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Sample records for professional standards guidelines

  1. 78 FR 18576 - Guidelines for Home Energy Professionals: Standard Work Specifications for Single Family Energy...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-27

    .... Many of the comments fail to consider issues faced when working in the existing homes sector... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Guidelines for Home Energy Professionals: Standard Work...

  2. 77 FR 19008 - Guidelines for Home Energy Professionals: Standard Work Specifications for Single Family Energy...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-29

    ...] [FR Doc No: 2012-7544] DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Guidelines for Home Energy Professionals: Standard Work Specifications for Single Family Energy Upgrades AGENCY: Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). ACTION: Notice...

  3. Guidelines for Home Energy Upgrade Professionals: Standard Work Specifications for Multifamily Energy Upgrades (Fact Sheet)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2011-08-01

    This fact sheet provides essential information about the 2011 publication of the Workforce Guidelines for Multifamily Home Energy Upgrades, including their origin, their development with the help of industry leaders to create the standard work specifications for retrofit work.

  4. Standards and Professional Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zengler, Cynthia J.

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to describe the professional development that has taken place in conjunction with Ohio adopting the College and Career Readiness (CCR) Standards. The professional development (PD) has changed over time to include not only training on the new standards and lesson plans but training on the concepts defined in the…

  5. Revisiting Professional Teacher Standards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Amanda

    2016-01-01

    The Australian Society for Music Education's (ASME) involvement in the development of professional standards for music educators was a significant and active research time in the history of the Society. As ASME celebrates its golden jubilee, it is appropriate to revisit that history and consider the future prospects of subject-specific standards.…

  6. Radiant Professionals Alliance guidelines 2010

    CERN Document Server

    IAPMO

    2010-01-01

    RPA Guidelines for the Design and Installation of Radiant Panel Heating and Snow/Ice Melt Systems. Intended for reference use by code officials, designers and installers. Deals with both hydronic and electric floor, wall and limited ceiling applications. Includes sample schematics and industry recommendations.

  7. Monitoring Standards for Professional Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, Helen

    2001-01-01

    A central issue in professional education is who has a mandate for determining the appropriateness of university curriculum and monitoring its quality. Examination of the accreditation guidelines of seven professions (law, medicine, nursing, psychology, physiotherapy, social work, and teaching) suggests that the relevance of professional…

  8. Compliance with standard treatment guidelines in the management ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Compliance with standard treatment guidelines in the management of hypertension: A review of practice of healthcare workers in Potchefstroom, North West Province, South ... Conclusions: As the adherence to hypertension guidelines in primary care by healthcare workers in general is suboptimal, continuous professional ...

  9. Standards and Guidelines in Telemedicine and Telehealth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krupinski, Elizabeth A.; Bernard, Jordana

    2014-01-01

    The development of guidelines and standards for telemedicine is an important and valuable process to help insure effective and safe delivery of quality healthcare. Some organizations, such as the American Telemedicine Association (ATA), have made the development of standards and guidelines a priority. The practice guidelines developed so far have been well received by the telemedicine community and are being adopted in numerous practices, as well as being used in research to support the practice and growth of telemedicine. Studies that utilize published guidelines not only help bring them into greater public awareness, but they also provide evidence needed to validate existing guidelines and guide the revision of future versions. Telemedicine will continue to grow and be adopted by more healthcare practitioners and patients in a wide variety of forms not just in the traditional clinical environments, and practice guidelines will be a key factor in fostering this growth. Creation of guidelines is important to payers and regulators as well as increasingly they are adopting and integrating them into regulations and policies. This paper will review some of the recent ATA efforts in developing telemedicine practice guidelines, review the role of research in guidelines development, review data regarding their use, and discuss some of areas where guidelines are still needed. PMID:27429261

  10. Standards and Guidelines for HIV Prevention Research ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    AJRH Managing Editor

    Standards and Guidelines for HIV Prevention Research: Considerations for Local Context in the Interpretation of Global .... African women19,20. But then there is the question of which guidelines should be used to structure ..... sponsors prior to initiating HIV prevention studies. The lessons from this case study show that in.

  11. Consumer and professional standards: working towards consensus

    OpenAIRE

    Williamson, C.

    2000-01-01

    Standards of treatment and care should be acceptable to healthcare consumers as well as to healthcare professionals. A simple categorisation of standards according to their acceptability to consumers is outlined. Professional/consumer groups which review and set standards are discussed, with emphasis on the principles of partnership. Working together towards consensus can be difficult but is now an important way forward.

  12. Ethical and professional standards compliance among practicing ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study investigated ethical and professional standards compliance among practicing librariansin university libraries in Benue State. The purpose of the study was todetermine the extent to which librarians in university libraries comply with ethics and professional standards in librarianship. The study adopted a descriptive ...

  13. Standardization of Guidelines for Patient Photograph Deidentification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Erik A; Troiano, Chelsea; Spiegel, Jeffrey H

    2016-06-01

    This work was performed to advance patient care by protecting patient anonymity. This study aimed to analyze the current practices used in patient facial photograph deidentification and set forth standardized guidelines for improving patient autonomy that are congruent with medical ethics and Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act. The anonymization guidelines of 13 respected journals were reviewed for adequacy in accordance to facial recognition literature. Simple statistics were used to compare the usage of the most common concealment techniques in 8 medical journals which may publish the most facial photographs. Not applicable. Not applicable. Facial photo deidentification guidelines of 13 journals were ascertained. Number and percentage of patient photographs lacking adequate anonymization in 8 journals were determined. Facial image anonymization guidelines varied across journals. When anonymization was attempted, 87% of the images were inadequately concealed. The most common technique used was masking the eyes alone with a black box. Most journals evaluated lack specific instructions for properly de-identifying facial photographs. The guidelines introduced here stress that both eyebrows and eyes must be concealed to ensure patient privacy. Examples of proper and inadequate photo anonymization techniques are provided. Improving patient care by ensuring greater patient anonymity.

  14. Professional Standards for Australian Special Education Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dempsey, Ian; Dally, Kerry

    2014-01-01

    Although professional standards for Australian teachers were developed several years ago, this country is yet to develop such standards for special education teachers. The lack of standards for the special education profession is associated with the absence of a consistent process of accreditation in Australia and a lack of clarity in the pathways…

  15. A 2016 update on standards and guidelines relevant to thermographers

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIntosh, Gregory B.; Huff, Roy

    2017-05-01

    This paper presents a synopsis and status of the various national and international standards relevant to thermal imaging and thermographers developed for the building, electrical, industrial, medical, and non-destructive testing industries. Particular detail will be given to newer and/or relevant to thermal imaging and thermographers within a wide variety of applications and disciplines. Common to most standards and guidelines are minimum performance requirements for the instrument, qualifications for the operator, and limitations of how thermal imaging should be applied. This paper will summarize by discussing those areas and applications where development is still required. re-written standards that have come to be in the past 7 years, or are currently in development. These documents cut across a wide variety of agencies and disciplines, and nations often without regard for or knowledge of other similar standards or requirements. Agencies include but are not limited to the American Society for Test methods; American society for Non-Destructive Testing; Canadian Standards Association; International Standards organization; National Master Specifications of Canada (NMS) National Institute of Standards (NIST); and National Fire Prevention Association. While standards, guidelines and protocols exist in many disciplines and industries, given the recent proliferation of low cost thermal imagers which are easily accessible to the public, it is important and appropriate that there be a widespread understanding of who, how , when, and where these imagers should properly be applied in order to obtain credible, scientific, and repeatable results. The best place to look for this understanding is through the knowledge and use of professional standards guidelines and protocols.

  16. Supporting students in professional socialisation: Guidelines for professional nurses and educators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hester Cathrina (Rina de Swardt

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Professional socialisation of nursing students involves learning skills, attitudes, behaviour and professional roles, largely in the clinical area. During clinical accompaniment and reflective discussions with a group of undergraduate Baccalaureate nursing students in South Africa, students reported negative professional socialisation experiences, primarily in the clinical area. Such experiences could influence the quality of patient care. The objective of this study was to develop and validate guidelines to support professional nurses and educators in the professional socialisation of student nurses. Evidence was generated from an exploration and description of the perceptions of professional nurses regarding their role in the professional socialisation of students, the perceptions of nurse educators regarding the teaching and facilitation of professional socialisation of students, and the socialisation experiences of students. Following a sequential mixed-methods design, qualitative data guided the collection of quantitative data. All data and literature directed the development of these guidelines, which experts reviewed and validated according to a set of criteria. These guidelines focus on the clinical, nursing educational institution environment and values and beliefs of the nursing profession. Facilitation of sound work ethics, professional behaviour, cultural and gender awareness, role modelling and the application of a range of teaching strategies is proposed.

  17. Developing an Ethical Framework for All Geoscientists: AGI Guidelines for Ethical Professional Conduct

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boland, Maeve A.; Leahy, P. Patrick; Keane, Christopher M.

    2016-04-01

    In 1997, a group of geoscientists and others recognized the need for a broad-based set of ethical standards for the geosciences that would be an expression of the highest common denominator of values for the profession. The American Geosciences Institute (AGI) coordinated the development of the 1999 AGI Guidelines for Ethical Professional Conduct and their subsequent revision in 2015. AGI is a nonprofit federation of 51 geoscientific and professional organizations that span the geosciences and have approximately 250,000 members. AGI serves as a voice for shared interests in the geoscience community and one of its roles is to facilitate collaboration and discussion among its member societies on matters of common or overarching concern. In this capacity, AGI convened a working group to create the 1999 Guidelines for Ethical Professional Conduct and a further working group to revise the Guidelines in 2015 through a consensus process involving all member societies. The Guidelines are an aspirational document, setting out ideals and high levels of achievement for the profession. They have no provision for disciplinary of enforcement action and they do not supersede the ethics statements or codes of any member society. The 1999 Guidelines pay considerable attention to the professional behavior of geoscientists. The 2015 Guidelines place greater emphasis on the societal context of the geosciences and the responsibilities of geoscientists in areas such as communication, education, and the challenges of understanding complex natural systems. The 2015 Guidelines have been endorsed by 29 member societies to date. To translate the aspirations in the Guidelines into specific actions, AGI has facilitated discussions on the practical implications of aspects of the Guidelines. One outcome of these discussions has been a Consensus Statement Regarding Access and Inclusion of Individuals Living with Disabilities in the Geosciences.

  18. Professional Standards for Visual Arts Educators

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Art Education Association, 2009

    2009-01-01

    The National Art Education Association (NAEA) is committed to ensuring that all students have access to a high quality, certified visual arts educator in every K-12 public school across the United States, recognizing that effective arts instruction is a core component of 21st-century education. "Professional Standards for Visual Arts…

  19. CIRSE Standards of Practice Guidelines on Gastrostomy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sutcliffe, James, E-mail: jasutcliffe@gmail.com; Wigham, Andrew, E-mail: a.wigham@doctors.org.uk [Oxford University Hospitals NHS Trust, Radiology Department (United Kingdom); Mceniff, Niall, E-mail: nmceniff@stjames.ie [St. James’s Hospital, Radiology (DiagIm) (Ireland); Dvorak, Petr, E-mail: petr-dvorak@email.cz [Faculty Hospital Charles University, Radiology Department (Czech Republic); Crocetti, Laura, E-mail: laura.crocetti@med.unipi.it [University of Pisa, Diagnostic Imaging and Intervention, Department of Hepatology and Liver Transplants (Italy); Uberoi, Raman, E-mail: Raman.Uberoi@ouh.nhs.uk [Oxford University Hospitals NHS Trust, Radiology Department (United Kingdom)

    2016-07-15

    PurposeSurgical Gastrostomy has been around since the 19th century but in 1980 the first successful percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy was reported. A year later the first successful percutaneous gastrostomy was performed using fluoroscopic guidance. The technique for percutaneous insertion and the equipment used has been refined since then and it is now considered the gold standard for gastrostomy insertion. Here we present guidelines for image-guided enteral feeding tubes in adults.Material and MethodWe performed a review and analysis of the scientific literature, other national and international guidelines and expert opinion.ResultsStudies have shown fluoroscopic techniques have consistently higher success rates with lower rates of major complications than endoscopic techniques. However, the Achilles' heel of many fluoroscopic techniques is the requirement for smaller gastrostomy tube sizes resulting in them being more prone to blockages and thus requiring further intervention.ConclusionRadiological feeding tube insertion is a safe and effective procedure. Success rates are higher, and complication rates lower than PEG or surgical gastrostomy tube placement and innovative techniques for gastric and jejunal access mean that there are very few cases in which RIG is not possible. The principal weakness of radiologically inserted gastrostomies is the limitiation on tube size which leads to a higher rate of tube blockage. Per-oral image-guided gastrostomies have to an extent addressed this but have not been popularised. Currently many centres still consider endoscopic gastrostomies as the first line unless patients are too unwell to undergo this procedure or previous attempts have failed, in which case radioloically inserted gastrostomies are the technique of choice.

  20. Knowledge of exercise prescription guidelines among certified exercise professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zenko, Zachary; Ekkekakis, Panteleimon

    2015-05-01

    This survey assessed the knowledge of the "Guidance for prescribing exercise" issued by the American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM) in 2011 among certified exercise professionals. A sample of 1,808 certified exercise professionals (66.70% women, mean (± SD) age = 38.28 ± 12.56 years) responded to electronic invitations. The 11-question online questionnaire assessed knowledge of the recommended frequency, duration, and intensity ranges in terms of heart rate, metabolic equivalents, and ratings of perceived exertion. Respondents had 7.45 ± 8.07 years of work experience and represented all 50 U.S. states. On average, participants answered 42.87 ± 1.69% of the questions correctly. Gender, age, and years of professional experience were not associated with overall knowledge of the guidelines. Likewise, having 1, 2, or 3+ certifications made no difference in overall knowledge. However, there were significant differences between levels of education (F = 7.12, p guidelines as 7.01 ± 1.69 of 10 but rated the level of knowledge necessary to practice safely and effectively as 8.32 ± 1.64 (t = 28.60, p guidelines among certified exercise professionals, showed that there is room for improvement, considering that the average score was below 50%.

  1. Best practice in forensic entomology--standards and guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amendt, Jens; Campobasso, Carlo P; Gaudry, Emmanuel; Reiter, Christian; LeBlanc, Hélène N; Hall, Martin J R

    2007-03-01

    Forensic entomology, the use of insects and other arthropods in forensic investigations, is becoming increasingly more important in such investigations. To ensure its optimal use by a diverse group of professionals including pathologists, entomologists and police officers, a common frame of guidelines and standards is essential. Therefore, the European Association for Forensic Entomology has developed a protocol document for best practice in forensic entomology, which includes an overview of equipment used for collection of entomological evidence and a detailed description of the methods applied. Together with the definitions of key terms and a short introduction to the most important methods for the estimation of the minimum postmortem interval, the present paper aims to encourage a high level of competency in the field of forensic entomology.

  2. Positive School Leadership: How the Professional Standards for Educational Leaders Can Be Brought to Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Joseph; Louis, Karen Seashore; Smylie, Mark

    2017-01-01

    In November 2015, the National Policy Board for Educational Administration--a coalition of nine professional associations--adopted the Professional Standards for Educational Leaders (PSEL), a set of guidelines for the training, certification, hiring, evaluation, and supervision of school principals and superintendents. While it draws heavily from…

  3. Practice guidelines for the supervising professional: intraoperative neurophysiological monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skinner, Stanley A; Cohen, Bernard Allan; Morledge, David Eric; McAuliffe, John J; Hastings, John Daniel; Yingling, Charles D; McCaffrey, Michael

    2014-04-01

    The American Society of Neurophysiological Monitoring (ASNM) was founded in 1988 as the American Society of Evoked Potential Monitoring. From the beginning, the Society has been made up of physicians, doctoral degree holders, technologists, and all those interested in furthering the profession. The Society changed its name to the ASNM and held its first Annual Meeting in 1990. It remains the largest worldwide organization dedicated solely to the scientifically based advancement of intraoperative neurophysiology. The primary goal of the ASNM is to assure the quality of patient care during monitored procedures along the neuraxis. This goal is accomplished through programs in education, advocacy of basic and clinical research, and publication of guidelines. The ASNM is committed to the development of medically sound and clinically relevant guidelines for intraoperative neurophysiology. Guidelines are formulated based on exhaustive literature review, recruitment of expert opinion, and broad consensus among ASNM membership. Input is likewise sought from sister societies and related constituencies. Adherence to a literature-based, formalized process characterizes the construction of all ASNM guidelines. The guidelines covering the Professional Practice of intraoperative monitoring were established by a committee of nearly 30 total participants and ultimately endorsed by the Board of Directors of ASNM on January 24th 2013. That document follows.

  4. Professional and Regulatory Infection Control Guidelines: Collaboration to Promote Patient Safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clayton, Judith L; Miller, Kimberly J

    2017-09-01

    Professional organizations and regulatory agencies collaborate on infection prevention and control guidelines to support preventing and controlling infection in the surgical setting. More specifically, regulatory and accrediting agencies, professional associations, and advisory committees create and promote the use of evidence-based recommendations for preventing surgical site infections. Many agencies perform accreditation surveys to ensure compliance with these standards and guidelines. Perioperative personnel can use these resources to implement and sustain essential processes for infection prevention and control and to facilitate staff member compliance with standards, regulations, and best practices. To guide perioperative practice, it is important for nurses to understand the role of these agencies and organizations and the resources each offers to help ensure the best patient outcomes. Copyright © 2017 AORN, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Sandia software guidelines. Volume 3. Standards, practices, and conventions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1986-07-01

    This volume is one in a series of Sandia Software Guidelines intended for use in producing quality software within Sandia National Laboratories. In consonance with the IEEE Standard for Software Quality Assurance Plans, this volume identifies software standards, conventions, and practices. These guidelines are the result of a collective effort within Sandia National Laboratories to define recommended deliverables and to document standards, practices, and conventions which will help ensure quality software. 66 refs., 5 figs., 6 tabs.

  6. Standards for Educational Public Relations and Communications Professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chappelow, Marsha A.

    2003-01-01

    Describes National School Public Relations Association standards for school public relations and communications professionals and program. Includes reactions and comments about new Association standards from seven superintendents and four school public-relations professionals. (PKP)

  7. Hair transplantation: Standard guidelines of care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patwardhan Narendra

    2008-03-01

    that proper hair growth can be expected after about 9 months after transplantation. Preoperative laboratory studies to be performed include Hb%, blood counts including platelet count, bleeding and clotting time (or prothrombin time and activated partial thromboplastin time, blood chemistry profile including sugar. Methods : Follicular unit hair transplantation is the gold standard method of hair transplantation; it preserves the natural architecture of the hair units and gives natural results. Mini-micro-grafting is a method hair transplantation involving randomly assorted groups of hairs, with out consideration of their natural configuration of follicular units, under loupe or naked eye examination. Mini-grafts consist of 4-5-6 hairs while micro-grafts consist of 1-3 hairs. Punch gives ugly cosmetically unacceptable results and should no longer be used. Patient Selection : Hair transplantation can be performed in any person with pattern hair loss, with good donor area, in good general health and reasonable expectations. Caution should be exercised in, very young patients whose early alopecia is still evolving, patients with Norwood grade VI or VII with poor density, patients with unrealistic expectations, and patients with significant systemic health problems. Medical therapy: Most patients will need concurrent medical treatment since the process of pattern hair loss is progressive and may affect the remaining hairs. Manpower : Hair transplantation is a team effort. Particularly, performing large sessions, needs a well trained team of trained assistants. Anesthesia: 2% lignocaine with adrenaline is generally used for anesthesia; tumescent technique is preferred. Bupivacaine has been used by some authors in view of its prolonged duration of action. Donor dissection : Strip dissection by single blade is recommended for donor area. Steromicroscopic dissection is recommended for dissection of hair units in follicular unit transplantation; mini-micro-grafting does not need

  8. Implications of WHO Guideline on Sugars for dental health professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moynihan, Paula; Makino, Yuka; Petersen, Poul Erik; Ogawa, Hiroshi

    2018-02-01

    The burden of oral disease is high in populations across the world. This is because of high consumption of free sugars. The WHO Guideline on Sugars Intake for Adults and Children recommended limiting free sugars to no more than 5% energy intake to protect oral health throughout the life-course. The objectives of this paper are to consider the implications of the Guideline for dental health practice and to advocate use of the common risk factor approach when providing dietary advice. As part of a broad range of actions needed to reduce free sugars intake, improved education for dental health professionals and supporting patients to eat less free sugars are key actions for the dental profession. All dental health professionals should have the skills and confidence to provide their patients with healthier eating advice, including how to limit free sugars intake. It is therefore important that dental health professionals receive adequate education in diet and nutrition, and there is a need for dental educational regulating bodies to define the content of the dental curriculum with respect to nutrition. All patients, or their parents or carers, should receive dietary advice to reduce free sugars within the context of a healthy diet for the prevention of all NCDs. Dietary advice should: (i) focus on reducing the amount of free sugars consumed; (ii) be tailored according to the patient's body mass status (eg underweight, overweight, normal weight); (iii) encourage the consumption of fresh fruits and vegetables, nuts, seeds, and wholegrain starch-rich foods; (iv) discourage the consumption of foods high in saturated fat and salt; and (v) discourage the consumption of all drinks containing free sugars. The dental health professional has an opportunity to support patients to reduce their intake of free sugars-such advice and support will have positive impacts beyond the mouth. © 2017 The World Health Organization.

  9. The European Stroke Organisation Guidelines: a standard operating procedure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ntaios, George; Bornstein, Natan M; Caso, Valeria

    2015-01-01

    cornerstones in this standard operating procedure: The first is the implementation of the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation methodology for the development of its Guideline Documents. The second one is the decision of the European Stroke Organisation to move from the classical...... on the related module rather swiftly; with the previous approach of a single large Guideline Document, its entire revision had to be completed before an updated publication, delaying the production of up-to-date guidelines. After discussion within the European Stroke Organisation Guidelines Committee...

  10. A case of standardization? Implementing health promotion guidelines in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rod, Morten Hulvej; Høybye, Mette Terp

    2016-01-01

    policies and interventions and were structured according to risk factors such as alcohol, smoking and physical activity. This article examines the process of implementation of the new Danish health promotion guidelines. The article is based on qualitative interviews and participant observation, focusing...... and standardization. It remains an open question whether or not the guidelines lead to more standardized policies and interventions, but we suggest that the guidelines promote a risk factor oriented approach as the dominant frame for knowledge, reasoning, decision making and priority setting in health promotion. We...

  11. The European Stroke Organisation Guidelines: a standard operating procedure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ntaios, George; Bornstein, Natan M; Caso, Valeria; Christensen, Hanne; De Keyser, Jacques; Diener, Hans-Christoph; Diez-Tejedor, Exuperio; Ferro, Jose M; Ford, Gary A; Grau, Armin; Keller, Emanuella; Leys, Didier; Russell, David; Toni, Danilo; Turc, Guillaume; Van der Worp, Bart; Wahlgren, Nils; Steiner, Thorsten

    2015-10-01

    In 2008, the recently founded European Stroke Organisation published its guidelines for the management of ischemic stroke and transient ischemic attack. This highly cited document was translated in several languages and was updated in 2009. Since then, the European Stroke Organisation has published guidelines for the management of intracranial aneurysms and subarachnoidal hemorrhage, for the establishment of stroke units and stroke centers, and recently for the management of intracerebral hemorrhage. In recent years, the methodology for the development of guidelines has evolved significantly. To keep pace with this progress and driven by the strong determination of the European Stroke Organisation to further promote stroke management, education, and research, the European Stroke Organisation decided to delineate a detailed standard operating procedure for its guidelines. There are two important cornerstones in this standard operating procedure: The first is the implementation of the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation methodology for the development of its Guideline Documents. The second one is the decision of the European Stroke Organisation to move from the classical model of a single Guideline Document about a major topic (e.g. management of ischemic stroke) to focused modules (i.e. subdivisions of a major topic). This will enable the European Stroke Organisation to react faster when new developments in a specific stroke field occur and update its recommendations on the related module rather swiftly; with the previous approach of a single large Guideline Document, its entire revision had to be completed before an updated publication, delaying the production of up-to-date guidelines. After discussion within the European Stroke Organisation Guidelines Committee and significant input from European Stroke Organisation members as well as methodologists and analysts, this document presents the official standard operating procedure for

  12. Implementing Professional Standard for Teachers: the Krasnoyarsk Krai Experience

    OpenAIRE

    Andreyeva S.Y.,; Butenko A.V.,

    2016-01-01

    In this article we present the Krasnoyarsk krai experience in implementing the professional standard for teachers. We discuss three key processes in the regional educational system that promote professional growth in teachers in accordance with the professional standard. We developed a model of qualification levels of teachers’ professional skills based upon the particular criteria of perfect performance. This model was employed in the organization of workshops for teacher trainees. Finally, ...

  13. Standard guidelines for electrosurgery with radiofrequency current

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mutalik Sharad

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Definition: Radiofrequency (RF induces thermal destruction of the targeted tissue by an electrical current at a frequency of 0.5 MHz (RF. As the electrode tip is not heated, there is minimal thermal damage to the surrounding tissues, producing good esthetic results. Therefore, RF ablation is also known as cold ablation or "coblation." Modality: It has three modes of operation: (a Cut, (b cut and coagulate and (c coagulate. Therefore, it can be used for various purposes like incision, ablation, fulguration, shave excision and coagulation. Because of the coagulation facility, hemostasis can be achieved and operation becomes easier and faster. Indications: It is effective in treating various skin conditions like dermatosis papulosa nigra, warts, molluscum contagiosum, colloid milia, acquired junctional, compound and dermal melanocytic nevi, seborrheic keratosis, skin tags, granuloma pyogenicum, verrucous epidermal nevi, xanthelesma, rhinophyma, superficial basal cell carcinoma and telangiectasia. It can also be used for cosmetic indications such as resurfacing, earlobe repair and blepharoplasty. Anesthesia: The procedure is accomplished either under topical anesthesia eutactic mixture of local anesthetics or local injectable anesthesia, under all aseptic precautions. Procedure: While operating, only the tip of the electrode should come in contact with the tissue. Actual contact of the electrode with the tissue should be very brief in order to prevent excessive damage to the deeper tissues. This can be accomplished by moving the electrode quickly. Complications: Complications are uncommon and mainly occur due to an improper technique. The treating physician should be aware of the contraindications of the procedure as listed in these guidelines. Physician qualification: RF surgery may be performed by a dermatologist who has acquired adequate training during post-graduation or through recognized fellowships and workshops dedicated to RF surgery. He

  14. Standard operating procedures for ESPEN guidelines and consensus papers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bischoff, Stephan C; Singer, Pierre; Koller, Michael; Barazzoni, Rocco; Cederholm, Tommy; van Gossum, André

    2015-12-01

    The ESPEN Guideline standard operating procedures (SOP) is based on the methodology provided by the Association of Scientific Medical Societies of Germany (AWMF), the Scottish Intercollegiate Guidelines Network (SIGN), and the Centre for Evidence-based Medicine at the University of Oxford. The SOP is valid and obligatory for all future ESPEN-sponsored guideline projects aiming to generate high-quality guidelines on a regular basis. The SOP aims to facilitate the preparation of guideline projects, to streamline the consensus process, to ensure quality and transparency, and to facilitate the dissemination and publication of ESPEN guidelines. To achieve this goal, the ESPEN Guidelines Editorial board (GEB) has been established headed by two chairmen. The GEB will support and supervise the guideline processes and is responsible for the strategic planning of ESPEN guideline activities. Key elements of the SOP are the generation of well-built clinical questions according to the PICO system, a systemic literature search, a classification of the selected literature according to the SIGN evidence levels providing an evidence table, and a clear and straight-forward consensus procedure consisting of online voting's and a consensus conference. Only experts who meet the obligation to disclosure any potential conflict of interests and who are not employed by the Industry can participate in the guideline process. All recommendations will be graded according to the SIGN grading and novel outcome models besides biomedical endpoints. This approach will further extent the leadership of ESPEN in creating up-to-date and suitable for implementation guidelines and in sharing knowledge on malnutrition and clinical nutrition. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd and European Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism. All rights reserved.

  15. Information and Communication Technology (ICT) Standards and Guidelines. Final rule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-18

    We, the Architectural and Transportation Barriers Compliance Board (Access Board or Board), are revising and updating, in a single rulemaking, our standards for electronic and information technology developed, procured, maintained, or used by Federal agencies covered by section 508 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, as well as our guidelines for telecommunications equipment and customer premises equipment covered by Section 255 of the Communications Act of 1934. The revisions and updates to the section 508-based standards and section 255-based guidelines are intended to ensure that information and communication technology covered by the respective statutes is accessible to and usable by individuals with disabilities.

  16. ACSM's Health/Fitness Facility Standards and Guidelines. Second Edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, James A., Ed; Tharrett, Stephen J., Ed.

    The American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM) sets the industry standard for certifying professionals involved in health and fitness and their clinical applications. This 5-part publication provides a revised edition of six standards representing the industry's consensus on design and operation of a safe and high-quality health/fitness facility.…

  17. Evaluation of benefits to patients of training mental health professionals in suicide guidelines : cluster randomized trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Beurs, Derek P.; de Groot, Marieke H.; de Keijser, Jos; van Duin, Erik; de Winter, Remco F.P.; Kerkhof, Ad J.F.M.

    Background Randomised studies examining the effect on patients of training professionals in adherence to suicide guidelines are scarce. Aims To assess whether patients benefited from the training of professionals in adherence to suicide guidelines. Method In total 45 psychiatric departments were

  18. Evaluation of benefit to patients of training mental health professionals in suicide guidelines: cluster randomised trial.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beurs, D.P. de; Groot, M.H. de; Keijser, J. de; Duijn, E. van; Winter, R.F.P. de; Kerkhof, A.J.F.M.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Randomised studies examining the effect on patients of training professionals in adherence to suicide guidelines are scarce. Aims: To assess whether patients benefited from the training of professionals in adherence to suicide guidelines. Method: In total 45 psychiatric departments were

  19. Implementing Professional Standard for Teachers: the Krasnoyarsk Krai Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreyeva S.Y.,

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available In this article we present the Krasnoyarsk krai experience in implementing the professional standard for teachers. We discuss three key processes in the regional educational system that promote professional growth in teachers in accordance with the professional standard. We developed a model of qualification levels of teachers’ professional skills based upon the particular criteria of perfect performance. This model was employed in the organization of workshops for teacher trainees. Finally, we describe and discuss new practices of assessing teachers’ professional qualification in educational institutions and on the level of the regional educational system in general.

  20. 36 CFR 292.42 - Management standards and guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... administration of National Forest System lands and resources, the standards and guidelines in §§ 292.43 to 292.48... AGRICULTURE NATIONAL RECREATION AREAS Hells Canyon National Recreation Area-Federal Lands § 292.42 Management... land where the proposed activity is contemplated is within the Wilderness Lands, Wild and Scenic Rivers...

  1. Standards and Guidelines for Commuter Student Programs and Services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    NASPA Journal, 1986

    1986-01-01

    In describing standards and guidelines for commuter student programs and services, an analysis is provided of the mission, the program, multicultural programs and services, leadership and management, organization and administration, human resources, funding, facilities, legal responsibilities, equal opportunity, access and affirmative action,…

  2. Compliance with standard treatment guidelines in the management ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Peter Rapula Siko

    http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0. Compliance with standard treatment guidelines in the management of hypertension: a review of practice of healthcare workers in Potchefstroom,. North West Province, South Africa. Peter Rapula Sikoa and Claire van Deventera*. aFamily Medicine and Rural Health, University ...

  3. Factors of Engagement: Professional Standards and the Library Science Internship

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dotson, Kaye B.; Dotson-Blake, Kylie P.

    2015-01-01

    In today's technological world, school librarians planning to be leaders should be ready to keep up with advances in standards significant to the profession. The professional standards, specifically American Association of School Librarians (AASL) Standards and International Society for Technology in Education (ISTE) Standards for Coaches offer…

  4. Standard guidelines for setting up a dermatosurgery theatre

    OpenAIRE

    Rajendran S; Omprakash H

    2009-01-01

    Introduction, definition, rationale and scope: Dermatologists in India are now increasingly performing surgical and cosmetic procedures in their practice. This calls for minimum standards at the national level with the main focus of patient safety and hence the guidelines for setting up a dermatosurgical theatre. Facility: The dermatosurgery theatre can be created in either physician′s clinic, or a hospital depending on the procedure to be performed. The dermatosurgery theatre requi...

  5. Multiple Roles of Specialized Literacy Professionals: The ILA 2017 Standards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bean, Rita M.; Kern, Diane; Griffith, Robin; Lacina, Jan

    2018-01-01

    This article compares the ILA 2017 Standards for preparing specialized literacy professionals with the 2010 Standards. The authors also describe levels of emphases for each specialized literacy role and implications of the new Standards for those serving in the field and for those who prepare them.

  6. CURRICULUM DESIGN FOR TRAINING SPECIALISTS IN THE SPHERE OF UPBRINGING IN THE CONTEXT OF PROFESSIONAL STANDARDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irina N Emelyanova

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The article examines the new guidelines and priorities for modelling specialists’ training in the field of upbringing in the context of the new professional standard.Research method - content analysis for the professional standard “Specialist in the field of upbringing”. The content analysis was carried out according to the types of activities that are identified in the federal state educational standards of the pedagogical direction: pedagogical, project, cultural and educational, research, methodical, and managerial activity. The study revealed a priority of pedagogical, methodological, and managerial contents for training specialists in the field of upbringing. Socio-cultural content lags behind, scientific research content is reduced to zero.Polemical issues: “What does the emergence of new spheres of activities ‘expert in the field of social upbringing’ give us? To what degree professional and educational standards should be identical?” are considered. The need for professional training model to focus not only on the priority content outlined in the professional standards is proved. It is necessary to set cultural and developmental tasks.The model for socio-pedagogical training of a specialist in the field of social upbringing is offered on the example of the master’s level “Methodology and methods of social upbringing” educational program implemented at the Tyumen State University. A general conclusion is drawn on the need to establish a new educational policy in the field of social pedagogical training.

  7. Guidelines for the organisation of continuing professional development activities for the European dentist

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Suomalainen, K.; Karaharju-Suvanto, T.; Bailey, S.; Bullock, A.; Cowpe, J.; Barnes, E.; Thomas, H.; Thomas, R.; Kavadella, A.; Kossioni, A.; Kersten, H.; Povel, E.; Giles, M.; Walmsley, D.; Soboleva, U.; Liepa, A.; Akota, I.

    2013-01-01

    Aim Free movement of dental professionals across the European Union calls for more uniform continuing education in dentistry to ensure up-to-date, high-quality patient care and patient safety. This article provides guidelines for the management and delivery of high-quality continuing professional

  8. SPSP Phase III Recruiting, Selecting, and Developing Secure Power Systems Professionals. Individual and Team Performance Guidelines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Neil, Lori Ross [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Conway, T. J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Tobey, D. H. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Greitzer, Frank L. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Dalton, Angela C. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Pusey, Portia K. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2015-03-01

    The Secure Power Systems Professional Phase III final report was released last year which an appendix of Individual and Team Performance Guidelines. This new report is that appendix broken out as a standalone document to assist utilities in recruiting and developing Secure Power Systems Professionals at their site.

  9. Professional Standards, Teacher Identities and an Ethics of Singularity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Matthew; Moore, Alex

    2013-01-01

    This paper offers a critical analysis of the education policy move towards teacher professional standards. Drawing on Lacan's three registers of the psyche (real, imaginary and symbolic), the paper argues that moves towards codification (and domestication) of teachers' work and identities in standardized (and sanitized) forms, such as the…

  10. Education Policy Borrowing: Professional Standards for School Leaders in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Wei

    2017-01-01

    Realizing there is a global policy convergence that emphasizes the standardized key qualities of and expectations for "successful" school leaders, this article provides an in-depth analysis on the initiation of the "Professional Standards for Compulsory Schools Principals" (Ministry of Education of the People's Republic of…

  11. PRAXIOCENTRALISM IN THE PROFESSIONAL STANDARD OF THE TEACHER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Y. Monakhova

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The main objective of the professional standard, systematizing the work function of a teacher, is to describe not personal qualities of teachers but the process and outcome of their activities. The logic of the development of the professional standard involves the analysis of teaching activities and evaluation of its results, which should possess the properties of measurability and diagnosability.The aim of the present publication is to identify praxiological foundations of the professional standard of the teacher via a comparative analysis of the requirements and fundamental concepts of praxeology – a General theory of successful activities developed by domestic and foreign authors and reflected in monographic and dissertation researches.Methodology and methods of research. Methodological basis of research is the ideas of system, activity and praxiological approaches.Results. The authors prove that pedagogical praxeology as the science and practice of effective organization of pedagogical activity is a new mechanism to describe the characteristics of pedagogical activity and formation of complex of professional portrait of the teacher. Pedagogical praxeology as the mechanism: establishes the framework of competences of the teacher; defines the requirements for structured content, conditions and quality of work of the teacher, their qualifications and competences in the field of professional activity; provides the necessary compliance awareness of teacher’s requirements; describes methods of assessing the development of competencies of teachers; promotes the involvement of the teacher in the task of improving the quality of education; serves as the basis for constructing a continuous trajectory of increasing level of professional training of each teacher.Scientific novelty. The content of professional standards from the standpoint of the praxiological approach is investigated; conceptual ideas of praxeology, defining role and

  12. What Next? Translating AGI's 2015 Guidelines for Ethical Professional Conduct into Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boland, M. A.; Keane, C.

    2016-12-01

    In 2015, the American Geosciences Institute (AGI) published a revised version of the 1999 Guidelines for Ethical Professional Conduct, an aspirational document outlining ethical principles that should inform the professional behavior of all geoscientists. The revised Guidelines reflect a consensus of opinion among AGI's 51 member societies and show an evolution in thinking about geoscience ethics. The Guidelines also represent a foundational document to support the expansion of ethical guidelines by individual societies and organizations. Publishing the Guidelines was a significant milestone but aspirations need to be matched by action. We examine several developments that implement aspects of the Guidelines, including the development of a consensus statement regarding access and inclusion of individuals living with disabilities in the geosciences, a Joint AGI/Geological Society of America Societies meeting on professional conduct, geoethics training initiatives, and efforts to foster international cooperation in recognizing and implementing ethical practice in the geosciences. In addition, we examine the level of success in using these Guidelines as philosophical cornerstones for a number of international projects, such as Resourcing Future Generations and the International Raw Materials Observatory, that bring geoscience directly into contact with large societal issues.

  13. Guidelines on chemotherapy in advanced stage gynecological malignancies: an evaluation of 224 professional societies and organizations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolaos P Polyzos

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Clinical practice guidelines are important for guiding practice, but it is unclear if they are commensurate with the available evidence. METHODS: We examined guidelines produced by cancer and gynecological societies and organizations and evaluated their coverage of and stance towards chemotherapy for advanced stage disease among 4 gynecological malignancies (breast, ovarian, cervical, endometrial cancer where the evidence for the use of chemotherapy is very different (substantial and conclusive for breast and ovarian cancer, limited and suggesting no major benefit for cervical and endometrial cancer. Eligible societies and organizations were identified through systematic internet searches (last update June 2009. Pertinent websites were scrutinized for presence of clinical practice guidelines, and relative guidelines were analyzed. RESULTS: Among 224 identified eligible societies and organizations, 69 (31% provided any sort of guidelines, while recommendations for chemotherapy on advanced stage gynecological malignancies were available in 20 of them. Only 14 had developed their own guideline, and only 5 had developed guidelines for all 4 malignancies. Use of levels of evidence and grades of recommendations, and aspects of the production, implementation, and timeliness of the guidelines did not differ significantly across malignancies. Guidelines on breast and ovarian cancer utilized significantly more randomized trials and meta-analyses. Guidelines differed across malignancies on their coverage of disease-free survival (p = 0.033, response rates (p = 0.024, symptoms relief (p = 0.005, quality of life (p = 0.001 and toxicity (p = 0.039, with breast and ovarian cancer guidelines typically covering more frequently these outcomes. All guidelines explicitly or implicitly endorsed the use of chemotherapy. CONCLUSIONS: Clinical practice guidelines are provided by the minority of professional societies and organizations

  14. Standard guidelines for setting up a dermatosurgery theatre

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajendran S

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction, definition, rationale and scope: Dermatologists in India are now increasingly performing surgical and cosmetic procedures in their practice. This calls for minimum standards at the national level with the main focus of patient safety and hence the guidelines for setting up a dermatosurgical theatre. Facility: The dermatosurgery theatre can be created in either physician′s clinic, or a hospital depending on the procedure to be performed. The dermatosurgery theatre requires careful planning with regards to - location, dimension, shell design, lighting, electrical requirements, operation table, chair, trolley, surgical instruments, sterilization of devices, asepsis and advanced life support. Apart from physical considerations, other considerations including theatre etiquettes, consent for surgery, safety of dermatosurgeon, theatre staff and lastly biomedical waste management should be looked into. These issues are discussed in detail in the recommendations.

  15. Assessment of Ethical and Other Professional Standards in Private ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Compliance of 21 private medical laboratories in Osun State with ethical and other professional was assessed by the authors' pre and post inspection by the Medical Laboratory Science Council of Nigeria (MLSCN). Laboratory environment, personnel, equipment and adherence to Standard Operating Procedures (SOPs) ...

  16. Sustainability of professionals' adherence to clinical practice guidelines in medical care: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ament, Stephanie M C; de Groot, Jeanny J A; Maessen, José M C; Dirksen, Carmen D; van der Weijden, Trudy; Kleijnen, Jos

    2015-12-29

    To evaluate (1) the state of the art in sustainability research and (2) the outcomes of professionals' adherence to guideline recommendations in medical practice. Systematic review. Searches were conducted until August 2015 in MEDLINE, CINAHL, EMBASE, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) and the Guidelines International Network (GIN) library. A snowball strategy, in which reference sections of other reviews and of included papers were searched, was used to identify additional papers. Studies needed to be focused on sustainability and on professionals' adherence to clinical practice guidelines in medical care. Studies had to include at least 2 measurements: 1 before (PRE) or immediately after implementation (EARLY POST) and 1 measurement longer than 1 year after active implementation (LATE POST). The search retrieved 4219 items, of which 14 studies met the inclusion criteria, involving 18 sustainability evaluations. The mean timeframe between the end of active implementation and the sustainability evaluation was 2.6 years (minimum 1.5-maximum 7.0). The studies were heterogeneous with respect to their methodology. Sustainability was considered to be successful if performance in terms of professionals' adherence was fully maintained in the late postimplementation phase. Long-term sustainability of professionals' adherence was reported in 7 out of 18 evaluations, adherence was not sustained in 6 evaluations, 4 evaluations showed mixed sustainability results and in 1 evaluation it was unclear whether the professional adherence was sustained. (2) Professionals' adherence to a clinical practice guideline in medical care decreased after more than 1 year after implementation in about half of the cases. (1) Owing to the limited number of studies, the absence of a uniform definition, the high risk of bias, and the mixed results of studies, no firm conclusion about the sustainability of professionals' adherence to guidelines in medical practice can be drawn

  17. Writing for professional publication. Part 3: following journal guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowler, John

    Recognizing your motivation and identifying the content of your potential article are the first two steps in writing for publication. However, you will almost certainly receive a rejection letter if you do not plan and structure your article to meet the style of the specific journal you intend submitting to. In the third part of a series of articles, John Fowler, an experienced nursing lecturer and author, highlights the importance of downloading and reading carefully the author instructions which are found on the websites of nearly all professional journals.

  18. Implications of WHO Guideline on Sugars for dental health professionals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moynihan, Paula; Makino, Yuka; Petersen, Poul Erik

    2018-01-01

    health professionals receive adequate education in diet and nutrition, and there is a need for dental educational regulating bodies to define the content of the dental curriculum with respect to nutrition. All patients, or their parents or carers, should receive dietary advice to reduce free sugars...... within the context of a healthy diet for the prevention of all NCDs. Dietary advice should: (i) focus on reducing the amount of free sugars consumed; (ii) be tailored according to the patient's body mass status (eg underweight, overweight, normal weight); (iii) encourage the consumption of fresh fruits...

  19. Critical attitudes and beliefs towards guidelines amongst palliative care professionals - results from a national survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalies, Helen; Schöttmer, Rieke; Simon, Steffen T; Voltz, Raymond; Crispin, Alexander; Bausewein, Claudia

    2017-03-21

    Little is known about palliative care professionals' attitudes towards guidelines. In 2015, the German Association for Palliative Medicine (DGP) published an evidence based guideline for palliative care in adults with incurable cancer. Before publication we conducted a national survey among members of the DGP to detect possible barriers and facilitators for its implementation. The aim of the present publication was to evaluate critical attitudes and beliefs which could hinder the effective implementation of the new guideline and to evaluate differences within professional groups and medical specialisations. This web-based online survey was addressed to all members of the DGP in summer 2014. Twenty-one questions concerning attitudes and beliefs towards guidelines were a priori developed to represent the following topics: scepticism regarding the quality of guidelines, doubts about the implementation of guidelines, restrictions in treatment options through guidelines, discrepancy between palliative care values and guidelines. Differences within professions and specialisations were tested using Kruskal-Wallis tests. All 4.786 members with known email address were invited, 1.181 followed the link, 1.138 began to answer the questionnaire and 1.031 completed the questionnaire. More than half of participating members were physicians and one third nurses. Scepticism regarding the quality of existing guidelines was high (range 12.8-73.2%). Doubts regarding practical aspects of guidelines were less prevalent but still high (range 21.8-57.6%). About one third (range 5.4-31.4%) think that guidelines restrict their treatment options. In addition, 38.8% believed that guidelines are a kind of cookbook and restrict the flexibility of individual patient care. The majority saw no or little discrepancy between palliative care values and guidelines (range 68.4-82.6%). There were relatively small but significant differences between professions and specialisations. The person

  20. TEACHERS’ PROFESSIONAL COMMITMENT AS AN INDICATOR OF PSYCHOLOGICAL READINESS TO THE PROFESSIONAL STANDARDS IMPLEMENTATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. A. Minyurova

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Nowadays, the problems of motivation of modern teachers and their valuable relation to the profession are actively being discussed in the scientific and pedagogical community. The changes in the relations between an employer and a teacher have been caused by the introduction of professional standards of the teacher and the extending practice of the conclusion of the socalled "effective contracts" between educational institutions and teachers. The aim of the present publication is to consider a phenomenon of professional commitment of teachers as a criterion of their psychological readiness for acceptance of new realities caused by the changed qualification competences having been imposed by the professional standard. Methodology and research methods. Comparative analysis and synthesis of the approaches to studying of a phenomenon of professional commitment existing in foreign psychology have been used. The empirical research of commitment of the Russian teachers to the profession was conducted on the basis of the authors’ method “The Questionnaire of Professional Commitment”. Statistical processing of the data obtained during the survey was carried out on the basis of the Statistica 7.0 program. The method of the factor analysis was applied. Results and scientific novelty. Yet, most studies in the field of the problematics of professional commitment have predominantly been carried out by foreign scholars. The attempt to describe the research experience on studying of professional commitment of the Russian teachers has been made for the first time ever. The proposed models of professional commitment are compared. It is proved that the structure of each model depends on professional and cultural diversity of a target group of a specific study. The specific features of psychological content of professional commitment of the Russian teachers are designated. Based on the systematized results of survey, the key structural

  1. Teacher’s electronic portfolio in professional standard of teacher

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naydenova Irina S.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Urgent questions related to the teacher professional standard, especially with the construction of its portfolio in electronic formis raised in the article. Today the most important indicator for the quality of teacher education is a professional competences of teachers which in demand with the era of postmodernism. However, attention is paid to such modern aspects of didactics as the digitization of learning and application of gadget technology in the educational process. The article analyzes the components, which today a teacher uses in the field of education and science of measuring the quality of social and emotional development of the student.

  2. Nurses' attitudes towards euthanasia in conflict with professional ethical guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terkamo-Moisio, Anja; Kvist, Tarja; Kangasniemi, Mari; Laitila, Teuvo; Ryynänen, Olli-Pekka; Pietilä, Anna-Maija

    2017-02-01

    Despite the significant role of nurses in end-of-life care, their attitudes towards euthanasia are under-represented both in the current literature and the controversial debate that is ongoing in several countries. What are the attitudes towards euthanasia among Finnish nurses? Which characteristics are associated with those attitudes? Cross-sectional web-based survey. Participants and research context: A total of 1003 nurses recruited via the members' bulletin of the Finnish Nurses Association and social media. Ethical considerations: Ethical approval was obtained from the Committee on Research Ethics of the university to which the authors were affiliated. The majority (74.3%) of the participants would accept euthanasia as part of Finnish healthcare, and 61.8% considered that Finland would benefit from a law permitting euthanasia. Most of the nurses (89.9%) thought that a person must have the right to decide on his or her own death; 77.4% of them considered it likely that they would themselves make a request for euthanasia in certain situations. The value of self-determination and the ability to choose the moment and manner of one's death are emphasized in the nurses' attitudes towards euthanasia. A continuous dialogue about euthanasia and nurses' shared values is crucial due to the conflict between nurses' attitudes and current ethical guidelines on nursing.

  3. Carbon dioxide reduction through urban forestry: guidelines for professional and volunteer tree planters

    Science.gov (United States)

    E. Gregory McPherson; James R. Simpson

    1999-01-01

    Carbon dioxide reduction through urban forestry—Guidelines for professional and volunteer tree planters has been developed by the Pacific Southwest Research Station’s Western Center for Urban Forest Research and Education as a tool for utilities, urban foresters and arborists, municipalities, consultants, non-profit organizations and others to...

  4. Professional Technical Standards in Colleges and Schools of Pharmacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, Tricia M.; Chichester, Clinton O.; Sanoski, Cynthia A.; Woodward, Donald A.; Worley, Marcia M.; Early, Johnnie L.

    2011-01-01

    Objective To determine the prevalence, characteristics, and use of professional technical standards among colleges and schools of pharmacy accredited by the Accreditation Council for Pharmacy Education (ACPE). Methods The Web site of every college and school of pharmacy accredited by ACPE was searched to identify information regarding the availability, content, and use of technical standards and to obtain demographic information. Results Information was obtained from all of the 114 colleges and schools of pharmacy and 67 (59%) had technical standards in place. Common themes for technical standards were: observation; communication; motor; intellectual, conceptual, integrative and quantitative abilities; and behavioral and social attributes. Of those colleges and schools with technical standards, 61 (91%) had standards that addressed all 5 of these themes and 34 (51%) specified that the technical standards were used in their admission, progression, and graduation procedures. Conclusion More than half of the colleges and schools of pharmacy examined in this study have technical standards; however, 41% have yet to develop and implement them. Colleges and schools of pharmacy looking for guidance in technical standards development could use the technical standards themes identified in this study. PMID:21655404

  5. Pilot testing of guidelines to support good practice in the development of professional portfolios.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, David J; Cortis, Joseph D; Sowter, Julie

    2011-11-01

    The aims of this study were to evaluate whether the introduction of new evidence based portfolio guidelines helped students and assessors to understand the expectations for completion of a clinical practice portfolio, and whether this understanding resulted in the submission of evidence consistent with the guidelines. New evidence based portfolio guidelines were introduced to an undergraduate BSc (Hons) Radiography (Diagnostic) programme. A total of 134 students completed 12 item questionnaires relating to using the portfolio guidelines. Semi-structured interviews were undertaken with 12 students and 5 lecturer practitioners. Documentary analysis was undertaken on 26 portfolios. Survey data indicated that the new guidelines increased students' understanding of portfolio evidence requirements. Statistically significant increases in scores were evident for only two out of 12 questions; these related to understanding the need for critical reflection and which elements of the portfolio would be rewarded in assessment. Survey data also indicated some dissatisfaction with the role of lecturer practitioners and clinical assessors in relation to portfolio development. Interviews provided more mixed perceptions of the contribution of enhanced guidelines and identified some reasons for dissatisfaction with the lecturer practitioner and clinical assessor role. Documentary analysis indicated that whilst the guidelines improved students' and lecturers' understanding of evidence requirements, this did not translate into portfolio evidence which matched guideline expectations. Portfolio evidence was restricted to meeting the minimum profession specific task requirements and often indicated a mis-match between guideline expectations and assessor assessment judgements. New evidence based guidelines improved understanding of evidence and presentation requirements for clinical practice portfolios. Consistent interpretation of portfolio guidelines however requires structured

  6. What factors increase Dutch child health care professionals' adherence to a national guideline on preventing child abuse and neglect?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Konijnendijk, A.A.J.; Boere-Boonekamp, M.M.; Fleuren, M.A.H.; Haasnoot, M.E.; Need, A.

    2016-01-01

    Guidelines to support health care professionals in early detection of, and responses to, suspected Child Abuse and Neglect (CAN) have become increasingly widely available. Yet little is known about professionals' adherence to these guidelines or the determinants that affect their uptake. This study

  7. What factors increase Dutch child health care professionals' adherence to a national guideline on preventing child abuse and neglect?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Konijnendijk, A.A.J.; Boere - Boonekamp, M.M.; Fleuren, M.A.H.; Haasnoot-Smallegange, R.M.E.; Need, A.

    2016-01-01

    © 2015 Elsevier Ltd.Guidelines to support health care professionals in early detection of, and responses to, suspected Child Abuse and Neglect (CAN) have become increasingly widely available. Yet little is known about professionals' adherence to these guidelines or the determinants that affect their

  8. Developing European guidelines for training care professionals in mental health promotion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Greacen Tim

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although mental health promotion is a priority mental health action area for all European countries, high level training resources and high quality skills acquisition in mental health promotion are still relatively rare. The aim of the current paper is to present the results of the DG SANCO-funded PROMISE project concerning the development of European guidelines for training social and health care professionals in mental health promotion. Methods The PROMISE project brought together a multidisciplinary scientific committee from eight European sites representing a variety of institutions including universities, mental health service providers and public health organisations. The committee used thematic content analysis to filter and analyse European and international policy documents, scientific literature reviews on mental health promotion and existing mental health promotion programmes with regard to identifying quality criteria for training care professionals on this subject. The resulting PROMISE Guidelines quality criteria were then subjected to an iterative feedback procedure with local steering groups and training professionals at all sites with the aim of developing resource kits and evaluation tools for using the PROMISE Guidelines. Scientific committees also collected information from European, national and local stakeholder groups and professional organisations on existing training programmes, policies and projects. Results The process identified ten quality criteria for training care professionals in mental health promotion: embracing the principle of positive mental health; empowering community stakeholders; adopting an interdisciplinary and intersectoral approach; including people with mental health problems; advocating; consulting the knowledge base; adapting interventions to local contexts; identifying and evaluating risks; using the media; evaluating training, implementation processes and outcomes. The

  9. The Standardized Professional Encounter: A New Model to Assess Professionalism and Communication Skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lifchez, Scott D; Cooney, Carisa M; Redett, Richard J

    2015-06-01

    Physician-patient communication is vital to patient care, and physician-nurse interactions are equally critical. Conflict between nurses and physicians can greatly impair communication, increasing the risk of treatment errors, yet physicians receive little education during training on recognizing and resolving professional conflicts. We created and implemented the Standardized Professional (S-Pro) Encounter to improve training and provide opportunities to evaluate resident professionalism and communication with health care team colleagues. The standardized patient model is well established for teaching and assessing clinical and communication skills. Using the standardized patient concept, we created a nurse-resident encounter with 2 professionally trained medical portrayers (1 "nurse," 1 "patient"), in which the nurse disagrees with the resident's treatment plan. Residents were surveyed for prior experience with nurse-physician conflict management, and we assessed postencounter for collaborative skills and conflict resolution. All residents (n=18) observed at least 1 physician-nurse conflict in front of patients. Eleven (61%) reported being involved in at least 1 conflict. Twelve residents (67%) had 2 or fewer prior education experiences in interprofessional conflict management. Faculty assessment and S-Pro scores demonstrated high agreement, while resident self-assessment scores demonstrated low agreement with faculty and S-Pro scores. Participants and evaluators found the encounter to be reasonably authentic. There was strong agreement between the faculty and S-Pro assessment of resident performance when using the Boggs scale. The S-Pro Encounter is easily adapted for other clinical situations or training programs, and facilitates the assessment of professionalism and communication skills between residents and other health care professionals.

  10. Professional standard of specialist of guardianship and custodianship agency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G.V. Semya

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available We justified the introduction of the professional standard of specialist of guardianship and custodianship agency taking into consideration the psychological characteristics of the target group of customers. We describe the situation in our country with qualification of professionals, the international trends in the field of protection of the rights of minors in the countries – members of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development. We analyze the reflection of the theme of labor functions in the Russian legislation. We reveal the need for psychological and pedagogical knowledge for successful professional of guardianship authorities, compile a list of the necessary skills and knowledge. The main focus of the work of specialists is to maintain the child in the biological family at all stages of working with child and family problems. We characterize the trends in professional activities related to the development of the regional legislation in comparison with federal, increased number of international instruments to which Russia joined in the protection of children's rights. It is stressed that a requirement for education is additional retraining for new programs on the basis of higher education in the following professions and fields of study: law, pedagogy and psychology, social pedagogy and social work.

  11. Laboratory diagnosis of creatine deficiency syndromes: a technical standard and guideline of the American College of Medical Genetics and Genomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharer, J Daniel; Bodamer, Olaf; Longo, Nicola; Tortorelli, Silvia; Wamelink, Mirjam M C; Young, Sarah

    2017-02-01

    Disclaimer: These ACMG Standards and Guidelines are intended as an educational resource for clinical laboratory geneticists to help them provide quality clinical laboratory genetic services. Adherence to these standards and guidelines is voluntary and does not necessarily assure a successful medical outcome. These Standards and Guidelines should not be considered inclusive of all proper procedures and tests or exclusive of others that are reasonably directed to obtaining the same results. In determining the propriety of any specific procedure or test, clinical laboratory geneticists should apply their professional judgment to the specific circumstances presented by the patient or specimen. Clinical laboratory geneticists are encouraged to document in the patient's record the rationale for the use of a particular procedure or test, whether or not it is in conformance with these Standards and Guidelines. They also are advised to take notice of the date any particular guideline was adopted, and to consider other relevant medical and scientific information that becomes available after that date. It also would be prudent to consider whether intellectual property interests may restrict the performance of certain tests and other procedures.Cerebral creatine deficiency syndromes are neurometabolic conditions characterized by intellectual disability, seizures, speech delay, and behavioral abnormalities. Several laboratory methods are available for preliminary and confirmatory diagnosis of these conditions, including measurement of creatine and related metabolites in biofluids using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry or gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, enzyme activity assays in cultured cells, and DNA sequence analysis. These guidelines are intended to standardize these procedures to help optimize the diagnosis of creatine deficiency syndromes. While biochemical methods are emphasized, considerations for confirmatory molecular testing are also discussed

  12. Continuous evaluation of midwives as to professional standards

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZAHRA YAZDANPANAHI

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Implementation of professional standards as well as evaluation and assessments of providers has an important role in health promotion of each society. The purpose of this study was to assess the midwives working at midwifery offices as to performance of professional standards and effectiveness of continuous evaluation and education on them. Methods: This is an interventional study in which all of midwifery offices (110 were evaluated. The study was done in three stages using standard checklist observation and interview in each step. Based on detected errors, appropriate education was done and their performance was reevaluated in the next step of supervision. Finally total scores in each step as well as scores in different subjects were compared among three evaluated stages. Results: Overall mean score of faults at midwifery offices decreased from step 1 to step 3 in the following fields: environmental health and infection control (P<0.0002, personal and patient care (P=0.0005, individual health (P=0.003 and adherence to laws and rules (P<0.0001. Conclusion: Continuous evaluation is essential for assessing the effectiveness and improvement of our educational program. With continuous evaluation, correction of observed defects will be done at an early stage by appropriate intervention and education. So our medical and health programs will attain the planned goals.

  13. 78 FR 34431 - Effluent Limitations Guidelines and Standards for the Steam Electric Power Generating Point...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-07

    ... and Standards for the Steam Electric Power Generating Point Source Category; Proposed Rule #0;#0... PROTECTION AGENCY 40 CFR Part 423 RIN 2040-AF14 Effluent Limitations Guidelines and Standards for the Steam... certain steam electric power plants by revising technology-based effluent limitations guidelines and...

  14. 45 CFR 1180.70 - Guidelines and standards for museum conservation projects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ...) NATIONAL FOUNDATION ON THE ARTS AND THE HUMANITIES INSTITUTE OF MUSEUM AND LIBRARY SERVICES GRANTS REGULATIONS Museum Conservation Program § 1180.70 Guidelines and standards for museum conservation projects... 45 Public Welfare 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Guidelines and standards for museum conservation...

  15. The Canadian 24-Hour Movement Guidelines for Children and Youth: Implications for practitioners, professionals, and organizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latimer-Cheung, Amy E; Copeland, Jennifer L; Fowles, Jonathon; Zehr, Lori; Duggan, Mary; Tremblay, Mark S

    2016-06-01

    The new Canadian 24-Hour Movement Guidelines for Children and Youth emphasize the integration of all movement behaviours that occur over a whole day (i.e., light, moderate, and vigorous physical activity, sedentary behaviour, and sleep). These guidelines shift the paradigm away from considering each behaviour in isolation. This concept of the "whole day matters" not only calls for a change in thinking about movement but also for redevelopment of dissemination and implementation practice. Past guideline launch activities largely have aimed to create awareness through passive dissemination strategies (e.g., Website posts, distribution of print resources). For the integrated guidelines to have public health impact, we must move beyond dissemination and raising of awareness to implementation and behaviour change. Shifting this focus requires new, innovative approaches to intervention, including interdisciplinary collaboration, policy change, and refocused service provision. The purpose of this paper is to identify practitioners, professionals, and organizations with potential to disseminate and/or implement the guidelines, discuss possible implementation strategies for each of these groups, and describe the few resources being developed and those needed to support dissemination and implementation efforts. This discussion makes readily apparent the need for a well-funded, comprehensive, long-term dissemination, implementation, and evaluation plan to ensure uptake and activation of the guidelines.

  16. Student Affairs Standards and Competencies: Examining the Professional Standards and Competencies of California Community College Student Government Advisors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutierrez, Anthony Christopher

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine the professional standards and competencies that California community college student government advisors perceive as important, their confidence level in those professional standards and competencies and the role that they believe professional organizations can play in developing those skills. This study…

  17. Ergonomics standards and guidelines for computer workstation design and the impact on users' health - a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woo, E H C; White, P; Lai, C W K

    2016-03-01

    This paper presents an overview of global ergonomics standards and guidelines for design of computer workstations, with particular focus on their inconsistency and associated health risk impact. Overall, considerable disagreements were found in the design specifications of computer workstations globally, particularly in relation to the results from previous ergonomics research and the outcomes from current ergonomics standards and guidelines. To cope with the rapid advancement in computer technology, this article provides justifications and suggestions for modifications in the current ergonomics standards and guidelines for the design of computer workstations. Practitioner Summary: A research gap exists in ergonomics standards and guidelines for computer workstations. We explore the validity and generalisability of ergonomics recommendations by comparing previous ergonomics research through to recommendations and outcomes from current ergonomics standards and guidelines.

  18. What factors increase Dutch child health care professionals' adherence to a national guideline on preventing child abuse and neglect?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konijnendijk, Annemieke A J; Boere-Boonekamp, Magda M; Fleuren, Margot A H; Haasnoot, Maria E; Need, Ariana

    2016-03-01

    Guidelines to support health care professionals in early detection of, and responses to, suspected Child Abuse and Neglect (CAN) have become increasingly widely available. Yet little is known about professionals' adherence to these guidelines or the determinants that affect their uptake. This study used a cross-sectional design to assess the adherence of Dutch Child Health Care (CHC) professionals to seven key activities described in a national guideline on preventing CAN. This study also examined the presence and strengths of determinants of guideline adherence. Online questionnaires were filled in between May and July 2013 by 164 CHC professionals. Adherence was defined as the extent to which professionals performed each of seven key activities when they suspected CAN. Thirty-three determinants were measured in relation to the guideline, the health professional, the organisational context and the socio-political context. Bivariate and multivariate regression analyses tested associations between determinants and guideline adherence. Most of the responding CHC professionals were aware of the guideline and its content (83.7%). Self-reported rates of full adherence varied between 19.5% and 42.7%. Stronger habit to use the guideline was the only determinant associated with higher adherence rates in the multivariate analysis. Understanding guideline adherence and associated determinants is essential for developing implementation strategies that can stimulate adherence. Although CHC professionals in this sample were aware of the guideline, they did not always adhere to its key recommended activities. To increase adherence, tailored interventions should primarily focus on enhancing habit strength. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Basic life support revisited – New American Heart Association, 2015, guidelines: An update for dental professionals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed Nadeem Ahmed Bijle

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available American Heart Association (AHA - a professional organization dealing with appropriate cardiac care in an effort to reduce disability and deaths caused by cardiovascular disease and stroke, portrays the necessity of continuous evaluated evidence-based medicine. Thus, AHA formally introduces every 5 years their guidelines for the Emergency Cardiovascular Care on the basis of a thorough evidence search to make provision of the best possible treatment for patients with cardiac emergencies. Since, new 2015 AHA guidelines are established very recently, awareness of our fellow dentists with its major changes at least with respect to basic life support (BLS seems important. Hence, this communication is scripted to throw light on the significant changes in 2015 AHA guidelines has brought in BLS protocols.

  20. Guidelines for Professional Training of Junior Medical Staff in the Context of European Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sosnova Myroslava

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with outlining guidelines for improving professional training of junior medical staff based on European experience. Consequently, guidelines and recommendations on enhancing the efficiency of medical education in general and junior medical specialists’ professional training, in particular, published by European Union of Medical Specialists, General Medical Council, World Federation for Medical Education have been studied, analyzed, justified and presented in the paper. According to European Union of Medical Specialists it has been concluded that general aspects of medical specialists’ training are based on the selection process for the access to the medical specialists’ training, duration of training, common trunk, training program and quality assurance; requirements for training institutions involve recognition, size, quality assurance and teaching infructructure; requirements for instructors encompass qualification, training program, teacher/trainee ratio; requirements for trainees cover experience, language and logbook. In addition, the components that define the quality of junior medical specialists’ professional training based on N. Novosolova’s ideas have been indicated. Finally, based on the positive aspects of the guidelines analyzed the appropriate ones that, in our opinion, may be of use in Ukraine, have been presented.

  1. Implementing the Professional Development Standards: An Innovative M.S. Degree for High School Chemistry Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowery Bretz, Stacey

    2002-11-01

    The 1996 publication of the National Science Education Standards (NSES) has had a profound effect on curriculum development, assessment of student learning, and pre-service teacher education. One consequence of this at the state level has been the abandonment of permanent certification for K-12 teachers in favor of renewable licensure. Ohio and Pennsylvania now require secondary teachers to earn an M.S. within ten years of their B.S. However, the NSES for professional development have yet to receive emphasis and priority in implementation equal to that given the content standards. For high school chemistry teachers, existing M.S. programs fail to meet the NSES professional development guidelines. This report outlines a vision for a new kind of masters' degree, tailored to the needs and talents of high school chemistry teachers, which provides for integration of both pedagogical knowledge and content knowledge (chemistry). The program empowers teachers with the skills necessary for continual professional development throughout their careeers by using action research in the high school classroom. Graduate courses in chemistry education research, including an extensive annotated bibliography, and early evaluation results are reported.

  2. Standard guidelines of care: Lasers for tattoos and pigmented lesions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aurangabadkar Sanjeev

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Lasers have revolutionized the treatment of pigmentary disorders and have become the mainstay of therapy for many of them. Machines: Though different laser machines are used, Quality-switched (QS lasers are considered as the gold standard for treatment of pigmented lesions. Proper knowledge of the physics of laser machine, methodology, dosage schedules, etc., is mandatory. Physician Qualification: Laser may be administered by a dermatologist, who has received adequate background training in lasers during postgraduation or later at a center that provides education and training in lasers, or in focused workshops which provide such trainings. He should have adequate knowledge of the machines, parameters, cooling systems, and aftercare. Facility: The procedure may be performed in the physician′s minor procedure room. Indications: Epidermal lesions: Cafι au lait macules (CALM, lentigines, freckles, solar lentigo, nevus spilus, pigmented seborrheic keratosis, dermatosis papulosa nigra (DPN. Dermal lesions: Nevus of Ota, Blue nevus, Hori′s nevus (acquired bilateral nevus of Ota-like macules. Tattoos: Amateur, professional, cosmetic, medicinal, and traumatic. Mixed epidermal and dermal lesions: Postinflammatory hyperpigmentation (PIH, nevus spilus, periorbital and perioral pigmentation, acquired melanocytic nevi (moles, melasma and Becker′s Nevus. Contraindications: Absolute: Active local infection, photo-aggravated skin diseases and medical conditions, tattoo granuloma, allergic reactions to tattoo pigment, unstable vitiligo and psoriasis. Relative: Keloid and keloidal tendencies, patient on isotretinoin, history of herpes simplex, patient who is not co-operative or has unrealistic expectation. Patient selection: Proper patient selection is important. Investigations to identify any underlying cause for pigmentation are important; concurrent topical and systemic drug therapy may be needed. History of scarring, response to previous

  3. Goals, Guidelines, and Standards for Student Scientific Investigations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jona, Kemi; Adsit, John

    2008-01-01

    This publication is intended to provide a set of quality guidelines for developing and evaluating student scientific investigations and surrounding course content that are parts of courses (or other learning experiences) delivered online at a distance from the instructor and a traditional science classroom. To be inclusive of the range of…

  4. METHODOLOGY COMPARATIVE EVALUATION OF PROFESSIONAL STANDARDS AND EDUCATION STANDARDS WITH THE USE OF NON-NUMERIC DATA PROCESSING METHODS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gennady V. Abramov

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The article discusses the development of a technique that allows for a comparative assessment of the requirements of the professional standard and the federal state educational standards. The results can be used by universities to adjust the learning process for the analysis of their curricula to better compliance with professional standards

  5. Guidelines for Standardized Testing of Broadband Seismometers and Accelerometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutt, Charles R.; Evans, John R.; Followill, Fred; Nigbor, Robert L.; Wielandt, Erhard

    2010-01-01

    Testing and specification of seismic and earthquake-engineering sensors and recorders has been marked by significant variations in procedures and selected parameters. These variations cause difficulty in comparing such specifications and test results. In July 1989, and again in May 2005, the U.S. Geological Survey hosted international pub-lic/private workshops with the goal of defining widely accepted guidelines for the testing of seismological inertial sensors, seismometers, and accelerometers. The Proceedings of the 2005 workshop have been published and include as appendix 6 the report of the 1989 workshop. This document represents a collation and rationalization of a single set of formal guidelines for testing and specifying broadband seismometers and accelerometers.

  6. Sunscreen compliance with regional clinical practice guidelines and product labeling standards in New Zealand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sporer, Matthias E; Mathy, Joanna E; Kenealy, John; Mathy, Jon A

    2016-03-01

    INTRODUCTION For general practitioners, practice nurses and community pharmacists in New Zealand, a core duty is to educate patients about sun protection. We aimed to evaluate compliance of locally available sunscreens with regional clinical practice guidelines and sunscreen labelling standards, to assist clinicians in advising consumers on sunscreen selection. METHODS We audited all sunscreens available at two Auckland stores for three New Zealand sunscreen retailers. We then assessed compliance with accepted regional clinical practice guidelines for sun protection from the New Zealand Guidelines Group. We further assessed compliance with regional Australia/New Zealand consumer standards for sunscreen labelling. RESULTS All sunscreens satisfied clinical guidelines for broad-spectrum protection, and 99% of sunscreens met or exceeded clinical guidelines for minimal Sun Protection Factor. Compliance with regional standardized labelling guidelines is voluntary in New Zealand and 27% of audited sunscreens were not fully compliant with SPF labelling standards. DISCUSSION Sunscreens were generally compliant with clinical guidelines for minimal sun protection. However there was substantial noncompliance with regional recommendations for standardized sunscreen labelling. Primary health care clinicians should be aware that this labelling noncompliance may mislead patients into thinking some sunscreens offer more sun protection than they do. Mandatory compliance with the latest regional labelling standards would simplify sunscreen selection by New Zealand consumers. KEYWORDS Sunscreen; Sun Protection Factor; SPF; Skin Neoplasms; Melanoma; Skin Cancer Prevention.

  7. Laboratory diagnosis of galactosemia: a technical standard and guideline of the American College of Medical Genetics and Genomics (ACMG).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasquali, Marzia; Yu, Chunli; Coffee, Bradford

    2018-01-01

    Disclaimer: These ACMG Standards and Guidelines are developed primarily as an educational resource for clinical laboratory geneticists to help them provide quality clinical laboratory genetic services. Adherence to these Standards and Guidelines is voluntary and does not necessarily assure a successful medical outcome. These Standards and Guidelines should not be considered inclusive of all proper procedures and tests or exclusive of other procedures and tests that are reasonably directed to obtaining the same results. In determining the propriety of any specific procedure or test, the clinical laboratory geneticist should apply his or her own professional judgment to the specific circumstances presented by the individual patient or specimen. Clinical laboratory geneticists are encouraged to document in the patient's record the rationale for the use of a particular procedure or test, whether or not it is in conformance with these Standards and Guidelines. They also are advised to take notice of the date any particular guideline was adopted, and to consider other relevant medical and scientific information that becomes available after that date. It also would be prudent to consider whether intellectual property interests may restrict the performance of certain tests and other procedures.Galactosemias are inherited disorders of galactose metabolism due to deficiency in one of the three enzymes involved in the Leloir pathway: galactose-1-phosphate uridyltransferase, galactokinase, and uridine diphosphate (UDP)-galactose-4'-epimerase. Galactose-1-phosphate uridyltransferase deficiency, or classic galactosemia, is the most frequent and the most severe of the three enzyme deficiencies; it is characterized by failure to thrive, liver failure, susceptibility to sepsis, and death, if untreated. Newborn screening for classic galactosemia has been implemented in all of the United States, while screening for galactokinase deficiency and UDP-galactose-4'-epimerase deficiency is

  8. C++ Coding Standards 101 Rules, Guidelines, and Best Practices

    CERN Document Server

    Sutter, Herb

    2005-01-01

    Consistent, high-quality coding standards improve software quality, reduce time-to-market, promote teamwork, eliminate time wasted on inconsequential matters, and simplify maintenance. Now, two of the world's most respected C++ experts distill the rich collective experience of the global C++ community into a set of coding standards that every developer and development team can understand and use as a basis for their own coding standards.

  9. Developing Consensus on the CompHP Professional Standards for Health Promotion in Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speller, Viv; Parish, Richard; Davison, Heather; Zilnyk, Anna

    2012-01-01

    Building on the CompHP Core Competencies for health promotion the Professional Standards for Health Promotion have been developed and consulted on across Europe. The standards were formulated to fit within the complexity of professional, occupational and educational standards frameworks in Europe as learning outcome standards with performance…

  10. Uncertainty of measurement and clinical value of semen analysis: has standardisation through professional guidelines helped or hindered progress?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomlinson, M J

    2016-09-01

    This article suggests that diagnostic semen analysis has no more clinical value today than it had 25-30 years ago, and both the confusion surrounding its evidence base (in terms of relationship with conception) and the low level of confidence in the clinical setting is attributable to an associated high level of 'uncertainty'. Consideration of the concept of measurement uncertainty is mandatory for medical laboratories applying for the ISO15189 standard. It is evident that the entire semen analysis process is prone to error every step from specimen collection to the reporting of results and serves to compound uncertainty associated with diagnosis or prognosis. Perceived adherence to published guidelines for the assessment of sperm concentration, motility and morphology does not guarantee a reliable and reproducible test result. Moreover, the high level of uncertainty associated with manual sperm motility and morphology can be attributed to subjectivity and lack a traceable standard. This article describes where and why uncertainty exists and suggests that semen analysis will continue to be of limited value until it is more adequately considered and addressed. Although professional guidelines for good practice have provided the foundations for testing procedures for many years, the risk in following rather prescriptive guidance to the letter is that unless they are based on an overwhelmingly firm evidence base, the quality of semen analysis will remain poor and the progress towards the development of more innovative methods for investigating male infertility will be slow. © 2016 American Society of Andrology and European Academy of Andrology.

  11. [Adherence between antibiotic prescriptions and guidelines in an internal medicine ward: an evaluation of professional practices].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peix, C; Vandenhende, M-A; Bonnet, F; Lacoste, D; Bernard, N; Youssef, J; Hessamfar, M; Pometan, J-P; Morlat, P

    2013-08-01

    This is an evaluation of professional practices (EPP) on antibiotic therapy in an internal medicine ward. A 6-month prospective review of antibiotic prescriptions and their comparisons with local and national guidelines (drug, daily dose, administration, and duration) were performed. Antibiotic therapy on 227 infectious episodes was collected. According to local guidelines, we found 56% of totally respected (lower respiratory tract infections: 38%, urinary tract infections: 88% and skin infections: 73%), 33% of partially respected and 11% of non-appropriate prescriptions. Considering national guidelines for lower respiratory tract infections as references, the results were: totally respected prescriptions 81%, partially respected prescriptions 16%, and non-appropriate prescriptions 3%. This evaluation of the prescriptions allowed setting up long-lasting actions to improve clinical practice. This approach anticipates the procedures of EPP that will be needed for hospital accreditation and highlights the importance of considering several guidelines for the interpretation of the results. Copyright © 2012 Société nationale française de médecine interne (SNFMI). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  12. Taking an Investigative Stance in Using the Professional Standards in the Languages Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farmer, Kylie

    2009-01-01

    The Professional Standards Project (PSP) is a nationally coordinated professional learning program for languages teachers, to improve the quality of languages teaching and, thereby, improve student learning. It is based on the use of the "Professional standards for accomplished teaching of languages and cultures" (hereafter, "the…

  13. SPSP Phase III Recruiting, Selecting, and Developing Secure Power Systems Professionals: Behavioral Interview Guidelines by Job Roles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Neil, Lori Ross [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Conway, T. J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Tobey, D. H. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Greitzer, Frank L. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Dalton, Angela C. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Pusey, Portia K. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2015-03-01

    The Secure Power Systems Professional Phase III final report was released last year which an appendix of Behavioral Interview Guidelines by Job Roles. This new report is that appendix broken out as a standalone document to assist utilities in recruiting and developing Secure Power Systems Professionals at their site.

  14. Guidelines for maintaining a professional compass in the era of social networking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landman, Matthew P; Shelton, Julia; Kauffmann, Rondi M; Dattilo, Jeffery B

    2010-01-01

    The use of social networking (SN) sites, such as Facebook and Twitter, has skyrocketed during the past 5 years, with more than 400 million current users. What was once isolated to high schools or college campuses has become increasingly ubiquitous in everyday life and across a multitude of industries. Medical centers and residency programs are not immune to this invasion. These sites present opportunities for the rapid dissemination of information from status updates, to tweets, to medical support groups, and even clinical communication between patients and providers. Although powerful, this technology also opens the door for misuse and policies for use will be necessary. We strive to begin a discourse in the surgical community in regard to maintaining professionalism while using SN sites. The use of SN sites among surgical house staff and faculty has not been addressed previously. To that end, we sought to ascertain the use of the SN site Facebook at our residency program. Of 88 residents and 127 faculty, 56 (64%) and 28 (22%), respectively, have pages on Facebook. Of these, 50% are publicly accessible. Thirty-one percent of the publicly accessible pages had work-related comments posted, and of these comments, 14% referenced specific patient situations or were related to patient care. Given the widespread use of SN websites in our surgical community and in society as a whole, every effort should be made to guard against professional truancy. We offer a set of guidelines consistent with the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education and the American College of Surgeons professionalism mandates in regard to usage of these websites. By acknowledging this need and by following these guidelines, surgeons will continue to define and uphold ethical boundaries and thus demonstrate a commitment to patient privacy and the highest levels of professionalism. Copyright © 2010 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Guidelines for Maintaining a Professional Compass in the Era of Social Networking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landman, Matthew P.; Shelton, Julia; Kauffmann, Rondi M.; Dattilo, Jeffery B.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives The use of social networking (SN) sites such as Facebook and Twitter has skyrocketed over the past 5 years, with over 400 million current users. What was once isolated to high schools or college campuses has become increasingly ubiquitous in everyday life and across a multitude of industries. Medical centers and residency programs are not immune to this invasion. These sites present opportunities for the rapid dissemination of information from status updates to tweets to medical support groups and even clinical communication between patients and providers. While powerful, this technology also opens the door for misuse and policies for use will be necessary. We strive to begin a discourse in the surgical community regarding maintaining professionalism while using SN sites. Results The use of SN sites among surgical housestaff and faculty has not previously been addressed. To that end, we sought to ascertain the use of the SN site Facebook at our residency program. Of 88 residents and 127 faculty, 56 (64%) and 28 (22%) respectively have pages on Facebook. Of these, 50% are publicly accessible. Thirty-one percent of the publicly accessible pages had work –related comments posted, and of these comments, 14% referenced specific patient situations or were related to patient care. Conclusions Given the widespread use of SN sites in our surgical community and in society as a whole, every effort should be made to guard against professional truancy. We offer a set a guidelines consistent with the ACGME and ACS professionalism mandates regarding usage of these sites. By acknowledging this need and following these guidelines, surgeons will continue to define and uphold ethical boundaries and thus demonstrate a commitment to patient privacy and the highest levels of professionalism. PMID:21156295

  16. Adherence of hip and knee arthroplasty studies to RSA standardization guidelines. A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madanat, Rami; Mäkinen, Tatu J; Aro, Hannu T; Bragdon, Charles; Malchau, Henrik

    2014-09-01

    Guidelines for standardization of radiostereometry (RSA) of implants were published in 2005 to facilitate comparison of outcomes between various research groups. In this systematic review, we determined how well studies have adhered to these guidelines. We carried out a literature search to identify all articles published between January 2000 and December 2011 that used RSA in the evaluation of hip or knee prosthesis migration. 2 investigators independently evaluated each of the studies for adherence to the 13 individual guideline items. Since some of the 13 points included more than 1 criterion, studies were assessed on whether each point was fully met, partially met, or not met. 153 studies that met our inclusion criteria were identified. 61 of these were published before the guidelines were introduced (2000-2005) and 92 after the guidelines were introduced (2006-2011). The methodological quality of RSA studies clearly improved from 2000 to 2011. None of the studies fully met all 13 guidelines. Nearly half (43) of the studies published after the guidelines demonstrated a high methodological quality and adhered at least partially to 10 of the 13 guidelines, whereas less than one-fifth (11) of the studies published before the guidelines had the same methodological quality. Commonly unaddressed guideline items were related to imaging methodology, determination of precision from double examinations, and also mean error of rigid-body fitting and condition number cutoff levels. The guidelines have improved methodological reporting in RSA studies, but adherence to these guidelines is still relatively low. There is a need to update and clarify the guidelines for clinical hip and knee arthroplasty RSA studies.

  17. Adherence of hip and knee arthroplasty studies to RSA standardization guidelines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mäkinen, Tatu J; Aro, Hannu T; Bragdon, Charles; Malchau, Henrik

    2014-01-01

    Background and purpose Guidelines for standardization of radiostereometry (RSA) of implants were published in 2005 to facilitate comparison of outcomes between various research groups. In this systematic review, we determined how well studies have adhered to these guidelines. Methods We carried out a literature search to identify all articles published between January 2000 and December 2011 that used RSA in the evaluation of hip or knee prosthesis migration. 2 investigators independently evaluated each of the studies for adherence to the 13 individual guideline items. Since some of the 13 points included more than 1 criterion, studies were assessed on whether each point was fully met, partially met, or not met. Results 153 studies that met our inclusion criteria were identified. 61 of these were published before the guidelines were introduced (2000–2005) and 92 after the guidelines were introduced (2006–2011). The methodological quality of RSA studies clearly improved from 2000 to 2011. None of the studies fully met all 13 guidelines. Nearly half (43) of the studies published after the guidelines demonstrated a high methodological quality and adhered at least partially to 10 of the 13 guidelines, whereas less than one-fifth (11) of the studies published before the guidelines had the same methodological quality. Commonly unaddressed guideline items were related to imaging methodology, determination of precision from double examinations, and also mean error of rigid-body fitting and condition number cutoff levels. Interpretation The guidelines have improved methodological reporting in RSA studies, but adherence to these guidelines is still relatively low. There is a need to update and clarify the guidelines for clinical hip and knee arthroplasty RSA studies. PMID:24954489

  18. [The system of continuing professional education of medical doctors in Austria. Structure, guidelines and quality management].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Routil, W

    2006-05-01

    This article describes the system of continuing medical education in Austria. Pursuant to section sign 49 para.1* of the Austrian Medical Law 1998/Amendment 2001, Austrian doctors are under the obligation to participate in continuing professional education according to the guidelines of the Austrian Medical Chamber. The Austrian doctors see themselves as members of an independent profession. The Austrian system of continuing (physician) professional education developed continuously, for one, based on the principle of self-responsibility of licensed doctors and for the other, on the responsibility for self-administration of the medical profession. The participation in CPD or CME events, which are quality assured by a given set of rules, is documented by a time-limited diploma issued by the Austrian Medical Chamber. The recognition system comprises CPD-CME events in Austria as well as abroad, literature study under specific rules including an assessment system and the use of electronic media. The CPD-CME guidelines are updated annually by the Austrian Medical Chamber. The permanent maintenance and administration of the CPD-CME Programme of the Austrian Medical Chamber (Diplom-Fortbildungs-Programm, DFP), was handed over to the Austrian Academy of Physicians, which is under the obligation to report to its founding body, the Austrian Medical Chamber.

  19. Information Interface Related Standards, Guidelines, and Recommended Practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-07-01

    Exchange (TRADACOMS) Other References 1. "Standards for Electronic Data Exchange," by Nigel Fenton, Computer Communications, 7, 4, Aug. 1984, pp. 181...College Hanover, NH 03755 Mr. Oliver Selfridge 45 Percy Road Lexington, MA 02173 IDA General W.Y. Smith, HQ Mr. Seymour Deitchman, HQ Mr. Robin Pirie

  20. Standardization of health data – ICAR guidelines including health key

    Science.gov (United States)

    Systematic improvement of animal health requires knowledge about the status quo and reliable measures to characterize it. In dairy herds, health monitoring has gained importance to ensure sustainable and cost-efficient milk production in accordance with public expectations. In this context, standard...

  1. Report from AmSECT's International Consortium for Evidence-Based Perfusion: American Society of Extracorporeal Technology Standards and Guidelines for Perfusion Practice: 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Robert A; Bronson, Shahna L; Dickinson, Timothy A; Fitzgerald, David C; Likosky, Donald S; Mellas, Nicholas B; Shann, Kenneth G

    2013-09-01

    One of the roles of a professional society is to develop standards and guidelines of practice as an instrument to guide safe and effective patient care. The American Society of Extracorporeal Technology (AmSECT) first published its Essentials for Perfusion Practice, Clinical Function: Conduct of Extracorporeal Circulation in 1993. The International Consortium for Evidence-Based Perfusion (ICEBP), a committee within AmSECT, was tasked with updating this document in 2010. The aim of this report is to describe the method of development and content of AmSECT's new professional standards and guidelines. The ICEBP committee independently evaluated and provided input regarding the current "Essentials and Guidelines." Structural changes were made to the entire document, and a draft document was developed, presented, and circulated to the AmSECT Board of Directors and broader membership for comment. Informed by these reviews, a revised document was then presented to the Society for a membership vote. The final document consists of 15 areas of practice covered by 50 Standards and 38 Guidelines (see Appendix 1) with the first standard focusing on the development of institutional protocols to support their implementation and use. A majority of the membership voted to accept the document (81.2% of the voting membership accepting, 18.8% rejecting). After an audit of the balloting process by AmSECT's Ethics Committee, the results were reported to the membership and the document was officially adopted on July 24, 2013. The Standards and Guidelines will serve as a useful guide for cardiac surgical teams that wish to develop institution-specific standards and guidelines to improve the reliability, safety, and effectiveness of adult cardiopulmonary bypass. The ICEBP recognizes that the development of a Standards and Guidelines statement alone will not change care. Safe, reliable, and effective care will be best served through the development and implementation of institutional

  2. Standard guidelines for the use of dermal fillers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vedamurthy Maya

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Currently used fillers vary greatly in their sources, efficacy duration and site of deposition; detailed knowledge of these properties is essential for administering them. Indications for fillers include facial lines (wrinkles, folds, lip enhancement, facial deformities, depressed scars, periocular melanoses, sunken eyes, dermatological diseases-angular cheilitis, scleroderma, AIDS lipoatrophy, earlobe plumping, earring ptosis, hand, neck, dιcolletι rejuvenation. Physicians′ qualifications : Any qualified dermatologist may use fillers after receiving adequate training in the field. This may be obtained either during postgraduation or at any workshop dedicated to the subject of fillers. The physicians should have a thorough knowledge of the anatomy of the area designated to receive an injection of fillers and the aesthetic principles involved. They should also have a thorough knowledge of the chemical nature of the material of the filler, its longevity, injection techniques, and any possible side effects. Facility: Fillers can be administered in the dermatologist′s minor procedure room. Preoperative counseling and informed consent: Detailed counseling with respect to the treatment, desired effects, and longevity of the filler should be discussed with the patient. Patients should be given brochures to study and adequate opportunity to seek information. Detailed consent forms need to be completed by the patients. A consent form should include the type of filler, longevity expected and possible postoperative complications. Preoperative photography should be carried out. Choice of the filler depends on the site, type of defect, results needed, and the physician′s experience. Injection technique and volume depend on the filler and the physician′s preference, as outlined in these guidelines.

  3. Standards and Guidelines of the Reading Recovery [TM] Council of North America. Third Edition: Fall 1998.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reading Recovery Council of North America, Columbus, OH.

    This booklet outlines the Reading Recovery Council of North America's (RRCNA) standards and guidelines for those who are responsible for the establishment and maintenance of effective Reading Recovery and/or "Descubriendo La Lectura" sites. The standards are deemed essential for assuring quality services to children and effective…

  4. 78 FR 277 - Section 610 Review of NPDES Permit Regulation and Effluent Limitations Guidelines Standards for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-03

    ... Limitations Guidelines Standards for Concentrated Animal Feeding Operations (CAFOs); Extension of Comment... Standards for Concentrated Animal Feeding Operations (CAFOs). As initially published in the Federal Register... the EPA will not know your identity or contact information unless you provide it in the body of your...

  5. [Standards and guidelines of radiation protection and safety in dental X-ray examinations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, X L; Li, G; Cheng, Y; Yu, Q; Wang, H; Zhang, Z Y

    2017-12-09

    With the rapid development of imaging technology, the application of dental imaging in diagnosis, treatment planning, intraoperative surgical navigation, monitoring of treatment or lesion development and assessment of treatment outcomes is playing an essential role in oral healthcare. The increased total number of dental X-ray examinations is accompanied by a relatively significant increase in collective dose to patients as well as to dental healthcare workers, which is harmful to human bodies to a certain degree. Some radiation protection standards and guidelines in dental radiology have been published in European countries, US, Canada and Australia, etc. Adherence to these standards and guidelines helps to achieve images with diagnostic quality and avoid unnecessary and repeated exposures. However, no radiation protection standard or guideline with regard to dental X-ray examinations has been put in force so far in mainland China. Therefore, a literature review on available radiation protection standards and guidelines was conducted to provide reference to the development of radiation protection standards or guidelines in mainland China.

  6. Guidelines for imaging retinoblastoma: imaging principles and MRI standardization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Graaf, Pim de; Rodjan, Firazia; Castelijns, Jonas A. [VU University Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Goericke, Sophia [University Hospital, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology and Neuroradiology, Essen (Germany); Galluzzi, Paolo [Azienda Ospedaliera e Universitaria Senese, Policlinico ' ' Le Scotte' ' , Unit of Diagnostic and Therapeutic Neuroradiology, Siena (Italy); Maeder, Philippe [CHUV, Service de Radiodiagnostic et Radiologie Interventionelle, Lausanne (Switzerland); Brisse, Herve J. [Institut Curie, Departement d' Imagerie, Paris (France)

    2012-01-15

    Retinoblastoma is the most common intraocular tumor in children. The diagnosis is usually established by the ophthalmologist on the basis of fundoscopy and US. Together with US, high-resolution MRI has emerged as an important imaging modality for pretreatment assessment, i.e. for diagnostic confirmation, detection of local tumor extent, detection of associated developmental malformation of the brain and detection of associated intracranial primitive neuroectodermal tumor (trilateral retinoblastoma). Minimum requirements for pretreatment diagnostic evaluation of retinoblastoma or mimicking lesions are presented, based on consensus among members of the European Retinoblastoma Imaging Collaboration (ERIC). The most appropriate techniques for imaging in a child with leukocoria are reviewed. CT is no longer recommended. Implementation of a standardized MRI protocol for retinoblastoma in clinical practice may benefit children worldwide, especially those with hereditary retinoblastoma, since a decreased use of CT reduces the exposure to ionizing radiation. (orig.)

  7. Using Qualitative Research to Inform Development of Professional Guidelines: A Case Study of the Society of Critical Care Medicine Family-Centered Care Guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coombs, Maureen A; Davidson, Judy E; Nunnally, Mark E; Wickline, Mary A; Curtis, J Randall

    2017-08-01

    To explore the importance, challenges, and opportunities using qualitative research to enhance development of clinical practice guidelines, using recent guidelines for family-centered care in the ICU as an example. In developing the Society of Critical Care Medicine guidelines for family-centered care in the neonatal ICU, PICU, and adult ICU, we developed an innovative adaptation of the Grading of Recommendations, Assessments, Development and Evaluations approach to explicitly incorporate qualitative research. Using Grading of Recommendations, Assessments, Development and Evaluations and the Council of Medical Specialty Societies principles, we conducted a systematic review of qualitative research to establish family-centered domains and outcomes. Thematic analyses were undertaken on study findings and used to support Population, Intervention, Comparison, Outcome question development. We identified and employed three approaches using qualitative research in these guidelines. First, previously published qualitative research was used to identify important domains for the Population, Intervention, Comparison, Outcome questions. Second, this qualitative research was used to identify and prioritize key outcomes to be evaluated. Finally, we used qualitative methods, member checking with patients and families, to validate the process and outcome of the guideline development. In this, a novel report, we provide direction for standardizing the use of qualitative evidence in future guidelines. Recommendations are made to incorporate qualitative literature review and appraisal, include qualitative methodologists in guideline taskforce teams, and develop training for evaluation of qualitative research into guideline development procedures. Effective methods of involving patients and families as members of guideline development represent opportunities for future work.

  8. Differentiated Levels of Teacher Qualifications and the Structure of the Professional Teacher Standards

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zabrodin Yu.M.,

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available This article discusses and analyzes the questions effect of professional standards for the preparation and development of professional resources, world experience in the development and implementation of professional standards, typical problems and necessary conditions for increasing the efficiency of the development and implementation of professional standards. The formation of labor functions of teaching staff requirements, taking into account the differentiated c skill levels are formulated in the study. Formulated requirements extend requirements for the qualification of workers which are determined with the Russian Ministry of Labor-specific professional activity types. The study proposed options for the construction of the structure of job functions of the professional teacher standard that correspond differentiated levels of staff qualifications.

  9. Professional Standards for Educational Leaders: The Empirical, Moral, and Experiential Foundations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Joseph F.

    2017-01-01

    "Professional Standards for Educational Leaders" introduces the foundations of the recently revised professional educational leadership standards and provides an in-depth explanation and application of each one. Written by the primary architect of PSEL, educational leadership expert Joseph F. Murphy, this authoritative guide to…

  10. Discourse Surrounding the International Education Standards for Professional Accountants (IES): A Content Analysis Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugahara, Satoshi; Wilson, Rachel

    2013-01-01

    The development and implementation of the International Education Standards (IES) for professional accountants is currently an important issue in accounting education and for educators interested in a shift toward international education standards more broadly. The purpose of this study is to investigate professional and research discourse…

  11. Redefining What It Means to Be a Teacher through Professional Standards: Implications for Continuing Teacher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torrance, Deirdre; Forde, Christine

    2017-01-01

    This article connects with an international debate around the place of professional standards in educational policy targeted at enhancing teacher quality, with associated implications for continuing teacher education. Scotland provides a fertile context for discussion, having developed sets of professional standards in response to a recent…

  12. 2018 Guidelines for the Early Management of Patients With Acute Ischemic Stroke: A Guideline for Healthcare Professionals From the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powers, William J; Rabinstein, Alejandro A; Ackerson, Teri; Adeoye, Opeolu M; Bambakidis, Nicholas C; Becker, Kyra; Biller, José; Brown, Michael; Demaerschalk, Bart M; Hoh, Brian; Jauch, Edward C; Kidwell, Chelsea S; Leslie-Mazwi, Thabele M; Ovbiagele, Bruce; Scott, Phillip A; Sheth, Kevin N; Southerland, Andrew M; Summers, Deborah V; Tirschwell, David L

    2018-01-24

    The purpose of these guidelines is to provide an up-to-date comprehensive set of recommendations for clinicians caring for adult patients with acute arterial ischemic stroke in a single document. The intended audiences are prehospital care providers, physicians, allied health professionals, and hospital administrators. These guidelines supersede the 2013 guidelines and subsequent updates. Members of the writing group were appointed by the American Heart Association Stroke Council's Scientific Statements Oversight Committee, representing various areas of medical expertise. Strict adherence to the American Heart Association conflict of interest policy was maintained. Members were not allowed to participate in discussions or to vote on topics relevant to their relations with industry. The members of the writing group unanimously approved all recommendations except when relations with industry precluded members voting. Prerelease review of the draft guideline was performed by 4 expert peer reviewers and by the members of the Stroke Council's Scientific Statements Oversight Committee and Stroke Council Leadership Committee. These guidelines use the American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association 2015 Class of Recommendations and Levels of Evidence and the new American Heart Association guidelines format. These guidelines detail prehospital care, urgent and emergency evaluation and treatment with intravenous and intra-arterial therapies, and in-hospital management, including secondary prevention measures that are appropriately instituted within the first 2 weeks. The guidelines support the overarching concept of stroke systems of care in both the prehospital and hospital settings. These guidelines are based on the best evidence currently available. In many instances, however, only limited data exist demonstrating the urgent need for continued research on treatment of acute ischemic stroke. © 2018 American Heart Association, Inc.

  13. A review and critical analysis of professional societies' guidelines for pharmacologic management of type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vigersky, Robert A

    2012-06-01

    The development of clinical practice guidelines (CPGs), which are promulgated by various sponsoring organizations to provide direction to clinicians for management of complex problems, generally adhere to a set of key principles. To reassure the users of their scientific and ethical validity, these include the use of a system to rate the quality of evidence on which the guideline is based and the divulgence of any conflicts of interest (COI) among members of the panel developing the guidelines. I analyzed the CPGs for pharmacologic management of patients with type 2 diabetes written by the two US professional societies that developed such guidelines (American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists [AACE] and the American Diabetes Association/European Association for the Study of Diabetes [ADA/EASD]) to assess their adherence to these principles of guideline development and to compare them with regard to simplicity, consideration of costs, and peer review status. To put the existence of COIs in these guidelines into context, I also reviewed the COIs from government-sponsored panels that developed diabetes CPGs. The results of this analysis suggest that both the AACE and ADA/EASD guidelines should be regarded as consensus documents rather than true CPGs, since neither guideline employed evidence grading. COI was extremely common among the members of both CPG panels from professional organizations, as well in the CPG panels with government sponsorship. In addition, the nature and extent of external peer review of these guidelines is unclear. Given these limitations, the AACE and ADA/EASD CPGs for diabetes management should be regarded as advisory at best, rather than prescriptive or authoritative, especially in view of their noncompliance with key principles of guideline development.

  14. Guidelines for the early management of patients with acute ischemic stroke: a guideline for healthcare professionals from the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jauch, Edward C; Saver, Jeffrey L; Adams, Harold P; Bruno, Askiel; Connors, J J Buddy; Demaerschalk, Bart M; Khatri, Pooja; McMullan, Paul W; Qureshi, Adnan I; Rosenfield, Kenneth; Scott, Phillip A; Summers, Debbie R; Wang, David Z; Wintermark, Max; Yonas, Howard

    2013-03-01

    The authors present an overview of the current evidence and management recommendations for evaluation and treatment of adults with acute ischemic stroke. The intended audiences are prehospital care providers, physicians, allied health professionals, and hospital administrators responsible for the care of acute ischemic stroke patients within the first 48 hours from stroke onset. These guidelines supersede the prior 2007 guidelines and 2009 updates. Members of the writing committee were appointed by the American Stroke Association Stroke Council's Scientific Statement Oversight Committee, representing various areas of medical expertise. Strict adherence to the American Heart Association conflict of interest policy was maintained throughout the consensus process. Panel members were assigned topics relevant to their areas of expertise, reviewed the stroke literature with emphasis on publications since the prior guidelines, and drafted recommendations in accordance with the American Heart Association Stroke Council's Level of Evidence grading algorithm. The goal of these guidelines is to limit the morbidity and mortality associated with stroke. The guidelines support the overarching concept of stroke systems of care and detail aspects of stroke care from patient recognition; emergency medical services activation, transport, and triage; through the initial hours in the emergency department and stroke unit. The guideline discusses early stroke evaluation and general medical care, as well as ischemic stroke, specific interventions such as reperfusion strategies, and general physiological optimization for cerebral resuscitation. Because many of the recommendations are based on limited data, additional research on treatment of acute ischemic stroke remains urgently needed.

  15. Into the Wild Country: Epistemic Issues in Professional Guidelines for Palliative Sedation in End-of-Life Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wackers, Ger

    2015-01-01

    End-of-life care is an important object of governance. Using the linguistic notions of polysemy, metaphorical blending and counterfactual reasoning, this paper critically examines epistemic issues in professional guidelines for palliative sedation of the dying. As a last resort option, palliative sedation is described as the intentional,…

  16. 78 FR 70938 - Draft Guidelines; Product Environmental Performance Standards and Ecolabels for Voluntary Use in...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-27

    ... Ave. NW., Washington, DC. The EPA/DC Public Reading Room hours of operation are 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., Monday through Friday, excluding legal holidays. The telephone number of the EPA/DC Public Reading Room... input on the draft Guidelines and the concept of assessing non-governmental standards and ecolabels for...

  17. Applying international standards and guidelines on corporate social responsibility: An action plan

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cramer, J.M.

    2005-01-01

    How can a company start the process of corporate social responsibility in an international context, thereby makinge use of diverse standards and guidelines? This question immediately came to the fore emerged after the start of the programme ‘Corporate social responsibility in international context’

  18. 78 FR 41907 - Effluent Limitations Guidelines and Standards for the Steam Electric Power Generating Point...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-12

    ... Electric Power Generating Point Source Category,'' published in the Federal Register on June 7, 2013, by 45..., rather than August 6, 2013. List of Subjects in 40 CFR Part 423 Environmental protection, Electric power... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 423 RIN 2040-AF14 Effluent Limitations Guidelines and Standards for the Steam Electric...

  19. Guidelines, Criteria, and Rules of Thumb for Evaluating Normed and Standardized Assessment Instruments in Psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cicchetti, Domenic V.

    1994-01-01

    In the context of developing assessment instruments in psychology, issues of standardization, norming procedures, and test reliability and validity are discussed. Criteria, guidelines, and rules of thumb are provided to help the clinician with instrument selection for a given psychological assessment. (SLD)

  20. 78 FR 38735 - Autopsy Performance Criteria: Standards, Guidelines and Best Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-27

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE Office of Justice Programs Autopsy Performance Criteria: Standards, Guidelines and Best Practices AGENCY... and Best Practices''. The opportunity to provide comments on this document is open to coroner/medical...

  1. 40 CFR 420.07 - Effluent limitations guidelines and standards for pH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... standards for pH. 420.07 Section 420.07 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED... § 420.07 Effluent limitations guidelines and standards for pH. (a) The pH level in process wastewaters subject to a subpart within this part shall be within the range of 6.0 to 9.0. (b) The pH level shall be...

  2. Guidelines for the Management of Patients With Unruptured Intracranial Aneurysms: A Guideline for Healthcare Professionals From the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, B Gregory; Brown, Robert D; Amin-Hanjani, Sepideh; Broderick, Joseph P; Cockroft, Kevin M; Connolly, E Sander; Duckwiler, Gary R; Harris, Catherine C; Howard, Virginia J; Johnston, S Claiborne Clay; Meyers, Philip M; Molyneux, Andrew; Ogilvy, Christopher S; Ringer, Andrew J; Torner, James

    2015-08-01

    The aim of this updated statement is to provide comprehensive and evidence-based recommendations for management of patients with unruptured intracranial aneurysms. Writing group members used systematic literature reviews from January 1977 up to June 2014. They also reviewed contemporary published evidence-based guidelines, personal files, and published expert opinion to summarize existing evidence, indicate gaps in current knowledge, and when appropriate, formulated recommendations using standard American Heart Association criteria. The guideline underwent extensive peer review, including review by the Stroke Council Leadership and Stroke Scientific Statement Oversight Committees, before consideration and approval by the American Heart Association Science Advisory and Coordinating Committee. Evidence-based guidelines are presented for the care of patients presenting with unruptured intracranial aneurysms. The guidelines address presentation, natural history, epidemiology, risk factors, screening, diagnosis, imaging and outcomes from surgical and endovascular treatment. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  3. Psychological and Educational Support in Professional Self-Determination in Students: Through the Lens of Professional Standard for Teachers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonova M.V.,

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The paper focuses on the importance of organized educational support for students in their professional self-determination. It reviews the list of professional competencies defined in the professional standard for teachers dealing with self-determination in students and analyses the basic requirements set for teacher education programmes. The system of professional self-determination for young people is described basing on the experience of the Republic of Mordovia, where career guidance in schools is regulated by the Regional Educational Module “Start into the Profession”. This module was developed according to the specifics of the given region and represents an integrated system of activities aimed at efficient career guidance for students living in rural and urban areas of the Republic of Mordovia.

  4. Awareness and enforcement of guidelines for publishing industry-sponsored medical research among publication professionals: the Global Publication Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wager, Elizabeth; Woolley, Karen; Adshead, Viv; Cairns, Angela; Fullam, Josh; Gonzalez, John; Grant, Tom; Tortell, Stephanie

    2014-04-19

    To gather information about current practices and implementation of publication guidelines among publication professionals working in or for the pharmaceutical industry. Web-based survey publicised via email and social media to members of the International Society for Medical Publication Professionals (ISMPP) and other organisations from November 2012 to February 2013. 469 individuals involved in publishing industry-sponsored research in peer-reviewed journals, mainly working in pharmaceutical or device companies ('industry', n=144), communication agencies ('agency', n=238), contract research organisations (CRO, n=15) or as freelancers (n=34). Most respondents (78%) had worked on medical publications for ≥5 years and 62% had a PhD/MD. Over 90% of industry, agency and CRO respondents routinely refer to Good Publication Practice (GPP2) and the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors' Uniform Requirements. Most respondents (78% industry, 79% agency) received mandatory training on ethical publication practices. Over 90% of respondents' companies had publication guidelines or policies and required medical writing support to be acknowledged in publications (96% industry, 99% agency). Many industry respondents used publication management tools to monitor compliance with company guidelines and about half (46%) stated that their company had formal publication audits. Fewer agencies audited adherence to guidelines but 20% of agency respondents reported audits of employees and 6% audits of freelancers. Of concern, 37% of agency respondents reported requests from authors or sponsors that they believed were unethical, although 93% of these requests were withdrawn after respondents explained the need for compliance with guidelines. Most respondents' departments (63% industry, 58% agency, 60% CRO) had been involved in publishing studies with negative or inconclusive results. Within this sample, most publication professionals working in or for industry were aware of

  5. Teachers’ Opinion about Implementation of the Professional Standard: Results of Sociological Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margolis A.A.,

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The article discusses some aspects of the teaching community readiness to implementation of the professional standard. Based on the questionnaire data, conducted among teachers of educational institutions in all federal districts of the Russian Federation (1000, the authors estimated the level of teachers’ awareness about the professional standard, as well as related to its implementation. Although the implementation of the professional standard is expected in the nearest future, this research shows that the level of awareness of teachers it is not high enough. Not all teachers reviewed this document, and among respondents who claimed to have studied the standard, a considerable percentage doesn’t know, what information is contained in it. In general, respondents are positive about the inmpementation of professional standards, although there are concerns among educators that bureaucratic barriers on them may increase.

  6. Professional Standards for Teachers--What Are They Good For?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adoniou, Misty; Gallagher, Mary

    2017-01-01

    This article reports on a study of teacher and principal attitudes to newly mandated teacher standards in Australia. The qualitative study of 36 teachers and principals was conducted over 12 months as the new educators in five schools completed a mandatory teacher probation process framed by the teacher standards. The study found positive…

  7. Educators' Professional Characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnaveni, R.; Anitha, J.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To develop a comprehensive model of professional characteristics of an educator that will prepare them for high standards of professional achievements, as all professions demand standardization and formulation of guidelines in today's competitive environment. Design/methodology/approach: Literature on essentials of an educator was sourced…

  8. Child Rights as a Framework for Advancing Professional Standards for Practice, Ethics, and Professional Development in School Psychology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nastasi, Bonnie Kaul; Naser, Shereen

    2014-01-01

    The United Nations (1989) Convention on the Rights of the Child was designed to promote and protect the survival, development, and well-being of children, thus extending human rights to individuals from birth to age 18. This article examines the consistency of the Articles of the Convention with the professional standards for school psychology, as…

  9. Probability of Failure Analysis Standards and Guidelines for Expendable Launch Vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilde, Paul D.; Morse, Elisabeth L.; Rosati, Paul; Cather, Corey

    2013-09-01

    Recognizing the central importance of probability of failure estimates to ensuring public safety for launches, the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), Office of Commercial Space Transportation (AST), the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), and U.S. Air Force (USAF), through the Common Standards Working Group (CSWG), developed a guide for conducting valid probability of failure (POF) analyses for expendable launch vehicles (ELV), with an emphasis on POF analysis for new ELVs. A probability of failure analysis for an ELV produces estimates of the likelihood of occurrence of potentially hazardous events, which are critical inputs to launch risk analysis of debris, toxic, or explosive hazards. This guide is intended to document a framework for POF analyses commonly accepted in the US, and should be useful to anyone who performs or evaluates launch risk analyses for new ELVs. The CSWG guidelines provide performance standards and definitions of key terms, and are being revised to address allocation to flight times and vehicle response modes. The POF performance standard allows a launch operator to employ alternative, potentially innovative methodologies so long as the results satisfy the performance standard. Current POF analysis practice at US ranges includes multiple methodologies described in the guidelines as accepted methods, but not necessarily the only methods available to demonstrate compliance with the performance standard. The guidelines include illustrative examples for each POF analysis method, which are intended to illustrate an acceptable level of fidelity for ELV POF analyses used to ensure public safety. The focus is on providing guiding principles rather than "recipe lists." Independent reviews of these guidelines were performed to assess their logic, completeness, accuracy, self- consistency, consistency with risk analysis practices, use of available information, and ease of applicability. The independent reviews confirmed the

  10. Building an Online Course Based on the E-Learning Standards: Guidelines, Issues, and Challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Permanand Mohan

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper provides a comprehensive set of guidelines for building an online course based on the e-learning standards. It discusses the steps that should be followed to build a digital repository that facilitates the storage, retrieval, and reuse of the learning resources that comprise an online course in a standard way. The paper also examines various shortcomings associated with adopting the e-learning standards that threaten the viability of widespread reuse of learning resources. Finally, the paper highlights research challenges that must be surmounted in order to gain the benefits of reusable digital learning resources.

  11. In-house consultation to support professionals' responses to child abuse and neglect: Determinants of professionals' use and the association with guideline adherence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konijnendijk, Annemieke A J; Boere-Boonekamp, Magda M; Kaya, Anna H; Haasnoot, Maria E; Need, Ariana

    2017-07-01

    This study examined the presence and strengths of determinants associated with consultation of an in-house expert on child abuse and neglect (CAN) by preventive child health care professionals who suspect CAN. This study also assessed the relationship between in-house CAN expert consultation and professionals' performance of six recommended activities described in a national guideline on preventing CAN for preventive child health care professionals. A total of 154 professionals met the study's inclusion criteria. They filled in a questionnaire that measured in-house consultation practices and twelve determinants associated with the professional, the in-house expert, and the organizational context. Bivariate and multivariate regression analyses were performed. Almost half of the participants (46.8%) reported to consult the in-house expert in (almost) all of their suspected CAN cases. Professionals who reported better recollection of consulting the in-house expert (i.e. not forgetting to consult the expert) (p=.001), who were more familiar with consultation (p=.002), who had more positive attitudes and beliefs about consultation (p=.011) and who reported being more susceptible to the behavior (p=.001) and expectations/opinions (p=.025) of colleagues regarding in-house expert consultation were more likely to consult the in-house expert. Furthermore, in-house expert consultation was positively associated with two of six key guideline activities: consulting the regional child protection service and monitoring whether support was provided to families. The implications of these results for improving professionals' responses to CAN are discussed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. American College of Medical Genetics and Genomics technical standards and guidelines: microarray analysis for chromosome abnormalities in neoplastic disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooley, Linda D; Lebo, Matthew; Li, Marilyn M; Slovak, Marilyn L; Wolff, Daynna J

    2013-06-01

    Microarray methodologies, to include array comparative genomic hybridization and single-nucleotide polymorphism-based arrays, are innovative methods that provide genomic data. These data should be correlated with the results from the standard methods, chromosome and/or fluorescence in situ hybridization, to ascertain and characterize the genomic aberrations of neoplastic disorders, both liquid and solid tumors. Over the past several decades, standard methods have led to an accumulation of genetic information specific to many neoplasms. This specificity is now used for the diagnosis and classification of neoplasms. Cooperative studies have revealed numerous correlations between particular genetic aberrations and therapeutic outcomes. Molecular investigation of chromosomal abnormalities identified by standard methods has led to discovery of genes, and gene function and dysfunction. This knowledge has led to improved therapeutics and, in some disorders, targeted therapies. Data gained from the higher-resolution microarray methodologies will enhance our knowledge of the genomics of specific disorders, leading to more effective therapeutic strategies. To assist clinical laboratories in validation of the methods, their consistent use, and interpretation and reporting of results from these microarray methodologies, the American College of Medical Genetics and Genomics has developed the following professional standard and guidelines.

  13. Laboratory diagnosis of biotinidase deficiency, 2017 update: a technical standard and guideline of the American College of Medical Genetics and Genomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strovel, Erin T; Cowan, Tina M; Scott, Anna I; Wolf, Barry

    2017-10-01

    Disclaimer: These ACMG Standards and Guidelines are intended as an educational resource for clinical laboratory geneticists to help them provide quality clinical laboratory genetic services. Adherence to these Standards and Guidelines is voluntary and does not necessarily assure a successful medical outcome. These Standards and Guidelines should not be considered inclusive of all proper procedures and tests or exclusive of others that are reasonably directed to obtaining the same results. In determining the propriety of any specific procedure or test, clinical laboratory geneticists should apply their professional judgment to the specific circumstances presented by the patient or specimen. Clinical laboratory scientists and geneticists are encouraged to document in the patient's record the rationale for the use of a particular procedure or test, whether or not it is in conformance with these Standards and Guidelines. They also are advised to take notice of the date any particular guideline was adopted, and to consider other relevant medical and scientific information that becomes available after that date. It also would be prudent to consider whether intellectual property interests may restrict the performance of certain tests and other procedures.Biotinidase deficiency is an autosomal recessively inherited disorder of biotin recycling that is associated with neurologic and cutaneous consequences if untreated. Fortunately, the clinical features of the disorder can be ameliorated or prevented by administering pharmacological doses of the vitamin biotin. Newborn screening and confirmatory diagnosis of biotinidase deficiency encompasses both enzymatic and molecular testing approaches. These guidelines were developed to define and standardize laboratory procedures for enzymatic biotinidase testing, to delineate situations for which follow-up molecular testing is warranted, and to characterize variables that can influence test performance and interpretation of results.

  14. Governmental standard drink definitions and low-risk alcohol consumption guidelines in 37 countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalinowski, Agnieszka; Humphreys, Keith

    2016-07-01

    One of the challenges of international alcohol research and policy is the variability in and lack of knowledge of how governments in different nations define a standard drink and low-risk drinking. This study gathered such information from governmental agencies in 37 countries. A pool of 75 countries that might have definitions was created using World Health Organization (WHO) information and the authors' own judgement. Structured internet searches of relevant terms for each country were supplemented by efforts to contact government agencies directly and to consult with alcohol experts in the country. Most of the 75 national governments examined were not identified as having adopted a standard drink definition. Among the 37 that were so identified, the modal standard drink size was 10 g pure ethanol, but variation was wide (8-20 g). Significant variability was also evident for low-risk drinking guidelines, ranging from 10-42 g per day for women and 10-56 g per day for men to 98-140 g per week for women and 150-280 g per week for men. Researchers working and communicating across national boundaries should be sensitive to the substantial variability in 'standard' drink definitions and low-risk drinking guidelines. The potential impact of guidelines, both in general and in specific national cases, remains an important question for public health research. © 2016 Society for the Study of Addiction.

  15. Strategies to improve Critical Infrastructures Robustness against the IEMI threat : a Review of relevant Standards and Guidelines on the topic

    OpenAIRE

    Simio, Francesca De; Cillis, Francesca De; Fumagalli, Giustino; Maggio, Maria Carla De; Beek, Stefan van de; Dawson, John F.; Dawson, Linda; Setola, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    This paper aims to provide a brief overview of relevant standards, procedures and guidelines to standard bodies to manage the impact of the Intentional ElectroMagnetic Interference (IEMI) threat. It also provides guidelines for CI operators on how to reduce their exposure on IEMI hazards.

  16. Section E9 of the American College of Medical Genetics technical standards and guidelines: fluorescence in situ hybridization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mascarello, James T; Hirsch, Betsy; Kearney, Hutton M; Ketterling, Rhett P; Olson, Susan B; Quigley, Denise I; Rao, Kathleen W; Tepperberg, James H; Tsuchiya, Karen D; Wiktor, Anne E

    2011-07-01

    This updated Section E9 has been incorporated into and supersedes the previous Section E9 in Section E: Clinical Cytogenetics of the 2008 Edition (Revised 02/2007) American College of Medical Genetics Standards and Guidelines for Clinical Genetics Laboratories. This section deals specifically with the standards and guidelines applicable to fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis.

  17. Review and comparison of quality standards, guidelines and regulations for laboratories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tjeerd A.M. Datema

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: The variety and number of laboratory quality standards, guidelines and regulations (hereafter: quality documents makes it difficult to choose the most suitable one for establishing and maintaining a laboratory quality management system. Objectives: There is a need to compare the characteristics, suitability and applicability of quality documents in view of the increasing efforts to introduce quality management in laboratories, especially in clinical diagnostic laboratories in low income and middle income countries. This may provide valuable insights for policy makers developing national laboratory policies, and for laboratory managers and quality officers in choosing the most appropriate quality document for upgrading their laboratories. Method: We reviewed the history of quality document development and then selected a subset based on their current use. We analysed these documents following a framework for comparison of quality documents that was adapted from the Clinical Laboratory Standards Institute guideline GP26 Quality management system model for clinical laboratory services. Results: Differences were identified between national and international, and non-clinical and clinical quality documents. The most salient findings were the absence of provisions on occurrence management and customer service in almost all non-clinical quality documents, a low number of safety requirements aimed at protecting laboratory personnel in international quality documents and no requirements regarding ethical behaviour in almost all quality documents. Conclusion: Each laboratory needs to investigate whether national regulatory standards are present. These are preferred as they most closely suit the needs of laboratories in the country. A laboratory should always use both a standard and a guideline: a standard sums up the requirements to a quality management system, a guideline describes how quality management can be integrated in the laboratory

  18. Using Professional Standards for Higher Education to Improve Student Affairs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Renay M.

    2014-01-01

    The instruction and program quality at community colleges adheres to standards mandated through regional and national accreditation at institution and program levels. Community college personnel must understand their specific role in college and program accreditation and how accreditation is crucial for functions, such as accessing federal…

  19. Court Interpreters and Translators: Developing Ethical and Professional Standards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funston, Richard

    Changing needs in the courtroom have raised questions about the need for standards in court interpreter qualifications. In California, no formal training or familiarity with the legal system is required for certification, which is done entirely by language testing. The fact that often court interpreters are officers of the court may be…

  20. Management of acute diarrhoeal disease at Edendale Hospital: Are standard treatment guidelines followed?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kershinee Reddy

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Background. Diarrhoeal disease (DD is a major cause of childhood mortality in developing countries. In South Africa (SA, it ranks as one of the top five causes of under-5 mortality. Local and global guidelines on the management of acute DD are readily available. The Standard Treatment Guidelines (STGs and Essential Drugs List for Hospital Level Paediatrics are a recognised standard of care for children in SA hospitals. However, children still die from this preventable disease. Objective. To determine whether doctors adhered to standard treatment guidelines when treating children under 5 years of age presenting to Edendale Hospital in Pietermaritzburg, KwaZulu-Natal Province, with acute DD. Methods. The study was a retrospective clinical audit of individual patient records. Results. One hundred and thirty-five patient records were reviewed. Forty-seven percent had a correct nutritional assessment, 41% were correctly assessed for shock and 27% for dehydration. Appropriate investigations were undertaken in 12%. Ninety-seven percent of patients had appropriate fluid plans prescribed. Zinc was prescribed in only 39% of patients, whereas 84% were appropriately not prescribed antibiotics and no patients received anti-diarrhoeal medication. In 90% of patients, the correct post-care patient referral was made, and 47% of caregivers were adequately advised about ongoing care of their children. Conclusion. This study identifies substantial non-adherence to the SA STGs for the management of young children with acute DD.

  1. Are You Experienced The Case for Acquisition Professional Qualification Standards

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    was to translate the competencies into on-the- job tools and processes to develop “individual qualification plans.” All this was to be completed and...declaring the trainee proficient enough to perform the job on their own. Physicians are required to complete years of schooling and resi-dency training, as...perform acquisition jobs . Without such standards, it is difficult to define mini- mum requirements for senior acquisition positions, as well as to

  2. MGIMO Educational Standards: Goal and Contents of Professional Language Training of IR Economics Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alla A. Kizima

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The article gives a methodological analysis of MGIMO-University own education standards and programmes. The relevance of the article is explained by the necessity to define the goals and contents of professional language training of IR economics students at MGIMO-University after a transfer to own education standards. The researcher used competence-based and cultural studies approaches with reference to the didactic principles of accessibility, systematic, consistency, necessity and sufficiency. The author used a set of methods including the method of theoretical analysis, the method of synthesis and systematization, summative method. The article addresses the difference in the training of IR economists and economists in other spheres of economics, underlines the importance of professional language training of IR economics students, analyses the specifics of professional language training of IR economists from the standpoint of competence-based approach by comparing the competences presented in the Federal State Education Standards of Higher Education and MGIMO own education standards. The author gives a definition of goal and contents of professional language training of IR economics students as well as didactic principles of contents choice that define the effectiveness of training. In conclusion the author points out that the contents of professional language training of IR economics students based on MGIMO own education standards are approached as the system of professional knowledge, skills and competence leading to successful intercultural communication.

  3. Professional Standards and Performance Evaluation for Principals in China: A Policy Analysis of the Development of Principal Standards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shujie; Xu, Xianxuan; Grant, Leslie; Strong, James; Fang, Zheng

    2017-01-01

    This article presents the results of an interpretive policy analysis of China's Ministry of Education Standards (2013) for the professional practice of principals. In addition to revealing the evolution of the evaluation of principals in China and the processes by which this policy is formulated, a comparative analysis was conducted to compare it…

  4. Attitudes of Palestinian Health-Care Professionals in Gaza to Clinical Practice Guideline for Diagnosis and Treatment of Diabetes Mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmoud Radwan

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundDespite the huge numbers of the internationally produced and implemented Clinical Practice Guidelines (CPGs, the compliance with them is still low in health care. This study aimed at assessing the attitudes of Palestinian health-care professionals toward the most perceived factors influencing the adherence to the CPG for Diabetes Mellitus in the Primary Health-care centers of the Ministry of Health (PHC-MoH and the Primary Health-care centers of the United Nations Relief and Works Agency for Palestine Refugees (PHC-UNRWA using a validated questionnaire.MethodsA cross-sectional design was employed with a census sample of all Palestinian family doctors and nurses (n = 323. The Cabana theoretical framework was used to develop a study questionnaire. A cross cultural adaptation framework was followed to develop the Arabic version questionnaire. The psychometric properties of Arabic version were finally assessed.ResultsThe Arabic version questionnaire showed a good construct validity and internal consistency reliability. The overall adherence level to the diabetic guideline was disappointingly suboptimal 51.5% (47.3% in the PHC-MoH and 55.5% in the PHC-UNRWA P = 0.000. The most frequently perceived barriers in the PHC-MoH were lack of incentives, lack of resources, and lack of guideline trustworthiness, whereas the lack of time and the lack of guideline trustworthiness were the most prominent barriers in the PHC-UNRWA. In spite of the lack of trustworthiness of the diabetic guideline, most respondents in both settings had a positive attitude toward guidelines in general, but this attitude was not a predictor of guideline adherence.ConclusionThe good validity and reliability of our questionnaire can provide support for the accuracy of our findings. Multifaceted implementation strategies targeting the main barriers elicited from this study are required for addressing the lack of incentives, organizational resources, lack of confidence

  5. Attitudes of Palestinian Health-Care Professionals in Gaza to Clinical Practice Guideline for Diagnosis and Treatment of Diabetes Mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radwan, Mahmoud; Akbari Sari, Ali; Rashidian, Arash; Takian, Amirhossein; Abou-Dagga, Sanaa; Elsous, Aymen

    2017-01-01

    Despite the huge numbers of the internationally produced and implemented Clinical Practice Guidelines (CPGs), the compliance with them is still low in health care. This study aimed at assessing the attitudes of Palestinian health-care professionals toward the most perceived factors influencing the adherence to the CPG for Diabetes Mellitus in the Primary Health-care centers of the Ministry of Health (PHC-MoH) and the Primary Health-care centers of the United Nations Relief and Works Agency for Palestine Refugees (PHC-UNRWA) using a validated questionnaire. A cross-sectional design was employed with a census sample of all Palestinian family doctors and nurses (n = 323). The Cabana theoretical framework was used to develop a study questionnaire. A cross cultural adaptation framework was followed to develop the Arabic version questionnaire. The psychometric properties of Arabic version were finally assessed. The Arabic version questionnaire showed a good construct validity and internal consistency reliability. The overall adherence level to the diabetic guideline was disappointingly suboptimal 51.5% (47.3% in the PHC-MoH and 55.5% in the PHC-UNRWA) P = 0.000. The most frequently perceived barriers in the PHC-MoH were lack of incentives, lack of resources, and lack of guideline trustworthiness, whereas the lack of time and the lack of guideline trustworthiness were the most prominent barriers in the PHC-UNRWA. In spite of the lack of trustworthiness of the diabetic guideline, most respondents in both settings had a positive attitude toward guidelines in general, but this attitude was not a predictor of guideline adherence. The good validity and reliability of our questionnaire can provide support for the accuracy of our findings. Multifaceted implementation strategies targeting the main barriers elicited from this study are required for addressing the lack of incentives, organizational resources, lack of confidence in the guideline, and time constraints.

  6. The SQUIRE (Standards for QUality Improvement Reporting Excellence) guidelines for quality improvement reporting: explanation and elaboration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogrinc, G; Mooney, S E; Estrada, C; Foster, T; Goldmann, D; Hall, L W; Huizinga, M M; Liu, S K; Mills, P; Neily, J; Nelson, W; Pronovost, P J; Provost, L; Rubenstein, L V; Speroff, T; Splaine, M; Thomson, R; Tomolo, A M; Watts, B

    2008-01-01

    As the science of quality improvement in health care advances, the importance of sharing its accomplishments through the published literature increases. Current reporting of improvement work in health care varies widely in both content and quality. It is against this backdrop that a group of stakeholders from a variety of disciplines has created the Standards for QUality Improvement Reporting Excellence, which we refer to as the SQUIRE publication guidelines or SQUIRE statement. The SQUIRE statement consists of a checklist of 19 items that authors need to consider when writing articles that describe formal studies of quality improvement. Most of the items in the checklist are common to all scientific reporting, but virtually all of them have been modified to reflect the unique nature of medical improvement work. This “Explanation and Elaboration” document (E & E) is a companion to the SQUIRE statement. For each item in the SQUIRE guidelines the E & E document provides one or two examples from the published improvement literature, followed by an analysis of the ways in which the example expresses the intent of the guideline item. As with the E & E documents created to accompany other biomedical publication guidelines, the purpose of the SQUIRE E & E document is to assist authors along the path from completion of a quality improvement project to its publication. The SQUIRE statement itself, this E & E document, and additional information about reporting improvement work can be found at http://www.squire-statement.org. PMID:18836062

  7. Could Australia Have Its Own Teacher Professional Standards for Teaching Relationships and Sexuality Education?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collier-Harris, Christine A.; Goldman, Juliette D. G.

    2017-01-01

    In many countries, there are no professional standards determining attributes, praxis, effectiveness and evaluation for teachers of relationships and sexuality education in schools. However, in the USA, a new set of pre-service teacher preparation standards has been developed for sexuality education and health. Australia has a set of generic…

  8. Changes in the Expertise of ESL Professionals: Knowledge and Action in an Era of New Standards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdés, Guadalupe; Kibler, Amanda; Walqui, Aída

    2014-01-01

    This professional paper builds on the work of TESOL's issue briefs, "Implementing the Common Core State Standards for English Learners: The Changing Role of the ESL Teacher" (February 2013) and Overview of the Common Core State Standards Initiatives for ELLs (March, 2013). It discusses the shifting landscape surrounding the new Common…

  9. Clinical compliance of viewing conditions in radiology reporting environments against current guidelines and standards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daly, S.; Rainford, L.; Butler, M. L.

    2014-03-01

    Several studies have demonstrated the importance of environmental conditions in the radiology reporting environment, with many indicating that incorrect parameters could lead to error and misinterpretation. Literature is available with recommendations as to the levels that should be achieved in clinical practice, but evidence of adherence to these guidelines in radiology reporting environments is absent. This study audited the reporting environments of four teleradiologist and eight hospital based radiology reporting areas. This audit aimed to quantify adherence to guidelines and identify differences in the locations with respect to layout and design, monitor distance and angle as well as the ambient factors of the reporting environments. In line with international recommendations, an audit tool was designed to enquire in relation to the layout and design of reporting environments, monitor angle and distances used by radiologists when reporting, as well as the ambient factors such as noise, light and temperature. The review of conditions were carried out by the same independent auditor for consistency. The results obtained were compared against international standards and current research. Each radiology environment was given an overall compliance score to establish whether or not their environments were in line with recommended guidelines. Poor compliance to international recommendations and standards among radiology reporting environments was identified. Teleradiology reporting environments demonstrated greater compliance than hospital environments. The findings of this study identified a need for greater awareness of environmental and perceptual issues in the clinical setting. Further work involving a larger number of clinical centres is recommended.

  10. [Guidelines for certification of Activated clotting time (ACT) according to the EN ISO 22870 standards].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lasne, Dominique; Bauters, Anne; Le Querrec, Agnès; Bourdin, Carole; Voisin, Sophie

    2015-01-01

    Point of care testing (POCT) must comply with regulatory requirements according to standard EN ISO 22870, which identify biologists as responsible for POCT. Activated clotting time (ACT) is mandatory to monitor on whole blood, anticoagulation achieved by unfractionated heparin during cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) or cardiac catheterization. This test has no equivalent in the laboratory. With the aim to help the multidisciplinary groups for POCT supervision when they have to analyse the wish of medical departments to use ACT and to help the biologists to be in accordance with the standard, we present the guidelines of the GEHT (Groupe d'étude d'hémostase et thrombose) subcommittee "CEC et Biologie délocalisée" for the certification of ACT. These guidelines are based on the SFBC guidelines for the certification of POCT and on the analysis of the literature to ascertain the justification of clinical need and assess the analytical performance of main analyzers used in France, as well as on a survey conducted with French and Belgian biologists.

  11. PRAXIOCENTRALISM IN THE PROFESSIONAL STANDARD OF THE TEACHER (Continuation of the article

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Yu. Monakhova

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The main objective of the professional standard, systematizing the work function of a teacher, is to describe not personal qualities of teachers but the process and outcome of their activities. The logic of the development of the professional standard involves the analysis of teaching activities and evaluation of its results, which should possess the properties of measurability and diagnosability.The aim of the present publication is to identify praxiological foundations of the professional standard of the teacher via a comparative analysis of the requirementsand fundamental concepts of praxeology – a General theory of successful activities developed by domestic and foreign authors and reflected in monographic and dissertation researches.Methodology and methods of research. Methodological basis of research is the ideas of system, activity and praxiological approaches. Results. The authors prove that pedagogical praxeology as the science and practice of effective organization of pedagogical activity is a new mechanism to describe the characteristics of pedagogical activity and formation of complex of professional portrait of the teacher. Pedagogical praxeology as the mechanism: establishes the framework of competences of the teacher; defines the requirements for structured content, conditions and quality of work of the teacher, their qualifications and competences in the field of professional activity; provides the necessary compliance awareness of teacher’s requirements; describes methods of assessing the development of competencies of teachers; promotes the involvement of the teacher in the task of improving the quality of education; serves as the basis for constructing a continuous trajectory of increasing level of professional training of each teacher.Scientific novelty. The content of professional standards from the standpoint of the praxiological approach is investigated; conceptual ideas of praxeology, defining role and

  12. Global quality criteria, standards, and indicators for doctoral programs in nursing; literature review and guideline development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, M J; McKenna, Hugh P; Ketefian, S

    2006-05-01

    Nursing profession has intensified education and training of nurse researchers who could enhance the health of people through the discovery and dissemination of knowledge. This resulted in rapid increase in the number of doctoral programs in nursing in many countries in recent decades, but the guidelines for quality programs are lacking. To develop guidelines for quality criteria, standards, and indicators for doctoral programs in nursing that may be used worldwide. The work of the quality criteria, standards and indicators (QCSI) committee of the International Network for Doctoral Education in Nursing formed the basis of this paper and authors supplemented it by a literature review and consultation with international experts. The major criteria of quality of doctoral program were: the nature of the mission, the quality of faculty, the students, the curriculum, program administration, and resources. Sub-criteria, standards and indicators for each of these criteria were identified in sufficient detail to provide guidance for quality doctoral programs in nursing. Concerns as to whether the QCSI would apply to those countries and doctoral programs that focus on a research thesis only, without formal coursework were addressed. Experts from across the world felt that the QCSI would be applicable for most program types. Global criteria, standards, and indicators for doctoral programs in nursing presented in this article may serve as guidelines for most doctoral programs in the world as these were developed by experienced nurse scholars representing eight countries from five continents. The degree of detail in these parameters is sufficient to enhance the utility of the QCSI for all doctoral programs worldwide.

  13. Guidelines for preparing high school psychology teachers: course-based and standards-based approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Psychology is one of the most popular elective high school courses. The high school psychology course provides the foundation for students to benefit from psychological perspectives on personal and contemporary issues and learn the rules of evidence and theoretical frameworks of the discipline. The guidelines presented here constitute the second of two reports in this issue of the American Psychologist (January 2013) representing recent American Psychological Association (APA) policies that support high-quality instruction in the teaching of high school psychology. These guidelines, aligned to the standards presented in the preceding report, describe models for the preparation of preservice psychology teachers. The two reports together demonstrate the rigor and competency that should be expected in psychology instruction at the high school level.

  14. The development of professional practice standards for Australian general practice nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halcomb, Elizabeth; Stephens, Moira; Bryce, Julianne; Foley, Elizabeth; Ashley, Christine

    2017-08-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the current role of general practice nurses and the scope of nursing practice to inform the development of national professional practice standards for Australian general practice nurses. Increasing numbers of nurses have been employed in Australian general practice to meet the growing demand for primary care services. This has brought significant changes to the nursing role. Competency standards for nurses working in general practice were first developed in Australia in 2005, but limited attention has been placed on articulating the contemporary scope of practice for nurses in this setting. Concurrent mixed methods design. Data collection was conducted during 2013-2014 and involved two online surveys of Registered and Enrolled Nurses currently working in general practice, a series of 14 focus groups across Australia and a series of consultations with key experts. Data collection enabled the development of 22 Practice Standards separated into four domains: (i) Professional Practice; (ii) Nursing Care; (iii) General Practice Environment and (iv) Collaborative Practice. To differentiate the variations in enacting these Standards, performance indicators for the Enrolled Nurse, Registered Nurse and Registered Nurse Advanced Practice are provided under each Standard. The development of national professional practice standards for nurses working in Australian general practice will support ongoing workforce development. These Standards are also an important means of articulating the role and scope of the nurses' practice for both consumers and other health professionals, as well as being a guide for curriculum development and measurement of performance. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Healthcare professionals' and policy makers' views on implementing a clinical practice guideline of hypertension management: a qualitative study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ping Yein Lee

    Full Text Available Most studies have reported barriers to guideline usage mainly from doctors' perspective; few have reported the perspective of other stakeholders. This study aimed to determine the views and barriers to adherence of a national clinical practice guideline (CPG on management of hypertension from the perspectives of policymakers, doctors and allied healthcare professionals.This study used a qualitative approach with purposive sampling. Seven in depth interviews and six focus group discussions were conducted with 35 healthcare professionals (policy makers, doctors, pharmacists and nurses at a teaching hospital in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, between February and June 2013. All interviews were audio-recorded, transcribed verbatim and checked. Thematic approach was used to analyse the data.Two main themes and three sub-themes emerged from this study. The main themes were (1 variation in the use of CPG and (2 barriers to adherence to CPG. The three sub-themes for barriers were issues inherent to the CPG, systems and policy that is not supportive of CPG use, and attitudes and behaviour of stakeholders. The main users of the CPG were the primary care doctors. Pharmacists only partially use the guidelines, while nurses and policy makers were not using the CPG at all. Participants had suggested few strategies to improve usage and adherence to CPG. First, update the CPG regularly and keep its content simple with specific sections for allied health workers. Second, use technology to facilitate CPG accessibility and provide protected time for implementation of CPG recommendations. Third, incorporate local CPG in professional training, link CPG adherence to key performance indicators and provide incentives for its use.Barriers to the use of CPG hypertension management span across all stakeholders. The development and implementation of CPG focused mainly on doctors with lack of involvement of other healthcare stakeholders. Guidelines should be made simple, current

  16. A taxonomy for education and training in professional psychology health service specialties: evolution and implementation of new guidelines for a common language.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozensky, Ronald H; Grus, Catherine L; Nutt, Roberta L; Carlson, Cindy I; Eisman, Elena J; Nelson, Paul D

    2015-01-01

    The Education and Training Guidelines: A Taxonomy for Education and Training in Professional Psychology Health Service Specialties was endorsed as a policy of the American Psychological Association in 2012. These Guidelines have the potential for broad impact on the field by providing both a structure and recommendations for the consistent usage of language--definitions and terminology--to reduce current descriptive inconsistencies across education and training programs in professional psychology. The Guidelines are not designed to define specifics of the training or practice of individual psychologists; they are to be used only to describe programmatic structure in a consistent manner. This article details the developmental history of these Guidelines and highlights the strong alliance between the leaders of the various recognized specialties in professional psychology and the education and training community in health service psychology. The content, application, future dissemination and impact of the Guidelines are presented. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved.

  17. Peculiarities of Professional Training Standards Development and Implementation within Competency-Based Approach: Foreign Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Desyatov Tymofiy

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The article analyzes the development of competency-based professional training standards and their implementation into educational process in foreign countries. It determines that the main idea of competency-based approach is competency-and-active learning, which aims at complex acquirement of diverse skills and ways of practice activities via mastering respective competences. The article states that competency is the product of competence due to which a person successfully realizes themselves in different spheres of their professional engagement, gains social independence and becomes mobile and qualified. The article also dwells on the international experience of professional and training standards development, it analyses specific internal national, as well as external all-European and worldwide conceptions of professional and training standards development, conceptual foundations of competency-based approach in national higher education within the framework of global information society formation. It highlights specific aspects of standards development based on activity-oriented technologies and professional competence assessment. The article states that within the framework of competency-based teaching and training, quality-assuring actions have to ensure the correspondence of standards and learning outcomes. It informs that the labour market is represented by employers, trade unions and the government. The article explores the fact that in Russia, Ukraine and many other countries the employers and the trade unions do not collaborate to formulate their needs with regard to professional training standards, that is why the government and its administration bodies have to do the task of predicting labour market needs on their own.

  18. Commercial and Industrial Solid Waste Incineration Units (CISWI): New Source Performance Standards (NSPS) and Emission Guidelines (EG) for Existing Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Learn about the New Source Performance Standards (NSPS) for commercial and industrial solid waste incineration (CISWI) units including emission guidelines and compliance times for the rule. Read the rule history and summary, and find supporting documents

  19. 75 FR 65293 - Draft Guidelines on Pharmacovigilance of Veterinary Medicinal Products: Electronic Standards for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-22

    ... Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service Draft Guidelines on Pharmacovigilance of Veterinary Medicinal... (VICH) has developed a draft guideline titled ``Pharmacovigilance of Veterinary Medicinal Products... guideline applies to pharmacovigilance and adverse event reporting on veterinary vaccines regulated by the...

  20. Standards and guidelines pertinent to the development of decommissioning criteria for sites contaminated with radioactive material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dickson, H.W.

    1978-08-01

    A review of existing health and safety standards and guidelines has been undertaken to assist in the development of criteria for the decontamination and decommissioning of property contaminated with radioactive material. During the early years of development of the nuclear program in the United States, a number of sites were used which became contaminated with radioactive material. Many of these sites are no longer useful for nuclear activities, and the U.S. DOE desires to develop criteria for the management of these sites for future uses. Radiation protection standards promulgated by ICRP, NCRP, and ANSI have been considered. Government regulations, from the Code of Federal Regulations and the legal codes of various states, as well as regulatory guidelines with specific application to decommissioning of nuclear facilities also have been reviewed. In addition, recommendations of other scientific organizations such as the National Academy of Sciences/National Research Council Advisory Committee on the Biological Effects of Ionizing Radiations and the United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation were considered. Finally, a few specific recommendations and discussions from current literature were included. 28 references.

  1. Writing for the U.K. Professional Standards in Higher Education: An Autobiographical Narrative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prince, Heather

    2013-01-01

    The process of writing and submitting a portfolio for the U.K. Professional Standards Framework is described as a reflective, evidence-based approach to teaching and the support of learning in Higher Education. Through an autobiographical and personal narrative approach, the journey through the submission of a portfolio at Descriptor 3 level…

  2. Functional Competency Development Model for Academic Personnel Based on International Professional Qualification Standards in Computing Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tumthong, Suwut; Piriyasurawong, Pullop; Jeerangsuwan, Namon

    2016-01-01

    This research proposes a functional competency development model for academic personnel based on international professional qualification standards in computing field and examines the appropriateness of the model. Specifically, the model consists of three key components which are: 1) functional competency development model, 2) blended training…

  3. Explanation and elaboration of the SQUIRE (Standards for Quality Improvement Reporting Excellence) Guidelines, V.2.0: examples of SQUIRE elements in the healthcare improvement literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman, Daisy; Ogrinc, Greg; Davies, Louise; Baker, G Ross; Barnsteiner, Jane; Foster, Tina C; Gali, Kari; Hilden, Joanne; Horwitz, Leora; Kaplan, Heather C; Leis, Jerome; Matulis, John C; Michie, Susan; Miltner, Rebecca; Neily, Julia; Nelson, William A; Niedner, Matthew; Oliver, Brant; Rutman, Lori; Thomson, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Since its publication in 2008, SQUIRE (Standards for Quality Improvement Reporting Excellence) has contributed to the completeness and transparency of reporting of quality improvement work, providing guidance to authors and reviewers of reports on healthcare improvement work. In the interim, enormous growth has occurred in understanding factors that influence the success, and failure, of healthcare improvement efforts. Progress has been particularly strong in three areas: the understanding of the theoretical basis for improvement work; the impact of contextual factors on outcomes; and the development of methodologies for studying improvement work. Consequently, there is now a need to revise the original publication guidelines. To reflect the breadth of knowledge and experience in the field, we solicited input from a wide variety of authors, editors and improvement professionals during the guideline revision process. This Explanation and Elaboration document (E&E) is a companion to the revised SQUIRE guidelines, SQUIRE 2.0. The product of collaboration by an international and interprofessional group of authors, this document provides examples from the published literature, and an explanation of how each reflects the intent of a specific item in SQUIRE. The purpose of the guidelines is to assist authors in writing clearly, precisely and completely about systematic efforts to improve the quality, safety and value of healthcare services. Authors can explore the SQUIRE statement, this E&E and related documents in detail at http://www.squire-statement.org. PMID:27076505

  4. Teachers’ Professional Development in the Framework of the New Federal State Educational Standards

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. A. Sidenko

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper considers a contradiction between the great demand for teachers’ professional development, induced by the new Federal State Educational Standards, and the lack of relevant training programs for school teachers. The author has conducted a survey to assess teachers’ readiness for innovative activity required by the new educational standards. The survey reveals that 97% of teachers denote either difficulty or disapproval of imple- menting the above standards. Investigating the reasons for teachers’ negative attitude, the author puts forward a hypothesis of their insufficient motivation and commitment. In theoretical part of the research teachers’ motivation is considered as a goal, intention, necessity, and personal quality that can be developed. As a result, a method of teachers’ motivation development is suggested actuating the motivation mechanism of achievements. The method is based on the project technique facilitating teachers’ professional and individual goal-setting ability. The program modules for teachers’ further training and prospective results are given. 

  5. Meeting the needs of tomorrow's public service: Guidelines for professional education in public administration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, R. L.; Cleaveland, F. N.

    1973-01-01

    The educational programs for public administration were studied to develop guidelines for meeting the requirements of public service in the 1980's. The current state of education for public service is discussed along with a prospective view of the service over the next decade. Criteria for evaluating graduate programs are presented.

  6. American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists Protocol for Standardized Production of Clinical Practice Guidelines--2010 update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mechanick, Jeffrey I; Camacho, Pauline M; Cobin, Rhoda H; Garber, Alan J; Garber, Jeffrey R; Gharib, Hossein; Petak, Steven M; Rodbard, Helena W; Trence, Dace L

    2010-01-01

    In 2004, the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists (AACE) published the "Protocol for Standardized Production of Clinical Practice Guidelines," which was to be implemented in forthcoming clinical practice guidelines (CPG). This protocol formally incorporated subjective factors and evidence-based medicine (EBM) methods that tightly mapped evidence levels to recommendation grades. A uniform publication template and multilevel review process were also outlined. Seven CPG have been subsequently published with use of this 2004 AACE protocol. Recently, growing concerns about the usefulness of CPG have been raised. The purposes of this report are to address shortcomings of the 2004 AACE protocol and to present an updated 2010 AACE protocol for CPG development. AACE CPG are developed without any industry involvement. Multiplicities of interests among writers and reviewers that might compromise the usefulness of CPG are avoided. Three major goals are to (1) balance transparently the effect of rigid quantitative EBM methods with subjective factors, (2) create a less onerous, less time-consuming, and less costly CPG production process, and (3) introduce an electronic implementation component. The updated 2010 AACE protocol emphasizes "informed judgment" and hybridizes EBM descriptors (study design type), qualifiers (study flaws), and subjective factors (such as risk, cost, and relevance). In addition, by focusing on more specific topics and clinical questions, the expert evaluation and multilevel review process is more transparent and expeditious. Lastly, the final recommendations are linked to a new electronic implementation feature.

  7. [European community guidelines and standards in indoor air quality: what proposals for Italy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Settimo, Gaetano; D'Alessandro, Daniela

    2014-01-01

    Indoor air quality is an issue on which to focus because of the increasing number of exposed population and in view of the strong public feeling on this issue. This paper reports the rules of EU and several European countries about indoor air quality, focusing on the initiatives performed in Italy to respond to WHO recommendations. Several EU countries have introduced in their legislation rules relating to indoor air quality. At the moment, in Italy, a reference rule has not been issued. For this reason, up to date main informations concerning some guidelines or reference values in indoor air, to be used for a first comparison, are those obtained by the scientific literature, or by the guidelines issued by other European countries or, for analogy, by other standard values such as limit or reference values regarding outdoor air. Even the EU, while reaffirming the priority of energy efficiency measures, recommends healthier indoor environments and the development of a specific European strategy on the issue of indoor air quality. The National Study Group on indoor pollution of the Italian National Health Institute (ISS), is working for the development of shared technical and scientific documents, in order to provide greater uniformity of actions at national level, waiting for a legal framework for indoor air quality, in the light of the indication already produced by the WHO.

  8. Information and Communication Technologies for the Dissemination of Clinical Practice Guidelines to Health Professionals: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Angelis, Gino; Davies, Barbara; King, Judy; McEwan, Jessica; Cavallo, Sabrina; Loew, Laurianne; Wells, George A; Brosseau, Lucie

    2016-11-30

    The transfer of research knowledge into clinical practice can be a continuous challenge for researchers. Information and communication technologies, such as websites and email, have emerged as popular tools for the dissemination of evidence to health professionals. The objective of this systematic review was to identify research on health professionals' perceived usability and practice behavior change of information and communication technologies for the dissemination of clinical practice guidelines. We used a systematic approach to retrieve and extract data about relevant studies. We identified 2248 citations, of which 21 studies met criteria for inclusion; 20 studies were randomized controlled trials, and 1 was a controlled clinical trial. The following information and communication technologies were evaluated: websites (5 studies), computer software (3 studies), Web-based workshops (2 studies), computerized decision support systems (2 studies), electronic educational game (1 study), email (2 studies), and multifaceted interventions that consisted of at least one information and communication technology component (6 studies). Website studies demonstrated significant improvements in perceived usefulness and perceived ease of use, but not for knowledge, reducing barriers, and intention to use clinical practice guidelines. Computer software studies demonstrated significant improvements in perceived usefulness, but not for knowledge and skills. Web-based workshop and email studies demonstrated significant improvements in knowledge, perceived usefulness, and skills. An electronic educational game intervention demonstrated a significant improvement from baseline in knowledge after 12 and 24 weeks. Computerized decision support system studies demonstrated variable findings for improvement in skills. Multifaceted interventions demonstrated significant improvements in beliefs about capabilities, perceived usefulness, and intention to use clinical practice guidelines, but

  9. Standard based deposit guideline for distribution of human biological materials in cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Hwa Jeong; Kim, Hye Hyeon; Im, Jeong Soo; Kim, Ju Han

    2014-01-01

    Human biological materials from cancer patients are linked directly with public health issues in medical science research as foundational resources so securing "human biological material" is truly important in bio-industry. However, because South Korea's national R and D project lacks a proper managing system for establishing a national standard for the outputs of certain processes, high-value added human biological material produced by the national R and D project could be lost or neglected. As a result, it is necessary to develop a managing process, which can be started by establishing operating guidelines to handle the output of human biological materials. The current law and regulations related to submitting research outcome resources was reviewed, and the process of data 'acquisition' and data 'distribution' from the point of view of big data and health 2.0 was examined in order to arrive at a method for switching paradigms to better utilize human biological materials. For the deposit of biological research resources, the original process was modified and a standard process with relative forms was developed. With deposit forms, research information, researchers, and deposit type are submitted. The checklist's 26 items are provided for publishing. This is a checklist of items that should be addressed in deposit reports. Lastly, XML-based deposit procedure forms were designed and developed to collect data in a structured form, to help researchers distribute their data in an electronic way. Through guidelines included with the plan for profit sharing between depositor and user it is possible to manage the material effectively and safely, so high-quality human biological material can be supplied and utilized by researchers from universities, industry and institutes. Furthermore, this will improve national competitiveness by leading to development in the national bio-science industry.

  10. The Impact of Adapting a General Professional Development Framework to the Constraints of In-Service Professional Development on the Next Generation Science Standards in Urban Settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGee, Steven; Nutakki, Nivedita

    2017-01-01

    Urban school districts face a dilemma in providing professional development support for teachers in transition to the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS). Districts need to maximize the quality and amount of professional development within practical funding constraints. In this paper, we discuss preliminary results from a…

  11. Struggles of Professionalism and Emotional Labour in Standardized Mental Health Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annette Kamp

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This article points out how recent public sector reforms under headings as New Public Management, Lean and Quality Reforms entail different forms for standardization, and examines how this development instigates a transformation of interdisciplinary and highly skilled emotional labor in mental healthcare. It is based on an ethnographic study of a Danish child psychiatric unit, which ‘produces’ diagnoses and treatment/therapy for children and their families. We illustrate how the enforcement of standardization upsets the balance between the humanistic and medical aspects of psychiatry as a discipline and field of practice, and show how this development challenges professional identities, interdisciplinary collaboration and hierarchical relations. The development is however negotiated, reformulated, and opposed, in teams of mental health professionals. In this context of increasing standardization, highly skilled emotional labor unfolds. We point out how acceleration and leaning of work procedures increases the emotional labor in relation to clients, partners, and colleagues. But paradoxically, at the same time, emotional labor becomes still more invisible as it is excluded from the standardized schemes. The study illustrates the crucial role of emotional labor in mental care work and points out how it is left to the professionals to negotiate paradoxes and make ends meet.

  12. Professional e-mail communication among health care providers: proposing evidence-based guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malka, S Terez; Kessler, Chad S; Abraham, John; Emmet, Thomas W; Wilbur, Lee

    2015-01-01

    E-mail is now a primary method of correspondence in health care, and proficiency with professional e-mail use is a vital skill for physicians. Fundamentals of e-mail courtesy can be derived from lay literature, but there is a dearth of scientific literature that addresses the use of e-mail between physicians. E-mail communication between providers is generally more familiar and casual than other professional interactions, which can promote unprofessional behavior or misunderstanding. Not only e-mail content but also wording, format, and tone may influence clinical recommendations and perceptions of the e-mail sender. In addition, there are serious legal and ethical implications when unprofessional or unsecured e-mails related to patient-identifying information are exchanged or included within an electronic medical record. The authors believe that the appropriate use of e-mail is a vital skill for physicians, with serious legal and ethical ramifications and the potential to affect professional development and patient care. In this article, the authors analyze a comprehensive literature search, explore several facets of e-mail use between physicians, and offer specific recommendations for professional e-mail use.

  13. Overview and comparative study of GPR international standards and guidelines - COST Action TU1208

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pajewski, Lara; Marciniak, Marian; Benedetto, Andrea; Tosti, Fabio

    2016-04-01

    Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) can be effectively used for non-destructive testing of composite structures and diagnostics affecting the whole life-cycle of civil engineering works. Nevertheless, few recognised international standards exist in this field and inhomogeneous recommendations are present in different countries. Moreover, the levels of knowledge, awareness and experience regarding the use of GPR in civil engineering vary strongly across different European areas. The COST Action TU1208 is working hard on leveraging these differences, by sharing and disseminating knowledge and experience, as well as by developing guidelines and protocols for a safe and effective use of GPR in civil engineering. GPR users need to know which is the best way to conduct GPR measurements and what the quality level for the results should be. The TU1208 guidelines will ensure a higher efficiency and quality of GPR services and they will constitute a scientific basis for the introduction of European Standards on the application of GPR in civil engineering. The aim of this contribution is to present an in-depth overview and critical analysis of the existing GPR international and national standards and guidelines. The main documents considered in our work are listed and briefly described in the following. Three standards are provided by the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM), to guide the GPR use for subsurface investigation, evaluation of asphalt-covered concrete bridge decks, and determination of pavement-layer thickness: 1. ASTM D6432-11, Standard Guide for Using the Surface Ground Penetrating Radar Method for Subsurface Investigation, ASTM International, West Conshohocken, PA, 2011, www.astm.org, DOI: 10.1520/D6432-11. 2. ASTM D6087-08, Standard Test Method for Evaluating Asphalt-Covered Concrete Bridge Decks Using Ground Penetrating Radar, ASTM International, West Conshohocken, PA, 2008, www.astm.org, DOI: 10.1520/D6087-08. 3. ASTM D4748-10, Standard Test Method

  14. The European Federation of Organisations for Medical Physics Policy Statement No. 10.1: Recommended Guidelines on National Schemes for Continuing Professional Development of Medical Physicists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christofides, Stelios; Isidoro, Jorge; Pesznyak, Csilla; Cremers, Florian; Figueira, Rita; van Swol, Christiaan; Evans, Stephen; Torresin, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    Continuing Professional Development (CPD) is vital to the medical physics profession if it is to embrace the pace of change occurring in medical practice. As CPD is the planned acquisition of knowledge, experience and skills required for professional practice throughout one's working life it promotes excellence and protects the profession and public against incompetence. Furthermore, CPD is a recommended prerequisite of registration schemes (Caruana et al. 2014) and is implied in the Council Directive 2013/59/EURATOM (EU BSS) and the International Basic Safety Standards (BSS). It is to be noted that currently not all national registration schemes require CPD to maintain the registration status necessary to practise medical physics. Such schemes should consider adopting CPD as a prerequisite for renewing registration after a set period of time. This EFOMP Policy Statement, which is an amalgamation and an update of the EFOMP Policy Statements No. 8 and No. 10, presents guidelines for the establishment of national schemes for CPD and activities that should be considered for CPD. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  15. Developing an Implementation Guideline to International Standard School for Schools under Secondary Educational Service Area Office 25

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Worawut Poltree

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The objectives of developing an implementation guideline to international standard school for schools under secondary educational service area office 25 were ; 1 to study present and problem an implementation guideline to international standard school for schools under secondary educational service area office 25 and 2 to develop an implementation guideline to international standard school for schools under secondary educational service area office 25. There were 68 samples ; administrators, deputy administrators, head of quality management systems, and academic teachers by purposive sampling. The tools used to collect the data were the five level scale questionnaire and structured interviews. Data were analyzed using mean, standard deviation, and descriptive analysis. The researcher set the research by 2 phase. The first phase educated present and problem an implementation guideline to international standard school for schools under secondary educational service area office 25. The research was assessed feasibility of developing an implementation guideline to international standard school for schools under secondary educational service area office 25 by 5 experts. The research results were: 1. The present and problem an implementation guideline to international standard school for schools under secondary educational service area office 25 found that the overall present were at the high level and each one was at the high level. The overall problem were at the low and each one was at the moderate 2 aspects ; The leadership and the focus on personnel. Then it was at the low level. 2. Developing an implementation guideline to international standard school for schools under secondary educational service area office 25 found that 1 the leadership had set with the vision, values, performance of the school’s senior leadership, including good governance of the school, implementation of the ethics law, and responsibility for the community, 2 strategic

  16. Developing palliative care practice guidelines and standards for nursing home-based palliative care teams: a Delphi study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temkin-Greener, Helena; Ladwig, Susan; Caprio, Tom; Norton, Sally; Quill, Timothy; Olsan, Tobie; Cai, Xueya; Mukamel, Dana B

    2015-01-01

    Lack of nursing home (NH)-specific palliative care practice guidelines has been identified as a barrier to improving palliative and end-of-life (EOL) quality of care. The objectives of this study were to (1) assess which of the guidelines developed by the National Consensus Project, and the corresponding preferred care practices endorsed by the National Quality Forum, are important and feasible to implement in NHs; and (2) identify the operational standards for palliative care teams in NHs. Two-round mail Delphi study. Based on the existing literature, a set of 7 domains with associated 22 palliative practice guidelines was drafted. We invited 48 NH leaders, including clinicians, to review the importance (10-point Likert scale) and the feasibility (5-point Likert scale) of these guidelines. Participants were also asked about palliative care team composition rounding frequency. The response rate to both rounds was 85%. With regard to importance, the mean rating for all guidelines was 8 or higher (ie, highly important), but there was variability in agreement with regard to 5 of the guidelines. The same 5 guidelines were also considered more difficult to implement (eg, costly, unrealistic). Overall, 17 palliative care guidelines were identified for use by NH palliative care teams. Five disciplines (social work, certified nurse assistant, nurse, physician, and nurse practitioner or physician assistant) were identified as comprising a core team and 3 were proposed as extended or ad hoc members. The palliative care guidelines and team standards identified in this study may be helpful in providing practical direction to NH administrators and staff looking to improve palliative care practice for their residents. Copyright © 2015 AMDA – The Society for Post-Acute and Long-Term Care Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Checklist for standardized reporting of drug-drug interaction management guidelines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Floor-Schreudering, A.; Geerts, A.F.; Aronson, J.K.; Bouvy, M.L.; Ferner, R.E.; Smet, P.A.G.M. de

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE: Inconsistencies and omissions in drug-drug interaction (DDI) management guidelines may lead to harm and suboptimal therapy. The purpose of this study was to define a checklist for DDI management guidelines to help developers produce high-quality guidelines that will support healthcare

  18. ETHICAL ISSUE AND NURSING STRATEGIES FOR ACHIEVING PROFESSIONAL STANDARDS IN NURSING EDUCATION

    OpenAIRE

    Idongesit I. Akpabio

    2011-01-01

    Background: This paper aimed at presenting in-depth information on strategies of implementing ethical decision making in nursing practice and education in the contemporary society. The complex issues in nursing education and practice have ethical implications for the attainment of professional standard. The ability of nurses to engage in ethical practice in everyday work and to deal with ethical situations, problems and concerns could be the result of decisions made at a variety of levels. So...

  19. Maternal perception and attitudes regarding healthcare professionals' guidelines on feeding practices in the child's first year of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broilo, Mônica C; Louzada, Maria Laura C; Drachler, Maria de Lourdes; Stenzel, Lucia M; Vitolo, Márcia R

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate the maternal perceptions and attitudes related to adherence to healthcare professionals' guidelines on breastfeeding and complementary feeding, and associated factors. A cross-sectional analysis of data from a randomized field trial was performed, in which 20 health centers (HCs) were selected in the city of Porto Alegre, state of Rio Grande do Sul, from eight Health Management Districts of the city. Pregnant women were selected from these HCs, and when the children were aged between six and nine months, data regarding the maternal perception of adherence to professional advice and consequences of feeding practices on child health were obtained during home visits. Association analyses were performed using Poisson regression. Data were collected from 631 mother-child binomials. According to the mothers' perception, 47% reported not following instructions received in the HU. Among these, 45.7% did not recognize the importance of eating habits for the child's health. The perception of adherence to professional advice was associated with higher prevalence of exclusive breastfeeding (EBF), introduction of solid food (ISF) after four months, introduction of non-recommended foods after six months, and higher family income. A higher prevalence of EBF and ISF was observed after four months (p habits for the child's health. There was a high prevalence of mothers who did not follow the advice of health professionals; the perception that food does not affect the child's health can be a barrier to the improvement of eating habits in childhood. Copyright © 2013 Sociedade Brasileira de Pediatria. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  20. METHODOLOGICAL UNCERTAINTIES OF A NEW PROFESSIONAL TEACHER’S STANDARD AND PROPOSALS FOR ITS IMPROVEMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor G. Gorb

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the investigation is to determine the ways of overcoming methodological uncertainties included into the teacher’s (tutor’s professional standards. Methods. The system-activity approach to the teacher’s activity development was used by the author. Results. The author has developed (on the basis of the system-activity approach the structure and content of the teacher’s personnel administration plan that allows realizing demands of the teacher’s (tutor’s professional standards and solving its main methodological uncertainties. Scientific novelty. The author presents own systematic and activity-based methodology to the development of personnel administration plan for the educational sphere personnel in order to enhance pedagogical potential of educational activity, and create organizational arrangements for its effectiveness, quality and social efficiency. Practical significance. The proposed system-activity methodology can be used under the modernization of personnel administration plans for teachers within the context of the teacher’s professional standard realization. 

  1. Adherence patterns to National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) guidelines for referral to cancer genetic professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Febbraro, Terri; Robison, Katina; Wilbur, Jennifer Scalia; Laprise, Jessica; Bregar, Amy; Lopes, Vrishali; Legare, Robert; Stuckey, Ashley

    2015-07-01

    Genetic predisposition is responsible for 5-10% of breast cancer, 10% of ovarian cancer and 2-5% of uterine cancer. The study objective was to compare genetic counseling and testing referral rates among women with breast cancer that met NCCN referral guidelines to the referral rates among women with gynecologic cancers and determine predictors of referral. Utilizing an institutional tumor registry database, patients from an academic women's oncology program were identified who met a subset of NCCN guidelines for genetic referral between 2004 and 2010. Patients diagnosed with ovarian cancer, breast cancer ≤50years of age, or uterine cancer genetic referral and uptake of genetic testing. 820 women were included (216 uterine, 314 breast, and 290 ovarian cancer). The overall genetic referral rate was 21.7%. 34% of eligible breast cancer patients were referred compared to 13.4% of uterine cancer and 14.5% of ovarian cancer patients (pcancer diagnosis, family history and earlier stage were all significant referral predictors. The odds of being referred increased with the number of affected family members. 70.8% of referred patients, consulted with genetics. Among those who consulted with genetics, 95.2% underwent testing. Although increasing, genetic counseling remains underutilized across cancer diagnosis. Women with breast cancer are more likely to be referred than women with gynecologic cancers. Younger age, earlier stage and positive family history appear to be predictive of referral for genetic evaluation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Behaviour of health professionals concerning the recommendations for prophylaxis for infectious endocarditis in our setting: Are the guidelines followed?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anguita, P; Castillo, F; Gámez, P; Carrasco, F; Roldán, R; Jurado, B; Castillo, J C; Martín, E; Anguita, M

    2017-03-01

    The prophylaxis regimens for infectious endocarditis recommended by the clinical practice guidelines have recently changed. We do not know whether the current regimens are correctly followed in our setting. Our objective was to describe the approaches of various health professionals concerning these guidelines. We conducted a survey in Cordoba, using a 16-item online questionnaire on this topic. We randomly selected a sample of 180 practitioners (20 cardiologists, 80 dentists and 80 primary care physicians), of whom 173 responded. Half of the participants were men; 52% had more than 20 years of professional experience. Some 88.3% of the participants considered that prophylaxis of endocarditis is effective (77.8% of the cardiologists, 93.7% of the dentist; p=.086). In general, prophylaxis is performed in conditions of clearly established risk (>90% of those surveyed). However, prophylaxis is also performed in a high proportion of cases with no risk of endocarditis, varying between 30 and 60% according to the procedure (mostly the dentists, between 36 and 67%, followed by the primary care physicians, between 28 and 59%). The antibiotic regimens employed varied significantly. The primary care physicians were furthest from the recommended regimen (only 25.8% used the recommended regimen vs. 54.4% of dentists and 72.2% of cardiologists; p=.002). Compliance with the recommendations on prophylaxis for endocarditis should be improved in our setting. We observed a tendency, especially among noncardiologists, to "overindicate" the prophylaxis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Medicina Interna (SEMI). All rights reserved.

  3. Implementation of pregnancy weight management and obesity guidelines: a meta-synthesis of healthcare professionals' barriers and facilitators using the Theoretical Domains Framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heslehurst, N; Newham, J; Maniatopoulos, G; Fleetwood, C; Robalino, S; Rankin, J

    2014-06-01

    Obesity in pregnancy is rising and is associated with severe health consequences for both the mother and the child. There is an increasing international focus on guidelines to manage the clinical risks of maternal obesity, and for pregnancy weight management. However, passive dissemination of guidelines is not effective and more active strategies are required for effective guideline implementation into practice. Implementation of guidelines is a form of healthcare professional behaviour change, and therefore implementation strategies should be based on appropriate behaviour change theory. This systematic review aimed to identify the determinants of healthcare professionals' behaviours in relation to maternal obesity and weight management. Twenty-five studies were included. Data synthesis of the existing international qualitative and quantitative evidence base used the Theoretical Domains Framework to identify the barriers and facilitators to healthcare professionals' maternal obesity and weight management practice. The domains most frequently identified included 'knowledge', 'beliefs about consequences' and 'environmental context and resources'. Healthcare professionals' weight management practice had the most barriers compared with any other area of maternal obesity practice. The results of this review will be used to inform the development of an intervention to support healthcare professional behaviour change. © 2014 The Authors. obesity reviews © 2014 International Association for the Study of Obesity.

  4. Practical guidelines on e-cigarettes for practitioners and others health professionals. A French 2016 expert's statement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dautzenberg, B; Adler, M; Garelik, D; Loubrieu, J F; Mathern, G; Peiffer, G; Perriot, J; Rouquet, R M; Schmitt, A; Underner, M; Urban, T

    2017-02-01

    A group of 11 French medical experts has developed guidelines through a Delphi progressive consensus about smoking management at the e-cigarette era. The lack of scientific data about e-cigarettes led the experts to set out recommendations, mainly based on clinical practice while waiting for scientific validations. The validated smoking cessation treatments keep the first place in the prevention and the treatment of tobacco-induced damages. The e-cigarette, experimented by a large proportion of smokers, is a safer product than tobacco. The health professional must answer the patients about the e-cigarettes: (1) A smoker who questions about e-cigarettes should receive information. Even if there is a lack of data, e-cigarettes offer much lower risks than tobacco. (2) A dual user is at high risk of returning to exclusive tobacco use; he should also optimize other nicotine intakes by combining nicotine replacement therapy and/or optimizing the nicotine intake through the e-cigarette. (3) A smoker who wish to use the e-cigarette in order to quit with or without associated pharmacological treatment should be accompanied and not discouraged. (4) A vaper who is tired to continuing to vape should be accompanied to quit. Specific guidelines are also provided for adolescents, pregnant women, patients during perioperative periods and also for pulmonary, cardiac and schizophrenic patients. Copyright © 2017 SPLF. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  5. International standards for tuberculosis care: Relevance and implications for laboratory professionals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pai M

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available On World Tuberculosis (TB Day 2006, the International Standards for Tuberculosis Care (ISTC was officially released and widely endorsed by several agencies and organizations. The ISTC release was the culmination of a year long global effort to develop and set internationally acceptable, evidence-based standards for tuberculosis care. The ISTC describes a widely endorsed level of care that all practitioners, public and private, should seek to achieve in managing individuals who have or are suspected of having, TB and is intended to facilitate the effective engagement of all healthcare providers in delivering high quality care for patients of all ages, including those with smear-positive, smear-negative and extra-pulmonary TB, TB caused by drug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis and TB/HIV coinfection. In this article, we present the ISTC, with a special focus on the diagnostic standards and describe their implications and relevance for laboratory professionals in India and worldwide. Laboratory professionals play a critical role in ensuring that all the standards are actually met by providing high quality laboratory services for smear microscopy, culture and drug susceptibility testing and other services such as testing for HIV infection. In fact, if the ISTC is widely followed, it can be expected that there will be a greater need and demand for quality assured laboratory services and this will have obvious implications for all laboratories in terms of work load, requirement for resources and trained personnel and organization of quality assurance systems.

  6. Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics: standards of practice and standards of professional performance for registered dietitian nutritionists (competent, proficient, and expert) in adult weight management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jortberg, Bonnie; Myers, Eileen; Gigliotti, Linda; Ivens, Barbara J; Lebre, Monica; Burke March, Susan; Nogueira, Isadora; Nwankwo, Robin; Parkinson, Meredith R; Paulsen, Barbara; Turner, Tonya

    2015-04-01

    Weight management encompasses the inter-relationship of nutrition, physical activity, and health behavior change. Nutrition is key for the prevention and treatment of obesity and chronic disease and maintenance of overall health. Thus, the Weight Management Dietetic Practice Group, with guidance from the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics Quality Management Committee, has developed Standards of Practice and Standards of Professional Performance for Registered Dietitian Nutritionists (RDNs) in Adult Weight Management as a resource for RDNs working in weight management. This document allows RDNs to assess their current skill levels and to identify areas for further professional development in this expanding practice area. This document describes the current standards for weight management practice for RDNs. The Standards of Practice represent the four steps in the Nutrition Care Process as applied to the care of patients/clients. The Standards of Professional Performance consist of six domains of professionalism: Quality in Practice, Competence and Accountability, Provision of Services, Application of Research, Communication and Application of Knowledge, and Utilization and Management of Resources. Within each standard, specific indicators provide measurable action statements that illustrate how the standard can be applied to practice. The indicators describe three skill levels (competent, proficient, and expert) for RDNs working in weight management. The Standards of Practice and Standards of Professional Performance are complementary resources for the Registered Dietitian Nutritionist in weight management. Copyright © 2015 Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Striving for the best: WONCA global standards for continuing professional development for family doctors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Victor; Walsh, Allyn; de Silva, Nandani; Politi, Eleni; Grusauskas, Heather

    2018-02-23

    While all physicians must continue to learn new knowledge through their careers, their post-training continuing professional development (CPD) has received less attention. Problems include lack of support for physicians, frequent deviations from best practices such as mandatory participation, focus on community need, and clear conflicts of interest amongst providers. Additionally, specialists from other disciplines catering to different patient populations often provide CPD for family doctors. The Working Party on Education of the World Organisation of Family Doctors (WONCA) sought to develop global standards in CPD for family doctors. The standards were developed through an iterative process with reference to published best practices for effective CPD. Adapted for family doctors from the World Federation for Medical Education's CPD for Medical Doctors: WFME Global Standards for Quality Improvement', the WONCA CPD Standards for Family Doctors were approved by WONCA Council in November 2016. The objectives of the standards are to: (1) Provide a resource for family doctors and/or groups of family doctors to design and structure a program of CPD to reinforce lifelong learning; (2) Optimise current CPD systems such that, through more effective program design and delivery, family doctors are advancing in patient care and their discipline; (3) Offer a set of globally recognised standards developed through a family medicine perspective to provide feedback on existing CPD programs and systems and encourage international recognition of CPD activities. The WONCA Global CPD Standards should inspire best practices in family medicine CPD, assisting family doctors in providing excellent care.

  8. The effect of the SQUIRE (Standards of QUality Improvement Reporting Excellence) guidelines on reporting standards in the quality improvement literature: a before-and-after study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howell, Victoria; Schwartz, Amanda Eva; O'Leary, James Daniel; Mc Donnell, Conor

    2015-06-01

    The SQUIRE (Standards of QUality Improvement Reporting Excellence) guidelines were developed to improve the reporting of quality improvement (QI) projects. The effect of the guidelines on the completeness of reporting in the QI literature is unknown. Our primary objective was to determine if the completeness of reporting in the QI literature has been improved[OUP_CE13] since the introduction of the SQUIRE guidelines. We performed a before-and-after evaluation of QI articles selected from four prominent journals of healthcare quality. Twenty-five articles published in each of two time periods (2006-2008 and 2010-2011) were confirmed to be QI projects using a standardised definition and were independently evaluated by two investigators as an interim evaluation of a planned larger sample. Articles were assessed using 50 statements of the SQUIRE guidelines, and the overall change in the completeness of reporting between the two groups was determined. The value of p<0.05 was considered significant. Both groups were similar in characteristics. There was no significant difference in the mean (SD) number of SQUIRE statements completed by authors before and after publication of the SQUIRE guidelines, 20.2 (5.0) versus 20.4 (7.0), p=0.9. The study was stopped early due to the absence of any significant trend in the completeness of reporting. There was no overall improvement observed in the completeness of reporting of QI projects after the publication of the SQUIRE guidelines, and the study was stopped early. There is potential for improvement in reporting standards, particularly for those guideline items or statements specific to QI projects. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  9. Setting Global Standards for Stem Cell Research and Clinical Translation: The 2016 ISSCR Guidelines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George Q. Daley

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The International Society for Stem Cell Research (ISSCR presents its 2016 Guidelines for Stem Cell Research and Clinical Translation (ISSCR, 2016. The 2016 guidelines reflect the revision and extension of two past sets of guidelines (ISSCR, 2006; ISSCR, 2008 to address new and emerging areas of stem cell discovery and application and evolving ethical, social, and policy challenges. These guidelines provide an integrated set of principles and best practices to drive progress in basic, translational, and clinical research. The guidelines demand rigor, oversight, and transparency in all aspects of practice, providing confidence to practitioners and public alike that stem cell science can proceed efficiently and remain responsive to public and patient interests. Here, we highlight key elements and recommendations in the guidelines and summarize the recommendations and deliberations behind them.

  10. Application of standard treatment guidelines in rural community health centres, Timor-Leste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higuchi, Michiyo; Okumura, Junko; Aoyama, Atsuko; Suryawati, Sri; Porter, John

    2012-08-01

    To analyse nurses' and midwives' knowledge of and attitudes towards standard treatment guidelines (STGs), which were developed to help their practices at rural community health centres (CHCs) in Timor-Leste. Fifty-five nurses and midwives were individually interviewed. Data were analysed qualitatively using the Framework approach. Overall, the standard treatments for acute respiratory tract infections, malaria and diarrhoea were well known by the respondents. Clinical nurses showed precise and detailed knowledge, especially for antibiotic use. The respondents were willing to use STGs and believed that they 'should' follow them. This feeling arose due to their self-awareness as frontline health workers and, at the same time, as peripheral civil servants. The changes brought about by the introduction of STGs were positively perceived. Three components of the change were observed: the concept, daily practice and perceived patient satisfaction. The respondents had previously felt a lack of confidence and hoped to improve their capacity as health care workers; they became confident in their practices by using STGs. Self-confidence was identified more clearly in the clinical nurse interviews. Few difficulties in using STGs were indicated, and the respondents suggested ways to deal with these difficulties. By using the STGs, the nurses/midwives gained knowledge and self-confidence. The positive perception of the changes promoted further use of the STGs. Clinical nurse training positively influenced the knowledge of and attitudes towards the STGs. Few difficulties in applying STGs in daily practice were identified, which is contrary to previous studies that targeted physicians in the Western world. Development of STGs within a health policy framework was considered a key factor. The STGs exist across related policies and various programmes, which are interconnected. The Timor-Leste experience indicates the value of STGs for non-physician health care providers at the

  11. Students as Stakeholders in the Policy Context of the European Standards and Guidelines for Quality Assurance in Higher Education Institutions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Logermann, Frauke; Leisyte, Liudvika; Curaj, Adrian; Matei, Liviu; Pricopie, Remus; Salmi, Jamil; Scott, Peter

    2015-01-01

    The European Standard and Guidelines for Quality Assurance (ESG) of 2005 can be defined as one of the major Bologna documents aimed at furthering the role of students as stakeholders in internal quality assurance processes at higher education institutions (HEIs). Still little is known about

  12. Implementation and translation: from European standards and guidelines for quality assurance to education quality work in higher education institutions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westerheijden, Donald F.; Kohoutek, Jan; Eggins, Heather

    2014-01-01

    The Standards and Guidelines for Quality Assurance in the European Higher Education Area (ESG for short) have been part of the regulative infrastructure of the European Higher Education Area (EHEA) since 2005 (European Association for Quality Assurance in Higher Education, 2009).

  13. Guidelines for the primary prevention of stroke: a guideline for healthcare professionals from the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, Larry B; Bushnell, Cheryl D; Adams, Robert J; Appel, Lawrence J; Braun, Lynne T; Chaturvedi, Seemant; Creager, Mark A; Culebras, Antonio; Eckel, Robert H; Hart, Robert G; Hinchey, Judith A; Howard, Virginia J; Jauch, Edward C; Levine, Steven R; Meschia, James F; Moore, Wesley S; Nixon, J V Ian; Pearson, Thomas A

    2011-02-01

    This guideline provides an overview of the evidence on established and emerging risk factors for stroke to provide evidence-based recommendations for the reduction of risk of a first stroke. Writing group members were nominated by the committee chair on the basis of their previous work in relevant topic areas and were approved by the American Heart Association (AHA) Stroke Council Scientific Statement Oversight Committee and the AHA Manuscript Oversight Committee. The writing group used systematic literature reviews (covering the time since the last review was published in 2006 up to April 2009), reference to previously published guidelines, personal files, and expert opinion to summarize existing evidence, indicate gaps in current knowledge, and when appropriate, formulate recommendations using standard AHA criteria (Tables 1 and 2). All members of the writing group had the opportunity to comment on the recommendations and approved the final version of this document. The guideline underwent extensive peer review by the Stroke Council leadership and the AHA scientific statements oversight committees before consideration and approval by the AHA Science Advisory and Coordinating Committee. Schemes for assessing a person's risk of a first stroke were evaluated. Risk factors or risk markers for a first stroke were classified according to potential for modification (nonmodifiable, modifiable, or potentially modifiable) and strength of evidence (well documented or less well documented). Nonmodifiable risk factors include age, sex, low birth weight, race/ethnicity, and genetic predisposition. Well-documented and modifiable risk factors include hypertension, exposure to cigarette smoke, diabetes, atrial fibrillation and certain other cardiac conditions, dyslipidemia, carotid artery stenosis, sickle cell disease, postmenopausal hormone therapy, poor diet, physical inactivity, and obesity and body fat distribution. Less well-documented or potentially modifiable risk factors

  14. Consolidated Health Economic Evaluation Reporting Standards (CHEERS)--explanation and elaboration: a report of the ISPOR Health Economic Evaluation Publication Guidelines Good Reporting Practices Task Force

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Husereau, Don; Drummond, Michael; Petrou, Stavros; Carswell, Chris; Moher, David; Greenberg, Dan; Augustovski, Federico; Briggs, Andrew H; Mauskopf, Josephine; Loder, Elizabeth

    2013-01-01

    .... The Consolidated Health Economic Evaluation Reporting Standards (CHEERS) statement is an attempt to consolidate and update previous health economic evaluation guidelines into one current, useful reporting guidance...

  15. Patient perceptions of risky drinking: Knowledge of daily and weekly low-risk guidelines and standard drink sizes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sprague, Debra J; Vinson, Daniel C

    2017-01-01

    Effective intervention for risky drinking requires that clinicians and patients know low-risk daily and weekly guidelines and what constitutes a "standard drink." The authors hypothesized that most patients lack this knowledge, and that education is required. Following primary care visits, patients completed anonymous exit questionnaires that included the 3 Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test-Consumption (AUDIT-C) questions, "How many drinks (containing alcohol) can you safely have in one day?" and questions about size, in ounces, of a standard drink of wine, beer, and liquor. Descriptive analyses were done in Stata. Of 1,331 respondents (60% female, mean age: 49.6, SD = 17.5), 21% screened positive on the AUDIT-C for risky drinking. Only 10% of those accurately estimated daily low-risk limits, with 9% accurate on weekly limits, and half estimated low-risk limits at or below guidelines. Fewer than half who checked "Yes" to "Do you know what a 'standard drink' is?" provided accurate answers for beer, wine, or liquor. Patients with a positive screen were twice as likely to say they knew what a standard drink is, but only a third gave accurate estimates. When asked about plans in the next month regarding change in drinking behavior, 23% with a positive AUDIT-C indicated they were at least considering a change. Most patients in primary care don't know specifics of the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA) guidelines for low-risk drinking. Exploring patient perceptions of low-risk guidelines and current drinking behavior may reveal discrepancies worth discussing. For risky drinkers, most of whom don't know daily and weekly low-risk guidelines or standard drink sizes, education can be vital in intervening. Findings suggest the need for detailed and explicit social marketing and communication on exactly what low-risk drinking entails.

  16. The Impact of the Next Generation Science Standards on Future Professional Development and Astronomy Education Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buxner, Sanlyn

    2013-06-01

    The Next Generation Science Standards will have a profound impact on the future science education of students and professional development for teachers. The science and engineering practices, crosscutting concepts, and disciplinary core ideas laid out in the Framework for K-12 Science Education (NRC, 2011) will change the focus and methods of how we prepare teachers to meet these new standards. Extending beyond just the use of inquiry in the classroom, teachers will need support designing and implementing integrated experiences for students that require them to apply knowledge of content and practices. Integrating the three dimensions central to the new standards will pose curricular challenges and create opportunities for innovative space science projects and instruction. The science research and technology community will have an important role in supporting authentic classroom practices as well as training and support of teachers in these new ways of presenting science and technology. These changes will require a new focus for teacher professional development and new ways to research impacts of teacher training and changes in classroom practice. In addition, new and innovative tools will be needed to assess mastery of students’ knowledge of practices and the ways teachers effectively help students achieve these new goals. The astronomy education community has much to offer as K-12 and undergraduate level science educators rethink and redefine what it means to be scientifically literate and figure out how to truly measure the success of these new ways of teaching science.

  17. Factors influencing adherence to standard precautions among nursing professionals in psychiatric hospitals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thaís Helena Piai-Morais

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE Evaluate and correlate individual, work-related and organizational factors that influence adherence to standard precautions among nursing professionals of psychiatric hospitals in São Paulo. METHOD An exploratory cross-sectional study conducted with 35 nursing professionals, using the assessment tool for adherence to standard precautions through the Likert scale, ranging from 1 to 5. RESULTS Knowledge of the precautions received a high score (4.69; adherence received (3.86 and obstacles (3.78, while intermediaries and the scales of organizational factors received low scores (2.61. There was a strong correlation between the magnitude adherence scale and the personal protective equipment availability (r = 0.643; p = 0.000. The training scale for prevention of HIV exposure (p = 0.007 was statistically different between the nurses and nursing assistants. CONCLUSION The organizational factors negatively contributed to adherence to standard precautions, indicating that psychiatric institutions lack safe working conditions, ongoing training and management actions to control infections.

  18. American Clinical Neurophysiology Society Guideline 5: Minimum Technical Standards for Pediatric Electroencephalography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuratani, John; Pearl, Phillip L; Sullivan, Lucy R; Riel-Romero, Rosario Maria S; Cheek, Janna; Stecker, Mark M; Orta, Daniel San Juan; Selioutski, Olga; Sinha, Saurabh R; Drislane, Frank W; Tsuchida, Tammy N

    2016-01-01

    This revision to the EEG Guidelines is an update incorporating the current electroencephalography technology and practice. It was previously published as Guideline 2. Similar to the prior guideline, it delineates the aspects of Guideline 1 that should be modified for neonates and young children. Recording conditions for photic stimulation and hyperventilation are revised to enhance the provocation of epileptiform discharges. Revisions recognize the difficulties involved in performing an EEG under sedation in young children. Recommended neonatal EEG montages are displayed for the reduced set of electrodes only since the montages in Guideline 3 should be used for a 21-electrode 10-20 system array. Neonatal documentation is updated to use current American Academy of Pediatrics term "postmenstrual age" rather than "conceptional age." Finally, because therapeutic hypothermia alters the prognostic value of neonatal EEG, the necessity of documenting the patient's temperature at the time of recording is emphasized.

  19. A correlation study involving a comparison of professional science teaching standards and student performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schum, Paul A.

    If international report cards were issued today, to all industrialized nations world wide, the United States would receive a "C" at best in mathematics and science. This is not simply a temporary or simple cause and effect circumstance that can easily be addressed. The disappointing truth is that this downward trend in mathematics and science mastery by American students has been occurring steadily for at least the last eight years of international testing, and that there are numerous and varied bases for this reality. In response to this crisis, The National Science Teachers Association (NSTA), The American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS), and The National Research Council (NRC) each have proposed relatively consistent, but individual sets of professional science teaching standards, designed to improve science instruction in American schools. It is of extreme value to the scientific, educational community to know if any or all of these standards lead to improved student performance. This study investigates the correlation between six, specific teacher behaviors that are common to these national standards and which behaviors, if any, result in improved student performance, as demonstrated on the Science Reasoning sub-test of the ACT Assessment. These standards focus classroom science teachers on professional development, leading toward student mastery of scientific interpretation, concept development, and constructive relationship building. Because all individual teachers interpret roles, expectations, and guiding philosophies from different lenses, effective professional practice may reflect consistency in rationale and methodology yet will be best evidenced by an examination of specific teaching techniques. In this study, these teaching techniques are evidenced by self-reported teacher awareness and adherence to these consensual standards. Assessment instruments vary widely, and the results of student performance often reflect the congruency of

  20. Social work in a society under pressure. Keeping professional principles and standards upright.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Willem Blok

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This article is based on the content and outcome of the 5th Annual International Conference on Social Work & Social Work Education in Leeuwarden, The Netherlands on February 5, 2016. It shows how Social Work is embedded in society, and describes the pressure of contemporary (international problems on society, and the way in which authorities respond to it. The article continues with a discussion of the answers given by the 200 conference participants on the question how social workers and social work educators could cope with this pressure without denying their international professional principles and standards.

  1. Application of Professional Standards of the Specialists of the Sphere of Social Service

    OpenAIRE

    Voloshina I.A.; Zaytseva O.M.; Goncharova A.A.

    2017-01-01

    The article reviews the first results of application of professional standards of the sphere of social service in the regions of the Russian Federation in accordance with legal requirements: “Psychologist in the social sphere”, “Head of the institution of medical and social expertise”, “Head of the social service organization”, “Social worker”, “Specialist of the guardianship agency for minors”, “Specialist in medical and social expertise”, “Specialist in the provision of public services in t...

  2. Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics: revised 2015 standards of practice and standards of professional performance for registered dietitian nutritionists (competent, proficient, and expert) in pediatric nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nevin-Folino, Nancy; Ogata, Beth N; Charney, Pamela J; Holt, Katrina; Brewer, Holly L; Sharrett, Mary K; Carney, Liesje N

    2015-03-01

    All of the health care professions recognize that care of infants and children is best managed as a specialty area of practice. Nutrition plays a key role in normal growth and development. Appropriate nutrition care is vital adjuvant therapy for infants and children with acute or chronic illness. Provision of nutrition services in pediatric practice requires that registered dietitian nutritionists (RDNs) have advanced knowledge in the focus area of pediatric nutrition. Therefore, the Pediatric Nutrition Dietetic Practice Group, with guidance from the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics Quality Management Committee, has developed this revision of the Standards of Practice and Standards of Professional Performance for RDNs in Pediatric Nutrition as a resource for RDNs working in pediatric nutrition to assess skill level and to identify needs for professional development to advance practice in pediatric nutrition. This revision reflects recent advances in pediatric nutrition and replaces the previous Standards published in 2009. The Standards of Practice represent the four steps of the Nutrition Care Process as applied to the care of patients/clients. The Standards of Professional Performance represent six domains of professionalism: Quality in Practice, Competence and Accountability, Provision of Services, Application of Research, Communication and Application of Knowledge, and Utilization and Management of Resources. The Standards of Practice and Standards of Professional Performance are complementary resources for RDNs working in pediatric nutrition and dietetics practice. Copyright © 2015 Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. The Use of Poster Sessions to Develop Professionalism, Domain Five of the Ecuadorian National English Teachers' Standards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales J., María V.; Morales J., María A.

    2017-01-01

    This study describes the presence of professional skills found in poster session proposals in order to consider the use of poster sessions for developing the skills required by the 2012 Ecuadorian Standards for English teachers, specifically related to the fifth domain professionalism. Thirteen poster session proposals for a national English…

  4. Exploring the Potential for a Consolidated Standard for Reporting Guidelines for Qualitative Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karin Hannes

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Consolidating a standard for reporting qualitative research remains a challenging endeavor, given the variety of different paradigms that steer qualitative research as well as the broad range of designs, and techniques for data collection and analysis that one could opt for when conducting qualitative research. Method: A total of 18 experts in qualitative research participated in an argument Delphi approach to explore the arguments that would plead for or against the development and use of reporting guidelines (RGs for qualitative research and to generate opinions on what may need to be considered in the further development or further refinement of RGs for qualitative research. Findings: The potential to increase quality and accountability of qualitative research was identified as one of the core benefits of RGs for different target groups, including students. Experts in our pilot study seem to resist a fixed, extensive list of criteria. They emphasize the importance of flexibility in developing and applying such criteria. Clear-cut RGs may restrict the publication of reports on unusual, innovative, or emerging research approaches. Conclusions: RGs should not be used as a substitute for proper training in qualitative research methods and should not be applied rigidly. Experts feel more comfortable with RGs that allow for an adaptation of criteria, to create a better fit for purpose. The variety in viewpoints between experts for the majority of the topics will most likely complicate future consolidation processes. Design specific RGs should be considered to allow developers to stay true to their own epistemological principles and those of their potential users.

  5. Spanish Compliance With Guidelines for Prescribing Four Drugs in the Intensive Phase of Standard Tuberculosis Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-García, José-María; Rodrigo, Teresa; Casals, Martí; Ruiz-Manzano, Juan; Pascual-Pascual, Teresa; Caylà, Joan A

    2016-05-01

    International and Spanish guidelines recommend a 4-drug regimen in the intensive treatment of tuberculosis (TB). The aim of our study was to determine if these recommendations are followed in Spain, and the factors associated with the use of 3 drugs (standard regimen without ethambutol). Observational, multicenter, retrospective analysis of data from patients diagnosed with TB in practically all Spanish Autonomous Communities between 2007 and 2102. Factors associated with the use of 3 drugs were analyzed using logistic regression, and odds ratios (OR) and corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CI) were calculated. A total of 3,189 patients were included, 1,413 (44.3%) of whom received 3 drugs. The percentage of 3-drug users among patients with positive sputum smear was 41.2%; among patients with resistance to at least 1 drug, 36.1%; among HIV-infected patients, 31.4%; and among immigrants, 24.8%. Factors associated with the use of 3 drugs were: female sex (OR=1.18; CI: 1.00-1.39); native Spanish (OR=3.09; CI: 2.58-3.70); retired (OR=1.42; CI: 1.14-1.77); homeless (OR=3.10; CI: 1.52-6.43); living alone (OR=1.62; CI: 1.11-2.36); living in a family (OR=1.97; CI: 1.48-2.65); seen by specialists in the region (OR=1.37; CI: 1.10;1.70); no HIV infection (OR=1.63; CI: 1.09-2.48); and negative sputum smear with positive culture (OR=1.59; CI: 1.25-2.02). A large proportion of TB patients receive intensive treatment with 3 drugs. TB treatment recommendations should be followed, both in routine clinical practice and by the National Plan for Prevention and Control of Tuberculosis in Spain. Copyright © 2015 SEPAR. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  6. DESIGNING UNIVERSITY TEXTBOOK “FUNDAMENTALS OF BUSINESS INFORMATICS” IN ACCORDANCE WITHREQUIREMENTS OF THE EDUCATIONAL AND PROFESSIONAL STANDARDS

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ю В Фролов; К Р Овчинникова

    2016-01-01

    The article discusses step by step the process of designing an interdisciplinary tutorial on the basics of business informatics in the context of the requirements Federal state educational and professional standards...

  7. American College of Medical Genetics standards and guidelines for interpretation and reporting of postnatal constitutional copy number variants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kearney, Hutton M; Thorland, Erik C; Brown, Kerry K; Quintero-Rivera, Fabiola; South, Sarah T

    2011-07-01

    Genomic microarrays used to assess DNA copy number are now recommended as first-tier tests for the postnatal evaluation of individuals with intellectual disability, autism spectrum disorders, and/or multiple congenital anomalies. Application of this technology has resulted in the discovery of widespread copy number variation in the human genome, both polymorphic variation in healthy individuals and novel pathogenic copy number imbalances. To assist clinical laboratories in the evaluation of copy number variants and to promote consistency in interpretation and reporting of genomic microarray results, the American College of Medical Genetics has developed the following professional guidelines for the interpretation and reporting of copy number variation. These guidelines apply primarily to evaluation of constitutional copy number variants detected in the postnatal setting.

  8. Academy of nutrition and dietetics: revised 2014 standards of practice and standards of professional performance for registered dietitian nutritionists (competent, proficient, and expert) in sports nutrition and dietetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinmuller, Patricia L; Kruskall, Laura J; Karpinski, Christine A; Manore, Melinda M; Macedonio, Michele A; Meyer, Nanna L

    2014-04-01

    Sports nutrition and dietetics addresses relationships of nutrition with physical activity, including weight management, exercise, and physical performance. Nutrition plays a key role in the prevention and treatment of obesity and chronic disease and for maintenance of health, and the ability to engage in physical activity, sports, and other aspects of physical performance. Thus, the Sports, Cardiovascular, and Wellness Nutrition Dietetic Practice Group, with guidance from the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics Quality Management Committee, has developed the Revised 2014 Standards of Practice and Standards of Professional Performance as a resource for Registered Dietitian Nutritionists working in sports nutrition and dietetics to assess their current skill levels and to identify areas for further professional development in this emerging practice area. The revised document reflects advances in sports nutrition and dietetics practice since the original standards were published in 2009 and replaces those standards. The Standards of Practice represents the four steps in the Nutrition Care Process as applied to the care of patients/clients. The Standards of Professional Performance covers six standards of professional performance: quality in practice, competence and accountability, provision of services, application of research, communication and application of knowledge, and utilization and management of resources. Within each standard, specific indicators provide measurable action statements that illustrate how the standards can be applied to practice. The indicators describe three skill levels (competent, proficient, and expert) for Registered Dietitian Nutritionists working in sports nutrition and dietetics. The Standards of Practice and Standards of Professional Performance are complementary resources for Registered Dietitian Nutritionists in sports nutrition and dietetics practice. Copyright © 2014 Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. Published by Elsevier Inc

  9. Ethical standards and regulations principles of professional conduct in the field of mediation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yulia I. Melnychuk

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available An origin of conflicts, during life of man, is the inevitable phenomenon. A subject for a conflict results in the origin of conflict situation, which contains the negative colouring the display of which can be offence. Mediaciya appears the alternative method of permission of conflict, which is directed on zalagodzhennya and decision of conflicts by the direct socializing with an offender and suffering. A collaboration as a result of realization of which reasons of divergences and aspiration of resisting sides of search of vzaemopriynyatnikh ways of decision of situation turn out appears the base of process of mediacii. In this process the third participant is a neurohumor, the purpose of activity of which is adjusting and communicative process control. Institualizaciya of codes of conduct, which are added the certain types of moral mutual relations between people is optimum for realization of professional activity. Socialphilosophical interpretation of cultural, humanism principles of restoration process is fixed in the ethics standards of mediacii. Ethics norms are key in achievement of the real perfection, that is why there is a clear requirement in the ethics estimation of practice of neurohumor for the maintainance of moral, legal norms upgrading functioning. Professional practice of neurohumor is based on an awareness them of ethics aspects and social payment in prevention of recidivism, observance of ethics rules and standards, proper European legislation, national traditions.

  10. Partnership on Rotational ViscoElastic Test Standardization (PROVETS): evidence-based guidelines on rotational viscoelastic assays in veterinary medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goggs, Robert; Brainard, Benjamin; de Laforcade, Armelle M; Flatland, Bente; Hanel, Rita; McMichael, Maureen; Wiinberg, Bo

    2014-01-01

    To systematically examine the evidence relating to the performance of rotational viscoelastic testing in companion animals, to develop assay guidelines, and to identify knowledge gaps. Multiple questions were considered within 5 parent domains, specifically system comparability, sample handling, assay activation and test protocol, definitions and data reporting, and nonstandard assays. Standardized, systematic evaluation of the literature was performed. Relevant articles were categorized according to level of evidence and assessed for quality. Consensus was developed regarding conclusions for application of concepts to clinical practice. Academic and referral veterinary medical centers. Databases searched included Medline, Commonwealth Agricultural Bureaux abstracts, and Google Scholar. Worksheets were prepared evaluating 28 questions across the 5 domains and generating 84 assay guidelines. Evidence-based guidelines for the performance of thromboelastography in companion animals were generated through this process. Some of these guidelines are well supported while others will benefit from additional evidence. Many knowledge gaps were identified and future work should be directed to address these gaps and to objectively evaluate the impact of these guidelines on assay comparability within and between centers. © Veterinary Emergency and Critical Care Society 2014.

  11. Developing Standards for Language Teacher Education Programs in Indonesia: Professionalizing or Losing in Complexity?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana Luciana

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Setting standards for language teacher education programs, materials, and evaluation sparks some hope in attempts to improve the quality of the programs. Yet, this very fact augmented by my examination of ten language teacher education programs in Java, Bali, and Lampung (FKIP and PGRI triggers a critical look at the idea of standard development. In particular, I would like to explore whether it can lead to a better professionalism or we are just lost in the complexity of the standardization itself. This paper consists of four sections. Departing from an overview of language teacher education programs in Indonesia and the theoretical foundations, some major problems in this area are identified. Following this, the discussion is focused on the idea of standard development for language teacher education programs in Indonesia. Eventually, some suggestions are put forth to highlight the need for establishing coherent curriculum framework bridging the two realms of language teacher education and school milieu as well as providing learners with knowledge base that enables them to cope with complex demands of school settings and more essentially, to act as an agent in the social change process.

  12. Cross-disciplinary competency standards for work-related assessments: communicating the requirements for effective professional practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Travis, Jamie

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to introduce the cross-disciplinary competency standards for work-related assessments, why they are needed and how they have been developed in New South Wales (NSW). Cross-disciplinary competency standards communicate the benchmarks for effective performance of work-related assessments. They outline what is expected of rehabilitation professionals, including the ability to apply and transfer competence across different conditions and workplace contexts. Outcomes in occupational rehabilitation are affected by the efficacy of the work-related assessments performed, which is dependent upon competent, clinical decision-making by rehabilitation professionals. However, in Australia, work-related assessment practice is not governed by universally accepted competency standards or by any competency-based training/education and assessment system. To enhance professional practice, WorkCover NSW has developed cross-disciplinary competency standards for work-related a ssessments. The competencies provide (i) quality standards for professional workplace training and development, (ii) benchmarks for assessing the competence of rehabilitation professionals, (iii) a framework for evidence-based practice, (iv) benchmarks for measuring service quality and (v) "real world" learning outcomes and assessment criteria for professional education programs.

  13. Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics: Revised 2017 Standards of Practice in Nutrition Care and Standards of Professional Performance for Registered Dietitian Nutritionists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-01-01

    Registered dietitian nutritionists (RDNs) face complex situations every day. Competently addressing the unique needs of each situation and applying standards appropriately are essential to providing safe, timely, patient-/client-/customer-centered, quality nutrition and dietetics care and services. The Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics (Academy) leads the profession by developing standards that can be used by RDNs (who are credentialed by the Commission on Dietetic Registration) for self-evaluation to assess quality of practice and performance. The Standards of Practice reflect the Nutrition Care Process and workflow elements as a method to manage nutrition care activities with patients/clients/populations that include nutrition screening, nutrition assessment, nutrition diagnosis, nutrition intervention/plan of care, nutrition monitoring and evaluation, and discharge planning and transitions of care. The Standards of Professional Performance consist of six domains of professional performance: Quality in Practice, Competence and Accountability, Provision of Services, Application of Research, Communication and Application of Knowledge, and Utilization and Management of Resources. Within each standard, specific indicators provide measurable action statements that illustrate how the standard can be applied to practice. The Academy's Revised 2017 Standards of Practice and Standards of Professional Performance for RDNs, along with the Academy's Code of Ethics and the Revised 2017 Scope of Practice for the RDN, provide minimum standards and tools for demonstrating competence and safe practice and are used collectively to gauge and guide an RDN's performance in nutrition and dietetics practice. Copyright © 2018 Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. A Common Language? The Use of Teaching Standards in the Assessment of Professional Experience: Teacher Education Students' Perceptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loughland, Tony; Ellis, Neville

    2016-01-01

    There is a strong critique of the reductionist, technical and instrumentalist impacts of the Australian Professional Standards for Teachers from critical policy researchers in education. At the same time, advocates of the standards espouse their potential as providing a common language of teaching. We argue that both views are based on logical…

  15. Teaching English Language Learner Students: Professional Standards in Elementary Education in Central Region States. Issues & Answers. REL 2012-No. 122

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apthorp, Helen; Wang, Xin; Ryan, Susan; Cicchinelli, Louis F.

    2012-01-01

    This report on professional teaching standards in the Central Region examines what K-8 general education teachers are expected to know and be able to do in order to teach English language learner students. It reviews the standards for coverage of six topics that the research literature suggests are important for improving student achievement. Key…

  16. OpenAIRE Guidelines for CRIS Managers: Supporting Interoperability of Open Research Information through Established Standards

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Houssos, Nikos; Jörg, Brigitte; Dvořák, Jan

    2014-01-01

    their information in a way that is compatible with OpenAIRE. This contribution focuses on a specific type of data source, CRIS systems, and the respective OpenAIRE guidelines, based on CERIF XML. A range of issues, spanning different aspects of information representation and exchange, needed to be addressed......OpenAIRE is the European infrastructure enabling researchers to comply with the European Union requirements for Open Access to research results. OpenAIRE collects metadata from data sources across Europe and beyond and defines interoperability guidelines to assist providers in exposing...

  17. Guidelines for the management of aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage: a guideline for healthcare professionals from the American Heart Association/american Stroke Association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connolly, E Sander; Rabinstein, Alejandro A; Carhuapoma, J Ricardo; Derdeyn, Colin P; Dion, Jacques; Higashida, Randall T; Hoh, Brian L; Kirkness, Catherine J; Naidech, Andrew M; Ogilvy, Christopher S; Patel, Aman B; Thompson, B Gregory; Vespa, Paul

    2012-06-01

    The aim of this guideline is to present current and comprehensive recommendations for the diagnosis and treatment of aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (aSAH). A formal literature search of MEDLINE (November 1, 2006, through May 1, 2010) was performed. Data were synthesized with the use of evidence tables. Writing group members met by teleconference to discuss data-derived recommendations. The American Heart Association Stroke Council's Levels of Evidence grading algorithm was used to grade each recommendation. The guideline draft was reviewed by 7 expert peer reviewers and by the members of the Stroke Council Leadership and Manuscript Oversight Committees. It is intended that this guideline be fully updated every 3 years. Evidence-based guidelines are presented for the care of patients presenting with aSAH. The focus of the guideline was subdivided into incidence, risk factors, prevention, natural history and outcome, diagnosis, prevention of rebleeding, surgical and endovascular repair of ruptured aneurysms, systems of care, anesthetic management during repair, management of vasospasm and delayed cerebral ischemia, management of hydrocephalus, management of seizures, and management of medical complications. aSAH is a serious medical condition in which outcome can be dramatically impacted by early, aggressive, expert care. The guidelines offer a framework for goal-directed treatment of the patient with aSAH.

  18. 12 CFR Appendix A to Part 570 - Interagency Guidelines Establishing Standards for Safety and Soundness

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... risk assessment; 3. Timely and accurate financial, operational and regulatory reports; 4. Adequate..., DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY SAFETY AND SOUNDNESS GUIDELINES AND COMPLIANCE PROCEDURES Pt. 570, App. A Appendix... section 318 of the Riegle Community Development and Regulatory Improvement Act of 1994, Pub. L. 103-325...

  19. 76 FR 18407 - Standards of Performance for New Stationary Sources and Emissions Guidelines for Existing Sources...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-04

    ... guidelines, correcting inadvertent drafting errors in the nitrogen oxides and sulfur dioxide emissions limits... 611310 services, state universities. This table is not intended to be exhaustive, but rather provides a... the Cd and Hg emissions limits in Table 1B to subpart Ec (NSPS). EPA reviewed the other emissions...

  20. Guidelines and algorithms: strategies for standardization of referral criteria in diagnostic radiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kainberger, Franz; Pokieser, Peter; Imhof, Herwig [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, University of Vienna (Austria); Czembirek, Heinrich [Zentralroentgeninstitut, Lainz Hospital, Vienna (Austria); Fruehwald, Franz [Fruehwald-Institute of Diagnostic Imaging, Poelten (Austria)

    2002-03-01

    Guidelines can be regarded as special forms of algorithms and have been shown to be useful tools for supporting medical decision making. With the Council Directive 97/43/Euratom recommendations concerning referral criteria for medical exposure have to be implemented into national law of all EU member states. The time- and cost-consuming efforts of developing, implementing, and updating such guidelines are balanced by the acceptance in clinical practice and eventual better health outcomes. Clearly defined objectives with special attention drawn on national and regional differences among potential users, support from organisations with expertise in evidence-based medicine, separated development of the evidence component and the recommendations component, and large-scale strategies for distribution and implementation are necessary. Editors as well as users of guidelines for referral criteria have to be aware which expectations can be met and which cannot be fulfilled with this instrument; thus, dealing with guidelines requires a new form of ''diagnostic reasoning'' based on medical ethics. (orig.)

  1. Guidelines for Preparing High School Psychology Teachers: Course-Based and Standards-Based Approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Psychologist, 2013

    2013-01-01

    Psychology is one of the most popular elective high school courses. The high school psychology course provides the foundation for students to benefit from psychological perspectives on personal and contemporary issues and learn the rules of evidence and theoretical frameworks of the discipline. The guidelines presented here constitute the second…

  2. 12 CFR Appendix B to Part 570 - Interagency Guidelines Establishing Information Security Standards

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... deposits are FDIC-insured and any subsidiaries of such savings associations, except brokers, dealers... technology, the sensitivity of your customer information, internal or external threats to information, and... Guidelines, I.C.2.d (I.C.2.c for OTS). 10 See FFIEC Information Technology Examination Handbook, Information...

  3. 12 CFR Appendix B to Part 30 - Interagency Guidelines Establishing Information Security Standards

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... foreign banks, and any subsidiaries of such entities (except brokers, dealers, persons providing insurance..., the information security program in light of any relevant changes in technology, the sensitivity of... Guidelines, I.C.2.d (I.C.2.c for OTS). 10 See FFIEC Information Technology Examination Handbook, Information...

  4. American Clinical Neurophysiology Society Guideline 6: Minimum Technical Standards for EEG Recording in Suspected Cerebral Death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stecker, Mark M; Sabau, Dragos; Sullivan, Lucy R; Das, Rohit R; Selioutski, Olga; Drislane, Frank W; Tsuchida, Tammy N; Tatum, William O

    2016-01-01

    This revision to the EEG Guidelines is an update incorporating current EEG technology and practice. The role of the EEG in making the determination of brain death is discussed as are suggested technical criteria for making the diagnosis of electrocerebral inactivity.

  5. Compliance with infection control standard precautions guidelines: a survey among dental healthcare workers in Hail Region, Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haridi, Hassan Kasim; Al-Ammar, Abdalmohsen Saud; Al-Mansour, Moazzy Ibraheim

    2016-11-01

    The concept of standard precautions (SP) has been a cornerstone of dental infection control (IC) practice. Full adherence with SP guidelines is still a matter of concern in many institutions. The objectives of the present study were to assess and characterise compliance with SP guidelines among dental healthcare workers (DHCWs) and to analyse factors that affect compliance. A regional cross-sectional questionnaire survey among DHCWs in all health facilities was carried out from August to November 2014. A total of 307 returned valid self-report questionnaires with a response rate of 73.1%. Most participants (86.3%) were aware of the SP guidelines, 84.4% received IC training and 88.9% received hepatitis B vaccination. Compliance with SP was found to be high; the majority (90.1%) attained 75% on the compliance scale. In the multivariate logistic regression model, perceived higher institutional commitment as regard IC requirements (odds ratio [OR], 4.34; P <0.001), perceived training as adequate (OR, 3.51; P = 0.003), dentist job (OR, 2.99; P = 0.035) and younger age (OR, 0.59; P = 0.041) were independently predicted as good compliant behaviour. This survey revealed high self-reported compliance with SP guidelines. Institutional factors appear to have an important role. Attention should be paid to dental assistants and private DHCWs.

  6. Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics: Standards of Practice and Standards of Professional Performance for Registered Dietitian Nutritionists (Competent, Proficient, and Expert) in Public Health and Community Nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruening, Meg; Udarbe, Adrienne Z; Yakes Jimenez, Elizabeth; Stell Crowley, Phyllis; Fredericks, Doris C; Edwards Hall, Leigh Ann

    2015-10-01

    The need and demand for population-level disease prevention has increased, especially with the passage of the Affordable Care Act, a worldwide increase in obesity and chronic disease, and a global emphasis on preventative health care that includes behavioral, environmental, and policy interventions. In response to these evolving needs, the Public Health and Community Nutrition Dietetic Practice Group, with guidance from the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics Quality Management Committee, has developed Standards of Practice and Standards of Professional Performance as tools for registered dietitian nutritionists (RDNs) currently in practice or interested in working in public health and community nutrition, to assess their current skill levels and to identify areas for professional development. The Standards of Practice address the four steps of the Nutrition Care Process for community and public health RDNs, which are assessment, diagnosis, intervention, and evaluation/monitoring. The Standards of Professional Performance consist of the following six domains of professional performance for community and public health RDNs: Quality in Practice, Competence and Accountability, Provision of Services, Application of Research, Communication and Application of Knowledge, and Utilization and Management of Resources. Within each standard, specific indicators provide measurable action statements that illustrate the ways in which RDNs can address client and population nutrition and health. The indicators describe three skill levels (competent, proficient, and expert) for RDNs. These tools highlight the unique scope of expertise that RDNs provide to the field of public health and community nutrition. Copyright © 2015 Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. 12 CFR Appendix D-1 to Part 208 - Interagency Guidelines Establishing Standards for Safety and Soundness

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... and operations; 3. Assess the source, volatility, and sustainability of earnings, including the effect... exposure. F. Asset growth. G. Asset quality. H. Earnings. I. Compensation, fees and benefits. III... standards; (2) compensation standards; and (3) such standards relating to asset quality, earnings, and stock...

  8. Systematic Information to Health-Care Professionals about Vaccination Guidelines Improves Adherence in Patients With Inflammatory Bowel Disease in Anti-TNFα Therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Katrine R; Steenholdt, Casper; Buhl, Sine S

    2015-01-01

    vaccination guidelines at baseline and at 2-month intervals for 6 months, followed by reassessment of vaccination status (intervention group; n=99); (3) cross-sectional evaluation of representative gastroenterologists' knowledge of guidelines (n=53). Outcomes were assessed by validated questionnaires. RESULTS...... (32%) and insufficient consultation time (26%). Patient-perceived barriers were costs of vaccinations (35%) and forgetfulness (25%). CONCLUSIONS: Gastroenterologists' limited knowledge of vaccination guidelines during anti-TNFα therapy can be overcome by systematic education of health......' adherence. METHODS: The study comprised three parts: (1) cross-sectional evaluation of baseline vaccination status in all IBD patients in anti-TNFα therapy (reference group; n=130); (2) prospective interventional study, where health-care professionals received systematic oral and written information about...

  9. Analyses of IEQ and user satisfaction in 20 office buildings : significant findings to impact future design standards and guidelines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, J.; Loftness, V.; Aziz, A. [Carnegie Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, PA (United States). Centre for Building Performance and Diagnostics

    2009-07-01

    This paper reported on a field study that provided supportive ideas for environmental standards and design guidelines for office environments which could satisfy indoor environmental quality (IEQ) requirements. IEQ is an important variable affecting occupant health, productivity as well as organization success. As such, occupant comfort and satisfaction must be ensured for each component of IEQ, notably thermal quality, air quality, lighting quality, and noise. In partnership with the General Services Administration, the Center for Building Performance and Diagnostics research team at Carnegie Mellon conducted a post-occupancy evaluation field study of 20 commercial office buildings throughout the United States. The objective and subjective data of IEQ obtained from the study were used for correlational analysis. The study results provide evidences to modify office environmental design guideline to improve physiological and environmental benefits. 5 refs., 1 tab., 10 figs.

  10. A compilation of current regulations, standards and guidelines in remote afterloading brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tortorelli, J.P.; Simion, G.P.; Kozlowski, S.D. [Idaho National Engineering Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    1994-10-01

    Over a dozen government and professional organizations in the United States and Europe have issued regulations and guidance concerning quality management in the practice of remote afterloading brachytherapy. Information from the publications of these organizations was collected and collated for this report. This report provides the brachytherapy licensee access to a broad field of quality management information in a single, topically organized document.

  11. Eliciting views of patients with head and neck cancer and carers on professionally derived standards for care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birchall, M; Richardson, A; Lee, L

    2002-03-02

    To examine views of patients and carers on the process of care for people with head and neck cancer; to assess whether focus groups are useful in this setting; to compare priorities and standards identified with those published by healthcare professionals; and to incorporate the expressed views into existing national standards. Multicentre study of nine regional focus groups. Area covered by two regional health authorities. 40 patients who had had head and neck cancer and 18 carers. Views of individuals and groups on standards. Applicability of the method for patients whose appearance and ability to communicate was altered and for recently bereaved carers. Ease of incorporation of views into national and regional standards. Patients and carers participated in discussions on all the principal questions. Opinions were expressed on waiting times, information available to patients, coordination of care, and crisis management. Professionally derived standards were substantially improved by the incorporation of the views of patients and carers. There were no technical problems in carrying out this study on patients with communication difficulties or altered appearance nor with recently bereaved carers. Occasionally, participants said that the meetings were therapeutic. Professionally facilitated and analysed focus groups are effective in assessing views of patients with cancer and carers on professionally derived standards for care and can be applied in settings traditionally viewed as difficult. Views expressed by patients and carers are powerful motivators for change in the delivery of cancer care.

  12. Guidelines for the Management of Spontaneous Intracerebral Hemorrhage: A Guideline for Healthcare Professionals From the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemphill, J Claude; Greenberg, Steven M; Anderson, Craig S; Becker, Kyra; Bendok, Bernard R; Cushman, Mary; Fung, Gordon L; Goldstein, Joshua N; Macdonald, R Loch; Mitchell, Pamela H; Scott, Phillip A; Selim, Magdy H; Woo, Daniel

    2015-07-01

    The aim of this guideline is to present current and comprehensive recommendations for the diagnosis and treatment of spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage. A formal literature search of PubMed was performed through the end of August 2013. The writing committee met by teleconference to discuss narrative text and recommendations. Recommendations follow the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association methods of classifying the level of certainty of the treatment effect and the class of evidence. Prerelease review of the draft guideline was performed by 6 expert peer reviewers and by the members of the Stroke Council Scientific Oversight Committee and Stroke Council Leadership Committee. Evidence-based guidelines are presented for the care of patients with acute intracerebral hemorrhage. Topics focused on diagnosis, management of coagulopathy and blood pressure, prevention and control of secondary brain injury and intracranial pressure, the role of surgery, outcome prediction, rehabilitation, secondary prevention, and future considerations. Results of new phase 3 trials were incorporated. Intracerebral hemorrhage remains a serious condition for which early aggressive care is warranted. These guidelines provide a framework for goal-directed treatment of the patient with intracerebral hemorrhage. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  13. Standards of practice: quality assurance guidelines for percutaneous treatments of intervertebral discs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelekis, Alexis D; Filippiadis, Dimitris K; Martin, Jean-Baptiste; Brountzos, Elias

    2010-10-01

    Percutaneous treatments are used in the therapy of small- to medium-sized hernias of intervertebral discs to reduce the intradiscal pressure in the nucleus and theoretically create space for the herniated fragment to implode inward, thus reducing pain and improving mobility and quality of life. These techniques involve the percutaneous removal of the nucleus pulposus by using a variety of chemical, thermal, or mechanical techniques and consist of removal of all or part of nucleus pulposus to induce more rapid healing of the abnormal lumbar disc. These guidelines are written to be used in quality improvement programs for assessing fluoroscopy- and/or computed tomography-guided percutaneous intervertebral disc ablative techniques.

  14. Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics: Revised 2017 Standards of Practice in Nutrition Care and Standards of Professional Performance for Nutrition and Dietetics Technicians, Registered.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-12-23

    Nutrition and dietetics technicians, registered (NDTRs) face complex situations every day. Competently addressing the unique needs of each situation and applying standards appropriately are essential to providing safe, timely patient-/client-/customer-centered quality nutrition and dietetics care and services. The Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics (Academy) leads the profession by developing standards that can be used by NDTRs (who are credentialed by the Commission on Dietetic Registration) for self-evaluation to assess quality of practice and performance. The Standards of Practice reflect the NDTR's role under the supervision of registered dietitian nutritionists in nutrition screening and the Nutrition Care Process and workflow elements, which includes nutrition screening, nutrition assessment, nutrition diagnosis, nutrition intervention/plan of care, nutrition monitoring and evaluation, and discharge planning and transitions of care. The Standards of Professional Performance consist of six domains of professional performance: Quality in Practice, Competence and Accountability, Provision of Services, Application of Research, Communication and Application of Knowledge, and Utilization and Management of Resources. Within each standard, indicators provide measurable action statements that illustrate how the standard can be applied to practice. The Academy's Revised 2017 Standards of Practice and Standards of Professional Performance for NDTRs along with the Academy/Commission on Dietetic Registration Code of Ethics, and the Scope of Practice for the NDTR provide minimum standards and tools for demonstrating competence and safe practice, and are used collectively to gauge and guide an NDTR's performance in nutrition and dietetics practice. Copyright © 2017 Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. THE ROLE OF EDUCATIONAL EFFECTIVENESS FOR THE STANDARD OF FEDERAL GOVERNMENTAL EDUCATION PROFESSIONAL HIGH EDUCATION IN THE PROFESSIONAL PREPARATION OF STUDENTS FOR THE PSYCHO-PEDAGOGICAL FIELD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svetlana Petrovna Akutina

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The goal: the educational research of educational effectiveness FGOS PVO for the professional preparation.The research method and the methodological approach: to enlighten the goals of the Federal Governmental Education Standard (FGOS of the high professional education (VPO of the psycho-pedagogical field within the education system reforming; to create new didactical materials, programs, plans, training courses; to model the educational effectiveness of a high education institution according to the competence approach.The clue of the educational effectiveness is in the developing an individual educational path for students in the comprehensive phase, and as a result the role of an educator, and a tutor increases; the changes in social cultural sphere of an educational institution, the importance of students self-management are to remodel the formulating personal needs paradigm in professional, private, intellectual, cultural and modal advancing.The research results are to open valuable possibilities of educational effectiveness in FGOS VPO influencing the professional preparation, that is filled with innovative forms, me-thods, technological approaches in cooperation between students and educators; to organize socially oriented process within the educational and extra educational context, to construct an individual educational path to obtain a qualification, to guaranty the realization of a new educational system for educators’ cooperation, for tutors and social partners; all these permit to act in different cultural spheres acquiring positive experience of professional training.The application field: the research results are applied in the pedagogical activity to prepare professional figures in the psycho pedagogical area, in educational projects with students, in cooperating with various social partners.

  16. Safety Standard for Hydrogen and Hydrogen Systems: Guidelines for Hydrogen System Design, Materials Selection, Operations, Storage and Transportation. Revision

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-01-01

    The NASA Safety Standard, which establishes a uniform process for hydrogen system design, materials selection, operation, storage, and transportation, is presented. The guidelines include suggestions for safely storing, handling, and using hydrogen in gaseous (GH2), liquid (LH2), or slush (SLH2) form whether used as a propellant or non-propellant. The handbook contains 9 chapters detailing properties and hazards, facility design, design of components, materials compatibility, detection, and transportation. Chapter 10 serves as a reference and the appendices contained therein include: assessment examples; scaling laws, explosions, blast effects, and fragmentation; codes, standards, and NASA directives; and relief devices along with a list of tables and figures, abbreviations, a glossary and an index for ease of use. The intent of the handbook is to provide enough information that it can be used alone, but at the same time, reference data sources that can provide much more detail if required.

  17. Guidelines on Building Regulations 2008

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thse guidelines clarify and intepret the provisions of the Building Regulations of 2008 (BR08). The Guidelines, which match BR08 in terms of organisation into Parts, are accompanied by the full text of the regulations and the explanatory notes issued by the Danish Enterprise and Construction...... Authority. The Guidelines refer the reader to sources such as relevant standards, instructions and other background material which provides more detailed information. The Guidelines cover the same ground as BR08, including building control regulations, layout, fitting out, structures, fire safety, indoor...... climate, energy consumotion and services. The Guidelines are aimed at all professionals involved in building projects, particularly building design consultants, contractors and municipal application officers....

  18. The Effects of Achieved National Board for Professional Teaching Standards Certification on the Marginality of Physical Education Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaudreault, Karen Lux; Woods, Amelia Mays

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to examine the relationship between achieving The National Board for Professional Teaching Standards certification and feelings of marginality of physical education teachers. Data sources included a focus group interview with 6 National Board Certified Physical Education Teachers (NBCPETs) and individual phone…

  19. Classroom Management and National Professional Standards for Teachers: A Review of the Literature on Theory and Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egeberg, Helen M.; McConney, Andrew; Price, Anne

    2016-01-01

    This article reviews the conceptual and empirical research on classroom management to ascertain the extent to which there is consistency between the "advice" found in the research literature and the professional standards for teachers and initial teacher education, in regards to knowledge and perspectives about effective classroom…

  20. Guideline Implementation: Patient Information Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fencl, Jennifer L

    2016-12-01

    Clinical documentation captured in a patient's record provides health care personnel with information that can be used to guide patient care. Data collected in electronic health records can be accessed and aggregated across the health care delivery system to enhance the safety, quality, and efficacy of care. The updated AORN "Guideline for patient information management" provides guidance to perioperative personnel on documenting and managing patient information. This article focuses on key points of the guideline, which address data capture that supports the clinical workflow, incorporation of professional guidelines and standards as well as regulatory and mandatory reporting elements, use of standardized clinical terminologies, data aggregation for use in research and analytics, considerations for patient care orders, and safeguards for the patient's security and confidentiality. Perioperative RNs should review the complete guideline for additional information and for guidance when writing and updating policies and procedures. Copyright © 2016 AORN, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Congruence between position descriptions for public health nursing directors and supervisors with national professional standards and competencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polivka, Barbara J; Chaudry, Rosemary Valedes; Jones, Alexandria

    2014-01-01

    This study described the extent to which position descriptions (PDs) for public health directors of nursing (DONs) and non-DON public health nursing (PHN) supervisors in Ohio local health departments incorporate national standards of PHN practice and competencies for public health managers. Ninety-four PDs were obtained from 66 local health departments. Statements in each PD were analyzed for congruence with the 2007 American Nurses Association Public Health Nursing Scope and Standards of Practice (ANA Standards) and the Council on Linkages Core Competencies for Public Health Professionals (COL Competencies). Health department and PD characteristics were also obtained. COL Competencies within each COL skill domain were pooled for analysis. Position descriptions addressed an average of 7.6 of the 20 ANA Standards/Substandards (range, 1-15). The most commonly addressed ANA Standards were Leadership, Regulatory Activities, Collegiality and Professional Relationships, and Planning; the least often addressed were Population Diagnosis and Priorities, Professional Practice Evaluation, Outcomes Identification, Advocacy, and Evaluation. Position descriptions addressed an average of 3.6 of the 8 COL skill domains (range, 0-6). Financial Planning and Management, Policy Development/Program Planning, Community Dimensions of Practice, and Analytic/Assessment were the most commonly addressed COL skill domains, whereas Cultural Competence and Basic Public Health Sciences were the least commonly addressed. About 75% of the PDs included task statements that did not correspond to any of the ANA Standards or COL Competencies. Results indicate that PDs do not reflect compliance with professional mandates for the practice of PHN. This lack of fit between PDs and nationally recognized standards of practice and competencies suggest that PHN may be undifferentiated as a public health discipline and as a nursing specialty.

  2. Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics: Revised 2012 Standards of Practice in Nutrition Care and Standards of Professional Performance for Dietetic Technicians, Registered.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-01

    DTRs face complex situations every day. Competently addressing the unique needs of each situation and applying standards appropriately is essential to providing safe, timely, person-centered quality care and service. All DTRs are advised to conduct their practice based on the most recent edition of the Academy's Code of Ethics and the Scope of Practice in Nutrition and Dietetics, the Scope of Practice for the DTR, the 2012 Standards of Practice in Nutrition Care and Standards of Professional Performance for DTRs. These resources provide minimum standards and tools for demonstrating competence and safe practice, and are used collectively to gauge and guide a DTR's performance in nutrition and dietetics practice. The SOP and SOPP for the DTR are self-evaluation tools that promote quality assurance and performance improvement. Self-assessment provides opportunities to identify areas for enhancement, new learning and skill development, and to encourage progression of career growth. All DTRs are advised to have in their personal libraries the most recent copy of the Academy's Scope of Practice in Nutrition and Dietetics and its components: The 2012 Academy Standards of Practice in Nutrition Care and Standards of Professional Performance for DTRs; the Code of Ethics; and the Scope of Practice for the DTR. To ensure that credentialed dietetics practitioners always have access to the most current materials, each resource is maintained on the Academy's website. The documents will continue to be reviewed and updated as new trends in the profession of nutrition and dietetics and external influences emerge.

  3. 76 FR 15703 - Standards of Performance for New Stationary Sources and Emission Guidelines for Existing Sources...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-21

    ... Organic Matter ERT Electronic Reporting Tool ERU Energy Recovery Unit ESP Electrostatic Precipitator FF... implementation of same. In setting forth the methodology EPA must use to establish the first-stage technology... new standards based on a MACT methodology that is consistent with the CAA and District of Columbia...

  4. 75 FR 31937 - Standards of Performance for New Stationary Sources and Emission Guidelines for Existing Sources...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-04

    ... forth the methodology EPA must use to establish the first-stage technology-based standards, CAA Section... that are controlled use wet scrubbers, dry scrubbers, electrostatic precipitators (ESPs), or fabric...-clones, fabric filters, ESPs, wet scrubbers, ] venturi scrubbers, selective non-catalytic reduction (SNCR...

  5. 12 CFR Appendix A to Part 364 - Interagency Guidelines Establishing Standards for Safety and Soundness

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... and operations; 3. Assess the source, volatility, and sustainability of earnings, including the effect... documentation. D. Credit underwriting. E. Interest rate exposure. F. Asset growth. G. Asset quality. H. Earnings...) such standards relating to asset quality, earnings, and stock valuation as they determine to be...

  6. ICT Competency Standards for Teachers: Implementation Guidelines, Version 1.0

    Science.gov (United States)

    United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO), 2008

    2008-01-01

    The goal of the United National Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) Information and Communication Technology (ICT) Competency Standards for Teachers (ICT-CST) project is to improve teachers' practice in all areas of a their work. By combining ICT skills with emergent views in pedagogy, curriculum, and school organization,…

  7. An Introduction to the Standards for Preparation and Professional Development for Teachers of Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reimers, Jackson E.; Farmer, Cheryl L.; Klein-Gardner, Stacy S.

    2015-01-01

    The past 30 years have yielded a mature body of research regarding effective professional development for teachers of science and mathematics, leading to a robust selection of professional development programs for these teachers. The current emphasis on connections among science, technology, engineering, and mathematics underscores the need for…

  8. A structured record to implement the national Guidelines for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background. Guidelines to improve standards of care for hypertension and diabetes were disseminated by the National Department of Health in 1996 but have generally not been implemented by health professionals in local primary care. A strategy for the adoption and implementation of the Guidelines was developed in ...

  9. Medical tourism in plastic surgery: ethical guidelines and practice standards for perioperative care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iorio, Matthew L; Verma, Kapil; Ashktorab, Samaneh; Davison, Steven P

    2014-06-01

    The goal of this review was to identify the safety and medical care issues that surround the management of patients who had previously undergone medical care through tourism medicine. Medical tourism in plastic surgery occurs via three main referral patterns: macrotourism, in which a patient receives treatments abroad; microtourism, in which a patient undergoes a procedure by a distant plastic surgeon but requires postoperative and/or long-term management by a local plastic surgeon; and specialty tourism, in which a patient receives plastic surgery from a non-plastic surgeon. The ethical practice guidelines of the American Medical Association, International Society of Aesthetic Plastic Surgery, American Society of Plastic Surgeons, and American Board of Plastic Surgeons were reviewed with respect to patient care and the practice of medical tourism. Safe and responsible care should start prior to surgery, with communication and postoperative planning between the treating physician and the accepting physician. Complications can arise at any time; however, it is the duty and ethical responsibility of plastic surgeons to prevent unnecessary complications following tourism medicine by adequately counseling patients, defining perioperative treatment protocols, and reporting complications to regional and specialty-specific governing bodies. This journal requires that authors assign a level of evidence to each article. For a full description of these Evidence-Based Medicine ratings, please refer to the Table of Contents or the online Instructions to Authors www.springer.com/00266.

  10. Improvement of Breast Cancer Patient Pathway Using EUSOMA Standards and European Guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akdag, Hatice Camgöz; Cantürk, Nuh Zafer

    2017-01-01

    Queues in hospitals are directly affecting the quality of human life, which should have priority compared to other types of queues. The aim of this paper is to design a future value stream map of the system and patient pathway in terms of quality improvement in order to decrease the non-value added activities for breast cancer patients, doctors and nurses for a radiology unit in a Training and Research University Hospital based in Kocaeli, Turkey. Nowadays, the increased demand versus insufficient sources affect healthcare services due to poor quality with long queues during the diagnosis and treatment processes. For this paper, data were collected from personal observations, information technologies units and authorized employees. Moreover, data tracking and keeping systems are too poor for revealing the current situation. This paper provides an example of a current and future value stream map showing step by step where the bottlenecks are and how it can be improved and what specific benefits it will bring to the healthcare system. In consideration of all these outcomes, it is highly suggested that the hospital apply European Guidelines for quality assurance in breast cancer screening and diagnosis together with the mentioned above improvement suggestions using lean applications. Celsius.

  11. Formação profissional ética: um compromisso a partir das diretrizes curriculares? Ethical professional education: a commitment based on the curricular guidelines?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirelle Finkler

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Esta reflexão problematiza o discurso e a prática que se estabelecem em torno do tema da formação ética dos profissionais da saúde e, mais particularmente, do cirurgião-dentista, situando o atual momento de implantação das Diretrizes Curriculares Nacionais no ensino superior brasileiro. Procura-se, desta forma, indicar alguns limites e possibilidades para uma formação ética condizente com o novo perfil profissional almejado.This reflection questions the discourse and practice surrounding the ethical education of health professionals and, more particularly, of dentists, situating the current state of deployment of the National Curriculum Guidelines in Brazilian Higher Education. The goal is to point to a few limits and possibilities for an ethical education in line with the new professional profile that is sought.

  12. Nurses’ Perceptions of Critical Issues Requiring Consideration in the Development of Guidelines for Professional Registered Nurse Staffing for Perinatal Units

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, Kathleen Rice; Lyndon, Audrey; Wilson, Jane; Ruhl, Catherine

    2012-01-01

    Objective To solicit input from registered nurse members of the Association of Women’s Health, Obstetric and Neonatal Nurses (AWHONN) on critical considerations for review and revision of existing nurse staffing guidelines. Design Thematic analysis of responses to a cross-sectional on-line survey question: “Please give the staffing task force your input on what they should consider in the development of recommendations for staffing of perinatal units.” Participants N = 884 AWHONN members. Main Outcome Measure Descriptions of staffing concerns that should be considered when evaluating and revising existing perinatal nurse staffing guidelines. Results Consistent themes identified included the need for revision of nurse staffing guidelines due to requirements for safe care, increases in patient acuity and complexity, invisibility of the fetus and newborn as separate and distinct patients, difficulties in providing comprehensive care during labor and for mother-baby couplets under current conditions, challenges in staffing small volume units, and the negative effect of inadequate staffing on nurse satisfaction and retention. Conclusion Participants overwhelmingly indicated current nurse staffing guidelines were inadequate to meet the needs of contemporary perinatal clinical practice and required revision based on significant changes that had occurred since 1983 when the original staffing guidelines were published. PMID:22690743

  13. Development of clinical practice guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollon, Steven D; Areán, Patricia A; Craske, Michelle G; Crawford, Kermit A; Kivlahan, Daniel R; Magnavita, Jeffrey J; Ollendick, Thomas H; Sexton, Thomas L; Spring, Bonnie; Bufka, Lynn F; Galper, Daniel I; Kurtzman, Howard

    2014-01-01

    Clinical practice guidelines (CPGs) are intended to improve mental, behavioral, and physical health by promoting clinical practices that are based on the best available evidence. The American Psychological Association (APA) is committed to generating patient-focused CPGs that are scientifically sound, clinically useful, and informative for psychologists, other health professionals, training programs, policy makers, and the public. The Institute of Medicine (IOM) 2011 standards for generating CPGs represent current best practices in the field. These standards involve multidisciplinary guideline development panels charged with generating recommendations based on comprehensive systematic reviews of the evidence. The IOM standards will guide the APA as it generates CPGs that can be used to inform the general public and the practice community regarding the benefits and harms of various treatment options. CPG recommendations are advisory rather than compulsory. When used appropriately, high-quality guidelines can facilitate shared decision making and identify gaps in knowledge.

  14. GUIDELINES FOR THE DESIGN OF INSTRUMENTS OF COMPETENCE ASSESSMENT FROM MEASURABLE LEARNING STANDARDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ignacio Polo Martínez

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The evaluation is not enough to improve education necessary but. There are no magic to educational problems through assessment solutions. However, the evaluation, in partnership with the methodology, should be treated as determinants of the quality and improving education. Surely, many teachers agree that it is not easy to design assessment tools that are consistent with the teaching-learning competence and, in turn, with rigorous curriculum standards and assessment of the Autonomous Community. However, this difficulty should not be considered as an impossibility. Through this article aims to contribute to building an improvement plan associated with the design of the evaluation instruments from different areas or subjects. Such a design should be based on at least the following: I want to evaluate (referring to assessment criteria and standards of assessable learning included in the instrument and I will evaluate (referencing jurisdictional situations linked to next and known student context, HOW I WILL QUALIFY (preserving the right of students to an objective evaluation and what consequences they will have the results for the different agents that make up the educational community.

  15. Comparison of the CLSI guideline and ISO/IDF standard for antimicrobial susceptibility testing of Lactobacilli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayrhofer, Sigrid; Zitz, Ulrike; Birru, Firew H; Gollan, Dagmar; Gołoś, Aleksandra K; Kneifel, Wolfgang; Domig, Konrad J

    2014-12-01

    Lactobacilli play a crucial role as probiotics and as starter cultures in the production of fermented foods. Although lactobacilli are a technologically useful and beneficial group of bacteria, a few members of them have been rarely correlated with bacterial infections. Correspondingly, clinicians are interested in the antimicrobial susceptibility of lactobacilli. In addition, antimicrobial susceptibility testing (AST) is also relevant for commercially applied lactobacilli as bacterial strains harboring transferable antibiotic resistance genes should not be used in fermented and probiotic foods. Therefore, two methods were developed by different organizations, which were compared within this study. For this purpose, 22 Lactobacillus-type strains were tested for their antimicrobial susceptibility to 16 antibiotics following the procedures of the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) and the International Organization of Standardization (ISO)/International Dairy Federation (IDF). Crucial discrepancies between both procedures were detected mainly due to the different AST media. Hence, half of the strains tested did not consistently grow in the CLSI medium, whereas all showed evaluable growth in the ISO/IDF medium. However, some antibiotics were influenced by the latter medium. In particular, low levels of essential agreement between both methods were obtained with seven antibiotics. Accordingly, different interpretative criteria are needed for both procedures to distinguish resistant from susceptible strains.

  16. Analysis of Open Automated Demand Response Deployments in California and Guidelines to Transition to Industry Standards

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghatikar, Girish; Riess, David; Piette, Mary Ann

    2014-01-02

    This report reviews the Open Automated Demand Response (OpenADR) deployments within the territories serviced by California?s investor-owned utilities (IOUs) and the transition from the OpenADR 1.0 specification to the formal standard?OpenADR 2.0. As demand response service providers and customers start adopting OpenADR 2.0, it is necessary to ensure that the existing Automated Demand Response (AutoDR) infrastructure investment continues to be useful and takes advantage of the formal standard and its many benefits. This study focused on OpenADR deployments and systems used by the California IOUs and included a summary of the OpenADR deployment from the U.S. Department of Energy-funded demonstration conducted by the Sacramento Municipal Utility District (SMUD). Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory collected and analyzed data about OpenADR 1.0 deployments, categorized architectures, developed a data model mapping to understand the technical compatibility of each version, and compared the capabilities and features of the two specifications. The findings, for the first time, provided evidence of the total enabled load shed and average first cost for system enablement in the IOU and SMUD service territories. The OpenADR 2.0a profile specification semantically supports AutoDR system architectures and data propagation with a testing and certification program that promotes interoperability, scaled deployments by multiple vendors, and provides additional features that support future services.

  17. Promotion of Standard Treatment Guidelines and Building Referral System for Management of Common Noncommunicable Diseases in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S K Jindal

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Treatment services constitute one of the five priority actions to face the global crisis due to noncommunicable diseases (NCDs. It is important to formulate standard treatment guidelines (STGs for an effective management, particularly at the primary and secondary levels of health care. Dissemination and implementation of STGs for NCDs on a country-wide scale involves difficult and complex issues. The management of NCDs and the associated costs are highly variable and huge. Besides the educational strategies for promotion of STGs, the scientific and administrative sanctions and sanctity are important for purposes of reimbursements, insurance, availability of facilities, and legal protection. An effective and functional referral- system needs to be built to ensure availability of appropriate care at all levels of health- services. The patient-friendly "to and fro" referral system will help to distribute the burden, lower the costs, and maintain the sustainability of services.

  18. Curriculum guidelines, standards and skills in spanish language. from untamed industrial objectivity to student’s harmless subjectivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franklin Yessid Arias Bedoya

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Competency Based Education is a curricular approach that, in addition to the controversy it arises, establishes practices and specific thoughts in schools: its origin from behavioral theories and their connection to the economic field disclose formation objectives that highlight the need of thinking about teaching practices and institutional curricula. These goals linked to projects such as work-oriented education and the propaedeutic cycles reveal the implicit intentions in the education system, where students’ specific characteristics yield to national economic imperatives. This reflection paper seeks to explore and define the ‘conceptual gap’ between an education based on the ideals of trade logic, and one directed to the aesthetic and socio-political formation of the subject, on the basis of legal documents as the Curricular Guidelines, Skill Standards for Spanish Language, Law 39 of 1903, General Law of Education and texts by various educational theorists such as Paulo Freire and Gimeno Sacristan.

  19. Self-efficacy for deprescribing: A survey for health care professionals using evidence-based deprescribing guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrell, Barbara; Richardson, Lisa; Raman-Wilms, Lalitha; de Launay, David; Alsabbagh, Mhd Wasem; Conklin, James

    2018-01-01

    Although polypharmacy is associated with significant morbidity, deprescribing can be challenging. In particular, clinicians express difficulty with their ability to deprescribe (i.e. reduce or stop medications that are potentially inappropriate). Evidence-based deprescribing guidelines are designed to help clinicians take action on reducing or stopping medications that may be causing more harm than benefit. Determine if implementation of evidence-based guidelines increases self-efficacy for deprescribing proton pump inhibitor (PPI), benzodiazepine receptor agonist (BZRA) and antipsychotic (AP) drug classes. A deprescribing self-efficacy survey was developed and administered to physicians, nurse practitioners and pharmacists at 3 long-term care (LTC) and 3 Family Health Teams in Ottawa, Canada at baseline and approximately 6 months after sequential implementation of each guideline. For each drug class, overall and domain-specific self-efficacy mean scores were calculated. The effects of implementation of each guideline on self-efficacy were tested by estimating the difference in scores using paired t-test. A linear mixed-effects model was used to investigate change over time and over practice sites. Of eligible clinicians, 25, 21, 18 and 13 completed the first, second, third and fourth survey respectively. Paired t-tests compared 14 participants for PPI and BZRA, and 9 for AP. Overall self-efficacy score increased for AP only (95% confidence intervals (CI) 0.32 to 19.79). Scores for domain 2 (develop a plan to deprescribe) increased for PPI (95% CI 0.52 to 24.12) and AP guidelines (95% CI 2.46 to 18.11); scores for domain 3 (implement the plan for deprescribing) increased for the PPI guideline (95% CI 0.55 to 14.24). Longitudinal analysis showed an increase in non-class specific scores, with a more profound effect for clinicians in LTC where guidelines were routinely used. Implementation of evidence-based deprescribing guidelines appears to increase clinicians' self

  20. A Comparison of Casual In-Clinic Blood Pressure Measurements to Standardized Guideline-Concordant Measurements in Severely Obese Individuals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sana Vahidy

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Objectives. The objective of this study was to compare casual BP taken in a bariatric clinic to standardized guideline-concordant BP. Subjects/Methods. A cross sectional analysis was performed using baseline data from a weight management trial. Patients were recruited from a Canadian bariatric care program. Standardized BP was performed using a Watch BP oscillometric device. Casual in-clinic BP single readings, taken using a Welch Allyn oscillometric device, were chart-abstracted. Paired t-tests, Bland-Altman plots, and Pearson’s correlations were used for analysis. Results. Data from 134 patients were analyzed. Mean age was 41.5 ± 8.9 y, mean BMI was 46.8 ± 6.5 kg/m2, and 40 (30% had prior hypertension. Mean casual in-clinic BP was 128.8 ± 14.1/81.6 ± 9.9 mmHg and mean standardized BP was 133.2 ± 15.0/82.0 ± 10.3 mmHg (difference of −4.3 ± 12.0 for systolic (p<0.0001 and −0.4 ± 10.0 mmHg for diastolic BP (p=0.6. Pearson’s coefficients were 0.66 (p<0.0001 for SBP and 0.50 (p<0.0001 for DBP. 28.4% of casual versus 26.9% of standardized measurements were ≥140/90 mmHg (p<0.0001. Conclusion. In this bariatric clinic, casual BP was unexpectedly lower than standardized BP. This could potentially lead to the underdiagnosis of hypertension.

  1. Utilization study of antidiabetic agents in a teaching hospital of Sikkim and adherence to current standard treatment guidelines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sushrut Varun Satpathy

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Diabetes has gradually emerged as one of the most serious public health problems in our country. This underlines the need for timely disease detection and decisive therapeutic intervention. This prospective cross-sectional observational study aims at analyzing the utilization pattern of antidiabetic agents in a remote North-East Indian tertiary care teaching hospital in the perspective of current standard treatment guidelines. Materials and Methods: Diabetic patients receiving antidiabetic medication, both as outpatients and inpatients in our hospital over a period of 12 months (May 2013–May 2014, were included in this study. The data obtained were sorted and analyzed on the basis of gender, type of therapy, and hospital setting. Results: A total of 310 patients were included in the study. Metformin was the single most frequently prescribed antidiabetic agent (66.8% followed by the sulfonylureas group (37.4%. Insulin was prescribed in 23.2% of the patients. Combination antidiabetic drug therapy (65.1% was used more frequently than monotherapy (34.8%. The use of biguanides (P < 0.0001 and sulfonylureas (P = 0.02 in combination was significant as compared to their use as monotherapy. A total of 48% of all antidiabetic combinations used, comprised metformin and sulfonylureas (n = 96. Insulin use was significantly higher as monotherapy and in inpatients (P< 0.0001. The utilization of drugs from the National List of Essential Medicines was 51.2%, while 11% of antidiabetics were prescribed by generic name. Conclusion: The pattern of utilization largely conforms to the current standard treatment guidelines. Increased use of generic drugs is an area with scope for improvement.

  2. A review of multidisciplinary clinical practice guidelines in suicide prevention: toward an emerging standard in suicide risk assessment and management, training and practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernert, Rebecca A; Hom, Melanie A; Roberts, Laura Weiss

    2014-10-01

    The current paper aims to: (1) examine clinical practice guidelines in suicide prevention across fields, organizations, and clinical specialties and (2) inform emerging standards in clinical practice, research, and training. The authors conducted a systematic literature review to identify clinical practice guidelines and resource documents in suicide prevention and risk management. The authors used PubMed, Google Scholar, and Google Search, and keywords included: clinical practice guideline, practice guideline, practice parameters, suicide, suicidality, suicidal behaviors, assessment, and management. To assess for commonalities, the authors reviewed guidelines and resource documents across 13 key content categories and assessed whether each document suggested validated assessment measures. The search generated 101 source documents, which included N = 10 clinical practice guidelines and N = 12 additional resource documents (e.g., non-formalized guidelines, tool-kits). All guidelines (100 %) provided detailed recommendations for the use of evidence-based risk factors and protective factors, 80 % provided brief (but not detailed) recommendations for the assessment of suicidal intent, and 70 % recommended risk management strategies. By comparison, only 30 % discussed standardization of risk-level categorizations and other content areas considered central to best practices in suicide prevention (e.g., restricting access to means, ethical considerations, confidentiality/legal issues, training, and postvention practices). Resource documents were largely consistent with these findings. Current guidelines address similar aspects of suicide risk assessment and management, but significant discrepancies exist. A lack of consensus was evident in recommendations across core competencies, which may be improved by increased standardization in practice and training. Additional resources appear useful for supplemental use.

  3. Guidelines for Adult Stroke Rehabilitation and Recovery: A Guideline for Healthcare Professionals From the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winstein, Carolee J; Stein, Joel; Arena, Ross; Bates, Barbara; Cherney, Leora R; Cramer, Steven C; Deruyter, Frank; Eng, Janice J; Fisher, Beth; Harvey, Richard L; Lang, Catherine E; MacKay-Lyons, Marilyn; Ottenbacher, Kenneth J; Pugh, Sue; Reeves, Mathew J; Richards, Lorie G; Stiers, William; Zorowitz, Richard D

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this guideline is to provide a synopsis of best clinical practices in the rehabilitative care of adults recovering from stroke. Writing group members were nominated by the committee chair on the basis of their previous work in relevant topic areas and were approved by the American Heart Association (AHA) Stroke Council's Scientific Statement Oversight Committee and the AHA's Manuscript Oversight Committee. The panel reviewed relevant articles on adults using computerized searches of the medical literature through 2014. The evidence is organized within the context of the AHA framework and is classified according to the joint AHA/American College of Cardiology and supplementary AHA methods of classifying the level of certainty and the class and level of evidence. The document underwent extensive AHA internal and external peer review, Stroke Council Leadership review, and Scientific Statements Oversight Committee review before consideration and approval by the AHA Science Advisory and Coordinating Committee. Stroke rehabilitation requires a sustained and coordinated effort from a large team, including the patient and his or her goals, family and friends, other caregivers (eg, personal care attendants), physicians, nurses, physical and occupational therapists, speech-language pathologists, recreation therapists, psychologists, nutritionists, social workers, and others. Communication and coordination among these team members are paramount in maximizing the effectiveness and efficiency of rehabilitation and underlie this entire guideline. Without communication and coordination, isolated efforts to rehabilitate the stroke survivor are unlikely to achieve their full potential. As systems of care evolve in response to healthcare reform efforts, postacute care and rehabilitation are often considered a costly area of care to be trimmed but without recognition of their clinical impact and ability to reduce the risk of downstream medical morbidity resulting from

  4. AMERICAN ASSOCIATION OF CLINICAL ENDOCRINOLOGISTS AND AMERICAN COLLEGE OF ENDOCRINOLOGY PROTOCOL FOR STANDARDIZED PRODUCTION OF CLINICAL PRACTICE GUIDELINES, ALGORITHMS, AND CHECKLISTS - 2017 UPDATE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mechanick, Jeffrey I; Pessah-Pollack, Rachel; Camacho, Pauline; Correa, Ricardo; Figaro, M Kathleen; Garber, Jeffrey R; Jasim, Sina; Pantalone, Kevin M; Trence, Dace; Upala, Sikarin

    2017-08-01

    Clinical practice guideline (CPG), clinical practice algorithm (CPA), and clinical checklist (CC, collectively CPGAC) development is a high priority of the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists (AACE) and American College of Endocrinology (ACE). This 2017 update in CPG development consists of (1) a paradigm change wherein first, environmental scans identify important clinical issues and needs, second, CPA construction focuses on these clinical issues and needs, and third, CPG provide CPA node/edge-specific scientific substantiation and appended CC; (2) inclusion of new technical semantic and numerical descriptors for evidence types, subjective factors, and qualifiers; and (3) incorporation of patient-centered care components such as economics and transcultural adaptations, as well as implementation, validation, and evaluation strategies. This third point highlights the dominating factors of personal finances, governmental influences, and third-party payer dictates on CPGAC implementation, which ultimately impact CPGAC development. The AACE/ACE guidelines for the CPGAC program is a successful and ongoing iterative exercise to optimize endocrine care in a changing and challenging healthcare environment. AACE = American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists ACC = American College of Cardiology ACE = American College of Endocrinology ASeRT = ACE Scientific Referencing Team BEL = best evidence level CC = clinical checklist CPA = clinical practice algorithm CPG = clinical practice guideline CPGAC = clinical practice guideline, algorithm, and checklist EBM = evidence-based medicine EHR = electronic health record EL = evidence level G4GAC = Guidelines for Guidelines, Algorithms, and Checklists GAC = guidelines, algorithms, and checklists HCP = healthcare professional(s) POEMS = patient-oriented evidence that matters PRCT = prospective randomized controlled trial.

  5. Child seat belt guidelines: Examining the 4 feet 9 inches rule as the standard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morse, Amber M; Aitken, Mary E; Mullins, Samantha H; Miller, Beverly K; Pomtree, Mindy M; Ulloa, Erin M; Montgomery, Jeffrey S; Saylors, Marie E

    2017-11-01

    Current American Academy of Pediatrics recommendations regarding transition from child safety/booster seat to adult safety belt use indicate that children should be at least 4 feet 9 inches, 8 years old, or 80 pounds. Proper fit in the vehicle seat, assessed with a five-point fit test, should also be met. Although most children reach 4 feet 9 inches around age 8 years, each child and vehicle presents a unique combination; thus a child may not fit appropriately in all vehicle types using only the 4 feet 9 inches requirement. We enrolled children, aged 7 years to 12 years, into our study. Height, weight, and demographic data were obtained. A Child Passenger Safety Technician then performed the five-point fit test in each of a uniform lineup of five vehicles. Data were collected on fit in the standard vehicle seat and also in a booster seat. We set 90% as the threshold proportion of children who meet all criteria for proper fit to validate current recommendations of a height of 4 feet 9 inches. Data were collected on 388 children. The percentage of 90% proper fit was met in the compact car and small sport-utility vehicle (SUV). However, only 80 (77%) of 104 students (p seat belt do not meet safety requirements for fit, especially in larger, commonly used vehicles (large SUVs and trucks). This emphasizes the need for evaluation of fit by a trained personnel and/or development of standard back seat dimensions in all vehicles for maximum safety. Epidemiologic level 1.

  6. Corporate System of Advanced Education for Teachers in Educational Organization in the Context of Professional Standard Implementation

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    Kurneshova L.Y.,

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The paper describes methodological approaches to the development of corporate system of advanced training for teachers in the context of implementation of the professional standard for teachers as a basis for competitive growth of educational institution. The key stage in this process is to identify areas of concern in the competencies of the teaching staff. The paper presents a system developed for these purposes which consists of the following four elements: self-testing for teachers; professional training; psychoeducational diagnostic training; training on creating a corporate roadmap for raising professional skills in teachers. The paper addresses the issues related to roadmap development basing on the foresight methodology. Finally, it provides an analysis of various forms of advanced training programs for teachers used in 46 regional centers for advanced training in every federal region of the Russian Federation. Supported by the Moscow Educational Department. The research work “Development and realization of manage- ment project “Organization and implementation of teacher professional training based on the requirements of Teacher professional standard”

  7. Adherence Patterns to National Comprehensive Cancer Network Guidelines for Referral of Women With Breast Cancer to Genetics Professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuckey, Ashley; Febbraro, Terri; Laprise, Jessica; Wilbur, Jennifer S; Lopes, Vrishali; Robison, Katina

    2016-08-01

    Genetic predisposition is responsible for 5% to 10% of breast cancer. The National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) established guidelines delineating appropriate candidates for genetic counseling. This study aims to determine referral patterns for genetic counseling in women who met such guidelines. Utilizing an institutional tumor registry, patients from an academic oncology program who met a subset of NCCN guidelines for genetic referrals between 2004 and 2010 were identified (breast cancer diagnosis ≤50 y without a known BRCA mutation). A retrospective chart review was conducted. Statistics were analyzed using SAS version 9.2. A total of 314 patients were identified and 107 (34.1%) were referred for genetic counseling. Median age at diagnosis was younger for those referred versus not referred (43 and 46 y; PWomen were more likely referred with a family history suspicious for an inherited cancer syndrome (67.3% vs. 36.2%; Pwomen referred. Those patients who choose prophylactic contralateral mastectomy were likely to have been referred for genetic counseling (63.6% vs. 36.4%, Pwomen who meet NCCN referral guidelines. Age and family history were noted to be predictive of referral for genetic evaluation. Further research is needed to determine additional factors that may impact not only referral rates but subsequent care for women with possible genetic predispositions to cancer.

  8. Clinical Guidelines and the Translation of Texts into Care: Overcoming Professional Conflicts Concerning Evidence-based Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davenport, Elisabeth

    2000-01-01

    Reviews problems identified in previous research on evidence-based nursing practice; discusses conflicts between medical and nursing domains; explores the provenance and status of the clinical guideline as a translation artefact or bridging mechanism based on a social studies of science approach; and presents a case study of Scottish clinical…

  9. Balancing Professional Standards and Political Discretion in Selecting Top Officials in Slovenia

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    Polonca KOVAČ

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available One of the key drivers of modern and efficient public administration under the good governance doctrine is an efficient top officials’ selection system. A targeted selection and recruitment system is a prerequisite for the whole administration to act in compliance with the political priorities of the government. However, civil servants and top officials alike must put professional competencies above political loyalty. Therefore, a new system was introduced in Slovenia following the 2003 Civil Servants Act, aimed at ensuring professionalism against (overpoliticization of public administration. A research carried out in 2012 among candidates and selected top officials and ministers, as their political superiors, revealed an overall efficiency of the Slovenian selection scheme in the sense of restricted over-politicization and increased professionalism. Its outcomes lead to the conclusion that the selection system in Slovenia, owing to its two-phase professional and political selection, is most adequate in terms of both regulation and practice since it takes into account the twofold role of top officials and civil service or public administration as a whole (first, as a force providing professional solutions by ensuring legality and efficient resource management, and second, as the closest collaborators of the political leadership implementing government policies.

  10. A selective review of prenatal exercise guidelines since the 1950s until present: Written for women, health care professionals, and female athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kehler, Ainslie K; Heinrich, Katie M

    2015-12-01

    Traditional society values have long-held the notion that the pregnant woman is construed as a risk to her growing fetus and is solely responsible for controlling this risk to ensure a healthy pregnancy. It is hard to ignore the participation of pregnant women in sport and exercise today, especially in high-level sports and popular fitness programs such as CrossFit™. This challenges both traditional and modern prenatal exercise guidelines from health care professionals and governing health agencies. The guidelines and perceived limitations of prenatal exercise have drastically evolved since the 1950s. The goal of this paper is to bring awareness to the idea that much of the information regarding exercise safety during pregnancy is hypersensitive and dated, and the earlier guidelines had no scientific rigor. Research is needed on the upper limits of exercise intensity and exercise frequency, as well as their potential risks (if any) on the woman or fetus. Pregnant women are physically capable of much more than what was once thought. There is still disagreement about the types of exercise deemed appropriate, the stage at which exercise should begin and cease, the frequency of exercise sessions, as well as the optimal level of intensity during prenatal exercise. Research is needed to determine the upper limits of exercise frequency and intensity for pregnant women who are already trained. Healthy women and female athletes can usually maintain their regular training regime once they become pregnant. Copyright © 2015 Australian College of Midwives. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. A selective review of prenatal exercise guidelines since the 1950s until present: written for women, health care professionals, and female athletes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kehler, Ainslie K.; Heinrich, Katie M.

    2017-01-01

    Background Traditional society values have long-held the notion that the pregnant woman is construed as a risk to her growing fetus and is solely responsible for controlling this risk to ensure a healthy pregnancy. It is hard to ignore the participation of pregnant women in sport and exercise today, especially in high-level sports and popular fitness programs such as CrossFit™. This challenges both traditional and modern prenatal exercise guidelines from health care professionals and governing health agencies. The guidelines and perceived limitations of prenatal exercise have drastically evolved since the 1950’s. Aim The goal of this paper is to bring awareness to the idea that much of the information regarding exercise safety during pregnancy is hypersensitive and dated, and the earlier guidelines had no scientific rigor. Research is needed on the upper limits of exercise intensity and exercise frequency, as well as their potential risks (if any) on the woman or fetus. Discussion Pregnant women are physically capable of much more than what was once thought. There is still disagreement about the types of exercise deemed appropriate, the stage at which exercise should begin and cease, the frequency of exercise sessions, as well as the optimal level of intensity during prenatal exercise. Conclusion Research is needed to determine the upper limits of exercise frequency and intensity for pregnant women who are already trained. Healthy women and female athletes can usually maintain their regular training regime once they become pregnant. PMID:26210535

  12. Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics: Revised 2012 Standards of Practice in Nutrition Care and Standards of Professional Performance for Registered Dietitians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-01

    RDs face complex situations every day. Competently addressing the unique needs of each situation and applying standards appropriately is essential to providing safe, timely, person-centered quality care and service. All RDs are advised to conduct their practice based on the most recent edition of the Academy's Code of Ethics and the Scope of Practice in Nutrition and Dietetics, the Scope of Practice for the Registered Dietitian, the 2012 Standards of Practice in Nutrition Care and Standards of Professional Performance for RDs, and the applicable focus area SOP and SOPP for RDs. These resources provide minimum standards and tools for demonstrating competence and safe practice, and are used collectively to gauge and guide an RD's performance in nutrition and dietetics practice. The SOP and SOPP for the RD are self-evaluation tools that promote quality assurance and performance improvement. Self-assessment provides opportunities to identify areas for enhancement, new learning, and skill development, and to encourage progression of career growth. All RDs are advised to have in their personal libraries the most recent copy of the Academy's Scope of Practice in Nutrition and Dietetics and its components: The 2012 Academy Standards of Practice in Nutrition Care and Standards of Professional Performance for Registered Dietitians; applicable focus area SOP and SOPP; the Code of Ethics; and the Scope of Practice for the Registered Dietitian. To ensure that credentialed dietetics practitioners always have access to the most current materials, each resource is maintained on the Academy's website. The documents will continue to be reviewed and updated as new trends in the profession of nutrition and dietetics and external influences emerge.

  13. Development of guidelines for tertiary education institutions to assist them in supporting students with a mental illness: a Delphi consensus study with Australian professionals and consumers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicola J. Reavley

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Background. The age at which most young people are in tertiary education is also the age of peak onset for mental illness. Because mental health problems can have adverse effects on students’ academic performance and welfare, institutions require guidance how they can best provide support. However, the scientific evidence for how best to do this is relatively limited. Therefore a Delphi expert consensus study was carried out with professional and consumer experts.Methods. A systematic review of websites, books and journal articles was conducted to develop a 172 item survey containing strategies that institutions might use to support students with a mental illness. Two panels of Australian experts (74 professionals and 35 consumers were recruited and independently rated the items over three rounds, with strategies reaching consensus on importance written into the guidelines.Results. The overall response rate across three rounds was 83% (80% consumers, 85% professionals. 155 strategies were endorsed as essential or important by at least 80% of panel members. The endorsed strategies provided information on policy, measures to promote support services, service provision, accessibility of support services, relationships between services, other types of support and issues associated with reasonable adjustments. They also provided guidance on the procedures the institutions should have for making staff aware of issues associated with mental illness, mental illness training, support for staff and communicating with a student with a mental illness. They also covered student rights and responsibilities, the procedures the institutions should have for making students aware of issues associated with mental illness, dealing with mental health crises, funding and research and evaluation.Conclusions. The guidelines provide guidance for tertiary institutions to assist them in supporting students with a mental illness. It is hoped that they may be used to

  14. Professional identity in nursing: UK students' explanations for poor standards of care

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    Traynor, Michael; Buus, Niels

    2016-01-01

    Research concludes that professional socialisation in nursing is deeply problematic because new recruits start out identifying with the profession’s ideals but lose this idealism as they enter and continue to work in the profession. This study set out to examine the topic focussing on the development of professional identity. Six focus groups were held with a total of 49 2nd and 3rd year BSc nursing students studying at a university in London, UK and their transcripts were subject to discours...

  15. A comparison of two methods for measuring anti-hypertensive drug use: concordance of use with South African standard treatment guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pillay, Thamizhanban; Smith, Anthony J; Hill, Suzanne R

    2009-06-01

    To assess prescriber adherence to standard anti-hypertensive treatment guidelines in South Africa, determine if supply data are useful indicators of drug use, and assess the cost implications of not complying with the guidelines. We undertook two studies: an analysis of records of the anti-hypertensive drugs supplied to all 54 public-sector hospitals with a hypertension clinic in KwaZulu-Natal, and a direct-observation survey of anti-hypertensive drug prescriptions presented to pharmacies in a subset of 16 of the 54 hospitals. We calculated the relative use of each anti-hypertensive drug group as a proportion of all anti-hypertensive drugs supplied or prescribed. We ranked drug groups in order of use for comparison with recommended South African standard treatment guidelines, and we compared the proportions derived from supply data with those derived from the prescription survey. Supply data showed that, in line with treatment guidelines, diuretics and angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors were the most frequently supplied medicines (42% and 27%, respectively). However, methyldopa - not included in the treatment guidelines - represented 10% of all anti-hypertensives supplied, but the proportion varied widely between hospitals (0-37%). Reserpine, second choice in the treatment guidelines, was used in high amounts by only two hospitals. Calcium channel blockers and beta blockers represented a small proportion of the anti-hypertensive drugs supplied: 6% each. Results from the prescription survey were in concordance with supply data for the most frequently prescribed drugs but gave slightly different estimates of the use of others. Supply data, the most available source of information about drug use in developing countries, are (with some provisos) a reliable data source for the evaluation of adherence to treatment guidelines. Our results showed substantial non-adherence to standard treatment guidelines.

  16. Standard guidelines of care: CO 2 laser for removal of benign skin lesions and resurfacing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krupashankar D

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Resurfacing is a treatment to remove acne and chicken pox scars, and changes in the skin due to ageing. Machines : Both ablative and nonablative lasers are available for use. CO 2 laser is the gold standard in ablative lasers. Detailed knowledge of the machines is essential. Indications for CO 2 laser: Therapeutic indications: Actinic and seborrheic keratosis, warts, moles, skin tags, epidermal and dermal nevi, vitiligo blister and punch grafting, rhinophyma, sebaceous hyperplasia, xanthelasma, syringomas, actinic cheilitis angiofibroma, scar treatment, keloid, skin cancer, neurofibroma and diffuse actinic keratoses. CO 2 laser is not recommended for the removal of tattoos. Aesthetic indications: Resurfacing for acne, chicken pox and surgical scars, periorbital and perioral wrinkles, photo ageing changes, facial resurfacing. Physicians′ qualifications: Any qualified dermatologist (DVD or MD may practice CO 2 laser. The dermatologist should possess postgraduate qualification in dermatology and should have had specific hands-on training in lasers either during postgraduation or later at a facility which routinely performs laser procedures under a competent dermatologist/plastic surgeon, who has experience and training in using lasers. For the use of CO 2 lasers for benign growths, a full day workshop is adequate. As parameters may vary in different machines, specific training with the available machine at either the manufacturer′s facility or at another centre using the machine is recommended. Facility: CO 2 lasers can be used in the dermatologist′s minor procedure room for the above indications. However, when used for full-face resurfacing, the hospital operation theatre or day care facility with immediate access to emergency medical care is essential. Smoke evacuator is mandatory. Preoperative counseling and Informed consent Detailed counseling with respect to the treatment, desired effects, possible postoperative complications, should be

  17. Assembling the "Accomplished" Teacher: The Performativity and Politics of Professional Teaching Standards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulcahy, Dianne

    2011-01-01

    Set within the socio-political context of standards-based education reform, this article explores the constitutive role of teaching standards in the production of the practice and identity of the "accomplished" teacher. It contrasts two idioms for thinking about and studying these standards, the representational and the performative. Utilising the…

  18. School-Based Mental Health Professionals' Bullying Assessment Practices: A Call for Evidence-Based Bullying Assessment Guidelines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blake, Jamilia; Banks, Courtney S.; Patience, Brenda A.; Lund, Emily M.

    2014-01-01

    A sample of 483 school-based mental health professionals completed a survey about the training they have received related to conducting bullying assessments in schools, competence in conducting an assessment of bullying, and the bullying assessment methods they used. Results indicate that school counselors were usually informed about incidents of…

  19. Professional identity in nursing: UK students' explanations for poor standards of care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traynor, Michael; Buus, Niels

    2016-10-01

    Research concludes that professional socialisation in nursing is deeply problematic because new recruits start out identifying with the profession's ideals but lose this idealism as they enter and continue to work in the profession. This study set out to examine the topic focussing on the development of professional identity. Six focus groups were held with a total of 49 2nd and 3rd year BSc nursing students studying at a university in London, UK and their transcripts were subject to discourse analysis. Participants' talk was strongly dualistic and inflected with anxiety. Participants identified with caring as an innate characteristic. They described some qualified nurses as either not possessing this characteristic or as having lost it. They explained strategies for not becoming corrupted in professional practice. Their talk enacted distancing from 'bad' qualified nurses and solidarity with other students. Their talk also featured cynicism. Neophyte nurses' talk of idealism and cynicism can be understood as identity work in the context of anxiety inherent in the work of nurses and in a relatively powerless position in the professional healthcare hierarchy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Proposed Standards for Education in Online Searching in the Professional Librarianship Curriculum. Position Paper No. 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mignon, Edmond, Ed.

    This position paper, from a March 1978 institute for library educators on teaching techniques for online searching in professional librarianship programs, recognizes two types of teaching programs currently in existence. One of these is consciousness raising, which stresses a basic understanding and appreciation of concepts and issues, and is…

  1. TESOL Professional Standards in the "Asian Century": Dilemmas Facing Australian TESOL Teacher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liyanage, Indika; Walker, Tony; Singh, Parlo

    2015-01-01

    Australian teacher education programmes that prepare teachers of English to speakers of other languages (TESOL) are confronting the nexus of two facets of globalization: transformations in the Asian region, captured in the notion of the "Asian century", and shifting conceptions of professionalism in TESOL in non-compulsory education. In…

  2. Barriers influencing implementation of the National Science Education Standards by middle school teachers engaged in collaborative professional development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Carla Cunnagin

    This study focused on implementation of the National Science Education Standards by middle school science teachers. Science teachers from two suburban middle schools who engaged in structured collaborative professional development over a period of two years were participants in the study. A review of the current literature in this field indicated a need for further research on sustained, collaborative professional development (Loucks-Horsley, Hewson, Love & Stiles, 1998; Supovitz & Turner, 2000). Previous findings indicated teachers implementing curricular reform encounter barriers and/or dilemmas when implementing the new instructional strategies into their teaching practices (Anderson, 1996). This study sought to find out what technical, political and cultural barriers teachers encounter when implementing standards-based instruction and how those barriers impacted implementation. There were twelve participants in this mixed methods study. A stratified random sample of a high, medium and low implementer of standards-based instruction, based upon their self-reported use in a teacher questionnaire, were selected at each of the two middle schools. Detailed classroom observations were conducted using the Local Systemic Change Classroom Observation Protocol (Horizon Research, 2002) identifying their level of use of standards-based instruction. All twelve teachers were interviewed regarding their instructional practices and possible barriers they encountered to implementation. Findings in this study indicated that as the number of technical, political or cultural barriers increased, implementation of standards-based instruction decreased. Cultural dimension categories such as existing teacher beliefs about instruction and how students learn science, as well as the belief that standards-based instruction is not aligned with state assessments were barriers for teachers in this study. In addition, if a teacher had a high barrier in a cultural category, they also were one

  3. Experimental investigations and guidelines for PCB design for a fuel injection ECU to meet automotive environmental, EMI/EMC and ESD standards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalyankar-Narwade, Supriya; Kumar, C. Ramesh; Patil, Sanjay A.

    2017-11-01

    Engine Management ECU plays a vital role in controlling different important features related to the engine performance. ECU is an embedded system which includes hardware and firmware platform for control logics. However, it is necessary to verify its smooth performance by its functionality testing in the Electromagnetic environment for approval. If these requirements are not known at earlier stages, then ECU may not fulfil functional requirements during required automotive electronic test standards. Hence, focusing on EMS ECU, this paper highlights hardware, layout and software guidelines for solving problems related with Electromagnetic Interference (EMI) to comply ISO 7637, CISPR 25 standard, Electromagnetic Compatibility (EMC) to comply ISO 11452-4,5 standard, Electrostatic Discharge (ESD) to comply ISO 10605 standard and Environmental Testing to comply standards as per IEC standards. This paper specifies initially the importance, need and guidelines for reducing the EMI effect on PCB i.e. making ECU more electromagnetically compatible as per automotive standards. The guidelines are useful for the designers to avoid pitfalls at the later stage. After mentioned modifications in the paper, ECU successfully passed the requirements for all standard tests.

  4. Analysis of exchanges between novice and cooperating teachers during internships using the NCATE/NASPE Standards for Teacher Preparation in Physical Education as guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banville, Dominique

    2006-06-01

    To be recognized as an accredited program, Physical Education Teacher Education (PETE) programs in the country must abide by guidelines put forward by the National Association for Sport and Physical Education (NASPE), in collaboration with the National Council for the Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE). The guidelines are divided into nine standards and identify a number of outcomes (NASPE, 1998). The purpose of this study was to determine the nature of the exchanges between novice teachers (NTs) and cooperating teachers (CTs), when using the NASPE Standards (1998) as a reference point, and determine if the focus of the exchanges differed over time and according to data source. Six pairs of CTs and their NT participated in the study. Data were collected through recorded conversations between NTs and their CT as well as NTs' logs. Data showed that the majority of conversations focused on planning and instruction (Standard 6) and management and motivation (Standard 4), while few related to diverse learners (Standard 3), growth and development (Standard 2), and communication (Standard 5). The small amount of information shared by CTs in some standards indicates a need for PETE programs to share the guidelines with CTs to make them aware of the importance of offering a variety of topics to interns, because CTs are the primary source of information during this crucial experience.

  5. Reflections of Turkish accounting and financial reporting standards on vocational school students: A research on comparing perceptions of intermediate and mid-level accounting professional candidates

    OpenAIRE

    Seldüz Hakan; Seldüz Emine

    2016-01-01

    This research aims to compare the perceptions of intermediate and mid-level accounting professional candidates on accounting and financial reporting standards. A significant part of accounting process is carried out by vocational school graduate intermediate and mid-level accounting professionals. However, it can be claimed that adequate education about accounting and financial reporting standards isn’t given in vocational schools although these standards structure the whole accounting proces...

  6. The Clinical Significance of Schistocytes: A Prospective Evaluation of the International Council for Standardization in Hematology Schistocyte Guidelines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elise Schapkaitz

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The presence of ≥1% schistocytes on a peripheral blood smear (PBS is an important criterion for the diagnosis of thrombotic microangiopathy (TMA. The reporting of schistocytes has been standardized by the International Council for Standardization in Hematology (ICSH. Despite the availability of guidelines, however, the assessment of schistocytes remains subjective. More recently, the automated fragmented red cell (FRC parameter has been evaluated. However, local studies are not available. Materials and Methods: A prospective study was performed at the Charlotte Maxeke Johannesburg Academic Hospital in order to evaluate the ICSH recommendations for schistocyte measurement in 146 PBSs with schistocytes. Schistocytes were evaluated by microscopy and ADVIA 2120 automated hematology analyzers. Results: Schistocytes were frequently observed in patients with TMA (n=76, infection (n=20, hematologic malignancy (n=10, renal failure (n=5, and hemoglobinopathy (n=15, and in neonates (n=11. Schistocytes were ≥1% in all PBSs with TMA (n=76 with a mean of 3.44±1.84. Schistocytes of ≥1% were also observed in cases of renal failure and hemoglobinopathy, and in neonates. In these conditions, schistocytes were mainly observed in conjunction with moderate red blood cell changes. The agreement between two morphologists gave a correlation coefficient of 0.63 [confidence interval (CI: 0.52-0.75], while the correlation coefficient between the average of the morphologists and the FRC percentage was -1.97 (CI: -1.60 to -2.34. The ADVIA 2120 underestimated the schistocyte count in patients with TMA. Conclusion: Observer bias can be decreased by implementing the standardized procedures recommended by the ICSH. However, estimation of schistocytes by the ADVIA 2120 analyzer requires further evaluation as a screening tool. A higher threshold for schistocytes in thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura is recommended to distinguish this hematological emergency

  7. Minimum standard guidelines of care on requirements for setting up a laser room

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dhepe Niteen

    2009-08-01

    low humidity and dust free environment for longer life of machines. Patient chair: A dental/cosmetic chair with adjustable task light is a suitable option for patient positioning. The chair should have the option to tilt head down or ′syncope position′ to facilitate resuscitation of a patient in vaso-vagal shock. Maintenance: Annual maintenance contract (AMC is essential after warranty period is over and is essential for insurance purposes. Mobile Laser Unit: Mobile laser units are of relevance in the Indian context to render laser facility available in smaller towns. A laser with fiber optic delivery system can be made mobile after consultation with supplier. However a laser with an articulated arm delivery cannot be made mobile. Proper packing with shock absorbing material is necessary during transportation. The area where lasers are to be moved to and operated should have appropriate facilities as mentioned above. Records: Patient′s health declaration questionnaires, laser register are essential records. Digital photography before and at regular intervals after procedure is an essential record. Detailed informed consent in patients language for each procedure explaining nature of procedure, anesthesia used, and machine used, post operative down time should be signed by patient. Drugs, anesthesia and sterilization: An electrocautery machine to control bleeding, equipments for airway maintenance, other instruments for emergency resuscitation and an emergency drug tray are essential. Standard sterilization practices are adopted. For most of laser procedures topical anesthesia is sufficient. Safe laser use: Protocols of safe laser use to avoid burns or eye damage to patients or operator are adopted. Reflective surfaces like mirrors, reflective jewelleries are not allowed in laser room. Machine should always be on standby mode when not in direct use. It should be used by authorized operator only. Eye protection: Goggles of sufficient optical density (OD intended

  8. Mapping the Association of College and Research Libraries information literacy framework and nursing professional standards onto an assessment rubric

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willson, Gloria; Angell, Katelyn

    2017-01-01

    Objective The authors developed a rubric for assessing undergraduate nursing research papers for information literacy skills critical to their development as researchers and health professionals. Methods We developed a rubric mapping six American Nurses Association professional standards onto six related concepts of the Association of College & Research Libraries (ACRL) Framework for Information Literacy for Higher Education. We used this rubric to evaluate fifty student research papers and assess inter-rater reliability. Results Students tended to score highest on the “Information Has Value” dimension and lowest on the “Scholarship as Conversation” dimension. However, we found a discrepancy between the grading patterns of the two investigators, with inter-rater reliability being “fair” or “poor” for all six rubric dimensions. Conclusions The development of a rubric that dually assesses information literacy skills and maps relevant disciplinary competencies holds potential. This study offers a template for a rubric inspired by the ACRL Framework and outside professional standards. However, the overall low inter-rater reliability demands further calibration of the rubric. Following additional norming, this rubric can be used to help students identify the key information literacy competencies that they need in order to succeed as college students and future nurses. These skills include developing an authoritative voice, determining the scope of their information needs, and understanding the ramifications of their information choices. PMID:28377678

  9. The impact of Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS) professional development on the self-efficacy of science teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akella, Somi Devi M.

    In 2012, the National Research Council introduced the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS), which were created to improve the K-12 education in the U.S. and stress the importance of providing professional development (PD) to acquire the knowledge, skills, and self-efficacy to design lessons to meet high standards of teaching and learning. Bandura's (1977) theory of self-efficacy posits that people are motivated to perform an action if they are confident that they can perform the action successfully. The purpose of this survey research was to investigate the impact of professional development on the self-efficacy of science teachers with regard to the NGSS practice of Analyzing and Interpreting Data as well as to probe teachers' perceptions of barriers to their self-efficacy in applying this practice. The study found that focused and targeted PD helped improve participants' self-efficacy in incorporating the NGSS practices and addressed several barriers to teacher self-efficacy. In response to findings, Akella's Science Teaching Efficacy Professional Development (ASTEPD) model is proposed as a tool to guide PD practice and, thus, helps improve teacher self-efficacy.

  10. Mapping the Association of College and Research Libraries information literacy framework and nursing professional standards onto an assessment rubric.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willson, Gloria; Angell, Katelyn

    2017-04-01

    The authors developed a rubric for assessing undergraduate nursing research papers for information literacy skills critical to their development as researchers and health professionals. We developed a rubric mapping six American Nurses Association professional standards onto six related concepts of the Association of College & Research Libraries (ACRL) Framework for Information Literacy for Higher Education. We used this rubric to evaluate fifty student research papers and assess inter-rater reliability. Students tended to score highest on the "Information Has Value" dimension and lowest on the "Scholarship as Conversation" dimension. However, we found a discrepancy between the grading patterns of the two investigators, with inter-rater reliability being "fair" or "poor" for all six rubric dimensions. The development of a rubric that dually assesses information literacy skills and maps relevant disciplinary competencies holds potential. This study offers a template for a rubric inspired by the ACRL Framework and outside professional standards. However, the overall low inter-rater reliability demands further calibration of the rubric. Following additional norming, this rubric can be used to help students identify the key information literacy competencies that they need in order to succeed as college students and future nurses. These skills include developing an authoritative voice, determining the scope of their information needs, and understanding the ramifications of their information choices.

  11. Development and evaluation of standardized narrative cases depicting the general surgery professionalism milestones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rawlings, Arthur; Knox, Aaron D C; Park, Yoon Soo; Reddy, Shalini; Williams, Sarah R; Issa, Nabil; Jameel, Abid; Tekian, Ara

    2015-08-01

    Residency programs now are required to use educational milestones, which has led to the need for new methods of assessment. The literature suggests that narrative cases are a promising tool to track residents' progress. This study demonstrates the process for developing and evaluating narrative cases representing the five levels of the professionalism milestones. In 2013, the authors identified 28 behaviors in the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education general surgery professionalism milestones. They modified previously published narrative cases to fit these behaviors. To evaluate the quality of these cases, the authors developed a 28-item, five-point scale instrument, which 29 interdisciplinary faculty completed. The authors compared the faculty ratings by narrative case and specialty with the authors' initial rankings of the cases by milestone level. They used t tests and analysis of variance to compare mean scores across specialties. The authors developed 10 narrative cases, 2 for each of the 5 milestone levels. Each case contained at least 20 of the 28 behaviors identified in the milestones. Mean faculty ratings matched the milestone levels. Reliability was good (G coefficient = 0.86, phi coefficient = 0.85), indicating consistency in raters' ability to determine the proper milestone level for each case. The authors demonstrate a process for using specialty-specific milestones to develop narrative cases that map to a spectrum of professionalism behaviors. This process can be applied to other competencies and specialties to facilitate faculty awareness of resident performance descriptors and provide a frame of reference for milestones assessment.

  12. Professional Learning: Trends in State Efforts. Benchmarking State Implementation of College- and Career-Readiness Standards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Kimberly; Mire, Mary Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    This report presents a multi-year study of how states are implementing their state college- and career-readiness standards. In this report, the Southern Regional Education Board's (SREB's) Benchmarking State Implementation of College- and Career-Readiness Standards project studied state efforts in 2014-15 and 2015-16 to foster effective…

  13. Identifying Professional Teaching Standards Using Rasch Model Analysis: The Case of Northern Cyprus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alibaba Erden, Hale; Özer, Bekir

    2013-01-01

    Problem Statement: The Teacher's-Act defined for the state-school teachers of North Cyprus shows that teachers are not selected according to any specific standards. In North Cyprus, apart from the exam topics defined at the teacher's exam regulations, there is not any kind of identified standard for teachers. Training qualified teachers based upon…

  14. Creating Coherence: Common Core State Standards, Teacher Evaluation, and Professional Learning. Special Issues Brief. Revised

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leo, Sheri Frost; Coggshall, Jane G.

    2013-01-01

    This Special Issues Brief from the "Center on Great Teachers and Leaders" (GTL Center) introduces an approach to creating coherence among three potentially transformative instructional reforms: implementation of the Common Core State Standards for student learning, new standards-based teacher evaluation systems, and job-embedded…

  15. A standardized patient model to teach and assess professionalism and communication skills: the effect of personality type on performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lifchez, Scott D; Redett, Richard J

    2014-01-01

    Teaching and assessing professionalism and interpersonal communication skills can be more difficult for surgical residency programs than teaching medical knowledge or patient care, for which many structured educational curricula and assessment tools exist. Residents often learn these skills indirectly, by observing the behavior of their attendings when communicating with patients and colleagues. The purpose of this study was to assess the results of an educational curriculum we created to teach and assess our residents in professionalism and communication. We assessed resident and faculty prior education in delivering bad news to patients. Residents then participated in a standardized patient (SP) encounter to deliver bad news to a patient's family regarding a severe burn injury. Residents received feedback from the encounter and participated in an education curriculum on communication skills and professionalism. As a part of this curriculum, residents underwent assessment of communication style using the Myers-Briggs type inventory. The residents then participated in a second SP encounter discussing a severe pulmonary embolus with a patient's family. Resident performance on the SP evaluation correlated with an increased comfort in delivering bad news. Comfort in delivering bad news did not correlate with the amount of prior education on the topic for either residents or attendings. Most of our residents demonstrated an intuitive thinking style (NT) on the Myers-Briggs type inventory, very different from population norms. The lack of correlation between comfort in delivering bad news and prior education on the subject may indicate the difficulty in imparting communication and professionalism skills to residents effectively. Understanding communication style differences between our residents and the general population can help us teach professionalism and communication skills more effectively. With the next accreditation system, residency programs would need to

  16. The Importance and Degree of Implementation of the European Standards and Guidelines for Internal Quality Assurance in Universities: The Views of Portuguese Academics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manatos, Maria J.; Rosa, Maria J.; Sarrico, Cláudia S.

    2015-01-01

    This research seeks to explore academics' perceptions of the importance and degree of implementation of the Standards and Guidelines for Quality Assurance in the European Higher Education Area (ESG) for internal quality assurance. It uses empirical evidence from Portugal, gathered via a questionnaire given to all university academics. Results show…

  17. Aligning "TextEvaluator"® Scores with the Accelerated Text Complexity Guidelines Specified in the Common Core State Standards. Research Report. ETS RR-15-21

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheehan, Kathleen M.

    2015-01-01

    The "TextEvaluator"® text analysis tool is a fully automated text complexity evaluation tool designed to help teachers, curriculum specialists, textbook publishers, and test developers select texts that are consistent with the text complexity guidelines specified in the Common Core State Standards.This paper documents the procedure used…

  18. MIQE précis: Practical implementation of minimum standard guidelines for fluorescence-based quantitative real-time PCR experiments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bustin, S.A.; Beaulieu, J.F.; Huggett, J.; Jaggi, R.; Kibenge, F.S.; Olsvik, P.A.; Penning, L.C.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/110369181; Toegel, S.

    2010-01-01

    MIQE précis: Practical implementation of minimum standard guidelines for fluorescence-based quantitative real-time PCR experiments Stephen A Bustin1 , Jean-François Beaulieu2 , Jim Huggett3 , Rolf Jaggi4 , Frederick SB Kibenge5 , Pål A Olsvik6 , Louis C Penning7 and Stefan Toegel8 1 Centre for

  19. A multifaceted feedback strategy alone does not improve the adherence to organizational guideline-based standards: a cluster randomized trial in intensive care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vos, M.L. de; Veer, S.N. van der; Wouterse, B.; Graafmans, W.C.; Peek, N.; Keizer, N.F. de; Jager, K.J.; Westert, G.P.; Voort, P.H. van der

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Organizational data such as bed occupancy rate and nurse-to-patient ratio are related to clinical outcomes and to the efficient use of intensive care unit (ICU) resources. Standards for these performance indicators are provided in guidelines. We studied the effects of a multifaceted

  20. A multifaceted feedback strategy alone does not improve the adherence to organizational guideline-based standards : A cluster randomized trial in intensive care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vos, Maartje; van der Veer, S.N.; Wouterse, B.; Graafmans, W.C.; Peek, N.; de Keizer, N.F.; Jager, K.J.; Westert, Gert; van der Voort, P.H.J.

    2015-01-01

    Background Organizational data such as bed occupancy rate and nurse-to-patient ratio are related to clinical outcomes and to the efficient use of intensive care unit (ICU) resources. Standards for these performance indicators are provided in guidelines. We studied the effects of a multifaceted

  1. Guideline of guidelines: kidney stones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziemba, Justin B; Matlaga, Brian R

    2015-08-01

    Several professional organizations have developed evidence-based guidelines for the initial evaluation, diagnostic imaging selection, symptomatic management, surgical treatment, medical therapy, and prevention of recurrence for both ureteric and renal stones. The purpose of this article is to summarize these guidelines with reference to the strength of evidence. All guidelines endorse an initial evaluation to exclude concomitant infection, imaging with a non-contrast computed tomography scan, and consideration of medical expulsive therapy or surgical intervention depending on stone size and location. Recommends for metabolic evaluation vary by guideline, but all endorse increasing fluid intake to reduce the risk of recurrence. © 2015 The Authors BJU International © 2015 BJU International Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. The importance of professional judgement applied in the context of the International Financial Reporting Standards

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    IVAN, Ionela

    2016-01-01

    ... – International Financial Reporting Standards. This fact is the result of the complexity and diversity of some situations, which might give rise to difficulties in terms of choosing the appropriate accounting policies and methods...

  3. Attitude and practice of the health care professionals towards the clinical practice guidelines in King Khalid University Hospital in Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahabi, Hayfaa A; Alzeidan, Rasmieh A; Fayed, Amel A; Esmaeil, Samia A; Al Aseri, Zohair A

    2011-08-01

    To explore the opinion and practice of the health care providers in King Khalid University Hospital (KKUH) towards clinical practice guidelines (CPGs). A cross-sectional self-reported anonymous survey was distributed to 2225 health care professionals working in KKUH clinical departments. The response rate was 56.5%. The respondents had a positive attitude towards CPGs; 90% thought that CPG unify patients' care and 96% agreed that CPGs improve the quality of services provided. The respondents' practice in using CPGs concurred with their attitude and opinion. A total of 86.3% agreed that CPGs changed the way they manage their patients and 71.8% agreed with the statement that they have already used CPGs in the management of the patients. Compared to nurses, physicians were significantly less likely to use CPGs in practice (P < 0.05); moreover, the practice of using guidelines differs significantly according to the years of experience, with 71% of respondents with experience of 15 years or more using CPGs in the management of their patients, compared to 60% among respondents with less years of experience (P < 0.05). The health care providers at KKUH have positive practice and attitude towards CPGs in general, which could positively influence the future introduction and implementation of evidence-based CPGs. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  4. Dripstone Columns: A Strategy Development Model for Strategic Renewal for the National Board for Professional Teaching Standards

    OpenAIRE

    Callisto, Kristen Alana Wong

    2016-01-01

    The National Board for Professional Teaching Standards was established in 1987 and is an independent, non-profit, and non-governmental organization that works to advance accomplished teaching. At the time of my residency, the National Board was in the midst of several significant changes: a major re-design of its board certification assessment, the launch of ATLAS – an online case library of accomplished teaching, the transition of a new president and CEO, and the wind-down of several large g...

  5. Mapping the Association of College and Research Libraries information literacy framework and nursing professional standards onto an assessment rubric

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gloria Willson, MLIS, MPH

    2017-04-01

    Conclusions: The development of a rubric that dually assesses information literacy skills and maps relevant disciplinary competencies holds potential. This study offers a template for a rubric inspired by the ACRL Framework and outside professional standards. However, the overall low inter-rater reliability demands further calibration of the rubric. Following additional norming, this rubric can be used to help students identify the key information literacy competencies that they need in order to succeed as college students and future nurses. These skills include developing an authoritative voice, determining the scope of their information needs, and understanding the ramifications of their information choices.

  6. Improving pre-service elementary teachers' self-reported efficacy for using the professional teacher standards in health education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Jeffrey K; Clark, Susan E; Brey, Rebecca A

    2014-07-01

    The effectiveness of health education methods courses for pre-service elementary teachers has not been assessed for improving the pre-service elementary teacher's self-efficacy for using the professional teacher standards in health education (PTSHE). A quasi-experimental design was used to assess pre-service elementary teachers' self-efficacy toward using the PTSHE. Four institutions whose elementary education programs provide a health education methods course were recruited to participate in the study. Students were recruited to participate and they completed the Pre-service Health Education National Standards Self-efficacy (PHENSS) Scale at the beginning and end of the semester. Data were analyzed using SPSS (version 15) software. A significant increase in the PHENSS Scale scores indicated that a 3-credit health education methods course could improve the pre-service elementary teacher's self-efficacy to use the national standards in their teaching of health education. Further analysis indicated statistically significant improvement of the participants' PHENSS scores in 2 of the 7 standards. Teacher self-efficacy can be a useful measure of the pre-service elementary teachers' ability to use the national standards for health education. The design of the methods course may affect the PHENSS scores. © 2014, American School Health Association.

  7. Struggles of professionalism and emotional labour in standardized mental health care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kamp, Annette; Dybbroe, Betina

    2016-01-01

    This article points out how recent public sector reforms under headings as New Public Management, Lean and Quality Reforms entail different forms for standardization, and examines how this development instigates a transformation of interdisciplinary and highly skilled emotional labor in mental...... healthcare. It is based on an ethnographic study of a Danish child psychiatric unit, which ‘produces’ diagnoses and treatment/therapy for children and their families. We illustrate how the enforcement of standardization upsets the balance between the humanistic and medical aspects of psychiatry...... standardization, highly skilled emotional labor unfolds. We point out how acceleration and leaning of work procedures increases the emotional labor in relation to clients, partners, and colleagues. But paradoxically, at the same time, emotional labor becomes still more invisible as it is excluded from...

  8. Antiretroviral therapy for adults infected with HIV: Guidelines for health care professionals from the Quebec HIV care committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouleau, Danielle; Fortin, Claude; Trottier, Benoît; Lalonde, Richard; Lapointe, Normand; Côté, Pierre; Routy, Jean-Pierre; Matte, Marie-France; Tsarevsky, Irina; Baril, Jean-Guy

    2011-01-01

    The appropriate use of antiretrovirals reduces morbidity and mortality caused by HIV infection. The present article provides health care professionals with a practical guide for the use of antiretrovirals. Therapy should be initiated based predominantly on clinical presentation and CD4 count, and should consist of three active drugs or at least two active drugs when this is not possible, as in cases of some treatment-experienced patients. This is the most effective way to achieve long-term suppression of viral replication. Selection of individual drugs in the regimen should consider the weight of the evidence supporting these choices, as well as their tolerability profiles and ease of use, the patients’ comorbidities and treatment history. Treatment interruption is not recommended, either in aviremic patients or in those who have experienced virological failure. Instead, the therapeutic regimen should be adjusted to minimize side effects, promote adherence and suppress viral replication. PMID:22654926

  9. Special Education Professional Standards: How Important Are They in the Context of Teacher Performance Evaluation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woolf, Sara B.

    2015-01-01

    Teacher performance evaluation represents a high stakes issue as evidenced by its pivotal emphasis in national and local education reform initiatives and federal policy levers. National, state, and local education leaders continue to experience unprecedented pressure to adopt standardized benchmarks to reflect and link student achievement data to…

  10. The Standardization of Geography Teachers' Practices: A Journey to Self-Sustainability and Professional Identity Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexandre, Fernando

    2016-01-01

    Geography education in Portugal is still very much attached to what can be defined as a descriptive and factual approach, which seems to prevail in spite of all the changes introduced in the design of school geography. Given this context, the paper intends to foresee the process that leads to the standardization of teachers' knowledge and…

  11. Effectiveness of external inspection of compliance with standards in improving healthcare organisation behaviour, healthcare professional behaviour or patient outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flodgren, Gerd; Pomey, Marie-Pascale; Taber, Sarah A; Eccles, Martin P

    2011-11-09

    Inspection systems are used in health care to promote quality improvements, i.e. to achieve changes in organisational structures or processes, healthcare provider behaviour and patient outcomes. These systems are based on the assumption that externally promoted adherence to evidence-based standards (through inspection/assessment) will result in higher quality of health care. However, the benefits of external inspection in terms of organisational, provider and patient level outcomes are not clear. To evaluate the effectiveness of external inspection of compliance with standards in improving healthcare organisation behaviour, healthcare professional behaviour and patient outcomes. We searched the following electronic databases for studies: the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effectiveness, Scopus, HMIC, Index to Theses and Intute from their inception dates up to May 2011. There was no language restriction and studies were included regardless of publication status. We searched the reference lists of included studies and contacted authors of relevant papers, accreditation bodies and the International Organization for Standardisation (ISO), regarding any further published or unpublished work. We included randomised controlled trials (RCTs), controlled clinical trials (CCTs), interrupted time-series (ITSs) and controlled before and after studies (CBAs) evaluating the effect of external inspection against external standards on healthcare organisation change, healthcare professional behaviour or patient outcomes in hospitals, primary healthcare organisations and other community-based healthcare organisations. Two review authors independently applied eligibility criteria, extracted data and assessed the risk of bias of each included study. Since meta-analysis was not possible, we produced a narrative results summary. We identified one cluster

  12. Guidelines, minimal requirements and standard of cancer care around the Mediterranean Area: report from the Collaborative AROME (Association of Radiotherapy and Oncology of the Mediterranean Area) working parties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-01

    Guidelines are produced in oncology to facilitate clinical decision making and improve clinical practice. However, existing guidelines are mainly developed for countries with a certain availability of means and cultural aspects are rarely taken into account. Around the Mediterranean Area, countries share common cultural backgrounds but also great disparities with respect to availability of means; current guidelines by most societies are not applicable to all of those countries. Association of Radiotherapy and Oncology of the Mediterranean Area (AROME) is a scientific organization for the promotion and overcoming of inequalities in oncology clinical practice around the Mediterranean Area. In an effort to accomplish this goal, members of the AROME society have developed clinical recommendations for most common cancer sites in countries around the Mediterranean Area. The structure of these recommendations lies in the concept of minimal requirements vs. standard of care; they are being presented and discussed in the main text. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Problems of professional ethics standards use in auditors’ practice in Ukraine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bondar V.P.

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Significant problems of the professional ethics principles violation by auditors cause many problems not only in reliability of disclosed audit opinion, but also cause problems of global stakeholders’ mistrust to the audit profession. This generally creates the barriers for ensuring the transparency of mechanisms of disclosure and verification of Ukrainian business data and does not help form appropriate investment climate. The article finds that auditor’s ethical principles should be regulated and organized on all the levels of the audit quality control ensuring. According to the results of this study, the author highlights these four levels (international, national, local, personal and describes the contribution of each level of documents in the organization of the quality control (in part of ethical principles has been. The research proves the system of organizational support for creating ethical principles compliance environment during carrying out audit assignment based on identifying and eliminating threats to auditors’ independence. In this regard, the author proposes the structure and content of organizational and administrative documents, which are the part of the internal audit quality control system.

  14. Validity Evidence and Scoring Guidelines for Standardized Patient Encounters and Patient Notes From a Multisite Study of Clinical Performance Examinations in Seven Medical Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Yoon Soo; Hyderi, Abbas; Heine, Nancy; May, Win; Nevins, Andrew; Lee, Ming; Bordage, Georges; Yudkowsky, Rachel

    2017-11-01

    To examine validity evidence of local graduation competency examination scores from seven medical schools using shared cases and to provide rater training protocols and guidelines for scoring patient notes (PNs). Between May and August 2016, clinical cases were developed, shared, and administered across seven medical schools (990 students participated). Raters were calibrated using training protocols, and guidelines were developed collaboratively across sites to standardize scoring. Data included scores from standardized patient encounters for history taking, physical examination, and PNs. Descriptive statistics were used to examine scores from the different assessment components. Generalizability studies (G-studies) using variance components were conducted to estimate reliability for composite scores. Validity evidence was collected for response process (rater perception), internal structure (variance components, reliability), relations to other variables (interassessment correlations), and consequences (composite score). Student performance varied by case and task. In the PNs, justification of differential diagnosis was the most discriminating task. G-studies showed that schools accounted for less than 1% of total variance; however, for the PNs, there were differences in scores for varying cases and tasks across schools, indicating a school effect. Composite score reliability was maximized when the PN was weighted between 30% and 40%. Raters preferred using case-specific scoring guidelines with clear point-scoring systems. This multisite study presents validity evidence for PN scores based on scoring rubric and case-specific scoring guidelines that offer rigor and feedback for learners. Variability in PN scores across participating sites may signal different approaches to teaching clinical reasoning among medical schools.

  15. New aspects from legislation, guidelines and safety standards for MRI; Neues aus Gesetzen, Richtlinien und Sicherheitsstandards fuer die MRT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muehlenweg, M. [Krankenhaus Martha-Maria Halle-Doelau, Institut fuer Radiologie, Halle (Saale) (Germany); Schaefers, G. [MR:comp GmbH, Gelsenkirchen (Germany); Trattnig, S. [Exzellenzzentrum Hochfeld-Magnetresonanz, Medizinische Universitaet Wien, Universitaetsklinik fuer Radiodiagnostik, Wien (Austria)

    2015-08-15

    Many aspects of magnetic resonance (MR) operation are not directly regulated by law but in standards, guidelines and the operating instructions of the MR scanner. The mandatory contents of the operating instructions are regulated in a central standard of the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) 60601-2-33. In this standard, the application of static magnetic fields in MRI up to 8 Tesla (T) in the clinical routine (first level controlled mode) has recently been approved. Furthermore, the equally necessary CE certification of ultra-high field scanners (7-8 T) in Europe is expected for future devices. The existing installations will not be automatically certified but will retain their experimental status. The current extension of IEC 60601-2-33 introduces a new add-on option, the so-called fixed parameter option (FPO). This option might also be switched on in addition to the established operating modes and defines a fixed device constellation and certain parameters of the energy output of MR scanners designed to simplify the testing of patients with implants in the future. The employment of pregnant workers in an MRI environment is still not generally regulated in Europe. In parts of Germany and Austria pregnant and lactating employees were prohibited from working in the MR control zone (0.5 mT) in 2014. This is based on the mostly unresolved question of the applicability of limits for employees (exposure of extremities to static magnetic fields up to 8 T allowed) or the thresholds for the general population (maximum 400 mT). According to the European Society of Urogenital Radiology (ESUR), the discarding of breast milk after i.v. administration of gadolinium-based contrast agents in the case of a breastfeeding woman is only recommended when using contrast agents in the nephrogenic systemic fibrosis (NSF) high-risk category. (orig.) [German] Viele Belange des MR-Betriebs sind nicht direkt gesetzlich geregelt, sondern in Normen, Richtlinien und der

  16. Teaching English Language Learner Students: Professional Standards in Elementary Education in Central Region States. Summary. Issues & Answers. REL 2012-No. 122

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apthorp, Helen; Wang, Xin; Ryan, Susan; Cicchinelli, Louis F.

    2012-01-01

    This report on professional teaching standards in the Central Region examines what K-8 general education teachers are expected to know and be able to do in order to teach English language learner students. It reviews the standards for coverage of six topics that the research literature suggests are important for improving student achievement. Key…

  17. Assessing the Viability of Social Media for Disseminating Evidence-Based Nutrition Practice Guideline Through Content Analysis of Twitter Messages and Health Professional Interviews: An Observational Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hand, Rosa K; Kenne, Deric; Wolfram, Taylor M; Abram, Jenica K; Fleming, Michael

    2016-11-15

    Given the high penetration of social media use, social media has been proposed as a method for the dissemination of information to health professionals and patients. This study explored the potential for social media dissemination of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics Evidence-Based Nutrition Practice Guideline (EBNPG) for Heart Failure (HF). The objectives were to (1) describe the existing social media content on HF, including message content, source, and target audience, and (2) describe the attitude of physicians and registered dietitian nutritionists (RDNs) who care for outpatient HF patients toward the use of social media as a method to obtain information for themselves and to share this information with patients. The methods were divided into 2 parts. Part 1 involved conducting a content analysis of tweets related to HF, which were downloaded from Twitonomy and assigned codes for message content (19 codes), source (9 codes), and target audience (9 codes); code frequency was described. A comparison in the popularity of tweets (those marked as favorites or retweeted) based on applied codes was made using t tests. Part 2 involved conducting phone interviews with RDNs and physicians to describe health professionals' attitude toward the use of social media to communicate general health information and information specifically related to the HF EBNPG. Interviews were transcribed and coded; exemplar quotes representing frequent themes are presented. The sample included 294 original tweets with the hashtag "#heartfailure." The most frequent message content codes were "HF awareness" (166/294, 56.5%) and "patient support" (97/294, 33.0%). The most frequent source codes were "professional, government, patient advocacy organization, or charity" (112/277, 40.4%) and "patient or family" (105/277, 37.9%). The most frequent target audience codes were "unable to identify" (111/277, 40.1%) and "other" (55/277, 19.9%). Significant differences were found in the popularity of

  18. Utilization of the American Telemedicine Association's Clinical Practice Guidelines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antoniotti, Nina; Bernard, Jordana

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Background: The American Telemedicine Association (ATA) Standards and Guidelines Committee develops practice standards and guidelines. Key to the Committee's mission is dissemination so the standards can be used in the practice of telemedicine. Over a 2-year period, when a standards document was accessed from the ATA Web site, a short survey was completed, but it did not assess how the documents were used once downloaded. A more formal survey was conducted to determine the impact ATA standards and guidelines are having on healthcare delivery via telemedicine. Materials and Methods: A survey was developed and distributed via SurveyMonkey to 13,177 ATA members and nonmembers in November 2011. Results were compiled and analyzed after a 90-day open period for responses to be submitted. Results: The majority of respondents (96%) believe the practice of telemedicine/telehealth should have standards and guidelines and that the ATA and other professional societies/associations should be responsible for developing them. The top uses of guidelines include guidance for clinical practice, training, gaining reimbursement, and research. Respondents indicating a need for standards and guidelines said the ATA (78.7%) and other professional societies/associations (74.5%) should be responsible for development. When asked to list specific practice guidelines or standards they are using for telehealth, the majority (21.5%) are using in-house (e.g., hospital, company)-developed guidelines, followed by those from professional associations/societies (20.4%) and those developed by the ATA (18.2%). Conclusions: Overall, the survey results indicate guidelines documents developed by the ATA and other professional societies and those developed in-house are being regularly accessed and used in both public and private sectors. Practitioners of telemedicine believe that standards and guidelines are needed for guidance for clinical practice, training, gaining reimbursement, and research

  19. Is the American Society of Shoulder and Elbow Therapists' rehabilitation guideline better than standard care when applied to Bankart-operated patients? A controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damkjær, Lars; Petersen, Tom; Juul-Kristensen, Birgit

    2015-02-01

    To determine whether there is a difference in shoulder-related physical function and quality of life between postoperative rehabilitation patients receiving standard care and those receiving care according to the American Society of Shoulder and Elbow Therapists' rehabilitation guideline for arthroscopic anterior capsulolabral repair of the shoulder. Descriptive studies with comparison between a retrospective and a prospective cohort. Municipal outpatient rehabilitation centre. A total of 96 arthroscopic Bankart-operated patients. A total of 52 patients received standard care; 44 patients underwent rehabilitation according to the American Society of Shoulder and Elbow Therapists' rehabilitation guideline. Primary outcome variable was Western Ontario Shoulder Instability Index. Secondary outcome measures were Patient-Specific Functional Scale, shoulder range of motion, return to work, return to sports, and costs. There was no significant difference in adjusted mean change scores between the standard care group and the guideline group in the primary outcome variable (Western Ontario Shoulder Instability Index total = 574.85 vs. 644.48) or the secondary outcomes (Patient-Specific Functional Scale = 4.6 vs. 5.0; range of motion in forward flexion = 46.49° vs. 49.58°; external rotation in adduction = 28.58° vs. 34.18°; external rotation in abduction = 51.29° vs. 47.55°; weeks until return to work = 5.2 vs. 6.9; weeks until return to sports =13.9 vs. 13.1; costs = number of visits; 18.5 vs. 15.9). There were no significant between-group differences in shoulder-related physical function and quality of life between the standard care group and the guideline group, following Bankart operations. © The Author(s) 2014.

  20. [Single or double moral standards? Professional ethics of psychiatrists regarding self-determination, rights of third parties and involuntary treatment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollmächer, T

    2015-09-01

    The current intensive discussion on the legal and moral aspects of involuntary treatment of psychiatric patients raises a number of ethical issues. Physicians are unambiguously obligated to protect patient welfare and autonomy; however, in psychiatric patients disease-related restrictions in the capacity of self-determination and behaviors endangering the rights of third parties can seriously challenge this unambiguity. Therefore, psychiatry is assumed to have a double function and is also obligated to third parties and to society in general. Acceptance of such a kind of double obligation carries the risk of double moral standards, placing the psychiatrist ethically outside the community of physicians and questioning the unrestricted obligation towards the patient. The present article formulates a moral position, which places the psychiatrist, like all other physicians, exclusively on the side of the patient in terms of professional ethics and discusses the practical problems arising from this moral position.

  1. Experience of Approbation and Target Reference Points of Introduction of the Professional Standard "Pedagogue-Psychologist (Educational psychologist" in Sverdlovsk Region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasyagina N.N.

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The experience of application of the professional standard "Pedagogue-psychologist (educational psychologist" in the Sverdlovsk region is described. A regional model for the application of the professional standard developed on the basis of the principles of unity of centralization and decentralization, interdepartmental and network interaction developed by the authors is presented. The main forms and methods of work on the application of a professional standard in the region are disclosed; the results of the Sverdlovsk region internship site are described, including mechanisms for identifying personnel shortages and development of personalized trajectories of the professional development of psychology teachers in the region. The following are highlighted as priority areas: the development of regional normative legal acts regulating the professional activity of pedagogue-psychologists, the application of the professional standard of the pedagogue-psychologist in the formation of the personnel policy in the field of education, and the modernization of the system of vocational training and additional vocational education of psychologists.

  2. Biodiesel I: Historical background, present and future production and standards - professional paper

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Skala Dejan U.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Biodiesel is defined as a fuel which may be used as pure biofuel or at high concentration in mineral oil derivatives, in accordance with specific quality standards for transport applications. The main raw material used for biodiesel production is rapeseed, which contains mono-unsaturated acids (about 60% and also poly-unsaturated fatty acids (C 18:1 and C 18:3 in a lower quantity, as well as some undesired saturated fatty acids (palmitic and stearic acids. Other raw materials have also been used in research and the industrial production of biodiesel (palm oil, sunflower oil, soybean oil, waste plant oil, animal fats, etc. The historical background of biodiesel production, installed industrial capacities, as well as the Directive of the European Parliament and of the Council (May 2003 regarding the promotion of the use of biofuels or other renewable fuels for transport are discussed in the first part of this article. The second part focuses on some new concepts for the future development of technology for biodiesel production, based on the application of non-catalytic transesterification under supercritical conditions or the use of lipases as an alternative catalyst for this reaction.

  3. Testing the Efficacy of Alcohol Labels with Standard Drink Information and National Drinking Guidelines on Consumers' Ability to Estimate Alcohol Consumption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hobin, Erin; Vallance, Kate; Zuo, Fei; Stockwell, Tim; Rosella, Laura; Simniceanu, Alice; White, Christine; Hammond, David

    2017-08-09

    Despite the introduction of national drinking guidelines in Canada, there is limited public knowledge of them and low understanding of 'standard drinks (SDs)' which limits the likelihood of guidelines affecting drinking behaviour. This study tests the efficacy of alcohol labels with SD information and Canada's Low-Risk Drinking Guidelines (LRDGs) as compared to %ABV labels on consumers' ability to estimate alcohol intake. It also examines the label size and format that best supports adults' ability to make informed drinking choices. This research consisted of a between-groups experiment (n = 2016) in which participants each viewed one of six labels. Using an online survey, participants viewed an alcohol label and were asked to estimate: (a) the amount in a SD; (b) the number of SDs in an alcohol container and (c) the number of SDs to consume to reach the recommended daily limit in Canada's LRDG. Results indicated that labels with SD and LRDG information facilitated more accurate estimates of alcohol consumption and awareness of safer drinking limits across different beverage types (12.6% to 58.9% increase in accuracy), and labels were strongly supported among the majority (66.2%) of participants. Labels with SD and LRDG information constitute a more efficacious means of supporting accurate estimates of alcohol consumption than %ABV labels, and provide evidence to inform potential changes to alcohol labelling regulations. Further research testing labels in real-world settings is needed. Results indicate that the introduction of enhanced alcohol labels combining standard drink information and national drinking guidelines may be an effective way to improve drinkers' ability to accurately assess alcohol consumption and monitor intake relative to guidelines. Overall support for enhanced labels suggests probable acceptability of introduction at a population level.

  4. Development of Design Standards and Guidelines for Electromagnetic Compatibility and Lightning Protection for Spacecraft Utilizing Composite Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-01-01

    Preliminary design guidelines necessary to assure electromagnetic compatibility (EMC) of spacecraft using composite materials, are presented. A database of electrical properties of composite materials which may have an effect on EMC is established. The guidelines concentrate on the composites that are conductive but may require enhancement to be adequate for EMC purposes. These composites are represented by graphite reinforced polymers. Methods for determining adequate conductivity levels for various EMC purposes are defined, along with the methods of design which increase conductivity of composite materials and joints to adequate levels.

  5. Teacher Perceptions of Their Curricular and Pedagogical Shifts: Outcomes of a Project-Based Model of Teacher Professional Development in the Next Generation Science Standards

    OpenAIRE

    Shernoff, David J.; Sinha, Suparna; Bressler, Denise M.; Schultz, Dawna

    2017-01-01

    In this study, we conducted a model of teacher professional development (PD) on the alignment of middle and high school curricula and instruction to the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSSs), and evaluated the impact of the PD on teacher participants’ development. The PD model included a 4-day summer academy emphasizing project-based learning (PBL) in the designing of NGSS-aligned curricula and instruction, as well as monthly follow-up Professional Learning Community meetings throughout t...

  6. Systematic review of trends in prophylaxis of corticosteroid-induced osteoporosis : the need for standard audit guidelines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duyvendak, M.; Naunton, M.; van Roon, E. N.; Bruyn, G. A. W.; Brouwers, J. R. B. J.

    2008-01-01

    Corticosteroid-induced osteoporosis (CIOP) is currently undertreated. Systematic review of the literature revealed that the percentage of patients treated adequately is dependent on study quality. Therefore, it remains unknown whether adherence to the guidelines is really so poor. Five major quality

  7. Geology at Our Doorstep: Building a Partnership for Standards-Based Curriculum and Professional Development in Middle School Earth Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laursen, S.; Lester, A.; Cannon, E.; Forrest, A.; Bencivengo, B.; Hunter, K.

    2003-12-01

    Geology at Our Doorstep is a collaboration between a science outreach program (CIRES Outreach), students and faculty in a university geology department (U. Colorado at Boulder), and a local school district (St. Vrain Valley) to develop locally relevant geology classroom resources for use by the district's middle-school teachers. The project grew out of direct conversations with teachers about their ideas and needs and was explicitly based on district and state standards in Earth science and scientific thinking, drawing on close work with the district on standards implementation and assessment over the past two years. We intended to draw on existing curriculum resources and substitute local geologic examples to construct a "place-based" teaching resource. However, we found that generic, national-level curricula did not effectively match the rich geologic resources of our area, and instead developed a rather more substantial set of original materials, including classroom collections of regional rocks, reference materials on local geology, classroom activities, and media resources, all shared with teachers at a series of professional development workshops. While the original project was small in scale, a number of spin-off projects have evolved. This project models several important features in the development of university-K12 partnerships: consultation with districts, piloting of small projects, and the role of outreach programs in facilitating participation of university faculty and students.

  8. Attestation and evaluation of the teacher’s qualification compliance with the Professional standard of the teacher: experience of Khabarovsk Krai

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Perminova O.P.,

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The article is dedicated to the experience of pilot projects of approbation of the Standard of “Teacher’s” professional activity (educational activities in the field of preschool, primary general, basic general, secondary education (tutor, teacher" in Khabarovsk Krai in terms of attestation and evaluation of the teacher’s qualification compliance with the Professional standard of the teacher. Possible variants of models of teacher attestation, approaches to the criteria of teacher evaluation in the process of attestation are analyzed; the model of “Attestation for the identification of qualification category (differentiated qualification level” is described. Basing on the understanding of the Professional standard as a complex and multi-aspect mechanism, the authors come to conclusion about the necessity of changing the procedure of educators attestation (tutors and teachers, of creating a system of attestation that meets the challenges of time and is aimed at motivating teachers to continuous development.

  9. [Guidelines for management of epilepsy--commentary on Scottish ("SIGN") guidelines].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Planjar-Prvan, Miljenka; Granić, Davorka

    2005-01-01

    The choice of AED (antiepileptic drug), worldwide and in Croatia, is been still based on the physician's subjective decision, personal experience, knowledge and marketing pressure made by big pharmaceutical industries. Therefore, according to some opinions, there is a need of treatment guidelines for epilepsy that would provide relevant information based on scientific evidence on the efficacy, tolerability and safety of AEDs. The guidelines, published by a competent source, should be designed as to allow for easy access to the information on the best practice in specific cases. An extensive background literature review was made to identify such a type of guidelines for the management of epilepsy. The literature review revealed a number of references with the recommendations for treating epilepsy in different groups of patients and from various, specific aspects of epilepsy treatment. However, only one comprehensive set of guidelines for the diagnosis and treatment of epilepsy treatment was found, i.e. the evidence-based guidelines published by the Scottish Intercollegiate Guidelines Network (SIGN). The development of this set of guidelines is quite extensively described in order to illustrate how rigorous and long-lasting the process was, including a great number of health professionals at the national level. Such a type of well designed guidelines facilitates access to highest educational standards for all professionals involved in the primary and secondary care of people with epilepsy. However, it is clear that guidelines can fully replace the standards of clinical practice based on critical evaluation and integration of all clinical data of each individual patient. No guidelines can replace the physician's obligation to keep informed of the novel achievements in the epileptology either.

  10. [The biological component of the professional standards and qualification characteristics of preventive medicine specialists (as exemplified by the specialty of parasitology)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astanina, S Iu; Dovgalev, A S; Avdiukhina, T I

    2014-01-01

    In the context of theoretical analysis, the paper characterizes a specialist training system based on the biological component of the qualification characteristics and professional standard of preventive medicine specialists. Evidence is provided for the relationship between the components of the training system for preventive medicine specialists. The authors also specify the fact that the content of qualification characteristics and professional standards, besides general requirements, must take into account requirements for training the specialists in terms of natural and climatic and socioeconomic characteristics of regions.

  11. Improving planning, design, reporting and scientific quality of animal experiments by using the Gold Standard Publication Checklist, in addition to the ARRIVE guidelines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooijmans, Carlijn R; de Vries, Rob; Leenaars, Marlies; Curfs, Jo; Ritskes-Hoitinga, Merel

    2011-01-01

    Several studies have demonstrated serious omissions in the way research that use animals is reported. In order to improve the quality of reporting of animal experiments, the Animals in research: reporting in vivo experiments (ARRIVE) Guidelines were published in the British Journal of Pharmacology in August 2010. However, not only the quality of reporting of completed animal studies needs to be improved, but also the design and execution of new experiments. With both these goals in mind, we published the Gold Standard Publication Checklist (GSPC) in May 2010, a few months before the ARRIVE guidelines appeared. In this letter, we compare the GSPC checklist with the ARRIVE Guidelines. The GSPC describes certain items in more detail, which makes it both easier to use when designing and conducting an experiment and particularly suitable for making systematic reviews of animal studies more feasible. In order to improve not only the reporting but also the planning, design, execution and thereby, the scientific quality of animal experiments, we strongly recommend to all scientists involved in animal experimentation and to editors of journals publishing animal studies to take a closer look at the contents of both the ARRIVE guidelines and GSPC, and select the set of guidelines which is most appropriate for their particular situation. LINKED ARTICLES To view the article by Kilkenny et al. visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1476-5381.2010.00872.x. To view the editorial by McGrath et al. visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1476-5381.2010.00873.x PMID:21091655

  12. Assessing Clinical Microbiology Practice Guidelines: American Society for MicrobiologyAd HocCommittee on Evidence-Based Laboratory Medicine Practice Guidelines Assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nachamkin, Irving; Kirn, Thomas J; Westblade, Lars F; Humphries, Romney

    2017-11-01

    As part of the American Society for Microbiology (ASM) Evidence-Based Laboratory Medicine Practice Guidelines Committee of the Professional Practice Committee, an ad hoc committee was formed in 2014 to assess guidelines published by the committee using an assessment tool, Appraisal of Guidelines for Research Evaluation II (AGREE II). The AGREE II assessment helps reviewers determine whether published guidelines are robust, transparent, and clear in presenting practice recommendations in a standardized manner. Identifying strengths and weaknesses of practice guidelines by ad hoc assessments helps with improving future guidelines through the participation of key stakeholders. This minireview describes the development of the ad hoc committee and results from their review of several ASM best practices guidelines and a non-ASM practice guideline from the Emergency Nurses Association. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  13. Variation of system performance, quality control standards and adherence to international FDG-PET/CT imaging guidelines. A national survey of PET/CT operations in Austria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rausch, I; Bergmann, H; Geist, B; Schaffarich, M; Hirtl, A; Hacker, M; Beyer, T

    2014-01-01

    To gather information on clinical operations, quality control (QC) standards and adoption of guidelines for FDG-PET/CT imaging in Austrian PET/CT centres. A written survey composed of 68 questions related to A) PET/CT centre and installation, B) standard protocol parameters for FDG-PET/CT imaging of oncology patients, and C) standard QC procedures was conducted between November and December 2013 among all Austrian PET/CT centres. In addition, a NEMA-NU2 2012 image quality phantom test was performed using standard whole-body imaging settings on all PET/CT systems with a lesion-to-background ratio of 4. Recovery coefficients (RC) were calculated for each lesion and PET/CT system. A) 13 PET/CT systems were installed in 12 nuclear medicine departments at public hospitals. B) Average fasting prior to FDG-PET/CT was 7.6 (4-12) h. All sites measured blood glucose levels while using different cut-off levels (64%: 150 mg/dl). Weight-based activity injection was performed at 83% sites with a mean FDG activity of 4.1 MBq/kg. Average FDG uptake time was 55 (45-75) min. All sites employed CT contrast agents (variation from 1%-95% of the patients). All sites reported SUV-max. C) Frequency of QC tests varied significantly and QC phantom measurements revealed significant differences in RCs. Significant variations in FDG-PET/CT protocol parameters among all Austrian PET/CT users were observed. Subsequently, efforts need to be put in place to further standardize imaging protocols. At a minimum clinical PET/CT operations should ensure compliance with existing guidelines. Further, standardized QC procedures must be followed to improve quantitative accuracy across PET/CT centres.

  14. Standards of resuscitation during inter-hospital transportation: the effects of structured team briefing or guideline review - A randomised, controlled simulation study of two micro-interventions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christensen Erika F

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Junior physicians are sometimes sent in ambulances with critically ill patients who require urgent transfer to another hospital. Unfamiliar surroundings and personnel, time pressure, and lack of experience may imply a risk of insufficient treatment during transportation as this can cause the physician to loose the expected overview of the situation. While health care professionals are expected to follow complex algorithms when resuscitating, stress can compromise both solo-performance and teamwork. Aim To examine whether inter-hospital resuscitation improved with a structured team briefing between physician and ambulance crew in preparation for transfer vs. review of resuscitation guidelines. The effect parameters were physician team leadership (requesting help, delegating tasks, time to resuscitation key elements (chest compressions, defibrillation, ventilations, medication, or a combination of these termed "the first meaningful action", and hands-off ratio. Methods Participants: 46 physicians graduated within 5 years. Design: A simulation intervention study with a control group and two interventions (structured team briefing or review of guidelines. Scenario: Cardiac arrest during simulated inter-hospital transfer. Results Forty-six candidates participated: 16 (control, 13 (review, and 17 (team briefing. Reviewing guidelines delayed requesting help to 162 seconds, compared to 21 seconds in control and team briefing groups (p = 0.021. Help was not requested in 15% of cases; never requesting help was associated with an increased hands-off ratio, from 39% if the driver's assistance was requested to 54% if not (p Conclusion Neither review nor team briefing improved the time to resuscitation key elements. Review led to an eight-fold increase in the delay to requesting help. The association between never requesting help and an increased hands-off ratio underpins the importance of prioritising available resources. Other medical

  15. From industry to academia: Benefits of integrating a professional project management standard into (geo)science research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cristini, Luisa

    2017-04-01

    Scientific and technological research carried out within universities and public research institutions often involves large collaborations across several countries. Despite the considerable budget (typically millions of Euros), the high expectations (high impact scientific findings, new technological developments and links with policy makers, industry and civil society) and the length of the project over several years, these international projects often rely heavily on the personal skills of the management team (project coordinator, project manager, principal investigators) without a structured, transferable framework. While this approach has become an established practice, it's not ideal and can jeopardise the success of the entire effort with consequences ranging from schedule delays, loss of templates/systems, financial charges and ultimately project failure. In this presentation I will show the advantages of integrating a globally recognised standard for professional project management, such as the PMP® by the Project Management Institute, into academic research. I will cover the project management knowledge areas (integration management, scope management, time management, cost management, quality management, human resources management, risk management, procurement management, and stakeholder management) and the processes within these throughout the phases of the project lifetime (project initiation, planning, executing, monitoring and controlling, and closure). I will show how application of standardised, transferable procedures, developed within the business & administration sector, can benefit academia and more generally scientific research.

  16. Designing Higher Education Courses and other Professional Development to Engender Science Teachers' Enthusiasm to Embrace the New Generation Science Standards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welstead, C.; Forder, S. E.

    2014-12-01

    This presentation is an overview of best practices in the design of continuing education courses and professional development workshops for Science teachers to enable them to transition to the NGSS; to share their enthusiasm in a way that engages students and leads to increased student achievement; and to become change agents in their educational settings and in their communities, in order to garner widespread support for an inquiry-based, NGSS-based curriculum. Proposed strands for teacher preparation programmes include a focus on higher level conceptual thinking; problem-solving opportunities for learning; inquiry-based learning; experiential learning and fieldwork; the authentic and effective incorporation of technology in teaching and learning; integrated and cross-curricular teaching and learning; learning that supports diversity and equity; and the appropriate, reliable and valid assessment of understanding. A series of three courses has been developed to prepare teachers in a graduate programme for implementing an inquiry-based, standards-based Science curriculum that incorporates the above-mentioned strands.

  17. Study protocol: Cost effectiveness of two strategies to implement the NVOG guidelines on hypertension in pregnancy: An innovative strategy including a computerised decision support system compared to a common strategy of professional audit and feedback, a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luitjes Susanne HE

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hypertensive disease in pregnancy remains the leading cause of maternal mortality in the Netherlands. Seventeen percent of the clinical pregnancies are complicated by hypertension and 2% by preeclampsia. The Dutch Society of Obstetrics and Gynaecology (NVOG has developed evidence-based guidelines on the management of hypertension in pregnancy and chronic hypertension. Previous studies showed a low adherence rate to other NVOG guidelines and a large variation in usual care in the different hospitals. An explanation is that the NVOG has no general strategy of practical implementation and evaluation of its guidelines. The development of an effective and cost effective implementation strategy to improve adherence to the guidelines on hypertension in pregnancy is needed. Methods/Design The objective of this study is to assess the cost effectiveness of an innovative implementation strategy of the NVOG guidelines on hypertension including a computerised decision support system (BOS compared to a common strategy of professional audit and feedback. A cluster randomised controlled trial with an economic evaluation alongside will be performed. Both pregnant women who develop severe hypertension or pre-eclampsia and professionals involved in the care for these women will participate. The main outcome measures are a combined rate of major maternal complications and process indicators extracted from the guidelines. A total of 472 patients will be included in both groups. For analysis, descriptive as well as regression techniques will be used. A cost effectiveness and cost utility analysis will be performed according to the intention-to-treat principle and from a societal perspective. Cost effectiveness ratios will be calculated using bootstrapping techniques.

  18. Reliability of the standard goniometry and diagrammatic recording of finger joint angles: a comparative study with healthy subjects and non-professional raters

    OpenAIRE

    Mačionis, Valdas

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Background Diagrammatic recording of finger joint angles by using two criss-crossed paper strips can be a quick substitute to the standard goniometry. As a preliminary step toward clinical validation of the diagrammatic technique, the current study employed healthy subjects and non-professional raters to explore whether reliability estimates of the diagrammatic goniometry are comparable with those of the standard procedure. Methods The study included two procedurally different parts,...

  19. On the Training in the Conditions of Application of Professional Standards in the Field of Education (on the Example of Educational Psychologist

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Egorova M.A.

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The article presents a modern approach to the design of the basic educational program for the training of a pedagogue-psychologist, the purpose and objectives of which are set by the professional standard “Pedagogue-psychologist (educational psychologist”. The structure of the basic educational program of bachelor and master's levels is designed according to the modular principle, and the key mechanism for achieving educational results - professional competences - is networking with partner organizations (schools, kindergartens, psychological and medico-social centers. The main criteria of network partners for the training of psychologists are described. The training module is characterized as a logically completed, relatively independent part of the educational program that forms a certain competence or group of competencies. In the curriculum the module acts as an educational unit uniting theory, practice, research work and the final modular attestation of the student. The advantages of the modular structure of the educational program, coupled with the professional standard, are presented.

  20. A "Common" Vision of Instruction? An Analysis of English/Language Arts Professional Development Materials Related to the Common Core State Standards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodge, Emily; Benko, Susanna L.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to describe the stances put forward by a selection of professional development resources interpreting the Common Core State Standards for English Language Arts (ELA) teachers, and to analyse where these resources stand in relation to research in ELA. Specifically, we analyse resources written by English educators…

  1. Improving Pre-Service Elementary Teachers' Self-Reported Efficacy for Using the Professional Teacher Standards in Health Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Jeffrey K.; Clark, Susan E.; Brey, Rebecca A.

    2014-01-01

    Background: The effectiveness of health education methods courses for pre-service elementary teachers has not been assessed for improving the pre-service elementary teacher's self-efficacy for using the professional teacher standards in health education (PTSHE). Methods: A quasi-experimental design was used to assess pre-service elementary…

  2. Common Pressures, Same Results? Recent Reforms in Professional Standards and Competences in Teacher Education for Secondary Teachers in England, France and Germany

    Science.gov (United States)

    Page, Tina M.

    2015-01-01

    Over the last decade, the introduction of professional standards and competences in initial teacher education for secondary teachers in England, France and Germany has provided the cornerstone of education reform in all three countries. The precise number and specific content of a measurable set of skills for teachers have offered challenges for…

  3. Development of Design Standards and Guidelines for Electromagnetic Compatibility and Lightning Protection for Spacecraft Utilizing Composite Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camp, Dennis W.

    1997-01-01

    This final report presents information concerning technical accomplishments by Tec-Masters, Inc. (TMI) for this contract effort. This effort included the accomplishment and/or submission by TMI of the following items: (1) Literature Survey Report, Electrical Properties of Non-Metallic Composites by Mr. Hugh W. Denny; (2) Interim Report, Composite Materials - Conductivity, Shielding Effectiveness, and Current Carrying Capability by Mr. Ross W. Evans; (3) Fault Current Test Plan by Mr. Ross W. Evans (4) Fault Current Test Procedure by Mr. Ross W. Evans (5) Test Report, Fault Current Through Graphite Filament Reinforced Plastic, NASA CR-4774, Marshall Space Flight Center, Alabama, September 1996, by Mr. Ross W. Evans; (6) Test Plan, Lightning Effects on Composite Materials by Mr. Ross W. Evans; (7) Test Report, Lightning Effects on Composite Materials, NASA CR-4783, Marshall Space Flight Center, Alabama, February 1997, by Mr. Ross W. Evans; (8) Design Guidelines for Shielding Effectiveness, Current Carrying Capability, and the Enhancement of Conductivity of Composite Materials, NASA CR-4784, Marshall Space Flight Center, Alabama, September 1996, by Mr. Ross W. Evans. These items are not attached but are considered to be a part of this final report. Efforts on two additional items were accomplished at no increase in cost to NASA/MSFC. These items consisted of updating the 'MSFC EMC Design and Interference Control Handbook,' and revising the 'Design Guidelines for Shielding Effectiveness, Current Carrying Capability, and the Enhancement of Conductivity of Composite Materials.'

  4. Differences and Relationship Between Standard and Specific Throwing Test in Handball According to the Competitive and Professional Level

    OpenAIRE

    Rivilla García, Jesús; Grande Rodriguez, Ignacio; Chirosa, L.J.; Gómez Ortiz, María Jose; Sampedro Molinuevo, Javier

    2011-01-01

    The present study analyzed the differences in distance throwing with heavy and light medicine ball and throwing velocity between handball players of different competitive and professional level. Likewise, the relationship between the three throwing test of progressive specificity was analyzed: throwing with heavy medicinal ball (TH), throwing with light medicinal ball (TL) and throwing velocity (TV). For this purpose, sixty-five professional (P), semiprofessional (S) and non-professional (...

  5. Reflections of Turkish accounting and financial reporting standards on vocational school students: A research on comparing perceptions of intermediate and mid-level accounting professional candidates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seldüz Hakan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This research aims to compare the perceptions of intermediate and mid-level accounting professional candidates on accounting and financial reporting standards. A significant part of accounting process is carried out by vocational school graduate intermediate and mid-level accounting professionals. However, it can be claimed that adequate education about accounting and financial reporting standards isn’t given in vocational schools although these standards structure the whole accounting process. A survey is conducted over students of the related vocational school in Aksaray University. The results indicate no significant difference on students’ perceptions in terms of their school year, high school type, job or internship experience and intention to perform the profession after graduation. These results can be traced to inadequacy of present curriculums and internship programs which can’t create a difference. Based on the results, the content of internship applications is rearranged and an optional subject named as “Accounting and Reporting Standards” is established.

  6. Inter-professional differences in compliance with standard precautions in operating theatres: a multi-site, mixed methods study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cutter, Jayne; Jordan, Sue

    2012-08-01

    Occupational acquisition of blood-borne infections has been reported following exposure to blood or body fluids. Consistent adherence to standard precautions will reduce the risk of infection. To identify: the frequency of self-reported adverse exposure to blood and body fluids among surgeons and scrub nurses during surgical procedures; contributory factors to such injuries; the extent of compliance with standard precautions; and factors influencing compliance with precautions. A multi-site mixed methods study incorporating a cross-sectional survey and interviews. Six NHS trusts in Wales between January 2006 and August 2008. Surgeons and scrub nurses and Senior Infection Control Nurses. A postal survey to all surgeons and scrub nurses, who engaged in exposure prone procedures, followed by face to face interviews with surgeons and scrub nurses, and telephone interviews with Infection Control Nurses. Response rate was 51.47% (315/612). Most 219/315 (69.5%) respondents reported sustaining an inoculation injury in the last five years: 183/315 (58.1%) reported sharps' injuries and 40/315 (12.7%) splashes. Being a surgeon and believing injuries to be an occupational hazard were significantly associated with increased risk of sharps' injuries (adjusted odds ratio 1.73, 95% confidence interval 1.04-2.88 and adjusted odds ratio 2.0, 1.11-3.5, respectively). Compliance was incomplete: 31/315 (10%) respondents always complied with all available precautions, 1/315 (0.003%) claimed never to comply with any precautions; 64/293 (21.8%) always used safety devices, 141/310 (45.5%) eye protection, 72 (23.2%) double gloves, and 259/307 (84.4%) avoided passing sharps from hand to hand. Others selected precautions according to their own assessment of risk. Surgeons were less likely to adopt eye protection (adjusted odds ratio 0.28, 0.11-0.71) and to attend training sessions (odds ratio 0.111, 0.061-0.19). The professions viewed the risks associated with their roles differently, with

  7. Evidentiary standards for forensic anthropology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Angi M; Crowder, Christian M

    2009-11-01

    As issues of professional standards and error rates continue to be addressed in the courts, forensic anthropologists should be proactive by developing and adhering to professional standards of best practice. There has been recent increased awareness and interest in critically assessing some of the techniques used by forensic anthropologists, but issues such as validation, error rates, and professional standards have seldom been addressed. Here we explore the legal impetus for this trend and identify areas where we can improve regarding these issues. We also discuss the recent formation of a Scientific Working Group for Forensic Anthropology (SWGANTH), which was created with the purposes of encouraging discourse among anthropologists and developing and disseminating consensus guidelines for the practice of forensic anthropology. We believe it is possible and advisable for anthropologists to seek and espouse research and methodological techniques that meet higher standards to ensure quality and consistency in our field.

  8. States' Participation Guidelines for Alternate Assessments Based on Modified Academic Achievement Standards (AA-MAS) in 2010. Synthesis Report 82

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazarus, Sheryl S.; Hodgson, Jennifer R.; Price, Lynn M.; Thurlow, Martha L.

    2011-01-01

    Federal legislation requires that all students participate in state accountability systems. Most students with disabilities participate in the regular assessment, with or without accommodations. Students with more significant cognitive disabilities participate in the Alternate Assessment based on Alternate Achievement Standards (AA-AAS). A few…

  9. Guidelines for standard preclinical experiments in the mouse model of myasthenia gravis induced by acetylcholine receptor immunization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuzun, Erdem; Berrih-Aknin, Sonia; Brenner, Talma; Kusner, Linda L; Le Panse, Rozen; Yang, Huan; Tzartos, Socrates; Christadoss, Premkumar

    2015-08-01

    Myasthenia gravis (MG) is an autoimmune disorder characterized by generalized muscle weakness due to neuromuscular junction (NMJ) dysfunction brought by acetylcholine receptor (AChR) antibodies in most cases. Although steroids and other immunosuppressants are effectively used for treatment of MG, these medications often cause severe side effects and a complete remission cannot be obtained in many cases. For pre-clinical evaluation of more effective and less toxic treatment methods for MG, the experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis (EAMG) induced by Torpedo AChR immunization has become one of the standard animal models. Although numerous compounds have been recently proposed for MG mostly by using the active immunization EAMG model, only a few have been proven to be effective in MG patients. The variability in the experimental design, immunization methods and outcome measurements of pre-clinical EAMG studies make it difficult to interpret the published reports and assess the potential for application to MG patients. In an effort to standardize the active immunization EAMG model, we propose standard procedures for animal care conditions, sampling and randomization of mice, experimental design and outcome measures. Utilization of these standard procedures might improve the power of pre-clinical EAMG experiments and increase the chances for identifying promising novel treatment methods that can be effectively translated into clinical trials for MG. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Application of ISO 9000 Standards to Education and Training. Interpretation and Guidelines in a European Perspective. CEDEFOP Document.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van den Berghe, Wouter

    This report brings together European experience on the interpretation and implementation of ISO 9000 in education and training (ET) environments. Chapter 1 discusses the importance of quality concepts in ET and summarizes key concepts of total quality management (TQM) and its relevance for ET. Chapter 2 introduces the ISO 9000 standards. It…

  11. [Norms and standards for radiofrequency electromagnetic fields in Latin America: guidelines for exposure limits and measurement protocols].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skvarca, Jorge; Aguirre, Aníbal

    2006-01-01

    New technologies that use electromagnetic fields (EMF) have proved greatly beneficial to humankind. EMF are used in a variety of ways in the transmission of electrical energy and in telecommunications, industry, and medicine. However, some studies have shown that EMF could be detrimental to one's health, having found an association between exposure to EMF on the one hand, and the incidence of some types of cancer as well as behavioral changes on the other. Although so far there is no concrete proof that exposure to low-intensity EMF is hazardous, researchers continue to study the issue in an attempt to reach a consensus opinion and to establish safety standards. While developing and establishing such norms and standards have traditionally been the responsibility of international specialized agencies, national health authorities should take an active part in this process. Currently the Pan American Health Organization is promoting scientific research, often in the form of epidemiologic studies, in order to propose uniform norms and standards. Some Latin American countries, including Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Costa Rica, Ecuador, Mexico, Peru, and Venezuela, have already enacted incomplete or partial legislation based on recommended international standards. This article describes the norms established in Latin America and the particular approach taken by each country.

  12. American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition and Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics: Revised 2014 Standards of Practice and Standards of Professional Performance for Registered Dietitian Nutritionists (Competent, Proficient, and Expert) in Nutrition Support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brantley, Susan L; Russell, Mary K; Mogensen, Kris M; Wooley, Jennifer A; Bobo, Elizabeth; Chen, Yimin; Malone, Ainsley; Roberts, Susan; Romano, Michelle M; Taylor, Beth

    2014-12-01

    This 2014 revision of the Standards of Practice (SOP) and Standards of Professional Performance (SOPP) for Registered Dietitians Nutritionists (RDNs) in Nutrition Support represents an update of the 2007 Standards composed by content experts of the American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition and the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. The revision is based upon the Revised 2012 SOP in Nutrition Care and SOPP for RDs, which incorporates the Nutrition Care Process and the six domains of professionalism: Quality in Practice, Competence and Accountability, Provision of Services, Application of Research, Communication and Application of Knowledge, and Utilization and Management of Resources. These SOP and SOPP are designed to promote the provision of safe, effective, and efficient nutrition support services, facilitate evidence-based practice, and serve as a professional evaluation resource for RDNs who specialize or wish to specialize in nutrition support therapy. These standards should be applied in all patient/client care settings in which RDNs in nutrition support provide care. These settings include, but are not limited to, acute care, ambulatory/outpatient care, and home and alternate site care. The standards highlight the value of the nutrition support RDN's roles in quality management, regulatory compliance, research, teaching, consulting, and writing for peer-reviewed professional publications. The standards assist the RDN in nutrition support to distinguish his or her level of practice (competent, proficient, or expert) and would guide the RDN in creating a personal development plan to achieve increasing levels of knowledge, skill, and ability in nutrition support practice. © 2014 American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition.

  13. Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics: revised 2014 standards of professional performance for registered dietitian nutritionists in management of food and nutrition systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berthelsen, Rita M; Barkley, William C; Oliver, Patricia M; McLymont, Veronica; Puckett, Ruby

    2014-07-01

    Management in food and nutrition systems is presented with an ever-challenging tension between effective utilization of manpower resources, mechanical equipment, financial management, material production, and time constraints to produce optimal products. Management drives opportunities for personal development for multiple levels of its employee workforce. Given an increasing need to deliver high-quality food and services to satisfied customers, the Management in Food and Nutrition Systems Dietetic Practice Group, with guidance from the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics Quality Management Committee, has developed the Revised 2014 Standards of Professional Performance, which replace the 2009 Standards, as a tool for registered dietitian nutritionists working in food and nutrition systems management within health care and non-health care organizations. These Standards of Professional Performance consist of six domains of professionalism: Quality in Practice, Competence and Accountability, Provision of Services, Application of Research, Communication and Application of Knowledge, and Utilization and Management of Resources. Within each standard, specific indicators provide measurable action statements that illustrate how strong communication skills, attention to customer satisfaction, use of various resources, and application of personnel management principles can be applied to practice. The indicators describe three skill levels (ie, competent, proficient, and expert) for registered dietitian nutritionists managing food and nutrition systems. Copyright © 2014 Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Development of guidelines to assist organisations to support employees returning to work after an episode of anxiety, depression or a related disorder: a Delphi consensus study with Australian professionals and consumers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reavley, Nicola J; Ross, Anna; Killackey, Eoin J; Jorm, Anthony F

    2012-09-03

    Mental disorders are a significant cause of disability and loss of workplace productivity. The scientific evidence for how organisations should best support those returning to work after common mental disorders is relatively limited. Therefore a Delphi expert consensus study was carried out with professional and consumer experts. A systematic review of websites, books and journal articles was conducted to develop a 387 item survey containing strategies that organisations might use to support those returning to work after common mental disorders. Three panels of Australian experts (66 health professionals, 30 employers and 80 consumers) were recruited and independently rated the items over three rounds, with strategies reaching consensus on importance written into the guidelines. The participation rate across all three rounds was 60.2% (57.6% health professionals, 76.7% employers, 56.3% consumers). 308 strategies were endorsed as essential or important by at least 80% of all three panels. The endorsed strategies provided information on policy and procedures, the roles of supervisors, employees and colleagues in managing absence and return to work, and provision of mental health information and training. The guidelines outline strategies for organisations supporting those returning to work after common mental disorders. It is hoped that they may be used to inform policy and practice in a variety of workplaces.

  15. Consolidated Health Economic Evaluation Reporting Standards (CHEERS)--explanation and elaboration: a report of the ISPOR Health Economic Evaluation Publication Guidelines Good Reporting Practices Task Force.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Husereau, Don; Drummond, Michael; Petrou, Stavros; Carswell, Chris; Moher, David; Greenberg, Dan; Augustovski, Federico; Briggs, Andrew H; Mauskopf, Josephine; Loder, Elizabeth

    2013-01-01

    Economic evaluations of health interventions pose a particular challenge for reporting because substantial information must be conveyed to allow scrutiny of study findings. Despite a growth in published reports, existing reporting guidelines are not widely adopted. There is also a need to consolidate and update existing guidelines and promote their use in a user-friendly manner. A checklist is one way to help authors, editors, and peer reviewers use guidelines to improve reporting. The task force's overall goal was to provide recommendations to optimize the reporting of health economic evaluations. The Consolidated Health Economic Evaluation Reporting Standards (CHEERS) statement is an attempt to consolidate and update previous health economic evaluation guidelines into one current, useful reporting guidance. The CHEERS Elaboration and Explanation Report of the ISPOR Health Economic Evaluation Publication Guidelines Good Reporting Practices Task Force facilitates the use of the CHEERS statement by providing examples and explanations for each recommendation. The primary audiences for the CHEERS statement are researchers reporting economic evaluations and the editors and peer reviewers assessing them for publication. The need for new reporting guidance was identified by a survey of medical editors. Previously published checklists or guidance documents related to reporting economic evaluations were identified from a systematic review and subsequent survey of task force members. A list of possible items from these efforts was created. A two-round, modified Delphi Panel with representatives from academia, clinical practice, industry, and government, as well as the editorial community, was used to identify a minimum set of items important for reporting from the larger list. Out of 44 candidate items, 24 items and accompanying recommendations were developed, with some specific recommendations for single study-based and model-based economic evaluations. The final

  16. Using Standards to Develop Student Learning Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komives, Susan R.; Smedick, William

    2012-01-01

    A critical step in the professionalization of the field of leadership education (Komives, 2011) and the evolution of leadership as a field of study (International Leadership Association [ILA], 2009) is the development of best practices, standards of practice, and guidelines for assessment of quality in program delivery and accomplishment of…

  17. Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics and National Kidney Foundation: revised 2014 standards of practice and standards of professional performance for registered dietitian nutritionists (competent, proficient, and expert) in nephrology nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kent, Pamela S; McCarthy, Maureen P; Burrowes, Jerrilynn D; McCann, Linda; Pavlinac, Jessie; Goeddeke-Merickel, Catherine M; Wiesen, Karen; Kruger, Sarah; Byham-Gray, Laura; Pace, Rory C; Hannahs, Valarie; Benner, Debbie

    2014-09-01

    Compelling evidence indicates that the incidence of chronic kidney disease (CKD) is increasing because of an aging population and a higher prevalence of cardiovascular disease, diabetes, and hypertension. Nutrition management of patients with CKD requires early disease recognition, appropriate interpretation of the markers and stages of CKD, and collaboration with other health care practitioners. Better management of CKD can slow its progression, prevent metabolic complications, and reduce cardiovascular related outcomes. Caring for patients with CKD necessitates specialized knowledge and skills to meet the challenges associated with this growing epidemic. The Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics Renal Dietitians Practice Group and the National Kidney Foundation Council on Renal Nutrition, with guidance from the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics Quality Management Committee, have updated the 2009 Standards of Practice in Nutrition Care and Standards of Professional Performance as a tool for registered dietitian nutritionists working in nephrology nutrition to assess their current skill levels and to identify areas for additional professional development in this practice area. The Standards of Practice apply to the care of patients/clients with kidney disease. The Standards of Professional Performance consist of six domains of professionalism, including: Quality in Practice, Competence and Accountability, Provision of Services, Application of Research, Communication and Application of Knowledge, and Utilization and Management of Resources. Within each standard, specific indicators provide measurable action statements that illustrate how nephrology nutrition principles can be applied to practice. The indicators describe three skill levels (ie, competent, proficient, and expert) for registered dietitian nutritionists working in nephrology nutrition. Copyright © 2014 Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics and the National Kidney Foundation, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc

  18. Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics and National Kidney Foundation: revised 2014 Standards of Practice and Standards of Professional Performance for registered dietitian nutritionists (competent, proficient, and expert) in nephrology nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kent, Pamela S; McCarthy, Maureen P; Burrowes, Jerrilynn D; McCann, Linda; Pavlinac, Jessie; Goeddeke-Merickel, Catherine M; Wiesen, Karen; Kruger, Sarah; Byham-Gray, Laura; Pace, Rory C; Hannahs, Valarie; Benner, Debbie

    2014-09-01

    Compelling evidence indicates that the incidence of chronic kidney disease (CKD) is increasing because of an aging population and a higher prevalence of cardiovascular disease, diabetes, and hypertension. Nutrition management of patients with CKD requires early disease recognition, appropriate interpretation of the markers and stages of CKD, and collaboration with other health care practitioners. Better management of CKD can slow its progression, prevent metabolic complications, and reduce cardiovascular related outcomes. Caring for patients with CKD necessitates specialized knowledge and skills to meet the challenges associated with this growing epidemic. The Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics Renal Dietitians Practice Group and the National Kidney Foundation Council on Renal Nutrition, with guidance from the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics Quality Management Committee, have updated the 2009 Standards of Practice in Nutrition Care and Standards of Professional Performance as a tool for registered dietitian nutritionists working in nephrology nutrition to assess their current skill levels and to identify areas for additional professional development in this practice area. The Standards of Practice apply to the care of patients/clients with kidney disease. The Standards of Professional Performance consist of six domains of professionalism, including: Quality in Practice, Competence and Accountability, Provision of Services, Application of Research, Communication and Application of Knowledge, and Utilization and Management of Resources. Within each standard, specific indicators provide measurable action statements that illustrate how nephrology nutrition principles can be applied to practice. The indicators describe three skill levels (ie, competent, proficient, and expert) for registered dietitian nutritionists working in nephrology nutrition. Copyright © 2014 Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics and the National Kidney Foundation, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc

  19. Methodological guidelines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Halsnaes, K.; Callaway, J.M.; Meyer, H.J.

    1999-04-01

    The guideline document establishes a general overview of the main components of climate change mitigation assessment. This includes an outline of key economic concepts, scenario structure, common assumptions, modelling tools and country study assumptions. The guidelines are supported by Handbook Reports that contain more detailed specifications of calculation standards, input assumptions and available tools. The major objectives of the project have been provided a methodology, an implementing framework and a reporting system which countries can follow in meeting their future reporting obligations under the FCCC and for GEF enabling activities. The project builds upon the methodology development and application in the UNEP National Abatement Coasting Studies (UNEP, 1994a). The various elements provide countries with a road map for conducting climate change mitigation studies and submitting national reports as required by the FCCC. (au) 121 refs.

  20. Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics: Standards of professional performance for Registered Dietitian Nutritionists (Competent, Proficient, and Expert) in Sustainable, Resilient, and Healthy Food and Water Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tagtow, Angie; Robien, Kim; Bergquist, Erin; Bruening, Meg; Dierks, Lisa; Hartman, Barbara E; Robinson-O'Brien, Ramona; Steinitz, Tamara; Tahsin, Bettina; Underwood, Teri; Wilkins, Jennifer

    2014-03-01

    Sustainability is the ability of a system to be maintained over the long term. Resilience is the ability of a system to withstand disturbances and continue to function in a sustainable manner. Issues of sustainability and resilience apply to all aspects of nutrition and dietetics practice, can be practiced at both the program and systems level, and are broader than any one specific practice setting or individual intervention. Given an increasing need to apply principles of sustainability and resilience to nutrition and dietetics practice, as well as growing interest among the public and by Registered Dietitian Nutritionists of health issues related to food and water systems, the Hunger and Environmental Nutrition Dietetic Practice Group, with guidance from the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics Quality Management Committee, has developed the Standards of Professional Performance as a tool for Registered Dietitian Nutritionists working in sustainable, resilient, and healthy food and water systems to assess their current skill levels and to identify areas for further professional development in this emerging practice area. This Standards of Professional Performance document covers six standards of professional performance: quality in practice, competence and accountability, provision of services, application of research, communication and application of knowledge, and utilization and management of resources. Within each standard, specific indicators provide measurable action statements that illustrate how sustainable, resilient, and healthy food and water systems principles can be applied to practice. The indicators describe three skill levels (competent, proficient, and expert) for Registered Dietitian Nutritionists working in sustainable, resilient, and healthy food and water systems. Copyright © 2014 Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Motion analysis of the mandible: guidelines for standardized analysis of computer-assisted recording of condylar movements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahlers, M Oliver; Bernhardt, Olaf; Jakstat, Holger A; Kordaß, Bernd; Türp, Jens C; Schindler, Hans-Jürgen; Hugger, Alfons

    2015-01-01

    Mandibular movement recording has long been established as the method for the physiological design of indirect dental restorations. Condylar movement recording is the basis for individual, patient-specific programming of partially or fully adjustable articulators. The settings derived from these recordings can generally be used in both traditional mechanical and electronic virtual articulators. For many years, condylar movement recordings have also provided useful information about morphological conditions in the temporomandibular joints (TMJs) of patients with masticatory system dysfunction based on the recorded movement patterns. The latest clinical application for recorded jaw-motion analysis data consists of functional monitoring of the patient as a diagnostic and surveillance tool accompanying treatment. Published parameters for the analysis of such recordings already exist, but a standardized and practicable protocol for the documentation and analysis of such jaw-movement recordings is still lacking. The aim of this article by a multicenter consortium of authors is to provide an appropriate protocol with the documentation criteria needed to meet the requirements for standardized analysis of computer-assisted recording of condylar movements in the future.

  2. A superior method to report clinically relevant quality information about the point-of-care INR device performance compared with the International Organization for Standardization guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shermock, Kenneth M; Clarke, William; Streiff, Michael B

    2010-11-11

    A revised ISO guideline was recently published that recommended methods to assess the quality of point-of-care INR measures. We assessed the relative performance of the ISO methods and a method that we developed. We compared the ability of the ISO and the Shermock methods to predict when the INR measures lead to identical or different clinical decisions. Clinical decisions that were directly measured in a previous trial were used as a standard. The Shermock method was significantly better (82% of predictions correct) than the revised ISO method (61% correct, psuperior in providing information that clinicians and patients care most about regarding the quality of the INR measures used to guide clinical decisions. Regulatory agencies should strongly consider incorporating the Shermock method into the device approval process. Local clinical laboratories should consider using the Shermock method in quality assurance assessments. 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. GRADE guidelines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guyatt, Gordon H; Thorlund, Kristian; Oxman, Andrew D

    2013-01-01

    , calculating summary measures requires converting to the same units of measurement for each study. The longest standing and most widely used approach is to divide the difference in means in each study by its standard deviation and present pooled results in standard deviation units (standardized mean difference...... in means is usually desirable. When the natural units of the outcome measure are not easily interpretable, choosing a threshold to create a binary outcome and presenting relative and absolute effects become a more attractive alternative. When studies use different measures of the same construct...... and absolute effects, presenting the ratio of the means of intervention and control groups, and presenting the results in minimally important difference units. We outline the merits and limitations of each alternative and provide guidance for meta-analysts and guideline developers....

  4. Adaptation of methodology to select structural alternatives of one-way slab in residential building to the guidelines of the European Committee for Standardization (CEN/TC 350)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fraile-Garcia, Esteban, E-mail: esteban.fraile@unirioja.es [University of La Rioja, Department of Mechanical Engineering (Spain); Ferreiro-Cabello, Javier, E-mail: javier.ferreiro@unirioja.es [University of La Rioja, Department of Mechanical Engineering (Spain); Qualiberica S.L. (Spain); Martinez-Camara, Eduardo, E-mail: eduardo.martinezc@unirioja.es [University of La Rioja, Department of Mechanical Engineering (Spain); Jimenez-Macias, Emilio, E-mail: emilio.jimenez@unirioja.es [University of La Rioja, Department of Electrical Engineering (Spain)

    2015-11-15

    The European Committee for Standardization (CEN) through its Technical Committee CEN/TC-350 is developing a series of standards for assessing the building sustainability, at both product and building levels. The practical application of the selection (decision making) of structural alternatives made by one-way slabs leads to an intermediate level between the product and the building. Thus the present study addresses this problem of decision making, following the CEN guidelines and incorporating relevant aspects of architectural design into residential construction. A life cycle assessment (LCA) is developed in order to obtain valid information for the decision making process (the LCA was developed applying CML methodology although Ecoindicator99 was used in order to facilitate the comparison of the values); this information (the carbon footprint values) is contrasted with other databases and with the information from the Environmental Product Declaration (EPD) of one of the lightening materials (expanded polystyrene), in order to validate the results. Solutions of different column disposition and geometries are evaluated in the three pillars of sustainable construction on residential construction: social, economic and environmental. The quantitative analysis of the variables used in this study enables and facilitates an objective comparison in the design stage by a responsible technician; the application of the proposed methodology reduces the possible solutions to be evaluated by the expert to 12.22% of the options in the case of low values of the column index and to 26.67% for the highest values. - Highlights: • Methodology for selection of structural alternatives in buildings with one-way slabs • Adapted to CEN guidelines (CEN/TC-350) for assessing the building sustainability • LCA is developed in order to obtain valid information for the decision making process. • Results validated comparing carbon footprint, databases and Env. Product Declarations

  5. Does googling for preconception care result in information consistent with international guidelines: a comparison of information found by Italian women of childbearing age and health professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agricola, Eleonora; Gesualdo, Francesco; Pandolfi, Elisabetta; Gonfiantini, Michaela V; Carloni, Emanuela; Mastroiacovo, Pierpaolo; Tozzi, Alberto E

    2013-01-25

    Preconception counseling is effective in reducing the risk of adverse pregnancy outcomes. The Internet is commonly used by women and health professionals to search for health information. We compared the consistency of preconception information found on the Internet with the recommendations published by American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology (AJOG) simulating a web search by women of childbearing age and health professionals. We reviewed websites resulting from a Google search performed using search strings selected by Italian women of childbearing age and health professionals. We investigated if retrieved information was consistent with AJOG recommendations for preconception care. Logistic regression was used to compare presence of consistent recommendations between women and health professionals. The highest frequency of correct recommendations was found for folic acid supplementation (39.4% of websites). Consistency of preconception information did not significantly differ between search strategies except for folic acid supplementation. "Communities and blogs" website category provided less frequently correct recommendations compared with "Medical/Public Agency" category (i.e. folic acid supplementation (aOR 0.254; CI 0.098-0.664; p = Preconception information found is poor and inaccurate regardless of the search is performed by women or health professionals. It is unlikely that information found on the web have any positive impact among women and health professionals in our setting. Strategies to improve preconception information on the web and education of health professionals for web searching of health information should be considered.

  6. Improving knowledge and changing behavior towards guideline based decisions in diabetes care: a controlled intervention study of a team-based learning approach for continuous professional development of physicians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kühne-Eversmann Lisa

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Continuing Professional Development (CPD courses should ideally improve a physician’s knowledge and change their professional behavior in daily practice towards a best clinical practice reference model and guideline adherence. Interactive methods such as team-based learning and case-based learning, as compared to lectures, can impart sustainable knowledge and lead to high satisfaction among participants. We designed an interactive case-based CPD-seminar on diabetes care using a team-based learning approach to evaluate whether it leads to an improvement of short-term knowledge and changing of behavior towards guideline based decisions and how this learning approach is perceived by participants. Methods Questionnaires and an electronic voting system were used to evaluate motivation, acceptance and knowledge of voluntary participants. Furthermore, we analyzed data on index diagnostic tests and referrals of patients with diabetes of participating physicians over a period of six months before and after the course in comparison with a matched control group in a quasi-experimental design. Results Participants (n=103 rated the interactivity and team-based discussions as the main reasons for enhanced learning. They also expected that the course would change their professional behavior. Participants scored a mean of 43.9% right answers before and 62.6% after the course (p Conclusions Our team-based learning CPD-approach was highly accepted and resulted in an increase of short-term knowledge. It significantly increased the referral to diabetes specialists in daily practice whereas all other key professional behavior indicators did change but not significantly.

  7. A qualitative assessment of practitioner perspectives post-introduction of the first Continuous Professional Competence (CPC) guidelines for emergency medical technicians in Ireland.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Knox, Shane

    2015-01-01

    In November 2013, the Irish Regulator for emergency medical technicians (EMTs) introduced the first mandatory requirement for registrants to demonstrate evidence of continuous professional development (CPD)\\/continuous professional competence (CPC). This qualitative study assessed the experience of practitioners with CPC-related materials provided to them by the Regulator in addition to identifying perceived or encountered practical challenges and suggested improvements six months following introduction of the requirement.

  8. Korean Society of Cardiovascular Imaging Guidelines for Cardiac Computed Tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Young Jin [Korean Society of Cariovascular Imaging Guidelines Committee, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Byoung Wook; Choe, Kyu Ok [Dept. of Radiology, Yensei University Heath System, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Yong, Hwan Seok [Dept. of Radiology, Korea University Guro Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Yang Min [Dept. of Radiology, Sejong Hospital and Sejong Heart Institute, Bucheon (Korea, Republic of); Choe, Yeon Hyeon [Dept. of Radiology, Samsug Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lim, Tae Hwan [Dept. of Radiology, Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, Jae Hyung [Dept. of Radiology, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-09-15

    The Korean Society of Cardiovascular Imaging (KOCSI) has issued a guideline for the use of cardiac CT imaging in order to assist clinicians and patients in providing adequate level of medical service. In order to establish a guideline founded on evidence based medicine, it was designed based on comprehensive data such as questionnaires conducted in international and domestic hospitals, intensive journal reviews, and with experts in cardiac radiology. The recommendations of this guideline should not be used as an absolute standard and medical professionals can always refer to methods non-adherent to this guideline when it is considered more reasonable and beneficial to an individual patient's medical situation. The guideline has its limitation and should be revised appropriately with the advancement medical equipment technology and public health care system. The guideline should not be served as a measure for standard of care. KOCSI strongly disapproves the use of the guideline to be used as the standard of expected practice in medical litigation processes.

  9. International Representations of Inclusive Education: How Is Inclusive Practice Reflected in the Professional Teaching Standards of China and Australia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrington, Suzanne; Saggers, Beth; Adie, Lenore; Zhu, Nan; Gu, Dingqian; Hu, Xiaoyi; Wang, Yan; Deng, Meng; Mu, Guanglun Michael

    2015-01-01

    Inclusive education focuses on addressing marginalisation, segregation and exclusion within policy and practice. The purpose of this article is to use critical discourse analysis to examine how inclusion is represented in the education policy and professional documents of two countries, Australia and China. In particular, teacher professional…

  10. Using the ePortfolio to Complement Standardized Testing in a Healthcare Professional Program: Better Education or More Busy Work?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Clarence

    2012-01-01

    This article evaluates the full-scale integration of the ePortfolio into a healthcare professional program in an open admissions community college in the United States. The Physical Therapist Assistant program in question struggles to balance the dynamic tension between preparing students for a summative multiple-choice licensing examination and…

  11. How Much Is Enough? Involving Occupational Experts in Setting Standards on a Specific-Purpose Language Test for Health Professionals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pill, John; McNamara, Tim

    2016-01-01

    This paper considers how to establish the minimum required level of professionally relevant oral communication ability in the medium of English for health practitioners with English as an additional language (EAL) to gain admission to practice in jurisdictions where English is the dominant language. A theoretical concern is the construct of…

  12. Preventing malaria in international travellers: an evaluation of published English-language guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kliner, Merav; Poole, Kristina; Sinclair, David; Garner, Paul

    2014-11-03

    People intending to travel may seek information on malaria prevention from a range of sources. To ensure the best protection, this information needs to be reliable, up-to-date, consistent, and useful to their decision making. This study appraises current international and national guidelines written in English for malaria prevention in travellers, and whether any recommendations conflict. We systematically identified national or international English-language guidelines on malaria prevention in travellers to July 2013 using standard and multiple searching methods. We critically appraised guidelines using the AGREE II tool, and report inconsistent recommendations within guidelines. We identified five sets of English-language guidelines on preventing malaria for travellers. Assessment against AGREE II indicate that all of the guidelines fall short of internationally accepted standards in guideline development: none include a transparent description of methods; only one describes sources of funding or potential conflicts of interest; and only one includes formal presentation of the evidence alongside transparent assessment of the quality of that evidence. There were a number of important discrepancies between guidelines, and some omit information about effectiveness, safety and adverse effects of chemoprophylaxis options. The methods used for developing guidelines for malaria prevention in travellers lags behind current internationally recognized standards. Healthcare professionals as well as travellers themselves could be better informed if guidelines were more systematic and transparent summaries of the current knowledge on drug interventions in relation to effects, safety, administration and contra-indications.

  13. Reporting and publishing guidelines: article 12 in Integrating and coordinating efforts in COPD guideline development. An official ATS/ERS workshop report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Kevin C; Irwin, Richard S; File, Thomas M; Schünemann, Holger J; Guyatt, Gordon H; Rabe, Klaus F

    2012-12-01

    Professional societies, like many other organizations around the world, have recognized the need to use rigorous processes to ensure that health care recommendations are informed by the best available research evidence. This is the twelfth of a series of 14 articles that were prepared to advise guideline developers in respiratory and other diseases. This article discusses the reporting and publishing of guidelines. The authors formulated and discussed the following questions on the reporting and publishing of guidelines. (1) What should be reported in guidelines? (2) How should guidelines be written? (3) How should the bottom-line message be conveyed? (4) How should guidelines be packaged? (5) Where should guidelines be published? (6) Who benefits from the publication of guidelines? (7) What information should be vetted by the editor(s)? (8) How should guidelines be peer reviewed? We conducted a review of the literature, looking for systematic reviews and methodological research that addressed these questions, but we did not conduct a full systematic review. Our conclusions are based on the available evidence from the published literature and logical arguments from experienced guideline developers. There is little empirical evidence that addresses the reporting and publishing of guidelines. A standard format for reporting guidelines is desirable to ensure that guidelines are comprehensive and that all of the information necessary to judge their quality is presented. In addition, guidelines should contain concise evidence-based recommendations. To facilitate the use of guidelines by consumers, it is preferable to publish them in journals that serve the target audience and to package them in multiple ways. Editors and peer reviewers should ensure that reporting standards have been met, potential conflicts of interest have been adequately addressed and made public, and that the recommendations address important clinical questions.

  14. Evaluating Adherence of Health-Care Team to Standard Guideline of Colistin Use at Intensive Care Units of a Referral Hospital in Shiraz, Southwest of Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Afsaneh Vazin

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To evaluate colistin use according to global standard drug consumption in intensive care units of a referral hospital in Shiraz, Iran Methods: A prospective, interventional study was performed during an 11 month period on 100 patients admitted to ICUs of a teaching hospital being treated with colistin for at least 3 subsequent doses. Required demographic, clinical, and paraclinical data were gathered by a pharmacist. Fifteen indexes were considered to evaluate colistin use. A clinical pharmacist reviewed indication and dose of colistin at the time of prescribing this agent. Results: In our study population, pneumonia (69% was the main indication of colistin. In 87% of patients, colistin administration was based on microbiological laboratory evidence. Continuation of therapy was inappropriate in 5% of cases. By the intervention of the clinical pharmacist, colistin was discontinued in all patients in whom empirical therapy was continued incorrectly. None of the patients received loading dose of colistin. The maintenance dose, dose interval, and duration of treatment of colistin were appropriate in 76%, 71%, and 100% of patients, respectively. For none of the patients, the pharmacokinetic dosing method was used. In all patients, serum creatinine and WBC count were evaluated on daily basis. The sum indexes of colistin use were relevant to standard guidelines in 67.33% of the cases.Conclusion: The results of this study highlight the necessity of the pharmaceutical care team participation in all stages of treatment with antibiotics. After pharmacist interventions, some criteria of colistin utilization were corrected and brought closer to standard values.

  15. Author Guidelines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chief Editor

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available AUTHOR GUIDELINES Indian Journal of Community Health (IJCH accepts only online submission of manuscript(s by using Open Journal software (OJS at http://www.iapsmupuk.org/journal/index.php/IJCH/login Online SubmissionsAlready have a Username/Password for Indian Journal of Community Health (IJCH? GO TO LOGINNeed a Username/Password?GO TO REGISTRATIONNote: Registration and login are required to submit items online and to track the status of current submissions.Author GuidelinesIJCH strictly adheres on the recommendations for the Conduct, Reporting, Editing and Publication of Scholarly Work in Medical Journals as per the standard universal guidelines given by International Committee of Medical Journal Editors (ICMJE - Recommendations for Uniform Requirements for Manuscripts. Authors are requested to visit http://www.icmje.org/index.html before making online submission of their manuscript(s. http://www.icmje.org/recommendations/browse/manuscript-preparation/preparing-for-submission.html Preparing for SubmissionGeneral PrinciplesReporting GuidelinesManuscript SectionsTitle PageAbstractIntroductionMethodsResultsDiscussionReferencesTablesIllustrations (FiguresUnits of MeasurementAbbreviations and Symbols 1. General PrinciplesThe text of articles reporting original research is usually divided into Introduction, Methods, Results, and Discussion sections. This so-called “IMRAD” structure is not an arbitrary publication format but a reflection of the process of scientific discovery. Articles often need subheadings within these sections to further organize their content. Other types of articles, such as meta-analyses, may require different formats, while case reports, narrative reviews, and editorials may have less structured or unstructured formats.Electronic formats have created opportunities for adding details or sections, layering information, cross-linking, or extracting portions of articles in electronic versions. Supplementary electronic

  16. Author Guidelines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chief Editor

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Author GuidelinesIJCH strictly adheres on the recommendations for the Conduct, Reporting, Editing and Publication of Scholarly Work in Medical Journals as per the standard universal guidelines given by International Committee of Medical Journal Editors (ICMJE - Recommendations for Uniform Requirements for Manuscripts. Authors are requested to visit http://www.icmje.org/index.html before making online submission of their manuscript(s.  http://www.icmje.org/recommendations/browse/manuscript-preparation/preparing-for-submission.html Preparing for SubmissionPAGE CONTENTSGeneral PrinciplesReporting GuidelinesManuscript SectionsTitle PageAbstractIntroductionMethodsResultsDiscussionReferencesTablesIllustrations (FiguresUnits of MeasurementAbbreviations and Symbols1. General PrinciplesThe text of articles reporting original research is usually divided into Introduction, Methods, Results, and Discussion sections. This so-called “IMRAD” structure is not an arbitrary publication format but a reflection of the process of scientific discovery. Articles often need subheadings within these sections to further organize their content. Other types of articles, such as meta-analyses, may require different formats, while case reports, narrative reviews, and editorials may have less structured or unstructured formats.Electronic formats have created opportunities for adding details or sections, layering information, cross-linking, or extracting portions of articles in electronic versions. Supplementary electronic-only material should be submitted and sent for peer review simultaneously with the primary manuscript.2. Reporting GuidelinesReporting guidelines have been developed for different study designs; examples include CONSORT for randomized trials, STROBE for observational studies, PRISMA for systematic reviews and meta-analyses, and STARD for studies of diagnostic accuracy. Journals are encouraged to ask authors to follow these guidelines because

  17. AUTHOR GUIDELINES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chief Editor

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available AUTHOR GUIDELINESIndian Journal of Community Health (IJCH accepts only online submission of manuscript(s by using Open Journal software (OJS at http://www.iapsmupuk.org/journal/index.php/IJCH/loginOnline SubmissionsAlready have a Username/Password for Indian Journal of Community Health (IJCH? GO TO LOGINNeed a Username/Password?GO TO REGISTRATIONNote: Registration and login are required to submit items online and to track the status of current submissions.Author GuidelinesIJCH strictly adheres on the recommendations for the Conduct, Reporting, Editing and Publication of Scholarly Work in Medical Journals as per the standard universal guidelines given by International Committee of Medical Journal Editors (ICMJE - Recommendations for Uniform Requirements for Manuscripts. Authors are requested to visit http://www.icmje.org/index.html before making online submission of their manuscript(s.SectionsEditorial:On issues of current public health needAbout 1000 – 1200 wordsReferences: 5 – 10 (PubMed - Citation preferredInvited Commentary:Brief, provocative, opinionated communicationsOn issues of current public health needMain Text: 750-1000 words excluding referencesReferences: 5 – 10 (PubMed - Citation preferredOriginal Article:Articles from Original ResearchStructured abstract: 250 wordsMain Text: 2500 - 3000 words, IMRD formatKey Words: 5 - 8References: 20 – 25 (PubMed - Citation preferredTables / Figures: 3 – 4*Certificate of clearance from respective Institutional Ethical Committee (IECReview Article:On subject of public health relevanceAbstract: 250 wordsMain Text: 2500 - 3000 wordsKey Words: 3 - 4References: 20 – 25 (PubMed - Citation preferredTables / Figures: 3 – 4Short Communication / Article:Short report of a research project / outbreakMain Text : 1000 – 1200 wordsReferences: 10 – 15 (PubMed - Citation preferredTable / Figure: 01*Certificate of clearance from respective Institutional Ethical Committee (IECReport from the field

  18. The use of clinical guidelines for referral of patients with lesions suspicious for oral cancer may ease early diagnosis and improve education of healthcare professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seoane, Juan; Corral-Lizana, Cesar; González-Mosquera, Antonio; Cerero, Rocío; Esparza, Germán; Sanz-Cuesta, Teresa; Varela-Centelles, Pablo

    2011-11-01

    Early diagnosis and referral of oral cancer is essential. Successful implementation of clinical guidelines must include current practitioners and students. To evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of students at oral cancer screening and to assess the effectiveness of clinical referral guidelines. Fifth year dental students were randomly allocated to either control (n=19) or experimental groups (n = 18). Both received the customary training in oral diagnosis. The experimental group underwent a 2 hour workshop where the guidelines for the referral of suspicious lesions were discussed. Three months later, a set of 51 clinical cases including benign, malignant, and precancerous conditions/lesions were used to assess the screening ability of each subject. All 37 students entered the study. Sensitivity (control group) ranged from 16.7% to 66.7%; the experimental group scored from 16.7% to 83.3%. Fifty percent of the experimental students reached sensitivity values ≥ 62.5% (p = 0.01). Diagnostic specificity (control group) spanned from 80% to 93.3% (median = 50%); amongst experimental group it ranged from 82.2% to 97.8% (median = 92.8%); (p = 0.003). Concordance -control group- was X = 82.5 (SD = 3.2), and X = 88.2 (SD = 4.3) for the experimental, (p > 0.001). Cohen's kappa test was poor (K cancers urgently (p = 0.002) and left less unreferred cancers (0.04). This group also referred more precancerous lesions/conditions urgently (p = 0.02). The implementation of a clinical referral guideline at undergraduate level has proved valuable, under experimental conditions, to significantly increase diagnostic abilities of the examiners and thus to improve screening for oral cancer.

  19. Non-Suicidal Self-Injury in Our Schools: A Review and Research-Informed Guidelines for School Mental Health Professionals

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Riggi, Melissa E.; Moumne, Samira; Heath, Nancy L.; Lewis, Stephen P.

    2017-01-01

    Non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI), the immediate and deliberate destruction of one's own body tissue, without suicidal intent, and not for purposes that are socially accepted, is a critical concern for youth in schools. Despite significant scholarly advances and increasing clinical awareness of NSSI, many school mental health professionals (MHPs)…

  20. Guideline for Reversal of Antithrombotics in Intracranial Hemorrhage: A Statement for Healthcare Professionals from the Neurocritical Care Society and Society of Critical Care Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frontera, Jennifer A; Lewin, John J; Rabinstein, Alejandro A; Aisiku, Imo P; Alexandrov, Anne W; Cook, Aaron M; del Zoppo, Gregory J; Kumar, Monisha A; Peerschke, Ellinor I B; Stiefel, Michael F; Teitelbaum, Jeanne S; Wartenberg, Katja E; Zerfoss, Cindy L

    2016-02-01

    The use of antithrombotic agents, including anticoagulants, antiplatelet agents, and thrombolytics has increased over the last decade and is expected to continue to rise. Although antithrombotic-associated intracranial hemorrhage can be devastating, rapid reversal of coagulopathy may help limit hematoma expansion and improve outcomes. The Neurocritical Care Society, in conjunction with the Society of Critical Care Medicine, organized an international, multi-institutional committee with expertise in neurocritical care, neurology, neurosurgery, stroke, hematology, hemato-pathology, emergency medicine, pharmacy, nursing, and guideline development to evaluate the literature and develop an evidence-based practice guideline. Formalized literature searches were conducted, and studies meeting the criteria established by the committee were evaluated. Utilizing the GRADE methodology, the committee developed recommendations for reversal of vitamin K antagonists, direct factor Xa antagonists, direct thrombin inhibitors, unfractionated heparin, low-molecular weight heparin, heparinoids, pentasaccharides, thrombolytics, and antiplatelet agents in the setting of intracranial hemorrhage. This guideline provides timely, evidence-based reversal strategies to assist practitioners in the care of patients with antithrombotic-associated intracranial hemorrhage.

  1. Electrical safety guidelines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-09-01

    The Electrical Safety Guidelines prescribes the DOE safety standards for DOE field offices or facilities involved in the use of electrical energy. It has been prepared to provide a uniform set of electrical safety standards and guidance for DOE installations in order to affect a reduction or elimination of risks associated with the use of electrical energy. The objectives of these guidelines are to enhance electrical safety awareness and mitigate electrical hazards to employees, the public, and the environment.

  2. Record Keeping Guidelines

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Psychologist, 2007

    2007-01-01

    These guidelines are designed to educate psychologists and provide a framework for making decisions regarding professional record keeping. State and federal laws, as well as the American Psychological Association's "Ethical Principles of Psychologists and Code of Conduct," generally require maintenance of appropriate records of psychological…

  3. Submissions of stakeholders on voluntary codes of conduct, guidelines and best practices, and/or standards in relation to access and benefit-sharing for all subsectors of genetic resources for food and agriculture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martyniuk, E.; Berger, B.; Bojkovski, D.; Bouchel, D.; Hiemstra, S.J.

    2014-01-01

    The Commission, at its Fourteenth Regular Session, requested its Secretary to invite stakeholder groups to report on voluntary codes of conduct, guidelines and best practices, and/or standards in relation to access and benefit-sharing for all subsectors of genetic resources for food and agriculture,

  4. New worldwide lipid guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saraf, Smriti; Ray, Kausik K

    2015-07-01

    Atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD) remains the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in most countries. Modification of common risk factors such as dyslipidaemia can result in significant reduction of ASCVD incidence in the population and improve clinical outcomes. The purpose of this review is to discuss and compare the latest worldwide lipid guidelines, and to demonstrate the variation in practice in different parts of the world. The lipid guidelines have recently been updated in different countries. The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) guidelines in the United Kingdom were issued in July 2014, are risk based and are broadly similar to the American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association task force guidelines that were published in November 2013. Both these guidelines are in variance with both the Canadian Guidelines and the European Society of Cardiology/European Atherosclerosis Society guidelines 2011, which are target based and have different risk scoring systems, which results in significant variation in practice and increased healthcare costs in certain countries. The difference in guidelines in different countries makes it difficult for the clinician to standardize the treatment provided to individuals. The variance in risk scoring systems makes it difficult to compare risk prediction tools across countries and hence the optimum treatment available for a given population. Standardization of guidelines based on randomized controlled trial data and validation and calibration of various risk scoring systems could help improve clinical outcomes in this high-risk group of individuals at risk of ASCVD within individual countries.

  5. Guidelines for the prevention of stroke in women: a statement for healthcare professionals from the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bushnell, Cheryl; McCullough, Louise D; Awad, Issam A; Chireau, Monique V; Fedder, Wende N; Furie, Karen L; Howard, Virginia J; Lichtman, Judith H; Lisabeth, Lynda D; Piña, Ileana L; Reeves, Mathew J; Rexrode, Kathryn M; Saposnik, Gustavo; Singh, Vineeta; Towfighi, Amytis; Vaccarino, Viola; Walters, Matthew R

    2014-05-01

    The aim of this statement is to summarize data on stroke risk factors that are unique to and more common in women than men and to expand on the data provided in prior stroke guidelines and cardiovascular prevention guidelines for women. This guideline focuses on the risk factors unique to women, such as reproductive factors, and those that are more common in women, including migraine with aura, obesity, metabolic syndrome, and atrial fibrillation. Writing group members were nominated by the committee chair on the basis of their previous work in relevant topic areas and were approved by the American Heart Association (AHA) Stroke Council's Scientific Statement Oversight Committee and the AHA's Manuscript Oversight Committee. The panel reviewed relevant articles on adults using computerized searches of the medical literature through May 15, 2013. The evidence is organized within the context of the AHA framework and is classified according to the joint AHA/American College of Cardiology and supplementary AHA Stroke Council methods of classifying the level of certainty and the class and level of evidence. The document underwent extensive AHA internal peer review, Stroke Council Leadership review, and Scientific Statements Oversight Committee review before consideration and approval by the AHA Science Advisory and Coordinating Committee. We provide current evidence, research gaps, and recommendations on risk of stroke related to preeclampsia, oral contraceptives, menopause, and hormone replacement, as well as those risk factors more common in women, such as obesity/metabolic syndrome, atrial fibrillation, and migraine with aura. To more accurately reflect the risk of stroke in women across the lifespan, as well as the clear gaps in current risk scores, we believe a female-specific stroke risk score is warranted.

  6. IT governance guidelines for directors

    CERN Document Server

    Calder, Alan

    2005-01-01

    This important new book – 'IT Governance: Guidelines for Directors' provides directors, executives, managers and professional advisers with clear, pragmatic guidelines for ensuring that IT and the business work together for the same strategic objectives. 

  7. Journal of Wildlife Management guidelines

    Science.gov (United States)

    William M. Block; Frank R. Thompson; Dawn Hanseder; Allison Cox; Anna Knipps

    2011-01-01

    These Guidelines apply to all Journal of Wildlife Management (JWM, The Journal) submissions. Publishing a professional manuscript proceeds most smoothly if authors understand the policy, procedures, format, and style of the outlet to which they are submitting a manuscript. These instructions supersede all previous guidelines. Manuscripts that clearly deviate from this...

  8. Reflection and the way of competence development in educational standards of professionally oriented training of specialists in Kyrgyz literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akmatov Bolotbek Mekenovich

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The article examines problems of the professionally oriented training of specialists in Kyrgyz literature on the basis of competence in the situation of Kyrgyzstan entering the Bologna process. The author accents on a sharp necessity of the updates of both the form and the maintenance of teaching Kyrgyz literature during the Bachelor’s programme, curricula, regulations and positions in accordance with modern requirements combining large achievements in formation of the developed countries and literary-cultural values created by Kyrgyz people. Also the article marks the value of richness and vividness of speech, humour, metaphorical and allegoric language means in Kyrgyz literature. For example, works of Midin Alibaev, Raikan Shukyrbekov, Baidilda Sarnogoev, etc. The author evaluates the necessity of teaching the forms of national emotionally-expressive vocabulary through literature.

  9. The occupational toxicologist: professionalism, morality and ethical standards in the context of legal and non-litigation issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballantyne, Bryan

    2005-01-01

    By its very nature, practice and intended applications, the profession of occupational toxicology has individual and collective responsibilities related to the design, conduct, interpretation and extrapolation of laboratory and controlled human clinical studies in order to determine the potential for industrial xenobiotics to produce adverse effects. The implications for health-related adverse effects in the workplace, and in the domestic and general environment carries many and various responsibilities for the toxicologist which are related to multiple and wide-ranging ethical issues. This review presents and discusses some of the major areas where the occupational toxicologist may experience potential ethical problems related to the conduct of routine professional activities. Emphasis is placed on the design, conduct, interpretation and reporting of laboratory studies; animal welfare; regulatory activities; human clinical volunteer studies; roles and responsibilities in defining workplace safety and protective measures; malpractices in various disciplines and work practices; misconduct in publication; and codes of ethical behavior. Copyright (c) 2005 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. Guidelines for autopsy investigation of sudden cardiac death

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Basso, Cristina; Aguilera, Beatriz; Banner, Jytte

    2017-01-01

    Pathology has developed these guidelines, which represent the minimum standard that is required in the routine autopsy practice for the adequate investigation of SCD. The present version is an update of our original article, published 10 years ago. This is necessary because of our increased understanding...... blocks and appropriate material for toxicology, microbiology, biochemistry, and molecular investigation. Our recommendations apply to university medical centers, regionals hospitals, and all healthcare professionals practicing pathology and forensic medicine. We believe that their adoption throughout...

  11. A Randomized Trial Testing the Impact of Narrative Vignettes vs. Guideline Summaries on Provider Response to a Professional Organization Clinical Policy for Safe Opioid Prescribing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meisel, Zachary F.; Metlay, Joshua P.; Sinnenberg, Lauren; Kilaru, Austin S.; Grossestreuer, Anne; Barg, Frances K.; Shofer, Frances S.; Rhodes, Karin V.; Perrone, Jeanmarie

    2016-01-01

    Background Clinical guidelines are known to be underused by practitioners. In response to the challenges of treating pain amidst a prescription opioid epidemic, the American College of Emergency Physicians published an evidence-based clinical policy for opioid prescribing in 2012. Evidence-based narratives, an effective method of communicating health information in a variety of settings, offer a novel strategy for disseminating guidelines to physicians and engaging providers with clinical evidence. Objectives To compare whether narrative vignettes embedded in the American College of Emergency Physician (ACEP) daily e-newsletter improved dissemination of the clinical policy to ACEP members, and engagement of members with the clinical policy, compared to traditional summary text. Methods A prospective randomized controlled study, entitled Stories to Promote Information using Narrative (SPIN) trial, was performed. Derived from qualitative interviews with 61 ACEP physicians, 4 narrative vignettes were selected and refined, using a consensus panel of clinical and implementation experts. All ACEP members were then block randomized by state of residence to receive alternative versions of a daily emailed newsletter for a total of 24 days during a 9 week period. Narrative newsletters contained a selection of vignettes that referenced opioid prescription dilemmas. Control newsletters contained a selection of descriptive text about the clinical policy using similar length and appearance to the narrative vignettes. Embedded in the newsletters were web links to the complete vignette or traditional summary text, as well as additional links to the full ACEP clinical policy and a website providing assistance with prescription drug monitoring program enrollment. The newsletters were otherwise identical. Outcomes measured were the percentage of subjects who visited any of the web pages that contained additional guideline related information and the odds of any unique physician

  12. Guidelines for Building Science Education

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Metzger, Cheryn E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Rashkin, Samuel [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Huelman, Pat [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2015-11-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) residential research and demonstration program, Building America, has triumphed through 20 years of innovation. Partnering with researchers, builders, remodelers, and manufacturers to develop innovative processes like advanced framing and ventilation standards, Building America has proven an energy efficient design can be more cost effective, healthy, and durable than a standard house. As Building America partners continue to achieve their stretch goals, they have found that the barrier to true market transformation for high performance homes is the limited knowledge-base of the professionals working in the building industry. With dozens of professionals taking part in the design and execution of building and selling homes, each person should have basic building science knowledge relevant to their role, and an understanding of how various home components interface with each other. Instead, our industry typically experiences a fragmented approach to home building and design. After obtaining important input from stakeholders at the Building Science Education Kick-Off Meeting, DOE created a building science education strategy addressing education issues preventing the widespread adoption of high performance homes. This strategy targets the next generation and provides valuable guidance for the current workforce. The initiative includes: • Race to Zero Student Design Competition: Engages universities and provides students who will be the next generation of architects, engineers, construction managers and entrepreneurs with the necessary skills and experience they need to begin careers in clean energy and generate creative solutions to real world problems. • Building Science to Sales Translator: Simplifies building science into compelling sales language and tools to sell high performance homes to their customers. • Building Science Education Guidance: Brings together industry and academia to solve problems related to

  13. [Rehabilitation in undergraduate education and advanced professional training of the participating professional groups].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mau, Wilfried; Bengel, Jürgen; Pfeifer, Klaus

    2017-04-01

    In the German health care system, multiprofessional and coordinated rehabilitation care provides support for successful disease management. Against a background of the conditions and strong dynamics of the provision, this article gives an overview of some of the pertinent developments in rehabilitation-related undergraduate education and advanced professional training of physicians, psychologists, and exercise therapy professions in Germany. Frequently, there are few provisions and great variation between different locations. New conditions, such as the National Competence-Based Learning Objectives for Undergraduate Medical Education, the National Guidelines for Graduate Medical Education, and the ongoing reform of the psychotherapists' law emphasizing training in psychotherapy at university, allow the expectation of a positive effect on the competence of rehabilitation professionals. Education in physiotherapy is developing according to international standards aimed at improved evidence-based care. For the widely evidence-based undergraduate education and advanced professional training in sports and exercise therapy better profiling and professionalization should be sought.

  14. Professional Development in Climate Science Education as a Model for Navigating the Next Generations Science Standards - A High School Science Teacher's Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manning, C.; Buhr, S. M.

    2012-12-01

    The Next Generation Science Standards attempt to move the American K12 education system into the 21st century by focusing on science and engineering practice, crosscutting concepts, and the core ideas of the different disciplines. Putting these standards into practice will challenge a deeply entrenched system and science educators will need significant financial support from state and local governments, professional development from colleges and universities, and the creation of collegial academic networks that will help solve the many problems that will arise. While all of this sounds overwhelming, there are proven strategies and mechanisms already in place. Educators who tackle challenging topics like global climate change are turning to scientists and other like-minded teachers. Many of these teachers have never taken a class in atmospheric science but are expected to know the basics of climate and understand the emerging science as well. Teachers need scientists to continue to reach out and provide rigorous and in-depth professional development opportunities that enable them to answer difficult student questions and deal with community misconceptions about climate science. Examples of such programs include Earthworks, ICEE (Inspiring Climate Education Excellence) and ESSEA (Earth System Science Education Alliance). Projects like CLEAN (Climate Literacy and Energy Awareness Network) provide excellent resources that teachers can integrate into their lessons. All of these benefit from the umbrella of documents like Climate Literacy: The Essential Principles of Climate Science. Support from the aforementioned networks has encouraged the development of effective approaches for teaching climate science. From the perspective of a Geoscience master teacher and instructional coach, this presentation will demonstrate how scientists, researchers, and science education professionals have created models for professional development that create long-term networks supporting

  15. AAPM Medical Physics Practice Guideline 3.a: Levels of supervision for medical physicists in clinical training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seibert, J Anthony; Clements, Jessica B; Halvorsen, Per H; Herman, Michael G; Martin, Melissa C; Palta, Jatinder; Pfeiffer, Douglas E; Pizzutiello, Robert J; Schueler, Beth A; Shepard, S Jeff; Fairobrent, Lynne A

    2015-05-08

    The American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) is a nonprofit professional society whose primary purposes are to advance the science, education and professional practice of medical physics. The AAPM has more than 8,000 members and is the principal organization of medical physicists in the United States.The AAPM will periodically define new practice guidelines for medical physics practice to help advance the science of medical physics and to improve the quality of service to patients throughout the United States. Existing medical physics practice guidelines will be reviewed for the purpose of revision or renewal, as appropriate, on their fifth anniversary or sooner.Each medical physics practice guideline represents a policy statement by the AAPM, has undergone a thorough consensus process in which it has been subjected to extensive review, and requires the approval of the Professional Council. The medical physics practice guidelines recognize that the safe and effective use of diagnostic and therapeutic radiology requires specific training, skills, and techniques, as described in each document. Reproduction or modification of the published practice guidelines and technical standards by those entities not providing these services is not authorized.The following terms are used in the AAPM practice guidelines:Must and Must Not: Used to indicate that adherence to the recommendation is considered necessary to conform to this practice guideline.Should and Should Not: Used to indicate a prudent practice to which exceptions may occasionally be made in appropriate circumstances.

  16. Medical Physics Practice Guideline 4.a: Development, implementation, use and maintenance of safety checklists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fong de Los Santos, Luis E; Evans, Suzanne; Ford, Eric C; Gaiser, James E; Hayden, Sandra E; Huffman, Kristina E; Johnson, Jennifer L; Mechalakos, James G; Stern, Robin L; Terezakis, Stephanie; Thomadsen, Bruce R; Pronovost, Peter J; Fairobent, Lynne A

    2015-05-08

    The American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) is a nonprofit professional society whose primary purposes are to advance the science, education and professional practice of medical physics. The AAPM has more than 8,000 members and is the principal organization of medical physicists in the United States.The AAPM will periodically define new practice guidelines for medical physics practice to help advance the science of medical physics and to improve the quality of service to patients throughout the United States. Existing medical physics practice guidelines will be reviewed for the purpose of revision or renewal, as appropriate, on their fifth anniversary or sooner.Each medical physics practice guideline represents a policy statement by the AAPM, has undergone a thorough consensus process in which it has been subjected to extensive review, and requires the approval of the Professional Council. The medical physics practice guidelines recognize that the safe and effective use of diagnostic and therapeutic radiology requires specific training, skills, and techniques, as described in each document. Reproduction or modification of the published practice guidelines and technical standards by those entities not providing these services is not authorized.The following terms are used in the AAPM practice guidelines:Must and Must Not: Used to indicate that adherence to the recommendation is considered necessary to conform to this practice guideline.Should and Should Not: Used to indicate a prudent practice to which exceptions may occasionally be made in appropriate circumstances.

  17. A qualitative assessment of practitioner perspectives post-introduction of the first continuous professional competence (CPC) guidelines for emergency medical technicians in Ireland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knox, Shane; Dunne, Suzanne; Cullen, Walter; Dunne, Colum P

    2015-05-24

    In November 2013, the Irish Regulator for emergency medical technicians (EMTs) introduced the first mandatory requirement for registrants to demonstrate evidence of continuous professional development (CPD)/continuous professional competence (CPC). This qualitative study assessed the experience of practitioners with CPC-related materials provided to them by the Regulator in addition to identifying perceived or encountered practical challenges and suggested improvements six months following introduction of the requirement. Five fora were utilised, comprising two distinct groupings: a group of student EMTs (n = 62) and four discrete groups of qualified EMTs (total n = 131) all of whom had commenced the newly-introduced CPC process. All 193 volunteers were members of the Civil Defence (an auxiliary/voluntary organisation) and represented a nationwide distribution of personnel. Responses were categorised as 'perceived' challenges to CPC, relating to student EMTs, and 'experienced' challenges to CPC, relating to qualified EMTs. Responses also included suggestions from both groups of EMTs on how to improve the current system and guidance material. Audio/visual recordings were made, transcribed and then analysed using NVivo (version 10). A coding framework was developed which identified unifying themes. All participants agreed that CPC for pre-hospital practitioners was a welcomed initiative believing that CPC activities would help ensure that EMTs maintain or enhance their skills and be better enabled to provide quality care to the patients they might encounter. Two specific areas were identified by both groups as being challenging: 1) the practicalities of completing CPC and 2) the governance and administration of the CPC process. Challenging practicalities included: ability of voluntary EMTs to gain access to operational placements with paramedics and advanced paramedics; the ability to experience the number of patient contacts required and the definition of

  18. Reliability of the standard goniometry and diagrammatic recording of finger joint angles: a comparative study with healthy subjects and non-professional raters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macionis, Valdas

    2013-01-09

    Diagrammatic recording of finger joint angles by using two criss-crossed paper strips can be a quick substitute to the standard goniometry. As a preliminary step toward clinical validation of the diagrammatic technique, the current study employed healthy subjects and non-professional raters to explore whether reliability estimates of the diagrammatic goniometry are comparable with those of the standard procedure. The study included two procedurally different parts, which were replicated by assigning 24 medical students to act interchangeably as 12 subjects and 12 raters. A larger component of the study was designed to compare goniometers side-by-side in measurement of finger joint angles varying from subject to subject. In the rest of the study, the instruments were compared by parallel evaluations of joint angles similar for all subjects in a situation of simulated change of joint range of motion over time. The subjects used special guides to position the joints of their left ring finger at varying angles of flexion and extension. The obtained diagrams of joint angles were converted to numerical values by computerized measurements. The statistical approaches included calculation of appropriate intraclass correlation coefficients, standard errors of measurements, proportions of measurement differences of 5 or less degrees, and significant differences between paired observations. Reliability estimates were similar for both goniometers. Intra-rater and inter-rater intraclass correlation coefficients ranged from 0.69 to 0.93. The corresponding standard errors of measurements ranged from 2.4 to 4.9 degrees. Repeated measurements of a considerable number of raters fell within clinically non-meaningful 5 degrees of each other in proportions comparable with a criterion value of 0.95. Data collected with both instruments could be similarly interpreted in a simulated situation of change of joint range of motion over time. The paper goniometer and the standard goniometer can

  19. Reliability of the standard goniometry and diagrammatic recording of finger joint angles: a comparative study with healthy subjects and non-professional raters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Macionis Valdas

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Diagrammatic recording of finger joint angles by using two criss-crossed paper strips can be a quick substitute to the standard goniometry. As a preliminary step toward clinical validation of the diagrammatic technique, the current study employed healthy subjects and non-professional raters to explore whether reliability estimates of the diagrammatic goniometry are comparable with those of the standard procedure. Methods The study included two procedurally different parts, which were replicated by assigning 24 medical students to act interchangeably as 12 subjects and 12 raters. A larger component of the study was designed to compare goniometers side-by-side in measurement of finger joint angles varying from subject to subject. In the rest of the study, the instruments were compared by parallel evaluations of joint angles similar for all subjects in a situation of simulated change of joint range of motion over time. The subjects used special guides to position the joints of their left ring finger at varying angles of flexion and extension. The obtained diagrams of joint angles were converted to numerical values by computerized measurements. The statistical approaches included calculation of appropriate intraclass correlation coefficients, standard errors of measurements, proportions of measurement differences of 5 or less degrees, and significant differences between paired observations. Results Reliability estimates were similar for both goniometers. Intra-rater and inter-rater intraclass correlation coefficients ranged from 0.69 to 0.93. The corresponding standard errors of measurements ranged from 2.4 to 4.9 degrees. Repeated measurements of a considerable number of raters fell within clinically non-meaningful 5 degrees of each other in proportions comparable with a criterion value of 0.95. Data collected with both instruments could be similarly interpreted in a simulated situation of change of joint range of motion over

  20. Other Solid Waste Incineration (OSWI) Units Standards of Performance for New Stationary Sources and Emission Guidelines for Existing Sources Fact Sheets

    Science.gov (United States)

    This page contains a November 2005, and and November 2006 fact sheet with information regarding the final and proposed NSPS and Emission Guidelines for Existing Sources for OSWI. This document provides a summary of the information for this regulation

  1. Survey of Implementation of Antiemetic Prescription Standards in Indian Oncology Practices and Its Adherence to the American Society of Clinical Oncology Antiemetic Clinical Guideline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patil, Vijay; Noronha, Vanita; Joshi, Amit; Parikh, Purvish; Bhattacharjee, Atanu; Chakraborty, Santam; Jandyal, Sunny; Muddu, Vamshi; Ramaswamy, Anant; Babu, K. Govinda; Lokeshwar, Nilesh; Hingmire, Sachin; Ghadyalpatil, Nikhil; Banavali, Shripad

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Adherence to international antiemetic prophylaxis guidelines like those of ASCO can result in better control of chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting; however, the extent of implementation of such guidelines in India is unknown. Therefore, this survey was planned. Methods This study was an anonymized cross-sectional survey approved by the ethics committee. Survey items were generated from the clinical questions given in the ASCO guidelines. The survey was disseminated through personal contacts at an oncology conference and via e-mail to various community oncology centers across India. The B1, B2, and B3 domains included questions regarding the optimal antiemetic prophylaxis for high, moderate, and low-minimal emetogenic regimens. Results Sixty-six (62.9%) of 105 responded and 65 centers (98.5%) were aware of the published guidelines. The partial, full, and no implementation scores were 92.5%, 4.5%, and 3.0%, respectively. Full implementation was better for the low-minimal emetogenic regimens (34.8%) than the highly emetogenic regimens (6.1%). The three most frequent reasons for hampered implementation of ASCO guidelines in routine chemotherapy practice cited by centers were a lack of sensitization (26 centers; 39.4%), lack of national guidelines (12 centers; 18.2%), and lack of administrative support (10 centers; 15.2%). Conclusion Awareness regarding ASCO antiemetic guidelines is satisfactory in Indian oncology practices; however, there is a need for sensitization of oncologists toward complete implementation of these guidelines in their clinical practice. PMID:28831443

  2. Survey of Implementation of Antiemetic Prescription Standards in Indian Oncology Practices and Its Adherence to the American Society of Clinical Oncology Antiemetic Clinical Guideline

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijay Patil

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Adherence to international antiemetic prophylaxis guidelines like those of ASCO can result in better control of chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting; however, the extent of implementation of such guidelines in India is unknown. Therefore, this survey was planned. Methods: This study was an anonymized cross-sectional survey approved by the ethics committee. Survey items were generated from the clinical questions given in the ASCO guidelines. The survey was disseminated through personal contacts at an oncology conference and via e-mail to various community oncology centers across India. The B1, B2, and B3 domains included questions regarding the optimal antiemetic prophylaxis for high, moderate, and low-minimal emetogenic regimens. Results: Sixty-six (62.9% of 105 responded and 65 centers (98.5% were aware of the published guidelines. The partial, full, and no implementation scores were 92.5%, 4.5%, and 3.0%, respectively. Full implementation was better for the low-minimal emetogenic regimens (34.8% than the highly emetogenic regimens (6.1%. The three most frequent reasons for hampered implementation of ASCO guidelines in routine chemotherapy practice cited by centers were a lack of sensitization (26 centers; 39.4%, lack of national guidelines (12 centers; 18.2%, and lack of administrative support (10 centers; 15.2%. Conclusion: Awareness regarding ASCO antiemetic guidelines is satisfactory in Indian oncology practices; however, there is a need for sensitization of oncologists toward complete implementation of these guidelines in their clinical practice.

  3. Development of national standardized all-hazard disaster core competencies for acute care physicians, nurses, and EMS professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, Carl H; Koenig, Kristi L; Whiteside, Mary; Murray, Rick

    2012-03-01

    The training of medical personnel to provide care for disaster victims is a priority for the physician community, the federal government, and society as a whole. Course development for such training guided by well-accepted standardized core competencies is lacking, however. This project identified a set of core competencies and performance objectives based on the knowledge, skills, and attitudes required by the specific target audience (emergency department nurses, emergency physicians, and out-of-hospital emergency medical services personnel) to ensure they can treat the injuries and illnesses experienced by victims of disasters regardless of cause. The core competencies provide a blueprint for the development or refinement of disaster training courses. This expert consensus project, supported by a grant from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, incorporated an all-hazard, comprehensive emergency management approach addressing every type of disaster to minimize the effect on the public's health. An instructional systems design process was used to guide the development of audience-appropriate competencies and performance objectives. Participants, representing multiple academic and provider organizations, used a modified Delphi approach to achieve consensus on recommendations. A framework of 19 content categories (domains), 19 core competencies, and more than 90 performance objectives was developed for acute medical care personnel to address the requirements of effective all-hazards disaster response. Creating disaster curricula and training based on the core competencies and performance objectives identified in this article will ensure that acute medical care personnel are prepared to treat patients and address associated ramifications/consequences during any catastrophic event. Copyright © 2012 American College of Emergency Physicians. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Physical Activity Design Guidelines for School Architecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brittin, Jeri; Sorensen, Dina; Trowbridge, Matthew; Lee, Karen K; Breithecker, Dieter; Frerichs, Leah; Huang, Terry

    2015-01-01

    Increasing children's physical activity at school is a national focus in the U.S. to address childhood obesity. While research has demonstrated associations between aspects of school environments and students' physical activity, the literature currently lacks a synthesis of evidence to serve as a practical, spatially-organized resource for school designers and decision-makers, as well as to point to pertinent research opportunities. This paper describes the development of a new practical tool: Physical Activity Design Guidelines for School Architecture. Its aims are to provide architects and designers, as well as school planners, educators, and public health professionals, with strategies for making K-12 school environments conducive to healthy physical activity, and to engage scientists in transdisciplinary perspectives toward improved knowledge of the school environment's impact. We used a qualitative review process to develop evidence-based and theory-driven school design guidelines that promote increased physical activity among students. The design guidelines include specific strategies in 10 school design domains. Implementation of the guidelines is expected to enable students to adopt healthier physical activity behaviors. The tool bridges a translational gap between research and environmental design practice, and may contribute to setting new industry and education standards.

  5. Physical Activity Design Guidelines for School Architecture.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeri Brittin

    Full Text Available Increasing children's physical activity at school is a national focus in the U.S. to address childhood obesity. While research has demonstrated associations between aspects of school environments and students' physical activity, the literature currently lacks a synthesis of evidence to serve as a practical, spatially-organized resource for school designers and decision-makers, as well as to point to pertinent research opportunities. This paper describes the development of a new practical tool: Physical Activity Design Guidelines for School Architecture. Its aims are to provide architects and designers, as well as school planners, educators, and public health professionals, with strategies for making K-12 school environments conducive to healthy physical activity, and to engage scientists in transdisciplinary perspectives toward improved knowledge of the school environment's impact. We used a qualitative review process to develop evidence-based and theory-driven school design guidelines that promote increased physical activity among students. The design guidelines include specific strategies in 10 school design domains. Implementation of the guidelines is expected to enable students to adopt healthier physical activity behaviors. The tool bridges a translational gap between research and environmental design practice, and may contribute to setting new industry and education standards.

  6. Physical Activity Design Guidelines for School Architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brittin, Jeri; Sorensen, Dina; Trowbridge, Matthew; Lee, Karen K.; Breithecker, Dieter; Frerichs, Leah; Huang, Terry

    2015-01-01

    Increasing children’s physical activity at school is a national focus in the U.S. to address childhood obesity. While research has demonstrated associations between aspects of school environments and students’ physical activity, the literature currently lacks a synthesis of evidence to serve as a practical, spatially-organized resource for school designers and decision-makers, as well as to point to pertinent research opportunities. This paper describes the development of a new practical tool: Physical Activity Design Guidelines for School Architecture. Its aims are to provide architects and designers, as well as school planners, educators, and public health professionals, with strategies for making K-12 school environments conducive to healthy physical activity, and to engage scientists in transdisciplinary perspectives toward improved knowledge of the school environment’s impact. We used a qualitative review process to develop evidence-based and theory-driven school design guidelines that promote increased physical activity among students. The design guidelines include specific strategies in 10 school design domains. Implementation of the guidelines is expected to enable students to adopt healthier physical activity behaviors. The tool bridges a translational gap between research and environmental design practice, and may contribute to setting new industry and education standards. PMID:26230850

  7. Quality Tools for Professional Higher Education Review and Improvement. PHExcel Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jørgensen, Malene Dahl; Sparre Kristensen, Regitze; Wimpf, Alexandre; Delplace, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    The report is the project's first outcome, and provides an overview of quality tools, quality models and quality labels, currently in use in (professional) higher education. It is followed by a gap analysis as regards the Standards and Guidelines for quality assurance in the European Higher Education Area (ESG), and the identified characteristics…

  8. Bill Lang's contributions to acoustics at International Business Machines Corporation (IBM), signal processing, international standards, and professionalism in noise control engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maling, George C.

    2005-09-01

    Bill Lang joined IBM in the late 1950s with a mandate from Thomas Watson Jr. himself to establish an acoustics program at IBM. Bill created the facilities in Poughkeepsie, developed the local program, and was the leader in having other IBM locations with development and manufacturing responsibilities construct facilities and hire staff under the Interdivisional Liaison Program. He also directed IBMs acoustics technology program. In the mid-1960s, he led an IEEE standards group in Audio and Electroacoustics, and, with the help of James Cooley, Peter Welch, and others, introduced the fast Fourier transform to the acoustics community. He was the convenor of ISO TC 43 SC1 WG6 that began writing the 3740 series of standards in the 1970s. It was his suggestion to promote professionalism in noise control engineering, and, through meetings with Leo Beranek and others, led the founding of INCE/USA in 1971. He was also a leader of the team that founded International INCE in 1974, and he served as president from 1988 until 1999.

  9. Requirements for the Modernization of General Vocational Education Programs (GVEP for Teachers’ Training in Accordance with the Professional Standard of the Teacher: Proposals for the Implementation of the Activity Approach in Teachers’ Training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margolis A.A

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The article discusses the problem of modernization of teachers’ training programs in the context of bringing them into line with the requirements of the professional standard of the teacher. The author distinguishes two basic tasks of professionalization of pedagogical programs aimed at achieving this goal: to strengthen the practical training of future teachers on the basis of the networking of educational institutions of general and higher education (school and university partnership, and to develop research competencies of future teachers, providing them the opportunity to carry out professional development (restructuring of their professional actions on the basis of a mini-research embedded in professional practice and reflection of their bases. The author substantiates the basic positions of the activity approach in preparing teachers and shows the place of this approach in the context of modern practitioner-researcher and reflective teacher approaches. The article defines the basic requirements for the development of vocational education teachers’ training programs developed by the author on the basis of the activity approach in the context of tasks and professionalization of such programs, in accordance with the requirements of the professional standard of the teacher.

  10. 2013 AHA/ACC guideline on lifestyle management to reduce cardiovascular risk: A report of the American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association task force on practice guidelines

    Science.gov (United States)

    The goals of the American College of Cardiology (ACC) and the American Heart Association (AHA) are to prevent cardiovascular (CV) diseases, improve the management of people who have these diseases through professional education and research, and develop guidelines, standards and policies that promot...

  11. A Blueprint for Telerehabilitation Guidelines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Brennan

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Telerehabilitation refers to the delivery of rehabilitation services via information and communication technologies.  Clinically, this term encompasses a range of rehabilitation and habilitation services that include assessment, monitoring, prevention, intervention, supervision, education, consultation, and counseling.  Telerehabilitation has the capacity to provide service across the lifespan and across a continuum of care.  Just as the services and providers of telerehabilitation are broad, so are the points of service, which may include health care settings, clinics, homes, schools, or community-based worksites. This document was developed collaboratively by members of the Telerehabilitation SIG of the American Telemedicine Association, with input and guidance from other practitioners in the field, strategic stakeholders, and ATA staff.   Its purpose is to inform and assist practitioners in providing effective and safe services that are based on client needs, current empirical evidence, and available technologies.   Telerehabilitation professionals, in conjunction with professional associations and other organizations are encouraged to use this document as a template for developing discipline-specific standards, guidelines, and practice requirements.      

  12. A blueprint for telerehabilitation guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brennan, David; Tindall, Lyn; Theodoros, Deborah; Brown, Janet; Campbell, Michael; Christiana, Diana; Smith, David; Cason, Jana; Lee, Alan

    2010-01-01

    Telerehabilitation refers to the delivery of rehabilitation services via information and communication technologies. Clinically, this term encompasses a range of rehabilitation and habilitation services that include assessment, monitoring, prevention, intervention, supervision, education, consultation, and counseling. Telerehabilitation has the capacity to provide service across the lifespan and across a continuum of care. Just as the services and providers of telerehabilitation are broad, so are the points of service, which may include health care settings, clinics, homes, schools, or community-based worksites. This document was developed collaboratively by members of the Telerehabilitation SIG of the American Telemedicine Association, with input and guidance from other practitioners in the field, strategic stakeholders, and ATA staff. Its purpose is to inform and assist practitioners in providing effective and safe services that are based on client needs, current empirical evidence, and available technologies. Telerehabilitation professionals, in conjunction with professional associations and other organizations are encouraged to use this document as a template for developing discipline-specific standards, guidelines, and practice requirements.

  13. Translating Osteoporosis Prevention Guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brennan-Olsen, Sharon L; Hosking, Sarah M; Dobbins, Amelia G; Pasco, Julie A

    2017-04-01

    In Australia, the social gradient of chronic disease has never been as prominent as in current times, and the uptake of preventive health messages appears to be lower in discrete population groups. In efforts to re-frame health promotion from addressing behavior change to empowerment, we engaged community groups in disadvantaged neighborhoods to translate published preventive guidelines into easy-to-understand messages for the general population. Our research team established partnerships with older aged community groups located in disadvantaged neighborhoods, determined by cross-referencing addresses with the Australian Bureau of Statistics, to translate guidelines regarding osteoporosis prevention. We developed an oversized jigsaw puzzle that we used to translate recommended osteoporosis prevention guidelines. Successful participatory partnerships between researchers, health promotion professionals, and community groups in disadvantaged neighborhoods build capacity in researchers to undertake future participatory processes; they also make the best use of expert knowledge held by specific communities.

  14. Guidelines for Project Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Arieh, David

    2001-01-01

    Project management is an important part of the professional activities at Kennedy Space Center (KSC). Project management is the means by which many of the operations at KSC take shape. Moreover, projects at KSC are implemented in a variety of ways in different organizations. The official guidelines for project management are provided by NASA headquarters and are quite general. The project reported herein deals with developing practical and detailed project management guidelines in support of the project managers. This report summarizes the current project management effort in the Process Management Division and presents a new modeling approach of project management developed by the author. The report also presents the Project Management Guidelines developed during the summer.

  15. Prevention of peripherally inserted central line-associated blood stream infections in very low-birth-weight infants by using a central line bundle guideline with a standard checklist: a case control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei; Zhao, Chunling; Ji, Qinglian; Liu, Ying; Shen, Guirong; Wei, Lili

    2015-06-18

    Catheter-related infections (CRIs) are one of the severe complications of PICC placement. If treatment is not timely or correct, the incidence of infection and mortality rate can be high. A central line bundle (CLB) guideline was first proposed by the Institute for Healthcare Improvement, and included five key measures. Very low-birth-weight infants (VLBWIs) have a low immune response and indistinct symptoms after infection compared with other populations (Costa P, Kimura AF, de Vizzotto MP, de Castro TE, West A, Dorea E. Prevalence and reasons for non-elective removal of peripherally inserted central catheter in neonates. Rev Gaucha Enferm. 2012;33:126-33). Some reviews have focused on the effect and safety of a CLB in VLBWIs and its preventive effect on bacterial colonization and infection. Fifty-seven VLBWIs who underwent PICC insertion at a hospital in Qingdao, China, between November 2012 and June 2013, and for whom a CLB guideline and a standard checklist were adopted, were included in the CLB group. In contrast, 53 VLBWIs who underwent PICC insertion, but for whom a CLB guideline and a standard checklist were not adopted, were included in the control group. The incidence of CRIs was compared between before and after the treatment. The incidence of infection showed a statistically significant reduction from 10.0 to 2.20 per 1000 catheter days in the control group (P control group and 31.9 ± 15.0 days in the study group (P < 0.05), and these values were significantly different. The use of a CLB guideline with a standard checklist could be effective and feasible for preventing CRIs in VLBWIs and prolonging indwelling catheter time.

  16. Improving planning, design, reporting and scientific quality of animal experiments by using the Gold Standard Publication Checklist, in addition to the ARRIVE guidelines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hooijmans, C.R.; Vries, R.B.M. de; Leenaars, M.; Curfs, J.H.A.J.; Ritskes-Hoitinga, M.

    2011-01-01

    Several studies have demonstrated serious omissions in the way research that use animals is reported. In order to improve the quality of reporting of animal experiments, the Animals in research: reporting in vivo experiments (ARRIVE) Guidelines were published in the British Journal of Pharmacology

  17. Less use of standard guideline-based treatment of myocardial infarction in patients with chronic kidney disease: a Danish nation-wide cohort study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blicher, Thalia Marie; Hommel, Kristine; Olesen, Jonas Bjerring

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this Danish nationwide study was to evaluate the treatment of myocardial infarction (MI) in patients with non-end-stage chronic kidney disease (CKD) and in patients requiring renal replacement therapy (RRT). Upgraded guidelines for the management of MI were implemented around 2004; hence...

  18. Injuries, Matches Missed and the Influence of Minimum Medical Standards in the A-League Professional Football: A 5-Year Prospective Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gouttebarge, Vincent; Hughes Schwab, Brendan A; Vivian, Adam; M M J Kerkhoffs, Gino

    2016-03-01

    Epidemiological data on the occurrence of time-loss injuries over several A-League seasons remains lacking, while the effect of the mandatory implementation of 'Minimum Medical Standards' as a part of the collective bargaining agreement (CBA) needs to be explored. To explore the 5 year evolution of hamstring, groin, knee, ankle and total time-loss injuries among professional footballers in the A-League; to evaluate the consequences of these time-loss injuries in terms of total matches missed and costs incurred; and to explore whether the mandatory implementation of 'Minimum Medical Standards' in the A-League had led to a decrease in the occurrence of total time-loss injuries and total matches missed. An observational prospective study has been carried out since 2008. Data were collected weekly during the seasons 2008 - 2009 to 2012 - 2013 through official match previews/reviews, official media releases, official websites and/or self-reports by players. Total and specific (hamstring, groin, knee and ankle) numbers of time-loss injuries and matches missed were obtained for each season and the related financial costs calculated. The total number of time-loss injuries and matches missed rose from 129 and 506 respectively in 2008 - 2009 to 202 and 1110 in 2010 - 2011. Following the introduction of 'Minimum Medical Standards', both categories decreased (significantly for matches missed). These time-loss injuries and matches missed led to high costs of up to AUD$ 37,317,029.29 (2012 - 2013 season). The same trend was found for knee injuries, while hamstring and ankle injuries remained almost the same. However, time-loss due to groin injuries increased despite the introduction of "Minimum Medical Standards". The introduction of "Minimum Medical Standards" in the A-League had a favorable effect on the number of total, hamstring, knee and ankle injuries and on the number of matches missed due to these injuries, but not on the number of groin injuries. The costs related to

  19. Is keep/refer decision making an integral part of national guidelines for the physiotherapy profession within Europe? A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lackenbauer, Wolfgang; Janssen, Jessie; Roddam, Hazel; Selfe, James

    2016-11-28

    Keep/refer decision as the ability to independently determine whether a patient's condition is suitable for physiotherapy management (keep) or not (refer), is regarded as an core element in the World Confederation of Physical Therapists' (WCPT) Guideline for Standards of Physical Therapy Practice. However, it is currently unknown how individual European countries have implemented this in their national guidelines. To determine if keep/refer decision making abilities are an integral part of national guidelines for the physiotherapy profession of member countries of the European Network of Physiotherapy in Higher Education (ENPHE). A review was performed including medical databases, the grey literature and personal correspondence with professional ENPHE member associations. To gain the information of interest, all eligible documents were reviewed. 11 national guidelines for the physiotherapy profession could be obtained. Two additional member associations use European guidelines as their national ones. Despite the fact that in the WCPT guidelines keep/refer decision making abilities are clearly described as a core element, there exists huge inconsistency as to how various European (with direct and non direct access systems) countries have included them in their national guidelines. Despite the fact that most ENPHE member countries deem a close collaboration between health care professionals important and that physiotherapists should know the limitation of their expertise, keep/refer decision making abilities as explicitly stated in the WCPT guidelines were not included in the majority of guidelines that were reviewed. Copyright © 2017 Chartered Society of Physiotherapy. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. AAPM Medical Physics Practice Guideline 5.a.: Commissioning and QA of Treatment Planning Dose Calculations - Megavoltage Photon and Electron Beams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smilowitz, Jennifer B; Das, Indra J; Feygelman, Vladimir; Fraass, Benedick A; Kry, Stephen F; Marshall, Ingrid R; Mihailidis, Dimitris N; Ouhib, Zoubir; Ritter, Timothy; Snyder, Michael G; Fairobent, Lynne

    2015-09-08

    The American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) is a nonprofit professional society whose primary purposes are to advance the science, education and professional practice of medical physics. The AAPM has more than 8,000 members and is the principal organization of medical physicists in the United States. The AAPM will periodically define new practice guidelines for medical physics practice to help advance the science of medical physics and to improve the quality of service to patients throughout the United States. Existing medical physics practice guidelines will be reviewed for the purpose of revision or renewal, as appropriate, on their fifth anniversary or sooner. Each medical physics practice guideline represents a policy statement by the AAPM, has undergone a thorough consensus process in which it has been subjected to extensive review, and requires the approval of the Professional Council. The medical physics practice guidelines recognize that the safe and effective use of diagnostic and therapeutic radiology requires specific training, skills, and techniques, as described in each document. Reproduction or modification of the published practice guidelines and technical standards by those entities not providing these services is not authorized. The following terms are used in the AAPM practice guidelines:• Must and Must Not: Used to indicate that adherence to the recommendation is considered necessary to conform to this practice guideline.• Should and Should Not: Used to indicate a prudent practice to which exceptions may occasionally be made in appropriate circumstances.

  1. Professional performance in school

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rubio, J. F.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Professional performance in education is now calling the attention of researcher due to its role in the professionalizing process intended to increase international education standards. In this article the term professional performance is examined from the two socio-historic traditional roles involved in training the individuals as a bio-psychic and social entity: teachers and executive. By means of scientific methods, the author gives the theoretical grounds connecting professional performance, learning and individual capacity of using them in solving problem at his labor position. The professional performance is regarded as a human value that stimulates the activity. By predicting educational alternatives, the paper portraits a model of professional performance in education, referring the necessary actions needed for achieving the goals of education. Searching and discussing such alternatives leads to reinterpret professional problems and to find out ways of improving educational standards.

  2. Knowledge of and Adherence to Hygiene Guidelines among Medical Students in Austria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verena G. Herbert

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Adherence to hygiene guidelines is of utmost importance for healthcare professionals. The aim of this study was to evaluate the knowledge on and the adherence to hygiene guidelines among medical students in Austria. Additionally, a possible difference between female and male students was investigated. Methods. An open paper-based survey among third-year medical students at the Medical University of Graz was conducted. The questionnaire consisted of 20 single-choice questions covering compliance with basic hygiene standards, self-rated knowledge of hygiene guidelines, and satisfaction with current hygiene education, equipment, and quality standards. Results. Of 192 medical students, 70% judged their knowledge of hygiene standards as “excellent” or “good”; however, only 49% reported adherence to hygiene guidelines and only 43% performed hygienic hand disinfection according to WHO guidelines. Of the respondents, 79% voted for a mandatory course on hygiene standards in medical education. No significant gender differences were observed. Conclusion. While the knowledge on hygiene guidelines appears to be good among medical students, adherence is limited and requires improvement. The need for an optimum education in hygiene is high.

  3. Developing professional competence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wahlgren, Bjarne

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of university programs for professionals is to qualify the students to act competently in a subsequent job situation. Practical experiences as well as comprehensive research studies have shown that only a limited part of what is learned during the coursework is applied in the subsequent...... professional practice. There is too little transfer from the training programs to application in the workplace. Based on Danish research the relation between school and professional work, between scholastic knowledge and practical knowledge, is analyzed. Guideline for a new and more efficient curricula...

  4. Instructional Guidelines. Welding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fordyce, H. L.; Doshier, Dale

    Using the standards of the American Welding Society and the American Society of Mechanical Engineers, this welding instructional guidelines manual presents a course of study in accordance with the current practices in industry. Intended for use in welding programs now practiced within the Federal Prison System, the phases of the program are…

  5. Summary guidelines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Halsnaes, K.; Painuly, J.P.; Turkson, J.; Meyer, H.J.; Markandya, A.

    1999-09-01

    This document is a summary version of the methodological guidelines for climate change mitigation assessment developed as part of the Global Environment Facility (GEF) project Economics of Greenhouse Gas Limitations; Methodological Guidelines. The objectives of this project have been to develop a methodology, an implementing framework and a reporting system which countries can use in the construction of national climate change mitigation policies and in meeting their future reporting obligations under the FCCC. The methodological framework developed in the Methodological Guidelines covers key economic concepts, scenario building, modelling tools and common assumptions. It was used by several country studies included in the project. (au) 13 refs.

  6. Pharmacists and Natural Health Products: A systematic analysis of professional responsibilities in Canada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farrell J

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Natural health products such as herbs, vitamins and homeopathic medicines are widely available in Canadian pharmacies. Purpose: to conduct a systematic analysis of Canadian pharmacy policies and guidelines to explore pharmacists’ professional responsibilities with respect to natural health products.Methods: Legislation, codes of ethics, standards of practice and guidance documents that apply to the practice of pharmacy in each Canadian jurisdiction were systematically collected and examined to identify if, and how, these instruments establish professional duties in regard to natural health products.Results: The majority of Canadian jurisdictions now include some explicit reference to natural health products in standards of practice policy or guideline documents. Often natural health products are simply assumed to be included in the over-the-counter (OTC product category and thus professional responsibilities for OTCs are relevant for natural health products. A minority of provinces have specific policies on natural health products, herbals or homeopathy. In addition, the National Association of Pharmacy Regulatory Authorities’ Model Standards of Practice specifically refers to natural health products. Most policy documents indicate that pharmacists should inquire about natural health product use when counselling patients and, when asked, should provide accurate information regarding the efficacy, toxicity, side effects or interactions of natural health products. Public messaging also indicates that pharmacists are knowledgeable professionals who can provide evidence-based information about natural health products.Conclusions: Explicit policies or guidelines regarding pharmacists’ professional responsibilities with respect to natural health products currently exist in the majority of Canadian jurisdictions.

  7. Number and type of guideline implementation tools varies by guideline, clinical condition, country of origin, and type of developer organization: content analysis of guidelines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurel Liang

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Guideline implementation tools (GI tools can improve clinician behavior and patient outcomes. Analyses of guidelines published before 2010 found that many did not offer GI tools. Since 2010 standards, frameworks and instructions for GI tools have emerged. This study analyzed the number and types of GI tools offered by guidelines published in 2010 or later. Methods Content analysis and a published GI tool framework were used to categorize GI tools by condition, country, and type of organization. English-language guidelines on arthritis, asthma, colorectal cancer, depression, diabetes, heart failure, and stroke management were identified in the National Guideline Clearinghouse. Screening and data extraction were in triplicate. Findings were reported with summary statistics. Results Eighty-five (67.5% of 126 eligible guidelines published between 2010 and 2017 offered one or more of a total of 464 GI tools. The mean number of GI tools per guideline was 5.5 (median 4.0, range 1 to 28 and increased over time. The majority of GI tools were for clinicians (239, 51.5%, few were for patients (113, 24.4%, and fewer still were to support implementation (66, 14.3% or evaluation (46, 9.9%. Most clinician GI tools were guideline summaries (116, 48.5%, and most patient GI tools were condition-specific information (92, 81.4%. Government agencies (patient 23.5%, clinician 28.9%, implementation 24.1%, evaluation 23.5% and developers in the UK (patient 18.5%, clinician 25.2%, implementation 27.2%, evaluation 29.1% were more likely to generate guidelines that offered all four types of GI tools. Professional societies were more likely to generate guidelines that included clinician GI tools. Conclusions Many guidelines do not include any GI tools, or a variety of GI tools for different stakeholders that may be more likely to prompt guideline uptake (point-of-care forms or checklists for clinicians, decision-making or self-management tools for

  8. Number and type of guideline implementation tools varies by guideline, clinical condition, country of origin, and type of developer organization: content analysis of guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Laurel; Abi Safi, Jhoni; Gagliardi, Anna R

    2017-11-15

    Guideline implementation tools (GI tools) can improve clinician behavior and patient outcomes. Analyses of guidelines published before 2010 found that many did not offer GI tools. Since 2010 standards, frameworks and instructions for GI tools have emerged. This study analyzed the number and types of GI tools offered by guidelines published in 2010 or later. Content analysis and a published GI tool framework were used to categorize GI tools by condition, country, and type of organization. English-language guidelines on arthritis, asthma, colorectal cancer, depression, diabetes, heart failure, and stroke management were identified in the National Guideline Clearinghouse. Screening and data extraction were in triplicate. Findings were reported with summary statistics. Eighty-five (67.5%) of 126 eligible guidelines published between 2010 and 2017 offered one or more of a total of 464 GI tools. The mean number of GI tools per guideline was 5.5 (median 4.0, range 1 to 28) and increased over time. The majority of GI tools were for clinicians (239, 51.5%), few were for patients (113, 24.4%), and fewer still were to support implementation (66, 14.3%) or evaluation (46, 9.9%). Most clinician GI tools were guideline summaries (116, 48.5%), and most patient GI tools were condition-specific information (92, 81.4%). Government agencies (patient 23.5%, clinician 28.9%, implementation 24.1%, evaluation 23.5%) and developers in the UK (patient 18.5%, clinician 25.2%, implementation 27.2%, evaluation 29.1%) were more likely to generate guidelines that offered all four types of GI tools. Professional societies were more likely to generate guidelines that included clinician GI tools. Many guidelines do not include any GI tools, or a variety of GI tools for different stakeholders that may be more likely to prompt guideline uptake (point-of-care forms or checklists for clinicians, decision-making or self-management tools for patients, implementation and evaluation tools for managers and

  9. Pharmacists' perceptions of professionalism on social networking sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benetoli, Arcelio; Chen, Timothy F; Schaefer, Marion; Chaar, Betty; Aslani, Parisa

    SNS to be unregulated while most believed certain guidance was needed to maintain high professional standards in the online environment. A definitive strategy to separate professional and personal information and activities on SNS was not adopted by most pharmacists. E-professionalism issues could negatively impact on the standing of individual practitioners and the profession. Most agreed that education about SNS use would be beneficial; however, support for guidelines or regulations for pharmacists' use of SNS was not unanimous. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Teacher Perceptions of Their Curricular and Pedagogical Shifts: Outcomes of a Project-Based Model of Teacher Professional Development in the Next Generation Science Standards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shernoff, David J; Sinha, Suparna; Bressler, Denise M; Schultz, Dawna

    2017-01-01

    In this study, we conducted a model of teacher professional development (PD) on the alignment of middle and high school curricula and instruction to the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSSs), and evaluated the impact of the PD on teacher participants' development. The PD model included a 4-day summer academy emphasizing project-based learning (PBL) in the designing of NGSS-aligned curricula and instruction, as well as monthly follow-up Professional Learning Community meetings throughout the year providing numerous opportunities for teachers to develop and implement lesson plans, share results of lesson writing and implementation (successes and challenges), provide mutual feedback, and refine curricula and assessments. Following the summer academy, six female teachers were interviewed about their current conceptualizations of NGSS, the extent of curricular shifts made that are required by NGSS, their self-perceptions regarding their level of accomplishment in curriculum writing, and the benefits of the PD in reaching their goals related to NGSS. Interviews were supplemented with an analysis of lesson plans written while participating in the PD program. The interviewed teachers suggested that they had made important conceptual and pedagogical shifts required by NGSS as they participated in the PD, and also noted a variety of challenges as they made this shift. While all teachers were relative novices at NGSS curriculum writing before the PD, most of the teachers interviewed felt that they had achieved the status of an "accomplished novice" following the summer academy. An analysis of their written lessons suggested a great range in the extent to which teachers effectively applied their understanding of NGSS to write lessons aligned to NGSS. Interviewed teachers believed that the PD model was helpful to their development as science teachers, and all reported that there were no aspects of the PD that were not helpful. Even though most teachers obtained a basic

  11. Teacher Perceptions of Their Curricular and Pedagogical Shifts: Outcomes of a Project-Based Model of Teacher Professional Development in the Next Generation Science Standards

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David J. Shernoff

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we conducted a model of teacher professional development (PD on the alignment of middle and high school curricula and instruction to the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSSs, and evaluated the impact of the PD on teacher participants’ development. The PD model included a 4-day summer academy emphasizing project-based learning (PBL in the designing of NGSS-aligned curricula and instruction, as well as monthly follow-up Professional Learning Community meetings throughout the year providing numerous opportunities for teachers to develop and implement lesson plans, share results of lesson writing and implementation (successes and challenges, provide mutual feedback, and refine curricula and assessments. Following the summer academy, six female teachers were interviewed about their current conceptualizations of NGSS, the extent of curricular shifts made that are required by NGSS, their self-perceptions regarding their level of accomplishment in curriculum writing, and the benefits of the PD in reaching their goals related to NGSS. Interviews were supplemented with an analysis of lesson plans written while participating in the PD program. The interviewed teachers suggested that they had made important conceptual and pedagogical shifts required by NGSS as they participated in the PD, and also noted a variety of challenges as they made this shift. While all teachers were relative novices at NGSS curriculum writing before the PD, most of the teachers interviewed felt that they had achieved the status of an “accomplished novice” following the summer academy. An analysis of their written lessons suggested a great range in the extent to which teachers effectively applied their understanding of NGSS to write lessons aligned to NGSS. Interviewed teachers believed that the PD model was helpful to their development as science teachers, and all reported that there were no aspects of the PD that were not helpful. Even though most teachers

  12. Diretrizes curriculares para a formação de profissionais de saúde: competências ou práxis? Curriculum guidelines for training healthcare professionals: skills or praxis?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ingrid D'avilla Freire Pereira

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Este estudo analisa os referenciais teóricos e epistemológicos da educação que constam das Diretrizes Curriculares Nacionais (DCN relativas à formação profissional em saúde no Brasil. Para tanto, resgata a historicidade da relação educação, saúde e sociedade e as reformas do ensino médico; descreve o movimento de instituição das DCN para a área da saúde no país; e discute as relações entre o referencial da pedagogia das competências, que alicerça as DCN, e a concepção de direito à saúde formulada pela VIII Conferência Nacional de Saúde. Os resultados desta investigação sugerem a hipótese de que, para formar profissionais de saúde comprometidos com os princípios da VIII Conferência Nacional de Saúde e com a compreensão da saúde como direito, é necessário questionar os limites da pedagogia das competências adotada pelas DCN, bem como construir uma proposta de formação que dialogue com o pressuposto da transformação social, de modo que a sua didática possibilite aos estudantes evoluírem criticamente da práxis individual e comum para a práxis histórica.This study examines the theoretical and epistemological benchmarks of education contained in the National Curriculum Guidelines (DCN for the training of health professionals in Brazil. To achieve its goals, it rescues the historicity of the relationship among education, health, and society and the reform of medical education; it describes the movement of instituting the DCN for the health care area in Brazil, and discusses the relationship between the benchmark of the pedagogy of skills that underpins the DCN and the concept of the right to health formulated by the 8th National Health Conference. The results of this investigation suggest the hypothesis that, to train health professionals committed to the principles of the 8th National Health Conference and with the understanding of health as a right, it is necessary to question the limits of the

  13. Professional Exchange: Mapping the Future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dingman, Robert L.

    1993-01-01

    New associate editor of Professional Exchange section of "Journal of Mental Health Counseling" discusses importance of section. Lists potential topics suggested in 1989, then adds several other topics to the list. Concludes with guidelines for submission to Professional Exchange section. (NB)

  14. AAPM-RSS Medical Physics Practice Guideline 9.a. for SRS-SBRT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halvorsen, Per H; Cirino, Eileen; Das, Indra J; Garrett, Jeffrey A; Yang, Jun; Yin, Fang-Fang; Fairobent, Lynne A

    2017-09-01

    The American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) is a nonprofit professional society whose primary purposes are to advance the science, education, and professional practice of medical physics. The AAPM has more than 8,000 members and is the principal organization of medical physicists in the United States. The AAPM will periodically define new practice guidelines for medical physics practice to help advance the science of medical physics and to improve the quality of service to patients throughout the United States. Existing medical physics practice guidelines will be reviewed for revision or renewal, as appropriate, on their fifth anniversary or sooner. Each medical physics practice guideline represents a policy statement by the AAPM, has undergone a thorough consensus process in which it has been subjected to extensive review, and requires the approval of the Professional Council. The medical physics practice guidelines recognize that the safe and effective use of diagnostic and therapeutic radiology requires specific training, skills, and techniques, as described in each document. Reproduction or modification of the published practice guidelines and technical standards by those entities not providing these services is not authorized. The following terms are used in the AAPM practice guidelines: Must and Must Not: Used to indicate that adherence to the recommendation is considered necessary to conform to this practice guideline. Should and Should Not: Used to indicate a prudent practice to which exceptions may occasionally be made in appropriate circumstances. Approved by AAPM Professional Council 3-31-2017 and Executive Committee 4-4-2017. © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Applied Clinical Medical Physics published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  15. Guidelines to Support Professional Copyright Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dryden, Jean

    2012-01-01

    Copyright is extremely complex, and it is difficult to convey its complexities in a clear and concise form. Through decades of experience, archivists developed informal best practices for dealing with copyright in the analog world; however the application of copyright in the digital environment is evolving in response to rapidly changing…

  16. The Tundra Is the Text: Using Alaska Native Contexts To Promote Cultural Relevancy in Teacher Professional Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fickel, Letitia Hochstrasser; Jones, Ken

    In summer 2000, the University of Alaska Anchorage and cooperating professional development schools organized four summer institutes to enhance teachers' cultural and subject matter knowledge. This dual focus was prompted by the new Alaska Content Standards and by guidelines for preparing culturally responsive teachers, developed by Alaska Native…

  17. Does professional autonomy protect medical futility judgments?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gampel, Eric

    2006-04-01

    Despite substantial controversy, the use of futility judgments in medicine is quite common, and has been backed by the implementation of hospital policies and professional guidelines on medical futility. The controversy arises when health care professionals (HCPs) consider a treatment futile which patients or families believe to be worthwhile: should HCPs be free to refuse treatments in such a case, or be required to provide them? Most physicians seem convinced that professional autonomy protects them from being forced to provide treatments they judge mentally futile, given the lack of patient benefit as well as the waste of medical resources involved. The argument from professional autonomy has been presented in a number of articles, but it has not been subjected to much critical scrutiny. In this paper I distinguish three versions of the argument: 1) that each physician should be free to exercise his or her own medical judgment; 2) that the medical profession as a whole may provide futility standards to govern the practice of its members; and 3) that the moral integrity of each physician serves as a limit to treatment demands. I maintain that none of these versions succeeds in overcoming the standard objection that futility determinations involve value judgments best left to the patients, their designated surrogates, or their families. Nor do resource considerations change this fact, since they should not influence the properly patient-centered judgment about futility.

  18. Consent for routine neonatal procedures: A study of practices in Irish neonatal units. How do we compare with the gold standard BAPM guidelines?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ryan, M A

    2017-06-01

    The Irish National Consent Policy (NCP)¹ proposes that the legal requirement for consent extends to all forms of interventions, investigations and treatment, carried out on or behalf of the Health Service Executive (HSE). This study employs a quantitative descriptive approach to investigate the practices for obtaining consent for an identified group of routine neonatal procedures in neonatal facilities throughout Ireland. The BAPM (British Association of Perinatal Medicine)² guidelines were identified as ‘gold standard’ for the purposes of this study. The results indicated a lack of consistency between participating units pertaining to the modes of consent utilised and notable variances from ‘gold standard’ guidelines. Unanimity was evident for 3 procedures only (administering BCG, 6-in-1, and donor breast milk to infant). Significant findings related to EEG with video recordings, MRI\\/CT and gastro intestinal imaging, screening of an infant with suspected substance abuse or retinopathy of prematurity screening (ROP), administration of Vitamin K, and the carrying out of a lumbar puncture.

  19. Workshops to disseminate the Canadian Thoracic Society guidelines for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease to health care professionals in Ontario: impact on knowledge, perceived health care practices and participant satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moosa, Dilshad; Blouin, Maria; Hill, Kylie; Goldstein, Roger

    2009-01-01

    The Canadian Thoracic Society (CTS) has developed a clinical practice guideline (CPG) regarding the management of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Implementation of this CPG in the primary care setting requires an effective dissemination strategy. To examine the change in knowledge, participant satisfaction and perceived changes in clinical practice among health care professionals working in the primary care setting following attendance at a workshop to disseminate the CTS CPG for COPD. A 2.5 h workshop was conducted in three community health sites within Ontario. Each workshop comprised a didactic presentation and interactive case study discussions. Before, and one month following the workshop, a structured knowledge assessment questionnaire was administered. A structured satisfaction questionnaire and evaluative form that examined the impact of the workshop on the clinical management of COPD patients were administered immediately and three months following completion of the workshop, respectively. Sixty-nine participants attended the workshop. The mean score for the structured knowledge assessment questionnaire increased from 8.5+/-2.7 to 10.6+/-2.0 following the workshop (P=0.008). Eighty-nine per cent and 96% of participants indicated that they would recommend the workshop to a colleague and had greater confidence in their management of COPD patients, respectively. Following attendance of the workshop, 73%, 69% and 46% described increased patient education, patient monitoring and the use of objective testing in clinical practice, respectively. Workshop attendance was associated with high levels of satisfaction and important self-reported changes in clinical practice, which may reflect improved knowledge of the CTS CPG for COPD.

  20. Adherence to hand hygiene guidelines - significance of measuring fidelity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korhonen, Anne; Ojanperä, Helena; Puhto, Teija; Järvinen, Raija; Kejonen, Pirjo; Holopainen, Arja

    2015-11-01

    The aim was to evaluate the usability of fidelity measures in compliance evaluation of hand hygiene. Adherence to hand hygiene guidelines is important in terms of patient safety. Compliance measures seldom describe how exactly the guidelines are followed. A cross-sectional observation study in a university hospital setting was conducted. Direct observation by trained staff was performed using a standardised observation form supplemented by fidelity criteria. A total of 830 occasions were observed in 13 units. Descriptive statistics (frequency, mean, percentages and range) were used as well as compliance rate by using a standard web-based tool. In addition, the binomial standard normal deviate test was conducted for comparing different methods used in evaluation of hand hygiene and in comparison between professional groups. Measuring fidelity to guidelines was revealed to be useful in uncovering gaps in hand hygiene practices. The main gap related to too short duration of hand rubbing. Thus, although compliance with hand hygiene guidelines measured using a standard web-based tool was satisfactory, the degree of how exactly the guidelines were followed seemed to be critical. Combining the measurement of fidelity to guidelines with the compliance rate is beneficial in revealing inconsistency between optimal and actual hand hygiene behaviour. Evaluating fidelity measures is useful in terms of revealing the gaps between optimal and actual performance in hand hygiene. Fidelity measures are suitable in different healthcare contexts and easy to measure according to the relevant indicators of fidelity, such as the length of hand rubbing. Knowing the gap facilitates improvements in clinical practice. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Ten years of multidisciplinary mental health guidelines in the Netherlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franx, Gerdien; Niesink, Peter; Swinkels, Jan; Burgers, Jako; Wensing, Michel; Grol, Richard

    2011-08-01

    From 1999 until 2009 the National Steering Group for Multidisciplinary Guideline Development in Mental Health led a national guideline programme in the Netherlands. Ten service user and carer groups and 30 professional organizations were involved. Within the programme 13 practice guidelines and a range of other deliverables, such as patient versions, checklists and implementation materials, were produced. Lessons learned included the methodology of developing guidelines, service user and carer involvement, and the dissemination and implementation of the guidelines. There are important future challenges such as following a strict and transparent methodology, adhering to process management, improving integration of the service user and professional perspectives, and bridging the gap between guideline and practice.

  2. ASVCP quality assurance guidelines: control of general analytical factors in veterinary laboratories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flatland, Bente; Freeman, Kathy P; Friedrichs, Kristen R; Vap, Linda M; Getzy, Karen M; Evans, Ellen W; Harr, Kendal E

    2010-09-01

    Owing to lack of governmental regulation of veterinary laboratory performance, veterinarians ideally should demonstrate a commitment to self-monitoring and regulation of laboratory performance from within the profession. In response to member concerns about quality management in veterinary laboratories, the American Society for Veterinary Clinical Pathology (ASVCP) formed a Quality Assurance and Laboratory Standards (QAS) committee in 1996. This committee recently published updated and peer-reviewed Quality Assurance Guidelines on the ASVCP website. The Quality Assurance Guidelines are intended for use by veterinary diagnostic laboratories and veterinary research laboratories that are not covered by the US Food and Drug Administration Good Laboratory Practice standards (Code of Federal Regulations Title 21, Chapter 58). The guidelines have been divided into 3 reports on 1) general analytic factors for veterinary laboratory performance and comparisons, 2) hematology and hemostasis, and 3) clinical chemistry, endocrine assessment, and urinalysis. This report documents recommendations for control of general analytical factors within veterinary clinical laboratories and is based on section 2.1 (Analytical Factors Important In Veterinary Clinical Pathology, General) of the newly revised ASVCP QAS Guidelines. These guidelines are not intended to be all-inclusive; rather, they provide minimum guidelines for quality assurance and quality control for veterinary laboratory testing. It is hoped that these guidelines will provide a basis for laboratories to assess their current practices, determine areas for improvement, and guide continuing professional development and education efforts. ©2010 American Society for Veterinary Clinical Pathology.

  3. American College of Medical Genetics and Genomics: standards and guidelines for documenting suspected consanguinity as an incidental finding of genomic testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehder, Catherine W; David, Karen L; Hirsch, Betsy; Toriello, Helga V; Wilson, Carolyn M; Kearney, Hutton M

    2013-02-01

    Genomic testing, including single-nucleotide polymorphism-based microarrays and whole-genome sequencing, can detect long stretches of the genome that display homozygosity. The presence of these segments, when distributed across multiple chromosomes, can indicate a familial relationship between the proband's parents. This article describes the detection of possible consanguinity by genomic testing and the factors confounding the inference of a specific p-arental relationship. It is designed to guide the documentation of suspected consanguinity by clinical laboratory professionals and to alert laboratories to the need to establish a reporting policy in conjunction with their ethics review committee and legal counsel.

  4. European guidelines for quality assurance in colorectal cancer screening and diagnosis. First Edition--Communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Austoker, J; Giordano, L; Hewitson, P; Villain, P

    2012-09-01

    Multidisciplinary, evidence-based guidelines for quality assurance in colorectal cancer screening and diagnosis have been developed by experts in a project coordinated by the International Agency for Research on Cancer. The full guideline document covers the entire process of population-based screening. It consists of 10 chapters and over 250 recommendations, graded according to the strength of the recommendation and the supporting evidence. The 450-page guidelines and the extensive evidence base have been published by the European Commission. The chapter on communication includes 35 graded recommendations. The content of the chapter is presented here to promote international discussion and collaboration by making the principles and standards recommended in the new EU Guidelines known to a wider professional and scientific community. Following these recommendations has the potential to enhance the control of colorectal cancer through improvement in the quality and effectiveness of screening programmes and services. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  5. Testing post-editing guidelines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Flanagan, Marian; Christensen, Tina Paulsen

    2014-01-01

    ), which can be used as a basis on which to instruct post-editors in professional environments. This paper reports on a qualitative study that investigates how trainee translators on an MA course, which is aimed at preparing the trainees for the translation industry, interpret these PE guidelines...

  6. Towards standard protocols and guidelines for urine proteomics: a report on the Human Kidney and Urine Proteome Project (HKUPP) symposium and workshop, 6 October 2007, Seoul, Korea and 1 November 2007, San Francisco, CA, USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Tadashi; Langham, Robyn G; Ronco, Pierre; Knepper, Mark A; Thongboonkerd, Visith

    2008-06-01

    The Human Kidney and Urine Proteome Project (HKUPP) was initiated in 2005 to promote proteomics research in the nephrology field, to better understand kidney functions as well as pathogenic mechanisms of kidney diseases, and to define novel biomarkers and therapeutic targets. This project was first approved in 2005 by the Human Proteome Organisation (HUPO) as a Kidney Disease Initiative under an umbrella of the HUPO Disease Biomarker Initiative (DBI), and more recently was approved as the HKUPP Initiative in 2007. Several sub-projects have been planned to achieve the ultimate goals. The most pressing is the establishment of "standard protocols and guidelines for urine proteome analysis". This sub-project had been extensively discussed during the first HKUPP symposium (during 6(th) HUPO Annual World Congress--October 2007, Seoul, Korea) and second workshop (during 40(th) American Society of Nephrology Renal Week--November 2007, San Francisco, CA, USA). Additional data and references have been collected after the symposium and workshop. An initial draft of standard protocols and guidelines for proteome analysis of non-proteinuric urine (urine protein excretion 150 mg/day) will soon be released as the first HKUPP product.

  7. Home Mechanical Ventilation: A Canadian Thoracic Society Clinical Practice Guideline

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Douglas A McKim

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Increasing numbers of patients are surviving episodes of prolonged mechanical ventilation or benefitting from the recent availability of user-friendly noninvasive ventilators. Although many publications pertaining to specific aspects of home mechanical ventilation (HMV exist, very few comprehensive guidelines that bring together all of the current literature on patients at risk for or using mechanical ventilatory support are available. The Canadian Thoracic Society HMV Guideline Committee has reviewed the available English literature on topics related to HMV in adults, and completed a detailed guideline that will help standardize and improve the assessment and management of individuals requiring noninvasive or invasive HMV. The guideline provides a disease-specific review of illnesses including amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, spinal cord injury, muscular dystrophies, myotonic dystrophy, kyphoscoliosis, post-polio syndrome, central hypoventilation syndrome, obesity hypoventilation syndrome, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease as well as important common themes such as airway clearance and the process of transition to home. The guidelines have been extensively reviewed by international experts, allied health professionals and target audiences. They will be updated on a regular basis to incorporate any new information.

  8. Dietary guidelines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jelsøe, Erling

    2015-01-01

    Dietary guidelines are issued regularly in most developed countries. In almost all cases they are concerned solely with the nutritional aspects of food and eating and are based on an understanding of food exclusively as a source of nutrients. In recent years, however, a growing number of proposals...... in a number of countries have addressed the issue of making dietary guidelines that integrate health and sustainability, but in all cases they have been met with different kinds of resistance. This article reviews the development towards an integrated understanding of health and sustainability in relation...... to food and eating and the emergence of proposals for integrated guidelines. It explores the conflicts and controversies that have arisen in the wake of the various proposals and identifies a number of different types of conflicts. These relate to conflicts of interests between the various actors involved...

  9. Hypertension guidelines and their effects on the health system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konta, Brigitte

    2005-12-01

    existing literature at the present time. One can assume from international studies with analogical reasoning that these are confessed and have a high level of acceptance in the medical community. Unfortunately the actual usage is not represented satisfactorily in the scientific literature. The effects of the guidelines on the medical procedures seem to be very strongly individual and the analyses to the compliance show at least an observable effect within the last few years. No publications could be found for the cost effectiveness of the guidelines. The actual compliance with guidelines seems to be in relation with the duration of the professional practice. It seems the shorter the professional practice takes place, the stronger the guidelines are adhered. Discussion: At present, there are only a few notes for the German health service regarding the actual effect of the hypertonus guidelines. However, the reason is not that the effect would not be possibly strong but at the methodical challenge to evaluate the sustaining effects of the application of the hypertonus guidelines. For this reason the literature is very rare regarding this topic. For Germany it can be derived by analogical reasoning from foreign studies that guidelines will facilitate a more and more essential contribution to the design of the health system. Considering that primarily younger physicians accepted guidelines mode, the further construction, update and implementation of guidelines are essential, particularly with regard to the quality assurance. Straight guidelines can express a standard of the quality of a health system as a benchmark. The existence of guidelines or the lack thereof is considered also as a quality indicator of a health system at the organisation for economic cooperation and development (OECD. Conclusion: Guidelines should be evaluated - especially the hypertonus guideline. Also further development and implementation should be emphasised. Methodically oriented work to the approach

  10. Hypertension guidelines and their effects on the health system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, Wilhelm; Konta, Brigitte

    2005-12-21

    studies with analogical reasoning that these are confessed and have a high level of acceptance in the medical community. Unfortunately the actual usage is not represented satisfactorily in the scientific literature. The effects of the guidelines on the medical procedures seem to be very strongly individual and the analyses to the compliance show at least an observable effect within the last few years. No publications could be found for the cost effectiveness of the guidelines. The actual compliance with guidelines seems to be in relation with the duration of the professional practice. It seems the shorter the professional practice takes place, the stronger the guidelines are adhered. At present, there are only a few notes for the German health service regarding the actual effect of the hypertonus guidelines. However, the reason is not that the effect would not be possibly strong but at the methodical challenge to evaluate the sustaining effects of the application of the hypertonus guidelines. For this reason the literature is very rare regarding this topic. For Germany it can be derived by analogical reasoning from foreign studies that guidelines will facilitate a more and more essential contribution to the design of the health system. Considering that primarily younger physicians accepted guidelines mode, the further construction, update and implementation of guidelines are essential, particularly with regard to the quality assurance. Straight guidelines can express a standard of the quality of a health system as a benchmark. The existence of guidelines or the lack thereof is considered also as a quality indicator of a health system at the organisation for economic cooperation and development (OECD). Guidelines should be evaluated - especially the hypertonus guideline. Also further development and implementation should be emphasised. Methodically oriented work to the approach is pretty recent. It is undeniable that guidelines represent a very essential and important

  11. On the Issue of Individual Culture in Teachers in the Context of Approbation and Implementation of Professional Standard for Teachers on Municipal Level (From the Author’s Work Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mityashov P.V.,

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The author of the article refers to one of the most difficult for realization directions of the work of managers of different levels with teaching staff - the expansion of cultural horizons, formation of particular outlook and development of intelligence of the modern school teacher. From his point of view, this direction is a necessary condition for approbation and implementation of the professional standard "Teacher (educational activities in the field of preschool, primary general, basic general, secondary education (tutor, teacher" (hereinafter - Professional standard of the teacher and in general - requirement of life. Analyzing the overall situation in terms of readiness of the teacher to work in the context of the development of the federal state educational standard for general education (hereinafter referred to as FSES, approbation of professional standard, the author refers to the experience of educational management body of Novonikolaevsk municipal district of the Volgograd region offering concrete steps and measures for solution of the overall problem of general culture of teacher personality.

  12. 13 point video tape quality guidelines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaunt, R.

    1997-05-01

    Until high definition television (ATV) arrives, in the U.S. we must still contend with the National Television Systems Committee (NTSC) video standard (or PAL or SECAM-depending on your country). NTSC, a 40-year old standard designed for transmission of color video camera images over a small bandwidth, is not well suited for the sharp, full-color images that todays computers are capable of producing. PAL and SECAM also suffers from many of NTSC`s problems, but to varying degrees. Video professionals, when working with computer graphic (CG) images, use two monitors: a computer monitor for producing CGs and an NTSC monitor to view how a CG will look on video. More often than not, the NTSC image will differ significantly from the CG image, and outputting it to NTSC as an artist works enables the him or her to see the images as others will see it. Below are thirteen guidelines designed to increase the quality of computer graphics recorded onto video tape. Viewing your work in NTSC and attempting to follow the below tips will enable you to create higher quality videos. No video is perfect, so don`t expect to abide by every guideline every time.

  13. Standard Compliance: Guidelines to Help State and Alternative Fuel Provider Fleets Meet Their Energy Policy Act Requirements, 10 CFR Part 490 (Book)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2014-03-01

    This guidebook addresses the primary requirements of the Alternative Fuel Transportation Program to help state and alternative fuel provider fleets comply with the Energy Policy Act via the Standard Compliance option. It also addresses the topics that covered fleets ask about most frequently.

  14. Standard Compliance: Guidelines to Help State and Alternative Fuel Provider Fleets Meet Their Energy Policy Act Requirements, 10 CFR Part 490 (Book)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2012-04-01

    This guidebook addresses the primary requirements of the Alternative Fuel Transportation Program to help state and alternative fuel provider fleets comply with the Energy Policy Act via the Standard Compliance option. It also addresses the topics that covered fleets ask about most frequently.

  15. Environmental and social standards (safeguard policies) in financing of energy projects. Structure of the guidelines and recent trends; Die Umwelt- und Sozialstandards (Safeguard Policies) in der Finanzierung von Energieprojekten. Struktur der Richtlinien und aktuelle Tendenzen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nickel, E. [Environmental Consultancy und Training GBR, Leipzig (Germany)

    2005-08-01

    The environmental and social standards of the World Bank Group (the safeguard policies) have now become the accepted standard for ecological risk analysis, which is a mandatory component of the credit-rating process for international financing institutions. The safeguard policies are a set of procedural and quality guidelines which address such topics as environmental impact assessment, nature reserves, involuntary resettlement/compensation payments, and indigenous peoples, the application of which is truly complex. The standards of the World Bank, the International Bank for Reconstruction and Development (IBRD) and the International Development Association (IDA) differ from those of the International Finance Corporation (IFC), which is also part of the World Bank Group. The major reason for this difference is that these institutions address different negotiating parties in the approval process: while the IBRD and the Ida work with governments, the IFC is responsible for cooperation with the private sector. The safeguard policies are complemented by other qualitative standards, and by the setting of limit values and technical specifications, which are established in supplementary but non-binding sets of rules. One such manual of rules, which, like the IFC's safeguard policies, is currently undergoing revision, is the Pollution Prevention and Abatement Handbook. Due to their increasing application in international financing institutions, new trends have emerged in the application of the safeguard policies over the past few years, which in some cases are mutually reinforcing with other concepts, such as the >>Corporate Responsibility Approach<<. (orig.)

  16. Evidence-based guideline update: determining brain death in adults: report of the Quality Standards Subcommittee of the American Academy of Neurology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wijdicks, Eelco F M; Varelas, Panayiotis N; Gronseth, Gary S; Greer, David M

    2010-06-08

    To provide an update of the 1995 American Academy of Neurology guideline with regard to the following questions: Are there patients who fulfill the clinical criteria of brain death who recover neurologic function? What is an adequate observation period to ensure that cessation of neurologic function is permanent? Are complex motor movements that falsely suggest retained brain function sometimes observed in brain death? What is the comparative safety of techniques for determining apnea? Are there new ancillary tests that accurately identify patients with brain death? A systematic literature search was conducted and included a review of MEDLINE and EMBASE from January 1996 to May 2009. Studies were limited to adults. In adults, there are no published reports of recovery of neurologic function after a diagnosis of brain death using the criteria reviewed in the 1995 American Academy of Neurology practice parameter. Complex-spontaneous motor movements and false-positive triggering of the ventilator may occur in patients who are brain dead. There is insufficient evidence to determine the minimally acceptable observation period to ensure that neurologic functions have ceased irreversibly. Apneic oxygenation diffusion to determine apnea is safe, but there is insufficient evidence to determine the comparative safety of techniques used for apnea testing. There is insufficient evidence to determine if newer ancillary tests accurately confirm the cessation of function of the entire brain.

  17. Tank exhaust comparison with 40 CFR 61.93, Subpart H, and other referenced guidelines for Tank Farms National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutant (NESHAP) designated stacks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bachand, D.D.; Crummel, G.M.

    1994-07-01

    The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) promulgated National Emission Standards other than Radon from US Department of Energy (DOE) Facilities (40 CFR 61, Subpart H) on December 15, 1989. The regulations specify procedures, equipment, and test methods that.are to be used to measure radionuclide emissions from exhaust stacks that are designated as National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutant (NESHAP) stacks. Designated NESHAP stacks are those that have the potential to cause any member of the public to receive an effective dose equivalent (EDE) greater than or equal to 0.1 mrem/year, assuming all emission controls were removed. Tank Farms currently has 33 exhaust stacks, 15 of which are designated NESHAP stacks. This document assesses the compliance status of the monitoring and sampling systems for the designated NESHAP stacks.

  18. Health professionals’ perceptions about the adoption of existing guidelines for the diagnosis of fetal alcohol spectrum disorders in Australia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Watkins Rochelle E

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite the availability of five guidelines for the diagnosis of fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASD, there is no national endorsement for their use in diagnosis in Australia. In this study we aimed to describe health professionals’ perceptions about the adoption of existing guidelines for the diagnosis of FASD in Australia and identify implications for the development of national guidelines. Methods We surveyed 130 Australian and 9 international health professionals with expertise or involvement in the screening or diagnosis of FASD. An online questionnaire was used to evaluate participants’ familiarity with and use of five existing diagnostic guidelines for FASD, and to assess their perceptions about the adoption of these guidelines in Australia. Results Of the 139 participants surveyed, 84 Australian and 8 international health professionals (66.2% responded to the questions on existing diagnostic guidelines. Participants most frequently reported using the University of Washington 4-Digit Diagnostic Code (27.2% and the Canadian guidelines (18.5% for diagnosis. These two guidelines were also most frequently recommended for adoption in Australia: 32.5% of the 40 participants who were familiar with the University of Washington 4-Digit Diagnostic Code recommended adoption of this guideline in Australia, and 30.8% of the 26 participants who were familiar with the Canadian guidelines recommended adoption of this guideline in Australia. However, for the majority of guidelines examined, most participants were unsure whether they should be adopted in Australia. The adoption of existing guidelines in Australia was perceived to be limited by: their lack of evidence base, including the appropriateness of established reference standards for the Australian population; their complexity; the need for training and support to use the guidelines; and the lack of an interdisciplinary and interagency model to support service delivery in

  19. Stevens-Johnson Syndrome and Toxic Epidermal Necrolysis Standard Reporting and Evaluation Guidelines: Results of a National Institutes of Health Working Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maverakis, Emanual; Wang, Elizabeth A; Shinkai, Kanade; Mahasirimongkol, Surakameth; Margolis, David J; Avigan, Mark; Chung, Wen-Hung; Goldman, Jennifer; La Grenade, Lois; Pirmohamed, Munir; Shear, Neil H; Tassaeeyakul, Wichittra; Hoetzenecker, Wolfram; Klaewsongkram, Jettanong; Rerkpattanapipat, Ticha; Manuyakorn, Wiparat; Yasuda, Sally Usdin; Sharon, Victoria R; Sukhov, Andrea; Micheletti, Robert; Struewing, Jeff; French, Lars E; Cheng, Michelle Y

    2017-06-01

    Toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN) and Stevens-Johnson Syndrome (SJS) are rare, acute, life-threatening dermatologic disorders involving the skin and mucous membranes. Research into these conditions is hampered by a lack of standardization of case reporting and data collection. To establish a standardized case report form to facilitate comparisons and maintain data quality based on an international panel of SJS/TEN experts who performed a Delphi consensus-building exercise. The elements presented for committee scrutiny were adapted from previous case report forms and from PubMed literature searches of highly cited manuscripts pertaining to SJS/TEN. The expert opinions and experience of the members of the consensus group were included in the discussion. Overall, 21 out of 29 experts who were invited to participate in the online Delphi exercise agreed to participate. Surveys at each stage were administered via an online survery software tool. For the first 2 Delphi rounds, results were analyzed using the Interpercentile Range Adjusted for Symmetry method and statements that passed consensus formulated a new case report form. For the third Delphi round, the case report form was presented to the committee, who agreed that it was "appropriate and useful" for documenting cases of SJS/TEN, making it more reliable and valuable for future research endeavors. With the consensus of international experts, a case report form for SJS/TEN has been created to help standardize the collection of patient information in future studies and the documentation of individual cases.

  20. AAPM medical physics practice guideline 6.a.: Performance characteristics of radiation dose index monitoring systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gress, Dustin A; Dickinson, Renee L; Erwin, William D; Jordan, David W; Kobistek, Robert J; Stevens, Donna M; Supanich, Mark P; Wang, Jia; Fairobent, Lynne A

    2017-07-01

    The American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) is a nonprofit professional society whose primary purposes are to advance the science, education and professional practice of medical physics. The AAPM has more than 8,000 members and is the principal organization of medical physicists in the United States. The AAPM will periodically define new practice guidelines for medical physics practice to help advance the science of medical physics and to improve the quality of service to patients throughout the United States. Existing medical physics practice guidelines will be reviewed for the purpose of revision or renewal, as appropriate, on their fifth anniversary or sooner. Each medical physics practice guideline represents a policy statement by the AAPM, has undergone a thorough consensus process in which it has been subjected to extensive review, and requires the approval of the Professional Council. The medical physics practice guidelines recognize that the safe and effective use of diagnostic and therapeutic radiology requires specific training, skills, and techniques, as described in each document. Reproduction or modification of the published practice guidelines and technical standards by those entities not providing these services is not authorized. The following terms are used in the AAPM practice guidelines: •Must and Must Not: Used to indicate that adherence to the recommendation is considered necessary to conform to this practice guideline. •Should and Should Not: Used to indicate a prudent practice to which exceptions may occasionally be made in appropriate circumstances. © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Applied Clinical Medical Physics published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  1. Guidelines for severe uncontrolled asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cisneros Serrano, Carolina; Melero Moreno, Carlos; Almonacid Sánchez, Carlos; Perpiñá Tordera, Miguel; Picado Valles, César; Martínez Moragón, Eva; Pérez de Llano, Luis; Soto Campos, José Gregorio; Urrutia Landa, Isabel; García Hernández, Gloria

    2015-05-01

    Since the publication, 9 years ago, of the latest SEPAR (Spanish Society of Pulmonology and Thoracic Surgery) Guidelines on Difficult-to-Control Asthma (DCA), much progress has been made in the understanding of asthmatic disease. These new data need to be reviewed, analyzed and incorporated into the guidelines according to their level of evidence and recommendation. Recently, consensus documents and clinical practice guidelines (CPG) addressing this issue have been published. In these guidelines, specific mention will be made of what the previous DCA guidelines defined as "true difficult-to-control asthma". This is asthma that remains uncontrolled after diagnosis and a systematic evaluation to rule out factors unrelated to the disease itself that lead to poor control ("false difficult-to-control asthma"), and despite an appropriate treatment strategy (Spanish Guidelines for the Management of Asthma [GEMA] steps 5 and 6): severe uncontrolled asthma. In this respect, the guidelines propose a revised definition, an attempt to classify the various manifestations of this type of asthma, a proposal for a stepwise diagnostic procedure, and phenotype-targeted treatment. A specific section has also been included on DCA in childhood, aimed at assisting healthcare professionals to improve the care of these patients. Copyright © 2014 SEPAR. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  2. The current status of diabetes professional educational standards and competencies in the UK--a position statement from the Diabetes UK Healthcare Professional Education Competency Framework Task and Finish Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, N; George, S; Priest, L; Deakin, T; Vanterpool, G; Karet, B; Simmons, D

    2011-12-01

    Diabetes is a significant health concern, both in the UK and globally. Management can be complex, often requiring high levels of knowledge and skills in order to provide high-quality and safe care. The provision of good, safe, quality care lies within the foundations of healthcare education, continuing professional development and evidence-based practice, which are inseparable and part of a continuum during the career of any health professional. Sound education provides the launch pad for effective clinical management and positive patient experiences. This position paper reviews and discusses work undertaken by a Working Group under the auspices of Diabetes UK with the remit of considering all health professional educational issues for people delivering care to people with diabetes. This work has scoped the availability of education for those within the healthcare system who may directly or indirectly encounter people with diabetes and reviews alignment to existing competency frameworks within the UK's National Health Service. © 2011 The Authors. Diabetic Medicine © 2011 Diabetes UK.

  3. Restoring medical professionalism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernat, James L

    2012-08-21

    The essence of medical professionalism is placing dedication to the welfare of patients above physicians' personal or proprietary interests. Medicine has become deprofessionalized as a consequence of socioeconomic factors leading to increasing commercialization and perverse financial incentives converting it into a business, the presence of unmanaged conflicts of interest, challenges to medical authority by insurance companies and the consumerism movement, and by gradual changes in the attitudes of physicians. Organized medicine has responded by making explicit its standards of professionalism and its dedication to preserving them. Medical educators have studied the means to develop professional attitudes and behaviors among medical students and residents. Modeling the characteristics of professional behavior by virtuous physicians remains the most effective method to instill professional behaviors in trainees. Restoring professionalism may be abetted by changes in physicians' financial incentives through innovative models of health care delivery, by physicians reducing their conflicts of interest, and by medical societies rejecting a guild identity.

  4. Initial hospital management of patients with emergent large vessel occlusion (ELVO): report of the standards and guidelines committee of the Society of NeuroInterventional Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McTaggart, Ryan A; Ansari, Sameer A; Goyal, Mayank; Abruzzo, Todd A; Albani, Barb; Arthur, Adam J; Alexander, Michael J; Albuquerque, Felipe C; Baxter, Blaise; Bulsara, Ketan R; Chen, Michael; Almandoz, Josser E Delgado; Fraser, Justin F; Frei, Donald; Gandhi, Chirag D; Heck, Don V; Hetts, Steven W; Hussain, M Shazam; Kelly, Michael; Klucznik, Richard; Lee, Seon-Kyu; Leslie-Mawzi, Thabele; Meyers, Philip M; Prestigiacomo, Charles J; Pride, G Lee; Patsalides, Athos; Starke, Robert M; Sunenshine, Peter; Rasmussen, Peter A; Jayaraman, Mahesh V

    2017-03-01

    To summarize the current literature regarding the initial hospital management of patients with acute ischemic stroke (AIS) secondary to emergent large vessel occlusion (ELVO), and to offer recommendations designed to decrease the time to endovascular treatment (EVT) for appropriately selected patients with stroke. Using guidelines for evidenced-based medicine proposed by the Stroke Council of the American Heart Association, a critical review of all available medical literature supporting best initial medical management of patients with AIS secondary to ELVO was performed. The purpose was to identify processes of care that most expeditiously determine the eligibility of a patient with an acute stroke for interventions including intravenous fibrinolysis with recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (IV tPA) and EVT using mechanical embolectomy. This review identifies four elements that are required to achieve timely revascularization in ELVO. (1) In addition to non-contrast CT (NCCT) brain scan, CT angiography should be performed in all patients who meet an institutional threshold for clinical stroke severity. The use of any advanced imaging beyond NCCT should not delay the administration of IV tPA in eligible patients. (2) Activation of the neurointerventional team should occur as soon as possible, based on either confirmation of large vessel occlusion or a prespecified clinical severity threshold. (3) Additional imaging techniques, particularly those intended to physiologically select patients for EVT (CT perfusion and diffusion-perfusion mismatch imaging), may provide additional value, but should not delay EVT. (4) Routine use of general anesthesia during EVT procedures, should be avoided if possible. These workflow recommendations apply to both primary and comprehensive stroke centers and should be tailored to meet the needs of individual institutions. Patients with ELVO are at risk for severe neurologic morbidity and mortality. To achieve the best possible

  5. Meeting the need for educational standards in the practice of telemedicine and telehealth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picot, J

    2000-01-01

    The first telemedicine standard to be developed, documented and adopted widely was the radiology standard, which includes technical and image transmission standards as well as requirements and qualifications needed for teleradiology practice. But many other health professionals engaged either full time or part time in telemedicine and telehealth--for example, telepsychiatry, telepathology, teletriage and tele-ophthalmology--also need and use special skills and knowledge. At present, they acquire these skills on the job and their skills may not be recognized. There should be performance standards and telepractice guidelines for professionals operating in the fields of telemedicine and telehealth. Furthermore, there is a case for the development and implementation of education and training standards, enabling professionals who practise in the field to obtain suitable skills, knowledge and recognition for telepractice.

  6. Guidelines for guidelines: are they up to the task? A comparative assessment of clinical practice guideline development handbooks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shabnam Ansari

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: We conducted a comparative review of clinical practice guideline development handbooks. We aimed to identify the main guideline development tasks, assign weights to the importance of each task using expert opinions and identify the handbooks that provided a comprehensive coverage of the tasks. METHODS: We systematically searched and included handbooks published (in English language by national, international or professional bodies responsible for evidenced-based guideline development. We reviewed the handbooks to identify the main guideline development tasks and scored each handbook for each task from 0 (the handbook did not mention the task to 2 (the task suitably addressed and explained, and calculated a weighted score for each handbook. The tasks included in over 75% of the handbooks were considered as 'necessary' tasks. RESULT: Nineteen guideline development handbooks and twenty seven main tasks were identified. The guideline handbooks' weighted scores ranged from 100 to 220. Four handbooks scored over 80% of the maximum possible score, developed by the National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence, Swiss Centre for International Health, Scottish Intercollegiate Guidelines Network and World Health Organization. Necessary tasks were: selecting the guideline topic, determining the guideline scope, identifying relevant existing guidelines, involving the consumers, forming guideline development group,, developing clinical questions, systematic search for evidence, selecting relevant evidence, appraising identifies research evidence, making group decision, grading available evidence, creating recommendations, final stakeholder consultation, guideline implementation strategies, updating recommendations and correcting potential errors. DISCUSSION: Adequate details for evidence based development of guidelines were still lacking from many handbooks. The tasks relevant to ethical issues and piloting were missing in most handbooks

  7. Guidelines for guidelines: are they up to the task? A comparative assessment of clinical practice guideline development handbooks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansari, Shabnam; Rashidian, Arash

    2012-01-01

    We conducted a comparative review of clinical practice guideline development handbooks. We aimed to identify the main guideline development tasks, assign weights to the importance of each task using expert opinions and identify the handbooks that provided a comprehensive coverage of the tasks. We systematically searched and included handbooks published (in English language) by national, international or professional bodies responsible for evidenced-based guideline development. We reviewed the handbooks to identify the main guideline development tasks and scored each handbook for each task from 0 (the handbook did not mention the task) to 2 (the task suitably addressed and explained), and calculated a weighted score for each handbook. The tasks included in over 75% of the handbooks were considered as 'necessary' tasks. Nineteen guideline development handbooks and twenty seven main tasks were identified. The guideline handbooks' weighted scores ranged from 100 to 220. Four handbooks scored over 80% of the maximum possible score, developed by the National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence, Swiss Centre for International Health, Scottish Intercollegiate Guidelines Network and World Health Organization. Necessary tasks were: selecting the guideline topic, determining the guideline scope, identifying relevant existing guidelines, involving the consumers, forming guideline development group,, developing clinical questions, systematic search for evidence, selecting relevant evidence, appraising identifies research evidence, making group decision, grading available evidence, creating recommendations, final stakeholder consultation, guideline implementation strategies, updating recommendations and correcting potential errors. Adequate details for evidence based development of guidelines were still lacking from many handbooks. The tasks relevant to ethical issues and piloting were missing in most handbooks. The findings help decision makers in identifying the

  8. The Introduction of Innovative Educational Technologies in the Personnel Training Process for Sport and Tourism Industries through the Application of Professional Standards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaitseva, Natalia A.; ?ndryushchenko, Lilia ?.

    2016-01-01

    The relevance of the research stems from the importance of modernization of the system of training for sport and tourism, without which the intensive development of this kind of professional activity is not possible. The aim of the study was the generalization of the experience of introduction of the innovative educational technologies in the…

  9. Editorial: can China master the guideline challenge?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Kehu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract China is experiencing increased health care use and expenditures, without sufficient controls to ensure quality and value. Transparent, cost-conscious and patient-centered guidelines based on the best available evidence could help establishing these quality and practice measures. We examined how guidelines could support the Chinese health reform. Specifically, we summarized the current state of the art and related challenges in guideline development and explored possible solutions in the context of the Chinese health reform. China currently lacks capacity for evidence-based guideline development and coordination by a central agency. Most Chinese guideline users rely on recommendations developed by professional groups that lack demonstration of transparency (including conflict of interest management and evidence synthesis and quality. These deficiencies appear larger than in other regions of the world. In addition, misperceptions about the role of guidelines in assisting practitioners as opposed to providing rules requiring adherence, and a perception that traditional Chinese medicine (TCM cannot be appropriately incorporated in guidelines are present. China’s capacity could be strengthened by a central guideline agency to provide or coordinate evidence synthesis for guideline development and to oversee the work of guideline developers. China can build on what is known and work with the international community to develop methods to meet the challenges of evidence-based guideline development.

  10. Pharmacists and Natural Health Products: A systematic analysis of professional responsibilities in Canada

    OpenAIRE

    Farrell J; Ries NM; Boon H

    2008-01-01

    Natural health products such as herbs, vitamins and homeopathic medicines are widely available in Canadian pharmacies. Purpose: to conduct a systematic analysis of Canadian pharmacy policies and guidelines to explore pharmacists’ professional responsibilities with respect to natural health products.Methods: Legislation, codes of ethics, standards of practice and guidance documents that apply to the practice of pharmacy in each Canadian jurisdiction were systematically collected and examined ...

  11. Governing mobile technology use for continuing professional development in the Australian nursing profession

    OpenAIRE

    Mather, Carey Ann; Gale, Fred; Cummings, Elizabeth Anne

    2017-01-01

    Background The rapid growth in the use of mobile technology in Australia has outpaced its governance, especially in healthcare settings. Whilst some Australian professional bodies and organisations have developed standards and guidelines to direct appropriate use of social media and mobile technology, clear governance arrangements regarding when, where and how to use mobile technology at point of care in nursing are currently lacking. Discussion This paper analyses how the use of mobile techn...

  12. A methodological survey identified eight proposed frameworks for the adaptation of health related guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darzi, Andrea; Abou-Jaoude, Elias A; Agarwal, Arnav; Lakis, Chantal; Wiercioch, Wojtek; Santesso, Nancy; Brax, Hneine; El-Jardali, Fadi; Schünemann, Holger J; Akl, Elie A

    2017-06-01

    Our objective was to identify and describe published frameworks for adaptation of clinical, public health, and health services guidelines. We included reports describing methods of adaptation of guidelines in sufficient detail to allow its reproducibility. We searched Medline and EMBASE databases. We also searched personal files, as well manuals and handbooks of organizations and professional societies that proposed methods of adaptation and adoption of guidelines. We followed standard systematic review methodology. Our search captured 12,021 citations, out of which we identified eight proposed methods of guidelines adaptation: ADAPTE, Adapted ADAPTE, Alberta Ambassador Program adaptation phase, GRADE-ADOLOPMENT, MAGIC, RAPADAPTE, Royal College of Nursing (RCN), and Systematic Guideline Review (SGR). The ADAPTE framework consists of a 24-step process to adapt guidelines to a local context taking into consideration the needs, priorities, legislation, policies, and resources. The Alexandria Center for Evidence-Based Clinical Practice Guidelines updated one of ADAPTE's tools, modified three tools, and added three new ones. In addition, they proposed optionally using three other tools. The Alberta Ambassador Program adaptation phase consists of 11 steps and focused on adapting good-quality guidelines for nonspecific low back pain into local context. GRADE-ADOLOPMENT is an eight-step process based on the GRADE Working Group's Evidence to Decision frameworks and applied in 22 guidelines in the context of national guideline development program. The MAGIC research program developed a five-step adaptation process, informed by ADAPTE and the GRADE approach in the context of adapting thrombosis guidelines. The RAPADAPTE framework consists of 12 steps based on ADAPTE and using synthesized evidence databases, retrospectively derived from the experience of producing a high-quality guideline for the treatment of breast cancer with limited resources in Costa Rica. The RCN outlines

  13. Moving beyond Compliance: Promoting Research-Based Professional Discretion in the Implementation of the Common Core State Standards in English Language Arts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodard, Rebecca; Kline, Sonia

    2015-01-01

    State- and local-level mandates are currently being implemented to ensure strict compliance to the new national Common Core State Standards for English Language Arts (CCSS for ELA) and related assessments. These standards provide many potential opportunities to improve literacy education nationally and locally. However, the CCSS for ELA will…

  14. Effective doses, guidelines & regulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burch, Michael D

    2008-01-01

    comprehensive federal legislation which includes a mandatory standard of 1 microg L-(1) for microcystins, and also recommendations for saxitoxins (3 microg L(-1)) and for cylindrospermopsin (15 microg L(-1)). Although guidelines for cyanotoxins and cyanobacterial cell numbers for recreational waters are in place in a number of countries, it is consid ered that there is currently insufficient information to derive sound guidelines for the use of water contaminated by cyanobacteria or toxins for agricultural production, fisheries and ecosystem protection. In relation to the need for specific regulations for toxins for the US, the surveys that have been carried out to date would indicate that the priority compounds for regulation, based upon their incidence and distribution, are microcystins, cylindrospermopsin and Anatoxin-a. Additional research is required to support guideline development, including whole-of-life animal studies with each of the known cyanotoxins. In view of the animal studies that indicate that microcystins may act as tumor promoters, and also some evidence of genotoxicity and carcinogenicity for cylindrospermopsin, it may be appropriate to carry out whole-of-life animal studies with both toxicity and carcinogenicity as end-points. In relation to microcystins, it is known that there a large number of congeners, and the toxico-dynamics and kinetics of these variants are not well understood. Further research is needed to consider the approach to take in formulating health advisories or regulations for toxin mixtures, i.e. multiple microcystins, or mixtures of toxin types. An important requirement for regulation is the availability of robust monitoring and analytical protocols for toxins. Currently rapid and economical screening or quantitative analytical methods are not available to the water industry or natural resource managers, and this is a priority before the release of guidelines and regulations. There is insufficient information available in a range of the

  15. Professionalism: rise and fall.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, M S

    1979-01-01

    Historically, the early professionalization movements in medicine and the law appear as organizational projects which aspire to monopolize income and opportunities in markets of services or labor and to monopolize status and work privileges in occupational hierarchies. Their central task is to standardize training and link it to actual or potential markets of labor or services, a linkage that is structurally effected in the modern university. The second wave of professionalization has different protagonists than the older "market professions": placed in a different structural situation, the bureaucratic professions transform the model of profession (which they adopt as a strategy of collective ascension) into an ideology. The import of the ideology of professionalism is examined in relation to two issues: the relationships between professional occupations and bureaucratic organizations; and the position of professional occupations within the larger structure of inequality. Analysis of the first point requires consideration of the distinctions between professional occupations in the public and private sectors, the use of professional knowledge and the image of profession in bureaucratic organizations, and the specific characteristics of professions that produce their own knowledge. In the discussion of the second point, professional occupations and their ideology are examined in relation to other occupations and to the possibilities of political awareness generated by uncertain professional statuses.

  16. [Elaboration and critical evaluation of clinical guidelines].

    Science.gov (United States)

    García Villar, C

    2015-11-01

    Clinical guidelines are documents to help professionals and patients select the best diagnostic or therapeutic option. Elaborating guidelines requires an efficient literature search and a critical evaluation of the articles found to select the most appropriate ones. After that, the recommendations are formulated and then must be externally evaluated before they can be disseminated. Even when the guidelines are very thorough and rigorous, it is important to know whether they fulfill all the methodological requisites before applying them. With this aim, various scales have been developed to critically appraise guidelines. Of these, the AGREE II instrument is currently the most widely used. This article explains the main steps in elaborating clinical guidelines and the main aspects that should be analyzed to know whether the guidelines are well written. Copyright © 2015 SERAM. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  17. Accessibility Guidelines for Astronomy and Astrophysics Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monkiewicz, Jacqueline; Murphy, Nicholas; Diaz-Merced, Wanda Liz; Aarnio, Alicia; Knierman, Karen; AAS Working Group for Accessibility and Disability

    2018-01-01

    Attendance at meetings and conferences is a critical component of an astronomer's professional life, providing opportunities for presenting one's work, staying current in the field, career networking, and scientific collaboration. Exclusion from these gatherings due to lack of accessibility and accommodation failure is a reality for disabled astronomers, and contributes substantially to low levels of representation in the senior-most levels of the field. We present a preview of the AAS Working Group for Accessibility and Disability's best practice recommendations for meetings accessibility. Applying the principles of universal access and barrier-free design, we model a paradigm of anticipating and removing accessibility barriers in advance, rather than putting the burden of requesting accommodation solely on disabled astronomers and students. We cite several professional and nonprofessional societies identified as meetings accessibility exemplars, and model our guidelines on their best practices. We establish standards for accessibility budgeting, venue choice, publication of policies online, designating point persons, and identifying barriers. We make recommendations for oral and poster presentations, event registration, receptions and banquets, excursions, and other typical conference activities. For meetings which are constrained by fixed budgets and venue choice, we identify a number of low cost/high reward accessibility steps which might still have a large beneficial impact. We likewise provide adapted recommendations for low budget meetings. THIS IS A POSTER LOCATED IN THE AAS BOOTH

  18. Guidelines for prevention in psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-04-01

    The effectiveness of prevention to enhance human functioning and reduce psychological distress has been demonstrated. From infancy through adulthood, access to preventive services and interventions is important to improve the quality of life and human functioning and reduce illness and premature death. The importance of prevention is consistent with the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act of 2010. Even with the increased focus on prevention, psychology training programs rarely require specific courses on prevention. In particular, conceptualizations about best practices in prevention, particularly at the environmental level, are lacking. Therefore, psychologists engaged in prevention can benefit from a set of guidelines that address and inform prevention practices. Accordingly, the Guidelines for Prevention in Psychology are intended to "inform psychologists, the public, and other interested parties regarding desirable professional practices" in prevention. The Prevention Guidelines are recommended based on their potential benefits to the public and the professional practice of psychology. They support prevention as an important area of practice, research, and training for psychologists. The Guidelines give increased attention to prevention within APA, encouraging psychologists to become involved with preventive activities relevant to their area of practice. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved).

  19. Professional courtesy: can you legally provide it?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Michael; Baum, Neil

    2010-01-01

    Professional courtesy: Something most physicians did and enjoyed doing, and that was a nice perk that physicians offered their colleagues. But is it legal? Can it still be done without breaking the law? What are the guidelines? This article will answer these questions. After reading this article, you will understand the guidelines for professional courtesy and what the risks and penalties are if they are violated.

  20. Governing mobile technology use for continuing professional development in the Australian nursing profession.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mather, Carey Ann; Gale, Fred; Cummings, Elizabeth Anne

    2017-01-01

    The rapid growth in the use of mobile technology in Australia has outpaced its governance, especially in healthcare settings. Whilst some Australian professional bodies and organisations have developed standards and guidelines to direct appropriate use of social media and mobile technology, clear governance arrangements regarding when, where and how to use mobile technology at point of care in nursing are currently lacking. This paper analyses how the use of mobile technology by nurses at point of care is governed. It highlights the existence of a mobile technology paradox: an identified inability of nurses to access mobile technology in a context where it is increasingly recognised that its use in situ can enhance nursing practice while contributing to mobile learning and continuing professional development. While the recent release of the Registered Nurse Standards for Practice and accompanying Standard for Continuing Professional Development provides some direction regarding professional standards to support the use of mobile technology for mobile learning, we argue a more inclusive approach is required if emerging technologies are to be fully embraced. We describe how an implementation framework, underpinned by more detailed standards, guidelines and codes, could enable the nursing profession to be leaders in embedding mobile technology in healthcare environments nationally and globally. The prevalence of mobile technology in Australia has outpaced its governance in healthcare environments. Its limited availability at point of care is hindering nursing practice, mobile learning and continuing professional development. We discuss the emergence of mobile technology and impediments for its use by nurses in situ. We analyse the professional codes governing nursing, outlining potential reforms to enable implementation of mobile technology at point of care by nurses.

  1. Guidelines for use of fishes in research: revised and expanded

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, Jill A.; Bart, Henry L.; Bowker, James D.; Bowser, Paul R.; MacMillan, J. Randy; Nickum, John G.; Rachlin, Joseph W.; Rose, James D.; Sorensen, Peter W.; Warkentine, Barbara E.; Whitledge, Greg W.

    2014-01-01

    acronyms with corresponding terms, low regulatory priority drugs, and Office of International des Epizooties notifiable disease agents. Again, the Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee (IACUC) role is explained, expectations for research are provided, and a brief checklist for IACUC readiness is included. Overall, the ,i>2014 Guidelines is the taxon-specific resource for our professional societies and is a principal document for standards on the care and use of fish and aquatic vertebrates in research.

  2. Guideline on Muscle-Invasive and Metastatic Bladder Cancer (European Association of Urology Guideline): American Society of Clinical Oncology Clinical Practice Guideline Endorsement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milowsky, Matthew I; Rumble, R Bryan; Booth, Christopher M; Gilligan, Timothy; Eapen, Libni J; Hauke, Ralph J; Boumansour, Pat; Lee, Cheryl T

    2016-06-01

    To endorse the European Association of Urology guideline on muscle-invasive (MIBC) and metastatic bladder cancer. The American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) has a policy and set of procedures for endorsing clinical practice guidelines that have been developed by other professional organizations. The guideline on MIBC and metastatic bladder cancer was reviewed for developmental rigor by methodologists. The ASCO Endorsement Panel then reviewed the content and recommendations. The ASCO Endorsement Panel determined that the recommendations from the European Association of Urology guideline on MIBC and metastatic bladder cancer, published online in March 2015, are clear, thorough, and based on the most relevant scientific evidence. ASCO endorses the guideline on MIBC and metastatic bladder cancer and has added qualifying statements, including highlighting the use of chemoradiotherapy for select patients with MIBC and recommending a preference for clinical trials in the treatment of metastatic disease in the second-line setting. Multidisciplinary care for patients with MIBC and metastatic bladder cancer is critical. The standard treatment of MIBC (cT2-T4a N0M0) is neoadjuvant cisplatin-based combination chemotherapy followed by radical cystectomy. In cisplatin-ineligible patients, radical cystectomy alone is recommended. Adjuvant cisplatin-based chemotherapy may be offered to high-risk patients who have not received neoadjuvant therapy. Chemoradiotherapy may be offered as an alternative to cystectomy in appropriately selected patients with MIBC and in some patients for whom cystectomy is not an option. Metastatic disease should be treated with cisplatin-containing combination chemotherapy or with carboplatin combination chemotherapy or single agents in patients ineligible for cisplatin.Additional information is available at http://www.asco.org/endorsements/MIBC and www.asco.org/guidelineswiki. © 2016 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  3. [Urolithiasis guidelines: retrospective view and perspectives].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Türk, C

    2016-10-01

    The first German guidelines on urolithiasis were published in four sections in "Der Urologe A" in 1997 and were listed at The Association of the Scientific Medical Societies in Germany (AWMF) in 1999. The European Association of Urology (EAU) published the first guidelines on urolithiasis in 2000. All guidelines must be updated on a regular basis. Guidelines should represent the highest level of evidence for the best diagnostic and therapeutic procedures, independent of economic pressure. Guidelines should safeguard optimal patient care and also serve as a basis for education and training of healthcare professionals. They are a tool for quality management and for national healthcare structures and strategies as well as for the judicature. Medical guidelines form the foundation for the elaboration of local clinical treatment pathways, which are the bridge to treatment of patients and also take economic and regional circumstances into consideration. In the future information technology (IT) could play an even more important role for both the complex methods of establishing guidelines and their implementation. The contents of guidelines could then be directly integrated into the clinical pathway, if necessary or into electronic patient charts in order to propose a medically and financially optimized treatment pathway. Because of the complexity of producing guidelines, they will in part be produced at a national level and adapted to the regional circumstances. Future technical, medical and genetic developments will lead to a multidisciplinary and multiprofessional cooperation in the production of guidelines.

  4. Postdoctoral program guidelines.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teich-McGoldrick, Stephanie; Miller, Andrew W.; Sava, Dorina Florentina; Liu, Yanli; Ferreira, Summer Rhodes; Biedermann, Laura Butler; Cruz-Campa, Jose Luis; Hall, Lisa Michelle; Liu, Xiaohua H.; Ekoto, Isaac

    2012-04-01

    We, the Postdoc Professional Development Program (PD2P) leadership team, wrote these postdoc guidelines to be a starting point for communication between new postdocs, their staff mentors, and their managers. These guidelines detail expectations and responsibilities of the three parties, as well as list relevant contacts. The purpose of the Postdoc Program is to bring in talented, creative people who enrich Sandia's environment by performing innovative R&D, as well as by stimulating intellectual curiosity and learning. Postdocs are temporary employees who come to Sandia for career development and advancement reasons. In general, the postdoc term is 1 year, renewable up to five times for a total of six years. However, center practices may vary; check with your manager. At term, a postdoc may apply for a staff position at Sandia or choose to move to university, industry or another lab. It is our vision that those who leave become long-term collaborators and advocates whose relationships with Sandia have a positive effect upon our national constituency.

  5. Good publication practice guidelines for medical communications agencies: a MedComm perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bareket-Samish, A; Denny, M; Ruzicka, B; Bogush, M; Flynn, K; Glinka, K; McMahon-Wise, B; Schiller, S; Sjostedt, P; Matheson, N

    2009-02-01

    Physicians and other health care personnel rely on the peer-reviewed biomedical literature as a key source for making clinical decisions. Thus, ensuring that the nonclinical and clinical findings published in biomedical journals are reported accurately and clearly, without undue influence from commercial interests, is essential. Accordingly, beginning in the mid-1990s and continuing to the present, various organizations, including the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors, the American Medical Association, the Council of Science Editors, the American Medical Writers Association, and the International Society for Medical Publication Professionals, have published guidelines to strengthen and uphold ethical standards in biomedical communications. A task force of staff members from the AXIS group of companies reviewed these and other guidelines to assess the need for a good publication practices (GPP) document specific to medical communications agencies. As this review demonstrated an unmet need, the task force was charged with developing GPP guidelines for the AXIS group of agencies in the United States. Although such guidelines have been previously published on behalf of medical journal editors and publishers, medical writers, academic centers, and pharmaceutical companies, there has been no prior publication in the peer-reviewed literature of good publication practices for medical communications agencies, which face unique challenges in negotiating a balance among authors, sponsoring companies, and biomedical publishers. This article presents and discusses these GPP guidelines. To our knowledge, this is the first publication of guidelines developed from the perspective of a medical communications agency.

  6. BIOSAFETY GUIDELINES

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The International Potato Centre (CIP) recognises the value of biotechnology in the conservation and use of solanum potato and sweet potato germplasm. Biotechnological development and utilisation at CIP is currently at the transgenic plant production and gene mapping stages. CIP complies with international standards ...

  7. Revised dietary guidelines for Koreans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Young Ai; Lee, Haeng Shin; Kim, Bok Hee; Lee, Yoonna; Lee, Hae Jeung; Moon, Jae Jin; Kim, Cho-il

    2008-01-01

    With rapidly changing dietary environment, dietary guidelines for Koreans were revised and relevant action guides were developed. First, the Dietary Guidelines Advisory Committee was established with experts and government officials from the fields of nutrition, preventive medicine, health promotion, agriculture, education and environment. The Committee set dietary goals for Koreans aiming for a better nutrition state of all after a thorough review and analysis of recent information related to nutritional status and/or problems of Korean population, changes in food production/supply, disease pattern, health policy and agricultural policy. Then, the revised dietary guidelines were proposed to accomplish these goals in addition to 6 different sets of dietary action guides to accommodate specific nutrition and health problems of respective age groups. Subsequently, these guidelines and guides were subjected to the focus group review, consumer perception surveys, and a public hearing for general and professional comments. Lastly, the language was clarified in terms of public understanding and phraseology. The revised Dietary guidelines for Koreans are as follows: eat a variety of grains, vegetables, fruits, fish, meat, poultry and dairy products; choose salt-preserved foods less, and use less salt when you prepare foods; increase physical activity for a healthy weight, and balance what you eat with your activity; enjoy every meal, and do not skip breakfast; if you drink alcoholic beverages, do so in moderation; prepare foods properly, and order sensible amounts; enjoy our rice-based diet.

  8. Tumescent liposuction: Standard guidelines of care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mysore Venkataram

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Definition : Tumescent liposuction is a technique for the removal of subcutaneous fat under a special form of local anesthesia called tumescent anesthesia. Physician′s qualifications : The physician performing liposuction should have completed postgraduate training in dermatology or a surgical specialty and should have had adequate training in dermatosurgery at a center that provides training in cutaneous surgery. In addition, the physician should obtain specific liposuction training or experience at the surgical table ("hands on" under the supervision of an appropriately trained and experienced liposuction surgeon. In addition to the surgical technique, training should include instruction in fluid and electrolyte balance, potential complications of liposuction, tumescent and other forms of anesthesia as well as emergency resuscitation and care. Facility : Liposuction can be performed safely in an outpatient day care surgical facility, or a hospital operating room. The day care theater should be equipped with facilities for monitoring and handling emergencies. A plan for handling emergencies should be in place with which all nursing staff should be familiar. A physician trained in emergency medical care and acute cardiac emergencies should be available in the premises. It is recommended but not mandatory, that an anesthetist be asked to stand by. Indications: Liposuction is recommended for all localized deposits of fat. Novices should restrict themselves to the abdomen, thighs, buttocks and male breasts. Arms, the medial side of the thigh and the female breast need more experience and are recommended for experienced surgeons. Liposuction may be performed for non-cosmetic indications such as hyperhidrosis of axillae after adequate experience has been acquired, but is not recommended for the treatment of obesity. Preoperative evaluation : Detailed history is to be taken with respect to any previous disease, drug intake and prior surgical procedures. Liposuction is contraindicated in patients with severe cardiovascular disease, severe coagulation disorders including thrombophilia, and during pregnancy. Physical evaluation should be detailed and should include assessment of general physical health to determine the fitness of the patient for surgery, as well as the examination of specific sites that need liposuction to check for potential problems. Preoperative Informed consent : The patient should sign a detailed consent form listing details about the procedure and possible complications. The consent form should specifically state the limitations of the procedure and should mention whether more procedures are needed for proper results. The patient should be provided with adequate opportunity to seek information through brochures, computer presentations, and personal discussions. Preoperative laboratory studies to be performed include Hb%, blood counts including platelet counts, bleeding and clotting time (or prothrombin and activated partial thromboplastin time and blood chemistry profile; ECG is advisable. Liver function tests, and pregnancy test for women of childbearing age are performed as mandated by the individual patient′s requirements. Ultrasound examination is recommended in cases of gynecomastia. Preoperative medication : Preoperative antibiotics and non-sedative analgesics such as paracetamol are recommended. The choice of antibiotic and analgesic agents depends on the individual physician′s preference and the prevailing local conditions. Type of anesthetic employed : Lidocaine is the preferred local anesthetic; its recommended dose is 35-45 mg/kg and doses should not exceed 55 mg/kg wt. The recommended concentration of epinephrine in tumescent solutions is 0.25-1.5 mg/L. The total dosage of epinephrine should be minimized and should not exceed 50 µg/kg. Surgical technique/procedure It is always advisable not to combine liposuction with other procedures to avoid exceeding the recommended dosage of lignocaine. However, such combinations may be attempted if the total required dose of lignocaine does not exceed the maximum dose indicated above. The recommended cannula size for liposuction is not to be larger than 3.5 mm in diameter. The recommended volume of fat removed is in proportion to the fat content and/or size and/or weight of the patient being treated. It is recommended that the volume of fat removed not exceed 5000 mL in a single operative session.Large volume liposuctions or mega-liposuctions are not recommended. Intraoperative and postoperative monitoring : Baseline vital signs including blood pressure and heart rate, are recorded pre- and postoperatively. Pulse oximeter monitoring is essential in all cases. Postoperative care: Postoperative antibiotics should be selected by the physician and taken for five days. Postoperative antiinflammatory drugs such as Cox 2 Inhibiters may be given for 5-7 days; specialized compression garments, binders, and tape help to reduce bruising, hematomas, seromas, and pain. Generally, compression is recommended for two weeks although this is variable according to the needs of the individual patient.

  9. Standard guidelines for electrosurgery with radiofrequency current

    OpenAIRE

    Mutalik Sharad

    2009-01-01

    Definition: Radiofrequency (RF) induces thermal destruction of the targeted tissue by an electrical current at a frequency of 0.5 MHz (RF). As the electrode tip is not heated, there is minimal thermal damage to the surrounding tissues, producing good esthetic results. Therefore, RF ablation is also known as cold ablation or "coblation." Modality: It has three modes of operation: (a) Cut, (b) cut and coagulate and (c) coagulate. Therefore, it can be used for various purposes like incision, ...

  10. Guidelines for data content standards for Africa.

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Cooper, Anthony K

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Electrical splice point Depth Area Survey System Description Electrical transformer bank point Distance Mark Survey System First Devision Electrical transformer vault point Dolphin Survey System Second Devision Fuel air eliminator point Dredged Area Survey...

  11. Guidelines for data content standards for Africa

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Cooper, Antony K

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Electrical transformer bank point Distance Mark Survey System First Devision Electrical transformer vault point Dolphin Survey System Second Devision Fuel air eliminator point Dredged Area Survey System Third Devision Fuel anode point Dyke Transaction...

  12. Standard guidelines of care for acne surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khunger, Niti

    2008-01-01

    Acne surgery is the use of various surgical procedures for the treatment of postacne scarring and also, as adjuvant treatment for active acne. Surgery is indicated both in active acne and post-acne scars. PHYSICIANS' QUALIFICATIONS: Any Dermatologist can perform most acne surgery techniques as these are usually taught during postgraduation. However, certain techniques such as dermabrasion, laser resurfacing, scar revisions need specific "hands-on" training in appropriate training centers. Most acne surgery procedures can be performed in a physician's minor procedure room. However, full-face dermabrasion and laser resurfacing need an operation theatre in a hospital setting. ACTIVE ACNE: Surgical treatment is only an adjunct to medical therapy, which remains the mainstay of treatment. Comedone extraction is a process of applying simple mechanical pressure with a comedone extractor, to extract the contents of the blocked pilosebaceous follicle. Superficial chemical peel is a process of applying a chemical agent to the skin, so as to cause controlled destruction of the epidermis leading to exfoliation. Glycolic acid, salicylic acid and trichloroacetic acid are commonly used peeling agents for the treatment of active acne and superficial acne scars. CRYOTHERAPY: Cryoslush and cryopeel are used for the treatment of nodulocystic acne. Intralesional corticosteroids are indicated for the treatment of nodules, cysts and keloidal acne scars. Nonablative lasers and light therapy using Blue light, non ablative radiofrequency, Nd:YAG laser, IPL (Intense Pulsed Light), PDT (Photodynamic Therapy), pulse dye laser and light and heat energy machines have been used in recent years for the treatment of active inflammatory acne and superficial acne scars. Proper counseling is very important in the treatment of acne scars. Treatment depends on the type of acne scars; a patient may need more than one type of treatment. Subcision is a treatment to break the fibrotic strands that tether the scar to the underlying subcutaneous tissue, and is useful for rolling scars. Punch excision techniques such as punch excision, elevation and replacement are useful for depressed scars such as ice pick and boxcar scars. TCA chemical reconstruction of skin scars (CROSS) (Level C) is useful for ice pick scars. Resurfacing techniques include ablative methods (such as dermabrasion and laser resurfacing), and nonablative methods such as microdermabrasion and nonablative lasers. Ablative methods cause significant postoperative changes in the skin, are associated with significant healing time and should be performed by dermatosurgeons trained and experienced in the procedure. Fillers are useful for depressed scars. Proper case selection is very important in ensuring satisfactory results.

  13. Standard guidelines of care for vitiligo surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parsad Davinder

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Vitiligo surgery is an effective method of treatment for selected, resistant vitiligo patches in patients with vitiligo. Physician′s qualifications: The physician performing vitiligo surgery should have completed postgraduate training in dermatology which included training in vitiligo surgery. If the center for postgraduation does not provide education and training in cutaneous surgery, the training may be obtained at the surgical table (hands-on under the supervision of an appropriately trained and experienced dermatosurgeon at a center that routinely performs the procedure. Training may also be obtained in dedicated workshops. In addition to the surgical techniques, training should include local anesthesia and emergency resuscitation and care. Facility: Vitiligo surgery can be performed safely in an outpatient day care dermatosurgical facility. The day care theater should be equipped with facilities for monitoring and handling emergencies. A plan for handling emergencies should be in place, with which all nursing staff should be familiar. Vitiligo grafting for extensive areas may need general anesthesia and full operation theater facility in a hospital setting and the presence of an anesthetist is recommended in such cases. Indications for vitiligo surgery : Surgery is indicated for stable vitiligo that does not respond to medical treatment. While there is no consensus on definitive parameters for stability, the Task Force suggests the absence of progression of disease for the past one year as a definition of stability. Test grafting may be performed in doubtful cases to detect stability. Preoperative counseling and Informed consent: A detailed consent form elaborating the procedure and possible complications should be signed by the patient. The patient should be informed of the nature of the disease and that the determination of stability is only a vague guide. The consent form should specifically state the limitations of the procedure, about the possible future progression of disease and whether more procedures will be needed for proper results. The patient should be provided with adequate opportunity to seek information through brochures and one-to-one discussions. The need for concomitant medical therapy should be emphasized and the patient should understand that proper results take time (a few months to a year. Preoperative laboratory studies include hemogram including platelet counts, bleeding and clotting time (or prothrombin and activated partial thromboplastin time, and blood chemistry profile. Screening for antibodies for hepatitis B surface antigen and HIV is recommended depending on individual requirements. Anesthesia: Lignocaine (2% with or without adrenaline is generally used for anesthesia; infiltration and nerve block anesthesia are adequate in most cases. General anesthesia may be needed in patients with extensive lesions. Postoperative care: Proper postoperative immobilization and care are very important to obtain satisfactory results.

  14. Standard guidelines for care: Sclerotherapy in dermatology

    OpenAIRE

    Niti Khunger; Sacchidanand, S

    2011-01-01

    Definition: Sclerotherapy is defined as the targeted elimination of small vessels, varicose veins and vascular anomalies by the injection of a sclerosant. The aim of sclerotherapy is to damage the vessel wall and transform it into a fibrous cord that cannot be recanalized. It is a simple, cost-effective, efficacious and esthetically acceptable modality for both therapeutic and esthetic purposes. Indications: Therapeutic indications include varicose veins and vascular malformations. Esthetic i...

  15. Standard guidelines for care: Sclerotherapy in dermatology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niti Khunger

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Definition: Sclerotherapy is defined as the targeted elimination of small vessels, varicose veins and vascular anomalies by the injection of a sclerosant. The aim of sclerotherapy is to damage the vessel wall and transform it into a fibrous cord that cannot be recanalized. It is a simple, cost-effective, efficacious and esthetically acceptable modality for both therapeutic and esthetic purposes. Indications: Therapeutic indications include varicose veins and vascular malformations. Esthetic indications include telangiectasias and reticular veins. In the management of varicose veins, it may need to be combined with other surgical methods of treatment, such as ligation of the saphenofemoral junction, stab ligation of perforators and stripping. A surgical opinion may be necessary. Methodology: A thorough knowledge of the anatomy and physiology of the venous system of the legs, basic principles of venous insufficiency, methods of diagnosis and, in addition, uses, mechanisms of action and complications of sclerosing agents and proper compression techniques are important pre-requisites to successful sclerotherapy. Although various sclerosing agents are available, polidoconal and sodium tetradecyl sulfate are most commonly used. More recently, these sclerosants have been used in microfoam form for increased efficacy. The basic principle of a successful sclerotherapy technique is the use of an optimal volume and concentration of the sclerosant according to the size of the vessel. The sclerosant is injected carefully into the vessel and compression is applied. Contraindications: Contraindications include superficial and deep venous thrombosis, sapheno-femoral junction incompetence, pregnancy, myocardial decompensation, migraine, hypercoagulable state, serious systemic illness, dependency edema, immobility, arterial disease, diabetes mellitus and allergic reactions to sclerosants. Complications: While sclerotherapy is usually a safe procedure, complications may occur due to inappropriate patient selection or improper injection techniques. The complications may be acute or delayed. Complications include hyperpigmentation, matting, local urticaria, cutaneous necrosis, microthrombi, accidental intra-arterial injection, phlebitis, deep vein thrombosis, thromboembolism, scintillating scotomas, nerve damage and allergic reactions. Physician Qualification: Sclerotherapy may be administered by a surgeon or dermatologist who has acquired adequate training during post-graduation or through recognized fellowships and workshops dedicated to sclerotherapy. He should have an adequate knowledge of the anatomy of the venous system, be able to diagnose and manage venous disease and its associated consequences as well as possess the necessary skills to perform the procedures, understand the appropriate indications and limitations, technique modifications and management of the potential adverse sequelae associated with sclerotherapy and also understand the pharmacology of the sclerosing solutions. Facility: The procedure may be performed in the physician′s procedure room.

  16. Standard guidelines of care for acne surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khunger Niti

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Acne surgery is the use of various surgical procedures for the treatment of postacne scarring and also, as adjuvant treatment for active acne. Surgery is indicated both in active acne and post-acne scars. Physicians′ qualifications: Any Dermatologist can perform most acne surgery techniques as these are usually taught during postgraduation. However, certain techniques such as dermabrasion, laser resurfacing, scar revisions need specific "hands-on" training in appropriate training centers. Facility: Most acne surgery procedures can be performed in a physician′s minor procedure room. However, full-face dermabrasion and laser resurfacing need an operation theatre in a hospital setting. Active acne: Surgical treatment is only an adjunct to medical therapy, which remains the mainstay of treatment. Comedone extraction is a process of applying simple mechanical pressure with a comedone extractor, to extract the contents of the blocked pilosebaceous follicle. Superficial chemical peel is a process of applying a chemical agent to the skin, so as to cause controlled destruction of the epidermis leading to exfoliation. Glycolic acid, salicylic acid and trichloroacetic acid are commonly used peeling agents for the treatment of active acne and superficial acne scars. Cryotherapy: Cryoslush and cryopeel are used for the treatment of nodulocystic acne. Intralesional corticosteroids are indicated for the treatment of nodules, cysts and keloidal acne scars. Nonablative lasers and light therapy using Blue light, non ablative radiofrequency, Nd:YAG laser, IPL (Intense Pulsed Light, PDT (Photodynamic Therapy, pulse dye laser and light and heat energy machines have been used in recent years for the treatment of active inflammatory acne and superficial acne scars. Proper counseling is very important in the treatment of acne scars. Treatment depends on the type of acne scars; a patient may need more than one type of treatment. Subcision is a treatment to break the fibrotic strands that tether the scar to the underlying subcutaneous tissue, and is useful for rolling scars. Punch excision techniques such as punch excision, elevation and replacement are useful for depressed scars such as ice pick and boxcar scars. TCA chemical reconstruction of skin scars (CROSS (Level C is useful for ice pick scars. Resurfacing techniques include ablative methods (such as dermabrasion and laser resurfacing, and nonablative methods such as microdermabrasion and nonablative lasers. Ablative methods cause significant postoperative changes in the skin, are associated with significant healing time and should be performed by dermatosurgeons trained and experienced in the procedure. Fillers are useful for depressed scars. Proper case selection is very important in ensuring satisfactory results.

  17. Standard guidelines of care for chemical peels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khunger Niti

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Chemical peeling is the application of a chemical agent to the skin, which causes controlled destruction of a part of or the entire epidermis, with or without the dermis, leading to exfoliation and removal of superficial lesions, followed by regeneration of new epidermal and dermal tissues. Indications for chemical peeling include pigmentary disorders, superficial acne scars, ageing skin changes, and benign epidermal growths. Contraindications include patients with active bacterial, viral or fungal infection, tendency to keloid formation, facial dermatitis, taking photosensitizing medications and unrealistic expectations. Physicians′ qualifications : The physician performing chemical peeling should have completed postgraduate training in dermatology. The training for chemical peeling may be acquired during post graduation or later at a center that provides education and training in cutaneous surgery or in focus