelae, interfering in the swallowing, breathing, voice and speech processes and requiring rehabilitation. OBJECTIVE: To describe the anatomical characteristics and voice quality of ML patients. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A descriptive transversal study was conducted in a cohort of ML patients treated at the Laboratory for Leishmaniasis Surveillance of the Evandro Chagas National Institute of Infectious Diseases-Fiocruz, between 2010 and 2013. The patients were submitted to otorhinolaryngologic clinical examination by endoscopy of the upper airways and digestive tract and to speech-language assessment through directed anamnesis, auditory perception, phonation times and vocal acoustic analysis. The variables of interest were epidemiologic (sex and age and clinic (lesion location, associated symptoms and voice quality. RESULTS: 26 patients under ML treatment and monitored by speech therapists were studied. 21 (81% were male and five (19% female, with ages ranging from 15 to 78 years (54.5+15.0 years. The lesions were distributed in the following structures 88.5% nasal, 38.5% oral, 34.6% pharyngeal and 19.2% laryngeal, with some patients presenting lesions in more than one anatomic site. The main complaint was nasal obstruction (73.1%, followed by dysphonia (38.5%, odynophagia (30.8% and dysphagia (26.9%. 23 patients (84.6% presented voice quality perturbations. Dysphonia was significantly associated to lesions in the larynx, pharynx and oral cavity. CONCLUSION: We observed that vocal quality perturbations are frequent in patients with mucosal leishmaniasis, even without laryngeal lesions; they are probably associated to disorders of some

  5. The voice of the voiceless

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Morales

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Women’s voice, these are stories of a group of women and their partners who lived part of a particular historical period agriculture during the twentieth century, the hacienda. The present work attempts to reflect their everyday life, reinterpreted from nowadays as a reflection of collective memory, in the big farms where they grew by putting in scene their roles in juxtaposition to the roles of male tradition.

  6. [Definition of psychogenic voice disorders].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, H H

    1991-02-01

    The clinical designation of the psychogenic voice disorder is discussed. "Psychogenic" is aetiologically by no means an apposite, or adjective, to organic diseases, for the occurrence of factors that can be defined as psychopathological (either primary or secondary) is always practically and clinically important--especially if these factors are of general psychosocial relevance, or of a latent depressive and neurotic nature. Hence, biographical anamnesis can be obligatory, supplying information that is essential for a therapeutic approach.

  7. The role of femininity and averageness of voice pitch in aesthetic judgments of women's voices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feinberg, David R; DeBruine, Lisa M; Jones, Benedict C; Perrett, David I

    2008-01-01

    Although averageness is preferred in auditory stimuli (eg music) and non-face objects (eg wristwatches), exaggerated feminine characteristics are preferred to averageness in female faces. To establish whether or not men prefer femininity in female voices to average characteristics, we conducted a correlational study (study 1) to assess the relationship between voice pitch and attractiveness ratings. We found a positive linear relationship between voice pitch and attractiveness ratings. In study 2 we manipulated pitch in women's voices with low (lower than average), average, and high (higher than average) starting pitches and gauged men's preferences. Men preferred women's voices with raised pitch for all levels of starting pitch. These findings suggest that men prefer high voice pitch to average voice pitch in women's voices.

  8. Aerodynamics of esophageal voice production with and without a groningen voice prosthesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schutte, HK; Nieboer, GJ

    2002-01-01

    Objectives: Aerodynamic aspects of esophageal voice production in laryngectomees have been studied to clarify and compare the physiology of injection (IE) and button-assisted (TE) esophageal voice. Methods: Simultaneous measurements of intratracheal, sub- and suprapseudoglottic pressure,

  9. Improvements of Voice Timbre Control Based on Perceived Age in Singing Voice Conversion

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    KOBAYASHI, Kazuhiro; TODA, Tomoki; NAKANO, Tomoyasu; GOTO, Masataka; NAKAMURA, Satoshi

    2016-01-01

    ... age has been developed. In this technique, the perceived age of a singing voice, which is the age of the singer as perceived by the listener, is used as one of the intuitively understandable measures to describe voice...

  10. Voice congruency facilitates word recognition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Campeanu

    Full Text Available Behavioral studies of spoken word memory have shown that context congruency facilitates both word and source recognition, though the level at which context exerts its influence remains equivocal. We measured event-related potentials (ERPs while participants performed both types of recognition task with words spoken in four voices. Two voice parameters (i.e., gender and accent varied between speakers, with the possibility that none, one or two of these parameters was congruent between study and test. Results indicated that reinstating the study voice at test facilitated both word and source recognition, compared to similar or no context congruency at test. Behavioral effects were paralleled by two ERP modulations. First, in the word recognition test, the left parietal old/new effect showed a positive deflection reflective of context congruency between study and test words. Namely, the same speaker condition provided the most positive deflection of all correctly identified old words. In the source recognition test, a right frontal positivity was found for the same speaker condition compared to the different speaker conditions, regardless of response success. Taken together, the results of this study suggest that the benefit of context congruency is reflected behaviorally and in ERP modulations traditionally associated with recognition memory.

  11. How do teachers with self-reported voice problems differ from their peers with self-reported voice health?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyberg Åhlander, Viveka; Rydell, Roland; Löfqvist, Anders

    2012-07-01

    This randomized case-control study compares teachers with self-reported voice problems to age-, gender-, and school-matched colleagues with self-reported voice health. The self-assessed voice function is related to factors known to influence the voice: laryngeal findings, voice quality, personality, psychosocial and coping aspects, searching for causative factors of voice problems in teachers. Subjects and controls, recruited from a teacher group in an earlier questionnaire study, underwent examinations of the larynx by high-speed imaging and kymograms; voice recordings; voice range profile; audiometry; self-assessment of voice handicap and voice function; teaching and environmental aspects; personality; coping; burnout, and work-related issues. The laryngeal and voice recordings were assessed by experienced phoniatricians and speech pathologists. The subjects with self-assessed voice problems differed from their peers with self-assessed voice health by significantly longer recovery time from voice problems and scored higher on all subscales of the Voice Handicap Index-Throat. The results show that the cause of voice dysfunction in this group of teachers with self-reported voice problems is not found in the vocal apparatus or within the individual. The individual's perception of a voice problem seems to be based on a combination of the number of symptoms and of how often the symptoms occur, along with the recovery time. The results also underline the importance of using self-assessed reports of voice dysfunction. Copyright © 2012 The Voice Foundation. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Effects of experience on fetal voice recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kisilevsky, Barbara S; Hains, Sylvia M J; Lee, Kang; Xie, Xing; Huang, Hefeng; Ye, Hai Hui; Zhang, Ke; Wang, Zengping

    2003-05-01

    The ability of human fetuses to recognize their own mother's voice was examined. Sixty term fetuses were assigned to one of two conditions during which they were exposed to a tape recording of their mother or a female stranger reading a passage. Voice stimuli were delivered through a loudspeaker held approximately 10 cm above the maternal abdomen and played at an average of 95 dB SPL. Each condition consisted of three 2-min periods: no stimulus, voice (mother or stranger), and no stimulus. Fetal heart rate increased in response to the mother's voice and decreased in response to the stranger's; both responses were sustained for 4 min. The finding of differential behavior in response to a familiar versus a novel voice provides evidence that experience influences fetal voice processing. It supports an epigenetic model of speech perception, presuming an interaction between genetic expression of neural development and species-specific experience.

  13. Voice symptoms and risk factors for developing voice disorders in future musical actors

    OpenAIRE

    D'haeseleer, Evelien; Claeys, Sofie; Meerschman, Iris; Bettens, Kim; Degeest, Sofie; Dijckmans, Caroline; De Smet, Joke; Luyten, Anke; Van Lierde, Kristiane

    2016-01-01

    Musical theater students follow an intensive program of singing, acting and physical excercises (dancing) and are expected to participate in long rehearsals and full performances. As they are absolutely depending on their vocal quality and vocal capacities for their studies and their future profession, an optimal voice coaching is very important. The purpose of this study was to determine the voice quality, voice symptoms and the risk factors for developing voice problems in future elite vo...

  14. Voice Recognition System using Template Matching

    OpenAIRE

    Luqman Gbadamosi

    2013-01-01

    It is easy for human to recognize familiar voice but using computer programs to identify a voice when compared with others is a herculean task. This is due to the problem that is encountered when developing the algorithm to recognize human voice. It is impossible to say a word the same way in two different occasions. Human speech analysis by computer gives different interpretation based on varying speed of speech delivery. This research paper gives detail description of the process behind imp...

  15. Complaining Behavior of Academic Library Users in South Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Dong-Geun

    2004-01-01

    This study investigates the influences of the antecedent factors on the complaints and resulting behaviors of 582 university library users in South Korea. There were statistically significant relationships between personal norms and negative word of mouth and indirect voice behaviors, between service importance and negative word-of-mouth behavior,…

  16. Familiarity and Voice Representation: From Acoustic-Based Representation to Voice Averages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maureen Fontaine

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The ability to recognize an individual from their voice is a widespread ability with a long evolutionary history. Yet, the perceptual representation of familiar voices is ill-defined. In two experiments, we explored the neuropsychological processes involved in the perception of voice identity. We specifically explored the hypothesis that familiar voices (trained-to-familiar (Experiment 1, and famous voices (Experiment 2 are represented as a whole complex pattern, well approximated by the average of multiple utterances produced by a single speaker. In experiment 1, participants learned three voices over several sessions, and performed a three-alternative forced-choice identification task on original voice samples and several “speaker averages,” created by morphing across varying numbers of different vowels (e.g., [a] and [i] produced by the same speaker. In experiment 2, the same participants performed the same task on voice samples produced by familiar speakers. The two experiments showed that for famous voices, but not for trained-to-familiar voices, identification performance increased and response times decreased as a function of the number of utterances in the averages. This study sheds light on the perceptual representation of familiar voices, and demonstrates the power of average in recognizing familiar voices. The speaker average captures the unique characteristics of a speaker, and thus retains the information essential for recognition; it acts as a prototype of the speaker.

  17. Speaking up in groups: a cross-level study of group voice climate and voice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Elizabeth Wolfe; Wheeler-Smith, Sara L; Kamdar, Dishan

    2011-01-01

    Despite a growing body of research on employee voice—defined as the discretionary communication of ideas, suggestions, or opinions intended to improve organizational or unit functioning—the effects of shared or collective-level cognitions have received scant attention. There has also been relatively little research on voice within work groups. Our goal in this study was to address these important gaps by focusing on the effects of group-level beliefs about voice (i.e., group voice climate) on individual voice behavior within work groups. We conducted a cross-level investigation of voice behavior within 42 groups of engineers from a large chemical company. Consistent with our hypotheses, group voice climate was highly predictive of voice and explained variance beyond the effects of individual-level identification and satisfaction, and procedural justice climate. Also consistent with predictions, the effect of identification on voice was stronger in groups with favorable voice climates. These findings provide evidence that voice is shaped not just by individual attitudes and perceptions of the work context, as past research has shown, but also by group-level beliefs. The results also highlight the importance of broadening our conceptual models of voice to include shared cognitions and of conducting additional cross-level research on voice.

  18. Familiarity and Voice Representation: From Acoustic-Based Representation to Voice Averages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontaine, Maureen; Love, Scott A.; Latinus, Marianne

    2017-01-01

    The ability to recognize an individual from their voice is a widespread ability with a long evolutionary history. Yet, the perceptual representation of familiar voices is ill-defined. In two experiments, we explored the neuropsychological processes involved in the perception of voice identity. We specifically explored the hypothesis that familiar voices (trained-to-familiar (Experiment 1), and famous voices (Experiment 2)) are represented as a whole complex pattern, well approximated by the average of multiple utterances produced by a single speaker. In experiment 1, participants learned three voices over several sessions, and performed a three-alternative forced-choice identification task on original voice samples and several “speaker averages,” created by morphing across varying numbers of different vowels (e.g., [a] and [i]) produced by the same speaker. In experiment 2, the same participants performed the same task on voice samples produced by familiar speakers. The two experiments showed that for famous voices, but not for trained-to-familiar voices, identification performance increased and response times decreased as a function of the number of utterances in the averages. This study sheds light on the perceptual representation of familiar voices, and demonstrates the power of average in recognizing familiar voices. The speaker average captures the unique characteristics of a speaker, and thus retains the information essential for recognition; it acts as a prototype of the speaker. PMID:28769836

  19. Reconciling Voices in Writing an Autoethnographic Thesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dawn Johnston MSc

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available The authors consider writing and supervising an autoethnographic thesis as a process of reconciling voices while finding one's own academic and personal voice. They draw from notions of polyphony to speak about how we negotiated with different voices (the voices of experts, research participants, personal affiliations, those used in our supervisory discussions our way forward in the supervisory relationship, as well as in the thesis itself. They invite readers to draw their own meanings from these negotiations as they can relate to supervisory relationships and the writing of academic theses.

  20. Behavioral Treatment of Voice Disorders in Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziegler, Aaron; Gillespie, Amanda I.; Verdolini Abbott, Katherine

    2010-01-01

    Introduction The purpose of this paper is to review the literature on the behavioral treatment of voice disorders in teachers. The focus is on phonogenic disorders, that is voice disorders thought to be caused by voice use. Methods Review of the literature and commentary. Results The review exposes distinct holes in the literature on the treatment of voice problems in teachers. However, emerging trends in treatment are noted. For example, most studies identified for review implemented a multiple-therapy approach in a group setting, in contrast to only a few studies that assessed a single-therapy approach with individual patients. Although the review reveals that the evidence around behavioral treatment of voice disorders in teachers is mixed, a growing body of data provides some indicators on how effectively rehabilitation of teachers with phonogenic voice problems might be approached. Specifically, voice amplification demonstrates promise as a beneficial type of indirect therapy and vocal function exercises as well as resonant voice therapy show possible benefits as direct therapies. Finally, only a few studies identified even remotely begin to meet guidelines of the Consolidated Standards of Reporting Trials statement, a finding that emphasizes the need to increase the number of investigations that adhere to strict research standards. Conclusions Although data on the treatment of voice problems in teachers are still limited in the literature, emerging trends are noted. The accumulation of sufficient studies will ultimately provide useful evidence about this societally important issue. PMID:20093840

  1. Prevalence of voice disorders among future teachers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simberg, S; Laine, A; Sala, E; Rönnemaa, A M

    2000-06-01

    An epidemiological study was conducted in order to find out the prevalence of voice disorders among students studying to be teachers. Vocal symptoms were inquired of 226 students. Their voices were assessed perceptually by a speech therapist and those who had abnormal voice quality or reported several vocal symptoms were referred to a clinical examination by a laryngologist. The results showed that 20% of this population reported two or more vocal symptoms during the previous year and that 19% had an organic voice disorder. This reinforces the need for clinical evaluation of students with vocal symptoms and more vocal training in the teacher education programs.

  2. Singing Voice Analysis, Synthesis, and Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Youngmoo E.

    The singing voice is the oldest musical instrument, but its versatility and emotional power are unmatched. Through the combination of music, lyrics, and expression, the voice is able to affect us in ways that no other instrument can. The fact that vocal music is prevalent in almost all cultures is indicative of its innate appeal to the human aesthetic. Singing also permeates most genres of music, attesting to the wide range of sounds the human voice is capable of producing. As listeners we are naturally drawn to the sound of the human voice, and, when present, it immediately becomes the focus of our attention.

  3. Voices from the heart: the use of digital story telling in education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, Jackie

    2014-01-01

    Digital storytelling has emerged as a powerful teaching and learning tool, which presents personal narratives, images and music to create a unique and sometimes emotional snapshot into another person's experience. By offering a platform for sharing and understanding such narratives, professionals may gain insight into a perceived experience and construct their role accordingly. Used effectively, they can engage the listener and offer opportunity to reflect and consider the impact of their professional role on the storyteller. This article looks at how digital storytelling can enhance professional practice and enable vulnerable voices to be heard.

  4. Voice field measurements--a new method of examination: the influence of hearing on the human voice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lejska, Mojmír

    2004-06-01

    There are various methods to evaluate voice parameters. Original software was used to assess the voice quality by the staff of AUDIO-Fon centr Brno, Czech Republic. A group of hereditary deaf persons was examined. Deaf persons have all of the biological conditions to make voice except for the possibility of acoustic feedback. We examined the voices of 35 persons (20 men and 15 women) with hereditary profound hearing impairments, and we compared voice parameters with the voice of intact persons. To measure we used special software called voice field measurements (VFMs). The program graphically records voice frequency and intensity. VFM is an objective method that enables the assessment of basic physical voice characteristics. It is suitable for the examination of both intact and disturbed voice. The voice of the deaf has a higher basic voice frequency in men as well as in women. This type of voice production, ie, childlike voice, which is fixed only by a motor stereotype, is much more demanding for a mature larynx. Hearing influences both the voice development and speech production. The voice of persons with hearing impairments has a higher basic voice frequency regardless of their sex. This type of voice production, which is fixed only by a motor stereotype, ie, child voice, is much more demanding for a larynx of an adult. Thus, phonation of deaf people is more demanding and their voice production needs greater effort. Deaf people, despite an intact phonic apparatus, cannot produce more than one type of voice. They cannot modulate their voices concerning the frequency and dynamics. They cannot change their voices continually. The voice is limited in both of these parameters (frequency and dynamics). If a deaf person wants to change a voice characteristic, it is possible only by discontinuous changes-"skipping."

  5. QMRPACK user`s guide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freund, R.W. [AT& T Bell Labs., Murray Hill, NJ (United States); Nachtigal, N.M.; Reeb, J.C. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1994-10-01

    QMRPACK is a library of FORTRAN 77 subroutines that may be used to solve linear systems of equations with the quasi-minimal residual (QMR) method and to compute eigenvalue approximations. This User`s Guide is designed to be an overview of the codes contained in QMRPACK. Installation information is provided, and the example matrix format is discussed. The relative merits of each algorithm, as well as usage criterion are described. The authors also provide instructions for making the test drivers, as well as test output from several machines.

  6. Perceiving the effects of ethanol intoxication on voice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollien, Harry; Harnsberger, James D; Martin, Camilo A; Hill, Rebecca; Alderman, G Allan

    2009-09-01

    Many conditions operate to degrade the quality of the human voice. Alcohol intoxication is one of them. In this project, the objectives were to examine the ability of human listeners to accurately estimate both the presence and severity of intoxication from two types of speech samples. A review of available data suggests that, although listeners can often identify individuals who are intoxicated simply by hearing samples of their voice, they are less efficient at accurately determining the severity of this condition. A number of aural-perceptual studies were carried out to test these relationships. Populations of speakers, selected based on rigorous criteria, provided orally read and extemporaneous utterances when sober and at three highly controlled levels of intoxication. Listener groups of university students and professionals attempted to identify both the existence and specific level of intoxication present. It was found that these individuals were proficient in recognizing the presence of, and increases in, intoxication but were less accurate in gauging the specific levels. Several subordinate relationships were also investigated. In this regard, statistically significant differences were not found between male and female listeners or between professionals and lay listeners; however, they were found for different classes of speech. That is, it was shown that text difficulty correlated with severity of effect.

  7. Chapter 9. Drug user researchers as autoethnographers: "doing reflexivity" with women drug users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ettorre, Elizabeth

    2013-11-01

    This article explores autoethnography, based upon transcribed, narratives, conversations, and research notes, as a useful method of creating social and cultural insights into the lives of women drug users and their particular kinds of problems and to related issues of reflexivity, reliability, and validity. A critical issue is raised by asking the question "where do we go from here?" contending that we must challenge outdated methodological traditions and canons that deny autoethnographers their voice and close the door to their claims of authenticity.

  8. Experiences about HIV-AIDS preventive-control activities: Discourses from non-governmental organizations professionals and users Experiencias sobre la prevención y el control del VIH-sida: Discursos de los profesionales y usuarios de las organizaciones no gubernamentales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Berenguera

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The main aim of this study was to identify the experiences of professionals in nongovernmental organizations (NGO in Catalonia (Spain working in HIV/AIDS prevention and control activities and potential areas of improvement of these activities and their evaluation. A further aim was to characterize the experiences, knowledge and practices of users of these organizations with regard to HIV infection and its prevention. Methods: A phenomenological qualitative study was conducted with the participation of both professionals and users of Catalan nongovernmental organizations (NGO working in HIV/AIDS. Theoretical sampling (professional and opportunistic sampling (users were performed. To collect information, the following techniques were used: four focus groups and one triangular group (professionals, 22 semi-structured interviews, and two observations (users. A thematic interpretive content analysis was conducted by three analysts. Results: The professionals of nongovernmental organizations working in HIV/AIDS adopted a holistic approach in their activities, maintained confidentiality, had cultural and professional competence and followed the principles of equality and empathy. The users of these organizations had knowledge of HIV/AIDS and understood the risk of infection. However, a gap was found between knowledge, attitudes and behavior. Conclusions: NGO offer distinct activities adapted to users' needs. Professionals emphasize the need for support and improvement of planning and implementation of current assessment. The preventive activities of these HIV/AIDS organizations are based on a participatory health education model adjusted to people's needs and focused on empowerment.Objetivos: Identificar las experiencias y actividades de las organizaciones no gubernamentales (ONG que trabajan en la prevención y control del VIH/sida, las posibles áreas de mejora de las actividades y de su evaluación, e identificar las experiencias

  9. Clinical voice analysis of Carnatic singers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arunachalam, Ravikumar; Boominathan, Prakash; Mahalingam, Shenbagavalli

    2014-01-01

    Carnatic singing is a classical South Indian style of music that involves rigorous training to produce an "open throated" loud, predominantly low-pitched singing, embedded with vocal nuances in higher pitches. Voice problems in singers are not uncommon. The objective was to report the nature of voice problems and apply a routine protocol to assess the voice. Forty-five trained performing singers (females: 36 and males: 9) who reported to a tertiary care hospital with voice problems underwent voice assessment. The study analyzed their problems and the clinical findings. Voice change, difficulty in singing higher pitches, and voice fatigue were major complaints. Most of the singers suffered laryngopharyngeal reflux that coexisted with muscle tension dysphonia and chronic laryngitis. Speaking voices were rated predominantly as "moderate deviation" on GRBAS (Grade, Rough, Breathy, Asthenia, and Strain). Maximum phonation time ranged from 4 to 29 seconds (females: 10.2, standard deviation [SD]: 5.28 and males: 15.7, SD: 5.79). Singing frequency range was reduced (females: 21.3 Semitones and males: 23.99 Semitones). Dysphonia severity index (DSI) scores ranged from -3.5 to 4.91 (females: 0.075 and males: 0.64). Singing frequency range and DSI did not show significant difference between sex and across clinical diagnosis. Self-perception using voice disorder outcome profile revealed overall severity score of 5.1 (SD: 2.7). Findings are discussed from a clinical intervention perspective. Study highlighted the nature of voice problems (hyperfunctional) and required modifications in assessment protocol for Carnatic singers. Need for regular assessments and vocal hygiene education to maintain good vocal health are emphasized as outcomes. Copyright © 2014 The Voice Foundation. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Sound induced activity in voice sensitive cortex predicts voice memory ability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca eWatson

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The ‘temporal voice areas’ (TVAs (Belin et al., 2000 of the human brain show greater neuronal activity in response to human voices than to other categories of nonvocal sounds. However, a direct link between TVA activity and voice perceptionbehaviour has not yet been established. Here we show that a functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI measure of activity in the TVAs predicts individual performance at a separately administered voice memory test. This relation holds whengeneral sound memory ability is taken into account. These findings provide the first evidence that the TVAs are specifically involved in voice cognition.

  11. Evaluation of Voice Disorders: Dysphonia Severity Index and Voice Handicap Index

    OpenAIRE

    Hakkesteegt, Marieke

    2009-01-01

    textabstractThe voice is arguable still the most important tool of communication despite the growing importance of e-mails and text messaging (SMS) in daily contact. Indeed in modern society people are probably even more dependent on their voice than in the rural societies of old. Approximately one third of the working population nowadays need their voice to earn money1. And it goes without saying that most people need their voice for daily social activities. Any impairment of the voice there...

  12. Sound-induced activity in voice-sensitive cortex predicts voice memory ability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Rebecca; Latinus, Marianne; Bestelmeyer, Patricia E G; Crabbe, Frances; Belin, Pascal

    2012-01-01

    The "temporal voice areas" (TVAs; Belin et al., 2000) of the human brain show greater neuronal activity in response to human voices than to other categories of non-vocal sounds. However, a direct link between TVA activity and voice perception behavior has not yet been established. Here we show that a functional magnetic resonance imaging measure of activity in the TVAs predicts individual performance at a separately administered voice memory test. This relation holds when general sound memory ability is taken into account. These findings provide the first evidence that the TVAs are specifically involved in voice cognition.

  13. Associations between the Transsexual Voice Questionnaire (TVQMtF ) and self-report of voice femininity and acoustic voice measures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dacakis, Georgia; Oates, Jennifer; Douglas, Jacinta

    2017-11-01

    The Transsexual Voice Questionnaire (TVQMtF ) was designed to capture the voice-related perceptions of individuals whose gender identity as female is the opposite of their birth-assigned gender (MtF women). Evaluation of the psychometric properties of the TVQMtF is ongoing. To investigate associations between TVQMtF scores and (1) self-perceptions of voice femininity and (2) acoustic parameters of voice pitch and voice quality in order to evaluate further the validity of the TVQMtF . A strong correlation between TVQMtF scores and self-ratings of voice femininity was predicted, but no association between TVQMtF scores and acoustic measures of voice pitch and quality was proposed. Participants were 148 MtF women (mean age 48.14 years) recruited from the La Trobe Communication Clinic and the clinics of three doctors specializing in transgender health. All participants completed the TVQMtF and 34 of these participants also provided a voice sample for acoustic analysis. Pearson product-moment correlation analysis was conducted to examine the associations between TVQMtF scores and (1) self-perceptions of voice femininity and (2) acoustic measures of F0, jitter (%), shimmer (dB) and harmonic-to-noise ratio (HNR). Strong negative correlations between the participants' perceptions of their voice femininity and the TVQMtF scores demonstrated that for this group of MtF women a low self-rating of voice femininity was associated with more frequent negative voice-related experiences. This association was strongest with the vocal-functioning component of the TVQMtF . These strong correlations and high levels of shared variance between the TVQMtF and a measure of a related construct provides evidence for the convergent validity of the TVQMtF . The absence of significant correlations between the TVQMtF and the acoustic data is consistent with the equivocal findings of earlier research. This finding indicates that these two measures assess different aspects of the voice

  14. Integrating cues of social interest and voice pitch in men's preferences for women's voices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Benedict C; Feinberg, David R; Debruine, Lisa M; Little, Anthony C; Vukovic, Jovana

    2008-04-23

    Most previous studies of vocal attractiveness have focused on preferences for physical characteristics of voices such as pitch. Here we examine the content of vocalizations in interaction with such physical traits, finding that vocal cues of social interest modulate the strength of men's preferences for raised pitch in women's voices. Men showed stronger preferences for raised pitch when judging the voices of women who appeared interested in the listener than when judging the voices of women who appeared relatively disinterested in the listener. These findings show that voice preferences are not determined solely by physical properties of voices and that men integrate information about voice pitch and the degree of social interest expressed by women when forming voice preferences. Women's preferences for raised pitch in women's voices were not modulated by cues of social interest, suggesting that the integration of cues of social interest and voice pitch when men judge the attractiveness of women's voices may reflect adaptations that promote efficient allocation of men's mating effort.

  15. Quality of life indicators according to voice disorders and voice-related conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merrill, Ray M; Anderson, Allison E; Sloan, Arielle

    2011-09-01

    To evaluate the association between a history of voice disorders and voice-related conditions and the short form-36 eight-scale measure of functional health and well-being as well as psychometrically based physical and mental health summary measures within a senior population. Cross-sectional survey completed by 461 individuals aged 50 years and older, October 2010. The questionnaire included items on demographics, medical history, health, and voice use and disorders. Quality of life indicators were based on questions from the SF-36. The prevalence of ever having had a voice disorder was 17%. Hoarseness, esophageal reflux, frequent throat clearing, respiratory allergies, pneumonia, difficulty projecting the voice, chronic dryness of the throat, bitter or acid taste, effort required to talk, stomach or duodenal ulcers, wobbly or shaky voice, voice discomfort, chronic throat soreness, and emphysema were significantly associated with participants indicating they had experienced a voice disorder. The history of anxiety and depression was also significantly associated with a history of voice-related conditions. Those with a history of voice disorders had significantly poorer health with respect to physical functioning, bodily pain, role limitations due to physical health problems, role limitations due to emotional problems, emotional well-being and social functioning, energy or fatigue, and general health perception. Voice disorders stem from a variety of risk factors and biological mechanisms. Such disorders may lead to poor physical and psychosocial functioning. Copyright © 2011 The American Laryngological, Rhinological, and Otological Society, Inc.

  16. The Influence of Electrolarynx Use on Postlaryngectomy Voice-Related Quality of Life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Steven R; Doyle, Philip C

    2014-06-01

    To investigate voice-related quality of life in an effort to index self-assessed voice disability in speakers who use the electrolarynx and to determine the perceived level of influence of the electrolarynx on vocal communication. Prospective study. This study was conducted at a tertiary care facility. Forty laryngectomized adults (25 men, 15 women) who used the electrolarynx as a primary method of communication served as participants. The Voice-Related Quality of Life measure was administered and scored in standard fashion and descriptive data generated for physical, social-emotional, and total scores. Data indicate substantial variability in self-perceived quality of life specific to voice use; a wide range of physical, social-emotional, and total scores were observed. Only one-quarter of these participants rated themselves as having "poor/fair" voice-related quality of life. Our findings suggest that use of the electrolarynx as a postlaryngectomy method of verbal communication has a wide-ranging influence on self-perceived voice-related quality of life and that mean scores from prior studies may not accurately reflect the potential value of the electrolarynx. Communication disability related to electrolarynx use does in fact vary; however, it is not uniformly poor, and some may be highly proficient users. Consequently, the Voice-Related Quality of Life measure may also serve as a useful tool for clinical documentation of rehabilitation outcomes in those who use the electrolarynx as a postlaryngectomy method of speech. © American Academy of Otolaryngology—Head and Neck Surgery Foundation 2014.

  17. From Out of Our Voices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evangelia Papanikolaou

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Note from the interviewer: Diane Austin's new book “The Theory and Practice of Vocal Psychotherapy: Songs of the Self” (2008 which was published recently, has been an excellent opportunity to learn more about the use of voice in therapy, its clinical applications and its enormous possibilities that offers within a psychotherapeutic setting. This interview focuses on introducing some of these aspects based on Austin’s work, and on exploring her background, motivations and considerations towards this pioneer music-therapeutic approach. The interview has been edited by Diane Austin and Evangelia Papanikolaou and took place via a series of emails, dated from September to December 2009.

  18. A prospective multicenter clinical feasibility study of a new automatic speaking valve for postlaryngectomy voice rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lansaat, L; de Kleijn, B J; Hilgers, F J M; van der Laan, B F A M; van den Brekel, M W M

    2017-02-01

    Evaluation of short- and long-term clinical feasibility and exploration of limitations and advantages of a new automatic speaking valve (ASV) for laryngectomized patients with integrated HME, the Provox FreeHands FlexiVoice (FlexiVoice). This ASV not only enables automatic, but also manual closure of the valve. A multicenter, prospective clinical study in 40 laryngectomized patients was conducted. Participants were asked to use the FlexiVoice for 26 weeks. The primary outcome measure was long-term compliance. Secondary outcome measures were: patient preference, hours of FlexiVoice use, device life of adhesive, voice and speech quality, and quality of life. After 26 weeks, 15 patients (37.5 %) were using the FlexiVoice on a daily basis, for a mean of 12.64 h/day (SD ± 5.03). Ten patients (25 %) were using the device on a non-daily basis, for a mean of 3.76 h/day (SD ± 2.07). The remaining 15 patients (37.5 %) discontinued using the FlexiVoice. Sixty percent of the 25 long-term users applied both automatic and manual closure of the valve. Unpredictable fixation of the adhesive was the main reason for discontinuing or not using the FlexiVoice on a daily basis. Overall, 18 patients (45 %) preferred the FlexiVoice, 16 patients (40 %) their usual HME, 3 patients (7.5 %) their usual ASV, 1 patient (2.5 %) preferred no device at all, and in 2 patients preference was not recorded. The minor technical issues identified could be corrected. The Provox FreeHands FlexiVoice appears to be a useful ASV, which allows for hands-free speech in a larger proportion of laryngectomized patients in the present cohort. The additional manual closure option of the device is beneficial for maintaining the adhesive seal longer.

  19. The "voice" has it: screen reader adoption and switching behavior among vision impaired persons in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, Ted; Pal, Joyojeet; Cutrell, Edward

    2013-01-01

    We present results from a mixed methods study of screen reader use and switching behavior among people with vision impairments in India. We examine loyalty and experimentation with screen readers and find that the main drivers of adoption for early users differ significantly from the factors that drive continued use by advanced users. We discuss the factor that emerges as one of the strongest stated drivers of early adoption, text-to-speech "voice" quality, particularly a "human-sounding voice" as one of the key features differentiating free/open source products from more expensive proprietary products. While the initial preferences are driven by voice quality, application support becomes more important over time as users speed up their sound settings and become more comfortable with the resultant non-human-sounding speech. We discuss these findings from two theoretical perspectives--first, through the application of the economics of behavior switching, and second, vis-à-vis novice and expert approaches toward new product adoption. We argue that these findings further our understanding of initial user comfort related to assistive technology adoption, and the impact of early technology choices on long-term technology switching behavior.

  20. Predictors of Choral Directors' Voice Handicap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Sandra

    2013-01-01

    Vocal demands of teaching are considerable and these challenges are greater for choral directors who depend on the voice as a musical and instructive instrument. The purpose of this study was to (1) examine choral directors' vocal condition using a modified Voice Handicap Index (VHI), and (2) determine the extent to which the major variables…

  1. Speaking with the voice of authority

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    GPB Consulting has developed a scientific approach to voice coaching. A digital recording of the voice is sent to a lab in Switzerland and analyzed by a computer programme designed by a doctor of psychology and linguistics and a scientist at CERN (1 page).

  2. Student Voice and the Common Core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yonezawa, Susan

    2015-01-01

    Common Core proponents and detractors debate its merits, but students have voiced their opinion for years. Using a decade's worth of data gathered through design-research on youth voice, this article discusses what high school students have long described as more ideal learning environments for themselves--and how remarkably similar the Common…

  3. Teachers' Ability to Accurately Identify Disordered Voices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Catherine N.; Harris, Timothy B.

    1992-01-01

    This study, with 45 elementary school classroom teachers and 64 elementary education majors, found that the classroom teachers were able to consistently identify children with disordered voices. Students were somewhat inclined to underrefer children with possible voice disorders. (Author/DB)

  4. Voice recognition dictation: radiologist as transcriptionist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pezzullo, John A; Tung, Glenn A; Rogg, Jeffrey M; Davis, Lawrence M; Brody, Jeffrey M; Mayo-Smith, William W

    2008-12-01

    Continuous voice recognition dictation systems for radiology reporting provide a viable alternative to conventional transcription services with the promise of shorter report turnaround times and increased cost savings. While these benefits may be realized in academic institutions, it is unclear how voice recognition dictation impacts the private practice radiologist who is now faced with the additional task of transcription. In this article, we compare conventional transcription services with a commercially available voice recognition system with the following results: 1) Reports dictated with voice recognition took 50% longer to dictate despite being 24% shorter than those conventionally transcribed, 2) There were 5.1 errors per case, and 90% of all voice recognition dictations contained errors prior to report signoff while 10% of transcribed reports contained errors. 3). After signoff, 35% of VR reports still had errors. Additionally, cost savings using voice recognition systems in non-academic settings may not be realized. Based on average radiologist and transcription salaries, the additional time spent dictating with voice recognition costs an additional $6.10 per case or $76,250.00 yearly. The opportunity costs may be higher. Informally surveyed, all radiologists expressed dissatisfaction with voice recognition with feelings of frustration, and increased fatigue. In summary, in non-academic settings, utilizing radiologists as transcriptionists results in more error ridden radiology reports and increased costs compared with conventional transcription services.

  5. [Mutation voice disorders conditioned by psychic factors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wojciechowska, Anna; Obrebowski, Andrzej; Studzińska, Katarzyna; Swidziński, Piotr

    2010-01-01

    The case of 17 year old boy with mutational falsetto conditioned by a complex of psychic factors particulary with personality disorders and strong emotional bond with his mother was described. Phonation exercises lowered the average voice pitch. The stable results of phoniatric rehabilitation is dependent on effectiveness of psychological therapy of the whole family. Acoustic voice analysis demonstrates objectively the results of rehabilitation.

  6. Analog voicing detector responds to pitch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abel, R. S.; Watkins, H. E.

    1967-01-01

    Modified electronic voice encoder /Vocoder/ includes an independent analog mode of operation in addition to the conventional digital mode. The Vocoder is a bandwidth compression equipment that permits voice transmission over channels, having only a fraction of the bandwidth required for conventional telephone-quality speech transmission.

  7. Perception of Paralinguistic Traits in Synthesized Voices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baird, Alice Emily; Hasse Jørgensen, Stina; Parada-Cabaleiro, Emilia

    the paralinguistic traits of the synthesized voice. Using a corpus of 13 synthesized voices, constructed from acoustic concatenative speech synthesis, we assessed the response of 23 listeners from differing cultural backgrounds. Evaluating if the perception shifts from the known ground–truths, we asked listeners...... exploration into a more participatory and inclusive synthesized vocal identity....

  8. Analyzing the mediated voice - a datasession

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lawaetz, Anna

    Broadcasted voices are technologically manipulated. In order to achieve a certain autencity or sound of “reality” paradoxically the voices are filtered and trained in order to reach the listeners. This “mis-en-scene” is important knowledge when it comes to the development of a consistent method...

  9. Voice aftereffects of adaptation to speaker identity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zäske, Romi; Schweinberger, Stefan R; Kawahara, Hideki

    2010-09-01

    While adaptation to complex auditory stimuli has traditionally been reported for linguistic properties of speech, the present study demonstrates non-linguistic high-level aftereffects in the perception of voice identity, following adaptation to voices or faces of personally familiar speakers. In Exp. 1, prolonged exposure to speaker A's voice biased the perception of identity-ambiguous voice morphs between speakers A and B towards speaker B (and vice versa). Significantly biased voice identity perception was also observed in Exp. 2 when adaptors were videos of speakers' silently articulating faces, although effects were reduced in magnitude relative to those seen in Exp. 1. By contrast, adaptation to an unrelated speaker C elicited an intermediate proportion of speaker A identifications in both experiments. While crossmodal aftereffects on auditory identification (Exp. 2) dissipated rapidly, unimodal aftereffects (Exp. 1) were still measurable a few minutes after adaptation. These novel findings suggest contrastive coding of voice identity in long-term memory, with at least two perceptual mechanisms of voice identity adaptation: one related to auditory coding of voice characteristics, and another related to multimodal coding of familiar speaker identity. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Using the Voice to Design Ceramics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tvede Hansen, Flemming; Jensen, Kristoffer

    2011-01-01

    SoundShaping, a system to create ceramics from the human voice. Based on a generic audio feature extraction system, and the principal component analysis to ensure that the pertinent information in the voice is used, a 3D shape is created using simple geometric rules. This shape is output to a 3D printer...

  11. Epidemiology of voice problems in Dutch teachers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jong, F. I. C. R. S.; Kooijman, P. G. C.; Thomas, G.; Huinck, W. J.; Graamans, K.; Schutte, H. K.

    2006-01-01

    In order to assess voice complaints and absence from work due to voice problems among teachers of primary and secondary education, as well as among a control group, 2,117 questionnaires were analysed. The total group consisted of 1,878 teachers and 239 controls. Female teachers more frequently

  12. Epidemiology of voice problems in Dutch teachers.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jong, F.I.C.R.S. de; Kooijman, P.G.C.; Thomas, G.; Huinck, W.J.; Graamans, K.; Schutte, H.K.

    2006-01-01

    In order to assess voice complaints and absence from work due to voice problems among teachers of primary and secondary education, as well as among a control group, 2,117 questionnaires were analysed. The total group consisted of 1,878 teachers and 239 controls. Female teachers more frequently

  13. Gender in Voice Perception in Autism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groen, Wouter B.; van Orsouw, Linda; Zwiers, Marcel; Swinkels, Sophie; van der Gaag, Rutger Jan; Buitelaar, Jan K.

    2008-01-01

    Deficits in the perception of social stimuli may contribute to the characteristic impairments in social interaction in high functioning autism (HFA). Although the cortical processing of voice is abnormal in HFA, it is unclear whether this gives rise to impairments in the perception of voice gender. About 20 children with HFA and 20 matched…

  14. Quick Statistics about Voice, Speech, and Language

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Statistics and Epidemiology Quick Statistics About Voice, Speech, Language Voice, Speech, Language, and Swallowing Nearly 1 in 12 (7.7 ... condition known as persistent developmental stuttering. 8 , 9 Language 3.3 percent of U.S. children ages 3- ...

  15. The Male Voice of Emotional Intimacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Twohey, Denise; Ewing, Michael

    1995-01-01

    Inability to hear or understand the male voice of intimacy creates difficulty in relationships. Listening to relational dialogues of intimacy based on feminine relational strengths may preclude understanding or hearing males voices. Reviews special issue of the "Journal of Mental Health Counseling" on counseling men, concluding with several…

  16. Typicality ratings of male and female voices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spisak, Brian; Mullennix, John; Moro, Kelly; Will, Jessica; Farnsworth, Lynn

    2002-05-01

    Researchers have suggested that human voices are represented in memory in terms of prototypes [e.g., Kreiman and Papcun (1991); Papcun et al. (1989)]. Others have suggested that speech utterances are stored in memory via detailed exemplar-based representations [e.g., Lachs et al. (2000)]. The goal of the present study was to provide the first step toward assessing the viability of a prototype view of voice. Ten hVd utterances were recorded from each of 20 male and 20 female speakers. The utterances were blocked by speaker gender and presented to male and female listeners who rated each stimulus on a 1-7 typicality scale from ``least typical voice'' to ``most typical voice.'' There were significant effects of the type of vowel and speaker voice on the ratings, as well as interactions of vowel type with gender of subject and speaker voice. The results are discussed in terms of the strength of evidence for a graded category structure of voice categories that would be consistent with a prototype perspective of long-term memory representations of voice.

  17. Voice Therapy: A Need for Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Charles G.

    1980-01-01

    Conceptual and methodological guidelines for voice therapy research are presented, and suggestions are offered for selecting experimental designs. Divergent terminology, philosophy, and issues of voice therapy are examined to serve as an overview and as a basis for research direction. (Author/DLS)

  18. Why Is My Voice Changing? (For Teens)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... enter puberty earlier or later than others. How Deep Will My Voice Get? How deep a guy's voice gets depends on his genes: ... of Use Notice of Nondiscrimination Visit the Nemours Web site. Note: All information on TeensHealth® is for ...

  19. Nasalance change after sinonasal surgery: analysis of voice after septoturbinoplasty and endoscopic sinus surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Young Ha; Lee, Sang Hee; Park, Chang Woo; Cho, Jin Hee

    2013-01-01

    Changes in nasalance caused by resonance change after endonasal surgeries have been reported in prior studies. In clinical practice, although patients often complain of a nasal voice just after surgery, their voices recover over time. The objective of this study was to evaluate the long-term nasalance changes before and after endonasal surgery. Patients who underwent sinonasal surgery at Yeouido St. Mary's Hospital between March 2009 and July 2011 were included in this study. We classified the subjects into three groups according to the surgeries they underwent: group 1, the septoturbinoplasty group; group 2, the endoscopic sinus surgery group; and group 3, the septoturbinoplasty and endoscopic sinus surgery group. We checked acoustic profiles, Grade, Roughness, Breathiness, Asthenia, Strain (GRBAS) scores, and nasalance using a nasometer before and after the sinonasal surgery. When considering multidimensional voice program results, no observed parameters showed statistically meaningful changes before or after the operation in all three groups. GRBAS scales in all patients changed less than two scales postoperatively. Nasalance increased at 1 month after the operation in all groups. However, it returned to original levels with time: 3 months in group 2 and 6 months in groups 1 and 3. Sinonasal surgery can change the acoustic characteristics of the vocal tract and produce a significant increase in nasality in the early phase. However, after proper healing of the nasal cavity, nasality was observed to become similar to the preoperative level. Therefore, patients, especially voice professionals, do not need to be wary of voice changes after sinonasal surgery.

  20. Voice disorders in teachers: critical review on the worker's health surveillance practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santana, Maria da Conceição C Pessoa de; Goulart, Bárbara Niegia Garcia de; Chiari, Brasilia Maria

    2012-01-01

    To analyze scientific bibliographic production on the practice of occupational health surveillance related to voice disorders in teachers. The Cochrane Handbook precepts which involves the formulation of the question to be investigated, the location, the studies selection and articles' critical evaluation were followed. The articles published between 2000 and 2011 were selected in the PubMed, LILACS, MEDLINE database, and the Cochrane Library using the descriptors voice disorders; teachers, occupational health, workers' health surveillance. Texts were analyzed, using a standardized form when the following data were collected: objectives, research design, characteristics of the study group, obtained results and discussion on the practice of surveillance related to voice disorder. Initially, 141 studies were identified. After reviewing the titles and abstracts, considering inclusion and exclusion criteria, verifying consistency with the topic researched and eliminating the ones which were concurrently in more than one database, 32 articles were effectively analyzed for relating in the findings and/or conclusions to the practice of surveillance related to voice disorders in teachers. The practice of monitoring workers' health was evidenced in this research mainly as the identification of risk factors associated with voice disorders in teachers, aimed at the transformation of the working conditions and the assurance of quality of assistance to these workers as professionals.

  1. Suggestions for Layout and Functional Behavior of Software-Based Voice Switch Keysets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, David W.

    2010-01-01

    Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) provides communication services for a number of real time environments, including Space Shuttle Propulsion support and International Space Station (ISS) payload operations. In such settings, control team members speak with each other via multiple voice circuits or loops. Each loop has a particular purpose and constituency, and users are assigned listen and/or talk capabilities for a given loop based on their role in fulfilling the purpose. A voice switch is a given facility's hardware and software that supports such communication, and may be interconnected with other facilities switches to create a large network that, from an end user perspective, acts like a single system. Since users typically monitor and/or respond to several voice loops concurrently for hours on end and real time operations can be very dynamic and intense, it s vital that a control panel or keyset for interfacing with the voice switch be a servant that reduces stress, not a master that adds it. Implementing the visual interface on a computer screen provides tremendous flexibility and configurability, but there s a very real risk of overcomplication. (Remember how office automation made life easier, which led to a deluge of documents that made life harder?) This paper a) discusses some basic human factors considerations related to keysets implemented as application software windows, b) suggests what to standardize at the facility level and what to leave to the user's preference, and c) provides screen shot mockups for a robust but reasonably simple user experience. Concepts apply to keyset needs in almost any type of operations control or support center.

  2. VoiceThread as a Peer Review and Dissemination Tool for Undergraduate Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guertin, L. A.

    2012-12-01

    VoiceThread has been utilized in an undergraduate research methods course for peer review and final research project dissemination. VoiceThread (http://www.voicethread.com) can be considered a social media tool, as it is a web-based technology with the capacity to enable interactive dialogue. VoiceThread is an application that allows a user to place a media collection online containing images, audio, videos, documents, and/or presentations in an interface that facilitates asynchronous communication. Participants in a VoiceThread can be passive viewers of the online content or engaged commenters via text, audio, video, with slide annotations via a doodle tool. The VoiceThread, which runs across browsers and operating systems, can be public or private for viewing and commenting and can be embedded into any website. Although few university students are aware of the VoiceThread platform (only 10% of the students surveyed by Ng (2012)), the 2009 K-12 edition of The Horizon Report (Johnson et al., 2009) lists VoiceThread as a tool to watch because of the opportunities it provides as a collaborative learning environment. In Fall 2011, eleven students enrolled in an undergraduate research methods course at Penn State Brandywine each conducted their own small-scale research project. Upon conclusion of the projects, students were required to create a poster summarizing their work for peer review. To facilitate the peer review process outside of class, each student-created PowerPoint file was placed in a VoiceThread with private access to only the class members and instructor. Each student was assigned to peer review five different student posters (i.e., VoiceThread images) with the audio and doodle tools to comment on formatting, clarity of content, etc. After the peer reviews were complete, the students were allowed to edit their PowerPoint poster files for a new VoiceThread. In the new VoiceThread, students were required to video record themselves describing their research

  3. Voice pedagogy-what do we need?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, Brian P; Herbst, Christian T

    2016-12-01

    The final keynote panel of the 10th Pan-European Voice Conference (PEVOC) was concerned with the topic 'Voice pedagogy-what do we need?' In this communication the panel discussion is summarized, and the authors provide a deepening discussion on one of the key questions, addressing the roles and tasks of people working with voice students. In particular, a distinction is made between (1) voice building (derived from the German term 'Stimmbildung'), primarily comprising the functional and physiological aspects of singing; (2) coaching, mostly concerned with performance skills; and (3) singing voice rehabilitation. Both public and private educators are encouraged to apply this distinction to their curricula, in order to arrive at more efficient singing teaching and to reduce the risk of vocal injury to the singers concerned.

  4. Student Voice in Work Integrated Learning Scholarship: A Review of Teacher Education and Geographical Sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kate Eileen Thomson

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Work integrated learning is an umbrella term that refers to the opportunities provided to university students to integrate knowledge of theory and practice as part of their degree program. As the role of students in higher education is evolving, we sought to develop our understanding of the role of students in the work integrated learning (WIL space through exploring current literature on student voice. In this paper, we consider what has been reported about WIL in relation to student voice, how it has been represented, and how this has influenced practice. We undertook a systematic literature review for two different disciplines, one which represented an example of a professionally accredited undergraduate degree program (teacher education, and the other an example of a program with no professional accreditation (geographical sciences. The teacher education literature demonstrated more clearly the use of student voice to inform WIL within curriculum design. However, the geographical sciences literature did include examples of student voice being incorporated within the design of collaborative community-based forms of WIL. A role for students as researchers, who lead research and initiate curriculum change into WIL, was noticeably absent in both disciplinary sets of literature. The lack of evidence of the inclusion of students in the design, conduct, and analysis of WIL provides an invitation for SoTL scholars to redefine the role of students in this space.

  5. Factors affecting the quality of sound recording for speech and voice analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogel, Adam P; Morgan, Angela T

    2009-01-01

    The importance and utility of objective evidence-based measurement of the voice is well documented. Therefore, greater consideration needs to be given to the factors that influence the quality of voice and speech recordings. This manuscript aims to bring together the many features that affect acoustically acquired voice and speech. Specifically, the paper considers the practical requirements of individual speech acquisition configurations through examining issues relating to hardware, software and microphone selection, the impact of environmental noise, analogue to digital conversion and file format as well as the acoustic measures resulting from varying levels of signal integrity. The type of recording environment required by a user is often dictated by a variety of clinical and experimental needs, including: the acoustic measures being investigated; portability of equipment; an individual's budget; and the expertise of the user. As the quality of recorded signals is influenced by many factors, awareness of these issues is essential. This paper aims to highlight the importance of these methodological considerations to those previously uninitiated with voice and speech acoustics. With current technology, the highest quality recording would be made using a stand-alone hard disc recorder, an independent mixer to attenuate the incoming signal, and insulated wiring combined with a high quality microphone in an anechoic chamber or sound treated room.

  6. Technology User Groups and Early Childhood Education: A Preliminary Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parette, Howard P.; Hourcade, Jack J.; Blum, Craig; Watts, Emily H.; Stoner, Julia B.; Wojcik, Brian W.; Chrismore, Shannon B.

    2013-01-01

    This article presents a preliminary examination of the potential of Technology User Groups as a professional development venue for early childhood education professionals in developing operational and functional competence in using hardware and software components of a Technology toolkit. Technology user groups are composed of varying numbers of…

  7. Classroom Research and Professional Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omaira Vergara Luján

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available This article intends to share the experience of a group of teachers in the Classroom Research Seminar of the Teacher Development Program in English carried out at Universidad del Valle, Cali, from January to June, 2007. The seminar was part of a high-level in-service program for teachers of English of a network of private educational institutions. We would like to share the highlights and difficulties of the experience. We will start with the general framework of the program and the concept of professional development that underlies it. Next we will focus on the classroom research seminar, its objectives, methodology and results. Finally we share the voices of some of the participants, who talk about the influence this seminar had on their professional development and daily work.

  8. Professional Certification

    Science.gov (United States)

    WaterSense recognizes certification programs for irrigation professionals that meet the specification criteria. Certification programs cover three areas: irrigation system design, installation and maintenance, and system auditing.

  9. Your Cheatin' Voice Will Tell on You: Detection of Past Infidelity from Voice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Susan M; Harrison, Marissa A

    2017-01-01

    Evidence suggests that many physical, behavioral, and trait qualities can be detected solely from the sound of a person's voice, irrespective of the semantic information conveyed through speech. This study examined whether raters could accurately assess the likelihood that a person has cheated on committed, romantic partners simply by hearing the speaker's voice. Independent raters heard voice samples of individuals who self-reported that they either cheated or had never cheated on their romantic partners. To control for aspects that may clue a listener to the speaker's mate value, we used voice samples that did not differ between these groups for voice attractiveness, age, voice pitch, and other acoustic measures. We found that participants indeed rated the voices of those who had a history of cheating as more likely to cheat. Male speakers were given higher ratings for cheating, while female raters were more likely to ascribe the likelihood to cheat to speakers. Additionally, we manipulated the pitch of the voice samples, and for both sexes, the lower pitched versions were consistently rated to be from those who were more likely to have cheated. Regardless of the pitch manipulation, speakers were able to assess actual history of infidelity; the one exception was that men's accuracy decreased when judging women whose voices were lowered. These findings expand upon the idea that the human voice may be of value as a cheater detection tool and very thin slices of vocal information are all that is needed to make certain assessments about others.

  10. Voice responses to changes in pitch of voice or tone auditory feedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivasankar, Mahalakshmi; Bauer, Jay J; Babu, Tara; Larson, Charles R

    2005-02-01

    The present study was undertaken to examine if a subject's voice F0 responded not only to perturbations in pitch of voice feedback but also to changes in pitch of a side tone presented congruent with voice feedback. Small magnitude brief duration perturbations in pitch of voice or tone auditory feedback were randomly introduced during sustained vowel phonations. Results demonstrated a higher rate and larger magnitude of voice F0 responses to changes in pitch of the voice compared with a triangular-shaped tone (experiment 1) or a pure tone (experiment 2). However, response latencies did not differ across voice or tone conditions. Data suggest that subjects responded to the change in F0 rather than harmonic frequencies of auditory feedback because voice F0 response prevalence, magnitude, or latency did not statistically differ across triangular-shaped tone or pure-tone feedback. Results indicate the audio-vocal system is sensitive to the change in pitch of a variety of sounds, which may represent a flexible system capable of adapting to changes in the subject's voice. However, lower prevalence and smaller responses to tone pitch-shifted signals suggest that the audio-vocal system may resist changes to the pitch of other environmental sounds when voice feedback is present.

  11. Understanding the Voice of the Customer: Practical, Data-Driven Planning and Decision Making for Access Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huff-Eibl, Robyn; Miller-Wells, John; Begay, Wendy

    2014-01-01

    This article describes the process and role frontline access and public service staff play in needs assessment and evaluation of user services, specifically in understanding the voice of the customer. Information includes how the University of Arizona Libraries have incorporated daily data collection into the strategic planning process, resources…

  12. Personal and Professional Characteristics of Music Educators: One Size Does Not Fit All.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doherty, Mary Lynn; van Mersbergen, Miriam

    2017-01-01

    The prevalence of voice disorders among various educator groups is well known, and voice disorders among music educators are higher than the general classroom educators. Music educators vary with respect to behavioral and personality factors, personal characteristics, type of music taught, job-specific environment, and governmental professional expectations. This study aims to identify risk factors for voice disorders in a heterogeneous population of music educators. An online survey was conducted with 213 respondents. Survey questions addressed demographics, level of education, years of music teaching experience, specialty training, primary teaching assignments and instrument, vocal health behaviors, and diagnoses of voice disorders. Summary statistics and group comparisons are reported. Those whose primary instrument was voice reported a greater frequency of voice disorders. Female and older music educators also had a higher prevalence of voice disorders. Music educators are a heterogeneous group of individuals who require more careful consideration in the prevention and treatment of occupational voice problems. Copyright © 2017 The Voice Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Professional formation of the information professionals: librarians in literature, reflexions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Tereza Machado Teles Walter

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available The introduction of the information and communication technologies in the labour environment of the information professionals caused changes in the way of working, in the perspectives of the offer of services and products to users, and in the necessities of professional education. This work discusses some difficulties related to the formation of librarians, concerning to the disciplines related to information technologies, and how literature has been discussing this subject. It is also pointed the interface with other professionals and how the distinctive characteristics of the librarians should be warranted so they can compete to information jobs.

  14. Interpersonal Processes and Attachment in Voice-Hearers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robson, George; Mason, Oliver

    2015-11-01

    Studies of both clinical and non-clinical voice hearers suggest that distress is rather inconsistently associated with the perceived relationship between voice and hearer. It is also not clear if their beliefs about voices are relevant. This study investigated the links between attachment anxiety/avoidance, interpersonal aspects of the voice relationship, and distress whilst considering the impact of beliefs about voices and paranoia. Forty-four voice-hearing participants completed a number of self-report measures tapping attachment, interpersonal processes in the voice relationship, beliefs about voices, paranoia, distress and depression. Attachment avoidance was related to voice intrusiveness, hearer distance and distress. Attachment anxiety was related to voice intrusiveness, hearer dependence and distress. A series of simple mediation analyses were conducted that suggest that the relationship between attachment and voice related distress may be mediated by interpersonal dynamics in the voice-hearer relationship, beliefs about voices and paranoia. Beliefs about voices, the hearer's relationship with their voices, and the distress voices sometimes engender appear to be meaningfully related to their attachment style. This may be important to consider in therapeutic work.

  15. Sonorous Voice and Feminist Teaching: Lessons from Cavarero

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forrest, Michelle

    2015-01-01

    I claim that Adriana Cavarero's concept of sonorous voice is significant in feminist teaching because, as she argues, dominant concepts of voice refer to voice in semantic terms thereby discounting voice in sonorous terms. This process of "devocalization", spanning the history of Western philosophy, devalues the uniqueness embodied in…

  16. Voice therapy and vocal nodules in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonard, Rebecca

    2009-12-01

    This review considers recent and significant information pertinent to voice therapy for vocal nodules. Available evidence suggests that voice therapy directed to excessive, hyperfunctional and maladaptive vocal practices can be effective in improving voice quality and reducing size/extent of pathology. However, there is also a growing literature suggesting that behavioral approaches may not be sufficient to permanently heal tissue changes in some patients, regardless of compliance with treatment aims, due to lasting structural damage in the vocal fold cover. This evidence underscores the need for early identification and education in individuals at risk for nodules. The relationship between vocal nodules and excessive, phonotraumatic voice use is well established. Voice therapy typically consists of education regarding vocal fold mechanics and etiological factors, as well as modification of specific vocal practices that either cause, exacerbate or result from inappropriate voice production. Therapy can be effective in improving voice quality and tissue health but does not necessarily result in complete resolution of pathology. It should always be considered as a part of the treatment regimen for patients with vocal nodules.

  17. Neural correlates of adaptation to voice identity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schweinberger, Stefan R; Walther, Christian; Zäske, Romi; Kovács, Gyula

    2011-11-01

    Apart from speech content, the human voice also carries paralinguistic information about speaker identity. Voice identification and its neural correlates have received little scientific attention up to now. Here we use event-related potentials (ERPs) in an adaptation paradigm, in order to investigate the neural representation and the time course of vocal identity processing. Participants adapted to repeated utterances of vowel-consonant-vowel (VCV) of one personally familiar speaker (either A or B), before classifying a subsequent test voice varying on an identity continuum between these two speakers. Following adaptation to speaker A, test voices were more likely perceived as speaker B and vice versa, and these contrastive voice identity aftereffects (VIAEs) were much more pronounced when the same syllable, rather than a different syllable, was used as adaptor. Adaptation induced amplitude reductions of the frontocentral N1-P2 complex and a prominent reduction of the parietal P3 component, for test voices preceded by identity-corresponding adaptors. Importantly, only the P3 modulation remained clear for across-syllable combinations of adaptor and test stimuli. Our results suggest that voice identity is contrastively processed by specialized neurons in auditory cortex within ∼250 ms after stimulus onset, with identity processing becoming less dependent on speech content after ∼300 ms. ©2011 The British Psychological Society.

  18. Function Activation on Intelligent Buildings Using Mobile Devices through Voice Commands

    OpenAIRE

    Moumtadi Fatima; Granados-Lovera Fabián; Delgado-Hernández Julio Carlos

    2014-01-01

    Development of information and communication technologies has allowed the incorporation into different areas of human activity of apps that control electrical and electronic devices through voice commands. With these apps, in telemedicine people affected by some temporary decrease in their physical capacities have improved their level of autonomy; utilities have been added to educational environments to facilitate the use of IT applications to users with physical disability; finally, home aut...

  19. Unfamiliar voice identification: Effect of post-event information on accuracy and voice ratings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harriet Mary Jessica Smith

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available This study addressed the effect of misleading post-event information (PEI on voice ratings, identification accuracy, and confidence, as well as the link between verbal recall and accuracy. Participants listened to a dialogue between male and female targets, then read misleading information about voice pitch. Participants engaged in verbal recall, rated voices on a feature checklist, and made a lineup decision. Accuracy rates were low, especially on target-absent lineups. Confidence and accuracy were unrelated, but the number of facts recalled about the voice predicted later lineup accuracy. There was a main effect of misinformation on ratings of target voice pitch, but there was no effect on identification accuracy or confidence ratings. As voice lineup evidence from earwitnesses is used in courts, the findings have potential applied relevance.

  20. Real time analysis of voiced sounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, J. P. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    A power spectrum analysis of the harmonic content of a voiced sound signal is conducted in real time by phase-lock-loop tracking of the fundamental frequency, (f sub 0) of the signal and successive harmonics (h sub 1 through h sub n) of the fundamental frequency. The analysis also includes measuring the quadrature power and phase of each frequency tracked, differentiating the power measurements of the harmonics in adjacent pairs, and analyzing successive differentials to determine peak power points in the power spectrum for display or use in analysis of voiced sound, such as for voice recognition.

  1. Voice Disorders in Teachers: Clinical, Videolaryngoscopical, and Vocal Aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Eny Regina Bóia Neves; Tavares, Elaine Lara Mendes; Martins, Regina Helena Garcia

    2015-09-01

    Dysphonia is more prevalent in teachers than among the general population. The objective of this study was to analyze clinical, vocal, and videolaryngoscopical aspects in dysphonic teachers. Ninety dysphonic teachers were inquired about their voice, comorbidities, and work conditions. They underwent vocal auditory-perceptual evaluation (maximum phonation time and GRBASI scale), acoustic voice analysis, and videolaryngoscopy. The results were compared with a control group consisting of 90 dysphonic nonteachers, of similar gender and ages, and with professional activities excluding teaching and singing. In both groups, there were 85 women and five men (age range 31-50 years). In the controls, the majority of subjects worked in domestic activities, whereas the majority of teachers worked in primary (42.8%) and secondary school (37.7%). Teachers and controls reported, respectively: vocal abuse (76.7%; 37.8%), weekly hours of work between 21 and 40 years (72.2%; 80%), under 10 years of practice (36%; 23%), absenteeism (23%; 0%), sinonasal (66%; 20%) and gastroesophageal symptoms (44%; 22%), hoarseness (82%; 78%), throat clearing (70%; 62%), and phonatory effort (72%; 52%). In both groups, there were decreased values of maximum phonation time, impairment of the G parameter in the GRBASI scale (82%), decrease of F0 and increase of the rest of acoustic parameters. Nodules and laryngopharyngeal reflux were predominant in teachers; laryngopharyngeal reflux, polyps, and sulcus vocalis predominated in the controls. Vocal symptoms, comorbidities, and absenteeism were predominant among teachers. The vocal analyses were similar in both groups. Nodules and laryngopharyngeal reflux were predominant among teachers, whereas polyps, laryngopharyngeal reflux, and sulcus were predominant among controls. Copyright © 2015 The Voice Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Mediatization: a concept, multiple voices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Gilberto GOMES

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Mediatization has become increasingly a key concept, fundamental, essential to describe the present and the history of media and communicative change taking place. Thus, it became part of a whole, one can not see them as a separate sphere. In this perspective, the media coverage is used as a concept to describe the process of expansion of the different technical means and consider the interrelationships between the communicative change, means and sociocultural change. However, although many researchers use the concept of mediatization, each gives you the meaning that best suits your needs. Thus, the concept of media coverage is treated with multiple voices. This paper discusses this problem and present a preliminary pre-position on the matter.

  3. The impact of phonation mode and vocal technique on vocal fold closure in young females with normal voice quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Bodt, Marc S; Clement, Gregory; Wuyts, Floris L; Borghs, Cindy; Van Lierde, Kristiane M

    2012-11-01

    Because voice quality depends substantially on vocal fold closure (VFC), voice therapists try to modify VFC by specific voice techniques or adjustments in phonation mode. This study demonstrates the impact of six different phonation modes on VFC in healthy subjects. For this study, 21 female subjects with normal voice quality were selected. The impact of different phonation modes and voice techniques was examined by fiberoptic laryngovideoendoscopy during different modes of phonation: habitual phonation, high pitch, low pitch, resonance on /m/, Coblenzer's "abspannen," and chant talk. The video recordings were judged by three experienced professionals (two Speech and Language Pathologist and one laryngologist) by means of a visual analog scale. Statistical analysis showed that only resonance on /m/ significantly improved VFC compared with habitual phonation. All other phonation modes and techniques, except low-pitched phonation, led to a significant worse closure in comparison with the closure at normal pitch. The glottic closure observed by low-pitched phonation was not significantly different than the closure at habitual pitch. Interrater agreement was moderate to very good, depending on the mode of phonation. The results of this study allow a better understanding of the impact of phonation mode and vocal therapy techniques on VFC in healthy subjects and give an indication about the impact of these methods to influence VFC. Copyright © 2012 The Voice Foundation. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Bringing voice in policy building.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lotrecchiano, Gaetano R; Kane, Mary; Zocchi, Mark S; Gosa, Jessica; Lazar, Danielle; Pines, Jesse M

    2017-07-03

    Purpose The purpose of this paper is to describe the use of group concept mapping (GCM) as a tool for developing a conceptual model of an episode of acute, unscheduled care from illness or injury to outcomes such as recovery, death and chronic illness. Design/methodology/approach After generating a literature review drafting an initial conceptual model, GCM software (CS Global MAXTM) is used to organize and identify strengths and directionality between concepts generated through feedback about the model from several stakeholder groups: acute care and non-acute care providers, patients, payers and policymakers. Through online and in-person population-specific focus groups, the GCM approach seeks feedback, assigned relationships and articulated priorities from participants to produce an output map that described overarching concepts and relationships within and across subsamples. Findings A clustered concept map made up of relational data points that produced a taxonomy of feedback was used to update the model for use in soliciting additional feedback from two technical expert panels (TEPs), and finally, a public comment exercise was performed. The results were a stakeholder-informed improved model for an acute care episode, identified factors that influence process and outcomes, and policy recommendations, which were delivered to the Department of Health and Human Services's (DHHS) Assistant Secretary for Preparedness and Response. Practical implications This study provides an example of the value of cross-population multi-stakeholder input to increase voice in shared problem health stakeholder groups. Originality/value This paper provides GCM results and a visual analysis of the relational characteristics both within and across sub-populations involved in the study. It also provides an assessment of observational key factors supporting how different stakeholder voices can be integrated to inform model development and policy recommendations.

  5. The neural changes in connectivity of the voice network during voice pitch perturbation

    OpenAIRE

    Flagmeier, Sabina G.; Ray, Kimberly L.; Parkinson, Amy L.; Li, Karl; Vargas, Robert; Price, Larry R.; Laird, Angela R.; Charles R Larson; Robin, Donald A.

    2014-01-01

    Voice control is critical to communication. To date, studies have used behavioral, electrophysiological and functional data to investigate the neural correlates of voice control using perturbation tasks, but have yet to examine the interactions of these neural regions. The goal of this study was to use structural equation modeling of functional neuroimaging data to examine network properties of voice with and without perturbation. Results showed that the presence of a pitch shift, which was p...

  6. Speaking up for patient safety by hospital-based health care professionals: a literature review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Okuyama, A.; Wagner, C.; Bijnen, A.B.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Speaking up is important for patient safety, but often, health care professionals hesitate to voice concerns. Understanding the influencing factors can help to improve speaking-up behaviour and team communication. This review focused on health care professionals' speaking-up behaviour

  7. Matters in End-User Development: Enculturing Qualities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wulf, V.; Pipek, V.; Rosson, M.B.; Ruyter, B.E.R. de

    2010-01-01

    End-User Computing, End-User Development, End-User Software Engineering and related approaches have experienced an enormous wave of attention currently. As modern Information and Communication Technologies (ICT) pervade more and more areas not only of our professional, but also of our private lives,

  8. User research & technology, pt.2

    CERN Document Server

    Greifeneder, Elke

    2011-01-01

    This e-book is Part 2 on the theme "User Research and Technology". The research covers the testing of online digital library resources using various methods. Library and information science as a field is changing and the requirements for top quality research are growing more stringent. This is typical of the experience of other professional fields as they have moved from practitioners advising practitioners to researchers building on past results. This e-book contains 12 papers on this theme.

  9. Hands-free human-machine interaction with voice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juang, B. H.

    2004-05-01

    Voice is natural communication interface between a human and a machine. The machine, when placed in today's communication networks, may be configured to provide automation to save substantial operating cost, as demonstrated in AT&T's VRCP (Voice Recognition Call Processing), or to facilitate intelligent services, such as virtual personal assistants, to enhance individual productivity. These intelligent services often need to be accessible anytime, anywhere (e.g., in cars when the user is in a hands-busy-eyes-busy situation or during meetings where constantly talking to a microphone is either undersirable or impossible), and thus call for advanced signal processing and automatic speech recognition techniques which support what we call ``hands-free'' human-machine communication. These techniques entail a broad spectrum of technical ideas, ranging from use of directional microphones and acoustic echo cancellatiion to robust speech recognition. In this talk, we highlight a number of key techniques that were developed for hands-free human-machine communication in the mid-1990s after Bell Labs became a unit of Lucent Technologies. A video clip will be played to demonstrate the accomplishement.

  10. Experiments on Detection of Voiced Hesitations in Russian Spontaneous Speech

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasilisa Verkhodanova

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The development and popularity of voice-user interfaces made spontaneous speech processing an important research field. One of the main focus areas in this field is automatic speech recognition (ASR that enables the recognition and translation of spoken language into text by computers. However, ASR systems often work less efficiently for spontaneous than for read speech, since the former differs from any other type of speech in many ways. And the presence of speech disfluencies is its prominent characteristic. These phenomena are an important feature in human-human communication and at the same time they are a challenging obstacle for the speech processing tasks. In this paper we address an issue of voiced hesitations (filled pauses and sound lengthenings detection in Russian spontaneous speech by utilizing different machine learning techniques, from grid search and gradient descent in rule-based approaches to such data-driven ones as ELM and SVM based on the automatically extracted acoustic features. Experimental results on the mixed and quality diverse corpus of spontaneous Russian speech indicate the efficiency of the techniques for the task in question, with SVM outperforming other methods.

  11. The innovation effect of user design: Exploring consumers' innovation perceptions of firms selling products designed by users

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Schreier (Martin); C. Fuchs (Christoph); D.W. Dahl (Darren)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractThe authors study consumer perceptions of firms that sell products designed by users. In contrast with the traditional design mode, in which professional designers employed by firms handle the design task, common design by users involves the firm's user community in creating new product

  12. Justine user`s manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, S.R.

    1995-10-01

    Justine is the graphical user interface to the Los Alamos Radiation Modeling Interactive Environment (LARAMIE). It provides LARAMIE customers with a powerful, robust, easy-to-use, WYSIWYG interface that facilitates geometry construction and problem specification. It is assumed that the reader is familiar with LARAMIE, and the transport codes available, i.e., MCNPTM and DANTSYSTM. No attempt is made in this manual to describe these codes in detail. Information about LARAMIE, DANTSYS, and MCNP are available elsewhere. It i also assumed that the reader is familiar with the Unix operating system and with Motif widgets and their look and feel. However, a brief description of Motif and how one interacts with it can be found in Appendix A.

  13. Speech therapy and voice recognition instrument

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, J.; Babcock, M. L.

    1972-01-01

    Characteristics of electronic circuit for examining variations in vocal excitation for diagnostic purposes and in speech recognition for determiniog voice patterns and pitch changes are described. Operation of the circuit is discussed and circuit diagram is provided.

  14. [Influence of resistance to voices on depression].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monestès, J L; Vavasseur-Desperriers, J; Villatte, M; Denizot, L; Loas, G; Rusinek, S

    2015-02-01

    Beliefs about voices and reactions to voices have been proposed as important variables influencing the course of depression in schizophrenia. Consequences of auditory hallucinations are different according to identity, goals, omnipotence, omniscience, and meanings attributed to voices by the client. Ten to 15 % of the general population experience auditory hallucinations during lifetime without any distress or need for medical care. In addition, neither frequency of voices, nor their topography, influence the emotional consequences of auditory hallucinations experiences, but the relationships to voices. The Revised Belief about Voices Questionnaire analyzes voices along 5 dimensions: malevolence, benevolence, omnipotence, resistance, and engagement. Malevolent voices are related to depression, whereas benevolent voices engender more positive emotions. Subjects usually engage with benevolent voices, and resist to malevolent voices. But resistance strategies are barely efficient and often backfire. Patients resisting to their voices consider them more malevolent and present with more depressive symptoms. This research aims at studying the influence of resistance to auditory hallucinations on depression in a group of patients suffering from schizophrenia and experiencing auditory hallucinations, using the Revised Beliefs About Voices Questionnaire (BAVQ-R). It also provides a study of the psychometrics properties of the French language version of the BAVQ-R. Thirty-eight patients suffering from paranoid schizophrenia, undifferentiated schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder, have been tested with the French versions of the Revised Beliefs About Voices Questionnaire (BAVQ-R), the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS), and the Calgary Depression Scale for Schizophrenia (CDSS). Each patient presented with auditory hallucinations during the week before evaluation, with a minimum score of 3 on P3 item of PANSS. Mean age was 39.39 years (SD 11.33); mean duration of

  15. Voice Pitch Influences Perceptions of Sexual Infidelity

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    O'Connor, Jillian J.M; Re, Daniel E; Feinberg, David R

    2011-01-01

    .... Among men, testosterone is inversely related to voice pitch, relationship and offspring investment, and is positively related to the pursuit of short-term relationships, including extra-pair sex...

  16. Common Problems That Can Affect Your Voice

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to improve the voice. Treatment choice depends on the nature of the vocal cord paralysis, the degree of vocal impairment, ... cancer is a very serious condition requiring immediate medical attention. Chronic hoarseness warrants evaluation by an otolaryngologist ...

  17. Enhancing temporal cues to voice pitch in continuous interleaved sampling cochlear implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Tim; Faulkner, Andrew; Rosen, Stuart

    2004-10-01

    The limited spectral resolution of cochlear implant systems means that voice pitch perception depends on weak temporal envelope cues. Enhancement of such cues was investigated in implant users and in acoustic simulations. Subjects labeled the pitch movement of processed synthetic diphthongal glides. In standard processing, noise carriers (simulations) or pulse trains (implant users) were modulated by 400 Hz low-pass envelopes. In modified processing, carriers were modulated by two components: (1) Slow-rate (pitch cues. Though significant, advantages for modified processing were small, suggesting that the potential for developing strategies delivering enhanced pitch perception is limited. .

  18. Pitch synchronous transform warping in voice conversion

    OpenAIRE

    Vích, R. (Robert); Vondra, M. (Martin)

    2012-01-01

    In this paper a new voice conversion algorithm is presented, which transforms the utterance of a source speaker into the utterance of a target speaker. The voice conversion approach is based on pitch synchronous speech analysis, Discrete Cosine Transform (DCT), nonlinear spectral warping with spectrum interpolation and pitch synchronous speech synthesis with overlapping using the speech production model. The DCT speech model contains also information about the phase properties of the modeled ...

  19. VOICE PROSTHESES – TEN YEARS AFTER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Igor Fajdiga

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available Since the introduction of tracheoesophageal puncture method by Bloom and Singer in 1980, the success of restoring vocal communication in laryngectomees has improved significantly. At the University Department of Otorhinolaringology and Cervicofacial Surgery in Ljubljana, the method has been used since 1993. We have performed 76 secondary tracheoesophageal punctures in patients with no objective contraindications and with an interest for this method. The success rate was 92%. With regard to our 10-years experience, we wanted to (re define present and future role of tracheoesophageal voice/speech in the alaryngeal voice rehabilitation. To compare both alaryngeal speech modes, 32 patients using tracheoesophageal speech and 35 patients using esophageal speech were included into the study. In both groups the patients were established speakers. The complications that occurred in the patients with voice prostheses are presented. Most of them required only replacement of prostheses for their solution.The tracheoesophageal puncture and voice prosthesis insertion is a reliable and fast way of restoring good voice and speech after laryngectomy. In spite of some objective disadvantage in comparison to esophageal speech – like the use of hand, need for regular maintenance, and relying to medical service, its good characteristics should rank it immediately after a good esophageal speech. This means that tracheoesophageal voice prostheses should be offered to all patients, which are not able to learn a good esophageal voice in short time, to avoid a frustrating time with no vocal communication. After tracheoesophageal puncture and voice prosthesis insertion, the patient should still get a possibility to learn esophageal speech if he wants to avoid the drawbacks of the tracheoesophageal speech.

  20. Interactive Voice Response Polling in Election Campaigns

    OpenAIRE

    Brunk, Alexander Crowley

    2015-01-01

    Since the early 2000s, Interactive Voice Response (IVR) has become a widely popular method of conducting public opinion surveys in the United States. IVR surveys use an automated computer voice to ask survey questions and elicit responses in place of a live interviewer. Previous studies have shown that IVR polls conducted immediately before elections are generally accurate, but have raised questions as to their validity in other contexts. This study examines whether IVR polls generate m...

  1. Professional Synergy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, P. R.

    1981-01-01

    True professionals develop and create together a better future by their human endeavors in synergy. They must operate comfortably in two cultures--the industrial culture which is disappearing, and the superindustrial or cyberculture which is emerging. (CT)

  2. PROFESSIONAL CATEGORIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sorin Fildan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The transition process which Romanian commercial law underwent has affected both the term of ‘trader’, by redefining it, and the classification of professional categories. Currently, the term of ‘professional’ is conveyed by a descriptive listing of the categories of persons it comprises: traders, entrepreneurs, business operators, as well as any other person authorized to carry out economic or professional activities.

  3. Multidimensional acoustic analysis of pathological voice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petrović-Lazić Mirjana

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. There are subjective and objective ways to examine the effects of vocal therapy in voice disorders. The most precise and objective check-up is the use of computer voice analysis. Objective. The aim of the research was to perform a detailed analysis of acoustic structure of the vowel A before and after voice treatment in patients with vocal fold nodules in order to obtain objective verification of the vocal rehabilitation success. Methods. We examined 30 female patients, aged 34.6±6.69 years, with vocal fold nodules. Acoustic parameters of voice were compared with the control group consisting of 21 subjects without voice pathology. In all persons the vowel A was recorded and analyzed before and after a month of vocal therapy. The success of the vocal therapy was tracked using computer analysis of vocal structure. Signal, noise and tremor parameters were processed. Results. Of the analyzed vowel A parameters: STD, PER, JITA, JITT, RAP, vFO, ShdB, SHIM, APQ, VTI, SPI, F0, NHR, FTRI, eleven improved (p<0.05 and p<0.01. Three parameters (F0, NHR, FTRI changed showing improvement, but the obtained differences were not statistically significant (p>0.05. Conclusion. Based on the obtained results it was concluded that vocal therapy gave satisfactory results, but that it should be continually applied until full stabilization of the voice.

  4. Voice Pitch Influences Perceptions of Sexual Infidelity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jillian J.M. O'Connor

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Sexual infidelity can be costly to members of both the extra-pair and the paired couple. Thus, detecting infidelity risk is potentially adaptive if it aids in avoiding cuckoldry or loss of parental and relationship investment. Among men, testosterone is inversely related to voice pitch, relationship and offspring investment, and is positively related to the pursuit of short-term relationships, including extra-pair sex. Among women, estrogen is positively related to voice pitch, attractiveness, and the likelihood of extra-pair involvement. Although prior work has demonstrated a positive relationship between men's testosterone levels and infidelity, this study is the first to investigate attributions of infidelity as a function of sexual dimorphism in male and female voices. We found that men attributed high infidelity risk to feminized women's voices, but not significantly more often than did women. Women attributed high infidelity risk to masculinized men's voices at significantly higher rates than did men. These data suggest that voice pitch is used as an indicator of sexual strategy in addition to underlying mate value. The aforementioned attributions may be adaptive if they prevent cuckoldry and/or loss of parental and relationship investment via avoidance of partners who may be more likely to be unfaithful.

  5. Voice pitch influences perceptions of sexual infidelity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connor, Jillian J M; Re, Daniel E; Feinberg, David R

    2011-02-28

    Sexual infidelity can be costly to members of both the extra-pair and the paired couple. Thus, detecting infidelity risk is potentially adaptive if it aids in avoiding cuckoldry or loss of parental and relationship investment. Among men, testosterone is inversely related to voice pitch, relationship and offspring investment, and is positively related to the pursuit of short-term relationships, including extra-pair sex. Among women, estrogen is positively related to voice pitch, attractiveness, and the likelihood of extra-pair involvement. Although prior work has demonstrated a positive relationship between men's testosterone levels and infidelity, this study is the first to investigate attributions of infidelity as a function of sexual dimorphism in male and female voices. We found that men attributed high infidelity risk to feminized women's voices, but not significantly more often than did women. Women attributed high infidelity risk to masculinized men's voices at significantly higher rates than did men. These data suggest that voice pitch is used as an indicator of sexual strategy in addition to underlying mate value. The aforementioned attributions may be adaptive if they prevent cuckoldry and/or loss of parental and relationship investment via avoidance of partners who may be more likely to be unfaithful.

  6. The understanding of law professionals from the Federal District about drug users under the current new law / A compreensão dos operadores de direito do Distrito Federal sobre o usuário de drogas na vigência da nova lei

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Fátima Olivier Sudbrack

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Drugs users have been receiving contradictory treatments thereby promoting their stigma besides hiding and limiting the understanding of the phenomenon. The objective of this study was to investigate how the District Attorneys and Judges are considering and applying the new law which legislates on the conduct of drug use in Brazil. Eleven Law professionals from the Federal District participated in semi-structured interviews divided in three areas: the point of view in relation to the user of drugs, how the law is being applied, and how they conceive the work of the multidisciplinary teams. The results showed very heterogeneous positions, showing that there is no unanimity on the understanding of the new law. For some, there is a shared belief that drugs abuse is a public health problem, for others, it is believed that the user must receive a punishment for his/her illegal act. An effective and efficient interdisciplinary dialogue should allow a reflective action aiming at favoring those who come to justice.

  7. [The voice of some caretakers of elderly immigrants].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vall Mayans, Montserrat

    2011-01-01

    First link and the results of further investigation. Corresponds to an initial exploration of the topic of greatest interest to the author A complementary test of others, such as bibliographical databases and other sources. Be part of the voice or narrative of six respondents (target group or people you trust backed by professional informants who have provided their contacts), by telephone to save time and other resources (field work was conducted in a single country Nicaragua, in order to learn in situ cultural and social aspects of it, including educational purposes) and it follows a semi-structured interview This provides an understanding that seeks to approach the reality of care over our society certain part of some immigrants, the reality of educational material and may or may not differ from that of indigenous carers in the informal context. It aims, in particular approach the aspect of health education for these caregivers, an issue that will be further developed in other research.

  8. Writing a Professional Life on Facebook

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briggs, Timothy J.

    2013-01-01

    This video presents one academic's experiences using Facebook in service of his professional life in order to contend that Facebook can be valuable to faculty as both a site for professional conversations and a social network that enables users to create and maintain social capital.

  9. [Vocalab: a new software for voice evaluation and therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menin-Sicard, A; Sicard, E

    2003-01-01

    When handling vocal pathologies, speech therapists need tools to visualise voice and speech, in order to correlate personal auditory analysis with accurate data. Vocalab2 is a spectral analysis tool designed for speech therapists, developed in partnership with INSA Toulouse, France. Vocalab is a simple and user-friendly tool with important features to be used during evaluation and therapy. The software is based on a set of phoniatric data and sophisticated real-time signal analysis (Fourier transform, fundamental detection). One of the key tools of Vocalab2 is the real-time spectrum for visualising, differentiating and comparing every cord approximation and speech movement. Animations are proposed for illustrating most phonemes, and videos related to folding cords in the case of pathologic and normal sound production are also proposed. An extensive test has been conducted during 18 month, with important feedback that has considerably improved the tool. The satisfaction ratio is around 8/10.

  10. Voicing Others’ Voices: Spotlighting the Researcher as Narrator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan O’SULLIVAN

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available As qualitative research undertakings are not independent of the researcher, the “indissoluble interrelationship between interpreter and interpretation” (Thomas & James, 2006, p. 782 renders it necessary for researchers to understand that their text is a representation, a version of the truth that is the product of writerly choices, and that it is discursive. Endlessly creative, artistic and political, as there is no single interpretative truth, the interpretative process facilitates the refashioning of representations, the remaking of choices and the probing of discourses. As a consequence of the particularity of any researcher’s account, issues pertaining to researcher identity and authorial stance always remain central to research endeavours (Kamler & Thomson, 2006, p. 68; Denzin & Lincoln 2011, pp. 14-15. Therefore, researchers are encouraged to be reflexive about their analyses and research accounts (Elliott, 2005, p. 152, as reflexivity helps spotlight the role of the researcher as narrator. In turn, spotlighting the researcher as narrator foregrounds a range of complex issues about voice, representation and interpretive authority (Chase, 2005, p. 657; Genishi & Glupczynski, 2006, p. 671; Eisenhart, 2006. In essence, therefore, this paper is reflective of the challenges of “doing” qualitative research in educational settings. Its particular focus-the shaping of beginning primary teachers’ identities, in Ireland, throughout the course of their initial year of occupational experience, post-graduation- endeavours to highlight issues pertaining to the researcher as narrator (O’Sullivan, 2014.

  11. Voice recognition for radiology reporting: Is it good enough?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rana, D.S. [Department of Radiology, Norfolk and Norwich University Hospital, Norwich (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: sameen.rana@nnuh.nhs.co.uk; Hurst, G. [Department of Radiology, Norfolk and Norwich University Hospital, Norwich (United Kingdom); Shepstone, L. [School of Medicine, Health Policy and Practice, University of East Anglia, Norwich (United Kingdom); Pilling, J. [Department of Radiology, Norfolk and Norwich University Hospital, Norwich (United Kingdom); Cockburn, J. [Department of Radiology, Norfolk and Norwich University Hospital, Norwich (United Kingdom); Crawford, M. [Department of Radiology, Norfolk and Norwich University Hospital, Norwich (United Kingdom)

    2005-11-01

    AIM: To compare the efficiency and accuracy of radiology reports generated by voice recognition (VR) against the traditional tape dictation-transcription (DT) method. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Two hundred and twenty previously reported computed radiography (CR) and cross-sectional imaging (CSI) examinations were separately entered into the Radiology Information System (RIS) using both VR and DT. The times taken and errors found in the reports were compared using univariate analyses based upon the sign-test, and a general linear model constructed to examine the mean differences between the two methods. RESULTS: There were significant reductions (p<0.001) in the mean difference in the reporting times using VR compared with DT for the two reporting methods assessed (CR, +67.4; CSI, +122.1 s). There was a significant increase in the mean difference in the actual radiologist times using VR compared with DT in the CSI reports; -14.3 s, p=0.037 (more experienced user); -13.7 s, p=0.014 (less experienced user). There were significantly more total and major errors when using VR compared with DT for CR reports (-0.25 and -0.26, respectively), and in total errors for CSI (-0.75, p<0.001), but no difference in major errors (-0.16, p=0.168). Although there were significantly more errors with VR in the less experienced group of users (mean difference in total errors -0.90, and major errors -0.40, p<0.001), there was no significant difference in the more experienced (p=0.419 and p=0.814, respectively). CONCLUSIONS: VR is a viable reporting method for experienced users, with a quicker overall report production time (despite an increase in the radiologists' time) and a tendency to more errors for inexperienced users.

  12. Application of AI techniques to a voice-actuated computer system for reconstructing and displaying magnetic resonance imaging data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherley, Patrick L.; Pujol, Alfonso, Jr.; Meadow, John S.

    1990-07-01

    To provide a means of rendering complex computer architectures languages and input/output modalities transparent to experienced and inexperienced users research is being conducted to develop a voice driven/voice response computer graphics imaging system. The system will be used for reconstructing and displaying computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging scan data. In conjunction with this study an artificial intelligence (Al) control strategy was developed to interface the voice components and support software to the computer graphics functions implemented on the Sun Microsystems 4/280 color graphics workstation. Based on generated text and converted renditions of verbal utterances by the user the Al control strategy determines the user''s intent and develops and validates a plan. The program type and parameters within the plan are used as input to the graphics system for reconstructing and displaying medical image data corresponding to that perceived intent. If the plan is not valid the control strategy queries the user for additional information. The control strategy operates in a conversation mode and vocally provides system status reports. A detailed examination of the various AT techniques is presented with major emphasis being placed on their specific roles within the total control strategy structure. 1.

  13. Processing female and male voices: a word spotting experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pépiot, Erwan

    2013-12-01

    Several previous studies showed that synthetic vowel identification is more difficult for voices with a high f0 (the lowest frequency that defines voice pitch), but it is not clear whether this means that female voices, which generally have a higher f0, are processed more slowly than male voices. A word spotting experiment was conducted with 25 French native listeners (8 men, 17 women; M age = 27.6 yr., SD = 10.8). Words produced by four male and four female speakers were played to the participants. Their task was to press a button every time they identified the target word "étage." Response times were collected and compared in four different conditions: male voice preceded by male voices, female voice preceded by female voices, male voice preceded by female voices, and female voice preceded by male voices. Results showed that both sexes' voices were processed equally fast. Moreover, no significant correlation was found between mean f0 of the target word and response time. Nevertheless, when a target word produced by a male speaker occurred after several words produced by a female speaker (or vice-versa) the listener's RT decreased, suggesting that male and female voices are processed as two different entities.

  14. Voice Education in Teacher Training: An Investigation into the Knowledge about the Voice and Voice Care in Teacher-Training Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovacic, Gordana

    2005-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate knowledge about the voice and voice care in teacher-training students. A voice care questionnaire was administered to teacher-training students (N = 184) and students of other professions (N = 143). Discriminant analysis demonstrated that the teacher-training students' knowledge was significantly…

  15. The ethical dimension of the systematization of professional exercise

    OpenAIRE

    Isabela Sarmet de Azevedo

    2014-01-01

    This article focuses on the systematization of the professional social worker. The objectives of the study were to analyze the unity between theory and practice and the ethical dimensions of professional practice; discuss the importance of the systematization of the professional practice for all fields of professional activity; and articulate systematization of professional exercise, with the working conditions and the demands of users of social policies. Comprised a review of the literature ...

  16. Professionals vs. role-professionals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Milana, Marcella; Skrypnyk, Oleksandra

    2010-01-01

    several occupations in the field of adult education that position themselves along a continuum. Consequently the authors suggest that professionalization among adult education practitioners should be assessed in light of the knowledge about adult learning theories practitioners possess, the ethical...

  17. Alternative voice after laryngectomy using a sound-producing voice prosthesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Torn, M; de Vries, M. P.; Festen, JM; Verdonck-de Leeuw, IM; Mahieu, HF

    Objective: To improve the voice quality of female laryngectomees and/or laryngectomees with a hypotonic pharyngoesophageal (PE) segment by means of a pneumatic artificial source of voice incorporated in a regular tracheoesophageal (TE) shunt valve. Study Design: Experimental, randomized, crossover

  18. Alternative voice after laryngectomy using a sound-producing voice prosthesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Torn, M.; de Vries, M P; Festen, J.M.; Verdonck-de Leeuw, I M; Mahieu, H.F.

    OBJECTIVE: To improve the voice quality of female laryngectomees and/or laryngectomees with a hypotonic pharyngoesophageal (PE) segment by means of a pneumatic artificial source of voice incorporated in a regular tracheoesophageal (TE) shunt valve. STUDY DESIGN: Experimental, randomized, crossover

  19. Phonetogram voice range profile : assessment of voice capacities and its clinical value

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schutte, HK; Clements, MP

    1996-01-01

    Voice range profile measurement is being used more and more as a practical clinical tool in the process of voice evaluation. In principle it means a graphical representation of a patient's or person's vocal capabilities concerning the fundamental frequency range and dynamic range on several

  20. Evaluation of Voice Disorders: Dysphonia Severity Index and Voice Handicap Index

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.M. Hakkesteegt (Marieke)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractThe voice is arguable still the most important tool of communication despite the growing importance of e-mails and text messaging (SMS) in daily contact. Indeed in modern society people are probably even more dependent on their voice than in the rural societies of old. Approximately one