WorldWideScience

Sample records for professional social work

  1. NURTURING PROFESSIONAL SOCIAL WORK IN MALAWI

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    theory backed practice would be achieved. KEY TERMS: Malawi, social ... Underpinned by theories of social work, social sciences, humanities and indigenous knowledge, social work engages .... social work administration, social work with disabilities and special populations, family and child welfare, life course and ageing ...

  2. Graduate Students' Perceptions of Professional Power in Social Work Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bundy-Fazioli, Kimberly; Quijano, Louise M.; Bubar, Roe

    2013-01-01

    The study of ways that professional power is perceived in social work practice is limited. This exploratory qualitative study analyzes second-year MSW students' perceptions of professional power in social work practice. This inquiry is guided by social constructivism and symbolic interactionism perspectives. The authors used constant comparison…

  3. Social Professional Education and Work in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maria José Freitas

    2006-01-01

    Article about social work and social policy in the Netherlands. It gives information about the background, history, the meaning of the profession and the different types of professional areas in which the profession is divided. Other subjects are: social work curricula, the European dimension of

  4. Social Professional Work and Education in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maria José Freitas

    2003-01-01

    Article about social work and social policy in the Netherlands. It gives information about the background, history, the meaning of the profession and the different types of professional areas in which the profession is divided. Other subjects are: social work curricula, the European dimension of

  5. Social Work Discretion between Professionalism and Managerialism in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skals, Anette

    Professionalism and managerialism are important and conflicting concepts in the study of professionals working in public service organizations. By focusing on street-level social workers and social work discretion, it is possible to see how welfare-to-work policies are practiced as well as how...... organizational articulations opens or closes for discretion in social work. This paper seeks on an empirical basis to account for how management organizes, supervises and seeks control over social work discretion and, consequently, influences the discretionary powers of social workers in a Danish municipality...... attention or intervention before returning to work after ill health. Here professionalism is institutionalized in bureaucratic organizations. Hence the social workers must control clients’ legal access to sick leave programmes and at the same time deliver individualized services in order to remove barriers...

  6. Professional 'imperialism' and resistance: Social Work in the Filippines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jem Price

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The sociology of professions has traditionally attempted to increase our understanding of categorisations of different occupations by reference to taxonomic hierarchies, as well as the identification and exploration of characteristics that warrant 'professional status'. In may cases, this explorations take the forms of historical accounts of professional activity. Rarely, however, has the literature on professions explored processes of professionalization in devoliping, post-colonial contexts. This article contributes to this body of literature in the study of professions in a number of ways. Firstly, it 'maps' the growth of social work in the Filippines, placing this account within a broader discussions of social work as an internationality activity (Harrison & Melville, 2010; Lyons, 2006 and identifying some of the key forms and features of social work in the Filippines. Consideration is given to the degree of professionalisation of social work within the country by exploring professional organisation, regulation and education.  In doing this, the article offers a critical overview of the nature and preoccupations of social work in the Filippines and celebrates the invaluable contributions it makes to the country and its people. The article argue that the forms social work takes and the settings in wich it happens reflect both contemporay societal and environmental factors as well as the global development of social work.  In this sense, the article considers the impact of Roman Catholicism as well as the orientation of social work in relation to some enduring tensions and debates around the profession's purpose and potential. Key to the professional forms that social work takes in the Filippines is the contribution of 'indigenous' social work knowledge base wich is explored, alongside a comentary on social work education and training in the country. 

  7. Social Work or Relief Work? A Crisis in Professional Social Work

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adhikari Harasankar

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Social work is a sharing and caring profession based on scientific methods. This problem solving profession makes people self-reliant and self-dependent when he/she is in any sorts of crises. Thus, it differs from relief work, social services or social welfare delivered during emergence crises. This paper examined the application of professional social work as relief work, which did not bring any change among the beneficiaries; rather it set their mind as opportunist. For this purpose, the programme sponsored by the government of India and implemented by nongovernmental organizations for rehabilitation of the street children (i.e., pavements and slums dwellers, children of sex workers, and so forth of Metro cities like Kolkata had priority. This evaluative study assessed the progress and changes among 500 street children who were the beneficiaries for 10 years of the programme, selected according to their parental residents/occupation through stratified sampling. Interviews, case studies and group interaction were used to collect data on various aspects, i.e. personal background, education, and occupation of these children. It revealed that after almost 10 years of services, the problem of children was static. Firstly, service delivery system was as relief work. The methods of social work were not implied while the professionals were in implementation. On the other hand, the scope of monitoring and evaluation of the programme by government was suspended due to several reasons. Definitely, the politicalization in human development would be restricted. The problems of suffering would be root out and it should not be a continued process.

  8. Social work values, professional unity, and the South African context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drower, S J

    1996-03-01

    As a subsystem of society, the profession of social work reflects the conflicting value systems at play in the broader social context. In South Africa a spectrum of social work associations have in the past and continue in the present to mirror the different value positions evident in wider South African society. The present period of social transition has stimulated debate among South African social workers concerning this divergence and subsequent lack of unity within the profession. However, such debate has failed to pay adequate attention to the effect on professional unity of the interplay among historical and sociopolitical forces, different value dimensions, and the broader social context. This article highlights this interrelationship and the complexities of forging professional unity among social workers in South Africa.

  9. Multiple Relationships : Maintaining Professional Identity in Rural Social Work Practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keith Brownlee

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Working in a rural community locates the professional in a wider social network as community members often expect more from their professionals; not only as service providers, but also as engaged members of the community. This can result in the rural social worker being highly visible both personally and professionally and it can also lead to overlapping relationships. These higher expectations can place stress on the worker in terms of maintaining accepted professional roles and a sense of professional identity. This qualitative study explores the first-hand experiences of a cross-section of service providers in more than a dozen communities within northwestern Ontario and northern Manitoba, Canada. The responses of the participants provide some insight into how rural practitioners maintain their professional identity when working within the unique demands of the rural and remote context. Recurring themes from the interviews suggest that these professionals craft their own informal decision-making processes to address intersecting roles, community gossip, and personal isolation, even while, in some cases, practicing in their home community. The findings provide greater understanding of the pressures and realities of working in small remote towns and the challenges of responding to the expectations and realities of relationships including the expectation of working with friends and family members of friends or colleagues: issues that have not been adequately studied in the literature to date.

  10. Social distance in Lithuanian psychology and social work students and professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pranckeviciene, Aiste; Zardeckaite-Matulaitiene, Kristina; Marksaityte, Rasa; Endriulaitiene, Aukse; Tillman, Douglas R; Hof, David D

    2018-02-16

    This cross-sectional study aimed to compare desire for social distance from people with mental illness in the disciplines of social work and psychology, and among students and professionals having different professional experience. 948 respondents (715 students and 233 professionals) from Lithuanian educational and mental health-care institutions participated in an anonymous survey. Social distance was measured using Lithuanian Social Distance Scale which was created for this study. Participants also answered questions about familiarity with mental illness. Bias of social desirability was measured using the balanced inventory of desirable responding. Series of ANCOVA analysis revealed that psychology and social work master's and PhD students reported less social distance from people with mental illness when compared with bachelor's students. Familiarity with mental illness was significantly related to less social distance in the student sample, but not in professionals' sample. The strongest desire for social distance in the professionals' sample was observed in social workers having less than 5 years of professional practice and most experienced psychologists with more than 10 years of professional practice. Social distance from people with mental illness decreases through the study years; however, results of professional psychologists and social workers illustrate different trajectories in social distance through the professional career. The results of this study support the need for anti-stigma programmes and initiatives orientated towards mental health professionals.

  11. Legitimizing social work : the practice of reflective professionals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nol Reverda; Marijke Sniekers; Marianne Potting; Croline Lamers

    2010-01-01

    Social work is a profession that is very much part of and contributes to an ever changing and evolving society. It is therefore essential that social work is able to respond to the diverse and dynamic demands that it may encounter in that society and in the future. The critique of social work is,

  12. Nurturing professional social work in Malawi | Kakowa | African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Social work training in Malawi started with a community development certificate in 1964 and later a certificate in social welfare in 1978. In 2006, the first degree programme was introduced. As of 2016, three universities offered degree programmes. Despite this long history, social work has not been fully professionalised.

  13. Practicing Professional Values: Factors Influencing Involvement in Social Work Student Organizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martindale, Dorothy; Olate, René; Anderson, Keith A.

    2017-01-01

    One of the most promising avenues for the development of professional values is involvement in professional student organizations. A convenience sample of baccalaureate social work students (n = 482) was drawn from 15 institutions. Regression analyses revealed several predictors of involvement in social work student organizations, including…

  14. LGBT-Competence in Social Work Education: The Relationship of School Factors to Professional Competence

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarty-Caplan, David

    2015-01-01

    Background: In recent years, social work has become increasingly concerned with efforts to produce professionals capable of effectively supporting lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) clients. Research examining LGBT-competence in social work remains limited, however, because it often neglects to address the role social work education…

  15. Recasting Licensing in Social Work: Something More for Professionalism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grise-Owens, Erlene; Owens, Larry W.; Miller, Justin Jay

    2016-01-01

    Abraham Flexner contended that "something more than a degree or claim" is needed to make a profession. He further asserted that the definitions of a profession require recasting over time. This article critically considers recasting licensing as something more for social work. Analysis of past and present discourse on licensing in social…

  16. Social Work Values and Pacifism: Opposition to War as a Professional Responsibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verschelden, Cia

    1993-01-01

    Contends that, if social workers behave professionally according to their prescribed values and ethics, it will follow that they are working from an active pacifist perspective. Presents definition of pacifism and examines pacifism and social work values (importance of individual, respect for differences, commitment to social justice, persistence…

  17. Attitudes about Mental Illness and Professional Danger among New Social Work Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theriot, Matthew T.; Lodato, Gayle A.

    2012-01-01

    This article describes the results of a study comparing attitudes toward mental illness and perceptions of professional danger among new social work students (n=64) and other university students (n=111). Such topics have implications for social work education and curriculum development but have not been studied adequately. Results from…

  18. Developing Social Work Professional Judgment Skills: Enhancing Learning in Practice by Researching Learning in Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rawles, Joanna

    2016-01-01

    The aims of this article are twofold: to discuss the value of practice-based research as a basis for enhancing learning and teaching in social work and, as an illustration of this, to present the findings of a preliminary qualitative research study into social work students' development of professional judgment skills. The research was conducted…

  19. Social work in a society under pressure. Keeping professional principles and standards upright.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Willem Blok

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This article is based on the content and outcome of the 5th Annual International Conference on Social Work & Social Work Education in Leeuwarden, The Netherlands on February 5, 2016. It shows how Social Work is embedded in society, and describes the pressure of contemporary (international problems on society, and the way in which authorities respond to it. The article continues with a discussion of the answers given by the 200 conference participants on the question how social workers and social work educators could cope with this pressure without denying their international professional principles and standards.

  20. Qualities and Practices of Professional Social Work Leadership in an Interdisciplinary Mental Health Service: An Action Learning Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNabb, David; Webster, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Since the mid-1980s, health service restructuring in New Zealand has strengthened managerialism, arguably detracting from professional considerations. Professional leaders without line-management responsibilities have replaced social work departments headed by a professional social worker. An emerging social work contribution to interdisciplinary…

  1. Challenges to Social Work research: from academic education to professional practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aglair Alencar Setubal

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available The reflections contained in this essay seek to the call attention of professionals, professors and students of Social Work to the importance of research in the various contexts of activity in this field, despite the challenges and difficulties presented in its realization. It offers possibilities for conducting research from a critical professional intervention, in keeping with the concrete reality - the context of professional practice. It also highlights the importance for the preparation of a history of Social Work based on theoretical-methodological postures that consider the wealth, complexity and essence of reality, breaking with the 'pseudoconcreticity', with the utilitarian, manipulative praxis that is constructed in the dimension of a 'common consciousness'. Despite the importance attributed to research, it sought to avoid separating it from human-social reality, given that it is in this context that research acquires meaning, becomes accepted and considers the needs of Social Work as a historic profession.

  2. State Definitions of Social Work Practice: Implications for our Professional Identity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Katharine; Fogel, Sondra; Plitt Donaldson, Linda; Erickson, Christina

    2017-01-01

    For over a century, the social work profession has been concerned with describing the unique and specific characteristics that define its core functions in society; however, the profession has yet to agree to a single definition of social work. In the absence of a unifying definition, 51 different statutory definitions of social work have been created by each state and the District of Columbia. Using qualitative methods, each statutory definition of social work was analyzed to gain an understanding of how social work is defined and understood across the United States. Findings indicate that 57% of the statutory language blend the full range of micro to macro social work practice skills into their definition. However, even within these and those remaining, there are vast differences in definitions. Implications for state licensing laws, are considered, along with how this impacts education, the work force, and professional identity.

  3. Intersecting Sexual, Gender, and Professional Identities among Social Work Students: The Importance of Identity Integration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craig, Shelley L.; Iacono, Gio; Paceley, Megan S.; Dentato, Michael P.; Boyle, Kerrie E. H.

    2017-01-01

    Discrimination toward lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer (LGBTQ) social work students can negatively affect academic performance and personal and professional identity development. Intersectionality is a conceptual approach that states that social identities interact to form different meanings and experiences from those that could be…

  4. Problems for Social Work in a Strike Situation: Professional, Ethical, and Value Considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Dena

    1987-01-01

    Discusses potential ethical conflicts social workers face in a strike: whether priority should be given to patient welfare or to the individual's civil rights to participate in union activities. Notes standards of professional behavior conflict with union requirements. Concludes the social work profession should examine labor unions in the 1980s…

  5. Self-reflective Ethnographies of Practice and their Relevance for Professional Socialisation in Social Work

    OpenAIRE

    Riemann, Gerhard

    2011-01-01

    "The article tries to explicate and illustrate a type of qualitative practitioner research in the field of professional training and to shed light on its practical uses for the acquisition of analytical skills and the fostering of professional discourse. The discussion is based on the author’s work with social work students who are encouraged and supported to become “ethnographers of their own affairs”, especially in the context of their practice placements, which are a mand...

  6. A study on the level of awareness of school principles on professional social work

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Reza Iravani

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we present a study to determine the level of awareness of school principles on professional social work in the city of Esfehan, Iran. The proposed study of this paper distributes questionnaire among eighty principle managers who work for different schools in this city. The first part of the questionnaire is devoted to people's personal characteristics such as gender, age, etc. and the second part is associated with the some questions about their awareness on professional social work. The study, for instance, finds that there is a meaningful relationship between job experience and gender and awareness when the statistical significance level is less than five percent but there is no relationship between the level of education and the awareness on professional social work.

  7. A Response to Anastas and Coffey: The Science of Social Work and Its Relationship to Social Work Education and Professional Organizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voisin, Dexter R.; Wong, Marleen; Samuels, Gina Miranda

    2014-01-01

    Relationships are central to the profession of social work; relationships with allied disciplines, among professional social work organizations, and between classroom and field education. However, embedded within these relationships are historical tensions, and contemporary opportunities that can advance both the science of social work and the…

  8. Nurturing professional social work in Malawi | Kakowa | African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    If you would like more information about how to print, save, and work with PDFs, Highwire Press provides a helpful Frequently Asked Questions about PDFs. Alternatively, you can download the PDF file directly to your computer, from where it can be opened using a PDF reader. To download the PDF, click the Download link ...

  9. Identifying, Preventing, and Addressing Job Burnout and Vicarious Burnout for Social Work Professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Felicia

    2016-01-01

    Genuineness, concern for others, and empathy are characteristics used to describe the professional social worker. To this end, the social worker tirelessly works on behalf of and in collaboration with the client to move them from stagnant life situations into positive life situations. While the fundamental principles of social work are wonderful, the result for some workers is job burnout and/or vicarious trauma. The concepts of job burnout, its antecedents, and manifestations are thoroughly discussed in this article to provide a holistic overview of this phenomenon. The six antecedents: workload, control, values, fairness, reward, and community are discussed and linked to the manifestations of job burnout. When working with individuals who have been exposed to the depravity of life, the professional can take on the client's vulnerabilities, victimizations, and stress. The common term for this phenomenon is vicarious trauma. Professionals who work with trauma victims can often have issues in their personal and professional life as evidenced by reduced professional efficacy, increased emotional concerns, and physical concerns. The purpose of the author in this article is to provide an overview of job burnout, vicarious trauma, and a discussion about self-care responsibilities.

  10. To have voice and choice : Turkish and Moroccan Dutch professionals in social work

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hans van Ewijk; Drs Peter Hendriks

    2016-01-01

    Social work in the Netherlands is attracting an increasing number of Turkish and Moroccan Dutch professionals, mostly second-generation migrant women from a Muslim background. Inspired by Amartya Sen’s capability approach, this article presents the findings of a qualitative content analysis of 40

  11. Under Stress: Social Coping Mechanisms for Survival among the Working Professionals

    OpenAIRE

    Ms. Coral Barboza; Dr. Babu Thomas

    2016-01-01

    The nature of work of professionals and their family life may very often expose them to high level of stress which has the potential of affecting their productive and earning capacity. Coping strategies have been the subject of many studies and various suggestions have been made regarding the most appropriate way to categorise them in terms of function and efficacy (Amble, 2006; Buys et al., 2010). The goal of the current study was to examine how social coping mechanisms are helpful to employ...

  12. Health and social care professionals' attitudes to interprofessional working and interprofessional education: A literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Carroll, Veronica; McSwiggan, Linda; Campbell, Martin

    2016-01-01

    The healthcare setting is a rich learning environment for students to experience interprofessional working (IPW) and interprofessional education (IPE). However, opportunities for IPE are limited, and student experiences of effective IPW are varied. This raises the question of how IPW and IPE are valued by health or social care professionals. A search of the literature was carried out to identify studies of health and social care staff attitudes to IPW and IPE. This review provides a summary of the main factors found to influence attitudes and the strengths and limitations of these studies. Professional background and prior IPE experience were identified as the influencing factors for which there is most evidence. The main limitations of the studies accessed included a focus on the value of IPE for staff, as opposed to students, and a limited number of studies considering the relationship between attitudes to IPW and the value placed on IPE. It is important that health and social care professionals lead by example by working collaboratively and providing students with opportunities for IPE. Identifying the variables influencing attitudes to IPW and IPE may assist in improving IPW and experiences of IPE for students learning in the healthcare setting.

  13. Public health and social work: training dual professionals for the contemporary workplace.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruth, Betty J; Sisco, Sarah; Wyatt, Jamie; Bethke, Christina; Bachman, Sara S; Piper, Tinka Markham

    2008-01-01

    The emergence of new, complex social health concerns demands that the public health field strengthen its capacity to respond. Academic institutions are vital to improving the public health infrastructure. Collaborative and transdisciplinary practice competencies are increasingly viewed as key components of public health training. The social work profession, with its longstanding involvement in public health and emphasis on ecological approaches, has been a partner in many transdisciplinary community-based efforts. The more than 20 dual-degree programs in public health and social work currently offered reflect this collaborative history. This study represents an exploratory effort to evaluate the impact of these programs on the fields of public health and social work. This study explored motivations, perspectives, and experiences of 41 graduates from four master of social work/master of public health (MSW/ MPH) programs. Four focus groups were conducted using traditional qualitative methods during 2004. Findings suggest that MSW/MPH alumni self-selected into dual programs because of their interest in the missions, ethics, and practices of both professions. Participants highlighted the challenges and opportunities of dual professionalism, including the struggle to better define public health social work in the workplace. Implications for academic public health focus on how schools can improve MSW/MPH programs to promote transdisciplinary collaboration. Increased recognition, better coordination, and greater emphasis on marketing to prospective employers were suggested. A national evaluation of MSW/MPH graduates could strengthen the roles and contributions of public health social work to the public health infrastructure. A conceptual framework, potentially based on developmental theory, could guide this evaluation of the MSW/MPH training experience.

  14. Effects of organizational and professional identification on the relationship between administrators' social influence and professional employees' adoption of new work behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hekman, David R; Steensma, H Kevin; Bigley, Gregory A; Hereford, James F

    2009-09-01

    Administrative social influence is a principal tool for motivating employee behavior. The authors argue that the compliance of professional employees (e.g., doctors) with administrative social influence will depend on the degree to which these employees identify with their profession and organization. Professional employees were found to be most receptive to administrator social influence to adopt new work behavior when they strongly identified with the organization and weakly identified with the profession. In contrast, administrator social influence was counterproductive when professional employees strongly identified with the profession and weakly identified with the organization.

  15. The development of professional social work values and ethics in the workplace: a critical incident analysis from the students' perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Papouli, Eleni

    2014-01-01

    This thesis explores Greek social work students’ perceptions of the development of\\ud their professional values and ethics in the workplace during their professional\\ud practice placement. To accomplish its goals, the thesis includes a literature review\\ud and employs a qualitative exploratory research design with descriptive elements\\ud positioned within the constructivist paradigm. This research design allows the\\ud researcher to explore and describe a topic - social work values and ethics ...

  16. Teaching Note--Educating Public Health Social Work Professionals: Results from an MSW/MPH Program Outcomes Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruth, Betty J.; Marshall, Jamie Wyatt; Velásquez, Esther E. M.; Bachman, Sara S.

    2015-01-01

    Dual-degree programs in public health and social work continue to proliferate, yet there has been little research on master's of social work (MSW)/master's of public health (MPH) graduates. The purpose of this study was to describe and better understand the self-reported professional experiences, identities, roles, and outcomes associated with 1…

  17. TRENDS IN SOCIAL SECURITY AGAINST ACCIDENTS AT WORK AND PROFESSIONAL DISEASES IN UKRAINE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Hamankova

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The article describes the main trends of formation and development of insurance against accidents. Defined position of the social insurance against accidents and professional diseases in the social protection system in Ukraine. Investigated the essence and content of social insurance against accidents.

  18. Is social support equally beneficial for working climate and health of women and men at different professional grades?

    OpenAIRE

    Casini, Annalisa; Godin, Isabelle; Clays, Els; Kittel, France

    2011-01-01

    Aim: To examine the association between social support at work (SSW), health factors and working climate as a function of gender and professional grade. Methods: Belstress III database comprising data on 2983 workers of seven (semi-)public companies were used. Socio-demographic, working climate, mental and physical health indicators were collected. Professional grade and gender stratified logistic regressions were performed for evaluating the association between SSW and current health, stress...

  19. [Problems of the development of clinical social work as professional activity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martynenko, A V

    1995-01-01

    Population health protection is a vast sphere of professional social activity. At the present stage of reformation medicosocial activity acquires the features of professional activity of an intersectoral type aimed at medical rehabilitation, legislative, psychological, pedagogical, and sociocommunal care of clients in order to repair and maintain his or her physical, mental, and social well-being. Such an approach to the solution of interdiscipline problems of subjects finding themselves in difficult situations implies comprehensive research.

  20. Social Justice Messaging and Self-Efficacy: Understanding What Influences Student Affairs Professionals to Choose Social Justice Work on Campus

    OpenAIRE

    Monje-Paulson, Laura Nicole

    2016-01-01

    The primary objective of this study was to examine social justice messaging sent to Student Affairs (SA) professionals from institutions and professional organizations. The secondary objective of this study was to explore the application of a social cognitive framework that better emphasizes the role of the environment and social justice self-efficacy as determinants of social justice choices. As the fields of Student Affairs and Higher Education strive to create campus communities that suppo...

  1. The price of professional silence: Social work and human rights in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The place of the social work profession on the human rights arena is beyond doubt. To this end, social work strives to eliminate distress, improve the social functioning of individuals, groups and communities as well as promoting social justice. Zimbabwe has been confronted by a plethora of human rights challenges mainly ...

  2. A PERSONAL NARRATIVE ON THE ROLE OF MICROLEVEL PROFESSIONAL SOCIAL WORK PRACTICE CALLING FOR ITS APPLICATION IN SRI LANKA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarathchandra Gamlath

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper is a personal reflection on social work and what constitutes a social worker, with special reference to Sri Lanka. Drawing from global literature, it observes that the field of social work has evolved to become a package of knowledge, skills, competencies, code of ethics, and accreditation standards. Therefore, qualified social workers today possess a set of practical as well as academic competencies that is designed to address issues not only at the macro and mezzo level, but also at the individual and family levels. The paper argues that Sri Lanka has yet to adopt a multi-faceted social work approach like this, and explores the possibility of enhancing the institutional capacity of the National Institute for Social Development (the country’s only institute of higher education that offers professional social work education to deliver such approach.

  3. On College Formation of Future Lawyers' Professional Readiness to Work in Social Welfare Institutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikitina, Natalya Ivanovna; Grebennikova, Veronica Mikhailovna; Nikishina, Irina Nikolaevna; Galkina, Tatyana Engersovna; Tolstikova, Svetlana Nikolaevna

    2016-01-01

    In Russia today, more than ever, various social welfare institutions (Centers for social services, Social assistance centers for families and children, Rehabilitation centers for disabled children and their families, Centers for work with refugees and IDPs, Centers of medico-social rehabilitation of military men, etc.) require legal profile…

  4. Connecting Social Work and Activism in the Arts through Continuing Professional Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rawdon, Kathryn; Moxley, David

    2016-01-01

    The authors place a continuing education conference devoted to linking the arts, social practice, and social work within the context of a movement to advance arts activism. They illustrate how social workers, artists, and community arts activists can collaborate in building public awareness about serious social issues, creating alternative…

  5. Civic Professionalism: Using Service Learning to Educate Social Work Students as Citizens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tracey Kathleen Burke

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Schools of social work have put considerable energy into civic engagement and community partnership. Despite the attention paid to the civic mission of the university and/or of the profession, however, very little attention has been paid to the civic education of social work students. It will be argued here that social work education must include discussions about citizenship and democracy, about participating in our communities apart from our work. Service learning, with its emphasis on civic learning and a complementary focus on social justice, provides both a lens and a pedagogy for accomplishing this.

  6. "What Works" in Education and Social Welfare? A Mapping of the "Evidence Discourse" and Reflections upon Consequences for Professionals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krejsler, John B.

    2013-01-01

    Drawing on Foucauldian genealogy, the article maps major sources and trajectories of the evidence discourse. This enables scrutiny of the current struggle about "evidence" for "What Works" in education and social welfare. Evidence discourse is identified as emerging from the medical field as a bottom-up professional strategy.…

  7. Assessing the Implicit Curriculum in Social Work Education: Heterogeneity of Students' Experiences and Impact on Professional Empowerment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, N. Andrew; Farmer, Antoinette Y.; Donnelly, Louis; Forenza, Brad

    2014-01-01

    The implicit curriculum, which refers to a student's learning environment, has been described as an essential feature of an integrated professional social work curriculum. Very little is known, however, about the heterogeneity of students' experiences with the implicit curriculum, how this heterogeneity may be distributed across groups of…

  8. Peeping at peers: A cross-national study of professionalism in social work

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ma Martijn van Van Lanen

    2008-01-01

    Contemporary social work is subjected to ongoing questions in terms of its effectiveness and accountability. It appears to be problematic for social workers to defend themselves in a proper manner. When they do so, they often seem to rely primarily on a rhetoric of good intentions and are thus

  9. Work motivation among healthcare professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kjellström, Sofia; Avby, Gunilla; Areskoug-Josefsson, Kristina; Andersson Gäre, Boel; Andersson Bäck, Monica

    2017-06-19

    Purpose The purpose of this paper is to explore work motivation among professionals at well-functioning primary healthcare centers subject to a national healthcare reform which include financial incentives. Design/methodology/approach Five primary healthcare centers in Sweden were purposively selected for being well-operated and representing public/private and small/large units. In total, 43 interviews were completed with different medical professions and qualitative deductive content analysis was conducted. Findings Work motivation exists for professionals when their individual goals are aligned with the organizational goals and the design of the reform. The centers' positive management was due to a unique combination of factors, such as clear direction of goals, a culture of non-hierarchical collaboration, and systematic quality improvement work. The financial incentives need to be translated in terms of quality patient care to provide clear direction for the professionals. Social processes where professionals work together as cohesive groups, and provided space for quality improvement work is pivotal in addressing how alignment is created. Practical implications Leaders need to consistently translate and integrate reforms with the professionals' drives and values. This is done by encouraging participation through teamwork, time for structured reflection, and quality improvement work. Social implications The design of the reforms and leadership are essential preconditions for work motivation. Originality/value The study offers a more complete picture of how reforms are managed at primary healthcare centers, as different medical professionals are included. The value also consists of showing how a range of aspects combine for primary healthcare professionals to successfully manage external reforms.

  10. Social professionals perceptions' on activating citizenship.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reeli Sirotkina; Hans van Ewijk

    2010-01-01

    This article reports on qualitative research among 48 social professionals, managers and policymakers and their perceptions of activating citizenship, social work roles and responsibilities, carried out in Utrecht and Tartu. Professionals from both countries agreed to the idea of activating

  11. Preventing Empathic Distress and Social Stressors at Work Through Nonviolent Communication Training: A Field Study With Health Professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wacker, Renata; Dziobek, Isabel

    2016-12-15

    One major source of mental health problems in health professionals are personally demanding encounters at work. Thus, a crucial prevention focus is the development of emotional and social skills necessary to effectively manage interactions with clients, colleagues, and supervisors. The aim of our pre-post intervention field study was to evaluate an employee training in nonviolent communication (NVC) within a public health organization. A training group participated in a 3-day NVC training and completed questionnaires before and 3 months after training. Changes in NVC skills, empathic distress, empathy, and social stressors at work were compared with data from a control group without training. Additionally, we observed NVC-trained participants' communication behavior immediately before and after the intervention. We found a promotion of communication skills in training participants as evidenced by increased emotion verbalization behavior and enhanced use of NVC at work. Empathic distress declined, and an increase of social stressors at work was prevented by enhanced emotion verbalization. The findings demonstrate that NVC training can be an effective means to foster emotional and interpersonal skills and to prevent empathic distress and social stressors at work in individuals working in socioemotionally challenging settings. Possible causal mechanisms explaining the training effects are discussed. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  12. Reconstructing professional identity for professional and interprofessional practice: a mixed methods study of joint training programmes in learning disability nursing and social work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sims, David

    2011-07-01

    This article draws on the findings from a mixed methods study with practitioners who qualified from joint training programmes in learning disability nursing and social work and explores the impact on professional identity of such programmes. Although several joint programmes are well established, very little research has been carried out with those who have qualified from them. These practitioners have experienced a kind of training quite unlike that offered by singular education programmes, incorporating a dual socialisation process, which has been neither analysed nor theorised. The study reported in this article comprised a postal survey to graduates from five programmes followed by in depth semi-structured interviews. Survey data were analysed by use of SPSS, while the interviews were analysed by use of a content analysis approach. The article discusses findings in relation to theoretical conceptions of professional status, boundaries and identity and relates these to the perceptions of respondents about their professional identities. It explores the ambiguities and uncertainties inherent in this type of professional training programme and argues that these reflect aspects of the current context of professions as a whole. The article concludes that a new professional identity is emerging in learning disability practice, generated by such programmes.

  13. Functional Pathways of Social Support for Mental Health in Work and Family Domains Among Chinese Scientific and Technological Professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gan, Yiqun; Gan, Tingting; Chen, Zhiyan; Miao, Miao; Zhang, Kan

    2015-10-01

    This study investigated the role of social support in the complex pattern of associations among stressors, work-family interferences and depression in the domains of work and family. A questionnaire was administered to a nationwide sample of 11,419 Chinese science and technology professionals. Several structural equation models were specified to determine whether social support functioned as a predictor or a mediator. Using Mplus 5.0, we compared the moderation model, the independence model, the antecedent model and the mediation model. The results revealed that the relationship between work-family interference and social support was domain specific. The independence model fit the data best in the work domain. Both the moderation model and the antecedent model fit the family domain data equally well. The current study was conducted to answer the need for comprehensive investigations of cultural uniqueness in the antecedents of work-family interference. The domain specificity, i.e. the multiple channels of the functions of support in the family domain and not in the work domain, ensures that this study is unique and culturally specific. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. Children with social and emotional difficulties need support from a range of professionals: Preparing professions for integrated working

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lesley A Hughes

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Inclusive education for all children means that teachers are increasingly faced with challenges in managing children with social, emotional and behavioural difficulties (SEBD whose complex needs span a number of professional disciplines, some of which sit outside of education. However, whilst it is recognised that children with SEBD require management and support across a range of professions that include education, health, social and youth services, there is little done to prepare teaching staff for working across professional and organisational boundaries. The evidence of poor communication and team working amongst professions has led to policy changes and guidelines calling for greater coordination in the delivery of services for children and young people. This paper considers how education and training needs to prepare students with the knowledge and skills for collaborative working through interprofessional education (IPE, and draws on adult learning theory and activity theory to frame its direction. In doing so, it demonstrates a model for IPE that can be used to engage students from different disciplines to gain insight into the understanding of the wider issues of SEBD and the roles and responsibilities of the other professions involved. The model is one that enables students to consider the impact the role of others has on their own role, and to reflect on how their role impacts on the role of others.

  15. Professional social networking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowley, Robert D

    2014-12-01

    We review the current state of social communication between healthcare professionals, the role of consumer social networking, and some emerging technologies to address the gaps. In particular, the review covers (1) the current state of loose social networking for continuing medical education (CME) and other broadcast information dissemination; (2) social networking for business promotion; (3) social networking for peer collaboration, including simple communication as well as more robust data-centered collaboration around patient care; and (4) engaging patients on social platforms, including integrating consumer-originated data into the mix of healthcare data. We will see how, as the nature of healthcare delivery moves from the institution-centric way of tradition to a more social and networked ambulatory pattern that we see emerging today, the nature of health IT has also moved from enterprise-centric systems to more socially networked, cloud-based options.

  16. Military Social Work: Opportunities and Challenges for Social Work Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wooten, Nikki R.

    2015-01-01

    Military social work is a specialized field of practice spanning the micro-macro continuum and requiring advanced social work knowledge and skills. The complex behavioral health problems and service needs of Iraq and Afghanistan veterans highlight the need for highly trained social work professionals who can provide militarily relevant and…

  17. Developing Interdisciplinary Skills and Professional Confidence in Palliative Care Social Work Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Supiano, Katherine P.; Berry, Patricia H.

    2013-01-01

    Research suggests that better educational preparation is necessary to assure that health care social workers have the competencies essential for high quality interdisciplinary palliative care practice. This study is a qualitative evaluation of those elements contributing to competence and confidence in interdisciplinary practice skills of second…

  18. The participative society. Why social work professionals should focus on environment rather than behaviour

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dr. S.M. Verhagen

    2009-01-01

    This text is structured as follows. Section 1 concerns the background to this public lecture: the fact that social participation is becoming increasingly important in our society. This is evident, for example, from the way we are evolving from a protective welfare state into an activational,

  19. Professional competence of social workers’: management methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Dudaryov

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available In the article the problem of social workers’ professional competence is actualized. It is proved that finding ways to optimize the specialists for social welfare system professional training is in line with common didactic problems of the high school pedagogies. The theoretical analysis of Ukrainian and foreign scientists’ works connected with the aspects of social workers’ professional competence is done. The definition of «competence» and «professional competence» is given. The main components of social workers’ professional competence are defined. These are: motivation (psychological readiness to professional activity; value and semantic (orientation, values, meanings; cognitive and professional (general culture, literacy, vocational education; action and professional (work with people at different social levels, work with information, achievement, etc.; auto­psychological (personal and professional reflection; regulatory (emotional and volitional self­regulation. The general structure and content criteria of social worker’s professional competence are under analysis. The characteristic of innovative forms and methods of social workers’ professional competence management (such as case­study, socio­psychological training is given. The causes for social workers’ successful training in high school are defined. The conclusions of the study are made and promising areas for future studies of the issues related to the subject under consideration are defined.

  20. The price of professional silence: Social work and human rights in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    If you would like more information about how to print, save, and work with PDFs, Highwire Press provides a helpful Frequently Asked Questions about PDFs. Alternatively, you can download the PDF file directly to your computer, from where it can be opened using a PDF reader. To download the PDF, click the Download link ...

  1. Practice-based research:changing the professional culture and language of social work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wade, Kathleen; Neuman, Karen

    2007-01-01

    Practice-based evaluation integrates research skills and techniques into the clinical process in order to correlate clinical interventions with treatment outcomes. Although most clinicians recognize the importance of some form of practice evaluation, barriers including lack of time, resources, expertise, and organizational support may deter such evaluation efforts. However, there are numerous advantages for clinicians and agencies to develop a culture that values and integrates practice evaluation into its daily work-life; these include opportunities for teamwork, collaboration, mentoring, and innovation. This paper defines practice evaluation research, identifies strategies for its implementation, and describes a framework for creating a "research friendly" culture. It further describes the implementation of such an innovative program in both a hospital and a mental health agency setting.

  2. Política Social e Serviço Social: os desafios da intervenção profissional Social Policy and Social Work: the challenges of professional intervention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Regina Celia Tamaso Mioto

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Este artigo discute política social e Serviço Social e os desafios que esta relação apresenta para a intervenção profissional. Enfatiza o florescimento e o aprofundamento desse debate ao longo das duas últimas décadas do século 20, e a sua consolidação no início do século 21, que se expressam através da consistente produção de conhecimento e da inserção peculiar dos órgãos representativos da categoria profissional no processo de luta pela institucionalização das políticas públicas compatíveis com os valores contidos no Código de Ética Profissional dos assistentes sociais. O enfoque maior recai sobre a questão da intervenção dos assistentes sociais, no campo da política social, ao implementar o projeto profissional, comprometido com a defesa dos direitos sociais de caráter universal. Nessa perspectiva, trata a política social como um campo contraditório, permeado por interesses e projetos societários antagônicos, no qual se reatualizam questões diretamente articuladas à especificidade e à autonomia profissional.This article discusses social policy and Social Work and the challenges that their relationship presents for professional intervention. It emphasizes the flourishing and deepening of the debate about this issue in the past two decades of the 20th century, and its consolidation in the early 21st century, which is expressed through the constant production of knowledge and the peculiar insertion of agencies that represent the professional category in the struggle for the institutionalization of public policies compatible with the values found in the Code of Professional Ethics for social workers. The strongest focus is on the issues of the intervention of social workers in the field of social policy, through implementation of the professional project, committed to defending social rights of a universal character. From this perspective, it involves social policy as a contradictory field that is permeated

  3. Frontline work and the impact of solidarity: Encounters between children and professionals under Danish preventive health and social policy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Marie Østergaard

    2013-01-01

    using professionals with different disciplinary backgrounds such as teachers, pedagogues and home nurses as the final implementers. However, we know from implementation studies that strong political intentions won’t do it alone. They need to be supported by clear policy goals to minimize bureaucratic...... problems all the way from policy design to the teacher’s desk and the home nurse’s family visit (Wildavsky 1984, Brodkin 2006). In the Danish case, a comparative policy study finds that preventive policy design causes ambivalent policy tools, regulative acts and unspecific political categories (Harrits...... distance between professionals and children sometimes, but not always, caused them to worry more. Why is it that professionals sometimes but not always resist to increase their worry for children based on social distance? I explore this variation through a focus on the professionals solidarity orientations...

  4. Team social cohesion, professionalism, and patient-centeredness: Gendered care work, with special reference to elderly care - a mixed methods study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Öhman, Ann; Keisu, Britt-Inger; Enberg, Birgit

    2017-06-02

    Healthcare organisations are facing large demands in recruiting employees with adequate competency to care for the increasing numbers of elderly. High degrees of turnover and dissatisfaction with working conditions are common. The gendered notion of care work as 'women's work', in combination with low salaries and status, may contribute to negative work experiences. There is abundant information about the negative aspects of elderly care health services, but little is known about positive aspects of this work. The study aim was to investigate work satisfaction from a gender perspective among Swedish registered nurses, physiotherapists, and occupational therapists, focusing specifically on healthcare services for the elderly. A mixed methods approach was adopted in which we combined statistics and open-ended responses from a national survey with qualitative research interviews with healthcare professionals in elderly care organisations. The survey was administered to a random sample of 1578 registered nurses, physiotherapists, and occupational therapists. Qualitative interviews with 17 professionals were conducted in six elderly care facilities. Qualitative and quantitative content analyses, chi 2 and constructivist grounded theory were used to analyse the data. There was a statistically significant difference in overall work satisfaction between those who worked in elderly care and those who did not (64 and 74,4% respectively, p Team social cohesion', 'Career development and autonomy', 'Client-centeredness', and 'Invisible and ignored power structures'. The results show the complexity of elderly care work and describe several aspects that are important for work satisfaction among health professionals. The results reveal that work satisfaction is dependent on social interrelations and cohesion in the work team, in possibilities to use humour and to have fun together, and in the ability to work as professionals to provide client-centered elderly care. Power relations

  5. Military Social Work: Opportunities and Challenges for Social Work Education

    OpenAIRE

    Wooten, Nikki R.

    2015-01-01

    Military social work is a specialized field of practice spanning the micro-macro continuum and requiring advanced social work knowledge and skills. The complex behavioral health problems and service needs of Iraq and Afghanistan veterans highlight the need for highly trained social work professionals who can provide militarily-relevant and culturally-responsive evidence-informed services. Responding to the military behavioral health workforce and service needs of recently returned veterans pr...

  6. Are rural health professionals also social entrepreneurs?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farmer, Jane; Kilpatrick, Sue

    2009-12-01

    Social entrepreneurs formally or informally generate community associations and networking that produces social outcomes. Social entrepreneurship is a relatively new and poorly understood concept. Policy promotes generating community activity, particularly in rural areas, for health and social benefits and 'community resilience'. Rural health professionals might be well placed to generate community activity due to their status and networks. This exploratory study, conducted in rural Tasmania and the Highlands and Islands of Scotland considered whether rural health professionals act as social entrepreneurs. We investigated activities generated and processes of production. Thirty-eight interviews were conducted with general practitioners, community nurses, primary healthcare managers and allied health professionals living and working rurally. Interviewees were self-selecting responders to an invitation for rural health professionals who were 'formally or informally generating community associations or networking that produced social outcomes'. We found that rural health professionals initiated many community activities with social outcomes, most related to health. Their identification of opportunities related to knowledge of health needs and examples of initiatives seen elsewhere. Health professionals described ready access to useful people and financial resources. In building activities, health professionals could simultaneously utilise skills and knowledge from professional, community member and personal dimensions. Outcomes included social and health benefits, personal 'buzz' and community capacity. Health professionals' actions could be described as social entrepreneurship: identifying opportunities, utilising resources and making 'deals'. They also align with community development. Health professionals use contextual knowledge to envisage and grow activities, indicating that, as social entrepreneurs, they do not explicitly choose a social mission, rather they

  7. Social Work Experience and Development in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sibin, Wang

    2013-01-01

    This article presents the experience and limitations of government-run social work and the nonprofessional nature of social work, and suggests that the rapid development of social work and its professionalization are the inevitable results of the reform in the system. The author maintains that under market socialism, social work requires the…

  8. Professional Socialization: A Bridge between the Explicit and Implicit Curricula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Shari E.

    2013-01-01

    Professional socialization has become a notable construct for social work with the publication of the Council on Social Work Education's (2008) revised "Educational Policy and Accreditation Standards." Though historically regarded as essential, little is known about the professional socialization of social workers. This article presents…

  9. Shaping the Future of Prevention in Social Work: An Analysis of the Professional Literature from 2000 through 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruth, Betty J.; Velásquez, Esther E.; Marshall, Jamie Wyatt; Ziperstein, Dory

    2016-01-01

    In light of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act’s goals of better patient care, cost control, and improved population outcomes, prevention is emerging as an important component of health reform. As a result, broad societal interest in prevention is growing, together with widespread interest in public health. The profession, with its extensive involvement in the health system and deep roots in public health, needs to know more about its relationship to prevention. This study builds upon the Social Work Interest in Prevention Study–which evaluated the extent, types, and levels of prevention content in nine social work journals over a six year time period from 2000–2005. The goal of the expanded study, the Social Work Interest in Prevention Study-Expansion (SWIPS-E), was to assess whether interest in prevention had increased over the full decade, which included the time period in which health care reform was enacted. PMID:25929010

  10. Does "Social Work Abstracts" Work?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holden, Gary; Barker, Kathleen; Covert-Vail, Lucinda; Rosenberg, Gary; Cohen, Stephanie A.

    2008-01-01

    Objective: The current study seeks to provide estimates of the adequacy of journal coverage in the Social Work Abstracts (SWA) database. Method: A total of 23 journals listed in the Journal Citation Reports social work category during the 1997 to 2005 period were selected for study. Issue-level coverage estimates were obtained for SWA and…

  11. In or Out When Out & About?: Identifying the Professional Support Needs of LGBT Preservice Social Work & Education Majors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palladino, John M.; Giesler, Mark A.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this phenomenological qualitative study was to explore how preservice social work and teacher education majors navigate field practicums (e.g., student teaching) as self-identified gay, lesbian, bisexual, or transgender (LGBT) individuals. In-depth interviews with 26 preservice candidates, representative of two public, comprehensive…

  12. Factors Affecting Applications to Professional Schools of Six Professions (Medicine, Dentistry, Nursing, Law, Social Work, and Public Health).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Susan; And Others

    1987-01-01

    Future demand for professional education is examined through demographic trends, enrollment trends, professional manpower demands, the role of values and attitudes, and the current responses of the professional schools to change. (MSE)

  13. Teaching and learning in social work practice placements :a study of process in professional education and training

    OpenAIRE

    Gardiner, Derek William George

    1988-01-01

    Approximately half of the time on social work training courses is devoted to practice placements in agencies, where students practise under the supervision of a qualified worker. The supervisory relationship is a key carponent in the developnent of practice skills " but it is under-researched. This study, of the teaching and learning processes in supervision, is essentially illuminative in nature and purpose. It is a qualitative study from the perspectives of superviso...

  14. "There's no place like home" a pilot study of perspectives of international health and social care professionals working in the UK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moran, Anna; Nancarrow, Susan; Butler, Allister

    2005-10-27

    Many countries are reporting health workforce shortages across a range of professions at a time of relatively high workforce mobility. Utilising the global market to supply shortage health skills is now a common recruitment strategy in many developed countries. At the same time a number of countries report a 'brain drain' resulting from professional people leaving home to work overseas. Many health and social care professionals make their way to the UK from other countries. This pilot study utilises a novel 'e-survey' approach to explore the motives, experiences and perspectives of non-UK health and social care professionals who were working or had worked in the UK. The study aims to understand the contributions of international health and social care workers to the UK and their 'home' countries. The purpose of the pilot study is also in part to test the appropriateness of this methodology for undertaking a wider study. A 24-item questionnaire with open-ended and multiple choice questions was circulated via email to 10 contacts who were from a country outside the UK, had trained outside the UK and had email access. These contacts were requested to forward the email to other contacts who met these criteria (and so on). The email was circulated over a one month pilot period to 34 contacts. Responses were from physiotherapists (n = 11), speech therapists (n = 4), social workers (n = 10), an occupational therapist (n = 1), podiatrists (n = 5), and others (n = 3). Participants were from Australia (n = 20), South Africa (n = 10), New Zealand (n = 3) and the Republic of Ireland (n = 1). Motives for relocating to the UK included travel, money and career opportunities. Participants identified a number of advantages and disadvantages of working in the UK compared to working in their home country health system. Respondents generally reported that by working in the UK, they had accumulated skills and knowledge that would allow them to contribute more to their profession and

  15. Professionally Social Using social media for professional research communication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisbeth Klarstrup

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available In this short article, I will discuss what I consider the important characteristics, opportunities and challenges offered by social media when used for professional communication purposes. The insights – or perhaps rather points of discussion - put forth here are based on my own experiences as practicing social media communicator and Danish research blogger, as well as on my general research into the use of social media for professional communication purposes, by for instance Danish politicians (see Klastrup and Svejgaard Pedersen 2005, Klastrup 2007.

  16. Professionally Social Using social media for professional research communication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisbeth Klarstrup

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available In this short article, I will discuss what I consider the important characteristics, opportunities and challenges offered by social media when used for professional communication purposes. The insights – or perhaps rather points of discussion - put forth here are based on my own experiences as practicing social media communicator and Danish research blogger, as well as on my general research into the use of social media for professional communication purposes, by for instance Danish politicians (see Klastrup and Svejgaard Pedersen 2005, Klastrup 2007.

  17. “Sacred Work”: Reflections on the Professional and Personal Impact of an Interdisciplinary Palliative Oncology Clinical Experience by Social Work Learners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alyssa A. Middleton

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available This study explored the impact of an oncology palliative care clinical experience with older adults on social work learners. A three-member research team conducted a qualitative content analysis of reflective writings. 27 Master of Science in Social Work students enrolled in an interprofessional palliative oncology curriculum and completed a reflective writing assignment to summarize the clinical scenario, analyze the patient/family care provided, and describe the impact of the experience. Using a constant comparison approach based on grounded theory, the research team analyzed the reflections to come to consensus related to the overall impact of the experience. Two overarching themes (professional and personal impact and 11 subthemes (appreciation of interdisciplinary teams, recognition of clinical skills of other disciplines, insight into clinical skills of the social worker, perception of palliative care, embracing palliative care principles, centrality of communication, importance of social support, family as the unit of care, countertransference, conflict between personal values and patient/family values, and emotional reactions were identified. Experiential learning opportunities for social work learners in interprofessional palliative care build appreciation for and skills in applying palliative care principles including teamwork, symptom control, and advanced care planning along with a commitment to embrace these principles in future practice.

  18. Professional Norms and Categorization Practices among Danish Social Workers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Marie Østergaard

    2012-01-01

    social workers’ professional norms as they have been identified in 24 in-depth interviews with Danish social workers. Based on Emile Durkheim’s concepts of Professional Ethics and solidarity I interpret expressions about what drive social workers in their work with unemployed and/or disabled social...

  19. How Competent Are Healthcare Professionals in Working According to a Bio-Psycho-Social Model in Healthcare? The Current Status and Validation of a Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van de Velde, Dominique; Eijkelkamp, Ank; Peersman, Wim; De Vriendt, Patricia

    2016-01-01

    Over the past decades, there has been a paradigm shift from a purely biomedical towards a bio-psycho-social (BPS) conception of disability and illness, which has led to a change in contemporary healthcare. However, there seems to be a gap between the rhetoric and reality of working within a BPS model. It is not clear whether healthcare professionals show the necessary skills and competencies to act according to the BPS model. The aim of this study was (1) to develop a scale to monitor the BPS competencies of healthcare professionals, (2) to define its factor-structure, (3) to check internal consistency, (4) test-retest reliability and (5) feasibility. Item derivation for the BPS scale was based on qualitative research with seven multidisciplinary focus groups (n = 58) of both patients and professionals. In a cross-sectional study design, 368 healthcare professionals completed the BPS scale through a digital platform. An exploratory factor analysis was performed to determine underlying dimensions. Statistical coherence was expressed in item-total correlations and in Cronbach's α coefficient. An intra-class-correlation coefficient was used to rate the test-retest reliability. The qualitative study revealed 45 items. The exploratory factor analysis showed five underlying dimensions labelled as: (1) networking, (2) using the expertise of the client, (3) assessment and reporting, (4) professional knowledge and skills and (5) using the environment. The results show a good to strong homogeneity (item-total ranged from 0.59 to 0.79) and a strong internal consistency (Cronbach's α ranged from 0.75 to 0.82). ICC ranged between 0.82 and 0.93. The BPS scale appeared to be a valid and reliable measure to rate the BPS competencies of the healthcare professionals and offers opportunities for an improvement in the healthcare delivery. Further research is necessary to test the construct validity and to detect whether the scale is responsive and able to detect changes over time.

  20. Professional relationships and power dynamics between urban community-based nurses and social work case managers: advocacy in action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Staci

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore how community-based case managers interface with their clients' healthcare providers and other community organizations as a function within their advocacy efforts. Case managers previously defined advocacy as occurring at individual, organizational, and community levels. The relationships they attempt to develop and maintain are consistent with case management ideology, yet this is a complex process to ensure care for vulnerable populations with many medical and socioeconomic needs. Community-based case management settings. In-depth qualitative interviews with a total of 20 nurse and social work case managers working in public housing, university-affiliated community nursing centers, local parishes, and community ministry. The case managers in this study reflected on how they interface with their clients, other healthcare providers, and community organizations on behalf of their clients. They reflect on the importance of trust and communication to facilitate this process. The advocacy work of case managers is influenced by the setting, others' perceptions of their knowledge and expertise, and power dynamics. Their ability to effectively advocate is greatly influenced by the strength of the relationships they forge. Advocacy for vulnerable clients is influenced by the existing relationship between case managers and their clients' healthcare providers. Case managers need to be persistent in their interactions with other providers to ensure that their clients have access to valuable community resources. Clear lines of communication should be established between case managers so that there is clarity around roles and expectations in service provision. Case managers should also participate in the mentoring of future health professions students so they may learn the application of advocacy work in community settings.

  1. Secondary Professional Socialization through Professional Organizations: An Exploratory Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, K. Andrew; Eberline, Andrew D.; Templin, Thomas J.

    2016-01-01

    Secondary professional socialization is a phase of occupational socialization theory that focuses on graduate education in preparation for a career in academia. Due to the need to present and publish research and make professional contacts, professional organizations likely serve an important socializing function during graduate education. The…

  2. The Professionalization of Iranian hospital social Workers

    Science.gov (United States)

    KHALVATI, MALIHEH; FEKRAZAD, HOSSEIN; RAFATJAH, MARYAM; OSTADHASHEMI, LEILA; KHANKEH, HAMID REZA

    2018-01-01

    Introduction: Identity is formed through our understanding of ourselves and what others perceive of our actions and how we do things. Formation of professional identity includes development, advancement and socialization through social learning of specific knowledge and skills obtained within the context of professional roles, new attitudes and values. Methods: This qualitative study used content analysis approach to explain the professionalization process of 22 social workers working in 14 public hospitals in Tehran based on their experiences. The data were collected through semi-structured interviews, observation and writing in the field. Results: Eleven categories and three themes of entry into the profession, identity formation, and identity ownership were extracted out of data analysis. Revealing the process, barriers and facilitators of professionalization of hospital social workers was the results of this study. Conclusion: Certain individual characteristics were factors for the tendency of participants to choose this profession. The participants' understanding of their profession was formed, when studying in the university through learning relevant knowledge, skills, views and professional expectations. Achieving a single identity and professional pride and self-esteem are achievements of identity ownership. PMID:29344524

  3. SOCIO-PROFESSIONAL ASPECTS OF WORK BALANCE SYSTEM APPROACH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZUBENSCHI Mariana

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationsbetween professional demands and psychosocial factors related to the professional activity, environment and professional culture, as well as conditions and factors of human wellbeing and health, among doctors, teachers and social workers, in a sample of 288 Moldovan professionals. The short version of Copenhagen Psychosocial Questionnaire (COPSOQ were used for data collection. This questionnaire was used to establish the professional psychosocial factors that evaluate working conditions, health and wellbeing in the workplaces of these three professional sphere. As hypothesized, the Pearson correlations revealed that emotional demands, demands for responsibility at work, influence at work, degree of freedom at work, meaning of work, commit¬ment to the workplace, wellbeing and health were positive predictors of psychologi¬cal factors related to the professional activity in Moldova.

  4. Specialists of social work as key subjects in the field of social work

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. V. Oresheta

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available In the presented article an author is analyze social work as type of professional activity and is carried out the sociological analysis of specialists of social work as key subjects in the field of social work. As social work is important direction of activity in any state, it methodological bases, key tasks and main principles though are something alike, however differ depending on legal, organizational, financial possibilities of the state and necessities of clients. Specialists of social work provide realization of social work on national, regional and local levels on enterprises, in establishments, organizations of different pattern of ownership. Professional activity of specialists of social work in Ukraine must correspond the basic requirements and tasks, to certain in Order of Ministry of social policy of Ukraine from 25.05.2012 year «About assertion of new release of qualifying description of profession «Specialist on social work»». In the article is also analyses the short history and features of social work as the type of professional activity in Ukraine, professional requirements to the specialists of social work, their task, role and function are specified. It is set that a necessary condition for a capture this profession is social orientation of personality, presence of the proper social qualities, such as: humanism, goodwill, justice, to responsibility and others. One of entrance terms of efficiency of social work is the presence of skilled shots of the proper level. A considerable value for successful professionalism has an orientation of specialist of social work which plugs the system of values and motivation of him to activity. For a social worker as the professional an important place is occupied by the awareness of itself by the subject of professional activity, that is professional identity.

  5. Social Work and Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gehlert, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    Interest has grown in the past few years about the place of social work in science. Questions remain, such as whether social work should be considered a science, and if so, where it fits into the constellation of sciences. This article attempts to shed light on these questions. After briefly considering past and present constructions of science…

  6. Existential Social Work

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donald F. Krill

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The existential impact upon social work began in the 1960’s with the emphasis upon freedom, responsibility and a sense of the absurd. It affirmed human potential while faulting the deterministic thinking that was popular with psychological theorists at that time. It was open to the prospects of spirituality, but was less than optimistic concerning great progress among social institutions. It was a forerunner to the strengths-based social work programs of our present day.

  7. Social Workers as Civic-Minded Professionals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah E. Twill

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This study examined civic-mindedness among a sample of social work educators, community practitioners and new graduates. Using a web-based survey, researchers administered Hatcher’s (2008 Civic-Minded Professional scale. Results indicated that traditional and field faculty were more civic-minded than new graduates and other practitioners. Social work educators who focused on raising civic awareness in courses were more civic-minded than colleagues. New graduates who had participated in club service events were more civic-minded; however, there was no significant differences between groups based on number of community service courses completed. Social workers, whether faculty or not, who had participated in collaborative research were more civic-minded. The authors conclude that how social workers view their commitment to civic engagement has implications. Social workers need to be vigilant in our commitment to well-being in society. Intentional practices could be implemented to strengthen the partnership among groups.

  8. How Competent Are Healthcare Professionals in Working According to a Bio-Psycho-Social Model in Healthcare? The Current Status and Validation of a Scale.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dominique Van de Velde

    Full Text Available Over the past decades, there has been a paradigm shift from a purely biomedical towards a bio-psycho-social (BPS conception of disability and illness, which has led to a change in contemporary healthcare. However, there seems to be a gap between the rhetoric and reality of working within a BPS model. It is not clear whether healthcare professionals show the necessary skills and competencies to act according to the BPS model.The aim of this study was (1 to develop a scale to monitor the BPS competencies of healthcare professionals, (2 to define its factor-structure, (3 to check internal consistency, (4 test-retest reliability and (5 feasibility.Item derivation for the BPS scale was based on qualitative research with seven multidisciplinary focus groups (n = 58 of both patients and professionals. In a cross-sectional study design, 368 healthcare professionals completed the BPS scale through a digital platform. An exploratory factor analysis was performed to determine underlying dimensions. Statistical coherence was expressed in item-total correlations and in Cronbach's α coefficient. An intra-class-correlation coefficient was used to rate the test-retest reliability.The qualitative study revealed 45 items. The exploratory factor analysis showed five underlying dimensions labelled as: (1 networking, (2 using the expertise of the client, (3 assessment and reporting, (4 professional knowledge and skills and (5 using the environment. The results show a good to strong homogeneity (item-total ranged from 0.59 to 0.79 and a strong internal consistency (Cronbach's α ranged from 0.75 to 0.82. ICC ranged between 0.82 and 0.93.The BPS scale appeared to be a valid and reliable measure to rate the BPS competencies of the healthcare professionals and offers opportunities for an improvement in the healthcare delivery. Further research is necessary to test the construct validity and to detect whether the scale is responsive and able to detect changes over time.

  9. (Destabilizing Self-Identities in Professional Work

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anders Buch

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available It is characteristic of much professional work that it is performed in ambiguous contexts. Thus, uncertainty, unpredictability, indeterminacy, and recurrent organizational transformations are an integral part of modern work for, e.g., engineers, lawyers, business consultants, and other professionals. Although key performance indicators and other knowledge management systems are used to set standards of excellence for professionals, the character of professional work is still flexible, open to interpretation and heterarchical. The very successfulness (or unsuccessfulness of the work is established in a complex work context where various goals, interests, and perspectives are mediated, altered, contested, mangled, and negotiated in a process of sense-making. The work context is heterogeneously populated by various actors (e.g., the customer, the manager, the colleagues and actants (e.g., quality systems and technical equipment that give “voice” to (conflicting interpretations of what constitutes successful work. Thus, the professionals must navigate in a very complex environment where the locus of governance is far from stable. These characteristics of professional work seem to have implications for the way professionals make sense of their work and their own identities. The identity work of professionals is interwoven with their professional training and career background. With an academic training and a professional career, the individual typically identifies with the profession’s values and adopts a certain way of seeing and approaching the world. This professional outlook typically will constitute the basis of the individual’s appraisal of the work and lay out a horizon of expectations in relation to fulfillment, self-realization, and job satisfaction. In this way, the construction of self-identity becomes the yardstick for the individual’s sense-making and, a fortiori, for the individual’s sense of meaningful work. In this paper

  10. Social Work Research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Social work research has gathered a greater transparency and clarity of identity in North American and parts of Europe. Furthermore, the rapid emergence of social work research in other European countries, China, India, Japan and elsewhere in Asia and Pacific Rim countries, and gradually in South...... America, has created a need for a collection that can contribute to both shaping and making accessible key and sometimes hard-to-access sources. This four-volume collection answers this need, bringing together key literature in a single resource and structuring it into thematic volumes to enable clear...... understanding of the different aspects involved in the research. Volume One: Historical Trajectories, Purposes and Key Concepts Volume Two: Key Decisions about Research Strategy Volume Three: The Practice of Social Work Research Volume Four: The Contexts of Social Work Research...

  11. Associations between Emotional Exhaustion, Social Capital, Workload, and Latitude in Decision-Making among Professionals Working with People with Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowalski, Christoph; Driller, Elke; Ernstmann, Nicole; Alich, Saskia; Karbach, Ute; Ommen, Oliver; Schulz-Nieswandt, Frank; Pfaff, Holger

    2010-01-01

    Background: Many people working in human services in Western countries suffer from burnout, characterized by emotional exhaustion, depersonalization, and decreased personal performance. Prevention of emotional exhaustion (the first phase of burnout) constitutes a great challenge because emotional exhaustion may cause increasing turnover rates in…

  12. Unnoticed Professional Competence in Day Care Work

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annegrethe Ahrenkiel

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available This article presents a double perspective on social educators’ professional competence: It discusses how everyday life in day care centres (preschools is dependent on professional competences that can be conceived as “unnoticed.” These aspects of professional competence are embedded in routines, experiences and embodied forms of knowledge. However, it may be discussed whether these competences are under pressure from increased demands for documentation, standardization and evaluation of children’s learning outcomes. The article will briefly outline this development in the day care sector, followed by a discussion of unnoticed professional competence and the related notion of gestural knowledge. The double perspective on social educators’ professional competences will be illuminated by empirical examples from a research project involving social educators from two day care centres in Denmark.

  13. Unnoticed Professional Competence in Day Care Work

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahrenkiel, Annegrethe; Schmidt, Camilla; Nielsen, Birger Steen

    2013-01-01

    This article presents a double perspective on social educators’ professional competence: It discusses how everyday life in day care centres (preschools) is dependent on professional competences that can be conceived as “unnoticed.” These aspects of professional competence are embedded in routines......, experiences and embodied forms of knowledge. However, it may be discussed whether these competences are under pressure from increased demands for documentation, standardization and evaluation of children’s learning outcomes. The article will briefly outline this development in the day care sector, followed...... by a discussion of unnoticed professional competence and the related notion of gestural knowledge. The double perspective on social educators’ professional competences will be illuminated by empirical examples from a research project involving social educators from two day care centres in Denmark....

  14. The Relationship of Social Pedagogy and Social Work

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blahoslav Kraus

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The article analyses the development of the relationship between social work and social pedagogy at the end of the 20th century in the Czech Republic and compares this relationship to the one in neighbouring countries (Germany, England, France, Switzerland, Denmark, Sweden, Finland, Poland, Slovakia, Russia, Lithuania. The article further deals with various concepts of this relationship (including identification, differentiation, and convergent principle. It also compares the paradigms of social pedagogy and social work (autonomy, similarities and differences mainly in epistemological terms. Series of paradigms appear in both social work and social pedagogy during their development. A prevailing tendency towards the multi-paradigmatism can be seen. Furthermore, the article discusses the differences in professional aspirations within both fields and the number of job opportunities for the fields graduates. A conclusion of the article is dedicated to the professional career within social pedagogy and social work regarding the real life situation in both fields.

  15. Toward Transgender Affirmative Social Work Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Austin, Ashley; Craig, Shelley L.; McInroy, Lauren B.

    2016-01-01

    Social work has professional and academic standards consistent with transgender affirmative education and practice. Nevertheless, a growing body of research suggests that transgender issues are largely absent from social work education, resulting in practitioners who are uninformed or biased against transgender issues. The present study expands…

  16. Current Issues in Social Work Doctoral Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman, Harriet

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of doctoral programs in social work is to prepare research-scientists who contribute to knowledge that guides professional practice and educators competent to teach new cohorts of social work practitioners. In grooming stewards of the profession, doctoral programs also must prepare their graduates to support the larger contemporary…

  17. Teacher Professionalization in the Age of Social Networking Sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimmons, Royce; Veletsianos, George

    2015-01-01

    As teacher education students become professionals, they face a number of tensions related to identity, social participation, and work-life balance, which may be further complicated by social networking sites (SNS). This qualitative study sought to articulate tensions that arose between professionalization influences and teacher education student…

  18. Social Work Education in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skytte, Marianne

    2005-01-01

    The development of the social work education and the education for social educators in Denmark. The undergraduate programs and the possibilities for further study within social work in Denmark.......The development of the social work education and the education for social educators in Denmark. The undergraduate programs and the possibilities for further study within social work in Denmark....

  19. Significant Issues in Rebuilding the Social Work Profession in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shu, Cai

    2013-01-01

    The author traces the origin of social work to the Confucian concept of Great Unity and social organization of traditional Chinese society. While professional social work started in 1921, its development was interrupted in 1952, but the practice of social work never stopped. Social work was revived as a discipline and profession in 1979 and has…

  20. Models of inter professional working for older people living at home: a survey and review of the local strategies of english health and social care statutory organisations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goodman Claire

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Most services provided by health and social care organisations for older people living at home rely on interprofessional working (IPW. Although there is research investigating what supports and inhibits how professionals work together, less is known about how different service models deliver care to older people and how effectiveness is measured. The aim of this study was to describe how IPW for older people living at home is delivered, enacted and evaluated in England. Method An online survey of health and social care managers across England directly involved in providing services to older people, and a review of local strategies for older people services produced by primary care organisations and local government adult services organisations in England. Results The online survey achieved a 31% response rate and search strategies identified 50 local strategies that addressed IPW for older people living at home across health and social care organisations. IPW definitions varied, but there was an internal consistency of language informed by budgeting and organisation specific definitions of IPW. Community Services for Older People, Intermediate Care and Re-enablement (rehabilitation Teams were the services most frequently identified as involving IPW. Other IPW services identified were problem or disease specific and reflected issues highlighted in local strategies. There was limited agreement about what interventions or strategies supported the process of IPW. Older people and their carers were not reported to be involved in the evaluation of the services they received and it was unclear how organisations and managers judged the effectiveness of IPW, particularly for services that had an open-ended commitment to the care of older people. Conclusion Health and social care organisations and their managers recognise the value and importance of IPW. There is a theoretical literature on what supports IPW and what it can achieve

  1. Models of inter professional working for older people living at home: a survey and review of the local strategies of English health and social care statutory organisations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman, Claire; Drennan, Vari; Scheibl, Fiona; Shah, Dhrushita; Manthorpe, Jill; Gage, Heather; Iliffe, Steve

    2011-12-14

    Most services provided by health and social care organisations for older people living at home rely on interprofessional working (IPW). Although there is research investigating what supports and inhibits how professionals work together, less is known about how different service models deliver care to older people and how effectiveness is measured. The aim of this study was to describe how IPW for older people living at home is delivered, enacted and evaluated in England. An online survey of health and social care managers across England directly involved in providing services to older people, and a review of local strategies for older people services produced by primary care organisations and local government adult services organisations in England. The online survey achieved a 31% response rate and search strategies identified 50 local strategies that addressed IPW for older people living at home across health and social care organisations. IPW definitions varied, but there was an internal consistency of language informed by budgeting and organisation specific definitions of IPW. Community Services for Older People, Intermediate Care and Re-enablement (rehabilitation) Teams were the services most frequently identified as involving IPW. Other IPW services identified were problem or disease specific and reflected issues highlighted in local strategies. There was limited agreement about what interventions or strategies supported the process of IPW. Older people and their carers were not reported to be involved in the evaluation of the services they received and it was unclear how organisations and managers judged the effectiveness of IPW, particularly for services that had an open-ended commitment to the care of older people. Health and social care organisations and their managers recognise the value and importance of IPW. There is a theoretical literature on what supports IPW and what it can achieve. The need for precision may not be so necessary for the terms used

  2. Youth work as Social work

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Torben Bechmann

    2009-01-01

    Antologi, som indgår i serien Wiiliam Thompson - Serie for studier af sociale indsatser og international social politik. Nærværende bidrag (kapitel 6) omhandler forholdet mellem dansk ungdomsrådgivning, ungdomsbestemmelsen og hvordan et fænomen som ensomhed kan forstås herindenfor. Kapitlet...... omhandler dansk social arbejde generelt, men særligt med vægt på en diskussion af ungdomsbegrebet, den stadigt mere populære opdeling mellem frivilligt og professionelt socialt arbejde samt "professionaliseringen" af hverdagslivets socialiet. Mange af bidragene fra antologien kan ses som indgående i en...... bredere international diskussion om sociale rettigheder som demokratiske rettigheder....

  3. Advancing Work Practices Through Online Professional Development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Noesgaard, Signe Schack

    was not effective and subsequently terminate change that could have advanced their practices. This underlines the need to think beyond the course format to make online professional development interventions continuous, committing, and contextual. The research suggests rethinking online professional development...... as adaptive “just-in-time” technologies and proposes a design theory called “situated online professional development,” entailing six design principles for advancing work practices....

  4. A Challenge to the Social Work Profession? The Rise of Socially Engaged Art and a Call to Radical Social Work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hee Chul

    2017-10-01

    In this era of neoliberalism, social work in the United States is arguably overly professionalized and privatized, and has almost lost its activists roots in working for social justice. Radical social work rooted in macro-level community-based practice has been in crisis over the past three decades. The rise of socially engaged art has become more prominent in the United States even as social work has strayed away from its basic tenets such as community practice, advocacy, and social action. How should the social work profession interpret the rise of socially engaged art-already a trend in the art world-whose modality and purpose resembles radical social work? By comparing and contrasting the similarities and differences between radical social work and socially engaged art, this article examines the possibility of consilience between the two and the implications for the social work profession. © 2017 National Association of Social Workers.

  5. Empathy in Social Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eriksson, Karl; Englander, Magnus

    2017-01-01

    A dominant conceptualization of empathy in social work practice and education, provided by Karen Gerdes and Elizabeth Segal, relies heavily on the simulation theory adopted directly from the cognitive neurosciences. The aim was to critically challenge such a view by reporting on some recent empirical findings from the field in which professional…

  6. Social PR study 2015: a study of social media use among PR professionals

    OpenAIRE

    Pole, K.; Cision UK

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to explore and understand how social media impacts PR professionals and their media relationships. It compares the results with research from the published Social Journalism Study 2015 and notes that PR professionals and journalists are largely in agreement about how social media is changing their work environment.

  7. Social strategies that work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piskorski, Mikołaj Jan

    2011-11-01

    Although most companies have collected lots of friends and followers on social platforms such as Facebook, few have succeeded in generating profits there. That's because they merely port their digital strategies into social environments by broadcasting their commercial messages or seeking customer feedback. To succeed on social platforms, says Harvard Business School's Piskorski, businesses need to devise social strategies that are consistent with users' expectations and behavior in these venues--namely, people want to connect with other people, not with companies. The author defines successful social strategies as those that reduce costs or increase customers' willingness to pay by helping people establish or strengthen relationships through doing free work on a company's behalf. Citing successes at Zynga, eBay, American Express, and Yelp, Piskorski shows that social strategies can generate profits by helping people connect in exchange for tasks that benefit the company such as customer acquisition, marketing, and content creation. He lays out a systematic way to build a social strategy and shows how a major credit card company he advised used the method to roll out its own strategy.

  8. Inter-professional cooperation as collective ethics work: A contribution to inter-professional ethics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    dr Ed de Jonge

    2016-01-01

    Thesis: Ethics work (Banks 2012, 2016) is a stimulating concept for the ethical improvement of inter-professional cooperation. Outline: Starting point: ideal-typical professionalism Introduction to ethics work Professionalism requires inter-professional cooperation Inter-professional expansion

  9. Transnational Social Workers: Making the Profession a Transnational Professional Space

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allen Bartley

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper draws on research conducted in New Zealand from 2009 to 2011 with overseas-qualified social workers as members of a global profession experiencing both great international demand for their skills and unparalleled flows of professional transnationalism. In line with the international social work literature, this cohort of migrant professionals offers a range of needed skill and expertise as well as unique challenges to local employers, client communities, and the social work profession as a whole. With a specific focus on mixed-methods data dealing with participants' induction experiences and engagement with professional bodies, this paper argues that migrant social workers have created in New Zealand a transnational professional space that demands a response from local social work stakeholders.

  10. Professions in Organizations, Professional Work in Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanderstraeten, Raf

    2007-01-01

    Professions are occupational arrangements for dealing with human problems. Professional "people work" requires a certain interactive closeness; face-to-face communication is prominent in professional-client relations. This also seems the case in the educational system. But in education, organization provides the "raison d'etre" of this profession.…

  11. Consumer and professional standards: working towards consensus

    OpenAIRE

    Williamson, C.

    2000-01-01

    Standards of treatment and care should be acceptable to healthcare consumers as well as to healthcare professionals. A simple categorisation of standards according to their acceptability to consumers is outlined. Professional/consumer groups which review and set standards are discussed, with emphasis on the principles of partnership. Working together towards consensus can be difficult but is now an important way forward.

  12. Effective Social Work Practice in Lagos: An Emerging Megacity ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Social work is the profession through which social services in theconglomerate of social welfare are provided by professionally trainedpersons. The practice of social work has three perspectives namely: residual, which is ad hoc or reactive, and largely practiced before advent of modern social work profession; institutional ...

  13. Boundaries of Professionalization at Work

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Flensborg Jensen, Maya Christiane

    work in the west tend to privilege some workers (i.e., white, white-collar, heterosexual males) and marginalize others, especially female workers who perform “dirty”, private household services for the aging or disabled, such as home care workers. Following these studies I take a critical stance...

  14. Making connections between practitioner's personal use of social media and social work practice

    OpenAIRE

    Simpson, Jenny

    2014-01-01

    The paper will discuss if there is any link between social work practitioner’s personal use of social media and their practice with service users. Integral to the discussion will be social work ethics and values, issues of confidentiality, professionalism and how service users are making use of social media.\\ud \\ud The emergence of policy guidelines in relation to social media by social work employers and national professional bodies such as the British Association of Social Workers (BASW) hi...

  15. The Evolution of Doctoral Social Work Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurzman, Paul A.

    2015-01-01

    Doctoral education in social work is evolving as a major enterprise in American higher education, with more than 80 programs now in place. Committed to providing stewards of the profession, these PhD and DSW programs also are a major impetus for research and are the primary faculty pipeline for the 735 CSWE-accredited professional social work…

  16. Social Media for Professional Development and Networking Opportunities in Academia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donelan, Helen

    2016-01-01

    The research reported on in this article explores the use of social media for work-related or professional purposes. In particular, it focuses on the perceptions and use of social media by academics in the UK. The purpose of the research was to explore the potential social media has to facilitate the changing landscape of higher education and…

  17. Medical social work positions: BSW or MSW?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, Doris M; Toh, JoAnne S

    2017-04-01

    Acute care social work positions face budgetary scrutiny in the current climate of fiscal restraint in Canadian health care. Managers may be faced with the question of whether a new or vacant medical social work position should be filled by a BSW social worker or an MSW social worker. This question is further complicated when experienced and less costly BSW social workers are available while MSW social workers with medical or hospital experience may be limited in supply. This paper reviews the literature relevant to medical social work practice and hiring. A small scale survey was conducted with inter-professional managers responsible for the hiring of medical social workers. The purpose of this research was to examine the current hiring practices and considerations for hospital medical social workers.

  18. Professional use of social media by pharmacists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barry, Arden R; Pearson, Glen J

    2015-01-01

    A recent trend among health care professionals is the use of social media for professional purposes. These rapidly expanding media allow for timely and efficient access to health information, but they also carry the potential for increased liability. There is a paucity of research detailing how health care professionals, specifically pharmacists, use social media. To characterize the use of social media by pharmacists in the Canadian province of Alberta and to identify independent determinants of and perceived barriers to using social media for professional purposes. Data for this mixed-methods study were collected by an online survey in March and April 2014. Alberta pharmacists were invited to participate via e-mail distributed by 2 professional organizations. The survey had 273 respondents. Of these, 226 (82.8%) stated that they had a social media account for either personal or professional purposes, and 138 (61.1%) of these reported using social media for professional purposes, although most respondents used social media predominantly for personal reasons. The most commonly reported social media applications were Facebook and Twitter, accessed primarily via smartphones. Of the 273 respondents, 206 (75.5%) had a Facebook account, and 101 (49.0%) of these used Facebook to some extent for professional purposes. Twitter users (104 [38.1%] of respondents) had a higher rate of professional utilization (57/104 [54.8%]). The most commonly identified barrier to using social media for professional purposes was concern over liability. Positive predictors of use of social media for professional purposes included younger age and fewer years of professional experience. Participants perceived the most beneficial aspect of social media (in professional terms) as connecting with pharmacist colleagues. More than 80% of pharmacists in Alberta reported that they had a social media account, and over half of them reported using their accounts for professional purposes. Although

  19. Peculiarities of Future Social Sphere Specialists’ Professional Training in Poland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zieba Beata

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The article reviews certain aspects of organising the process of professional training of future specialists in social sphere. It identifies, considers and analyzes the main definitions of scientific research, the object of which is to make specialists in social sphere ready for professional activity. The article highlights peculiarities of forming professionally significant personal qualities of social workers as well as their mature, objective system of values. The practical training with a focus on having the ability to apply effective creative approaches in solving social problems is identified as an important component of the comprehensive process of professional training of future specialists in social and pedagogical work. It emphasises the importance of the use of effective innovation in social and socio-educational institutions. It analyzes the problem of organizing student teaching, which includes ignoring the use of active forms and methods in the learning process, a lack of skills of professional activity. The article reveals potential opportunities for the practical activity which is most closely approximate to real professional situations as an opportunity to form a positive attitude towards oneself as a subject of the chosen professional activity and the formation of students as professionals. It forms the principles of future social sphere specialists’ training. The article also highlights the need to direct the educational process towards formation of an individual creative approach and establishment of partnerships between education and social institutions.

  20. Dialogical communication and empowering social work practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natland, Sidsel

    2015-01-01

    How to succeed in facilitating for empowering processes within social work practice is a central topic in both theoretical discussions and regarding its principles in practice. With a particular focus on how dialogical communication can play a part in order to practice empowering social work, through this text the author frames HUSK as a project facilitating the underpinning humanistic approaches in social work. Dialogical communication and its philosophical base is presented and recognized as a means to achieve empowering social work as well as highlighting the importance of the humanistic approach. The author also underscores how HUSK projects in themselves were enabled because of the required collaboration between service users, professionals, and researchers that signified HUSK. This is pinpointed as having potential for a future research agenda as well as pointing at how the outcomes of the projects may impact future social work practice when the goal is to conduct empowering social work.

  1. Professionalism in Meeting Social Assistance: Interventions Adopted ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aim of this article is to explore the organisational professionalism that will result in the provision of service quality in meeting social assistance at the. South African Social Security Agency. It is postulated that service quality and professionalism are inversely related. The article explores a conceptual defi nition of ...

  2. Embodying Social Work as a Profession

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maura B. Nsonwu

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this research is to highlight competing and contrasting definitions of social work that have been the subject of continuous ideological debate. These opposing interpretations have characterized public and professional discourse. It is the growth of, and struggle over, these conflicting versions of social work that we trace by exploring and expanding on the work of African American and White social work pioneers, feminist and empowerment epistemologies, and implications for social work practice and pedagogy. Our discussion emphasizes the construction of meaning through personal experiences by reuniting the head, hands, heart, and soul of our profession. We offer a reconstructed framework that echoes the groundbreaking work of our historical pioneers and collectively weaves their wisdom into contemporary social work practice.

  3. Professional behaviors, sense of belonging, and professional socialization of early career clinical laboratory scientists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schill, Janna Marie

    Professional socialization is a process that individuals experience as members of a profession and consists of the knowledge, attitudes, and experiences that influence and shape their professional identity. The process of professional socialization has not been studied in the clinical laboratory science profession. Clinical laboratory science is an allied health profession that is faced by a workforce shortage that has been caused by a decrease in new graduates, decreased retention of qualified professionals, and increased retirements. Other allied health professions such as nursing, athletic training, and pharmacy have studied professional socialization as a way to identify factors that may influence the retention of early career professionals. This mixed method study, which quantitatively used Hall's Professionalism Scale (1968) in addition to qualitative focus group interviews, sought to identify the professional attitudes and behaviors, sense of belonging, and professional socialization of early career clinical laboratory scientists. Early career clinical laboratory scientists were divided into two groups based upon the amount of work experience they had; new clinical laboratory science graduates have had less than one year of work experience and novice clinical laboratory scientists had between one and three years of work experience. This study found that early career clinical laboratory scientists have established professional identities and view themselves as members of the clinical laboratory science field within four proposed stages of professional socialization consisting of pre-arrival, encounter, adaptation, and commitment. New CLS graduates and novice clinical laboratory scientists were found to be at different stages of the professional stage process. New CLS graduates, who had less than one year of work experience, were found to be in the encounter stage. Novice clinical laboratory scientists, with one to three years of work experience, were found to

  4. Transformations of Professional Work in Psychiatric Health Care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dybbroe, Betina

    In psychiatry in Denmark health and social care is being replaced by diagnostic categorisations and a more consumerized relation between the health professionals and patients as self- responsible citizens. Increasing medicalization and New Public Management reforms and standardization for cost......- effectiveness intertwine with a neo-liberal health policy of a “user- focus and user involvement”,that transforms psychiatric practice. Through the micro-sociological study of professionals working with patients in psychiatry, it is illuminated how patients/clients are objectified and left to care...... for themselves, and how professionalism is transformed into manualisation of practice, and test technologies replace meeting “significant others”....

  5. What Works in Education and Social Welfare?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krejsler, John B.

    2013-01-01

    Drawing on Foucauldian genealogy, the article maps major sources and trajectories of the evidence discourse. This enables scrutiny of the current struggle about evidence for What Works in education and social welfare. Evidence discourse is identified as emerging from the medical field as a bottom......-up professional strategy. It is subsequently reworked and launched into education and social welfare in moves that largely bypass professionals to serve policy-maker and market needs to enable evidence-based choices among public services. From this perspective, the author argues that education and social welfare...

  6. What works in education and social welfare?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krejsler, John B.

    2011-01-01

    Drawing on Foucauldian genealogy, the article maps major sources and trajectories of the evidence discourse. This enables scrutiny of the current struggle about evidence for What Works in education and social welfare. Evidence discourse is identified as emerging from the medical field as a bottom......-up professional strategy. It is subsequently reworked and launched into education and social welfare in moves that largely bypass professionals to serve policy-maker and market needs to enable evidence-based choices among public services. From this perspective, the author argues that education and social welfare...

  7. Student writing in social work education

    OpenAIRE

    Rai, Lucy

    2008-01-01

    This thesis explores the experiences of a group of social work students undertaking assessed academic writing as part of their professional training through distance learning in the UK in 2001. Drawing upon the concept of 'academic literacies' and informed by a psychosocial approach, this thesis explores the nature of students' writing within the context of the experiences of students and tutors.\\ud \\ud Writing in social work requires students to include reflections on personal experience and...

  8. Everyday practice and unnoticed professional competence in day care work

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahrenkiel, Annegrethe; Warring, Niels; Nielsen, Birger Steen

    In Denmark more than 9 out 10 children attend day care centers that are publicly funded and regulated. The main part of employees, the social educators, at day care centers have attended a 3½ years educational programme with both theoretical and practical elements. Nevertheless it has been hard...... different forms of knowledge function together in the social educators’ work practice....... for the social educators to get recognition for their professional competencies and the societal importance of their work. Neoliberal governance has imposed a lot of demands for documentation, evaluation etc., and a growing focus on children’s learning in day care centers has resulted in national goals...

  9. Riding Third: Social Work in Ambulance Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Hilary; Rasmussen, Brian

    2012-01-01

    This research explored the possible role of social work alongside emergency ambulance services. An ethnographic study included semistructured interviews and direct observations collected over 300 hours while riding in ambulances in an urban setting. The data suggest that social work could play a role by providing needed psychosocial care during…

  10. Social Work Learning Spaces: The Social Work Studio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zufferey, Carole; King, Sue

    2016-01-01

    This paper explores the contribution of a physical learning space to student engagement in social work education. Drawing on a constructivist methodology, this paper examines the findings of a survey conducted with students and staff in a social work and human service programme about their experiences of a Social Work Studio learning space. The…

  11. Social media for professional development and networking opportunities in academia

    OpenAIRE

    Donelan, Helen

    2016-01-01

    The research reported on in this article explores the use of social media for work-related or professional purposes. In particular, it focuses on the perceptions and use of social media by academics in the UK. The purpose of the research was to explore the potential social media has to facilitate the changing landscape of higher education and support the individual academic in their role. Of particular interest is how specific social media tools are being used to enhance networking opportunit...

  12. Social Networking Strategies for Professionals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breeding, Marshall

    2009-01-01

    Library professionals have always engaged with associations and communities to share experiences and information. Going back through the earliest times of the profession, librarians have interacted through conference meetings, professional publications, and a variety of other venues. These in-person and print-based interactions continue as…

  13. Teachers as a Social and Professional Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zasypkin, V. P.; Zborowski, G. E.; Shuklina, E. A.

    2015-01-01

    The article looks at teachers as a social and professional community, discussing their social and demographic characteristics and social well-being. These factors are used to gauge the quality of life, their attitude toward their careers and other activities, and use of free time. Two clusters of teachers that express positive and negative social…

  14. Individual features, working conditions and work injuries are associated with work ability among nursing professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Frida Marina; Martinez, Maria Carmen

    2013-01-01

    To investigate factors associated with work ability among nursing professionals. They comprised 514 nursing professionals (83.8% of the total number of workers) from a hospital in São Paulo, Brazil. In 2009, we conducted a cross-sectional study that was a part of a 5-year planned cohort study initiated in 2008. We administered a comprehensive questionnaire to the participants in order to obtain data on their sociodemographic characteristics, lifestyles, and working conditions. The questionnaire also contained the Brazilian versions of the following: the Job Stress Scale (JSS), Effort-Reward Imbalance (ERI) Questionnaire, Work-Related Activities That May Contribute To Job-Related Pain and/or Injury (WRAPI), and Work Ability Index (WAI). The results were analyzed using descriptive, bivariate, and multivariate linear regression analyses. On the WAI, 74.9% of the workers obtained a score of over 40 points (score range 7-49); the mean score was 42.3 points (SD=4.5). The final multivariate model showed that lower WAI scores were related to the work-related outcome, which was work injury, and the following individual characteristics and working conditions: body mass index (p=0.001), sex (female; p=0.002), sedentariness (p social support at work (p=0.003), effort-reward ratio (p=0.001), violence at work (p=0.005), WRAPI score (p work injuries (yes; p=0.001). Various factors were associated with work ability. The results showed that a number of variables should be considered when planning and implementing actions to maintain or improve work ability among nursing professionals.

  15. Learning Strategies at Work and Professional Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haemer, Hannah Deborah; Borges-Andrade, Jairo Eduardo; Cassiano, Simone Kelli

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to investigate the prediction of current and evolutionary perceptions of professional development through five learning strategies at work and through training and how individual and job characteristics predict those strategies. Design/methodology/approach: Variables were measured in a cross-sectional survey, with 962…

  16. Explorations in Social Work Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tie'er, Shi

    2013-01-01

    Social work education leans toward the applied approach emphasizing the practical and experiential. At present, many schools still offer social work education in the traditional academic model emphasizing textual learning. This approach is not suitable to the knowledge, student or teacher orientation in social work, and its pedagogy. To develop…

  17. A Multiple Case Study Discovering Part-Time Faculties' Perceptions of Their Professional Needs, Working Conditions, Social Network, and Job Satisfaction at Three Community Colleges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millner-Harlee, Tanya

    2010-01-01

    This study employed a multiple case study design to evaluate the perspectives of part-time faculties at three community colleges in the Northeast. The purpose of this study was to discover how needs, working conditions, and social networks influence the part-time faculties' job satisfaction. Maslow (1954), Bourdieu (1986), and Herzberg, Mausner,…

  18. Teaching Standards-Based Group Work Competencies to Social Work Students: An Empirical Examination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macgowan, Mark J.; Vakharia, Sheila P.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: Accreditation standards and challenges in group work education require competency-based approaches in teaching social work with groups. The Association for the Advancement of Social Work with Groups developed Standards for Social Work Practice with Groups, which serve as foundation competencies for professional practice. However, there…

  19. About crisis of moral in social work practice in bulgaria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Georgiev

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available This article is an attempt to outline the situation of social work practice in Bulgaria and the today status of the Bulgarian Association of Social Workers and its Code of Ethics. I argue that there is a crisis of moral in social work practice in Bulgaria. My personal experience and observations on the practice of social workers are rationalized in the methodology of Jurgen Habermas. This article is an attempt to bring the importance of the Code of Ethics for the professional status and professional identity of the social work profession and the role of the Code of Ethics in overcoming the moral crisis in the social work practice

  20. Professional dynamics and the changing nature of medical work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hafferty, F W; Light, D W

    1995-01-01

    The organization and delivery of health care in the United States is undergoing significant social, organizational, economic, political, and cultural changes with important implications for the future of medicine as a profession. This essay will draw upon some of these changes and briefly review major sociological writings on the nature of medicine's professional status to examine the nature of professional dynamics in a changing environment. To this end, we focus on the nature of medical work and how this work impacts on and is impacted by medicine's own internal differentiation and the presence of contested domains at medicine's periphery. We trace this dynamic through a number of issues including the multidimensional nature of medical work, the role of elites in that work, and how changes in the terms and conditions of work can exert changes at medicine's technical core. We close with some thoughts on the relationship of public policy to medicine's professional status, the role health policy might take in shaping a new professional status, the role health policy might take in shaping a new professional ethnic for medicine, and the role sociologists might play in this process.

  1. Social Media Training for Professional Identity Development in Undergraduate Nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mather, Carey; Cummings, Elizabeth; Nichols, Linda

    2016-01-01

    The growth of social media use has led to tension affecting the perception of professionalism of nurses in healthcare environments. The aim of this cross-sectional study was to explore first and final year undergraduate student use of social media to understand how it was utilised by them during their course. Descriptive statistical analysis was undertaken to compare differences between first and final year student use. No difference indicated there was a lack of development in the use of social media, particularly concerning in relation to expanding their professional networks. There is a need for the curriculum to include opportunities to teach student nurses methods to ensure the appropriate and safe use of social media. Overt teaching and modelling of desired behaviour to guide and support the use of social media to positively promote professional identity formation, which is essential for work-readiness at graduation, is necessary.

  2. Inter-professional cooperation as collective ethics work: A contribution to inter-professional ethics

    OpenAIRE

    Jonge, de, Ed

    2016-01-01

    Thesis: Ethics work (Banks 2012, 2016) is a stimulating concept for the ethical improvement of inter-professional cooperation. Outline: Starting point: ideal-typical professionalism Introduction to ethics work Professionalism requires inter-professional cooperation Inter-professional expansion of ethics work Final remarks and further challenges

  3. African Journal of Social Work

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The African Journal of Social Work is an international refereed journal that serves as a forum for exchanging ideas and knowledge and discussing issues relevant to social work practice, education and research in the African region. Producing 2 issues a year, the Journal is published by the National Association of Social ...

  4. Integrating Social Neuroscience and Social Work: Innovations for Advancing Practice-Based Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matto, Holly C.; Strolin-Goltzman, Jessica

    2010-01-01

    Throughout the social work profession, there is ongoing interest in building a social science agenda that can address the complex practice-based questions faced by social work professionals today. Methodological innovations and unique funding opportunities have already significantly advanced research on social work practice. Still, there is…

  5. [Criteria for forensic medical evaluation of professional working capacity loss].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapustin, A V; Tomilin, V V; Ol'khovik, V P; Panfilenko, O A; Serebriakova, V G

    2000-01-01

    The main and additional criteria used in evaluation (in percent) of loss of professional working capacity are characterized. Criteria common for forensic medical and medical social expert evaluations and differences between them are discussed. These differences are due to the fact that forensic medical expert evaluations are based on the Civil and Civil Processual Codes of the Russian Federation but not on the departamental norm-setting documents.

  6. Een internationale bachelor Social Work : eindrapportage internationale bachelor Social Work

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Frank Salemans

    2006-01-01

    Vergelijkende Europese studie in opdracht van Kees van Aken, toenmalig directeur van de opleiding Social Work i.o. van de Hogeschool Zuyd, naar welke verschillende varianten er mogelijk zijn als er gesproken wordt over een Internationale Bachelor Social Work - Maastricht. Op welke manieren zijn er

  7. Being on sick leave due to heart failure: self-rated health, encounters with healthcare professionals and social insurance officers and self-estimated ability to return to work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordgren, Lena; Söderlund, Anne

    2015-01-01

    Younger people with heart failure often experience poor self-rated health. Furthermore, poor self-rated health is associated with long-term sick leave and disability pension. Socio-demographic factors affect the ability to return to work. However, little is known about people on sick leave due to heart failure. The aim of this study was to investigate associations between self-rated health, mood, socio-demographic factors, sick leave compensation, encounters with healthcare professionals and social insurance officers and self-estimated ability to return to work, for people on sick leave due to heart failure. This population-based investigation had a cross-sectional design. Data were collected in Sweden in 2012 from two official registries and from a postal questionnaire. In total, 590 subjects, aged 23-67, responded (response rate 45.8%). Descriptive statistics, correlation analyses (Spearman bivariate analysis) and logistic regression analyses were used to investigate associations. Poor self-rated health was strongly associated with full sick leave compensation (OR = 4.1, p work (OR = 3.3, p work imposes reduced quality of life. Positive encounters with healthcare professionals and social insurance officers can be supportive when people with heart failure struggle to remain in working life.

  8. Encountering social work through STS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Birk, Rasmus

    2016-01-01

    this by examining the materials and types of knowledge that participate in shaping local community work practices and encounters between local community workers and residents in marginalized housing areas. Through this analysis, I argue that social work research can benefit from orienting itself more concretely......Encountering social work through STS: Marginalization, materials and knowledge In this presentation, I attempt to produce an encounter between STS and social work. Concretely, I focus on the subset of social work called “local community work”, which in Denmark is used to intervene on marginalized...... housing areas. The Danish state and its municipalities diligently track and monitor the statistics of social housing areas. Using “parameters of marginalization” such as ethnicity, income, unemployment and education, topographical depictions of social issues in certain areas are constituted and used...

  9. Importance of social work socio- educational intervention of sex education

    OpenAIRE

    Quiroz A., Sandra; Sepúlveda Q., Paula

    2016-01-01

    In education the figure of Social Services, is in a process of maturation-recognized, especially in terms of functions and professional work. Currently in the school social worker is carrying out his work in interdisciplinary teams of teachers, psychologists and other related educational field professionals, the development of actions, often passively and quietly. In search of the definitions given by the FITS (International Federation of Social Workers) said that through educational institut...

  10. Work lives of professionals : Policies, professional associations, managers and clients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L.G. Tummers (Lars); V.J.J.M. Bekkers (Victor); A.J. Steijn (Bram)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractAt the moment, there is an intense debate going on concerning professionals and professionalism in the public sector. Research shows that public professionals are experiencing increasing pressures as they have to take into account several output performance norms, and these often

  11. Hepatitis C and Social Work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mack, Heather; Paylor, Ian

    2016-06-01

    It is now a full decade since Paylor and Orgel (2004) called for social work to 'wake up' to hepatitis C (HCV). In that time, a small but significant body of social research has developed which has highlighted the far-reaching social consequences of living with HCV. Using this as a foundation, Paylor and Mack (2010) expanded arguments on the role of social work and identified specific areas where social work might become involved, arguing that the profession is uniquely placed and skilled, to respond and provide support. This article draws on qualitative in-depth interviews with twenty-one people who (had) lived with HCV in the UK, to strengthen and broaden the argument that social work and social care need to urgently take a bigger role in working with people with HCV, given the cross-cutting and wide range of issues that arise. This is the first study which uses participant data to argue for the need for social work involvement and in that it highlights a number of points in the experience where social work support is needed including pre and post diagnosis, whilst on treatment and after treatment.

  12. Social Symbolic Work in Context

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brincker, Benedikte

    This paper reports on a research project that explores social symbolic work. The social symbolic work in question seeks to introduce education in entrepreneurship into the school curriculum in a remote part of Greenland – in order to contribute to regional development. The paper investigates how ...... and agility (MMA)....

  13. Defining criminal justice social work

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The fundamental objective of this article is to urge a change in the conventional paradigms used to define the practice of social work in the field of criminal justice, and to set in motion a conversion to a unified paradigm of criminal justice social work. A unified paradigm is used here to refer to the multidimensional and ...

  14. The Social Work Practice Doctorate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartocollis, Lina; Cnaan, Ram A.; Ledwith, Kate

    2014-01-01

    This article provides a systematic review of the emerging practice doctorate in social work. Based on the experience of the first such Doctor of Social Work (DSW) program, we provide information regarding the program origins and rationale, development, current structure, and future direction. Such information will enrich the discussion on the role…

  15. Using Student Group Work in Higher Education to Emulate Professional Communities of Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fearon, Colm; McLaughlin, Heather; Eng, Tan Yoke

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to discuss the value of social learning from group work that emulates a professional community of practice. Design/methodology/approach: A thought piece that first, examines the role of group-work projects as part of social learning, then outlines key arguments for social learning based upon applying a…

  16. Corporate social responsibility of future radiology professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Sandra K; Collins, Kevin S

    2011-01-01

    Plagued by difficult economic times, many radiology managers may find themselves faced with ethical dilemmas surrounding ongoing organizational pressures to maintain high levels of productivity with restricted resources. This often times tests the level of moral resilience and corporate social consciousness of even the most experienced radiology professionals. A study was conducted to determine what Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) orientation and viewpoint future radiology professionals may have. The results of the study indicate that these study participants may initially consider patient care more important than profit maximization. Study results indicate that these specific future radiology professionals will not need laws, legal sanctions, and intensified rules to force them to act ethically. However,they may need ongoing training as to the necessity of profit maximization if they seek the highest quality of care possible for their patients.

  17. Attitudes and characteristics of health professionals working in Aboriginal health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Annabelle M; Magarey, Anthea M; Jones, Michelle; O'Donnell, Kim; Kelly, Janet

    2015-01-01

    There is an unacceptable gap in health status between Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal people in Australia. Linked to social inequalities in health and political and historical marginalisation, this health gap must be urgently addressed. It is important that health professionals, the majority of whom in Australia are non-Aboriginal, are confident and equipped to work in Aboriginal health in order to contribute towards closing the health gap. The purpose of this study was to explore the attitudes and characteristics of non-Aboriginal health professionals working in Aboriginal health. The research was guided and informed by a social constructionist epistemology and a critical theoretical approach. It was set within a larger healthy eating and physical activity program delivered in one rural and one metropolitan community in South Australia from 2005 to 2010. Non-Aboriginal staff working in the health services where the program was delivered and who had some experience or an interest working in Aboriginal health were invited to participate in a semi-structured interview. Dietitians working across South Australia (rural and metropolitan locations) were also invited to participate in an interview. Data were coded into themes that recurred throughout the interview and this process was guided by critical social research. Thirty-five non-Aboriginal health professionals participated in a semi-structured interview about their experiences working in Aboriginal health. The general attitudes and characteristics of non-Aboriginal health professionals were classified using four main groupings, ranging from a lack of practical knowledge ('don't know how'), a fear of practice ('too scared'), the area of Aboriginal health perceived as too difficult ('too hard') and learning to practice regardless ('barrier breaker'). Workers in each group had different characteristics including various levels of willingness to work in the area; various understandings of Australia's historical

  18. Family health teams: can health professionals learn to work together?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soklaridis, Sophie; Oandasan, Ivy; Kimpton, Shandra

    2007-07-01

    To learn what educators across the health professions involved in primary health care think about the use and development of academic family health teams to provide, teach, and model interprofessional collaboration and about the introduction of interprofessional education (IPE) within structured academic primary care. Qualitative study using focus groups. Higher education institutions across Ontario. Purposeful sample of 36 participants from nursing, pharmacy, speech language pathology, occupational and physical therapy, social work, and family medicine. Participants were invited to join focus groups of 6 to 8 health professionals. Themes were derived from qualitative analysis of data gathered using a grounded-theory approach. Three major themes were identified: the lack of consensus on opportunities for future academic family health teams to teach IPE, the lack of formalized teaching of interprofessional collaboration and the fact that what little has been developed is primarily for family physicians and hardly at all for other health professionals, and the confusion around the definition of IPE across health professions. The future role of family health teams in academic primary care settings as a place for learners to see teamwork in action and to learn collaboration needs to be examined. Unless academic settings are developed to provide the necessary training for primary health care professionals to work in teams, a new generation of health care professionals will continue to work in status quo environments, and reform initiatives are unlikely to become sustainable over time.

  19. Social Integration as Professional Field: Psychotherapy in Sweden

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Johnsson

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The present article describes and analyses the emergence and development of a professional field called social integration. Ideas, theories, and occupational practices forming this field are explored, particularly those related to the development of a new discipline, that of psychotherapy. The development of three occupations (psychiatry, psychology and social work and their professionalisation is described through their qualitative and quantitative take‑offs in particular historical periods. Three periods are identified: formation, 1850-1920, when psychiatry was defined as a medical sub-discipline; consolidation, 1920-1945, with the institutionalisation of psychiatric care, and with psychoanalysis and mental hygiene as qualitatively new cognitive bases for practitioners; and professionalisation, 1945-1980, with the deinstitutionalisation of psychiatric care and the professionalisation of psychologists and social workers. New ideas on subjectivity and individualism, new welfare state institutions, as well as collaborative professionalism all favoured the creation of psychotherapy as professional knowledge, and a possible new profession of psychotherapists.

  20. Are Empathy and Compassion Bad for the Professional Social Worker?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Nilsson

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies have shown that social workers and other professional helpers who work with traumatized individuals run a risk of developing compassion fatigue or secondary traumatic stress. Some researchers have hypothesized that helpers do this as a result of feeling too much empathy or too much compassion for their clients, thereby implying that empathy and compassion may be bad for the professional social worker. This paper investigates these hypotheses. Based on a review of current research about empathy and compassion it is argued that these states are not the causes of compassion fatigue. Hence, it is argued that empathy and compassion are not bad for the professional social worker in the sense that too much of one or the other will lead to compassion fatigue.

  1. Latino Critical Perspective in Social Work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiehne, Elizabeth

    2016-04-01

    Although a Latino critical perspective (LatCrit) is consistent with social work's professional mission and values, it is largely absent from its literature. With a focus on the Latino population in the United States, LatCrit elucidates an oppressive structure of social inequality and discrimination and promotes systemic change through self-advocacy. Thus, LatCrit supports the call for the revival of mezzo- and macro-level practice in social work. This article discusses the utility of LatCrit for social work practice through a discussion of its origins, main tenets, and primary aims. A critique of the theoretical perspective is also offered; its insights for social work practice, philosophical assumptions, and challenges for use in the field are highlighted. Social workers are offered an analysis of LatCrit enabling them to apply the theoretical perspective discretionarily rather than universally to meet diverse challenges and client needs. Specific ways in which social workers can facilitate the LatCrit praxis are discussed, such as community organizing and grassroots advocacy campaigns.

  2. (De)stabilizing Self-Identities in Professional Work

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buch, Anders; Andersen, Vibeke

    2013-01-01

    implications for the way professionals make sense of their work and their own identities. The identity work of professionals is interwoven with their professional training and career background. With an academic training and a professional career, the individual typically identifies with the profession......, the construction of self-identity becomes the yardstick for the individual’s sense-making and, a fortiori, for the individual’s sense of meaningful work. In this paper, we will claim that the ambiguity involved in professional work becomes a potential strain on the identity construction of the employees engaged...... professionals draw on different frameworks of meaning in order to stabilize their identities....

  3. Social Work and Lived Citizenship

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Warming, Hanne; Fahnøe, Kristian

    2017-01-01

    Warming and Fahnøe offers, through introduction of the sensitising concept of lived citizenship and a socio-spatial perspective, a much needed renewal of the rights and strength based approach to social work practice and research towards an almost anthropological understanding of the social...... situation of vulnerable groups. Indeed, they show how the concept of lived citizenship, and four supporting concepts (disciplinary versus inclusive identity shaping; intimate citizenship; space; community governance) enables contextualized analyses of the complexities of social work as a social space...... of meaning and power as (re-) producing practices through which clients experience and negotiate rights, responsibilities, participation, identity and belonging, and thereby of dynamics of inclusion and exclusion related to social work....

  4. Social work and lived citizenship

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Warming, Hanne; Fahnøe, Kristian Relsted

    2017-01-01

    Warming and Fahnøe offers, through the introduction of the sensitizing concept of lived citizenship and a socio-spatial perspective, a much needed renewal of the rights and strength-based approach to social work practice and research towards an almost anthropological understanding of the social...... situation of vulnerable groups. Indeed, they show how the concept of lived citizenship, and four supporting concepts (disciplinary versus inclusive identity shaping; intimate citizenship; space; and community governance) enables the contextualized analyses of the complexities of social work as a social...... space of meaning and power as (re-)producing practices through which clients experience and negotiate rights, responsibilities, participation, identity and belonging, and thereby of dynamics of inclusion and exclusion related to social work...

  5. Professional Training of Social Workers: Development of Professionally Significant Qualities in the Future Social Workers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minzhanov, Nurlan A.; Ertysbaeva, Gaukhar N.; Abdakimova, Madina K.; Ishanov, Pirmagambet Z.

    2016-01-01

    Today, the traditional approach to professional training is obsolete. This problem has determined the need to create new didactic forms related to the organization of training in the modern education system. The purpose of this study was to analyze possible development of professionally important qualities and abilities in the future social care…

  6. Social Maturation: Work Group Proceedings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resnick, Michael D.; And Others

    1985-01-01

    The work group's discussion centers on seven factors affecting disabled adolescents' social development. Each of the following factors is addressed in terms of potentially important research, service, and policy initiatives: self esteem, peer groups, parenting, family, services, enforced dependency, and positive sexual socialization. (CL)

  7. Beta Testing in Social Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traube, Dorian E.; Begun, Stephanie; Petering, Robin; Flynn, Marilyn L.

    2017-01-01

    The field of social work does not currently have a widely adopted method for expediting innovations into micro- or macropractice. Although it is common in fields such as engineering and business to have formal processes for accelerating scientific advances into consumer markets, few comparable mechanisms exist in the social sciences or social…

  8. Coworking Spaces: A Source of Social Support for Independent Professionals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cornelia eGerdenitsch

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Coworking spaces are shared office environments for independent professionals. Such spaces have been increasing rapidly throughout the world, and provide, in addition to basic business infrastructure, the opportunity for social interaction. This article explores social interaction in coworking spaces and reports the results of two studies. Study 1 (N = 69 coworkers finds that social interaction in coworking spaces can take the form of social support. Study 2 further investigates social support among coworkers (N = 154 coworkers and contrasts these results with those of social support among colleagues in traditional work organizations (N = 609. A moderated mediation model using time pressure and self-efficacy, based on the conservation of resources theory, is tested. Social support from both sources was positively related to performance satisfaction. Self-efficacy mediated this relationship in the employee sample, while in the coworking sample, self-efficacy only mediated the relationship between social support and performance satisfaction if time pressure was high. Thus, a mobilization of social support seems necessary in coworking spaces. We conclude that coworking spaces, as modern social work environments, should align flexible work infrastructure with well-constructed opportunities for social support.

  9. [Educational gerontology and social work].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kricheldorff, Cornelia; Klott, Stefanie

    2017-07-01

    Educational gerontology has become established over the past 40 years in a multifaceted, differentiated practice which, against the background of social change processes, combined with the phenomena of demographic change, takes up and creates room for accompanying irritations, learning requirements and opportunities. A corresponding theoretical foundation exists in the scientific discipline of geragogy, which is located at the interfaces between gerontology, educational science and social work. The close proximity between education of and social work with the elderly is meanwhile also evident in many recent research and development projects, in which theory formation for geragogy and social work as scientific disciplines take place at the same time. Against this background, the core developmental lines of geragogy are briefly sketched in this article and linked with the exemplary scientific discourse within gerontology and social work sciences. The result is a form of synthesis of central theoretical premises of social gerontology in the field of educational gerontology. This claim becomes more concrete by a recourse to the results of relevant research and development projects, which refer to different facets of educational work in different gerontological fields or as a conscious approach to methodological integration, also in the sense of participatory procedures. Theoretical and didactic approaches to educational gerontology are of increasing importance in terms of enabling integration and participation and also in the context of research and development projects. This also involves participation of the elderly as experts in their own field as well as participatory procedures and approaches. Willingness to learn and openness to educational approaches will also be the basic prerequisites for older people in the future, creating orientation in a rapidly changing world and social participation. One important task for educational gerontology in this context is

  10. Work environment impact on professional burnout

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karina Erenkfeit

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Burnout is strongly correlated with job stress. This process becomes more common and not only strikes a worker directly but also the interests of employers and beneficiaries. A sense of emotional and physical exhaustion and excessive work load usually affects social workers. This load arises from the following factors: too many responsibilities in relation to individual potential, too much unrecognized involvement without appreciation and lack of recuperation. The aim of this study is to highlight the growing problem of the burnout and a number of associated syndromes including presentation of feasible solutions.

  11. Violence on the elderly and Social Work

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Irene Lopes Carvalho

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Violence and abuse of the elderly won expression and visibility across the increase of the number of people aged 65 or over in the total population of developed countries. However, this issue is not only explained by the increase in the elderly population and the longevity, but also by the awareness that the problem exists, especially of professionals working in the social and health area. In this article we first identify the notions of violence upon the elderly statements by international organizations (OMS, EU and some studies in this area. Besides this problematisation, we present the known categories of violence and risk indicators. Here is some statistical data on the phenomenon in Portugal and some guidelines for policies in this area. Secondly, we present the result of a inquiry instrument applied to social work professionals, whose aim was to assess the perception of the risk categories of violence over the elderly. You must create educational programs and prevention campaigns for the general public can identify the signs of abuse and report situations, train health professionals and social area with responsibility to protection of the elderly and introduce guidelines that homogenizing the procedures, develop home care programs to improve the procedures of informal caregivers and develop systems for monitoring and evaluating the quality of care for older people, especially the long-term.

  12. Developing Professional Ethics for Social Educators and Early Childhood Educators in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ribers, Bjørn

    2016-01-01

    Over the last two decades, Danish labour unions have been working continuously on developing professional ethical codes and guidelines for social educators and early childhood and youth educators in Denmark. The majority of empirical research projects studying ethical dimensions of social work...... empirical research results on ethical issues in the professional practice and in the education of welfare professionals. The paper discusses the current state of professional ethics in childhood and youth work and debates the constellation between educational policies, the political process of developing...... professional ethical codes and the continuing changes in the organisation of the Danish welfare state, which vehemently influence the welfare professions....

  13. Participatory planning intercultural: Reflections for social work

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esperanza Gómez Hernández

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Since the nineties, participatory planning has emerged as a linking strategy for various social, political, economic and cultural sectors that assessed it as a potential for building consensus in the making of local processes forsocial improvement. Similarly, it was legitimized as a setting for practice for professionals trained in the social sciences, mainly Social Work. This article, from a geopolitical and geo-cultural perspective, presents contextual elements that determined the configuration of participatory planning in Latin America. These elements shall be staged in order to redefine diversity and the intercultural perspective that has been linked to this mobilizing strategy, against the institutionalized discourse of development and for the emergence of crisis and ruptures with this social paradigm from other practices and worldviews of life in the territories.

  14. Social pedagogy between everyday life and professionalism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rothuizen, Jan Jaap

    2014-01-01

    You have to know a bit of history in order to understand that the term social pedagogy can have different meanings. This article presents social pedagogy first and foremost as an approach that focuses on the other person’s possibilities to decide, to be an actor and to be a participant. When you...... practice a social pedagogical approach, you have to think because you will often find yourself in situations with no fixed recipe for what to do. The social pedagogy occurs in tension fields. Therefore, social pedagogical work is in constant development....

  15. Medical professionalism and the social contract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, Lynette

    2011-01-01

    Conceptions of professionalism in medicine draw on social contract theory; its strengths and weaknesses play out in how we reason about professionalism. The social contract metaphor may be a heuristic device prompting reflection on social responsibility, and as such is appealing: it encourages reasoning about privilege and responsibility, the broader context and consequences of action, and diverse perspectives on medical practice. However, when this metaphor is elevated to the status of a theory, it has well-known limits: the assumed subject position of contractors engenders blind spots about privilege, not critical reflection; its tendency to dress up the status quo in the trappings of a theoretical agreement may limit social negotiation; its attempted reconciliation of social obligation and self-interest fosters the view that ethics and self-interest should coincide; it sets up false expectations by identifying appearance and reality in morality; and its construal of prima facie duties as conditional misdirects ethical attention in particular situations from current needs to supposed past agreements or reciprocities. Using philosophical ideas as heuristic devices in medical ethics is inevitable, but we should be conscious of their limitations. When they limit the ethical scope of debate, we should seek new metaphors.

  16. Religious Content in Social Work Education: A Comparative Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canda, Edward R.

    1989-01-01

    A rationale and methodology for teaching about the spiritual and religious aspects of human behavior in social work curricula is presented. An approach derived from the field of comparative religious studies is described, and its implications for the personal and professional preparation of the social work educator are discussed. (MSE)

  17. Social Work: A Profession in Search of Its Identity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gitterman, Alex

    2014-01-01

    Micro social work practice can be understood in the context of its historical professional traditions and dialectics as well as the environmental pressures and demands placed on the profession. In becoming a profession, social work relied heavily on principles drawn from medicine and science. Although these bodies of knowledge provided the…

  18. Revitalizing social work education through global and critical awareness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Flem, Aina Lian; Jönsson, Jessica H.; Alseth, Ann Kristin

    2016-01-01

    and critical components in theoretical courses, professional training and field practice in the social work education of the countries in question. It is argued that social work education should move beyond the old division of classical and international/intercultural toward including global and critical...

  19. Career Implications of Doctoral Social Work Student Debt Load

    Science.gov (United States)

    Begun, Audrey L.; Carter, James R.

    2017-01-01

    Although research has been conducted in other professional disciplines, social work has yet to explore how doctoral student debt load influences career development. This exploratory study surveyed 281 social work doctoral students and recent graduates, 75 BSW and MSW program leaders, and 24 doctoral program leaders about debt load, career choices,…

  20. Research on Ethical Agency : Symposium: empirical ethics in social work

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    dr Ed de Jonge

    2016-01-01

    Symposium ESWRA - ECSWR 2016: empirical ethics in social work. Objective: ethical aspects of social work (esp. at home) Structure: cooperation of the research group of UAS Utrecht Netherlands with six regional welfare organizations Method: practice based ethics research Focus on professional

  1. FUTURE PROFESSIONAL EMPLOYEE`S COMPETITIVENESS A SOCIAL & EDUCATIONAL CONCEPT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irina Aleksandrovnа Levitskaya

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In today’s world of growing value and importance of such indicators of competitive modern specialist training as professionalism, moral and social maturity, mobility, readiness for innovation. The implementation of this approach in the practice of higher education requires a multidisciplinary integrative approach. This ensures the integrity of the general professio-nal training of modern specialists. After graduating high school graduate is faced with the problem of the fierce market competition. Being dependent on changes in the job market, the specialist should be able to realize their potential ability to work, i.e. to be competitive in the labor market. The greatest importance is the integrative characteristics of the individual, providing a higher professional status, consistently high demand for professional services, higher ranking position in the job market, i.e. competitiveness.

  2. Information and Communication Technologies in Social Work

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian E. Perron

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Information and communication technologies (ICTs are electronic tools used to convey, manipulate and store information. The exponential growth of Internet access and ICTs greatly influenced social, political, and economic processes in the United States, and worldwide. Regardless of the level of practice, ICTs will continue influencing the careers of social workers and the clients they serve. ICTs have received some attention in the social work literature and curriculum, but we argue that this level of attention is not adequate given their ubiquity, growth and influence, specifically as it relates to upholding social work ethics. Significant attention is needed to help ensure social workers are responsive to the technological changes in the health care system, including the health care infrastructure and use of technology among clients. Social workers also need ICT competencies in order to effectively lead different types of social change initiatives or collaborate with professionals of other disciplines who are using ICTs as part of existing strategies. This paper also identifies potential pitfalls and challenges with respect to the adoption of ICTs, with recommendations for advancing their use in practice, education, and research.

  3. Information and Communication Technologies in Social Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perron, Brian E.; Taylor, Harry O.; Glass, Joseph E.; Margerum-Leys, Jon

    2011-01-01

    Information and communication technologies (ICTs) are electronic tools used to convey, manipulate and store information. The exponential growth of Internet access and ICTs greatly influenced social, political, and economic processes in the United States, and worldwide. Regardless of the level of practice, ICTs will continue influencing the careers of social workers and the clients they serve. ICTs have received some attention in the social work literature and curriculum, but we argue that this level of attention is not adequate given their ubiquity, growth and influence, specifically as it relates to upholding social work ethics. Significant attention is needed to help ensure social workers are responsive to the technological changes in the health care system, including the health care infrastructure and use of technology among clients. Social workers also need ICT competencies in order to effectively lead different types of social change initiatives or collaborate with professionals of other disciplines who are using ICTs as part of existing strategies. This paper also identifies potential pitfalls and challenges with respect to the adoption of ICTs, with recommendations for advancing their use in practice, education, and research. PMID:21691444

  4. Social Work in a Developing Continent: The Case of Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher Chitereka

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Social work is a professional approach to ameliorating social problems. It is generally understood as a helping profession that utilizes professionally qualified personnel who use its knowledge base to help people tackle their social problems (Mupedziswa, 2005. Nevertheless, in developing countries, social work is a relatively young profession which was influenced by colonialism in its formation. The type of social work practiced in these countries largely mirrors the one that is being practiced in Britain, France and Portugal among others. Utilizing the continent of Africa as a case study, this article argues that social work practice in Africa tends to be curative or remedial in nature and is not adequately addressing people’s problems. It therefore proposes a paradigm shift from remedial to a social development paradigm if it is to make an impact in the 21st century.

  5. Online professionalism: social media, social contracts, trust, and medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, Lois

    2011-01-01

    The AMA Council on Ethical and Judicial Affairs (CEJA) has initiated an important discussion on medical professionalism and the use of social media by issuing thoughtful and practical guidance for physicians and medical students. The implications of online activities for trust in the profession, as well as for trust between patient and doctor, however, will need further exploration as digital life expands and evolves.

  6. Social media and social work education: understanding and dealing with the new digital world.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Lin; Mishna, Faye; Zhang, Vivian F; Van Wert, Melissa; Bogo, Marion

    2014-10-01

    Accompanying the multiple benefits and innovations of social media are the complex ethical and pedagogical issues that challenge social work educators. Without a clear understanding of the blurred boundaries between public and private, the potentially limitless and unintended audiences, as well as the permanency of the information shared online, social work students who use social media can find themselves in difficult situations in their personal and professional lives. In this article, we present three scenarios that illustrate issues and complexities involving social media use by social work students, followed by a discussion and recommendations for social work educators.

  7. Work Stress and Depression among Direct Support Professionals: The Role of Work Support and Locus of Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray-Stanley, J. A.; Muramatsu, N.; Heller, T.; Hughes, S.; Johnson, T. P.; Ramirez-Valles, J.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Although work stress can impede the capacity of direct support professionals and contribute to mental health challenges, external (i.e. work social support) and internal resources (i.e. an internal locus of control) have been shown to help DSPs cope more actively. We examined how work stress was associated with depression, with a…

  8. Professional Learning between Past Experience and Future Work

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weber, Kirsten

    2010-01-01

    This paper is about learning, qualification and possible professionalization in human service work. With human services we primarily refer to work related to health care, child care, social work, and education. I present empirical findings from different phases of training and workplace experience...... of Danish child care pedagogues. The investigation is part of a human resource centered research program studying the development of welfare institutions and systems in Denmark. Welfare institutions have been developing since World War II as an important aspect of and precondition for the socio......-economic development of Denmark from a predominantly rural, agricultural society to an entirely urban industrial and service producing society. This development has required a substantial new labor force in the first place. It has drawn on “spontaneous” qualifications, primarily by recruitment of female workers...

  9. Bibliotherapy in social pedagogical work

    OpenAIRE

    Jelen, Tamara

    2013-01-01

    The thesis deals with bibliotherapy as an intervention, which can be used by social pedagogue in his work. Bibliotherapy is defined through its history and the areas where it is used, mainly in Slovenia. To understand the concept further there is a need for more detailed definition, therefore part is also dedicated to different forms of bibliotherapy, its goals and the process as defined by various authors and the comparison between them. But to explain bibliotherapy in the context of social ...

  10. Toward Mentoring in Palliative Social Work: A Narrative Review of Mentoring Programs in Social Work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toh, Ying Pin; Karthik, R; Teo, Chia Chia; Suppiah, Sarasvathy; Cheung, Siew Li; Krishna, Lalit

    2017-01-01

    Mentoring by an experienced practitioner enhances professional well-being, promotes resilience, and provides a means of addressing poor job satisfaction and high burnout rates among medical social workers. This is a crucial source of support for social workers working in fields with high risk of compassion fatigue and burnout like palliative care. Implementing such a program, however, is hindered by differences in understanding and application of mentoring practice. This narrative review of mentoring practice in social work seeks to identify key elements and common approaches within successful mentoring programs in social work that could be adapted to guide the design of new mentoring programs in medical social work. Methodology and Data Sources: A literature search of mentoring programs in social work between January 1, 2000, and December 31, 2015, using Pubmed, CINAHL, OVID, ERIC, Scopus, Cochrane and ScienceDirect databases, involving a senior experienced mentor and undergraduate and/or junior postgraduates, was carried out. A total of 1302 abstracts were retrieved, 22 full-text articles were analyzed, and 8 articles were included. Thematic analysis of the included articles revealed 7 themes pertaining to the mentoring process, outcomes and barriers, and the characteristics of mentoring relationships, mentors, mentees, and host organizations. Common themes in prevailing mentoring practices help identify key elements for the design of an effective mentoring program in medical social work. We conclude with a discussion of the implications of these findings upon clinical practice in palliative care and on sustaining such a program.

  11. Professional learning communities: Teachers working collaboratively for continuous improvement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffith, Louise Ann

    Current research indicates that a professional learning community (PLC) is an effective means for helping teachers to bridge the gap between research and practice. A PLC is a team of educators systematically working together to improve teaching practice and student learning. This study evaluated the PLC formed by teachers at a public elementary school. A 2-part formative assessment was conducted: an implementation evaluation to determine if PLC practices were in place and an evaluation to determine the PLC's progress towards meeting its goals. The PLC consisted of 6 4th grade and 5th grade teachers working to increase their science content and pedagogical knowledge. The foundation of this PLC was based in 4 areas of educational research and theory: constructivism, social learning, multiple intelligences, and differentiated instruction. Data were collected by means of interviews, participant observation, and analysis of artifacts. Data were then analyzed using an iterative set of phases: data reduction, data display, conclusion drawing and verification. The implementation evaluation showed that the PLC was in the developing stage. The progress evaluation showed that the PLC was making significant progress towards its goals of increased collaboration and pedagogical knowledge, but there was insufficient evidence to determine if participants' science content knowledge improved. An executive summary of the results and recommendations was presented to the stakeholders. The positive social change implications include knowledge useful for educators who are searching for direction in improving the quality of professional development offered to elementary teachers.

  12. Experiences of Social Work Educators Working with Students with Psychiatric Disabilities or Emotional Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazza, Elena

    2015-01-01

    Social work educators have an ethical responsibility to graduate students who are academically, behaviorally, and professionally prepared to enter the social work profession. Although a student's suitability to the profession is not necessarily hindered because of the effects of a psychiatric disability or an emotional problem, sometimes it is.…

  13. Characteristics of the Process of Culture Development Project Activities (Culture of Social Engineering) at the Future Bachelors of Social Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikitina, Natalya I.; Romanova, Elena Yu.; Vasilyeva, Tatyana V.; Nikishina, Irina N.; Grebennikova, Veronica M.

    2017-01-01

    In modern Russia professional activity productivity of social work specialist depends largely on his abilities and skills in the field of social design. University graduate's (social work bachelor`s) high level of professional-project activity culture can be regarded as one of the necessary conditions of successful labour market adaptation of…

  14. Work Value Characteristics of Construction Professionals

    OpenAIRE

    Beach, Tyler

    2016-01-01

    The construction industry is projected to experience continued employment growth affecting craft workers but professionals as well. Previous studies have identified demographic differences in generational categories and gender as a contributing factor in the recruitment and retention of construction professionals. Survey data collected as part of this study found that there are more significant similarities between the three generations (Baby Boomers, Gen X and Millennials) surveyed than diff...

  15. Social media and professional networking: a case of information professionals in the SCECSAL region

    OpenAIRE

    Chisenga, Justin; Chande-Mallya, Rehema

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to establish the extent to which library and information professionals in the Standing Conference of Eastern, Central and Southern Africa Library and Information Associations (SCECSAL) region are using social media applications for professional networking. The findings show that although the professionals are adopting social media applications, its use is more for social networking than professional networking purposes. Among those using the applications for profe...

  16. Research on Social Work: where are we heading to?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emanuel Jones Xavier Freitas

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Does research in Social Work highlight aspects of concrete reality in order to offer an appropriate professional intervention in the contemporary social context? Through the present work, based on bibliometric research, we seek to elucidate aspects that allow a debate about the main characteristics of scientific publications of the journal Serviço Social & Sociedade in the period from 2010 to 2016. It was found that scientific productions in Social Work still allude to great theoretical contemplation with emphasis on the production of narrative reviews, without relying on specific aspects of social life to develop their analysis.

  17. How work setting and job experience affect professional nurses' values.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Feito, Ana; Palmeiro-Longo, María Del Rosario; Hoyuelos, Salomé Basurto; García-Díaz, Vanesa

    2017-01-01

    The development of professional values in nursing is directly related to quality and ethical clinical practise and may also increase practitioner and patients' satisfaction. Some factors, such as work setting or work experience, can influence the importance granted to the professional values of nursing. To compare in primary care nurses and hospital care nurses the importance granted to professional values and to contrast this perception as a function of professional experience. Research design, participants and research context: Descriptive cross-sectional study. Participants were 380 nursing professionals from the public health system (primary care and hospital care). Three dimensions were analysed: ethics, professional expertise and professional mastery. Data were collected from January to June 2015. Ethical considerations: We obtained permission from the Ethics Committee and participants' informed consent. Hospital care professionals attached more importance to all the values analysed, regardless of their work experience. Ethical values, such as confidentiality and respect for the person, were considered to be very important in both systems. Values related to professional expertise obtained lower scores, especially in primary care. In general, professionals with more than 20 years' experience granted less importance to the values. The professional setting influenced the importance assigned to professional nursing values, and clear differences were observed between primary and hospital care. The domain of ethics was considered the most important. It is necessary to reflect on the significance attributed to professional values, especially in more expert nursing staff.

  18. Current trends in Uruguayan Social Work: an aging profession?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mónica de Martino Bermúdez

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available This article synthesizes some reflections about the future of Social Work as a profession in Uruguay, based on the identification of certain problems that are of concern to the authors. Although they work in different professional activities and at different educational levels, the three share a certain perspective about tendencies observed in Social Work in Uruguay and believe they have some responses. Based on a dialog with the Sociology of Professions and theories of Pierre Bourdieu, the authors demonstrate that Social Work as a "field" as understood by this author, is clearly in an aging process that is expressed in a professional "habitus" that has little harmony with its social-historical time. In light of questions about the responsibility of the academic sector in the reproduction of this "habitus" and about the challenges to the profile of the students of Social Work, the authors map analyses and propose certain lines of interpretation.

  19. Work-related wellness of information technology professionals in South Africa / C. Westerman

    OpenAIRE

    Westerman, Christelle

    2005-01-01

    The information technology industry is considered to be one of the most demanding industries, with significant social, physical and psychological consequences for the wellbeing of the information technology professional. Work wellness and general psychological well-being plays an important role in the well-being of the information technology professional. The measurement of work-related wellness requires valid, reliable and culturally fair measuring instruments. However research on work welln...

  20. Faithful but Different: Clinical Social Workers Speak Out about Career Motivation and Professional Values

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, Carolyn; Maschi, Tina; O'Brien, Helen; Morgen, Keith; Ward, Kelly

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe licensed clinical social workers' (LCSWs) professional motivation to pursue a social work career and the decision to enter clinical practice. It used a probability sample of 245 New Jersey LCSWs and the Social Work Values Survey as part of an anonymous self-administered mail survey. Descriptive analyses…

  1. Learning experiences for the transition to professional work

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leigh N. Wood

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available A better educated workforce contributes to a more informed and tolerant society with higher economic output, and this is also associated with higher levels of personal health, interpersonal trust and civic and social engagement. Against this backdrop, the role of universities has expanded, as university learning has moved beyond providing an education to preparing students for leadership positions within society. This article examines the effectiveness of final-year learning experiences from the perception of recent graduates. The aim is to improve undergraduate curriculum to facilitate the transition to professional employment. An online quantitative and qualitative survey instrument was developed to investigate graduates’ perceptions of their different learning experiences and assessment types in their senior year. Four hundred and twelve alumni from five universities completed the survey. Our results indicate that graduates value case studies, group work and oral presentations, and that graduates rate lectures and guest lectures from practitioners as the least important in their transition to work. The results validate the use of graduate capability frameworks and mapping the development of the skills over the curriculum. These results are useful for curriculum designers to assist with designing programmes on the transition to professional work.

  2. Professional Use of Social Media by Pharmacists: A Qualitative Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benetoli, Arcelio; Chen, Timothy Frank; Schaefer, Marion; Chaar, Betty B; Aslani, Parisa

    2016-09-23

    Social media is frequently used by consumers and health care professionals; however, our knowledge about its use in a professional capacity by pharmacists is limited. Our aim was to investigate the professional use of social media by pharmacists. In-depth semistructured interviews were conducted with practicing pharmacists (N=31) from nine countries. Interviews were recorded, transcribed verbatim, and thematically analyzed. Wikipedia, YouTube, and Facebook were the main social media platforms used. Professional use of social media included networking with peers, discussion of health and professional topics, accessing and sharing health and professional information, job searching, and professional promotion. Wikipedia was the participants' first choice when seeking information about unfamiliar topics, or topics that were difficult to search for. Very few pharmacy-related contributions to Wikipedia were reported. YouTube, a video-sharing platform, was used for self-education. University lectures, "how-to" footage, and professionally made videos were commonly watched. No professional contribution was made to YouTube. Facebook, a general social networking site, was used for professional networking, promotion of achievements, and job advertisements. It also afforded engagement in professional discussions and information sharing among peers. Participants used social media in a professional capacity, specifically for accessing and sharing health and professional information among peers. Pharmacists, as medicines experts, should take a leading role in contributing to health information dissemination in these user-friendly virtual environments, to reach not only other health care professionals but also health consumers.

  3. Social media and dentistry: some reflections on e-professionalism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neville, P; Waylen, A

    2015-04-24

    The proliferation of digital technology is impacting on the training and development of healthcare professionals. Research on the online behaviour of medical and pharmacy students indicates that social media poses a number of risks to the professional practice of healthcare professionals. General Dental Council guidelines on the use of social media also suggest that it has the potential to expose dental professionals to a variety of breaches of professional conduct. This paper explores the various ways social media can help, as well as hinder, the practice of dental professionalism. However, the lack of primary research on the social media behaviour of dental students and qualified dental practitioners alike acts as a barrier to increasing social media awareness within dentistry. The paper concludes by calling for more research-led discussion on the role social media plays in shaping our understanding of dental professionalism in the twenty-first century.

  4. Development of Professional Identity through Socialization in Graduate School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liddell, Debora L.; Wilson, Maureen E.; Pasquesi, Kira; Hirschy, Amy S.; Boyle, Kathleen M.

    2014-01-01

    Professional identity is one outcome of successful socialization. The purpose of this study was to understand how socialization in graduate programs contributes to the development of professional identity for new professionals in student affairs. Via survey, we found significant relationships between program qualities, standards, activities, and…

  5. Response: Social Work, Science, Social Impact--Crafting an Integrative Conversation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nurius, Paula S.; Kemp, Susan P.

    2012-01-01

    Shifts in the ways that science is being undertaken and marshaled toward social change argue for a new kind of professional competence. Taking the view that the science of social work is centrally about the relationship of research to social impact, the authors extend Fong's focus on transdisciplinary and translational approaches to science,…

  6. Work-Family Conflict, Perceived Supervisor Support and Organizational Commitment among Brazilian Professionals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casper, Wendy Jean; Harris, Christopher; Taylor-Bianco, Amy; Wayne, Julie Holliday

    2011-01-01

    The current study examines a variety of relationships pertaining to work-family conflict among a sample of Brazilian professionals, in order to shed light on work-family issues in this cultural context. Drawing from the cultural values of Brazil and social identity theory, we examine the relationships of two directions of work-family conflict…

  7. Burnout in Professionals Working with Deaf Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meadow, Kathryn P.

    1981-01-01

    Two hundred forty deaf education professionals completed an inventory on burnout, career motivation, and job satisfaction. Teachers of deaf students were more likely to experience burnout than teachers of nonhandicapped children and teachers aged 27 through 30 expressed the highest degree of emotional exhaustion. (CL)

  8. Social media and professionalism: does the profession need to re-think the parameters of professionalism within social media?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holden, Acl

    2017-03-01

    Social media is no longer a new concept, with social media platforms dominating how many communicate. It would be unrealistic to expect that dentistry would not become involved in the use of social media for professional reasons, as well as professionals using social media platforms privately. Despite it being acceptable for dental professionals to have social media presence, those dental professionals have a framework of professional, ethical and legal obligations to which they must conform when using social media. This article seeks to discuss how unintentionally professionalism may be breached by dental professionals not making a distinction between social media and other facets of professional life. There is need for a discussion about how as a profession, dentistry may perceive the effects of professional interaction with social media on the profession's wider relationship with society and whether current regulatory advice goes far enough to protecting the interests of patients. It is important for the use of social media by dental professionals to fit within the established social contract between the profession and society and failure to observe the terms of this will cause damage to the patient-professional relationship. © 2016 Australian Dental Association.

  9. Using Tablet PCs in Social Work Practice Education

    OpenAIRE

    Diane M. Hodge

    2008-01-01

    Within social work practice courses, video recording has been used to record and evaluate the clinical practice skills of students. This process has been limited by labor-intensive, tapebased video equipment, non-digital means of organizing and assessing specific scenes and events within the video, and paper evaluation forms. As an interdisciplinary project, professors from professional disciplines (education, social work, and counseling) worked with information technology students from compu...

  10. Social Work in the Engaged University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Elisa M.; Pyles, Loretta

    2013-01-01

    This article identifies the importance of educating social work students and enlisting social work faculty to embrace the university-community engagement arena as a critical subfield of community practice. Through the lens of social work knowledge, values, and skills, the authors present three case studies of social workers who are working in the…

  11. Tourism employment: contingent work or professional career?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjalager, Anne-Mette; Andersen, Steen

    2001-01-01

    with a professional or vocational tourism education. Discusses the implications of the retention pattern, arguing that tourism shares its professional labour market with neighbouring sectors, and that the industry and educational support framework must therefore take account of this. However, there is a very real...... background does not give them any particular advantages vis-à-vis employees with less relevant qualifications. The retention of employees is a critical problem in Danish tourism, but while turnover is extremely high among the unskilled, significantly better retention rates are found among those...... risk of losing the competition for the best-qualified staff. Finally, it is postulated that tourism is a locus for new types of career concepts; however, we still lack a genuine understanding of the role of tourism for the contingent or boundaryless career....

  12. An evaluation of the professional, social and demographic profile and quality of life of physicians working at the Prehospital Emergency Medical System (SAMU) in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tallo, Fernando Sabia; Campos Vieira Abib, Simone de; Baitello, André Luciano; Lopes, Renato Delascio

    2014-09-01

    To describe the profile of physicians working at the Prehospital Emergency Medical System (SAMU) in Brazil and to evaluate their quality of life. Both a semi-structured questionnaire with 57 questions and the SF-36 questionnaire were sent to research departments within SAMU in the Brazilian state capitals, the Federal District and inland towns in Brazil. Of a total of 902 physicians, including 644 (71.4%) males, 533 (59.1%) were between 30 and 45 years of age and 562 (62.4%) worked in a state capital. Regarding education level, 45.1% had graduated less than five years before and only 43% were specialists recognized by the Brazilian Medical Association. Regarding training, 95% did not report any specific training for their work at SAMU. The main weaknesses identified were psychiatric care and surgical emergencies in 57.2 and 42.9% of cases, respectively; traumatic pediatric emergencies, 48.9%; and medical emergencies, 42.9%. As for procedure-related skills, the physicians reported difficulties in pediatric advanced support (62.4%), airway surgical access (45.6%), pericardiocentesis (64.4%) and thoracentesis (29.9%). Difficulties in using an artificial ventilator (43.3%) and in transcutaneous pacing (42.2%) were also reported. Higher percentages of young physicians, aged 25-30 years (26.7 vs 19.0%; pworked exclusively in prehospital care (18.0 vs 7.7%; p48 h per week (12.8 vs 8.6%; pworked for a longer length of time at SAMU.

  13. Scaling up Social: Strategies for Solving Social Work's Grand Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Maria Y.; Ostrow, Laysha; Kemp, Susan P.

    2017-01-01

    The Grand Challenges for Social Work Initiative aims to focus the profession's attention on how social work can play a larger role in mitigating contemporary social problems. Yet a central issue facing contemporary social work is its seeming reticence to engage with social problems, and their solutions, beyond individual-level interventions.…

  14. Youth work in a marginalized area and its contribution to social mobility and social justice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tireli, Üzeyir

    2016-01-01

    and municipal employees and observations in youth clubs this paper carries out an analysis of the conditions for social pedagogical work in a socially deprived area in Copenhagen as experienced by these professionals. The paper puts special emphasis on the fact that the youth work takes place in an area......This paper addresses the question of how professionals involved in social pedagogical work in a marginalized area deal with young people’s possibilities of social mobility. Based on interviews with teachers, social pedagogues, pedagogical assistants, educational supervisors, street workers...... that in itself poses a potential risk for the young people living there. One of the main conclusions is that the professionals do not include the specific terms and conditions that the marginalized residential area represents in their practice. The professionals’ good intentions and initiatives for youth...

  15. Professional burnout and work engagement among dentists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Te Brake, Hans; Bouman, Anne-Marthe; Gorter, Ronald; Hoogstraten, Johan; Eijkman, Michiel

    2007-06-01

    A recent development within burnout research is the shift to its conceptual opposite: work engagement. This study aimed to unravel the concepts of burnout and work engagement, and to determine their levels among dentists. A representative sample of 497 Dutch general dental practitioners was included (survey response rate of 59%), consisting of 372 men and 121 women (the gender of 4 dentists remained unknown). The hypothesized three-factor structure of work engagement (vigor, dedication, and absorption), as measured by the Utrecht Work Engagement Scale (UWES), was substantiated among dentists. It was also found that work engagement was related negatively to burnout, as measured by the Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI). However, a model consisting of a reduced ('core') burnout factor and an 'enhanced' engagement factor (composed of the three original factors plus the burnout factor, personal accomplishment) showed the best fit. Overall burnout levels among dentists are low, and the levels of engagement indicate that dentists have a positive working attitude.

  16. GLOBAL AGENDA FOR SOCIAL WORK AND SOCIAL DEVELOPMENT: A PATH TOWARD SUSTAINABLE SOCIAL WORK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lombard, Antoinette

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The Global Agenda for Social Work and Social Development (2012 reflects the commitment of social workers, educators and social development practitioners to the Post-2015 Development Agenda. The 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development, effective from September 2015, provides a framework for positioning the Global Agenda to contribute towards a more just society. This paper explores how the four commitments of the Global Agenda link with the 17 Sustainable Development Goals. Implications and opportunities relating to the Global Agenda for social work practice and education are discussed, and guidelines are presented for more sustainable development outcomes for social work practice and education.

  17. Professional burnout and work engagement among dentists.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brake, H. te; Bouman, A-M.; Gorter, R.; Hoogstraten, J.; Eijkman, M.

    2007-01-01

    A recent development within burnout research is the shift to its conceptual opposite: work engagement. This study aimed to unravel the concepts of burnout and work engagement, and to determine their levels among dentists. A representative sample of 497 Dutch general dental practitioners was included

  18. Youth work in a marginalized area and its contribution to social mobility and social justice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tireli, Üzeyir

    This paper addresses the question of how professionals involved in social pedagogical work in a marginalized area deal with young people’s possibilities of social mobility. Based on interviews with teachers, social pedagogues, pedagogical assistants, educational supervisors, street workers...... mobility therefore results in a form of social reproduction. The paper draws on data from an ethnographic fieldwork conducted in Copenhagen in 2013-2015 as part of a larger research project: “Youth, Social Communities and Educational Challenges...... and municipal employees and observations in youth clubs this paper carries out an analysis of the conditions for social pedagogical work in a socially deprived area in Copenhagen as experienced by these professionals. The paper puts special emphasis on the fact that the youth work takes place in an area...

  19. Professional competencies learned through working on a medication education project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hämeen-Anttila, Katri; Saano, Susanna; Vainio, Kirsti

    2010-08-10

    To implement a medication education project and assess the competencies students learned and implemented in professional practice after graduation. Fourth-year pharmacy students planned, carried out, and reported on a real-life project during 1 study year. Outside experts and 2 faculty members facilitated the work. The aim of the medication education project was to create material that schoolteachers could use to teach children about rational use of medicines. All students who had participated in the medication education program during its 3 years were contacted (n = 31). A questionnaire was sent to the 21 students who had graduated (18 responded), and a focus group was conducted with the 10 students completing their final year of pharmacy school (9 participants). The competencies that the students reported learning most were teamwork and social interaction skills. They considered the project motivating but also found it challenging and the deadlines frustrating. Through participation in a medication education project, students learned interpersonal skills, time management, conflict resolution, and other skills that many of them already were finding valuable in their professional practice.

  20. Clinical Social Work Practice and Education: What Would Flexner Think Now?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tosone, Carol

    2016-01-01

    A century has passed since Abraham Flexner posed the question on whether social work is a profession. This article attempts to answer that question, and considers several definitions put forth by global and national social work professional organizations, including a definition of clinical social work. Addressing the current state of social work…

  1. Discourses of social justice: examining the ethics of democratic professionalism in nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Janice L

    2014-01-01

    This essay provides a critical exploration of discourses of social justice in nursing. It examines commitments to social justice in the work of international nursing scholars and in professional codes of ethics in international nursing organizations. The analysis touches on salient conversations in philosophy, relating these ways of knowing to social justice as an ethical pattern in nursing practice. On the basis of this analysis, the discussion explores questions of professional formation in nursing, noticing when commitments to social justice are taken up or evaded in different models of professionalism. In concluding comments, implications of democratic professionalism are explored for professional formation in nursing, arguing for teaching, learning, and knowledge projects that contribute to social justice in our democracy.

  2. THE PROCESS OF FORMATION OF PROFESSIONAL SOCIAL WORKERS AND THE CHALLENGE OF RESEARCH

    OpenAIRE

    Édina Evelyn Casali Meireles de Souza

    2013-01-01

    This article was structured apos to participação no seminar "The challenge of research from professional practice: a reflection from the implementation of the degree in Social Work", in February 2012, the Faculty of Social Work at the University of Granada. On occasion, we present our contribution to bringing the debate, the structure and organization of vocational training of Social Workers, School of Social Service of the Federal University of Juiz de Fora - Brazil, emphasizing the importan...

  3. The Challenge of Assessing Professional Competence in Work Integrated Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNamara, Judith

    2013-01-01

    A fundamental aspect of work integrated learning (WIL) is the development of professional competence, the ability of students to perform in the workplace. Alignment theory therefore suggests that the assessment of WIL should include an assessment of students' demonstration of professional competence in the workplace. The assessment of professional…

  4. About crisis of moral in social work practice in bulgaria

    OpenAIRE

    Y. Georgiev

    2017-01-01

    This article is an attempt to outline the situation of social work practice in Bulgaria and the today status of the Bulgarian Association of Social Workers and its Code of Ethics. I argue that there is a crisis of moral in social work practice in Bulgaria. My personal experience and observations on the practice of social workers are rationalized in the methodology of Jurgen Habermas. This article is an attempt to bring the importance of the Code of Ethics for the professional status and profe...

  5. Pluralism, Social Work and Ethical-Political Project: One theme, many challenges

    OpenAIRE

    Valeria Lucilia Forti

    2017-01-01

    This essay is the result of observations drawn from our decades of experience as a social worker and professor, particularly of classes in professional ethics in Social Work. It is also based on theoretical studies and qualitative empirical academic research about ethics/professional ethics and Social Work. The content was partially presented and debated in a lecture at the XV ENPESS. The arguments seek to deepen the debate about the relationship between pluralism and Social Work. Such a deba...

  6. [Social Work with old people and Social Gerontology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aner, Kirsten

    2017-07-01

    The current article outlines the development of Social Work with older people in the German social state and the role of gerontological discourses in this process. Some theories of Social work are introduced to show the mutual benefit that it has, when Social Work with older people and Gerontology continuously engage in common theoretical debates.

  7. SocialWelfare Policy Changes and SocialWork Practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doris McGartland Rubio

    2000-12-01

    Full Text Available Managed care, welfare reform, changes in government-sponsored health insurance, privatization, for-profit commercial activity, and increasing competition for charitable funding are affecting nonprofit social service organizations. This study of 244 nonprofit social service agencies explores the influence of social policy changes on nonprofit organizations. The effects of such changes on social work practice and social work field education within nonprofit organizations are explicated. Guidance for social work field education departments is provided.

  8. Resilience of primary healthcare professionals working in challenging environments: a focus group study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matheson, Catriona; Robertson, Helen D; Elliott, Alison M; Iversen, Lisa; Murchie, Peter

    2016-07-01

    The modern primary healthcare workforce needs to be resilient. Early research framed professional resilience as avoiding 'burnout'; however, more recent literature has introduced the concept of positive adaptation to professional challenges, which results in individuals thriving in their role. To explore what primary health professionals working in challenging environments consider to be characteristics of resilience and what promotes or challenges professional resilience. A qualitative focus group in north east Scotland. Five focus groups were held with 20 health professionals (six GPs, nine nurses, four pharmacists, and a practice manager) based in rural or deprived city areas in the north east of Scotland. Inductive thematic analysis identified emerging themes. Personal resilience characteristics identified were optimism, flexibility and adaptability, initiative, tolerance, organisational skills, being a team worker, keeping within professional boundaries, assertiveness, humour, and a sense of self-worth. Workplace challenges were workload, information overload, time pressures, poor communication, challenging patients, and environmental factors (rural location). Promoters of professional resilience were strong management support, teamwork, workplace buffers, and social factors such as friends, family, and leisure activities. A model of health professional resilience is proposed that concurs with existing literature but adds the concept of personal traits being synergistic with workplace features and social networks. These facilitate adaptability and enable individual health professionals to cope with adversity that is inevitably part of the everyday experience of those working in challenging healthcare environments. © British Journal of General Practice 2016.

  9. COSTS OF PROFESSIONAL SOCIALIZATION PERSONALITY IN ACTIVITY OF SOCIONOMICAL TYPE

    OpenAIRE

    Arendachuk Irina Vasilevna

    2012-01-01

    This article analyzes the psychological factors of formation of emotional burnout as a form of costs of professional socialization personality in activity of socionomical type (on an example of the specialists working in sphere of trade). Methods: «Purpose-in-Life Test» (J. Karembeu, L. Maholik in adaptation of Leontiev D.A.); techniques «Diagnosis burnout syndrome» (C. Maslach, C. Jackson in adaptation of Vodopyanova N.E.) and «The survey of labor stress» (adapted Russian version Ch. Spielbe...

  10. Group Work Education in Social Work: A Review of the Literature Reveals Possible Solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaRocque, Sarah E.

    2017-01-01

    This article examines the growing concerns in the literature that traditional group work education in social work is not providing the foundational knowledge, skills, evidence-based practice, professional uses of self, and adherence to practice standards necessary for effective group practice. An exploration of the best available evidence on group…

  11. Impact of Decoding Work within a Professional Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeo, Michelle; Lafave, Mark; Westbrook, Khatija; McAllister, Jenelle; Valdez, Dennis; Eubank, Breda

    2017-01-01

    This chapter demonstrates how Decoding work can be used productively within a curriculum change process to help make design decisions based on a more nuanced understanding of student learning and the relationship of a professional program to the field.

  12. Framing Education for a Science of Social Work: Missions, Curriculum, and Doctoral Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fong, Rowena

    2012-01-01

    Social work education has historically been grounded in professional practice but recent discussions have urged a reconsideration of social work as a science. Social work is progressively doing more intervention work, service systems research, implementation research, and translational research which are elevating research standards to new levels…

  13. Using social media to enhance career development opportunities for health promotion professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roman, Leah A

    2014-07-01

    For health promotion professionals, social media offers many ways to engage with a broader range of colleagues; participate in professional development events; promote expertise, products, or services; and learn about career-enhancing opportunities such as funding and fellowships. Previous work has recommended "building networking into what you are already doing." This article provides updated and new social media resources, as well as practical examples and strategies to promote effective use of social media. Social media offers health promotion professionals cost-effective opportunities to enhance their career by building communities of practice, participating in professional development events, and enriching classroom learning. Developing the skills necessary to use social media for networking is important in the public health workforce, especially as social media is increasingly used in academic and practice settings. © 2014 Society for Public Health Education.

  14. Professional Use of Social Media by Pharmacists: A Qualitative Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benetoli, Arcelio; Chen, Timothy Frank; Schaefer, Marion; Chaar, Betty B

    2016-01-01

    Background Social media is frequently used by consumers and health care professionals; however, our knowledge about its use in a professional capacity by pharmacists is limited. Objective Our aim was to investigate the professional use of social media by pharmacists. Methods In-depth semistructured interviews were conducted with practicing pharmacists (N=31) from nine countries. Interviews were recorded, transcribed verbatim, and thematically analyzed. Results Wikipedia, YouTube, and Facebook were the main social media platforms used. Professional use of social media included networking with peers, discussion of health and professional topics, accessing and sharing health and professional information, job searching, and professional promotion. Wikipedia was the participants’ first choice when seeking information about unfamiliar topics, or topics that were difficult to search for. Very few pharmacy-related contributions to Wikipedia were reported. YouTube, a video-sharing platform, was used for self-education. University lectures, “how-to” footage, and professionally made videos were commonly watched. No professional contribution was made to YouTube. Facebook, a general social networking site, was used for professional networking, promotion of achievements, and job advertisements. It also afforded engagement in professional discussions and information sharing among peers. Conclusions Participants used social media in a professional capacity, specifically for accessing and sharing health and professional information among peers. Pharmacists, as medicines experts, should take a leading role in contributing to health information dissemination in these user-friendly virtual environments, to reach not only other health care professionals but also health consumers. PMID:27663570

  15. Organizational-professional conflict of I/O psychologists, job satisfaction and work engagement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mladenović Branko

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available organizational-professional conflict occurs among employees in situations when organizational expectations and demands are opposed to the professional principles and standards. The results of studies have shown that this conflict negatively affects employees' attitude towards the job and affective-motivational state of fulfilment with work role. The purpose of this research was to examine exposure to organizational-professional conflict among I/O psychologists in Serbia, to find out whether there is a correlation between the exposure to organizational-professional conflict, job satisfaction and work engagement, and to determine the main factors of exposure to organizational-professional conflict. Our sample consisted of 96 I/O psychologists. Results have shown that there was significant high negative correlation between the exposure to organizational-professional conflict and job satisfaction, as well as significant moderate negative correlation between the exposure to organizational-professional conflict and work engagement. The highest correlations were with social dimensions of job satisfaction. The exposure to organizational-professional conflict was lower among I/O psychologists with longer work experience and those at higher positions in organizational hierarchy. The exposure to organizational-professional conflict was higher among I/O psychologists who were working in privately owned companies and among those who were fixed-term employees. There was no significant correlation between the exposure to organizational-professional conflict and the size of the organization or business field. Our study showed that organizational-professional conflict should be considered as an important theoretical and research topic, as well as a relevant professional and career issue.

  16. Constructing nurses' professional identity through social identity theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willetts, Georgina; Clarke, David

    2014-04-01

    The profession of nursing continues to struggle with defining and clarifying its professional identity. The definitive recognition of nursing as a profession was the moving of training from the hospital apprentice model to the tertiary sector. However, this is only part of the story of professional identity in nursing. Once training finishes and enculturation into the workplace commences, professional identity becomes a complicated social activity. This paper proposes social identity theory as a valuable research framework to assist with clarifying and describing the professional identity of nurses. The paper outlines the key elements of a profession and then goes on to describe the main concepts of social identity theory. Lastly, a connection is made between the usefulness of using social identity theory in researching professional identity in nursing, recognizing the contextual nature of the social activity of the profession within its workplace environment. © 2013 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  17. Staff Peer Relationships and the Socialization Process of New Professionals: A Quantitative Investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strayhorn, Terrell L.

    2009-01-01

    Prior research on student affairs professionals has focused largely on the nature of student affairs work with most attention given to mid- and senior-level administrators. Thus, relatively little is known about new professionals and their socialization to the student affairs profession. Based on a multivariate analysis of survey data from a…

  18. Elementary English Education: An Arena of Social Struggle for Professional Chinese Parents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Xia; Xue, Mo; Xu, Ming

    2014-01-01

    In response to the national and individual needs for English instruction, China mandated English provision in elementary schools in 2001. Grounded in the work of Bourdieu, this study examines professional Chinese parents' language attitudes in relation to their social positions. It draws data from interviews with 20 professional Chinese parents…

  19. CONSTRUCTING SERVICE DISCOURSES IN LITHUANIAN FAMILY SOCIAL WORK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberta Motiečienė

    2016-09-01

    active labour measures and the development of other services, which are still limited (European Commission Council, 2015. The main target problems and challenges of the current family social work are domestic violence against children, different kinds of addictions and lack of social and parenting skills. In this paper, service discourses in Lithuanian family social work are analysed through social workers’ accounts of their work and cases. In Lithuania, family social work is equated to social work with “families at risk”. The phrase “family at social risk” is associated with the phrase “family with multiple problems” that is used in the academic literature on social work. Lithuanian legal acts define a family at risk as one that needs basic or special social services, whose parents are raising children under 18 years old; are suffering from alcohol, drug or psychotropic abuse problems or a gambling addiction; lack certain skills to know how or be able to take care of their children; use psychological, physical or sexual violence against their children; and spend monetary support for expenses other than family interests, thus posing dangers to their children’s physical, mental, spiritual and moral development and safety (Žin., No. 17-589, 2006, Article 2, part 7. A family from which 13CONSTRUCTING SERVICE DISCOURSES IN LITHUANIAN FAMILY SOCIAL WORK a child is taken and placed under temporary care is also listed in the Register of Social Risk Families with Children. These definitions broadly describe how social issues connected to families are constructed in society and how social work’s role in social problems and families is perceived. Family lives form a moral area where people’s identities and professional aims are constructed. Moral understandings are shaped by social constructions of the child, the adult, parenthood and family life. A central moral imperative concerning the requirement for a responsible adult is to prioritise the needs of the

  20. Indigenous People in a Landscape of Risk: Teaching Social Work Students about Socially Just Social Work Responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weaver, Hilary; Congress, Elaine

    2009-01-01

    The need for social justice in social work practice is particularly apparent in work with indigenous populations. In spite of the social work profession's commitment to social justice, social workers have often done significant harm in their work with indigenous peoples. Social work educators are ideally positioned to close this gap between social…

  1. The professional socialization of the graduate assistant athletic trainer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazerolle, Stephanie M; Eason, Christianne M; Clines, Stephanie; Pitney, William A

    2015-05-01

    The graduate assistant athletic trainer (AT) position often serves as one's first experience working independently as an AT and is also an important aspect of the professional socialization process. The socialization experiences of graduate assistant ATs have yet to be fully explored. To understand the socialization process for graduate assistant ATs during their graduate experience. Qualitative study. We conducted phone interviews with all participants. A total of 25 graduate assistant ATs (20 women, 5 men) studying in 1 of 3 academic tracks: (1) accredited postprofessional athletic training program (n = 8), (2) postprofessional athletic training program (n = 11), or (3) a nonathletic training degree program (n = 6). The average age was 25 ± 5 years, and the median age was 24 years. Participants were certified by the Board of Certification for an average of 2 ± 0.4 years. We analyzed the data using a general inductive approach. Peer review, field notes, and intercoder reliability established trustworthiness. Data saturation guided participant recruitment. The ability to gain clinical independence as a practitioner was an important socialization process. Having the chance to develop a relationship with a mentor, who provided support, guidance, and more of a hierarchical relationship, was an important socializing agent for the graduate assistant AT. Participants used the orientation session as a means to understand the expectations and role of the graduate-assistant position. Academic coursework was a way to achieve better inductance into the role via the opportunity to apply classroom skills during their clinical practice. Socializing the graduate assistant blends formal and informal processes. Transition to practice is a critical aspect of the profession; thus, supporting autonomous practice with directed mentoring can promote professional maturity.

  2. A Survey of Graduate Social Work Educators: Teaching Perspectives and Classroom Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danhoff, Kristin Lindsay

    2012-01-01

    Social work educators have the challenging task of preparing students to be ethically, morally, and socially responsible professionals. As professionals in the 21st Century, social workers are faced with ever increasing complexity and change. Teaching philosophies are at the foundation of what educators do in the classroom. Research about teaching…

  3. Sociology and Social Work in Nigeria: Characteristics ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abstract. This paper presents the evolution of sociology and social work in Nigeria and examines the current characteristics and areas of convergences and ... The findings show that the teaching of social work employs considerable sociological theories and sociology students are influenced by their exposure to social work.

  4. Social Work Science and Knowledge Utilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsh, Jeanne C.; Reed, Martena

    2016-01-01

    Objective: This article advances understanding of social work science by examining the content and methods of highly utilized or cited journal articles in social work. Methods: A data base of the 100 most frequently cited articles from 79 social work journals was coded and categorized into three primary domains: content, research versus…

  5. Military Social Work Thinking in South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrian D. van Breda

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Military social workers in South Africa have developed distinctive ways of thinking about military social work. These developments have been influenced by various contextual factors, such as the transition of South Africa to a non-racial democracy in 1994 and the establishment of a military social work research capacity. These factors contributed to new ways of thinking, such as the recognition that military social work has a mandate to facilitate organizational change and the adoption of a resilience perspective. A central development in military social work thinking in South Africa was the formulation of a Military Social Work Practice Model, which is described and illustrated in some detail. This model emphasizes binocular vision (focusing on the interface between soldiers and the military organization and four practice positions, derived from occupational social work theory. The author notes the importance of creating appropriate contexts that facilitate further developments in military social work theory.

  6. Policy on professional support in return-to-work: Occupational health professionals' experiences in a Canadian setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maiwald, Karin; Meershoek, Agnes; de Rijk, Angelique; Nijhuis, Frans J N

    2015-01-01

    In Canada and other countries, sickness-based absences among workers is an economic and sociological problem. Return-to-work (RTW) policy developed by both employer and worker' representatives (that is, bipartite policy) is preferred to tackle this problem. The intent was to examine how this bipartite agreed-upon RTW policy works from the perspective of occupational health professionals (those who deliver RTW services to workers with temporary or permanent disabilities) in a public healthcare organization in Canada. In-depth interviews were held with 9 occupational health professionals and transcribed verbatim. A qualitative, social constructivist, analysis was completed. The occupational health professionals experienced four main problems: 1) timing and content of physicians' medical advice cannot be trusted as a basis for RTW plans; 2) legal status of the plans and thus needing workers' consent and managers' approval can create tension, conflict and delays; 3) limited input and thus little fruitful inference in transdisciplinary meetings at the workplace; and yet 4) the professionals can be called to account for plans. Bipartite representation in developing RTW policy does not entirely delete bottlenecks in executing the policy. Occupational health professionals should be offered more influence and their professionalism needs to be enhanced.

  7. Teaching Tweeting: Recommendations for Teaching Social Media Work in LIS and MSIS Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simons, Rachel N.; Ocepek, Melissa G.; Barker, Lecia J.

    2016-01-01

    A combination of public relations, marketing, advertising, and information and communication technologies, social media work is an increasingly important part of information professionals' jobs. This paper reports on a survey-based study of 49 information professionals who routinely use social media in their work. Respondents provided information…

  8. Continuing Education for the Emerging Social Work Profession in China: The Experiment in Shenzhen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Ching Man; Yan, Miu Chung; Liang, Yan

    2016-01-01

    In-service training as a form of continuing professional education (CPE) is important for social work professionals to maintain their skills and enhance their knowledge for publicly accountable practice. These goals are concerns in Mainland China, which has experienced rapid development in social work since economic reforms started in the early…

  9. Social Justice, Education and School Social Work in Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadir, Ural; Aktan, Mehmet Can

    2015-01-01

    This study focuses on welfare state, social justice and school social work interaction. In this paper, these three concepts' reflections in Turkey were mentioned. Researchers aimed to discuss how school social work (which is brought to the agenda recently) is important in the provision of social justice in Turkish public service delivery. [For the…

  10. A construção de si pela atividade de trabalho: a socialização profissional The construction of self through work activity: the professional socialization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claude Dubar

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available A sociologia funcionalista das profissões distingue dois tipos muito diferentes de atividades de trabalho: as profissões e as ocupações (ambas no sentido que os ingleses lhes dão. Como apenas as primeiras (a dos médicos, advogados, engenheiros, professores... são consideradas escolhas e áreas autônomas que permitem a construção de uma carreira, as segundas (que constituem a maioria acabam sendo desvalorizadas. Os sociólogos interacionistas (como os de Chicago: Hughes, Becker, Strauss etc. e críticos (marxianos, weberianos etc. contestam essa posição e consideram que todas as atividades de trabalho poderiam se tornar "profissionais" (no sentido francês, desde que resultassem de uma socialização que permitisse a aquisição de competências e o reconhecimento (inclusive monetário de todos os que exercem e compartilham uma mesma atividade. A comparação da socialização de clínicos gerais e de auxiliares de enfermagem na França ilustra esta tese, ao tomar o trabalho como um processo de construção e de reconhecimento de si.The functionalist sociology of professions distinguishes between two very different types of work activities, professions and occupations (both in the sense the English give to them. As just the first (doctors, lawyers, engineers and professors... are considered autonomous choices and areas that allow for the construction of a career, the second (which constitute the majority end up being devalued. The interactionist sociologists (like those from Chicago: Hughes, Becker, Strauss etc. and critics (Marxists, Weberian etc. challenge this position and consider that all activities could become "professional" (in the French sense, as they result in a socialization that allows for the acquisition of skills and recognition (including monetary for all those executing and sharing the same activity. The comparison of the socialization of general practioners and nursing assistants in France illustrates this thesis, in

  11. Simulated Family Therapy Interviews in Clinical Social Work Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mooradian, John K.

    2007-01-01

    This article describes a learning method that employed theatre students as family clients in an advanced social work practice course. Students were provided with an opportunity to integrate and apply their learning of theory, clinical skills, and professional conduct in full-length family therapy sessions that occurred in the classroom and were…

  12. [Freelance nurses and social care workers working with the elderly].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douguet, Florence; Vilbrod, Alain

    2013-05-01

    Freelance nurses are in contact with an array of professionals working to help elderly people to continue living at home. In particular they form close ties with social service assistants and home care support workers. Between diverging perspectives and actual collaboration, these relationships seem atthe very least extremely contrasting.

  13. The Ethic of Care: Recapturing Social Work's First Voice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dybicz, Phillip

    2012-01-01

    This article examines the dynamic between expressions of care--that is, simple acts of kindness and consideration that make up friendly relations--and professional expertise. During the 20th century, social work based its expertise on a solid scientific foundation. Within the embrace of scientific expertise, expressions of care are assigned the…

  14. Compassion Fatigue among Social Work Students in Field Placements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harr, Cynthia; Moore, Brenda

    2011-01-01

    This pilot study, conducted with BSW and MSW field students at a public university in Southwestern United States, explored the psychological effect of compassion fatigue and compassion satisfaction on social work students in field placements. Results from the Professional Quality of Life Scale's compassion satisfaction and fatigue subscales…

  15. Inbreeding in Social Work Education: An Empirical Examination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wells, Richard A.; And Others

    1979-01-01

    Academic inbreeding--selecting former students of an institution to its faculty--was found to be prevalent in graduate schools of social work, but not related to an institution's ranking on measures of prestige, scholarly or professional productivity, and teaching quality. It was concluded that inbreeding is not predictive of institutional or…

  16. Social Work Continuing Education: Current Issues and Future Direction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurzman, Paul A.

    2016-01-01

    Continuing education is arising as an area of rapid growth and increased attention in the social work profession. Conceptually, the impetus and focus are on the promotion of the principles of lifelong learning and professional replenishment; but pragmatically, the driving force has been the virtually universal requirement of continuing education…

  17. Positioning Social Work in a Socially Sensitive Society.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hans van Ewijk

    2010-01-01

    As a practitioner, a manager and a scientist in social work for 40 years, I am still intrigued by the social work positioning and legitimating processes. Its recognition by users and financiers is often diffuse and its fragmentation sometimes hinders effective interventions. In social work itself,

  18. Positioning Social Work in a Socially Sensitive Society

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ewijk, H. van

    2010-01-01

    As a practitioner, a manager and a scientist in social work for 40 years, I am still intrigued by the social work positioning and legitimating processes. Its recognition by users and financiers is often diffuse and its fragmentation sometimes hinders effective interventions. In social work itself,

  19. IMPORTANCE OF SOCIAL WORK IN IMPLEMENTATION OF SOCIAL CARE FOR DISABLED PEOPLE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Velichko ANDREEVSKI

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available The implementation of social care for disabled people is conditioned by the level of development of the professional services for social care, engagement of medical and special education staff in a very complex process of rehabilitation and education. The organs and services of social care and social work, through legal regulations, are obliged to participate in providing, organization and implementation of social care for disabled people. This process starts with prevention, detection, diagnosis, rehabilitation, realization of their rights and lasts until their inclusion, i.e. social integration and in a large number of cases to the end of their lives.

  20. Interaction effect of work excitement and work frustration on the professional commitment of nurses in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Yuan-Ping; Wang, Hsiu-Hung; Huang, Shan; Wang, Huang-I

    2014-03-01

    The current shortage of professional nurses in Taiwan both undermines hospital quality of care and raises hospitals' human resource management costs. Few studies have concurrently investigated the interaction effect between professional commitment and, respectively, the positive and negative work attitudes of nurses. Results of this investigation may help improve strategies designed to raise nurse retention rates. This study used the interaction effects of work excitement and work frustration to assess their influence on the professional commitment of nurses. This study was conducted at one hospital in southern Taiwan and used a cross-sectional design with self-administrated questionnaires. Seven hundred thirty-five nurses completed and submitted valid questionnaires (valid response rate: 68.5%). Exploratory and confirmatory factor analysis confirmed the reliability and validity of the three measurement models of work excitement, work frustration, and professional commitment. Correlation and hierarchical regression analysis verified the direct and interaction effects with the correlations among the three measured variables. Work frustration was higher than work excitement among participants (M = 2.72, SD = 0.71 vs. M = 2.26, SD = 0.62). The mean participant score for professional commitment was 2.72 (SD = 0.45) on a 4-point Likert scale. There was a significant and positive correlation between work excitement and professional commitment and a significant and negative correlation between work frustration and professional commitment. High work frustration had a negative effect on professional commitment, whereas high work excitement had a higher positive effect on professional commitment. The two-way interaction between work excitement and frustration was statistically significant in explaining the effects of professional commitment (p Nurses often work in conditions that are highly frustrating. Although work excitement has been shown as having a greater influence on

  1. Social Action among Social Work Practitioners: Examining the Micro-Macro Divide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattocks, Nicole Olivia

    2018-01-01

    Social work is a profession that seeks to enhance the well-being of all people and promote social justice and social change through a range of activities, such as direct practice, community organizing, social and political action, and policy development. However, the current literature suggests that the profession's focus on social justice and social action are weakening, replaced by individualism and therapeutic interventions. This article examines data derived from a survey of 188 National Association of Social Workers members from Maryland; Virginia; and Washington, DC, to explore levels of social action participation among social workers and determine whether identifying as a macro-level practitioner would predict higher levels of social action activity compared with being a micro-level practitioner. Findings indicate that social workers in this sample engage in only a moderate level of social action behavior. In addition, identifying oneself as a mezzo- or macro-level practitioner predicts increased frequency of social action behavior. Implications include emphasizing the importance of social action in schools of social work and practice settings and adequately preparing social work professionals to engage in social action. © 2017 National Association of Social Workers.

  2. Violence and Social Work: Critical Notes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Fernando Siqueira da Silva

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available This theoretical essay presents some important observations about violence as a social phenomenon that places particular demands upon Social Work. It suggests ways to handle this critical category of Social Work. It works from the perspective of totality, emphasizing the diverse unity between ontology (the existence of a social being and gnosology (knowledge about this being, considering the reconstruction of the issue proposed as ‘concrete thought’.

  3. A Scoping Review of Social Media Use in Social Work Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Chitat

    2016-01-01

    The trend of using social media in social work is increasing, but research which systematically reviews and evaluates their uses in actual practice is limited. This article reviews the social work literature to identify the uses, benefits, and limitations of social media in social work practice, and identifies current gaps in the literature to provide recommendations for future social work research. Articles in 64 social work journals published between 2000 and 2014 were screened and analyzed. The included articles (n = 20) were analyzed with particular reference to their level of evidence and ways of social media use. The methodological quality of the studies in this review was low, and this was consistent with the findings of recent systematic reviews of social media use in medical healthcare. The findings initially suggested that social media can potentially contribute to various social work processes, including: service user engagement, need assessment, intervention, and program evaluation. Limitations include lack of quality control, reliability, confidentiality, and privacy. In social work, the dominant research concern in social media is more about professional ethics than their application in intervention. Implications for research and practice are discussed.

  4. The politics of interprofessional working and the struggle for professional autonomy in nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salhani, Daniel; Coulter, Ian

    2009-04-01

    This study of interprofessional work relations in a Canadian mental health team examines how nursing deployed different forms of power in order to alter the mental health division of labour, to gain administrative, organizational and content control over its own work, expand its jurisdictional boundaries by expropriating the work of other professionals, and exclude others from encroaching on its old and newly acquired jurisdictions. This is set against the context of nursing's long-standing professional project to consolidate and expand its professional jurisdiction. Using an ethnographic study of a single interprofessional mental health team in a psychiatric hospital in Canada, the paper attempts to understand the politics and paradoxes involved in realizing nursing's professional project and how the politics of professional autonomy and professional dominance are actually conducted through micro-political struggles. The data demonstrates the effects of the political struggles at the organizational and work process levels, particularly in the forms of collaboration that result. Nurses gained substantial autonomy from medical domination and secured practical dominion over the work of non-medical professionals. New forms of interprofessional collaboration were accomplished through both simultaneous and sequential micro-political struggles with psychiatrists and non-medical professionals, and the formation of political alliances and informal agreements. Nursing solidarity at the elite level and substantial effort by the elite nurses and their committed colleagues to mobilize their less enthused members were fundamental to their success. The nurses deployed political (power) strategies and tactics to organize and reorganize themselves and other professionals on multiple levels (politically, organizationally, ideologically, socially and culturally). This study reveals the complexity and robustness of micro-political dynamics in the constitution of professional and

  5. Organisational and task factors influencing teachers’ professional development at work

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Evers, A.T.; Heijden, B.I.J.M. van der; Kreijns, K.

    2016-01-01

    - Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to investigate organisational (cultural and relational) and task factors which potentially enhance teachers’ professional development at work (TPD at Work). The development of lifelong learning competencies and, consequently, the careers of teachers, has

  6. Unnoticed professional competence in day care work and the challenge of neoliberalism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahrenkiel, Annegrethe; Warring, Niels; Schmidt, Camilla

    New Public Management and neoliberalism has had a huge impact on care and health work imposing demands for documentation, standardization and evaluation. These demands seem to be in contrast with core aspects of the professional competence that are unnoticed. The paper explores how social educator......’s work in day care centers can be explored, developed and potentially democratized acknowledging the unnoticed aspects of daily work practices and professional competence. The paper draws on empirical examples from two research projects (Ahrenkiel et al. 2009, 2011) and discuss how noticing...

  7. Impact of Death Work on Self: Existential and Emotional Challenges and Coping of Palliative Care Professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Wallace Chi Ho; Tin, Agnes Fong; Fong, Agnes; Wong, Karen Lok Yi; Tse, Doris Man Wah; Lau, Kam Shing; Chan, Lai Ngor

    2016-02-01

    Palliative care professionals, such as social workers, often work with death and bereavement. They need to cope with the challenges on "self" in working with death, such as coping with their own emotions and existential queries. In this study, the authors explore the impact of death work on the self of palliative care professionals and how they perceive and cope with the challenges of self in death work by conducting a qualitative study. Participants were recruited from the palliative care units of hospitals in Hong Kong. In-depth interviews were conducted with 22 palliative care professionals: five physicians, 11 nurses, and six social workers. Interviews were transcribed to text for analysis. Emotional challenges (for example, aroused emotional distress from work) and existential challenges (for example, shattered basic assumptions on life and death) were identified as key themes. Similarly, emotional coping (for example, accepting and managing personal emotions) and existential coping (for example, rebuilding and actualizing life-and-death assumptions) strategies were identified. This study enhances the understanding of how palliative care professionals perceive and cope with the challenges of death work on the self. Findings may provide insights into how training can be conducted to enhance professionals' self-competence in facing these challenges.

  8. Professional Learning in Unlikely Spaces: Social Media and Virtual Communities as Professional Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathleen P. King

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available In this case study, results demonstrate that an individual’s use of social media as professional learning spans understanding, networking, professional identity development, and transformative learning. Specifically, virtual online communities facilitated through social media provide professional networks, social relationships and learning beyond the scope of the individual’s usual experience. Case study method reveals strategies, extent, and impact of learning providing insight into this phenomenon. The significance of the research includes purposefully facilitating professional learning through informal learning contexts, including social media and online communities beyond technology-centric fields. Discussion and recommendations include using social media and virtual communities as instructional strategies for graduate studies and continued learning beyond formal education.

  9. Examining Inclusion of Evidence-Based Practice on Social Work Training Program Websites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wike, Traci L.; Bledsoe, Sarah E.; Bellamy, Jennifer L.; Grady, Melissa D.

    2013-01-01

    Websites represent a visible medium for social work programs to communicate information about social work research, academics, and professional training priorities, including evidence-based practice (EBP). However, few studies have examined the content of social work program websites. This exploratory study aimed to answer the question: Are EBP…

  10. PECULIARITIES OF PROFESSIONAL COMMUNICATION OF A SOCIAL PEDAGOGUE WITH A FAMILY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flyura Al’tafovna Mustaeva

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The professional communication of a social pedagogue with a family is an actual problem of modern science. The object of the research is a Russian family, the subject – the communication of a social pedagogue with a family. The purpose of the research is the revealing of peculiarities of professional communication of a social pedagogue with a family, the account of which in practical professional work of an expert will promote the perfection of his work and the improvement of the quality of social-pedagogical services to a family.During the research the following methods were used: analysis of references, questioning methods, analysis of documents, pedagogical supervision. On the basis of the sociological researches: social problems of a Russian family were revealed, subjects of social-pedagogical work with a family were named, the necessity of the introduction of an institute of social pedagogues helping families was proved. The concept of self-determination of a family was introduced, the necessity of the transition of a family to self-determination while deciding its problems and realizing its educational function was proved. The peculiarities of professional communication of a social pedagogue with different types of families were revealed. The professional communication of a social pedagogue with a family is a complex process demanding the competent organization of interpersonal interaction, the usage of personal potential to create favorable psychological background and an atmosphere of trust, the knowledge of social problems and social-psychological peculiarities of a family, the differentiated approach in social-pedagogical work with a family.The results of the research can be used in practical activities of social pedagogues, in vocational training of experts.

  11. Social and personal normative influences on healthcare professionals to use information technology: Towards a more robust social ergonomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holden, Richard J

    2012-09-01

    Social structures and processes are increasingly acknowledged and studied within the human factors/ergonomics (HFE) discipline. At the same time, social phenomena are rarely the focus of HFE work, leaving a knowledge gap. The present study directly addresses social and personal normative forces that influence technology use and performance. Social and personal normative influence to use electronic health records (EHR) were investigated using semi-structured qualitative interviews with 20 attending physicians at two US hospitals. Analyses used a comprehensive framework based on leading social scientific theories and revealed numerous sources of influence, including hospital administration, colleagues, patients, clinical and professional groups, government, and one's self. Influence was achieved through different means and invoked different psychological processes. Findings motivate a new view of professionals' technology use as a highly social process occurring in a social context, with implications for research, policy, design, and in general the development of a robust social ergonomics.

  12. Social Media, Professionalism and Higher Education: A Sociomaterial Consideration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenwick, Tara

    2016-01-01

    Within debates about student professionalism and how to develop it in higher education (HE), increasing focus has turned to students' uses of social media. While social media skills are promoted by some HE educators, most emphasis is still given to perceived hazards and abuses of social media in practice. These are typically framed as a matter of…

  13. Military Social Work as an Exemplar in Teaching Social Work Competencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daley, James G.; Carlson, Joan; Evans, Pinkie

    2015-01-01

    This article is for social work educators unfamiliar with military social work and receptive to a number of exemplars to enhance teaching strategies within their courses. Because examples of military social work are directly tied to the Council on Social Work Education competencies, this article offers a number of suggested teaching strategies…

  14. The Science of Social Work and Its Relationship to Social Work Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anastas, Jeane W.

    2014-01-01

    As John Brekke has observed, social work does not use the word "science" to define itself, suggesting a need to articulate a science of social work. This article discusses the science of social work and its relationship to social work practice in the United States, arguing that a "rapprochement" between practice and science…

  15. Work engagement in professional nursing practice: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keyko, Kacey; Cummings, Greta G; Yonge, Olive; Wong, Carol A

    2016-09-01

    Work engagement in professional nursing practice is critically important to consider when addressing key challenges of health systems, including the global nursing shortage, pressures to reduce health care spending, and increasing demands for quality care and positive outcomes for patients. However, research on work engagement in professional nursing practice has not yet been synthesized and therefore, does not provide a sufficient foundation of knowledge to guide practice and further research. The overall aim of this systematic review is to determine what is currently known about the antecedents and outcomes of work engagement in professional nursing practice. Systematic review. The search strategy included eight electronic databases: CINAHL, MEDLINE, PsycINFO, PROQUEST, SCOPUS, Web of Science, EMBASE, and Business Source Complete. The search was conducted in October 2013. Quantitative and qualitative research that examined relationships between work engagement and antecedent or outcome factors was included. Quality assessment, data extractions, and analysis were completed on all included studies. Data extracted from included studies were synthesized through descriptive and narrative synthesis. Content analysis was used to categorize factors into themes and categories. 3621 titles and abstracts were screened and yielded 113 manuscripts for full text review. Full text review resulted in 18 included studies. All factors examined were grouped into either influences or outcomes of work engagement. A total of 77 influencing factors were categorized into 6 themes: organizational climate, job resources, professional resources, personal resources, job demands, and demographic variables. A total of 17 outcomes of work engagement were categorized into 3 themes: performance and care outcomes, professional outcomes, and personal outcomes. Based on the results, we adapted the Job Demands-Resources (JD-R) model and developed the Nursing Job Demands-Resources (NJD-R) model for

  16. African American Professionals: Coping with Occupational Stress in Predominantly White Work Environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holder, Judith C.; Vaux, Alan

    1998-01-01

    A survey of 112 African-American professionals in predominantly White workplaces found that work- and race-related stressors independently influenced job satisfaction. Internal locus of control and collegial/supervisory support lessened stress. Nonwork social support did not buffer effects of race-related stressors. (SK)

  17. Politicised Notions of Professional Identity and Psychosocial Practice among Practitioners Working with Asylum Seekers and Refugees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apostolidou, Zoe

    2015-01-01

    This is the first study undertaken in the UK that investigates the notion of professional identity among practitioners who work with asylum seekers and refugees. Drawing on a social constructionist epistemology and a Foucauldian theoretical and methodological framework of power and discourse, I analysed extracts from semi-structured interviews…

  18. WORKING ENVIRONMENT AND JOB SATISFACTION AMONG HEALTH PROFESSIONAL WORKING AT A TERTIARY CARE HOSPITAL OF PAKISTAN.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aziz, Imrana; Kumar, Ramesh; Rathore, Anita; Lal, Manohr

    2015-01-01

    Work environment is believed to be a major factor for better performance of human resource for health in any organization. This study concentrated on multiple factors involved in job satisfaction was appraised to critique their efficient significance in calculation of the health professional liking. Factors included job matched with workers' skills/experience, incentives, supervision, administrator support; convenient work load, training, appreciation, low pay and job protection were major contributors in job satisfaction. A mix method study was done in 2014; an initial descriptive cross sectional survey was done followed by qualitative approach. Eighteen in-depth interviews with health care providers were conducted after taking written consent. Nodes, sub-nodes and final themes were generated during qualitative data analysis. Main findings and themes were, generated after making the nodes and sub-nodes from the most frequent responses. These themes were; absence of work pressure, work place safety, social support, learning opportunities, and employee influence on conditions and recognition individual or team efforts. Work environment is a major contributing factor towards job satisfaction among the health workers.

  19. Working Paper on Social capital

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lassen Hanan, Anne

    This paper outlines the major schools within social capital theory. Contemporary authors such as Coleman, Putnam and Bourdieu are elaborated on. The paper also presents a non-exhaustive review on studies of social capital. Furthermore, a criticial discussion on social capital is reviewed, before ...... the concept is bridged to the context of farmers and traders in yam and cassava value chains in the Ghana....

  20. Work, employment, and mental illness: expanding the domain of Canadian social work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shankar, Janki; Barlow, Constance A; Khalema, Ernest

    2011-01-01

    Despite established evidence that work and employment are an important component of recovery for people who experience mental illness, social work education in Canada seldom offers graduate training or courses on the significance of work in peoples' lives or on the practices involved in helping to gain and retain employment for these individuals. In this article the authors argue that the high levels of unemployment among people who experience mental illness, and the rising incidence of mental health and addictions issues in workplaces, offer the opportunity, as well as the mandate, for social work educators to provide professional education in the area of employment support and assistance.

  1. Social Stressors at Work, Sleep, and Recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Diana; Gross, Sven; Elfering, Achim

    2016-03-01

    Many employees in service work are required to work on Saturdays, recovering during work-free Sundays and working again Mondays. We examined the effects of social stressors at work on recovery status at Sunday noon and Monday noon, and investigated if sleep quality mediates the negative effects of social stressors at work on recovery. From Saturday until Monday morning, 41 participants wore actigraphs to measure sleep duration and sleep fragmentation. Social stressors at work were assessed by self-reported questionnaires administered on Saturday. Recovery status was reported Sunday noon and Monday noon. Hierarchical regression analysis revealed that social stressors at work were negatively related to recovery status on Sunday and on Monday. Supporting our assumptions, more social stressors at work predicted higher sleep fragmentation in the night to Monday. A mediation effect of sleep quality, however, was not found. Theoretical and practical implications of these results are discussed.

  2. [Medical professionalism-on social responsibilities viewed from historical perspective].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jang Han

    2015-03-01

    What is medical professionalism and does it matter to the patients? Medical professionals take responsibility for their judgements and the consequences that ensue. Traditionally medical professionalism is defined as a set of values, behaviors, and relationships which support the trust the public has in doctors. The public is well aware that absence of professionalism is harmful to their interests. However, the exercise of medical professionalism is endangered by the political and cultural environment. The values of professionalism have been changed throughout the medical history and the meaning of it was also changed according to social theories. Traditional medical professionalism was based on the virtue of autonomy, self-regulation and competency etc. However, in the new millenium era, the meaning of professionalism has changed under the concept of responsibility which includes the classical virtues. The meaning of professionalism nowadays is only based on the structure and conflicting theories which cannot solve all the issues surrounding professionalism in medical practice. The conditions of medical practice are critical determinants for the future of professionalism. The interaction between doctor and patient is central to the medical care, and medical professionalism has roots in almost every aspect of medical care. I argue that doctors have responsibility to act according to the values which have been determined by the medical profession, history and surrounding society. The new millennium medical professionalism which based on the responsibility could initiate a public dialogue about the role of the doctor in creating a fairer society.

  3. Working atmosphere, job satisfaction and individual characteristics of community mental health professionals in integrated care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goetz, Katja; Kleine-Budde, Katja; Bramesfeld, Anke; Stegbauer, Constance

    2017-09-05

    Working requirements of community mental healthcare professionals in integrated care are complex. There is a lack of research concerning the relation of job satisfaction, working atmosphere and individual characteristics. For the current study, a survey evaluating job satisfaction and working atmosphere of mental healthcare professionals in integrated care was performed. About 321 community mental healthcare professionals were included in the survey; the response rate was 59.5%. The professional background of community mental healthcare professionals included nursing, social work and psychology. Community mental healthcare professionals reported the highest satisfaction with colleagues and the lowest satisfaction with income. Moreover, it could be shown that more responsibility, more recognition and more variety in job tasks lead to an increase of overall job satisfaction. Healthcare for mentally ill patients in the community setting is complex and requires well-structured care with appropriate responsibilities within the team. A co-operative relationship among colleagues as well as clearly defined responsibilities seem to be the key for the job satisfaction of community mental healthcare professionals in integrated care. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Work engagement in employees at professional improvement programs in health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizangela Gianini Gonsalez

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This study evaluated the levels of engagement at work in enhancement programs and professionals training in health. Method: A cross-sectional study with 82 health professionals enhancement programs and improvement of a public institution in the State of São Paulo, using the Utrech Work Engagement Scale (UWES, a self-administered questionnaire composed of seventeen self-assessment items in three dimensions: vigor, dedication and absorption. The scores were calculated according to the statistical model proposed in the Preliminary Manual UWES. Results: Engagement levels were too high on the force, high dedication and dimension in general score, and medium in size to 71.61% absorption, 58.03%, 53.75% and 51.22% of workers, respectively. The professionals present positive relationship with the work; they are responsible, motivated and dedicated to the job and to the patients. Conclusion: Reinforces the importance of studies that evaluate positive aspects of the relationship between professionals and working environment, contributing to strengthen the programs of improvement, advancing the profile of professionals into the labour market.

  5. Participation and Emotions: Troubling Encounters between Children and Social Welfare Professionals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinkney, Sharon

    2011-01-01

    This paper explores the emotional aspects of participation within social welfare contexts. The focus is on individual professionals, such as social workers and children's rights workers and their articulation, management and negotiation of the emotional when working with children and young people. The institutions of welfare are also shown to be…

  6. A social institution supervisor’s professional establishment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Astremska Iryna Volodymyrivna

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The article covers the problem of а social sphere supervisor’s professional establishment. It is proven that professionalconsciousness (professional self-conception includes one's image about themselves as a member of a professional community. These mindsets are proved to include characteristics that determine one's success – professionally important qualities (individual psychological qualities and personal relations. There are defined five criteria psychological preparation development of an educator, a psychologist and a psychology lecturer of a Pedagogical University in a system of continuous education, which are also important for the supervisor’s professional establishment. The basic approaches and models are outlined on defining professionally important personal qualities for a social institution supervisor.

  7. [Maintenance of work ability among hospital health care professionals].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knezević, Bojana; Golubić, Rajna; Belosević, Ljiljana; Milosević, Milan; Mustajbegović, Jadranka

    2010-12-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the values of the Work Ability Index (WAI) and to analyze the factors that may be associated with work ability among hospital health care professionals. A total of 1856 health care professionals employed at 5 Zagreb hospitals participated in this cross-sectional study. Data were collected using the Work Ability Index Questionnaire and Occupational Stress Assessment Questionnaire for hospital health care professionals. The average WAI of all participants was 38.68+/-6.28, indicating very good work ability. WAI was significantly higher in men than in women, 40.43+/-5.81 and 38.27+/-6.32, respectively (pnurses (pnurses (pnurses, suggesting that the jobs of highly educated participants, which are characterized by broad decision-making latitude and promotion possibilities maintain work ability better in comparison with low decision-making latitude jobs and low control jobs. About 5 percent of all participants had poor WAI. We identified the following significant predictors of suboptimal WAI among health care professionals: female sex, age, service accrual, and stressors related to organization and financial issues (phazards (p=0.040), and shift work (p=0.001). The average WAI of all participants indicated very good work ability, but small percent of them had poor WAI. Our results suggest the need of preventive measures that would target maintenance of work ability at an organizational and individual level. The organizational level should include the provision of a sufficient number of workers, adequate financial resources for work and adequate salaries, less paperwork, positive collaboration with the public, especially media, and education of medical staff on the risks and hazards at work. The individual level should include individual assessment of sensitivity to night work and shift work considering age and health status, and training in stress management techniques.

  8. EL TRABAJO SOCIAL EN EL ENTORNO EDUCATIVO ESPAÑOL / SOCIAL WORK IN THE SPANISH EDUCATIONAL ENVIRONMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Concepción Castro Clemente

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Social work professionals play an important role in prevention and care interventions in education, functions that are often unknown to the whole society. For a long time, their capabilities and potentials in its educational function have been constrained and undervalued at the risk of losing their professional identity by imposing them what is their work. Their first interventions were developed in Special Education centers. Their presence has been gradually increased in the educational environment in coordination with other professionals. The great social transformations, decades ago, together with the emerging technologies have generated new conflicts that require new responses from the sectors involved. It is a complex social moment that caused a period of opportunities for social recognition of the profession. The specific training of social workers, acquired and internalized knowledge, intervention methodology and characteristics of the work performed, make them the ideal professionals to interact between the education system and agents involved: students, families, school and social classes.

  9. Inter-Professional Working and Learning: "Recontextualising" Lessons from "Project Work" for Programmes of Initial Professional Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guile, David

    2012-01-01

    The paper argues that over the past two decades there has been a paradox at the heart of the literature on the professions: inter-professional work has been a growing feature of work in the global economy since the 1990s, however, this has been rarely acknowledged. The paper addresses this paradox in three ways. The paper explains how changes in…

  10. Social work with families at social risk promoting gender equality

    OpenAIRE

    Pivoriene J.; Bardauskiene R.

    2016-01-01

    The article is based on the research whose aim is to find out the attitudes of social workers toward gender equality. The qualitative research was carried out in 2014 in order to find out social workers' attitudes to gender equality in families and families at social risk, as well as obstacles and possibilities for implementation of gender equality in families at social risk. Eight social workers working with families at social risk were interviewed using semi-structured interview and content...

  11. Social Maturation: Work Group Proceedings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resnick, Michael D.; And Others

    1985-01-01

    Each of the seven factors that affect adolescent social development is presented together with a description of potentially important research, service, and policy initiatives within each topic area. The factors are self-esteem, peer group, parenting, family, services, enforced dependency, and positive sexual socialization. (CT)

  12. Enterprise Social Media at Work

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dyrby, Signe; Jensen, Tina Blegind; Avital, Michel

    2014-01-01

    organizational members interact and collaborate. Drawing on Bruno Latour’s cartography of controversies, we present novel empirical insights from a case study of the ESM platform Yammer in an IT consultancy company. Our analysis uncovers four threads of the social fabric: ‘public-private context’, ‘social...

  13. The Army Social Work Internship Program: training today's uniformed social worker.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, Reginald W

    2014-01-01

    Uniformed social workers are involved in ensuring the well-being of Soldiers and their families during peace and war. The Army Medical Department Center and School is charged with the educational development of uniformed social workers. This article focuses on a relatively new approach to preparing social work officers for their dual role of providing garrison and operational behavioral health services to Soldiers and families. In the 4 years since implementation, this 2-year training program has become the model for the professional development of new uniformed social work graduates.

  14. Social networking, identity and professionalism in clinical psychology

    OpenAIRE

    McKenzie, Karen; Fawns, Tim

    2011-01-01

    The paper discusses some of the issues faced by clinical psychology trainees when integrating their 'personal' 'student' and 'professional' images. This is in the context of the increasing use of social networking sites for both personal and educational processes.

  15. Unnoticed professional competence and knowledge in day care work

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Warring, Niels; Ahrenkiel, Annegrethe; Nielsen, Birger Steen

    ), communities of practice (Wenger) have been influencing the discussion on professional development. Across the different notions there is a shared view that important parts of professional competence is part of daily practices and embedded in routines, experiences, shared repertoire, etc. NPM and neoliberalism......In research on professions in the public care and health sector the issue of professional competence and knowledge is central. Discussions on tacit knowledge (Polanyi), modus 1 and 2 knowledge (Gibbons), intuitive expertise (Dreyfus), reflective practice (Schön), practical knowledge (Bourdieu...... has had an important impact on care and health work imposing demands for documentation, standardization and evaluation. These increasing demands seem to be in contrast with the tacit and embodied parts of professional competence that not easily can be documented, standardized and evaluated. It can...

  16. Enabling professionals to change practices aimed at tackling social inequality through professional development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Bente; Brandi, Ulrik

    2018-01-01

    the impact of a professional development programme on changing practices that can address social inequality in ECEC. The article explores how a professional development programme, VIDA, can contribute to enabling professionals in enhancing the change potentials in ECEC, with a view to enhancing the learning......Research has shown the potential for early childhood education and care (ECEC) in making a difference for all children. However, research also highlights how hard overcoming the ‘gaps’ between children from differing social backgrounds still is. The overall aim of this article is to examine...... conditions and well-being of all children, and socially disadvantaged children in particular. The overall argument is that co-construction as well as openness and reflection in the ECEC field is needed when professionals are to change their pedagogical practices towards tackling the issues of social...

  17. Professional Socialization of Electrical Engineers in University Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keltikangas, Kirsti; Martinsuo, Miia

    2009-01-01

    University educators constantly seek ways in which courses and curricula would promote students' professional development in line with the needs of industries. The purpose of this study was to develop a framework for analysing professional socialization particularly in the context of electrical engineering education and explore factors associated…

  18. Helping, mediating, and gaining recognition: The everyday identity work of Romanian health social workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciocănel, Alexandra; Lazăr, Florin; Munch, Shari; Harmon, Cara; Rentea, Georgiana-Cristina; Gaba, Daniela; Mihai, Anca

    2018-01-19

    Health social work is a field with challenges, opportunities, and ways of professing social work that may vary between different national contexts. In this article, we look at how Romanian health social workers construct their professional identity through their everyday identity work. Drawing on a qualitative study based on interviews with 21 health social workers working in various organizational contexts, we analyze what health social workers say they do and how this shapes their self-conception as professionals. Four main themes emerged from participants' descriptions: being a helping professional, being a mediator, gaining recognition, and contending with limits. Through these themes, participants articulated the everyday struggles and satisfactions specific to working as recently recognized professionals in Romanian health and welfare systems not always supportive of their work.

  19. Toward Valuation in Social Work and Social Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cnaan, Ram A.; Kang, Chulhee

    2011-01-01

    Social work and social services are known to be beneficial to society, but to date no systematic valuation of their contribution has been attempted. The aim of this article is to advance our ability to quantify both the known direct benefits and some of the positive externalities of social work. The authors make the case of why valuation is…

  20. Impact of using social media at work

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kraan, K.; Dhondt, S.; Jong, T. de

    2011-01-01

    A recent TNO study found that using social media at work encourages innovative, active work behaviour among Dutch employees but does not increase emotional exhaustion due to information overload. Researchers discovered that social media use favoured innovative work most if its use was not in the

  1. Studying empowerment in a socially and ethnically diverse social work community in Copenhagen, Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mørck, Line Lerche

    2011-01-01

      Abstract This article analyzes empowerment in Copenhagen's "wild" social work community. Social practice theory of boundary communities is presented and used to analyze empowerment as dialectic between individual and collective movement. This includes analysis of the boundary positions...... of the social street workers, their dilemmas, everyday learning and possibilities for expansive learning. A boundary community, such as the "wild" social work community, is constituted by an overlap of communities of social street workers, established professionals with formal educations, and local street...... communities of young men. The social street work is analyzed at the time of the street riots and fires that took place in Copenhagen, in February 2008. It is analyzed how social street workers, facilitated meetings of the opposing factions, parties who usually do not enter into dialogue. It is discussed how...

  2. Work climate, work values and professional commitment as predictors of job satisfaction in nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caricati, Luca; Sala, Rachele La; Marletta, Giuseppe; Pelosi, Giulia; Ampollini, Monica; Fabbri, Anna; Ricchi, Alba; Scardino, Marcello; Artioli, Giovanna; Mancini, Tiziana

    2014-11-01

    To investigate the effect of some psychosocial variables on nurses' job satisfaction. Nurses' job satisfaction is one of the most important factors in determining individuals' intention to stay or leave a health-care organisation. Literature shows a predictive role of work climate, professional commitment and work values on job satisfaction, but their conjoint effect has rarely been considered. A cross-sectional questionnaire survey was adopted. Participants were hospital nurses and data were collected in 2011. Professional commitment and work climate positively predicted nurses' job satisfaction. The effect of intrinsic vs. extrinsic work value orientation on job satisfaction was completely mediated by professional commitment. Nurses' job satisfaction is influenced by both contextual and personal variables, in particular work climate and professional commitment. According to a more recent theoretical framework, work climate, work values and professional commitment interact with each other in determining nurses' job satisfaction. Nursing management must be careful to keep the context of work tuned to individuals' attitude and vice versa. Improving the work climate can have a positive effect on job satisfaction, but its effect may be enhanced by favouring strong professional commitment and by promoting intrinsic more than extrinsic work values. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Registered Nurses' work experiences: personal accounts integrated with professional identity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fagerberg, Ingegerd

    2004-05-01

    The work context is important for the development of Registered Nurses' skills and identity as professionals, but the work context and organization can also hinder their professional development. This paper reports a study whose purpose was to understand the meaning of Registered Nurses' narratives of their work experience 5 years after graduation. Data were collected in 2001 from interviews with 16 Registered Nurses 5 years after graduation and analysed using a phenomenological hermeneutic method, influenced by the philosophy of Paul Ricoeur. Analyses of the narratives resulted in three themes: 'The meaning of caring and protection of patients', 'The meaning of work organization in nurses' work' and 'The implied meaning of using one's individual attributes in one's professional role'. Since the number of nurses participating in the study is small, it is important to re-contextualize the results when transferring them to other contexts. There is a complex interrelationship between the health care organization, individual attributes of nurses (including self-esteem) and patient care. Provision of adequate resources and support for nurses' professional and personal development is needed to ensure high quality patient care, and these are political issues.

  4. Promoting gender sensitivity in social work

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Ann-Karina Eske

    2016-01-01

    The article reflects on teaching gender theory to students who are not enrolled in a gender programme. It argues that learning can be facilitated to social work students by tapping into their own gendered experiences and by linking gender to wider concerns about social inequality. The article draws...... on personal notes from teaching gender and social diversity to social work students. In this context, two main obstacles are identified: anti-feminism and individualization. These obstacles can be addressed productively. First by bringing students’ gendered experiences and social categorisations into play......, and second, by demonstrating how social problems are shaped by gender structures and unequal power relations....

  5. Promoting Professional Socialization Within the Experiential Curriculum: Implementation of a High-stakes Professionalism Rubric.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanzer, Kim; Dintzner, Matthew

    2017-02-25

    Objectives. To describe the implementation of a high-stakes rubric to assess student professionalism in introductory and advanced pharmacy practice experiences (IPPEs and APPEs) to promote the professional socialization of students in the doctor of pharmacy (PharmD) program at Western New England University (WNE). Findings. A professionalism rubric was adapted from the literature to assess the professional behavior of students enrolled in experiential courses based on evaluation of the following criteria: appropriate communication skills with patients and providers, appearance and dress code, timeliness, and initiative. The rubric was implemented in the fall semester of 2013 as a high-stakes component of the assessment within all experiential courses. Students were required to meet expectations for each of the four criteria in order to pass the practice experience, independent of their performance in other course components. Students were assessed by their preceptors at the midpoint and end of each practice experience using the appropriate evaluation tool. Each of the IPPE and APPE evaluation tools included the professionalism rubric as a requirement for assessment. Use of the Professionalism Rubric as a high-stakes assessment tool highlighted professionalism as an important component of the program, making expectations explicit to students and providing leverage to preceptors for holding students accountable. Summary. The Office of Experiential Affairs at WNE has raised awareness of the importance of professionalism and promoted the professional socialization of PharmD students with the use of a high-stakes professionalism rubric.

  6. Challenges to professionalism: Social accountability and global environmental change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearson, David; Walpole, Sarah; Barna, Stefi

    2015-01-01

    This article explores the concept of professionalism as it relates to social change and social accountability, and expands on them in the light of global environmental changes. Professionalism in medicine includes concepts of altruism, service, professional knowledge, self-regulation and autonomy. Current dialogues around social accountability suggest that medical schools should re-orientate their strategy and desired education, research and service outcomes to the health needs of the communities they serve.This article addresses the following questions: • How do we reconcile ideas of medical professionalism with the demands of creating a more equal, just, sustainable and socially inclusive society? • What new challenges do or will we face in relation to environmental degradation, biodiversity loss, ecosystem health and climate change? • How can medical schools best teach social and environmental responsiveness within a framework of professionalism? • How do medical schools ensure that tomorrow's doctors possess the knowledge, skills and attitude to adapt to the challenges they will face in future roles?We offer ideas about why and how medical educators can change, recommendations to strengthen the teaching of professionalism and social accountability and suggestions about the contribution of an emerging concept, that of "environmental accountability".

  7. What does caring mean to nursing and social work students?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagdonaite-Stelmokiene, R; Zydziunaite, V; Suominen, T; Astedt-Kurki, P

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this study in Lithuania was to discover how the meaning of caring is perceived by nursing and social work students. Nursing and social work are caring professions, which provide care in different ways. It is still unclear what features constitute the meaning of caring for nursing and social work students as future caring professionals. Snowball sampling technique was applied in the study. The data were collected as reflective narratives. Data were analysed using qualitative content analysis. For nursing and social work students, the meaning of caring comprises mission, proficiency, values and collaboration. These features overlap, but the implementation of caring is dependent on the particular profession. Nursing and social work students describe the meaning of caring as holistic assistance to patient/client: the work mission for both. However, the tasks, responsibilities and focus on providing care to a patient/client differ in both professions. Reflective narratives were preferred to semi-structured interviews. The researchers did not contact the participants in person to ask them additional questions. The meaning of caring is perceived as a developmental phenomenon, which depends on professional philosophy, practice, continuing learning and experience. Nursing and social work students perceive it as a way of thinking about the individual's being in a profession and acting collaboratively for the wellbeing of others. Focus on the meaning of caring in nursing and social work (post)graduate education is a premise to shift the training from self- to other-centred, from mono- to multi-disciplinary approach. This is related to the shift of practices towards effective patient-centred team-working within the health system, with the spotlight on caring. © 2016 International Council of Nurses.

  8. Different Welfare System—Same Values? How Social Work Educators in Norway, Chile and Argentina Comprehend Core Social Work and Social Policy Issues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rolv Lyngstad

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available During 2013 and 2014, five focus-group interviews were conducted in Norway, Chile and Argentina in order to understand better how professors at social work programs understand professional issues and controversial social policy issues in their countries. In the focus groups, the participants were asked to reflect upon a vignette which was a fictitious discussion about professional issues and dilemmas in social work practices. Three themes were deployed in the vignette. The first related to different attitudes with respect to how social problems in society should be approached and treated (with a special focus on the relationship between the public, private and civil sectors in solving welfare problems. The second was about social work dilemmas in the contested space between universal equality values and local freedom values/discretion embedded in local self-determination. The third focused on welfare states’ principles distinguishing welfare benefits and services and how public welfare policies should be designed. The three countries are very different with respect to variables affecting welfare policies and social work practices. The most profound difference is likely that Chile (and to a lesser degree Argentina since the dictatorship is highly influenced by neo-liberal policies advocating small public involvement in social policy, whereas Norway is a typical social-democratic welfare state. This fact, however, does not affect the reflections and apprehensions of the issues in a substantial way. The professional attitudes of the professors are surprisingly equal in spite of their different backgrounds.

  9. Teaching Clinical Social Work under Occupation: Listening to the Voices of Palestinian Social Work Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokaliari, Efrosini; Berzoff, Joan; Byers, David S.; Fareed, Anan; Berzoff-Cohen, Jake; Hreish, Khalid

    2016-01-01

    The authors were invited to teach clinical social work in the Palestinian West Bank. In order to teach, we designed a study exploring how 65 Palestinian social work students described the psychological and social effects of working under occupation. Students described social stressors of poverty, unemployment, lack of infrastructure, violence,…

  10. Social Media in Professional Medicine: New Resident Perceptions and Practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefebvre, Cedric; Mesner, Jason; Stopyra, Jason; O'Neill, James; Husain, Iltifat; Geer, Carol; Gerancher, Karen; Atkinson, Hal; Harper, Erin; Huang, William; Cline, David M

    2016-06-09

    For younger generations, unconstrained online social activity is the norm. Little data are available about perceptions among young medical practitioners who enter the professional clinical arena, while the impact of existing social media policy on these perceptions is unclear. The objective of this study was to investigate the existing perceptions about social media and professionalism among new physicians entering in professional clinical practice; and to determine the effects of formal social media instruction and policy on young professionals' ability to navigate case-based scenarios about online behavior in the context of professional medicine. This was a prospective observational study involving the new resident physicians at a large academic medical center. Medical residents from 9 specialties were invited to participate and answer an anonymous questionnaire about social media in clinical medicine. Data were analyzed using SAS 9.4 (Cary, NC), chi-square or Fisher's exact test was used as appropriate, and the correct responses were compared between different groups using the Kruskal-Wallis analysis of variance. Familiarity with current institutional policy was associated with an average of 2.2 more correct responses (P=.01). Instruction on social media use during medical school was related to correct responses for 2 additional questions (P=.03). On dividing the groups into no policy exposure, single policy exposure, or both exposures, the mean differences were found to be statistically significant (3.5, 7.5, and 9.4, respectively) (P=.03). In this study, a number of young physicians demonstrated a casual approach to social media activity in the context of professional medical practice. Several areas of potential educational opportunity and focus were identified: (1) online privacy, (2) maintaining digital professionalism, (3) safeguarding the protected health information of patients, and (4) the impact of existing social media policies. Prior social media

  11. Work-Related Stress and Coping Strategies of Professional Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Bonita C.

    1988-01-01

    Interviewed 20 professional women on their work-related stress and coping processes to identify those who were good and poor at coping. Found that more effective copers seemed to have used problem-focused coping such as seeking information or advice or taking problem-solving action, whereas less effective copers seemed to have used strategies such…

  12. The Work, Perceptions and Professional Development of Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Ana Maria; Herdeiro, Rosalinda

    2014-01-01

    This article presents work from an ongoing investigation, where the objective is to understand the impact of recent Portuguese legislation--the Teaching Career Statute and its respective Evaluation of Teacher Performance regulations--on the (re)construction of teacher identity, the teaching career and professional development. From an analysis of…

  13. A Professional Challenge: Working with Multi-Problem Families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carson, Ann Taylor

    The manual for professionals working with multi-problem families was developed by Project IINTACT which provided home-based services to families with young children who were developmentally delayed or at risk of developmental delay. Three groups of high risk families were served: those in which one or more parents is mentally retarded, those…

  14. Professional caregivers' work with the dying in nursing homes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Karen Tind; Glasdam, Stinne

    2013-01-01

    International studies on the death of elderly nursing home residents show the complexity in the understanding of the professionals who care for the dying. The aim of this study is to explore the discourses about professional caregivers caring for those dying in Denmark in the last decade. A disco......International studies on the death of elderly nursing home residents show the complexity in the understanding of the professionals who care for the dying. The aim of this study is to explore the discourses about professional caregivers caring for those dying in Denmark in the last decade....... A discourse analysis inspired by Foucault was constructed. The material consists of different source documents: research articles, newspaper articles, theses, books, websites – 35 sources in total. There are constructed six positions of speech, five discourses and three themes: (1) ‘the work...... of the professional caregivers – a complex low-status work’; (2) ‘the education of the professionals – the way to ensure a good death or possessing the right qualifications’ and (3) ‘the vulnerable professionals’. The study concludes that an economical/political discourse is dominating and sets up the frames within...

  15. Working with soils: soil science continuing professional development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannam, Jacqueline; Thompson, Dick

    2017-04-01

    The British Society of Soil Science launched the Working with Soils professional competency programme in 2011. This was in response to concerns from practitioners and professionals of a significant skills gap in various sectors that require soil science skills. The programme includes one and two day courses that cover the qualifications, knowledge and skills required of a professional scientist or engineer conducting a range of contract work. All courses qualify for continuing professional development points with various professional practice schemes. Three courses cover the foundations of soil science namely; describing a soil profile, soil classification and understanding soil variability in the field and landscape. Other tailored courses relate to specific skills required from consultants particularly in the planning process where land is assessed for agricultural quality (agricultural land classification). New courses this year include soil handling and restoration that provides practitioners with knowledge of the appropriate management of large volumes of soil that are disturbed during development projects. The courses have so far successfully trained over 100 delegates ranging from PhD students, environmental consultants and government policy advisors.

  16. Social Work Values and Ethics: Reflections on the Profession's Odssey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frederic G. Reamer

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Social workers' understanding of ethical issues has matured significantly. This article traces the evolution of the profession's approach to the values and ethics. During its history, social work has moved through four major periods-- the morality period, the values period, the ethical theories and decision-making period, and the ethical standards and risk-management (the prevention of ethics complaints and ethics related lawsuits is diverting social workers from in-depth exploration of core professional and personal values, ethical dilemmas, and the nature of the profession's moral mission. The author encourages the profession to recalibrate its focus on values and ethics.

  17. A set of professional working ability indicators of military operators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mykola Korchahin

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: determination of indicators of professional work capacity and their impact on the success of professional activity of military operators in the cycle of alert duty. Material & Methods: indicators of the professional capacity of military operators were determined through theoretical analysis, systematization and generalization of data from scientific and methodological sources, medical-biological, psycho-diagnostic methods and mathematical methods of processing the results of the study. Result: it is determined that the most informative indirect indicators of the professional capacity of military operators of the contract service of the Air Forces of the Armed Forces of Ukraine is: physical condition, psycho-emotional state, physical performance, aerobic endurance, static endurance of back muscles, neck and the abs, the speed of perception, memory, concentration and shifting attention. The correlation dependence of the level of professional preparedness of military operators on indirect indices of professional work capacity: physical fitness (r=0,58, psycho-emotional state (r=0,51, physical performance (r=0,34, aerobic endurance (r=0.59, static endurance of the muscles of the back and neck (r=0,52, static endurance of the abs muscles (r=0,48, simple sensorimotor reaction (r=0,44, short-term (operational memory (r=0,40, concentration and attention switching (r=0,46. Conclusion: a complex characteristic of the indicators of psycho-physiological functions of the body of a specialist can be used to assess the dynamics and prediction of the professional capacity of military operators of the Air Force in the cycle of alert duty.

  18. Are MOOCs the next trend in social work?: Implications for practice education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trevor Gates

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Higher education continues to evolve responding to technological advances and growing economic challenges. Social work education has been slower to embrace emergent technologies than other fields in higher education. Contributing to this cautious approach may be historical controversy surrounding social work professionalization and practice. Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs are an important trend gathering recent attention in higher education. The contribution of MOOCs to social work education remains undetermined. This essay explores historical influences impacting current social work education, factors surrounding MOOC utilization, and the relevance of MOOCs for the future of social work education. We provide recommendations for embracing MOOC development in social work education through a deliberative strategy.

  19. Trabajo social y campo posmoderno: critica de sus proposiciones en torno a la intervención profesional = Social work and postmodern field: critical of its proposals about professional intervention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gianna, Sergio Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available El trabajo que aquí se presente tiene por finalidad el análisis y crítica de una de las tendencias contemporáneas en el Trabajo Social argentino: el campo posmoderno. Para ello, resulta fundamental el estudio y análisis de las principales determinaciones que presenta el campo posmoderno en las ciencias sociales, en particular, sus consideraciones en torno a la modernidad, la transición a un nuevo estadio de la sociabilidad, de carácter posmoderno, y la función que ejerció y ejerce la ciencia en la actualidad. Esto, permite identificar las mediaciones existentes entre éstas proposiciones teóricas y la configuración de un campo posmoderno en el Trabajo Social y como se generan un conjunto de proposiciones teóricas, políticas y éticas en torno a la intervención profesional

  20. Social Work, Structured Fun and the Jokes of Social Structure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mik-Meyer, Nanna

    The topic of social work does not normally inspire laughter. So it is perhaps not surprising that research into the culture of social work rarely pursues its humorous aspect—the role of irony and laughter, for example. But if Michael Mulkay (1988) is right in suggesting that the domain of humor a...... allows contradictory worlds to coexist, then this topic warrants a closer look. After all, no one would deny that social work involves a measure of contradiction....

  1. Professional qualification in Social Education: the role of the Practicum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen Pereira Dominguez

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This article addresses the role to be performed by the Practicum in the training of social workers. For this purpose we have done a brief tour around the different criteria that have supported the professional development of social education and academic training. It offers thus an epistemological revision has its initial motivation in the need identified in several research projects in which we have participated in over the selection of studies in the early stages of post-compulsory education and compulsory secondary. The analysis of the different actors involved in the process of professionalization of social education and the importance of certain skills, lead us to propose a Practicum able to provide a framework for reflection on professional practices in a learning coordinated context, interdisciplinary and professionalism.

  2. WORKING WITH YOUNG PEOPLE: A MODEL OF SOCIAL INTERVENTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dovilė Lisauskienė

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Social workers, working with young people ought to be aware of the values, needs and problems of contemporary young people. Therefore, it is necessary to develop study programmes of Social Work that would reflect the current situation of modern youth and be oriented towards effective techniques for working with young people. The most common methods described in the literature are counseling, supervision, case management, self-reflection. The article highlights the method of social intervention, which objectively and fully assesses the problem situation and establishes the connections and relationships between the young man and his relatives, friends or authorities. This method helps to enable young people to solve their own problems. The aim of the research is to analyze the application features of the social intervention model when working with young people. The objectives are to discuss the activities of youth organizations in the field of social 99SOCIALINIO TINKLO INTERVENCIJOS MODELIO TAIKYMAS DIRBANT SU JAUNIMU work; to highlight the methods of social workers‘ practice; to investigate the application of social intervention model, enabling young people to solve their own problems. The methods applied include comparative analysis of scientific literature, monitoring, social intervention model. The survey revealed that when social workers enable young people to solve their own problems, a model of social intervention allows to evaluate not only the relationships of close people or family members, but also highlights the roles of youth organizations or social workers and their positive effect on the customer‘s actions. Thus, when applying the method of social intervention, social workers play an important role, as well as their professional knowledge and skills to establish the connection with the client are extremely important in order to promote the client‘s reflection.

  3. Catalyzing Innovation in Social Work Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traube, Dorian E.; Begun, Stephanie; Okpych, Nathanael; Choy-Brown, Mimi

    2017-01-01

    Social innovation is defined by novelty and improvement. This definition requires social work practice to be more effective or efficient than preexisting alternatives. Practice innovation is accomplished by leveraging technical, social, and economic factors to generate novel interventions, diffusion or adoption of the interventions into broader…

  4. Medical Professional and Usage of Social Media

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rabeya Yousuf; Sheikh Muhammad Abu Bakar; Mainul Haque; Md Nurul Islam; Abdus Salam

    2017-01-01

    ... and health care decisions contradict with the openness of the usage of social media. Member of the medical profession can use social media but need to abide by the code of conduct of medical ethics in order to render the best possible services...

  5. Recognition and Judgement in Social Work

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juul, Søren

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to argue for recognition as a normative ideal for social work and to confront the ideal with the reality found in the social institutions. I shall use the concept "judgement" to describe institutional routines and ways of thinking which constitute barriers...... to recognition. In the first part, I outline the normative ideal and show its relevance for practical social work on the basis of social clients' experiences of disrespect. In the second, I expalin the concept of judgement and criticise the prevailing forms of judgement to be found in the social institutions...

  6. Professional Socialization Experiences of Early Career Urban Physical Educators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flory, Sara Barnard

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to examine how three physical education (PE) teachers' professional socialization programmes influenced their early careers in urban schools in the US. Using cultural relevance theory and occupational socialization theory, three early career PE teachers were observed and interviewed for a period of six weeks each.…

  7. Shift work and arteriosclerosis risk in professional bus drivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chun-Chieh; Shiu, Li-Jie; Li, Yu-Ling; Tung, Kuan-Yeng; Chan, Kwan-Yu; Yeh, Chih-Jung; Chen, Shiuan-Chih; Wong, Ruey-Hong

    2010-01-01

    Professional bus drivers are at increased risk for cardiovascular disease, but the underlying causes are unclear. Professional bus drivers often follow shift schedules. Especially, an association between shift work and early manifestations of cardiovascular disease has not been elucidated. Thus we investigated the links between shift work and arteriosclerosis risk in professional bus drivers. Questionnaires were administered to 184 bus drivers on demographic characteristics, lifestyle, and occupational history from 5 transportation companies in Taiwan. Brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV) was measured using a volume-plethysmographic apparatus. Body mass index, waist circumference, biochemical variables, and blood pressure were also measured. Arteriosclerotic risk factors (age, weekly driving hours, systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure, and insulin level) differed in part among different groups of drivers. Long-term shift drivers had higher baPWV compared to regular drivers and short-term shift drivers (1594 cm/s vs. 1497 and 1432, pshift driving. Long-term shift work could increase the risk of arteriosclerosis in professional bus drivers. Larger studies would be necessary to provide further evidence regarding this finding.

  8. Healthcare professionals' work engagement in Finnish university hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lepistö, Sari; Alanen, Seija; Aalto, Pirjo; Järvinen, Päivi; Leino, Kaija; Mattila, Elina; Kaunonen, Marja

    2017-10-10

    Concerns about the sufficiency and dedication of the healthcare workforce have arisen as the baby boomer generation is retiring and the generation Y might have different working environment demands. To describe the association between work engagement of healthcare professionals' and its background factors at five Finnish university hospitals. Survey data were collected from nurses, physicians and administrative staff (n = 561) at all five university hospitals in Finland. Data were collected using an electronic questionnaire that comprised the Utrecht Work Engagement Scale (9 items) and 13 questions regarding the respondents' backgrounds. Descriptive and correlational analyses were used to examine the data. Most respondents were female (85%) and nursing staff (72%). Baby boomers (49%) were the largest generational cohort. The work engagement composite mean for the total sample was 5.0, indicating high work engagement. Significant differences in work engagement existed only among sex and age groups. The highest work engagement scores were among administrative staff. Work engagement among healthcare professionals in Finnish university hospitals is high. High work engagement might be explained by suitable job resources and challenges, as well as opportunities provided by a frontline care environment. Attention should especially be paid to meeting the needs of young people entering the workforce to strengthen their dedication and absorption. © 2017 Nordic College of Caring Science.

  9. Gênero e os sentidos do trabalho social Gender and the meanings of social work

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacy Corrêa Curado

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available A partir de pesquisa realizada com profissionais do Programa de Inclusão Social (PIS, do Estado Mato Grosso do Sul, gestão 2003-2006, este artigo discute os sentidos do trabalho social, ressaltando sentidos da relação gênero e trabalho e da naturalização da participação da mulher no trabalho social. A pesquisa pautou-se por aportes da Psicologia Social, em diálogo com teorias de gênero e literatura sobre trabalho social. Apresentamos cinco conjuntos de sentidos do trabalho social, a saber: ajuda; promoção de direitos e transformação social; mercado profissional e gestão social; estratégia político-eleitoral e assistencialista. O quinto conjunto agrega sentidos das relações de gênero e incluem o afeto como instrumento de trabalho, o desapego financeiro e o não-profissionalismo. Apesar de positividades, esses sentidos alimentam a desvalorização, a invisibilidade e a feminização dessa atividade.Based upon a research done with professionals of the Program for Social Inclusion (PIS, of Mato Grosso do Sul, Brazil, during 2003-2006, the article discusses the meanings of social work, highlighting meanings of gender and work relationship and the naturalization of women's participation in the territory of social work. The research was developed under the perspective of Social Psychology, including dialogues with theories of gender and literature on social work. We present five sets of meanings assigned to this activity: social work as an aid, as an element of social change and rights promotion, as a professional category and social management, as a vote-seeking and aid-oriented strategy. The fifth set includes meanings produced within gender relationships such as: kindness as a work tool, lack of financial attachment and lack of professional skills. Although the positive aspects of this net, it also feeds a process of devaluation, invisibility and feminization of the social work.

  10. 'Blue' social capital and work performance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grøn, Sisse; Svendsen, Gunnar Lind Haase

    2012-01-01

    (Progoulaki & Roe 2011). This challenges social capital on board, i.e. the resources inherent in network cooperation associated with norms of reciprocity and trust (Putnam 2000: 19). Fragmentizing ‘blue’ social capital should however be restored, because work performance depends on the quality of cooperation...... findings suggest that a balance between three types of social capital – bonding, bridging and linking – is needed to achieve a high-performance work system (Gittell et al. 2010). Hence, main actors within the shipping sector should take ‘blue’ social capital into account in order to increase work...... efficiency and economic performance....

  11. Advancing Social Work Education for Health Impact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keefe, Robert H.; Ruth, Betty J.; Cox, Harold; Maramaldi, Peter; Rishel, Carrie; Rountree, Michele; Zlotnik, Joan; Marshall, Jamie

    2017-01-01

    Social work education plays a critical role in preparing social workers to lead efforts that improve health. Because of the dynamic health care landscape, schools of social work must educate students to facilitate health care system improvements, enhance population health, and reduce medical costs. We reviewed the existing contributions of social work education and provided recommendations for improving the education of social workers in 6 key areas: aging, behavioral health, community health, global health, health reform, and health policy. We argue for systemic improvement in the curriculum at every level of education, including substantive increases in content in health, health care, health care ethics, and evaluating practice outcomes in health settings. Schools of social work can further increase the impact of the profession by enhancing the curricular focus on broad content areas such as prevention, health equity, population and community health, and health advocacy. PMID:29236540

  12. Enriching Social Work through Interdisciplinary Disability Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Irene; Quaglia, Christine; Leslie, Donald

    2010-01-01

    This paper recommends that faculties of Social Work incorporate Disability Studies in their curriculum by embracing its interdisciplinary deconstructionist perspective. Disability Studies encourages Social Work to move beyond person-in--the-environment and anti-oppressive approaches to find more effective ways of removing barriers for persons with…

  13. Archives: African Journal of Social Work

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Items 1 - 9 of 9 ... Archives: African Journal of Social Work. Journal Home > Archives: African Journal of Social Work. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register · Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives. 1 - 9 of 9 Items ...

  14. Interprofessional leadership training in MCH social work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pecukonis, Edward; Doyle, Otima; Acquavita, Shauna; Aparicio, Elizabeth; Gibbons, Maya; Vanidestine, Todd

    2013-01-01

    The need to train health social workers to practice interprofessionally is an essential goal of social work education. Although most health social workers have exposure to multidisciplinary practice within their field work, few social work education programs incorporate interprofessional learning as an integrated component of both course work and field experiences (McPherson, Headrick, & Moss, 2001; Reeves, Lewin, Espin, & Zwaranstein, 2010; Weinstein, Whittington, & Leiba, 2003). In addition, little is written about the kinds of curricula that would effectively promote interdisciplinary training for social work students. These findings are particularly puzzling since there is increasing and compelling evidence that interdisciplinary training improves health outcomes (IOM, 2001). This article describes a social work education program that incorporates an Interprofessional education and leadership curriculum for Maternal and Child Health Social Work (MCHSW) at the University of Maryland's School of Social Work. The University of Maryland's Interprofesisonal Training Model is described along with the components needed to formulate an interdisciplinary learning experience. Various outcomes and lessons learned are discussed.

  15. Social Work Faculty and Mental Illness Stigma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Amy C.; Fulambarker, Anjali; Kondrat, David C.; Holley, Lynn C.; Kranke, Derrick; Wilkins, Brittany T.; Stromwall, Layne K.; Eack, Shaun M.

    2017-01-01

    Stigma is a significant barrier to recovery and full community inclusion for people with mental illnesses. Social work educators can play critical roles in addressing this stigma, yet little is known about their attitudes. Social work educators were surveyed about their general attitudes about people with mental illnesses, attitudes about practice…

  16. Leadership in Social Work: Where Are We?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, W. Patrick

    2016-01-01

    This article provides an overview of the status of leadership in social work, with an emphasis on unique functions and challenges leaders face in the field. Included in this review is a consideration of the concept of leadership as distinct from management, a historical review of the development of leadership as a specialty within social work, and…

  17. Epistemological Development in Social Work Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson-Meger, Jennifer

    2014-01-01

    Epistemological development is an important factor in facilitating learner identity and developing critical thinking aptitudes. This qualitative action research study explored undergraduate social work students' epistemological beliefs about knowledge, how knowledge is constructed, and implications for social work education. Data collection…

  18. Self-Efficacy Regarding Social Work Competencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holden, Gary; Barker, Kathleen; Kuppens, Sofie; Rosenberg, Gary

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: The need for psychometrically sound measurement approaches to social work educational outcomes assessment is increasing. Method: The research reported here describes an original and two replication studies of a new scale (N = 550) designed to assess an individual's self-efficacy regarding social work competencies specified by the Council…

  19. Integrating Collegiate Sports into Social Work Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, Emmett L., Jr.

    2014-01-01

    Every week there is a national news story involving a collegiate student-athlete, and oftentimes the tale relates to a social work education issue. There are 731 social work programs, yet none offers coursework in student-athlete behavior and their environment. Student-athletes experience the same developmental challenges as nonathletes, and…

  20. Social Work Research in Practice: Lessons Learned.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trowbridge, Kelly; Mische Lawson, Lisa

    2017-01-01

    Using data and research to drive and evaluate clinical decision-making continues to slowly gain prominence across social work settings. This article shares insights and recommendations from a novice social work investigator to encourage other social workers to consider the value of researching while in practice. Practitioners new to research need encouragement and support. This article provides ideas for easing the first steps towards research to avoid potentially discouraging pitfalls.

  1. Emotional dissonance in medical social work practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Keith R; Merighi, Joseph R

    2003-01-01

    This qualitative study examined several ecological aspects of medical social work practice that affect social workers' emotional well-being. Forty-seven medical social workers from seven hospitals participated in small group interviews in which practice experiences were explored. A grounded theory approach was used to analyze the data, with emotional dissonance emerging as a central theme. Community, family, and individual factors contributing to emotional dissonance are presented, and the effect of social support is examined.

  2. The impact of social media on medical professionalism: a systematic qualitative review of challenges and opportunities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gholami-Kordkheili, Fatemeh; Wild, Verina; Strech, Daniel

    2013-08-28

    The rising impact of social media on the private and working lives of health care professionals has made researchers and health care institutions study and rethink the concept and content of medical professionalism in the digital age. In the last decade, several specific policies, original research studies, and comments have been published on the responsible use of social media by health care professionals. However, there is no systematic literature review that analyzes the full spectrum of (1) social media-related challenges imposed on medical professionalism and (2) social media-related opportunities to both undermine and improve medical professionalism. The aim of this systematic qualitative review is to present this full spectrum of social media-related challenges and opportunities. We performed a systematic literature search in PubMed (restricted to English and German literature published between 2002 and 2011) for papers that address social media-related challenges and opportunities for medical professionalism. To operationalize "medical professionalism", we refer to the 10 commitments presented in the physicians' charter "Medical professionalism in the new millennium" published by the ABIM Foundation. We applied qualitative text analysis to categorize the spectrum of social media-related challenges and opportunities for medical professionalism. The literature review retrieved 108 references, consisting of 46 original research studies and 62 commentaries, editorials, or opinion papers. All references together mentioned a spectrum of 23 broad and 12 further-specified, narrow categories for social media-related opportunities (n=10) and challenges (n=13) for medical professionalism, grouped under the 10 commitments of the physicians' charter. The accommodation of the traditional core values of medicine to the characteristics of social media presents opportunities as well as challenges for medical professionalism. As a profession that is entitled to self

  3. Harmonizing professional, personal, and social responsibilities: Indian women dentists' perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagda, Suhasini Jayantilal

    2015-05-01

    Women in Indian culture have a paradoxical status: on the one hand, goddesses are worshipped for power and prosperity; on the other hand, working women face challenges due to age-old beliefs and sociocultural norms. With 60% of the students enrolled in undergraduate dental education currently being women, there is a need to study the challenges these women are facing and how they tackle them. The aim of this survey study was to assess the barriers women dentists face in career advancement and how successfully they balance the personal, professional, and social aspects of their lives. Questionnaires, consisting of four qualitative and 24 quantitative items, were distributed to 500 women dentists: postgraduate residents and faculty members in dental colleges of Mumbai and Navi Mumbai, as well as private dental practitioners. Of the 500 women, 210 returned the survey, for an overall response rate of 42%. The results showed that 95% of the respondents believed they successfully balance the various spheres of their lives, but the most common challenges they faced continued to be traditional gender bias, dual professional and home responsibilities, and preconceived ideas about women.

  4. Work leave among nursing professionals due to psychological etiologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robson Douglas de Oliveira

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To analyze the incidence and the length of periods off work specifically linked to psychological causes among nursing professionals. Furthermore, the study tried to identify risk factors for the work leaves and suggest actions that can mitigate the problems encountered. Methods: This was a retrospective, ecological study, in the largest public hospital of Curitiba-PR, with data from 3,692 nurses (2,294 auxiliary nurses, 590 nursing technicians and 808 nurses from January 2007 to September 2010. An exploratory review was performed to form the theoretical basis of this study. The annual incidences for each type of work leave due to psychological causes were identified, among the nursing professionals. Results: It was found that the main cause of absenteeism were depressive episodes (F32, with 784 leaves. As for the length of time, the cause for longer periods off among nurses (40.62 days on average was the bipolar affective disorder (F31. Nursing assistants and technicians were away from work due to recurrent depressive disorder (F33 on average for 40.47 days and 54.33 days, respectively. Conclusion: There was a high incidence of depressive episodes and the mean duration of absenteeism due to psychological causes was over 30 days, pointing to the need of investments in prevention and in healthcare for nursing professionals. doi:http://dx.doi.org/10.5020/18061230.2013.p554

  5. Social work management in emerging health care systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenney, J J

    1990-02-01

    An overview of the health care industry's trend toward multihealth systems is presented and specific adaptive strategies for social work managers in health care are suggested. The challenges to social work leaders during this transition from largely free-standing, privately owned health care institutions to corporately owned, horizontally and vertically integrated delivery systems are discussed in terms of identity, style, and substance. Directors of social work departments in multihealth corporations will need to resolve issues of institutional versus corporate identity as well as those of corporate versus professional identity. A multioptional management style that incorporates networking and political expertise should be cultivated. Substantive demands in the areas of management information systems, productivity, quality assurance, and budgeting also must be addressed. The emergence of multihealth systems poses major challenges and unique opportunities to the social work profession. Awareness of managerial strategies and critical content areas can help social work leaders enhance the role and contribution of social work in these exciting and complex health care delivery systems.

  6. Why do health professionals work in a community mental health service?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spear, Jonathan

    2006-06-01

    The aim of this pilot study was to determine the reasons why mental health professionals work in a community mental health service. A survey of psychiatrists and trainees (n = 13) and other mental health professionals (n = 67) was conducted in an Australian community mental health service with a socioeconomically deprived catchment population. Respondents were asked to list their main reasons for working and to complete measures of job design, well-being, social support, role clarity, teamwork and job satisfaction. The qualitative results were validated using focus groups. The response rate was 53.7% (43/80). Income (31/43), belonging (21/43), self-esteem (30/43) and self-actualization (9/43) were the main reasons given for working. Mental health professionals, who reported self-actualization as a reason for work, had significantly higher well-being and job satisfaction than other subjects. Mental health professionals who cited self-actualization as a reason for work perceived that their work was more significant and had higher task identity compared with other subjects. This study is limited by a small sample size and the inability to exclude confounding variables. Maslow's hierarchy of needs was a useful framework for categorizing reasons for work. Some practical approaches to meet the needs of the mental health workforce are discussed.

  7. Social Work Interventions In The Psycho-Social Management Of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The paper pointed out that, stress can cause physical and mental illness in the workers and these can affect their performance at work negatively. It also discussed how social work interventions are helpful in the psycho-social management of stress among industrial workers. it is suggested in this paper that, the employers of ...

  8. Working memory capacity in generalized social phobia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amir, Nader; Bomyea, Jessica

    2011-05-01

    Research suggests that understanding complex social cues depends on the availability of cognitive resources (e.g., Phillips, Channon, Tunstall, Hedenstrom, & Lyons, 2008). In spite of evidence suggesting that executive control functioning may impact anxiety (e.g., Eysenck, Derakshan, Santos, & Calvo, 2007), relatively few studies have examined working memory in individuals with generalized social phobia. Moreover, few studies have examined the role of threat-relevant content in working memory performance in clinically anxious populations. To this end, the present study assessed working memory capacity (WMC) in individuals with generalized social phobia and nonanxious controls using an operation span task with threat-relevant and neutral stimuli. Results revealed that nonanxious individuals demonstrated better WMC than individuals with generalized social phobia for neutral words but not for social threat words. Individuals with generalized social phobia demonstrated better WMC performance for threat words relative to neutral words. These results suggest that individuals with generalized social phobia may have relatively enhanced working memory performance for salient, socially relevant information. This enhanced working memory capacity for threat-relevant information may be the result of practice with this information in generalized social phobia.

  9. Business in Social Work Education: A Historically Black University's Social Work Entrepreneurship Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archibald, Paul; Muhammad, Omar; Estreet, Anthony

    2016-01-01

    The destabilization of the current economy has sparked increased interest in entrepreneurship, especially for underrepresented minority social work students. The entrepreneurial thinking of these social work students entering social work programs at historically Black colleges and universities needs to be fostered in a learning environment. This…

  10. Poverty-Aware Social Work Practice: A Conceptual Framework for Social Work Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krumer-Nevo, Michal; Weiss-Gal, Idit; Monnickendam, Menachem

    2009-01-01

    Despite the profound commitment of social work toward people living in poverty, the social work profession has failed to develop practice based on awareness of poverty. This article shows the ways in which poverty became a marginal issue in social work practice, reviews the literature on teaching poverty in international context, and then…

  11. Philosophic Thinking in Social Work: An Analysis of 30 Years of "Social Work" Editorials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez-Brawley, Emilia E.; Zorita, Paz M-B

    2016-01-01

    This article looks at 30 years of editorial perspectives and trends in social work as a profession through the analysis of editorials from the journal "Social Work." It identifies the wax and wane of philosophic (intellectual or scholarly) questions in social work thinking in the past three decades. It defines what philosophic thinking…

  12. Use of Non-Social Work Journals in Social Work Research: Results of a Citation Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strothmann, Molly

    2010-01-01

    Social work research and teaching draw on the literature of other disciplines. While the use of interdisciplinary sources has been discussed at length and citation patterns in social work literature have been studied, no research has identified specific sources from other disciplines that are important for social work scholarship. Based on…

  13. Healthcare quality improvement work: a professional employee perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadolin, Christian; Andersson, Thomas

    2017-06-12

    Purpose The purpose of this paper is to describe and analyze conditions that influence how employees engage in healthcare quality improvement (QI) work. Design/methodology/approach Qualitative case study based on interviews ( n=27) and observations ( n=10). Findings The main conditions that influence how employees engage in healthcare QI work are professions, work structures and working relationships. These conditions can both prevent and facilitate healthcare QI. Professions and work structures may cement existing institutional logics and thus prevent employees from engaging in healthcare QI work. However, attempts to align QI with professional logics, together with work structures that empower employees, can make these conditions increase employee engagement, which can be accomplished through positive working relationships that foster institutional work, which bridge different competing institutional logics, making it possible to overcome barriers that professions and work structures may constitute. Practical implications Understanding the conditions that influence how employees engage in healthcare QI work will make initiatives more likely to succeed. Originality/value Healthcare QI has mainly been studied from an implementer perspective, and employees have either been neglected or seen as passive resisters. Weak employee perspectives make healthcare QI research incomplete. In our research, healthcare QI work is studied closely at the actor level to understand healthcare QI from an employee perspective.

  14. Learning for Work and Professional Development: The Significance of Informal Learning Networks of Digital Media Industry Professionals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campana, Joe

    2014-01-01

    Informal learning networks play a key role in the skill and professional development of professionals, working in micro-businesses within Australia's digital media industry, as they do not have access to learning and development or human resources sections that can assist in mapping their learning pathway. Professionals working in this environment…

  15. Learning Environment at Work: Dilemmas Facing Professional Employees

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Vibeke; Andersen, Anders Siig

    2007-01-01

    In an effort to increase efficiency and democracy, the modernozation of the public sector has involved an increase in market and user control, an increased application of technology, a decentralization of responsibilities and competencies, and more management and personnel development initiatives....... The article analyze the learning environment in two govermental worksites in Denmark and shows how professional employees respond to the dilemmas posed by modernization at work....

  16. Catalytic models developed through social work

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Mogens

    2015-01-01

    The article develops the concept of catalytic processes in relation to social work with adolescents in an attempt to both reach a more nuanced understanding of social work and at the same time to develop the concept of catalytic processes in psychology. The social work is pedagogical treatment...... of adolescents placed in out-of-home care and is characterised using three situated cases as empirical data. Afterwards the concept of catalytic processes is briefly presented and then applied in an analysis of pedagogical treatment in the three cases. The result is a different conceptualisation of the social...... work with new possibilities of development of the work, but also suggestions for development of the concept of catalytic processes....

  17. Using Tablet PCs in Social Work Practice Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diane M. Hodge

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Within social work practice courses, video recording has been used to record and evaluate the clinical practice skills of students. This process has been limited by labor-intensive, tapebased video equipment, non-digital means of organizing and assessing specific scenes and events within the video, and paper evaluation forms. As an interdisciplinary project, professors from professional disciplines (education, social work, and counseling worked with information technology students from computer science to design and develop Table PC-based One- Note EVAs (Extended Video Application that would provide a more effective way of evaluating clinical practice skills for professional program students. This case study presents how one interdisciplinary team was able to create an EVA for use with digital recordings of clinical practice skills so that these demonstrations could be recorded, organized, and evaluated more effectively. The issues of working through communication differences, design difficulties, and the additional steps toward implementation are explored. The lessons learned from working as an interdisciplinary team and the impact of Tablet PCs in social work practice courses is also presented.

  18. Crossing the Color Line: Black Professional Men’s Development of Interracial Social Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adia Harvey Wingfield

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Sociologists have established that social networks often play an important role in hiring, promotions, and occupational mobility. For black workers, however, social networks can be racialized in ways that work to their disadvantage. In this paper, I consider how black professional men develop and maintain interracial social networks with white men and women. I argue that these networks are shaped by intersections of race and gender and are intentionally constructed in response to black professional men’s perceptions of their positioning within male-dominated occupations. Specifically, this paper examines how black men establish social networks with white men, their perceptions of how diverging levels of social capital shape these networks compared to their white male peers, and their observations of ways that women are less advantaged than they are in constructing social networks.

  19. The Long Gone Promises of Social Work

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Linda Lundgaard

    2005-01-01

    The article analyses one case: a sickness benefit office in a social services department. It takes as a starting point that organisations function as projection surfaces for fantasies, emotions and reactions. The psycho-societal perspective clarifies how a social services department transfers...... a crucial dilemma in social work onto social workers by processes of individualising. The dilemma relates to the disparity between clients' complex life situations and the limited possibilities for social workers to resolve them. There is an ambiguity in this transference. In cases of failure, management...

  20. Social constructivist learning environment in an online professional practice course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sthapornnanon, Nunthaluxna; Sakulbumrungsil, Rungpetch; Theeraroungchaisri, Anuchai; Watcharadamrongkun, Suntaree

    2009-02-19

    To assess the online social constructivist learning environment (SCLE) and student perceptions of the outcomes of the online introductory module of pharmacy professional practice that was designed based on social constructivism theory. The online introductory module of pharmacy professional practice in pharmaceutical marketing and business was carefully designed by organizing various activities, which were intended to encourage social interaction among students. The Constructivist Online Learning Environment Survey (COLLES) was applied to assess the SCLE. Course evaluation questionnaires were administered to assess student perceptions of this online module. The result from the COLLES illustrated the development of SCLE in the course. The students reported positive perceptions of the course. An online introductory module of pharmacy professional practice in pharmaceutical marketing and business was effective in promoting SCLE.

  1. Social Work Education Canada’s North : Capacity Building through Social Work

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Douglas Durst

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The Faculty of Social Work program at the University of Regina is a broker for two social work programs north of the 60th parallel reaching the northern residents of both Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal ancestry. In addition, for over 30 years, the University of Regina partners with the First Nations University of Canada where a specialized Bachelor of Indian Social Work is offered and now a Master of Aboriginal Social Work. This paper presents the background to the Northern Human Service/BSW program at Yukon College in Whitehorse, Yukon and the Certificate of Social Work at the Aurora College in Yellowknife, Northwest Territories.

  2. A sociological perspective on "the unmotivated client": public accountability and professional work methods in vocational rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Hal, Lineke; Meershoek, Agnes; Nijhuis, Frans; Horstman, Klasien

    2013-05-01

    This study aims at a sociological understanding of the concept of (un)motivation in order to provide clues for improving vocational rehabilitation (VR) support. (Un)motivation is understood as the product of the interaction between clients and professionals in an institutional context. To gain better understanding of this construction of (un)motivation, in depth-interviews are held with 14 VR professionals. Based on the stories professionals told about their professional practices, we analysed the ways in which they guide their clients during their VR path within the institutional context of the Dutch welfare state. "The unmotivated client" is a judgment that arises in the interaction between professional and client if the institutional goals of VR are not achieved. Two work methods are distinguished in which this judgment takes shapes in various ways, namely "Professional as a Signpost" and "Professional as a Personal Guide". Professionals work in a dichotomous public accountability framework with a strong focus on labour participation. This causes professionals to look for ways out of VR paths in which labour participation is not achieved. The construction of "the unmotivated client" is such a way out. An alternative way out is to explicitly value clients' (intermediary) achievements. • In vocational rehabilitation (VR) there exists the risk that a perceived lack of motivation is only considered a personal problem in stead of a social issue. • Reconsideration of the public accountability framework of VR may lead to more inclusive VR support in which a differentiated concept of participation is valued. • Lessons can be drawn from the articulation of achievements made in VR paths that are now considered unsuccessful. • For more inclusive VR support, the specific situation and situated needs of clients need to be taken as a starting point instead of a primary focus on the final goal of labour participation.

  3. Communication satisfaction of professional nurses working in public hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, J-D; Bezuidenhout, M C; Roos, J H

    2015-11-01

    This study aimed to establish and describe the level of communication satisfaction that professional nurses experience in selected public hospitals in the City of Johannesburg, South Africa. The success of any organisation depends on the effectiveness of its communication systems and the interaction between staff members. Data were collected by means of questionnaires, based on the Communication Satisfaction Questionnaire (CSQ), from a sample of 265 professional nurses from different categories, chosen using a disproportionate random stratified sampling method. The results indicated poor personal feedback between nurse managers (operational managers) and professional nurses, as well as dissatisfaction among nurse managers and professional nurses with regard to informal communication channels. A lack of information pertaining to policies, change, financial standing and achievements of hospitals was identified. Nurse managers should play a leadership role in bringing staff of different departments together by creating interactive communication forums for the sharing of ideas. The results emphasise the need for nurse managers to improve communication satisfaction at all levels of the hospital services in order to enhance staff satisfaction and create a positive working environment for staff members. © 2014 The Authors. Journal of Nursing Management Published by John wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Cooperation of return-to-work professionals: the challenges of multi-actor work disability management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liukko, Jyri; Kuuva, Niina

    2017-07-01

    This article explores which concrete factors hinder or facilitate the cooperation of return-to-work (RTW) professionals in a complex system of multiple stakeholders. The empirical material consists of in-depth interviews with 24 RTW professionals from various organizations involved in work disability management in Finland. The interviews were analyzed using thematic content analysis. The study revealed several kinds of challenges in the cooperation of the professionals. These were related to two partly interrelated themes: communication and distribution of responsibility. The most difficult problems were connected to the cooperation between public employment offices and other stakeholders. However, the study distinguished notable regional differences depending primarily on the scale of the local network. The main areas of improvement proposed by the interviewees were related to better networking of case managers and expansion of expertise. The article argues for the importance of systematic networking and stresses the role of public employment services in the multi-actor management of work disabilities. The article contributes to existing work disability case management models by suggesting the employment administration system as an important component in addition to health care, workplace and insurance systems. The study also highlights the need for expansion of expertise in the field. Implications for Rehabilitation Cooperation between RTW professionals in public employment offices and other organizations involved in work disability management was considered inadequate. In order to improve the cooperation of RTW professionals, the stakeholders need to create more systematic ways of communication and networking with professionals in other organizations. There is a need to expand the expertise in work disability management and rehabilitation, partly by increasing the role of other professionals than physicians.

  5. Equine – assisted social pedagogic family work

    OpenAIRE

    Bojc, Karin

    2016-01-01

    Master's thesis presents literature and research projects on the equine-assisted and video-based social pedagogical work with individuals, groups and families. It describes different ways of assistance of horses in a process of establishing family issues and some ways of horse support assistance in the process of solving those issues in cooperation with social pedagogue. The thesis represents a use of video material in social pedagogical processes, advantages in using video material for resea...

  6. Social Media for Networking, Professional Development, and Patient Engagement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markham, Merry Jennifer; Gentile, Danielle; Graham, David L

    2017-01-01

    Social media has become an established method of communication, and many physicians are finding these interactive tools and platforms to be useful for both personal and professional use. Risks of social media, or barriers to its use, include perceived lack of time, privacy concerns, and the risk of damage to one's reputation by unprofessional behavior. Of the social media platforms, Twitter has become favored by physicians and other health care professionals. Although one of the most obvious uses of social media is for rapid dissemination and receipt of information, oncologists are finding that social media is important for networking through blogs, Facebook, and Twitter. These platforms also have potential for providing opportunities for professional development, such as finding collaborators through networking, participation in Twitter journal clubs, and participating in online case-based tumor boards. Social media can also be used for patient engagement, such as through participation in tweet chats. There is emerging data that patient engagement through these platforms may lead to improvement in some health-related outcomes; however, data are sparse for oncology-specific outcomes. Efforts are underway to determine how to assess how social media engagement impacts health outcomes in oncology patients.

  7. Editorial | Chereni | African Journal of Social Work

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    African Journal of Social Work. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 6, No 1 (2016) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads.

  8. African Journal of Social Work: Submissions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    )is an international refereed journal that serves as a forum for exchanging ideas and knowledge and discussing issues relevant to social work practice, education and research in the African region. Producing 2 issues a year, the Journal is ...

  9. Social Work Intervention Focused on Transitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-19

    Study Focus: 30-day Rehospitalizations Among At-risk Older Adults Randomized to a Social Work-driven Care Transitions Intervention; Heart Disease; Diabetes; Hypertension; Cancer; Depression; Asthma; Chronic Heart Failure; Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease; Stroke

  10. Counterbalancing work-related stress? Work engagement among intensive care professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Mol, Margo M C; Nijkamp, Marjan D; Bakker, Jan; Schaufeli, Wilmar B; Kompanje, Erwin J O

    2017-05-20

    Working in an Intensive Care Unit (ICU) is increasingly complex and is also physically, cognitively and emotionally demanding. Although the negative emotions of work-related stress have been well studied, the opposite perspective of work engagement might also provide valuable insight into how these emotional demands may be countered. This study focused on the work engagement of ICU professionals and explored the complex relationship between work engagement, job demands and advantageous personal resources. This was a cross-sectional survey study among ICU professionals in a single-centre university hospital. Work engagement was measured by the Utrecht Work Engagement Scale, which included items about opinions related to the respondent's work environment. Additionally, 14 items based on the Jefferson Scale of Physician Empathy were included to measure empathic ability. A digital link to the questionnaire was sent in October 2015 to a population of 262 ICU nurses and 53 intensivists. The overall response rate was 61% (n=193). Work engagement was negatively related both to cognitive demands among intensivists and to emotional demands among ICU nurses. No significant relationship was found between work engagement and empathic ability; however, agreeableness, conscientiousness, and emotional stability were highly correlated with work engagement. Only the number of hours worked per week remained as a confounding factor, with a negative effect of workload on work engagement after controlling for the effect of weekly working hours. Work engagement counterbalances work-related stress reactions. The relatively high workload in ICUs, coupled with an especially heavy emotional burden, may be acknowledged as an integral part of ICU work. This workload does not affect the level of work engagement, which was high for both intensivists and nurses despite the known high job demands. Specific factors that contribute to a healthy and successful work life among ICU professionals need

  11. Rural and Urban Social Work Comparisons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, John; Smith, Marshall L.; Hull, Grafton H., Jr.; Ray, JoAnn

    1995-01-01

    Survey of 2,006 graduates with at least a bachelor's degree in social work (BSW) (86% female, 88% White, average age 34) found that, compared to urban workers, rural social workers were more likely to be White; had fewer master's degrees and lower incomes; were more satisfied with their BSW preparation; and showed greater community involvement.…

  12. The Temperance Movement and Social Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murdach, Allison D.

    2009-01-01

    This article examines a forgotten episode in social work history: the involvement of the profession in the temperance movement in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. Though some notable social workers such as Jane Addams, Robert A. Woods, and Representative Jeannette Rankin (the first woman elected to the U.S. Congress), championed the…

  13. Social Work Faculty and Undergraduate Research Mentorships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horner, Pilar S.; Hughes, Anne K.; Vélez Ortiz, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Social work faculty scholars lead the field as generators of knowledge that integrates investigative studies with practical social welfare outcomes. As such, the faculty potentially offers undergraduate researchers a different way of envisioning research that extends beyond traditional undergraduate research models. To date, however, no research…

  14. The Epistemological Trends of Social Work in the Latin American Context

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nora Eugenia Muñoz Franco

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this article is to share some of the results of the research State of the Art of the Theoretical and Methodological Foundations of the Professional Intervention of Social Work in Latin America. It analyzes the epistemological dimension of professional intervention in Social Work by reviewing scholarly production in Argentina, Brazil, Chile and Colombia from 1998-2008. The discussion seeks to advance in the configuration of the disciplinary status of Social Work, by consolidating intervention as the foundational and structuralizing axis of the profession, emphasizing its scientific and transformative character in the realm of the social sciences.

  15. Social Work with unaccompanied aylum seeking children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Niels Rosendal

    2010-01-01

    Review of "textbook" on social work with unaccompanied asyum seeking children. This book presents national and international research findings, case stories and interviews, is written on a high level and deserves a braod audience......Review of "textbook" on social work with unaccompanied asyum seeking children. This book presents national and international research findings, case stories and interviews, is written on a high level and deserves a braod audience...

  16. Communication Technology Integration into Social Work Practice

    OpenAIRE

    Angela N. Bullock; Alex D. Colvin

    2015-01-01

    The uses for communication technology continue to grow in the United States. Technology is changing how people collect and share information and is reshaping how people interact with one another. As a result of this transformation, the use of technology has evolved in social work practice. Communication technology is being incorporated into traditional social work practice for administrative and therapeutic purposes. This article will examine a theoretically based direction for the future c...

  17. Working memory capacity in Generalized Social Phobia

    OpenAIRE

    Amir, Nader; Bomyea, Jessica

    2011-01-01

    Research suggests that understanding complex social cues depends on the availability of cognitive resources (e.g., Phillips, Channon, Tunstall, Hedenstrom, & Lyons, 2008). In spite of evidence suggesting that executive control functioning may impact anxiety (e.g., Eysenck, Derakshan, Santos, & Calvo, 2007), relatively few studies have examined working memory in individuals with Generalized Social Phobia (GSP). Moreover, few studies have examined the role of threat-relevant content in working ...

  18. Analysis of the professional practice of social educators in secondary schools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margarita González Sánchez

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This article focuses on the social educator as a professional in the social education context who is qualified to carry out social education activities in schools, taking on functions aimed at resolving situations and problems that affect students and families. The main objective of this study was to see which professionals were responsible for attending to the socio-educational needs that arise in secondary schools in Spain’s different Autonomous Communities, and to analyse what functions they carry out. It is a descriptive-correlational study in which a digital questionnaire was given to a sampleof 440 agents of socio-educational intervention. Descriptive techniques of central tendency and dispersion as well as correlational and inferential techniques were used through non-parametric testing of hypotheses. The results show that the social educator is a professional that performs social-educational functions addressed to attending to situations of conflict or needon a more regular basis than other professionals who work in schools. The results show that the work of social educators focuses mainly on actions aimed at preventing absenteeism and controlling the students as they arrive at school, tasks of detection and prevention of risk factors, organising parents’ schools and information programmes, conflict mediation, development of communication programmes, socio-educational support and assessment for the educational community, and preparation of cultural events.

  19. Social-Psychological Aspects of Professional Learning Motivation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markov D.O.,

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The article contains a theoretical review of both Russian (T.O. Gordeeva A.G. Bugrimenko, O.A. Tchadenkova etc. and foreign (R. Rayan, and E. Dasy, A. Elliot and H. Makgregor, etc approaches, classifications and researches of motivation of educational-professional activity, and special attention is paid to the socially-psychological features of this motivation: external conditionality of structural components, including achievement motivation, the mechanism of its formation in changing conditions of social environment, as well as nature of correlation of socially-psychological features of personality, in particular, processes of its socially-psychological adaptation, with characteristics of its motivational sphere. The article considers researches of external educational environment, (M. Bokarts, etc. and inner personality settings (К. Dvak, А. Bandura on becoming and development of motivation training are considered. Also there are researches of dynamics of motivation of educational-professional activity on various phases of educational process are described.

  20. Professional socialization of students in clinical nurse specialist programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ares, Terri L

    2014-11-01

    Graduate nursing programs facilitate the transition of RNs to advanced roles through a complex process of professional socialization. The purpose of this study was to explore the professional socialization of clinical nurse specialist (CNS) students. Two hundred twenty-five students, representing 73 CNS programs, responded to an online survey. Both preprogram variables and educational experiences contributed to an adequate level of CNS socialization. Students' self-concept was strong, and they felt prepared to practice in the role, which was highly correlated with their perceptions of how well the program prepared them academically and experientially. Having a CNS mentor was positively associated with readiness to practice. Outcomes did not vary with cohort status, and online instruction did not impede socialization. These findings provide implications for CNS program advisement and design. Copyright 2014, SLACK Incorporated.

  1. Use of Social Media for Professional Development by Health Care Professionals: A Cross-Sectional Web-Based Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Background Social media can be used in health care settings to enhance professional networking and education; patient communication, care, and education; public health programs; organizational promotion; and research. Objective The aim of this study was to explore the use of social media networks for the purpose of professional development among health care professionals in Saudi Arabia using a purpose-designed Web-based survey. Methods A cross-sectional web-based survey was undertaken. A link to the survey was posted on the investigator’s personal social media accounts including Twitter, LinkedIn, and WhatsApp. Results A total of 231 health care professionals, who are generally social media users, participated in the study. Of these professionals, 70.6% (163/231) use social media for their professional development. The social media applications most frequently used, in the descending order, for professional development were Twitter, YouTube, Instagram, Facebook, Snapchat, and LinkedIn. The majority of respondents used social media for professional development irrespective of their age group, with the highest proportion seen in those aged 20-30 years. Social media were perceived as being most beneficial for professional development in terms of their impact on the domains of knowledge and problem solving and least helpful for enhancing clinical skills. Twitter was perceived as the most helpful type of social media for all domains listed. Respondents most frequently reported that social media were useful for professional development for the reasons of knowledge exchange and networking. Conclusions Social media are frequently used by health care professionals in Saudi Arabia for the purposes of professional development, with Twitter most frequently used for this purpose. These findings suggest that social media networks can be powerful tools for engaging health care professionals in their professional development. PMID:27731855

  2. Use of Social Media for Professional Development by Health Care Professionals: A Cross-Sectional Web-Based Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsobayel, Hana

    2016-09-12

    Social media can be used in health care settings to enhance professional networking and education; patient communication, care, and education; public health programs; organizational promotion; and research. The aim of this study was to explore the use of social media networks for the purpose of professional development among health care professionals in Saudi Arabia using a purpose-designed Web-based survey. A cross-sectional web-based survey was undertaken. A link to the survey was posted on the investigator's personal social media accounts including Twitter, LinkedIn, and WhatsApp. A total of 231 health care professionals, who are generally social media users, participated in the study. Of these professionals, 70.6% (163/231) use social media for their professional development. The social media applications most frequently used, in the descending order, for professional development were Twitter, YouTube, Instagram, Facebook, Snapchat, and LinkedIn. The majority of respondents used social media for professional development irrespective of their age group, with the highest proportion seen in those aged 20-30 years. Social media were perceived as being most beneficial for professional development in terms of their impact on the domains of knowledge and problem solving and least helpful for enhancing clinical skills. Twitter was perceived as the most helpful type of social media for all domains listed. Respondents most frequently reported that social media were useful for professional development for the reasons of knowledge exchange and networking. Social media are frequently used by health care professionals in Saudi Arabia for the purposes of professional development, with Twitter most frequently used for this purpose. These findings suggest that social media networks can be powerful tools for engaging health care professionals in their professional development.

  3. Occupational asthma in professional cleaning work: a clinical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mäkelä, R; Kauppi, P; Suuronen, K; Tuppurainen, M; Hannu, T

    2011-03-01

    Several epidemiological studies have reported an increased risk of asthma among professional cleaners. To date, however, no analysis of large patient series from clinic of occupational medicine has been published. To describe the cases of occupational asthma (OA) diagnosed at the Finnish Institute of Occupational Health (FIOH) during the period 1994-2004 in workers employed in professional cleaning work. OA was diagnosed according to patient history, lung function examinations and specific challenge tests with measurements of the forced expiratory volume in 1 second and peak expiratory flow values. Our series comprised 20 patients, all female, with a mean age of 48.8 years (range 27-60 years). The mean duration of cleaning work before the onset of the respiratory symptoms was 14.3 years (range 1-36 years), and the mean duration of cleaning work before the FIOH examinations was 18.6 years (range 3-38 years). OA was triggered by chemicals in 9 cases (45%) and by moulds in 11 cases (55%). The chemicals were cleaning chemicals (wax-removing substances containing ethanolamines in five cases and a cleaning agent containing chloramine-T in one case) and chemicals used in the industrial processes at workplaces (three cases). Of the moulds, the most frequently associated with OA was Aspergillus fumigatus (nine cases). OA was attributed not only to cleaning chemicals but also to other chemicals used in work environments. Moulds are presented as a new cause of OA in cleaners.

  4. Social media in nurse education: Utilization and E-professionalism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duke, Valda J A; Anstey, Allan; Carter, Sandra; Gosse, Natalie; Hutchens, Karen M; Marsh, Janice A

    2017-10-01

    To explore faculty and student utilization of social media and its professional implications in nurse education. A descriptive study. Five hundred six Bachelor of Nursing students, 112 Practical Nursing students and 74 faculty members were invited to complete a questionnaire of 28 questions relating to social media. Three hundred thirty-seven students and 29 faculty responded. Students spent significantly more time using social media compared to faculty and both groups used it mainly for personal use. However, almost twice as many students used social media for educational purposes than did faculty (58.5% vs 27.6%, pused social media to talk about academic related problems, only 28% of faculty did so (pacademic related problems. YouTube and text messaging were popular platforms for educational purposes. While Facebook was also a popular educational site for students (95% used it for informal learning; 67% for formal learning), it was much less commonly used by faculty (45% used it for informal learning; 17% for formal learning). More students than faculty felt that they were aware of privacy features, and of the professional behavior expected when using social media. In addition, more students (90.7%) than faculty (71.43%) used these privacy features (pacademic staff to view (p=0.003). There is a high reported usage of social media among students and faculty. Utilization of public platforms, while potentially beneficial, can have professional implications if not used appropriately with both personal and academic use. Developing best practice approaches for using social media in nurse education is essential to ensure that faculty and students are informed of e-professionalism. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. An Occupation's Responsibility: The Role of Social Foundations in the Cultivation of Professionalism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunzenhauser, Michael G.

    2013-01-01

    In this essay, the author argues that inquiry and engagement in the social foundations of education is fundamental to cultivating professionalism in education. As many commentators on the subject have noted, teaching does not meet many of the criteria of a profession derived from the sociological study of fields of work. As Joseph Newman observes,…

  6. "Friending Facebook?" A Minicourse on the Use of Social Media by Health Professionals

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Daniel R.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: Health professionals are working in an era of social technologies that empower users to generate content in real time. This article describes a 3-part continuing education minicourse called "Friending Facebook?" undertaken at Penn State Hershey Medical Center that aimed to model the functionality of current technologies in…

  7. Social Patterns in Mobile Technology Mediated Collaboration among Members of the Professional Distance Education Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laru, Jari; Jarvela, Sanna

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to identify social patterns in mobile technology mediated collaboration among distributed members of the professional distance education community. Ten participants worked for 12 weeks designing a master's programme in information sciences. The participants' mobile technology usage activity and interview data were first…

  8. The ethic of care: recapturing social work's first voice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dybicz, Phillip

    2012-07-01

    This article examines the dynamic between expressions of care--that is, simple acts of kindness and consideration that make up friendly relations--and professional expertise. During the 20th century, social work based its expertise on a solid scientific foundation. Within the embrace of scientific expertise, expressions of care are assigned the vital, but limited, role of ameliorating the sterile application of scientific knowledge, mainly through the application of social work values. This role is limited, however, because social workers are cautioned to avoid dual relationships; one cannot be both a professional and a friend to the client. This was not always the case. Working from a different paradigm, Charity Organization Society workers and settlement house workers each actively embraced and nurtured the notion of being a friend and neighbor to those they served. Post-modern practices--also stemming from a different paradigm and embracing an expertise in critical consciousness, in turn--seek to redefine the client-social worker relationship along this dimension. Expressions of care, propagated through a genuine (albeit circumscribed) friendship, actively contribute to treatment planning and a more fruitful outcome.

  9. Pharmacists' perceptions of professionalism on social networking sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benetoli, Arcelio; Chen, Timothy F; Schaefer, Marion; Chaar, Betty; Aslani, Parisa

    Social networking sites (SNS) are a new venue for communication, and health care professionals, like the general population, are using them extensively. However, their behavior on SNS may influence public perceptions about their professionalism. This study explored how pharmacists separate professional and personal information and activities on SNS, their perceptions of professional behavior on SNS, and opinions on guidelines in this area. In-depth, semi-structured interviews were conducted with international practising pharmacists (n = 31) recruited from a range of countries (n = 9). Initially, pharmacists known to the research team were invited, and thereafter, participants were recruited using a snowballing technique. The interviews lasted from 30 to 120 min. All interviews were recorded, transcribed verbatim, and thematically analyzed. A majority of participants mixed professional and personal information and activities on SNS, and about one third adopted a separation strategy where professional information and activities were clearly separated from personal ones (e.g. two different SNS accounts, or one particular SNS for professional use and another platform for personal purposes). Most participants expressed concern over how pharmacists present themselves and behave in SNS when they reported (un)professional behaviors of peers they had observed. Examples of perceived unprofessional behaviors included revealing details of personal life and activities; open complaints about the pharmacy sector, co-workers, physicians, and patients; inappropriate description of pharmacists' roles and activities; and breaches of patient confidentiality. Positive professional behaviors, such as expression of compassion for patients, examples of effective patient management, promotion of pharmacists' role, and correction of misleading health information being spread online were also observed. There was no consensus on having professional social media guidelines. Some preferred

  10. Dietetic students' identity and professional socialization in preparation for practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lordly, Daphne; MacLellan, Debbie

    2012-01-01

    Students' identity development and professional socialization during dietetic education were explored. Thirteen undergraduate dietetic students from two universities completed three in-depth interviews based on Seidman's phenomenological approach. The students were at various stages of their education. Data were analyzed with a feminist form of inductive thematic analysis. Dietetic students come to the educational process with a broad interest in health, helping, or foods and nutrition. The academic and practical components of dietetic education create opportunities for students to refine personal interests in order to (re-)envision their place within the profession. The complexity of professional socialization and identity development was illuminated as some students' focus was redirected to becoming an intern rather than becoming a dietitian. Students transformed their identity to meet the requirements they thought were expected or necessary to obtain an internship. Internship competition and the program environment can influence this transformation. Professional identity development begins before dietetic education and develops within the context of that education, representing the intersection of both people and events. A recognition and understanding of these complexities can result in strategic recruitment, informed curriculum changes, and professional development opportunities for dietetic educators, which will enhance their ability to support students in the professional socialization process.

  11. Time for action: key considerations for implementing social accountability in the education of health professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ventres, William; Boelen, Charles; Haq, Cynthia

    2017-09-12

    Within health professional education around the world, there exists a growing awareness of the professional duty to be socially responsible, being attentive to the needs of all members of communities, regions, and nations, especially those who disproportionately suffer from the adverse influence of social determinants. However, much work still remains to progress beyond such good intentions. Moving from contemplation to action means embracing social accountability as a key guiding principle for change. Social accountability means that health institutions attend to improving the performance of individual practitioners and health systems by directing educational and practice interventions to promote the health of all the public and assessing the systemic effects of these interventions. In this Reflection, the authors (1) review the reasons why health professional schools and their governing bodies should codify, in both curricular and accreditation standards, norms of excellence in social accountability, (2) present four considerations crucial to successfully implementing this codification, and (3) discuss the challenges such changes might entail. The authors conclude by noting that in adopting socially accountable criteria, schools will need to expand their philosophical scope to recognize social accountability as a vitally important part of their institutional professional identity.

  12. Reboundarying Professional Jurisdiction: Educational Work on Discount Sale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henriksson, Lea

    2014-01-01

    Education is a critical instrument for governments and communities managing economic and social development in global times. Reboundarying educational work reflects this dynamic where the national and local are networked in complex ways. In this frame, the focus in this article is on a policy debate on educational labour force and gendered work…

  13. Using Pinterest in Undergraduate Social Work Education: Assignment Development and Pilot Survey Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Lisa R.; Hitchcock, Laurel Iverson

    2017-01-01

    This article describes the development, implementation, and assessment of a social media assignment using Pinterest as a tool for student engagement and professional development in two undergraduate social work courses. Twenty-one undergraduate students enrolled in Human Behavior and the Social Environment (HBSE) courses completed the assignment…

  14. Selling the Need for School Social Work Services to the Legislature: A Call for Advocacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whittlesey-Jerome, Wanda

    2012-01-01

    Recent attempts to marginalize the social work profession have had an impact on school social workers in New Mexico. To better understand the quality of the workplace for these related services professionals, a past lead social worker for a large school district was interviewed, and three open-ended items were added to the 2010 statewide school…

  15. Social Distancing of Depressive and Panic Disorders in an International Sample of Social Work Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donna S. Wang

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available : Using an international sample, this study examined what variables were associated with social distancing among social work students. A total of 1,042 students from seven universities in the United States, United Kingdom, and Australia participated in a cross-sectional paper and pencil survey that applied the Social Distancing Scale to case vignettes describing an individual with panic disorder or major depressive disorder. The results show that levels of social distancing were related to age, knowing someone with a mental illness, type of disorder, level of conservatism, race, country, professional interest in mental health, level of student, and sex. Overall, 16.8% of the variance was accounted for with these significant variables. Implications for social work education and future research are discussed.

  16. editorial note african social work to tackling emerging social problems

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mugumbate

    EDITORIAL NOTE. AFRICAN SOCIAL WORK TO TACKLING EMERGING SOCIAL PROBLEMS. Wairire, G., PhD & Mthetwa, E, PhD. We feel highly honored to bring to you our first issue as Editors of the ... demonstrated the practice of stereotypical gender roles, although there were changes in the role the women played.

  17. [Quality of life of people with Parkinson's disease in the context of professional work and physiotherapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cholewa, Joanna; Gorzkowska, Agnieszka; Nawrocka, Agnieszka; Cholewa, Jarosław

    2017-10-17

    Of many diseases and disorders of the nervous system Parkinson's disease (PD) deserves a particular attention for its specific effects having an impact on the ability to undertake different forms of professional and economic activities. Due to the constantly growing incidence rate and the lowering age of patients, PD is becoming more and more serious social problem. The aim of this study was to determine the effects of professional work and physiotherapy on the quality of live in people with Parkinson's disease. The research was carried out on 109 people with diagnosed PD of stage II according to the Hoehn and Yahr classification. They were divided into professionally working and non-working subjects and those participating and not participating in physiotherapy programs. The Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS), was used to estimate the patients' clinical status. The Parkinson's Disease Questionnaire (PDQ-39), the Quality of Life Short Form (SF-36) Questionnaire and the Parkinson's Disease Quality of Life Questionnaire (PDQL) were used to estimate the quality of life. In all groups statistically significant differences were observed in each of the used scale. The PDQ-39 (F = 5.278, p = 0.04), SF physical component (F = 4.24, p = 0.005), SF mental component (F = 3.45, p = 0.021), PDQL (F = 6.57, p = 0.003). The highest quality of life was noticed in people working professionally and participating in physiotherapy programs. Professional activity and participation in properly planned physiotherapy help reduce the symptoms and improve the quality of life of people with Parkinson's disease. The study showed that the quality of life of people with PD is determined by professional work and participation in the process of rehabilitation. Med Pr 2017;68(6):725-734.

  18. [Psychophysiological correlates of individual styles of professional operator's work].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinokhodova, A G; Boritko, Ia S; Chekalina, A I; Gushchin, V I; Dudukin, A V

    2013-01-01

    One of the prioritized objectives of psychophysiological support for long-duration space missions is to strengthen professional reliability of cosmonauts. Operator's reliability is dependent as on skillfulness, so individual work style. PILOT-1 and VIRTU methods were used to study individual psychological characteristics and operator's strategy during project MARS500. The established two individual work styles (IWSs), i.e. control and search, reflect different types of reacting to stress. Combined analysis of these data and results of the "Mirror coordinograph" test showed invariance of IWSs no matter whether a task is complicated or simple. Operators demonstrating the "control" strategy are characterized by high initial mobilization readiness. Their reliability demands great physiological resources (high "cost"). Initial mobilization and physiological "cost" are lower in operators demonstrating the "search" work style. Dependent on the level of mobilization and motivation, their efficacy, in terms of quality and reliability specifically, is unstable in nature.

  19. Social Work Practice Behaviors and Beliefs: Rural-Urban Differences?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tom A. Croxton

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available There is continuing debate within the social work profession on whether there are significant differences in the practice behaviors and beliefs between rural and urban clinical social workers and whether different standards should be applied in defining ethical practices. This study measures those differences with regard to five practice behaviors: bartering,maintaining confidentiality, competent practice, dual relationships, and social relationships. Differences were found in beliefs regarding the appropriateness of professional behavior though such differences did not translate into practice behaviors.More significantly, the research suggests considerable confusion about the meanings of ethical standards and the utilization of intervention techniques without formal training across both urban and rural social workers.

  20. Advance care planning in South Korea: Social work perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Sung Ae; Kolomer, Stacey

    2016-08-01

    As ethical issues arise concerning the continuation of futile medical treatment for dying patients in Korean society, advance directive planning initiatives have been put into place to guide practice. This article describes the awareness and attitudes of social workers in Korea regarding advance care planning and related factors. A total of 246 gerontological/geriatric social workers completed a mailed or in-person survey regarding awareness and attitudes toward advance care planning. Seventy-three percent (n = 180) of the participants reported no knowledge of advance directives. Social workers who emphasized self-determination as a professional value, professed a preference for hospice care, and who were comfortable discussing death were more likely to have a positive attitudes toward advance care planning. This study reinforces the need for the infusion of advance care planning and end-of-life training in social work education in Korea.

  1. Fatigue at work: Professional illness of the 21th century: Prevention and consequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kostić Marina R.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Psychophysical capabilities of individuals in terms of work in the modern systems of today are not the only factor that their performance and achievement of results depend on. The context is much broader, starting from work conditions at their work place, through physical and climate factors, social environment and support, down to psychophysical status of an individual, his/her general work efficiency and risk from getting professional illnesses. Although the mechanisms and causes of fatigue occurring at work have long been a subject of study and interest in the area of psychophysiology of work, the fact is that to the day there has been no unique and generally accepted definition of fatigue, not only due to complex causes of its origin, but also due to complexity and diversity of its manifestations. Factors that are subject of study may be grouped into areas of contents of work, organization of work or work environment, and they significantly affect working ability and its misbalance, needs, capabilities and requirements to be met by an individual at a work place. Similarly to the concept of stress at work, fatigue as a reversible physiological occurrence manifests itself in physiological, i.e. health-related, psychological and professional areas, which in the long run affects total performance and efficiency of an individual, and results in unfit behavior, mental problems or physical illness. Keeping this in mind, it is important that a professional department and personnel management in organizations and institutions should react in a timely manner in order to prevent, detect and eliminate the factors that bring an individual at work to chronicle fatigue, therefore, to reduced performance and productivity at work.

  2. Social work with families at social risk promoting gender equality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pivoriene J.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The article is based on the research whose aim is to find out the attitudes of social workers toward gender equality. The qualitative research was carried out in 2014 in order to find out social workers' attitudes to gender equality in families and families at social risk, as well as obstacles and possibilities for implementation of gender equality in families at social risk. Eight social workers working with families at social risk were interviewed using semi-structured interview and content analysis for research data analysis. The research data reveals that gender equality in the family can be reached by mutual agreement, when the division of duties and responsibilities is in accordance with needs and abilities of family members. Good family relations are emphasized as a prerequisite for gender equality. Families at social risk with unbalanced social functioning and relationships are affected by stereotyped thinking about gender roles. As informants point out, this makes gender equality impossible in families at social risk. Social workers reveal that they do not directly relate the gender dimension with social work practice, and as a result it becomes problematic to promote gender equality in families at social risk. The main obstacles for implementation of gender equality are clients' resistance to change, too much responsibilities put on women-mother by social workers and other institutions that deal with social risk families, lack of information on gender equality and tools for promoting gender equality in the family. However, the informants provide solutions for promotion of gender equality in micro, mezzo and macro practice that correspond to the guidelines presented in the documents and strategies on gender equality at national and EU level.

  3. An exploratory study of the relationship between faculty & residents’ current use of social media and their intention to use social media for professional development

    OpenAIRE

    Loo, May Eng; Lim, Yong Hao; Wong, Wai Ling Brenda; Lee, Yee Mun

    2017-01-01

    Background:Social media applications provide useful platforms for professional development among doctors. Given that the main determinants of doctors’ intention to use social media for development are perceived usefulness and ease of use, this study examines if these determinants are moderated by patterns of current social media use.Summary of Work187 faculty and residents (38% response rate) completed an online questionnaire on their current social media use and perception of social media fo...

  4. Teaching to Transform? Addressing Race and Racism in the Teaching of Clinical Social Work Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varghese, Rani

    2016-01-01

    Faculty members are key stakeholders to support social work students' learning about race and racism in practice and to promote the professional standards established by the field. This qualitative study examines how 15 clinical social work faculty members teaching advanced practice in the Northeast conceptualize and incorporate their…

  5. Healthcare professionals' intentions and behaviours: a systematic review of studies based on social cognitive theories

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Godin, Gaston; Bélanger-Gravel, Ariane; Eccles, Martin; Grimshaw, Jeremy

    2008-01-01

    ... interventions targeting healthcare professionals. The aim of this study was to systematically review the published scientific literature about factors influencing health professionals' behaviours based on social cognitive theories...

  6. The Influence of Work Characteristics in the Quality of Life of Mental Health Professionals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreia Paula

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Mental health professionals are the main instrument for intervention in this area considered as a priority in Public Health and are subject to emotional exhaustion and stress that can negatively affect their quality of life. Aims: This study aims to assess the influence of job characteristics on health-related quality of life of health professionals.Methods: To address this it was decided to conduct a cross-sectional analytical study with a quantitative approach. SF-36v2 was used as a generic instrument for assessing quality of life, which is already validated for Portuguese population, complemented by a social and professional survey. Data collection took place from 28 January to 30 April 2013.Results and Conclusions: The sample comprised 201 mental health professionals in Portugal. Health-related quality of life shows statistically significant differences in the groups of studied professionals, according to the number of hours worked per week (p=0.04 and the degree of job satisfaction (p<0.001. The assessment of the quality of life of mental health professionals allows the implementation of changes in the organization of mental health services and may contribute to an improvement in the provision of healthcare services.

  7. Stealth voluntarism: an expectation of health professional work in underserviced areas?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanlon, Neil; Halseth, Greg; Ostry, Alec

    2011-01-01

    Voluntarism can take many forms, and its boundaries are not always straightforward. In this paper, we explore a particular type of voluntary activities carried out as an add-on to formal duties of health care professionals and administrators. We outline some impressions of what we term 'stealth voluntarism', which we situate at the interstices of health care professionalism, place integration, and welfare retrenchment. Our discussion draws on exploratory research looking at health care and social support in smaller urban centres in the interior of British Columbia, Canada. While stealth voluntarism can occur anywhere, we highlight its unique implications for systems of support in rural and small town places. We conclude by considering the wider implications of stealth voluntarism as an expectation of professional work in underserviced areas, particularly in the context of welfare retrenchment and the offloading of care. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. LEVERAGING BRANDING THROUGH SOCIAL MEDIA: A STUDY ON MARKETING PROFESSIONALS

    OpenAIRE

    Madhusmita Choudhury

    2017-01-01

    In the era of internet, digitisation & social Media, Sales & Marketing is no longer a different entity hence; marketing professionals need to learn how to shape of information about themselves, their companies & their products. It is a new revolution in the era of web 2.0 & Social media the way company & their customer communicate. In fact social media act as a bicycle with seats for customers & pedals for two riders i.e. Sales & Marketing, one behind the other. With the changing techniques o...

  9. Problems of realism and theorization in social research and Social Work

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Estela Grassi

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available This article analyzes the problems of social research in Social Work. It discusses the naive position that leads to the supposition that professional intervention is immediate 'in the reality of problems'; and that which understands that theory possesses a true knowledge 'about reality', as if this would precede all knowledge. It defines research as social practice that has as its raison d'état the production of knowledge, while it inscribes itself in and feeds the political-cultural processes of production of social problems. For this reason, for Social Work, research is not equivalent to social diagnosis, but should be a continuous process that accompanies the development of any social project and professional practice. This requires a willingness to learn the profession (theoretical command, methodological-technical management and a questioning attitude, and to protect against the risks of the naturalization of the problems in which it is required to intervene, which can be caused by either a naive realism or theorization.

  10. Pluralism, Social Work and Ethical-Political Project: One theme, many challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valeria Lucilia Forti

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available This essay is the result of observations drawn from our decades of experience as a social worker and professor, particularly of classes in professional ethics in Social Work. It is also based on theoretical studies and qualitative empirical academic research about ethics/professional ethics and Social Work. The content was partially presented and debated in a lecture at the XV ENPESS. The arguments seek to deepen the debate about the relationship between pluralism and Social Work. Such a debate is essential to professionals in the field, since it is linked to the fundamental ethical principles of the current Code of Professional Ethics of Social Workers. It should be noted that there is a sufficient and critical apprehension of the subject by Social Work professionals and students must have an adequate and critical grasp of these issues, particularly considering the present moment when current conservative waves that are expressed with such importance in the social life of Brazilians and seem to have repercussions in this professional field.

  11. Substance use disorder in the context of LGBT health: a social work perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silvestre, Anthony; Beatty, Rodger L; Friedman, M Reuel

    2013-01-01

    The impacts of public and private funding of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) health research, the state of integration of LGBT health issues into the academic and professional training programs of health care practitioners, and the larger social reality experienced by LGBT people profoundly affect substance use and substance use disorders in those populations. This analysis uses a social work perspective and considers the current state of research, professional training, and social oppression as they affect the health of LGBT people. Suggestions for action are offered that may improve the health of LGBT peoples and the practice of social work.

  12. Online professionalism and the mirror of social media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greysen, S Ryan; Kind, Terry; Chretien, Katherine C

    2010-11-01

    The rise of social media--content created by Internet users and hosted by popular sites such as Facebook, Twitter, YouTube, and Wikipedia, and blogs--has brought several new hazards for medical professionalism. First, many physicians may find applying principles for medical professionalism to the online environment challenging in certain contexts. Second, physicians may not consider the potential impact of their online content on their patients and the public. Third, a momentary lapse in judgment by an individual physician to create unprofessional content online can reflect poorly on the entire profession. To overcome these challenges, we encourage individual physicians to realize that as they "tread" through the World Wide Web, they leave behind a "footprint" that may have unintended negative consequences for them and for the profession at large. We also recommend that institutions take a proactive approach to engage users of social media in setting consensus-based standards for "online professionalism." Finally, given that professionalism encompasses more than the avoidance of negative behaviors, we conclude with examples of more positive applications for this technology. Much like a mirror, social media can reflect the best and worst aspects of the content placed before it for all to see.

  13. Professional and social activity of patients after heart transplant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcinkowska, Urszula; Kukowka, Karol; Gałeczka, Michał; Pudlo, Robert; Zakliczyński, Michał; Zembala, Marian

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the study is to describe both professional and social activities of patients after heart transplant. Ninety-five heart transplant patients treated at the Silesian Center for Heart Diseases in Zabrze were surveyed, comprising 29 women (30.5%) and 66 men (69.5%). The average age of respondents was 54.3 years old (standard deviation (SD) = 15 years); the average period that had elapsed since the heart transplant was 7.1 years (SD = 4 years). We designed a questionnaire as a tool for collecting information from patients. Twenty-five percent of patients worked at the time of completion of the questionnaire. Eighty percent of those patients were working before and after the transplant, 20%--only after transplantation (p < 0.05). A different job position at a new workplace had 47.8% of patients, 34.8% of them had the same job position at the same work place as they had had before, 63.4% of the heart transplant respondents were pensioners. Eighty-two percent of patients had a certificate with a designated degree of disability--among them: 69% had a certificate for a significant degree of disability, 22%--for a moderate degree of disability. Among those surveyed, 52.5% said that their financial situation had not changed whereas 34.5% of those surveyed reported a change for the worse. Thirty-seven percent of respondents reported changes in family relationships. Seventy-seven percent reported that they received help from family members, as compared with 19% who did not. Only 25.3% of the patients treated at the Silesian Centre for Heart Diseases after heart transplant are employed and it is one of the lowest employment rates in this category of patients in Europe. One third of working patients have the same work place as they had before their operation. Heart transplant is a cause of changes in family relationships. Most often family bonds are strengthened but sometimes family members become nervous, impatient and unwilling to talk about the transplant. This work

  14. Review: Reconstructive Research in Social Work

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Lüders

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available This review focuses on the first four books of a new series titled "Reconstructive Research in Social Work" published by Barbara Budrich publishers. The starting point is the idea that the methods and findings of qualitative research could be helpful for different areas of social work, education and advanced training. The two conference readers and the two studies present a wide range of concepts, methods, results and fields of application. At the same time, they demonstrate that some important questions are still open, especially in relation to the differences between the ethics and quality criteria of qualitative scientific research and the standards of social work practice. URN: urn:nbn:de:0114-fqs1002219

  15. FORENSIC SOCIAL WORK AS A FIELD OF ACTION IN SOCIAL ARBITRATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Sandra Krmpotic

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to analyze forensic practice of the Social Worker from new coordinates, recognizing that the social demand and the public agenda requires today we count on professionals who understand the social role of the law, are trained in the arbitration, the founded social diagnosis, and in a restorative intervention both before damage as a promoter of rights. From a socio-legal approach, forensic practice is one of the modalities of participation of the scientific-technical knowledge in the arbitration of the social. The account is enrolled in the studies since 2005 that involved the author referring to Forensic Social Work in the Southern Cone of Latin America, based on bibliographic research, and in the contents collected in individual and group interviews, and professional events. While referring to local experiencies, it is understood that tied current concerns crossing the practice in diverse regions, from the transformations of the state and the law in late modernity with respect to the organization of social life and the conditions of citizenship, along with a diversification of forms of social inequality.

  16. Descriptions of euthanasia as social representations: comparing the views of Finnish physicians and religious professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jylhänkangas, Leila; Smets, Tinne; Cohen, Joachim; Utriainen, Terhi; Deliens, Luc

    2014-03-01

    In many western societies health professionals play a powerful role in people's experiences of dying. Religious professionals, such as pastors, are also confronted with the issues surrounding death and dying in their work. It is therefore reasonable to assume that the ways in which death-related topics, such as euthanasia, are constructed in a given culture are affected by the views of these professionals. This qualitative study addresses the ways in which Finnish physicians and religious professionals perceive and describe euthanasia and conceptualises these descriptions and views as social representations. Almost all the physicians interviewed saw that euthanasia does not fit the role of a physician and anchored it to different kinds of risks such as the slippery slope. Most of the religious and world-view professionals also rejected euthanasia. In this group, euthanasia was rejected on the basis of a religious moral code that forbids killing. Only one of the religious professionals - the freethinker with an atheist world-view - accepted euthanasia and described it as a personal choice, as did the one physician interviewed who accepted it. The article shows how the social representations of euthanasia are used to protect professional identities and to justify their expert knowledge of death and dying. © 2013 The Authors. Sociology of Health & Illness © 2013 Foundation for the Sociology of Health & Illness/John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. The Future of Multicultural Social Work

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rowena Fong

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Multicultural social work has been evolving over the last forty years despite challenges in limited knowledge, insufficient resources, and inadequate infusion into the curriculum. Discussions continue about appropriate conceptual frameworks, culturally sensitive terms, traditional and indigenous practice approaches and treatments, and relevant outcome measures and evaluation methods. Future directions foster the inclusion of cultural values as strengths. Intersectionality guides practice approaches and systems of care. Service learning requirements, national ethnic resource centers, and ethnic resource centers, and ethnic studies dual degree programs are innovative initiatives yet to be fully integrated into social work curriculum.

  18. Statistics and Data Interpretation for Social Work

    CERN Document Server

    Rosenthal, James

    2011-01-01

    "Without question, this text will be the most authoritative source of information on statistics in the human services. From my point of view, it is a definitive work that combines a rigorous pedagogy with a down to earth (commonsense) exploration of the complex and difficult issues in data analysis (statistics) and interpretation. I welcome its publication.". -Praise for the First Edition. Written by a social worker for social work students, this is a nuts and bolts guide to statistics that presents complex calculations and concepts in clear, easy-to-understand language. It includes

  19. Being Both Helpers and Victims: Health Professionals' Experiences of Working During a Natural Disaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hugelius, Karin; Adolfsson, Annsofie; Örtenwall, Per; Gifford, Mervyn

    2017-04-01

    In November 2013, the Haiyan typhoon hit parts of the Philippines. The typhoon caused severe damage to the medical facilities and many injuries and deaths. Health professionals have a crucial role in the immediate disaster response system, but knowledge of their experiences of working during and in the immediate aftermath of a natural disaster is limited. Aim The aim of this study was to explore health professionals' experiences of working during and in the immediate aftermath of a natural disaster. Eight health professionals were interviewed five months after the disaster. The interviews were analyzed using phenomenological hermeneutic methods. The main theme, being professional and survivor, described both positive and negative emotions and experiences from being both a helper, as part of the responding organization, and a victim, as part of the surviving but severely affected community. Sub-themes described feelings of strength and confidence, feelings of adjustment and acceptance, feelings of satisfaction, feelings of powerless and fear, feelings of guilt and shame, and feelings of loneliness. Being a health professional during a natural disaster was a multi-faceted, powerful, and ambiguous experience of being part of the response system at the same time as being a survivor of the disaster. Personal values and altruistic motives as well as social aspects and stress-coping strategies to reach a balance between acceptance and control were important elements of the experience. Based on these findings, implications for disaster training and response strategies are suggested. Hugelius K , Adolfsson A , Örtenwall P , Gifford M . Being both helpers and victims: health professionals' experiences of working during a natural disaster. Prehosp Disaster Med. 2017;32(2):117-123.

  20. [The humanization of birth: how health professionals working in delivery care perceive it].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Souza, Taísa Guimarães; Gaíva, Maria Aparecida Munhoz; Modes, Priscilla Shirley Siniak dos Anjos

    2011-09-01

    This was a qualitative exploratory study, which aimed to investigate how health professionals working in delivery care perceive the humanization of the birth process. 17 professionals who work in the area were interviewed. The data were obtained through semi-structured interviews and processed through thematic analysis. During the data analysis 3 categories emerged: the meaning of humanization of birth; the humanization practice in the studied services; and difficulties of the humanization process. The results show that the humanization of birth care is not yet a common practice in most of the studied hospitals and that the staff is not prepared to provide a humanized and qualified service for mothers and newborns. We conclude that it is essential to change the biomedical model from a mainly technical approach to an approach that values the social and cultural aspects of pregnancy and delivery.

  1. Teaching about Faith-Based Organizations in the Social Work Curriculum: Perspectives of Social Work Educators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandya, Samta P.

    2016-01-01

    Faith-based organizations (FBOs) have an important presence in contemporary civil society and have gained further prominence through their repertoire of social welfare and services. This study engaged social work educators (n = 316) across nine countries to examine their perceptions of including discourses on faith and FBOs in the social work…

  2. Professional and social activity of patients after heart transplant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Urszula Marcinkowska

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The aim of the study is to describe both professional and social activities of patients after heart transplant. Material and Methods: Ninety-five heart transplant patients treated at the Silesian Center for Heart Diseases in Zabrze were surveyed, comprising 29 women (30.5% and 66 men (69.5%. The average age of respondents was 54.3 years old (standard deviation (SD = 15 years; the average period that had elapsed since the heart transplant was 7.1 years (SD = 4 years. We designed a questionnaire as a tool for collecting information from patients. Results: Twenty-five percent of patients worked at the time of completion of the questionnaire. Eighty percent of those patients were working before and after the transplant, 20% – only after transplantation (p < 0.05. A different job position at a new workplace had 47.8% of patients, 34.8% of them had the same job position at the same work place as they had had before, 63.4% of the heart transplant respondents were pensioners. Eighty-two percent of patients had a certificate with a designated degree of disability – among them: 69% had a certificate for a significant degree of disability, 22% – for a moderate degree of disability. Among those surveyed, 52.5% said that their financial situation had not changed whereas 34.5% of those surveyed reported a change for the worse. Thirty-seven percent of respondents reported changes in family relationships. Seventy-seven percent reported that they received help from family members, as compared with 19% who did not. Conclusions: Only 25.3% of the patients treated at the Silesian Centre for Heart Diseases after heart transplant are employed and it is one of the lowest employment rates in this category of patients in Europe. One third of working patients have the same work place as they had before their operation. Heart transplant is a cause of changes in family relationships. Most often family bonds are strengthened but sometimes family members

  3. Social Pedagogy in Spain: From academic and professional reconstruction to scientific and social uncertainty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martí Xavier March Cerdà

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction and aims: A reflection on the reality of Social Pedagogy in Spain during the second decade of the 21st century from an analytical perspective, with the aim of finding out and recognising its weak points, its strong points, its challenges and its opportunities. The analysis centres on reviewing Social Pedagogy as a key discipline  in the reconstruction of Educational Sci- ences and a socio-educational response to the demands and needs of society and the Welfare State. Analysis of the current situation is completed with research into Social Education studies. The sphere of reference is made up of the group of universities offering social education courses in Spain. The variables structuring the data capture were: 1 the structure of the offer, 2 the fea- tures of the courses offered, and 3 course results. Methodology: The sample taken was structural in nature, selecting 11 universities holding the courses in three areas of Spain - the North, Central and Southern Spain and the Mediterranean region. Information was gathered using two comple- mentary methodologies, a questionnaire, falling within the context of the Ibero-American Social Education Society (SIPS, and a review of the web sites of the universities offering courses in so- cial education. Data processing and analysis: The analysis was carried out in two complementary stages. First of all, the closed questions were processed using SPSS and then the digital records of the open questions were processed using the NVIVO program. Results: The large majority of the courses on offer are classroom-based, with some distance learning courses being available. The average size of the courses was around 87 places. It should be pointed out that the double degree in Social Education and Social Work on offer is merely symbolic. There is multi-departmental in- volvement in teaching the Degree, although a larger role is played by the Pedagogy departments and all socio-educational fields are

  4. Research and Social Work: from the bourgeois to the ontologic perspective of social science

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Lara

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this article is to question the bourgeois concept of social sciences, to present a brief history of research in Social Work and to present the first steps of the 'ontologic perspective' as a theoretical-methodological reference, with a focus on the production of knowledge in the current academic world. The considerations warn that research and theoretical clarification for social assistants in the current situation become their principal means of work, because it is from the systematization of the social reality that the professional has the ability to act with greater security and to give possible responses that would be accepted by the social objectivity. The study begins by locating Social Work as a profession that has been guaranteeing its space in the realm of research, principally in relation to studies about expressions of social issues. Thus, it maintains that the objects of social science research emerge from a concrete reality and establish their mediations in a society that produces and reproduces by means of unreconcilable contradictions.

  5. Quantifying Globalization in Social Work Research: A 10-Year Review of American Social Work Journals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agbényiga, DeBrenna L.; Huang, Lihua

    2014-01-01

    Measured by the prevalence of journal article contributions, geographic coverage, and international collaboration, this literature review found an increasing level of globalization with respect to American social work research and contribution to the social work profession from 2000-2009. Findings suggest changes are needed in global awareness and…

  6. Social Work Values in Human Services Administration: Implications for Social Work Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Larry D.; Hoefer, Richard

    2014-01-01

    The perceived wisdom in the social work education community, based on empirical research from the 1990s and the early part of this century, says that the master of social work (MSW) degree is not competitive with the master of business administration or the master of public administration to obtain top-level administration jobs in nonprofit…

  7. The metaphors of collaboration, or the social construction of collaborative interactions between health professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomelleri, Stefano; Lusardi, Roberto; Artioli, Giovanna

    2015-03-13

    This article illustrates the ways in which symbolic representations of reality, embodied in metaphors and language, can affect collaborative interactions in the current situation of social and economic change. We assume that corporate transformation and organizational configurations influence health professionals' representations in largely unconscious ways and, with these, their everyday practice. On the basis of empirical data collected through 13 focus groups in an Italian hospital, our intention is to show the extent to which joint working can be linked to three main metaphors each matching specific forms of social and professional interaction. The three metaphors of collaboration constitute different attempts to interpret social and organizational changes in proactive - encouraging social innovation - or defensive terms - as actions of cultural resistance. The three metaphors are: apparatus, family and team. In different ways, the first two represent forms of resistance to change and are widely present within organizations. The latter, on the other hand, consists of a proactive way to deal with ongoing social and organizational change. This metaphor testifies to the existence of a different approach to collaborative interactions, a perspective related to specific combinations of organizational and professional characteristics. This study indicates that organizational change and collaboration can be strengthened by metaphors that illustrate open, plural and highly heterogeneous professional settings.

  8. Sociale innovatie of work and employment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pot, F.; Dhondt, S.; Oeij, P.

    2012-01-01

    Social innovation of work and employment are prerequisites to achieve the EU2020 objectives of smart, sustainable and inclusive growth. It covers labour market innovation on societal level and workplace innovation on organisational level. This paper focuses on the latter. Workplace innovations are

  9. Social Relations at Work and Incident Dementia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ishtiak-Ahmed, Kazi; Hansen, Åse Marie; Garde, Anne Helene

    2017-01-01

    Objective: We investigated whether social relations at work were associated with incident dementia in old age. Methods: One thousand five hundred seventy-two occupationally active men from the Copenhagen Male Study Cohort were followed from 1986 to 2014. Participants underwent a clinical examinat...

  10. The Epistemological Beliefs of Social Work Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson-Meger, Jennifer I.

    2013-01-01

    Research has shown that undergraduate students come into social work programs with an epistemological belief system that values personal experience over critical thinking processes. Epistemological development and self-efficacy are important factors to facilitating identity as a learner and developing critical thinking aptitudes. This qualitative,…

  11. SOCIAL WORK WITH REFUGEES IN ZIMBABWE Johanne ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mugumbate

    It is the responsibility of the social worker to work hand in glove with the tracing office to help locate the whereabouts of the parents. In Zimbabwe at Tongogara Refugee Camp, International Committee of the Red Cross. (ICRC) is carrying out the tracing process of parents and reunite families. Under this arrangement it is the.

  12. Grief and Loss: A Social Work Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, Jennifer E.

    2013-01-01

    Despite the wealth of research that exists in the area of death, grief, and loss, the scarcity of literature examining the impact upon social work practitioners is troubling. This article initially draws upon a case study to explore this impact through the theoretical framework of disenfranchised grief. Further comment is made regarding the…

  13. Social Work, Pastoral Care and Resilience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Considine, Tom; Hollingdale, Paul; Neville, Ruth

    2015-01-01

    This paper briefly examines the growing interest in developing resilience in the social work curricula as it is seen as a crucial quality necessary to cope with the increasing demands of the profession. The recent research into developing resilience is dominated by a psychological model which emphasises personal qualities. It runs the risk of…

  14. [Work and health: Two social rights].

    Science.gov (United States)

    García Blanco, Lucía

    2015-01-01

    Work and health are two concepts whose formulation varies from one society to another depending on unique and temporal appreciation. Updating them to our time involves the challenge to understand their construction as part of consuming organized societies. Political and social processes during the last decades must be analyzed, and so must be the worker subject as a psychophysics unit. Health, as well, ought to be considered a universal right, from where to focus and understand pathological social behaviors impacting the workplace. The subject's social dimension and the health-work relationship are dynamic. And keeping this dynamic involves to continuously review principles, norms and regulations which need to fit reality, and specific communication and language modes, as well as working conditions and environmental aspects. These processes must be considered as taking part in Argentina's social imaginary worth highlighting: a shift in how the State's role is considered, the public policy's sense, the importance of working in a complementary and interdisciplinary way, redesigning the concept of health through the broadening of those under the State's care and considering and building the workplace as a healthy space.

  15. Sociology and Social Work in Nigeria: Characteristics ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abstract. This paper presents the evolution of sociology and social work in Nigeria and examines the current characteristics and areas of convergences and divergences in both fields. it was only in the 1960s that universities in Nigeria began to offer degree programmes in sociology with the first sub-department and full ...

  16. Social Media Awareness and Use Among LIS Professionals in India: a Study

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Shihab I

    2015-01-01

      Social media is offering new challenges to Library and Information science professionals in this web based environment to enhance the number of social media users, social media tools and social media sites...

  17. The affective consequences of social comparison as related to professional burnout and social comparison orientation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buunk, BP; Ybema, J.F.; Gibbons, FX; Ipenburg, M

    2001-01-01

    In a study among sociotherapists, the affective consequences of social comparison were examined and related to professional burnout and to individual differences in social comparison orientation. Participants were confronted with a bogus interview with an upward versus a downward comparison target.

  18. The affective consequenses of social comparison as related to professional burnout and social comparison orientation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buunk, B.P.; Ybema, J.F.; Gibbons, F.X.; Ipenburg, M.L.

    2001-01-01

    In a study among sociotherapists, the affective consequences of social comparison were examined and related to professional burnout and to individual differences in social comparison orientation. Participants were confronted with a bogus interview with an upward versus a downward comparison target.

  19. Attitudes toward euthanasia: implications for social work practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chong, Alice Ming-Lin; Fok, Shiu-Yeu

    2009-01-01

    This article reports the findings of a randomized general household survey that examined the attitudes of 618 Chinese respondents toward different types of euthanasia. The general public is found to agree with active euthanasia and non-voluntary euthanasia, but is neutral about passive euthanasia. Support for euthanasia is predicted by decreasing importance of religious belief, higher family income, experiences in taking care of terminally ill family members, being non-Protestants, and increasing age. Patients were perceived as the chief decision makers in euthanasian decisions. Finally, suggestions on social work practice and professional training are made.

  20. Reflections of a Latino in the Social Work Profession

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandro Garcia

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available This is a first-person account of seminal events that have helped shape the rich history and cultural heritage of the social work profession. In examining these events, the author has provided some personal history as a Mexican American growing up in South Texas that provides a historical and value context for his participation in these events. He also discusses his leadership experiences in serving on the national staff of NASW and volunteer leadership experiences in a number of professional organizations during critical times for the profession.

  1. Exploring the state of religious diversity in social work education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Hodge

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available This study examines the perceptions of religious discrimination in social work education among a religiously heterogeneous, national sample of professionally affiliated graduate students. The results indicate that theologically liberal and mainline Christians perceive low levels of religious discrimination to exist, on par with those who report no faith affiliation. As posited, however, evangelical and theologically conservative Christians reported significantly higher levels of religious discrimination. Relationships between orthodox beliefs, spiritual motivation and perceptions of religious discrimination are also explored. The implications of these findings are discussed as they intersect the NASW Code of Ethics and the CSQW Educational Policy and Accreditation Standards.

  2. Conceptions of authority within contemporary social work practice in managed mental health care organizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bransford, Cassandra L

    2005-07-01

    This article examines how social workers may use their authority to create managed mental health care organizations that support the principles and values of professional social work practice. By exploring research and theoretical contributions from a multidisciplinary perspective, the author suggests ways that social workers may incorporate empowerment strategies into their organizational practices to create more socially responsible and humane mental health organizations. (c) 2005 APA, all rights reserved.

  3. The characteristics of oncology social work in Australia: Implications for workforce planning in integrated cancer care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pockett, Rosalie; Peate, Michelle; Hobbs, Kim; Dzidowska, Monika; L Bell, Melanie; Baylock, Brandi; Epstein, Irwin

    2016-12-01

    To describe the demographics, professional characteristics, self-reported professional development needs and research involvement of oncology social workers in Australia and to describe perceived barriers to provision of quality psychosocial care. A cross-sectional online survey was administered to social workers working in the oncology field who were contacted through three professional organizations; the Australian Association of Social Workers, Oncology Social Work Australia and the Psycho-oncology Co-operative Research Group, the University of Sydney. A snowball recruitment method was adopted to maximize the sample size. Two thirds of respondents had over 10 years professional practice experience but with lesser experience in oncology settings. Twenty-eight percent had post-graduate qualifications. Professional development needs were reported as moderate or high by 68% of respondents. No association between professional needs and work setting was found. Years of experience in oncology practice and living in an urban area increased the likelihood of involvement in research. Barriers to psychosocial care included poor understandings of the social work role, time constraints and an inadequate number of social work positions. In this first Australian study of the social work oncology workforce, the results demonstrated active, well-qualified and experienced social workers providing frontline services to people with cancer and their caregivers in geographically diverse locations across Australia. Inadequate resources and a lack of integrated psychosocial care were identified as barriers to comprehensive cancer care. The need for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander social workers was identified as an urgent workforce priority. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  4. SOCIAL SKILLS AND ACADEMIC BACKGROUND: A COMPARATIVE STUDY AMONG STUDENTS AND PSYCHOLOGY PROFESSIONALS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diêgo Ferreira de Oliveira

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The present research had as an objective the comparison of Social Skills (SS on psychology course undergraduates' and professionals working in the area with at least one year of work performance. Three groups participated in this study: 63 students at the beginning of the course (1st, 2nd and 3rd semesters; 54 students at the end of the course (8th, 9th and 10th semesters; and 25 psychologists. For the data collect it was used a Social Skills Inventory (SSI that was applied at the university places of work or availability, or via e-mail, with the professionals. The results showed that there were no significant differences in the overall score of Social Skills, neither between the students at the beginning and the end of the course (p=0.319 nor between students at the end of the course and the psychologists (p= 0,70. There was a significant difference in the comparison of students at the beginning of the course and psychologists (p= 0.009. From the manual, it was possible to verify that the majority, of students and professionals, presented a good repertory of SS in its different factors. It was considered still relevant, the development of activities that could enable a major learning of these SS still during graduation, evaluating that they are fundamental to the psychologists' performance. Keywords: Social skills. Psychology. Psychology students. Psychologists.

  5. Social Work as an Action Science: A Perspective from Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sommerfeld, Peter

    2014-01-01

    It is a surprising fact that social work is not conceived as a scientific discipline in many countries and especially in the United States. It is surprising because the extent of academic social work programs and the scientific output of people working at schools of social work are significant. And it is surprising anyway if social work is…

  6. Introspection as intra-professionalism in social and health care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundgaard Andersen, Linda; Dybbroe, Betina

    2017-01-01

    framing and complex exchanges of loss and confirmation, and of denial and displacement take place between a group of social workers and their supervisor. In the second case, it becomes apparent how the research interview opens up an opportunity for processing the emotions and socially critical experiences...... involved in hospital work....

  7. Professionalization and professional fields of Social Education: gender training from the university

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Victoria Pérez-de-Guzmán; Encarna Bas-Peña; Juan Francisco Trujillo Herrera

    2017-01-01

    This work makes a brief tour of Social Education in Spain, to show that from its beginnings, as a university degree, are established specific areas of socio-educational intervention of people who will...

  8. Social policy formulation and the role of professionals: the involvement of social workers in parliamentary committees in Israel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gal, John; Weiss-Gal, Idit

    2011-03-01

    The aim of this study is to contribute to a better understanding of the role of social care professionals in the social policy formulation process by studying social workers' involvement in parliamentary committees in Israel. The study methodology is a quantitative content analysis of the minutes of parliamentary committees that met between the years 1999 and 2006. The findings indicate that social workers participated in 13% of the deliberations of parliamentary committees concerning diverse social policy and social care issues and that two-thirds of these participants are affiliated with non-profit organisations and local government. The findings also offer an insight into the types of parliamentary committees in which social workers participate, and the subjects upon which these focused. Finally, the data shed light on organisational and demographic characteristics of the social workers participating in parliamentary committees in the Israeli parliament. These findings appear to offer support for the discourse within international social work literature that advocates greater involvement of social workers in social policy formulation. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  9. Apples and Pears: Engaging Social Work Students in Social Dialogue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyneke, Roelof P.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate how an adventure-based activity could help facilitate dialogue and enable a safe process where students could engage in a difficult topic such as diversity without feeling threatened. Method: A qualitative study was used in which 89 social work students who took part in diversity training gave permission that their…

  10. Newly graduated nurses' job satisfaction: comparison with allied hospital professionals, social workers, and elementary school teachers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Mihyun; Lee, Ji Yun; Cho, Sung-Hyun

    2012-09-01

    The purposes of this study are to examine differences in job satisfaction among professional groups including nurses, allied hospital professionals, social workers, and elementary school teachers, and to identify specific characteristics of job satisfaction of nurses. The study design was a cross-sectional exploratory study using secondary data analysis with the 2009 Graduates Occupational Mobility Survey. The sample was female new graduates. The differences in job satisfaction among professional groups were analyzed using logistic regression (satisfied vs. not satisfied). Overall, 41.5% of nurses, 50.1% of allied hospital professionals, 58.2% of social workers, and 89% of elementary school teachers were satisfied with their job. Nurses were significantly less satisfied than the other professionals in 5 of the 11 job characteristics and had the lowest odds ratio (OR) when compared with elementary school teachers: work content (OR = 0.197, 95% CI [0.128, 0.304]), physical work environment (OR = 0.353, 95% CI [0.236, 0.529]), working hours (OR = 0.054, 95% CI [0.033, 0.088]), personal growth (OR = 0.242, 95% CI [0.160, 0.366]), and autonomy (OR = 0.188, 95% CI [0.123, 0.288]). Work content, physical work environment, interpersonal relationship, advancement system, and autonomy were significantly associated with the overall job satisfaction of nurses. Relatively dissatisfying job characteristics in nursing work environment that were significant predictors for nurses' job satisfaction should be improved. Newly graduated nurses are at risk for job dissatisfaction. This can result in high turnover rates and can exacerbate the nursing shortage. Efforts to improve the work environment are needed. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  11. Assessing work disability for social security benefits: international models for the direct assessment of work capacity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geiger, Ben Baumberg; Garthwaite, Kayleigh; Warren, Jon; Bambra, Clare

    2017-08-25

    It has been argued that social security disability assessments should directly assess claimants' work capacity, rather than relying on proxies such as on functioning. However, there is little academic discussion of how such assessments could be conducted. The article presents an account of different models of direct disability assessments based on case studies of the Netherlands, Germany, Denmark, Norway, the United States of America, Canada, Australia, and New Zealand, utilising over 150 documents and 40 expert interviews. Three models of direct work disability assessments can be observed: (i) structured assessment, which measures the functional demands of jobs across the national economy and compares these to claimants' functional capacities; (ii) demonstrated assessment, which looks at claimants' actual experiences in the labour market and infers a lack of work capacity from the failure of a concerned rehabilitation attempt; and (iii) expert assessment, based on the judgement of skilled professionals. Direct disability assessment within social security is not just theoretically desirable, but can be implemented in practice. We have shown that there are three distinct ways that this can be done, each with different strengths and weaknesses. Further research is needed to clarify the costs, validity/legitimacy, and consequences of these different models. Implications for rehabilitation It has recently been argued that social security disability assessments should directly assess work capacity rather than simply assessing functioning - but we have no understanding about how this can be done in practice. Based on case studies of nine countries, we show that direct disability assessment can be implemented, and argue that there are three different ways of doing it. These are "demonstrated assessment" (using claimants' experiences in the labour market), "structured assessment" (matching functional requirements to workplace demands), and "expert assessment" (the

  12. Semiotic Analysis in the Study of Social Work

    OpenAIRE

    Laine, Terhi; Saurama, Erja

    2009-01-01

    Research and professional practices have the joint aim of re-structuring the preconceived notions of reality. They both want to gain the understanding about social reality. Social workers use their professional competence in order to grasp the reality of their clients, while researchers’ pursuit is to open the secrecies of the research material. Development and research are now so intertwined and inherent in almost all professional practices that making distinctions between practising, develo...

  13. Personal, professional, and work factors associated with Australian clinical medical practitioners' experiences of workplace aggression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hills, Danny J; Joyce, Catherine M

    2013-08-01

    This study examined the extent to which a range of personal, professional, and work factors are associated with workplace aggression experienced by medical practitioners in Australian clinical practice settings. An exploratory, descriptive study of cross-sectional, self-report survey design was undertaken in the third wave of the Medicine in Australia: Balancing Employment and Life survey during 2010-2011. Of 16 327 medical practitioners sampled, 9951 (60.9%) responded and 9449 (57.9%) worked in clinical practice. Logistic regression was undertaken to detect statistically significant associations between a suite of personal, professional, and work variables and eight binary outcome variables measuring exposure to verbal or written and physical aggression from patients, patients' relatives or carers, co-workers and others external to the workplace during the previous year. Age was consistently negatively associated and external control orientation was consistently positively associated with workplace aggression exposure from each source. Key variables related to work conditions (total hours worked, unpredictable work hours, a poor support network of other doctors, patients with unrealistic expectations, patients with complex health and social problems) and the presence of workplace aggression prevention and minimization strategies (alerts to high risk of aggression, restricting or withdrawing access for aggressive persons and optimized patient waiting) were also associated with aggression exposure. A broader implementation of strategies to prevent and minimize the likelihood and consequences of workplace aggression is required and needs to take account of both the individual and sub-group profiles of medical practitioners. Strategies need to mitigate the more challenging aspects of medical work, including excessive work hours, inadequate access to professional support networks, and larger caseloads of patients with complex conditions.

  14. Dentistry's social contract and the loss of professionalism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holden, Acl

    2017-03-01

    The social contract between society and the dental profession is essential to the ability to provide high quality dental care to patients. The social contract defines the profession and its place in society, giving the profession its legitimacy. Society bestows benefits upon the dental profession in exchange for our ability to alleviate pain and suffering caused by oral disease. This article seeks to explore the nature of this social contract in the provision of oral health care and what may become of the profession should the expectations of either party not be met. Changing beliefs within society and within the profession have led to new concepts of professionalism that focus upon alternative values to what is termed 'nostalgic professionalism'. It is concerning when these new values begin to focus upon financial reward built upon commercial practices, with patients slipping away to be replaced with clients; the dentist-patient relationship lacking in any degree of altruism. This article will argue that breaches in the social contract are not to the benefit of patients or the profession and that whilst specifics of the contract will inevitably change, the nature of this should not. © 2016 Australian Dental Association.

  15. Geographical Variation and Social Work Students' Job Intentions in China: A Geographic Information Systems Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yean; Guo, Yingqi; Zeng, Shouchui

    2018-02-02

    Social work education in China is undergoing far-reaching development. However, an important issue, low professional commitment, has been identified. Why do social work graduates-especially master's level graduates-take jobs unrelated to social work? To answer this question, it is important to take into account that the professionalization of social work is happening unevenly across China as a result of uneven social and economic development. Models used in past research do not consider the possibility that the low intention for social work jobs and its potential predictors may vary across regions. To address this problem, Geographic Information Systems software is being adopted to explore the varying degrees of social work graduates' job intention, its predictors across China, and the association between job intention and predictors at both national and regional levels. Authors of this study found substantial geographic variation in predictors of social work graduates' job intention across regions. Their findings also suggest some heterogeneity in the association between job intention and specific correlates that would be masked in the traditional nationwide model. Policymakers aiming to improve the job intention of social work graduates should consider regional variation as part of their approach. © 2018 National Association of Social Workers.

  16. [Medical-psychological and social aspects of professional adaptation of staff of criminal-executive system].

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'iakovich, M P; Pavlov, A V

    2010-02-01

    There was observed medical-psychological and social aspects of professional adaptation of staff of criminal-executive system, was given evaluation of conditions of their work. Was learned risk of damage of health, adaptational potential, personal peculiarities of staff Was learned valuable-motivation sphere, self-concept of competitionability, type of life position, several elements of mode of life of the staff. Was educed decreasing of adaptational capabilities, high personal anxiety and low stress firmness among high number of young specialists. Was formed an apprehension about effectiveness of their professional adaptation in conditions of absence of system of dynamic medical-psychological observe and prophylactic measures.

  17. Time Work by Overworked Professionals: Strategies in Response to the Stress of Higher Status

    OpenAIRE

    Moen, Phyllis; Lam, Jack; Ammons, Samantha; Kelly, Erin L.

    2013-01-01

    How are professionals responding to the time strains brought on by the stress of their higher status jobs? Qualitative data from professionals reveal (a) general acceptance of the emerging temporal organization of professional work, including rising time demands and blurred boundaries around work/ nonwork times and places, and (b) time work as strategic responses to work intensification, overloads, and boundarylessness. We detected four time-work strategies: prioritizing time, scaling back ob...

  18. The Impact of Public Housing Policy on Family Social Work Theory and Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarty, Dawn

    2008-01-01

    Social workers are the professionals most engaged with families living in low-income and subsidized housing and most familiar with the problems associated with inadequate housing. Yet the discussion of public housing policy has been left largely to economists and housing activists and the clear implications for family social work practice have not…

  19. A National Survey of Graduate Education in Psychopharmacology: Advancing the Social Work Perspective on Psychiatric Medication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Shannon; Narendorf, Sarah; Lacasse, Jeffrey R.

    2017-01-01

    Social workers' unique skills and professional perspective can contribute to improved practices in psychopharmacology, yet it is unclear how social work programs prepare students for this area of practice. This study examined instruction of psychopharmacology through a national Web-based survey of MSW program directors and instructors of…

  20. TALENT MANAGEMENT BASED ON THERAPEUTIC WORK WITH A PROFESSIONAL HANDBALL TEAM

    OpenAIRE

    Keczelei, Danica

    2013-01-01

    All athletes regardless of their age should get mental skills development that could be integrated into their normal training. Psychological training is essential for better performance because in sports the psychological factors play a very important role. The aim of this presentation is to show the therapeutic work of a professional men’s handball team and demonstrate the nature of the social environment and how it can have an effect on their performance. The author examines how a team fo...

  1. Promoting Election-Related Policy Practice among Social Work Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pritzker, Suzanne; Burwell, Christianna

    2016-01-01

    Political involvement is an integral component of the social work profession, yet there is no explicit reference to social work participation in election-related activities in either the National Association of Social Workers Code of Ethics or the Council on Social Work Education Educational Policy and Accreditation Standards. Social work…

  2. Prevalence of burnout in health professionals working in palliative care: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parola, Vitor; Coelho, Adriana; Cardoso, Daniela; Sandgren, Anna; Apóstolo, João

    2017-07-01

    More than ever, the current increasing need for palliative care leads to health professionals providing this type of care which further leads to multiple challenges, and stressful and demanding situations. The multiple challenges of working in palliative care put health professionals working in this context at the risk of burnout. To examine the evidence on the prevalence of burnout among health professionals working in palliative care. The current review included studies that encompass qualified health professionals working in palliative care, caring for patients 18 years of age or older. The current review considered studies reporting on the point prevalence of burnout, measured by a burnout scale, such as, but not limited to, the Maslach Burnout Inventory, Burnout Measure and Copenhagen Burnout Inventory. The current review considered studies conducted in the context of specialist palliative care, more specifically, palliative care units, specialized palliative home care or hospices. The current review considered observational study designs, including prospective and retrospective cohort, case-control and cross-sectional studies. An initial search of MEDLINE (via PubMed) and CINAHL was undertaken, followed by a second search for published and unpublished studies since 1975 in major healthcare-related electronic databases. Studies written in English, Spanish and Portuguese were included. Two independent reviewers assessed the methodological quality of studies using the standardized critical appraisal instrument from the Joanna Briggs Institute. No studies were excluded from the review based on the methodological appraisal. Data were extracted using a data extraction table, taking into account the review questions. Significant differences were found between condition measures, thus we were unable to perform a meta-analysis. Eight cross-sectional studies met the inclusion criteria, with a total of 1406 health professionals. The sample was limited to nurses

  3. Effects of academic-industry relations on the professional socialization graduate science students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holleman, Margaret Ann Phillippi

    This study asks if there has been a change in graduate student socialization in the biological sciences given the increased commercialism of life sciences. Drawing on the work of Steven Brint (1994) and Sheila Slaughter and Larry Leslie (1997) and Sheila Slaughter and Gary Rhoades (2004), this study asks if graduate student socialization has shifted emphasis from the social and moral dimensions of work (social trustee professionalism) to the practical, technical, and commercial dimensions (expert professionalism). Building on the survey results of the Acadia Project (Swazey, Louis, & Anderson, 1994; Louis, Anderson & Rosenberg, 1995), this qualitative study uses interviews with 25 graduate science students at two A.A.U. research universities that have been heavily involved in academic-industry relations to see how the students were professionally socialized throughout their educational careers. The student configuration compares males and females, U.S. and international students, and those funded by the government versus those receiving at least partial support from industry. It uses critical professionalization theory as a framework. The study found that students' career goals and values were usually set before graduate school primarily by females in non-elite institutions, such as community colleges, women's and liberal arts colleges, and non-flagship state universities. Also, university science faculty tend to continue to socialize students---even those planning to go into industry---for the professoriate, as their prestige is based on placing proteges into other elite schools. U.S. females and most students going into academics or government labs had the values of social trustee professionals while those going into industry held those of expert professionals. The former were more likely to recognize situations involving conflicts of interest or commitment. Almost all the students were disillusioned by the grants and promotion and tenure systems. They feel both

  4. Economic Modeling in SocialWork Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barry R. Cournoyer

    2000-12-01

    Full Text Available Economic modeling provides academic administrators with a logical framework for analyzing costs associated with the processes involved in the delivery of social work education. The specific costs associated with activities such as teaching, research, and service may be determined for a school of social work as a whole or for specific responsibility centers (e.g., programs and services within the school. Economic modeling utilizes modern spreadsheet software that can be configured in relation to the idiosyncratic needs and budgeting strategies that exist in virtually all colleges and universities. As a versatile planning tool, it enables managers to identify specific “cost-drivers” that cause the occurrence of real costs in relation to designated programmatic initiatives. In addition, economic modeling provides academic planners and decision-makers a useful vehicle for considering the economic impact of various projected (“what if” scenarios.

  5. Theorizing practice research in social work

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Uggerhøj, Lars

    2011-01-01

    The article focuses on theories, definitions, interests, possibilities and barriers in practice research in social work. It points out that both practice and research will be influenced by participating in and developing practice research. – and that both parts must and will learn from the process....... To elaborate and define practice research in social work, it is necessary to consider connected approaches and theories. The article will show that practice research is both connected to and can use the theoretical frames of Actual science and Mode 2 knowledge production. To understand and develop research...... closely connected to practice it is necessary to define it in three different ways: practice research, practitioner research and user-controlled research. Examples from different Nordic approaches connected to these definitions will be presented. Although practice and research both need to develop...

  6. What Works in Education and Social Welfare?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krejsler, John B.

    2013-01-01

    Drawing on Foucauldian genealogy, the article maps major sources and trajectories of the evidence discourse. This enables scrutiny of the current struggle about evidence for What Works in education and social welfare. Evidence discourse is identified as emerging from the medical field as a bottom...... professions may profit from adopting evidence as a floating signifier. An analytical distinction between external and internal forms of evidence is introduced to facilitate alternative strategies to dealing with the evidence discourse....

  7. Exploring Redundancy in SocialWork Education

    OpenAIRE

    Bruce Dalton; Lois Wright

    2003-01-01

    The issue of redundancy has not been well explored in the social work curriculum. The Educational Policy and Accreditation Standards (EPAS) (CSWE, 2001) requires redundancy in the form of integration of material across content areas and addresses redundancy vertically between levels of education and year of program. Furthermore, research and theory support the notion that various types of redundancy produce educational benefits.This paper uniquely uses MSW students to track ...

  8. Strategic planning for social work marketing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genkins, M

    1985-01-01

    Diminishing governmental and philanthropic funding for human service programs mandate new approaches for developing sources of support. In order to ensure both survival and enhancement of programs, marketing techniques employed in the business sector with strategic planning seeking to define consumer-need and product-demand appear to be a current necessity for social work service administrators. The author discusses the theoretical background of such a task and suggests specific marketing modalities and strategies for application in nonprofit agency and institutional settings.

  9. Professional socialization of baccalaureate nursing students: can students in distance nursing programs become socialized?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nesler, M S; Hanner, M B; Melburg, V; McGowan, S

    2001-10-01

    Distance education programs may have difficulty socializing nursing students due to limited face-to-face student-faculty interaction. Socialized attitudes toward the nursing profession were assessed using two measures with three groups--senior BSN students enrolled at campus-based programs, senior BSN students enrolled in distance programs, and non-nursing students. The purpose of this analysis was to determine whether nursing students enrolled in distance programs had professional socialization outcomes comparable to nursing students enrolled in campus-based programs, and to examine the psychometric properties of two popular measures of professional socialization. Results indicated that students in the distance programs had higher scores than the campus-based nursing students, who, in turn, had higher scores than non-nursing students. A statistical interaction of RN status by program type indicated that health care experience was a critical factor in the socialization process. Of the two socialization measures examined, one had acceptable psychometric properties. These data suggest that health care and preceptorship experiences are important determinants of professional socialization and that students who opt for distance nursing programs graduate with socialization outcomes that are at least comparable to those of students who attend traditional programs.

  10. Internationalization of Bachelor's programmes in social work in Europe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    dr Raymond Kloppenburg; Peter Hendriks

    2016-01-01

    This article presents the results of a survey on the internationalization of Bachelor’s education in social work, which was carried out at 33 schools of social work across Europe. Many universities are seeking to “internationalize” their social work curriculum. However, although many social work

  11. The Use of Emotions in Social Work Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikebuchi, Johnathan; Rasmussen, Brian Michael

    2014-01-01

    The role of emotions, although central to social work practice, has been relatively neglected in the process of teaching and learning social work. This article explores how social work educators can incorporate an understanding of the role of emotions in both the teaching and practice of social work. Attention is drawn toward evolutionary and…

  12. Guiding Social Work Doctoral Graduates through Scholarly Publications and Presentations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, Cynthia L.; Tomal, Daniel R.

    2015-01-01

    Disseminating the work of social work doctoral graduates aligns with the Council on Social Work Education's National Statement on Research Integrity in Social Work publication practices and the National Association of Social Workers Code of Ethics. Publications and presentations are essential to their future success, yet little support is provided…

  13. Link between Work-Related Prosocial Orientation and Professional Capability of Employees: A Preliminary Exploratory Investigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Małgorzata Adamska-Chudzińska

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The paper explores the link between work-related prosocial orientation of organizations and professional capabilities of employees suggesting that the prosocial orientation impacts the level of professional capability and proactive engagement. The article applies three main methods: literature studies, in-depth questionnaire surveys and multi-person method of assessment. The applied sub-measures for both leading constructs were formed and collinearity was tested using linear correlation coefficient. In prosocial environments psychological predispositions as essential aspects of personality and determinants of human behaviour, activate and stimulate professional activity. The implementation of a prosocial orientation leads to significant growth in professional capability and can influence employees’ entrepreneurial behaviour. An important aspect of employee proactive behaviour is building an internal policy based on prosocial mechanisms. Effective stimulation of prosocial and proactive attitudes and actions requires the creation of an environment where activities are realized alongside social values and with respect for individual personal determinants of activity. Considerations and findings presented in the paper contribute to the area of determinants of effective and lasting proactive employee development. The use of the multi-person method can be considered valuable in behavioural research in entrepreneurship.

  14. Suicide Prevention in Social Work Education: How Prepared Are Social Work Students?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osteen, Philip J.; Jacobson, Jodi M.; Sharpe, Tanya L.

    2014-01-01

    The prevalence of suicide suggests social workers will encounter clients at risk for suicide, but research shows social workers receive little to no training on suicide and suicide prevention and feel unprepared to work effectively with clients at risk. Baseline results from a randomized intervention study of the Question, Persuade, and Refer…

  15. A Comparative Analysis of Social Work in Vietnam and Canada: Rebirth and Renewal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Douglas Durst

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Social work education is rapidly developing in the Socialist Republic of Vietnam and it is facing new challenges as it blends the historical, political and cultural influences. This article reviews and compares the historical and recent developments of social work in Canada and Vietnam. Canadian social work developed in Euro-western culture and its values, whereas, Vietnam suffered under French colonialism, a 30 year war of independence and then economic depression. For many years, social work remained nebulous but in recent years, the country has seen a rebirth of social work. Field education is the link from theory to practice and is often where differences between the two countries become evident. The article concludes with a discussion on the professionalization of social work and its future contribution to the emerging “new” Vietnam.

  16. Practice with persons with autism spectrum disorders: predictors of self-efficacy among social work students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinecola, Cassie M; Lemieux, Catherine M

    2015-01-01

    Diagnoses of autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) have been on the rise, and the need for knowledgeable and competent professionals is dire. However, few social workers enter the field of ASDs. Rooted in social cognitive theory, this study examined the extent to which knowledge, interest, contact, and training predicted master's in social work students' self-efficacy in working with individuals with ASDs. Approximately 18% of the variance was explained (R(2) = .18, p social work practice and education are discussed.

  17. Professional Preparation of Students of Social Pedagogy in the Czech Republic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martincová, Jana; Andrysová, Pavla

    2017-01-01

    This paper addresses the professional preparation of future teachers of social pedagogy (social educators) in the context of current tasks which the social pedagogy in the Czech Republic still has. Based on the results of the research which aims to present the professional characteristics of students of social pedagogy, we propose an innovation of…

  18. "New Professionalism," Workforce Remodeling and the Restructuring of Teachers' Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevenson, Howard; Carter, Bob; Passy, Rowena

    2007-01-01

    Since its election in 1997 the Labour government's policy has sought to promote a "new professionalism" amongst teachers. First mooted at the time when new performance management arrangements were introduced, the discourse of new professionalism has now become closely associated with the "workforce remodeling" agenda in which…

  19. Involving service users in the classroom with social work students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackay, Rob; Millar, Jeremy

    2012-02-01

    The purpose of this paper is to explore and discuss issues related to the requirement by the Scottish Social Services Council (SSSC) and the Scottish Government that service users and carers are partners and stakeholders in social work education. This requirement is one of several that are used by the SSSC in the approval of Scottish Universities to deliver social work courses. This paper explains the developmental process of involving service users and carers as partners in the planning of social work courses at the Robert Gordon University (RGU), Aberdeen. This is illustrated with reference to a group made up of young people ('The Voice of Reason') and also in relation to a group made up of adult service users (the Service User Panel). This short paper suggests there are benefits for student learning if we invite service users and carers to become partners in the teaching/learning process. There are also benefits for teaching staff and indeed for the University itself as a public institution on the basis that an ongoing relationship allows for good partnership working. This enables the University and its staff to be viewed positively and from that vantage point further developments are more likely. At the same time this paper has discussed the need to avoid tokenistic moves through ensuring a sound organisational commitment is made to providing effective support and putting in place enabling structures and processes. Lastly it discusses the broader implications for partnership working in relation to the education and training of students for professional practice. The suggestion is made that such a teaching and learning approach equips the students with good partnership skills and attitudes that will help to inform their practice post-qualification. Interest is expressed in the experiences of other professions who have adopted similar approaches to incorporating service users into students' learning experiences. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  20. Burnout, Moral Distress, Work-Life Balance, and Career Satisfaction among Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation Professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumann, Joyce L; Mau, Lih-Wen; Virani, Sanya; Denzen, Ellen M; Boyle, Deborah A; Boyle, Nancy J; Dabney, Jane; De KeselLofthus, Alexandra; Kalbacker, Marion; Khan, Tippu; Majhail, Navneet S; Murphy, Elizabeth A; Paplham, Pamela; Parran, Leslie; Perales, Miguel-Angel; Rockwood, Todd H; Schmit-Pokorny, Kim; Shanafelt, Tait D; Stenstrup, Elaine; Wood, William A; Burns, Linda J

    2017-12-02

    A projected shortage of hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) health professionals was identified as a major issue during the National Marrow Donor Program/Be The Match System Capacity Initiative. Work-related distress and work-life balance were noted to be potential barriers to recruitment/retention. This study examined these barriers and their association with career satisfaction across HCT disciplines. A cross-sectional, 90-item, web-based survey was administered to advanced practice providers, nurses, physicians, pharmacists, and social workers in 2015. Participants were recruited from membership lists of 6 professional groups. Burnout (measured with the Maslach Burnout Inventory subscales of emotional exhaustion and depersonalization) and moral distress (measured by Moral Distress Scale-Revised) were examined to identify work-related distress. Additional questions addressed demographics, work-life balance, and career satisfaction. Of 5759 HCT providers who received an individualized invitation to participate, 914 (16%) responded; 627 additional participants responded to an open link survey. Significant differences in demographic and practice characteristics existed across disciplines (P burnout differed across disciplines (P burnout, whereas social workers had the lowest prevalence at less than one-third. Moral distress scores ranged from 0 to 336 and varied by discipline (P burnout varied by discipline; however, moral distress was a significant contributing factor for all providers. Those with burnout were more likely to report inadequate work-life balance and a low level of career satisfaction; however, overall there was a high level of career satisfaction across disciplines. Burnout, moral distress, and inadequate work-life balance existed at a variable rate in all HCT disciplines, yet career satisfaction was high. These results suggest specific areas to address in the work environment for HCT health professionals, especially the need for relief of

  1. Advancing Hospice and Palliative Care Social Work Leadership in Interprofessional Education and Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blacker, Susan; Head, Barbara A; Jones, Barbara L; Remke, Stacy S; Supiano, Katherine

    2016-01-01

    The importance of interprofessional collaboration in achieving high quality outcomes, improving patient quality of life, and decreasing costs has been growing significantly in health care. Palliative care has been viewed as an exemplary model of interprofessional care delivery, yet best practices in both interprofessional education (IPE) and interprofessional practice (IPP) in the field are still developing. So, too, is the leadership of hospice and palliative care social workers within IPE and IPP. Generating evidence regarding best practices that can prepare social work professionals for collaborative practice is essential. Lessons learned from practice experiences of social workers working in hospice and palliative care can inform educational efforts of all professionals. The emergence of interprofessional education and competencies is a development that is relevant to social work practice in this field. Opportunities for hospice and palliative social workers to demonstrate leadership in IPE and IPP are presented in this article.

  2. Graduating Pharmacy Students’ Perspectives on E-Professionalism and Social Media

    OpenAIRE

    Ness, Genevieve Lynn; Sheehan, Amy Heck; Snyder, Margie E.; Jordan, Joseph; Cunningham, Jean E.; Gettig, Jacob P.

    2013-01-01

    Objective. To determine the use patterns of social media among graduating pharmacy students, characterize students’ views and opinions of professionalism on popular social media sites, and compare responses about social media behavior among students seeking different types of employment.

  3. Beyond Words: Comics in the Social Work Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akesson, Bree; Oba, Olufunke

    2017-01-01

    Equipping future social workers to interrogate social justice, human rights, and cultural issues requires a revision of social work education. Culturally relevant teaching is increasingly important in today's globalized world. In this article, we explore the role of comics as a form of social work pedagogy to tackle complex social issues. The…

  4. Spirituality and Religion among the General Public: Implications for Social Work Discourse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodge, David R

    2015-07-01

    Conceptualizations play a central role in social work discourse, shaping actions in the areas of practice, research, and education. Although many formulations of spirituality and religion have been advanced by social work scholars, the views of members of the general public have been largely absent from the professional conversation. The present article adds to the profession's evolving discussion on spirituality and religion by describing common understandings of spirituality and religion among the general population and by discussing the implication of these views for social work discourse on spirituality and religion. By understanding common views among the public, the social work profession is better positioned to provide ethical and professional services that respect clients' spiritual beliefs and values.

  5. Small-group learning and its value to social work education

    OpenAIRE

    Neilson, Deanna

    2006-01-01

    This paper examines theory and practice around small-group learning, with a focus on the higher education context and professional or practice learning in the workplace. Implications for social work education are discussed in the spirit of the drive to restore critical reflection and the potential for social change to practice, reversing what has been termed in the current political climate as the transformation of social workers into ‘little more than organisational functionaries..’ (Parton ...

  6. Exploring Redundancy in SocialWork Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruce Dalton

    2003-05-01

    Full Text Available The issue of redundancy has not been well explored in the social work curriculum. The Educational Policy and Accreditation Standards (EPAS (CSWE, 2001 requires redundancy in the form of integration of material across content areas and addresses redundancy vertically between levels of education and year of program. Furthermore, research and theory support the notion that various types of redundancy produce educational benefits.This paper uniquely uses MSW students to track instances of redundancy over their first year of study and distinguishes between helpful and unhelpful redundancy. It presents both the study results and a description of the study process so that other schools may use or adapt it.

  7. Social work practice with LGBT seniors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gratwick, Steve; Jihanian, Lila J; Holloway, Ian W; Sanchez, Marisol; Sullivan, Kathleen

    2014-01-01

    The Los Angeles Gay & Lesbian Center began providing services to LGBT seniors in 2008. Since then, the Center's seniors program has grown to over 3,300 clients. It provides a variety of enrichment and support services with the overarching goal of empowering seniors to successfully age in place. This article outlines the service delivery program of the Center's Seniors Services Department and describes its successes and challenges in meeting the needs of diverse LGBT seniors. It offers future directions for social work practice, policy, and research with LGBT older adults.

  8. Professional Social Networking in Radiology: Who Is There and What Are They Doing?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Sumir S; Hawkins, C Matthew; Rawson, James V; Hoang, Jenny K

    2017-05-01

    Although it is perceived that the use of social media professionally is increasing among radiologists, little is known about the habits and demographics of this subspecialty. This study aims to compare radiologists who use social networking for professional purposes to those who do not with regard to their characteristics, habits, and attitudes. Radiologists were invited by e-mail and through posts on social networks to participate in a survey on the use of social media platforms. Questions included type of user, pattern of use, and benefits and barriers. Professional users and professional nonusers were compared. One hundred eighty-six radiologists responded. One hundred ten (59.1%) used social networking for professional purposes, 34 (18.2%) for personal-use only, and 42 (22.6%) denied using social media. LinkedIn was the most common platform among all professional users, and Twitter was the most commonly used platform among highly active professional users. Trainees comprised 52 out of 110 (47.3%) professional social networking users compared to 18 out of 76 (23.7%) nonusers (P networking for professional purposes. Radiology is likely to see growth in the role of social networking in the coming years as nearly half of professional users are radiology trainees. Twitter use for professional purposes among radiologists was disproportionately male. It is important to be cognizant of gender imbalance and to improve visibility of female leaders on social networking. Copyright © 2017 The Association of University Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Returning to Work after a Common Mental Health Disorder: a New Preoccupation for Mental Health Professionals?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lepièce, Brice; Reynaert, Christine; Jacques, Denis; Zdanowicz, Nicolas

    2017-09-01

    Since 2010, the Belgian mental healthcare system has been involved in a structural reform: the main objective of this reorganisation is to foster the reintegration in the community of patients suffering from a mental health disorder. In parallel, the role of mental health professionals has evolved these last years: from a strictly clinical role, to the preoccupation with the rehabilitation of social competencies such as enhancing patients' abilities to return to work. The aim of this paper is to explore, specifically for patients hospitalized for a common mental health disorder, the predictive variables of returning to work within 6 months after hospitalization (RTW6). Our sample was extracted from routinely collected data during the patients' hospital stay (10 days) at the Psychosomatic Rehabilitation Day Centre of CHU Godinne. A sample of 134 patients participated in our study. Those patients were contacted 6 months after their hospitalization to assess resumption of work. We found that a patient's sociodemographicand socioeconomic variables, and depressive symptoms at the beginning of hospitalization were not predictive of return to work within 6 months (RTW6). On the other hand, duration of absence from work before hospitalization and the diagnosis of a major depression in particular were negatively associated with RTW6, whereas improvement of depressive symptoms during hospitalization stay was positively associated to RTW6. Our study identified the diagnosis of major depression and the duration of absence from work before hospitalization as two important risk factors impeding a fast return to work for patients hospitalised for a common mental health disorder. As the preoccupation with patients' abilities to return to work is now on the agenda of mental health professionals, special support and supervision should be dedicated to the more vulnerable patients.

  10. Multiple Forms of Professional Agency for (noncrafting of Work Practices in a Hospital Organization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaija Collin

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available In recent working life studies, professional agency is seen as pivotal to the development of work communities and work organizations. This paper addresses professional agency during a practicebased intervention (work conference in a Finnish hospital setting. To develop work practices, the intervention sought to create a dialogical space for the promotion of collective professional agency. Here, we present an investigation of the manifestations of professional agency and how they emerged within and between professional groups. We also elaborate how professional positions frame the emergence of different manifestations of professional agency. The audio and video materials from the intervention are analyzed through the utilization of qualitative content analysis and analysis of key incidents illustrating the emergence of professional agency and its connection to prevailing circumstances in a hospital work context. Transformative, responsive, relational, and resisting forms of agency were identified. The emergence of these forms differed amid the intervention and across the professional groups, reflecting power relations in the organization. In light of the findings, we discuss the meaning of different forms of professional agency for developmental efforts and how professional agency may trigger or hinder sustainable organizational development.

  11. "Us and them": a social network analysis of physicians' professional networks and their attitudes towards EBM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mascia, Daniele; Cicchetti, Americo; Damiani, Gianfranco

    2013-10-22

    Extant research suggests that there is a strong social component to Evidence-Based Medicine (EBM) adoption since professional networks amongst physicians are strongly associated with their attitudes towards EBM. Despite this evidence, it is still unknown whether individual attitudes to use scientific evidence in clinical decision-making influence the position that physicians hold in their professional network. This paper explores how physicians' attitudes towards EBM is related to the network position they occupy within healthcare organizations. Data pertain to a sample of Italian physicians, whose professional network relationships, demographics and work-profile characteristics were collected. A social network analysis was performed to capture the structural importance of physicians in the collaboration network by the means of a core-periphery analysis and the computation of network centrality indicators. Then, regression analysis was used to test the association between the network position of individual clinicians and their attitudes towards EBM. Findings documented that the overall network structure is made up of a dense cohesive core of physicians and of less connected clinicians who occupy the periphery. A negative association between the physicians' attitudes towards EBM and the coreness they exhibited in the professional network was also found. Network centrality indicators confirmed these results documenting a negative association between physicians' propensity to use EBM and their structural importance in the professional network. Attitudes that physicians show towards EBM are related to the part (core or periphery) of the professional networks to which they belong as well as to their structural importance. By identifying virtuous attitudes and behaviors of professionals within their organizations, policymakers and executives may avoid marginalization and stimulate integration and continuity of care, both within and across the boundaries of healthcare

  12. Hospital Social Work and Spirituality: Views of Medical Social Workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandya, Samta P

    2016-01-01

    This article is based on a study of 1,389 medical social workers in 108 hospitals across 12 countries, on their views on spirituality and spiritually sensitive interventions in hospital settings. Results of the logistic regression analyses and structural equation models showed that medical social workers from European countries, United States of America, Canada, and Australia, those had undergone spiritual training, and those who had higher self-reported spiritual experiences scale scores were more likely to have the view that spirituality in hospital settings is for facilitating integral healing and wellness of patients and were more likely to prefer spiritual packages of New Age movements as the form of spiritual program, understand spiritual assessment as assessing the patients' spiritual starting point, to then build on further interventions and were likely to attest the understanding of spiritual techniques as mindfulness techniques. Finally they were also likely to understand the spiritual goals of intervention in a holistic way, that is, as that of integral healing, growth of consciousness and promoting overall well-being of patients vis-à-vis only coping and coming to terms with health adversities. Results of the structural equation models also showed covariances between religion, spirituality training, and scores on the self-reported spiritual experiences scale, having thus a set of compounding effects on social workers' views on spiritual interventions in hospitals. The implications of the results for health care social work practice and curriculum are discussed.

  13. Connectivity and discontinuity in social work practice: Challenges and opportunities of the implementation of an e-social work system in Romania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anca Mihai

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available To increase the efficiency of the social work system in Romania, “investments in improving the current IT system in order to build an efficient electronic social work system” (Romanian Government, 2015b, 85 and the “development of a modern payment system” (Romanian Government, 2015b, 85 are key-points in the National Strategy concerning Social Inclusion and Poverty Reduction for the period 2015-2020. Among other utilisations, the e-social work system is meant to be used by potential clients when submitting a request to benefit of means-tested measures. The current level of digitalisation of the Romanian society, particularly among vulnerable groups, leaves room for constructive debate regarding the feasibility and the potential challenges of such a project. The purpose of this paper is to identify the challenges posed to social workers’ daily practice by the introduction of digitalisation in the work place, as well as its potential effects on the social worker-client professional relationship. We discuss based on the national strategies and data provided by the Digital Economy and Society Index (DESI (connectivity infrastructure and quality, digital skills of human capital, use of internet by citizens, integration and digital technology, and digital public services. We identify gaps between the aims and the proposed solutions concerning the e-social work system. Our study contributes to understanding the potential changes in social workers’ traditional roles brought forth by the implementation of a digitized social work system.

  14. Measuring social accountability in health professional education: development and international pilot testing of an evaluation framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larkins, Sarah L; Preston, Robyn; Matte, Marie C; Lindemann, Iris C; Samson, Rex; Tandinco, Filedito D; Buso, David; Ross, Simone J; Pálsdóttir, Björg; Neusy, André-Jacques

    2013-01-01

    Health professional schools are responsible for producing graduates with competencies and attitudes to address health inequities and respond to priority health needs. Health professional schools striving towards social accountability founded the Training for Health Equity Network (THEnet). This article describes the development of THEnet evaluation framework for socially accountable health professional education, presents the framework to be used as a tool by other schools and discusses the findings of pilot implementation at five schools. The framework was designed collaboratively and built on Boelen and Woollard's conceptualization, production and usability model. It includes key components, linked to aspirational statements, indicators and suggested measurement tools. Five schools completed pilot implementation, involving workshops, document/data review and focus group discussions with faculty, students and community members. Three sections of the framework consider: How does our school work?; What do we do? and What difference do we make? Pilot testing proved that the evaluation framework was acceptable and feasible across contexts and produced findings useful at school level and to compare schools. The framework is designed as a formative exercise to help schools take a critical look at their performance and progress towards social accountability. Initiatives to implement the framework more widely are underway. The framework effectively aids in identifying strengths, weaknesses and gaps, with a view to schools striving for continuous self-improvement. THEnet evaluation framework is applicable and useful across contexts. It is possible and desirable to assess progress towards social accountability in health professional schools and this is an important step in producing health professionals with knowledge, attitudes, and skills to meet the challenges of priority health needs of underserved populations.

  15. The Work of Rural Professionals: Doing the Gemeinshaft-Gesellschaft Gavotte

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mellow, Muriel

    2005-01-01

    This paper considers how rurality affects the work of professionals. Sociologists have paid little attention to possible rural-urban differences in work styles and no study exists which compares the rural experience of those in different professions. I review the literature describing the work of various rural professionals and examine interview…

  16. Anthropometric profiles and social physique anxiety of physical education professionals from India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mookerjee, Swapan; Singh, Jasraj; Cashi, Tamra

    2002-02-01

    Previous work indicates that there may be a relationship between the observation and evaluation of one's physique and the construct of social physique anxiety associated with this process. Since physical educators are expected to serve as role models of desired fitness behaviors, bodily appearance, and composition, it is of interest to examine whether such responses and relationships may be observed. However, there is limited published information on anthropometric profiles and body images of physical education professionals, especially of those from India. Therefore, this study compared anthropometric profiles and Social Physique Anxiety in a sample of 182 male physical education professionals from India (M age=41.2 yr.). Body Mass Index, sum of three skinfolds (Tricep, Abdomen, and Thigh), and waist/hip ratio were determined using standard procedures. The sample was grouped into overweight and normal weight categories. Significant group differences were found for the sum of skinfolds and waist/hip ratio, with no significant differences between groups on the Social Physique Anxiety total score. Correlations for the anthropometric measures with the Social Physique Anxiety scores indicated no significant relationships. Mean total Social Physique Anxiety score for the combined group was comparable to those reported for other groups of physically active individuals. These findings indicate low Social Physique Anxiety in this sample and may have implications with regard to the attitudes pertaining to body image and role modeling of appropriate fitness behaviors.

  17. ExCEL in Social Work: Excellence in Cancer Education & Leadership: An Oncology Social Work Response to the 2008 Institute of Medicine Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otis-Green, Shirley; Jones, Barbara; Zebrack, Brad; Kilburn, Lisa; Altilio, Terry A; Ferrell, Betty

    2015-09-01

    ExCEL in Social Work: Excellence in Cancer Education & Leadership was a multi-year National Cancer Institute (NCI)-funded grant for the development and implementation of an innovative educational program for oncology social workers. The program's curriculum focused upon six core competencies of psychosocial-spiritual support necessary to meet the standard of care recommended by the 2008 Institute of Medicine (IOM) Report: Cancer Care for the Whole Patient: Meeting Psychosocial Health Needs. The curriculum was delivered through a collaborative partnership between the City of Hope National Medical Center and the two leading professional organizations devoted exclusively to representing oncology social workers--the Association of Oncology Social Work and the Association of Pediatric Oncology Social Workers. Initial findings support the feasibility and acceptability of this tailored leadership skills-building program for participating oncology social workers.

  18. ExCEL in Social Work: Excellence in Cancer Education & Leadership An Oncology Social Work Response to the 2008 Institute of Medicine Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otis-Green, Shirley; Jones, Barbara; Zebrack, Brad; Kilburn, Lisa; Altilio, Terry A.; Ferrell, Betty

    2014-01-01

    ExCEL in Social Work : Excellence in Cancer Education & Leadership was a multi-year National Cancer Institute (NCI)-funded grant for the development and implementation of an innovative educational program for oncology social workers. The program’s curriculum focused upon six core competencies of psychosocial-spiritual support necessary to meet the standard of care recommended by the 2008 Institute of Medicine (IOM) Report: Cancer Care for the Whole Patient: Meeting Psychosocial Health Needs. The curriculum was delivered through a collaborative partnership between the City of Hope National Medical Center and the two leading professional organizations devoted exclusively to representing oncology social workers - the Association of Oncology Social Work and the Association of Pediatric Oncology Social Workers. Initial findings support the feasibility and acceptability of this tailored leadership skills-building program for participating oncology social workers. PMID:25146345

  19. The American Academy of Social Work and Social Welfare: History and Grand Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barth, Richard P.; Gilmore, Grover C.; Flynn, Marilyn S.; Fraser, Mark W.; Brekke, John S.

    2014-01-01

    Conceptualized by social work deans and actualized with the support of major social work organizations, the American Academy of Social Work and Social Welfare was established in 2009. This article describes the historical context and creation of the Academy, whose objectives include recognizing outstanding social work scholars and practitioners;…

  20. Integrating Social Work into Undergraduate Education through a Community Action and Social Change Multidisciplinary Minor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards-Schuster, Katie; Ruffolo, Mary C.; Nicoll, Kerri Leyda

    2015-01-01

    Social work education has a long and successful history of developing change agents through bachelor of social work, master's of social work, and PhD programs, but these programs often create boundaries limiting the reach and infusion of social work perspectives. With rapid changes in social, economic, and political contexts, students from all…