WorldWideScience

Sample records for professional staff equipment

  1. A Measure of Staff Burnout among Health Professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, John W.

    Staff burnout among health professionals refers to a syndrome of physical and emotional exhaustion involving the development of negative job attitudes, a poor professional self-concept, and a loss of empathic concern for clients. The Staff Burnout Scale for Health Professionals (SBS-HP) is a 20-item inventory assessing cognitive, affective,…

  2. Transforming Spaces and Identities: The Contributions of Professional Staff to Learning Spaces in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Carroll

    2012-01-01

    Staff are a university's key resource. Typically, research has concentrated on the contribution of academic staff, and has largely overlooked the crucial role of professional staff. However, recently there has been an increase in research by professional staff, about professional staff. In Australia, professional staff comprise more than half the…

  3. Competence essence of professional experience staff

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. V. Shpektorenko

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The advanced studies of researchers, studying components of work experience are considered in the article. Author vision of internal components of work experience is offered in the article, the factors of its forming are selected. Using comparative, comprehensive and systematic method, modeling author examines internal component structure of professional experience personnel, including personnel of public administration. The author determines that professional experience is formed in relation to personal, professional competency as an employee - the ability to learn and academic mobility, based on the importance of intelligence belongs. Professional experience as the degree of formation competency skills, and formed under the influence of value-orientation characteristics, such as professional qualifications and performance, professional orientation of a person, his professional intentions, calling, interests, expectations, satisfaction. Professional experience - a form of assimilation specialist own rational and collective achievements in the professional field, is a summary of the result of the professional man pointing to the implementation of the competency skills of the employee in the course of professional activities on its self-sufficiency

  4. Staff experiences of providing maternity services in rural southern Tanzania – a focus on equipment, drug and supply issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background The poor maintenance of equipment and inadequate supplies of drugs and other items contribute to the low quality of maternity services often found in rural settings in low- and middle-income countries, and raise the risk of adverse patient outcomes through delaying care provision. We aim to describe staff experiences of providing maternal and neonatal care in rural health facilities in Southern Tanzania, focusing on issues related to equipment, drugs and supplies. Methods Focus group discussions and in-depth interviews were conducted with different staff cadres from all facility levels in order to explore experiences and views of providing maternity care in the context of poorly maintained equipment, and insufficient drugs and other supplies. A facility survey quantified the availability of relevant items. Results The facility survey, which found many missing or broken items and frequent stock outs, corroborated staff reports of providing care in the context of missing or broken care items. Staff reported increased workloads, reduced morale, difficulties in providing optimal maternity care, and carrying out procedures with potential health risks to themselves as a result. Conclusions Inadequately stocked and equipped facilities compromise the health system’s ability to reduce maternal and neonatal mortality and morbidity by affecting staff personally and professionally, which hinders the provision of timely and appropriate interventions. Improving stock control and maintaining equipment could benefit mothers and babies, not only through removing restrictions to the availability of care, but also through improving staff working conditions. PMID:23410228

  5. Staff experiences of providing maternity services in rural southern Tanzania - a focus on equipment, drug and supply issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penfold, Suzanne; Shamba, Donat; Hanson, Claudia; Jaribu, Jennie; Manzi, Fatuma; Marchant, Tanya; Tanner, Marcel; Ramsey, Kate; Schellenberg, David; Schellenberg, Joanna Armstrong

    2013-02-14

    The poor maintenance of equipment and inadequate supplies of drugs and other items contribute to the low quality of maternity services often found in rural settings in low- and middle-income countries, and raise the risk of adverse patient outcomes through delaying care provision. We aim to describe staff experiences of providing maternal and neonatal care in rural health facilities in Southern Tanzania, focusing on issues related to equipment, drugs and supplies. Focus group discussions and in-depth interviews were conducted with different staff cadres from all facility levels in order to explore experiences and views of providing maternity care in the context of poorly maintained equipment, and insufficient drugs and other supplies. A facility survey quantified the availability of relevant items. The facility survey, which found many missing or broken items and frequent stock outs, corroborated staff reports of providing care in the context of missing or broken care items. Staff reported increased workloads, reduced morale, difficulties in providing optimal maternity care, and carrying out procedures with potential health risks to themselves as a result. Inadequately stocked and equipped facilities compromise the health system's ability to reduce maternal and neonatal mortality and morbidity by affecting staff personally and professionally, which hinders the provision of timely and appropriate interventions. Improving stock control and maintaining equipment could benefit mothers and babies, not only through removing restrictions to the availability of care, but also through improving staff working conditions.

  6. Managing Professional Development of Academic Staff to Enhance University Performance

    OpenAIRE

    Murphy, Jennifer

    2014-01-01

    Calls for more effective and modern teaching practices, higher research outputs, leaner administrative processes, greater community engagement, and more student-centred approaches to the business of higher education have intensified the challenges of working in a university. These challenges have added considerable complexity to the roles of academic staff, many of whom are facing increasing demands for which they are ill equipped to deal in terms of their formal education. To succeed in the ...

  7. Staff mobility, recruitment and professional development in Ethiopian higher education

    OpenAIRE

    Zeleke, Aytaged Sisay

    2009-01-01

    This study is aimed at understanding staff mobility, recruitment and professional development in Ethiopian higher education. To respond to these questions, qualitative method was mainly used. The data collection tools were literature review, internet, in depth interviews, documents, speeches and open ended questionnaire. These data collection instruments were appraised to learn about their strengths and weaknesses. Moreover, the interview was conducted in Amharic language and tape recording a...

  8. A Comparative Study of the Perceptions of Professional Staff on Their Contribution to Student Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regan, Julie-Anne; Dollard, Emma; Banks, Nicci

    2014-01-01

    This study examined the perceptions of professional staff on their contribution to student outcomes. An online Delphi survey method was used to collect data from two expert panels: professional staff based in faculties and professional staff based in central university departments. The aim of this method is for the panels to reach consensus. The…

  9. A comprehensive professional development training's effect on afterschool program staff behaviors to promote healthy eating and physical activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weaver, Robert Glenn; Beets, Michael W; Saunders, Ruth P; Beighle, Aaron; Webster, Collin

    2014-01-01

    Evaluate a comprehensive intervention designed to support staff and program leaders in the implementation of the YMCA of USA healthy eating and physical activity (HEPA) standards for their afterschool programs (3-6 pm). Pre- (fall 2011) and postassessment (spring 2012) no-control group. Four large-scale YMCA afterschool programs serving approximately 500 children. Professional development training founded on the 5Ms (ie, Mission, Model, Manage, Monitor, and Maximize) and LET US Play principles (ie, Lines, Elimination, Team size, Uninvolved staff/kids, and Space, equipment, and rules), on-site booster training sessions, workshops, and ongoing technical support for staff and program leaders from January to May 2012. System for Observing Staff Promotion of Activity and Nutrition. Multilevel mixed-effects linear (ie, staff behaviors expressed as a percentage of the number of scans observed) and logistic regression. A total of 5328 System for Observing Staff Promotion of Activity and Nutrition scans were completed over the 2 measurement periods. Of the 20 staff behaviors identified in HEPA standards and measured in this study, 17 increased or decreased in the appropriate direction. For example, the proportion staff engaged in physical activity with children increased from 26.6% to 37% and the proportion of staff eating unhealthy foods decreased from 42.1% to 4.5%. Comprehensive professional development training, founded on the 5Ms and LET US Play principles, and ongoing technical assistance can have a sizable impact on key staff behaviors identified by HEPA standards for afterschool programs.

  10. Professional Mobility of the Staff in the Risk Society

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Otenko Vasyl I.

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Unanticipated crises in various spheres of society are becoming a main object of attention of the mankind and civilization forming a new model of civilization – the risk society. Although this model is reflected in many works by scientists from different areas, methodological and practical justification of mechanisms for complex study of risks both at the society and enterprise level still remain relevant. The main resource for solving the problem of adaptation to life in the risk society is a person, who has both a high level of creativity and social responsibility. The unpredictability of enterprise risks can be overcome by developing professional mobility of its staff. This quality of a person is formed under the influence of a large number of external and internal factors. Among them the most difficult are the creative motivation of a person’s behavior and his/her internal mental set. In order to develop a methodological basis for formation of the staff professional mobility, it is necessary to formulate the main idea and hypothesis of a new theory, justify a list of disciplines studying certain aspects of the risk society and professional mobility, analyze paradigms of related sciences and choose ideas to form foundations of a new paradigm for creating a multidisciplinary system of concepts, principles and methods of research information support, rules of qualitative and quantitative assessment of its subject.

  11. Engaging professional staff in the discourse of engagement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rhonda Leece

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The shift in higher education away from traditional, transactional service models and toward innovative, transformational approaches, has led to a reframing of professional identities. At the University of the Sunshine Coast (USC, the creation of the Student Engagement team in 2015 took a learner-centred, theory-driven and evidence-based approach. However, the new team has been drawn from diverse backgrounds and is building a new, shared identity. To create a common language and understanding of practice in the team, the theory and scholarship of higher education was integrated into team leader discussions.  These staff participated in a series of discussions, were encouraged to apply this learning to their daily practice in work with students and in communicating and contextualising their work among staff. The participants have shared their perspective on this new approach and results indicate that, while we are successfully achieving some objectives, the initiative can be adapted to become more effective.

  12. The higher school teaching staff professional development system creation on the adaptive management principles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Borova T.A.

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with theoretical analysis of the higher school teaching staff professional development system creation on the adaptive management principles. It is determined the background and components of the higher school teaching staff professional development adaptive management system. It is specified the mechanisms for higher school teaching staff professional development adaptive management: monitoring and coaching. It is shown their place in the higher school teaching staff professional development system on the adaptive management principles. The results of the system efficiency are singled out.

  13. A coordinated comprehensive professional development training's effect on summer day camp staff healthy eating and physical activity promoting behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weaver, R Glenn; Beets, Michael W; Saunders, Ruth P; Beighle, Aaron

    2014-08-01

    The YMCA of USA recently adopted Healthy Eating and Physical Activity (HEPA) Standards for their summer-day- camps (SDCs). Standards call for staff to exhibit HEPA promoting behaviors while eliminating HEPA discouraging behaviors. No studies have evaluated training programs to influence policy specified staff behaviors and related changes in child activity in SDCs. Four YMCA SDCs serving approximately 800 children/week participated in this no control group pre/post pilot study. Professional development training founded in the 5 Ms (Mission, Model, Manage, Monitor, Maximize) and LET US Play principles (lines; elimination; team size; uninvolved staff/kids; and space, equipment, and rules) was delivered to staff. Outcomes were staff promotion behaviors and child activity assessed via systematic observation instruments. Twelve of 17 HEPA staff behaviors changed in the appropriate direction from baseline to postassessment with 5 behaviors reaching statistically significant changes. The percentage of girls and boys observed in moderate-to-vigorous physical activity increased from 15.3% to 18.3% (P > .05) and 17.9% to 21.2%, whereas sedentary behavior decreased from 66.8% to 59.8% and 62.3% to 53.6%, respectively. Evidence suggests that the professional development training designed to assist SDCs to meet the HEPA Standards can lead to important changes in staff behaviors and children's physical activity.

  14. On-line professional staff development: An evaluation study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vries, Linda; Naidu, Som; Jegede, Olugbemiro; Collis, Betty

    1995-01-01

    This paper reports the design, implementation, and evaluation of a teleseminar on instructional design (ID) and computer-mediated communication (CMC) for the purposes of staff development at The University of Southern Queensland, Toowoomba, Australia. Participation was open to any staff with an

  15. Exploring technological and architectural solutions for nursing home residents, care professionals and technical staff: Focus groups with professional stakeholders.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.H. Wetzels; MD E.J.M. Wouters; J. van Hoof; A.M.C. Dooremalen; H.T.G. Weffers

    2014-01-01

    J. van Hoof, A.M.C. Dooremalen, M.H. Wetzels, H.T.G. Weffers, E.J.M. Wouters (2014) Exploring technological and architectural solutions for nursing home residents, care professionals and technical staff: Focus groups with professional stakeholders. International Journal for Innovative Research in

  16. Professional development on innovation competence of teaching staff in Ugandan universities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kasule, G.W.

    2015-01-01

    Professional Development on Innovation Competence of Teaching Staff in Ugandan Universities George Wilson Kasule Abstract Sufficient university teaching staff with innovation competence is key if universities want to play a significant role in fostering sustainable

  17. Assessment of Non-Professional Staff Training programme In ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The type of training available to them include job orientation, formal in-service training, job rotation, typewriting, computer training, Factors like lack of finance, poor remuneration for teachers, delay in releasing the results, lack of basic teaching facilities, lukewarm attitude of staff militate against effective establishment of ...

  18. Factors associated with personal protection equipment use and hand hygiene among hemodialysis staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimokura, Gayle; Weber, David J; Miller, William C; Wurtzel, Heather; Alter, Miriam J

    2006-04-01

    Because exposure to blood by health care workers is frequent during hemodialysis, gloves are required for all contact with patients and their equipment, followed by hand hygiene. In this study, we investigated factors associated with performing these practices as recommended. Staff members from a sample of 45 US hemodialysis facilities were surveyed using an anonymous self-administered questionnaire. Factors independently associated with reporting increased compliance with recommended hand hygiene and glove use practices during patient care were identified with multivariate modeling. Of 605 eligible staff members, 420 (69%) responded: registered nurses, 41%; dialysis technicians, 51%; and licensed practical nurses, 8%. Only 35% reported that dialysis patients were at risk for bloodborne virus infections, and only 36% reported always following recommended hand hygiene and glove use practices. Independent factors associated with more frequent compliance were being a technician (versus a registered nurse) and reporting always doing what was needed to protect themselves from infection. Compliance with recommended hand hygiene and glove use practices by hemodialysis staff was low. The rationale for infection control practices specific to the hemodialysis setting was poorly understood by all staff. Infection control training should be tailored to this setting and should address misconceptions.

  19. [Medical-psychological and social aspects of professional adaptation of staff of criminal-executive system].

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'iakovich, M P; Pavlov, A V

    2010-02-01

    There was observed medical-psychological and social aspects of professional adaptation of staff of criminal-executive system, was given evaluation of conditions of their work. Was learned risk of damage of health, adaptational potential, personal peculiarities of staff Was learned valuable-motivation sphere, self-concept of competitionability, type of life position, several elements of mode of life of the staff. Was educed decreasing of adaptational capabilities, high personal anxiety and low stress firmness among high number of young specialists. Was formed an apprehension about effectiveness of their professional adaptation in conditions of absence of system of dynamic medical-psychological observe and prophylactic measures.

  20. Expectativas da equipe de enfermagem em relação à liderança Expectations of the nursing staff in relation to the leadership

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gisela Maria Schebella Souto de Moura

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVOS: Identificar as expectativas da equipe de enfermagem em relação à liderança do futuro chefe. MÉTODOS: Trata-se de pesquisa exploratória, descritiva, realizada em hospital universitário. Os dados foram coletados por meio de entrevistas semiestruturadas com 62 profissionais da área de enfermagem. Os depoimentos transcritos foram analisados de acordo com o referencial da análise de conteúdo. RESULTADOS: Da análise emergiram quatro categorias de expectativas: comportamento do futuro chefe, trabalho com a equipe de enfermagem, trabalho com outras equipes e ambiente de trabalho. Os resultados evidenciaram que a equipe de enfermagem preocupa-se com as habilidades e características do futuro chefe frente às atribuições nos serviços de saúde. CONCLUSÃO: As equipes de enfermagem esperam que os futuros chefes de enfermagem tenham habilidades para liderar uma equipe e proporcionar um ambiente favorável ao trabalho.OBJECTIVES: To identify the expectations of the nursing staff in relation to the leadership of a future manager. METHODS: This was an exploratory, descriptive research study, conducted in a university hospital. Data were collected by means of semi-structured interviews with 62 professionals in the field of nursing. The transcribed interviews were analyzed according to the reference of content analysis. RESULTS: Four categories of expectations emerged from the analysis: the behavior of the future manager, working with the nursing staff, working with other teams, and the work environment. The results showed that the nursing staff is concerned with the abilities and characteristics of the future manager facing the assignments in health services. CONCLUSION: The nursing staff expected that the future nursing managers would have the abilities for leading a team and providing a favorable work environment.

  1. Competencies within a professional clinical ladder: differences in understanding between nurse managers and staff nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knoche, Erin L; Meucci, Joanne H

    2015-01-01

    Clinical ladders provide a framework for professional nursing development and have shown increased personal and professional satisfaction. This article describes a standardized approach for clinical ladder implementation. Managers' and staff nurses' knowledge of the model must align for important stakeholders to perceive the clinical ladder as valuable. Understanding differences and perspectives can be useful as the basis for education and further clinical ladder refinement augmenting the potential for increased nursing satisfaction and professional development.

  2. PUBLICATION ACTIVITY AND ITS ROLE IN ASSESSMENT OF PROFESSIONAL ENGAGEMENT OF HEI ACADEMIC STAFF (RUSSIAN PRACTICES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. B. Ardashkin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the research is to analyze and summarize the Russian best practices of using the publication activity as a criterion to assess the professional activity of the academic staff; to identify the role of motivational factors as a method to manage and control the publication activity of the academic staff.Methods. The authors address the methodology of comprehensive research based on the method of document analysis, comparative analysis, and method of secondary use of sociological and psychological data.Results and scientific novelty concludes in presenting Russian and international best practices generalized on using the publication activity to assess the engagement of HEI (Higher Educational Institution academic staff; the most appropriate formats of using the publication activity as a criterion to assess the research component of the academic staff engagement are defined. Degree of reliability of this criterion is shown – its strengths and shortcomings. The conclusion is drawn on need of the essential changes in management of publication activity affecting both professional and motivational spheres of scientific and pedagogical staff. The most acceptable options of measurement of staff work efficiency of this category are formulated.Practical significance. The research outcomes can be the corpus for designing the assessment method for the professional engagement of the academic staff.

  3. From paperwork to parenting: experiences of professional staff in student support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Wendy C Y; Flynn, Eleanor; Mann, Rebecca; Woodward-Kron, Robyn

    2017-03-01

    For academic staff, responding to student concerns is an important responsibility. Professional staff, or non-academic staff who do administrative work in medical schools, are often the first to be approached by students, yet there is little research on how they manage student issues. Informed by the conceptual framework of emotional labour, we examined the experiences of professional staff, aiming to identify theoretical and practical insights for improving the provision of student support. We examined the scope of support provided, the impact of providing this support on staff and how these impacts can be managed. Professional staff at two medical schools were invited to participate in semi-structured qualitative interviews. Interviews were transcribed and independently analysed for emergent themes. Data analysis continued with purposive sampling for maximum variation until thematic saturation was reached. Findings were returned to participants in writing and via oral presentations for member checking and refinement. Twenty-two female staff from clinical, teaching and commercial backgrounds at nine urban and rural teaching sites were interviewed. Participants described providing support for diverse concerns, from routine requests to life-threatening emergencies. Four major themes emerged: firstly, all described roles consistent with emotional labour. Secondly, student support was regarded as informal work, and not well recognised or defined. Consequently, many drew upon their personal orientation to provide support. Finally, we identified both positive and negative personal impacts, including ongoing distress after critical events. Professional staff perform a range of student support work, leading to emotional, personal and work impacts. In turn, they need support, recognition and training in this essential but under-recognised role. Emotional labour offers a conceptual framework for understanding the gendered nature and impact of this work and how it may be

  4. . CONDITIONS AND DETERMINANTS OF THE ACADEMIC STAFF PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT IN THE MODERN SCHOOL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. L. Fomenko

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper reveals the research findings concerning a complicated process of academic staff formation in the secondary school. The main determinants of the process include the discrepancy between the actual development level of academic staff and the existing requirements of pedagogic society. The author denotes the main motives for academic staff development: moral and financial incentives for professional growth, new educational tasks, unsatisfactory social status of educational institution, etc; and identifies the complex of objective and subjective conditions positively affecting the given process. According to the author, the main priority should be given to the methodological provision of academic staff, integration of their activity, and stimulation of informational, methodical, and organizational channels of school activity. In conclusion, the paper considers the principles of life-long teacher training, corporate cooperation, partnership and solidarity, and discusses the technological structure of academic staff development, based on the competence model of education. 

  5. How mentors can influence the values, behaviours and attitudes of nursing staff through positive professional socialisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norman, Kay

    2015-12-01

    This article explores the concept and processes involved in professional socialisation and how mentors and nurse managers can help to foster positive aspects of this in their practice. Positive professional socialisation needs champions to instil fundamental professional values and behaviours in nursing staff, and managers need to support mentors to influence and lead the way in promoting standards of excellence in the nursing profession to assure public trust and confidence, and ultimately patient safety. The time out activities will ask you to consider and develop possible strategies to help support mentors and staff, and aim to encourage you to explore the potential benefits of positive professional socialisation for your team in delivering high quality patient care.

  6. A Coordinated Comprehensive Professional Development Training’s Effect on Summer Day Camp Staff Healthy Eating and Physical Activity Promoting Behaviors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weaver, R. Glenn; Beets, Michael W.; Saunders, Ruth P.; Beighle, Aaron

    2015-01-01

    Background The YMCA of USA recently adopted Healthy Eating and Physical Activity (HEPA) Standards for their summer-day-camps (SDCs). Standards call for staff to exhibit HEPA promoting behaviors while eliminating HEPA discouraging behaviors. No studies have evaluated training programs to influence policy specified staff behaviors and related changes in child activity in SDCs. Method Four YMCA summer-day-camps serving approximately 800 children per week participated in this no control group pre/post pilot study. Professional development training founded in the 5Ms (Mission, Model, Manage, Monitor, Maximize) and LET US Play principles (lines, elimination, team size, uninvolved staff/kids, and space, equipment and rules) was delivered to staff. Outcomes were staff promotion behaviors and child activity assessed via systematic observation instruments. Results Twelve of 17 HEPA staff behaviors changed in the appropriate direction from baseline to post-assessment with five behaviors reaching statistically significant changes. The percentage of girls and boys observed in moderate-to-vigorous-physical-activity increased from 15.3% to 18.3% (p > .05) and 17.9% to 21.2% whereas sedentary behavior decreased from 66.8% to 59.8% and 62.3% to 53.6%, respectively. Conclusion Evidence suggests that the professional development training designed to assist SDCs to meet the HEPA Standards can lead to important changes in staff behaviors and children’s physical activity. PMID:25368946

  7. Professional development status of teaching staff in a Ugandan public university

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kasule, George Wilson; Wesselink, Renate; Mulder, Martin

    2016-01-01

    A study was conducted to determine general professional development activities perceived to be important in enhancing university teaching staff’s job performance, and the extent to which teaching staff participate in these activities in Uganda. Data were collected through semi-structured

  8. Careers of Professional Staff in Australian and UK Universities: A Mixed Methods Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gander, Michelle

    2017-01-01

    This article confirms the reliability of a protean and boundaryless career attitudes scale, tested in a pilot study. Additionally, it summarises the results of this study into the career attitudes of professional staff in Australian and UK universities. A mixed methods approach was taken using a survey consisting of both closed questions on a…

  9. Incorporating Religiosity, Spirituality, and Mindfulness into the Professional Development of Residence Life Staff

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Monica Galloway; Sauerheber, Jill Duba; Dye, Lacretia; Hughey, Aaron W.

    2014-01-01

    Incorporating an understanding of religiosity and spirituality into the professional development of residence life staff can give them the knowledge and insights needed to successfully utilize students' already heightened awareness of their own religiosity, spirituality, and mindfulness, creating an environment that meets their emotional and…

  10. Part-Time Work and Advancement: A Study of Female Professional Staff in Australian Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Janis; Troup, Carolyn; Strachan, Glenda

    2017-01-01

    One focus of gender equity policies in universities has been the creation of "retention" part-time work for professional staff, which allows employees to move between full-time and part-time hours at their request. This paper examines whether such "good" part-time jobs can contribute to or at least not impede women's career…

  11. Professional Learning among Specialist Staff in Resourced Mainstream Schools for Pupils with ASD and SLI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bond, Caroline; Hebron, Judith; Oldfield, Jeremy

    2017-01-01

    Supporting pupils with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) in mainstream schools is a challenging task. This article proposes a professional development framework for educational psychologists (EPs) to consider when supporting the development of specialist ASD staff. The framework focuses on training content, educator characteristics and organisational…

  12. Role Stressors, Engagement and Work Behaviours: A Study of Higher Education Professional Staff

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curran, Tara M.; Prottas, David J.

    2017-01-01

    The study used data provided by 349 professional staff employees from 17 different US higher education institutions to assess aspects of their working conditions that could influence their own work engagement and the work-related behaviours of their colleagues. Relationships among three role stressors (role ambiguity, role conflict and role…

  13. New Developments in Transnational Education and the Challenges for Higher Education Professional Staff

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, Michelle; Barnett, Rebecca; Barrett, Heather

    2017-01-01

    Transnational education (TNE) is a fast moving area. The growth of TNE provision across the higher education (HE) sector has meant professional staff have developed considerable experience and knowledge in this field. However, the development of online and distance learning provision combined with the changing TNE landscape has given rise to new…

  14. Examining Variation in Hospice Visits by Professional Staff in the Last 2 Days of Life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teno, Joan M; Plotzke, Mike; Christian, Thomas; Gozalo, Pedro

    2016-03-01

    In the final days of life, symptoms are exacerbated and often families need both education and emotional support from hospice professional staff. The Medicare Hospice Benefit provides a per-diem payment with no requirements on the frequency of patient visits. To examine individual characteristics, hospice program, and geographic variation in hospice visits by professional staff during the last 2 days of life. This retrospective cohort study of 661 557 Medicare hospice beneficiaries included all patients who died in federal fiscal year 2014 (October 1, 2013-September 30, 2014) in hospice services while receiving routine home care in the last 2 days of life. Data analysis was conducted from March 9 to August 25, 2015. Medicare regulations require that hospice care centers report daily the frequency and duration of patient visits by professional staff, as well as the type of hospice staff who conduct these visits. We examined visit variation by hospice professional staff (physician, nursing staff, and social worker) during the last 2 days of life using a multivariable logistic model adjusting for decedent and hospice program characteristics. Of the 661 557 patients in the study, 81 478 (12.3%) received no professional staff visits in the last 2 days of life. State variation ranged from 590 of 15 399 patients (3.8%) in Wisconsin to 97 of 492 patients (19.7%) in Alaska, and hospice program interquartile variation ranged from 3.2% (25th percentile) to 19.5% (75th percentile). Black patients were less likely to have any visits than were white patients (7352 of 48 221 [15.2%] vs 70 365 of 585 377 [12.0%]; adjusted odds ratio, 1.30; 95% CI, 1.24-1.37). Those dying in a nursing home were 1.74 times less likely to have any visits than those dying at home (30 880 of 186 649 [16.5%] vs 40 973 of 386 654 [10.6%]; 95% CI, 1.62-1.88). Those dying on a Sunday were 3.35 times less likely to have a visit compared with persons dying on a Tuesday (19 519 of 95 979 [20.3%] vs 6784 of 92

  15. Days individual equipment of protection and professional risks; Equipements de protection individuelle et risques professionnelles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2007-07-01

    The personal protection equipment is studied in the legal way (legal liabilities, certification, European texts), technical way (ergonomics, painfulness of ventilated equipment wearing, reliability of a respirable air line, protection gloves against the chemical risk, exposure to nano particulates, working in hot area), human factors (hostile area and emotion management), studies on personal equipment such evaluation, efficiency, conception of new equipment, physiological tolerance, limit of use, and some general safety studies on the working places. (N.C.)

  16. Staff experiences of providing maternity services in rural southern Tanzania - a focus on equipment, drug and supply issues

    OpenAIRE

    Penfold, S.; Shamba, D; C Hanson; Jaribu, J; Manzi, F.; T Marchant; Tanner, M; Ramsey, K.; SCHELLENBERG, D.; Schellenberg, JA

    2013-01-01

    Background The poor maintenance of equipment and inadequate supplies of drugs and other items contribute to the low quality of maternity services often found in rural settings in low- and middle-income countries, and raise the risk of adverse patient outcomes through delaying care provision. We aim to describe staff experiences of providing maternal and neonatal care in rural health facilities in Southern Tanzania, focusing on issues related to equipment, drugs and supplies. Methods Focus gro...

  17. Exploring the Contribution of Professional Staff to Student Outcomes: A Comparative Study of Australian and UK Case Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Carroll; Regan, Julie-Anne

    2016-01-01

    This paper reports on the second stage of a comparative study between two higher education institutions: one in Australia and the other in the United Kingdom, which explored the contributions of professional staff to student outcomes. The first stage acted as a scoping exercise to ascertain how the contributions of professional staff to student…

  18. Estimation of the parameters of quality control test of professional competence of staff

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oleksandra Bakanova

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: to develop a method for estimating the reliability of the control of functional competencies of staff with limited test sample. Material and Methods: statistical process control, sampling by attributes. Results: the dependence of the reliability of the sampling of the sample size and the population of test questions, the control plan, methodical error sampling with a given probability. Conclusions: the proposed method of selecting control plan that allows correct (with a given probability decision criterion to choose the implementation of process control professional competencies of staff with limited test sample.

  19. Concussion knowledge and management practices among coaches and medical staff in Irish professional rugby teams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraas, M R; Coughlan, G F; Hart, E C; McCarthy, C

    2015-06-01

    Self-reported concussion rates among U-20 and elite rugby union players in Ireland are 45-48%. Half of these injuries go unreported. Accurate knowledge of concussion signs and symptoms and appropriate management practices among coaches and medical staff is important to improve the welfare of players. Examine concussion knowledge among coaches, and management techniques among medical staff of professional Irish rugby teams. Surveys were administered to 11 coaches and 12 medical staff at the end of the 2010-2011 season. Coaches demonstrated an accurate knowledge of concussion with a good understanding of concussion-related symptoms. Medical staff reported using a variety of methods for assessing concussion and making return-to-play decisions. Reliance on subjective clinical methods was evident, with less reliance on objective postural stability performance. Overall, the coaches in this investigation have accurate knowledge of concussion and medical staff use effective techniques for managing this injury. On-going education is needed to assist coaches in identifying concussion signs and symptoms. It is recommended that medical staff increase their reliance on objective methods for assessment and return-to-play decision making.

  20. MANAGEMENT TECHNOLOGY OF PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT OF STAFF IN MEDICAL ORGANIZA TIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. A. Revskaia

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The article analyzes the mechanisms and technology management personnel professionalization of medical organizations. The question is now becoming even more relevant within the health care sector optimization, the main purpose of which is claimed to improve the quality of health care by improving the efficiency of health care organizations and their personnel, including the availability of physicians and medical staff, their skills and professionalism. The problems of improving the technology of postgraduate education of doctors examined.

  1. THE ROLE OF SUPPORT GROUPS IN THE COOPERATION BETWEEN PARENTS OF PEOPLE WITH INTELLECTUAL DISABILITIES AND PROFESSIONAL STAFF

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Metka NOVAK

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: One of the ways of building and developing a better cooperative relationship between parents of people with severe and profound intellectual disabilities and professional staff is the inclusion of parents in support groups for parents and staff in support groups for staff. Goal: To examine the correlation of the level of cooperative relationship between the parents of people with severe and profound intellectual disabilities and professional staff with the inclusion of parents in support groups for parents and staff in support groups for staff. Methodology: Respondents: parents (296 of people with severe and profound learning disabilities and staff (298 in five centres across Slovenia; Methods: descriptive statistics, test of homogeneity, the rankit method, one-way analysis of variance; Procedures: survey questionnaires for parents and staff. The data was processed using SPSS software for personal computers. Results: The difference between the variances of the groups (parent found is statistically significant (F = 6.16; p = 0.01. Staff included in support groups have a significantly lower level of cooperative relationship with parents (f=10; M = - 0.12 than staff not included in these groups (f = 191; M = 0.04. Conclusion:In contrast to theoretical findings the results indicated less successful cooperation for professional staff included in support groups. The results furthermore did not confirm any differences in the cooperative relationship of parents included in support groups and those who are not. We suggest an in-depth analysis of the workings of support groups.

  2. Awareness of biomedical waste management among dental professionals and auxiliary staff in Amritsar, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narang, Ramandeep S; Manchanda, Adesh; Singh, Simarpreet; Verma, Nitin; Padda, Sarfaraz

    2012-12-01

    The aim of this study was to determine awareness of biomedical waste (BMW) management policies and practices among dental professionals and auxiliary staff in a dental hospital/clinics in Amritsar, India, to inform the development of future policies for effective implementation of BMW rules. The study involved 160 staff members at the Amritsar hospital/clinics (80 dentists and 80 auxiliary staff) to whom a questionnaire was distributed regarding policies, practices and awareness relating to BMW. The questionnaire was first piloted. Completed questionnaires were returned anonymously. The resulting data were statistically tested using the chi-square test for differences between the dentists and auxiliary staff. In respect of BMW management policies, there was a highly significant difference in the responses of the dentists, whose answers suggested far greater knowledge than that of the auxiliaries (Pmanagement practices, the dentists were significantly more aware (Pwaste collection in the hospital and the disposal of various items into different colour-coded bags. As for employee education/awareness, there was a significant difference (Pmanagement among dental auxiliary staff in the dental hospital/clinics in Amritsar and a lack of awareness of some aspects among dentists who work in the hospital/clinics. The results provide the hospital authorities with data upon which they can develop a strategy for improving BMW management.

  3. Professional burnout, stress and job satisfaction of nursing staff at a university hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Portero de la Cruz

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: to describe the social and work characteristics of the nursing staff at a tertiary hospital in the Public Health Service of Andalucía, to assess the degree of professional professional burnout and job satisfaction of those professionals and to study the possible relation between the professional burnout variables and the stress and job satisfaction levels on the one hand and social and employment variables on the other.METHOD: descriptive and cross-sectional study in a sample of 258 baccalaureate and auxiliary nurses. As research instruments, an original and specific questionnaire was used to collect social and employment variables, the Maslach Burnout Inventory, the Nursing Stress Scale and the Font-Roja questionnaire. Descriptive, inferential statistics and multivariate analysis were applied.RESULTS: average scores were found for professional stress and satisfaction, corresponding to 44,23 and 65,46 points, respectively. As regards professional burnout, an average score was found on the emotional exhaustion subscale; a high score for depersonalization and a low score for professional accomplishment. Studies are needed to identify the scores on these subscales in health organizations and to produce knowledge on their interrelations.

  4. Professional Ethics and Organizational Commitment Among the Education Department Staff of Tabriz University of Medical Sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Imani

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Concepts such as organizational commitment and employees’ and managers’ ethics provide decision-makers and policy makers with potentially useful information which can result in increasing organizational efficiency and effectiveness. This study aimed to explore the relationship between professional ethics and organizational commitment among the staff working in the education departments of Tabriz University of Medical Sciences. Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted in 2015. The study population consisted of all staff working as educational experts in the education departments of Tabriz University of Medical Sciences (N = 65. Data collection instruments used in this study were two standard questionnaires on professional ethics and organizational commitment. SPSS software version 21 was used to analyze the data. Results: According to the results, mean scores obtained for professional ethics and organizational commitment were (91.57± 9.13 (95% CI, 89.23-93.91 and (64.89 ± 10.37 (95% CI, 62.2367.54, respectively. A significant relationship was observed between professional ethics and organizational commitment among the educational experts working in Tabriz University of Medical Sciences (correlation coefficient = 0.405 (P = 0.001 (at 95% confidence level. Furthermore, there was a significant relationship between professional ethics and work experience (P = 0.043. The highest level of professional ethics observed was associated with those participants having a work experience of ranging from 6 to 10 years. Individuals with fulltime employment scored the highest in organizational commitment. Conclusion: Educational experts possessed a high level of professional ethics. The finding provides the grounds for promoting organizational commitment, which will lead to higher levels of organizational effectiveness.

  5. CORELATION BETWEEN TIME COMPETENCE OF THE CHILD CARE STAFF AND THEIR PROFESSIONAL BURNOUT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga Viktorovna Kuzmin

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the results of the empirical research into correlation between the time competence indices of child care staff and their professional burnout; the article also addresses the notion of time competence and gives its characteristics. We have also confirmed the hypothesis that the reduction of professional and personal achievements contribute to recognition of the fact that it is vital to organize your time, to prioritize and to schedule, it is also crucial to increase self-organization that manifests itself in the in the desire to set goals on the basis of situation analysis, to establish self-control and performance correction.    The research results will help psychologists prevent professional burnout by means of time consciousness awareness. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.12731/2218-7405-2013-7-4

  6. Ergonomia e as atividades ocupacionais da equipe de enfermagem Ergonomics and the occupacional activities of the nursing staff

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neusa Maria Costa Alexandre

    1998-04-01

    Full Text Available Esse trabalho discute determinadas condições ergonômicas do trabalho que causam lesões no sistema músculo-esquelético da coluna vertebral, relacionando-as com as atividades ocupacionais da equipe de enfermagem.This paper discusses some of the ergonomics conditions that contribute to the development of musculoskeletal disorders of the vertebral column and relates these conditions to the occupational activities of the nursing staff.

  7. Using Computer-Based Continuing Professional Education of Training Staff to Develop Small- and Medium-Sized Enterprises in Thailand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sooraksa, Nanta

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes a career development program for staff involved in providing training for small- and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) in Thailand. Most of these staff were professional vocational teachers in schools. The program uses information communication technology (ICT), and its main objective is to teach Moodle software as a tool for…

  8. The synergy professional practice model and its patient characteristics tool: a staff empowerment strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacPhee, Maura; Wardrop, Andrea; Campbell, Cheryl; Wejr, Patricia

    2011-10-01

    Nurse leaders can positively influence practice environments through a number of empowerment strategies, among them professional practice models. These models encompass the philosophy, structures and processes that support nurses' control over their practice and their voice within healthcare organizations. Nurse-driven professional practice models can serve as a framework for collaborative decision-making among nursing and other staff. This paper describes a provincewide pilot project in which eight nurse-led project teams in four healthcare sectors worked with the synergy professional practice model and its patient characteristics tool. The teams learned how the model and tool can be used to classify patients' acuity levels and make staffing assignments based on a "best fit" between patient needs and staff competencies. The patient characteristics tool scores patients' acuities on eight characteristics such as stability, vulnerability and resource availability. This tool can be used to make real-time patient assessments. Other potential applications for the model and tool are presented, such as care planning, team-building and determining appropriate staffing levels. Our pilot project evidence suggests that the synergy model and its patient characteristics tool may be an empowerment strategy that nursing leaders can use to enhance their practice environments.

  9. Establishment of Experimental Equipment for Training of Professionals in the Nuclear Radiation Measurement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahn, S. K.; Seo, K. W.; Joo, Y. C.; Kim, I. C.; Woo, C. K.; Yoo, B. H. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-09-15

    The main purpose of this project is to establish experimental equipment for training of professionals and students in the field of radiation measurement, and settle the foundation for the advanced education system and program. The priority for the experimental equipment had been deduced by reviewing of the Nuclear Training and Education Center of KAERI and other country's training courses. Equipment for training of radiation professionals are High-Purity Germanium spectroscopic systems, alpha analyzers, and hand-held gamma/neutron inspector systems. For the basic experiments, electric personal dosimeters and a reader, radiation survey meters, and various alpha, beta and gamma radiation isotopes have been equipped. Some old or disused equipment and devices were disposed and re-arranged, and a new experiment lab had been settled for gamma spectroscopy. Along with the preparation of equipment, 14 experimental modules have been selected for practical and essential experiments training to professionals from industries, universities and research organizations. Among the modules, 7 important experiment notes had been prepared in Korea and also in English. As a consequence, these advanced radiation experimental setting would be a basis to cooperate with IAEA or other countries for international training courses. These activities would be a foundation for our contribution to the international nuclear society and for improving our nuclear competitiveness. The experimental equipment and application notes developed in this study will be used also by other training institutes and educational organizations through introducing and encouraging to use them to the nuclear society.

  10. Closing an open psychiatric ward: organizational change and its effect on staff uncertainty, self-efficacy, and professional functioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melnikov, Semyon; Shor, Razya; Kigli-Shemesh, Ronit; Gun Usishkin, Monica; Kagan, Ilya

    2013-04-01

    Converting an open psychiatric ward to a closed one can be threatening and stressful for the medical and nursing staff involved. This study describes the effects of this change, in particular the before-after correlation among self-efficacy, professional functioning, and uncertainty. Forty-four staff participated, completing pre-/poststructured questionnaires. Uncertainty was higher before the conversion than after the conversion. Professional functioning declined after the conversion. Self-efficacy was positively correlated with pre- and postconversion functioning, but negatively correlated with postconversion uncertainty. It is important to prepare staff for this significant organizational change. Suggestions for prechange interventions are offered. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. 19 CFR 10.36 - Commercial travelers' samples; professional equipment and tools of trade; theatrical effects and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... Commercial travelers' samples; professional equipment and tools of trade; theatrical effects and other... extension. (d) The privilege of clearance of commercial travelers' samples or professional equipment, tools... 19 Customs Duties 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Commercial travelers' samples; professional...

  12. The Professional Development Needs of Staff in Wales on Behaviour Management and Attendance: Findings from the NBAR Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, Ken

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents the evidence collected for the National Behaviour and Attendance Review (NBAR) in Wales on the professional development needs of staff on behaviour management and school attendance. These data were collected in two stages between 2006 and 2008. At Stage 1, data were collected from four pre-selected professional focus groups who…

  13. Guidelines for Professional Training of Junior Medical Staff in the Context of European Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sosnova Myroslava

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with outlining guidelines for improving professional training of junior medical staff based on European experience. Consequently, guidelines and recommendations on enhancing the efficiency of medical education in general and junior medical specialists’ professional training, in particular, published by European Union of Medical Specialists, General Medical Council, World Federation for Medical Education have been studied, analyzed, justified and presented in the paper. According to European Union of Medical Specialists it has been concluded that general aspects of medical specialists’ training are based on the selection process for the access to the medical specialists’ training, duration of training, common trunk, training program and quality assurance; requirements for training institutions involve recognition, size, quality assurance and teaching infructructure; requirements for instructors encompass qualification, training program, teacher/trainee ratio; requirements for trainees cover experience, language and logbook. In addition, the components that define the quality of junior medical specialists’ professional training based on N. Novosolova’s ideas have been indicated. Finally, based on the positive aspects of the guidelines analyzed the appropriate ones that, in our opinion, may be of use in Ukraine, have been presented.

  14. Medical equipment management

    CERN Document Server

    Willson, Keith; Tabakov, Slavik

    2013-01-01

    Know What to Expect When Managing Medical Equipment and Healthcare Technology in Your Organization As medical technology in clinical care becomes more complex, clinical professionals and support staff must know how to keep patients safe and equipment working in the clinical environment. Accessible to all healthcare professionals and managers, Medical Equipment Management presents an integrated approach to managing medical equipment in healthcare organizations. The book explains the underlying principles and requirements and raises awareness of what needs to be done and what questions to ask. I

  15. Oral health in pregnancy: educational needs of dental professionals and office staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kloetzel, Megan K; Huebner, Colleen E; Milgrom, Peter; Littell, Christopher T; Eggertsson, Hafsteinn

    2012-01-01

    Dental care during pregnancy is important for pregnant women and their children. Comprehensive guidelines for the provision of dental services for pregnant patients were published in 2006, but there is relatively little information about their use in actual practice. The aim of this study was to examine differences in knowledge and attitudes regarding dental care in pregnancy among dentists, dental hygienists, dental assistants, and nonclinical office staff. A secondary aim was to identify sources of influence on attitudes and knowledge regarding the guidelines. A survey was used to collect information from 766 employees of a Dental Care Organization based in Oregon; responses from 546 were included in the analyses reported here. Statistically significant differences in knowledge were found among the professional-role groups. Dentists and hygienists consistently answered more items correctly than did other respondents. Within all professional-role groups, knowledge gaps existed and were most pronounced regarding provision of routine and emergency services. Positive perceptions of providing dental care during pregnancy were associated with higher knowledge scores (z = 4.16, P office personnel are needed to promote the diffusion of current evidence-based guidelines for dental care during pregnancy. © 2012 American Association of Public Health Dentistry.

  16. Development of Personal Protection Equipment for Medical Staff: Case of Dental Surgeon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tran Thi Anh Dao

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available During daily oral health care, dental surgeons are in contact with numerous potentially infectious germs from patients’ saliva and blood. Appropriate personal protection equipment should be chosen to mitigate these risks, but the garment must also be comfortable and not hamper activities. This paper presents our research work on optimised working clothing for dentists and discusses some important points in the functional design. Following a consumer study on how users wear the garment and what are their expectations, three main functions were investigated: protection, ergonomics and thermal comfort. Aesthetic appearance was also taken into consideration as it is necessary that the wearer should feel appropriately and attractively dressed in the context of health care.

  17. Professional burnout, stress and job satisfaction of nursing staff at a university hospital

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Portero de la Cruz, Silvia; Vaquero Abellán, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    ... of Andalucía, to assess the degree of professional professional burnout and job satisfaction of those professionals and to study the possible relation between the professional burnout variables and the stress...

  18. Musculoskeletal injuries among hospital patient care staff before and after implementation of patient lift and transfer equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoenfisch, Ashley L; Lipscomb, Hester J; Pompeii, Lisa A; Myers, Douglas J; Dement, John M

    2013-01-01

    Using an observational research design and robust surveillance data, we evaluated rates of musculoskeletal (MS) injuries, days away from work, and restricted work days among patient care staff at a medical center and community hospital in the United States over 13 years, during which time a "minimal manual lift" policy and mechanical lift equipment were implemented. Workers' compensation claims data were linked to human resources data to define outcomes of interest and person-time at risk to calculate rates. Poisson and negative binomial regression with lagging were used to compare outcome rates in different windows of time surrounding the intervention. Patterns of MS injuries associated with patient-handling were contrasted to patterns of other MS injuries that would not be affected by the use of mechanical lift equipment. At the medical center, no change in the patient-handling MS injury rate followed the intervention. A 44% decrease was observed at the community hospital. At both hospitals, the rate of days away declined immediately - before it was reasonable for the intervention to have been adopted. Institutional-level changes at the time of the intervention likely influenced observed results with findings only partially consistent with an intervention effect. Observational studies can be useful in assessing effectiveness of safety interventions in complex work environments. Such studies should consider the process of intervention implementation, the time needed for intervention adoption, and the dynamic nature of work environments.

  19. Financial impact of nursing professionals staff required in an Intensive Care Unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araújo, Thamiris Ricci de; Menegueti, Mayra Gonçalves; Auxiliadora-Martins, Maria; Castilho, Valéria; Chaves, Lucieli Dias Pedreschi; Laus, Ana Maria

    2016-11-21

    to calculate the cost of the average time of nursing care spent and required by patients in the Intensive Care Unit (ICU) and the financial expense for the right dimension of staff of nursing professionals. a descriptive, quantitative research, using the case study method, developed in adult ICU patients. We used the workload index - Nursing Activities Score; the average care time spent and required and the amount of professionals required were calculated using equations and from these data, and from the salary composition of professionals and contractual monthly time values, calculated the cost of direct labor of nursing. the monthly cost of the average quantity of available professionals was US$ 35,763.12, corresponding to 29.6 professionals, and the required staff for 24 hours of care is 42.2 nurses, with a monthly cost of US$ 50,995.44. the numerical gap of nursing professionals was 30% and the monthly financial expense for adaptation of the structure is US$ 15,232.32, which corresponds to an increase of 42.59% in the amounts currently paid by the institution. calcular o custo do tempo médio de assistência de enfermagem despendido e requerido pelos pacientes internados em Unidade de Terapia Intensiva (UTI) e o dispêndio financeiro para adequação do quadro de profissionais de enfermagem. pesquisa descritiva, quantitativa, na modalidade de estudo de caso, desenvolvida na UTI de pacientes adultos. Utilizou-se o índice de carga de trabalho - Nursing Activities Score; o tempo médio de assistência despendido, requerido e o quantitativo de profissionais requerido foram calculados por meio de equações e, a partir desses dados, e de valores da composição salarial dos profissionais e tempo mensal contratual, calculou-se o custo da mão de obra direta de enfermagem. o custo mensal do quantitativo médio de profissionais disponível foi de US$ 35.763,12, correspondendo a 29,6 profissionais, e o requerido para 24 horas de cuidado é de 42,2 profissionais de

  20. Relacionamento multiprofissional X criança X acompanhante: desafio para a equipe Multiprofessional relationship X child X responsible: challenge to the staff

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Paula Dias França Guareschi

    1997-12-01

    Full Text Available O trabalho em questão enfoca a importância do relacionamento existente entre a, equipe multiprofissional, a criança hospitalizada e o acompanhante. As autoras identificam e comentam os pontos positivos e negativos das unidades pediátricas estudadas, assim como as orientações fornecidas pela equipe e as assimiladas pelas crianças e acompanhantes.This work focus the importance of the relationship existent between the multiprofessional staff, the hospitalized child and the responsible. The authors identify and comment about the positive and negative points of the pediatric units studied, as well as the orientations given by the staff and assimilated by the children and responsibles. Multiprofessional relationship X child X responsible: challenge to the staff.

  1. Association between addiction treatment staff professional and educational levels and perceptions of organizational climate and resources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krull, Ivy; Lundgren, Lena; Beltrame, Clelia

    2014-01-01

    Research studies have identified addiction treatment staff who have higher levels of education as having more positive attitudes about evidence-based treatment practices, science-based training, and the usefulness of evidence-based practices. This study examined associations between addiction treatment staff level of education and their perceptions of 3 measures of organizational change: organizational stress, training resources and staffing resources in their treatment unit. The sample included 588 clinical staff from community-based substance abuse treatment organizations who received Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) funding (2003-2008) to implement evidence-based practices (EBPs). Bivariate analysis and regression modeling methods examined the relationship between staff education level (no high school education, high school education, some college, associate's degree, bachelor's degree, master's degree, doctoral degree, and other type of degree such as medical assistant, registered nurse [RN], or postdoctoral) and attitudes about organizational climate (stress), training resources, and staffing resources while controlling for staff and treatment unit characteristics. Multivariable models identified staff with lower levels of education as having significantly more positive attitudes about their unit's organizational capacity. These results contradict findings that addiction treatment staff with higher levels of education work in units with greater levels of organizational readiness for change. It cannot be inferred that higher levels of education among treatment staff is necessarily associated with high levels of organizational readiness for change.

  2. Staff Peer Relationships and the Socialization Process of New Professionals: A Quantitative Investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strayhorn, Terrell L.

    2009-01-01

    Prior research on student affairs professionals has focused largely on the nature of student affairs work with most attention given to mid- and senior-level administrators. Thus, relatively little is known about new professionals and their socialization to the student affairs profession. Based on a multivariate analysis of survey data from a…

  3. Dealing with professional misconduct by colleagues in home care: a survey among nursing staff.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maurits, E.E.M.; Veer, A.J.E. de; Groenewegen, P.P.; Francke, A.L.

    2016-01-01

    Background<\\strong> Professional misconduct in healthcare, a (generally) lasting situation in which patients are at risk or actually harmed, can jeopardise the health and well-being of patients and the quality of teamwork. Two types of professional misconduct can be distinguished: misconduct

  4. Dealing with professional misconduct by colleagues in home care : A nationwide survey among nursing staff

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maurits, Erica E M; de Veer, Anke J E; Groenewegen, Peter P.; Francke, Anneke L.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Professional misconduct in healthcare, a (generally) lasting situation in which patients are at risk or actually harmed, can jeopardise the health and well-being of patients and the quality of teamwork. Two types of professional misconduct can be distinguished: misconduct associated with

  5. Is It Bullying or Sexual Harassment? Knowledge, Attitudes, and Professional Development Experiences of Middle School Staff

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charmaraman, Linda; Jones, Ashleigh E.; Stein, Nan; Espelage, Dorothy L.

    2013-01-01

    Background: This study fills a gap in the literature by examining how school staff members view bullying and sexual harassment and their role in preventing both. Given recent legislation, increasingly more attention is paid to bully prevention; however, student-on-student sexual harassment is less addressed. Methods: Four focus groups were…

  6. EQUIP training the trainers: an evaluation of a training programme for service users and carers involved in training mental health professionals in user-involved care planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraser, C; Grundy, A; Meade, O; Callaghan, P; Lovell, K

    2017-08-01

    WHAT IS KNOWN ON THE SUBJECT?: UK NHS policy highlights the importance of user and carer involvement in health professional training. We know little about service user and carer motivations and experiences of accessing training courses for delivering training to health professionals and how well such courses prepare them for delivering training to healthcare professionals. 'Involvement' in training has often been tokenistic and too narrowly focused on preregistration courses. There is limited data on how best to prepare and support potential service user and carer trainers. WHAT DOES THIS PAPER ADD TO EXISTING KNOWLEDGE?: This study adds to the international literature by highlighting service user and carer motivations for accessing a training course for delivering training to health professionals. Service users and carers wanted to gain new skills and confidence in presentation/facilitation as well as to make a difference to healthcare practice. We also learned that service users desired different levels of involvement in training facilitation - some wanted to take a more active role than others. A one-size-fits-all approach is not always appropriate. Encountering resistance from staff in training was a previously unidentified challenge to service user and carers' experience of delivering training in practice and is a key challenge for trainers to address in future. Professional training involvement can be enhanced via specialist training such as the EQUIP training the trainers programme evaluated here. WHAT ARE THE IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE?: When training service users and carers to deliver training to mental health professionals, it is important that service users are equipped to deal with resistance from staff. It is important that service user and carer roles are negotiated and agreed prior to delivering training to healthcare professionals to accommodate individual preferences and allay anxieties. Training for service users and carers must be offered

  7. The feeling of family success and the professional burnout syndrome among penitentiary staff (a draft of a research project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnieszka Barczykowska

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Mutual relations between family and professional life have been for many years one of the most important fields of research in economics, sociology and, more and more often, pedagogy, which focuses on searching for factors protecting from the development of burnout syndrome and aims at increasing the effectiveness of pedagogic efforts. Due to the above, this article, being a draft of a research project, is dedicated to the facilitating effect of family life on professional life of the penitentiary staff. The authors take a stance that the feeling of satisfaction from family life can not only significantly neutralize the feeling of failure but, primarily, contribute to the search for more and more innovative forms of work.

  8. Developing nurse leaders: a program enhancing staff nurse leadership skills and professionalism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abraham, Pauline J

    2011-01-01

    This study aims to determine whether participation in the Nursing Leadership Perspectives Program (NLPP) at Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota, produced a change in leadership skills, increased professional activities, leadership promotion, and retention rates of participants. The NLPP is an educational program designed to enhance leadership skills and promote professionalism of registered nurses. The 6-month program provides participants with theoretical knowledge, core competencies, and opportunities to practice application of leadership skills. Outcome metrics were collected from registered nurses who completed the program (n = 15). Data analysis included descriptive and nonparametric methods. Participants reported statistically significant changes in their leadership skills after participation in the program (P = .007) on the Leadership Practices Inventory. Changes in professional behavior were also statistically significant as rated by the Nursing Activity Scale (P = .001). Participants demonstrated a change in leadership skills and professional behavior following the program.

  9. The effect of continuing professional education on perioperative nurses' relationships with medical staff: findings from a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tame, Susan L

    2013-04-01

    To report perceived changes to UK perioperative nurses' relationships with medical staff following periods of formal, university-based study. Continuing professional development is considered important for nursing internationally; however, practice changes may not result following formal study. The literature did not describe perioperative nurses' experiences of formal study, and it was believed differences may exist due to hierarchical interprofessional relationships in the operating theatre. Descriptive, qualitative. Unstructured interviews (N=23) were conducted between 2006-2007 with a purposive sample of perioperative nurses who had recent experience of continuing professional education. All participants were employed by one National Health Service Trust in the North of England, UK. Audio-taped interviews were transcribed fully into the ethnograph computer-assisted qualitative data analysis programme and data coded and analysed to identify themes. Findings.  The findings indicated that whilst continuing professional education did not have a direct impact on practice, development of increased knowledge and confidence facilitated participants' collaboration with and questioning of medical colleagues. Such increased interprofessional collaboration was attributed to indirectly enhancing patient care. Continuing professional education appeared to lead to intrinsic changes to practitioners rather than direct behavioural change. Nurses' increased knowledge and confidence affected the balance of power in the doctor-nurse relationship in British perioperative environments. This paper is of significance to perioperative nursing and may be transferable to other areas of care. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  10. Estimation of the parameters of quality control test of professional competence of staff

    OpenAIRE

    Oleksandra Bakanova; Andriy Yegorov; Tetiana Zakhvatova; Klavdiia Nekrasova

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: to develop a method for estimating the reliability of the control of functional competencies of staff with limited test sample. Material and Methods: statistical process control, sampling by attributes. Results: the dependence of the reliability of the sampling of the sample size and the population of test questions, the control plan, methodical error sampling with a given probability. Conclusions: the proposed method of selecting control plan that allows correct (with a given probab...

  11. Resilience and Professional Quality of Life in Staff Working with People with Intellectual Disabilities and Offending Behavior in Community Based and Institutional Settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Søndenaa, Erik; Lauvrud, Christian; Sandvik, Marita; Nonstad, Kåre; Whittington, Richard

    2013-01-01

    Staff in forensic services for people with intellectual disabilities (ID) are expected to deal with a wide range of emotional challenges when providing care. The potential impact of this demanding work has not been systematically explored previously. This article explores the professional quality of life (QoL) and the resilience (hardiness) of the staff in this setting. The Professional QoL questionnaire and the Disposional Resilience Scale were completed by staff (n=85, 80% response rate) in the Norwegian forensic service for ID offenders. Responses from staff working in institutional settings were compared to those from staff in local community services. Staff in the local community services had higher resilience scores compared to the staff in the institutional setting, (t=2.19; P<0.05). However in the other QoL and resilience domains there were no differences between the staff in the two settings. The greater sense of resilient control among community staff may be a function of both the number of service users they work with and the institutional demands they face. Even though these participants worked with relatively high risk clients, they did not report significantly impaired quality of life compared to other occupations. PMID:26973892

  12. Academic Staff's Apathy towards Formal Professional Development Programmes at North West University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makunye, M. M.; Pelser, T. G.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore reasons for academics' apathy towards formal professional development programmes at North-West University. The research design was essentially descriptive, employing both qualitative and quantitative research techniques to gather and analyse data. Three techniques, namely, questionnaire surveys, analysis of…

  13. Measuring professional satisfaction and nursing workload among nursing staff at a Greek Coronary Care Unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Gouzou

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective To explore potential associations between nursing workload and professional satisfaction among nursing personnel (NP in Greek Coronary Care Units (CCUs. Method A cross-sectional study was performed involving 66 members of the NP employed in 6 randomly selected Greek CCUs. Job satisfaction was assessed by the IWS and nursing workload by NAS, CNIS and TISS-28. Results The response rate was 77.6%. The reliability of the IWS was α=0.78 and the mean score 10.7 (±2.1, scale range: 0.5-39.7. The most highly valued component of satisfaction was “Pay”, followed by “Task requirements”, “Interaction”, “Professional status”, “Organizational policies” and “Autonomy”. NAS, CNIS and TISS-28 were negatively correlated (p≤0.04 with the following work components: “Autonomy”, “Professional status”, “Interaction” and “Task requirements”. Night shift work independently predicted the score of IWS. Conclusion The findings show low levels of job satisfaction, which are related with nursing workload and influenced by rotating shifts.

  14. Staff experiences of providing maternity services in rural southern Tanzania - a focus on equipment, drug and supply issues

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Penfold, Suzanne; Shamba, Donat; Hanson, Claudia; Jaribu, Jennie; Manzi, Fatuma; Marchant, Tanya; Tanner, Marcel; Ramsey, Kate; Schellenberg, David; Schellenberg, Joanna Armstrong

    2013-01-01

    The poor maintenance of equipment and inadequate supplies of drugs and other items contribute to the low quality of maternity services often found in rural settings in low- and middle-income countries...

  15. Staff's normative attitudes towards coercion: the role of moral doubt and professional context-a cross-sectional survey study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molewijk, Bert; Kok, Almar; Husum, Tonje; Pedersen, Reidar; Aasland, Olaf

    2017-05-25

    The use of coercion is morally problematic and requires an ongoing critical reflection. We wondered if not knowing or being uncertain whether coercion is morally right or justified (i.e. experiencing moral doubt) is related to professionals' normative attitudes regarding the use of coercion. This paper describes an explorative statistical analysis based on a cross-sectional survey across seven wards in three Norwegian mental health care institutions. Descriptive analyses showed that in general the 379 respondents a) were not so sure whether coercion should be seen as offending, b) agreed with the viewpoint that coercion is needed for care and security, and c) slightly disagreed that coercion could be seen as treatment. Staff did not report high rates of moral doubt related to the use of coercion, although most of them agreed there will never be a single answer to the question 'What is the right thing to do?'. Bivariate analyses showed that the more they experienced general moral doubt and relative doubt, the more one thought that coercion is offending. Especially psychologists were critical towards coercion. We found significant differences among ward types. Respondents with decisional responsibility for coercion and leadership responsibility saw coercion less as treatment. Frequent experience with coercion was related to seeing coercion more as care and security. This study showed that experiencing moral doubt is related to some one's normative attitude towards coercion. Future research could investigate whether moral case deliberation increases professionals' experience of moral doubt and whether this will evoke more critical thinking and increase staff's curiosity for alternatives to coercion.

  16. Evaluating staff and student experiences of multidisciplinary continuous professional development via distance-learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurst, J

    2005-01-01

    Continuous professional development (CPD) in caring for people with kidney disease is limited in some regions of the UK and within Europe generally. This is compounded for all by limited resources for course fees and the lack of study leave granted away from the clinical area for full-time courses. This is set against recommendations from National and European governments, and renal clinical guidelines concerning expectations of CPD and clinical competency levels of renal nurses (1-4). In the past renal practitioners have been trained in all areas of the renal speciality by Schools of Nursing linked to renal units based in large teaching hospitals. However, more recent changes in the structure of Health Care provision have led in some instances to a rationalising of post registration education delivery.

  17. THEORY AND PRACTICE OF RHYTHM IN THE PROFESSIONAL TRAINING SYSTEM FOR ATHLETES AND TEACHING STAFF

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga Aftimichuk

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Background . Rhythm is important for the implementation of all processes as in nature and in living organisms. It organizes motor human activity making it more productive and rational. On teaching working and sports motions the process of the impellent work correct rhythm assimilation plays an important role because it determines the movement performance optimum that is shown in its automation process reduction. As a result, man’s physical strength and nervous energy are saved. Rhythm category acquires a special status for the physical training specialist. All his activity including the motor component depends on the rhythm. The aim of the research is to study the physiology of rhythm and justify the more efficient training process for future teachers and coaches. Methods . The following theoretical research methods were used: the abstract and axiomatic methods, analysis and synthesis, induction and deduction, idealization, comparison and generalization. Results. As a result of study of materials from the natural sciences, numerology, psychology, music, cybernetics, synergetic, physiology, was found that the change of different states, as in nature and in living organisms, is an undulating rhythmic character. Physiological basis of the same rhythm is dynamic change excitation and inhibition processes occurring in the central nervous system. In this paper features of rhythm were identified. To accelerate the assimilation of motor action rational rhythm it is necessary to develop a sense of rhythm which is successfully formed in during the musical-motor activities. Conclusions. For today the study of the rhythm phenomenon in professional preparation on physical education and sport, in our opinion, requires the further study. Adding exercises involving certain motor skills elements similar in rhythmic structure with professional and technical actions to the coaches and teachers education and the competitive technology formation should be

  18. Measuring hospital staff nurses perception on quality of the professional practice environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Brouwer, Brigitte Johanna Maria; Fingal, Cheryl; Schoonhoven, Lisette; Kaljouw, Marian J; Van Achterberg, Theo

    2017-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine construct validity of the Dutch Essentials of Magnetism II © instrument, designed to assess nursing practice environments, using hypotheses testing. Reduction in hospital length of stay and the number of inpatient beds increases care intensity. Educational levels and numbers of nursing staff in hospitals, however, do not match this increase, resulting in a strain on quality of care and patient safety. A possible answer to existing concerns about quality of care may be the creation of a productive and healthy practice environment, as this has an impact on the quality of care. Therefore, areas requiring improvement of the practice environment have to be defined. A cross-sectional, correlational study design. We determined construct validity with hypotheses testing by relating the Dutch Essentials of Magnetism II to the Dutch Practice Environment Scale of the Nursing Work Index. We formulated 15 hypotheses prior to data-analysis; 10 related to convergent validity and five related to discriminant validity. Data were collected from qualified nurses (N = 259) on nine randomly selected hospital wards from March to April 2012. Response rate was 47% (n = 121). Total scores of both instruments are strongly correlated (r = 0·88). In total, 12 of 15 hypotheses (80%) were confirmed and three were rejected. The D-EOMII has satisfactory construct validity for measuring the nursing practice environment in hospitals and can be used by nurses, managers, health policy makers, hospitals and governments to assess and identify processes and relationships that are in need of improvement. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Dose evaluation in medical staff during diagnostics procedures in interventional radiology; Avaliacao da dose na equipe medica durante procedimentos diagnoticos de radiologia intervencionista

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bacchim Neto, Fernando A.; Alves, Allan F.F.; Rosa, Maria E.D.; Miranda, Jose R.A. [Universidade Estadual Paulista Julio de Mesquita Filho (UNESP), Botucatu, SP (Brazil). Instituto de Biociencias. Departamento de Fisica e Biofisica; Moura, Regina [Faculdade de Medicina de Botucatu, SP (Brazil). Departamento de Cirurgia e Ortopedia; Pina, Diana R., E-mail: bacchim@ibb.unesp.br [Universidade Estadual Paulista Julio de Mesquita Filho (UNESP), Botucatu, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina. Departamento de Doencas Tropicais e Diagnostico por Imagem

    2014-08-15

    Studies show that personal dosimeters may underestimate the dose values in interventional physicians, especially in extremities and crystalline. The objective of this work was to study the radiation exposure levels of medical staff in diagnostic interventional radiology procedures. For this purpose LiF:Mg,Ti (TLD-100) dosimeters were placed in different regions of the physician body. When comparing with reference dose levels, the maximum numbers of annual procedures were found. This information is essential to ensure the radiological protection of those professionals. (author)

  20. The Occupational Well-Being of School Staff and Maintenance of Their Ability to Work in Finland and Estonia--Focus on the School Community and Professional Competence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saaranen, Terhi; Sormunen, Marjorita; Pertel, Tiia; Streimann, Karin; Hansen, Siivi; Varava, Liana; Lepp, Kadi; Turunen, Hannele; Tossavainen, Kerttu

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to present the baseline results of a research and development project targeted to improve the occupational well-being of school staff and maintain their ability to work, in Finland and Estonia. It reveals the most problematic factors in the various aspects of the school community and professional competence and outlines…

  1. A Quantitative Study on Organisational Commitment and Communication Satisfaction of Professional Staff at a Master's Institution in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bray, Nathaniel J.; Williams, Laine

    2017-01-01

    This study examined communication satisfaction and organisational commitment for professional staff at an American Master's institution using two quantitative surveys: Downs and Hazen's Communication Satisfaction Questionnaire and Meyer and Allen's TCM Employee Commitment Survey. One hundred and sixty-eight full-time and part-time staff…

  2. Staff Perceptions of Professional Development and Empowerment as Long-Term Leadership Tasks of School Principals in South African Schools: An Exploratory Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Niekerk, Eldridge; Muller, Hélène

    2017-01-01

    This article reports on the perceptions of school staff of professional development and empowerment as part of the long-term leadership task of principals. The long-term leadership model was used as a theoretical framework to quantitatively determine the perceptions of 118 teachers and education managers in approximately 100 schools throughout…

  3. [Critical trajectories of female victims of gender violence: discourse analysis of women and staff professionals in Porto Alegre, Rio Grande do Sul State, Brazil].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meneghel, Stela Nazareth; Bairros, Fernanda; Mueller, Betânia; Monteiro, Débora; Oliveira, Lidiane Pellenz de; Collaziol, Marceli Emer

    2011-04-01

    This qualitative study aims to describe the trajectories of female victims of gender violence in Porto Alegre, Rio Grande do Sul State, Brazil. The methodology included in-depth interviews with women and staff, attempting to map the critical paths of women when they made the decision to seek professional help. We interviewed 21 women victims of gender violence and 25 professionals, including law enforcement officials, health and social workers, and nongovernmental organizations. The women's trajectories in the services were mapped, identifying facilitating factors and obstacles in the process of breaking with gender violence. The victims reported: pressure by professional staff to return to their marriages and police inefficiency in providing protection. The discourse of law enforcement officials and health and social workers showed a range of different concepts regarding violence, medicalization of violence, and network fragmentation.

  4. E3 Staff Database

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Agency for International Development — E3 Staff database is maintained by E3 PDMS (Professional Development & Management Services) office. The database is Mysql. It is manually updated by E3 staff as...

  5. Survey the relationship between professional ethics and improve the quality of care with nurses, staff empowerment of the perspective of Ayatollah Rouhani hospital of Babol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamed Hosseinzadeh

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Ethics, how to live and how to behave in a professional style and in a professional environment, both individual and organizational sets. In this regard, the present study was to determine the relationship between the ethics of the profession and improve the quality of care with nurses, hospital staff empowerment from the perspective of Ayatollah Rouhani was performed. The study was a descriptive one. The population consisted of nurses Ayatollah spiritual Babylon, which uses random sampling method, 163 samples were selected and evaluated. Collection tool was a questionnaire, content validity of the questionnaire in consultation with experts confirmed the reliability of the test-retest on 10% of the total of 2-week interval was calculated, and Cronbach's alpha for the whole questionnaire 0.85respectively. To analyze the data, structural equation modeling was used. The results showed that relations professional ethics to improve the quality of care (P <0.01 and staff empowerment (P <0.01 was significant. The ability of the staff as well as improve the quality of care (P <0.05 there was a significant relationship. Based on the results of research, professional ethics directly and indirectly improve the quality of nursing care was effective (P<0.05. In general it can be said that rely on moral and ethical management, increases the effectiveness of the approach is to improve the quality of care and sense of empowerment among nurses.

  6. Partners with Clinical Practice: Evaluating the Student and Staff Experiences of On-line Continuing Professional Development for Qualified Nephrology Practitioners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susannah QUINSEE

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Partners with Clinical Practice: Evaluating the Student and Staff Experiences of On-line Continuing Professional Development for Qualified Nephrology Practitioners Judith HURST Susannah QUINSEE City University London, THE UNITED KINGDOM ABSTRACT The inclusion of online learning technologies into the higher education (HE curriculum is frequently associated with the design and development of new models of learning. One could argue that e-learning even demands a reconfiguration of traditional methods of learning and teaching. However, this transformation in pedagogic methodology does not just impact on lecturers and teachers alone. Online learning has ‘pervasive impacts and changes in other HE functions’ (HEFCE, p.2. Thus, e-learning is a transformational process that posits new challenges for staff and students, both in educational methods and support. Many political, clinical, financial and social influences impact on registered health professionals’ ability to continue their professional development. This is particularly pertinent in the delivery of nephrology care. In order to evaluate the programme that has now run for 2 years in the context of this institution, evaluative research methodology sought to explore the experiences of the staff and students involved. Qualitative data was collected from the students and a reflective framework was used to form the basis of a focus group for the staff. This paper will present how a virtual learning environment (VLE was developed utilising the pedagogic framework of solution-focused learning. It will demonstrate evaluation of the students’ experiences compared to their traditional classroom-learning counterparts, and highlight the reflections of staff developers as they moved into new roles and developed different aspects of their present roles within a traditional HE context.

  7. Higher education in tourism, hospitality, and gastronomy: an answer to the need for professional staff in this area in the Republic of Macedonia

    OpenAIRE

    Taskov, Nako; Metodijeski, Dejan

    2010-01-01

    The subject of this article is tourism and the role that higher education institutions have in shaping the professional staff in the field of tourism, hospitality and gastronomy in Republic of Macedonia. For this purpose the need of higher education institutions in the field of tourism is explained, and a review of universities in Macedonia in which function faculties of tourism, hospitality and gastronomy is made. Republic of Macedonia is not a country with a long tradition in tourism but st...

  8. The ethical landscape of professional care in everyday practice as perceived by staff: A qualitative content analysis of ethical diaries written by staff in child and adolescent psychiatric in-patient care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pelto-Piri Veikko

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although there has been some empirical research on ethics concerning the attitudes and approaches of staff in relation to adult patients, there is very little to be found on child and adolescent psychiatric care. In most cases researchers have defined which issues are important, for instance, coercive care. The aim of this study was to provide a qualitative description of situations and experiences that gave rise to ethical problems and considerations as reported by staff members on child and adolescent psychiatric wards, although they were not provided with a definition of the concept. Methods The study took place in six child and adolescent psychiatric wards in Sweden. All staff members involved with patients on these wards were invited to participate. The staff members were asked to keep an ethical diary over the course of one week, and data collection comprised the diaries handed in by 68 persons. Qualitative content analysis was used in order to analyse the diaries. Results In the analysis three themes emerged; 1 good care 2 loyalty and 3 powerlessness. The theme ‘good care’ contains statements about the ideal of commitment but also about problems living up to the ideal. Staff members emphasized the importance of involving patients and parents in the care, but also of the need for professional distance. Participants seldom perceived decisions about coercive measures as problematic, in contrast to those about pressure and restrictions, especially in the case of patients admitted for voluntary care. The theme ‘loyalty’ contains statements in which staff members perceived contradictory expectations from different interested parties, mainly parents but also their supervisor, doctors, colleagues and the social services. The theme ‘powerlessness’ contains statements about situations that create frustration, in which freedom of action is perceived as limited and can concern inadequacy in relation to patients and

  9. The ethical landscape of professional care in everyday practice as perceived by staff: A qualitative content analysis of ethical diaries written by staff in child and adolescent psychiatric in-patient care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelto-Piri, Veikko; Engström, Karin; Engström, Ingemar

    2012-07-09

    Although there has been some empirical research on ethics concerning the attitudes and approaches of staff in relation to adult patients, there is very little to be found on child and adolescent psychiatric care. In most cases researchers have defined which issues are important, for instance, coercive care. The aim of this study was to provide a qualitative description of situations and experiences that gave rise to ethical problems and considerations as reported by staff members on child and adolescent psychiatric wards, although they were not provided with a definition of the concept. The study took place in six child and adolescent psychiatric wards in Sweden. All staff members involved with patients on these wards were invited to participate. The staff members were asked to keep an ethical diary over the course of one week, and data collection comprised the diaries handed in by 68 persons. Qualitative content analysis was used in order to analyse the diaries. In the analysis three themes emerged; 1) good care 2) loyalty and 3) powerlessness. The theme 'good care' contains statements about the ideal of commitment but also about problems living up to the ideal. Staff members emphasized the importance of involving patients and parents in the care, but also of the need for professional distance. Participants seldom perceived decisions about coercive measures as problematic, in contrast to those about pressure and restrictions, especially in the case of patients admitted for voluntary care. The theme 'loyalty' contains statements in which staff members perceived contradictory expectations from different interested parties, mainly parents but also their supervisor, doctors, colleagues and the social services. The theme 'powerlessness' contains statements about situations that create frustration, in which freedom of action is perceived as limited and can concern inadequacy in relation to patients and violations in the workplace. The ethical considerations described by

  10. Personal protective equipment for preventing highly infectious diseases due to exposure to contaminated body fluids in healthcare staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verbeek, Jos H; Ijaz, Sharea; Mischke, Christina; Ruotsalainen, Jani H; Mäkelä, Erja; Neuvonen, Kaisa; Edmond, Michael B; Sauni, Riitta; Kilinc Balci, F Selcen; Mihalache, Raluca C

    2016-04-19

    In epidemics of highly infectious diseases, such as Ebola Virus Disease (EVD) or SARS, healthcare workers (HCW) are at much greater risk of infection than the general population, due to their contact with patients' contaminated body fluids. Contact precautions by means of personal protective equipment (PPE) can reduce the risk. It is unclear which type of PPE protects best, what is the best way to remove PPE, and how to make sure HCWs use PPE as instructed. To evaluate which type or component of full-body PPE and which method of donning or removing (doffing) PPE have the least risk of self-contamination or infection for HCWs, and which training methods most increase compliance with PPE protocols. We searched MEDLINE (PubMed up to 8 January 2016), Cochrane Central Register of Trials (CENTRAL up to 20 January 2016), EMBASE (embase.com up to 8 January 2016), CINAHL (EBSCOhost up to 20 January 2016), and OSH-Update up to 8 January 2016. We also screened reference lists of included trials and relevant reviews, and contacted NGOs and manufacturers of PPE. We included all eligible controlled studies that compared the effect of types or components of PPE in HCWs exposed to highly infectious diseases with serious consequences, such as EVD and SARS, on the risk of infection, contamination, or noncompliance with protocols. This included studies that simulated contamination with fluorescent markers or a non-pathogenic virus.We also included studies that compared the effect of various ways of donning or removing PPE, and the effects of various types of training in PPE use on the same outcomes. Two authors independently selected studies, extracted data and assessed risk of bias in included trials. We intended to perform meta-analyses but we did not find sufficiently similar studies to combine their results. We included nine studies with 1200 participants evaluating ten interventions. Of these, eight trials simulated the exposure with a fluorescent marker or virus or bacteria

  11. THE ANALYSIS OF PROFESSIONAL COMPUTER EQUIPMENT IN THE TECHNICAL UNIVERSITIES OF UKRAINE IN 1991-2011

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renat Ya. Rizhniak

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The article (that is based on the economic-statistical analysis of time series, which characterize the dynamics of the computer technology acquisition of technical higher educational institutions of Ukraine defines the basic laws of development of computer software provision of the technical universities of Ukraine in the economic conditions that were typical for our country during 1991-2011. The conclusions are formulated: on the dynamics of average indicators of the technical equipment the of technical universities with computer technology for 100 students, on the average indicators of the variations of such availability during the specified period and the indicators of variations for the individual institutions, on the detection of the presence of correlation between time series, describing the complete set of technical universities with computer technology, on the distribution of technical universities into clusters according to the revealed trends in computer security dynamics.

  12. TECHNOLOGY MANAGEMENT IN THE PUBLIC HEALTH SECTOR: PROFESSIONAL VIEW FROM EQUIPMENT MAINTENANCE EXPERTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.O. Kachieng’a

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available South Africa has tried various strategies to improve access, quality and cost-efficiency in the health care delivery systems. However it is clear that the optimal approach has yet to be found. It has been recognised that health technology is an important element of this transformation, and will continue to play a vital role.
    It is almost evident that the way health technology is managed in health care institutions directly affects the quality of treatment patients receive. Although strategic importance of technology in health care has been documented widely in scientific literature; technology planning, procurement and management have not received the attention they deserve in the transformation of health care services in the country.
    The survey discussed in this paper investigated health care equipment maintenance problems and associated technological constraints from point of view of health technology managers, biomedical and clinical engineers. It also provides recommendations for competitive utilisation of technology in the public health sector.

  13. Views of patient, healthcare professionals and administrative staff on flow of information and collaboration in a regional health information exchange: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mäenpää, Tiina; Asikainen, Paula; Suominen, Tarja

    2017-12-01

    Nowadays, patients can be more involved in developing healthcare services with their healthcare professionals. Patient-centred information is a key part of improving regional health information exchange (HIE), giving patients an active role in care management. The aim was to get a deeper understanding of the flow of information and collaboration in one hospital district area from the viewpoint of patients, healthcare professionals and administrative staff. The data were collected by themed interviews and analysed using both deductive and inductive content analyses. The interview themes were the flow of information and collaboration after 5 years of HIE usage in one hospital district area in Finland. Health information exchange usage had changed the regional flow of information after the 5-year period. The patients were satisfied that their primary care physician was able to access their special care information. The experiences of healthcare professionals and administrative staff also showed that information availability and information exchange had improved regionally. HIE usage was also found to have improved regional collaboration between different organisations in patient health care. It was recognised that patients had taken on more responsibility for transferring their follow-up treatment information. Healthcare information exchange between professionals not only improves patient care or patient involvement in their own care, but it also requires that patient self-care or self-care management is integrated into HIE systems to share information not only among professionals, but also between patients and professionals. This information will be used in the development of healthcare systems to meet more the developing of the continuity of care the patient's point of view. © 2017 Nordic College of Caring Science.

  14. Innovative public library services - staff-less or staff-intensive?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johannsen, Carl Gustav Viggo

    2014-01-01

    Purpose – Several recent library innovations seem to make professional and clerical staff superfluous such as automated loan and delivery equipment, staff-less libraries open in 80 hours a week, and virtual services, enabling users to search the library catalogue and make reservations of library...... materials from their home address. The purpose of this paper is to examine whether such developments will necessarily lead to a situation where public libraries become self-service institutions or to what extent self-service and innovative staff-intensive library services can develop and co......-exist. Furthermore, the paper will examine what challenges library leaders face and what they can do, and actually have done, to handle staff resistance and other related problems to the benefit of both the users, the local communities, and also, the staff, in particular, when introducing new and innovative services...

  15. Psychological maintenance as an integrated approach to prevention and correction of professional burning out of the medical staff

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. S. Kucher

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The syndrome of professional burning out is a complex of symptoms and signs evidenced in various negative psychic conditions at individual, interpersonal and organizational levels. It is formed owing to a long mismatch between the requirements of the professional environment and the resources of the expert. Analysis of the preventive and correctional programs as a psychological assistance showed insufficiency of such approach. Creation of preventive and correctional programs within psychological maintenance from the position of involution of professional resources, taking into account the theoretical - methodological basis (the concept, the purposes, tasks, system approach, criteria of efficiency and the subjective-personal resources of counteraction directed at activization to burning out at all stages of professional development is progressive.

  16. An investigation of relation between organizational justice and professional commitment of staff: A case study of public organization in Kermanshah

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mostafa Emami

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an empirical study to investigate the relationship between organizational justice and professional commitment in Kermanshah official organizations. The study uses 20 questions to measure professional commitment from a questionnaire originally developed by Spell et al. (2007 [Spell, C. S., & Arnold, T. J. (2007. A multi-level analysis of organizational justice climate, structure, and employee mental health. Journal of Management, 33(5, 724-751.]. In addition, the study adopts 12 questions from another questionnaire developed by Vallas (1999 [Vallas, S. P. (1999. Rethinking post‐Fordism: The meaning of workplace flexibility. Sociological theory, 17(1, 68-101.] to measure organizational justice. Cronbach alpha for organizational justice questionnaire and professional commitment are 0.81 and 0.89, respectively, which are well above the minimum acceptable level. Based on the results of this survey, there is a positive and meaningful relationship between organizational justice and professional commitment. The implementation of the linear regression analysis also reveals that there is a positive and meaningful relationship between inter-organizational justice and professional commitment. The study performs Freedman test to rank three components of organizational justice and the results indicate that interactional justice maintains the highest level of importance while distributive justice comes last in terms of priority.

  17. Financial and Mathematical Model of Payroll for Labour Remuneration of Teaching Staff in the Sphere of Secondary Professional Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksandr Vladimirovich Dorzhdeev

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The article is devoted to building up a financial and mathematical model and designing the appropriate procedure of forming the quota, directed to the payroll of the vocational education teaching staff under the circumstances of normative-per capita financing. Nowadays the given problem occurred after the implementation of normative-per capita financing system is one of the most urgent and complicated problems. The procedures used in many educational institutions are outdated, based on a totally hourly basis and don’t meet the modern requirements of the educational economics and financial management. The approach, suggested in the article, not only solves many financial problems of educational institutions but also reveals problem areas, unprofitable educational programs, resolves optimization tasks, and proposes the algorithm of making the appropriate managerial decisions. Besides, the article describes the distribution procedure of the teaching staff payroll among structural subdivisions of the vocational educational institutions. In the context of the given model, financing should be implemented in proportion to the part of the structural subdivision in the educational process. This part is determined on the basis of the education financial plan of the current academic year of each educational program in this educational institution. In addition, the part of each structural subdivision is determined as the sum of parts of the respective subjects of the educational plan. The suggested procedure promotes the optimization of managing financial performance of vocational educational institutions, provides the opportunity of implementing individual contracts with the teaching staff, and using a number of other modern approaches to financial management of educational institutions.

  18. Composição da equipe de enfermagem em Unidades de Terapia Intensiva Composición del equipo de enfermería en Unidades de Cuidados Intensivos Composition of the nursing staff in Intensive Care Units

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcia Galan Perroca

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Descrever a composição e distribuição da equipe de enfermagem em Unidades de Terapia Intensiva (UTI. METODO: Estudo descritivo, exploratório, realizado em 17 UTIs de seis instituições hospitalares localizadas na Região Noroeste do Estado de São Paulo. RESULTADOS: Foram encontrados, em média, os seguintes percentuais: 13,1% de enfermeiros, 11,2% técnicos e 75,7% auxiliares de enfermagem. A relação enfermeiro/leito apresentou variação de 0,08 a 0,80 (Md 0,31(0,27;0,41 e a enfermagem/leito de 1,36 a 4,0 (Md 2,45(1,62;2,91. CONCLUSÃO: a composição quanti-qualitativa da equipe de enfermagem nas Unidades de Terapia Intensiva investigadas não se encontra em concordância com os valores recomendados pelo Conselho Federal de Enfermagem (COFEN, no que ser refere a pacientes críticos.OBJETIVO: Describir la composición y distribución del equipo de enfermería en Unidades de Cuidados Intensivos (UCI. METODO: Estudio descriptivo, exploratorio, realizado en 17 UCIs de seis instituciones hospitalarias localizadas en la Región Nor Oeste del Estado de Sao Paulo. RESULTADOS: Fueron encontrados, en promedio, los siguientes porcentajes: 13,1% de enfermeros, 11,2% de técnicos y 75,7% auxiliares de enfermería. La relación enfermero/cama presentó variación de 0,08 a 0,80 (Md 0,31(0,27;0,41 y la enfermería/cama de 1,36 a 4,0 (Md 2,45(1,62;2,91. CONCLUSION: la composición cuanti-cualitativa del equipo de enfermería en las Unidades de Cuidados Intensivos investigadas no se encuentra en concordancia con los valores recomendados por el Consejo Federal de Enfermería (COFEN, en lo que se refiere a pacientes críticos.OBJECTIVE: To describe the composition and distribution of nursing staff in the Intensive Care Unit (ICU. METHOD: This exploratory study was conducted in 17 ICUs within six hospitals located in the northwestern region of São Paulo. RESULTS: We found on average the following percentages: 13.1% professional nurses

  19. Assessment of professional behaviour : a comparison of self-assessment by first year dental students and assessment by staff

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zijlstra-Shaw, S.; Kropmans, TJB; Tams, J

    2005-01-01

    Objective: A study was set up to assess usefulness and acceptability of a method of assessing professional behaviour of undergraduate dental students. Setting: The first year preclinical course at the Department of Dentistry and Oral Hygiene, University of Groningen, the Netherlands. Materials and

  20. The impact of staff training on special educational needs professionals' attitudes toward and understanding of applied behavior analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smyth, Sinéad; Reading, Benjamin E; McDowell, Claire

    2017-01-01

    Research-based evidence points to the efficacy and value of applied behavior analysis (ABA) in meeting the needs of individuals with learning disabilities and autism. Nonetheless, public, government, and professional perception of ABA can be negative. The current study was designed to measure the impact of a short intervention on professionals' attitudes toward, and knowledge of, ABA. Teachers and classroom assistants from two separate schools for children with severe learning difficulties completed a self-report survey on knowledge of and attitudes toward ABA. They were then presented with a 90-min training module designed to increase their knowledge of the history of ABA and their functional assessment skills. Following training, the self-report was readministered. The mean scores for each group increased only after the training had been delivered. Further research is needed to address the impact of training on classroom practice.

  1. Professional Quality of Life of Veterans Affairs Staff and Providers in a Patient-Centered Care Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Locatelli, Sara M; LaVela, Sherri L

    2015-01-01

    Changes to the work environment prompted by the movement toward patient-centered care have the potential to improve occupational stress among health care workers by improving team-based work activities, collaboration, and employee-driven quality improvement. This study was conducted to examine professional quality of life among providers at patient-centered care pilot facilities. Surveys were conducted with 76 Veterans Affairs employees/providers at facilities piloting patient-centered care interventions, to assess demographics, workplace practices and views (team-based environment, employee voice, quality of communication, and turnover intention), and professional quality of life (compassion satisfaction, burnout, and secondary traumatic stress).Professional quality-of-life subscales were not related to employee position type, age, or gender. Employee voice measures were related to lower burnout and higher compassion satisfaction. In addition, employees who were considering leaving their position showed higher burnout and lower compassion satisfaction scores. None of the work practices showed relationships with secondary traumatic stress.

  2. Motivating Your Development Staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, Nancy

    1996-01-01

    Suggestions for motivating institutional advancement staff at colleges and universities include nonfinancial motivators (such as appreciation, team building, empowerment, professional development opportunities, flexibility, and formal recognition) and financial rewards (such as bonuses and merit pay). (DB)

  3. Convergence and translation: attitudes to inter-professional learning and teaching of creative problem-solving among medical and engineering students and staff

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Healthcare worldwide needs translation of basic ideas from engineering into the clinic. Consequently, there is increasing demand for graduates equipped with the knowledge and skills to apply interdisciplinary medicine/engineering approaches to the development of novel solutions for healthcare. The literature provides little guidance regarding barriers to, and facilitators of, effective interdisciplinary learning for engineering and medical students in a team-based project context. Methods A quantitative survey was distributed to engineering and medical students and staff in two universities, one in Ireland and one in Belgium, to chart knowledge and practice in interdisciplinary learning and teaching, and of the teaching of innovation. Results We report important differences for staff and students between the disciplines regarding attitudes towards, and perceptions of, the relevance of interdisciplinary learning opportunities, and the role of creativity and innovation. There was agreement across groups concerning preferred learning, instructional styles, and module content. Medical students showed greater resistance to the use of structured creativity tools and interdisciplinary teams. Conclusions The results of this international survey will help to define the optimal learning conditions under which undergraduate engineering and medicine students can learn to consider the diverse factors which determine the success or failure of a healthcare engineering solution. PMID:24450310

  4. Radiology preparedness in ebola virus disease: guidelines and challenges for disinfection of medical imaging equipment for the protection of staff and patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mollura, Daniel J; Palmore, Tara N; Folio, Les R; Bluemke, David A

    2015-05-01

    The overlap of early Ebola virus disease (EVD) symptoms (eg, fever, headache, abdominal pain, diarrhea, emesis, and fatigue) with symptoms of other more common travel-related diseases (eg, malaria, typhoid fever, pneumonia, and meningococcemia) may result in delayed diagnosis of EVD before isolation of infected patients. Radiology departments should consider policies for and approaches to decontamination of expensive and potentially easily damaged radiology equipment. In addition, the protection of radiology personnel must be considered during the work-up phase of undiagnosed EVD patients presenting to emergency departments. The purpose of this article is to consider the effect of EVD on radiology departments and imaging equipment, with particular consideration of guidelines currently available from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention that may be applicable to radiology. (©) RSNA, 2015.

  5. Alternative methods for internal quality control in research laboratories for environmental analysis: a programme for the performance evaluation of equipment, methods and staff

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wieling, J. (Inst. of Environmental Sciences (IMW-TWO), Dept. of Analytical Chemistry, TNO, Delft (Netherlands)); Bakkeren, H.A. (Inst. of Environmental Sciences (IMW-TWO), Dept. of Analytical Chemistry, TNO, Delft (Netherlands)); Peters, R.J.B. (Inst. of Environmental Sciences (IMW-TWO), Dept. of Analytical Chemistry, TNO, Delft (Netherlands)); Gils, W.J.C.G. van (Inst. of Environmental Sciences (IMW-TWO), Dept. of Analytical Chemistry, TNO, Delft (Netherlands)); Leer, E.W.B. de (Inst. of Environmental Sciences (IMW-TWO), Dept. of Analytical Chemistry, TNO, Delft (Netherlands)); Mulder, S.A. (Inst. of Environmental Sciences (IMW-TWO), Dept. of Analytical Chemistry, TNO, Delft (Netherlands)); Burg, P.A. van der (Inst. of Environmental Sciences (IMW-TWO), Dept. of Analytical Chemistry, TNO, Delft (Netherlands)); Renesse van Duivenbode, J.A.D. van (Inst. of Environmental Sciences (IMW-TWO), Dept. of Analytical Chemistry, TNO, Delft (Netherlands))

    1994-04-01

    In analytical research laboratories, the problem of quality assurance is more difficult to solve than in laboratories devoted exclusively to routine analysis: The former usually have to deal with a much geater variety of samples and may have to develop entirely new methods of analysis. For research laboratories we have developed several alternative methods of quality assurance. These methods can be used to distinguish between different analytical methods, between different types of equipment, between different levels of skill among laboratory technicians, or even between the performance of technicians of the same level of skill. (orig.)

  6. Reduction of levels of radiation exposure over patients and medical staff by using additional filters of copper and aluminum on the outputs of X-ray tubes in hemodynamic equipment; Reducao da dose de radiacao em pacientes e equipes medicas pelo uso de filtros adicionais de cobre e aluminio nas saidas de tubos de raios X em equipamentos de hemodinamica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weis, Guilherme L.; Müller, Felipe M.; Schuch, Luiz A., E-mail: glweis@gmail.com [Universidade Federal de Santa Maria (UFSM), Santa Maria, RS (Brazil)

    2013-12-15

    Radioprotection in hemodynamic services is extremely important. Decrease of total exposition time, better positioning of medical staff in the room, use of individual and collective protection equipment and shorter distance between the patient and the image intensifier tube are, among others, some ways to reduce the levels of radiation. It is noted that these possible forms of reducing the radiation exposition varies depending on the medical staff. Hence, the purpose of the present paper is to reduce such levels of radiation exposition in a way apart from medical staffs. It is proposed, therefore, the use of additional filters on the output of the X-ray tube in three hemodynamic equipment from different generations: detector with a flat panel of amorphous selenium, image intensifier tube with charge coupled device, and image intensifier tube with video camera. In order to quantify the quality of the images generated, a simulator made of aluminum plates and other devices was set up, so it was possible to measure and compare the acquired images. Methods of images analysis (threshold, histogram, 3D surface) were used to measure the signal/noise ratio, the spatial resolution, the contrast and the definition of the signal area, thus doubts regarding the analysis of the images among observers (inter-observers) and even for a single observer (intra-observer) can be avoided. Ionization chambers were also used in order to quantify the doses of radiation that penetrated the skin of the patients with and without the use of the filters. In all cases was found an arrangement of filters that combines quality of the images with a significant reduction of the levels of exposure to ionizing radiation, concerning both the patient and the medical staff. (author)

  7. Occurrence of post traumatic stress symptoms and their relationship to professional quality of life (ProQoL) in nursing staff at a forensic psychiatric security unit: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauvrud, Christian; Nonstad, Kåre; Palmstierna, Tom

    2009-04-16

    Violence is frequent towards nurses in forensic mental health hospitals. Implications of this high risk environment have not been systematically explored. This paper explores occurrence of symptoms on post traumatic stress and their relationship to professional quality of life. Self report questionnaires assessing symptoms of post traumatic stress and professional quality of life were distributed among psychiatric nurses in a high security forensic psychiatric unit with high frequency of violent behaviour. Relationships between post traumatic stress symptoms, forensic nursing experience, type of ward and compassion satisfaction, burnout and compassion fatigue were explored. The prevalence of post traumatic stress symptoms was low. Low scores were found on compassion satisfaction. Length of psychiatric nursing experience and low scores on compassion satisfaction were correlated to increased post traumatic stress symptoms. Although high violence frequency, low rate of post traumatic stress symptoms and low compassion satisfaction scores was found. High staff/patient ratio and emotional distance between staff and patients are discussed as protective factors.

  8. Significados do processo do morrer e da morte para a equipe multiprofissional Meaning of the process of dying and death for multiprofessional staff

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandra Guimarães Carvalho Barbosa

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Objetivo: descrever os significados que a equipe multiprofissional de uma Unidade de Tratamento Intensivo Adulto detém sobre o processo do morrer e a morte. Método: realizada pesquisa de natureza qualitativa, obtiveram os dados por meio de entrevista semiestruturada com 21 profissionais de saúde. Analisaram os resultados embasados na análise de conteúdo temática, que resultou nas categorias: Visão não científica da morte e do morrer e Visão científica da morte e do morrer. Resultado: evidenciaram-se significados sobre a morte, tais como: um processo natural, uma etapa a cumprir, um evento fisiológico e a extinção. Conclusão: Devido à multiplicidade de significados encontrados ha necessidade de discussão e reflexão sobre o processo do morrer e da morte, com a expectativa de melhor conviver com esses eventos.

  9. Effects of a Competency-Based Professional Development Training on Children's Physical Activity and Staff Physical Activity Promotion in Summer Day Camps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weaver, R. Glenn; Beets, Michael W.; Turner-McGrievy, Gabrielle; Webster, Collin A.; Moore, Justin

    2014-01-01

    The YMCA of the USA serves more than nine million youth in its summer day camping programs nationwide. In spring 2011, the YMCA of Columbia, SC, with support from the University of South Carolina, adopted a competency-based staff-level training approach in an attempt to align staff behaviors with the YMCA of the USA new physical activity standards…

  10. Excellence in leadership: demands on the professional school ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A professional school principal is the educational leader and manager of a school, and is therefore responsible for the work performance of all the people in the school (i.e. both staff and learners). People are the human resources of schools. They use material resources (such as finances, information equipment, and ...

  11. Staff perceptions of challenging parent-staff interactions and beneficial strategies in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, Joshua; Friedman, Susan Hatters; Collin, Marc; Martin, Richard J

    2018-01-01

    To characterise neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) staff perceptions regarding factors which may lead to more challenging staff-parent interactions, and beneficial strategies for working with families with whom such interactions occur. A survey of 168 physician and nursing staff at two NICUs in American teaching hospitals inquired about their perceptions of challenging parent-staff interactions and situations in which such interactions were likely to occur. From a medical perspective, staff perceptions of challenging interactions were noted when infants had recent decompensation, high medical complexity, malformations or long duration of stay in the NICU. From a psychological/social perspective, a high likelihood of challenging interactions was noted with parents who were suspicious, interfere with equipment, or parents who hover in the NICU, express paranoid or delusional thoughts, repeat questions, perceive the staff as inaccessible, are managing addictions, or who require child protective services involvement. Frequent family meetings, grieving opportunities, education of parents, social work referrals, clearly defined rules, partnering in daily care and support groups were perceived as the most beneficial strategies for improving difficult interactions. This study delineates what staff perceive as challenging interactions and provides support for an educational and interventional role that incorporates mental health professionals. ©2017 Foundation Acta Paediatrica. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Staff Motivation at Kuwait University Libraries

    OpenAIRE

    Taghreed Alqudsi-ghabra; Huda H. Mansouri

    2010-01-01

    Motivation is a force that leads people to act or perform. Motivating staff is a key element in making workers productive. It has the potential to increase incentive, put staff members at ease, and derive some satisfaction from their jobs. Factors that motivate staff vary across the professional, para-professional, and non-professional levels. The research here is a study of motivation techniques used by managers of Kuwait University libraries to improve employees' job satisfaction levels. In...

  13. Medical Center Staff Attitudes about Spanking

    OpenAIRE

    Gershoff, Elizabeth T.; Font, Sarah A.; Taylor, Catherine A.; Foster, Rebecca H.; Garza, Ann Budzak; Olson-Dorff, Denyse; Terreros, Amy; Nielsen-Parker, Monica; Spector, Lisa

    2016-01-01

    Several medical professional organizations, including the American Academy of Pediatrics, recommend that parents avoid hitting children for disciplinary purposes (e.g., spanking) and that medical professionals advise parents to use alternative methods. The extent to which medical professionals continue to endorse spanking is unknown. This study is the first to examine attitudes about spanking among staff throughout medical settings, including non-direct care staff. A total of 2,580 staff at a...

  14. Rotatividade da equipe de enfermagem: estudo em hospital-escola Rotación del equipo de enfermería: estudio en un hospital universitario Nursing staff turnover: a study at a school-hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felícia Hiromi Nomura

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Este estudo é do tipo exploratório-descritivo de caráter retrospectivo, e teve o objetivo de mensurar e comparar as taxas de rotatividade da equipe de enfermagem do Hospital Universitário da Universidade de São Paulo. A população constituiu-se de 255 trabalhadores de enfermagem - 78 enfermeiras, 20 técnicos e 156 auxiliares que se desligaram do hospital no período de 1997 a 2000. Para mensurar a rotatividade foram utilizados indicadores globais, taxa de admissão e desligamento, taxa líquida de substituição e taxa de variação do número das posições de trabalho. A análise quantitativa dos dados permitiu concluir que a equipe de enfermagem, nesse hospital, apresenta baixa rotatividade.Este estudio es de tipo exploratorio-descriptivo de carácter retrospectivo y tuvo como objetivo medir y comparar las tasas de rotación del equipo de enfermería del Hospital Universitario de la Universidad de São Paulo. La población se constituyó de 255 trabajadores de enfermería - 78 enfermeras, 20 técnicos y 156 auxiliares que salieron del hospital en el período de 1997 a 2000. Para la mensuración de la rotación se utilizó indicadores globales, tasa de admisión y renuncia, tasa líquida de substitución y tasa de variación. El desarrollo de esta investigación permitió concluir que el equipo de enfermería en ese hospital presenta baja rotación.The goal of this exploratory-descriptive study was to measure and compare nursing staff turnover levels at the University Hospital of São Paulo University. The population consisted of 255 nursing workers - 78 nurses, 20 technicians and 156 auxiliaries - who resigned from the hospital between 1997 and 2000. Turnover levels were measured by means of global indicators, admission and resignation, net replacement on the job and variation rates. Quantitative data analysis indicated a low nursing staff turnover rate at this hospital.

  15. Staff Cuts Remake the Custodial Closet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fickes, Michael

    2003-01-01

    Suggests that new cleaning and finishing materials and new equipment can help school facility departments cope with staff cuts, focusing on: chemicals and dispensers, safety training and information for custodial staff, cleaning tools and power equipment, and cleaner and more efficient schools. (SM)

  16. Estresse da equipe de enfermagem do corpo de bombeiros no Atendimento Pré-Hospitalar Móvel El estrés del equipo de enfermería del cuerpo de bomberos en atención pre-hospitalaria móvil Stress at the nursing staff from the fire department in a mobile pre-hospital care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richiére dos Santos Pereira Salvador

    2013-06-01

    profesionales.The research has as subject, the study of the stress at work on a nursing staff from the Fire Department in the pre - hospital care, and aims to identify what are the stressors in the work of professionals who are part of the nursing staff of APH Mobile from the Fire Department; analyze the impact of stress on the health of these professionals. The study characterized itself as qualitative descriptive - exploratory, involving 10 professionals. Data collection was conducted through interviews recorded electronically, using a semi-structured instrument. After transcription of the interviews, the similar aspects and differences found were grouped into analyze categories. It was confirmed that these professionals are subjected to constant stress, having modified their lifestyle habits, with health impact. It is suggested that the identified problems are studied in order to develop strategies in order to generate better working conditions for these professionals.

  17. O atendimento do doente mental em pronto-socorro geral: sentimentos e ações dos membros da equipe de enfermagem Caring of the mental ill patient in the emergency room: feelings and attitudes from nurse's staff

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudinei José Gomes Campos

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available Estuda-se aqui o cotidiano de assistência ao doente mental apresentado pelos membros da equipe de enfermagem de um Pronto-Socorro Geral. Os objetivos foram descrever os sentimentos destes indivíduos em relação ao doente mental e seu atendimento naquele local e analisar como é oferecida esta assistência. A relação dinâmica entre pensar, sentir e agir, demonstrou que a maioria dos indivíduos estudados apresentava fortes concepções de senso comum. Os sentimentos variavam entre pena, medo e raiva, dependendo do tipo de comportamento apresentado pelos pacientes. O atendimento prestado foi quase exclusivamente voltado aos aspectos técnicos da profissão, em uma vertente organicista/biológica.This work is based upon a day-by-day study of the services provid by a nurse team at a mentally impaired emergency room. Our aim is to study staff's reactions toward the patients as well as service itself We could feel the dynamic relation among thinking, feeling and performance created strong conceptions on individuals based upon a common sense The feelings noticed are: pity, scare and rage depending upon behavior. The assistance given to the mentally impaired is, at large, based exclusively on technical data resorted to organic/biological aspects.

  18. Staff Association

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2014-01-01

    Remove of the staff association office   The Staff Association offices are going to be renovated during the coming four months, February to May 2014. The physical move from our current premises 64/R-002 to our temporary office in  510/R-010 will take place on Friday January 31st, so the Secretariat will be closed on that day. Hence, from Monday February 3rd until the end of May 2014 the Staff Association Secretariat will be located in 510/R-010 (entrance just across the CERN Printshop).    

  19. Renewal of radiological equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-01

    In this century, medical imaging is at the heart of medical practice. Besides providing fast and accurate diagnosis, advances in radiology equipment offer new and previously non-existing options for treatment guidance with quite low morbidity, resulting in the improvement of health outcomes and quality of life for the patients. Although rapid technological development created new medical imaging modalities and methods, the same progress speed resulted in accelerated technical and functional obsolescence of the same medical imaging equipment, consequently creating a need for renewal. Older equipment has a high risk of failures and breakdowns, which might cause delays in diagnosis and treatment of the patient, and safety problems both for the patient and the medical staff. The European Society of Radiology is promoting the use of up-to-date equipment, especially in the context of the EuroSafe Imaging Campaign, as the use of up-to-date equipment will improve quality and safety in medical imaging. Every healthcare institution or authority should have a plan for medical imaging equipment upgrade or renewal. This plan should look forward a minimum of 5 years, with annual updates. Teaching points • Radiological equipment has a definite life cycle span, resulting in unavoidable breakdown and decrease or loss of image quality which renders equipment useless after a certain time period.• Equipment older than 10 years is no longer state-of-the art equipment and replacement is essential. Operating costs of older equipment will be high when compared with new equipment, and sometimes maintenance will be impossible if no spare parts are available.• Older equipment has a high risk of failure and breakdown, causing delays in diagnosis and treatment of the patient and safety problems both for the patient and the medical staff.• Every healthcare institution or authority should have a plan for medical imaging equipment upgrade or replacement. This plan should look forward a

  20. Integralidade e transdisciplinaridade em equipes multiprofissionais na saúde coletiva Integrality and transdisciplinarity in multi-professional teams in collective health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvani Botlender Severo

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Este artigo traz uma discussão e reflexão sobre a ativação da integralidade no processo de trabalho das equipes multiprofissionais na saúde coletiva. Alicerçamo-nos na teoria da complexidade de Edgar Morin e na lógica transdisciplinar de Basarab Nicolescu para compreender os paradoxos na ação coletiva dos trabalhadores no desafio de integrar as formações disciplinares com a exigência na prática de processos inter/transdisciplinares. Os trabalhadores encontram dificuldades na reorientação do modelo assistencial na saúde quando sua lógica está centrada na doença.This article brings about both a discussion and reflection on the activation of integrality in the work process of multi-professional teams in collective health. It has been grounded on the theory of complexity, by Edgar Morin, as well as on the transdisciplinary logic, by Basarab Nicolescu, to understand paradoxes in the collective action of workers when challenged to integrate disciplinary formations with the practice requirement of inter/transdisciplinary processes. Workers have found difficulty in reorienting the health assisting model whenever their logic is focused on illness.

  1. Occurrence of post traumatic stress symptoms and their relationship to professional quality of life (ProQoL in nursing staff at a forensic psychiatric security unit: a cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nonstad Kåre

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Violence is frequent towards nurses in forensic mental health hospitals. Implications of this high risk environment have not been systematically explored. This paper explores occurrence of symptoms on post traumatic stress and their relationship to professional quality of life. Methods Self report questionnaires assessing symptoms of post traumatic stress and professional quality of life were distributed among psychiatric nurses in a high security forensic psychiatric unit with high frequency of violent behaviour. Relationships between post traumatic stress symptoms, forensic nursing experience, type of ward and compassion satisfaction, burnout and compassion fatigue were explored. Results The prevalence of post traumatic stress symptoms was low. Low scores were found on compassion satisfaction. Length of psychiatric nursing experience and low scores on compassion satisfaction were correlated to increased post traumatic stress symptoms. Conclusion Although high violence frequency, low rate of post traumatic stress symptoms and low compassion satisfaction scores was found. High staff/patient ratio and emotional distance between staff and patients are discussed as protective factors.

  2. Staff evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swartz, A J

    1979-02-01

    The necessity for evaluating hospital pharmacy department personnel, and the recognized methods for performing such evaluations, including their advantages and deficiencies, are reviewed. Performance appraisal systems using ranking, person-to-person comparison, grading, graphic scales, checklists, forced-choice description, selection of critical incidents and management by objectives (MBO) are detailed, with emphasis upon their use in hospital pharmacy departments. All of these systems, with the exception of MBO, place inappropriate emphasis upon various subjective personality trails while failing to include objective results attained by personnel. Most of these methods (again excepting MBO) deny the evaluate-manager the opportunity to coach staff members in an attempt to improve results achievement. Staff evaluation, when carried out under an MBO system, is more likely to provide the hospital pharmacy department and its director with improved staff performance and development.

  3. End of life care for people with dementia: The views of health professionals, social care service managers and frontline staff on key requirements for good practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Richard Philip; Bamford, Claire; Poole, Marie; McLellan, Emma; Exley, Catherine; Robinson, Louise

    2017-01-01

    Background Evidence consistently shows that people with advanced dementia experience suboptimal end of life care compared to those with cancer; with increased hospitalisation, inadequate pain control and fewer palliative care interventions. Understanding the views of those service managers and frontline staff who organise and provide care is crucial in order to develop better end of life care for people with dementia. Methods and findings Qualitative interviews and focus groups were conducted from 2013 to 2015 with 33 service managers and 54 staff involved in frontline care, including doctors, nurses, nursing and care home managers, service development leads, senior managers/directors, care assistants and senior care assistants/team leads. All were audio recorded and transcribed verbatim. Participants represented a diverse range of service types and occupation. Transcripts were subject to coding and thematic analysis in data meetings. Analysis of the data led to the development of seven key themes: Recognising end of life (EOL) and tools to support end of life care (EOLC), Communicating with families about EOL, Collaborative working, Continuity of care, Ensuring comfort at EOL, Supporting families, Developing and supporting staff. Each is discussed in detail and comprise individual and collective views on approaches to good end of life care for people with dementia. Conclusions The significant challenges of providing good end of life care for people with dementia requires that different forms of expertise should be recognised and used; including the skills and knowledge of care assistants. Successfully engaging with people with dementia and family members and helping them to recognise the dying trajectory requires a supportive integration of emotional and technical expertise. The study strengthens the existing evidence base in this area and will be used with a related set of studies (on the views of other stakeholders and observations and interviews conducted in

  4. End of life care for people with dementia: The views of health professionals, social care service managers and frontline staff on key requirements for good practice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Philip Lee

    Full Text Available Evidence consistently shows that people with advanced dementia experience suboptimal end of life care compared to those with cancer; with increased hospitalisation, inadequate pain control and fewer palliative care interventions. Understanding the views of those service managers and frontline staff who organise and provide care is crucial in order to develop better end of life care for people with dementia.Qualitative interviews and focus groups were conducted from 2013 to 2015 with 33 service managers and 54 staff involved in frontline care, including doctors, nurses, nursing and care home managers, service development leads, senior managers/directors, care assistants and senior care assistants/team leads. All were audio recorded and transcribed verbatim. Participants represented a diverse range of service types and occupation. Transcripts were subject to coding and thematic analysis in data meetings. Analysis of the data led to the development of seven key themes: Recognising end of life (EOL and tools to support end of life care (EOLC, Communicating with families about EOL, Collaborative working, Continuity of care, Ensuring comfort at EOL, Supporting families, Developing and supporting staff. Each is discussed in detail and comprise individual and collective views on approaches to good end of life care for people with dementia.The significant challenges of providing good end of life care for people with dementia requires that different forms of expertise should be recognised and used; including the skills and knowledge of care assistants. Successfully engaging with people with dementia and family members and helping them to recognise the dying trajectory requires a supportive integration of emotional and technical expertise. The study strengthens the existing evidence base in this area and will be used with a related set of studies (on the views of other stakeholders and observations and interviews conducted in four services to develop an

  5. Functional anatomy of the cardiovascular system: professional development for PreK-3 teachers using a "train and equip" method results in learning opportunities for students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, E Robert

    2008-01-01

    Preadolescent students are interested in learning the structure and function of the human body. However, their teachers are not trained in this content. The purpose of this project was to expand a successful outreach effort in the health sciences for grade 7-12 teachers to include PreK-3 teachers. A "Healthy Hearts" workshop was offered to train the teachers in relevant content and also to give them a resource kit of supplies and equipment to facilitate the transference of the training into educational opportunities for their students. The workshop included many role-playing activities and use of all items in the resource kit. A total of 25 workshops were conducted in 14 different community locations with 716 PreK-3 teachers attending from 169 communities representing 59 (79%) of the state's 75 counties. African American (AA) teacher participation was 35%, twice the state AA population rate and 3.5x the AA public school teacher rate. Pre to Posttest scores increased an average of 15%. The results of the evaluation measures regarding the workshop and the transference of the training and use of resource kit items into learning opportunities for students were excellent. Universities have the capability, perhaps the responsibility, to provide the much-needed professional development training to PreK-12 teachers. Anatomists in medical and nonmedical school settings are well positioned to participate in this process and help close the gap between the interest young children have in learning about the human body and the lack of teacher training in this content. (c) 2008 American Association of Anatomists.

  6. Developing Professional Learning for Staff Working with Children with Speech, Language and Communication Needs Combined with Moderate-Severe Learning Difficulties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Carolyn

    2011-01-01

    This article presents research undertaken as part of a PhD by Carolyn Anderson who is a senior lecturer on the BSc (Hons) in Speech and Language Pathology at the University of Strathclyde. The study explores the professional learning experiences of 49 teachers working in eight schools and units for children with additional support needs in…

  7. Justification of the conceptual construct "readiness to the labour organization staff sports schools" in the context of vocational training future professionals of physical culture and sports

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Perepletchikov D.A.

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Was analyzed literature devoted to the preparation of students of physical education to administrative activities. In the context of their training we held a comparative analysis of the approaches to organize the pedagogical process. As a reference point for the formation of professional preparedness specialist physical education and sports identified qualifying characteristics posts in this industry. Based on the analysis of literature given the definition of the concept of "readiness for organization of the Youth sports school.

  8. A importância da equipe interdisciplinar no diagnóstico de dislexia do desenvolvimento: relato de caso The importance of interdisciplinary staff in the diagnosis of developmental dyslexia: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magda S. Vanzo Pestun

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available Descrevemos o trabalho de uma equipe interdisciplinar da FCM/UNICAMP na avaliação de um menino de 9 anos e 3 meses aluno de escola pública de Campinas, com dislexia do desenvolvimento. O procedimento constou de 4 fases: 1 anamnese com a mãe; 2 avaliação neuropsicológica; 3 avaliação específica de leitura e escrita; 4 exames complementares. Os resultados das várias avaliações revelaram que o menino apresenta inteligência normal, ausência de déficit auditivo ou visual mas dificuldades em provas específicas de leitura, em memória de curto prazo (especialmente em sequências auditivas e em consciência fonológica, além de lentidão, falta de concentração, sinais neurológicos menores e hipoperfusão da porção mesial do lobo temporal. Esses dados sugeriram que a criança apresenta dislexia do desenvolvimento do tipo misto, necessitando de intervenção psicopedagógica.We describe the work of the interdisciplinary staff of FCM/UNICAMP for the diagnosis of developmental dyslexia, evaluating a 9 years old boy from the second year of a first grade public school. The procedure consisted of four stages: 1 Interview with the mother (anamnesis; 2 neuropsychological evaluation; 3 specific evaluation for reading and writing skills; 4 complementary exams. The results revealed that the child presented normal intelligence, normal auditory and visual function but difficulties in reading specific test, in auditory short-term memory (specially in auditory sequences, and in phonological conscience, as well as slowness, lack of concentration, slight neurological signs and hypoperfusion of the mesial portion of the temporal lobe. These data suggest that the child has developmental dyslexia of mixed type, requiring psychopedagogic follow-up.

  9. A equipe de enfermagem e o mito do trabalho em grupo El equipo de enfermeria yel mito del trabajo en grupo The nursing staff and the myth of group work

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sueli Moreira Pirolo

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available Este estudo tem como objetivos: análise dos comportamentos individuais no transcorrer da "passagem de plantão"; e análise do comportamento grupal na realização da referida tarefa, a partir da observação cenas filmadas da equipe de enfermagem, recebendo e passando o plantão. Na análise dos comportamentos individuais, foi utilizada uma lista de indicadores de comunicação não -verbal. Na análise dos comportamentos grupais foi utilizada uma lista de indicadores, considerando os conceitos de processo grupal. Os resultados mostraram que os indicadores não -verbais ineficazes predominaram, e os indicadores grupais inadequados foram mais expressivos. Com base nesses resultados, pode-se concluir que a "passagem de plantão" não se constituiu como uma atividade grupal.Este estudio tiene como objetivos: análisis de los comportamientos individuales en el desarrollar del "cambio de turno ", y análisis del comportamiento grupal y la realización de dicha tarea. En el análisis de los comportamientos individuales, fue utilizada una lista de indicadores de comunicación no verbal. En el análisis de los comportamientos grupales, fue utilizada una lista de indicadores, considerando los conceptos del proceso grupal. Los resultados enseñaron que los indicadores no verbales ineficaces predominan, y los indicadores grupales inadecuados fueron más expresivos, se puede concluir que le "cambio de turno" no se constituyó en una actividad grupal.This paper has two objectives: the first one is analyzing the individual behaviors indicated by non-verbal communication during shist exchanges; the second one is analyzing group behavior during shist exchanges based on the observation the videotaped scenes of a nursing staff during a shist exchange. A list of non-verbal communication signs was used to analyze individual behaviors. The concepts group were used to analyze group behaviors. The results showed that ineffective non verbal signs prevailed over

  10. Medicaid program; third party liability for medical assistance; FFP rates for skilled professional medical personnel and supporting staff; and sources of state share of financial participation--HCFA. Proposed rules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-06-04

    These proposed regulations would--(1) Broaden the scope of services for which a State must collect from third parties the cost of medical assistance furnished to Medicaid recipients, remove the specific requirements for the terms of cooperative agreements for third party collections, and revise the methods of paying claims involving third party liability; (2) Clarify criteria used in determining whether skilled professional medical personnel and supporting staff involved in the administration of the Medicaid program quality for 75 percent Federal matching; and (3) Clarify policy to permit public and private donations to be used as a State's share of financial participation in the entire Medicaid program, instead of only for training expenditures. The proposed amendments would clarify policy and reduce program expenditures.

  11. Staff Rostering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.A.E. Thompson

    1978-09-01

    Full Text Available Staff rostering is a key factor in nursing management with potential to bring life to, or to paralyse the system. This places immense responsibility on those in charge of rostering, and an all but intolerable load if the task is incumbent upon any one person. Nurse administrators (managers who have handled such a task, are to be congratulated on the order they have created out of potential ‘chaos’. It would seem, however, that the time is surely ripe for regular appraisals of the situation with a resultant increased participation in the policy and decision-making process.

  12. Impact of design of installations and in the personal staff formation of the hybrid equipment: PET-CT; Impacto en el diseno de instalaciones y en la formacion del personal de los equipos hibridos: PET-CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hernandez, R.; Soler, K.; Alonso, I., E-mail: ramon@orasen.co.cu, E-mail: karen@orasen.co.cu, E-mail: azul@orasen.con.cu [Centro Nacional de Seguridad Nuclear, La Habana (Cuba)

    2013-11-01

    In this article the general principles to be considered in the design of a Nuclear Medicine department with PET-CT, and address the existing problems regarding training needs and staff training, to take on this new technology.

  13. Motivating Staff--A Problem for the School Administrator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batchler, Merv

    1981-01-01

    Examines the implications for educators of the "Motivation-Hygiene Theory" proposed by Frederick Herzberg. Suggests increasing staff opportunities for goal setting, decision making, and expanded professional competence as strategies for developing staff motivation. (Author/MLF)

  14. Percepções da equipe de enfermagem sobre seu trabalho em uma unidade de queimados La percepción del personal de enfermería de su trabajo en una unidad de quemados How the nursing staff perceives work in a burn unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria de Lourdes Custódio Duarte

    2012-03-01

    analyze nurses' perception regarding their work in a Burn Unit of a public hospital in the state of Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil. This is a study with a qualitative approach, developed from semi-structured interviews with 20 professionals of the hospital's nursing staff. From the data analysis three categories emerged: The meaning of work in a Burn Unit; Difficulties encountered in daily work; Strategies used by nurses in their work performance. We conclude that it is the duty of the institutions where Burn Units are located to provide spaces for psychological support in attending the demands of professionals who assist victims of thermal trauma. We emphasize the need for educational institutions to place a greater emphasis in this area during the training of future professionals.

  15. Cognizance and utilization about breast cancer screening among the health professional female students and staffs of University Kuala Lumpur, Royal College of Medicine Perak, Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haque, A T M Emdadul; Mohd Hisham, Muhammad Afif Bin; Ahmad Adzman, Noor Azwa Laili Binti; Azudin, Nur Atiqah Binti; Shafri, Nursakinah Binti; Haque, Mainul

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer (BC) is a major life-threatening problem and a global concern including Malaysia. BC is an equal threat for both developing and developed countries. The aim of this study was to determine the relationship between sociodemographic factors with knowledge, attitude, and perception on BC screening among the females of University Kuala Lumpur, Royal College of Medicine Perak (UniKL RCMP). This cross-sectional study was conducted from 2015 to 2016. The populations included were the students and staff of UniKL RCMP. The simple sampling method was used and a set of questionnaire was prepared and distributed to the participants who were willing to participate. The data were analyzed by using the SPSS version 17. Of the 220 only 203 questionnaires were returned. Nearly 87.7% of participants indicated genetic factors as the cause of BC, followed by exposure to carcinogenic and X-ray. Excessive smoking (54.2%) and sedentary lifestyle (52.2%) were the risk factors of the BC. 100% of participants thought that breast self-examination (BSE) is important to detect a breast lump and most of them (76.8%) knew what a mammogram is but only 2.0% went for a mammogram. Chemotherapy (71.9%) and surgery (71.9%) were treatments options according to study participants. Nearly 91.1% agreed that regular mammogram could help to detect BC at an early stage. Nearly 88.2% thought BC is not easily curable. Finally, for the attitude on BC screening, most of them knew how to perform BSE (69.0%) with the frequency of 36.0% doing it once a year. The majority of the participants found the good knowledge on BC and on how to perform BSE. Although most of them knew what a mammogram is, only a few have gone for it since perhaps it is recommended for those who are above 50-year-old. Therefore, researchers believe and trust that there is an urgent need of state-funded multicenter study to prevent and early diagnosis of BC in Malaysia.

  16. Managing Your Support Staff: An Insider's View.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rais, Shirley

    1993-01-01

    Provides practical tips on three key traits of successful library managers: ability to motivate, utilization of authority to reward or discipline, and ability to delegate. Encouraging library support staff interested in becoming professional librarians is stressed. (EAM)

  17. [A listening support group for nursing staff].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemoine, Dominique

    2016-05-01

    The feedback from a consultant nurse in a listening support group for health professionals shows that, for hospital nursing staff, the phenomenon of suffering in the workplace is a reality. In addition to providing help to professionals who request it, the missions of such a group are to promote discussion around psycho-social risks in the framework of a policy of compassionate care for staff. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  18. Staff rosters for 1979: environmental programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-12-01

    The roster of the scientific and professional staffs of the Environmental Programs of the Department of Energy and Environment has been compiled as of December 1979. Staff members have been listed according to their organizational units, i.e., the Atmospheric Sciences Division, the Environmental Chemistry Division, the Oceanographic Sciences Division, and the Land and Freshwater Environmental Sciences Group. Educational background, research interests, professional activities, summary of experience at BNL, and selected publications have been included for each member listed.

  19. Teaching Staff Advanced Training: European Experience

    OpenAIRE

    Kovalchuk Vasyl

    2015-01-01

    The issue of teaching staff advanced training is paid much attention in many countries. In the Republic of Moldova progressive professional credits system is used. Credits are scored not only in assigning teaching degrees or issuing a certificate of continuing professional education, but also for teachers’ evaluation at the educational institution. Advanced training of teaching staff in France is provided by various institutions of postgraduate education, university institutes and regional ce...

  20. Perceptions of mothers and hospital staff of paediatric care in 13 public hospitals in northern Tanzania

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mwangi, Rose; Chandler, Clare; Nasuwa, Fortunata

    2008-01-01

    interviewed to explore their opinions and experience of the admission process and conditions on the ward. Overcrowding, unsanitary conditions and lack of food were major concerns for mothers on the ward, who were deterred from seeking treatment earlier due to fears that hospital admission posed a significant...... risk of exposure to infection. While most staff were seen as being sympathetic and supportive to mothers, a minority were reported to be judgemental and authoritarian. Health workers identified lack of trained staff, overwork and low pay as major concerns. Staff shortages, lack of effective training...... and equipment are established problems but our findings also highlight a need for wards to become more parent-friendly, particularly with regard to food, hygiene and space. Training programmes focused on professional conduct and awareness of the problems that mothers face in seeking and receiving care may...

  1. Medical center staff attitudes about spanking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gershoff, Elizabeth T; Font, Sarah A; Taylor, Catherine A; Foster, Rebecca H; Garza, Ann Budzak; Olson-Dorff, Denyse; Terreros, Amy; Nielsen-Parker, Monica; Spector, Lisa

    2016-11-01

    Several medical professional organizations, including the American Academy of Pediatrics, recommend that parents avoid hitting children for disciplinary purposes (e.g., spanking) and that medical professionals advise parents to use alternative methods. The extent to which medical professionals continue to endorse spanking is unknown. This study is the first to examine attitudes about spanking among staff throughout medical settings, including non-direct care staff. A total of 2580 staff at a large general medical center and 733 staff at a children's hospital completed an online survey; respondents were roughly divided between staff who provide direct care to patients (e.g., physicians, nurses) and staff who do not (e.g., receptionists, lab technicians). Less than half (44% and 46%) of staff at each medical center agreed that spanking is harmful to children, although almost all (85% and 88%) acknowledged that spanking can lead to injury. Men, staff who report being religious, and staff who held non-direct care positions at the medical center reported stronger endorsement of spanking and perceived their co-workers to be more strongly in favor of spanking. Non-direct care staff were more supportive of spanking compared with direct care staff on every item assessed. All staff underestimated the extent to which their co-workers held negative views of spanking. If medical centers and other medical settings are to lead the charge in informing the community about the harms of spanking, comprehensive staff education about spanking is indicated. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. STAFF NEEDED

    CERN Document Server

    2001-01-01

    The English National Programme, part of the Lycée International de Ferney-Voltaire (France) needs the following staff for September 2001: A part-time teacher of primary English The post involves teaching the English curriculum to pupils who are within the French educational system: Classes take place on Tuesday afternoons at the Lycée, Team spirit necessary as teachers work as a team, Induction & training are offered. A part time teacher of senior secondary history-geography in English A part time teacher of secondary mathematics in English Teachers must be mother-tongue English speakers and have a relevant degree and/or teaching qualification. For the history-geography post, either history or geography degrees are acceptable. Please send your c.v. and a letter of application to Peter Woodburn, Head, English National Programme, Lycée International, 01216 Ferney-Voltaire, France. (Email: engnat@hotmail.com) Telephone 04 50 40 82 66 for further details of posts. Ple...

  3. Professional development of distance education professionals ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Erna Kinsey

    Professional development of distance education professionals (DEPs) at TSA: a profile of functions. J.F. van Koller. Institute for Staff Development, Technikon SA, Private Bag X6, Florida, 1710 South Africa jvcoller@tsa.ac.za. This article deals with the development of a profile of the functions and required competencies of ...

  4. Teaching Staff Advanced Training: European Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovalchuk, Vasyl

    2015-01-01

    The issue of teaching staff advanced training is paid much attention in many countries. In the Republic of Moldova progressive professional credits system is used. Credits are scored not only in assigning teaching degrees or issuing a certificate of continuing professional education, but also for teachers' evaluation at the educational…

  5. Improving staff selection processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerinus, Marie; Shannon, Marina

    2014-11-11

    This article, the second in a series of articles on Leading Better Care, describes the actions undertaken in recent years in NHS Lanarkshire to improve selection processes for nursing, midwifery and allied health professional (NMAHP) posts. This is an area of significant interest to these professions, management colleagues and patients given the pivotal importance of NMAHPs to patient care and experience. In recent times the importance of selecting staff not only with the right qualifications but also with the right attributes has been highlighted to ensure patients are well cared for in a safe, effective and compassionate manner. The article focuses on NMAHP selection processes, tracking local, collaborative development work undertaken to date. It presents an overview of some of the work being implemented, highlights a range of important factors, outlines how evaluation is progressing and concludes by recommending further empirical research.

  6. Supporting underserved patients with their medicines: a study protocol for a patient/professional coproduced education intervention for community pharmacy staff to improve the provision and delivery of Medicine Use Reviews (MURs)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latif, Asam; Pollock, Kristian; Anderson, Claire; Waring, Justin; Solomon, Josie; Chen, Li-Chia; Anderson, Emma; Gulzar, Sulma; Abbasi, Nasa; Wharrad, Heather

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Community pharmacy increasingly features in global strategies to modernise the delivery of primary healthcare. Medicine Use Reviews (MURs) form part of the English Government's medicines management strategy to improve adherence and reduce medicine waste. MURs provide space for patient–pharmacist dialogue to discuss the well-known problems patients experience with medicine taking. However, ‘underserved’ communities (eg, black and minority ethnic communities, people with mental illness), who may benefit the most, may not receive this support. This study aims to develop, implement and evaluate an e-learning education intervention which is coproduced between patients from underserved communities and pharmacy teams to improve MUR provision. Methods and analysis This mixed-methods evaluative study will involve a 2-stage design. Stage 1 involves coproduction of an e-learning resource through mixed patient–professional development (n=2) and review (n=2) workshops, alongside informative semistructured interviews with patients (n=10) and pharmacy staff (n=10). Stage 2 involves the implementation and evaluation of the intervention with community pharmacy staff within all community pharmacies within the Nottinghamshire geographical area (n=237). Online questionnaires will be completed at baseline and postintervention (3 months) to assess changes in engagement with underserved communities and changes in self-reported attitudes and behaviour. To triangulate findings, 10 pharmacies will record at baseline and postintervention, details of actual numbers of MURs performed and the proportion that are from underserved communities. Descriptive and inferential statistics will be used to analyse the data. The evaluation will also include a thematic analysis of one-to-one interviews with pharmacy teams to explore the impact on clinical practice (n=20). Interviews with patients belonging to underserved communities, and who received an MUR, will also be conducted (n

  7. Concussion knowledge among rehabilitation staff

    OpenAIRE

    Salisbury, David; Kolessar, Michael; Callender, Librada; Bennett, Monica

    2017-01-01

    A concussion knowledge survey was completed by 561 rehabilitation professionals across a wide range of disciplines in a nationwide rehabilitation hospital system. Item questions were structured to reflect key areas of concussion knowledge targeted in a prior consensus statement. The vast majority of staff provided responses consistent with the current concussion literature regarding concussion diagnosis and symptom presentation immediately after concussion. Greater variability was seen for it...

  8. Radiation exposure to operating room staff during prostate brachytherapy using iodine-125 seeds; Exposition radiologique de l'equipe operatoire au cours de curietherapies de prostate par implants permanents d'iode-125

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gagna, G.; Amabile, J.C.; Laroche, P. [Service de protection radiologique des armees (SPRA), 1 bis rue du Lieutenant Raoul Batany, 92141 Clamart Cedex (France); Gauron, C. [Institut national de recherche et de securite (INRS), Departement Etudes et Assistance Medicales, 30 rue Olivier Noyer, 75680 Paris Cedex 14 (France)

    2011-04-15

    The French defense radiation protection service (SPRA) and the French national institute for research and safety (INRS) conducted a joint study to assess the radiation exposure to operating room staff during prostate brachytherapy using iodine-125 seeds at the Val-de-Grace military hospital. The purpose of the study was the assessment of the effective doses, the equivalent doses to the extremities and lens received by a novice team, the different ambient dose equivalent rates measurements and the delineation of areas. After six brachy-therapies, all the recorded doses with whole-body InLight{sup R} OSL and nanoDot{sup R} dosimeters remained below the detection limit for the whole staff. The dose rate measured at the end of implantation by an AT1123{sup R} survey meter is about 170 {mu}Sv/h at the perineum of the patient. The controlled area limit is estimated to be about 20 cm from the patient perineum. From these results, the authors propose recommendations for the categorization of workers, the delineation of areas and the dose monitoring procedures. This study demonstrates that real-time ultrasound-guided trans-perineal prostate brachytherapy delivers low dose to the operators because of the radioactive source characteristics and the instrumentation providing an effective radiation protection for the surgical team. (authors)

  9. Safety of nursing staff and determinants of adherence to personal protective equipment La seguridad de los trabajadores de enfermería y los factores determinantes para adhesión a los equipamientos de protección individual Segurança dos trabalhadores de enfermagem e fatores determinantes para adesão aos equipamentos de proteção individual

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heliny Carneiro Cunha Neves

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available A qualitative study conducted in a teaching hospital with 15 nursing professionals. Attempted to analyze the reasons, attitudes and beliefs of nursing staff regarding adherence to personal protective equipment. Data were collected through focus groups, analyzed by the method of interpretation of meanings, considering Rosenstock’s model of health beliefs as a reference framework. Data revealed two themes: Occupational safety and Interpersonal Relationship. We identified several barriers that interfere in matters of safety and personal protective equipment, such as communication, work overload, physical structure, accessibility of protective equipment and organizational and management aspects. Adherence to personal protective equipment is determined by the context experienced in the workplace, as well as by individual values and beliefs, but the decision to use the personal protective equipment is individual.Estudio cualitativo realizado en un hospital universitario con 15 profesionales de enfermería. Objetivó analizar las razones, actitudes y creencias de los trabajadores de enfermería referentes a la adhesión a los equipamientos de protección individual. Los datos fueron recolectados por medio de grupo focal, analizados por el método de interpretación de sentidos, considerando el referencial del modelo de creencias sobre salud de Rosenstock. De los datos surgieron dos categorías temáticas, Seguridad en el trabajo y Relaciones Interpersonales. Identificamos varias barreras que interfieren en las cuestiones de seguridad y protección individual como comunicación, sobrecarga de trabajo, estructura física, accesibilidad a los equipamientos de protección y aspectos organizacionales y administrativos. La adhesión a los equipamientos de protección es determinada tanto por el contexto experimentado en el ambiente de trabajo, como por valores y creencias individuales; sin embargo, la decisión del uso de los equipamientos de protecci

  10. Decentralized Ground Staff Scheduling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, M. D.; Clausen, Jens

    2002-01-01

    Typically, ground staff scheduling is centrally planned for each terminal in an airport. The advantage of this is that the staff is efficiently utilized, but a disadvantage is that staff spends considerable time walking between stands. In this paper a decentralized approach for ground staff...

  11. Implantação do Programa Saúde na escola em Fortaleza-CE: atuação de equipe da Estratégia Saúde da Família Implantación del Programa de Salud Escolar en Fortaleza-CE: desempeño de equipo de la Estrategia Salud de la Familia School Health Program implementation in Fortaleza-CE: performance of the Family Health Strategy staff

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lindelvania Matias de Santiago

    2012-12-01

    professionals to perceive their social role as educators and provided adolescents a greater contact with the staff from FHS. The rapprochement between the school and the FHS is crucial to help teenagers to transform scientific knowledge into healthy behaviors.

  12. Equipment repaired is equipment gained

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V Srinivasan

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available According to WHO, at any one time, around 50 per cent of medical equipment in low- and middle-income countries cannot be used because of lack of maintenance or spare parts. We have found that unwillingness or inability to repair equipment and put it back in use is also a major cause.

  13. Estratégias de enfrentamento utilizadas pela equipe de enfermagem de um CTI adulto perante situações de estresse Coping strategies used by the nursing staff of an adult ICU in stress situations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emanuelle Graziottin Colossi

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Introdução: Para os profissionais da saúde lidar com situações de estresse, como por exemplo, a eminência da morte dos pacientes, parece ser uma das maiores dificuldades vividas em sue ambiente de trabalho. Frente a este contexto, cada pessoa lança mão de estratégias próprias para o enfrentamento de situações estressantes (coping, as quais são determinadas pelo ambiente e por características de personalidade. Objetivo: Identificar as estratégias de enfrentamento (coping dos profissionais de enfermagem de um CTI adulto diante de situações estressantes inerentes a sua profissão. Materiais e Métodos: Trata-se de um estudo descritivo transversal, no qual foi aplicado o Inventário COPE, em trinta e oito técnicos de enfermagem e/ou enfermeiros. Os dados do inventário foram analisados em termos descritivos. Resultados: As estratégias de enfrentamento mais utilizadas foram as relacionadas à capacidade pró-ativa do sujeito (reinterpretação positiva, coping ativo e busca por suporte social e as menos utilizadas foram as relacionadas às emoções (foco nas emoções e humor. Conclusão: Na amostra estudada, os profissionais buscam estratégias que antecedam as dificuldades inerentes a sua prática diária, isolando os aspectos mais irrelevantes dos estressores e focalizando a atenção no resultado de suas ações, o que permite uma melhor percepção de seu trabalho e o sentimento de realização profissional.Introduction: For health professionals, to deal with stressful situations, such as the imminence of death of their patients, seems to be one of the greatest difficulties experienced in the workplace. In these situations, each person makes use of their own strategies in order to cope with stressful situations, which are determined by the environment and the personality traits. Objective: To identify the coping strategies used by nursing professionals of an adult ICU while facing stressful situations inherent to their

  14. Reabilitação Psicossocial: visão da equipe de Saúde Mental Reabilitación Psicosocial: visión del equipo de Salud Mental Psychosocial Rehabilitation: perceptions of the Mental Health staff

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Salete Bessa Jorge

    2006-12-01

    segmentos de la vida social.This study is inserted in assumptions of research's analysis qualitative which objective was to interpretate the Mental Health professional's perspectives about psychosocial rehabilitation of mental disorder's porter to know as them proceed it in their professional practice. Data collection came up by the application of semi-structured interviews to 8 Mental Health professionals that work in the Center of Psychosocial Attention. After the readings, notes of pieces of talk, subcategories and categories were composed after the interpretation based on the literature. The results pointed that psychosocial rehabilitation is a process which implementation and still needs effective overcome of traditional paradigma of health mental disease, that form conception and therapeutic practices and requires trust of professionals about the users' capacity of live as citizen in the most variable segments of social life.

  15. Elections to Staff Council

    CERN Multimedia

    Saff Association

    2013-01-01

    2013 Elections to Staff Council   Vote! Make your voice heard and be many to elect the new Staff Council. More details on the elections can be found on the Staff Association web site (https://ap-vote.web.cern.ch/elections-2013).   Timetable elections Monday 28 October to Monday 11 November, 12:00 am voting Monday 18 and Monday 25 November, publication of the results in Echo Tuesday 19 November, Staff Association Assizes Tuesday 3 December, first meeting of the new Staff Council and election of the new Executive Committee The voting procedure is monitored by the Election Committee.

  16. Solar Equipment

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-01-01

    A medical refrigeration and a water pump both powered by solar cells that convert sunlight directly into electricity are among the line of solar powered equipment manufactured by IUS (Independent Utility Systems) for use in areas where conventional power is not available. IUS benefited from NASA technology incorporated in the solar panel design and from assistance provided by Kerr Industrial Applications Center.

  17. Staff Responses When Parents Hit Children in a Hospital Setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Font, Sarah A; Gershoff, Elizabeth T; Taylor, Catherine A; Terreros, Amy; Nielsen-Parker, Monica; Spector, Lisa; Foster, Rebecca H; Budzak Garza, Ann; Olson-Dorff, Denyse

    Physical punishment of children is a prevalent practice that is condemned by most medical professionals given its link with increased risk of child physical abuse and other adverse child outcomes. This study examined the prevalence of parent-to-child hitting in medical settings and the intervention behaviors of staff who witness it. Staff at a children's medical center and a general medical center completed a voluntary, anonymous survey. We used descriptive statistics to examine differences in the experiences of physicians, nurses, and other medical staff. We used logistic regression to predict intervention behaviors among staff who witnessed parent-to-child hitting. Of the hospital staff who completed the survey (N = 2863), we found that 50% of physicians, 24% of nurses, 27% of other direct care staff, and 17% of nondirect care staff witnessed parent-to-child hitting at their medical center in the past year. A majority of physicians, nurses, and other direct care staff reported intervening sometimes or always. Nondirect care staff rarely intervened. Believing staff have the responsibility to intervene, and having comfortable strategies with which to intervene were strongly predictive of intervention behavior. Staff who did not intervene commonly reported that they did not know how to respond. Many medical center staff witness parent-to-child hitting. Although some of the staff reported that they intervened when they witnessed this behavior, the findings indicate that staff may need training to identify when and how they should respond.

  18. Quantitative and qualitative processes of change during staff-coaching sessions : An exploratory study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Oorsouw, W.M.W.J.; Embregts, P.J.C.M.; Bosman, A.M.T.

    2013-01-01

    Staff training is one of the interventions that managers can embed in their organizations to help staff improve their professional competences related to challenging behaviour of clients with intellectual disabilities. Individual coaching adds learning opportunities that are feasible but difficult

  19. Quantitative and qualitative processes of change during staff-coaching sessions: An exploratory study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oorsouw, W.M.W.J. van; Embregts, P.J.C.M.; Bosman, A.M.T.

    2013-01-01

    Staff training is one of the interventions that managers can embed in their organizations to help staff improve their professional competences related to challenging behaviour of clients with intellectual disabilities. Individual coaching adds learning opportunities that are feasible but difficult

  20. Supported Conversation for hospital staff

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Forchhammer, Hysse B; Løvholt, Annelise P.; Mathiesen, Lone Lundbak

    Aims It is a challenge for health professionals to involve patients with aphasia (PWAs) in their own treatment, care and rehabilitation. Disrupted communication may also influence patient safety and lead to social isolation. In order to increase health care professionals’ ability to engage PWAs i...... hospital staff’s confidence and self-assessed ability to communicate with PWAs....... month period. Each course had 10-12 participants and lasted 6 hours, including instruction in the SCA principles, video analysis, interdisciplinary group work, and practice sessions with PWAs. Self-assessed learning outcomes were evaluated with a brief questionnaire filled out by staff members...... immediately before course attendance and 3-6 months afterwards. Results Self-rated knowledge of aphasia had significantly improved when assessed 3-6 months after the course and improvement was seen for all groups of health professionals. Comfort and ease in communicating with PWA and ability to solve problems...

  1. Job satisfaction among emergency department staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suárez, M; Asenjo, M; Sánchez, M

    2017-02-01

    To compare job satisfaction among nurses, physicians and administrative staff in an emergency department (ED). To analyse the relationship of job satisfaction with demographic and professional characteristics of these personnel. We performed a descriptive, cross-sectional study in an ED in Barcelona (Spain). Job satisfaction was evaluated by means of the Font-Roja questionnaire. Multivariate analysis determined relationship between the overall job satisfaction and the variables collected. Fifty-two nurses, 22 physicians and 30 administrative staff were included. Administrative staff were significantly more satisfied than physicians and nurses: 3.42±0.32 vs. 2.87±0.42 and 3.06±0.36, respectively. Multivariate analysis showed the following variables to be associated with job satisfaction: rotation among the different ED acuity levels (OR: 2.34; 95%CI: 0.93-5.89) and being an administrative staff (OR: 0.27; 95%CI: 0.09-0.80). Nurses and physicians reported greater stress and work pressure than administrative staff and described a worse physical working environment. Interpersonal relationships obtained the highest score among the three groups of professionals. Job satisfaction of nurses and physicians in an ED is lower than that of administrative staff with the former perceiving greater stress and work pressure. Conversely, interpersonal relationships are identified as strength. Being nurse or physician and not rotating among the different ED acuity levels increase dissatisfaction. Copyright © 2016 College of Emergency Nursing Australasia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Visit of the US Congressional Staff delegation

    CERN Multimedia

    Patrice Loïez

    2001-01-01

    List of participants: Jon Kamarck, Chief Clerk, VA-HUD subcommittee, Senate Appropriations Committee; Cheh Kim, Professional Staff Member, VA-HUD subcommittee, Senate Appropriations Committee; David Schindel, Head, National Science Foundation, Europe Office; Terry Schaff, National Science Foundation, Office of Legislative & Public Affairs; Tim Clancy, National Science Foundation, Office of Legislative & Public Affairs; Ms Lynette Poulton, First Secretary, US Mission in Geneva

  3. The different roles of the Staff association

    CERN Document Server

    Staff Association

    2012-01-01

    The statutory role of the CERN Staff Association is defined in Chapter VII of the Staff Rules and Regulations. The means of the Association to realize its aims are described in Article I.1.3 of the Statutes of the CERN Staff Association. Generally speaking, its aims are “To serve and defend the economic, social, professional and moral interests of its members and all CERN staff“. Usually we deal with professional and social issues (employment conditions, defence of collective or individual rights, promotion of basic research...). But the Association also plays a role of integration (clubs promoting cultural, humanitarian, and sport or offering entertainment, organizing exhibitions and conferences) and it can promote actions to provide its members with material or social advantages (Interfon, commercial offers). Advantageous commercial offers In recent years the Association was able to negotiate with business or cultural partners benefits for its members. A full list can be found on our...

  4. Universities' expectations of pastoral care: trends, stressors, resource gaps and support needs for teaching staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laws, Thomas A; Fiedler, Brenton A

    2012-10-01

    Since the mid-90s, the university environment has challenged the motivation of academic staff to engage in pastoral care. A literature review revealed five themes that aligned with analysis of interview data from a previous study (Laws and Fiedler, 2010). The key themes were i) staff were often disturbed by unplanned intrusions of students who exhibited behavioural problems or sought emotional support, ii) the management of emotions in face-to-face encounters was stressful, iii) staff felt under-equipped for dealing with Mental Health (MH) issues, iv) standards and control needed updating and v) counselling and disability services did not meet academics' need to know about 'at risk' students. Having identified the incidence of mental health issues among Australian University students, this study aims to locate literature that describes how well current university policies/protocols are supported by Evidence Based Practice in the management of MH problems in the student population. Findings from a content analysis of the literature were triangulated with verbatim comments recorded during a previous study that utilised semi structured interviews with 34 academics at the School of Nursing and Midwifery and the School of Commerce at the University of South Australia (Laws and Fiedler, 2010). Lack of clarity on role boundaries around promotion of students' well-being was not clearly defined. The Higher Education (HE) institutions' slowness in responding to mental health needs of students combined with the increasing expectations of academics' performance monitoring has lead staff to avoid deep investment in their students' well-being. The literature indicates that students are in need of psychological support, but pastoral care remains ill-defined despite enduring expectations held by university administrators. Teacher motivation is diminished by time spent with students in need of emotional support which is not acknowledged in workloads. Staff stress is increased by

  5. Hospital staff corridor conversations: work in passing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Martínez, Esther; Bangerter, Adrian; Lê Van, Kim; Navarro, Cécile

    2016-03-01

    First, to document the prevalence of corridor occupations and conversations among the staff of a hospital clinic, and their main features. Second, to examine the activities accomplished through corridor conversations and their interactional organization. Despite extensive research on mobility in hospital work, we still know fairly little about the prevalence and features of hospital staff corridor conversations and how they are organized. We conducted a study combining descriptive statistical analysis and multimodal conversation analysis of video recordings of staff corridor practices in a hospital outpatient clinic in Switzerland. In 2012, we collected 59 hours of video recordings in a corridor of a hospital clinic. We coded and statistically analysed the footage that showed the clinic staff exclusively. We also performed qualitative multimodal conversation analysis on a selection of the recorded staff conversations. Corridor occupations by the clinic staff are frequent and brief and rarely involve stops. Talk events (which include self-talk, face-to-face conversations and telephone conversations) during occupations are also brief and mobile, overwhelmingly focus on professional topics and are particularly frequent when two or more staff members occupy the corridor. The conversations present several interactional configurations and comprise an array of activities consequential to the provision of care and work organization. These practices are related to the fluid work organization of a spatially distributed team in a fast-paced, multitasking environment and should be taken into consideration in any undertaking aimed at improving hospital units' functioning. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Using psychological science to improve summer camp staff training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schafer, Ethan D

    2007-10-01

    Preseason staff training is an exciting and stressful time for all camping professionals. By using principles of developmental psychology, learning theory, and self-monitoring, however, we can maximize the usefulness of training sessions. This article also discusses educating staff about children's mental health issues and managing challenging situations with adolescents.

  7. Supervising Staff in Student Affairs: Exploration of the Synergistic Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saunders, Sue A.; Cooper, Diane L.; Winston, Roger B., Jr.; Chernow, Erin

    2000-01-01

    Describes the development andexplores the validity of the Synergistic Supervision Scale (SSS), which measures the extent to which staff perceive that their supervisor focuses on the advancement of the institutional mission and the personal and professional advancement of staff. Results indicate that synergistic supervision seems to be a valid…

  8. Sizing of Staff of Neonatal Units in a University Hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriela Ramos Ferreira Curan

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim was to evaluate the size of the nursing neonatal units of a university hospital regarding the education and professional experience of the nursing staff and the adequacy of existing legislation professional staff. Descriptive, quantitative study, conducted at the Intensive Care Unit and Neonatal Intermediate Care. We used two instruments to collect data with the nursing staff and the professional relationship and bed occupancy. Employees had an average experience in neonatal units of 14 years; most had more than one vocational training (59.3%. The number of nurses was below the recommended by current professional legislation (12.5% and nursing assistants above (56.2%; 51.9% were employees in other sectors doing overtime. It was concluded that although qualified, which can determine a differentiated service, the team does not meet the recommended sizing standards for professional assistance in these specialized units.

  9. Inversión del recurso-tiempo en la monitorización de embarazadas de bajo riesgo por el equipo de salud de la familia Investimento do recurso-tempo na monitorização das gestantes de baixo risco pela equipe de saúde da família Investment of time resource in prenatal care by family health staff

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sayuri Tanaka Maeda

    2005-04-01

    study is about low-risk pregnant women attended by a family health unit. It aims to describe the time resource the health staff invested and to analyze its configuration in the prenatal monitoring process. Data were collected from 47 women between 20 and 29 years old, who were attended from 2001 to 2003, in the eastside of São Paulo City. The pregnant women were classified according to the health care they received: a first group without health problems, a second with early expert intervention and a third with patients needing dental treatment. In the three groups, more time was invested by health professionals with higher education, followed by community health agents during home visits. Average total time per pregnant woman was 10 hours for the first group and 12 hours for the second and the third group. The time invested in direct care ranged from 59.40% to 80.51%.

  10. Concepções da equipe de enfermagem sobre a exposição a riscos físicos e químicos no ambiente hospitalar Concepciones del personal de enfermería sobre exposición a riesgos físicos y químicos en el ambiente hospitalario Conceptions of nursing staff about the exposure to physical and chemical risks in hospital environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ethiele Sulzbacher

    2013-02-01

    an exploratory field research, of quantitative source. Data were collected through a questionnaire administered to 33 professional nursing staff of a general hospital in the northwestern region of the state of Rio Grande do Sul, in the first half of 2011 and were analyzed using descriptive statistics. The workers noticed chemical and physical risks they are exposed and reported to recognize them, however, after the analysis of the responses, we identified knowledge deficit about the scientific conception of physical risk. The continuing health education can be a strategy to update workers on occupational risks.

  11. Elections to Staff Council

    CERN Document Server

    Staff Association

    2011-01-01

    Elections to fill all seats in the Staff Council are being organized this month. The voting takes place from the 31st of October to the 14th of November, at noon. As you may have noted when reading Echo, many issues concerning our employment conditions are on the agenda of the coming months and will keep the next Staff Council very busy. So, make your voice heard and take part in the elections for a new Staff Council. By doing so, you will be encouraging the men and women who will be representing you over the next two years and they will doubtless appreciate your gratitude. Every member of the Staff Association will have received an email containing a link to the webpage which will allow voting. If you are a member of the Staff Association and you did not receive such an email, please contact the Staff Association secretariat (staff.association@cern.ch). Do not forget to vote * * * * * * * Vote Make your voice heard and be many to elect the new Staff Council. More details on the election...

  12. Staff Specialist Survival Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-01

    The syllabus for this 4.5-day course addresses the challenges for today’s staff specialists and provides not only hands-on review of actual artifacts...but also case studies to enhance learners’ actual experiences. Background The course was designed to magnify the staff specialist’s skills in

  13. Academic staff reward

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    structures and management systems. As a result, many universities are rethinking their reward strategies to better align them with the new realities in order to improve teaching staff motivation and retention. This study was conducted to identify academic staff reward related problems and to examine the effectiveness of both ...

  14. New staff contract policy

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2006-01-01

    Following discussion at TREF and on the recommendation of the Finance Committee, Council approved a new staff contract policy, which became effective on 1 January 2006. Its application is covered by a new Administrative Circular No. 2 (Rev. 3) 'Recruitment, appointment and possible developments regarding the contractual position of staff members'. The revised circular replaces the previous Circulars No. 9 (Rev. 3) 'Staff contracts' and No. 2 (Rev. 2) 'Guidelines and procedures concerning recruitment and probation period for staff members'. The main features of the new contract policy are as follows: The new policy provides chances for long-term employment for all staff recruits staying for four years without distinguishing between those assigned to long-term or short-term activities when joining CERN. In addition, it presents a number of simplifications for the award of ICs. There are henceforth only 2 types of contract: Limited Duration (LD) contracts for all recruitment and Indefinite Contracts (IC) for...

  15. Screening for tuberculosis among homeless shelter staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Renzi, Simona; Tomao, Paola; Martini, Agnese; Capanna, Silvia; Rubino, Luca; D'Amico, Wanda; Tomei, Fabio; Visca, Paolo; Vonesch, Nicoletta

    2012-06-01

    The prevalence of tuberculosis (TB) among homeless shelter staff was assessed using the tuberculin skin test (TST) and the Quantiferon TB-Gold in tube interferon-γ release assay (QFT-TB). Investigation of 51 participants for whom both QFT-TB and TST results were available showed 47.1% and 43.1% positivity, respectively, with excellent (92%) concordance between the 2 tests. The high risk for acquiring occupational TB necessitates the development of TB surveillance protocols for homeless shelter staff in Italy. Copyright © 2012 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Elections to Staff Council

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2013-01-01

    Elections to fill all seats in the Staff Council are being organized this month. The voting takes place from the 28 of October to the 11th of November, at noon. As you may have noted when reading Echo, many issues concerning our employment conditions are on the agenda of the coming months, and in particular the Five-yearly-Review 2015, subject of the questionnaire that you probably recently filled out. All this will keep the next Staff Council very busy indeed. So, make your voice heard and take part in the elections for a new Staff Council. By doing so, you will be encouraging the men and women who will be representing you over the next two years and they will doubtless appreciate your gratitude. Every member of the Staff Association will have received an email containing a link to the webpage which will allow voting. If you are a member of the Staff Association and you did not receive such an email, please contact the Staff Association secretariat (staff.association@cern.ch). Do not forget to v...

  17. Teaching Staff Advanced Training: European Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kovalchuk Vasyl

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The issue of teaching staff advanced training is paid much attention in many countries. In the Republic of Moldova progressive professional credits system is used. Credits are scored not only in assigning teaching degrees or issuing a certificate of continuing professional education, but also for teachers’ evaluation at the educational institution. Advanced training of teaching staff in France is provided by various institutions of postgraduate education, university institutes and regional centers of education in order to help teachers to renew their professional knowledge and at the same time to refocus it on the level of consciousness according to the real problems of school and the community. The feature of teaching staff advanced training in France is that it is teachers’ personal matter and duration of all periods of training should come to one year during all professional career. In Finland, teaching staff advanced training is organized directly in schools under aegis of the National Board of Education, the National Centre for Advanced Training in Education, departments of teacher education and other faculties of higher educational institutions on credit system basis. Among the topical forms there are targeted, cascade, common (cooperative teaching and learning by own example. In the UK, advanced training takes place in two models: the course model based on higher educational establishments and school based in-service education. The main purpose of advanced training system is to familiarize teachers with theoretical and practical innovations in educational activities, progressive teaching technologies, and consolidate their skills of independent acquisition of knowledge necessary for their professional development.

  18. Perceptions of staff shortage as a predisposing factor for stress ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Perceptions of staff shortage as a predisposing factor for stress among professional orthopaedic nurses at a public hospital in Buffalo City Municipality, Eastern Cape ... Orthopaedic Unit managers should develop strategies to reduce stress in the workplace and promote coping skills for professional orthopaedic nurses.

  19. Career Progression of Junior Professional Officers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pepper S. E.; Carbonaro J.; Hoffheins, B; Collins, T.

    2015-07-12

    The U.S. Support Program to IAEA Safeguards (USSP) has funded more than 25 Junior Professional Officer (JPO) positions in the IAEA Department of Safeguards since 2005. JPOs are college graduates with zero to two years’ work experience who work alongside experienced IAEA staff members for one to two years and assist with basic, yet essential work while obtaining valuable experience. They contribute to equipment development, testing, integration, open source information collection and analysis, and software and database development. This paper will study the trends in career progression for the JPOs who have completed assignments with the IAEA in the Department of Safeguards. Brookhaven National Laboratory, in its role in managing the USSP, has compiled information that can be analyzed for this purpose.

  20. Implications for patient safety in the use of safe patient handling equipment: a national survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elnitsky, Christine A; Lind, Jason D; Rugs, Deborah; Powell-Cope, Gail

    2014-12-01

    The prevalence of musculoskeletal injuries among nursing staff has been high due to patient handling and movement. Internationally, healthcare organizations are integrating technological equipment into patient handling and movement to improve safety. Although evidence shows that safe patient handling programs reduce work-related musculoskeletal injuries in nursing staff, it is not clear how safe these new programs are for patients. The objective of this study was to explore adverse patient events associated with safe patient handling programs and preventive approaches in US Veterans Affairs medical centers. The study surveyed a convenience sample of safe patient handling program managers from 51 US Department of Veterans Affairs medical centers to collect data on skin-related and fall-related adverse patient events. Both skin- and fall-related adverse patient events associated with safe patient handling occurred at VA Medical centers. Skin-related events included abrasions, contusions, pressure ulcers and lacerations. Fall-related events included sprains and strains, fractures, concussions and bleeding. Program managers described contextual factors in these adverse events and ways of preventing the events. The use of safe patient handling equipment can pose risks for patients. This study found that organizational factors, human factors and technology factors were associated with patient adverse events. The findings have implications for how nursing professionals can implement safe patient handling programs in ways that are safe for both staff and patients. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  1. Staff rules and regulations

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2007-01-01

    The 11th edition of the Staff Rules and Regulations, dated 1 January 2007, adopted by the Council and the Finance Committee in December 2006, is currently being distributed to departmental secretariats. The Staff Rules and Regulations, together with a summary of the main modifications made, will be available, as from next week, on the Human Resources Department's intranet site: http://cern.ch/hr-web/internal/admin_services/rules/default.asp The main changes made to the Staff Rules and Regulations stem from the five-yearly review of employment conditions of members of the personnel. The changes notably relate to: the categories of members of the personnel (e.g. removal of the local staff category); the careers structure and the merit recognition system; the non-residence, installation and re-installation allowances; the definition of family, family allowances and family-related leave; recognition of partnerships; education fees. The administrative circulars, some of which are being revised following the ...

  2. Staff Association Cocktail

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2017-01-01

    The Staff Association has been organising for many years a cocktail with delegates of the Member States participating in Finance Committees of March and September. This cocktail is held at the end of the day, after the Finance Committee meeting. This direct and regular communication helps establish an ongoing contact between the Staff Association and CERN Member States and, more recently, the Associate Member States. Ambassadors of the CERN Staff Association, who are Members of the Personnel, have the opportunity to meet their national delegation in an informal and friendly atmosphere. These exchanges, facilitated by the use of the national language, allow the personnel via the Staff Association to express its ideas and positions on current affairs and fundamental issues, and also to hear about those of the delegations in return.

  3. Observation Tools for Professional Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malu, Kathleen F.

    2015-01-01

    Professional development of teachers, including English language teachers, empowers them to change in ways that improve teaching and learning (Gall and Acheson 2011; Murray 2010). In their seminal research on staff development--professional development in today's terms--Joyce and Showers (2002) identify key factors that promote teacher change.…

  4. Os Doutores da Alegria na unidade de internação pediátrica: experiências da equipe de enfermagem Los Doctores de la Alegría en una unidad pediátrica de internación: experiencias del equipo de enfermería The Clown Doctors in a pediatric unit of internment: experiences of the nursing staff

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberta Ramos de Oliveira

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available O estudo enfoca a experiência da equipe de enfermagem com a atuação dos Doutores da Alegria na unidade de internação pediátrica, tendo como objetivos: descrever os conhecimentos da equipe de enfermagem quanto à atuação dos Doutores da Alegria e analisar as experiências da equipe de enfermagem quanto a esta atuação. O estudo é de natureza qualitativa, e os sujeitos do estudo foram dez membros da equipe de enfermagem. Para a abordagem dos sujeitos, foi utilizada a entrevista não diretiva em grupo. Constata-se que a maioria das depoentes conhece a atuação dos Doutores da Alegria, sendo possível evidenciar reações e benefícios durante a hospitalização da criança, bem como a tríade de relações entre palhaços, mãe acompanhante e equipe de enfermagem. Conclui-se que os palhaços atuam como agentes facilitadores, atentando para o fato de que brincadeiras e brinquedos constituem recursos que podem/devem ser utilizados no contexto hospitalar, acarretando novos significados ao cuidar.El estudio enfoca la experiencia del equipo de enfermería con los Doctores de la Alegría en una unidad pediátrica de internación, teniendo como objetivos: describir el conocimiento del equipo de enfermería cuanto a de la actuación de los Doctores de la Alegría y analizar las experiencias del equipo de enfermería cuanto a ellos. Estudio de naturaleza cualitativa, y los sujetos fueron diez miembros del equipo de enfermería Para el abordaje de los sujetos fue usado entrevista no directiva en grupo. Constatase que la mayoría de los deponentes conocían la actuación de los Doctores de la Alegría, siendo posible evidenciar reacciones y ventajas durante la hospitalización del niño, tan bien como la tríada de relaciones entre los payasos, la madre acompañando y el equipo de enfermería. Se concluye que los payasos actúan como agentes facilitadores, dando atención para el hecho de que trampeas y juguetes constituyen los recursos, de los

  5. Staff Association Information Meetings

    CERN Multimedia

    2011-01-01

    Staff Association Information Meetings: - Thursday 29 September at 2 p.m., Meyrin, Kjell Johnsen Auditorium, 30-7-017 (in French) - Friday 30 September at 10 a.m., Prévessin, BE Auditorium, 864-1-D02 (in French) - Monday 3 October at 2 p.m., Meyrin, IT Auditorium, 31-3-004 (in French) - Tuesday 4 October at 2 p.m., Meyrin, Filtration Plant, 222-R-001 (in English)   Staff Association

  6. Cleaning supplies and equipment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... gov/ency/patientinstructions/000443.htm Cleaning supplies and equipment To use the sharing features on this page, ... to clean supplies and equipment. Disinfecting Supplies and Equipment Start by wearing the right personal protective equipment ( ...

  7. Medical Students and Staff Physicians: The Question of Social Media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noller, Michael; Mai, Johnny P; Zapanta, Philip E; Camacho, Macario

    2017-07-01

    Social media's prevalence among the professional world is rapidly increasing. Its use among medical personnel-specifically, medical students, resident physicians, and staff physicians-could compromise personal-professional boundaries. Could the acceptance or lack of acceptance of a friend request bias the medical student application process? If friend requests are accepted, then medical students, resident physicians, and staff physicians are provided access to very personal aspects of one another's lives, which may not have been the intent. The question remains whether the separation of one's personal life from work is necessary. Should medical students restrict social media relationships with residents and staff physicians to professional social media networks? The suitability and opportunities of social media among medical professionals is an ongoing issue for research that needs continued evaluation.

  8. Interagindo com a equipe multiprofissional: as interfaces da assistência na gestação de alto risco Interactuando con el equipo multiprofesional las interfaces de la asistencia en la gravidez de riesgo Interacting with the multiprofessional staff: the interfaces of high risk pregnancy assistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Virgínia Junqueira Oliveira

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Estudo de natureza qualitativa, parte da dissertação de mestrado intitulada "Vivenciando a gravidez de alto risco: entre a luz e a escuridão". Retrata como se dá a relação entre os profissionais de saúde de uma equipe interdisciplinar de atenção ao pré-natal de risco e as gestantes que frequentam esse serviço. Participaram do estudo 16 gestantes que estavam sendo acompanhadas no Pré-natal de Alto Risco da Policlínica Municipal da cidade de Divinópolis/MG. Na busca da compreensão do fenômeno em estudo, este trabalho procura descrever como a mulher recebe o diagnóstico de alto risco na gravidez. As narrativas mostram como a gestante adere à nova situação de risco e ao tratamento prescrito; revelam quais são suas reais necessidades e como assimilam as orientações e os cuidados disponibilizados por uma equipe interdisciplinar e multiprofissional na atenção ao pré-natal de alto risco.Estudio de carácter cualitativo, parte de la tesis de maestría sobre el tema "Vivir el embarazo de alto riesgo: entre la luz y la oscuridad". Retrata cómo se da la relación de profesionales de salud de un equipo interdisciplinario de atención prenatal en el riesgo y las mujeres embarazadas que asisten a este servicio. Los participantes del estudio fueron dieciséis embarazadas, que fueron acompañados en el prenatal de alto riesgo del Policlínico Municipal de la Ciudad de Divinópolis / MG. En busca de la comprensión del fenómeno en estudio, este trabajo intenta describir cómo la mujer recibe un diagnóstico de embarazo de alto riesgo. Las narraciones muestran de qué manera la mujer embarazada se adapta a la nueva situación de riesgo y el tratamiento prescrito; muestran cuáles son sus necesidades reales y la forma de asimilar la orientación y la atención prestada por un equipoQuantitative study, part of the Master thesis entitled "Experiencing the high-risk pregnancy: between light and darkness". It pictures the relationship

  9. Maori in Partnership: A Peer Mentoring Model for Tertiary Indigenous Staff in New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kensington-Miller, Barbara; Ratima, Matiu

    2015-01-01

    This article presents a professional development programme which brought an indigenous minority group of tertiary staff together. We describe a peer-mentoring model, piloted in 2009 at The University of Auckland, New Zealand with university staff in order to promote staff advancement. The participants were all Maori, the indigenous people of New…

  10. Aquatic Equipment Information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sova, Ruth

    Equipment usually used in water exercise programs is designed for variety, intensity, and program necessity. This guide discusses aquatic equipment under the following headings: (1) equipment design; (2) equipment principles; (3) precautions and contraindications; (4) population contraindications; and (5) choosing equipment. Equipment is used…

  11. Estudio de seguimiento del desgaste profesional en relación con factores organizativos en el personal de enfermería de medicina interna A survey of the professional weakening in relation with organizational factors in the nursing staff of the internal medicine deparment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mª Carmen Gómez Sánchez

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available El personal de enfermería es uno de los grupos profesionales más afectados por el Síndrome de burnout, debido a la gran cantidad de estresores diarios, inherentes a su profesión, que debe afrontar. El objetivo de este estudio fue analizar comparativamente el grado de estrés profesional y satisfacción laboral en un grupo de profesionales de enfermería de Medicina Interna en el año 1998 y 2005, e intentar analizar si existía relación con factores organizativos de la Institución. En ambos años se distribuyen 107 cuestionarios que incluían el Inventario de Burnout de Maslach (MBI para medir la incidencia de Burnout y el Cuestionario de Satisfacción Laboral de Warr, Cook y Hall (1979. Se objetivó un descenso del grado de agotamiento emocional y un aumento del grado de realización personal. El grado de satisfacción laboral de los profesionales en ambos años objeto de estudio fue de moderadamente satisfecho. El hecho de disminuir la sobrecarga laboral y mejorar la seguridad en el puesto de trabajo podría influir positivamente en la reducción de la sobrecarga emocional.Nursing staff is one of the most affected professional groups the burnout syndrome due to the great quantity of everyday stressful factors which are attached to their profession which nurses have to face up to. The aim of this survey was to analyze comparatively the professional stress and labour self-satisfaction in a professional nursing staff of the internal medicine department between 1998 and 200 and to try to analyze if there was any relationship with organizational factors of the institution. 107 questionnaires were given out in both years the questionnaires included burnout inventory of Maslach to measure the incidence of burnout and the questionary of laboral self-satisfaction. The result of the survey was a falling-of the emotional exhaustion degree and an increase of the personal fulfilment degree. The degree of personal self-satisfaction of the nursing

  12. THE STAFF ASSOCIATION'S INTERNAL COMMISSIONS A source of innovative ideas

    CERN Multimedia

    STAFF ASSOCIATION

    2010-01-01

    In the heart of the Staff Association, internal commissions carry out preparatory work which is indispensable for productive discussions in Staff Council and Executive Committee meetings. These working groups, composed of staff delegates and interested staff members, are think tanks for all subjects in the area assigned to them. Five commissions are active in 2010 : The “In-Form-Action” Commission develops a communication strategy (Information), organizes staff mobilization and action (Action) and promotes delegate training (Formation [training]), in order to enhance, support and professionalize the activities of the Staff Association. The Commission for “Employment Conditions” deals with remuneration, the advancement system, working hours, recruitment, and retention, among other things. It gives its opinion on proposals by the Management or elaborates its own proposals. The Commission for “Health and Safety” examines all aspec...

  13. Preparing Writing Centers and Tutors for Literacy Mediation for Working Class Campus-Staff

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oslund, Christy M.

    2011-01-01

    This study grew out of the realization that implicit literacy expectations between working class United Auto Workers (UAW) staff and professional class staff were complicating the filling out and filing of a position audit form. Professional class supervisors had designed the form as a measure of fairness, in that each UAW employee on campus was…

  14. Resíduos sólidos de serviços de saúde: uma fotografia do comprometimento da equipe de enfermagem Residuos sólidos de servicios de salud: una fotografía del comprometimiento del equipo de enfermería Solid waste of health services: a photograph of the commitment of nursing staff

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katsuy Meotti Doi

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available O presente trabalho investigou os conhecimentos e atitudes dos profissionais da equipe de enfermagem do Hospital de Clínicas de Porto Alegre (HCPA, Rio Grande do Sul, em relação ao descarte dos resíduos sólidos dos serviços de saúde (RSSS. Realizou-se uma pesquisa de natureza exploratória descritiva, através de uma abordagem qualitativa. Os dados foram obtidos a partir de entrevistas semi-estruturadas aplicadas a 24 profissionais da equipe de enfermagem. Os dados foram categorizados através da análise de conteúdo, tendo sido identificadas quatro categorias: Significado da expressão resíduos sólidos de serviços de saúde; Separação dos resíduos sólidos dos serviços de saúde; Realização do curso/conhecimento e Profissionais que não realizam a separação. Os resultados ratificaram a importância de tratar com maior seriedade a questão apresentada, reforçando a necessidade do acesso às orientações adequadas.El presente trabajo pretiende investigar los conocimientos y actitudes de los profesionales del equipo de enfermería del Hospital de Clínicas de Porto (HCPA, Rio Grande do Sul, Brasil, en relación al descarte de los residuos sólidos de los servicios de salud (RSSS. Fue realizada una pesquisa de naturaleza exploratoria descriptiva, a través de un abordaje cualitativo. Los datos fueron obtenidos a partir de encuestas semi estructuradas aplicadas a 24 profesionales del equipo de enfermaje. Se buscó la categorización de los datos a través del análisis de contenido. Fueron identificadas cuatro categorías: Significado de la palabra residuos sólidos de servicios de salud; Separación de los residuos sólidos de los servicios de salud; Realización del curso/conocimiento y Profesionales que no realizan la separación. Con los resultados, se ratificó la importancia de tratar con mayor seriedad la cuestión presentada, reforzando la necesidad del acceso a las orientaciones adecuadas.This work investigated the

  15. Infection prevention and mass vaccination training for U.S. point of dispensing staff and volunteers: a national study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebmann, Terri; Loux, Travis M; Zink, Thomas K; Swick, Zachary; Wakefield, Mary

    2015-03-01

    Points of dispensing (PODs) are deployed for medical countermeasure mass dispensing. However, infection prevention and vaccine administration pre-event training offered and just-in-time (JIT) education planned for POD workers have not been assessed. Disaster planners were sent an online questionnaire in 2013. McNemar tests compared training offered to staff versus volunteers and pre-event training versus JIT training. In total, 301 disaster planners participated. The most frequent pre-event training included hand hygiene (59.1% and 28.0%) and personal protective equipment (PPE) selection (52.1% and 24.1%) for staff and volunteers, respectively. Few provided pre-event training on the cold chain technique (14.8% and 5.1%) or smallpox vaccine administration (4.7% and 2.3%) for staff or volunteers. For all topics except smallpox vaccine administration, more staff than volunteers received pre-event training (P vaccine administration to ensure safe and successful POD deployment. Copyright © 2015 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Unidades de internação psiquiátrica em hospital geral: espaços de cuidados e a atuação da equipe de enfermagem Unidades de hospitalización psiquiátrica en hospital general: espacios de cuidados y la actuación del equipo de enfermería General hospital psychiatric wards: facilities and performance of nursing staff

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Lúcia Machado

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available Este artigo constitui-se numa revisão sobre Unidades de Internação Psiquiátrica em Hospital Geral. São descritas experiências de implantação de Enfermarias de Psiquiatria, pontuando questões sobre a tolerância com o doente mental no hospital geral e a atuação da equipe de enfermagem. Foi feita uma leitura aleatória de trabalhos, artigos, dissertações e teses produzidas no Brasil, nos últimos dez anos. A análise dessas experiências tem por base a Reforma Psiquiátrica, os conceitos de "transição paradigmática", o campo de atenção psicossocial e reflexões sobre a atuação do enfermeiro. Acredita-se que esses equipamentos sejam iniciativas voltadas para a criação de espaços de inclusão do doente mental na sociedade e geradores de propostas transformadoras da enfermagem em saúde mental, mediante a construção de práticas profissionais éticas, terapêuticas, flexíveis e comprometidas com o cuidado de subjetividades.Este artículo es un ensayo sobre las Unidades de Hospitalización Psiquiátrica en un Hospital General. Se describen experiencias de hospitalización en Servicios de Psiquiatría, señalando cuestiones sobre la tolerancia con el enfermo mental en el hospital general y la actuación del equipo de enfermería. El análisis de estas experiencias tiene como base la Reforma Psiquiátrica, los conceptos de "transición paradigmática", el campo de atención psicosocial y reflexiones sobre la actuación del enfermero. Se cree que estos equipamientos y propuestas transformadoras de la enfermería en salud mental, sean iniciativas orientadas para la creación de espacios de inclusión del enfermo mental en la sociedad.This article contains an essay on General Hospital Psychiatric Wards. Authors describe the experiences regarding the implementation of Psychiatric Wards, pointing out questions about the tolerance with psychiatric patients at a general hospital and the performance of the nursing staff. Authors read

  17. Self-reported competence of home nursing staff in Finland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grönroos, Eija; Perälä, Marja-Leena

    2008-10-01

    This paper is a report of a study to investigate the self-reported competence of home nursing staff and whether this is associated with their education, job descriptions, access to help and support and with factors in their psychosocial work environment, such as opportunities for personal growth and development at work. Home nursing staff face increasing demands on their competence. Advances in information technology and working methods have increased the need for education. Thus, information on the factors associated with the competence of home nursing staff help us to support them in a way that improves the quality of care. The data were gathered via a questionnaire completed in 2003 by the home nursing staff of 24 municipalities in different regions of Finland. A total of 2366 home care staff (response rate 63%), of whom 790 were home nursing staff (response rate 65%), were sent questionnaires. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression were used as main statistical methods. The best predictors for self-reported competence of home nursing staff were their reading scientific or professional journals, opportunities for skill development, decision-making latitude and work demands. Simple and practical ways for updating the competence of home nursing staff should be created. These staff are a very important source of information for home care clients. Supporting the knowledge of home nursing staff is also an efficient way of keeping clients and their informal caregivers informed about care guidelines, health and social services and social benefits.

  18. Planning Considerations for Afterschool Professional Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradshaw, L. Daniele

    2015-01-01

    Professional development is vital to the success of afterschool programs. Effective professional development enhances afterschool program quality by facilitating staff performance and knowledge; in addition, professional development is vital for improving student learning outcomes (Bouffard & Little, 2004; Hall & Surr, 2005; Joyce &…

  19. Staff rules and regulations

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2007-01-01

    The 11th edition of the Staff Rules and Regulations, dated 1 January 2007, adopted by the Council and the Finance Committee in December 2006, is currently being distributed to departmental secretariats. The Staff Rules and Regulations, together with a summary of the main modifications made, will be available, as from next week, on the Human Resources Department's intranet site: http://cern.ch/hr-web/internal/admin_services/rules/default.asp The main changes made to the Staff Rules and Regulations stem from the five-yearly review of employment conditions of members of the personnel. The changes notably relate to: the categories of members of the personnel (e.g. removal of the local staff category); the careers structure and the merit recognition system; the non-residence, installation and re-installation allowances; the definition of family, family allowances and family-related leave; recognition of partnerships; education fees. The administrative circulars, some of which are being revised following the m...

  20. Academic staff reward

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    has a major role to play in achieving the objectives of the institution. ... Exceptionally, well motivated academic staff can, with appropriate ... significance attributed to the work. **To perform at their best, most individuals need to have financial or other extrinsic rewards tied to their performance. Rewards. Intrinsic*. Extrinsic**.

  1. Integration of CERN staff

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1965-01-01

    An example of the integration of CERN staff in the neighbouring communes is provided by the hamlet of Bugnon at St-Genis-Pouilly (Ain), FRance. The CERN installation on the Swiss site are visible on the left in the background. Behind them the Saleve mountain in Haute-Savoie.

  2. Radiation Protection for the Fluoroscopy Operator and Staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meisinger, Quinn C; Stahl, Cosette M; Andre, Michael P; Kinney, Thomas B; Newton, Isabel G

    2016-10-01

    The purposes of this article are to review available data regarding the range of protection devices and garments with a focus on eye protection and to summarize techniques for reducing scatter radiation exposure. Fluoroscopy operators and staff can greatly reduce their radiation exposure by wearing properly fitted protective garments, positioning protective devices to block scatter radiation, and adhering to good radiation practices. By understanding the essentials of radiation physics, protective equipment, and the features of each imaging system, operators and staff can capitalize on opportunities for radiation protection while minimizing ergonomic strain. Practicing and promoting a culture of radiation safety can help fluoroscopy operators and staff enjoy long, productive careers helping patients.

  3. Hygiene Knowledge of Food Staff in Catering Industry

    OpenAIRE

    Hülya Yardımcı; Gülperi Hakli; Funda Pinar Çakiroğlu; Ayşe Özfer Özçelik

    2015-01-01

    This study, designed as a cross-sectional study, was carried out to determine the hygiene knowledge of the staff (N = 317) employed in kitchen and service departments of catering firms in Ankara. It was found that the mean scores of the staff with regard to personal hygiene, food hygiene, and kitchen and equipment hygiene were 10.7 ± 1.6, 19.8 ± 4.0, and 13.6 ± 2.0, respectively. Male staff achieved higher mean scores ...

  4. Professional roles of a health team: a view of its components Los roles profesionales de un equipo de salud: la visión de sus integrantes Papéis profissionais de uma equipe de saúde: visão de seus integrantes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Regina da Costa Saar

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Based on the Theory of Roles, this study aimed to examine health team professionals' views on the role played by their colleagues. We interviewed 39 health professionals: 01 nutritionist, 02 psychologists, 02 nurses, 03 physiotherapists, 04 pharmacists, 10 dentists and 17 physicians. The results showed that the participants considered that teamwork shares responsibility, which relieves stress and is a way of learning; they also indicate that expectations regarding the professionals' role are not very clear and that most participants have little knowledge about their colleagues' professional role. The most clearly described professional roles are those of physicians, nurses and pharmacists. The most obscure is the psychologist's role.Este estudio, basado en la Teoría de Roles, tuvo como objetivo estudiar la visión que los profesionales de un equipo de salud tienen con relación al rol de sus compañeros de equipo. Entrevistamos a 39 profesionales de salud: 01 nutricionista, 02 psicólogos, 02 enfermeras, 03 fisioterapeutas, 04 farmacéuticos, 10 dentistas y 17 médicos. Los resultados mostraron que, al compartir el trabajo, los participantes dividen responsabilidad, disminuyen el stress; así como lo consideran una forma de aprendizaje; las expectativas en relación a los roles profesionales no son claras y la mayoría conoce muy poco el rol profesional del equipo. Los roles profesionales descritos más claramente son los de médico, enfermero y farmacéutico. El menos especificado es el del psicólogo.Fundamentado na teoria de papéis, este estudo buscou investigar a visão que os profissionais de uma equipe de saúde têm a respeito do papel desempenhado por seus companheiros de equipe. Entrevistou-se 39 profissionais de saúde: 1 nutricionista, 2 psicólogos, 2 enfermeiros, 3 fisioterapeutas, 4 farmacêuticos, 10 dentistas, e 17 médicos. Os resultados indicaram que os informantes consideram que o trabalho em equipe divide a responsabilidade

  5. Ambiente do centro de terapia intensiva e o trabalho da equipe de enfermagem Ambiente del centro de cuidados intensivos y el trabajo del grupo de enfermería The environment of the intensive care center and the work of the nursing staff

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzel Regina Ribeiro Chavaglia

    2011-12-01

    e individualidad de los clientes y ruido. Se concluye que las instalaciones cumplen con las recomendaciones mínimas de ANVISA. Fueron identificadas condiciones ambientales favorables y desfavorables para el trabajo. La creación de mejores condiciones ambientales permite un mejor desempeño del equipo, influyendo positivamente en la atención de calidad, seguridad y satisfacción profesional.This is a descriptive exploratory study with a quantitative approach. It aims to characterize the environment of the Intensive Care Center (ICC in regard to its physical area, material resources and equipments, and to identify factors concerned to the work of nurses. It investigates environmental factors that contribute to an aesthetically harmonious, functional and humanized space and that favor the performance of nursing work. The units that make up the ICC meet the recommendations of the National Health Surveillance Agency (ANVISA in the evaluated items. he following favorable work conditions were highlighted: thermal conditions, color of the ceiling, walls and floors, luminosity. The following unfavorable work conditions were highlighted: outdoor spaces, privacy and individuality of clients and noise. The conclusion is that the facilities of the units meet the minimum recommendations of ANVISA. Both favorable and unfavorable environmental work conditions were identified. The creation of better environmental conditions allows a better staff performance, influencing positively quality, safety, and job satisfaction.

  6. Unity is strength: staff college and the British officer corps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Anthony

    2009-03-01

    Utilizing Bourdieu's concept of the habitus, Keith Macdonald has recently examined the elite social origins of the British officer corps. His analysis is valid as far at it goes but it ignores the professional practices of British officers. This article examines Britain's Joint Services Command and Staff College to assess the unification of the three services around common forms of military practice. It argues that while the new staff college has been effective in disseminating new forms of professional expertise among British officers, various practices have been institutionalized which actively undermine the unity of the officer corps.

  7. TRAINING EMPLOYEES TO WORK WITH HI-TECH EQUIPMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. A. Dremina

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study is to describe a research relying on the capabilities of networking, which improves the quality of vocational training of skilled workers that are intended to work with new hi-tech equipment.Methods. Methods of system and comparative analysis, modeling, synthesis and generalization are used. Specification of the model of workers training offered by authors is carried out on the basis of deep interviews to experts – the representatives of the large enterprises who are carrying out training of the personnel.Results. Social and pedagogical contradictions are revealed, on the one hand, in the growing need for highly professional personnel for hi-tech productions, and, on the other hand, in insufficiently effective countermeasures of the system of vocational education and training on closing actual requirements of productions. The discrepancies reducing the quality of preparation of skilled workers are revealed by comparative analysis of competences based on an ideal competence model of the trainer and teacher of VET with the competences presented in educational both professional standards and the discussed projects. Characteristics of the existing pedagogical process in the hi-tech production environment are described. For the purpose of quality improvement of the pedagogical process, the network format of interactions of the enterprise, educational and the business organizations is offered.Scientific novelty. The concept «pedagogical process» for the purpose of making it more instrumental is specified; it joins a technological process and the design of its ideal model for the hi-tech production environment. The unique network project including design and development of innovative manuals and teaching materials for the welding equipment of Fronius International GmbH.Practical significance. The research results can be useful to the management of staff development and career advancement of hi-tech productions, and VET

  8. Force Integration Doctrine and Division Staff Organization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-06-06

    Lieutenant General Carl E. Vuono, commander of the Combined Arms Center, Fort Leavenworth, a group of officers at the Command and General Staff College...i, , ." " - "- . .. . "- • • • - 4 : + ’ ,.. .... . . .. . .L CHAPTER 6 END NOTES 1. Flesch , Rudolf, ed. The Book of Unusual Quotations. (New York...Communigue" 5 (No 4, 1981): 25-28. U.S. Army Materiel Command. "US Army Weaponry and Equipment in Mid-1980s," Army 35 (October 1985): 390-510. Vuono, Carl

  9. Hygiene Knowledge of Food Staff in Catering Industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hülya Yardımcı

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available This study, designed as a cross-sectional study, was carried out to determine the hygiene knowledge of the staff (N = 317 employed in kitchen and service departments of catering firms in Ankara. It was found that the mean scores of the staff with regard to personal hygiene, food hygiene, and kitchen and equipment hygiene were 10.7 ± 1.6, 19.8 ± 4.0, and 13.6 ± 2.0, respectively. Male staff achieved higher mean scores in personal hygiene knowledge test compared with female staff (p < .01. The staff receiving a hygiene training were determined to have higher mean scores in terms of hygiene knowledge tests compared with those who have not received, and the production staff had higher knowledge as to hygiene than the other groups (p < .01. The mean scores for hygiene knowledge tests were found to be increasing with age. Hygiene knowledge scores of the staff were quite lower than what must be taken. For that reason, periodical training programs should be organized to increase the awareness of the staff about hygiene.

  10. Student and Staff Perceptions of a Vacation Research Assistantship Scheme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penn, Felicity; Stephens, Danielle; Morgan, Jessica; Upton, Penney; Upton, Dominic

    2013-01-01

    There is a push for universities to equip graduates with desirable employability skills and "hands-on" experience. This article explores the perceptions of students and staff experiences of a research assistantship scheme. Nine students from the University of Worcester were given the opportunity to work as a student vacation researcher…

  11. Management problems of staff motivation

    OpenAIRE

    PUZYNYA T.A.

    2015-01-01

    Staff motivation is a major link in improving the competitiveness of any organization. One of the main problems of management of motivation of staff is the individuality of each employee, so the knowledge of psychology and individual needs will help organizations effectively manage staff.

  12. The Middles: Observations on Professional Competence and Autonomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komives, Susan R.

    1992-01-01

    Examines the overlay of maintaining a high degree of professional knowledge and autonomy with the additive and generative stages of professional development for midmanagement student affairs staff. Discusses rethinking professional autonomy and describes a focus group on professionalism in student affairs. (ABL)

  13. Índice de segurança técnica da equipe de enfermagem da pediatria de um hospital de ensino Índice de seguridad técnica del equipo de enfermería de la pediatría de un hospital de enseñanza Technical safety index of a teaching hospital's pediatrics unit nursing staff

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karin Emilia Rogenski

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available O estudo teve por objetivo identificar o Índice de Segurança Técnica (IST da equipe de enfermagem da Unidade de Pediatria do Hospital Universitário da USP, no período de 2001 a 2005. Os percentuais de cada tipo de ausência, dos profissionais de enfermagem, foram obtidos junto ao Departamento de Enfermagem ou calculados com base nas equações propostas na literatura. O percentual de ausências por folgas correspondeu ao maior percentual de cobertura dos trabalhadores de enfermagem. Os percentuais totais de ausências não previstas foram inferiores àqueles referentes às ausências previstas, contrariando o discurso das enfermeiras que relacionam esse tipo de ausência como o principal responsável pela insuficiência de pessoal nas instituições de saúde. A variação dos ISTs apontou a importância de serem realizadas avaliações sistemáticas das ausências da equipe de enfermagem, assim como de se identificarem índices específicos das unidades, como subsídio para a avaliação do quadro de pessoal nas organizações de saúde.El estudio tuvo por objetivo identificar el Índice de Seguridad Técnica (IST del equipo de enfermería de la Unidad de Pediatría del Hospital Universitario de USP, en el periodo de 2001 a 2005. Los porcentajes de cada tipo de ausencia, de los profesionales de enfermería, fueron obtenidos junto al Departamento de Enfermería o calculados con base en las ecuaciones propuestas en la literatura. El porcentaje de ausencias por descanso correspondió al mayor porcentaje de cobertura de los trabajadores de enfermería. Los porcentajes totales de ausencias no previstas fueron inferiores aquellos referentes a las ausencias previstas, contrariando el discurso de las enfermeras que relacionan ese tipo de ausencia como el principal responsable por la insuficiencia de personal en las instituciones de salud. La variación de los ISTs apuntó la importancia de que sean realizadas evaluaciones sistemáticas de las

  14. Influence of professional skills and personal competencies on job ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study investigated the influences of professional skills and personal competencies on job performances of registry staff in University of Ibadan, Nigeria. The study adopted the survey research deign while 102 registry staff participated. Finding from the study revealed that registry staff in University of Ibadan presses ...

  15. Information for contractors' staff

    CERN Document Server

    Dosimetry Service

    2005-01-01

    We have observed a significant decrease in the number of completed Certificates for Work in Controlled Radiation Areas being submitted with applications for dosimeters for your staff. Henceforth, we shall no longer be able to issue dosimeters without a certificate, which must be signed by the employee and the contractor's radiation-protection expert. You can obtain the certificate form from the Dosimetry Service at Building 24/E-011 or from our Website: http://service-rp-dosimetry.web.cern.ch/service-rp-dosimetry/ Thank you for your understanding. The Dosimetry Service

  16. Staff Development: Cafe Style

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arns, Jennifer

    2008-01-01

    In most cases, memorable learning opportunities are fun, collaborative, and influential. Jennifer Arns, instructional programs director for the Organization for Education Technology and Curriculum, outlines the EdTech Professional Development Cadre, a refreshing and engaging PD approach. (Contains 3 resources.)

  17. Creating intentionally inviting schools through professional development: an appreciative inquiry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G.M. Steyn

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available The professional development (PD of teachers plays an important role in schools; it is indispensable for continuous school development. When schools are exposed to new approaches to learning and teaching, teachers are granted the opportunities to change their thinking and behaviour. In 2009, two South African schools with specific inviting characteristics were nominated for the inviting school award given by the International Alliance for Invitational Education (IAIE. However, the inviting characteristics of these schools were not explicitly intentional according to the IE philosophy, therefore they had to follow a professional development programme aimed at raising teachers’ awareness of invitational education (IE. Workshops were held to equip staff members with IE knowledge and skills, and to increase their understanding of their current practices with a view of making them more intentionally inviting. The study focused on the following two questions: What are the positive experiences of teaching staff concerning the current approach to teaching and learning in schools?; and What strategies may be introduced to assist teachers and their schools in becoming intentionally inviting? These two questions are based on appreciative inquiry (AI and IE. A qualitative research design was most appropriate for the purpose of this study. An analysis of the data revealed two categories (the discovery phase: discovering the best of what exists in the school and the dreaming phase: creating a new future on which AI is based.

  18. Perinatal staff perceptions of safety and quality in their service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinni, Suzanne V; Wallace, Euan M; Cross, Wendy M

    2014-11-28

    Ensuring safe and appropriate service delivery is central to a high quality maternity service. With this in mind, over recent years much attention has been given to the development of evidence-based clinical guidelines, staff education and risk reporting systems. Less attention has been given to assessing staff perceptions of a service's safety and quality and what factors may influence that. In this study we set out to assess staff perceptions of safety and quality of a maternity service and to explore potential influences on service safety. The study was undertaken within a new low risk metropolitan maternity service in Victoria, Australia with a staffing profile comprising midwives (including students), neonatal nurses, specialist obstetricians, junior medical staff and clerical staff. In depth open-ended interviews using a semi-structured questionnaire were conducted with 23 staff involved in the delivery of perinatal care, including doctors, midwives, nurses, nursing and midwifery students, and clerical staff. Data were analyzed using naturalistic interpretive inquiry to identify emergent themes. Staff unanimously reported that there were robust systems and processes in place to maintain safety and quality. Three major themes were apparent: (1) clinical governance, (2) dominance of midwives, (3) inter-professional relationships. Overall, there was a strong sense that, at least in this midwifery-led service, midwives had the greatest opportunity to be an influence, both positively and negatively, on the safe delivery of perinatal care. The importance of understanding team dynamics, particularly mutual respect, trust and staff cohesion, were identified as key issues for potential future service improvement. Senior staff, particularly midwives and neonatal nurses, play central roles in shaping team behaviors and attitudes that may affect the safety and quality of service delivery. We suggest that strategies targeting senior staff to enhance their performance in

  19. Comunicação da equipe multiprofissional e indivíduos portadores de hipertensão arterial Comunicación entre los profesionales de la salud y los portadores de hipertensión arterial Communication between the health staff and hypertensive patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magda Cristina Queiroz Dell'Acqua

    1997-07-01

    Full Text Available O presente estudo tem como objetivos levantar dados sobre o que os indivíduos portadores de hipertensão arterial pensam sobre a sua doença e verificar a ocorrência do processo de comunicação entre estes e os profissionais que atuam junto aos mesmos. Foram entrevistados 66 clientes, obtendo-se 73 narrativas, constatando-se que a maioria (69 narrativas dos participantes da pesquisa faz correlação com o conceito de hipertensão arterial, ainda que de maneira pouco elaborada. Apesar de 95% dos clientes fazerem alguma referência à doença, não significa que as orientações recebidas anteriormente foram aprendidas. Espera-se que o enfermeiro por desempenhar um importante papel dentro da equipe multiprofissional, identifique as possíveis barreiras relativas ao processo de comunicação, havendo daí a intervenção junto aos elementos que podem estar dificultando ou impedindo a compreensão necessária para que o cliente assuma seu autocuidado.Este trabajo tiene como objetivo coger datos sobre lo que piensan los portadores de hipertensión arterial sobre su enfermedad y verificar el proceso de comunicación entre los mismos y con los profesionales de la salud que actuan junto a ellos. Fueron entrevistados 66 clientes, obteniendo 73 narrativas, de las cuales se constató que la mayoría (69 narrativas de los sujetos hicieron referencia al concepto de hipertensión arterial, aunque de forma pocoelaborada. A pesar de que el 95% de los clientes hacieron alguna referencia a la enfermedad, no significa que las orientaciones recibidas anteriormente fueron aprehendidas. Se espera que el enfermero, por desempenãr un importante papel dentro del equipo multiprofesional, identifique las barreras posibles del proceso de comunicación, obteniendo al mismo que interviene en las etapas que pueden estar dificultando o impidiendo la comprensión necesaria para que cliente asuma su autocuidado.This study aims to analyse data on hypertensive individuals and

  20. Mapping Staff Competencies for Information Literacy Interventions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheila Corrall

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Information literacy (IL is a key strategic objective for academic libraries. Many academic librarians are involved in designing, developing and delivering IL programmes, using both classroom teaching and e-learning methods. IL has also become a priority at institutional level and some universities and colleges have formal policies and strategies to integrate and embed IL in the curriculum. IL interventions also happen informally at enquiry points and reference desks, when queries offer ‘teachable moments’ for library staff to help students develop information skills and understanding while solving their information problems. Research shows that such instruction features strongly in both face-to-face and virtual reference transactions, but few IL policies and strategies cover this frontline personalised IL support. Similarly, most discussion of staff training and development for IL education has centred on the teaching roles and pedagogical knowledge of professional librarians, with limited discussion of the competencies needed for frontline interventions by paraprofessionals or assistants. This workshop promotes an inclusive holistic model of IL education and library workforce development. It will investigate the skills and knowledge needed by frontline staff to contribute effectively to the IL mission of academic libraries. It will focus on the learning support needed by students from different educational, social, ethnic and cultural backgrounds, with particular reference to postgraduate students, as a group typifying this diversity. The facilitator will review IL interventions and library staff competencies discussed in the literature. Participants will discuss typical queries or problems presented by different categories of postgraduate students and then identify the skills, knowledge and understanding required by frontline staff to provide an appropriate service response. The skillsets identified will be compared with those of teaching

  1. The Staff Association and you

    CERN Multimedia

    Association du personnel

    2013-01-01

    The Staff Association, your representative with the Management and the Member States The article VII 1.01 of the Staff Rules and Regulations (SR&R) provides that “the relations between the Director-General and the personnel shall be established either on an individual basis or on a collective basis with the Staff Association as intermediary”. This essential role of the Staff representatives, of being the spokesperson of the entire staff of the Organization vis-à-vis the Director-General and the Members States, is achieved through regular participation in the various joint advisory committees defined in the SR&R. The most important are the Standing Concertation Committee and the TREF, tripartite forum where your representatives meet with the Member States delegates, in the presence of the Management, to explain the position of the staff on the various issues concerning employment conditions. The Finance Committee also gives the opportunity to the Staff Association to ...

  2. Educação continuada da equipe de enfermagem nas UTIs do município de São Paulo Educación continua del equipo de enfermería en Unidades de Tratamiento Intensivo del municipio de São Paulo Continuing education of ICU nursing staff in São Paulo city

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Sumie Koizumi

    1998-07-01

    Full Text Available Este estudo é parte de um projeto maior sobre os recursos estruturais das UTIs no Município de São Paulo, incluindo a análise de sua estrutura física, recursos humanos, materiais e equipamentos. Os aspectos relativos às atividades de educação continuada da equipe de enfermagem são analisados neste artigo. A amostra estudada foi de 43 UTIs e um questionário respondido pela enfermeira responsável pela Unidade, o instrumento usado para a coleta de dados. Do total de Unidades estudadas, 34 (79,1% responderam ter treinamento inicial específico e 18 (41,9%, programas de atualização, os quais enfocam principalmente, revisão de técnicas e rotinas e atualização de patologias. As atividades de educação continuada são desenvolvidas predominantemente por enfermeiros das UTIs. Em relação aos enfermeiros, além das atividades de educação continuada desenvolvidas pelo próprio hospital, 50,2% assinalaram ter feito cursos de especialização ou aprimoramento em enfermagem médico-cirúrgica ou em outras áreas ou tanto em enfermagem médico-cirúrgica como em outras áreas. Face ao detectado e considerando o desenvolvimento do enfermeiro de UTI como o de um especialista, algumas sugestões para o aprimoramento das atividades de educação continuada nessas Unidades são apresentadas.Este estudio hace parte de un proyecto sobre caracterización de las UTIs en el Municipio de São Paulo, en lo que se refiere a la estructura física y los recursos humanos y materiales. Los aspectos relativos a las actividades de educación continua del equipo de enfermeria son analizados en este estudio. La muestra estudiada fue de 43 UTIs y un cuestionario respondido por la enfermera responsable por la Unidad, el instrumento usado para la recolección de los datos. En 34 (79,1% de las UTIs estudiadas se realizaban entrenamiento inicial específico y en l8 (41,9%, programas de atualizacción, los cuales enfocaban, principalmente, la revisión de t

  3. MASSIVE OPEN ONLINE COURSES FOR PEDAGOGICAL STAFF TRAINING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. M. Gyshchina

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. At the present time much attention of the society is fixed more and more to the problem of qualification improvement of pedagogical staff on account of total informatization of society, cardinal technological changes, becoming stronger interrelation of education, science and production, and active introduction in practice of professional standards. The existing system of professional development of pedagogical staff stands in need of reorganization and modernization. The search of the formats corresponding to modern realities, models and technologies of continuous training and retraining of education experts is becoming urgent today.The aim of the article is to show the possibilities of innovative forms of distance learning, realized in the form of a massive open online course (MOOC, for the training and continuous training of pedagogical staff.Methodology and research methods. The methods involve system-based analysis, synthesis, and generalization.Results and scientific novelty. The concept «mass open online course» (MOOC is clarified. MOOC is considered as a form of electronic distance training carried out on the basis of educational multimedia content, and wherein a large number of participants are involved online. The advantages of MOOC in the organization of hybrid forms of distance learning are shown: these online courses enable to combine planned online interactions of students with lecturers and tutors; mass discussions on topical professional subjects; offline study of records of training materials, and independent participants’ online coursework.The model of professional development of pedagogical staff on the basis of MOOC and realization of the principles of open education is presented: open platform, open schedule, open training, and open certification. The main approaches to the formation of new educational environment based on MOOC are designated as an innovative platform of preparation and professional

  4. Day Jobs/Nightwork: Academic Staff Studying towards Higher Degrees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winberg, C.; Adams, A.; Esbach, J.; Groenewald, W.; Lakay, D.; Muzondo, I.; Randall, K.; Seane, G.; Siyepu, S.; Veeran, P.

    2010-01-01

    Universities of Technology (UTs) offer career-focused education in a wide variety of disciplines and fields. Traditionally, UTs recruited academic staff with relevant workplace experience, rather than academic qualifications. The result of this strategy was, while many lecturers possessed professional qualifications in their field, they did not…

  5. Job Stress and Burnout: Occupational Hazards for Services Staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neville, Sandra H.

    1981-01-01

    Notes the components of occupational stress as they pertain to staff personnel involved with the direct delivery of library services to users. Solutions are discussed in terms of productive individual coping strategies, enhanced organizational design, and cohesive professional support. Seventeen references are listed. (Author/RAA)

  6. Day jobs/nightwork: Academic staff studying towards higher degrees ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Universities of Technology (UTs) offer career-focused education in a wide variety of disciplines and fields. Traditionally, UTs recruited academic staff with relevant workplace experience, rather than academic qualifications. The result of this strategy was, while many lecturers possessed professional qualifications in their field ...

  7. AASA Honors Leaders in Staff Development, Educational Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    School Administrator, 1992

    1992-01-01

    The 1990-91 AASA/National Staff Development Council Award for Outstanding Achievement in Professional Development went to Hattiesburg (Mississippi) Public Schools. Top educational research honors went to graduate student Dianne E. Ashby, for an HIV project at Illinois State University, and educational psychologist Lou Ann S. Dickson, for a project…

  8. Developing Intercultural Competence in University Staff: Augmenting Internationalisation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrew, Helen

    2012-01-01

    The primary aim of this research was to consider the benefit of providing professional development in intercultural competence for general staff at Deakin University. While the question arose from a disparity identified in the University policies, the importance of this consideration was highlighted in an impending audit to be conducted by AUQA,…

  9. A Learning Opportunity for Staff: Simulating an IT Department Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sipher, Justin; Spencer, Gene

    2007-01-01

    Skidmore College CTO Justin Sipher wanted to develop a staff professional development activity that would focus on the general issue of organizational effectiveness. He contacted Gene Spencer, whom he had met at the 2001 Frye Institute, for help. Sipher and Spencer agreed that the theme of organizational effectiveness could be explored in a…

  10. Work Roles, News Gathering Equipment, and Newscasts in Current U.S. Television News Departments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harless, James D.; Collins, Erik L.

    In the Spring of 1973, American television news editors were surveyed for data on staff size, operating budgets, work roles, camera equipment, portable VTR equipment, wire services, mobile equipment, and number of newscasts. The data obtained are reported in five levels of operating budgets with a summary of the statistics for each area of news…

  11. Office support staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choat, Dennis E

    2005-11-01

    The pace at which we live and practice in this new century leaves little time to manage many of the menial tasks of day-to-day survival. This is especially true in the field of medicine. With today's insurance policies and procedures, Health Information Privacy Protection Act (HIPPA) regulations, and the low return of payment for time invested, it is crucial to have a supportive group of people around you to help make your valuable time as meaningful as possible. This article will describe an arrangement of ancillary office staff for a colorectal practice. There will be detailed information on job descriptions, expectations, and level of training required for each. Upon completion of this article, one should be able to identify the personnel needed to establish and manage an efficient office from the front desk to the billing department and ultimately the practice manager.

  12. Exercise Equipment: Neutral Buoyancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shackelford, Linda; Valle, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Load Bearing Equipment for Neutral Buoyancy (LBE-NB) is an exercise frame that holds two exercising subjects in position as they apply counter forces to each other for lower extremity and spine loading resistance exercises. Resistance exercise prevents bone loss on ISS, but the ISS equipment is too massive for use in exploration craft. Integrating the human into the load directing, load generating, and motion control functions of the exercise equipment generates safe exercise loads with less equipment mass and volume.

  13. Relationship between care staff generativity and perceived job competence in elderly nursing homes

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Araki, Mariko

    2011-01-01

    .... The present study aimed to characterize the relationship between staff member generativity and perceived job competence in elderly nursing homes, and to determine the professional value of elderly care...

  14. A new logo for the Staff Association

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2013-01-01

    On 3rd December 2012 the Staff Association launched a competition open to all to design a new logo, which should not contain the official CERN logo, reserved by CERN’s new graphic charter to the official use by the Organization. We are pleased that this competition sparked a strong interest. A total of 57 proposals were received within the time limits, some submitted from far away: Poland, Czech Republic, Turkey and even Cameroon! The selection of the winning logo was made in two steps: first the pre-selection of six finalists, followed by the final choice of the winning logo by members of the Staff Association.  Winning logo The pre-selection was made in two stages. Three of the six finalists were nominated by a jury consisting of seven members of the Staff Association, including communication professionals. In parallel, from 4 to 15 February CERN employed members of the personnel were able to visit the exhibition of all the logo proposals on the 1st floor of the Main Building and ...

  15. Toward Multinational Professional Military Education in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schaub Jr, Gary John; Breitenbauch, Henrik Ø.

    European NATO nations need better staff officers. Operation Unified Protector exposed a widespread deficiency in the professional knowledge of field-grade European officers. Professional military education (PME) is where corrective Alliance action must focus. The Nordic countries—Norway, Denmark...

  16. Teaching and Teacher Education for Health Professionals ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Musumali

    This result suggests that a large proportion of teaching staff could benefit from teacher education. ... requirement for formal training in teaching for the horde health professionals who participate (full-time, part-time or ... training for educators in health professionals' education. Method: 250 medical students from the MB ChB.

  17. Purchasing Supplies, Equipment and Services Under EPA Grants

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA developed this guidance to help ensure you meet EPA requirements when making such necessary purchases. With very few exceptions, you must follow a competitive process when you use EPA grant funds to acquire equipment and professional services.

  18. Nosocomial infections and staff hygiene

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Petroudi, Dimitra

    2009-01-01

    .... The most important defences against nosocomial transmission of viral, bacterial, and other infections are detailed and continuing education of staff and strict adherence to infection control policies...

  19. Training Humanitarian Professionals at a Distance: Testing the Feasibility of Distance Learning with Humanitarian Professionals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bollettino, Vincenzo; Bruderlein, Claude

    2008-01-01

    Training is an essential part of the professional development of staff working for international humanitarian organizations. While humanitarian workers are being deployed around the world to provide life-saving relief assistance in often-hazardous missions, it is imperative for organizations to ensure that staff members understand the mission and…

  20. [HBV, HCV, and HIV infection prevalence among prison staff in the light of occupational risk factors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gańczak, Maria; Szych, Zbigniew

    2017-06-27

    Objectives of the study: to assess the occupational risk for blood-borne infections (BBIs) among prison staff (number/ circumstances of blood exposures and preventive methods used), and to estimate the prevalence of hepatitis B virus (HBV), hepatitis C virus (HCV) and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). The survey, which included serological testing with the use of 3-generation enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA) was completed on active staff at a correctional facility in Goleniów, Poland, between June-July 2015. Response rate was 38%, 87 participants (aged 22-64 years, median: 34 years) agreed to participate. There were 88.5% males, correctional officers comprised 87.4% of the participants. Having had ≥ 1 blood exposure during professional career was reported by 28.7% respondents, 8% - sustained it in the preceding year. For correctional officers the last blood exposure was caused by a hollow-bore needle/razor blade during cell or manual searches. This was not reported by 83.3%. Participation rate in an infection control training was 85.1%. Hepatitis B virus vaccination uptake was 83.9%. Compliance with glove use was 75.9%, with protective eyewear - 28.7%. Regular use of both was reported by 9.2% of participants. The lack of their availability was the most common reason (79.7%) for non-compliance. Anti-HBc (hepatitis B core antigen) total/anti-HCV/anti-HIV prevalence was 2.3%, 1.1%, and 0%, respectively. Prison staff are at risk for occupational exposures to blood. Reporting of such incidents is poor, as well as compliance with personal protective equipment use, which place them at risk for acquiring BBIs. Anti-HCV prevalence is similar to that observed in the general population, anti-HBc total prevalence is lower, possibly due to high vaccination uptake, however, poor response rate limits precise prevalence estimates. Med Pr 2017;68(4):507-516.

  1. A Structured Writing Programme for Staff: Facilitating Knowledge, Skills, Confidence and Publishing Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devlin, Marcia; Radloff, Alex

    2014-01-01

    The growing interest in the higher education sector in publishing pedagogical research has led to a focus on professional development for staff who wish to engage in this endeavour. This paper describes and evaluates a specific programme designed to help university staff to prepare and submit a high-quality paper to a peer-reviewed journal.…

  2. Developing an Organizational Commitment to Employee Success: The Student Affairs Staff Development Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Thomas H.; Randall, Kathleen P.

    1994-01-01

    Presents unique model of staff development for student affairs division based on current strategies which have proven to be successful in corporate sector. Notes that model has twofold purpose of addressing concerns regarding opportunities for professional development and problem of institutional staff attrition in field of student affairs.…

  3. Space Heating Equipment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rafferty, Kevin D.

    1998-01-01

    The performance evaluation of space heating equipment for a geothermal application is generally considered from either of two perspectives: (a) selecting equipment for installation in new construction, or (b) evaluating the performance and retrofit requirements of an existing system. With regard to new construction, the procedure is relatively straightforward. Once the heating requirements are determined, the process need only involve the selection of appropriately sized hot water heating equipment based on the available water temperature. It is important to remember that space heating equipment for geothermal applications is the same equipment used in non-geothermal applications. What makes geothermal applications unique is that the equipment is generally applied at temperatures and flow rates that depart significantly from traditional heating system design. This chapter presents general considerations for the performance of heating equipment at non-standard temperature and flow conditions, retrofit of existing systems, and aspects of domestic hot water heating.

  4. THE INNOVATIVE METHODS OF FUTURE PROFESSIONAL STAFF EDUCATION

    OpenAIRE

    Iwona Grabara

    2014-01-01

    The article presents the results of the carried out analysis concerning the level determination of the use of innovative methods of teaching specialized subjects in preparation for the profession of logistics, and to identify and determine possible changes in the types of teaching methods, used in relation to carried out in this area of research by specialists and experts in the past 15 years. The purpose of this article is to realize that the education system in all schools modes in Poland d...

  5. 13 CFR 120.824 - Professional management and staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ..., management, marketing, packaging, processing, closing, servicing or liquidation services provided by... the CDC makes for managing, marketing, packaging, processing, closing, servicing, or liquidation..., marketing, packaging, processing, closing, servicing or liquidation function, the CDC's Board must explain...

  6. Should the United States Army Have a Professional General Staff?

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-03-23

    recognized that it is late in arriving and is still in its infantile stages. There exists, as of now, no real operational doctrine worth the name in the...Republic of Germany, the German Democratic Republic, and the Union of Soviet Socialest Republics: "Examinations for promotion to captain and/or major, or...Ainsworth and his retirement. Unfortun antly this was not where the matter rested. Gereral Wood happened to be a Republican. In 1910 the Democrats had

  7. CERN computing equipment for Senegal

    CERN Multimedia

    Anaïs Schaeffer

    2014-01-01

    On 26 May, CERN once again had the honour of donating computing equipment to a foreign institute.   This time, around 100 servers and five network hubs were sent to Senegal, making it the seventh country, after Morocco, Ghana, Bulgaria, Serbia, Egypt and the Philippines, to receive a donation of computing equipment from the Organization. The official ceremony was held at CERN on 26 May in the presence of the Director-General, Rolf Heuer, and Senegal's ambassador to Geneva, Fodé Seck, who both expressed their enthusiasm for the project. The equipment is intended for Cheikh Anta Diop University (UCAD) in Dakar and will be of particular use to students attending the African School of Fundamental Physics and its Applications (ASP 2014) taking place from 3 to 23 August, for which CERN is a partner. The ASP allows a large number of African students to hone their skills in high-energy physics and to forge professional links with fellow physicists in Africa and Europe. ...

  8. Guidelines for staff administering laser therapy in an office setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plauntz, Leslie

    2013-01-01

    Advances in laser technology provide not only new opportunities, but an increase in laser applications. Many independent clinics now offer laser treatments. Use of laser treatment and related services should only be provided to patients by appropriately trained and qualified personnel. This article outlines the roles and responsibilities of the healthcare team working in independent laser healthcare facilities. The article is meant to assist clinics in developing their own quality management programs and is intended only to act as a guide to ensure that treatment is provided by qualified professionals in the safest, most effective manner. Staff working in laser clinics are responsible for the operation of lasers during treatment. They are also responsible for patient and staff safety, implementation of standards of care, and providing only procedures that meet and follow strict safety parameters. Accidents will occur with lasers when providers do not have the proper skills, training, and education on laser treatments. Regardless of many safety regulations involving laser use, little is written on the qualifications, selection, and ongoing education of the professional and technical staff working in independent healthcare facilities offering laser services. This article provides a detailed outline of the necessary skills and knowledge the nurses and the support staff need to possess to use lasers for patient treatment in laser treatment centers. Staff educated in laser science and safety can recognize potential hazards and ensure that safety standards are actively integrated into the daily practice of patient care.

  9. Professional capital contested: A bourdieusian analysis of conflicts between professionals and managers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Noordegraaf (Mirko); W. Schinkel (Willem)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractAlthough Bourdieu paid scant attention to (and in fact discredited) the notion of professionalism, his social theory is well-equipped to understand the evolution of professional work. Professionalism can be conceived as a set of symbolic resources that (re)produce an occupational order,

  10. 2011 Elections to Staff Council

    CERN Document Server

    Staff Association

    2011-01-01

    Vote Elections to fill all seats in the Staff Council are being organized this month. Voting will begin on Monday 31 October. Make your voice heard and be many to elect the new Staff Council. By doing so, you will be encouraging the men and women who will  represent you over the next two years and they will doubtless appreciate your gratitude. More details on the elections can be found on the Staff Association web site. (http://association.web.cern.ch) Elections Timetable Monday 31 October, at noon start date for voting Monday 14 November, at noon closing date for voting Monday 21 November, publication of the results in Echo Tuesday 22 and Wednesday 29 November Staff Association Assizes Tuesday 6 December, at 10.00 a.m. first meeting of the new Staff Council and election of the new Executive Committee The voting procedure is monitored by the Election Committee. 

  11. An analysis of USMC heavy construction equipment (HCE) requirements

    OpenAIRE

    Blaxton, Allen C.; Fay, Michael J.; Hansen, Cheryl M.; Zuchristian, Christopher M.

    2003-01-01

    MBA Professional Report Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. According to I and L, HQMC, the Marine Corps needs to re-evaluate current operational requirements for engineer construction equipment. Acquisition and force allocation levels for equipment have remained essentially at constant 1970's, Cold War levels. Because acquisition and allocation levels haven't changed at the same rate as personnel, there is a perception that much of the existing equipment is unnecess...

  12. Effective dose estimation to patients and staff during urethrography procedures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sulieman, A. [Prince Sattam bin Abdulaziz University, College of Applied Medical Sciences, Radiology and Medical Imaging Department, P. O- Box 422, Alkharj 11942 (Saudi Arabia); Barakat, H. [Neelain University, College of Science and Technology, Medical Physics Department, Khartoum (Sudan); Alkhorayef, M.; Babikir, E. [King Saud University, College of Applied Sciences, Radiological Sciences Department, P. O. Box 10219, Riyadh 11433 (Saudi Arabia); Dalton, A.; Bradley, D. [University of Surrey, Centre for Nuclear and Radiation Physics, Department of Physics, Surrey, GU2 7XH Guildford (United Kingdom)

    2015-10-15

    Medical-related radiation is the largest source of controllable radiation exposure to humans and it accounts for more than 95% of radiation exposure from man-made sources. Few data were available worldwide regarding patient and staff dose during urological ascending urethrography (ASU) procedure. The purposes of this study are to measure patient and staff entrance surface air kerma dose (ESAK) during ASU procedure and evaluate the effective doses. A total of 243 patients and 145 staff (Urologist) were examined in three Hospitals in Khartoum state. ESAKs were measured for patient and staff using thermoluminescent detectors (TLDs). Effective doses (E) were calculated using published conversion factors and methods recommended by the national Radiological Protection Board (NRPB). The mean ESAK dose for patients and staff dose were 7.79±6.7 mGy and 0.161±0.30 mGy per procedures respectively. The mean and range of the effective dose was 1.21 mSv per procedure. The radiation dose in this study is comparable with previous studies except Hospital C. It is obvious that high patient and staff exposure is due to the lack of experience and protective equipment s. Interventional procedures remain operator dependent; therefore continuous training is crucial. (Author)

  13. Professional training for hygienic and sanitation maintenance of systems and equipments with risk of legionelosis Capacitación del personal que realiza las operaciones de mantenimiento higiénico-sanitario de las instalaciones de riesgo frente a Legionella

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milagros Fernández de Lezeta Sáez de Jáuregui

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Training for technicians in charge of maintenance, cleaning and disinfection of the equipment and installations that could be amplify and spread Legionella need to be checked and updated. This revision must to be done keeping with the kind of tasks performed and requested knowledges for technicians.In the following lines there is an analysis about the present training and ANECPLA proposes different levels based on its training experience and skills need by technicians to prevent and control legionnaires’ disease.La formación del personal técnico dedicado a las tareas de mantenimiento, limpieza y desinfección de equipos e instalaciones de riesgo frente a Legionella requiere una revisión y actualización que debe ser realizada teniendo en cuenta el tipo de tareas desempeñadas y conocimientos exigidos para su desarrollo.En este artículo se hace un análisis sobre la formación actual y se proponen diferentes niveles de capacitación en base a los criterios y experiencia que ANECPLA posee en materia de formación y conocimiento de las habilidades que se tienen que desarrollar en el trabajo de prevención y control de legionelosis.

  14. Factors affecting medical and nursing staff reporting of child abuse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Natan, M; Faour, C; Naamhah, S; Grinberg, K; Klein-Kremer, A

    2012-09-01

    The purpose of the current research was to examine whether the theory of planned behaviour (TPB) succeeds in predicting nursing and medical staff reporting of suspected child abuse. Despite the rising incidence of child abuse in Israel, medical and nursing staff reports of suspected child abuse remain low. This descriptive, correlational, cross-sectional study was based on TPB. The Child Abuse Report Intention Scale questionnaire was administered to 143 nurses and 42 doctors who work with children in various departments of a central Israeli hospital and in a large affiliated community-based clinic. Descriptive, correlational and linear regression statistics were calculated. Objection to child abuse, views of professional responsibility on this issue, degree of self-control and subjective beliefs, affect reporting of suspected child abuse. Differences in reporting are evident between doctors and nurses and also between medical and nursing staff from the Arab and Jewish sectors. Doctors report more than nurses and Jewish staff members report more than their Arab colleagues. Medical and nursing staff's number of own children has a direct effect on their inclination to report child abuse. The TPB model succeeds in partly predicting medical and nursing staff reporting of suspected child abuse. This model can serve as a basis for intervention plans aimed at developing medical and nursing simulations of coping with conflict issues involving child abuse in an attempt to eradicate and treat inadequate reporting. © 2012 The Authors. International Nursing Review © 2012 International Council of Nurses.

  15. Portrait: Yves Sillanoli, Staff Association delegate since 2004

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2017-01-01

    Yves Sillanoli - Staff Association delegate. I worked at CERN as Contractor’s personnel for 18 years, and in 2003, I became a staff member. By nature, I am someone who enjoys getting involved in associations. For 35 years, I was a member of a sports association in my community. Therefore, for me it was natural to want to reach out and help my colleagues, especially those with professional experiences similar to mine. Moreover, even though both my father and my brother had worked at CERN before me, I really wanted to understand the inner functioning of the Organization. To this end, I decided to run for staff delegate and was elected to the Staff Association in 2004. Joining the Staff Association has been, above all, a chance to meet people: Gianni Deroma, former President of the Staff Association, and Philippe Defert, who passed away in 2013, were great listeners and had a real sense of mutual help. Philippe Defert influenced greatly my decision take part in the Association and, over time, a rema...

  16. Staff happiness and work satisfaction in a tertiary psychiatric centre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baruch, Y; Swartz, M; Sirkis, S; Mirecki, I; Barak, Y

    2013-09-01

    Mental health professionals are at a high risk of burnout. Positive psychology outcomes of staff in acute in-patient psychiatric wards are poorly researched and unclear. To quantify the satisfaction with life and work-life satisfaction of mental health staff at a large university-affiliated tertiary psychiatric centre. We utilized the Satisfaction with Life Scale (SWLS) and the Work-Life Satisfaction Questionnaire (WLSQ). Two hundred and nine out of 450 staff members (46%) participated; mean age 48.2 + 9.9 years; 63% were male. On average the participants had been practising their speciality for 21.1 + 9.8 years (range: 2-48). The mean total SWLS scores differed significantly between professions (P happiness were reported by psychologists and social workers, followed by the administrative staff, the psychiatrists and finally the nursing staff. Staff scored the highest for work as a 'calling' followed by work as a 'career' and the lowest rating for work as a 'job'. The mean total WLSQ score differed between professions, (P happiness may contribute to increase in moral and counter burnout.

  17. Violence to staff in a general hospital setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whittington, R; Shuttleworth, S; Hill, L

    1996-08-01

    The problem of aggression to staff in a general hospital was examined from the perspective of Poyner & Warne's (1986) model of workplace violence. A total of 396 staff (39% response rate) provided information on their experience of violence in the past year and a subsample were additionally interviewed about their current levels of mental health (GHQ). Some 72 staff (21% of respondents had been physically assaulted and 90% of these assaulted staff worked beyond the accident and emergency department, e.g. in medical wards. Nurses were physically assaulted, threatened and verbally abused at higher rates than other professionals. Employee factors (younger age, shorter National Health Service experience and attendance at violence training) were significantly associated with assault (P < 0.05). Postoperative confusion, receiving treatment and delayed treatment were common precursors of aggression. Mental health was significantly worse amongst staff exposed to threats (P < 0.01). This exploratory study establishes that violence is a problem across a number of general hospital departments and occupations and we argue that effective training should be made more available for staff at risk of assault.

  18. Evaluating the Staff at Enterprise: Several Theoretical and Methodological Aspects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Girman Alla P.

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The article is aimed at generalizing and systematizing various knowledge, related to evaluation of staff, on a common theoretical-methodological basis. Concept, objectives, directions, methods, and indicators for evaluating staff in the contemporary economy were analyzed. The topicality of using the theoretical developments on staff evaluation in actual practice of functioning of enterprises has been substantiated. A new approach to the procedure of evaluation of the total human resource of enterprise, based on the life cycle of organization, has been proposed. On the basis of the proposed scientific algorithmic step-by-step approach to the evaluation of staff, managers of companies can design their own models for staff evaluation, develop its separate elements. Prospects for further researches in this direction involve relation of staff evaluation to the life cycle of employee no less than the life cycle of enterprise. Management of the life cycle of employee represents methods for management of his development that would change the level of the employee’s professional maturity as result of a system impact.

  19. Psychosocial Predictors of Anxiety in Nursing Home Staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallego-Alberto, Laura; Losada, Andrés; Vara, Carlos; Olazarán, Javier; Muñiz, Ruben; Pillemer, Karl

    2017-08-23

    Although research shows that nursing home staff experience significant levels of stress and burnout, studies analyzing the relationship of psychosocial variables on their feelings of anxiety are scarce. This study aims to analyze the relationship between psychosocial variables and levels of anxiety among staff. Participants were 101 nursing home professionals. In addition to anxiety, socio-demographic variables, depersonalization, burden, relationship with families of the residents, and guilt about the care offered to the residents were assessed. A hierarchical regression analysis was carried out to analyze the contribution of the assessed variables to staff anxiety levels. The obtained model explained 57% of the variance in anxious symptomatology. Guilt about the care offered and poor quality of the relationship with residents' family were associated with anxiety. Further, working at nursing homes where the staff report higher levels of anxiety symptoms, the presence of depersonalization and burden were also associated with anxiety. The findings suggest that in addition to work-related variables (burden and burnout), problems with family members and guilt about the care offered are relevant variables for understanding staff's anxious symptomatology. Interventions that address issues of guilt about the quality of care, and problematic relationships with family members of residents, may have potential to reduce staff anxiety and promote their well-being.

  20. Positive effects of experience in terminal care on nursing home staff in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abe, Koji; Ohashi, Akira

    2011-09-01

    This study aimed to examine the psychological effects of terminal care experience on nursing home staff and analyze the differences between staff who are experienced and those who are inexperienced in providing terminal care. A mailed survey was conducted in 2007. A total of 37% (N = 72) of the participants had experience in terminal care in nursing homes. Analysis of variance (ANOVA) revealed that the professional efficacy (a subscale of the Maslach Burnout Inventory-General Survey [MBI-GS]) and tenure (duration of service) of the experienced staff were significantly higher than those of the inexperienced staff. The high professional efficacy noted among the experienced staff suggests that the provision of terminal care in nursing homes does not necessarily lead to burnout among caregivers and may in fact serve as an important motivational factor.

  1. Cooling of electronic equipment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    A. Kristensen, Anders Schmidt

    2003-01-01

    Cooling of electronic equipment is studied. The design size of electronic equipment decrease causing the thermal density to increase. This affect the cooling which can cause for example failures of critical components due to overheating or thermal induced stresses. Initially a pin fin heat sink...

  2. Interface transfer of equipment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ashton, I.J.

    1989-04-01

    This article details the interface transfer of heavy-duty face equipment from 5's to 6's face in the Great Row Seam at Silverdale Colliery, British Coal, Western Area. The salvaged face was roofbolted using leg-mounted Wombat drilling rigs. All heavy-duty equipment was transported by FSV's. 5 figs.

  3. Eye dose to staff involved in interventional and procedural fluoroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLean, D.; Hadaya, D.; Tse, J.

    2016-03-01

    In 2011 the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) lowered the occupational eye dose limit from 150 to 20 mSv/yr [1]. While international jurisdictions are in a process of adopting these substantial changes, medical physicists at the clinical level have been advising medical colleagues on specific situations based on dose measurements. Commissioned and calibrated TLDs mounted in commercially available holders designed to simulate the measurement of Hp(3), were applied to staff involved in x-ray procedures for a one month period. During this period clinical procedure data was concurrently collected and subject to audit. The use or not of eye personal protective equipment (PPE) was noted for all staff. Audits were conducted in the cardiac catheterisation laboratory, the interventional angiography rooms and the procedural room where endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) procedures are performed. Significant levels of occupational dose were recorded in the cardiac and interventional procedures, with maximum reading exceeding the new limit for some interventional radiologists. No significant eye doses were measured for staff performing ERCP procedures. One outcome of the studies was increased use of eye PPE for operators of interventional equipment with increased availability also to nursing staff, when standing in close proximity to the patient during procedures.

  4. A cluster randomised controlled trial and process evaluation of a training programme for mental health professionals to enhance user involvement in care planning in service users with severe mental health issues (EQUIP): study protocol for a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bower, Peter; Roberts, Chris; O'Leary, Neil; Callaghan, Patrick; Bee, Penny; Fraser, Claire; Gibbons, Chris; Olleveant, Nicola; Rogers, Anne; Davies, Linda; Drake, Richard; Sanders, Caroline; Meade, Oonagh; Grundy, Andrew; Walker, Lauren; Cree, Lindsey; Berzins, Kathryn; Brooks, Helen; Beatty, Susan; Cahoon, Patrick; Rolfe, Anita; Lovell, Karina

    2015-08-13

    Involving service users in planning their care is at the centre of policy initiatives to improve mental health care quality in England. Whilst users value care planning and want to be more involved in their own care, there is substantial empirical evidence that the majority of users are not fully involved in the care planning process. Our aim is to evaluate the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of training for mental health professionals in improving user involvement with the care planning processes. This is a cluster randomised controlled trial of community mental health teams in NHS Trusts in England allocated either to a training intervention to improve user and carer involvement in care planning or control (no training and care planning as usual). We will evaluate the effectiveness of the training intervention using a mixed design, including a 'cluster cohort' sample, a 'cluster cross-sectional' sample and process evaluation. Service users will be recruited from the caseloads of care co-ordinators. The primary outcome will be change in self-reported involvement in care planning as measured by the validated Health Care Climate Questionnaire. Secondary outcomes include involvement in care planning, satisfaction with services, medication side-effects, recovery and hope, mental health symptoms, alliance/engagement, well-being and quality of life. Cost- effectiveness will also be measured. A process evaluation informed by implementation theory will be undertaken to assess the extent to which the training was implemented and to gauge sustainability beyond the time-frame of the trial. It is hoped that the trial will generate data to inform mental health care policy and practice on care planning. ISRCTN16488358 (14 May 2014).

  5. Managing Custodial and Maintenance Staffs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fickes, Michael

    2001-01-01

    Presents some basic maintenance management techniques that can help schools meet their budgets, preserve staffing levels, meet productivity needs, and sustain quality services. Tips for staff recruitment, training, and retention are explored. (GR)

  6. Ethical issues and the new staff mix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erlen, J A; Mellors, M P; Koren, A M

    1996-01-01

    The role of the professional nurse is changing due to the effects of work redesign programs, downsizing, and the increasing use of unlicensed assistive personnel (UAP). Nurses recognize that they cannot provide all aspects of the patient's care; however, nurses generally lack the knowledge and skill to delegate effectively. If nurses cannot delegate appropriate tasks to others, mistrust those to whom they are delegating tasks, and show limited respect toward UAP when delegating and supervising their work, there is the distinct possibility that patients will not receive quality care. The authors examine the ethical issues of respect for persons, trust, and promoting patient well-being, as well as the nursing issues related to accountability and responsibility when delegating care. There are several recommendations provided to enable nurses to reduce the threat of compromised patient care created by this new staff mix.

  7. SENIOR STAFF ADVANCEMENT COMMITTEE (SSAC)

    CERN Multimedia

    2000-01-01

    Composition and mandateThe Senior Staff Advancement Committee is composed of members nominated ad persona by the Director-General.The Committee examines proposals from Divisions concerning promotions to grade 13 in Career Path IX, changes of career path to Career Path IX and advancements to the exceptional grade in Career path VIII.The Director-General may consult the Committee on any matter related to senior staff careers.The Committee makes its recommendations to the Director-General.

  8. Why join the Staff Association

    CERN Multimedia

    Association du personnel

    2011-01-01

    Becoming a member of the Staff Association (SA) is above all a personal choice, showing that the joining person’s commitment and adherence to values such as solidarity, social cohesion, etc.In September, the SA launches a membership campaign to convince a maximum number to join, to inform, arouse interest and support. Posters, emails and individual contacts are part of the campaign programme, just like this editorial. As far as individual contacts are concerned, we ask you to give time and lend an ear to the delegates of your department in the Staff Council, who will approach you, in order to make an open and constructive discussion possible. Do not hesitate to ask questions and let them know your thoughts about the SA, as (constructive) criticism enables us to progress. The Staff Association and its role of collective representation The Staff Association, via its delegates, represents collectively all staff of the Organization before the Director-General and Member States. To do this, staff rep...

  9. Trabalho em equipe na perspectiva da gerência de serviços de saúde: instrumentos para a construção da prática interprofissional Team work under the perspective of health services management: instruments for the construction of inter-professional practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina Peduzzi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Estuda-se a contribuição da ação gerencial para a promoção da prática interprofissional. Trata-se de pesquisa qualitativa, realizada em 21 serviços públicos de saúde de uma região de São Paulo, por meio de entrevista semiestruturada com 21 gerentes (diretores e utiliza-se a técnica de análise temática. Como resultado, para promover o trabalho em equipe, os gerentes lançam mão dos instrumentos: comunicação, construção do compromisso das equipes e dos trabalhadores com o projeto institucional, estímulo à autonomia das equipes, definição de responsabilidades e accountability, promoção de mudança da cultura institucional e supervisão externa. Conclui-se que a comunicação e demais ferramentas quando aplicadas à promoção do trabalho em equipe estão orientadas ao trabalho, isto é, à atenção eficaz e eficiente às necessidades de saúde dos usuários.Study on the contribution of the managerial action for the promotion of inter-professional practice. It is a qualitative research carried out in 21 public health services facilities in a region of São Paulo, using data from semi-structured interview with 21 managers (directors and the technique of theme analysis was used. As a result, in order to promote team work, managers use tools such as: communication, construction of commitment on the part of teams and workers in relation to the institutional project, stimulus to team autonomy, definition of responsibilities and accountability, promotion of institutional culture change and external supervision. The conclusion is that the tool of communication and others, whenever applied to the promotion of team work, are work-oriented, that is, oriented to efficient and effective care to the health needs of the users.

  10. Structures and practices enabling staff nurses to control their practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, Marlene; Schmalenberg, Claudia; Maguire, Patricia; Brewer, Barbara B; Burke, Rebecca; Chmielewski, Linda; Cox, Karen; Kishner, Janice; Krugman, Mary; Meeks-Sjostrom, Diana; Waldo, Mary

    2008-08-01

    This mixed-methods study uses interviews, participant observations, and the CWEQII empowerment tool to identify structures and attributes of structures that promote control over nursing practice (CNP). Nearly 3,000 staff nurses completed the Essentials of Magnetism (EOM), an instrument that measures CNP, one of the eight staff nurse-identified essential attributes of a productive work environment. Strategic sampling is used to identify 101 high CNP-scoring clinical units in 8 high-EOM scoring magnet hospitals. In addition to 446 staff nurses, managers, and physicians on these high-scoring units, chief nursing officers, chief operating officers, and representatives from other professional departments are interviewed; participant observations are made of all unit/departmental/hospital council and interdisciplinary meetings held during a 4 to 6 day site visit. Structures and components of viable shared governance structures that enabled CNP are identified through constant comparative analysis of interviews and observations, and through analysis of quantitative measures.

  11. Tuberculosis among prison staff in Rio Grande do Sul

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline Busatto

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective: to evaluate the risk of infection and illness caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis among health care and security staff in prisons in two regions of Rio Grande do Sul (RS. Method: cross-sectional study involving prison staff. An interview and sputum smear microscopy and culture were performed. Latent infection was evaluated according to the result of the tuberculin test (TT, self-referred. Results: among staff who had a TT, 10 (83.3% in the central region and 2 (16.7% in the southern region were considered reactors. Length of employment among prison officers who reacted to TT was 15.3 years, and among health care workers, 4.1 years (p = 0.01. No cases of active tuberculosis (TB were identified. Conclusion: prevalence of latent TB was 27.9%. Length of employment between different professional categories and their working regions was considered a risk factor for latent TB.

  12. Assessing the Knowledge, Skills, and Abilities of Public Health Professionals in Big City Governmental Health Departments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGinty, Meghan D; Castrucci, Brian C; Rios, Debra M

    2017-12-13

    To identify essential knowledge, skills, and abilities (KSAs) for and characterize gaps in KSAs of professionals working in large, urban health departments. A survey was disseminated to potentially eligible supervisors within 26 of 28 health departments in the largest, most urban jurisdictions in the country. A supervisor was eligible to participate if he or she supervised at least 1 staff member whose highest level of education was a master's degree. A total of 645 eligible supervisors participated in the workforce survey for a response rate of 27.1% and cooperation rate of 55.2%. Supervisors were asked to rate the importance of KSAs to their masters-level staffs' work and indicate their staffs' proficiency. Fifty-eight percent of supervisors reported supervising staff with a master of public health/master of science in public health degree. More than 30% of supervisors indicated that all of the 30 KSAs were essential. Four of the top 10 KSAs rated as essential by supervisors pertained to the ability to communicate. The top skills gaps perceived by supervisors were professional staffs' ability to apply quality improvement concepts to their work (38.0%), understanding of the political system (37.7%), and ability to anticipate changes (33.8%). Public health practitioners receive training in methods, theories, and evidence-based approaches, yet further investment in the workforce is necessary to advance population health. A focus should be placed developing strategic skills rather than advancing narrow specialties. Findings from this research can guide the creation and implementation of training curricula and professional development programs offered within local health departments or targeted to their staff, as well as satisfaction of accreditation requirements. By focusing on building strategic skills, we can ensure a public health workforce that is equipped with the KSAs necessary to practice Public Health 3.0 and leaders who are able to serve as their communities

  13. Professional Certification

    Science.gov (United States)

    WaterSense recognizes certification programs for irrigation professionals that meet the specification criteria. Certification programs cover three areas: irrigation system design, installation and maintenance, and system auditing.

  14. Ending disruptive behavior: staff nurse recommendations to nurse educators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lux, Kathleen M; Hutcheson, Jane B; Peden, Ann R

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative descriptive study was to identify educational strategies that can prepare new graduates to manage disruptive behavior (DB) in the workplace. DB is any inappropriate behavior, confrontation, or conflict - ranging from verbal abuse to sexual harassment - that harms or intimidates others to the extent that quality of care or patient safety could be compromised. Individual interviews were conducted with nine staff nurses currently in practice in acute care settings in the United States. Staff nurses recommended educational strategies that focused on communication skills for professional practice. These included learning how to communicate with hostile individuals, and giving and receiving constructive criticism. Descriptions that participants provided about their work culture were an unexpected finding that has relevance for nurse educators as they prepare students for transition to practice Nurses described lack of management support and intervention for DB situations, personality clashes with coworkers, and devaluation of nursing work as affecting professional practice. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. [Medical Equipment Maintenance Methods].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hongbin

    2015-09-01

    Due to the high technology and the complexity of medical equipment, as well as to the safety and effectiveness, it determines the high requirements of the medical equipment maintenance work. This paper introduces some basic methods of medical instrument maintenance, including fault tree analysis, node method and exclusive method which are the three important methods in the medical equipment maintenance, through using these three methods for the instruments that have circuit drawings, hardware breakdown maintenance can be done easily. And this paper introduces the processing methods of some special fault conditions, in order to reduce little detours in meeting the same problems. Learning is very important for stuff just engaged in this area.

  16. Psychometric properties of the Spanish Burnout Inventory among staff nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gil-Monte, P R; Manzano-García, G

    2015-12-01

    The burnout syndrome contributes to the deterioration in the quality of personal life as well as lower quality practice in healthcare personnel. Researchers have been concerned about the psychometric limitations of some previous questionnaires designed to evaluate burnout. The Spanish Burnout Inventory was developed to address the problems associated with other instruments, but it has not yet been validated in staff nurses. This study provides evidence that the Spanish Burnout Inventory has adequate psychometric properties to estimate burnout in staff nurses. The Spanish Burnout Inventory offers a theoretical proposal to explain the different components of burnout. The Spanish Burnout Inventory provides researchers and practitioners with an expanded conceptualization of the burnout syndrome, which can facilitate the diagnosis and treatment of nursing professionals. Researchers have been concerned about the psychometric limitations of the some previous questionnaires designed to evaluate burnout. To address these problems associated with previous instruments, the Spanish Burnout Inventory (SBI) was developed. The instrument has not yet been validated in staff nurses. The purpose of this paper was to evaluate the psychometric properties of the SBI. The sample consisted of 720 staff nurses from two Spanish general hospitals. The instrument is composed of 20 items distributed in four dimensions: Enthusiasm towards the job (five items), Psychological exhaustion (four items), Indolence (six items) and Guilt (five items). Data were subjected to confirmatory factor analysis. To assess the factorial validity of the SBI, four alternative models were tested. Results show that the four-factor model of the SBI has adequate psychometric properties for the study of burnout in staff nurses. This model fitted the data better than the alternative models. The study provides evidence of the adequate psychometric properties of a measure to evaluate burnout in nursing professionals. The

  17. A comparison of leadership vs. renovation in changing staff values.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bond, G E; Fiedler, F E

    1999-01-01

    The authors compared the effects of the staff's perceptions of the culture in a LTC facility pre and post-intervention(s). One unit had significant architectural modification (physical intervention). On the second unit, efforts were directed toward culture change through management modification (social intervention through goal setting and role modeling). Lastly, both were compared to a third control unit where there was no planned change. On the unit with the social intervention model there was an attempt to support a "neighborhood" sense for residents and staff that would encourage residents to become more self-directed and self-sufficient rather than remain in the passive "good patient" role. Significant staff training resources and time were devoted to this effort. On the second unit, the architectural renovation sought to provide a distinctly home-like open, and relaxed atmosphere with a large, well-equipped day room. This encouraged closer resident and staff interactions and included a staff workstation that was part of the day room. On a third control unit, no changes were made.

  18. Substance abusers' personality disorders and staff members' emotional reactions

    OpenAIRE

    Hesse Morten; Thylstrup Birgitte

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background Previous research has indicated that aggressive behaviour and DSM-IV cluster B personality disorders (PD) may be associated with professionals' emotional reactions to clients, and that cluster C PD may be associated with positive emotional reactions. Methods Staff members recruited from workshops completed a self-report inventory of emotional reactions to patients, the Feeling Word Checklist-58, and substance abusers completed a self-report of DSM-IV personality disorder, ...

  19. Porque profissionais de enfermagen com incontinência urinária não buscam tratamento Porque los profesionales de enfermería con incontinencia urinaria no buscan el tratamiento Why the nursing staff professionals with urinary incontinence do not seek for treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosângela Higa

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Verificou-se a prevalência de incontinência urinária (IU entre mulheres profissionais de enfermagem de um hospital de ensino, se houve procura por tratamento médico e as razões alegadas para não fazê-lo. Entre as 291 (77% que responderam a um questionário, 27,5% relataram IU, destas, 79% não tinham procurado tratamento médico. Os principais motivos para não tratarem a IU foram a pequena quantidade de urina perdida (28,8% e a crença de que a IU é um problema comum para as mulheres (22%. A prevalência de IU e as justificativas para não procurarem tratamento foram semelhantes às de estudos anteriores com mulheres em geral. Conclui-se que o fato de serem profissionais de saúde parece não ter influenciado suas atitudes.Fue verificado la prevalecía de la incontinencia urinaria (IU en profesionales de enfermería de un hospital de encino, se procuraran por tratamiento médico y los motivos para no hace-lo. Entre las 291 (77% que responderán a uno cuestionario, 27,5% relataron IU, entre esas, 79% no habían procurado por tratamiento médico. Los principales motivos para no tratarlo fueron porque la cantidad de orina perdida era pequeña (28,8% y porque creen que la IU es un problema común para las mujeres (22%. La prevalecía de IU e los motivos para no procuraren tratamiento fueran iguales a estudios con mujeres en general. Concluí-se que ser profesional de la salud parece no tener influenciado en sus actitudes.It was verified the prevalence of urinary incontinence (UI among the women's nurse staff at a medical school, if the incontinent women seek a doctor for treatment and what was they reasons for not seeking treatment. Among 291 women that answer the survey, 27.5% reported UI and, 79% women didn't seek UI treatment. The most common reasons for not seek treatment were that incontinence was slight degree (28.8% and the belief that the UI was a common problem for women (22%. The prevalence and the reasons for not seeking

  20. Professional Skills in International Financial Surveillance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seabrooke, Leonard; Nilsson, Emelie Rebecca

    2015-01-01

    In 2006, the International Monetary Fund's (IMF) Financial Sector Assessment Program (FSAP) lauded Iceland's capacity to “withstand extreme, but plausible, shocks,” which was clearly an error in judgment. After the international financial crisis hit, IMF officials bemoaned the lack of professional...... market skills in FSAP teams. Importing these skills was difficult given IMF staff freezes, but postcrisis FSAP continued with heightened legitimacy inside and outside the IMF. This article provides an assessment of FSAP teams, focusing on the hiring of external experts and their professional skills. We...... are a consequence of demands for professional insulation, institutional legitimation, and a view of professionalism as transnational organizational competence....

  1. Electronic equipment packaging technology

    CERN Document Server

    Ginsberg, Gerald L

    1992-01-01

    The last twenty years have seen major advances in the electronics industry. Perhaps the most significant aspect of these advances has been the significant role that electronic equipment plays in almost all product markets. Even though electronic equipment is used in a broad base of applications, many future applications have yet to be conceived. This versatility of electron­ ics has been brought about primarily by the significant advances that have been made in integrated circuit technology. The electronic product user is rarely aware of the integrated circuits within the equipment. However, the user is often very aware of the size, weight, mod­ ularity, maintainability, aesthetics, and human interface features of the product. In fact, these are aspects of the products that often are instrumental in deter­ mining its success or failure in the marketplace. Optimizing these and other product features is the primary role of Electronic Equipment Packaging Technology. As the electronics industry continues to pr...

  2. 2017 Elections to Staff Council

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2017-01-01

    Make your voice heard, support your candidates! After verification by the Electoral Commission, all candidates for the elections to the Staff Council have been registered. It is now up to you, members of the Staff Association, to vote for the candidate(s) of your choice. We hope that you will be many to vote and to elect the new Staff Council! By doing so, you can support and encourage the women and men, who will represent you over the next two years. We are using an electronic voting system; all you need to do is click the link below and follow the instructions on the screen. https://ap-vote.web.cern.ch/elections-2017 The deadline for voting is Monday, 13 November at midday (12 pm). Elections Timetable Monday 13 November, at noon Closing date for voting Tuesday 21 November and Tuesday 5 December Publication of the results in Echo Monday 27 and Tuesday 28 November Staff Association Assizes Tuesday 5 December (afternoon) First meeting of the new Staff Council and election of the new Executive Committee The ...

  3. NO to sacrificing future staff!

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2011-01-01

    During our public meetings last week, we reviewed several subjects. However, the most urgent one today is the 2nd package of measures for our Pension Fund. In our previous issue, we devoted a long article to the Management’s plan for staff recruited from January 2012. A disaster! As we announced at our meetings, the Staff Association will organize a referendum at the beginning of April. For the message to be heard it is vital that as many staff as possible take part. By voting you will express your support to your staff representatives to stand in the way of these unacceptable measures. It is a matter of urgency that the staff makes their voice heard. Time is short, the decisions will be made in June. The future of our Organization is as stake. This is our future colleagues we are talking about. We must prevent this sacrifice. They must be welcomed in such a manner that there is no uneasiness between us. They must be made to feel welcome in their new family, CERN, our CERN. That they should pay an ...

  4. Resolution of the Staff Council

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2015-01-01

    You were many to attend the public information meetings organised in October and we thank you for your interest. In this decision phase of the current Five-Yearly Review of our employment conditions they provided an opportunity to review the Management proposals in detail. They were a moment of exchange also on the various topics under review, and your comments were many and very valuable. Meeting on Thursday 29th October, the Staff Council discussed once more these proposals. It considered that the "package" of proposed measures is not balanced enough in its current form. It decided to formulate additional requests to the Management, relating mainly to the effects of the introduction of the proposed new career system. The resolution adopted this morning also implies that the consultation of staff, originally foreseen next week, is postponed. The staff Council will reconvene in a special session on Thursday, 5th November to reassess its position depending on the progress made regarding its d...

  5. 2017 Elections to Staff Council

    CERN Document Server

    Staff Association

    2017-01-01

    Make your voice heard, support your candidates! We hope that you will be many to vote and to elect the new Staff Council! By doing so, you can support and encourage the women and men, who will represent you over the next two years. The voting takes place from 23 October to 13 November, at noon at https://ap-vote.web.cern.ch/elections-2017. Elections Timetable Monday 13 November, at noon Closing date for voting Tuesday 21 November and Tuesday 5 December Publication of the results in Echo Monday 27 and Tuesday 28 November Staff Association Assizes Tuesday 5 December (afternoon) First meeting of the new Staff Council and election of the new Executive Committee The voting procedure will be monitored by the Election Committee, which is also in charge of announcing the results in Echo on 21 November and 5 December. Candidates for the 2017 Elections

  6. Perceptions Among Psychiatric Staff of Creating a Therapeutic Alliance With Patients on Community Treatment Orders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansson, Susanne; Fridlund, Bengt

    2016-10-01

    A therapeutic alliance with a continuing collaboration between a patient and psychiatric staff is a resource for helping patients cope with the demands of coercive legislation. Knowledge exists describing coercion in inpatient care while the knowledge regarding the perceptions of creating a therapeutic alliance with patients on Community Treatment Orders (CTO) among psychiatric staff is scarce. To describe perceptions among psychiatric staff of creating a therapeutic alliance with patients on CTOs, an exploratory design using a phenomenographic method was employed. Thirteen semi-structured audio-taped interviews were conducted with psychiatric staff responsible for patients on CTOs. The staff worked in five different outpatient clinics and the interviews were conducted at their workplaces. The analysis resulted in in four metaphors: the persevering psychiatric staff, the learning psychiatric staff, the participating psychiatric staff, and the motivating psychiatric staff. Patients on CTOs were more time-consuming for psychiatric staff in care and treatment. Long-term planning is required in which the creation of a therapeutic alliance entails the patient gradually gaining greater self-awareness and wanting to visit the outpatient clinic. The professional-patient relationship is essential and if a therapeutic alliance is not created, the patient's continued care and treatment in the community is vulnerable.

  7. Professional behaviours and factors contributing to nursing professionalism among nurse managers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Michiko; Taketomi, Kikuko; Yonemitsu, Yoshikazu; Kawamoto, Rieko

    2016-01-01

    To examine the perception of professional behaviours and factors contributing to nursing professionalism among nurse managers. Professional behaviours influence nursing professionalisation and managers' behaviours strongly impact professional development. In Japan, few studies have examined professional nursing behaviours from the nurse managers' perspective. The Behavioural Inventory for Professionalism in Nursing was performed with 525 nurse managers representing 15 facilities in Japan. The highest professional behaviours score obtained was 'competence and continuing education' and the lowest behavioural score was 'publication and communication'. The results demonstrate that higher nursing professionalism is related significantly to the increased length of nursing experience, a higher level of educational preparation and the current position as a nurse administrator. This study demonstrated that nursing professionalism is influenced by years of experience and nursing management education. Awareness of extrinsic professional factors is important continually to maintain nursing professionalism. The findings of our study may help nurse managers to continue their self-development and to realise the potential of their nursing staff by developing professionalism. These findings also provide an understanding of international professionalism trends to achieve higher levels of nursing professionalism through the evaluation of professional nursing behaviours. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Attitudes of nursing staff towards involvement in medical end-of-life decisions: A national survey study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Albers, G.; Francke, A.L.; de Veer, A.J.E.; Bilsen, J.; Onwuteaka-Philipsen, B.D.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: To investigate nursing staff attitudes towards involvement and role in end-of-life decisions (ELDs) and the relationships with sociodemographic and work-related characteristics. Methods: Survey study among nationally representative Dutch research sample consisting of care professionals.

  9. Attitudes of nursing staff towards involvement in medical end-of-life decisions: a national survey study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Albers, G.; Francke, A.L.; Veer, A.J.E. de; Bilsen, J.; Onwuteaka-Philipsen, B.D.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: To investigate nursing staff attitudes towards involvement and role in end-of-life decisions (ELD) and the relationships with sociodemographic and work-related characteristics. Methods: Survey study among nationally representative Dutch research sample consisting of care professionals.

  10. A new approach to orientation: professional entry into practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowers, Bendi; Bennett, Sandra S; Schneider, Sharon K; Brunner, Barbie W

    2009-01-01

    With a strong emphasis on the overall recruitment and retention of staff, the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Clinical Programs Staff Education Department, developed a new orientation program: "Professional Entry Into Practice." This article provides the model to review current orientation processes and to revise and evaluate new orientation processes.

  11. Beyond Cruise Control: The Promise of Professional Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuman, Lucy J.

    This paper describes a professional development effort designed to revitalize, remotivate and reactivate an experienced staff of teachers. This program creates an organizational culture in which each individual is perceived as a learner and a leader. The program is designed to meet the needs of the teaching staff at any place in their career cycle…

  12. Perceptions of Special Education Teachers' Professional Learning Experiences in Arkansas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose-Greer, Paula

    2017-01-01

    Professional learning is gaining credence as a best practice for staff development. The change in terms from professional training to professional development may be an improvement; however, responding to the needs of the learners to support a teacher's need to learn themselves requires professional "learning" (Easton, 2008). Studies are…

  13. About Personal Protective Equipment (PPE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Equipment for Infection Control Questions About Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing ... Print Q1. How do manufacturers ensure personal protective equipment (PPE) is safe and effective? A1. To help ...

  14. EPA’s Response Equipment

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA maintains a variety of equipment to respond to hazardous substance emergencies such as releases or oil spills regardless of their nature, size, or location. This include ASPECT, PHILIS, Equipment Module (EM), and personal protective equipment.

  15. A comparison of basic and state-of-the-arts skills sets of biomedical science technical staff in Lagos public universities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    John, T A

    2011-12-01

    Biomedical science has advanced drastically in developed countries in the last two decades with many health and economic benefits. In Nigeria, biomedical science has not thrived and the contribution from Nigerian universities, indeed African universities, to publications in global high impact journals is low. The present work was based on the hypothesis that there is a lack of state-of-the-arts experimentation in Nigerian biomedical science experiments. An investigation was carried out on the professional skills of biomedical science technical staff of the two (federal and state) public universities in Lagos, Nigeria using a closed-ended questionnaire survey. The 17 respondents were asked about their training, the frequency of utilization of 99 skills, and their expertise. The respondents were "untrained" more in state-of-the-arts skills (34% for electrophoresis, 28% for genomics, 22% for immunochemistry, and 34% for proteomics skills) than in general professional skills (5%), basic technical equipment skills (16%), or general biomedical science knowledge and skills (16%). Frequencies of responses were higher for general skills than for state-of-the-arts skills in the responses "utilizing frequently" (9.96%-31-61% versus 0.36%-4.2%), and "I'm expert" (9.55%-19.88% versus 5.88%-8.48%). It was projected that with continued investment in modern equipment and infrastructure, there will be increased drive for training and usage of modern bioscience research skills and multidisciplinary approaches and production of high-tech scientific publications.

  16. Prioritizing equipment for replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capuano, Mike

    2010-01-01

    It is suggested that clinical engineers take the lead in formulating evaluation processes to recommend equipment replacement. Their skill, knowledge, and experience, combined with access to equipment databases, make them a logical choice. Based on ideas from Fennigkoh's scheme, elements such as age, vendor support, accumulated maintenance cost, and function/risk were used.6 Other more subjective criteria such as cost benefits and efficacy of newer technology were not used. The element of downtime was also omitted due to the data element not being available. The resulting Periop Master Equipment List and its rationale was presented to the Perioperative Services Program Council. They deemed the criteria to be robust and provided overwhelming acceptance of the list. It was quickly put to use to estimate required capital funding, justify items already thought to need replacement, and identify high-priority ranked items for replacement. Incorporating prioritization criteria into an existing equipment database would be ideal. Some commercially available systems do have the basic elements of this. Maintaining replacement data can be labor-intensive regardless of the method used. There is usually little time to perform the tasks necessary for prioritizing equipment. However, where appropriate, a clinical engineering department might be able to conduct such an exercise as shown in the following case study.

  17. Study to assess the compensation and skills of medical library professionals relative to information technology professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weise, F O; McMullen, T D

    2001-07-01

    The study seeks to determine how medical library professionals performing information-technology (IT) roles are compensated and how their positions are designed compared to information technology staff in their institutions. 550 medical library directors in hospital and academic medical libraries were surveyed. The data was then compared to survey data from other compensation studies of the IT industry. There is a gap in compensation between medical library professionals and IT professionals performing similar functions using information technology. Technology-intense library jobs are compensated at higher levels than more traditional jobs. To compete with IT salaries, managers of medical library professionals will need to be ever more cognizant of the employment practices of IT professionals in nonmedical library disciplines. It is typically in the medical library's best interest to ensure that IT-related jobs, accountabilities, and capabilities of the medical library are known and understood by others, especially in the human resources and information technology staff departments.

  18. How can the health situation and well-being of staff at German schools for the severely handicapped be improved?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claus, Matthias; Adams, Johanna; Kimbel, Renate; Letzel, Stephan; Rose, Dirk-Matthias

    2016-04-01

    The aim of the study was to describe measures suggested by staff at German schools for the severely handicapped regarding possibilities to improve their health situation and well-being at work. We further wanted to analyze whether sociodemographic, occupation-related, and health-related characteristics influence the type of measures proposed. The cross-sectional study was carried out between August 2010 and August 2012 at 13 schools for the handicapped focusing on motoric and/or holistic development of severely handicapped pupils. Data of teachers and educational staff were surveyed using written questionnaires. The analysis is based on free-text answers regarding the question: "What specific occupation-related measures would lead to an improvement of your well-being or health situation at the workplace?" A total of 395 persons (response proportion: 59.7 %) with a mean age of 45 years and predominantly female (86.8 %) participated in our survey. A total of 205 persons answered the study question providing 456 improvement suggestions, which were classified into 6 main and 13 subcategories. The main categories were professional education and supervision, organization of working tasks and time, work safety and work equipment, social aspects of work, human resources and contractual framework, and other. Measures proposed were influenced by gender, burden by nursing activities, teaching, and administrative tasks, and frequency of deterioration in working atmosphere. Proposed measures raise awareness for job-related health stressors and are a starting point to improve working conditions at these schools. Since suggestions vary widely by school and composition of staff, individual priorities have to be set and discussed with the school management.

  19. Integrating staff well-being into the Primary Health Care system: a case study in post-conflict Kosovo

    OpenAIRE

    van der Veen, Albertien; van Pietersom, Tineke; Lopes Cardozo, Barbara; Rushiti, Feride; Ymerhalili, Genc; Agani, Ferid

    2015-01-01

    Background Staff well-being including stress awareness and stress management skills is usually not a priority in (mental) health policies. In Kosovo, the level of stress amongst primary health care (PHC) professionals is high because health professionals are part of the population seriously affected by conflict. The need to support staff and look after their well-being was recognised by the Director of the Centre for Development of Family Medicine, Head of Primary Care. In response, the Antar...

  20. Do the supportive staff have enough oral health knowledge? - A study at a teaching health care institution in South India

    OpenAIRE

    Venumbaka Siva Kalyan; A S Kalyana Bhargava; T Madhavi Padma; KVNR Pratap; G Venkateswara Rao; Anitha Akkaloori

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Oral hygiene plays an imperative role in preventing oral diseases. The assessment of knowledge, attitude and practice in relation to oral hygiene among the supportive staff members would help the professional, to inculcate in their patients the acceptable oral habits to thwart oral diseases as these staff members are a bridge between healthcare professional and the patient. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional questionnaire-based study was conducted at a teaching health care...

  1. Professional Synergy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, P. R.

    1981-01-01

    True professionals develop and create together a better future by their human endeavors in synergy. They must operate comfortably in two cultures--the industrial culture which is disappearing, and the superindustrial or cyberculture which is emerging. (CT)

  2. PROFESSIONAL CATEGORIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sorin Fildan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The transition process which Romanian commercial law underwent has affected both the term of ‘trader’, by redefining it, and the classification of professional categories. Currently, the term of ‘professional’ is conveyed by a descriptive listing of the categories of persons it comprises: traders, entrepreneurs, business operators, as well as any other person authorized to carry out economic or professional activities.

  3. Análise das funções cognitivas e sono na equipe de enfermagem nos turnos diurno e noturno Análisis de la función cognitiva y el sueño en el equipo de enfermería en los turnos de el día y nocturno Analysis of cognitive function and sleep of nursing staff on different shift work

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatriz de Oliveira

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Este estudo teve como objetivo analisar a memória de curto prazo, a atenção e o padrão do sono na equipe de enfermagem nos turnos diurno e noturno. Participaram 109 sujeitos de uma instituição hospitalar de Minas Gerais, distribuídos nos turnos: diurno (n= 68 e noturno (n=41. Utilizou-se, para coleta de dados: Diário de sono e Testes da Bateria WAIS III. Os resultados para a medida da qualidade do sono dos sujeitos do turno noturno apresentou diferença significativa (pEste estudio tuvo como objetivo analizar los estándares de memoria a corto plazo, la atención y su sueño personal de enfermería en los turnos. Los participantes del estudio fueron 109 pacientes de un hospital, en Minas Gerais, distribuidos en el turno de día (n = 68 y turno de noche (n = 41. La recolección de datos se realizó a través del diario del sueño y de la batería de prueba WAIS III. Los resultados muestran que existe una diferencia significativa en la calidad del sueño del trabajo en turnos de noche (p The aim of this study was to analyze short-term memory, attention and sleep patterns of the nursing staff working night and day shifts. Study participants were 109 subjects in a hospital in Minas Gerais working on the day shift (n = 68 or night shift (n = 41. Data collection was performed using the Sleep Diary and WAIS-III Test Battery. The results showed a significant difference for the quality of sleep of those on night shift work (p <0.0001; ANOVA. The subjects on the day shifts performed better on the Digit Symbol with a significant difference (p = 0.0008; Mann-Whitney test. In conclusion, the quality of sleep of the group on the night shift showed lower averages compared with those on the day shifts, although they had greater total sleep. The level of attention showed to be best for the group on the day shift work.

  4. Nosocomial infections and staff hygiene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petroudi, Dimitra

    2009-03-01

    Nosocomial infections are a major source of morbidity and mortality in hospital settings. The most important defences against nosocomial transmission of viral, bacterial, and other infections are detailed and continuing education of staff and strict adherence to infection control policies. The issue is no longer whether hand hygiene is effective, but how to produce a sustained improvement in health workers' compliance.

  5. Staff Inservice. A Simulation Notebook.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Root, Barbara

    Once the possibility of a rescheduled school year has been broached, staff inservice should be underway. Such variables as variations in the number of schools or pupils involved, the makeup of districts or communities, and differences in local policy or State regulations, as well as financial resources or personnel available, preclude designating…

  6. English for Airport Ground Staff

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cutting, Joan

    2012-01-01

    This article describes part of a European Commission Leonardo project that aimed to design a multimedia course for English language learners seeking work as ground staff in European airports. The structural-functional analysis of the dialogues written from the course showed that, across the four trades explored (security guards, ground handlers,…

  7. Motivating Staff, Parents, and Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Cynthia Cavenaugh

    Two motivational theories considered particularly useful in administering early childhood programs are discussed, and guidelines for motivating staff, parents, and children are provided. First, the two-factor theory of motivation within organizations, as outlined by Herzberg (1959), is described. Offered in this section are a list of motivators…

  8. Equipment Operational Requirements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greenwalt, B; Henderer, B; Hibbard, W; Mercer, M

    2009-06-11

    The Iraq Department of Border Enforcement is rich in personnel, but poor in equipment. An effective border control system must include detection, discrimination, decision, tracking and interdiction, capture, identification, and disposition. An equipment solution that addresses only a part of this will not succeed, likewise equipment by itself is not the answer without considering the personnel and how they would employ the equipment. The solution should take advantage of the existing in-place system and address all of the critical functions. The solutions are envisioned as being implemented in a phased manner, where Solution 1 is followed by Solution 2 and eventually by Solution 3. This allows adequate time for training and gaining operational experience for successively more complex equipment. Detailed descriptions of the components follow the solution descriptions. Solution 1 - This solution is based on changes to CONOPs, and does not have a technology component. It consists of observers at the forts and annexes, forward patrols along the swamp edge, in depth patrols approximately 10 kilometers inland from the swamp, and checkpoints on major roads. Solution 2 - This solution adds a ground sensor array to the Solution 1 system. Solution 3 - This solution is based around installing a radar/video camera system on each fort. It employs the CONOPS from Solution 1, but uses minimal ground sensors deployed only in areas with poor radar/video camera coverage (such as canals and streams shielded by vegetation), or by roads covered by radar but outside the range of the radar associated cameras. This document provides broad operational requirements for major equipment components along with sufficient operational details to allow the technical community to identify potential hardware candidates. Continuing analysis will develop quantities required and more detailed tactics, techniques, and procedures.

  9. Absenteísmo - doença na equipe de enfermagem: relação com a taxa de ocupação Ausentismo - enfermedad en el equipo de enfermería: relación con la tasa de ocupación Absenteeism - disease in the nursing staff: relationship with the occupation tax

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tania Regina Sancinetti

    2009-12-01

    ón, sugeriendo que los profesionales se ausentaron por enfermedad después de haberen sido sometidos a ritmos mayores de trabajoThis is a qualitative descriptive, transversal study aiming to analyze the amount and causes of sick leave of nursing professionals and its relationship with the occupation tax of the hospitalization units in a teaching hospital. The methodology was divided into two phases: demographic characterization of professionals and identification and analysis of absences regarding the amount and type of sick leaves, medical diagnosis and its relationship with the occupation tax of the Hospital. The nursing professionals presented the greatest amount of sick leaves. Diseases of the osteomuscular system and of the connective tissue represented 4,957 days (41.5% of absences and mental and behavioral disorders 3,393 days (28.4%. The monthly percentage of sick licenses was inversely proportional to the occupation tax, suggesting that professionals were absent due to diseases after being submitted to greater work load.

  10. Smoking behavior among hospital staff still influences attitudes and counseling on smoking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Willaing, Ingrid; Ladelund, Steen

    2004-01-01

    Smoking among health professionals has been shown to influence smoking-related knowledge and counseling in clinical practice. The evidence regarding smoking as a risk factor has increased in the past decade. The present study was carried out in 2000 and investigated the associations between...... individual smoking behavior among hospital staff and (a). smoking-related knowledge, (b). attitudes toward counseling on smoking, and (c). self-reported smoking-related counseling provided by the staff. The study was based on a survey using self-administered questionnaires given to all hospital staff...... in a large university hospital in Denmark. Altogether, 82% of staff (2561) returned a completed questionnaire. Analyses focused on a subsample consisting of health professionals in the clinical wards (1429). Multivariate analyses were performed in which smoking-related knowledge, attitudes toward smoking...

  11. A equipe de saúde mental numa aproximação sociopoética: das relações interpessoais à produção de subjetividade El equipo de salud mental en un acercamiento sociopoético: de las relaciones interpersonales a la producción de subjetividad The mental health staff in an sociopoetic approach: from the inter-personal relationships to the production of subjectivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lia Carneiro Silveira

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Objetivamos perceber como se dá a produção de subjetividade dentro dos novos serviços de saúde mental, utilizando como referencial teórico-metodológico uma abordagem inovadora chamada Sociopoética. A produção dos dados deu-se por meio de oficinas com a equipe de trabalhadores de saúde mental de um hospital-dia. Como resultados percebemos aspectos institucionais, sociais, econômicos e pessoais referenciados pela equipe como sendo aqueles mais relevantes na composição do quadro de sua prática dentro dos novos serviços. Concluímos que o processo de pesquisa mostrou-se um importante instrumento de auto-análise, permitindo ao grupo repensar sua prática e multiplicar as possibilidades de produção de sentido para suas experiências.Tuvimos como objetivo percibir cómo se dan las posibilidades de producción de subjetividad dentro de la nueva estructura de salud mental usando como referencial teórico-metodológico una aproximación innovadora llamada Sociopoética. La producción de los datos se hizo a través de talleres con los trabajadores de salud mental de un hospital de día. Como resultados percibimos los aspectos institucionales, sociales, económicos y personales referidos por el grupo como los más importantes en la composición del cuadro de su práctica dentro de los nuevos servicios. Concluimos que el proceso de investigación se mostró como un importante instrumento de auto-análisis, permitiendo al grupo volver a pensar su práctica y multiplicar las posibilidades de producción del sentido para sus experiencias.We aim to notice how the possibilities of subjectivity production are being given inside of the new mental health services using as theoretical-methodological referential an innovative approach called "Sociopoética". The production of the data was made through workshops with the mental health workers of a Day Unit staff. As a result we noticed the institutional, social, economical and personal aspects

  12. O uso da simulação realística como metodologia de ensino e aprendizagem para as equipes de enfermagem de um hospital infanto-juvenil: relato de experiência = The use of realistic simulation as teaching-learning methodology for nursing staff in a child-adolescent hospital: experience report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abreu, Aguilda Gomes de

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objetivo: O presente artigo tem como objetivo relatar a primeira experiência vivenciada pelo serviço de Educação Continuada de um hospital infanto-juvenil do Estado do Paraná com a utilização da simulação realística como uma metodologia de ensino e aprendizagem para as equipes de enfermagem. Descrição da experiência: As simulações aconteceram em dois dias consecutivos, em ambiente de trabalho, guiadas por enfermeiros instrutores, que são gestores das Unidades de atendimento do hospital infanto-juvenil. Foram preparados 6 cenários distintos, com as seguintes temáticas: cuidados de enfermagem na administração de quimioterápicos, cuidados de enfermagem com acessos venosos periféricos e hemocomponentes, cuidados e aspiração de traqueostomia, cuidados c om nutrição e sondas, administração de medicamentos, medicamentos de alta vigilância e registros e anotações de enfermagem em prontuário. Participaram nas simulações um total de 195 colaboradores de enfermagem. Percebemos que para estes colaboradores as si mulações permitiram a identificação e a reconstrução de condutas, por meio de um feedback imediato após o término das simulações. As experiências também possibilitaram a estes profissionais, ter maior segurança e confiança para a execução da prática real no trabalho cotidiano nos diversos setores de assistência na Instituição. Conclusão: O uso da simulação realística mostrou-se como uma metodologia inovadora para realização de treinamentos na instituição, por replicar experiências da vida real favorecendo um ambiente de interatividade entre os participantes, facilitando o processo de ensino - aprendizagem das equipes de enfermagem que atuam no Hospital infanto-juvenil

  13. Concussion Incidence in Professional Football

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nathanson, John T.; Connolly, James G.; Yuk, Frank; Gometz, Alex; Rasouli, Jonathan; Lovell, Mark; Choudhri, Tanvir

    2016-01-01

    offensive skill players was significantly greater than other position types. The strengths and limitations of various concussion incidence metrics need further evaluation. Clinical Relevance: A better understanding of the relative risks of the different positions/units is needed to help athletes, team personnel, and medical staff make optimal player safety decisions and enhance rules and equipment. PMID:26848481

  14. Flipped ESL Teacher Professional Development: Embracing Change to Remain Relevant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razak, Rafiza Abdul; Kaur, Dalwinder; Halili, Siti Hajar; Ramlan, Zahri

    2016-01-01

    Many traditional professional development programs that are initiated to equip ESL teachers with knowledge and skills have been futile for numerous reasons. This paper addresses a gap in the recent research of ESL teachers' professional development. Literature has revealed many shortcomings of the traditional and online professional development…

  15. Professionals vs. role-professionals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Milana, Marcella; Skrypnyk, Oleksandra

    2010-01-01

    several occupations in the field of adult education that position themselves along a continuum. Consequently the authors suggest that professionalization among adult education practitioners should be assessed in light of the knowledge about adult learning theories practitioners possess, the ethical...

  16. Staff

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2006-01-01

    TÜ teadustöötajaist ja õppejõududest on 2/3 doktorikraadiga. TÜ rektor Jaak Aaviksoo ja teadusprprektor Ain Heinaru valiti Euroopa kõrghariduspoliitika juhtorganitesse. Sotsiaalteaduskonna prof. Wolfgang Drechsler sai Saksa-Eesti akadeemiliste suhete arendamise eest Saksamaa Liitvabariigi Teeneteristi

  17. Shipboard and laboratory equipment

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Shyamprasad, M.; Ramaswamy, V.

    bed, and a digital clock and a transponder helped to locate the camera. Equipment for the analysis of the nodules such as x-ray fluorescence and atomic absorption spectrophotometers were installed aboard MV Skandi Surveyor and MV Fernella and MV G A...

  18. Parents' and staff's support for a childcare agency employee mandatory vaccination policy or agency certification program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebmann, Terri; Wang, Jing; Wilson, Kristin D; Gilbertson, Philip G; Wakefield, Mary

    2016-07-01

    Vaccine-preventable diseases pose a significant risk to children in childcare. However, few regulations exist regarding childcare staff vaccination. This study aimed to assess support for a childcare agency staff mandatory vaccination policy. Surveys were distributed to staff and parents at 23 St Louis, Mo, childcare agencies during fall 2014. Staff and parents' support for a mandatory vaccination and/or agency certification program were compared using χ(2) tests. Multivariate logistic regression was conducted using a 2-level nested design and controlling for gender, race, age, and income to determine predictive models for support for a mandatory staff vaccination policy and/or agency certification program. Overall, 354 parents and staff participated (response rate, 32%). Most supported a mandatory staff vaccination policy (80.0%; n = 280) or agency certification program (81.2%; n = 285), and there were no differences between parents versus staff. Determinants of support for a mandatory policy included willingness to receive influenza vaccine annually, belief that vaccines are safe and effective, and support for the policy only if there were no costs. There is strong support for some type of childcare agency staff vaccination policy. Implementing such a policy/program should be a collaborative endeavor that addresses vaccine cost and access. Copyright © 2016 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Non-invasive system for monitoring of the manufacturing equipment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazăre, A. G.; Belu, N.; Ionescu, L. M.; Rachieru, N.; Misztal, A.

    2017-08-01

    The automotive industry is one of the most important industries in the world that concerns the economy and the world culture. High demand has resulted in increasing of the pressure on the production lines. In conclusion, it is required more careful in monitoring of the production equipment not only for maintenance but also for staff safety and to increase the quality of production. In this paper, we propose a solution for non-invasive monitoring of the industrial equipment operation by measuring the current consumption on energy supply lines. Thus, it is determined the utilization schedule of the equipment and operation mode. Based on these measurements, it’s built an activity report for that equipment, available to the quality management and maintenance team. The solution consists of the current measuring equipment, with self-harvesting capabilities and radio transceiver, and an embedded system which run a server. The current measuring equipment will transmit data about consumption of each energy supply network line where is placed the industrial equipment. So, we have an internal measuring radio network. The embedded system will collect data for the equipment and put in a local data base and it will provide via an intranet application. The entire system not requires any supplementary energy supply and interventions in the factory infrastructure. It is experimented in a company from the automotive industries.

  20. Burnout syndrome in critical care nursing staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poncet, Marie Cécile; Toullic, Philippe; Papazian, Laurent; Kentish-Barnes, Nancy; Timsit, Jean-Francçois; Pochard, Frédéric; Chevret, Sylvie; Schlemmer, Benoît; Azoulay, Elie

    2007-04-01

    Burnout syndrome (BOS) associated with stress has been documented in health care professionals in many specialties. The intensive care unit (ICU) is a highly stressful environment. Little is known about BOS in critical care nursing staff. To identify determinants of BOS in critical care nurses. We conducted a questionnaire survey in France. Among 278 ICUs contacted for the study, 165 (59.4%) included 2,525 nursing staff members, of whom 2,392 returned questionnaires with complete Maslach Burnout Inventory data. Of the 2,392 respondents (82% female), 80% were nurses, 15% nursing assistants, and 5% head nurses. Severe BOS-related symptoms were identified in 790 (33%) respondents. By multivariate analysis, four domains were associated with severe BOS: (1) personal characteristics, such as age (odds ratio [OR], 0.97/yr; confidence interval [CI], 0.96-0.99; p=0.0008); (2) organizational factors, such as ability to choose days off (OR, 0.69; CI, 0.52-0.91; p=0.009) or participation in an ICU research group (OR, 0.74; CI, 0.56-0.97; p=0.03); (3) quality of working relations (1-10 scale), such as conflicts with patients (OR, 1.96; CI, 1.16-1.30; p=0.01), relationship with head nurse (OR, 0.92/point; CI, 0.86-0.98; p=0.02) or physicians (OR, 0.81; CI, 0.74-0.87; p=0.0001); and (4) end-of-life related factors, such as caring for a dying patient (OR, 1.39; CI, 1.04-1.85; p=0.02), and number of decisions to forego life-sustaining treatments in the last week (OR, 1.14; CI, 1.01-1.29; p=0.04). One-third of ICU nursing staff had severe BOS. Areas for improvement identified in our study include conflict prevention, participation in ICU research groups, and better management of end-of-life care. Interventional studies are needed to investigate these potentially preventive strategies.

  1. Evaluating nonphysician staff members' self-perceived ability to provide multisource evaluations of residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikels, Susan Michelle; Guiton, Gretchen; Loeb, Danielle; Brandenburg, Suzanne

    2013-03-01

    Multisource evaluations of residents offer valuable feedback, yet there is little evidence on the best way to collect these data from a range of health care professionals. This study evaluated nonphysician staff members' ability to assess internal medicine residents' performance and behavior, and explored whether staff members differed in their perceived ability to participate in resident evaluations. We distributed an anonymous survey to nurses, medical assistants, and administrative staff at 6 internal medicine residency continuity clinics. Differences between nurses and other staff members' perceived ability to evaluate resident behavior were examined using independent t tests. The survey response rate was 82% (61 of 74). A total of 55 respondents (90%) reported that it was important for them to evaluate residents. Participants reported being able to evaluate professional behaviors very well (62% [36 of 58] on the domain of respect to staff; 61% [36 of 59] on attire; and 54% [32 of 59] on communication). Individuals without a clinical background reported being uncomfortable evaluating medical knowledge (60%; 24 of 40) and judgment (55%; 22 of 40), whereas nurses reported being more comfortable evaluating these competencies. Respondents reported that the biggest barrier to evaluation was limited contact (86%; 48 of 56), and a significant amount of feedback was given verbally rather than on written evaluations. Nonphysician staff members agree it is important to evaluate residents, and they are most comfortable providing feedback on professional behaviors. A significant amount of feedback is provided verbally but not necessarily captured in a formal written evaluation process.

  2. Becoming University Scholars: Inside Professional Autoethnographies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez, Fernando; Sancho, Juana Maria; Creus, Amalia; Montane, Alejandra

    2010-01-01

    This article shows part of the results of a research project: The Impact of Social Change in Higher Education Staff Professional Life and Work (Spanish Ministry of Science and Innovation, SEJ2006-01876). The main aim of this project was to explore and understand how scholars establish a dialogue, resist, adapt themselves or adopt changes, in the…

  3. Constructing principals' professional identities through life stories ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    the ideas of democracy and participative leadership in their roles and duties, they will always receive positive and meaningful feedback from their staff which would assist them in maturing in their behaviour and constructing their professional identity. While learning from their teachers, the principals also improved on their.

  4. Schools must include faculty and staff in sexual violence prevention efforts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sales, Jessica; Krause, Kathleen

    2017-01-01

    Creating a normative campus environment intolerant to sexual violence is important for prevention. While prevention initiatives focusing on students are vital, faculty and staff have a central role in supporting and sustaining a comprehensive strategy for preventing campus sexual violence. Nationwide, colleges and universities recently implemented campus climate surveys. At Emory, we decided to survey faculty and staff as well as students, motivated by our use of an ecological framing of campus sexual violence. Faculty and staff are long-term members of the community, and can provide stability and continuity that reinforces prevention efforts prioritized for students. We recommend that schools use a trauma-informed approach to guide the involvement of faculty and staff in prevention. We encourage colleges and universities to consider the experiences and needs of their faculty and staff, as professionals who serve as leaders on campus and as those who guide students through their academic experiences.

  5. The current state of NCAA Division I collegiate strength facilities: size, equipment, budget, staffing, and football status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Judge, Lawrence W; Petersen, Jeffrey C; Bellar, David M; Craig, Bruce W; Cottingham, Michael P; Gilreath, Erin L

    2014-08-01

    Strength and conditioning training programs are essential components of athletic performance, and the effectiveness of these programs can be linked to the strength and conditioning facilities (SCFs) used by athletes. The primary purpose of this study was to provide a statistical overview of National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) Division I SCFs, equipment and maintenance budget, and the relationship between SCF budget and staffing space, and equipment. The secondary purpose was to note differences in SCFs between those schools with and without football programs. An 84-item online survey instrument, developed with expert input from certified strength professionals, was used to collect data regarding the SCFs in NCAA Division I universities. A total of 110 valid and complete surveys were returned for a response rate of 38.6%. Results of Pearson's χ2 analysis demonstrated that the larger reported annual equipment budgets were associated with larger SCFs (χ2 = 451.4, p ≤ 0.001), greater maximum safe capacity of athletes using the facility (χ2 = 366.9, p ≤ 0.001), increased numbers of full-time coaches (χ2 = 224.2, p ≤ 0.001), and increased number of graduate assistant or intern coaches (χ2 = 102.9, p ≤ 0.001). Based on these data, it can be suggested to athletic administrators and strength and conditioning professionals at the collegiate level that budgets need to be re-evaluated as the number of personnel available to monitor student-athletes and the size and safe capacity of the facility are related to the ability of the strength and conditioning staff to safely and adequately perform their duties.

  6. Influence of staff infection control training on infection-related quality measures in US nursing homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Jasjit; Stone, Patricia W; Travers, Jasmine L; Cohen, Catherine C; Herzig, Carolyn T A

    2017-09-01

    Health care-associated infections are a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in US nursing home residents. Ongoing training of nursing home staff is vital to the implementation of infection prevention and control processes. Our aim was to describe associations between methods, frequency, and timing of staff infection prevention and control training and infection-related quality measures. In this national survey of nursing homes, timing of staff infection prevention and control training was associated with reduced indwelling urinary catheter use. Copyright © 2017 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. 2015 Elections to Staff Council

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Asscociation

    2015-01-01

    Make your voice heard, support your candidates! Be many to vote and to elect the new Staff Council. By doing so, you will be encouraging the men and women who will represent you over the next two years and they will without doubt appreciate your gratitude. The voting takes place from the 26th of October to the 9th of November, at noon at https://ap-vote.web.cern.ch/elections-2015.   Elections Timetable Monday 9 November, at noon Closing date for voting Monday 16 and Monday 23 November, publication of the results in Echo Tuesday 8 December, at 10.00 a.m. first meeting of the new Staff Council and election of the new Executive Committee The voting procedure will be monitored by the Election Committee, which is also in charge of announcing the results in Echo on 16 and 24 November. Candidates for the 2015 elections

  8. Ethics beyond borders: how health professionals experience ethics in humanitarian assistance and development work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, Matthew R

    2008-08-01

    Health professionals are involved in humanitarian assistance and development work in many regions of the world. They participate in primary health care, immunization campaigns, clinic- and hospital-based care, rehabilitation and feeding programs. In the course of this work, clinicians are frequently exposed to complex ethical issues. This paper examines how health workers experience ethics in the course of humanitarian assistance and development work. A qualitative study was conducted to consider this question. Five core themes emerged from the data, including: tension between respecting local customs and imposing values; obstacles to providing adequate care; differing understandings of health and illness; questions of identity for health workers; and issues of trust and distrust. Recommendations are made for organizational strategies that could help aid agencies support and equip their staff as they respond to ethical issues.

  9. Three-Dimensional Computer Simulation as an Important Competence Based Aspect of a Modern Mining Professional

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aksenova Olesya

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with the problem of necessity of educational process transformation to meet the requirements of modern miming industry; cooperative developing of new educational programs and implementation of educational process taking into account modern manufacturability. The paper proves the idea of introduction into mining professionals learning process studying of three-dimensional models of surface technological complex, ore reserves and underground digging complex as well as creating these models in different graphic editors and working with the information analysis model obtained on the basis of these three-dimensional models. The technological process of manless coal mining at the premises of the mine Polysaevskaya controlled by the information analysis models built on the basis of three-dimensional models of individual objects and technological process as a whole, and at the same time requiring the staff able to use the programs of three-dimensional positioning in the miners and equipment global frame of reference is covered.

  10. Three-Dimensional Computer Simulation as an Important Competence Based Aspect of a Modern Mining Professional

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aksenova, Olesya; Pachkina, Anna

    2017-11-01

    The article deals with the problem of necessity of educational process transformation to meet the requirements of modern miming industry; cooperative developing of new educational programs and implementation of educational process taking into account modern manufacturability. The paper proves the idea of introduction into mining professionals learning process studying of three-dimensional models of surface technological complex, ore reserves and underground digging complex as well as creating these models in different graphic editors and working with the information analysis model obtained on the basis of these three-dimensional models. The technological process of manless coal mining at the premises of the mine Polysaevskaya controlled by the information analysis models built on the basis of three-dimensional models of individual objects and technological process as a whole, and at the same time requiring the staff able to use the programs of three-dimensional positioning in the miners and equipment global frame of reference is covered.

  11. HBV, HCV, and HIV infection prevalence among prison staff in the light of occupational risk factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Gańczak

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Objectives of the study: to assess the occupational risk for blood-borne infections (BBIs among prison staff (number/ circumstances of blood exposures and preventive methods used, and to estimate the prevalence of hepatitis B virus (HBV, hepatitis C virus (HCV and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV. Material and Methods: The survey, which included serological testing with the use of 3-generation enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA was completed on active staff at a correctional facility in Goleniów, Poland, between June–July 2015. Results: Response rate was 38%, 87 participants (aged 22–64 years, median: 34 years agreed to participate. There were 88.5% males, correctional officers comprised 87.4% of the participants. Having had ≥ 1 blood exposure during professional career was reported by 28.7% respondents, 8% – sustained it in the preceding year. For correctional officers the last blood exposure was caused by a hollow-bore needle/razor blade during cell or manual searches. This was not reported by 83.3%. Participation rate in an infection control training was 85.1%. Hepatitis B virus vaccination uptake was 83.9%. Compliance with glove use was 75.9%, with protective eyewear – 28.7%. Regular use of both was reported by 9.2% of participants. The lack of their availability was the most common reason (79.7% for non-compliance. Anti-HBc (hepatitis B core antigen total/anti-HCV/anti-HIV prevalence was 2.3%, 1.1%, and 0%, respectively. Conclusions: Prison staff are at risk for occupational exposures to blood. Reporting of such incidents is poor, as well as compliance with personal protective equipment use, which place them at risk for acquiring BBIs. Anti-HCV prevalence is similar to that observed in the general population, anti-HBc total prevalence is lower, possibly due to high vaccination uptake, however, poor response rate limits precise prevalence estimates. Med Pr 2017;68(4:507–516

  12. Use of athletic training equipment in fire sport

    OpenAIRE

    Mikulová, Miroslava

    2013-01-01

    Thema works: Use of athletic training equipment in fire sport Student: Miroslava Mikulová Supervisor: odb. as. Aleš Kaplan Aims: The aim of this work is based on a questionnaire survey to determine the use of special introductory athletic training and other resources in fire sport for both professional and volunteer firefighters. Methodology: The data that was necessary to write a thesis, I have gained through non-standardized anonymous questionnaire created for both professional and voluntee...

  13. Towards mobile staff members management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Encheva, Sylvia

    2017-07-01

    Todays project management requires a number of abilities which involve finding quick solutions to shortage of staff members with possession of specific qualities. When persons with team responsibilities are under pressure or due to various circumstances are unable to perform exhaustive search in databases, an interactive visualization tool can come in quite handy in finding good solutions unforeseen occurrences. In particular we propose application of selected graphs for facilitating mobile human resource management.

  14. 2015 Elections to Staff Council

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2015-01-01

    Elections Timetable Monday 26 October, at noon Start date for voting Monday 9 November, at noon Closing date for voting Monday 16 and Monday 23 November, publication of the results in Echo Monday 23 and Tuesday 24 November Staff Association Assizes Tuesday 1st December, at 10.00 a.m. first meeting of the new Staff Council and election of the new Executive Committee The voting procedure will be monitored by the Election Committee, which is also in charge of announcing the results in Echo on 16 and 24 November. During its meeting of March 17 2015, the Staff Council approved the election rules, which define the allocation of seats in each department, as follows:   Number of seats in the electoral colleges Departments BE EN TE DG/DGS FP GS HR/PF IT PH Career paths AA - D 2 3 3 1 1 2 1 1 2 Career paths E - G 2 2 2 1 1 1 1 2 3   Global CERN Career paths AA - G 14     Number of seats for fellows representatives Global CERN 5 For more informat...

  15. 2015 Elections to Staff Council

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2015-01-01

    Elections Timetable Monday 21 September, at noon Start date for receipt of the application Friday 16 October, at noon Closing date for receipt of the applications Monday 26 October, at noon Start date for voting Monday 9 November, at noon Closing date for voting Monday 16 and Monday 23 November, publication of the results in Echo Monday 23 and Tuesday 24 November Staff Association Assizes Tuesday 1st December, at 10.00 a.m. first meeting of the new Staff Council and election of the new Executive Committee The voting procedure will be monitored by the Election Committee, which is also in charge of announcing the results in Echo on 16 and 24 November. During its meeting of March 17 2015, the Staff Council approved the election rules, which define the allocation of seats in each department, as follows:   Number of seats in the electoral colleges Departments BE EN TE DG/DGS FP GS HR/PF IT PH Career paths AA - D 2 3 3 1 1 2 1 1 2 Career paths E - G 2 2 2 1 1 1 1 2 3   ...

  16. Ethical challenges related to next of kin - nursing staffs' perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tønnessen, Siri; Solvoll, Betty-Ann; Brinchmann, Berit Støre

    2016-11-01

    Patients in clinical settings are not lonely islands; they have relatives who play a more or less active role in their lives. The purpose of this article is to elucidate the ethical challenges nursing staff encounter with patients' next of kin and to discuss how these challenges affect clinical practice. The study is based on data collected from ethical group discussions among nursing staff in a nursing home. The discussions took place in 2011 and 2012. The data were analysed and interpreted by using hermeneutic methodology. All the data have been anonymised and handled with confidentiality. Written informed consent was obtained from all participants. Ethical challenges relating to patients' next of kin were found to be an issue frequently discussed in the groups. Our findings indicate that next of kin have different characteristics, categorised as 'the professionals' and 'the shadows'. In this article, we will describe the next of kin's characteristics and the ethical challenges and practical implications that nursing staff experience in this connection. We will discuss the findings in the light of the four basic principles of medical ethics and propose interventions to help nurses manage ethical challenges related to next of kin. The study reveals the need to enhance nursing staffs' communicative and ethical skills on an individual level, but most importantly, to establish routines in clinical settings for informing and following up next of kin in a systematic and structured way. © The Author(s) 2015.

  17. 12 CFR 722.6 - Professional association membership; competency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 6 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Professional association membership; competency... CREDIT UNIONS APPRAISALS § 722.6 Professional association membership; competency. (a) Membership in... membership in any particular appraisal organization. (b) Competency. All staff and fee appraisers performing...

  18. 12 CFR 564.6 - Professional association membership; competency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Professional association membership; competency... APPRAISALS § 564.6 Professional association membership; competency. (a) Membership in appraisal organizations... membership in any particular appraisal organization. (b) Competency. All staff and fee appraisers performing...

  19. 12 CFR 34.46 - Professional association membership; competency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Professional association membership; competency... ESTATE LENDING AND APPRAISALS Appraisals § 34.46 Professional association membership; competency. (a... membership or lack of membership in any particular appraisal organization. (b) Competency. All staff and fee...

  20. 12 CFR 323.6 - Professional association membership; competency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Professional association membership; competency... OF GENERAL POLICY APPRAISALS § 323.6 Professional association membership; competency. (a) Membership... membership or lack of membership in any particular appraisal organization. (b) Competency. All staff and fee...

  1. The Virtual Extension Annual Conference: Addressing Contemporary Professional Development Needs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franz, Nancy K.; Brekke, Robin; Coates, Deb; Kress, Cathann; Hlas, Julie

    2014-01-01

    Extension systems are experimenting with new models for conducting professional development to enhance staff competence and other returns on professional development investments. The ISUEO virtual annual conference provides a successful flipped classroom model of asynchronous and synchronous learning events for conducting an Extension annual…

  2. Prevalent Approaches to Professional Development in State 4-H Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Martin H.; Worker, Steven M.; Schmitt-McQuitty, Lynn; Meehan, Cheryl L.; Lewis, Kendra M.; Schoenfelder, Emily; Brian, Kelley

    2017-01-01

    High-quality 4-H programming requires effective professional development of educators. Through a mixed methods study, we explored professional development offered through state 4-H programs. Survey results revealed that both in-person and online delivery modes were used commonly for 4-H staff and adult volunteers; for teen volunteers, in-person…

  3. Professional Development Policy in a Small Rural Education System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maxwell, T. W.

    1991-01-01

    Professional development policy of a small, rural education system in New South Wales (Australia) allows control of staff development at system, school, and individual levels; and identifies a rationale and aim, assumptions, principles of procedure, and characteristics of a healthy professional learning environment. These features guide…

  4. From Youth Worker Professional Development to Organizational Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rana, Sheetal; Baumgardner, Briana; Germanic, Ofir; Graff, Randy; Korum, Kathy; Mueller, Megan; Randall, Steve; Simmons, Tim; Stokes, Gina; Xiong, Will; Peterson, Karen Kolb

    2013-01-01

    An ongoing, innovative youth worker professional development is described in this article. This initiative began as youth worker professional development and then transcended to personal and organizational development. It grew from a moral response of Saint Paul Parks and Recreation staff and two faculty members of Youth Studies, University of…

  5. Diagnostics of heavy mining equipment during the scheduled preventive maintenance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drygin, M. Yu; Kuryshkin, N. P.

    2018-01-01

    Intensification of production, economic globalization and dramatic downgrade of the workers’ professional skills lead to unacceptable technical state of heavy mining equipment. Equipment maintenance outage reaches 84 % of the total downtime, of which emergency maintenance takes up to 36 % of time, that excesses 429 hours per year fr one excavator. It is shown that yearly diagnostics using methods of non-destructive check allows to reduce emergency downtime by 47 %, and 55 % of revealed defects can be eliminated without breaking the technological cycle of the equipment.

  6. MODERNIZATION OF CUPOLA EQUIPMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. L. Rovin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This article presents an automated cupola complex, developed by scientific-production enterprise «Technolit» together with GSTU named after P. O. Sukhoi, launched in the spring of 2015 at the plant «Stroiex» in the city of Chelyabinsk (the Russian Federation. The old cupolas (open type have been replaced by the new cupolas of the closed type, equipped with automatic control and management system and multistage wet gas treatment system. Cupolas are equipped with systems of post-combustion gases and the batch charging, the separate systems of air blast, systems of sludge removal and recirculation of water, the slag granulation installations, mechanized cleaning of cupola furnace and automatic safety system. These activities allowed the company to increase production and improve the quality of cast iron, reduce the coke consumption by 20% and reducing emissions of pollutants into the atmosphere almost 30 times.

  7. The SLAC Comparator for the Calibration of Digital Leveling Equipment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gassner, G.L.; Ruland, R.E.; /SLAC

    2006-11-07

    At SLAC digital levels are used for precise leveling, both for setting out and monitoring. A very high precision of 30 {micro}m is required, which can only be achieved by regularly calibrating the leveling equipment. The calibration facility is also used for detailed investigations to refine the SLAC leveling procedure. In this paper the setup of the SLAC vertical comparator is described. In order to also perform traditional staff calibration a CCD camera was integrated into the SLAC comparator. Finally an overview of further investigations of our leveling equipment is presented.

  8. Sensitive Equipment Decontamination

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-01

    permeable and porous materials of equipment, such as rubbers, plastic and paints , due to their solvating powers. Such absorption can cause changes to...substrates (e.g., polymers, paints ). TECHNICAL PART STO-TR-HFM-233 3 - 39 N°- Requirement Technical Specifications Capability (efficacy...needed. Environmental aspects Toxicity of nanoparticles has to be studied. Operational parameters Unknown. Shelf-life parameters Depends on

  9. Soviet equipment flies in

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1978-01-01

    End of February 1977 a Soviet Ilyushin-76 heavy freight aircraft landed at Cointrin airport having on board fifty large wire proprtional chambers and associated apparatus, together weighing 10 tons, supplied by the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna, USSR. The equipment was for the CERN- Dubna-Munich-Saclay experiment NA4 on deep inelastic muon scattering being set up in the North Area of SPS. See Weekly Bulletin 11/78.

  10. Bridges and Equipment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-09-15

    the Trilateral Design and Test Code, paragraph 4.2.11, refers to a 15-percent impact factor for bending moment and deflection for crossing vehicle...speeds of 25 km/hr (15 mph). Since the BCS is equipped with both strain and load control features, the impact factor of each vehicle load and speed...can be determined. BCS testing to date has revealed that wheeled vehicle impact factors are approximately 10 percent and tracked vehicle impact

  11. Equipment Obsolescence Management Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Redmond, J.

    2014-07-01

    Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) Operators are challenged with securing reliable supply channels for safety related equipment due to equipment obsolescence. Many Original Equipment Manufacturers (OEMs) have terminated production of spare parts and product life-cycle support. The average component life cycles are much shorter than the NPP design life, which means that replacement components and parts for the original NPP systems are not available for the complete design life of the NPPs. The lack or scarcity of replacement parts adversely affects plant reliability and ultimately the profitability of the affected NPPs. This problem is further compounded when NPPs pursue license renewal and approval for plant-life extension. A reliable and predictable supply of replacement co components is necessary for NPPs to remain economically competitive and meet regulatory requirements and guidelines. Electrical and I and C components, in particular, have short product life cycles and obsolescence issues must be managed pro actively and not reactively in order to mitigate the risk to the NPP to ensure reliable and economic NPP operation. (Author)

  12. Equipping the stockyard

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-04-01

    Good stockyard management has become an important feature in the coal supply chain. Today, virtually all suppliers and consumers make use of at least one stockyard when moving coal. The type of handling equipment that is best for a particular situation is consequently of wide interest. The value of coal stored in stockpiles can form a significant part of the end user's costs, as pointed out in a recent IEA Coal Research report 'Management of coal stockpiles'. Better blending is becoming a key factor in optimising both power plant and blast furnace performance. It is important to match the materials handling equipment to a facility's needs. Good stockpile management involves processing coal quality within the pile and controlling dust. Decisions must be made on appropriate methods of stacking coal, in longitudinal or circular bed. The article goes on to describe recent contracts for stockyard equipment by such manufacturers as UK-based Strachan and Henshaw and Spain's TAIM TFG. 3 photos.

  13. HEMATOLOGIC FINDINGS IN OPERATING ROOM STAFFS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H SOLTANI

    2000-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Long term exposure to trace amounts of anesthetic vapors and gases may produce hematologic and hepatic disorders in human. Since operating room (OR staffs are exposed to these agents, we decided to study their hematopoietic and hepatic systems in comparison with ordinary ward staffs. Methods. Seventy staffs from OR were compared with a matched similar number of ward staffs about their hematologic and hepatic laboratory findings in a historical cohort study. Findings. Mean of leukocyte and platelet counts were significantly lower in OR staffs, but in normal range. Mean of monocyte count was significantly higher in OR staffs. No significant differences were found between two groups for other hepatic and hematologic tests. Fatigue and headache were reported in OR staffs more than others. Conclusion. These findings may warn a risk to OR staffs but, it is not clear and requires further controlled studies.

  14. Spotting and supporting eating disorders in school: recommendations from school staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knightsmith, P; Treasure, J; Schmidt, U

    2013-12-01

    Eating disorders have a high rate of onset in school-aged children. School staff are in an excellent position to spot the early warning signs and offer support during recovery. This article explores the findings from focus groups conducted with 63 members of staff from 29 UK schools with the aims of (i) understanding whether they are in a good position to support students with eating disorders and (ii) to generate recommendations regarding school staff's training needs for spotting and supporting eating disorders. Participants took part in semi-structured focus groups. These were transcribed and analysed using content analysis principles. Five key themes emerged: (i) many staff do not have a basic understanding of eating disorders, (ii) eating disorders are taboo in the staffroom, (iii) staff do not feel comfortable talking to students about eating disorders, (iv) support is needed to ensure the teacher-parent relationship is a positive one and (v) school staff would welcome practical ideas for how they can best support students during the recovery period. The findings show that school staff currently feel ill-equipped to support students with eating disorders and endorse a need for focused training for school staff to better enable them to support students with eating disorders.

  15. Measurement of staff empowerment within health service organizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irvine, D; Leatt, P; Evans, M G; Baker, R G

    1999-01-01

    A measure of empowerment was developed and its psychometric properties evaluated. Employees (n = 52) of two hospitals participated in semistructured interviews and a pilot test of the research instrument. A second study was undertaken with professional, support, and administrative staff (n = 405) of four community hospitals. Psychometric evaluation included factor analysis, reliability estimation, and validity assessment. Subjects responded to questionnaires measuring empowerment, leadership behavior, organizational citizenship behavior and job behaviors related to quality improvement. Factor analysis indicated three dimensions of empowerment: behavioral, verbal, and outcome empowerment. Coefficient alphas ranged from .83 to .87. The three dimensions were positively related to leadership behavior that encouraged self-leadership and negatively related to directive leadership. The three dimensions discriminated between the empowerment level of managers compared to that of nonmanagement staff. Empowerment predicted organizational citizenship behavior and job behaviors related to quality improvement.

  16. 77 FR 24952 - Staff Technical Conference on Geomagnetic Disturbances to the Bulk-Power System; Technical...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-26

    .... to 4:00 p.m. to discuss issues related to the reliability of the Bulk-Power System as affected by... currents to transformers and other equipment on the Bulk-Power System, as well as, options for addressing... Energy Regulatory Commission Staff Technical Conference on Geomagnetic Disturbances to the Bulk-Power...

  17. Asthma education for school staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kew, Kayleigh M; Carr, Robin; Donovan, Tim; Gordon, Morris

    2017-04-12

    Teachers and school staff should be competent in managing asthma in schools. Demonstrated low levels of asthma knowledge mean that staff may not know how best to protect a child with asthma in their care, or may fail to take appropriate action in the event of a serious attack. Education about asthma could help to improve this knowledge and lead to better asthma outcomes for children. To assess the effectiveness and safety of asthma education programmes for school staff, and to identify content and attributes underpinning them. We conducted the most recent searches on 29 November 2016. We included randomised controlled trials comparing an intervention to educate school staff about asthma versus a control group. We included studies reported as full text, those published as abstract only and unpublished data. At least two review authors screened the searches, extracted outcome data and intervention characteristics from included studies and assessed risk of bias. Primary outcomes for the quantitative synthesis were emergency department (ED) or hospital visits, mortality and asthma control; we graded the main results and presented evidence in a 'Summary of findings' table. We planned a qualitative synthesis of intervention characteristics, but study authors were unable to provide the necessary information.We analysed dichotomous data as odds ratios, and continuous data as mean differences or standardised mean differences, all with a random-effects model. We assessed clinical, methodological and statistical heterogeneity when performing meta-analyses, and we narratively described skewed data. Five cluster-RCTs of 111 schools met the review eligibility criteria. Investigators measured outcomes in participating staff and often in children or parents, most often at between 1 and 12 months.All interventions were educational programmes but duration, content and delivery varied; some involved elements of training for pupils or primary care providers. We noted risk of selection

  18. Strengthening Bullying Prevention through School Staff Connectedness

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brennan, Lindsey M.; Waasdorp, Tracy E.; Bradshaw, Catherine P.

    2014-01-01

    The growing concern about bullying and school violence has focused national attention on various aspects of school climate and school connectedness. The current study examined dimensions of staff connectedness (i.e., personal, student, staff, and administration) in relation to staff members' comfort intervening in bullying situations (e.g.,…

  19. University Staff and the Knowledge Based Economy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Court, Stephen

    2000-01-01

    Used surveys and telephone interviews to examine linkages between university staff and business in the United Kingdom. Found a wide range of activities but patchy reward from higher education institutions. Business participation and institutional recognition was greater among post-1992 staff; participation was greater among science-related staff,…

  20. Short Communication Employee -Driven Staff Training and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper examines the concept of staff training and development within the South African context. The changing labour legislation in South Africa makes it mandatory for the employer to provide training and development. However, staff have an important role to play in staff training and development. The paper gives an ...

  1. Become a staff delegate: why not you?

    CERN Multimedia

    Association du personnel

    2009-01-01

    Following a decision taken at the Staff Association General Assembly in May 2008, staff delegates are elected in the autumn of odd-numbered years. The next elections which will lead to a total renewal of the Staff Council will thus take place in November 2009. Will you be a candidate?

  2. Correctional Staff Training Institutes. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Southern Illinois Univ., East St. Louis, Center for the Study of Crime, Delinquency and Corrections.

    Three national institutes for correctional staff trainers incorporated new techniques in an attempt to upgrade corrections programs through improved staff development. There were 78 trainer and 200 middle management staff and correctional officers involved in the program, representing more than 100 correctional institutions in the United States.…

  3. What Did I Miss? A Qualitative Assessment of the Impact of Patient Suicide on Hospice Clinical Staff

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fairman, Nathan; Montross Thomas, Lori P.; Whitmore, Stephanie; Meier, Emily A.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Background: Patient suicides can affect clinicians both personally and professionally, with frequent reports of psychological and behavioral changes occurring in response to this type of patient death. Although hospice clinicians have regular exposure to dying patients, the impact of patient suicide on this group has been understudied. Objectives: This study examined the personal and professional impact of patient suicides among hospice clinical staff, the coping strategies used by this group, and their recommendations for staff support after a patient suicide. Design: Utilizing an online survey, 186 hospice staff qualitatively described the impact of patient suicides on them as people and professionals, their resulting coping strategies, and any recommendations for supporting others. Three study investigators coded all of the staff responses at a paragraph level and summarized the most common emergent themes using grounded theory procedures. Setting/Subjects: One hundred eighty-six clinical staff members who worked in an academic nonprofit hospice setting. Measurements: An open-ended, qualitative survey was used to gather data about demographics, clinical experience, exposure to known or suspected suicides, recommendations for support in the event of a patient suicide, the personal and professional impacts of suicide, and coping strategies. Results: The themes expressed by the hospice staff in reaction to patient suicides included: psychological responses such as feelings of guilt and self-doubt, changes in professional attitudes, and changes in clinical practice such as greater sensitivity to signs of suicide. When coping with a patient suicide, hospice staff described the use of team-based support strategies, debriefings, and personal spiritual practices. Recommendations for future support included facilitated debriefings, individual counseling, spiritual practices, leaves of absence, self-care activities, and educational interventions. Conclusion: Data

  4. Conhecimento da equipe de enfermagem sobre higiene oral em pacientes criticamente enfermos El conocimiento del equipo de enfermería sobre higiene oral en pacientes críticamente enfermos Nursing staff's knowledge about oral care in critically ill patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabrielli Mottes Orlandini

    2012-09-01

    nuevas prácticas. Esto nos sugiere que la higiene bucal en los pacientes hospitalizados no ha sido una preocupación evidente, en las prácticas de cuidado y educación para la salud.The objective of this study was to assess the knowledge of nursing professionals who perform or supervise the oral hygiene care in critically ill patients and, secondarily, to verify their opinion about the care provided. This is an exploratory study with a quantitative approach, using an instrument developed by the authors applied to the nurses and technicians working in a mid-sized Intensive Care Unit (ICU in Porto Alegre. The results show that 50% of nurses and 72.8% of technicians agree that oral hygiene is important in critically ill patients, but there is no relation to ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP. Fromthe sample, 16.6% of nurses and 66.6% of nursing technicians agree that the routine of the institution is adequate, and 66.6% of nurses and 30.7% of technicians indicate new practices. This suggests that oral hygiene in hospitalized patients has not been an evident concern, regarding health education practices and care.

  5. The relationship between empowerment and effectiveness of staff ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of different dimensions of empowerment (servicing staff, staff monitoring, consulting staff, and training staff) on dimensions of effectiveness of staff (staff satisfaction and staff performance). This study is applied in terms of data collection and it is survey type of descriptive study ...

  6. Highway Maintenance Equipment Operator. Specialized Equipment. Training Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perky, Sandra Dutreau; And Others

    This curriculum guide provides instructional materials to assist in training equipment operators in the safe and effective use of highway maintenance equipment. It includes 18 units of instruction covering the large equipment used in maintenance operations. Each unit of instruction consists of eight basic components: performance objectives,…

  7. Highway Maintenance Equipment Operator. Miscellaneous Equipment. Training Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perky, Sandra Dutreau; And Others

    This curriculum guide provides instructional materials to assist in training equipment operators in the safe and effective use of highway maintenance equipment. It includes six units of instruction covering the small, specialized equipment used in maintenance operations. Each unit of instruction consists of eight basic components: performance…

  8. Nursing leadership practices as perceived by Finnish nursing staff: high ethics, less feedback and rewards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eneh, Victor Okey; Vehviläinen-Julkunen, Katri; Kvist, Tarja

    2012-03-01

    The purpose was to examine the perceptions of Finnish nursing staff of their nursing leadership and how nurses' background variables are associated with their perceptions. Nursing leadership practices and behaviours influence nursing staff work performances. In Finland, studies examining leadership practices from the perspective of nursing staff are limited. This quantitative, cross-sectional study involved four hospitals in Eastern Finland. A total of 1497 nursing staff completed the structured electronic questionnaire. In general, seven out of 10 nursing staff held positive perceptions about leadership ethics and their professional development. Over one-third of nursing staff were dissatisfied with the nursing process and with their feedback and rewards, while only four out of 10 evaluated their nursing director either in a positive or negative way. There were no significant differences regarding their perceptions when different background variables were taken into account. Nursing leadership needs the opinion of nursing staff in order to help formulate a favourable work environment where they can utilize their full potential and improve nursing care. Nursing staff expect feedback and rewards, involvement in the decision making process, and clear vision from nurse leaders. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  9. Innovative Defense Acquisition Concept Deployer Equipment Bundle (DEB)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-06-01

    METHODOLOGY This project reviewed a substantial amount of literature , to include applicable concept plans, memorandums, cost benefit analyses, organizational...NAVAL POSTGRADUATE SCHOOL MONTEREY, CALIFORNIA MBA PROFESSIONAL REPORT INNOVATIVE DEFENSE ACQUISITION CONCEPT DEPLOYER...ACQUISITION CONCEPT DEPLOYER EQUIPMENT BUNDLE (DEB) 5. FUNDING NUMBERS 6. AUTHOR(S) Frederic Albesa, Isaac J. Ortman, and Stephen F. Kirouac 7

  10. Being Professional

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Anne Winther

    The paper discusses students' process of acquiring a feeling of being professionals within a vocational education programme for elderly care in Denmark. The focus is on what seems to be a paradox within the programme: the future care helper being constructed within the overall term ‘the professio......The paper discusses students' process of acquiring a feeling of being professionals within a vocational education programme for elderly care in Denmark. The focus is on what seems to be a paradox within the programme: the future care helper being constructed within the overall term ‘the...... professional care helper’ in the school setting but the job being closely related to daily life's routine tasks; the paper points to difficulties for students in identifying the exact content of the term ‘professional’. Furthermore students seem to be uncertain about their ‘professionalism’ in relation...... ‘storyline’, c.f. Bronwyn Davies and the empirical material consists of observations and interviews in the theoretical periods and in the traineeships....

  11. Californium-252 Program Equipment Evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chattin, Fred Rhea [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Wilson, Kenton [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Ezold, Julie G. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2017-12-01

    To successfully continue the 252Cf production and meet the needs of the customers, a comprehensive evaluation of the Building 7920 processing equipment was requested to identify equipment critical to the operational continuity of the program.

  12. 2011 Elections to Staff Council

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2011-01-01

    Elections Timetable Starting with Echo of 26 September, posters, etc. call for applications Wednesday 26 October, at noon closing date for receipt of the application Monday 31 October, at noon start date for voting Monday 14 November, at noon closing date for voting Monday 21 November, publication of the results in Echo Tuesday 22 and Wednesday 29 November Staff Association Assizes Tuesday 6 December, at 10.00 a.m. first meeting of the new Staff Council and election of the new Executive Committee The voting procedure will be monitored by the Election Committee, which is also in charge of announcing the results in Echo on 21 November. In its meeting on 19 September 2011, the Electoral Commission decided on the following distribution of seats in colleges 0.1 to 0.6: Sector Department Career path AA – A – B – C – D Career path E – F – G – H Accelerators and Technology BE TE EN Electoral college 0.1 18 si&e...

  13. 2013 Elections to Staff Council

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2013-01-01

    Elections Timetable Starting with Echo of 16 September, posters, etc. call for applications Monday 21 October, at noon closing date for receipt of the applications Monday 28 October, at noon start date for voting Monday 11 November, at noon closing date for voting Monday 18 and Monday 25 November, publication of the results in Echo Tuesday 19 November Staff Association Assizes Tuesday 3 December, at 10.00 a.m. first meeting of the new Staff Council and election of the new Executive Committee The voting procedure is monitored by the Election Committee, which is also in charge of announcing the results in Echo on 18 and 25 November. n its meeting on 11 September 2013, the Electoral Commission decided on the following distribution of seats in colleges O.1 to O.6: Sectors Departments Career paths AA – A – B – C – D Career paths E – F – G – H Accelerators and Technology BE TE EN Electoral college 0.1 13 si&...

  14. 2013 Elections to Staff Council

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2013-01-01

    Elections Timetable Starting with Echo of 16 September, posters, etc. call for applications Monday 21 October, at noon closing date for receipt of the applications Monday 28 October, at noon start date for voting Monday 11 November, at noon closing date for voting Monday 18 and Monday 25 November, publication of the results in Echo Tuesday 19 November Staff Association Assizes Tuesday 3 December, at 10.00 a.m. first meeting of the new Staff Council and election of the new Executive Committee The voting procedure is monitored by the Election Committee, which is also in charge of announcing the results in Echo on 18 and 25 November. n its meeting on 11 September 2013, the Electoral Commission decided on the following distribution of seats in colleges O.1 to O.6: Sectors Departments Career paths AA – A – B – C – D Career paths E – F – G – H Accelerators and Technology BE TE EN Electoral colle...

  15. Visualization environment for reviewing and experimenting with compaction equipment trajectories in context

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vasenev, Alexandr; Hartmann, Timo; Miller, Seirgei Rosario; Doree, Andries G.

    Visualization Environments (VEs) can assist construction professionals in studying intricate interrelations between construction equipment trajectories and their context. Such VEs typically support them in either reviewing earlier conducted work or experimenting with possible alternatives. In the

  16. Trainees versus Staff: Exploring Counseling Outcomes in a College Counseling Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilagan, Guy; Vinson, Mike; Sharp, Julia L.; Havice, Pamela; Ilagan, Jill

    2014-01-01

    Investigators compared counseling outcomes among nonpaid graduate-level trainees and professional staff at a college counseling center. Counseling outcomes for 331 college student participants were measured using the Outcome Questionnaire 45.2 (OQ45.2), employing a pretest--posttest design. The two groups of service providers did not differ…

  17. Work-Life Balance among academic staff of the University of Lagos ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Work-life balance is associated with the maintenance of stability in both one's professional and personal life. It is key to the welfare and, subsequently, job satisfaction and productivity of employees. It is against this understanding that this study surveyed the way academic staff of the University of Lagos perceive and pursue ...

  18. Staff Development through Inquiry: Opening a Pandora's Box of Teacher Beliefs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collinson, Vivienne

    This paper argues that teachers' beliefs and attitudes affect not only their instructional decisions and human relationships, but also their willingness to seek professional knowledge, particularly when such knowledge contradicts their beliefs. Results obtained from a case study on K-5 staff development through inquiry are used to illustrate what…

  19. Video Feedback in Key Word Signing Training for Preservice Direct Support Staff

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rombouts, Ellen; Meuris, Kristien; Maes, Bea; De Meyer, Anne-Marie; Zink, Inge

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Research has demonstrated that formal training is essential for professionals to learn key word signing. Yet, the particular didactic strategies have not been studied. Therefore, this study compared the effectiveness of verbal and video feedback in a key word signing training for future direct support staff. Method: Forty-nine future…

  20. Using quality measures for quality improvement: The perspective of hospital staff

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.A. Hashjin (Asgar Aghaei); H. Ravaghi (Hamid); D.S. Kringos (Dionne); U.C. Ogbu (Uzor); C. Fischer (Claudia); S.R. Azami (Saeid Reza); N.S. Klazinga (Niek)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractResearch objective: This study examines the perspectives of a range of key hospital staff on the use, importance, scientific background, availability of data, feasibility of data collection, cost benefit aspects and availability of professional personnel for measurement of quality

  1. The Client Company Marginally Utilises the Knowledge of Highly Skilled Temporary Staff

    Science.gov (United States)

    Augustsson, Gunnar

    2016-01-01

    This study is based on the presumption that there is often an underuse of temporary staff in client companies (CC) with highly skilled professionals. The study combines theories of the flexible organisation and a sociocultural perspective on learning within the framework of an inter-organisational context. The data are based partly on 17…

  2. Immersed in Literacy Learning: One Staff Shifts Its Thinking and Lives to Tell about It

    Science.gov (United States)

    Socol, Theresa Tribbe

    2006-01-01

    Using Cambourne's model of Natural Learning and Literacy Acquisition (1985), this paper examines one staff's professional development as they are immersed in literacy learning. This year-long qualitative study examined the changes in teachers' understanding of literacy concepts, as well as factors that contributed to or inhibited these changes.…

  3. The Impact of the Bologna Process on Academic Staff in Ukraine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Marta A.; Chapman, David W.; Rumyantseva, Nataliya L.

    2012-01-01

    Academic staff in Ukraine face a convergence of institutional and professional pressures precipitated by a national economic crisis, projected declines in enrolment and dramatic changes to institutional procedures as institutions implement the Bologna Process. This article examines the extent to which these pressures are reshaping the way academic…

  4. A Qualitative Study to Explore Patient and Staff Perceptions of Intradialytic Exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Stephanie; Tonelli, Marcello; Klarenbach, Scott; Molzahn, Anita

    2016-06-06

    Randomized, controlled trials show that regular exercise is beneficial for patients on hemodialysis. Intradialytic exercise may have additional benefits, such as amelioration of treatment-related symptoms. However, the factors that influence the implementation of intradialytic exercise are largely unknown. Individual semistructured interviews were conducted with a purposive sample of patients on hemodialysis who had participated in a pilot randomized, controlled trial on intradialytic exercise and dialysis staff that worked in the unit during the trial. The trial took place from July to December of 2014 and enrolled 31 patients. Interviews were conducted from April to December of 2014. Interview coding followed an inductive and broad-based approach. Thematic analysis was used to group codes into common themes, first individually and then, across staff and patient interviews. Twenty-five patients and 11 staff were interviewed. Three themes common to both groups emerged: support, norms (expected practices) within the dialysis unit, and the role of the dialysis nurse. The support of the kinesiologist enhanced patients' confidence and sense of capability and was a key component of implementation. However, the practice of initiating exercise at the start of the shift was a barrier to staff participation. Staff focused on the technical aspects of their role in intradialytic exercise, whereas patients viewed encouragement and assistance with intradialytic exercise as the staff's role. An additional theme of no time (for staff to participate in intradialytic exercise) was influenced by its low priority in their workflow and the demands of the unit. The staff's emphasis on patients setting up their own equipment and enhanced social interaction among participants were additional themes that conveyed the unintended consequences of the intervention. The kinesiologist-patient interactions and staff readiness for intradialytic exercise were important factors in the

  5. Pedagogy of the Repressed: Research and Professionality within HE in FE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Andrew; Wilson, Benita

    2011-01-01

    This paper provides a reflective focus on the concept of change to the professional identity of FE lecturers. Traditional perceptions of FE staff as vocational specialists are contested and the emergence of a new professional with an extended professionality is discussed. The changes analysed deal with the emergence of the HE in FE sector and the…

  6. The Hidden Curriculum in Medical and Law Schools: A Role for Student Affairs Professionals

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGuire, Linda A.; Phye, Julie

    2006-01-01

    This chapter discusses responsibilities for student affairs professionals in law and medical schools. It poses that student affairs staff are particularly suited to teach the hidden curriculum of the professional schools, described as inculcating professional values. The chapter ends with four strategies for such instruction.

  7. Smoking behavior among hospital staff still influences attitudes and counseling on smoking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Willaing, Ingrid; Ladelund, Steen

    2004-01-01

    Smoking among health professionals has been shown to influence smoking-related knowledge and counseling in clinical practice. The evidence regarding smoking as a risk factor has increased in the past decade. The present study was carried out in 2000 and investigated the associations between...... individual smoking behavior among hospital staff and (a). smoking-related knowledge, (b). attitudes toward counseling on smoking, and (c). self-reported smoking-related counseling provided by the staff. The study was based on a survey using self-administered questionnaires given to all hospital staff......-related counseling, smoking-related counseling practices, and self-rated qualifications for counseling were main outcome measures. Health professionals who were current smokers systematically underestimated the health consequences of smoking and differed significantly from nonsmokers in their assessments of smoking...

  8. Providing Logistics Support to CDC-Deployed Staff for the Ebola Response in Liberia, Guinea, and Sierra Leone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dopson, Stephanie A; Rodriguez, Rockie; Rouse, Edward N

    2015-11-01

    The first Ebola cases in West Africa were reported by the Guinea Ministry of Health on March 23, 2014, and by June it became the largest recorded Ebola outbreak. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention field teams were deployed to West Africa, including in-country logistics staff who were critical for ensuring the movement of staff, equipment, and supplies to locations where public health knowledge and experience were applied to meet mission-related requirements. The logistics role was critical to creating the support for epidemiologists, medical doctors, laboratory staff, and health communicators involved in health promotion activities to successfully respond to the epidemic, both in the capital cities and in remote villages. Logistics personnel worked to procure equipment, such as portable video projectors, and have health promotion materials printed. Logistics staff also coordinated delivery of communication and health promotion materials to the embassy and provided assistance with distribution to various partners. © 2015 Society for Public Health Education.

  9. Inter-Professional Palliative Care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Kirsten Halskov; Henriksen, Jette; Meldgaard, Anette

    2013-01-01

    Chapter 11 by Kirsten Halskov Madsen, Anette Meldgaard and Jette Henriksen deals with the development of palliative care programmes aimed at the basic level of palliative care practice. The need to develop educational opportunities at particularly this level – described as ‘the basic inter......-professional level of palliative care’ – has been increasing for many years where palliative care has conventionally and primarily been associated with specialist training. As the authors show – based on a mapping out of existing educational initiatives in a region of Denmark, a reading of the curriculum...... and a description of the organization of palliative care – there is a need for such inter-professional palliative care that raises the level of competences at the basic level and the sharing of knowledge as well as securing the continuous qualifying of healthcare staff working with palliative care....

  10. Professional development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Jin Hee; Hartline, Beverly Karplus; Milner-Bolotin, Marina

    2013-03-01

    The three sessions of the professional development workshop series were each designed for a different audience. The purpose of the first session was to help mid-career physicists aspire for and achieve leadership roles. The second session brought together students, postdoctoral fellows, and early-career physicists to help them plan their career goals and navigate the steps important to launching a successful career. The final session sought to increase awareness of the results of physics education research, and how to use them to help students-especially women-learn physics better. The presentations and discussions were valuable for both female and male physicists.

  11. Professional C++

    CERN Document Server

    Gregoire, Marc

    2014-01-01

    Master complex C++ programming with this helpful, in-depth resource From game programming to major commercial software applications, C++ is the language of choice. It is also one of the most difficult programming languages to master. While most competing books are geared toward beginners, Professional C++, Third Edition, shows experienced developers how to master the latest release of C++, explaining little known features with detailed code examples users can plug into their own codes. More advanced language features and programming techniques are presented in this newest edition of the book,

  12. Is nurse managers' leadership style related to Japanese staff nurses' affective commitment to their hospital?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kodama, Yoshimi; Fukahori, Hiroki; Sato, Kana; Nishida, Tomoko

    2016-10-01

    To determine if nurse managers' leadership style is related to Japanese staff nurses' affective commitment to their hospital. In Western countries, nurse managers' transformational leadership style has been found to increase staff nurses' affective commitment to their hospital. However, there are few studies examining this relationship in the context of acute care hospitals in Japan. Staff nurses completed measures of their nurse managers' perceived leadership style and factors related to their own affective commitment. The association between affective commitment and perception of leadership style was assessed with multiple logistic regression. Of 736 questionnaires distributed, 579 (78.9%) were returned, and data from 396 (53.8%) fully completed questionnaires were analysed. The intellectual stimulation aspect of transformational leadership positively increased staff nurses' affective commitment (odds ratio: 2.23). Nurse managers' transactional and laissez-faire leadership styles were not related to affective commitment among staff nurses. The intellectual stimulation aspect of transformational leadership may increase the retention of staff nurses through enhanced affective commitment. To increase staff nurses' affective commitment to their hospital, we suggest that hospital administrators equip nurse managers with intellectual stimulation skills. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Chapter 12. Space Heating Equipment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rafferty, Kevin D.

    1998-01-01

    The performance evaluation of space heating equipment for a geothermal application is generally considered from either of two perspectives: (a) selecting equipment for installation in new construction, or (b) evaluating the performance and retrofit requirements of an existing system. With regard to new construction, the procedure is relatively straightforward. Once the heating requirements are determined, the process need only involve the selection of appropriately sized hot water heating equipment based on the available water temperature. It is important to remember that space heating equipment for geothermal applications is the same equipment used in non-geothermal applications. What makes geothermal applications unique is that the equipment is generally applied at temperatures and flow rates that depart significantly from traditional heating system design. This chapter presents general considerations for the performance of heating equipment at non-standard temperature and flow conditions, retrofit of existing systems, and aspects of domestic hot water heating.

  14. Bringing poetry into staff development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Ronnie

    2002-01-01

    "Quello che mai fue detto d'alfcuna," words from Dante, "strive to say which was never said by anyone." This is the art of true verbal expression, the essence of poetry. Poet W. H. Auden once wrote that "poetry can open spaces of meaning for the human spirit that is more intimate to other human beings than it is to ourselves" (Auden, 1968). Poetry has many definitions. To some, it is the rhythmic verse they remember from grade school or from Mother Goose. To others, poetry is a verse of meter and measure, of balance and harmony. However, to most individuals, poetry is the ultimate expression of human emotion. Roy (1999) believed that nursing is in need of poetry, in order to evoke the deepest of images, fears, questions, and quests of the human spirit and the nursing profession. This article examines the use of poetry and how it might be incorporated into staff education.

  15. Teaching Staff Advanced Training in Russia, the Republic of Kazakhstan, the USA and Canada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kovalchuk Vasyl

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In the article the peculiarities in organization of postgraduate teacher training in foreign countries have been highlighted; the basic problems and prospects for advanced training which stipulate for reforming the relevant national systems have been revealed; common and distinctive trends in their development have been justified. In Russia there is a cascade (cyclic system of teaching staff advanced training, based on the principles of andragogy, namely, continuity, self-control and self-analysis of professional activities by teachers and the use of their own experience during the advanced training. The abovementioned system consists of three phases such as pre-course, course and implementing. Each element of this model is a constituent part of the other, providing cycling and growth. Tasks for teachers are grounded on all the phases of the described system and influence their professional development. In the Republic of Kazakhstan there are three basic systems for teaching staff advanced training, namely, centers of educational excellence at the “Nazarbayev Intellectual Schools”, JSC “National Centre of Teaching Staff Advanced Training” (based on RIPKSO and 16 regional teaching staff advanced training institutes, teaching staff advanced training centres at universities and experimental sections. According to the defined module in the terms of the complex 3-month courses combining face-to-face and online training are provided. In the USA advanced training is provided by multilevel higher educational institutions which offer a wide range of different full-time and distance training programs and some programs are taught directly in educational establishments. The content of advanced training is determined by standards of professional pedagogical education according to the educational program and provides for fundamental, psychological, pedagogical, methodical, IT, practical, social and humanitarian training. Teaching staff advanced

  16. Changes to supervision in community pharmacy: pharmacist and pharmacy support staff views.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, Fay; Schafheutle, Ellen I; Willis, Sarah C; Noyce, Peter R

    2013-11-01

    Pharmacists now offer increasing levels and ranges of clinical, diagnostic and public health services, which may require a pharmacist to be absent from the pharmacy premises. Currently, in the UK, many pharmacy activities legally require the direct supervision and physical presence of the pharmacist. This study aimed to explore the potential for changes to supervision, allowing pharmacist absence, and greater utilisation of pharmacy support staff. Four nominal group discussions were conducted in May 2012 with community pharmacists (CPs), community pharmacy support staff, hospital pharmacists and hospital pharmacy support staff, involving 21 participants. Participants were asked to generate pharmacy activities, which they felt could/could not be safely performed by support staff in the absence of a pharmacist, followed by a discussion of these items and voting using an agreement scale. A written record of the items generated and voting scores was made and the group discussion elements were audio-recorded, transcribed verbatim and analysed thematically. The selling of general sales list medicines, assembly of prescriptions and provision of public health services received a high level of agreement between groups, as activities that could be performed. There was greater disagreement about the safety of support staff selling pharmacy medicines and handing out checked and bagged prescription items to patients. Group discussion revealed some of the main challenges to supervision changes, including CPs' perceptions about their presence being critical to patient safety, reluctance to relinquish control, concerns about knowing and trusting the competencies of support staff, and reluctance by support staff to take greater professional responsibility. The findings of this study aim to inform a future consultation on changes to pharmacy supervision in the UK. The empowerment of pharmacy technicians as a professional group may be key to any future change; this may require

  17. Evaluating the intervening factors in patient safety: focusing on hospital nursing staff

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberta Meneses Oliveira

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE To evaluate intervening factors in patient safety, focusing on hospital nursing staff. METHOD The study is descriptive, with qualitative approach, excerpt from a larger study with analytical nature. It was undertaken in a public hospital in Fortaleza, CE, Brazil, between January and June 2013, with semi-structured interviews to 70 nurses, using Thematic Content Analysis. RESULTS The principal intervening factors in patient safety related to hospital nursing staff were staff dimensioning and workload, professional qualification and training, team work, being contracted to the institution, turnover and lack of job security, and bad practice/disruptive behaviors. These aspects severely interfere with the establishment of a safety culture in the hospital analyzed. CONCLUSION It is necessary for managers to invest in nursing staff, so that these workers may be valued as fundamental in the promotion of patient safety, making it possible to develop competences for taking decisions with focus on the improvement of quality care.

  18. Evaluating the intervening factors in patient safety: focusing on hospital nursing staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Roberta Meneses; Leitao, Ilse Maria Tigre de Arruda; Aguiar, Leticia Lima; Oliveira, Adriana Catarina de Souza; Gazos, Dionisia Mateus; Silva, Lucilane Maria Sales da; Barros, Ariane Alves; Sampaio, Renata Lopes

    2015-02-01

    To evaluate intervening factors in patient safety, focusing on hospital nursing staff. The study is descriptive, with qualitative approach, excerpt from a larger study with analytical nature. It was undertaken in a public hospital in Fortaleza, CE, Brazil, between January and June 2013, with semi-structured interviews to 70 nurses, using Thematic Content Analysis. The principal intervening factors in patient safety related to hospital nursing staff were staff dimensioning and workload, professional qualification and training, team work, being contracted to the institution, turnover and lack of job security, and bad practice/disruptive behaviors. These aspects severely interfere with the establishment of a safety culture in the hospital analyzed. It is necessary for managers to invest in nursing staff, so that these workers may be valued as fundamental in the promotion of patient safety, making it possible to develop competences for taking decisions with focus on the improvement of quality care.

  19. The effect of nursing staff on student learning in the clinical setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webster, Alanna; Bowron, Caitlin; Matthew-Maich, Nancy; Patterson, Priscilla

    2016-06-01

    Aim To explore baccalaureate nursing students' perspectives of the influence of nursing staff on their learning and experience in the clinical setting. Method A qualitative description approach was used. Thirty nursing students were interviewed individually or in focus groups. Data were analysed using content analysis. Four researchers analysed the data separately and agreed on the themes. Findings Nursing staff had positive (enabling) and negative (hindering) effects on students' clinical learning and socialisation to nursing. Nursing staff may encourage and excite students when they behave as positive mentors, facilitators and motivators. However, their actions may also have a negative effect on students, decreasing their confidence, learning and desire to continue in the profession. Conclusion Nursing staff influence student learning. Their actions, attitude and willingness to teach are influential factors. The findings have implications for patient safety, nurse retention and recruitment, and preparing students for professional practice.

  20. Teaching with wikis: improving staff development through action research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robyn Benson

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports on the use of action research in a case study involving two iterations of an online workshop implemented at two universities in late 2007 and early 2009 to prepare teaching staff for using wikis for student group work and assessment. Workshop participants were immersed in the experience of collaborating in a wiki as learners and then reflected on this experience as teachers. Experience of the pilot workshop suggested a need for more orientation, potentially by introducing a blended learning design. The second iteration highlighted a need to develop the orientation session further and increase support strategies throughout the workshop, suggesting the value of offering it at faculty or department level if no “reward” is available for participation. Outcomes from the two cycles illustrate the value of action research for iterative improvement of this staff development model and for implementing the scholarship of teaching and learning to develop and share professional knowledge in this emerging area. This paper outlines a staff development approach involving Web 2.0 applications on which others can build.

  1. The operational staff during exercise RESUME-95

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jensen, J. [Jensen Consult, Virum (Denmark)

    1997-12-31

    With more than 100 participants entering the exercise RESUME-95 the Exercise Planning Committee decided to establish an operational staff named Directing Staff (DISTAFF) to ensure that the exercise plan was followed, the planned activities were carried out and to intervene if anything went wrong. In general the duties of the operational staff involve tasks such as secretarial assistance, keeping log of the progress of the situation and gathering, updating and distributing information on all aspects of the situation. Throughout the entire event it is the staff`s responsibility to keep a general view of the current situation and to make the necessary plans for the progress of the situation based on the available information. Furthermore the staff should ensure necessary contact to the public and to the media. (au).

  2. Job Burnout Reduces Hand Hygiene Compliance Among Nursing Staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manomenidis, Georgios; Panagopoulou, Efharis; Montgomery, Anthony

    2017-10-13

    Health professional burnout has been associated with suboptimal care and reduced patient safety. However, the extent to which burnout influences hand hygiene compliance among health professionals has yet to be explored. The aim of the study was to examine whether job burnout reduces hand washing compliance among nursing staff. A diary study was conducted. Forty registered nurses working in a general city hospital in Thessaloniki, Greece, completed a questionnaire, while they were monitored for hand hygiene compliance following the World Health Organization protocol for hand hygiene assessment. Burnout was measured using validated items from the Maslach Burnout Inventory. Data were collected from September to October 2015. Multiple regression analysis showed that controlling for years in practice, burnout was negatively associated with hand hygiene compliance (R = 0.322, F(3,36) = 5.704, P burnout were less likely to comply with hand hygiene opportunities (b = - 3.72, 95% confidence interval = -5.94 to -1.51). This study showed that burnout contributes to suboptimal care by reducing compliance to hand hygiene among nurses. Given the crucial role of hand hygiene compliance for the prevention of in-hospital infections, this study highlights the need for interventions targeting the prevention of burnout among nursing staff.

  3. The reasons of the nursing staff to notify adverse events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Paiva, Miriam Cristina Marques da Silva; Popim, Regina Célia; Melleiro, Marta Maria; Tronchim, Daisy Maria Rizatto; Lima, Silvana Andréa Molina; Juliani, Carmen Maria Casquel Monti

    2014-10-01

    This research aimed to understand the motivation for reporting adverse events from the perspective of nursing staff in the work environment. Qualitative study that used the phenomenology of Alfred Schutz for reference, which offers a systematic approach to understand the social aspects of human action. Data were collected by open interviews with 17 nurses and 14 technicians/assistant nurses in a university hospital. Motivation was revealed through six categories: all types of occurrences must be reported; the incident report is an auxiliary instrument to health care provision management; the culture of punishment in transition; nurses as the agents responsible for voluntary reporting; sharing problems with higher management and achieving quality in the work process. It was unveiled that, when reporting adverse events, team members perceived themselves to be in a collaborative relationship with the institution and trusted that they would receive administrative support and professional security, which encouraged them to continue reporting. Reporting allows health care professionals to share responsibilities with managers and encourages corrective actions. The study revealed the nursing staff's motivation for adverse event reporting, contributing to reflections on institutional policies aimed at patient safety in health care.

  4. The reasons of the nursing staff to notify adverse events

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miriam Cristina Marques da Silva de Paiva

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: this research aimed to understand the motivation for reporting adverse events from the perspective of nursing staff in the work environment.METHOD: qualitative study that used the phenomenology of Alfred Schutz for reference, which offers a systematic approach to understand the social aspects of human action. Data were collected by open interviews with 17 nurses and 14 technicians/assistant nurses in a university hospital.RESULTS: motivation was revealed through six categories: all types of occurrences must be reported; the incident report is an auxiliary instrument to health care provision management; the culture of punishment in transition; nurses as the agents responsible for voluntary reporting; sharing problems with higher management and achieving quality in the work process.DISCUSSION: it was unveiled that, when reporting adverse events, team members perceived themselves to be in a collaborative relationship with the institution and trusted that they would receive administrative support and professional security, which encouraged them to continue reporting. Reporting allows health care professionals to share responsibilities with managers and encourages corrective actions.FINAL CONSIDERATIONS: the study revealed the nursing staff's motivation for adverse event reporting, contributing to reflections on institutional policies aimed at patient safety in health care.

  5. Improving staff retention and career progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szeremeta, Lorraine; Shamash, Natalie

    Staff shortages are serious and widespread and, for many trusts, the cost of temporary staff is not sustainable. In many cases, the existing workforce has the skills necessary to fill vacant posts. A trust developed an initiative to maximise use of its nurses' expertise and minimise staff attrition. This article describes the scheme and how it increased job satisfaction, promoted development opportunities and cut costs.

  6. 21 CFR 866.4520 - Immunofluorometer equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ...) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Immunology Laboratory Equipment and Reagents § 866.4520 Immunofluorometer equipment. (a) Identification. Immunofluorometer equipment for clinical use with...

  7. Correlates of direct care staffs' attitudes towards aggression of persons with intellectual disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knotter, M H; Stams, G J J M; Moonen, X M H; Wissink, I B

    2016-12-01

    To explain direct care staff's attitudes (responsive or rejecting) towards aggression of clients with intellectual disability (ID), data were collected about client characteristics as well as individual and team characteristics of 475 direct care staff members, working in 71 teams. Multilevel analyses revealed that a positive team climate was positively associated with both a rejecting and responsive attitude towards aggression. Senior staff members and females showed a less responsive attitude towards aggression, whereas a relatively high percentage of females in a team and a positive attitude towards external professionals were associated with a more responsive attitude towards aggression. Unexpectedly, staff who experienced less verbal and/or physical aggressive incidents of their clients with ID showed a more rejecting attitude towards aggression. Finally, characteristics of the clients with ID accounted for the largest part of the variance in the attitude towards aggression of direct care staff, in particular psychiatric diagnoses. Further research is necessary in order to understand how team processes affect the attitude towards aggression of direct care staff. Further it is recommended to provide direct care staff with knowledge about mental disorders in clients with ID. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. The difficulties experienced by nurses and healthcare staff involved in the process of breaking bad news.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warnock, Clare; Buchanan, Jean; Tod, Angela Mary

    2017-07-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the difficulties experienced by nurses and healthcare professionals when engaging in the process of breaking bad news. The challenges faced by staff when breaking bad news have previously been researched in relation to particular settings or participants. This study involved staff from diverse settings and roles to develop broader insights into the range of difficulties experienced in clinical practice. The study used a descriptive survey design involving self-reported written accounts and framework analysis. Data were collected using a structured questionnaire containing a free text section that asked participants to describe a difficult experience they had encountered when involved in the process of breaking bad news. Data were collected from healthcare staff from hospital, community, hospice and care home settings attending training days on breaking bad news between April 2011 and April 2014. Multiple inter-related factors presented challenges to staff engaging in activities associated with breaking bad news. Traditional subjects such as diagnostic and treatment information were described but additional topics were identified such as the impact of illness and care at the end of life. A descriptive framework was developed that summarizes the factors that contribute to creating difficult experiences for staff when breaking bad news. The framework provides insights into the scope of the challenges faced by staff when they engage in the process of breaking bad news. This provides the foundation for developing interventions to support staff that more closely matches their experiences in clinical practice. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Professional socialisation: an influence on professional ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Professional socialisation refers to the acquisition of values, attitudes, skills and knowledge pertaining to a profession. This article reviews the definition and conceptualisation of professional socialisation through anticipatory and formal professional socialisation processes. It describes the core elements of professional ...

  10. Amendments to the Staff Rules and Regulations

    CERN Document Server

    2003-01-01

    The Staff Rules and Regulations in force since 1 January 1996 are modified as follows: as from 1 April 2003 • Article R II 1.19 - Types and duration of contracts of staff members (page 15) as from 1 July 2003 Implementation of the category of local staff members Copies of this update are available in the divisional secretariats. In addition, Staff Rules and Regulations are available for consultation on the Web at http://cern.ch/hr-div/internal/admin_services/rules/default.asp Human Resources Division Tel. 74128

  11. Identifying barriers and facilitators to participation in pressure ulcer prevention in allied healthcare professionals: a mixed methods evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worsley, Peter R; Clarkson, Paul; Bader, Dan L; Schoonhoven, Lisette

    2017-09-01

    To evaluate the barriers and facilitators for allied health professional's participation in pressure ulcer prevention. Mixed method cohort study. Single centre study in an acute university hospital trust. Five physiotherapists and four occupational therapists were recruited from the hospital trust. Therapists had been working in the National Health Service (NHS) for a minimum of one year. Therapist views and experiences were collated using an audio recorded focus group. This recording was analysed using constant comparison analysis. Secondary outcomes included assessment of attitudes and knowledge of pressure ulcer prevention using questionnaires. Key themes surrounding barriers to participation in pressure ulcer prevention included resources (staffing and equipment), education and professional boundaries. Fewer facilitators were described, with new training opportunities and communication being highlighted. Results from the questionnaires showed the therapists had a positive attitude towards pressure ulcer prevention with a median score of 81% (range 50 to 83%). However, there were gaps in knowledge with a median score of 69% (range 50 to 77%). The therapist reported several barriers to pressure ulcer prevention and few facilitators. The primary barriers were resources, equipment and education. Attitudes and knowledge in AHPs were comparable to data previously reported from experienced nursing staff. Copyright © 2016 Chartered Society of Physiotherapy. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Staff knowledge and attitudes towards deliberate self-harm in adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, Tanya; Geraghty, Wendy; Street, Karen; Simonoff, Emily

    2003-10-01

    This study investigates knowledge, attitudes and training needs concerning deliberate self-harm (DSH) in adolescents, amongst a variety of professionals involved in the assessment and management of adolescence who self-harm. A questionnaire survey was completed by 126 health professionals working with adolescents who harm themselves. The main outcome measures were a knowledge measure and three attitude measures (generated using factor analysis). The mean percentage of correctly answered knowledge questions, across all professional groups, was 60%. With regard to knowledge, over three-quarters of participants were unaware that homosexual young men and those who had been sexually abused are at greater risk of DSH, whilst one third of staff were unaware that adolescents who self-harm are at increased risk of suicide. Staff who felt more effective felt less negative towards this group of patients (B=-0.21, p=0.03). Forty-two per cent of the participants wanted further training in DSH amongst adolescents.

  13. Promoting Staff Resilience in the Pediatric Intensive Care Unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, K Jane; Forbes, Michael L; Lukasiewicz, Gloria J; Williams, Trisha; Sheets, Anna; Fischer, Kay; Niedner, Matthew F

    2015-09-01

    Health care professionals experience workplace stress, which may lead to impaired physical and mental health, job turnover, and burnout. Resilience allows people to handle stress positively. Little research is aimed at finding interventions to improve resilience in health care professionals. To describe the availability, use, and helpfulness of resilience-promoting resources and identify an intervention to implement across multiple pediatric intensive care units. A descriptive study collecting data on availability, utilization, and impact of resilience resources from leadership teams and individual staff members in pediatric intensive care units, along with resilience scores and teamwork climate scores. Leadership teams from 20 pediatric intensive care units completed the leadership survey. Individual surveys were completed by 1066 staff members (51% response rate). The 2 most used and impactful resources were 1-on-1 discussions with colleagues and informal social interactions with colleagues out of the hospital. Other resources (taking a break from stressful patients, being relieved of duty after your patient's death, palliative care support for staff, structured social activities out of hospital, and Schwartz Center rounds) were highly impactful but underused. Utilization and impact of resources differed significantly between professions, between those with higher versus lower resilience, and between individuals in units with low versus high teamwork climate. Institutions could facilitate access to peer discussions and social interactions to promote resilience. Highly impactful resources with low utilization could be targets for improved access. Differences in utilization and impact between groups suggest that varied interventions would be necessary to reach all individuals. ©2015 American Association of Critical-Care Nurses.

  14. Why Do Staff of Joint-Use Libraries Sometimes Fail to Integrate? Investigating Cultures and Ethics in a Public-Tertiary Joint-Use Library

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvert, Philip James

    2010-01-01

    Joint-use libraries have identified staff integration as a problem. Using focus groups, this project investigated the culture, professional ethics, and attitudes of staff in a public-tertiary joint-use library in Auckland, New Zealand. Findings show some difference in organizational cultures, but more variation at the lower level of roles and…

  15. Occupational hazards to dental staff

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jamshid Ayatollahi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Dental professionals are predisposed to a number of occupational hazards. These include exposure to infections (including Human Immunodeficiency Virus and viral hepatitis; percutaneous exposure incidents, dental materials, radiation, and noise; musculoskeletal disorders; psychological problems and dermatitis; respiratory disorders; and eye insults. Percutaneous exposure incidents remain a main concern, as exposure to serious infectious agents is a virtual risk. Minimizing percutaneous exposure incidents and their consequences should continue to be considered, including sound infection control practices, continuing education, and hepatitis B vaccination. Basically, for any infection control strategies, dentists should be aware of individual protective measures and appropriate sterilization or other high-level disinfection utilities. Strained posture at work disturbs the musculoskeletal alignment and leads to stooped spine. The stooped posture also involved certain groups of muscles and joints. This may lead to diseases of the musculoskeletal system. Continuous educating and appropriate intervention studies are needed to reduce the complication of these hazards. So, it is important for dentists to remain constantly up-to-date about measures on how to deal with newer strategies and dental materials, and implicates the need for special medical care for this professional group.

  16. Occupational hazards to dental staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayatollahi, Jamshid; Ayatollahi, Fatemah; Ardekani, Ali Mellat; Bahrololoomi, Rezvan; Ayatollahi, Jahangir; Ayatollahi, Ali; Owlia, Mohammad Bagher

    2012-01-01

    Dental professionals are predisposed to a number of occupational hazards. These include exposure to infections (including Human Immunodeficiency Virus and viral hepatitis); percutaneous exposure incidents, dental materials, radiation, and noise; musculoskeletal disorders; psychological problems and dermatitis; respiratory disorders; and eye insults. Percutaneous exposure incidents remain a main concern, as exposure to serious infectious agents is a virtual risk. Minimizing percutaneous exposure incidents and their consequences should continue to be considered, including sound infection control practices, continuing education, and hepatitis B vaccination. Basically, for any infection control strategies, dentists should be aware of individual protective measures and appropriate sterilization or other high-level disinfection utilities. Strained posture at work disturbs the musculoskeletal alignment and leads to stooped spine. The stooped posture also involved certain groups of muscles and joints. This may lead to diseases of the musculoskeletal system. Continuous educating and appropriate intervention studies are needed to reduce the complication of these hazards. So, it is important for dentists to remain constantly up-to-date about measures on how to deal with newer strategies and dental materials, and implicates the need for special medical care for this professional group.

  17. The Competency Model for Professional Rehabilitation Nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaughn, Stephanie; Mauk, Kristen L; Jacelon, Cynthia S; Larsen, Pamala D; Rye, Jill; Wintersgill, Wendy; Cave, Christine E; Dufresne, David

    2016-01-01

    Rehabilitation nursing is practiced in various settings along the healthcare continuum. No framework is noted in the literature that defines the necessary competencies of the rehabilitation nurse. To develop a Competency Model for Professional Rehabilitation Nursing and its application to clinical and educational practice. A seven-member Association of Rehabilitation Nurses (ARN) task force was convened; conducted a literature review, reviewed current and historical ARN documents, including the Strategic Plan, and developed a Competency Model for Professional Rehabilitation Nursing practice. The Competency Model for Professional Rehabilitation Nursing delineates four domains of rehabilitation nursing practice and essential role competencies. The Competency Model for Professional Rehabilitation Nursing addresses this diverse specialty practice in the current healthcare arena. This framework can be used to guide nurses practicing at different levels of proficiency in various settings. The Competency Model can be used as a structure for staff orientation, evaluation tools, clinical ladder components, role descriptions and rehabilitation nursing courses. © 2015 Association of Rehabilitation Nurses.

  18. Professionalism: a framework to guide medical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brody, Howard; Doukas, David

    2014-10-01

    Despite considerable advances in the incorporation of professionalism into the formal curriculum, medical students and residents are too often presented with a mechanical, unreflective version of the topic that fails to convey deeper ethical and humanistic aspirations. Some misunderstandings of professionalism are exacerbated by commonly used assessment tools that focus only on superficially observable behaviour and not on moral values and attitudes. Following a selective literature review, we engaged in philosophical ethical analysis to identify the key precepts associated with professionalism that could best guide the development of an appropriately reflective curriculum. The key precepts needed for a robust presentation of professionalism can be grouped under two headings: 'Professionalism as a trust-generating promise' (representing commitment to patients' interests, more than a mere business, a social contract, a public and collective promise, and hard work), and 'Professionalism as application of virtue to practice' (based on virtue, deeper attitudes rather than mere behaviour, and requiring of practical wisdom). These key precepts help students to avoid many common, unreflective misunderstandings of professionalism, and guide faculty staff and students jointly to address the deeper issues required for successful professional identity formation. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Competencies Setup for Nuclear Regulatory Staff in Thailand

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pingish, Panupong; Siripirom, Lopchai; Nakkaew, Pongpan; Manuwong, Theerapatt; Wongsamarn, Vichian [Office of Atoms for Peace, Bangkok (Thailand)

    2010-05-15

    Competencies setup for regulatory bodies oversee a research reactor and nuclear power reactors in Thailand, concentrating on staff development in areas of review and assessment, inspection and enforcement, authorization, and development of regulations and guides. The regulatory body in Thailand is the Bureau of Nuclear Safety Regulation (BNSR) which belongs to the Office of Atoms for Peace (OAP). The BNSR is divided into 4 groups according to the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). These groups are the nuclear safety administration group, nuclear safety technical support group, nuclear safety assessment and licensing group, and the nuclear installations inspection group. Each group is divided into senior and junior positions. The competencies model was used for implementation of staff qualification, career planning and professional progression by BNSR. Competencies are related to knowledge, skills and attitudes (KSAs) needed to perform their job. A key issue is obtaining competencies for the regulatory bodies. The systematic approach to training (SAT) has been used in several countries for improvement regulator performance. The SAT contains 5 steps, including analysis, design, development, implementation and evaluation, to achieve competencies. The SAT provides a logical progression from the identification of competencies required to perform a job to the design, development and implementation of training using the competencies model. In the first step, BNSR performs an operating analysis of training needs assessment (TNA) by using gap analysis technique, as suggested by IAEA. Individual regulatory bodies address the gap using appropriate training program, after comparing the actual and desired competency profiles to determine the gap. This paper examines competencies setup for regulatory staff of BNSR as a result of gaps analysis to establish a scheme for design characteristics of regulatory staff and training courses, thereby enhancing the regulatory

  20. Radiological equipment analyzed by specific developed phantoms and software

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soto, M.; Campayo, J. M. [Logistica y Acondicionamientos Industriales SAU, Sorolla Center, Local 10, Av. de las Cortes Valencianas No. 58, 46015 Valencia (Spain); Mayo, P. [TITANIA Servicios Tecnologicos SL, Sorolla Center, Local 10, Av. de las Cortes Valencianas No. 58, 46015 Valencia (Spain); Verdu, G.; Rodenas, F., E-mail: m.soto@lainsa.co [ISIRYIM Universidad Politecnica de Valencia, Camino de Vera s/n, Valencia (Spain)

    2010-10-15

    The use of radiographic phantoms specifically designed to evaluate the operation of the radiographic equipment lets the study of the image quality obtained by this equipment in an objective way. In digital radiographic equipment, the analysis of the image quality can be computerized because the acquisition of the image is possible in different technologies that are, computerized radiography or phosphor plate and direct radiography or detector. In case of film-screen equipment s this analysis could be applied digitalising the image in a professional scanner. In this work we have shown an application to assess automatically the constancy quality image in the image chain of the radiographic equipment s. This application is integrated by designed radiographic phantoms which are adapted to conventional, dental equipment s and specific developed software for the automatic evaluation of the phantom image quality. The software is based on digital image processing techniques that let the automatic detection of the different phantom tests by edge detector, morphological operators, threshold histogram techniques... etc. The utility developed is enough sensitive to the radiographic equipment of operating conditions of voltage (kV) and charge (m As). It is a friendly user programme connected with a data base of the hospital or clinic where it has been used. After the phantom image processing the user can obtain an inform with a resume of the imaging system state with accepting and constancy results. (Author)

  1. Information technology equipment cooling system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, Mark D.

    2014-06-10

    According to one embodiment, a system for removing heat from a rack of information technology equipment may include a sidecar indoor air to liquid heat exchanger that cools warm air generated by the rack of information technology equipment. The system may also include a liquid to liquid heat exchanger and an outdoor heat exchanger. The system may further include configurable pathways to connect and control fluid flow through the sidecar heat exchanger, the liquid to liquid heat exchanger, the rack of information technology equipment, and the outdoor heat exchanger based upon ambient temperature and/or ambient humidity to remove heat from the rack of information technology equipment.

  2. Negotiating optimum capital equipment acquisitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pols, A L

    1999-06-01

    Healthcare organizations planning capital equipment acquisitions should negotiate with more than one equipment vendor and determine the equipment purchase price, service agreement price, and financing or leasing option rate separately to avoid hidden costs. The purchase price should be negotiated first. A long-term service agreement should be locked in, or service insurance purchased, for the length of the financing or lease agreement. The equipment vendor's financing agreement should be compared with offers from third parties, who may have more beneficial financing options or more flexible lease arrangements.

  3. Impact of patient suicide on front-line staff in Ireland.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Gaffney, Paul

    2009-08-01

    Research and anecdotal evidence suggests that coming to terms with the suicide of a patient can be extremely distressing for front-line professionals. Some research also suggests that exposure to such situations can undermine professionals\\' functioning and feelings of competence, cause them to question their professional standing and ultimately contribute to burnout. A survey of 447 front-line professionals\\' experiences of patient suicide was undertaken to further explore these issues. Thematic analysis of open-ended questionnaire items revealed that concerns for the bereaved family, feelings of responsibility for the death and having a close therapeutic relationship with the client are key factors that influence the adjustment and coping of a health professional in the aftermath of the death of a client by suicide. The results are discussed with a focus on the impact of suicide on front-line staff, the need for ongoing support and training and the development of specific post-suicide protocols.

  4. SU-F-P-33: Combining Research and Professional Practice in the Clinical Setting: A Medical Physicist Personal Experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez-Tarjuelo, J [Consorcio Hospitalario Provincial de Castello, Castello de la Plana (Spain)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To initiate a discussion on the current and evolving role of Medical Physicists based on author’s professional and research experience in patient safety and quality control. Methods: Several professionals of the departments of Medical Physics and Radiation Oncology, chiefly devoted to clinical tasks, began a research program on patient safety and quality control in a framework provided by the implementation of intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT). We performed studies on virtual simulation for IORT, in vivo dosimetry, failure mode and effect analysis (FMEA), statistical process control (SPC), and receiver operating characteristics of dosimetric equipment. This was done with the support of our research foundation and different grants while continuing with our departmental clinical routine involving about 1600 annual treatments with two linacs and different brachytherapy techniques. Results: We published 5 papers in international journals in the last two years. This author conducted a doctoral research which resulted in a dissertation in 2015. The extra time spent after treatments was essential to succeed. Funding and support achieved via our foundation played a crucial role; but this would have not been possible without punctual external mentoring and partnership. FMEA conclusions were able to be implemented only with staff commitment; however, conclusions concerning equipment cannot be easily communicated to manufacturers. These tasks required extra training in the appropriated methods. Conclusion: Research needed the support of a dedicated foundation, which would have been very difficult to obtain with the sole participation of our departments. FMEA and SPC results may need engagement of staff and manufacturers, respectively, hard to achieve without strong recommendations or even a regulatory framework. All these fields need evolution of Medical Physicists’ roles and additional training. Devotion to both clinical tasks and research could be unfeasible

  5. Evaluation of Authentic Human Caring Professional Practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brewer, Barbara B; Watson, Jean

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study was to present an instrument and comparative database designed to evaluate patients' perceptions of caring behaviors of caregivers. Acute care leaders are under pressure to improve publicly reported patient satisfaction scores. Some nurse leaders have implemented professional practice environments based on human caring theory, whereas others have used scripting to standardize communication between staff and patients. The Watson Caritas Patient Score (WCPS) is collected quarterly from a random sample of patients who are admitted to acute care hospital units. The WCPS was able to discriminate across unit types and hospitals. Items were related to publicly reported nursing communication scores. Participation in research based on human caring theory has given nurse leaders the opportunity to evaluate effectiveness of professional practice environments. It may provide the opportunity to focus staff communication with patients more authentically and in a way that enriches the experience for both.

  6. Workplace violence against nursing staff in a Saudi university hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkorashy, Hanan A Ezzat; Al Moalad, Fawziah Bakheet

    2016-06-01

    Violence against nurses is a major challenge for healthcare administrators. It is gaining more attention because it has a negative impact on nurses, the quality of health care and health organization. Common types of violence include physical harassment, sexual abuse, aggression, mobbing and bullying. Patients, their relatives and co-workers are considered the main perpetrators. To determine the prevalence rate of workplace violence against nursing professionals in a university hospital in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, most frequent type and perpetrators as well as the contributing factors. This quantitative cross-sectional study adapted a survey questionnaire from the Massachusetts Nurses Association Survey on Workplace Violence/Abuse to collect data from a quota sample of 370 nursing personnel. Almost half of the participants had experienced violence in the professional setting during the 12 months prior to the study. The majority of subjects perceived workplace violence as verbal abuse. Nearly all nursing professionals identified patients as the leading cause. Slightly more than half mentioned understaffing, misunderstandings, long waits for service and lack of staff training and policies for preventing crisis as contributing factors. The prevalence rate is extremely high among nurses in the targeted Saudi university hospital. Saudi health as well as university hospitals' administration and policy makers should adopt and introduce a 'zero tolerance policy', set standards and develop practical measures for preventing the incidence and for controlling the prevalence of violence against nurses. Besides, healthcare organizations, particularly hospitals, can fulfil their obligations to provide both staff and patients with more secure environment. Further research on the topic is needed. © 2016 International Council of Nurses.

  7. Touch and relate: body experience among staff in habilitation services

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Görel Råsmark

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available In habilitation centres staff meet children with different impairments, children who need extensive support and training while growing up. A prevailing biomedical view of the body in habilitation services is gradually becoming supplemented by a perspective on the body as constantly involved in experiencing and communicating, the latter involving also the bodies of the therapists. Investigating body experience in habilitation staff in their encounters with the children may provide concepts that make it easier to reflect on what is going on in the interaction. When shared among larger number of peers and supported by further research in the field, reflected body experience may become a substantial aspect of professional self-knowledge. Our aim with this study was to contribute to the understanding of what it means to be a body for other bodies in the specific relational context of child habilitation, and more specifically to investigate what role the therapists’ body experience may play for professional awareness and practice. In the study, five physiotherapists and three special-education teachers spoke of physical and emotional closeness (the body as affection but also of a provoking closeness (the body as provoked with the children and of how their own body experience made them more attentive to the children's experience (the body as reference. Situations that included bodily limitations (the body as restriction were described, as were situations where the body came into focus through the gazes of others or one's own (the body as observed. The body was described as a flexible tool (the body as tool, and hands were given an exclusive position as a body part that was constantly communicating. Three shifts of intentionality that form a comprehensive structure for this body experience were discerned. When professional reflection is evoked it may further body awareness, deepen reflection in practice and strengthen intercorporeality.

  8. Touch and relate: body experience among staff in habilitation services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Råsmark, Görel; Richt, Bengt; Rudebeck, Carl Edvard

    2014-01-01

    In habilitation centres staff meet children with different impairments, children who need extensive support and training while growing up. A prevailing biomedical view of the body in habilitation services is gradually becoming supplemented by a perspective on the body as constantly involved in experiencing and communicating, the latter involving also the bodies of the therapists. Investigating body experience in habilitation staff in their encounters with the children may provide concepts that make it easier to reflect on what is going on in the interaction. When shared among larger number of peers and supported by further research in the field, reflected body experience may become a substantial aspect of professional self-knowledge. Our aim with this study was to contribute to the understanding of what it means to be a body for other bodies in the specific relational context of child habilitation, and more specifically to investigate what role the therapists' body experience may play for professional awareness and practice. In the study, five physiotherapists and three special-education teachers spoke of physical and emotional closeness (the body as affection) but also of a provoking closeness (the body as provoked) with the children and of how their own body experience made them more attentive to the children's experience (the body as reference). Situations that included bodily limitations (the body as restriction) were described, as were situations where the body came into focus through the gazes of others or one's own (the body as observed). The body was described as a flexible tool (the body as tool), and hands were given an exclusive position as a body part that was constantly communicating. Three shifts of intentionality that form a comprehensive structure for this body experience were discerned. When professional reflection is evoked it may further body awareness, deepen reflection in practice and strengthen intercorporeality.

  9. Training Staff to Manage Challenging Behaviour

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Oorsouw, Wietske M. W. J.; Embregts, Petri J. C. M.; Bosman, Anna M. T.; Jahoda, Andrew

    2010-01-01

    Background: A training package for staff working with clients presenting challenging behaviour was developed to (1) increase their knowledge regarding challenging behaviour, and (2) to improve the quality of physical intervention techniques. The latter aim was intended to reduce staff anxiety about dealing with incidents and limit physical risk of…

  10. Staff Development for Teaching Slow Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leff, Rhona

    2008-01-01

    If you have noticed that your teachers need more "tricks up their sleeves" for working with slow learners, you can initiate a staff-development plan for changing that. Here are some suggestions for using the time, resources, and staff that you already have to improve the teaching of slow learners.

  11. Training staff to manage challenging behaviour

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oorsouw, W.M.W.J. van; Embregts, P.J.C.M.; Bosman, A.M.T.; Jahoda, A.

    2010-01-01

    Background - A training package for staff working with clients presenting challenging behaviour was developed to (1) increase their knowledge regarding challenging behaviour, and (2) to improve the quality of physical intervention techniques. The latter aim was intended to reduce staff anxiety about

  12. Staff attitudes towards patients with schizophrenia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vendsborg, Per; Bratbo, Johanne; Dannevang, Anders

    2013-01-01

    Stigmatizing attitudes have been reported in international studies among staff in psychiatry. The authors wanted to investigate if this was the case in Denmark.......Stigmatizing attitudes have been reported in international studies among staff in psychiatry. The authors wanted to investigate if this was the case in Denmark....

  13. Restructure Staff Development for Systemic Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Thomas F.

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a systems approach based on the work of W. Edwards Deming to system wide, high impact staff development. Deming has pointed out the significance of structure in systems. By restructuring the process of staff development we can bring about cost effective improvement of the whole system. We can improve student achievement while…

  14. Training Staff to Manage Challenging Behaviour

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oorsouw, W.M.W.J. van; Embregts, P.J.C.M.; Bosman, A.M.T.; Jahoda, A.

    2010-01-01

    Background - A training package for staff working with clients presenting challenging behaviour was developed to (1) increase their knowledge regarding challenging behaviour, and (2) to improve the quality of physical intervention techniques. The latter aim was intended to reduce staff anxiety about

  15. Exploring Staff Perceptions of Student Plagiarism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flint, Abbi; Clegg, Sue; Macdonald, Ranald

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents analysis of qualitative data from a research project looking at staff perceptions of plagiarism at a post-1992 university. Twenty-six members of staff from departments and academic schools from across the university took part in open and semi-structured interviews. Analysis shows that variable definitions of plagiarism exist;…

  16. 40 CFR 1.25 - Staff Offices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Staff Offices. 1.25 Section 1.25... INFORMATION Headquarters § 1.25 Staff Offices. (a) Office of Administrative Law Judges. The Office of... proceedings. The Office provides supervision of the Administrative Law Judges, who operate as a component of...

  17. staff/bed and staff/patient ratios in south african public sector mental

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    To document staff/bed and staff/patient ratios in public. sector mental health services in South Africa. Design. Cross-sectional survey. Method. Aquestionnaire was distributed to provincial mental health co-ordinators requesting numbers of full-time equivalent (FTE) staff who provide mental health care at all service levels ...

  18. Staff/bed and staff/patient ratios in South African public sector mental ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives. To document staff/bed and staff/patient ratios in public. sector mental health services in South Africa. Design. Cross-sectional survey. Method. Aquestionnaire was distributed to provincial mental health co-ordinators requesting numbers of full-time equivalent (FTE) staff who provide mental health care at all ...

  19. Ombuds’ corner: Let's not confuse students and fellows with missing staff

    CERN Multimedia

    Vincent Vuillemin

    2013-01-01

    One of the main missions of CERN is education. Several programmes are dedicated to training students. Others, like the Fellowship programme, offer graduates to start a career and become professionals in their fields. All these young and fresh people provide very valuable contributions to our Organization.   At the same time, it is important to remember that they (especially the students) are here to learn from our professional staff for their future career. This is the correct exchange: they bring their dedicated work to our projects and they gain experience by working with our staff. There’s no better way to learn than on-the-job. However they should not be considered as missing staff, with the exact same requirements expected from the CERN staff. Potential missing staff in some areas is a separate issue, and educational programmes are not designed to make up for it. On-the-job learning and training are not separated but dynamically linked together, benefiting to both par...

  20. Perceptions of professionalism among nursing faculty and nursing students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhtar-Danesh, Noori; Baumann, Andrea; Kolotylo, Camille; Lawlor, Yvonne; Tompkins, Catherine; Lee, Ruth

    2013-02-01

    Although there is no consensus about the definition of professionalism, some generally recognized descriptors include knowledge, specialization, intellectual and individual responsibility, and well-developed group consciousness. In this study, Q-methodology was used to identify common viewpoints about professionalism held by nursing faculty and students, and four viewpoints emerged as humanists, portrayers, facilitators, and regulators. The humanists reflected the view that professional values include respect for human dignity, personal integrity, protection of patient privacy, and protection of patients from harm. The portrayers believed that professionalism is evidenced by one's image, attire, and expression. For facilitators, professionalism not only involves standards and policies but also includes personal beliefs and values. The regulators believed that professionalism is fostered by a workplace in which suitable beliefs and standards are communicated, accepted, and implemented by its staff. The differences indicate that there may be numerous contextual variables that affect individuals' perceptions of professionalism.

  1. Adaptable healing patient room for stroke patients. A staff evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daemen, E M L; Flinsenberg, I C M; Van Loenen, E J; Cuppen, R P G; Rajae-Joordens, R J E

    2014-01-01

    presentation of the concept or phase of the ADRA system the participants rated the concept or phase anonymously on a 7-point Likert scale. In addition to rating the phase in the therefore designed booklets, they were also asked to motivate their ratings in writing. Subsequently, a focus group discussion took place. During the discussion the two note takers wrote down all the comments. Afterwards the quantitative results were analyzed with the non-parametric Kruskal-Wallis test. Significant effects were further analyzed in a post-hoc Mann-Whitney test. The results show that hospital staff expects a positive effect on the healing process of the patient for the Artificial Skylight, the Adaptable Stimulus Dosage concept and the different ADRA phases that provide a clear daily rhythm structure during the day. In fact the staff members from different healthcare institutions and with different professional roles agreed on most aspects. In addition, the staff also expected a positive effect for almost all phases on the efficiency of the clinical workflow, also for the AS and ASD concepts. This is a very promising result as the phases were designed primarily with the healing effect of the patient in mind. The hospital staff evaluation in the laboratory setting gave us an indication of the likely impact of the Adaptive Healing Environment Patient Room on the healing progress of patients. Furthermore, this laboratory evaluation of the concepts was an important step that enabled to improve the shortcomings of the current concept before starting clinical trials. In addition, we generated feedback from different departments from different institutions, which suggest that they all see similar added values for the patient room.

  2. Professional stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanojević Dragana Z.

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Job stress is a line, for the person at work hired adverse physiological, psychological and behavioral reactions to situations in which job requirements are not in accordance with its capabilities, abilities and needs. Sources of stress at work are numerous. Personal factors: personality types have been most studied so far, environmental changes and demographic characteristics as well. Interpersonal stress inducing factors act and influence to the occurrence of many psychosomatic diseases. Psychosocial climate and relationships which are prevented or encouraged such as: cooperation and competition, trust and suspicion certainly affect to the appearance of professional stress. The way of leadership is very important. Organizational factors are the type of work, work time, noncompliance of the job, the introduction of new ethnologies, the conflict of personal roles, fear of job loss, bad physical conditions of working environment. The consequences of stress at work are numerous: at the cognitive level, the emotional level, the production plan, the health, plan reduces the immune system that cause a variety of psychosomatic illnesses and accidents at work.

  3. The utilization of knowledge of and interest in research and development among primary care staff by means of strategic communication - a staff cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morténius, Helena; Marklund, Bertil; Palm, Lars; Fridlund, Bengt; Baigi, Amir

    2012-08-01

    The obvious gap between evidence and practice in health care is unfavourable for patient care and requires the promotion of a scientific attitude among health care professionals. The aim of the present study was to determine the utilization of knowledge of and interest in research and development among primary care staff by means of a strategic communication process. A cohort consisting of primary care staff (n = 1276) was designed and strategic communication was utilized as a platform over a 7-year period. Quantitative and qualitative methods were taken in account. We found that 97% of the staff had gained knowledge of research and development, 60% of whom remained interested in the subject. The oral communication channel was the most powerful for creating research interest. Organizational culture was a barrier to interest in science. The study demonstrates a significant increase in knowledge and interest among primary care staff as a result of a strategic communication process. Strategic communication should lead to a more evenly distributed research commitment among all health care professionals, thus facilitating communication between them and patients in order to clarify, for example, the causes of disease. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  4. Attitudes of General Hospital Staff Toward Patients Who Self-harm in South India: A Cross-Sectional Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Narendra; Rajendra, Rajagopal; Majgi, Sumanth Mallikarjuna; Krishna, Murali; Keenan, Paul; Jones, Steve

    2016-01-01

    There is growing global interest into the attitudes and clinical management of persons who deliberately self-harm. People who self-harm experience many problems and typically have many needs related to management of their psychological wellbeing. A positive attitude amongst general hospital staff should prevail with people who self-harm. The principal purpose was to determine student staff attitudes towards patients who self-harmed from a professional and cultural perspective, which might influence patient treatment following hospital admission. The focus concentrated upon staff knowledge, attitudes and beliefs regarding self-harm. A cross sectional survey of the hospital staff using a validated questionnaire was carried out. This paper reports on interdisciplinary staff from two large general hospitals in Mysuru, South India (n=773). Findings suggest that within a general hospital setting there is wide variation in staff attitudes and knowledge levels related to self-harm. Whilst there is attitudinal evidence for staff attitudes, this study investigates interprofessional differences in an attempt to progress treatment approaches to a vulnerable societal group. Very few staff had any training in assessment of self harm survivors. There is an urgent need for training general hospital staff in self harm assessment and prevention in south India. The results allow a series of recommendations for educational and skills initiatives before progressing to patient assessment and treatment projects and opens potential for cross cultural comparison studies. In addition, interventions must focus on current resources and contexts to move the evidence base and approaches to patient care forward.

  5. 23 CFR 140.910 - Equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 23 Highways 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Equipment. 140.910 Section 140.910 Highways FEDERAL... Railroad Work § 140.910 Equipment. (a) Company owned equipment. Cost of company-owned equipment may be... equipment. Where company owned equipment is not available, reimbursement will be limited to the amount of...

  6. LISTEN WHILE YOU WORK? The Attitude of Healthcare Professionals to Music in the OR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faraj, Adna Abdilmajeedn; Wright, P; Haneef, J H S; Jones, Adrian

    2015-06-01

    Although the playing of music is commonplace in the operating theatre, there is nothing in the literature examining whether staff feel this is beneficial. Questionnaires were distributed amongst a random selection of staff in practice at a district general hospital: medical staff from a range of surgical specialities, anaesthetists, and all grades of perioperative staff (nurse/operating department practitioners/healthcare assistants) were encouraged to participate. There were 121 health professionals in total working in the operating theatres. The authors compared the responses to each question amongst the respondents, to check for the tendency to correlate. Out of the 52 health professionals who responded, 36 stated that music is played in their theatre either every day, or two to three times a week. Only five respondents felt that this was too often. Fifteen percent of medical staff were of the opinion that the nursing staff controlled the choice of music. Nursing staff were almost evenly split in thinking that nursing staff, surgical staff and the whole theatre team controlled the choice of music. The majority of both nursing and medical staff felt that they enjoyed their work more and performed better when music was played in theatre. The study concluded that the majority of theatre staff found listening to music while they work a positive experience. The potential for music to have a distracting or detrimental effect on a minority of individuals should always be considered.

  7. Listen while you work? The attitude of healthcare professionals to music in the operating theatre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faraj, A A; Wright, A P; Haneef, J H S; Jones, A

    2014-09-01

    Although the playing of music is commonplace in the operating theatre, there is nothing in the literature examining whether staff feel this is beneficial. Questionnaires were distributed amongst a random selection of staff in practice at a district general hospital: medical staff from a range of surgical specialities, anaesthetists, and all grades of perioperative staff (nurse/operating department practitioners/healthcare assistants) were encouraged to participate. There were 121 health professionals in total working in the operating theatres. The authors compared the responses to each question amongst the respondents, to check for the tendency to correlate. Out of the 52 health professionals who responded, 36 stated that music is played in their theatre either every day, or two to three times a week. Only five respondents felt that this was too often. Fifteen percent of medical staff were of the opinion that the nursing staff controlled the choice of music. Nursing staff were almost evenly split in thinking that nursing staff, surgical staff and the whole theatre team controlled the choice of music. The majority of both nursing and medical staff felt that they enjoyed their work more and performed better when music was played in theatre. The study concluded that the majority of theatre staff found listening to music while they work a positive experience. The potential for music to have a distracting or detrimental effect on a minority of individuals should always be considered.

  8. Integrating staff well-being into the Primary Health Care system: a case study in post-conflict Kosovo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Veen, Albertien; van Pietersom, Tineke; Lopes Cardozo, Barbara; Rushiti, Feride; Ymerhalili, Genc; Agani, Ferid

    2015-01-01

    Staff well-being including stress awareness and stress management skills is usually not a priority in (mental) health policies. In Kosovo, the level of stress amongst primary health care (PHC) professionals is high because health professionals are part of the population seriously affected by conflict. The need to support staff and look after their well-being was recognised by the Director of the Centre for Development of Family Medicine, Head of Primary Care. In response, the Antares Foundation and the Kosovo Rehabilitation Centre for Torture Victims (KRCT), in close cooperation with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, implemented an integrated psycho-social capacity building programme for PHC professionals. This case-study describes how staff well-being was integrated into the PHC system in Kosovo. This was accomplished through raising awareness on staff well-being and stress management as well as strengthening knowledge of and skills in stress management. Eighteen national PHC staff were trained and more than a thousand family doctors and nurses attended stress management workshops. A steering committee consisting of key stakeholders was responsible for overseeing the execution of the programme. This steering committee successfully advocated for integration of staff well-being and stress management in the revised mental health strategy 2014-2020. The curriculum developed for the training was integrated in the professional staff development programme for family doctors and nurses. The effectiveness of the programme was assessed through an evaluation (including a survey among PHC professionals trained under the programme). Evaluation findings showed that offering structured support, entailing the opportunity to discuss work related problems and providing tools to deal with stress related to work or personal life, helps staff to continue their professional tasks under challenging conditions. Evaluation findings suggest that results can be sustained

  9. Effect of real-time radiation dose feedback on pediatric interventional radiology staff radiation exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Racadio, John; Nachabe, Rami; Carelsen, Bart; Racadio, Judy; Hilvert, Nicole; Johnson, Neil; Kukreja, Kamlesh; Patel, Manish

    2014-01-01

    To measure and compare individual staff radiation dose levels during interventional radiologic (IR) procedures with and without real-time feedback to evaluate whether it has any impact on staff radiation dose. A prospective trial was performed in which individuals filling five different staff roles wore radiation dosimeters during all IR procedures during two phases: a 12-week "closed" phase (measurements recorded but display was off, so no feedback was provided) and a 17-week "open" phase (display was on and provided real-time feedback). Radiation dose rates were recorded and compared by Mann-Whitney U test. There was no significant difference in median procedure time, fluoroscopy time, or patient dose (dose-area product normalized to fluoroscopy time) between the two phases. Overall, the median staff dose was lower in the open phase (0.56 µSv/min of fluoroscopy time) than in the closed phase (3.01 µSv/min; P staff can significantly reduce radiation exposure to the primary operator, most likely by increasing staff compliance with use of radiation protection equipment and dose reduction techniques. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  10. Food Service Equipment and Appurtenances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Sanitation Foundation, Ann Arbor, MI.

    Equipment design specifications are presented relating to tables of all kinds, counters, sinks and drainboards, bins, shelves, drawers, hoods and similar kitchen appurtenances, not including baking, roasting, toasting, broiling or frying equipment, food preparation machinery such as slicers, choppers, and cutters, mixers and grinders, steam…

  11. [Burnout syndrome among health staff].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curiel-García, José Angel; Rodríguez-Morán, Martha; Guerrero-Romero, Fernando

    2006-01-01

    To determine the prevalence of burnout syndrome components among the medical and nursing staff of the second care level hospitals of the Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social and Instituto de Seguridad Social al Servicio de los Trabajadores del Estado from Durango, Mexico. A cross-sectional comparative study was carried out among 73 physicians and 100 nurses randomly selected from both hospitals. The prevalence of burnout syndrome components was established by the Maslash Burnout Inventory, which determines the presence of physical/emotional exhaustion, depersonalization, and labor performance. In addition, sociodemographic and labor information was collected. Prevalence was calculated with a reliability interval of 95% (CI 95%). 73 physicians and 100 nurses enrolled, corresponding to 22.8% and 14.5% of such personnel working in both institutions. Among the IMSS and ISSSTE workers respectively, the prevalence of depersonalization was 43.2% (34.4-52.9) and 14.5% (6.8-25.8), whereas the prevalence of physical/emotional exhaustion was 41.4% (32.7-51.1) and 19.4% (10.4-31.4). Pre-valence of labor performance was higher among the personnel of Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social: 99.1% (95.1-100) versus 96.8% (88.8-100). Severe depersonalization (p = 0.004), but not emotional exhaustion (p = 0.09) nor labor performance (p = 0.06) was significantly higher among personnel working at the Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social. Prevalence of depersonalization and physical/emotional exhaustion was higher among physicians and nurses of the Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social; nonetheless, their labor performance was high. Our finding suggests that personnel working at the Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social make a greater effort to maintain the high labor performance that medical care requires.

  12. How work setting and job experience affect professional nurses' values.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Feito, Ana; Palmeiro-Longo, María Del Rosario; Hoyuelos, Salomé Basurto; García-Díaz, Vanesa

    2017-01-01

    The development of professional values in nursing is directly related to quality and ethical clinical practise and may also increase practitioner and patients' satisfaction. Some factors, such as work setting or work experience, can influence the importance granted to the professional values of nursing. To compare in primary care nurses and hospital care nurses the importance granted to professional values and to contrast this perception as a function of professional experience. Research design, participants and research context: Descriptive cross-sectional study. Participants were 380 nursing professionals from the public health system (primary care and hospital care). Three dimensions were analysed: ethics, professional expertise and professional mastery. Data were collected from January to June 2015. Ethical considerations: We obtained permission from the Ethics Committee and participants' informed consent. Hospital care professionals attached more importance to all the values analysed, regardless of their work experience. Ethical values, such as confidentiality and respect for the person, were considered to be very important in both systems. Values related to professional expertise obtained lower scores, especially in primary care. In general, professionals with more than 20 years' experience granted less importance to the values. The professional setting influenced the importance assigned to professional nursing values, and clear differences were observed between primary and hospital care. The domain of ethics was considered the most important. It is necessary to reflect on the significance attributed to professional values, especially in more expert nursing staff.

  13. Information technology equipment cooling method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, Mark D.

    2015-10-20

    According to one embodiment, a system for removing heat from a rack of information technology equipment may include a sidecar indoor air to liquid heat exchanger that cools air utilized by the rack of information technology equipment to cool the rack of information technology equipment. The system may also include a liquid to liquid heat exchanger and an outdoor heat exchanger. The system may further include configurable pathways to connect and control fluid flow through the sidecar heat exchanger, the liquid to liquid heat exchanger, the rack of information technology equipment, and the outdoor heat exchanger based upon ambient temperature and/or ambient humidity to remove heat generated by the rack of information technology equipment.

  14. Attitudes and characteristics of health professionals working in Aboriginal health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Annabelle M; Magarey, Anthea M; Jones, Michelle; O'Donnell, Kim; Kelly, Janet

    2015-01-01

    There is an unacceptable gap in health status between Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal people in Australia. Linked to social inequalities in health and political and historical marginalisation, this health gap must be urgently addressed. It is important that health professionals, the majority of whom in Australia are non-Aboriginal, are confident and equipped to work in Aboriginal health in order to contribute towards closing the health gap. The purpose of this study was to explore the attitudes and characteristics of non-Aboriginal health professionals working in Aboriginal health. The research was guided and informed by a social constructionist epistemology and a critical theoretical approach. It was set within a larger healthy eating and physical activity program delivered in one rural and one metropolitan community in South Australia from 2005 to 2010. Non-Aboriginal staff working in the health services where the program was delivered and who had some experience or an interest working in Aboriginal health were invited to participate in a semi-structured interview. Dietitians working across South Australia (rural and metropolitan locations) were also invited to participate in an interview. Data were coded into themes that recurred throughout the interview and this process was guided by critical social research. Thirty-five non-Aboriginal health professionals participated in a semi-structured interview about their experiences working in Aboriginal health. The general attitudes and characteristics of non-Aboriginal health professionals were classified using four main groupings, ranging from a lack of practical knowledge ('don't know how'), a fear of practice ('too scared'), the area of Aboriginal health perceived as too difficult ('too hard') and learning to practice regardless ('barrier breaker'). Workers in each group had different characteristics including various levels of willingness to work in the area; various understandings of Australia's historical

  15. Mental health professionals' attitudes towards mental illness: professional and cultural factors in the INTER NOS study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Olmo-Romero, Francisco; González-Blanco, María; Sarró, Salvador; Grácio, Jaime; Martín-Carrasco, Manuel; Martinez-Cabezón, Ana C; Perna, Giampaolo; Pomarol-Clotet, Edith; Varandas, Pedro; Ballesteros-Rodríguez, Javier; Rebolleda-Gil, Carlos; Vanni, Giovanna; González-Fraile, Eduardo

    2018-01-20

    Research shows that personnel working in mental health facilities may share some of the societal prejudices towards mental illness. This might result in stigmatizing behaviours towards people suffering from mental disorders, undermining the quality of their care. To describe and compare attitudes towards mental illness across a sample of professionals working in a wide range of mental health facilities in Spain, Portugal and Italy. We administered a survey to personnel including two questionnaires related to stigmatizing attitudes: The Community Attitudes toward the Mentally Ill (CAMI) and the Attribution Questionnaire (AQ-27). Data were compared according to professional category, work setting and country. 34.06% (1525) professionals of the surveyed population responded adequately. Psychologists and social therapists had the most positive attitudes, and nursing assistants the most negative, on most factors of CAMI and AQ-27. Community staff had more positive attitudes than hospital-based professionals in most factors on CAMI and in discriminatory responses on AQ-27. Globally, mental health professionals showed a positive attitude towards mental illness, but also a relative support to coercive treatments. There are differences in attitudes modulated by professional category and setting. Results can guide preventive strategies, particularly for the hospital-based and nursing staff.

  16. Reconciling the professional and student identities of clinical psychology trainees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenzie, Karen; Cossar, Jill A; Fawns, Tim; Murray, Aja L

    2013-10-01

    The study explored the ways in which qualified and trainee clinical psychologists perceived professional behaviour, as illustrated in a series of short vignettes, in student and clinical practice contexts. Comparisons were made to identify the extent to which ideas of professionalism differed across different learning contexts and between qualified and unqualified staff, with the aim of adding to the literature on which factors influence the development of professional identity in health professionals. An online questionnaire depicting a range of potentially unprofessional behaviours was completed by 265 clinical psychology trainees and 106 qualified clinical psychologists. The data were analysed using a general linear model with simultaneous entry in which rater (trainee vs qualified clinical psychologist), setting (student vs placement) and their interaction predicted acceptability ratings. We found that, in general, trainees and qualified staff agreed on those behaviours that were potentially unprofessional, although where significant differences were found, these were due to trainees rating the same behaviours as more professionally acceptable than qualified clinical psychologists. Despite trainees identifying a range of behaviours as professionally unacceptable, some percentage reported having engaged in a similar behaviour in the past. Irrespective of the status of the rater, the same behaviours tended to be viewed as more professionally unacceptable when in a placement (clinical) setting than in a student (university) setting. Generally, no support was found for a rater by setting interaction. The study suggests that trainee clinical psychologists are generally successful at identifying professional norms, although they do not always act in accordance with these. Conflicting student and professional norms may result in trainees viewing some potentially unprofessional behaviour as less severe than qualified staff. Health professional educators should be aware

  17. The delivery of injury prevention exercise programmes in professional youth soccer: Comparison to the FIFA 11.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, James; Young, Warren; Finch, Caroline F

    2017-01-01

    Injury prevention exercise programmes for amateur soccer have gained considerable attention, but little is known about their relevance and adaptability to professional soccer settings. The first aim of this study was to evaluate the delivery and content of injury prevention exercise programmes used by professional youth soccer teams, compared to the industry standard injury prevention exercise programme for soccer, the Fédération Internationale de Football Association's FIFA 11+. The second aim was to document specific challenges to implementing injury prevention exercise programmes in this context. Prospective observational study. The participants were soccer coaches, fitness coaches and physiotherapists (n=18) from four teams in a professional youth soccer academy. Each team's chosen injury prevention exercise programmes were observed weekly across an entire soccer season (160 sessions). The delivery and content of the programmes were documented on a standardised worksheet and compared to the FIFA 11+. Specific implementation challenges were recorded. Fitness coaches were the primary deliverers of injury prevention exercise programmes, with support from physiotherapists. Multiple delivery formats and locations were employed, along with the extensive use of equipment. Across all injury prevention exercise programme sessions, a median of one FIFA 11+ exercise was performed in its original form and a further four in a modified form. Implementation challenges included poor staff communication, competing training priorities and heavy game schedules. Although the basic components of the FIFA 11+ hold relevance for professional youth male teams, the delivery and content of injury prevention exercise programmes require considerable tailoring for this context. Recognising this will inform the development of improved, context-specific injury prevention exercise programmes, along with corresponding strategies to enhance their implementation. Copyright © 2016 Sports

  18. Interpersonal strain at work: A new burnout facet relevant for the health of hospital staff

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiara Consiglio

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Interpersonal strain was recently proposed as a new dimension related to burnout corresponding to the disengagement reaction in work relationships (Borgogni, Consiglio, Alessandri, & Schaufeli, 2012. The study, framed within the Conservation of Resources Model, investigates the potential mediating role of interpersonal strain (along with exhaustion and cynicism between emotional dissonance and health symptoms among hospital staff. Structural equation modeling on 347 hospital professionals (56% nurses, 16% physicians and 28% other staff revealed that interpersonal strain is strongly associated with emotional dissonance and health symptoms and that emotional dissonance is indirectly associated with health symptoms through interpersonal strain and exhaustion, but not through cynicism.

  19. Managing the human factor in information security how to win over staff and influence business managers

    CERN Document Server

    Lacey, David

    2009-01-01

    With the growth in social networking and the potential for larger and larger breaches of sensitive data,it is vital for all enterprises to ensure that computer users adhere to corporate policy and project staff design secure systems. Written by a security expert with more than 25 years'' experience, this book examines how fundamental staff awareness is to establishing security and addresses such challenges as containing threats, managing politics, developing programs, and getting a business to buy into a security plan. Illustrated with real-world examples throughout, this is a must-have guide for security and IT professionals.

  20. Equipe de trabalho

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel Gerber Hornink

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available   Equipe de Trabalho 2014 1. Equipe editorial Editor-Chefe Bayardo Bapstista Torres, Instituto de Química - USP, Brasil Eduardo Galembeck, Departamento de Bioquímica Instituto de Biologia UNICAMP, Brasil   Editores Gabriel Gerber Hornink, Depto. Bioquímica, Instituto de Ciências Biomédicas, Universidade - Federal de Alfenas - Unifal-MG, Brasil Vera Maria Treis Trindade, Instituto de Ciências Básicas da Saúde, Departamento de Bioquímica, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Brasil   Corpo Editorial Adriana Cassina, Departamento de Bioquímica, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad de la República, Uruguai Angel Herráez, Departamento de Bioquímica y Biología molecular, Universidad de Alcalá de Henares, Madrid, Espanha André Amaral Gonçalves Bianco, Universidade Federal de São Paulo (Unifesp, Brasil Denise Vaz de Macedo, Departamento de Bioquímica, Instituto de Biologia, Universidade Estadual de Campinas - Unicamp, Brasil Eneida de Paula, Departamento de Bioquímica, Instituto de Biologia, Universidade Estadual de Campinas - Unicamp, Brasil Guilherme Andrade Marson, Instituto de Química - USP, Brasil Jose Antonio Martinez Oyanedel, Universidad de Concepción, Chile Josep Maria Fernández Novell, Dept. Bioquímica i Biologia Molecular Universitat de Barcelona, Espanha Leila Maria Beltramini, Instituto de Física de São Carlos, Universidade Estadual de São Paulo - USP, Brasil Manuel João da Costa, Escola de Ciências da Saúde, Universidade do Minho, Portugal Maria Lucia Bianconi, Instituto de Bioquímica Médica Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ, Brasil María Noel Alvarez, Departamento de Bioquímica, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad de la República, Uruguai Miguel Ángel Medina Torres, Department of Molecular Biology & Biochemistry Faculty of Sciences University of Málaga, Espanha Nelma Regina Segnini Bossolan, Instituto de Física de São Carlos, Universidade de São Paulo - USP, Brasil Paulo De Avila

  1. The impact of Erasmus mobility on the professional career: Empirical results of international studies on temporary student and teaching staff mobility Die Auswirkungen der Erasmus-Mobilität auf die berufliche Entwicklung : empirische Ergebnisse internationaler Studien über temporäre Mobilität von Studierenden und Lehrenden

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Constanze Engel

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The impact of an Erasmus study period abroad for mobile students and teaching assignments of Erasmus teachers on professional development is the focus of the article. Temporary study abroad is expected to have a positive impact on personal and academic development, but also to be conducive to transition to employment and career development. Though the impact has been declining, study abroad remains an important experience for the professional career. Erasmus teaching assignments often do not last longer than a few days. Nevertheless, mobile teachers report a positive impact on their career. The article is based on the VALERA Study1 “The professional value of Erasmus mobility”, a European-wide evaluation study by the International Centre for Higher Education Research Kassel.Im Zentrum des Artikels steht der Einfluss temporärer internationaler Studien- und Lehraufenthalte auf den Berufsweg ehemaliger Erasmus Studierender und Lehrender. Es wird erwartet, dass ein Auslandsaufenthalt während des Studiums nicht nur auf die persönliche und akademische Entwicklung der mobilen Studierenden einen positiven Einfluss hat, sondern auch auf den Übergang in den Beruf und die erste Karriere. Ein Auslandsaufenthalt im Studium hat einen sehr wichtigen Einfluss auf die berufliche Entwicklung ehemals mobiler Studierender, auch wenn der individuelle Ertrag im Laufe der Zeit gesunken ist. Lehraufenthalte im Rahmen des Erasmus Programmes dauern häufig nicht länger als wenige Tage. Dennoch berichten auch die Erasmus Lehrenden von einem positiven Einfluss des Lehraufenthaltes im Ausland auf ihre berufliche Entwicklung. Dieser Artikel basiert auf Ergebnissen der VALERA-Studie “Der berufliche Ertrag der Erasmus-Mobilität“, einer europaweiten Evaluierungstudie des Erasmus Programms durchgeführt vom Internationalen Zentrum für Hochschulforschung Kassel.

  2. When procedures meet practice in community pharmacies: qualitative insights from pharmacists and pharmacy support staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Christian E L; Phipps, Denham L; Ashcroft, Darren M

    2016-06-06

    Our aim was to explore how members of community pharmacy staff perceive and experience the role of procedures within the workplace in community pharmacies. Community pharmacies in England and Wales. 24 community pharmacy staff including pharmacists and pharmacy support staff were interviewed regarding their view of procedures in community pharmacy. Transcripts were analysed using thematic analysis. 3 main themes were identified. According to the 'dissemination and creation of standard operating procedures' theme, community pharmacy staff were required to follow a large amount of procedures as part of their work. At times, complying with all procedures was not possible. According to the 'complying with procedures' theme, there are several factors that influenced compliance with procedures, including work demands, the high workload and the social norm within the pharmacy. Lack of staff, pressure to hit targets and poor communication also affected how able staff felt to follow procedures. The third theme 'procedural compliance versus using professional judgement' highlighted tensions between the standardisation of practice and the professional autonomy of pharmacists. Pharmacists feared being unsupported by their employer for working outside of procedures, even when acting for patient benefit. Some support staff believed that strictly following procedures would keep patients and themselves safe. Dispensers described following the guidance of the pharmacist which sometimes meant working outside of procedures, but occasionally felt unable to voice concerns about not working to rule. Organisational resilience in community pharmacy was apparent and findings from this study should help to inform policymakers and practitioners regarding factors likely to influence the implementation of procedures in community pharmacy settings. Future research should focus on exploring community pharmacy employees' intentions and attitudes towards rule-breaking behaviour and the impact this

  3. Dental CBCT equipment and performance issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horner, K; Jacobs, R; Schulze, R

    2013-02-01

    Dental cone beam computed tomography (CBCT), also known as digital volumetric tomography was developed in the late 1990s and is now increasingly available in clinical practice. It can provide high resolution cross-sectional images of teeth and the maxillofacial region with applications in all branches of dentistry. As a new imaging modality, there were no established suspension levels at a European level. A literature review, encompassing scientific, professional publications and existing national guidelines was performed in an attempt to develop a set of suspension levels for dental CBCT, using additional expert opinion from the members of the European Academy of dento-maxillo-facial radiology. A limited set of suspension levels has been devised for aspects of the X-ray tube and generator, dosimetry, field-of-view, alignment and image quality. These should be kept under review in the light of growing experience of testing equipment in practice.

  4. (Destabilizing Self-Identities in Professional Work

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anders Buch

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available It is characteristic of much professional work that it is performed in ambiguous contexts. Thus, uncertainty, unpredictability, indeterminacy, and recurrent organizational transformations are an integral part of modern work for, e.g., engineers, lawyers, business consultants, and other professionals. Although key performance indicators and other knowledge management systems are used to set standards of excellence for professionals, the character of professional work is still flexible, open to interpretation and heterarchical. The very successfulness (or unsuccessfulness of the work is established in a complex work context where various goals, interests, and perspectives are mediated, altered, contested, mangled, and negotiated in a process of sense-making. The work context is heterogeneously populated by various actors (e.g., the customer, the manager, the colleagues and actants (e.g., quality systems and technical equipment that give “voice” to (conflicting interpretations of what constitutes successful work. Thus, the professionals must navigate in a very complex environment where the locus of governance is far from stable. These characteristics of professional work seem to have implications for the way professionals make sense of their work and their own identities. The identity work of professionals is interwoven with their professional training and career background. With an academic training and a professional career, the individual typically identifies with the profession’s values and adopts a certain way of seeing and approaching the world. This professional outlook typically will constitute the basis of the individual’s appraisal of the work and lay out a horizon of expectations in relation to fulfillment, self-realization, and job satisfaction. In this way, the construction of self-identity becomes the yardstick for the individual’s sense-making and, a fortiori, for the individual’s sense of meaningful work. In this paper

  5. Dental hygiene education for nursing staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kullberg, Erika; Forsell, Marianne; Wedel, Peter; Sjögren, Petteri; Johansson, Olle; Herbst, Bertil; Hoogstraate, Janet

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to describe a new dental hygiene education program for nursing staff and to report experiences from the program at a nursing home in Stockholm, Sweden (2006). This strategy comprises 3 steps. The first is individual instruction for nursing staff about oral care for patients and hands-on training in toothbrushing technique using an electric toothbrush. The second step was small discussion groups of 4 to 8 nursing staff, led by a dental hygienist and a psychologist. The third step was a theoretical lecture focusing on the associations among dental hygiene, oral health, and general health among the elderly. During the dental hygiene education program, a negative attitude toward oral care was noted among members of the nursing staff, although they did consider oral care important for their patients. Increased self-confidence of staff in providing oral care was noted after completing the dental hygiene education program. Nursing staff members stated that they had received more detailed knowledge about oral care during the program. This dental hygiene education program appears to result in increased knowledge and interest in oral hygiene tasks among the nursing staff and may lead to improved dental hygiene among nursing home residents.

  6. The Staff Association and its history

    CERN Document Server

    Staff Association

    2015-01-01

    The Staff Association will celebrate its 60th birthday in the spring of 2015. We are collecting all information about the sixty years of the Staff Association. In particular, we are looking at publications of the Staff Association, which started with the “Staff Association Journal”, in 1955, which later became “Le Proton déchainé”, then, more simply, “Proton” in 1982 (the figure on the left shows the different mutations of our magazine). In our collection we are missing a few issues, in particular № 1 (dated mid-1955).     Dear reader, if have any old issues of this magazine, or of Graviton (figure on the right), another magazine edited by the Staff Association, or any other material or information that might help us document the history of the Staff Association, we would very much like to have a copy of the material or your contribution (written or oral). Please contact the Staff Association Sec...

  7. Staff Acceptance of Tele-ICU Coverage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Paul S.; Cram, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Background: Remote coverage of ICUs is increasing, but staff acceptance of this new technology is incompletely characterized. We conducted a systematic review to summarize existing research on acceptance of tele-ICU coverage among ICU staff. Methods: We searched for published articles pertaining to critical care telemedicine systems (aka, tele-ICU) between January 1950 and March 2010 using PubMed, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature, Global Health, Web of Science, and the Cochrane Library and abstracts and presentations delivered at national conferences. Studies were included if they provided original qualitative or quantitative data on staff perceptions of tele-ICU coverage. Studies were imported into content analysis software and coded by tele-ICU configuration, methodology, participants, and findings (eg, positive and negative staff evaluations). Results: Review of 3,086 citations yielded 23 eligible studies. Findings were grouped into four categories of staff evaluation: overall acceptance level of tele-ICU coverage (measured in 70% of studies), impact on patient care (measured in 96%), impact on staff (measured in 100%), and organizational impact (measured in 48%). Overall acceptance was high, despite initial ambivalence. Favorable impact on patient care was perceived by > 82% of participants. Staff impact referenced enhanced collaboration, autonomy, and training, although scrutiny, malfunctions, and contradictory advice were cited as potential barriers. Staff perceived the organizational impact to vary. An important limitation of available studies was a lack of rigorous methodology and validated survey instruments in many studies. Conclusions: Initial reports suggest high levels of staff acceptance of tele-ICU coverage, but more rigorous methodologic study is required. PMID:21051386

  8. Nursing professional facing patient privacy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fidel López Espuela

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Privacy of patients admitted to the hospital is played down in favour of other needs considered more basic by the healthcare system and more related to the disease than to patients themselves. Situations and factors where privacy is damaged are frequent, but it is known that when these are avoided by professionals’ attitude, through strategies and different mechanisms, it becomes one of the most satisfactory elements to patients.Objectives: To identify and analyze situations and factors which affect privacy in hospital environment as well as the adaptation capacity of patients to them.Methodology: Phenomenological, qualitative research. By means of discussion groups with professionals, the following questions where answered: ‘What do professionals understand by privacy? Which situations and factors jeopardize it during the hospital stay? How do they think patients get adapted?Results: The concept of privacy is complex, personal and non-transferable. Situations in which it is jeopardized were divided in 5 main areas. Numerous behaviors regarding adaptation of patients to these were collected.Discussion: Although there is little nursery research referring to privacy and its defense in the professional-patient relationship field, concern about this aspect always shown by nursery staff stands out.As a conclussion, we observe the need to complement this research with the perception patients have about these same questions, establishing the importance they give to privacy.

  9. Do players and staff sleep more during the pre- or competitive season of elite rugby league?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caia, Johnpaul; Scott, Tannath J; Halson, Shona L; Kelly, Vincent G

    2017-09-01

    This study establishes the sleep behaviour of players and staff during the pre- and competitive seasons of elite rugby league. For seven days during both the pre- and competitive seasons, seven rugby league players and nine full-time staff from one professional Australian rugby league club had their sleep monitored via wrist actigraphy and self-report sleep diaries. Two-way repeated measures analysis of variance determined differences between the pre- and competitive season in players and staff, with effect sizes (ES) used to interpret the practical magnitude of differences. Findings show an earlier bed time and wake time for players (-34 min, ES = 1.5; ±0.5 and -39 min, 2.1; ±0.5 respectively) and staff (-29 min, ES = 0.8; ±0.3 and -35 min, ES = 1.7; ±0.4 respectively) during pre-season when compared to the competitive season. Despite this, no differences were seen when considering the amount of time in bed, sleep duration or sleep efficiency obtained between the pre- and competitive seasons. Our results suggest that early morning training sessions scheduled during pre-season advances wake time in elite rugby league. However, both players and staff can aim to avoid reductions in sleep duration and sleep efficiency with subsequent adjustment of night time sleep patterns. This may be particularly pertinent for staff, who wake earlier than players during both the pre- and competitive seasons.

  10. "Somebody else's problem?" Staff perceptions of the sources and control of meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrow, Elizabeth; Griffiths, Peter; Rao, G Gopal; Flaxman, Debbie

    2011-05-01

    Meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is endemic within the United Kingdom health care sector. Recent campaigns to reduce health care-associated infection have rested on increasing staff accountability and ownership of the problem and its solutions. However, the existence of reservoirs of colonization in the community now creates ambiguity about sources, which may undermine preventative strategies. The theoretical framework of causal attribution was applied to explore staff biases in perceptions and effects on infection control behaviors on both sides of the hospital/care home interface. Forty-four staff from 1 acute care hospital and 53 staff from 6 care homes estimated prevalence, risk, and sources of MRSA. Focus groups (6 care home and 8 hospital) were used to elicit group perceptions. Staff tended to attribute the causes of MRSA to external (not self) human factors including patient risk factors and poor infection control practices of others. Teams tend to attribute their "successes" in infection control to dispositional attributions (good team policy and performance) and attribute "lapses" to situational factors (client group, patient movement, work pressures). Variations in information needs, ownership, and infection control practices could be addressed by better interorganizational working and support for staff teams to assess their own responses to the problem. Copyright © 2011 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Model-based equipment diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, David J.; Strojwas, Andrzej J.; Mozumder, P. K.

    1994-09-01

    A versatile methodology is described in which equipment models have been incorporated into a single process diagnostic system for the PECVD of silicon nitride. The diagnosis system has been developed and tested with data collected using an Applied Materials Precision 5000 single wafer reactor. The parametric equipment diagnosis system provides the basis for optimal control of multiple process responses by the classification of potential sources of equipment faults without the assistance of in-situ sensor data. The basis for the diagnosis system is the use of tuned empirical equipment models which have been developed using a physically-based experimental design. Nine individual site-specific models were used to provide an effective method of modeling the spatially-dependent process variations across the wafer with better sensitivity than mean-based models. The diagnostic system has been tested using data that was produced by adjusting the actual equipment controls to artificially simulate a variety of possible subtle equipment drifts and shifts. Statistical algorithms have been implemented which detect equipment drift, shift and variance stability faults using the difference between the predicted process responses to the off-line measured process responses. Fault classification algorithms have been developed to classify the most likely causes for the process drifts and shifts using a pattern recognition system based upon flexible discriminant analysis.

  12. An interdepartmental, standardized equipment pool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fahlstrøm, Elisabeth; Grimnes, Sverre; Johannejen, Nann Helene

    2006-03-01

    To solve problems concerning patient equipment with emphasis on patient care, nursing quality and better nursing management. A monitoring system, designed to follow the patient around in the hospital was discovered. Based on this concept a special, standardized pool system managed by the Clinical Engineering Department was developed. An all-department standardization of monitors and pumps was tried. With pumps it was a success. With monitors, two of 21 departments preferred non-standardized equipment. The equipment pool has successfully been run for 5 years. An evaluation showed that nursing care is better and that only 2% of those asked disapproved of the system. The pool eliminated problems like lack of equipment when needed, the wrong type of equipment found, lack of fitting disposables, the items that could be found being out of order or too dirty to be used. Nurses no longer waste time searching for equipment ready for use. Bedside equipment in working order can always be found in one of the storerooms. As a result, patient safety was greatly enhanced. We also show that this is economically a good system.

  13. A proposta da educação permanente em saúde na atualização da equipe de saúde em diabetes mellitus Una propuesta de educación permanente en salud en la actualización del equipo de salud en diabetes mellitus A proposal of continuing health education to update health team professionals in diabetes mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreia Cristinha Seabra Rodrigues

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo do estudo foi relatar a experiência da Educação Permanente em Saúde na atualização da equipe de saúde de uma Unidade Básica de Saúde para a atenção integral e humanizada às pessoas com diabetes tipo 2. A metodologia de escolha para a capacitação das equipes de saúde foi a Educação em Permanente em Saúde, por meio de oficinas educativas em diabetes com enfoque na problematização do processo educativo e profissional. Buscou-se, assim, construir um programa de educação em diabetes visando a modificar e a reori-entar a prática da equipe de saúde. A Educação Permanente contribuiu para a integração dos indivíduos, fortificou o comprometimento profissional e desenvolveu a consciência de grupo. A experiência de inserir o ensino no cotidiano das equipes de saúde favoreceu o progresso da integração entre universidade, serviço e comunidade, favorecendo o planejamento e organização do programa educativo, valorizando a interdisciplinaridade.El objetivo del estudio fue relatar la experiencia de la Educación Permanente en Salud en las actualizaciones del equipo de salud de una Unidad Básica de Salud para la atención integral y humanizada a las personas con diabetes tipo 2. La metodología de elección para la capacitación de los equipos de salud fue la Educación Permanente en Salud, a través de talleres educativos sobre la diabetes, con enfoque en la problematización del proceso educativo y profesional. Se buscó así construir un programa de educación en diabetes apuntando a modificar y reorientar la práctica del equipo de salud. La Educación Permanente contribuyó en la integración de los individuos, fortaleció el compromiso profesional y desarrolló la conciencia de grupo. La experiencia de insertar la enseñanza en la rutina cotidiana de los equipos de salud favoreció el progreso de la integración entre universidad, servicio y comunidad, facilitando el planeamiento y la organización del

  14. Eye Protection: Survey of Dermatologists and Office Staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pate, David A; Kampp, Jeremy T

    2017-09-01

    Splash injuries to mucosal membranes during procedures have been well documented in dermatology and carry a potential risk of blood-borne virus transmission. The risk to the ocular mucosa can be minimized with proper eye protection. To examine the prevalence of wearing eye protection during dermatologic procedures by physicians, trainees, and office staff in dermatology. A Cross-sectional observational study of US dermatologists, residents, nurses, and medical assistants was performed regarding eye protection during dermatologic procedures. The rates of wearing eye protection in every dermatologic procedure are as follows: dermatologists 42.3%, residents/fellows 39.6%, and nurses/medical assistants 25%. Ninety-eight percent of respondents thought blood-borne illnesses could be transmitted by splash injury. The rates of having splash injury during your career are as follows: dermatologists 73.1%, residents/fellows 16.7%, and nurses/medical assistants 50%. The rates of having a splash injury within the last year are as follows: dermatologists 11.5%, residents/fellows 8.3%, and nurses/medical assistants 35.7%. The use of eye protection is an important component of the personal protective equipment to help prevent transmission of blood-borne illnesses. Dermatologists and staff should strive to increase awareness and the use of face masks with eye shields or face mask with separate eye protection in every dermatologic procedure.

  15. Retrospection and Reflection: The Emerging Influence of an Institutional Professional Recognition Scheme on Professional Development and Academic Practice in a UK University

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Sluis, Hendrik; Burden, Penny; Huet, Isabel

    2017-01-01

    Raising the quality and profile of teaching and student learning is something universities across the UK are aspiring to achieve in order to maintain reputations. Currently, the UK Professional Standards Framework (UKPSF) provides a standard by which academic staff can gain professional recognition for their academic practice and many UK…

  16. Prerequisite programs and food hygiene in hospitals: food safety knowledge and practices of food service staff in Ankara, Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bas, Murat; Temel, Mehtap Akçil; Ersun, Azmi Safak; Kivanç, Gökhan

    2005-04-01

    Our objective was to determine food safety practices related to prerequisite program implementation in hospital food services in Turkey. Staff often lack basic food hygiene knowledge. Problems of implementing HACCP and prerequisite programs in hospitals include lack of food hygiene management training, lack of financial resources, and inadequate equipment and environment.

  17. Staffing, Equipment, Monitoring Considerations for Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzgerald, David C; Darling, Edward M; Cardona, Monika F

    2017-10-01

    Although the reasons for the recent growth in adult extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) are multifactorial, much of the success may be attributed to the development of well-trained staff and the technological innovations in equipment and monitoring devices used during extracorporeal support. In this article, the authors discuss general educational formats for the ECMO bedside provider, staffing support models, and devices designed to best meet the needs of the patient while simultaneously ensuring the proper delivery of ECMO-related care. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Professional communications of Russian technical and engineering specialists: empirical analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R N Abramov

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Sociology of professions focus on the role of interpersonal and intergroup communications in the professional communities as an element of professional culture. The article considers forms and features of professional communications of Russian engineers and technicians in the context of their professional culture defined as the constellation of ideology, values, beliefs, language, and forms of activity typical for the community, which rarely becomes an object of Russian sociologists’ studies. The author shows that interpersonal professional communications on the various aspects of professional activity is an important element of professional culture. The article is based on the results of online survey of Russian engineers and expert interviews with Russian technical specialists - they were questioned on the ways of updating their professional knowledge and on the role of various channels of communication in this process. At the beginning of the article, the author provides an overview of approaches to the study of professional culture in Russia and abroad, and underlines the significant role of the Internet and the declining role of literature as a source of new knowledge for the engineering and technical staff. The results of the study also revealed an important role of informal and direct communications in the transfer of professional knowledge within the engineering community, while organizational environment has a relatively low impact on the updating of professional knowledge, which can be explained by the lack of management attention to the professional development of specialists.

  19. Oncology staff reflections about a 52-year-old staff Christmas choir: constructivist research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Callaghan, Clare C; Hornby, Colin J; Pearson, Elizabeth J M; Ball, David L

    2010-12-01

    Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre has one of the world's most enduring staff Christmas choirs. Commencing in 1956, the choir performs in a cafeteria, patient wards, and outpatient waiting areas before each Christmas. With recent emphasis on oncology staff support needs the choir's relevance warranted investigation. This constructivist research examined what effect the staff Christmas choir had on the choir members and staff bystanders in 2008. Sampling was convenience and purposive. Staff choir members were invited to participate during rehearsals, and staff bystanders were invited at seven choir performances in the hospital. Respondents completed anonymous and semistructured questionnaires and the conductor (of 29 years) was interviewed. The inductive, comparative, and cyclic data analyses were informed by grounded theory and qualitative interrater reliability was performed. Questionnaires from 64 staff were returned. The choir elicited positive emotions, memories, Christmas spirit, hospital community and/or work-life effects for many staff, in a cancer context described as sometimes "overwhelming" and "stressful." Choir members' reactions included stress relief, friendship and feeling rewarded. Bystanders' reactions included feeling uplifted, inspired and moved. Suggestions for future performances were offered, including musical acknowledgement of other religious festivals. Two respondents were concerned about intrusive effects on patients and work practices. A staff Christmas choir supported most choir member and staff bystander respondents in an oncology hospital and is recommended in comparable contexts. Further investigation is warranted to extend understanding about Christmas music's effects in palliative care settings.

  20. A systems approach to developing staff training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giffort, D W

    1998-01-01

    This chapter shows how concepts from organizational psychology can be used to design a comprehensive staff training model for a statewide mental health service system, and emphasizes the importance of competency identification in this model.

  1. Meeting staff representatives of the European Agencies

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2014-01-01

      The AASC (Assembly of Agency Staff Committee) held its 27th Meeting of the specialized European Agencies on 26 and 27 May on the premises of the OHIM (Office for Harmonization in the Internal Market) in Alicante, Spain. Two representatives of the CERN Staff Association, in charge of External Relations, attended as observers. This participation is a useful complement to regular contacts we have with FICSA (Federation of International Civil Servants' Associations), which groups staff associations of the UN Agencies, and the annual CSAIO conferences (Conference of Staff Associations of International Organizations), where each Autumn representatives of international organizations based in Europe meet to discuss themes of common interest to better promote and defend the rights of the international civil servants. All these meetings allow us to remain informed on items that are directly or indirectly related to employment and social conditions of our colleagues in other international and Europ...

  2. Means of Staff Number Reduction and Outplacement

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    H. Urbancová

    2014-01-01

    .... The objective is to present the ways of staff number reduction in Czech organizations and outplacement for the laid-off workers and a partial objective is to compare the results with those in the Slovak Republic...

  3. EMR Measurements on NDA Equipment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Macdonell, Alexander Thomas [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Meierbachtol, Krista Cruse [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Evans, James Walter Jr. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Mayo, Douglas R. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-07-10

    Electromagnetic radiation (EMR) emission strength measurements were performed on a suite of passive non-destructive assay (NDA) radiation detection equipment. Data were collected from 9 kHz up to 6 GHz on each of the assembled systems.

  4. EAS Equipment Authorization Grantee Registrations

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Communications Commission — EAS (Equipment Authorization System). Radio Frequency (RF) devices are required to be properly authorized under 47 CFR Part 2 prior to being marketed or imported...

  5. ENERGY STAR Certified Imaging Equipment

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Certified models meet all ENERGY STAR requirements as listed in the Version 2.0 ENERGY STAR Program Requirements for Imaging Equipment that are effective as of...

  6. Enhancing the clinical leadership of band 6 staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duffy, Kathleen; Carlin, Anne

    2014-11-18

    This is the third article in a series of seven articles on an initiative in NHS Lanarkshire. Visible clinical leaders can have a significant effect on patient care and standards of practice. Over the past decade the development of clinical leadership has focused on senior charge nurses or midwives and team leaders, that is, band 7 practitioners or above. Band 6 staff 'act up' in these roles and therefore need to develop the associated knowledge, skills and attributes for their current practice and future progression into such roles. This article reports on the establishment, implementation and evaluation of a clinical leadership programme developed specifically for band 6 nurses, midwives and allied health professionals at one Scottish NHS board.

  7. Staff resistance to restraint reduction: identifying & overcoming barriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curran, Staci Silver

    2007-05-01

    Professional organizations, regulating agencies, and hospital administrators have taken a strong stance on restraint reduction policies. When implementing a restraint reduction initiative, it is important to identify the barriers to restraint reduction, such as concern for personal safety, lack of knowledge about and practice using alternate de-escalation skills, and fear of disrupting the therapeutic milieu by using a variety of de-escalation methods. Education aimed to reduce the use of restraints needs to do more than simply provide information. It is important to acknowledge the emotional response of the nursing staff and the culture of the current practice. A variety of educational strategies, including role-playing, and case studies will help identify attitudes, beliefs, and behaviors that are congruent with reducing the use of restraints. If the ultimate goal of restraint reduction is philosophical change, it will eventually lead to a new culture of practice.

  8. The impact of nurse managers' leadership styles on ward staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saleh, Usama; O'Connor, Tom; Al-Subhi, Hattan; Alkattan, Rana; Al-Harbi, Saad; Patton, Declan

    2018-02-22

    to explore the nature of leadership styles used by the nursing management team, as perceived by nurses working at the bedside. leadership style is related to job satisfaction, staff retention, costs, and quality of care. The leadership styles of managers can be crucial in the healthcare setting, but very few studies have focused on them. the study employed qualitative methodology, involving 35 nurses working in different specialties of a medical city in Saudi Arabia. Data collection consisted of completing demographic and professional information and a semi-structured interview using open-ended questions. a phenomenologic-hermeneutic approach was used to identify major themes. the findings showed that participants described four types of leadership styles: relational leadership, preferential leadership, communication chain leadership, and ineffectual leadership. the leadership style employed by nurse managers has a major impact on nurses' satisfaction, turnover, and the quality of patient care they deliver.

  9. 'I give staff time to care'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lomas, Clare

    Flo Panel-Coates is working to improve care at a heavily criticised NHS trust. Since taking on the director of nursing post in October 2012, she has secured more support for ward leaders, giving them time to do their job, improved the skill mix of staff, and cut senior nurses' paperwork. Ensuring staff work consistently to the highest standard is the NHS's biggest challenge, she says.

  10. Influences on students' assistive technology use at school: the views of classroom teachers, allied health professionals, students with cerebral palsy and their parents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlsson, Petra; Johnston, Christine; Barker, Katrina

    2017-09-07

    This study explored how classroom teachers, allied health professionals, students with cerebral palsy, and their parents view high-tech assistive technology service delivery in the classroom. Semi-structured interviews with six classroom teachers and six parents and their children were conducted. Additionally, two focus groups comprising 10 occupational therapists and six speech pathologists were carried out. Ethical and confidentiality considerations meant that the groups were not matched. Results revealed that it is often untrained staff member who determine students' educational needs. The participants' experiences suggested that, particularly in mainstream settings, there is a need for support and guidance from a professional with knowledge of assistive technology who can also take a lead and guide classroom teachers in how to meet students' needs. Students' motivation to use the technology was also found to be critical for its successful uptake. The study points to the need for classroom teachers to be given sufficient time and skill development opportunities to enable them to work effectively with assistive technology in the classroom. The participants' experiences suggest that such opportunities are not generally forthcoming. Only in this way can it be ensured that students with disabilities receive the education that is their right. Implications for Rehabilitation Classroom teachers, allied health professionals, students, parents need ongoing support and opportunities to practise operational, strategic and linguistic skills with the assistive technology equipment. System barriers to the uptake of assistive technology need to be addressed. To address the lack of time available for training, programing and other support activities around assistive technology, dedicated administrative support is crucial. Professional development around the use of the quality low cost ICF-CY checklist is recommended for both school and allied health staff.

  11. Night nursing – staff's working experiences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Campbell Ann-Mari

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although the duties and working conditions of registered, and enrolled nurses have previously been described from different perspectives, they have not been examined from the night nursing aspect. The aim of the study was to describe the night nursing staff's working experiences. Methods The design of the study is qualitative and descriptive. Interviews were conducted with 10 registered and 10 enrolled nurses working as night staff at a Swedish University Hospital. The interview guide was thematic and concerned the content of their tasks, as well as the working conditions that constitute night nursing. In addition, the interviews were transcribed verbatim and analyzed using content analysis. Results The night duties have to be performed under difficult conditions that include working silently in dimmed lighting, and making decisions when fatigue threatens. According to the night staff, its main goals are to provide the patients with rest and simultaneously ensure qualified care. Furthermore, the night nursing staff must prepare the ward for the daytime activities. Conclusion The most important point is the team work, which developed between the registered and enrolled nurses and how necessary this team work is when working at night. In order for nurses working at night to be fully appreciated, the communication between day and night staff in health care organizations needs to be developed. Furthermore, it is important to give the night staff opportunities to use its whole field of competence.

  12. [User violence towards nursing staff in public hospitals: Murcia, Spain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galián Muñoz, Inmaculada; Llor Esteban, Bartolomé; Ruiz Hernández, José Antonio

    2012-01-01

    The workplace violence has special relevance for the health care workers. Nursing staff is one of the professions most affected by this risk. Our objective is to determine the prevalence during the past year of diverse hostile manifestations by users towards professional hospital nursing staff who depend on the "Servicio Murciano de Salud" [Health Service of Murcia] (SMS), as well as to detect the sociodemographic and occupational workers characteristics associated with higher exposure. A cross-sectional study carried out during the year 2010 of a random sample of nursing personnel from all the hospitals of SMS, through a self-administered and anonymous survey (Ecoh-U scale). The sample was stratified by hospitals and services (30% of the workers) and finally we got a sample of 1.489 workers (confidence level 99%; sampling error 1,75%). We compared the punctuation average obtained in the scale according to variables sociodemographics and laborables. We used the test t of student in variables dichotomous and ANOVA and Tukey in variables multi-response. The 21,8% of the surveyed people reported that they suffered from "anger due to assistential delay" at least once a month. The workers who obtained punctuations significantly larger were psychiatric hospital workers (19,7), emergency workers (20,60), temporary (16,38) and with old 6-10 years in the profession (17,20). Although nursing staff is one of the professions most exposed to violence, the risk distribution is not homogeneous. Significant differences were found according to marital status, age, hospital, service, profession, contract type, shift and seniority in the profession.

  13. What makes staff consider leaving the health service in Malawi?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chimwaza, Wanangwa; Chipeta, Effie; Ngwira, Andrew; Kamwendo, Francis; Taulo, Frank; Bradley, Susan; McAuliffe, Eilish

    2014-03-19

    Malawi faces a severe shortage of health workers, a factor that has contributed greatly to high maternal mortality in the country. Most clinical care is performed by mid-level providers (MLPs). While utilization of these cadres in providing health care is a solution to the current shortages, demotivating factors within the Malawian health system are pushing them into private, non-governmental, and other non-health related positions. This study aims to highlight these demotivating factors by exploring the critical aspects that influence MLPs' intention to leave their jobs. This descriptive qualitative study formed part of the larger Health Systems Strengthening for Equity (HSSE) study. Data presented in this paper were collected in Malawi using the Critical Incident Analysis tool. Participants were asked to narrate an incident that had happened during the past three months which had made them seriously consider leaving their job. Data were subjected to thematic analysis using NVivo 8 software. Of the 84 respondents who participated in a Critical Incident Analysis interview, 58 respondents (69%) indicated they had experienced a demotivating incident in the previous three months that had made them seriously consider leaving their job. The most commonly cited critical factors were being treated unfairly or with disrespect, lack of recognition of their efforts, delays and inconsistencies in salary payments, lack of transparent processes and criteria for upgrading or promotion, and death of patients. Staff motivation and an enabling environment are crucial factors for retaining MLPs in the Malawian health system. This study revealed key 'tipping points' that drive staff to seriously consider leaving their jobs. Many of the factors underlying these critical incidents can be addressed by improved management practices and the introduction of fair and transparent policies. Managers need to be trained and equipped with effective managerial skills and staff should have access

  14. Characteristics of the nurse manager's recognition behavior and its relation to sense of coherence of staff nurses in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyata, Chiharu; Arai, Hidenori; Suga, Sawako

    2015-01-01

    The recognition behaviors strongly influence the job satisfaction of staff nurses and an extremely important factor for the prevention of burnout and the promotion of retention. Additionally, among internal factors that may affect worker's mental health, a sense of coherence (SOC) is an important concept from the view of the salutogenic theory and stress recognition style. Individual's SOC increases in relation to recognition behavior. However, in Japan, few studies have examined the effect of recognition behaviors on the SOC of staff nurses. The purpose of this study was to investigate how staff nurses perceive recognition behaviors of the nurse manager and to determine the relationship between recognition behaviors and the staff nurses' SOC. This quantitative, cross-sectional study involved 10 hospitals in Japan. A total of 1425 nurses completed the questionnaire. As a result, the perceptions of nurse manager's recognition behaviors by staff nurses were evaluated by presentation and report, individual value and the transfer of responsibility, and professional development. The median score of staff nurse SOC-13 was 50 (IQR; 45-55). Significant differences in SOC scores were found in marital status, age, years of experience, and mental and physical health condition. In conclusion, recognition behaviors by the nurse manager can improve staff nurse's SOC and effectively support the mental health of the staff nurse.

  15. [Job satisfaction of nursing staff in Spanish prisons].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vera-Remartínez, E J; Mora Parra, L M; González Gómez, J A; García Jiménez, J; Garcés Pina, E; Domínguez Zamorano, J A; Borraz Fernández, J R; Blanco Quiroga, A; Armenteros López, B

    2009-02-01

    There are no available studies assessing job satisfaction amongst nursing staff in Spanish prisons. The aim of this study is to establish overall levels of job satisfaction and determine each of the components. Cross-sectional and multi-centre descriptive study conducted in Spanish prisons. A Font Roja satisfaction questionnaire adapted by J. Arranz for the study was used to measure degrees of job satisfaction using a Likert's scale. A parametric test was used and a regression model was constructed for predictive ends. 376 nurses answered the questionnaire (Participation Rate 62.7%; Response Rate 76.7%) 67 centres took part (91.8%). The average satisfaction mark was 2.84 (CL 95%: 2.81-2.87). The lowest ranked components were job variety 1.66 (CL 95%: 1.58-1.74), job-related stress 2.15 (CL 95%: 2.08-2.23) and control over job 2.77 (CL 95%: 2.73-2.82). The highest ranked aspect was job satisfaction, averaging 3.52 (CL 95%: 3.44-3.58). The average satisfaction mark for prison nursing staff was low when compared to other groups of health care professionals, which implies the need for corrective measures.

  16. 21 CFR 225.30 - Equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Equipment. 225.30 Section 225.30 Food and Drugs... Equipment § 225.30 Equipment. (a) Equipment which is designed to perform its intended function and is properly installed and used is essential to the manufacture of medicated feeds. Such equipment permits...

  17. 46 CFR 154.1430 - Equipment locker.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Equipment locker. 154.1430 Section 154.1430 Shipping... FOR SELF-PROPELLED VESSELS CARRYING BULK LIQUEFIED GASES Design, Construction and Equipment Safety Equipment § 154.1430 Equipment locker. One of each item of equipment under §§ 154.1400 and 154.1420 must be...

  18. 7 CFR 550.38 - Equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Equipment. 550.38 Section 550.38 Agriculture... Equipment/property Standards § 550.38 Equipment. (a) The Cooperator shall not use equipment acquired with... the Federal Government retains an interest in the equipment. (b) The Cooperator shall use the...

  19. 21 CFR 226.30 - Equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Equipment. 226.30 Section 226.30 Food and Drugs... Facilities and Equipment § 226.30 Equipment. Equipment used for the manufacture, processing, packaging, bulk... facilitate maintenance and operation for its intended purpose. The equipment shall: (a) Be so constructed...

  20. 40 CFR 63.1003 - Equipment identification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 10 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Equipment identification. 63.1003...) National Emission Standards for Equipment Leaks-Control Level 1 § 63.1003 Equipment identification. (a) General equipment identification. Equipment subject to this subpart shall be identified. Identification of...