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Sample records for prior austenite grain

  1. Study of Ferrite During Refinement of Prior Austenite Grains in Microalloyed Steel Continuous Casting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jiang; Wen, Guanghua; Tang, Ping

    2017-12-01

    The formation of coarse prior austenite grain is a key factor to promote transverse crack, and the susceptibility to the transverse crack can be reduced by refining the austenite grain size. In the present study, the high-temperature confocal laser scanning microscope (CLSM) was used to simulate two types of double phase-transformation technologies. The distribution and morphology of ferrites under different cooling conditions were analyzed, and the effects of ferrite distribution and morphology on the double phase-transformation technologies were explored to obtain the suitable double phase-change technology for the continuous casting process. The results indicate that, under the thermal cycle TH0 [the specimens were cooled down to 913 K (640 °C) at a cooling rate of 5.0 K/s (5.0 °C/s)], the width of prior austenite grain boundaries was thick, and the dislocation density at grain boundaries was high. It had strong inhibition effect on crack propagation; under the thermal cycle TH1 [the specimens were cooled down to 1073 K (800 °C) at a cooling rate of 5.0 K/s (5.0 °C/s) and then to 913 K (640 °C) at a cooling rate of 1.0 K/s (1.0 °C/s)], the width of prior austenite grain boundary was thin, and the dislocation density at grain boundaries was low. It was beneficial to crack propagation. After the first phase change, the developed film-like ferrite along the austenite grain boundaries improved the nucleation conditions of new austenitic grains and removed the inhibition effect of the prior austenite grain boundaries on the austenite grain size.

  2. Effect of Prior Austenite Grain Size on the Morphology of Nano-Bainitic Steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Kritika; Kumar, Avanish; Singh, Aparna

    2018-04-01

    The strength in nanostructured bainitic steels primarily arises from the fine platelets of bainitic ferrite embedded in carbon-enriched austenite. However, the toughness is dictated by the shape and volume fraction of the retained austenite. Therefore, the exact determination of processing-morphology relationships is necessary to design stronger and tougher bainite. In the current study, the morphology of bainitic ferrite in Fe-0.89C-1.59Si-1.65Mn-0.37Mo-1Co-0.56Al-0.19Cr (wt pct) bainitic steel has been investigated as a function of the prior austenite grain size (AGS). Specimens were austenitized at different temperatures ranging from 900 °C to 1150 °C followed by isothermal transformation at 300 °C. Detailed microstructural characterization has been carried out using scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction. The results showed that the bainitic laths transformed in coarse austenite grains are finer resulting in higher hardness, whereas smaller austenite grains lead to the formation of thicker bainitic laths with a large fraction of blocky type retained austenite resulting in lower hardness.

  3. A quantitative atom probe study of the Nb excess at prior austenite grain boundaries in a Nb microalloyed strip-cast steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Felfer, Peter J.; Killmore, Chris R.; Williams, Jim G.; Carpenter, Kristin R.; Ringer, Simon P.; Cairney, Julie M.

    2012-01-01

    Most modern HSLA steels rely on the effect of Nb in steels to achieve the properties desired for a specific application. While the role of Nb in forming precipitates has been well characterized, its role in a solid solution is less well understood due to the difficulty of obtaining quantitative experimental data. In the current work, site-specific atom probe tomography was used to quantify the amount of Nb present at prior austenite grain boundaries in a commercial strip-cast steel, produced via the Castrip ® process. This was compared to the amount of Nb found at ferrite–ferrite grain boundaries that had formed during the transformation from austenite to ferrite. With the interfacial excess Nb measured, thermodynamic calculations were carried out and compared to the change in transformation temperature obtained by dilatometry, with reference to a comparable Nb free, strip-cast steel.

  4. The Influence of Lath, Block and Prior Austenite Grain (PAG) Size on the Tensile, Creep and Fatigue Properties of Novel Maraging Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAdam, Steven; Hill, Paul; Rawson, Martin; Perkins, Karen

    2017-01-01

    The influence of martensitic microstructure and prior austenite grain (PAG) size on the mechanical properties of novel maraging steel was studied. This was achieved by looking at two different martensitic structures with PAG sizes of approximately 40 µm and 80 µm, produced by hot rolling to different reductions. Two ageing heat-treatments were considered: both heat-treatments consisted of austenisation at 960 °C, then aging at 560 °C for 5 h, but while one was rapidly cooled the other was slow cooled and then extended aged at 480 °C for 64 h. It is shown that for the shorter ageing treatment the smaller PAG size resulted in significant improvements in strength (increase of more than 150 MPa), ductility (four times increase), creep life (almost four times increase in creep life) and fatigue life (almost doubled). Whereas, the extended aged sample showed similar changes in the fatigue life, elongation and hardness it displayed yet showed no difference in tensile strength and creep. These results display the complexity of microstructural contributions to mechanical properties in maraging steels. PMID:28773086

  5. The Influence of Lath, Block and Prior Austenite Grain (PAG) Size on the Tensile, Creep and Fatigue Properties of Novel Maraging Steel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simm, Thomas; Sun, Lin; McAdam, Steven; Hill, Paul; Rawson, Martin; Perkins, Karen

    2017-06-30

    The influence of martensitic microstructure and prior austenite grain (PAG) size on the mechanical properties of novel maraging steel was studied. This was achieved by looking at two different martensitic structures with PAG sizes of approximately 40 µm and 80 µm, produced by hot rolling to different reductions. Two ageing heat-treatments were considered: both heat-treatments consisted of austenisation at 960 °C, then aging at 560 °C for 5 h, but while one was rapidly cooled the other was slow cooled and then extended aged at 480 °C for 64 h. It is shown that for the shorter ageing treatment the smaller PAG size resulted in significant improvements in strength (increase of more than 150 MPa), ductility (four times increase), creep life (almost four times increase in creep life) and fatigue life (almost doubled). Whereas, the extended aged sample showed similar changes in the fatigue life, elongation and hardness it displayed yet showed no difference in tensile strength and creep. These results display the complexity of microstructural contributions to mechanical properties in maraging steels.

  6. 原奥氏体晶粒尺寸对珠光体钢组织及韧性的影响%Effect of Prior Austenite Grain Size on Microstructure and Toughness of Pearlitic Steel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    梁宇; 向嵩; 梁益龙; 杨明; 魏泽民; 熊虎; 李静

    2017-01-01

    The effect of prior austenite grain size on the pearlitic microstructure and toughness was investigated.Experimental results,showed that the interlarnellar spacing had no obvious change under the same isothermal transformation temperature.The proeutectoid ferrite percentage decreased and the pearlitic colony size increased with the increase of the prior austenite grain size.The fracture toughness was controlled by the microplasticity zone ((1-2)δc) at the crack tip,and the δc was opening displacement of critical crack.If prior austenite grain size was larger than (1-2)δc,the majority of crack propagation resistance came from necking and breaking of the pearlitic lamellar α and θ phase.If prior austenite grain size was close to or less than (1-2)δc,crack propagation mainly went through the grain boundaries,pearlitic colony boundaries and α+θ larnellar interface,which caused high crack tortuosity.The crack propagation resistance came from the crack deflection and branching.And the quasi-static fracture toughness J had small changes with the increase of prior austenite grain size,While the front microplasticity zone of the impact toughness notch was much larger than the prior austenite grain size.High angle grain boundary in the microplasticity zone would cause the crack deflection and branching,which increased the crack growth resistance.Improving high angle grain boundary density of the plastic zone was beneficial to improve the impact toughness,and the impact toughness decreased significantly with the increase of prior austenite grain size.%探索了奥氏体晶粒尺寸对珠光体等温转变组织特征以及对韧性性能的影响规律.研究表明,在相同等温转变温度下,珠光体片层间距无明显变化,随奥氏体晶粒尺寸的增加,先共析铁素体量减少而珠光体团尺寸增加.珠光体断裂韧性受控于裂纹前沿塑性影响区尺寸(1~2)δc,其中δc为临界裂纹张开位移,当原奥氏体晶粒大于(1~2)δc

  7. Grain boundary precipitation in an austenitic stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, A.R.; Howell, P.R.; Ralph, B.

    The precipitation of second phase particles of niobium carbide in an austenitic stainless steel is shown to be considerably influenced by the degree of deformation introduced prior to the ageing treatment. Sites for the nucleation of second phase particles are identified and the importance of one type of nucleation site, extrinsic dislocations, to the evolution of the final boundary precipitate distributions is emphasized. Further, it is shown that the presence of a grain boundary can effect precipitation processes for some considerable distance into the matrix on either side of the boundary. (author)

  8. Neutron depolarisation study of the austenite grain size in TRIP steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dijk, N.H. van; Zhao, L.; Rekveldt, M.Th.; Fredrikze, H.; Tegus, O.; Brueck, E.; Sietsma, J.; Zwaag, S. van der

    2004-01-01

    We have performed combined neutron depolarisation and magnetisation measurements in order to obtain an in situ determination of the average grain size and volume fraction of the retained austenite phase in TRIP steels. The average grain size of the retained austenite was found to decrease for an increase in austenite volume fraction at two different annealing temperatures

  9. Austenite Grain Growth Behavior of AISI 4140 Alloy Steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Wang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available AISI 4140 alloy steel is widely applied in the manufacture of various parts such as gears, rams, and spindles due to its good performance of strength, toughness, and wear resistance. The former researches most focused on its deformation and recrystallization behaviors under high temperature. However, the evolution laws of austenite grain growth were rarely studied. This behavior also plays an important role in the mechanical properties of parts made of this steel. In this study, samples are heated to a certain temperature of 1073 K, 1173 K, 1273 K, and 1373 K at a heating rate of 5 K per second and hold for different times of 0 s, 120 s, 240 s, 360 s, and 480 s before being quenched with water. The experimental results suggest that the austenite grains enlarge with increasing temperature and holding time. A mathematical model and an application developed in Matlab environment are established on the basis of previous works and experimental results to predict austenite grains size in hot deformation processes. The predicted results are in good agreement with experimental results which indicates that the model and the application are reliable.

  10. Austenite Grain Size Estimtion from Chord Lengths of Logarithmic-Normal Distribution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrian H.

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Linear section of grains in polyhedral material microstructure is a system of chords. The mean length of chords is the linear grain size of the microstructure. For the prior austenite grains of low alloy structural steels, the chord length is a random variable of gamma- or logarithmic-normal distribution. The statistical grain size estimation belongs to the quantitative metallographic problems. The so-called point estimation is a well known procedure. The interval estimation (grain size confidence interval for the gamma distribution was given elsewhere, but for the logarithmic-normal distribution is the subject of the present contribution. The statistical analysis is analogous to the one for the gamma distribution.

  11. The effect of cooling rate and austenite grain size on the austenite to ferrite transformation temperature and different ferrite morphologies in microalloyed steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Esmailian, M.

    2010-01-01

    The effect of different austenite grain size and different cooling rates on the austenite to ferrite transformation temperature and different ferrite morphologies in one Nb-microalloyed high strength low alloy steel has been investigated. Three different austenite grain sizes were selected and cooled at two different cooling rates for obtaining austenite to ferrite transformation temperature. Moreover, samples with specific austenite grain size have been quenched, partially, for investigation on the microstructural evolution. In order to assess the influence of austenite grain size on the ferrite transformation temperature, a temperature differences method is established and found to be a good way for detection of austenite to ferrite, pearlite and sometimes other ferrite morphologies transformation temperatures. The results obtained in this way show that increasing of austenite grain size and cooling rate has a significant influence on decreasing of the ferrite transformation temperature. Micrographs of different ferrite morphologies show that at high temperatures, where diffusion rates are higher, grain boundary ferrite nucleates. As the temperature is lowered and the driving force for ferrite formation increases, intragranular sites inside the austenite grains become operative as nucleation sites and suppress the grain boundary ferrite growth. The results indicate that increasing the austenite grain size increases the rate and volume fraction of intragranular ferrite in two different cooling rates. Moreover, by increasing of cooling rate, the austenite to ferrite transformation temperature decreases and volume fraction of intragranular ferrite increases.

  12. Niobium effects on the austenitic grain growth and hardenability of steels for mechanical construction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vieira, R.R.; Arruda Camargo, L.M. de; Oliveira Junior, G.G. de; Dias Filho, A.G.C.

    1983-01-01

    The austenitic grain growth and hardenability of SAE 86XX and 5120 steels modified with 0,001 to 0,20 per-cent niobium content were studied when submitted to case hardening and quenching heat treatments. The results show that niobium controlS the austenite grain size better than molybdenum up to 950 0 C austenitization temperature. The hardenability, evaluated by the Jominy test which the modified SAE 8640 steels, is more strongly inflencied by the grain refining resulting from niobium addition than by any other supposed effect. (Author) [pt

  13. Influence of austenite grain size on recrystallisation-precipitation interaction in a V-microalloyed steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quispe, A.; Medina, S.F.; Gomez, M.; Chaves, J.I.

    2007-01-01

    By means of torsion tests using small specimens, the influence of austenite grain size on strain induced precipitation kinetics has been determined in a vanadium microalloyed steel. Determination of recrystallisation-precipitation-time-temperature (RPTT) diagrams for two austenite grain sizes allows values of the aforementioned magnitudes to be determined. An ample discussion is made of the quantitative influence found and its relation with nucleation and growth mechanisms of precipitates. The results are compared with the quantitative influence exerted by the other variables, reaching the conclusion that the austenite grain size has a notable influence on strain induced precipitation kinetics which should not be underestimated. Finally, the influence of austenite grain size is included in a strain induced precipitation model constructed by the authors of this work and which also takes into account the other aforementioned variables

  14. Grain-to-Grain Variations in NbC Particle Size Distributions in an Austenitic Stainless Steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barlow, Claire; Ralph, B.; Silverman, B.

    1979-01-01

    Quantitative information has been obtained concerning the size distributions of NbC precipitate particles in different grains in a deformed and aged austenitic stainless steel specimen. The precipitate size distributions obtained differ from one grain to another. The average disparity measured be...

  15. Dependence of corrosion properties of AISI 304L stainless steel on the austenite grain size

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sabooni, Soheil; Rashtchi, Hamed; Eslami, Abdoulmajid; Karimzadeh, Fathallah; Enayati, Mohammad Hossein; Raeissi, Keyvan; Imani, Reihane Faghih [Isfahan Univ. of Technology, Isfahan (Iran, Islamic Republic of). Dept. of Materials Engineering; Ngan, Alfonso Hing Wan [The Univ. of Hong Kong (China). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

    2017-07-15

    The corrosion resistance of austenitic stainless steels is known to be hampered by the loss of chromium available for passive surface layer formation as a result of chromium carbide precipitation at austenite grain boundaries during annealing treatments. Although high-temperature annealing can promote carbide dissolution leading to better corrosion resistance, grain coarsening also results, which would lead to poorer mechanical properties. Processing methods to achieve both good corrosion resistance and mechanical properties are thus highly desirable for austenitic stainless steels. In the present study, we show that the corrosion resistance of AISI 304L stainless steel can be improved by grain refinement into the ultrafine-grained regime. Specifically, samples with different austenite grain sizes in the range of 0.65-12 μm were studied by potentiodynamic polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy tests in a 3.5 wt.% NaCl solution. All samples showed a typical passive behavior with similar corrosion potential, but the corrosion current density decreased significantly with decreasing grain size. The results show that the sample with the finest grain size had the best corrosion resistance due to a higher resistance of the passive layer to pitting attacks. This study indicates that grain refinement which improves mechanical properties can also significantly improve the corrosion resistance of AISI 304L stainless steel.

  16. Modelling grain-scattered ultrasound in austenitic stainless-steel welds: A hybrid model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nowers, O.; Duxbury, D. J.; Velichko, A.; Drinkwater, B. W.

    2015-01-01

    The ultrasonic inspection of austenitic stainless steel welds can be challenging due to their coarse grain structure, charaterised by preferentially oriented, elongated grains. The anisotropy of the weld is manifested as both a ‘steering’ of the beam and the back-scatter of energy due to the macroscopic granular structure of the weld. However, the influence of weld properties, such as mean grain size and orientation distribution, on the magnitude of scattered ultrasound is not well understood. A hybrid model has been developed to allow the study of grain-scatter effects in austenitic welds. An efficient 2D Finite Element (FE) method is used to calculate the complete scattering response from a single elliptical austenitic grain of arbitrary length and width as a function of the specific inspection frequency. A grain allocation model of the weld is presented to approximate the characteristic structures observed in austenitic welds and the complete scattering behaviour of each grain calculated. This model is incorporated into a semi-analytical framework for a single-element inspection of a typical weld in immersion. Experimental validation evidence is demonstrated indicating excellent qualitative agreement of SNR as a function of frequency and a minimum SNR difference of 2 dB at a centre frequency of 2.25 MHz. Additionally, an example Monte-Carlo study is presented detailing the variation of SNR as a function of the anisotropy distribution of the weld, and the application of confidence analysis to inform inspection development

  17. Influence of prior cold rolling reduction on microstructure and mechanical properties of a reversion annealed high-Mn austenitic steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Behjati, P., E-mail: p.behjatipournaki@ma.iut.ac.ir [Department of Materials Engineering, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan 84156-83111 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Kermanpur, A. [Department of Materials Engineering, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan 84156-83111 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Karjalainen, L.P.; Järvenpää, A.; Jaskari, M. [Centre for Advanced Steels Research, University of Oulu, FIN-90014 Oulu (Finland); Samaei Baghbadorani, H. [Department of Materials Engineering, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan 84156-83111 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Najafizadeh, A. [Foulad Institute of Technology, Fouladshahr, Isfahan 84916-63763 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Hamada, A. [Metallurgical and Materials Engineering Department, Faculty of Petroleum and Mining Engineering, Suez University, Suez 43721 (Egypt)

    2016-01-05

    The martensitic reversion is known to be effective in refining the grain size of metastable austenitic stainless steels. However, severe cold rolling reductions are generally required for this process. In this study, the influence of the degree of prior cold rolling and subsequent annealing on the microstructure and mechanical properties of a metastable high-Mn austenitic steel was investigated. Three cold rolling reductions of 20%, 35% and 50% were applied at ambient temperature before the annealing at 700 °C for the durations of 10, 100 and 1000 s. Microstructures were examined by optical, scanning and transmission electron microscopes. Mechanical properties were measured by hardness and tensile tests. The microstructure changes were followed by magnetic measurements and X-ray diffraction. It was shown that a relatively small reduction of 35% and 100 s annealing could provide efficient grain refinement (the average size of 0.5 µm) and accordingly an outstanding combination of strength-ductility properties with the yield strength 890 MPa, tensile strength 1340 MPa and elongation 41% was achieved. The occurrence of martensite reversion and recrystallization processes with different contributions in dependence on degree of prior deformation before annealing was discussed.

  18. The effect of grain size on the mechanical response of a metastable austenitic stainless steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sinclair C.W.

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The combination of high environmental resistance and excellent strength, elongation and energy absorption make austenitic stainless steels potentially attractive for transportation applications. In the case of metastable grades that undergo a strain induced martensitic transformation it is possible to significantly change the mechanical properties simply by changing the austenite grain size. Predicting such behaviour using physically based models is, however, extremely challenging. Here, some recent work on the coupling between grain size and mechanical response will be presented for a metastable AISI 301 LN stainless steel. Successes and continuing challenges will be highlighted.

  19. Grain-to-grain variations in NbC particle size distributions in an austenitic stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barlow, C.Y.; Ralph, B.; Silverman, B.; Jones, A.R.

    1979-01-01

    Quantitative information has been obtained concerning the size distributions of NbC precipitate particles in different grains in a deformed and aged austenitic stainless steel specimen. The precipitate size distributions obtained differ from one grain to another. The average disparity measured between the mean precipitate sizes was a function of the distance between the grains compared. The results obtained are considered in terms of differences in precipitation behaviour due to variations in the levels of plastic strain in constituent grains of the deformed specimen. (author)

  20. Modification of the grain boundary microstructure of the austenitic PCA stainless steel to improve helium embrittlement resistance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maziasz, P.J.; Braski, D.N.

    1986-01-01

    Grain boundary MC precipitation was produced by a modified thermal-mechanical pretreatment in 25% cold worked (CW) austenitic prime candidate alloy (PCA) stainless steel prior to HFIR irradiation. Postirradiation tensile results and fracture analysis showed that the modified material (B3) resisted helium embrittlement better than either solution annealed (SA) or 25% CW PCA irradiated at 500 to 600 0 C to approx.21 dpa and 1370 at. ppM He. PCA SA and 25% CW were not embrittled at 300 to 400 0 C. Grain boundary MC survives in PCA-B3 during HFIR irradiation at 500 0 C but dissolves at 600 0 C; it does not form in either SA or 25% CW PCA during similar irradiation. The grain boundary MC appears to play an important role in the helium embrittlement resistance of PCA-B3

  1. Mechanical stability of individual austenite grains in TRIP steel studied by synchrotron X-ray diffraction during tensile loading

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blondé, R. [Fundamental Aspects of Materials and Energy, Faculty of Applied Sciences, Delft University of Technology, Mekelweg 15, 2629 JB Delft (Netherlands); Materials Innovation Institute, Mekelweg 2, 2628 CD Delft (Netherlands); Jimenez-Melero, E. [Dalton Cumbrian Facility, The University of Manchester, Westlakes Science and Technology Park, Moor Row, Cumbria, CA24 3HA (United Kingdom); Zhao, L. [Materials Innovation Institute, Mekelweg 2, 2628 CD Delft (Netherlands); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Delft University of Technology, Mekelweg 2, 2628 CD Delft (Netherlands); Wright, J.P. [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, 6 Rue Jules Horowitz, BP 220, 38043 Grenoble Cedex (France); Brück, E. [Fundamental Aspects of Materials and Energy, Faculty of Applied Sciences, Delft University of Technology, Mekelweg 15, 2629 JB Delft (Netherlands); Zwaag, S. van der [Novel Aerospace Materials Group, Faculty of Aerospace Engineering, Delft University of Technology, Kluyverweg 1, 2629 HS, Delft (Netherlands); Dijk, N.H. van, E-mail: N.H.vanDijk@tudelft.nl [Fundamental Aspects of Materials and Energy, Faculty of Applied Sciences, Delft University of Technology, Mekelweg 15, 2629 JB Delft (Netherlands)

    2014-11-17

    The stability of individual metastable austenite grains in low-alloyed TRIP steels has been studied during tensile loading using high-energy X-ray diffraction. The carbon concentration, grain volume and grain orientation with respect to the loading direction was monitored for a large number of individual grains in the bulk microstructure. Most austenite grains transform into martensite in a single transformation step once a critical load is reached. The orientation-dependent stability of austenite grains was found to depend on their Schmid factor with respect to the loading direction. Under the applied tensile stress the average Schmid factor decreased from an initial value of 0.44 to 0.41 at 243 MPa. The present study reveals the complex interplay of microstructural parameters on the mechanical stability of individual austenite grains, where the largest grains with the lowest carbon content tend to transform first. Under the applied tensile stress the average carbon concentration of the austenite grains increased from an initial value of 0.90 to 1.00 wt% C at 243 MPa, while the average grain volume of the austenite grains decreased from an initial value of 19 to 15 µm{sup 3} at 243 MPa.

  2. Metallographic screening of grain boundary engineered type 304 austenitic stainless steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanning, F., E-mail: Fabian.Hanning@googlemail.com; Engelberg, D.L., E-mail: Dirk.engelberg@manchester.ac.uk

    2014-08-15

    An electrochemical etching method for the identification of grain boundary engineered type 304 austenitic stainless steel microstructures is described. The method can be applied for rapid microstructure screening to complement electron backscatter diffraction analysis. A threshold parameter to identify grain boundary engineered microstructure is proposed, and the application of metallographic etching for characterising the degree of grain boundary engineering discussed. - Highlights: • As-received (annealed) and grain boundary engineered microstructures were compared. • Electro-chemical polarisation in nitric acid solutions was carried out. • A metallographic screening method has been developed. • The screening method complements EBSD analysis for microstructure identification.

  3. The Influence of Austenite Grain Size on the Mechanical Properties of Low-Alloy Steel with Boron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beata Białobrzeska

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This study forms part of the current research on modern steel groups with higher resistance to abrasive wear. In order to reduce the intensity of wear processes, and also to minimize their impact, the immediate priority seems to be a search for a correlation between the chemical composition and structure of these materials and their properties. In this paper, the correlation between prior austenite grain size, martensite packets and the mechanical properties were researched. The growth of austenite grains is an important factor in the analysis of the microstructure, as the grain size has an effect on the kinetics of phase transformation. The microstructure, however, is closely related to the mechanical properties of the material such as yield strength, tensile strength, elongation and impact strength, as well as morphology of occurred fracture. During the study, the mechanical properties were tested and a tendency to brittle fracture was analysed. The studies show big differences of the analysed parameters depending on the applied heat treatment, which should provide guidance to users to specific applications of this type of steel.

  4. Study of the Sensitization on the Grain Boundary in Austenitic Stainless Steel Aisi 316

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kocsisová Edina

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Intergranular corrosion (IGC is one of the major problems in austenitic stainless steels. This type of corrosion is caused by precipitation of secondary phases on grain boundaries (GB. Precipitation of the secondary phases can lead to formation of chromium depleted zones in the vicinity of grain boundaries. Mount of the sensitization of material is characterized by the degree of sensitization (DOS. Austenitic stainless steel AISI 316 as experimental material had been chosen. The samples for the study of sensitization were solution annealed on 1100 °C for 60 min followed by water quenching and then sensitization by isothermal annealing on 700 °C and 650 °C with holding time from 15 to 600 min. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM was used for identification of secondary phases. Electron backscattered diffraction (EBSD was applied for characterization of grain boundary structure as one of the factors which influences on DOS.

  5. Improvement of corrosion resistance in austenitic stainless steel by grain boundary character distribution control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Yun; Kaneda, Junya; Kasahara, Shigeki; Shigenaka, Naoto

    2012-01-01

    Strauss test, Coriou test and Huey test were conducted on a Type 316L austenitic stainless steel. Improvement in grain boundary corrosion resistance was verified after raising low Σ coincidence site lattice (CSL) grain boundary (GB) frequency by controlling grain boundary character distribution (GBCD). During crevice corrosion test under gamma-ray irradiation, initiation frequency of GB corrosion after GBCD controlled specimens decreased to 1/10 of GBCD uncontrolled counterpart along with lower depth of corrosion. Stress corrosion cracking (SCC) propagation rate of GBCD controlled specimen decreased to less than 1/2 of GBCD uncontrolled specimen in high temperature and high pressure water. Based on these results, we expect that GBCD control will improve corrosion resistance of austenitic material in a wide range of application and environment. (author)

  6. Evaluation of deformation behavior of in grains and grain boundaries of L-grade austenitic stainless steel 316L

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagashima, Nobuo; Hayakawa, Masao; Tsukada, Takashi; Kaji, Yoshiyuki; Miwa, Yukio; Ando, Masami; Nakata, Kiyotomo

    2009-01-01

    In this study, micro-hardness tests and AFM observations were performed on SUS 316L low-carbon austenitic stainless steel pre-strained by cold rolling to investigate its deformation behavior. The following results were obtained. Despite the fact that the same plastic strain was applied, post-tensile test AFM showed narrower slip-band spacing in a reduction in area of 30% cold-rolled specimen than the unrolled specimen. Concentrated slip bands were observed near grain boundaries. These were presumably due to slip blocking at grain boundaries. SCC sensitivity increased at a hardness of 300 or higher, the frequency occurrence of a hardness of 300 or higher in the micro-hardness measurements was compared. The micro-hardness did not exceed 300 both within grains and at grain boundaries in the unrolled and up to a reduction in area of 20% cold-rolled specimens of before and after the tensile tests. Micro-hardness exceeding 300 was found to occur frequently in after tensile test specimens with a reduction in area of 30% or more, particularly at grain boundaries. It is suggested that the nonuniformity of deformation at grain boundaries plays an important role of IGSCC crack propagation mechanism of low-carbon austenitic stainless steel. (author)

  7. Modification of the grain structure of austenitic welds for improved ultrasonic inspectability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wagner, S.; Dugan, S.; Stubenrauch, S.; Jacobs, O.

    2012-01-01

    Austenitic stainless steel welds, which are widely used for example in nuclear power plants and chemical installations, present major challenges for ultrasonic inspection due to the grain structure of the weld. Large grains in combination with the elastic anisotropy of the material lead to increased scattering and affect sound wave propagation in the weld. This results in a reduced signal-to-noise ratio, and complicates the interpretation of signals and the localization of defects. The aim of this project is to influence grain growth in the weld during the welding process to produce smaller grains, in order to improve sound propagation through the weld, thus improving inspectability. Metallographic sections of the first test welds have shown that a modification of the grain structure can be achieved by influencing the grain growth with magnetic fields. For further optimization, test blocks for ultrasonic testing were manufactured to study sound propagation through the weld and detectability of test flaws.

  8. Growth modes of individual ferrite grains in the austenite to ferrite transformation of low carbon steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, D.Z.; Xiao, N.M.; Lan, Y.J.; Zheng, C.W.; Li, Y.Y.

    2007-01-01

    The mesoscale deterministic cellular automaton (CA) method and probabilistic Q-state Potts-based Monte Carlo (MC) model have been adopted to investigate independently the individual growth behavior of ferrite grain during the austenite (γ)-ferrite (α) transformation. In these models, the γ-α phase transformation and ferrite grain coarsening induced by α/α grain boundary migration could be simulated simultaneously. The simulations demonstrated that both the hard impingement (ferrite grain coarsening) and the soft impingement (overlapping carbon concentration field) have a great influence on the individual ferrite growth behavior. Generally, ferrite grains displayed six modes of growth behavior: parabolic growth, delayed nucleation and growth, temporary shrinkage, partial shrinkage, complete shrinkage and accelerated growth in the transformation. Some modes have been observed before by the synchrotron X-ray diffraction experiment. The mesoscopic simulation provides an alternative tool for investigating both the individual grain growth behavior and the overall transformation behavior simultaneously during transformation

  9. Radiation-induced grain boundary segregation in austenitic stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruemmer, S.M.; Charlot, L.A.; Vetrano, J.S.; Simonen, E.P.

    1994-11-01

    Radiation-induced segregation (RIS) to grain boundaries in Fe-Ni-Cr-Si stainless alloys has been measured as a function of irradiation temperature and dose. Heavy-ion irradiation was used to produce damage levels from 1 to 20 displacements per atom (dpa) at temperatures from 175 to 550 degrees C. Measured Fe, Ni, and Cr segregation increased sharply with irradiation dose (from G to 5 dpa) and temperature (from 175 to about 350 degrees C). However, grain boundary concentrations did not change significantly as dose or temperatures were further increased. Although interfacial compositions were similar, the width of radiation-induced enrichment or depletion profiles increased consistently with increasing dose or temperature. Impurity segregation (Si and P) was also measured, but only Si enrichment appeared to be radiation-induced. Grain boundary Si peaked at levels approaching 10 at% after irradiation doses to 10 dpa at an intermediate temperature of 325 degrees C. No evidence of grain boundary silicide precipitation was detected after irradiation at any temperature. Equilibrium segregation of P was measured in the high-P alloys, but interfacial concentration did not increase with irradiation exposure. Comparisons to reported RIS in neutron-irradiated stainless steels revealed similar grain boundary compositional changes for both major alloying and impurity elements

  10. Changes in grain boundary composition induced by neutron irradiation of austenitic stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asano, K.; Nakata, K.; Fukuya, K.; Kodama, M.

    1992-01-01

    The radiation induced segregation of solutes to the grain boundary in austenitic stainless steels were studied. Type 304 and type 316 steel samples neutron irradiated at 561K up to 9.2x10 25 n/m 2 were obtained and minute compositional profiles across grain boundaries were examined using an analytical scanning transmission electron microscope equipped with a field emission electron gun. Chromium was slightly enriched at grain boundaries at the lowest irradiation dose but decreased with increasing fluence. Higher fluence irradiation resulted in depletion in chromium and molybdenum, and enrichment in nickel, silicon and phosphorus. These changes in grain boundary chemistry were limited within about 5nm of the boundary. Significant depletion of chromium and enrichment of impurities on the grain boundary occurred at fluences roughly coincidental with that of SCC susceptibility change obtained from another project

  11. Austenite grain growth and microstructure control in simulated heat affected zones of microalloyed HSLA steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Lei [Department of Machine Tools and Factory Management, Technical University of Berlin, Pascalstraße 8 – 9, 10587, Berlin (Germany); Federal Institute for Materials Research and Testing, Unter den Eichen 87, 12205, Berlin (Germany); Kannengiesser, Thomas [Federal Institute for Materials Research and Testing, Unter den Eichen 87, 12205, Berlin (Germany); Institute of Materials and Joining Technology, Otto von Guericke University Magdeburg, Universitetsplatz 2, 39106, Magdeburg (Germany)

    2014-09-08

    The roles of microalloying niobium, titanium and vanadium for controlling austenite grain growth, microstructure evolution and hardness were investigated at different simulated heat affected zones (HAZ) for high strength low alloy (HSLA) S690QL steel. High resolution FEG-SEM has been used to characterize fine bainitic ferrite, martensite and nanosized second phases at simulated coarse and fine grain HAZs. It was found that for Ti bearing steel (Ti/N ratio is 2) austenite grain had the slowest growth rate due to the presence of most stable TiN. The fine cuboidal particles promoted intragranular acicular ferrite (IGF) formation. Nb bearing steel exhibited relatively weaker grain growth retardation compared with titanium bearing steels and a mixed microstructure of bainite and martensite was present for all simulated HAZs. IGF existed at coarse grain HAZ of Ti+V bearing steel but it was totally replaced by bainite at fine grain HAZs. Hardness result was closely related to the morphology of bainitic ferrite, intragranular ferrite and second phases within ferrite. The microstructure and hardness results of different simulated HAZs were in good agreement with welded experimental results.

  12. Development of Ultra-Fine-Grained Structure in AISI 321 Austenitic Stainless Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiamiyu, A. A.; Szpunar, J. A.; Odeshi, A. G.; Oguocha, I.; Eskandari, M.

    2017-12-01

    Ultra-fine-grained (UFG) structure was developed in AISI 321 austenitic stainless steel (ASS) using cryogenic rolling followed by annealing treatments at 923 K, 973 K, 1023 K, and 1073 K (650 °C, 700 °C, 750 °C, and 800 °C) for different lengths of time. The α'-martensite to γ-austenite reversion behavior and the associated texture development were analyzed in the cryo-rolled specimens after annealing. The activation energy, Q, required for the reversion of α'-martensite to γ-austenite in the steel was estimated to be 80 kJ mol-1. TiC precipitates and unreversed triple junction α'-martensite played major roles in the development of UFG structure through the Zener pinning of grain boundaries. The optimum annealing temperature and time for the development of UFG structure in the cryo-rolled AISI 321 steel are (a) 923 K (650 °C) for approximately 28800 seconds and (b) 1023 K (750 °C) for 600 seconds, with average grain sizes of 0.22 and 0.31 µm, respectively. Annealing at 1023 K (750 °C) is considered a better alternative since the volume fraction of precipitated carbides in specimens annealed at 1023 K (750 °C) are less than those annealed at 923 K (650 °C). More so, the energy consumption during prolonged annealing time to achieve an UFG structure at 923 K (650 °C) is higher due to low phase reversion rate. The hardness of the UFG specimens is 195 pct greater than that of the as-received steel. The higher volume fraction of TiC precipitates in the UFG structure may be an additional source of hardening. Micro and macrotexture analysis indicated {110}〈uvw〉 as the major texture component of the austenite grains in the UFG structure. Its intensity is stronger in the specimen annealed at low temperatures.

  13. Microstructural evolution of a 2.25Cr - 1 Mo steel during austenitization and temper: austenite grain growth, carbide precipitation sequence and effects on mechanical properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Depinoy, Sylvain

    2015-01-01

    This work aims at optimizing tensile and toughness properties of a 2.25Cr - 1Mo steel by controlling its microstructure through heat treatments. To this aim, phase transformations during austenitization, quenching and tempering have to be understood. Quantitative microstructural analyses were performed by means of SEM, TEM and XRD to characterize and model metallurgical evolution of the steel at each step of the heat treatment. The evolution of austenite during the austenitization stage, and its influence on the resulting as-quenched microstructure were thoroughly investigated. Austenite grain growth was modelled in order to understand its mechanisms, including the limited growth phenomenon observed at lower temperatures. The effect of austenitization conditions on further decomposition of austenite and on mechanical properties after quenching + tempering was experimentally determined. An optimal austenitization condition was selected and applied to study the tempering stage. Carbide precipitation was studied for various tempering temperatures and amounts of time. M3C carbides precipitate first, followed by M2C and M7C3; M23C6 are the equilibrium carbides. The influence of carbide precipitation on mechanical properties was studied. Tensile properties are closely linked to the tempering conditions in the range investigated, while impact toughness remains stable. (author) [fr

  14. Ductility, strength and hardness relation after prior incremental deformation (ratcheting) of austenitic steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kussmaul, K.; Diem, H.K.; Wachter, O.

    1993-01-01

    Experimental investigations into the stress/strain behavior of the niobium stabilized austenitic material with the German notation X6 CrNiNb 18 10 proved that a limited incrementally applied prior deformation will reduce the total deformation capability only by the amount of the prior deformation. It could especially be determined on the little changes in the reduction of area that the basically ductile deformation behavior will not be changed by the type of the prior loading. There is a correlation between the amount of deformation and the increase in hardness. It is possible to correlate both the changes in hardness and the material properties. In the case of low cycle fatigue tests with alternating temperature an incremental increase in total strain (ratcheting) was noted to depend on the strain range applied

  15. On the grain boundary hardening in a B-bearing 304 austenitic stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yao, X.X.

    1999-01-01

    The precipitates, (Cr,Fe) 23 (C,B) 6 carbides and (Cr,Fe) 2 B borides, formed along the grain boundaries in a 304 austenitic stainless steel containing boron of 33 ppm after solution treatment at 1100 C for 1 h followed by isothermal ageing for 0.5 h at temperatures ranging from 750 to 1050 C have been identified. The influence of these precipitates on the grain boundary hardening has been investigated by means of micro-Vickers hardness measurements. It is found that the degree of grain boundary hardening below 900 C decreases, while it increases above 900 C with increasing ageing temperature. The dissolution of (Cr,Fe) 23 (C,B) 6 carbides and the precipitation of (Cr,Fe) 2 B borides are associated with the changes of grain boundary hardening in this B-bearing 304 austenitic stainless steel between 750 and 1100 C. The non-equilibrium boron segregation enhances the grain boundary hardening when the ageing temperature is above 900 C. (orig.)

  16. Ensemble Empirical Mode Decomposition based methodology for ultrasonic testing of coarse grain austenitic stainless steels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Govind K; Kumar, Anish; Jayakumar, T; Purnachandra Rao, B; Mariyappa, N

    2015-03-01

    A signal processing methodology is proposed in this paper for effective reconstruction of ultrasonic signals in coarse grained high scattering austenitic stainless steel. The proposed methodology is comprised of the Ensemble Empirical Mode Decomposition (EEMD) processing of ultrasonic signals and application of signal minimisation algorithm on selected Intrinsic Mode Functions (IMFs) obtained by EEMD. The methodology is applied to ultrasonic signals obtained from austenitic stainless steel specimens of different grain size, with and without defects. The influence of probe frequency and data length of a signal on EEMD decomposition is also investigated. For a particular sampling rate and probe frequency, the same range of IMFs can be used to reconstruct the ultrasonic signal, irrespective of the grain size in the range of 30-210 μm investigated in this study. This methodology is successfully employed for detection of defects in a 50mm thick coarse grain austenitic stainless steel specimens. Signal to noise ratio improvement of better than 15 dB is observed for the ultrasonic signal obtained from a 25 mm deep flat bottom hole in 200 μm grain size specimen. For ultrasonic signals obtained from defects at different depths, a minimum of 7 dB extra enhancement in SNR is achieved as compared to the sum of selected IMF approach. The application of minimisation algorithm with EEMD processed signal in the proposed methodology proves to be effective for adaptive signal reconstruction with improved signal to noise ratio. This methodology was further employed for successful imaging of defects in a B-scan. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  17. Effect of Austenite Deformation on the Microstructure Evolution and Grain Refinement Under Accelerated Cooling Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, H.; Palmiere, E. J.

    2017-07-01

    Although there has been much research regarding the effect of austenite deformation on accelerated cooled microstructures in microalloyed steels, there is still a lack of accurate data on boundary densities and effective grain sizes. Previous results observed from optical micrographs are not accurate enough, because, for displacive transformation products, a substantial part of the boundaries have disorientation angles below 15 deg. Therefore, in this research, a niobium microalloyed steel was used and electron backscattering diffraction mappings were performed on all of the transformed microstructures to obtain accurate results on boundary densities and grain refinement. It was found that with strain rising from 0 to 0.5, a transition from bainitic ferrite to acicular ferrite occurs and the effective grain size reduces from 5.7 to 3.1 μm. When further increasing strain from 0.5 to 0.7, dynamic recrystallization was triggered and postdynamic softening occurred during the accelerated cooling, leading to an inhomogeneous and coarse transformed microstructure. In the entire strain range, the density changes of boundaries with different disorientation angles are distinct, due to different boundary formation mechanisms. Finally, the controversial influence of austenite deformation on effective grain size of low-temperature transformation products was argued to be related to the differences in transformation conditions and final microstructures.

  18. Influence of grain structure on the deformation mechanism in martensitic shear reversion-induced Fe-16Cr-10Ni model austenitic alloy with low interstitial content: Coarse-grained versus nano-grained/ultrafine-grained structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Challa, V.S.A. [Laboratory for Excellence in Advanced Steel Research, Department of Metallurgical, Materials Engineering, and Biomedical Engineering, University of Texas at El Paso, El Paso, TX 79968 (United States); Misra, R.D.K., E-mail: dmisra2@utep.edu [Laboratory for Excellence in Advanced Steel Research, Department of Metallurgical, Materials Engineering, and Biomedical Engineering, University of Texas at El Paso, El Paso, TX 79968 (United States); Somani, M.C. [Center for Advanced Steels Research, The University of Oulu, P.O. Box 4200, 90014 Oulu (Finland); Wang, Z.D. [State Key Laboratory for Rolling and Automation, Northeastern University, 3-11 Wenhua Road, Shenyang 110819 (China)

    2016-04-20

    Nanograined/ultrafine-grained (NG/UFG) materials characterized by high strength-high ductility combination are excellent vehicles to obtain an unambiguous understanding of deformation mechanisms vis-à-vis their coarse-grained counterparts. In this context, the innovative concept of phase reversion-induced NG/UFG structure enabled achieving high strength besides comparable ductility, for instance, in metastable austenitic stainless steels. In the phase reversion process, severe deformation of austenite at room temperature (typically ~60–80%) transforms face-centered cubic austenite (γ) to body centered cubic martensite (α′). Upon annealing, martensite reverts to austenite leading to extensive grain refinement. The objective of the present study to fundamentally understand the deformation mechanisms in NG/UFG structure in relation to that of the coarse-grained (CG) structure was accomplished by combining depth-sensing nanoscale experiments on an Fe-16Cr-10Ni model austenitic alloy conducted at different strain rates, followed by the study of structural evolution in the deformed zone using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). In the high strength NG/UFG steel (YS~585 MPa), stacking faults and nanotwins contributed to the enhanced ductility (El~35%), while in the case of low strength (YS~260 MPa) coarse-grained (CG) counterpart, ductility was also high (El~40%), but chiefly due to strain-induced martensite, which points to a clear case of grain size effect (and the corresponding level of strength). The distinct change in the deformation mechanism from stacking faults and twinning-induced plasticity (TWIP) in the NG structure to transformation-induced plasticity (TRIP) in the CG structure is elucidated in terms of austenite stability-strain energy relationship. The insights on the relationship between grain structure (and strength) and deformation mechanisms are envisaged to be important in providing a new direction for the futuristic design of high strength

  19. Quantification by image analysis of grain size of the high temperature phase (austenite) of martensitic steels 9Cr-1Mo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barcelo, F.; Brachet, J.C.

    1993-01-01

    In martensitic steels, the austenitic grain size before transformation may influence mechanical properties. 9Cr-1Mo steel (EM10) is used in hexagonal pipes fabrication in fast neutrons reactors. Image analysis allows to quantify the older grain size in function of the austenization heat treatment conditions. (A.B.). 2 figs

  20. Effect of prior cold work on creep properties of a titanium modified austenitic stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vijayanand, V.D.; Parameswaran, P.; Nandagopal, M.; Panneer Selvi, S.; Laha, K.; Mathew, M.D.

    2013-01-01

    Prior cold worked (PCW) titanium-modified 14Cr–15Ni austenitic stainless steel (SS) is used as a core-structural material in fast breeder reactor because of its superior creep strength and resistance to void swelling. In this study, the influence of PCW in the range of 16–24% on creep properties of IFAC-1 SS, a titanium modified 14Cr–15Ni austenitic SS, at 923 K and 973 K has been investigated. It was found that PCW has no appreciable effect on the creep deformation rate of the steel at both the test temperatures; creep rupture life increased with PCW at 923 K and remained rather unaffected at 973 K. The dislocation structure along with precipitation in the PCW steel was found to change appreciably depending on creep testing conditions. A well-defined dislocation substructure was observed on creep testing at 923 K; a well-annealed microstructure with evidences of recrystallization was observed on creep testing at 973 K

  1. Applying Ultrasonic Phased Array Technology to Examine Austenitic Coarse-Grained Structures for Light Water Reactor Piping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, Michael T.; Cumblidge, Stephen E.; Doctor, Steven R.

    2003-01-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory is evaluating the capabilities and limitations of phased array (PA) technology to detect service-type flaws in coarse-grained austenitic piping structures. The work is being sponsored by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Office of Research. This paper presents initial work involving the use of PA technology to determine the effectiveness of detecting and accurately characterizing flaws on the far-side of austenitic piping welds

  2. Effect of initial grain size on dynamic recrystallization in high purity austenitic stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El Wahabi, M.; Gavard, L.; Montheillet, F.; Cabrera, J.M.; Prado, J.M.

    2005-01-01

    The influence of initial microstructure on discontinuous dynamic recrystallization (DDRX) has been investigated by using high purity and ultra high purity austenitic stainless steels with various initial grain sizes. After uniaxial compression tests at constant strain rates and various temperatures, the steady state microstructure or the state corresponding to the maximum strain (ε = 1) attained in the test was analyzed by scanning electron microscopy aided with automated electron back scattering diffraction. Recrystallized grain size d rec and twin boundary fraction f TB measurements were carried out. The mechanical behavior was also investigated by comparing experimental stress-strain curves with various initial grain sizes. DDRX kinetics was described by the classical Avrami equation. It was concluded that larger initial grain sizes promoted a delay in the DDRX onset in the two alloys. It was also observed that the softening process progressed faster for smaller initial grain sizes. The effect of initial grain size is larger in the HP material and becomes more pronounced at low temperature

  3. Modification of the grain structure of austenitic welds for improved ultrasonic inspectability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wagner, Sabine; Dugan, Sandra; Stubenrauch, Steffen; Jacobs, Oliver

    2013-01-01

    Welding is an essential part of the fabrication of austenitic stainless steel components used in industrial plants, such as those designed for nuclear power generation, chemical processing, conventional power generation and, increasingly, for production of renewable energy. The welded austenitic material presents major challenges for ultrasonic inspection due to the grain structure of the weld metal. The typically coarse grain structure, in combination with the elastic anisotropy of the material, leads to increased scattering and affects sound wave propagation in the weld. These effects result in a reduced signal-to-noise ratio, and complicate the interpretation of signals and the localisation of defects by ultrasonic inspection. This paper presents the results of a research project dealing with efforts to influence grain growth in the weld during the welding process, in particular during the solidification process, in order to produce smaller grains. The objective was to achieve improved sound propagation through the weld, so that inspectability can be improved. The welding process was modified by the application of alternating magnetic fields at different frequencies, as well as different temperature cycles and pulsed arc technology. Metallographic sections of the test welds show that modification of the grain structure can be achieved by the use of these techniques. For further optimisation, test blocks for ultrasonic testing were manufactured with testflaws to study sound propagation through the modified weld and to assess the detectability of test flaws. The results of this investigation are of importance in assessing the integrity of highly stressed components in industrial installations, particularly for those components with stringent requirements on safety and quality.

  4. Elaboration of austenitic stainless steel samples with bimodal grain size distributions and investigation of their mechanical behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flipon, B.; de la Cruz, L. Garcia; Hug, E.; Keller, C.; Barbe, F.

    2017-10-01

    Samples of 316L austenitic stainless steel with bimodal grain size distributions are elaborated using two distinct routes. The first one is based on powder metallurgy using spark plasma sintering of two powders with different particle sizes. The second route applies the reverse-annealing method: it consists in inducing martensitic phase transformation by plastic strain and further annealing in order to obtain two austenitic grain populations with different sizes. Microstructural analy ses reveal that both methods are suitable to generate significative grain size contrast and to control this contrast according to the elaboration conditions. Mechanical properties under tension are then characterized for different grain size distributions. Crystal plasticity finite element modelling is further applied in a configuration of bimodal distribution to analyse the role played by coarse grains within a matrix of fine grains, considering not only their volume fraction but also their spatial arrangement.

  5. An investigation on microstructure and mechanical propertiesof a Nb-microalloyed nano/ultrafine grained 201 austenitic stainless steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samaei Baghbadorani, H., E-mail: h.samaeibaghbadorani@ma.iut.ac.ir [Department of Materials Engineering, Isfahan University of Technology, 84156-83111 Isfahan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Kermanpur, A. [Department of Materials Engineering, Isfahan University of Technology, 84156-83111 Isfahan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Najafizadeh, A. [Department of Materials Engineering, Isfahan University of Technology, 84156-83111 Isfahan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Fould Institute of Technology, Fouldshare 84916-63763 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Behjati, P.; Rezaee, A.; Moallemi, M. [Department of Materials Engineering, Isfahan University of Technology, 84156-83111 Isfahan (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-06-11

    The present study was aimed to investigate the mechanical properties of a nano/ultrafine grained Nb-containing 201 austenitic stainless steel. For this purpose, 90% cold rolled sheets with fully martensitic microstructure were isothermally annealed at 900 °C for different times of 1 to 1800 s, leading to the reversion of strain- induced α′-martensite to austenite and significant grain refinement. Ferritescopy, X-ray diffractometery and optical/electron microscopy techniques along with hardness measurements and tensile tests were used to study the evolution in microstructure and mechanical properties in the course of annealing. It was found that heavy cold-rolling promoted formation of Nb-rich carbonitrides which effectively retarded the growth of fine reverted austenite grains. The obtained results showed that the complete transformation of martensite to austenite took about 60 s with the corresponding austenite grain size of about 90 nm. This sample had an ultrahigh yield strength of 1170 MPa, which was almost four times higher than that of the raw material and outstanding elongation of 37%. Further, the true stress–strain curves of the reversion annealed samples revealed two distinct uniform elongation stages (stage I and stage II), whereas, the onset of stage II was concurrent with pronounced strain hardening. This was related to the sharp increase in the formation of α′-martensite upon tensile straining.

  6. An improved method to identify grain boundary creep cavitation in 316H austenitic stainless steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, B., E-mail: b.chen@bristol.ac.uk [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Bristol, Bristol BS8 1TR (United Kingdom); Flewitt, P.E.J. [Interface Analysis Centre, University of Bristol, 121 St. Michael' s Hill, Bristol BS2 8BS (United Kingdom); H.H. Wills Physics Laboratory, University of Bristol, Tyndall Avenue, Bristol BS8 1TL (United Kingdom); Smith, D.J. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Bristol, Bristol BS8 1TR (United Kingdom); Jones, C.P. [Interface Analysis Centre, University of Bristol, 121 St. Michael' s Hill, Bristol BS2 8BS (United Kingdom)

    2011-04-15

    Inter-granular creep cavitation damage has been observed in an ex-service 316H austenitic stainless steel thick section weldment. Focused ion beam cross-section milling combined with ion channelling contrast imaging is used to identify the cavitation damage, which is usually associated with the grain boundary carbide precipitates in this material. The results demonstrate that this technique can identify, in particular, the early stage of grain boundary creep cavitation unambiguously in materials with complex phase constituents. -- Research highlights: {yields} FIB milling plus ion channelling contrast optimise the observation of cavity. {yields} Identification of the creep cavities unambiguously, using an FIB technique. {yields} The FIB technique can retain the polyhedral shape of cavity. {yields} Various stages of creep cavitation can be observed, using the FIB technique.

  7. Grain boundary chromium concentration effects on the IGSCC and IASCC of austenitic stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruemmer, S.M.; Arey, B.W.; Charlot, L.A.

    1993-08-01

    Comparisons are made between grain boundary composition and intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) of 304 and 309 austenitic stainless steels in high-temperature water environments. Chromium depletion had the dominant effect on cracking resistance with the extent of IG cracking controlled by the interfacial chromium concentration. The minimum chromium concentration required to promote cracking was a function of the applied strain rate during slow-strain-rate tensile tests in 288 C air-saturated water. Depletion from bulk levels of 18 wt% to ∼13.5 wt% Cr at grain boundaries prompted 100% IG cracking at a strain rate of 1 x 10 -6 s -1 , while embrittlement was observed with only a slight depletion to ∼17 wt% at 2 x 10 -7 s -1 . Insights into critical interfacial compositions promoting IGSCC are discussed in reference to cracking of irradiated stainless steel nuclear reactor core components

  8. High-cycle fatigue behavior of ultrafine-grained austenitic stainless and TWIP steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamada, A.S. [Materials Engineering Laboratory (4KOMT), Box 4200, University of Oulu, 90014 Oulu (Finland); Metallurgical and Materials Engineering Department, Faculty of Petroleum and Mining Engineering, Suez Canal University, Box 43721, Suez (Egypt); Karjalainen, L.P., E-mail: pentti.karjalainen@oulu.fi [Materials Engineering Laboratory (4KOMT), Box 4200, University of Oulu, 90014 Oulu (Finland)

    2010-08-20

    High-cycle fatigue behavior of ultrafine-grained (UFG) 17Cr-7Ni Type 301LN austenitic stainless and high-Mn Fe-22Mn-0.6C TWIP steels were investigated in a reversed plane bending fatigue and compared to the behavior of steels with conventional coarse grain (CG) size. Optical, scanning and transmission electron microscopy were used to examine fatigue damage mechanisms. Testing showed that the fatigue limits leading to fatigue life beyond 4 x 10{sup 6} cycles were about 630 MPa for 301LN while being 560 MPa for TWIP steel, and being 0.59 and 0.5 of the tensile strength respectively. The CG counterparts were measured to have the fatigue limits of 350 and 400 MPa. The primary damage caused by fatigue took place by grain boundary cracking in UFG 301LN, while slip band cracking occurred in CG 301LN. However, in the case of TWIP steel, the fatigue damage mechanism is similar in spite of the grain size. In the course of cycling neither the formation of a martensite structure nor mechanical twinning occurs, but intense slip bands are created with extrusions and intrusions. Fatigue crack initiates preferentially on grain and twin boundaries, and especially in the intersection sites of slip bands and boundaries.

  9. Investigation on the crystallography of the transformation products of reverted austenite in intercritically reheated coarse grained heat affected zone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    You, Yang; Shang, Chengjia; Chen, Liang; Subramanian, Sundaresa

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Area of reverted austenite is traced out by crystallographic information. ► Bainite and martensite regions were confirmed within it. ► The martensite region is considered as the blocky MA particles. ► Martensite region has high deformation to initiate fracture. ► More uniform transformation of the reverted austenite is good for toughness. -- Abstract: In present study the intercritically reheated coarse grained heat affected zone (ICCGHAZ) showing the worst impact toughness in the heat affected zone of multi-pass welding was simulated by Gleeble-1500, and its microstructure was investigated in detail by means of scanning electron microscope (SEM) and electron backscattering diffraction (EBSD). With the crystallographic information from EBSD scanning the area of a single reverted austenite grain which formed during the thermal cycles of second pass simulation was traced out. Within it two regions with different characteristic both in morphology and crystallography were found out, showing an un-uniform transformation of the reverted austenite. The region I is a bainitic region containing larger bainitic ferrite grains, while the region II is made up of several clusters containing tiny grains. Based on the crystallographic information each cluster was determined as martensite island thereby should be considered as blocky Martensite/Austenite constituent (M/A), which is hard phase and harmful for toughness. Analysis on the level of deformation shows that the region II is much higher deformed than the region I, indicating there is high stress concentration within the region II. The possible influence of the region I and the region II on fracture is discussed under the early proposed M/A’s fracture-initiating mechanisms. It suggests that the main cause of the toughness reduction is the un-uniform transformation of the reverted austenite, and the toughness performance of the ICCGHAZ could be improved if the transformation of the reverted

  10. Mechanisms of ultrafine-grained austenite formation under different isochronal conditions in a cold-rolled metastable stainless steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Celada-Casero, C., E-mail: c.celada@cenim.csic.es [MATERALIA group, Dpt. of Physical Metallurgy, Centro Nacional de Investigaciones Metalúrgicas (CENIM-CSIC), Av. Gregorio del Amo 8, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Huang, B.M. [National Taiwan University, Dpt. of Materials Science and Engineering, 1 Roosvelt Road, Section 4, 10617 Taipei, Taiwan, ROC (China); Aranda, M.M. [MATERALIA group, Dpt. of Physical Metallurgy, Centro Nacional de Investigaciones Metalúrgicas (CENIM-CSIC), Av. Gregorio del Amo 8, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Yang, J.-R. [National Taiwan University, Dpt. of Materials Science and Engineering, 1 Roosvelt Road, Section 4, 10617 Taipei, Taiwan, ROC (China); Martin, D. San [MATERALIA group, Dpt. of Physical Metallurgy, Centro Nacional de Investigaciones Metalúrgicas (CENIM-CSIC), Av. Gregorio del Amo 8, 28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2016-08-15

    The primary objective of this work is to obtain fundamental insights on phase transformations, with focus on the reaustenitization process (α′→γ transformation), of a cold-rolled (CR) semi-austenitic metastable stainless steel upon different isochronal conditions (0.1, 1, 10 and 100 °C/s). For this purpose, an exhaustive microstructural characterization has been performed by using complementary experimental such as scanning and transmission electron microscopy (SEM and TEM), electron backscattered diffraction (EBSD), electron probe microanalysis (EPMA), micro-hardness Vickers and magnetization measurements. It has been detected that all microstructural changes shift to higher temperatures as the heating rate increases. The reaustenitization occurs in two-steps for all heating rates, which is attributed to the chemical banding present in the CR state. The α′→γ transformation is controlled by the migration of substitutional alloying elements across the austenite/martensite (γ/α′) interface, which finally leads to ultrafine-grained reaustenitized microstructures (440–280 nm). The morphology of the martensite phase in the CR state has been found to be the responsible for such a grain refinement, along with the presence of χ-phase and nanometric Ni{sub 3}(Ti,Al) precipitates that pin the austenite grain growth, especially upon slowly heating at 0.1 °C/s. - Highlights: •Ultrafine-grained austenite structures are obtained isochronally at 0.1–100 °C/s •The α′→γ transformation occurs in two steps due to the initial chemical banding •A diffusional mechanism governs the α′→γ transformation for all heating rates •The dislocation-cell-type of martensite promotes a diffusional mechanism •Precipitates located at α′/γ interfaces hinder the austenite growth.

  11. Effect of reversion annealing on the formation of nano/ultrafine grained structure in 201 austenitic stainless steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moallemi, Mohammad; Najafizadeh, Abbas; Kermanpur, Ahmad [Department of Materials Engineering, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan 84156-83111 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Rezaee, Ahad, E-mail: a.rezaee@ma.iut.ac.ir [Department of Materials Engineering, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan 84156-83111 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2011-12-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The secondary increase in the martensite content after reversion annealing. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Formation of thermally induced martensite due to carbide precipitation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The smallest average grain size of 70 nm is achieved by annealing at 850 Degree-Sign C for 15 s. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A fully austenitic structure with grain size of 100 nm and 1370 MPa yield strength. - Abstract: The formation of nano/ultrafine grain structure in a 201 austenitic stainless steel was investigated by the martensite thermomechanical treatment. Cast ingots were first homogenized, then hot-forged and solution-annealed to reduce the initial grain size. Cold rolling was then conducted down to 90% reduction in thickness, followed by reversion annealing at a temperature in the range of 1023-1173 K for 15-1800 s. The effect of reversion parameters on grain refinement was investigated. The resulting microstructures were characterized by a scanning electron microscopy equipped with X-ray energy-dispersive spectrometer, an X-ray diffractometer and a Feritscope. The hardness was measured by the Vickers method. The results show that a nano/ultrafine-grained structure formed in the initial stages of the reversion, but significant grain growth took place during the entire course of reversion. Initially lowered, the volume fraction of martensite increased again during the reversion treatment due to carbide precipitation. A fully austenitic nano grained 201 stainless steel with the average grain size of 100 nm was produced, possessing a yield strength of about 1370 MPa.

  12. Void-assisted grain boundary migration in ion-irradiated austenitic stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vaidya, W.V.

    1983-01-01

    A number of austenitic stainless steels (15 wt% Cr-15 wt% Ni) were irradiated in the solution-annealed condition with 46 MeV Nisup(6+)-ions to a dose-level of 64 dpa at 848 K. Though the microstructure was initially well-equilibrated, under irradiation a general interface migration was observed, the most pronounced being at grain boundaries followed by that at incoherent and even at coherent twins. Changes at the migrating interfaces, features of the migration and variations in the near grain boundary voidage are described. After considering various possibilities which might have caused the migration, it is shown that the observed migration was void-assisted. This has led to the conclusion that voids by nature do not constitute an obstacle for the migrating interface but on the contrary, they offer driving force. Therefore, migration becomes feasible even in the solution-annealed specimens in which inherently there should be a least tendency for such a migration. (orig.)

  13. Void-assisted grain boundary migration in ion-irradiated austenitic stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vaidya, W.V.

    1983-01-01

    A number of austenitic stainless steels (15 wt% Cr-15 wt% Ni) were irradiated in the solution-annealed condition with 46 MeV Ni 6+ -ions to a dose-level of 64 dpa at 848 K. Though the microstructure was initially well-equilibrated, under irradiation a general interface migration was observed, the most pronounced being at grain boundaries followed by that at incoherent and even at coherent twins. Changes at the migrating interfaces, features of the migration and variations in the near grain boundary voidage are described. After considering various possibilities which might have caused the migration, it is shown that the observed migration was void-assisted. This has led to the conclusion that voids by nature do not constitute an obstacle for the migrating interface but on the contrary, they offer driving force. Therefore, migration becomes feasible even in the solution-annealed specimens in which inherently there should be a least tendency for such a migration. (orig.)

  14. Effect of smelting method on the austenite grain size and properties of heat-resisting pearlitic steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balakhovskaya, M.B.; Khusainova, N.A.; Davlyatova, L.N.

    1975-01-01

    Influence of smelting method on austenite grain size and properties of refractory perlite steel were studied. An opportunity was found to increase the steel refractoriness without deteriorating its other properties. The steel 12Kh1MF of electric or common open-hearth smelting was used. The dependence of kinetics of austenite grain growth on the smelting method was studied in the temperature range 950 deg - 1200 deg C with 1 hour exposure. The grain size of austenite in steel is supposedly determined by aluminium nitrides and vanadium carbides. In tests of normalized (kept for 20 minutes at 950-980 deg C) and tempered (kept for 3 hours at 730 deg C) transverse (tangential) pipe cross-section samples the electric steel had higher impact viscosity than the open-hearth metal. At working temperatures (540 deg -580 deg C) the difference in viscosity has its minimum. Viscosity of both steels 12Kh1MF begins to sharply decrease from 20 deg C. However, electric steel has rather high viscosity even at - 40 deg C, while the open-hearth one becomes brittle as early as at - 20 deg C. Long-term strength tests at 580 deg C under stresses 10-14 kG/mm 2 show that the coarse-grain steel is more refractory, i.e. time till fracture of open-hearth steel samples is twice as long as that of electric steel samples

  15. Effect of smelting method on the austenite grain size and properties of heat-resisting pearlitic steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balakhovskaya, M B; Khusainova, N A; Davlyatova, L N [Vsesoyuznyj Nauchno-Issledovatel' skij Teplotekhnicheskij Inst., Moscow (USSR)

    1975-12-01

    Influence of smelting method on austenite grain size and properties of refractory perlite steel were studied. An opportunity was found to increase the steel refractoriness without deteriorating its other properties. The steel 12Kh1MF of electric or common open-hearth smelting was used. The dependence of kinetics of austenite grain growth on the smelting method was studied in the temperature range 950 deg - 1200 deg C with 1 hour exposure. The grain size of austenite in steel is supposedly determined by aluminium nitrides and vanadium carbides. In tests of normalized (kept for 20 minutes at 950-980 deg C) and tempered (kept for 3 hours at 730 deg C) transverse (tangential) pipe cross-section samples the electric steel had higher impact viscosity than the open-hearth metal. At working temperatures (540 deg -580 deg C) the difference in viscosity has its minimum. Viscosity of both steels 12Kh1MF begins to sharply decrease from 20 deg C. However, electric steel has rather high viscosity even at /sup -/40 deg C, while the open-hearth one becomes brittle as early as at /sup -/20 deg C. Long-term strength tests at 580 deg C under stresses 10-14 kG/mm/sup 2/ show that the coarse-grain steel is more refractory, i.e. time till fracture of open-hearth steel samples is twice as long as that of electric steel samples.

  16. The influence of grain size on the strain-induced martensite formation in tensile straining of an austenitic 15Cr–9Mn–Ni–Cu stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kisko, A.; Misra, R.D.K.; Talonen, J.; Karjalainen, L.P.

    2013-01-01

    In order to improve understanding on the behavior of ultrafine-grained austenitic stainless steels during deformation, the influence of the austenite grain size and microstructure on the strain-induced martensite transformation was investigated in an austenitic 15Cr–9Mn–Ni–Cu (Type 204Cu) stainless steel. By different reversion treatments of the 60% cold-rolled sheet, varying grain sizes from ultrafine (0.5 μm), micron-scale (1.5 μm), fine (4 μm) to coarse (18 μm) were obtained. Some microstructures also contained a mixture of ultrafine or micron-scale and coarse initially cold-worked austenite grains. Samples were tested in tensile loading and deformation structures were analyzed after 2%, 10% and 20% engineering strains by means of martensite content measurements, scanning electron microscope together with a electron backscatter diffraction device and transmission electron microscope. The results showed that the martensite nucleation sites and the rate of transformation vary. In ultrafine grains strain-induced α′-martensite nucleates at grain boundaries and twins, whereas in coarser grains as well as in coarse-grained retained austenite, α′-martensite formation occurs at shear bands, sometimes via ε-martensite. The transformation rate of strain-induced α′-martensite decreases with decreasing grain size to 1.5 μm. However, the rate is fastest in the microstructure containing a mixture of ultrafine and retained cold-worked austenite grains. There the ultrafine grains transform quite readily to martensite similarly as the coarse retained austenite grains, where the previous cold-worked microstructure is still partly remaining

  17. Stability of grain-refined reversed structures in a 301LN austenitic stainless steel under cyclic loading

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Järvenpää, A.; Jaskari, M.; Man, Jiří; Karjalalinen, L.P.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 703, č. 4 (2017), s. 280-292 ISSN 0921-5093 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-32665S Institutional support: RVO:68081723 Keywords : austenitic stainless steel * reversion treatment * grain size * deformation induced martensite * strain-controlled fatigue Subject RIV: JL - Materials Fatigue, Friction Mechanics OBOR OECD: Audio engineering, reliability analysis Impact factor: 3.094, year: 2016

  18. Effect of Nb Addition to Ti-Bearing Super Martensitic Stainless Steel on Control of Austenite Grain Size and Strengthening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Xiaoping; Langelier, Brian; Gault, Baptiste; Subramanian, Sundaresa

    2017-05-01

    The role of Nb in normalized and tempered Ti-bearing 13Cr5Ni2Mo super martensitic stainless steel is investigated through in-depth characterization of the bimodal chemistry and size of Nb-rich precipitates/atomic clusters and Nb in solid solution. Transmission electron microscopy and atom probe tomography are used to analyze the samples and clarify precipitates/atom cluster interactions with dislocations and austenite grain boundaries. The effect of 0.1 wt pct Nb addition on the promotion of (Ti, Nb)N-Nb(C,N) composite precipitates, as well as the retention of Nb in solution after cooling to room temperature, are analyzed quantitatively. (Ti, Nb)N-Nb(C,N) composite precipitates with average diameters of approximately 24 ± 8 nm resulting from epitaxial growth of Nb(C,N) on pre-existing (Ti,Nb)N particles, with inter-particle spacing on the order of 205 ± 68 nm, are found to be associated with mean austenite grain size of 28 ± 10 µm in the sample normalized at 1323 K (1050 °C). The calculated Zener limiting austenite grain size of 38 ± 13 µm is in agreement with the experimentally observed austenite grain size distribution. 0.08 wt pct Nb is retained in the as-normalized condition, which is able to promote Nb(C, N) atomic clusters at dislocations during tempering at 873 K (600 °C) for 2 hours, and increases the yield strength by 160 MPa, which is predicted to be close to maximum increase in strengthening effect. Retention of solute Nb before tempering also leads to it preferentially combing with C and N to form Nb(C, N) atom clusters, which suppresses the occurrence of Cr- and Mo-rich carbides during tempering.

  19. The effect of prior tempering on cryogenic treatment to reduce retained austenite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stratton, Paul

    2010-01-01

    The consensus view is that a high carbon case gives gears the best overall properties provided that there is no carbide network and that the retained austenite has been reduced below 20% by cryogenic treatment. This view is effectively enshrined in the SAE AMS 2759/7 standard. The cryogenic treatment usually takes place immediately after the quench to avoid austenite stabilisation. However, for some parts with complex geometries that might crack during the treatment, a short low temperature temper is carried out first. Little is known on how this temper affects the subsequent cryogenic treatment. Three carburizing steels used extensively in the aerospace industry were carburized to produce high retained austenite levels in the case using two different, but typical carburizing cycles. The retained austenite was determined by XRD before and after cryogenic treatment carried out in accordance with the standard and compared with that obtained when an intermediate temper was used. This study shows that for three typical carburizing steels, carburized using typical cycles, the efficacy of the cryogenic treatment is reduced only slightly after the temper, and not enough to be industrially significant. (author)

  20. Microstructural sensitivity of 316H austenitic stainless steel: Residual stress relaxation and grain boundary fracture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, B., E-mail: b.chen@bristol.ac.uk [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Bristol, Bristol BS8 1TR (United Kingdom); Flewitt, P.E.J. [Interface Analysis Centre, University of Bristol, 121 St Michael' s Hill, Bristol BS2 8BS (United Kingdom); H.H. Wills Physics Laboratory, School of Physics, University of Bristol, Tyndall Avenue, Bristol BS8 1TL (United Kingdom); Smith, D.J. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Bristol, Bristol BS8 1TR (United Kingdom)

    2010-10-25

    Research highlights: {yields} Triaxial residual macro-stresses have been measured by neutron diffraction. {yields} Rates of stress relaxation are shown to be a function of the microstructure. {yields} Quantification of M{sub 23}C{sub 6} precipitation was undertaken by a novel approach. {yields} Intergranular M{sub 23}C{sub 6} precipitation promotes the potential to intergranular fracture. {yields} Phosphorous segregation further enhances the potential to intergranular fracture. - Abstract: The present work considers the role of thermo-mechanical history on the generation and relaxation of residual stresses, typical of those encountered in Type 316H austenitic stainless steel thick section weldments. A series of thermo-mechanical pre-treatments have been developed and applied to simulate the critical microstructures observed within the heat affected zone of the thick section parent material. The through thickness distributions of the residual macro-stresses in cylindrical specimens have been measured by neutron diffraction and then the rates of the relaxation are shown to be a function of microstructure. The susceptibility to intergranular brittle fracture at a temperature of -196 deg. C is shown to be a function of M{sub 23}C{sub 6} carbide precipitates and phosphorous segregation at the grain boundaries. Finally, the link of the present study to the understanding of the reheat cracking is briefly discussed.

  1. Effect of plasma arc welding variables on fusion zone grain size and hardness of AISI 321 austenitic stainless steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondapalli, S. P.

    2017-12-01

    In the present work, pulsed current microplasma arc welding is carried out on AISI 321 austenitic stainless steel of 0.3 mm thickness. Peak current, Base current, Pulse rate and Pulse width are chosen as the input variables, whereas grain size and hardness are considered as output responses. Response surface method is adopted by using Box-Behnken Design, and in total 27 experiments are performed. Empirical relation between input and output response is developed using statistical software and analysis of variance (ANOVA) at 95% confidence level to check the adequacy. The main effect and interaction effect of input variables on output response are also studied.

  2. Demonstrating the Effect of Precipitation on the Mechanical Stability of Fine-Grained Austenite in Reversion-Treated 301LN Stainless Steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antti Järvenpää

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available According to recent investigations, a huge difference exists in the mechanical stability of austenite between the grain-refined structure states obtained in reversion annealing at 800–700 °C or at 900 °C, in a 301LN type austenitic stainless steel. Precipitation of chromium nitride occurring at these lower temperatures has been argued to be the factor reducing the stability. To prove this argument, a fine-grained, very stable austenitic structure was created at 900 °C in 1 s, and subsequently annealed at lower temperatures between 850 and 750 °C, up to 1000 s. It was found that the subsequent annealing at 750 and 800 °C resulted in prominent gradual decrease of the mechanical stability under tensile straining, detectable after 10 s annealing duration and continued until 1000 s. Only minimal grain growth occurred, which decreased the stability very marginally. The degree of the stability drop followed the predicted kinetics of the Cr2N precipitation with regards as its dependence on annealing duration and temperature. Further, the tensile yield strength of the fine-grained structure increased slightly due to the annealing. The presence of nano-sized Cr2N particles was verified after 1000 s holding at 750 °C. These observations and predictions yield firm evidence for the imperative contribution of precipitation to the highly reduced mechanical stability of grain-refined austenite in this steel.

  3. Nano/ultrafine grained austenitic stainless steel through the formation and reversion of deformation-induced martensite: Mechanisms, microstructures, mechanical properties, and TRIP effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shirdel, M., E-mail: mshirdel1989@ut.ac.ir [School of Metallurgy and Materials Engineering, College of Engineering, University of Tehran, P.O. Box 11155-4563, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Mirzadeh, H., E-mail: hmirzadeh@ut.ac.ir [School of Metallurgy and Materials Engineering, College of Engineering, University of Tehran, P.O. Box 11155-4563, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Advanced Metalforming and Thermomechanical Processing Laboratory, School of Metallurgy and Materials Engineering, University of Tehran, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Parsa, M.H., E-mail: mhparsa@ut.ac.ir [School of Metallurgy and Materials Engineering, College of Engineering, University of Tehran, P.O. Box 11155-4563, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Center of Excellence for High Performance Materials, School of Metallurgy and Materials Engineering, University of Tehran, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Advanced Metalforming and Thermomechanical Processing Laboratory, School of Metallurgy and Materials Engineering, University of Tehran, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    A comprehensive study was carried out on the strain-induced martensitic transformation, its reversion to austenite, the resultant grain refinement, and the enhancement of strength and strain-hardening ability through the transformation-induced plasticity (TRIP) effect in a commercial austenitic 304L stainless steel with emphasis on the mechanisms and the microstructural evolution. A straightforward magnetic measurement device, which is based on the measurement of the saturation magnetization, for evaluating the amount of strain-induced martensite after cold rolling and reversion annealing in metastable austenitic stainless steels was used, which its results were in good consistency with those of the X-ray diffraction (XRD) method. A new parameter called the effective reduction in thickness was introduced, which corresponds to the reasonable upper bound on the obtainable martensite fraction based on the saturation in the martensitic transformation. By means of thermodynamics calculations, the reversion mechanisms were estimated and subsequently validated by experimental results. The signs of thermal martensitic transformation at cooling stage after reversion at 850 °C were found, which was attributed to the rise in the martensite start temperature due to the carbide precipitation. After the reversion treatment, the average grain sizes were around 500 nm and the nanometric grains of the size of ~ 65 nm were also detected. The intense grain refinement led to the enhanced mechanical properties and observation of the change in the work-hardening capacity and TRIP effect behavior. A practical map as a guidance for grain refining and characterizing the stability against grain growth was proposed, which shows the limitation of the reversion mechanism for refinement of grain size. - Graphical abstract: Display Omitted - Highlights: • Nano/ultrafine grained austenitic stainless steel through martensite treatment • A parameter descriptive of a reasonable upper bound on

  4. Nano/ultrafine grained austenitic stainless steel through the formation and reversion of deformation-induced martensite: Mechanisms, microstructures, mechanical properties, and TRIP effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shirdel, M.; Mirzadeh, H.; Parsa, M.H.

    2015-01-01

    A comprehensive study was carried out on the strain-induced martensitic transformation, its reversion to austenite, the resultant grain refinement, and the enhancement of strength and strain-hardening ability through the transformation-induced plasticity (TRIP) effect in a commercial austenitic 304L stainless steel with emphasis on the mechanisms and the microstructural evolution. A straightforward magnetic measurement device, which is based on the measurement of the saturation magnetization, for evaluating the amount of strain-induced martensite after cold rolling and reversion annealing in metastable austenitic stainless steels was used, which its results were in good consistency with those of the X-ray diffraction (XRD) method. A new parameter called the effective reduction in thickness was introduced, which corresponds to the reasonable upper bound on the obtainable martensite fraction based on the saturation in the martensitic transformation. By means of thermodynamics calculations, the reversion mechanisms were estimated and subsequently validated by experimental results. The signs of thermal martensitic transformation at cooling stage after reversion at 850 °C were found, which was attributed to the rise in the martensite start temperature due to the carbide precipitation. After the reversion treatment, the average grain sizes were around 500 nm and the nanometric grains of the size of ~ 65 nm were also detected. The intense grain refinement led to the enhanced mechanical properties and observation of the change in the work-hardening capacity and TRIP effect behavior. A practical map as a guidance for grain refining and characterizing the stability against grain growth was proposed, which shows the limitation of the reversion mechanism for refinement of grain size. - Graphical abstract: Display Omitted - Highlights: • Nano/ultrafine grained austenitic stainless steel through martensite treatment • A parameter descriptive of a reasonable upper bound on

  5. Microtwins and their effect on accumulation of excess dislocation density in grains with different types of crystal lattice bending in deformed austenitic steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gibert, Ivan, E-mail: gibert1993@mail.ru [National Research Tomsk Polytechnic University, 30, Lenin Ave., 634050, Tomsk (Russian Federation); Kiseleva, Svetlana, E-mail: kisielieva1946@mail.ru; Popova, Natalya, E-mail: natalya-popova-44@mail.ru; Koneva, Nina, E-mail: koneva@tsuab.ru; Kozlov, Eduard, E-mail: kozlov@tsuab.ru [Tomsk State University of Architecture and Building, 2, Solyanaya Sq., 634003, Tomsk (Russian Federation)

    2016-01-15

    The investigation of excess dislocation density accumulation in the deformed polycrystalline austenitic steel was carried out using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The distributions of the excess dislocation density in the grains of the deformed austenitic steel with different bending types were obtained and plotted. It was established that in the austenitic polycrystalline steel at the deformation degrees ε = 14 and 25 % the distributions of the excess dislocation density are multimodal. In both cases the grain with compound bending is more stressed. The values of the average excess dislocation density in the grains with the compound and simple bending are less at ε = 25 % than that at ε = 14 %. This is explained by a significant relaxation of the internal stresses in steel with the increase of the deformation degree from 14 % to 25 %. The increase of the number of twinning systems and the material volume fraction covered by twinning leads to the internal stress relaxation and consequently to the increase of the excess dislocation density. The presence of microtwins in the deformed material has an influence on the distribution of the excess dislocation density. In the deformed polycrystalline austenitic steel the number of grains with compound bending is increased with the increase of the plastic deformation degree.

  6. Grain boundary segregation and intergranular stress corrosion cracking susceptibility of austenitic stainless steels in high temperature water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shoji, T.; Yamaki, K.; Ballinger, R.G.; Hwang, I.S.

    1992-01-01

    The effects of grain boundary segregation on intergranular stress corrosion cracking of austenitic stainless steels in high temperature water have been examined as a function of heat treatment. The materials investigated were: (1) two commercial purity Type 304; (2) low sulfur Type 304; (3) nuclear grade Type 304; (4) ultra high purity Type 304L; and (5) Type 316L and Type 347L. Specimens were solution treated at 1050 degrees C for 0.5 hour and given a sensitization heat treatment at 650 degrees C for 50 hours. Some of the specimens were then subjected to an aging heat treatment at 850 degrees C for from one to ten hours to cause Cr recovery at the grain boundaries. The effects of heat treatments on degree of sensitization and grain boundary segregation were evaluated by Electrochemical Potentiokinetic Reactivation (EPR) and Coriou tests, respectively. The susceptibility to stress corrosion (SCC) was evaluated using slow strain rate tests technique (SSRT) in high temperature water. SSRT tests were performed in an aerated pure water (8 ppm dissolved oxygen) at 288 degrees C at a strain rate of 1.33 x 10 -6 /sec. Susceptibility to intergranular stress corrosion cracking was compared with degree of sensitization and grain boundary segregation. The results of the investigation indicate that EPR is not always an accurate indicator of SCC susceptibility. The Coriou test provides a more reliable measure of SCC susceptibility especially for 304L, 304NG, 316L, and 347L stainless steels. The results also indicate that grain boundary segregation as well as degree of sensitization must be considered in the determination of SCC susceptibility

  7. Grain-boundary microchemistry and intergranular cracking of irradiated austenitic stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, H.M.; Ruther, W.E.; Sanecki, J.E.; Kassner, T.F.

    1993-01-01

    Constant-extension-rate tensile tests and grain-boundary analysis by Auger electron spectroscopy were conducted on high and commercial-purity (HP and CP) Type 304 stainless steel (SS) specimens from irradiated boiling-water reactor (BWR) components to identify the mechanisms of irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC). Contrary to previous beliefs, susceptibility to intergranular fracture could not be correlated with radiation-induced segregation of impurities such as Si, P, C, or S, but a correlation was obtained with grain-boundary Cr concentration, indicating a role for Cr depletion. Detailed analysis of grain-boundary chemistry was conducted on BWR neutron absorber tubes that were fabricated from two similar heats of HP Type 304 SS of virtually identical bulk chemical composition but exhibiting a significant difference in susceptibility to IASCC after irradiation to ∼2 x 10 21 n/cm 2 (E > 1 MeV). Grain-boundary concentrations of Cr Ni, Si, P, S, and C of the cracking-resistant and -susceptible HP heats were virtually identical. However, grain boundaries of the cracking-resistant material contained less N and more B and Li than those of the cracking-susceptible material. This observation indicates that, besides the deleterious effect of grain-boundary Cr depletion, a synergism between grain-boundary segregation of N and B and transmutation to H and Li plays an important role in IASCC

  8. Ultrasonic Characterization of Cast Austenitic Stainless Steel Microstructure: Discrimination between Equiaxed- and Columnar-Grain Material – An Interim Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramuhalli, Pradeep; Good, Morris S.; Diaz, Aaron A.; Anderson, Michael T.; Watson, Bruce E.; Peters, Timothy J.; Dixit, Mukul; Bond, Leonard J.

    2009-10-27

    Ultrasonic nondestructive evaluation (NDE) and inspection of cast austenitic stainless steel (CASS) components used in the nuclear power industry is neither as effective nor reliable as is needed due to detrimental effects upon the interrogating ultrasonic beam and interference from ultrasonic backscatter. The root cause is the coarse-grain microstructure inherent to this class of materials. Some ultrasonic techniques perform better for particular microstructural classifications and this has led to the hypothesis that an ultrasonic inspection can be optimized for a particular microstructural class, if a technique exists to reliably classify the microstructure for feedback to the inspection. This document summarizes scoping experiments of in-situ ultrasonic methods for classification and/or characterization of the material microstructures in CASS components from the outside surface of a pipe. The focus of this study was to evaluate ultrasonic methods and provide an interim report that documents results and technical progress. An initial set of experiments were performed to test the hypothesis that in-service characterization of cast austenitic stainless steel (CASS) is feasible, and that, if reliably performed, such data would provide real-time feedback to optimize in-service inspections in the field. With this objective in mind, measurements for the experiment were restricted to techniques that should be robust if carried forward to eventual field implementation. Two parameters were investigated for their ability to discriminate between different microstructures in CASS components. The first parameter was a time-of-flight ratio of a normal incidence shear wave to that of a normal incidence longitudinal wave (TOFRSL). The ratio removed dependency on component thickness which may not be accurately reported in the field. The second parameter was longitudinal wave attenuation. The selected CASS specimens provided five equiaxed-grain material samples and five columnar-grain

  9. Grain boundary characteristics and texture formation in a medium carbon steel during its austenitic decomposition in a high magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Y.D.; Esling, C.; Lecomte, J.S.; He, C.S.; Zhao, X.; Zuo, L.

    2005-01-01

    A 12-T magnetic field has been applied to a medium plain carbon steel during the diffusional decomposition of austenite and the effect of a high magnetic field on the distribution of misorientation angles, grain boundary characteristics and texture formation in the ferrite produced has been investigated. The results show that a high magnetic field can cause a considerable decrease in the frequency of low-angle misorientations and an increase in the occurrence of low Σ coincidence boundaries, in particular the Σ3 of ferrite. This may be attributed to the elevation in the transformation temperature caused by the magnetic field and, therefore, the reduction of the transformation stress. The wider temperature range for grain growth offers longer time to the less mobile Σ boundaries to enlarge their areas. Moreover, the magnetic field can enhance the transverse field-direction fiber ( parallel TFD). It can be assumed that the effects of the field were caused by the dipolar interaction between the magnetic moments of Fe atoms

  10. Grain Orientation and Interface Character Distribution During Austenite Precipitation Phase in Duplex Stainless Steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    XU Ting

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The grain orientation and the interface character distribution were investigated for γ precipitation from the supersaturated α during aging at 1323K in duplex stainless steel by using EBSD technique and misorientation analysis based on Rodrigues-Frank (R-F space. The results show that sharp texture and the grain boundary character distribution featured by a high population of low angle grain boundary (LAB and a small number of twin boundaries (TBs are produced in the γ precipitated from cold-rolled supersaturated coarse α with pre-strain of ε=2. The precipitated γ grains approximately possess K-S, N-W and Bain orientation relationship with the α matrix equally. For the unstrained α matrix of the same orientation, nearly random texture and the grain boundary character predominated by TBs are introduced in the γ precipitation after aging. Most of γ have K-S relation with the α matrix. However, twining in γ leads to the deviation from typical K-S orientation relationship. And also, one-fourth of phase boundaries along γ grains containing twins are found to obey a new orientation relationship of 35°/〈110〉 with α matrix.

  11. Interaction Between Second-Phase Particle Dissolution and Abnormal Grain Growth in an Austenitic Stainless Steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dutra J.C.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The continuing development of stainless steels has resulted in complex steel compositions with substantial amounts of alloying elements. The benefits of such additions invariably come attached to unavoidable disadvantages. One of the most critical item is the potential microstructural instability of the material. Alloying elements may be in a supersaturated solid solution, in which the precipitation of carbides, nitrides, borides and intermetallic phases occurs in a wide range of temperatures. In order to dissolve the mentioned precipitates, solution annealing is commonly performed. However, at the temperature range in which this treatment is carried out, the onset of abnormal grain growth can occur. The interaction between the dissolution of these second-phase particles and the occurrence of abnormal grain growth is investigated in this work. This study also shows that the thermodynamics and the kinetics of dissolution of precipitates may be used to predict whether abnormal grain growth takes place.

  12. Processing of fine grained AISI 304L austenitic stainless steel by cold rolling and high-temperature short-term annealing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naghizadeh, Meysam; Mirzadeh, Hamed

    2018-05-01

    An advanced thermomechanical process based on the formation and reversion of deformation-induced martensite was used to refine the grain size and enhance the hardness of an AISI 304L austenitic stainless steel. Both low and high reversion annealing temperatures and also the repetition of the whole thermomechanical cycle were considered. While a microstructure with average austenite grain size of a few micrometers was achieved based on cold rolling and high-temperature short-term annealing, an extreme grain refinement up to submicrometer regime was obtained by cold rolling followed by low-temperature long-term annealing. However, the required annealing time was found to be much longer, which negates its appropriateness for industrial production. While a magnificent grain refinement was achieved by one pass of the high-temperature thermomechanical process, the reduction in grain size was negligible by the repetition of the whole cycle. It was found that the hardness of the thermomechanically processed material is much higher than that of the as-received material. The results of the present work were shown to be compatible with the general trend of grain size dependence of hardness for AISI 304L stainless steel based on the Hall-Petch relationship. The results were also discussed based on the X-ray evaluation of dislocation density by modified Williamson-Hall plots.

  13. Enhanced mechanical behaviors of gradient nano-grained austenite stainless steel by means of ultrasonic impact treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinjun Yang

    Full Text Available The gradient nano-grained (GNG structure was formed on the top layer of AISI 304 in the presence of coarse grains (CG by means of ultrasonic impact treatment (UIT. The impact velocity was 5 m/s and the coverage changed from 3000% to 9000% in order to obtain the microstructure GNG/CG materials. The tensile test and small punch test (SPT were further carried out in order to investigate the mechanical behaviors of the GNG/CG 304 at the different stress states. The results indicated that the yield strength of GNG/CG 304 obtained by tensile test and SPT increased at the small expense of ductility. The stress triaxiality T played an important role in the deformation behavior of GNG/CG 304. An increased T-value in the region of biaxial stretching of small punch specimen (T = 2/3 led to an improved ductility compared with that noted in the case of uniaxial tensile specimen. The strain rate sensitivity m of GNG/CG 304 was 0.0468 that was estimated to be 25-fold greater than the coarse material. The yield strength of GNG/CG 304 at 400 °C was 1.6-fold greater than the coarse material at ambient temperature due to the thermal stability of the GNG layer. Thus, the GNG structure could improve the comprehensive mechanical performances of AISI 304 with a balance of strength and ductility. Keywords: GNG structure, Mechanical behaviors, Small punch test, Ultrasonic impact treatment, Austenite stainless steel

  14. Non-equilibrium grain boundary segregation of boron in austenitic stainless steel - IV. Precipitation behaviour and distribution of elements at grain boundaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karlsson, L.; Norden, H.

    1988-01-01

    The distribution of elements and the precipitation behaviour at grain boundaries have been studied in boron containing AISI 316L and ''Mo-free AISI 316L'' type austenitic stainless steels. A combination of microanalytical techniques was used to study the boundary regions after cooling at 0.29-530 0 C/s from 800, 1075 or 1250 0 C. Tetragonal M/sub 2/B, M/sub 5/B/sub 3/ and M/sub 3/B/sub 2/, all rich in Fe, Cr and Mo, precipitated in the ''high B'' (40 ppm) AISI 316L steel whereas orthorhombic M/sub 2/B, rich in Cr and Fe was found in the ''Mo-free steel'' with 23 ppm B. In the ''high B steel'' a thin (<2nm), continuous layer, containing B, Cr, Mo and Fe and having a stoichiometry of typically M/sub 9/B, formed at boundaries after cooling at intermediate cooling rates. For both types of steels a boundary zone was found, after all heat treatments, with a composition differing significantly from the bulk composition. The differences were most marked after cooling at intermediate cooling rates. In both types of steel boundary depletion of Cr and enrichment of B and C occurred. It was found that non-equilibrium grain boundary segregation of boron can affect the precipitation behaviour by making the boundary composition enter a new phase field ''Non-equilibrium phases'' might also form. The synergistic effect of B and Mo on the boundary composition and precipitation behaviour, and the observed indications of C non-equilibrium segregation are discussed

  15. Effects of niobium additions on the structure, depth, and austenite grain size of the case of carburized 0.07% C steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, M. A.; Bepari, M. M. A.

    1996-10-01

    Carbon (0.07%) steel samples containing about 0.04% Nb singly and in combination with nitrogen were carburized in a natural Titas gas atmosphere at a temperature of 1223 K (950 °C) and a pressure of about 0.10 MPa for 1/2 to 4 h, followed by slow cooling in the furnace. Their microstructures were studied by optical microscopy. The austenite grain size of the case and the case depths were determined on baseline samples of low-carbon steels and also on niobium and (Nb + N) microalloyed steel samples. It was found that, when compared to the baseline steel, niobium alone or in combination with nitrogen decreased the thickness of cementite network near the surface of the carburized case of the steels. However, niobium in combination with nitrogen was more effective than niobium in reducing the thickness of cementite network. Niobium with or without nitrogen inhibited the formation of Widmanstätten cementite plates at grain boundaries and within the grains near the surface in the hypereutectoid zone of the case. It was also revealed that, when compared to the baseline steel, niobium decreased the case depth of the carburized steels, but that niobium with nitrogen is more effective than niobium alone in reducing the case depth. Niobium as niobium carbide (NbC) and niobium in the presence of nitrogen as niobium carbonitride, [Nb(C,N)] particles refined the austenite grain size of the carburized case, but Nb(C,N) was more effective than NbC in inhibiting austenite grain growth.

  16. Effect of initial grain size on inhomogeneous plastic deformation and twinning behavior in high manganese austenitic steel with a polycrystalline microstructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueji, R.; Tsuchida, N.; Harada, K.; Takaki, K.; Fujii, H.

    2015-08-01

    The grain size effect on the deformation twinning in a high manganese austenitic steel which is so-called TWIP (twining induced plastic deformation) steel was studied in order to understand how to control deformation twinning. The 31wt%Mn-3%Al-3% Si steel was cold rolled and annealed at various temperatures to obtain fully recrystallized structures with different mean grain sizes. These annealed sheets were examined by room temperature tensile tests at a strain rate of 10-4/s. The coarse grained sample (grain size: 49.6μm) showed many deformation twins and the deformation twinning was preferentially found in the grains in which the tensile axis is parallel near to [111]. On the other hand, the sample with finer grains (1.8 μm) had few grains with twinning even after the tensile deformation. The electron back scattering diffraction (EB SD) measurements clarified the relationship between the anisotropy of deformation twinning and that of inhomogeneous plastic deformation. Based on the EBSD analysis, the mechanism of the suppression of deformation twinning by grain refinement was discussed with the concept of the slip pattern competition between the slip system governed by a grain boundary and that activated by the macroscopic load.

  17. Refinement of grain structure in 20 MnNiMo (SA508C) steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheng Zhongqi; Xiao Hong; Peng Feng; Zou Min

    1997-04-01

    The size of prior austenite grains and bainitic colonies of 20 MnNiMo (SA508C) steel (a reactor pressure vessel steel) after normal heat treatment is measured and its controlling factors are discussed. Results show that low aluminium content can induce serious mixed structure with fine and coarse grains in prior austenite. Fast cooling rate can promote refinement of bainitic colonies. Further refinement of grains can be obtained by inter-critical quenching. (5 figs., 1 tab.)

  18. Factors affecting the grain growth of austenite in low alloy steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parker, J.D.; Storer, S.M.

    1995-01-01

    The performance of steels is linked to the metallurgical transformations which occur during manufacture. Clearly then the optimization of a fabrication procedure must be based on fundamental relationships linking specific thermal treatments with transformation behaviour. Optimized manufacture of thick-section, multipass welds is therefore particularly complex since the thermal cycles associated with fusion welding result in the formation of heterogeneous microstructures. Moreover, these transformations will take place under rapid heating and cooling conditions so that standard data based on equilibrium behaviour may not be directly relevant. The present study is part of an integrated research programme aimed at establishing the basic microstructural relationships required to optimize the manufacture and performance of weldments. Work to date demonstrates that utilization of a computer controlled Gleeble simulation system allows a wider range of heating and cooling rates to be applied than is possible with traditional heat treatment techniques. Additional advantages of this system include precise control of time at peak temperature and uniform temperatures within a defined work zone. Results presented for a CrMoV creep resistant low alloy steel indicate that grain growth behaviour in the range 955-1390 C can be related to the time at peak temperature. The effect of this transformation behaviour on weldment behaviour is discussed. (orig.)

  19. Grain-orientation-dependent of γ–ε–α′ transformation and twinning in a super-high-strength, high ductility austenitic Mn-steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eskandari, M., E-mail: m.eskandari@scu.ac.ir [Department of Materials Science & Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Shahid Chamran University of Ahvaz, Ahvaz (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Zarei-Hanzaki, A. [Hot Deformation & Thermo-mechanical Processing of High Performance Engineering Materials, School of Metallurgy and Materials Engineering, University of Tehran, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Mohtadi-Bonab, M.A. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Bonab, Velayat Highway (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Onuki, Y. [Frontier Research Center for Applied Atomic Sciences, Ibaraki University (Japan); Basu, R. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, ITM University, Gurgaon (India); Asghari, A. [Electrical and Computer Engineering Department, University of Texas at San Antonio, Texas (United States); Szpunar, J.A. [Advanced Materials for Clean Energy, Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Saskatchewan (Canada)

    2016-09-30

    A newly developed, austenitic lightweight steel, containing a low-density element, Al, exhibits tensile elongation up to 50% as well as high ultimate-tensile stress (tensile fracture at 1800 MPa) without necking behavior. Electron backscatter diffraction analysis is carried out to investigate the orientation dependence of the martensitic transformation in tensile testing to 30% strain at 323 K (25 °C). A pronounced γ→ε→α′ transformation is observed in <111> and <110>∥TD (TD: tensile direction) γ-grains. The α′-transformation textures is analyzed. Large misorientation spreads is seen in the <100>∥TD γ-grains. Interestingly, twin-assisted martensitic transformation is detected in the <111>∥TD followed by the twin boundary directly moving to a γ/α′ phase boundary. These phenomena are related to a change of Schmid factor for different orientations of grains.

  20. The effect of prior deformation on subsequent microplasticity and damage evolution in an austenitic stainless steel at elevated temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Dong-Feng; Davies, Catrin M.; Zhang, Shu-Yan; Dickinson, Calum; O’Dowd, Noel P.

    2013-01-01

    The micromechanical deformation of an austenitic stainless steel under uniaxial tension at elevated temperature (550 °C) following room-temperature compression has been examined in this work. The study combines micromechanical finite-element modelling and in situ neutron diffraction measurements. Overall, good agreement has been achieved between the measured and simulated stress vs. lattice strain response, when prestrain is accounted for. The results indicate that the introduction of prestrain can significantly influence subsequent microscale deformation and damage development associated with microplasticity and that an appropriate representation of strain history can improve the predictive accuracy at the microscale for a polycrystalline material

  1. Strain-Annealing Based Grain Boundary Engineering to Evaluate its Sole Implication on Intergranular Corrosion in Extra-Low Carbon Type 304L Austenitic Stainless Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pradhan, S. K.; Bhuyan, P.; Kaithwas, C.; Mandal, Sumantra

    2018-07-01

    Strain-annealing based thermo-mechanical processing has been performed to promote grain boundary engineering (GBE) in an extra-low carbon type austenitic stainless steel without altering the grain size and residual strain to evaluate its sole influence on intergranular corrosion. Single-step processing comprising low pre-strain ( 5 and 10 pct) followed by annealing at 1273 K for 1 hour have resulted in a large fraction of Σ3 n boundaries and significant disruption in random high-angle grain boundaries (RHAGBs) connectivity. This is due to the occurrence of prolific multiple twinning in these specimens as confirmed by their large twin-related domain and twin-related grain size ratio. Among the iterative processing, the schedule comprising two cycles of 10 and 5 pct deformation followed by annealing at 1173 K for 1 hour has yielded the optimum GBE microstructure with the grain size and residual strain akin to the as-received condition. The specimens subjected to the higher number of iterations failed to realize GBE microstructures due to the occurrence of partial recrystallization. Owing to the optimum grain boundary character distribution, the GBE specimen has exhibited remarkable resistance against sensitization and intergranular corrosion as compared to the as-received condition. Furthermore, the lower depth of percolation in the GBE specimen is due to the significant disruption of RHAGBs connectivity as confirmed from its large twin-related domain and lower fractal dimension.

  2. Modelling Cr depletion under a growing Cr2O3 layer on austenitic stainless steel: the influence of grain boundary diffusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansson, Anette Nørgaard; Hattel, Jesper Henri; Dahl, Kristian Vinter

    2009-01-01

    according to a parabolic rate law as a consequence of rate limiting diffusion of Cr cations through the oxide layer; the retraction of the oxide/alloy interface associated with the removal of Cr atoms from the substrate is included in the calculations. Numerically, the movement of the oxide/alloy interface......The oxidation behaviour of austenitic stainless steels in the temperature range 723–1173K is strongly influenced by the grain size of the oxidizing alloy. In this work the evolution of the concentration profiles of Cr, Ni and Fe in the substrate below a growing Cr2O3 layer is simulated...... with a Fisher-type numerical model, which takes both volume and grain boundary diffusion into consideration. The model is based on a two-dimensional control volume-based solution of Fick’s 2nd law for multicomponent diffusion and includes crossterm diffusion coefficients. The oxide layer is assumed to grow...

  3. Study on the crystallographic orientation relationship and formation mechanism of reversed austenite in economical Cr12 super martensitic stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ye, Dong; Li, Shaohong; Li, Jun; Jiang, Wen; Su, Jie; Zhao, Kunyu

    2015-01-01

    Effect of carbides and crystallographic orientation relationship on the formation mechanism of reversed austenite of economical Cr12 super martensitic stainless steel (SMSS) has been investigated mainly by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD). The results indicate that the M_2_3C_6 precipitation and the formation of the reversed austenite have the interaction effect during tempering process in SMSS. The reversed austenite forms intensively at the sub-block boundary and the lath boundary within a misorientation range of 0–60°. M_2_3C_6 has the same crystallographic orientation relationship with reversed austenite. There are two different kinds of formation modes for reversed austenite. One is a nondiffusional shear reversion; the other is a diffusion transformation. Both are strictly limited by crystallographic orientation relationship. The austenite variants are limited to two kinds within one packet and five kinds within one prior austenite grain. - Highlights: • Reversed austenite forms at martensite boundaries with misorientation of 0–60° • M_2_3C_6 precipitation and reversed austenite formation have the interaction effect. • Two austenite variants with different orientations can be formed inside a packet. • Two reversed austenite formation modes: shear reversion; diffusion transformation

  4. Study on the crystallographic orientation relationship and formation mechanism of reversed austenite in economical Cr12 super martensitic stainless steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ye, Dong; Li, Shaohong; Li, Jun; Jiang, Wen [Faculty of Materials Science and Engineering, Kunming University of Science and Technology, Kunming 650093 (China); Su, Jie [Institute for Structural Materials, Central Iron and Steel Research Institute, Beijing 100081 (China); Zhao, Kunyu, E-mail: kyzhaoy@sina.com [Faculty of Materials Science and Engineering, Kunming University of Science and Technology, Kunming 650093 (China)

    2015-11-15

    Effect of carbides and crystallographic orientation relationship on the formation mechanism of reversed austenite of economical Cr12 super martensitic stainless steel (SMSS) has been investigated mainly by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD). The results indicate that the M{sub 23}C{sub 6} precipitation and the formation of the reversed austenite have the interaction effect during tempering process in SMSS. The reversed austenite forms intensively at the sub-block boundary and the lath boundary within a misorientation range of 0–60°. M{sub 23}C{sub 6} has the same crystallographic orientation relationship with reversed austenite. There are two different kinds of formation modes for reversed austenite. One is a nondiffusional shear reversion; the other is a diffusion transformation. Both are strictly limited by crystallographic orientation relationship. The austenite variants are limited to two kinds within one packet and five kinds within one prior austenite grain. - Highlights: • Reversed austenite forms at martensite boundaries with misorientation of 0–60° • M{sub 23}C{sub 6} precipitation and reversed austenite formation have the interaction effect. • Two austenite variants with different orientations can be formed inside a packet. • Two reversed austenite formation modes: shear reversion; diffusion transformation.

  5. Effect of multiple austenitizing treatments on HT-9 steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Emigh, R.A.

    1985-12-01

    The effect of multiple austenitizing treatments on the toughness of an Fe-12Cr-1.0Mo-0.5W-0.3V (HT-9) steel was studied. The resulting microstructures were characterized by their mechanical properties, precipitated carbide distribution, and fracture surface appearance. It was proposed that multiple transformations would refine the martensite structure and improve toughness. Optical and scanning electron microscopic observations revealed that the martensite packet structure was somewhat refined by a second austenite transformation. Transmission electron microscopy studies of carbon extraction replicas showed that this multiple step treatment had eliminated grain boundary carbide films seen in single treated specimens on prior austenite grain boundaries. The 0.2% yield strength, tensile strength, and elongation were relatively unchanged, but the toughness measured by fatigue pre-cracked Charpy impact tests increased for the multiple step specimens

  6. Passive behavior of a bulk nanostructured 316L austenitic stainless steel consisting of nanometer-sized grains with embedded nano-twin bundles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Tianshu; Liu, Li; Zhang, Bin; Li, Ying; Yan, Fengkai; Tao, Nairong; Wang, Fuhui

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Nanometer-grains (NG) and bundles of nano-twins (NT) is synthesized in 316L. • (NG + NT) and NT enhance the concentration of active Fe Fe in the passive film. • (NG + NT) and NT enhance the passive ability. • A Cr 0 -enriched layer forms at the passive film/metal interface. - Abstract: The passive behavior of a bulk nanostructured 316L austenitic stainless steel consisting of nanometer-sized grains (NG) and nano-twin bundles (NT) are investigated. The electrochemical results indicate that the spontaneous passivation ability and growth rate of passive film are improved. The X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) shows that a Cr 0 -enriched layer forms at the passive film/metal interface. More nucleation sites afforded by the nanostructures and the enhanced diffusion rate of charged species across the passive film are believed to be responsible for the improved passive ability. The PDM model is introduced to elaborate the microscopic process of passivation

  7. Deformation effects on the development of grain boundary chronium depletion (sensitization) in type 316 austenitic stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atteridge, D.G.; Wood, W.E.; Advani, A.H.; Bruemmer, S.M.

    1990-01-01

    Deformation induces an acceleration in the kinetics and reduction in the thermodynamic barrier to carbide precipitation and grain boundary chromium depletion (GBCD) development of a high carbon Type 316 stainless steel (SS). This was observed in a study on strain effects on GBCD (or sensitization) development in the range of 575 degree C to 775 degree C. Grain boundary chromium depletion behavior of SS was examined using the indirect electrochemical potentiokinetic reactivation (EPR) test and supported by studies on carbide precipitation using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). 99 refs., 84 figs., 9 tabs

  8. Effects of grain dust on lungs prior to and following dust remediation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pahwa, Punam; Dosman, James A; McDuffie, Helen H

    2008-12-01

    To determine longitudinal estimates of pulmonary function decline in Canadian grain elevator workers before and after dust control by analyzing data collected from five regions of Canada over 15 years. Declines in forced expired volume in one second and forced vital capacity before and after dust control were estimated by using a generalized estimating equations approach. For grain workers who were in the grain industry for 20 or more years both before and after dust control: the mean annual loss of forced expired volume in one second was greatest among current smoking grain workers followed by ex-smokers and nonsmokers, respectively. Similar results were obtained for forced vital capacity. Grain dust control was effective in reducing decline in the lung function measurements among grain workers in all smoking and exposure categories.

  9. Martensite shear phase reversion-induced nanograined/ultrafine-grained Fe-16Cr-10Ni alloy: The effect of interstitial alloying elements and degree of austenite stability on phase reversion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Misra, R.D.K., E-mail: dmisra@louisiana.edu [Center for Structural and Functional Materials, University of Louisiana at Lafayette, Madison Hall Room 217, P.O. Box 44130, Lafayette, LA 70504-1430 (United States); Zhang, Z.; Venkatasurya, P.K.C. [Center for Structural and Functional Materials, University of Louisiana at Lafayette, Madison Hall Room 217, P.O. Box 44130, Lafayette, LA 70504-1430 (United States); Somani, M.C.; Karjalainen, L.P. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Oulu, P.O. Box 4200, Oulu 90014 (Finland)

    2010-11-15

    Research highlights: {yields} Development of a novel process involving phase-reversion annealing process. {yields} Austensite stability strongly influences development of nanograined structure. {yields} Interstitial elements influence microstructural evolution during annealing. - Abstract: We describe here an electron microscopy study of microstructural evolution associated with martensitic shear phase reversion-induced nanograined/ultrafine-grained (NG/UFG) structure in an experimental Fe-16Cr-10Ni alloy with very low interstitial content. The primary objective is to understand and obtain fundamental insights on the influence of degree of austenite stability (Fe-16Cr-10Ni, 301LN, and 301 have different austenite stability index) and interstitial elements (carbon and nitrogen) in terms of phase reversion process, microstructural evolution during reversion annealing, and temperature-time annealing sequence. A relative comparison of Fe-16Cr-10Ni alloy with 301LN and 301 austenitic stainless steels indicated that phase reversion in Fe-16Cr-10Ni occurred by shear mechanism, which is similar to that observed for 301, but is different from the diffusional mechanism in 301LN steel. While the phase reversion in the experimental Fe-16Cr-10Ni alloy and 301 austenitic stainless steel occurred by shear mechanism, there were fundamental differences between these two alloys. The reversed strain-free austenite grains in Fe-16Cr-10Ni alloy were characterized by nearly same crystallographic orientation, where as in 301 steel there was evidence of break-up of martensite laths during reversion annealing resulting in several regions of misoriented austenite grains in 301 steel. Furthermore, a higher phase reversion annealing temperature range (800-900 deg. C) was required to obtain a fully NG/UFG structure of grain size 200-600 nm. The difference in the phase reversion and the temperature-time sequence in the three stages is explained in terms of Gibbs free energy change that

  10. Low-Temperature Nitriding of Deformed Austenitic Stainless Steels with Various Nitrogen Contents Obtained by Prior High-Temperature Solution Nitriding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bottoli, Federico; Winther, Grethe; Christiansen, Thomas Lundin

    2016-01-01

    In the past decades, high nitrogen steels (HNS) have been regarded as substitutes for conventional austenitic stainless steels because of their superior mechanical and corrosion properties. However, the main limitation to their wider application is their expensive production process....... As an alternative, high-temperature solution nitriding has been applied to produce HNS from three commercially available stainless steel grades (AISI 304L, AISI 316, and EN 1.4369). The nitrogen content in each steel alloy is varied and its influence on the mechanical properties and the stability of the austenite...... investigated. Both hardness and yield stress increase and the alloys remain ductile. In addition, strain-induced transformation of austenite to martensite is suppressed, which is beneficial for subsequent low-temperature nitriding of the surface of deformed alloys. The combination of high- and low...

  11. OMASAL MORPHOLOGY OF DAIRY COWS FED WITH HIGH OR LOW GRAIN CONTENT DIET PRIOR PARTURITION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danilo de Oliveira Rocha Bhering Santoro

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Little is known about the morphological response of the omasum in dairy cows that consume a high-energy diet pre-partum. The aim of this study was to investigate whether a transitional diet with high grain content is able to induce changes in omasum morphology. Six weeks before the expected calving, four Holstein cows were fed a standardization diet, and four weeks before delivery, the cows were fed a diet with high grain content (HGC or low (LGC grain content. After calving, all of the cows were fed a high energy lactation diet. The cows that were fed the HGC diet pre-partum had higher dry matter and nutrient intake than the cows that were fed the LGC diet. The mitotic index of the omasum epithelium was higher than the mitotic index in the rumen, but apparently the response to the diet stimuli was slower. In the cows that were fed the HGC diet, the omasum papillae were taller one week before parturition and two weeks post-partum. Cows that were fed the HGC diet had a thinner epithelium due to thinner non-keratinized layers of the omasum epithelium. We conclude that the omasum mucosa of dairy cows responds to the stimuli of a pre-partum HGC diet, which was indicated by the greater height of the omasum papillae and by the reduced thickness of the omasum epithelium. It seems that the mitotic index responds a little more slowly, but the response to the diet stimuli is stronger in the omasum epithelium than in the rumen.

  12. Nondestructive characterization of austenitic stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jayakumar, T.; Kumar, Anish

    2010-01-01

    The paper presents an overview of the non-destructive methodologies developed at the authors' laboratory for characterization of various microstructural features, residual stresses and corrosion in austenitic stainless steels. Various non-destructive evaluation (NDE) parameters such as ultrasonic velocity, ultrasonic attenuation, spectral analysis of the ultrasonic signals, magnetic hysteresis parameters and eddy current amplitude have been used for characterization of grain size, precipitation behaviour, texture, recrystallization, thermomechanical processing, degree of sensitization, formation of martensite from metastable austenite, assessment of residual stresses, degree of sensitization and propensity for intergranular corrosion in different austenitic steels. (author)

  13. Evaluation of Microstructure and Mechanical Properties in Dissimilar Austenitic/Super Duplex Stainless Steel Joint

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahmani, Mehdi; Eghlimi, Abbas; Shamanian, Morteza

    2014-10-01

    To study the effect of chemical composition on microstructural features and mechanical properties of dissimilar joints between super duplex and austenitic stainless steels, welding was attempted by gas tungsten arc welding process with a super duplex (ER2594) and an austenitic (ER309LMo) stainless steel filler metal. While the austenitic weld metal had vermicular delta ferrite within austenitic matrix, super duplex stainless steel was mainly comprised of allotriomorphic grain boundary and Widmanstätten side plate austenite morphologies in the ferrite matrix. Also the heat-affected zone of austenitic base metal comprised of large austenite grains with little amounts of ferrite, whereas a coarse-grained ferritic region was observed in the heat-affected zone of super duplex base metal. Although both welded joints showed acceptable mechanical properties, the hardness and impact strength of the weld metal produced using super duplex filler metal were found to be better than that obtained by austenitic filler metal.

  14. Phase Transformations of an Fe-0.85 C-17.9 Mn-7.1 Al Austenitic Steel After Quenching and Annealing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Wei-Chun

    2014-09-01

    Low-density Mn-Al steels could potentially be substitutes for commercial Ni-Cr stainless steels. However, the development of the Mn-Al stainless steels requires knowledge of the phase transformations that occur during the steel making processes. Phase transformations of an Fe-0.85 C-17.9 Mn-7.1 Al (wt.%) austenitic steel, which include spinodal decomposition, precipitation transformations, and cellular transformations, have been studied after quenching and annealing. The results show that spinodal decomposition occurs prior to the precipitation transformation in the steel after quenching and annealing at temperatures below 1023 K and that coherent fine particles of L12-type carbide precipitate homogeneously in the austenite. The cellular transformation occurs during the transformation of high-temperature austenite into lamellae of austenite, ferrite, and kappa carbide at temperatures below 1048 K. During annealing at temperatures below 923 K, the austenite decomposes into lamellar austenite, ferrite, κ-carbide, and M23C6 carbide grains for another cellular transformation. Last, when annealing at temperatures below 873 K, lamellae of ferrite and κ-carbide appear in the austenite.

  15. Influence of the initial metallurgical state and the austenizing conditions on the distribution of austenitc grain size of the martensitic-ferritic steel T91(9%Cr-1%Mo-V-Nb)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zavaleta Gutierrez, N; Luppo, M.I; Danon, C.A; Garcia de Andres, C

    2006-01-01

    It is a known fact that the austenizing conditions (speed of heating to the austenite temperature and austenizing time) as well as the initial metallurgical state of the material strongly influence the distribution of austenitic grain size in steels. This distribution will be one of the parameters that will control the behavior of the material in a later transformation from the austenite -by continuous cooling or in the isothermal case - and this behavior will determine the product's final mechanical properties. Based on the published literature, we have studied the influence of the initial metallurgical state and the speed of heating to austenite on the distribution of austenitic grain size for a certain austenizing temperature and time for a martensitic-iron ASTM A213 grade T91 steel. Two-stage thermal cycles were designed for this, that is, tempering for a variable period of time at the industrial tempering temperature (780 o C) followed by the austenizing (1050 o C, 30 minutes) 'in situ'. We have analyzed the following as a whole: 1) the role of the stabilizing elements (Nb, V) that eventually control the anchoring of the austenitic grain boundary by carbide or carbonitride precipitation. Therefore, we have tried to vary the fraction of these elements present in solid solution by annealing before austenizing. 2) the role of the speed of heating to austenite. In this case, we have considered two different values (1 and 30 o C/s), previously reported as inferior and superior, respectively, to the speed of 'critical' heat needed to produce a distribution of heterogeneous austenitic grain size when the metallurgical state before the austenizing is quenched and tempered. Preliminary results suggest that a annealing stage after tempering in the plant and prior to eventual austenizing significantly reduces the influence of the heating to austenite speed in the development of a heterogeneous structure of austenitic grains (CW)

  16. Effects of cooling rate, austenitizing temperature and austenite deformation on the transformation behavior of high-strength boron steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mun, Dong Jun; Shin, Eun Joo; Choi, Young Won; Lee, Jae Sang; Koo, Yang Mo

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Non-equilibrium segregation of B in steel depends strongly on the cooling rate. ► A higher austenitization temperature reduced the B hardenability effect. ► An increase in B concentration at γ grain boundaries accelerates the B precipitation. ► The loss of B hardenability effect is due to intragranular borocarbide precipitation. ► The controlled cooling after hot deformation increased the B hardenability effect. - Abstract: The phase transformation behavior of high-strength boron steel was studied considering the segregation and precipitation behavior of boron (B). The effects of cooling rate, austenitizing temperature and austenite deformation on the transformation behavior of B-bearing steel as compared with B-free steel were investigated by using dilatometry, microstructural observations and analysis of B distribution. The effects of these variables on hardenability were discussed in terms of non-equilibrium segregation mechanism and precipitation behavior of B. The retardation of austenite-to-ferrite transformation by B addition depends strongly on cooling rate (CR); this is mainly due to the phenomenon of non-equilibrium grain boundary segregation of B. The hardenability effect of B-bearing steel decreased at higher austenitizing temperature due to the precipitation of borocarbide along austenite grain boundaries. Analysis of B distribution by second ion mass spectroscopy confirmed that the grain boundary segregation of B occurred at low austenitizing temperature of 900 °C, whereas B precipitates were observed along austenite grain boundaries at high austenitizing temperature of 1200 °C. The significant increase in B concentration at austenite grain boundaries due to grain coarsening and a non-equilibrium segregation mechanism may lead to the B precipitation. In contrast, solute B segregated to austenite grain boundaries during cooling after heavy deformation became more stable because the increase in boundary area by grain

  17. Crystallography of lath martensite and stabilization of retained austenite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarikaya. M.

    1982-10-01

    TEM was used to study the morphology and crystallography of lath martensite in low and medium carbon steels in the as-quenched and 200/sup 0/C tempered conditions. The steels have microduplex structures of dislocated lath martensite and continuous thin films of retained austenite at the lath interfaces. Stacks of laths form the packets which are derived from different (111) variants of the same austenite grain. The residual parent austenite enables microdiffraction experiments with small electron beam spot sizes for the orientation relationships (OR) between austenite and martensite. All three most commonly observed ORs, namely Kurdjumov-Sachs, Nishiyama-Wassermann, and Greninger-Troiano, operate within the same sample.

  18. Crystallography of lath martensite and stabilization of retained austenite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarikaya, M.

    1982-10-01

    TEM was used to study the morphology and crystallography of lath martensite in low and medium carbon steels in the as-quenched and 200 0 C tempered conditions. The steels have microduplex structures of dislocated lath martensite and continuous thin films of retained austenite at the lath interfaces. Stacks of laths form the packets which are derived from different [111] variants of the same austenite grain. The residual parent austenite enables microdiffraction experiments with small electron beam spot sizes for the orientation relationships (OR) between austenite and martensite. All three most commonly observed ORs, namely Kurdjumov-Sachs, Nishiyama-Wassermann, and Greninger-Troiano, operate within the same sample

  19. Additional grain refinement in recrystallization controlled rolling of Ti-microalloyed steels processed by near-net-shape casting technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arribas, M.; Lopez, B.; Rodriguez-Ibabe, J.M.

    2008-01-01

    This paper analyzes the recrystallization kinetics in Ti-microalloyed steels processed using 'beam blank' casting technology. The faster solidification rates associated with this technology brings a finer precipitation of TiN particles which are very effective in controlling austenite grain growth during hot working. Furthermore, these small precipitates have been shown to delay static and dynamic recrystallization. The finer the precipitates the higher the delay in recrystallization. Nevertheless, beyond particle size and distribution, the level of delay is very dependent on microstructure (above all austenite grain size) and deformation conditions (strain and temperature). This paper studies the effects of this recrystallization delay on the microstructure evolution during hot rolling. Special attention was paid to the study of the occurrence of partial recrystallization during the final stages of rolling, which could lead to the presence of mixed microstructures before transformation. The possibility of achieving an additional austenite grain size refinement prior to transformation was evaluated

  20. Characterization of microstructure and texture across dissimilar super duplex/austenitic stainless steel weldment joint by austenitic filler metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eghlimi, Abbas; Shamanian, Morteza; Eskandarian, Masoomeh; Zabolian, Azam; Szpunar, Jerzy A.

    2015-01-01

    The evolution of microstructure and texture across an as-welded dissimilar UNS S32750 super duplex/UNS S30403 austenitic stainless steel joint welded by UNS S30986 (AWS A5.9 ER309LMo) austenitic stainless steel filler metal using gas tungsten arc welding process was evaluated by optical micrography and EBSD techniques. Due to their fabrication through rolling process, both parent metals had texture components resulted from deformation and recrystallization. The weld metal showed the highest amount of residual strain and had large austenite grain colonies of similar orientations with little amounts of skeletal ferrite, both oriented preferentially in the < 001 > direction with cub-on-cube orientation relationship. While the super duplex stainless steel's heat affected zone contained higher ferrite than its parent metal, an excessive grain growth was observed at the austenitic stainless steel's counterpart. At both heat affected zones, austenite underwent some recrystallization and formed twin boundaries which led to an increase in the fraction of high angle boundaries as compared with the respective base metals. These regions showed the least amount of residual strain and highest amount of recrystallized austenite grains. Due to the static recrystallization, the fraction of low degree of fit (Σ) coincident site lattice boundaries, especially Σ3 boundaries, was increased in the austenitic stainless steel heat affected zone, while the formation of subgrains in the ferrite phase increased the content of < 5° low angle boundaries at that of the super duplex stainless steel. - Graphical abstract: Display Omitted - Highlights: • Extensive grain growth in the HAZ of austenitic stainless steel was observed. • Intensification of < 100 > orientated grains was observed adjacent to both fusion lines. • Annealing twins with Σ3 CSL boundaries were formed in the austenite of both HAZ. • Cub-on-cube OR was observed between austenite and ferrite in the weld

  1. Characterization of microstructure and texture across dissimilar super duplex/austenitic stainless steel weldment joint by austenitic filler metal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eghlimi, Abbas, E-mail: a.eghlimi@ma.iut.ac.ir [Department of Materials Engineering, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan 84156-83111 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Shamanian, Morteza [Department of Materials Engineering, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan 84156-83111 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Eskandarian, Masoomeh [Department of Materials Engineering, Shiraz University, Shiraz 71348-51154 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Zabolian, Azam [Department of Natural Resources, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan 84156-83111 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Szpunar, Jerzy A. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK S7N 5A9 (Canada)

    2015-08-15

    The evolution of microstructure and texture across an as-welded dissimilar UNS S32750 super duplex/UNS S30403 austenitic stainless steel joint welded by UNS S30986 (AWS A5.9 ER309LMo) austenitic stainless steel filler metal using gas tungsten arc welding process was evaluated by optical micrography and EBSD techniques. Due to their fabrication through rolling process, both parent metals had texture components resulted from deformation and recrystallization. The weld metal showed the highest amount of residual strain and had large austenite grain colonies of similar orientations with little amounts of skeletal ferrite, both oriented preferentially in the < 001 > direction with cub-on-cube orientation relationship. While the super duplex stainless steel's heat affected zone contained higher ferrite than its parent metal, an excessive grain growth was observed at the austenitic stainless steel's counterpart. At both heat affected zones, austenite underwent some recrystallization and formed twin boundaries which led to an increase in the fraction of high angle boundaries as compared with the respective base metals. These regions showed the least amount of residual strain and highest amount of recrystallized austenite grains. Due to the static recrystallization, the fraction of low degree of fit (Σ) coincident site lattice boundaries, especially Σ3 boundaries, was increased in the austenitic stainless steel heat affected zone, while the formation of subgrains in the ferrite phase increased the content of < 5° low angle boundaries at that of the super duplex stainless steel. - Graphical abstract: Display Omitted - Highlights: • Extensive grain growth in the HAZ of austenitic stainless steel was observed. • Intensification of < 100 > orientated grains was observed adjacent to both fusion lines. • Annealing twins with Σ3 CSL boundaries were formed in the austenite of both HAZ. • Cub-on-cube OR was observed between austenite and ferrite in the weld

  2. Phase transformation by fatigue in austenitic stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jo, Y.S.; Kwun, S.I.

    1988-01-01

    The effect of strain induced martensite on the fatigue behavior of AISI 304 austenitic stainless steel was investigated. During low cycle fatigue, the austenitic stainless steel showed a continuous cyclic hardening until fracture. The extent of cyclic hardening increased with decreasing austenite stability. The austenite stability was controlled by different aging time and temperature, which resulted in different carbide morphologies. The fatigue crack propagation rate near ΔK th varied also with the austenite stability inside the plastic zone at the crack up. Especially, the near-threshold fatigue crack propagation rate of the grain boundary carbide precipitated condition was the lowest. This was considered to be due to the roughness induced closure caused by intergranular facet. A new model for the intergranular facet formation and the fatigue crack propagation of grain boundary carbide precipitated condition was proposed. (Author)

  3. A powder metallurgy austenitic stainless steel for application at very low temperatures

    CERN Document Server

    Sgobba, Stefano; Liimatainen, J; Kumpula, M

    2000-01-01

    The Large Hadron Collider to be built at CERN will require 1232 superconducting dipole magnets operating at 1.9 K. By virtue of their mechanical properties, weldability and improved austenite stability, nitrogen enriched austenitic stainless steels have been chosen as the material for several of the structural components of these magnets. Powder Metallurgy (PM) could represent an attractive production technique for components of complex shape for which dimension tolerances, dimensional stability, weldability are key issues during fabrication, and mechanical properties, ductility and leak tightness have to be guaranteed during operation. PM Hot Isostatic Pressed test plates and prototype components of 316LN-type grade have been produced by Santasalo Powdermet Oy. They have been fully characterized and mechanically tested down to 4.2 K at CERN. The fine grained structure, the absence of residual stresses, the full isotropy of mechanical properties associated to the low level of Prior Particle Boundaries oxides ...

  4. Embrittlement of Intercritically Reheated Coarse Grain Heat-Affected Zone of ASTM4130 Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Liying; Han, Tao; Han, Bin

    2018-04-01

    In this investigation, a thermal welding simulation technique was used to investigate the microstructures and mechanical properties of the intercritically reheated coarse grain heat-affected zone (IR CGHAZ) of ASTM4130 steel. The effect of post weld heat treatment (PWHT) on the toughness of IR CGHAZ was also analyzed. The toughness of IR CGHAZ was measured by means of Charpy impact, and it is found that IR CGHAZ has the lowest toughness which is much lower than that of the base metal regardless of whether PWHT is applied or not. The as-welded IR CGHAZ is mainly composed of ferrite, martensite, and many blocky M-A constituents distributing along grain boundaries and subgrain boundaries in a near-connected network. Also, the prior austenite grains are still as coarse as those in the coarse grain heat-affected zone (CGHAZ). The presence of the blocky M-A constituents and the coarsened austenite grains result in the toughness deterioration of the as-welded IR CGHAZ. Most of the blocky M-A constituents are decomposed to granular bainite due to the effect of the PWHT. However, PWHT cannot refine the prior austenite grains. Thus, the low toughness of IR CGHAZ after PWHT can be attributed to two factors, i.e., the coarsened austenite grains, and the presence of the remaining M-A constituents and granular bainite, which are located at grain boundaries and subgrain boundaries in a near-connected network. The absorbed energy of the IR CGHAZ was increased by about 3.75 times, which means that the PWHT can effectively improve the toughness but it cannot be recovered to the level of base metal.

  5. Partial transformation of austenite in Al-Mn-Si TRIP steel upon tensile straining: an in situ EBSD study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lomholt, Trine Nybo; Adachi, Y.; da Silva Fanta, Alice Bastos

    2013-01-01

    The transformation of austenite to martensite in an Al–Mn–Si transformation-induced plasticity steel was investigated with in situ electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) measurements under tensile straining. The visualisation of the microstructure upon straining allows for an investigation...... to be more stable than large grains, while austenite grains located beside bainitic ferrite are the most stable. Moreover, it is demonstrated that austenite grains transform gradually...

  6. Self-stabilization of untransformed austenite by hydrostatic pressure via martensitic transformation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakada, Nobuo; Ishibashi, Yuji; Tsuchiyama, Toshihiro; Takaki, Setsuo

    2016-01-01

    For improving the understanding of austenite stability in steel, hydrostatic pressure in untransformed austenite that is generated via martensitic transformation was evaluated from macro- and micro-viewpoints, and its effect on austenite stability was investigated in a Fe-27%Ni austenitic alloy. X-ray diffractometry revealed that the lattice parameter of untransformed austenite is continuously decreased via martensitic transformation only when martensite becomes the dominant phase in the microstructure. This suggests that the untransformed austenite is isotropically compressed by the surrounding martensite grains, i.e., hydrostatic pressure is generated in untransformed austenite dynamically at a later stage of martensitic transformation. On the other hand, microscopic strain mapping using the electron backscatter diffraction technique indicated that a finer untransformed austenite grain has a higher hydrostatic pressure, while a high density of dislocations is also introduced in untransformed austenite near the austenite/martensite interface because of lattice-invariant shear characterized by non-thermoelastic martensitic transformation. Furthermore, it was experimentally demonstrated that the hydrostatic pressure stabilizes the untransformed austenite; however, the austenite stabilization effect alone is not large enough to fully explain a large gap between martensite start and finish temperatures in steel.

  7. Effects of austenitization temperature on the microstructure of 15BCr30 and PL22 boron steels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. A. Suski

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper studies boron precipitation and segregation at austenitic grain boundaries for low carbon boron steels types: PL22 and 15BCr30. The following parameters were evaluated: percentage of martensite/bainite, size and nucleation sites of austenitic grains and precipitates sizes. Three austenitization temperatures were studied (870, 1050 and 1200 °C. The highest martensite percentage occurred for 1050 °C. Iron-borocarbides were detected at grain boundaries for all tested temperatures. At 870 °C the coarse iron-borocarbides are due to non-solubility and coalescence. The highest martensite percentage at 1050 °C is caused by the discrete precipitation of iron-borocarbides at austenitic grains boundaries. The discrete precipitation was due to the low non-equilibrium segregation of boron at grain boundaries. The low non-equilibrium segregation and the small grain size at 1050 °C reduce the total boron concentration at grain boundaries.

  8. High toughness in the intercritically reheated coarse-grained (ICRCG) heat-affected zone (HAZ) of low carbon microalloyed steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Jun, E-mail: hujunral@163.com [The State Key Laboratory of Rolling and Automation, Northeastern University, Shenyang 110819 (China); Du, Lin-Xiu [The State Key Laboratory of Rolling and Automation, Northeastern University, Shenyang 110819 (China); Wang, Jian-Jun [Institute of Materials Research, School of Material and Metallurgy, Northeastern University, Shenyang 110819 (China); Xie, Hui; Gao, Cai-Ru [The State Key Laboratory of Rolling and Automation, Northeastern University, Shenyang 110819 (China); Misra, R.D.K. [Laboratory for Excellence in Advanced Steel Research, Center for Structural and Functional Materials, University of Louisiana at Lafayette, Lafayette, LA 70504-4130 (United States)

    2014-01-10

    Motivated by the small lattice mismatch between ferrite and vanadium nitride (VN), we describe here the welding thermal cycle simulation that provides high toughness in the ICRCG HAZ of low carbon V–N steel. This unique behavior is attributed to the formation of ultra-fine grained ferrite along prior austenite grain boundaries generated by the first pass welding thermal cycle with high misorientation boundaries, where V(C, N) precipitates provide potential nucleation sites for ferrite, leading to extraordinary refinement of martensite/austenite (M/A) constituent. Nitrogen stimulates the precipitation behavior of V(C, N). The nucleation of high density of V(C, N) precipitates consumes carbon-content in the austenite, leading to decrease in the carbon-content in the M/A constituent, with consequent decrease in hardness. The increase in toughness is explained in terms of Griffith's crack propagation theory.

  9. High toughness in the intercritically reheated coarse-grained (ICRCG) heat-affected zone (HAZ) of low carbon microalloyed steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu, Jun; Du, Lin-Xiu; Wang, Jian-Jun; Xie, Hui; Gao, Cai-Ru; Misra, R.D.K.

    2014-01-01

    Motivated by the small lattice mismatch between ferrite and vanadium nitride (VN), we describe here the welding thermal cycle simulation that provides high toughness in the ICRCG HAZ of low carbon V–N steel. This unique behavior is attributed to the formation of ultra-fine grained ferrite along prior austenite grain boundaries generated by the first pass welding thermal cycle with high misorientation boundaries, where V(C, N) precipitates provide potential nucleation sites for ferrite, leading to extraordinary refinement of martensite/austenite (M/A) constituent. Nitrogen stimulates the precipitation behavior of V(C, N). The nucleation of high density of V(C, N) precipitates consumes carbon-content in the austenite, leading to decrease in the carbon-content in the M/A constituent, with consequent decrease in hardness. The increase in toughness is explained in terms of Griffith's crack propagation theory

  10. Effect of thermal aging on grain structural characteristic and Ductile-to-Brittle transition temperature of CLAM steel at 550 °C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Wei [Key Laboratory of Neutronics and Radiation Safety, Institute of Nuclear Energy Safety Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei, Anhui, 230031 (China); University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui, 230031 (China); Chen, Jianwei [Key Laboratory of Neutronics and Radiation Safety, Institute of Nuclear Energy Safety Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei, Anhui, 230031 (China); Xu, Gang, E-mail: gang.xu@fds.org.cn [Key Laboratory of Neutronics and Radiation Safety, Institute of Nuclear Energy Safety Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei, Anhui, 230031 (China)

    2017-02-15

    Highlights: • The grain boundary length per unit area decreased with the increasing aging time. • The fraction of LABs increased obviously after thermal aging. • Prior austenitic grain refinement is more important to improve low temperature toughness. - Abstract: In this work, electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) was used to investigate the grain structure evolution of China low activation martensitic (CLAM) steel samples which were aged at 550 °C for 0 h, 2000 h, 4000 h and 10,000 h. The results showed that the prior austenitic grain size increased with the aging time, which led to the decrease of grain boundary length. The fraction of misorientation angle in a range from about 4 to 10° increased obviously after thermal aging for 10,000 h, and it indicated that the fine subgrains formed in the CLAM steel during the long-term thermal exposure. Furthermore, Charpy impact experiments were carried out to analyze the toughness of the CLAM steel before and after aging, particularly the Ductile-to-Brittle Transition Temperature (DBTT). Though amounts of fine subgrians formed in matrix, a substantial increase in DBTT (∼40.1 °C) had been noticed after aging for 10,000 h. The results showed that the high angle boundaries such as prior austenitic grain boundaries are more effective in retarding the propagation of cleavage crack than subgrain boundaries.

  11. Damping Capacity of High Manganese Austenitic Stainless Steel with a Two Phase Mixed Structure of Martensite and Austenite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hwang, Tae Hyun; Kang, Chang-Yong

    2013-01-01

    The damping capacity of high manganese austenitic stainless steel with a two phase mixed structure of deformation-induced martensite and reversed austenite was studied. Reversed austenite with an ultra-fine grain size of less than 0.2 μm was obtained by reversion treatment. The two phase structure of deformation-induced martensite and reversed austenite was obtained by annealing treatment at a range of 500-700 °C and various times in cold rolled high manganese austenitic stainless steel. The damping capacity increased with an increasing annealing temperature and time. In high manganese stainless steel with the two phase mixed structure of martensite and austenite, the damping capacity decreased with an increasing volume fraction of deformation-induced martensite. Thus, the damping capacity was strongly affected by deformation-induced martensite. The results confirmed that austenitic stainless steel with a good combination of strength and damping capacity was obtained from the two phase mixed structure of austenite and martensite.

  12. Low temperature sensitization of austenitic stainless steel: an ageing effect during BWR service

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shah, B.K.; Sinha, A.K.; Rastogi, P.K.; Kulkarni, P.G.

    1994-01-01

    Sensitization in austenitic stainless steel refers to chromium carbide precipitation at the grain boundaries with concomitant depletion of chromium below 12% near grain boundaries. This makes the material susceptible to either intergranular corrosion (IGC) or intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC). This effect is predominant whenever austenitic stainless steel is subjected to thermal exposure in the temperature range 723-1073K either during welding or during heat treatment. Low temperature sensitization (LTS) refers to sensitization at temperature below the typical range of sensitization i.e. 723-1073K. A prerequisite for LTS phenomenon is reported to be the presence of chromium carbide nuclei at the grain boundaries which can grow during boiling water reactor service even at a relatively lower temperature of around 560K. LTS can lead to failure of BWR pipe due to IGSCC. The paper reviews the phenomenological and mechanistic aspects of LTS. Studies carried out regarding effect of prior cold work on LTS are reported. Summary of the studies reported in literature to examine the occurrence of LTS during BWR service has also been included. (author). 10 refs., 3 figs

  13. Austenitic Reversion of Cryo-rolled Ti-Stabilized Austenitic Stainless Steel: High-Resolution EBSD Investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiamiyu, A. A.; Odeshi, A. G.; Szpunar, J. A.

    2018-02-01

    In this study, AISI 321 austenitic stainless steel (ASS) was cryo-rolled and subsequently annealed at 650 and 800 °C to reverse BCC α'-martensite to FCC γ-austenite. The texture evolution associated with the reversion at the selected temperatures was investigated using high-resolution EBSD. After the reversion, TiC precipitates were observed to be more stable in 650 °C-annealed specimens than those reversed at 800 °C. {110} texture was mainly developed in specimens subjected to both annealing temperatures. However, specimens reversed at 650 °C have stronger texture than those annealed at 800 °C, even at the higher annealing time. The strong intensity of {110} texture component is attributed to the ability of AISI 321 ASS to memorize the crystallographic orientation of the deformed austenite, a phenomenon termed texture memory. The development of weaker texture in 800 °C-annealed specimens is attributed to the residual strain relief in grains, dissolution of grain boundary precipitates, and an increase in atomic migration along the grain boundaries. Based on the observed features of the reversed austenite grains and estimation from an existing model, it is suspected that the austenite reversion at 650 and 800 °C undergone diffusional and martensitic shear reversion, respectively.

  14. Effect of acicular ferrite formation on grain refinement in the coarse-grained region of heat-affected zone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wan, X.L.; Wei, R.; Wu, K.M.

    2010-01-01

    The microstructure of acicular ferrite and its formation for the grain refinement of coarse-grained region of heat-affected zone of high strength low-alloy bainite steels were studied using three-dimensional reconstruction technique. Crystallographic grain size was analyzed by means of electron backscatter diffraction. It was revealed that the microstructure in the coarse-grained region of the heat-affected zone consisted of predominantly bainite packets and a small proportion of acicular ferrite. Acicular ferrite was of lath or plate-like rather than needle or rod-like morphology. Tempering of the coarse-grained region of heat-affected zone showed that the acicular ferrite was more stable than the bainite, indicating that the acicular ferrite was formed prior to bainite. The acicular ferrite laths or plates divided the prior austenite grains into smaller and separate regions, and confining the bainite transformed at lower temperatures in the smaller regions and hence leading to the grain refinement in the coarse-grained region of the heat-affected zone.

  15. Effect of acicular ferrite formation on grain refinement in the coarse-grained region of heat-affected zone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wan, X.L.; Wei, R. [Institute of Advanced Steels and Welding Technology, Hubei Provincial Key Laboratory for Systems Science on Metallurgical Processing, Key Laboratory for Ferrous Metallurgy and Resources Utilization of Ministry of Education, Wuhan University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430081 (China); Wu, K.M., E-mail: wukaiming@wust.edu.cn [Institute of Advanced Steels and Welding Technology, Hubei Provincial Key Laboratory for Systems Science on Metallurgical Processing, Key Laboratory for Ferrous Metallurgy and Resources Utilization of Ministry of Education, Wuhan University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430081 (China)

    2010-07-15

    The microstructure of acicular ferrite and its formation for the grain refinement of coarse-grained region of heat-affected zone of high strength low-alloy bainite steels were studied using three-dimensional reconstruction technique. Crystallographic grain size was analyzed by means of electron backscatter diffraction. It was revealed that the microstructure in the coarse-grained region of the heat-affected zone consisted of predominantly bainite packets and a small proportion of acicular ferrite. Acicular ferrite was of lath or plate-like rather than needle or rod-like morphology. Tempering of the coarse-grained region of heat-affected zone showed that the acicular ferrite was more stable than the bainite, indicating that the acicular ferrite was formed prior to bainite. The acicular ferrite laths or plates divided the prior austenite grains into smaller and separate regions, and confining the bainite transformed at lower temperatures in the smaller regions and hence leading to the grain refinement in the coarse-grained region of the heat-affected zone.

  16. Five-parameter crystallographic characteristics of the interfaces formed during ferrite to austenite transformation in a duplex stainless steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haghdadi, N.; Cizek, P.; Hodgson, P. D.; Tari, V.; Rohrer, G. S.; Beladi, H.

    2018-05-01

    The crystallography of interfaces in a duplex stainless steel having an equiaxed microstructure produced through the ferrite to austenite diffusive phase transformation has been studied. The five-parameter interface character distribution revealed a high anisotropy in habit planes for the austenite-ferrite and austenite-austenite interfaces for different lattice misorientations. The austenite and ferrite habit planes largely terminated on (1 1 1) and (1 1 0) planes, respectively, for the austenite-ferrite interfaces associated with Kurdjumov-Sachs (K-S) and Nishiyama-Wasserman (N-W) orientation relationships. This was mostly attributed to the crystallographic preference associated with the phase transformation. For the austenite-ferrite interfaces with orientation relationships which are neither K-S nor N-W, both austenite and ferrite habit planes had (1 1 1) orientations. Σ3 twin boundaries comprised the majority of austenite-austenite interfaces, mostly showing a pure twist character and terminating on (1 1 1) planes due to the minimum energy configuration. The second highest populated austenite-austenite boundary was Σ9, which tended to have grain boundary planes in the tilt zone due to the geometrical constraints. Furthermore, the intervariant crystallographic plane distribution associated with the K-S orientation relationship displayed a general tendency for the austenite habit planes to terminate with the (1 1 1) orientation, mainly due to the crystallographic preference associated with the phase transformation.

  17. Helium-induced weld cracking in austenitic and martensitic steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, H.T.; Chin, B.A.

    1991-01-01

    Helium was uniformly implanted into type 316 stainless steel and Sandvik HT-9 (12Cr-1MoVW) to levels of 0.18 to 256 and 0.3 to 1 a.p.p.m., respectively, using the ''tritium trick'' technique. Autogenous bead-on-plate, full penetration, welds were then produced under fully constrained conditions using the gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) process. The control and hydrogen-charged plates of both alloys were sound and free of any weld defects. For the 316 stainless steel, catastrophic intergranular fracture occurred in the heat-affected zone (HAZ) of welds with helium levels ≥ 2.5 a.p.p.m. In addition to the HAZ cracking, brittle fracture along the centreline of the fusion zone was also observed for the welds containing greater than 100 a.p.p.m. He. For HT-9, intergranular cracking occurred in the HAZ along prior-austenite grain boundaries of welds containing 1 a.p.p.m. He. Electron microscopy observations showed that the cracking in the HAZ originated from the growth and coalescence of grain-boundary helium bubbles and that the fusion-zone cracking resulted from the growth of helium bubbles at dendrite boundaries. The bubble growth kinetics in the HAZ is dominated by stress-induced diffusion of vacancies into bubbles. Results of this study indicate that the use of conventional GTAW techniques to repair irradiation-degraded materials containing even small amounts of helium may be difficult. (author)

  18. Ultrasonic inspection of austenitic welds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baikie, B.L.; Wagg, A.R.; Whittle, M.J.; Yapp, D.

    1976-01-01

    Optical and X-ray metallography combined with ultrasonic testing by compression waves was used for inspection of stainless steel weld metal produced by three different welding techniques. X-ray diffraction showed that each weld possessed a characteristic fibre textured structure which was shown by optical microscopy to be parallel to columnar grain boundaries. Metallographic evidence suggested that the development of fibre texture is due to the mechanism of competitive growth. From observations made as a result of optical metallographic examination the orientation of the fibre axis could be predicted if the weld geometry and welding procedure were known. Ultrasonic velocity and attenuation measurements as a continuous function of grain orientation, made on cylinders machined from weld samples, showed that attenuation was strongly orientation dependent. It was concluded that the sensitivity of ultrasonic inspection to small defects is unlikely to be as high for austenitic welds as for ferritic even when transmission is improved by modifying the welding procedure to improve the ultrasonic transmission. (U.K.)

  19. Influence of grain size and texture prior to warm rolling on microstructure, texture and magnetic properties of Fe-6.5 wt% Si steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, H. J.; Xu, Y. B.; Jiao, H. T.; Cheng, S. F.; Misra, R. D. K.; Li, J. P.

    2018-05-01

    Fe-6.5 wt% Si steel hot bands with different initial grain size and texture were obtained through different annealing treatment. These bands were then warm rolled and annealed. An analysis on the evolution of microstructure and texture, particularly the formation of recrystallization texture was studied. The results indicated that initial grain size and texture had a significant effect on texture evolution and magnetic properties. Large initial grains led to coarse deformed grains with dense and long shear bands after warm rolling. Such long shear bands resulted in growth advantage for {1 1 3} 〈3 6 1〉 oriented grains during recrystallization. On the other hand, sharp {11 h} 〈1, 2, 1/h〉 (α∗-fiber) texture in the coarse-grained sample led to dominant {1 1 2} 〈1 1 0〉 texture after warm rolling. Such {1 1 2} 〈1 1 0〉 deformed grains provided massive nucleation sites for {1 1 3} 〈3 6 1〉 oriented grains during subsequent recrystallization. These {1 1 3} 〈3 6 1〉 grains were confirmed to exhibit an advantage on grain growth compared to γ-fiber grains. As a result, significant {1 1 3} 〈3 6 1〉 texture was developed and unfavorable γ-fiber texture was inhibited in the final annealed sheet. Both these aspects led to superior magnetic properties in the sample with largest initial grain size. The magnetic induction B8 was 1.36 T and the high frequency core loss P10/400 was 17.07 W/kg.

  20. Diffractometry of expanded austenite using synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fewell, M.P.; Priest, J.M.; Collins, G.A.; Short, K.T.

    2000-01-01

    Full text: The question of the structure of the nitrogen-rich surface layer produced in the nitriding of austenitic stainless steel has been controversial for some time. Diffractometry using conventional x-ray sources is routinely carried out on this material. The result universally seen shows an ostensibly f.c.c. lattice with a larger lattice parameter than that of the underlying austenite. The difficulty with this interpretation lies in the 200 reflection, which lies at slightly lower Bragg angle than expected on the basis of the 111, 220 and 311 reflections. This behaviour is seen in all work known to us, regardless of the grade of austenitic stainless steel or the details of the nitriding technique. It has been explained as due to a mixed f.c.c. phase with different grains having different lattice constants, or as due to a tetragonal distortion of the lattice or an f.c.c lattice with a high frequency of stacking faults, or as indicating a triclinic lattice with a unit cell having all sides equal and two angles equal

  1. The mechanical stability of retained austenite in low-alloyed TRIP steel under shear loading

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blondé, R., E-mail: r.j.p.blonde@tudelft.nl [Fundamental Aspects of Materials and Energy, Faculty of Applied Sciences, Delft University of Technology, Mekelweg 15, 2629 JB Delft (Netherlands); Materials Innovation Institute, Mekelweg 2, 2628 CD Delft (Netherlands); Jimenez-Melero, E., E-mail: enrique.jimenez-melero@manchester.ac.uk [Dalton Cumbrian Facility, The University of Manchester, Westlakes Science and Technology Park, Moor Row, Cumbria CA24 3HA (United Kingdom); Zhao, L., E-mail: lie.zhao@tudelft.nl [Materials Innovation Institute, Mekelweg 2, 2628 CD Delft (Netherlands); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Delft University of Technology, Mekelweg 2, 2628 CD Delft (Netherlands); Schell, N., E-mail: norbert.schell@hzg.de [Institute of Materials Research, Helmholtz-Zentrum Geesthacht, Max Planck Strasse 1, 21502 Geesthacht (Germany); Brück, E., E-mail: e.h.bruck@tudelft.nl [Fundamental Aspects of Materials and Energy, Faculty of Applied Sciences, Delft University of Technology, Mekelweg 15, 2629 JB Delft (Netherlands); Zwaag, S. van der, E-mail: s.vanderzwaag@tudelft.nl [Novel Aerospace Materials Group, Faculty of Aerospace Engineering, Delft University of Technology, Kluyverweg 1, 2629 HS Delft (Netherlands); Dijk, N.H. van, E-mail: n.h.vandijk@tudelft.nl [Fundamental Aspects of Materials and Energy, Faculty of Applied Sciences, Delft University of Technology, Mekelweg 15, 2629 JB Delft (Netherlands)

    2014-01-31

    The microstructure evolution during shear loading of a low-alloyed TRIP steel with different amounts of the metastable austenite phase and its equivalent DP grade has been studied by in-situ high-energy X-ray diffraction. A detailed powder diffraction analysis has been performed to probe the austenite-to-martensite transformation by characterizing simultaneously the evolution of the austenite phase fraction and its carbon concentration, the load partitioning between the austenite and the ferritic matrix and the texture evolution of the constituent phases. Our results show that for shear deformation the TRIP effect extends over a significantly wider deformation range than for simple uniaxial loading. A clear increase in average carbon content during the mechanically-induced transformation indicates that austenite grains with a low carbon concentration are least stable during shear loading. The observed texture evolution indicates that under shear loading the orientation dependence of the austenite stability is relatively weak, while it has previously been found that under tensile load the {110}〈001〉 component transforms preferentially. The mechanical stability of retained austenite in TRIP steel is found to be a complex interplay between the interstitial carbon concentration in the austenite, the grain orientation and the load partitioning.

  2. Effect of small addition of Cr on stability of retained austenite in high carbon steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hossain, Rumana; Pahlevani, Farshid, E-mail: f.pahlevani@unsw.edu.au; Sahajwalla, Veena

    2017-03-15

    High carbon steels with dual phase structures of martensite and austenite have considerable potential for industrial application in high abrasion environments due to their hardness, strength and relatively low cost. To design cost effective high carbon steels with superior properties, it is crucial to identify the effect of Chromium (Cr) on the stability of retained austenite (RA) and to fully understand its effect on solid-state phase transition. This study addresses this important knowledge gap. Using standard compression tests on bulk material, quantitative X-ray diffraction analysis, nano-indentation on individual austenitic grains, transmission electron microscopy and electron backscatter diffraction–based orientation microscopy techniques, the authors investigated the effect of Cr on the microstructure, transformation behaviour and mechanical stability of retained austenite in high carbon steel, with varying Cr contents. The results revealed that increasing the Cr %, altered the morphology of the RA and increased its stability, consequently, increasing the critical pressure for martensitic transformation. This study has critically addressed the elastoplastic behaviour of retained austenite – and provides a deep understanding of the effect of small additions of Cr on the metastable austenite of high carbon steel from the macro- to nano-level. Consequently, it paves the way for new applications for high carbon low alloy steels. - Highlights: • Effect of small addition of Cr on metastable austenite of high carbon steel from the macro- to nano-level • A multi-scale study of elastoplastic behaviour of retained austenite in high carbon steel • The mechanical stability of retained austenite during plastic deformation increased with increasing Cr content • Effect of grain boundary misorientation angle on hardness of individual retained austenite grains in high carbon steel.

  3. Using the ''Epiquant'' automatic analyzer for quantitative estimation of grain size

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsivirko, E I; Ulitenko, A N; Stetsenko, I A; Burova, N M [Zaporozhskij Mashinostroitel' nyj Inst. (Ukrainian SSR)

    1979-01-01

    Application possibility of the ''Epiquant'' automatic analyzer to estimate qualitatively austenite grain in the 18Kh2N4VA steel has been investigated. Austenite grain has been clarified using the methods of cementation, oxidation and etching of the grain boundaries. Average linear size of grain at the length of 15 mm has been determined according to the total length of grain intersection line and the number of intersections at the boundaries. It is shown that the ''Epiquant'' analyzer ensures quantitative estimation of austenite grain size with relative error of 2-4 %.

  4. Expanded austenite in nitrided layers deposited on austenitic and super austenitic stainless steel grades

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Casteletti, L.C.; Fernandes, F.A.P.; Heck, S.C.; Gallego, J.

    2010-01-01

    In this work nitrided layers deposited on austenitic and super austenitic stainless steels were analyzed through optical microscopy and X-rays diffraction analysis (XRD). It was observed that the formation of N supersaturated phase, called expanded austenite, has promoted significant increment of hardness (> 1000HV). XRD results have indicated the anomalous displacement of the diffracted peaks, in comparison with the normal austenite. This behavior, combined with peaks broadening, it was analyzed in different nitriding temperatures which results showed good agreement with the literature. (author)

  5. Magnetic properties of cyclically deformed austenite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Das, Arpan, E-mail: dasarpan1@yahoo.co.in

    2014-06-01

    In meta-stable austenitic stainless steels, low cycle fatigue deformation is accompanied by a partial stress/strain-induced solid state phase transformation of paramagnetic γ(fcc) austenite phase to ferromagnetic α{sup /}(bcc) martensite. The measured characteristic of magnetic properties, which are the saturation magnetization, susceptibility, coercivity, retentivity, and the area under the magnetic hysteresis loop are sensitive to the total strain amplitude imposed and the corresponding material behaviour. The morphologies and nucleation characteristics of deformation induced martensites (i.e., ϵ(hcp), α{sup /}(bcc)) have been investigated through analytical transmission electron microscope. It has been observed that deformation induced martensites can nucleate at a number of sites (i.e., shear band intersections, isolated shear bands, shear band–grain boundary intersection, grain boundary triple points, etc.) through multiple transformation sequences: γ(fcc)→ϵ(hcp), γ(fcc)→ϵ(hcp)→α{sup /}(bcc), γ(fcc)→ deformation twin →α{sup /}(bcc) and γ(fcc)→α{sup /}(bcc). - Highlights: • LCF tests were done at various strain amplitudes of 304LNSS. • Quantification of martensite was done through ferritecope. • Magnetic properties were characterised through VSM. • Correlation of magnetic properties with the cyclic plastic response was done. • TEM was done to investigate the transformation micro-mechanisms.

  6. Thermal stability of retained austenite in TRIP steels studied by synchrotron X-ray diffraction during cooling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dijk, N.H. van; Butt, A.M.; Zhao, L.; Sietsma, J.; Offerman, S.E.; Wright, J.P.; Zwaag, S. van der

    2005-01-01

    We have performed in situ X-ray diffraction measurements at a synchrotron source in order to study the thermal stability of the retained austenite phase in transformation induced plasticity steels during cooling from room temperature to 100 K. A powder analysis of the diffraction data reveals a martensitic transformation of part of the retained austenite during cooling. The fraction of austenite that transforms during cooling is found to depend strongly on the bainitic holding time and the composition of the steel. It is shown that that austenite grains with a lower average carbon concentration have a lower stability during cooling

  7. Diffraction study of the retained austenite content in TRIP steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gnaeupel-Herold, T., E-mail: tg-h@nist.gov [NIST Center for Neuron Research, 100 Bureau Dr., Gaithersburg MD 20899-6102 (United States); University of Maryland, Department of Material Science and Engineering., College Park MD 20742-2142 (United States); Creuziger, A., E-mail: adam.creuziger@nist.gov [NIST Metallurgy Division, 100 Bureau Dr., Gaithersburg MD 20899-8553 (United States); Kent State University, Kent, OH 44242 (United States)

    2011-04-25

    Research highlights: {yields} Novel orientation averaging scheme for retained austenite content measurement. {yields} assumption of random grain orientation generally not justified. {yields} Averaging scheme allows to disregard texture. {yields} unlike Rietveld method, averaging method does not orientation density function. {yields} Two independent (hkl) are necessary for retained austenite content. - Abstract: The results of a study of using neutron diffraction for determining the retained austenite content of TRIP steels are presented. The study covers a wide area of materials, deformation modes (uniaxial, biaxial and plane strain), strains, and the retained austenite content as a result of these variables. It was determined using basic principles of statistics that a minimum of two reflections (hkl) for each phase is necessary to calculate a phase mass fraction and the associated standard deviation. Texture from processing the steel is the largest source of uncertainty. Through the method of complete orientation averaging described in this paper, the texture effect and with it the standard deviation of the austenite mass fraction can be substantially reduced, regardless of the type or severity of the texture.

  8. Effect of Cr Contents and Heat Treating on Reverted Austenite in Maraging Steel Weldments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, S. W.; Lee, H. W.

    2018-05-01

    By conducting flux cored arc welding (FCAW) on maraging steels with Cr contents of 1.4 and 5.2 wt%, this study observed the effects of Cr content and heat treating on reverted austenite formation in welded maraging steel. Aging treatment was carried out at the temperatures of 450, 480 and 530 °C for 3 h in each condition. As the aging temperature increased, reverted austenite was formed along the interdendritic and intercellular grain boundaries, and the proportion of reverted austenite increased with increasing Cr addition. The aging process led to the segregation of Ti and Mo along the interdendritic and intercellular grain boundaries. Some of the welded specimens were subjected to solution heat treatment at 820 and 1250 °C for 1 h after welding, resulting in a decrease in reverted austenite fraction.

  9. Austenite stability in reversion-treated structures of a 301LN steel under tensile loading

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Järvenpää, A.; Jaskari, M.; Man, Jiří; Karjalainen, L. P.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 127, MAY (2017), s. 12-26 ISSN 1044-5803 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-32665S Institutional support: RVO:68081723 Keywords : austenitic stainless steel * austenite stability * grain size * reversion annealing * tensile straining * deformation induced martensite Subject RIV: JL - Materials Fatigue, Friction Mechanics OBOR OECD: Audio engineering, reliability analysis Impact factor: 2.714, year: 2016

  10. The improvement of ultrasonic characteristics in weld metal of austenitic stainless steel using magnetic stirring method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arakawa, T.; Tomisawa, Y.

    1988-01-01

    The magnetic stirring welding process was tested to save the difficulty of ultrasonic testing of austenitic stainless steel overlayed welds, due to grain refinement of weld solidification structure. The testing involved stirring the molten pool with Lorenz force induced by the interaction of welding current and alternative magnetic field applied from the outside magnetic coil. This report summarizes improvement of ultrasonic characteristic in austenitic stainless steel overlayed welds caused by magnetic stirring welding process

  11. Analysis of recrystallization behavior of hot-deformed austenite reconstructed from electron backscattering diffraction orientation maps of lath martensite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kubota, Manabu; Ushioda, Kohsaku; Miyamoto, Goro; Furuhara, Tadashi

    2016-01-01

    The recrystallization behavior of hot-deformed austenite of a 0.55% C steel at 800 °C was investigated by a method of reconstructing the parent austenite orientation map from an electron backscattering diffraction orientation map of lath martensite. Recrystallized austenite grains were clearly distinguished from un-recrystallized austenite grains. Very good correlation was confirmed between the static recrystallization behavior investigated mechanically by double-hit compression tests and the change in austenite microstructure evaluated by the reconstruction method. The recrystallization behavior of hot-deformed 0.55% C steel at 800 °C is directly revealed and it was observed that by addition of 0.1% V the recrystallization was significantly retarded.

  12. Solidification Based Grain Refinement in Steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-27

    34Thermal Analysis Study of Heterogeneous Nuclei in Stainless Steels ," International Journal of Metalcasting Date: May, 2011 Status: Submitted...develop strength through the precipitation of carbide particles. The resulting mechanical properties can be strengths of 2,000 MPa, 80% elongation, and...by thermomechanical grain refinemeni and precipitation hardening. This is achieved by precipitating niobium carbides , which pin the austenite grains

  13. Characterization of the austenitic stability of metastable austenitic stainless steel with regard to its formability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Matthias; Liewald, Mathias

    2018-05-01

    During the last decade, the stainless steel market showed a growing volume of 3-5% p.a.. The austenitic grades are losing market shares to ferritic or 200-series grades due to the high nickel price, but still playing the most important role within the stainless steel market. Austenitic stainless steel is characterized by the strain-induced martensite formation, causing the TRIP-effect (Transformation Induced Plasticity) which is responsible for good formability and high strength. The TRIP-effect itself is highly dependent on the forming temperature, the strain as well as the chemical composition which has a direct influence on the stability of the austenite. Today the austenitic stability is usually characterized by the so called Md30-temperature, which was introduced by Angel and enhanced by several researches, particularly Nohara. It is an empirical formula based on the chemical composition and the grain size of a given material, calculating the temperature which is necessary to gain a 50 % martensite formation after 30 % of elongation in a tensile test. A higher Md30-temperature indicates a lower stability and therefore a higher tendency towards martensite formation. The main disadvantage of Md30 -temperature is the fact that it is not based on forming parameters and only describes a single point instead of the whole forming process. In this paper, an experimental set up for measuring martensite and temperature evolution in a non-isothermal tensile test is presented, which is based on works of Hänsel and Schmid. With this set up, the martensite formation rate for different steels of the steel grade EN 1.4301 and EN 1.4310 is measured. Based on these results a new austenitic stability criterion is defined. This criterion and the determined Md30-temperatures are related to the stretch formability of the materials. The results show that the new IFU criterion is with regard to the formability a much more useful characteristic number for metastable austenitic steels

  14. The stability of retained austenite at different locations during straining of I&Q&P steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Chenghao [School of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Science & Technology Beijing, 30 Xueyuan Road, Haidian District, Beijing 100083 (China); Yu, Hao, E-mail: yuhao@ustb.edu.cn [School of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Science & Technology Beijing, 30 Xueyuan Road, Haidian District, Beijing 100083 (China); Li, Lili; Zhou, Tao; Lu, Jun [School of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Science & Technology Beijing, 30 Xueyuan Road, Haidian District, Beijing 100083 (China); Liu, Xihui [Qingzhou Construction Quality and Safety Supervision Station, Shandong 262500 (China)

    2016-07-18

    This paper presents a detailed investigation of the transformation behavior of retained austenite at different locations of intercritical heating, quenching and partitioning (I&Q&P) steel. The consumption of retained austenite at different strains is investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD). Results indicate that retained austenite can transform into martensite progressively during the whole deformation process, which is in favor of a good combination of strength and ductility, contributing to a high product of strength and elongation (PSE) of 31.9 GPa%. The transformation characteristics of retained austenite at different locations after different strains are characterized by electron back scattered diffraction (EBSD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Results show that the transformation preferentially occurs in the retained austenite at ferrite grain boundaries, subsequently the one within ferrite grains (at 10% strain) and eventually the one between martensite laths (at 15% strain). In FCC phase, the average local misorientations are 0.547° and 0.674° at 5% and 10% strain, respectively; however, the values are not more than 0.7° at 15% and 20% strain due to the TRIP effect. For the retained austenite within ferrite grains, the interior part preferentially transforms into twin martensite, while the interface still remains due to alloying elements segregation.

  15. The role of martensitic transformation on bimodal grain structure in ultrafine grained AISI 304L stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sabooni, S.; Karimzadeh, F.; Enayati, M.H.; Ngan, A.H.W.

    2015-01-01

    In the present study, metastable AISI 304L austenitic stainless steel samples were subjected to different cold rolling reductions from 70% to 93%, followed by annealing at 700 °C for 300 min to form ultrafine grained (UFG) austenite with different grain structures. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and nanoindentation were used to characterize the martensitic transformation, in order to relate it to the bimodal distribution of the austenite grain size after subsequent annealing. The results showed that the martensite morphology changed from lath type in the 60% rolled sample to a mixture of lath and dislocation-cell types in the higher rolling reductions. Calculation of the Gibbs free energy change during the reversion treatment showed that the reversion mechanism is shear controlled at the annealing temperature and so the morphology of the reverted austenite is completely dependent on the morphology of the deformation induced martensite. It was found that the austenite had a bimodal grain size distribution in the 80% rolled and annealed state and this is related to the existence of different types of martensite. Increasing the rolling reduction to 93% followed by annealing caused changing of the grain structure to a monomodal like structure, which was mostly covered with small grains of around 300 nm. The existence of bimodal austenite grain size in the 80% rolled and annealed 304L stainless steel led to the improvement of ductility while maintaining a high tensile strength in comparison with the 93% rolled and annealed sample

  16. Regularities of ferritic-pearlitic structure formation during subcooled austenite decomposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shkatov, V.V.; Frantsenyuk, L.I.; Bogomolov, I.V.

    1997-01-01

    Relationships of ferrite-pearlite structure parameters to austenite grain size and cooling conditions during γ -> α transformation are studied for steel 3 sp. A mathematical description has been proposed for grain evolution in carbon and low alloy steel cooling after hot rolling. It is shown that ferrite grain size can be controlled by changing temperature range of water spraying when the temperatures of rolling completion and strip coiling are the same

  17. Production and several properties of single crystal austenitic stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okamoto, Kazutaka; Yoshinari, Akira; Kaneda, Junya; Aono, Yasuhisa; Kato, Takahiko

    1998-01-01

    The single crystal austenitic stainless steels Type 316L and 304L were grown in order to improve the resistance to stress corrosion cracking (SCC) using a unidirectional solidification method which can provide the large size single crystals. The mechanical properties and the chemical properties were examined. The orientation and temperature dependence of tensile properties of the single crystals were measured. The yield stress of the single crystal steels are lower than those of the conventional polycrystal steels because of the grain boundary strength cannot be expected in the single crystal steels. The tensile properties of the single crystal austenitic stainless steel Type 316L depend strongly on the orientation. The tensile strength in orientation are about 200 MPa higher than those in the and orientations. The microstructure of the single crystal consists of a mixture of the continuous γ-austenitic single crystal matrix and the δ-ferrite phase so that the effects of the γ/δ boundaries on the chemical properties were studied. The effects of the δ-ferrite phases and the γ/δ boundaries on the resistance to SCC were examined by the creviced bent beam test (CBB test). No crack is observed in all the CBB test specimens of the single crystals, even at the γ/δ boundaries. The behavior of the radiation induced segregation (RIS) at the γ/δ boundaries in the single crystal austenitic stainless steel Type 316L was evaluated by the electron irradiation test in the high voltage electron microscope (HVEM). The depletion of oversized solute chromium at the γ/δ boundary in the single crystal austenitic stainless steel Type 316L is remarkably lower than that at the grain boundary in the polycrystalline-type 316L. (author)

  18. Austenitic stainless steel weld inspection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mech, S.J.; Emmons, J.S.; Michaels, T.E.

    1978-01-01

    Analytical techniques applied to ultrasonic waveforms obtained from inspection of austenitic stainless steel welds are described. Experimental results obtained from a variety of geometric and defect reflectors are presented. Specifically, frequency analyses parameters, such as simple moments of the power spectrum, cross-correlation techniques, and adaptive learning network analysis, all represent improvements over conventional time domain analysis of ultrasonic waveforms. Results for each of these methods are presented, and the overall inspection difficulties of austenitic stainless steel welds are discussed

  19. Characterization of the martensite phase formed during hydrogen ion irradiation in austenitic stainless steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Hyung-Ha; Lim, Sangyeob; Kwon, Junhyun

    2017-10-01

    Microstructural changes in austenitic stainless steel caused by hydrogen ion irradiation were investigated using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). It has been confirmed that the irradiation induced the formation of martensite along the grain boundary; the martensite phase exhibited a crystal orientation relationship with the adjacent austenite phase. The results of this study also indicate that the concentration of Cr in the martensite phase is lower compared to that in the austenite matrix. The TEM results showed the development of asymmetric radiation-induced segregation (RIS) near the grain boundary, which leads to local changes in the chemical composition such as reduction of Cr near the grain boundary. The asymmetric RIS serves as a prerequisite for the formation of the martensite under hydrogen irradiation.

  20. Phase transformation kinetics in rolled U-10 wt. % Mo foil: Effect of post-rolling heat treatment and prior γ-UMo grain size

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jana, Saumyadeep; Overman, Nicole; Varga, Tamas; Lavender, Curt; Joshi, Vineet V.

    2017-12-01

    The effect of sub-eutectoid heat treatment on the phase transformation behavior in rolled U-10 wt.percent Mo (U10Mo) foils was systematically investigated. The as-cast 5 mm thick foils were initially homogenized at 900 degrees C for 48 hours and were hot rolled to 2 mm and later cold rolled down to 0.2 mm. Three starting microstructures were evaluated: (i) hot- + cold-rolled to 0.2 mm (as-rolled condition), (ii) hot- + cold-rolled to 0.2 mm + annealed at 700 deg. C for 1 hour, and (iii) hot- + cold-rolled to 0.2 mm + annealed at 1000 deg. C for 60 hours. U10Mo rolled foils went through various degrees of decomposition when subjected to the sub-eutectoid heat-treatment step and formed a lamellar microstructure through a cellular reaction mostly along the previous γ-UMo grain boundaries.

  1. Concurrent microstructural evolution of ferrite and austenite in a duplex stainless steel processed by high-pressure torsion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cao, Y.; Wang, Y.B.; An, X.H.; Liao, X.Z.; Kawasaki, M.; Ringer, S.P.; Langdon, T.G.; Zhu, Y.T.

    2014-01-01

    A duplex stainless steel with approximately equal volume fractions of ferrite and austenite was processed by high-pressure torsion. Nano-indentation, electron backscatter diffraction and transmission electron microscopy were used to investigate the hardness and microstructure evolutions of the steel. Despite the different strain-hardening rates of individual ferrite and austenite, the microstructures of the two phases evolved concurrently in such a way that the neighbouring two phases always maintained similar hardness. While the plastic deformation and grain refinement of ferrite occurred mainly via dislocation activities, the plastic deformation and grain refinement process of austenite were more complicated and included deformation twinning and de-twinning in coarse grains, grain refinement by twinning and dislocation–twin interactions, de-twinning in ultrafine grains and twin boundary subdivision

  2. Tailoring plasticity of austenitic stainless steels for nuclear applications: Review of mechanisms controlling plasticity of austenitic steels below 400 °C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meric de Bellefon, G., E-mail: mericdebelle@wisc.edu [University of Wisconsin-Madison (United States); Duysen, J.C. van [EDF R& D (France); University of Tennessee-Knoxville (United States); Unité Matériaux et Transformation (UMET) CNRS, Université de Lille (France)

    2016-07-15

    AISI 304 and 316 austenitic stainless steels were invented in the early 1900s and are still trusted by materials and mechanical engineers in numerous sectors because of their good combination of strength, ductility, and corrosion resistance, and thanks to decades of experience and data. This article is part of an effort focusing on tailoring the plasticity of both types of steels to nuclear applications. It provides a synthetic and comprehensive review of the plasticity mechanisms in austenitic steels during tensile tests below 400 °C. In particular, formation of twins, extended stacking faults, and martensite, as well as irradiation effects and grain rotation are discussed in details. - Highlights: • This article is part of an effort to tailor the plasticity of 304L and 316L steels for nuclear applications. • It reviews mechanisms controlling plasticity of austenitic steels during tensile tests. • Formation of twins, extended stacking faults, and martensite, grain rotation, and irradiation effects are discussed.

  3. Intergranular corrosion in unserviced austenitic stainless steel pipes made of alloy 904L; Kornzerfall in nicht betriebsbeanspruchten rostfreien austenitischen Rohren aus Alloy 904L

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neidel, Andreas; Cagliyan, Erhan; Fischer, Boromir; Giller, Madeleine; Riesenbeck, Susanne [Siemens AG, Energy Sector, Berlin (Germany). Gasturbinenwerk Berlin

    2017-09-01

    Seamless tubes of the highly corrosion resistant austenitic steel 1.4539, X1NiCrMoCu25-20-5 (Alloy 904L) were observed to exhibit signs of inter-crystalline damage to a depth of several layers of grains and in particular on their internal surface. The material had been stored and had not been put into service. A number of hypotheses had been discussed to explain the predominant cause of the damage. Using optical light and scanning electron microscopy investigation techniques, clear evidence was obtained indicating it to be inter-crystalline corrosion due to the sensitisation of the grain boundaries. The most probable cause of this was determined to be the presence of residual deposits from the rolling process, which due to poor cleaning, had not been completely removed prior to the final solution annealing treatment. This explaining why predominantly the internal surface of the tubes was affected.

  4. Ultrasonic testing of austenitic stainless steel welds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishino, Shunichi; Hida, Yoshio; Yamamoto, Michio; Ando, Tomozumi; Shirai, Tasuku.

    1982-05-01

    Ultrasonic testing of austenitic stainless steel welds has been considered difficult because of the high noise level and remarkable attenuation of ultrasonic waves. To improve flaw detectability in this kind of steel, various inspection techniques have been studied. A series of tests indicated: (1) The longitudinal angle beam transducers newly developed during this study can detect 4.8 mm dia. side drilled holes in dissimilar metal welds (refraction angle: 55 0 from SUS side, 45 0 from CS side) and in cast stainless steel welds (refraction angle: 45 0 , inspection frequency: 1 MHz). (2) Cracks more than 5% t in depth in the heat affected zones of fine-grain stainless steel pipe welds can be detected by the 45 0 shear wave angle beam method (inspection frequency: 2 MHz). (3) The pattern recognition method using frequency analysis technology was presumed useful for discriminating crack signals from spurious echoes. (author)

  5. Modification of the Strength Anisotropy in an Austenitic ODS Steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, T. K.; Jang, J.; Kim, S. H.; Lee, C. B.; Bae, C. S.; Kim, D. H.

    2007-01-01

    Among many candidate alloys for Gen IV reactors, the oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) alloy is widely considered as a good candidate material for the in-reactor component, like cladding tube. The ODS alloy is well known due to its good high temperature strength, and excellent irradiation resistance. For the previous two decades in the nuclear community, the ODS alloy developments have been mostly focused on the ferritic martensitic (F-M) steel-based ones. On the other hand, the austenitic stainless steels (e.g. 316L or 316LN) have been used as a structural material due to its good high temperature strength and a good compatibility with a media. However, the austenitic stainless steel showed unfavorable characteristics in the dimensional stability under neutron irradiation and cracking behavior with the media. It is thus expected that the austenitic ODS steels restrain the dimension stability under neutron irradiation. However, the ODS alloys usually reveal the anisotropic characteristic in mechanical strength in the hoop and longitudinal directions, which is attributed to the grain morphology strongly developed parallel to the rolling direction with a high aspect ratio. This study focuses on a modification of the strength anisotropy of an austenitic ODS alloy by a recrystallization heat treatment

  6. Elastic interaction between twins during tensile deformation of austenitic stainless steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juul, Nicolai Ytterdal; Winther, Grethe; Dale, Darren

    2016-01-01

    . However, the components of the Type II stress normal to the twin boundary plane exhibit the same large variations as for the grain boundaries. Elastic grain interactions are therefore complex and must involve the entire set of neighbouring grains. The elastic-regime stress along the tensile direction......In austenite, the twin boundary normal is a common elastically stiff direction shared by the two twins, which may induce special interactions. By means of three-dimensional X-ray diffraction this elastic interaction has been analysed and compared to grains separated by conventional grain boundaries...

  7. On abnormal decomposition of supercooled austenite in carbon and alloy steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parusov, V.V.; Dolzhenkov, I.I.; Podobedov, L.V.; Vakulenko, I.A.

    1980-01-01

    Residual stresses which appear as a result of thermal cycling in the temperature range of 300-700 deg C are investigated in an austenitic class steel (03Kh18N11) to ground the assumption on the effect of plastic deformation, appearing due to thermal stresses, on the mechanism of supercooled austenite decomposition. The determination of residual stresses is carried out with the help of X-ray diffraction analysis. It is established that the deformation brings about an increase in density of dislocation the interaction of which leads to the formation of a typical austenite substructure which conditions the proceeding of the eutectoid transformation according to an abnormal mechanism. It is noted, that the grain pearlite formation due to plastic and microplastic deformation of supercooled austenite induced by thermal stresses should be taken into account when developing steel heat treatment shedules [ru

  8. The effects of retained austenite on dry sliding wear behavior of carburized steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hyung-Jun [Research Inst. of Industrial Science and Technology, Steel Products Dept., Pohang (Korea, Republic of); Kweon, Young-Gak [Research Inst. of Industrial Science and Technology, Steel Products Dept., Pohang (Korea, Republic of)

    1996-04-01

    Ring-on-square tests on two kinds of low-alloy carburized steel which were AISI 8620 and 4140 were carried out to study the dry sliding wear behavior. The influence of different retained austenite level of 6% to 40% was evaluated while trying to eliminate other factors. Test results show that the effects of grain size and carburized steel species are negligible in dry sliding wear behavior. While the influence of retained austenite is negligible at 20 kg load condition, wear resistance is decreased at 40 kg load condition as the retained austenite level is increased from 6% to 30%. However, wear resistance is again increased above about 30% of retained austenite level at 40 kg load condition. (orig.)

  9. Grain size measurements by ultrasonic Rayleigh surface waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palanichamy, P.; Jayakumar, T.

    1996-01-01

    The use of Rayleigh surface waves to determine average grain size nondestructively in an austenitic stainless steel AISI type 316 stainless is discussed. Two commercial type 4MHz frequency surface wave transducers, one as transmitter and the other as receiver were employed for the measurement of surface wave amplitudes. Relative amplitudes of the Rayleigh surface waves were correlated with the metallographically obtained grain sizes. Results indicate that surface/sub-surface average grain sizes of AISI type 316 austenitic stainless steel can be estimated with a confidence level of more than 80% in the grain size range 30-170 μm. (author)

  10. Cryogenic properties of austenitic stainless steels for superconducting magnet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nohara, K.; Kato, T.; Ono, Y.; Sasaki, T.; Suzuki, S.

    1983-01-01

    The present study examines the magnetic and mechanical properties of a variety of austenitic stainless steels and high maganese steel which are candidate materials for the superconducting magnet attached to high energy particle accelerators. The effect of a specified heat treatment for the precipitation of intermetallic compound Nb3Sn to be used as superconductor on ductility and toughness are especially examined. It is found that nitrogen-strengthened austenitic stainless steels have high strength and good ductility and toughness, but that these are destroyed by precipitation treatment. The poor ductility and toughness after precipitation are caused by a weakening of the grain boundaries due to the agglomerated chromium carbide percipitates. The addition of vanadium suppresses this effect by refining the grain. Austenitic steels are found to have low magnetic permeabilities and Neel temperatures, and show serrated flow in traction test due to strained martensitic transformation. High manganese steel has extremely low permeability, a Neel temperature about room temperature, and has a serrated flow in traction test due to adiabatic deformation at liquid helium temperature

  11. Simulation of radiation induced segregation and PWSCC susceptibility for austenitic stainless steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujimoto Koji; Yonezawa, Toshio; Iwamura, Toshihiko [Mitsubishi Heavy Industries Ltd., Takasago, Hyogo (Japan). Takasago R and D Center; Ajiki, Kazuhide [Mitsubishi Heavy Industries Ltd., Kobe (Japan). Kobe Shipyard and Machinery Works; Urata, Sigeru [General Office of Nuclear and Fossil Power Production, Kansai Electric Power Co., Inc., Osaka (Japan)

    2000-08-01

    Recently, irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) of austenitic stainless steels for core internal components materials become a subject of discussion in light water reactors (LWRs). IASCC has not been found in Pressurized Water Reactors (PWRs). However, the authors have investigated on the possibility of IASCC of austenitic stainless steels for core internal materials so as to be able to estimate the degradation of PWR plants up to the end of their lifetime. In this study, in order to verify the hypothetical that the IASCC in PWRs shall be caused by the primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC) as a result of radiation induced segregation (RIS) at grain boundaries, the authors simulated RIS at grain boundaries of austenitic stainless steels based on previous study and estimated RIS tendency after long time operation. And the authors melted the test alloys whose bulk compositions simulated the grain boundary compositions of irradiated austenitic stainless steels and made clear chromium-nickel-silicon compositions for PWSCC susceptibility area in austenitic alloys by slow strain rate tensile (SSRT) test. (author)

  12. Simulation of radiation induced segregation and PWSCC susceptibility for austenitic stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujimoto Koji; Yonezawa, Toshio; Iwamura, Toshihiko

    2000-01-01

    Recently, irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) of austenitic stainless steels for core internal components materials become a subject of discussion in light water reactors (LWRs). IASCC has not been found in Pressurized Water Reactors (PWRs). However, the authors have investigated on the possibility of IASCC of austenitic stainless steels for core internal materials so as to be able to estimate the degradation of PWR plants up to the end of their lifetime. In this study, in order to verify the hypothetical that the IASCC in PWRs shall be caused by the primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC) as a result of radiation induced segregation (RIS) at grain boundaries, the authors simulated RIS at grain boundaries of austenitic stainless steels based on previous study and estimated RIS tendency after long time operation. And the authors melted the test alloys whose bulk compositions simulated the grain boundary compositions of irradiated austenitic stainless steels and made clear chromium-nickel-silicon compositions for PWSCC susceptibility area in austenitic alloys by slow strain rate tensile (SSRT) test. (author)

  13. Effect of deformation temperature on niobium clustering, precipitation and austenite recrystallisation in a Nb–Ti microalloyed steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kostryzhev, Andrii G.; Al Shahrani, Abdullah; Zhu, Chen; Ringer, Simon P.; Pereloma, Elena V.

    2013-01-01

    The effect of deformation temperature on Nb solute clustering, precipitation and the kinetics of austenite recrystallisation were studied in a steel containing 0.081C–0.021Ti–0.064 Nb (wt%). Thermo-mechanical processing was carried out using a Gleeble 3500 simulator. The austenite microstructure was studied using a combination of optical microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and atom probe microscopy, enabling a careful characterisation of grain size, as well as Nb-rich clustering and precipitation processes. A correlation between the austenite recrystallisation kinetics and the chemistry, size and number density of Nb-rich solute atom clusters, and NbTi(C,N) precipitates was established via the austenite deformation temperature. Specifically, we have determined thresholds for the onset of recrystallisation: for deformation levels above 75% and temperatures above 825 °C, Nb atom clusters <8 nm effectively suppressed austenite recrystallisation

  14. G-phase precipitation in austenitic stainless steel deformed by high pressure torsion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shuro, I., E-mail: innoshuro@martens.me.tut.ac.jp [Functional Materials Engineering, Toyohashi University of Technology, 1-1, Toyohashi, Aichi 441-8580 (Japan); Kuo, H.H. [Functional Materials Engineering, Toyohashi University of Technology, 1-1, Toyohashi, Aichi 441-8580 (Japan); Sasaki, T.; Hono, K. [National Institute for Materials Sciences, Sengen 1-2-1, Tsukuba 305-0047 (Japan); Todaka, Y.; Umemoto, M. [Functional Materials Engineering, Toyohashi University of Technology, 1-1, Toyohashi, Aichi 441-8580 (Japan)

    2012-08-30

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Using TEM and APT analyses, G-phase precipitation was observed in HPTed SUS304 with no trace of spinodal decomposition. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer G-phase precipitation occurred much shorter time than previous studies probably due to the elimination of prior SD and enhanced diffusion by severe plastic deformation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer G-phase composition is a function of aging time. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Tensile tests showed that in SUS304 embrittlement occurs solely due to G-phase precipitation. - Abstract: G phase an intermetallic silicide has been observed in martensite of precipitation hardened stainless steels and in the ferrite of dual (austenite and ferrite) phase stainless steels. In both cases, before G-phase precipitates, the matrix composition changes due to spinodal decomposition and solute partitioning between ferrite and austenite. Thus in the present study, single bcc phase and high Ni content stainless steel, was selected to study G-phase precipitation expecting elimination of the interference from spinodal decomposition and solute partitioning. Fe-18Cr-8Ni (SUS304) austenitic stainless steel samples were deformed at room temperature by high pressure torsion to obtain 100% volume fraction of deformation induced martensite ({alpha} Prime ). HPT deformation was chosen due to its ability to induce high strength by grain refinement and also attain 100% {alpha} Prime at room temperature. After annealing at 400 Degree-Sign C for 500 h, G-phase precipitation was observed in the fully martensitic matrix without spinodal decomposition. Crystallographic analysis of annealed samples using high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) detected a Mn-Ni-Si rich G-phase with fcc crystal structure with lattice parameter of 1.16 nm. The value of lattice parameter corresponds well with previously reported values. Chemical analysis by atom probe tomography

  15. G-phase precipitation in austenitic stainless steel deformed by high pressure torsion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shuro, I.; Kuo, H.H.; Sasaki, T.; Hono, K.; Todaka, Y.; Umemoto, M.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Using TEM and APT analyses, G-phase precipitation was observed in HPTed SUS304 with no trace of spinodal decomposition. ► G-phase precipitation occurred much shorter time than previous studies probably due to the elimination of prior SD and enhanced diffusion by severe plastic deformation. ► G-phase composition is a function of aging time. ► Tensile tests showed that in SUS304 embrittlement occurs solely due to G-phase precipitation. - Abstract: G phase an intermetallic silicide has been observed in martensite of precipitation hardened stainless steels and in the ferrite of dual (austenite and ferrite) phase stainless steels. In both cases, before G-phase precipitates, the matrix composition changes due to spinodal decomposition and solute partitioning between ferrite and austenite. Thus in the present study, single bcc phase and high Ni content stainless steel, was selected to study G-phase precipitation expecting elimination of the interference from spinodal decomposition and solute partitioning. Fe–18Cr–8Ni (SUS304) austenitic stainless steel samples were deformed at room temperature by high pressure torsion to obtain 100% volume fraction of deformation induced martensite (α′). HPT deformation was chosen due to its ability to induce high strength by grain refinement and also attain 100% α′ at room temperature. After annealing at 400 °C for 500 h, G-phase precipitation was observed in the fully martensitic matrix without spinodal decomposition. Crystallographic analysis of annealed samples using high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) detected a Mn–Ni–Si rich G-phase with fcc crystal structure with lattice parameter of 1.16 nm. The value of lattice parameter corresponds well with previously reported values. Chemical analysis by atom probe tomography (APT) showed G-phase of composition Mn 21 Ni 50 Si 24 Fe 4 Cr. Tensile tests showed that G-phase precipitation leads to

  16. Evolution of non-uniform grain structure during hot defornnation of a Nb-Ti microalloyed steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katajarinne, T.

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available Recrystallisation and the evolution of the abnormally grown austenite grains were investigated for a continuously cast slab of a 0.13 C-1.41 Mn-0.027 Nb-0.012 Ti steel during reheating and after the subsequent deformation. The stability of the recrystallised structure and the uniformity of the final microstructure were also studied. The abnormally grown grains appear in a few minutes at reheating temperatures around 1200 °C. All grains in the bimodal grain structure recrystallised at 1100 °C for strains > 0.2 within about 40 s. The coarse grains are refined, while the fine grains become slightly larger. Some abnormal grain growth can occur again in the recrystallised structure within 10 min. After cooling at 1° C/s the coarse austenite grains transform into large areas of upper bainite, while the finer grains transform to fine ferrite and pearlite. The transformed microstructure in specimens cooled at l°C/s consists of large upper bainitic areas corresponding to the prior coarse austenite grains, surrounded by fine ferrite-pearlite grains.

    Se ha estudiado la recristalización y la evolución del crecimiento anormal de grano, durante el recalentamiento y tras deformaciones sucesivas, en un acero 0,13 C-1,41 Mn-0,027 Nb- 0,012 Ti procedente de colada continua. Se ha estudiado, así mismo, la estabilidad de la estructura recristalizada y la uniformidad de la microestructura final. Para temperaturas de recalentamiento próximas a 1.200 °C, aparece crecimiento anormal de grano en unos pocos minutos. Todos los granos pertenecientes a la estructura bimodal resultante recristalizan durante, aproximadamente, 40 s, a 1.100 °C, para una deformación de 0,2. El tamaño de grano se afina en aquellas regiones con granos más gruesos de partida y crece, ligeramente, en las que tenían un grano m��s fino. En 10 min, se puede desencadenar, de nuevo, un cierto crecimiento anormal de grano en la estructura recristalizada. La microestructura final

  17. Precipitation of Second Phases in High-Interstitial-Alloyed Austenitic Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Tae-Ho; Ha, Heon-Young; Kim, Sung-Joon

    2011-12-01

    The precipitation reaction of an austenitic stainless steel containing N + C was investigated using transmission electron microscopy. The main precipitate formed during isothermal aging at 1123 K (850 °C) was M23C6 carbide, and its morphology gradually changed in a sequence of intergranular (along grain boundary) → cellular (or discontinuous) → intragranular (within grain interior) form with aging time. Irrespective of different morphologies, the M23C6 was consistently related to austenite matrix in accordance with the cube-on-cube orientation relationship. Based on the analysis of electron diffraction, two variants of intragranular M23C6 were identified, and they were related to each other by twin relation. Prolonged aging produced other types of precipitates—the rod-shaped Cr2N and the coarse irregular intermetallic sigma phase. The similarities and differences in precipitation behavior between N only and N + C alloyed austenitic stainless steels are briefly discussed.

  18. Tailoring plasticity of austenitic stainless steels for nuclear applications: Review of mechanisms controlling plasticity of austenitic steels below 400 °C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meric de Bellefon, G.; van Duysen, J. C.

    2016-07-01

    AISI 304 and 316 austenitic stainless steels were invented in the early 1900s and are still trusted by materials and mechanical engineers in numerous sectors because of their good combination of strength, ductility, and corrosion resistance, and thanks to decades of experience and data. This article is part of an effort focusing on tailoring the plasticity of both types of steels to nuclear applications. It provides a synthetic and comprehensive review of the plasticity mechanisms in austenitic steels during tensile tests below 400 °C. In particular, formation of twins, extended stacking faults, and martensite, as well as irradiation effects and grain rotation are discussed in details.

  19. Stability of retained austenite arising at low temperatures in low carbon steels with copper using TRIP effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michta, G.; Pietrzyk, J.; Osuch, W.; Kruk, A.

    2003-01-01

    The magnetometric measurement results of decomposition of retained austenite arising during low temperature bainite transformation, obtained structure and mechanical properties are presented. Presented results demonstrate that the low temperature bainite transformation leads to formation of two kinds of retained austenite with different stability. Decomposition of low stability retained austenite was observed during cooling to -196 o C, the second with high stability was decomposed only during heating up to 560 o C. The first one was observed in microstructure as big grains and the second more refinement in structure was localised between bainitic regions. (author)

  20. Effect of austenitization conditions on kinetics of isothermal transformation of austenite of structural steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konopleva, E.V.; Bayazitov, V.M.; Abramov, O.V.; Kozlova, A.G.

    1987-01-01

    Effect of austenization of kinetics of pearlite and bainite transformations for steels with different carbon content differing by alloying character and degree has been investigated. Austenization temperature increase is shown to leads to retardation of ferrite-pearlite transformation in low- and medium-carbon alloyed steels. Step-like holding in the region of austenite stable state (850, 950 deg) after high-temperature heating (1100 deg C) increases the rate of transformation partially recovering its kinetics and decomposition velocity after low-temperature heating in steels alloyed advantageously with carbide-forming elements (08Kh2G2F, 30Kh3) and does not affect kinetics in the 35Kh, 30KhGSN2A, 45N5 steels. Increase of heating temperature and growth of an austenite grain cause considerable acceleration of bainite transformation, increase of the temperaure of bainite transformation beginning and increase of the transformation amplitude in the 08Kh2G2F, 30Kh3 steels and affect weakly kinetics in steels with mixed alloying (30KhGSN2A) or low-alloy one (35Kh). The bainite transformation rate in the 45N5 steelite does not depend on austenization. The effect of additional acceleration of bainite transformation as a result holding after high-temperature heating in those steels, where activation of transformation occurs with increase of heating temperature

  1. Corrosion of austenitic stainless steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, M C.M. [Instituto Nacional de Tecnologia, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil)

    1977-01-01

    Types of corrosion observed in a heat exchanger pipe and on a support of still of molasses fermented wort, both in austenitic stainless steel, are focused. Not only are the causes which might have had any kind of influence on them examined, but also the measures adopted in order to avoid and lessen its occurence.

  2. Morphology and crystallographic orientation relationship in isothermally transformed Fe–N austenite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiao, Dongling; Luo, Chengping; Liu, Jiangwen; Zhang, Guoqing

    2014-01-01

    The 225 °C isothermal transformation of a high-nitrogen austenite with Fe–2.71 wt.% N was investigated by means of electron microscopy. It was found that the transformation products were composed of ultrafine α-Fe and γ′-Fe 4 N plus retained austenite γ, which were in two types of morphologies, namely, (i) with the retained austenite patches dispersed among the (α-Fe + γ′-Fe 4 N) packets and (ii) with the ultrafine α-Fe and γ/γ′-Fe 4 N laths interwoven with each other within a single bainitic packet. A cube–cube orientation relationship between the γ (austenite) and γ′-Fe 4 N, and a near Greninger–Troiano (G–T) one between the γ (austenite) and the bainitic α-ferrite were detected. The morphology, orientation relationship and high hardness (> 1000 HV) of the transformation products indicated that the isothermal transformation of the high nitrogen austenite was analogous to a bainitic one. - Highlights: • Isothermal transformation products consisted of nano-sized α-Fe + γ′ + γ (retained). • The hardness of transformation product exceeded 1000 HV. • The α-Fe and γ/γ′-Fe 4 N kept a near G-T OR in the grain interior

  3. Proceedings of the specialists' meeting on reliability of the ultrasonic inspection of austenitic materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-01-01

    The contributions of this meeting addressed several topics: the fundamentals of ultrasonic examination of austenitic materials (effect of anisotropy on propagation, improvement of ultrasonic testing to thick bimetallic welds, aspects of the ultrasonic testing of austenitic steel structures, utilization of a Fisher linear discriminant function in intergranular stress corrosion cracking or IGSCC detection, case of coarse grain austenitic welds, efforts of the Argonne National Laboratory), instruments and methods (longitudinal wave ultrasonic inspection, Grass echo suppression technique during the ultrasonic inspection of fuel cladding tubes, inspections of fillet and butt welds, improvement by signal averaging techniques, multiple bearing angle crack detector for cladded pipes examinations, flow-to-grain echo enhancement by split-spectrum processing, ultrasonic imaging techniques, ultrasonic inspection of pipe weldments for IGSCC), industrial practice (ultrasonic testing techniques for fabrication and in-service inspection, experiences in ultrasonic examination of austenitic steel components, experience and practice on nuclear piping in Spain, detection of underclad defects, sizing of cracks perpendicular to stainless overlay), and reliability (survey of ultrasonic testing in austenitic weld material, examination of electron beam welds, factors affecting the reliability of ultrasonic examination, detectability of IGSCC, ultrasonic inspection reliability for primary piping systems)

  4. Proceedings of the specialists' meeting on reliability of the ultrasonic inspection of austenitic materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1980-07-01

    The contributions of this meeting addressed several topics: the fundamentals of ultrasonic examination of austenitic materials (effect of anisotropy on propagation, improvement of ultrasonic testing to thick bimetallic welds, aspects of the ultrasonic testing of austenitic steel structures, utilization of a Fisher linear discriminant function in intergranular stress corrosion cracking or IGSCC detection, case of coarse grain austenitic welds, efforts of the Argonne National Laboratory), instruments and methods (longitudinal wave ultrasonic inspection, Grass echo suppression technique during the ultrasonic inspection of fuel cladding tubes, inspections of fillet and butt welds, improvement by signal averaging techniques, multiple bearing angle crack detector for cladded pipes examinations, flow-to-grain echo enhancement by split-spectrum processing, ultrasonic imaging techniques, ultrasonic inspection of pipe weldments for IGSCC), industrial practice (ultrasonic testing techniques for fabrication and in-service inspection, experiences in ultrasonic examination of austenitic steel components, experience and practice on nuclear piping in Spain, detection of underclad defects, sizing of cracks perpendicular to stainless overlay), and reliability (survey of ultrasonic testing in austenitic weld material, examination of electron beam welds, factors affecting the reliability of ultrasonic examination, detectability of IGSCC, ultrasonic inspection reliability for primary piping systems)

  5. Influence of Ti on the Hot Ductility of High-manganese Austenitic Steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hongbo; Liu, Jianhua; Wu, Bowei; Su, Xiaofeng; Li, Shiqi; Ding, Hao

    2017-07-01

    The influence of Ti addition ( 0.10 wt%) on hot ductility of as-cast high-manganese austenitic steels has been examined over the temperature range 650-1,250 °C under a constant strain rate of 10-3 s-1 using Gleeble3500 thermal simulation testing machine. The fracture surfaces and particles precipitated at different tensile temperatures were characterized by means of scanning electron microscope and X-ray energy dispersive spectrometry (SEM-EDS). Hot ductility as a function of reduction curves shows that adding 0.10 wt% Ti made the ductility worse in the almost entire range of testing temperatures. The phases' equilibrium diagrams of precipitates in Ti-bearing high-Mn austenitic steel were calculated by the Thermo-Calc software. The calculation result shows that 0.1 wt% Ti addition would cause Ti(C,N) precipitated at 1,499 °C, which is higher than the liquidus temperature of high-Mn austenitic steel. It indicated that Ti(C,N) particles start forming in the liquid high-Mn austenitic steel. The SEM-EDS results show that Ti(C,N) and TiC particles could be found along the austenite grain boundaries or at triple junction, and they would accelerate the extension of the cracks along the grain boundaries.

  6. Grain boundary engineering for structure materials of nuclear reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, L.; Allen, T. R.; Busby, J. T.

    2013-10-01

    Grain boundary engineering (GBE), primarily implemented by thermomechanical processing, is an effective and economical method of enhancing the properties of polycrystalline materials. Among the factors affecting grain boundary character distribution, literature data showed definitive effect of grain size and texture. GBE is more effective for austenitic stainless steels and Ni-base alloys compared to other structural materials of nuclear reactors, such as refractory metals, ferritic and ferritic-martensitic steels, and Zr alloys. GBE has shown beneficial effects on improving the strength, creep strength, and resistance to stress corrosion cracking and oxidation of austenitic stainless steels and Ni-base alloys.

  7. Grain boundary engineering for structure materials of nuclear reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tan, L., E-mail: tanl@ornl.gov [Materials Science and Technology Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (United States); Allen, T.R. [Department of Engineering Physics, University of Wisconsin–Madison (United States); Busby, J.T. [Materials Science and Technology Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (United States)

    2013-10-15

    Grain boundary engineering (GBE), primarily implemented by thermomechanical processing, is an effective and economical method of enhancing the properties of polycrystalline materials. Among the factors affecting grain boundary character distribution, literature data showed definitive effect of grain size and texture. GBE is more effective for austenitic stainless steels and Ni-base alloys compared to other structural materials of nuclear reactors, such as refractory metals, ferritic and ferritic–martensitic steels, and Zr alloys. GBE has shown beneficial effects on improving the strength, creep strength, and resistance to stress corrosion cracking and oxidation of austenitic stainless steels and Ni-base alloys.

  8. Hot Ductility Characterization of Sanicro-28 Super-Austenitic Stainless Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirzaei, A.; Zarei-Hanzaki, A.; Abedi, H. R.

    2016-05-01

    The hot ductility behavior of a super-austenitic stainless steel has been studied using tensile testing method in the temperature range from 1073 K to 1373 K (800 °C to 1100 °C) under the strain rates of 0.1, 0.01, and 0.001 s-1. The hot compression tests were also performed at the same deformation condition to identify the activated restoration mechanisms. At lower temperatures [ i.e., 1073 K and 1173 K (800 °C and 900 °C)], the serration of initial grain boundaries confirms the occurrence of dynamic recovery as the predominant restoration process. However, in the course of applied deformation, the initial microstructure is recrystallized at higher temperatures [ i.e., 1273 K and 1373 K (1000 °C and 1100 °C)]. In this respect, annealing the twin boundaries could well stimulate the recrystallization kinetic through initiation new annealing twins on prior annealing twin boundaries. The hot tensile results show that there is a general trend of increasing ductility by temperature. However, two regions of ductility drop are recognized at 1273 K and 1373 K (1000°C)/0.1s-1 and (1100°C)/0.01s-1. The ductility variations at different conditions of temperature and strain rate are discussed in terms of simultaneous activation of grain boundary sliding and restoration processes. The observed ductility troughs are attributed to the occurrence of grain boundary sliding and the resulting R-type and W-type cracks. The occurrence of dynamic recrystallization is also considered as the main factor increasing the ductility at higher temperatures. The enhanced ductility is primarily originated from the post-uniform elongation behavior, which is directly associated with the strain rate sensitivity of the experimental material.

  9. Role of Austenite in Brittle Fracture of Bond Region of Super Duplex Stainless Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitagawa, Yoshihiko; Ikeuchi, Kenji; Kuroda, Toshio

    Weld simulation of heat-affected zone (HAZ) was performed to investigate the mechanism by which austenite affects the toughness of super duplex stainless steel. Thermal cycles of various peak temperatures in the range from 1373 K to 1673 K corresponding to the HAZ were applied to SAF2507 super duplex stainless steel specimens. Charpy impact test was carried out using the specimens after the weld simulation, and the fracture surfaces were observed by SEM using three-dimensionally reconstruction technique. Austenite content decreased with increasing the peak temperature when the peak temperature exceeded 1473 K and the impact value decreased with increasing the peak temperature and decreasing the austenite content. The thermal cycle of the peak temperature of 1673 K corresponding to weld bond region caused decreasing of austenite content which was 22% lower than that of the base metal. The ductile-brittle transition temperature was measured. As a result the temperature increased rapidly in the weld bond region, the peak temperature of which exceeded 1623 K by the grain growth of ferrite matrix occurring subsequently to the completely dissolution of austenite. The morphology of the fracture surfaces after impact testing at 77 K showed cleavage fracture of ferrite. The {100} orientations of cleavage fracture facets were measured using three-dimensional images of the fracture surfaces and the results were visualized as the orientation color maps. The results showed that there were cleavage fractures consisting of a few facets parallel to each other. It was considered that a few facets existed in one ferrite grain. It was concluded that Widmanstätten austenite divided the large fracture into smaller cleavage facets in a ferrite grain and then suppressed the degradation of bond toughness of duplex stainless steel.

  10. Ultrasonic inspection of austenitic welds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tomlinson, J R; Wagg, A R; Whittle, M J [N.D.T. Applications Centre, CEGB, Manchester (United Kingdom)

    1980-11-01

    The metallurgical structure of austenitic welds is described and contrasted with that found in ferritic welds. It is shown that this structure imparts a marked elastic anisotropy in the ultrasonic propagation parameters. Measurements of variations in the apparent attenuation of sound and deviations in the beam direction are described. The measurements are interpreted in terms of the measured velocity anisotropy. Two applications of the fundamental work are described. In the first it is shown how, by using short pulse compression wave probes, and with major modification of the welding procedure, a stainless steel fillet weld in an AGR boiler can be inspected. In the second application, alternative designs of a transition butt weld have been compared for ease of ultrasonic inspection. The effects of two different welding processes on such an inspection are described. Finally, the paper examines the prospects for future development of inspection and defect-sizing techniques for austenitic welds. (author)

  11. Investigation of strain-induced martensitic transformation in metastable austenite using nanoindentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahn, T.-H.; Oh, C.-S.; Kim, D.H.; Oh, K.H.; Bei, H.; George, E.P.; Han, H.N.

    2010-01-01

    Strain-induced martensitic transformation of metastable austenite was investigated by nanoindentation of individual austenite grains in multi-phase steel. A cross-section prepared through one of these indented regions using focused ion beam milling was examined by transmission electron microscopy. The presence of martensite underneath the indent indicates that the pop-ins observed on the load-displacement curve during nanoindentation correspond to the onset of strain-induced martensitic transformation. The pop-ins can be understood as resulting from the selection of a favorable martensite variant during nanoindentation.

  12. Investigation of Strain-Induced Martensitic Transformation in Metastable Austenite using Nanoindentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahn, T.-H. [Seoul National University; Oh, C.-S. [Korean Institute of Materials Science; Kim, D. H. [Seoul National University; Oh, K. H. [Seoul National University; Bei, Hongbin [ORNL; George, Easo P [ORNL; Han, H. N. [Seoul National University

    2010-01-01

    Strain-induced martensitic transformation of metastable austenite was investigated by nanoindentation of individual austenite grains in multi-phase steel. A cross-section prepared through one of these indented regions using focused ion beam milling was examined by transmission electron microscopy. The presence of martensite underneath the indent indicates that the pop-ins observed on the load-displacement curve during nanoindentation correspond to the onset of strain-induced martensitic transformation. The pop-ins can be understood as resulting from the selection of a favorable martensite variant during nanoindentation.

  13. Microstructural Evolutions During Reversion Annealing of Cold-Rolled AISI 316 Austenitic Stainless Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naghizadeh, Meysam; Mirzadeh, Hamed

    2018-06-01

    Microstructural evolutions during reversion annealing of a plastically deformed AISI 316 stainless steel were investigated and three distinct stages were identified: the reversion of strain-induced martensite to austenite, the primary recrystallization of the retained austenite, and the grain growth process. It was found that the slow kinetics of recrystallization at lower annealing temperatures inhibit the formation of an equiaxed microstructure and might effectively impair the usefulness of this thermomechanical treatment for the objective of grain refinement. By comparing the behavior of AISI 316 and 304 alloys, it was found that the mentioned slow kinetics is related to the retardation effect of solute Mo in the former alloy. At high reversion annealing temperature, however, an equiaxed austenitic microstructure was achieved quickly in AISI 316 stainless steel due to the temperature dependency of retardation effect of molybdenum, which allowed the process of recrystallization to happen easily. Conclusively, this work can shed some light on the issues of this efficient grain refining approach for microstructural control of austenitic stainless steels.

  14. Characterization of microstructure and texture across dissimilar super duplex/austenitic stainless steel weldment joint by super duplex filler metal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eghlimi, Abbas, E-mail: a.eghlimi@ma.iut.ac.ir [Department of Materials Engineering, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan 84156-83111 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Shamanian, Morteza [Department of Materials Engineering, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan 84156-83111 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Eskandarian, Masoomeh [Department of Materials Engineering, Shiraz University, Shiraz 71348-51154 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Zabolian, Azam [Department of Natural Resources, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan 84156-83111 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Szpunar, Jerzy A. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon SK S7N 5A9 (Canada)

    2015-08-15

    In the present paper, microstructural changes across an as-welded dissimilar austenitic/duplex stainless steel couple welded by a super duplex stainless steel filler metal using gas tungsten arc welding process is characterized with optical microscopy and electron back-scattered diffraction techniques. Accordingly, variations of microstructure, texture, and grain boundary character distribution of base metals, heat affected zones, and weld metal were investigated. The results showed that the weld metal, which was composed of Widmanstätten austenite side-plates and allotriomorphic grain boundary austenite morphologies, had the weakest texture and was dominated by low angle boundaries. The welding process increased the ferrite content but decreased the texture intensity at the heat affected zone of the super duplex stainless steel base metal. In addition, through partial ferritization, it changed the morphology of elongated grains of the rolled microstructure to twinned partially transformed austenite plateaus scattered between ferrite textured colonies. However, the texture of the austenitic stainless steel heat affected zone was strengthened via encouraging recrystallization and formation of annealing twins. At both interfaces, an increase in the special character coincident site lattice boundaries of the primary phase as well as a strong texture with <100> orientation, mainly of Goss component, was observed. - Graphical abstract: Display Omitted - Highlights: • Weld metal showed local orientation at microscale but random texture at macroscale. • Intensification of <100> orientated grains was observed adjacent to the fusion lines. • The austenite texture was weaker than that of the ferrite in all duplex regions. • Welding caused twinned partially transformed austenites to form at SDSS HAZ. • At both interfaces, the ratio of special CSL boundaries of the primary phase increased.

  15. A discrete dislocation–transformation model for austenitic single crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shi, J; Turteltaub, S; Remmers, J J C; Van der Giessen, E

    2008-01-01

    A discrete model for analyzing the interaction between plastic flow and martensitic phase transformations is developed. The model is intended for simulating the microstructure evolution in a single crystal of austenite that transforms non-homogeneously into martensite. The plastic flow in the untransformed austenite is simulated using a plane-strain discrete dislocation model. The phase transformation is modeled via the nucleation and growth of discrete martensitic regions embedded in the austenitic single crystal. At each instant during loading, the coupled elasto-plasto-transformation problem is solved using the superposition of analytical solutions for the discrete dislocations and discrete transformation regions embedded in an infinite homogeneous medium and the numerical solution of a complementary problem used to enforce the actual boundary conditions and the heterogeneities in the medium. In order to describe the nucleation and growth of martensitic regions, a nucleation criterion and a kinetic law suitable for discrete regions are specified. The constitutive rules used in discrete dislocation simulations are supplemented with additional evolution rules to account for the phase transformation. To illustrate the basic features of the model, simulations of specimens under plane-strain uniaxial extension and contraction are analyzed. The simulations indicate that plastic flow reduces the average stress at which transformation begins, but it also reduces the transformation rate when compared with benchmark simulations without plasticity. Furthermore, due to local stress fluctuations caused by dislocations, martensitic systems can be activated even though transformation would not appear to be favorable based on the average stress. Conversely, the simulations indicate that the plastic hardening behavior is influenced by the reduction in the effective austenitic grain size due to the evolution of transformation. During cyclic simulations, the coupled plasticity

  16. Enhancement of mechanical properties of a TRIP-aided austenitic stainless steel by controlled reversion annealing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamada, A.S., E-mail: atef.hamada@suezuniv.edu.eg [Centre for Advanced Steels Research, Box 4200, University of Oulu, 90014 Oulu (Finland); Metallurgical and Materials Engineering Department, Faculty of Petroleum & Mining Engineering, Suez University, Box 43721, Suez (Egypt); Kisko, A.P. [Centre for Advanced Steels Research, Box 4200, University of Oulu, 90014 Oulu (Finland); Sahu, P. [Department of Physics, Jadavpur University, Kolkata 700032 (India); Karjalainen, L.P. [Centre for Advanced Steels Research, Box 4200, University of Oulu, 90014 Oulu (Finland)

    2015-03-25

    Controlled martensitic reversion annealing was applied to a heavily cold-worked metastable austenitic low-Ni Cr–Mn austenitic stainless steel (Type 201) to obtain different ultrafine austenite grain sizes to enhance the mechanical properties, which were then compared with the conventional coarse-grained steel. Characterization of the deformed and reversion annealed microstructures was performed by electron back scattered diffraction (EBSD), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and light and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The steel with a reverted grain size ~1.5 μm due to annealing at 800 °C for 10 s showed significant improvements in the mechanical properties with yield stress ~800 MPa and tensile strength ~1100 MPa, while the corresponding properties of its coarse grained counterpart were ~450 MPa and ~900 MPa, respectively. However, the fracture elongation of the reversion annealed steel was ~50% as compared to ~70% in the coarse grained steel. A further advantage is that the anisotropy of mechanical properties present in work-hardened steels also disappears during reversion annealing.

  17. Effect of single and double austenitization treatments on the microstructure and mechanical properties of 16Cr-2Ni steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balan, K. P.; Reddy, A. Venugopal; Sarma, D. S.

    1999-06-01

    Double austenitization (DA) treatment is found to yield the best combination of strength and toughness in both low-temperature as well as high-temperature tempered conditions as compared to single austenitization (SA) treatments. Obtaining the advantages of double austenitization (DA) to permit dissolution of alloy carbides without significant grain coarsening was attempted in AISI 431 type martensitic stainless steel. Structure-property correlation after low-temperature tempering (200 °C) as well as high-temperature double tempering (650+600 °C) was carried out for three austenitization treatments through SA at 1000 °C, SA at 1070 °C, and DA at 1070+1000 °C. While the increase in strength after DA treatment and low-temperature tempering at 200 °C is due to the increased amount of carbon in solution as a result of dissolution of alloy carbides during first austenitization, the increased toughness is attributable to the increased quantity of retained austenite. After double tempering (650+600 °C), strength and toughness are mainly found to depend on the precipitation and distribution of carbides in the microstructure and the grain size effect.

  18. Transformation of austenite to duplex austenite-ferrite assembly in annealed stainless steel 316L consolidated by laser melting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saeidi, K.; Gao, X. [Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry, Arrhenius Laboratory, Stockholm University, S-106 91 Stockholm (Sweden); Lofaj, F. [Institute of Materials Research of the Slovak Academy of Sciences, Watsonova 47, Košice (Slovakia); Faculty of Materials Science and Technology in Trnava, Slovak University of Technology in Bratislava, 916 24 Trnava (Slovakia); Kvetková, L. [Institute of Materials Research of the Slovak Academy of Sciences, Watsonova 47, Košice (Slovakia); Shen, Z.J. [Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry, Arrhenius Laboratory, Stockholm University, S-106 91 Stockholm (Sweden)

    2015-06-05

    Highlights: • Mechanical properties, phase and microstructure stability of laser melted steel was studied. • Duplex austenite-ferrite assembly with improved mechanical properties was formed. • Dissolution of Mo in the steel matrix resulted in ferrite stabilization and stress relief. • Enhanced mechanical properties were achieved compared to conventionally casted and annealed steel. - Abstract: Laser melting (LM), with a focused Nd:YAG laser beam, was used to form solid bodies from 316L austenite stainless steel powder and the laser melted samples were heat treated at various temperatures. The phase changes in heat treated samples were characterized using X-ray diffraction (XRD). Samples heat treated at 800 °C and 900 °C remained single austenite while in samples heat treated at 1100 °C and 1400 °C a dual austenite-ferrite phase assembly was formed. The ferrite formation was further verified by electron back scattering diffraction (EBSD) and selective area diffraction (SAD). Microstructural changes were studied by scanning and transmission electron microscopy (SEM, TEM). In samples heat treated up to 900 °C, coalescence of the cellular-sub grains was noticed, whereas in sample heat treated at and above 1100 °C the formation of ferrite phase was observed. The correlation between the microstructure/phase assembly and the measured strength/microhardness were investigated, which indicated that the tensile strength of the laser melted material was significantly higher than that of the conventional 316L steel even after heat treatment whereas caution has to be taken when laser melted material will be exposed to an application temperature above 900 °C.

  19. Static recrystallisation and precipitation after hot deformation of austenitic stainless steels containing molybdenum and niobium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lombry, R.; Rossard, C.; Thomas, B.J.

    1981-01-01

    In general the hot workability of austenite depends on the work hardening during deformation and the kinetics of the dynamic and static restoration processes. Static recrystallisation is a very important factor in the case of hot rolling. The present work was undertaken to determine the effect of additions of molybdenum or niobium on the kinetics of static recrystallisation. The results show that the rate of static recrystallisation of type 304, 316 and 347 stainless steels decreases in this order for a given amount of prior deformation (epsilon=0,44). The differences in the rates of recrystallisation increases as the temperature is lowered towards 900 deg C. The effect of molybdenum appears to be attribuable to a solute drag effect on the mobility of dislocations, subgrain boundaries or grain boundaries whereas niobium additions lead to the formation of NbC precipitates on the dislocation cell walls and sub boundaries. It is also shown that in the case of type 316 and type 347 steels the dynamic recrystallisation process (observed in type 304 steels at all temperatures above 900 deg C) is replaced by dynamic recovery at temperatures egal to or below about 1000 deg C [fr

  20. The high temperature oxidation behaviour of austenitic stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hales, R.

    1977-04-01

    High temperature annealing in a dynamic vacuum has been utilised to induce the growth of duplex oxide over the whole surface of stainless steel specimens. It is found that duplex oxide grows at a rate which does not obey a simple power law. The oxidation kinetics and oxide morphology have also been studied for a series of ternary austenitic alloys which cover a range of composition between 5 and 20% chromium. A model has been developed to describe the formation of duplex oxide and the subsequent formation of a 'healing layer' which virtually causes the oxidation process to stop. This phase tends to form at grain boundaries and a relationship has been derived for the reaction kinetics which relates the reaction rate with grain size of the substrate. (author)

  1. Dynamical recrystallization of high purity austenitic stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gavard, L.

    2001-01-01

    The aim of this work is to optimize the performance of structural materials. The elementary mechanisms (strain hardening and dynamical regeneration, germination and growth of new grains) occurring during the hot working of metals and low pile defect energy alloys have been studied for austenitic stainless steels. In particular, the influence of the main experimental parameters (temperature, deformation velocity, initial grain size, impurities amount, deformation way) on the process of discontinuous dynamical recrystallization has been studied. Alloys with composition equal to those of the industrial stainless steel-304L have been fabricated from ultra-pure iron, chromium and nickel. Tests carried out in hot compression and torsion in order to cover a wide range of deformations, deformation velocities and temperatures for two very different deformation ways have allowed to determine the rheological characteristics (sensitivity to the deformation velocity, apparent activation energy) of materials as well as to characterize their microstructural deformations by optical metallography and electron back-scattered diffraction. The influence of the initial grain size and the influence of the purity of the material on the dynamical recrystallization kinetics have been determined. An analytical model for the determination of the apparent mobility of grain boundaries, a semi-analytical model for the dynamical recrystallization and at last an analytical model for the stationary state of dynamical recrystallization are proposed as well as a new criteria for the transition between the refinement state and the state of grain growth. (O.M.)

  2. Expanded austenite, crystallography and residual stress

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Thomas; Hummelshøj, Thomas Strabo; Somers, Marcel A. J.

    2010-01-01

    The identity of expanded austenite as developing during low temperature nitriding and/or carburising of austenitic stainless steel has been under debate since the very first observation of this phase. In the present article, recent results obtained with (a) homogeneous samples of various uniform ...

  3. Expanded austenite; crystallography and residual stress

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Thomas; Hummelshøj, Thomas Strabo; Somers, Marcel A. J.

    2009-01-01

    The identity of expanded austenite as developing during low temperature nitriding and/or carburizing of austenitic stainless steel has been under debate since the very first observation of this phase. In the present article recent results obtained with i) homogeneous samples of various uniform co...

  4. Optimization and verification of ultrasonic testability of acoustically anisotropic materials on austenitic and dissimilar welds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pudovikov, Sergey

    2013-01-01

    Austenitic and dissimilar welds with respect to the ultrasonic testing (UT) methods are considered normally as ''difficult-to-test'' objects. During the solidification process in such welds a distinct dendrite microstructure evolves, which is coarse-grained, anisotropic and inhomogeneous simultaneously. The reliability of available ultrasonic methods on austenitic welds depends significantly on the selected UT-parameters as well as on the inspection personnel experience. In the present dissertation, an ultrasonic testing method was developed, which allows the flaw detection and evaluation in acoustically anisotropic inhomogeneous materials, especially in austenitic and dissimilar welds with a quantitative statement to the defect size, type, and location. The principle of synthetic focusing with taking into account the material anisotropy and inhomogeneity along with two- and three-dimensional visualization provides a reliable and quantitative assessment of the inspection results in acoustically anisotropic inhomogeneous test objects. Among others, an iterative algorithm for the determination of unknown elastic properties of inhomogeneous anisotropic materials has been developed. It allows practical application of the developed UT method, since the anisotropy of most of austenitic and dissimilar welds (especially of hand-welded joints) in practice is usually unknown. The functionality of the developed inspection technique has been validated by many experiments on welded austenitic specimens having artificial and natural defects. For the practical application of the new ultrasonic technique different testing strategies are proposed, which can be used depending on the current inspection task.

  5. Spinodal decomposition of austenite in long-term-aged duplex stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, H.M.

    1989-02-01

    Spinodal decomposition of austenite phase in the cast duplex stainless steels CF-8 and -8M grades has been observed after long- term thermal aging at 400 and 350/degree/C for 30,000 h (3.4 yr). At 320/degree/C, the reaction was observed only at the limited region near the austenite grain boundaries. Ni segregation and ''worm-holes'' corresponding to the spatial microchemical fluctuations have been confirmed. The decomposition was observed only for heats containing relatively high overall Ni content (9.6--12.0 wt %) but not in low-Ni (8.0--9.4 wt %) heats. In some specimens showing a relatively advanced stage of decomposition, localized regions of austenite with a Vickers hardness of 340--430 were observed. However, the effect of austenite decomposition on the overall material toughness appears secondary for aging up to 3--5 yr in comparison with the effect of the faster spinodal decomposition in ferrite phase. The observation of the thermally driven spinodal decomposition of the austenite phase in cast duplex stainless steels validates the proposition that a miscibility gap occurs in Fe-Ni and ancillary systems. 16 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab

  6. CASS Ferrite and Grain Structure Relationship

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruud, Clayton O. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Ramuhalli, Pradeep [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Meyer, Ryan M. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Diaz, Aaron A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Anderson, Michael T. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2016-07-13

    This document summarizes the results of research conducted at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to determine whether, based on experimental measurements, a correlation existed between grain structure in cast austenitic stainless steel (CASS) piping and ferrite content of the casting alloy. The motivation for this research lies in the fact that ultrasonic testing (UT) is strongly influenced by CASS grain structure; knowledge of this grain structure may help improve the ability to interpret UT responses, thereby improving the overall reliability of UT inspections of CASS components.

  7. Mechanical properties of austenitic stainless steels in sodium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lloyd, G.J.

    1978-03-01

    A detailed review of the mechanical properties of austenitic stainless steels in liquid sodium is presented. Consideration has been given to the influence of the of the impurities in reactor sodium and metallurgical variables upon the stress rupture life, the low cycle fatigue and combined creep/fatigue resistance, elastic-plastic crack propagation rates, the high cycle fatigue life, tensile properties and fracture toughness. The effects of exposure to contaminated sodium prior to testing are also discussed. Examples of the success of mechanistic interpretations of materials behaviour in sodium are given and additionally, the extent to which mechanical properties in sodium may be predicted with the use of appropriate data. (author)

  8. Effect of electromagnetic stirring on solidification structure of austenitic stainless steel in horizontal continuous casting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZHOU Shu-cai

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available An investigation on the influence of low frequency rotary electromagnetic stirring on solidification structure of austenitic stainless steel in horizontal continuous casting was experimentally conducted and carried out on an industrial trial basis. The results show that application of appropriate electromagnetic stirring parameters can obviously improve the macrostructure of austenitic stainless steel, in which both columnar and equiaxed grains can be greatly refined and shrinkage porosity or cavity zone along centerline can be remarkably decreased due to eliminating intracrystalline and enlarging equiaxed grains zone. The industrial trials verify that the electromagnetic stirring intensity of austenitic stainless steel should be higher than that of plain carbon steel. Electromagnetic stirring has somewhat affected the macrostructure of austenitic stainless steel even if the magnetic flux density of the electromagnetic stirring reaches 90 mT (amplitude reaches 141 mT in average at frequency f=3-4Hz, which provides a reference for the optimization of design and process parameters when applying the rotary electromagnetic stirrer.

  9. Some remarks on the analysis of stress-corrosion cracking of austenitic stainless-steel cladding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kupka, I.; Nrkous, P.

    1977-01-01

    Stress-corrosion cracking is greatly influenced by tensile stresses in the material. The occurrence of tensile stresses in the material under consideration results from residual stresses brought about during manufacturing processes and from stress caused by operation. In the case of an austenitic steel cladding the residual stresses arise in the course of welding and thermal treatment. The technique of residual stress measurement in austenitic cladding materials is described and the results are given. Both the longitudinal and transverse components of the stresses show in all cases similar behaviour not only prior to, but also after heat treatment. (J.B.)

  10. The influences of impurity content, tensile strength, and grain size on in-service temper embrittlement of CrMoV steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheruvu, N.S.; Seth, B.B.

    1989-01-01

    The influences of impurity levels, grain size, and tensile strength on in-service temper embrittlement of CrMoV steels have been investigated. The samples for this study were taken from steam turbine CrMoV rotors which had operated for 15 to 26 years. The effects of grain size and tensile strength on embrittlement susceptibility were separated by evaluating the embrittlement behavior of two rotor forgings made from the same ingot after an extended step-cooling treatment. Among the residual elements in the steels, only P produces a significant embrittlement. The variation of P and tensile strength has no effect on in-service temper embrittlement susceptibility, as measured by the shift in fracture appearance transition temperature (FATT). However, the prior austenite grain size plays a major role in service embrittlement. The fine grain steels with a grain size of ASTM No. 9 or higher are virtually immune to in-service embrittlement. In steels having duplex grain sizes, embrittlement susceptibility is controlled by the size of coarser grains. For a given steel chemistry, the coarse grain steel is more susceptible to in-service embrittlement, and a decrease in ASTM grain size number from 4 to 0/1 increases the shift in FATT by 61 degrees C (10/10 degrees F). It is demonstrated that long-term service embrittlement can be simulated, except in very coarse grain steels, by using the extended step-cooling treatment. The results of step-cooling studies show that the coarse grain rotor steels take longer time during service to reach a fully embrittled state than the fine grain rotor steels

  11. On qualification of TOFD technique for austenitic stainless steel welds inspection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinez-Ona, R. [Tecnatom, San Sebastian de los Reyes (Spain); Viggianiello, S.; Bleuze, A. [Metalscan, Saint-Remy (France)

    2006-07-01

    Time of Flight Diffraction (TOFD) technique is gaining ground as a solid method for detection and sizing of defects. It has been reported that TOFD technique provides good results on the inspection of fine grain steels. However, there are few results regarding the application and performance of this technique on austenitic stainless steels. A big challenge of these inspections is the coarse grain structure that produces low signal to noise ratio and may mask the diffraction signals. Appropriate transducer design, selection of technique parameters and analysis tools could overcome the actual difficulties. In this paper, the main design aspects and parameters of the TOFD technique for austenitic steels are presented. It follows the description of qualification tests carried out to validate the technique for inspecting stainless steels welds. To conclude, discussion of results from actual inspections is shown. (orig.)

  12. Observation of changing crystal orientations during grain coarsening

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, Hemant; Huizenga, Richard M.; Bytchkov, Aleksei; Sietsma, Jilt; Offerman, S. Erik

    2012-01-01

    Understanding the underlying mechanisms of grain coarsening is important in controlling the properties of metals, which strongly depend on the microstructure that forms during the production process or during use at high temperature. Grain coarsening of austenite at 1273 K in a binary Fe–2 wt.% Mn alloy was studied using synchrotron radiation. Evolution of the volume, average crystallographic orientation and mosaicity of more than 2000 individual austenite grains was tracked during annealing. It was found that an approximately linear relationship exists between grain size and mosaicity, which means that orientation gradients are present in the grains. The orientation gradients remain constant during coarsening and consequently the character of grain boundaries changes during coarsening, affecting the coarsening rate. Furthermore, changes in the average orientation of grains during coarsening were observed. The changes could be understood by taking the observed orientation gradients and anisotropic movement of grain boundaries into account. Five basic modes of grain coarsening were deduced from the measurements, which include: anisotropic (I) and isotropic (II) growth (or shrinkage); movement of grain boundaries resulting in no change in volume but a change in shape (III); movement of grain boundaries resulting in no change in volume and mosaicity, but a change in crystallographic orientation (IV); no movement of grain boundaries (V).

  13. Effect of Hot Rolling on the Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of Nitrogen Alloyed Austenitic Stainless Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chenna Krishna, S.; Karthick, N. K.; Jha, Abhay K.; Pant, Bhanu; Cherian, Roy M.

    2018-05-01

    In the present investigation, the effect of multi-pass hot rolling in the temperature range of 700-1000 °C on the microstructure and mechanical properties of nitrogen alloyed austenitic stainless steel was studied with the aid of optical microscopy, tensile testing and x-ray diffraction measurements. The microstructural changes that occurred in the hot rolled specimens were elongation of grains in rolling direction, nucleation of new grains at the grain boundaries of elongated grains and growth of nucleated grains to form fully recrystallized grains. Elongated grains formed at lower rolling temperature (700-800 °C) due to inadequate strain/temperature for the initiation of dynamic recrystallization. At higher rolling temperature (900-1000 °C), fine grains formed due to dynamic recrystallization. Tensile properties showed strong dependency on the rolling temperature. Tensile strength increased with the decrease in the rolling temperature at the cost of ductility. Maximum strength was observed in samples hot rolled at 700 °C with yield strength of 917 MPa and ductility of 25%. This variation in the tensile properties with the rolling temperature is attributed to changes in the dislocation density and grain structure. The estimated yield strength from the dislocation density, solid solution and grain boundary strengthening closely matched with experimentally determined yield strength confirming the role of dislocation density and grain size in the strengthening.

  14. Ultrasonic inspection of austenitic welds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baikie, B.L.; Wagg, A.R.; Whittle, M.J.; Yapp, D.

    1976-01-01

    The ultrasonic examination of austenitic stainless steel weld metal has always been regarded as a difficult proposition because of the large and variable ultrasonic attenuations and back scattering obtained from apparently similar weld deposits. The work to be described shows how the existence of a fibre texture within each weld deposit (as a result of epitaxial growth through successive weld beads) produces a systematic variation in the ultrasonic attenuation coefficient and the velocity of sound, depending upon the angle between the ultrasonic beam and the fibre axis. Development work has shown that it is possible to adjust the welding parameters to ensure that the crystallographic texture within each weld is compatible with improved ultrasonic transmission. The application of the results to the inspection of a specific weld in type 316 weld metal is described

  15. Parametrical limits of SCC-susceptibility of austenitic and austenitic-ferritic Cr-Ni steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Starosvetskij, D.I.; Baru, R.L.; Bondarenko, A.I.; Bogoyavlenskij, V.L.; Timonin, V.A.

    1990-01-01

    Comparative investigations into corrosion cracking (CC) of austenitic (12Kh18N10T) and austenitic-ferritic (08Kh22N6T) chromium-nickel steels are performed for various chloride media in a wide range of chloride concentrations and temperatures. It is shown that the ratio between steels in terms of their CC-susceptibility is not definite and can undergo a reversal depending on parameters of medium, level and conditions of loading. Differences in mechanisms of corrosion cracking of austenitic and austenitic-ferritic steels are established

  16. Microstructure and mechanical properties of annealed SUS 304H austenitic stainless steel with copper

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sen, Indrani [Department of Materials Engineering, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560012 (India); Amankwah, E. [Department of Materials Engineering, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560012 (India); Department of Materials Science, African University of Science and Technology, Abuja (Nigeria); Kumar, N.S. [Department of Materials Engineering, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560012 (India); Fleury, E. [Center for High Temperature Energy Materials, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Seoul 136-791 (Korea, Republic of); Oh-ishi, K.; Hono, K. [National Institute for Materials Science, 1-2-1 Sengen, Tsukuba 305-0047 (Japan); Ramamurty, U., E-mail: ramu@materials.iisc.ernet.in [Department of Materials Engineering, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560012 (India)

    2011-05-25

    Research highlights: {yields} SUS 304H austenitic stainless steel containing 3 wt.% Cu was annealed at 700 deg. C for up to 100 h. {yields} Microstructure and mechanical properties of annealed alloys are examined. {yields} Nano-sized Cu-rich precipitation upon annealing. {yields} Strength of the alloy remains invariant with annealing whereas ductility improves. {yields} Fatigue crack growth threshold of 3 wt.% Cu added alloy increases with annealing. - Abstract: An experimental investigation into the effect of Cu on the mechanical properties of 0 and 3 wt.% Cu added SUS 304H austenitic stainless steel upon annealing at 700 deg. C for up to 100 h was conducted. Optical microscopy reveals grain coarsening in both the alloys upon annealing. Observations by transmission electron microscopy revealed the precipitation of nanometer-sized spherical Cu particles distributed within the austenitic grains and the presence of carbides at the dislocations. Both the yield and ultimate tensile strengths of the alloys were found to remain invariant with annealing. Tensile ductility and the threshold stress intensity factor range for fatigue crack growth for 3 wt.% Cu added alloy increase with annealing. These are attributed to the grain coarsening with annealing. In all, the addition of Cu to SUS 304H does not affect the mechanical performance adversely while improving creep resistance.

  17. Constitutive modeling of metastable austenitic stainless steel

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Perdahcioglu, Emin Semih; Geijselaers, Hubertus J.M.; Huetink, Han; Khan, A.

    2010-01-01

    A physically based, macroscale constitutive model has been developed that can describe the complex mechanical behavior of metastable austenitic stainless steels. In the developed model a generalized model for the mechanically induced martensitic transformation is introduced. Mechanical tests have

  18. Consitutive modeling of metastable austenitic stainless steel

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Perdahcioglu, Emin Semih; Perdahcioglu, Emin Semih

    2008-01-01

    Metastable austenitic stainless steels combine high formability and high strength, which are generally opposing properties in materials. This property is a consequence of the martensitic phase transformation that takes place during deformation. This transformation is purely mechanically induced

  19. Giant grains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leitch-Devlin, M.A.; Millar, T.J.; Williams, D.A.

    1976-01-01

    Infrared observations of the Orion nebula have been interpreted by Rowan-Robinson (1975) to imply the existence of 'giant' grains, radius approximately 10 -2 cm, throughout a volume about a parsec in diameter. Although Rowan-Robinson's model of the nebula has been criticized and the presence of such grains in Orion is disputed, the proposition is accepted, that they exist, and in this paper situations in which giant grains could arise are examined. It is found that, while a giant-grain component to the interstellar grain density may exist, it is difficult to understand how giant grains arise to the extent apparently required by the Orion nebula model. (Auth.)

  20. Mechanism for suppression of radiation-induced segregation by oversized solute addition in austenitic stainless steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hackett, Micah Jeremiah

    The objective of this thesis is to quantify the effect of oversized solutes on radiation-induced segregation in austenitic stainless steels and to determine the mechanism of this effect. Zr or Hf additions to austenitic stainless steels demonstrated a reduction in radiation-induced segregation of Cr and Ni at the grain boundary after proton irradiation at 400°C and 500°C to low doses, but the solute effect disappeared at higher doses. Rate theory modeling of RIS was extended to incorporate a solute-vacancy trapping mechanism to predict the effect of solutes on RIS. The model showed that RIS is most sensitive to the solute-vacancy binding energy. First principles calculations were used to determine a binding energy of 1.08 eV for Zr and 0.71 eV for Hf. Model and experiment agreed in showing suppression of Cr depletion at doses of 3 dpa at 400°C and 1 dpa at 500°C, and experimental results were consistent with the model in showing greater effectiveness of Zr relative to Hf due to a larger binding energy. The dislocation loop microstructure was measured at 400°C, 3 and 7 dpa, and a significant decrease in loop density and total loop line length in the oversized solute alloys relative to the reference alloys. The loop microstructure results were consistent with RIS results by confirming enhanced recombination of point defects by solute-vacancy trapping. Increases in RIS with dose indicated a loss of solute effectiveness, which was consistent with an observed increase in loop line length from 3 to 7 dpa. The loss of solute effectiveness at high dose is attributed to a loss of oversized solute from the matrix due to coarsening of carbide precipitates. X-ray diffraction identified a microstructure with ZrC or HfC precipitates prior to irradiation. Precipitate coarsening was identified as the most likely mechanism for the loss of solute effectiveness on RIS by the following: (1) diffusion analysis suggested significant solute diffusion by the vacancy flux to

  1. Martensitic Transformation in Ultrafine-Grained Stainless Steel AISI 304L Under Monotonic and Cyclic Loading

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heinz Werner Höppel

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The monotonic and cyclic deformation behavior of ultrafine-grained metastable austenitic steel AISI 304L, produced by severe plastic deformation, was investigated. Under monotonic loading, the martensitic phase transformation in the ultrafine-grained state is strongly favored. Under cyclic loading, the martensitic transformation behavior is similar to the coarse-grained condition, but the cyclic stress response is three times larger for the ultrafine-grained condition.

  2. OKMC study of the effect of grain boundaries in martensitic Fe-Cr-C alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chiapetto, M.; Becquart, C.S.; Malerba, L.

    2015-01-01

    Fe-Cr-C alloys with chromium concentrations in the range from about 2 wt % to 12 wt % form ferritic-martensitic structures by rapid cooling from the austenite state already in the presence of relatively low carbon concentrations. In this process it is possible to obtain different ratios of ferrite and martensite, as well as formation of carbides, by varying the thermal treatment. The presence of ferrite or martensite might have an influence on the nano-structural evolution under irradiation of these alloys. Here, considering a tempered martensite reference alloy with 9% Cr, we make use of an already validated object kinetic Monte Carlo (OKMC) model in order to study the possible effect of the formation of martensite laths on the material nano-structural evolution under neutron irradiation, assuming that the relevant boundaries act as sinks for radiation defects. The results show that the reduction of the grain size (including in this definition the average size of prior austenite grains, blocks and laths) does not play any relevant role until sizes of the order of about 0.5 μm are reached: for smaller grains the number of defects being absorbed by the boundaries becomes dominant. However, this threshold is lower than the experimentally observed martensite lath dimensions, thereby suggesting that what makes the difference in martensitic Fe-Cr-C alloys with respect to ferrite concerning events and mechanisms taking place during irradiation are not the lath boundaries as sinks. Differences between the nano-structural evolution in ferrite and martensite should therefore be ascribed to other factors. This document is composed of an article and the presentation slides. (authors)

  3. Characteristic of Low Temperature Carburized Austenitic Stainless Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Istiroyah; Pamungkas, M. A.; Saroja, G.; Ghufron, M.; Juwono, A. M.

    2018-01-01

    Low temperature carburizing process has been carried out on austenitic stainless steel (ASS) type AISI 316L, that contain chromium in above 12 at%. Therefore, conventional heat treatment processes that are usually carried out at high temperatures are not applicable. The sensitization process due to chromium migration from the grain boundary will lead to stress corrosion crack and decrease the corrosion resistance of the steel. In this study, the carburizing process was carried out at low temperatures below 500 °C. Surface morphology and mechanical properties of carburized specimens were investigated using optical microscopy, non destructive profilometer, and Vicker microhardness. The surface roughness analysis show the carburising process improves the roughness of ASS surface. This improvement is due to the adsorption of carbon atoms on the surface of the specimen. Likewise, the hardness test results indicate the carburising process increases the hardness of ASS.

  4. High cycle fatigue of austenitic stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gauthier, J.P.; Lehmann, D.; Picker

    1990-01-01

    This study concerns the evaluation of material data to be used in LMFBR design codes. High cycle fatigue properties of three austenitic stainless steels are evaluated: type AISI 316 (UKAEA tests), type AISI 316L (CEA tests) and type AISI 304 (Interatom tests). The data on these steels comprised some 550 data points from 14 casts. This data set covered a wide range of testing parameters: temperature from 20-625 0 C, frequency from 1-20 000 Hz, constant amplitude and random fatigue loading, with and without mean stress, etc. However, the testing conditions chosen by the three partners differed considerably because they had been fixed independently and not harmonized prior to the tests. This created considerable difficulties for the evaluations. Experimental procedures and statistical treatments used for the three subsets of data are described and discussed. Results are presented in tables and graphs. Although it is often difficult to single out the influence of each parameter due to the different testing conditions, several interesting conclusions can be drawn: The HCF properties of the three steels are consistent with the 0.2% proof stress, the fatigue limit being larger than the latter at temperatures above 550 0 C. The type 304 steel has lower tensile properties than the two other steels and hence also lower HCF properties. Parameters which clearly have a significant effect of HCF behaviour are mean stress or R-ratio (less in the non-endurance region than in the endurance region), temperature, cast or product. Other parameters have probably a weak or no effect but it is difficult to conclude due to insufficient data: environment, specimen orientation, frequency, specimen geometry

  5. Irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking of austenitic alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Was, G.S.; Atzmon, M.

    1991-01-01

    An experimental program has been conducted to determine the mechanism of irradiation-assisted stress-corrosion cracking (IASCC) in austenitic stainless steel. High-energy protons have been used to produce grain boundary segregation and microstructural damage in samples of controlled impurity content. The densities of network dislocations and dislocation loops were determined by transmission electron microscopy and found to resemble those for neutron irradiation under LWR conditions. Grain boundary compositions were determined by in situ fracture and Auger spectroscopy, as well as by scanning transmission electron microscopy. Cr depletion and Ni segregation were observed in all irradiated samples, with the degree of segregation depending on the type and amount of impurities present. P, and to a lesser extent P, impurities were observed to segregate to the grain boundaries. Irradiation was found to increase the susceptibility of ultra-high-purity (UHP), and to a much lesser extent of UHP+P and UHP+S, alloys to intergranular SCC in 288 degree C water at 2 ppm O 2 and 0.5 μS/cm. No intergranular fracture was observed in arcon atmosphere, indicating the important role of corrosion in the embrittlement of irradiated samples. The absence of intergranular fracture in 288 degree C argon and room temperature tests also suggest that the embrittlement is not caused by hydrogen introduced by irradiation. Contrary to common belief, the presence of P impurities led to a significant improvement in IASCC over the ultrahigh purity alloy

  6. Interface segregation behavior in thermal aged austenitic precipitation strengthened stainless steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Hui [Key Laboratory for Microstructures, Shanghai University, Shanghai 200444 (China); Technical Department, Jiuli Hi-Tech Metals Co., Ltd., Huzhou 313008 (China); Song, Hui [Key Laboratory for Microstructures, Shanghai University, Shanghai 200444 (China); Liu, Wenqing, E-mail: wqliu@staff.shu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory for Microstructures, Shanghai University, Shanghai 200444 (China); Institute of Materials, Shanghai University, Shanghai 200072 (China); Xia, Shuang; Zhou, Bangxin [Institute of Materials, Shanghai University, Shanghai 200072 (China); Su, Cheng; Ding, Wenyan [Technical Department, Jiuli Hi-Tech Metals Co., Ltd., Huzhou 313008 (China)

    2015-12-15

    The segregation of various elements at grain boundaries, precipitate/matrix interfaces were analyzed using atom probe tomography in an austenitic precipitation strengthened stainless steel aged at 750 °C for different time. Segregation of P, B and C at all types of interfaces in all the specimens were observed. However, Si segregated at all types of interfaces only in the specimen aged for 16 h. Enrichment of Ti at grain boundaries was evident in the specimen aged for 16 h, while Ti did not segregate at other interfaces. Mo varied considerably among interface types, e.g. from segregated at grain boundaries in the specimens after all the aging time to never segregate at γ′/γ phase interfaces. Cr co-segregated with C at grain boundaries, although carbides still did not nucleate at grain boundaries yet. Despite segregation tendency variations in different interface types, the segregation tendency evolution variation of different elements depending aging time were analyzed among all types of interfaces. Based on the experimental results, the enrichment factors, Gibbs interface excess and segregation free energies of segregated elements were calculated and discussed. - Highlights: • Solute atoms segregated at interfaces were analyzed in an austenitic stainless steel. • The comparison of segregation in different interfaces was studied by APT. • The evolution of interface segregation during aging treatment was discussed.

  7. Martensitic transformation behaviour in sensitized SUS304 austenitic stainless steel during isothermal holding at low temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jae-hwa; Fukuda, Takashi; Kakeshita, Tomoyuki

    2009-01-01

    We investigated martensitic transformation behaviour in sensitized SUS304 austenitic stainless steel to determine the stability of the austenitic phase at low temperatures. We found that a specimen that was sensitized at 973 K for 100 h exhibits an isothermal martensitic transformation when the specimen is held in the temperature range between 60 and 260 K. We constructed a time-temperature-transformation (TTT) diagram corresponding to the formation of 0.5 vol. % α'-martensite. A magnetization measurement was used to evaluate the volume fraction of a'-martensite. The TTT diagram shows a double-C curve with two noses located at about 100 and 200 K. In-situ optical microscope observations reveal that the double C-curve is due to two different transformation sequences. That is, the upper part of the C-curve is due to a direct γ → α' martensitic transformation and the lower part of the C-curve is due to a successive γ → ψ → α' martensitic transformation. The direct γ → α' transformation occurs in the vicinity of grain boundaries while the successive γ → ψ' → α' transformation occurs near the centre of grains. A scanning electron microscope observation reveals that carbide particles of M 23 C 6 are formed in the grain boundaries. The concentration difference between the centre of the grains and regions near grain boundaries is the reason for the difference in the isothermal transformation sequence for the sensitized SUS304 stainless steel.

  8. austenitic steel corrosion by oxygen-containing liquid sodium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rivollier, Matthieu

    2017-01-01

    France is planning to construct the 4. generation of nuclear reactors. They will use liquid sodium as heat transfer fluid and will be made of 316L(N) austenitic steel as structural materials. To guarantee optimal operation on the long term, the behavior of this steel must be verified. This is why corrosion phenomena of 316L(N) steel by liquid sodium have to be well-understood. Literature points out that several corrosion phenomena are possible. Dissolved oxygen in sodium definitely influences each of the corrosion phenomenon. Therefore, the austenitic steel corrosion in oxygen-containing sodium is proposed in this study. Thermodynamics data point out that sodium chromite formation on 316L(N) steel is possible in sodium containing roughly 10 μg.g -1 of oxygen for temperature lower than 650 C (reactor operating conditions).The experimental study shows that sodium chromite is formed at 650 C in the sodium containing 200 μg.g -1 of oxygen. At the same concentration and at 550 C, sodium chromite is clearly observed only for long immersion time (≥ 5000 h). Results at 450 C are more difficult to interpret. Furthermore, the steel is depleted in chromium in all cases.The results suggest the sodium chromite is dissolved in the sodium at the same time it is formed. Modelling of sodium chromite formation - approached by chromium diffusion in steel (in grain and grain boundaries -, and dissolution - assessed by transport in liquid metal - show that simultaneous formation and dissolution of sodium chromite is a possible mechanism able to explain our results. (author) [fr

  9. Deformation mechanisms induced under high cycle fatigue tests in a metastable austenitic stainless steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roa, J.J., E-mail: joan.josep.roa@upc.edu [CIEFMA-Departament de Ciència dels Materials i Enginyeria Metallúrgica, ETSEIB, Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya, Avda. Diagonal 647, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); CRnE, Campus Diagonal Sud, Edificio C’, Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya, C/ Pascual i Vila 15, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Fargas, G. [CIEFMA-Departament de Ciència dels Materials i Enginyeria Metallúrgica, ETSEIB, Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya, Avda. Diagonal 647, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Jiménez-Piqué, E. [CIEFMA-Departament de Ciència dels Materials i Enginyeria Metallúrgica, ETSEIB, Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya, Avda. Diagonal 647, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); CRnE, Campus Diagonal Sud, Edificio C’, Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya, C/ Pascual i Vila 15, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Mateo, A. [CIEFMA-Departament de Ciència dels Materials i Enginyeria Metallúrgica, ETSEIB, Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya, Avda. Diagonal 647, 08028 Barcelona (Spain)

    2014-03-01

    Advanced techniques were used to study the deformation mechanisms induced by fatigue tests in a metastable austenitic stainless steel AISI 301LN. Observations by Atomic Force Microscopy were carried out to study the evolution of a pre-existing martensite platelet at increasing number of cycles. The sub-superficial deformation mechanisms of the austenitic grains were studied considering the cross-section microstructure obtained by Focused Ion Beam and analysed by Scanning Electron Microscopy and Transmission Electron Microscopy. The results revealed no deformation surrounding the pre-existing martensitic platelet during fatigue tests, only the growth on height was observed. Martensite formation was associated with shear bands on austenite, mainly in the {111} plane, and with the activation of the other intersecting austenite {111}〈110〉 slip system. Furthermore, transmission electron microscopy results showed that the nucleation of ε-martensite follows a two stages phase transformation (γ{sub fcc}→ε{sub hcp}→α'{sub bcc})

  10. Environmental Degradation of Dissimilar Austenitic 316L and Duplex 2205 Stainless Steels Welded Joints

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Topolska S.

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper describes structure and properties of dissimilar stainless steels welded joints between duplex 2205 and austenitic 316L steels. Investigations were focused on environmentally assisted cracking of welded joints. The susceptibility to stress corrosion cracking (SCC and hydrogen embrittlement was determined in slow strain rate tests (SSRT with the strain rate of 2.2 × 10−6 s−1. Chloride-inducted SCC was determined in the 35% boiling water solution of MgCl2 environment at 125°C. Hydrogen assisted SCC tests were performed in synthetic sea water under cathodic polarization condition. It was shown that place of the lowest resistance to chloride stress corrosion cracking is heat affected zone at duplex steel side of dissimilar joins. That phenomenon was connected with undesirable structure of HAZ comprising of large fractions of ferrite grains with acicular austenite phase. Hydrogen assisted SCC tests showed significant reduction in ductility of duplex 2205 steel while austenitic 316L steel remains almost immune to degradation processes. SSR tests of dissimilar welded joints revealed a fracture in the area of austenitic steel.

  11. Refinement of ferrite grain size during hot direct rolling of hsla steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ajmal, M.

    2001-01-01

    Steel ingots containing 0.04 wt % Nb and varying contents of carbon were made in laboratory, that simulated thin slab casting. Mn and Si content were kept constant at 1.35 % and 0.25 % respectively. After each casting the mould assembly was transferred to the rolling mill and the temperature of the ingot was monitored. Each ingot was rolled to 4mm thickness in three passes. The first pass of 43% reduction for all the ingots were given at 1140 degree C. The second pass (reduction, 35 %) for all the ingots were given at 1040 degree C. However the temperature for third pass (reduction, 30 %) was varied to retain more strain in the austenite prior to transformation. It was shown that third pass at lower temperature i.e. 810 degree C in the austenite range yields a ferrite grains size of 2-3 micrometer. A yield strength of 465 Mpa and tensile strength of 530 Mpa can also be achieved in these plates. (author)

  12. Role of quaternary additions on dislocated martensite, retain austenite and mechanical properties of Fe/Cr/C structural steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rao, B.V.N.

    1978-02-01

    The influence of quaternary alloy additions of Mn and Ni to Fe/Cr/C steels which have been designed to provide superior mechanical properties has been investigated. Transmission electron microscopy and x-ray analysis revealed increasing amounts of retained austenite with Mn up to 2 w/o and with 5 w/o Ni additions after quenching from 1100 0 C. This is accompanied by a corresponding improvement in toughness properties of the quaternary alloys. In addition, the generally attractive combinations of strength and toughness in these quaternary alloys is attributed to the production of dislocated lath martensite from a homogeneous austenite phase free from undissolved alloy carbides. Grain-refining resulted in a further increase in the amount of retained austenite

  13. Constitutive modeling of metastable austenitic stainless steel (CD-rom)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Perdahcioglu, Emin Semih; Geijselaers, Hubertus J.M.; Huetink, Han; Boisse, P.

    2008-01-01

    A stress-update algorithm is developed for austenitic metastable steels which undergo phase evolution during deformation. The material initially comprises only the soft and ductile austenite phase which due to the phenomenon of mechanically induced martensitic transformation, transforms completely

  14. Transformation in austenitic stainless steel sheet under different loading directions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Boogaard, Antonius H.; Krauer, J.; Hora, P.

    2011-01-01

    The stress-strain relation for austenitic stainless steels is based on 2 main contributions: work hardening and a phase transformation from austenite to martensite. The transformation is highly temperature dependent. In most models for phase transformation from austenite to martensite, the stress

  15. Transformation in Austenitic Stainless Steel Sheet under Different Loading Directions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Boogaard, Antonius H.; Krauer, J.; Hora, P.

    2011-01-01

    The stress-strain relation for austenitic stainless steels is based on 2 main contributions: work hardening and a phase transformation from austenite to martensite. The transformation is highly temperature dependent. In most models for phase transformation from austenite to martensite, the stress

  16. Longitudinal wave ultrasonic inspection of austenitic weldments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gray, B.S.; Hudgell, R.J.; Seed, H.

    1980-01-01

    Successful volumetric inspection of LMFBR primary circuits, and also much of the secondary circuit, is dependent on the availability of satisfactory examination procedures for austenitic welds. Application of conventional ultrasonic techniques is hampered by the anisotropic, textured structure of the weld metal and this paper describes development work on the use of longitudinal wave techniques. In addition to confirming the dominant effects of the weld structure on ultrasound propagation some results are given of studies utilising deliberately induced defects in Manual Metal Arc Welds in 50 mm plate together with preliminary work on the inspection of narrow austenitic welds fabricated by automatic processes. (author)

  17. Recrystallization induced plasticity in austenite and ferrite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang Mingxin; Pineau, André; Bouaziz, Olivier; Vu, Trong-Dai

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Plasticity can be induced by recrystallization in austenite and ferrite. ► Strain rate is proportional to recrystallization kinetics. ► Overall atomic flux selects a preferential direction may be the origin. - Abstract: New experimental evidences are provided to demonstrate that plastic strain can be induced by recrystallization in austenite and ferrite under an applied stress much smaller than their yield stresses. Such Recrystallization Induced Plasticity (RIP) phenomenon occurs because the overall atomic flux during recrystallization follows a preferential direction imposed by the applied stress.

  18. Ultrasonic velocity measurements- a potential sensor for intelligent processing of austenitic stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Venkadesan, S.; Palanichamy, P.; Vasudevan, M.; Baldev Raj

    1996-01-01

    Development of sensors based on Non-Destructive Evaluation (NDE) techniques for on-line sensing of microstructure and properties requires a thorough knowledge on the relation between the sensing mechanism/measurement of an NDE technique and the microstructure. As a first step towards developing an on-line sensor for studying the dynamic microstructural changes during processing of austenitic stainless steels, ultrasonic velocity measurements have been carried out to study the microstructural changes after processing. Velocity measurements could follow the progress of annealing starting from recovery, onset and completion of recrystallization, sense the differences in the microstructure obtained after hot deformation and estimate the grain size. This paper brings out the relation between the sensing method based on ultrasonic velocity measurements and the microstructure in austenitic stainless steel. (author)

  19. Correlation between microstructure and mechanical properties of stable mixtures formed by austenite and martensite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eckstein, C.B.

    1982-03-01

    The influence of martensite in mechanical properties of stable mixtures formed by austenite and martensite was studied by varying the amount of martensite in the mixtures. Microstructural parameters were determined by Optical Quantitative Metallography and used to establish the correlation between the mechanical response of the mixtures in tension and their microstructures. The 'in situ' deformation of each phase in mixtures was determined experimentally in terms of the rule of mixtures. It is shown that the partitioning of the deformation depends on the amount of martensite in the mixture and that it tends to a condition of isostrain at higher martensite volume fractions. Optical observation of fractured specimens showed that the beginning of the fracture process may related to regions of the austenite grain boundaries where they meet martensite plates. (Author) [pt

  20. Design of Wear-Resistant Austenitic Steels for Selective Laser Melting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemke, J. N.; Casati, R.; Lecis, N.; Andrianopoli, C.; Varone, A.; Montanari, R.; Vedani, M.

    2018-03-01

    Type 316L stainless steel feedstock powder was modified by alloying with powders containing carbide/boride-forming elements to create improved wear-resistant austenitic alloys that can be readily processed by Selective Laser Melting. Fe-based alloys with high C, B, V, and Nb contents were thus produced, resulting in a microstructure that consisted of austenitic grains and a significant amount of hard carbides and borides. Heat treatments were performed to modify the carbide distribution and morphology. Optimal hard-phase spheroidization was achieved by annealing the proposed alloys at 1150 °C for 1 hour followed by water quenching. The total increase in hardness of samples containing 20 pct of C/B-rich alloy powder was of 82.7 pct while the wear resistance could be increased by a factor of 6.

  1. On superplasticity of corrosion resistant ferritic-austenitic chromium-nickel steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Surovtsev, A P; Sukhanov, V E

    1988-01-01

    The deformability of corrosion resistant chromium-nickel ferritic austenitic steel type O8Kh22N6T under tension, upsetting and torsion in the 600-1200 deg C temperature range is studied. For the deformation rate of the order of 10/sup -3/ s/sup -1/ the effect of superelasticity reveals itself at 850 deg C in the process of ferrite dynamic polymerization, in the 925-950 deg C range, at initial stages of dynamic recrystallization - the dynamic polygonization controlled by chromium carbide dissolving in steel and maximum at 1050 deg C in the process of development of austenite dynamic recrystallization with grain refinement with F/A ratio equalling 1. After upsetting in the elasticity mode at 1050 deg C the impact strength of the above steel is maximum.

  2. Solute grain boundary segregation during high temperature plastic deformation in a Cr-Mo low alloy steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, X.-M.; Song, S.-H.; Weng, L.-Q.; Liu, S.-J.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → The segregation of P and Mo is evidently enhanced by plastic deformation. → The boundary concentrations of P and Mo increase with increasing strain. → A model with consideration of site competition in grain boundary segregation in a ternary system is developed. → Model predictions show a reasonable agreement with the observations. - Abstract: Grain boundary segregation of Cr, Mo and P to austenite grain boundaries in a P-doped 1Cr0.5Mo steel is examined using field emission gun scanning transmission electron microscopy for the specimens undeformed and deformed by 10% with a strain rate of 2 x 10 -3 s -1 at 900 deg. C, and subsequently water quenched to room temperature. Before deformation, there is some segregation for Mo and P, but the segregation is considerably increased after deformation. The segregation of Cr is very small and there is no apparent difference between the undeformed and deformed specimens. Since the thermal equilibrium segregation has been attained prior to deformation, the segregation produced during deformation has a non-equilibrium characteristic. A theoretical model with consideration of site competition in grain boundary segregation between two solutes in a ternary alloy is developed to explain the experimental results. Model predictions are made, which show a reasonable agreement with the observations.

  3. Model Predictive Control of the Exit Part Temperature for an Austenitization Furnace

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hari S. Ganesh

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Quench hardening is the process of strengthening and hardening ferrous metals and alloys by heating the material to a specific temperature to form austenite (austenitization, followed by rapid cooling (quenching in water, brine or oil to introduce a hardened phase called martensite. The material is then often tempered to increase toughness, as it may decrease from the quench hardening process. The austenitization process is highly energy-intensive and many of the industrial austenitization furnaces were built and equipped prior to the advent of advanced control strategies and thus use large, sub-optimal amounts of energy. The model computes the energy usage of the furnace and the part temperature profile as a function of time and position within the furnace under temperature feedback control. In this paper, the aforementioned model is used to simulate the furnace for a batch of forty parts under heuristic temperature set points suggested by the operators of the plant. A model predictive control (MPC system is then developed and deployed to control the the part temperature at the furnace exit thereby preventing the parts from overheating. An energy efficiency gain of 5.3 % was obtained under model predictive control compared to operation under heuristic temperature set points tracked by a regulatory control layer.

  4. Electron backscatter and X-ray diffraction studies on the deformation and annealing textures of austenitic stainless steel 310S

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nezakat, Majid, E-mail: majid.nezakat@usask.ca [Canadian Light Source Inc., 44 Innovation Boulevard, Saskatoon, SK, S7N 2V3 (Canada); Akhiani, Hamed [Westpower Equipment Ltd., 4451 54 Avenue South East, Calgary, AB T2C 2A2 (Canada); Sabet, Seyed Morteza [Department of Ocean and Mechanical Engineering, Florida Atlantic University, Boca Raton, FL 33431 (United States); Szpunar, Jerzy [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Saskatchewan, 57 Campus Drive, Saskatoon, SK, S7N 5A9 (Canada)

    2017-01-15

    We studied the texture evolution of thermo-mechanically processed austenitic stainless steel 310S. This alloy was cold rolled up to 90% reduction in thickness and subsequently annealed at 1050 °C. At the early stages of deformation, strain-induced martensite was formed from deformed austenite. By increasing the deformation level, slip mechanism was found to be insufficient to accommodate higher deformation strains. Our results demonstrated that twinning is the dominant deformation mechanism at higher deformation levels. Results also showed that cold rolling in unidirectional and cross rolling modes results in Goss/Brass and Brass dominant textures in deformed samples, respectively. Similar texture components are observed after annealing. Thus, the annealing texture was greatly affected by texture of the deformed parent phase and martensite did not contribute as it showed an athermal reversion during annealing. Results also showed that when the fraction of martensite exceeds a critical point, its grain boundaries impeded the movement of austenite grain boundaries during annealing. As a result, recrystallization incubation time would increase. This caused an incomplete recrystallization of highly deformed samples, which led to a rational drop in the intensity of the texture components. - Highlights: •Thermo-mechanical processing through different cold rolling modes can induce different textures. •Martensite reversion is athermal during annealing. •Higher fraction of deformation-induced martensite can increase the annealing time required for complete recrystallization. •Annealing texture is mainly influenced by the deformation texture of austenite.

  5. Effect of inter-critically reheating temperature on microstructure and properties of simulated inter-critically reheated coarse grained heat affected zone in X70 steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu, Zhixiong; Kuzmikova, Lenka; Li, Huijun; Barbaro, Frank

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the influence of the inter-critical reheating temperature on the microstructure and mechanical properties of a coarse grained heat affected zone (CGHAZ) in an API 5L grade X70 pipeline steel seam weld. A Gleeble 3500 thermo-mechanical simulator was employed to duplicate particular weld thermal cycles in order to accurately assess specific regions of the weld HAZ. Detailed microstructural analysis, including investigation of the martensite–austenite (M–A) constituent, was performed using optical microscope (OM), scanning electron microscope (SEM) and selective etching techniques. It is shown that the fracture toughness of the CGHAZ is significantly reduced following exposure to a subsequent inter-critical thermal cycle. Fracture toughness gradually improves as the inter-critical temperature is increased, but does not return to the value of the original CGHAZ due to the presence of isolated large M–A particles and coarse microstructure. Significance of M–A particles to the HAZ fracture toughness is first related to the location of particles along prior austenite grain boundaries, followed by the size of individual M–A particles

  6. Cryogenic properties of V-bearing austenitic stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nohara, Kiyohiko

    1985-01-01

    A new type austenitic stainless steel which is expected as the cryogenic structural material for superconducting magnets has been developed. This steel is that vanadium was added to SUS 316 stainless steel of low carbon and high nitrogen, which has the sufficient strength and toughness at 4 K, and maintains the stable nonmagnetic state. This is applicable both to the solution state and the state of carrying out age hardening heat treatment for precipitating Nb 3 Sn subsequent to it. Accordingly, this material can be applied to the sheath material for nuclear fusion and the manufacture of superconducting magnets by Wind and React process besides the candidate material of superconducting magnets for nuclear fusion. This phenomenon is due to the fact that vanadium carbide precipitates in crystal grains before chrome carbide precipitates at grain boundaries, thus the precipitation of chrome carbide is suppressed. In this experiment, the effect of vanadium addition on the cryogenic properties of SUS 316 stainless steel was examined. The experimental method and the results of the effects of vanadium and nitrogen, solution treatment and precipitation aging, and the measurement of magnetism are reported. (Kako, I.)

  7. The Cracking Mechanism of Ferritic-Austenitic Cast Steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stradomski G.

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In the high-alloy, ferritic - austenitic (duplex stainless steels high tendency to cracking, mainly hot-is induced by micro segregation processes and change of crystallization mechanism in its final stage. The article is a continuation of the problems presented in earlier papers [1 - 4]. In the range of high temperature cracking appear one mechanism a decohesion - intergranular however, depending on the chemical composition of the steel, various structural factors decide of the occurrence of hot cracking. The low-carbon and low-alloy cast steel casting hot cracking cause are type II sulphide, in high carbon tool cast steel secondary cementite mesh and / or ledeburite segregated at the grain solidified grains boundaries, in the case of Hadfield steel phosphorus - carbide eutectic, which carrier is iron-manganese and low solubility of phosphorus in high manganese matrix. In duplex cast steel the additional factor increasing the risk of cracking it is very “rich” chemical composition and related with it processes of precipitation of many secondary phases.

  8. Microstructure Evolution During Creep of Cold Worked Austenitic Stainless Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishan Yadav, Hari; Ballal, A. R.; Thawre, M. M.; Vijayanand, V. D.

    2018-04-01

    The 14Cr–15Ni austenitic stainless steel (SS) with additions of Ti, Si, and P has been developed for their superior creep strength and better resistance to void swelling during service as nuclear fuel clad and wrapper material. Cold working induces defects such as dislocations that interact with point defects generated by neutron irradiation and facilitates recombination to make the material more resistant to void swelling. In present investigation, creep properties of the SS in mill annealed condition (CW0) and 40 % cold worked (CW4) condition were studied. D9I stainless steel was solution treated at 1333 K for 30 minutes followed by cold rolling. Uniaxial creep tests were performed at 973 K for various stress levels ranging from 175-225 MPa. CW4 samples exhibited better creep resistance as compared to CW0 samples. During creep exposure, cold worked material exhibited phenomena of recovery and recrystallization wherein new strain free grains were observed with lesser dislocation network. In contrast CW0 samples showed no signs of recovery and recrystallization after creep exposure. Partial recrystallization on creep exposure led to higher drop in hardness in cold worked sample as compared to that in mill annealed sample. Accelerated precipitation of carbides at the grain boundaries was observed during creep exposure and this phenomenon was more pronounced in cold worked sample.

  9. In situ synchrotron X-ray diffraction studies of the effect of microstructure on tensile behavior and retained austenite stability of thermo-mechanically processed transformation induced plasticity steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yan, Kun [School of Mechanical, Materials and Mechatronic Engineering, University of Wollongong, NSW 2522 (Australia); Liss, Klaus-Dieter [School of Mechanical, Materials and Mechatronic Engineering, University of Wollongong, NSW 2522 (Australia); Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Lucas Heights, NSW 2234 (Australia); Timokhina, Ilana B. [Institute for Frontier Materials, Deakin University, Geelong, VIC 3217 (Australia); Pereloma, Elena V., E-mail: elenap@uow.edu.au [School of Mechanical, Materials and Mechatronic Engineering, University of Wollongong, NSW 2522 (Australia)

    2016-04-26

    Transmission electron microscopy and in situ synchrotron high-energy X-ray diffraction were used to investigate the martensitic transformation and lattice strains under uniaxial tensile loading of Fe-Mn-Si-C-Nb-Mo-Al Transformation Induced Plasticity (TRIP) steel subjected to different thermo-mechanical processing schedules. In contrast with most of the diffraction analysis of TRIP steels reported previously, the diffraction peaks from the martensite phase were separated from the peaks of the ferrite-bainite α-matrix. The volume fraction of retained γ-austenite, as well as the lattice strain, were determined from the diffraction patterns recorded during tensile deformation. Although significant austenite to martensite transformation starts around the macroscopic yield stress, some austenite grains had already experienced martensitic transformation. Hooke’s Law was used to calculate the phase stress of each phase from their lattice strain. The ferrite-bainite α-matrix was observed to yield earlier than austenite and martensite. The discrepancy between integrated phase stresses and experimental macroscopic stress is about 300 MPa. A small increase in carbon concentration in retained austenite at the early stage of deformation was detected, but with further straining a continuous slight decrease in carbon content occurred, indicating that mechanical stability factors, such as grain size, morphology and orientation of the retained austenite, played an important role during the retained austenite to martensite transformation.

  10. Welding metallurgy of austenitic stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ibrahim, A.N.

    1983-01-01

    Austenitic stainless steels welds are commonly found in nuclear reactor systems. The macrostructure and the transformation of delta -phase into γ - phase which occur during rapid solidification of such welds are discussed. Finally, several types of defects which are derived from the welding operation, particularly defects of crack type, are also discussed in brief. (author)

  11. Modeling of austenite to ferrite transformation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    395–398. c Indian Academy of Sciences. Modeling of austenite to ferrite transformation. MOHSEN KAZEMINEZHAD. ∗. Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Sharif University of Technology, Azadi Avenue, Tehran, Iran. MS received 17 January 2011; revised 9 July 2011. Abstract. In this research, an algorithm ...

  12. Austenitic stainless steels for cryogenic service

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dalder, E.N.C.; Juhas, M.C.

    1985-09-19

    Presently available information on austenitic Fe-Cr-Ni stainless steel plate, welds, and castings for service below 77 K are reviewed with the intent (1) of developing systematic relationships between mechanical properties, composition, microstructure, and processing, and (2) of assessing the adequacy of these data bases in the design, fabrication, and operation of engineering systems at 4 K.

  13. Austenitic stainless steels for cryogenic service

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dalder, E.N.C.; Juhas, M.C.

    1985-01-01

    Presently available information on austenitic Fe-Cr-Ni stainless steel plate, welds, and castings for service below 77 K are reviewed with the intent (1) of developing systematic relationships between mechanical properties, composition, microstructure, and processing, and (2) of assessing the adequacy of these data bases in the design, fabrication, and operation of engineering systems at 4 K

  14. Mechanized ultrasonic inspection of austenitic pipe systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dressler, K.; Luecking, J.; Medenbach, S.

    1999-01-01

    The contribution explains the system of standard testing methods elaborated by ABB ZAQ GmbH for inspection of austenitic plant components. The inspection tasks explained in greater detail are basic materials testing (straight pipes, bends, and pipe specials), and inspection of welds and dissimilar welds. The techniques discussed in detail are those for detection and sizing of defects. (orig./CB) [de

  15. Interstellar grains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoyle, F.; Wickramasinghe, N.C.

    1980-11-01

    Interstellar extinction of starlight was observed and plotted as a function of inverse wavelength. Agreement with the calculated effects of the particle distribution is shown. The main kinds of grain distinguished are: (1) graphite spheres of radius 0.02 microns, making up 10% of the total grain mass (2) small dielectric spheres of radius 0.04 microns making up 25% and (3) hollow dielectric cylinders containing metallic iron, with diameters of 2/3 microns making up 45%. The remaining 20% consists of other metals, metal oxides, and polysiloxanes. Absorption factor evidence suggests that the main dielectric component of the grains is organic material.

  16. Effect of solution treatment conditions on the sensitization of austenitic stainless steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    XIAOFEI YU

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the impact of the conditions of solution treatment on the degree of sensitization (DOS of austenitic stainless steel (AISI 304 was investigated in detail. The results derived from the electrochemical potentiodynamic reactivation (EPR test indicated that the DOS decreased as the solution treatment temperature and time increased. The reason for this was studied via the SEM morphologies and EDS results, which indicated that the grain size influenced the DOS. Furthermore, cellular automaton (CA was utilized to simulate grain growth, the precipitation of Cr-rich carbides and the three dimensional distribution of the chromium concentration, which vividly illuminated the effect of the grain size on the DOS and was in accordance with the experiment results.

  17. Expanded austenite in nitrided layers deposited on austenitic and super austenitic stainless steel grades; Analise da austenita expandida em camadas nitretadas em acos inoxidaveis austeniticos e superaustenitico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casteletti, L.C.; Fernandes, F.A.P.; Heck, S.C. [Universidade de Sao Paulo (EESC/USP), Sao Carlos, SP (Brazil). Escola de Engenharia. Dept. de Engenharia de Materais, Aeronautica e Automobilistica; Oliveira, A.M. [Instituto de Educacao, Ciencia e Tecnologia do Maranhao (IFMA), Sao Luis, MA (Brazil); Gallego, J., E-mail: gallego@dem.feis.unesp.b [UNESP, Ilha Solteira, SP (Brazil). Dept. Engenharia Mecanica

    2010-07-01

    In this work nitrided layers deposited on austenitic and super austenitic stainless steels were analyzed through optical microscopy and X-rays diffraction analysis (XRD). It was observed that the formation of N supersaturated phase, called expanded austenite, has promoted significant increment of hardness (> 1000HV). XRD results have indicated the anomalous displacement of the diffracted peaks, in comparison with the normal austenite. This behavior, combined with peaks broadening, it was analyzed in different nitriding temperatures which results showed good agreement with the literature. (author)

  18. A multiscale constitutive model for intergranular stress corrosion cracking in type 304 austenitic stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siddiq, A; Rahimi, S

    2013-01-01

    Intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) is a fracture mechanism in sensitised austenitic stainless steels exposed to critical environments where the intergranular cracks extends along the network of connected susceptible grain boundaries. A constitutive model is presented to estimate the maximum intergranular crack growth by taking into consideration the materials mechanical properties and microstructure characters distribution. This constitutive model is constructed based on the assumption that each grain is a two phase material comprising of grain interior and grain boundary zone. The inherent micro-mechanisms active in the grain interior during IGSCC is based on crystal plasticity theory, while the grain boundary zone has been modelled by proposing a phenomenological constitutive model motivated from cohesive zone modelling approach. Overall, response of the representative volume is calculated by volume averaging of individual grain behaviour. Model is assessed by performing rigorous parametric studies, followed by validation and verification of the proposed constitutive model using representative volume element based FE simulations reported in the literature. In the last section, model application is demonstrated using intergranular stress corrosion cracking experiments which shows a good agreement

  19. Combining gradient structure and TRIP effect to produce austenite stainless steel with high strength and ductility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, X.L.; Yang, M.X.; Yuan, F.P.; Chen, L.; Zhu, Y.T.

    2016-01-01

    We report a design strategy to combine the benefits from both gradient structure and transformation-induced plasticity (TRIP). The resultant TRIP-gradient steel takes advantage of both mechanisms, allowing strain hardening to last to a larger plastic strain. 304 stainless steel sheets were treated by surface mechanical attrition to synthesize gradient structure with a central coarse-grained layer sandwiched between two grain-size gradient layers. The gradient layer is composed of submicron-sized parallelepiped austenite domains separated by intersecting ε-martensite plates, with increasing domain size along the depth. Significant microhardness heterogeneity exists not only macroscopically between the soft coarse-grained core and the hard gradient layers, but also microscopically between the austenite domain and ε-martensite walls. During tensile testing, the gradient structure causes strain partitioning, which evolves with applied strain, and lasts to large strains. The γ → α′ martensitic transformation is triggered successively with an increase of the applied strain and flow stress. Importantly, the gradient structure prolongs the TRIP effect to large plastic strains. As a result, the gradient structure in the 304 stainless steel provides a new route towards a good combination of high strength and ductility, via the co-operation of both the dynamic strain partitioning and TRIP effect.

  20. Numerical and experimental study of long term creep damage in austenitic stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cui, Yiting

    2015-01-01

    The creep fracture of 316L(N) austenitic stainless steels has been studied both experimentally and theoretically for temperatures from 525 C up to 700 C and lifetimes up to nineteen years. For short term creep, failure is due to necking. Experimental lifetimes are bounded by the lower and upper bound predictions provided by a necking model and taking into account scatter in input parameters. This model leads to fair predictions of lifetimes up to a few thousand hours at very high temperature. Based on FEG-SEM observations, the transition observed in the failure curves is due to intergranular cavitation. The Riedel modeling of cavity growth by vacancy diffusion along grain boundaries coupled with continuous nucleation is carried out. Lifetimes are predicted fairly well using this model for long term creep failure whatever the considered austenitic stainless steel (316L(N), 304H, 316H, 321H) and the applied temperature (525 C - 700 C). Taking into account low and high stress regimes of Norton-power law, the Riedel model allows us to predict the creep lifetimes up to 25 years which differ from experimental data by less than a factor 3. The effect of the heterogeneity of the microstructure on grain boundary stress concentrations and cavity nucleation is simulated by the finite element method (Cast3M software). It aims to determine the distribution of grain boundary normal stress fields around precipitates depending on time and temperature. The features of the precipitates and the creep behavior of the austenitic matrix are both taking into account. (author) [fr

  1. Influence of strain-induced martensitic transformation on fatigue short crack behaviour in an austenitic stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baffie, N.; Stolarz, J.; Magnin, Th.

    2000-01-01

    The influence of martensitic transformation induced by cyclic straining on the mechanisms of low cycle fatigue damage in a metastable austenitic stainless steel with different grain sizes has been investigated using macroscopic measurements and microscopic observations of short crack evolutions. The amount of martensite formed during cyclic straining increases with increasing plastic strain amplitude and cumulative plastic strain but the dominant parameter is the grain size of austenite. The fine microstructure (D = 10 μm) with maximum martensite fraction of about 20% is characterised by a better fatigue resistance than the coarse one (D 40μm and only 2% of martensite) for the same plastic strain amplitude. Martensitic transformation is found to radically modify the cyclic response of the alloy and consequently the damage mechanisms. Indeed, both short crack nucleation and growth take place exclusively in the transformed regions. A mechanism of short crack propagation based on the γ→ α' transformation assisted by stress concentration at the crack tip is proposed. The indirect influence of grain boundaries in the austenite on crack propagation in the martensite is demonstrated. The better fatigue resistance of metastable alloys with fine granular structure can thus be understood. (authors)

  2. Effects of phosphorus, silicon and sulphur on microstructural evolution in austenitic stainless steels during electron irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukuya, K.; Nakahigashi, S.; Ozaki, S.; Shima, S.

    1991-01-01

    Fe-18Cr-9Ni-1,5Mn austenitic alloys containing phosphorus, silicon and sulphur were irradiated by 1 MeV electrons at 573-773 K. Phosphorus increased the interstitial loop nucleation and decreased the void swelling by increasing void number density and suppressing void growth. Silicon had a similar effect to phosphorus but its effect was weaker than phosphorus. Sulphur enhanced void swelling through increasing the void density. Nickel enrichment at grain boundaries was suppressed only in the alloy containing phosphorus. These phosphorus effects may be explained by a strong interaction with interstitials resulting in a high density of sinks for point defects. (orig.)

  3. Influence of the austenitizing temperature in the cleavage facet size of Niocor 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Darwish, F.A.I.; Teixeira, J.C.G.; Fernandes, R.A.; Juer, S.

    1983-01-01

    Convetional Charpy specimens of Niocor 2 steel cooled in air from various austenitizing temperatures were fractured at -196 0 C so as to insure failure by cleavage. The cleavage facet size distribution was determined and then correlated with the grain size and other aspects of the microstructure. The results that the average facet size can be increased through a coarsening of the microstructure. For the case where the γ→α transformation products are predominantely acicular, the facet size is shown to depend on substructural aspects primarily the lath packet size. (Author) [pt

  4. Quantitative description of changes in the structure in austenitic steels after hot temperature deformation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuc, D.; Rodak, K.; Niewielski, G.; Hetmanczyk, M.

    1998-01-01

    An investigation on the structural changes in austenitic hard deformable Cr-Mn and Cr-Ni steels during dynamic recrystallization has been presented in the paper. The influence of the factors (strain rate, deformation, temperature) on the geometric characteristic of grains has been taken into consideration. Investigation of the structure were performed using metallographic microscope and transmission electron microscope. The results of researched should widen the theoretical background in order to the model of phenomena, which accompany the dynamic recovery and dynamic recrystallization. (author)

  5. Microstructural aspects of crack formation and propagation in the austenitic steel X6CrNiNb18-10 under low cycle fatigue loading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soppa, E.; Kohler, C.; Roos, E.; Schuler, X.

    2012-01-01

    The understanding of the crack initiation mechanisms and crack growth in apparently monolithic materials like X6CrNiNb18-10 stainless steel under cyclic loading requires the explicit analysis of the phenomena underlying fatigue on both atomistic and microscopic levels. The permanent delivery of mechanical energy through cyclic loading evokes changes in the microstructure that can lead to a martensitic transformation. The transformation of a metastable cubic face centered austenite and formation of a cubic body centered α'-martensite under cyclic loading at room temperature was found, both, in the experiment and in molecular dynamics simulations. The martensite nucleates prevalently at grain boundaries, triple points and at the specimen free surface and forms small (∝ 1 μm) differently oriented grains, also in the same parent austenitic grain. By a combination of interrupted low cycle fatigue tests (LCF) and electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) measurements the martensitic transformation and subsequent fatigue crack formation were observed at the same area in the microstructure at different stages of the specimen lifetime. The EBSD measurements showed the following crack initiation scenarios: Cracks started (a) at the phase boundary between austenite and α'-martensite, (b) inside fully martensitic areas in the matrix, (c) at broken or debonded coarse NbCs. It is obvious that formation of a hard α'-martensite in a ductile and soft austenite and forming two-phase material causes a heterogeneous stress and strain distribution on the microscopic level. α'-martensite enhances locally the stress amplitude whereas in a soft austenite the plastic strain amplitude increases. Strain concentration in the austenite along the phase boundary is connected with a stress increase along the interface and can initiate fatigue crack there. Also at the crack tip, a permanent martensitic transformation occurs, so that the growth of the fatigue cracks at room temperature seems

  6. Microstructural aspects of crack formation and propagation in the austenitic steel X6CrNiNb18-10 under low cycle fatigue loading

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soppa, E.; Kohler, C.; Roos, E.; Schuler, X. [Stuttgart Univ. (Germany). MPA

    2012-07-01

    The understanding of the crack initiation mechanisms and crack growth in apparently monolithic materials like X6CrNiNb18-10 stainless steel under cyclic loading requires the explicit analysis of the phenomena underlying fatigue on both atomistic and microscopic levels. The permanent delivery of mechanical energy through cyclic loading evokes changes in the microstructure that can lead to a martensitic transformation. The transformation of a metastable cubic face centered austenite and formation of a cubic body centered α'-martensite under cyclic loading at room temperature was found, both, in the experiment and in molecular dynamics simulations. The martensite nucleates prevalently at grain boundaries, triple points and at the specimen free surface and forms small (∝ 1 μm) differently oriented grains, also in the same parent austenitic grain. By a combination of interrupted low cycle fatigue tests (LCF) and electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) measurements the martensitic transformation and subsequent fatigue crack formation were observed at the same area in the microstructure at different stages of the specimen lifetime. The EBSD measurements showed the following crack initiation scenarios: Cracks started (a) at the phase boundary between austenite and α'-martensite, (b) inside fully martensitic areas in the matrix, (c) at broken or debonded coarse NbCs. It is obvious that formation of a hard α'-martensite in a ductile and soft austenite and forming two-phase material causes a heterogeneous stress and strain distribution on the microscopic level. α'-martensite enhances locally the stress amplitude whereas in a soft austenite the plastic strain amplitude increases. Strain concentration in the austenite along the phase boundary is connected with a stress increase along the interface and can initiate fatigue crack there. Also at the crack tip, a permanent martensitic transformation occurs, so that the growth of the fatigue cracks at room

  7. Austenitic stainless steels with cryogenic resistance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tarata, Daniela Florentina

    1999-01-01

    The most used austenitic stainless steels are alloyed with chromium and nickel and have a reduced carbon content, usually lower than 0.1 % what ensures corresponding properties for processing by plastic deformation at welding, corrosion resistance in aggressive environment and toughness at low temperatures. Steels of this kind alloyed with manganese are also used to reduce the nickel content. By alloying with manganese which is a gammageneous element one ensures the stability of austenites. Being cheaper these steels may be used extensively for components and equipment used in cryogenics field. The best results were obtained with steels of second group, AMnNi, in which the designed chemical composition was achieved, i.e. the partial replacement of nickel by manganese ensured the toughness at cryogenic temperatures. If these steels are supplementary alloyed, their strength properties may increase to the detriment of plasticity and toughness, although the cryogenic character is preserved

  8. Pitting corrosion resistant austenite stainless steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Rooyen, D.; Bandy, R.

    A pitting corrosion resistant austenite stainless steel comprises 17 to 28 wt. % chromium, 15 to 26 wt. % nickel, 5 to 8 wt. % molybdenum, and 0.3 to 0.5 wt. % nitrogen, the balance being iron, unavoidable impurities, minor additions made in the normal course of melting and casting alloys of this type, and may optionally include up to 10 wt. % of manganese, up to 5 wt. % of silicon, and up to 0.08 wt. % of carbon.

  9. The nucleation of austenite in ferritic ductile cast iron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chou, J.M.; Hon, M.H.; Lee, J.L.

    1992-01-01

    Austempered ductile cast iron has recently been receiving increasing attention because of its excellent combination of strength and ductility. Since the austenitization process has a significant influence on the mechanical properties of austempered ductile cast iron, several investigations on the nucleation sites of austenite and diffusion paths of carbon from spheroidal graphite have been reported in ferritic ductile cast iron. However, agreement on this subject has not ben reached. The purpose of this paper is to study the preferential nucleation sites of austenite during austenitization at two austenitizing temperatures in ferritic ductile cast iron. An attempt was made to understand the reasons which give rise to preferential austenite nucleation sites. The carbon diffusion paths from spheroidal graphite were also investigated

  10. Corrosion behavior of austenitic and ferritic/martensitic steels in oxygen-saturated liquid Pb-Bi eutectic at 450circC and 550circC

    OpenAIRE

    倉田 有司; 二川 正敏; 斎藤 滋

    2005-01-01

    Static corrosion tests of various austenitic and ferritic/martensitic steels were conducted in oxygen-saturated liquid Pb-Bi at 450circC and 550circC for 3000h to study the effects of temperature and alloying elements on corrosion behavior. Oxidation, grain boundary corrosion, dissolution and penetration were observed. The corrosion depth decreases at 450circC with increasing Cr content in steels regardless of ferritic/martensitic or austenitic steels. Appreciable dissolution of Ni and Cr doe...

  11. Impact of the nanostructuration on the corrosion resistance and hardness of irradiated 316 austenitic stainless steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hug, E.; Prasath Babu, R.; Monnet, I.; Etienne, A.; Moisy, F.; Pralong, V.; Enikeev, N.; Abramova, M.; Sauvage, X.; Radiguet, B.

    2017-01-01

    The influence of grain size and irradiation defects on the mechanical behavior and the corrosion resistance of a 316 stainless steel have been investigated. Nanostructured samples were obtained by severe plastic deformation using high pressure torsion. Both coarse grain and nanostructured samples were irradiated with 10 MeV 56Fe5+ ions. Microstructures were characterized using transmission electron microscopy and atom probe tomography. Surface mechanical properties were evaluated thanks to hardness measurements and the corrosion resistance was studied in chloride environment. Nanostructuration by high pressure torsion followed by annealing leads to enrichment in chromium at grain boundaries. However, irradiation of nanostructured samples implies a chromium depletion of the same order than depicted in coarse grain specimens but without metallurgical damage like segregated dislocation loops or clusters. Potentiodynamic polarization tests highlight a definitive deterioration of the corrosion resistance of coarse grain steel with irradiation. Downsizing the grain to a few hundred of nanometers enhances the corrosion resistance of irradiated samples, despite the fact that the hardness of nanocrystalline austenitic steel is only weakly affected by irradiation. These new experimental results are discussed in the basis of couplings between mechanical and electrical properties of the passivated layer thanks to impedance spectroscopy measurements, hardness properties of the surfaces and local microstructure evolutions.

  12. Hot rolling and annealing effects on the microstructure and mechanical properties of ODS austenitic steel fabricated by electron beam selective melting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Rui; Ge, Wen-jun; Miao, Shu; Zhang, Tao; Wang, Xian-ping; Fang, Qian-feng

    2016-03-01

    The grain morphology, nano-oxide particles and mechanical properties of oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS)-316L austenitic steel synthesized by electron beam selective melting (EBSM) technique with different post-working processes, were explored in this study. The ODS-316L austenitic steel with superfine nano-sized oxide particles of 30-40 nm exhibits good tensile strength (412 MPa) and large total elongation (about 51%) due to the pinning effect of uniform distributed oxide particles on dislocations. After hot rolling, the specimen exhibits a higher tensile strength of 482 MPa, but the elongation decreases to 31.8% owing to the introduction of high-density dislocations. The subsequent heat treatment eliminates the grain defects induced by hot rolling and increases the randomly orientated grains, which further improves the strength and ductility of EBSM ODS-316L steel.

  13. Optimized chemical composition, working and heat treatment condition for resistance to irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking of cold worked 316 and high-chromium austenitic stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yonezawa, Toshio; Iwamura, Toshihiko; Fujimoto, Koji; Ajiki, Kazuhide

    2000-01-01

    The authors have reported that the primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC) in baffle former bolts made of austenitic stainless steels for PWR after long-term operation is caused by irradiation-induced grain boundary segregation. The resistance to PWSCC of simulated austenitic stainless steels whose chemical compositions are simulated to the grain boundary chemical composition of 316 stainless steel after irradiation increased with decrease of the silicon content, increases of the chromium content, and precipitation of M 23 C 6 carbides at the grain boundaries. In order to develop resistance to irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking in austenitic stainless steels, optimized chemical compositions and heat treatment conditions for 316CW and high-chromium austenitic stainless steels for PWR baffle former bolts were investigated. For 316CW stainless steel, ultra-low-impurities and high-chromium content are beneficial. About 20% cold working before aging and after solution treatment has also been recommended to recover sensitization and make M 23 C 6 carbides coherent with the matrix at the grain boundaries. Heating at 700 to 725degC for 20 to 50 h was selected as a suitable aging procedure. Cold working of 5 to 10% after aging produced the required mechanical properties. The optimized composition of the high-chromium austenitic stainless steel contents 30% chromium, 30% nickel, and ultra-low impurity levels. This composition also reduces the difference between its thermal expansion coefficient and that of 304 stainless steel for baffle plates. Aging at 700 to 725degC for longer than 40 h and cold working of 10 to 15% after aging were selected to meet mechanical property specifications. (author)

  14. Corrosion behavior of austenitic stainless steel containing Ti

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cha, Sueng Ok; Choe, Han Cheol; Kim, Kwan Hyu

    1998-01-01

    Corrosion behavior of austenitic stainless steel containing Ti has been studied by using electrochemical techniques. The samples containing Ti from 0.1 to 1.0 wt% were solutionized at 1050 .deg. C for 1hr and then sensitized at 650 .deg. C for 5hr under argon atmosphere. Microstructure and phase analysis of the samples after heat treatment and corrosion tests were carried out by using XRD. TEM, SEM and optical microscope. The amount of δ-ferrite and TiC precipitates in matrix increased as the Ti content increased. In the sensitized samples, Cr 23 C 6 precipitates were observed at γ/δ interface. Degree Of Sensitization(DOS) was lower than 1.0 in all of the solutionized samples and the sensitized samples of Ti content above 0.4% wt% whereas the sensitized samples of Ti content lower than 0.4 wt% showed DOS higher than 1.0. Intergranular attack appeared mainly at grain boundaries in the sensitized sample containing 0.1 wt% Ti and at the γ/δ interface of the higher Ti content. In the latter, however, the attack was not so severe. Pitting potential(E pit ) and repassivation potential(E rep ) of the solutionized and sensitized samples were increased with increasing Ti content. The number and size of the pits decreased with increasing Ti content in the sensitized samples. The pits nucleated at Cr 23 C 6 site and the γ/δ interface

  15. Hot compression deformation behavior of AISI 321 austenitic stainless steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haj, Mehdi; Mansouri, Hojjatollah; Vafaei, Reza; Ebrahimi, Golam Reza; Kanani, Ali

    2013-06-01

    The hot compression behavior of AISI 321 austenitic stainless steel was studied at the temperatures of 950-1100°C and the strain rates of 0.01-1 s-1 using a Baehr DIL-805 deformation dilatometer. The hot deformation equations and the relationship between hot deformation parameters were obtained. It is found that strain rate and deformation temperature significantly influence the flow stress behavior of the steel. The work hardening rate and the peak value of flow stress increase with the decrease of deformation temperature and the increase of strain rate. In addition, the activation energy of deformation ( Q) is calculated as 433.343 kJ/mol. The microstructural evolution during deformation indicates that, at the temperature of 950°C and the strain rate of 0.01 s-1, small circle-like precipitates form along grain boundaries; but at the temperatures above 950°C, the dissolution of such precipitates occurs. Energy-dispersive X-ray analyses indicate that the precipitates are complex carbides of Cr, Fe, Mn, Ni, and Ti.

  16. Quantification of elemental segregation to lath and grain boundaries in low-alloy steel by STEM X-ray mapping combined with the zeta-factor method

    CERN Document Server

    Watanabe, M

    2003-01-01

    Elemental segregation to two types of boundaries in a low-alloy steel were studied by X-ray mapping using scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM). To quantify the acquired X-ray maps, the zeta-factor method was applied, and then the compositional maps and the thickness map were obtained. Based on these quantified maps, further information about the analytical sensitivity of solute-element detection and the spatial resolution of segregation analysis were extracted. Furthermore, maps of the number of excess atoms on the boundary were also calculated from the compositional and thickness maps. It was concluded that Cr, Ni and Mo are co-segregated on the prior-austenite grain boundary and only Ni was segregated on the lath boundary. (orig.)

  17. Fatigue mechanisms in an austenitic steel under cyclic loading: Experiments and atomistic simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soppa, E.A., E-mail: ewa.soppa@mpa.uni-stuttgart.de; Kohler, C., E-mail: christopher.kohler@mpa.uni-stuttgart.de; Roos, E., E-mail: eberhard.roos@mpa.uni-stuttgart.de

    2014-03-01

    Experimental investigations on the austenitic stainless steel X6CrNiNb18-10 (AISI – 347) and concomitant atomistic simulations of a FeNi nanocrystalline model system have been performed in order to understand the basic mechanisms of fatigue damage under cyclic loading. Using electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) the influence of deformation induced martensitic transformation and NbC size distribution on the fatigue crack formation has been demonstrated. The martensite nucleates prevalently at grain boundaries, triple points and at the specimen free surface and forms small (∼1 µm sized) differently oriented grains. The atomistic simulations show the role of regions of a high density of stacking faults for the martensitic transformation.

  18. SIMS analysis of deuterium absorption and diffusion in austenitic Fe-Mn-C steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dieudonne, T.; Chene, J.; Marchetti, L.; Jomard, F.; Wery, M.; Allely, C.; Cugy, P.; Scott, C.P.

    2012-01-01

    Austenitic Fe-Mn-C steels are Ultra High Strength Steels which may be used for the production of deep drawn automotive parts containing extremely high residual stress and strain levels. In consequence, hydrogen absorption occurring during the corrosion process in aqueous environments may enhance the sensitivity of these steels to different kinds of hydrogen-induced damage, in particular Stress Corrosion Cracking (SCC). In order to predict and prevent SCC, it is important to study the behaviour of hydrogen in these austenitic steels exposed to aqueous environments and in particular the dependence on the alloy chemistry and microstructure. SIMS profiles of deuterium introduced by cathodic charging in selected specimens were used to characterize the diffusion of hydrogen in these steels. This allowed to be studied the role of chemical composition and microstructure on the kinetics of H absorption at room temperature. The competition between bulk matrix diffusion and short-circuit diffusion phenomena along grain boundaries was investigated. The results show a strong dependence of H diffusion and distribution on the alloy chemistry and grain size. (authors)

  19. Intergranular Corrosion Behavior of Low-Nickel and 304 Austenitic Stainless Steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bansod, Ankur V.; Patil, Awanikumar P.; Moon, Abhijeet P.; Khobragade, Nilay N.

    2016-09-01

    Intergranular corrosion (IGC) susceptibility for Cr-Mn austenitic stainless steel and 304 austenitic stainless steel (ASS) was estimated using electrochemical techniques. Optical and SEM microscopy studies were carried out to investigate the nature of IGC at 700 °C with increasing time (15, 30, 60, 180, 360, 720, 1440 min) according to ASTM standard 262 A. Quantitative analysis was performed to estimate the degree of sensitization (DOS) using double loop electrochemical potentiokinetic reactivation (DLEPR) and EIS technique. DLEPR results indicated that with the increase in thermal aging duration, DOS becomes more severe for both types of stainless steel. The DOS for Cr-Mn ASS was found to be higher (65.12% for 1440 min) than that of the AISI 304 ASS (23% for 1440 min). The higher degree of sensitization resulted in lowering of electrical charge capacitance resistance. Chronoamperometry studies were carried out at a passive potential of 0.4 V versus SCE and was observed to have a higher anodic dissolution of the passive film of Cr-Mn ASS. EDS studies show the formation of chromium carbide precipitates in the vicinity of the grain boundary. The higher Mn content was also observed for Cr-Mn ASS at the grain boundary.

  20. Production, microstructure and mechanical properties of two different austenitic ODS steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gräning, T., E-mail: tim.graening@kit.edu; Rieth, M.; Hoffmann, J.; Möslang, A.

    2017-04-15

    This article is to summarize and examine processing parameters of novel developed austenitic oxide dispersed strengthened (ODS) steels. Comparing hot-rolled and extruded conditions after the same degree of deformation after and before annealing, are just some examples to give insights into the complex processing of austenitic ODS steels. One of the major drawbacks of the material is the more sophisticated production process. Due to a ductile matrix material with an increased stickiness during milling, a two-step milling procedure with the use of ZrO{sub 2} milling balls was applied to raise the production yield and to use the abrasion of the ZrO{sub 2} as an additional element to facilitate the formation of nano-sized precipitates. To get a better understanding how the different powder particle sizes after milling affect final properties, sieving was applied and revealed a serious effect in terms of precipitate size, distribution and mechanical properties. Grain sizes in relation to the precipitate size, annealing time and processing parameters were determined and compared to the mechanical properties. Hardness and tensile test have pointed out, that the precipitate size and number are more important in respect to the ultimate tensile strength than the grain size and that in this study hot-rolled material exhibited the better properties. The investigation of the microstructure illustrated the stability of precipitates during annealing at 1100 °C for 40 h. These heat treatments also led to a consistent grain size, due to the pinning effect of the grain boundaries, caused by precipitates. - Highlights: •Comparison of the microstructure of extruded and hot-rolled ODS. •Two-step mechanical alloying with ZrO{sub 2} milling balls. •Determination of precipitate size distribution depending on chemical composition and annealing times. •Determination of the influence of sieving of mechanical alloyed powder on the near net shape products. •Tensile tests of two

  1. Production, microstructure and mechanical properties of two different austenitic ODS steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gräning, T.; Rieth, M.; Hoffmann, J.; Möslang, A.

    2017-04-01

    This article is to summarize and examine processing parameters of novel developed austenitic oxide dispersed strengthened (ODS) steels. Comparing hot-rolled and extruded conditions after the same degree of deformation after and before annealing, are just some examples to give insights into the complex processing of austenitic ODS steels. One of the major drawbacks of the material is the more sophisticated production process. Due to a ductile matrix material with an increased stickiness during milling, a two-step milling procedure with the use of ZrO2 milling balls was applied to raise the production yield and to use the abrasion of the ZrO2 as an additional element to facilitate the formation of nano-sized precipitates. To get a better understanding how the different powder particle sizes after milling affect final properties, sieving was applied and revealed a serious effect in terms of precipitate size, distribution and mechanical properties. Grain sizes in relation to the precipitate size, annealing time and processing parameters were determined and compared to the mechanical properties. Hardness and tensile test have pointed out, that the precipitate size and number are more important in respect to the ultimate tensile strength than the grain size and that in this study hot-rolled material exhibited the better properties. The investigation of the microstructure illustrated the stability of precipitates during annealing at 1100 °C for 40 h. These heat treatments also led to a consistent grain size, due to the pinning effect of the grain boundaries, caused by precipitates.

  2. Intermetallic Strengthened Alumina-Forming Austenitic Steels for Energy Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Bin [Dartmouth College, Hanover, NH (United States); Baker, Ian [Dartmouth College, Hanover, NH (United States)

    2016-03-31

    In order to achieve energy conversion efficiencies of >50 % for steam turbines/boilers in power generation systems, the materials required must be strong, corrosion-resistant at high temperatures (>700°C), and economically viable. Austenitic steels strengthened with Laves phase and L12 precipitates, and alloyed with aluminum to improve oxidation resistance, are potential candidate materials for these applications. The creep resistance of these alloys is significantly improved through intermetallic strengthening (Laves-Fe2Nb + L12-Ni3Al precipitates) without harmful effects on oxidation resistance. Microstructural and microchemical analyses of the recently developed alumina-forming austenitic (AFA) steels (Fe-14Cr-32Ni-3Nb-3Al-2Ti-based) indicated they are strengthened by Ni3Al(Ti) L12, NiAl B2, Fe2Nb Laves phase and MC carbide precipitates. Different thermomechanical treatments (TMTs) were performed on these stainless steels in an attempt to further improve their mechanical properties. The thermo-mechanical processing produced nanocrystalline grains in AFA alloys and dramatically increased their yield strength at room temperature. Unfortunately, the TMTs didn’t increase the yield strengths of AFA alloys at ≥700ºC. At these temperatures, dislocation climb is the dominant mechanism for deformation of TMT alloys according to strain rate jump tests. After the characterization of aged AFA alloys, we found that the largest strengthening effect from L12 precipitates can be obtained by aging for less than 24 h. The coarsening behavior of the L12 precipitates was not influenced by carbon and boron additions. Failure analysis and post-mortem TEM analysis were performed to study the creep failure mechanisms of these AFA steels after creep tests. Though the Laves and B2-NiAl phase precipitated along the boundaries can improve the creep properties, cracks were

  3. Interface segregation behavior in thermal aged austenitic precipitation strengthened stainless steel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hui; Song, Hui; Liu, Wenqing; Xia, Shuang; Zhou, Bangxin; Su, Cheng; Ding, Wenyan

    2015-12-01

    The segregation of various elements at grain boundaries, precipitate/matrix interfaces were analyzed using atom probe tomography in an austenitic precipitation strengthened stainless steel aged at 750 °C for different time. Segregation of P, B and C at all types of interfaces in all the specimens were observed. However, Si segregated at all types of interfaces only in the specimen aged for 16 h. Enrichment of Ti at grain boundaries was evident in the specimen aged for 16 h, while Ti did not segregate at other interfaces. Mo varied considerably among interface types, e.g. from segregated at grain boundaries in the specimens after all the aging time to never segregate at γ'/γ phase interfaces. Cr co-segregated with C at grain boundaries, although carbides still did not nucleate at grain boundaries yet. Despite segregation tendency variations in different interface types, the segregation tendency evolution variation of different elements depending aging time were analyzed among all types of interfaces. Based on the experimental results, the enrichment factors, Gibbs interface excess and segregation free energies of segregated elements were calculated and discussed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Correlation between locally deformed structure and oxide film properties in austenitic stainless steel irradiated with neutrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chimi, Yasuhiro, E-mail: chimi.yasuhiro@jaea.go.jp [Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), 2-4 Shirakata, Tokai-mura, Naka-gun, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Kitsunai, Yuji [Nippon Nuclear Fuel Development, 2163 Narita-cho, Oarai-machi, Higashi-ibaraki-gun, Ibaraki 311-1313 (Japan); Kasahara, Shigeki [Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), 2-4 Shirakata, Tokai-mura, Naka-gun, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Chatani, Kazuhiro; Koshiishi, Masato [Nippon Nuclear Fuel Development, 2163 Narita-cho, Oarai-machi, Higashi-ibaraki-gun, Ibaraki 311-1313 (Japan); Nishiyama, Yutaka [Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), 2-4 Shirakata, Tokai-mura, Naka-gun, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan)

    2016-07-15

    To elucidate the mechanism of irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) in high-temperature water for neutron-irradiated austenitic stainless steels (SSs), the locally deformed structures, the oxide films formed on the deformed areas, and their correlation were investigated. Tensile specimens made of irradiated 316L SSs were strained 0.1%–2% at room temperature or at 563 K, and the surface structures and crystal misorientation among grains were evaluated. The strained specimens were immersed in high-temperature water, and the microstructures of the oxide films on the locally deformed areas were observed. The appearance of visible step structures on the specimens' surface depended on the neutron dose and the applied strain. The surface oxides were observed to be prone to increase in thickness around grain boundaries (GBs) with increasing neutron dose and increasing local strain at the GBs. No penetrative oxidation was observed along GBs or along surface steps. - Highlights: • Visible step structures depend on the neutron dose and the applied strain. • Local strain at grain boundaries was accumulated with the neutron dose. • Oxide thickness increases with neutron dose and local strain at grain boundaries. • No penetrative oxidation was observed along grain boundaries or surface steps.

  5. Study of Creep of Alumina-Forming Austenitic Stainless Steel for High-Temperature Energy Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afonina, Natalie Petrovna

    To withstand the high temperature (>700°C) and pressure demands of steam turbines and boilers used for energy applications, metal alloys must be economically viable and have the necessary material properties, such as high-temperature creep strength, oxidation and corrosion resistance, to withstand such conditions. One promising class of alloys potentially capable of withstanding the rigors of aggressive environments, are alumina-forming austenitic stainless steels (AFAs) alloyed with aluminum to improve corrosion and oxidation resistance. The effect of aging on the microstructure, high temperature constant-stress creep behavior and mechanical properties of the AFA-type alloy Fe-20Cr-30Ni-2Nb-5Al (at.%) were investigated in this study. The alloy's microstructural evolution with increased aging time was observed prior to creep testing. As aging time increased, the alloy exhibited increasing quantities of fine Fe2Nb Laves phase dispersions, with a precipitate-free zone appearing in samples with higher aging times. The presence of the L1 2 phase gamma'-Ni3Al precipitate was detected in the alloy's matrix at 760°C. A constant-stress creep rig was designed, built and its operation validated. Constant-stress creep tests were performed at 760°C and 35MPa, and the effects of different aging conditions on creep rate were investigated. Specimens aged for 240 h exhibited the highest creep rate by a factor of 5, with the homogenized sample having the second highest rate. Samples aged for 2.4 h and 24 h exhibited similar low secondary creep rates. Creep tests conducted at 700oC exhibited a significantly lower creep rate compared to those at 760oC. Microstructural analysis was performed on crept samples to explore high temperature straining properties. The quantity and size of Fe2Nb Laves phase and NiAl particles increased in the matrix and on grain boundaries with longer aging time. High temperature tensile tests were performed and compared to room temperature results. The

  6. Microstructural evolution in deformed austenitic TWinning Induced Plasticity steels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Tol, R.T.

    2014-01-01

    This thesis studies the effect of plastic deformation on the stability of the austenitic microstructure against martensitic transformation and diffusional decomposition and its role in the phenomenon of delayed fracture in austenitic manganese (Mn)-based TWinning Induced Plasticity (TWIP) steels.

  7. Lattice expansion of carbon-stabilized expanded austenite

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hummelshøj, Thomas Strabo; Christiansen, Thomas; Somers, Marcel A. J.

    2010-01-01

    The lattice parameter of expanded austenite was determined as a function of the content of interstitially dissolved carbon in homogeneous, carburized thin stainless steel foils. For the first time this expansion of the face-centered cubic lattice is determined on unstrained austenite. It is found...

  8. Reverted austenite in PH 13-8 Mo maraging steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schnitzer, Ronald; Radis, Rene; Noehrer, Matthias; Schober, Michael; Hochfellner, Rainer; Zinner, Silvia; Povoden-Karadeniz, E.; Kozeschnik, Ernst; Leitner, Harald

    2010-01-01

    The mechanical properties of maraging steels are strongly influenced by the presence of reverted austenite. In this study, the morphology and chemical composition of reverted austenite in a corrosion resistant maraging steel was characterized using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and atom probe tomography (APT). Two types of austenite, i.e. granular and elongated, are present after aging at 575 o C, whereby the content of the latter increases during aging. The investigations revealed that the austenite phase is enriched in Ni, which prevents the transformation to martensite during cooling. Inside and next to the austenitc areas, Mo and Cr-rich carbides, which form during the aging treatment, were found. Various aging treatments were performed to obtain the activation energy for the formation of reverted austenite. Additionally, the experimental data are compared with thermodynamic and kinetic simulations. Based on these results and the chemical composition changes of the phases, a model for the formation of reverted austenite is presented. It is concluded that precipitation of B2-ordered NiAl and formation of reverted austenite take place simultaneously during aging and that dissolution of precipitates is not essential for the initial formation of reverted austenite.

  9. Tribocorrosion wear of austenitic and martensitic steels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Rozing

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper explores the impact of tribocorrosion wear caused by an aggressive acidic media. Tests were conducted on samples made of stainless steel AISI 316L, 304L and 440C. Austenitic steels were tested in their nitrided state and martensitic in quenched and tempered and then induction hardened state. Electrochemical corrosion resistance testing and analysis of the microstructure and hardness in the cross section was carried out on samples of selected steels. To test the possibility of applying surface modification of selected materials in conditions of use, tests were conducted on samples/parts in a worm press for final pressing.

  10. influence of delta ferrite on the flow stress grain size relationship

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    SIZE RELATIONSHIP OF AN AUSTENITIC STAINLESS STEEL by ... The effect of delta ferrite on the flow stress-grain size relation is investigated. ... some of these deviations, new models have .... J. N. Petch, J of Iron and Steel Inst., 174 25,.

  11. Grain size effects in multiphase steels assisted by transformation-induced plasticity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Turteltaub, S.R.; Suiker, A.S.J.

    2006-01-01

    The influence of the austenitic grain size on the overall stress-strain behavior in a multiphase carbon steel is analyzed through three-dimensional finite element simulations. A recently developed multiscale martensitic transformation model is combined with a plasticity model to simulate the

  12. Microstructure characterization in domestically-made TP310HNbN austenitic stainless steel after creep test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Yan; Lin, Lin; Hou, Shufang; Wang, Bohan

    Microstructure characterization of domestically-made TP310HNbN austenitic stainless steel after creep test was investigated by means of transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The results revealed that M23C6 carbides precipitated both inside grains and at the grain boundaries and NbCrN particles were located inside grains for creep-rupture samples. It was clear that sigma phase and NbC particles precipitated inside grains for the creep-rupture sample at 670 C. M23C6 carbides with lattice parameter of three times of the austenite matrix grow in a cube to cube orientation relationship with the matrix. The amount of M23C6 carbide particles obviously increased with the testing time prolonged. Deformation hardening induced an enhanced hardness nearby rupture surface for the creep-rupture samples with a short testing time. For the domestically-made TP310HNbN steel, great attention should be paid to the distribution, size and amount of sigma phase and M23C6 during service.

  13. MIDDLEMEN IN THE MARKET FOR GRAIN: CHANGES AND COMPARISONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary Eschelbach Hansen

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available The role of middlemen in the market for grain changed with the advent of standardized grain grading. Prior to grain grading, economies of scale were limited because of the requirement that middlemen develop strong personal reputations though the maintenance of multi-faceted relationships with clients. Grain grading homogenized grain, making it possible for middlemen to take advantage of economies of scale in their operations.

  14. Boron content effect on the high-temperature plasticity of corrosion resistant low-carbon austenite type steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gol'dshtejn, Ya.E.; Shmatko, M.N.; Chuvatina, S.N.

    1976-01-01

    With the concept that the state of grain and subgrain boundaries influences the hot plasticity of corrosion resistant steel as a starting point, the study was undertaken of the effect of boron microalloying up on the intergranular strength and of the action boron exerts upon the distribution (redistribution) of other phases present in austenitic 03Kh16N14M3 steels. An electron microscope study of the composition of redundant phases and that of the fine structure of steel have shown the effect of small additions of boron upon the hot plasticity of steel to be linked directly to its influence upon austenite disintegration and the precipitation along the boundaries of crystals of redundant phases in the course of hot plastic deformation. The action of boron upon the process plasticity of steel depends on the temperature and the rate of deformation which govern the kinetics of the precipitation of the redundant phases

  15. Novel ferrite–austenite duplex lightweight steel with 77% ductility by transformation induced plasticity and twinning induced plasticity mechanisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sohn, Seok Su; Choi, Kayoung; Kwak, Jai-Hyun; Kim, Nack J.; Lee, Sunghak

    2014-01-01

    The need for lightweight materials has been an important issue in automotive industries to reduce greenhouse gas emission and to improve fuel efficiency. In addition, automotive steels require an excellent combination of strength and ductility to sustain automotive structures and to achieve complex shapes, but the traditional approach to obtain a reduction in weight from down-gauged steels with high strength has many limitations. Here, we present a new ferrite–austenite duplex lightweight steel containing a low-density element, Al; this steel exhibits tensile elongation up to 77% as well as high tensile strength (734 MPa). The enhanced properties are attributed to the simultaneous formation of deformation-induced martensites and deformation twins and the additional plasticity due to deformation twinning in austenite grains having optimal mechanical stability. The present work gives a promise for automotive applications requiring excellent properties as well as reduced specific weight

  16. Characterization of microstructures in austenitic stainless steels by ultrasonics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raj, Baldev; Palanichamy, P.; Jayakumar, T.; Kumar, Anish; Vasudevan, M.; Shankar, P.

    2000-01-01

    Recently, many nondestructive techniques have been considered for microstructural characterization of materials to enable in-situ component assessment for pre-service quality and in-service performance. Ultrasonic parameters have been used for estimation of average grain size, evaluation of recrystallization after cold working, and characterization of Cr2N precipitation during thermal aging in different grades of austenitic stainless steels. Ultrasonic first back wall echo signals were obtained from several specimens of AISI type 316 stainless steel with different grain sizes. Shift in the spectral peak frequency and the change in the full width at half maximum of the autopower spectrum of the first back wall echo are correlated with the grain size in the range 30-150 microns. The advantages of this method are: (i) independence of variation in couplant conditions (ii), applicable even to highly attenuating materials, (iii) direct correlation of the ultrasonic parameters with yield strength and (iv) suitability for shop-floor applications. Recrystallization behavior (temperature range 973-1173 K and time durations 0.5-1000 h) of cold worked titanium modified 316 stainless steel (D9) has been characterized using ultrasonic velocity measurements. A velocity parameter derived using a combination of shear and longitudinal wave velocities is correlated with the degree of recrystallization. These velocity measurement could also identify onset, progress and completion of recrystallization more accurately as compared to hardness and strength measurements. Ultrasonic velocity measurements were performed in thermally aged (at 1123 K for 10 to 2000 h) nuclear grade 316 LN stainless steel. Change in velocity due to thermal aging treatment could be used to reveal the formation of (i) Cr-N clusters associated with high lattice strains, (ii) coherent Cr2N precipitation, (iii) loss of coherency and (iv) growth of incoherent Cr2N precipitates. Microstructural characterization by

  17. Development of optimized advanced austenitic steels (II). Evaluation of out-of-pile testing results of the test fuel claddings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uwaba, Tomoyuki; Mizuta, Shunji; Ukai, Shigeharu [Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Inst., Oarai, Ibaraki (Japan). Oarai Engineering Center

    2000-03-01

    14Cr-25Ni optimized advanced austenitic steels have been developed to improve the swelling resistance of 15Cr-20Ni austenitic stainless steels used for FBR fuel cladding. In this improvement, Ti, Nb, V and P were dissolved into 14Cr-25Ni matrix by means of the high-temperature solution treatment to make finely distributed and stabilized precipitates in the operation. Furthermore, at the final stage of cold-working, cold-working level increased and residual stress was reduced. In this study, as fabricated microstructure observation, solubility of alloying elements and grain size test in the manufacturing process were evaluated. Following results were obtained. (1) Spherical precipitates were observed in the grain. Most of them were identified as complexed carbide-nitride [Ti,Nb(C,N)] by EDX analysis. (2) The dissolved percentages of Ti and Ni in the matrix were about 70% and 30% respectively. Undissolved Ti and Nb may react with undissolved carbon and precipitate as MC carbides. (3) High-temperature solution treatment is effective for the sufficient solubility of alloying elements, but it is likely to induce very large grains, which is the cause of defective signal in the ultrasonic alloy testing. The results of the grain size test showed that the large grain size is reduced in low Nb (0.1wt%) alloy compared with the standard alloy (0.2wt% Nb), and the effectiveness for the grain size control by reducing the Nb content was confirmed. Also, it was suggested that the intermediate heat treatment and cold work conditions would possibly avoid the occurrence of the large grain at the final heat treatment. (author)

  18. Austenite strengthening and softening during hot deformation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tushinskij, L.I.; Vlasov, V.S.; Kazimirova, I.E.; Tokarev, A.O.

    1981-01-01

    Processes of formation of austenite structure of 20 and 12Kh18N10T steels during hot deformation and postdeformation isothermal holdings have been investigated by the methods of analysis of curves of hot deformation, high-temperature metallography and light microscopy. Deformation has been exercised by extention in vacuum with average 4x10 -2 s -1 rate. Deformation temperatures of steel 20 are 930 and 1000 deg C, of steel 12Kh18N10T - 1100 deg C. It is stated that dynamic recrystallization takes place in both investigated steels during hot deformation. In the carbonic steel it is developed by shifting sections of high-angular boundaries, flow stress in this case remains constant. Recrystallization is developed by subgrain coalescence in austenite steel, that brings about preservation of increased defect density in recrystallized volumes. As a result strengthening of steel is continued up to fracture during the increase of the deformation degree. Postdeformation weakening of 12Kh18N10T steel is slowed down as compared with weakening of carbonic steel [ru

  19. Effect of melting technique on grain size and heat resistance of the 12Kh1MF steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lanskaya, K.A.; Kulikova, L.V.; Butneva, N.I.

    1978-01-01

    Investigated are the 12Kh1MF steel melted in open-hearth and arc furnaces (deoxidation by aluminium in 1.0 kg/t quantity) and then subjected to electroslag melting. The size of an austenitic grain depends on the residual contents of nitrogen and aluminium in steel. The open-hearth metal subjected to electroslag melting and containing a small quantity of nitrogen (0.006%) and aluminium (0.013%) has coarse austenitic grains and higher heat resistance compared to the steel melted in an arc furnace and also sub ected to electroslag melting. The nitride analysis of steel is carried out

  20. Quantitative evaluation of ultrasonic wave propagation in inhomogeneous anisotropic austenitic welds using 3D ray tracing method. Numerical and experimental validation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kolkoori, Sanjeevareddy

    2014-01-01

    Austenitic welds and dissimilar welds are extensively used in primary circuit pipes and pressure vessels in nuclear power plants, chemical industries and fossil fuelled power plants because of their high fracture toughness, resistance to corrosion and creep at elevated temperatures. However, cracks may initiate in these weld materials during fabrication process or stress operations in service. Thus, it is very important to evaluate the structural integrity of these materials using highly reliable non-destructive testing (NDT) methods. Ultrasonic non-destructive inspection of austenitic welds and dissimilar weld components is complicated because of anisotropic columnar grain structure leading to beam splitting and beam deflection. Simulation tools play an important role in developing advanced reliable ultrasonic testing (UT) techniques and optimizing experimental parameters for inspection of austenitic welds and dissimilar weld components. The main aim of the thesis is to develop a 3D ray tracing model for quantitative evaluation of ultrasonic wave propagation in an inhomogeneous anisotropic austenitic weld material. Inhomogenity in the anisotropic weld material is represented by discretizing into several homogeneous layers. According to ray tracing model, ultrasonic ray paths are traced during its energy propagation through various discretized layers of the material and at each interface the problem of reflection and transmission is solved. The influence of anisotropy on ultrasonic reflection and transmission behaviour in an anisotropic austenitic weld material are quantitatively analyzed in three dimensions. The ultrasonic beam directivity in columnar grained austenitic steel material is determined three dimensionally using Lamb's reciprocity theorem. The developed ray tracing model evaluates the transducer excited ultrasonic fields accurately by taking into account the directivity of the transducer, divergence of the ray bundle, density of rays and phase

  1. Quantitative evaluation of ultrasonic wave propagation in inhomogeneous anisotropic austenitic welds using 3D ray tracing method. Numerical and experimental validation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kolkoori, Sanjeevareddy

    2014-07-01

    Austenitic welds and dissimilar welds are extensively used in primary circuit pipes and pressure vessels in nuclear power plants, chemical industries and fossil fuelled power plants because of their high fracture toughness, resistance to corrosion and creep at elevated temperatures. However, cracks may initiate in these weld materials during fabrication process or stress operations in service. Thus, it is very important to evaluate the structural integrity of these materials using highly reliable non-destructive testing (NDT) methods. Ultrasonic non-destructive inspection of austenitic welds and dissimilar weld components is complicated because of anisotropic columnar grain structure leading to beam splitting and beam deflection. Simulation tools play an important role in developing advanced reliable ultrasonic testing (UT) techniques and optimizing experimental parameters for inspection of austenitic welds and dissimilar weld components. The main aim of the thesis is to develop a 3D ray tracing model for quantitative evaluation of ultrasonic wave propagation in an inhomogeneous anisotropic austenitic weld material. Inhomogenity in the anisotropic weld material is represented by discretizing into several homogeneous layers. According to ray tracing model, ultrasonic ray paths are traced during its energy propagation through various discretized layers of the material and at each interface the problem of reflection and transmission is solved. The influence of anisotropy on ultrasonic reflection and transmission behaviour in an anisotropic austenitic weld material are quantitatively analyzed in three dimensions. The ultrasonic beam directivity in columnar grained austenitic steel material is determined three dimensionally using Lamb's reciprocity theorem. The developed ray tracing model evaluates the transducer excited ultrasonic fields accurately by taking into account the directivity of the transducer, divergence of the ray bundle, density of rays and phase

  2. Austenite Formation from Martensite in a 13Cr6Ni2Mo Supermartensitic Stainless Steel

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bojack, A.; Zhao, L.; Morris, P.F.; Sietsma, J.

    2016-01-01

    The influence of austenitization treatment of a 13Cr6Ni2Mo supermartensitic stainless steel (X2CrNiMoV13-5-2) on austenite formation during reheating and on the fraction of austenite retained after tempering treatment is measured and analyzed. The results show the formation of austenite in two

  3. Impact of the nanostructuration on the corrosion resistance and hardness of irradiated 316 austenitic stainless steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hug, E., E-mail: eric.hug@ensicaen.fr [Laboratoire de Cristallographie et Sciences des Matériaux, Normandie Université, CNRS UMR 6508, 6 Bd Maréchal Juin, 14050 Caen (France); Prasath Babu, R. [School of Materials, University of Manchester, M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Groupe de Physique des Matériaux, UMR CNRS 6634, Université et INSA de Rouen, Normandie Université, Saint-Etienne du Rouvray Cedex (France); Monnet, I. [Centre de recherches sur les Ions, les Matériaux et la Photonique CEA-CNRS, Normandie Université, 6 Bd Maréchal Juin, 14050 Caen (France); Etienne, A. [Groupe de Physique des Matériaux, UMR CNRS 6634, Université et INSA de Rouen, Normandie Université, Saint-Etienne du Rouvray Cedex (France); Moisy, F. [Centre de recherches sur les Ions, les Matériaux et la Photonique CEA-CNRS, Normandie Université, 6 Bd Maréchal Juin, 14050 Caen (France); Pralong, V. [Laboratoire de Cristallographie et Sciences des Matériaux, Normandie Université, CNRS UMR 6508, 6 Bd Maréchal Juin, 14050 Caen (France); Enikeev, N. [Institute of Physics of Advanced Materials, Ufa (Russian Federation); Saint Petersburg State University, Laboratory of the Mechanics of Bulk Nanostructured Materials, 198504 St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Abramova, M. [Institute of Physics of Advanced Materials, Ufa (Russian Federation); and others

    2017-01-15

    Highlights: • Impacts of nanostructuration and irradiation on the properties of 316 stainless steels are reported. • Irradiation of nanostructured samples implies chromium depletion as than depicted in coarse grain specimens. • Hardness of nanocrystalline steels is only weakly affected by irradiation. • Corrosion resistance of the nanostructured and irradiated samples is less affected by the chromium depletion. - Abstract: The influence of grain size and irradiation defects on the mechanical behavior and the corrosion resistance of a 316 stainless steel have been investigated. Nanostructured samples were obtained by severe plastic deformation using high pressure torsion. Both coarse grain and nanostructured samples were irradiated with 10 MeV {sup 56}Fe{sup 5+} ions. Microstructures were characterized using transmission electron microscopy and atom probe tomography. Surface mechanical properties were evaluated thanks to hardness measurements and the corrosion resistance was studied in chloride environment. Nanostructuration by high pressure torsion followed by annealing leads to enrichment in chromium at grain boundaries. However, irradiation of nanostructured samples implies a chromium depletion of the same order than depicted in coarse grain specimens but without metallurgical damage like segregated dislocation loops or clusters. Potentiodynamic polarization tests highlight a definitive deterioration of the corrosion resistance of coarse grain steel with irradiation. Downsizing the grain to a few hundred of nanometers enhances the corrosion resistance of irradiated samples, despite the fact that the hardness of nanocrystalline austenitic steel is only weakly affected by irradiation. These new experimental results are discussed in the basis of couplings between mechanical and electrical properties of the passivated layer thanks to impedance spectroscopy measurements, hardness properties of the surfaces and local microstructure evolutions.

  4. Phase volume fractions and strain measurements in an ultrafine-grained NiTi shape-memory alloy during tensile loading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Young, M.L.; Wagner, M.F.-X.; Frenzel, J.; Schmahl, W.W.; Eggeler, G.

    2010-01-01

    An ultrafine-grained pseudoelastic NiTi shape-memory alloy wire with 50.9 at.% Ni was examined using synchrotron X-ray diffraction during in situ uniaxial tensile loading (up to 1 GPa) and unloading. Both macroscopic stress-strain measurements and volume-averaged lattice strains are reported and discussed. The loading behavior is described in terms of elasto-plastic deformation of austenite, emergence of R phase, stress-induced martensitic transformation, and elasto-plastic deformation, grain reorientation and detwinning of martensite. The unloading behavior is described in terms of stress relaxation and reverse plasticity of martensite, reverse transformation of martensite to austenite due to stress relaxation, and stress relaxation of austenite. Microscopically, lattice strains in various crystallographic directions in the austenitic B2, martensitic R, and martensitic B19' phases are examined during loading and unloading. It is shown that the phase transformation occurs in a localized manner along the gage length at the plateau stress. Phase volume fractions and lattice strains in various crystallographic reflections in the austenite and martensite phases are examined over two transition regions between austenite and martensite, which have a width on the order of the wire diameter. Anisotropic effects observed in various crystallographic reflections of the austenitic phase are also discussed. The results contribute to a better understanding of the tensile loading behavior, both macroscopically and microscopically, of NiTi shape-memory alloys.

  5. Predictive coarse-graining

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schöberl, Markus, E-mail: m.schoeberl@tum.de [Continuum Mechanics Group, Technical University of Munich, Boltzmannstraße 15, 85748 Garching (Germany); Zabaras, Nicholas [Institute for Advanced Study, Technical University of Munich, Lichtenbergstraße 2a, 85748 Garching (Germany); Department of Aerospace and Mechanical Engineering, University of Notre Dame, 365 Fitzpatrick Hall, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States); Koutsourelakis, Phaedon-Stelios [Continuum Mechanics Group, Technical University of Munich, Boltzmannstraße 15, 85748 Garching (Germany)

    2017-03-15

    We propose a data-driven, coarse-graining formulation in the context of equilibrium statistical mechanics. In contrast to existing techniques which are based on a fine-to-coarse map, we adopt the opposite strategy by prescribing a probabilistic coarse-to-fine map. This corresponds to a directed probabilistic model where the coarse variables play the role of latent generators of the fine scale (all-atom) data. From an information-theoretic perspective, the framework proposed provides an improvement upon the relative entropy method and is capable of quantifying the uncertainty due to the information loss that unavoidably takes place during the coarse-graining process. Furthermore, it can be readily extended to a fully Bayesian model where various sources of uncertainties are reflected in the posterior of the model parameters. The latter can be used to produce not only point estimates of fine-scale reconstructions or macroscopic observables, but more importantly, predictive posterior distributions on these quantities. Predictive posterior distributions reflect the confidence of the model as a function of the amount of data and the level of coarse-graining. The issues of model complexity and model selection are seamlessly addressed by employing a hierarchical prior that favors the discovery of sparse solutions, revealing the most prominent features in the coarse-grained model. A flexible and parallelizable Monte Carlo – Expectation–Maximization (MC-EM) scheme is proposed for carrying out inference and learning tasks. A comparative assessment of the proposed methodology is presented for a lattice spin system and the SPC/E water model.

  6. Superior radiation-resistant nanoengineered austenitic 304L stainless steel for applications in extreme radiation environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, C; Zheng, S; Wei, C C; Wu, Y; Shao, L; Yang, Y; Hartwig, K T; Maloy, S A; Zinkle, S J; Allen, T R; Wang, H; Zhang, X

    2015-01-15

    Nuclear energy provides more than 10% of electrical power internationally, and the increasing engagement of nuclear energy is essential to meet the rapid worldwide increase in energy demand. A paramount challenge in the development of advanced nuclear reactors is the discovery of advanced structural materials that can endure extreme environments, such as severe neutron irradiation damage at high temperatures. It has been known for decades that high dose radiation can introduce significant void swelling accompanied by precipitation in austenitic stainless steel (SS). Here we report, however, that through nanoengineering, ultra-fine grained (UFG) 304 L SS with an average grain size of ~100 nm, can withstand Fe ion irradiation at 500 °C to 80 displacements-per-atom (dpa) with moderate grain coarsening. Compared to coarse grained (CG) counterparts, swelling resistance of UFG SS is improved by nearly an order of magnitude and swelling rate is reduced by a factor of 5. M(23)C(6) precipitates, abundant in irradiated CG SS, are largely absent in UFG SS. This study provides a nanoengineering approach to design and discover radiation tolerant metallic materials for applications in extreme radiation environments.

  7. Three-dimensional studies of intergranular carbides in austenitic stainless steel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ochi, Minoru; Kawano, Rika; Maeda, Takuya; Sato, Yukio; Teranishi, Ryo; Hara, Toru; Kikuchi, Masao; Kaneko, Kenji

    2017-04-01

    A large number of morphological studies of intergranular carbides in steels have always been carried out in two dimensions without considering their dispersion manners. In this article, focused ion beam serial-sectioning tomography was carried out to study the correlation among the grain boundary characteristics, the morphologies and the dispersions of intergranular carbides in 347 austenitic stainless steel. More than hundred intergranular carbides were characterized in three dimensions and finally classified into three different types, two types of carbides probably semi-coherent to one of the neighboring grains with plate-type morphology, and one type of carbides incoherent to both grains with rod-type morphology. In addition, the rod-type carbide was found as the largest number of carbides among three types. Since large numbers of defects, such as misfit dislocations, may be present at the grain boundaries, which can be ideal nucleation sites for intergranular rod-type carbide precipitation. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Japanese Society of Microscopy. All rights reserved.For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. Deformation behavior of austenitic stainless steel at deep cryogenic temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Wentuo; Liu, Yuchen; Wan, Farong; Liu, Pingping; Yi, Xiaoou; Zhan, Qian; Morrall, Daniel; Ohnuki, Somei

    2018-06-01

    The nonmagnetic austenite steels are the jacket materials for low-temperature superconductors of fusion reactors. The present work provides evidences that austenites transform to magnetic martensite when deformation with a high-strain is imposed at 77 K and 4.2 K. The 4.2 K test is characterized by serrated yielding that is related to the specific motion of dislocations and phase transformations. The in-situ transmission electron microscope (TEM) observations in nanoscale reveal that austenites achieve deformation by twinning under low-strain conditions at deep cryogenic temperatures. The generations of twins, martensitic transformations, and serrated yielding are in order of increasing difficulty.

  9. Martensite phase reversion-induced nano/ ultrafine grained AISI 304L stainless steel with magnificent mechanical properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Shirdel

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Austenitic stainless steels are extensively used in various applications requiring good corrosion resistance and formability. In the current study, the formation of nano/ ultrafine grained austenitic microstructure in a microalloyed AISI 304L stainless steel was investigated by the advanced thermomechanical process of reversion of strain-induced martensite. For this purpose, samples were subjected to heavy cold rolling to produce a nearly complete martensitic structure. Subsequently, a wide range of annealing temperatures (600 to 800°C and times (1 to 240 min were employed to assess the reversion behavior and to find the best annealing condition for the production of the nano/ultrafine grained austenitic microstructure. Microstructural characterizations have been performed using X-ray diffraction (XRD, scanning electron microscopy (SEM, and magnetic measurement, whereas the mechanical properties were assessed by tensile and hardness tests. After thermomechanical treatment, a very fine austenitic structure was obtained, which was composed of nano sized grains of ~ 85 nm in an ultrafine grained matrix with an average grain size of 480 nm. This microstructure exhibited superior mechanical properties: high tensile strength of about 1280 MPa with a desirable elongation of about 41%, which can pave the way for the application of these sheets in the automotive industry.

  10. Irradiation-Assisted Stress Corrosion Cracking of Austenitic Stainless Steels in BWR Environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Y.; Chopra, O. K.; Gruber, Eugene E.; Shack, William J.

    2010-01-01

    The internal components of light water reactors are exposed to high-energy neutron irradiation and high-temperature reactor coolant. The exposure to neutron irradiation increases the susceptibility of austenitic stainless steels (SSs) to stress corrosion cracking (SCC) because of the elevated corrosion potential of the reactor coolant and the introduction of new embrittlement mechanisms through radiation damage. Various nonsensitized SSs and nickel alloys have been found to be prone to intergranular cracking after extended neutron exposure. Such cracks have been seen in a number of internal components in boiling water reactors (BWRs). The elevated susceptibility to SCC in irradiated materials, commonly referred to as irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC), is a complex phenomenon that involves simultaneous actions of irradiation, stress, and corrosion. In recent years, as nuclear power plants have aged and irradiation dose increased, IASCC has become an increasingly important issue. Post-irradiation crack growth rate and fracture toughness tests have been performed to provide data and technical support for the NRC to address various issues related to aging degradation of reactor-core internal structures and components. This report summarizes the results of the last group of tests on compact tension specimens from the Halden-II irradiation. The IASCC susceptibility of austenitic SSs and heat-affected-zone (HAZ) materials sectioned from submerged arc and shielded metal arc welds was evaluated by conducting crack growth rate and fracture toughness tests in a simulated BWR environment. The fracture and cracking behavior of HAZ materials, thermally sensitized SSs and grain-boundary engineered SSs was investigated at several doses (3 dpa). These latest results were combined with previous results from Halden-I and II irradiations to analyze the effects of neutron dose, water chemistry, alloy compositions, and welding and processing conditions on IASCC. The

  11. In situ synchrotron analysis of lattice rotations in individual grains during stress-induced martensitic transformations in a polycrystalline CuAlBe shape memory alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berveiller, S.; Malard, B.; Wright, J.; Patoor, E.; Geandier, G.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → 3DXRD, Laue microdiffraction measurements of grain rotation in a shape memory alloy. → During stress-induced martensitic transformation, the austenite grains rotate. → This rotation reverses with the reverse transformation. → The austenite grains splits into various orientations with martensite formation. - Abstract: Two synchrotron diffraction techniques, three-dimensional X-ray diffraction and Laue microdiffraction, are applied to studying the deformation behaviour of individual grains embedded in a Cu 74 Al 23 Be 3 superelastic shape memory alloy. The average lattice rotation and the intragranular heterogeneity of orientations are measured during in situ tensile tests at room temperature for four grains of mean size ∼1 mm. During mechanical loading, all four grains rotate and the mean rotation angle increases with austenite deformation. As the martensitic transformation occurs, the rotation becomes more pronounced, and the grain orientation splits into several sub-domains: the austenite orientation varies on both sides of the martensite variant. The mean disorientation is ∼1 o . Upon unloading, the sub-domains collapse and reverse rotation is observed.

  12. Study of crack initiation in low-cycle fatigue of an austenitic stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mu, P.

    2011-03-01

    The material studied is an austenitic stainless steel, that is widely used in nuclear equipment for its very high corrosion resistance combined to good mechanical properties. Although crack initiation is proved to play an important role in fatigue, its mechanisms have not been fully understood. Some crack initiation criteria based on physical mechanisms of plastic deformation have been defined. However, these criteria are not easy to use and valid, as they need local variables at the grain scale. The present study aims at establishing a crack initiation criterion in low-cycle fatigue, which should be usable under variable amplitude loading conditions. Tension-compression fatigue tests were first carried out to characterize the mechanical behavior of the stainless steel AISI 316L. The mechanical behavior was simulated using a self-consistent model using a crystalline plastic law based on dislocation densities. The evolution of surface damage was observed during a fatigue test using an in situ optical microscopic device. Cracks were analyzed after 2000 cycles and their crystallographic characteristics calculated. As surface grains exhibit larger strain because they are less constraint by neighbor grains, a specific numerical frame is necessary to determine stress state in surface grains. A localization law specific to surface grains under cyclic loading was identified from finite element simulations. The proposed form needs an intergranular accommodation variable, on the pattern of the localization law of Cailletaud-Pilvin. Stress-strain state in surface grains was simulated. Potential indicators for crack initiation were then compared on a same experimental data base. Indicators based on the equivalent plastic strain were found to be suitable indicators of fatigue damage. (author)

  13. Cyclic deformation behaviour of austenitic steels at ambient and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R. Narasimhan (Krishtel eMaging) 1461 1996 Oct 15 13:05:22

    Fatigue; cyclic deformation behaviour; metastable austenitic steel; .... Figure 4 shows a sequence of the basic diagrams which can be used to assess the fatigue .... well as the change of temperature and the development of the magnetic ...

  14. Low-temperature creep of austenitic stainless steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, R. P.; Walsh, R. P.

    2017-09-01

    Plastic deformation under constant load (creep) in austenitic stainless steels has been measured at temperatures ranging from 4 K to room temperature. Low-temperature creep data taken from past and unreported austenitic stainless steel studies are analyzed and reviewed. Creep at cryogenic temperatures of common austenitic steels, such as AISI 304, 310 316, and nitrogen-strengthened steels, such as 304HN and 3116LN, are included. Analyses suggests that logarithmic creep (creep strain dependent on the log of test time) best describe austenitic stainless steel behavior in the secondary creep stage and that the slope of creep strain versus log time is dependent on the applied stress/yield strength ratio. The role of cold work, strain-induced martensitic transformations, and stacking fault energy on low-temperature creep behavior is discussed. The engineering significance of creep on cryogenic structures is discussed in terms of the total creep strain under constant load over their operational lifetime at allowable stress levels.

  15. Formation and stabilization of reversed austenite in supermartensitic stainless steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nießen, Frank; Grumsen, Flemming Bjerg; Hald, John

    2017-01-01

    of the reversed austenite phase fraction. Annealing at higher temperatures led to a gradual increase in hardness which was caused by formation of fresh martensite from reversed austenite. It was demonstrated that stabilization of reversed austenite is primarily based on chemical stabilization by partitioning......The formation and stabilization of reversed austenite upon inter-critical annealing was investigated in a X4CrNiMo16-5-1 (EN 1.4418) supermartensitic stainless steel by means of scanning electron microscopy, electron backscatter-diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, energy-dispersive X......-ray spectroscopy and dilatometry. The results were supported by thermodynamics and kinetics models, and hardness measurements. Isothermal annealing for 2 h in the temperature range of 475 to 650 °C led to gradual softening of the material which was related to tempering of martensite and the steady increase...

  16. Nanostructured Bainite-Austenite Steel for Armours Construction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burian W.

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Nanostructured bainite-austenite steels are applied in the armours construction due to their excellent combination of strength and ductility which enables to lower the armour weight and to improve the protection efficiency. Mechanical properties of the bainite-austenite steels can be controlled in the wide range by chemical composition and heat treatment. In the paper the results of investigation comprising measuring of quasi - static mechanical properties, dynamic yield stress and firing tests of bainite-austenite steel NANOS-BA® are presented. Reported results show that the investigated bainite-austenite steel can be used for constructing add-on armour and that the armour fulfils requirements of protection level 2 of STANAG 4569. Obtained reduction in weight of the tested NANOS-BA® plates in comparison with the present solutions is about 30%.

  17. Welding of austenitic stainless steel with a high molybdenum content

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liljas, A.; Holmberg, B.

    1984-01-01

    Welding of austenitic steel is discussed. Welding tests of AVESTA 250 SMO (six percent Mo) are reported. Welding without special additives can make the joints susceptible for corrosion in aggressive environments, e.g. sea water. (L.E.)

  18. Effects of austenitizing temperature in quenched niobium steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mello, F.B.C. de; Assuncao, F.C.R.

    1980-01-01

    Three steel compositions with varying Nb content were austenitized at different temperatures and quenched in cold water. Metallographic examination and hardness measurements provided a basis for explaining the hardening mechanism and the role of Nb on the process. (Author) [pt

  19. Chemically Induced Phase Transformation in Austenite by Focused Ion Beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basa, Adina; Thaulow, Christian; Barnoush, Afrooz

    2014-03-01

    A highly stable austenite phase in a super duplex stainless steel was subjected to a combination of different gallium ion doses at different acceleration voltages. It was shown that contrary to what is expected, an austenite to ferrite phase transformation occurred within the focused ion beam (FIB) milled regions. Chemical analysis of the FIB milled region proved that the gallium implantation preceded the FIB milling. High resolution electron backscatter diffraction analysis also showed that the phase transformation was not followed by the typical shear and plastic deformation expected from the martensitic transformation. On the basis of these observations, it was concluded that the change in the chemical composition of the austenite and the local increase in gallium, which is a ferrite stabilizer, results in the local selective transformation of austenite to ferrite.

  20. Effect of residual stress and hardening on grain boundary sliding in welds of low-carbon stainless steels with surface machining

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mori, Hiroaki; Mochizuki, Masahito; Nishimoto, Kazutoshi; Katsuyama, Jinya

    2007-01-01

    To clarify the effects of residual stress and hardening on intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) behavior in welds of low-carbon austenitic stainless steels with surface machining, residual stress and hardness were evaluated by 3-dimentional thermo elastic-plastic analysis and grain boundary sliding behavior was examined using a constant strain rate tensile test. It was revealed that grain boundary sliding occurred in the material at 561K by the tensile test with the numerically simulated tensile residual stress due to welding and surface machining. In addition, it was clarified that the grain boundary energy is raised by the grain boundary sliding. On the basis of these results, it was concluded that the cause of IGSCC in the welds of low-carbon austenitic stainless steel with surface hardening is the increase in grain boundary energy due to grain boundary sliding accelerated by residual stress of multi pass welding and surface hardening. (author)

  1. Effect of residual stress and hardening on grain boundary sliding in welds of low-carbon stainless steels with surface machining

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mori, Hiroaki; Mochizuki, Masahito; Nishimoto, Kazutoshi; Katsuyama, Jinya

    2008-01-01

    To clarify the effects of residual stress and hardening on intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) behavior in welds of low-carbon austenitic stainless steels with surface machining, residual stress and hardness were evaluated by 3-dimentional thermo elastic-plastic analysis and grain boundary sliding behavior was examined using a constant strain rate tensile test. It was revealed that grain boundary sliding occurred in the material at 561K by the tensile test with the numerically simulated tensile residual stress due to multi-pass welding and surface machining. In addition, it was clarified that the grain boundary energy is raised by the grain boundary sliding. On the basis of these results, it was concluded that the cause of IGSCC in the welds of low-carbon austenitic stainless steel with surface hardening is the increase in grain boundary energy due to grain boundary sliding induced by residual stress of multi pass welding and surface hardening. (author)

  2. Grain-resolved analysis of localized deformation in nickel-titanium wire under tensile load.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sedmák, P; Pilch, J; Heller, L; Kopeček, J; Wright, J; Sedlák, P; Frost, M; Šittner, P

    2016-08-05

    The stress-induced martensitic transformation in tensioned nickel-titanium shape-memory alloys proceeds by propagation of macroscopic fronts of localized deformation. We used three-dimensional synchrotron x-ray diffraction to image at micrometer-scale resolution the grain-resolved elastic strains and stresses in austenite around one such front in a prestrained nickel-titanium wire. We found that the local stresses in austenite grains are modified ahead of the nose cone-shaped buried interface where the martensitic transformation begins. Elevated shear stresses at the cone interface explain why the martensitic transformation proceeds in a localized manner. We established the crossover from stresses in individual grains to a continuum macroscopic internal stress field in the wire and rationalized the experimentally observed internal stress field and the topology of the macroscopic front by means of finite element simulations of the localized deformation. Copyright © 2016, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  3. Mechanical and microstructural aspects of severe plastic deformation of austenitic steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodak, K.; Pawlicki, J.; Tkocz, M.

    2012-05-01

    The paper presents the effects of severe plastic deformation by multiple compression in the orthogonal directions on the microstructure and the mechanical properties of austenitic steel. Several deformation variants were conducted with different number of passes. FEM simulations were performed in order to evaluate the actual values of the effective strain in the examined, central parts of the compressed samples. The deformed microstructure was investigated by means of the scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) and the scanning electron microscopy (SEM) supported by the electron back scattered diffraction (EBSD). X-ray phase analysis was performed to evaluate the martensite volume fraction. The mechanical properties were determined by means of the digital image correlation method and hardness testing. It is shown that the applied forming technique leads to strong grain refinement in the austenitic steel. Moreover, deformation induces the martensitic γ- α' transformation. The microstructural changes cause an improvement in the strength properties. The material exhibits the ultimate tensile strength of 1560 MPa and the yield stress of 1500 MPa after reaching the effective strain of 10.

  4. Mechanical and microstructural aspects of severe plastic deformation of austenitic steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodak, K; Pawlicki, J; Tkocz, M

    2012-01-01

    The paper presents the effects of severe plastic deformation by multiple compression in the orthogonal directions on the microstructure and the mechanical properties of austenitic steel. Several deformation variants were conducted with different number of passes. FEM simulations were performed in order to evaluate the actual values of the effective strain in the examined, central parts of the compressed samples. The deformed microstructure was investigated by means of the scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) and the scanning electron microscopy (SEM) supported by the electron back scattered diffraction (EBSD). X-ray phase analysis was performed to evaluate the martensite volume fraction. The mechanical properties were determined by means of the digital image correlation method and hardness testing. It is shown that the applied forming technique leads to strong grain refinement in the austenitic steel. Moreover, deformation induces the martensitic γ– α' transformation. The microstructural changes cause an improvement in the strength properties. The material exhibits the ultimate tensile strength of 1560 MPa and the yield stress of 1500 MPa after reaching the effective strain of 10.

  5. On the determination of stress profiles in expanded austenite by grazing incidence X-ray diffraction and successive layer removal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fernandes, Frederico Augusto Pires; Christiansen, Thomas L.; Winther, Grethe

    2015-01-01

    Surface layers of expanded austenite resulting from nitriding typically exhibit large gradients in residual stress and composition. Evaluation of residual-stress profiles is explored by means of grazing incidence X-ray diffraction (GI-XRD), probing shallow depths, combined with successive layer...... removal. Several factors complicating the stress determination are analysed and discussed: (1) ghost stresses arising from a small variation in the shallow information depths probed with GI-XRD, (2) selection of the grain interaction model used to calculate the X-ray elastic constants for conversion...

  6. On the determination of stress profiles in expanded austenite by grazing incidence X-ray diffraction and successive layer removal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandes, Frederico A.P.; Christiansen, Thomas L.; Winther, Grethe; Somers, Marcel A.J.

    2015-01-01

    Surface layers of expanded austenite resulting from nitriding typically exhibit large gradients in residual stress and composition. Evaluation of residual-stress profiles is explored by means of grazing incidence X-ray diffraction (GI-XRD), probing shallow depths, combined with successive layer removal. Several factors complicating the stress determination are analysed and discussed: (1) ghost stresses arising from a small variation in the shallow information depths probed with GI-XRD, (2) selection of the grain interaction model used to calculate the X-ray elastic constants for conversion of lattice strains into residual stress and (3) the composition dependence of these elastic constants

  7. A study of the carbon distribution in retained austenite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scott, C.P.; Drillet, J.

    2007-01-01

    Cold-rolled and annealed transformation-induced plasticity (TRIP) steels were overaged to modify the carbon concentrations (C γ ) in retained austenite. Experimental C γ values were directly obtained by electron energy loss spectroscopy and compared with data derived from X-ray diffraction measurements of the austenite lattice parameter (a γ ). In this way, we evaluated the different expressions available in the literature relating C γ to a γ

  8. Interactions between the phase stress and the grain-orientation-dependent stress in duplex stainless steel during deformation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jia, N.; Peng, R. Lin; Wang, Y.D.; Chai, G.C.; Johansson, S.; Wang, G.; Liaw, P.K.

    2006-01-01

    The development of phase stress and grain-orientation-dependent stress under uniaxial compression was investigated in a duplex stainless steel consisting of austenite and ferrite. Using in situ neutron diffraction measurements, the strain response of several h k l planes to the applied compressive stress was mapped as a function of applied stress and sample direction. Analysis based on the experimental results and elastoplastic self-consistent simulations shows that phase stresses of thermal origin further increase during elastic loading but decrease with increased plastic deformation. Grain-orientation-dependent stresses become significant in both austenite and ferrite after loading into the plastic region. After unloading from the plastic regime, a considerable intergranular stress remains in the austenitic phase and dominates over the phase stress. This study provides fundamental experimental inputs for future micromechanical modeling aiming at the evaluation and prediction of the mechanical performance of multiphase materials

  9. Plastic fracture toughness of austenitic welding connection for Ver-1000 nuclear reactor piping of 300-350 mm diameter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasil'chenko, G.S.; Dragunov, Yu.G.; Kabelevskij, M.G.; Kazantsev, A.G.; Kunavin, S.A.; Merinov, G.N.; Sokov, L.M.

    2000-01-01

    The outside welding technology for circular welds in a pearlitic tube using austenitic welding wire materials is developed and applied in manufacturing pipelines of CPP and ECC. Mechanical properties and fracture toughness of austenitic welded joints in pearlitic tubes are determined to substantiate by calculation the practicality of the leakage prior to failure concept. The work is accomplished on experimental tube manufactured by hand arc welding. When manufactured the tube is cut into 5 rings. From the rings the tensile specimens are cut for testing at 20 and 350 deg C as well as Charpy V-notch impact specimens and compact specimens ST-1T. It is shown that the materials of the experimental tube meet the standard requirements. Only axial specimens cut across the weld are not in conformity with the requirements for specific elongation [ru

  10. Grain Structure Control of Additively Manufactured Metallic Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fuyao Yan

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Grain structure control is challenging for metal additive manufacturing (AM. Grain structure optimization requires the control of grain morphology with grain size refinement, which can improve the mechanical properties of additive manufactured components. This work summarizes methods to promote fine equiaxed grains in both the additive manufacturing process and subsequent heat treatment. Influences of temperature gradient, solidification velocity and alloy composition on grain morphology are discussed. Equiaxed solidification is greatly promoted by introducing a high density of heterogeneous nucleation sites via powder rate control in the direct energy deposition (DED technique or powder surface treatment for powder-bed techniques. Grain growth/coarsening during post-processing heat treatment can be restricted by presence of nano-scale oxide particles formed in-situ during AM. Grain refinement of martensitic steels can also be achieved by cyclic austenitizing in post-processing heat treatment. Evidently, new alloy powder design is another sustainable method enhancing the capability of AM for high-performance components with desirable microstructures.

  11. Intergranular corrosion behavior associated with delta-ferrite transformation of Ti-modified Super304H austenitic stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bai, Guanshun; Lu, Shanping; Li, Dianzhong; Li, Yiyi

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Relationship between delta-ferrite transformation and IGC behavior was evaluated by DL-EPR test quantitatively. • The IGC site at austenite/ferrite grain boundary changes with aging time at 650 °C. • A higher fraction of delta-ferrite with poor stability increases the IGC sensitisation. • Self-healing of IGC was mainly induced by the Cr diffusion from primary austenite rather than the delta-ferrite. - Abstract: A double loop electrochemical potentiokinetic reactivation (DL-EPR) test was conducted to investigate the relationship between the evolution of delta-ferrite and the intergranular corrosion (IGC) of Ti-modified Super304H, which was aged at 650 °C for 4–500 h. Scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy were adopted to analyze the evolution of delta-ferrite. The results indicated that a higher fraction of delta-ferrite with poor stability increased the IGC sensitisation of Ti-modified Super304H. Moreover, the self-healing of the sensitisation of Ti-modified Super304H occurred after 48 h due to the diffusion of chromium atoms mainly from the adjacent primary austenite rather than the delta-ferrite

  12. The effects of adding molybdenum and niobium on the creep strength of 18Cr-10Ni-20Co austenitic steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomono, Yutaka

    1987-01-01

    The decrease in the creep strength of structural materials during service at elevated temperatures is a very important problem that affects the security of plants and machinery. The improvement in the creep strength of 18Cr-10Ni-20Co austenitic steel achieved through the addition of molybdenum and niobium was studied in tests carried out at 973K and 1,073K. The creep strengthening mechanism was examined using transmission electron micrographs, X-ray diffraction, etc. The results obtained are summarized as follows: (1) The creep strength of low C-18Cr-10Ni-20Co austenitic steel with molybdenum was greatly improved by the addition of niobium up to 1% by weight. In the case of long-term creep, no trend toward decreasing creep strength was observed. (2) The creep strength of austenitic steel possessing a matrix strengthened with molybdenum can be improved through the addition of niobium combined with precipitation hardening with fine carbides precipitated in the grains. (author)

  13. Influence of helium embrittlement on post-irradiation creep rupture behaviour of austenitic and martensitic stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wassilew, C.

    1982-01-01

    The author has investigated the influence of helium embrittlement on the creep rupture properties of the austenitic stainless steels 1.4970 and 1.4962 and the martensitic stainless steel 1.4914 after irradiation in the BR-2 reactor in Mol, Belgium. The results show that austenitic steels react much more strongly to the embrittlement effect of the helium than do martensitic steels. The causes of the lower embrittlement tendency of the martensitic than of both austenitic stainless steels were analysed carefully. A new embrittlement model was developed on the basis of data derived from the creep rupture experiments, and reinforced by a simple metallographic investigation of the fracture zone and its immediate environment. This model pays specific attention to the role of the twin planes as the most efficient area of increased vacancy production, and takes into account the ability of the twin boundaries to transport these vacancies with reduced energy and low loss into the high-angle grain boundaries. (author)

  14. Characterization of phase properties and deformation in ferritic-austenitic duplex stainless steels by nanoindentation and finite element method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwarm, Samuel C.; Mburu, Sarah; Ankem, Sreeramamurthy

    2016-01-01

    The phase properties and deformation behavior of the δ–ferrite and γ–austenite phases of CF–3 and CF–8 cast duplex stainless steels were characterized by nanoindentation and microstructure-based finite element method (FEM) models. We evaluated the elastic modulus of each phase and the results indicate that the mean elastic modulus of the δ–ferrite phase is greater than that of the γ–austenite phase, and the mean nanoindentation hardness values of each phase are approximately the same. Furthermore, the elastic FEM model results illustrate that greater von Mises stresses are located within the δ–ferrite phase, while greater von Mises strains are located in the γ–austenite phase in response to elastic deformation. The elastic moduli calculated by FEM agree closely with those measured by tensile testing. Finally, the plastically deformed specimens exhibit an increase in misorientation, deformed grains, and subgrain structure formation as measured by electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD).

  15. Atomic scale study of grain boundary segregation before carbide nucleation in Ni–Cr–Fe Alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Hui, E-mail: huili@shu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory for Microstructures, Shanghai University, Shanghai 200444 (China); Institute of Materials, Shanghai University, Shanghai 200072 (China); Xia, Shuang [Institute of Materials, Shanghai University, Shanghai 200072 (China); Liu, Wenqing [Key Laboratory for Microstructures, Shanghai University, Shanghai 200444 (China); Liu, Tingguang; Zhou, Bangxin [Institute of Materials, Shanghai University, Shanghai 200072 (China)

    2013-08-15

    Highlights: • Impurities segregated at grain boundaries were observed by atom probe tomography. • The comparison of segregation features in two Ni–Cr–Fe alloys was studied by APT. • C and Cr atoms co-segregated at grain boundaries before carbide precipitation. -- Abstract: Three dimensional chemical information concerning grain boundary segregation before carbide nucleation was characterized by atom probe tomography in two Ni–Cr–Fe alloys which were aged at 500 °C for 0.5 h after homogenizing treatment. B, C and Si atoms segregation at grain boundary in Alloy 690 was observed. B, C, N and P atoms segregation at grain boundary in 304 austenitic stainless steel was observed. C atoms co-segregation with Cr atoms at the grain boundaries both in Alloy 690 and 304 austenitic stainless steel was found, and its effect on the carbide nucleation was discussed. The amount of each segregated element at grain boundaries in the two Ni–Cr–Fe alloys were analyzed quantitatively. Comparison of the grain boundary segregation features of the two Ni–Cr–Fe alloys were carried out based on the experimental results.

  16. Active flux tungsten inert gas welding of austenitic stainless steel AISI 304

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Klobčar

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the effects of flux assisted tungsten inert gas (A-TIG welding of 4 (10 mm thick austenitic stainless steel EN X5CrNi1810 (AISI 304 in the butt joint. The sample dimensions were 300 ´ 50 mm, and commercially available active flux QuickTIG was used for testing. In the planned study the influence of welding position and weld groove shape was analysed based on the penetration depth. A comparison of microstructure formation, grain size and ferrit number between TIG welding and A-TIG welding was done. The A-TIG welds were subjected to bending test. A comparative study of TIG and A-TIG welding shows that A-TIG welding increases the weld penetration depth.

  17. Study of precipitation phenomena during the creep of austenitic stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le May, I.; Bassett, B.J.; White, W.E.

    1975-01-01

    Creep-rupture data for two austenitic stainless steels, AISI Types 310 and 316, are presented, together with observations of precipitation taking place during creep. While the effects of creep deformation on precipitation in the Type 310 were negligible, ferrite precipitation was considerably greater in the Type 316 undergoing creep than in unstressed material. Ferrite precipitation appears to promote grain boundary cavitation and internal cracking, thus reducing creep resistance and a correlation has been noted between increased ferrite precipitation and apparent further weakening of the Type 316 over the temperature range 730 to 800 0 C approximately, as evidenced by breaks in the isostress lines on a plot of log (time to rupture) versus temperature

  18. A study of precipitation phenomena during the creep of austenitic stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le May, I.; White, W.E.; Bassett, B.J.

    1975-01-01

    Creep-rupture data for two austenitic stainless steels, AISI Types 310 and 316, are presented, together with observations of precipitation taking place during creep. While the effects of creep deformation on precipitation in the Type 310 were negligible, ferrite precipitation was considerably greater in the Type 316 undergoing creep than in unstressed material. Ferrite precipitation appears to promote grain boundary cavitation and internal cracking, thus reducing creep resistance, and a correlation has been noted between increased ferrite precipitation and apparent further weakening of the Type 316 over the temperature range 730 0 C to 800 0 C approximately, as evidenced by breaks in the isostress lines on a plot of log (time to rupture) versus temperature. (author)

  19. Precipitation sequences in austenitic Fe-22Cr-21Ni-6Mo-(N) stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, S.-J.; Lee, T.-H.

    1999-01-01

    Precipitation sequence of nitrogen containing Fe-22Cr-21Ni-6Mo-N austenitic stainless steel has been investigated after aging at high temperatures, and compared with nitrogen free steel. The σ phases and M 23 C 6 carbides were observed along the grain boundaries as well as in the matrix in both of the solution treated specimens. The M 6 C carbides and chi phase appeared successively in between 3 hours and 24 hours depending on the nitrogen content. Main difference in aging behavior was the precipitation of fine nitrides. Aging for 24 hours and 168 hours of nitrogen containing steel resulted in the formation of fine Cr 2 N and faceted AlN nitrides. The crystallography, structure and morphology were analyzed with analytical electron microscopy. (orig.)

  20. Mechanical Behaviour of 304 Austenitic Stainless Steel Processed by Room Temperature Rolling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Rahul; Goel, Sunkulp; Verma, Raviraj; Jayaganthan, R.; Kumar, Abhishek

    2018-03-01

    To study the effect of room temperature rolling on mechanical properties of 304 Austenitic Stainless Steel, the as received 304 ASS was rolled at room temperature for different percentage of plastic deformation (i.e. 30, 50, 70 and 90 %). Microstructural study, tensile and hardness tests were performed in accordance with ASTM standards to study the effect of rolling. The ultimate tensile strength (UTS) and hardness of a rolled specimen have enhanced with rolling. The UTS has increased from 693 MPa (as received) to 1700 MPa (after 90% deformation). The improvement in UTS of processed samples is due to combined effect of grain refinement and stress induced martensitic phase transformation. The hardness values also increases from 206 VHN (as received) to 499 VHN (after 90% deformation). Magnetic measurements were also conducted to confirm the formation of martensitic phase.

  1. Effect of irradiation temperature on microstructural changes in self-ion irradiated austenitic stainless steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Hyung-Ha; Ko, Eunsol; Lim, Sangyeob; Kwon, Junhyun; Shin, Chansun

    2017-09-01

    We investigated the microstructural and hardness changes in austenitic stainless steel after Fe ion irradiation at 400, 300, and 200 °C using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and nanoindentation. The size of the Frank loops increased and the density decreased with increasing irradiation temperature. Radiation-induced segregation (RIS) was detected across high-angle grain boundaries, and the degree of RIS increases with increasing irradiation temperature. Ni-Si clusters were observed using high-resolution TEM in the sample irradiated at 400 °C. The results of this work are compared with the literature data of self-ion and proton irradiation at comparable temperatures and damage levels on stainless steels with a similar material composition with this study. Despite the differences in dose rate, alloy composition and incident ion energy, the irradiation temperature dependence of RIS and the size and density of radiation defects followed the same trends, and were very comparable in magnitude.

  2. Alloying effect on the structure and properties of austenitic heat-resistant steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levitin, V.V.; Grabovskij, V.Ya.; Korostelev, V.F.; Ryvkin, Yu.A.

    1978-01-01

    Investigated have been mechanical properties at test temperatures of 20-95O deg C, wear resistance, softening at thermomechanical cycling and microstructure of cast austenitic chromium-nickel steels (13%Cr + 35%Ni), produced by electroslag remelting with variations in Ti, Mo, Nb and W contents. Regression equations for relationship of the investigated characteristics to alloying element content have been obtained. Titanium, molybdenum and niobium increasing hardness and strength limit at room and high temperatures promote a decrease in ductility. Tungsten increases strength properties, wear resistance and thermal stability of the steels without negative effect on the impact strength. The impact strength decrease with an increase in alloying is due to brittle precipitations along the boundaries of as-cast grains, containing Ti, Mo, Nb and Si

  3. The influence of He on the high temperature fracture of an austenitic stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saguees, A.A.

    1976-01-01

    The Ti-stabilised DIN 1.4970 austenitic stainless steel is an important candidate for high temperature - high neutron fluence applications which will create appreciable amounts of He within the matrix. In order to determine the mechanical effects associated with the presence of He alone a set of tensile specimens was cyclotron implanted to uniform He concentrations in the 10 -6 to 10 -4 at. range and later creep tested at 700 0 C and 800 0 C. The elongation to fracture values of the implanted specimens were reduced with respect to those of unimplanted controls. Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) examination revealed that fracture starts as intergranular and subsequently propagates in a transgranular fashion, the intergranular part being much more extended in the implanted material. Transmission Electron Microscope (TEM) examination revealed He segregation at the grain boundary precipitates. A mechanism of He embrittlement is discussed in terms of the present results

  4. Novel approaches to determining residual stresses by ultramicroindentation techniques: Application to sandblasted austenitic stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frutos, E.; Multigner, M.; Gonzalez-Carrasco, J.L.

    2010-01-01

    This research addresses the determination of residual stresses in sandblasted austenitic steel by ultramicroindentation techniques using a sharp indenter, of which the sensitivity to residual stress effects is said to be inferior to that of spherical ones. The introduction of an angular correction in the model of Wang et al. which relates variations in the maximum load to the presence of residual stresses is proposed. Similarly, the contribution to the hardness of grain size refinement and work hardening, developed as a consequence of the severe plastic deformation during blasting, is determined in order to avoid overestimation of the residual stresses. Measurements were performed on polished cross sections along a length of several microns, thus obtaining a profile of the residual stresses. Results show good agreement with those obtained by synchrotron radiation on the same specimens, which validates the method and demonstrates that microindentation using sharp indenters may be sensitive to the residual stress effect.

  5. Testing of intergranular and pitting corrosion in sensitized welded joints of austenitic stainless steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bore V. Jegdic

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Pitting corrosion resistance and intergranular corrosion of the austenitic stainless steel X5Cr Ni18-10 were tested on the base metal, heat affected zone and weld metal. Testing of pitting corrosion was performed by the potentiodynamic polarization method, while testing of intergranular corrosion was performed by the method of electrochemical potentiokinetic reactivation with double loop. The base metal was completely resistant to intergranular corrosion, while the heat affected zone showed a slight susceptibility to intergranular corrosion. Indicators of pitting corrosion resistance for the weld metal and the base metal were very similar, but their values are significantly higher than the values for the heat affected zone. This was caused by reduction of the chromium concentration in the grain boundary areas in the heat affected zone, even though the carbon content in the examined stainless steel is low (0.04 wt. % C.

  6. Novel approaches to determining residual stresses by ultramicroindentation techniques: Application to sandblasted austenitic stainless steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frutos, E. [Centro de Bioingenieria, Biomateriales y Nanomedicina, CIBER-BBN, Instituto de Salud Carlos III (Spain)] [Centro Nacional de Investigaciones Metalurgicas, CENIM-CSIC, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Multigner, M. [Centro Nacional de Investigaciones Metalurgicas, CENIM-CSIC, 28040 Madrid (Spain)] [Centro de Bioingenieria, Biomateriales y Nanomedicina, CIBER-BBN, Instituto de Salud Carlos III (Spain); Gonzalez-Carrasco, J.L., E-mail: jlg@cenim.csic.es [Centro Nacional de Investigaciones Metalurgicas, CENIM-CSIC, 28040 Madrid (Spain)] [Centro de Bioingenieria, Biomateriales y Nanomedicina, CIBER-BBN, Instituto de Salud Carlos III (Spain)

    2010-07-15

    This research addresses the determination of residual stresses in sandblasted austenitic steel by ultramicroindentation techniques using a sharp indenter, of which the sensitivity to residual stress effects is said to be inferior to that of spherical ones. The introduction of an angular correction in the model of Wang et al. which relates variations in the maximum load to the presence of residual stresses is proposed. Similarly, the contribution to the hardness of grain size refinement and work hardening, developed as a consequence of the severe plastic deformation during blasting, is determined in order to avoid overestimation of the residual stresses. Measurements were performed on polished cross sections along a length of several microns, thus obtaining a profile of the residual stresses. Results show good agreement with those obtained by synchrotron radiation on the same specimens, which validates the method and demonstrates that microindentation using sharp indenters may be sensitive to the residual stress effect.

  7. Constrained noninformative priors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atwood, C.L.

    1994-10-01

    The Jeffreys noninformative prior distribution for a single unknown parameter is the distribution corresponding to a uniform distribution in the transformed model where the unknown parameter is approximately a location parameter. To obtain a prior distribution with a specified mean but with diffusion reflecting great uncertainty, a natural generalization of the noninformative prior is the distribution corresponding to the constrained maximum entropy distribution in the transformed model. Examples are given

  8. Precipitation sequence and its effect on age hardening of alumina-forming austenitic stainless steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moon, Joonoh, E-mail: mjo99@kims.re.kr [Ferrous Alloy Department, Advanced Metallic Materials Division, Korea Institute of Materials Science, Changwon, Gyeongnam 642-831 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Tae-Ho [Ferrous Alloy Department, Advanced Metallic Materials Division, Korea Institute of Materials Science, Changwon, Gyeongnam 642-831 (Korea, Republic of); Heo, Yoon-Uk [Graduate Institute of Ferrous Technology, Pohang University of Science and Technology, 77 Cheongam-ro, Nam-gu, Gyeongbuk 790-784 (Korea, Republic of); Han, Young-Soo [Neutron Science Division, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon 305-353 (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Jun-Yun; Ha, Heon-Young [Ferrous Alloy Department, Advanced Metallic Materials Division, Korea Institute of Materials Science, Changwon, Gyeongnam 642-831 (Korea, Republic of); Suh, Dong-Woo [Graduate Institute of Ferrous Technology, Pohang University of Science and Technology, 77 Cheongam-ro, Nam-gu, Gyeongbuk 790-784 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-01

    The precipitation sequence during ageing of Fe–14Cr–20Ni–0.9Nb–2.5Al based alumina-forming austenitic (AFA) steel was explored through a transmission electron microscopy analysis and a small angle neutron scattering experiment. The samples were aged at 700 °C for up to 504 h. Particles of NbC, M{sub 23}C{sub 6} and Ni{sub 3}Al-type L1{sub 2} were observed in the early stage of ageing. Metastable L1{sub 2} particles were formed both in grain interior and along grain boundary. M{sub 23}C{sub 6} carbides precipitated along grain boundary accompanied with precipitation of L1{sub 2} particles. After ageing for longer than 48 h, particles of B2-NiAl and Laves-Fe{sub 2}Nb were newly formed. We suggest the possibility of phase transition from L1{sub 2} to B2 with increase in ageing time. Finally, this study examined the change of mechanical properties during ageing through a Gleeble hot tension test and a Vickers hardness test, and then the relationship between precipitation behavior and mechanical properties was carefully investigated and discussed in terms of precipitation behavior.

  9. Study on the dynamic recrystallization model and mechanism of nuclear grade 316LN austenitic stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Shenglong; Zhang, Mingxian; Wu, Huanchun; Yang, Bin

    2016-01-01

    In this study, the dynamic recrystallization behaviors of a nuclear grade 316LN austenitic stainless steel were researched through hot compression experiment performed on a Gleeble-1500 simulator at temperatures of 900–1250 °C and strain rates of 0.01–1 s −1 . By multiple linear regressions of the flow stress-strain data, the dynamic recrystallization mathematical models of this steel as functions of strain rate, strain and temperature were developed. Then these models were verified in a real experiment. Furthermore, the dynamic recrystallization mechanism of the steel was determined. The results indicated that the subgrains in this steel are formed through dislocations polygonization and then grow up through subgrain boundaries migration towards high density dislocation areas and subgrain coalescence mechanism. Dynamic recrystallization nucleation performs in grain boundary bulging mechanism and subgrain growth mechanism. The nuclei grow up through high angle grain boundaries migration. - Highlights: •Establish the DRX mathematical models of nuclear grade 316LN stainless steel •Determine the DRX mechanism of this steel •Subgrains are formed through dislocations polygonization. •Subgrains grow up through subgrain boundaries migration and coalescence mechanism. •DRX nucleation performs in grain boundary bulging mechanism and subgrain growth mechanism.

  10. Ultrasonic nonlinearity of AISI316 austenitic steel subjected to long-term isothermal aging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gong, Won Sik; Kim, Chung Seok [Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering, Chosun University, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-06-15

    This study presents the ultrasonic nonlinearity of AISI316 austenitic stainless steels subjected to longterm isothermal aging. These steels are attractive materials for use in industrial mechanical structures because of their strength at high-temperatures and their chemical stability. The test materials were subjected to accelerated heat-treatment in an electrical furnace for a predetermined aging duration. The variations in the ultrasonic nonlinearity and microstructural damage were carefully evaluated through observation of the microstructure. The ultrasonic nonlinearity stiffly dropped after aging for up to 1000 h and, then, monotonously decreased. The polygonal shape of the initial grain structures changed to circular, especially as the annealing twins in the grains dissolved and disappeared. The delta ferrite on the grain boundaries could not be observed at 1000 h of aging, and these continuously transformed into their sigma phases. Consequently, in the intial aging period, the rapid decrease in the ultrasonic nonlinearity was caused by voids, dislocations, and twin annihilation. The continuous monotonic decrease in the ultrasonic nonlinearity after the first drop resulted from the generation of Cr{sub 23}C{sub 6} precipitates and σ phases.

  11. Evaluation of radiation-induced sensitization using electrochemical potentiokinetic reactivation technique for austenitic stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inazumi, T.; Bell, G.E.C.; Hishinuma, A.

    1990-01-01

    The electrochemical potentiokinetic reactivation (EPR) test technique was applied to the determination of sensitization in a neutron-irradiated (420 degree C, 10 dpa) titanium-modified austenitic stainless steel. Miniaturized specimens (3 mm diam by 0.25 mm thick) in solution-annealed and 25% cold-worked conditions were tested. The degree of sensitization (DOS) was calculated in terms of the reactivation charge (Pa). Results indicated the occurrence of radiation-induced sensitization when compared to control specimens thermally aged at the irradiation temperature. Post-EPR examination of the specimen surfaces showed etching across the face of each grain as well as at grain boundaries. This indicates that the Pa value normalized by the total grain boundary area, which is an accepted EPR-DOS criterion, cannot be directly used as an indicator of the DOS to determine the susceptibility of this irradiated material to intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC). Further investigations are necessary to correlate the results in this study to the IGSCC susceptibility of the irradiated stainless steel. 26 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs

  12. Effect of hardening on the crack growth rate of austenitic stainless steels in primary PWR conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castano, M.L.; Garcia, M.S.; Diego, G. de; Gomez-Briceno, D.; Francia, L.

    2002-01-01

    Intergranular cracking of non-sensitized materials, found in light water reactor (LWR) components exposed to neutron radiation, has been attributed to Irradiation Assisted Stress Corrosion Cracking (IASCC). Cracking of baffle former bolts, fabricated of AISI-316L and AISI-347, have been reported in some Europeans and US PWR plants. Examinations of removed bolts indicate the intergranular cracking characteristics can be associated with IASCC phenomena. Neutron radiation produce critical modifications of the microstructure and microchemical of stainless steels such hardening due to irradiation and Radiation Induce Segregation (RIS) at grain boundaries, among others. Chromium depletion at grain boundary due to RIS seems to justify the intergranular cracking of irradiated materials, both in plant and in lab tests, at high electrochemical corrosion potential (BWR-NWC environments), but it is not enough to explain cracking at low corrosion potential (BWR-HWC and PWR environments). In these latter conditions, hardening is considered a possible additional mechanism to explain the behavior of irradiated material. Radiation Hardening can be simulated in non irradiated material by mechanical deformation. Although some differences exists in the types of defects produced by radiation and mechanical deformation, it is accepted that the study of the stress corrosion behavior of unirradiated austenitic steels with different hardening levels would contribute to the understanding of IASCC mechanism. In order to evaluate the influence of hardening on the stress corrosion susceptibility of austenitic steels, crack growth rate tests with 316L and 347 stainless steels with nominal yield strengths from 500 to 900 MPa, produced by cold work are being carried out at 340 deg C in PWR conditions. Preliminary results indicate that crack propagation was obtained in the 316Lss and 347ss cold worked, even with a yield strength of 550 MPa. (authors)

  13. Study of structural modifications induced by ion implantation in austenitic stainless steel; Etude des modifications structurales induites par implantation ionique dans les aciers austenitiques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dudognon, J

    2006-12-15

    Ion implantation in steels, although largely used to improve the properties of use, involves structural modifications of the surface layer, which remain still prone to controversies. Within this context, various elements (N, Ar, Cr, Mo, Ag, Xe and Pb) were implanted (with energies varying from 28 to 280 keV) in a 316LVM austenitic stainless steel. The implanted layer has a thickness limited to 80 nm and a maximum implanted element concentration lower than 10 % at. The analysis of the implanted layer by grazing incidence X ray diffraction highlights deformations of austenite lines, appearance of ferrite and amorphization of the layer. Ferritic phase which appears at the grain boundaries, whatever the implanted element, is formed above a given 'threshold' of energy (produced of fluency by the energy of an ion). The formation of ferrite as well as the amorphization of the implanted layer depends only on energy. In order to understand the deformations of austenite diffraction lines, a simulation model of these lines was elaborated. The model correctly describes the observed deformations (broadening, shift, splitting) with the assumption that the expansion of the austenitic lattice is due to the presence of implanted element and is proportional to the element concentration through a coefficient k'. This coefficient only depends on the element and varies linearly with its radius. (author)

  14. Surface integrity and fatigue behaviour of electric discharged machined and milled austenitic stainless steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lundberg, Mattias, E-mail: mattias.lundberg@liu.se; Saarimäki, Jonas; Moverare, Johan J.; Calmunger, Mattias

    2017-02-15

    Machining of austenitic stainless steels can result in different surface integrities and different machining process parameters will have a great impact on the component fatigue life. Understanding how machining processes affect the cyclic behaviour and microstructure are of outmost importance in order to improve existing and new life estimation models. Milling and electrical discharge machining (EDM) have been used to manufacture rectangular four-point bend fatigue test samples; subjected to high cycle fatigue. Before fatigue testing, surface integrity characterisation of the two surface conditions was conducted using scanning electron microscopy, surface roughness, residual stress profiles, and hardness profiles. Differences in cyclic behaviour were observed between the two surface conditions by the fatigue testing. The milled samples exhibited a fatigue limit. EDM samples did not show the same behaviour due to ratcheting. Recrystallized nano sized grains were identified at the severely plastically deformed surface of the milled samples. Large amounts of bent mechanical twins were observed ~ 5 μm below the surface. Grain shearing and subsequent grain rotation from milling bent the mechanical twins. EDM samples showed much less plastic deformation at the surface. Surface tensile residual stresses of ~ 500 MPa and ~ 200 MPa for the milled and EDM samples respectively were measured. - Highlights: •Milled samples exhibit fatigue behaviour, but not EDM samples. •Four-point bending is not suitable for materials exhibiting pronounced ratcheting. •LAGB density can be used to quantitatively measure plastic deformation. •Grain shearing and rotation result in bent mechanical twins. •Nano sized grains evolve due to the heat of the operation.

  15. Austenitic alloys Fe-Ni-Cr dominating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gibson, R.C.; Korenko, M.K.

    1980-01-01

    Austenitic alloy essentially comprising 42 to 48% nickel, 11 to 13% chromium, 2.6 to 3.4% niobium, 0.2 to 1.2% silicon, 0.5 to 1.5% vanadium, 2.6 to 3.4% molybdenum, 0.1 to 0.3% aluminium, 0.1 to 0.3% titanium, 0.02 to 0.05% carbon, 0.002 to 0.015% boron, up to 0.06% zirconium, the balance being iron. The characteristic of this alloy is a conventional elasticity limit to within 2% of at least 450 MPa, with a maximum tensile strength of at least 500 MPa at a test temperature of 650 0 C after immersion annealing at 1038 0 C and 30% hardening. To this effect the invention concerns Ni-Cr-Fe high temperature alloys possessing excellent mechanical strength characteristics, that can be obtained with lower levels of nickel and chromium than those used in alloys of this kind in the present state of the technique, a higher amount of niobium than in the previous alloys and with the addition of 0.5 to 1.5% vanadium [fr

  16. Ion-nitriding of austenitic stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pacheco, O.; Hertz, D.; Lebrun, J.P.; Michel, H.

    1995-01-01

    Although ion-nitriding is an extensively industrialized process enabling steel surfaces to be hardened by nitrogen diffusion, with a resulting increase in wear, seizure and fatigue resistance, its direct application to stainless steels, while enhancing their mechanical properties, also causes a marked degradation in their oxidation resistance. However, by adaption of the nitriding process, it is possible to maintain the improved wear resistant properties while retaining the oxidation resistance of the stainless steel. The controlled diffusion permits the growth of a nitrogen supersaturated austenite layer on parts made of stainless steel (AISI 304L and 316L) without chromium nitride precipitation. The diffusion layer remains stable during post heat treatments up to 650 F for 5,000 hrs and maintains a hardness of 900 HV. A very low and stable friction coefficient is achieved which provides good wear resistance against stainless steels under diverse conditions. Electrochemical and chemical tests in various media confirm the preservation of the stainless steel characteristics. An example of the application of this process is the treatment of Reactor Control Rod Cluster Assemblies (RCCAs) for Pressurized Water Nuclear Reactors

  17. The evolution of ferrite grain size in structural steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hodgson, P.D.

    1999-01-01

    The refinement of the ferrite grain size is the main aim of modern thermomechanical processes for hot rolled steels. The ferrite grain size is determined by the composition, the state of the austenite at the point of transformation and the cooling rate through transformation. By adding microalloying additions of Ti for grain refinement and Nb to retard recrystallisation, it is possible to reduce the ferrite grain size to less than 5μm at moderate to high cooling rates. However, it is not possible under even the most extreme traditional controlled rolling and accelerated cooling conditions to produce an equiaxed ferrite grain size of less than 3μm. More recent work, though, involving rolling with high undercooling and friction conditions that lead to high shear, suggests that it is possible to produce microstructures in a single rolling pass with an average grain size less than 1μm. This appears to involve a dynamic (ie strain induced) transformation process. The current understanding of static and dynamic transformation and the resultant grain size is reviewed and areas requiring further research are highlighted

  18. Effect of heat input on the microstructure, residual stresses and corrosion resistance of 304L austenitic stainless steel weldments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Unnikrishnan, Rahul, E-mail: rahulunnikrishnannair@gmail.com [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Visvesvaraya National Institute of Technology (VNIT), South Ambazari Road, Nagpur 440010, Maharashtra (India); Idury, K.S.N. Satish, E-mail: satishidury@gmail.com [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Visvesvaraya National Institute of Technology (VNIT), South Ambazari Road, Nagpur 440010, Maharashtra (India); Ismail, T.P., E-mail: tpisma@gmail.com [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Visvesvaraya National Institute of Technology (VNIT), South Ambazari Road, Nagpur 440010, Maharashtra (India); Bhadauria, Alok, E-mail: alokbhadauria1@gmail.com [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Visvesvaraya National Institute of Technology (VNIT), South Ambazari Road, Nagpur 440010, Maharashtra (India); Shekhawat, S.K., E-mail: satishshekhawat@gmail.com [Department of Metallurgical Engineering and Materials Science, Indian Institute of Technology Bombay (IITB), Powai, Mumbai 400076, Maharashtra (India); Khatirkar, Rajesh K., E-mail: rajesh.khatirkar@gmail.com [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Visvesvaraya National Institute of Technology (VNIT), South Ambazari Road, Nagpur 440010, Maharashtra (India); Sapate, Sanjay G., E-mail: sgsapate@yahoo.com [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Visvesvaraya National Institute of Technology (VNIT), South Ambazari Road, Nagpur 440010, Maharashtra (India)

    2014-07-01

    Austenitic stainless steels are widely used in high performance pressure vessels, nuclear, chemical, process and medical industry due to their very good corrosion resistance and superior mechanical properties. However, austenitic stainless steels are prone to sensitization when subjected to higher temperatures (673 K to 1173 K) during the manufacturing process (e.g. welding) and/or certain applications (e.g. pressure vessels). During sensitization, chromium in the matrix precipitates out as carbides and intermetallic compounds (sigma, chi and Laves phases) decreasing the corrosion resistance and mechanical properties. In the present investigation, 304L austenitic stainless steel was subjected to different heat inputs by shielded metal arc welding process using a standard 308L electrode. The microstructural developments were characterized by using optical microscopy and electron backscattered diffraction, while the residual stresses were measured by X-ray diffraction using the sin{sup 2}ψ method. It was observed that even at the highest heat input, shielded metal arc welding process does not result in significant precipitation of carbides or intermetallic phases. The ferrite content and grain size increased with increase in heat input. The grain size variation in the fusion zone/heat affected zone was not effectively captured by optical microscopy. This study shows that electron backscattered diffraction is necessary to bring out changes in the grain size quantitatively in the fusion zone/heat affected zone as it can consider twin boundaries as a part of grain in the calculation of grain size. The residual stresses were compressive in nature for the lowest heat input, while they were tensile at the highest heat input near the weld bead. The significant feature of the welded region and the base metal was the presence of a very strong texture. The texture in the heat affected zone was almost random. - Highlights: • Effect of heat input on microstructure, residual

  19. Grain Handling and Storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Troy G.; Minor, John

    This text for a secondary- or postecondary-level course in grain handling and storage contains ten chapters. Chapter titles are (1) Introduction to Grain Handling and Storage, (2) Elevator Safety, (3) Grain Grading and Seed Identification, (4) Moisture Control, (5) Insect and Rodent Control, (6) Grain Inventory Control, (7) Elevator Maintenance,…

  20. Grain Grading and Handling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rendleman, Matt; Legacy, James

    This publication provides an introduction to grain grading and handling for adult students in vocational and technical education programs. Organized in five chapters, the booklet provides a brief overview of the jobs performed at a grain elevator and of the techniques used to grade grain. The first chapter introduces the grain industry and…

  1. Reversed austenite for enhancing ductility of martensitic stainless steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dieck, S.; Rosemann, P.; Kromm, A.; Halle, T.

    2017-03-01

    The novel heat treatment concept, “quenching and partitioning” (Q&P) has been developed for high strength steels with enhanced formability. This heat treatment involves quenching of austenite to a temperature between martensite start and finish, to receive a several amount of retained austenite. During the subsequent annealing treatment, the so called partitioning, the retained austenite is stabilized due to carbon diffusion, which results in enhanced formability and strength regarding strain induced austenite to martensite transformation. In this study a Q&P heat treatment was applied to a Fe-0.45C-0.65Mn-0.34Si-13.95Cr stainless martensite. Thereby the initial quench end temperature and the partitioning time were varied to characterize their influence on microstructural evolution. The microstructural changes were analysed by dilatometer measurements, X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy, including electron back-scatter diffraction. Compression testing was made to examine the mechanical behaviour. It was found that an increasing partitioning time up to 30 min leads to an enhanced formability without loss in strength due to a higher amount of stabilized retained and reversed austenite as well as precipitation hardening.

  2. Modeling of Non-isothermal Austenite Formation in Spring Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, He; Wang, Baoyu; Tang, Xuefeng; Li, Junling

    2017-12-01

    The austenitization kinetics description of spring steel 60Si2CrA plays an important role in providing guidelines for industrial production. The dilatometric curves of 60Si2CrA steel were measured using a dilatometer DIL805A at heating rates of 0.3 K to 50 K/s (0.3 °C/s to 50 °C/s). Based on the dilatometric curves, a unified kinetics model using the internal state variable (ISV) method was derived to describe the non-isothermal austenitization kinetics of 60Si2CrA, and the abovementioned model models the incubation and transition periods. The material constants in the model were determined using a genetic algorithm-based optimization technique. Additionally, good agreement between predicted and experimental volume fractions of transformed austenite was obtained, indicating that the model is effective for describing the austenitization kinetics of 60Si2CrA steel. Compared with other modeling methods of austenitization kinetics, this model, which uses the ISV method, has some advantages, such as a simple formula and explicit physics meaning, and can be probably used in engineering practice.

  3. Solidification behavior of austenitic stainless steel filler metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    David, S.A.; Goodwin, G.M.; Braski, D.N.

    1980-02-01

    Thermal analysis and interrupted solidification experiments on selected austenitic stainless steel filler metals provided an understanding of the solidification behavior of austenitic stainless steel welds. The sequences of phase separations found were for type 308 stainless steel filler metal, L + L + delta + L + delta + γ → γ + delta, and for type 310 stainless steel filler metal, L → L + γ → γ. In type 308 stainless steel filler metal, ferrite at room temperature was identified as either the untransformed primary delta-ferrite formed during the initial stages of solidification or the residual ferrite after Widmanstaetten austenite precipitation. Microprobe and scanning transmission electron microscope microanalyses revealed that solute extensively redistributes during the transformation of primary delta-ferrite to austenite, leading to enrichment and stabilization of ferrite by chromium. The type 310 stainless steel filler metal investigated solidifies by the primary crystallization of austenite, with the transformation going to completion at the solidus temperature. In our samples residual ferrite resulting from solute segregation was absent at the intercellular or interdendritic regions

  4. Mass transfer behavior of a modified austenitic stainless steel in lithium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tortorelli, P.F.; DeVan, J.H.

    1983-01-01

    An austenitic stainless steel that was developed to resist neutron damage was exposed to lithium in the high-temperature part of a thermal convection loop for 6700 h. Specimens of this Prime Candidate Alloy (PCA) composed of 65.0 Fe-15.9 Ni-13.0 Cr-1.9 Mo-1.9 Mn-1.7 Si-0.5 Ti-0.05 C (wt %) were exposed at 600 and 570 0 C in both solution annealed and cold worked forms. The dissolution process was found to be similar to other austenitic alloys in flowing lithium: weight losses of PCA eventually became linearly proportional to exposure time with the specimen surfaces exhibiting porous layers depleted in nickel and chromium. However, the measured weight losses and dissolution rates of these PCA specimens were higher than those of type 316 stainless steel exposed under similar conditions and can be attributed to the higher nickel concentration of the former alloy. The effect of cold work on dissolution rates was less definitive, particularly at 570 0 C. At longer exposure times, the annealed PCA specimen exposed at 600 0 C suffered greater dissolution than the cold worked material, while no effect of prior deformation was observed by analysis of the respective surfaces

  5. Design and Optimization of an Austenitic TRIP Steel for Blast and Fragment Protection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feinberg, Zechariah Daniel

    In light of the pervasive nature of terrorist attacks, there is a pressing need for the design and optimization of next generation materials for blast and fragment protection applications. Sadhukhan used computational tools and a systems-based approach to design TRIP-120---a fully austenitic transformation-induced plasticity (TRIP) steel. Current work more completely evaluates the mechanical properties of the prototype, optimizes the processing for high performance in tension and shear, and builds models for more predictive power of the mechanical behavior and austenite stability. Under quasi-static and dynamic tension and shear, the design exhibits high strength and high uniform ductility as a result of a strain hardening effect that arises with martensitic transformation. Significantly more martensitic transformation occurred under quasi-static loading conditions (69% in tension and 52% in shear) compared to dynamic loading conditions (13% tension and 5% in shear). Nonetheless, significant transformation occurs at high-strain rates which increases strain hardening, delays the onset of necking instability, and increases total energy absorption under adiabatic conditions. Although TRIP-120 effectively utilizes a TRIP effect to delay necking instability, a common trend of abrupt failure with limited fracture ductility was observed in tension and shear at all strain rates. Further characterization of the structure of TRIP-120 showed that an undesired grain boundary cellular reaction (η phase formation) consumed the fine dispersion of the metastable gamma' phase and limited the fracture ductility. A warm working procedure was added to the processing of TRIP-120 in order to eliminate the grain boundary cellular reaction from the structure. By eliminating η formation at the grain boundaries, warm-worked TRIP-120 exhibits a drastic improvement in the mechanical properties in tension and shear. In quasi-static tension, the optimized warm-worked TRIP-120 with an Mssigma

  6. Small punch creep test in a 316 austenitic stainless steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saucedo-Muñoz, Maribel L.

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The small punch creep test was applied to evaluate the creep behavior of a 316 type austenitic stainless steel at temperatures of 650, 675 and 700 °C. The small punch test was carried out using a creep tester with a specimen size of 10×10×0.3 mm at 650, 675 and 700 °C using loads from 199 to 512 N. The small punch creep curves show the three stages found in the creep curves of the conventional uniaxial test. The conventional creep relationships which involve parameters such as creep rate, stress, time to rupture and temperature were followed with the corresponding parameters of small punch creep test and they permitted to explain the creep behavior in this steel. The mechanism and activation energy of the deformation process were the grain boundary sliding and diffusion, respectively, during creep which caused the intergranular fracture in the tested specimens.El ensayo de termofluencia por indentación se utilizó para evaluar el comportamiento a la termofluencia en un acero inoxidable austenítico 316. Este ensayo se realizó en una máquina de indentación con muestras de 10×10×0,3 mm a temperaturas de 650, 675 y 700 °C con cargas de 199 a 512 N. Las curvas de termofluencia del ensayo mostraron las tres etapas características observadas en el ensayo convencional de tensión. Asimismo, las principales relaciones de termofluencia entre parámetros como velocidad de termofluencia, esfuerzo, tiempo de ruptura y temperatura se observaron en los parámetros correspondientes al ensayo de indentación, lo que permitió caracterizar el comportamiento de termofluencia en este acero. El mecanismo y la energía de activación del proceso de deformación en la termofluencia corresponden al deslizamiento de los límites de grano y la difusión a través de los mismos, respectivamente, lo cual causó la fractura intergranular en las muestras ensayadas.

  7. High temperature crack initiation in an austenitic stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laiarinandrasana, Lucien

    1994-01-01

    The study deals with crack initiation at 600 deg. C and 650 deg. C, on an austenitic stainless steel referenced by Z2 CND 17 12. The behaviour laws of the studied plate were updated in comparison with existing data. Forty tests were carried out on CT specimens, with continuous fatigue with load or displacement controlled, pure creep, pure relaxation, creep-fatigue and creep-relaxation loadings. The practical initiation definition corresponds to a small crack growth of about the grain size, monitored by electrical potential drop technique. The time necessary for the crack to initiate is predicted with fracture mechanics global and local approaches, with the help of microstructural observations and finite element results. An identification of a 'Paris' law' for continuous cyclic loading and of a unique correlation between the initiation time and C h * for creep tests was established. For the local approach, crack initiation by creep can be interpreted as the reaching of a critical damage level, by using a damage incremental rule. For creep-fatigue tests, crack growth rates at initiation are greater than those of Paris' law for continuous fatigue. A calculation of a transition time between elastic-plastic and creep domains shows that crack initiation can be interpreted whether by providing Paris' law with an acceleration term when the dwell period is less than the transition time, or by calculating a creep contribution which relies on C h * parameter when the dwell period and/or the initiation times are greater than the transition time. Creep relaxation tests present crack growth rates at initiation which are less than those for 'equivalent' creep-fatigue tests. These crack growth rates decrease when increasing hold time, but also when temperature decreases. Though, for hold times which are important enough and at lower temperature, there is no effect of the dwell period insofar as crack growth rate is equal to continuous fatigue

  8. Crack initiation at high temperature on an austenitic stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laiarinandrasana, L.

    1994-01-01

    The study deals with crack initiation at 600 degrees Celsius and 650 degrees Celsius, on an austenitic stainless steel referenced by Z2 CND 17 12. The behaviour laws of the studied plate were update in comparison with existing data. Forty tests were carried out on CT specimens, with continuous fatigue with load or displacement controlled, pure creep, pure relaxation, creep-fatigue and creep-relaxation loadings. The practical initiation definition corresponds to a small crack growth of about the grain size, monitored by electrical potential drop technique. The time necessary for the crack to initiate is predicted with fracture mechanics global and local approaches, with the helps of microstructural observations and finite elements results. An identification of a 'Paris'law' for continuous cyclic loading and of a unique correlation between the initiation time and C * k for creep tests was established. For the local approach, crack initiation by creep can be interpreted as the reaching of a critical damage level, by using a damage incremental rule. For creep-fatigue tests, crack growth rates at initiation are greater than those of Paris'law for continuous fatigue. A calculation of a transition time between elastic-plastic and creep domains shows that crack initiation can be interpreted whether by providing Paris'law with an acceleration term when the dwell period is less than the transition time, or by calculating a creep contribution which relies on C * k parameter when the dwell period and/or the initiation times are greater than the transition time. Creep relaxation tests present crack growth rates at initiation which are less than those for 'equivalent' creep-fatigue tests. These crack growth rates when increasing hold time, but also when temperature decreases. Though, for hold times which are important enough and at lower temperature, there is no effect of the dwell period insofar as crack growth rate is equal to continuous fatigue Paris law predicted ones

  9. Highly corrosive and high strength Cr-Mn series austenite sintered steel, method of manufacturing the same and the usage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arai, Masahiko; Hirano, Tatsumi; Aono, Yasuhisa; Kato, Takahiko; Kondo, Yasuo; Inagaki, Masatoshi

    1998-01-01

    The steel of the present invention comprises a highly corrosive and high strength Cr-Mn series austenite sintered steel containing up to 0.1% of C, up to 1% of Si, up to 0.4% of N, from 9 to 25% of (Mn + Ni) within a range of more than 2% and up to 15% of Mn and from 14 to 20% of Cr, and it has an average crystal grain size of 1μm or less and comprises at least 90 vol% of an austenite phase. In addition, the alloy is incorporated with one or more elements of up to 3% of Mo, 1.0% of Ti, up to 2.0% of Zr and up to 1.0% of Nb in an amount of up to 2.0% in total of Ti, Zr and Nb. When these materials are used under the circumstance where materials are generally deteriorated in grain boundaries, since they are excellent in corrosion resistance and strength, remarkable effects can be attained in the improvement of the safety and the reliability of products. In addition, they are applied not only to a reactor core but also to a water-cooled circumstance and a circumstance where hydrogen exists, thereby capable of exhibiting remarkable effects. (T.M.)

  10. Effect of Ti additions on the swelling of electron irradiated austenitic steels and Ni alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gilbon, D.; Didout, G.; Le Naour, L.; Levy, V.

    1979-01-01

    It has been shown that titanium is a beneficial additive for the swelling of austenitic steels. The amplitude of the effects observed depends much on the nature and concentration of the other additives in the austenitic matrix [fr

  11. Effect of coarse {gamma} grain size on the dynamic and static recrystallisation during hot working in microalloyed Nb and Nb-Ti steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandez, A.I.; Abad, R.; Lopez, B.; Rodriguez-Ibabe, J.M. [Centro de Estudios e Investigaciones Tecnicas de Guipuzcoa (CEIT), San Sebastian (Spain)

    1998-10-01

    The effect of coarse austenite grain size on the dynamic and static recrystallisation kinetics of two microalloyed Nb and Nb-Ti steels has been investigated in the present work. To characterize the dynamic recrystallisation behaviour of the austenite, continuous-torsion tests were carried out after the reheating of the specimen at different temperatures in the range 1000-1420 C. It has been observed that the occurrence of dynamic recrystallisation is dependent on the initial grain size and the deformation conditions (temperature and strain-rate). Decreasing values of the Zener-Hollomon parameter (Z) and grain size promotes dynamic recrystallisation. However for the coarser grain sizes no peaks appear on the flow curves above a determined value of Z. This value seems to decrease with increasing the grain size. An equation to predict the {epsilon}{sub p} peak strain for a wide range of grain sizes has been obtained for both steels. The effect of strain on the static recrystallisation of the austenite, having a large grain size, has been also studied. Interrupted-torsion tests were performed to determined the fractional softening. A quadratic dependence of t{sub 0.5} on strain has been observed, denoting a less dependence of recrystallisation on strain than proposed previously by other authors in the range of lower grain sizes. (orig.) 22 refs.

  12. Modelling study on the three-dimensional neutron depolarisation response of the evolving ferrite particle size distribution during the austenite-ferrite phase transformation in steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, H.; van der Zwaag, S.; van Dijk, N. H.

    2018-07-01

    The magnetic configuration of a ferromagnetic system with mono-disperse and poly-disperse distribution of magnetic particles with inter-particle interactions has been computed. The analysis is general in nature and applies to all systems containing magnetically interacting particles in a non-magnetic matrix, but has been applied to steel microstructures, consisting of a paramagnetic austenite phase and a ferromagnetic ferrite phase, as formed during the austenite-to-ferrite phase transformation in low-alloyed steels. The characteristics of the computational microstructures are linked to the correlation function and determinant of depolarisation matrix, which can be experimentally obtained in three-dimensional neutron depolarisation (3DND). By tuning the parameters in the model used to generate the microstructure, we studied the effect of the (magnetic) particle size distribution on the 3DND parameters. It is found that the magnetic particle size derived from 3DND data matches the microstructural grain size over a wide range of volume fractions and grain size distributions. A relationship between the correlation function and the relative width of the particle size distribution was proposed to accurately account for the width of the size distribution. This evaluation shows that 3DND experiments can provide unique in situ information on the austenite-to-ferrite phase transformation in steels.

  13. On the S-phase formation and the balanced plasma nitriding of austenitic-ferritic super duplex stainless steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira, Willian R.; Kurelo, Bruna C. E. S.; Ditzel, Dair G.; Serbena, Francisco C.; Foerster, Carlos E.; de Souza, Gelson B.

    2018-03-01

    The different physical responses of austenite (γ) and ferrite (α) iron structures upon nitriding result in technical challenges to the uniform modification of α-γ materials, as the super duplex stainless steel (SDSS). The effects of voltage (7-10 kV), frequency and pulse width on the nitrogen plasma immersion ion implantation of SDSS (α ∼ 56%, γ ∼ 44%) were investigated, correlated with structural, morphological and mechanical analyses. By controlling the treatment power, temperatures ranged from 292 °C to 401 °C. Despite the overall increase in hardness for any of the employed parameters (from ∼6 GPa to ∼15 GPa), the structure of individual grains was strikingly dissimilar at the same temperatures, depending on the energetic conditions of implantation. Modified-α grains containing iron nitrides (ε-Fe2-3N, γ‧ -Fe4N) presented intense brittleness, whereas the expanded phase γN (S-phase) laid principally in modified-γ grains, exhibiting ductile-like deformation features and thicker layers. The γN was the dominant phase in both α-γ grains at ∼401 °C, providing them with balanced structure and mechanical behavior. These phenomena corroborate with γN as mediator of the process, through a mechanism involving the nitrogen-promoted ferrite to austenite conversion and nitrides dissolution at high temperatures. An approximately linear correlation of the γN content with respect to the ion energy per pulse was demonstrated, which properly embodies limiting effects to the treatment. This can be a parameter for the α-γ steel surface modification, consisting in a better adjustment to obtain more precise control along with temperature.

  14. Dynamical recrystallization of high purity austenitic stainless steels; Recristallisation dynamique d'aciers inoxydables austenitiques de haute purete

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gavard, L

    2001-01-01

    The aim of this work is to optimize the performance of structural materials. The elementary mechanisms (strain hardening and dynamical regeneration, germination and growth of new grains) occurring during the hot working of metals and low pile defect energy alloys have been studied for austenitic stainless steels. In particular, the influence of the main experimental parameters (temperature, deformation velocity, initial grain size, impurities amount, deformation way) on the process of discontinuous dynamical recrystallization has been studied. Alloys with composition equal to those of the industrial stainless steel-304L have been fabricated from ultra-pure iron, chromium and nickel. Tests carried out in hot compression and torsion in order to cover a wide range of deformations, deformation velocities and temperatures for two very different deformation ways have allowed to determine the rheological characteristics (sensitivity to the deformation velocity, apparent activation energy) of materials as well as to characterize their microstructural deformations by optical metallography and electron back-scattered diffraction. The influence of the initial grain size and the influence of the purity of the material on the dynamical recrystallization kinetics have been determined. An analytical model for the determination of the apparent mobility of grain boundaries, a semi-analytical model for the dynamical recrystallization and at last an analytical model for the stationary state of dynamical recrystallization are proposed as well as a new criteria for the transition between the refinement state and the state of grain growth. (O.M.)

  15. Anelastic mechanical loss spectrometry of hydrogen in austenitic stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yagodzinskyy, Y.; Andronova, E.; Ivanchenko, M.; Haenninen, H.

    2009-01-01

    Atomic distribution of hydrogen, its elemental diffusion jumps and its interaction with dislocations in a number of austenitic stainless steels are studied with anelastic mechanical loss (AML) spectrometry in combination with the hydrogen thermal desorption method. Austenitic stainless steels of different chemical composition, namely, AISI 310, AISI 201, and AISI 301LN, as well as LDX 2101 duplex stainless steel are studied to clarify the role of different alloying elements on the hydrogen behavior. Activation analyses of the hydrogen Snoek-like peaks are performed with their decomposition to sets of Gaussian components. Fine structure of the composite hydrogen peaks is analyzed under the assumption that each component corresponds to diffusion transfer of hydrogen between octahedral positions with certain atomic compositions of the nearest neighbouring lattice sites. An additional component originating from hydrogen-dislocation interaction is considered. Binding energies for hydrogen-dislocation interaction are also estimated for the studied austenitic stainless steels.

  16. Optimization and verification of ultrasonic testability of acoustically anisotropic materials on austenitic and dissimilar welds; Optimierung und Nachweis der Ultraschallpruefbarkeit von akustisch anisotropen Werkstoffen an austenitischen Schweiss- und Mischverbindungen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pudovikov, Sergey

    2013-11-21

    Austenitic and dissimilar welds with respect to the ultrasonic testing (UT) methods are considered normally as ''difficult-to-test'' objects. During the solidification process in such welds a distinct dendrite microstructure evolves, which is coarse-grained, anisotropic and inhomogeneous simultaneously. The reliability of available ultrasonic methods on austenitic welds depends significantly on the selected UT-parameters as well as on the inspection personnel experience. In the present dissertation, an ultrasonic testing method was developed, which allows the flaw detection and evaluation in acoustically anisotropic inhomogeneous materials, especially in austenitic and dissimilar welds with a quantitative statement to the defect size, type, and location. The principle of synthetic focusing with taking into account the material anisotropy and inhomogeneity along with two- and three-dimensional visualization provides a reliable and quantitative assessment of the inspection results in acoustically anisotropic inhomogeneous test objects. Among others, an iterative algorithm for the determination of unknown elastic properties of inhomogeneous anisotropic materials has been developed. It allows practical application of the developed UT method, since the anisotropy of most of austenitic and dissimilar welds (especially of hand-welded joints) in practice is usually unknown. The functionality of the developed inspection technique has been validated by many experiments on welded austenitic specimens having artificial and natural defects. For the practical application of the new ultrasonic technique different testing strategies are proposed, which can be used depending on the current inspection task.

  17. Atomic force microscopy of surface relief in individual grains of fatigued 316L austenitic stainless steel

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Man, Jiří; Obrtlík, Karel; Blochwitz, C.; Polák, Jaroslav

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 50, č. 15 (2002), s. 3767-3780 ISSN 1359-6454 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA106/00/D055; GA ČR GA106/01/0376 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z2041904 Keywords : fatigue * persistent slip band * atomic force microscopy Subject RIV: JL - Materials Fatigue, Friction Mechanics Impact factor: 3.104, year: 2002

  18. Evaluation of welds on a ferritic-austenitic stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pleva, J.; Johansson, B.

    1984-01-01

    Five different welding methods for the ferritic-austenitic steel 22Cr6Ni3MoN have been evaluated on mill welded heavy wall pipes. The corrosion resistance of the weld joints has been tested both in standard tests and in special environments, related to certain oil and gas wells. The tests were conclusive in that a welding procedure with the addition of sufficient amounts of filler metal should be employed. TIG welds without or with marginal filler addition showed poor resistance to pitting, and to boiling nitric acid. Contents of main alloying elements in ferrite and austenite phases have been measured and causes of corrosion attack in welds are discussed

  19. Oxidation resistant high creep strength austenitic stainless steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brady, Michael P.; Pint, Bruce A.; Liu, Chain-Tsuan; Maziasz, Philip J.; Yamamoto, Yukinori; Lu, Zhao P.

    2010-06-29

    An austenitic stainless steel displaying high temperature oxidation and creep resistance has a composition that includes in weight percent 15 to 21 Ni, 10 to 15 Cr, 2 to 3.5 Al, 0.1 to 1 Nb, and 0.05 to 0.15 C, and that is free of or has very low levels of N, Ti and V. The alloy forms an external continuous alumina protective scale to provide a high oxidation resistance at temperatures of 700 to 800.degree. C. and forms NbC nanocarbides and a stable essentially single phase fcc austenitic matrix microstructure to give high strength and high creep resistance at these temperatures.

  20. Microstructural observation of ion-irradiated austenitic stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sawai, T.; Hamada, S.; Hishinuma, A.

    1992-01-01

    Type 316 stainless steel, base metal and weld metal obtained from an electron beam weld joint, was irradiated with 90 MeV Br +6 in the JAERI tandem accelerator. Cross-sectional TEM specimens were obtained by nickel plating. Microstructural observation revealed a band of tiny dislocation loops was observed around the mean projected range and the measured distance from the surface was 6.75±0.15μm. This is slightly larger than the calculated value using Ziegler's stopping power. Defect clusters were also observed around defect sinks within the mean projected range, suggesting cascade-sink interaction. These sinks are the grain boundary in the base metal specimen and preexisting dislocation lines in the weld metal specimen. Surface roughness of polished specimen was detected at the shallower side of the peak damage band, although no visible crystalline defect cluster was observed. This suggests radiation-induced microchemical evolution prior to sever microstructural evolution. (author)

  1. Effect of hot rolling on the structure and the mechanical properties of nitrogen-bearing austenitic-martensitic 14Kh15AN4M steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bannykh, O. A.; Betsofen, S. Ya.; Lukin, E. I.; Blinov, V. M.; Voznesenskaya, N. M.; Tonysheva, O. A.; Blinov, E. V.

    2016-04-01

    The effect of the rolling temperature and strain on the structure and the properties of corrosionresistant austenitic-martensitic 14Kh15AN4M steel is studied. The steel is shown to exhibit high ductility: upon rolling in the temperature range 700-1100°C at a reduction per pass up to 80%, wedge steel specimens are uniformly deformed along and across the rolling direction without cracking and other surface defects. Subsequent cold treatment and low-temperature tempering ensure a high hardness of the steel (50-56 HRC). Austenite mainly contributes to the hardening upon rolling in the temperature range 700-800°C at a reduction of 50-70%, and martensite makes the main contribution at higher temperatures and lower strains. Texture does not form under the chosen deformation conditions, which indicates dynamic recrystallization with the nucleation and growth of grains having no preferential orientation.

  2. Role of stress-assisted martensite in the design of strong ultrafine-grained duplex steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yen, Hung-Wei; Ooi, Steve Woei; Eizadjou, Mehdi; Breen, Andrew; Huang, Ching-Yuan; Bhadeshia, H.K.D.H.; Ringer, Simon P.

    2015-01-01

    This work explains the occurrence of transformation-induced plasticity via stress-assisted martensite, when designing ultrafine-grained duplex steels. It is found that, when the austenite is reduced to a fine scale of about 300 nm, the initial deformation-induced microstructure can be dominated by parallel lamellae of ε martensite or mechanical twinning, which cannot efficiently provide nucleation sites for strain-induced martensite. Hence, α′ martensite nucleation occurs independently by a stress-assisted process that enhances transformation-induced plasticity in ultrafine-grained austenite. This metallurgical principle was validated experimentally by using a combination of transmission Kikuchi diffraction mapping, transmission electron microscopy and atom probe microscopy, and demonstrated theoretically by the thermodynamics model of stress-assisted martensite

  3. Heating temperature effect on ferritic grain size of rotor steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheremnykh, V.G.; Derevyankin, E.V.; Sakulin, A.A.

    1983-01-01

    The heating temperature effect on ferritic grain size of two steels 13Kh1M1FA and 25Kh1M1FA is evaluated. It is shown that exposure time increase at heating temperatures below 1000 deg C up to 10h changes but slightly the size of the Cr-Mo-V ferritic grain of rotor steel cooled with 25 deg C/h rate. Heating up to 1000 deg C and above leads to substantial ferritic grain growth. The kinetics of ferritic grain growth is determined by the behaviour of phases controlling the austenitic grain growth, such as carbonitrides VCsub(0.14)Nsub(0.78) in 13Kh1M1FA steel and VCsub(0.18)Nsub(0.72) in 25Kh1M1FA steel. Reduction of carbon and alloying elements content in steel composition observed at the liquation over rotor length leads to a certain decrease of ferritic grain resistance to super heating

  4. Evolution behavior of nanohardness after thermal-aging and hydrogen-charging on austenite and strain-induced martensite in pre-strained austenitic stainless steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Yuanyuan; Zhou, Chengshuang; Hong, Yuanjian; Zheng, Jinyang; Zhang, Lin

    2018-05-01

    Nanoindentation has been used to study the effects of thermal-aging and hydrogen on the mechanical property of the metastable austenitic stainless steel. Thermal-aging at 473 K decreases the nanohardness of austenite, while it increases the nanohardness of strain-induced ɑ‧ martensite. Hydrogen-charging at 473 K increases the nanohardness of austenite, while it decreases the nanohardness of strain-induced ɑ‧ martensite. The opposite effect on austenite and ɑ‧ martensite is first found in the same pre-strained sample. This abnormal evolution behavior of hardness can be attributed to the interaction between dislocation and solute atoms (carbon and hydrogen). Carbon atoms are difficult to move and redistribute in austenite compared with ɑ‧ martensite. Therefore, the difference in the diffusivity of solute atoms between austenite and ɑ‧ martensite may result in the change of hardness.

  5. The Prior-project

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engerer, Volkmar Paul; Roued-Cunliffe, Henriette; Albretsen, Jørgen

    digitisation of Arthur Prior’s Nachlass kept in the Bodleian Library, Oxford. The DH infrastructure in question is the Prior Virtual Lab (PVL). PVL was established in 2011 in order to provide researchers in the field of temporal logic easy access to the papers of Arthur Norman Prior (1914-1969), and officially......In this paper, we present a DH research infrastructure which relies heavily on a combination of domain knowledge with information technology. The general goal is to develop tools to aid scholars in their interpretations and understanding of temporal logic. This in turn is based on an extensive...

  6. EBSD study of purity effects during hot working in austenitic stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El Wahabi, M.; Gavard, L.; Cabrera, J.M.; Prado, J.M.; Montheillet, F.

    2005-01-01

    The technique of electron back scattering diffraction (EBSD) is considered as a powerful instrument for the study of the microstructural changes during hot forming processes and gives the possibility to present the information in different ways (OIM, misorientation diagram and pole figures). The present work is focused on the observation by EBSD of the microstructure evolution during deformation at high temperature of three austenitic stainless steels: AISI-304H, AISI-304L and a high purity steel HP. The difference between the three steels is the content carbon and the presence of residual elements. To this aim compression tests were carried out at a constant strain rate of 0.001 s -1 and different temperatures. The study showed an increase of twin boundary fractions and a diminution of substructure (low angle densities boundaries) at increasing temperatures. On the other hand, increasing carbon content promotes lower twin boundary fractions and larger amounts of low angle boundaries. This effect can be explained by the reduction of grain boundary mobility caused by increasing carbon contents, which in turn reduces the migration rate and consequently the probability of twin boundary generation. Moreover, the increment of low angle boundaries with carbon content accelerates the twin character loss. It was also found that the dynamically recrystallized grain size decreased at increasing carbon content due to a typical drag effect. No important features on textures were found during DDRX

  7. Microstructural characterization of dissimilar welds between Incoloy 800H and 321 Austenitic Stainless Steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sayiram, G., E-mail: sayiram.g@vit.ac.in; Arivazhagan, N.

    2015-04-15

    In this work, the microstructural character of dissimilar welds between Incoloy 800H and 321 Stainless Steel has been discussed. The microscopic examination of the base metals, fusion zones and interfaces was characterized using an optical microscope and scanning electron microscopy. The results revealed precipitates of Ti (C, N) in the austenitic matrix along the grain boundaries of the base metals. Migration of grain boundaries in the Inconel 82 weld metal was very extensive when compared to Inconel 617 weldment. Epitaxial growth was observed in the 617 weldment which increases the strength and ductility of the weld metal. Unmixed zone near the fusion line between 321 Stainless Steel and Inconel 82 weld metal was identified. From the results, it has been concluded that Inconel 617 filler metal is a preferable choice for the joint between Incoloy 800H and 321 Stainless Steel. - Highlights: • Failure mechanisms produced by dissimilar welding of Incoloy 800H to AISI 321SS • Influence of filler wire on microstructure properties • Contemplative comparisons of metallurgical aspects of these weldments • Microstructure and chemical studies including metallography, SEM–EDS • EDS-line scan study at interface.

  8. Creep and precipitation behaviors of AL6XN austenitic steel at elevated temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, L. J.; Sun, J.; Xing, H.

    2012-08-01

    Creep behaviors of the solution-treated AL6XN austenitic stainless steel have been investigated at 873-1023 K and 120-260 MPa. The results showed that the creep stress exponent and activation energy of the AL6XN steel are 5 and 395.4 kJ/mol, respectively in the power-law breakdown regime. TEM observations revealed that dislocations distributed homogenously in grains. The creep deformation mechanism is mainly attributed to viscous dislocation glide. Precipitates in the steel after creep deformation were additionally analyzed by TEM, and the results showed that there are four different types of precipitates, such as M23C6, M6C, σ phase and Laves phase. The M23C6 carbides were observed at grain boundaries in the steel after creep at 873 K. The M6C, σ phase and Laves phase precipitates were found when the creep temperature increases to 923-1023 K. Although the AL6XN steel exhibited low steady state creep rates, a high volume fraction of brittle precipitates of σ and Laves phases reduced the creep lifetime of the steel at elevated temperatures.

  9. Creep and precipitation behaviors of AL6XN austenitic steel at elevated temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meng, L.J. [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shanghai Jiaotong University, Dongchuan Road 800, Shanghai 200240 (China); Sun, J., E-mail: jsun@sjtu.edu.cn [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shanghai Jiaotong University, Dongchuan Road 800, Shanghai 200240 (China); Xing, H. [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shanghai Jiaotong University, Dongchuan Road 800, Shanghai 200240 (China)

    2012-08-15

    Creep behaviors of the solution-treated AL6XN austenitic stainless steel have been investigated at 873-1023 K and 120-260 MPa. The results showed that the creep stress exponent and activation energy of the AL6XN steel are 5 and 395.4 kJ/mol, respectively in the power-law breakdown regime. TEM observations revealed that dislocations distributed homogenously in grains. The creep deformation mechanism is mainly attributed to viscous dislocation glide. Precipitates in the steel after creep deformation were additionally analyzed by TEM, and the results showed that there are four different types of precipitates, such as M{sub 23}C{sub 6}, M{sub 6}C, {sigma} phase and Laves phase. The M{sub 23}C{sub 6} carbides were observed at grain boundaries in the steel after creep at 873 K. The M{sub 6}C, {sigma} phase and Laves phase precipitates were found when the creep temperature increases to 923-1023 K. Although the AL6XN steel exhibited low steady state creep rates, a high volume fraction of brittle precipitates of {sigma} and Laves phases reduced the creep lifetime of the steel at elevated temperatures.

  10. High Temperature Tensile Properties of Unirradiated and Neutron Irradiated 20 Cr-35 Ni Austenitic Steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roy, R B; Solly, B

    1966-12-15

    The tensile properties of an unirradiated and neutron irradiated (at 40 deg C) 20 % Cr, 35 % Ni austenitic steel have been studied at 650 deg C, 750 deg C and 820 deg C. The tensile elongation and mode of fracture (transgranular) of unirradiated specimens tested at room temperature and 650 deg C are almost identical. At 750 deg C and 820 deg C the elongation decreases considerably and a large part of the total elongation is non-uniform. Furthermore, the mode of fracture at these temperatures is intergranular and microscopic evidence suggests that fracture is caused by formation and linkup of grain boundary cavities. YS and UTS decrease monotonically with temperature. Irradiated specimens show a further decrease in ductility and an increase in the tendency to grain boundary cracking. Irradiation has no significant effect on the YS, but the UTS are reduced. The embrittlement of the irradiated specimens is attributed to the presence of He and Li atoms produced during irradiation and the possible mechanisms are discussed. Prolonged annealing of irradiated and unirradiated specimens at 650 deg C appears to have no significant effect on tensile properties.

  11. Ultrasonic wave propagation in real-life austenitic V-butt welds: Numerical modeling and validation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hannemann, R.; Marklein, R.; Langenberg, K. J.; Schurig, C.; Koehler, B.; Walte, F.

    2000-01-01

    In nondestructive testing the evaluation of austenitic steel welds with ultrasound is a commonly used method. But, since the wave propagation, scattering, and diffraction effects in such complicated media are hardly understood, computer simulations are very helpful to increase the knowledge of the physical phenomena in such samples. A particularly powerful numerical time domain modeling tool is the well established Elastodynamic Finite Integration Technique (EFIT). Recently, EFIT has been extended to simulate elastic waves in inhomogeneous anisotropic media. In this paper, the step-by-step evaluation of ultrasonic wave propagation in inhomogeneous anisotropic media will be described and the results will be validated against measurements. As a simplified model, a V-butt weld with perpendicular grain structure is investigated. The coincidence between the B Scans of the simulation and the measurement of an idealized V-butt weld is remarkable and even effects predicted by theory and simulation - the appearance of two coupled quasi-SV waves - can be observed. As a next step, an improved and more realistic model of the grain orientation inside the V-butt weld is introduced. This model has been implemented in the EFIT code and has been validated against measurements. For this verification, measured and simulated B-Scans for a real-life V-butt weld have been compared and a significant coincidence has been observed. Furthermore, the main pulses in the B-Scans are interpreted by analyzing the snapshot-movies of the wavefronts

  12. Mechanisms of irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking in austenitic stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Was, G.S.; Busby, G.T.

    2004-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: Service and laboratory experience have shown that irradiation enhances the stress corrosion cracking of austenitic alloys in high temperature water. The degree of irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) increases with dose as the microstructure undergoes significant changes, including dislocation loop formation, grain boundary segregation and hardening. These changes occur simultaneously and at comparable rates, complicating the attribution of IASCC to specific components of the microstructure. Each of the principal effects of irradiation have been considered as potential causes of IASCC, but the multivariable nature of the problem obscures a definitive determination of the mechanism. Rather, the mechanism of IASCC is more likely due to a combination of factors, some which have not yet been considered. Among these effects is the heterogeneity of deformation caused by the irradiated microstructure, and the interaction of localized deformation bands with grain boundaries. Current understanding and proposed mechanisms of IASCC will be reviewed, and recent progress on the role of heterogeneous deformation on IASCC will be presented. (authors)

  13. Nature of gallium focused ion beam induced phase transformation in 316L austenitic stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Babu, R. Prasath; Irukuvarghula, S.; Harte, A.; Preuss, M.

    2016-01-01

    The microstructural evolution and chemistry of the ferrite phase (α), which transforms from the parent austenite phase (γ) of 316L stainless steel during gallium (Ga) ion beam implantation in Focused Ion Beam (FIB) instrument was systematically studied as a function of Ga"+ ion dose and γ grain orientations. The propensity for initiation of γ → α phase transformation was observed to be strongly dependent on the orientation of the γ grain with respect to the ion beam direction and correlates well with the ion channelling differences in the γ orientations studied. Several α variants formed within a single γ orientation and the sputtering rate of the material, after the γ → α transformation, is governed by the orientation of α variants. With increased ion dose, there is an evolution of orientation of the α variants towards a variant of higher Ga"+ channelling. Unique topographical features were observed within each specific γ orientation that can be attributed to the orientation of defects formed during the ion implantation. In most cases, γ and α were related by either Kurdjumov-Sachs (KS) or Nishiyama-Wassermann (NW) orientation relationship (OR) while in few, no known OR's were identified. While our results are consistent with gallium enrichment being the cause for the γ → α phase transformation, some observations also suggest that the strain associated with the presence of gallium atoms in the lattice has a far field stress effect that promotes the phase transformation ahead of gallium penetration.

  14. The mechanical properties of austenite stainless steel 304 after structural deformation through cold work

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mubarok, Naila; Manaf, Azwar, E-mail: azwar@ui.ac.id [PPS Materials Science, FMIPA-Universitas Indonesia, Depok 16424 (Indonesia); Notonegoro, Hamdan Akbar [Mechanical Engineering Dept., FT-Universitas Sultan Ageng Tirtayasa,Cilegon 42435 (Indonesia); Thosin, Kemas Ahmad Zaini [Pusat Penelitian Fisika,LIPI, Serpong (Indonesia)

    2016-06-17

    The 304 stainless steel (SS) type is widely used in oil and gas operations due to its excellent corrosion resistance. However, the presence of the fine sand particles and H{sub 2}S gas contained in crude oil could lead the erosion and abrasion in steel. In this study, cold rolled treatments were conducted to the 304 SS in order to increase the wear resistance of the steel. The cold work has resulted in thickness reduction to 20%, 40% and 60% of the original. Various microstructural characterizations were used to analyze the effect of deformation. The hardness characterization showed that the initial hardness value increased from 145 HVC to 395 HVC as the level of deformation increase. Further, the wear resistance increased with the deformation rate from 0% to 40% and subsequently decreased from 40% to 60% deformation rate. Microstructural characterization shows that the boundary change to coincide by 56 µm, 49 µm, 45 µm, and 43 µm width and the grain go to flatten and being folded like needles. The effect of deformation on the grain morphology and structure was also studied by optical metallography and X-Ray Diffraction. It is shown that the deformation by means of a cold rolled process has transformed the austenite structure into martensitic structure.

  15. Arthur Prior and 'Now'

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blackburn, Patrick Rowan; Jørgensen, Klaus Frovin

    2016-01-01

    ’s search led him through the work of Castañeda, and back to his own work on hybrid logic: the first made temporal reference philosophically respectable, the second made it technically feasible in a modal framework. With the aid of hybrid logic, Prior built a bridge from a two-dimensional UT calculus...

  16. Prior Knowledge Assessment Guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-12-01

    assessment in a reasonable amount of time. Hands-on assessments can be extremely diverse in makeup and administration depending on the subject matter...DEVELOPING AND USING PRIOR KNOWLEDGE ASSESSMENTS TO TAILOR TRAINING D-3 ___ Brush and scrub ___ Orchards ___ Rice

  17. Microbiota of kefir grains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomislav Pogačić

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Kefir grains represent the unique microbial community consisting of bacteria, yeasts, and sometimes filamentous moulds creating complex symbiotic community. The complexity of their physical and microbial structures is the reason that the kefir grains are still not unequivocally elucidated. Microbiota of kefir grains has been studied by many microbiological and molecular approaches. The development of metagenomics, based on the identification without cultivation, is opening new possibilities for identification of previously nonisolated and non-identified microbial species from the kefir grains. Considering recent studies, there are over 50 microbial species associated with kefir grains. The aim of this review is to summarise the microbiota composition of kefir grains. Moreover, because of technological and microbiological significance of the kefir grains, the paper provides an insight into the microbiological and molecular methods applied to study microbial biodiversity of kefir grains.

  18. Ultrasonic inspectability of austenitic stainless steel and dissimilar metal weld joints

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pudovikov, S.; Bulavinov, A.; Kroening, M. [Fraunhofer-Institut fuer Zerstoerungsfreie Pruefverfahren IZFP, Saarbruecken (Germany)

    2008-07-01

    Since their invention in 1912, austenitic stainless steel materials are widely used in a variety of industry sectors. In particular, austenitic stainless steel material is qualified to meet the design criteria of high quality, safety related applications, for example, the primary loop of the most of the nuclear power plants in the world, due to high durability and corrosion resistance. Certain operating conditions may cause a range of changes in the integrity of the component, and therefore require nondestructive testing at reasonable intervals. These in-service inspections are often performed using ultrasonic techniques, in particular when cracking is of specific concern. However, the coarse, dendritic grain structure of the weld material, formed during the welding process, is extreme and unpredictably anisotropic. Such structure is no longer direction-independent to the ultrasonic wave propagation; therefore, the ultrasonic beam deflects and redirects and the wave front becomes distorted. Thus, the use of conventional ultrasonic testing techniques using fixed beam angles is very limited and the application of ultrasonic Phased Array techniques becomes desirable. The ''Sampling Phased Array'' technique, invented and developed by Fraunhofer IZFP, allows the acquisition of time signals (A-scans) for each individual transducer element of the array along with image reconstruction techniques using ''SynFoc'' algorithms. The reconstruction considers the sound propagation from each image pixel to the individual sensor element. For anisotropic media, where the sound beam is deflected and the sound path is not known a-priory, we implement a new phase adjustment called ''Reverse Phase Matching'' technique. This algorithm permits the acquisition of phase-corrected A-scans that represent the actual sound propagation in the anisotropic structure; this technique can be utilized for image reconstruction. (orig.)

  19. Fatigue and creep–fatigue deformation of an ultra-fine precipitate strengthened advanced austenitic alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carroll, M.C.; Carroll, L.J.

    2012-01-01

    An advanced austenitic alloy, HT-UPS (high-temperature ultrafine-precipitation-strengthened), has been identified as an ideal candidate material for the structural components of fast reactors and energy-conversion systems. HT-UPS alloys demonstrate improved creep resistance relative to 316 stainless steel (SS) through additions of Ti and Nb, which precipitate to form a widespread dispersion of stable nanoscale metallic carbide (MC) particles in the austenitic matrix. To investigate the behavior in more representative conditions than are offered by uniaxial creep tests, the low-cycle continuous fatigue and combined creep–fatigue response of an HT-UPS alloy have been investigated at 650 °C and 1.0% total strain, with an R-ratio of −1 and hold times at peak tensile strain of up to 150 min. The cyclic deformation response of HT-UPS is directly compared to that of standard 316 SS. The measured values for total cycles to failure between the two alloys are similar, despite differences in peak stress profiles and in qualitative observations of the deformed microstructures. Crack propagation is primarily transgranular in both fatigue and creep–fatigue of each alloy at the investigated conditions. Internal grain boundary damage in the form of fine cracks resulting from the tensile hold is present following the application of hold times of 60 min and longer, and considerably more internal cracks are quantifiable in 316 SS than in HT-UPS. The dislocation substructures observed in the deformed material differ substantially; an equiaxed cellular structure is observed in the microstructure of 316 SS, whereas HT-UPS exhibits widespread and relatively homogenous tangles of dislocations pinned by the nanoscale MC precipitates. The significant effect of the fine distribution of precipitates on observed fatigue and creep–fatigue response is described in three distinct behavioral regions as the microstructure evolves with continued cycling.

  20. Fatigue and creep-fatigue deformation of an ultra-fine precipitate strengthened advanced austenitic alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carroll, M.C., E-mail: Mark.Carroll@INL.gov [Idaho National Laboratory, 1955 Fremont, PO Box 1625, Idaho Falls, ID 83415-2218 (United States); Carroll, L.J. [Idaho National Laboratory, 1955 Fremont, PO Box 1625, Idaho Falls, ID 83415-2218 (United States)

    2012-10-30

    An advanced austenitic alloy, HT-UPS (high-temperature ultrafine-precipitation-strengthened), has been identified as an ideal candidate material for the structural components of fast reactors and energy-conversion systems. HT-UPS alloys demonstrate improved creep resistance relative to 316 stainless steel (SS) through additions of Ti and Nb, which precipitate to form a widespread dispersion of stable nanoscale metallic carbide (MC) particles in the austenitic matrix. To investigate the behavior in more representative conditions than are offered by uniaxial creep tests, the low-cycle continuous fatigue and combined creep-fatigue response of an HT-UPS alloy have been investigated at 650 Degree-Sign C and 1.0% total strain, with an R-ratio of -1 and hold times at peak tensile strain of up to 150 min. The cyclic deformation response of HT-UPS is directly compared to that of standard 316 SS. The measured values for total cycles to failure between the two alloys are similar, despite differences in peak stress profiles and in qualitative observations of the deformed microstructures. Crack propagation is primarily transgranular in both fatigue and creep-fatigue of each alloy at the investigated conditions. Internal grain boundary damage in the form of fine cracks resulting from the tensile hold is present following the application of hold times of 60 min and longer, and considerably more internal cracks are quantifiable in 316 SS than in HT-UPS. The dislocation substructures observed in the deformed material differ substantially; an equiaxed cellular structure is observed in the microstructure of 316 SS, whereas HT-UPS exhibits widespread and relatively homogenous tangles of dislocations pinned by the nanoscale MC precipitates. The significant effect of the fine distribution of precipitates on observed fatigue and creep-fatigue response is described in three distinct behavioral regions as the microstructure evolves with continued cycling.

  1. Corrosion of silicon-containing austenitic stainless steels under trans-passive conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stolarz, Jacek

    1989-01-01

    This research thesis addresses austenitic stainless steels which are used in installations for the chemical treatment of nuclear fuels, and are there in contact with nitric acid solutions the oxidising character of which generally promotes metal passivity. However, if this nitric environment becomes too oxidising, these steels may face severe corrosion problems. More particularly, this thesis addresses the study of intergranular corrosion, and aims at analysing various aspects of the corrosion of these austenitic stainless steels in trans-passive conditions. The author aims at determining and distinguishing the contributions due to silicon and those related to the presence of other impurities and addition elements by comparing the behaviours of industrial grade steels and high purity alloys in rigorously controlled electrochemical conditions. Another objective is to study the influence of the intergranular structure on silicon segregation by means of an attack technique in trans-passive conditions. After a report of a bibliographical study on the addressed topics and a presentation of the studied materials and implemented experimental techniques, the author reports the study of steel behaviour with respect to generalised dissolution in trans-passive conditions, as well in the nitric environment as in a sulphuric acid solution at imposed potential. Localised intragranular corrosion phenomena are discussed. A trans-passive intragranular corrosion model is proposed, and its possibilities in the analysis of intergranular segregation analysis are discussed. Experimental results of trans-passive intergranular corrosion of stainless steels are presented and interpreted by using the McLean segregation model. The influence of steel composition and of experimental conditions is discussed, as well as the role of grain boundary structure in the corrosion process [fr

  2. Methodic recommendations on ultrasonic testing of pipeline austenitic butt joints

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grebennik, V.S.; Lantukh, V.M.; Tajts, M.Z.; Ermolov, I.N.; Volkov, A.S.; Vyatskov, I.A.; Kesler, N.A.; Shchedrin, I.F.

    1989-01-01

    Recommendations for the application of ultrasonic testing of austenitic welded joints of the Du 500 pipelines with the walls 32-34 mm thick made of steel Kh18N10T are developed. The optimal values of the main parameters of ultrasonic testing are determined experimentally. Principles of calculation of the optimal parameters are considered. 1 ref.; 4 figs

  3. Nondestructive testing of austenitic casting and dissimilar metal welds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lahdenperae, K.

    1995-01-01

    The publication is a literature study of nondestructive testing of dissimilar metal welds and cast austenitic components in PWR and BWR plants. A major key to the successful testing is a realistic mockup made of the materials to be tested. The inspectors must also be trained and validated using suitable mockups. (42 refs., 27 figs., 10 tabs.)

  4. On the elusive crystal structure of expanded austenite

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brink, Bastian; Ståhl, Kenny; Christiansen, Thomas Lundin

    2017-01-01

    No consistent structural description exists for expanded austenite that accurately accounts for the hkl-dependent peak shifts and broadening observed in diffraction experiments. The best available description for homogeneous samples is a face-centered cubic lattice with stacking faults. Here Deby...

  5. To the corrosion of austenitic steels in sodium loops

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schad, M.

    1978-03-01

    This report describes the comparison between experimental corrosion and calculated corrosion effects on austenitic steels exposed to liquid sodium. As basis for the calculations served a diffusion model. The comparison showed that the model is able to predict the corrosion effects. In addition the model was used to calculate the corrosion effect along an actual fuel rod. (orig.) [de

  6. Phase Transformation of Metastable Austenite in Steel during Nano indentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahn, Taehong; Lee, Sung Bo; Han, Heung Nam; Park, Kyungtae

    2013-01-01

    These can produce geometrical softening accompanied by a sudden displacement excursion during load-controlled nanoindentation, which referred to in the literature as a pop-in. In this study, phase transformation of metastable austenite to stress-induced ε martensite which causes pop-ins during nanoindentation of steel will be reported and discussed. This study investigated the relationship between pop-in behavior of austenite in the early stage of nanoindentation and formation of ε martensite based on microstructural analyses. The load-displacement curve obtained from nanoindentation revealed stepwise pop-ins in the early stage of plastic deformation. From analyses of high resolution TEM images, a cluster of banded structure under the indent turned out a juxtaposition of (111) planes of γ austenite and (0001) planes of ε martensite. The calculation of displacement along indentation axis for (111) slip system by formation of ε martensite showed that geometrical softening can also occur by ε martensite formation when considering that the stress-induced ε martensite transformation is the predominant deformation mode in the early stage of plastic deformation and its monopartial nature as well. These microstructural investigations strongly suggest that the pop-in behavior in the early stage of plastic deformation of austenite is closely related to the formation of ε martensite

  7. Phase Transformation of Metastable Austenite in Steel during Nano indentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahn, Taehong [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Sung Bo; Han, Heung Nam [Seoul National Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, Kyungtae [Hanbat National Univ., Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-05-15

    These can produce geometrical softening accompanied by a sudden displacement excursion during load-controlled nanoindentation, which referred to in the literature as a pop-in. In this study, phase transformation of metastable austenite to stress-induced ε martensite which causes pop-ins during nanoindentation of steel will be reported and discussed. This study investigated the relationship between pop-in behavior of austenite in the early stage of nanoindentation and formation of ε martensite based on microstructural analyses. The load-displacement curve obtained from nanoindentation revealed stepwise pop-ins in the early stage of plastic deformation. From analyses of high resolution TEM images, a cluster of banded structure under the indent turned out a juxtaposition of (111) planes of γ austenite and (0001) planes of ε martensite. The calculation of displacement along indentation axis for (111) slip system by formation of ε martensite showed that geometrical softening can also occur by ε martensite formation when considering that the stress-induced ε martensite transformation is the predominant deformation mode in the early stage of plastic deformation and its monopartial nature as well. These microstructural investigations strongly suggest that the pop-in behavior in the early stage of plastic deformation of austenite is closely related to the formation of ε martensite.

  8. Effect of shot peening on metastable austenitic stainless steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fargas, G., E-mail: gemma.fargas@upc.edu [CIEFMA - Departament de Ciència dels Materials i Enginyeria Metallúrgica, Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); CRnE, Centre de Recerca en Nanoenginyeria, Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Roa, J.J.; Mateo, A. [CIEFMA - Departament de Ciència dels Materials i Enginyeria Metallúrgica, Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); CRnE, Centre de Recerca en Nanoenginyeria, Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya, 08028 Barcelona (Spain)

    2015-08-12

    In this work, shot peening was performed in a metastable austenitic stainless steel EN 1.4318 (AISI 301LN) in order to evaluate its effect on austenite to martensite phase transformation and also the influence on the fatigue limit. Two different steel conditions were considered: annealed, i.e., with a fully austenitic microstructure, and cold rolled, consisting of a mixture of austenite and martensite. X-ray diffraction, electron back-scattered diffraction and focus ion beam, as well as nanoindentation techniques, were used to elucidate deformation mechanisms activated during shot peening and correlate with fatigue response. Results pointed out that extensive plastic deformation and phase transformation developed in annealed specimens as a consequence of shot peening. However, the increase of roughness and the generation of microcracks led to a limited fatigue limit improvement. In contrast, shot peened cold rolled specimens exhibited enhanced fatigue limit. In the latter case, the main factor that determined the influence on the fatigue response was the distance from the injector, followed successively by the exit speed of the shots and the coverage factor.

  9. Laser cladding crack repair of austenitic stainless steel

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Van Rooyen, C

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Laser cladding crack repair of austenitic stainless steel vessels subjected to internal water pressure was evaluated. The purpose of this investigation was to develop process parameters for in-situ repair of through-wall cracks in components...

  10. Carbon diffusion in carbon-supersaturated ferrite and austenite

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Čermák, Jiří; Král, Lubomír

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 586, FEB (2014), s. 129-135 ISSN 0925-8388 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP108/11/0148; GA MŠk(CZ) ED1.1.00/02.0068 Institutional support: RVO:68081723 Keywords : carbon diffusion * Carbon supersaturation * Carbon supersaturation * Ferrite * Austenite Subject RIV: BJ - Thermodynamics Impact factor: 2.999, year: 2014

  11. Factors which determine the swelling rate of austenitic stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garner, F.A.; Wolfer, W.G.

    1983-01-01

    Once void nucleation subsides, the swelling rate of many austenitic alloys becomes rather insensitive to variables that control the transient regime of swelling. Models are presented which describe the roles of nickel, chromium and silicon in void nucleation. The relative insensitivity of steady-state swelling to temperature, displacement rate and composition is also discussed

  12. Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of Fe-18Mn-18Cr-0.5N Austenitic Nonmagnetic Stainless Steel in Asymmetric Hot Rolling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Y. L.; Li, C. S.; Ma, B.; Han, Y. H.

    2017-05-01

    Asymmetric hot rolling (ASHR) with a mismatch speed ratio of 1.15 in a single pass was applied to Fe-18Mn-18Cr-0.5N steel and was compared with symmetric hot rolling (SHR). The results indicated that a through-thickness microstructure gradient was formed in the plate due to the shear strain (0.36) introduced by ASHR. A fine-grained layer with the average size of 3 μm was achieved at the top surface of ASHR plate, while numerous elongated grains with a few recrystallized grains were presented at the center layer. The texture was distributed randomly at the top surface of ASHR plate, and a weaker intensity of typical hot-rolled texture in austenitic steel was obtained at the center layer of ASHR plate compared to SHR plate. An excellent combination of microhardness, strength and ductility was obtained in the ASHR plate, which was attributed to gradient microstructure induced by ASHR.

  13. Local Alignments for Fine-Grained Categorization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gavves, E.; Fernando, B.; Snoek, C.G.M.; Smeulders, A.W.M.; Tuytelaars, T.

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this paper is fine-grained categorization without human interaction. Different from prior work, which relies on detectors for specific object parts, we propose to localize distinctive details by roughly aligning the objects using just the overall shape. Then, one may proceed to the

  14. Thermal fatigue cracking of austenitic stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fissolo, A.

    2001-01-01

    This report deals with the thermal fatigue cracking of austenitic stainless steels as AISI 316 LN and 304 L. Such damage has been clearly observed for some components used in Fast Breeder reactors (FBR) and Pressure Water Reactor (PWR). In order to investigate thermal fatigue, quasi-structural specimen have been used. In this frame, facilities enforcing temperature variations similar to those found under the operation conditions have been progressively developed. As for components, loading results from impeded dilatation. In the SPLASH facility, the purpose was to establish accurate crack initiation conditions in order to check the relevance of the usual component design methodology. The tested specimen is continuously heated by the passage of an electrical DC current, and submitted to cyclic thermal down shock (up to 1000 deg C/s) by means of periodical spraying of water on two opposite specimen faces. The number of cycles to crack initiation N i is deduced from periodic examinations of the quenched surfaces, by means of optical microscopy. It is considered that initiation occurs when at least one 50μm to 150□m long crack is observed. Additional SPLASH tests were performed for N >> N i , with a view to investigate the evolution of a surface multiple cracking network with the number of cycles N. The CYTHIA test was mainly developed for the purpose of assessing crack growth dynamics of one isolated crack in thermal fatigue conditions. Specimens consist of thick walled tubes with a 1 mm circular groove is spark-machined at the specimen centre. During the test, the external wall of the tube is periodically heated by using a HF induction coil (1 MHz), while its internal wall is permanently cooled by flowing water. Total crack growth is derived from post-mortem examinations, whereby the thermal fatigue final rupture surface is oxidized at the end of the test. The specimen is broken afterwards under mechanical fatigue at room temperature. All the tests confirm that

  15. New developments for the ultrasonic inspection of austenitic stainless steel welds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chassignole, Bertrand; Doudet, Loic; Dupond, Olivier; Fouquet, Thierry; Richard, Benoit

    2006-01-01

    EDF R and D undertakes studies in non destructive testing (NDT) for better understanding the influence of various parameters (material, type of defect, geometry) on the 'controllability' of the critical components for nuclear safety. In the field of ultrasonic testing, one of the principal research orientations is devoted to the study of the austenitic stainless steel welds of the primary cooling system. Indeed, the structure of these welds present characteristics making difficult their examination, for example: - a strong anisotropy of the properties of elasticity which, coupled with the heterogeneity of the grain orientations, can involve phenomena of skewing, division and distortion of the beam; - a significant scattering of the waves by the grains involving an high attenuation and sometimes backscattered signals. For several years, actions have been launched to improve comprehension of these disturbing phenomena and to evaluate the controllability of those welds. This work is based on the one hand on experimental analyses on representative mock-ups and on the other hand on the developments of modelling codes taking into account the characteristics of the materials. We present in this document a synthesis of this work by developing the following points in particular: - a description of the phenomena of propagation; - the works undertaken to characterize the structure of the welds; - an example of study coupling experimental and modelling analyses for a butt weld achieved by manual arc welding with coated electrodes. The paper has the following contents: 1. Context; 2. Presentation of the problem; 3. Characterization of austenitic welds; 4. From comprehension to industrial application; 5. Conclusion and perspectives; 5. Conclusion and perspectives. This synthesis shows that each austenitic stainless steel weld is a particular case for the ultrasonic testing. This work allowed to better apprehend the disturbances of the ultrasonic propagation in the welds and thus

  16. Reversed austenite in 0Cr13Ni4Mo martensitic stainless steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Y.Y., E-mail: songyuanyuan@imr.ac.cn [Institute of Metal Research, Chinese Academy of Science, Shenyang 110016 (China); Li, X.Y.; Rong, L.J.; Li, Y.Y. [Institute of Metal Research, Chinese Academy of Science, Shenyang 110016 (China); Nagai, T. [National Institute for Materials Science, Sengen 1-2-1, Tsukuba 305-0047 (Japan)

    2014-01-15

    The austenite reversion process and the distribution of carbon and other alloying elements during tempering in 0Cr13Ni4Mo martensitic stainless steel have been investigated by in-situ high temperature X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM). The microstructure of the reversed austenite was characterized using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The results revealed that the amount of the reversed austenite formed at high temperature increased with the holding time. Direct experimental evidence supported carbon partitioning to carbides and Ni to the reversed austenite. The reversed austenite almost always nucleated in contact with lath boundary M{sub 23}C{sub 6} carbides during tempering and the diffusion of Ni promoted its growth. The Ni enrichment and the ultrafine size of the reversed austenite were considered to be the main factors that accounted for the stability of the reversed austenite. - Highlights: • The amount of the reversed austenite formed at high temperature increases with the holding time. • STEM results directly show that carbon is mainly partitioned into the carbides and Ni into the reversed austenite. • The Ni enrichment and the ultrafine size are the main factors leading to the stabilization of the reversed austenite.

  17. Material Characterization of Fatigue Specimens made from Meta-stable Austenitic Stainless Steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niffenegger, M.; Grosse, M.; Kalkhof, D.; Leber, H. [Paul Scherrer Institut Villigen (Switzerland); Vincent, A.; Pasco, L.; Morin, M. [Insa de Lyon (France)

    2003-07-01

    The main objective of the EU-project CRETE (Contract No.: FIS5-1999-00280) was to assess the capability and the reliability of innovative NDT-inspection techniques for the detection of material degradation, induced by thermal fatigue and neutron irradiation, of metastable austenitic and ferritic low-alloy steel. Several project partners tested aged or irradiated samples, using various techniques (acoustic, magnetic and thermoelectric). However, these indirect methods require a careful interpretation of the measured signal in terms of micro-structural evolutions due to ageing of the material. Therefore the material had to be characterized in its undamaged, as well as in its damaged state. The present report summarises only the material characterization of the fatigue specimens. It is issued simultaneously as an PSI Bericht and the CRETE work package 3 (WP3) report. Each partner according to their own specifications purchased three materials under investigation, namely AISI 347, AISI 321 and AISI 304L. After sending the material to PSI, all fatigue specimens were manufactured by the same Swiss company. Each partner was responsible for his fatigue tests which are documented in the report WP1, written by FANP. In order to characterize the material in its unfatigued as well as in its fatigued state and to consider microstructural changes related to fatigue damage the methods listed below were employed either by PSI or by INSA de Lyon: (1) Inductive Coupled Plasma Emission Photometry (ICP-OES) was applied to determine the chemical composition, (2) Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) for observing cracks, slip bands between grain and twin boundaries, - Ferromaster for measuring the magnetic permeability, (3) Physical Properties Measuring System (PPMS) for measuring magnetization characteristics, (4) Neutron- and advanced X-ray diffraction methods for the quantitative determination of martensite, - Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) for the observation of crystalline

  18. Sets of priors reflecting prior-data conflict and agreement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Walter, G.M.; Coolen, F.P.A.; Carvalho, J.P.; Lesot, M.-J.; Kaymak, U.; Vieira, S.; Bouchon-Meunier, B.; Yager, R.R.

    2016-01-01

    Bayesian inference enables combination of observations with prior knowledge in the reasoning process. The choice of a particular prior distribution to represent the available prior knowledge is, however, often debatable, especially when prior knowledge is limited or data are scarce, as then

  19. Effect of Heat Treatment on the Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of Nitrogen-Alloyed High-Mn Austenitic Hot Work Die Steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Zhang

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available In view of the requirements for mechanical properties and service life above 650 °C, a high-Mn austenitic hot work die steel, instead of traditional martensitic hot work die steel such as H13, was developed in the present study. The effect of heat treatment on the microstructure and mechanical properties of the newly developed work die steel was studied. The results show that the microstructure of the high-Mn as-cast electroslag remelting (ESR ingot is composed of γ-Fe, V(C,N, and Mo2C. V(C,N is an irregular multilateral strip or slice shape with severe angles. Most eutectic Mo2C carbides are lamellar fish-skeleton-like, except for a few that are rod-shaped. With increasing solid solution time and temperature, the increased hardness caused by solid solution strengthening exceeds the effect of decreased hardness caused by grain size growth, but this trend is reversed later. As a result, the hardness of specimens after various solid solution heat treatments increases first and then decreases. The optimal combination of hardness and austenitic grain size can be obtained by soaking for 2 h at 1170 °C. The maximum Rockwell hardness (HRC is 47.24 HRC, and the corresponding austenite average grain size is 58.4 μm. When the solid solution time is 3 h at 1230 °C, bimodality presented in the histogram of the austenite grain size as a result of further progress in secondary recrystallization. Compared with the single-stage aging, the maximum impact energy of the specimen after two-stage aging heat treatment was reached at 16.2 J and increased by 29.6%, while the hardness decreased by 1–2 HRC. After two-stage aging heat treatment, the hardness of steel reached the requirements of superior grade H13, and the maximum impact energy was 19.6% higher than that of superior grade H13, as specified in NADCA#207-2003.

  20. Synergistic Computational and Microstructural Design of Next- Generation High-Temperature Austenitic Stainless Steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karaman, Ibrahim [Texas A& M Engineering Experiment Station, College Station, TX (United States); Arroyave, Raymundo [Texas A& M Engineering Experiment Station, College Station, TX (United States)

    2015-07-31

    -forming austenitic stainless steel, is fully austenitic, but possesses carbides that were not dissolvable and could not be controlled. This alloy also did not show deformation twinning. Alloy 2 was designed based on alloy 1, but was not fully austenitic and had significant traces of uncontrollable precipitates as well. Alloy 3, also designed based on alloy 1, was mainly austenitic with evolution of a second phase along the grain boundaries, but also had precipitates that were not controllable. Based on the knowledge gained from the first generation of the designed steels, two more steels, called PGAA1 and PGAA2, were proposed using genetic algorithms that, based on the modelling, were supposed to exhibit alumina-scale formation. PGAA1, however, did not demonstrate a fully austenitic structure. PGAA2 could achieve a mostly austenitic structure through thermo-mechanical processing, and was then used for oxidation tests. The oxidation tests of PGAA2, with and without nitrogen impurities, along with alloy 1, suggested that PGAA2 can form alumina-scale similar to alloy 1, but N impurity will prevent formation of such a scale, probably through formation of aluminum nitrides. For the above mentioned genetic algorithm framework of alloy design, separate models were developed for specific design criteria. For prediction of alumina formation in stainless steels, a model was constructed based off of two criteria – effective valence and third element effect. These criteria capture the thermodynamics and kinetics of alumina formation in steels. To test the efficacy and robustness of this model, they were tested against alloys in the literature which had been experimentally verified to exhibit alumina formation and the predictions were in excellent agreement with the experiments. Another meta-model for prediction of twinning in unknown steel compositions was developed by an informatics based machine learning/data mining approach. Stacking Fault Energy data was captured from the literature for a

  1. Prior indigenous technological species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Jason T.

    2018-01-01

    One of the primary open questions of astrobiology is whether there is extant or extinct life elsewhere the solar system. Implicit in much of this work is that we are looking for microbial or, at best, unintelligent life, even though technological artefacts might be much easier to find. Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence (SETI) work on searches for alien artefacts in the solar system typically presumes that such artefacts would be of extrasolar origin, even though life is known to have existed in the solar system, on Earth, for eons. But if a prior technological, perhaps spacefaring, species ever arose in the solar system, it might have produced artefacts or other technosignatures that have survived to present day, meaning solar system artefact SETI provides a potential path to resolving astrobiology's question. Here, I discuss the origins and possible locations for technosignatures of such a prior indigenous technological species, which might have arisen on ancient Earth or another body, such as a pre-greenhouse Venus or a wet Mars. In the case of Venus, the arrival of its global greenhouse and potential resurfacing might have erased all evidence of its existence on the Venusian surface. In the case of Earth, erosion and, ultimately, plate tectonics may have erased most such evidence if the species lived Gyr ago. Remaining indigenous technosignatures might be expected to be extremely old, limiting the places they might still be found to beneath the surfaces of Mars and the Moon, or in the outer solar system.

  2. New microstructural features occurring during transformation from austenite to ferrite under the kinetic influence of magnetic field in a medium carbon steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Yudong; He Changshu; Zhao Xiang; Zuo Liang; Esling, Claude; He, Jicheng

    2004-01-01

    The effects of magnetic field on nucleation barrier of the phase transformation from austenite to ferrite at different cooling rates in 42CrMo steel have been investigated. The microstructures of ferrite and pearlite aligned along the magnetic field direction (parallel to the hot-rolling direction) are obtained at a cooling rate of 10 deg. C/min, resulting from the kinetic effects of the applied magnetic field during cooling and the microstructural influences of an inhomogeneous deformation occurring during the previous hot rolling. In this case, the formation of ferrite grains at higher temperatures is attributed mainly to the preferential nucleation at austenite boundaries. However, a fairly uniform microstructure of randomly distributed ferrite and pearlite is formed at a high cooling rate of 46 deg. C/min in the magnetic field of 14 T, as a result of both intergranular and intragranular nucleation at relatively low temperatures. Probing into this issue is helpful to gain a better understanding of kinetic influences of magnetic field on the phase transformation from austenite to ferrite

  3. Microstructure and local texture evolution by plasma nitriding in a 316L austenitic stainless steel and consequences on its fatigue durability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stinville, Jean-Charles

    2010-01-01

    The present study concerns the surface and mechanical properties induced by specific low temperature (∼400 C) plasma nitriding of an AISI 316L austenitic stainless steel largely used for structural component in nuclear and chemical industries. It focuses especially on its influence on the fatigue durability. The great advantages of this plasma nitriding process are to produce thick nitrided layers with a high concentration of nitrogen atoms in solid solution into the material and to preserve the stainless character of the substrate. As a consequence a new phase named expanded austenite or γ N phase is formed and the lattice expansion associated with the high supersaturation of interstitial nitrogen atoms results in residual compressive stresses at the surface that exceed 2 GPa. The surface is then strongly modified as a result of complex effects including some crystallographic plane rotation, plasticity and damage in some grains depending on their orientation. The considerable increase of hardness and wear resistance produced by plasma nitriding of austenitic stainless steels is now well documented but there are practically no data on the influence on fatigue properties. Series of fatigue tests in air at room temperature carried out in the low cycle fatigue range show a significant improvement of the fatigue life. The results are discussed especially taking into account the compressive residual stresses induced by the nitrided layer. (authors)

  4. Influence of the grain size on deleterious phase precipitation in superduplex stainless steel UNS S32750

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pardal, J.M.; Tavares, S.S.M.; Fonseca, M. Cindra; Souza, J.A. de; Corte, R.R.A.; Abreu, H.F.G. de

    2009-01-01

    In the present work, the effect of grain size on deleterious phase precipitation in a superduplex stainless steel was investigated. The materials studied were heat treated isothermally at 800 deg. C, 850 deg. C and 900 deg. C for times up to 120 min. Hardness tests, light optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction were carried out to detect sigma and other harmful precipitate phases. The ferritic and austenitic grain sizes in the solution treated condition of the two steels analyzed were measured by electron backscattered diffraction (EBSD). Cyclic polarization corrosion tests were performed to evaluate the effect of grain size on the corrosion resistance. The results presented show that the precipitation of deleterious phases such as χ, σ and γ 2 , which can occur during welding and forming operations, is retarded by grain growth

  5. Compaction of cereal grain

    OpenAIRE

    Wychowaniec, J.; Griffiths, I.; Gay, A.; Mughal, A.

    2013-01-01

    We report on simple shaking experiments to measure the compaction of a column of Firth oat grain. Such grains are elongated anisotropic particles with a bimodal polydispersity. In these experiments, the particle configurations start from an initially disordered, low-packing-fraction state and under vertical shaking evolve to a dense state with evidence of nematic-like structure at the surface of the confining tube. This is accompanied by an increase in the packing fraction of the grain.

  6. Evolution of interstellar grains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greenberg, J.M.

    1984-01-01

    The principal aim of this chapter is to derive the properties of interstellar grains as a probe of local physical conditions and as a basis for predicting such properties as related to infrared emissivity and radiative transfer which can affect the evolution of dense clouds. The first sections will develop the criteria for grain models based directly on observations of gas and dust. A summary of the chemical evolution of grains and gas in diffuse and dense clouds follows. (author)

  7. Microbiota of kefir grains

    OpenAIRE

    Tomislav Pogačić; Sanja Šinko; Šimun Zamberlin; Dubravka Samaržija

    2013-01-01

    Kefir grains represent the unique microbial community consisting of bacteria, yeasts, and sometimes filamentous moulds creating complex symbiotic community. The complexity of their physical and microbial structures is the reason that the kefir grains are still not unequivocally elucidated. Microbiota of kefir grains has been studied by many microbiological and molecular approaches. The development of metagenomics, based on the identification without cultivation, is opening new possibilities f...

  8. Grain boundary migration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dimitrov, O.

    1975-01-01

    Well-established aspects of grain-boundary migration are first briefly reviewed (influences of driving force, temperature, orientation and foreign atoms). Recent developments of the experimental methods and results are then examined, by considering the various driving of resistive forces acting on grain boundaries. Finally, the evolution in the theoretical models of grain-boundary motion is described, on the one hand for ideally pure metals and, on the other hand, in the presence of solute impurity atoms [fr

  9. The stress rupture properties of austenitic steel weld metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wood, D.S.

    Elevated temperature stress rupture data on Mo containing and Mo free austenitic weld metals have been collected from French, Dutch, German and UK sources and the results analysed. The stress rupture strength of Mo containing weld metal is significantly higher than that of Mo free weld metal. At 10,000h the rupture strength of Mo containing weld metal is higher than that of Type 316 steel whereas the Mo free weld metal is about 20% lower than that of Type 304 steel. Austenitic weld metal can give low stress rupture ductility values. It is concluded that there are insufficient data to permit reliable extrapolations to long times and it is recommended that long term tests are performed to overcome this situation

  10. Thermodynamic stability of austenitic Ni-Mn-Cu cast iron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Janus

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The performed research was aimed at determining thermodynamic stability of structures of Ni-Mn-Cu cast iron castings. Examined were 35 alloys. The castings were tempered at 900 °C for 2 hours. Two cooling speeds were used: furnace-cooling and water-cooling. In the alloys with the nickel equivalent value less than 20,0 %, partial transition of austenite to martensite took place. The austenite decomposition ratio and the related growth of hardness was higher for smaller nickel equivalent value and was clearly larger in annealed castings than in hardened ones. Obtaining thermodynamically stable structure of castings requires larger than 20,0 % value of the nickel equivalent.

  11. STRUCTURAL STABILITY OF HIGH NITROGEN AUSTENITIC STAINLESS STEELS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jana Bakajová

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the structural stability of an austenitic stainless steel with high nitrogen content. The investigated steel was heat treated at 800°C using different annealing times. Investigation was carried out using light microscopy, transmission electron microscopy and thermodynamic calculations. Three phases were identified by electron diffraction: Cr2N, sigma – phase and M23C6. The thermodynamic prediction is in good agreement with the experimental result. The only is the M23C6 carbide phase which is not thermodynamically predicted. Cr2N is the majority secondary phase and occurs in the form of discrete particles or cells (lamellas of Cr2N and austenite.

  12. An alternative to the crystallographic reconstruction of austenite in steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernier, Nicolas; Bracke, Lieven; Malet, Loïc; Godet, Stéphane

    2014-01-01

    An alternative crystallographic austenite reconstruction programme written in Matlab is developed by combining the best features of the existing models: the orientation relationship refinement, the local pixel-by-pixel analysis and the nuclei identification and spreading strategy. This programme can be directly applied to experimental electron backscatter diffraction mappings. Its applicability is demonstrated on both quenching and partitioning and as-quenched lath-martensite steels. - Highlights: • An alternative crystallographic austenite reconstruction program is developed. • The method combines a local analysis and a nuclei identification/spreading strategy. • The validity of the calculated orientation relationship is verified on a Q and P steel. • The accuracy of the reconstructed microtexture is investigated on a martensite steel

  13. Laser borided composite layer produced on austenitic 316L steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikołajczak Daria

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Austenitic 316L steel is well-known for its good resistance to corrosion and oxidation. Therefore, this material is often used wherever corrosive media or high temperatures are to be expected. The main drawback of this material is very low hardness and low resistance to mechanical wear. In this study, the laser boriding was used in order to improve the wear behavior of this material. As a consequence, a composite surface layer was produced. The microstructure of laser-borided steel was characterized by only two zones: re-melted zone and base material. In the re-melted zone, a composite microstructure, consisting of hard ceramic phases (borides and a soft austenitic matrix, was observed. A significant increase in hardness and wear resistance of such a layer was obtained.

  14. Austin: austenitic steel irradiation E 145-02 Irradiation Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Genet, F.; Konrad, J.

    1987-01-01

    Safety measures for nuclear reactors require that the energy which might be liberated in a reactor core during an accident should be contained within the reactor pressure vessel, even after very long irradiation periods. Hence the need to know the mechanical properties at high deformation velocity of structure materials that have received irradiation damage due to their utilization. The stainless steels used in the structures of reactors undergo damage by both thermal and fast neutrons, causing important changes in the mechanical properties of these materials. Various austenitic steels available as structural materials were irradiated or are under irradiation in various reactors in order to study the evolution of the mechanical properties at high deformation velocity as a function of the irradiation damage rate. The experiment called AUSTIN (AUstenitic STeel IrradiatioN) 02 was performed by the JRC Petten Establishment on behalf of Ispra in support of the reactor safety programme

  15. Residual stress studies of austenitic and ferritic steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chrenko, R.M.

    1978-01-01

    Residual studies have been made on austenitic and ferritic steels of the types used as structural materials. The residual stress results presented here will include residual stress measurements in the heat-affected zone on butt welded Type 304 stainless steel pipes, and the stresses induced in Type 304 austenitic stainless steel and Type A508 ferritic steel by several surface preparations. Such surface preparation procedures as machining and grinding can induce large directionality effects in the residual stresses determined by X-ray techniques and some typical data will be presented. A brief description is given of the mobile X-ray residual stress apparatus used to obtain most of the data in these studies. (author)

  16. Electron microscopy and plastic deformation of industrial austenitic stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, Barry

    1976-01-01

    The different mechanisms of plastic deformation observed in austenitic stainless steels are described and the role of transmission electron microscopy in the elucidation of the mechanisms is presented. At temperatures below 0,5Tm, different variants of dislocation glide are competitive: slip of perfect and partial dislocations, mechanical twinning and strain-induced phase transformations. The predominance of one or other of these mechanisms can be rationalized in terms of the temperature and composition dependence of the stacking fault energy and the thermodynamic stability of the austenite. At temperatures above 0,5Tm dislocation climb and diffusion of point defects become increasingly important and at these temperatures recovery, recrystallization and precipitation can also occur during deformation [fr

  17. High Nitrogen Austenitic Stainless Steel Precipitation During Isothermal Annealing

    OpenAIRE

    Maria Domankova; Katarína Bártová; Ivan Slatkovský; Peter Pinke

    2016-01-01

    The time-temperature-precipitation in high-nitrogen austenitic stainless steel was investigated using light optical microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, selected area diffraction and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. The isothermal precipitation kinetics curves and the corresponding precipitation activation energy were obtained. The diffusion activation energy of M2N precipitation is 129 kJ/mol. The results show that critical temperature for M2N precipitation is about 825°C with ...

  18. Integrity of austenitic stainless steel piping welds for nuclear service

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Canalini, A.; Lopes, L.R.

    1983-01-01

    A criterion applying K 1d concept was developed to determine the fracture mechanics properties of austenitic stainless steel nuclear piping welds. The critical dimensions, lenght and depth, for crack initiation were established and plotted in a chart. This study enables the dimensions of a discontinuity detected in an in-service inspection to be compared to the critical dimensions for crack initiation, and the indication can be judged critical or non-critical for the component. (author) [pt

  19. High Cycle Fatigue of Metastable Austenitic Stainless Steels

    OpenAIRE

    Fargas Ribas, Gemma; Zapata Dederle, Ana Cristina; Anglada Gomila, Marcos Juan; Mateo García, Antonio Manuel

    2009-01-01

    Metastable austenitic stainless steels are currently used in applications where severe forming operations are required, such as automotive bodies, due to its excellent ductility. They are also gaining interest for its combination of high strength and formability after forming. The biggest disadvantage is the difficulty to predict the mechanical response, which depends heavily on the amount of martensite formed. The martensitic transformation in metastable stainless steels can b...

  20. Diagnostic experimental results on the hydrogen embrittlement of austenitic steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gavriljuk, V.G.; Shivanyuk, V.N.; Foct, J

    2003-03-14

    Three main available hypotheses of hydrogen embrittlement are analysed in relation to austenitic steels based on the studies of the hydrogen effect on the interatomic bonds, phase transformations and microplastic behaviour. It is shown that hydrogen increases the concentration of free electrons, i.e. enhances the metallic character of atomic interactions, although such a decrease in the interatomic bonding cannot be a reason for brittleness and rather assists an increased plasticity. The hypothesis of the critical role of the hydrogen-induced {epsilon} martensite was tested in the experiment with the hydrogen-charged Si-containing austenitic steel. Both the fraction of the {epsilon} martensite and resistance to hydrogen embrittlement were increased due to Si alloying, which is at variance with the pseudo-hydride hypothesis. The hydrogen-caused early start of the microplastic deformation and an increased mobility of dislocations, which are usually not observed in the common mechanical tests, are revealed by the measurements of the strain-dependent internal friction, which is consistent with the hypothesis of the hydrogen-enhanced localised plasticity. An influence of alloying elements on the enthalpy E{sub H} of hydrogen migration in austenitic steels is studied using the temperature-dependent internal friction and a correlation is found between the values of E{sub H} and hydrogen-caused decrease in plasticity. A mechanism for the transition from the hydrogen-caused microplasticity to the apparent macrobrittle fracture is proposed based on the similarity of the fracture of hydrogenated austenitic steels to that of high nitrogen steels.

  1. Morphology change of retained austenite during austempering of carbide-free bainitic steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hofer, Christina, E-mail: christina.hofer@unileoben.ac.at [Department of Physical Metallurgy and Materials Testing, Montanuniversität Leoben, Franz-Josef-Straße 18, 8700 Leoben (Austria); Winkelhofer, Florian [Research and Development - Business Unit Coil, voestalpine Stahl GmbH, voestalpine‐Straße 3, A-4020 Linz (Austria); Clemens, Helmut; Primig, Sophie [Department of Physical Metallurgy and Materials Testing, Montanuniversität Leoben, Franz-Josef-Straße 18, 8700 Leoben (Austria)

    2016-05-10

    A change in the mechanical properties of a carbide-free bainitic steel was observed during prolonged holding at austempering temperature after termination of the bainitic transformation. To determine the origin of the property change, the microstructure was investigated by correlative electron microscopy. Although the retained austenite content remains the same during prolonged holding, its morphology changes from thin films separating the individual bainitic sub-units to a more globular structure. Since films of austenite contain a higher C concentration, the blocky austenite becomes gradually enriched in C during this morphology change. The more homogeneous distribution of the C after prolonged austempering leads to higher deformability as a result of a more pronounced TRIP effect. - Highlights: • Higher deformability after prolonged austempering of carbide-free bainite. • Microstructure-property relationship revealed by correlative electron microscopy. • Change in austenite morphology. • Spherodization of film austenite; C enrichment & homogenization of blocky austenite.

  2. Effect of rare earth element yttrium addition on microstructures and properties of a 21Cr-11Ni austenitic heat-resistant stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Lei; Ma, Xiaocong; Wang, Longmei; Ye, Xiaoning

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → Applications of Y in 21Cr-11Ni austenitic heat-resistant stainless steel. → Sensible characteristics of microstructure and properties have been observed. → Y has been found be effective in improving hot ductility of 21Cr-11Ni steel. → Inhibitory effect of Y on S segregation to the grain boundary has been observed. -- Abstract: In this comparative study, the microstructure and the mechanical properties of a 21Cr-11Ni austenitic heat-resistant stainless steel with and without addition of rare earth (RE) element yttrium have been investigated. The results show that a number of fine spherical yttrium-rich oxide particles are not uniformly distributed in the matrix of steel with yttrium; instead, they are aligned along the rolling direction. The grains surrounding the alignment are nearly one order of magnitude smaller than those farther away from the alignment. The approximate calculation results indirectly show that the grain refinement may be mainly attributed to the stimulation for nucleation of recrystallization rather than to pinning by particles. Furthermore, the alignment has resulted in significant loss in transverse impact toughness and tensile elongation at room temperature. There is a trough in the hot ductility-temperature curve, which is located between 973 and 1173 K. The ductility trough of steel with yttrium becomes shallow within a certain temperature range, especially around 1073 K, indicating that improvement on hot ductility is achieved by yttrium addition. The results may be attributed to the increase of grain boundary cohesion indicated by the effective improvement on intergranular failure tendency, and the inhibitory effect of yttrium on sulfur segregation to grain boundaries is believed to be an important cause.

  3. Influence of mechanical and thermal treatments on microstructure and mechanical properties of titanium stabilized austenitic stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sidhom, H.

    1983-12-01

    Thermal and mechanical treatments for microstructure optimization in titanium stabilized austenitic stainless steels used in nuclear industry are examined. The steels studied Z10CNDT15-15B and Z6CNDT17-13 are of the type 15-15 Ti and 316 Ti. These treatments allow the elimination of casting heterogeneity produced by dendritic solidification, improve mechanical properties particularly creep and the best compromise between grain size solid solution of metal additions is obtained. Secondary precipitation of (TiMo)C on dislocations is improved by a previous strain hardening. The precipitation reinforce the good effect of strain hardening by stabilization of the microstructure producing a better resistance to recrystallization [fr

  4. 'In-beam' simulation of high temperature helium embrittlement of DIN 1.4970 austenitic stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schroeder, H.; Batfalsky, P.

    1982-01-01

    This work describes a facility for high temperature creep rupture tests during homogeneous helium implantation. This 'in-beam' creep testing facility is used to simulate helium embrittlement effects which will be very important for first wall materials of future fusion reactors operated at high temperatures. First results for DIN 1.4970 austenitic stainless steel clearly demonstrate differences between samples 'in-beam' tested at 1073 K and those creep tested at the same temperature after room temperature helium implantation. The specimens ruptured 'in-beam' have much shorter lifetimes and lower ductility than the specimens tested after room temperature implantation. There are also differences in the microstructures, concerning helium bubble sizes and densities in matrix and grain boundaries. These microstructural differences may be a key for the understanding of the more severe helium embrittlement effects 'in-beam' as compared to creep tests performed after room temperature implantation. (orig.)

  5. Stress corrosion cracking and oxidation of austenitic stainless steel 316 L and model alloy in supercritical water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saez-Maderuelo, A.; Gomez-Briceno, D.; Diego, G.

    2015-01-01

    In this work, an austenitic stainless steel type 316 L was tested in deaerated supercritical water at 400 deg. C and 500 deg. C and 25 MPa to determine how variations in water conditions influence its stress corrosion cracking behaviour and to make progress in the understanding of mechanisms involved in SCC processes in this environment. Moreover, the influence of plastic deformation in the resistance of the material to SCC was also studied at both temperatures. In addition to this, previous oxidation experiments at 400 deg. C and 500 deg. C and at 25 MPa were taken into account to gain some insight in this kind of processes. Furthermore, a cold worked model alloy based on the stainless steel 316 L with some variations in the chemical composition in order to simulate the composition of the grain boundary after irradiation was tested at 400 deg. C and 25 MPa in deaerated supercritical water. (authors)

  6. Retained austenite thermal stability in a nanostructured bainitic steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Avishan, Behzad; Garcia-Mateo, Carlos; Yazdani, Sasan; Caballero, Francisca G.

    2013-01-01

    The unique microstructure of nanostructured bainite consists of very slender bainitic ferrite plates and high carbon retained austenite films. As a consequence, the reported properties are opening a wide range of different commercial uses. However, bainitic transformation follows the T 0 criteria, i.e. the incomplete reaction phenomena, which means that the microstructure is not thermodynamically stable because the bainitic transformation stops well before austenite reaches an equilibrium carbon level. This article aims to study the different microstructural changes taking place when nanostructured bainite is destabilized by austempering for times well in excess of that strictly necessary to end the transformation. Results indicate that while bainitic ferrite seems unaware of the extended heat treatment, retained austenite exhibits a more receptive behavior to it. - Highlights: • Nanostructured bainitic steel is not thermodynamically stable. • Extensive austempering in these microstructures has not been reported before. • Precipitation of cementite particles is unavoidable at longer austempering times. • TEM, FEG-SEM and XRD analysis were used for microstructural characterization

  7. Retained austenite thermal stability in a nanostructured bainitic steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Avishan, Behzad, E-mail: b_avishan@sut.ac.ir [Faculty of Materials Engineering, Sahand University of Technology, Tabriz (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Garcia-Mateo, Carlos, E-mail: cgm@cenim.csic.es [Department of Physical Metallurgy, National Centre for Metallurgical Research (CENIM-CSIC), MATERALIA Research Group, Avda. Gregorio del Amo, 8, 28040, Madrid (Spain); Yazdani, Sasan, E-mail: yazdani@sut.ac.ir [Faculty of Materials Engineering, Sahand University of Technology, Tabriz (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Caballero, Francisca G., E-mail: fgc@cenim.csic.es [Department of Physical Metallurgy, National Centre for Metallurgical Research (CENIM-CSIC), MATERALIA Research Group, Avda. Gregorio del Amo, 8, 28040, Madrid (Spain)

    2013-07-15

    The unique microstructure of nanostructured bainite consists of very slender bainitic ferrite plates and high carbon retained austenite films. As a consequence, the reported properties are opening a wide range of different commercial uses. However, bainitic transformation follows the T{sub 0} criteria, i.e. the incomplete reaction phenomena, which means that the microstructure is not thermodynamically stable because the bainitic transformation stops well before austenite reaches an equilibrium carbon level. This article aims to study the different microstructural changes taking place when nanostructured bainite is destabilized by austempering for times well in excess of that strictly necessary to end the transformation. Results indicate that while bainitic ferrite seems unaware of the extended heat treatment, retained austenite exhibits a more receptive behavior to it. - Highlights: • Nanostructured bainitic steel is not thermodynamically stable. • Extensive austempering in these microstructures has not been reported before. • Precipitation of cementite particles is unavoidable at longer austempering times. • TEM, FEG-SEM and XRD analysis were used for microstructural characterization.

  8. Weldability of newly developed austenitic alloy for cryogenic service

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogawa, T.; Koseki, T.

    1986-01-01

    The testing reported in this paper involved typical steels of the new grades such as STEEL-A (0.025C-14Ni-25Cr-0.35N), STEEL-B (0.04C-23Mn-13Cr-0.22N) and STEEL-C (0.20C-25Mn-5Cr), and commercial steels of Type 300 series. Weldments were made mainly using the GTAW, SMAW and SAW processes with experimental and commercial filler metals. Strength and toughness of weldments were examined at 77 K (-321 0 F) and 4 K. The strengthening of material through the addition of nitrogen was far greater in the weld metal that in the base metal at cryogenic temperature. In fact, 0.2% proof stress of weld metals bearging 0.20% to 0.40% nitrogen at 77 K exhibited a higher value by 60 to 150 MPa (8,740 to 21,760 psi) than that of the base metal. Impact absorbed energy of weld metals at 77 K decreased rapidly with nitrogen content, 60-90 J at 0.20%N to 20-50J at 0.35% N. Rather high impact absorbed energy was obtained when the weld metal solidified as primary austenitic phase, resulting in fully austenitic microstructure or austenite-eutectic ferrite mixture at ambient temperature. In addition, oxide inclusions, the number of which strongly depends on welding processes, were detrimental to toughness of weld metals at cryogenic temperature

  9. Determination of delta ferrite volumetric fraction in austenitic stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Almeida Macedo, W.A. de.

    1983-01-01

    Measurements of delta ferrite volumetric fraction in AISI 304 austenitic stainless steels were done by X-ray diffraction, quantitative metallography (point count) and by means of one specific commercial apparatus whose operational principle is magnetic-inductive: The Ferrite Content Meter 1053 / Institut Dr. Foerster. The results obtained were comparated with point count, the reference method. It was also investigated in these measurements the influence of the martensite induced by mechanical deformation. Determinations by X-ray diffraction, by the ratio between integrated intensities of the ferrite (211) and austenite (311) lines, are in excelent agreement with those taken by point count. One correction curve for the lectures of the commercial equipment in focus was obtained, for the range between zero and 20% of delta ferrite in 18/8 stainless steels. It is demonstrated that, depending on the employed measurement method and surface finishing of the material to be analysed, the presence of martensite produced by mechanical deformation of the austenitic matrix is one problem to be considered. (Author) [pt

  10. Low ductility creep failure in austenitic weld metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, R.G.

    Creep tests have been carried out for times of up to approx. 22,000 hrs on three austenitic weld metals of nominal composition 17Cr-8Ni-2Mo, 19Cr-12Ni-3Mo+Nb and 17Cr-10Ni-2Mo. The two former deposits were designed to produce delta-ferrite contents in the range 3-9% while the latter was designed to be fully austenitic. The common feature of all three weld metals was that they all gave very low strains at failure, typically approx. 1%. The microstructures of the failed creep specimens have been studied using optical and electron microscopy and the precipitate structures related to the occurrence of low creep strains. Creep deformation and fracture mechanisms in austenitic materials in general have been reviewed and this has been used as a basis for discussion of the observations of the present work. Finally, some of the factors that can be controlled to improve long-term creep ductility have been appraised

  11. Study of irradiation damage structures in austenitic stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamada, Shozo

    1997-08-01

    The irradiation damage microstructures in austenitic stainless steels, which have been proposed to be a candidate of structural materials of a fusion reactor, under ions and neutrons irradiation have been studied. In ion irradiation experiments, cross-sectional observation of the depth distribution of damage formed due to ion irradiation became available. Comparison and discussion between experimental results with TEM and the calculated ones in the depth profiles of irradiation damage microstructures. Further, dual-phase stainless steels, consisted of ferritic/austenitic phases, showed irradiation-induced/enhanced precipitation during ion irradiation. High Flux Isotope Reactor with high neutron fluxes was employed in neutron-irradiation experiments. Swelling of 316 steel showed irradiation temperature dependence and this had strong correlation with phase instability under heavy damage level. Swelling resistance of Ti-modified austenitic stainless steel, which has good swelling resistance, decreased during high damage level. This might be caused by the instability of Ti-carbide particles. The preparation method to reduce higher radioactivity of neutron-irradiated TEM specimen was developed. (author). 176 refs

  12. Study of irradiation damage structures in austenitic stainless steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamada, Shozo [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    1997-08-01

    The irradiation damage microstructures in austenitic stainless steels, which have been proposed to be a candidate of structural materials of a fusion reactor, under ions and neutrons irradiation have been studied. In ion irradiation experiments, cross-sectional observation of the depth distribution of damage formed due to ion irradiation became available. Comparison and discussion between experimental results with TEM and the calculated ones in the depth profiles of irradiation damage microstructures. Further, dual-phase stainless steels, consisted of ferritic/austenitic phases, showed irradiation-induced/enhanced precipitation during ion irradiation. High Flux Isotope Reactor with high neutron fluxes was employed in neutron-irradiation experiments. Swelling of 316 steel showed irradiation temperature dependence and this had strong correlation with phase instability under heavy damage level. Swelling resistance of Ti-modified austenitic stainless steel, which has good swelling resistance, decreased during high damage level. This might be caused by the instability of Ti-carbide particles. The preparation method to reduce higher radioactivity of neutron-irradiated TEM specimen was developed. (author). 176 refs.

  13. Determination of delta ferrite volumetric fraction in austenitic stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Almeida Macedo, W.A. de.

    1983-01-01

    Measurements of delta ferrite volumetric fraction in AISI 304 austenitic stainless steels were done by X-ray difraction, quantitative metallography (point count) and by means of one specific commercial apparatus whose operational principle is magnetic-inductive: The Ferrite Content Meter 1053 / Institut Dr. Forster. The results obtained were comparated with point count, the reference method. It was also investigated in these measurements the influence of the martensite induced by mechanical deformation. Determinations by X-ray diffraction, by the ratio between integrated intensities of the ferrite (211) and austenite (311) lines, are in excelent agreement with those taken by point count. One correction curve for the lectures of the commercial equipment in focus was obtained, for the range between zero and 20% of delta ferrite in 18/8 stainless steels. It is demonstrated that, depending on the employed measurement method and surface finishing of the material to be analysed, the presence of martensite produced by mechanical deformation of the austenitic matrix is one problem to be considered. (Author) [pt

  14. Phase stability of high manganese austenitic steels for cryogenic applications

    CERN Document Server

    Couturier, K

    2000-01-01

    The aim of this work is to study the austenitic stability against a' martensitic transformation of three non-magnetic austenitic steels : a new stainless steel X2CrMnNiMoN 19-12-11-1 grade, a traditional X8CrMnNiN 19-11-6 grade and a high manganese X8MnCrNi 28-7-1 grade. Measurements of relative magnetic susceptibility at room temperature are performed on strained tensile specimens at 4.2 K. A special extensometer for high precision strain measurements at low temperature has been developed at CERN to test specimens up to various levels of plastic strain. Moreover, the high precision strain recording of the extensometer enables a detailed study of the serrated yield phenomena associated with 4.2 K tensile testing and their influence on the evolution of magnetic susceptibility. The results show that high Mn contents increase the stability of the austenitic structure against a' martensitic transformation, while keeping high strength at cryogenic temperature. Moreover, proper elaboration through primary and possi...

  15. Study on mechanism of intergranular stress corrosion cracking and analysis of residual stress and work hardening in welds of low-carbon austenitic stainless steel with hard surface machining

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mori, Hiroaki; Mochizuki, Masahito; Nishimoto, Kazutoshi; Toyoda, Masao; Katsuyama, Jinya

    2007-01-01

    In order to make clear the effects of residual stress and hardening on intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) behavior in the welds of Type 316L low-carbon austenitic stainless steel with surface hardening, the residual stress and hardness in the butt-joint of pipes as a typical example of the actual structure were estimated and the grain boundary sliding was analyzed from the viewpoint of micro-deformation. On the basis of these results, the mechanism of IGSCC was discussed by the integrated knowledge between metallurgy and mechanics. The relationship between plastic strain and hardness in hard-machined surface near welds was clarified from the experimented relationship and the analysis method by the thermal elastic-plastic analysis. The distributions of hardness and residual stress with the actual surface machining could be simulated. It was made clear that grain boundary sliding occurred in the steel at 561K by a constant strain rate tensile test. From the comparison of grain boundary sliding behavior between solution treated specimen and cold-rolled one, it was found that the grain boundary sliding in cold-rolled one occurs in smaller strain conditions than that in as received one, and the amount of grain boundary sliding in cold-rolled one increases remarkably with increases in rolling reduction. In addition, it was clarified that the grain boundary energy is raised by the grain boundary sliding. On the basis of these results, it was concluded that the cause of IGSCC in the welds of Type 316L low-carbon austenitic stainless steel with surface hardening is the increase in grain boundary energy due to grain boundary sliding induced by residual stress of multi pass welding and surface hardening. (author)

  16. Change of austenite state before martensite transformation and Msub(el) temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarrak, V.I.; Suvorova, S.O.

    1978-01-01

    The N31 alloy austenite behaviour in the premartensite temperature range is investigated. To study the austenite state the method of resistance to microplastic deformation sensitive to the structural state of metals is used. The resistance to microplastic deformation was determined by amplitude dependence of internal friction. The Msub(el) temperature is found at which the change of austenite state is observed due to the appearence of elastic nuclei of martensite below the Msub(el) temperature

  17. Response of cast austenitic stainless steel to low temperature plasma carburizing.

    OpenAIRE

    Sun, Yong

    2008-01-01

    The response of a cast 316 type austenitic stainless steel to the novel low temperature plasma carburizing process has been investigated in this work. The cast steel has a dendritic structure with a mix of austenite, ferrite and carbide phases. The results show that such a complex structure responds well to the carburizing process, and the inter-dendrite regions containing ferrite and carbides can be transformed to expanded austenite to form a continuous and uniform layer supersat...

  18. Origins of GEMS Grains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messenger, S.; Walker, R. M.

    2012-01-01

    Interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) collected in the Earth s stratosphere contain high abundances of submicrometer amorphous silicates known as GEMS grains. From their birth as condensates in the outflows of oxygen-rich evolved stars, processing in interstellar space, and incorporation into disks around new stars, amorphous silicates predominate in most astrophysical environments. Amorphous silicates were a major building block of our Solar System and are prominent in infrared spectra of comets. Anhydrous interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) thought to derive from comets contain abundant amorphous silicates known as GEMS (glass with embedded metal and sulfides) grains. GEMS grains have been proposed to be isotopically and chemically homogenized interstellar amorphous silicate dust. We evaluated this hypothesis through coordinated chemical and isotopic analyses of GEMS grains in a suite of IDPs to constrain their origins. GEMS grains show order of magnitude variations in Mg, Fe, Ca, and S abundances. GEMS grains do not match the average element abundances inferred for ISM dust containing on average, too little Mg, Fe, and Ca, and too much S. GEMS grains have complementary compositions to the crystalline components in IDPs suggesting that they formed from the same reservoir. We did not observe any unequivocal microstructural or chemical evidence that GEMS grains experienced prolonged exposure to radiation. We identified four GEMS grains having O isotopic compositions that point to origins in red giant branch or asymptotic giant branch stars and supernovae. Based on their O isotopic compositions, we estimate that 1-6% of GEMS grains are surviving circumstellar grains. The remaining 94-99% of GEMS grains have O isotopic compositions that are indistinguishable from terrestrial materials and carbonaceous chondrites. These isotopically solar GEMS grains either formed in the Solar System or were completely homogenized in the interstellar medium (ISM). However, the

  19. New Process for Grain Refinement of Aluminum. Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. Joseph A. Megy

    2000-09-22

    A new method of grain refining aluminum involving in-situ formation of boride nuclei in molten aluminum just prior to casting has been developed in the subject DOE program over the last thirty months by a team consisting of JDC, Inc., Alcoa Technical Center, GRAS, Inc., Touchstone Labs, and GKS Engineering Services. The Manufacturing process to make boron trichloride for grain refining is much simpler than preparing conventional grain refiners, with attendant environmental, capital, and energy savings. The manufacture of boride grain refining nuclei using the fy-Gem process avoids clusters, salt and oxide inclusions that cause quality problems in aluminum today.

  20. Aging precipitation behavior and its influence on mechanical properties of Mn18Cr18N austenitic stainless steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Fengming; Li, Yajie; He, Wenwu; Zhao, Xiaodong; Chen, Huiqin

    2017-11-01

    The aging precipitation behavior in Mn18Cr18N austenitic stainless steel was investigated at temperatures from 600 °C to 900 °C. During isothermal aging treatment, the primary precipitate was Cr2N with a = 0.478 nm and c = 0.444 nm, and it preferentially nucleates along initial grain boundaries and gradually grows towards the interior of grains in discontinuous cellular way. Meanwhile, a small amount of granular face-centred cubic M23C6 with a = 1.066 nm also were observed, which mainly form along grain boundaries. The effect of these precipitates on mechanical properties of the alloy was studied. It was found that precipitates result in degeneration of the matrix hardness. Meanwhile, the SEM morphologies of aged tensile sample show that the brittle fracture predominates during deformation, i.e. the fracture mode transforms from intergranular fracture to transgranular fracture with the increasing of aging time. Compared with the solution-treated sample, the strength of the aged tensile samples slightly decreases and plasticity remarkably deteriorates.

  1. Comparison of the microstructure, deformation and crack initiation behavior of austenitic stainless steel irradiated in-reactor or with protons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stephenson, Kale J., E-mail: kalejs@umich.edu; Was, Gary S.

    2015-01-15

    Highlights: • Dislocation loops were the prominent defect, but neutron irradiation caused higher loop density. • Grain boundaries had similar amounts of radiation-induced segregation. • The increment in hardness and yield stress due to irradiation were very similar. • Relative IASCC susceptibility was nearly identical. • The effect of dislocation channel step height on IASCC was similar. - Abstract: The objective of this study was to compare the microstructures, microchemistry, hardening, susceptibility to IASCC initiation, and deformation behavior resulting from proton or reactor irradiation. Two commercial purity and six high purity austenitic stainless steels with various solute element additions were compared. Samples of each alloy were irradiated in the BOR-60 fast reactor at 320 °C to doses between approximately 4 and 12 dpa or by a 3.2 MeV proton beam at 360 °C to a dose of 5.5 dpa. Irradiated microstructures consisted mainly of dislocation loops, which were similar in size but lower in density after proton irradiation. Both irradiation types resulted in the formation of Ni–Si rich precipitates in a high purity alloy with added Si, but several other high purity neutron irradiated alloys showed precipitation that was not observed after proton irradiation, likely due to their higher irradiation dose. Low densities of small voids were observed in several high purity proton irradiated alloys, and even lower densities in neutron irradiated alloys, implying void nucleation was in process. Elemental segregation at grain boundaries was very similar after each irradiation type. Constant extension rate tensile experiments on the alloys in simulated light water reactor environments showed excellent agreement in terms of the relative amounts of intergranular cracking, and an analysis of localized deformation after straining showed a similar response of cracking to surface step height after both irradiation types. Overall, excellent agreement was observed

  2. Reformed austenite transformation during fatigue crack propagation of 13%Cr-4%Ni stainless steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thibault, Denis, E-mail: thibault.denis@ireq.ca [Institut de recherche d' Hydro-Quebec (IREQ), 1800, boul. Lionel-Boulet, Varennes, Quebec, J3X 1S1 (Canada); Bocher, Philippe, E-mail: philippe.bocher@etsmtl.ca [Ecole de technologie superieure, 1100, rue Notre-Dame Ouest, Montreal, Quebec, H3C 1K3 (Canada); Thomas, Marc, E-mail: marc.thomas@etsmtl.ca [Ecole de technologie superieure, 1100, rue Notre-Dame Ouest, Montreal, Quebec, H3C 1K3 (Canada); Lanteigne, Jacques, E-mail: lanteigne.jacques@ireq.ca [Institut de recherche d' Hydro-Quebec (IREQ), 1800, boul. Lionel-Boulet, Varennes, Quebec, J3X 1S1 (Canada); Hovington, Pierre, E-mail: hovington.pierre@ireq.ca [Institut de recherche d' Hydro-Quebec (IREQ), 1800, boul. Lionel-Boulet, Varennes, Quebec, J3X 1S1 (Canada); Robichaud, Patrice, E-mail: patrice.robichaud@riotinto.com [Centre de recherche et de developpement Arvida (CRDA), 1955, boul. Mellon, Jonquiere, Quebec, G7S 4K8 (Canada)

    2011-08-15

    Highlights: {yields} Reformed austenite in 13%Cr-4%Ni stainless steel transforms during fatigue crack growth. {yields} Low cycle fatigue tests showed that this transformation to martensite is gradual. {yields} XRD spectrums obtained on the fracture surface and have been correlated to LCF results. - Abstract: In the as-quenched state, 13%Cr-4%Ni martensitic stainless steels are essentially 100% martensitic. However, a certain amount of austenite is formed during the tempering of this alloy. This reformed austenite is thermally stable at room temperature but can transform to martensite under stress. This transformation is known to happen during impact testing but it has never been established if it occurs during fatigue crack propagation. This study presents the results of X-ray diffraction measurements of reformed austenite before and after crack growth testing. It has been found that reformed austenite does transform to martensite at the crack tip and that this transformation occurs even at a low stress intensity factor. Low-cycle fatigue tests were conducted to verify austenite transformation under cyclic straining. It was found that reformed austenite transforms only partially during the first strain reversal but that essentially all austenite has disappeared after 100 cycles. The relation between austenite transformation under low-cycle fatigue and its transformation during crack growth is also discussed.

  3. Use of overlapped reflection for determining the retained austenite by X-ray diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garin, J.L.; Gonzalez, C.F.

    1988-01-01

    Retainec austenite in high-carbon steels has been determined by means of new computation techniques applied to the processing of X-ray diffraction data. Instead of using the traditional procedure based on the weak (200) reflections of martensite and austenite, intensity measurements of the overlapped (110) peak of martensite and (111) peak of austenite were performed. The separation of the peaks was based on a Pearson VII function, which is capable of describing all diffraction profiles. The accuracy of integrated intensities was then improved with the beneficial effects of higher precision in the calculation of the amount of retained austenite. (author) [pt

  4. Reformed austenite transformation during fatigue crack propagation of 13%Cr-4%Ni stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thibault, Denis; Bocher, Philippe; Thomas, Marc; Lanteigne, Jacques; Hovington, Pierre; Robichaud, Patrice

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Reformed austenite in 13%Cr-4%Ni stainless steel transforms during fatigue crack growth. → Low cycle fatigue tests showed that this transformation to martensite is gradual. → XRD spectrums obtained on the fracture surface and have been correlated to LCF results. - Abstract: In the as-quenched state, 13%Cr-4%Ni martensitic stainless steels are essentially 100% martensitic. However, a certain amount of austenite is formed during the tempering of this alloy. This reformed austenite is thermally stable at room temperature but can transform to martensite under stress. This transformation is known to happen during impact testing but it has never been established if it occurs during fatigue crack propagation. This study presents the results of X-ray diffraction measurements of reformed austenite before and after crack growth testing. It has been found that reformed austenite does transform to martensite at the crack tip and that this transformation occurs even at a low stress intensity factor. Low-cycle fatigue tests were conducted to verify austenite transformation under cyclic straining. It was found that reformed austenite transforms only partially during the first strain reversal but that essentially all austenite has disappeared after 100 cycles. The relation between austenite transformation under low-cycle fatigue and its transformation during crack growth is also discussed.

  5. The sub-zero Celsius treatment of precipitation hardenable semi-austenitic stainless steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Villa, Matteo; Hansen, Mikkel Fougt; Somers, Marcel A. J.

    2015-01-01

    A precipitation hardenable semi-austenitic stainless steel AISI 632 grade was austenitized according to industrial specifications and thereafter subjected to isothermal treatment at sub-zero Celsius temperatures. During treatment, austenite transformed to martensite. The isothermal austenite-to-martensite...... treatment. Magnetometry showed that the additional thermal step in boiling nitrogen yields a minor increment of the fraction of martensite, but has a noteworthy accelerating effect on the transformation kinetics, which more pronounced when the isothermal holding is performed at a higher temperature. Data...... is interpreted in terms of instantaneous nucleation of martensite during cooling followed by time dependent growth during isothermal holding....

  6. Kinetics analysis of two-stage austenitization in supermartensitic stainless steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nießen, Frank; Villa, Matteo; Hald, John

    2017-01-01

    The martensite-to-austenite transformation in X4CrNiMo16-5-1 supermartensitic stainless steel was followed in-situ during isochronal heating at 2, 6 and 18 K min−1 applying energy-dispersive synchrotron X-ray diffraction at the BESSY II facility. Austenitization occurred in two stages, separated...... that the austenitization kinetics is governed by Ni-diffusion and that slow transformation kinetics separating the two stages is caused by soft impingement in the martensite phase. Increasing the lath width in the kinetics model had a similar effect on the austenitization kinetics as increasing the heating-rate....

  7. Effect of Austenitic and Austeno-Ferritic Electrodes on 2205 Duplex and 316L Austenitic Stainless Steel Dissimilar Welds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Jagesvar; Taiwade, Ravindra V.

    2016-11-01

    This study addresses the effect of different types of austenitic and austeno-ferritic electrodes (E309L, E309LMo and E2209) on the relationship between weldability, microstructure, mechanical properties and corrosion resistance of shielded metal arc welded duplex/austenitic (2205/316L) stainless steel dissimilar joints using the combined techniques of optical, scanning electron microscope, energy-dispersive spectrometer and electrochemical. The results indicated that the change in electrode composition led to microstructural variations in the welds with the development of different complex phases such as vermicular ferrite, lathy ferrite, widmanstatten and intragranular austenite. Mechanical properties of welded joints were diverged based on compositions and solidification modes; it was observed that ferritic mode solidified weld dominated property wise. However, the pitting corrosion resistance of all welds showed different behavior in chloride solution; moreover, weld with E2209 was superior, whereas E309L exhibited lower resistance. Higher degree of sensitization was observed in E2209 weld, while lesser in E309L weld. Optimum ferrite content was achieved in all welds.

  8. Microstructure of warm rolling and pearlitic transformation of ultrafine-grained GCr15 steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun, Jun-Jie; Lian, Fu-Liang; Liu, Hong-Ji; Jiang, Tao; Guo, Sheng-Wu; Du, Lin-Xiu; Liu, Yong-Ning

    2014-01-01

    Pearlitic transformation mechanisms have been investigated in ultra-fine grained GCr15 steel. The ultrafine-grained steel, whose grain size was less than 1 μm, was prepared by thermo-mechanical treatment at 873 K and then annealing at 923 K for 2 h. Pearlitic transformation was conducted by reheating the ultra-fine grained samples at 1073 K and 1123 K for different periods of time and then cooling in air. Scanning electron microscope observation shows that normal lamellar pearlite, instead of granular cementite and ferrite, cannot be formed when the grain size is approximately less than 4(± 0.6) μm, which yields a critical grain size for normal lamellar pearlitic transformations in this chromium alloyed steel. The result confirms that grain size has a great influence on pearlitic transformation by increasing the diffusion rate of carbon atoms in the ultra-fine grained steel, and the addition of chromium element doesn't change this pearlitic phase transformation rule. Meanwhile, the grain growth rate is reduced by chromium alloying, which is beneficial to form fine grains during austenitizing, thus it facilitating pearlitic transformation by divorced eutectoid transformation. Moreover, chromium element can form a relatively high gradient in the frontier of the undissolved carbide, which promotes carbide formation in the frontier of the undissolved carbide, i.e., chromium promotes divorced eutectoid transformation. - Highlights: • Ultrafine-grained GCr15 steel was obtained by warm rolling and annealing technology. • Reduction of grain size makes pearlite morphology from lamellar to granular. • Adding Cr does not change normal pearlitic phase transformation rule in UFG steel. • Cr carbide resists grain growth and facilitates pearlitic transformation by DET

  9. Orientations of recrystallization nuclei developed in columnar-grained Ni at triple junctions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xu, C.L.; Huang, S.; Zhang, Yubin

    2015-01-01

    A high purity columnar grained nickel sample with a strong <001> fiber texture was cold rolled to 50% reduction in thickness, followed by annealing at different temperatures. Optical microscopy was used to depict the grain boundaries prior to annealing and to detect nuclei formed on grain boundar...

  10. Ultrasonic testing of austenitic welds and its dependency on the welding process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tabatabaeipour, S.M.; Honarvar, F.

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes the ultrasonic testing of austenitic welds prepared by two different welding processes. The tests were carried out by the ultrasonic Time-of-Flight Diffraction (ToFD) technique. Shielded Metal Arc Welding (SMAW) and Gas Tungsten Arc Welding (GTAW) are the welding processes used for preparing the specimens. Identical artificial defects were implanted in both welds during the welding process. Both specimens were examined by the ToFD technique under similar conditions. Metallographic images were also obtained from the cross sectional plane of both the SMA and GTA welds. These images show that the grain orientation in the two welded specimens are different. D-scan images obtained by the ToFD technique from these welds indicates that inspecting the specimens prepared by the SMAW process is easier than the one made by the GTAW process. The results also show that the D-scan images cannot reveal the small vertical drilled holes implanted in the specimens. (author)

  11. Experimental and computational study of nitride precipitation in a CrMnN austenitic stainless steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pettersson, Niklas, E-mail: niklas.pettersson@swerea.se [Swerea KIMAB AB, P.O. Box 7047, 164 07 Kista (Sweden); Frisk, Karin [Swerea KIMAB AB, P.O. Box 7047, 164 07 Kista (Sweden); Fluch, Rainer [Böhler Edelstahl Gmbh, Mariazeller Strasse 25, 8605 Kapfenberg (Austria)

    2017-01-27

    The austenitic CrMnN stainless steels are high-strength, tough, and non-magnetic, and are used in oil field applications. The steels have high alloying contents, and precipitation of Cr-nitrides and/or intermetallic phases can occur when cooling through the temperature region 950–700 °C. The nitride precipitates appear in the grain boundaries but can be difficult to observe in the microstructure due to their small size. However, there is an effect of precipitation on corrosion and impact strength and a modelling approach to predict precipitation is valuable for alloy and process development. In the present work precipitation simulations were applied to a CrMnN steel composition, and coupled to experimental investigations after heat treatments at 700 and 800 °C. The early stages, with short heat-treatment times, were studied. The simulations were performed using TC-PRISMA, a software for calculation of multiphase precipitation kinetics, using multicomponent nucleation and growth models. Dedicated thermodynamic and kinetic databases were used for the simulations. The main precipitate was identified by experiments and simulations to be the Cr{sub 2}N nitride, and the precipitation during isothermal heat treatments was investigated. Isothermal precipitation diagrams are simulated, and the influence of precipitation kinetics on toughness is discussed.

  12. Experimental and computational study of nitride precipitation in a CrMnN austenitic stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pettersson, Niklas; Frisk, Karin; Fluch, Rainer

    2017-01-01

    The austenitic CrMnN stainless steels are high-strength, tough, and non-magnetic, and are used in oil field applications. The steels have high alloying contents, and precipitation of Cr-nitrides and/or intermetallic phases can occur when cooling through the temperature region 950–700 °C. The nitride precipitates appear in the grain boundaries but can be difficult to observe in the microstructure due to their small size. However, there is an effect of precipitation on corrosion and impact strength and a modelling approach to predict precipitation is valuable for alloy and process development. In the present work precipitation simulations were applied to a CrMnN steel composition, and coupled to experimental investigations after heat treatments at 700 and 800 °C. The early stages, with short heat-treatment times, were studied. The simulations were performed using TC-PRISMA, a software for calculation of multiphase precipitation kinetics, using multicomponent nucleation and growth models. Dedicated thermodynamic and kinetic databases were used for the simulations. The main precipitate was identified by experiments and simulations to be the Cr 2 N nitride, and the precipitation during isothermal heat treatments was investigated. Isothermal precipitation diagrams are simulated, and the influence of precipitation kinetics on toughness is discussed.

  13. Nonlinear Ultrasonic Characterization for Intergranular Corrosion Susceptibility of 304 Austenitic Stainless Steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HOU Tian-yu

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The variation law of nonlinear ultrasonic parameters for the samples sensitized at 650℃ for 2, 6, 10h was discussed using nonlinear ultrasonic testing technique and XRD pattern as well as microstructure. The results indicate that normalized nonlinear parameters(β/β0 of the samples show a monotonous growth trend with the increase of the sensitized time, and normalized nonlinear parameters(β/β0 of the samples sensitized with 2,6,10h increase to 28%, 32% and 43% respectively compared with that of the base material, meaning that it is feasible to use nonlinear parameter to characterize the sensitivity degree. It is analyzed that the mismatch between the carbide (Cr23C6 precipitated on the grain boundary and the austenitic matrix causes the local strain fields which interfere with the propagation of ultrasonic wave in the solid sample. In addition, the increment of precipitation phase exacerbates further the distortion of the ultrasonic with prolonging of the sensitization time.

  14. Effects of pre-creep on the dislocations of 316LN Austenite stainless steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pei, Hai-xiang; Hui, Jun; Hua, Hou; Feng, Zai-xin; Xu, Xiao-long

    2017-09-01

    The 316LN Austenite stainless steels (316LNASS) were pre-creep treated, the evolution of microstructure were investigated. The samples were pre-creep at 593 K and from 500 to 2000 h at 873 K with a stress in the range of 20 to 150 MPa, Then the evolution of microstructure and precipitation were investigated by optical microscope (OM), and transmission electron microscope (TEM). The results show that the crystal surface slipping resulted in dislocations and original dislocations decomposition during the pre-creep process, and generate quadrilateral or hexagonal dislocation network was obviously. The sub-grain boundary gradually became narrow with the increasing of pre-creep treatment time and temperature. When the pre-creep temperature was 593 K and 873 K, dislocation network gradually disappear with the increasing of pre-creep time and load. When the pre-creep temperature was 873 K under 120 MPa, and the treatment time was 2000 h, the hexagonal dislocation network (HDN) would completely disappeared. When the pre-creep temperature was 593 K under 20 MPa, and the treatment time was 500 h, the quadrilateral dislocation network (QDN) would completely disappeared.

  15. Effects of oversized solutes on radiation-induced segregation in austenitic stainless steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hackett, M. J.; Busby, J. T.; Miller, M. K.; Was, G. S.

    2009-06-01

    Zirconium or hafnium additions to austenitic stainless steels caused a reduction in grain boundary Cr depletion after proton irradiations for up to 3 dpa at 400 °C and 1 dpa at 500 °C. The predictions of a radiation-induced segregation (RIS) model were also consistent with experiments in showing greater effectiveness of Zr relative to Hf due to a larger binding energy. However, the experiments showed that the effectiveness of the solute additions disappeared above 3 dpa at 400 °C and above 1 dpa at 500 °C. The loss of solute effectiveness with increasing dose is attributed to a reduction in the amount of oversized solute from the matrix due to growth of carbide precipitates. Atom probe tomography measurements indicated a reduction in amount of oversized solute in solution as a function of irradiation dose. The observations were supported by diffusion analysis suggesting that significant solute diffusion by the vacancy flux to precipitate surfaces occurs on the time scales of proton irradiations. With a decrease in available solute in solution, improved agreement between the predictions of the RIS model and measurements were consistent with the solute-vacancy trapping process, as the mechanism for enhanced recombination and suppression of RIS.

  16. In-situ observation of weld joint of austenitic stainless steel due to helium irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamada, S.; Hojou, K.; Hishinuma, A.

    1992-01-01

    Microstructural evolution during helium ions irradiation in a weld metal containing 10% delta-ferrite of a weld joint of Ti-modified austenitic stainless steel were in-situ observed through a transmission electron microcopy. Very fine helium bubbles were observed in high number density in both a delta ferrite phase and a matrix to a dose of 3 x 10 19 ions·m -2 . Entirely different behavior appeared in both phases with increasing dose. Bubbles in a delta-ferrite phase were readily converted into voids during slight increment of dose, and these rapidly grew with additional increasing of dose. On the other hand, finer bubbles in a matrix were very stable during irradiation and did not grow any more up to 2 x 10 20 ions·m -2 . Swelling became much larger in a delta-ferrite phase than in a fcc matrix phase, resultantly ; This means an inverse phenomenon for conventional results that swelling is smaller in a ferrite phase than in a fcc phase. Sigma phase radiation-enhanced precipitated at the grain boundary between a delta-ferrite phase and a matrix at a dose 9 x 10 19 ions·m -2 . This phase grew in two dimensions with increasing dose. The chemical composition of the sigma phase observed during irradiation showed Cr and Mo enrichment, and Fe and Ni depletion compared with those of a sigma phase thermally produced. (author)

  17. Ultra-large size austenitic stainless steel forgings for fast breeder reactor 'Monju'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsukada, Hisashi; Suzuki, Komei; Sato, Ikuo; Miura, Ritsu.

    1988-01-01

    The large SUS 304 austenitic stainless steel forgings for the reactor vessel of the prototype FBR 'Monju' of 280 MWe output were successfully manufactured. The reactor vessel contains the heart of the reactor and sodium coolant at 530 deg C, and its inside diameter is about 7 m, and height is about 18 m. It is composed of 12 large forgings, that is, very thick flanges and shalls made by ring forging and an end plate made by disk forging and hot forming, using a special press machine. The manufacture of these large forgings utilized the results of the basic test on the material properties in high temperature environment and the effect that the manufacturing factors exert on the material properties and the results of the development of manufacturing techniques for superlarge forgings. The problems were the manufacturing techniques for the large ingots of 250 t class of high purity, the hot working techniques for stainless steel of fine grain size, the forging techniques for superlarge rings and disks, and the machining techniques of high precision for particularly large diameter, thin wall rings. The manufacture of these large stainless steel forgings is reported. (Kako, I.)

  18. The evolution of mechanical property change in irradiated austenitic stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lucas, G.E.

    1993-01-01

    The evolution of mechanical properties in austenitic stainless steels during irradiation is reviewed. Changes in strength, ductility and fracture toughness are strongly related to the evolution of the damage microstructure and microstructurally-based models for strengthening reasonably correlate the data. Irradiation-induced defects promote work softening and flow localization which in turn leads to significant reductions in ductility and fracture toughness beyond about 10 dpa. The effects of irradiation on fatigue appear to be modest except at high temperature where helium embrittlement becomes important. The swelling-independent component of irradiation creep strain increases linearly with dose and is relatively insensitive to material variables and irradiation temperature, except at low temperatures where accelerated creep may occur as a result of low vacancy mobility. Creep rupture life is a strong function of helium content, but is less sensitive to metallurgical conditions. Irradiation-induced stress corrosion cracking appears to be related to the evolution of radiation-induced segregation/depletion at grain boundaries, and hence may not be significant at low irradiation temperatures. (orig.)

  19. Study of ultrasonic characterization and propagation in austenitic welds: The MOSAICS project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chassignole, Bertrand, E-mail: bertrand.chassignole@edf.fr [EDF R and D, MMC department, Les Renardières, 77818 Moret sur Loing (France); Recolin, Patrick, E-mail: patrick.recolin@dcnsgroup.com [DCNS CESMAN, 44620 La montagne (France); Leymarie, Nicolas, E-mail: nicolas.leymarie@cea.fr [CEA LIST, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Gueudré, Cécile, E-mail: cecile.gueudre@univ-amu.fr [LMA, Aix Marseille Université, CNRS, UPR 7051, F-13402 Marseille Cedex 20 (France); Guy, Philippe, E-mail: philippe.guy@insa-lyon.fr [INSA Lyon, LVA laboratory, 69621 Villeurbanne (France); Elbaz, Deborah, E-mail: deborah.elbaz@extende.com [Extende, 91400 Orsay (France)

    2015-03-31

    Regulatory requirements enforce a volumetric inspection of welded components of nuclear equipments. However, the multi-pass austenitic welds are characterized by anisotropic and heterogeneous structures which lead to numerous disturbances of the ultrasonic beam. The MOSAICS project supported by the ANR (French National Research Agency) aims at matching various approaches to improve the prediction of the ultrasonic testing in those welds. The first stage consists in characterizing the weld structure (determination of the columnar grain orientation and measurements of elastic constants and attenuation coefficients). The techniques of characterization provide input data for the modeling codes developed in another task of the project. For example, a 3D version of the finite elements code ATHENA is developed by EDF R and D to take into account anisotropic texture in any direction. Semi-analytical models included in CIVA software are also improved to better predict the ultrasonic propagation in highly anisotropic and heterogeneous structures. The last stage deals with modeling codes validation based on experimental inspections on representative mock-ups containing calibrated defects. The objective of this paper is to give an overview of the MOSAICS project and to present specific results illustrating the various tasks.

  20. Effect of cold work on low-temperature sensitization behaviour of austenitic stainless steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kain, V. E-mail: vivkain@apsara.barc.ernet.in; Chandra, K.; Adhe, K.N.; De, P.K

    2004-09-01

    The effects of cold work and low-temperature sensitization heat treatment of non-sensitized austenitic stainless steels have been investigated and related to the cracking in nuclear power reactors. Types 304, 304L and 304LN developed martensite after 15% cold working. Heat treatment of these cold worked steels at 500 deg. C led to sensitization of grain boundaries and the matrix and a desensitization effect was seen in 11 days due to fast diffusion rate of chromium in martensite. Types 316L and 316LN did not develop martensite upon cold rolling due to its chemical composition suppressing the martensite transformation (due to deformation) temperature, hence these were not sensitized at 500 deg. C. The sensitization of the martensite phase was always accompanied by a hump in the reactivation current peak in the double loop electrochemical potentiokinetic reactivation test, thus providing a test to detect such sensitization. It was shown that bending does not produce martensite and therefore, is a better method to simulate weld heat affected zone. Bending and heating at 500 deg. C for 11 days led to fresh precipitation due to increased retained strain and desensitization of 304LN due to faster diffusion rate of chromium along dislocations. The as received or solution annealed 304 and 304LN with 0.15% nitrogen showed increased sensitization after heat treatment at 500 deg. C, indicating the presence of carbides/nitrides.

  1. Advanced ultrasonic techniques for nondestructive testing of austenitic and dissimilar welds in nuclear facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juengert, Anne; Dugan, Sandra; Homann, Tobias; Mitzscherling, Steffen; Prager, Jens; Pudovikov, Sergey; Schwender, Thomas

    2018-04-01

    Austenitic stainless steel welds as well as dissimilar metal welds with nickel alloy filler material, used in safety relevant parts of nuclear power plants, still challenge the ultrasonic inspection. The weld material forms large oriented grains that lead, on the one hand, to high sound scattering and, on the other hand, to inhomogeneity and to the acoustic anisotropy of the weld structure. The ultrasonic wave fronts do not propagate linearly, as in ferritic weld joints, but along the curves, which depend on the specific grain structure of the weld. Due to the influence of these phenomena, it is difficult to analyze the inspection results and to classify the ultrasonic indications, which could be both from the weld geometry and from the material defects. A correct flaw sizing is not possible. In an ongoing research project, different techniques to improve the reliability of ultrasonic testing at these kinds of welds are investigated. In a first step (in the previous research project) two ultrasonic inspection techniques were developed and validated on plane test specimens with artificial and realistic flaws. In the ongoing project, these techniques are applied to circumferential pipe welds with longitudinal and transverse flaws. The technique developed at the Federal Institute for Materials Research and Testing (BAM) in Germany uses a combination of ray tracing and synthetic aperture focusing technique (SAFT). To investigate the unknown grain structure, the velocity distribution of weld-transmitting ultrasound waves is measured and used to model the weld by ray tracing. The second technique, developed at the Fraunhofer Institute for Nondestructive Testing (IZFP) in Germany, uses Sampling Phased Array (Full Matrix Capture) combined with the reverse phase matching (RPM) and the gradient elastic constant descent algorithm (GECDM). This inspection method is able to estimate the elastic constants of the columnar grains in the weld and offers an improvement of the

  2. Microstructural stability of austenitic stainless steels on exposure to irradiation and elevated temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parameswaran, P.; Radhika, M.; Saroja, S.; Vijayalakshmi, M.; Nanda Gopal, M.

    2011-01-01

    Cold worked 316 stainless steels employed as core material in fast reactors on exposure to neutron irradiation to 40 dpa at ∼ 450 deg C have resulted in microstructural changes in terms of formation of voids and extensive precipitation of carbides, eta phase and nickel silicides. As a consequence there is degradation in the mechanical properties of the material, particularly ductility. In order to achieve higher burnup it is essential to find better materials, which would exhibit less void swelling and retain the microstructure over long radiation doses. Accordingly alloy D9 with appropriate modifications of Ni and Cr content with Ti additions has been developed. Further modification of alloy D9 with respect to minor alloying additions namely Si and P is being studied, in order to enhance the radiation resistance for extending the service life of components. The effectiveness of these elements can be achieved if and only if they are retained in solution over long time of exposure at high temperatures and irradiation. Therefore, the thermal stability of the newly developed improved D9 alloys, with a constant Ti:C ratio and different levels of Si and P has been studied with respect to microstructural evolution and its influence on the mechanical properties. Thermal aging behavior of the alloy with varying titanium contents at elevated temperatures was also studied in detail to identify the optimum alloying levels. The alloys in the 20% cold worked condition exhibit austenitic grains interspersed with bands of fine cold worked grains. On aging in the temperature range of 873-1073K for various durations upto two years the alloy showed the presence of different phases such as M 23 C 6 , intermetallics and TiC whose quantity varies with temperature. The hardness values showed a trend of an initial increase in all the alloys but at longer times the hardness either showed saturation or a decrease followed by saturation. The microstructural parameters like grain size and

  3. Measurement of lattice rotations and internal stresses in over one hundred individual grains during a stress-induced martensitic transformation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hachi Younes El

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available To better understand the properties of polycrystals at a microscopic scale during cyclic mechanical loading we have measured the relationship between grain orientations, their positions inside the sample and their internal stresses. In this work, in-situ 3DXRD technique was performed on over hundred grains during the stress-induced martensitic transformation in a Cu-Al-Be shape memory alloy. Information about the position, orientation, and stress field was obtained for each austenitic grain. These results have been used to develop a procedure that allows automatic processing for a large number of grains, matching them during loading and leads to a quantitative stress field. A strong heterogeneity of stress state between the grains at the surface and in the volume is evident.

  4. An investigation into the room temperature mechanical properties of nanocrystalline austenitic stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eskandari, Mostafa; Zarei-Hanzaki, Abbas; Abedi, Hamid Reza

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Strength of nanocrystalline specimens follows a trend of a remarkable rise along with a small drop in ductility in comparison to the coarse-grained one. ► Universal correlation of linear type (UTS = mτ max ) between shear punch test data and the tensile strength may be unreliable for the nanocrystalline materials. ► Actual relation between the maximum shear and ultimate tensile strength follows an empirical formula of UTS=0.013τ max 2 -25.62τ max +13049. -- Abstract: The present work has been conducted to evaluate the mechanical properties of nanostructured 316L and 301 austenitic stainless steels. The nanocrystalline structures were produced through martensite treatment which includes cold rolling followed by annealing treatment. The effect of equivalent rolling strain and annealing parameters on the room temperature mechanical behavior of the experimental alloys have been studied using the shear punch testing technique. The standard uniaxial tension tests were also carried out to adapt the related correlation factors. The microstructures and the volume fraction of phases were characterized by transmission electron microscopy and feritscopy methods, respectively. The results indicate that the strength of nanocrystalline specimens remarkably increases, but the ductility in comparison to the coarse-grained one slightly decreases. In addition the strength of nanocrystalline specimens has been increased by decreasing the annealing temperature and increasing the equivalent rolling strain. The analysis of the load–displacement data has also disclosed that the universal correlation of linear type (UTS = mτ max ) between shear punch test data and the tensile strength is somehow unreliable for the nanocrystalline materials. The results suggest that the actual relation between the maximum shear strength and ultimate tensile strength follows a second order equation of type UTS=aτ max 2 -bτ max +c.

  5. Quantitative analysis of microstructure deformation in creep fenomena of ferritic SA-213 T22 and austenitic SA-213 TP304H material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulyana, Cukup; Taufik, Ahmad; Gunawan, Agus Yodi; Siregar, Rustam Efendi

    2013-09-01

    The failure of critical component of fossil fired power plant that operated in creep range (high stress, high temperature and in the long term) depends on its microstructure characteristics. Ferritic low carbon steel (2.25Cr-1Mo) and Austenitic stainless alloy (18Cr-8Ni) are used as a boiler tube in the secondary superheater outlet header to deliver steam before entering the turbin. The tube failure is occurred in a form of rupture, resulting trip that disrupts the continuity of the electrical generation. The research in quantification of the microstructure deformation has been done in predicting the remaining life of the tube through interrupted accelerated creep test. For Austenitic Stainless Alloy (18Cr-8Ni), creep test was done in 550°C with the stress 424.5 MPa and for Ferritic Low Carbon Steel (2.25Cr-1Mo) in 570°C with the stress 189 MPa. The interrupted accelerated creep test was done by stopping the observation in condition 60%, 70%, 80% and 90% of remaining life, the creep test fracture was done before. Then the micro hardness test, photo micro, SEM and EDS were obtained from those samples. Refer to ASTM E122, microstructure parameters were calculated. The results indicated that there are a consistency of decreasing their grain diameters, increasing their grain size numbers, micro hardness, and the length of crack or void number per unit area with the decreasing of remaining life. While morphology of grain (stated in parameter α=LV/LH) relatively constant for austenitic. However, for ferritic the change of morphology revealed significantly. Fracture mode propagation of ferritic material is growth with voids transgranular and intergranular crack, and for austenitic material the fracture growth with intergranular creep fracture void and wedge crack. In this research, it was proposed a formulation of mathematical model for creep behavior corresponding their curve fitting resulted for the primary, secondary and tertiary in accelerated creep test. In

  6. Prior Elicitation, Assessment and Inference with a Dirichlet Prior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Evans

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Methods are developed for eliciting a Dirichlet prior based upon stating bounds on the individual probabilities that hold with high prior probability. This approach to selecting a prior is applied to a contingency table problem where it is demonstrated how to assess the prior with respect to the bias it induces as well as how to check for prior-data conflict. It is shown that the assessment of a hypothesis via relative belief can easily take into account what it means for the falsity of the hypothesis to correspond to a difference of practical importance and provide evidence in favor of a hypothesis.

  7. A new methodology based on ultrasonic attenuation to characterize dynamically recrystallized microstructure in a 15Cr-15Ni-2.2Mo-Ti modified austenitic stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mandal, S.; Kumar, A.; Sivaprasad, P.V.; Jayakumar, T.; Baldev Raj; Kumar, S.; Samajdar, I.

    2010-01-01

    In this study, a C-scan ultrasonic imaging system has been employed for imaging the microstructural variations during dynamic recrystallization (DRX) of a 15Cr-15Ni-2.2Mo-Ti modified austenitic stainless steel. Four specimens were forged at 1273 K for different strains in the range of 0.1-0.5. It has been observed that the specimen with 0.2 strain or lower did not show any variation in the amplitude of the first backwall echo. However, at and above 0.3 strain, a visible variation in the C-scan images has been observed. This variation has been attributed to the evolution of fine grains. The formation of fine grains, on the other hand, was related to DRX, as indicated by electron back scattered diffraction (EBSD). (author)

  8. Novel features of radiation-induced segregation and radiation-induced precipitation in austenitic stainless steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiao, Z., E-mail: zjiao@umich.edu [Department of Nuclear Engineering and Radiological Sciences, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Was, G.S. [Department of Nuclear Engineering and Radiological Sciences, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States)

    2011-02-15

    Three stainless steel alloys, high-purity 304 (HP304), high-purity 304 with high Si (HP304 + Si) and commercial purity 304 (CP304), were irradiated with 2 MeV protons to a dose of 5 dpa at 360 deg. C and subsequently examined using atom probe tomography (APT) and scanning transmission electron microscopy-energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry (STEM-EDS). Several novel features of radiation-induced segregation and radiation-induced precipitation were observed. There is a significant variation in the composition of enriched and depleted elements in the grain boundary plane and along the dislocation loop core. Boron segregation to the grain boundary prior to irradiation is not affected by the irradiation. Phosphorus segregation is enhanced by irradiation. Carbon depletes at the grain boundary and may be affected by co-segregation with Cr. APT and STEM-EDS measurements are in excellent agreement for almost all the elements studied. The segregation behavior of elements at dislocations mirrors that at the grain boundary, but at a lower magnitude, except for Si. Ni/Si-rich clusters formed in irradiated HP304 + Si and CP304 are probably the precursors of {gamma}' or other Si- and Ni-rich phases. Copper depletion was observed at both the grain boundary and the dislocation loops. Regions adjacent to the depleted zones were sites for Cu cluster formation, which were also spatially correlated with Ni/Si-rich clusters.

  9. Laser desensitization of austenitic stainless steel weld AHZ. Desensibilizacion con Laser de la zona afectada por el calor (ZAC) en aceros inoxidables austeniticos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, C.H.; Kim, K.C.; Chang, R.W. (Welding Research Center Research Institute of Industrial Science and Technology, Pohang (Korea, Republic of))

    1994-01-01

    This paper addressed the fundamental understanding of sensitization phenomena in the weld HAZ of austenitic stainless steel and a method of desensitization utilizing LASER, without degradation of other corrosion resistance (pitting resistance). Sensitization in the weld HAZ was due to a formation of CR depleted zone along grain boundaries and twin boundaries by precipitation of Cr[sub 2]3C[sub 6] which contains 70-80% Cr and a small amount of Fe having a cubic-cubic relationship with the austenite matrix. Common morphologies of carbides were found to be of bar and globular shapes. As the holding time increased, carbides with coarsened globular (iodomorph) and dendrite shapes were also found. However, there was no significant variation in the composition of carbides and width of the Cr depleted zone with morphology. Laser desensitization could be obtained with a proper choice of the beam power and travel speed under a constant beam size. As long as the beam density reached a critical amount, carbides and Cr depleted zone completed zone completely disappeared. The critical travel speed increased with higher beam power, but was constant regardless of the original degree of sensitization. Pitting resistance of the LASER desensitized base metal and HAZ appeared to be far superior to that found in the sensitized condition. The protection potential in the hysteresis loop test was very sensitive to the degree of sensitization, revealing that the protection potential was dependent upon the propagation of the pits through the Cr depleted grain boundaries. (Author) 10 refs.

  10. Grain boundary defects initiation at the outer surface of dissimilar welds: corrosion mechanism studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Bouvier, O.; Yrieix, B.

    1995-11-01

    Dissimilar welds located on the primary coolant system of the French PWR I plants exhibit grain boundary defects in the true austenitic zones of the first buttering layer. If grain boundaries reach the interface, they can extend to the martensitic band. Those defects are filled with compact oxides. In addition, the ferritic base metal presents some pits along the interface. Nowadays, three mechanisms are proposed to explain the initiation of those defects: stress corrosion cracking, intergranular corrosion and high temperature intergranular oxidation. This paper is dealing with the study of the mechanisms involved in the corrosion phenomenon. Intergranular corrosion tests performed on different materials show that only the first buttering layer, even with some δ ferrite, is sensitized. The results of stress corrosion cracking tests in water solutions show that intergranular cracking is possible on a bulk material representative of the first buttering layer. It is unlikely on actual dissimilar welds where the ferritic base metal protects the first austenitic layer by galvanic coupling. Therefore, the stress corrosion cracking assumption cannot explain the initiation of the defects in aqueous environment. The results of the investigations and of the corrosion studies led to the conclusion that the atmosphere could be the only possible aggressive environment. This conclusion is based on natural atmospheric exposure and accelerated corrosion tests carried out with SO 2 additions in controlled atmosphere. They both induce a severe intergranular corrosion on true sensitized austenitic materials. This corrosion studies cannot conclude definitively on the causes of the defect initiation on field, but they show that the atmospheric corrosion could produce intergranular attacks in the pure austenitic zones of the first buttering layer of the dissimilar welds and that this corrosion is stress assisted. (author). 1 ref., 6 figs., 4 tabs

  11. Kansas Agents Study Grain Marketing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoeff, Robert W.

    1973-01-01

    Author is an extension specialist in feed and grain marketing for Kansas State University. He describes a tour set up to educate members of the Kansas Grain and Feed Dealers' Association in the area of grain marketing and exporting. (GB)

  12. Corrosion properties of modified PNC1520 austenitic stainless steel in supercritical water as a fuel cladding candidate material for supercritical water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakazono, Yoshihisa; Iwai, Takeo; Abe, Hiroaki

    2009-01-01

    The supercritical water-cooled reactor (SCWR) has been designed and investigated because of its high thermal efficiency and plant simplification. There are some advantages including the use of a single phase coolant with high enthalpy. Supercritical Water (SCW) has never been used in nuclear power applications. There are numerous potential problems, particularly with materials. As the operating temperature of SCWR will be between 553 K and 893 K with a pressure of 25 MPa, the selection of materials is difficult and important. The PNC1520 austenitic stainless steel has been developed by Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) as a nuclear fuel cladding material for a Na-cooled fast breeder reactor. Austenitic Fe-base steels were selected for possible use in supercritical water systems because of their corrosion resistance and radiation resistance. The PNC1520 austenitic stainless steel was selected for possible use in supercritical water systems. The corrosion data of PNC1520 in SCW is required but does not exist. The purpose of the present study is to research the corrosion properties for PNC1520 austenitic stainless steel in SCW. The SCW corrosion test was performed for the standard PNC1520 (1520S) and the Ti-additional type of PNC1520 (1520T) by using a SCW autoclave. The 1520S and 1520T are the first trial production materials of SCWR cladding candidate material in our group. Corrosion and compatibility tests on the austenitic 1520S and 1520T steels in supercritical water were performed at 673, 773 and 600degC with exposures up to 1000 h. We have evaluated the amount of weight gain, weight loss and weight of scale after the corrosion test in SCW for 1520S and 1520T austenitic steels. After 1000 h corrosion test performed, the weight gains of both austenitic stainless steels were less than 2 g/m 2 at 400degC and 500degC. But 1520T weight increases more and weight loss than 1520S at 600degC. The SEM observation result of the surface after 1000 h corrosion of an test

  13. Determination of local carbon content in austenite during intercritical annealing of dual phase steels by PEELS analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia-Junceda, A.; Caballero, F.G.; Capdevila, C.; Garcia de Andres, C.

    2007-01-01

    Parallel electron energy loss spectroscopy has allowed to analyse and quantify local variations in the carbon concentration of austenite islands transformed during the intercritical annealing treatment of commercial dual-phase steels. These changes in the carbon content of different austenite regions are responsible for the different volume fractions of tempered martensite, martensite and retained austenite obtained after intercritical annealing and overaging treatment. This technique reveals how carbon distribution in austenite evolves as the transformation process advances

  14. Model for the interaction between interface migration and carbon diffusion during annealing of martensite-austenite microstructures in steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santofimia, M.J.; Zhao, L.; Sietsma, J.

    2008-01-01

    The interaction between carbon partitioning from martensite to austenite and interface migration during annealing of martensite-austenite microstructures is modeled, assuming the same chemical potential of carbon in martensite and austenite at the interface and allowing the motion of the phase interface when a free-energy difference occurs. The simulations show that the motion of the martensite-austenite interface can be significant and can takes place in either direction

  15. Whole Grains and Fiber

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for Physical Activity in Children My Family Health Tree What's that you're drinking? Get Active with ... grains. When grocery shopping, an easy way to identify healthy food choices is to look for the ...

  16. 6 Grain Yield

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    create a favourable environment for rice ... developing lines adaptable to many ... have stable, not too short crop duration with ..... Analysis of variance of the effect of site and season on maturity, grain yield and plant ..... and yield components.

  17. Simulation of the Growth of Austenite from As-Quenched Martensite in Medium Mn Steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huyan, Fei; Yan, Jia-Yi; Höglund, Lars; Ågren, John; Borgenstam, Annika

    2018-04-01

    As part of an ongoing development of third-generation advanced high-strength steels with acceptable cost, austenite reversion treatment of medium Mn steels becomes attractive because it can give rise to a microstructure of fine mixture of ferrite and austenite, leading to both high strength and large elongation. The growth of austenite during intercritical annealing is crucial for the final properties, primarily because it determines the fraction, composition, and phase stability of austenite. In the present work, the growth of austenite from as-quenched lath martensite in medium Mn steels has been simulated using the DICTRA software package. Cementite is added into the simulations based on experimental observations. Two types of systems (cells) are used, representing, respectively, (1) austenite and cementite forming apart from each other, and (2) austenite forming on the cementite/martensite interface. An interfacial dissipation energy has also been added to take into account a finite interface mobility. The simulations using the first type of setup with an addition of interfacial dissipation energy are able to reproduce the observed austenite growth in medium Mn steels reasonably well.

  18. Discontinuous precipitation in a nickel-free high nitrogen austenitic stainless steel on solution nitriding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadzadeh, Roghayeh; Akbari, Alireza; Grumsen, Flemming B.; Somers, Marcel A. J.

    2017-10-01

    Chromium-rich nitride precipitates in production of nickel-free austenitic stainless steel plates via pressurised solution nitriding of Fe-22.7Cr-2.4Mo ferritic stainless steel at 1473 K (1200 °C) under a nitrogen gas atmosphere was investigated. The microstructure, chemical and phase composition, morphology and crystallographic orientation between the resulted austenite and precipitates were investigated using optical microscopy, X-ray Diffraction (XRD), Scanning and Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) and Electron Back Scatter Diffraction (EBSD). On prolonged nitriding, Chromium-rich nitride precipitates were formed firstly close to the surface and later throughout the sample with austenitic structure. Chromium-rich nitride precipitates with a rod or strip-like morphology was developed by a discontinuous cellular precipitation mechanism. STEM-EDS analysis demonstrated partitioning of metallic elements between austenite and nitrides, with chromium contents of about 80 wt.% in the precipitates. XRD analysis indicated that the Chromium-rich nitride precipitates are hexagonal (Cr, Mo)2N. Based on the TEM studies, (Cr, Mo)2N precipitates presented a (1 1 1)γ//(0 0 2)(Cr, Mo)2N, ?γ//?(Cr, Mo)2N orientation relationship with respect to the austenite matrix. EBSD studies revealed that the austenite in the regions that have transformed into austenite and (Cr, Mo)2N have no orientation relation to the untransformed austenite.

  19. Extended X-ray absorption fine structure investigation of nitrogen stabilized expanded austenite

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oddershede, Jette; Christiansen, Thomas; Ståhl, Kenny

    2010-01-01

    As-delivered austenitic stainless steel and nitrogen stabilized expanded austenite, both fully nitrided and denitrided (in H2), were investigated with Cr, Fe and Ni extended X-ray absorption fine structure. The data shows pronounced short-range ordering of Cr and N. For the denitrided specimen...

  20. Strain hardening of cold-rolled lean-alloyed metastable ferritic-austenitic stainless steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Papula, Suvi [Aalto University School of Engineering, Department of Mechanical Engineering, P.O. Box 14200, FI-00076 Aalto (Finland); Anttila, Severi [Centre for Advanced Steels Research, University of Oulu, P.O. Box 4200, 90014 Oulu (Finland); Talonen, Juho [Outokumpu Oyj, P.O. Box 245, FI-00181 Helsinki (Finland); Sarikka, Teemu; Virkkunen, Iikka; Hänninen, Hannu [Aalto University School of Engineering, Department of Mechanical Engineering, P.O. Box 14200, FI-00076 Aalto (Finland)

    2016-11-20

    Mechanical properties and strain hardening of two pilot-scale lean-alloyed ferritic-austenitic stainless steels having metastable austenite phase, present at 0.50 and 0.30 volume fractions, have been studied by means of tensile testing and nanoindentation. These ferritic-austenitic stainless steels have high strain-hardening capacity, due to the metastable austenite phase, which leads to an improved uniform elongation and higher tensile strength in comparison with most commercial lean duplex stainless steels. According to the results, even as low as 0.30 volume fraction of austenite seems efficient for achieving nearly 40% elongation. The austenite phase is initially the harder phase, and exhibits more strain hardening than the ferrite phase. The rate of strain hardening and the evolution of the martensite phase were found to depend on the loading direction: both are higher when strained in the rolling direction as compared to the transverse direction. Based on the mechanical testing, characterization of the microstructure by optical/electron microscopy, magnetic balance measurements and EBSD texture analysis, this anisotropy in mechanical properties of the cold-rolled metastable ferritic-austenitic stainless steels can be explained by the elongated dual-phase microstructure, fiber reinforcement effect of the harder austenite phase and the presence and interplay of rolling textures in the two phases.

  1. Strain direction dependency of martensitic transformation in austenitic stainless steels: The effect of gamma-texture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hilkhuijsen, P.; Geijselaers, Hubertus J.M.; Bor, Teunis Cornelis; Perdahcioglu, Emin Semih; van den Boogaard, Antonius H.; Akkerman, Remko

    2013-01-01

    Uniaxial tensile tests on both a non-textured and a highly textured, fully austenitic stainless steel were performed in both the rolling and the transverse directions. Both materials show mechanically induced phase transformation from the austenitic FCC to the martensitic BCC phase. Differences in

  2. Effect of austenite deformation temperature on Nb clustering and precipitation in microalloyed steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pereloma, E.V.; Kostryzhev, A.G.; AlShahrani, A.; Zhu, C.; Cairney, J.M.; Killmore, C.R.; Ringer, S.P.

    2014-01-01

    The effect of thermomechanical processing conditions on Nb clustering and precipitation in both austenite and ferrite in a Nb–Ti microalloyed steel was studied using electron microscopy and atom probe tomography. A decrease in the deformation temperature increased the Nb-rich precipitation in austenite and decreased the extent of precipitation in ferrite. Microstructural mechanisms that explain this variation are discussed

  3. Empirical Formulae for The Calculation of Austenite Supercooled Transformation Temperatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trzaska J.

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents empirical formulae for the calculation of austenite supercooled transformation temperatures, basing on the chemical composition, austenitising temperature and cooling rate. The multiple regression method was used. Four equations were established allowing to calculate temperature of the start area of ferrite, perlite, bainite and martensite at the given cooling rate. The calculation results obtained do not allow to determine the cooling rate range of ferritic, pearlitic, bainitic and martensite transformations. Classifiers based on logistic regression or neural network were established to solve this problem.

  4. Pulsed magnetic welding application of fast breeder austenitic pins plugging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gallizzi, H.; Colombe, G.

    1986-11-01

    For specific nuclear needs, we had to develop pulsed magnetic welding on high resistivity coefficient alloys as austenitic steels. The magnetic force produced by an explosive inductor is transmitted on weld pieces by the use of an aluminium driver. A theoretical work carried out permitted to compare pulsed magnetic welding with explosive welding. With specific recordings, it was possible to study electrical and magnetical behavior during the active welding phase. By means of these informations, we are able to specify and to realize, with the financial help of ANVAR organization, a low impedance high velocity generator permitting to weld with a non destructible inductor. 6 refs [fr

  5. High Nitrogen Austenitic Stainless Steel Precipitation During Isothermal Annealing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Domankova

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The time-temperature-precipitation in high-nitrogen austenitic stainless steel was investigated using light optical microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, selected area diffraction and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. The isothermal precipitation kinetics curves and the corresponding precipitation activation energy were obtained. The diffusion activation energy of M2N precipitation is 129 kJ/mol. The results show that critical temperature for M2N precipitation is about 825°C with the corresponding incubation period 2.5 min.

  6. Decomposition kinetics of expanded austenite with high nitrogen contents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Thomas; Somers, Marcel A. J.

    2006-01-01

    This paper addresses the decomposition kinetics of synthesized homogeneous expanded austenite formed by gaseous nitriding of stainless steel AISI 304L and AISI 316L with nitrogen contents up to 38 at.% nitrogen. Isochronal annealing experiments were carried out in both inert (N2) and reducing (H2......) atmospheres. Differential thermal analysis (DTA) and thermogravimetry were applied for identification of the decomposition reactions and X-ray diffraction analysis was applied for phase analysis. CrN precipitated upon annealing; the activation energies are 187 kJ/mol and 128 kJ/mol for AISI 316L and AISI 304L...

  7. Alkaline stress corrosion of iron-nickel-chromium austenitic alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hocquellet, Dominique

    1984-01-01

    This research thesis reports the study of the behaviour in stress corrosion of austenitic iron-nickel-chromium alloys by means of tensile tests at imposed strain rate, in a soda solution at 50 pc in water and 350 degrees C. The author shows that the mechanical-chemical model allows the experimental curves to be found again, provided the adjustment of characteristic parameters, on the one hand, of corrosion kinetics, and on the other hand, of deformation kinetics. A classification of the studied alloys is proposed [fr

  8. Creep properties and microstructure of the new wrought austenitic steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vlasak, T.; Hakl, J.; Novak, P. [SVUM a.s., Prague (Czech Republic); Vyrostkova, A. [Slovak Academy of Sciences, Kosice (Slovakia). Inst. of Materials Research

    2010-07-01

    The contribution is oriented on the new wrought austenitic steel BGA4 (Cr23Ni15Mn6Cu3W1.5NbVMo) developed by the British Corus Company. Our main aim is to present creep properties studied in SVUM a.s. Prague during COST 536 programme. The dependencies of the creep strength, strength for specific creep strain and minimum creep strain rate were evaluated on the basis of long term creep tests carried out at temperature interval (625; 725) C. Important part of a paper is metallographic analysis. (orig.)

  9. The compatibility of various austenitic steels with molten sodium (1963)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Champeix, L.; Sannier, J.; Darras, R.; Graff, W.; Juste, P.

    1963-01-01

    Various techniques for studying corrosion by molten sodium have been developed and applied to the case of 18/10 austenitic steels. The results obtained are discussed as a function of various parameters: type of steel, temperature, oxygen content of the sodium, surface treatment, welds, mechanical strain. In general, these steels have an excellent resistance to sodium when the oxygen content is limited by a simple purification system of the 'cold trap' type, and when an attempt is made to avoid cavitation phenomena which are particularly dangerous, as is shown by the example given. (authors) [fr

  10. Resistance Element Welding of Magnesium Alloy/austenitic Stainless Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manladan, S. M.; Yusof, F.; Ramesh, S.; Zhang, Y.; Luo, Z.; Ling, Z.

    2017-09-01

    Multi-material design is increasingly applied in the automotive and aerospace industries to reduce weight, improve crash-worthiness, and reduce environmental pollution. In the present study, a novel variant of resistance spot welding technique, known as resistance element welding was used to join AZ31 Mg alloy to 316 L austenitic stainless steel. The microstructure and mechanical properties of the joints were evaluated. It was found that the nugget consisted of two zones, including a peripheral fusion zone on the stainless steel side and the main fusion zone. The tensile shear properties of the joints are superior to those obtained by traditional resistance spot welding.

  11. The tensile properties of austenitic steel weld metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wood, D.S.

    1985-01-01

    Elevated temperature tensile data on Mo containing and Mo free austenitic weld metals have been collected from French, German and UK sources and the results analysed. In the as welded condition the proof strength is significantly higher than that of wrought material and Mo containing weld metal is stronger than Mo free weld metal. The differences in UTS values are not so marked, and on average at temperatures above 400 0 the weld metal UTS is slightly lower than that of wrought material. The ductility of weld metal is significantly lower than that for wrought material. 7 refs, 2 tables, 20 figs

  12. Residual stresses associated with welds in austenitic steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fidler, R.

    1978-01-01

    Two exploratory welds have been made with AISI 316 austenitic steel and Armex GT electrodes by the manual metal-arc process, and residual stress measurements made in the as-welded condition and after various periods of stress relief. The results show that substantial stress relief occurs at temperatures of 850 0 and 750 0 C after 1 hr, but is not complete. The stress distributions are compared with those obtained from ferritic welds and the effect of differences in thermal expansion coefficients is examined using finite element analysis. (author)

  13. Void swelling behaviour of austenitic stainless steel during electron irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheng Zhongqi; Xiao Hong; Peng Feng; Ti Zhongxin

    1994-04-01

    The irradiation swelling behaviour of 00Cr17Ni14Mo2 austenitic stainless steel (AISI 316L) was investigated by means of high voltage electron microscope. Results showed that in solution annealed condition almost no swelling incubation period existed, and the swelling shifted from the transition period to the steady-state one when the displacement damage was around 40 dpa. In cold rolled condition there was evidently incubation period, and when the displacement damage was up to 84 dpa the swelling still remained in the transition period. The average size and density of voids in both conditions were measured, and the factors, which influenced the void swelling, were discussed. (3 figs.)

  14. Failures of austenitic stainless steel components during storage: Case studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shah, B.K.; Rastogi, P.K.; Sinha, A.K.; Kulkarni, P.G.

    1993-01-01

    Three studies of failures of austenitic stainless steel components during storage are described. In all cases, stress corrosion cracking was the failure mode by the action of residual stress alone. However, the source of residual stress was different for each case. Case 1 was the failure of a sample tube header for a pressurized heavy water reactor (PHWR). In Case 2, a heat exchanger shell failed during a hydrotest in a fertilizer plant. Cases concerned the cracking of type 304L plates used for spent fuel pool lining of a nuclear power station

  15. The characteristics creep fracture of austenitic stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monteiro, S.N.; Assis, A.M.C.A.

    1977-05-01

    The characteristics of fracture on creep of two AISI type 316 austenitic stainless steels tested at constant load from 600 to 800 0 C were studied by scanning electron microscopy. The morphological aspects of the fracture were analysed and correllated to the ductility level attained in creep. A marked change from intergranular to transgranular type of fracture was observed in going from 600 to 800 0 C. At 800 0 C on the other hand, the condition for crack nucleation at sigma phase as well as the special conditions of oxidation, are apparently responsible for that same change with the applied stress. (Author) [pt

  16. Kinetic of martensitic transformations induced by hydrogen in the austenite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, Sergio P. de; Saavedra, A.; Miranda, P.E.V. de

    1986-01-01

    The X-ray diffractometry technique was used, with an automatic data acquisition system to determine the kinetics of hydrogen induced martensitic phase transformations in an AISI 304 austenitic stainless steel type, used in nuclear power plants. Hydrogenation was performed cathodically in a 1N sulfuric acid solution, containing 100 mg/l of arsenic trioxide, at 50 0 C, during 2 hours and with a current density of 200 A/m 2 . It was found that the microstructure of the steel plays a role on the generation of hydrogen induced martensitic phases and surface micro cracks. Both kinetics were slower on a pre-cold rolled steel. (Author) [pt

  17. Thermodynamic modeling of the stacking fault energy of austenitic steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Curtze, S.; Kuokkala, V.-T.; Oikari, A.; Talonen, J.; Haenninen, H.

    2011-01-01

    The stacking fault energies (SFE) of 10 austenitic steels were determined in the temperature range 50 ≤ T ≤ 600 K by thermodynamic modeling of the Fe-Cr-Ni-Mn-Al-Si-Cu-C-N system using a modified Olson and Cohen modeling approach (Olson GB, Cohen M. Metall Trans 1976;7A:1897 ). The applied model accounts for each element's contribution to the Gibbs energy, the first-order excess free energies, magnetic contributions and the effect of interstitial nitrogen. Experimental SFE values from X-ray diffraction measurements were used for comparison. The effect of SFE on deformation mechanisms was also studied by electron backscatter diffraction.

  18. Austenite reversion in low-carbon martensitic stainless steels – a CALPHAD-assisted review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Niessen, Frank

    2018-01-01

    Low-carbon martensitic stainless steels with 11.5–16 wt-% Cr and martensite upon inter-critical annealing. The review treats...... the mechanisms governing the formation and stabilisation of reverted austenite and is assisted by the computation of phase equilibria. Literature data on Cr and Ni concentrations of the reverted austenite/martensite dual-phase microstructure are assessed with respect to predicted concentrations. Reasonable...... agreement was found for concentrations in martensite. Systematic excess of Cr in austenite of approx. 2 wt-% relative to calculations was suspected to originate from the growth of M23C6 with a coherent interface to austenite. Within large scatter, measured values of Ni in austenite were on average 2 wt...

  19. Carburization of austenitic and ferritic alloys in hydrocarbon environments at high temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serna, A.

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available The technical and industrial aspects of high temperature corrosion of materials exposed to a variety of aggressive environments have significant importance. These environments include combustion product gases and hydrocarbon gases with low oxygen potentials and high carbon potentials. In the refinery and petrochemical industries, austenitic and ferritic alloys are usually used for tubes in fired furnaces. The temperature range for exposure of austenitic alloys is 800-1100 °C, and for ferritic alloys 500-700 °C, with carbon activities ac > 1 in many cases. In both applications, the carburization process involves carbon (coke deposition on the inner diameter, carbon absorption at the metal surface, diffusion of carbon inside the alloy, and precipitation and transformation of carbides to a depth increasing with service. The overall kinetics of the internal carburization are approximately parabolic, controlled by carbon diffusion and carbide precipitation. Ferritic alloys exhibit gross but uniform carburization while non-uniform intragranular and grain-boundary carburization is observed in austenitic alloys.

    La corrosión a alta temperatura, tal como la carburación de materiales expuestos a una amplia variedad de ambientes agresivos, tiene especial importancia desde el punto de vista técnico e industrial. Estos ambientes incluyen productos de combustión, gases e hidrocarburos con bajo potencial de oxígeno y alto potencial de carbono. En las industrias de refinación y petroquímica, las aleaciones austeníticas y ferríticas se utilizan en tuberías de hornos. El rango de temperatura de exposición para aleaciones austeníticas está entre 800-1.100°C y para aleaciones ferríticas está entre 500-700°C, con actividades de carbono ac>1 en algunos casos. En tuberías con ambas aleaciones, el proceso de carburación incluye deposición de carbón (coque en el diámetro interno, absorción de carbono en la superficie

  20. Impact Strength of Austenitic and Ferritic-Austenitic Cr-Ni Stainless Cast Steel in -40 and +20°C Temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalandyk B.

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Studies described in this paper relate to common grades of cast corrosion resistant Cr-Ni steel with different matrix. The test materials were subjected to heat treatment, which consisted in the solution annealing at 1060°C followed by cooling in water. The conducted investigations, besides the microstructural characteristics of selected cast steel grades, included the evaluation of hardness, toughness (at a temperature of -40 and +20oC and type of fracture obtained after breaking the specimens on a Charpy impact testing machine. Based on the results of the measured volume fraction of ferrite, it has been found that the content of this phase in cast austenitic steel is 1.9%, while in the two-phase ferritic-austenitic grades it ranges from 50 to 58%. It has been demonstrated that within the scope of conducted studies, the cast steel of an austenitic structure is characterised by higher impact strength than the two-phase ferritic-austenitic (F-A grade. The changing appearance of the fractures of the specimens reflected the impact strength values obtained in the tested materials. Fractures of the cast austenitic Cr-Ni steel obtained in these studies were of a ductile character, while fractures of the cast ferritic-austenitic grade were mostly of a mixed character with the predominance of brittle phase and well visible cleavage planes.