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Sample records for process impurity determination

  1. Sodium sampling and impurities determination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Docekal, J.; Kovar, C.; Stuchlik, S.

    1980-01-01

    Samples may be obtained from tubes in-built in the sodium facility and further processed or they are taken into crucibles, stored and processed later. Another sampling method is a method involving vacuum distillation of sodium, thus concentrating impurities. Oxygen is determined by malgamation, distillation or vanadium balance methods. Hydrogen is determined by the metal diaphragm extraction, direct extraction or amalgamation methods. Carbon is determined using dry techniques involving burning a sodium sample at 1100 degC or using wet techniques by dissolving the sample with an acid. Trace amounts of metal impurities are determined after dissolving sodium in ethanol. The trace metals are concentrated and sodium excess is removed. (M.S.)

  2. Impurity doping processes in silicon

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, FFY

    1981-01-01

    This book introduces to non-experts several important processes of impurity doping in silicon and goes on to discuss the methods of determination of the concentration of dopants in silicon. The conventional method used is the discussion process, but, since it has been sufficiently covered in many texts, this work describes the double-diffusion method.

  3. Utilization of Photochemically Induced Fluorescence Detection for HPLC Determination of Genotoxic Impurities in the Vortioxetine Manufacturing Process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douša, Michal; Doubský, Jan; Srbek, Jan

    2016-07-01

    An analytical reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) method for the detection and quantitative determination of two genotoxic impurities at ppm level present in the vortioxetine manufacturing process is described. Applying the concept of threshold of toxicological concern, a limit of 75 ppm each for both genotoxic impurities was calculated based on the maximum daily dose of active pharmaceutical ingredients. The novel reversed-phase HPLC method with photochemically induced fluorescence detection was developed on XSELECT Charged Surface Hybrid Phenyl-Hexyl column using the mobile phase consisted a mixture of 10 mM ammonium formate pH 3.0 and acetonitrile. The elution was performed using an isocratic composition of 48:52 (v/v) at a flow rate of 1.0 mL/min. The photochemically induced fluorescence detection is based on the use of UV irradiation at 254 nm through measuring the fluorescence intensity at 300 nm and an excitation wavelength of 272 nm to produce fluorescent derivatives of both genotoxic impurities. The online photochemical conversion and detection is easily accomplished for two expected genotoxic impurities and provides a sufficiently low limit detection and quantification for the target analysis. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. Chemistry characterization and samples beryllium process impurity determination; Caracterizacao quimica e determinacao de impurezas de amostras de processo de berilio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carvalho, Leonel Mathry de

    1992-12-01

    Brazil is the greatest world producer of beryl (3 Be O.Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}.6SiO{sub 2}) and has recently begun to produce beryllium compounds by means of a pilot plant constructed at Governador Valadares city (Minas Gerais - Brazil). The aim of this work was the determination of trace level impurities and macro constituents in the tenth % range to support analytical control process of plant production and characterization of beryllium compounds. The impurities separations and purification process was developed by two steps procedure. The first one using EDTA complexation has separated and reduced some impurities to less than 1 {mu}g/ml level. In the second one it was used a chelating resin (Chelex 100) and the separation efficiency was about 75 to 97 % related with the element tested. High pure berylium oxide standard was obtained from purification of Be(OH)2. The R X fluorescence presented only traces of Cu and Si < 1 % Fe and Mn, Zn, Ca, Al, Na and S were completely removed. The beryllium content was determined by direct atomic emission spectroscopy in argon plasma (Dcp) and compared with classic gravimetric method as Be O. The results were in agreement (49,2+/-0,2 % and 48,3+/-0,1 % respectively) between 95 % of confidence. A low temperature gravimetric method for beryllium determination was also studied using Oxine with microwave furnace. A total of 24 elements including macro and trace level were determined by Dcp and/or spectrophotometric methods. The Be/B separation was studied using anionic resin in poly alcohols medium. A more detailed study of equilibrium conditions is necessary. This work was realized at Laboratorio de Analise Mineral (LAM) of Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear - Rio de Janeiro (CNEN). (author)

  5. Neutron activation determination of impurities in molybdenum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Usmanova, M.M.; Mukhamedshina, N.M.; Obraztsova, T.V.; Saidakhmedov, K.Kh.

    1984-01-01

    Instrumental neutron-activation techniques of impurity element determination in molybdenum and MoO 3 (solid and powdered samples) have been developed. When determining impurities of Na, K, Mn, Cu, W, Re molybdenum has been irradiated by thermal neutrons in reactor for 20 min, the sample mass constituted 200-300 mg, sample cooling time after irradiation - 2.5-3.5 h. It is shown that in the process of Cr, Fe, Co, Zn determination the samples should be irradiated with thermal neutrons, and in the process of Sb, Ta and Ni determination - with resonance and fast neutrons. Simultaneous determination of the elements during irradiation with neutrons with reactor spectrum is possible. When determining P and S the samples are irradiated with thermal and epithermal neutrons and β-activity of samples and comparison samples are measured using β-spectrometer with anthracene crystal. The techniques developed permit to determine impurities in Mo with a relative standard deviation 0.07-0.15 and lower boundaries of contents determined - 10 -4 - 10 -7 %

  6. Determination of degradation products and process related impurities of asenapine maleate in asenapine sublingual tablets by UPLC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Nitin; Sangeetha, D.; Kalyanraman, L.

    2017-11-01

    For determination of process related impurities and degradation products of asenapine maleate in asenapine sublingual Tablets, a reversed phase, stability indicating UPLC method was developed. Acetonitrile, methanol and potassium dihydrogen phosphate buffer with tetra-n- butyl ammonium hydrogen sulphate as ion pair (pH 2.2; 0.01 M) at flow rate of 0.2 ml/min were used in gradient elution mode. Separation was achieved by using acquity BEH Shield RP18 column (1.7 μm, 2.1 mm×100 mm) at 35 ºC. UV detection was performed at 228 nm. Subsequently the liquid chromatography method was validated as per ICH. The drug product was exposed to the stress conditions of acid hydrolysis, base hydrolysis, water hydrolysis, oxidative, thermal, and photolytic. In oxidative stress and thermal stress significant degradation was observed. All the degradation products were well separated from analyte peak and its impurities. Stability indicating nature of the method was proved by demonstrating the peak purity of Asenapine peak in all the stressed samples. The mass balance was found >95% for all the stress conditions. Based on method validation, the method was found specific, linear, accurate, precise, rugged and robust.

  7. Application of radioactivation analysis for determination of impurities in aluminium, raw materials and in samples from aluminium production process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vucina, L.J.

    1977-01-01

    Trace elements in aluminium, raw materials and in the samples from different stages of aluminium production were determined by nondestructive neutron radioactivation analysis. The samples were taken from the Bayer's process of alumina production (bauxite, red sludge and alumina), from the components of the reduction cell (anode, criolyte and AlF 3 ) and of the final product - aluminium (purity 99.5-99.7%). Under given set of conditions ten trace elements (V,La,Ga,Mn,Co,Cr,Sc,Sb,Zn and Fe) were determined in aluminium and followed through the production process. It was found that the main impurities in aluminium are iron (0.15%) and zinc (0.O6%). It has been concluded that the purity of produced aluminium depends mainly on the purity of used alumina. The second important source of contamination of aluminium is anode. The results obtained by radioactivation analysis for V, Mn, Cr and Fe fall within the ranges of concentrations of these elements determined by use of other methods (volumetry, spectrophotometry, atomic absorption). Higher values for zinc were obtained by radioactivation analysis, probably due to unsatisfactory irradiation and measuring conditions for this element. The possibilities of application of radioactivation analysis to these kinds of samples are also disscused

  8. Impurities in uranium process solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boydell, D.W.

    1980-01-01

    Several uranium purification circuits are presented in tabular form together with the average major impurity levels associated with each. The more common unit operations in these circuits, namely strong- and weak-base ion-exchange, solvent extraction and the precipitation of impurities are then discussed individually. Particular attention is paid to the effect and removal of impurities in each of these four unit operations. (author)

  9. Uranium analysis. Impurities determination by spark mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    Determination of impurities in uranium, suitable for atomic content greater than 10 -8 , particularly adapted for a low content. The method is quantitative for metallic impurities and qualitative for non metallic impurities [fr

  10. Determination of Impurities of Atrazine by HPLP-MS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Canping, Pan [Department of Applied Chemistry, China Agricultural University Beijing (China)

    2009-07-15

    The determination of the main impurities of the herbicide atrazine by GC/FID, GC/MS and LC/MS is described. The most relevant technical impurities were synthesized and characterized by IR and UV spectroscopy as well. The impurity profiles of different technical grade formulated products were tested and the typical impurities identified. (author)

  11. Evaluation of determinative methods for sodium impurities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molinari, Marcelo; Guido, Osvaldo; Botbol, Jose; Ares, Osvaldo

    1988-01-01

    Sodium, universally accepted as heat transfer fluid in fast breeder reactors, requires a special technology for every operation involved in any applicable methodology, due to its well known chemical reactivity. The purpose of this work is: a) to study the sources and effects of chemical species which, as traces, accompany sodium used in the nuclear field; b) to classify, taking into account, the present requirements and resources of the National Atomic Energy Commission (CNEA), the procedures found in the literature for determination of the most important impurities which exist in experimental liquid sodium systems and c) to describe the principles of the methods and to evaluate them in order to make a selection. It was concluded the convenience to develop, as a first stage, laboratory procedures to determine carbon, oxygen, hydrogen and non-volatile impurities, which besides serving present needs, will be referential for direct methods with undeferred response. The latter are needed in liquid sodium experimental loops and require, primarily, more complex and extended development. Additionally, a description is made of experimental work performed up-to-now in this laboratory, consisting of a transfer device for sodium sampling and a sodium distillation device, adapted from a previous design, with associated vacuum and inert gas systems. It is intended as a separative technique for indirect determination of oxygen and non-volatile impurities. (Author) [es

  12. Zirconium analysis. Impurities determination by spark mass specrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    Determination of impurities in zirconium, suitable for atomic content greater than 10 -8 but particularly adapted for low contents. The method is quantitative only if a reference sample is available (metallic impurities) [fr

  13. Spectrophotometric determination of zinc in impure solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez Hernandez, B.; Reyes Tamaral, A.

    1972-01-01

    A dithizone colorimetric method is described for determining zinc concentrations of 0.001 to 5 g/l in aqueous solutions from Rio Tinto Mines, containing copper, iron and other impurities. Citrate, cyanide and bis-2hydroxyethyl)-dithiocarbamate are added to the aqueous sample of masking several metals, and zinc is extracted at pH 5 with a solution of dithizone in carbon tetrachloride. Excess of dithizone is removed with sodium sulphide, and optical density of zinc dithionate in organic solution is measured at 5.35 nm. Calibration curves obey Beer's law up to 0.5 micro Zn/ml. (Author) 5 refs

  14. Spectrographic determination of impurities in magnesium metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Capdevila, C.; Diaz-Guerra, J. P.

    1979-01-01

    The spectrographic determination of trace quantities of Al, B, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Li, Hn, Mo, Ni and Si in magnesium metal is described. Samples are dissolved with HNO 3 and calcinate into MgO. In order to avoid losses of boron NH 4 OH is added to the nitric solution. Except for aluminium and chromium the analysis is performed through the use of the carrier distillation technique. These two impurities are determined by burning to completion the MgO. Among the compounds studied as carriers (AgCl, AgF, CsCl, CuF 2 , KCl and SrF 2 ) AgCl allows, In general, the best volatilization efficiency. Lithium determination is achieved by using KC1 or CsCl. Detection limits, on the basis of MgO, are in the range 0,1 to 30 ppm, depending on the element. (Author) 8 refs

  15. Spectroscopical determination of impurities in nuclear graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lordello, A.R.; Tognini, R.P.

    1975-01-01

    A spectrochemical method for the direct determination of B, Cd, Si, Hg, Fe, Mg, Mn, Cr, Ni, Al, Mo, Ti, Sr, Na, Zn, and As in nuclear grade graphite is described. A 9:1 ratio of graphite to copper difluoride is used in the preparation of samples and standards. The excitation is carried out in a d-c at 10 amperes. The copper fluoride used as spectrographic buffer serves to increase the volatilization rate of the impurities and to diminish the differences in the nature of the analytical and calibration samples. The relative standard deviations for the determination of the 16 trace elements, except Sr, Fe, Cd, Al and Si, are in the range of 8 - 20% in their appropriate calibration levels. For the latter five elements they are approximately 20-40%

  16. Impurities in alfalfa seed and their impact on processing technology

    OpenAIRE

    Đokić, Dragoslav; Stanisavljević, Rade; Marković, Jordan; Terzić, Dragan; Anđelković, Bojan

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this research was to determine relevant parameters and optimal alfalfa seed processing technology by a comparative analysis of two systems of machinery for processing natural alfalfa seed of different purity (59.0% and 71.0%) and with different content of impurities. The relevant parameters monitored during the test were: pure seed (%), weed seeds and seeds of other crops (%), inert matter (%), amount of processed seed (kg), seed processing time (min), consumption of steel powder (...

  17. Determination of trace impurities in materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parashar, D.C.

    1991-01-01

    Research work done at the National Physical Laboratory to develop new methods which are more specific and/or more sensitive has been reviewed. These methods are based on the use of existing facilities viz. atomic absorption spectrophotometry, uv-visible spectrophotometry, gas chromatography and conventional chemical methods. It is possible to determine impurities like boron at 5ppb level, phosphorus at 100 ppb and oxygen non-stoichiometry in 1:2:3 compounds with higher accuracy. Boron is determined spectrophotometrically by forming a complex with curcumin and phosphorus is determined indirectly by atomic absorption spectrophotometry by forming phosphomolybdate complex with antimony or bismuth which have 1:1 ratio with phosphorus in the complex. Gas chromatographic technique has been used to evaluate the oxygen non-stoichiometry in high temperature superconductors (1:2:3 compound) where the HTc sample is dissolved in dilute nitric acid in helium environment and the oxygen released is determined using thermal conductivity detector. (author). 19 refs., 3 figs., 4 tabs

  18. Process and system for removing impurities from a gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henningsen, Gunnar; Knowlton, Teddy Merrill; Findlay, John George; Schlather, Jerry Neal; Turk, Brian S

    2014-04-15

    A fluidized reactor system for removing impurities from a gas and an associated process are provided. The system includes a fluidized absorber for contacting a feed gas with a sorbent stream to reduce the impurity content of the feed gas; a fluidized solids regenerator for contacting an impurity loaded sorbent stream with a regeneration gas to reduce the impurity content of the sorbent stream; a first non-mechanical gas seal forming solids transfer device adapted to receive an impurity loaded sorbent stream from the absorber and transport the impurity loaded sorbent stream to the regenerator at a controllable flow rate in response to an aeration gas; and a second non-mechanical gas seal forming solids transfer device adapted to receive a sorbent stream of reduced impurity content from the regenerator and transfer the sorbent stream of reduced impurity content to the absorber without changing the flow rate of the sorbent stream.

  19. Effect of impurities on kinetic transport processes in fusion plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braun, Stefanie

    2010-12-10

    Within the framework of this thesis, different problems arising in connection with impurities have been investigated. Collisional damping of zonal flows in tokamaks: Since the Coulomb collision frequency increases with increasing ion charge, heavy, highly charged impurities play an important role in this process. The effect of such impurities on the linear response of the plasma to an external potential perturbation, as caused by zonal flows, is calculated with analytical methods. In comparison with a pure plasma, the damping of the flows occurs, as expected, considerably faster; for experimentally relevant parameters, the enhancement exceeds the effective charge Z{sub eff} of the plasma. Impurity transport driven by microturbulence in tokamaks: With regard to impurities, it is especially important whether the resulting flows are directed inwards or outwards, since they are deleterious for core energy confinement on the one hand, but on the other hand help protecting plasma-facing components from too high energy fluxes in the edge region. A semi-analytical model is presented describing the resulting impurity fluxes and the stability boundary of the underlying mode. The main goal is to bridge the gap between, on the one hand, costly numerical simulations, which are applicable to a broad range of problems but yield scarcely traceable results, and, on the other hand, analytical theory, which might ease the interpretation of the results but is so far rather rudimentary. The model is based on analytical formulae whenever possible but resorts to a numerical treatment when the approximations necessary for an analytical solution would lead to a substantial distortion of the results. Both the direction of the impurity flux and the stability boundary are found to depend sensitively on the plasma parameters such as the impurity density and the temperature gradient. Pfirsch-Schlueter transport in stellarators: Due to geometry effects, collisional transport plays a much more

  20. Risk-based Strategy to Determine Testing Requirement for the Removal of Residual Process Reagents as Process-related Impurities in Bioprocesses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Jinshu; Li, Kim; Miller, Karen; Raghani, Anil

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to recommend a risk-based strategy for determining clearance testing requirements of the process reagents used in manufacturing biopharmaceutical products. The strategy takes account of four risk factors. Firstly, the process reagents are classified into two categories according to their safety profile and history of use: generally recognized as safe (GRAS) and potential safety concern (PSC) reagents. The clearance testing of GRAS reagents can be eliminated because of their safe use historically and process capability to remove these reagents. An estimated safety margin (Se) value, a ratio of the exposure limit to the estimated maximum reagent amount, is then used to evaluate the necessity for testing the PSC reagents at an early development stage. The Se value is calculated from two risk factors, the starting PSC reagent amount per maximum product dose (Me), and the exposure limit (Le). A worst-case scenario is assumed to estimate the Me value, that is common. The PSC reagent of interest is co-purified with the product and no clearance occurs throughout the entire purification process. No clearance testing is required for this PSC reagent if its Se value is ≥1; otherwise clearance testing is needed. Finally, the point of the process reagent introduction to the process is also considered in determining the necessity of the clearance testing for process reagents. How to use the measured safety margin as a criterion for determining PSC reagent testing at process characterization, process validation, and commercial production stages are also described. A large number of process reagents are used in the biopharmaceutical manufacturing to control the process performance. Clearance testing for all of the process reagents will be an enormous analytical task. In this article, a risk-based strategy is described to eliminate unnecessary clearance testing for majority of the process reagents using four risk factors. The risk factors included

  1. Stability-Indicating RP-UPLC Method for the Simultaneous Determination of Potential Degradation and Process Impurities of Amlodipine Basylate and Benazepril HCl in Pharmaceutical Dosage Form

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gajanan B. Kasawar

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available A stability-indicating RP-UPLC method was developed for the quantification of related impurities of amlodipine basylate (AB and Benazepril hydrochloride (BH in solid pharmaceutical dosages form. The chromatographic separation employs a C18 column using a gradient elution, being solvent-A (1.36 g of potassium dihydrogen phosphate dissolved in one liter of water, adjusted to pH 3.0 with orthophosphoric acid and solvent-B (acetonitrile delivered at a flow rate of 0.3 mL min-1. The analytes were detected and quantified at 217 nm and 240 nm using photo diode-array detector. The method was validated demonstrating to be accurate and precise within the corresponding linear range of all components. The stability of the method was investigated under different stress conditions including hydrolytic, oxidative, exposed to photolytic, humidity and thermal as recommended by ICH guidelines. Relevant degradation was found under hydrolytic and oxidative conditions. Robustness against small modification in mobile phase pH, column oven temperature, flow rate and percentage of the mobile phase composition was ascertained. Lower limit of quantification and detection was also determined. The peak purity indices (purity angle < purity threshold obtained with the aid of PDA detector and satisfactory resolution between related impurities established the specificity of the determination.

  2. [Impurity removal technology of Tongan injection in liquid preparation process].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xu-fang; Wang, Xiu-hai; Bai, Wei-rong; Kang, Xiao-dong; Liu, Jun-chao; Wu, Yun; Xiao, Wei

    2015-08-01

    In order to effectively remove the invalid impurities in Tongan injection, optimize the optimal parameters of the impurity removal technology of liquid mixing process, in this paper, taking Tongan injection as the research object, with the contents of celandine alkali, and sinomenine, solids reduction efficiency, and related substances inspection as the evaluation indexes, the removal of impurities and related substances by the combined process of refrigeration, coction and activated carbon adsorption were investigated, the feasibility of the impurity removal method was definited and the process parameters were optimized. The optimized process parameters were as follows: refrigerated for 36 h, boiled for 15 min, activated carbon dosage of 0.3%, temperature 100 degrees C, adsorption time 10 min. It can effectively remove the tannin, and other impurities, thus ensure the quality and safety of products.

  3. Gas chromatographic determination of impurities of inorganic compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drugov, Yu.S.

    1985-01-01

    Methods of concentration, separation, detection in gas chromatographic determination of impurities of inorganic compounds including low-boiling gases, reactive gases, organometallic compounds, free metals, anions, etc. are reviewed. Methods of reaction gas chromatography for determining reactive gases, water, anions, metal chelates are considered in detail as well as methods of reaction-sorption concentration and reaction gas extraction. The application of gas chromatograpny ior anaiysis of water and atmosphere contamination, for determination of impurities in highly pure solid substances and gases is described

  4. Spectrochemical determination of impurities and noble metal traces in carnallite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldbart, Z.; Carmi, U.; Harrel, A.

    1978-02-01

    A spectrochemical method was developed for the determination of impurities and noble metal traces in carnallite by DC arc excitation. The investigated sample is brought to a standard form of potassium-magnesium sulphate mixed with graphite. Detection limits of 1-10 ppm were determined for 27 elements; the dynamical detection range is 1-400 ppm

  5. Impurity-defect induced noncentrosymmetricity in nonlinear optical processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miah, M. Idrish

    2009-01-01

    Noncentrosymmetric nanosize-material processes in cadmium iodide are formed by doping it with the impurity copper. The noncentrosymmetricity in the processes are probed by the observation of the second-order optical susceptibility χ ijk (2) . The value of χ ijk (2) is found to depend fashionably on the impurity content of the nanomaterials. The results also show that a significant enhancement in the noncentrosymmetric response is achieved in nanomaterials with reduced sizes and at low temperatures.

  6. Extraction process for removing metallic impurities from alkalide metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Royer, Lamar T.

    1988-01-01

    A development is described for removing metallic impurities from alkali metals by employing an extraction process wherein the metallic impurities are extracted from a molten alkali metal into molten lithium metal due to the immiscibility of the alkali metals in lithium and the miscibility of the metallic contaminants or impurities in the lithium. The purified alkali metal may be readily separated from the contaminant-containing lithium metal by simple decanting due to the differences in densities and melting temperatures of the alkali metals as compared to lithium.

  7. Spectrographic determination of impurities in beryllium oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paula Reino, L.C. de; Lordello, A.R.; Pereira, A.S.A.

    1986-03-01

    A method for the spectrographic determination of Al, B, Cd, Co, Cu, Cr, Fe, Mg, NaNi, Si and Zn in nuclear grade beryllium oxide has been developed. The determination of Co, Al, Na and Zn is besed upon a carrier distillation technique. Better results were obtained with 2% Ga 2 O 3 as carrier in beryllium oxide. For the elements B, Cd, Cu, Fe, Cr, Mg, Ni and Si the sample is loaded in a Scribner-Mullin shallow cup electrode, covered with graphite powder and excited in DC arc. The relative standard deviation values for different elements are in the range of 10 to 20%. The method fulfills requirements of precision and sensitivity for specification analysis of nuclear grade beryllium oxide.(Author) [pt

  8. Spectrographic determination of impurities in uranium tetrafluoride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Capdevila Perez, C.; Roca Adell, M.; Alvarez Gonzalez, F.

    1967-01-01

    A carrier distillation method for the determination of Ag, Al, As, B, Cd, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mg, Mn, Ni, Pb, and Si in uranium tetrafluoride was develop ped. the previous addition of 25% Y 2 3 prevents the excitation of uranium by conversion of the volatile UF 4 into U 3 0 8 during the arc discharge. NaCl or Ga 2 0 3 , containing Ge and V as internal standards, are used as carriers, and samples are arced in 10 Amp. d.c. arc in a graphite anode cup. 7 mm diameter, 10 mm deep, being the weight of charge 300 mg. (Author) 14 refs

  9. Effect of impurities and processing on silicon solar cells. Volume 1: Characterization methods for impurities in silicon and impurity effects data base

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopkins, R. H.; Davis, J. R.; Rohatgi, A.; Campbell, R. B.; Blais, P. D.; Rai-Choudhury, P.; Stapleton, R. E.; Mollenkopf, H. C.; Mccormick, J. R.

    1980-01-01

    Two major topics are treated: methods to measure and evaluate impurity effects in silicon and comprehensive tabulations of data derived during the study. Discussions of deep level spectroscopy, detailed dark I-V measurements, recombination lifetime determination, scanned laser photo-response, conventional solar cell I-V techniques, and descriptions of silicon chemical analysis are presented and discussed. The tabulated data include lists of impurity segregation coefficients, ingot impurity analyses and estimated concentrations, typical deep level impurity spectra, photoconductive and open circuit decay lifetimes for individual metal-doped ingots, and a complete tabulation of the cell I-V characteristics of nearly 200 ingots.

  10. Spectrographic determination of trace impurities in reactor grade aluminium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chandola, L.C.; Machado, I.J.

    1975-01-01

    A spectrographic method enabling the determination of 21 trace impurities in aluminium oxide is described. The technique involves mixing the sample with graphite buffer in the ratio 1:1, loading it in a graphite electrode and arcing it for 30 sec. in a dc arc to 10 A current against a pointed graphite cathode. The spectra are photographed on Ilford N.30 emulsion employing a large quartz spectrograph. The aluminium line at 2669.2 A 0 serves as the internal standard. The impurities determined are Ag, B, Bi, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Ga, In, Mg, Mo, Ni, Pb, Sb, Si, Sn, Ti, V and Zn. The sensitivity varies from 5 to 100 ppm and the precision from +- 5 to +- 22% for different elements. A method for converting aluminium metal to aluminium oxide is described. It is found that boron is not lost during this conversion. (author)

  11. Determination of sulphur-35 impurity in solutions of phosphorus-32

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez Pasques, R.H.; Iglicki, F.A; Cittadini, P.E.

    1982-01-01

    A method has been developed in order to evaluate the activity of sulphur-35 impurity in solutions of phosphorus-32. The procedure is based on the precipitation on benzidine sulphate in acid solution and further purification by dissolving and reprecipitating under appropriate conditions. 35 S beta radiation is measured with and end-window gas counter. A correction for any remaining 32 P is determined by differential absorption through aluminum. (author) [es

  12. Impurity-defect induced noncentrosymmetricity in nonlinear optical processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miah, M. Idrish, E-mail: m.miah@griffith.edu.au [Queensland Micro- and Nanotechnology Centre, Griffith University, Nathan, Brisbane, QLD 4111 (Australia); School of Biomolecular and Physical Sciences, Griffith University, Nathan, Brisbane, QLD 4111 (Australia); Department of Physics, University of Chittagong, Chittagong 4331 (Bangladesh)

    2009-12-15

    Noncentrosymmetric nanosize-material processes in cadmium iodide are formed by doping it with the impurity copper. The noncentrosymmetricity in the processes are probed by the observation of the second-order optical susceptibility {chi}{sub ijk}{sup (2)}. The value of {chi}{sub ijk}{sup (2)} is found to depend fashionably on the impurity content of the nanomaterials. The results also show that a significant enhancement in the noncentrosymmetric response is achieved in nanomaterials with reduced sizes and at low temperatures.

  13. Determination of rare earth impurities in thorium by spectrographic methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wray, L W

    1957-08-15

    A method for determining rare earth impurities in thorium in the fractional ppm range is described. Before spectrographic examination is possible, the impurities must be freed from the thorium matrix. This is accomplished by removing the bulk of the thorium by extraction with TBP-CCl{sub 4} and the remainder by extraction with TTA-C{sub 6}H{sub 6}. This results in a consistent recovery of rare earths of about 85% with an average sensitivity of 0.2 ppm. The experimental error is within 10%. Details of the procedure are given together with working curves for the major neutron absorbing rare earths; i.e. dysprosium, europium, gadolinium and samarium. (author)

  14. Spectrographic determination of impurities in enriched uranium solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Capdevila, C.; Roca, M.

    1980-01-01

    A spectrographic procedure for the determination of trace amounts of Al, B, Ba, Be, Bi, Ca, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, K, L i , Hg, Mn, Mo, Na, Nb, Ni, P, Pb, Ru, Sb, Sn, Sr, Ti, V, Zn, and Zr in enriched uranyl nitrate solutions from the reprocessing of spent nuclear fuels is described. After removal of uranium by either TBP or TNOA solvent extraction, the aqueous phase Is analysed by the graphite spark technique. TBP is adequate for all impurities, excepting boron and phosphorus; both of these elements can sat is factory be determined by using TNOA after the addition of mannitol to avoid boron losses. (Author) 4 refs

  15. PROCESS FOR RECOVERY OF URANIUM VALUES FROM IMPURE SOLUTIONS THEREOF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilner, S.B.

    1959-11-01

    A process is presented for the recovery of uraninm values from impure solutions which are obtained, for example, by washing residual uranium salt or uranium metal deposits from stainless steel surfaces using an aqueous or certain acidic aqueous solutions. The solutions include uranyl and oxidized iron, chromium, nickel, and copper ions and may contain manganese, zinc, and silver ions. In accordance with one procedure. the uranyl ions are reduced to the uranous state, and the impurity ions are complexed with cyanide under acidic conditions. The solution is then treated with ammonium hydroxide or alkali metal hydroxide to precipitate uranous hydroxide away from the complexed impurity ions in the solution. Alternatively, an excess of alkali metal cyanide is added to the reduced solution until the solution becomes sufficiently alkaline for the uranons hydroxide to precipitate. An essential feature in operating the process is in maintaining the pH of the solution sufficiently acid during the complexing operation to prevent the precipitation of the impurity metal hydroxides.

  16. Spectrographic determination of impurities in ammonium bifluoride. IV.Study of the processes of vaporization, transport and excitation of the elements Fe, Mn, Mo, Ni, Pb and Si

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alduan, F.A.; Capdevila, C.; Roca, M.

    1981-01-01

    The influences of the processes of vaporization, transport and excitation on the shape of the volatilization-excitation curves and on the values of the spectra-line intensities have been investigated in a method for the spectrographic determination of Fe, Mn, Mo, Ni, Pb and Si in ammonium bifluoride samples by direct current arc Ga 2 O 3 , GeO 2 , MgO and ZnO. The reaction products in the electrode cavity have been identified by X-ray powder diffraction analysis and the porcentages of vaporized and diffused element evaluated through analysis by total-burning spectrographic methods. In addition, the values of both the number of particles entering the discharge column and the transport efficiencies have been calculated. Thus, the origin of most observed differences has been explained. (author)

  17. Spectrographic determination of impurities in ammonium bifluoride. III. Study of the processes of vaporization, transport and excitation of the elements Al, B, Cu and Cr

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alduan, F. A.; Roca, M.; Capdevila, C.

    1979-01-01

    The influences of the processes of vaporization, transport and excitation on the shape of the volatilization-excitation curves and on the values of the spectral-line intensities have been investigated in a method for the spectrographic determination of Al, B, Cu and Cr In ammonium bifluoride samples by direct current are excitation in Scribner type electrodes, with addition of different matrices (graphite, 63203, GeO 2 , MgO and Zn0). The reaction products in the electrode cavity have been identified by X-ray powder diffraction analysis and the percentages of vaporized and diffused element evaluated through analysis by total-burning spectrographic methods. In addition, the values of both the number of particles entering the discharge column and the transport efficiencies have been calculated. Thus, the origin of most observed differences has been explained. (Author) 11 refs

  18. Determination of impurities in beryl by neutron activation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swain, K.K.; Dalvi, Aditi A.; Ajith, Nicy

    2015-01-01

    Beryl is a chemically complex and highly compositionally variable gem-forming mineral found in a variety of locations worldwide. Pure beryl is colorless, but the presence of impurities imparts colors such as green, blue, yellow, red, and white. It is one of the most important gem minerals and the gems are named by their color. The impurities in beryl can be determined using various analytical techniques. Neutron activation analysis (NAA) is a sensitive technique for multielement analysis of geological samples. Four beryl samples, collected from Nayakund Mehandi Block, Parseoni, Maharashtra, were received from Geological Survey of India (GSI), Pune. Powdered samples (50-100 mg) along with comparators (IAEA Soil-7) were packed in aluminum foils, sealed in an aluminum container and irradiated for 7 days in tray rod facility of Dhruva reactor, BARC, Mumbai. After irradiation, samples were brought to laboratory. Samples were opened, transferred into polyethylene packets and weighed. Gamma activity measurements were carried out using 45% HPGe detector coupled to 8 k multi channel analyzer. For the determination of manganese, which produces relatively shorter lived activation product ( 56 Mn: T 1/2 = 2.56 h), samples were sealed in polyethylene pouches and irradiated in graphite reflector position of Critical facility reactor, BARC, Mumbai. Relative method of NAA was used for concentration calculations. IAEA reference material (RM), SL -1 (lake sediment) was analyzed for quality control. Percentage errors on the measured concentrations of the elements are within ± 8% with respect to the recommended/information values

  19. Determination of impurities and degradation products from veterinary medicinal products by HPLC method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Gabriela Oltean

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The organic or inorganic impurities in the veterinary medicinal product can derive from starting materials, manufacturing process, incomplete purification, inappropriate storage. The acceptable levels of impurities in pharmaceuticals are estimated by comparison with standard solutions, according to the appropriate monographs. Forced degradation studies determine the stability of the method of dosage for the active compounds and for the entire finished product under excessive accelerated degradation conditions. They also provide information on degradation pathways and selectivity of analytical methods applied. The information provided by the degradation studies on the active compound and finished pharmaceutical product should demonstrate the specificity of the analytical method regarding impurities. Forced degradation studies should demonstrate that the impurities and degradation products generated do not interfere with the active compound. The current forced degradation methods consist of acid hydrolysis, basic hydrolysis, oxidation, exposure of the medicinal product to temperature and light. HPLC methods are an integral analytical instrument for the analysis of the medicinal product. The HPLC method should be able to separate, detect and quantify various specific degradation products that can appear after manufacture or storage of the medicinal product, as well as new elements appearing after synthesis. FDA and ICH guidelines recommend the enclosure of the results, including the chromatograms specific to the forced degradation-subjected medicinal product, in the documentation for marketing authorization. Using HPLC methods in forced degradation studies on medicinal products provides relevant information on the method of determination for the formulation of the medicinal product, synthesis product, packaging methods and storage.

  20. Spectrographic determination of impurities in uranium tetrafluoride matrices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reino, Luiz Carlos de Paula

    1980-01-01

    A direct spectrographic method for the determination of UF 4 impurities was developed. Investigations using spectrochemical carriers were carried out so to avoid uranium distillation, which as fluoride is much more volatile than the U 3 O 8 refractory matrix. The best results were obtained by using a mixture of MgO and NaCl carriers in the proportion of 20% and 10%, respectively, with respect to UF 4 matrix. An original spectrographic technique was introduced aiming to avoid the projection of sample particles outside the electrode during excitation. This new technique is based on the addition of a small quantity of a 0.5% gelatinous solution on the UF 4 tablet. The precision of the method was studied for each element analysed. The variation coefficients are within the range of 10 of 20%

  1. Spectrographic determination of impurities in uranium tetrafluoride matrices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reino, L.C.P.; Lordello, A.R.

    1980-01-01

    A direct spectrographic method for the determination of UF 4 impurities was developed. Investigations using spectrochemical carriers were carried out so to avoid uranium distillation, which as fluoride is much more volatile than the U 3 O 8 refractory matrix. The best results were obtained by using a mixture of MgO and NaCl carriers in the proportion of 20 and 10%, respectively, with respect to UF 4 matrix. An original spectrographic technique was introduced aiming to avoid the projection of sample particles outside the electrode during excitation. This new technique is based on the addition of a small quantity of a 0.5% gellatinous solution on the UF 4 tablet. The precision of the method was studied for each element analysed. The variation coefficients are within the range of 10 of 20%. (C.L.B.) [pt

  2. On the determination of various metallic and nonmetallic impurities in sodium metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schneider, H.; Gruenhaeuser, M.; Nagel, G.; Nold, E.; Schaefer, A.; Schumann, H.

    1976-04-01

    Methods for the determination of various metallic and nonmetallic impurities in sodium metal were developed or tested. Detection limits, reproducibilities and results of analyses are reported. (orig.) [de

  3. Determination of uranium content and its impurities in the AUC and UO2 powders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boybul; Arif Nugroho

    2012-01-01

    The analysis of uranium (U) content and its impurities in the ammonium uranyl carbonate (AUC) and uranium dioxide (UO 2 ) produced from research reactor fuel element production installation, PT. BATAN Teknologi have been carried out. Uranium content in the powders was analyzed by potentiometric titration methods and impurity contents was analyzed by atomic absorption spectrophotometer (AAS) and by inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES). The purpose of this study was to determine of impurity elements in the AUC and UO 2 powder resulting from the production process if it meets the required specifications. It is reported that U content in the AUC is 48.62 wt% and that in the UO 2 is 88.08 wt%. The precision and accuracy analysis of the U content is 0,235% and 0,151%. In case of impurities in the AUC powders, it is reported that the analytical results of Zn, Ni, Cd, Co, Mn, Mg, Fe, Cu and Cr at 10.15 ppm, 1.12 ppm, not detection, not detection, not detection, 0.30 ppm, 216.07 ppm, not detection, and 31.36 ppm, respectively, while that UO 2 are 11.31 ppm, 72.14 ppm, not detection, not detection, 6.25 ppm, 8.65 ppm, 298.24 ppm, 12.75 ppm and 32, 23 ppm. The U and impurity contents in both the AUC and UO 2 fulfill the specification of nuclear fuel for RSG-GAS research reactor. (author)

  4. Determination of U and Impurities Elements in The Uranium Tetra Fluoride by Potentiometric and Atomic Absorption Spectrophotometric Methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Putro Kasino, P

    1998-01-01

    The determination of u and impurities contents in the Uranium tetra fluoride (UF 4 )has been carried out by potentiometric titration using modified 'Davies-Gray' and atomic absorption spectrophotometric methods. Dissolution process of the powder sample using saturated Al 2 (SO 4 ) 3 solution introduced to determine UF 4 compound content in the UF 4 sample. The uranium Content in the obtained filtrate is analyzed by potentiometric. The impurities content is determined by ato-Mic absorption spectrophotometric using ammonium oxalate powder in introducing of the sample preparation. The experiment covered the observation on influence of stirring time of UF 4 sample dissolution in respect to separate UF 4 from its impurities in determination of uranium content. Also the effects of Ammonium Oxalate added and agitating time were observed deal with the sample preparation for the determination of Impurities content.The analysis result found that UF 4 content was 96.15 ± 0.04% the relative station 0.7%. However the best impurities determination was achieved by addition of ammonium oxalate powder and 15 Minutes of agitation time at temperature of 800 0 C

  5. Determination of Cyclam as Impurity in 99mTc-CTMP Using Radio electrophoresis Method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isti Daruwati; Misyetti; Maula Eka Sriyani; Teguh Hafiz AW

    2009-01-01

    Labelled compound of CTMP that are used for bone seeking radiopharmaceuticals must have to fulfill the standard requirements, such as have high radiochemical purity. CTMP compounds was in house synthesized from cyclam and formaldehyde in an acidic condition (conc. HCl) using Mannich methods. Impurities in CTMP product are the residue of cyclam, phosphoric acid, formaldehyde and hydrochloric acid. Formaldehyde and hydrochloride acid in the aqueous form is easily removed through the rinse process in the synthesis, while cyclam in the solid phase could be mix with CTMP. Therefore the impurities of cyclam in 99m Tc-CTMP must be determined. With nuclear technique, the determination of cyclam could be assessed simultaneously with labelled of CTMP with technetium-99m. Separation of 99m Tc-CTMP and 99m Tc-cyclam in solution was conducted with radio-electrophoresis method simultaneously. The radiochemical purity for both radiolabelled compound was determined by paper chromatography. The purity of radiolabelled 99m Tc-CTMP from cyclam was determined using electrophoresis method. The result show that the amount of cyclam in CTMP can be determined simultaneously using nuclear techniques with the labeling of 99m Tc-CTMP. Electrophoresis method can separated 99m Tc-cyclam, 99m Tc-CTMP, 99m TcO4 and 99m Tc-reduced with limit quantitation of cyclam until 0,4% w/w. (author)

  6. The role of impurities on the process of growing potassium hydrogen phthalate crystals from solution; A quantitative approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hottenhuis, M. H. J.; Lucasius, C. B.

    1988-09-01

    Quantitative information about the influence of impurities on the crystal growth process of potassium hydrogen phthalate from its aqueous solution was obtained at two levels: microscopic and macroscopic. At the microscopic level, detailed in situ observations of spiral steps at the (010) face were performed. The velocity of these steps was measured, as well in a "clean" as in a contaminated solution, where the influence of a number of different impurities was investigated. This resulted in a measure of effectiveness of step retardation for each of these impurities. From the same microscopic observations it was observed how these effectiveness factors were influenced by the supersaturation σ, the saturation temperature Ts of the solution and the concentration cimp of the impurity that w as used. At the macroscopic level, ICP (inductively coupled plasma) measurements were carried out in order to determine the distribution coefficient of the same impurities. In these measurements again the influence of the impurity concentration and the supersaturation on the distribution coefficient kD was determined.

  7. Determination of impurities in zirconium by emission spectrograph method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simbolon, S.; Masduki, B.; Aryadi

    2000-01-01

    Analysis of B, Cd, Si and Cr elements in zirconium oxide was carried out. Zirconium oxide was made by precipitating zirconium solution with oxalic acid and calcination was at temperature 900 oC for four hours. Silver chloride compound as much as 10% was used as a distillation carrier and 7 step filtration was used to reduce the impurities element spectra having high density. It was found that B concentration is between 3.80 and 7.44 ppm, Cd less then 0.5 ppm, Si between 74.38-150.33 ppm and Cr between 19.90-45.76 ppm. (author)

  8. The influence of optical parameters on impurity determinations by IR spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lombard, O.J.

    1985-01-01

    The important role of impurities in semiconductor materials is the subject of continuous research. The concentration of interstitial oxygen impurities in silicon are determined with the aid of infrared spectroscopy. The maximum absorption coefficient of the oxygen absorption peak, centered at 9,06 μm, is determined and the impurity concentration is then calculated using a calibration factor. This procedure was evaluated, paying particular attention to those optical parameters which may influence these impurity determinations. A thorough discussion of the theoretical and experimental aspects of infrared spectroscopy in general is followed by an overview of previous experimental work. This lead to some theoretical analysis regarding the influence of the index of refraction, the index of absorption and multiple reflections in the silicon wafer on impurity determinations. This lead to specific experimental investigations. The influence of the surface morphology of samples on impurity determinations was studied by determining the reflectance of silicon surfaces. It was established that the surface reflectance plays a role and that it must be taken into consideration for accurate impurity concentration determinations. The most accurate values for the absorption coefficient due to oxygen in silicon are calculated. This requires that the surface of the silicon wafers must be highly polished for the formula to be valid. Acceptable values for the absorption coefficient of damaged surfaces are obtained if the uncorrected formula is used. Experimental results may deviate as much as 32% from the real impurity concentration if the wrong formula is used to calculate the absorption coefficient of oxygen in silicon at 9,06 μm

  9. Study of the half-life of 123I and the determination of possible radionuclidic impurities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delgado, Jose Ubiratan; Araujo, Miriam Taina Ferreira de; Silva, Carlos Jose da; Araujo, Camila Cristina Cunha; Candido, Marcos Antonio; Pereira, Wagner do Prado

    2013-01-01

    During the process of production of the radiopharmaceutical nuclear reactor or cyclotron, impurities can be generated from biological, chemical and radionuclidic. The development of the present work was to study the half-life of Na 123 I sample produced in IEN (Institute of Nuclear Engineering) using the technique of gamma-ray spectrometry with germanium detector in order to Identify such impurities. The results Indicate values of half-life consistent with recent publications with a deviation of 0,08% and 0:11% of uncertainty as well as the identification of impurities to radionuclides 95m Tc, 96 Tc and 121 Te. (author)

  10. Determining factors for the presence of impurities in selectively collected biowaste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puig-Ventosa, Ignasi; Freire-González, Jaume; Jofra-Sora, Marta

    2013-05-01

    The presence of impurities in biodegradable waste (biowaste) causes problems with the management of waste, among which are additional costs derived from the need to improve pre-treatment of biowaste, loss of treatment capacity and the difficulty selling treated biowaste as compost owing to its low quality. When treated biowaste is used for soil conditioning it can also cause soil pollution. Understanding the reasons why impurities are in biowaste and the factors affecting the percentage of impurities present can be used to determine ways to minimise these negative effects. This article attempts to identify the main causes for the presence of impurities in biowaste. In order to do so, it carries out an empirical analysis of the level of impurities in biowaste from municipal waste collection in two steps. First, a bivariate analysis focuses on significant correlations between the presence of impurities and several variables. Second, the construction of an explanatory model based on the significant relations obtained in the first step, and on literature research, are used to check the stated hypothesis. The estimates demonstrate that the collection system, the global levels of separate collection, the urban density of the municipality and the requirement to use compostable bags may be the main drivers of impurity levels in biowaste.

  11. Determination of overall decontamination factors for common impurity elements in PHWR spent fuel reprocessing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pant, D.K.; Bhalerao, B.A.; Gupta, K.K.; Kulkarni, P.G.; Gurba, P.B.; Janardan, P.; Changrani, R.D.; Dey, P.K.

    2009-01-01

    An attempt has been made to determine overall decontamination factors for elemental impurities normally encountered in the U 3 O 8 product obtained by reprocessing of PHWR spent fuel. The solution obtained by dissolution of spent fuel and corresponding U 3 O 8 product were analyzed for 24 elemental impurities by ICP-AES for this purpose. Decontamination factors achieved for major neutron poisons are in the range of 200-400. (author)

  12. Processing Determinism

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Grady, William

    2015-01-01

    I propose that the course of development in first and second language acquisition is shaped by two types of processing pressures--internal efficiency-related factors relevant to easing the burden on working memory and external input-related factors such as frequency of occurrence. In an attempt to document the role of internal factors, I consider…

  13. Process for reducing halogen impurities in oil products

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Basler, F.

    1990-08-14

    Oil products, in particular waste oils, may be efficiently reprocessed according to an economic and technically simple method for removing impurities, notably halogens. In this method, the oil product is treated at temperatures up to about 150{degree}C with an effective amount of an aqueous solution of at least one compound selected from the group consisting of a strong acid, a salt of a weak base and a strong acid and precursors thereof. The oil product obtained in this step is treated at increased temperatures with at least one halogen binding agent. The water and/or solids from the product so treated are separated out. The process of the invention can be carried out in a conventional stripping apparatus. The strong acid used in the first step is preferably selected from sulfurous acid, phosphoric acid, phosphorous acid, and phosphonic acid. The salt of the weak base and strong acid is preferably ammonium sulfate, ammonium bisulfate, ammonium sulfite, diammonium hydrogen phosphate, ammonium dihydrogen phosphate, ammonium phosphite, and ammonium phosphonic acid. The second step of the method is preferably a coagulation step in which organic halogen compounds break down into hydrogen halides which are neutralized by the added halogen binding agents. The preferred halogen binding agents are ammonia and/or an organic base. The coagulation is preferably carried out in heat exchangers so that the oil is heated in 3 stages and the oil from each stage is passed through a cascade tower. In the third step, additives may be used to enhance separation of the oil. Experiments are described to illustrate the method of the invention. 1 tab.

  14. Instrumental neutron-activation determination of impurities in lead and titanium compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Popova, I L

    1980-01-01

    Instrumental neutron-activation analysis was used to determine 22 impurities in lead and titanium compounds (e.g. PbO, Pb/NO3/2, and TiO2) used as raw materials for ferroelectrics. Five elements (Al, V, Mn, Sc, and Se) were determined by short-lived isotopes and 17 elements were determined by long-lived isotopes. The detection limits were 7 x 10 to the -3rd to 2 x 10 to the -8th %. A substantial difference in concentrations of certain impurity elements has been found in different series of lead and titanium oxides of similar purity.

  15. The Determination of Uranium and Trace Metal Impurities in Yellow Cake Sample by Chemical Method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Busamongkol, Arporn; Rodthongkom, Chouvana

    1999-01-01

    The purity of uranium cake is very critical in nuclear-grade uranium (UO 2 ) and uranium hexafluoride (UF 6 ) production. The major element in yellow cake is uranium and trace metal impurities. The objective of this study is to determine uranium and 25 trace metal impurities; Aluminum, Barium, Bismuth, Calcium, Cadmium, Cobalt, Chromium, Copper, Iron, Potassium, Iithium, Magnesium, Manganese, Molybdenum, Sodium, Niobium, Nickel, Lead, Antimony, Tin, Strontium, Titanium, Vanadium, Zinc and Zirconium, Uranium is determined by Potassium dichromate titration, after solvent extraction with Cupferon in Chloroform, Trace metal impurities are determined by solvent extraction with Tributyl Phosphate in Carbon-tetrachloride ( for first 23 elements) and N-Benzoyl-N-Phenylhydroxylamine in Chloroform ( for last 2 elements), then analyzed by Atomic Absorption Spectrophotometer (AAS) compared with Inductively Couple Plasma Spectrophotometers (ICP). The accuracy and precision are studied with standard uranium octaoxide

  16. Use of electrothermal atomization for determining metallic impurities in nuclearly pure uranium compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Franco, M.B.

    1986-01-01

    Atomic absorption spectrometry with electrothermal atomization was used for the determination of Al, Cd, Cr, Fe, Mn, Mo and Ni as impurities in uranium oxide samples. The determinations were performed in solubilized samples both with and without uranium separation as well as in solid samples. (Author) [pt

  17. Use of electrothermal atomization for determining metallic impurities in nuclearly pure uranium compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Franco, M.B.

    1985-01-01

    Atomic absorption spectrometry with electrothermal atomization was used for the determination of Al, Cd, Cr, Fe, Mn, Mo and Ni as impurities in uranium oxide samples. The determinations were performed in solubilized samples both with and without uranium separation as well as in solid samples. (Author) [pt

  18. Proposal of flexible atomic and molecular process management for Monte Carlo impurity transport code based on object oriented method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asano, K.; Ohno, N.; Takamura, S.

    2001-01-01

    Monte Carlo simulation code on impurity transport has been developed by several groups to be utilized mainly for fusion related edge plasmas. State of impurity particle is determined by atomic and molecular processes such as ionization, charge exchange in plasma. A lot of atomic and molecular processes have been considered because the edge plasma has not only impurity atoms, but also impurity molecules mainly related to chemical erosion of carbon materials, and their cross sections have been given experimentally and theoretically. We need to reveal which process is essential in a given edge plasma condition. Monte Carlo simulation code, which takes such various atomic and molecular processes into account, is necessary to investigate the behavior of impurity particle in plasmas. Usually, the impurity transport simulation code has been intended for some specific atomic and molecular processes so that the introduction of a new process forces complicated programming work. In order to evaluate various proposed atomic and molecular processes, a flexible management of atomic and molecular reaction should be established. We have developed the impurity transport simulation code based on object-oriented method. By employing object-oriented programming, we can handle each particle as 'object', which enfolds data and procedure function itself. A user (notice, not programmer) can define property of each particle species and the related atomic and molecular processes and then each 'object' is defined by analyzing this information. According to the relation among plasma particle species, objects are connected with each other and change their state by themselves. Dynamic allocation of these objects to program memory is employed to adapt for arbitrary number of species and atomic/molecular reactions. Thus we can treat arbitrary species and process starting from, for instance, methane and acetylene. Such a software procedure would be useful also for industrial application plasmas

  19. Role of impurity molecules in radiation-initiated processes in solid carbohydrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kavetskii, V.G.; Yudin, I.V.

    1992-01-01

    Extension of the use of ionizing radiation for sterilization of medicinal preparations is stimulating the study of radiation-initiated processes in solid polyhydroxyl matrixes containing impurities of various organic substances. Such investigations make it possible to establish common characteristics of the effect of impurity molecules on the radiolysis of organic crystals. The materials of the investigation were lactose and rhamnose, precipitated by slow evaporation of the solvent from saturated aqueous solutions with different dihydroxyacetone contents. 4 refs., 1 fig

  20. Determining water content and other impurities in Siparuna ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aghomotsegin

    2016-03-30

    Mar 30, 2016 ... and thermodynamic parameters, became necessary. (Santos, 2004; Dantas, 2006). ... oil in 80 min distillation (after the first sign of boiling). The essential .... Khankari RK, Law D, Grant DJW (1992). Determination of water ...

  1. Effect of HEH[EHP] impurities on the ALSEP solvent extraction process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holfeltz, Vanessa E. [Nuclear Chemistry and Engineering Group, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA, USA; School of Nuclear Science and Engineering, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR, USA; Campbell, Emily L. [Nuclear Chemistry and Engineering Group, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA, USA; Peterman, Dean R. [Aqueous Separations and Radiochemistry Department, Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID, USA; Standaert, Robert F. [Biosciences Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN, USA; Department of Biochemistry & amp, Cellular and Molecular Biology, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN, USA; Biology & amp, Soft Matter Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN, USA; Shull Wollan Center — a Joint Institute for Neutron Sciences, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN, USA; Paulenova, Alena [School of Nuclear Science and Engineering, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR, USA; Lumetta, Gregg J. [Nuclear Chemistry and Engineering Group, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA, USA; Levitskaia, Tatiana G. [Nuclear Chemistry and Engineering Group, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA, USA

    2017-12-20

    In solvent extraction processes, organic phase impurities can negatively impact separation factors, hydrolytic performance, and overall system robustness. This affects the process-level viability of a separation concept and necessitates knowledge of the behavior and mechanisms to control impurities in the solvent. The most widespread way through which impurities are introduced into a system is through impure extractants and/or diluents used to prepare the solvent, and often development of new purification schemes to achieve the desired level of purity is needed. In this work, the acidic extractant, 2-ethylhexylphosphonic acid mono-2-ethylhexyl ester (HEH[EHP])—proposed for application in extractive processes aimed at separating trivalent minor actinides from lanthanides and other fission products—is characterized with respect to its common impurities and their impact on Am(III) stripping in the Actinide Lanthanide SEParation (ALSEP) system. To control impurities in HEH[EHP], existing purification technologies commonly applied for the acidic organophosphorus reagents are reviewed, and a new method specific to HEH[EHP] purification is presented.

  2. Separation and determination of synthetic impurities of difloxacin by reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, R Nageswara; Nagaraju, V

    2004-11-19

    A simple and rapid reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatographic method for separation and determination of process-related impurities of difloxacin (DFL) was developed. The separation was achieved on a reversed-phase C(18) column using methanol-water-acetic acid (78:21.9:0.1, v/v/v) as a mobile solvent at a flow rate of 1.0 ml/min at 28 degrees C using UV detection at 230 nm. It was linear over a range of 0.03 x 10(-6) to 1.60 x 10(-6)g for process related impurities and 0.05 x 10(-6) to 2.40 x 10(-6)g for difloxacin. The detection limits were 0.009 x 10(-6) to 0.024 x 10(-6)g for all the compounds examined. The recoveries were found to be in the range of 97.6-102.0% for impurities as well as difloxacin. The precision and robustness of the method were evaluated. It was used for not only quality assurance, but also monitoring the synthetic reactions involved in the process development work of difloxacin. The method was found to be specific, precise and reliable for the determination of unreacted levels of raw materials, intermediates in the reaction mixtures and the finished products of difloxacin.

  3. Quantitative determination of impurities in nuclear grade aluminum by Flame-Atomic Absorption Spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jat, J.R.; Nayak, A.K.; Balaji Rao, Y.; Ravindra, H.R.

    2013-01-01

    The paper deals with quantitative determination of impurity elements in nuclear grade aluminum, used as fin tubes in research reactors, by Flame-Atomic Absorption Spectrometry (F-AAS). The results have been compared with those obtained by Inductively Coupled Plasma Atomic Emission Spectrometry (ICP-AES) method. Experimental conditions used in both the methods are given in the paper. (author)

  4. Spectrographic determination of impurities in copper and copper oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sabato, S.F.; Lordello, A.R.

    1990-11-01

    An emission spectrographic method for the determination of Al, Bi, Ca, Cd, Cr, Fe, Ge, Mg, Mn, Mo, Ni, Pb, Sb, Si, Sn and Zn in copper and copper oxide is described. Two mixtures (Graphite and ZnO: graphite and GeO sub(2)) were used as buffers. The standard deviation lies around 10%. (author)

  5. Spectrochemical determination of impurities in zircaloy 2 and 4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paula Reino, L.C. de; Lordello, A.R.

    1987-06-01

    A method has been developed for the determination of Hf,Co,Mo,Pb,Ti,V,Al,Si,W,Cu,Mg,Mn,B and Cd in zircaloy 2 and 4. For hafnium determination 10% CuF 2 is added as spectrographic buffer on a previously oxidized zircaloy; the samples are loaded in a shallow cup electrode of Scribner Mullins type and excited in a direct current arc. The carrier distillation technique has been used for the other elements. Better results were obtained with 25% AgCl as carrier. The precision of the method varies from 4% for copper to 29% for boron but it does not exceed 17% for most elements. (Author) [pt

  6. Trace element impurity determination in aspirin tablets by INAA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyoshi, E.K.; Saiki, M.

    2009-01-01

    Instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA) was applied to assess trace element concentrations in six samples of aspirin tablets acquired in Sao Paulo city, Brazil. Concentrations of the elements Br, Ca, Co, Cr, Fe, K, La, Na, Sc and Zn were determined. Comparisons were made between the results obtained with published data for aspirins from foreign countries. Certified reference materials, INCT-MPH-2 Mixed Polish Herbs were analyzed for quality control of the analytical results. (author)

  7. Identification and determination of natural radioactive impurities in rare earth chlorides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gu, M.J.; Cen, Y.H.; Tang, T.Y.; Chang, J.X.

    1988-01-01

    227 Ac, 228 Th, 226 Ra, 210 Po and 210 Pb can be present at rare earth chlorides. A radiochemical procedure is presented for the identification and determination of natural radioactive impurities in rare earth chlorides. The determination limits for these radionuclides were 1.5x10 -4 to 3x10 -1 Bq/g. The relative standard deviations for determining 10 -2 Bq/g radionuclides were usually less than +-7%. (author) 9 refs.; 3 figs.; 2 tabs

  8. Performance of a palladium membrane reactor using a Ni catalyst for fusion fuel impurities processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Willms, R.S.; Wilhelm, R.; Okuno, K.

    1994-01-01

    The palladium membrane reactor (PNM) provides a means to recover hydrogen isotopes from impurities expected to be present in fusion reactor exhaust. This recovery is based on reactions such as water-gas shift and steam reforming for which conversion is equilibrium limited. By including a selectively permeable membrane such as Pd/Ag in the catalyst bed, hydrogen isotopes can be removed from the reacting environment, thus promoting the reaction to complete conversion. Such a device has been built and operated at the Tritium Systems Test Assembly (TSTA) at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). For the reactions listed above, earlier study with this unit has shown that hydrogen single-pass recoveries approaching 100% can be achieved. It was also determined that a nickel catalyst is a feasible choice for use with a PMR appropriate for fusion fuel impurities processing. The purpose of this study was to systematically assess the performance of the PMR using a nickel catalyst over a range of temperatures, feed compositions and flowrates. Reactions which were studied are the water-gas shift reaction and steam reforming

  9. Quantitative determination of salbutamol sulfate impurities using achiral supercritical fluid chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dispas, Amandine; Desfontaine, Vincent; Andri, Bertyl; Lebrun, Pierre; Kotoni, Dorina; Clarke, Adrian; Guillarme, Davy; Hubert, Philippe

    2017-02-05

    In the last years, supercritical fluid chromatography has largely been acknowledged as a singular and performing technique in the field of separation sciences. Recent studies highlighted the interest of SFC for the quality control of pharmaceuticals, especially in the case of the determination of the active pharmaceutical ingredient (API). Nevertheless, quality control requires also the determination of impurities. The objectives of the present work were to (i) demonstrate the interest of SFC as a reference technique for the determination of impurities in salbutamol sulfate API and (ii) to propose an alternative to a reference HPLC method from the European Pharmacopeia (EP) involving ion-pairing reagent. Firstly, a screening was carried out to select the most adequate and selective stationary phase. Secondly, in the context of robust optimization strategy, the method was developed using design space methodology. The separation of salbutamol sulfate and related impurities was achieved in 7min, which is seven times faster than the LC-UV method proposed by European Pharmacopeia (total run time of 50min). Finally, full validation using accuracy profile approach was successfully achieved for the determination of impurities B, D, F and G in salbutamol sulfate raw material. The validated dosing range covered 50 to 150% of the targeted concentration (corresponding to 0.3% concentration level), LODs close to 0.5μg/mL were estimated. The SFC method proposed in this study could be presented as a suitable fast alternative to EP LC method for the quantitative determination of salbutamol impurities. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Spectrographic determination of impurities in ammonium hydrogen fluoride samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roca, M.; Capdevila, C.; Alduan, F.A.

    1976-01-01

    The quantitative spectrographic trace determination of Al, B, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mn, Mo, Ni, Pb and Si in ammonium hydrogen fluoride samples is considered. 10 A dc arc excitation and graphite electrodes with crate either 4.5 mm or 8 mm deep are employed. A comparison of various matrices such as graphite, gallium oxide, germanium oxide, magnesium oxide and zinc oxide, in the ratios 1:1 and 1:3, as well as a mixture 50% graphite - 50% zinc oxide in the ratio 1:1 is included. Zinc oxide in the ratio 1:1 and 4x8 mm craters show the best over-all results. (author)

  11. Neutron activation determination of impurities in molybdenite and galena

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blinov, V.A.; Gavrilov, V.M.; Zherekhov, V.G.; Egorov, Yu.E.; Krivokhatskij, A.S.

    1975-01-01

    A method is described for non-destructive neutron-activation determination of 14 chemical elements (Na, Ag, Zn, Sc, La, Eu, Tb, Yb, Sb, Ta, Gr, Se, Fe and Co) in molybdenite and galenite minerals. The samples and standards of Ag, Se, Co and Np have been wrapped in an aluminium foil and packed in an aluminium container; they have been then irradiated for 10 hr in the vertical channel of a nuclear reactor with flux of thermal neutrons (3.0, 0.45)x10 13 n/cm 2 xsec to record the γ-spectra of the samples and standards 1, 5, 16, 65, 265 and 350 days after irradiation on a γ-spectrometer with a Ge(Li)-detector. The results are found to be in a good agreement with the spectra of Ag, Sb, La and Fe

  12. Fast determination of impurities in metallurgical grade silicon for photovoltaics by instrumental neutron activation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hampel, J.; Boldt, F.M.; Gerstenberg, H.; Hampel, G.; Kratz, J.V.; Reber, S.; Wiehl, N.

    2011-01-01

    Standard wafer solar cells are made of near-semiconductor quality silicon. This high quality material makes up a significant part of the total costs of a solar module. Therefore, new concepts with less expensive so called solar grade silicon directly based on physiochemically upgraded metallurgical grade silicon are investigated. Metallurgical grade silicon contains large amounts of impurities, mainly transition metals like Fe, Cr, Mn, and Co, which degrade the minority carrier lifetime and thus the solar cell efficiency. A major reduction of the transition metal content occurs during the unidirectional crystallization due to the low segregation coefficient between the solid and liquid phase. A further reduction of the impurity level has to be done by gettering procedures applied to the silicon wafers. The efficiency of such cleaning procedures of metallurgical grade silicon is studied by instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA). Small sized silicon wafers of approximately 200 mg with and without gettering step were analyzed. To accelerate the detection of transition metals in a crystallized silicon ingot, experiments of scanning whole vertical silicon columns with a diameter of approximately 1 cm by gamma spectroscopy were carried out. It was demonstrated that impurity profiles can be obtained in a comparably short time. Relatively constant transition metal ratios were found throughout an entire silicon ingot. This led to the conclusion that the determination of several metal profiles might be possible by the detection of only one 'leading element'. As the determination of Mn in silicon can be done quite fast compared to elements like Fe, Cr, and Co, it could be used as a rough marker for the overall metal concentration level. Thus, a fast way to determine impurities in photovoltaic silicon material is demonstrated. - Highlights: → We demonstrate a fast way to determine impurities in photovoltaic silicon by NAA. → We make first experiments of locally

  13. Fused salt processing of impure plutonium dioxide to high-purity plutonium metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mullins, L.J.; Christensen, D.C.; Babcock, B.R.

    1982-01-01

    A process for converting impure plutonium dioxide (approx. 96% pure) to high-purity plutonium metal (>99.9%) was developed. The process consists of reducing the oxide to an impure plutonium metal intermediate with calcium metal in molten calcium chloride. The impure intermediate metal is cast into an anode and electrorefined to produce high-purity plutonium metal. The oxide reduction step is being done now on a 0.6-kg scale with the resulting yield being >99.5%. The electrorefining is being done on a 4.0-kg scale with the resulting yield being 80 to 85%. The purity of the product, which averages 99.98%, is essentially insensitive to the purity of the feed metal. The yield, however, is directly dependent on the chemical composition of the feed. To date, approximately 250 kg of impure oxide has been converted to pure metal by this processing sequence. The availability of impure plutonium dioxide, together with the need for pure plutonium metal, makes this sequence a valuable plutonium processing tool

  14. EPR OF Mn2+ IMPURITIES IN CALCITE: A DETAILED STUDY PERTINENT TO MARBLE PROVENANCE DETERMINATION

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weihe, H.; Piligkos, S.; Barra, A.L.

    2009-01-01

    We demonstrate that the electron paramagnetic resonance spectrum of Mn2+ impurities in calcite, and therefore also in marble, may be accurately reproduced by a traditional spin Hamiltonian formalism. The success of such a treatment, however, very much depends on the spin Hamiltonian parameters...... having the correct signs as well as magnitudes. We present data that determine the sign of the axial anisotropy parameter and thereby facilitate future quantum mechanical characterizations of marble electron paramagnetic resonance spectra that supplement provenance determination....

  15. The use of ion chromatography for the determination of impurities in crude phosphoric acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pires, M.A.F.; Atalla, L.T.; Abrao, A.

    1988-07-01

    The determination of fluoride, nitrate, sulphate and phosphate ions in crude phosphoric acid by means of ion chromatography is described. A previous separation of interferent cations was made by using a cationic resin or EDTA complexation. The last alternative allowed more reproductible results. The technique described is very quick and is being applied for the simultaneous determination of impurities in phosphoric acid and its own phosphospate concentration. The method is quick and has good reprodutibility. (author) [pt

  16. Impurities in sugar cane and their influence on industrial processing evaluated by nuclear techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bacchi, M.A.; Fernandes, E.A.N.; Ferraz, E.S.B.

    1990-01-01

    During the cutting and loading operations, impurities, mainly soil, are added to sugar cane in amounts that can impair industrial processing due to excessive wear of metallic members and contamination of juice and bagasse. Mechanization of loading operation has showed a considerable enhancement of the impurity content, leading to the improvement of cane washing technology. Nevertheless, for a correct understanding of the problem and the process optimization, it is necessary and exact and fast quantification of these impurities as well as of its consequences. Nuclear techniques, in special neutron activation analysis, have been proved to be appropriate for estimating soil level in sugar cane, washing process efficiency and wearing of cases and moving parts. (author)

  17. Solid-state characterization and impurities determination of fluconazol generic products marketed in Morocco

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourichi, Houda; Brik, Youness; Hubert, Philipe; Cherrah, Yahia; Bouklouze, Abdelaziz

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we report the results of quality control based in physicochemical characterization and impurities determination of three samples of fluconazole drug substances marketed in Morocco. These samples were supplied by different pharmaceuticals companies. The sample A, as the discovered product, was supplied by Pfizer, while samples B and C (generics), were manufactured by two different Indian industries. Solid-state characterization of the three samples was realized with different physicochemical methods as: X-ray powder diffraction, Fourier-transformation infrared spectroscopy, differential scanning calorimetry. High performance liquid chromatography was used to quantify the impurities in the different samples. The results from the physicochemical methods cited above, showed difference in polymorph structure of the three drug substances. Sample A consisted in pure polymorph III, sample B consisted in pure polymorph II, sample C consisted in a mixture of fluconazole Form III, form II and the monohydrate. This result was confirmed by differential scanning calorimetry. Also it was demonstrated that solvents used during the re-crystallization step were among the origins of these differences in the structure form. On the other hand, the result of the stability study under humidity and temperature showed that fluconazole polymorphic transformation could be owed to the no compliance with the conditions of storage. The HPLC analysis of these compounds showed the presence of specific impurities for each polymorphic form, and a possible relationship could be exist between impurities and crystalline form of fluconazole. PMID:29403776

  18. Influence of radiative processes on the ignition of deuterium–tritium plasma containing inactive impurities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gus’kov, S. Yu., E-mail: guskov@sci.lebedev.ru [Russian Academy of Sciences, Lebedev Physical Institute (Russian Federation); Sherman, V. E. [Peter the Great St. Petersburg Polytechnic University (Russian Federation)

    2016-08-15

    The degree of influence of radiative processes on the ignition of deuterium–tritium (DT) plasma has been theoretically studied as dependent on the content of inactive impurities in plasma. The analytic criterion of plasma ignition in inertial confinement fusion (ICF) targets is modified taking into account the absorption of intrinsic radiation from plasma in the ignition region. The influence of radiative processes on the DT plasma ignition has been analytically and numerically studied for plasma that contains a significant fraction of inactive impurities either as a result of DT fuel mixing with ICF target ablator material or as a result of using light metal DT-hydrides as solid noncryogenic fuel. It has been shown that the effect of the absorption of intrinsic radiation leads to lower impurity-induced increase in the ignition energy as compared to that calculated in the approximation of optically transparent ignition region.

  19. Accurate determination of non-metallic impurities in high purity tetramethylammonium hydroxide using inductively coupled plasma tandem mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Liang; Xie, Hualin; Shi, Shuyun; Chen, Xiaoqing

    2018-06-01

    The content of non-metallic impurities in high-purity tetramethylammonium hydroxide (HPTMAH) aqueous solution has an important influence on the yield, electrical properties and reliability of the integrated circuit during the process of chip etching and cleaning. Therefore, an efficient analytical method to directly quantify the content of non-metallic impurities in HPTMAH aqueous solutions is necessary. The present study was aimed to develop a novel method that can accurately determine seven non-metallic impurities (B, Si, P, S, Cl, As, and Se) in an aqueous solution of HPTMAH by inductively coupled plasma tandem mass spectrometry (ICP-MS/MS). The samples were measured using a direct injection method. In the MS/MS mode, oxygen and hydrogen were used as reaction gases in the octopole reaction system (ORS) to eliminate mass spectral interferences during the analytical process. The detection limits of B, Si, P, S, Cl, As, and Se were 0.31, 0.48, 0.051, 0.27, 3.10, 0.008, and 0.005 μg L-1, respectively. The samples were analyzed by the developed method and the sector field inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (SF-ICP-MS) was used for contrastive analysis. The values of these seven elements measured using ICP-MS/MS were consistent with those measured by SF-ICP-MS. The proposed method can be utilized to analyze non-metallic impurities in HPTMAH aqueous solution. Table S2 Multiple potential interferences on the analytes. Table S3 Parameters of calibration curve and the detection limit (DL). Table S4 Results obtained for 25% concentration high-purity grade TMAH aqueous solution samples (μg L-1, mean ± standard deviation, n = 10).

  20. Determination of the impurity content of B, Cd, Cu, W in uranium-gadolinium pellets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Lan; Zhang Jiansheng; Zhang Bo; Shao Yan

    2010-01-01

    This paper deals with determining the impurity content of B, Cd, Cu and W in Uranium-gadolinium Pellets. Set up the method: dissolve the sample in nitric acid and mannitol; use the 3 mol/L HNO 3 solution for mobile phase, CL-TBP resin for stationary phase to separate the Uranium from its nitric acid solution, collect the leaching solution , analysed by the Multi-component spectra fitting ICP-AES. The studies also includes the setting up and validity testing of the MSF model. The studies conducted suggests that:the sampling mass 0.2000 g, prepared sample volume is 6 mL; range of the determination concentration Cu, W(3-300) μg/g; B, Cd (0.3-30) μg/g .The recovery of the impurities is (89-120)%, relative standard deviation is better than 8%. (authors)

  1. Determination of oxygen impurity in high purity materials by charged particle activation analysis using alpha projectiles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chowdhury, D.P.; Pal, S.; Arunachalam, J.; Verma R.; Gangadharan, S.

    1992-01-01

    40 MeV α-particles have been used to determine oxygen impurity at ppm levels in silicon, copper, and stainless steel, through the radiochemical separation of 18 F from the matrix. The separation of 18 F has been carried out by two techniques, viz. distillation of H 2 SiF 6 and precipitation of KBF 4 and some modification has been applied in the separation, depending on the nature of interferences from the matrix. Instrumental approach was also carried out to determine the oxygen impurity at ≥ 100 ppm in Si matrix because this approach is not possible in Cu and stainless steel samples due to matrix activity. (author) 10 refs.; 1 fig.; 5 tabs

  2. Determinant method and quantum simulations of many-body effects in a single impurity Anderson model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gubernatis, J.E.; Olson, T.; Scalapino, D.J.; Sugar, R.L.

    1985-01-01

    A short description is presented of a quantum Monte Carlo technique, often referred to as the determinant method, that has proved useful for simulating many-body effects in systems of interacting fermions at finite temperatures. Preliminary results using this technique on a single impurity Anderson model are reported. Examples of such many-body effects as local moment formation, Kondo behavior, and mixed valence phenomena found in the simulations are shown. 10 refs., 3 figs

  3. Spectrographic determination of metallic impurities in organic coolants for nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin Munoz, M.; Alvarez Gonzalez, F.

    1969-01-01

    A spectrochemical method for determining metallic impurities in organic coolants for nuclear reactors is given. The organic matter in solid samples is eliminated by controlled distillation and dry ashing in the presence of magnesium oxide as carrier. Liquid, samples are vacuum distillated. The residue is analyzed by carrier distillation and by total burning techniques. The analytical results are discussed and compared with those obtained destroying the organic matter without carrier and using the copper spark technique. (Author) 12 refs

  4. Contribution to the spectrographic determination of impurities in uranium by the carrier distillation method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Capdevila, C.

    1967-01-01

    The carrier distillation method for the determination of impurities in uranium has been modified in order to get a greater sensitivity. Electrodes 9.5 mm. diam. with a crater 7 mm. diam. and 10 mm. deep have been used, being the weigh of charge 300 mg.. The elements considered were: Al, As, B, Ca, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mg, Mn, Mo, Ni, P, Pb, Si, Sn, Ti and V, over the range 0.01 to 30 ppm. (Author) 13 refs

  5. Determination of impurities in silicon nitride by particle induced x-ray emission analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyagawa, Yoshiko; Saito, Kazuo; Niwa, Hiroaki; Ishizuka, Toshio; Miyagawa, Soji

    1985-01-01

    A method is presented for quantitative particle induced X-ray emission (PIXE) analysis of impurities in the thick samples of silicon nitride. In the analysis of ceramic materials such as silicon nitride, chemical treatments are required to prepare thin enough samples. However, the chemical treatments are undesirable for the PIXE analysis, because another complications are brought about. Our method does not need any chemical treatments and thick samples can be subjected to the measurements. The determination of impurities were made by on-line use of a personal computer in which standard X-ray intensity data were stored. The method and procedures are as follows: After subtracting a buckground spectrum from an observed PIXE spectrum, the resultant peaks are assigned to individual elements. Then, in order to determine the contents of the impurities, the intensity of each peak is compared with a Gaussian curve which is generated from the standard X-ray intensity data. The latter data were determined theoretically. The results were in satisfactory agreement with those obtained by ICP emission spectrometry. (author)

  6. Evaluation of helium impurity impacts on Spent Nuclear Fuel project processes (OCRWM)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SHERRELL, D.L.

    1999-09-21

    This document identifies the types and quantities of impurities that may be present within helium that is introduced into multi-canister overpacks (MCO)s by various SNF Project facilities, including, but not limited to the Cold Vacuum Drying (CVD) Facility (CVDF). It then evaluates possible impacts of worst case impurity inventories on MCO drying, transportation, and storage processes. Based on the evaluation results, this document: (1) concludes that the SNF Project helium procurement specification can be a factor-of-ten less restrictive than a typical vendor's standard offering (99.96% pure versus the vendor's 99.997% pure standard offering); (2) concludes that the CVDF's current 99.5% purity requirement is adequate to control the quality of the helium that is delivered to the MCO by the plant's helium distribution system; and (3) recommends specific impurity limits for both of the above cases.

  7. Evaluation of helium impurity impacts on Spent Nuclear Fuel project processes (OCRWM)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    SHERRELL, D.L.

    1999-01-01

    This document identifies the types and quantities of impurities that may be present within helium that is introduced into multi-canister overpacks (MCO)s by various SNF Project facilities, including, but not limited to the Cold Vacuum Drying (CVD) Facility (CVDF). It then evaluates possible impacts of worst case impurity inventories on MCO drying, transportation, and storage processes. Based on the evaluation results, this document: (1) concludes that the SNF Project helium procurement specification can be a factor-of-ten less restrictive than a typical vendor's standard offering (99.96% pure versus the vendor's 99.997% pure standard offering); (2) concludes that the CVDF's current 99.5% purity requirement is adequate to control the quality of the helium that is delivered to the MCO by the plant's helium distribution system; and (3) recommends specific impurity limits for both of the above cases

  8. Impurities determination in uranium eluates by total reflection X-ray fluorescence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vazquez, Cristina; Bellavigna, Horacio J.; Eppis, Maria R.; Ramella, Jose L.

    1999-01-01

    The chemical control of impurities in nuclear materials is indispensable in order to assure an efficient operation of the reactors. The maximum concentration admitted depends of the elements and in most cases are in the parts per billion range. Conventional analytical methods require a pre-concentration treatment of the sample and a previous separation of the matrix (uranium). This paper investigates the use of the total reflection X-ray fluorescence as an alternative methodology for the determination of impurities in nuclear materials, namely K, Ca, Ti, Cr, Mn, Fe, Ni, Cu and As. The detection limits obtained were in the range of 0.1 to 20 ng/ml for a 1000 seconds counting time. (author)

  9. Determination of heavy metals impurities in low and medium atomic weight matrices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paiano, Silvestre; Prado Souza, Rose M.G. do

    1997-01-01

    Heavy materials have a mass attenuation coefficient in the energy interval from 100 to 400 KeV substantially higher than those corresponding to light and medium atomic weight matrices. They also show, in the same energy range, a more pronounced energy variation of this parameter. In a few cases, this property can be used for the determination of the concentration of impurities constituted by heavy metals in a lighter matrix. An Ytterbium gamma-ray source, which has several energy peaks in the considered interval, is used to supply a number of energy pairs from which the density of impurities can be found without the use of reference materials. (author). 1 ref., 4 figs

  10. Validated Reverse Phase HPLC Method for the Determination of Impurities in Etoricoxib

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Venugopal

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the development of reverse phase HPLC method for etoricoxib in the presence of impurities and degradation products generated from the forced degradation studies. The drug substance was subjected to stress conditions of hydrolysis, oxidation, photolysis and thermal degradation. The degradation of etoricoxib was observed under base and oxidation environment. The drug was found stable in other stress conditions studied. Successful separation of the drug from the process related impurities and degradation products were achieved on zorbax SB CN (250 x 4.6 mm 5 μm particle size column using reverse phase HPLC method. The isocratic method employed with a mixture of buffer and acetonitrile in a ratio of 60:40 respectively. Disodium hydrogen orthophosphate (0.02 M is used as buffer and pH adjusted to 7.20 with 1 N sodium hydroxide solution. The HPLC method was developed and validated with respect to linearity, accuracy, precision, specificity and ruggedness.

  11. Silicon materials task of the Low Cost Solar Array Project: Effect of impurities and processing on silicon solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopkins, R. H.; Davis, J. R.; Rohatgi, A.; Hanes, M. H.; Rai-Choudhury, P.; Mollenkopf, H. C.

    1982-01-01

    The effects of impurities and processing on the characteristics of silicon and terrestrial silicon solar cells were defined in order to develop cost benefit relationships for the use of cheaper, less pure solar grades of silicon. The amount of concentrations of commonly encountered impurities that can be tolerated in typical p or n base solar cells was established, then a preliminary analytical model from which the cell performance could be projected depending on the kinds and amounts of contaminants in the silicon base material was developed. The impurity data base was expanded to include construction materials, and the impurity performace model was refined to account for additional effects such as base resistivity, grain boundary interactions, thermal processing, synergic behavior, and nonuniform impurity distributions. A preliminary assessment of long term (aging) behavior of impurities was also undertaken.

  12. Process to recover tritium from fusion fuel cycle impurities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Penzhorn, R.D.; Glugla, M.

    1986-01-01

    In this work, a process that includes a hopcalite and a ceramic-supported nickel catalyst together with a uranium getter bed and a palladium silver membrane has been developed. Hopcalite is operated at room temperature for the specific conversion of reactive CO into chemically inert CO 2 . At the same time, some oxygen is removed from the process gas. In the next step, water is decomposed on a uranium bed kept at only 250 0 C with formation of molecular hydrogen and UO 2 . At this stage, additional residual oxygen is also gettered. Since hopcalite will not oxidize hydrogen at room temperature, no getter consumption for reversing this reaction takes place. With the developed three-step process, tritium permeation losses are reduced substantially, because no temperature exceeds 450 0 C. The total amount of solid waste produced is comparatively small. The catalyst is not expected to become appreciably radioactive in view of the fact that the solubility of hydrogen in nickel is very low. Recovered hydrogen is of high purity. At the same time, a decontamination of the offgas down to a very low tritium level is possible

  13. Atomic absorption determination of iron and copper impurities in rare earth compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zelyukova, Yu.V.; Kravchenko, J.B.; Kucher, A.A.

    1978-01-01

    An extraction atomic absorption method for the determination of copper and iron impurities in rare earth compounds has been developed. The extraction separation of determined elements as hydroxy quinolinates with isobuthyl alcohol was used. It increased the sensitivity of these element determination and excluded the effect of the analysed sample. Cu, Te, Zn, Bi, Sn, In, Ga, Tl and the some other elements can be determined at pH 2.0-3.0 but rare earths are remained in an aqueous phase. The condition of the flame combustion does not change during the introduction of isobutyl extract but the sensitivity of the determination of the elements increased 2-3 times. The limit of Fe determination is 0.01 mg/ml and the limit of Cu determination is 0.014 mg/ml

  14. THE EFFICIENCY OF IMPURITIES EXTRACTION DURING THE PROCESS OF ETHANOL EPURATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Yu. Nikitina

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The static model of the hydroselection column that describes the concentration variation of the main components was proposed. The purpose of this work is an optimization of the shared mixture input-position and evaluation of efficiency of the digestion and the impurity compound concentration during the epuration process. To this end, the author developed a static model of epuration columns, which allows to reveal the dependence of the degree of digestion and the degree of concentration of the main impurities in the column of the number of plates in each of these parts. It’s proved that with the increasing of theoretical plates number in the concentration part of the column the concentration effect tends to the limit value. The effects of the head impurities digestion increase indefinitely with the growth of exhausting part. The proportion of the output from the condenser impurities depends more from the digestion effect than from the condensation effect. The effect of alcohol cleaning from the fusel oil components depends strongly from the ratio of the number of plates in the digestion and concentration parts (the optimal ratio for isopropanol, isoamyl, butanol is 1.5, for the propanol, isobutanol is 0.45.

  15. Determination of impurities in uranium--niobium (7.5%)--zirconium (2.5%) alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arragon, Y

    1973-10-01

    The determination of 11 impurities in uranium--niobium-- zirconium alloys was studied. Elements of which the alloy is composed are considered and information is given on the determination of niobium by niobic acid precipitation. Selective elimination of the three components is discussed. Two liquid-liquid extractions are used. The nioblum is separated by methylisobutylketone in a hydrochloric --hydrofluoric medium and the zirconium and uranium by tributyl phosphate in a nitric medium. The determination of trace elements using electrochemical methods is discussed. Anodic re-dissolution polarography or square wave polarography enabled six elements (cadmium, copper, lead, zinc, bismuth, and thallium) to be determined in a carbonate medium together with aluminium in tetraethylammonium perchlorate, molybdenum in nitric acid, ammonium nitrate, and tungsten in hydrochloric acid with added double sodium and potassium tartrate. Fluorine was determined using ionometric techniques with a specific electrode and carbon was titrated by conductometry after combustion of the sample in an oxygen current. (auth)

  16. Spectrographic determination of impurities in high-purity tantalum oxide and niobium oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, S.T.G.; Russell, G.M.

    1990-01-01

    The development of spectrographic methods by direct current arc excitation and carrier distillation for the determination of impurities in tantalum and niobium oxides are described. Iron, silicon, aluminium, titanium, calcium, silver, tin, magnesium, and manganese can be determined in tantalum oxide and niobium oxide in concentrations ranging from 3 to 300 p.p.m. Niobium can be determined in tantalum oxide in concentrations ranging from 10 to 300 p.p.m. Tantalum cannot be determined in niobium oxide, and tungsten cannot be determined in either matrix as a result of the absence of sensitive lines in the spectra of these elements. Relative standard deviations of analyte element concentrations are in the region of 0,18 for tantalum oxide samples, and 0,13 for niobium oxide samples. A detailed laboratory method is included. 4 figs., 4 tabs., 3 refs

  17. Using 3.05 MeV resonance for determination of oxygen impurities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burkova, I.E.; Polyanskij, V.N.; Yatis, A.A.

    1983-01-01

    The method of determining oxygen impurities behind thin films using the isolated resonance in the 16 O(α, α) 16 O reaction at E=3.048 MeV with the width GITA approximately 20 keV, is considered. Cross section in resonance is σsUb(R) = 0.95 b apd it increases cross section of Rutherford scattering by the factor of 25. The conclusion is made on the possibility of using 3.048 MeV resonance when investigating Me-Si film structures

  18. Report on intercomparison exercise SR-64. Determination of impurities in U3O8

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doubek, N.; Bagliano, G.; Deron, S.

    1985-04-01

    The report presents results of a laboratory intercomparison of the determination of impurities in U 3 O 8 samples. 38 different elements were analyzed by the laboratories which participated in the SR-64 exercise. At the issue of the exercise it was possible to provide recommended values for 8 elements. The content of 11 other elements could be assigned as information values. Seven different techniques of analyses were used but 29% of the results were obtained by flame atomic absorption and 69% by emission spectrography

  19. Report on intercomparison exercise SR-74 determination of impurities in U3O8

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doubek, N.; Deron, S.

    1987-06-01

    The report presents results of a laboratory intercomparison of the determination of impurities in U 3 O 8 sample organized by the IAEA. Seven laboratories of six countries, sent their results regarding 31 elements. The evaluation was based on 121 laboratory means. The majority of the results were obtained by emission spectroscopy and by flame atomic absorption techniques. As a result of this intercomparison, recommended certification values can be assigned for the concentration of Cr, Cu and Mg. Information values can be provided for an additional twelve elements (Al, B, Co, Fe, Mn, Mo, Ni, P, Pb, Sn, V, and Zn)

  20. Determination of impurity elements in steel by spark source mass spectrometry using powdered salts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saito, Morimasa; Sudo, Emiko

    1975-01-01

    Determination of impurity elements in steel by speak source mass spectrometry using powdered salts sample electrode was studied. The instrument used in this study was an AEI MS-7 mass spectrograph and the ion detector was Ilford Q2 photograph. Sample, (0.5--1) gram, was dissolved in hydrochloric acid (1 : 1) or nitric acid (1 : 1) together with yttrium of 1 microgram as the internal standard and then the solution was evaporated to dryness without baking. The salt residues were dried at 70 0 C for 30 minutes under vacuum. They were mixed with an equal amount of graphite powder for 5 minutes in a mixer mill, and then pressed into electrodes. When the relative sensitivity coefficient (Fe=1) was determined by using NBS 460 series standard samples, the results obtained by the proposed method for elements of Mo, Sn, Cu, Cr, Co, Ni, Mn, V, P, Si, and B were in good agreement with those obtained by the conventional method using solid sample electrodes (the solid method) and the precision of this method for 11 elements mentioned above was about 10% better than those of the solid method. However, both the accuracy and precision for elements of Nb, Ti, S and W were not good. This method was applied to the determination of impurities in NBS stainless steel and others. The relative standard deviations were within 20%. (auth.)

  1. Analysis of Sulfidation Routes for Processing Weathered Ilmenite Concentrates Containing Impurities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Sazzad; Rhamdhani, M. Akbar; Pownceby, Mark I.; Bruckard, Warren J.

    Rutile is the preferred feedstock for producing high-grade TiO2 pigment but due to decreasing resources, alternative materials such as ilmenite is now used to produce a synthetic rutile (SR) feedstock. This requires removal of impurities (e.g. Fe, Mg, Mn) which, for a primary ilmenite is straightforward process. Processing of weathered ilmenite however, is complex, especially when chrome-bearing impurities are present since minor chromium downgrades the SR market value as it imparts color to the final TiO2 pigment, Chrome-bearing spinels are a problem in weathered ilmenites from the Murray Basin, Australia as their physical and chemical properties overlap with ilmenite making separation difficult. In this paper, different sulfidation process routes for weathered ilmenites are analyzed for their applicability to Murray Basin deposits as a mean of remove chrome spinel impurities. Thermodynamic and experimental studies indicated that selective sulfidation of chrome-bearing spinel can be achieved under controlled pO2 and pS2 processing conditions thereby making them amenable to separation.

  2. Determination of trace amounts of impurities in molybdenum by spark source and glow discharge mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saito, Morimasa

    1994-01-01

    For the determination of trace and ultra-trace amounts of impurities in high-purity molybdenum, spark source mass spectrometry and glow discharge mass spectrometry were studied. In spark source mass spectrometry using the metal probe method, the liquid-helium cryogenic pump was used in order to protect the surface of the samples from oxidation. The theoretical relative sensitivity factors (Mo=1) calculated from physical properties were used. The analytical results obtained for molybdenum tablet and high-purity molybdenum were in good agreement with those obtained by other methods (atomic absorption spectrometry and others). In glow discharge mass spectrometry, the relative sensitivity factors were calculated by using the results obtained by spark source mass spectrometry and atomic absorption spectrometry, and this method was applied to the determination of ultra-trace amounts of impurities in ultra high-purity molybdenum and gave the satisfactory results. The detection limits (2σ, n=10) in the integration time of 600 s for U and Th were 0.6 ppb and 0.3 ppb, and the values for Al, Si, Cr, Mn and Cu were in the range of 10 ppb to 0.5 ppb. (author)

  3. DETERMINATION OF RELATED IMPURITIES IN THE ANILOCAINE SUBSTANCE BY HPLC METHOD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. R. Sabirzyanov

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Anilocaine is a local anesthetic from the group of substituted amides, synthesized in the Perm State Pharmaceutical Academy. Anilocaine shows high surface anesthetic, infiltration and conduction anesthesia and shows the high efficiency in the various fields of medical practice. The quality of produced medicines depends on the quality of pharmaceutical substances. The purity is one of the most important parameters of the quality of pharmaceutical substances. The aim of this work was the development and validation of methods for identification of specific impurities in the substance of anilocaine by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC. Materials and methods. Studies were performed on liquid chromatography LC-20 Prominence (Shimadzu, Japan equipped with a diode-array detector (SPD-M20A. Chromatographic column was Zorbax SB-C18 (4.6 mm × 250 mm, 5 μm. Validation assessment of the developed method conducted in accordance with the requirements of FP XIII and international requirementsICH (International Conference on Harmonization. Results and discussion. An experiment on the selection of the conditions of chromatographically showed that optimal separation of anilocaine and possible impurities (identified and unidentified by the method of reversed-phase HPLC is observed in isocratic mode, using an eluent based on phosphate buffer pH 3 and acetonitrile. The flow rate of mobile phase is 1 ml/min; wavelength detection is 210 nm. Time check chromatogram is 20 minutes. Conclusion. The method for the quantitative determination of impurities in the substance of anilocaine by high-performance liquid chromatography was developed as the result of the research. The validation procedure of the analytical methods established its specificity, linearity, precision and accuracy. This method is included in the project monograph on substance of anilocaine.

  4. VARIABILITY STUDY TO DETERMINE THE SOLUBILITY OF IMPURITIES IN PLUTONIUM-BEARING, LANTHANIDE BOROSILICATE GLASS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fox, K; Elizabeth Hoffman, E; Charles Crawford, C; Tommy Edwards, T; David Best, D; James Marra, J

    2007-09-26

    This study focuses on the development of a compositional envelope that describes the retention of various impurities in lanthanide borosilicate (LaBS) glass for vitrification and immobilization of excess, defense-related plutonium. A limited amount of impurity data for the various plutonium sources is available and projections were made through analysis of the available information. These projections were used to define types and concentrations of impurities in the LaBS glass compositions to be fabricated and tested. Sixty surrogate glass compositions were developed through a statistically designed approach to cover the anticipated ranges of concentrations for several impurity species expected in the plutonium feeds. An additional four glass compositions containing actual plutonium oxide were selected based on their targeted concentrations of metals and anions. The glasses were fabricated and characterized in the laboratory and shielded cells facility to determine the degree of retention of the impurity components, the impact of the impurities on the durability of each glass, and the degree of crystallization that occurred, both upon quenching and slow cooling. Overall, the LaBS glass system appears to be very tolerant of most of the impurity types and concentrations projected in the plutonium waste stream. For the surrogate glasses, the measured CuO, Ga{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Na{sub 2}O, NiO, and Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5} concentrations fell very close to their target values across the ranges of concentrations targeted in this study for each of these components. The measured CaO and PbO concentrations were consistently higher than the targeted values. The measured Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} and Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} concentrations were very close to the targets except for the one highest targeted value for each of these components. A solubility limit may have been approached in this glass system for K{sub 2}O and MgO. The measured Cl{sup -}, F{sup -}, SeO{sub 2} and SO{sub 4}{sup 2

  5. Spectrographic determination of impurities in magnesium metal; Determinacion espectrografica de impurezas en magnesio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Capdevila, C.; Diaz-Guerra, J. P.

    1979-07-01

    The spectrographic determination of trace quantities of Al, B, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Li, Hn, Mo, Ni and Si in magnesium metal is described. Samples are dissolved with HNO{sub 3} and calcinate into MgO. In order to avoid losses of boron NH{sub 4}OH is added to the nitric solution. Except for aluminium and chromium the analysis is performed through the use of the carrier distillation technique. These two impurities are determined by burning to completion the MgO. Among the compounds studied as carriers (AgCl, AgF, CsCl, CuF{sub 2}, KCl and SrF{sub 2}) AgCl allows, In general, the best volatilization efficiency. Lithium determination is achieved by using KC1 or CsCl. Detection limits, on the basis of MgO, are in the range 0,1 to 30 ppm, depending on the element. (Author) 8 refs.

  6. Synthesis, Isolation and Characterization of Process-Related Impurities in Oseltamivir Phosphate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yogesh Kumar Sharma

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Three known impurities in oseltamivir phosphate bulk drug at level 0.1% (ranging from 0.05-0.1% were detected by gradient reverse phase high performance liquid chromatography. These impurities were preliminarily identified by the mass number of the impurities. Different experiments were conducted and finally the known impurities were synthesized and characterized.

  7. Spectrographic determination of impurities in ceramic materials for nuclear fusion reactors III. Analysis of magnesium oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melon, A. M.; Roca, M.; Rucandio, M. I.

    1992-01-01

    The determination of minor and trace elements in the magnesium oxide, considered as possible ceramic material in thermonuclear fusion reactors, has been studied. The concentration ranges are 0.1 - 0.3% for Ca, Si and Y, and at the ppm level for Al, Co, Cr, Fe, Hf, K, Li, Mn, Na, Ni, Se, Ti, V and Zr. Atomic emission spectroscopy with direct current are excitation and photographic detection has been employed. In order to eliminate the effect due to the differences in density between standards and samples, which are a source of errors, a chemical treatment of both is carried out. Likewise, for attaining conditions more suitable for the volatilization of certain impurities, these are determined with the sample in fluoride form. (Author) 11 refs

  8. Spectrographic determination of impurities in ceramic materials for nuclear fusion reactors III. Analysis of magnesium oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melon, A.M.; Roca, M.; Rucandio, M.I.

    1992-01-01

    The determination of minor and trace elements in the magnesium oxide, considered as possible ceramic material in thermonuclear fusion reactors, has been studied. The concentration ranges are 0.1 - 0.3 % for Ca, Si and Y, and at the ppm level for Al, Co, Cr, Fe, Hf, K, Li, Mn, Na, Ni, Sc, Ti, V and Zr. Atomic emission spectroscopy with direct current arc excitation and photographic detection has been employed. In order to eliminated the effect due to the differences in density between standards and samples, which are a source of errors, a chemical treatment of both is carried out. Likewise, for attaining conditions more suitable for the volatilization of certain impurities, these are determined with the sample in fluoride form. (author)

  9. The determination of some impurities in zirconium metal by instrumental neutron activation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eddy, B.T.; Pearton, D.C.G.; Watterson, J.J.

    1976-01-01

    This report describes the work done on the development of an instrumental neutron-activation method for the analysis of impurities in reactor-grade zirconium. Nine samples were analysed, and the results were compared with those obtained by other techniques. No statistically significant differences were observed for ten of the twelve elements that could possibly be determined by instrumental neutron-activation analysis. Cadmium cannot be determined at the 0,5 p.p.m. level, and there is doubt about the comparative values recorded for aluminium. The precision of the measurement by direct instrumental neutron-activation analysis ranges from 1,4 per cent for tungsten to 17 per cent for chromium [af

  10. Impurities determination in precious metals like rhodium, palladium and platinum by neutron activation without separation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    May, S.; Piccot, D.; Pinte, G.

    1978-01-01

    The possibilities of the method explored using an installation of gamma or X ray spectrometry of good performance. The irradiations were realized in the reactors EL.3 (flux approximately 6.10 12 n.cm -2 .s -1 ) and Osiris (flux > 10 14 n.cm -2 .s -1 ) of the CEN Saclay. In rhodium the presence of iridium limits the analysis possibilities. However gold, silver and platinum are easily determined, just as the other elements (As, Br, Cl, Co, Mn, Na, Sb). In platinum it is possible to determine the elements of long period, especially antimony, silver, cobalt, iridium, tantalum and zinc. As for palladium the principal impurities are gold, silver and ruthenium for what is of precious metals and particularly zinc among the other metals. For the three matrices considered the detection limits of a certain number of elements are indicated [fr

  11. An empirical method for determination of elemental components of radiated powers and impurity concentrations from VUV and XUV spectral features in tokamak plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lawson, K.; Peacock, N.; Gianella, R.

    1998-12-01

    The derivation of elemental components of radiated powers and impurity concentrations in bulk tokamak plasmas is complex, often requiring a full description of the impurity transport. A novel, empirical method, the Line Intensity Normalization Technique (LINT) has been developed on the JET (Joint European Torus) tokamak to provide routine information about the impurity content of the plasma and elemental components of radiated power (P rad ). The technique employs a few VUV and XUV resonance line intensities to represent the intrinsic impurity elements in the plasma. From a data base comprising these spectral features, the total bolometric measurement of the radiated power and the Z eff measured by visible spectroscopy, separate elemental components of P rad and Z eff are derived. The method, which converts local spectroscopic signals into global plasma parameters, has the advantage of simplicity, allowing large numbers of pulses to be processed, and, in many operational modes of JET, is found to be both reliable and accurate. It relies on normalizing the line intensities to the absolute calibration of the bolometers and visible spectrometers, using coefficients independent of density and temperature. Accuracies of the order of ± 15% can be achieved for the elemental P rad components of the most significant impurities and the impurity concentrations can be determined to within ±30%. Trace elements can be monitored, although with reduced accuracy. The present paper deals with limiter discharges, which have been the main application to date. As a check on the technique and to demonstrate the value of the LINT results, they have been applied to the transport modelling of intrinsic impurities carried out with the SANCO transport code, which uses atomic data from ADAS. The simulations provide independent confirmation of the concentrations empirically derived using the LINT technique. For this analysis, the simple case of the L-mode regime is considered, the chosen

  12. Development of chromatographic methods for the determination of genotoxic impurities in cloperastine fendizoate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García, Antonia; Rupérez, Francisco J; Ceppa, Florencia; Pellati, Federica; Barbas, Coral

    2012-03-05

    The classification of an impurity of a drug substance as genotoxic means that the "threshold of toxicological concern" (TTC) value of 1.5 μg/day intake, considered to be associated with an acceptable risk, should be the admissible limit in the raw material and that leads to new analytical challenges. In this study, reliable chromatographic methods were developed and applied as limit tests for the control of three genotoxic impurities (GTIs) in cloperastine fendizoate, drug widely used as an antitussive active pharmaceutical ingredient (API). In particular, GC-MS was applied to the determination of one alkyl halide (2-chloroethanol, 2-CE), while HPLC-DAD was selected for the analysis of two sulfonate esters (methyl p-toluenesulfonate, MPTS, and 2-chloroethyl p-toluenesulfonate, CEPTS). Regarding GC-MS, strong anion-exchange (SAX)-SPE was applied to remove fendizoate from the sample solutions, due its low volatility and its high amount in the raw material. The GC-MS analysis was performed on a Factor Four VF-23 ms capillary column (30 m × 0.25 mm I.D., film thickness 0.25 μm, Varian). Single ion-monitoring (SIM) detection mode was set at m/z 80. In the case of HPLC-DAD, a suitable optimization of the chromatographic conditions was carried out in order to obtain a good separation of the impurity peaks from the drug substance peaks. The optimized method utilizes a SymmetryShield RP(8) column (250 mm × 4.6 mm, 5 μm, Waters) kept at 50°C, with phosphate buffer (pH 3.0; 10 mM)-methanol (containing 10% ACN) (45:55, v/v) as the mobile phase, at the flow-rate of 1.7 mL/min and UV detection at 227 nm. The required sensitivity level was achieved by injecting 80 μL of sample solution, purified from fendizoate by SAX-SPE, followed by a 1:1 (v/v) dilution of the SPE eluate with water. For both GC-MS and HPLC-DAD, the method validation was performed in relation to specificity and limit of detection (LOD), as required by ICH guidelines in relation to limit assays. The

  13. Direct determination of 52 impurities content of phosphate rocks by spectroscopic method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harel, A.

    1977-01-01

    A direct method for the determination of 52 impurities content of phosphate rocks by dc-arc with the exposure of the cathode region only (0.5 and 0.8 mm below the upper electrode of the arc) instead of the entire arc is described. This method was applied to 31 elements in the 0.5 mm region and to Sc, Y, U, Th, and the rare earths in the 0.8 mm region. Great efforts were made at selecting the proper standard. The physico-chemical identity between the sample and the standard proved conditional on certain factors. Calcium meta phosphate with 20% graphite constituted a standard composition that was identical to the mineral material after suitable treatment. The identity between the standard and the sample was inferred from the temperature, electron density, evaporation rate and line intensity parameters

  14. Rare earth impurities in high purity lanthanum oxide determined by neutron activation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen Van Suc; Desai, H.B.; Parthasarathy, R.; Gangadharan, S.

    1992-01-01

    Individual rare earth impurities in high purity La 2 O 3 (≥99.9%) have been determined by NAA after pre-separation of the matrix (La). The separation is carried out on an anion exchanger (Dowex 1x8) using different mixtures of methanol/nitric acid as eluants. The rare earth elements from Dy to Lu are eluted quantitatively using a 10% 1M HNO 3 - 90% methanol mixture, while the light rare earths from Ce to Gd are eluted quantitatively using a 10% 0.05M HNO 3 - 90% methanol mixture. La, which is retained on the column, is eluted using 0.1M HNO 3 . The recoveries of the various rare earth elements have been checked using radiotracers and also by spiking the sample with known amount of elements, and the recoveries are found to be quantitative. Results obtained on a typical high purity lanthanum oxide are reported here. (author) 5 refs.; 1 fig

  15. Determination of impurities in magnesium and aluminium by X-ray fluorescence spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roca, M.; Diaz-Guerra, J.P.

    1979-01-01

    The determination of traces of Al, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mn, Ni, Pb, Si and of Bi, Cr, Cu, Fe, Ga, Mg, Mn, Ni, Pb, Si, Sn, Ti, V and Zn in samples of magnesium and aluminium, respectively, by means of X-ray fluorescence spectrometry, are studied. An automatic sequential spectrometer with an on-line computer for the treatment of data has been employed. The most suitable measurement parameters have been chosen for each element in order to achieve detection limits to a few p.p.m. For magnesium in the form of drillings the analyses are performed with satisfactory results for most impurities by pressing the samples into briquettes and employing metallic discs as standards. Correction methods for the spectral interferences of Ti on V, and V on Cr have been applied. (author)

  16. Determination of impurity distributions in ingots of solar grade silicon by neutron activation analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karches, Barbara; Hampel, Gabriele; Plonka, Christian; Stieghorst, Christian; Wiehl, Norbert [Mainz Univ. (Germany). Inst. for Nuclear Chemistry; Schoen, Jonas; Krenckel, Patricia; Riepe, Stephan [Fraunhofer Institute for Solar Energy Systems, Freiburg (Germany); Gerstenberg, Heiko [Technische Univ. Muenchen, Garching (Germany). Heinz-Maier-Leibniz Zentrum; Ponsard, Bernard [Belgian Nuclear Research Centre (SCK CEN), Mol (Belgium). BR2 reactor

    2017-09-01

    In a series of crystallization experiments, the directional solidification of silicon was investigated as a low cost path for the production of silicon wafers for solar cells. Instrumental neutron activation analysis was employed to measure the influence of different crystallization parameters on the distribution of 3d-metal impurities of the produced ingots. A theoretical model describing the involved diffusion and segregation processes during the solidification and cooling of the ingots could be verified by the experimental results. By successive etching of the samples after the irradiation, it could be shown that a layer of at least 60 μm of the samples has to be removed to get real bulk concentrations.

  17. The determination, by atomic-absorption spectrophotometry, of impurities in manganese dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balaes, G.E.E.; Robert, R.V.D.

    1981-01-01

    This report describes various methods for the determination of impurities in electrolytic manganese dioxide by atomic-absorption spectrophotometry (AAS). The sample is dissolved in a mixture of acids, any residue being ignited and retreated with acid. Several AAS methods were applied so that the analysis required to meet the specifications could be attained. These involved conventional flame AAS, AAS with electrothermal atomization (ETA), hydride generation coupled with AAS, and cold-vapour AAS. Of the elements examined, copper, iron, zinc, and lead can be determined direct with confidence with or without corrections based on recoveries obtained from spiked solutions. Nickel can be determined direct by use of the method of standard additions, and copper, nickel, and lead by ETA with the method of standard additions. Arsenic and antimony are determined by hydride generation coupled with AAS, and mercury by cold-vapour AAS. The precision of analysis (relative standard deviation) is generally less than 0,050. Values were obtained for aluminium, molybdenum, magnesium, sodium, copper, chromium, and cadmium, but the accuracy of these determinations has not been fully established

  18. Protein binding studies with radiolabeled compounds containing radiochemical impurities. Equilibrium dialysis versus dialysis rate determination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Honoré, B

    1987-01-01

    The influence of radiochemical impurities in dialysis experiments with high-affinity ligands is investigated. Albumin binding of labeled decanoate (97% pure) is studied by two dialysis techniques. It is shown that equilibrium dialysis is very sensitive to the presence of impurities resulting...

  19. Recirculation of Chilean copper smelting dust with high impurities contents to the smelting process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sano, H.; Fujisawa, T. [Nagoya Univ., Nagoya (Japan). EcoTopia Science Inst.; Montenegro, V. [Nagoya Univ., Nagoya (Japan). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering

    2007-07-01

    Dust generated during the copper smelting process is generally stabilized using hydrometallurgical methods as it contains high concentrations of arsenic. In this laboratory study, dust was recirculated during the smelting process in order to recover more copper and decrease dust emissions while recovering more copper. The behaviour of impurities and their influence on matte quality was also investigated. Industrial matte, flue dust, slag, and copper concentrates from a Chilean smelter were used as test materials. Dust recirculation tests were conducted in a simulated electric furnace. Off-gases were collected in a reaction tube, and the condensed volatile matter, slag, and matte phases were analyzed for their elemental content by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry. The distribution of arsenic (As); antimony (Sb), bismuth (Bi), lead (Pb), and zinc (Zn) were investigated by varying the amounts of dust recirculating to the smelting stage with 21 per cent of the oxygen. Results showed that distributions of all analyzed elements increased with recirculation. It was concluded that copper can be recovered using the dust recirculation technique. However, impurities may limit the efficacy of the dust recirculation process. 6 refs., 3 tabs., 4 figs.

  20. Definition and dynamic control of a continuous chromatography process independent of cell culture titer and impurities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chmielowski, Rebecca A; Mathiasson, Linda; Blom, Hans; Go, Daniel; Ehring, Hanno; Khan, Heera; Li, Hong; Cutler, Collette; Lacki, Karol; Tugcu, Nihal; Roush, David

    2017-12-01

    Advances in cell culture technology have enabled the production of antibody titers upwards of 30g/L. These highly productive cell culture systems can potentially lead to productivity bottlenecks in downstream purification due to lower column loadings, especially in the primary capture chromatography step. Alternative chromatography solutions to help remedy this bottleneck include the utilization of continuous processing systems such as periodic counter-current chromatography (PCC). Recent studies have provided methods to optimize and improve the design of PCC for cell culture titers up to about 3g/L. This paper defines a continuous loading strategy for PCC that is independent of cell culture background and encompasses cell culture titers up to about 31g/L. Initial experimentation showed a challenge with determining a difference in change in UV280nm signal (ie. ΔUV) between cell culture feed and monoclonal antibody (mAb) concentration. Further investigation revealed UV280nm absorbance of the cell culture feedstock without antibody was outside of the linear range of detection for a given cell pathlength. Additional experimentation showed the difference in ΔUV for various cell culture feeds can be either theoretically predicted by Beer's Law given a known absorbance of the media background and impurities or experimentally determined using various UV280nm cell pathlengths. Based on these results, a 0.35mm pathlength at UV280nm was chosen for dynamic control to overcome the background signal. The pore diffusion model showed good agreement with the experimental frontal analysis data, which resulted in definition of a ΔUV setpoint range between 20 and 70% for 3C-PCC experiments. Product quality of the elution pools was acceptable between various cell culture feeds and titers up to about 41g/L. Results indicated the following ΔUV setpoints to achieve robust dynamic control and maintain 3C-PCC yield: ∼20-45% for titers greater than 10g/L depending on UV absorbance of

  1. Sample pretreatment for the determination of metal impurities in silicon wafer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, H. Y.; Kim, Y. H.; Yoo, H. D.; Lee, S. H.

    1999-01-01

    The analytical results obtained by microwave digestion and acid digestion methods for sample pretreatment to determine metal impurities in silicon wafer by inductively coupled plasma--mass spectrometry(ICP-MS) were compared. In order to decompose the silicon wafer, a mixed solution of HNO 3 and HF was added to the sample and the metal elements were determined after removing the silicon matrix by evaporating silicon in the form of Si-F. The recovery percentages of Ni, Cr and Fe were found to be 95∼106% for both microwave digestion and acid digestion methods. The recovery percentage of Cu obtained by the acid digestion method was higher than that obtained by the microwave digestion method. For Zn, however, the microwave digestion method gave better result than the acid digestion method. Fe was added to a silicon wafer using a spin coater. The concentration of Fe in this sample was determined by ICP-MS, and the same results were obtained in the two pretreatment methods

  2. Separation and determination of impurities in paracetamol, codeine and pitophenone in the presence of fenpiverinium in combined suppository dosage form.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vojta, Jiří; Hanzlík, Pavel; Jedlička, Aleš; Coufal, Pavel

    2015-01-01

    A new HPLC method for separation and determination of impurities in paracetamol, codeine phosphate hemihydrate and pitophenone hydrochloride in the presence of fenpiverinium bromide in combined suppository dosage form was developed and validated. The separation of paracetamol and its impurities 4-aminophenol, 4-nitrophenol, 4-chloracetanilid; codeine and its impurities methylcodeine, morphine, codeine dimer and 10-hydroxycodeine; pitophenone and its impurities 2-[4-[2-(1-piperidinyl)ethoxy]benzoyl] benzoic acid, 2-[4-[2-(1-piperidinyl)ethoxy]benzoyl]benzoic acid 2-(1-piperidinyl)-ethyl ester, methyl ester of 2-(4-hydroxybenzoyl) benzoic acid and fenpiverinium was achieved by using ion-pair reversed phase liquid chromatography with UV detection. Validation parameters such as the precision, accuracy, linearity, limit of detection (LOD), limit of quantification (LOQ) and robustness were verified for all the mentioned impurities of codeine phosphate hemihydrate and 4-aminophenol and 2-[4-[2-(1-piperidinyl)ethoxy]benzoyl] benzoic acid as the main degradation products of paracetamol and pitophenone hydrochloride, respectively. The described method was found to be useful for analysis of the stability samples and therefore suitable for routine purity testing of the drug product. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. AN ELECTROLYTIC CIP-CLEANING PROCESS FOR REMOVING IMPURITIES FROM THE INNER SURFACE OF A METALLIC CONTAINER

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2008-01-01

    The invention relates to a novel electrolytic process for removing impurities from the inner surface of a metallic container. The process is particularly useful for cleaning process reactors used for culturing microorganisms, and storage tanks used for storing metabolites formed in the process...... reactor, as well as containers for dairy products....

  4. Rapid and Simultaneous Determination of Acetylsalicylic Acid, Paracetamol, and Their Degradation and Toxic Impurity Products by HPLC in Pharmaceutical Dosage Forms

    OpenAIRE

    AKAY, Cemal

    2008-01-01

    Aims: Determinations of drug impurity and drug degradation products are very important from both pharmacological and toxicological perspectives. Establishment of monitoring methods for impurities and degradation products during pharmaceutical development is necessary because of their potential toxicity. The aim of this study was to develop a rapid and simultaneous determination method for paracetamol and acetylsalicylic acid (ACA) and their degradation and toxic impurity products by high perf...

  5. Determination of metal impurities in MOX powder by direct current arc atomic emission spectroscopy. Application of standard addition method for direct analysis of powder sample

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furuse, Takahiro; Taguchi, Shigeo; Kuno, Takehiko; Surugaya, Naoki

    2016-12-01

    Metal impurities in MOX powder obtained from uranium and plutonium recovered from reprocessing process of spent nuclear fuel have to be determined for its characterization. Direct current arc atomic emission spectroscopy (DCA-AES) is one of the useful methods for direct analysis of powder sample without dissolving the analyte into aqueous solution. However, the selection of standard material, which can overcome concerns such as matrix matching, is quite important to create adequate calibration curves for DCA-AES. In this study, we apply standard addition method using the certified U_3O_8 containing known amounts of metal impurities to avoid the matrix problems. The proposed method provides good results for determination of Fe, Cr and Ni contained in MOX samples at a significant quantity level. (author)

  6. Effects of the impurity-host interactions on the nonradiative processes in ZnS:Cr

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tablero, C.

    2010-11-01

    There is a great deal of controversy about whether the behavior of an intermediate band in the gap of semiconductors is similar or not to the deep-gap levels. It can have significant consequences, for example, on the nonradiative recombination. In order to analyze the behavior of an intermediate band, we have considered the effect of the inward and outward displacements corresponding to breathing and longitudinal modes of Cr-doped ZnS and on the charge density for different processes involved in the nonradiative recombination using first-principles. This metal-doped zinc chalcogenide has a partially filled band within the host semiconductor gap. In contrast to the properties exhibited by deep-gap levels in other systems, we find small variations in the equilibrium configurations, forces, and electronic density around the Cr when the nonradiative recombination mechanisms modify the intermediate band charge. The charge density around the impurity is equilibrated in response to the perturbations in the equilibrium nuclear configuration and the charge of the intermediate band. The equilibration follows a Le Chatelier principle through the modification of the contribution from the impurity to the intermediate band and to the valence band. The intermediate band introduced by Cr in ZnS for the concentrations analyzed makes the electronic capture difficult and later multiphonon emission in the charge-transfer processes, in accordance with experimental results.

  7. Neutron activation determination of impurities in high-purity bismuth with separation of matrix in form of hydroxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Artyukhin, P.I.; Shavinskij, B.M.; Mityakin, Yu.L.

    1979-01-01

    The technique of neutron activation determination of 15 impurity elements (Au, Ag, Ba, Cd, Co, Cs, Cu, Hg, K, Na, Ni, Se, Sr, Te, Zn) in high-purity bismuth (impurity content is approximately 10 -6 -10 -10 %) is presented. Bismuth hydroxide precipitation by ammonia from nitric acid solutions was used to separate bismuth from alkali, alkaline earth metals and elements forming stable ammines. Gold, selenium and tellurium are isolated in the form of metals at reduction by muriatic hydrazine. Results of analyzing two samples of special purity bismuth are presented. Neutron flux comprised 0.8-1x10 13 n/cm 2 xs. Radiation time was equal to 90 hours

  8. Quantitative determination of mineral coal impurities from Brazil through optical emission spectrography technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clain, Almir Faria

    1982-01-01

    The aim of the present research was to develop a spectrographic technique to determine the highest possible number of the chemical elements micro-constituents of Brazilian mineral coals. The experimental technique developed corresponds to the so called total-burning procedure. Coal samples were calcined to ashes at 400°C and then totally burned in graphite electrodes by a DC arc. The spectrographic measurements were made in a Jarrell-Ash emission spectrograph, Ebert mounting type, model Mark IV. An inert atmosphere chamber (for a gaseous mixture 20% 0 2 and 80% air) and a seven step rotating sector were used as main accessories. The analytical curves for the different elements, were obtained using synthetic standards in the concentration range of 10 to 1.000 ppm, and the standards as well as the coal ashes were diluted with spectrographically pure graphite in 1:1 ratio. Seventeen coal samples from different shells and strata of Morungava and Charqueadas mines - Rio Grande do Sul State - were analyzed to test the proposed technique, being possible to determine the following elements: B, Be, Bi, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Ga,Pb, Ge, Mn, Mo, Ni, Sn, Sb, V, Y, Zn and Zr. The coefficient of variation was 14% in average for all the elements and the sensitivity was so that the majority of the impurities present in the coals were analyzed. (author)

  9. Atomic absorption spectrophotometry for the determination of metallic impurities in coal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, M.J.S.F. da.

    1983-06-01

    The Brazilian Energetic Alternative Program expects the reduction of our dependence on foreign energy sources, through replacing fuel oil by mineral coal. Its gasification by means of nuclear energy must be also considered. However, the intensive burning of coal leads to serious environmental problems. During its combustion the release, to atmosphere, of toxic elements such as As, Hg, Pb, Sb, Se, Cd, Zn and others is of great concern. Increase in atmospheric pollution will take place by burning increased amounts of coal. In addition, some of those elements are concentrated in fly ashes. The determination of impurities in coal is also important for the Figueiras Project in the Nuclebras Mineral Prospection Program. Hence, it is important to have reliable analytical methods which can monitor inorganic constituents at various stages of coal production and utilization. The atomic absorption spectrophotometry is a suitable analytical technique to determine pollutants in coal because it is sensitive, simple, economic and cover a large range of concentrations. The need of a previous treatment of the sample is overcome by using an acid attack (HNO 3 + HClO 4 + HF) which has proved to be rapid and efficient. (Author) [pt

  10. Trace impurities analysis determined by neutron activation in the PbI 2 crystal semiconductor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamada, M. M.; Oliveira, I. B.; Armelin, M. J.; Mesquita, C. H.

    2003-06-01

    In this work, a methodology for impurity analysis of PbI 2 was studied to investigate the effectiveness of the purification. Commercial salts were purified by the multi passes zone refining and grown by the Bridgman method. To evaluate the purification efficiency, samples from the bottom, middle and upper sections of the ZR ingot were analyzed after 200, 300 and 500 purification passes, by measurements of the impurity concentrations, using the neutron activation analysis (NAA) technique. There was a significant reduction of the impurities according to the purification numbers. The reduction efficiency was different for each element, namely: Au>Mn>Co˜Ag>K˜Br. The impurity concentration of the crystals grown after 200, 300 and 500 passes and the PbI 2 starting material were analyzed by NAA and plasma optical emission spectroscopy.

  11. Suitability of different containers for the sampling and storage of biogas and biomethane for the determination of the trace-level impurities--A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arrhenius, Karine; Brown, Andrew S; van der Veen, Adriaan M H

    2016-01-01

    The traceable and accurate measurement of biogas impurities is essential in order to robustly assess compliance with the specifications for biomethane being developed by CEN/TC408. An essential part of any procedure aiming to determinate the content of impurities is the sampling and the transfer of the sample to the laboratory. Key issues are the suitability of the sample container and minimising the losses of impurities during the sampling and analysis process. In this paper, we review the state-of-the-art in biogas sampling with the focus on trace impurities. Most of the vessel suitability studies reviewed focused on raw biogas. Many parameters need to be studied when assessing the suitability of vessels for sampling and storage, among them, permeation through the walls, leaks through the valves or physical leaks, sorption losses and adsorption effects to the vessel walls, chemical reactions and the expected initial concentration level. The majority of these studies looked at siloxanes, for which sampling bags, canisters, impingers and sorbents have been reported to be fit-for-purpose in most cases, albeit with some limitations. We conclude that the optimum method requires a combination of different vessels to cover the wide range of impurities commonly found in biogas, which have a wide range of boiling points, polarities, water solubilities, and reactivities. The effects from all the parts of the sampling line must be considered and precautions must be undertaken to minimize these effects. More practical suitability tests, preferably using traceable reference gas mixtures, are needed to understand the influence of the containers and the sampling line on sample properties and to reduce the uncertainty of the measurement. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Determination of impurities and counterions of pharmaceuticals by capillary electromigration methods

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Štěpánová, Sille; Kašička, Václav

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 37, č. 15 (2014), s. 2039-2055 ISSN 1615-9306 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP206/12/0453; GA ČR(CZ) GA13-17224S Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : pharmaceutical analysis * drug impurities * drug counterions * chiral impurities * capillary electrophoresis Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation Impact factor: 2.737, year: 2014

  13. Simultaneous determination of piracetam and its four impurities by RP-HPLC with UV detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arayne, M Saeed; Sultana, Najma; Siddiqui, Farhan Ahmed; Mirza, Agha Zeeshan; Qureshi, Faiza; Zuberi, M Hashim

    2010-08-01

    A simple and rapid high-performance liquid chromatographic method for the separation and determination of piracetam and its four impurities, 2-oxopyrrolidin-1-yl)acetic acid, pyrrolidin-2-one, methyl (2-oxopyrrolidin-1-yl)acetate, and ethyl (2-oxopyrrolidin-1-yl)acetate, was developed. The separation was achieved on a reversed-phase C(18) Nucleosil column (25 cm x 0.46 cm, 10 microm). The mobile phase is composed of an aqueous solution containing 0.2 g/L of triethyl amine-acetonitrile (85:15, v/v). The pH of the mobile phase was adjusted to 6.5 with phosphoric acid at a flow rate of 1 mL/min at ambient temperature and UV detection at 205 nm. The developed method was found to give good separation between the pure drug and its four related substance. The polynomial regression data for the calibration plots showed good linear relationship in the concentration range of 50-10,000 ng/mL, 25-10,000 ng/mL, 45-10,000 ng/mL, 34-10,000 ng/mL, and 55-10,000 ng/mL, respectively, with r(2) = 0.9999. The method was validated for precision, accuracy, ruggedness, and recovery. The minimum quantifiable amounts were found to be 50 ng/mL of piracetam, 25 ng/mL of 2-oxopyrrolidin-1-yl)acetic acid, 45 ng/mL of pyrrolidin-2-one, 34 ng/mL of methyl (2-oxopyrrolidin-1-yl)acetate, and 55 ng/mL of ethyl (2-oxopyrrolidin-1-yl)acetate. Statistical analysis proves that the method is reproducible and selective for the estimation of piracetam as well as its related substance. As the method could effectively separate the drug from the related substances, it can be employed as a stability-indicating one. The proposed method shows high efficiency, allowing the separation of the main component piracetam from other impurities.

  14. Different Spectrophotometric and Chromatographic Methods for Determination of Mepivacaine and Its Toxic Impurity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelwahab, Nada S; Fared, Nehal F; Elagawany, Mohamed; Abdelmomen, Esraa H

    2017-09-01

    Stability-indicating spectrophotometric, TLC-densitometric, and ultra-performance LC (UPLC) methods were developed for the determination of mepivacaine HCl (MEP) in the presence of its toxic impurity, 2,6-dimethylanaline (DMA). Different spectrophotometric methods were developed for the determination of MEP and DMA. In a dual-wavelength method combined with direct spectrophotometric measurement, the absorbance difference between 221.4 and 240 nm was used for MEP measurements, whereas the absorbance at 283 nm was used for measuring DMA in the binary mixture. In the second-derivative method, amplitudes at 272.2 and 232.6 nm were recorded and used for the determination of MEP and DMA, respectively. The developed TLC-densitometric method depended on chromatographic separation using silica gel 60 F254 TLC plates as a stationary phase and methanol-water-acetic acid (9 + 1 + 0.1, v/v/v) as a developing system, with UV scanning at 230 nm. The developed UPLC method depended on separation using a C18 column (250 × 4.6 mm id, 5 μm particle size) as a stationary phase and acetonitrile-water (40 + 60, v/v; pH 4 with phosphoric acid) as a mobile phase at a flow rate of 0.4 mL/min, with UV detection at 215 nm. The chromatographic run time was approximately 1 min. The proposed methods were validated with respect to International Conference on Harmonization guidelines regarding precision, accuracy, ruggedness, robustness, and specificity.

  15. Determination of Bortezomib in API Samples Using HPLC: Assessment of Enantiomeric and Diastereomeric Impurities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamalzadeh, Zahra; Babanezhad, Esmaeil; Ghaffari, Solmaz; Mohseni Ezhiyeh, Alireza; Mohammadnejad, Mahdieh; Naghibfar, Mehdi; Bararjanian, Morteza; Attar, Hossein

    2017-08-01

    A new, normal phase high performance liquid chromatography (NP-HPLC) method was developed for separation of Bortezomib (BZB) enantiomers and quantitative determination of (1S,2R)-enantiomer of BZB in active pharmaceutical ingredient (API) samples. The developed method was validated based on International Conference on Harmonisation (ICH) guidelines and it was proved to be accurate, precise and robust. The obtained resolution (RS) between the enantiomers was more than 2. The calibration curve for (1S,2R)-enantiomer was found to be linear in the concentration range of 0.24-5.36 mg/L with regression coefficient (R2) of 0.9998. Additionally, the limit of detection (LOD) and limit of quantification (LOQ) were 0.052 and 0.16 mg/L, respectively. Also, in this study, a precise, sensitive and robust gradient reversed-phase HPLC (RP-HPLC) method was developed and validated for determination of BZB in API samples. The detector response was linear over the concentration range of 0.26-1110.5 mg/L. The values of R2, LOD and LOQ were 0.9999, 0.084 and 0.25 mg/L, respectively. For both NP-HPLC and RP-HPLC methods, all of the RSD (%) values obtained in the precision study were 2,000 and RS > 2.0. The performance of two common integration methods of valley to valley and drop perpendicular for drawing the baseline between two adjacent peaks were investigated for the determination of diastereomeric impurity (Imp-D) in the BZB-API samples. The results showed that the valley to valley method outperform the drop perpendicular method for calculation of Imp-D peak areas. Therefore, valley to valley method was chosen for peak integration. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. Different Chromatographic Methods for Simultaneous Determination of Mefenamic Acid and Two of Its Toxic Impurities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morcoss, Martha M; Abdelwahab, Nada S; Ali, Nouruddin W; Elsaady, Mohammed T

    2017-08-01

    Two sensitive, accurate and precise chromatographic methods mentioned as TLC-densitometric method and RP-HPLC-DAD method, were developed and validated for the simultaneous determination of mefenamic acid (MEF) and its two toxic impurities, benzoic acid (BA) and 2,3-dimethylaniline (DMA). In the proposed TLC-densitometric method a developing system consisting of chloroform:acetone:acetic acid:ammonia solution(70:30:2:2, v/v/v/v) was used, TLC aluminum plates 60 F254 was used as a stationary phase and the separated bands were UV-scanned at 225 nm. While the proposed RP-HPLC-DAD method depended on chromatographic separation on C18 column using 0.05 M KH2PO4 buffer: acetonitrile (40:60, v/v) as a mobile phase at constant flow rate of 1 mL/min with UV detection at 225 nm. Linear relationships were obtained in the ranges of 0.3-2, 0.3-2 and 0.3-1.8 μg/band (for TLC-densitometric method) and in the ranges of 7-50, 10-50 and 7-50 μg/mL (for HPLC-DAD method) for MEF, BA and DMA, respectively. Factors affecting the developed methods have been studied and optimized. Moreover ,the proposed methods were successfully applied for determination of the studied drug in its pharmaceutical dosage form. The methods showed no significance difference when compared with the reported method using F-test and Student's-t test. The low of detection and quantization limits of the proposed methods get them suitable for quality control and stability studies of MEF in pharmaceutical formulation. The developed methods have advantages of being more selective and sensitive than the published methods. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. Report on intercomparison exercise SR-54. Determination of impurities in U3O8

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doubek, N.; Bagliano, G.; Deron, S.

    1984-04-01

    The report presents results of a laboratory intercomparison of impurities in U 3 O 8 sample organized by the IAEA's Analytical Quality Control Service. Twelve laboratories in 11 countries sent their results. The framework of the intercomparison was therefore conceived mainly as a ''mean'' to laboratories dealing with analysis of impurities in uranium samples to check the reliability of their results. The evaluation was based on 97 laboratory means obtained with emission spectroscopy, atomic absorption techniques and neutron activation analysis. The concentration of three elements could be certified as a result of this intercomparison; informational values could be established for an additional six elements

  18. Gradient high performance liquid chromatography method for simultaneous determination of ilaprazole and its related impurities in commercial tablets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shang Wang

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available A methodology (HPLC proposed in this paper for simultaneously quantitative determination of ilaprazole and its related impurities in commercial tablets was developed and validated. The chromatographic separation was carried out by gradient elution using an Agilent C8 column (4.6 mm × 250 mm, 5 μm which was maintained at 25 °C. The mobile phase composed of solvent A (methanol and solvent B (solution consisting 0.02 mmol/l monopotassium phosphate and 0.025 mmol/l sodium hydroxide was at a flow rate of 1.0 ml/min. The samples were detected and quantified at 237 nm using an ultraviolet absorbance detector. Calibration curves of all analytes from 0.5 to 3.5 μg/ml were good linearity (r ≥ 0.9990 and recovery was greater than 99.5% for each analyte. The lower limit of detection (LLOD and quantification (LOQ of this analytical method were 10 ng/ml and 25 ng/ml for all impurities, respectively. The stress studies indicated that the degradation products could not interfere with the detection of ilaprazole and its related impurities and the assay can thus be considered stability-indicating. The method precisions were in the range of 0.41–1.21 while the instrument precisions were in the range of 0.38–0.95 in terms of peak area RSD% for all impurities, respectively. This method is considered stability-indicating and is applicable for accurate and simultaneous measuring of the ilaprazole and its related impurities in commercial enteric-coated tablets.

  19. A study on neutron activation analysis for the determination of the contents of impurities in reactor materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, N.B.

    1983-01-01

    In determining the contents of impurity elements in reactor materials using neutron activation analysis, methods for preconcentration and radiochemical separtion have been studied. Before applying neutron irradiation, impurities in uranium dioxide have been preconcentrated by an anion exchange separtion method and boron impurity has been preconcentrated by a cation exchange separation method or an ashing method. After neutron irradiation the radiochemical separation method for the determination of 27 elements is based on a group separation using ion-exchange resin and material exchanger. The method has imployed mineral acid or organic mixture of the acid, excluding hydrofluoric acid, as the media and common glass wares as the apparatus. This separation method was applied to the reactor materials such as aluminum, steel, graphite and uranium dioxide. The single comparator method was used for determining the content of each element separated radiochemically and analytical results gave the statistical and systematic errors of less than 10% and 6.1%, respectively. A prompt gamma-ray measurement method has been used for determining the content of preconcentrated boron and the analytical results gave the statistical and systematic errors of 5.4% and 3.3%, respectively. (Author)

  20. Identification, characterization, and high-performance liquid chromatography quantification of process-related impurities in vonoprazan fumarate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lei; Cao, Na; Ma, Xingling; Xiong, Kaihe; Sun, Lili; Zou, Qiaogen

    2016-04-01

    High-performance liquid chromatography analysis of vonoprazan fumarate, a novel proton pump inhibitor drug revealed six impurities. These were identified by liquid chromatography with mass spectrometry. Further, the structures of the impurities were confirmed by synthesis followed by characterization by mass spectrometry, NMR spectroscopy, and infrared spectroscopy. On the basis of these data and knowledge of the synthetic scheme of vonoprazan fumarate, the previously unknown impurity was identified as 1-[5-(2-fluorophenyl)-1-(pyridin-3-ylsulfonyl)-1H-pyrrol-3-yl]-N-methyldimethylamine, which is a new compound. The possible mechanisms by which these impurities were formed were also discussed. A high-performance liquid chromatography method was optimized in order to separate, selectively detect, and quantify all process-related impurities of vonoprazan fumarate. The presented method has been validated in terms of linearity, limits of detection, and quantification, and response factors and, therefore, is highly suitable for routine analysis of vonoprazan fumarate related substances as well as stability studies. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Determination of five kinds of impurity elements such as titanium in uranium titanium alloy by ICP-OES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiao Yan; Hu Haihong

    2010-01-01

    New description is given of an ICP-OES method in which 5 impurities, Ti, Fe, Ni, Cu, and Al in U-Ti alloy can be determined simultaneously. Studying the dissolution of the sample preparation, separation condition of impurity elements; determining analysis of instrument line, detection limit and detection lower limit; eliminating the matrix effect of Ti and TiO 2 on the measurement of precipitation; standard addition method verify the method accuracy and precision. The results show: taking Uranium titanium alloys containing 0.1000 g sample, 5 kinds of elements Ti detection lower limits is 0.2-0.7 μg·g -1 , recovery were in the range of 98.8%-102.1%, and RSD'S found were less than 8%. The method of measurement proved is accurate and reliable. (authors)

  2. Determination of elemental impurities in phosphoric acid by INAA employing a novel method of phosphate precipitation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kameník, Jan; Amsil, H.; Kučera, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 304, APR (2015), s. 157-162 ISSN 0236-5731 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GBP108/12/G108; GA MŠk LM2011019 Institutional support: RVO:61389005 Keywords : instrumental neutron activation analysis * phosphoric acid * elemental impurities * isothermal distillation Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation Impact factor: 0.983, year: 2015

  3. Determination of elemental impurities in phosphoric acid by INAA employing a novel method of phosphate precipitation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kameník, Jan; Amsil, H.; Kučera, Jan

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 2014, AUG (2014), s. 3455 ISSN 1588-2780 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GBP108/12/G108; GA MŠk(XE) LM2011019 Institutional support: RVO:61389005 Keywords : instrumental neutron activation analysis * phosphoric acid * elemental impurities * isothermal distillation Subject RIV: BG - Nuclear, Atomic and Molecular Physics, Colliders

  4. A validated stability-indicating RP-HPLC method for levofloxacin in the presence of degradation products, its process related impurities and identification of oxidative degradant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lalitha Devi, M; Chandrasekhar, K B

    2009-12-05

    The objective of current study was to develop a validated specific stability indicating reversed-phase liquid chromatographic method for the quantitative determination of levofloxacin as well as its related substances determination in bulk samples, pharmaceutical dosage forms in the presence of degradation products and its process related impurities. Forced degradation studies were performed on bulk sample of levofloxacin as per ICH prescribed stress conditions using acid, base, oxidative, water hydrolysis, thermal stress and photolytic degradation to show the stability indicating power of the method. Significant degradation was observed during oxidative stress and the degradation product formed was identified by LCMS/MS, slight degradation in acidic stress and no degradation was observed in other stress conditions. The chromatographic method was optimized using the samples generated from forced degradation studies and the impurity spiked solution. Good resolution between the peaks corresponds to process related impurities and degradation products from the analyte were achieved on ACE C18 column using the mobile phase consists a mixture of 0.5% (v/v) triethyl amine in sodium dihydrogen orthophosphate dihydrate (25 mM; pH 6.0) and methanol using a simple linear gradient. The detection was carried out at 294 nm. The limit of detection and the limit of quantitation for the levofloxacin and its process related impurities were established. The stressed test solutions were assayed against the qualified working standard of levofloxacin and the mass balance in each case was in between 99.4 and 99.8% indicating that the developed LC method was stability indicating. Validation of the developed LC method was carried out as per ICH requirements. The developed LC method was found to be suitable to check the quality of bulk samples of levofloxacin at the time of batch release and also during its stability studies (long term and accelerated stability).

  5. Investigation of the impurity transport in the ASDEX tokamak by spectroscopical methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krieger, K.W.

    1990-12-01

    Plasma impurities: a central problem of controlled thermonuclear fusion; magnetic plasma confinement in a Tokamak; methods to the determination of plasma impurity transport coefficients - by temporally modulated gas admission; the transport equation for impurities; neoclassical and anomalous transport; harmonic analysis of time-dependent signals; solutions of the transport equation; experimental equipment and measurements; measuring results - consistency of simple transport models with radial phase measurements; linearity of the transport processes; plasma disturbance by impurity injection; determination of the diffusion coefficient by simplified transport models; comparison of transport models for impurities and background plasma; measurements of the impurity transport at the plasma edge by high modulation frequencies. (AH)

  6. Determination of Propionylbrassinolide and Its Impurities by High-Performance Liquid Chromatography with Evaporative Light Scattering Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lidong Cao

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The discovery of brassinolide in 1979, a milestone in brassinosteroids research, has sparked great interest of brassinolide analogs (BLs in agricultural applications. Among these BLs, propionylbrassinolide has captured considerable attention because it shows plant growth regulating activity with an excellent durability. Two impurities of propionylbrassinolide were isolated and purified by semi-preparative high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC, and the chemical structures were confirmed. For simultaneous separation and determination of propionylbrassinolide and impurities, an efficient analytical method based on HPLC with evaporative light scattering detector (HPLC-ELSD was developed. The optimized analysis was performed on a C18 reversed phase column (250 mm × 4.60 mm, 5 μm with isocratic elution of acetonitrile and water (90:10, v/v as the mobile phase. The drift tube temperature of the ELSD system was set to 50 °C and the auxiliary gas pressure was 150 kPa. The regression equations demonstrated a good linear relationship (R2 = 0.9989–0.9999 within the test ranges. The limits of detection (LODs and quantification (LOQs for propionylbrassinolide, impurity 1 and 2 were 1.3, 1.2, 1,3 and 4.3, 4.0, 4.2 mg/L, respectively. The fully validated HPLC-ELSD method was readily applied to quantify the active ingredient and impurities in propionylbrassinolide technical concentrate. Moreover, the optimized separation conditions with ELSD have been successfully transferred to mass spectrometry (MS detector for LC-MS determination.

  7. Spectrographic determination of impurities in enriched uranium solutions; Determinacion espectrografica de impurezas en soluciones de uranio enriquecido

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Capdevila, C; Roca, M

    1980-07-01

    A spectrographic procedure for the determination of trace amounts of Al, B, Ba, Be, Bi, Ca, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, K, L i , Hg, Mn, Mo, Na, Nb, Ni, P, Pb, Ru, Sb, Sn, Sr, Ti, V, Zn, and Zr in enriched uranyl nitrate solutions from the reprocessing of spent nuclear fuels is described. After removal of uranium by either TBP or TNOA solvent extraction, the aqueous phase Is analysed by the graphite spark technique. TBP is adequate for all impurities, excepting boron and phosphorus; both of these elements can sat is factory be determined by using TNOA after the addition of mannitol to avoid boron losses. (Author) 4 refs.

  8. Isolation, structural determination, synthesis and quantitative determination of impurities in Intron-A, leached from a silicone tubing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Tze-Ming; Pramanik, Birendra; Aslanian, Robert; Gullo, Vincent; Patel, Mahesh; Cronin, Bart; Boyce, Chris; McCormick, Kevin; Berlin, Mike; Zhu, Xiaohong; Buevich, Alexei; Heimark, Larry; Bartner, Peter; Chen, Guodong; Pu, Haiyan; Hegde, Vinod

    2009-02-20

    Investigation of unexpected levels of impurities in Intron product has revealed the presence of low levels of impurities leached from the silicone tubing (Rehau RAU-SIK) on the Bosch filling line. In order to investigate the effect of these compounds (1a, 1b and 2) on humans, they were isolated identified and synthesized. They were extracted from the tubing by stirring in Intron placebo at room temperature for 72 h and were enriched on a reverse phase CHP-20P column, eluting with gradient aqueous ACN and were separated by HPLC. Structural elucidation of 1a, 1b and 2 by MS and NMR studies demonstrated them to be halogenated biphenyl carboxylic acids. The structures were confirmed by independent synthesis. Levels of extractable impurities in first filled vials of actual production are estimated to be in the range of 0.01-0.55 microg/vial for each leached impurity. Potential toxicity of these extractables does not represent a risk for patients under the conditions of clinical use.

  9. Process development, design and operation of off-line purification system for oil-contaminated impure heavy water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bose, H.; Rakesh Kumar; Gandhi, H.C.; Unny, V.K.P.; Ghosh, S.K.; Mishra, Vivek; Shukla, D.K.; Duraisamy, S.; Agarwal, S.K.

    2004-01-01

    A large volume of degraded, tritiated heavy water contaminated with mineral oil and ionic impurities have accumulated at Dhruva in the past years of reactor operation as a result of routine operation and maintenance activities. The need was felt for a simple and efficient process that could be set up and operated locally at site using readily available materials, to purify the accumulated impure heavy waters at Dhruva so as to make them acceptable at the up gradation facilities. After a detailed laboratory study, a three stage clean-up process was developed which could purify a highly turbid oil-water emulsion to yield clear, oil-free and de-mineralized heavy water at reasonable rates of volume through-put. Based on the laboratory data, a suitably scaled up purification unit has been designed and commissioned which in the past few months has processed a sizeable volume of oil-contaminated heavy water waste from Dhruva, with most satisfactory results

  10. Determination of 18 kinds of trace impurities in the vanadium battery grade vanadyl sulfate by ICP-OES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yong, Cheng

    2018-03-01

    The method that direct determination of 18 kinds of trace impurities in the vanadium battery grade vanadyl sulfate by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-OES) was established, and the detection range includes 0.001% ∼ 0.100% of Fe, Cr, Ni, Cu, Mn, Mo, Pb, As, Co, P, Ti, Zn and 0.005% ∼ 0.100% of K, Na, Ca, Mg, Si, Al. That the influence of the matrix effects, spectral interferences and background continuum superposition in the high concentrations of vanadium ions and sulfate coexistence system had been studied, and then the following conclusions were obtained: the sulfate at this concentration had no effect on the determination, but the matrix effects or continuous background superposition which were generated by high concentration of vanadium ions had negative interference on the determination of potassium and sodium, and it produced a positive interference on the determination of the iron and other impurity elements, so that the impacts of high vanadium matrix were eliminated by the matrix matching and combining synchronous background correction measures. Through the spectral interference test, the paper classification summarized the spectral interferences of vanadium matrix and between the impurity elements, and the analytical lines, the background correction regions and working parameters of the spectrometer were all optimized. The technical performance index of the analysis method is that the background equivalent concentration -0.0003%(Na)~0.0004%(Cu), the detection limit of the element is 0.0001%∼ 0.0003%, RSD<10% when the element content is in the range from 0.001% to 0.007%, RSD< 20% even if the element content is in the range from 0.0001% to 0.001% that is beyond the scope of the method of detection, recoveries is 91.0% ∼ 110.0%.

  11. Determination of assay and impurities of gamma irradiated chloramphenicol in eye ointment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hong, L.; Altorfer, H.R.

    2005-01-01

    A sample preparation method was developed to isolate chloramphenicol and its radiolytic products from an oily ointment base. The isolation method suspended the eye ointment in n-hexane at 45 deg C, and isolated the target compounds as residue by centrifugation. It was found that the main element to ensure a satisfactory isolation was keeping the sample solution at 45 deg C during sample preparation. Linearity, precision, accuracy and suitability of the method were confirmed valid for both assay and impurity tests. This isolation method was ideal for assay, unique for extraction of unexpected and complex radiolysis products, and had a number of advantages compared to the pretreatment methods described in the United States Pharmacopoeia and British Pharmacopoeia, in terms of accuracy, precision, and easy handling. The effect of γ-irradiation on chloramphenicol eye ointment was studied by HPLC-DAD, after applying the developed sample preparation method. The present assay and impurity test methods with HPLC-DAD were confirmed to be suitable for irradiated chloramphenicol in eye ointment. (author)

  12. Determination of the impurities in some pure metals, alloys, ores, plants, and coating materials with emission spectrography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chao, C N; Lee, S L; Tsai, H T

    1976-07-01

    There are many methods in the instrumental analysis. Among them, the emission spectrographic methods are developed and compiled in analyzing diverse samples. Semi-quantitative method is used widely in general samples, such as alloys, ores, sands, plants, coating materials--etc. However, in quantitative analysis, determination of the metallic impurities contents in the pure metals depends upon the matrix effect. It is necessary to convert to the form identically for unknown and standard alike. Though the technique may be different, all of these methods are easily prepared and applied on new materials.

  13. Application of neutron actication analysis to the determination of impurities in rare earth oxides produced at IPEN-CNEN/SP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saiki, M.; Oliveira Lellis, L. de.

    1988-07-01

    This paper describes a method for trace analysis in high purity rare earth oxides. This method is an application of instrumental neutron activation analysis. The results of analysis obtained in La 2 O 3 , CeO 2 , Pr 6 O 11 Nd 2 O 3 , Sm 2 O 3 and Gd 2 O 3 produced at IPEN-CNEN/SP are presented. A detailed study of the possible interference found in the neutron activation of these materials is also made. The sensitivity of the method is determined for impurities not detected in each sample. (author) [pt

  14. Determination of trace impurities in iron-based alloy using neutron activation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaidi, J.H.; Waheed, S.; Ahmad, S.

    2000-01-01

    A radiochemical neutron activation analysis procedure has been developed and applied to investigate 40 major, minor, and trace impurities in iron-based alloy. A comparison of RNAA and INAA indicated a significant improvement in the detection limits. The extensive use of these alloys in the heavy mechanical industry, manufacturing of aircraft engines, nuclear applications, medical devices and chemical equipment requires their precise characterization. The concentration of iron in the iron-based alloy was found to be 86.7%, whereas Ca, Cr, K, Mg, Mn, V and W were the other constituents of the alloy, which constituted to around 12.89%. The rest of the elements were present in minor or trace levels. Most of the rare earth elements were also present in trace amounts. (orig.)

  15. Impurity impacts on the purification process in oxy-fuel combustion based CO2 capture and storage system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, H.; Yan, J.; Yan, J.; Anheden, M.

    2009-01-01

    Based on the requirements of CO 2 transportation and storage, non-condensable gases, such as O 2 , N 2 and Ar should be removed from the CO 2 -stream captured from an oxy-fuel combustion process. For a purification process, impurities have great impacts on the design, operation and optimization through their impacts on the thermodynamic properties of CO 2 -streams. Study results show that the increments of impurities will make the energy consumption of purification increase; and make CO 2 purity of separation product and CO 2 recovery rate decrease. In addition, under the same operating conditions, energy consumptions have different sensitivities to the variation of the impurity mole fraction of feed fluids. The isothermal compression work is more sensitive to the variation of SO 2 ; while the isentropic compression work is more sensitive to the variation of Ar. In the flash system, the energy consumption of condensation in is more sensitive to the variation of Ar; but in the distillation system, the energy consumption of condensation is more sensitive to the variation of SO 2 , and CO 2 purity of separation is more sensitive to the variation of SO 2 . (author)

  16. Trace impurity analyzer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schneider, W.J.; Edwards, D. Jr.

    1979-01-01

    The desirability for long-term reliability of large scale helium refrigerator systems used on superconducting accelerator magnets has necessitated detection of impurities to levels of a few ppM. An analyzer that measures trace impurity levels of condensable contaminants in concentrations of less than a ppM in 15 atm of He is described. The instrument makes use of the desorption temperature at an indicated pressure of the various impurities to determine the type of contaminant. The pressure rise at that temperature yields a measure of the contaminant level of the impurity. A LN 2 cryogenic charcoal trap is also employed to measure air impurities (nitrogen and oxygen) to obtain the full range of contaminant possibilities. The results of this detector which will be in use on the research and development helium refrigerator of the ISABELLE First-Cell is described

  17. Application of Analytical Quality by Design concept for bilastine and its degradation impurities determination by hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatographic method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terzić, Jelena; Popović, Igor; Stajić, Ana; Tumpa, Anja; Jančić-Stojanović, Biljana

    2016-06-05

    This paper deals with the development of hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatographic (HILIC) method for the analysis of bilastine and its degradation impurities following Analytical Quality by Design approach. It is the first time that the method for bilastine and its impurities is proposed. The main objective was to identify the conditions where an adequate separation in minimal analysis duration could be achieved within a robust region. Critical process parameters which have the most influence on method performance were defined as acetonitrile content in the mobile phase, pH of the aqueous phase and ammonium acetate concentration in the aqueous phase. Box-Behnken design was applied for establishing a relationship between critical process parameters and critical quality attributes. The defined mathematical models and Monte Carlo simulations were used to identify the design space. Fractional factorial design was applied for experimental robustness testing and the method is validated to verify the adequacy of selected optimal conditions: the analytical column Luna(®) HILIC (100mm×4.6mm, 5μm particle size); mobile phase consisted of acetonitrile-aqueous phase (50mM ammonium acetate, pH adjusted to 5.3 with glacial acetic acid) (90.5:9.5, v/v); column temperature 30°C, mobile phase flow rate 1mLmin(-1), wavelength of detection 275nm. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Parallel processing for a 1-D time-dependent solution to impurity rate equations for fusion plasma simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Veerasingam, R.

    1990-01-01

    In fusion plasmas impurities such as carbon, oxygen or nickel can contaminate the plasma and cause degradation of the performance of a fusion device through radiation. However, impurities can also be used as diagnostics to obtain information about a plasma through spectroscopic experiments which can then be used in plasma modeling and simulations. In the past, serial algorithms have been described for either the time dependent or steady state problem. In this paper, we describe a parallel procedure adopted to solve the time-dependent problem. It can be shown that for the steady state problem a parallel procedure would not be a useful application of parallelization because a few seconds of the Central Processing Unit time on a CRAY-XMP or IBM 3090/600S would suffice to obtain the solution, while this is not the case for the time-dependent problem. In order to study the effects of low Z and high Z impurities on the final state of a plasma, time-dependent solutions are necessary. For purposes of diagnostics and comparisons with experiments, a fast turn around time of the simulations would be advantageous. We have implemented a parallel algorithm on and IBM 3090/600S and tested its performance for a typical set of fusion plasma parameters. 4 refs., 1 tab

  19. Determination of the magnetic impurities contribution to the nuclear relaxation in metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohen, A.M.

    1982-01-01

    The renormalization group techniques developed by Wilson for the Kondo problem are applied, for the first time, to the calculation of nuclear spin relaxation rates in dilute magnetic alloys. A procedure that calculates the longitudinal relaxation time T 1 over the entire temperature range 0 B T 1 is derived; for distances R between the impurity and the nucleus large compared to the inverse Fermi momentum H f , the result is identical to Korringa's expression for the nuclear spin relaxation rate in the pure metal. For smaller k F R, T 1 increases and becomes infinite as k F R→0. A numerical approach, capable of calculating T 1 at finite temperatures, is presented and tested by calculating T 1 for T→0; the numerical results are in excellent agreement with the analytical expression discussed above. Only for k F R→ infinity do the results for T 1 at T=0 agree with those found by Roshen and Saam, who recently analysed this problem in the light of Nozieres's Fermi liquid theory. The reasons for the discrepancy for finite k F R are discussed. (author) [pt

  20. High-performance liquid chromatographic determination of pantoprazole and its main impurities in pharmaceuticals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Letica, Jelena; Marković, Slavko; Zirojević, Jelena; Nikolić, Katarina; Agbaba, Danica

    2010-01-01

    An RP-HPLC method for simultaneous separation and quantification of pantoprazole and its five main impurities in pharmaceutical formulations was developed and validated. The separation was accomplished on a Zorbax Eclipse XDB C18 column (5 microm particle size, 150 x 4.6 mm id) using a gradient with mobile phase A [buffer-acetonitrile (70 + 30, v/v)], and mobile phase B [buffer-acetonitrile (30 + 70, v/v)]. The buffer was 0.01 M ammonium acetate solution with addition of 1 mL triethylamine/L of the solution, adjusted to pH 4.5 with orthophosphoric acid. The eluent flow rate was 1 mL/min, the temperature of the column was 30 degrees C, and the eluate was monitored at 290 nm. Linearity (r = 0.999), recovery (97.6-105.8%), RSD (0.55-1.90%), and LOQ (0.099-1.48 microg/mL) were evaluated and found to be satisfactory. The proposed method can be used for simultaneous identification and quantification of the analyzed compounds in pharmaceutical formulations.

  1. 50 curie Am-Be neutron source in determining impurities in various materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rastikerdar, S.

    1998-01-01

    The neutrons from a 50 Curies Am-Be neutron source after being thermalized have been used to study the impurities in various materials by measuring the gamma rays emitted from the activated samples. To get good resolution two HPGe detectors, one of them suitable for low energy gamma rays as well as X-rays and the other suitable for measuring the gamma-ray energies up to 10 MeV have been used. The resolution of the detectors were measured and proved to be better than 1.8 keV for 60 Co gamma rays. During the measurements the detectors were placed in thick lead chambers. In these chambers the background was reduced dramatically. To make the whole system safe and also for saving time in activation analysis a fully computerized control rabbit device has been coupled to the system. Our main purpose is to set up a portable, cheap and reliable system for activation analysis for research institutions that are not able to have reactors due to various reasons. Although our tests and analysis is still in progress we think that the system is very promising. In this paper we will discuss about the details and the future prospects. (author)

  2. Mechanisms of charge-state determination in hydrogen-based impurity complexes in crystalline germanium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliva, J.

    1984-01-01

    Recent experiments suggest that hydrogen may become bound to, and then tunnel around, substitutional carbon, silicon, or oxygen impurities in crystalline germanium. All these complexes are electrically active; [H,C] and [H,Si] are shallow acceptors, while [H,O] is a shallow donor. This paper attempts to elucidate the basic physical mechanisms controlling the charge state of such complexes as a function of the choice of the substitutional atom. A minimal-basis Bethe-cluster approach is used with the cluster comprising the ten-atom tetrahedral cage (including the substitutional atom) and enclosed H site, the latter coupled to all ten atoms of the cage. The important local correlation effect which tends to favor single occupation of the H site is modeled with a Hubbard-type term at that site. The charge state of the [H,C], [H,Si], and [H,O] complexes is associated with double occupation of the H site. Four aspects of the model are involved in favoring double occupation: (1) a low value of the H-site energy, (2) a reduced local correlation effect at the H site, (3) small hybridization between the H site and cage, and (4) a low value of the substitutional-site energy relative to that of the host. Results for the charge state for H at the cage center and for H near the substitutional atom are discussed in detail. Several useful formal results for local self-energies and local Green's functions are presented

  3. Glycolic acid physical properties and impurities assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lambert, D. P. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Pickenheim, B. R. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Hay, M. S. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); BIBLER, N. E. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2017-08-09

    This document has been revised to add analytical data for fresh, 1 year old, and 4 year old glycolic acid as recommended in Revision 2 of this document. This was needed to understand the concentration of formaldehyde and methoxyacetic acid, impurities present in the glycolic acid used in Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) experiments. Based on this information, the concentration of these impurities did not change during storage. These impurities were in the glycolic acid used in the testing included in this report and in subsequent testing using DuPont (now called Chemours) supplied Technical Grade 70 wt% glycolic acid. However, these impurities were not reported in the first two versions of this report. The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) is planning to implement a nitric-glycolic acid flowsheets to increase attainment to meet closure commitment dates during Sludge Batch 9. In fiscal year 2009, SRNL was requested to determine the physical properties of formic and glycolic acid blends.

  4. Experimental validation of a method for performance monitoring of the impurity processing stage in the TEP system of ITER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bornschein, B.; Corneli, D.; Glugla, M.; Guenther, K.; Le, T.L.; Simon, K.H.

    2007-01-01

    The Tokamak Exhaust Processing (TEP) system within the Tritium Plant of ITER needs to be designed such that tritium is recovered from all exhaust gases produced during different modes and operational conditions of the vacuum vessel. The reference process for the TEP system of ITER is called CAPER and comprises three different, consecutive steps to recover hydrogen isotopes at highest purity for direct transfer to the cryogenic Isotope Separation system. The second step ('impurity processing', IP) is carried out in a closed loop involving heterogeneously catalyzed cracking or conversion reactions to liberate tritium from tritiated hydrocarbons or tritiated water combined with permeation of hydrogen isotopes through a Pd/Ag permeator. This combination shifts chemical equilibria towards dehydrogenation and, therefore, enables detritiation factors higher than 1000 in the IP stage. Such a high decontamination factor requires the optimal performance of the permeator, which on the other hand is operated under conditions which provoke coking of the permeator membrane by hydrocarbon cracking. For this reason the permeator in the impurity processing loop needs to be repeatedly regenerated in order to sustain decontamination factors higher/in the order of 1000. At the Tritium Laboratory Karlsruhe (TLK) a method to measure the actual performance of the second stage of the CAPER process has been developed. This method has been successfully tested with the CAPER facility and appears feasible for the TEP system of ITER

  5. Determination of elemental impurities and U and O isotopic compositions with a view to identify the geographical and industrial origins of uranium ore concentrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salaun, A.; Hubert, A.; Pointurier, F.; Aupiais, J.; Pili, E.; Richon, P.; Fauré, A.; Diallo, S.

    2012-12-01

    First events of illicit trafficking of nuclear and radiological materials occurred 50 years ago. Nuclear forensics expertise are aiming at determining the use of seized material, its industrial history and provenance (geographical area, place of production or processing), at assisting in the identification and dismantling of illicit trafficking networks. This information is also valuable in the context of inspections of declared facilities to verify the consistency of operator's declaration. Several characteristics can be used to determine the origin of uranium ore concentrates such as trace elemental impurity patterns (Keegan et al., 2008 ; Varga et al., 2010a, 2010b) or uranium, oxygen and lead isotopic compositions (Tamborini et al., 2002a, 2002b ; Wallenius et al., 2006; Varga et al., 2009). We developed analytical procedures for measuring the isotopic compositions of uranium (234U/238U and 235U/238U) and oxygen (18O/16O) and levels of elemental impurities (e.g. REE, Th) from very small amounts of uranium ore concentrates (or yellow cakes). Micrometer particles and few milligrams of material are used for oxygen isotope measurements and REE determination, respectively. Reference materials were analyzed by mass spectrometry (TIMS, SF-ICP-MS and SIMS) to validate testing protocols. Finally, materials of unknown origin were analyzed to highlight significant differences and determine whether these differences allow identifying the origin of these ore concentrates. References: Keegan, E., et al. (2008). Applied Geochemistry 23, 765-777. Tamborini, G., et al. (2002a). Analytical Chemistry 74, 6098-6101. Tamborini, G., et al. (2002b). Microchimica Acta 139, 185-188. Varga, Z., et al. (2009). Analytical Chemistry 81, 8327-8334. Varga, Z., et al. (2010a). Talanta 80, 1744-1749. Varga, Z., et al. (2010b). Radiochimica Acta 98, 771-778 Wallenius, M., et al. (2006). Forensic Science International 156, 55-62.

  6. Micellar HPLC Method for Simultaneous Determination of Ethamsylate and Mefenamic Acid in Presence of Their Main Impurities and Degradation Products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, Fawzia; Sharaf El-Din, Mohie K; El-Deen, Asmaa Kamal; Shimizu, Kuniyoshi

    2017-01-01

    An eco-friendly sensitive, rapid and less hazardous micellar liquid chromatographic method was developed and validated for the simultaneous analysis of ethamsylate (ETM) and mefenamic acid (MFA) in the presence of hydroquinone (HQ) and 2,3-dimethylaniline (DMA) the main impurities of ETM and MFA, respectively. Good chromatographic separation was attained using Eclipse XDB-C8 column (150 mm × 4.6 mm, 5 μm particle size) adopting UV detection at 300 nm with micellar mobile phase consisting of 0.12 M sodium dodecyl sulfate, 0.3% triethylamine and 15% 2-propanol in 0.02 M orthophosphoric acid (pH 7.0) at 1.0 mL/min. The analytes were well resolved in <6.0 min, ETM (t R = 1.55 min), HQ (t R = 1.95 min), MFA (t R = 4.55 min) and DMA (t R = 5.80 min). Different validation parameters were examined as recommended by international conference on harmonization (ICH) guidelines. The method was linear over the concentration ranges of 0.5-18.0, 0.5-20.0, 0.01-0.5 and 0.02-0.2 µg/mL with limits of detection of 0.118, 0.159, 0.005 and 0.005 µg/mL and limits of quantification of 0.358, 0.482, 0.014 and 0.015 µg/mL for ETM, MFA, HQ and DMA, respectively. The suggested method was successfully applied for the determination of the two drugs in their bulk powder, laboratory-prepared mixtures, single-ingredient and co-formulated tablets. The obtained results were in accordance with those of the comparison method. The method can also detect trace amounts of HQ and DMA as the main impurities of ETM and MFA, respectively, within the BP limit (0.1%) for both impurities. Furthermore, it is a stability-indicating one for the determination of ETM in its pure form, single-component tablet and co-formulated tablets with other drugs. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. Development and validation of an ICP-MS method for the determination of elemental impurities in TP-6076 active pharmaceutical ingredient (API) according to USP 〈232〉/〈233〉.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chahrour, Osama; Malone, John; Collins, Mark; Salmon, Vrushali; Greenan, Catherine; Bombardier, Amy; Ma, Zhongze; Dunwoody, Nick

    2017-10-25

    The new guidelines of the United States pharmacopeia (USP), European pharmacopeia (EP) and international conference on harmonization (ICH) regulating elemental impurities limits in pharmaceuticals signify the end of unspecific analysis of metals as outlined in USP 〈231〉. The new guidelines specify both daily doses and concentration/limits of elemental impurities in pharmaceutical final products, active pharmaceutical ingredients (API) and excipients. In chapter USP 〈233〉 method implementation, validation and quality control during the analytical process are described. We herein report the use of a stabilising matrix that overcomes low spike recovery problem encountered with Os and allows the determination of all USP required elemental impurities (As, Cd, Hg, Pb, V, Cr, Ni, Mo, Cu, Pt, Pd, Ru, Rh, Os and Ir) in a single analysis. The matrix was used in the validation of a method to determine elemental impurities in TP-6076 active pharmaceutical ingredient (API) by ICP-MS according to the procedures defined in USP〈233〉 and to GMP requirements. This validation will support the regulatory submission of TP-6076 which is a novel tetracycline analogue effective against the most urgent multidrug-resistant gram-negative bacteria. Evaluation of TP-6076 in IND-enabling toxicology studies has led to the initiation of a phase 1 clinical trial. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Fifth workshop on the role of impurities and defects in silicon device processing. Extended abstracts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sopori, B.L.; Luque, A.; Sopori, B.; Swanson, D.; Gee, J.; Kalejs, J.; Jastrzebski, L.; Tan, T.

    1995-08-01

    This workshop dealt with engineering aspects and material properties of silicon electronic devices. Crystalline silicon growth, modeling, and properties are discussed in general and as applied to solar cells. Topics considered in discussions of silicon growth include: casting, string ribbons, Al backside contacts, ion implantation, gettering, passivation, and ultrasound treatments. Properties studies include: Electronic properties of defects and impurities, dopant and carrier concentrations, structure and bonding, nitrogen effects, degradation of bulk diffusion length, and recombination parameters. Individual papers from the workshop are indexed separately on the Energy Data Bases.

  9. Spectrographic determination of impurities in ammonium hydrogen fluoride samples. II. Study of the behaviour of the added matrices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alduan, F. A.; Roca, M.; Capdevila, C.

    1979-01-01

    In order to account for the variations In the shape of the excitation-volatilization' curves and the values of the line intensities of the different impurities determined in ammonium bifluoride, the behaviour of the added matrices (graphite, 63203, GeO 2 , MgO and ZnO) has been considered. With this aim the influence of the added matrices on the are discharge parameters (temperature and electronic concentration) and on the exhaustion rate of the electrode load as a function of the excitation time has been studied. On the other hand, the curve of variation of the line intensity of the metallic component of each matrix versus time has been obtained and the residues in the electrode cavity have been investigated by X-ray powder diffraction. (Author) 7 refs

  10. Spectrographic determination of impurities in amonium hydrogen fluoride samples. II. Study of the behaviour the added matrices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alduan, F.A.; Capdevila, C; Roca, M.

    1979-01-01

    In order to account for the variations in the shape of the excitation-volatilization curves and the values of the line intensities of the different impurities determined in ammonium bifluoride, the behaviour of the added matrices (graphite, Ga 2 O 3 , GeO 2 , MgO and ZnO) has been considered. With this aim the influence of the added matrices on the arc discharge parameters (temperature and electronic concentration) and on the exhaustation rate of the electrode load as a function of the excitation time has been studied. On the other hand, the curve of variation of the line intensity of the metallic component of each matrix versus time has been obtained and the residues in the electrode cavity have been investigated by X-ray powder diffraction. (author)

  11. Experimental Determination of Impurity and Interdiffusion Coefficients in Seven Ti and Zr Binary Systems Using Diffusion Multiples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhangqi; Liu, Zi-Kui; Zhao, Ji-Cheng

    2018-05-01

    Diffusion coefficients of seven binary systems (Ti-Mo, Ti-Nb, Ti-Ta, Ti-Zr, Zr-Mo, Zr-Nb, and Zr-Ta) at 1200 °C, 1000 °C, and 800 °C were experimentally determined using three Ti-Mo-Nb-Ta-Zr diffusion multiples. Electron probe microanalysis (EPMA) was performed to collect concentration profiles at the binary diffusion regions. Forward simulation analysis (FSA) was then applied to extract both impurity and interdiffusion coefficients in Ti-rich and Zr-rich part of the bcc phase. Excellent agreements between our results and most of the literature data validate the high-throughput approach combining FSA with diffusion multiples to obtain a large amount of systematic diffusion data, which will help establish the diffusion (mobility) databases for the design and development of biomedical and structural Ti alloys.

  12. Determination of residual acetone and acetone related impurities in drug product intermediates prepared as Spray Dried Dispersions (SDD) using gas chromatography with headspace autosampling (GCHS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quirk, Emma; Doggett, Adrian; Bretnall, Alison

    2014-08-05

    Spray Dried Dispersions (SDD) are uniform mixtures of a specific ratio of amorphous active pharmaceutical ingredient (API) and polymer prepared via a spray drying process. Volatile solvents are employed during spray drying to facilitate the formation of the SDD material. Following manufacture, analytical methodology is required to determine residual levels of the spray drying solvent and its associated impurities. Due to the high level of polymer in the SDD samples, direct liquid injection with Gas Chromatography (GC) is not a viable option for analysis. This work describes the development and validation of an analytical approach to determine residual levels of acetone and acetone related impurities, mesityl oxide (MO) and diacetone alcohol (DAA), in drug product intermediates prepared as SDDs using GC with headspace (HS) autosampling. The method development for these analytes presented a number of analytical challenges which had to be overcome before the levels of the volatiles of interest could be accurately quantified. GCHS could be used after two critical factors were implemented; (1) calculation and application of conversion factors to 'correct' for the reactions occurring between acetone, MO and DAA during generation of the headspace volume for analysis, and the addition of an equivalent amount of polymer into all reference solutions used for quantitation to ensure comparability between the headspace volumes generated for both samples and external standards. This work describes the method development and optimisation of the standard preparation, the headspace autosampler operating parameters and the chromatographic conditions, together with a summary of the validation of the methodology. The approach has been demonstrated to be robust and suitable to accurately determine levels of acetone, MO and DAA in SDD materials over the linear concentration range 0.008-0.4μL/mL, with minimum quantitation limits of 20ppm for acetone and MO, and 80ppm for DAA. Copyright

  13. Modification of working parameters for routine determination of trace elemental impurities in PuO2 samples by direct current arc-AES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pant, D.K.; Phadke, M.P.; Dapolikar, T.T.; Kapur, H.N.; Kumar, Rajendra; Dubey, K.

    2015-01-01

    In the present work we have altered the parameters of routine method to determine the trace elemental impurities in PuO 2 samples using DC arc source optically coupled with CCD based spectrometer system. The method is basically a fractional distillation technique using DC arc source, involving ignition, dilution of the sample with U 3 O 8 containing carrier mixture, arcing of the sample/standard mixture in DC arc and measurement of analyte signals by spectrometer system. In all fifteen elemental impurities including Boron and Cadmium were determined. Detection limits are comparable with ICP-AES method. (author)

  14. Determination of Impurities in Aluminum Alloy by INAA Single Comparator Method (K0-Standardization Method)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarheel, A.; Khamis, I.; Somel, N.

    2007-01-01

    Multielement determination by the k0 based INAA using k0-IAEA program has been performed at Syrian Atomic Energy Commission using alloys. Concentrations of Cu, Zn, Fe, Ni, Sn and Ti in addition to aluminum element were determined in an aluminum alloy and Ni, Cr, Mo were determined in dental alloys using INAA k0-standardization method. Al-0.1%Au, Ni and Zn certified reference materials were analyzed to assess the suitability and accuracy of the method. Elements were determined in reference materials and samples after short and long irradiations, according to element half-lives.

  15. Plutonium-241 processing: from impure oxide to high purity metal target disks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conner, W.V.; Baaso, D.L.

    1975-01-01

    The preparation of three plutonium-241 metal target disks, using a precision casting technique, is described. The disks were 0.625 inch in diameter and 0.125, 0.025, and 0.010 inch thick. All three disks were prepared simultaneously in a single casting. The variation in thickness of each disk was within +-1 percent of the disk's average thickness. The plutonium-241 was highly pure, and the finished disks contained a total of only 297 parts per million of detectable impurities. Purification of the plutonium oxide ( 241 PuO 2 ) and the conversion of the purified 241 PuO 2 to metal are also described. (U.S.)

  16. Chemometrics applications in biotechnology processes: predicting column integrity and impurity clearance during reuse of chromatography resin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rathore, Anurag S; Mittal, Shachi; Lute, Scott; Brorson, Kurt

    2012-01-01

    Separation media, in particular chromatography media, is typically one of the major contributors to the cost of goods for production of a biotechnology therapeutic. To be cost-effective, it is industry practice that media be reused over several cycles before being discarded. The traditional approach for estimating the number of cycles a particular media can be reused for involves performing laboratory scale experiments that monitor column performance and carryover. This dataset is then used to predict the number of cycles the media can be used at manufacturing scale (concurrent validation). Although, well accepted and widely practiced, there are challenges associated with extrapolating the laboratory scale data to manufacturing scale due to differences that may exist across scales. Factors that may be different include: level of impurities in the feed material, lot to lot variability in feedstock impurities, design of the column housing unit with respect to cleanability, and homogeneity of the column packing. In view of these challenges, there is a need for approaches that may be able to predict column underperformance at the manufacturing scale over the product lifecycle. In case such an underperformance is predicted, the operators can unpack and repack the chromatography column beforehand and thus avoid batch loss. Chemometrics offers one such solution. In this article, we present an application of chemometrics toward the analysis of a set of chromatography profiles with the intention of predicting the various events of column underperformance including the backpressure buildup and inefficient deoxyribonucleic acid clearance. Copyright © 2012 American Institute of Chemical Engineers (AIChE).

  17. On impurities transport in a tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rozhanskij, V.A.

    1980-01-01

    Transport of impurity ions is analitically analized in the case when main plasma is in plateau or banana regimes but impurity ions - in the Pfirsch-Schlutter mode. It is shown that in the large region of parameters the impUrity transport represents a drift in a p oloidal electric field, averaged from magnetic surface with provision for disturbance of concentration on it. Therefore, transport velocity does not depend on Z value and impurity type, as well as collision frequency both in the plateau and banana regimes. A value of flows is determined by the value of poloidal rotation velocity. At the rotation velocity corresponding to the electric field directed from the centre to periphery impurities are thrown out of a discharge, in the reverse case the flow is directed inside. Refusal from the assumption that Zsub(eff) > approximately 2, does not considerably change the results of work. The approach developed in the process of work can be applied to the case when impurity ions are in the plateau or banana modes

  18. Impurity production and transport at limiters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matthews, G.F.

    1989-01-01

    This paper concentrates on the description and evaluation of experiments on the DITE tokamak. These are designed to characterise the processes involved in the production and transport of neutral and ionised impurities near carbon limiters. The need for good diagnostics in the scrape-off layer is highlighted. Langmuir probes are used to provide input data for models of impurity production at limiters. Observations of the radial profiles of carbon and oxygen impurities are compared with the code predictions. Changeover experiments involving hydrogen and helium plasmas are used as a means for investigating the role of the atomic physics and chemistry. The impurity control limiter (ICL) experiment is described which shows how geometry plays an important role in determining the spatial distributions of the neutral and ionised carbon. New diagnostics are required to study the flux and charge state distribution of impurities in the boundary. Preliminary results from an in-situ plasma ion mass-spectrometer are presented. The role of oxygen and the importance of evaluating the wall sources of impurity are emphasised. (orig.)

  19. The analysis of impurities in the diuranate-determination of phosphate by phosphomolybdate blue spectrophotometric method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Haobo

    2014-01-01

    Phosphomolybdenum blue spectrophotometric method was used for determination of phosphate in the diuranate. Diuranate was dissolved in nitric acid solution, in which formed a soluble heteropolyacid complex (namely phosphomolybdenum yellow) due to interaction of phosphate and ammonium molybdate. Then phosphomolybdenum yellow was reduced to phosphomolybdenum blue with Bismuth nitrate as catalyst. Colour intensity at 700 nm is in proportion to the content of phosphate determined by spectrophotometric method. This experiment presents good linearity at the range of 30 μg to 245 μg phosphate, and the relative standard deviation of the experimental result is 2.4%, and the recovery rate is from 95% to 105%. The determination result of phosphate content will not be effected under conditions of 4 mg of SiO 2 , 6 mg of Fe, 400 mg of Cl - and 4.5 mg of Ge in the solution. (author)

  20. An evaluation of microwave-assisted fusion and microwave-assisted acid digestion methods for determining elemental impurities in carbon nanostructures using inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry

    KAUST Repository

    Patole, Shashikant P.

    2015-10-21

    It is common for as-prepared carbon nanotube (CNT) and graphene samples to contain remnants of the transition metals used to catalyze their growth; contamination may also leave other trace elemental impurities in the samples. Although a full quantification of impurities in as-prepared samples of carbon nanostructures is difficult, particularly when trace elements are intercalated or encapsulated within a protective layer of graphitic carbon, reliable information is essential for reasons such as quantifying the adulteration of physico-chemical properties of the materials and for evaluating environmental issues. Here, we introduce a microwave-based fusion method to degrade single- and double-walled CNTs and graphene nanoplatelets into a fusion flux thereby thoroughly leaching all metallic impurities. Subsequent dissolution of the fusion product in diluted hydrochloric and nitric acid allowed us to identify their trace elemental impurities using inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry. Comparisons of the results from the proposed microwave-assisted fusion method against those of a more classical microwave-assisted acid digestion approach suggest complementarity between the two that ultimately could lead to a more reliable and less costly determination of trace elemental impurities in carbon nanostructured materials. Graphical abstract A method for the complete digestion of carbon nanostructures has been demonstrated. Photographs (on the left side) show zirconium crucibles containing SWCNTs with flux of Na2CO3 and K2CO3, before and after microwave fusion; (on the right side) the appearance of the final solutions containing dissolved samples, from microwave-assisted fusion and microwave-assisted acid digestion. These solutions were used for determining the trace elemental impurities by ICP‒OES.

  1. Determination of metallic impurities in nuclearly pure uranium compounds by electrothermal spectrophotometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Franco, M.B.

    1986-01-01

    Atomic absorption spectrometry, with electrothermal atomization, has been used for the determination of Al, Cd, Cr, Fe, Mn and Ni in uranium oxide standards. The analysis were performed without sample dissolution and without uranium chemical separation. This technique is adequate for the qualification of nuclearly pure uranium, according to the standard specifications. (Author) [pt

  2. Determination of trace element impurities in aspirin tablets by neutron activation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iskander, F.Y.; Klein, D.E.; Bauer, T.L.

    1986-01-01

    Twenty-five trace and minor elements in five different Egyptian aspirin brands (Aspo, Askin, Aspocid, Aspeol and Rivo) were determined by instrumental neutron activation analysis. It was concluded that the concentration of As, Ba, Br, Co, Cr, Fe (except in Aspocid), Mg, Mn, Rb, Se, Sr and Zn in the Egyptian brands is below or within the concentration range reported for these elements in 16 American aspirin and aspirin-like brands. (author)

  3. Determination of tolerances of mirror displacement and radiator gas impurity for the CBM RICH detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adamczewski-Musch, J. [GSI Darmstadt (Germany); Becker, K.-H. [University Wuppertal (Germany); Belogurov, S. [ITEP Moscow (Russian Federation); Boldyreva, N. [PNPI Gatchina (Russian Federation); Chernogorov, A. [ITEP Moscow (Russian Federation); Deveaux, C. [University Gießen (Germany); Dobyrn, V. [PNPI Gatchina (Russian Federation); Dürr, M. [University Gießen (Germany); Eom, J. [Pusan National University (Korea, Republic of); Eschke, J. [GSI Darmstadt (Germany); Höhne, C. [University Gießen (Germany); Kampert, K.-H. [University Wuppertal (Germany); Kleipa, V. [GSI Darmstadt (Germany); Kochenda, L. [PNPI Gatchina (Russian Federation); Kolb, B. [GSI Darmstadt (Germany); Kopfer, J. [University Wuppertal (Germany); Kravtsov, P. [PNPI Gatchina (Russian Federation); Lebedev, S.; Lebedeva, E. [University Gießen (Germany); Leonova, E. [PNPI Gatchina (Russian Federation); and others

    2014-12-01

    The CBM experiment at the future FAIR facility will explore nuclear matter at high net-baryon densities. One of the key observables is di-leptons as they penetrate the created matter without further strong interactions. A gaseous RICH detector in a standard projective geometry using spherical mirrors is one of two detector elements for the required electron identification. The mirror system consists of about 72 trapezoidal mirror tiles. Any misalignment between the tiles relative to the nominal common spherical surface leads to reduction of the reconstruction efficiency of Cherenkov rings and deterioration of their resolution. To determine tolerances in mirror misalignment extensive simulation and measurement studies were carried out. Pure CO{sub 2} will be used as radiator gas. Gas contamination, mainly moisture and Oxygen, reduces the number of detected photons per ring and worsens the quality of reconstructed Cherenkov rings. Therefore a study was carried out to determine tolerances in radiator gas contamination. - Highlights: • Mirror misalignment leads to ring deformation in a RICH detector. • Radiator contamination leads to resolution deterioration of fitted rings. • To determine tolerances measurements and simulations were carried out. • Mirror displacements of up to 0.32 mm at any mirror side can be tolerated. • Oxygen (moisture) contamination of up to 1% (0.0011%) can be safely tolerated.

  4. A Simple and Direct LC-MS Method for Determination of Genotoxic Impurity Hydroxylamine in Pharmaceutical compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Thangarathinam; Ramya, Mohandass; Srinivasan, Viswanathan; Xavier, N

    2017-08-01

    Hydroxylamine is a known genotoxic impurity compound that needs to be controlled down to ppm level in pharmaceutical processes. It is difficult to detect using conventional analytical techniques due to its physio-chemical properties like lack of chromophore, low molecular weight, absence of carbon atom and high polarity. In addition to that, analysis of the pharmaceutical samples encounters considerable obstruction from matrix components that greatly overshadow the response of hydroxylamine. This study describes a simple, sensitive and direct Liquid Chromatographic-Mass Spectrometric method (LC-MS) for detection of hydroxylamine in pharmaceutical compounds. The LC-MS method was detected up to 0.008 ppm of hydroxylamine with S/N > 3.0 and quantified up to 0.025 ppm of hydroxylamine with S/N ratio >10.0. This validated method can be applied as a generic method to detect the hydroxylamine for pharmaceutical process control and drug substance release. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. Impurity gettering in semiconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sopori, Bhushan L.

    1995-01-01

    A process for impurity gettering in a semiconductor substrate or device such as a silicon substrate or device. The process comprises hydrogenating the substrate or device at the back side thereof with sufficient intensity and for a time period sufficient to produce a damaged back side. Thereafter, the substrate or device is illuminated with electromagnetic radiation at an intensity and for a time period sufficient to cause the impurities to diffuse to the back side and alloy with a metal there present to form a contact and capture the impurities. The impurity gettering process also can function to simultaneously passivate defects within the substrate or device, with the defects likewise diffusing to the back side for simultaneous passivation. Simultaneously, substantially all hydrogen-induced damage on the back side of the substrate or device is likewise annihilated. Also taught is an alternate process comprising thermal treatment after hydrogenation of the substrate or device at a temperature of from about 500.degree. C. to about 700.degree. C. for a time period sufficient to cause the impurities to diffuse to the damaged back side thereof for subsequent capture by an alloying metal.

  6. Impurities determination of uranium metal flame spectrophotometry and atomic absorption spectrophotometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rukihati.

    1978-01-01

    The atomic absorption flame spectrophotometry has been applied to the determination of chromium, copper, iron, lead, manganese and nickel in the metal of uranium. The first step to be done is to dissolve the uranium sample in nitric acid and then the uranium is extracted by a tributylphosphate-carbon tetrachloride solution. The aqueous phase which contains the chromium, copper, iron, lead, manganese and nickel is aspirated into an airacetylene flame. The results of this method are compared with the results of emission spectrographic method. It is found that this technique is competative to other methods in the sense that it is quite fast and accurate. (author)

  7. Localization of the antimony impurity atoms in the PbTe lattice determined by the Moessbauer emission spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masterov, V.F.; Nasredinov, F.S.; Nemov, S.A.; Seregin, P.P.; Troitskaya, N.N.; Bondarevskij, S.I.

    1997-01-01

    The 119 Sb ( 119m Sn) emission Moessbauer spectroscopy has shown that a localization of the antimony impurity atoms in the PbTe lattice is affected by the conductivity type of the host material, the antimony atoms occupied mainly anion and cation sites in n-type and p-type samples, respectively. The 119 Sn impurity in the anion sublattice of PbTe formed an decay. Its charge state was shown to be independent of the Fermi level position

  8. Determination of metallic impurities in raw materials for radioisotope production by atomic absorption spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roca, M.; Alvarez, F.; Capdevila, C.

    1969-01-01

    Atomic absorption spectrometry has been used for the determination of traces of calcium in scandium oxide, copper in zinc, iron in cobalt oxide, manganese In ferric oxide, nickel in copper and zinc in gallium oxide. The influences on the sensitivities arising from the hollow cathode currents, the gas pressures and the acid concentrations have been considered. A study of the interferences from the metallic matrices has also been performed, the interference due to the absorption of the manganese radiation by the atoms of iron being the most outstanding . In order to remove the interfering elements and increase sensitivity, pre-concentration methods have been tested. The addition methods has also been used. (Author) 14 refs

  9. Spectrographic determination of impurities in ceramic materials for nuclear fusion reactors. 1. Analysis of alumina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rucandio, M.I.; Roca, M.; Melon, A.

    1990-01-01

    The determination of minor and trace elements in the aluminium oxide considered as possible ceramic material in thermonuclear fusion reactors has been studied. The concentration ranges are 0.1-0.3 % for Ca, Si and Y, and at the ppm level for Co, Cr, Fe, Hf, K, Li, Mg, Mn, Na, Ni, Sc, Ta, Ti, V and Zr. Atomic emission spectroscopy with direct current arc excitation and photographic detection has been employed. For Hf, Mg, Ta, Ti, V and Zr the use of 40% of copper fluoride as a carrier and of Nb as internal standard provide suitable sensitivities and precissions, while for the rest of elements the best results are obtained with graphite powder in different proportions and Rb or Sn as internal standard. (Author). 7 refs

  10. Spectrographic Determination of Impurities in Ceramic Materials for Nuclear fusion Reactors. II. Analysis of Magnesium Aluminate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rucandio, M. I.; Roca, M.; Melon, A.

    1990-01-01

    The determination of minor and trace elements in the magnesium aluminate, considered as possible material in thermonuclear fusion reactors, has been studied. The concentration ranges are 0.1 - 0.3 % for Ca, SI and Y, and at the ppm level for Co, Cr, Fe, Hf, K, Li, Mn, Na, Ni, Se, Ta, Ti, V and Zr. Atomic emission spectroscopy with direct current are excitation and photographic detection has been employed. For Hf, Ta and Zr the use of 40% of copper fluoride as a carrier and of Nb as internal standard provide suitable sensitivities and precessions, while for the rest of elements the best results are obtained with graphite powder in different proportions and Rb or Sn as internal standard. (Author)4 refs

  11. Spectrographic determination of impurities in ceramic materials for nuclear fusion reactors. II. Analysis of magnesium aluminate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roca, M.; Rucandio, M.I.; Melon, A.

    1990-01-01

    The determination of minor and trace elements in the magnesium aluminate, considered as possible mataerial in thermonuclear fusion reactors, has been studied. The concentaration ranges are 0.1-0.3 % for Ca, Si and Y, and at the ppm level for Co, Cr, Fe, Hf, K, Li, Mn, Na, Ni, Sc, Ta, Ti, V and Zr. Atomic emission spectroscopy with direct current arc excitation and photographic detection has been employed. For Hf, Ta and Zr the use of 40% of copper fluoride as a carrier and of Nb as internal standard provide suitable sensitivities and precissions, while for the rest of elements the best results are obtained with graphite power in different proportions and Rb or Sn as internal standard. (Author). 4 refs

  12. Use of atomic absorption spectrometry to determine metallic impurities in coal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, M.J.S.F. da.

    1983-01-01

    The Brazilian Energetic Alternative Program expects the reduction of our dependence on foreign energy sources, by replacing fuel oil by mineral coal. Its gasification by means of nuclear energy must be also considered. However, the intensive burning of coal leads to serious environmental problems. During its combustion the release to atmosphere of toxic elements such as As, Hg, Pb, Zn and others is of great concern. Hence, it is important to have reliable analytical methods which can monitor inorganic constituents at various stages of coal production and utilization. The AAS is a suitable analytical technique to determine pollutants in coal because it is sensitive, simple, economic and cover a large range of concentration. The need of a previous treatment of sample is overcome by using an acid attack (HNO 3 + HClO 4 + HF) which has been proved to be rapid and efficient. (Author) [pt

  13. Determination of 17 impurity elements in nuclear quality uranium compounds by atomic absorption spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andonie, O.; Smith, L.A.; Cornejo, S.

    1985-01-01

    A method is described for the determination of 17 elements (Al, Ca, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, K, Li, Mg, Mn, Mo, Na, Ni, Pb, V and Zn) in the ppm level, in nuclearly pure uranium compounds by flame atomic absorption spectroscopy. The analysis is performed by first dissolving the uranium sample in nitric acid and then extracting the uranium with tributyl phosphate solution. The aqueous phase, free of uranium, which contains the elements to analyze is inspirated into the flame of an atomic absorption spectrophotometer using air-acetylene or nitrous oxide-acetylene flame according to the element in study. This method allows to extract the uranium selectively in more than 99.0% and the recovery of the elements sudied was larger 90% (for K) to 100% (for Cr). The sensitivity of the method vary from 0.096 μg/g U (for Cd) to 5.5 μg/g U (for Na). (Author)

  14. Spectrographic Determination of Impurities in Ceramic Materials for Nuclear Fusion Reactors. I. Analysis of Alumina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rucandio, M. I.; Roca, M.; Melon, A.

    1990-01-01

    The determination of minor and trace elements in the aluminium oxide considered as possible ceramic material in thermonuclear fusion reactors has been studied. The concentration ranges are 0.1 - 0.3 * for Ca, Si and Y, and at the ppm level for Co, Cr, Fe, Hf, K, Li, Mg, Mn, Na, Ni, Se, Ta, Ti, V and Zr. Atomic emission spectroscopy with direct current ore excitation and photographic detection has been employed. For Hf, Mg, Ta, Ti, V and Zr the use of 40% of copper fluoride as a carrier and of Nb as lnternal standard provide suitable sensitivities and precessions, while for the rest of elements the bent results are obtained with graphite powder in different proportions and Rb or Sn as internal standard. (Author) 7 refs

  15. The impurity transport in HT-6B tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang Rong; Xie Jikang; Li Linzhong; He Yexi; Wang Shuya; Deng Chuanbao; Li Guoxiang; Qiu Lijian

    1992-06-01

    The quasi-stationary profiles of the impurity ionization stages in HT-6B tokamak were determined by monitoring the VUV (vacuum ultraviolet) and visible line emissions from impurities. An impurity transport code was set up. The impurity transport coefficients and other parameters of impurities in that device were simulated and determined. From the measurement of impurity emission profiles and simulation analysis, it is concluded that the impurity confinement is improved and the impurity recycling is reduced by the slow magnetic compression. Some characteristics of impurity transport in that device are also discussed

  16. Determination of trace impurities in high-purity iron using salting-out of polyoxyethylene-type surfactants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsumiya, Hiroaki, E-mail: h-matsu@numse.nagoya-u.ac.jp [Department of Molecular Design and Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8603 (Japan); Sakane, Yuto; Hiraide, Masataka [Department of Molecular Design and Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8603 (Japan)

    2009-10-19

    To an iron sample solution was added polyoxyethylene-4-isononylphenoxy ether (PONPE, nonionic surfactant, average number of ethylene oxides 7.5) and the surfactant was aggregated by the addition of lithium chloride. The iron(III) matrix was collected into the condensed surfactant phase in >99.9% yields, leaving trace metals [e.g., Ti(IV), Cr(III), Mn(II), Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II), Zn(II), Cd(II), Pb(II), and Bi(III)] in the aqueous phase. After removing the surfactant phase by centrifugation, the remaining trace metals were concentrated onto an iminodiacetic acid-type chelating resin. The trace metals were desorbed with dilute nitric acid for the determination by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry or graphite-furnace atomic absorption spectrometry. The proposed separation method allowed the analysis of high-purity iron metals for trace impurities at low {mu}g g{sup -1} to ng g{sup -1} levels.

  17. Enantioseparation and impurity determination of the enantiomers of novel phenylethanolamine derivatives by high performance liquid chromatography on amylose stationary phase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Jing; Guan Jin; Pan Li; Jiang Kun; Cheng Maosheng; Li Famei

    2008-01-01

    Simple and efficient analytical HPLC methods using Chiralpak AS-H as chiral stationary phase were developed for direct enantioseparation of 11 novel phenylethanolamine derivatives. The chromatographic experiments were performed in normal phase mode with n-hexane-ethanol-triethylamine (TEA) as mobile phase. Excellent baseline enantioseparation was obtained for most of compounds. The effects of the concentration of organic modifiers and column temperature were studied for the enantiomeric separation. The mechanism of chiral recognition was discussed based on the relationship between the thermodynamic parameters and structures of compounds. It was found that the enantioseparations were all enthalpy driven, and the tert-butyl groups of compounds had significant influence on the chiral recognition. Trantinterol enantiomers were resolved (R s = 2.73) within 14 min using n-hexane-ethanol-TEA (98:2:0.1, v/v/v) as mobile phase with a flow rate of 0.8 mL min -1 at 30 deg. C. The optimized method was validated for linearity, precision, accuracy and stability in solution and proved to be robust. The limits of detection (LOD) and quantification (LOQ) for (+)-trantinterol were 0.15 and 0.46 μg mL -1 . The method was applied for enantiomeric impurity determination of (-)-trantinterol bulk samples

  18. Determination of trace impurities in high purity water by emission spectroscopy and flame photometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charbel, M.Y.; Lordello, A.R.

    1985-01-01

    A spectrochemical method for the determination of trace amounts of Fe, Mg, Mn, Sn, Cr, Bi, Ni, Ca, Na, Zn, Sr, Al, Ba and Cu in high purity water is described. In addition Na, Li and K are measured by flame photometry. The standards used in the spectrochemical method are prepared by evaporation in hot plate of 50 mL standard solution in Teflon becker to dryness, the residue being dissolved with 500 μL hot HCl (1:1). Four hundred μL of this solution is evaporated under infra-red lamp on Apiezon treated flat top graphite electrodes. The residue is submitted to a direct current arc excitation. The accuracy is estimated by the spectrochemical method with a direct procedure sample preparation. The relative standard deviation varies from +- 4% to +- 27%. For the elements Na, Li and K standard solutions are concentrated fiftyfold by a simple evaporation procedure and then measured by flame photometry. The standard deviation and accuracy are given. (Author) [pt

  19. Simultaneous HPLC Determination of Chlordiazepoxide and Mebeverine HCl in the Presence of Their Degradation Products and Impurities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rania N. El-Shaheny

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A simple, rapid, and sensitive RP-HPLC method was developed and validated for the simultaneous determination of chlordiazepoxide (CDO and mebeverine HCl (MBV in the presence of CDO impurity (2-amino-5-chlorobenzophenone, ACB and MBV degradation product (veratric acid, VER. Separation was achieved within 9 min on a BDS Hypersil phenyl column (4.5 mm × 250 mm, 5 µm particle size using a mobile phase consisting of acetonitrile: 0.1 M potassium dihydrogen phosphate: triethylamine (35 : 65 : 0.2, v/v/v in an isocratic mode at a flow rate of 1 mL/min. The pH of the mobile phase was adjusted to 4.5 with orthophosphoric acid and UV detection was set at 260 nm. A complete validation procedure was conducted. The proposed method exhibited excellent linearity over the concentration ranges of 1.0–100.0, 10.0–200.0, 2.0–40.0, and 2.0–40.0 µg/mL for CDO, MBV, VER, and ACB, respectively. The proposed method was applied for the simultaneous determination of CDO and MBV in their coformulated tablets with mean percentage recoveries of 99.75 ± 0.62 and 98.61 ± 0.38, respectively. The results of the proposed method were favorably compared with those of a comparison HPLC method using Student t-test and the variance ratio F-test. The chemical structure of MBV degradation product was ascertained by mass spectrometry and IR studies.

  20. Detecting determinism from point processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrzejak, Ralph G; Mormann, Florian; Kreuz, Thomas

    2014-12-01

    The detection of a nonrandom structure from experimental data can be crucial for the classification, understanding, and interpretation of the generating process. We here introduce a rank-based nonlinear predictability score to detect determinism from point process data. Thanks to its modular nature, this approach can be adapted to whatever signature in the data one considers indicative of deterministic structure. After validating our approach using point process signals from deterministic and stochastic model dynamics, we show an application to neuronal spike trains recorded in the brain of an epilepsy patient. While we illustrate our approach in the context of temporal point processes, it can be readily applied to spatial point processes as well.

  1. A rapid stability indicating LC-method for determination of praziquantel in presence of its pharmacopoeial impurities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hisham Hashem

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available This study reports for the first time about a stability indicating RP-HPLC method for quantitative determination of Praziquantel (PZQ in bulk powder and dosage form and in presence of its pharmacopoeial impurities. The chromatographic separation was carried out on (Caltrex AI® calixarene column, a relatively new packing material. Chromatography was done using an isocratic binary mobile phase consisting of ACN and 25 mM ammonium acetate (NH4Ac in the ratio of 40:60 at flow rate of 1 mL min−1, 30 °C and 210 nm wavelength for detection. The elution time of PZQ was found to be 6.15 ± 0.03 min. The method was validated for system suitability, linearity, precision, limits of detection and quantitation, specificity, stability and robustness. The robustness study was done for small changes in temperature, flow rate, wavelength of detection and % of ACN in mobile phase. Stability tests were done through exposure of the analyte solution to five different stress conditions: Reflux with 1 N HCl, reflux with 1 N NaOH, reflux with 30% H2O2, thermal degradation of powder and exposure to UV radiation. Limits of detection and quantification were found to be 0.56 and 1.70 μg mL−1, respectively. The recovery value of this method was 100.30% ± 1.10 and the reproducibility was within 1.31.

  2. Divertor experiment for impurity control in DIVA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagami, Masayuki

    1979-04-01

    Divertor actions of controlling the impurities and the transport of impurity ions in the plasma have been investigated in the DIVA device. Following are the results: (1) The radial transport of impurity ions is not described only by neoclassical theory, but it is strongly influenced by anomalous process. Radial diffusion of impurity ions across the whole minor radius is well described by a neoclassical diffusion superposed by the anomalous diffusion for protons. Due to this anomalous process, which spreads the radial density profile of impurity ions, 80 to 90% of the impurity flux in the plasma outer edge is shielded even in a nondiverted discharge. (2) The divertor reduces the impurity flux entering the main plasma by a factor of 2 to 4. The impurity ions shielded by the scrape-off plasma are rapidly guided into the burial chamber with a poloidal excursion time roughly equal to that of the scrape-off plasma. (3) The divertor reduces the impurity ion flux onto the main vacuum chamber by guiding the impurity ions diffusing from the main plasma into the burial chamber, thereby reducing the plasma-wall interaction caused by diffusing impurity ions at the main vacuum chamber. The impurity ions produced in the burial chamber may flow back to the main plasma through the scrape-off layer. However, roughly only 0.3% of the impurity flux into the scrape-off plasma in the burial chamber penetrates into the main plasma due to the impurity backflow. (4) A slight cooling of the scrape-off plasma with light-impurity injection effectively reduces the metal impurity production at the first wall by reducing the potential difference between the plasma and the wall, thereby reducing the accumulation of the metal impurity in the discharge. Radiation cooling by low-Z impurities in the plasma outer edge, which may become an important feature in future large tokamaks both with and without divertor, is numerically evaluated for carbon, oxygen and neon. (author)

  3. Impurities determination on nuclear fuel element components for the IEA-R1 research reactor by analytical methods based on ED-XRF and ICP-OES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reis, Edson Luis Tocaia dos; Scapin, Marcos; Cotrim, Marycel Elena Barboza; Salvador, Vera Lucia; Pires, Maria Aparecida Faustino

    2009-01-01

    The production of nuclear fuel used in the research reactor at Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP) requires a series of chemical and metallurgical processes. The quality of the end product depends on the control over all the stages of the manufacturing process and over the quality of raw materials employed. In fact, spectrometric methods are increasingly used as quantitative analytical techniques applicable to uranium compounds because of simultaneous determination of several elements with minimum amounts of sample. However, the main obstacle of uranium compounds analysis by spectrometric techniques such as optical emission spectrometry with inductively coupled plasma (ICP-OES) is the complex emission spectrum of uranium. The ICP-OES is not appropriately capable of determining the major elements of interest without initial chemical separation of uranium. In this sense, the use of X-ray fluorescence spectrometry (XRF) has been considered for quantitative determination of main elements with the advantage of not being destructive and not requiring a prior preparation of samples for analysis. Due to the simplicity of this technique, its applicability includes research and quality control in universities, research institutions, petrochemical industries, metallurgy, mining, etc. In this work, some components considered impurities in nuclear fuel element samples used in the IEA-R1 research reactor of IPEN/CNEN-SP were chemically characterized by ICP-OES analysis after chromatography extraction separation by using TBP/XAD-14 system and compared to results obtained by energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometry (EDXRF) and wavelength dispersive X-ray fluorescence (WDXRF). (author)

  4. Preparation of homogeneous reference materials for spectrometric determination of impurities in Zr-2.5% Nb alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nageswara Rao, A.; Radha Krishna, G.; Ravindra, H.R.; Gopalan, B.; Gopala Krishna, T.; Sanyal, T.

    2003-01-01

    For the purpose of standardising the analytical procedure, a set of three Zr-Nb alloy standards with varying trace level impurity concentrations have been prepared with the help of melt shop of Nuclear Fuel Complex, Hyderabad. Their homogeneity and elemental distribution have been ascertained using an optical emission direct reading spectrometer and optical microscope. (author)

  5. Spectrographic determination of metallic impurities in organic coolants for nuclear reactors; Determinacion espectrografica de impurezas metalicas en refrigerantes organicos para reactores nucleares

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin Munoz, M; Alvarez Gonzalez, F

    1969-07-01

    A spectrochemical method for determining metallic impurities in organic coolants for nuclear reactors is given. The organic matter in solid samples is eliminated by controlled distillation and dry ashing in the presence of magnesium oxide as carrier. Liquid, samples are vacuum distillated. The residue is analyzed by carrier distillation and by total burning techniques. The analytical results are discussed and compared with those obtained destroying the organic matter without carrier and using the copper spark technique. (Author) 12 refs.

  6. An evaluation of microwave-assisted fusion and microwave-assisted acid digestion methods for determining elemental impurities in carbon nanostructures using inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry

    KAUST Repository

    Patole, Shashikant P.; Simõ es, Filipa; Yapici, Tahir; Warsama, Bashir H.; Anjum, Dalaver H.; Da Costa, Pedro M. F. J.

    2015-01-01

    A method for the complete digestion of carbon nanostructures has been demonstrated. Photographs (on the left side) show zirconium crucibles containing SWCNTs with flux of Na2CO3 and K2CO3, before and after microwave fusion; (on the right side) the appearance of the final solutions containing dissolved samples, from microwave-assisted fusion and microwave-assisted acid digestion. These solutions were used for determining the trace elemental impurities by ICP‒OES.

  7. Determination of Degradation Products of Cyclobenzaprine Hydrochloride, Lidocaine and Piroxicam in a Semi-Topical Formulation: MS-MS Confirmation of Unknown Impurities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cioroiu, Bogdan Ionel; Grigoriu, Ioana Cezara; Cioroiu, Mona Elisabeta; Niculaua, Marius; Lupuleasa, Roxana; Lazar, Mihai Ioan

    2016-07-01

    Association of cyclobenzaprine hydrochloride, piroxicam and lidocaine in a topical formulation is one of the newest innovations in the pharmaceutical formulary field. In this study, a reversed-phase liquid chromatographic method was developed for the establishment of the impurities of cyclobenzaprine hydrochloride, lidocaine and piroxicam in the semisolid topical formulation. In this study, we not only determined 2,6-dimethylaniline, 2-pyrydilamine but also specified impurities of cyclobenzaprine hydrochloride (dibenzosuberenone, amitriptyline, carbinole, cyclobenzaprine N-oxide and anthrachinone). The target compounds were determined using a mobile phase that consisted of a mixture of phosphate buffer (0.025 M; pH 6.2)-acetonitrile-methanol (60 : 13 : 27, v/v/v). A minimum of three supplementary possible degradation products were determined. Using mass spectrometry, the unspecified impurities were identified and the use of correlation matrices permitted the association with the possible source compounds. The chromatographic conditions were qualified and validated according to ICH guideline requirements to confirm specificity, linearity, accuracy and precision. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. Depth Profile of Impurity Phase in Wide-Bandgap Cu(In1-x ,Ga x )Se2 Film Fabricated by Three-Stage Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shenghao; Nazuka, Takehiro; Hagiya, Hideki; Takabayashi, Yutaro; Ishizuka, Shogo; Shibata, Hajime; Niki, Shigeru; Islam, Muhammad M.; Akimoto, Katsuhiro; Sakurai, Takeaki

    2018-02-01

    For copper indium gallium selenide [Cu(In1-x ,Ga x )Se2, CIGS]-based solar cells, defect states or impurity phase always form due to both the multinary compositions of CIGS film and the difficulty of controlling the growth process, especially for high Ga concentration. To further improve device performance, it is important to understand such formation of impurity phase or defect states during fabrication. In the work presented herein, the formation mechanism of impurity phase Cu2-δ Se and its depth profile in CIGS film with high Ga content, in particular CuGaSe2 (i.e., CGS), were investigated by applying different growth conditions (i.e., normal three-stage process and two-cycle three-stage process). The results suggest that impurity phase Cu2-δ Se is distributed nonuniformly in the film because of lack of Ga diffusion. The formed Cu2-δ Se can be removed by etching the as-deposited CGS film with bromine-methanol solution, resulting in improved device performance.

  9. Spectrographic determination of impurities in ammonium bifluoride. III. Study of the processes of vaporization, transport and excitation of the elements Al, B, Cu and Cr; Determinacion espectrografico de impurezas en bifluoruro amonico. III. Estudio de los procesos de volatilizacion, transporte y excitacion de los elementos Al, B, Cu, Cr

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alduan, F A; Roca, M; Capdevila, C

    1979-07-01

    The influences of the processes of vaporization, transport and excitation on the shape of the volatilization-excitation curves and on the values of the spectral-line intensities have been investigated in a method for the spectrographic determination of Al, B, Cu and Cr In ammonium bifluoride samples by direct current are excitation in Scribner type electrodes, with addition of different matrices (graphite, 63203, GeO{sub 2}, MgO and Zn0). The reaction products in the electrode cavity have been identified by X-ray powder diffraction analysis and the percentages of vaporized and diffused element evaluated through analysis by total-burning spectrographic methods. In addition, the values of both the number of particles entering the discharge column and the transport efficiencies have been calculated. Thus, the origin of most observed differences has been explained. (Author) 11 refs.

  10. Neptunium determination in PUREX process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rawat, Neetika; Kar, Aishwarya S.; Tomar, B.S.; Pandey, M.P.; Umadevi, K.

    2016-10-01

    237 Np is one of the most important minor actinides present in nuclear spent fuel both from environmental and application point of view. The routing of neptunium to the particular stream of PUREX process is necessary for its separation and purification as 237 Np is the target nuclide for production of 238 Pu. The routing of neptunium to a particular PUREX stream will also help in better nuclear waste management, which in turn, will impart less bearing on the environment considering its long half life, alpha emitting properties and mobile nature. In order to route Neptunium to a particular stream of PUREX process, it is imperative to understand the distribution of neptunium in various process streams. Owing to high dose of actual samples, the neptunium distribution was studied using 239 Np tracer by simulating actual column conditions of PUREX streams in lab scale. The present study deals with neptunium determination in actual PUREX streams samples also. (author)

  11. Validation of an analytical methodology for the determination of diethylene glycol and ethylene glycol as impurities in glycerin and propylene glycol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosabal Cordovi, Ursula M; Fonseca Gola, Antonio; Cordovi Velazquez, Juan M; Morales Torres, Galina

    2014-01-01

    A methodology for the quantification of diethylene glycol (DEG) and the ethylene glycol (EG) impurities by gas Chromatography with flame ionization detector in glycerol and propylene glycol samples was developed and validated. It was selected dimethyl sulphoxide as internal standard. It was used hydrogen as carrier and auxiliary gas. The temperature program was 100°C holding one minute, then ramp to rate of 7.5°C/ min up to 200 °C. A Restek 624 column was used, with a flow in column of 4.20 ml/ min. Temperatures of the injector and detector were set at 220°C and 250 °C, respectively. The linearity was determined at 25-75 ?μg/ml as interval of concentrations for both impurities with correlation coefficients larger than 0.999. Detection Limits were settled down in 0.0350 μ?g/ml to the diethylene glycol, and 0.0572 μg/ml to ethylene glycol, while the quantitation limits were 0.1160 μ?g/ml to DEG and 0.1897 μg/ml to the EG. The recoveries were 99.98 % and 100.00 %, respectively; with RSD % 1.18 % to DEG, and 0.60 % to the EG. The obtained results demonstrated that the methodology was linear, accurate, robustness, sensitive and selective to be used in the determination of both impurities in the quality control of the glycerol and propylene glycol as raw materials

  12. Dynamical impurity problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Emery, V.J.; Kivelson, S.A.

    1993-01-01

    In the past few years there has been a resurgence of interest in dynamical impurity problems, as a result of developments in the theory of correlated electron systems. The general dynamical impurity problem is a set of conduction electrons interacting with an impurity which has internal degrees of freedom. The simplest and earliest example, the Kondo problem, has attracted interest since the mid-sixties not only because of its physical importance but also as an example of a model displaying logarithmic divergences order by order in perturbation theory. It provided one of the earliest applications of the renormalization group method, which is designed to deal with just such a situation. As we shall see, the antiferromagnetic Kondo model is controlled by a strong-coupling fixed point, and the essence of the renormalization group solution is to carry out the global renormalization numerically starting from the original (weak-coupling) Hamiltonian. In these lectures, we shall describe an alternative route in which we identify an exactly solvable model which renormalizes to the same fixed point as the original dynamical impurity problem. This approach is akin to determining the critical behavior at a second order phase transition point by solving any model in a given universality class

  13. Dynamical impurity problems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Emery, V.J. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Kivelson, S.A. [California Univ., Los Angeles, CA (United States). Dept. of Physics

    1993-12-31

    In the past few years there has been a resurgence of interest in dynamical impurity problems, as a result of developments in the theory of correlated electron systems. The general dynamical impurity problem is a set of conduction electrons interacting with an impurity which has internal degrees of freedom. The simplest and earliest example, the Kondo problem, has attracted interest since the mid-sixties not only because of its physical importance but also as an example of a model displaying logarithmic divergences order by order in perturbation theory. It provided one of the earliest applications of the renormalization group method, which is designed to deal with just such a situation. As we shall see, the antiferromagnetic Kondo model is controlled by a strong-coupling fixed point, and the essence of the renormalization group solution is to carry out the global renormalization numerically starting from the original (weak-coupling) Hamiltonian. In these lectures, we shall describe an alternative route in which we identify an exactly solvable model which renormalizes to the same fixed point as the original dynamical impurity problem. This approach is akin to determining the critical behavior at a second order phase transition point by solving any model in a given universality class.

  14. Computers in the investigation of the impurity content of high-purity materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Makarov, Yu.B.; Yan'kov, S.V.

    1987-01-01

    The efficiency of the concept of data banks for the accumulation and processing of information is now generally acknowledged. In scientific investigations not only bibliographic but also factual data banks are becoming more and more prevalent. In this article, the authors consider the possibilities of providing a data bank on high-purity materials for the study of impurity contents. Also in this paper, the authors distinguish the following groups of problems that arise in the study of impurity composition and presents examples of their proposed solutions to these problems: the analysis of error and the determination of the most probably value of impurity concentration; the estimation of average properties of impurity composition with respect to groups of impurities and samples, and the forecast of the complete impurity composition

  15. Using of dimensional analysis to determine the parameters of gravity separator table device to minimize impurities in bulk lentils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H Bagheri

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Lentil (Lens culinaris medic is an important and highly nutritious crop belonging to the family of legumes. Lentil is cultivated worldwide but competition with weeds is a problem affecting production and can reduce yield by more than 80%. The study on the separation of impurities in bulk lentils (Euphorbia helioscopia weed, Wild oat weed and etc. by a gravity separator has an extreme importance. Since no study has been done to date, in this study, the effects of different parameters of a gravity separator (longitudinal and latitudinal slopes, oscillation frequency and amplitude on the separation of foreign matters in lentil seeds were evaluated. A dimensionless number (v/aω which shows ration of air current velocity blown to lentil to the maximum velocity of table oscillation, was considered in ratio of separation. Materials and Methods In this research, lentil samples were taken from farms in Ardebil Province (Bileh-Savar cultivar. A gravity separator apparatus was also used for separating impurities from lentil seeds. A Laboratory Gravity Separator Type LA-K (Westrup A/S Denmark was used to separate impurities from bulk lentils. In this machine, table settings were as follows; longitudinal slope parameters (1°,1.5°, 1.75°, 2° and 2.5°, latitudinal slope (0.5°, 1°, and 1.5°, frequency of oscillation (380, 400, 420 and 450 cycles min-1, and amplitude of oscillation (5 and 7 mm, these settings were all adjustable. Similarly, the instrument had 5 boxes whereby, through proper adjustment, the heavier material was transferred toward the right side of the table and lighter material moved toward the left side. Through proper adjustment of the main parameters of the instrument, the impurities were separated from bulk lentils. Then using an electronic seed counter, five groups of seed which each group containing 100 seeds were counted and selected. Results and Discussion The results of variance analysis of the factorial design with

  16. Rapid determination of fluoride in uranyl nitrate solution obtained in conversion process of uranium tetrafluoride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levin, R.; Feldman, R.; Sahar, E.

    1976-01-01

    In uranium production the conversion of impure uranium tetrafluoride by sodium hydroxide was chosen as a current process. A rapid method for determination of fluoride in uranyl-nitrate solution was developed. The method includes precipitation of uranium as diuranate, separation by centrifugation, and subsequent determination of fluoride in supernate by titration with thorium nitrate. Fluoride can be measured over the range 0.15-2.5 gr/gr U, with accuracy of +-5%, within 15 minutes. (author)

  17. Effect of absorbing impurities on the accuracy of the optical method for the detection of the iodine-containing substances resulting from the processing of waste nuclear fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kireev, S. V.; Simanovsky, I. G.; Shnyrev, S. L.

    2010-12-01

    The study is aimed at an increase in the accuracy of the optical method for the detection of the iodine-containing substances in technological liquids resulting form the processing of the waste nuclear fuel. It is demonstrated that the accuracy can be increased owing to the measurements at various combinations of wavelengths depending on the concentrations of impurities that are contained in the sample under study and absorb in the spectral range used for the detection of the iodine-containing substances.

  18. Development and validation of impurity-profiling UPLC method for the determination of sodium cromoglicate and tetryzoline hydrochloride: Application on rabbit aqueous humor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lotfy, Hayam M; Saleh, Sarah S; Hassan, Nagiba Y; Salem, Hesham

    2015-12-01

    Sodium cromoglicate (SCG), antihistaminic agent, and tetryzoline hydrochloride (TZH), a sympathomimetic agent, are formulated together as an ophthalmic preparation. An ultra-performance liquid chromatographic method with UV detection (UPLC-UV) was developed and validated for the quantitative determination of SCG and TZH in rabbit aqueous humor. Due to the instability of both SCG and TZH under alkaline conditions, the UPLC method was applied for their determination in the presence of their possible degradation impurities. The separation was performed using C18 column (1.7μm particle size) and isocratic elution system with methanol: 1% o-phosphoric acid (65: 35, v/v).The optimum flow rate was 0.5ml/min and the detection was done at 230nm. The suggested method was validated in compliance with the ICH guidelines and was successfully applied for determination of sodium cromoglicate (SCG) and tetryzoline HCl (TZH) as prepared synthetically in laboratory mixtures, and in the presence of their alkali-induced degradation impurities. The suggested method was effectively applied the determination of spiked rabbit aqueous humor samples as well as commercial pharmaceutical formulation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Spectrophotometric determination of zinc in impure solutions; Determinacion Espectrofotometrica de Zinc en muestras de rio-Tinto prvia estracciond el Ditizonato con Tetracloruro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodriguez Hernandez, B.; Reyes Tamaral, A.

    1972-07-01

    A dithizone colorimetric method is described for determining zinc concentrations of 0.001 to 5 g/l in aqueous solutions from Rio Tinto Mines, containing copper, iron and other impurities. Citrate, cyanide and bis-(2hydroxyethyl)-dithiocarbamate are added to the aqueous sample of masking several metals, and zinc is extracted at pH 5 with a solution of dithizone in carbon tetrachloride. Excess of dithizone is removed with sodium sulphide, and optical density of zinc dithionate in organic solution is measured at 5.35 nm. Calibration curves obey Beer's law up to 0.5 micro Zn/ml. (Author) 5 refs.

  20. Spectrophotometric determination of zinc in impure solutions; Determinacion Espectrofotometrica de Zinc en muestras de rio-Tinto prvia estracciond el Ditizonato con Tetracloruro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodriguez Hernandez, B; Reyes Tamaral, A

    1972-07-01

    A dithizone colorimetric method is described for determining zinc concentrations of 0.001 to 5 g/l in aqueous solutions from Rio Tinto Mines, containing copper, iron and other impurities. Citrate, cyanide and bis-(2hydroxyethyl)-dithiocarbamate are added to the aqueous sample of masking several metals, and zinc is extracted at pH 5 with a solution of dithizone in carbon tetrachloride. Excess of dithizone is removed with sodium sulphide, and optical density of zinc dithionate in organic solution is measured at 5.35 nm. Calibration curves obey Beer's law up to 0.5 micro Zn/ml. (Author) 5 refs.

  1. Determination of 25 trace impurity elements in U3O8 by horizontal ICP-AES after separation with TBP levextrel resin chromatography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guan Jingsu; Shi Youqing; Gao Binghua; Liu Yingmei

    1988-01-01

    A method for the determination of Al, As, Ba, Be, Bi, Ca, Cd, Cu, Co, Cr, Fe, Mg, Mn, Mo, Ni, P, Pb, Ru, Sb, Sn, Sr, Ti, V, W and Zn 25 trace elements in U 3 O 8 is reported. The sample is dissolved in HNO 3 or HNO 3 -HCLO 4 -HF and the uranium is separated by TBP Levextrel resin chromatogyaphy. The impurity elements containing in the aquaous phase are determined by horizontal ICp-AES method. With a sample of 300 mg, the detection limit for all the 25 elements is in the range of 0.01∼5ppm, the recovery is in the range of 82∼ 121%, the determination precision (RSD) is less than ±13%. 18 trace elements in reference material of U 3 O 8 prepared in China are determined, the values obtained well with the values of overall median of accepted laboratory means

  2. Spectroscopic studies of carbon impurities in PISCES-A

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ra, Y.; Hirooka, Y.; Leung, W.K.; Conn, R.W.; Pospieszczyk, A.

    1989-08-01

    The graphite used for the limiter of the tokamak reactor produces carbon-containing molecular impurities as a result of the interactions with the edge plasma. The behavior of these molecular impurities has been studied using emission spectroscopy. The present study includes: finding molecular bands and atomic lines in the visible spectral range which can be used for the study of the molecular impurities, studying the breakup processes of the molecular impurities on their way from the source into the plasma, developing a spectroscopic diagnostic method for the absolute measurement of the molecular impurity flux resulting from graphite erosion. For these studies, carbon-containing molecules such as CH 4 , C 2 H 2 , C 2 H 4 , and CO 2 were injected into the tokamak-boundary,like plasma generated by PISCES-A. The spectrograms of these gases were taken. Many useful bands and lines were determined from the spectrograms. The breakup processes of these gases were studied by observing the spatial profiles of the emission of the molecules and their radicals for different plasma conditions. For the absolute measurement of the eroded molecular impurity flux, the photon efficiency of the lines and bands were found by measuring the absolute number of the emitted photons and injected gas molecules. The chemical sputtering yield of graphite by hydrogen plasma was spectroscopically measured using the previously obtained photon efficiencies. It showed good agreement with results obtained by weight loss measurements. 16 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab

  3. A New Platform for Profiling Degradation-Related Impurities Via Exploiting the Opportunities Offered by Ion-Selective Electrodes: Determination of Both Diatrizoate Sodium and Its Cytotoxic Degradation Product.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riad, Safaa M; Abd El-Rahman, Mohamed K; Fawaz, Esraa M; Shehata, Mostafa A

    2018-05-01

    Although the ultimate goal of administering active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs) is to save countless lives, the presence of impurities and/or degradation products in APIs or formulations may cause harmful physiological effects. Today, impurity profiling (i.e., the identity as well as the quantity of impurity in a pharmaceutical) is receiving critical attention from regulatory authorities. Despite the predominant use of spectroscopic and chromatographic methods over electrochemical methods for impurity profiling of APIs, this work investigates the opportunities offered by electroanalytical methods, particularly, ion-selective electrodes (ISEs), for profiling degradation-related impurities (DRIs) compared with conventional spectroscopic and chromatographic methods. For a meaningful comparison, diatrizoate sodium (DTA) was chosen as the anionic X-ray contrast agent based on its susceptibility to deacetylation into its cytotoxic and mutagenic degradation product, 3,5-diamino-2,4,6 triiodobenzoic acid (DTB). This cationic diamino compound can be also detected as an impurity in the final product because it is used as a synthetic precursor for the synthesis of DTA. In this study, four novel sensitive and selective sensors for the determination of both DTA and its cytotoxic degradation products are presented. Sensors I and II were developed for the determination of the anionic drug, DTA, and sensors III and IV were developed for the determination of the cationic cytotoxic impurity. The use of these novel sensors not only provides a stability-indicating method for the selective determination of DTA in the presence of its degradation product, but also permits DRI profiling. Moreover, a great advantage of these proposed ISE systems is their higher sensitivity for the quantification of DTB relative to other spectroscopic and chromatographic methods, so it can measure trace amounts of DTB impurities in DTA bulk powder and pharmaceutical formulation without a need for

  4. An inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometric (ICP-AES) determination of boron and other trace impurities in aluminium metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deshpande, S.S.; Patil, P.B.; Karanjikar, N.P.

    2002-01-01

    The optimisation and use of ICP-AES technique for the analysis of aluminium metal for B, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mg, Mn, Ni, Si, Ti, V and Zn in the concentration range 5.0 to 50.0 ppm is described. The method involves the dissolution of aluminium metal in acqua-regia. The matrix aluminium solution (2mg/ml) is mixed with composite impurity solution in proper proportions, for getting the required set of standards. JY 1 metre Czerny-Turner Scanning monochromator is used to measure peak intensities corresponding to each analyte wavelength selected. The mean relative standard deviation (RSD) of the method for various elements is found to be 4.0% -2.0% in the concentration range studied. (author)

  5. The Determining Finite Automata Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. S. Vinogradova

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The theory of formal languages widely uses finite state automata both in implementation of automata-based approach to programming, and in synthesis of logical control algorithms.To ensure unambiguous operation of the algorithms, the synthesized finite state automata must be deterministic. Within the approach to the synthesis of the mobile robot controls, for example, based on the theory of formal languages, there are problems concerning the construction of various finite automata, but such finite automata, as a rule, will not be deterministic. The algorithm of determinization can be applied to the finite automata, as specified, in various ways. The basic ideas of the algorithm of determinization can be most simply explained using the representations of a finite automaton in the form of a weighted directed graph.The paper deals with finite automata represented as weighted directed graphs, and discusses in detail the procedure for determining the finite automata represented in this way. Gives a detailed description of the algorithm for determining finite automata. A large number of examples illustrate a capability of the determinization algorithm.

  6. Processing Determinants of Reading Speed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Mark D.; McClelland, James L.

    1979-01-01

    Two groups of undergraduates differing in reading ability were tested on a number of reaction-time tasks designed to determine the speed of encoding visual information at several different levels, tests of sensory functions, verbal and quantitative reasoning ability, short-term auditory memory span, and ability to comprehend spoken text.…

  7. Defect-impurity interactions in irradiated germanium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cleland, J.W.; James, F.J.; Westbrook, R.D.

    1975-07-01

    Results of experiments are used to formulate a better model for the structures of lattice defects and defect-impurity complexes in irradiated n-type Ge. Single crystals were grown by the Czochralski process from P, As, or Sb-doped melts, and less than or equal to 10 15 to greater than or equal to 10 17 oxygen cm -3 was added to the furnace chamber after approximately 1 / 3 of the crystal had been solidified. Hall coefficient and resistivity measurements (at 77 0 K) were used to determine the initial donor concentration due to the dopant and clustered oxygen, and infrared absorption measurements (at 11.7 μ) were used to determine the dissociated oxygen concentration. Certain impurity and defect-impurity interactions were then investigated that occurred as a consequence of selected annealing, quenching, Li diffusion, and irradiation experiments at approximately 300 0 K with 60 Co photons, 1.5 to 2.0 MeV electrons, or thermal energy neutrons. Particular attention was given to determining the electrical role of the irradiation produced interstitial and vacancy, and to look for any evidence from electrical and optical measurements of vacancy--oxygen, lithium--oxygen, and lithium--vacancy interactions. (U.S.)

  8. Study of the composition of impurities in paraffins, which have been removed at different stages of the carbamide deparaffinization process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dorodnova, V.S.; Martirosov, R.A.; Martynenko, A.G.; Pereverzev, A.N.

    1980-01-01

    Results of the study on the composition of impurities in paraffin raw material, which has been removed from different stages of a deparaffinization unit are presented. It is shown that by using the method of chromatographic partitioning of paraffins during rinsing of the system basically monocyclic aromatics are removed, and the content of polycyclic aromatics and resins shows practically no change. A separation temperature of the system of 93-95/sup 0/ is recommended as optimum for existing G-64 commercial units. The content of residual paraffin in this case in the carbamide is about 1%.

  9. Impurity study of TMX using ultraviolet spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allen, S.L.; Strand, O.T.; Moos, H.W.; Fortner, R.J.; Nash, T.J.; Dietrich, D.D.

    1981-01-01

    An extreme ultraviolet (EUV) study of the emissions from intrinsic and injected impurities in TMX is presented. Two survey spectrographs were used to determine that the major impurities present were oxygen, nitrogen, carbon, and titanium. Three absolutely-calibrated monochromators were used to measure the time histories and radial profiles of these impurity emissions in the central cell and each plug. Two of these instruments were capable of obtaining radial profiles as a function of time in a single shot

  10. Determination of trace impurities in uranium-transition metal alloy fuels by ICP-MS using extended common analyte internal standardization (ECAIS) technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saha, Abhijit; Deb, S.B.; Nagar, B.K.; Saxena, M.K.

    2015-01-01

    An analytical methodology was developed for the determination of eight trace impurities viz, Al, B, Cd, Co, Cu, Mg, Mn and Ni in three different uranium-transition metal alloy fuels (U-Me; Me = Ti, Zr and Mo) employing inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). The well known common analyte internal standardization (CAIS) chemometric technique was modified and then employed to minimize and account for the matrix effect on analyte intensity. Standard addition of analytes to the pure synthetic U-Me sample solutions and subsequently their ≥ 94% recovery by the ICP-MS measurement validates the proposed methodology. One real sample of each of these alloys was analyzed by the developed analytical methodology and the %RSD observed was in the range of 5-8%. The method detection limits were found to be within 4-10 μg L -1 . (author)

  11. Interactions of structural defects with metallic impurities in multicrystalline silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McHugo, S.A.; Thompson, A.C.; Hieslmair, H.

    1997-01-01

    Multicrystalline silicon is one of the most promising materials for terrestrial solar cells. It is critical to getter impurities from the material as well as inhibit contamination during growth and processing. Standard processing steps such as, phosphorus in-diffusion for p-n junction formation and aluminum sintering for backside ohmic contact fabrication, intrinsically possess gettering capabilities. These processes have been shown to improve L n values in regions of multicrystalline silicon with low structural defect densities but not in highly dislocated regions. Recent Deep Level Transient Spectroscopy (DLTS) results indirectly reveal higher concentrations of iron in highly dislocated regions while further work suggests that the release of impurities from structural defects, such as dislocations, is the rate limiting step for gettering in multicrystalline silicon. The work presented here directly demonstrates the relationship between metal impurities, structural defects and solar cell performance in multicrystalline silicon. Edge-defined Film-fed Growth (EFG) multicrystalline silicon in the as-grown state and after full solar cell processing was used in this study. Standard solar cell processing steps were carried out at ASE Americas Inc. Metal impurity concentrations and distributions were determined by use of the x-ray fluorescence microprobe (beamline 10.3.1) at the Advanced Light Source, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. The sample was at atmosphere so only elements with Z greater than silicon could be detected, which includes all metal impurities of interest. Structural defect densities were determined by preferential etching and surface analysis using a Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) in secondary electron mode. Mapped areas were exactly relocated between the XRF and SEM to allow for direct comparison of impurity and structural defect distributions

  12. Method for detecting trace impurities in gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freund, S.M.; Maier, W.B. II; Holland, R.F.; Beattie, W.H.

    A technique for considerably improving the sensitivity and specificity of infrared spectrometry as applied to quantitative determination of trace impurities in various carrier or solvent gases is presented. A gas to be examined for impurities is liquefied and infrared absorption spectra of the liquid are obtained. Spectral simplification and number densities of impurities in the optical path are substantially higher than are obtainable in similar gas-phase analyses. Carbon dioxide impurity (approx. 2 ppM) present in commercial Xe and ppM levels of Freon 12 and vinyl chloride added to liquefied air are used to illustrate the method.

  13. Moessbauer Studies of Implanted Impurities in Solids

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    Moessbauer studies were performed on implanted radioactive impurities in semiconductors and metals. Radioactive isotopes (from the ISOLDE facility) decaying to a Moessbauer isotope were utilized to investigate electronic and vibrational properties of impurities and impurity-defect structures. This information is inferred from the measured impurity hyperfine interactions and Debye-Waller factor. In semiconductors isoelectronic, shallow and deep level impurities have been implanted. Complex impurity defects have been produced by the implantation process (correlated damage) or by recoil effects from the nuclear decay in both semiconductors and metals. Annealing mechanisms of the defects have been studied. \\\\ \\\\ In silicon amorphised implanted layers have been recrystallized epitaxially by rapid-thermal-annealing techniques yielding highly supersaturated, electrically-active donor concentrations. Their dissolution and migration mechanisms have been investigated in detail. The electronic configuration of Sb donors...

  14. Determination of the 121Te gamma emission probabilities associated with the production process of radiopharmaceutical NaI[123I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Araujo, M.T.F.; Lopes, R.T.; Poledna, R.; Delgado, J.U.; Almeida, M.C.M. de; Silva, R.L.

    2015-01-01

    The 123 I is widely used in radiodiagnostic procedures in nuclear medicine. According to Pharmacopoeia care should be taken during its production process, since radionuclidic impurities may be generated. The 121 Te is an impurity that arises during the 123 I production and determining their gamma emission probabilities (Pγ) is important in order to obtain more information about its decay. Activities were also obtained by absolute standardization using the sum-peak method and these values were compared to the efficiency curve method. (author)

  15. A pharmacology guided approach for setting limits on product-related impurities for bispecific antibody manufacturing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajan, Sharmila; Sonoda, Junichiro; Tully, Timothy; Williams, Ambrose J; Yang, Feng; Macchi, Frank; Hudson, Terry; Chen, Mark Z; Liu, Shannon; Valle, Nicole; Cowan, Kyra; Gelzleichter, Thomas

    2018-04-13

    bFKB1 is a humanized bispecific IgG1 antibody, created by conjoining an anti-Fibroblast Growth Factor Receptor 1 (FGFR1) half-antibody to an anti-Klothoβ (KLB) half-antibody, using the knobs-into-holes strategy. bFKB1 acts as a highly selective agonist for the FGFR1/KLB receptor complex and is intended to ameliorate obesity-associated metabolic defects by mimicking the activity of the hormone FGF21. An important aspect of the biologics product manufacturing process is to establish meaningful product specifications regarding the tolerable levels of impurities that copurify with the drug product. The aim of the current study was to determine acceptable levels of product-related impurities for bFKB1. To determine the tolerable levels of these impurities, we dosed obese mice with bFKB1 enriched with various levels of either HMW impurities or anti-FGFR1-related impurities, and measured biomarkers for KLB-independent FGFR1 signaling. Here, we show that product-related impurities of bFKB1, in particular, high molecular weight (HMW) impurities and anti-FGFR1-related impurities, when purposefully enriched, stimulate FGFR1 in a KLB-independent manner. By taking this approach, the tolerable levels of product-related impurities were successfully determined. Our study demonstrates a general pharmacology-guided approach to setting a product specification for a bispecific antibody whose homomultimer-related impurities could lead to undesired biological effects. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  16. Effects of deep impurities and structural defects in polycrystalline silicon for photovoltaic applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galluzzi, F.; Scafe, E.; Beghi, M.; Fossati, S.; Tincani, M.; Pizzini, S.

    1985-01-01

    An extensive experimental study of minority carrier recombination in CZ grown polycrystalline silicon intentionally doped with metallic impurities (Ti, V, Fe, Cr, Zr) is reported. Experimental values of average diffusion lengths have been compared with values calculated by a simple model of carrier recombination, taking into account the effects of impurities, grain boundaries and intragrain crystal defects. The results are fairly consistent and allow the determination of threshold densities for structural defects and deep impurities. The author's analysis gives a simple quantitative description of recombination processes in solar-grade silicon, as far as the average behaviour is concerned

  17. High-Temperature Electrical Insulation Behavior of Alumina Films Prepared at Room Temperature by Aerosol Deposition and Influence of Annealing Process and Powder Impurities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schubert, Michael; Leupold, Nico; Exner, Jörg; Kita, Jaroslaw; Moos, Ralf

    2018-04-01

    Alumina (Al2O3) is a widely used material for highly insulating films due to its very low electrical conductivity, even at high temperatures. Typically, alumina films have to be sintered far above 1200 °C, which precludes the coating of lower melting substrates. The aerosol deposition method (ADM), however, is a promising method to manufacture ceramic films at room temperature directly from the ceramic raw powder. In this work, alumina films were deposited by ADM on a three-electrode setup with guard ring and the electrical conductivity was measured between 400 and 900 °C by direct current measurements according to ASTM D257 or IEC 60093. The effects of film annealing and of zirconia impurities in the powder on the electrical conductivity were investigated. The conductivity values of the ADM films correlate well with literature data and can even be improved by annealing at 900 °C from 4.5 × 10-12 S/cm before annealing up to 5.6 × 10-13 S/cm after annealing (measured at 400 °C). The influence of zirconia impurities is very low as the conductivity is only slightly elevated. The ADM-processed films show a very good insulation behavior represented by an even lower electrical conductivity than conventional alumina substrates as they are commercially available for thick-film technology.

  18. Influence of impurities on the crystallization of dextrose monohydrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markande, Abhay; Nezzal, Amale; Fitzpatrick, John; Aerts, Luc; Redl, Andreas

    2012-08-01

    The effects of impurities on dextrose monohydrate crystallization were investigated. Crystal nucleation and growth kinetics in the presence of impurities were studied using an in-line focused beam reflectance monitoring (FBRM) technique and an in-line process refractometer. Experimental data were obtained from runs carried out at different impurity levels between 4 and 11 wt% in the high dextrose equivalent (DE) syrup. It was found that impurities have no significant influence on the solubility of dextrose in water. However, impurities have a clear influence on the nucleation and growth kinetics of dextrose monohydrate crystallization. Nucleation and growth rate were favored by low levels of impurities in the syrup.

  19. Determination and quantification of impurities found in samples of {sup 124}I using gamma spectrometry; Determinacao e quantificacao de impurezas encontradas em amostra de {sup 124}I usando a espectrometria gama

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Ronaldo Lins da; Delgado, Jose Ubiratan; Araujo, Miriam Taina Ferreira de; Laranjeira, Adilson da Silva; Poledna, Roberto; Veras, Eduardo de; Almeida, Maria Candida M. [Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria, (IRD/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Braghirolli, Ana Maria S. [Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear (IEN/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2014-07-01

    {sup 124}I, positron emitter is produced in the IEN/CNEN-RJ and used in diagnosis image of tumors. In this radioisotope production process impurities appear and health agency requires that the level of these characteristics is quantified. These radionuclides emit gamma and X-radiation, allowing the identification and quantitation by gamma spectrometry. With the use of HPGE detector, coupled with the efficiency curve, was identified {sup 125}I and {sup 126}I. The impurity levels measured in the sample were in the range of 0.5% to 90%, respectively, indicating the feasibility of the method for controlling the quality of the radiopharmaceutical.

  20. Standard test method for determination of impurities in nuclear grade uranium compounds by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2010-01-01

    1.1 This test method covers the determination of 67 elements in uranium dioxide samples and nuclear grade uranium compounds and solutions without matrix separation by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). The elements are listed in Table 1. These elements can also be determined in uranyl nitrate hexahydrate (UNH), uranium hexafluoride (UF6), triuranium octoxide (U3O8) and uranium trioxide (UO3) if these compounds are treated and converted to the same uranium concentration solution. 1.2 The elements boron, sodium, silicon, phosphorus, potassium, calcium and iron can be determined using different techniques. The analyst's instrumentation will determine which procedure is chosen for the analysis. 1.3 The test method for technetium-99 is given in Annex A1. 1.4 The values stated in SI units are to be regarded as standard. 1.5 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish ...

  1. Selective determination of dimenhydrinate in presence of six of its related substances and potential impurities using a direct GC/MS method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tarek S. Belal

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A novel simple, direct and selective gas chromatography–mass spectrometry (GC/MS procedure was developed for the determination of the antihistamine drug dimenhydrinate (DMH in presence of six of its related substances and potential impurities, namely, diphenylmethane, diphenylmethanol, benzophenone, orphenadrine, caffeine and 8-chlorocaffeine. The method involved resolution of the underivatized compounds using a trifluoropropylmethyl polysiloxane (Rtx-200 capillary column and the mass spectrometric detection was carried out in the electron-impact (EI mode. Excellent baseline separation of DMH and the cited related substances was achieved in less than 15 min. Quantification of the parent drug DMH was based on measuring its peak area. The reliability and analytical performance of the proposed method were validated with respect to linearity, range, precision, accuracy, specificity, robustness, detection and quantification limits. Calibration curve of DMH was linear over the range 50–500 μg/mL with determination coefficient (R2 = 0.9982. The proposed method was successfully applied for the assay of DMH in tablets dosage form with recoveries >96.80%.

  2. Simultaneous determination of some dihydroxybenzenesulphonic acid derivatives and their degradation product and main impurity (hydroquinone) by ion-pair liquid chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolba, M M

    2014-11-01

    A simple and sensitive high-performance liquid chromatography method was developed and validated for the determination of calcium dobesilate (DOB) or ethamsylate (ETM) in the presence of their degradation product, hydroquinone (HQ). The analyses were carried out on Promosil C18 column (4.6 mM × 250 mM, 5 µm particle size) using an ion-pair mobile phase consisting of methanol-1.5 mM tetra-butyl ammonium bromide in 0.06 M phosphate buffer (25 : 75, v/v) at pH 6.0 with fluorescence detection at 286/333 nm. Pindolol was used as an internal standard. The proposed method was found to be rectilinear over the concentration ranges of 0.05-0.5 µg/mL for DOB, 0.1-0.8 µg/mL for ETM and 0.005-0.1 µg/mL for HQ. The method was applied for the determination of the studied drugs in different dosage forms and biological fluids. The results of the proposed method were statistically compared with those obtained by the comparison methods revealing no significance differences in the performance of the methods regarding accuracy and precision. Moreover, applying a time-programmed fluorescence technique was valuable for the detection of trace amounts of HQ as an impurity and allowed purity testing of ETM or DOB within the BP pharmacopeial limit (0.1%). Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. Determination of the main impurities formed after acid hydrolysis of soybean extracts and the in vitro mutagenicity and genotoxicity studies of 5-ethoxymethyl-2-furfural.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemitz, Marina C; Picada, Jaqueline N; da Silva, Juliana; Garcia, Ana Letícia H; Papke, Débora K M; Grivicich, Ivana; Steppe, Martin; von Poser, Gilsane L; Teixeira, Helder F

    2016-09-10

    Soybean acid hydrolyzed extracts are raw-materials widely used for manufacturing of pharmaceuticals and cosmetics products due to their high content of isoflavone aglycones. In the present study, the main sugar degradation products 5-hydroxymethyl-2-furfural (HMF) and 5-ethoxymethyl-2-furfural (EMF) were quantitatively determined after acid hydrolysis of extracts from different soybean cultivars by a validated liquid chromatography method. The furanic compounds determined in samples cover the range of 0.16-0.21mg/mL and 0.22-0.33mg/mL for HMF and EMF, respectively. Complementarily, due to the scarce literature regarding the EMF toxicology, this study also assessed the EMF mutagenicity by the Salmonella/microsome test and genotoxicity by the comet assay. The results revealed that EMF did not show mutagenicity at the range of 50-5000μg/plate in S. typhimurium strains TA98, TA97a, TA100, TA102 and TA1535, but induced DNA damage in HepG2 cells at non-cytotoxic doses of 0.1-1.3mg/mL, mainly by oxidative stress mechanisms. Based on literature of HMF genotoxicity, and considering the EMF genotoxicity results herein shown, purification procedures to remove these impurities from extracts are recommended during healthcare products development to ensure the security of the products. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Validated high-performance anion-exchange chromatography with pulsed amperometric detection method for the determination of residual keratan sulfate and other glucosamine impurities in sodium chondroitin sulfate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bottelli, Susanna; Grillo, Gianluca; Barindelli, Edoardo; Nencioni, Alessandro; Di Maria, Alessandro; Fossati, Tiziano

    2017-07-07

    An efficient and sensitive analytical method based on high-performance anion exchange chromatography with pulsed amperometric detection (HPAEC-PAD) was devised for the determination of glucosamine (GlcN) in sodium chondroitin sulfate (CS). Glucosamine (GlcN) is intended as marker of residual keratan sulfate (KS) and other impurities generating glucosamine by acidic hydrolyzation. The latter brings CS and KS to their respective monomers. Since GlcN is present only in KS we developed a method that separates GlcN from GalN, the principal hydrolytic product of CS, and then we validated it in order to quantify GlcN. Method validation was performed by spiking CS raw material with known amounts of KS. Detection limit was 0.5% of KS in CS (corresponding to 0.1μg/ml), and the linear range was 0.5-5% of KS in CS (corresponding to 0.1-1μg/ml). The optimized analysis was carried out on an ICS-5000 system (Dionex, Sunnyvale, CA, USA) equipped with a Dionex Amino Trap guard column (3mm×30mm), Dionex CarboPac-PA20 (3mm×30mm) and a Dionex CarboPac-PA20 analytical column (3mm×150mm) using gradient elution at a 0.5ml/min flow rate. Regression equations revealed good linear relationship (R 2 =0.99, n=5) within the test ranges. Quality parameters, including precision and accuracy, were fully validated and found to be satisfactory. The fully validated HPAEC-PAD method was readily applied for the quantification of residual KS in CS in several raw materials and USP/EP reference substance. Results confirmed that the HPAEC-PAD method is more specific than the electrophoretic method for related substance reported in EP and provides sensitive determination of KS in acid-hydrolyzed CS samples, enabling the quantitation of KS and other impurities (generating glucosamine) in CS. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Peculiarities of the determination of shallow impurity concentrations in semiconductors from the analysis of exciton luminescence spectra

    CERN Document Server

    Glinchuk, K D

    2002-01-01

    An analysis was made of the applicability limits of the method for the determination of the content of shallow acceptors and donors in semiconductors from the ratio of the low-temperature (T = 1.8-4.2 K) luminescence intensities of exciton bands, in particular, induces by radiative annihilation of excitons bound to acceptors (donors) and free excitons. It is shown that correct data about the concentrations of shallow acceptors and donors as well as data on changes in their content as a result of various treatments may be obtained if the occupancy of the defects in question by holes and electrons does not depend on the excitation intensity or external treatments. A way to check the fulfillment of criteria for the method application is suggested. An example is given is given of the method application for determination of thermally stimulated changes in the concentration of shallow acceptors and donors in gallium arsenide

  6. Integrable quantum impurity models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eckle, H.P.

    1998-01-01

    By modifying some of the local L operators of the algebraic form of the Bethe Ansatz inhomogeneous one dimensional quantum lattice models can be constructed. This fact has recently attracted new attention, the inhomogeneities being interpreted as local impurities. The Hamiltonians of the so constructed one-dimensional quantum models have a nearest neighbour structure except in the vicinity of the local impurities which involve three-site interactions. The pertinent feature of these models is the absence of backscattering at the impurities: the impurities are transparent. (Copyright (1998) World Scientific Publishing Co. Pte. Ltd)

  7. Determination of oxygen content and carbonate impurity in YBa2Cu3O7-x by diffuse reflectance infrared spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merzbacher, C.I.; Bonner, B.P.

    1991-01-01

    Samples of YBa 2 Cu 3 O 7-x with x ranging from ∼0 to 0.65 have been analyzed by diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy (DRIFTS) in the midinfrared region (400--6000 cm -1 ). Spectral line shapes vary gradually as a function of oxygen stoichiometry, and the reflectance at 400 and 1000 cm -1 decreases linearly with decreasing oxygen content. Spectra of samples that were incompletely synthesized or exposed to a 4% CO 2 atmosphere at 650 degree C clearly indicated the presence of carbonate. DRIFTS is therefore a quick, nondestructive method for determining oxygen content in YBa 2 Cu 3 O 7-x powders, and for detecting carbonate species due to synthesis error or reaction with CO 2 -bearing atmosphere

  8. Determination of the impurities Al, Mn, Fe, Ni, Cu and Zn in nuclear grade uranium by ICP-OES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kakazu, Mauricio H.; Cotrim, Marycel E.B.; Silva, Douglas B. da; Pires, Maria Aparecida F., E-mail: mhkakazu@ipen.b [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    Uranium compounds are specially produced for use in nuclear reactors and must meet strict physical and chemicals specifications. The current study discusses the separation of Al, Mn, Fe, Ni, Cu and Zn from uranium compounds and their quantitative determination using inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry. To avoid interference effect caused by uranium in the spectroscopic emission lines of elements of interest, the chromatographic behavior of TBP impregnated macroporous Amberlite XAD-4 column was investigated. The break through curves of uranium obtained showed maximum retention of up to 11 grams of uranium and the elution curves for the elements showed reproducible recovery rate of 90% on 50 mL elution. Synthetic samples of nuclear grade uranium prepared with the addition of 250 {mu}g/g of U of the above individual elements were used to verify the performance of the method. The method showed a recovery rate of 80 to 90% for the elements under study. (author)

  9. Determination of the impurities Al, Mn, Fe, Ni, Cu and Zn in nuclear grade uranium by ICP-OES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kakazu, Mauricio H.; Cotrim, Marycel E.B.; Silva, Douglas B. da; Pires, Maria Aparecida F.

    2011-01-01

    Uranium compounds are specially produced for use in nuclear reactors and must meet strict physical and chemicals specifications. The current study discusses the separation of Al, Mn, Fe, Ni, Cu and Zn from uranium compounds and their quantitative determination using inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry. To avoid interference effect caused by uranium in the spectroscopic emission lines of elements of interest, the chromatographic behavior of TBP impregnated macroporous Amberlite XAD-4 column was investigated. The break through curves of uranium obtained showed maximum retention of up to 11 grams of uranium and the elution curves for the elements showed reproducible recovery rate of 90% on 50 mL elution. Synthetic samples of nuclear grade uranium prepared with the addition of 250 μg/g of U of the above individual elements were used to verify the performance of the method. The method showed a recovery rate of 80 to 90% for the elements under study. (author)

  10. Device for removing impurities from liquid metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naito, Kesahiro; Yokota, Norikatsu; Shimoyashiki, Shigehiro; Takahashi, Kazuo; Ishida, Tomio.

    1984-01-01

    Purpose: To attain highly reliable and efficient impurity removal by forming temperature distribution the impurity removing device thereby providing the function of corrosion product trap, nuclear fission product trap and cold trap under the conditions suitable to the impurity removing materials. Constitution: The impurity removing device comprises a container containing impurity removing fillers. The fillers comprise material for removing corrosion products, material for removing nuclear fission products and material for removing depositions from liquid sodium. The positions for the respective materials are determined such that the materials are placed under the temperature conditions easy to attain their function depending on the temperature distribution formed in the removing device, whereby appropriate temperature condition is set to each of the materials. (Yoshino, Y.)

  11. Determination of trace impurities of aluminium, cadmium, chromium, copper and nickel in indium phosphate by flameless atomic absorption spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chruscinska, T.J.

    1990-01-01

    The sample (0.25 g) was treated with a nitric (0.9 ml) + hydrochloric (0.25 ml) acid mixture, heated to syrup under glass and then dissolved with 5 mol · 1 -1 HNO 3 (1 ml). The traces were determined in 0.2 mol · 1 -1 HNO 3 using Perkin-Elmer Model 430 Atomic Absorption Spectrometer equipped with a HGA 76B Graphite Furnace and an AS-1 Auto Sampling System. Pyrolytically coated and then tantalum treated tubes was employed. Additive errors due to contamination with, and loss of, the analyte element were controlled by estimation of the blank value and recovery. Background was corrected throughout. The background correction system efficiency was checked for the continuum background by two line method and for structured background by decreasing the slit or choosing different analytical lines. No other multiplicative (influencing the slope of the analytical curve) matrix interferences were found except for cadmium. (author). 12 refs, 4 tabs, 3 figs

  12. Phonon-impurity relaxation and acoustic wave absorption in yttrium-aluminium garnet crystals with impurities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivanov, S.N.; Kotelyanskij, I.M.; Medved', V.V.

    1983-01-01

    The experimental results of investigations of the influence of substitution impurities in the yttrium-aluminium garnet lattice on absorption of high-frequency acoustic waves are presented. It is shown that the phonon-impurity relaxation processses affect at most the wave absorption and have resonance character when the acoustic wave interacts with the thermal phonon group in the vicinity of the perturbed part of the phonon spectrum caused by the impurity. The differences of time values between inelastic and elastic thermal phonons relaxations determined from the data on longitudinal and shear waves in pure and impurity garnet crystals are discussed

  13. Light impurity production in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Philipps, V.; Vietzke, E.; Erdweg, M.

    1989-01-01

    A review is given of the different erosion processes of carbon materials with special emphasis on conditions relevant to plasma surface interactions. New results on the chemical erosion and radiation enhanced sublimation of boron-carbon layers are presented. The chemical hydrocarbon formation produced by the interaction of the TEXTOR scrape-off plasma with a carbon target has been investigated up to temperatures of 1500K using a Sniffer probe. The chemical interaction of the plasma with the carbon walls in TEXTOR is also analysed by measuring the hydrocarbon and CO and CO 2 partial pressures built up on the surrounding walls during the discharges. The recycling of oxygen impurities in an all carbon surrounding occurs predominantly in the form of CO and Co 2 molecules and the analysis of both neutral pressures during the discharges has been used as an additional diagnostic for the oxygen impurity situation in TEXTOR. These data are discussed in view of spectroscopic measurements on the influx of carbon and oxygen atoms from the walls and impurity line radiation. CD-band spectroscopy in addition is employed to identify the hydrocarbon chemical carbon erosion. Our present understanding of the oxygen impurity recycling and the oxygen sources are described. Particle induced release of CO molecules from the entire first wall is believed to be the dominant influx process of oxygen in the SOL of plasmas with carbon facing materials. The influence of coating the TEXTOR first wall with a boron-carbon film (B/C ≅1) on the light impurity behaviour is shown. (author)

  14. Simultaneous determination of hydrochlorothiazide and benazepril hydrochloride or amiloride hydrochloride in presence of hydrochlorothiazide impurities: chlorothiazide and salamide by HPTLC method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naguib, Ibrahim A; Abdelaleem, Eglal A; Zaazaa, Hala E; Draz, Mohammed E

    2015-01-01

    Simple, selective and sensitive high-performance thin layer chromatographic (HPTLC) method has been developed and validated for the simultaneous determination of hydrochlorothiazide (HCZ) in the presence of its impurities (chlorothiazide (CT) and salamide (DSA)), in two quaternary mixtures with benazepril hydrochloride (BZ) or amiloride hydrochloride (AM). The separation was carried out on HPTLC silica gel 60 F254 using ethyl acetate-methanol-glacial acetic acid (85:2:0.3 v/v/v) followed by densitometric measurement of bands at 240 nm for the first mixture containing HCZ, CT, DSA, BZ and by using ethyl acetate-methanol-water-ammonia (90:10:5:3 v/v/v) followed by densitometric measurement at 278 nm for the second mixture containing HCZ, CT, DSA, AM. Calibration curves were constructed in the range of (0.2-1.8 µg/band) and (0.4-2.2 µg/band) with good accuracy for HCZ and BZ, respectively, for the first mixture and in the range of (0.6-1.8 µg/band) and (0.4-2.4 µg/band) with good accuracy for HCZ and AM, respectively, for the second mixture. The developed method was validated according to ICH guidelines and demonstrated good accuracy and precision. Moreover, the methods were successfully applied for the determination of HCZ and BZ and AM in pure form and pharmaceutical dosage forms. The results were statically compared with the reported methods with no significant difference, indicating the ability of the proposed method to be used for routine analysis of drug product. © The Author [2014]. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. Determining probabilities of geologic events and processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hunter, R.L.; Mann, C.J.; Cranwell, R.M.

    1985-01-01

    The Environmental Protection Agency has recently published a probabilistic standard for releases of high-level radioactive waste from a mined geologic repository. The standard sets limits for contaminant releases with more than one chance in 100 of occurring within 10,000 years, and less strict limits for releases of lower probability. The standard offers no methods for determining probabilities of geologic events and processes, and no consensus exists in the waste-management community on how to do this. Sandia National Laboratories is developing a general method for determining probabilities of a given set of geologic events and processes. In addition, we will develop a repeatable method for dealing with events and processes whose probability cannot be determined. 22 refs., 4 figs

  16. The determinants of the antibiotic resistance process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franco, Beatriz Espinosa; Altagracia Martínez, Marina; Sánchez Rodríguez, Martha A; Wertheimer, Albert I

    2009-01-01

    The use of antibiotic drugs triggers a complex interaction involving many biological, sociological, and psychological determinants. Resistance to antibiotics is a serious worldwide problem which is increasing and has implications for morbidity, mortality, and health care both in hospitals and in the community. To analyze current research on the determinants of antibiotic resistance and comprehensively review the main factors in the process of resistance in order to aid our understanding and assessment of this problem. We conducted a MedLine search using the key words "determinants", "antibiotic", and "antibiotic resistance" to identify publications between 1995 and 2007 on the determinants of antibiotic resistance. Publications that did not address the determinants of antibiotic resistance were excluded. The process and determinants of antibiotic resistance are described, beginning with the development of antibiotics, resistance and the mechanisms of resistance, sociocultural determinants of resistance, the consequences of antibiotic resistance, and alternative measures proposed to combat antibiotic resistance. Analysis of the published literature identified the main determinants of antibiotic resistance as irrational use of antibiotics in humans and animal species, insufficient patient education when antibiotics are prescribed, lack of guidelines for treatment and control of infections, lack of scientific information for physicians on the rational use of antibiotics, and lack of official government policy on the rational use of antibiotics in public and private hospitals.

  17. Impurities in radioactive solutions for gamma spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delgado, J.U.

    1990-01-01

    The absolute and relative methods for radioactive sources calibration, like 4 Πβ-γ and 4Πγ ionization chamber respectively, allows to reach 0,1% of exactiness in activity measurement, but cannot distinguish radioactive impurities that interfere in the activity. Then, one of the problems associated to a quality control of calibrated sources furnished to users is the identification and quantification of the impurities. In this work, a routine technical procedure, using the facilities of gamma spectrometry method that allows to identify and to determine the impurities relative contribution to the source main radionuclide activity, is described. (author) [pt

  18. Numerical analysis of impurity separation from waste salt by investigating the change of concentration at the interface during zone refining process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Ho-Gil; Shim, Moonsoo; Lee, Jong-Hyeon; Yi, Kyung-Woo

    2017-09-01

    The waste salt treatment process is required for the reuse of purified salts, and for the disposal of the fission products contained in waste salt during pyroprocessing. As an alternative to existing fission product separation methods, the horizontal zone refining process is used in this study for the purification of waste salt. In order to evaluate the purification ability of the process, three-dimensional simulation is conducted, considering heat transfer, melt flow, and mass transfer. Impurity distributions and decontamination factors are calculated as a function of the heater traverse rate, by applying a subroutine and the equilibrium segregation coefficient derived from the effective segregation coefficients. For multipass cases, 1d solutions and the effective segregation coefficient obtained from three-dimensional simulation are used. In the present study, the topic is not dealing with crystal growth, but the numerical technique used is nearly the same since the zone refining technique was just introduced in the treatment of waste salt from nuclear power industry because of its merit of simplicity and refining ability. So this study can show a new application of single crystal growth techniques to other fields, by taking advantage of the zone refining multipass possibility. The final goal is to achieve the same high degree of decontamination in the waste salt as in zone freezing (or reverse Bridgman) method.

  19. Process Approach to Determining Quality Inspection Deployment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-08

    27 B.1 The Deming Rule...k1/k2? [5] At this stage it is assumed that the manufacturing process is capable and that inspection is effective. The Deming rule is explained in...justify reducing inspectors. (See Appendix B for Deming rule discussion.) Three quantities must be determined: p, the probability of a nonconformity

  20. Development and Validation of a Precise, Single HPLC Method for the Determination of Tolperisone Impurities in API and Pharmaceutical Dosage Forms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raju, Thummala Veera Raghava; Seshadri, Raja Kumar; Arutla, Srinivas; Mohan, Tharlapu Satya Sankarsana Jagan; Rao, Ivaturi Mrutyunjaya; Nittala, Someswara Rao

    2013-01-01

    A novel, sensitive, stability-indicating HPLC method has been developed for the quantitative estimation of Tolperisone-related impurities in both bulk drugs and pharmaceutical dosage forms. Effective chromatographic separation was achieved on a C18 stationary phase with a simple mobile phase combination delivered in a simple gradient programme, and quantitation was by ultraviolet detection at 254 nm. The mobile phase consisted of a buffer and acetonitrile delivered at a flow rate 1.0 ml/min. The buffer consisted of 0.01 M potassium dihydrogen phosphate with the pH adjusted to 8.0 by using diethylamine. In the developed HPLC method, the resolution between Tolperisone and its four potential impurities was found to be greater than 2.0. Regression analysis showed an R value (correlation coefficient) of greater than 0.999 for the Tolperisone impurities. This method was capable of detecting all four impurities of Tolperisone at a level of 0.19 μg/mL with respect to the test concentration of 1000 μg/mL for a 10 µl injection volume. The tablets were subjected to the stress conditions of hydrolysis, oxidation, photolysis, and thermal degradation. Considerable degradation was found to occur in base hydrolysis, water hydrolysis, and oxidation. The stress samples were assayed against a qualified reference standard and the mass balance was found to be close to 100%. The established method was validated and found to be linear, accurate, precise, specific, robust, and rugged.

  1. Contribution to the spectrographic determination of impurities in uranium by the carrier distillation method; Nuevas aportaciones a la determinacion espectrografica de impurezas en materiales de uranio por el metodo de distilacion fraccionada con portador

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Capdevila, C

    1967-07-01

    The carrier distillation method for the determination of impurities in uranium has been modified in order to get a greater sensitivity. Electrodes 9.5 mm. diam. with a crater 7 mm. diam. and 10 mm. deep have been used, being the weigh of charge 300 mg.. The elements considered were: Al, As, B, Ca, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mg, Mn, Mo, Ni, P, Pb, Si, Sn, Ti and V, over the range 0.01 to 30 ppm. (Author) 13 refs.

  2. Investigation of correlations in some chemical impurities and isotope ratios for nuclear forensic purposes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wallenius, M.; Mayer, K.; Nicholl, A.; Horta, J.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: Institute for Transuranium Elements (ITU) has worked in the area of nuclear forensic science since 1992 when the first seized sample was analysed. From the beginning the analytical tools for seized materials were adapted from safeguards measurements and from materials science. Especially in the view of the origin determination the spectrum of parameters to be taken into account had to be widened. In addition to the development of a comprehensive database on nuclear materials for power reactor fuels, experimental investigations were started to identify characteristic parameters. These systematic investigations comprised the development of methodologies for age determination of Pu and highly enriched uranium, surface roughness determination of UO 2 pellets and n( 18 O)/n( 16 O) measurements in uranium oxides. However, a more profound understanding on the nature of the characteristic chemical impurities and their propagation throughout the entire process appeared necessary in particular for uranium materials. Therefore a systematic research programme was launched in order to better understand which chemical impurities might be considered as characteristic for the origin of the base material. On the other hand some impurities are introduced intentionally during the processing of the material. These impurities might be characteristic for the process used or for the plant where the material was processed. We carried out impurity measurements on uranium ores, on intermediate products (Ammoniumdiuranate or yellow cake) and on (natural) uranium oxides, hence 'vertically' throughout the process in individual facilities. n( 18 O)/n( 16 O) ratio measurements have been proven to provide useful additional information on the geographic origin of the materials. We therefore investigated the n( 18 O)/n( 16 O) isotope ratios in these different compounds, in order to obtain further experimental evidence for a consistent set of materials reportedly originating from the same

  3. The origin of metal impurities in DIVA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohasa, Kazumi; Sengoku, Seio; Maeda, Hikosuke; Ohtsuka, Hideo; Yamamoto, Shin

    1978-10-01

    The origin of metal impurities in DIVA (JFT-2a Tokamak) has been studied experimentally. Three processes of metal impurity release from the first wall were identified; i.e. ion sputtering, evaporation, and arcing. Among of these, ion sputtering is the predominant process in the quiet phase of the discharge, which is characterized by no spikes in the loop voltage and no localized heat flux concentrations on the first wall. ''Cones'' formation due to the sputtering is observed on the gold protection plate (guard limiter) exposed to about 10,000 discharges by scanning electron micrograph. In the SEM photographs, the spacial distribution of cones on the shell surface due to the ion sputtering coincides with the spacial distribution of intensity of Au-I line radiation. Gold is the dominant metal impurity in DIVA. The honeycomb structure can decrease release of the metal impurity. (author)

  4. The determinants of the antibiotic resistance process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatriz Espinosa Franco

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Beatriz Espinosa Franco1, Marina Altagracia Martínez2, Martha A Sánchez Rodríguez1, Albert I Wertheimer31Facultad de Estudios Superiores Zaragoza (UNAM, Mexico; 2Universidad Autónoma Metropolitana Unidad Xochimilco, Mexico; 3Temple University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USABackground: The use of antibiotic drugs triggers a complex interaction involving many biological, sociological, and psychological determinants. Resistance to antibiotics is a serious worldwide problem which is increasing and has implications for morbidity, mortality, and health care both in hospitals and in the community.Objectives: To analyze current research on the determinants of antibiotic resistance and comprehensively review the main factors in the process of resistance in order to aid our understanding and assessment of this problem.Methods: We conducted a MedLine search using the key words “determinants”, “antibiotic”, and “antibiotic resistance” to identify publications between 1995 and 2007 on the determinants of antibiotic resistance. Publications that did not address the determinants of antibiotic resistance were excluded.Results: The process and determinants of antibiotic resistance are described, beginning with the development of antibiotics, resistance and the mechanisms of resistance, sociocultural determinants of resistance, the consequences of antibiotic resistance, and alternative measures proposed to combat antibiotic resistance.Conclusions: Analysis of the published literature identified the main determinants of antibiotic resistance as irrational use of antibiotics in humans and animal species, insufficient patient education when antibiotics are prescribed, lack of guidelines for treatment and control of infections, lack of scientific information for physicians on the rational use of antibiotics, and lack of official government policy on the rational use of antibiotics in public and private hospitals.Keywords: antibiotic drug resistance

  5. Variational method for magnetic impurities in metals: impurity pairs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oles, A M [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Festkoerperforschung, Stuttgart (Germany, F.R.); Chao, K A [Linkoeping Univ. (Sweden). Dept. of Physics and Measurement Technology

    1980-01-01

    Applying a variational method to the generalized Wolff model, we have investigated the effect of impurity-impurity interaction on the formation of local moments in the ground state. The direct coupling between the impurities is found to be more important than the interaction between the impurities and the host conduction electrons, as far as the formation of local moments is concerned. Under certain conditions we also observe different valences on different impurities.

  6. Process and apparatus for determining molecular spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boesl, U.; Neusser, H.J.; Schlag, E.W.

    1984-01-01

    A process for determining molecular spectra in unseparated mixtures, in particular unseparated isotopic mixtures, which comprises allowing said mixture to successively flow through a photoreactor which is irradiated by an adjustable-wavelength laser and then through a mass spectrometer wherein the concentration of particles of specified mass is determined by variation of the wavelength of the laser or variation of the mass setting of the mass spectrometer in such a manner that a two-dimensional spectrum results having the parameters of wavelength and mass

  7. Features of accumulation of radiation defects in metal with impurity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iskakov, B.M.

    2002-01-01

    The processes of accumulation and annealing of radiation defects in solids are being studied for the last fifty years quite intensively. Many regularities of these processes are fixed, but there are more unsolved problems. The computer simulation is one of the effective tools in finding the mechanisms of accumulation and annealing of radiation defects in solids. The numerical solution of the system of the differential equations by means of computers describing kinetics of accumulation of radiation point defects in metals with impurity, has allowed to receive a number of new outcomes. It was revealed, that a determinative factor influential in concentration of point defects (vacancies and interstitial atoms), formed during an exposure of metal, is the correlation a speed of Frenkel twins recombination, the capture of defects by impurity atoms and absorption of defects by other drainage, for example by dislocations. If the speed of capture of interstitial atoms by impurity atoms for two - three order is lower than the recombination speed of Frenkel twins and on two - three order exceeds the speed of capture of vacancies by impurity atoms, the concentration of interstitial atoms within the first seconds of an exposure passes through a maximum, then quickly decreases in some times and after that starts slowly to grow. The change of concentration of interstitial atoms in an initial period of an exposure does not influence on the change of a vacancy concentration. Within the whole period of an exposure, during which the concentration of interstitial atoms achieves a maximum and then is reduced, the vacancy concentration is steadily enlarged. However subsequent sluggish rise of concentration of interstitial atoms during an exposure is followed by the decrease of the vacancy concentration. The most remarkable feature of the kinetics of accumulation of interstitial atoms in metals with impurity is the presence of two extremum on curve dependence of interstitial atoms on a

  8. Numerical studies of impurities in fusion plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hulse, R.A.

    1982-09-01

    The coupled partial differential equations used to describe the behavior of impurity ions in magnetically confined controlled fusion plasmas require numerical solution for cases of practical interest. Computer codes developed for impurity modeling at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory are used as examples of the types of codes employed for this purpose. These codes solve for the impurity ionization state densities and associated radiation rates using atomic physics appropriate for these low-density, high-temperature plasmas. The simpler codes solve local equations in zero spatial dimensions while more complex cases require codes which explicitly include transport of the impurity ions simultaneously with the atomic processes of ionization and recombination. Typical applications are discussed and computational results are presented for selected cases of interest

  9. An integrated quality by design and mixture-process variable approach in the development of a capillary electrophoresis method for the analysis of almotriptan and its impurities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orlandini, S; Pasquini, B; Stocchero, M; Pinzauti, S; Furlanetto, S

    2014-04-25

    The development of a capillary electrophoresis (CE) method for the assay of almotriptan (ALM) and its main impurities using an integrated Quality by Design and mixture-process variable (MPV) approach is described. A scouting phase was initially carried out by evaluating different CE operative modes, including the addition of pseudostationary phases and additives to the background electrolyte, in order to approach the analytical target profile. This step made it possible to select normal polarity microemulsion electrokinetic chromatography (MEEKC) as operative mode, which allowed a good selectivity to be achieved in a low analysis time. On the basis of a general Ishikawa diagram for MEEKC methods, a screening asymmetric matrix was applied in order to screen the effects of the process variables (PVs) voltage, temperature, buffer concentration and buffer pH, on critical quality attributes (CQAs), represented by critical separation values and analysis time. A response surface study was then carried out considering all the critical process parameters, including both the PVs and the mixture components (MCs) of the microemulsion (borate buffer, n-heptane as oil, sodium dodecyl sulphate/n-butanol as surfactant/cosurfactant). The values of PVs and MCs were simultaneously changed in a MPV study, making it possible to find significant interaction effects. The design space (DS) was defined as the multidimensional combination of PVs and MCs where the probability for the different considered CQAs to be acceptable was higher than a quality level π=90%. DS was identified by risk of failure maps, which were drawn on the basis of Monte-Carlo simulations, and verification points spanning the design space were tested. Robustness testing of the method, performed by a D-optimal design, and system suitability criteria allowed a control strategy to be designed. The optimized method was validated following ICH Guideline Q2(R1) and was applied to a real sample of ALM coated tablets

  10. Determination of the {sup 121}Te gamma emission probabilities associated with the production process of radiopharmaceutical NaI[{sup 123}I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Araujo, M.T.F.; Lopes, R.T., E-mail: maraujo@con.ufrj.br, E-mail: miriamtaina@hotmail.com [Coordenacao dos Cursos de Pos-Graduacao em Engenharia (LIN/PEN/COPPE/UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Programa de Engenharia Nuclear. Lab. de Instrumentacao Nuclear; Poledna, R.; Delgado, J.U.; Almeida, M.C.M. de; Silva, R.L. [Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria (IRD/CNEN-RJ/LNMRI), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Lab. Nacional de Metrologia das Radiacoes Ionizantes

    2015-07-01

    The {sup 123}I is widely used in radiodiagnostic procedures in nuclear medicine. According to Pharmacopoeia care should be taken during its production process, since radionuclidic impurities may be generated. The {sup 121}Te is an impurity that arises during the {sup 123}I production and determining their gamma emission probabilities (Pγ) is important in order to obtain more information about its decay. Activities were also obtained by absolute standardization using the sum-peak method and these values were compared to the efficiency curve method. (author)

  11. Gamma-ray impurities of {sup 111}In, {sup 201}Tl, {sup 177}Lu and {sup 99m}Tc determined by means of a HPGE spectrometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koskinas, Marina F.; Almeida, Jamille da Silveira; Moreira, Denise Simões; Semmler, Renato; Dias, Mauro da Silva, E-mail: koskinas@ipen.br, E-mail: jamillealmeida@gmail.com, E-mail: denise.moreira@ipen.br, E-mail: rsemmler@ipen.br, E-mail: msdias@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2017-11-01

    This work aims to present the radioactive impurities gamma rays emitters detected in some radiopharmaceuticals widely applied to diagnosis and therapy purposes, supplied to nuclear medicine services in Brazil by the Radiopharmaceutical Center(CR) of Nuclear and Energy Research Institute, IPEN, in São Paulo. The analysis was undertaken by means of an HPGe gamma spectrometer. The radiopharmaceuticals analyzed were: {sup 111}In, {sup 201}Tl, {sup 177}Lu and {sup 99m}Tc. (author)

  12. Determination of radionuclidic impurities in 99mTceluate from 99Mo/99mTc generator for quality control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hou, Xiaolin

    2017-01-01

    , 89Sr and 90Sr. Radioactive decay for removal of 99mTc, ion exchange and extraction chromatography for removal of 99Mo and 99Tc are effective for separation of interferences. Gamma spectrometry, LSC with alpha/beta discrimination, and Cherenkov counting using LSC are sensitive methods for measurement...... of the impurity radionuclides. The detection limits of this method are well meet the requirement of the quality control according to the limitation of the pharmacopoeia....

  13. Development and Validation of a Precise, Single HPLC Method for the Determination of Tolperisone Impurities in API and Pharmaceutical Dosage Forms

    OpenAIRE

    Raju, Thummala Veera Raghava; Seshadri, Raja Kumar; Arutla, Srinivas; Mohan, Tharlapu Satya Sankarsana Jagan; Rao, Ivaturi Mrutyunjaya; Nittala, Someswara Rao

    2012-01-01

    A novel, sensitive, stability-indicating HPLC method has been developed for the quantitative estimation of Tolperisone-related impurities in both bulk drugs and pharmaceutical dosage forms. Effective chromatographic separation was achieved on a C18 stationary phase with a simple mobile phase combination delivered in a simple gradient programme, and quantitation was by ultraviolet detection at 254 nm. The mobile phase consisted of a buffer and acetonitrile delivered at a flow rate 1.0 ml/min. ...

  14. Improved profile fitting and quantification of uncertainty in experimental measurements of impurity transport coefficients using Gaussian process regression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chilenski, M.A.; Greenwald, M.; Howard, N.T.; White, A.E.; Rice, J.E.; Walk, J.R.; Marzouk, Y.

    2015-01-01

    The need to fit smooth temperature and density profiles to discrete observations is ubiquitous in plasma physics, but the prevailing techniques for this have many shortcomings that cast doubt on the statistical validity of the results. This issue is amplified in the context of validation of gyrokinetic transport models (Holland et al 2009 Phys. Plasmas 16 052301), where the strong sensitivity of the code outputs to input gradients means that inadequacies in the profile fitting technique can easily lead to an incorrect assessment of the degree of agreement with experimental measurements. In order to rectify the shortcomings of standard approaches to profile fitting, we have applied Gaussian process regression (GPR), a powerful non-parametric regression technique, to analyse an Alcator C-Mod L-mode discharge used for past gyrokinetic validation work (Howard et al 2012 Nucl. Fusion 52 063002). We show that the GPR techniques can reproduce the previous results while delivering more statistically rigorous fits and uncertainty estimates for both the value and the gradient of plasma profiles with an improved level of automation. We also discuss how the use of GPR can allow for dramatic increases in the rate of convergence of uncertainty propagation for any code that takes experimental profiles as inputs. The new GPR techniques for profile fitting and uncertainty propagation are quite useful and general, and we describe the steps to implementation in detail in this paper. These techniques have the potential to substantially improve the quality of uncertainty estimates on profile fits and the rate of convergence of uncertainty propagation, making them of great interest for wider use in fusion experiments and modelling efforts. (paper)

  15. Radiation-chemical disinfection of dissolved impurities and environmental protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petrukhin, N.V.; Putilov, A.V.

    1986-01-01

    Radiation-chemical neutralization of dissolved toxic impurities formed in the production processes of different materials, while modern plants being in use, is considered. For the first time the processes of deep industrial waste detoxication and due to this peculiarities of practically thorough neutralization of dissolved toxic impurities are considered. Attention is paid to devices and economic factors of neutralization of dissolved toxic impurities. The role of radiation-chemical detoxication for environment protection is considered

  16. Determination of hydroxylamine in purex process solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ertel, D.; Weindel, P.

    1984-05-01

    In PUREX process solutions hydroxylamine or HAN (hydrolammonium nitrate) respectively, can be oxidized specifically to give nitrous acid, HNO 2 , which by sybsequent GRIESS reaction forms the well-known reddish azo-dye. Its absorbance is spectrophotometrically measured at 520 nm and results in linear calibration graphs covering the analytical range of 10 -5 to 10 -6 M NH 2 OH. The influence of other reductants (N 2 H 4 , Pu-III) as well as of further PUREX main constituents like U-VI, HNO 3 etc. was checked-up and determined quantitatively. There are no analytical limitations in case of HAN concentrations > 10 -2 M. (orig.) [de

  17. Impurity control in TFTR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cecchi, J.L.

    1980-06-01

    The control of impurities in TFTR will be a particularly difficult problem due to the large energy and particle fluxes expected in the device. As part of the TFTR Flexibility Modification (TEM) project, a program has been implemented to address this problem. Transport code simulations are used to infer an impurity limit criterion as a function of the impurity atomic number. The configurational designs of the limiters and associated protective plates are discussed along with the consideration of thermal and mechanical loads due to normal plasma operation, neutral beams, and plasma disruptions. A summary is given of the materials-related research, which has been a collaborative effort involving groups at Argonne National Laboratory, Sandia Laboratories, and Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory. Conceptual designs are shown for getterng systems capable of regenerating absorbed tritium. Research on this topic by groups at the previously mentioned laboratories and SAES Research Laboratory is reviewed

  18. CALCULATIONS OF DOUBLE IMPURITY DIFFUSION IN INTEGRATED CIRCUIT PRODUCTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. A. Bondarev

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Analytical formulae for calculating simultaneous diffusion of two impurities in silicon are presented. The formulae are based on analytical solutions of diffusion equations that have been obtained for the first time by the author while using some special mathematical functions. In contrast to usual formal mathematical approaches, new functions are determined in the process of investigation of real physical models. Algorithms involve some important relations from thermodynamics of irreversible processes and also variational thermodynamic functionals that were previously obtained by the author for transfer processes. Calculations considerably reduce the time required for development of new integrated circuits. 

  19. Incorporation, diffusion and segregation of impurities in polycrystalline silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deville, J.P.; Soltani, M.L. (Universite Louis Pasteur, 67 - Strasbourg (France)); Quesada, J. (Laboratoire de Metallurgie-Chimie des Materiaux, E.N.S.A.I.S., 67 - Strasbourg (France))

    1982-01-01

    We studied by means of X-Ray photoelectron Spectroscopy the nature, distribution and, when possible, the chemical bond of impurities at the surface of polycrystalline silicon samples grown on a carbon ribbon. Besides main impurities (carbon and oxygen), always present at concentrations around their limit of solubility in silicon, metal impurities have been found: their nature varies from one sample to another. Their spatial distribution is not random: some are strictly confined at the surface (sodium), whereas others are in the superficial oxidized layer (calcium, magnesium) or localized at the oxide-bulk silicon interface (iron). Metal impurities are coming from the carbon ribbon and are incorporated to silicon during the growth process. It is not yet possible to give a model of diffusion processes of impurities since they are too numerous and interact one with the other. However oxygen seems to play a leading role in the spatial distribution of metal impurities.

  20. Relation between hyperfine field and lattice location measurements for heavy impurities in iron: influence of radiation damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thome, L.; Bernas, H.; Cohen, C.

    1978-01-01

    The relation between the hyperfine interaction (HFI) and the lattice location of heavy impurities in iron is discussed in the light of results (see companion papers) on 169 Yb, 175 Yb and Au in Fe. A compilation of all known results in Fe and Cu reveals a simple correlation between the difference in atomic radii of implanted and host atoms and the corrected extinction ratio in lattice location experiments. A simple model is developed to account simultaneously for the annealing -and implantation- temperature dependence of the impurity HFI and lattice location in Fe between room temperature and 800K. It is based on existing information concerning the nature and evolution of radiation damage in Fe: impurity evolution is described in terms of a two-stage process involving (i) vacancy migration towards the impurity and (ii) migration of the impurity-vacancy complex, with the latter stage being much faster than the former. Quantitative agreement is found with our experimental results, as well as with results obtained on other impurities in Fe. It is suggested that the model is applicable in all cases where vacancy motion determines impurity evolution

  1. Glycolic acid physical properties and impurities assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lambert, D. P. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Pickenheim, B. R. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Bibler, N. E. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Hay, M. S. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-06-08

    This document has been revised due to recent information that the glycolic acid used in Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) experiments contains both formaldehyde and methoxyacetic acid. These impurities were in the glycolic acid used in the testing included in this report and in subsequent testing using DuPont (now called Chemours) supplied Technical Grade 70 wt% glycolic acid. However, these impurities were not reported in earlier revisions. Additional data concerning the properties of glycolic acid have also been added to this report. The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) is planning to implement a nitric-glycolic acid flowsheets to increase attainment to meet closure commitment dates during Sludge Batch 9. In fiscal year 2009, SRNL was requested to determine the physical properties of formic and glycolic acid blends. Blends of formic acid in glycolic acid were prepared and their physical properties tested. Increasing amounts of glycolic acid led to increases in blend density, viscosity and surface tension as compared to the 90 wt% formic acid that is currently used at DWPF. These increases are small, however, and are not expected to present any difficulties in terms of processing. The effect of sulfur impurities in Technical Grade glycolic acid was studied for its impact on DWPF glass quality. While the glycolic acid specification allows for more sulfate than the current formic acid specification, the ultimate impact is expected to be on the order of 0.033 wt% sulfur in glass. Note that lower sulfur content glycolic acid could likely be procured at some increased cost if deemed necessary. A paper study on the effects of radiation on glycolic acid was performed. The analysis indicates that substitution of glycolic acid for formic acid would not increase the radiolytic production rate of H2 and cause an adverse effect in the Slurry Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) or Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) process. It has been cited that glycolic acid

  2. Impurity screening of scrape-off plasma in a tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kishimoto, Hiroshi; Tani, Keiji; Nakamura, Hiroo

    1981-11-01

    Impurity screening effect of a scrape-off layer has been studied in a tokamak, based on a simple model of wall-released impurity behavior. Wall-sputtered impurities are stopped effectively by the scrape-off plasma for a medium-Z or high-Z wall system while major part of impurities enters the main plasma in a low-Z wall system. The screening becomes inefficient with increase of scrape-off plasma temperature. Successive multiplication of recycling impurities in the scrape-off layer is large for a high-Z wall and is enhanced by a rise of scrape-off plasma temperature. The stability of plasma-wall interaction is determined by a multiplication factor of recycling impurities. (author)

  3. Impurity solitons with quadratic nonlinearities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Carl A. Balslev; Torres, Juan P-; Torner, Lluis

    1998-01-01

    We fmd families of solitary waves mediated by parametric mixing in quadratic nonlinear media that are localized at point-defect impurities. Solitons localized at attractive impurities are found to be dynamically stable. It is shown that localization at the impurity modifies strongly the soliton...

  4. Synthesis and Structural Determination of Temocapril Sulfoxide Hydrochlorides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seong, Seok Bong; Moon, Jong Taik; Kim, Jung Ahn; Choo, Dong Joon; Lee, Jae Yeol

    2012-01-01

    Impurity (or related substance) control in pharmaceutical products is a primary goal of drug development. Stringent international regulatory requirements have been in place for several years as outlined in the International Conference on Harmonization (ICH) Guidelines Q3A (R), Q3B (R) and Q3C. According to ICH guidelines, impurities associated with the manufacture of a drug substance, also known as an active pharmaceutical ingredient (API), are classified into the following categories: (1) organic impurities (process and drug-related); (2) inorganic impurities (3) residual solvents. Many potential impurities result from the API manufacturing process including starting materials, isomers, intermediates, reagents, solvents, catalysts and reaction by-products. These potential impurities should be investigated to determine process control mechanisms for their removal and the need for specification controls at appropriate points in the process. The suggested structures of the impurities can be synthesized and will provide the final evidence for their structures, previously determined by spectroscopic methods. Therefore it is essential to know the structure of these impurities in the bulk drug in order to alter the reaction condition and to reduce the quantity of impurity to an acceptable level. Isolation, identification and quantification of impurities help the pharmaceutical company to obtain a pure substance with less toxicity and safety in drug therapy

  5. Magnetic states of single impurity in disordered environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G.W. Ponedilok

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The charged and magnetic states of isolated impurities dissolved in amorphous metallic alloy are investigated. The Hamiltonian of the system under study is the generalization of Anderson impurity model. Namely, the processes of elastic and non-elastic scattering of conductive electrons on the ions of a metal and on a charged impurity are included. The configuration averaged one-particle Green's functions are obtained within Hartree-Fock approximation. A system of self-consistent equations is given for calculation of an electronic spectrum, the charged and the spin-polarized impurity states. Qualitative analysis of the effect of the metallic host structural disorder on the observed values is performed. Additional shift and broadening of virtual impurity level is caused by a structural disorder of impurity environment.

  6. UPLC and LC-MS studies on degradation behavior of irinotecan hydrochloride and development of a validated stability-indicating ultra-performance liquid chromatographic method for determination of irinotecan hydrochloride and its impurities in pharmaceutical dosage forms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Navneet; Sangeetha, Dhanaraj; Reddy, Sunil P

    2012-10-01

    The objective of the current investigation was to study the degradation behavior of irinotecan hydrochloride under different International Conference on Harmonization (ICH) recommended stress conditions using ultra-performance liquid chromatography and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry and to establish a validated stability-indicating reverse-phase ultra-performance liquid chromatographic method for the quantitative determination of irinotecan hydrochloride and its seven impurities and degradation products in pharmaceutical dosage forms. Irinotecan hydrochloride was subjected to the stress conditions of oxidative, acid, base, hydrolytic, thermal and photolytic degradation. Irinotecan hydrochloride was found to degrade significantly in oxidative and base hydrolysis and photolytic degradation conditions. The degradation products were well resolved from the main peak and its impurities, thus proving the stability-indicating power of the method. Chromatographic separation was achieved on a Waters Acquity BEH C8 (100 × 2.1 mm) 1.7-µm column with a mobile phase containing a gradient mixture of solvent A (0.02M KH(2)PO(4) buffer, pH 3.4) and solvent B (a mixture of acetonitrile and methanol in the ratio of 62:38 v/v). The mobile phase was delivered at a flow rate of 0.3 mL/min with ultraviolet detection at 220 nm. The run time was 8 min, within which irinotecan and its seven impurities and degradation products were satisfactorily separated. The developed method was validated as per ICH guidelines with respect to specificity, linearity, limit of detection, limit of quantification, accuracy, precision and robustness. This method was also suitable for the assay determination of irinotecan hydrochloride in pharmaceutical dosage forms.

  7. Fractal growth in impurity-controlled solidification in lipid monolayers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fogedby, Hans C.; Sørensen, Erik Schwartz; Mouritsen, Ole G.

    1987-01-01

    A simple two-dimensional microscopic model is proposed to describe solidifcation processes in systems with impurities which are miscible only in the fluid phase. Computer simulation of the model shows that the resulting solids are fractal over a wide range of impurity concentrations and impurity...... diffusional constants. A fractal-forming mechanism is suggested for impurity-controlled solidification which is consistent with recent experimental observations of fractal growth of solid phospholipid domains in monolayers. The Journal of Chemical Physics is copyrighted by The American Institute of Physics....

  8. Linear support vector regression and partial least squares chemometric models for determination of Hydrochlorothiazide and Benazepril hydrochloride in presence of related impurities: A comparative study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naguib, Ibrahim A.; Abdelaleem, Eglal A.; Draz, Mohammed E.; Zaazaa, Hala E.

    2014-09-01

    Partial least squares regression (PLSR) and support vector regression (SVR) are two popular chemometric models that are being subjected to a comparative study in the presented work. The comparison shows their characteristics via applying them to analyze Hydrochlorothiazide (HCZ) and Benazepril hydrochloride (BZ) in presence of HCZ impurities; Chlorothiazide (CT) and Salamide (DSA) as a case study. The analysis results prove to be valid for analysis of the two active ingredients in raw materials and pharmaceutical dosage form through handling UV spectral data in range (220-350 nm). For proper analysis a 4 factor 4 level experimental design was established resulting in a training set consisting of 16 mixtures containing different ratios of interfering species. An independent test set consisting of 8 mixtures was used to validate the prediction ability of the suggested models. The results presented indicate the ability of mentioned multivariate calibration models to analyze HCZ and BZ in presence of HCZ impurities CT and DSA with high selectivity and accuracy of mean percentage recoveries of (101.01 ± 0.80) and (100.01 ± 0.87) for HCZ and BZ respectively using PLSR model and of (99.78 ± 0.80) and (99.85 ± 1.08) for HCZ and BZ respectively using SVR model. The analysis results of the dosage form were statistically compared to the reference HPLC method with no significant differences regarding accuracy and precision. SVR model gives more accurate results compared to PLSR model and show high generalization ability, however, PLSR still keeps the advantage of being fast to optimize and implement.

  9. Process and equipment for the detection of impurities like salted water and sulfur contained in a multiphase fluid by nuclear techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arnold, D.M.; Paap, H.J.

    1981-01-01

    A technique for detecting impurities, like sulfur and salted water, in petroleum refineries is described. The fluid is bombarded with fast neutrons which are showed down and then captured producing gamma spectra. Analysis of the spectra indicates the relative presence of sulfur, hydrogen and chlorine. The gas/liquid ratio of the fluid can also be calculated. An apparatus making use of this technique is also described [fr

  10. Search for impurities of counting gases in ionization chambers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hofmann, T.

    1992-03-01

    In order to reach for the gas detectors applied at the ALADIN spectrometer of the GSI an as good as possible and timely remaining gas purity, a study on the kind and effects of impurities in different counting gases was performed. The gas purity was observed via the signal height of an α source after a drift path of the electrons of 50 cm. A steady decrease of the α-signals was measures, the steepness of which decreases slowly as function of the time. The half-life lies in the range of weeks, which lets conclude on a slow outgassing from the materials of the arrangement. By a gas chromatography and mass spectroscopy these impurities could be determined. Beside impurities by polar molecules as water and oxygen from the atmosphere, which are deposed in microscopical capillaries of the chamber materials and then outgassed in the samples after several days so-called softeners could be observed. Because these impurities in the arrangement at the ALADIN spectrometer cannot be avoided, a purification system in the flow-through operation was constructed and its effect tested. The gas quality can by this over several days be kept in the mean constant. In this dynamical process the fluctuations of the signal heights lie at ±0.7%. A ionization chamber as monitor for the gas purity was constructed and tested with different gas mixtures concerning observables like signal height and drift time. By this calibrated monitor in the experiment at the ALADIN spectrometer the gas quality can be independently determined. (orig.) [de

  11. The effects of naturally occurring impurities in rock salt

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In this paper we investigate the effect that naturally occurring impurities in salt mines have both on effective permittivity of the medium and on radio wave propagation at ∼200 MHz. The effective permittivity is determined based on the dielectric properties of salt and the characteristics of the main impurities. We conclude that ...

  12. Impurity dependence of superconductivity in niobium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laa, C.

    1984-04-01

    Jump temperatures, the critical fields Hsubc and Hsubc 2 and specific heats were measured on niobium samples where the impurity content was systematically varied by loading with nitrogen. Quantities could thus be extrapolated to lattice perfection and absolute purity. Comparisons with theories were made and some parameters extracted. Agreement was found with Gorkov theory for small impurities. A new value of the Ginsburg-Landau parameter Ko was determined to be just above 1/sqrt2 which proves that niobium is an elementary Type II semiconductor. By comparisons with the BCS and the CLAC theory the values of the mean Fermi velocity, the London penetration depth, the BCS coherence length and the impurity parameter were extracted. (G.Q.)

  13. Magnetic impurity coupled to interacting conduction electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schork, T.

    1996-01-01

    We consider a magnetic impurity which interacts by hybridization with a system of weakly correlated electrons and determine the energy of the ground state by means of a 1/N f expansion. The correlations among the conduction electrons are described by a Hubbard Hamiltonian and are treated to the lowest order in the interaction strength. We find that their effect on the Kondo temperature, T K , in the Kondo limit is twofold: first, the position of the impurity level is shifted due to the reduction of charge fluctuations, which reduces T K . Secondly, the bare Kondo exchange coupling is enhanced as spin fluctuations are enlarged. In total, T K increases. Both corrections require intermediate states beyond the standard Varma-Yafet ansatz. This shows that the Hubbard interaction does not just provide quasiparticles, which hybridize with the impurity, but also renormalizes the Kondo coupling. copyright 1996 The American Physical Society

  14. Quality by design in the chiral separation strategy for the determination of enantiomeric impurities: development of a capillary electrophoresis method based on dual cyclodextrin systems for the analysis of levosulpiride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orlandini, S; Pasquini, B; Del Bubba, M; Pinzauti, S; Furlanetto, S

    2015-02-06

    Quality by design (QbD) concepts, in accordance with International Conference on Harmonisation Pharmaceutical Development guideline Q8(R2), represent an innovative strategy for the development of analytical methods. In this paper QbD principles have been comprehensively applied in the set-up of a capillary electrophoresis method aimed to quantify enantiomeric impurities. The test compound was the chiral drug substance levosulpiride (S-SUL) and the developed method was intended to be used for routine analysis of the pharmaceutical product. The target of analytical QbD approach is to establish a design space (DS) of critical process parameters (CPPs) where the critical quality attributes (CQAs) of the method have been assured to fulfil the desired requirements with a selected probability. QbD can improve the understanding of the enantioseparation process, including both the electrophoretic behavior of enantiomers and their separation, therefore enabling its control. The CQAs were represented by enantioresolution and analysis time. The scouting phase made it possible to select a separation system made by sulfated-β-cyclodextrin and a neutral cyclodextrin, operating in reverse polarity mode. The type of neutral cyclodextrin was included among other CPPs, both instrumental and related to background electrolyte composition, which were evaluated in a screening phase by an asymmetric screening matrix. Response surface methodology was carried out by a Doehlert design and allowed the contour plots to be drawn, highlighting significant interactions between some of the CPPs. DS was defined by applying Monte-Carlo simulations, and corresponded to the following intervals: sulfated-β-cyclodextrin concentration, 9-12 mM; methyl-β-cyclodextrin concentration, 29-38 mM; Britton-Robinson buffer pH, 3.24-3.50; voltage, 12-14 kV. Robustness of the method was examined by a Plackett-Burman matrix and the obtained results, together with system repeatability data, led to define a method

  15. Experimental study of impurity production in the Tokapole II tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brickhouse, N.S.

    1984-01-01

    The release mechanism for low-Z impurities in Tokapole II has been characterized through impurity doping and isotopic exchange experiments. The desorption mechanism responsible for the low-Z impurity concentrations during the rise phase of the plasma current depends on the mass of the plasma ions. Doping with small amounts of any gas studied (H 2 , D 2 , He, N 2 , O 2 , Ne, Ar, Kr, and Xe) increases the early-time radiation of O, C, and N. For exotic gas doping this increase is linear with the dopant concentration, and proportional to the mass of the dopant, as expected for a momentum transfer process. Isotopic exchange experiments confirm the mass-dependence of oxygen production. A time-dependent coronal model is compared with the vacuum ultraviolet spectroscopic signals of the ionizing oxygen. The quantity sigma/tau (desorption cross section divided by particle confinement time) is determined to be 4 x 10 13 cm 2 /msec. The oxygen influx has a large peak early in the start-up

  16. Volatility Determination in an Ambit Process Setting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barndorff-Nielsen, Ole; Graversen, Svend-Erik

    The probability limit behaviour of normalised quadratic variation is studied for a simple tempo-spatial ambit process, with particular regard to the question of volatility memorylessness.......The probability limit behaviour of normalised quadratic variation is studied for a simple tempo-spatial ambit process, with particular regard to the question of volatility memorylessness....

  17. Study by nuclear techniques of the impurity-defect interaction in implanted metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thome, Lionel.

    1978-01-01

    The properties of out equilibrium alloys formed by impurity implantation are strongly influenced by radiation damage created during implantation. This work presents a study, via hyperfine interaction and lattice location experiments, of the impurity-defect interaction in ion implanted metals. When the impurity and defect concentrations in the implanted layer are small, i.e. when impurities are uniformly recoil implanted in the whole crystal volume following a nuclear reaction (Aq In experiments), the impurity interacts with its own damage cascade. In this case, a vacancy is found to be trapped by a fraction of impurities during an athermal process. The value of this fraction does not seem to depend critically on impurity and host. When the impurity and defect concentrations are such that defect cascades interact, i.e. when impurities are implanted with an isotope separator (Fe Yb experiments), the observed impurity-vacancy (or vacancy cluster) interactions depend then strongly on the nature of impurity and host. An empirical relation, which indicates the importance of elastic effects, has been found between the proportion of impurities interacting with defects and the difference between impurity and host atom radii. At implantation temperature such that vacancies are mobile, the impurity-defect interaction depends essentially on vacancy migration. A model based on chemical kinetics has been developed to account for the variation with temperature of measured quantities [fr

  18. Analysis of Ba{sub x}Sr{sub y}TiO{sub 3} perovskite layers. II. Development of analytical method for the determination of the stoichiometry and trace impurities by ICP-MS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boulyga, S.F. [Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH (Germany). Zentralabteilung fuer Chemische Analysen]|[Radiation Physics and Chemistry Problems Inst., Minsk (Belarus); Becker, J.S. [Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH (Germany). Zentralabteilung fuer Chemische Analysen

    2000-11-01

    Determination of stoichiometry in semiconducting and non-conducting thin layers is of importance for the study of growth mechanisms and for the control of defects during their development and production. An analytical procedure for inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) was developed using different ICP-MS instruments [one double-focusing sector field ICP-MS (DF-ICP-MS) and two quadrupole ICP-MS without and with hexapole collision cell (ICP-QMS and HEX-ICP-QMS, respectively)] for the determination of stoichiometry and trace impurities in thin Ba{sub x}Sr{sub y}TiO{sub 3} (BST) perovskite layers on silicon substrates after dissolution of layer. Maximum sensitivity, lowest detection limits and best precision was achieved in DF-ICP-MS. ICP-QMS with hexapole collision cell yielded better sensitivity and lower limits of detection in comparison to conventional quadrupole ICP-MS. (orig.)

  19. Application of copper sulfate pentahydrate as an ammonia removal reagent for the determination of trace impurities in ammonia by gas chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aomura, Yoko; Kobayashi, Yoshihiko; Miyazawa, Yuzuru; Shimizu, Hideharu

    2010-03-12

    Rapid analysis of trace permanent gas impurities in high purity ammonia gas for the microelectronics industry is described, using a gas chromatograph equipped with a phtoionization detector. Our system incorporates a reactive precolumn in combination with the analytical column to remove the ammonia matrix peak that otherwise would complicate the measurements due to baseline fluctuations and loss of analytes. The performance of 21 precolumn candidate materials was evaluated. Copper sulfate pentahydrate (CuSO(4).5H(2)O) was shown to selectively react with ammonia at room temperature and atmospheric column pressures, without affecting the hydrogen, oxygen, nitrogen, methane or carbon monoxide peak areas. To prevent loss of trace carbon dioxide, an additional boron trioxide reactant layer was inserted above the copper sulfate pentahydrate bed in the reactive precolumn. Using the combined materials, calibration curves for carbon dioxide proved to be equivalent in both ammonia and helium matrix gases. These curves were equivalent in both matrix gases. The quantitative performance of the system was also evaluated. Peak repeatabilities, based on eight injections, were in the range of 4.1-8.2% relative standard deviation; and detection limits were 6.9 ppb for H(2), 1.8 ppb for O(2), 1.6 ppb for N(2), 6.4 ppb for CH(4), 13 ppb for CO, and 5.4 ppb for CO(2). Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Interpretation of plasma impurity deposition probes. Analytic approximation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stangeby, P. C.

    1987-10-01

    Insertion of a probe into the plasma induces a high speed flow of the hydrogenic plasma to the probe which, by friction, accelerates the impurity ions to velocities approaching the hydrogenic ion acoustic speed, i.e., higher than the impurity ion thermal speed. A simple analytic theory based on this effect provides a relation between impurity fluxes to the probe Γimp and the undisturbed impurity ion density nimp, with the hydrogenic temperature and density as input parameters. Probe size also influences the collection process and large probes are found to attract a higher flux density than small probes in the same plasma. The quantity actually measured, cimp, the impurity atom surface density (m-2) net-deposited on the probe, is related to Γimp and thus to nimp by taking into account the partial removal of deposited material caused by sputtering and the redeposition process.

  1. Environmental Determinants of Lexical Processing Effort

    OpenAIRE

    McDonald, Scott

    2000-01-01

    Institute for Adaptive and Neural Computation A central concern of psycholinguistic research is explaining the relative ease or difficulty involved in processing words. In this thesis, we explore the connection between lexical processing effort and measurable properties of the linguistic environment. Distributional information (information about a word’s contexts of use) is easily extracted from large language corpora in the form of co-occurrence statistics. We claim that su...

  2. Determination of acrylamide concentration in processed food ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Currently, acrylamide concentration in processed food products have become a very serious health issue. The World Health Organization (WHO) and the Scientific Committee for Food (SCF) of the European Union also confirmed this concern. In laboratory scale, it was found that acrylamide causes tumors in animals.

  3. Impurity sources in TEXTOR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pospieszczyk, A; Bay, H L; Bogen, P; Hartwig, H; Hintz, E; Koenen, L; Ross, G G; Rusbueldt, D; Samm, U; Schweer, B

    1987-02-01

    The deuterium, oxygen and carbon fluxes from the main limiter and the deuterium fluxes from the wall are measured in TEXTOR for an 'all carbon' surrounding as a function of central density n/sub e/, of applied ICRH-power and of different wall conditions (carbonization). For this purpose, emission spectroscopy both with filter systems and spectrometers has been used. It is found that a major release mechanism for light impurities is via the formation of molecules. Oxygen seems to enter the discharge from the liner via O-D containing molecules, whereas the limiter acts as the main carbon source by the release of hydro-carbons as indicated by the observed CD-band spectra. Both oxygen and carbon fluxes are reduced by about a factor of two after a fresh carbonization. Above a certain critical density the plasma detaches from the limiter and forms a stable discharge with a radiation cooled boundary layer and with a major fraction of particles now reaching the wall instead of the limiter. The critical density rises with decreasing impurity fluxes or with increasing heating powers.

  4. Impurity sources in TEXTOR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pospieszczyk, A.; Bay, H.L.; Bogen, P.; Hartwig, H.; Hintz, E.; Koenen, L.; Ross, G.G.; Rusbueldt, D.; Samm, U.; Schweer, B.

    1987-01-01

    The deuterium, oxygen and carbon fluxes from the main limiter and the deuterium fluxes from the wall are measured in TEXTOR for an 'all carbon' surrounding as a function of central density n e , of applied ICRH-power and of different wall conditions (carbonization). For this purpose, emission spectroscopy both with filter systems and spectrometers has been used. It is found that a major release mechanism for light impurities is via the formation of molecules. Oxygen seems to enter the discharge from the liner via O-D containing molecules, whereas the limiter acts as the main carbon source by the release of hydro-carbons as indicated by the observed CD-band spectra. Both oxygen and carbon fluxes are reduced by about a factor of two after a fresh carbonization. Above a certain critical density the plasma detaches from the limiter and forms a stable discharge with a radiation cooled boundary layer and with a major fraction of particles now reaching the wall instead of the limiter. The critical density rises with decreasing impurity fluxes or with increasing heating powers. (orig.)

  5. Application of analytical quality by design principles for the determination of alkyl p-toluenesulfonates impurities in Aprepitant by HPLC. Validation using total-error concept.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zacharis, Constantinos K; Vastardi, Elli

    2018-02-20

    In the research presented we report the development of a simple and robust liquid chromatographic method for the quantification of two genotoxic alkyl sulphonate impurities (namely methyl p-toluenesulfonate and isopropyl p-toluenesulfonate) in Aprepitant API substances using the Analytical Quality by Design (AQbD) approach. Following the steps of AQbD protocol, the selected critical method attributes (CMAs) were the separation criterions between the critical peak pairs, the analysis time and the peak efficiencies of the analytes. The critical method parameters (CMPs) included the flow rate, the gradient slope and the acetonitrile content at the first step of the gradient elution program. Multivariate experimental designs namely Plackett-Burman and Box-Behnken designs were conducted sequentially for factor screening and optimization of the method parameters. The optimal separation conditions were estimated using the desirability function. The method was fully validated in the range of 10-200% of the target concentration limit of the analytes using the "total error" approach. Accuracy profiles - a graphical decision making tool - were constructed using the results of the validation procedures. The β-expectation tolerance intervals did not exceed the acceptance criteria of±10%, meaning that 95% of future results will be included in the defined bias limits. The relative bias ranged between - 1.3-3.8% for both analytes, while the RSD values for repeatability and intermediate precision were less than 1.9% in all cases. The achieved limit of detection (LOD) and the limit of quantification (LOQ) were adequate for the specific purpose and found to be 0.02% (corresponding to 48μgg -1 in sample) for both methyl and isopropyl p-toluenesulfonate. As proof-of-concept, the validated method was successfully applied in the analysis of several Aprepitant batches indicating that this methodology could be used for routine quality control analyses. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B

  6. Spectrographic determination of impurities in ammonium hydrogen fluoride samples. II. Study of the behaviour of the added matrices; Determinacion espectrografica de impurezas en bibluoruro amonico. II. Estudio del comportamiento de las matrices adicionadas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alduan, F. A.; Roca, M.; Capdevila, C.

    1979-07-01

    In order to account for the variations In the shape of the excitation-volatilization' curves and the values of the line intensities of the different impurities determined in ammonium bifluoride, the behaviour of the added matrices (graphite, 63203, GeO{sub 2}, MgO and ZnO) has been considered. With this aim the influence of the added matrices on the are discharge parameters (temperature and electronic concentration) and on the exhaustion rate of the electrode load as a function of the excitation time has been studied. On the other hand, the curve of variation of the line intensity of the metallic component of each matrix versus time has been obtained and the residues in the electrode cavity have been investigated by X-ray powder diffraction. (Author) 7 refs.

  7. Spectrographic determination of impurities in ammonium hydrogen fluoride samples. II. Study of the behaviour of the added matrices; Determinacion espectrografica de impurezas en bibluoruro amonico. II. Estudio del comportamiento de las matrices adicionadas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alduan, F A; Roca, M; Capdevila, C

    1979-07-01

    In order to account for the variations In the shape of the excitation-volatilization' curves and the values of the line intensities of the different impurities determined in ammonium bifluoride, the behaviour of the added matrices (graphite, 63203, GeO{sub 2}, MgO and ZnO) has been considered. With this aim the influence of the added matrices on the are discharge parameters (temperature and electronic concentration) and on the exhaustion rate of the electrode load as a function of the excitation time has been studied. On the other hand, the curve of variation of the line intensity of the metallic component of each matrix versus time has been obtained and the residues in the electrode cavity have been investigated by X-ray powder diffraction. (Author) 7 refs.

  8. Carbon impurity transport around limiters in the DITE tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pitcher, C.S.; Stangeby, P.C.; Goodall, D.H.J.; Matthews, G.F.; McCracken, G.M.

    1989-01-01

    The transport of impurity ions originating at the limiter in a tokamak is critically dependent on the location of the ion in the boundary plasma. In the confined plasma, just inboard of the limiter, impurity ions will disperse freely into the discharge whilst in the scrape-off layer the pre-sheath plasma flow and the associated ambipolar electric field may tend to sweep impurities back to the limiter surface. In this paper we have studied, both by experiment and by theory, the transport of carbon impurity ions in the vicinity of the limiter. By comparing experimental measurements of the spatial distributions of impurities around the limiter with that predicted from a Monte Carlo computer code it appears that the parallel dispersal on closed field lines in the confined plasma is consistent with classical transport processes and that in the scrape-off layer the dispersal is indeed impeded by the pre-sheath plasma flow. (orig.)

  9. Recirculation effect of Chilean copper smelting dust with high impurities contents on the impurity distributions during smelting process; Efecto de la recirculacion de polvo de fundicion de cobre de Chile con altos contenidos de impurezas en la distribucion de impurezas durante el proceso de fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Montenegro, V.; Sano, H.; Fujisawa, T.

    2010-07-01

    Usually, dust generated during the copper smelting process by the Teniente Converter and the Flash Smelting Furnaces in Chile, contains high concentrations of copper, zinc, arsenic, antimony and other metals. In general, the dust is recirculated to the smelting process or it is directed to hydrometallurgical process for recovery and stabilization. However, in recent years the generation of dust has increased because of the degradation of the quality of the concentrate. In addition, the environmental regulations have become stricter. It is therefore desirable to understand the behavior of those elements, when the smelting process operates with recirculation of dust. In this study, the effect of dust recirculation to smelting process on the distribution among the matte, slag and gas phases was evaluated, as a function of matte grade, amount of recirculated dust, oxygen enrichment and temperature. It was found that the concentration in the matte of the impurities such as arsenic, antimony and bismuth, increased slightly with recirculation of dust. On the other hand, the concentration of lead and zinc depend of the direct recirculation of dust to the process. Additionally, it was found that high concentrations of arsenic and antimony in the dust may lead to the formation and precipitation of copper arsenates and other metals (speiss), which may generates important operational problems. (Author) 15 refs.

  10. Full automation and validation of a flexible ELISA platform for host cell protein and protein A impurity detection in biopharmaceuticals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rey, Guillaume; Wendeler, Markus W

    2012-11-01

    Monitoring host cell protein (HCP) and protein A impurities is important to ensure successful development of recombinant antibody drugs. Here, we report the full automation and validation of an ELISA platform on a robotic system that allows the detection of Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) HCPs and residual protein A of in-process control samples and final drug substance. The ELISA setup is designed to serve three main goals: high sample throughput, high quality of results, and sample handling flexibility. The processing of analysis requests, determination of optimal sample dilutions, and calculation of impurity content is performed automatically by a spreadsheet. Up to 48 samples in three unspiked and spiked dilutions each are processed within 24 h. The dilution of each sample is individually prepared based on the drug concentration and the expected impurity content. Adaptable dilution protocols allow the analysis of sample dilutions ranging from 1:2 to 1:2×10(7). The validity of results is assessed by automatic testing for dilutional linearity and spike recovery for each sample. This automated impurity ELISA facilitates multi-project process development, is easily adaptable to other impurity ELISA formats, and increases analytical capacity by combining flexible sample handling with high data quality. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Theoretical Study of Radiation from a Broad Range of Impurity Ions for Magnetic Fusion Diagnostics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Safronova, Alla [Univ. of Nevada, Reno, NV (United States)

    2014-03-14

    Spectroscopy of radiation emitted by impurities plays an important role in the study of magnetically confined fusion plasmas. The measurements of these impurities are crucial for the control of the general machine conditions, for the monitoring of the impurity levels, and for the detection of various possible fault conditions. Low-Z impurities, typically present in concentrations of 1%, are lithium, beryllium, boron, carbon, and oxygen. Some of the common medium-Z impurities are metals such as iron, nickel, and copper, and high-Z impurities, such as tungsten, are present in smaller concentrations of 0.1% or less. Despite the relatively small concentration numbers, the aforementioned impurities might make a substantial contribution to radiated power, and also influence both plasma conditions and instruments. A detailed theoretical study of line radiation from impurities that covers a very broad spectral range from less than 1 Å to more than 1000 Å has been accomplished and the results were applied to the LLNL Electron Beam Ion Trap (EBIT) and the Sustained Spheromak Physics Experiment (SSPX) and to the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) at Princeton. Though low- and medium-Z impurities were also studied, the main emphasis was made on the comprehensive theoretical study of radiation from tungsten using different state-of-the-art atomic structure codes such as Relativistic Many-Body Perturbation Theory (RMBPT). The important component of this research was a comparison of the results from the RMBPT code with other codes such as the Multiconfigurational Hartree–Fock developed by Cowan (COWAN code) and the Multiconfiguration Relativistic Hebrew University Lawrence Atomic Code (HULLAC code), and estimation of accuracy of calculations. We also have studied dielectronic recombination, an important recombination process for fusion plasma, for variety of highly and low charged tungsten ions using COWAN and HULLAC codes. Accurate DR rate coefficients are needed for

  12. Interactions of impurities with a moving grain boundary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bauer, C L [Carnegie-Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, Pa. (USA)

    1975-01-01

    Most theories developed to explain interaction of impurities with a moving grain boundary involve a uniform excess impurity concentration distributed along a planar grain boundary. As boundary velocity increases, the excess impurities exert a net drag force on the boundary until a level is reached whereat the drag force no longer can balance the driving force and breakaway of the boundary from these impurities occurs. In this investigation, assumptions of a uniform lateral impurity profile and a planar grain boundary shape are relaxed by allowing both forward and lateral diffusion of impurities in the vicinity of a grain boundary. It is found that the two usual regions (drag of impurities by, and breakaway of a planar grain boundary) are separated by an extensive region wherein a uniform lateral impurity profile and a planar grain boundary shape are unstable. It is suspected that, in this unstable region, grain boundaries assume a spectrum of more complex morphologies and that elucidation of these morphologies can provide the first definitive description of the breakaway process and insight to more complex phenomena such as solid-solution strengthening, grain growth and secondary recrystallization.

  13. Picometer registration of zinc impurity states in Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8+δ for phase determination in intra-unit-cell Fourier transform STM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamidian, M H; Firmo, I A; Fujita, K; Mukhopadhyay, S; Davis, J C; Orenstein, J W; Eisaki, H; Uchida, S; Lawler, M J; Kim, E-A

    2012-01-01

    Direct visualization of electronic-structure symmetry within each crystalline unit cell is a new technique for complex electronic matter research (Lawler et al 2010 Nature 466 347-51, Schmidt et al 2011 New J. Phys. 13 065014, Fujita K et al 2012 J. Phys. Soc. Japan 81 011005). By studying the Bragg peaks in Fourier transforms of electronic structure images and particularly by resolving both the real and imaginary components of the Bragg amplitudes, distinct types of intra-unit-cell symmetry breaking can be studied. However, establishing the precise symmetry point of each unit cell in real space is crucial in defining the phase for such a Bragg-peak Fourier analysis. Exemplary of this challenge is the high-temperature superconductor Bi 2 Sr 2 CaCu 2 O 8+δ for which the surface Bi atom locations are observable, while it is the invisible Cu atoms that define the relevant CuO 2 unit-cell symmetry point. Here we demonstrate, by imaging with picometer precision the electronic impurity states at individual Zn atoms substituted at Cu sites, that the phase established using the Bi lattice produces a ∼2%(2π) error relative to the actual Cu lattice. Such a phase assignment error would not diminish reliability in the determination of intra-unit-cell rotational symmetry breaking at the CuO 2 plane (Lawler et al 2010 Nature 466 347-51, Schmidt et al 2011 New J. Phys. 13 065014, Fujita K et al 2012 J. Phys. Soc. Japan 81 011005). Moreover, this type of impurity atom substitution at the relevant symmetry site can be of general utility in phase determination for the Bragg-peak Fourier analysis of intra-unit-cell symmetry. (paper)

  14. Determination of Ag in technique process research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Su Tao; Zhang Lihua; Fan Dejun; Liu Huanliang; Wu Jizong

    2008-01-01

    Based on the chromogenic reaction of Ag with p-dimethylamino benzyl rhodanine, a new spectrophotometric method for determination of Ag in the presence of PVA-124 and Triton X-100 as surfactant is established. The factors such as acidity, reaction time and the concentration of surfactant were studied. The results show that the appropriate conditions are as the following. The concentrations of p-dimethylamino benzyl rhodanine, PVA and Triton X-100 are 0.1 g·L -1 , 10 g·L -1 and 0.16% respectively. Acidity is 1.0 mol·L -1 . Reaction time is 20 minutes. Absorption wavelength is 470 nm. The influence of several coexisting ions, especially Pu (Ⅳ) on analyzing Ag is also studied. The results indicate that when the concentration of Ag is less than five times of the concentration of Pu. PMBP is used to extract Pu (Ⅳ). The optimum extraction conditions are as follows. The concentration of PMBP is 0.1 mol·L-1. Acidity is 2.0 mol·L-1. The ratio of organic and water phase is 1:1. Extraction time is 3 minutes. Conformity to Berr's law was obtained with the scope of 0.1-1.0 μg·mL -1 . The determination limit of Ag is 0.1 μg·mL -1 . The relative standard deviation for this method is 2.6% (n=3). The recovery is 104-114%. (authors)

  15. Neo-classical impurity transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stringer, T.E.

    The neo-classical theory for impurity transport in a toroidal plasma is outlined, and the results discussed. A general account is given of the impurity behaviour and its dependence on collisionality. The underlying physics is described with special attention to the role of the poloidal rotation

  16. Modeling of impurity transport in the core plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hulse, R.A.

    1992-01-01

    This paper presents a brief overview of computer modeling of impurity transport in the core region of controlled thermonuclear fusion plasmas. The atomic processes of importance in these high temperature plasmas and the numerical formulation of the model are described. Selected modeling examples are then used to highlight some features of the physics of impurity behavior in large tokamak fusion devices, with an emphasis on demonstrating the sensitivity of such modeling to uncertainties in the rate coefficients used for the atomic processes. This leads to a discussion of current requirements and opportunities for generating the improved sets of comprehensive atomic data needed to support present and future fusion impurity modeling studies

  17. Anomalous temperature behavior of Sn impurities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haskel, D.; Shechter, H.; Stern, E.A.; Newville, M.; Yacoby, Y.

    1993-01-01

    Sn impurities in Pb and Ag hosts have been investigated by Moessbauer effect and in Pb by x-ray-absorption fine-structure (XAFS) studies. The Sn atoms are dissolved up to at least 2 at. % in Pb and up to at least 8 at. % in Ag for the temperature ranges investigated. The concentration limit for Sn-Sn interactions is 1 at. % for Pb and 2 at. % for Ag as determined experimentally by lowering the Sn concentration until no appreciable change occurs in the Moessbauer effect. XAFS measurements verify that the Sn impurities in Pb are dissolved and predominantly at substitutional sites. For both hosts the temperature dependence of the spectral intensities of isolated Sn impurities below a temperature T 0 is as expected for vibrating about a lattice site. Above T 0 the Moessbauer spectral intensity exhibits a greatly increased rate of drop-off with temperature without appreciable broadening. This drop-off is too steep to be explained by ordinary anharmonic effects and can be explained by a liquidlike rapid hopping of the Sn, localized about a lattice site. Higher-entropy-density regions of radii somewhat more than an atomic spacing surround such impurities, and can act as nucleation sites for three-dimensional melting

  18. Impurity study experiment proposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-05-01

    ISX is a modest tokamak which emphasizes the production of a predictable test plasma, experimental flexibility, ease of assembly and disassembly, and good diagnostic access. Its plasma models the outer cooler layers in EPR like plasmas. In addition, provisions will be made for long discharge times which may be necessary to observe some impurity effects. These machine characteristics will enable one to study the collisional transport of impurities in the plasma, perform systematic studies of wall and limiter materials and geometries, study methods of cleaning the walls, and develop and test new diagnostic techniques. ISX will employ water-cooled copper coils to produce a maximum toroidal magnetic field of 20 kG at the plasma axis, which is 77 cm from the major axis. The plasma minor radius will be about 15 cm, and the maximum plasma current will be 100 kA which will be induced by an iron core transformer with a capability of up to 0.9 volt-sec for long discharges. An aspect ratio of five and the modest magnetic field permit a design with ample space for thick wall structures such as honeycomb walls. The ''picture frame'' toroidal field coil provides additional space, while removable coil top sections allow easy replacement of the vacuum chamber. The 72-turn toroidal field coil is grouped into 24 sections for increased access. Absence of a conducting shell and placement of the vertical field and transformer primary coils away from the plasma allow easy viewing of the plasma and good diagnostic access. (U.S.)

  19. Quantitative spectrographic analysis of impurities in antimonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brito, J. de; Gomes, R.P.

    1978-01-01

    An emission spectrographic method is describe for the determination of Ag, Al, As, Be, Bi, Cd, Cr, Cu, Ga, Ni, Pb, Sn, Si, and Zn in high purity antimony metal. The metal sample ia dissolved in nitric acid(1:1) and converted tp oxide by calcination at 900 0 C for one hour. The oxide so obtained is mixed with graphite, which is used as a spectroscopic buffer, and excited by a direct current arc. Many parameters are studied optimum conditions are selected for the determination of the impurities mentioned. The spectrum is photographed in the second order of a 15.000 lines per inch grating and the most sensitive lines for the elements are selected. The impurities are determined in the concentration range of 1 - 0,01% with a precision of approximately 10% [pt

  20. Coulomb singularity effects in tunnelling spectroscopy of individual impurities

    OpenAIRE

    Arseyev, P. I.; Maslova, N. S.; Panov, V. I.; Savinov, S. V.

    2002-01-01

    Non-equilibrium Coulomb effects in resonant tunnelling processes through deep impurity states are analyzed. It is shown that Coulomb vertex corrections to the tunnelling transfer amplitude lead to a power-law singularity in current- voltage characteristics

  1. Impact of the Injection Protocol on an Impurity's Stationary State

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamayun, Oleksandr; Lychkovskiy, Oleg; Burovski, Evgeni; Malcomson, Matthew; Cheianov, Vadim V.; Zvonarev, Mikhail B.

    2018-06-01

    We examine stationary-state properties of an impurity particle injected into a one-dimensional quantum gas. We show that the value of the impurity's end velocity lies between zero and the speed of sound in the gas and is determined by the injection protocol. This way, the impurity's constant motion is a dynamically emergent phenomenon whose description goes beyond accounting for the kinematic constraints of the Landau approach to superfluidity. We provide exact analytic results in the thermodynamic limit and perform finite-size numerical simulations to demonstrate that the predicted phenomena are within the reach of the ultracold gas experiments.

  2. Hopping conductivity via deep impurity states in InP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuznetsov, V.P.; Messerer, M.A.; Omel'yanovskij, Eh.M.

    1984-01-01

    Hopping (epsilon 3 ) and Mott conductivities via deep impurity compounds with localization radius below 10 A have been studied using as an example Mn in InP. It is shown, that the existing theory of hopping conductivity in low-alloyed semiconductors with Na 3 << 1 can be Used for the case of deep centres as successfully as for the case of insignificant hydrogen-like impurities. Fundamental parameters of the theory: localization radius of wave function of deep impurities, state density near the Fermi level, mean hop length, are determined

  3. Reduction of impurities and activation of lithium orthosilicate breeder materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knitter, Regina; Fischer, Ulrich; Herber, Stefan; Adelhelm, Christel

    2009-01-01

    The fabrication of lithium orthosilicate pebbles by melt-spraying enables a facile reprocessing of irradiated material by direct remelting. However, the necessary waiting period for the reprocessing is determined by the long-term activation of the material under irradiation that is dominated by the impurities. The activation characteristics for the current composition of lithium orthosilicate pebbles were assessed on the basis of three-dimensional activation calculations for a fusion power reactor. The calculations were used to identify critical amounts of impurities and were compared to the results of a hypothetical, pure material without impurities, as well as to a calculated Li-6 enriched OSi composition.

  4. Impurities enhance caking in lactose powder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carpin, M.; Bertelsen, H.; Dalberg, A.

    2017-01-01

    Caking of lactose and other dry ingredients is a common problem in the dairy and food industries. The lactose production process includes different purification steps, depending on the type of lactose produced. The aim of this study was therefore to investigate how the remaining impurities (i.......e. non-lactose components) affect the caking tendency of the final powder. The results from a combination of different methods, including dynamic vapor sorption, characterization of the physicochemical composition and assessment of caking with a ring shear tester, suggested humidity caking. Larger...... amounts of impurities in the lactose powder resulted in enhanced moisture sorption and greater caking tendency. These findings emphasize the importance of controlling the washing and purification steps throughout the production process in order to limit caking in the final product...

  5. Mobile impurities in ferromagnetic liquids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kantian, Adrian; Schollwoeck, Ulrich; Giamarchi, Thierry

    2011-03-01

    Recent work has shown that mobile impurities in one dimensional interacting systems may exhibit behaviour that differs strongly from that predicted by standard Tomonaga-Luttinger liquid theory, with the appearance of power-law divergences in the spectral function signifying sublinear diffusion of the impurity. Using time-dependent matrix product states, we investigate a range of cases of mobile impurities in systems beyond the analytically accessible examples to assess the existence of a new universality class of low-energy physics in one-dimensional systems. Correspondence: Adrian.Kantian@unige.ch This work was supported in part by the Swiss SNF under MaNEP and division II.

  6. Impurity production and transport in the boundary layer of tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCracken, G.M.

    1987-01-01

    The processes by which impurities are produced and enter the discharge are discussed. Emphasis is placed on sputtering at the limiter and an analytical global model is described which incorporates the self-stabilizing effects whch control the edge temperature. Predictions of the scaling of edge temperature and of total radiated power are compared with experimental data from JET and other tokamaks operating with limiters. Under many conditions the scaling of the edge conditions and of the radiated power is accurately predicted. Impurity transport in the boundary and the question of how to control the boundary layer is then discussed. The example of the Impurity Control Limiter on DITE is described. (author)

  7. Synthesis and Characterization of Maillard Reaction Products of Salbutamol and Terbutaline with Lactose and Development and Validation of an LC Method for the Determination of Salbutamol and Terbutaline in the Presence of These Impurities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asmaa A. El-Zaher

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Being secondary amines, both salbutamol (SLB and terbutaline (TRB react by Maillard reaction (MR with lactose, which is added as an inactive ingredient in tablets. The Amadori rearrangement products were synthesized, isolated, and characterized by mass spectrometry. In addition, a simple, selective, and precise reversed-phase liquid chromatography (LC method was developed and validated for the determination of SLB and TRB in tablets, each in the presence of its MR impurity. The chromatographic separation was performed on a Symmetry® Waters C18 column (150 mm × 4.6 mm, 5 μm using a mobile phase consisting of 0.5% aqueous phosphoric acid to acetonitrile (90:10, v/v at a flow rate of 0.7 mL minute −1 . Quantitation was achieved using UV detection at 230 nm. Linearity, accuracy, and precision were found to be acceptable for the determination of SLB and TRB in the concentration range of 0.2-60 and 0.5-80 μg mL −1 , respectively. The proposed method was successfully applied to the determination of SLB and TRB in bulk and in their tablets.

  8. Investigations of impurity control in JET using fuelling, and interpretation of experiments using the LIM impurity code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gondhalekar, A.; Stangeby, P.C.; Elder, J.D.

    1994-01-01

    Inhibition of contamination of the plasma core in JET by edge impurities during high power heating of deuterium plasmas in limiter configuration using fuelling is demonstrated. By injecting deuterium gas during heating, in the presence of a much larger recycling deuterium flux, a reduction of more than a factor of 2 was effected in n z (0)/Φ z , the ratio of central impurity density to impurity influx at the plasma edge. The reduction in n z (0) was obtained without much effect on peak electron temperature and density. Reduction of plasma contamination by gas fuelling was observed also when hot spots formed on the limiter, a condition that without simultaneous gas fuelling culminated in runaway plasma contamination. Detailed analysis of the experiments is undertaken with the purpose of identifying the processes by which plasma contamination was inhibited, employing standard limiter plasma contamination modelling. Processes which might produce the observed impurity inhibiting effects of gas injection include: (a) reduction in impurity production at the limiter; (b) increase in impurity screening in the scrape-off layer; (c) increase in radial impurity transport at the plasma edge; (d) increase in average deuteron flow velocity to the limiter along the scrape-off layer. These are examined in detail using the Monte Carlo limiter impurity transport code LIM. Bearing in mind that uncertainties exist both in the choice of appropriate modelling assumptions to be used and in the measurement of required edge plasma parameters, changes in n z (0)/Φ z by a factor of 2 are at the limit of the present modelling capability. However, comparison between LIM code simulations and measurements of plasma impurity content indicate that the standard limiter plasma contamination model may not be adequate and that other processes need to be added in order to be able to describe the experiments in JET. (author). 24 refs, 2 figs, 8 tabs

  9. Separation coefficients of liquid-vapor in systems formed by yttrium chloride with some impurities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Volkov, V.T.; Nikiforova, T.V.; Nisel'son, L.A.; Telegin, G.F.

    1990-01-01

    Using equilibrium Rayleigh distillation in the 800-950 deg C temperature range, separation coefficients of liquid-vapor for systems, formed by yttrium chloride with Co, Cr, Ni, Mn, Fe, Cu, Na, K, Mg, Ca, Li impurities are determined. The impurity concentration lies within 0.02-0.4 mass. % limits of each impurity, and total impurity concentration does not exceed 1 mass. %. The tested impurities, except for calcium, are more volatile than the base, yttrium trichloride. In most systems negative deviation from the Raoult's law is observed

  10. Impurities that cause difficulty in stripping actinides from commercial tetraalkylcarbamoylmethylphosphonates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bahner, C.T.; Shoun, R.R.; McDowell, W.J.

    1977-09-01

    Dihexyl[(diethylcarbamoyl)methyl]phosphonate (DHDECMP) in diethylbenzene extracts actinides well from 6 M nitric acid solution, but commercially available DHDECMP contains impurities which interfere with stripping the actinides from the organic extract. DHDECMP purified by molecular distillation does not contain these impurities, but the pot residue contains increased concentrations of them. Heating the purified DHDECMP causes the formation of products which interfere with stripping in the same way, suggesting that high temperatures employed in the manufacture of DHDECMP may produce the offending impurities. These impurities can be separated from the heat-decomposed material or the pot residues by dilution with a large volume of hexanes (causing part of the impurities to separate as a second liquid phase) followed by equilibration of the hexane solution with dilute alkali. After the treatment with hexane and dilute alkali, the DHDECMP is readily recovered and functions well in the actinide extraction process. Dibutyl[(dibutylcarbamoyl)methyl]-phosphonate (DBDBCMP) and di(2-ethylhexyl)[(diethylcarbamoyl)-methyl]phosphonate (DEHDECMP) are purified less effectively by these methods. Similar separation methods using diethylbenzene or CCl 4 as solvent do not remove impurities as completely as the hexane process. Impurities can also be removed from a benzene solution of the DHDECMP pot residue by passing it through a column packed with silica gel or diethylaminoethyl cellulose. These impurities have been separated into fractions for analytical examination by use of various solvents and by column chromatography. Hexyl hydrogen [(diethylcarbamoyl)methyl]-phosphonate has been identified tentatively as a principal objectionable impurity. Dihexyl phosphoric acid and possibly dihexylphosphonate have been identified in other fractions

  11. ACCELERATING COLUMN FOR SEPARATION OF ETHANOL FROM FACTIONS OF INTERMEDIATE AND HEAD IMPURITIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. V. Agafonov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Summary. Nowadays purification of ethanol from the head and intermediate impurities is done with the selection of fractions of fusel alcohol and fusel oil from the distillation column and head and intermediate fractions impurities from condenser Epuration column operating accord-ing to the hydro-selection method. Due to this the fraction contains at least 13% ethyl alcohol, resulting in a reduced yield of the final product. Distillation of these fractions in the known acceleration columns requires increased consumption of heating steam for 6-8 kg / dal and increasing installation metal content. In this paper we investigate the process of distillation fraction from the condenser of Epura-tion column, fusel alcohol from the distillation column and subfusel liquid layer from the decanter, which is fed on a plate of supply of new accelerating column (AC, which operates on Epuration technology with the supply of hydro-selection water on the top plate and has in its composition concentration, boiling and stripping parts, a dephlagmator, a condenser, a boiler. Material balance equations of the column were obtained and ethyl alcohol concentration on its plates were determined by them. Having converted the material balance equations, we determined the dependences for the impurities ratio being drawn from the accelerating column with the Luther flows and ethyl alcohol fraction. Then we received the equation for determining the proportion of impurities taken from the column condenser with fraction. These calculations proved that the studied impurities are almost completely selected with this faction, ethyl alcohol content of it being 0.14% of the hourly output.

  12. Quantification of active pharmaceutical ingredient and impurities in sildenafil citrate obtained from the Internet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veronin, Michael A; Nutan, Mohammad T; Dodla, Uday Krishna Reddy

    2014-10-01

    The accessibility of prescription drugs produced outside of the United States, most notably sildenafil citrate (innovator product, Viagra®), has been made much easier by the Internet. Of greatest concern to clinicians and policymakers is product quality and patient safety. The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has issued warnings to potential buyers that the safety of drugs purchased from the Internet cannot be guaranteed, and may present a health risk to consumers from substandard products. The objective of this study was to determine whether generic sildenafil citrate tablets from international markets obtained via the Internet are equivalent to the US innovator product regarding major aspects of pharmaceutical quality: potency, accuracy of labeling, and presence and level of impurities. This will help identify aspects of drug quality that may impact public health risks. A total of 15 sildenafil citrate tablets were obtained for pharmaceutical analysis: 14 generic samples from international Internet pharmacy websites and the US innovator product. According to US Pharmacopeial guidelines, tablet samples were tested using high-performance liquid chromatography for potency of active pharmaceutical ingredient (API) and levels of impurities (impurities A, B, C, and D). Impurity levels were compared with International Conference on Harmonisation (ICH) limits. Among the 15 samples, 4 samples possessed higher impurity B levels than the ICH qualification threshold, 8 samples possessed higher impurity C levels than the ICH qualification threshold, and 4 samples possessed more than 1% impurity quantity of maximum daily dose (MDD). For API, 6 of the samples failed to fall within the 5% assay limit. Quality assurance tests are often used to detect formulation defects of drug products during the manufacturing and/or storage process. Results suggest that manufacturing standards for sildenafil citrate generic drug products compared with the US innovator product are not

  13. Comparative ANNs with Different Input Layers and GA-PLS Study for Simultaneous Spectrofluorimetric Determination of Melatonin and Pyridoxine HCl in the Presence of Melatonin’s Main Impurity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amer M. Alanazi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Melatonin (MLT has many health implications, therefore it is important to develop specific analytical methods for the determination of MLT in the presence of its main impurity, N-{2-[1-({3-[2-(acetylaminoethyl]-5-methoxy-1H-indol-2-yl}methyl-5-methoxy-1H-indol-3-yl]ethyl}acetaamide (DMLT and pyridoxine HCl (PNH as a co-formulated drug. This work describes simple, sensitive, and reliable four multivariate calibration methods, namely artificial neural network preceded by genetic algorithm (GA-ANN, principal component analysis (PCA-ANN and wavelet transform procedures (WT-ANN as well as partial least squares preceded by genetic algorithm (GA-PLS for the spectrofluorimetric determination of MLT and PNH in the presence of DMLT. Analytical performance of the proposed methods was statistically validated with respect to linearity, accuracy, precision and specificity. The proposed methods were successfully applied for the assay of MLT in laboratory prepared mixtures containing up to 15% of DMLT and in commercial MLT tablets with recoveries of no less than 99.00%. No interference was observed from common pharmaceutical additives and the results compared favorably with those obtained by a reference method.

  14. Behaviour of carbon-bearing impurity suspensions in sodium loops

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kozlov, F A; Zagorulko, Yu I; Alexseev, V V [Institute of Physics and Power Engineering, Obninsk (USSR)

    1980-05-01

    The experimental estimation results of the carbon-bearing impurity particle sizes in sodium by the sedimentometric analysis methods are presented. The techniques and results of the mass transfer calculations between the sodium flows contained the carbon-bearing impurity disperse phase, and the channel walls, the carbon particles solution kinetics and the soluble carbon near-wall concentration in channel with allowance for the flow-wall mass transfer processes, are given. (author)

  15. Behaviour of carbon-bearing impurity suspensions in sodium loops

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kozlov, F.A.; Zagorulko, Yu.I.; Alexseev, V.V.

    1980-01-01

    The experimental estimation results of the carbon-bearing impurity particle sizes in sodium by the sedimentometric analysis methods are presented. The techniques and results of the mass transfer calculations between the sodium flows contained the carbon-bearing impurity disperse phase, and the channel walls, the carbon particles solution kinetics and the soluble carbon near-wall concentration in channel with allowance for the flow-wall mass transfer processes, are given. (author)

  16. The Effect of Ultrasound on the Crystallisation of Paracetamol in the Presence of Structurally Similar Impurities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thai T. H. Nguyen

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Sono-crystallisation has been used to enhance crystalline product quality particularly in terms of purity, particle size and size distribution. In this work, the effect of impurities and ultrasound on crystallisation processes (nucleation temperature, yield and crystal properties (crystal size distribution determined by Focused Beam Reflectance Measurement (FBRM, crystal habit, filtration rate and impurity content in the crystal product by Liquid Chromatography-Mass Spectroscopy (LC-MS were investigated in bulk suspension crystallisation experiments with and without the use of ultrasound. The results demonstrate that ultrasonic intervention has a significant effect on both crystallisation and product crystal properties. It increases the nucleation rate resulting in smaller particles and a narrower Particle Size Distribution (PSD, the yield has been shown to be increase as has the product purity. The effect of ultrasound is to reduce the level acetanilide impurity incorporated during growth from a 2 mol% solution of the selected impurity from 0.85 mol% to 0.35 mol% and likewise ultrasound reduces the uptake of metacetamol from 1.88 mol% to 1.52 mol%.

  17. Determinants of Successful Internationalisation Processes in Business Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradford, Henry; Guzmán, Alexander; Trujillo, María-Andrea

    2017-01-01

    We analyse the internationalisation process in business schools as a response to the globalisation phenomena and argue that environmental pressures, isomorphic forces, the pool of internal resources and the alignment of the process with the institution's general strategic plan are the main determinants of a successful internationalisation process.…

  18. Determination of 21 trace impurities in UO2 with tributyl phosphate chromatographic separation-USN-inductively coupled/atomic emission spectrometric

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hou Lieqi; Wang Shuan; Li Jie

    1996-03-01

    A method of tributyl phosphate chromatographic separation-USN-inductively coupled/atomic emission spectrometric was selected. And the parameters, interference of acid concentrations, interference of coexisting elements, selecting of flow for carrier gas, solution temperature were studied. When the sampling amount is 250 mg, the determination range for Al, Ag, Ba, Ca, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, In, Li, Mg, Mn, Mo, Ni, Pb, Sn, Ti, V, Y and Zn are 0.2∼100 ng· -1 , recovery are 94%∼110%. The RSD (n 8) are 0.8%∼6.2%. (3 refs., 4 tabs.)

  19. Standard test method for determination of impurities in plutonium: acid dissolution, ion exchange matrix separation, and inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopic (ICP/AES) analysis

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2003-01-01

    1.1 This specification covers blended uranium trioxide (UO3), U3O8, or mixtures of the two, powders that are intended for conversion into a sinterable uranium dioxide (UO2) powder by means of a direct reduction process. The UO2 powder product of the reduction process must meet the requirements of Specification C 753 and be suitable for subsequent UO2 pellet fabrication by pressing and sintering methods. This specification applies to uranium oxides with a 235U enrichment less than 5 %. 1.2 This specification includes chemical, physical, and test method requirements for uranium oxide powders as they relate to the suitability of the powder for storage, transportation, and direct reduction to UO2 powder. This specification is applicable to uranium oxide powders for such use from any source. 1.3 The scope of this specification does not comprehensively cover all provisions for preventing criticality accidents, for health and safety, or for shipping. Observance of this specification does not relieve the user of th...

  20. Qualitative and Quantitative Analysis of Organic Impurities in Feedwater of a Heat-Recovery Steam Generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chichirov, A. A.; Chichirova, N. D.; Filimonova, A. A.; Gafiatullina, A. A.

    2018-03-01

    In recent years, combined-cycle units with heat-recovery steam generators have been constructed and commissioned extensively in the European part of Russia. By the example of the Kazan Cogeneration Power Station no. 3 (TETs-3), an affiliate of JSC TGK-16, the specific problems for most power stations with combined-cycle power units that stem from an elevated content of organic impurities in the feedwater of the heat-recovery steam generator (HRSG) are examined. The HRSG is fed with highly demineralized water in which the content of organic carbon is also standardized. It is assumed that the demineralized water coming from the chemical water treatment department of TETs-3 will be used. Natural water from the Volga River is treated to produce demineralized water. The results of a preliminary analysis of the feedwater demonstrate that certain quality indices, principally, the total organic carbon, are above the standard values. Hence, a comprehensive investigation of the feedwater for organic impurities was performed, which included determination of their structure using IR and UV spectroscopy techniques, potentiometric measurements, and element analysis; determination of physical and chemical properties of organic impurities; and prediction of their behavior in the HRSG. The estimation of the total organic carbon revealed that it exceeded the standard values in all sources of water comprising the feedwater for the HRSG. The extracted impurities were humic substances, namely, a mixture of humic and fulvic acids in a 20 : 80 ratio, respectively. In addition, an analysis was performed of water samples taken at all intermediate stages of water treatment to study the behavior of organic substances in different water treatment processes. An analysis of removal of the humus substances in sections of the water treatment plant yielded the concentration of organic substances on the HRSG condensate. This was from 100 to 150 μg/dm3. Organic impurities in boiler water can induce

  1. Determination of deep-level impurities and their effects on the small-single and LF noise properties of ion-implanted GaAs MESFETs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sriram, S.; Kim, B.; Ghosh, P.K.; Das, M.B.; Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park; Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park

    1982-01-01

    A large number of deep levels, with energies ranging from Esub(c)-0.19eV to Esub(c)-0.9eV, have been identified and characterized using ion-implanted MESFET's on undoped and Cr-doped LEC-grown semi-insulating GaAs substrates. Measurement techniques used include deep level transient (DLTS) and steady state spectroscopic (DLSS) methods. Large capture cross-section values are obtained for levels below Esub(c)-0.5eV, possibly due to high electric field. Spectral densities of LF noise with distinct bulges have been shown to be related to deep levels. In some samples, natural deep level related oscillations have been observed and their ionization energies have been determined. (author)

  2. Surface impurity removal from DIII-D graphite tiles by boron carbide grit blasting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, R.L.; Hollerbach, M.A.; Holtrop, K.L.; Kellman, A.G.; Taylor, P.L.; West, W.P.

    1993-11-01

    During the latter half of 1992, the DIII-D tokamak at General Atomics (GA) underwent several modifications of its interior. One of the major tasks involved the removal of accumulated metallic impurities from the surface of the graphite tiles used to line the plasma facing surfaces inside of the tokamak. Approximately 1500 graphite tiles and 100 boron nitride tiles from the tokamak were cleaned to remove the metallic impurities. The cleaning process consisted of several steps: the removed graphite tiles were permanently marked, surface blasted using boron carbide (B 4 C) grit media (approximately 37 μm. diam.), ultrasonically cleaned in ethanol to remove loose dust, and outgassed at 1000 degrees C. Tests were done using, graphite samples and different grit blaster settings to determine the optimum propellant and abrasive media pressures to remove a graphite layer approximately 40-50 μm deep and yet produce a reasonably smooth finish. EDX measurements revealed that the blasting technique reduced the surface Ni, Cr, and Fe impurity levels to those of virgin graphite. In addition to the surface impurity removal, tritium monitoring was performed throughout the cleaning process. A bubbler system was set up to monitor the tritium level in the exhaust gas from the grit blaster unit. Surface wipes were also performed on over 10% of the tiles. Typical surface tritium concentrations of the tiles were reduced from about 500 dpm/100 cm 2 to less than 80 dpm/100 cm 2 following the cleaning. This tile conditioning, and the installation of additional graphite tiles to cover a high fraction of the metallic plasma facing surfaces, has substantially reduced metallic impurities in the plasma discharges which has allowed rapid recovery from a seven-month machine opening and regimes of enhanced plasma energy confinement to be more readily obtained. Safety issues concerning blaster operator exposure to carcinogenic metals and radioactive tritium will also be addressed

  3. Defect-impurity interactions in ion-implanted metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turos, A.

    1986-01-01

    An overview of defect-impurity interactions in metals is presented. When point defects become mobile they migrate towards the sinks and on the way can be captured by impurity atoms forming stable associations so-called complexes. In some metallic systems complexes can also be formed athermally during ion implantation by trapping point defects already in the collision cascade. An association of a point defect with an impurity atom leads to its displacement from the lattice site. The structure and stability of complexes are strongly temperature dependent. With increasing temperature they dissociate or grow by multiple defect trapping. The appearance of freely migrating point defects at elevated temperatures, due to ion bombardment or thermal annealing, causes via coupling with defect fluxes, important impurity redistribution. Because of the sensitivity of many metal-in-metal implanted systems to radiation damage the understanding of this processes is essential for a proper interpretation of the lattice occupancy measurements and the optimization of implantation conditions. (author)

  4. Purification of simple substances by distillation with impurity hydrothermal oxidation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalashnik, O.N.; Nisel'son, L.A.

    1987-01-01

    A possibility of applying distillation method in water vapours for purification of simple substances from impurities is studied. Based on thermodynamic analysis of interaction processes in E-H 2 O system, conducted using a computer, it is as certained that SS, Se, Te, As, Cd, Hg can be purified from the majority of the impurities analysed by distillation in a water vapour flow. Behaviour of Zn, C, Ge, Al, Sb characteristic impurities under cadmium, arsenic and tellurium distillation is studied. Experiments on cadmium, arsenic and tellurium purification have confirmed, that distillation with hydrothermal oxidation of Zn, C, Ge impurities sometimes appears to be a more effective method as compared to distillation in a hydrogen flow

  5. Application of secondary ion emission to impurity control in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krauss, A.R.; Gruen, D.M.

    1979-01-01

    The extent to which high Z impurities enter the plasma of a magnetic confinement fusion device depends on the kinetic energy, angle of emission, and very importantly, the charge state of the ejected material. We have been studying both the fundamental process of secondary ion emission and possible techniques for producing surfaces which give rise to high ion fractions during sputtering, with a view to assessing the potential of this approach to impurity control in tokamaks. By carefully choosing materials exposed to fusion plasmas and by properly modifying the surface it may be possible to insure that nearly all the impurities are ejected as ions. As long as certain gas blanket configurations are avoided and especially if a divertor is used, it should then be possible to remove the impurities before they reach the plasma. The relative merits of a variety of materials are considered with regard to this application

  6. Modeling of ELM events and their effect on impurity enrichment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hogan, J.; Colchin, R.; Coster, D.; Baylor, L.; Fenstermacher, M.; Groth, M.; Wade, M.

    2003-01-01

    Modeling of transient impurity transport during large ELMs is used to explore basic processes which may determine ELM-averaged enrichment. The b2-Eirene code (solps4), used for DIII-D geometry, suggests that a complex sequence can occur during an ELM cycle in which a transiently detached phase, with relatively low enrichment, can occur even under nominally attached conditions. A slower recovery phase then follows, in which the effect of induced scrape-off layer flows can increase in importance. The model results are compared with available fast time-scale measurements. The observed increased enrichment with higher Z is similar to trends in basic particle reflection properties. Neon recycling processes may thus introduce a significant history effect, as illustrated by analysis of continuous, unforced neon accumulation in a DIII-D discharge with a well-characterized operational history

  7. Influence of impurities on silicide contact formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kazdaev, Kh.R.; Meermanov, G.B.; Kazdaev, R.Kh.

    2002-01-01

    Research objectives of this work are to investigate the influence of light impurities implantation on peculiarities of the silicides formation in molybdenum monocrystal implanted by silicon, and in molybdenum films sputtered on silicon substrate at subsequent annealing. Implantation of the molybdenum samples was performed with silicon ions (90 keV, 5x10 17 cm -2 ). Phase identification was performed by X ray analysis with photographic method of registration. Analysis of the results has shown the formation of the molybdenum silicide Mo 3 Si at 900 deg. C. To find out the influence of impurities present in the atmosphere (C,N,O) on investigated processes we have applied combined implantation. At first, molybdenum was implanted with ions of the basic component (silicon) and then -- with impurities ions. Acceleration energies (40keV for C, 45 keV for N and 50 keV for O) were chosen to obtain the same distribution profiles for basic and impurities ions. Ion doses were 5x10 17 cm -2 for Si-ions and 5x10 16 cm -2 - for impurities. The most important results are reported here. The first, for all three kinds of impurities the decreased formation temperatures of the phase Mo 3 Si were observed; in the case of C and N it was ∼100 deg. and in the case of nitrogen - ∼200 deg. Further, simultaneously with the Mo 3 Si phase, the appearance of the rich-metal phase Mo 5 Si 3 was registered (not observed in the samples without additional implantation). In case of Mo/Si-structure, the implantation of the impurities (N,O) was performed to create the peak concentration (∼4at/%) located in the middle of the molybdenum film (∼ 150nm) deposited on silicon substrate. Investigation carried out on unimplanted samples showed the formation of the silicide molybdenum MoSi 2 , observed after annealing at temperatures 900/1000 deg. C, higher than values 500-600 deg. C reported in other works. It is discovered that electrical conductivity of Mo 5 Si 3 -films synthesized after impurities

  8. Impurity Correction Techniques Applied to Existing Doping Measurements of Impurities in Zinc

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearce, J. V.; Sun, J. P.; Zhang, J. T.; Deng, X. L.

    2017-01-01

    Impurities represent the most significant source of uncertainty in most metal fixed points used for the realization of the International Temperature Scale of 1990 (ITS-90). There are a number of different methods for quantifying the effect of impurities on the freezing temperature of ITS-90 fixed points, many of which rely on an accurate knowledge of the liquidus slope in the limit of low concentration. A key method of determining the liquidus slope is to measure the freezing temperature of a fixed-point material as it is progressively doped with a known amount of impurity. Recently, a series of measurements of the freezing and melting temperature of `slim' Zn fixed-point cells doped with Ag, Fe, Ni, and Pb were presented. Here, additional measurements of the Zn-X system are presented using Ga as a dopant, and the data (Zn-Ag, Zn-Fe, Zn-Ni, Zn-Pb, and Zn-Ga) have been re-analyzed to demonstrate the use of a fitting method based on Scheil solidification which is applied to both melting and freezing curves. In addition, the utility of the Sum of Individual Estimates method is explored with these systems in the context of a recently enhanced database of liquidus slopes of impurities in Zn in the limit of low concentration.

  9. RP-LC and TLC Densitometric Determination of Paracetamol and Pamabrom in Presence of Hazardous Impurity of Paracetamol and Application to Pharmaceuticals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ola Mohamed El-Houssini

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Two simple, accurate and reproducible methods were developed and validated for the simultaneous determination of paracetamol (PARA and pamabrom (PAMB in pure form and in tablets. The first method was based on reserved-phase high-performance liquid chromatography, on a Thermo Hypersil ODS column using methanol:0.01 M sodium hexane sulfonate:formic acid (67.5:212.5:1 v/v/v as the mobile phase. The flow rate was 2 mL/min and the column temperature was adjusted to 35 °C. Quantification was achieved with UV detection at 277 nm over concentration range of 100-600 and 4-24 μg/mL, with mean percentage recoveries were found to be 99.90 ± 0.586 and 99.26 ± 0.901 for PARA and PAMB, respectively. The second method was based on thin-layer chromatography separation of PARA and PAMB followed by densitometric measurement of the spots at 254 nm and 277 nm for PARA and PAMB respectively. Separation was carried out on aluminum sheet of silica gel 60F 254 using dichloromethane:methanol:glacial acetic acid (7.5:1:0.5 v/v/v as the mobile phase over concentration range of 1-10 and 0.32-3.20 μg per spot, with mean percentage recovery of 100.52 ± 1.332 and 99.71 ± 1.478 for PARA and PAMB, respectively. The methods retained their accuracy in presence of up to 50% of P-aminophenol and could be successfully applied in tablets.

  10. Time-Dependent Impurity in Ultracold Fermions: Orthogonality Catastrophe and Beyond

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Knap

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The recent experimental realization of strongly imbalanced mixtures of ultracold atoms opens new possibilities for studying impurity dynamics in a controlled setting. In this paper, we discuss how the techniques of atomic physics can be used to explore new regimes and manifestations of Anderson’s orthogonality catastrophe (OC, which could not be accessed in solid-state systems. Specifically, we consider a system of impurity atoms, localized by a strong optical-lattice potential, immersed in a sea of itinerant Fermi atoms. We point out that the Ramsey-interference-type experiments with the impurity atoms allow one to study the OC in the time domain, while radio-frequency (RF spectroscopy probes the OC in the frequency domain. The OC in such systems is universal, not only in the long-time limit, but also for all times and is determined fully by the impurity-scattering length and the Fermi wave vector of the itinerant fermions. We calculate the universal Ramsey response and RF-absorption spectra. In addition to the standard power-law contributions, which correspond to the excitation of multiple particle-hole pairs near the Fermi surface, we identify a novel, important contribution to the OC that comes from exciting one extra particle from the bottom of the itinerant band. This contribution gives rise to a nonanalytic feature in the RF-absorption spectra, which shows a nontrivial dependence on the scattering length, and evolves into a true power-law singularity with the universal exponent 1/4 at the unitarity. We extend our discussion to spin-echo-type experiments, and show that they probe more complicated nonequilibirum dynamics of the Fermi gas in processes in which an impurity switches between states with different interaction strength several times; such processes play an important role in the Kondo problem, but remained out of reach in the solid-state systems. We show that, alternatively, the OC can be seen in the energy-counting statistics

  11. Impurity penetration through the stochastic layer near the separatrix in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morozov, D.K.; Herrera, J.J.E.; Rantsev-Kartinov, V.A.

    1995-01-01

    It is shown that a stochastic layer produced by ripple perturbations near the separatrix in tokamaks, leads to anomalous plasma flow out of the bulk plasma along perturbed field lines, which brings out impurities. This suggests that the stochastic layer may play a cleaning role. There is an opposite process of anomalous impurity diffusion into the plasma. The balance of these two processes defines the impurity concentration in the bulk plasma. copyright 1995 American Institute of Physics

  12. Impurity bubbles in a BEC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timmermans, Eddy; Blinova, Alina; Boshier, Malcolm

    2013-05-01

    Polarons (particles that interact with the self-consistent deformation of the host medium that contains them) self-localize when strongly coupled. Dilute Bose-Einstein condensates (BECs) doped with neutral distinguishable atoms (impurities) and armed with a Feshbach-tuned impurity-boson interaction provide a unique laboratory to study self-localized polarons. In nature, self-localized polarons come in two flavors that exhibit qualitatively different behavior: In lattice systems, the deformation is slight and the particle is accompanied by a cloud of collective excitations as in the case of the Landau-Pekar polarons of electrons in a dielectric lattice. In natural fluids and gases, the strongly coupled particle radically alters the medium, e.g. by expelling the host medium as in the case of the electron bubbles in superfluid helium. We show that BEC-impurities can self-localize in a bubble, as well as in a Landau-Pekar polaron state. The BEC-impurity system is fully characterized by only two dimensionless coupling constants. In the corresponding phase diagram the bubble and Landau-Pekar polaron limits correspond to large islands separated by a cross-over region. The same BEC-impurity species can be adiabatically Feshbach steered from the Landau-Pekar to the bubble regime. This work was funded by the Los Alamos LDRD program.

  13. Capture of impurity atoms by defects and the distribution of the complexes under ion bormbardment of growing films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radzhabov, T.D.; Iskanderova, Z.A.; Arutyunova, E.O.; Samigulin, K.R.

    1982-01-01

    Theoretical study of capture of impurity gas atoms with defects during ion introduction of the impurity in the process of film growth with simultaneous diffusion has been carried out. Concentration profiles of forned impurity-defect complexes have been calculated analytically and numerically by means of a computer in film depth and in a substrate; basic peculiarities of impurity component formation captured with defects in a wide range of changing basic experimental parameters have been revealed. Effect of impurity capture with defects on amount and distribution of total concentration of impurity atoms and intensity of complete absorption of bombarding ions in films have been analyzed. Shown is a possibility for producing films with a high concentration level and almost uniform distribution of the impurity-defect complexes for real, achievable an experiment, values of process parameters as well as a possibility for increasing complete absorption of gaseous impurity wiht concentration growth of capture defects-traps

  14. Refractometry of TGS crystals doped with L-threonine impurity under uniaxial pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stadnyk, V. I.; Kiryk, Yu. I.

    2013-01-01

    The temperature and spectral dependences of the refractive indices of triglycine sulphate (TGS) crystals doped with L-threonine impurity have been investigated. It is established that the introduction of an impurity weakens the temperature dependence of refractive indices. The electronic polarizability, refractions, and parameters of UV oscillators of mechanically deformed impurity crystals are calculated. The temperature coefficients of the phase transition shift are determined

  15. Refractometry of TGS crystals doped with L-threonine impurity under uniaxial pressure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stadnyk, V. I., E-mail: vasylstadnyk@ukr.net; Kiryk, Yu. I. [Lviv National University (Ukraine)

    2013-07-15

    The temperature and spectral dependences of the refractive indices of triglycine sulphate (TGS) crystals doped with L-threonine impurity have been investigated. It is established that the introduction of an impurity weakens the temperature dependence of refractive indices. The electronic polarizability, refractions, and parameters of UV oscillators of mechanically deformed impurity crystals are calculated. The temperature coefficients of the phase transition shift are determined.

  16. Enhanced ionized impurity scattering in nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Jung Hyun; Lee, Seok-Hee; Shin, Mincheol

    2013-06-01

    The electronic resistivity in silicon nanowires is investigated by taking into account scattering as well as the donor deactivation from the dielectric mismatch. The effects of poorly screened dopant atoms from the dielectric mismatch and variable carrier density in nanowires are found to play a crucial role in determining the nanowire resistivity. Using Green's function method within the self-consistent Born approximation, it is shown that donor deactivation and ionized impurity scattering combined with the charged interface traps successfully to explain the increase in the resistivity of Si nanowires while reducing the radius, measured by Björk et al. [Nature Nanotech. 4, 103 (2009)].

  17. Tokamak impurity-control techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidt, J.A.

    1980-01-01

    A brief review is given of the impurity-control functions in tokamaks, their relative merits and disadvantages and some prominent edge-interaction-control techniques, and there is a discussion of a new proposal, the particle scraper, and its potential advantages. (author)

  18. Nonmagnetic impurities in magnetic superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mineev, V.P.

    1989-01-01

    The magnetization and magnetic field arising around the nonmagnetic impurity in magnetic superconductor with triplet pairing are found. The relationship of these results with the data of recent (gm)sR experiments in heavy fermionic superconductor U 1 - x Th x Be 13 is presented

  19. Complexity of Quantum Impurity Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bravyi, Sergey; Gosset, David

    2017-12-01

    We give a quasi-polynomial time classical algorithm for estimating the ground state energy and for computing low energy states of quantum impurity models. Such models describe a bath of free fermions coupled to a small interacting subsystem called an impurity. The full system consists of n fermionic modes and has a Hamiltonian {H=H_0+H_{imp}}, where H 0 is quadratic in creation-annihilation operators and H imp is an arbitrary Hamiltonian acting on a subset of O(1) modes. We show that the ground energy of H can be approximated with an additive error {2^{-b}} in time {n^3 \\exp{[O(b^3)]}}. Our algorithm also finds a low energy state that achieves this approximation. The low energy state is represented as a superposition of {\\exp{[O(b^3)]}} fermionic Gaussian states. To arrive at this result we prove several theorems concerning exact ground states of impurity models. In particular, we show that eigenvalues of the ground state covariance matrix decay exponentially with the exponent depending very mildly on the spectral gap of H 0. A key ingredient of our proof is Zolotarev's rational approximation to the {√{x}} function. We anticipate that our algorithms may be used in hybrid quantum-classical simulations of strongly correlated materials based on dynamical mean field theory. We implemented a simplified practical version of our algorithm and benchmarked it using the single impurity Anderson model.

  20. Insight into point defects and impurities in titanium from first principles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayak, Sanjeev K.; Hung, Cain J.; Sharma, Vinit; Alpay, S. Pamir; Dongare, Avinash M.; Brindley, William J.; Hebert, Rainer J.

    2018-03-01

    Titanium alloys find extensive use in the aerospace and biomedical industries due to a unique combination of strength, density, and corrosion resistance. Decades of mostly experimental research has led to a large body of knowledge of the processing-microstructure-properties linkages. But much of the existing understanding of point defects that play a significant role in the mechanical properties of titanium is based on semi-empirical rules. In this work, we present the results of a detailed self-consistent first-principles study that was developed to determine formation energies of intrinsic point defects including vacancies, self-interstitials, and extrinsic point defects, such as, interstitial and substitutional impurities/dopants. We find that most elements, regardless of size, prefer substitutional positions, but highly electronegative elements, such as C, N, O, F, S, and Cl, some of which are common impurities in Ti, occupy interstitial positions.

  1. Investigation of impurities present in recycling and reusing of scrap lead for accumulator industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farooq, A.; Irfan, N.; Chaudhry, M.M.; Nawab, S.

    2012-01-01

    Recycling and reusing are the basic strategies of reducing solid waste generated from industries. Millions of batteries containing toxic metals and poisonous wastes are discarded every year in Pakistan. Battery waste deposited in landfills increases the concentration of toxic metals in leachates obtained from landfill base. For this reason, recycling of locally available scrap lead has been focused. During reduction and refining stages, samples were obtained at various stages from a five ton lead smelting pot of an accumulator industry. Various impurities present were determined and removed in order to reuse in accumulators. X-ray fluorescence (XRF) and atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS) techniques were used to analyze the samples obtained at various stages of recycling. This work has been carried out to reduce these impurities and the refining process has thus been optimized. The lead thus obtained is 99.98 % pure. (author)

  2. Impurity incorporation in R.A.D. polysilicon layers and consequences on their electrical properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Revel, G.; Deschamps, N.; Deville, J.P.; Texier-Hervo, C.; Belouet, C.

    1982-01-01

    The growth of polysilicon layers by direct freezing of a film on a carbon ribbon by the RAD process goes along with a contamination of the silicon melt by carbon and its compositional impurities. This paper reports on this contamination effect studied mainly by means of neutron activation analyses (NAA) and its consequences on the electrical properties of the layers. The purification of the carbon ribbons in chlorine at high temperatures results in low contamination levels of the melt; NAA evidenced a significant segregation at the growth front, the effective partition coefficients determined being in the 10 - 1 to 10 - 3 range. Even though impurities are shown to impair the device performances, it is concluded that they are not necessarily incorporated in an electrically active form. Finally, AM 1 conversion efficiencies of 12% are reported for RAD cells 4 cm 2 in size. (Auth.)

  3. Influence of Impurities on the Radiation Response of the TlBr Semiconductor Crystal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robinson Alves dos Santos

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Two commercially available TlBr salts were used as the raw material for crystal growths to be used as radiation detectors. Previously, TlBr salts were purified once, twice, and three times by the repeated Bridgman method. The purification efficiency was evaluated by inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy (ICP-MS, after each purification process. A compartmental model was proposed to fit the impurity concentration as a function of the repetition number of the Bridgman growths, as well as determine the segregation coefficients of impurities in the crystals. The crystalline structure, the stoichiometry, and the surface morphology of the crystals were evaluated, systematically, for the crystals grown with different purification numbers. To evaluate the crystal as a radiation semiconductor detector, measurements of its resistivity and gamma-ray spectroscopy were carried out, using 241Am and 133Ba sources. A significant improvement of the radiation response was observed in function of the crystal purity.

  4. Properties of magnetic impurities embedded into an anisotropic Heisenberg chain with spin gap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schlottmann, P.

    2000-01-01

    We consider a U(1)-invariant model consisting of the integrable anisotropic easy-axis Heisenberg chain of arbitrary spin S embedding an impurity of spin S'. The host chain has a spin gap for all values of S. The ground state properties and the elementary excitations of the host are studied as a function of the anisotropy and the magnetic field. The impurity is located on a link of the chain and interacts only with both neighboring sites. The coupling of the impurity to the lattice can be tuned by the impurity rapidity p 0 (usually playing the role of the Kondo coupling). The impurity model is then integrable as a function of two continuous parameters (the anisotropy and the impurity rapidity) and two discrete variables (the spins S and S'). The Bethe ansatz equations are derived and used to obtain the magnetization of the impurity. The impurity magnetization is non-universal as a function of p 0 . For small fields the impurity magnetization is determined by the spin gap and the van Hove singularity of the rapidity band. For an overcompensated impurity (S'< S) at intermediate fields there is a crossover to non-Fermi-liquid behavior remnant from the suppressed quantum critical point

  5. Multi-impurity polarons in a dilute Bose-Einstein condensate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santamore, D H; Timmermans, Eddy

    2011-01-01

    We describe the ground state of a large, dilute, neutral atom Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) doped with N strongly coupled mutually indistinguishable, bosonic neutral atoms (referred to as ‘impurity’) in the polaron regime where the BEC density response to the impurity atoms remains significantly smaller than the average density of the surrounding BEC. We find that N impurity atoms with N ≠ 1 can self-localize at a lower value of the impurity-boson interaction strength than a single impurity atom. When the ‘bare’ short-range impurity-impurity repulsion does not play a significant role, the self-localization of multiple bosonic impurity atoms into the same single particle orbital (which we call co-self-localization) is the nucleation process of the phase separation transition. When the short-range impurity-impurity repulsion successfully competes with co-self-localization, the system may form a stable liquid of self-localized single impurity polarons. (paper)

  6. Breatherlike impurity modes in discrete nonlinear lattices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hennig, D.; Rasmussen, Kim; Tsironis, G. P.

    1995-01-01

    We investigate the properties of a disordered generalized discrete nonlinear Schrodinger equation, containing both diagonal and nondiagonal nonlinear terms. The equation models a Linear host lattice doped with nonlinear impurities. We find different types of impurity states that form itinerant...

  7. Risk Importance Determination Process of CANDU Maintenance Rule Function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seo, Mi Ro; Jo, Ha Yan; Hwang, Mi Jeong

    2009-01-01

    In Korea, Maintenance Rule (MR) programs development for all PWR were completed. However, in case of PHWR (CANDU type, Wolsong Unit 1,2,3,4), the study of MR program was delayed, since the design concepts and operating experiences are different from those of PWR. This paper describes the process and results for the risk importance determination process of functions in scope. The risk importance was determined by PSA Basic Event Mapping and Delphi method. For Delphi evaluation, Delphi evaluation item for CANDU need to be developed because the design and normal operation functions are different from PWR

  8. Impurity energy level in the Haldane gap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Wei; Lu Yu

    1995-11-01

    An impurity bond J' in a periodic 1D antiferromagnetic spin 1 chain with exchange J is considered. Using the numerical density matrix renormalization group method, we find an impurity energy level in the Haldane gap, corresponding to a bound state near the impurity bond. When J' J. The impurity level appears only when the deviation dev = (J'- J)/J' is greater than B c , which is close to 0.3 in our calculation. (author). 15 refs, 4 figs

  9. Silicon impurity release and surface transformation of TiO2 anatase and rutile nanoparticles in water environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Xuyang; Chen, Gexin; Erwin, Justin G.; Su, Chunming

    2014-01-01

    Surface transformation can affect the stability, reactivity, and toxicity of titanium dioxide (TiO 2 ) nanoparticles (NPs) in water environments. Herein, we investigated the release kinetics of Si impurity frequently introduced during NP synthesis and the resulting effect on TiO 2 NP transformation in aqueous solutions. The release of Si increased from 2 h to 19 d at three pHs with the order: pH 11.2 ≥ pH 2.4 > pH 8.2. The Si release process followed parabolic kinetics which is similar to diffusion controlled dissolution of minerals, and the release magnitude followed the order: 10 × 40 nm rutile > 50 nm anatase > 30 × 40 nm rutile. FTIR data indicated preferential dissolving of less polymerized Si species on NP surface. Surface potential and particle size of TiO 2 NPs remained almost constant during the 42-day monitoring, implying the unaffected stability and transport of these NPs by the incongruent dissolution of impurities. Highlights: • Si impurity may affect the colloid stability, reactivity, and toxicity of TiO 2 NPs. • Si impurity gradually released during 2 h – 19 d following a parabolic curve. • FTIR data indicated less polymerized Si species dissolved from TiO 2 NPs. • Surface potential and size of TiO 2 remained constant during impurity release. • NP production needs to consider ion release and environmental transformation. -- The incongruent dissolution of surface charge determining Si impurity did not significantly affect the surface potential and aggregation status of TiO 2 nanoparticles in aqueous solutions

  10. Investigation of impurity defects in α-iron by molecular dynamics method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kevorkyan, Yu.R.

    1986-01-01

    Investigation of the configuration of impurity defects in α-iron by the molecular dynamics method is presented. The Jhonson model potential has been used to calculate the interaction of matrix atoms. The impurity-matrix atom interaction is described by the same form of the potential shifted along the axis of interatomic distances for a definite value. The correspondence between the shift value and change in the radius of the impurity defect is established on the basis of calculation of the relaxation volume. Possible configurations of the impurity - interstitial matrix atom complexes are obtained for the given model of the impurity defect, dimensional boundaries of possible transitions between different configurations are determined. Formation and bound energies, relaxation volumes of impurity defects are calculated

  11. Influence of impurities on the surface morphology of the TIBr crystal semiconductor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, Robinson A. dos; Silva, Julio B. Rodrigues da; Martins, Joao F.T.; Ferraz, Caue de M.; Costa, Fabio E. da; Mesquita, Carlos H. de; Hamada, Margarida M.; Gennari, Roseli F.

    2013-01-01

    The impurity effect in the surface morphology quality of TlBr crystals was evaluated, aiming a future application of these crystals as room temperature radiation semiconductor detectors. The crystals were purified and grown by the Repeated Bridgman technique. Systematic measurements were carried out for determining the stoichiometry, structure orientation, surface morphology and impurity of the crystal. A significant difference in the crystals impurity concentration was observed for almost all impurities, compared to those found in the raw material. The crystals wafer grown twice showed a surface roughness and grains which may be due to the presence of impurities on the surface, while those obtained with crystals grown three times presented a more uniform surface: even though, a smaller roughness was still observed. It was demonstrated that the impurities affect strongly the surface morphology quality of crystals. (author)

  12. Anomalous diffusion, clustering, and pinch of impurities in plasma edge turbulence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Priego, M.; Garcia, O.E.; Naulin, V.

    2005-01-01

    The turbulent transport of impurity particles in plasma edge turbulence is investigated. The impurities are modeled as a passive fluid advected by the electric and polarization drifts, while the ambient plasma turbulence is modeled using the two-dimensional Hasegawa-Wakatani paradigm for resistive...... drift-wave turbulence. The features of the turbulent transport of impurities are investigated by numerical simulations using a novel code that applies semi-Lagrangian pseudospectral schemes. The diffusive character of the turbulent transport of ideal impurities is demonstrated by relative...... orientation determined by the charge of the impurity particles. Second, a radial pinch scaling linearly with the mass-charge ratio of the impurities is discovered. Theoretical explanation for these observations is obtained by analysis of the model equations. (C) 2005 American Institute of Physics....

  13. A one-dimensional plasma and impurity transport model for reversed field pinches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Veerasingam, R.

    1991-11-01

    In this thesis a one-dimensional (1-D) plasma and impurity transport model is developed to address issues related to impurity behavior in Reversed Field Pinch (RFP) fusion plasmas. A coronal non-equilibrium model is used for impurities. The impurity model is incorporated into an existing one dimensional plasma transport model creating a multi-species plasma transport model which treats the plasma and impurity evolution self-consistently. Neutral deuterium particles are treated using a one-dimensional (slab) model of neutral transport. The resulting mode, RFPBI, is then applied to existing RFP devices such as ZT-40M and MST, and also to examine steady state behavior of ZTH based on the design parameters. A parallel algorithm for the impurity transport equations is implemented and tested to determine speedup and efficiency

  14. 20 CFR 404.1619 - Quick disability determination process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Quick disability determination process. 404.1619 Section 404.1619 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION FEDERAL OLD-AGE, SURVIVORS AND... that is fully favorable to the individual or if there is an unresolved disagreement between the...

  15. 20 CFR 416.1019 - Quick disability determination process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Quick disability determination process. 416.1019 Section 416.1019 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION SUPPLEMENTAL SECURITY INCOME... disagreement between the disability examiner and the medical or psychological consultant, the State agency will...

  16. Impurity sublattice localization in ZnO revealed by li marker diffusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Azarov, A.Yu.; Knutsen, K.E.; Neuvonen, P.T.

    2013-01-01

    Sublattice localization of impurities in compound semiconductors, e.g., ZnO, determines their electronic and optical action. Despite that the impurity position may be envisaged based on charge considerations, the actual localization is often unknown, limiting our understanding of the incorporation...... and possible doping mechanisms. In this study, we demonstrate that the preferential sublattice occupation for a number of impurities in ZnO can be revealed by monitoring Li diffusion. In particular, using ion implantation, the impurity incorporation into the Zn sublattice (holds for, B, Mg, P, Ag, Cd, and Sb...

  17. Stacking change in MoS2 bilayers induced by interstitial Mo impurities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortés, Natalia; Rosales, Luis; Orellana, Pedro A; Ayuela, Andrés; González, Jhon W

    2018-02-01

    We use a theoretical approach to reveal the electronic and structural properties of molybdenum impurities between MoS 2 bilayers. We find that interstitial Mo impurities are able to reverse the well-known stability order of the pristine bilayer, because the most stable form of stacking changes from AA' (undoped) into AB' (doped). The occurrence of Mo impurities in different positions shows their split electronic levels in the energy gap, following octahedral and tetrahedral crystal fields. The energy stability is related to the accommodation of Mo impurities compacted in hollow sites between layers. Other less stable configurations for Mo dopants have larger interlayer distances and band gaps than those for the most stable stacking. Our findings suggest possible applications such as exciton trapping in layers around impurities, and the control of bilayer stacking by Mo impurities in the growth process.

  18. Observation of impurity accumulation and concurrent impurity influx in PBX

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sesnic, S.S.; Fonck, R.J.; Ida, K.; Couture, P.; Kaita, R.; Kaye, S.; Kugel, H.; LeBlanc, B.; Okabayashi, M.; Paul, S.; Powell, E.T.; Reusch, M.; Takahashi, H.; Gammel, G.; Morris, W.

    1987-01-01

    Impurity studies in L- and H-mode discharges in PBX have shown that both types of discharges can evolve into either an impurity accumulative or nonaccumulative case. In a typical accumulative discharge, Z eff peaks in the center to values of about 5. The central metallic densities can be high, n met /n e ≅ 0.01, resulting in central radiated power densities in excess of 1 W/cm 3 , consistent with bolometric estimates. The radial profiles of metals obtained independently from the line radiation in the soft X-ray and the VUV regions are very peaked. Concurrent with the peaking, an increase in the impurity influx coming from the edge of the plasma is observed. At the beginning of the accumulation phase the inward particle flux for titanium has values of 6x10 10 and 10x10 10 particles/cm 2 s at minor radii of 6 and 17 cm. At the end of the accumulation phase, this particle flux is strongly increased to values of 3x10 12 and 1x10 12 particles/cm 2 s. This increased flux is mainly due to influx from the edge of the plasma and to a lesser extent due to increased convective transport. Using the measured particle flux, an estimate of the diffusion coefficient D and the convective velocity v is obtained. (orig.)

  19. Process to determine light elements content of steel and alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quintella, Cristina M.A.L.T.M.H.; Castro, Martha T.P.O. [Universidade Federal da Bahia (IQ/UFBA), Salvador, BA (Brazil). Inst. de Quimica. LabLaser; Mac-Culloch, Joao N.L.M. [PETROBRAS, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2009-07-01

    The present work reports a process to determine qualitatively and quantitatively elements of molar mass inferior to 23 within materials, by X rays spectra associated with multivariate data analysis, or chemometric analysis. The spectra is acquired between 5 keV and 22 keV when the materials are exposed to X radiation. Here is reported the direct determination of carbon content in steel and metallic alloys. The process is more effective when using spectral regions which are not usually used. From the analysis of these spectral regions which were not considered before, it was possible to detect light elements with molar mass lower than 23, which have low capacity of absorbing and emitting radiation, but have high capacity of scattering radiation. The process here reported has the advantage that X-Ray spectra obtained are calibrated multivariately, showing high potential for development in order to be used in a portable field equipment. (author)

  20. Determination of import process during Yucca Mountain Site characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hastings, P.S.; Gwyn, D.W.; Wemheuer, R.F.

    1996-01-01

    Construction of an underground Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF) for characterizing the Yucca Mountain site precedes the design of a potential repository, with site characterization testing and ESF construction conducted as parallel activities. As a result of this fact, a program is required to: (1) provide for inclusion of the underground excavation into a potential repository, (2) minimize the potential impact of ESF construction on site characterization test results, and (3) minimize the potential impact of ESF construction and site characterization testing on the waste isolation capabilities of the site. At Yucca Mountain, the Determination of Importance (DI) process fulfills these goals. This paper addresses the evolution of the DI process; describes how the DI process fits into design, testing, and construction programs: and discusses how the process is implemented through specification requirements

  1. Phonon scattering by isotopic impurities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dacol, D.K.

    1974-06-01

    The effects upon vibrations of a perfect crystal lattice due to the replacement of some of its atoms by isotopes of these atoms are studied. The approach consists in considering the isotopic impurities as scattering centres for the quanta of the elastic waves the objective is to obtain the scattering amplitudes. These amplitudes are obtained through a canonical transformation method which was introduced by Chevalier and Rideau in the study of the Wentzel's model in quantum field theory

  2. Impurity diffusion in transition-metal oxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peterson, N.L.

    1982-06-01

    Intrinsic tracer impurity diffusion measurements in ceramic oxides have been primarily confined to CoO, NiO, and Fe 3 O 4 . Tracer impurity diffusion in these materials and TiO 2 , together with measurements of the effect of impurities on tracer diffusion (Co in NiO and Cr in CoO), are reviewed and discussed in terms of impurity-defect interactions and mechanisms of diffusion. Divalent impurities in divalent solvents seem to have a weak interaction with vacancies whereas trivalent impurities in divalent solvents strongly influence the vacancy concentrations and significantly reduce solvent jump frequencies near a trivalent impurity. Impurities with small ionic radii diffuse more slowly with a larger activation energy than impurities with larger ionic radii for all systems considered in this review. Cobalt ions (a moderate size impurity) diffuse rapidly along the open channels parallel to the c-axis in TiO 2 whereas chromium ions (a smaller-sized impurity) do not. 60 references, 11 figures

  3. Low Z impurity transport in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hawryluk, R.J.; Suckewer, S.; Hirshman, S.P.

    1978-10-01

    Low Z impurity transport in tokamaks was simulated with a one-dimensional impurity transport model including both neoclassical and anomalous transport. The neoclassical fluxes are due to collisions between the background plasma and impurity ions as well as collisions between the various ionization states. The evaluation of the neoclassical fluxes takes into account the different collisionality regimes of the background plasma and the impurity ions. A limiter scrapeoff model is used to define the boundary conditions for the impurity ions in the plasma periphery. In order to account for the spectroscopic measurements of power radiated by the lower ionization states, fluxes due to anomalous transport are included. The sensitivity of the results to uncertainties in rate coefficients and plasma parameters in the periphery are investigated. The implications of the transport model for spectroscopic evaluation of impurity concentrations, impurity fluxes, and radiated power from line emission measurements are discussed

  4. BWR water chemistry impurity studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ljungberg, L.G.; Korhonen, S.; Renstroem, K.; Hofling, C.G.; Rebensdorff, B.

    1990-03-01

    Laboratory studies were made on the effect of water impurities on environmental cracking in simulated BWR water of stainless steel, low alloy steel and nickel-base alloys. Constant elongation rate tensile (CERT) tests were run in simulated normal water chemistry (NWC), hydrogen water chemistry (HWC), or start-up environment. Sulfate, chloride and copper with chloride added to the water at levels of a fraction of a ppM were found to be extremely deleterious to all kinds of materials except Type 316 NG. Other detrimental impurities were fluoride, silica and some organic acids, although acetic acid was beneficial. Nitrate and carbon dioxide were fairly inoccuous. Corrosion fatigue and constant load tests on compact tension specimens were run in simulated normal BWR water chemistry (NWC) or hydrogen water chemistry (HWC), without impurities or with added sulfate or carbon dioxide. For sensitized Type 304 SS in NWC, 0.1 ppM sulfate increased crack propagation rates in constant load tests by up to a factor of 100, and in fatigue tests up to a factor of 10. Also, cracking in Type 316 nuclear grade SS and Alloy 600 was enhanced, but to a smaller degree. Carbon dioxide was less detrimental than sulfate. 3 figs., 4 tabs

  5. Determination of reduction yield of lithium metal reduction process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, In Kyu; Cho, Young Hwan; Kim, Taek Jin; Jee, Kwang Young

    2004-01-01

    Metal reduction of spent oxide fuel is the first step for the effective storage of spent fuel in Korea as well as transmutation purpose of long-lived radio-nuclides. During the reduction of uranium oxide by lithium metal to uranium metal, lithium oxide is stoichiometrically produced. By determining the concentration of lithium oxide in lithium chloride, we can estimate that how much uranium oxide is converted to uranium metal. Previous method to determine the lithium oxide concentration in lithium chloride is tedious and timing consuming. This paper describe the on-line monitoring method of lithium oxide during the reduction process

  6. Impact of impurities and cryoconite on the optical properties of the Morteratsch Glacier (Swiss Alps)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Mauro, Biagio; Baccolo, Giovanni; Garzonio, Roberto; Giardino, Claudia; Massabò, Dario; Piazzalunga, Andrea; Rossini, Micol; Colombo, Roberto

    2017-11-01

    The amount of reflected energy by snow and ice plays a fundamental role in their melting processes. Different non-ice materials (carbonaceous particles, mineral dust (MD), microorganisms, algae, etc.) can decrease the reflectance of snow and ice promoting the melt. The object of this paper is to assess the capability of field and satellite (EO-1 Hyperion) hyperspectral data to characterize the impact of light-absorbing impurities (LAIs) on the surface reflectance of ice and snow of the Vadret da Morteratsch, a large valley glacier in the Swiss Alps. The spatial distribution of both narrow-band and broad-band indices derived from Hyperion was analyzed in relation to ice and snow impurities. In situ and laboratory reflectance spectra were acquired to characterize the optical properties of ice and cryoconite samples. The concentrations of elemental carbon (EC), organic carbon (OC) and levoglucosan were also determined to characterize the impurities found in cryoconite. Multi-wavelength absorbance spectra were measured to compare the optical properties of cryoconite samples and local moraine sediments. In situ reflectance spectra showed that the presence of impurities reduced ice reflectance in visible wavelengths by 80-90 %. Satellite data also showed the outcropping of dust during the melting season in the upper parts of the glacier, revealing that seasonal input of atmospheric dust can decrease the reflectance also in the accumulation zone of the glacier. The presence of EC and OC in cryoconite samples suggests a relevant role of carbonaceous and organic material in the darkening of the ablation zone. This darkening effect is added to that caused by fine debris from lateral moraines, which is assumed to represent a large fraction of cryoconite. Possible input of anthropogenic activity cannot be excluded and further research is needed to assess the role of human activities in the darkening process of glaciers observed in recent years.

  7. Evaluation of the mineral impurities and wear down in alcohol and sugar industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bacchi, Marcio A.

    1993-01-01

    A tropical clime culture, the sugar cane is planted mainly in underdeveloped countries, being a important economic source. The agricultural sector received during many years funds for technological development, but the sugar cane pressing system did not receive significant technical evolution since the fifties. One of the problem needs solution is the low quality of the raw material, caused by the difficulty of the reaping operation, it causes exaggerated addiction of impurities. The industrial ware down in plants and distilleries does not come exclusively from the action from mineral impurities, occurring also in the processing of pure raw material, free of soil, but is known that the great increase in ware down especially in the extraction system due to the presence of soil on the cane. Keeping the level of minerals to the minimum, makes the ware down to follow to acceptable technical and economical levels. This paper discusses the possibility of quantify the ware down of the extraction equipment by neutron activation of samples collected in one sugar cane plant. For that, the study of the behavior of the elements from sugar cane itself and soil present as impurity and the ware down of the metallic equipment. It was not possible quantify any addition of ware down elements in cane and its derivatives, by the processing system. The iron demonstrated to be a potential tracer element of ware down but the high rates of soil makes difficult the measurement of this element, when proceeding from of the ware down. The reason iron/scandium might be useful in identification of iron of mechanical ware down origin, serving as label of soil origin. Iron and thorium are good tracers of soil in sugar cane loads, being usable for the determination of the impurities levels once known their concentration in the sugar cane original soils

  8. Impurity studies in fusion devices using laser-fluorescence-spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Husinsky, W.R.

    1980-08-01

    Resonance fluorescence excitation of neutral atoms using tunable radiation from dye lasers offers a number of unique advantages for impurity studies in fusion devices. Using this technique, it is possible to perform local, time-resolved measurements of the densities and velocity distributions of metallic impurities in fusion devices without disturbing the plasma. Velocities are measured by monitoring the fluorescence intensity while tuning narrow bandwidth laser radiation through the Doppler - broadened absorbtion spectrum of the transition. The knowledge of the velocity distribution of neutral impurities is particularly useful for the determination of impurity introduction mechanisms. The laser fluorescence technique will be described in terms of its application to metallic impurities in fusion devices and related laboratory experiments. Particular attention will be given to recent results from the ISX-B tokamak using pulsed dye lasers where detection sensitivities for neutral Fe of 10 6 atoms/cm 3 with a velocity resolution of 600 m/sec (0.1 eV) have been achieved. Techniques for exciting plasma particles (H,D) will also be discussed

  9. The use KPI's to determine the waste in production process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borsos, G.; Iacob, C. C.; Calefariu, G.

    2016-11-01

    In theory and practice of management is well-known Lean approach about forms of waste from production processes (Muda) and the method VSM (Value Stream Map), one of the most effective methods for determining the activities generating value within industrial companies. It is also obvious concern of the specialists for performance measurement regardless of purview of the organizations. The literature review has shown that the link between performance indicators and the objectives of the companies is researched in detail. However, the correlation between indicators and the forms of waste that generate deviations from the setpoints is rather nature practical and it depends on the talent and managerial skills of those directing production processes. The paper presents the results of a applied study, performed by the authors, through which it was has sought to will create a system of performance indicators specific to manufacturing activity that to be a useful tool to quantify the losses and to determining ways to improve default losses.

  10. Interplay of light and heavy impurities in a fusion plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaja, Mustafa [IPP, Garching (Germany); Tokar, Mikhail [IEK4, Juelich FZ, Juelich (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    Radiation from impurities eroded from the walls can lead to a broad spectrum of spectacular phenomena in fusion devices An example of such events are breathing oscillations observed in the large helical device (LHD), in long pulse discharges with a stainless steel divertor. They were characterized with oscillations of a period of a second in various plasma parameters. By optimizing magnetic geometry this operation mode, leading to a deteriorate plasma performance, can be avoided. Nonetheless it is of interest and practical importance to understand and firmly predict conditions for breathing phenomenon, in particular, in view of similar impurity environment in W-7 X stellarator. A qualitative explanation for breathing oscillations proposed earlier presumes that they arise due to non-linear synergetic interplay of diverse physical processes. A one-dimensional non-stationary model, describing the generation and transport of main, impurity particles and heat by including the radiation of high-Z (Fe) and low-Z (C and O) impurities is elaborated here. The calculations predict the appearance of oscillations in the relevant range of plasma parameters, reproduce well experimentally observed amplitudes and period of oscillations. It demonstrates that the smaller the fraction of the plasma interaction with a stainless steel surface, the higher the light impurity concentration needed to excite the breathing oscillations. This shows a way to avoid oscillations in future experiments.

  11. Quantum one dimensional spin systems. Disorder and impurities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brunel, V.

    1999-01-01

    This thesis presents three studies that are respectively the spin-1 disordered chain, the non magnetic impurities in the spin-1/2 chain and the reaction-diffusion process. The spin-1 chain of weak disorder is performed by the Abelian bosonization and the renormalization group. This allows to take into account the competition between the disorder and the interactions and predicts the effects of various spin-1 anisotropy chain phases under many different disorders. A second work uses the non magnetic impurities as local probes of the correlations in the spin-1/2 chain. When the impurities are connected to the chain boundary, the author predicts a temperature dependence of the relaxation rate (1/T) of the nuclear spin impurities, different from the case of these impurities connected to the whole chain. The last work deals with one dimensional reaction-diffusion problem. The Jordan-Wigner transformation allows to consider a fermionic field theory that critical exponents follow from the renormalization group. (A.L.B.)

  12. Local measurement of transport parameters for laser injected trace impurities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giannella, R; Lauro-Taroni, L [Commission of the European Communities, Abingdon (United Kingdom). JET Joint Undertaking

    1994-07-01

    A procedure has been developed that determines local measurements of transport parameters`s profiles for injected impurities. The measured profiles extend from the plasma centre up to a certain radial position (usually {rho} = 0.6-0.7). In the outer region of the plasma the procedure supplies ``most suitable extensions`` up to the plasma edge of the measured transport profiles. The procedure intrinsically assures consistency and excellent agreement between the simulated and experimental data of local broad band soft X-ray emissivity and intensities of individual emission lines from different ion states of the injected impurities. 4 refs., 3 figs.

  13. A theoretical study of impurity production at limiters in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pitcher, C.S.; Matthews, G.F.; Goodall, D.H.J.; McCracken, G.M.; Stangeby, P.C.

    1988-01-01

    The spatial distribution of neutral impurity emissions around graphite limiters in the DITE tokamak is investigated using a Monte Carlo neutral transport code based on physical sputtering. The Monte Carlo code results are compared with experiments for the CI distributions observed toroidally around the probe limiter and radially around the fixed limiter. The comparison between code and experiment demonstrates the ability of camera observations and Langmuir probe measurements to provide detailed information on the production of impurities at limiters. From the Monte Carlo simulation it is shown that the toroidal distribution of impurity emission is determined mainly by the geometry of the limiter and the radial variation of the sputtering yield, while the radial distribution is sensitive mainly to the sputtered atom velocity distribution and the rate coefficients for ionization and excitation

  14. A conceptual and calculational model for gas formation from impure calcined plutonium oxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lyman, John L.; Eller, P. Gary

    2000-01-01

    Safe transport and storage of pure and impure plutonium oxides requires an understanding of processes that may generate or consume gases in a confined storage vessel. We have formulated conceptual and calculational models for gas formation from calcined materials. The conceptual model for impure calcined plutonium oxides is based on the data collected to date

  15. Rapid determination of fluorine in the pulp process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivanenko, V.V.; Kustov, V.N.; Levitskaya, O.N.

    1994-01-01

    The control of enrichment of mineral raw materials in order to increase the yield of enriched minerals is an important problem of modern industry. A possible solution is an automatic control system (ACS), which makes possible the monitoring and optimization of the enrichment. In terms of future applications, the nuclear-physical analysis, which is based on the use of a radionuclide source of neutrons, is a promising method. The advantages of this method (high rate, the possibility of performing the analysis directly in the flow, high accuracy, and high sensitivity) make themselves evident in the determination of short-lived isotopes, such as F, Ag, Si, Al, V, etc. Both an instrumental complex and a method for the rapid neutron activation determination (RNAD) of fluorine in the pulp flow of the enrichment process of raw materials were developed at the Institute of Chemistry, Far East Division, Russian Academy of Sciences. The analytical complex for RNAD comprises an activator; a densitometer; a pump; a pulp-feed system; a gamma-ray detector; a data acquisition apparatus; and a computer for processing the input/output data and controlling the analysis. The authors found that the RNAD of fluorine using radionuclide Pu-Be sources allows the determination in a 6-L pulp under recirculation conditions with an error of less than 1% in 3-5 minutes. The method allows the routine monitoring of the enrichment process of mineral raw materials

  16. Modeling of the Microchemistry for Diffusion of Selected Impurities in Uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirkpatrick, J. R.; Bullock, J.S. IV

    2001-01-01

    Unalloyed metallic uranium used in some work done at Y-12 contains small quantities of impurities, the three most significant of which are carbon, iron, and silicon. During metallurgical processing, as the metal cools from a molten condition towards room temperature, the metallic matrix solution becomes supersaturated in each of the impurities whose concentration exceeds the solubility limit. Many impurity atoms form compounds with uranium that precipitate out of the solution, thus creating and growing inclusions. The objective of the present work is to study the distribution of impurity atoms about some of the inclusions, with a view toward examining the effect of the interaction between inclusions on the impurity atom distribution. The method used is time-dependent mass diffusion from the supersaturated solution to the surfaces of the inclusions. Micrographs of metal samples suggest that the inclusions form in successive stages. After each inclusion forms, it begins to draw impurity atoms from its immediate vicinity, thus altering the amounts and distributions of impurity atoms available for formation and growth of later inclusions. In the present work, a one-dimensional spherical approximation was used to simulate inclusions and their regions of influence. A first set of calculations was run to simulate the distribution of impurity atoms about the largest inclusions. Then, a second set of calculations was run to see how the loss of impurity atoms to the largest inclusions might affect the distribution of impurity atoms around the next stage of inclusions. Plots are shown for the estimated distributions of impurity atoms in the region of influence about the inclusions for the three impurities studied. The authors believe that these distributions are qualitatively correct. However, there is enough uncertainty about precisely when inclusions nucleate and begin to grow that one should not put too much reliance on the quantitative results. This work does provide a

  17. Colorimetric determination of reducing normality in the Purex process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baumann, E.W.

    1983-07-01

    Adjustment of the valence state of plutonium from extractable Pu(IV) to nonextractable Pu(III) in the Purex process is accomplished by addition of reductants such as Fe(II), hydroxylamine nitrate (HAN), or U(IV). To implement on-line monitoring of this reduction step for improved process control at the Savannah River Plant, a simple colorimetric method for determining excess reductant (reducing normality) was developed. The method is based on formation of a colored complex of Fe(II) with FerroZine (Hach Chemical Company). The concentration of Fe(II) is determined directly. The concentration of HAN or U(IV), in addition to Fe(II), is determined indirectly as Fe(II), produced through reduction of Fe(III). Experimental conditions for a HAN-Fe(III) reaction of known stoichiometry were established. The effect of hydrazine, which stabilizes U(IV), was also determined. Real-time measurements of color development were made that simulated on-line performance. A laboratory analytical procedure is included. 5 references, 8 figures

  18. Impurity Role In Mechanically Induced Defects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howell, R.H.; Asoka-Kumar, P.; Hartley, J.; Sterne, P.

    2000-01-01

    An improved understanding of dislocation dynamics and interactions is an outstanding problem in the multi scale modeling of materials properties, and is the current focus of major theoretical efforts world wide. We have developed experimental and theoretical tools that will enable us to measure and calculate quantities defined by the defect structure. Unique to the measurements is a new spectroscopy that determines the detailed elemental composition at the defect site. The measurements are based on positron annihilation spectroscopy performed with a 3 MeV positron beam [1]. Positron annihilation spectroscopy is highly sensitive to dislocations and associated defects and can provide unique elements of the defect size and structure. Performing this spectroscopy with a highly penetrating positron beam enables flexibility in sample handling. Experiments on fatigued and stressed samples have been done and in situ measurement capabilities have been developed. We have recently performed significant upgrades to the accelerator operation and novel new experiments have been performed [2-4] To relate the spectrographic results and the detailed structure of a defect requires detailed calculations. Measurements are coupled with calculated results based on a description of positions of atoms at the defect. This gives an atomistic view of dislocations and associated defects including impurity interactions. Our ability to probe impurity interactions is a unique contribution to defect understanding not easily addressed by other atomistic spectroscopies

  19. Determination of Properties of Selected Fresh and Processed Medicinal Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shirley G. Cabrera

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The study aimed to determine the chemical properties, bioactive compounds, antioxidant activity and toxicity level of fresh and processed medicinal plants such as corn (Zea mays silk, pancitpancitan (Peperomiapellucida leaves, pandan (Pandanus amaryllifolius leaves, and commercially available tea. The toxicity level of the samples was measured using the Brine Shrimp Lethality Assay (BSLA. Statistical analysis was done using Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS. Results showed that in terms of chemical properties there is significant difference between fresh and processed corn silk except in crude fiber content was noted. Based on proximate analyses of fresh and processed medicinal plants specifically in terms of % moisture, %crude protein and % total carbohydrates were also observed. In addition, there is also significant difference on bioactive compound contents such as total flavonoids and total phenolics between fresh and processed corn silk except in total vitamin E (TVE content. Pandan and pancit-pancitan showed significant difference in all bioactive compounds except in total antioxidant content (TAC. Fresh pancit-pancitan has the highest total phenolics content (TPC and TAC, while the fresh and processed corn silk has the lowest TAC and TVE content, respectively. Furthermore, results of BSLA for the three medicinal plants and commercially available tea extract showed after 24 hours exposure significant difference in toxicity level was observed. The percentage mortality increased with an increase in exposure time of the three medicinal plants and tea extract. The results of the study can served as baseline data for further processing and commercialization of these medicinal plants.

  20. A case study: application of statistical process control tool for determining process capability and sigma level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chopra, Vikram; Bairagi, Mukesh; Trivedi, P; Nagar, Mona

    2012-01-01

    Statistical process control is the application of statistical methods to the measurement and analysis of variation process. Various regulatory authorities such as Validation Guidance for Industry (2011), International Conference on Harmonisation ICH Q10 (2009), the Health Canada guidelines (2009), Health Science Authority, Singapore: Guidance for Product Quality Review (2008), and International Organization for Standardization ISO-9000:2005 provide regulatory support for the application of statistical process control for better process control and understanding. In this study risk assessments, normal probability distributions, control charts, and capability charts are employed for selection of critical quality attributes, determination of normal probability distribution, statistical stability, and capability of production processes, respectively. The objective of this study is to determine tablet production process quality in the form of sigma process capability. By interpreting data and graph trends, forecasting of critical quality attributes, sigma process capability, and stability of process were studied. The overall study contributes to an assessment of process at the sigma level with respect to out-of-specification attributes produced. Finally, the study will point to an area where the application of quality improvement and quality risk assessment principles for achievement of six sigma-capable processes is possible. Statistical process control is the most advantageous tool for determination of the quality of any production process. This tool is new for the pharmaceutical tablet production process. In the case of pharmaceutical tablet production processes, the quality control parameters act as quality assessment parameters. Application of risk assessment provides selection of critical quality attributes among quality control parameters. Sequential application of normality distributions, control charts, and capability analyses provides a valid statistical

  1. Process for determining the remediation category of hazardous substance sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sieben, A.K.

    1994-01-01

    An evaluation process has been developed that aids in selecting the appropriate remediation category of hazardous substance sites. Three general remediation categories have been established: No further Action: Potential Early Action: and Defer for RI/FS or Transition/Decontamination and Decommissioning. This evaluation method is a preliminary screening process only and will not identify the most appropriate remediation alternative for each site. The remedy selection process can proceed only after a remediation category is determined for each site. All sites are evaluated at a preliminary screening level to determine the general remediation category. After the first screen, a secondary evaluation is performed on both the PEA sites and the DEFER sites. For PEAs, this secondary evaluation will incorporate additional specific factors, such as a screening level risk assessment. For the DEFER sites feasibility factors will be used to distinguish between the sites which should undergo a normal RI/FS and the sites which will be recommended to be remediated in association with D ampersand D of buildings. Ultimately, all of the sites will be placed into one of four remediation categories

  2. Impurity control in toroidal devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-01-01

    This summary report on the Technical Committee Meeting organized by the IAEA and held in Naka-Gun, Japan, 13-15 February 1989, provides an overview of the results presented. Of the twenty-three papers presented, sixteen were devoted to tokamak experiments. These presented data of plasma behavior in the scrape-off layer and divertor regions, as well as effects of impurities on the core plasma; these are summarized here. Other papers summarized deal with plasma-wall interactions, including wall material behavior. Still others deal with theoretical work on physics modelling in the edge region. Refs, figs and tabs

  3. Sample processing method for the determination of perchlorate in milk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dyke, Jason V.; Kirk, Andrea B.; Kalyani Martinelango, P.; Dasgupta, Purnendu K.

    2006-01-01

    In recent years, many different water sources and foods have been reported to contain perchlorate. Studies indicate that significant levels of perchlorate are present in both human and dairy milk. The determination of perchlorate in milk is particularly important due to its potential health impact on infants and children. As for many other biological samples, sample preparation is more time consuming than the analysis itself. The concurrent presence of large amounts of fats, proteins, carbohydrates, etc., demands some initial cleanup; otherwise the separation column lifetime and the limit of detection are both greatly compromised. Reported milk processing methods require the addition of chemicals such as ethanol, acetic acid or acetonitrile. Reagent addition is undesirable in trace analysis. We report here an essentially reagent-free sample preparation method for the determination of perchlorate in milk. Milk samples are spiked with isotopically labeled perchlorate and centrifuged to remove lipids. The resulting liquid is placed in a disposable centrifugal ultrafilter device with a molecular weight cutoff of 10 kDa, and centrifuged. Approximately 5-10 ml of clear liquid, ready for analysis, is obtained from a 20 ml milk sample. Both bovine and human milk samples have been successfully processed and analyzed by ion chromatography-mass spectrometry (IC-MS). Standard addition experiments show good recoveries. The repeatability of the analytical result for the same sample in multiple sample cleanup runs ranged from 3 to 6% R.S.D. This processing technique has also been successfully applied for the determination of iodide and thiocyanate in milk

  4. Void growth suppression by dislocation impurity atmospheres

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weertman, J.; Green, W.V.

    1976-01-01

    A detailed calculation is given of the effect of an impurity atmosphere on void growth under irradiation damage conditions. Norris has proposed that such an atmosphere can suppress void growth. The hydrostatic stress field of a dislocation that is surrounded by an impurity atmosphere was found and used to calculate the change in the effective radius of a dislocation line as a sink for interstitials and vacancies. The calculation of the impurity concentration in a Cottrell cloud takes into account the change in hydrostatic pressure produced by the presence of the cloud itself. It is found that void growth is eliminated whenever dislocations are surrounded by a condensed atmosphere of either oversized substitutional impurity atoms or interstitial impurity atoms. A condensed atmosphere will form whenever the average impurity concentration is larger than a critical concentration

  5. Impurity-induced moments in underdoped cuprates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khaliullin, G.; Kilian, R.; Krivenko, S.; Fulde, P.

    1997-01-01

    We examine the effect of a nonmagnetic impurity in a two-dimensional spin liquid in the spin-gap phase, employing a drone-fermion representation of spin-1/2 operators. The properties of the local moment induced in the vicinity of the impurity are investigated and an expression for the nuclear-magnetic-resonance Knight shift is derived, which we compare with experimental results. Introducing a second impurity into the spin liquid an antiferromagnetic interaction between the moments is found when the two impurities are located on different sublattices. The presence of many impurities leads to a screening of this interaction as is shown by means of a coherent-potential approximation. Further, the Kondo screening of an impurity-induced local spin by charge carriers is discussed. copyright 1997 The American Physical Society

  6. Graphene plasmons: Impurities and nonlocal effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viola, Giovanni; Wenger, Tobias; Kinaret, Jari; Fogelström, Mikael

    2018-02-01

    This work analyzes how impurities and vacancies on the surface of a graphene sample affect its optical conductivity and plasmon excitations. The disorder is analyzed in the self-consistent Green's function formulation and nonlocal effects are fully taken into account. It is shown that impurities modify the linear spectrum and give rise to an impurity band whose position and width depend on the two parameters of our model, the density and the strength of impurities. The presence of the impurity band strongly influences the electromagnetic response and the plasmon losses. Furthermore, we discuss how the impurity-band position can be obtained experimentally from the plasmon dispersion relation and discuss this in the context of sensing.

  7. Determination of a cleaning and decontamination process using solvents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boutot, P.; Schipfer, P.

    1967-03-01

    This work has been carried out on samples of the white cotton serge material of which most of the working overalls of the Nuclear Research Centre are made. The aims are: - to determine,from the decontamination and cleaning points of view, the efficiency of various solvents (white-spirit, trichloroethylene, perchlorethylene and tri-chloro-trifluoroethane) and the role of additives likely to improve the treatment; - to control the textile from the wear and shrinkage points of view; - to try to develop a basic cleaning and decontamination process as a function of the possibilities of each solvent considered. (authors) [fr

  8. Upper critical magnetic field of superconducting films with magnetic impurities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lemberger, T.R.

    1978-01-01

    The upper critical magnetic field, H/sub c2/(T), of In-Mn and Pb-Mn alloy films was measured. H/sub c2/ was determined from the resistance of the films. The results were compared with the theory of Fulde and Maki. This theory assumes that the electron-phonon coupling is weak, and that the interaction between the impurity spins and the conduction electron spins is weak. The theory predicts that the pair-breaking effect of the magnetic impurities is temperature-independent, and that the pair-breaking effects of the magnetic impurities and the applied magnetic field are additive. Furthermore, it predicts explicitly the temperature dependence of H/sub c2/. The temperature dependence of H/sub c2/ for the In-Mn alloy films is well described by the Fulde-Maki theory, despite the moderately strong electron-phonon coupling and the strong interaction between the impurity spins and the conduction electron spins. The temperature dependence of H/sub c2/ for the Pb-Mn alloy films is not well described by the Fulde-Maki theory, probably due to the strong electron-phonon coupling in Pb. However, even without a quantitatively correct theory, one can conclude from the Pb-Mn data that the pair-breaking effect of the magnetic impurities is temperature independent, and that the pair-breaking effects of the magnetic impurities and the applied magnetic field are additive. For some of the Pb-Mn alloy films, there was a region of positive curvature in H/sub c2/(T) near the zero-field transition temperature. This positive curvature is not understood

  9. Factors determining the viability of radiation processing in developing countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Linde, H.J. van der

    1988-01-01

    In the fifteen years since the introduction of radiation processing to South Africa, four commercial irradiation facilities have been established. These are involved in the processing of a large variety of products, from syringes and prostheses to strawberries and sugar yeast. Three of the facilities are devoted mainly to food irradiation and several thousand tonnes are now processed annually. During this period it was repeatedly experienced that the successful introduction of radiation processing in general, and food radurization in particular, on a commercial scale was critically dependent on the following factors: acceptance by the producer, industry and consumer; initial capital expenditure; running costs and overheads in general; and continuous throughput. All of these factors contribute to the processing cost which is the ultimate factor in determining the value/price ratio for the potential entrepreneur and customer of this new technology. After a market survey had identified the need for a new food irradiation facility to cope with the growing interest in commercial food radurization in the Western Cape, the above-mentioned factors were of cardinal importance in the design and manufacture of a new irradiator. The resulting batch-pallet facility which was commissioned in August 1986, is rather inefficient as far as energy utilization is concerned but this shortcoming is compensated for by its low cost, versatility and low hold-up. Although the facility has limitations as far as the processing of really large volumes of produce is concerned, it is particularly suitable not only for developing countries, but for developed countries in the introductory phase of commercial food radurization. (author)

  10. Measuring and controlling method for organic impurities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aizawa, Motohiro; Igarashi, Hiroo

    1995-01-01

    The present invention concerns measurement and control for organic impurities contained in ultrapurified water for use in a nuclear power plant. A specimen containing organic impurities leached out of anionic exchange resins and cationic exchange resins is introduced to an organic material decomposing section to decompose organic impurities into organic carbon and other decomposed products. Sulfate ions, nitrate ions, nitrite ions and carbon dioxide are produced by the decomposition of the organic impurities. As a next step, carbon dioxide in the decomposed products is separated by deaerating with a nitrogen gas or an argon gas and then a TOC concentration is measured by a non-dispersion-type infrared spectrometer. Further, a specimen from which carbon dioxide was separated is introduced to a column filled with ion exchange resins and, after concentrating inorganic ion impurities, the inorganic ion impurities are identified by using a measuring theory of an ion chromatographic method of eluting and separating inorganic ion impurities and detecting them based on the change of electroconductivity depending on the kinds of the inorganic ion impurities. Organic impurities can be measured and controlled, to improve the reliability of water quality control. (N.H.)

  11. Network formation determined by the diffusion process of random walkers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikeda, Nobutoshi

    2008-01-01

    We studied the diffusion process of random walkers in networks formed by their traces. This model considers the rise and fall of links determined by the frequency of transports of random walkers. In order to examine the relation between the formed network and the diffusion process, a situation in which multiple random walkers start from the same vertex is investigated. The difference in diffusion rate of random walkers according to the difference in dimension of the initial lattice is very important for determining the time evolution of the networks. For example, complete subgraphs can be formed on a one-dimensional lattice while a graph with a power-law vertex degree distribution is formed on a two-dimensional lattice. We derived some formulae for predicting network changes for the 1D case, such as the time evolution of the size of nearly complete subgraphs and conditions for their collapse. The networks formed on the 2D lattice are characterized by the existence of clusters of highly connected vertices and their life time. As the life time of such clusters tends to be small, the exponent of the power-law distribution changes from γ ≅ 1-2 to γ ≅ 3

  12. Polarizability of a crystal with impurities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goettig, S.

    1985-09-01

    The expression for the complex frequency- and wavevector-dependent longitudinal electronic polarizability due to the presence of a weak static disorder (e.g. impurities) in a crystal with an arbitrary band structure is derived. The quantum kinetic equation in the self-consistent-field approximation is solved, expanding the one-particle density operator in powers of the screened static imperfection field and a weak perturbing electric field. The polarizability is determined by the induced electronic charge density quadratic in the imperfection field and linear in the perturbing field, averaged over the statistical distribution of imperfections. The obtained expression, which accounts properly for the collective effects in the electronic plasma, takes also into account the polar coupling of the plasma with longitudinal optical phonons. The conductivity in the optical limit (q-vector→O) is calculated, and the correspondence with one-band effective-mass approximation is established. (author)

  13. DETERMINATION OF DIVERSITY OF THE WORKSTATUSES IN THE IMPLEMENTATION PROCESS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    TKACH T. V.

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Raising of problem. Implementation of the plans is accompanied by an increase in the uncertainty of the state of the production system, which largely depends on the organizational and technological decisions laid down in the calendar plan at the stage of its development. Determining the changes in the diversity of the system statuses, in terms of the implementation stages of the plan, will allow to outline the likely crisis periods and to prepare for them in advance. In accordance with this, research in the field of improving of the methodology for developing the calendar plans in order to expand of the factors on which its feasibility is assessed, determines the relevance of this work. Purpose of the article. To determine the impact of organizational and technological decisions of the calendar plan on the appearance of parametric failures of a separate work. Conclusion. A methodology for calculating the dynamics of the diversity of possible statuses the process of the eхecuting of a separate work, to monitor the intensity of the increase in the uncertainty of the system status by the stages of the implementation of the calendar plan.

  14. Influence of negative substrate bias voltage on the impurity concentrations in Zr films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, J.-W.; Bae, J.W.; Mimura, K.; Isshiki, M.

    2006-01-01

    Zr films were deposited on Si(1 0 0) substrates without a substrate bias voltage and with substrate bias voltages of -50 V and -100 V using a non-mass separated ion beam deposition system. Secondary ion mass spectrometry and glow discharge mass spectrometry were used to determine the impurity concentrations in a Zr target and Zr films. It was found that the total amount of impurities in the Zr film deposited at the substrate bias voltage of -50 V was much lower than that in the Zr film deposited without the substrate bias voltage. It means that applying a negative bias voltage to the substrate can suppress the increase in impurities of Zr films. Furthermore, it was confirmed that dominant impurity elements such as C, N and O have a considerable effect on the purity of Zr films and these impurities can be remarkably reduced by applying the negative substrate bias voltage

  15. Spectrochemical analysis of impurities in nickel and in nickel oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldbart, Z.; Lorber, A.; Harel, A.

    1981-11-01

    Various spectrochemical methods are described for the quantitative determination of 23 impurities in metallic nickel and in nickel oxide. The average limit of detection is from 1 to 5 ppm and the dynamic range lies over 2.5 orders of magnitude. The elements that were determined are: Al,B,Ba,Bi,Ca,Cd,Co,Cu,Fe,Ga,Ge,In,Mg,Mn,Mo,Nb,Si,Sn,Sr,Ti,Cr,V. (author)

  16. Determination of lead 210 in scales from industrial processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faria, Lígia S.; Moreira, Rubens M.; Kastner, Geraldo F.; Barbosa, João B.S.

    2017-01-01

    Industrial processes such as oil and gas extraction and groundwater exploitation are examples of installations that can accumulate naturally occurring radioactive materials (NORM) during the extraction and production. Lead-210 deposits in the production can be formed by the same mechanisms that occur in the environment through the support of Radon-222, (where 210 Pb is produced at 222 Rn decay) or without support, as 210 Pb. The objective of this work is to evaluate the mineralogical characteristics and determine the activity of lead-210 in the scales using the X-Ray Diffraction and Gamma Spectrometry techniques. Were analyzed fifteen samples, four scales from oil industry, ten scales from groundwater conductors and one for groundwater supply pipe. The highest activity found in the oil scale and groundwater conductors scale was 0.30 ± 0.06 Bq g -1 and 3.80 ± 0.20 Bq g -1 , respectively. (author)

  17. Determination of action zone in the nuclear / radiology handling process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ade Awalludin

    2013-01-01

    Assessment has been conducted on determination of action zone in nuclear or radiological emergency. The assessment is taken into account radiological risk level in nuclear or radiological emergency management process outside nuclear installation. Managing of nuclear emergency is same as that one of other emergency by adding the principles of radiation protection. This study aims to provide guidance in making of safety and security perimeter outside the nuclear installation for first responders during nuclear/radiological emergency based on dose rate, contamination level or distance from the scene. Separation of working zone is important for first responder safety that works in radiological environment in the event of nuclear or radiation emergency without violating their standard operating procedure. Value limit of safety and security perimeter has been made according to the conditions in Indonesia and considering the applicability in practical. (author)

  18. Determination of lead 210 in scales from industrial processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faria, Lígia S.; Moreira, Rubens M.; Kastner, Geraldo F.; Barbosa, João B.S., E-mail: ligsfaria@gmail.com, E-mail: rubens@cdtn.br, E-mail: gfk@cdtn.br, E-mail: jbsb@cdtn.br [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2017-11-01

    Industrial processes such as oil and gas extraction and groundwater exploitation are examples of installations that can accumulate naturally occurring radioactive materials (NORM) during the extraction and production. Lead-210 deposits in the production can be formed by the same mechanisms that occur in the environment through the support of Radon-222, (where {sup 210}Pb is produced at {sup 222}Rn decay) or without support, as {sup 210}Pb. The objective of this work is to evaluate the mineralogical characteristics and determine the activity of lead-210 in the scales using the X-Ray Diffraction and Gamma Spectrometry techniques. Were analyzed fifteen samples, four scales from oil industry, ten scales from groundwater conductors and one for groundwater supply pipe. The highest activity found in the oil scale and groundwater conductors scale was 0.30 ± 0.06 Bq g{sup -1} and 3.80 ± 0.20 Bq g{sup -1}, respectively. (author)

  19. Surface effects and impurity production in tokamak machines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Staib, P.; Staudenmaier, G.

    1978-01-01

    Plasma-wall interactions are presently investigated in two ways: a) The a priori assumption of a mechanism responsible for impurity release. Relevant experimental data can be used in a model and calculations made in order to understand the observed impurity behaviour in plasma. b) The comprehensive investigation of samples exposed to a plasma. Recent investigations have confirmed the earlier assumption that the interactions occur only in the topmost atomic layers of the wall, and so emphasize the major role of surface physics on this field. These investigations have further shown that besides atomic processes, such a desorption or sputtering, other processes occur, extending on a microscopic rather than an atomic scale. These are for example evaporation, arcing, and mechanical stress. Both aspects are discussed as far as possible in a quantitative way. The contribution of most probable processes is estimated using data available on flux and energy of particles and yields of single processes. The conclusion is reached that no process can be disregarded. Several processes seem to contribute to the impurity release and are different at different phases of the discharge. An interdependence between these processes is likely. (Auth.)

  20. Spectrophotometric determination of nitrite in simulated Purex Process solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Araujo, I.daC. de; Matsuda, H T; Araujo, B.F. de; Araujo, J.A. de

    1984-01-01

    A spectrophotometric method for nitrite determination in simulated Purex Process solutions is presented, utilizing the Griess reagent for the formation of the coloured azocompound with an absorption maximum at 525 nm. Molar absortivity was 36,262 and the sensitivity of the method 10/sup -6/M for nitrite. The calibration curve is linear in the range of 2 to 30..mu..g NO/sup -//sub 2//25 ml in cells of 1 cm optical path. The method can be used in the presence of uranium up to limits of an U/NO/sup -//sub 2/ ratio of 150. Test solutions were prepared to simulate composition and concentrations as obtained by irradiating standard fuel with a neutro flux of 3.2 x 10/sup 13/ n.s/sup -1/.cm/sup -2/, with a burn-up value of 33,000 Mwd/T and cooling time of two years. Nitrite determinations in these solutions were accurate within limits of 5%.

  1. Dressed topological insulators. Rashba impurity, Kondo effect, magnetic impurities, proximity-induced superconductivity, hybrid systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Posske, Thore Hagen

    2016-01-01

    Topological insulators are electronic phases that insulate in the bulk and accommodate a peculiar, metallic edge liquid with a spin-dependent dispersion. They are regarded to be of considerable future use in spintronics and for quantum computation. Besides determining the intrinsic properties of this rather novel electronic phase, considering its combination with well-known physical systems can generate genuinely new physics. In this thesis, we report on such combinations including topological insulators. Specifically, we analyze an attached Rashba impurity, a Kondo dot in the two channel setup, magnetic impurities on the surface of a strong three-dimensional topological insulator, the proximity coupling of the latter system to a superconductor, and hybrid systems consisting of a topological insulator and a semimetal. Let us summarize our primary results. Firstly, we determine an analytical formula for the Kondo cloud and describe its possible detection in current correlations far away from the Kondo region. We thereby rely on and extend the method of refermionizable points. Furthermore, we find a class of gapless topological superconductors and semimetals, which accommodate edge states that behave similarly to the ones of globally gapped topological phases. Unexpectedly, we also find edge states that change their chirality when affected by sufficiently strong disorder. We regard the presented research helpful in future classifications and applications of systems containing topological insulators, of which we propose some examples.

  2. Dressed topological insulators. Rashba impurity, Kondo effect, magnetic impurities, proximity-induced superconductivity, hybrid systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Posske, Thore Hagen

    2016-02-26

    Topological insulators are electronic phases that insulate in the bulk and accommodate a peculiar, metallic edge liquid with a spin-dependent dispersion. They are regarded to be of considerable future use in spintronics and for quantum computation. Besides determining the intrinsic properties of this rather novel electronic phase, considering its combination with well-known physical systems can generate genuinely new physics. In this thesis, we report on such combinations including topological insulators. Specifically, we analyze an attached Rashba impurity, a Kondo dot in the two channel setup, magnetic impurities on the surface of a strong three-dimensional topological insulator, the proximity coupling of the latter system to a superconductor, and hybrid systems consisting of a topological insulator and a semimetal. Let us summarize our primary results. Firstly, we determine an analytical formula for the Kondo cloud and describe its possible detection in current correlations far away from the Kondo region. We thereby rely on and extend the method of refermionizable points. Furthermore, we find a class of gapless topological superconductors and semimetals, which accommodate edge states that behave similarly to the ones of globally gapped topological phases. Unexpectedly, we also find edge states that change their chirality when affected by sufficiently strong disorder. We regard the presented research helpful in future classifications and applications of systems containing topological insulators, of which we propose some examples.

  3. Impurity effects in the electrothermal instability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomimura, A.; Azevedo, M.T. de

    1982-01-01

    A 'impure' plasma model is proposed based on the homogeneous hydrogen plasma used in the theory formulated by Tomimura and Haines to explain the electrothermal instable mode growth with the wave vector perpendicular to the applied magnetic field. The impurities are introduced implicitly in the transport coefficients of the two-fluid model through a effective charge number Z sub(eff). (Author) [pt

  4. Depolarization of diffusing spins by paramagnetic impurities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schillaci, M.E.; Hutson, R.L.; Heffner, R.H.; Leon, M.; Dodds, S.A.; Estle, T.L.

    1981-01-01

    We study the depolarization of diffusing spins (muons) interacting with dilute paramagnetic impurities in a solid using a simple computational model which properly treats the muon motion and preserves correct muon-impurity distances. Long-range (dipolar) and nearest-neighbor (contact) interactions are treated together. Diffusion parameters are deduced and model comparisons made for AuGd (300 ppm). (orig.)

  5. Elimination device for metal impurities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yanagisawa, Ko.

    1982-01-01

    Purpose: To enable reuse of adsorbing materials by eliminating Fe 3 O 4 films reduced with adsorbing performance by way of electrolytic polishing and then forming fresh membranes using high temperature steams. Constitution: An elimination device is provided to a coolant clean-up system of a reactor for eliminating impurities such as cobalt. The elimination device comprises adsorbing materials made of stainless steel tips or the likes having Fe 3 O 4 films. The adsorbing materials are regenerated by applying an electric current between grid-like cathode plates and anode plates to leach out the Fe 3 O 4 films, washing out the electrolytic solution by cleaning water and then applying steams at high temperature onto the adsorbing materials to thereby form fresh Fe 3 O 4 films again thereon. The regeneration of the adsorbing materials enables to eliminate Co 60 and the like in the primary coolant efficiently. (Moriyama, K.)

  6. Impurity radionuclide analysis for the radiopharmaceutical Na[123I] using gamma spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Araujo, Miriam Taina Ferreira de; Silva, Ronaldo Lins da; Poledna, Roberto; Delgado, Jose Ubiratan; Andrade, Erica de Araujo Lima de; Oliveira, Antonio Eduardo de; Laranjeiras, Adilson Silva; Braghirolli, Ana Maria Silveira

    2014-01-01

    During the process of manufacturing a radiopharmaceutical radionuclide impurities nature can be generated. With the need to meet the standards of ANVISA recommends that applications of doses as low as feasible in patients, the concern comes with a 'boost' that can come from these radionuclidic impurities generated in the production process and or manipulation. For Na[¹²³I] provided by IEN is important to quantify its major impurity, ¹²¹Te as well as gaining a better understanding of the parameters related to the decay scheme, since the data in the literature show discrepancies. (author)

  7. Impurities in Drug Products and Active Pharmaceutical Ingredients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kątny, M; Frankowski, M

    2017-05-04

    Analytical methods should be selective and fast. In modern times, scientists strive to meet the criteria of green chemistry, so they choose analytical procedures that are as short as possible and use the least toxic solvents. It is quite obvious that the products intended for human consumption should be characterized as completely as possible. The safety of a drug is dependent mainly on the impurities that it contains. High pressure liquid chromatography and ultra-high pressure liquid chromatography have been proposed as the main techniques for forced degradation and impurity profiling. The aim of this article was to characterize the relevant classification of drug impurities and to review the methods of impurities determination for atorvastatin (ATV) and duloxetine (DLX) (both in active pharmaceutical ingredients and in different dosage forms). These drugs have an impact on two systems of the human body: cardiac and nervous. Simple characteristics of ATV and DLX, their properties and specificity of action on the human body, are also included in this review. The analyzed pharmaceuticals-ATV (brand name Lipiron) and DLX (brand name Cymbalta)-were selected for this study based on annual rankings prepared by Information Medical Statistics.

  8. EUV impurity study of the Alcator tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terry, J.L.; Chen, K.I.; Moos, H.W.; Marmar, E.S.

    1978-01-01

    The intensity of resonance line radiation from oxygen, nitrogen, carbon and molybdenum impurities has been measured in the high-field (80kG), high-density (6x10 14 cm -3 ) discharges of the Alcator Tokamak, using a 0.4-m normal-incidence monochromator (300-1300A) with its line of sight fixed along a major radius. Total light-impurity concentrations of a few tenths of a percent have been estimated by using both a simple model and a computer code which included Pfirsch-Schlueter impurity diffusion. The resulting values of Zsub(eff), including the contributions due to both the light impurities and molybdenum, were close to one. The power lost through the impurity line radiation from the lower ionization states accounted for approximately 10% of the total Ohmic input power at high densities. (author)

  9. High-frequency EPR of surface impurities on nanodiamond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Zaili; Stepanov, Viktor; Takahashi, Susumu

    Diamond is a fascinating material, hosting nitrogen-vacancy (NV) defect centers with unique magnetic and optical properties. There have been many reports that suggest the existence of paramagnetic impurities near surface of various kinds of diamonds. Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) investigation of mechanically crushed nanodiamonds (NDs) as well as detonation NDs revealed g 2 like signals that are attributed to structural defects and dangling bonds near the diamond surface. In this presentation, we investigate paramagnetic impurities in various sizes of NDs using high-frequency (HF) continuous wave (cw) and pulsed EPR spectroscopy. Strong size dependence on the linewidth of HF cw EPR spectra reveals the existence of paramagnetic impurities in the vicinity of the diamond surface. We also study the size dependence of the spin-lattice and spin-spin relaxation times (T1 and T2) of single substitutional nitrogen defects in NDs Significant deviations from the temperature dependence of the phonon-assisted T1 process were observed in the ND samples, and were attributed to the contribution from the surface impurities. This work was supported by the Searle Scholars Program and the National Science Foundation (DMR-1508661 and CHE-1611134).

  10. FY 1974 report on the results of the Sunshine Project. Study on a system to refine/transport/store hydrogen and the safety technology (Investigational study of behavior of trace impurities in the liquefaction process); 1974 nendo suiso no seisei, yuso, chozo system oyobi hoan gijutsu ni kansuru kenkyu seika hokokusho. Ekika katei ni okeru biryo fujunbutsu no kyodo ni kansuru chosa kenkyu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1975-05-28

    Hydrogen gas as material is produced mostly by steam reforming of hydrocarbons, and includes a considerable amount of impurities such as carbon dioxide, nitrogen and oxygen. The concentration of impurities in the refined gas is approximately 1ppm. In the liquefaction process of hydrogen liquefaction plant, the gases entering the low temperature portion near the free expansion valve (J-T valve) are mostly oxygen and nitrogen. When oxygen is solidified, attached, accumulated near J-T valve, it incurs a possibility of exploding for reason of impact force, etc. by contact with the valve portion. A mixture of hydrogen and oxygen ignites at the minimum value of approximately 0.02 milli-joule, and therefore it has great danger of explosion. As viewed from a point of danger prevention, there is a possibility of explosion when the hydrogen-oxidizing agent mixture is formed. Accordingly, it is necessary to conduct an experiment for confirming the explosion at J-T valve portion. From viewpoints of prevention of explosion accident and running operation, it is necessary to experimentally grasp the definite allowable oxygen concentration. Further, it is necessary to establish a technology to continuously and accurately measure the concentration of trace impurities in hydrogen gas. (NEDO)

  11. An Implant-Passivated Blocked Impurity Band Germanium Detector for the Far Infrared, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose to investigate the feasibility of fabricating a germanium blocked-impurity-band (BIB) detector using a novel process which will enable us to: 1- fabricate...

  12. An Implant-Passivated Blocked Impurity Band Germanium Detector for the Far Infrared, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose to fabricate a germanium blocked-impurity-band (BIB) detector using a novel process which will enable us to: 1- fabricate a suitably-doped active layer...

  13. Determination of the Priority Aspect in Process of Determining Urban Residential Area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhekti Pribadi, Cherie; Hariyanto, Teguh

    2017-12-01

    Recently, the population growth is increasingly crowded in urban area and as a source of land supply for housing development into the needs of each individual becomes increasingly limited. the home is one of the basic rights of the people and therefore every citizen has the right to reside and got a good environment and healthy. Besides the house is also a basic human need to enhance the dignity, the dignity, quality of life and livelihood, as well as personal self-reflection in order to improve the standard of living, as well as the formation of character, character and personality of the nation. The construction of such housing should always take into consideration many aspects in order to create a balanced environment not only based on the suitability of land but also based on the aspects that exist in surrounding. Therefore, this study will be to analyze the priority aspect in process of determining urban residential area using Analytical Hierarchy Process Method. This method aims to determine priority aspect were used based on primary data collection form of questionnaires and interviews to respondents who expert in the field.

  14. Complexity in estimation of esomeprazole and its related impurities' stability in various stress conditions in low-dose aspirin and esomeprazole magnesium capsules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, Palavai Sripal; Hotha, Kishore Kumar; Sait, Shakil

    2013-01-01

    A complex, sensitive, and precise high-performance liquid chromatographic method for the profiling of impurities of esomeprazole in low-dose aspirin and esomeprazole capsules has been developed, validated, and used for the determination of impurities in pharmaceutical products. Esomeprazole and its related impurities' development in the presence of aspirin was traditionally difficult due to aspirin's sensitivity to basic conditions and esomeprazole's sensitivity to acidic conditions. When aspirin is under basic, humid, and extreme temperature conditions, it produces salicylic acid and acetic acid moieties. These two byproducts create an acidic environment for the esomeprazole. Due to the volatility and migration phenomenon of the produced acetic acid and salicylic acid from aspirin in the capsule dosage form, esomeprazole's purity, stability, and quantification are affected. The objective of the present research work was to develop a gradient reversed-phase liquid chromatographic method to separate all the degradation products and process-related impurities from the main peak. The impurities were well-separated on a RP8 column (150 mm × 4.6mm, X-terra, RP8, 3.5μm) by the gradient program using a glycine buffer (0.08 M, pH adjusted to 9.0 with 50% NaOH), acetonitrile, and methanol at a flow rate of 1.0 mL min(-1) with detection wavelength at 305 nm and column temperature at 30°C. The developed method was found to be specific, precise, linear, accurate, rugged, and robust. LOQ values for all of the known impurities were below reporting thresholds. The drug was subjected to stress conditions of hydrolysis, oxidation, photolysis, and thermal degradation in the presence of aspirin. The developed RP-HPLC method was validated according to the present ICH guidelines for specificity, linearity, accuracy, precision, limit of detection, limit of quantification, ruggedness, and robustness.

  15. Non-perturbative study of impurity effects on the Kubo conductivity in macroscopic periodic and quasiperiodic lattices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sánchez, Vicenta; Ramírez, Carlos; Sánchez, Fernando; Wang, Chumin

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we analyze the effects of site and bond impurities on the electrical conductance of periodic and quasiperiodic systems with macroscopic length by means of a real-space renormalization plus a convolution method developed for the Kubo–Greenwood formula. All analyzed systems are connected to semi-infinite periodic leads. Analytical and numerical conductivity spectra are obtained for one and two site impurities in a periodic chain, where the separation between impurities determines the number of maximums in the spectra. We also found transparent states at the zero chemical potential in Fibonacci chains of every three generations with bond impurities, whose existence was confirmed by an analytical analysis within the Landauer formalism. For many impurities, the spectral average of the conductivity versus the system length reveals a power-law behavior, when the distance between impurities follows the Fibonacci sequence. Finally, we present an analysis of the conductance spectra of segmented periodic and Fibonacci chains and nanowires

  16. Non-perturbative study of impurity effects on the Kubo conductivity in macroscopic periodic and quasiperiodic lattices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sánchez, Vicenta; Ramírez, Carlos; Sánchez, Fernando [Departamento de Física, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Apartado Postal 70-542, 04510 México D.F., México (Mexico); Wang, Chumin, E-mail: chumin@unam.mx [Instituto de Investigaciones en Materiales, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Apartado Postal 70-360, 04510 México D.F. (Mexico)

    2014-09-15

    In this paper, we analyze the effects of site and bond impurities on the electrical conductance of periodic and quasiperiodic systems with macroscopic length by means of a real-space renormalization plus a convolution method developed for the Kubo–Greenwood formula. All analyzed systems are connected to semi-infinite periodic leads. Analytical and numerical conductivity spectra are obtained for one and two site impurities in a periodic chain, where the separation between impurities determines the number of maximums in the spectra. We also found transparent states at the zero chemical potential in Fibonacci chains of every three generations with bond impurities, whose existence was confirmed by an analytical analysis within the Landauer formalism. For many impurities, the spectral average of the conductivity versus the system length reveals a power-law behavior, when the distance between impurities follows the Fibonacci sequence. Finally, we present an analysis of the conductance spectra of segmented periodic and Fibonacci chains and nanowires.

  17. Insight of solvent extraction process: Reassessment of trace level determinations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chandramouleeswaran, S. [Analytical Chemistry Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai, 400094 (India); Ramkumar, Jayshree, E-mail: jrk@barc.gov.in [Analytical Chemistry Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai, 400094 (India); Basu, M. [Chemistry Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai, 400094 (India)

    2016-09-28

    Solvent extraction is hoary yet modern technique with great scope of research due to the various intriguing phenomena in the system. Tri-n-butyl phosphate (TBP) is a well known extractant which has been extensively used for separation of uranium matrix prior to elemental profiling. In this paper, one of the impurities namely Fe is being considered as it posed a challenge to the separation due to its co-extraction with TBP along with uranium. In these studies, for the first time, the existence of cation-cation inner sphere complexes between the UO{sub 2}{sup 2+}and Fe{sup 3+} ions in both aqueous and organic phases have been establisted in addition to the selective separation of iron from uranium sample matrix using only TBP. The data from both spectrophotometric and thermophysical studies corroborated one another confirming the presence of cation-cation interactions (CCIs). The developed solvent extraction with only TBP showed almost no interferences on the iron extraction from matrix uranium and other co-ions like aluminum and copper. This has been the first time application of pure TBP for selective removal of iron from uranium samples. The procedure possessed excellent reproducibility and robustness. - Graphical abstract: Spectrophotometric studies indicate a possibility of cation-cation inner sphere complex formation between the ions (UO{sub 2}{sup 2+} and Fe{sup 3+}) in aqueous phase to a great extent but it is reduced in the organic phase due to the solvation of ions by TBP molecules. These results are corroborated by those of thermophysical studies. Solvent extraction procedure suitably modified to ensure selective and complete removal of iron from uranium matrix prior to its analysis by ICP-OES. The developed methodology was applied to analysis of uranium samples. - Highlights: • The presence of cation – cation inner sphere complexes between UO{sub 2}{sup 2+} and Fe{sup 3+} established. • A decreased tendency in organic layer due to TBP solvation.

  18. Investigation of impurity-helium solid phase decomposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boltnev, R.E.; Gordon, E.B.; Krushinskaya, I.N.; Martynenko, M.V.; Pel'menev, A.A.; Popov, E.A.; Khmelenko, V.V.; Shestakov, A.F.

    1997-01-01

    The element composition of the impurity-helium solid phase (IHSP), grown by injecting helium gas jet, involving Ne, Ar, Kr, and Xe atoms and N 2 molecules, into superfluid helium, has been studied. The measured stoichiometric ratios, S = N H e / N I m, are well over the values expected from the model of frozen together monolayer helium clusters. The theoretical possibility for the freezing of two layers helium clusters is justified in the context of the model of IHSP helium subsystem, filled the space between rigid impurity centers. The process of decomposition of impurity-helium (IH)-samples taken out of liquid helium in the temperature range 1,5 - 12 K and the pressure range 10-500 Torr has been studied. It is found that there are two stages of samples decomposition: a slow stage characterized by sample self cooling and a fast one accompanied by heat release. These results suggest, that the IHSP consists of two types of helium - weakly bound and strongly bound helium - that can be assigned to the second and the first coordination helium spheres, respectively, formed around heavy impurity particles. A tendency for enhancement of IHSP thermo stability with increasing the impurity mass is observed. Increase of helium vapor pressure above the sample causes the improvement of IH sample stability. Upon destruction of IH samples, containing nitrogen atoms, a thermoluminescence induced by atom recombination has been detected in the temperature region 3-4,5 K. This suggests that numerous chemical reactions may be realized in solidified helium

  19. Plasma Interactions with Mixed Materials and Impurity Transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rognlien, T. D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Beiersdorfer, Peter [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Chernov, A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Frolov, T. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Magee, E. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Rudd, R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Umansky, M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2016-10-28

    The project brings together three discipline areas at LLNL to develop advanced capability to predict the impact of plasma/material interactions (PMI) on metallic surfaces in magnetic fusion energy (MFE) devices. These areas are (1) modeling transport of wall impurity ions through the edge plasma to the core plasma, (2) construction of a laser blow-off (LBO) system for injecting precise amounts of metallic atoms into a tokamak plasma, and (3) material science analysis of fundamental processes that modify metallic surfaces during plasma bombardment. The focus is on tungsten (W), which is being used for the ITER divertor and in designs of future MFE devices. In area (1), we have worked with the University of California, San Diego (UCSD) on applications of the UEDGE/DUSTT coupled codes to predict the influx of impurity ions from W dust through the edge plasma, including periodic edge-plasma oscillations, and revived a parallel version of UEDGE to speed up these simulations. In addition, the impurity transport model in the 2D UEDGE code has been implemented into the 3D BOUT++ turbulence/transport code to allow fundamental analysis of the impact of strong plasma turbulence on the impurity transport. In area (2), construction and testing of the LBO injection system has been completed. The original plan to install the LBO on the National Spherical Torus Experiment Upgrade (NSTX-U) at Princeton and its use to validate the impurity transport simulations is delayed owing to NSTX-U being offline for substantial magnetic coil repair period. In area (3), an analytic model has been developed to explain the growth of W tendrils (or fuzz) observed for helium-containing plasmas. Molecular dynamics calculations of W sputtering by W and deuterium (D) ions shows that a spatial blending of interatomic potentials is needed to describe the near-surface and deeper regions of the material.

  20. Plasma Interactions with Mixed Materials and Impurity Transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rognlien, T. D.; Beiersdorfer, Peter; Chernov, A.; Frolov, T.; Magee, E.; Rudd, R.; Umansky, M.

    2016-01-01

    The project brings together three discipline areas at LLNL to develop advanced capability to predict the impact of plasma/material interactions (PMI) on metallic surfaces in magnetic fusion energy (MFE) devices. These areas are (1) modeling transport of wall impurity ions through the edge plasma to the core plasma, (2) construction of a laser blow-off (LBO) system for injecting precise amounts of metallic atoms into a tokamak plasma, and (3) material science analysis of fundamental processes that modify metallic surfaces during plasma bombardment. The focus is on tungsten (W), which is being used for the ITER divertor and in designs of future MFE devices. In area (1), we have worked with the University of California, San Diego (UCSD) on applications of the UEDGE/DUSTT coupled codes to predict the influx of impurity ions from W dust through the edge plasma, including periodic edge-plasma oscillations, and revived a parallel version of UEDGE to speed up these simulations. In addition, the impurity transport model in the 2D UEDGE code has been implemented into the 3D BOUT++ turbulence/transport code to allow fundamental analysis of the impact of strong plasma turbulence on the impurity transport. In area (2), construction and testing of the LBO injection system has been completed. The original plan to install the LBO on the National Spherical Torus Experiment Upgrade (NSTX-U) at Princeton and its use to validate the impurity transport simulations is delayed owing to NSTX-U being offline for substantial magnetic coil repair period. In area (3), an analytic model has been developed to explain the growth of W tendrils (or fuzz) observed for helium-containing plasmas. Molecular dynamics calculations of W sputtering by W and deuterium (D) ions shows that a spatial blending of interatomic potentials is needed to describe the near-surface and deeper regions of the material.

  1. Influence of iron impurities on defected graphene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faccio, Ricardo; Pardo, Helena [Centro NanoMat, Cryssmat-Lab, DETEMA, Polo Tecnológico de Pando, Facultad de Química, Universidad de la República, Cno. Saravia s/n, CP 91000 Pando (Uruguay); Centro Interdisciplinario en Nanotecnología, Química y Física de Materiales, Espacio Interdisciplinario, Universidad de la República, Montevideo (Uruguay); Araújo-Moreira, Fernando M. [Materials and Devices Group, Department of Physics, Universidade Federal de São Carlos, SP 13565-905 (Brazil); Mombrú, Alvaro W., E-mail: amombru@fq.edu.uy [Centro NanoMat, Cryssmat-Lab, DETEMA, Polo Tecnológico de Pando, Facultad de Química, Universidad de la República, Cno. Saravia s/n, CP 91000 Pando (Uruguay); Centro Interdisciplinario en Nanotecnología, Química y Física de Materiales, Espacio Interdisciplinario, Universidad de la República, Montevideo (Uruguay)

    2015-03-01

    Highlights: • The interaction among a multivacancy graphene system and iron impurities is studied. • The studied iron impurities were single atom and tetrahedral and octahedral clusters. • DFT calculations using the VASP code were performed. • The embedding of Fe affects the structure and electronic behavior in the graphene. • Half metal or semimetal behavior can be obtained, depending on the Fe impurities. - Abstract: The aim of this work is to study the interaction of selected iron cluster impurities and a multivacancy graphene system, in terms of the structural distortion that the impurities cause as well as their magnetic response. While originally, the interaction has been limited to vacancies and isolated metallic atoms, in this case, we consider small iron clusters. This study was undertaken using Density Functional Theory (DFT) calculations. The influence of the iron impurities in the electronic structure of the vacant graphene system is discussed. The main conclusion of this work is that the presence of iron impurities acts lowering the magnetic signal due to the occurrence of spin pairing between carbon and iron, instead of enhancing the possible intrinsic carbon magnetism.

  2. Impurity Induced Phase Competition and Supersolidity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karmakar, Madhuparna; Ganesh, R.

    2017-12-01

    Several material families show competition between superconductivity and other orders. When such competition is driven by doping, it invariably involves spatial inhomogeneities which can seed competing orders. We study impurity-induced charge order in the attractive Hubbard model, a prototypical model for competition between superconductivity and charge density wave order. We show that a single impurity induces a charge-ordered texture over a length scale set by the energy cost of the competing phase. Our results are consistent with a strong-coupling field theory proposed earlier in which superconducting and charge order parameters form components of an SO(3) vector field. To discuss the effects of multiple impurities, we focus on two cases: correlated and random distributions. In the correlated case, the CDW puddles around each impurity overlap coherently leading to a "supersolid" phase with coexisting pairing and charge order. In contrast, a random distribution of impurities does not lead to coherent CDW formation. We argue that the energy lowering from coherent ordering can have a feedback effect, driving correlations between impurities. This can be understood as arising from an RKKY-like interaction, mediated by impurity textures. We discuss implications for charge order in the cuprates and doped CDW materials such as NbSe2.

  3. Influence of iron impurities on defected graphene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faccio, Ricardo; Pardo, Helena; Araújo-Moreira, Fernando M.; Mombrú, Alvaro W.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • The interaction among a multivacancy graphene system and iron impurities is studied. • The studied iron impurities were single atom and tetrahedral and octahedral clusters. • DFT calculations using the VASP code were performed. • The embedding of Fe affects the structure and electronic behavior in the graphene. • Half metal or semimetal behavior can be obtained, depending on the Fe impurities. - Abstract: The aim of this work is to study the interaction of selected iron cluster impurities and a multivacancy graphene system, in terms of the structural distortion that the impurities cause as well as their magnetic response. While originally, the interaction has been limited to vacancies and isolated metallic atoms, in this case, we consider small iron clusters. This study was undertaken using Density Functional Theory (DFT) calculations. The influence of the iron impurities in the electronic structure of the vacant graphene system is discussed. The main conclusion of this work is that the presence of iron impurities acts lowering the magnetic signal due to the occurrence of spin pairing between carbon and iron, instead of enhancing the possible intrinsic carbon magnetism

  4. Impurity diagnosis of a KSTAR graphite divertor tile using laser induced breakdown spectroscopy technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Minju; Cho, Min Sang; Cho, Byoung Ick, E-mail: bicho@gist.ac.kr

    2017-04-15

    Laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) has been tested to diagnose impurity elements on a Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research (KSTAR) divertor tile. Spectral lines of various impurity elements such as iron, chromium, and nickel were detected from the divertor surface. The variation of spectra with consecutive laser pulses demonstrates the potential for depth profiling analysis for the deposited impurity layer. The LIBS plasma parameters have been qualitatively determined from analysis of the relative line intensities and linewidths for each element. The validity of this analysis has been checked with atomic spectral simulations.

  5. Impurity Trapping of Positive Muons in Metals

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    Polarized positive muons are implanted into metal samples. In an applied magnetic field the muon spin precession is studied. The line width in the precession frequency spectrum gives information about the static and dynamic properties of muons in a metal lattice. At temperatures where the muon is immobile within its lifetime the line width gives information about the site of location. At temperatures where the muon is mobile, the line width gives information on the diffusion process. It is known from experiments on quasi-elastic neutron scattering on hydrogen in niobium that interstitial impurities like nitrogen tend to act as traps for hydrogen. These trapping effects have now been studied systematically for muons in both f.c.c. metals (aluminium and copper) and b.c.c. metals (mainly niobium). Direct information on the trapping rates and the nature of the diffusion processes can be obtained since the muonic lifetime covers a time range where many of these processes occur.\\\\ \\\\ Mathematical models are set up ...

  6. Spectrochemical analysis of impurities in plutonium and its compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buffereau, M.; Crehange, G.; Deniaud, S.; Leclainche, C.

    1967-01-01

    After a review of previous works, various powdered or wet analytical methods are studied. One tries to give an explanation for some phenomena. A detailed know-how of studied methods is given. Validity of results is discussed. Problem of impurities in alloys analysis and non spectroscopic elements determination is quickly reviewed. One concludes to the interest of the use of some particular methods and the necessity of basic studies in order to obtain best information. (author) [fr

  7. Radiation and impurity measurements in FRX-C/T

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chrien, R.E.; McKenna, K.F.; Rej, D.J.; Tuszewski, M.

    1984-01-01

    Translation of Field-Reversed Configurations (FRCs) in the FRX-C/T device has provided better diagnostic access for radiation measurements. It is observed that radiated power accounts for 7 +- 2% of the total power losses, indicating that thermal conduction accounts for about half of the losses. It was determined through impurity seeding experiments that the oxygen fraction is 0.6 +- 0.2% and that oxygen can account for most of the radiated power

  8. Improvement of RFX performances by field and impurity control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buffa, A.; Gnesotto, F.

    1995-01-01

    The Reverse Field Pinch experiment RFX has been operated since 1992 with the principal objective of extending the knowledge of RFP confinement to larger dimensions and higher plasma currents. Experiments have been run between 500 and 900 kA; confinement parameters are mainly determined by magnetic field quality and plasma density behavior. Significant improvements were obtained by feedback controlling the poloidal field configuration and by reducing the impurities produced by plasma-wall interactions

  9. 36 CFR 242.15 - Rural determination process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... SUBSISTENCE MANAGEMENT REGULATIONS FOR PUBLIC LANDS IN ALASKA Program Structure § 242.15 Rural determination...) Development and diversity of the economy; (iii) Community infrastructure; (iv) Transportation; and (v... years shall be required before the non-rural determination becomes effective. (c) Current determinations...

  10. Low-Z impurities in PLT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hinnov, E.; Suckewer, S.; Bol, K.; Hawryluk, R.; Hosea, J.; Meservey, E.

    1977-11-01

    Low-Z impurities concentrations (oxygen and carbon) have been measured in different discharges in PLT. The contribution to Z/sub eff/, influx rates and radiation losses by oxygen and carbon were obtained. An inverse correlation was found between the low-Z impurity density (and also the edge ion temperature) and the high-Z impurity (tungsten) density. A one-dimensional computer transport model has been used to calculate the spatial profiles of different oxygen and carbon ionization states. This model predicts that fully stripped oxygen and carbon ions should exist near the plasma periphery

  11. Simulated impurity transport in LHD from MIST

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rice, J.E. [National Inst. for Fusion Science, Toki, Gifu (Japan)

    1998-05-01

    The impurity transport code MIST and atomic physics package LINES are used to calculate the time evolution of charge state density profiles, individual line emissivity profiles and total radiated power profiles for impurities in LHD plasmas. Three model LHD plasmas are considered; a high density, low temperature case, a low density, high temperature case and the initial LHD start-up plasma (500 kW ECH), using impurity transport coefficient profiles from Heliotron E. The elements oxygen, neon, scandium, iron, nickel and molybdenum are considered, both injected and in steady state. (author)

  12. Model determination and validation for reactive wetting processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yost, F.G.; O`Toole, E.J.; Sackinger, P.A. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Swiler, T.P. [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States). Dept. of Chemical and Nuclear Engineering

    1998-01-01

    It is shown that dissolutive wetting initially yields a metastable equilibrium. A compact model for the kinetics of approach to this metastable state is described. The technique for constructing these kinetics stems from the early work of Onsager and begins with a relationship for the entropy production. From this, a coupled set of nonlinear, ordinary differential equations can be written directly. The equations are solved numerically for the wetted area and compared with experimental data. The model captures many of the subtle complexities of dissolutive wetting such as multiple metastable states. Sessile drop experiments involving a variety of Bi-Sn alloys on solid Bi substrates were performed. Substrates prepared from small and large-grained polycrystals and single crystals were used to measure equilibrium and metastable contact angles and estimate the surface tension and equilibrium contact angle of the solid-liquid interface. The substrates were also used to investigate the coupling of the dissolution and wetting processes and to investigate the effect of substrate grain size on wetting. It was determined that the equilibrium wetting geometry is independent of linear scale and that grain size has little influence on wetting or dissolution in the Bi-Sn system. To investigate the atomic behavior of liquids at interfaces during wetting, the authors simulated wetting in the Ag-Cu system using molecular dynamics with atomic potentials and observed both atomic dynamics and structural correlations of the liquid-solid interface. The authors found that spreading is prompted by interactions between the liquid and the substrate surface that cause the liquid layer in contact with the substrate to take on some of the symmetry of the substrate surface and result in the formation of a liquid monolayer that extends beyond the major part of the liquid droplet.

  13. Impurities of oxygen in silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomes, V.M.S.

    1985-01-01

    The electronic structure of oxygen complex defects in silicon, using molecular cluster model with saturation by watson sphere into the formalism of Xα multiple scattering method is studied. A systematic study of the simulation of perfect silicon crystal and an analysis of the increasing of atom number in the clusters are done to choose the suitable cluster for the calculations. The divacancy in three charge states (Si:V 2 + , Si:V 2 0 , Si:V 2 - ), of the oxygen pair (Si:O 2 ) and the oxygen-vacancy pair (Si:O.V) neighbours in the silicon lattice, is studied. Distortions for the symmetry were included in the Si:V 2 + and Si:O 2 systems. The behavior of defect levels related to the cluster size of Si:V 2 0 and Si:O 2 systems, the insulated oxygen impurity of silicon in interstitial position (Si:O i ), and the complexes involving four oxygen atoms are analysed. (M.C.K.) [pt

  14. Nucleation of voids - the impurity effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, I-W; Taiwo, A.

    1984-01-01

    Nucleation of voids under irradiation in multicomponent alloys remains an unsolved theoretical problem. Of particular interest are the effects of nonequilibrium solute segregation phenomena on the critical nucleus and the nucleation rate. The resolution of the multicomponent nucleation in a dissipative system also has broader implication to the field of irreversible thermodynamics. The present paper describes a recent study of solute segregation effects in void nucleation. We begin with a thermodynamic model for a nonequilibrium void with interfacial segregation. The thermodynamic model is coupled with kinetic considerations of solute/solvent diffusion under a bias, which is itself related to segregation by the coating effect, to assess the stability of void embryos. To determine nucleation rate, we develop a novel technique by extending the most probable path method in statistical mechanics for nonequilibrium steady state to simulate large fluctuation with nonlinear dissipation. The path of nucleation is determined by solving an analogous problem on particle trajectory in classical dynamics. The results of both the stability analysis and the fluctuation analysis establish the paramount significance of the impurity effect via the mechanism of nonequilibrium segregation. We conclude that over-segregation is probably the most general cause for the apparently low nucleation barriers that are responsible for nearly ubiquitous occurrence of void swelling in common metals

  15. Impurity penetration and transport during VH-mode on DIII-D

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lippmann, S.I.; Evans, T.E.; Jackson, G.L.; West, W.P.

    1992-05-01

    A new modeling effort is made in order to understand the observed relatively low levels of impurity contamination during the VH-mode phase on DIII-D, as compared to those observed during the H-mode phase of selected discharges. The key element is the inclusion of the real 2-D flux surface geometry in the prediction of impurity penetration of sputtered atoms through the scrape-off layer into the core plasma. Of the elements which determine the impurity content in the plasma: sputtering yield, penetration, and core transport, the penetration through the scrape-off layer is found to be the most determinative factor. The low impurity content in VH-mode is attributed to the development of a scrape-off layer with higher density and temperature properties than those normally obtained in H-mode

  16. Ab initio study of the EFG tensor at Cd impurities in Sc2O3 semiconductor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Munoz, E.L.; Richard, D.; Errico, L.A.; Renteria, M.

    2009-01-01

    We present an ab initio study of diluted Cd impurities localized at both cation sites of the semiconductor Sc 2 O 3 . The electric-field-gradient (EFG) tensor at Cd impurities located at both cationic sites of the host structure was determined from the calculation of the electronic structure of the doped system. Calculations were performed with the full-potential augmented-plane wave plus local orbitals (APW+lo) method within the framework of the density functional theory. We studied the atomic structural relaxations and the perturbation of the electronic charge density induced by the impurities in the host system in a fully self-consistent way. We showed that the Cd impurity introduces an increase of 8% in the nearest oxygen neighbors bond-lengths, changing the EFG sign for probes located at the asymmetric cation site. The APW+lo predictions for the charged state of the Cd impurity were compared with EFG results existent in the literature, coming from time-differential γ-γ perturbed-angular-correlations experiments performed on 111 Cd-implanted Sc 2 O 3 powder samples. From the excellent agreement between theory and experiment, we can strongly suggest that the Cd acceptor impurities are ionized at room temperature. Finally, we showed that simple calculations like those performed within the point-charge model with antishielding factors do not correctly describe the problem of a Cd impurity in Sc 2 O 3 .

  17. Fabrication of Gate-tunable Graphene Devices for Scanning Tunneling Microscopy Studies with Coulomb Impurities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Han Sae; Tsai, Hsin-Zon; Wong, Dillon; Germany, Chad; Kahn, Salman; Kim, Youngkyou; Aikawa, Andrew S.; Desai, Dhruv K.; Rodgers, Griffin F.; Bradley, Aaron J.; Velasco, Jairo; Watanabe, Kenji; Taniguchi, Takashi; Wang, Feng; Zettl, Alex; Crommie, Michael F.

    2015-01-01

    Owing to its relativistic low-energy charge carriers, the interaction between graphene and various impurities leads to a wealth of new physics and degrees of freedom to control electronic devices. In particular, the behavior of graphene’s charge carriers in response to potentials from charged Coulomb impurities is predicted to differ significantly from that of most materials. Scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and scanning tunneling spectroscopy (STS) can provide detailed information on both the spatial and energy dependence of graphene's electronic structure in the presence of a charged impurity. The design of a hybrid impurity-graphene device, fabricated using controlled deposition of impurities onto a back-gated graphene surface, has enabled several novel methods for controllably tuning graphene’s electronic properties.1-8 Electrostatic gating enables control of the charge carrier density in graphene and the ability to reversibly tune the charge2 and/or molecular5 states of an impurity. This paper outlines the process of fabricating a gate-tunable graphene device decorated with individual Coulomb impurities for combined STM/STS studies.2-5 These studies provide valuable insights into the underlying physics, as well as signposts for designing hybrid graphene devices. PMID:26273961

  18. Hydrogenic impurity in double quantum dots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, X.F.

    2007-01-01

    The ground state binding energy and the average interparticle distances for a hydrogenic impurity in double quantum dots with Gaussian confinement potential are studied by the variational method. The probability density of the electron is calculated, too. The dependence of the binding energy on the impurity position is investigated for GaAs quantum dots. The result shows that the binding energy has a minimum as a function of the distance between the two quantum dots when the impurity is located at the center of one quantum dot or at the center of the edge of one quantum dot. When the impurity is located at the center of the two dots, the binding energy decreases monotonically

  19. Models for impurity effects in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hogan, J.T.

    1980-03-01

    Models for impurity effects in tokamaks are described with an emphasis on the relationship between attainment of high β and impurity problems. We briefly describe the status of attempts to employ neutral beam heating to achieve high β in tokamaks and propose a qualitative model for the mechanism by which heavy metal impurities may be produced in the startup phase of the discharge. We then describe paradoxes in impurity diffusion theory and discuss possible resolutions in terms of the effects of large-scale islands and sawtooth oscillations. Finally, we examine the prospects for the Zakharov-Shafranov catastrophe (long time scale disintegration of FCT equilibria) in the context of present and near-term experimental capability

  20. Impurity induced resistivity upturns in underdoped cuprates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Das, Nabyendu, E-mail: nabyendudas@gmail.com; Singh, Navinder

    2016-01-28

    Impurity induced low temperature upturns in both the ab-plane and the c-axis dc-resistivities of cuprates in the pseudogap state have been observed in experiments. We provide an explanation of this phenomenon by incorporating impurity scattering of the charge carriers within a phenomenological model proposed by Yang, Rice and Zhang. The scattering between charge carriers and the impurity atom is considered within the lowest order Born approximation. Resistivity is calculated within Kubo formula using the impurity renormalized spectral functions. Using physical parameters for cuprates, we describe qualitative features of the upturn phenomena and its doping evolution that coincides with the experimental findings. We stress that this effect is largely due to the strong electronic correlations.

  1. Impurity induced resistivity upturns in underdoped cuprates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Das, Nabyendu; Singh, Navinder

    2016-01-01

    Impurity induced low temperature upturns in both the ab-plane and the c-axis dc-resistivities of cuprates in the pseudogap state have been observed in experiments. We provide an explanation of this phenomenon by incorporating impurity scattering of the charge carriers within a phenomenological model proposed by Yang, Rice and Zhang. The scattering between charge carriers and the impurity atom is considered within the lowest order Born approximation. Resistivity is calculated within Kubo formula using the impurity renormalized spectral functions. Using physical parameters for cuprates, we describe qualitative features of the upturn phenomena and its doping evolution that coincides with the experimental findings. We stress that this effect is largely due to the strong electronic correlations.

  2. Final Report - Effects of Impurities on Fuel Cell Performance and Durability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trent Molter

    2012-08-18

    This program is focused on the experimental determination of the effects of key hydrogen side impurities on the performance of PEM fuel cells. Experimental data has been leveraged to create mathematical models that predict the performance of PEM fuel cells that are exposed to specific impurity streams. These models are validated through laboratory experimentation and utilized to develop novel technologies for mitigating the effects of contamination on fuel cell performance. Results are publicly disseminated through papers, conference presentations, and other means.

  3. Effects of helium impurities on superalloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Selle, J.E.

    1977-07-01

    A review of the literature on the effects of helium impurities on superalloys at elevated temperatures was undertaken. The actual effects of these impurities vary depending on the alloy, composition of the gas atmosphere, and temperature. In general, exposure in helium produces significant but not catastrophic changes in the structure and properties of the alloys. The effects of these treatments on the structure, creep, fatigue, and mechanical properties of the various alloys are reviewed and discussed. Suggestions for future work are presented

  4. Achieving improved ohmic confinement via impurity injection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bessenrodt-Weberpals, M.; Soeldner, F.X.

    1991-01-01

    Improved Ohmic Confinement (IOC) was obtained in ASDEX after a modification of the divertors that allowed a larger (deuterium and impurity) backflow from the divertor chamber. The quality of IOC depended crucially on the wall conditions, i.e. IOC was best for uncovered stainless steels walls and vanished with boronization. Furthermore, IOC was found only in deuterium discharges. These circumstances led to the idea that IOC correlates with the content of light impurities in the plasma. To substantiate this working hypothesis, we present observations in deuterium discharges with boronized wall conditions into which various impurities have been injected with the aim to induce IOC conditions. Firstly, the plasma behaviour in typical IOC discharges is characterized. Secondly, injection experiments with the low-Z impurities nitrogen and neon as well as with the high-Z impurities argon and krypton are discussed. Then, we concentrate on optimized neon puffing that yields the best confinement results which are similar to IOC conditions. Finally, these results are compared with eperiments in other tokamaks and some conclusions are drawn about the effects of the impurity puffing on both, the central and the edge plasma behaviour. (orig.)

  5. Mechanisms of impurity diffusion in rutile

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peterson, N.L.; Sasaki, J.

    1984-01-01

    Tracer diffusion of 46 Sc, 51 Cr, 54 Mn, 59 Fe, 60 Co, 63 Ni, and 95 Zr, was measured as functions of crystal orientation, temperature, and oxygen partial pressure in rutile single crystals using the radioactive tracer sectioning technique. Compared to cation self-diffusion, divalent impurities (e.g., Co and Ni) diffuse extremely rapidly in TiO 2 and exhibit a large anisotropy in the diffusion behavior; divalent-impurity diffusion parallel to the c-axis is much larger than it is perpendicular to the c-axis. The diffusion of trivalent impurity ions (Sc and Cr) and tetravalent impurity ions (Zr) is similar to cation self-diffusion, as a function of temperature and of oxygen partial pressure. The divalent impurity ions Co and Ni apparently diffuse as interstitial ions along open channels parallel to the c-axis. The results suggest that Sc, Cr, and Zr ions diffuse by an interstitialcy mechanism involving the simultaneous and cooperative migration of tetravalent interstitial titanium ions and the tracer-impurity ions. Iron ions diffused both as divalent and as trivalent ions. 8 figures

  6. Computer simulation model of the structure of ion implanted impurities in semiconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roman, E.; Majlis, N.

    1983-02-01

    A system of ion implanted impurities in a semiconductor is described by a Monte Carlo simulation of a non-equilibrium system of random distributed hard spheres. The radial distribution function of this system is found. The comparison is made with the fluid hard sphere case. The assumption of the absence either of annealing or diffusion of the impurities after the implantation process is also made. (author)

  7. Simulation of the accumulation kinetics for radiation point defects in a metals with impurity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iskakov, B.M.; Nurova, A.B.

    2001-01-01

    In the work a kinetics of vacancies (V) and interstitial atoms (IA) accumulation for cases when the V and IA are recombining with each other, absorbing by drain and capturing by impurity atoms has been simulated. The differential equations system numerical solution was carried out by the Runge-Kutta method. The dynamical equilibrium time achievement for the point radiation defects accumulation process in the metal with impurity is considered

  8. Sources of Information as Determinants of Product and Process Innovation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez, Jaime; Salazar, Idana; Vargas, Pilar

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we use a panel of manufacturing firms in Spain to examine the extent to which they use internal and external sources of information (customers, suppliers, competitors, consultants and universities) to generate product and process innovation. Our results show that, although internal sources are influential, external sources of information are key to achieve innovation performance. These results are in line with the open innovation literature because they show that firms that are opening up their innovation process and that use different information sources have a greater capacity to generate innovations. We also find that the importance of external sources of information varies depending on the type of innovation (product or process) considered. To generate process innovation, firms mainly rely on suppliers while, to generate product innovation, the main contribution is from customers. The potential simultaneity between product and process innovation is also taken into consideration. We find that the generation of both types of innovation is not independent.

  9. Sources of Information as Determinants of Product and Process Innovation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaime Gómez

    Full Text Available In this paper we use a panel of manufacturing firms in Spain to examine the extent to which they use internal and external sources of information (customers, suppliers, competitors, consultants and universities to generate product and process innovation. Our results show that, although internal sources are influential, external sources of information are key to achieve innovation performance. These results are in line with the open innovation literature because they show that firms that are opening up their innovation process and that use different information sources have a greater capacity to generate innovations. We also find that the importance of external sources of information varies depending on the type of innovation (product or process considered. To generate process innovation, firms mainly rely on suppliers while, to generate product innovation, the main contribution is from customers. The potential simultaneity between product and process innovation is also taken into consideration. We find that the generation of both types of innovation is not independent.

  10. Sources of Information as Determinants of Product and Process Innovation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we use a panel of manufacturing firms in Spain to examine the extent to which they use internal and external sources of information (customers, suppliers, competitors, consultants and universities) to generate product and process innovation. Our results show that, although internal sources are influential, external sources of information are key to achieve innovation performance. These results are in line with the open innovation literature because they show that firms that are opening up their innovation process and that use different information sources have a greater capacity to generate innovations. We also find that the importance of external sources of information varies depending on the type of innovation (product or process) considered. To generate process innovation, firms mainly rely on suppliers while, to generate product innovation, the main contribution is from customers. The potential simultaneity between product and process innovation is also taken into consideration. We find that the generation of both types of innovation is not independent. PMID:27035456

  11. Local chemistry of Al and P impurities in silica

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lægsgaard, Jesper; Stokbro, Kurt

    2000-01-01

    The local structure around Al and P impurities in silica is investigated using density-functional theory. Two distinct cases are considered: impurities substituting for a Si atom in alpha quartz, and impurities implanted in a stoichiometric alpha-quartz crystal. Both impurity elements are found t...

  12. Impurity and quaternions in nonrelativistic scattering from a quantum memory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Margetis, Dionisios; Grillakis, Manoussos G

    2008-01-01

    Models of quantum computing rely on transformations of the states of a quantum memory. We study mathematical aspects of a model proposed by Wu in which the memory state is changed via the scattering of incoming particles. This operation causes the memory content to deviate from a pure state, i.e. induces impurity. For nonrelativistic particles scattered from a two-state memory and sufficiently general interaction potentials in (1+1) dimensions, we express impurity in terms of quaternionic commutators. In this context, pure memory states correspond to null hyperbolic quaternions. In the case with point interactions, the scattering process amounts to appropriate rotations of quaternions in the frequency domain. Our work complements previous analyses by Margetis and Myers (2006 J. Phys. A 39 11567)

  13. Impurity studies and discharge cleaning in Doublet III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marcus, F.B.

    1979-10-01

    The goal of present and next generation tokamak experiments is to produce high-density, high-purity plasmas during high-power, extended-duration discharges. Plasma discharges with Z/sub eff/ values near unity and low concentrations of medium and high-Z metallic impurities have been obtained in Doublet III using a combination of low-power hydrogen discharge cleaning, gas puffing, precise plasma shape and position control, and high-Z limiters. Analysis of the first wall surface and residual gas impurities confirmed that clean conditions have been achieved. The high-Z limiters showed very limited amounts of melting or arcing. The progress of the wall cleaning process was monitored by three diagnostic techniques: Auger electron spectroscopy of metallic samples at the vessel wall, residual gas analysis, and the resistivity of full power discharges

  14. Formation of dust grains with impurities in red giant winds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dominik, Carsten

    1994-01-01

    Among the several proposed carriers of diffuse interstellar bands (DIB's) are impurities in small dust grains, especially in iron oxide grains (Huffman 1977) and silicate grains (Huffman 1970). Most promising are single ion impurities since they can reproduce the observed band widths (Whittet 1992). These oxygen-rich grains are believed to originate mostly in the mass flows from red giants and in supernovae ejecta (e.g. Gehrz 1989). A question of considerable impact for the origin of DIB's is therefore, whether these grains are produced as mainly clean crystals or as some dirty materials. A formalism has been developed that allows tracking of the heterogeneous growth of a dust grain and its internal structure during the dust formation process. This formalism has been applied to the dust formation in the outflow from a red giant star.

  15. Impurity studies and discharge cleaning in Doublet III

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marcus, F.B.

    1979-10-01

    The goal of present and next generation tokamak experiments is to produce high-density, high-purity plasmas during high-power, extended-duration discharges. Plasma discharges with Z/sub eff/ values near unity and low concentrations of medium and high-Z metallic impurities have been obtained in Doublet III using a combination of low-power hydrogen discharge cleaning, gas puffing, precise plasma shape and position control, and high-Z limiters. Analysis of the first wall surface and residual gas impurities confirmed that clean conditions have been achieved. The high-Z limiters showed very limited amounts of melting or arcing. The progress of the wall cleaning process was monitored by three diagnostic techniques: Auger electron spectroscopy of metallic samples at the vessel wall, residual gas analysis, and the resistivity of full power discharges.

  16. Noble gas atoms as chemical impurities in silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tkachev, V.D.; Mudryi, A.V.; Minaev, N.S.

    1984-01-01

    The behaviour of noble gas atoms implanted in silicon is studied by the luminescence method. The energy position of Moessbauer-type luminescence bands with zero-phonon lines 1.0148, 1.0120, 1.0097, 1.0048 eV and others connected with implanted atoms of neon, helium, argon, krypton, respectively, indicates the formation of deep energy levels in the forbidden gap of silicon. Implantation of the noble gas isotopes confirms their participation in formation processes of the luminescence centers in silicon. The temperature range of existence and the symmetry of defects incorporating the noble gas atoms are found. It is noted that noble gas atoms form impurity complexes with deep energy levels and their behaviour in crystals does not differ from that of main doped or residual technological impurity atoms. (author)

  17. A simple NAA process for multielement determination of spinach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ni Bangfa; Wang Pingsheng; Nie Huiling; Tian Weizhi

    1998-01-01

    Forty elements in NIST 1570a (or IAEA-331), an intercomparison material, spinach, have been determined using the NAA techniques. Among them, 31 elements, i.e. Ag, Al, Ba, Br, Ca, Ce, Cl, Co, Cr, Cs, Eu, Fe, Hf, K, La, Mg, Mn, Na, Ni, Rb, Re, Sb, Sc, Se, Sr, Ta, Tb, Th, V, Zn and Zr, were determined by employing INAA. A series of simple and quantitative radiochemical separation procedures were established for the determination of 9 additional elements. Among them, Cd, Lu, Mo, Sm, Yb and U were determined by removing the major interfering nuclide 82 Br; Cu by 0.048 mol/L NaDDTC/CHCl 3 extraction from 1 mol/L HCl medium; and As and P by using an inorganic exchange column of acid aluminum oxide (AAO). The interferences from fission products and γ spectrum of 235 U have been corrected by the NAA software, ADVNAA

  18. Socioeconomic Determinants of Income From Fresh and Processed ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A total sample size of 84 crayfish marketers were in all randomly selected across three major Cray ... determine the income derived from fresh crayfish marketing while household size and purchasing ... EMAIL FULL TEXT EMAIL FULL TEXT

  19. The impurity transport in HT-6M tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Wei; Wan Baonian; Xie Jikang

    2003-01-01

    The space-time profile of impurities has been measured with a multichannel visible spectroscopic detect system and UV rotation-mirror system in the HT-6M tokamak. An ideal impurity transport code has been used to simulate impurities (carbon and oxygen) behaviour during the OHM discharge. The profiles of impurities diffusion and convection coefficient, impurities ion densities in different ionized state, loss power density and effective charge number have been derived. The impurity behaviour during low-hybrid current drive has also been analyzed, the results show that the confinement of particles, impurities and energy has been improved, and emission power and effective charge number have been reduced

  20. Thinking through cancer risk: characterizing smokers' process of risk determination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hay, Jennifer; Shuk, Elyse; Cruz, Gustavo; Ostroff, Jamie

    2005-10-01

    The perception of cancer risk motivates cancer risk reduction behaviors. However, common measurement strategies for cancer risk perceptions, which involve numerical likelihood estimates, do not adequately capture individuals' thoughts and feelings about cancer risk. To guide the development of novel measurement strategies, the authors used semistructured interviews to examine the thought processes used by smokers (N = 15) as they considered their cancer risk. They used grounded theory to guide systematic data coding and develop a heuristic model describing smokers' risk perception process that includes a cognitive, primarily rational process whereby salient personal risk factors for cancer are considered and combined, and an affective/attitudinal process, which shifts risk perceptions either up or down. The model provides a tentative explanation concerning how people hold cancer risk perceptions that diverge from rational assessment of their risks and will be useful in guiding the development of non-numerical measurements strategies for cancer risk perceptions.

  1. Impurity characterization of magnesium diuranate using simultaneous TG–DTA–FTIR measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raje, Naina, E-mail: nraje@barc.gov.in [Analytical Chemistry Division, B.A.R.C., Mumbai 400 085 (India); Ghonge, Darshana K. [Analytical Chemistry Division, B.A.R.C., Mumbai 400 085 (India); Hemantha Rao, G.V.S. [NFC, ECIL Post, Hyderabad (India); Reddy, A.V.R. [Analytical Chemistry Division, B.A.R.C., Mumbai 400 085 (India)

    2013-05-15

    Current studies describe the application of simultaneous thermogravimetry–differential thermal analysis – evolved gas analysis techniques for the compositional characterization of magnesium diuranate (MDU) with respect to the impurities present in the matrix. The stoichiometric composition of MDU was identified as MgU{sub 2}O{sub 7}⋅3H{sub 2}O. Presence of carbonate and sulphate as impurities in the matrix was confirmed through the evolved gas analysis using Fourier Transformation Infrared Spectrometry detection. Carbon and magnesium hydroxide content present as impurities in magnesium diuranate have been determined quantitatively using TG and FTIR techniques and the results are in good agreement. Powder X-ray diffraction analysis of magnesium diuranate suggests the presence of magnesium hydroxide as impurity in the matrix. Also these studies confirm the formation of magnesium uranate, uranium sesquioxide and uranium dioxide above 1000 °C, due to the decomposition of magnesium diuranate.

  2. Determining the quark charges by one and two photon processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Janah, A.

    1982-01-01

    Testable predictions are presented, which may be used to decide between the gauge theories of integer and fractionally charged quarks (icq and fcq). Two distinctive features of icq are exploited, namely (a) presence of color non-singlet components in weak and electromagnetic currents and (b) possible liberation of color non-singlet states above a threshold energy. Consequences are sought in lepton-hadron interaction processes, taking into account the known color-suppression effect. Single photon/weak-boson processes such as nuN → nuX distinguish between icq and fcq only above color-threshold. Experimental consequences of color-liberation in the above process are obtained. It is found that the gluon-parton contribution survives color-suppression to produce a significant rise in the structure functions when color-threshold is exceeded. Two-photon processes such as e + e - → e + e - + 2 jets distinguish between the two theories even below color threshold. To obtain the icq predictions for this process, one must take into account (a) the (momentum-dependent) color suppression and (b) the added contribution from pair production of charged gluons

  3. Initial experience with the NRC significance determination process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Madison, A.L. [Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation, US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (United States)

    2001-07-01

    The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) has revamped its inspection, assessment, and enforcement programs for commercial nuclear power plants. The new oversight process uses more objective, timely, and safety-significant criteria in assessing performance, while seeking to more effectively and efficiently regulate the industry. The NRC tested the new process at thirteen reactors at nine sites across the country on a pilot basis in 1999 to identify what things worked well and what improvements were called for before beginning Initial Implementation at all US nuclear power plants on April 2, 2000. After a year of experience has been gained with the new oversight process at all US plants, the NRC anticipates making further improvements based on this wider experience. (author)

  4. Initial experience with the NRC significance determination process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Madison, A.L.

    2001-01-01

    The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) has revamped its inspection, assessment, and enforcement programs for commercial nuclear power plants. The new oversight process uses more objective, timely, and safety-significant criteria in assessing performance, while seeking to more effectively and efficiently regulate the industry. The NRC tested the new process at thirteen reactors at nine sites across the country on a pilot basis in 1999 to identify what things worked well and what improvements were called for before beginning Initial Implementation at all US nuclear power plants on April 2, 2000. After a year of experience has been gained with the new oversight process at all US plants, the NRC anticipates making further improvements based on this wider experience. (author)

  5. Multipass optical device and process for gas and analyte determination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernacki, Bruce E [Kennewick, WA

    2011-01-25

    A torus multipass optical device and method are described that provide for trace level determination of gases and gas-phase analytes. The torus device includes an optical cavity defined by at least one ring mirror. The mirror delivers optical power in at least a radial and axial direction and propagates light in a multipass optical path of a predefined path length.

  6. Determination of rare earths in their extraction processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    You Jiannan; Zhang Yuqin

    1989-01-01

    A method for determination of rare earths in ores, ion-exchange resins and solution samples has been developed. The ore is molten with sodium peroxide and the molten sample is leached with triethenol amine and sodium citrate. In weak acid medium, the rare earths can be extracted by PMBP-phenol solution, and stripped with formic acid. In the acetic acidsodium acetate buffer medium of pH3, the spectrophotometric determination of rare earths with arsenazo M has been made. The rare earths in ion-exchange resins can be directly determined by spectrophotometry after being leached with hydrochloric acid and at heated condition. The rare earths with arsenazo M or a red complex. The maximum absorption of the complex is at 640 nm, and the molar absorption is 8.0 x 10 4 L centre dot mol -1 centre dot cm -1 . While the range of determination is 0.005%-0.5% and 0.001-1.0 g/L, the relative standard deviation is less than 5%, and recovery of rare earths is 98.5-105%. The method is rather simple and rapid

  7. 50 CFR 100.15 - Rural determination process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... (CONTINUED) NATIONAL WILDLIFE MONUMENTS SUBSISTENCE MANAGEMENT REGULATIONS FOR PUBLIC LANDS IN ALASKA Program... fish and wildlife; (ii) Development and diversity of the economy; (iii) Community infrastructure; (iv... of 5 years shall be required before the non-rural determination becomes effective. (c) Current...

  8. Factors determining the viability of radiation processing in developing countries

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Linde, HJ; Basson, RA

    In the fifteen years since the introduction of radiation processing to South Africa, four commercial irradiation facilities have been established. These are involved in the processing of a large variety of products, from syringes and prostheses to strawberries and sugar yeast. Three of the facilities are devoted mainly to food irradiation and several thousand tonnes are now processed annually. During this period it was repeatedly experienced that the successful introduction of radiation processing in general, and food radurization in particular, on a commercial scale was critically dependent on the following factors: acceptance by the producer, industry and consumer; initial capital expenditure; running costs and overheads in general; and continous throughput. All of these factors contribute to the processing cost which is the ultimate factor in determing the value/price ratio for the potential entrepreneur and customer of this new technology. After a market survey had identified the need for a new food irradiation facility to cope with the growing interest in commercial food radurization in the Western Cape, the above-mentioned factors were of cardinal importance in the design and manufacture of a new irradiator. The resulting batch-pallet facility which was commisioned in August 1986, is rather inefficient as far as energy utilization is concerned but this shortcoming is compensated for by its low cost, versatility and low hold-up. Although the facility has limitations as far as the processing of really large volumes of produce is concerned, it is particularly suitable not only for developing countries, but for developed countries in the introductory phase of commercial food radurization.

  9. SME Acceptability Determination For DWPF Process Control (U)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edwards, T. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2017-06-12

    The statistical system described in this document is called the Product Composition Control System (PCCS). K. G. Brown and R. L. Postles were the originators and developers of this system as well as the authors of the first three versions of this technical basis document for PCCS. PCCS has guided acceptability decisions for the processing at the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) at the Savannah River Site (SRS) since the start of radioactive operations in 1996. The author of this revision to the document gratefully acknowledges the firm technical foundation that Brown and Postles established to support the ongoing successful operation at the DWPF. Their integration of the glass propertycomposition models, developed under the direction of C. M. Jantzen, into a coherent and robust control system, has served the DWPF well over the last 20+ years, even as new challenges, such as the introduction into the DWPF flowsheet of auxiliary streams from the Actinide Removal Process (ARP) and other processes, were met. The purpose of this revision is to provide a technical basis for modifications to PCCS required to support the introduction of waste streams from the Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF) into the DWPF flowsheet. An expanded glass composition region is anticipated by the introduction of waste streams from SWPF, and property-composition studies of that glass region have been conducted. Jantzen, once again, directed the development of glass property-composition models applicable for this expanded composition region. The author gratefully acknowledges the technical contributions of C.M. Jantzen leading to the development of these glass property-composition models. The integration of these models into the PCCS constraints necessary to administer future acceptability decisions for the processing at DWPF is provided by this sixth revision of this document.

  10. TBP determination in nitric acid solutions from solvent extraction process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuada, T.A.; Carvalho, E.I. de; Araujo, I. da C.; Cohen, V.H.

    1988-07-01

    Heavy organic phases have been observed on some occasions during TBP extraction process. These products, described as red oils, were considered as the main cause for process failures, specially in evaporators and concentrators. In view of safety aspects it is necessary to control organic concentration in product and waste solutions. The proposed method involves the organic removal by chloroform as a first step, followed by purification onto a silica gel column. The results are given from analysing TBP and its degradation product (DBP) by gas chromatography. (author) [pt

  11. Determination of TBP in nitric solutions of process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuada, T.A.; Carvalho, E.I. de; Araujo, I. da C. de; Cohen, V.H.

    1988-01-01

    Heavy organic phases have been observed on some occasions during TBP extraction process. These products, described as red oils, were considered as the main cause for process failures, specially in evaporators and concentrators. In view of safety aspects it is necessary to control organic concentration in product and waste solutions. The proposed method involves the organic removal by chloroform as a first step, followed by purification onto a silica gel column. The results are given from analysing TBP and its degradation product (DBP) by gas chromatography. (author) [pt

  12. Determining the optimum process parameter for grinding operations using robust process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neseli, Suley Man; Asilturk, Ilhan; Celik, Levent [Univ. of Selcuk, Konya (Turkmenistan)

    2012-11-15

    We applied combined response surface methodology (RSM) and Taguchi methodology (TM) to determine optimum parameters for minimum surface roughness (Ra) and vibration (Vb) in external cylindrical grinding. First, an experiment was conducted in a CNC cylindrical grinding machine. The TM using L{sup 27} orthogonal array was applied to the design of the experiment. The three input parameters were workpiece revolution, feed rate and depth of cut; the outputs were vibrations and surface roughness. Second, to minimize wheel vibration and surface roughness, two optimized models were developed using computer aided single objective optimization. The experimental and statistical results revealed that the most significant grinding parameter for surface roughness and vibration is workpiece revolution followed by the depth of cut. The predicted values and measured values were fairly close, which indicates 2 ( 94.99 R{sup 2Ra}=and 2 92.73) R{sup 2Vb}=that the developed models can be effectively used to predict surface roughness and vibration in the grinding. The established model for determination of optimal operating conditions shows that a hybrid approach can lead to success of a robust process.

  13. Determining the optimum process parameter for grinding operations using robust process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neseli, Suley Man; Asilturk, Ilhan; Celik, Levent

    2012-01-01

    We applied combined response surface methodology (RSM) and Taguchi methodology (TM) to determine optimum parameters for minimum surface roughness (Ra) and vibration (Vb) in external cylindrical grinding. First, an experiment was conducted in a CNC cylindrical grinding machine. The TM using L 27 orthogonal array was applied to the design of the experiment. The three input parameters were workpiece revolution, feed rate and depth of cut; the outputs were vibrations and surface roughness. Second, to minimize wheel vibration and surface roughness, two optimized models were developed using computer aided single objective optimization. The experimental and statistical results revealed that the most significant grinding parameter for surface roughness and vibration is workpiece revolution followed by the depth of cut. The predicted values and measured values were fairly close, which indicates 2 ( 94.99 R 2Ra =and 2 92.73) R 2Vb =that the developed models can be effectively used to predict surface roughness and vibration in the grinding. The established model for determination of optimal operating conditions shows that a hybrid approach can lead to success of a robust process

  14. FP-LAPW Calculations of the EFG at Cd Impurities in Rutile SnO2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Errico, L. A.; Fabricius, G.; Renteria, M.

    2001-01-01

    We report an ab initio study of the electric-field gradient (EFG) at Cd impurities located at the cation site in the semiconductor SnO 2 (rutile phase). The study was performed with the WIEN97 implementation of the FP-LAPW method. In order to simulate the diluted Cd-impurity in the SnO 2 host and to calculate the electronic structure of the system we used a 72-atoms super-cell, studying the relaxation introduced by the impurity in the lattice. The free-relaxation process performed shows that the relaxations of the oxygen nearest-neighbors of the impurity are not isotropic. Our prediction for the EFG tensor are compared with experimental results and point-charge model predictions

  15. Impurity engineering of Czochralski silicon used for ultra large-scaled-integrated circuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Deren; Chen, Jiahe; Ma, Xiangyang; Que, Duanlin

    2009-01-01

    Impurities in Czochralski silicon (Cz-Si) used for ultra large-scaled-integrated (ULSI) circuits have been believed to deteriorate the performance of devices. In this paper, a review of the recent processes from our investigation on internal gettering in Cz-Si wafers which were doped with nitrogen, germanium and/or high content of carbon is presented. It has been suggested that those impurities enhance oxygen precipitation, and create both denser bulk microdefects and enough denuded zone with the desirable width, which is benefit of the internal gettering of metal contamination. Based on the experimental facts, a potential mechanism of impurity doping on the internal gettering structure is interpreted and, a new concept of 'impurity engineering' for Cz-Si used for ULSI is proposed.

  16. Enhanced electron/fuel-ion equilibration through impurity ions: Studies applicable to NIF and Omega

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrasso, R. D.; Sio, H.; Kabadi, N.; Lahmann, B.; Simpson, R.; Parker, C.; Frenje, J.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Li, C. K.; Seguin, F. H.; Rinderknecht, H.; Casey, D.; Grabowski, P.; Graziani, F.; Taitano, W.; Le, A.; Chacon, L.; Hoffman, N.; Kagan, G.; Simakov, A.; Zylstra, A.; Rosenberg, M.; Betti, R.; Srinivasan, B.; Mancini, R.

    2017-10-01

    In shock-driven exploding-pushers, a platform used extensively to study multi-species and kinetic effects, electrons and fuel ions are far out of equilibrium, as reflected by very different temperatures. However, impurity ions, even in small quantities, can couple effectively to the electrons, because of a Z2 dependence, and in turn, impurity ions can then strongly couple to the fuel ions. Through this mechanism, electrons and fuel-ions can equilibrate much faster than they otherwise would. This is a quantitative issue, depending upon the amount and Z of the impurity. For NIF and Omega, we consider the role of this process. Coupled non-linear equations, reflecting the temperatures of the three species, are solved for a range of conditions. Consideration is also given to ablatively driven implosions, since impurities can similarly affect the equilibration. This work was supported in part by DOE/NNSA DE-NA0002949 and DE-NA0002726.

  17. Density profiles and particle fluxes of heavy impurities in the limiter shadow region of a tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Claassen, H.A.; Repp, H.

    1980-01-01

    For the case of low impurity concentration, transport calculations have been performed for heavy impurities, in the scrape-off layer plasma of a tokamak with a poloidal ring limiter. The theory is based on the drift-kinetic equations for the various ionization states of the impurity ions taking due consideration of the convection and collision processes. The background plasma and the impurity sources from the torus wall and the limiter surface enter the theory as input parameters. The theory is developed for the first two orders of the drift approximation. Numerical results are given to zero order drift approximation for the radial profiles of density and particle fluxes parallel to the magnetic field. (orig.)

  18. Simulation of Industrial Wastewater Treatment from the Suspended Impurities into the Flooded Waste Mining Workings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bondareva, L.; Zakharov, Yu; Goudov, A.

    2017-04-01

    The paper is dedicated to the mathematical model of slurry wastewater treatment and disposal in a flooded mine working. The goal of the research is to develop and analyze the mathematical model of suspended impurities flow and distribution. Impurity sedimentation model is under consideration. Due to the sediment compaction problem solution domain can be modified. The model allows making a forecast whether volley emission is possible. Numerical simulation results for “Kolchuginskaya” coal mine presented. Impurity concentration diagrams in outflow corresponding to the real full-scale data obtained. Safely operation time mine workings like a wastewater treatment facility are estimated. The carried out calculations demonstrate that the method of industrial wastewater treatment in flooded waste mine workings can be put into practice but it is very important to observe all the processes going on to avoid volley emission of accumulated impurities.

  19. Impurity incorporation, deposition kinetics, and microstructural evolution in sputtered Ta films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitacre, Jay Fredric

    pressure of 1 x 10--6 Torr had grains less than 10 nm in diameter and significant amorphous content Calculated radial distribution functions show a significant increase in average inter-atomic spacing in films grown using higher base pressures and Ar pressures. The amorphous content in the films was determined via comparison between ideal crystalline diffraction patterns and actual data. Thinner films grown at higher Ar pressures had relatively greater amorphous content. Real-time process control using the in-situ diffractometer was also demonstrated. The effects observed are discussed in the context of previous theories and experiments that document room-temperature sputter film growth. The changes in film microstructure observed were impurity mediated. Specifically, oxygen desorbed from the chamber walls during growth were incorporated into the film and subsequently limited grain development and texturing. A second phase consisting of amorphous Ta2O5 formed between the grain nuclei. Adatom kinetics played a role in determining surface morphology: at low Ar pressures (2 mTorr) significant adatom kinetic energies served to flattened the film surface, though impurity levels dominated grain development even in these conditions.

  20. Determinants of Use of Indigenous Fish Processing Practices in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Descriptive statistics was used to analyze the socio- economic features of the fish processors while the logit model was used to capture the socio-economic factors ... education (β=1.90), household size (β=2.48), FAI (β=2.80), consumers preference (β=3.37), processing tradition (β=3.74), VFP (β=0.02) and cosmopoliteness ...