WorldWideScience

Sample records for primary production values

  1. Valuing ecosystem services. A shadow price for net primary production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richmond, Amy; Kaufmann, Robert K.; Myneni, Ranga B.

    2007-01-01

    We analyze the contribution of ecosystem services to GDP and use this contribution to calculate an empirical price for ecosystem services. Net primary production is used as a proxy for ecosystem services and, along with capital and labor, is used to estimate a Cobb Douglas production function from an international panel. A positive output elasticity for net primary production probably measures both marketed and nonmarketed contributions of ecosystems services. The production function is used to calculate the marginal product of net primary production, which is the shadow price for ecosystem services. The shadow price generally is greatest for developed nations, which have larger technical scalars and use less net primary production per unit output. The rate of technical substitution indicates that the quantity of capital needed to replace a unit of net primary production tends to increase with economic development, and this rate of replacement may ultimately constrain economic growth. (author)

  2. Primary productivity

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Verlecar, X.N.; Parulekar, A.H.

    Photosynthetic production in the oceans in relation to light, nutrients and mixing processes is discussed. Primary productivity in the estuarine region is reported to be high in comparison to coastal and oceanic waters. Upwelling phenomenon...

  3. Transmission of cultural values in the production of EFL textbooks for the Chinese primary curriculum

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Jingyi

    2012-01-01

    In the global world, cultural issues relating to the subject of English as Foreign Language (EFL) have become important. This is especially the case when considering the EFL curriculum for Chinese Primary Education. Many writers have addressed the nature of curriculum design as knowledge and cultural reproduction, but usually in the North American and European literature. This research takes these debates and relocates them in the context of China as it enters a new market e...

  4. Achieving Value in Primary Care: The Primary Care Value Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rollow, William; Cucchiara, Peter

    2016-03-01

    The patient-centered medical home (PCMH) model provides a compelling vision for primary care transformation, but studies of its impact have used insufficiently patient-centered metrics with inconsistent results. We propose a framework for defining patient-centered value and a new model for value-based primary care transformation: the primary care value model (PCVM). We advocate for use of patient-centered value when measuring the impact of primary care transformation, recognition, and performance-based payment; for financial support and research and development to better define primary care value-creating activities and their implementation; and for use of the model to support primary care organizations in transformation. © 2016 Annals of Family Medicine, Inc.

  5. Primary production of phytoplankton of Chascomus Pond (Prov. Buenos Aires (Argentina)). Critical evaluation of photosynthesis values obtained by O2 and 14 C methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romero, M.C.; Arenas, P.M.

    1989-01-01

    The primary production of the phytoplankton of Chascomus pound was estimated with the dissolved oxygen and the assimilation of 14 CO 2 techniques, the laboratory, at light saturation. The bicarbonate consumptions by the phytoplankton was corrected by the excretion values, anaplerotic uptake of CO 2 by heterotrophic bacteria and for adsorption on suspended material. Gross production primary values fluctuated within 619,5 and 168,9 mg C.m -3 . h -1 , the net primary production within 564,8 (summer) and 93,8 (winter) mg C.m -3 . h -1 . Steemann Nielsen's technique subestimated the primary production in an average of the 21%; during the months of December, January and February those differences were only of the 8,6 and 1% respectively, implying that carrying out the respective corrections, both methods equalize themselves. (author)

  6. Nordic Noir Production Values

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Waade, Anne Marit; Jensen, Pia Majbritt

    2013-01-01

    In this article the authors argue that Nordic noir constitutes a set of production values utilised and conceptualised to make Danish television series attractive in the international market. The idea of production values is embedded into a media industrial context where market principles of target...... by relating the specific Nordic noir production values present in the two series to changing conditions in Danish television drama production, in particular the internationalisation of DR’s Drama Division....

  7. Primary Productivity (PP_Master)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set included primary production for each subregion in the study (Georges Bank, Gulf of Maine, Southern New England, Middle Atlantic Bight) . The data came...

  8. Testing compound-specific δ13C of amino acids in mussels as a new approach to determine the average 13C values of primary production in littoral ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vokhshoori, N. L.; Larsen, T.; McCarthy, M.

    2012-12-01

    Compound-specific isotope analysis of amino acids (CSI-AA) is a technique used to decouple trophic enrichment patterns from source changes at the base of the food web. With this new emerging tool, it is possible to precisely determine both trophic position and δ15N or δ13C source values in higher feeding organisms. While most work to date has focused on nitrogen (N) isotopic values, early work has suggested that δ13C CSI-AA has great potential as a new tracer both to a record δ13C values of primary production (unaltered by trophic transfers), and also to "fingerprint" specific carbon source organisms. Since essential amino acids (EAA) cannot be made de novo in metazoans but must be obtained from diet, the δ13C value of the primary producer is preserved through the food web. Therefore, the δ13C values of EAAs act as a unique signature of different primary producers and can be used to fingerprint the dominant carbon (C) source driving primary production at the base of the food web. In littoral ecosystems, such as the California Upwelling System (CUS), the likely dominant C sources of suspended particulate organic matter (POM) pool are kelp, upwelling phytoplankton or estuarine phytoplankton. While bulk isotopes of C and N are used extensively to resolve relative consumer hierarchy or shifting diet in a food web, we found that the δ13C bulk values in mussels cannot distinguish exact source in littoral ecosystems. Here we show 15 sites within the CUS, between Cape Blanco, OR and La Jolla, CA where mussels were sampled and analyzed for both bulk δ13C and CSI-AA. We found no latitudinal trends, but rather average bulk δ13C values for the entire coastal record were highly consistent (-15.7 ± 0.9‰). The bulk record would suggest either nutrient provisioning from kelp or upwelled phytoplankton, but 13C-AA fingerprinting confines these two sources to upwelling. This suggests that mussels are recording integrated coastal phytoplankton values, with the enriched

  9. Production of hydrocarbons of value

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1931-06-16

    A process is described for the production of hydrocarbons of great value by treating with heat and pressure carbonaceous materials such as coals, tars, mineral oils, and products of distillation and transformation of these materials, also for the refining with heat and pressure of mixed liquid hydrocarbons by means of hydrogen gas, preferably in the presence of catalysts, consisting in using as the hydrogenating gas that obtained by gasification of combustible solids after partial or complete cleaning at atmospheric or elevated pressures, by means of solid adsorbents, chemical agents or catalysts, or mixtures of these agents, the hydrocarbons being characterized by strong unsaturation, and the presence of oxygen, sulfur compounds, and oxides of nitrogen.

  10. Gasification : converting low value feedstocks to high value products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koppel, P.; Lorden, D.

    2009-01-01

    This presentation provided a historic overview of the gasification process and described the process chemistry of its two primary reactions, notably partial oxidation and steam reforming. The gasification process involves converting low value carbonaceous solid or liquid feeds to a synthetic gas by reacting the feed with oxygen and steam under high pressure and temperature conditions. Since the gasifier operates under a reducing environment instead of an oxidizing environment, mist sulphur is converted to hydrogen sulphide instead of sulphur dioxide. The gasification process also involves cleaning up synthetic gas and acid gas removal; recovery of conventional sulphur; and combustion or further processing of clean synthetic gas. This presentation also outlined secondary reactions such as methanation, water shift, and carbon formation. The negative effects of gasification were also discussed, with particular reference to syngas; metal carbonyls; soot; and slag. Other topics that were presented included world syngas production capacity by primary feedstock; operating IGCC projects; natural gas demand by oil sands supply and demand considerations; reasons for using the gasification process; gasifier feedstocks; and gasification products. The presentation concluded with a discussion of gasification licensors; gasification technologies; gasification experience; and the regulatory situation for greenhouse gas. Gasification has demonstrated excellent environmental performance with sulphur recovery greater than 99 per cent, depending on the the recovery process chosen. The opportunity also exists for carbon dioxide recovery. tabs., figs.

  11. Value added products from microalgae

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Naidoo, T

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available , feed, pharmaceutical and research industries (Pulz and Gross, 2004). The market for these applications is still emerging, but there have already been new areas of research in microalgal biotechnology to satisfy the new product demands of industry...

  12. Adjusting Quality index Log Values to Represent Local and Regional Commercial Sawlog Product Values

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orris D. McCauley; Joseph J. Mendel; Joseph J. Mendel

    1969-01-01

    The primary purpose of this paper is not only to report the results of a comparative analysis as to how well the Q.I. method predicts log product values when compared to commercial sawmill log output values, but also to develop a methodology which will facilitate the comparison and provide the adjustments needed by the sawmill operator.

  13. CONSUMERS PRODUCTS AND SERVICES VALUE PERCEPTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bogdan Nichifor

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available This article is a theoretical approach on products and services as value satisfiers. Consumers have knowledge about the personal, symbolic values that products, services and brands help them satisfy or achieve. Values are people’s broad life goals. Values often involve the emotional affect associated with such goals and needs (the strong feelings and emotions that accompany success. Recognizing when a value has been satisfied or a basic life goal has been achieved is an internal feeling that is somewhat intangible and subjective. In contrast, functional and psychosocial consequences are more tangible and are more obvious when they occur. Salespeople add value by identifying customer needs and devising or delivering a solution for those needs. Salespeople are able to adapt how products or/and services are presented or even to adapt products/services so that they meet the needs of the buyers. Such adaption powers professional selling, because customers often don’t know what they need or how to configure a solution to their needs. Satisfying a value usually elicits positive affect (happiness, joy, satisfaction, whereas blocking a value produces negative affect (frustration, anger, disappointment. Consumers can have products and services knowledge about products and services attributes, consequences of products or services use and personal values. Most marketing research focuses on one type of products and services knowledge – usually attributes or consequences, where the focus typically is on benefits rather than risks. Values are examined less frequently and usually in isolation. This paper objective is to show the importance of creating, delivering, and capturing buyer value. A company’s ability to deliver value to its customers is closely tied with its ability to create satisfaction for its employees and other stakeholders. Value ultimately depends on the perceiver. Smart companies not only offer purchase value but also offer use value

  14. HANPP Collection: Human Appropriation of Net Primary Productivity as a Percentage of Net Primary Productivity

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Human Appropriation of Net Primary Productivity (HANPP) as a Percentage of Net Primary Product (NPP) portion of the HANPP Collection represents a map identifying...

  15. Exploring the Values of Chaplains in Government Primary Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isaacs, Amy Kate; Mergler, Amanda

    2018-01-01

    Minimal prior research has examined the school chaplaincy programme in Australia. This exploratory study sought to identify the values primary school chaplains feel are the most important to them personally, and in their role as chaplain. Eight chaplains working in government primary schools were interviewed. Inductive thematic analysis was used…

  16. tracing uganda's global primary organic pineapple value chain

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ACSS

    2016-02-22

    Feb 22, 2016 ... methods were used to validate results obtained from the .... TABLE 2. Agronomic information on organic pineapple production in Uganda ..... management, which makes the value chain expensive ..... A handbook for value ...

  17. Improving functional value of meat products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wangang; Xiao, Shan; Samaraweera, Himali; Lee, Eun Joo; Ahn, Dong U

    2010-09-01

    In recent years, much attention has been paid to develop meat and meat products with physiological functions to promote health conditions and prevent the risk of diseases. This review focuses on strategies to improve the functional value of meat and meat products. Value improvement can be realized by adding functional compounds including conjugated linoneleic acid, vitamin E, n3 fatty acids and selenium in animal diets to improve animal production, carcass composition and fresh meat quality. In addition, functional ingredients such as vegetable proteins, dietary fibers, herbs and spices, and lactic acid bacteria can be directly incorporated into meat products during processing to improve their functional value for consumers. Functional compounds, especially peptides, can also be generated from meat and meat products during processing such as fermentation, curing and aging, and enzymatic hydrolysis. This review further discusses the current status, consumer acceptance, and market for functional foods from the global viewpoints. Future prospects for functional meat and meat products are also discussed.

  18. Method for the production of primary amines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baldenius, Kai-Uwe; Ditrich, Klaus; Breurer, Michael; Navickas, Vaidotas; Janssen, Dick; Crismaru, Ciprian; Bartsch, Sebastian

    2014-01-01

    The present invention relates to a novel enzymatically catalyzed method for the production of aliphatic primary amines, which method comprises the enzymatic oxidation of a primary aliphatic alcohol catalyzed by an alcohol dehydrogenase, amination of the resulting oxocompound catalyzed by a

  19. Civic values in the texts of the Primary Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Ortiz Cermeño

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Documentary study university textbooks on civic values in the Primary Education. Technique has been used as discourse analysis with ATLAS.ti version 6.2. The results show how the theories discussed affect the values of freedom and discipline primarily, followed by respect, equality related to justice, accountability and participation closely with citizen participation. We conclude that the values that work in this subjet are essential in the initial training of teachers.

  20. Deep primary production in coastal pelagic systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lyngsgaard, Maren Moltke; Richardson, Katherine; Markager, Stiig

    2014-01-01

    produced. The primary production (PP) occurring below the surface layer, i.e. in the pycnocline-bottom layer (PBL), is shown to contribute significantly to total PP. Oxygen concentrations in the PBL are shown to correlate significantly with the deep primary production (DPP) as well as with salinity...... that eutrophication effects may include changes in the structure of planktonic food webs and element cycling in the water column, both brought about through an altered vertical distribution of PP....

  1. Microbial production of value-added nutraceuticals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jian; Guleria, Sanjay; Koffas, Mattheos Ag; Yan, Yajun

    2016-02-01

    Nutraceuticals are important natural bioactive compounds that confer health-promoting and medical benefits to humans. Globally growing demands for value-added nutraceuticals for prevention and treatment of human diseases have rendered nutraceuticals a multi-billion dollar market. However, supply limitations and extraction difficulties from natural sources such as plants, animals or fungi, restrict the large-scale use of nutraceuticals. Metabolic engineering via microbial production platforms has been advanced as an eco-friendly alternative approach for production of value-added nutraceuticals from simple carbon sources. Microbial platforms like the most widely used Escherichia coli and Saccharomyces cerevisiae have been engineered as versatile cell factories for production of diverse and complex value-added chemicals such as phytochemicals, prebiotics, polysaccaharides and poly amino acids. This review highlights the recent progresses in biological production of value-added nutraceuticals via metabolic engineering approaches. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Value analysis for advanced technology products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soulliere, Mark

    2011-03-01

    Technology by itself can be wondrous, but buyers of technology factor in the price they have to pay along with performance in their decisions. As a result, the ``best'' technology may not always win in the marketplace when ``good enough'' can be had at a lower price. Technology vendors often set pricing by ``cost plus margin,'' or by competitors' offerings. What if the product is new (or has yet to be invented)? Value pricing is a methodology to price products based on the value generated (e.g. money saved) by using one product vs. the next best technical alternative. Value analysis can often clarify what product attributes generate the most value. It can also assist in identifying market forces outside of the control of the technology vendor that also influence pricing. These principles are illustrated with examples.

  3. Primary production of tropical marine ecosystems

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Bhattathiri, P.M.A.

    Among tropical marine ecosystems estuaries are one of the highly productive areas and act as a nursery to large number of organisms. The primary production in most of the estuaries is less during the monsoon period. Post-monsoon period shows...

  4. Primary production in the Sulu Sea

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R. Narasimhan (Krishtel eMaging) 1461 1996 Oct 15 13:05:22

    its remotely sensed values from OCTS (Ocean Colour Temperature Scanner) are found to be in ... Although the Sulu Sea is more productive than the adjacent South China Sea, the central area ... surrounding ocean by a chain of islands.

  5. Contemporary Universities and the Production of Value

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bengtsen, Søren Smedegaard; Shumar, Wesley

    value and a different conversation about creating new value. By drawing on Ronald Barnett's philosophy of higher education we argue that universities are much occupied with their 'acting' and 'knowing' efforts, while they forget the dimension of 'being' - who they are and what they want for themselves......Today, contemporary universities are encouraged to be innovative, creative, and foster knowledge production and knowledge transfer. These are a set of values, but they have a very specific meaning within the context of neoliberal capitalism. They encapsulate certain free market economic values...... that universities are encouraged to cultivate. In this way we can think about universities as being commodified—their core mission has become focused on creating greater economic value for the individual, for corporations, and for the society. In this focusing of the university mission on the economic...

  6. Primary Productivity of the Cengklik Dam Boyolali

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    WIRYANTO

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Primary productivity dynamic of the water ecosystem was conducted faster in the last decades. This study was intended to find out the primary productivity of Cengklik dam Boyolali, Central Java to explain the ecosystem dynamic and to lead the maintenance of dam. This study used quantitative methods in completely randomized group design (CRD, and the data was analized by Analysis of Variance (ANAVA. Samples were taken horizontally in four sampling point, respectively in the riparian zone, around of the floating net (“karamba”, in the center of dam water and around of the ex-paddy fields. There were taken vertically in three-depth point in each of the sampling point, respectively 0.5 meter, 1.5 meter, and 2.5 meter. The results showed that the gross primary productivity of the dam was 11.122.500-22.545.600 mgC/m3/days, and the primary productivity differences in each of the point sampling caused by light intensity, nutrient supply, and abundance of the chlorophyll organisms.

  7. Tracing Uganda's global primary organic pineapple value chain ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The organic sector is one of the fastest growing sectors globally. ... opportunity for developing countries to export high value products in the global market. ... It is clear from the study that the chain is private- sector-driven, has relatively young ...

  8. Adding Production Value Through Application of Value Based Scheduling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindhard, Søren; Wandahl, Søren

    2012-01-01

    Customer value is a key goal in the Lean philosophy, essentially only actions that adds value should be conducted. In a transformation view, the basic lean approach is to remove waste, which indirectly increases value (or withstand value lose). Lean Construction acknowledges two different types o...... be minimized and management should seek towards democratic leadership....

  9. Embracing value co-creation in primary care services research: a framework for success.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janamian, Tina; Crossland, Lisa; Jackson, Claire L

    2016-04-18

    Value co-creation redresses a key criticism of researcher-driven approaches to research - that researchers may lack insight into the end users' needs and values across the research journey. Value co-creation creates, in a step-wise way, value with, and for, multiple stakeholders through regular, ongoing interactions leading to innovation, increased productivity and co-created outcomes of value to all parties - thus creating a "win more-win more" environment. The Centre of Research Excellence (CRE) in Building Primary Care Quality, Performance and Sustainability has co-created outcomes of value that have included robust and enduring partnerships, research findings that have value to end users (such as the Primary Care Practice Improvement Tool and the best-practice governance framework), an International Implementation Research Network in Primary Care and the International Primary Health Reform Conference. Key lessons learned in applying the strategies of value co-creation have included the recognition that partnership development requires an investment of time and effort to ensure meaningful interactions and enriched end user experiences, that research management systems including governance, leadership and communication also need to be "co-creative", and that openness and understanding is needed to work across different sectors and cultures with flexibility, fairness and transparency being essential to the value co-creation process.

  10. Primary productivity of the Andaman Sea

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Bhattathiri, P.M.A.; Devassy, V.P.

    The average surface and column primary productivity, chl a and particulate organic carbon, estimated at 24 stations during Feb. 1979, were respectively 5.3 mg C/m3/d and 273 mg C/m2 /d; 0.03 mg/m3 and 3.64 mg/m2; and 132mg/m3 and 4.59 g/m2...

  11. Primary production in the Bay of Bengal during southwest monsoon of 1978

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Bhattathiri, P.M.A.; Devassy, V.P.; Radhakrishna, K.

    Measurements of primary production, chlorophyll a and particulate organic carbon were made at 33, 43 and 44 stations respectively during August-September of 1978. The average surface production, chlorophyll a and particulate organic carbon values...

  12. Mass extinctions: Ecological selectivity and primary production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhodes, Melissa Clark; Thayer, Charles W.

    1991-09-01

    If mass extinctions were caused by reduced primary productivity, then extinctions should be concentrated among animals with starvation-susceptible feeding modes, active lifestyles, and high-energy budgets. The stratigraphic ranges (by stage) of 424 genera of bivalves and 309 genera of articulate brachiopods suggest that there was an unusual reduction of primary productivity at the Cretaceous/Tertiary (K/T) boundary extinction. For bivalves at the K/T, there were (1) selective extinction of suspension feeders and other susceptible trophic categories relative to deposit feeders and other resistant categories, and (2) among suspension feed-ers, selective extinction of bivalves with active locomotion. During the Permian-Triassic (P/Tr) extinction and Jurassic background time, extinction rates among suspension feeders were greater for articulate brachiopods than for bivalves. But during the K/T event, extinction rates of articulates and suspension-feeding bivalves equalized, possibly because the low-energy budgets of articulates gave them an advantage when food was scarce.

  13. Multiple stressors for oceanic primary production

    KAUST Repository

    Agusti, Susana

    2015-12-15

    Marine ecosystems are increasingly exposed to stress factors of anthropogenic origin that change their function, structure and services they deliver society. Climate change occurs simultaneously with other changes in the environment acting jointly in a context of global environmental change. For oceanic phytoplankton communities, the research conducted so far has identified stress factors associated with global change and their impact individually (warming, acidification, increased UVB radiation, pollutants). But when several stressors act simultaneously interactions and responses are not equal to the sum of individual impacts, but may have synergistic effects (the effects are multiplied) or antagonistic (cancel out the effects) that hinder predictions of the vulnerability of ecosystems to global change. Here we will examine the vulnerability of oceanic primary producers to the accumulation of different stressors associated with global change. The trend for autotrophic picoplankton to increase with temperature in the ocean has led to predictions that autotrophic picoplankton abundance will increase with warming. However, it is documented a trend towards a decline in productivity, due to declined autotroph biomass and production with warming and the associated stratification in the subtropical ocean. Models predicting an increase in abundance are in contradiction with the reported decrease in productivity in several oceanic areas, and associate oligotrophication. Here we perform a global study to analyze the relationships of autotrophic picoplankton with oceanic temperature, nutrients, underwater light and ultraviolet B (UVB) radiation, and productivity. We built a model to project the future changes of autotrophic picoplankton considering multiple environmental changes in future climate scenarios for the subtropical gyres. We considered increased water temperature, and associated changes in productivity and underwater light and UVB. The model show that warming and

  14. Multiple stressors for oceanic primary production

    KAUST Repository

    Agusti, Susana; Llabré s, Moira; Lubiá n, Luis M.; Moreno-Ostos, Enrique; Estrada, Marta; Duarte, Carlos M.; Cerezo, Maria I.

    2015-01-01

    Marine ecosystems are increasingly exposed to stress factors of anthropogenic origin that change their function, structure and services they deliver society. Climate change occurs simultaneously with other changes in the environment acting jointly in a context of global environmental change. For oceanic phytoplankton communities, the research conducted so far has identified stress factors associated with global change and their impact individually (warming, acidification, increased UVB radiation, pollutants). But when several stressors act simultaneously interactions and responses are not equal to the sum of individual impacts, but may have synergistic effects (the effects are multiplied) or antagonistic (cancel out the effects) that hinder predictions of the vulnerability of ecosystems to global change. Here we will examine the vulnerability of oceanic primary producers to the accumulation of different stressors associated with global change. The trend for autotrophic picoplankton to increase with temperature in the ocean has led to predictions that autotrophic picoplankton abundance will increase with warming. However, it is documented a trend towards a decline in productivity, due to declined autotroph biomass and production with warming and the associated stratification in the subtropical ocean. Models predicting an increase in abundance are in contradiction with the reported decrease in productivity in several oceanic areas, and associate oligotrophication. Here we perform a global study to analyze the relationships of autotrophic picoplankton with oceanic temperature, nutrients, underwater light and ultraviolet B (UVB) radiation, and productivity. We built a model to project the future changes of autotrophic picoplankton considering multiple environmental changes in future climate scenarios for the subtropical gyres. We considered increased water temperature, and associated changes in productivity and underwater light and UVB. The model show that warming and

  15. Towards 250 m mapping of terrestrial primary productivity over Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonsamo, A.; Chen, J. M.

    2011-12-01

    Terrestrial ecosystems are an important part of the climate and global change systems. Their role in climate change and in the global carbon cycle is yet to be well understood. Dataset from satellite earth observation, coupled with numerical models provide the unique tools for monitoring the spatial and temporal dynamics of territorial carbon cycle. The Boreal Ecosystems Productivity Simulator (BEPS) is a remote sensing based approach to quantifying the terrestrial carbon cycle by that gross and net primary productivity (GPP and NPP) and terrestrial carbon sinks and sources expressed as net ecosystem productivity (NEP). We have currently implemented a scheme to map the GPP, NPP and NEP at 250 m for first time over Canada using BEPS model. This is supplemented by improved mapping of land cover and leaf area index (LAI) at 250 m over Canada from MODIS satellite dataset. The results from BEPS are compared with MODIS GPP product and further evaluated with estimated LAI from various sources to evaluate if the results capture the trend in amount of photosynthetic biomass distributions. Final evaluation will be to validate both BEPS and MODIS primary productivity estimates over the Fluxnet sites over Canada. The primary evaluation indicate that BEPS GPP estimates capture the over storey LAI variations over Canada very well compared to MODIS GPP estimates. There is a large offset of MODIS GPP, over-estimating the lower GPP value compared to BEPS GPP estimates. These variations will further be validated based on the measured values from the Fluxnet tower measurements over Canadian. The high resolution GPP (NPP) products at 250 m will further be used to scale the outputs between different ecosystem productivity models, in our case the Canadian carbon budget model of Canadian forest sector CBM-CFS) and the Integrated Terrestrial Ecosystem Carbon model (InTEC).

  16. Primary production in the Bay of Bengal during August 1977

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Devassy, V.P.; Bhattathiri, P.M.A.; Radhakrishna, K.

    Primary production, chlorophyll @ia@@, phaeophytin, phytoplankton and particulate organic carbon (POC) were studied at 14 stations in the Bay of Bengal during August 1977. Column primary production, chlorophyll @ia@@, and phaeopigments varied from 0...

  17. Relationship between chlorophyll-a and column primary production

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Dalal, S.G.; Bhargava, R.M.S.

    Relationship between surface chlorophyll a and column primary production has been established to help in estimating the latter more quickly and accurately. The equation derived is Primary Production, y = 0.54 Ln Chl a - 0.6. The relationship...

  18. HANPP Collection: Global Patterns in Net Primary Productivity (NPP)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Global Patterns in Net Primary Productivity (NPP) portion of the Human Appropriation of Net Primary Productivity (HANPP) Collection maps the net amount of solar...

  19. Courgette Production: Pollination Demand, Supply, and Value.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knapp, Jessica L; Osborne, Juliet L

    2017-10-01

    Courgette (Cucurbita pepo L.) production in the United Kingdom is estimated to be worth £6.7 million. However, little is known about this crop's requirement for insect-mediated pollination (pollinator dependence) and if pollinator populations in a landscape are able to fulfil its pollination needs (pollination deficit). Consequently, pollination experiments were conducted over 2 yr to explore pollinator dependence and pollination deficit in field-grown courgette in the United Kingdom. Results showed that pollination increased yield by 39% and there was no evidence of pollination limitation on crop yield. This was evidenced by a surprisingly low pollination deficit (of just 3%) and no statistical difference in yield (length grown, circumference, and weight) between open- and hand-pollinated crops. Nonetheless, the high economic value of courgettes means that reducing even the small pollination deficit could still increase profit by ∼£166/ha. Interestingly, 56% of fruit was able to reach marketable size and shape without any pollination. Understanding a crop's requirement for pollinators can aid growers in their decision-making about what varieties and sites should be used. In doing so, they may increase their agricultural resilience and further their economic advantage. © The Authors 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America.

  20. Value of preoperative imaging localization for primary hyperparathyroidism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao Shuo; Tan Jian; Xu Jiahua; Zhou Yinbao

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the values of ultrasound, CT and 99m Tc-MIBI in the localization of hyperfunctioning parathyroid tissue. Methods: 23 patients with primary hyperparathyroidism underwent 23 ultrasound, 20 CT scans and 21 double phase 99m Tc-MIBI imagings. Surgical and histological correlation was obtained for all studies. Results: 23 adenomas and 2 hyperplastic glands were removed from 23 patients. The results showed the sensitivities were 60%, 68%, 91%; the specificities were 97%, 97%, 100%; and the accuracies were 89%, 91%, 98% respectively with ultrasound, CT and 99m Tc-MIBI. There was no significant difference between ultrasound and CT (P > 0.05), but 99m Tc-MIBI was superior to ultrasound and CT in the sensitivity and accuracy, the specificity was similar for all of three imaging methods (P > 0.05). Conclusions: Double phase 99m Tc-MIBI imaging is a promising technique for localization of parathyroid adenomas. It is necessary for patients to undergo the noninvasive imaging procedures before their initial neck exploration

  1. Evaluation of Organic Proxies for Quantifying Past Primary Productivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raja, M.; Rosell-Melé, A.; Galbraith, E.

    2017-12-01

    Ocean primary productivity is a key element of the marine carbon cycle. However, its quantitative reconstruction in the past relies on the use of biogeochemical models as the available proxy approaches are qualitative at best. Here, we present an approach that evaluates the use of phytoplanktonic biomarkers (i.e. chlorins and alkenones) as quantitative proxies to reconstruct past changes in marine productivity. We compare biomarkers contents in a global suite of core-top sediments to sea-surface chlorophyll-a abundance estimated by satellites over the last 20 years, and the results are compared to total organic carbon (TOC). We also assess satellite data and detect satellite limitations and biases due to the complexity of optical properties and the actual defined algorithms. Our findings show that sedimentary chlorins can be used to track total sea-surface chlorophyll-a abundance as an indicator for past primary productivity. However, degradation processes restrict the application of this proxy to concentrations below a threshold value (1µg/g). Below this threshold, chlorins are a useful tool to identify reducing conditions when used as part of a multiproxy approach to assess redox sedimentary conditions (e.g. using Re, U). This is based on the link between anoxic/disoxic conditions and the flux of organic matter from the sea-surface to the sediments. We also show that TOC is less accurate than chlorins for estimating sea-surface chlorophyll-a due to the contribution of terrigenous organic matter, and the different degradation pathways of all organic compounds that TOC includes. Alkenones concentration also relates to primary productivity, but they are constrained by different processes in different regions. In conclusion, as lons as specific constraints are taken into account, our study evaluates the use of chlorins and alkenones as quantitative proxies of past primary productivity, with more accuracy than by using TOC.

  2. Bioconversion of sago residue into value added products | Awg ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... value added products. DS Awg-Adeni, S Abd-Aziz, K Bujang, MA Hassan ... sago processing mills. This review focuses on the developments in processes and products for the value addition of sago residues through biotechnological means.

  3. Newness, value and new product performance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Trijp, van H.C.M.; Kleef, van E.

    2008-01-01

    Both consumers and organizations hold a dualistic attitude towards product innovativeness. Consumers are known to hold an inherent tendency to approach (neophilia) and avoid (neophobia) new food products at the same time. Similarly, at a managerial level it is not all that clear whether revenues of

  4. Value chain analysis on cassava and cassava based - products in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study examined the value Chain analysis (production process and cost related to each element of production chain to add value) on cassava and cassava products in Imo State specifically to ascertain the farm size holdings of the respondents as well as the ownerships of the land used for production. It also identified` ...

  5. Value Chain Optimisation of Biogas Production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Ida Græsted

    economically feasible. In this PhD thesis, the focus is to create models for investigating the profitability of biogas projects by: 1) including the whole value chain in a mathematical model and considering mass and energy changes on the upstream part of the chain; and 2) including profit allocation in a value......, the costs on the biogas plant has been included in the model using economy of scale. For the second point, a mathematical model considering profit allocation was developed applying three allocation mechanisms. This mathematical model can be applied as a second step after the value chain optimisation. After...... in the energy systems model to find the optimal end use of each type of gas and fuel. The main contributions of this thesis are the methods developed on plant level. Both the mathematical model for the value chain and the profit allocation model can be generalised and used in other industries where mass...

  6. Global patterns in human consumption of net primary production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imhoff, Marc L.; Bounoua, Lahouari; Ricketts, Taylor; Loucks, Colby; Harriss, Robert; Lawrence, William T.

    2004-06-01

    The human population and its consumption profoundly affect the Earth's ecosystems. A particularly compelling measure of humanity's cumulative impact is the fraction of the planet's net primary production that we appropriate for our own use. Net primary production-the net amount of solar energy converted to plant organic matter through photosynthesis-can be measured in units of elemental carbon and represents the primary food energy source for the world's ecosystems. Human appropriation of net primary production, apart from leaving less for other species to use, alters the composition of the atmosphere, levels of biodiversity, energy flows within food webs and the provision of important ecosystem services. Here we present a global map showing the amount of net primary production required by humans and compare it to the total amount generated on the landscape. We then derive a spatial balance sheet of net primary production `supply' and `demand' for the world. We show that human appropriation of net primary production varies spatially from almost zero to many times the local primary production. These analyses reveal the uneven footprint of human consumption and related environmental impacts, indicate the degree to which human populations depend on net primary production `imports' and suggest policy options for slowing future growth of human appropriation of net primary production.

  7. Primary production in the Kattegat - past and present

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Richardson, K.; Heilmann, Jens

    1995-01-01

    data collected during the period 1984-1993 are calculated using the method employed in the 1950s. It is concluded that primary production in the Kattegat has increased from less than 100 g C m(-2) y(- 1) to about 200 g C m(-2) y(-1) since the 1950s. This increase is not seen during the winter months...... to be responses to increases in primary production. However, for most areas, there are insufficient data to demonstrate whether or not increases in primary production have actually occurred. In this study, the evidence for increased primary production in the Kattegat is examined by comparing primary production...... measurements from the 1950s and measurements made in the period 1984-1993. The methods employed during the two periods differ considerably. These differences and how they may affect the validity of a comparison of the results from the studies carried out in two periods are addressed. The primary production...

  8. Features communikations media products and value system of teens

    OpenAIRE

    Гречаник, М. І.

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the genesis of the features of the relationship of media products and values as a teenager in the light of current trends in contemporary global information society, found that media products can influence the formation and development of personal values yk adolescence, due to physiological characteristics age. Media products meets the needs of adolescents and penetrates the subconscious, thus affecting the value system, which can lead to deformation of values as a teenager fal...

  9. Improvement of product design process by knowledge value analysis

    OpenAIRE

    XU, Yang; BERNARD, Alain; PERRY, Nicolas; LAROCHE, Florent

    2013-01-01

    Nowadays, design activities remain the core issue for global product development. As knowledge is more and more integrated, effective analysis of knowledge value becomes very useful for the improvement of product design processes. This paper aims at proposing a framework of knowledge value analysis in the context of product design process. By theoretical analysis and case study, the paper illustrates how knowledge value can be calculated and how the results can help the improvement of product...

  10. Site-level evaluation of satellite-based global terrestrial gross primary production and net primary production monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    David P. Turner; William D. Ritts; Warren B. Cohen; Thomas K. Maeirsperger; Stith T. Gower; Al A. Kirschbaum; Steve W. Runnings; Maosheng Zhaos; Steven C. Wofsy; Allison L. Dunn; Beverly E. Law; John L. Campbell; Walter C. Oechel; Hyo Jung Kwon; Tilden P. Meyers; Eric E. Small; Shirley A. Kurc; John A. Gamon

    2005-01-01

    Operational monitoring of global terrestrial gross primary production (GPP) and net primary production (NPP) is now underway using imagery from the satellite-borne Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) sensor. Evaluation of MODIS GPP and NPP products will require site-level studies across a range of biomes, with close attention to numerous scaling...

  11. Breeding value of primary synthetic wheat genotypes for grain yield

    Science.gov (United States)

    To introduce new genetic diversity into the bread wheat gene pool from its progenitor, Aegilops tauschii (Coss.) Schmalh, 33 primary synthetic hexaploid wheat genotypes (SYN) were crossed to 20 spring bread wheat (BW) cultivars at the International Wheat and Maize Improvement Center. Modified single...

  12. Phytoplankton primary production in the world's estuarine-coastal ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cloern, James E.; Foster, S.Q.; Kleckner, A.E.

    2014-01-01

    Estuaries are biogeochemical hot spots because they receive large inputs of nutrients and organic carbon from land and oceans to support high rates of metabolism and primary production. We synthesize published rates of annual phytoplankton primary production (APPP) in marine ecosystems influenced by connectivity to land – estuaries, bays, lagoons, fjords and inland seas. Review of the scientific literature produced a compilation of 1148 values of APPP derived from monthly incubation assays to measure carbon assimilation or oxygen production. The median value of median APPP measurements in 131 ecosystems is 185 and the mean is 252 g C m−2 yr−1, but the range is large: from −105 (net pelagic production in the Scheldt Estuary) to 1890 g C m−2 yr−1 (net phytoplankton production in Tamagawa Estuary). APPP varies up to 10-fold within ecosystems and 5-fold from year to year (but we only found eight APPP series longer than a decade so our knowledge of decadal-scale variability is limited). We use studies of individual places to build a conceptual model that integrates the mechanisms generating this large variability: nutrient supply, light limitation by turbidity, grazing by consumers, and physical processes (river inflow, ocean exchange, and inputs of heat, light and wind energy). We consider method as another source of variability because the compilation includes values derived from widely differing protocols. A simulation model shows that different methods reported in the literature can yield up to 3-fold variability depending on incubation protocols and methods for integrating measured rates over time and depth. Although attempts have been made to upscale measures of estuarine-coastal APPP, the empirical record is inadequate for yielding reliable global estimates. The record is deficient in three ways. First, it is highly biased by the large number of measurements made in northern Europe (particularly the Baltic region) and North America. Of the 1148

  13. Value Added Products from Renewable Biofuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blum, Paul [Univ. of Nebraska, Lincoln, NE (United States)

    2014-07-31

    Cellulosic ethanol is an emerging biofuel that will make strong contributions to American domestic energy needs. In the US midwest the standard method for pretreatment of biomass uses hot acid to deconstruct lignocellulose. While other methods work, they are not in common use. Therefore it is necessary to work within this context to achieve process improvements and reductions in biofuel cost. Technology underlying this process could supplement and even replace commodity enzymes with engineered microbes to convert biomass-derived lignocellulose feedstocks into biofuels and valueadded chemicals. The approach that was used here was based on consolidated bioprocessing. Thermoacidophilic microbes belonging to the Domain Archaea were evaluated and modfied to promote deconvolution and saccharification of lignocellulose. Biomass pretreatment (hot acid) was combined with fermentation using an extremely thermoacidophilic microbial platform. The identity and fate of released sugars was controlled using metabolic blocks combined with added biochemical traits where needed. LC/MS analysis supported through the newly established Nebraska Bioenergy Facility provided general support for bioenergy researchers at the University of Nebraska. The primary project strategy was to use microbes that naturally flourish in hot acid (thermoacidophiles) with conventional biomass pretreatment that uses hot acid. The specific objectives were: to screen thermoacidophilic taxa for the ability to deconvolute lignocellulose and depolymerize associated carbohydrates; evaluate and respond to formation of “inhibitors” that arose during incubation of lignocellulose under heated acidic conditions; identify and engineer “sugar flux channeling and catabolic blocks” that redirect metabolic pathways to maximize sugar concentrations; expand the hydrolytic capacity of extremely thermoacidophilic microbes through the addition of deconvolution traits; and establish the Nebraska Bioenergy Facility (NBF

  14. Fission product release into the primary coolant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Apperson, C.E.

    1977-01-01

    The analytic evaluation of steady state primary coolant activity is discussed. The reported calculations account for temperature dependent fuel failure in two particle types and arbitrary radioactive decay chains. A matrix operator technique implemented in the SUVIUS code is used to solve the simultaneous equations. Results are compared with General Atomic Company's published results

  15. A review of ocean chlorophyll algorithms and primary production models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jingwen; Zhou, Song; Lv, Nan

    2015-12-01

    This paper mainly introduces the five ocean chlorophyll concentration inversion algorithm and 3 main models for computing ocean primary production based on ocean chlorophyll concentration. Through the comparison of five ocean chlorophyll inversion algorithm, sums up the advantages and disadvantages of these algorithm,and briefly analyzes the trend of ocean primary production model.

  16. Chemical phenomena in primary titanium production

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    van Vuuren, DS

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available TiO2 $ 490m p.a. $ 2500 p.a. Pigment Production ~20 kt TiO2 5100 kt TiO2 $ 37m p.a. $ 10000 m.p.a. Sponge Production Nil 125 kt p.a. Ti $ 1250 m.p.a. Ingot Production Nil 145 kt p.a. Ti $ 2600 m.p.a. Mill Products Nil ~90 kt p.a. Ti $ 4500 m... Museum Photo courtesy of the Kyushu National Museum http://web-japan.org/nipponia/nipponia38/en/travel/travel03.html V AL U E TiCl4 TiO2 Sponge Powder M2TiF6 Ingot INC R EAS ING COS T PRECURSOR REDUCTANT PRODUCT...

  17. Production of High Value Cellulose from Tobacco

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berson, R Eric; Dvaid, Keith; McGinley, W Mark; Meduri, Praveen; Clark, Ezra; Dayalan, Ethirajulu; Sumanasekera, Gamini; Sunkara, Mahendra; Colliver, Donald

    2011-06-15

    The Kentucky Rural Energy Supply Program was established in 2005 by a federal direct appropriation to benefit the citizens of the Commonwealth by creating a unified statewide consortium to promote renewable energy and energy efficiency in Kentucky. The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Biomass Programs initially funded the consortium in 2005 with a $2 million operational grant. The Kentucky Rural Energy Consortium (KREC) was formed at the outset of the program to advance energy efficiency and comprehensive research on biomass and bioenergy of importance to Kentucky agriculture, rural communities, and related industries. In recognition of the successful efforts of the program, KREC received an additional $1.96 million federal appropriation in 2008 for renewal of the DOE grant. From the beginning, KREC understood the value of providing a statewide forum for the discussion of Kentucky's long term energy needs and economic development potential. The new funding allowed KREC to continue to serve as a clearinghouse and support new research and development and outreach programs for energy efficiency and renewable energy.

  18. Teachers’ Opinions about the Values in Primary Education Social Studies Curriculum and Values Education

    OpenAIRE

    Tuğba YANPAR YELKEN; F. Ayşe BALCI

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine the opinions of teachers concerning the values in social studies curriculum and values education. The research was conducted with the participation of 152 social studies and classroom teachers from 24 schools in 2006-2007 instruction year in Mersin. Teachers were asked to state their views about the significance of the values included in social studies curriculum, effectiveness of the methods followed during value teaching, relevant courses for values...

  19. From product centered design to value centered design: understanding the value-system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Randmaa, Merili; Howard, Thomas J.; Otto, T.

    Product design has focused on different parameters through history- design for usability, design for manufacturing, design for assembly etc. Today, as the products get bundled with service, it is important to interconnect product, service and business model design to create synergy effect and offer...... more value for the customer for less eford. Value and understanding the value-system needs to be in the focus of business strategy. Value can be created, exchanged and perceived. It can be tangible (physical products, money) or intangible (information, experience, relationships, service). Creating...... value is usually a co-creation process, where customers, suppliers and manufacturers all have their part. This paper describes a paradigm shift towards value-based thinking and proposes a new methodology for understanding and analysing the value system....

  20. MODIS/Terra Gross Primary Productivity 8-Day L4 Global 1km SIN Grid V055

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Terra/MODIS Gross Primary Productivity (GPP) product (MOD17A2) is a cumulative composite of GPP values based on the radiation-use efficiency concept that is...

  1. Interannual Variation in Phytoplankton Primary Production at a Global Scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rousseaux, Cecile Severine; Gregg, Watson W.

    2013-01-01

    We used the NASA Ocean Biogeochemical Model (NOBM) combined with remote sensing data via assimilation to evaluate the contribution of four phytoplankton groups to the total primary production. First, we assessed the contribution of each phytoplankton groups to the total primary production at a global scale for the period 1998-2011. Globally, diatoms contributed the most to the total phytoplankton production ((is)approximately 50%, the equivalent of 20 PgC·y1). Coccolithophores and chlorophytes each contributed approximately 20% ((is) approximately 7 PgC·y1) of the total primary production and cyanobacteria represented about 10% ((is) approximately 4 PgC·y1) of the total primary production. Primary production by diatoms was highest in the high latitudes ((is) greater than 40 deg) and in major upwelling systems (Equatorial Pacific and Benguela system). We then assessed interannual variability of this group-specific primary production over the period 1998-2011. Globally the annual relative contribution of each phytoplankton groups to the total primary production varied by maximum 4% (1-2 PgC·y1). We assessed the effects of climate variability on group-specific primary production using global (i.e., Multivariate El Niño Index, MEI) and "regional" climate indices (e.g., Southern Annular Mode (SAM), Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO) and North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO)). Most interannual variability occurred in the Equatorial Pacific and was associated with climate variability as indicated by significant correlation (p (is) less than 0.05) between the MEI and the group-specific primary production from all groups except coccolithophores. In the Atlantic, climate variability as indicated by NAO was significantly correlated to the primary production of 2 out of the 4 groups in the North Central Atlantic (diatoms/cyanobacteria) and in the North Atlantic (chlorophytes and coccolithophores). We found that climate variability as indicated by SAM had only a limited effect

  2. Governance and Upgrading Practices in Cloth Production Value Chain

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study examines the governance _pal/ern and upgrading _practices of value chain of cloth _production, focusing on micro and small cloth _producing entetprises in Addis Ababa. The study is based on a sample of 222 respondents drawn from various actors of the value chain in the city. The value chain is found out to ...

  3. On Tour... Primary Hardwood Processing, Products and Recycling Unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philip A. Araman; Daniel L. Schmoldt

    1995-01-01

    Housed within the Department of Wood Science and Forest Products at Virginia Polytechnic Institute is a three-person USDA Forest Service research work unit (with one vacancy) devoted to hardwood processing and recycling research. Phil Araman is the project leader of this truly unique and productive unit, titled ãPrimary Hardwood Processing, Products and Recycling.ä The...

  4. Is Chemoembolisation of Value in Inoperable Primary Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Luc Raoul

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available primary treatment for unresectable hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC. In this unit, 185 patients with a new diagnosis of HCC not amenable to surgery were seen between 1988 and 1991. Intended therapy for these patients was chemoembolisation with doxorubicin (60 mg/m2 and lipiodol, repeated at six week intervals until it was technically no longer possible o.r until complete tumour response had been obtained. Chemoembolisation was possible in 67 of the 185 (37%. Reasons for exclusion were portal vein occlusion (n=36, decompensated cirrhosis (n 44, distant metastases (n=5, diffuse tumour or unsuitable anatomy (tumour or vasculature (n=11, patient refusal (n=11, and other (n=11. Patients excluded from treatment survived for a median of 10 weeks (range 3 days-19 months. In patients treated, 18 had small HCC (4cm and 49 had large or multifocal HCC. Chemoembolisation was carried out a median of two sessions for small and three sessions for large tumours. Ten of 18 patients with small HCC showed a 50% or greater reduction in tumour size. Five of 49 patients with large or multifocal tumours showed a response to treatment. Median overall survival for treated patients was 36 weeks (range 3 days–4 years. One patient has subsequently undergone liver transplantation with no recurrence and minimal residual disease at transplantation. Two other patients are alive three years after chemoembolisation, one with no evidence of recurrent disease. No patient was thought suitable for surgery after their response to chemoembolisation. Chemotherapy related complications were seen in 22%. Complications were significantly more common in patients with larger tumours and poor liver reserve. Five patients died as a result of chemotherapy related complications. In conclusion, only one third of UK patients with unresectable HCC are treatable by chemoembolisation. Results with small tumours are encouraging, with a high response rate and the possibility of surgical intervention in

  5. PRIMARY PRODUCTION OF SEAGRASS BEDS IN SOUTH SULAWESI (INDONESIA) - A COMPARISON OF HABITATS, METHODS AND SPECIES

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ERFTEMEIJER, PLA; OSINGA, R; MARS, AE

    Primary production of tropical seagrass meadows was studied between April and August 1990 in South Sulawesi, Indonesia. Oxygen evolution studies in enclosures over seagrass vegetation revealed gross community production values between 900 and 4400 mg C m-2 day-1. Assumed community respiration ranged

  6. Challenges for bio-based products in sustainable value chains

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cardon, L.; Lin, J.W.; De Groote, M.; Ragaert, K.; Kopecka, J.A.; Koster, R.P.

    2011-01-01

    This work concerns studies related to strategic development of products in which bio-based plastics are or will be applied, referred to as bio-based products. The studies cover (1) current and potential benefits of bio-based products in extended value chains including activities after end-of-life of

  7. Primary energy sources for hydrogen production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hassmann, K.; Kuehne, H.M.

    1993-01-01

    The costs for hydrogen production through water electrolysis are estimated, assuming the electricity is produced from solar, hydro-, fossil, or nuclear power. The costs for hydrogen end-use in the power generation, heat and transportation sectors are also calculated, based on a state of the art technology and a more advanced technology expected to represent the state by the year 2010. The costs for hydrogen utilization (without energy taxes) are shown to be higher than current prices for fossil fuels (including taxes). Without restrictions imposed on fossil fuel consumption, hydrogen shall not gain a significant market share in either of the cases discussed. 2 figs., 3 tabs., 4 refs

  8. Work Environment and Productivity among Primary School Teachers ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    International Multidisciplinary Journal, Ethiopia. Vol. 5 (5), Serial No. ... work environment of Nigeria primary school teachers to greater productivity ... changes on the structure and curriculum, recommend and prescribed teaching methods and ...

  9. UV radiation and primary production in the Antarctic waters

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    LokaBharathi, P.A.; Krishnakumari, L.; Bhattathiri, P.M.A.; Chandramohan, D.

    at 683 nm), scalar irradiance (photosynthetically active radiation (PAR), computed primary production (pp), diffuse attenuation coefficient, and UVB (308 and 320 nm) and UVA (340 and 380 nm) radiation and ocean temperature all measured as a function...

  10. HANPP Collection: Global Patterns in Net Primary Productivity (NPP)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Global Patterns in Net Primary Productivity (NPP) portion of the HANPP Collection maps the net amount of solar energy converted to plant organic matter through...

  11. Methodology of evaluation of value created in the productive processes

    OpenAIRE

    M.T. Roszak

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: Of this paper was to present the methodology of analysis of the productive processes with applicationof value analysis and multi-criterion-analysis which allow to evaluate the technology and organization of theproductive processes.Design/methodology/approach: Presented in the paper methodology of evaluation of the productive processesis based on analysis of activities in the productive processes and their characteristics with reference to createdvalue in the productive chain.Findings...

  12. Value for value : the dynamics of supplier value in collaborative new product development.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smals, R.G.M.; Smits, A.A.J.

    2012-01-01

    Suppliers are recognized as an important source of innovation. Research into supplier involvement in new product development has shown that benefits can potentially be reaped by customers. However, a relatively unexplored precondition is the willingness of suppliers to invest in their customers’

  13. Satellite Driven Estimation of Primary Productivity of Agroecosystems in India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, N. R.; Dadhwal, V. K.; Agrawal, S.; Saha, S. K.

    2011-08-01

    Earth observation driven ecosystem modeling have played a major role in estimation of carbon budget components such as gross primary productivity (GPP) and net primary production (NPP) over terrestrial ecosystems, including agriculture. The present study therefore evaluate satellite-driven vegetation photosynthesis (VPM) model for GPP estimation over agro-ecosystems in India by using time series of the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) from SPOT-VEGETATION, cloud cover observation from MODIS, coarse-grid C3/C4 crop fraction and decadal grided databases of maximum and minimum temperatures. Parameterization of VPM parameters e.g. maximum light use efficiency (ɛ*) and Tscalar was done based on eddy-covariance measurements and literature survey. Incorporation of C3/C4 crop fraction is a modification to commonly used constant maximum LUE. Modeling results from VPM captured very well the geographical pattern of GPP and NPP over cropland in India. Well managed agro-ecosystems in Trans-Gangetic and upper Indo-Gangetic plains had the highest magnitude of GPP with peak GPP during kharif occurs in sugarcane-wheat system (western UP) and it occurs in rice-wheat system (Punjab) during Rabi season. Overall, croplands in these plains had more annual GPP (> 1000 g C m-2) and NPP (> 600 g C m-2) due to input-intensive cultivation. Desertic tracts of western Rajasthan showed the least GPP and NPP values. Country-level contribution of croplands to national GPP and NPP amounts to1.34 Pg C year-1 and 0.859 Pg C year-1, respectively. Modeled estimates of cropland NPP agrees well with ground-based estimates for north-western India (R2 = 0.63 and RMSE = 108 g C m-2). Future research will focus on evaluating the VPM model with medium resolution sensors such as AWiFS and MODIS for rice-wheat system and validating with eddy-covariance measurements.

  14. Value Chain Structures that Define European Cellulosic Ethanol Production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gregg, Jay Sterling; Bolwig, Simon; Hansen, Teis

    2017-01-01

    production plants across Europe from a global value chain (GVC) perspective. We find that most CE production plants in the EU focus largely on intellectual property and are therefore only at the pilot or demonstration scale. Crescentino, the largest CE production facility in Europe, is also more interested...... petroleum markets and higher financial risks. We argue that, to increase CE production, policies should consider value chains, promote the wider bio-economy of products and focus on economies of scope. Whereas the EU and its member states have ethanol quotas and blending targets, a more effective policy......Production of cellulosic ethanol (CE) has not yet reached the scale envisaged by the literature and industry. This study explores CE production in Europe to improve understanding of the motivations and barriers associated with this situation. To do this, we conduct a case study-based analysis of CE...

  15. Do Offshore Wind Farms Influence Marine Primary Production?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tweddle, J. F.; Murray, R. B. O.; Gubbins, M.; Scott, B. E.

    2016-02-01

    Primary producers (phytoplankton) form the basis of marine food-webs, supporting production of higher trophic levels, and act as a sink of CO2. We considered the impact of proposed large scale offshore wind farms in moderately deep waters (> 45 m) off the east coast of Scotland on rates of primary production. A 2 stage modelling process was used, employing state-of-the-art 3-D hydrographic models with the ability to capture flow at the spatial resolution of 10 m combined with 1-D vertical modelling using 7 years of local forcing data. Through influencing the strength of stratification via changes in current flow, large (100 m) modelled wind turbine foundations had a significant effect on primary producers, consistently reducing total annual primary production, although within the range of natural interannual variability. The percentage reduction was largest over submarine banks less than 54 m in depth, and was outside the range of natural interannual variability. Smaller (10 m) turbine foundations had no discernible effect on total annual primary production. The results indicate that smaller foundations should be favored as a mitigation measure, in terms of effects on primary production, and this type of analysis should be considered within sectoral planning and licensing processes for future renewable energy developments.

  16. Production and Utilization of Core-Textbooks in Primary School ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Production and Utilization of Core-Textbooks in Primary School System: Impact of Authors and Publishers. ... These stakeholders have specific roles to play and cannot operate in isolation. The study, therefore investigated the influence of authorship and publishers on core textbook production and utilisation in Oyo State ...

  17. MODIS-derived terrestrial primary production [chapter 28

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maosheng Zhao; Steven Running; Faith Ann Heinsch; Ramakrishna Nemani

    2011-01-01

    Temporal and spatial changes in terrestrial biological productivity have a large impact on humankind because terrestrial ecosystems not only create environments suitable for human habitation, but also provide materials essential for survival, such as food, fiber and fuel. A recent study estimated that consumption of terrestrial net primary production (NPP; a list of...

  18. Physical control of primary productivity on a seasonal scale in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Keywords. Primary production; upwelling; winter cooling; Ekman-pumping, nutrient transport; Arabian Sea ... on the other hand, is driven by advection from the Somalia upwelling. Surface cooling and convection resulting from reduced solar radiation and increased evaporation make the northern region productive in winter.

  19. Primary productivity in nearshore waters of Thal, Maharashtra coast

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Varshney, P.K.; Nair, V.R.; Abidi, S.A.H.

    Primary productivity off Thal, Maharashtra, India was evaluated at 3 stations during Feb. 1980 to Jan. 1981. The area was quite turbid and the euphotic zone never exceeded 2.5 m. Column production ranged from 0.69 to 605.21 mg C.m/2.d/2 (av. 78.2 mg...

  20. Recent Primary Production and Small Phytoplankton Contribution in the Yellow Sea during the Summer in 2016

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Hyo Keun; Kang, Jae Jung; Lee, Jae Hyung; Kim, Myungjoon; Ahn, So Hyun; Jeong, Jin-Yong; Yun, Mi Sun; Han, In-Seong; Lee, Sang Heon

    2018-05-01

    The high nutrient concentration associated with the mixing dynamics of two warm and cold water masses supports high primary production in the Yellow Sea. Although various environmental changes have been reported, no recent information on small phytoplankton contribution to the total primary production as an important indicator for marine ecosystem changes is currently available in the Yellow Sea. The major objective of this study is to determine the small (values decades ago. The higher contributions of small phytoplankton to the total chlorophyll a concentration and primary production might be caused by P-limited conditions and this resulted in lower chlorophyll a concentration and total primary production in this study compared to previous studies.

  1. VALUE STREAM MAPPING AND ITS SIGNIFICANCE IN THE PRODUCTION PROCESS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Onofrejova

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Monitoring of flows (material, information, personal, energy, financial, etc. in the production process is always inevitable approach while searching for improvements. There are, radical improvements known as innovations, and continuous improvement established by KAIZEN principles and its useful methods. Both approaches focus on processes that add value, and minimise or eliminate those without added value. The main target of this paper is to analyse the Value stream mapping approach and its benefit to the practical world.

  2. The management of production value stream factors in a foundry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Borkowski

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Connection of two value streams: production and human resources were proposed as a new approach to the production process. To assess the factors of production value streams the elements of the top of the Toyota's house as well as fourth and sixth Toyota's managing principles were used. On the basis of the feedback from respondents –the foundry workers, there can be determined the validity of series of decisive factors' importance that equalizes the work load and requires the standardization.

  3. Cost of product functions using analysis of value

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luminita Parv

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The value of use is a specific notion but of a great generality that makes the product be regarded as a complex system that transforms itself in time, thus undergoing evolution. Therefore, the product is important not in itself, but for the sake of the requirements it satisfies and for the functions it provides. In the analysis of value there are connections of a technical nature that implicitly lead to connections of an economic nature. Thus, the method of the ”analysis of value” will actually examine the cost of product functions, the aim of the method being the balance of functions costs on the basis of their importance for the product. Identifying the functions represents one of the important stages of the analysis of value. The difficulty in fixing the functions derives from the fact that there are not any rules clear enough for this activity, but only principles

  4. Economic values of pork production related traits in Finland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. SERENIUS

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the present study was to estimate economic values for sow efficiency and meat production traits in the Finnish pork production system including the consideration for subsidies. Economic values were estimated by developing a bio-economic model that describes the Finnish production system. Genetic improvement estimates for meat production traits were also developed in order to evaluate how much genetic gain is reduced due to selection for meat quality. Results showed that the highest economic values, when expressed in genetic standard deviations, were obtained for total number of piglets born (€2.07 per piglet, feed conversion ratio (€2.07 per feed unit per kg, and lean meat percentage (€1.69 per %. Economic values for litter size, piglet mortality, sows length of productive life, and lean meat percentage increased when subsidies were not accounted for in the bio-economic model. Results show further that meat quality should have 15–20 percent weight in the Finnish production trait index in order to prevent its deterioration. When the selection weights are 15–20% for meat quality, the expected loss in genetic gain is approximately 3 percent for other production traits when compared to selection indices where meat quality traits are not included.;

  5. The Relationship between the Values of Primary School and Music Teacher Candidates and Their Cheating Attitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saracaloglu, Asuman Seda; Gerçeker, Ceren Saygi; Aladag, Soner

    2018-01-01

    The aim of this research is to examine the relationship between the values of primary and music teacher candidates and their cheating attitudes in terms of different variables. The study group of the research is composed of 249 students who are studying at the Departments of Primary School Teaching and Music Education at Adnan Menderes University…

  6. Net present value analysis of the economic production quantity

    OpenAIRE

    Disney, Stephen Michael; Warburton, R. D. H.; Zhong, Q. C.

    2013-01-01

    Using Laplace transforms we extend the economic production quantity (EPQ) model by analysing cash flows from a net present value (NPV) viewpoint. We obtain an exact expression for the present value of the cash flows in the EPQ problem. From this, we are able to derive the optimal batch size. We obtain insights into the monotonicity and convexity of the present value of each of the cash flows, and show that there is a unique minimum in the present value of the sum of the cash flows in the exte...

  7. HANPP Collection: Human Appropriation of Net Primary Productivity (HANPP) by Country and Product

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Human Appropriation of Net Primary Productivity (HANPP) by Country and Product portion of the HANPP Collection contains tabular data on carbon-equivalents of...

  8. Continuous downstream processing for high value biological products: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zydney, Andrew L

    2016-03-01

    There is growing interest in the possibility of developing truly continuous processes for the large-scale production of high value biological products. Continuous processing has the potential to provide significant reductions in cost and facility size while improving product quality and facilitating the design of flexible multi-product manufacturing facilities. This paper reviews the current state-of-the-art in separations technology suitable for continuous downstream bioprocessing, focusing on unit operations that would be most appropriate for the production of secreted proteins like monoclonal antibodies. This includes cell separation/recycle from the perfusion bioreactor, initial product recovery (capture), product purification (polishing), and formulation. Of particular importance are the available options, and alternatives, for continuous chromatographic separations. Although there are still significant challenges in developing integrated continuous bioprocesses, recent technological advances have provided process developers with a number of attractive options for development of truly continuous bioprocessing operations. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. The 2010 spring drought reduced primary productivity in southwestern China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Li; Li Jing; Xiao Jingfeng; Wang Kun; Lei Liping; Guo Huadong

    2012-01-01

    Many parts of the world experience frequent and severe droughts. Summer drought can significantly reduce primary productivity and carbon sequestration capacity. The impacts of spring droughts, however, have received much less attention. A severe and sustained spring drought occurred in southwestern China in 2010. Here we examine the influence of this spring drought on the primary productivity of terrestrial ecosystems using data on climate, vegetation greenness and productivity. We first assess the spatial extent, duration and severity of the drought using precipitation data and the Palmer drought severity index. We then examine the impacts of the drought on terrestrial ecosystems using satellite data for the period 2000–2010. Our results show that the spring drought substantially reduced the enhanced vegetation index (EVI) and gross primary productivity (GPP) during spring 2010 (March–May). Both EVI and GPP also substantially declined in the summer and did not fully recover from the drought stress until August. The drought reduced regional annual GPP and net primary productivity (NPP) in 2010 by 65 and 46 Tg C yr −1 , respectively. Both annual GPP and NPP in 2010 were the lowest over the period 2000–2010. The negative effects of the drought on annual primary productivity were partly offset by the remarkably high productivity in August and September caused by the exceptionally wet conditions in late summer and early fall and the farming practices adopted to mitigate drought effects. Our results show that, like summer droughts, spring droughts can also have significant impacts on vegetation productivity and terrestrial carbon cycling. (letter)

  10. Benthic primary production and mineralization in a High Arctic Fjord

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Attard, Karl M.; Hancke, Kasper; Sejr, Mikael K.

    2016-01-01

    Coastal and shelf systems likely exert major influence on Arctic Ocean functioning, yet key ecosystem processes remain poorly quantified. We employed the aquatic eddy covariance (AEC) oxygen (O2) flux method to estimate benthic primary production and mineralization in a High Arctic Greenland fjord....... Seabed gross primary production (GPP) within the 40 m deep photic zone was highest at 10 m (29 mmol O2 m−2 d−1) and decreased to 5 mmol O2 m−2 d−1 at 40 m, while nighttime community respiration (CR) ranged from 11 to 25 mmol O2m−2 d−1. CR decreased to ~2.5 mmol O2m−2 d−1 at 80 m and remained constant...... with further depth. Fauna activity accounted for ~50% of the CR at depths ≤60 m but was primary production...

  11. Measuring the value of older people's production: a diary study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sahlen Klas-Göran

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The productive capacity of retired people is usually not valued. However, some retirees produce much more than we might expect. This diary-based study identifies the activities of older people, and suggests some value mechanisms. One question raised is whether it is possible to scale up this diary study into a larger representative study. Methods Diaries kept for one week were collected among 23 older people in the north of Sweden. The texts were analysed with a grounded theory approach; an interplay between ideas and empirical data. Results Some productive activities of older people must be valued as the opportunity cost of time or according to the market value, and others must be valued with the replacement cost. In order to make the choice between these methods, it is important to consider the societal entitlement. When there is no societal entitlement, the first or second method must be used; and when it exists, the third must be used. Conclusions An explicit investigation of the content of the entitlement is needed to justify the choice of valuation method for each activity. In a questionnaire addressing older people's production, each question must be adjusted to the type of production. In order to fully understand this production, it is important to consider the degree of free choice to conduct an activity, as well as health-related quality of life.

  12. Primary production in a shallow water lake with special reference to a reed swamp

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andersen, F.Oe.

    1976-01-01

    Phytoplankton gross primary production ( 14 C method) in the shallow, eutrophic Danish Lake Arresoe in 1973 was 980 g C m -2 . Calculated net primary production was near zero. Macrophyte net primary production was measured by harvesting the maximum biomass, and above ground values were between 420 and 1325 g ash free dry wt m -2 , while below ground values were between 2480 and 8570 g ash free dry wt m -2 . The reed swamps were mapped on aerial photographs, and the composition of the macrophyte vegetation was determined. A comparison of macrophyte vegetation in 1944 and 1972 showed a reduction in species diversity, especially of submerged species. The seasonal variations in physical and chemical data indicated strong eutrophication in Arresoe. (author)

  13. ADDED VALUE AS EFFICIENCY CRITERION FOR INDUSTRIAL PRODUCTION PROCESS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. M. Korotkevich

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Literary analysis has shown that the majority of researchers are using classical efficiency criteria for construction of an optimization model for production process: profit maximization; cost minimization; maximization of commercial product output; minimization of back-log for product demand; minimization of total time consumption due to production change. The paper proposes to use an index of added value as an efficiency criterion because it combines economic and social interests of all main interested subjects of the business activity: national government, property owners, employees, investors. The following types of added value have been considered in the paper: joint-stock, market, monetary, economic, notional (gross, net, real. The paper makes suggestion to use an index of real value added as an efficiency criterion. Such approach permits to bring notional added value in comparable variant because added value can be increased not only due to efficiency improvement of enterprise activity but also due to environmental factors – excess in rate of export price increases over rate of import growth. An analysis of methods for calculation of real value added has been made on a country-by-country basis (extrapolation, simple and double deflation. A method of double deflation has been selected on the basis of the executed analysis and it is counted according to the Laspeyires, Paasche, Fischer indices. A conclusion has been made that the used expressions do not take into account fully economic peculiarities of the Republic of Belarus: they are considered as inappropriate in the case when product cost is differentiated according to marketing outlets; they do not take account of difference in rate of several currencies and such approach is reflected in export price of a released product and import price for raw material, supplies and component parts. Taking this into consideration expressions for calculation of real value added have been specified

  14. Clinical productivity of primary care nurse practitioners in ambulatory settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Ying; Tuttle, Jane

    Nurse practitioners are increasingly being integrated into primary care delivery to help meet the growing demand for primary care. It is therefore important to understand nurse practitioners' productivity in primary care practice. We examined nurse practitioners' clinical productivity in regard to number of patients seen per week, whether they had a patient panel, and patient panel size. We further investigated practice characteristics associated with their clinical productivity. We conducted cross-sectional analysis of the 2012 National Sample Survey of Nurse Practitioners. The sample included full-time primary care nurse practitioners in ambulatory settings. Multivariable survey regression analyses were performed to examine the relationship between practice characteristics and nurse practitioners' clinical productivity. Primary care nurse practitioners in ambulatory settings saw an average of 80 patients per week (95% confidence interval [CI]: 79-82), and 64% of them had their own patient panel. The average patient panel size was 567 (95% CI: 522-612). Nurse practitioners who had their own patient panel spent a similar percent of time on patient care and documentation as those who did not. However, those with a patient panel were more likely to provide a range of clinical services to most patients. Nurse practitioners' clinical productivity was associated with several modifiable practice characteristics such as practice autonomy and billing and payment policies. The estimated number of patients seen in a typical week by nurse practitioners is comparable to that by primary care physicians reported in the literature. However, they had a significantly smaller patient panel. Nurse practitioners' clinical productivity can be further improved. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Radionuclide transfer to animal products: revised recommended transfer coefficient values

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howard, B.J.; Beresford, N.A.; Barnett, C.L.; Fesenko, S.

    2009-01-01

    A compilation has been undertaken of data which can be used to derive animal product transfer coefficients for radionuclides, including an extensive review of Russian language information. The resultant database has been used to provide recommended transfer coefficient values for a range of radionuclides to (i) cow, sheep and goat milk, (ii) meat (muscle) of cattle, sheep, goats, pigs and poultry and (iii) eggs. The values are used in a new IAEA handbook on transfer parameters which replaces that referred to as 'TRS 364'. The paper outlines the approaches and procedures used to identify and collate data, and assumptions used. There are notable differences between the TRS 364 'expected' values and the recommended values in the revised Handbook from the new database. Of the recommended values, three milk values are at least an order of magnitude higher than the TRS 364 values (Cr, Pu (cow) Pu (sheep)) and one milk value is lower (Ni (cow)). For meat, four values (Am, Cd, Sb (beef) I (pork)) are at least an order of magnitude higher than the TRS 364 values and eight values are at least an order of magnitude lower (Ru, Pu (beef), Ru, Sr, Zn (sheep), Ru, Sr (pork), Mn (poultry)). Many data gaps remain

  16. Radionuclide transfer to animal products: revised recommended transfer coefficient values

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Howard, B.J. [Centre for Ecology and Hydrology, Lancaster Environment Centre, Library Avenue, Bailrigg, Lancaster LAI 4AP (United Kingdom)], E-mail: bjho@ceh.ac.uk; Beresford, N.A.; Barnett, C.L. [Centre for Ecology and Hydrology, Lancaster Environment Centre, Library Avenue, Bailrigg, Lancaster LAI 4AP (United Kingdom); Fesenko, S. [International Atomic Energy Agency, 1400 Vienna (Austria)

    2009-03-15

    A compilation has been undertaken of data which can be used to derive animal product transfer coefficients for radionuclides, including an extensive review of Russian language information. The resultant database has been used to provide recommended transfer coefficient values for a range of radionuclides to (i) cow, sheep and goat milk, (ii) meat (muscle) of cattle, sheep, goats, pigs and poultry and (iii) eggs. The values are used in a new IAEA handbook on transfer parameters which replaces that referred to as 'TRS 364'. The paper outlines the approaches and procedures used to identify and collate data, and assumptions used. There are notable differences between the TRS 364 'expected' values and the recommended values in the revised Handbook from the new database. Of the recommended values, three milk values are at least an order of magnitude higher than the TRS 364 values (Cr, Pu (cow) Pu (sheep)) and one milk value is lower (Ni (cow)). For meat, four values (Am, Cd, Sb (beef) I (pork)) are at least an order of magnitude higher than the TRS 364 values and eight values are at least an order of magnitude lower (Ru, Pu (beef), Ru, Sr, Zn (sheep), Ru, Sr (pork), Mn (poultry)). Many data gaps remain.

  17. Wicked problems: a value chain approach from Vietnam's dairy product.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoi, Nguyen Viet

    2013-12-01

    In the past few years, dairy industry has become one of the fastest growing sectors in the packaged food industry of Vietnam. However, the value-added creation among different activities in the value chain of Vietnam dairy sector is distributed unequally. In the production activities, the dairy farmers gain low value-added rate due to high input cost. Whereas the processing activities, which managed by big companies, generates high profitability and Vietnamese consumers seem to have few choices due to the lack of dairy companies in the market. These wicked problems caused an unsustainable development to the dairy value chain of Vietnam. This paper, therefore, will map and analyze the value chain of the dairy industry in Vietnam. It will also assess the value created in each activity in order to imply solutions for a sustainable development of Vietnam's dairy industry. M10, M11.

  18. Waste valorization by biotechnological conversion into added value products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liguori, Rossana; Amore, Antonella; Faraco, Vincenza

    2013-07-01

    Fossil fuel reserves depletion, global warming, unrelenting population growth, and costly and problematic waste recycling call for renewable resources of energy and consumer products. As an alternative to the 100 % oil economy, production processes based on biomass can be developed. Huge amounts of lignocellulosic wastes are yearly produced all around the world. They include agricultural residues, food farming wastes, "green-grocer's wastes," tree pruning residues, and organic and paper fraction of urban solid wastes. The common ways currently adopted for disposal of these wastes present environmental and economic disadvantages. As an alternative, processes for adding value to wastes producing high added products should be developed, that is the upgrading concept: adding value to wastes by production of a product with desired reproducible properties, having economic and ecological advantages. A wide range of high added value products, such as enzymes, biofuels, organic acids, biopolymers, bioelectricity, and molecules for food and pharmaceutical industries, can be obtained by upgrading solid wastes. The most recent advancements of their production by biotechnological processes are overviewed in this manuscript.

  19. Values and public acceptability dimensions of sustainable egg production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, P B; Appleby, M; Busch, L; Kalof, L; Miele, M; Norwood, B F; Pajor, E

    2011-09-01

    The attributes of egg production that elicit values-based responses include the price and availability of eggs, environmental impacts, food safety or health concerns, and animal welfare. Different social groups have distinct interests regarding the sustainability of egg production that reflect these diverse values. Current scientifically based knowledge about how values and attitudes in these groups can be characterized is uneven and must be derived from studies conducted at varying times and using incomplete study methods. In general, some producer and consumer interests are translated through markets and are mediated by market mechanisms, whereas others are poorly reflected by economic behavior. An array of survey and focus group research has been performed to elicit consumer and activist beliefs about performance goals they would expect from an egg production system. These studies provide evidence that consumers' market behavior may be at odds with their ethical and political beliefs about performance goals.

  20. How much primary coastal temperate rain forest should society retain? Carbon uptake, recreation and other values

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kooten, van G.C.; Bulte, E.H.

    2000-01-01

    In this study, average and marginal approaches for determining optimal preservation of primary forests on British Columbia's coast are compared. When the market values from timber, mushrooms, etc., and nonmarket benefits (e.g., carbon sink, preservation values) of preserving old-growth forests are

  1. Shaping Estonian Primary School Pupils' Values by Using Bullying-Prevention Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piht, Sirje; Talts, Leida; Nigulas, Sigrit

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to identify to what extent using the methodology of the programme "Bullying-free school", initiated in the Kingdom of Denmark in 2007 and implemented in schools in Estonia since 2013, has supported the development of ethical values in primary school pupils. The methodology focuses on four value attitudes:…

  2. Medical Students' Personal Qualities and Values as Correlates of Primary Care Interest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borges, Nicole J.; Jones, Bonnie J.

    2004-01-01

    Medical schools must use selection methods that validly measure applicants' noncognitive qualities, but primary-care (PC) schools have a particular need. This study correlated entering students' personality and values scores with their professed interest in PC. 93 medical students completed instruments assessing personality (16PF & PSP), values,…

  3. Investigation of the Values Found in Primary Education Science and Technology Textbooks in Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benzer, Elif

    2013-01-01

    In this study, the value types of 6, 7 and 8 class text books which take place in the primary education science and technology education program, have been targeted for investigation for the present rate of these values in different textbooks, and, whether they changed in accordance with class variables (class, subject content, and divisions of…

  4. Value Forming Education of Prospective Primary School Teachers in Kazakhstan and Germany

    Science.gov (United States)

    Utyupova, Gulnara Ye.; Baiseitova, Zhanar B.; Mukhamadiyeva, Aizhan A.

    2016-01-01

    Value education is one of the most effective forms of education. However, this system is applied only in developed countries due to a number of factors. The purpose of this study is to develop a method for training primary school teachers capable of implementing the value education system in developing countries. Teachers not only conveys…

  5. Anthropogenic climate change has altered primary productivity in Lake Superior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Beirne, M D; Werne, J P; Hecky, R E; Johnson, T C; Katsev, S; Reavie, E D

    2017-06-09

    Anthropogenic climate change has the potential to alter many facets of Earth's freshwater resources, especially lacustrine ecosystems. The effects of anthropogenic changes in Lake Superior, which is Earth's largest freshwater lake by area, are not well documented (spatially or temporally) and predicted future states in response to climate change vary. Here we show that Lake Superior experienced a slow, steady increase in production throughout the Holocene using (paleo)productivity proxies in lacustrine sediments to reconstruct past changes in primary production. Furthermore, data from the last century indicate a rapid increase in primary production, which we attribute to increasing surface water temperatures and longer seasonal stratification related to longer ice-free periods in Lake Superior due to anthropogenic climate warming. These observations demonstrate that anthropogenic effects have become a prominent influence on one of Earth's largest, most pristine lacustrine ecosystems.

  6. UV radiation and natural fluorescence linked primary production in Antarctic waters

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    LokaBharathi, P.A.; KrishnaKumari, L.; Bhattathiri, P.M.A.; Chandramohan, D.

    Primary productivity and chlorophyll values have been measured using an underwater profiling radiometer for the first time in the waters around Indian Antarctic Station (70°46'S & 11°44'E) in the summer of 1994. The profiles include natural...

  7. Value Chain Structures that Define European Cellulosic Ethanol Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jay Sterling Gregg

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Production of cellulosic ethanol (CE has not yet reached the scale envisaged by the literature and industry. This study explores CE production in Europe to improve understanding of the motivations and barriers associated with this situation. To do this, we conduct a case study-based analysis of CE production plants across Europe from a global value chain (GVC perspective. We find that most CE production plants in the EU focus largely on intellectual property and are therefore only at the pilot or demonstration scale. Crescentino, the largest CE production facility in Europe, is also more interested in technology licensing than producing ethanol. Demonstration-scale plants tend to have a larger variety of feedstocks, whereas forestry-based plants have more diversity of outputs. As scale increases, the diversity of feedstocks and outputs diminishes, and firms struggle with feedstock provisioning, global petroleum markets and higher financial risks. We argue that, to increase CE production, policies should consider value chains, promote the wider bio-economy of products and focus on economies of scope. Whereas the EU and its member states have ethanol quotas and blending targets, a more effective policy would be to seek to reduce the risks involved in financing capital projects, secure feedstock provisioning and support a diversity of end products.

  8. Seasonality of primary and secondary production in an Arctic river

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kendrick, M.; Huryn, A.; Deegan, L.

    2011-12-01

    Rivers and streams that freeze solid for 8-9 months each year provide excellent examples of the extreme seasonality of arctic habitats. The communities of organisms inhabiting these rivers must complete growth and development during summer, resulting in a rapid ramp-up and down of production over the short ice-free period. The effects of recent shifts in the timing of the spring thaw and autumn freeze-up on the duration and pattern of the period of active production are poorly understood. We are currently investigating: 1) the response of the biotic community of the Kuparuk River (Arctic Alaska) to shifts in the seasonality of the ice-free period, and 2) the community response to increases in phosphorous (P) supply anticipated as the volume of the permafrost active-layer increases in response to climate warming. Here algal production supports a 2-tier web of consumers. We tracked primary and secondary production from the spring thaw through mid-August in a reference reach and one receiving low-level P fertilization. Gross primary production/community respiration (GPP/R) ratios for both reaches were increasing through mid-July, with higher GPP/R in response to the P addition. Understanding the degree of synchrony between primary and secondary production in this Arctic river system will enhance further understanding of how shifts in seasonality affect trophic dynamics.

  9. Decadal Changes in Global Ocean Annual Primary Production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregg, Watson; Conkright, Margarita E.; Behrenfeld, Michael J.; Ginoux, Paul; Casey, Nancy W.; Koblinsky, Chester J. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-View Sensor (SeaWiFS) has produced the first multi-year time series of global ocean chlorophyll observations since the demise of the Coastal Zone Color Scanner (CZCS) in 1986. Global observations from 1997-present from SeaWiFS combined with observations from 1979-1986 from the CZCS should in principle provide an opportunity to observe decadal changes in global ocean annual primary production, since chlorophyll is the primary driver for estimates of primary production. However, incompatibilities between algorithms have so far precluded quantitative analysis. We have developed and applied compatible processing methods for the CZCS, using modern advances in atmospheric correction and consistent bio-optical algorithms to advance the CZCS archive to comparable quality with SeaWiFS. We applied blending methodologies, where in situ data observations are incorporated into the CZCS and SeaWiFS data records, to provide improvement of the residuals. These re-analyzed, blended data records provide maximum compatibility and permit, for the first time, a quantitative analysis of the changes in global ocean primary production in the early-to-mid 1980's and the present, using synoptic satellite observations. An intercomparison of the global and regional primary production from these blended satellite observations is important to understand global climate change and the effects on ocean biota. Photosynthesis by chlorophyll-containing phytoplankton is responsible for biotic uptake of carbon in the oceans and potentially ultimately from the atmosphere. Global ocean annual primary decreased from the CZCS record to SeaWiFS, by nearly 6% from the early 1980s to the present. Annual primary production in the high latitudes was responsible for most of the decadal change. Conversely, primary production in the low latitudes generally increased, with the exception of the tropical Pacific. The differences and similarities of the two data records provide evidence

  10. Nitrogenous nutrients and primary production in a tropical oceanic environment

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Wafar, M.V.M.; Wafar, S.; Devassy, V.P.

    Measurements of the concentrations of nitrogenous nutrients and primary production were made at 10 stations along 8 degrees N and 10 degrees N in the tropical oceanic Lakshadweep waters Inorganic nitrogen (NO3, NO2 and NH4) accounted for less than...

  11. Anoxic and oxic phototrophic primary production during the Precambrian

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ebey-Honeycutt, Christina Marie; Bjerrum, Christian J.; Canfield, Donald Eugene

    2009-01-01

    of the mixed layer often lies above the base of the photic zone . Thus, an ecosystem model for the Precambrian should reflect the net primary production (NPP) of oxygenic phototrophs in the mixed layer and anoxygenic phototrophs below (NPPox and NPPred, respectively). Satelite data and a vertically generalized...

  12. Date fruit: chemical composition, nutritional and medicinal values, products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Zhen-Xing; Shi, Lu-E; Aleid, Salah M

    2013-08-15

    Date fruit has served as a staple food in the Arab world for centuries. Worldwide production of date fruit has increased almost threefold over the last 40 years, reaching 7.68 million tons in 2010. Date fruit can provide many essential nutrients and potential health benefits to the consumer. Date fruit goes through four ripening stages named kimri, khalal, rutab and tamer. The main chemical components of date fruit include carbohydrates, dietary fibre, enzymes, protein, fat, minerals, vitamins, phenolic acids and carotenoids. The chemical composition of date fruit varies according to ripening stage, cultivar, growing environment, postharvest conditions, etc. The nutritional and medicinal activities of date fruit are related to its chemical composition. Many studies have shown that date fruit has antioxidant, antimutagenic, anti-inflammatory, gastroprotective, hepatoprotective, nephroprotective, anticancer and immunostimulant activities. Various date fruit-based products such as date syrup, date paste, date juice and their derived products are available. Date by-products can be used as raw materials for the production of value-added products such as organic acids, exopolysaccharides, antibiotics, date-flavoured probiotic-fermented dairy produce, bakery yeasts, etc. In this paper the chemical composition and nutritional and medicinal values of date fruit as well as date fruit-based products are reviewed. © 2013 Society of Chemical Industry.

  13. Variation of productivity and nutritive values of oat (Avena sativa ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    GREGO

    2007-03-05

    Mar 5, 2007 ... location on productivity and nutritive values of oat are still scarce. According to ... water according to their supply and requirement balance. All the .... progressively increased with the growing stages (Table. 2). ... at its heading and blooming, the middle time of its life. Table 4 .... Work done by Deinum et al.

  14. The Milk and Milk Products Value Chain in Ethiopia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Drost (Sarah); J.C.A.C. van Wijk (Jeroen)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractThis report investigates the dynamics of a multi-stakeholder platform (named: Coordination Group, or CG) for stakeholders of the milk and milk products value chains in Ethiopia. The CG was initiated by the Dutch development organisation SNV in 2005 as part of a broader programme to

  15. Raman Lidar Profiles–Temperature (RLPROFTEMP) Value-Added Product

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Newsom, RK; Sivaraman, C; McFarlane, SA

    2012-10-31

    The purpose of this document is to describe the Raman Lidar Profiles–Temperature (RLPROFTEMP) value-added product (VAP) and the procedures used to derive atmospheric temperature profiles from the raw RL measurements. Sections 2 and 4 describe the input and output variables, respectively. Section 3 discusses the theory behind the measurement and the details of the algorithm, including calibration and overlap correction.

  16. Processing biogas planet digestates into value-added products -BIOVIRTA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paavola, T.; Rintala, J. (MTT Agrifood Research Finland, Jokioinen (Finland)), Email: teija.paavola@mtt.fi; Sahltroem, L.; Maunuksela, L.; Torniainen, M. (Finnish Food Safety Authority, EVIRA, Helsinki (Finland)), Email: leena.sahlstrom@evira.fi; Kaparaju, P.; Rintala, J. (Univ. of Jyvaeskylae (Finland)), Email: jukka.rintala@jyu.fi; Vikman, M.; Kapanen, A. (VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, Espoo (Finland)), Email: minna.vikman@vtt.fi

    2010-10-15

    The objective of BIOVIRTA project is to develop technologies and practices with which digestates, originating from anaerobic digestion of different organic wastes and by-products, can be refined to value-added and safe products for various end-uses. It is expected that the operational preconditions for biogas plants will be significantly enhanced when the end-products are proven safe and applicable. Selection of the raw materials for anaerobic codigestion is the main operational strategy that could influence the nutrient content in the digestate. This has been clearly established in the laboratory and full-scale studies with various digestates originating from different raw materials, e.g. rendering and slaughterhouse byproducts. The nutrient content in the digestate also affects the opportunities to produce refined digestate products. In this project, the possibilities for several processing technologies, e.g. mechanical separation and stripping, have been intensively evaluated for the production of different digestate products. Their mass balances have also been estimated. The feasibility for the use of the digestate products has been assessed based on their chemical and hygienic quality and for various end-uses, including as organic fertiliser and/or soil improver in crop production. The preliminary results of these field-experiments showed that the yield of barley fertilised with digestate products was comparable to inorganic fertilisers. (orig.)

  17. Fission product behaviour in the primary circuit of an HTR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Decken, C.B. von der; Iniotakis, N.

    1981-01-01

    The knowledge of fission product behaviour in the primary circuit of a High Temperature Reactor (HTR) is an essential requirement for the estimations of the availability of the reactor plant in normal operation, of the hazards to personnel during inspection and repair and of the potential danger to the environment from severe accidents. On the basis of the theoretical and experimental results obtained at the ''Institute for Reactor Components'' of the KFA Juelich /1/,/2/ the transport- and deposition behaviour of the fission- and activation products in the primary circuit of the PNP-500 reference plant has been investigated thoroughly. Special work had been done to quantify the uncertainties of the investigations and to calculate or estimate the dose rate level at different components of the primary cooling circuit. The contamination and the dose rate level in the inspection gap in the reactor pressure vessel is discussed in detail. For these investigations in particular the surface structure and the composition of the material, the chemical state of the fission products in the cooling gas, the composition of the cooling gas and the influence of dust on the transport- and deposition behaviour of the fission products have been taken into account. The investigations have been limited to the nuclides Ag-110m; Cs-134 and Cs-137

  18. Primary production in the Delta: Then and now

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cloern, James E.; Robinson, April; Richey, Amy; Grenier, Letitia; Grossinger, Robin; Boyer, Katharyn E.; Burau, Jon; Canuel, Elizabeth A.; DeGeorge, John F.; Drexler, Judith Z.; Enright, Chris; Howe, Emily R.; Kneib, Ronald; Mueller-Solger, Anke; Naiman, Robert J.; Pinckney, James L.; Safran, Samuel M.; Schoellhamer, David H.; Simenstad, Charles A.

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the role of restoration in the recovery of the Delta ecosystem, we need to have clear targets and performance measures that directly assess ecosystem function. Primary production is a crucial ecosystem process, which directly limits the quality and quantity of food available for secondary consumers such as invertebrates and fish. The Delta has a low rate of primary production, but it is unclear whether this was always the case. Recent analyses from the Historical Ecology Team and Delta Landscapes Project provide quantitative comparisons of the areal extent of 14 habitat types in the modern Delta versus the historical Delta (pre-1850). Here we describe an approach for using these metrics of land use change to: (1) produce the first quantitative estimates of how Delta primary production and the relative contributions from five different producer groups have been altered by large-scale drainage and conversion to agriculture; (2) convert these production estimates into a common currency so the contributions of each producer group reflect their food quality and efficiency of transfer to consumers; and (3) use simple models to discover how tidal exchange between marshes and open water influences primary production and its consumption. Application of this approach could inform Delta management in two ways. First, it would provide a quantitative estimate of how large-scale conversion to agriculture has altered the Delta's capacity to produce food for native biota. Second, it would provide restoration practitioners with a new approach—based on ecosystem function—to evaluate the success of restoration projects and gauge the trajectory of ecological recovery in the Delta region.

  19. Primary Production in the Delta: Then and Now

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James E. Cloern

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.15447/sfews.2016v14iss3art1To evaluate the role of restoration in the recovery of the Delta ecosystem, we need to have clear targets and performance measures that directly assess ecosystem function. Primary production is a crucial ecosystem process, which directly limits the quality and quantity of food available for secondary consumers such as invertebrates and fish. The Delta has a low rate of primary production, but it is unclear whether this was always the case. Recent analyses from the Historical Ecology Team and Delta Landscapes Project provide quantitative comparisons of the areal extent of 14 habitat types in the modern Delta versus the historical Delta (pre-1850. Here we describe an approach for using these metrics of land use change to: (1 produce the first quantitative estimates of how Delta primary production and the relative contributions from five different producer groups have been altered by large-scale drainage and conversion to agriculture; (2 convert these production estimates into a common currency so the contributions of each producer group reflect their food quality and efficiency of transfer to consumers; and (3 use simple models to discover how tidal exchange between marshes and open water influences primary production and its consumption. Application of this approach could inform Delta management in two ways. First, it would provide a quantitative estimate of how large-scale conversion to agriculture has altered the Delta's capacity to produce food for native biota. Second, it would provide restoration practitioners with a new approach—based on ecosystem function—to evaluate the success of restoration projects and gauge the trajectory of ecological recovery in the Delta region.

  20. Singular value correlation functions for products of Wishart random matrices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akemann, Gernot; Kieburg, Mario; Wei, Lu

    2013-01-01

    We consider the product of M quadratic random matrices with complex elements and no further symmetry, where all matrix elements of each factor have a Gaussian distribution. This generalizes the classical Wishart–Laguerre Gaussian unitary ensemble with M = 1. In this paper, we first compute the joint probability distribution for the singular values of the product matrix when the matrix size N and the number M are fixed but arbitrary. This leads to a determinantal point process which can be realized in two different ways. First, it can be written as a one-matrix singular value model with a non-standard Jacobian, or second, for M ⩾ 2, as a two-matrix singular value model with a set of auxiliary singular values and a weight proportional to the Meijer G-function. For both formulations, we determine all singular value correlation functions in terms of the kernels of biorthogonal polynomials which we explicitly construct. They are given in terms of the hypergeometric and Meijer G-functions, generalizing the Laguerre polynomials for M = 1. Our investigation was motivated from applications in telecommunication of multi-layered scattering multiple-input and multiple-output channels. We present the ergodic mutual information for finite-N for such a channel model with M − 1 layers of scatterers as an example. (paper)

  1. Reserves to production ratios and present value relationships

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayhow, I. G.; Lemee, J. A.

    2000-01-01

    It is shown that reserves to production ratio, R/P, which optimizes development and maximizes present value, can be estimated using an equation containing the four variables of well initial production; rate, well costs, netback prices and discount rate. A sensitivity analysis of the optimization equation indicates that well costs and well productivity have the most influence on the optimum R/P. Improvements in technology beneficially affect well productivity and reduce costs, hence reducing capital requirements and producing an economic incentive to produce at low R/Ps. The influence of gas prices is considered less significant, but the expected increases in gas prices in the Western Canadian Sedimentary Basin will also act an an incentive to produce at low R/Ps. Recent gas discoveries in the Basin have been single well pools with high productivity and limited areal extent, which produce at low R/Ps. Continuation of this trend will cause further decrease in R/Ps. While this study assumed maximizing present value as the most likely objective, it is possible that regulators and producers have other objectives. It would be reasonable to expect that these alternative objectives will also favour producing at high rates and at low R/Ps. 2 tabs., 13 figs

  2. Estimating Next Primary Productivity using Satellite and Ancillary Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhury, B. J.

    The net primary productivity (C) or annual rate of carbon accumulation per unit ground area by terrestrial plant communities is the difference of the rate of gross photosynthesis (Ag) and autotrophic respiration (R) per unit ground area. Although available observations show that R is a large and variable fraction of Ag, viz., 0.3 to 0.7, it is generally recognized that much uncertainties exist in this fraction due to difficulties associated with the needed measurements. Additional uncertainties arise when these measurements are extrapolated to regional or global land surface using empirical equations, for example, using regression equations relating C to mean annual precipitation and air temperature. Here, a process- based approach has been taken to calculate Ag and R using satellite and ancillary data. Ag has been expressed as a product of radiation use efficiency, magnitude of intercepted photosynthetically active radiation (PAR), and normalized by stresses due to soil water shortage and air temperature away from the optimum range. A biophysical model has been used to determine the radiation use efficiency from the maximum rate of carbon assimilation by a leaf, foliage temperature, and the fraction of diffuse PAR incident on a canopy. All meteorological data (PAR, air temperature, precipitation, etc.) needed for the calculation are derived from satellite observations, while a land use, land cover data (based on satellite and ground measurements) have been used to assess the maximum rate of carbon assimilation by a leaf of varied cover type based on field measurements. R has been calculated as the sum of maintenance and growth components. The maintenance respiration of foliage and live fine roots at a standard temperature of different land cover has been determined from their nitrogen content using field and satellite measurements, while that of living fraction of woody stem (viz., sapwood) from the seasonal maximum leaf area index as determined from satellite

  3. The Fashion Retail and the value creation with sustainable products: a multiple case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eleonora Alves Baptista

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to understand how the development of sustainable products in Brazilian fashion retail businesses creates value for the companies themselves, society and the environment. A qualitative approach to multiple case study method investigates practices and processes at four companies from Rio de Janeiro State. The study collected primary information from direct observation and interviews with the firms’ directors, and secondary data from industry reports and other documents. Three overall dimensions of the study - environmental management, value creation and product development in fast fashion companies - encoded into seven categories, when considered in data crosssynthesis, elucidate the following conclusions: (1 the firms do not have economic, ethical and legal fields integrated view; (2 the companies do not believe that the fashion consumer market values environmental practices and thus not motivated to invest in practices and products; (3 a fragmented supply chain makes it difficult to control activities and appears as a major constraint to the development of sustainable products; (4 access to information on best environmental practices and tax incentives are important inductors’ mechanisms to leverage the development of sustainable products in the Brazilian fashion retail; (5 the development of strategic capabilities in pollution prevention area, management products and clean technology create value for the production chain.

  4. HANPP Collection: Human Appropriation of Net Primary Productivity (HANPP) by Country and Product

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Global Patterns in Human Appropriation of Net Primary Productivity (HANPP) portion of the HANPP Collection represents a digital map of human appropriation of net...

  5. Variation of phytoplankton biomass and primary production in Daya Bay during spring and summer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song Xingyu; Huang Liangmin; Zhang Jianlin; Huang, Xiaoping; Zhang Junbin; Yin Jianqiang; Tan Yehui; Liu Sheng

    2004-01-01

    Environmental factors, phytoplankton biomass (Chl a) and primary production of two water areas in Daya Bay (Dapeng'ao Bay and Aotou Bay) were investigated during the transition period from spring to summer. Chl a ranged from 3.20 to 13.62 and 13.43 to 26.49 mg m -3 in Dapeng'ao Bay and Aotou Bay respectively, if data obtained during red tides are excluded. Primary production varied between 239.7 and 1001.4 mgC m -2 d -1 in Dapeng'ao Bay. The regional distribution of Chl a and primary production were mostly consistent from spring to summer in both bays. Seasonal transition characters have been found in Daya Bay from spring to summer, including high values of DO, nitrate and silicate. Size structures of phytoplankton and its primary production do not change very much from spring to summer, with micro-phytoplankton dominating and contributing about 50% of the whole. In Daya Bay, phytoplankton is limited by nitrogen in spring, and by phosphate in summer. Artificial impacts are evident from high temperature effluent from nuclear power stations, aquaculture and sewage. During the investigation, a red tide occurred in Aotou Bay, with a maximum Chl a of 103.23 mg m -3 at surface and primary production of 2721.9 mgC m -2 d -1 in the red tide center. Raised water temperature and nutrient supply from land-sources help to stimulate annual red tides

  6. Heterodox surplus approach: production, prices, and value theory

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Frederic

    2011-01-01

    In this paper I argue that that there is a heterodox social surplus approach that has its own account of output-employment and prices, and its own value theory which draws upon various heterodox traditions. Starting with the Sraffian technical definition of the social surplus and then working with a Sraffa-Leontief input-output framework, the particular distinguishing feature of the heterodox approach is the role of agency in determining prices, the social surplus, and total social product a...

  7. Organic Aerosol Component (OACOMP) Value-Added Product Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fast, J; Zhang, Q; Tilp, A; Shippert, T; Parworth, C; Mei, F

    2013-08-23

    Significantly improved returns in their aerosol chemistry data can be achieved via the development of a value-added product (VAP) of deriving OA components, called Organic Aerosol Components (OACOMP). OACOMP is primarily based on multivariate analysis of the measured organic mass spectral matrix. The key outputs of OACOMP are the concentration time series and the mass spectra of OA factors that are associated with distinct sources, formation and evolution processes, and physicochemical properties.

  8. ARM Climate Research Facility Quarterly Value-Added Product Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sivaraman, Chitra

    2014-01-14

    The purpose of this report is to provide a concise status update for value-added products (VAP) implemented by the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility. The report is divided into the following sections: (1) new VAPs for which development has begun, (2) progress on existing VAPs, (3) future VAPs that have been recently approved, (4) other work that leads to a VAP, and (5) top requested VAPs from the archive.

  9. Firm Productivity, Organizational Choice and Global Value Chain

    OpenAIRE

    Anna Giunta; Domenico Scalera; Francesco Trivieri; Jeffrey B. Nugent; Mariarosaria Agostino

    2011-01-01

    Based upon insights of the global value chain literature, the aim of this paper is to investigate the impact of being a supplier firm on labour productivity. The country of analysis is Italy, historically characterized by a very strong division of labour among firms. We make use of a unique database, which collects information on several organizational, structural and performance variables of a representative sample of more than 3000 Italian manufacturing firms, spanning the period 1998-2006....

  10. Fission and corrosion products behavior in primary circuits of LMFBR's

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feuerstein, H.; Thorley, A.W.

    1987-08-01

    Most of the 20 presented papers report items belonging to more than one session. The equipment results of primary circuits of LMFBR's relative to corrosion and fission products, release and chemistry of fuel, measurement techniques and analytical procedures of sodium sampling, difficulties with radionuclides and particles, reactor experiences with EBR-II, FFTF, BR10, BOR60, BN350, BN600, JOYO, and KNK-II, DFR, PFR, RAPSODIE, PHENIX, and SUPERPHENIX, and at least the verification of codes for calculation models of radioactive products accumulation and distribution are described. All 20 papers presented at the meeting are separately indexed in the database. (DG)

  11. Variations of Terrestrial Net Primary Productivity in East Asia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fangmin Zhang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Due to the heterogeneity and complexity of terrestrial ecosystems of East Asia, a better understanding of relationships between climate change and net primary productivity (NPP distribution is important to predict future carbon dynamics. The objective of this study is to analyze the temporal-spatial patterns of NPP in East Asia (10°S - 55°N, 60 - 155°E from 1982 to 2006 using the process-based Boreal Ecosystem Productivity Simulator (BEPS model. Prior to the regional simulation, the annual simulated NPP was validated using field observed NPP demonstrating the ability of BEPS to simulate NPP in different ecosystems of East Asia.

  12. Regulation of primary productivity rate in the equatorial Pacific

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barber, R.T.; Chavez, F.P.

    1991-01-01

    Analysis of the Chl-specific rate of primary productivity (P B ) as a function of subsurface nutrient concentration at >300 equatorial stations provides an answer to the question: What processes regulate primary productivity rate in the high-nutrient, low-chlorophyll waters of the equatorial Pacific? In the western Pacific where there is a gradient in 60-m [NO 3 ] from 0 to ∼12 μM, the productivity rate is a linear function of nutrient concentration; in the eastern Pacific where the gradient is from 12 to 28 μM, the productivity rate is independent of nutrient concentration and limited to ∼36 mg C(mg Chl) -1 d -1 , or a mean euphotic zone C-specific growth rate (μ) of 0.47 d -1 . However, rates downstream of the Galapagos Islands are not limited; they are 46.4 mg C(mg Chl) -1 d -1 and μ = 0.57 d -1 , very close to the predicted nutrient-regulated rates in the absence of other limitation. This pattern of rate regulation can be accounted for by a combination of eolian Fe, subsurface nutrients, and sedimentary Fe derived from the Galapagos platform. In the low-nutrient western Pacific the eolian supply of Fe is adequate to allow productivity rate to be set by subsurface nutrient concentration. In the nutrient-rich easter equatorial region eolian Fe is inadequate to support productivity rates proportional to the higher nutrient concentrations, so in this region eolian Fe is rate limiting. Around the Galapagos Islands productivity rates reach levels consistent with nutrient concentrations; sedimentary Fe from the Galapagos platform seems adequate to support increased nutrient-regulated productivity rates in this region

  13. Regional identity can add value to agricultural products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bradley C. Christensen

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Regional identity creation is being recognized for its economic benefits and as a strategic resource for producer communities. A regional identity is not a brand; it is built through a complicated process of developing cohesion and sharing in the industry community and communicating outside the industry community to opinion-makers and consumers. The California fine wine industry has built successful regional identities and leveraged them to add value to their wines. As regional identities in the wine industry have strengthened, so has the industry, and a symbiotic relationship with other local value-added industries, such as tourism and hospitality, has emerged. Other agricultural producers can learn from the identity creation experiences in the wine industry. With the many challenges faced by California agriculture, identity formation may offer producers new ideas for adding value to their products and finding larger markets.

  14. Nutritional Value of Irradiated Animal Feed By-Products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Din Farag, M.D.H.

    1998-01-01

    Animal feed by-products, widely used in animal diets, are sources of disease organisms for animals and for human beings. Salmonella is the principal genus of concern.Radiation treatment (radicidation, radurization) is a promising method of decontamination of feed ingredients. Commercial samples of fish, meat, and blood meals were sealed by heat in polyethylene bags and irradiated at dose levels of 5.0, 10, 20 and 50 kGy. Their chemical analysis were carried out according to A. O. A.C [1] and the total protein efficiency (TPE) of the three animal feed by-products was determined according to Wood ham (2) by using one day old Dokki-4 chicks. Radiation induced an insignificant effect on the chemical constituent of meals. Also, the same trend was observed with TPE of both fish and meat meals. However, irradiation treatments improved TPE values of irradiated blood meal samples. From the results, it could be concluded that irradiation of animal feed by-products up to a dose level of 50 Gy has no adverse effects on the nutritional value of animal feed by-products

  15. Genetic value of herd life adjusted for milk production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allaire, F R; Gibson, J P

    1992-05-01

    Cow herd life adjusted for lactational milk production was investigated as a genetic trait in the breeding objective. Under a simple model, the relative economic weight of milk to adjusted herd life on a per genetic standard deviation basis was equal to CVY/dCVL where CVY and CVL are the genetic coefficients of variation of milk production and adjusted herd life, respectively, and d is the depreciation per year per cow divided by the total fixed costs per year per cow. The relative economic value of milk to adjusted herd life at the prices and parameters for North America was about 3.2. An increase of 100-kg milk was equivalent to 2.2 mo of adjusted herd life. Three to 7% lower economic gain is expected when only improved milk production is sought compared with a breeding objective that included both production and adjusted herd life for relative value changed +/- 20%. A favorable economic gain to cost ratio probably exists for herd life used as a genetic trait to supplement milk in the breeding objective. Cow survival records are inexpensive, and herd life evaluations from such records may not extend the generation interval when such an evaluation is used in bull sire selection.

  16. Value of brush cytology for dominant strictures in primary sclerosing cholangitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ponsioen, C. Y.; Vrouenraets, S. M.; van Milligen de Wit, A. W.; Sturm, P.; Tascilar, M.; Offerhaus, G. J.; Prins, M.; Huibregtse, K.; Tytgat, G. N.

    1999-01-01

    Around 10% of patients with primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) develop cholangiocarcinoma, which is cholangiographically often indistinguishable from a benign dominant stricture. The aim of the present study was to assess the value of brush cytology in discriminating between benign and malignant

  17. The value of arteriography in the differential diagnosis of primary and secondary Raynaud's syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wagner, H.H.; Alexander, K.

    1985-01-01

    Arteriograms of the hands were carried out in 348 patients. Functional and organic changes were analysed in an attempt to differentiate primary from secondary Raynaud's syndrome. The value and limitations of this technique are illustrated by a number of examples. (orig.) [de

  18. The value of local treatment in patients with primary, disseminated, multifocal Ewing sarcoma (PDMES)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haeusler, Julia; Ranft, Andreas; Boelling, Tobias; Gosheger, Georg; Braun-Munzinger, Gabriele; Vieth, Volker; Burdach, Stefan; van den Berg, Henk; Juergens, Heribert; Dirksen, Uta

    2010-01-01

    The value of local treatment in patients with primary, disseminated, multifocal Ewing sarcoma (PDMES) was investigated. We analyzed 120 patients registered into the European Ewing Tumor Working Initiative of National Groups (EURO-E.W.I.N.G. 99) trial at the trial center of Muenster from 1998 to

  19. Supplier Value of Customer-Initiated Product Development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sommer, Anita Friis; Dukovska-Popovska, Iskra; Steger-Jensen, Kenn

    2013-01-01

    Increased market demand and shortened product life cycles generate industrial customer requests for collaborative product development. Manufacture-to-stock suppliers struggle to manage the request process to obtain profitability. The purpose of this paper is to investigate if request management...... is profitable for suppliers, and to examine possible relations between profitability of requests and the requesting customer. Through a case study, request management is identified as a profitable process due to long-term accumulated profit from developed products. Request profitability is not identified...... as related to profitability or turnover of existing customers, and thus profitability of requests cannot be predicted based on these customer data. Results from a coupled interview study indicate that request management has a large potential for future exploitation, and an outline of the supplier value...

  20. Prognostic value of lymph node-to-primary tumor standardized uptake value ratio in endometrioid endometrial carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, Hyun Hoon; Kim, Jae-Weon; Park, Noh-Hyun; Song, Yong Sang [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Cancer Research Institute, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Cheon, Gi Jeong [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Cancer Research Institute, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2018-01-15

    To determine whether the relative metabolic activity of pelvic or para-aortic LN compared with that of primary tumor measured by preoperative [{sup 18}F]FDG PET/CT scan has prognostic value in patients with endometrioid endometrial carcinoma. We retrospectively reviewed patients with endometrioid endometrial carcinoma who underwent preoperative [{sup 18}F]FDG PET/CT scans. Prognostic values of PET/CT-derived metabolic variables such as maximum standardized uptake value (SUV) of the primary endometrial carcinoma (SUV{sub Tumor}) and LN (SUV{sub LN}), and the LN-to-endometrial carcinoma SUV ratio (SUV{sub LN} / SUV{sub Tumor}) were assessed. Clinico-pathological data, imaging data, and treatment results were reviewed for 107 eligible patients. Median post-surgical follow-up was 23 months (range, 6-60), and 7 (6.5%) patients experienced recurrence. Regression analysis showed that SUV{sub LN} / SUV{sub Tumor} (P < 0.001), SUV{sub LN} (P = 0.003), International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) stage (P = 0.006), and tumor grade (P = 0.011) were risk factors of recurrence. Multivariate regression analysis revealed that FIGO stage (P = 0.034) was the independent risk factor of recurrence. SUV{sub LN} / SUV{sub Tumor} showed significant correlation with FIGO stage (P < 0.001), LN metastasis (P < 0.001), lymphovascular space invasion (P < 0.001), recurrence (P = 0.001), tumor grade (P < 0.001), and deep myometrial invasion of tumor (P = 0.022). Patient groups categorized by SUV{sub LN} / SUV{sub Tumor} showed significant difference in progression-free survival (Log-rank test, P = 0.001). Preoperative SUV{sub LN} / SUV{sub Tumor} measured by [{sup 18}F]FDG PET/CT was significantly associated with recurrence, and may become a novel prognostic factor in patients with endometrioid endometrial carcinoma. (orig.)

  1. Corrosion products in the primary circuits of PWRs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Darras, R.

    1983-01-01

    The characteristics of PWR primary circuits are recalled, particularly the chemical specifications of the medium and the various materials used (austenitic steel, nickel alloys, cobalt-based alloys and zirconium alloys). The behaviour of these materials as regards general corrosion in nominal and transient conditions is then outlined briefly, special emphasis being laid on the effect of the determining parameters on the quantity of corrosion products formed. The release of the latter into the primary coolant is caused by two main processes: solubilization and erosion. Particular attention was given therefore to the laws governing the solubility of the oxides involved, especially as a function of temperature and pH. Erosion, or release in the form of solid particles, is relatively severe during transient events. As these corrosion products are then carried through all circuits, they cause deposits to form in favourable places on the walls as a result either of precipitation of soluble species or of sedimentation followed by consolidation of suspended particles. The presence of corrosion products in the primary circuits creates a particular impact since they become radioactive as they pass through the core and especially when they remain in it in the form of deposits; as a result, the products are capable of contaminating the entire system. Finally, although long-term reliability is obviously an essential condition for materials developed, attention must also be given to problems associated with a build-up of corrosion products in the cooling circuits and efforts made to minimize them. To that end, a number of precautions are recommended, and various remedies can be applied: selecting materials which are not readily activated, keeping structures clean, purifying fluids properly, restricting solubilization and precipitation, and perhaps, periodic decontamination. (author)

  2. Nutritional value of milk and meat products derived from cloning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomé, Daniel; Dubarry, Michel; Fromentin, Gilles

    2004-01-01

    The development and use of milk and meat products derived from cloning depends on their safety and on the nutritional advantages they can confer to the products as perceived by consumers. The development of such products thus implies (i) to demonstrate their safety and security, (ii) to show that their nutritional value is equivalent to the traditional products, and (iii) to identify the conditions under which cloning could allow additional nutritional and health benefit in comparison to traditional products for the consumers. Both milk and meat products are a source of high quality protein as determined from their protein content and essential amino acid profile. Milk is a source of calcium, phosphorus, zinc, magnesium and vitamin B2 and B12. Meat is a source of iron, zinc and vitamin B12. An important issue regarding the nutritional quality of meat and milk is the level and quality of fat which usually present a high content in saturated fat and some modification of the fat fraction could improve the nutritional quality of the products. The role of the dietary proteins as potential allergens has to be taken into account and an important aspect regarding this question is to evaluate whether the cloning does not produce the appearance of novel allergenic structures. The presence of bio-activities associated to specific components of milk (lactoferrin, immunoglobulins, growth factors, anti-microbial components) also represents a promising development. Preliminary results obtained in rats fed cow's milk or meat-based diets prepared from control animals or from animals derived from cloning did not show any difference between control and cloning-derived products.

  3. Illness related wage and productivity losses: Valuing 'presenteeism'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wei; Sun, Huiying; Woodcock, Simon; Anis, Aslam

    2015-12-01

    One source of productivity loss due to illness is the reduced "quantity" or "quality" of labor input while working, often referred to as presenteeism. Illness-related presenteeism has been found to be potentially more costly than absenteeism. To value presenteeism, existing methods use wages as a proxy for marginal productivity at the firm level. However, wage may not equal marginal productivity in some scenarios. One instance is when a job involves team production and perfect substitutes for workers are not readily available. Using a Canadian linked employer-employee survey (2001-2005), we test whether relative wage equals relative marginal productivity among team workers and non-team workers with different frequencies of presenteeism (reduction at work due to illness). For the pooled cross-sectional estimates (2001, 2003, 2005) we obtain 13,755 observations with 6842 unique workplaces. There are 6490 observations for the first differences estimates from the odd years and 5263 observations for the first differences estimates from 2001 to 2002 and 2003 to 2004. We find that in both small and large firms, team workers with frequent reductions at work are less productive but earn similarly compared with non-team workers without reductions. We also find that in small firms, workers with occasional work reductions are more productive than workers without reductions, but the reverse is true in large firms. The study findings partially support the literature stating that productivity loss resulting from employee presenteeism could exceed wages if team work is involved. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Quantifying low-value services by using routine data from Austrian primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sprenger, Martin; Robausch, Martin; Moser, Adrian

    2016-12-01

    Open debates about the reduction of low-value services, unnecessary diagnostic tests and ineffective therapeutic procedures and initiatives like "Choosing Wisely "in the USA and Canada are still absent in Austria. The objectives of this study are: (i) to establish a list of ineffective or low-value services possibly provided in Austrian primary care, (ii) to explore how many of these services are quantifiable using routine data and (iii) to estimate the number of affected beneficiaries and avoidable costs arising from the provision of these services. In May 2014, we identified low-value care services relevant for primary care in Austria. For our analysis we used routine data sets from the Austrian health insurance. All analysis refer to the insured population of the Lower Austrian Sickness Fund (n = 1 168 433) in the year 2013. (i) We found 453 low-value services possibly offered in Austrian primary care. (ii) Only 34 (7.5%) services were quantifiable using routine data. (iii) In the year 2013, these 34 services were provided to at least 246 131 beneficiaries and the estimated avoidable costs arising were at least 11.38 million Euros. This accounts for 1.2% of overall spending of the Lower Austrian Sickness Fund for drugs and services provided by primary care doctors in the year 2013. The absence of a homogeneous, transparent and accessible coding system for diagnosis in Austrian primary care restrained our assessment. However, our study findings illustrate the potential utility and limitations of using claims-based measures to identify low-value care. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Public Health Association. All rights reserved.

  5. Hydrogen Production Costs of Various Primary Energy Sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Jae Hyuk; Tak, Nam Il; Kim, Yong Hee; Park, Won Seok

    2005-11-01

    Many studies on the economical aspects of hydrogen energy technologies have been conducted with the increase of the technical and socioeconomic importance of the hydrogen energy. However, there is still no research which evaluates the economy of hydrogen production from the primary energy sources in consideration of Korean situations. In this study, the hydrogen production costs of major primary energy sources are compared in consideration of the Korean situations such as feedstock price, electricity rate, and load factor. The evaluation methodology is based on the report of the National Academy of Science (NAS) of U.S. The present study focuses on the possible future technology scenario defined by NAS. The scenario assumes technological improvement that may be achieved if present research and development (R and D) programs are successful. The production costs by the coal and natural gas are 1.1 $/kgH 2 and 1.36 $/kgH 2 , respectively. However, the fossil fuels are susceptible to the price variation depending on the oil and the raw material prices, and the hydrogen production cost also depends on the carbon tax. The economic competitiveness of the renewable energy sources such as the wind, solar, and biomass are relatively low when compared with that of the other energy sources. The estimated hydrogen production costs from the renewable energy sources range from 2.35 $/kgH 2 to 6.03 $/kgH 2 . On the other hand, the production cost by nuclear energy is lower than that of natural gas or coal when the prices of the oil and soft coal are above $50/barrel and 138 $/ton, respectively. Taking into consideration the recent rapid increase of the oil and soft coal prices and the limited fossil resource, the nuclear-hydrogen option appears to be the most economical way in the future

  6. Regionally and seasonally differentiated primary production in the North Atlantic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sathyendranath, Shubha; Longhurst, Alan; Caverhill, Carla M.; Platt, Trevor

    1995-10-01

    A bio-geochemical classification of the N. Atlantic Basin is presented according to which the basin is first divided into four primary algal domains: Polar, West-Wind, Trades and Coastal. These are in turn sub-divided into smaller provinces. The classification is based on differences in the physical environment which are likely to influence regional algal dynamics. The seasonally-differentiated parameters of the photosynthesis-light curve ( P-I curve) and parameters that define the vertical structure in chlorophyll profile are then established for each province, based on an analysis of an archive of over 6000 chlorophyll profiles, and over 1800 P-I curves. These are then combined with satellite-derived chlorophyll data for the N. Atlantic, and information on cloud cover, to compute primary production at the annual scale. using a model that computes spectral transmission of light underwater, and spectral, photosynthetic response of phytoplankton to available light. The results are compared with earlier, satellite-derived, estimates of basin-scale primary production.

  7. Global net primary production and heterotrophic respiration for 1987

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hunt, R.E. Jr.; Piper, S.C.; Nemani, R. [Univ. of Montana, Missoula, MT (United States)]|[Scripps Institute of Oceanography, La Jolla, CA (United States)] [and others

    1995-06-01

    An ecosystem process model, BIOME-BGC, was parameterized and used to simulate the actual net primary production and heterotrophic respiration using daily climatic data, land cover type, leaf area index gridded to 1{degree} latitude by 1{degree} longitude grid cells for the year 1987. Global net primary production was 52 Pg C. These estimates were validated directly by two different methods. First, the grid cells were aggregated and used as inputs to a 3D atmospheric transport model, to compare CO{sub 2} station data with predictions. We simulated the intra-annual variation of atmospheric CO{sub 2} well for the northern hemisphere, but not for the southern hemisphere. Second, we calculated the net {sup 13}C uptake of vegetation, which is a function of water use efficiency. The {sup 13}C/{sup 12}C ratios agreed with measured data, indicating a strong limitation of global primary processes by the hydrologic cycle, especially precipitation. These are different from other global carbon models as we can simulate the year-to-year variation of climate, including El Nino, on the global carbon cycle.

  8. MODERN TECHNOLOGICAL SOLUTIONS USED IN THE PRODUCTION OF BAKERY PRODUCTS WITH HIGH BIOLOGICAL VALUE

    OpenAIRE

    Marta Brodowska; Dominika Guzek; Agnieszka Wierzbicka

    2014-01-01

    Biological value of the food products is a result of the presence of bioactive substances and the proportions of the components. Technological development allows to optimize and accelerate the processes of bread production and increase value of food. Bakery industry used whole grains and pseudocereals as additional source of active compounds, biotechnological techniques as using appropriate yeast strain and encapsulation, which provide protection of substance and their controlled release in p...

  9. Manufacturing of curd products of increased biological value for the elderly from dried components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zabodalova, Ludmila A; Belozerova, Maria S; Evstigneeva, Tatiana N

    2018-01-01

    In recent years, the number of elderly people has increased, and the diseases that arise in old age are associated, amongst other factors, with malnutrition. In the elderly, the need for primary nutrients and energy changes, so the development of food products intended for this particular group of people is becom- ing increasingly important. The purpose of this research is to work out the composition of and technology for producing low-fat curd products from raw milk and vegetable components. The developed products can be used for their gerodietetic properties, because nutritional and energy needs in the elderly were taken into account when designing the product. The curd product was manufactured from skimmed dried milk (SDM), soy isolate protein (SIP) and spelt grain. Optimal conditions for the recombination of SIP were determined. The influence of mass fraction of SIP on the properties of the clot and the end product was studied. The degree of dispersion of the grain component was determined, from the organoleptic evaluation of samples of the mixture, and the optimum method of addition was chosen. The method of adding cooked spelt into the clot after pressing was chosen. Harrington’s generalized desirability function was used for the calculation of the optimum mass frac- tion of the grain component in the end product. The formulation and technology for a curd product based on dry ingredients were determined. The amino acid composition and content of essential components in the developed product were determined, and the biological and nutritional value were calculated. The use of dry ingredients for the production of a curd product makes it possible to manufac- ture the product in the absence of raw milk. The formulation of the product is designed taking into account the needs of the body in old age. The incorporation of spelt increases the biological value of the curd product to 81.5%.

  10. ARM Climate Research Facility Quarterly Value-Added Product Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sivaraman, C. [DOE ARM Climate Research Facility, Washington, DC (United States)

    2016-10-01

    The purpose of this report is to provide a concise status update for Value-Added Products (VAPs) implemented by the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility. The report is divided into the following sections: (1) new VAPs for which development has begun; (2) progress on existing VAPs; (3) future VAPs that have been recently approved; (4) other work that leads to a VAP; (5) top requested VAPs from the ARM Data Archive; and (6) a summary of VAP and data releases to production and evaluation. New information is highlighted in blue text. New information about processed data by the developer is highlighted in red text. The upcoming milestones and dates are highlighted in green.

  11. The Economic Value of Habits in Household Production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bejan, Ioana; Jensen, Carsten Lynge; Andersen, Laura Mørch

    to adjust habits relevant for these activities. We utilize smart-metered hourly power consumption to unobtrusively measure treatment effects. We find that preventing habits from being adjusted reduces consumer surplus by 76% suggesting a substantial economic value of habits.......People are prone to habits but how important are they for economic outcomes? In a randomized field experiment we compare two treatments with identical economic incentives to adjust a range of household production activities. Treatments only differ in the extent to which they allow households...

  12. Molecular biology in studies of oceanic primary production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    LaRoche, J.; Falkowski, P.G.; Geider, R.

    1992-01-01

    Remote sensing and the use of moored in situ instrumentation has greatly improved our ability to measure phytoplankton chlorophyll and photosynthesis on global scales with high temporal resolution. However, the interpretation of these measurements and their significance with respect to the biogeochemical cycling of carbon relies on their relationship with physiological and biochemical processes in phytoplankton. For example, the use of satellite images of surface chlorophyll to estimate primary production is often based on the functional relationship between photosynthesis and irradiance. A variety of environmental factors such as light, temperature, nutrient availability affect the photosynthesis/irradiance (P vs I) relationship in phytoplankton. We present three examples showing how molecular biology can be used to provide basic insight into the factors controlling primary productivity at three different levels of complexity: 1. Studies of light intensity regulation in unicellular alga show how molecular biology can help understand the processing of environmental cues leading to the regulation of photosynthetic gene expression. 2. Probing of the photosynthetic apparatus using molecular techniques can be used to test existing mechanistic models derived from the interpretation of physiological and biophysical measurements. 3. Exploratory work on the expression of specific proteins during nutrient-limited growth of phytoplankton may lead to the identification and production of molecular probes for field studies

  13. Productivity and value added distribution in family-owned businesses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose Luis Gallizo Larraz

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Identify similarities and/or differences in the distribution of Value Added characterizing family businesses as opposed to non-family held firms, and analyse productivity by linking the distribution of the wealth generated by the company to a variety of related agents or stakeholders (employees, providers of loan capital, and shareholders. Design/methodology: A data series consisting of VA distribution in a sample of 8,609 Spanish companies, of which 5,109 are family firms and another 3,500 companies which are not, for the period comprising 2008 to 2013 was employed for this study. The data from the financial statements pertaining to these companies was taken from the SABI system (a privately-funded database analysing the financials of Spanish and Portuguese firms, operated by INFORMA, SA, selecting only those companies that employ standardized financial reporting practices. Findings and results: The work shows the existence of significant differences between family and non-family businesses in the distribution of value added among the different stakeholders. Given that, although both types of company spend most of the value added to remunerate staff, the family company spends a higher proportion thereof on self-financing as compared to non-family businesses, which spend a higher percentage on the remuneration of firm ownership. On the other hand, the lower labour productivity of family businesses is apparent, a result that can be explained both by the lower staff monetary remuneration, as well as the use of production technologies that are also less capital-intensive. Limitations: The study included only medium and large companies. These are companies that report financial statements offering more disaggregated data (through use of the standard forms. This owes to the legal requirement of these companies to file a cash flow statement, a necessary source for deriving information on dividends paid by the company. Added value: This is

  14. Primary and secondary metabolites production in signal grass around the year under nitrogen fertilizer

    OpenAIRE

    Syeda Maryam Hussain

    2016-01-01

    Plants produce a number of substances and products and primary and secondary metabolites (SM) are amongst them with many benefits but limitation as well. Usually, the fodder are not considered toxic to animals or as a source having higher SM. The Brachiaria decumbens has a considerable nutritional value, but it is considered as a toxic grass for causing photosensitization in animals, if the grass is not harvested for more than 30 days or solely. The absence of detailed information in the lite...

  15. Productive vegetation: relationships between net primary productivity, vegetation types and climate change in the Wet Tropics bioregion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramirez, Vanessa Valdez; Williams, Stephen E.; VanDerWal, Jeremy

    2007-01-01

    Full text: Full text: There is now ample evidence demonstrating the impacts of climate change on biodiversity and human society (Walther ef a/. 2002). Numerous studies have shown climate change is one of the most significant threats to tropical forests, such as the Wet Tropics Heritage Area, due to their high biodiversity and endemism (Pounds ef al. 1999; Hughes 2000; Parmesan and Yohe 2003). Williams ef al. (2003) suggested that small shifts in net primary productivity (NPP) as a result of climate change could lead to potentially massive follow-on effects for the extremely diverse and vulnerable rainforest flora and fauna. It is therefore crucial to explore the relationships between NPP and local biodiversity, especially to create models for different climate change scenarios. Nevertheless, NPP in the Wet Tropics has yet to be estimated. This is the first study to provide a general NPP estimate for the Wet Tropics bioregion using climate surrogates (Schuur 2003). This technique estimates NPP in an accurate, repeatable, and cost-effective way. NPP values were linked to vegetation types and examined under various climatic and environmental conditions. Results show a significant difference in productivity according to vegetation types and climatic variables, with temperature and rainfall seasonality as the most important determining variables. Additionally, lowland and upland vegetations showed a significant difference in productivity patterns throughout the year. Vegetation types located above 1000 metres in altitude had the lowest values of mean annual productivity due to their high rainfall and low temperatures; vegetation types located below 600 metres showed increased productivity values during the wet season (December-March). Net primary productivity will certainly be impacted by changes in temperature and rainfall, due to climate change. Although an increase in NPP values can be predicted for upland areas, the more widely distributed lowlands will drastically

  16. Patterns of primary production in the Red Sea

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Qurban, M.A.; Wafar, M.; Jyothibabu, R.; Manikandan, K.P.

    for bio- phic stations occupied in e Indian Ocean (source - et al., 1995), remotely-sensed (CZCS) chlorophyll data were used to make deductions on rates of primary production at basin-scale. The conclusion consistently arrived at from all earlier studies... acquired along the axis of the basin in the 2013 cruise, Wafar et al. (2016a) identified alternating zonal currents at six locations – 18–18.5°N, 19–20.5°N, 22°N, 24°N, 24.5°N and 26°N - and concluded that they represent three successive anticyclonic cells...

  17. Estimates of primary productivity over the Thar Desert based upon Nimbus-7 37 GHz data - 1979-1985

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhury, B. J.

    1987-01-01

    An empirical relationship has been determined between the difference of vertically and horizontally polarized brightness temperatures noted at the 37 GHz frequency of the Nimbus-7 SMMR and primary productivity over hot arid and semiarid regions of Africa and Australia. This empirical relationship is applied to estimate the primary productivity over the Thar Desert between 1979 and 1985, giving an average value of 0.271 kg/sq m per yr. The spatial variability of the productivity values is found to be quite significant, with a standard deviation about the mean of 0.08 kg/sq m per yr.

  18. Seasonal variability of mixed layer in the central Arabian Sea and its implication on nutrients and primary productivity

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    PrasannaKumar, S.; Narvekar, J.

    -1 Seasonal variability of mixed layer in the central Arabian Sea and its implication on nutrients and primary productivity S. Prasanna Kumar and Jayu Narvekar National Institute of Oceanography, Dona Paula, Goa-403 004, India... on a 2? x 4? grids up to a depth of 500m. Monthly mean temperature and salinity data were used to calculate the sigma-t values (UNESCO, 1981). We also used nitrate, chlorophyll a and primary productivity data in the upper 120m water column...

  19. MODERN TECHNOLOGICAL SOLUTIONS USED IN THE PRODUCTION OF BAKERY PRODUCTS WITH HIGH BIOLOGICAL VALUE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Brodowska

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Biological value of the food products is a result of the presence of bioactive substances and the proportions of the components. Technological development allows to optimize and accelerate the processes of bread production and increase value of food. Bakery industry used whole grains and pseudocereals as additional source of active compounds, biotechnological techniques as using appropriate yeast strain and encapsulation, which provide protection of substance and their controlled release in production of functional bread. The adding to bread fruits, vegetables and condiments may increase content of vitamin, minerals, dietary fiber and other bioactive compounds.

  20. Firm value creation and viability between product and process innovation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Fedele

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The role and characteristics of the innovation process have undergone changes throughout the history of industrial capitalism. In the contest of an emerging systemic complexity, technological innovation is able to generate a positive impact on the economic performances of companies by improving their internal efficiency, which allows to increase the market competitiveness. Innovation is, in fact, the leverage to gain competitive advantages that are the source of value creation and sustainable growth, to preserve and celebrate as one of the key components of the intangible assets of companies. Starting from Schumpeter's process of creative destruction, which considers innovation as “the engine of economic development” and “a continuous process of change and accumulation of knowledge”. The paper analyzes the variables at the center of innovation studies, the innovative approach and the impact of technological positioning as early-mover or follower in the market. Peculiarities will be described related to the definition of the project portfolio mix, the process of designing and developing of a new product, as well as the relationship between innovation and competitive advantage. Further attention will be placed on the targets of innovation and on the factors, objective and context, which hinder the willingness by the entrepreneur to „break‟ the stationary balance by introducing new combinations production factors as an essential condition for the maintenance of competitive advantage and the creation of value. The research approach is based on a qualitative methodology. The data retrieval was carried out through secondary sources.

  1. Software sensor for primary metabolite production case of alcoholic fermentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roux, G.; Dahhou, B.; Queinnec, I. [Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS), 31 - Toulouse (France)]|[Institut National des Sciences Appliquees (INSA), 31 - Toulouse (France); Goma, G. [Institut National des Sciences Appliquees (INSA), 31 - Toulouse (France)

    1995-12-31

    This paper investigate the application of an observer for state and parameter estimation to batch, continuous and fed batch fermentations for alcohol production taken as model for a primary metabolite production. This observer is provided to palliate the lack of suitable sensors for on-line biomass and ethanol concentrations measurements and to estimate the time varying specific growth rate. Estimates are obtained from an interlaced structure filter based on a `modified extended Kalman filter` by using on-line measurements of carbon dioxide outflow rate and substrate concentration. The filter algorithm was tested during batch, continuous and fed batch fermentation processes. The filter behaviour observed in the experiments gives good results with an agreement theory/practice. (authors) 18 refs.

  2. The Survey of Emphatic Tendency and Democratic Values of Primary School Teachers

    OpenAIRE

    PALAVAN, Özcan; AGBOYRAZ, İğdem

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the relation between emphatic orientation and democratic values of primary school teacher who worked in public schools and private schools in Malatya Province. The study was conducted out using survey technique. The sample size of this study consisted of 300 teachers in Malatya in between 2014-2015 academic year. It was used three different data collect tools. The first one was “Personal Information Form” which was designed by the researches. The secon...

  3. Inorganic carbon addition stimulates snow algae primary productivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, T. L.; Havig, J. R.

    2017-12-01

    Earth has experienced glacial/interglacial oscillations throughout its history. Today over 15 million square kilometers (5.8 million square miles) of Earth's land surface is covered in ice including glaciers, ice caps, and the ice sheets of Greenland and Antarctica, most of which are retreating as a consequence of increased atmospheric CO2. Glaciers are teeming with life and supraglacial snow and ice surfaces are often red due to blooms of photoautotrophic algae. Recent evidence suggests the red pigmentation, secondary carotenoids produced in part to thrive under high irradiation, lowers albedo and accelerates melt. However, there are relatively few studies that report the productivity of snow algae communities and the parameters that constrain their growth on snow and ice surfaces. Here, we demonstrate that snow algae primary productivity can be stimulated by the addition of inorganic carbon. We found an increase in light-dependent carbon assimilation in snow algae microcosms amended with increasing amounts of inorganic carbon. Our snow algae communities were dominated by typical cosmopolitan snow algae species recovered from Alpine and Arctic environments. The climate feedbacks necessary to enter and exit glacial/interglacial oscillations are poorly understood. Evidence and models agree that global Snowball events are accompanied by changes in atmospheric CO2 with increasing CO2 necessary for entering periods of interglacial time. Our results demonstrate a positive feedback between increased CO2 and snow algal productivity and presumably growth. With the recent call for bio-albedo effects to be considered in climate models, our results underscore the need for robust climate models to include feedbacks between supraglacial primary productivity, albedo, and atmospheric CO2.

  4. Combined constraints on global ocean primary production using observations and models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buitenhuis, Erik T.; Hashioka, Taketo; Quéré, Corinne Le

    2013-09-01

    production is at the base of the marine food web and plays a central role for global biogeochemical cycles. Yet global ocean primary production is known to only a factor of 2, with previous estimates ranging from 38 to 65 Pg C yr-1 and no formal uncertainty analysis. Here, we present an improved global ocean biogeochemistry model that includes a mechanistic representation of photosynthesis and a new observational database of net primary production (NPP) in the ocean. We combine the model and observations to constrain particulate NPP in the ocean with statistical metrics. The PlankTOM5.3 model includes a new photosynthesis formulation with a dynamic representation of iron-light colimitation, which leads to a considerable improvement of the interannual variability of surface chlorophyll. The database includes a consistent set of 50,050 measurements of 14C primary production. The model best reproduces observations when global NPP is 58 ± 7 Pg C yr-1, with a most probable value of 56 Pg C yr-1. The most probable value is robust to the model used. The uncertainty represents 95% confidence intervals. It considers all random errors in the model and observations, but not potential biases in the observations. We show that tropical regions (23°S-23°N) contribute half of the global NPP, while NPPs in the Northern and Southern Hemispheres are approximately equal in spite of the larger ocean area in the South.

  5. Value chains for biorefineries of wastes from food production and services - ValueWaste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kahiluoto, H.; Kuisma, M.; Knuuttila, M. (and others) (MTT Agrifood Research Finland, Mikkeli (Finland)). Email: helena.kahiluoto@mtt.fi

    2010-10-15

    The aim of the ValueWaste project is to analyse biomass potentials, appropriate technologies and business opportunities. Contrasting regional scenarios for biorefinery activities are developed, and their overall sustainability is assessed: environmental impacts using life cycle assessment, impacts on regional economy, partnership in actor chains, as well as business opportunities and possibilities for commercialisation are considered. South Savo and partly Satakunta provide the case study regions, but the project also produces tools for generalisation and contributes to national solutions. The theoretical potentials suggest that the agrifood waste has a significant and currently untapped potential for replacing non-renewable energy and recycling nutrients, and further for climate and water protection. The volume of agrifood waste varies mainly according to animal husbandry, crop production and food processing of a region. New business opportunities were found from the value chain of biowaste flows in the area of Etelae-Savo. Unexploited raw materials and new methods in waste collection and transportation offer entrepreneurial opportunities and decrease the costs of operation. Based on the conceptual work for creation of the contrasting regional biorefinery scenarios, performed in workshops for project and steering group members, four different optimisation starting points were determined: 1) replacement of fossil energy; 2) maximisation of carbon sequestration; 3) water protection and 4) enhancement of regional economy. Present situation of the biomass utilisation in the region was adopted as the baseline scenario. Four contrasting, consistent scenarios for the value chain of waste-based biorefineries are formed in South Savo. (orig.)

  6. Clinical significance of determination of SAC/PRA value in patients with primary aldosteronism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Liren; Dai Yaozong; Liu Jiumin

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the diagnostic significance of determining SAC/PRA valve in hyperaldosteronism. Methods: Plasma renin activity (PRA) and angiotensin (AT-II) as well as serum aldosterone contents were measured with RIA in 48 patients with primary aldosteronism and 30 controls. The SAC/PRA value was calculated. Results: Contents of PRA, AT-II and Aldo in blood of patients with primary aldosteronism were very significantly different from those in controls (p < 0.001) (PRA 0.14 ± 0.08 ng/ml/h vs 0.57 ± 0.08 ng/ml/h; AT-II 21.21 ± 7.55 ng/L vs 36.03 ± 6.11 ng/L; Aldo 1.07 ± 0.34 nmol/L vs 0.33 ± 0.04 nmol/L). Calculated SAC/PRA value was 913 ± 409 (normal upper limit 400). Conclusion: SAC/PRA value is an useful accessory diagnostic criterion for primary aldosteronism

  7. Value of ultrasonography, Ct and MR imaging in the diagnosis of primary hyperparathyroidism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tziakouri, C.; Eracleous, E.; Skannavis, S.; Pierides, A.; Symeonides, P.; Gourtsoyiannis, N.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the significance of preoperative localization of abnormal parathyroid glands to the surgical outcome in patients with primary hyperparathyroidism. Material and Methods: Thirty-nine patients with primary hyperparathyroidism were studied preoperatively with US (39 patients), CT (30 patients) and MR imaging (18 patients). The overall diagnostic accuracy for US was 87%, CT 66% and MR 94%. In patients with a single parathyroid adenoma US was the most cost-effective localization technique with a detection rate of 96%. CT had a lower detection rate (78%) but was of particular value for fairly large ectopic adenomas in the root of the neck. MR imaging was a good confirmatory test (93%). In patients with multiple gland disease (primary hyperplasia and multiple adenomas), no single localization study alone was sufficient. Combination of all 3 studies, however, alerted the physician to the presence of disease in more than one gland in 87% of these patients. Conclusion: US, CT and MR imaging followed by surgery performed by an experienced surgeon provided good clinical results in 39 patients with primary hyperparathyroidism. Preoperative localization was especially useful in patients with primary parathyroid hyperplasia or multiple adenomas and in patients with ectopic parathyroid adenomas in the root of the neck. We recommend identification of all abnormal parathyroid glands prior to surgery. (orig.)

  8. Localized products in France: definition, protection and value-adding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurence Bérard

    2007-04-01

    and variety. To do that, we need to look at the cultural criteria that link a place with a particular history and social group.In addition to formal procedures for the protection of geographical indications, various other initiatives also help to add value to local products. Part of coordinated (but basically unofficial campaigns, they reflect the efforts of players from all walks of life but mainly the public sector (Ministries of Agriculture, Tourism and the Environment.Not all countries have the same relationship with place. A product’s place within a territory is determined by various factors, some more important than others depending on that country’s economic and social history, culture, local balances of power and natural environment.

  9. NUTRITIONAL VALUE OF NEW UNCOOKED SMOKED PORK PRODUCT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu. Yu. Zabalueva

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The article presents the results of the study on nutritional value of the uncooked smoked pork product with the complex brine. It was found that the use of the starter cultures on the basis of Lactobacillus brevis and Lactobacillus fermentum in an amount of 5% by weight of the raw materials and the aqueous extract of dog-rose hips (Rosa Davurica in an amount of 0.5% by weight of the raw materials, as recipe ingredients of the brine, allows reducing the duration of the drying process by 24 hours and the salting process also by 24 hours.It was found that the product meets the requirements of the standard for this type of products by the content of protein (13.2% and fat (27.8%. The uncooked smoked pork loin, which was made using starter cultures on the basis of Lactobacillus brevis and Lactobacillus fermentum and the aqueous extract of dog-rose hips, is close to the recommended ratio of PUFAs : MUFAs : SFAs (10:60:30. The authors also noted that the presence of ascorbic acid in the extract led to a significant decrease in the residual amount of sodium nitrite by almost three times in the innovative smoked pork product, which increased its food safety.The results of the study showed that addition of the starter cultures L. brevis and L. fermentum and the extract of dog-rose hips (Rosa Davurica to the brine during salting had a positive effect on the formation of the sensory characteristics of the pork loin: taste, aroma, color and its structural and mechanical properties. The product had the more monolithic, firm texture and rich color. The research on the quantitative detection of viable cells of L. brevis and L. fermentum in the uncooked smoked pork loin «Pikantnaya» was also done in this work. It was found that on the 25th day of storage, the total number of viable cells in the loin was 1*107 CFU/g, which corresponded to the requirements for the probiotic products.

  10. Doppler Lidar Vertical Velocity Statistics Value-Added Product

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Newsom, R. K. [DOE ARM Climate Research Facility, Washington, DC (United States); Sivaraman, C. [DOE ARM Climate Research Facility, Washington, DC (United States); Shippert, T. R. [DOE ARM Climate Research Facility, Washington, DC (United States); Riihimaki, L. D. [DOE ARM Climate Research Facility, Washington, DC (United States)

    2015-07-01

    Accurate height-resolved measurements of higher-order statistical moments of vertical velocity fluctuations are crucial for improved understanding of turbulent mixing and diffusion, convective initiation, and cloud life cycles. The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility operates coherent Doppler lidar systems at several sites around the globe. These instruments provide measurements of clear-air vertical velocity profiles in the lower troposphere with a nominal temporal resolution of 1 sec and height resolution of 30 m. The purpose of the Doppler lidar vertical velocity statistics (DLWSTATS) value-added product (VAP) is to produce height- and time-resolved estimates of vertical velocity variance, skewness, and kurtosis from these raw measurements. The VAP also produces estimates of cloud properties, including cloud-base height (CBH), cloud frequency, cloud-base vertical velocity, and cloud-base updraft fraction.

  11. Zymomonas mobilis for fuel ethanol and higher value products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, P L; Jeon, Y J; Lee, K J; Lawford, H G

    2007-01-01

    High oil prices, increasing focus on renewable carbohydrate-based feedstocks for fuels and chemicals, and the recent publication of its genome sequence, have provided continuing stimulus for studies on Zymomonas mobilis. However, despite its apparent advantages of higher yields and faster specific rates when compared to yeasts, no commercial scale fermentations currently exist which use Z. mobilis for the manufacture of fuel ethanol. This may change with the recent announcement of a Dupont/Broin partnership to develop a process for conversion of lignocellulosic residues, such as corn stover, to fuel ethanol using recombinant strains of Z. mobilis. The research leading to the construction of these strains, and their fermentation characteristics, are described in the present review. The review also addresses opportunities offered by Z. mobilis for higher value products through its metabolic engineering and use of specific high activity enzymes.

  12. Value Creating Logic of Customer-Driven Product Development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Anders Peder; Sommer, Anita Friis

    This paper focuses on how companies on business-to-business markets, characterized by complex customer problems, organize and manage the interaction process as part of the management of customer requests for new products. More specifically it is investigated how the intra-organizational activities...... the relationship between customer problems of high complexity and the organization of activities in the buyer-supplier interaction process. Building on value configuration theory and theory of problem complexity this research contributes to widen our understanding of how marketing and problem solving processes...... part of the problem solving process is configured, when taking the customer supplier interaction into consideration. The research takes an inter-and intra-organizational perspective by focusing on the dyad between a buyer and supplier. A single case study is applied in order to investigate...

  13. [Value of R2(*) in evaluating the biological behavior of primary hepatocellular carcinoma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, S F; Liu, A L; Liu, J H; Li, Y; Liu, X D; Huang, K; Song, Q W; Xu, M Z; Guo, W Y

    2016-04-19

    To investigate the correlation between R2(*) value of enhanced T2 star-weighted angiography (ESWAN) sequence and primary hepatocellular carcinoma infiltration and tumor thrombus, and investigate the biological behavior of HCC. A total of 221 cases of patients' imaging data with MRI examination(including ESWAN sequence) diagnosed as primary HCC were retrospectively analyzed.All the patients were collected from January 2014 to September 2015 in the First Affiliated Hospital of Dalian Medical University.The differences of R2(*) values in different MR types of HCC were analyzed.All patients were divided into infiltration group and non-infiltration group, tumor thrombus group and non-tumor thrombus group, the R2(*) values of the paired groups were compared.The diagnostic efficiency of R2(*) in HCC infiltration and tumor thrombus were evaluated by ROC curve, and to find out the threshold values. The MR types of 221 patients included 90 cases of nodular type, 62 cases of massive type, 69 cases of diffuse type.70 patients had tumor thrombus.The R2(*) values of different MR types were (21.82±8.52), (24.17±8.84)and (34.45±11.73) Hz, respectively.There was no statistically significant difference between the nodular and the massive types (P=0.144), while the difference between the nodular and diffuse type, the massive and diffuse types were statistically significant(P=0.000). The R2(*) values of infiltration group and non-infiltration group were (34.45±11.73) and (22.78±8.70) Hz , the R2(*) values of tumor thrombus group and non-tumor thrombus group were (31.20±12.17) and (24.21±9.90) Hz, the difference also had statistically significant(t=7.397 and 4.534, P=0.000 and 0.000). The AUC of R2(*) values for infiltration and tumor thrombus were 0.804, 0.681. R2(*) ≥24.68 Hz was the threshold value to diagnose the infiltration and tumor thrombus. R2(*) value can be used as a MR non-enhancement quantitative index to evaluate the biological behavior of HCC.

  14. Effects of gender on screening value of aldosterone-renin ratio for primary aldosteronism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ye-qiong SONG

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective To explore the potential influence of gender on screening value of aldosterone-renin ratio (ARR for primary aldosteronism (PA. Methods The biochemical parameters were collected of 451 PA patients and 300 essential hypertension (EH patients who were diagnosed in the General Hospital of PLA from 1992 to 2014. Each group was then divided into two groups by gender. The clinical characteristics were compared and then the receiver operating characteristic curve (ROC was conducted to evaluate the best cut-off value. Results The plasma aldosterone concentration (PAC, serum sodium and ARR were much higher, but the plasma rennin activity (PRA, serum potassium and BMI were much lower in PA patients than in EH patients (P0.05. The best cut-off value of ARR in male PA patients was 19.11, the relevant area under the curve (AUC was 0.968, the sensitivity and specificity was 92.44% and 93.08%, and the Youden index (YI was 0.86. The best cut-off value of ARR in female PA patients was 27.26, with AUC 0.956, sensitivity 92.07%, specificity 90.00% and YI 0.82, respectively. If the cut-off value was set at 27.26 in males, the specificity would rise a little, but the sensitivity and YI would sharply decrease. Similarly, the sensitivity would increase a little but the specificity and YI would fall substantially if the cut-off value in females was set at 19.11. The best cut-off value of ARR in men was smaller than the official value recommended by guidelines. Conclusion Gender is an important factor should be considered while ARR is used in PA screening, and the cut-off value of ARR in screening female PA patients should be setting higher. DOI: 10.11855/j.issn.0577-7402.2017.01.10

  15. Organic carbon fluxes in the Atlantic and the Southern Ocean: relationship to primary production compiled from satellite radiometer data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, G.; Ratmeyer, V.; Wefer, G.

    Fluxes of organic carbon normalised to a depth of 1000 m from 18 sites in the Atlantic and the Southern Ocean are presented, comprising nine biogeochemical provinces as defined by Longhurst et al. (1995. Journal of Plankton Research 17, 1245-1271). For comparison with primary production, we used a recent compilation of primary production values derived from CZCS data (Antoine et al., 1996. Global Biogeochemical Cycles 10, 57-69). In most cases, the seasonal patterns stood reasonably well in accordance with the carbon fluxes. Particularly, organic carbon flux records from two coastal sites off northwest and southwest Africa displayed a more distinct correlation to the primary production in sectors (1×1°) which are situated closer to the coastal environments. This was primarily caused by large upwelling filaments streaming far offshore, resulting in a cross-shelf carbon transport. With respect to primary production, organic carbon export to a water depth of 1000 m, and the fraction of primary production exported to a depth of 1000 m (export fraction=EF 1000), we were able to distinguish between: (1) the coastal environments with highest values (EF 1000=1.75-2.0%), (2) the eastern equatorial upwelling area with moderately high values (EF 1000=0.8-1.1%), (3) and the subtropical oligotrophic gyres that yielded lowest values (EF 1000=0.6%). Carbon export in the Southern Ocean was low to moderate, and the EF 1000 value seems to be quite low in general. Annual organic carbon fluxes were proportional to primary production, and the export fraction EF 1000 increased with primary production up to 350 gC m -2 yr-1. Latitudinal variations in primary production were reflected in the carbon flux pattern. A high temporal variability of primary production rates and a pronounced seasonality of carbon export were observed in the polar environments, in particular in coastal domains, although primary production (according to Antoine et al., 1996. Global Biogeochemical Cycles 10, 57

  16. Prognostic value of semiquantification NP-59 SPECT/CT in primary aldosteronism patients after adrenalectomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu, Ching-Chu; Cheng, Mei-Fang; Tzen, Kai-Yuan; Yen, Ruoh-Fang; Wu, Vin-Cent; Wu, Kwan-Dun; Liu, Kao-Lang; Lin, Wei-Chou

    2014-01-01

    Primary aldosteronism (PA), characterized by an excessive production of aldosterone, affects 5-13 % of patients with hypertension. Accurate strategies are needed for the timely diagnosis of PA to allow curability and prevention of excessive cardiovascular events and related damage. This study aimed to evaluate the usefulness of semiquantification of 131 I-6β-iodomethyl-norcholesterol (NP-59) single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT)/CT in differentiating aldosterone-producing adenoma (APA) from idiopathic adrenal hyperplasia (IAH) and in predicting clinical outcomes after adrenalectomy. We retrospectively reviewed 49 PA patients who had undergone adrenalectomy after NP-59 SPECT/CT within 1 year. A conventional visual scale (VS) and two semiquantitative parameters generated from SPECT/CT, adrenal to liver ratio (ALR) and lesion to contralateral ratio of bilateral adrenal glands (CON), with cutoff values calculated by receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) analysis, were compared with pathology results and postsurgical outcomes to determine the accuracy. An ALR cutoff of 1.84 and a CON cutoff of 1.15 showed an ability to distinguish adenoma from hyperplasia similar to VS (p = 0.2592 and 0.1908, respectively). An ALR cutoff of 2.28 and a CON cutoff of 1.11 yielded the highest sensitivity and specificity to predict postsurgical outcomes, and an ALR of 2.28 had an ability superior to VS (p = 0.0215), while a CON of 1.11 did not (p = 0.1015). Patients with either ALR or CON greater than the cutoff had a high probability of positive postsurgical outcomes (n = 36/38), while patients with both ALR and CON less than the cutoff had a low probability of positive postsurgical outcomes (n = 2/11). Semiquantification of NP-59 scintigraphy has an ability similar to VS in differentiating APA from IAH, but an excellent ability to predict postsurgical outcomes of adrenalectomy. An ALR or CON greater than the cutoff strongly suggests benefits from adrenalectomy, and both

  17. Prognostic value of semiquantification NP-59 SPECT/CT in primary aldosteronism patients after adrenalectomy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Ching-Chu; Cheng, Mei-Fang; Tzen, Kai-Yuan; Yen, Ruoh-Fang [National Taiwan University Hospital and National Taiwan University College of Medicine, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Taipei (China); Wu, Vin-Cent; Wu, Kwan-Dun [National Taiwan University Hospital and National Taiwan University College of Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, Taipei (China); Liu, Kao-Lang [National Taiwan University Hospital and National Taiwan University College of Medicine, Department of Medical Imaging, Taipei (China); Lin, Wei-Chou [National Taiwan University Hospital and National Taiwan University College of Medicine, Department of Pathology, Taipei (China); Collaboration: the TAIPAI Study Group

    2014-07-15

    Primary aldosteronism (PA), characterized by an excessive production of aldosterone, affects 5-13 % of patients with hypertension. Accurate strategies are needed for the timely diagnosis of PA to allow curability and prevention of excessive cardiovascular events and related damage. This study aimed to evaluate the usefulness of semiquantification of {sup 131}I-6β-iodomethyl-norcholesterol (NP-59) single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT)/CT in differentiating aldosterone-producing adenoma (APA) from idiopathic adrenal hyperplasia (IAH) and in predicting clinical outcomes after adrenalectomy. We retrospectively reviewed 49 PA patients who had undergone adrenalectomy after NP-59 SPECT/CT within 1 year. A conventional visual scale (VS) and two semiquantitative parameters generated from SPECT/CT, adrenal to liver ratio (ALR) and lesion to contralateral ratio of bilateral adrenal glands (CON), with cutoff values calculated by receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) analysis, were compared with pathology results and postsurgical outcomes to determine the accuracy. An ALR cutoff of 1.84 and a CON cutoff of 1.15 showed an ability to distinguish adenoma from hyperplasia similar to VS (p = 0.2592 and 0.1908, respectively). An ALR cutoff of 2.28 and a CON cutoff of 1.11 yielded the highest sensitivity and specificity to predict postsurgical outcomes, and an ALR of 2.28 had an ability superior to VS (p = 0.0215), while a CON of 1.11 did not (p = 0.1015). Patients with either ALR or CON greater than the cutoff had a high probability of positive postsurgical outcomes (n = 36/38), while patients with both ALR and CON less than the cutoff had a low probability of positive postsurgical outcomes (n = 2/11). Semiquantification of NP-59 scintigraphy has an ability similar to VS in differentiating APA from IAH, but an excellent ability to predict postsurgical outcomes of adrenalectomy. An ALR or CON greater than the cutoff strongly suggests benefits from adrenalectomy, and

  18. Bioreactors for lignocellulose conversion into fermentable sugars for production of high added value products

    OpenAIRE

    Liguori, Rossana; Ventorino, Valeria; Pepe, Olimpia; Faraco, Vincenza

    2015-01-01

    Lignocellulosic biomasses derived from dedicated crops and agro-industrial residual materials are promising renewable resources for the production of fuels and other added value bioproducts. Due to the tolerance to a wide range of environments, the dedicated crops can be cultivated on marginal lands, avoiding conflict with food production and having beneficial effects on the environment. Besides, the agro-industrial residual materials represent an abundant, available, and cheap source of biop...

  19. Hydrogen Production Costs of Various Primary Energy Sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Jae Hyuk; Tak, Nam Il; Kim, Yong Hee; Park, Won Seok

    2005-01-01

    The limited resource and environmental impacts of fossil fuels are becoming more and more serious problems in the world. Consequently, hydrogen is in the limelight as a future alternative energy due to its clean combustion and inexhaustibility and a transition from the traditional fossil fuel system to a hydrogen-based energy system is under considerations. Several countries are already gearing the industries to the hydrogen economy to cope with the limitations of the current fossil fuels. Unfortunately, hydrogen has to be chemically separated from the hydrogen compounds in nature such as water by using some energy sources. In this paper, the hydrogen production costs of major primary energy sources are compared in consideration of the Korean situations. The evaluation methodology is based on the report of the National Academy of Science (NAS) of U.S

  20. The added value of C-reactive protein measurement in diagnosing pneumonia in primary care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Minnaard, Margaretha C; de Groot, Joris A H; Hopstaken, Rogier M

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: C-reactive protein (CRP) is increasingly being included in the diagnostic work-up for community-acquired pneumonia in primary care. Its added diagnostic value beyond signs and symptoms, however, remains unclear. We conducted a meta-analysis of individual patient data to quantify...... to a basic signs-and-symptoms prediction model was assessed. Outcome measures were improvement in discrimination between patients with and without pneumonia in primary care and improvement in risk classification, both within the individual studies and across studies. RESULTS: Authors of 8 eligible studies (n...... = 5308) provided their data sets. In all of the data sets, discrimination between patients with and without pneumonia improved after CRP measurement was added to the prediction model (extended model), with a mean improvement in the area under the curve of 0.075 (range 0.02-0.18). In a hypothetical cohort...

  1. Monitoring residue in animals and primary products of animal origin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janković Saša

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of control and systematic monitoring of residue is to secure, by the examination of a corresponding number of samples, the efficient monitoring of the residue level in tissues and organs of animals, as well as in primary products of animal origin. This creates possibilities for the timely taking of measures toward the securing of food hygiene of animal origin and the protection of public health. Residue can be a consequence of the inadequate use of medicines in veterinary medicine and pesticides in agriculture and veterinary medicine, as well as the polluting of the environment with toxic elements, dioxins, polychlorinated biphenyls, and others. Residue is being monitored in Serbia since 1972, and in 2004, national monitoring was brought to the level of EU countries through significant investments by the Ministry of Agriculture, Forestry and Water Management. This is also evident in the EU directives which permit exports of all kinds of meat and primary products of animal origin, covered by the Residue Monitoring Program. The program of systematic examinations of residue has been coordinated with the requirements of the European Union, both according to the type of examined substance, as well as according to the number of samples and the applied analytical techniques. In addition to the development of methods and the including of new harmful substances into the monitoring programme, it is also necessary to coordinate the national regulations that define the maximum permitted quantities of certain medicines and contaminants with the EU regulations, in order to protect the health of consumers as efficiently as possible, and for the country to take equal part in international trade.

  2. A Balance of Primary and Secondary Values: Exploring a Digital Legacy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amber L. Cushing

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This exploratory research explores the concept of a digital legacy as a general concept and as a collection of digital possessions with unique characteristics. The results reported in this article are part of a larger study. In Cushing (2013, the author identified the characteristics of a digital possession. In this study, these characteristics of a digital possession were utilized to explore how the characteristics of several digital possessions could form a collection, or a digital legacy. In addition to being explored as a collection of digital possessions, data was collected about the general concept of a digital legacy. In part I of the study, 23 participants from three age groups were interviewed about their general concept of a digital legacy. Five general characteristics describing a digital legacy were identified. In part II of the study, interview data from Cushing (2013 was used to create statements describing digital possessions. The statements were classified utilizing the archival concept of primary and secondary values, as well as the consumer behavior concepts of self extension to possessions and possession attachment. Primary value refers to the purpose for which the item was created, while secondary value refers to an additional value that the participants can perceive the item to hold, such as a perception that an item can represent one's identity. Using standard Q method procedure, 48 participants were directed to rank their agreement with 60 statements (written on cards, along a distribution of -5 to +5, according to the characteristics of the digital possession they would most like to maintain for a digital legacy. The ranked statements were analyzed using Q factor analysis, in order to perceive the most common statements associated with maintaining digital possessions for a digital legacy. Q method results suggested that most individuals described the digital possessions they wanted to maintain for a digital legacy using

  3. SMARTPHONE USERS IN CREATION OF CUSTOMER VALUE. A value-centered approach to product carbon footprint.

    OpenAIRE

    FINNILÄ, KIRSI

    2011-01-01

    To be able to differentiate services, provide competitive value propositions, and gain sustainable competitive advantage on the market, companies need to learn and understand how customers create value in their everyday activities. Value creation may occur at the pre-purchase and post-purchase stages of the consumption process. Depending on this, the created value can be regarded as perceived or desired customer value. The purpose of the study was to describe and analyse how the value creatio...

  4. Estimators of primary production for interpretation of remotely sensed data on ocean color

    Science.gov (United States)

    Platt, Trevor; Sathyendranath, Shubha

    1993-01-01

    The theoretical basis is explained for some commonly used estimators of daily primary production in a vertically uniform water column. These models are recast into a canonical form, with dimensionless arguments, to facilitate comparison with each other and with an analytic solution. The limitations of each model are examined. The values of the photoadaptation parameter I(k) observed in the ocean are analyzed, and I(k) is used as a scale to normalize the surface irradiance. The range of this scaled irradiance is presented. An equation is given for estimation of I(k) from recent light history. It is shown how the models for water column production can be adapted for estimation of the production in finite layers. The distinctions between model formulation, model implementation and model evaluation are discussed. Recommendations are given on the choice of algorithm for computation of daily production according to the degree of approximation acceptable in the result.

  5. Estimating Net Primary Productivity Using Satellite and Ancillary Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhury, Bhaskar J.

    2002-01-01

    The net primary productivity (C) or the annual rate of carbon accumulation per unit ground area by terrestrial plant communities is the difference of gross photosynthesis (A(sub g)) and respiration (R) per unit ground area. Available field observations show that R is a large and variable fraction of A(sub g), although it is generally recognized that there are considerable difficulties in determining these fluxes, and thus pose challenge in assessing the accuracy. Further uncertainties arise in extrapolating field measurements (which are acquired over a hectare or so area) to regional scale. Here, an approach is presented for determining these fluxes using satellite and ancillary data to be representative of regional scale and allow assessment of interannual variation. A, has been expressed as the product of radiation use efficiency for gross photosynthesis by an unstressed canopy and intercepted photosynthetically active radiation, which is then adjusted for stresses due to soil water shortage and temperature away from optimum. R has been calculated as the sum of growth and maintenance components (respectively, R(sub g) and R(sub m)).The R(sub m) has been determined from nitrogen content of plant tissue per unit ground area, while R(sub g) has been obtained as a fraction of the difference of A(sub g) and R(sub m). Results for five consecutive years (1986-1990) are presented for the Amazon-Tocontins, Mississippi, and Ob River basins.

  6. The economic potential of wood pellet production from alternative, low-value wood sources in the southeast of the US

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoefnagels, Ric; Junginger, Martin; Faaij, Andre

    2014-01-01

    The global demand for wood pellets used for energy purposes is growing. Therefore, increased amounts of wood pellets are produced from primary forestry products, such as pulp wood. The present analysis demonstrates that substantial amounts of alternative, low-value wood resources are available that

  7. Cloud Type Classification (cldtype) Value-Added Product

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flynn, Donna [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Shi, Yan [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Lim, K-S [Korean Atomic Energy Research Inst., Daejeon (South Korea); Riihimaki, Laura [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2017-08-15

    The Cloud Type (cldtype) value-added product (VAP) provides an automated cloud type classification based on macrophysical quantities derived from vertically pointing lidar and radar. Up to 10 layers of clouds are classified into seven cloud types based on predetermined and site-specific thresholds of cloud top, base and thickness. Examples of thresholds for selected U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility sites are provided in Tables 1 and 2. Inputs for the cldtype VAP include lidar and radar cloud boundaries obtained from the Active Remotely Sensed Cloud Location (ARSCL) and Surface Meteorological Systems (MET) data. Rain rates from MET are used to determine when radar signal attenuation precludes accurate cloud detection. Temporal resolution and vertical resolution for cldtype are 1 minute and 30 m respectively and match the resolution of ARSCL. The cldtype classification is an initial step for further categorization of clouds. It was developed for use by the Shallow Cumulus VAP to identify potential periods of interest to the LASSO model and is intended to find clouds of interest for a variety of users.

  8. Seasonal patterns in phytoplankton photosynthetic parameters and primary production at a coastal NW Mediterranean site

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josep M. Gasol

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available We carried out monthly photosynthesis-irradiance (P-E experiments with the 14C-method for 12 years (2003–2014 to determine the photosynthetic parameters and primary production of surface phytoplankton in the Blanes Bay Microbial Observatory, a coastal sampling station in the NW Mediterranean Sea. Our goal was to obtain seasonal trends and to establish the basis for detecting future changes of primary production in this oligotrophic area. The maximal photosynthetic rate PBmax ranged 30-fold (0.5-15 mg C mg Chl a–1 h–1, averaged 3.7 mg C mg Chl a–1 h–1 (±0.25 SE and was highest in August and lowest in April and December. We only observed photoinhibition twice. The initial or light-limited slope of the P-E relationship, αB, was low, averaging 0.007 mg C mg Chl a–1 h–1 (μmol photons m–2 s–1–1 (±0.001 SE, range 0.001-0.045 and showed the lowest values in spring (April-June. The light saturation parameter or saturation irradiance, EK, averaged 711 μmol photons m–2 s–1 (± 58.4 SE and tended to be higher in spring and lower in winter. Phytoplankton assemblages were typically dominated by picoeukaryotes in early winter, diatoms in late autumn and late winter, dinoflagellates in spring and cyanobacteria in summer. Total particulate primary production averaged 1.45 mg C m-3 h–1 (±0.13 SE with highest values in winter (up to 8.50 mg C m-3 h–1 and lowest values in summer (summer average, 0.30 mg C m-3 h–1, while chlorophyll-specific primary production averaged 2.49 mg C mg Chl a–1 h–1 (±0.19, SE and peaked in summer (up to 12.0 mg C mg Chl a–1 h–1 in August. 14C-determined phytoplankton growth rates varied between ca. 0.3 d–1 in winter and 0.5 d–1 in summer and were within 60-80% of the maximal rates of growth, based on PBmax. Chlorophyll a was a good predictor of primary production only in the winter and autumn. Seasonality appeared to explain most of the variability in the studied variables, while

  9. Seasonal patterns in phytoplankton photosynthetic parameters and primary production at a coastal NW Mediterranean site

    KAUST Repository

    Gasol, Josep M.

    2016-10-11

    We carried out monthly photosynthesis-irradiance (P-E) experiments with the 14C-method for 12 years (2003–2014) to determine the photosynthetic parameters and primary production of surface phytoplankton in the Blanes Bay Microbial Observatory, a coastal sampling station in the NW Mediterranean Sea. Our goal was to obtain seasonal trends and to establish the basis for detecting future changes of primary production in this oligotrophic area. The maximal photosynthetic rate PBmax ranged 30-fold (0.5-15 mg C mg Chl a–1 h–1), averaged 3.7 mg C mg Chl a–1 h–1 (±0.25 SE) and was highest in August and lowest in April and December. We only observed photoinhibition twice. The initial or light-limited slope of the P-E relationship, αB, was low, averaging 0.007 mg C mg Chl a–1 h–1 (μmol photons m–2 s–1)–1 (±0.001 SE, range 0.001-0.045) and showed the lowest values in spring (April-June). The light saturation parameter or saturation irradiance, EK, averaged 711 μmol photons m–2 s–1 (±58.4 SE) and tended to be higher in spring and lower in winter. Phytoplankton assemblages were typically dominated by picoeukaryotes in early winter, diatoms in late autumn and late winter, dinoflagellates in spring and cyanobacteria in summer. Total particulate primary production averaged 1.45 mg C m–3 h–1 (±0.13 SE) with highest values in winter (up to 8.50 mg C m–3 h–1) and lowest values in summer (summer average, 0.30 mg C m–3 h–1), while chlorophyll-specific primary production averaged 2.49 mg C mg Chl a–1 h–1 (±0.19, SE) and peaked in summer (up to 12.0 mg C mg Chl a–1 h–1 in August). 14C-determined phytoplankton growth rates varied between ca. 0.3 d–1 in winter and 0.5 d–1 in summer and were within 60-80% of the maximal rates of growth, based on PBmax. Chlorophyll a was a good predictor of primary production only in the winter and autumn. Seasonality appeared to explain most of the variability in the studied variables, while

  10. Diagnostic value of multi-tumor markers protein biochip detection for primary pulmonary cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Fengpo; Wu Yiwei; Li Qingru; Fa Yihua

    2005-01-01

    To evaluate the diagnostic value of multi-tumor markers protein biochip detection for primary pulmonary cancer, 12 tumor markers including AFP, CEA, NSE, CA125, CA15-3, CA242, CA19-9, PSA, f-PSA, FER, β-HCG and HGH were measured by the protein biochip in the serum of 45 primary pulmonary cancer patients. Positive rate of tumor markers was FER (42.2%), CEA (35.6%), CA125 (24.4%), CA15-3 (17.8%), CA242 (13.3%), CA19-9 (11.1%), β-HCG(8.9%), HGH(6.7%), NSE(4.4%), AFP (0), f-PSA (0) and PSA (0), respectively. The rate of patients with one abnorma indicator was 57.8% except FER. The positive rate using multi-tumor markers protein biochip detection was significantly higher than that of single tumor marker detective method, and this detection can be used for the diagnosis of patients with primary pulmonary cancer. (authors)

  11. Perception of the economic value of primary care services: a Willingness to Pay study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín-Fernández, Jesús; Gómez-Gascón, Tomás; Oliva-Moreno, Juan; del Cura-González, María Isabel; Domínguez-Bidagor, Julia; Beamud-Lagos, Milagros; Sanz-Cuesta, Teresa

    2010-03-01

    Identify the economic value the user attributes to the visit to the family physician, in a setting of a National Health System, by the Willingness to Pay (WTP) expressed. Economic evaluation study, by the contingent valuation method. Questions were asked about WTP using a payment card format. Interviews were conducted with 451 subjects, in areas with different socioeconomic characteristics. An ordered probit was used to evaluate model's validity. Median WTP expressed was euro18 (interquartile range euro8-28), not including "zero-answers" of thirty-four subjects (7.5%). This value represents 2% of average adjusted family incomes. Patients with higher incomes or with chronic illnesses presented a probability of 5-14 percentage points of expressing a high WTP. For every point of increase of patient satisfaction, the probability of presenting a WTP in the lowest range decreases 7.0 percentage points. Subjects with a low education level and those older than 65 expressed a lower WTP. Accessibility, risk perception, nationality and having private insurance were not related to the WTP expressed. Users of primary care have a clear perception of the economic value of care received from the family physician, even in a framework of providing services financed by taxes and without cost at the moment of use. This value increases in subjects with higher incomes, with greater need for care, or more satisfied.

  12. Perspectives on the value of advanced medical imaging: a national survey of primary care physicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Christine M; Kramer, Erich; Colamonico, Jennifer; Duszak, Richard

    2015-05-01

    To understand perceptions of primary care physicians (PCPs) about the value of advanced medical imaging. A national quantitative survey of 500 PCPs was conducted using an online self-administered questionnaire. Questions focused on advanced medical imaging (CT, MRI, and PET) and its perceived impact on the delivery of patient care. Responses were stratified by physician demographics. Large majorities of the PCPs indicated that advanced imaging increases their diagnostic confidence (441; 88%); provides data not otherwise available (451; 90%); permits better clinical decision making (440; 88%); increases confidence in treatment choices (438; 88%), and shortens time to definitive diagnosis (430; 86%]). Most (424; 85%) believe that patient care would be negatively affected without access to advanced imaging. PCPs whose clinical careers predated the proliferation of advanced imaging modalities (>20 years of practice) assigned higher value to advanced imaging on several dimensions compared with younger physicians whose training overlapped widespread technology availability. By a variety of metrics, large majorities of PCPs believe that advanced medical imaging provides considerable value to patient care. Those whose careers predated the widespread availability of advanced imaging tended to associate it with even higher value. Copyright © 2015 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. The Effect of Improving Primary Care Depression Management on Employee Absenteeism and Productivity A Randomized Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rost, Kathryn; Smith, Jeffrey L.; Dickinson, Miriam

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To test whether an intervention to improve primary care depression management significantly improves productivity at work and absenteeism over 2 years. Setting and Subjects: Twelve community primary care practices recruiting depressed primary care patients identified in a previsit screening. Research Design: Practices were stratified by depression treatment patterns before randomization to enhanced or usual care. After delivering brief training, enhanced care clinicians provided improved depression management over 24 months. The research team evaluated productivity and absenteeism at baseline, 6, 12, 18, and 24 months in 326 patients who reported full-or part-time work at one or more completed waves. Results: Employed patients in the enhanced care condition reported 6.1% greater productivity and 22.8% less absenteeism over 2 years. Consistent with its impact on depression severity and emotional role functioning, intervention effects were more observable in consistently employed subjects where the intervention improved productivity by 8.2% over 2 years at an estimated annual value of $1982 per depressed full-time equivalent and reduced absenteeism by 28.4% or 12.3 days over 2 years at an estimated annual value of $619 per depressed full-time equivalent. Conclusions: This trial, which is the first to our knowledge to demonstrate that improving the quality of care for any chronic disease has positive consequences for productivity and absenteeism, encourages formal cost-benefit research to assess the potential return-on-investment employers of stable workforces can realize from using their purchasing power to encourage better depression treatment for their employees. PMID:15550800

  14. The effect of improving primary care depression management on employee absenteeism and productivity. A randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rost, Kathryn; Smith, Jeffrey L; Dickinson, Miriam

    2004-12-01

    To test whether an intervention to improve primary care depression management significantly improves productivity at work and absenteeism over 2 years. Twelve community primary care practices recruiting depressed primary care patients identified in a previsit screening. Practices were stratified by depression treatment patterns before randomization to enhanced or usual care. After delivering brief training, enhanced care clinicians provided improved depression management over 24 months. The research team evaluated productivity and absenteeism at baseline, 6, 12, 18, and 24 months in 326 patients who reported full-or part-time work at one or more completed waves. Employed patients in the enhanced care condition reported 6.1% greater productivity and 22.8% less absenteeism over 2 years. Consistent with its impact on depression severity and emotional role functioning, intervention effects were more observable in consistently employed subjects where the intervention improved productivity by 8.2% over 2 years at an estimated annual value of US 1982 dollars per depressed full-time equivalent and reduced absenteeism by 28.4% or 12.3 days over 2 years at an estimated annual value of US 619 dollars per depressed full-time equivalent. This trial, which is the first to our knowledge to demonstrate that improving the quality of care for any chronic disease has positive consequences for productivity and absenteeism, encourages formal cost-benefit research to assess the potential return-on-investment employers of stable workforces can realize from using their purchasing power to encourage better depression treatment for their employees.

  15. Metabolic engineering of Cyanobacteria and microalgae for enhanced production of biofuels and high-value products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomaa, M A; Al-Haj, L; Abed, R M M

    2016-10-01

    A lot of research has been performed on Cyanobacteria and microalgae with the aim to produce numerous biotechnological products. However, native strains have a few shortcomings, like limitations in cultivation, harvesting and product extraction, which prevents reaching optimal production value at lowest costs. Such limitations require the intervention of genetic engineering to produce strains with superior properties. Promising advancements in the cultivation of Cyanobacteria and microalgae have been achieved by improving photosynthetic efficiency through increasing RuBisCO activity and truncation of light-harvesting antennae. Genetic engineering has also contributed to final product extraction by inducing autolysis and product secretory systems, to enable direct product recovery without going through costly extraction steps. In this review, we summarize the different enzymes and pathways that have been targeted thus far for improving cultivation aspects, harvesting and product extraction in Cyanobacteria and microalgae. With synthetic biology advancements, genetically engineered strains can be generated to resolve demanding process issues and achieve economic practicality. This comprehensive overview of gene modifications will be useful to researchers in the field to employ on their strains to increase their yields and improve the economic feasibility of the production process. © 2016 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  16. Economic values of production and functional traits, including residual feed intake, in Finnish milk production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hietala, P; Wolfová, M; Wolf, J; Kantanen, J; Juga, J

    2014-02-01

    Improving the feed efficiency of dairy cattle has a substantial effect on the economic efficiency and on the reduction of harmful environmental effects of dairy production through lower feeding costs and emissions from dairy farming. To assess the economic importance of feed efficiency in the breeding goal for dairy cattle, the economic values for the current breeding goal traits and the additional feed efficiency traits for Finnish Ayrshire cattle under production circumstances in 2011 were determined. The derivation of economic values was based on a bioeconomic model in which the profit of the production system was calculated, using the generated steady state herd structure. Considering beef production from dairy farms, 2 marketing strategies for surplus calves were investigated: (A) surplus calves were sold at a young age and (B) surplus calves were fattened on dairy farms. Both marketing strategies were unprofitable when subsidies were not included in the revenues. When subsidies were taken into account, a positive profitability was observed in both marketing strategies. The marginal economic values for residual feed intake (RFI) of breeding heifers and cows were -25.5 and -55.8 €/kg of dry matter per day per cow and year, respectively. The marginal economic value for RFI of animals in fattening was -29.5 €/kg of dry matter per day per cow and year. To compare the economic importance among traits, the standardized economic weight of each trait was calculated as the product of the marginal economic value and the genetic standard deviation; the standardized economic weight expressed as a percentage of the sum of all standardized economic weights was called relative economic weight. When not accounting for subsidies, the highest relative economic weight was found for 305-d milk yield (34% in strategy A and 29% in strategy B), which was followed by protein percentage (13% in strategy A and 11% in strategy B). The third most important traits were calving

  17. Value-added products from chicken feather fiber and protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Xiuling

    Worldwide poultry consumption has generated a huge amount of feather "waste" annually. Currently, the feather has a low value-being used for animal feed in the world. The quality of fibrous air filters depend on their main component, fibers. The main physical structure of chicken feathers is barbs which can be used directly as fibers. They have small diameter, which makes them a good choice for air filtration. The main chemical structure of chicken feathers is structural fibrous protein, keratin. Therefore, chicken feathers could potentially be used for protein fiber production. To obtain chicken feather fibers, barbs were stripped from the quills by a stripping device and separated with a blender. Some feather fibers were entangled with polyester staple fibers, and needlepunched to form a nonwoven fabric. Some feather fibers were blended with CelBond(TM) bi-component polyester as binder fibers, and pressed between two hot plates to produce thermobonded nonwovens. Whole chicken feathers were ground into powder and their keratin was reduced in water. The reduced keratin was salt precipitated, dried and dissolved in ionic liquid with/without bleach cotton. The reduced chicken feather keratin ionic liquid solutions were spun into regenerated fibers through dry-jet wet spinning. The needlepunched and thermobonded nonwovens were tested for filtration and other properties. With an increase of areal density and feather fiber composition, the air permeability of the needlepunched nonwovens decreased, and their filtration efficiency and pressure drop both increased. The case can be made that feather fibers gave fabrics better filtration at the same fabric weight, but at the expense of air permeability and pressure drop. The scrim and needlepunching process improved the filtration efficiency. Their strength depended on scrim. The hot-press process was very simple. The thermobonded nonwovens had very high air permeability. In them, there was also an inverse relation between

  18. The Place and Importance of Values Education in 4.th and 5th. Grade Primary School Social Studies Textbooks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Fatih Yiğit

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The term ‘value’ has been used in many different meanings until today in different areas and it has been the reason for confusion in values education. In this sense, Weber (1990 has stated that different approaches to the term ‘value’ have played a negative role for the production of values. Kohlberg (1981 has defined ‘value’ as giving moral decisions and acting accordingly while Hill (1991 interpreted values as the beliefs that people care and direct the life of individuals. On the other hand, Veugelers (2000 defined values as the beliefs that help individuals to decide what is good or evil. International organizations also saw the need to define values in accordance with their missions. In the Declaration of Human Rights by the United Nations, it is indicated that education should strengthen human rights and freedom while supporting tolerance among different religious groups, ethnicities and nations (Universal Declaration of Human Rights, 1948. UNESCO is another organization that defined the role of values in education. According to the report by UNESCO, education becomes valuable if one learns (a how to know (b how to do, (c how to live together and (d how to be. In this sense, UNESCO has also claimed that in order to develop intercultural and interfaith dialogue, common values accepted by everyone should be given in schools. It has been observed that critical thinking and problem solving skills were given in values education programs in western societies while those skills have started to be taught in Turkey recently. In this study, the main values education movements and the processes and principles of teaching values education in real life are analyzed. We looked at the place of values education in 4th and 5th grade Social Studies textbooks in Turkey. After analyzing the basic processes and principles of values education, we looked at the values to be given to the students in the textbooks. Values education approaches have

  19. Multi-Angle Snowflake Camera Value-Added Product

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shkurko, Konstantin [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Garrett, T. [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Gaustad, K [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2016-12-01

    The Multi-Angle Snowflake Camera (MASC) addresses a need for high-resolution multi-angle imaging of hydrometeors in freefall with simultaneous measurement of fallspeed. As illustrated in Figure 1, the MASC consists of three cameras, separated by 36°, each pointing at an identical focal point approximately 10 cm away. Located immediately above each camera, a light aims directly at the center of depth of field for its corresponding camera. The focal point at which the cameras are aimed lies within a ring through which hydrometeors fall. The ring houses a system of near-infrared emitter-detector pairs, arranged in two arrays separated vertically by 32 mm. When hydrometeors pass through the lower array, they simultaneously trigger all cameras and lights. Fallspeed is calculated from the time it takes to traverse the distance between the upper and lower triggering arrays. The trigger electronics filter out ambient light fluctuations associated with varying sunlight and shadows. The microprocessor onboard the MASC controls the camera system and communicates with the personal computer (PC). The image data is sent via FireWire 800 line, and fallspeed (and camera control) is sent via a Universal Serial Bus (USB) line that relies on RS232-over-USB serial conversion. See Table 1 for specific details on the MASC located at the Oliktok Point Mobile Facility on the North Slope of Alaska. The value-added product (VAP) detailed in this documentation analyzes the raw data (Section 2.0) using Python: images rely on OpenCV image processing library and derived aggregated statistics rely on some clever averaging. See Sections 4.1 and 4.2 for more details on what variables are computed.

  20. Large historical growth in global terrestrial gross primary production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campbell, J. E.; Berry, J. A.; Seibt, U.; Smith, S. J.; Montzka, S. A.; Launois, T.; Belviso, S.; Bopp, L.; Laine, M.

    2017-04-05

    Growth in terrestrial gross primary production (GPP) may provide a feedback for climate change, but there is still strong disagreement on the extent to which biogeochemical processes may suppress this GPP growth at the ecosystem to continental scales. The consequent uncertainty in modeling of future carbon storage by the terrestrial biosphere constitutes one of the largest unknowns in global climate projections for the next century. Here we provide a global, measurement-based estimate of historical GPP growth using long-term atmospheric carbonyl sulfide (COS) records derived from ice core, firn, and ambient air samples. We interpret these records using a model that relates changes in the COS concentration to changes in its sources and sinks, the largest of which is proportional to GPP. The COS history was most consistent with simulations that assume a large historical GPP growth. Carbon-climate models that assume little to no GPP growth predicted trajectories of COS concentration over the anthropogenic era that differ from those observed. Continued COS monitoring may be useful for detecting ongoing changes in GPP while extending the ice core record to glacial cycles could provide further opportunities to evaluate earth system models.

  1. Spatial scaling of net primary productivity using subpixel landcover information

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, X. F.; Chen, Jing M.; Ju, Wei M.; Ren, L. L.

    2008-10-01

    Gridding the land surface into coarse homogeneous pixels may cause important biases on ecosystem model estimations of carbon budget components at local, regional and global scales. These biases result from overlooking subpixel variability of land surface characteristics. Vegetation heterogeneity is an important factor introducing biases in regional ecological modeling, especially when the modeling is made on large grids. This study suggests a simple algorithm that uses subpixel information on the spatial variability of land cover type to correct net primary productivity (NPP) estimates, made at coarse spatial resolutions where the land surface is considered as homogeneous within each pixel. The algorithm operates in such a way that NPP obtained from calculations made at coarse spatial resolutions are multiplied by simple functions that attempt to reproduce the effects of subpixel variability of land cover type on NPP. Its application to a carbon-hydrology coupled model(BEPS-TerrainLab model) estimates made at a 1-km resolution over a watershed (named Baohe River Basin) located in the southwestern part of Qinling Mountains, Shaanxi Province, China, improved estimates of average NPP as well as its spatial variability.

  2. Investigating smoke's influence on primary production throughout the Amazon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flanner, M. G.; Mahowald, N. M.; Zender, C. S.; Randerson, J. T.; Tosca, M. G.

    2007-12-01

    Smoke from annual burning in the Amazon causes large reduction in surface insolation and increases the diffuse fraction of photosynthetically-active radiation (PAR). These effects have competing influence on gross primary production (GPP). Recent studies indicate that the sign of net influence depends on aerosol optical depth, but the magnitude of smoke's effect on continental-scale carbon cycling is very poorly constrained and may constitute an important term of fire's net impact on carbon storage. To investigate widespread effects of Amazon smoke on surface radiation properties, we apply a version of the NCAR Community Atmosphere Model with prognostic aerosol transport, driven with re-analysis winds. Carbon aerosol emissions are derived from the Global Fire Emissions Database (GFED). We use AERONET observations to identify model biases in aerosol optical depth, single-scatter albedo, and surface radiative forcing, and prescribe new aerosol optical properties based on field observations to improve model agreement with AERONET data. Finally, we quantify a potential range of smoke-induced change in large-scale GPP based on: 1) ground measurements of GPP in the Amazon as a function of aerosol optical depth and diffuse fraction of PAR, and 2) empirical functions of ecosystem-scale photosynthesis rates currently employed in models such as the Community Land Model (CLM).

  3. The 'added value' GPs bring to commissioning: a qualitative study in primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perkins, Neil; Coleman, Anna; Wright, Michael; Gadsby, Erica; McDermott, Imelda; Petsoulas, Christina; Checkland, Kath

    2014-11-01

    The 2012 Health and Social Care Act in England replaced primary care trusts with clinical commissioning groups (CCGs) as the main purchasing organisations. These new organisations are GP-led, and it was claimed that this increased clinical input would significantly improve commissioning practice. To explore some of the key assumptions underpinning CCGs, and to examine the claim that GPs bring 'added value' to commissioning. In-depth interviews with clinicians and managers across seven CCGs in England between April and September 2013. A total of 40 clinicians and managers were interviewed. Interviews focused on the perceived 'added value' that GPs bring to commissioning. Claims to GP 'added value' centred on their intimate knowledge of their patients. It was argued that this detailed and concrete knowledge improves service design and that a close working relationship between GPs and managers strengthens the ability of managers to negotiate. However, responders also expressed concerns about the large workload that they face and about the difficulty in engaging with the wider body of GPs. GPs have been involved in commissioning in many ways since fundholding in the 1990s, and claims such as these are not new. The key question is whether these new organisations better support and enable the effective use of this knowledge. Furthermore, emphasis on experiential knowledge brings with it concerns about representativeness and the extent to which other voices are heard. Finally, the implicit privileging of GPs' personal knowledge ahead of systematic public health intelligence also requires exploration. © British Journal of General Practice 2014.

  4. Natural forcings on a transformed territory overshoot thresholds of primary productivity in the Guadalquivir estuary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz, J.; Macías, D.; Navarro, G.

    2017-09-01

    A three year-long quasi continuum sampling dataset on the Guadalquivir estuary water quality was used to assess the role of light availability on its biological production. We found that inorganic nutrients within the estuary are very high (with mean values for inorganic nitrogen and phosphorous of 285 and 2.4 μM respectively) while phytoplankton biomass remains low most of the time (with a mean value of 2.6 mg/m3). A strong relationship between phytoplankton biomass and water turbidity was found indicating that, indeed, light availability is the major constraint of primary production in this system. Most of the time this limitation of primary production is not associated to enhanced turbidity connected to fresh water inputs. Instead, our data indicate that, independently of freshwater inputs, the photosynthesis is restricted by tidal forcings enhancing turbidity in an estuary that has been highly modified. Our results match with classical theories on the functioning of well-mixed, estuarine ecosystems as well as with recent modeling exercises. We also discuss the potential impacts of this particular characteristic of some estuarine systems for their management and regulatory control.

  5. Global land-surface primary productivity based upon Nimbus-7 37 GHz data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhury, B. J.

    1988-01-01

    Accumulation and renewal of organic matter as quantified through net primary productivity (NPP) is considered a very major function of the biosphere, and its estimation is crucial in understanding the carbon cycle. A physically-based model relating NPP to the difference of vertically and horizontally polarized brightness temperatures (Delta T) observed at 37 GHz frequency of the scanning multichannel microwave radiometer on board the Nimbus-7 satellite is used for fitting areally averaged values of NPP and Delta T for five biomes. The land-surface NPP within 80 deg N to 55 deg S is then calculated using the Delta T data and compared with other estimates.

  6. Design considerations of fission and corrosion product in primary system of MONJU

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yanagisawa, T.; Akagane, K.; Yamamoto, K.; Kawashima, K.

    1976-01-01

    General influence of fission and corrosion products in primary system on MONJU plant design is reviewed. Various research and development works are now in progress to decrease the generation rate, to remove the products more effectively and to develop the methods of evaluation the behaviour of radioactive products. The inventory and distribution of fission and corrosion products in the primary circuit of MONJU are given. The radiation levels on the primary components are estimated to be several roentgens per hour. (author)

  7. Reducing the uncertainty of the primary damage production in Fe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bjorkas, C.; Nordlund, K.

    2007-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: One of the key questions for understanding neutron irradiation damage buildup in fission and fusion reactor steels is knowing the primary damage state produced by neutron-induced atomic recoils in Fe. Supporting this is our recent study revealing that the initial damage in Fe 0.9 Cr 0.1 is essentially the same as in pure Fe [1]. In spite of decades of study, the question of what the amount and distribution of defects in Fe is, has remained highly unclear. Different computer simulations modules have given a good qualitative understanding of the cascade development [1,2]. However, quantitative differences of more than a factor of three have remained in the predicted clustered defect production numbers [2]. The disagreements between the potentials pose problems for finding a reliable predictive model for the behavior of Fe under irradiation. In this study we analyze the initial damage as predicted by three recent interatomic potentials for Fe. These are well suited for a comparison because they have very different physical motivations and functional forms, but are comparable in overall quality and in particular reproduce the energetics of interstitials in different configurations well. The potentials are those by Ackland and Mendelev et al. (AMS) [3], the 'magnetic' potential by Dudarev and Derlet (DD) [4] and the Tersoff-like analytical potential by Mueller, Erhart and Albe (MEA) [5]. The DD and MEA potentials were modified by us to describe high-energy repulsive interactions well. All potentials were then used in recoil collision cascade simulations carried out and analyzed in exactly the same manner for all potentials. Analysis of the resulting damage showed a much smaller uncertainty regarding the damage production than that of previous potentials. The total defect production numbers essentially agree within the statistical uncertainty for the three potentials. Some differences remains regarding the defect clustered fractions, but

  8. Primary Food Processing : Cornerstone of plant-based food production and the bio-economy in Europe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Logatcheva, K.; Galen, van M.A.

    2015-01-01

    This report describes the supply chains and special characteristics of plant-based primary food processors; producers of (wheat) flour, starches, vegetable oils and fats, sugar, and cocoa. The production value, direct employment in the industry, and indirect employment in farming were calculated.

  9. Diagnostic value of DIAGNOdent in detecting caries under composite restorations of primary molars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sichani, Ava Vali; Javadinejad, Shahrzad; Ghafari, Roshanak

    2016-01-01

    Direct observation cannot detect caries under restorations; therefore, the aim of this study was to compare the accuracy of radiographs and DIAGNOdent in detecting caries under restorations in primary teeth using histologic evaluation. A total of 74 previously extracted primary molars (37 with occlusal caries and 37 without caries) were used. Class 1 cavity preparations were made on each tooth by a single clinician and then the preparations were filled with composite resin. The accuracy of radiographs and DIAGNOdent in detecting caries was compared using histologic evaluation. The data were analyzed by SPSS version 21 using Chi-square, Mc Namara statistical tests and receiver operating characteristic curve. The significance was set at 0.05. The sensitivity and specificity for DIAGNOdent were 70.97 and 83.72, respectively. Few false negative results were observed, and the positive predictive value was high (+PV = 75.9) and the area under curve was more than 0.70 therefore making DIAGNOdenta great method for detecting caries (P = 0.0001). Two observers evaluated the radiographs and both observers had low sensitivity ( first observer: 48.39) (second observer: 51.61) and high specificity (both observers: 79.07). The +PV was lower than DIAGNOdent and the area under curve for both observers was less than 0.70. However, the difference between the two methods was not significant. DIAGNOdent showed a greater accuracy in detecting secondary caries under primary molar restorations, compared to radiographs. Although DIAGNOdent is an effective method for detecting caries under composite restorations, it is better to be used as an adjunctive method alongside other detecting procedures.

  10. Predictive and Prognostic Value of sPRR in Patients with Primary Epithelial Ovarian Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katrin Kreienbring

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. The purpose of the present study was to analyze the predictive and prognostic role of soluble (prorenin receptor (sPRR as a biomarker for clinicopathological outcome in patients with primary epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC. As part of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS whose activity is known to increase in ovarian cancer patients, the relation of sPRR and ovarian cancer should be further investigated. Patients and Methods. In this study 197 patients with primary EOC in our institution from 2000 to 2011 were included. sPRR was determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA in preoperative taken blood sera. Associations with clinicopathological outcome were analyzed and serum levels of sPRR in patients have been compared to those in healthy specimen. Kaplan-Meier and logistic/Cox regression assessed the impact of the markers on progression-free survival (PFS and overall survival (OS. Results. There have been no correlations proved of sPRR levels with neither clinicopathological factors nor prognostic data. Also the distribution of sPRR in patients and controls was normal. Conclusion. sPRR seems to have no predictive, prognostic, or diagnostic value in EOC. As several factors of the RAS which might indicate cancer events have been shown, sPRR seems not to be affected.

  11. Asymmetric Responses of Primary Productivity to Altered Precipitation Simulated by Land Surface Models across Three Long-term Grassland Sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, D.; Ciais, P.; Viovy, N.; Knapp, A.; Wilcox, K.; Bahn, M.; Smith, M. D.; Ito, A.; Arneth, A.; Harper, A. B.; Ukkola, A.; Paschalis, A.; Poulter, B.; Peng, C.; Reick, C. H.; Hayes, D. J.; Ricciuto, D. M.; Reinthaler, D.; Chen, G.; Tian, H.; Helene, G.; Zscheischler, J.; Mao, J.; Ingrisch, J.; Nabel, J.; Pongratz, J.; Boysen, L.; Kautz, M.; Schmitt, M.; Krohn, M.; Zeng, N.; Meir, P.; Zhang, Q.; Zhu, Q.; Hasibeder, R.; Vicca, S.; Sippel, S.; Dangal, S. R. S.; Fatichi, S.; Sitch, S.; Shi, X.; Wang, Y.; Luo, Y.; Liu, Y.; Piao, S.

    2017-12-01

    Changes in precipitation variability including the occurrence of extreme events strongly influence plant growth in grasslands. Field measurements of aboveground net primary production (ANPP) in temperate grasslands suggest a positive asymmetric response with wet years resulting in ANPP gains larger than ANPP declines in dry years. Whether land surface models used for historical simulations and future projections of the coupled carbon-water system in grasslands are capable to simulate such non-symmetrical ANPP responses remains an important open research question. In this study, we evaluate the simulated responses of grassland primary productivity to altered precipitation with fourteen land surface models at the three sites of Colorado Shortgrass Steppe (SGS), Konza prairie (KNZ) and Stubai Valley meadow (STU) along a rainfall gradient from dry to wet. Our results suggest that: (i) Gross primary production (GPP), NPP, ANPP and belowground NPP (BNPP) show nonlinear response curves (concave-down) in all the models, but with different curvatures and mean values. In contrast across the sites, primary production increases and then saturates along increasing precipitation with a flattening at the wetter site. (ii) Slopes of spatial relationships between modeled primary production and precipitation are steeper than the temporal slopes (obtained from inter-annual variations). (iii) Asymmetric responses under nominal precipitation range with modeled inter-annual primary production show large uncertainties, and model-ensemble median generally suggests negative asymmetry (greater declines in dry years than increases in wet years) across the three sites. (iv) Primary production at the drier site is predicted to more sensitive to precipitation compared to wetter site, and median sensitivity consistently indicates greater negative impacts of reduced precipitation than positive effects of increased precipitation under extreme conditions. This study implies that most models

  12. Measurement and evaluation of radioactive corrosion product behaviour in primary sodium circuits of JOYO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, K.; Iizawa, K.; Takahashi, K.; Zulquarnain, M.A.; Suzuki, S.; Kinjo, K.

    1992-01-01

    In the experimental fast reactor JOYO, the radioactive corrosion product (CP) measurement has been conducted in the primary sodium circuits during each annual inspection. The measured data has been analyzed by the computer code 'PSYCHE', which has been developed by PNC. Main results obtained from the measurements and/or calculations are as follows; (1) The dominant CP nuclide is 54 Mn followed by 60 Co and 58 Co. (2) Average surface gamma dose rate around the primary piping system at the 8th annual inspection is 0.96 mSv/h. The increasing rate of this value is 0.25 (mSv/h)/EFPY. (3) The calculated deposition densities of 54 Mn and 60 Co agree with measured ones within factor of 0.7 ∼ 1.7. (author)

  13. Impact of primary care depression intervention on employment and workplace conflict outcomes: is value added?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Jeffrey L; Rost, Kathryn M; Nutting, Paul A; Libby, Anne M; Elliott, Carl E; Pyne, Jeffrey M

    2002-03-01

    unemployment expenditures and increased tax receipts may be considerable. Although similar primary care depression interventions have been shown to produce comparable effects on subsequent employment at one year, replications in larger samples of depressed, employed patients in different economic climates may be necessary to increase the generalizability and precision of estimates. Primary care interventions that enhance depression treatment and improve clinical outcomes can contribute meaningful added value to society by improving employment and workplace outcomes. Federal/state governments may realize economic benefits from reduced unemployment expenditures and increased tax receipts should primary care depression interventions that improve employment outcomes be broadly disseminated. Policy initiatives to increase the dissemination of such interventions may be an innovative approach for improving labor force participation by depressed individuals. Formal cost-benefit analyses are needed to explore whether economic benefits to societal stakeholders from these and other labor outcomes equal or exceed the incremental costs of disseminating similar primary care interventions nationally. Researchers in other nations may wish to consider investigating the impact primary care depression interventions might have on employment and workplace outcomes in their countries.

  14. CONSUMER ENGAGEMENT AND VALUE ENHANCEMENT THROUGH PRODUCT INDIVIDUALISATION

    OpenAIRE

    Armellini, Juan Pablo

    2017-01-01

    Product customisation has always been a regular practice as a form of self or group identification. Previous studies have demonstrated that when investing time and effort to customise a product, an emotional attachment to that product develops. Since the 1980s, new technologies in design, manufacturing and communications have facilitated customisation practices for mass manufacturers as well as for individual consumers. For example, computer algorithms can now automate customisation (i.e. ind...

  15. Dimensionality of the Consumer Perceived Value of Product Colour

    OpenAIRE

    Kiehelä, Hanna

    2014-01-01

    Consumers’ product assessments are largely based on colour, and a product’s colour can increase consumer satisfaction, awareness and loyalty. However, existing colour research is fragmented and calls for theoretically-enhanced understandings of the role of colour in consumer product perception. The existing colour research mainly focuses on consumers’ immediate reactions when exposed to colours although studies show that consumers evaluate products differently in purchase and in use. There...

  16. Derivation of economic values for production traits in aquaculture species

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, K.P.E.; Berentsen, P.B.M.; Besson, M.B.; Komen, J.

    2017-01-01

    Background:
    In breeding programs for aquaculture species, breeding goal traits are often weighted based on the desired gains but economic gain would be higher if economic values were used instead. The objectives of this study were: (1) to develop a bio-economic model to derive economic values

  17. Assessing the nutritive value of waterweeds to livestock production ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Paspalum scrobiculatum and Dicksonia antartica recorded the least value at 24 and 48 hours incubation while Nymphaea lotus and Dicksonia antartica had the least value at 72 and 96 hours incubation. Heteranthera callifolia had the highest organic matter digestibility (%) while the least short chain fatty acid (μmol) was ...

  18. Benthic Light Availability Improves Predictions of Riverine Primary Production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirk, L.; Cohen, M. J.

    2017-12-01

    Light is a fundamental control on photosynthesis, and often the only control strongly correlated with gross primary production (GPP) in streams and rivers; yet it has received far less attention than nutrients. Because benthic light is difficult to measure in situ, surrogates such as open sky irradiance are often used. Several studies have now refined methods to quantify canopy and water column attenuation of open sky light in order to estimate the amount of light that actually reaches the benthos. Given the additional effort that measuring benthic light requires, we should ask if benthic light always improves our predictions of GPP compared to just open sky irradiance. We use long-term, high-resolution dissolved oxygen, turbidity, dissolved organic matter (fDOM), and irradiance data from streams and rivers in north-central Florida, US across gradients of size and color to build statistical models of benthic light that predict GPP. Preliminary results on a large, clear river show only modest model improvements over open sky irradiance, even in heavily canopied reaches with pulses of tannic water. However, in another spring-fed river with greater connectivity to adjacent wetlands - and hence larger, more frequent pulses of tannic water - the model improved dramatically with the inclusion of fDOM (model R2 improved from 0.28 to 0.68). River shade modeling efforts also suggest that knowing benthic light will greatly enhance our ability to predict GPP in narrower, forested streams flowing in particular directions. Our objective is to outline conditions where an assessment of benthic light conditions would be necessary for riverine metabolism studies or management strategies.

  19. Consequences of buffelgrass pasture development for primary productivity, perennial plant richness, and vegetation structure in the drylands of Sonora, Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franklin, Kimberly; Molina-Freaner, Francisco

    2010-12-01

    In large parts of northern Mexico native plant communities are being converted to non-native buffelgrass (Pennisetum ciliare) pastures, and this conversion could fundamentally alter primary productivity and species richness. In Sonora, Mexico land conversion is occurring at a regional scale along a rainfall-driven gradient of primary productivity, across which native plant communities transition from desert scrub to thorn scrub. We used a paired sampling design to compare a satellite-derived index of primary productivity, richness of perennial plant species, and canopy-height profiles of native plant communities with buffelgrass pastures. We sampled species richness across a gradient of primary productivity in desert scrub and thorn scrub vegetation to examine the influence of site productivity on the outcomes of land conversion. We also examined the influence of pasture age on species richness of perennial plants. Index values of primary productivity were lower in buffelgrass pastures than in native vegetation, which suggests a reduction in primary productivity. Land conversion reduced species richness by approximately 50% at local and regional scales, reduced tree and shrub cover by 78%, and reduced canopy height. Land conversion disproportionately reduced shrub species richness, which reflects the common practice among Sonoran ranchers of conserving certain tree and cactus species. Site productivity did not affect the outcomes of land conversion. The age of a buffelgrass pasture was unrelated to species richness within the pasture, which suggests that passive recovery of species richness to preconversion levels is unlikely. Our findings demonstrate that land conversion can result in large losses of plant species richness at local and regional scales and in substantial changes to primary productivity and vegetation structure, which casts doubt on the feasibility of restoring native plant communities without active intervention on the part of land managers.

  20. The value of CT in localizing primary and stomach-originated masses in the lesser sac

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dong Peng; Wang Bin; Zhang Shizhuang; Chang Guanghui; Sun Xihe; Cheng Xin

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the normal CT manifestation of the vascular arch of the gastric lesser curvature, and to further probe the value of CT in the localization diagnosis of the primary and stomach-originated masses in the lesser sac. Methods: Contrast-enhanced CT scanning was performed in 51 normal individuals. Emphasis of image observation was focused on the CT manifestations of vascular arch of the gastric lesser curvature and the relation between the vascular arch and the gastric wall. Also contrast- enhanced CT scan was performed for seventeen cases of primary and stomach-originated masses in the lesser sac subsequently proved by surgery and pathology. Image analysis was focused on the relation between the mass and the vascular arch and its branches of the gastric lesser curvature, the shape of the mass, and the relation between the mass and the gastric wall. Results: The vascular arch of the gastric lesser curvature was clearly visualized in the fifty normal individuals. The tributaries of the vascular arch near the cardiac part, gastric corpus, and pyloric part were revealed in 42, 10 and 7 cases respectively. The vascular arch was in close contact with the gastric wall in 38 cases. Among the 17 patients, 13 cases demonstrated the obliteration of the transparent fat plane between the mass and the gastric wall. In 6 patients with stomach- originated masses, 5 patients showed the stretching of vascular arch tributaries adjacent to the masses, and no vascular arch and its tributaries could be not visualized between the masses and the stomach. In 11 patients with primary masses in the lesser sac, vascular arch were showed between the masses and the stomach in 10 cases, and no stretching of vascular arch tributaries adjacent to the masses could be showed. Conclusions: CT scan can clearly depict the normal vascular arch and its branches of the gastric lesser curvature. Based on the relation between the vascular arch and the gastric wall, the presence of fat

  1. High predictive value of brain MRI imaging in primary mitochondrial respiratory chain deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Beaurepaire, Isaure; Grévent, David; Rio, Marlène; Desguerre, Isabelle; de Lonlay, Pascale; Levy, Raphaël; Dangouloff-Ros, Volodia; Bonnefont, Jean-Paul; Barcia, Giulia; Funalot, Benoit; Besmond, Claude; Metodiev, Metodi D; Ruzzenente, Benedetta; Assouline, Zahra; Munnich, Arnold; Rötig, Agnès; Boddaert, Nathalie

    2018-06-01

    Because the mitochondrial respiratory chain (RC) is ubiquitous, its deficiency can theoretically give rise to any symptom in any organ or tissue at any age with any mode of inheritance, owing to the twofold genetic origin of respiratory enzyme machinery, that is, nuclear and mitochondrial. Not all respiratory enzyme deficiencies are primary and secondary or artefactual deficiency is frequently observed, leading to a number of misleading conclusions and inappropriate investigations in clinical practice. This study is aimed at investigating the potential role of brain MRI in distinguishing primary RC deficiency from phenocopies and other aetiologies. Starting from a large series of 189 patients (median age: 3.5 years (8 days-56 years), 58% males) showing signs of RC enzyme deficiency, for whom both brain MRIs and disease-causing mutations were available, we retrospectively studied the positive predictive value (PPV) and the positive likelihood ratio (LR+) of brain MRI imaging and its ability to discriminate between two groups: primary deficiency of the mitochondrial RC machinery and phenocopies. Detection of (1) brainstem hyperintensity with basal ganglia involvement (P≤0.001) and (2) lactate peak with either brainstem or basal ganglia hyperintensity was highly suggestive of primary RC deficiency (P≤0.01). Fourteen items had a PPV>95% and LR+ was greater than 9 for seven signs. Biallelic SLC19A3 mutations represented the main differential diagnosis. Non-significant differences between the two groups were found for cortical/subcortical atrophy, leucoencephalopathy and involvement of caudate nuclei, spinothalamic tract and corpus callosum. Based on these results and owing to invasiveness of skeletal muscle biopsies and cost of high-throughput DNA sequencing, we suggest giving consideration to brain MRI imaging as a diagnostic marker and an informative investigation to be performed in patients showing signs of RC enzyme deficiency. © Article author(s) (or their

  2. Value addition to locally produced soybean in Ghana: production of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ghana produces about 50,000 metric tons of soy beans per annum, of which only about 15 metric tons are utilized. One aspect of utilizing the beans is in the production of soy sauce, a product whose demand is on the increase due to changing food habits of the Ghanaian society. A preliminary attempt to produce soy sauce ...

  3. Chemical and nutritional values of maize and maize products ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Maize and maize products in selected grain markets within Kaduna, Nigeria, were obtained and investigated for proximate and mineral composition analysis using Atomic Absorption Spectrophotometer (AAS) and flame photometer. Proximate composition of maize and maize products were in the range of 11.6- 20 .0% ...

  4. Which interventions offer best value for money in primary prevention of cardiovascular disease?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linda J Cobiac

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Despite many decades of declining mortality rates in the Western world, cardiovascular disease remains the leading cause of death worldwide. In this research we evaluate the optimal mix of lifestyle, pharmaceutical and population-wide interventions for primary prevention of cardiovascular disease. METHODS AND FINDINGS: In a discrete time Markov model we simulate the ischaemic heart disease and stroke outcomes and cost impacts of intervention over the lifetime of all Australian men and women, aged 35 to 84 years, who have never experienced a heart disease or stroke event. Best value for money is achieved by mandating moderate limits on salt in the manufacture of bread, margarine and cereal. A combination of diuretic, calcium channel blocker, ACE inhibitor and low-cost statin, for everyone with at least 5% five-year risk of cardiovascular disease, is also cost-effective, but lifestyle interventions aiming to change risky dietary and exercise behaviours are extremely poor value for money and have little population health benefit. CONCLUSIONS: There is huge potential for improving efficiency in cardiovascular disease prevention in Australia. A tougher approach from Government to mandating limits on salt in processed foods and reducing excessive statin prices, and a shift away from lifestyle counselling to more efficient absolute risk-based prescription of preventive drugs, could cut health care costs while improving population health.

  5. Michigan's fee-for-value physician incentive program reduces spending and improves quality in primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemak, Christy Harris; Nahra, Tammie A; Cohen, Genna R; Erb, Natalie D; Paustian, Michael L; Share, David; Hirth, Richard A

    2015-04-01

    As policy makers and others seek to reduce health care cost growth while improving health care quality, one approach gaining momentum is fee-for-value reimbursement. This payment strategy maintains the traditional fee-for-service arrangement but includes quality and spending incentives. We examined Blue Cross Blue Shield of Michigan's Physician Group Incentive Program, which uses a fee-for-value approach focused on primary care physicians. We analyzed the program's impact on quality and spending from 2008 to 2011 for over three million beneficiaries in over 11,000 physician practices. Participation in the incentive program was associated with approximately 1.1 percent lower total spending for adults (5.1 percent lower for children) and the same or improved performance on eleven of fourteen quality measures over time. Our findings contribute to the growing body of evidence about the potential effectiveness of models that align payment with cost and quality performance, and they demonstrate that it is possible to transform reimbursement within a fee-for-service framework to encourage and incentivize physicians to provide high-quality care, while also reducing costs. Project HOPE—The People-to-People Health Foundation, Inc.

  6. Diagnostic value of kinetic analysis using dynamic FDG PET in immunocompetent patients with primary CNS lymphoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishiyama, Yoshihiro; Yamamoto, Yuka; Monden, Toshihide; Sasakawa, Yasuhiro; Satoh, Katashi; Ohkawa, Motoomi; Kawai, Nobuyuki

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the accumulation of FDG in immunocompetent patients with primary central nervous system (CNS) lymphoma using qualitative and quantitative PET images and to compare baseline with follow-up PET after therapy. Twelve immunocompetent patients with CNS lymphoma were examined. Dynamic emission data were acquired for 60 min immediately following injection of FDG. In seven patients, repeated PET studies were performed after treatment. Applying a three-compartment five-parameter model, K 1 , k 2 , k 3 , k 4 , vascular fraction (V B ) and cerebral metabolic rate of glucose (CMR Glc ) were obtained. We evaluated the FDG uptake visually using qualitative and parametric images and quantitatively using parametric images. A total of 12 lesions were identified in ten patients with newly diagnosed CNS lymphoma. On visual analysis, ten lesions showed an increase on qualitative images, eight showed an increase on K 1 images, 12 showed an increase on k 3 images and ten showed an increase on CMR Glc images. On quantitative analysis, k 2 , k 3 and CMR Glc values of the lesion were significantly different from those of the normal grey matter (p 3 and CMR Glc images. The K 1 , k 2 , k 3 and CMR Glc values after treatment were significantly different from those obtained before treatment (p 3 , using dynamic FDG PET might be helpful for diagnosis of CNS lymphoma and for monitoring therapeutic assessment. (orig.)

  7. Engineering cyanobacteria to generate high-value products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ducat, Daniel C; Way, Jeffrey C; Silver, Pamela A

    2011-02-01

    Although many microorganisms have been used for the bioindustrial generation of valuable metabolites, the productive potential of cyanobacterial species has remained largely unexplored. Cyanobacteria possess several advantages as organisms for bioindustrial processes, including simple input requirements, tolerance of marginal agricultural environments, rapid genetics, and carbon-neutral applications that could be leveraged to address global climate change concerns. Here, we review recent research involving the engineering of cyanobacterial species for the production of valuable bioindustrial compounds, including natural cyanobacterial products (e.g. sugars and isoprene), biofuels (e.g. alcohols, alkanes and hydrogen), and other commodity chemicals. Biological and economic obstacles to scaled cyanobacterial production are highlighted, and methods for increasing cyanobacterial production efficiencies are discussed. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. RETHINKING VALUE: A VALUE-CENTRIC MODEL OF PRODUCT, SERVICE AND BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Randmaa, Merili; Mougaard, Krestine; Howard, Thomas J.

    2011-01-01

    Globalization and information technologies have made the economical landscape more transparent and customers smarter, more demanding and networked. Companies can see these changes as a threat to their business or as an opportunity to differentiate in the market and be a Prime Mover, by re......-thinking customer value within the value system. This article shows how the term “value” is understood in different contexts and fields of economy, to see if these definitions can be merged, in order to understand the concept of value in broader way. The authors argue through literature review and example cases...

  9. An Investigation of the Relationship between Digital Citizenship Levels of Pre-Service Primary School Teachers and Their Democratic Values

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aladag, Soner; Çiftci, Serdar

    2017-01-01

    This study seeks to investigate the relationship between digital citizenship levels of pre-service primary school teachers and their democratic values. The research was designed in descriptive survey model. The research was conducted with the participation of 346 pre-service primary school teachers (juniors and seniors) from Adnan Menderes…

  10. Altered primary production during mass-extinction events

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Schootbrugge, B.; Gollner, S.

    2013-01-01

    The Big Five mass-extinction events are characterized by dramatic changes in primary producers. Initial disturbance to primary producers is usually followed by a succession of pioneers that represent qualitative and quantitative changes in standing crops of land plants and/or phytoplankton. On land,

  11. Value addition and processed products of three indigenous fruits in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    African Journal of Food, Agriculture, Nutrition and Development ... According to consumer preference test, marula juice was on the lower value (2.3) due to its low ... As for jam and jelly; quality, taste and colour were acceptable and preferred.

  12. Bioreactors for lignocellulose conversion into fermentable sugars for production of high added value products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liguori, Rossana; Ventorino, Valeria; Pepe, Olimpia; Faraco, Vincenza

    2016-01-01

    Lignocellulosic biomasses derived from dedicated crops and agro-industrial residual materials are promising renewable resources for the production of fuels and other added value bioproducts. Due to the tolerance to a wide range of environments, the dedicated crops can be cultivated on marginal lands, avoiding conflict with food production and having beneficial effects on the environment. Besides, the agro-industrial residual materials represent an abundant, available, and cheap source of bioproducts that completely cut out the economical and environmental issues related to the cultivation of energy crops. Different processing steps like pretreatment, hydrolysis and microbial fermentation are needed to convert biomass into added value bioproducts. The reactor configuration, the operative conditions, and the operation mode of the conversion processes are crucial parameters for a high yield and productivity of the biomass bioconversion process. This review summarizes the last progresses in the bioreactor field, with main attention on the new configurations and the agitation systems, for conversion of dedicated energy crops (Arundo donax) and residual materials (corn stover, wheat straw, mesquite wood, agave bagasse, fruit and citrus peel wastes, sunflower seed hull, switchgrass, poplar sawdust, cogon grass, sugarcane bagasse, sunflower seed hull, and poplar wood) into sugars and ethanol. The main novelty of this review is its focus on reactor components and properties.

  13. The value of information updating in new product development

    CERN Document Server

    Artmann, Christian

    2009-01-01

    This work shows how managing uncertainty in new product development can be improved by conducting an information update during the development process. The book details the comprehensive model needed to perform that information update.

  14. Preparation of a primary target for the production of fission products in a nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arino, H.; Cosolito, F.J.; George, K.D.; Thornton, A.K.

    1976-01-01

    A primary target for the production of fission products in a nuclear reactor, such as uranium or plutonium fission products, is comprised of an enclosed, cylindrical vessel, preferably comprised of stainless steel, having a thin, continuous, uniform layer of fissionable material, integrally bonded to its inner walls and a port permitting access to the interior of the vessel. A process is also provided for depositing uranium material on to the inner walls of the vessel. Upon irradiation of the target with neutrons from a nuclear reactor, radioactive fission products, such as molybdenum-99, are formed, and thereafter separated from the target by the introduction of an acidic solution through the port to dissolve the irradiated inner layer. The irradiation and dissolution are thus effected in the same vessel without the necessity of transferring the fissionable material and fission products to a separate chemical reactor. Subsequently, the desired isotopes are extracted and purified. Molybdenum-99 decays to technetium-99m which is a valuable medical diagnostic radioisotope. 3 claims, 1 drawing figure

  15. Analysis of postoperative biochemical values and clinical outcomes after adrenalectomy for primary aldosteronism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swearingen, Andrew J; Kahramangil, Bora; Monteiro, Rosebel; Krishnamurthy, Vikram; Jin, Judy; Shin, Joyce; Siperstein, Allan; Berber, Eren

    2018-04-01

    Primary aldosteronism causes hypertension and hypokalemia and is often surgically treatable. Diagnosis includes elevated plasma aldosterone, suppressed plasma renin activity, and elevated aldosterone renin ratio. Adrenalectomy improves hypertension and hypokalemia. Postoperative plasma aldosterone and plasma renin activity may be useful in documenting cure or failure. A retrospective analysis of patients who underwent adrenalectomy for primary aldosteronism from 2010 to 2016 was performed, analyzing preoperative and postoperative plasma aldosterone, plasma renin activity, hypertension, and hypokalemia. The utility of postoperative testing was assessed. Clinical cure was defined as improved hypertension control and resolution of potassium loss. Biochemical cure was defined as aldosterone renin ratio reduction to <23.6. Forty-four patients were included; 20 had plasma aldosterone and plasma renin activity checked on postoperative day 1. In the study, 40/44 (91%) were clinically cured. All clinical failures had of biochemical failure at follow-up. Postoperative day 1aldosterone renin ratio <23.6 had PPV of 95% for clinical cure. Cured patients had mean plasma aldosterone drop of 33.1 ng/dL on postoperative day 1; noncured patient experienced 3.9 ng/dL increase. A cutoff of plasma aldosterone decrease of 10 ng/dL had high positive predictive value for clinical cure. Changes in plasma aldosterone and plasma renin activity after adrenalectomy correlate with improved hypertension and hypokalemia. The biochemical impact of adrenalectomy manifests as early as postoperative day 1. We propose a plasma aldosterone decrease of 10 ng/dL as a criterion to predict clinical cure. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Microbial Conversion of Waste Glycerol from Biodiesel Production into Value-Added Products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Liu

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Biodiesel has gained a significant amount of attention over the past decade as an environmentally friendly fuel that is capable of being utilized by a conventional diesel engine. However, the biodiesel production process generates glycerol-containing waste streams which have become a disposal issue for biodiesel plants and generated a surplus of glycerol. A value-added opportunity is needed in order to compensate for disposal-associated costs. Microbial conversions from glycerol to valuable chemicals performed by various bacteria, yeast, fungi, and microalgae are discussed in this review paper, as well as the possibility of extending these conversions to microbial electrochemical technologies.

  17. Primary production of edaphic algal communities in a Mississippi salt marsh

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sullivan, M.J.; Moncreiff, C.A.

    1988-01-01

    Primary production rates of edaphic algae associated with the sediments beneath four monospecific canopies of vascular plants were determined over an annual cycle in a Mississippi salt marsh. The edaphic algal flora was dominated by small, motile pennate diatoms. Algal production (as measured by 14 C uptake) was generally highest in spring-early summer and lowest in fall. Hourly rates ranged from a low of 1.4 mg C/m 2 in Juncus roemerianus Scheele to a high of 163 mg C/m 2 beneath the Scirpus olneyi Gray canopy. Stepwise multiple regressions identified a soil moisture index and chlorophyll a as the best environmental predictors of hourly production; light energy reaching the marsh surface and sediment and air temperature proved of little value. Adding the relative abundances of 33 diatom taxa to the set of independent variables only slightly increased R 2 ; however, virtually all variables selected were diatom taxa. R 2 was only 0.38 for the Spartina alterniflora Loisel. habitat but ranged from 0.70 to 0.87 for the remaining three vascular plant zones. Annual rates of algal production (g C/m 2 ) were estimated as follows: Juncus (28), Spartina (57), Distichlis spicata (L.) Greene (88), and Scirpus (151). The ratio of annual edaphic algal production to vascular plant net aerial production (EAP/VPP) was 10-12% for the first three habitats and 61% for Scirpus. Chlorophyll a concentrations, annual algal production rates, and EAP/VPP values were comparable to those determined in Texas, Delaware, and Massachusetts salt marshes but lower than those reported for Georgia and particularly California marshes

  18. Economic modeling of sealing primary molars using a "value of information" approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ney, J P; van der Goes, D N; Chi, D L

    2014-09-01

    The objective was to evaluate 2 primary molar sealant strategies for publicly insured children using an "expected value of perfect information" (EVPI) approach. We converted a 10,000-observation tooth-level cost-effectiveness simulation model comparing 2 primary molar sealant strategies - always seal (AS) and standard care (SC) - with a 1,250-observation child-level model. Costs per child per restoration or extraction averted were estimated. Opportunity losses under the AS strategy were determined for children for whom SC was the optimal choice. We determined the EVPI by multiplying mean opportunity losses by the projected incident population of publicly insured 3-year-olds in the US over 10 years with costs discounted at 2%. All analyses were conducted under assumptions of high and low intrachild correlations between at-risk teeth. The AS strategy cost $43.68 over SC (95% CI: -$5.50, $92.86) per child per restoration or extraction averted under the high intrachild correlation assumption and $15.54 (95% CI $7.86, $23.20) under the low intrachild correlation. Under high intrachild correlation, mean opportunity losses were $80.28 (95% CI: $76.39, $84.17) per child, and AS was the optimal strategy in 31% of children. Under low correlation, mean opportunity losses were $14.61 (95% CI: $12.20, $17.68) and AS was the optimal strategy in 87% of children. The EVPI was calculated at $530,813,740 and $96,578,389 (for high and low intrachild correlation, respectively), for a projected total incident population of 8,059,712 children. On average, always sealing primary molars is more effective than standard care, but widespread implementation of this preventive approach among publicly insured children would result in large opportunity losses. Additional research is needed to identify the subgroups of publicly insured children who would benefit the most from this effective and potentially cost-saving public health intervention. © International & American Associations for Dental

  19. Radiation processing for value addition in fish and fishery products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bandekar, J.R.; Karani, M.; Kakatkar, A.S.; Sharma, A.

    2009-01-01

    Fish is highly nutritious as it contains easily digestible proteins and nutritionally important vitamins and polyunsaturated fatty acids. However, due to high ambient temperature in tropical countries, fish is spoiled rapidly. Spoilage of fish during transportation and storage amounting to about 30% of the catch results in heavy economic losses. The microbiological hazard related to the presence of food-borne pathogens is also common in both marine and aqua-cultured fish and shellfish. In dried products (moisture content, < 20%) insects are mainly responsible for the loss of quality during storage. Radiation processing can play a major role in ensuring security and safety of fish and fishery products by reducing post-harvest losses and eliminating pathogenic microorganisms. Being a 'cold process' the technology helps in retaining the quality of fishery products in 'as is' condition. (author)

  20. Microalgal biorefinery for bulk and high-value products

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Postma, P.R.; Lam, 't G.P.; Barbosa, M.J.; Wijffels, R.H.; Eppink, M.H.M.; Olivieri, Giuseppe

    2017-01-01

    Microalgae are a promising source for proteins, lipids, and carbohydrates for the cosmetic, nutraceutical, chemical, food/feed, and biofuel industry. In comparison with soy and palm oil, microalgae can be produced in a more sustainable way. To make microalgae production economically feasible, all

  1. What's the Regulatory Value of a Target Product Profile?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breder, Christopher D; Du, Wenny; Tyndall, Adria

    2017-07-01

    Target product profiles (TPPs) are used as a regulatory tool for dialog on clinical development or manufacturing plans. Drugs and biologics approved by the FDA that mention TPPs are associated with more efficient regulatory review times, perhaps as a result of increased planning or because the TPP promotes well-organized regulatory dialog. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  2. The value of anticoccidials for sustainable global poultry production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadykalo, Stefanie; Roberts, Tara; Thompson, Michelle; Wilson, Jeff; Lang, Marcelo; Espeisse, Olivier

    2018-03-01

    Coccidiosis is a self-limiting disease that is universally present in poultry operations, causing extensive damage to the intestinal lining of the bird. Global economic losses from coccidiosis are estimated to be $3 billion per year. In-feed anticoccidial use has been the predominant form of coccidiosis control. However, due to widespread emergence of antimicrobial resistance, concerns have been raised regarding the safety of anticoccidials and the potential impact on human, animal, and environmental health. To investigate the benefits, risks, and alternatives to anticoccidial use, a comprehensive review of recent literature was conducted. Several live vaccines are available, which, when used in combination with anticoccidials, have been shown to help restore sensitivity of infective parasites. However, their use has been limited because of increased cost; increased susceptibility to bacterial enteritis; challenges with consistent application; and slow development of immunity. Various alternative feed products are available, but do not have a direct anticoccidial effect, and few studies have demonstrated consistent field efficacy of these products. Consumer and environmental safety of anticoccidials is monitored and assessed by governing bodies. Furthermore, there is a lack of current evidence to indicate that bacterial resistance poses a public health concern. The findings from this review indicate that in the absence of alternatives, poultry production is optimized by using anticoccidials, benefiting all three pillars of sustainability, including social (bird health, welfare, and food safety), economic (production efficiency), and environmental aspects. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Primary Productivity, NASA Aqua MODIS and GOES Imager, 0.1 degrees, Global, EXPERIMENTAL

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Primary Productivity is calculated from NASA Aqua MODIS Chl a and NOAA GOES Imager SST data. THIS IS AN EXPERIMENTAL PRODUCT: intended strictly for scientific...

  4. Primary Productivity, SeaWiFS and Pathfinder, 0.1 degrees, Global, EXPERIMENTAL

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Primary Productivity is calculated from SeaWiFS Chl a, Pathfinder SST, and SeaWiFS PAR data. THIS IS AN EXPERIMENTAL PRODUCT: intended strictly for scientific...

  5. Primary Productivity, NASA Aqua MODIS, 4.4 km, Global, EXPERIMENTAL

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Primary Productivity is calculated from NASA Aqua MODIS Chl a SST data. THIS IS AN EXPERIMENTAL PRODUCT: intended strictly for scientific evaluation by professional...

  6. Diagnostic value of ACTH stimulation test in determining the subtypes of primary aldosteronism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yiran; Zhang, Cui; Wang, Weiqing; Su, Tingwei; Zhou, Weiwei; Jiang, Lei; Zhu, Wei; Xie, Jing; Ning, Guang

    2015-05-01

    Adrenal venous sampling is recommended as the golden standard for subtyping primary aldosteronism (PA). However, it is invasive and inconvenient, and seeking a better way to make differential diagnosis of PA is necessary. The objective of the study was to evaluate the diagnostic value of ACTH stimulation test under 1 mg dexamethasone suppression test (DST) in determining the subtypes of PA. Ninety-five patients with PA confirmed by saline infusion test were included in this study. According to adrenal venous sampling and histopathology, 39 patients were diagnosed as bilateral adrenal hyperplasia (BAH), 37 as aldosterone-producing adenoma (APA), and 19 as unilateral adrenal hyperplasia (UAH). An ACTH stimulation test under 1 mg DST was performed in all patients. Plasma aldosterone and cortisol levels were measured every 30 minutes until 120 minutes after the iv injection of 50 IU ACTH. During the ACTH stimulation test, aldosterone levels in APA and UAH were similar (P > .05) but higher than those in BAH (P APA and UAH) were significantly higher than bilateral PA (BAH) (P guide further treatment in PA patients.

  7. Creating better doctors: exploring the value of learning medicine in primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newbronner, Elizabeth; Borthwick, Rachel; Finn, Gabrielle; Scales, Michael; Pearson, David

    2017-07-01

    Across the UK, 13% of undergraduate medical education is undertaken in primary care (PC). Students value their experiences in this setting but uncertainty remains about the extent to which these placements influence their future practice. To explore the impact of PC based undergraduate medical education on the development of medical students and new doctors as clinicians, and on students' preparedness for practice. Mixed method study across two UK medical schools. Focus groups and individual interviews with Year 5 medical students, Foundation Year 2 doctors and GP Specialty Trainees; online surveys of Year 5 medical students and Foundation Year 2 doctors. PC placements play an important part in the development of all 'apprentice' doctors, not just those wanting to become GPs. They provide a high quality learning environment, where students can: gradually take on responsibility; build confidence; develop empathy in their approach to patient care; and gain understanding of the social context of health and illness. The study suggests that for these results to be achieved, PC placements have to be high quality, with strong links between practice-based learning and teaching/assessment in medical school. GP tutors need to be enthusiastic and students actively involved in consultations.

  8. DESIRABLE ATTRIBUTES FOR VALUE ADDED MEAT PRODUCTS SURVEY 1993

    OpenAIRE

    Kinsey, Jean D.; Senauer, Benjamin; Jonk, Yvonne

    1993-01-01

    The purpose of this consumer survey was to learn more about consumer preferences for meat characteristics. Value added meat processors faced with the problem of trying to identify market niches wanted to know what types of consumers had similar preferences and what their specific preferences and concerns are. In addition, we wanted to learn more about attitudes that are believed to be changing due to new information about the relationship between diet and long term health, lifestyles that dem...

  9. Products of Irreducible Characters Having Complex-Valued Constituents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa R. Hendrixson

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available First, we prove that when a finite solvable group $G$ has a faithful irreducible character $\\chi$ such that $\\chi\\overline{\\chi}$ has two irreducible constituents, both must be real-valued. Then, we study the situation where $\\chi\\overline{\\chi}$ has exactly three distinct nonprincipal irreducible constituents, two of which are complex conjugates. In this case, we prove that $G$ has derived length bounded above by $6$.

  10. Value-added beef products (Productos Carnicos con Valor Agregado)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mac Donaldson; Will Holder; Jan Holder

    2006-01-01

    I'm speaking for Will and Jan Holder, who couldn't be here. I happen to be familiar with Will and Jan's company, Ervin's Natural Beef, and its program because I've sold them cattle. Will and Jan's value-added beef program is based on their family ranch in the area known as The Blue, in the mountains of eastern Arizona.

  11. Diagnostic value of CEA and CYFRA 21-1 tumor markers in primary lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okamura, Kyoko; Takayama, Koichi; Izumi, Miiru; Harada, Taishi; Furuyama, Kazuto; Nakanishi, Yoichi

    2013-04-01

    Lung cancer is sometimes difficult to differentiate from benign lung diseases expressing nodular shadow in imaging study. We assessed the diagnostic value of two commonly used tumor markers in distinguishing primary lung cancer from benign lung disease. The serum levels of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) and cytokeratin 19 fragments (CYFRA 21-1) were retrospectively analyzed in 655 lung cancer patients and 237 patients with benign lung disease. The standard cut-off levels of 3.2 ng/mL CEA and 3.5 ng/mL CYFRA 21-1 and twice these respective levels (6.4 ng/mL and 7.0 ng/mL) were used. CEA and CYFRA 21-1 levels were elevated in 32% and 11% of benign lung disease patients, respectively. CEA sensitivity and specificity for lung cancer diagnosis was 69% and 68% respectively, while that for CYFRA 21-1 was 43% and 89%, respectively. Thus, the combined value for the specificity of the two tumor markers was greater than either alone. Patients were grouped depending on their hospital status, and prevalence rates were determined. The prevalence rate of lung cancer in admitted patients was 51%, the prevalence rate of lung cancer in outpatients was 12%, and the prevalence rate of lung cancer identified during health check-ups was 0.1%. Positive predictive values (PPVs) were calculated using Bayes' theorem, and varied with the serum tumor marker and prevalence rate: PPVs of CEA [prevalence rate] were 69.2% [51%], 22.7% [12%], and 0.22% [0.1%], while PPVs of CYFRA 21-1 were 80.3% [51%], 34.8% [12%], and 0.39% [0.1%]. However, PPVs for lung cancer diagnosis at a prevalence rate of 51% were 87.3% or higher when the patient exhibited positive CEA and CYFRA 21-1, or CEA or CYFRA 21-1 levels twice the standard cut-off. Our results indicate that CEA and CYFRA 21-1 are reliable serum tumor markers for the diagnosis of lung cancer in addition to CT scans when combined or used individually at twice the standard cut-off level in high prevalence rate groups. The prevalence rate should

  12. Exploitation of Food Industry Waste for High-Value Products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravindran, Rajeev; Jaiswal, Amit K

    2016-01-01

    A growing global population leads to an increasing demand for food production and the processing industry associated with it and consequently the generation of large amounts of food waste. This problem is intensified due to slow progress in the development of effective waste management strategies and measures for the proper treatment and disposal of waste. Food waste is a reservoir of complex carbohydrates, proteins, lipids, and nutraceuticals and can form the raw materials for commercially important metabolites. The current legislation on food waste treatment prioritises the prevention of waste generation and least emphasises disposal. Recent valorisation studies for food supply chain waste opens avenues to the production of biofuels, enzymes, bioactive compounds, biodegradable plastics, and nanoparticles among many other molecules. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Bioconversion of chicken wastes to value-added products

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barik, S; Forgacs, T; Isbister, J [ARCTECH, Inc., Alexandria, VA (United States)

    1991-01-01

    Increasing quantities of chicken waste concerns the poultry industry because of escalating disposal costs and the potential for environmental pollution. Biological conversion of these wastes to valuable products such as methane and/or chemical feed-stocks appears to be feasible. Biomethanation of chicken waste by a sewage sludge microbial consortium produced as much as 69 mol% methane in the gas phase. Acetic and propionic acids were the major acids produced during the bioconversion. Addition of chelating agents and other micro-nutrients enhanced methane production and shifted the ratios of intermediates accumulated. Preliminary data indicate that more than 60% of the chicken waste carbon was converted and that the nitrogen-rich residue may have potential as a soil additive. (author).

  14. A value network development model and implications for innovation and production network management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vermeulen, B.; Kok, de A.G.

    2013-01-01

    In managing their value network, firms have to balance current and future value concerns and own and network partners’ concerns. Firms generate immediate value through manufacturing and selling the current generation of products together with other firms in its production network and generate future

  15. Short-term to seasonal variability in factors driving primary productivity in a shallow estuary: Implications for modeling production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canion, Andy; MacIntyre, Hugh L.; Phipps, Scott

    2013-10-01

    The inputs of primary productivity models may be highly variable on short timescales (hourly to daily) in turbid estuaries, but modeling of productivity in these environments is often implemented with data collected over longer timescales. Daily, seasonal, and spatial variability in primary productivity model parameters: chlorophyll a concentration (Chla), the downwelling light attenuation coefficient (kd), and photosynthesis-irradiance response parameters (Pmchl, αChl) were characterized in Weeks Bay, a nitrogen-impacted shallow estuary in the northern Gulf of Mexico. Variability in primary productivity model parameters in response to environmental forcing, nutrients, and microalgal taxonomic marker pigments were analysed in monthly and short-term datasets. Microalgal biomass (as Chla) was strongly related to total phosphorus concentration on seasonal scales. Hourly data support wind-driven resuspension as a major source of short-term variability in Chla and light attenuation (kd). The empirical relationship between areal primary productivity and a combined variable of biomass and light attenuation showed that variability in the photosynthesis-irradiance response contributed little to the overall variability in primary productivity, and Chla alone could account for 53-86% of the variability in primary productivity. Efforts to model productivity in similar shallow systems with highly variable microalgal biomass may benefit the most by investing resources in improving spatial and temporal resolution of chlorophyll a measurements before increasing the complexity of models used in productivity modeling.

  16. Modelling size-fractionated primary production in the Atlantic Ocean from remote sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brewin, Robert J. W.; Tilstone, Gavin H.; Jackson, Thomas; Cain, Terry; Miller, Peter I.; Lange, Priscila K.; Misra, Ankita; Airs, Ruth L.

    2017-11-01

    Marine primary production influences the transfer of carbon dioxide between the ocean and atmosphere, and the availability of energy for the pelagic food web. Both the rate and the fate of organic carbon from primary production are dependent on phytoplankton size. A key aim of the Atlantic Meridional Transect (AMT) programme has been to quantify biological carbon cycling in the Atlantic Ocean and measurements of total primary production have been routinely made on AMT cruises, as well as additional measurements of size-fractionated primary production on some cruises. Measurements of total primary production collected on the AMT have been used to evaluate remote-sensing techniques capable of producing basin-scale estimates of primary production. Though models exist to estimate size-fractionated primary production from satellite data, these have not been well validated in the Atlantic Ocean, and have been parameterised using measurements of phytoplankton pigments rather than direct measurements of phytoplankton size structure. Here, we re-tune a remote-sensing primary production model to estimate production in three size fractions of phytoplankton (10 μm) in the Atlantic Ocean, using measurements of size-fractionated chlorophyll and size-fractionated photosynthesis-irradiance experiments conducted on AMT 22 and 23 using sequential filtration-based methods. The performance of the remote-sensing technique was evaluated using: (i) independent estimates of size-fractionated primary production collected on a number of AMT cruises using 14C on-deck incubation experiments and (ii) Monte Carlo simulations. Considering uncertainty in the satellite inputs and model parameters, we estimate an average model error of between 0.27 and 0.63 for log10-transformed size-fractionated production, with lower errors for the small size class (10 μm), and errors generally higher in oligotrophic waters. Application to satellite data in 2007 suggests the contribution of cells 2 μm to total

  17. The value of peri-interventional procedure serum bile acid (TBA) detection in patients with primary liver cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fan Chen; Liu Yizhi

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the clinical value of peri-interventional procedure serum bile acid (TBA) detection in patients with primary liver cancer. Methods: The serum TBA was examined peri-operatively in 160 patients with primary liver cancer for testing the correlations between TBA, liver function, the degree of hepatocirrhosis, interventional therapy method and hepatic failure. Results: The preoperative mean value of serum TBA increased significantly in comparing with that of the control group (P<0.01). The preoperative value of serum TBA in different Child grading patients with primary liver cancer were different significantly (P<0.01), Child A< Child B< Child C, the increased degree of serum TBA corresponded with Child grading of the liver function and the cirrhotic degree of liver. In patients with liver function of Child B and C, the postoperative mean values of serum TBA in different interventional therapy methods were different significantly (P<0.01). Comparing with that of the patients without hepatic failure, the postoperative value of serum TBA in the patients with hepatic failure increased significantly (P<0.01). Conclusions: The value of serum TBA can sensitively and accurately reflect liver reserve ability and damage degree of peri-interventional procedure liver function. Hepatic failure can be detected in time and the prognosis of the patients with primary liver cancer can be predicted by testing the value of serum TBA continually. (authors)

  18. Consumer preferences and willingness to pay for value-added chicken product attributes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez Michel, Lorelei; Anders, Sven; Wismer, Wendy V

    2011-10-01

    A growing demand for convenient and ready-to-eat products has increased poultry processors' interest in developing consumer-oriented value-added chicken products. In this study, a conjoint analysis survey of 276 chicken consumers in Edmonton was conducted during the summer of 2009 to assess the importance of the chicken part, production method, processing method, storage method, the presence of added flavor, and cooking method on consumer preferences for different value-added chicken product attributes. Estimates of consumer willingness to pay (WTP) premium prices for different combinations of value-added chicken attributes were also determined. Participants'"ideal" chicken product was a refrigerated product made with free-range chicken breast, produced with no additives or preservatives and no added flavor, which could be oven heated or pan heated. Half of all participants on average were willing to pay 30% more for a value-added chicken product over the price of a conventional product. Overall, young consumers, individuals who shop at Farmers' Markets and those who prefer free-range or organic products were more likely to pay a premium for value-added chicken products. As expected, consumers' WTP was affected negatively by product price. Combined knowledge of consumer product attribute preferences and consumer WTP for value-added chicken products can help the poultry industry design innovative value-added chicken products. Practical Application:  An optimum combination of product attributes desired by consumers for the development of a new value-added chicken product, as well as the WTP for this product, have been identified in this study. This information is relevant to the poultry industry to enhance consumer satisfaction of future value-added chicken products and provide the tools for future profit growth. © 2011 Institute of Food Technologists®

  19. A Value-Based Business Approach to Product Line Software Engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raman K. Agrawalla

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available The present conceptual paper is an attempt to provide a Value-Based Business Approach (VBBA to product line software engineering. It argues that Product line software engineering should be seen as a system and considered as a means towards the end of appropriating more and more value for the business firm; contingent upon the fact that it provides value to customer and customer's customers operating its value creating system with agility, speed, economy and innovation; getting governed by the positive sum value creation outlook and guided by value- based management. With our value-based business triad, the product line engineering process can hope to achieve simultaneously value, variety and volume, product differentiation and cost leadership enabling the business firm to land on the virtuous value spiral.

  20. Gender implications of forest product value chains in the Congo basin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ingram, V.; Schure, J.M.; Tieguhong, J.C.; Ndoye, O.; Awono, A.; Iponga, D.M.

    2014-01-01

    Activities and roles in value chains of forest products in the Congo Basin are highly gendered, varying with the product's characteristics, the segment of the chain and customary regulations and norms. High-value products are primarily male-harvested when customary rules govern tenure and access,

  1. Value of recruitment strategies used in a primary care practice-based trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Shellie D; Bertoni, Alain G; Bonds, Denise E; Clinch, C Randall; Balasubramanyam, Aarthi; Blackwell, Caroline; Chen, Haiying; Lischke, Michael; Goff, David C

    2007-05-01

    "Physicians-recruiting-physicians" is the preferred recruitment approach for practice-based research. However, yields are variable; and the approach can be costly and lead to biased, unrepresentative samples. We sought to explore the potential efficiency of alternative methods. We conducted a retrospective analysis of the yield and cost of 10 recruitment strategies used to recruit primary care practices to a randomized trial to improve cardiovascular disease risk factor management. We measured response and recruitment yields and the resources used to estimate the value of each strategy. Providers at recruited practices were surveyed about motivation for participation. Response to 6 opt-in marketing strategies was 0.40% (53/13290), ranging from 0% to 2.86% by strategy; 33.96% (18/53) of responders were recruited to the study. Of those recruited from opt-out strategies, 8.68% joined the study, ranging from 5.35% to 41.67% per strategy. A strategy that combined both opt-in and opt-out approaches resulted in a 51.14% (90/176) response and a 10.80% (19/90) recruitment rate. Cost of recruitment was $613 per recruited practice. Recruitment approaches based on in-person meetings (41.67%), previous relationships (33.33%), and borrowing an Area Health Education Center's established networks (10.80%), yielded the most recruited practices per effort and were most cost efficient. Individual providers who chose to participate were motivated by interest in improving their clinical practice (80.5%); contributing to CVD primary prevention (54.4%); and invigorating their practice with new ideas (42.1%). This analysis provides suggestions for future recruitment efforts and research. Translational studies with limited funds could consider multi-modal recruitment approaches including in-person presentations to practice groups and exploitation of previous relationships, which require the providers to opt-out, and interactive opt-in approaches which rely on borrowed networks. These

  2. A lesson from science in polar extreme environments: ethics and social values for primary school

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Longa, Federica; Crescimbene, Massimo; Alfonsi, Lucilla; Romano, Vincenzo; Cesaroni, Claudio

    2015-04-01

    One of the relevant objectives of the researchers should be filling the gap between the scientific research and the school. Such objective should be pursued methodically, through commitment, foresight and cooperation. In this frame the idea to communicate and to share the experience of the scientific research in Antarctica with the public and with the school is a challenge that a team of INGV researchers, engaged for many years in scientific missions in Antarctica, carries on with great enthusiasm within the several outreach activities of the Italian National Program for Antarctic Research (PNRA). The outreach activities, aiming to disseminate the knowledge and the culture of the polar regions, have been mainly addressed to a public of adults and students of the secondary school (11-19 years). Recently, the researchers matured the need to realize outreach paths addressed to pupils of the primary school (8-10 years), taking the advantage of the multidisciplinary themes offered by the Antarctic research. The present work reports the experience of the outreach laboratory "On a mission to the South Pole", realized in the frame of events organized by INGV (ScienzAperta 2012 e 2014) and dedicated to the primary school. The educational themes developed within the laboratory concern the research in Antarctica, with particular focus on the human aspects, the geophysics and the progress of new technologies. The innovative aspect of the laboratory stands in the strategy to deal with Antarctica with an educational aim, proposing Antarctica as a natural laboratory, not only from a scientific point of view, but also as a laboratory of shared human experiences. The didactic path, based on interactive methodology that uses the role-paly and the experiential activities, enable the children to acquire the knowledge on Antarctica (knowledge); to explore the Antarctic characteristics as a natural laboratory and to experiment an emotional education through individual and team

  3. MR imaging of primary sclerosing cholangitis - Additional value of diffusion-weighted imaging and ADC measurement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Djokicc Kovac, Jelena [Center for Radiology and Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Clinical Center Serbia, Belgrade (Serbia)], e-mail: jelenadjokic2003@yahoo.co.uk; Maksimovic, Ruzica [Center for Radiology and Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Clinical Center Serbia, Belgrade (Serbia); Faculty of Medicine, Univ. of Belgrade, Belgrade (Serbia); Jesic, Rada [Clinic for Gastroenterohepatology, Clinical Center Serbia, Belgrade (Serbia); Faculty of Medicine, Univ. of Belgrade, Belgrade (Serbia); Stanisavljevic, Dejana [Inst. for Statistics, Faculty of Medicine, Univ. of Belgrade, Belgrade (Serbia); Kovac, Bojan [Military Medical Academy, Belgrade (Serbia)

    2013-04-15

    Background: Primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) is a cholestatic liver disease with chronic inflammation and progressive destruction of biliary tree. Magnetic resonance (MR) examination with diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) allows analysis of morphological liver parenchymal changes and non-invasive assessment of liver fibrosis. Moreover, MR cholangiopancreatography (MRCP), as a part of standard MR protocol, provides insight into bile duct irregularities. Purpose: To evaluate MR and MRCP findings in patients with primary sclerosing cholangitis and to determine the value of DWI in the assessment of liver fibrosis. Material and Methods: The following MR findings were reviewed in 38 patients: abnormalities in liver parenchyma signal intensity, changes in liver morphology, lymphadenopathy, signs of portal hypertension, and irregularities of intra- and extrahepatic bile ducts. Apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) was calculated for six locations in the liver for b = 800 s/mm{sup 2}. Results: T2-weighted hyperintensity was seen as peripheral wedge-shaped areas in 42.1% and as periportal edema in 28.9% of patients. Increased enhancement of liver parenchyma on arterial-phase imaging was observed in six (15.8%) patients. Caudate lobe hypertrophy was present in 10 (26.3%), while spherical liver shape was noted in 7.9% of patients. Liver cirrhosis was seen in 34.2% of patients; the most common pattern was micronodular cirrhosis (61.5%). Other findings included lymphadenopathy (28.9%), signs of portal hypertension (36.7%), and bile duct irregularities (78.9%). The mean ADCs (x10{sup -3} mm{sup 2}/s) were significantly different at stage I vs. stages III and IV, and stage II vs. stage IV. No significant difference was found between stages II and III. For prediction of stage {>=}II and stage {>=}III, areas under receiver-operating characteristic curves were 0.891 and 0.887, respectively. Conclusion: MR with MRCP is a necessary diagnostic procedure for diagnosis of PSC and

  4. Application of Primary Abatement Technology for Reduction of N2O Emmision in Petrokemija Nitric Acid Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ćosić, L.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Industrial nitric acid production by oxidation of gaseous ammonia with Ostwald procedure produces an unwanted by-product – colorless nitrous oxide, N2O. As emission of N2O represents a very serious problem due of its huge contribution to global warming, certain measures focused on its maximum reduction should be undertaken. Minimization of N2O emission in nitric acid production can be achieved in different parts of the process flow, depending on the applied available technologies. For the abatement of N2O emissions in Petrokemija's nitric acid production processes from the list of the best available technologies chosen were primary and secondary abatement technologies. The mentioned ensures reduction of N2O by use of improved selective heterogeneous catalysts in the step of gaseous ammonia oxidation. Precious metals in the shape of gauzes are used as selective heterogeneous catalyst in primary technology, while in the case of secondary technology the Fe2 O3 catalyst on Al2O3 support in the shape of spherical pellets is chosen. Shown is the application of primary technology for the abatement of N2O in both nitric acid production facilities and their comparison with classical heterogeneous catalyst and preparation for the installation of secondary selective catalyst. N2O emissions with the application of primary technology in both production facilities were reduced from 12 kg of N2O to 7 kg of N2O per ton of pure HNO3. With the primary reduction in N2O emissions the foundation was established for further reduction with the secondary technology to the final value of 0.7 kg of N2O per ton of pure HNO3, which represents mass concentration in the tail gas below 200 mg m-3 (at n. c.. With the applied technologies for the abatement of N2O emissions in Petrokemija's nitric acid production the future prescribed emission limit value will be satisfied.

  5. Environmental conditions and primary production in a Sahelian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Environmental descriptors (nutrient, water transparency, temperature ... Nutrient concentrations were low, with high variability (from 0 to 30 µg.l-1 for DIN and from 0 to 18 µg.l-1 for. PO4). The primary ... and permanent interventions of sea water.

  6. Effect of the fast pyrolysis temperature on the primary and secondary products of lignin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhou, Shuai; Garcia-Perez, Manuel; Pecha, Brennan; Kersten, Sascha R.A.; McDonald, Armando G.; Westerhof, Roel Johannes Maria

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents results on the primary pyrolysis products of organosolv lignin at temperatures between 360 and 700 °C. To study the primary products, a vacuum screen heater (heating rate of 8000 °C/s, deep vacuum of 0.7 mbar, and very fast cooling at the wall temperature of −100 °C) was used.

  7. Net primary productivity of subalpine meadows in Yosemite National Park in relation to climate variability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peggy E. Moore; Jan W. van Wagtendonk; Julie L. Yee; Mitchel P. McClaran; David N. Cole; Neil K. McDougald; Matthew L. Brooks

    2013-01-01

    Subalpine meadows are some of the most ecologically important components of mountain landscapes, and primary productivity is important to the maintenance of meadow functions. Understanding how changes in primary productivity are associated with variability in moisture and temperature will become increasingly important with current and anticipated changes in climate....

  8. Primary production, nutrient dynamics and mineralisation in a northeastern Greenland fjord during the summer thaw

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rysgaard, S.; Finster, K.; Dahlgaard, H.

    1996-01-01

    This investigation represents the first integrated study of primary production, nutrient dynamics and mineralisation in a northeastern fjord of Greenland. The data presented represent conditions and activities during the early summer thaw (first 2 weeks of July). Primary production (5.3 mmol C m(...

  9. Micro-phytoplankton photosynthesis, primary production and potential export production in the Atlantic Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tilstone, Gavin H.; Lange, Priscila K.; Misra, Ankita; Brewin, Robert J. W.; Cain, Terry

    2017-11-01

    Micro-phytoplankton is the >20 μm component of the phytoplankton community and plays a major role in the global ocean carbon pump, through the sequestering of anthropogenic CO2 and export of organic carbon to the deep ocean. To evaluate the global impact of the marine carbon cycle, quantification of micro-phytoplankton primary production is paramount. In this paper we use both in situ data and a satellite model to estimate the contribution of micro-phytoplankton to total primary production (PP) in the Atlantic Ocean. From 1995 to 2013, 940 measurements of primary production were made at 258 sites on 23 Atlantic Meridional Transect Cruises from the United Kingdom to the South African or Patagonian Shelf. Micro-phytoplankton primary production was highest in the South Subtropical Convergence (SSTC ∼ 409 ± 720 mg C m-2 d-1), where it contributed between 38 % of the total PP, and was lowest in the North Atlantic Gyre province (NATL ∼ 37 ± 27 mg C m-2 d-1), where it represented 18 % of the total PP. Size-fractionated photosynthesis-irradiance (PE) parameters measured on AMT22 and 23 showed that micro-phytoplankton had the highest maximum photosynthetic rate (PmB) (∼5 mg C (mg Chl a)-1 h-1) followed by nano- (∼4 mg C (mg Chl a)-1 h-1) and pico- (∼2 mg C (mg Chl a)-1 h-1). The highest PmB was recorded in the NATL and lowest in the North Atlantic Drift Region (NADR) and South Atlantic Gyre (SATL). The PE parameters were used to parameterise a remote sensing model of size-fractionated PP, which explained 84 % of the micro-phytoplankton in situ PP variability with a regression slope close to 1. The model was applied to the SeaWiFS time series from 1998-2010, which illustrated that micro-phytoplankton PP remained constant in the NADR, NATL, Canary Current Coastal upwelling (CNRY), Eastern Tropical Atlantic (ETRA), Western Tropical Atlantic (WTRA) and SATL, but showed a gradual increase in the Benguela Upwelling zone (BENG) and South Subtropical Convergence (SSTC

  10. Production of High Value Fluorine Gases for the Semiconductor Industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bulko, J. B.

    2003-10-23

    The chemistry to manufacture high purity GeF{sub 4} and WF{sub 6} for use in the semiconductor industry using Starmet's new fluorine extraction technology has been developed. Production of GeF{sub 4} was established using a tube-style reactor system where conversion yields as high as 98.1% were attained for the reaction between and GeO{sub 2}. Collection of the fluoride gas improved to 97.7% when the reactor sweep gas contained a small fraction of dry air (10-12 vol%) along with helium. The lab-synthesized product was shown to contain the least amount of infrared active and elemental impurities when compared with a reference material certified at 99.99% purity. Analysis of the ''as-produced'' gas using ICP-MS showed that uranium could not be detected at a detection limit of 0.019ppm-wt. A process to make WF{sub 6} from WO{sub 2}, and UF{sub 4}, produced a WOF{sub 4} intermediate, which proved difficult to convert to tungsten hexafluoride using titanium fluoride as a fluorinating agent.

  11. Value-added products from spent bleaching earth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loh Soh Kheang; Muzammil Ngatiman; James, Stephen

    2010-01-01

    Full text: Bleaching earth is used in the bleaching process of physical refining of palm oil to remove color, phospholipids, residue gums, oxidized products and any trace metals from the oil. These colored pigments are trapped and absorbed in the bleaching earth, thus transforming the originally whitish earth to dark grey and is, from then, named spent bleaching earth (SBE). SBE is considered as an industrial by-product as there is hardly any practical application for it. Large quantity of SBE is commonly disposed of in landfills, which poses potential hazards to environment. New economical ways in utilizing it is sought to eliminate the problem arises from its disposal. This paper presents a study on the possibility of developing a soil conditioner using enhanced SBE as the base material. The study found that there are certain attributes observed in the enhanced SBE that could be of advantages for SBE to become a good soil conditioner. The enhanced SBE contains organic matters and about 18-20 % of residue oil which exhibits good water holding capacity in slow release of water, and enriched nutrient content for plant nutrient uptake. (author)

  12. Can the primary algae production be measured precisely?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olesen, M.; Lundsgaard, C.

    1996-01-01

    Algae production in seawater is extremely important as a basic link in marine food chains. Evaluation of the algae quantity is based on 14CO 2 tracer techniques while natural circulation and light absorption in seawater is taken insufficiently into account. Algae production can vary by 500% in similar nourishment conditions, but varying water mixing conditions. (EG)

  13. Linking climate, gross primary productivity, and site index across forests of the western United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aaron R. Weiskittel; Nicholas L. Crookston; Philip J. Radtke

    2011-01-01

    Assessing forest productivity is important for developing effective management regimes and predicting future growth. Despite some important limitations, the most common means for quantifying forest stand-level potential productivity is site index (SI). Another measure of productivity is gross primary production (GPP). In this paper, SI is compared with GPP estimates...

  14. Consumer Value perceptions of food products from emerging processing technologies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perrea, Toula; Grunert, Klaus G; Krystallis Krontalis, Athanasios

    2015-01-01

    Through a qualitative research approach, the present paper aims to explore the range and type of ‘values’ and ‘costs’ in formulating overall Consumer Value (CV) perceptions, in association with two emerging processing technologies that at the outset are neither distinctly positive nor negative...... in the eyes of consumers, in two culturally variant contexts, namely a Western society where technology is often met with skepticism (i.e., the UK); and a non-Western society where technology plays a reassuring role regarding concerns about food safety and quality (i.e., China). Results reveal that the most......-technology counterparts, who ‘allow’ more room for cultural discrepancies to impact on their CV perceptions. Overall, findings support the view that CV perceptions in the context of food produced by means of emerging processing technologies can be successfully analyzed using a multidimensional conceptualization, where CV...

  15. Yields of primary products from chloroethylenes in air under electron beam irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hakoda, Teruyuki; Hashimoto, Shoji; Kojima, Takuji

    2003-01-01

    The quantitative analysis of toxic primary irradiation products was carried out for the development of the purification technology of chloroethylenes/air mixtures using an electron beam (EB). Degradation of chloroethylenes in humid air proceeded through the formation of primary products retaining a carbon-carbon (C-C) bond such as chloroacetyl chlorides and chloroacetyl aldehyde as well as that of primary products of COCl 2 and HCOCl through C-C bond cleavage. Chloroethylenes having one carbon bonded to two Cl atoms was decomposed into the primary products retaining a C-C bond prior to breaking a C-C bond. The number of Cl atoms of a chloroethylene molecule enhanced the formation ratio of primary products retaining a C-C bond. On the other hand, chloroethylene having two carbons bonded to one Cl atom was degraded thought the scission of a C-C bond predominantly C-C bond maintenance. (author)

  16. Values of serum AFP, GGTⅡ and GP73 in diagnosis of primary hepatocellular carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZHU Chen

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available ObjectiveTo explore the early diagnostic values of serum alpha-fetoprotein (AFP, gamma-glutamyltransferase Ⅱ (GGTⅡ, and Golgi protein 73 (GP73 in patients with primary hepatocellular carcinoma (PHC. MethodsThe serum specimens of 100 patients with liver diseases (50 cases of hepatitis and liver cirrhosis and 50 cases of PHC and 50 healthy people were collected in our hospital from February 2013 to February 2014. Electrochemical luminescence technique, specific immuno-membrane adsorption assay, and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay were used to measure the serum levels of AFP, GGTⅡ, and GP73. Comparison of continuous data between multiple groups was made by analysis of variance, and comparison between two groups was made by q test. The receiver operating characteristic (ROC curves of single or combined test results were made, and the areas under the ROC curves (AUCs were calculated. The sensitivity, specificity, and AUCs of AFP, GGTⅡ, GP73, and the combined test were analyzed and compared. ResultsThe level of serum GGTⅡ in the PHC group was significantly different compared with those in the other two groups (F=16.224, P<0.05, but there was no significant difference between the normal group and the hepatitis and liver cirrhosis group (P>0.05. Significant differences in serum levels of AFP and GP73 were observed by paired comparison between the PHC group, hepatitis and liver cirrhosis group, and normal group (F=193.128, F=20.231, P<0.05 for both. When assayed alone, the specificities of GP73, GGTⅡ, and AFP were 69%, 64% and 51%, respectively, and the sensitivities were 92%, 84%, and 76%, respectively. In combined test, the specificity was 94.6% and the sensitivity was 98.8%. ConclusionThe GP73 test is the best performer in the single assays. Combined test of serum AFP, GGTⅡ, and GP73 shows a good diagnostic value for PHC with greatly improved specificity and sensitivity.

  17. Nutritive value of citrus co-products in rabbit feeding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Carlos de Blas

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Pulps from different citrus fruits are relevant agro-industrial co-products in the Mediterranean area in terms of amounts produced and availability. Moreover, part of the product is dehydrated, which increases its interest in monogastric species such as rabbits. Seventy eight samples from various Spanish producers using several types of fresh fruits (orange, tangerine, lemon and pomelo and different processing methods of orange and tangerine samples (either fresh or dried after adding Ca(OH2 were analysed for their chemical composition and in vitro digestibility. Average dry matter (DM contents of ash, neutral detergent fibre, acid detergent fibre, acid detergent lignin (ADL, soluble fibre, crude protein (CP, insoluble neutral and acid detergent CP, ether extract and gross energy were 49.0, 226, 139, 12.1, 213, 71.2, 13.1, 4.2, 30.5 g and 17.8 MJ/kg DM, respectively. Mean DM and CP in vitro digestibility were 86.7 and 95.6%, respectively. Digestible energy was estimated to be 15.1 MJ/kg DM. A high variability (coefficient of variation from 17% for CP to 60% for ADL was observed among the samples for most of the traits studied, which was partially explained by the effects of type of fruit and processing. Lemon pulps had on average higher ash and fibre but lower sugar contents than the other pulps. Dehydration processes increased ash content (almost double than for fresh pulp due to lime addition. As regards the current results, citrus pulp has potential for use in rabbit diets as a source of energy and soluble fibre.

  18. 19 CFR 351.407 - Calculation of constructed value and cost of production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... ANTIDUMPING AND COUNTERVAILING DUTIES Calculation of Export Price, Constructed Export Price, Fair Value, and Normal Value § 351.407 Calculation of constructed value and cost of production. (a) Introduction. This... 19 Customs Duties 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Calculation of constructed value and cost of...

  19. Modeling of primary production of phytoplankton in the wetland Jaboque, Bogotá D.C.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julio Eduardo Beltrán Vargas

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available A dynamic simulation model is presented to explain the general behavior of the  primary production of phytoplankton in the wetland Jaboque - Bogota, Colombia, in three sections with differential physical and chemical characteristics. The model takes into account the physicochemical variables, the basin area, depth, annual rainfall, water temperature, pH and concentration of chlorophyll _a. The dynamic modeling is based on differential equations and the Euler integration method is used, the modeling was developed using Stella 9.1® computer program. The model allows quantifying the primary production of phytoplankton in wetland Jaboque from chlorophyll _a monthly average concentration for each section. The results of the Ppf modeling show that Ppf concentration variations  in each section of the wetland follow a reverse pattern to the bimodal behavior of precipitation. A high degree of correspondence between the values of chlorophyll_a Ppf field and modeled in the following manner r2 = 0.86 for the first section and r2 = 0.86 and r2 = 0.79 for the remaining sections was found. Error determination was 0,57 relative to the first section and 0,35; 0,46, indicating that the results are not overstated. The model shows in general terms the functional aspects of behavior Ppf and its relation to the process of eutrophication, and it allows recommendations for the management and restoration of wetlands.

  20. Spatial extrapolation of light use efficiency model parameters to predict gross primary production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karsten Schulz

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available To capture the spatial and temporal variability of the gross primary production as a key component of the global carbon cycle, the light use efficiency modeling approach in combination with remote sensing data has shown to be well suited. Typically, the model parameters, such as the maximum light use efficiency, are either set to a universal constant or to land class dependent values stored in look-up tables. In this study, we employ the machine learning technique support vector regression to explicitly relate the model parameters of a light use efficiency model calibrated at several FLUXNET sites to site-specific characteristics obtained by meteorological measurements, ecological estimations and remote sensing data. A feature selection algorithm extracts the relevant site characteristics in a cross-validation, and leads to an individual set of characteristic attributes for each parameter. With this set of attributes, the model parameters can be estimated at sites where a parameter calibration is not possible due to the absence of eddy covariance flux measurement data. This will finally allow a spatially continuous model application. The performance of the spatial extrapolation scheme is evaluated with a cross-validation approach, which shows the methodology to be well suited to recapture the variability of gross primary production across the study sites.

  1. Respiration of new and old carbon in the surface ocean: Implications for estimates of global oceanic gross primary productivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Matheus C.; Schulz, Kai G.; Eyre, Bradley D.

    2017-06-01

    New respiration (Rnew, of freshly fixated carbon) and old respiration (Rold, of storage carbon) were estimated for different regions of the global surface ocean using published data on simultaneous measurements of the following: (1) primary productivity using 14C (14PP); (2) gross primary productivity (GPP) based on 18O or O2; and (3) net community productivity (NCP) using O2. The ratio Rnew/GPP in 24 h incubations was typically between 0.1 and 0.3 regardless of depth and geographical area, demonstrating that values were almost constant regardless of large variations in temperature (0 to 27°C), irradiance (surface to 100 m deep), nutrients (nutrient-rich and nutrient-poor waters), and community composition (diatoms, flagellates, etc,). As such, between 10 and 30% of primary production in the surface ocean is respired in less than 24 h, and most respiration (between 55 and 75%) was of older carbon. Rnew was most likely associated with autotrophs, with minor contribution from heterotrophic bacteria. Patterns were less clear for Rold. Short 14C incubations are less affected by respiratory losses. Global oceanic GPP is estimated to be between 70 and 145 Gt C yr-1.Plain Language SummaryHere we present a comprehensive coverage of ocean new and old respiration. Our results show that nearly 20% of oceanic gross primary production is consumed in the first 24 h. However, most (about 60%) respiration is of older carbon fixed at least 24 h before its consumption. Rates of new respiration relative to gross primary production were remarkably constant for the entire ocean, which allowed a preliminary estimation of global primary productivity as between 70 and 145 gt C yr-1.

  2. Value-creation in new product development within converging value chains: An analysis in the functional foods and nutraceutical industry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bröring, S.; Cloutier, D.

    2008-01-01

    Abstract: Purpose ¿ This paper seeks to shed some light on value-creation in new product development (NPD) projects within the context of industry convergence and to explore alternative types of projects characterised by different buyer-seller relationships. Design/methodology/approach ¿ There has

  3. International Diversification, Product Strategy, And Firm Value:Evidence From Korea

    OpenAIRE

    Donseung Choi; Eunho Cho

    2014-01-01

    Existing studies showed inconsistent results for the relationship between international diversification (ID) and firm value. Thus, we primarily examine whether each MNCs product strategy moderates the relationship between ID and firm value. The results show that MNCs product strategy moderates the relationship between ID and firm value as measured by Tobins Q. Specifically, a positive relationship exists between ID and firm value in the firm group pursuing a cost leadership strategy, whereas ...

  4. Test marketing for value-added root and tuber based products in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Test marketing for value-added root and tuber based products in Ikwuano local government area ... JE Ewuziem, C Aniedu, E Oti, VO Onyenobi ... root and tuber based products, developed at National Root Crops Research Institute, Umudike.

  5. PROMOTION OF PRIMARY PRODUCTS - A VIEW FROM THE CLOISTER

    OpenAIRE

    Quilkey, John J.

    1986-01-01

    This paper is a discourse on how promotion may contribute to the efficiency of consumption. The view is taken that, through its addition to the quantity of search with respect to product characteristics, promotion may enable consumers to allocate their expenditures more efficiently and yield additional revenue to producers of the promoted product. The central plea is for consistency in the identification of promotion objectives, the implementation of the promotion program and monitoring of th...

  6. Global resistance and resilience of primary production following extreme drought are predicted by mean annual precipitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuart-Haëntjens, E. J.; De Boeck, H. J.; Lemoine, N. P.; Gough, C. M.; Kröel-Dulay, G.; Mänd, P.; Jentsch, A.; Schmidt, I. K.; Bahn, M.; Lloret, F.; Kreyling, J.; Wohlgemuth, T.; Stampfli, A.; Anderegg, W.; Classen, A. T.; Smith, M. D.

    2017-12-01

    Extreme drought is increasing globally in frequency and intensity, with uncertain consequences for the resistance and resilience of key ecosystem functions, including primary production. Primary production resistance, the capacity of an ecosystem to withstand change in primary production following extreme climate, and resilience, the degree to which primary production recovers, vary among and within ecosystem types, obscuring global patterns of resistance and resilience to extreme drought. Past syntheses on resistance have focused climatic gradients or individual ecosystem types, without assessing interactions between the two. Theory and many empirical studies suggest that forest production is more resistant but less resilient than grassland production to extreme drought, though some empirical studies reveal that these trends are not universal. Here, we conducted a global meta-analysis of sixty-four grassland and forest sites, finding that primary production resistance to extreme drought is predicted by a common continuum of mean annual precipitation (MAP). However, grasslands and forests exhibit divergent production resilience relationships with MAP. We discuss the likely mechanisms underlying the mixed production resistance and resilience patterns of forests and grasslands, including different plant species turnover times and drought adaptive strategies. These findings demonstrate the primary production responses of forests and grasslands to extreme drought are mixed, with far-reaching implications for Earth System Models, ecosystem management, and future studies of extreme drought resistance and resilience.

  7. Organic Aerosol Component (OACOMP) Value-Added Product

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fast, J [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory; Zhang, Q; tilp, A [Brookhaven National Laboratory; Shippert, T [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory; Parworth, C; Mei, F [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

    2013-08-23

    Organic aerosol (OA, i.e., the organic fraction of particles) accounts for 10–90% of the fine aerosol mass globally and is a key determinant of aerosol radiative forcing. But atmospheric OA is poorly characterized and its life cycle insufficiently represented in models. As a result, current models are unable to simulate OA concentrations and properties accurately. This deficiency represents a large source of uncertainty in quantification of aerosol effects and prediction of future climate change. Evaluation and development of aerosol models require data products generated from field observations. Real-time, quantitative data acquired with aerosol mass spectrometers (AMS) (Canagaratna et al. 2007) are critical to this need. The AMS determines size-resolved concentrations of non-refractory (NR) species in submicrometer particles (PM1) with fast time resolution suitable for both ground-based and aircraft deployments. The high-resolution AMS (HR-AMS), which is equipped with a high mass resolution time-of-flight mass spectrometer, can be used to determine the elemental composition and oxidation degrees of OA (DeCarlo et al. 2006).

  8. Peripheral blood values in workers occupied in the petrochemical production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G.G. Badamshina

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The study is devoted to solution of the problems of the early changes detection in a body on the stages, when only the conditions for the pathology formation were created. The analysis of peripheral blood in the workers, occupied in petrochemical production, allowed us to diagnose the changes that testify the body defenses’ decrease that occurs under exposure to chemicals. It is shown that in the initial period of exposure to harmful substances the body's reaction to a toxic irritant contain both specific and nonspecific components. The first working years is characterized by the reduction of the number of red blood cells and hemoglobin. Over the next years the gradual stabilization is presented, and then the moderate and persistent increase in red blood indices occur, what indicate on the adaptive nature of the condition. It was established, that in dependence of the tropism, mechanism of action and the hazard class of hazardous substances, the diverse hematological changes in the body workers are revealed.

  9. Scaling Gross Primary Production (GPP) over boreal and deciduous forest landscapes in support of MODIS GPP product validation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    David P. Turner; William D. Ritts; Warren B. Cohen; Stith T. Gower; Maosheng Zhao; Steve W. Running; Steven C. Wofsy; Shawn Urbanski; Allison L. Dunn; J.W. Munger

    2003-01-01

    The Moderate Resolution Imaging Radiometer (MODIS) is the primary instrument in the NASA Earth Observing System for monitoring the seasonality of global terrestrial vegetation. Estimates of 8-day mean daily gross primary production (GPP) at the 1 km spatial resolution are now operationally produced by the MODIS Land Science Team for the global terrestrial surface using...

  10. Current /sup 14/C methods for measuring primary production: gross underestimates in oceanic waters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gieskes, W W.C.; Kraay, G W; Baars, M A [Netherlands Institute for Sea Research, Texel, Netherlands

    1979-10-01

    The amount of organic matter produced through autotrophic processes in the euphotic zone of the tropical open ocean and available for respiration of autotrophs and heterotrophs was at least 5 to 15 times higher than values derived from the common /sup 14/C method suggested. The new estimates are based on measurements of /sup 14/C incorporation in organic matter of ocean samples incubated in bottles of up to 4 litres. Oceanic phytoplankton appeared to have a high growth rate, with generation times of hours, not days. High heterotrophic activity, finding its expression in high dark fixation rates of /sup 14/C, took place in conjunction with this high primary production of organic matter.

  11. Primary defect production by high energy displacement cascades in molybdenum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Selby, Aaron P. [Department of Nuclear Engineering, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996 (United States); Xu, Donghua, E-mail: xudh@utk.edu [Department of Nuclear Engineering, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996 (United States); Juslin, Niklas; Capps, Nathan A. [Department of Nuclear Engineering, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996 (United States); Wirth, Brian D. [Department of Nuclear Engineering, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996 (United States); Oak Ridge National Laboratory, P.O. Box 2008, MS6003, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States)

    2013-06-15

    We report molecular dynamics simulations of primary damage in molybdenum produced by high energy displacement cascades on the femto- to pico-second and Angstrom to nanometer scales. Clustering directly occurred for both interstitials and vacancies in the 1–50 keV cascade energy range explored. Point defect survival efficiency and partitioning probabilities into different sized clusters were quantified. The results will provide an important reference for kinetic models to describe the microstructural evolution in Mo under ion or neutron irradiations over much longer time and length scales.

  12. Prognostic value of elevated mean platelet volume in patients undergoing primary angioplasty for ST-elevation myocardial infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akgul, Ozgur; Uyarel, Huseyin; Pusuroglu, Hamdi; Gul, Mehmet; Isiksacan, Nilgun; Turen, Selahattin; Erturk, Mehmet; Surgit, Ozgur; Cetin, Mustafa; Bulut, Umit; Baycan, Omer Faruk; Uslu, Nevzat

    2013-06-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the prognostic value of mean platelet volume (MPV) in patients with STEMI undergoing primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). We prospectively enrolled 495 consecutive STEMI patients.The study population was divided into tertiles based on admission MPV values. The high MPV group (n= 148) was defined as a value in the third tertile (> 8.9), and the low MPV group (n = 347) included those patients with a value in the lower two tertiles ( 8.9) was found to be a powerful independent predictor of six-month all-cause mortality. These results suggest that a high admission MPV level was associated with increased six-month all-cause mortality in patients with STEMI undergoing primary PCI.

  13. [Prognostic value of JAK2, MPL and CALR mutations in Chinese patients with primary myelofibrosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Z F; Li, B; Liu, J Q; Li, Y; Ai, X F; Zhang, P H; Qin, T J; Zhang, Y; Wang, J Y; Xu, J Q; Zhang, H L; Fang, L W; Pan, L J; Hu, N B; Qu, S Q; Xiao, Z J

    2016-07-01

    To evaluate the prognostic value of JAK2, MPL and CALR mutations in Chinese patients with primary myelofibrosis (PMF). Four hundred and two Chinese patients with PMF were retrospectively analyzed. The Kaplan-Meier method, the Log-rank test, the likelihood ratio test and the Cox proportional hazards regression model were used to evaluate the prognostic scoring system. This cohort of patients included 209 males and 193 females with a median age of 55 years (range: 15- 89). JAK2V617F mutations were detected in 189 subjects (47.0% ), MPLW515 mutations in 13 (3.2%) and CALR mutations in 81 (20.1%) [There were 30 (37.0%) type-1, 48 (59.3%) type-2 and 3 (3.7%) less common CALR mutations], respectively. 119 subjects (29.6%) had no detectable mutation in JAK2, MPL or CALR. Univariate analysis indicated that patients with CALR type-2 mutations or no detectable mutations had inferior survival compared to those with JAK2, MPL or CALR type- 1 or other less common CALR mutations (the median survival was 74vs 168 months, respectively [HR 2.990 (95% CI 1.935-4.619),P<0.001]. Therefore, patients were categorized into the high-risk with CALR type- 2 mutations or no detectable driver mutations and the low- risk without aforementioned mutations status. The DIPSS-Chinese molecular prognostic model was proposed by adopting mutation categories and DIPSS-Chinese risk group. The median survival of patients classified in low risk (132 subjects, 32.8% ), intermediate- 1 risk (143 subjects, 35.6%), intermediate- 2 risk (106 subjects, 26.4%) and high risk (21 subjects, 5.2%) were not reached, 156 (95% CI 117- 194), 60 (95% CI 28- 91) and 22 (95% CI 10- 33) months, respectively, and there was a statistically significant difference in overall survival among the four risk groups (P<0.001). There was significantly higher predictive power for survival according to the DIPSS-Chinese molecular prognostic model compared with the DIPSS-Chinese model (P=0.005, -2 log-likelihood ratios of 855.6 and 869

  14. Value Added Products from Hemicellulose Utilization in Dry Mill Ethanol Plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodney Williamson, ICPB; John Magnuson, PNNL; David Reed, INL; Marco Baez, Dyadic; Marion Bradford, ICPB

    2007-03-30

    The Iowa Corn Promotion Board is the principal contracting entity for this grant funded by the US Department of Agriculture and managed by the US Department of Energy. The Iowa Corn Promotion Board subcontracted with New Jersey Institute of Technology, KiwiChem, Pacific Northwest National Lab and Idaho National Lab to conduct research for this project. KiwiChem conducted the economic engineering assessment of a dry-mill ethanol plant. New Jersey Institute of Technology conducted work on incorporating the organic acids into polymers. Pacific Northwest National Lab conducted work in hydrolysis of hemicellulose, fermentation and chemical catalysis of sugars to value-added chemicals. Idaho National Lab engineered an organism to ferment a specific organic acid. Dyadic, an enzme company, was a collaborator which provided in-kind support for the project. The Iowa Corn Promotion Board collaborated with the Ohio Corn Marketing Board and the Minnesota Corn Merchandising Council in providing cost share for the project. The purpose of this diverse collaboration was to integrate the hydrolysis, the conversion and the polymer applications into one project and increase the likelihood of success. This project had two primary goals: (1) to hydrolyze the hemicellulose fraction of the distillers grain (DG) coproduct coming from the dry-mill ethanol plants and (2) convert the sugars derived from the hemicellulose into value-added co-products via fermentation and chemical catalysis.

  15. Aboveground Net Primary Productivity in a Riparian Wetland Following Restoration of Hydrology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melissa Koontz

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available This research presents the initial results of the effects of hydrological restoration on forested wetlands in the Mississippi alluvial plain near Memphis, Tennessee. Measurements were carried out in a secondary channel, the Loosahatchie Chute, in which rock dikes were constructed in the 1960s to keep most flow in the main navigation channel. In 2008–2009, the dikes were notched to allow more flow into the secondary channel. Study sites were established based on relative distance downstream of the notched dikes. Additionally, a reference site was established north of the Loosahatchie Chute where the dikes remained unnotched. We compared various components of vegetation composition and productivity at sites in the riparian wetlands for two years. Salix nigra had the highest Importance Value at every site. Species with minor Importance Values were Celtis laevigata, Acer rubrum, and Plantanus occidentalis. Productivity increased more following the introduction of river water in affected sites compared to the reference. Aboveground net primary productivity was highest at the reference site (2926 ± 458.1 g·m−2·year−1, the intact site; however, there were greater increase at the sites in the Loosahatchie Chute, where measurements ranged from 1197.7 ± 160.0 g m−2·year−1·to 2874.2 ± 794.0 g·m−2·year−1. The site furthest from the notching was the most affected. Pulsed inputs into these wetlands may enhance forested wetland productivity. Continued monitoring will quantify impacts of restored channel hydrology along the Mississippi River.

  16. Aboveground Net Primary Productivity in a Riparian Wetland Following Restoration of Hydrology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koontz, Melissa; Lundberg, Christopher; Lane, Robert; Day, John; Pezeshki, Reza

    2016-02-04

    This research presents the initial results of the effects of hydrological restoration on forested wetlands in the Mississippi alluvial plain near Memphis, Tennessee. Measurements were carried out in a secondary channel, the Loosahatchie Chute, in which rock dikes were constructed in the 1960s to keep most flow in the main navigation channel. In 2008-2009, the dikes were notched to allow more flow into the secondary channel. Study sites were established based on relative distance downstream of the notched dikes. Additionally, a reference site was established north of the Loosahatchie Chute where the dikes remained unnotched. We compared various components of vegetation composition and productivity at sites in the riparian wetlands for two years. Salix nigra had the highest Importance Value at every site. Species with minor Importance Values were Celtis laevigata, Acer rubrum, and Plantanus occidentalis. Productivity increased more following the introduction of river water in affected sites compared to the reference. Aboveground net primary productivity was highest at the reference site (2926 ± 458.1 g·m(-2)·year(-1)), the intact site; however, there were greater increase at the sites in the Loosahatchie Chute, where measurements ranged from 1197.7 ± 160.0 g m(-2)·year(-1)·to 2874.2 ± 794.0 g·m(-2)·year(-1). The site furthest from the notching was the most affected. Pulsed inputs into these wetlands may enhance forested wetland productivity. Continued monitoring will quantify impacts of restored channel hydrology along the Mississippi River.

  17. GHG emissions from primary aluminum production in China: Regional disparity and policy implications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hao, Han; Geng, Yong; Hang, Wen

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • GHG emissions from primary aluminum production in China were accounted. • The impact of regional disparity of power generation was considered for this study. • GHG emissions factor of China’s primary aluminum production was 16.5 t CO_2e/t Al ingot in 2013. • Total GHG emissions from China’s primary aluminum production were 421 mt CO_2e in 2013. - Abstract: China is the world-leading primary aluminum production country, which contributed to over half of global production in 2014. Primary aluminum production is power-intensive, for which power generation has substantial impact on overall Greenhouse Gas (GHG) emissions. In this study, we explore the impact of regional disparity of China’s power generation system on GHG emissions for the sector of primary aluminum production. Our analysis reveals that the national GHG emissions factor (GEF) of China’s primary aluminum production was 16.5 t CO_2e/t Al ingot in 2013, with province-level GEFs ranging from 8.2 to 21.7 t CO_2e/t Al ingot. There is a high coincidence of provinces with high aluminum productions and high GEFs. Total GHG emissions from China’s primary aluminum production were 421 mt CO_2e in 2013, approximately accounting for 4% of China’s total GHG emissions. Under the 2020 scenario, GEF shows a 13.2% reduction compared to the 2013 level, but total GHG emissions will increase to 551 mt CO_2e. Based on our analysis, we recommend that the government should further promote energy efficiency improvement, facilitate aluminum industry redistribution with low-carbon consideration, promote secondary aluminum production, and improve aluminum industry data reporting and disclosure.

  18. Sensible use of primary energy in organic greenhouse production

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stanghellini, C.; Baptista, F.; Eriksson, Evert; Gilli, Celine; Giuffrida, F.; Kempkes, F.L.K.; Munoz, P.; Stepowska, Agnieszka; Montero, J.I.

    2016-01-01

    Review of the major sources for energy consumption in organic greenhouse horticulture and analyse of the options available to reduce energy consumption or, at least, increase the energy use efficiency of organic production in greenhouses. At the moment, the best way to match demand and availability

  19. Computing the Net Primary Productivity for a Savanna- Dominated ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    komla

    2003-05-19

    May 19, 2003 ... productivity of CO2 (between 1–2% per year) continues, a doubling of the CO2 ... The work ... Numerous isotope mass balance equa-tions are proposed to ..... Terrestrial ecoregions of the world: a new map of life on earth.

  20. Sustainable Production of Asphalt using Biomass as Primary Process Fuel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bühler, Fabian; Nguyen, Tuong-Van; Elmegaard, Brian

    2016-01-01

    is the heating and drying of aggregate,where natural gas, fuel oil or LPG is burned in a direct-fired rotary dryer. Replacing this energy source with amore sustainable one presents several technical and economic challenges, as high temperatures, short startuptimes and seasonal production variations are required...

  1. Products of tungstate ion interaction with primary aliphatic amines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skrylev, L.D.; Sejfullina, I.I.; Purich, A.N.; Babinets, S.K.

    1982-01-01

    Using the methods of conductometric titration, IR-spectroscopic and thermographic analyses precipitates formed in the process of interaction of diluted aqueous solutions of sodium tungstate with alcoholic solutions of dodecyl-, tetradecyl- and octadecylamine have been studied. It is shown that as a result of interaction tungstates of corresponding amines are formed. The structure and thermal stability of singled out products are determined

  2. Interannual Variation in Phytoplankton Class-Specific Primary Production at a Global Scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rousseaux, Cecile Severine; Gregg, Watson W.

    2014-01-01

    We used the NASA Ocean Biogeochemical Model (NOBM) combined with remote sensing data via assimilation to evaluate the contribution of 4 phytoplankton groups to the total primary production. First we assessed the contribution of each phytoplankton groups to the total primary production at a global scale for the period 1998-2011. Globally, diatoms were the group that contributed the most to the total phytoplankton production (50, the equivalent of 20 PgC y-1. Coccolithophores and chlorophytes each contributed to 20 (7 PgC y-1 of the total primary production and cyanobacteria represented about 10 (4 PgC y(sub-1) of the total primary production. Primary production by diatoms was highest in high latitude (45) and in major upwelling systems (Equatorial Pacific and Benguela system). We then assessed interannual variability of this group-specific primary production over the period 1998-2011. Globally the annual relative contribution of each phytoplankton groups to the total primary production varied by maximum 4 (1-2 PgC y-1. We assessed the effects of climate variability on the class-specific primary production using global (i.e. Multivariate El Nio Index, MEI) and regional climate indices (e.g. Southern Annular Mode (SAM), Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO) and North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO)). Most interannual variability occurred in the Equatorial Pacific and was associated with climate variability as indicated by significant correlation (p 0.05) between the MEI and the class-specific primary production from all groups except coccolithophores. In the Atlantic, climate variability as indicated by NAO was significantly correlated to the primary production of 2 out of the 4 groups in the North Central Atlantic (diatomscyanobacteria) and in the North Atlantic (chlorophytes and coccolithophores). We found that climate variability as indicated by SAM had only a limited effect on the class-specific primary production in the Southern Ocean. These results provide a modeling and

  3. Predictive value of elevated soluble CD40 ligand in patients undergoing primary angioplasty for ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pusuroglu, Hamdi; Akgul, Ozgur; Erturk, Mehmet; Uyarel, Huseyin; Bulut, Umit; Akkaya, Emre; Buturak, Ali; Surgit, Ozgur; Fuat, Ali; Cetin, Mustafa; Yldrm, Aydn

    2014-11-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the prognostic value of soluble CD40 ligand (sCD40L) in patients with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) undergoing a primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). The prognostic value of sCD40L has been documented in patients with acute coronary syndrome; however, its value in acute STEMI remains unclear. We prospectively enrolled 499 consecutive STEMI patients (397 men, 102 women) undergoing primary PCI. The study population was divided into tertiles on the basis of admission sCD40L values. The high sCD40L group (n=168) included patients with a value in the third tertile (≥0.947 mg/l) and the low sCD40L group (n=331) included patients with a value in the lower two tertiles (0.947 mg/l) is a powerful independent predictor of 1-year all-cause mortality (odds ratio: 3.68; 95% confidence interval: 1.54-8.77; P=0.003). The results of this study suggest that a high sCD40L level at admission is associated with increased in-hospital and 1-year all-cause mortality rates in patients with STEMI undergoing primary PCI.

  4. Global Human Appropriation of Net Primary Production and Associated Resource Decoupling: 2010-2050.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Chuanbin; Elshkaki, Ayman; Graedel, T E

    2018-02-06

    Human appropriation of net primary production (HANPP) methodology has previously been developed to assess the intensity of anthropogenic extraction of biomass resources. However, there is limited analysis concerning future trends of HANPP. Here we present four scenarios for global biomass demand and HANPP harv (the most key component of HANPP) from 2010 to 2050 by incorporating data on expanded historical drivers and disaggregated biomass demand (food, wood material, and fuelwood). The results show that the biomass demand has the lowest value in the equitability world scenario (an egalitarian vision) and the highest value in the security foremost scenario (an isolationist vision). The biomass demand for food and materials increases over time, while fuelwood demand decreases over time. Global HANPP harv rises to between 8.5 and 10.1 Pg C/yr in 2050 in the four scenarios, 14-35% above its value in 2010, and some 50% of HANPP harv is calculated to be crop residues, wood residues, and food losses in the future. HANPP harv in developing regions (Asia, Africa, and Latin America) increases faster than that in more-developed regions (North America and Europe), due to urbanization, population growth, and increasing income. Decoupling of HANPP harv and socioeconomic development is also discussed in this work.

  5. A model of regional primary production for use with coarse resolution satellite data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prince, S. D.

    1991-01-01

    A model of crop primary production, which was originally developed to relate the amount of absorbed photosynthetically active radiation (APAR) to net production in field studies, is discussed in the context of coarse resolution regional remote sensing of primary production. The model depends on an approximately linear relationship between APAR and the normalized difference vegetation index. A more comprehensive form of the conventional model is shown to be necessary when different physiological types of plants or heterogeneous vegetation types occur within the study area. The predicted variable in the new model is total assimilation (net production plus respiration) rather than net production alone or harvest yield.

  6. Interannual Variation in Phytoplankton Class-specific Primary Production at a Global Scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rousseaux, Cecile; Gregg, Watson

    2014-01-01

    Phytoplankton is responsible for over half of the net primary production on earth. The knowledge on the contribution of various phytoplankton groups to the total primary production is still poorly understood. Data from satellite observations suggest that for upwelling regions, photosynthetic rates by microplankton is higher than that of nanoplankton but that when the spatial extent is considered, the production by nanoplankton is comparable or even larger than microplankton. Here, we used the NASA Ocean Biogeochemical Model (NOBM) combined with remote sensing data via assimilation to evaluate the contribution of 4 phytoplankton groups to the total primary production. Globally, diatoms were the group that contributed the most to the total phytoplankton production (approx. 50%) followed by coccolithophores and chlorophytes. Primary production by diatoms was highest in high latitude (>45 deg) and in major upwelling systems (Equatorial Pacific and Benguela system). We assessed the effects of climate variability on the class-specific primary production using global (i.e. Multivariate El Nino Index, MEI) and 'regional' climate indices (e.g. Southern Annular Mode (SAM), Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO) and North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO)). Most interannual variability occurred in the Equatorial Pacific and was associated with climate variability. These results provide a modeling and data assimilation perspective to phytoplankton partitioning of primary production and contribute to our understanding of the dynamics of the carbon cycle in the oceans at a global scale.

  7. Derivation of economic values for veal, beef and milk production traits using profit equations.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bekman, H.; Arendonk, van J.A.M.

    1993-01-01

    In this study profit equations for milk, veal and beef bull production were developed to obtain economic values for different traits. Veal and beef production were described in terms of fat and protein daily gain. For categorical traits, dystocia and carcass quality traits, economic values were

  8. Tránsformation–Flow–Value as a strategic tool in Project Production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bertelsen, Sven; Bonke, Sten

    2012-01-01

    The paper investigates the use of the Transformation-Flow-Value theory as a strategic tool in the development of the project production firm. When producing products such as ships, focus on value more than on cost may be the best approach, but in service industries such as construction, focus...

  9. Asymmetric responses of primary productivity to precipitation extremes: A synthesis of grassland precipitation manipulation experiments

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Wilcox, K. R.; Shi, Z.; Gherardi, L. A.; Lemoine, N. P.; Koerner, S. E.; Hoover, D. L.; Bork, E.; Byrne, K. M.; Cahill, J.; Collins, S. L.; Evans, S.M.; Gilgen, Anna K.; Holub, Petr; Jiang, L.; Knapp, A. K.; LeCain, D.; Liang, J.; Garcia-Palacios, P.; Penuelas, J.; Pockman, W. T.; Smith, M. D.; Sun, S.; White, S. R.; Yahdjian, L.; Zhu, K.; Luo, Y.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 23, č. 10 (2017), s. 4376-4385 ISSN 1354-1013 Institutional support: RVO:86652079 Keywords : net primary productivity * terrestrial ecosystems * temperate grassland * biomass allocation * plant-communities * tallgrass prairie * climate extremes * use efficiency * united-states * global-change * aboveground net primary productivity * belowground net primary productivity * biomass allocation * climate change * grasslands * meta-analysis * root biomass Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour OBOR OECD: Environmental sciences (social aspects to be 5.7) Impact factor: 8.502, year: 2016

  10. Will Global Change Effect Primary Productivity in Coastal Ecosystems?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothschild, Lynn J.; Peterson, David L. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    Algae are the base of coastal food webs because they provide the source of organic carbon for the remaining members of the community. Thus, the rate that they produce organic carbon to a large extent controls the productivity of the entire ecosystem. Factors that control algal productivity range from the physical (e.g., temperature, light), chemical (e.g., nutrient levels) to the biological (e.g., grazing). Currently, levels of atmospheric carbon dioxide surficial fluxes of ultraviolet radiation are rising. Both of these environmental variables can have a profound effect on algal productivity. Atmospheric carbon dioxide may increase surficial levels of dissolved inorganic carbon. Our laboratory and field studies of algal mats and phytoplankton cultures under ambient and elevated levels of pCO2 show that elevated levels of inorganic carbon can cause an increase in photosynthetic rates. In some cases, this increase will cause an increase in phytoplankton numbers. There may be an increase in the excretion of fixed carbon, which in turn may enhance bacterial productivity. Alternatively, in analogy with studies on the effect of elevated pCO2 on plants, the phytoplankton could change their carbon to nitrogen ratios, which will effect the feeding of the planktonic grazers. The seasonal depletion of stratospheric ozone has resulted in elevated fluxes of UVB radiation superimposed on the normal seasonal variation. Present surface UV fluxes have a significant impact on phytoplankton physiology, including the inhibition of the light and dark reactions of photosynthesis, inhibition of nitrogenase activity, inhibition of heterocyst formation, reduction in motility, increased synthesis of the UV-screening pigment scytonemin, and mutation. After reviewing these issues, recent work in our lab on measuring the effect of UV radiation on phytoplankton in the San Francisco Bay Estuary will be presented.

  11. Diagnostic value of the proton pump inhibitor test for gastro-oesophageal reflux disease in primary care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aanen, M. C.; Weusten, B. L. A. M.; Numans, M. E.; de Wit, N. J.; Baron, A.; Smout, A. J. P. M.

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To assess the diagnostic accuracy of the proton pump inhibitor test in a primary care population as well as its additional value over reflux history, using the symptom association probability outcome during 24-h oesophageal pH recording as reference test for gastro-oesophageal reflux disease.

  12. Validating "Value Added" in the Primary Grades: One District's Attempts to Increase Fairness and Inclusivity in Its Teacher Evaluation System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amrein-Beardsley, Audrey; Polasky, Sarah; Holloway-Libell, Jessica

    2016-01-01

    One urban district in the state of Arizona sought to use an alternative achievement test (i.e., the Northwest Evaluation Association's (NWEA) Measures of Academic Progress for Primary Grades (MAP)) to include more value-added ineligible teachers in the districts' growth and merit pay system. The goal was to allow for its K-2 teachers to be more…

  13. LIFE CYCLE OF THE PHARMACEUTICAL PRODUCT AND PRIMARY STRATEGIC GOALS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina\tCIOT

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In addition to innovation, production at high standards, market and marketing policy, pharmaceutical companies need strategies that could cope with apparent contradictions, convergences and divergences, centralisation and involution, at the global and local level, focus and liberty, domestic production and external supply, ownership and alliances, networks and hierarchies, science or market orientation, all these being part of the essence of a profitable and expanding pharmaceutical company. Specialists appreciate that the 20 century will remain in the collective memory for its technological achievements, including a better understanding of the atomic structure, „information explosion” encouraged by the progress of the computer technology, the news from space exploration. If one wants to evaluate its importance in terms of impact on people’s lives, the 20 century could be called THE DRUG AREA. Many experts agree that, at the end of this century, pharmaceutical products would have a higher importance for our lives due to the special progress in neurobiology, immunology, molecular biology, cellular differentiation, cell membrane and genetic studies. In the pharmaceutical industry, important funds are directed towards research and development, while few understand and appreciate the contribution brought by the pharmaceutical marketing system and by the professionals in this field. These ones make the drug accessible at the right time and place, in the required quantity, at a reasonable price and with all the information required.

  14. Physical foundation of the labor theory of value: production and environmental destruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Obinata, T.

    2005-01-01

    A concept negentropy is introduced to supplement Marx's labor theory of value. The negentropy, that is a less entropy state than the thermal equilibrium state of matter, is a common property of the usefulness of material needs. The production of commodity increases the negentropy of product, but the action raises more environmental entropy than the negentropy of the product. This is environmental damage. In addition the negentropy plays a role of the substance of value and answers the issue about productive and unproductive labor. It is clarified that the origin of surplus value is the negentropy of information

  15. Consumers' values and attitudes and their relation to the consumption of pork products

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Barcellos, M.D; Perin, Marcelo G.; Pérez-Cueto, F.J.A

    2012-01-01

    Consumers' attitudes and personal values were assessed, investigating if those constructs affect the consumption of pork products. Empirical data was collected through a survey performed with 482 consumers in Brazil, according to Q-PorkChains project definitions. Attitudes towards the environment...... and nature are quite positive, although ethnocentrism is also present. Industrial food production seems to be an accepted system, but consumers are showing that environmental sustainability must not be forgotten. Consumers with more ‘traditionalist’ values prefer fresh, whilst those with ‘adventurous’ values...... prefer processed pork products. The development of innovative pork products aiming to attend to these different groups represents interesting opportunities for the pork chain...

  16. TOOL FOR VALUE IDENTIFICATION AND CONSUMER WILLINGNESS TO PURCHASE GREEN PRODUCTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geysler Rogis Flor Bertolini

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The value to consumers of environmental issues is an important factor for decision-making organizations. This article aims to present a tool that can identify the value and the willingness of consumers to purchase environmentally friendly products. It is an exploratory research, with an interrogative model. The proposed tool consists of two steps; the first is to check the value and purchasing preference of consumers towards environmentally friendly products. The second step is the simulation of supply environmentally friendly product to consumers. Based on the results, showing whether or not consumers will buy the product eco-organizations will obtain relevant information for decision making.

  17. Predictive Value of Elevated Uric Acid in Turkish Patients Undergoing Primary Angioplasty for ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akgul, Ozgur; Uyarel, Huseyin; Pusuroglu, Hamdi; Gul, Mehmet; Isiksacan, Nilgun; Turen, Selahattin; Erturk, Mehmet; Surgit, Ozgur; Cetin, Mustafa; Bulut, Umit; Baycan, Omer Faruk; Uslu, Nevzat

    2014-03-01

    Uric acid (UA) is an independent risk factor for the development of coronary heart disease. Serum UA levels have been correlated with all major forms of death from cardiovascular disease, including acute, subacute, and chronic forms of coronary artery disease (CAD), heart failure, and stroke. However, its value in acute ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) remains unclear. The aim of this study was to evaluate the prognostic value of UA in patients with STEMI undergoing primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). We prospectively enrolled 434 consecutive Turkish STEMI patients (mean age 55.4 ± 12.4 years, 341 male, 93 female) undergoing primary PCI. The study population was divided into tertiles based on admission UA values. The high UA group (n = 143) was defined as a value in the third tertile (> 5.7 mg/dl), and the low UA group (n = 291) included those patients with a value in the lower two tertiles (≤ 5.7 mg/dl). Clinical characteristics, in-hospital and six-month outcomes of primary PCI were analyzed. Compared to the low UA group, only Killip class > 1 at admission was more prevalent in the high UA group (3.4% vs. 17.5%, p 5.7 mg/dl) was found to be a powerful independent predictor of six-month all-cause mortality (hazard ratio: 5.57, 95% confidence interval: 1.903-16.3, p = 0.002). These results suggest that a high level of UA on admission was associated with increased in-hospital cardiovascular mortality, and six-month all-cause mortality in Turkish patients with STEMI undergoing primary PCI. Primary angioplasty; ST elevation myocardial infarction; Uric acid.

  18. Primary Screening of 10 - Hydroxy - 2 - Decenoic Acid Productive Strains

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    In this paper, eleven strains, which vere screened strictly from raw royal.jelly, soil and honeycomb etc. by means of dilution plate and spread plate methods, were cultured at 28°C for60 h with shaking. To determine whether they could yield 10-Hydroxy-2-decenoic acid during fermentation, gas chromatography and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry methods were used. The results showed that the strains BH002 and BH004. were both identified as Crvtococcaceae. where BH002 was primarily classified into Candida for possessing the abilities. The 10-HDA productivity of Candida BH002 and that of BH004 were 0.327% and 0.2648% respectively.

  19. Solubility of simulated PWR primary circuit corrosion products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kunig, R.H.; Sandler, Y.L.

    1986-08-01

    The solubility behavior of non-stoichiometric nickel ferrites, nickel-cobalt ferrites, and magnetite, as model substances for the corrosion products (''crud'') formed in nuclear pressurized water reactors, was studied in a flow system in aqueous solutions of lithium hydroxide, boric acid, and hydrogen with pH, temperature, and hydrogen concentrations as parameters. Below the temperature region of 300 to 330 0 C, at hydrogen concentrations of 25 to 40 cm 3 /kg H 2 O as used during reactor operation, the solubility of nickel-cobalt ferrite is the same as that of Ni and Co/sub x/Fe/sub 3-x/O 4 (x 3 /kg of hydrogen, the equilibrium iron and nickel solubilities increase congruently down to about 100 0 C, in a manner consistent with the solubility of Fe 3 O 4 , but sharply decline at lower temperatures, apparently due to formation of a borated layer. A cooldown experiment on a time scale of a typical Westinghouse reactor shutdown, as well as static experiments carried out on various ferrite samples at 60 0 C show that after addition of oxygen or peroxide evolution of nickel (and possibly cobalt) above the equilibrium solubility in hydrogen depends on the presence of dissociation products prior to oxidation. Thermodynamic calculations of various reduction and oxidative decomposition reactions for stoichiometric and non-stoichiometric nickel ferrite and cobalt ferrite are presented. Their significance to evolutions of nickel and cobalt on reactor shutdown is discussed. 30 refs., 38 figs., 34 tabs

  20. The influence of socio-cultural background and product value in usability testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonderegger, Andreas; Sauer, Juergen

    2013-05-01

    This article examines the influence of socio-cultural background and product value on different outcomes of usability tests. A study was conducted in two different socio-cultural regions, Switzerland and East Germany, which differed in a number of aspects (e.g. economic power, price sensitivity and culture). Product value (high vs. low) was varied by manipulating the price of the product. Sixty-four test participants were asked to carry out five typical user tasks in the context of coffee machine usage, measuring performance, perceived usability, and emotion. The results showed that in Switzerland, high-value products were rated higher in usability than low-value products whereas in East Germany, high-value products were evaluated lower in usability. A similar interaction effect of socio-cultural background and product value was observed for user emotion. Implications are that the outcomes of usability tests do not allow for a simple transfer across cultures and that the mediating influence of perceived product value needs to be taken into consideration. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd and The Ergonomics Society. All rights reserved.

  1. How drought severity constrains gross primary production(GPP) and its partitioning among carbon pools in a Quercus ilex coppice?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rambal, S.; Lempereur, M.; Limousin, J. M.; Martin-StPaul, N. K.; Ourcival, J. M.; Rodríguez-Calcerrada, J.

    2014-12-01

    The partitioning of photosynthates toward biomass compartments plays a crucial role in the carbon (C) sink function of forests. Few studies have examined how carbon is allocated toward plant compartments in drought-prone forests. We analyzed the fate of gross primary production (GPP) in relation to yearly water deficit in an old evergreen Mediterranean Quercus ilex coppice severely affected by water limitations. Carbon fluxes between the ecosystem and the atmosphere were measured with an eddy covariance flux tower running continuously since 2001. Discrete measurements of litterfall, stem growth and fAPAR allowed us to derive annual productions of leaves, wood, flowers and acorns, and an isometric relationship between stem and belowground biomass has been used to estimate perennial belowground growth. By combining eddy covariance fluxes with annual net primary productions (NPP), we managed to close a C budget and derive values of autotrophic, heterotrophic respirations and carbon-use efficiency (CUE; the ratio between NPP and GPP). Average values of yearly net ecosystem production (NEP), GPP and Reco were 282, 1259 and 977 g C m-2. The corresponding aboveground net primary production (ANPP) components were 142.5, 26.4 and 69.6 g C m-2 for leaves, reproductive effort (flowers and fruits) and stems, respectively. NEP, GPP and Reco were affected by annual water deficit. Partitioning to the different plant compartments was also impacted by drought, with a hierarchy of responses going from the most affected - the stem growth - to the least affected - the leaf production. The average CUE was 0.40, which is well in the range for Mediterranean-type forest ecosystems. CUE tended to decrease less drastically in response to drought than GPP and NPP did, probably due to drought acclimation of autotrophic respiration. Overall, our results provide a baseline for modeling the inter-annual variations of carbon fluxes and allocation in this widespread Mediterranean ecosystem, and

  2. Topographical effects of climate dataset and their impacts on the estimation of regional net primary productivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, L. Qing; Feng, Feng X.

    2014-11-01

    In this study, we first built and compared two different climate datasets for Wuling mountainous area in 2010, one of which considered topographical effects during the ANUSPLIN interpolation was referred as terrain-based climate dataset, while the other one did not was called ordinary climate dataset. Then, we quantified the topographical effects of climatic inputs on NPP estimation by inputting two different climate datasets to the same ecosystem model, the Boreal Ecosystem Productivity Simulator (BEPS), to evaluate the importance of considering relief when estimating NPP. Finally, we found the primary contributing variables to the topographical effects through a series of experiments given an overall accuracy of the model output for NPP. The results showed that: (1) The terrain-based climate dataset presented more reliable topographic information and had closer agreements with the station dataset than the ordinary climate dataset at successive time series of 365 days in terms of the daily mean values. (2) On average, ordinary climate dataset underestimated NPP by 12.5% compared with terrain-based climate dataset over the whole study area. (3) The primary climate variables contributing to the topographical effects of climatic inputs for Wuling mountainous area were temperatures, which suggest that it is necessary to correct temperature differences for estimating NPP accurately in such a complex terrain.

  3. Estimating primary productivity of tropical oil palm in Malaysia using remote sensing technique and ancillary data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanniah, K. D.; Tan, K. P.; Cracknell, A. P.

    2014-10-01

    The amount of carbon sequestration by vegetation can be estimated using vegetation productivity. At present, there is a knowledge gap in oil palm net primary productivity (NPP) at a regional scale. Therefore, in this study NPP of oil palm trees in Peninsular Malaysia was estimated using remote sensing based light use efficiency (LUE) model with inputs from local meteorological data, upscaled leaf area index/fractional photosynthetically active radiation (LAI/fPAR) derived using UK-DMC 2 satellite data and a constant maximum LUE value from the literature. NPP values estimated from the model was then compared and validated with NPP estimated using allometric equations developed by Corley and Tinker (2003), Henson (2003) and Syahrinudin (2005) with diameter at breast height, age and the height of the oil palm trees collected from three estates in Peninsular Malaysia. Results of this study show that oil palm NPP derived using a light use efficiency model increases with respect to the age of oil palm trees, and it stabilises after ten years old. The mean value of oil palm NPP at 118 plots as derived using the LUE model is 968.72 g C m-2 year-1 and this is 188% - 273% higher than the NPP derived from the allometric equations. The estimated oil palm NPP of young oil palm trees is lower compared to mature oil palm trees (oil palm trees contribute to lower oil palm LAI and therefore fPAR, which is an important variable in the LUE model. In contrast, it is noted that oil palm NPP decreases with respect to the age of oil palm trees as estimated using the allomeric equations. It was found in this study that LUE models could not capture NPP variation of oil palm trees if LAI/fPAR is used. On the other hand, tree height and DBH are found to be important variables that can capture changes in oil palm NPP as a function of age.

  4. Value of sestamibi for the prediction of resistance to primary chemotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maublant, J.; Cachin, F.; Mestas, D.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: Neoadjuvant chemotherapy can cause significant tumor regression of primary breast carcinoma, thus allowing a more conservative surgery to be performed in bulky tumors, even if a benefit in terms of prolongation of survival remains to be established. Clinical resistance is often encountered, but is not apparent during the first months of treatment. This has stimulated the search for tests predictive of tumor response in order to more accurately select patients who may benefit from such a long, risky in terms of side effects, and costly therapy. Several mechanisms have been reported to be involved in the multidrug resistance resistance (MDR) to many of the currently used chemotherapeutic drugs and specific proteins have been demonstrated to be over expressed in these tumor cells. The most important seems to be a membrane transporter, P-glycoprotein (Pgp), product of the MDR1 gene in man. Like the other members of that family, it can actively extrude a wide variety of substrates from the cells, among which anthracyclines as well as other small lipophilic cations. Drugs called reversers are able to block the efficacy of these transmembrane resistance mechanisms. In patients with a tumor resistant to chemotherapy, such a reverser could make the tumor sensitive to chemotherapy. However, up to now, most of the reversers have not yet demonstrated their clinical efficacy, often because of their side effects. Since resistance to chemotherapy as well as the possible efficacy of a reverser are processes that take months before becoming evident either clinically or by conventional imaging, any technique that could detect these effects during the early phase of the treatment or, even better, that could predict the outcome would save lives, time and money. The radiopharmaceutical hexakis (2-methoxyisobutylisonitrile) technetium ( 99m Tc-sestamibi), which has been initially registered for myocardial blood flow imaging, then for breast cancer imaging, is an

  5. Predictive value of elevated cystatin C in patients undergoing primary angioplasty for ST-elevation myocardial infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akgul, Ozgur; Uyarel, Huseyin; Ergelen, Mehmet; Pusuroglu, Hamdi; Gul, Mehmet; Turen, Selahattin; Bulut, Umit; Baycan, Omer Faruk; Ozal, Ender; Cetin, Mustafa; Yıldırım, Aydın; Uslu, Nevzat

    2013-10-01

    The prognostic value of cystatin C (CysC) has been documented in patients with acute coronary syndrome without ST-segment elevation. However, its value in acute ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) remains unclear. The aim of this study was to evaluate the prognostic value of CysC in patients with STEMI undergoing primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). We prospectively enrolled 475 consecutive STEMI patients (mean age 55.6±12.4 years, 380 male, 95 female) undergoing primary PCI. The study population was divided into tertiles based on admission CysC values. The high CysC group (n=159) was defined as a value in the third tertile (>1.12 mg/L), and the low CysC group (n=316) included those patients with a value in the lower two tertiles (≤1.12 mg/L). Clinical characteristics and in-hospital and one-month outcomes of primary PCI were analyzed. The patients of the high CysC group were older (mean age 62.8±13.1 vs. 52.3±10.5, P1.12 mg/L) was found to be a powerful independent predictor of one-month cardiovascular mortality (odds ratio, 5.3; 95% confidence interval, 1.25-22.38; P=.02). These results suggest that a high admission CysC level was associated with increased in-hospital and one-month cardiovascular mortality in patients with STEMI undergoing primary PCI. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Predictive value of elevated D-dimer in patients undergoing primary angioplasty for ST elevation myocardial infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akgul, Ozgur; Uyarel, Huseyin; Pusuroglu, Hamdi; Gul, Mehmet; Isiksacan, Nilgun; Turen, Selahattin; Erturk, Mehmet; Surgit, Ozgur; Cetin, Mustafa; Bulut, Umit; Baycan, Omer F; Uslu, Nevzat

    2013-10-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the prognostic value of D-dimer in patients with STEMI undergoing primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). The prognostic value of D-dimer has been documented in patients with acute coronary syndrome without ST-segment elevation. However, its value in acute ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) remains unclear. We prospectively enrolled 453 consecutive STEMI patients (mean age 55.6 ± 12.4 years, 364 male, 89 female) undergoing primary PCI. The study population was divided into tertiles based on admission D-dimer values. The high D-dimer group (n = 151) was defined as a value in the third tertile [>0.72 ug/ml fibrinogen equivalent units (FEU)], and the low D-dimer group (n = 302) included those patients with a value in the lower two tertiles (≤0.72 ug/ml FEU). Clinical characteristics, in-hospital and 6-month outcomes of primary PCI were analyzed. The patients of the high D-dimer group were older (mean age 60.1 ± 13.5 versus 52.4 ± 10.6, P 0.72 ug/ml FEU) was found to be a powerful independent predictor of 6-month all-cause mortality (odds ratio: 10.1, 95% confidence interval: 1.24-42.73, P = 0.03). These results suggest that a high admission D-dimer, level was associated with increased in-hospital cardiovascular mortality and 6-month all-cause mortality in patients with STEMI undergoing primary PCI.

  7. What Australian Primary School Students Value in Mathematics Learning: A WIFI Preliminary Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seah, Wee Tiong; Barkatsas, Tasos

    2014-01-01

    Grades 5/6 students in Melbourne reported the valuing of "achievement," "open-endedness," "relevance," "humanism," "ICT," and "openness" most in mathematics learning. Although prior research suggested that students in East Asia valued "achievement" most as well, there was an…

  8. Scaffolding Peer Collaboration through Values Education: Social and Reflective Practices from a Primary Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morcom, Veronica E.

    2016-01-01

    Peers create one of the most significant contexts for developing prosocial values. This paper reports on a yearlong study of thirty one year 4/5 students where antisocial values were deep-seated. The aim of this qualitative research was to examine how to reduce antisocial behaviour and promote peer collaboration. The notion of whole-class…

  9. The Morehouse Human Values in Medicine Program, 1978-80: Reinforcing a Commitment to Primary Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, Kathryn; Axelsen, Diana

    1982-01-01

    A program in human values in medicine begun in 1978 at Morehouse College's School of Medicine is discussed. The Human Values in Medicine Program draws on the Humanities--particularly philosophy, literature, and art--and secondarily on the social sciences. (MLW)

  10. Primary production measurements at three reservoirs in the state of Sao Paulo, Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jureidini, P.; Chinez, S.J.; Agudo, E.G.

    1983-01-01

    Primary production measurements were carried out at three reservoirs in the state of Sao Paulo, Barra Bonita, Paiva Castro and Ponte nova using the 14 C technique. Meanwhile, several physical and chemical parameters of these water were also evaluated, in order to find out the limnological conditions of these reservoirs. Primary production rates ranged from 7,6mg C/m 3 d at Ponte Nova, to 247,2mg C/m 3 d at Barra Bonita. There seems to be god correlation between water quality data and primary production measurements. Regarding the results, it may be stated that the Barra Bonita reservoir has reached the eutrophic level, while the other two exibit mesotrophic levels. As a way of testing the water quality data collected was used in Churchill and Nicholas model, issuing results in agreement with those of the primary production measurements. (Author) [pt

  11. HANPP Collection: Global Patterns in Human Appropriation of Net Primary Productivity (HANPP)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Global Patterns in Human Appropriation of Net Primary Productivity (HANPP) portion of the HANPP Collection represents a digital map of human appropriation of net...

  12. Safety assessment of smoke flavouring primary products by the European Food Safety Authority

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Theobald, A.; Arcella, D.; Carere, A.; Croera, C.; Engel, K.H.; Gott, D.; Gurtler, R.; Meier, D.; Pratt, I.; Rietjens, I.M.C.M.; Simon, R.; Walker, R.

    2012-01-01

    This paper summarises the safety assessments of eleven smoke flavouring primary products evaluated by the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA). Data on chemical composition, content of polyaromatic hydrocarbons and results of genotoxicity tests and subchronic toxicity studies are presented and

  13. NODC Standard Format Primary Productivity 1 (F029) Data (1958-1983) (NODC Accession 0014152)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset contains data from measurements of primary productivity. The data are collected to provide information on nutrient levels and nutrient flow in offshore...

  14. Primary productivity in the Karwar Bay, Karnataka, west coast of India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Naik, U.G.; Naik, R.K.; Nayak, V.N.

    The measurement of primary production is of great importance because of its significance to the problems of aquatic ecology and fishery management. The interaction of light intensity, temperature and nutrient levels determines the photosynthetic...

  15. Remote sensing of oceanic primary production: Computations using a spectral model

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sathyendranath, S.; Platt, T.; Caverhill, C.M.; Warnock, R.E.; Lewis, M.R.

    A spectral model of underwater irradiance is coupled with a spectral version of the photosynthesis-light relationship to compute oceanic primary production. The results are shown to be significantly different from those obtained using...

  16. Phytoplankton pigments and primary production around the oil fields off Maharashtra

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    JiyalalRam, M.J.; Ramaiah, Neelam; Mehta, P.; Krishnakumari, L.; Nair, V.R.

    Studies on phytoplankton pigments, primary productivity and particulate organic carbon were made at 21 locations off Bombay (Maharashtra, India) and adjacent waters during the 48th cruise of @iORV Sagar Kanya@@ in December 1988 to January 1989...

  17. Ocean primary production and available light: Further algorithms for remote sensing

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Platt, T.; Sathyendranath, S.; Caverhill, C.M.; Lewis, M.R.

    (1986, Deep-Sea Research, 33, 149-163) Further empirical evidence is presented to show the stability of the relationship between surface light and biomass-normalized primary production of the ocean water column A theoretical explanation is given...

  18. Primary productivity of marine macrophytes in the coral reef lagoon of the Kadmat Island, Lakshadweep

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Dhargalkar, V.K.; Shaikh, N.

    n situ primary productivity measurements were carried out with different macrophyte species (belonging to four groups) dominating the benthic communities in the coral reef lagoon of the Kadmat Island of the Lakshadweep Archipelago...

  19. VALUE-MOTIVATIONAL COMPONENT OF METHODICAL CULTURE OF PRIMARY SCHOOL TEACHER: THE ESSENCE AND WAYS OF FORMATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia Nikula

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available One of the main conditions of formation of methodological culture of primary school teacher, a factor that encourages the assimilation of effective models of professional and methodical activity is value-motivational component. In order to clearly understand the content of the phenomenon appointed its author selected criteria: system values orientation and professional and personal motivation. The value orientation as a set of values focus on professional and methodological activities which manifest themselves in individual positive attitude of students to it is determined on the base of the analysis of scientific and pedagogical sources. The indicators of value orientations are: human values (truth, goodness, beauty, life and health; personal values of teachers (humanity, justice, diligence, responsibility; teacher professional values (commitment, independence, initiative, organization, value orientation on professional and methodical activities. The essence of professional and personal motivation as individual education teacher's personality, which includes professional and personal motives, interests, needs, formation of which is a clear reference and internal impetus for the formation of methodological culture. The indicators of this criterion are: professional and methodical motivation; methodically-focused orientation teacher; interest in the success in professional and methodical work of the teacher; the need for professional self-realization and self-affirmation; desire career advancement; focus on student mastery of methodological culture. The system measure of the formation of values and motivational component: discussions, exercises, training exercises, collective creative discussion, a role play, a workshop is analysed.

  20. Corrosion products behaviour under VVER primary coolant conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grygar, T.; Zmitko, M.

    2002-01-01

    The aim of this work was to collect data on thermodynamic stability of Cr, Fe, and Ni oxides, mechanisms of hydrothermal corrosion of stainless steels and to compare the real observation with the theory. We found that the electrochemical potential and pH in PWR and VVER are close to the thermodynamic boundary between two fields of stable spinel type oxides. The ways of degradation of the passivating layers due to changes in water chemistry were considered and PWR and VVER systems were found to be potentially endangered by reductive attack. In certain VVER systems the characteristics of the passivating layer on steels and also concentration of soluble corrosion products seem to be in contradiction with the theoretical expectations. (author)

  1. NOx from cement production - reduction by primary measures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Lars Skaarup

    1999-01-01

    cement production processes cement is typically produced by thermally treating a mixture of limestone and clay minerals in kiln systems consisting of a rotary kiln and a calciner. Clinker burning at a temperature of about 1450 °C takes place in the internally fired rotary kiln and calcination, which...... rotary kilns, while NOx formation from fuel-N and reduction of NOx take place in calciners. NOx formation in the rotary kiln is mainly governed by the necessary clinker burning temperature and is not very amenable to control, while net NOx formation in calciners depends strongly on calciner design......, calciner operation, fuel properties and on the NOx level from the rotary kiln. The low-NOx calciner types presently marketed are based on combinations of reburning, air staging and temperature control and seem equivalent in their ability to restrict NOx formation. If fuels with a significant volatile...

  2. Applicability and prognostic value of histologic scoring systems in primary sclerosing cholangitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vries, Elisabeth M. G.; Verheij, Joanne; Hubscher, Stefan G.; Leeflang, Mariska M. G.; Boonstra, Kirsten; Beuers, Ulrich; Ponsioen, Cyriel Y.

    2015-01-01

    Primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) is a chronic cholestatic liver disease. At present, there is no appropriate histologic scoring system available for PSC, evaluating both degree of necroinflammatory activity (grade) and fibrosis (stage). The aim of this study was to assess if three scoring

  3. Diagnostic value of DIAGNOdent in detecting caries under composite restorations of primary molars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ava Vali Sichani

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: DIAGNOdent showed a greater accuracy in detecting secondary caries under primary molar restorations, compared to radiographs. Although DIAGNOdent is an effective method for detecting caries under composite restorations, it is better to be used as an adjunctive method alongside other detecting procedures.

  4. The value of rituximab treatment in primary Sjögren's syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verstappen, Gwenny M.; van Nimwegen, Jolien F.; Vissink, Arjan; Kroese, Frans G. M.; Bootsma, Hendrika

    The rationale for B cell depletion therapy with rituximab in primary Sjogren's syndrome relies upon the well-established role of B cell hyperactivity in immunopathogenesis. In line with this notion, several biomarkers of B cell activity are significantly affected by treatment, both in the target

  5. Primary School Teachers' Views on a Holistic Approach to Facilitating the Acquisition of Musical Cultural Values

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badjanova, Jelena

    2013-01-01

    Recent tendencies in education highlight the need to align the system of general education in Latvia with the tenets of sustainability. In keeping with this broad target orientation, this paper re-examines international and Latvian experiences and perspectives on the application of a holistic approach to the content of primary education. This…

  6. Methylmercury bioaccumulation in stream food webs declines with increasing primary production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walters, David; D.F. Raikow,; C.R. Hammerschmidt,; M.G. Mehling,; A. Kovach,; J.T. Oris,

    2015-01-01

    Opposing hypotheses posit that increasing primary productivity should result in either greater or lesser contaminant accumulation in stream food webs. We conducted an experiment to evaluate primary productivity effects on MeHg accumulation in stream consumers. We varied light for 16 artificial streams creating a productivity gradient (oxygen production =0.048–0.71 mg O2 L–1 d–1) among streams. Two-level food webs were established consisting of phytoplankton/filter feeding clam, periphyton/grazing snail, and leaves/shredding amphipod (Hyalella azteca). Phytoplankton and periphyton biomass, along with MeHg removal from the water column, increased significantly with productivity, but MeHg concentrations in these primary producers declined. Methylmercury concentrations in clams and snails also declined with productivity, and consumer concentrations were strongly correlated with MeHg concentrations in primary producers. Heterotroph biomass on leaves, MeHg in leaves, and MeHg in Hyalella were unrelated to stream productivity. Our results support the hypothesis that contaminant bioaccumulation declines with stream primary production via the mechanism of bloom dilution (MeHg burden per cell decreases in algal blooms), extending patterns of contaminant accumulation documented in lakes to lotic systems.

  7. Parameterization of surface irradiance and primary production in Århus Bay, SW Kattegat, Baltic Sea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund-Hansen, Lars Chresten; Sørensen, Helene Munk

    2009-01-01

    . The study is based on a one year long time-series of PAR, CTD-casts (n = 45), and primary production measurements (n = 24) from Århus Bay (56°09′ N; 10°20′ E), south west Kattegat. Results showed a high and positive correlation between observed and calculated primary production in the bay, as based...

  8. Climate dependence of the CO2 fertilization effect on terrestrial net primary production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alexandrov, G.A.; Yamagata, Y.; Oikawa, T.

    2003-01-01

    The quantitative formulation of the fertilization effect of CO 2 enrichment on net primary production (NPP) introduced by Keeling and Bacastow in 1970s (known as Keeling's formula) has been recognized as a summary of experimental data and has been used in various assessments of the industrial impact on atmospheric chemistry. Nevertheless, the magnitude of the formula's key coefficient, the so-called growth factor, has remained open to question. Some of the global carbon cycle modelers avoid this question by tuning growth factor and choosing the value that fits the observed course of atmospheric CO 2 changes. However, for mapping terrestrial sinks induced by the CO 2 fertilization effect one needs a geographical pattern of the growth factor rather than its globally averaged value. The earlier approach to this problem involved formulating the climate dependence of the growth factor and the derivation of its global pattern from climatic variables (whose geographical distribution is known). We use a process-based model (TsuBiMo) for this purpose and derive the values of growth factor for major biomes for comparison our approach with the earlier studies. Contrary to the earlier prevailing opinion, TsuBiMo predicts that these values decrease with mean annual temperature (excluding biomes of limited water supply). We attribute this result to the effect of light limitation caused by mutual shading inside a canopy, which was considered earlier as unimportant, and conclude that current hypotheses about CO 2 fertilization effect (and thus projections of the related carbon sink) are very sensitive to the choice of driving forces taken into account

  9. "Lost milk?": Counting the economic value of breast milk in gross domestic product.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, J P

    2013-11-01

    The contribution of breastfeeding and mothers milk to the economy is invisible in economic statistics. This article demonstrates how the economic value of human milk production can be included in economic statistics such as gross domestic product (GDP) and provides estimates for Australia, the United States, and Norway. The contribution of human milk and lactation to GDP in these countries is estimated using United Nations (System of National Accounting) guidelines and conventional economic valuation approaches to measuring production in GDP. In Australia, current human milk production levels exceed $3 billion annually. The United States has the potential to produce human milk worth more than US$110 billion a year, but currently nearly two thirds of this value is lost due to premature weaning. In Norway, production valued at US$907 million annually is 60% of its potential value. The potential loss of economic value from not protecting women's lactation and milk production from competing market pressures is large. Failure to account for mothers' milk production in GDP and other economic data has important consequences for public policy. The invisibility of human milk reduces the perceived importance of programs and regulations that protect and support women to breastfeed. The value of human milk can be measured using accepted international guidelines for calculating national income and production. It is quantitatively nontrivial and should be counted in GDP.

  10. The emissions of peat production and utilization chain, the effects of the emissions, proportion and valuing of them

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahonen, A.; Leiviskae, V.; Kiukaanniemi, E.

    1992-01-01

    The solid matter flush off of peat production areas do not differ remarkably from those of forest drainage and clear felling excluding the nitrogen flush out, which remain on higher level longer, for the 15-20 years of peat production. The fertilizer flush off of peat production is remarkably smaller than that of agriculture. The portion of peat of the total N-load in Finnish watercourses is 0.3 % and 0.2 % of the P-load. The low load value of peat production is due to the marginality of peat production areas of the total utilization of the ground. The portion of loads of peat production are increased on those areas there the portion of peat production of the total ground utilization is high, and no other water loading activities except forestry does not exist. The portion of peat of the total primary energy consumption is about 5 %. The portion of peat fuelled boilers of the solid matter, SO2 and NOx emissions of the energy production was 3 % and of CO2 emissions 8 % in 1991. The CO2 emissions of peat production and combustion into the air are about 360 k/produced m 3 . Some of the environmental effects of the peat production and utilization can be priced using market prices, and hence it is easy to estimate their costs if the reason-action connections are known. Others, like health effects and the conservational value of the mire, are very hard to prize. The estimation of environmental effects cause problems in valoring. the effects of peat production load to watercourses are not easy to separate from the effects of other loads on water courses

  11. Primary school teachers’ and students’ perception of values and media literacy

    OpenAIRE

    Paula Renes-Arellano; Sara Barral-Aramburu

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT: Ephemeral changes, cultural diversity, globalization processes, the media and the crisis of values in modern society require a profound reflection on the role of education and teachers in the integral formation of students. This paper has the purpose of knowing the perception and experience of teachers and students in the field of media based literacy and education in values. The methods of investigation used were qualitative, by using techniques such as the daily observation logs a...

  12. Cost-Effectiveness and Value of Information Analysis of Brief Interventions to Promote Physical Activity in Primary Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gc, Vijay Singh; Suhrcke, Marc; Hardeman, Wendy; Sutton, Stephen; Wilson, Edward C F

    2018-01-01

    Brief interventions (BIs) delivered in primary care have shown potential to increase physical activity levels and may be cost-effective, at least in the short-term, when compared with usual care. Nevertheless, there is limited evidence on their longer term costs and health benefits. To estimate the cost-effectiveness of BIs to promote physical activity in primary care and to guide future research priorities using value of information analysis. A decision model was used to compare the cost-effectiveness of three classes of BIs that have been used, or could be used, to promote physical activity in primary care: 1) pedometer interventions, 2) advice/counseling on physical activity, and (3) action planning interventions. Published risk equations and data from the available literature or routine data sources were used to inform model parameters. Uncertainty was investigated with probabilistic sensitivity analysis, and value of information analysis was conducted to estimate the value of undertaking further research. In the base-case, pedometer interventions yielded the highest expected net benefit at a willingness to pay of £20,000 per quality-adjusted life-year. There was, however, a great deal of decision uncertainty: the expected value of perfect information surrounding the decision problem for the National Health Service Health Check population was estimated at £1.85 billion. Our analysis suggests that the use of pedometer BIs is the most cost-effective strategy to promote physical activity in primary care, and that there is potential value in further research into the cost-effectiveness of brief (i.e., <30 minutes) and very brief (i.e., <5 minutes) pedometer interventions in this setting. Copyright © 2018 International Society for Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research (ISPOR). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Hard alloys testing-machine for values of PWR primary coolant circuits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campan, J.L.; Sauze, A.

    1980-01-01

    Testing of valve parts or material used in valve fabrication and particularly seizing conditions in friction of plane surfaces coated with hard alloys of the type stellite. The testing equipment called Marguerite is composed of a hot pressurized water loop in conditions similar to PWR primary coolant circuits (320 0 C, 150 bars) and a testing-machine with measuring instruments. Testing conditions and samples are described [fr

  14. The value of primary vascular stents in management of early portal vein stenosis after liver transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-Tsan Chang

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available If portal vein stenosis (PVS occurs within 1 month after liver transplantation (LT, especially within 1 week, it can be catastrophic and result in rapid loss of the grafts and mortality. Although surgical treatments have been considered standard treatment for PVS, patients are usually unable to receive operations or re-transplantations, because of their critical conditions and a shortage of grafts. Recently, primary percutaneous transhepatic portal vein stents (PTPS were suggested as alternative and less-invasive treatments of PVS. However, because lethal complications may follow these primary stent placements for patients in early stages after LT, primary PTPS placements for patients suffering PVS 1 month after LT has been suggested. From November 2009 to July 2015, 38 consecutive adult patients underwent LT at our institution. Among them, six recipients suffered PVS within 1 month after LT. Technical success was achieved in all six patients. Clinical success was obtained in two of the four patients suffering PVS within 1 week after LT, and in the other two patients suffering PVS>1 week after LT. All surviving patients and their grafts were in good condition, and their stents remained patent. Our experience showed that primary PTPS placements can be used to effectively treat patients with PVS encountered within 1 month, and even within 1 week, after LT with acceptable short-term results. However, possible fatal complications should be kept in mind. Long-term results of these procedures need further follow-up.

  15. A Software Architecture for Control of Value Production in Federated Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jay S. Bayne

    2003-08-01

    Full Text Available Federated enterprises are defined as interactive commercial entities that produce products and consume resources through a network of open, free-market transactions. Value production in such entities is defined as the real-time computation of enterprise value propositions. These computations are increasingly taking place in a grid-connected space – a space that must provide for secure, real-time, reliable end-to-end transactions governed by formal trading protocols. We present the concept of a value production unit (VPU as a key element of federated trading systems, and a software architecture for automation and control of federations of such VPUs.

  16. Relative value of computed tomography scanning and venous sampling in establishing the cause of primary hyperaldosteronism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheaves, R.; Goldin, J.; Reznek, R.H.

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the relative merits of the postural simulation test, adrenal computed tomography (CT) and venous sampling in the differential diagnosis of patients presenting with primary hyperaldosteronism. The records of 20 patients presenting with primary hyperaldosteronism were reviewed retrospectively. There were 15 patients with a unilateral aldosterone-producing adenoma (APA), 4 patients with idiopathic hyperaldosteronism (IHA) and 1 patient with primary adrenal hyperplasia (PAH). Bilateral venous sampling of adrenal veins was attempted in all patients and blood collected for aldosterone and cortisol assay. Plasma aldosterone concentration increased after 4 h of standing in all cases of hyperplasia, but was also demonstrated in 10/15 patients with a surgically-proven APA. CT scanning correctly identified all 15 cases of APA and also classified correctly the remaining 5 cases of hyperplasia. CT scanning may be used alone to confirm the cause of hyperaldosteronism where postural studies suggest an adrenal adenoma, and such patients may be considered for early surgery. 21 refs

  17. Nutrient flux fuels the summer primary productivity in the oligotrophic waters of the Gulf of Aqaba, Red Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tariq Al-Najjar

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available The thermohaline characteristics of the Gulf of Aqaba, Red Sea,depict a well-defined seasonal pattern of winter mixing from December toApril and summer stratification from May to November. This thermohalinestructure is a major controlling factor of the nutrient, chlorophyll aand primary productivity seasonal cycles. The nitrate and chlorophyll aconcentration records generated down to 200 m at a vertical resolution of25 m - weekly during 1994, 1995 and every two weeks from April 1997 throughto December 2000 - are employed to assess the nitrogen flux across the summerthermocline of the Gulf of Aqaba. The flux calculations are based on a simplediffusion model that incorporates the physical stress eddy diffusivity factorKz and a biological stress factor k. Both Kz and k arecalculated using the Michaelis-Menten equation and the nitrate concentrationgradient. The total nitrate flux of the Gulf of Aqaba during the seven summermonths (May-November is estimated at 0.52 mole N m-2. In relation toestablished primary productivity values (75.5 g C m-2 (MayNovember-1 and the generated chlorophyll a records, thisyields an f fraction of new to total primary production of 0.50. Thisrelatively high f value is discussed with respect to the geophysicalcharacteristics of the Gulf of Aqaba and similar oceanic basins. The remaining50% is accounted for by cross-sectional flow from the relativelynutrient-rich coral reef coastal habitat and rapid recycling, triggered byhigh irradiance and water temperature.

  18. The usefulness of Schwartz's 'Values Theory' in understanding consumer behaviour towards differentiated products

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krystallis Krontalis, Athanasios; Vassallo, M.; Chryssochoidis, G.

    2012-01-01

    The Values Theory adopts a generic framework whereby a set of values is employed across consumer decision-making contexts in a manner that makes no distinction among various product categories. The present study advances this theory by exhibiting the adaptation capability of the generic values...... instrument (the Portrait Value Questionnaire, PVQ), demonstrating that tailor-made PVQ versions can reflect consumers’ motives towards differentiated products (i.e. organic foods). A questionnaire was completed by approximately 1000 households in each of eight EU countries (N = 8171). The organic food...

  19. Deposition and incorporation of corrosion product to primary coolant suppressing method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsuzuki, Yasuo; Hasegawa, Naoyoshi; Fujioka, Tsunaaki.

    1992-01-01

    In a PWR type nuclear power plant, the concentration of dissolved nitrogen in primary coolants is increased by controlling the nitrogen partial pressure in a volume controlling tank gas phase portion or addition of water in a primary system water supply tank containing dissolved nitrogen to a primary system. Then ammonium is formed by a reaction with hydrogen dissolved in the primary coolants in the field of radiation rays, to control the concentration of ammonium in the coolants within a range from 0.5 to 3.5 ppm, and operate the power plant. As a result, deposition and incorporation of corrosion products to the structural materials of the primary system equipments during plant operation (pH 6.8 to 8.0) are suppressed. In other words, deposition of particulate corrosion products on the surface of fuel cladding tubes and the inner surface of pipelines in the primary system main equipments is prevented and incorporation of ionic radioactive corrosion products to the oxide membranes on the inner surface of the pipelines of the primary system main equipments is suppressed, to greatly reduce the radiation dose rate of the primary system pipelines. Thus, operator's radiation exposure can be decreased upon shut down of the plant. (N.H.)

  20. Hot-spots of primary productivity: An Alternative interpretation to Conventional upwelling models

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Ruth, Paul D.; Ganf, George G.; Ward, Tim M.

    2010-12-01

    The eastern Great Australian Bight (EGAB) forms part of the Southern and Indian Oceans and is an area of high ecological and economic importance. Although it supports a commercial fishery, quantitative estimates of the primary productivity underlying this industry are open to debate. Estimates range from 500 mg C m -2 day -1. Part of this variation may be due to the unique upwelling circulation of shelf waters in summer/autumn (November-April), which shares some similarities with highly productive eastern boundary current upwelling systems, but differs due to the influence of a northern boundary current, the Flinders current, and a wide continental shelf. This study examines spatial variations in primary productivity in the EGAB during the upwelling seasons of 2005 and 2006. Daily integral productivity calculated using the vertically generalised production model (VGPM) showed a high degree of spatial variation. Productivity was low (modelled with the VGPM, which uses surface measures of phytoplankton biomass to calculate productivity. Macro-nutrient concentrations could not be used to explain the difference in the low and high productivities (silica > 1 μmol L -1, nitrate/nitrite > 0.4 μmol L -1, phosphate > 0.1 μmol L -1). Mixing patterns or micro-nutrient concentrations are possible explanations for spatial variations in primary productivity in the EGAB. On a global scale, daily rates of primary productivity of the EGAB lie between the highly productive eastern boundary current upwelling systems, and less productive coastal regions of western and south eastern Australia, and the oligotrophic ocean. However, daily productivity rates in the upwelling hotspots of the EGAB rival productivities in Benguela and Humboldt currents.

  1. The value of contrast-enhanced laparoscopic ultrasound during robotic-assisted surgery for primary colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ellebaek, Signe Bremholm; Fristrup, Claus Wilki; Pless, Torsten

    2018-01-01

    AIM: The aim of this study was to assess the potential clinical value of contrast enhanced laparoscopic ultrasonography (CE-LUS) as a screening modality for liver metastases during robotic assisted surgery for primary colorectal cancer (CRC). METHOD: A prospective, descriptive (feasibility) study...... including 50 consecutive patients scheduled for robotic assisted surgery for primary CRC. CE-LUS was performed by 2 experienced specialists. Only patients without metastatic disease were included. Follow-up was obtained with contrast-enhanced CT imaging at 3 and 12 months postoperatively. RESULTS: Fifty......-up revealed no liver metastasis in any of the patients. CONCLUSION: CE-LUS did not increase the detection rate of occult liver metastasis during robotic assisted primary CRC surgery. The use of CE-LUS as a screening modality for detection of liver metastasis cannot be recommended based on this study...

  2. Customer Relationship Management Influence on Customer Value, Product Quality and Service Quality in Improving Customer Satisfaction and Its Implication on the Customer Loyalty

    OpenAIRE

    Harryani, Sri

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to determine the influence of Customer Relationship Management (CRM) on the Customer Value (CV), Product Quality (PQ) and Service Quality (SQ) in improving Customer Satisfaction (CS) that will have implications on the Customer Loyalty (CL). The research focuses on corporate banking, where customers serve as the research sample. The data in this research using the primary data and secondary data. Source primary data used questionnaire and source the secondary da...

  3. Estimation of net primary productivity using a process-based model in Gansu Province, Northwest China

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Peijuan; Xie, Donghui; Zhou, Yuyu; E, Youhao; Zhu, Qijiang

    2014-01-16

    The ecological structure in the arid and semi-arid region of Northwest China with forest, grassland, agriculture, Gobi, and desert, is complex, vulnerable, and unstable. It is a challenging and sustaining job to keep the ecological structure and improve its ecological function. Net primary productivity (NPP) modeling can help to improve the understanding of the ecosystem, and therefore, improve ecological efficiency. The boreal ecosystem productivity simulator (BEPS) model provides the possibility of NPP modeling in terrestrial ecosystem, but it has some limitations for application in arid and semi-arid regions. In this paper we improve the BEPS model, in terms of its water cycle by adding the processes of infiltration and surface runoff, to be applicable in arid and semi-arid regions. We model the NPP of forest, grass, and crop in Gansu Province as an experimental area in Northwest China in 2003 using the improved BEPS model, parameterized with moderate resolution remote sensing imageries and meteorological data. The modeled NPP using improved BEPS agrees better with the ground measurements in Qilian Mountain than that with original BEPS, with a higher R2 of 0.746 and lower root mean square error (RMSE) of 46.53 gC/m2 compared to R2 of 0.662 and RMSE of 60.19 gC/m2 from original BEPS. The modeled NPP of three vegetation types using improved BEPS show evident differences compared to that using original BEPS, with the highest difference ratio of 9.21% in forest and the lowest value of 4.29% in crop. The difference ratios between different vegetation types lie on the dependence on natural water sources. The modeled NPP in five geographic zones using improved BEPS are higher than those with original BEPS, with higher difference ratio in dry zones and lower value in wet zones.

  4. Antimitochondrial antibodies and other antibodies in primary biliary cirrhosis: diagnostic and prognostic value.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muratori, Luigi; Granito, Alessandro; Muratori, Paolo; Pappas, Georgios; Bianchi, Francesco B

    2008-05-01

    Antimitochondrial antibodies (AMA) are the serologic cornerstone in the diagnosis of primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC), even if they are not detectable in a proportion of patients, notwithstanding the most sensitive and sophisticated technologies used. To fill in the serologic gap in AMA-negative PBC, there is sound evidence to consider antinuclear antibody (ANA) patterns, such as anti-multiple nuclear dots and anti-membranous/rim-like, as PBC-specific surrogate hallmarks of the disease, and their detection can be considered virtually diagnostic. Furthermore, particular ANA specificities, such as anti-gp210, anti-p62, anticentromere antibodies, and anti-dsDNA, may provide additional diagnostic and prognostic information.

  5. Radiological diagnosis of primary sclerosing cholangitis: value of ERC and CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kollmann, F.D.; Maeurer, J.; Hintze, R.E.; Adler, A.; Veltzke, W.; Lohmann, R.; Felix, R.

    1994-01-01

    To evaluate the use of computed tomography (CT) in primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) as compared to endoscopic-retrograde cholangiography (ERC), imaging studies of 24 patients were reviewed. 19 patients were studied by ERC, 19 by CT and 14 by both. In 17 cases, ERC confirmed PSC. One cholangiogram suggested a tumor. CT reflected PSC in only 11 cases, while three patients displayed a mass lesion. Thus, ERC remains the standard imaging technique for diagnosing PSC, whereas CT proves beneficial in excluding hepatic masses. (orig.) [de

  6. Estimation of livestock appropriation of net primary productivity in Texas Drylands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert Washington-Allen; Jody Fitzgerald; Stephanie Grounds; Faisar Jihadi; John Kretzschmar; Kathryn Ramirez; John Mitchell

    2009-01-01

    The ecological state of US Drylands is unknown. This research is developing procedures to determine the impact of the ecological footprint of grazing livestock on the productive capacity of US Drylands. A pilot geodatabase was developed for the state of Texas that includes 2002 data for county boundaries, net primary productivity (NPP) derived from the Moderate...

  7. Patterns of new versus recycled primary production in the terrestrial biosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) availability regulate plant productivity throughout the terrestrial biosphere, influencing the patterns and magnitude of net primary production (NPP) by land plants both now and into the future. These nutrients enter ecosystems via geologic and atmospheric pathways, a...

  8. Social Values Reflections through the Use of EFL Storytelling: An Action Research with Primary Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez Combariza, Claudia Milena; Rodríguez Chapetón, María Ximena; Rojas Rincón, Vanessa Alejandra

    2013-01-01

    This article reports on the results of an action research project carried out with a group of third graders at a public school in Bogotá. The project aimed to gain insights into the use of English as foreign language storytelling and to analyze the way in which students reflect upon their own social values. The findings suggest that the use of…

  9. Value of the region of interest technique in the scintigraphic diagnosis of primary bone tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buell, U.; Keyl, W.; Meister, P.; Pfeifer, J.P.; Hartel, P.; Muenchen Univ.

    1981-01-01

    Employing ROI-technique, a ratio Q was obtained from relating accumulation of 99 sup(m)Tc-MDP at the site of the bone lesion (n = 150) with that of contralateral non-involved osseous areas. Values of Q were correlated with histologic tumor diagnosis, its dignity and frequency. Values of Q of greater than 3.0 were found in 95% of all sarcomas, in 100% of the osteosarcomas but in only 3.8% of all benign bone tumors. Values ranging from 1.0 to 1.2 were exclusively measured in benign tumors (e.g., in 52% of juvenile bone cysts and in 67% of non-ossifing fibromas). Since the threshold - separating benign from malignant lesions - at Q = 3.0 was blurred by tumorlike lesions, metastases and especially by Paget's disease, this method does not precisely predict dignity. However, this method may complement radiographic evaluation with low values supporting the diagnosis of a benign lesion. The combined findings of radiography and these rations gained by nuclear imaging may help determine the pathway of a patient through further diagnosis and treatment. (orig.) [de

  10. Mapping value added positions in facilities management by using a product-process matrix

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Katchamart, Akarapong

    2013-01-01

    Purpose – The purpose of this exploratory research paper is to present a product-process matrix that assists FM organizations and their stakeholders to map their value added position in their organizations. Using this matrix, FM practitioners are able to assess the existing value added delivering...... of the matrix are an FM product structure and an FM process structure. The supporting empirical data were collected through semi-structured interviews from selected FM organizations supplemented by relevant documents. Findings – Based on a product-process matrix, a typology of FM value added positions...... greater values to the client’s core business. Meanwhile, misaligning dilutes the value delivery. Research limitations/implications – This normative matrix can be used as a decision-making tool for a client to assess its FM performances and activities, and to determine the needs of FM provision...

  11. ARM Climate Research Facility Spectral Surface Albedo Value-Added Product (VAP) Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McFarlane, S; Gaustad, K; Long, C; Mlawer, E

    2011-07-15

    This document describes the input requirements, output data products, and methodology for the Spectral Surface Albedo (SURFSPECALB) value-added product (VAP). The SURFSPECALB VAP produces a best-estimate near-continuous high spectral resolution albedo data product using measurements from multifilter radiometers (MFRs). The VAP first identifies best estimates for the MFR downwelling and upwelling shortwave irradiance values, and then calculates narrowband spectral albedo from these best-estimate irradiance values. The methodology for finding the best-estimate values is based on a simple process of screening suspect data and backfilling screened and missing data with estimated values when possible. The resulting best-estimate MFR narrowband spectral albedos are used to determine a daily surface type (snow, 100% vegetation, partial vegetation, or 0% vegetation). For non-snow surfaces, a piecewise continuous function is used to estimate a high spectral resolution albedo at 1 min temporal and 10 cm-1 spectral resolution.

  12. Predictive value of elevated neutrophil to lymphocyte ratio in patients undergoing primary angioplasty for ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ergelen, Mehmet; Uyarel, Huseyin; Altay, Servet; Kul, Şeref; Ayhan, Erkan; Isık, Turgay; Kemaloğlu, Tuba; Gül, Mehmet; Sönmez, Osman; Erdoğan, Ercan; Turfan, Murat

    2014-05-01

    The neutrophil to lymphocyte ratio (NLR) has been investigated as a new predictor for cardiovascular risk. Admission NLR would be predictive of adverse outcomes after primary angioplasty for ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI). A total of 2410 patients with STEMI undergoing primary angioplasty were retrospectively enrolled. The study population was divided into tertiles based on the NLR values. A high NLR (n = 803) was defined as a value in the third tertile (>6.97), and a low NLR (n = 1607) was defined as a value in the lower 2 tertiles (≤6.97). High NLR group had higher incidence of inhospital and long-term cardiovascular mortality (5% vs 1.4%, P 6.97) was found as an independent predictor of inhospital cardiovascular mortality (odds ratio: 2.8, 95% confidence interval: 1.37-5.74, P = .005). High NLR level is associated with increased inhospital and long-term cardiovascular mortality in patients with STEMI undergoing primary angioplasty.

  13. Spatial and seasonal variability of fractionated phytoplankton biomass and primary production in the frontal region of the Northern Adriatic Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.R. VADRUCCI

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Spatial and seasonal patterns of variation of fractionated phytoplankton biomass and primary production and their relationships with nutrient concentrations were analyzed along an inshore - offshore gradient and in relation to the presence of a frontal system in the Northern Adriatic Sea. Sampling was carried out in winter and summer during four oceanographic cruises (June 1996 and 1997, February 1997 and 1998 as part of the PRISMA II project. Water samples for determining nutrient concentrations, phytoplankton biomass (as Chla and primary production (as 14 C assimilation were collected at five optical depths. Sampling stations were located along 2 or 4 parallel transects arranged perpendicularly to the shoreline and the frontal system. The transects were located at such a distance from the coast that the frontal system crossed them at their halfway point. Total dissolved nitrogen (TDN and total dissolved phosphorus concentrations (TDP were 12.41 ± 3 .95 mM and 0.146 ± 0 .070 mM, respectively. The values in the two seasonal periods were similar, decreasing along the inshore-offshore gradient. Values for phytoplankton biomass and primary productionwere higher in the winter than the summer cruises, and decreased, in both seasonal periods, along the inshore / offshore gradient. Moreover, in both seasonal periods, picophytoplankton dominated both biomass and productivity, (56% and 44%, respectively at stations beyond the frontal system, while microphytoplankton was more important at stations inside it (44% and 44%, respectively. Total phytoplankton biomass and primary production were directly related to nutrient concentrations. Regarding size classes, significant patterns of variation with nutrients were observed particularly for biomass. The results indicate that the size structure and function of phytoplankton guilds seem to be mediated by nutrient inflow, as well as by competitive interaction among size fractions.

  14. Digital Transformation of Lean Production: Systematic Approach for the Determination of Digitally Pervasive Value Chains

    OpenAIRE

    Peter Burggräf; Matthias Dannapfel; Hanno Voet; Patrick-Benjamin Bök; Jérôme Uelpenich; Julian Hoppe

    2017-01-01

    The increasing digitalization of value chains can help companies to handle rising complexity in their processes and thereby reduce the steadily increasing planning and control effort in order to raise performance limits. Due to technological advances, companies face the challenge of smart value chains for the purpose of improvements in productivity, handling the increasing time and cost pressure and the need of individualized production. Therefore, companies need to ensure quick and flexible ...

  15. Changes in water chemistry and primary productivity of a reactor cooling reservoir (Par Pond)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tilly, L.J.

    1975-01-01

    Water chemistry and primary productivity of a reactor cooling reservoir have been studied for 8 years. Initially the primary productivity increased sixfold, and the dissolved solids doubled. The dissolved-solids increase appears to have been caused by additions of makeup water from the Savannah River and by evaporative concentration during the cooling process. As the dissolved-solids concentrations and the conductivity of makeup water leveled off, the primary productivity stabilized. Major cation and anion concentrations generally followed total dissolved solids through the increase and plateau; however, silica concentrations declined steadily during the initial period of increased plankton productivity. Standing crops of net seston and centrifuge seston did not increase during this initial period. The collective data show the effects of thermal input to a cooling reservoir, illustrate the need for limnological studies before reactor siting, and suggest the possibility of using makeup-water additions to power reactor cooling basins as a reservoir management tool

  16. Recruitment and condition of juvenile sandeel on the Faroe shelf in relation to primary production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eliasen, Kirstin; Reinert, Jákup; Gaard, Eilif

    The food of early-life sandeel is dominated by zooplankton, which again depends on primary production. On the Faroe Shelf, measurements of accumulated new primary production and chlorophyll a during spring and summer have been carried out since 1990 and 1997, respectively. Large inter...... availability. We compare the time series from the sandeel 0-group surveys with data on phytoplankton production and biomass. The results confirm that survival and condition of the early-life stages of sandeel on the Faroe Shelf is dependent on the magnitude of the primary production. Although the sandeel......-annual variations in the onset of the spring bloom and its intensity have been observed. Since 1974 juvenile sandeels have been sampled annually on the Faroe shelf. These results also show large variations – both in number and in average length. Here, we investigate the variations in recruitment in relation to food...

  17. VALUE STREAM MAPPING AS LEAN PRODUCTION TOOL TO IMPROVE THE PRODUCTION PROCESS ORGANIZATION – CASE STUDY IN PACKAGING MANUFACTURING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorota Klimecka-Tatar

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available In the paper, the method of the production process improvement with the use of lean production tools has been presented. The Value Stream Mapping (VSM for the cardboard packaging produc-tion process has been presented. On the basis of the current state map (CSM, areas for improvement have been designated - 5 organizational changes of the process were marked out. To minimize the three basic losses excessive storage, unnecessary movement and delays, the changes were introduced in the method of inter-operative transport, supervision of the storage condition (input and output of the process, control at the processing operation and the use of a production loop. As a result of the changes, it is possible to shorten the process time, shorten the total time of operations adding value and reduce the number of non-compliant products.

  18. Diagnostic value of combined determination of serum AFP, CEA, CA199, SF levels in patients with primary hepatic carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Jiaming; Rui Zhilian

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the diagnostic value of combined detection of four tumor markers in patients with possible malignant change in liver disorders. Methods: Serum AFP, CEA, CA199 and SF levels were determined with chemiluminescence immunoassay (CLIA) in 49 patients with primary liver carcinoma, 7 patients with metastatic liver carcinoma, 40 patients with hepatic cirrhosis, 47 patients with HBV hepatitis and 30 controls. Results: The serum levels of AFP, CEA, SF in patients with primary hepatic cancer and serum levels of AFP, SF in patients with hepatic cirrhosis were all significantly higher than those in controls (P 0.05). Moreover, positive rate of combined determination of AFP, CEA, CA199, SF in patients with primary hepatic cancer was significantly higher than that in patients with metastatic liver cancer. Conclusion: With combined determination of these four tumor markers, the detection rate of primary hepatic carcinoma could be enhanced to above 95%. Also, differential diagnosis between primary and metastatic hepatic cancers could be facilitated. (authors)

  19. Microphytobenthic primary production along a non-tidal sandy beach gradient: an annual study from the Baltic Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Urban-Malinga

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available The microphytobenthic primary production and chlorophyll a content were studied over the annual cycle (May 1998 - May 1999 on a non-tidal Baltic sandy beach at three stations along the beach gradient: littoral, waterline and splash zone. The chlorophyll a concentrations varied between 0.88 and 12.18 µg cm-3. Net and gross primary production rates respectively lay within the ranges 0.1-31.4 mgC m-2 h-1 and 0.2-41.8 mgC m-2 h-1. The highest values of both Chl a content and primary production were noted at the littoral station, the lowest ones at the waterline. The mean annual P/B ratio was highest at the waterline. The differences in Chl a content between stations were statistically significant and may be related to water dynamics, resuspension and water content. Production rates were highly variable on monthly time scales, and the highest results at all the study locations were noted in July. The gross photosynthetic rates were significantly correlated with water temperature.

  20. Studies on dissolution characteristics of simulated corrosion products on pressurized water reactor primary coolant loops. Pt.2: Cobalt simulated corrosion product

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Shan; Zhou Xianyu

    1997-01-01

    The studies on the dissolution characteristics of simulated corrosion product of cobalt on pressurized water reactor primary coolant loops in aqueous solution of citric acid, hydrogen peroxide and citric acid-hydrogen peroxide have been performed. The results show that the portion of the dissolved simulated corrosion product of cobalt in citric acid aqueous solution clearly increases with a rise in citric acid concentration and is ten times above the corresponding value of iron. The portion of the products that dissolve is the largest at pH 3.00 in the pH range of 2.33∼4.50 and at 70 degree C in the range of 60∼80 degree C. It is shown that the portion of the dissolved simulated corrosion product of cobalt in hydrogen peroxide aqueous solution is smaller than the corresponding value in citric acid, and that the portion of the dissolved simulated corrosion product of cobalt in aqueous solution of hydrogen peroxide-citric acid is larger than the corresponding value in single citric acid aqueous solution

  1. Chlorophyll induced fluorescence retrieved from GOME2 for improving gross primary productivity estimates of vegetation

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Leth, Thomas C.; Verstraeten, Willem W.; Sanders, Abram F. J.

    2014-05-01

    Mapping terrestrial chlorophyll fluorescence is a crucial activity to obtain information on the functional status of vegetation and to improve estimates of light-use efficiency (LUE) and global primary productivity (GPP). GPP quantifies carbon fixation by plant ecosystems and is therefore an important parameter for budgeting terrestrial carbon cycles. Satellite remote sensing offers an excellent tool for investigating GPP in a spatially explicit fashion across different scales of observation. The GPP estimates, however, still remain largely uncertain due to biotic and abiotic factors that influence plant production. Sun-induced fluorescence has the ability to enhance our knowledge on how environmentally induced changes affect the LUE. This can be linked to optical derived remote sensing parameters thereby reducing the uncertainty in GPP estimates. Satellite measurements provide a relatively new perspective on global sun-induced fluorescence, enabling us to quantify spatial distributions and changes over time. Techniques have recently been developed to retrieve fluorescence emissions from hyperspectral satellite measurements. We use data from the Global Ozone Monitoring Instrument 2 (GOME2) to infer terrestrial fluorescence. The spectral signatures of three basic components atmospheric: absorption, surface reflectance, and fluorescence radiance are separated using reference measurements of non-fluorescent surfaces (desserts, deep oceans and ice) to solve for the atmospheric absorption. An empirically based principal component analysis (PCA) approach is applied similar to that of Joiner et al. (2013, ACP). Here we show our first global maps of the GOME2 retrievals of chlorophyll fluorescence. First results indicate fluorescence distributions that are similar with that obtained by GOSAT and GOME2 as reported by Joiner et al. (2013, ACP), although we find slightly higher values. In view of optimizing the fluorescence retrieval, we will show the effect of the references

  2. Carrot Loss during Primary Production : Field Waste and Pack House Waste.

    OpenAIRE

    Bond, Rebekka

    2016-01-01

    Background: it has been suggested that roughly one-third of all food produced for human consumption is lost or wasted globally. The reduction of loss and waste is seen as an important societal issue with considerable ethical, ecological and economic implications. Fruit and vegetables have the highest wastage rates of any food products; (45 %). And a big part of this waste occurs during production, but empirical data on loss during primary production is limited. Carrots are an important hortic...

  3. Determination of γ value in equation of state of detonation products by cylinder test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hua Pinghuan

    2001-01-01

    A method for the determination of γ value in γ law equation of state (EOS) of detonation products (DP) by cylinder test (CT) is provided. The γ values determined by this method are not surely in agreement with that determined by free-surface velocity method (FVM), but they can be used to satisfactorily calculate DP's ability to do work

  4. Designing products with added emotional value : development and application of an approach for research through design

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Desmet, P.M.A.; Overbeeke, C.J.; Tax, S.J.E.T.

    2001-01-01

    In this paper, a design approach is introduced for designing products with added emotional value. First, the approach was established, based on a theoretical framework and a non-verbal instrument to measure emotional responses. Second, the value of the design approach was assessed by applying it to

  5. Prognostic evaluation of primary biliary cirrhosis and its value in guiding therapeutic regimens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HUANG Chunyang

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Prognostic evaluation of patients with primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC and how to improve the prognosis have attracted much attention. Further therapeutic regimens for PBC patients with poor prognosis has become the direction of clinical and scientific studies. This article summarizes the association between baseline indices and prognosis and prognostic evaluation of patients undergoing ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA treatment, introduces the current status of UDCA combined with budesonide, fibrates, and obeticholic acid for patients with poor response to UDCA and the drugs being developed, and analyzes the influencing factors for prognosis and efficacy of UDCA. It is pointed out that prognosis and efficacy should be evaluated before and during UDCA treatment, and that therapeutic regimens should be adjusted in time to improve prognosis.

  6. Postoperative Pain Management After Primary Total Knee Arthroplasty: The Value of Liposomal Bupivacaine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sporer, Scott M; Rogers, Thea

    2016-11-01

    Multimodal pain protocols have been proposed to achieve improved long-acting postoperative analgesia. Controlling postoperative pain after joint arthroplasty is especially important as it relates to patient satisfaction and outcomes. The purpose of this study was to compare the postoperative pain, time to ambulation, and overall narcotic usage between patients who received either a femoral nerve block with a periarticular bupivacaine injection or a periarticular bupivacaine and extended-release liposomal bupivacaine injection after primary total knee arthroplasty. A total of 597 consecutive primary total knee arthroplasties performed between September 1, 2012 and August 31, 2014 received preoperative celecoxib, oxycodone, and transdermal scopolamine. Intraoperatively, patients either received a single-dose bupivacaine femoral nerve block along with 30-mL 0.25% bupivacaine periarticular injection (group A) or a 60-mL periarticular injection alone (20-mL liposomal bupivacaine, 30-mL 0.25% bupivacaine, and 10-mL saline; group B). The postoperative pain scores, narcotic usage, and time to ambulation were retrospectively collected from the electronic medical record. These outcomes were compared between treatment groups. There were 325 patients in group A compared with 272 in group B during the time frame. There was no difference among age, gender, race, and body mass index between the groups. Group B demonstrated a decreased need for breakthrough pain medication (16.9% vs 36.3% P bupivacaine resulted in a decrease need for breakthrough pain medication, improved pain scores at 12 hours, and an earlier time to ambulation compared to a combined femoral nerve block and periarticular bupivacaine injection. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Research on establishing the rank and quotient of functions in product value analysisengineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gheorghe Burz

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The constructive conception of a product results from uniting subsystems with basic usage values. These basic usage values make up the functions of the product. The notion of product function is the basic notion that product value analysis/value engineering(VA/VE operates with, and function analysis together with creative thinking constitutes „the oxygen of value engineering”. The present paper defines the notion of rank of a product function, establishes the formula for calculating its value and it reviews some ways of Determining the levels of importance of product functions, with the aim of proposing a new distribution of the importance of these Functions within the total usage value. Establishing the rank of a function can be reduced to the issue of comparing product functions by experts, consumers, team members for VA/VE. Subsequently, the ensuing results are subjected to adequate mathematical operations in order to determin the levels of importance and the quotients of each function within the product ussage value, as well as the distribution of these quotients. Due to the fact that the quota or quotient of a function within the product usage value plays an important role in conceiving and designing products, more precisely, in the economical shaping of functions, the distribution law to which this parametre is subjected is also very important. A critical study of the methods currently used to determine function quotients shows that these methods conduct to a linear distribution of these quotients, and, under these Circumstances, the ratio between the highest level of importance and the lowest level of importance is equal to the number of functions – number that is very high indeed for complex products. On the other hand, it is rightly assumed that there is a considerable number of products for which the functions do not follow a linear distribution. The Zipf distribution or its generalised form, the Pareto

  8. Integrated Biorefineries with Engineered Microbes and High-value Co-products for Profitable Biofuels Production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corn-based fuel ethanol production processes provide several advantages which could be synergistically applied to overcome limitations of biofuel processes based on lignocellulose. These include resources such as equipment, manpower, nutrients, water, and heat. The fact that several demonstration-...

  9. Sustainable multipurpose biorefineries for third-generation biofuels and value-added co-products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modern biorefinery facilities conduct many types of processes, including those producing advanced biofuels, commodity chemicals, biodiesel, and value-added co-products such as sweeteners and bioinsecticides, with many more co-products, chemicals and biofuels on the horizon. Most of these processes ...

  10. Identification of individuals' value and norms: One missing link to understanding new product success factors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harmsen, Hanne; Bove, Karsten

    and product and market characteristics to include aspects like individual and organisational skills, knowledge, values, and norms. We also argue that the focus on the mentioned aspects have limited the possibility of implementing the normative advice. Combining new product development literature with recent...

  11. PRODUCT OPTIMIZATION METHOD BASED ON ANALYSIS OF OPTIMAL VALUES OF THEIR CHARACTERISTICS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Constantin D. STANESCU

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents an original method of optimizing products based on the analysis of optimal values of their characteristics . Optimization method comprises statistical model and analytical model . With this original method can easily and quickly obtain optimal product or material .

  12. Relationship between meanings, emotions, product preferences and personal values. Application to ceramic tile floorings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agost, María-Jesús; Vergara, Margarita

    2014-07-01

    This work aims to validate a conceptual framework which establishes the main relationships between subjective elements in human-product interaction, such as meanings, emotions, product preferences, and personal values. The study analyzes the relationships between meanings and emotions, and between these and preferences, as well as the influence of personal values on such relationships. The study was applied to ceramic tile floorings. A questionnaire with images of a neutral room with different ceramic tile floorings was designed and distributed via the web. Results from the study suggest that both meanings and emotions must be taken into account in the generation of product preferences. The meanings given to the product can cause the generation of emotions, and both types of subjective impressions give rise to product preferences. Personal reference values influence these relationships between subjective impressions and product preferences. As a consequence, not only target customers' demographic data but specifically their values and criteria must be taken into account from the beginning of the development process. The specific results of this paper can be used directly by ceramic tile designers, who can better adjust product design (and the subjective impressions elicited) to the target market. Consequently, the chance of product success is reinforced. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd and The Ergonomics Society. All rights reserved.

  13. The International Comparison of Value Added, Productivity and Purchasing Power Parities in Agriculture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maddison, Angus; Ooststroom, Harry van

    1993-01-01

    This study is part of the ICOP (International Comparison of Output and Productivity) project of the University of Groningen. It presents international comparisons of levels of value added, productivity and purchasing power parities (PPPs) in agriculture for 13 countries for 1975. An early version of

  14. Temperature dependence of CO2-enhanced primary production in the European Arctic Ocean

    KAUST Repository

    Holding, J. M.

    2015-08-31

    The Arctic Ocean is warming at two to three times the global rate1 and is perceived to be a bellwether for ocean acidification2, 3. Increased CO2 concentrations are expected to have a fertilization effect on marine autotrophs4, and higher temperatures should lead to increased rates of planktonic primary production5. Yet, simultaneous assessment of warming and increased CO2 on primary production in the Arctic has not been conducted. Here we test the expectation that CO2-enhanced gross primary production (GPP) may be temperature dependent, using data from several oceanographic cruises and experiments from both spring and summer in the European sector of the Arctic Ocean. Results confirm that CO2 enhances GPP (by a factor of up to ten) over a range of 145–2,099 μatm; however, the greatest effects are observed only at lower temperatures and are constrained by nutrient and light availability to the spring period. The temperature dependence of CO2-enhanced primary production has significant implications for metabolic balance in a warmer, CO2-enriched Arctic Ocean in the future. In particular, it indicates that a twofold increase in primary production during the spring is likely in the Arctic.

  15. Responses of primary production, leaf litter decomposition and associated communities to stream eutrophication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dunck, Bárbara; Lima-Fernandes, Eva; Cássio, Fernanda; Cunha, Ana; Rodrigues, Liliana; Pascoal, Cláudia

    2015-01-01

    We assessed the eutrophication effects on leaf litter decomposition and primary production, and on periphytic algae, fungi and invertebrates. According to the subsidy-stress model, we expected that when algae and decomposers were nutrient limited, their activity and diversity would increase at moderate levels of nutrient enrichment, but decrease at high levels of nutrients, because eutrophication would lead to the presence of other stressors and overwhelm the subsidy effect. Chestnut leaves (Castanea sativa Mill) were enclosed in mesh bags and immersed in five streams of the Ave River basin (northwest Portugal) to assess leaf decomposition and colonization by invertebrates and fungi. In parallel, polyethylene slides were attached to the mesh bags to allow colonization by algae and to assess primary production. Communities of periphytic algae and decomposers discriminated the streams according to the trophic state. Primary production decomposition and biodiversity were lower in streams at both ends of the trophic gradient. - Highlights: • Algae and decomposers discriminated the streams according to the eutrophication level. • Primary production and litter decomposition are stimulated by moderate eutrophication. • Biodiversity and process rates were reduced in highly eutrophic streams. • Subsidy-stress model explained biodiversity and process rates under eutrophication. - Rates of leaf litter decomposition, primary production and richness of periphytic algae, fungi and invertebrates were lower in streams at both ends of the trophic gradient

  16. Estimating Net Primary Productivity Beneath Snowpack Using Snowpack Radiative Transfer Modeling and Global Satellite Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barber, D. E.; Peterson, M. C.

    2002-05-01

    Sufficient photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) penetrates snow for plants to grow beneath snowpack during late winter or early spring in tundra ecosystems. During the spring in this ecosystem, the snowpack creates an environment with higher humidity and less variable and milder temperatures than on the snow-free land. Under these conditions, the amount of PAR available is likely to be the limiting factor for plant growth. Current methods for determining net primary productivity (NPP) of tundra ecosystems do not account for this plant growth beneath snowpack, apparently resulting in underestimating plant production there. We are currently in the process of estimating the magnitude of this early growth beneath snow for tundra ecosystems. Our method includes a radiative transfer model that simulates diffuse and direct PAR penetrating snowpack based on downwelling PAR values and snow depth data from global satellite databases. These PAR levels are convolved with plant growth for vegetation that thrives beneath snowpacks, such as lichen. We expect to present the net primary production for Cladonia species (a common Arctic lichen) that has the capability of photosynthesizing at low temperatures beneath snowpack. This method may also be used to study photosynthesis beneath snowpacks in other hardy plants. Lichens are used here as they are common in snow-covered regions, flourish under snowpack, and provide an important food source for tundra herbivores (e.g. caribou). In addition, lichens are common in arctic-alpine environments and our results can be applied to these ecosystems as well. Finally, the NPP of lichen beneath snowpack is relatively well understood compared to other plants, making it ideal vegetation for this first effort at estimating the potential importance of photosynthesis at large scales. We are examining other candidate plants for their photosynthetic potential beneath snowpack at this time; however, little research has been done on this topic. We

  17. Flooded native pastures of the northern region of the Pantanal of Mato Grosso: biomass and primary productivity variations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. G. Pozer

    Full Text Available The Pantanal comprises a number of landscape units, submitted to a flood pulse with variable intensity or regularity. One of these units, the flooded plains, is important in cattle raising. This study was carried out in the northern portion of the Pantanal and presents data related to the productive dynamics of the flooded native pastures both protected from and exposed to cattle. The greatest total biomass values were for the protected pasture due to accumulated dead biomass. Net primary production presented smaller values at the flood-season start and increasing gradually beginning in the subsequent rainy season. However, consumption by cattle was also more intense during the months of greater precipitation. The effect of cattle in pastures is of fundamental importance to management since it prevents the dead biomass excess that increases fire risks.

  18. Quantitative assessment of human-induced impacts based on net primary productivity in Guangzhou, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yanyan; Wu, Zhifeng

    2018-02-08

    Urban expansion and land cover change driven primarily by human activities have significant influences on the urban eco-environment, and together with climate change jointly alter net primary productivity (NPP). However, at the spatiotemporal scale, there has been limited quantitative analysis of the impacts of human activities independent of climate change on NPP. We chose Guangzhou city as a study area to analyze the impacts of human activities on NPP, as well as the spatiotemporal variations of those impacts within three segments, using a relative impact index (RII) based on potential NPP (NPP p ), actual NPP (NPP act ), and NPP appropriation due to land use/land cover change (NPP lulc ). The spatial patterns and dynamics of NPP act and NPP lulc were evaluated and the impacts of human activities on NPP during the process of urban sprawl were quantitatively analyzed and assessed using the RII. The results showed that NPP act and NPP lulc in the study area had clear spatial heterogeneity, between 2001 and 2013 there was a declining trend in NPP act while an increasing trend occurred in NPP lulc , and those trends were especially significant in the 10-40-km segment. The results also revealed that more than 91.0% of pixels in whole study region had positive RII values, while the lowest average RII values were found in the > 40-km segment (39.03%), indicating that human activities were not the main cause for the change in NPP there; meanwhile, the average RII was greater than 65.0% in the other two, suggesting that they were subjected to severe anthropogenic disturbances. The RII values in all three segments of the study area increased, indicating an increasing human interference. The 10-40-km buffer zone had the largest slope value (0.5665), suggesting that this segment was closely associated with growing human disturbances. Particularly noteworthy is the fact that the > 40-km segment had a large slope value (0.3323) and required more conservation efforts. Based

  19. Price and Product Pooling: Impact on Development and Operation of Differentiated Value Chains

    OpenAIRE

    Hobbs, Jill E.; Kerr, William A.

    2006-01-01

    Price pooling has long been used as a means to deal with risk in the marketing of agricultural commodities. For commodities, product pooling may also generate potential benefits through economies of scale or the provision of market power. Yet there has also been a growing interest in product differentiation and the development of value chains as a means to increase returns to farmers. This article explores the question of whether price or product pooling is compatible with a strategy of pro-a...

  20. Autologous transfusion of drain contents in elective primary knee arthroplasty: its value and relevance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Vinay Kumar; Singh, Pankaj Kumar; Javed, Sadaf; Kumar, Kuldeep; Tomar, Juhi

    2011-07-01

    Total knee arthroplasty is associated with significant post-operative blood loss often necessitating blood transfusions. Blood transfusions may be associated with transfusion reactions and may transmit human immunodeficiency virus, hepatitis C virus and hepatitis B virus, with devastating consequences. After total knee arthroplasty, transfusion of the contents of an autologous drain is becoming common practice. The aim of our study was to look at the effectiveness of these drains in elective primary total knee arthroplasty. A prospective study was conducted including 70 non-randomised patients. A normal suction drain was used in 35 patients (group A), whereas in the other 35 patients, a CellTrans™ drain was used (group B). All the operations were performed by four surgeons using a tourniquet with a medial parapatellar approach. Pre- and post-operative haemoglobin concentrations were recorded in both groups. A Student's t-test was applied to determine the statistical significance of the data collected. The average fall in post-operative haemoglobin was 3.66 g/dL (SD 1.46; range, 0.6-7.0) among patients in whom the simple drain was used (group A) and 2.29 g/dL (SD 0.92; range, 0.6-5.9) among those in whom the CellTrans™ drain was used (group B) (p<0.0001). Twenty-five units of allogeneic blood were required in group A compared to four units in group B. The rate of transfusion was 5.7% (2 patients) in the group in which CellTrans™ drain was used and 25.7% (9 patients) in the group in which a simple suction drain was used. Total knee arthroplasty is associated with significant post-operative blood loss despite best operative technique. Autologous reinfusion of the contents of a CellTrans™ drain significantly reduces the rate of post-operative blood transfusion. This study indicates that the use of an autologous drain could be recommended as routine practice in primary total knee arthroplasty.

  1. Value stream mapping as a tool for lean production waste-free production; Wertstromanalyse als Werkzeug fuer Lean Production. Die verschwendungsfreiere Produktion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boerkircher, Mikko [Rheinkalk GmbH, Flandersbach (Germany). Bereich Brennen und Veredeln

    2010-01-15

    In the value stream mapping method the product flow is the focal point of all considerations. The method can be used easily and quickly and produces concrete results. A company soon learns to view its own production in a different light. In the following contribution it is shown how companies can identify potential for improvement in their production. (orig.)

  2. Interview and questionnaire guide: Quantification of food losses and waste in primary production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svanes, Erik; Hartikainen, Hanna; Mogensen, Lisbeth

    production in the Nordic countries. Other aims were to estimate the amount of side flow and to gain knowledge about the reasons behind it, how it can be reduced, how it is treated and how it can be better utilized.This guide contains a catalogue of questions that may be used for interviews and questionnaires...... with primary producers and other stakeholders within primary production. It also contains the justification behind the questions and some tips on how to conduct interviews.......This interview guide was developed within the Nordic project “Food losses and waste in primary production” (Franke et al. 2016). One of the main purposes of the project was to test research methods for the quantification of food losses and waste (in the project called 'side flow') from primary...

  3. Value of ¹⁸F-FDG PET/CT in the diagnosis of primary gastric cancer via stomach distension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Quanmei; Xin, Jun; Zhao, Zhoushe; Guo, Qiyong; Yu, Shupeng; Xu, Weina; Liu, Changping; Zhai, Wei

    2013-06-01

    To clarify the usefulness of (18)F-FDG PET/CT for detecting primary gastric cancer via gastric distention using a mixture of milk and Diatrizoate Meglumine. A total of 68 patients (male: 47, female: 21; age: 41-87 years) suspected of gastric carcinoma underwent (18)F-FDG PET/CT imaging. After whole-body PET/CT imaging in a fasting state, the patients drank a measured amount of milk with Diatrizoate Meglumine. Local gastric district PET/CT imaging was performed 30 min later. The imaging was analyzed by semi-quantitative analysis, standardized uptake value (SUV) of the primary tumor was measured in a region of interest. The diagnosis results were confirmed by gastroscopy, pathology, and follow-up results. Of the 68 patients, 56 malignant gastric neoplasm patients (male: 37, female: 19) were conformed. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value of fasting whole-body PET/CT imaging for a primary malignant tumor were 92.9%, 75.0%, 94.5%, and 69.0%, respectively. The values for distension with a mixture of milk and Diatrizoate Meglumine were 91.1%, 91.7%, 98.1%, and 68.8%, respectively. The area under the curve was 0.919 ± 0.033 and 0.883 ± 0.066 for the diagnosis of gastric cancer with SUVmax in a fasting state and after intake of mixture respectively, the differences were not statistically significant (P=0.359). Using gastric distension with a mixture of milk and Diatrizoate Meglumine, the mean ratio of the lesion's SUVmax to the adjacent gastric wall SUVmax increased significantly from 3.30 ± 3.05 to 13.50 ± 15.05, which was statistically significant (Pgastric carcinoma. Gastric distention can display the lesions more clearly, however, it cannot significantly improve diagnostic accuracy. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Assessing the Economic Viability of Bio-based Products for Missouri Value-added Crop Production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nicholas Kalaitzandonakes

    2005-11-30

    While research and development on biobased products has continued strong over the years, parallel attention on the economics and management of such product innovation has been lacking. With the financial support of the Department of Energy, the Economics and Management of Agrobiotechnology Center at the University of Missouri-Columbia has launched a pilot graduate education program that seeks to fill the gap. Within this context, a multi-disciplinary research and teaching program has been structured with an emphasis on new product and innovation economics and management. More specifically, this pilot graduate education program has the following major objectives: (1) To provide students with a strong background in innovation economics, management, and strategy. (2) To diversify the students academic background with coursework in science and technology. (3) To familiarize the student with biobased policy initiatives through interaction with state and national level organizations and policymakers. (4) To facilitate active collaboration with industry involved in the development and production of biobased products. The pilot education program seeks to develop human capital and research output. Although the research is, initially, focused on issues related to the State of Missouri, the results are expected to have national implications for the economy, producers, consumers and environment.

  5. Value of skeletal scintiscanning in cases of primary bone tumours and tumourous alterations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sokolowski, U.

    1982-01-01

    In the course of an investigation on the storage behaviour of primary bone tumours and tumourous bone alterations the skeletal scintigrams of a total of 26 patients were evaluated. Bone scintiscanning was done according to current practice after injection of an average amount of 10mCi sup(99m)Tc-MDP, followed by a semiquantitative evaluation. In all cases of malignant bone tumours there was fond to be increased storage of radionuclide; with benign bone alterations this was so in 70 per cent of cases. To differentiate between benign and malignant tumours respectively inflammatory bone diseases was not as a rule possible; however, the investigation yielded additional information completing the X-ray findings essentially. Thus very high storage of radioactivity was established for all osteosarcomas, whereas benign bone growths exhibited more circumscribed accumulations of activity. Skeletal scintiscanning for diagnostical purposes is particularly informative as to the early detection of bone foci evading X-ray diagnosis, more accurate delimitation of tumourous processes, and course control of tumours tending to degenerate. (orig./MG) [de

  6. Improving value in primary total joint arthroplasty care pathways: changes in inpatient physical therapy staffing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelt, Christopher E; Anderson, Mike B; Pendleton, Robert; Foulks, Matthew; Peters, Christopher L; Gililland, Jeremy M

    2017-03-01

    An early physical therapy (PT) care pathway was implemented to provide same-day ambulation after total joint arthroplasty by changing PT staffing hours. After receiving an exemption from our institutional review board, we performed a secondary data analysis on a cohort of patients that underwent primary TJA of the hip or knee 6 months before and 12 months after implementation of the change. Data on same-day ambulation rates, length of stay (LOS), and in-hospital costs were reviewed. Early evaluation and mobilization of patients by PT improved on postoperative day (POD) 0 from 64% to 85% after the change ( P ≤ .001). The median LOS before the change was 3.27 days compared to 3.23 days after the change ( P  = .014). Patients with higher American Society of Anesthesiologists scores were less likely to ambulate on POD 0 ( P  = .038) and had longer hospital stays ( P < .001). Early mobilization in the entire cohort was associated with a greater cost savings ( P < .001). A relatively simple change to staffing hours, using resources currently available to us, and little additional financial or institutional investment resulted in a significant improvement in the number of patients ambulating on POD 0, with a modest reduction in both LOS and inpatient costs.

  7. Factors affecting 18 F FDOPA standardized uptake value in patients with primary brain tumors after treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chiaravalloti, Agostino; Fiorentini, Alessandro; Villani, Veronica; Carapella, Carmine; Pace, Andrea; Di Pietro, Barbara; Di Russo, Carmen; Palumbo, Barbara; Floris, Roberto; Schillaci, Orazio

    2015-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the factors affecting 18 F FDOPA uptake in patients with primary brain tumors (PBT) after treatment. Materials and methods: 97 patients with PBT (6 were grade I, 40 were grade II, 29 were grade III and 22 were grade IV) underwent 18 F FDOPA positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) after treatment. Intervals from surgery, chemotherapy (CHT) and radiotherapy (RT) were 41.48 (± 42.27), 16.04 (± 29.08) and 28.62 (± 34.49) months respectively. Results: 18 F FDOPA uptake in the site of recurrence was not related to the interval from surgery and CHT while a significant relationship has been found with the interval from RT and tumor grade. Conclusions: The results of our study show that the interval from RT and the grade of PBT should be considered carefully when evaluating brain PET/CT scans since these factors could directly affect 18 F FDOPA uptake

  8. Does a perceptuomotor skills assessment have added value to detect talent for table tennis in primary school children?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faber, Irene R; Pion, Johan; Munivrana, Goran; Faber, Niels R; Nijhuis-Van der Sanden, Maria W G

    2017-04-18

    Talent detection intends to support lifelong sports participation, reduce dropouts and stimulate sports at the elite level. For this purpose it is important to reveal the specific profile which directs children to the sports that connect to their strengths and preferences. This study evaluated a perceptuomotor skills assessment as part of talent detection for table tennis, a sport in which perceptuomotor skills are considered essential to cope with the difficult technical aspects. Primary school children (n = 121) and gifted young table tennis players (n = 146) were assessed using the Dutch perceptuomotor skills assessment measuring "ball control" and "gross motor function". A discriminant function analysis confirmed the added value by identifying primary school children fitting the table tennis perceptuomotor profile of the young gifted table tennis players (28%). General linear model analyses for the assessment's individual test items showed that the table tennis players outperformed their primary school peers on all "ball control" items (P talent detection in table tennis at this young age. Longitudinal studies need to reveal the predictive value for sports participation and elite sports.

  9. Primary energy and greenhouse gas implications of increasing biomass production through forest fertilization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sathre, Roger [Ecotechnology, Mid Sweden University, Ostersund (Sweden); Gustavsson, Leif [Ecotechnology, Mid Sweden University, Ostersund (Sweden); Bergh, Johan [Ecotechnology, Mid Sweden University, Ostersund (Sweden); Southern Swedish Forest Research Centre, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Alnarp (Sweden)

    2010-04-15

    In this study we analyze the primary energy and greenhouse gas (GHG) implications of increasing biomass production by fertilizing 10% of Swedish forest land. We estimate the primary energy use and GHG emissions from forest management including production and application of N and NPK fertilizers. Based on modelled growth response, we then estimate the net primary energy and GHG benefits of using biomaterials and biofuels obtained from the increased forest biomass production. The results show an increased annual biomass harvest of 7.4 million t dry matter, of which 41% is large-diameter stemwood. About 6.9 PJ/year of additional primary energy input is needed for fertilizer production and forest management. Using the additional biomass for fuel and material substitution can reduce fossil primary energy use by 150 or 164 PJ/year if the reference fossil fuel is fossil gas or coal, respectively. About 22% of the reduced fossil energy use is due to material substitution and the remainder is due to fuel substitution. The net annual primary energy benefit corresponds to about 7% of Sweden's total primary energy use. The resulting annual net GHG emission reduction is 11.9 million or 18.1 million tCO{sub 2equiv} if the reference fossil fuel is fossil gas or coal, respectively, corresponding to 18% or 28% of the total Swedish GHG emissions in 2007. A significant one-time carbon stock increase also occurs in wood products and forest tree biomass. These results suggest that forest fertilization is an attractive option for increasing energy security and reducing net GHG emission.

  10. Primary energy and greenhouse gas implications of increasing biomass production through forest fertilization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sathre, Roger; Gustavsson, Leif; Bergh, Johan

    2010-01-01

    In this study we analyze the primary energy and greenhouse gas (GHG) implications of increasing biomass production by fertilizing 10% of Swedish forest land. We estimate the primary energy use and GHG emissions from forest management including production and application of N and NPK fertilizers. Based on modelled growth response, we then estimate the net primary energy and GHG benefits of using biomaterials and biofuels obtained from the increased forest biomass production. The results show an increased annual biomass harvest of 7.4 million t dry matter, of which 41% is large-diameter stemwood. About 6.9 PJ/year of additional primary energy input is needed for fertilizer production and forest management. Using the additional biomass for fuel and material substitution can reduce fossil primary energy use by 150 or 164 PJ/year if the reference fossil fuel is fossil gas or coal, respectively. About 22% of the reduced fossil energy use is due to material substitution and the remainder is due to fuel substitution. The net annual primary energy benefit corresponds to about 7% of Sweden's total primary energy use. The resulting annual net GHG emission reduction is 11.9 million or 18.1 million tCO 2equiv if the reference fossil fuel is fossil gas or coal, respectively, corresponding to 18% or 28% of the total Swedish GHG emissions in 2007. A significant one-time carbon stock increase also occurs in wood products and forest tree biomass. These results suggest that forest fertilization is an attractive option for increasing energy security and reducing net GHG emission.

  11. Primary energy and greenhouse gas implications of increasing biomass production through forest fertilization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sathre, Roger; Gustavsson, Leif [Ecotechnology, Mid Sweden University, Oestersund (Sweden); Bergh, Johan [Ecotechnology, Mid Sweden University, Oestersund (Sweden); Southern Swedish Forest Research Centre, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Alnarp (Sweden)

    2010-04-15

    In this study we analyze the primary energy and greenhouse gas (GHG) implications of increasing biomass production by fertilizing 10% of Swedish forest land. We estimate the primary energy use and GHG emissions from forest management including production and application of N and NPK fertilizers. Based on modelled growth response, we then estimate the net primary energy and GHG benefits of using biomaterials and biofuels obtained from the increased forest biomass production. The results show an increased annual biomass harvest of 7.4 million t dry matter, of which 41% is large-diameter stemwood. About 6.9 PJ/year of additional primary energy input is needed for fertilizer production and forest management. Using the additional biomass for fuel and material substitution can reduce fossil primary energy use by 150 or 164 PJ/year if the reference fossil fuel is fossil gas or coal, respectively. About 22% of the reduced fossil energy use is due to material substitution and the remainder is due to fuel substitution. The net annual primary energy benefit corresponds to about 7% of Sweden's total primary energy use. The resulting annual net GHG emission reduction is 11.9 million or 18.1 million tCO{sub 2equiv} if the reference fossil fuel is fossil gas or coal, respectively, corresponding to 18% or 28% of the total Swedish GHG emissions in 2007. A significant one-time carbon stock increase also occurs in wood products and forest tree biomass. These results suggest that forest fertilization is an attractive option for increasing energy security and reducing net GHG emission. (author)

  12. Aquacultural and socio-economic aspects of processing carps into some value-added products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sehgal, H S; Sehgal, G K

    2002-05-01

    Carps are the mainstay of Indian aquaculture, contributing over 90% to the total fish production, which was estimated to be 1.77 million metric tonnes in 1996. Carp culture has a great potential for waste utilization and thus for pollution abatement. Many wastes such as cow, poultry, pig, duck, goat, and sheep excreta, biogas slurry, effluents from different kinds of factories/industries have been efficiently used for enhancing the productivity of natural food of carps and related species. Besides, several organic wastes/byproducts such as plant products, wastes from animal husbandry, and industrial by-products have been used as carp feed ingredients to lower the cost of supplementary feeding. However, to ensure the continued expansion of fish ponds and the pollution control, there must be a market for the fish (carps) produced in these ponds. The carps have, however, a low market value due to the presence of intra-muscular bones, which reduces their consumer acceptability. Thus, a need was felt to develop some boneless convenience products for enhancing the consumer acceptability of the carps. Efforts were made to prepare three value-added fish products, namely fish patty, fish finger and fish salad from carp flesh and were compared with a reference product ('fish pakoura'). Sensory evaluation of these products gave highly encouraging results. The methods of preparation of these products were transferred to some progressive farmers of the region who prepared and sold these products at very attractive prices. Carp processing has a great potential for the establishment of a fish ancillary industry and thus for boosting the production of these species. In Punjab alone, there is a potential of consuming 32,448 metric tonnes per annum of such value-added products (which would require 54,080 metric tonnes of raw fish). The development of value-added products has a significant role in raising the socio-economic status of the people associated with carp culture. The

  13. PRACTICE THE VALUE OF RESPECT IN A GROUP OF FIFTH GRADE PRIMARY EDUCATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mayra Selene Uranga-Alvídrez

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Today humanity is facing various problems of social nature, the absence of values and its practice are a precedent favoring the imbalance of a society. The lack of respect is a wish Inquirer in the present ethnographic research, with the intention of favor in an documentary with a critical analysis links the affective and self-regulation of the emotions in a group of 5° B of the MelchorOcampo Elementary School. The research focuses in the study with approach a qualitative, its content analytical describes the scenario that conceived the interpersonal relations, the main results indicate that there are multiple factors the assistance, the inhospitable courtly space, the mediation, the influence of the core family, the geographical cultural context and the level of performance of the master for create environments of learning free of violence.

  14. Added value of delayed computed tomography angiography in primary intracranial hemorrhage and hematoma size for predicting spot sign.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Te Chang; Chen, Tai Yuan; Shiue, Yow Ling; Chen, Jeon Hor; Hsieh, Tsyh-Jyi; Ko, Ching Chung; Lin, Ching Po

    2018-04-01

    Background The computed tomography angiography (CTA) spot sign represents active contrast extravasation within acute primary intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) and is an independent predictor of hematoma expansion (HE) and poor clinical outcomes. The spot sign could be detected on first-pass CTA (fpCTA) or delayed CTA (dCTA). Purpose To investigate the additional benefits of dCTA spot sign in primary ICH and hematoma size for predicting spot sign. Material and Methods This is a retrospective study of 100 patients who underwent non-contrast CT (NCCT) and CTA within 24 h of onset of primary ICH. The presence of spot sign on fpCTA or dCTA, and hematoma size on NCCT were recorded. The spot sign on fpCTA or dCTA for predicting significant HE, in-hospital mortality, and poor clinical outcomes (mRS ≥ 4) are calculated. The hematoma size for prediction of CTA spot sign was also analyzed. Results Only the spot sign on dCTA could predict high risk of significant HE and poor clinical outcomes as on fpCTA ( P spot sign on fpCTA or dCTA in the absence of intraventricular and subarachnoid hemorrhage. Conclusion This study clarifies that dCTA imaging could improve predictive performance of CTA in primary ICH. Furthermore, the XY value is the best predictor for CTA spot sign.

  15. Water consumption in artificial desert oasis based on net primary productivity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Analysis of the water consumption is the basis for water allocation in oasis. However, the method of estimating oasis water consumption remains a great challenge. Based on net primary productivity (NPP) and the transpiration coefficient, a vegetation water consumption model was developed to estimate the water consumption in desert oasis in ERDAS environment. Our results demonstrated that the ecosystem in the middle reaches of the Heihe oasis consumed water of 18.41×108-21.9×108 m3 for irrigation. Without taking precipitation into account, the water consumption in farmland accounted for 77.1%-77.8% (or about 13.97×108-16.84×108 m3) of the oasis vegetation water consumption and in the farmland protection system accounting for 22%. The growing period precipitation in desert environments is about 7.02×108 m3, and the total annual precipitation is about 8.29×108 m3. The modeled water consumption of desert vegetation, however, is about 4.57×108 m3, equivalent to only 65% of the growing period precipitation or 55% of the total annual precipitation. The modeled value equals to the cumulative precipitation of greater than 5 mm, which is defined as the effective precipitation in arid desert.

  16. Diagnostic value of the fluoroscopic triggering 3D LAVA technique for primary liver cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Xiao-Yong; Chai, Chun-Hua; Xiao, Wen-Bo; Wang, Qi-Dong

    2010-04-01

    Primary liver cancer (PLC) is one of the common malignant tumors. Liver acquisition with acceleration volume acquisition (LAVA), which allows simultaneous dynamic enhancement of the hepatic parenchyma and vasculature imaging, is of great help in the diagnosis of PLC. This study aimed to evaluate application of the fluoroscopic triggering 3D LAVA technique in the imaging of PLC and liver vasculature. The clinical data and imaging findings of 38 adults with PLC (22 men and 16 women; average age 52 years), pathologically confirmed by surgical resection or biopsy, were collected and analyzed. All magnetic resonance images were obtained with a 1.5-T system (General Electrics Medical Systems) with an eight-element body array coil and application of the fluoroscopic triggering 3D LAVA technique. Overall image quality was assessed on a 5-point scale by two experienced radiologists. All the nodules and blood vessel were recorded and compared. The diagnostic accuracy and feasibility of LAVA were evaluated. Thirty-eight patients gave high quality images of 72 nodules in the liver for diagnosis. The accuracy of LAVA was 97.2% (70/72), and the coincidence rate between the extent of tumor judged by dynamic enhancement and pathological examination was 87.5% (63/72). Displayed by the maximum intensity projection reconstruction, nearly all cases gave satisfactory images of branches III and IV of the hepatic artery. Furthermore, small early-stage enhancing hepatic lesions and the parallel portal vein were also well displayed. Sequence of LAVA provides good multi-phase dynamic enhancement scanning of hepatic lesions. Combined with conventional scanning technology, LAVA effectively and safely displays focal hepatic lesions and the relationship between tumor and normal tissues, especially blood vessels.

  17. Corrosion product behaviour in the primary circuit of the KNK nuclear reactor facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stamm, H.H.; Stade, K.Ch.

    1976-01-01

    During nuclear operation of the KNK facility from 1972 until September 1974 the composition and behaviour of radionuclides occuring in the primary circuit were investigated. Besides traces of 140 Ba/ 140 La, no fission product activity was detectable in the KNK primary circuit. The fuel element purification from sodium deposits (prior to transport to the reprocessing plant) did not yield any indication of a fuel element failure during KNK-I operation. The activity inventory of the primary loop was exclusively made up of activated corrosion products and 22 Na. The main activity was due to 65 Zn, followed by 54 Mn, 22 Na, sup(110m)Ag, 182 Ta, 60 Co and 124 Sb. It was found that the sorption of 65 Zn and 54 Mn on crucibles made from nickel was condiserably higher than on vessels made from other materials. This observation was confirmed both in tests with material samples from the primary circuit and for disks of gate valves of the primary circuit. sup(110m)Ag did hardly exhibit any sorption effects and had been dissolved largely homogeneously in the hot primary coolant. In the first primary cold trap which was removed from the circuit after some 20,000 hours of operation, only 65 Zn and 54 Mn were detected in addition to traces of 60 Co and 182 Ta. (author)

  18. Microalgal Biorefinery for Bulk and High-Value Products: Product Extraction Within Cell Disintegration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Postma, P.R.; Lam, 't G.P.; Barbosa, M.J.; Wijffels, R.H.; Eppink, M.H.M.; Olivieri, G.

    2016-01-01

    Microalgae are a promising source for proteins, lipids, and carbohydrates for the cosmetic, nutraceutical, chemical, food/feed, and biofuel industry. In comparison with soy and palm oil, microalgae can be produced in a more sustainable way. To make microalgae production economically feasible, all

  19. Carbon Stable Isotope Values in Plankton and Mussels Reflect Changes in Carbonate Chemistry Associated with Nutrient Enhanced Net Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Autumn Oczkowski

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Coastal ecosystems are inherently complex and potentially adaptive as they respond to changes in nutrient loads and climate. We documented the role that carbon stable isotope (δ13C measurements could play in understanding that adaptation with a series of three Ecostat (i.e., continuous culture experiments. We quantified linkages among δ13C, nutrients, carbonate chemistry, primary, and secondary production in temperate estuarine waters. Experimental culture vessels (9.1 L containing 33% whole and 67% filtered (0.2 μm seawater were amended with dissolved inorganic nitrogen (N and phosphorous (P in low (3 vessels; 5 μM N, 0.3 μM P, moderate (3 vessels; 25 μM N, 1.6 μM P, and high amounts (3 vessels; 50 μM N, 3.1 μM P. The parameters necessary to calculate carbonate chemistry, chlorophyll-a concentrations, and particulate δ13C values were measured throughout the 14 day experiments. Outflow lines from the experimental vessels fed 250 ml containers seeded with juvenile blue mussels (Mytilus edulis. Mussel subsamples were harvested on days 0, 7, and 14 and their tissues were analyzed for δ13C values. We consistently observed that particulate δ13C values were positively correlated with chlorophyll-a, carbonate chemistry, and to changes in the ratio of bicarbonate to dissolved carbon dioxide (HCO3-:CO2. While the relative proportion of HCO3- to CO2 increased over the 14 days, concentrations of each declined, reflecting the drawdown of carbon associated with enhanced production. Plankton δ13C values, like chlorophyll-a concentrations, increased over the course of each experiment, with the greatest increases in the moderate and high treatments. Trends in δ13C over time were also observed in the mussel tissues. Despite ecological variability and different plankton abundances the experiments consistently demonstrated how δ13C values in primary producers and consumers reflected nutrient availability, via its impact on carbonate chemistry. We

  20. Prediction of bakery products nutritive value based on mathematical modeling of biochemical reactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. I. Ponomareva

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Researches are devoted to identifying changes in the chemical composition of whole-grain wheat bread during baking and to forecasting of food value of bakery products by mathematical modeling of biochemical transformations. The received model represents the invariant composition, considering speed of biochemical reactions at a batch of bakery products, and allowing conduct virtual experiments to develop new types of bread for various categories of the population, including athletes. The offered way of modeling of biochemical transformations at a stage of heat treatment allows to predict food value of bakery products, without spending funds for raw materials and large volume of experiment that will provide possibility of economy of material resources at a stage of development of new types of bakery products and possibility of production efficiency increase.

  1. Classifying FM Value Positioning by Using a Product-Process Matrix

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Katchamart, Akarapong

    with the type of facilities processes between FM organizations with their clients. Approach (Theory/Methodology): The paper develops the facilities product - process matrix to allow comparisons of different facilities products with facilities processes and illustrate its degree of value delivering. The building......, characterized by levels of information, knowledge and innovation sharing, and mutual involvement, defines four facilities process types. Positions on the matrix capture the product-process interrelationships in facilities management. Practical Implications: The paper presents propositions of relating...... blocks of matrix are a facilities product structure and a facilities process structure. Results: A facilities product structure, characterized by degrees of facilities product customization, complexity, contingencies involved, defines four facilities product categories. A facilities process structure...

  2. Mean annual precipitation predicts primary production resistance and resilience to extreme drought.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuart-Haëntjens, Ellen; De Boeck, Hans J; Lemoine, Nathan P; Mänd, Pille; Kröel-Dulay, György; Schmidt, Inger K; Jentsch, Anke; Stampfli, Andreas; Anderegg, William R L; Bahn, Michael; Kreyling, Juergen; Wohlgemuth, Thomas; Lloret, Francisco; Classen, Aimée T; Gough, Christopher M; Smith, Melinda D

    2018-04-27

    Extreme drought is increasing in frequency and intensity in many regions globally, with uncertain consequences for the resistance and resilience of ecosystem functions, including primary production. Primary production resistance, the capacity to withstand change during extreme drought, and resilience, the degree to which production recovers, vary among and within ecosystem types, obscuring generalized patterns of ecological stability. Theory and many observations suggest forest production is more resistant but less resilient than grassland production to extreme drought; however, studies of production sensitivity to precipitation variability indicate that the processes controlling resistance and resilience may be influenced more by mean annual precipitation (MAP) than ecosystem type. Here, we conducted a global meta-analysis to investigate primary production resistance and resilience to extreme drought in 64 forests and grasslands across a broad MAP gradient. We found resistance to extreme drought was predicted by MAP; however, grasslands (positive) and forests (negative) exhibited opposing resilience relationships with MAP. Our findings indicate that common plant physiological mechanisms may determine grassland and forest resistance to extreme drought, whereas differences among plant residents in turnover time, plant architecture, and drought adaptive strategies likely underlie divergent resilience patterns. The low resistance and resilience of dry grasslands suggests that these ecosystems are the most vulnerable to extreme drought - a vulnerability that is expected to compound as extreme drought frequency increases in the future. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  3. Development of a nuclear spallation simulation code and calculations of primary spallation products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishida, Takahiko; Nakahara, Yasuaki; Tsutsui, Tsuneo

    1986-08-01

    In order to make evaluations of computational models for the nuclear spallation reaction from a nuclear physics point of view, a simulation code NUCLEUS has been developed by modifying and combining the Monte Carlo codes NMTC/JAERI and NMTA/JAERI for calculating only the nuclear spallation reaction (intranuclear cascade + evaporation and/or fast fission) between a nucleus and a projectile without taking into consideration of internuclear transport. New several plotting routines have been provided for the rapid process of much more event data, obtained by using the ARGUS plotting system. The results obtained by our code can be directly compared with the experimental results using by thin foil experiments in which internuclear multiple collisions have little effects, and will serve to upgrade the calculational methods and the values of nuclear parameters currently used in the calculations. Some discussions are done about the preliminary computational results obtained by using NUCLEUS. The mass distribution and charge dispersion of reaction products are examined in some detail for the nuclear spallation reaction between incident protons and target nuclei, such as U, Pb and Ag, in the energy range from 0.5 GeV to 3.0 GeV. These results show that the distribution of reaction products ceases to change its form as the proton energy increases over about 2 GeV. The same tendency is seen in the energy dependence of the number of primary particles emitted from a nucleus. After spallation reactions, a variety of nuclei, especially many neutron deficient nuclides with nuclear charges nearly equal to ones of a target nucleus, are produced. Due to their short lifetime most of them will change to stable nuclides in due time. Finally, some important issues are discussed to improve the present simulation method. (author)

  4. Effects of foliage clumping on the estimation of global terrestrial gross primary productivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jing M.; Mo, Gang; Pisek, Jan; Liu, Jane; Deng, Feng; Ishizawa, Misa; Chan, Douglas

    2012-03-01

    Sunlit and shaded leaf separation proposed by Norman (1982) is an effective way to upscale from leaf to canopy in modeling vegetation photosynthesis. The Boreal Ecosystem Productivity Simulator (BEPS) makes use of this methodology, and has been shown to be reliable in modeling the gross primary productivity (GPP) derived from CO2flux and tree ring measurements. In this study, we use BEPS to investigate the effect of canopy architecture on the global distribution of GPP. For this purpose, we use not only leaf area index (LAI) but also the first ever global map of the foliage clumping index derived from the multiangle satellite sensor POLDER at 6 km resolution. The clumping index, which characterizes the degree of the deviation of 3-dimensional leaf spatial distributions from the random case, is used to separate sunlit and shaded LAI values for a given LAI. Our model results show that global GPP in 2003 was 132 ± 22 Pg C. Relative to this baseline case, our results also show: (1) global GPP is overestimated by 12% when accurate LAI is available but clumping is ignored, and (2) global GPP is underestimated by 9% when the effective LAI is available and clumping is ignored. The clumping effects in both cases are statistically significant (p < 0.001). The effective LAI is often derived from remote sensing by inverting the measured canopy gap fraction to LAI without considering the clumping. Global GPP would therefore be generally underestimated when remotely sensed LAI (actually effective LAI by our definition) is used. This is due to the underestimation of the shaded LAI and therefore the contribution of shaded leaves to GPP. We found that shaded leaves contribute 50%, 38%, 37%, 39%, 26%, 29% and 21% to the total GPP for broadleaf evergreen forest, broadleaf deciduous forest, evergreen conifer forest, deciduous conifer forest, shrub, C4 vegetation, and other vegetation, respectively. The global average of this ratio is 35%.

  5. Assessment of SMAP soil moisture for global simulation of gross primary production

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Liming; Chen, Jing M.; Liu, Jane; Bélair, Stéphane; Luo, Xiangzhong

    2017-07-01

    In this study, high-quality soil moisture data derived from the Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) satellite measurements are evaluated from a perspective of improving the estimation of the global gross primary production (GPP) using a process-based ecosystem model, namely, the Boreal Ecosystem Productivity Simulator (BEPS). The SMAP soil moisture data are assimilated into BEPS using an ensemble Kalman filter. The correlation coefficient (r) between simulated GPP from the sunlit leaves and Sun-induced chlorophyll fluorescence (SIF) measured by Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment-2 is used as an indicator to evaluate the performance of the GPP simulation. Areas with SMAP data in low quality (i.e., forests), or with SIF in low magnitude (e.g., deserts), or both are excluded from the analysis. With the assimilated SMAP data, the r value is enhanced for Africa, Asia, and North America by 0.016, 0.013, and 0.013, respectively (p r appears in single-cropping agricultural land where the irrigation is not considered in the model but well captured by SMAP (e.g., 0.09 in North America, p < 0.05). With the assimilation of SMAP, areas with weak model performances are identified in double or triple cropping cropland (e.g., part of North China Plain) and/or mountainous area (e.g., Spain and Turkey). The correlation coefficient is enhanced by 0.01 in global average for shrub, grass, and cropland. This enhancement is small and insignificant because nonwater-stressed areas are included.

  6. Optimal Consumer Electronics Product Take-Back Time with Consideration of Consumer Value

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Tse Fang

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Rapid economic growth in recent years has transformed our lifestyle to massively produce, consume, and dispose of products, especially for consumer electronics. This change has put great threat to our environment and caused natural resource depletion. Moreover, short product life cycles and quick replacements of consumer electronics create enormous electronic wastes (e-wastes. Without proper waste management, immense environmental damage is expected. In this empirical study, we notice that lots of valuable materials that can still be recycled from these used consumer electronics are left unused at home instead of being recycled at the appropriate time, which causes a low collection rate and a decrease in residual value for the used products. Therefore, it is important for the government and the recyclers to handle them efficiently by increasing the used product take-back rate. Our study develops an assessment model for customer value based on the idea of value engineering and the perspective of product life cycle. We also explore the relationship between product value and the total cost of ownership with an evaluation of their time variation, considering different usage modes for various consumer groups and different recycling award schemes (fixed and variable recycling awards. Proper take-back management is likely to create a win-win situation both for consumers and environmental protection. This study regards the notebook computer as an example to determine the optimal time for recycling laptops based on usage patterns and provides consumers a reference for when to replace their used product. The results from our modeling firstly clearly indicate that consumers with higher frequency of usage have shorter take back times and higher maximum consumer value. Secondly, a variable recycling award scheme with higher maximum consumer value is more practical than a fixed recycling award scheme.

  7. Food waste quantification in primary production - The Nordic countries as a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartikainen, Hanna; Mogensen, Lisbeth; Svanes, Erik; Franke, Ulrika

    2018-01-01

    Our understanding of food waste in the food supply chain has increased, but very few studies have been published on food waste in primary production. The overall aims of this study were to quantify the total amount of food waste in primary production in Finland, Sweden, Norway and Denmark, and to create a framework for how to define and quantify food waste in primary production. The quantification of food waste was based on case studies conducted in the present study and estimates published in scientific literature. The chosen scope of the study was to quantify the amount of edible food (excluding inedible parts like peels and bones) produced for human consumption that did not end up as food. As a result, the quantification was different from the existing guidelines. One of the main differences is that food that ends up as animal feed is included in the present study, whereas this is not the case for the recently launched food waste definition of the FUSIONS project. To distinguish the 'food waste' definition of the present study from the existing definitions and to avoid confusion with established usage of the term, a new term 'side flow' (SF) was introduced as a synonym for food waste in primary production. A rough estimate of the total amount of food waste in primary production in Finland, Sweden, Norway and Denmark was made using SF and 'FUSIONS Food Waste' (FFW) definitions. The SFs in primary production in the four Nordic countries were an estimated 800,000 tonnes per year with an additional 100,000 tonnes per year from the rearing phase of animals. The 900,000 tonnes per year of SF corresponds to 3.7% of the total production of 24,000,000 tonnes per year of edible primary products. When using the FFW definition proposed by the FUSIONS project, the FFW amount was estimated at 330,000 tonnes per year, or 1% of the total production. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Prognostic value of Ki67 analysed by cytology or histology in primary breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Stephanie; Stålhammar, Gustav; Darai-Ramqvist, Eva; Rantalainen, Mattias; Tobin, Nicholas P; Bergh, Jonas; Hartman, Johan

    2018-03-27

    The accuracy of biomarker assessment in breast pathology is vital for therapy decisions. The therapy predictive and prognostic biomarkers oestrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor, HER2 and Ki67 may act as surrogates to gene expression profiling of breast cancer. The aims of this study were to investigate the concordance of consecutive biomarker assessment by immunocytochemistry on preoperative fine-needle aspiration cytology versus immunohistochemistry (IHC) on the corresponding resected breast tumours. Further, to investigate the concordance with molecular subtype and correlation to stage and outcome. Two retrospective cohorts comprising 385 breast tumours with clinicopathological data including gene expression-based subtype and up to 10-year overall survival data were evaluated. In both cohorts, we identified a substantial variation in Ki67 index between cytology and histology and a switch between low and high proliferation within the same tumour in 121/360 cases. ER evaluations were discordant in only 1.5% of the tumours. From cohort 2, gene expression data with PAM50 subtype were used to correlate surrogate subtypes. IHC-based surrogate classification could identify the correct molecular subtype in 60% and 64% of patients by cytology (n=63) and surgical resections (n=73), respectively. Furthermore, high Ki67 in surgical resections but not in cytology was associated with poor overall survival and higher probability for axillary lymph node metastasis. This study shows considerable differences in the prognostic value of Ki67 but not ER in breast cancer depending on the diagnostic method. Furthermore, our findings show that both methods are insufficient in predicting true molecular subtypes. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  9. Value of {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT in the diagnosis of primary gastric cancer via stomach distension

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, Quanmei, E-mail: 444656285@qq.com [Department of Radiology, Shengjing Hospital of China Medical University, Shenyang 110004 (China); Xin, Jun, E-mail: xinj@sj-hospital.org [Department of Radiology, Shengjing Hospital of China Medical University, Shenyang 110004 (China); Zhao, Zhoushe, E-mail: zhoushe.zhao@ge.com [GE, Shenyang 110004 (China); Guo, Qiyong, E-mail: guoqy@vip.sina.com [Department of Radiology, Shengjing Hospital of China Medical University, Shenyang 110004 (China); Yu, Shupeng, E-mail: drizzleyu@163.com [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Shengjing Hospital of China Medical University, Shenyang 110004 (China); Xu, Weina, E-mail: xuwn@sj-hospital.org [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Shengjing Hospital of China Medical University, Shenyang 110004 (China); Liu, Changping, E-mail: liucp1698@163.com [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Shengjing Hospital of China Medical University, Shenyang 110004 (China); Zhai, Wei, E-mail: zhw69@163.com [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Shengjing Hospital of China Medical University, Shenyang 110004 (China)

    2013-06-15

    Objective: To clarify the usefulness of {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT for detecting primary gastric cancer via gastric distention using a mixture of milk and Diatrizoate Meglumine. Materials and methods: A total of 68 patients (male: 47, female: 21; age: 41–87 years) suspected of gastric carcinoma underwent {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT imaging. After whole-body PET/CT imaging in a fasting state, the patients drank a measured amount of milk with Diatrizoate Meglumine. Local gastric district PET/CT imaging was performed 30 min later. The imaging was analyzed by semi-quantitative analysis, standardized uptake value (SUV) of the primary tumor was measured in a region of interest. The diagnosis results were confirmed by gastroscopy, pathology, and follow-up results. Results: Of the 68 patients, 56 malignant gastric neoplasm patients (male: 37, female: 19) were conformed. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value of fasting whole-body PET/CT imaging for a primary malignant tumor were 92.9%, 75.0%, 94.5%, and 69.0%, respectively. The values for distension with a mixture of milk and Diatrizoate Meglumine were 91.1%, 91.7%, 98.1%, and 68.8%, respectively. The area under the curve was 0.919 ± 0.033 and 0.883 ± 0.066 for the diagnosis of gastric cancer with SUV{sub max} in a fasting state and after intake of mixture respectively, the differences were not statistically significant (P = 0.359). Using gastric distension with a mixture of milk and Diatrizoate Meglumine, the mean ratio of the lesion's SUV{sub max} to the adjacent gastric wall SUV{sub max} increased significantly from 3.30 ± 3.05 to 13.50 ± 15.05, which was statistically significant (P < 0.001). Conclusions: {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT imaging is highly accurate for the diagnosis of primary gastric carcinoma. Gastric distention can display the lesions more clearly, however, it cannot significantly improve diagnostic accuracy.

  10. 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography in colorectal cancer: value in primary staging and follow-up

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joerg, L.; Heinisch, M.; Rechberger, E.; Kurz, F.; Klug, R.; Aufschnaiter, M; Hammer, J.; Langsteger, W.

    2002-01-01

    Positron emission tomography using 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG-PET) is a encouraging imaging techniques allowing a highly sensitive whole-body search for malignant foci detected by their increased glucose metabolism compared with benign tissues. Several studies are now available that indicate its added value for diagnosis and staging of colorectal cancer. In all, patient management seems to be changed in 20-30 % of patients who undergo fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography in addition to standard staging procedures. Fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography is also useful in monitoring radiation therapy and chemotherapy. Regarding preoperative staging of primary colorectal cancer the literature is very limited. (author)

  11. An Overview of Natural Gas Conversion Technologies for Co-Production of Hydrogen and Value-Added Solid Carbon Products

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dagle, Robert A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Dagle, Vanessa [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Bearden, Mark D. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Holladay, Jamelyn D. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Krause, Theodore R. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Ahmed, Shabbir [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2017-11-16

    This report was prepared in response to the U.S. Department of Energy Fuel Cell Technologies Office Congressional Appropriation language to support research on carbon-free production of hydrogen using new chemical processes that utilize natural gas to produce solid carbon and hydrogen. The U.S. produces 9-10 million tons of hydrogen annually with more than 95% of the hydrogen produced by steam-methane reforming (SMR) of natural gas. SMR is attractive because of its high hydrogen yield; but it also converts the carbon to carbon dioxide. Non-oxidative thermal decomposition of methane to carbon and hydrogen is an alternative to SMR and produces CO2-free hydrogen. The produced carbon can be sold as a co-product, thus providing economic credit that reduces the delivered net cost of hydrogen. The combination of producing hydrogen with potentially valuable carbon byproducts has market value in that this allows greater flexibility to match the market prices of hydrogen and carbon. That is, the higher value product can subsidize the other in pricing decisions. In this report we highlight the relevant technologies reported in the literature—primarily thermochemical and plasma conversion processes—and recent research progress and commercial activities. Longstanding technical challenges include the high energetic requirements (e.g., high temperatures and/or electricity requirements) necessary for methane activation and, for some catalytic processes, the separation of solid carbon product from the spent catalyst. We assess current and new carbon product markets that could be served given technological advances, and we discuss technical barriers and potential areas of research to address these needs. We provide preliminary economic analysis for these processes and compare to other emerging (e.g., electrolysis) and conventional (e.g., SMR) processes for hydrogen production. The overarching conclusion of this study is that the cost of hydrogen can be potentially

  12. PREDICTIVE MODEL FOR THE ADDED VALUE OF SULTANA SEEDLESS GRAPE PRODUCTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Umut Burak Geyikci

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Turkey after USA is the second important raisin grape producer by cv “Sultana”in the world (Kara,2014. The Manisa district alone accounts for 31% of totalgrape production and 80% of the whole sultana seedless raisin grape production inTurkey. 95% of total grape output generated in Manisa is made up of Sultanaseedless grape(TUIK, 2012. In thisstudy, the added value of grape production inManisa has been calculated and according to the findings, the per capita addedvalue of grape production has been computed. In order to calculate the addedvalue of grape production in Manisa, costs of labor, fuel, fertilizer, disinfection,hormone, repair and maintenance of the businesses around have been investigated.After calculated costs had been deducted from total business income, the totaladded value of grape production in Manisa and the per capita added valueofgrape production in Manisa were attained The efficiency per hectare in the sampleproduction units, which was investigated during the field research, measures up to26.470 kg. The percentile distributions of cost items at this efficiency level are;27,8% fuel costs, 23,2% fertilizing costs, 19,9% irrigation costs, 11,4%disinfection costs, 7,5% hormone usage costs, 4,6% harvesting and transportingcosts and the rest consists of maintenance costs. When the costs are deducted from income per hectare (11.646 USD, the added value per hectare turns out to be8843 USD

  13. Potential consequences of climate change for primary production and fish production in large marine ecosystems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanchard, Julia L; Jennings, Simon; Holmes, Robert; Harle, James; Merino, Gorka; Allen, J Icarus; Holt, Jason; Dulvy, Nicholas K; Barange, Manuel

    2012-11-05

    Existing methods to predict the effects of climate change on the biomass and production of marine communities are predicated on modelling the interactions and dynamics of individual species, a very challenging approach when interactions and distributions are changing and little is known about the ecological mechanisms driving the responses of many species. An informative parallel approach is to develop size-based methods. These capture the properties of food webs that describe energy flux and production at a particular size, independent of species' ecology. We couple a physical-biogeochemical model with a dynamic, size-based food web model to predict the future effects of climate change on fish biomass and production in 11 large regional shelf seas, with and without fishing effects. Changes in potential fish production are shown to most strongly mirror changes in phytoplankton production. We project declines of 30-60% in potential fish production across some important areas of tropical shelf and upwelling seas, most notably in the eastern Indo-Pacific, the northern Humboldt and the North Canary Current. Conversely, in some areas of the high latitude shelf seas, the production of pelagic predators was projected to increase by 28-89%.

  14. The value of product flexibility in nuclear hydrogen technologies: A real options analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Botterud, Audun; Yildiz, Bilge; Conzelmann, Guenter; Petri, Mark C.

    2009-01-01

    Previous economic studies of nuclear hydrogen technologies focused on levelized costs without accounting for risks and uncertainties faced by potential investors. To address some of these risks and uncertainties, we used real options theory to assess the profitability of three nuclear hydrogen production technologies in evolving electricity and hydrogen markets. Monte-Carlo simulations are used to represent the uncertainty in hydrogen and electricity prices. The model computes both the expected value and the distribution of discounted profits from the production plant. It also quantifies the value of the option to switch between hydrogen and electricity production. Under these assumptions, we conclude that investors will find significant value in the capability to switch plant output between electricity and hydrogen. (author)

  15. Warming Increases the Proportion of Primary Production Emitted as Methane from Freshwater Mesocosms

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Methane and carbon dioxide are the dominant gaseous end products of the remineralisation of organic carbon and also the two largest contributors to the anthropogenic greenhouse effect. We investigated whether warming altered the balance of methane efflux relative to primary production and ecosystem respiration in a freshwater mesocosm experiment. Whole ecosystem CH4 efflux was strongly related to temperature with an apparent activation energy of 0.85eV. Furthermore, CH4 ef...

  16. Comparison of Values in 5th, 6th, 7th and 8th Grade Primary Education Music Class Students'? Workbooks According to Rokeach?s and Akbas's Value Classifications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çakirer, H. Serdar

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the present study is to compare the values in the songs of 5th, 6th, 7th and 8th grade primary education music classes students? workbooks according to the value categorizations proposed by Rockeach and Akbas and which values among the categories mentioned are taught to the students in the 5th, 6th, 7th and 8th grade primary education…

  17. Comparison between remote sensing and a dynamic vegetation model for estimating terrestrial primary production of Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ardö, Jonas

    2015-12-01

    Africa is an important part of the global carbon cycle. It is also a continent facing potential problems due to increasing resource demand in combination with climate change-induced changes in resource supply. Quantifying the pools and fluxes constituting the terrestrial African carbon cycle is a challenge, because of uncertainties in meteorological driver data, lack of validation data, and potentially uncertain representation of important processes in major ecosystems. In this paper, terrestrial primary production estimates derived from remote sensing and a dynamic vegetation model are compared and quantified for major African land cover types. Continental gross primary production estimates derived from remote sensing were higher than corresponding estimates derived from a dynamic vegetation model. However, estimates of continental net primary production from remote sensing were lower than corresponding estimates from the dynamic vegetation model. Variation was found among land cover classes, and the largest differences in gross primary production were found in the evergreen broadleaf forest. Average carbon use efficiency (NPP/GPP) was 0.58 for the vegetation model and 0.46 for the remote sensing method. Validation versus in situ data of aboveground net primary production revealed significant positive relationships for both methods. A combination of the remote sensing method with the dynamic vegetation model did not strongly affect this relationship. Observed significant differences in estimated vegetation productivity may have several causes, including model design and temperature sensitivity. Differences in carbon use efficiency reflect underlying model assumptions. Integrating the realistic process representation of dynamic vegetation models with the high resolution observational strength of remote sensing may support realistic estimation of components of the carbon cycle and enhance resource monitoring, providing suitable validation data is available.

  18. ARM Cloud Radar Simulator Package for Global Climate Models Value-Added Product

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Yuying [North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC (United States); Xie, Shaocheng [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-05-01

    It has been challenging to directly compare U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility ground-based cloud radar measurements with climate model output because of limitations or features of the observing processes and the spatial gap between model and the single-point measurements. To facilitate the use of ARM radar data in numerical models, an ARM cloud radar simulator was developed to converts model data into pseudo-ARM cloud radar observations that mimic the instrument view of a narrow atmospheric column (as compared to a large global climate model [GCM] grid-cell), thus allowing meaningful comparison between model output and ARM cloud observations. The ARM cloud radar simulator value-added product (VAP) was developed based on the CloudSat simulator contained in the community satellite simulator package, the Cloud Feedback Model Intercomparison Project (CFMIP) Observation Simulator Package (COSP) (Bodas-Salcedo et al., 2011), which has been widely used in climate model evaluation with satellite data (Klein et al., 2013, Zhang et al., 2010). The essential part of the CloudSat simulator is the QuickBeam radar simulator that is used to produce CloudSat-like radar reflectivity, but is capable of simulating reflectivity for other radars (Marchand et al., 2009; Haynes et al., 2007). Adapting QuickBeam to the ARM cloud radar simulator within COSP required two primary changes: one was to set the frequency to 35 GHz for the ARM Ka-band cloud radar, as opposed to 94 GHz used for the CloudSat W-band radar, and the second was to invert the view from the ground to space so as to attenuate the beam correctly. In addition, the ARM cloud radar simulator uses a finer vertical resolution (100 m compared to 500 m for CloudSat) to resolve the more detailed structure of clouds captured by the ARM radars. The ARM simulator has been developed following the COSP workflow (Figure 1) and using the capabilities available in COSP

  19. The value of atorvastatin over the product life cycle in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grabner, Michael; Johnson, Wallace; Abdulhalim, Abdulla M; Kuznik, Andreas; Mullins, C Daniel

    2011-10-01

    US health care reform mandates the reduction of wasteful health care spending while maintaining quality of care. Introducing new drugs into crowded therapeutic classes may be viewed as offering "me-too" (new drugs with a similar mechanism of action compared to existing drugs) drugs without incremental benefit. This article presents an analysis of the incremental costs and benefits of atorvastatin, a lipid-lowering agent. This analysis models the cost-effectiveness of atorvastatin over the product life cycle. The yearly cost-effectiveness of atorvastatin compared to simvastatin was modeled from 1997 to 2030 from the point of view of a US third-party payer. Estimates for incremental costs (in US $) and effects (in quality-adjusted life-years [QALYs]) for the primary and secondary prevention of cardiovascular events were taken from previously published literature and adjusted for changes in drug prices over time. Estimates of total statin use were derived using the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. Sensitivity analyses were conducted to examine variations in study parameters, including drug prices, indications, and discount rates. Assuming increasing statin use over time (with a mean of 1.07 million new users per year) and a 3% discount rate, the cumulative incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) of atorvastatin versus simvastatin ranged from cost-savings at release to a maximum of $45,066/QALY after 6 years of generic simvastatin use in 2012. Over the full modeled life cycle (1997-2030), the cumulative ICER of atorvastatin was $20,331/QALY. The incremental value of atorvastatin to US payers (after subtracting costs) was estimated at $44.57 to $194.78 billion, depending on willingness to pay. Findings from the sensitivity analyses were similar. A hypothetical situation in which atorvastatin did not exist was associated with a reduction in total expenditures but also a loss of QALYs gained. The cumulative ICER of atorvastatin varied across the

  20. Twenty-million-year relationship between mammalian diversity and primary productivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritz, Susanne A.; Eronen, Jussi T.; Schnitzler, Jan; Hof, Christian; Janis, Christine M.; Mulch, Andreas; Böhning-Gaese, Katrin; Graham, Catherine H.

    2016-01-01

    At global and regional scales, primary productivity strongly correlates with richness patterns of extant animals across space, suggesting that resource availability and climatic conditions drive patterns of diversity. However, the existence and consistency of such diversity–productivity relationships through geological history is unclear. Here we provide a comprehensive quantitative test of the diversity–productivity relationship for terrestrial large mammals through time across broad temporal and spatial scales. We combine >14,000 occurrences for 690 fossil genera through the Neogene (23–1.8 Mya) with regional estimates of primary productivity from fossil plant communities in North America and Europe. We show a significant positive diversity–productivity relationship through the 20-million-year record, providing evidence on unprecedented spatial and temporal scales that this relationship is a general pattern in the ecology and paleo-ecology of our planet. Further, we discover that genus richness today does not match the fossil relationship, suggesting that a combination of human impacts and Pleistocene climate variability has modified the 20-million-year ecological relationship by strongly reducing primary productivity and driving many mammalian species into decline or to extinction. PMID:27621451

  1. Value-Added Products Derived from Waste Activated Sludge: A Biorefinery Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Zhang

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Substantial research has been carried out on sustainable waste activated sludge (WAS management in the last decade. In addition to the traditional approach to reduce its production volume, considering WAS as a feedstock to produce bio-products such as amino acids, proteins, short chain fatty acids, enzymes, bio-pesticides, bio-plastics, bio-flocculants and bio-surfactants represents a key component in the transformation of wastewater treatment plants into biorefineries. The quality of these bio-products is a key factor with respect to the feasibility of non-conventional WAS-based production processes. This review provides a critical assessment of the production process routes of a wide range of value-added products from WAS, their current limitations, and recommendations for future research to help promote more sustainable management of this under-utilised and ever-growing waste stream.

  2. Recycling production designs: the value of coordination and flexibility in aluminum recycling operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brommer, Tracey H.

    The growing motivation for aluminum recycling has prompted interest in recycling alternative and more challenging secondary materials. The nature of these alternative secondary materials necessitates the development of an intermediate recycling facility that can reprocess the secondary materials into a liquid product Two downstream aluminum remelters will incorporate the liquid products into their aluminum alloy production schedules. Energy and environmental benefits result from delivering the products as liquid but coordination challenges persist because of the energy cost to maintain the liquid. Further coordination challenges result from the necessity to establish a long term recycling production plan in the presence of long term downstream aluminum remelter production uncertainty and inherent variation in the daily order schedule of the downstream aluminum remelters. In this context a fundamental question arises, considering the metallurgical complexities of dross reprocessing, what is the value of operating a coordinated set of by-product reprocessing plants and remelting cast houses? A methodology is presented to calculate the optimal recycling center production parameters including 1) the number of recycled products, 2) the volume of recycled products, 3) allocation of recycled materials across recycled products, 4) allocation of recycled products across finished alloys, 4) the level of flexibility for the recycling center to operate. The methods implemented include, 1) an optimization model to describe the long term operations of the recycling center, 2) an uncertainty simulation tool, 3) a simulation optimization method, 4) a dynamic simulation tool with four embedded daily production optimization models of varying degrees of flexibility. This methodology is used to quantify the performance of several recycling center production designs of varying levels of coordination and flexibility. This analysis allowed the identification of the optimal recycling

  3. Customer Focused Product Design Using Integrated Model of Target Costing, Quality Function Deployment and Value Engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossein Rezaei Dolatabadi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Target costing by integrating customer requirements, technical attributes and cost information into the product design phase and eliminating the non-value added functions, plays a vital role in different phases of the product life cycle. Quality Function Deployment (QFD and Value Engineering (VE are two techniques which can be used for applying target costing, successfully. The purpose of this paper is to propose an integrated model of target costing, QFD and VE to explore the role of target costing in managing product costs while promoting quality specifications meeting customers’ needs. F indings indicate that the integration of target costing, QFD and VE is an essential technique in managing the costs of production process. Findings also imply that integration of the three techniques provides a competitive cost advantage to companies.

  4. Diagnostic extrapolation of gross primary production from flux tower sites to the globe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beer, Christian; Reichstein, Markus; Tomelleri, Enrico; Ciais, Philippe; Jung, Martin; Carvalhais, Nuno; Rödenbeck, Christian; Baldocchi, Dennis; Luyssaert, Sebastiaan; Papale, Dario

    2010-05-01

    The uptake of atmospheric CO2 by plant photosynthesis is the largest global carbon flux and is thought of driving most terrestrial carbon cycle processes. While the photosynthesis processes at the leaf and canopy levels are quite well understood, so far only very crude estimates of its global integral, the Gross Primary Production (GPP) can be found in the literature. Existing estimates have been lacking sound empirical basis. Reasons for such limitations lie in the absence of direct estimates of ecosystem-level GPP and methodological difficulties in scaling local carbon flux measurements to global scale across heterogeneous vegetation. Here, we present global estimates of GPP based on different diagnostic approaches. These up-scaling schemes integrated high-resolution remote sensing products, such as land cover, the fraction of photosynthetically active radiation (fAPAR) and leaf-area index, with carbon flux measurements from the global network of eddy covariance stations (FLUXNET). In addition, meteorological datasets from diverse sources and river runoff observations were used. All the above-mentioned approaches were also capable of estimating uncertainties. With six novel or newly parameterized and highly diverse up-scaling schemes we consistently estimated a global GPP of 122 Pg C y-1. In the quantification of the total uncertainties, we considered uncertainties arising from the measurement technique and data processing (i.e. partitioning into GPP and respiration). Furthermore, we accounted for the uncertainties of drivers and the structural uncertainties of the extrapolation approach. The total propagation led to a global uncertainty of 15 % of the mean value. Although our mean GPP estimate of 122 Pg C y-1 is similar to the previous postulate by Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change in 2001, we estimated a different variability among ecoregions. The tropics accounted for 32 % of GPP showing a greater importance of tropical ecosystems for the global carbon

  5. The iMTA Productivity Cost Questionnaire: A Standardized Instrument for Measuring and Valuing Health-Related Productivity Losses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouwmans, Clazien; Krol, Marieke; Severens, Hans; Koopmanschap, Marc; Brouwer, Werner; Hakkaart-van Roijen, Leona

    2015-09-01

    Productivity losses often contribute significantly to the total costs in economic evaluations adopting a societal perspective. Currently, no consensus exists on the measurement and valuation of productivity losses. We aimed to develop a standardized instrument for measuring and valuing productivity losses. A group of researchers with extensive experience in measuring and valuing productivity losses designed an instrument suitable for self-completion, building on preknowledge and evidence on validity. The instrument was designed to cover all domains of productivity losses, thus allowing quantification and valuation of all productivity losses. A feasibility study was performed to check the questionnaire's consistency and intelligibility. The iMTA Productivity Cost Questionnaire (iPCQ) includes three modules measuring productivity losses of paid work due to 1) absenteeism and 2) presenteeism and productivity losses related to 3) unpaid work. Questions for measuring absenteeism and presenteeism were derived from existing validated questionnaires. Because validated measures of losses of unpaid work are scarce, the questions of this module were newly developed. To enhance the instrument's feasibility, simple language was used. The feasibility study included 195 respondents (response rate 80%) older than 18 years. Seven percent (n = 13) identified problems while filling in the iPCQ, including problems with the questionnaire's instructions and routing (n = 6) and wording (n = 2). Five respondents experienced difficulties in estimating the time that would be needed for other people to make up for lost unpaid work. Most modules of the iPCQ are based on validated questions derived from previously available instruments. The instrument is understandable for most of the general public. Copyright © 2015 International Society for Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research (ISPOR). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Food and value motivation: Linking consumer affinities to different types of food products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Boer, Joop; Schösler, Hanna

    2016-08-01

    This study uses the consumer affinity concept to examine the multiple motives that may shape consumers' relationships with food. The concept was applied in a study on four broad product types in the Netherlands, which cover a wide range of the market and may each appeal to consumers with different affinities towards foods. These product types may be denoted as 'conventional', 'efficient', 'gourmet' and 'pure'. A comparative analysis, based on Higgins' Regulatory Focus Theory, was performed to examine whether food-related value motivations could explain different consumer affinities for these product types. The affinities of consumers were measured by means of a non-verbal, visual presentation of four samples of food products in a nationwide survey (n = 742) among consumers who were all involved in food purchasing and/or cooking. The affinities found could be predicted fairly well from a number of self-descriptions relating to food and eating, which expressed different combinations of type of value motivation and involvement with food. The analysis demonstrated the contrasting role of high and low involvement as well as the potential complementarity of promotion- and prevention-focused value motivation. It is suggested that knowledge of the relationships between product types, consumer affinities and value motivation can help improve the effectiveness of interventions that seek to promote healthy and sustainable diets in developed countries. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Organoleptic characteristics and nutritive value estimation of baked food products from Manonjaya variety salacca flour

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumarto; Aprianty, D.; Bachtiar, R. A.; Kristiana, L.

    2018-01-01

    Manonjaya salacca (snake fruit) is one of the original varieties of Indonesia which is currently declining due to the quality of taste less favoured than the snake fruit on the market. This variety in the future is feared to be lost, so it is necessary to revitalize the utilization of this snake fruit by diversifying processed products, one of them is baked food products from Manonjaya salacca flour. The purpose of this research was to know the acceptance level of baked food products from Manonjaya salacca flour organoleptically and the nutritional value estimation. This research method was observational with a descriptive explanation. Panellists in this study were consumers with a total of 61 people. Organoleptically, respondents tend to value cake, muffin, cookies, and flakes in every color, flavor, taste, and texture parameters. Nutritional value per 100 g of baked food products from Salacca flour (cake, muffin, cookies, flakes) were energy 287.5-479.0 kcal, water 0.8-3.8 g, protein 6.0-6.7 g, fat 0.8-31.0 g, carbohydrates 45.0-98.8 g, and fiber 1.1-4.6 g. Panellists were accepted the organoleptic characteristics and the estimated nutritional values on baked food products from Manonjaya variety salacca flour were varied.

  8. Shrubland primary production and soil respiration diverge along European climate gradient

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reinsch, Sabine; Koller, Eva; Sowerby, Alwyn

    2017-01-01

    uncertain. Here we show the responses of ecosystem C to 8-12 years of experimental drought and night-time warming across an aridity gradient spanning seven European shrublands using indices of C assimilation (aboveground net primary production: aNPP) and soil C efflux (soil respiration: Rs). The changes...

  9. Joint control of terrestrial gross primary productivity by plant phenology and physiology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xia, Jianyang; Niu, Shuli; Ciais, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    Terrestrial gross primary productivity (GPP) varies greatly over time and space. A better understanding of this variability is necessary for more accurate predictions of the future climate–carbon cycle feedback. Recent studies have suggested that variability in GPP is driven by a broad range of b...

  10. Effects of precipitation changes on aboveground net primary production and soil respiration in a switchgrass field

    Science.gov (United States)

    This study attempted to test whether switchgrass aboveground net primary production (ANPP) responds to precipitation (PPT) changes in a double asymmetry pattern as framed by Knapp et al. (2016), and whether it is held true for other ecosystem processes such as soil respiration (SR). Data were colle...

  11. Studies on the primary productivity of a polluted mangrove pond in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The primary productivity of a polluted mangrove pond in Lagos was investigated for six months (October 2010-March 2011) using the chlorophyll-a method. Air and water temperatures were high (≥21°C) while transparency was lower than 11.5 cm at the mangrove pond. Total suspended solids were ≥2.0 mg/L while total ...

  12. Seasonal patterns in phytoplankton photosynthetic parameters and primary production at a coastal NW Mediterranean site

    KAUST Repository

    Gasol, Josep M.; Cardelú s, Clara; Moran, Xose Anxelu G.; Balagué , Vanessa; Forn, Irene; Marrasé , Cè lia; Massana, Ramon; Pedró s-Alió , Carlos; Sala, M. Montserrat; Simó , Rafel; Vaqué , Dolors; Estrada, Marta

    2016-01-01

    We carried out monthly photosynthesis-irradiance (P-E) experiments with the 14C-method for 12 years (2003–2014) to determine the photosynthetic parameters and primary production of surface phytoplankton in the Blanes Bay Microbial Observatory, a

  13. Estimating climate change effects on net primary production of rangelands in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthew C. Reeves; Adam L. Moreno; Karen E. Bagne; Steven W. Running

    2014-01-01

    The potential effects of climate change on net primary productivity (NPP) of U.S. rangelands were evaluated using estimated climate regimes from the A1B, A2 and B2 global change scenarios imposed on the biogeochemical cycling model, Biome-BGC from 2001 to 2100. Temperature, precipitation, vapor pressure deficit, day length, solar radiation, CO2 enrichment and nitrogen...

  14. Evaluation of MODIS gross primary productivity for Africa using eddy covariance data

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Sjöström, M

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available MOD17A2 provides operational gross primary production (GPP) data globally at 1 km spatial resolution and 8-day temporal resolution. MOD17A2 estimates GPP according to the light use efficiency (LUE) concept assuming a fixed maximum rate of carbon...

  15. Variance-based sensitivity analysis of BIOME-BGC for gross and net primary production

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Raj, R.; Hamm, N.A.S.; van der Tol, C.; Stein, A.

    2014-01-01

    Parameterization and calibration of a process-based simulator (PBS) is a major challenge when simulating gross and net primary production (GPP and NPP). The large number of parameters makes the calibration computationally expensive and is complicated by the dependence of several parameters on other

  16. Creating a regional MODIS satellite-driven net primary production dataset for european forests

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Neumann, Mathias; Moreno, Adam; Thurnher, Christopher; Mues, Volker; Härkönen, Sanna; Mura, Matteo; Bouriaud, Olivier; Lang, Mait; Cardellini, Giuseppe; Thivolle-Cazat, Alain; Bronisz, Karol; Merganic, Jan; Alberdi, Iciar; Astrup, Rasmus; Mohren, Frits; Zhao, Maosheng; Hasenauer, Hubert

    2016-01-01

    Net primary production (NPP) is an important ecological metric for studying forest ecosystems and their carbon sequestration, for assessing the potential supply of food or timber and quantifying the impacts of climate change on ecosystems. The global MODIS NPP dataset using the MOD17 algorithm

  17. Joint control of terrestrial gross primary productivity by plant phenology and physiology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Xia, J.; Niu, S.; Ciais, P.; Janssens, I.A.; Chen, J.; Ammann, C.; Arain, A.; Blanken, P.D.; Cescatti, A.; Moors, E.J.

    2015-01-01

    Terrestrial gross primary productivity (GPP) varies greatly over time and space. A better understanding of this variability is necessary for more accurate predictions of the future climate–carbon cycle feedback. Recent studies have suggested that variability in GPP is driven by a broad range of

  18. Cell specific primary production of autotrophic and mixotrophic phytoplankton in acidified lakes of the Bohemian Forest

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Znachor, Petr; Nedoma, Jiří

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 112, - (2004), s. 141-155 ISSN 0342-1120 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA206/98/0727; GA ČR(CZ) GA206/97/0072 Keywords : autoradiography * mixotrophy * primary production Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour

  19. Seasonal primary production in different sectors of the EEZ of India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sarupria, J.S.; Bhargava, R.M.S.

    The seasonal and regional variations in the primary production, based on the data collected at 562 stations over the period from 1962 to 1988, are presented. The entire Indian Exclusive Economic Zone (EEZ), measuring 2.01 million km super(2...

  20. Increased light-use efficiency sustains net primary productivity of shaded coffee plants in agroforestry system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charbonnier, Fabien; Roupsard, Olivier; le Maire, Guerric; Guillemot, Joannès; Casanoves, Fernando; Lacointe, André; Vaast, Philippe; Allinne, Clémentine; Audebert, Louise; Cambou, Aurélie; Clément-Vidal, Anne; Defrenet, Elsa; Duursma, Remko A; Jarri, Laura; Jourdan, Christophe; Khac, Emmanuelle; Leandro, Patricia; Medlyn, Belinda E; Saint-André, Laurent; Thaler, Philippe; Van Den Meersche, Karel; Barquero Aguilar, Alejandra; Lehner, Peter; Dreyer, Erwin

    2017-08-01

    In agroforestry systems, shade trees strongly affect the physiology of the undergrown crop. However, a major paradigm is that the reduction in absorbed photosynthetically active radiation is, to a certain extent, compensated by an increase in light-use efficiency, thereby reducing the difference in net primary productivity between shaded and non-shaded plants. Due to the large spatial heterogeneity in agroforestry systems and the lack of appropriate tools, the combined effects of such variables have seldom been analysed, even though they may help understand physiological processes underlying yield dynamics. In this study, we monitored net primary productivity, during two years, on scales ranging from individual coffee plants to the entire plot. Absorbed radiation was mapped with a 3D model (MAESPA). Light-use efficiency and net assimilation rate were derived for each coffee plant individually. We found that although irradiance was reduced by 60% below crowns of shade trees, coffee light-use efficiency increased by 50%, leaving net primary productivity fairly stable across all shade levels. Variability of aboveground net primary productivity of coffee plants was caused primarily by the age of the plants and by intraspecific competition among them (drivers usually overlooked in the agroforestry literature) rather than by the presence of shade trees. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Primary production, nutrients, and size spectra of suspended particles in the southern North Sea

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gieskes, W.W.C.

    1972-01-01

    The effect of nutrient enrichment from the Rhine on some major characteristics of the phytoplankton ecosystem of Dutch coastal waters was studied with 14C, liquid scintillation and Coulter Counter techniques. The magnitude of primary production in the most eutrophic waters closest to

  2. Improved estimates of net primary productivity from MODIS satellite data at regional and local scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yude Pan; Richard Birdsey; John Hom; Kevin McCullough; Kenneth Clark

    2006-01-01

    We compared estimates of net primary production (NPP) from the MODIS satellite with estimates from a forest ecosystem process model (PnET-CN) and forest inventory and analysis (FIA) data for forest types of the mid-Atlantic region of the United States. The regional means were similar for the three methods and for the dominant oak? hickory forests in the region. However...

  3. Modeling gross primary production of an evergreen needleleaf forest using MODIS and climate data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiangming Xiao; Qingyuan Zhang; David Hollinger; John Aber; Berrien, III Moore

    2005-01-01

    Forest canopies are composed of photosynthetically active vegetation (PAV, chloroplasts) and nonphotosynthetic vegetation (NPV, e.g., cell wall, vein, branch). The fraction of photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) absorbed by the canopy (FAPAR) should be partitioned into FAPARPAV and FAPARNPV. Gross primary production (...

  4. Planktonic primary production evaluation by means of the 14C method with liquid scintillation counting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frangopol, T.P.; Bologa, S.A.

    1979-05-01

    Preliminary results on the planktonic primary production obtained for the first time with the 14 C method off the Romanian Black Sea coast (1977, 1978) and in the Sinoe, Mamaia and Bicaz lakes (1978) are presented, along with a review of this method with special reference to liquid scintillation counting. 140 Refs. (author)

  5. Primary oxidation and reduction products in x-irradiated aspartic acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adams, S.M.; Budzinski, E.E.; Box, H.C.

    1976-01-01

    The primary reduction products identified by ESR--ENDOR spectroscopy in single crystals of DL-aspartic acid hydrochloride irradiated at 4.2degreeK are anions formed by addition of an electron to the carbonyl oxygen atoms of the carboxylic acid groups. The main consequence of the oxidation process is to produce a hole centered mainly on atomic chlorine

  6. Evaluation of MODIS gross primary productivity for Africa using eddy covariance data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sjostrom, M.; Zhao, M.; Archibald, S.; Veenendaal, E.M.

    2013-01-01

    MOD17A2 provides operational gross primary production (GPP) data globally at 1 km spatial resolution and 8-day temporal resolution. MOD17A2 estimates GPP according to the light use efficiency (LUE) concept assuming a fixed maximum rate of carbon assimilation per unit photosynthetically active

  7. Estimating primary production from oxygen time series: A novel approach in the frequency domain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cox, T.J.S.; Maris, T.; Soetaert, K.; Kromkamp, J.C.; Meire, P.; Meysman, F.J.R.

    2015-01-01

    Based on an analysis in the frequency domain of the governing equation of oxygen dynamics in aquatic systems, we derive a new method for estimating gross primary production (GPP) from oxygen time series. The central result of this article is a relation between time averaged GPP and the amplitude of

  8. Vegetation-specific model parameters are not required for estimating gross primary production

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Yuan, W.; Cai, W.; Liu, S.; Dong, W.; Chen, J.; Altaf Arain, M.; Blanken, P. D.; Cescatti, A.; Wohlfahrt, G.; Georgiadis, T.; Genesio, L.; Gianelle, D.; Grelle, A.; Kiely, G.; Knohl, A.; Liu, D.; Marek, Michal V.; Merbold, L.; Montagnani, L.; Panferov, O.; Peltoniemi, M.; Rambal, S.; Raschi, A.; Varlagin, A.; Xia, J.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 292, NOV 24 2014 (2014), s. 1-10 ISSN 0304-3800 Institutional support: RVO:67179843 Keywords : light use efficiency * gross primary production * model parameters Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour Impact factor: 2.321, year: 2014

  9. Relationships between net primary productivity and forest stand age in U.S. forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liming He; Jing M. Chen; Yude Pan; Richard Birdsey; Jens. Kattge

    2012-01-01

    Net primary productivity (NPP) is a key flux in the terrestrial ecosystem carbon balance, as it summarizes the autotrophic input into the system. Forest NPP varies predictably with stand age, and quantitative information on the NPP-age relationship for different regions and forest types is therefore fundamentally important for forest carbon cycle modeling. We used four...

  10. Transport of radioactive corrosion products in primary system of sodium-cooled fast breeder reactor 'MONJU'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matuo, Youichirou; Hasegawa, Masanori; Maegawa, Yoshiharu; Miyahara, Shinya

    2011-01-01

    Radioactive corrosion products (CP) are primary cause of personal radiation exposure during maintenance work at FBR plants with no breached fuel. The PSYCHE code has been developed based on the Solution-Precipitation model for analysis of CP transfer behavior. We predicted and analyzed the CP solution and precipitation behavior of MONJU to evaluate the applicability of the PSYCHE code to MONJU, using the parameters verified in the calculations for JOYO. From the calculation result pertaining to the MONJU system, distribution of 54 Mn deposited in the primary cooling system over 20 years of operation is predicted to be approximately 7 times larger than that of 60 Co. In particular, predictions show a notable tendency for 54 Mn precipitation to be distributed in the primary pump and cold-leg. The calculated distribution of 54 Mn and 60 Co in the primary cooling system of MONJU agreed with tendencies of measured distribution of JOYO. (author)

  11. Microalgal cultivation for value-added products: a critical enviro-economical assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kothari, Richa; Pandey, Arya; Ahmad, Shamshad; Kumar, Ashwani; Pathak, Vinayak V; Tyagi, V V

    2017-08-01

    The present review focuses on the cultivation of algal biomass for generating value-added products (VAP) and to assess their economic benefits and harmful environmental impact. Additionally, the impact of bioreactor designs on the yield of microalgal biomass for VAP is also considered. All these factors are discussed in relation to the impact of microalgae production on the bio-economy sector of commercial biotechnology.

  12. Primary production in a tropical large lake: The role of phytoplankton composition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Darchambeau, F., E-mail: francois.darchambeau@ulg.ac.be [Chemical Oceanography Unit, University of Liège, Liège (Belgium); Sarmento, H., E-mail: hugo.sarmento@gmail.com [Department of Hydrobiology, Federal University of São Carlos, 13565-905 São Carlos, São Paulo (Brazil); Descy, J.-P., E-mail: jean-pierre.descy@unamur.be [Research Unit in Environmental and Evolutionary Biology, University of Namur, Namur (Belgium)

    2014-03-01

    Phytoplankton biomass and primary production in tropical large lakes vary at different time scales, from seasons to centuries. We provide a dataset made of 7 consecutive years of phytoplankton biomass and production in Lake Kivu (Eastern Africa). From 2002 to 2008, bi-weekly samplings were performed in a pelagic site in order to quantify phytoplankton composition and biomass, using marker pigments determined by HPLC. Primary production rates were estimated by 96 in situ {sup 14}C incubations. A principal component analysis showed that the main environmental gradient was linked to a seasonal variation of the phytoplankton assemblage, with a clear separation between diatoms during the dry season and cyanobacteria during the rainy season. A rather wide range of the maximum specific photosynthetic rate (P{sub Bm}) was found, ranging between 1.15 and 7.21 g carbon g{sup −1} chlorophyll a h{sup −1}, and was best predicted by a regression model using phytoplankton composition as an explanatory variable. The irradiance at the onset of light saturation (I{sub k}) ranged between 91 and 752 μE m{sup −2} s{sup −1} and was linearly correlated with the mean irradiance in the mixed layer. The inter-annual variability of phytoplankton biomass and production was high, ranging from 53 to 100 mg chlorophyll a m{sup −2} (annual mean) and from 143 to 278 g carbon m{sup −2} y{sup −1}, respectively. The degree of seasonal mixing determined annual production, demonstrating the sensitivity of tropical lakes to climate variability. A review of primary production of other African great lakes allows situating Lake Kivu productivity in the same range as that of lakes Tanganyika and Malawi, even if mean phytoplankton biomass was higher in Lake Kivu. - Highlights: • We provide a 7-year dataset of primary production in a tropical great lake. • Specific photosynthetic rate was determined by community composition. • Annual primary production varied between 143 and 278 mg C m

  13. Primary production in a tropical large lake: The role of phytoplankton composition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Darchambeau, F.; Sarmento, H.; Descy, J.-P.

    2014-01-01

    Phytoplankton biomass and primary production in tropical large lakes vary at different time scales, from seasons to centuries. We provide a dataset made of 7 consecutive years of phytoplankton biomass and production in Lake Kivu (Eastern Africa). From 2002 to 2008, bi-weekly samplings were performed in a pelagic site in order to quantify phytoplankton composition and biomass, using marker pigments determined by HPLC. Primary production rates were estimated by 96 in situ 14 C incubations. A principal component analysis showed that the main environmental gradient was linked to a seasonal variation of the phytoplankton assemblage, with a clear separation between diatoms during the dry season and cyanobacteria during the rainy season. A rather wide range of the maximum specific photosynthetic rate (P Bm ) was found, ranging between 1.15 and 7.21 g carbon g −1 chlorophyll a h −1 , and was best predicted by a regression model using phytoplankton composition as an explanatory variable. The irradiance at the onset of light saturation (I k ) ranged between 91 and 752 μE m −2 s −1 and was linearly correlated with the mean irradiance in the mixed layer. The inter-annual variability of phytoplankton biomass and production was high, ranging from 53 to 100 mg chlorophyll a m −2 (annual mean) and from 143 to 278 g carbon m −2 y −1 , respectively. The degree of seasonal mixing determined annual production, demonstrating the sensitivity of tropical lakes to climate variability. A review of primary production of other African great lakes allows situating Lake Kivu productivity in the same range as that of lakes Tanganyika and Malawi, even if mean phytoplankton biomass was higher in Lake Kivu. - Highlights: • We provide a 7-year dataset of primary production in a tropical great lake. • Specific photosynthetic rate was determined by community composition. • Annual primary production varied between 143 and 278 mg C m −2 y −1 . • Pelagic production was highly

  14. Prognostic Value of Fluoro-D-glucose Uptake of Primary Tumor and Metastatic Lesions in Advanced Nonsmall Cell Lung Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen, Xuan Canh; Nguyen, Van Khoi; Tran, Minh Thong; Maurea, Simone; Salvatore, Marco

    2014-01-01

    To assess the prognostic value of maximum standardized uptake value (maxSUV) of the primary tumor (maxSUV pt ), maxSUV of whole-body tumors (maxSUV wb ) and sum of maximum standardized uptake value (sumaxSUV) measured by the sum of maxSUVs of the primary tumor, metastatic lymph nodes, and metastatic lesions per each organ on fluoro-D-glucose-positron emission tomography/computed tomography in advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Eighty-three patients (49 male, 34 female) with advanced NSCLC were enrolled. Seventeen patients had Stage IIIA, 21 Stage IIIB, and 45 Stage IV. maxSUV pt , maxSUV wb , sumaxSUV, age, gender, tumor-cell type, T stage, N stage, overall stage, primary tumor size, and specific treatment were analyzed for correlation with overall survival. Median follow-up duration was 13 months. Fifty patients were dead during a median follow-up time of 11 months and 33 patients were alive with a median time of 15 months. Univariate analysis revealed that overall survival was significantly correlated with sumaxSUV (≥35 vs. <35, P = 0.004), T stage (T4 vs. T1-T3, P = 0.025), overall stage (IV vs. III, P = 0.002), gender (male vs. female, P = 0.029) and specific treatment (no vs. yes, P = 0.011). maxSUV pt and maxSUV wb were not correlated with overall survival with P value of 0.139 and 0.168, respectively. Multivariate analysis identified sumaxSUV, T stage, gender, and specific treatment as independent prognostic indicators. Patients with a sumaxSUV of ≥35 were 1.921 times more likely to die than those with a sumaxSUV of < 35 (P = 0.047). Median survival time was 14 months for patients with sumaxSUV ≥ 35 compared with 20 months for those with sumaxSUV < 35. In patients with metastatic NSCLC, sumaxSUV with cut-off of 35 was much more significant for survival prognosis (P = 0.021). sumaxSUV is a new prognostic measure, independent of tumor stage, gender, and specific treatment in advanced NSCLC. sumaxSUV may be better than maxSUV pt and maxSUV wb in

  15. Robust Production Planning in Fashion Apparel Industry under Demand Uncertainty via Conditional Value at Risk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abderrahim Ait-Alla

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a mathematical model for robust production planning. The model helps fashion apparel suppliers in making decisions concerning allocation of production orders to different production plants characterized by different lead times and production costs, and in proper time scheduling and sequencing of these production orders. The model aims at optimizing these decisions concerning objectives of minimal production costs and minimal tardiness. It considers several factors such as the stochastic nature of customer demand, differences in production and transport costs and transport times between production plants in different regions. Finally, the model is applied to a case study. The results of numerical computations are presented. The implications of the model results on different fashion related product types and delivery strategies, as well as the model’s limitations and potentials for expansion, are discussed. Results indicate that the production planning model using conditional value at risk (CVaR as the risk measure performs robustly and provides flexibility in decision analysis between different scenarios.

  16. The Use of Alternative Raw Material in Production of Pastry Products as a Progressive Direction in Creating the Products of High Biological Value

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janа Bachinska

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines the impact of the use of alternative vegetable raw materials in the manufacture of pastry products with high biological value; it presents the results of evaluation of commodity of the developed products and compares them with the main samples presented in Kharkiv trade network. The feasibility of using a mixture of fiber and pumpkin seeds in the technology of pastry production to extend the range of confectionery products of high biological value and products with reduced calories has been proved. Adding the mixture of fiber and pumpkin seeds to biscuits and cakes positively affected the chemical composition of the ready-made product, saturating it with useful and necessary to human body mineral elements, vitamins, dietary fiber.

  17. Characterizing isotopic variability of primary production and consumers in Great Plains ecosystems during protracted regional drought

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haveles, A. W.; Fox-Dobbs, K.; Talmadge, K. A.; Fetrow, A.; Fox, D. L.

    2012-12-01

    Over the last few years (2010-2012), the Great Plains of the central USA experienced protracted drought conditions, including historically severe drought during Summer, 2011. Drought severity in the region generally decreases with increasing latitude, but episodic drought is a fundamental trait of grassland ecosystems. Documenting above ground energy and nutrient flow with current drought is critical to understanding responses of grassland ecosystems in the region to predicted increased episodicity of rainfall and recurrence of drought due to anthropogenic climate change. Characterization of biogeochemical variability of modern ecosystems at the microhabitat, local landscape, and regional scales is also necessary to interpret biogeochemical records of ancient grasslands based on paleosols and fossil mammals. Here, we characterize three grassland ecosystems that span the drought gradient in the Great Plains (sites in the Texas panhandle, southwest Kansas, and northwest Nebraska). We measured δ13C and δ15N values of plants and consumers to characterize the biogeochemical variability within each ecosystem. Vegetation at each site is a mix of trees, shrubs, herbs, and cool- and warm-growing season grasses (C3 and C4, respectively). Thus, consumers have access to isotopically distinct sources of forage that vary in abundance with microhabitat (e.g., open grassland, shrub thicket, riparian woodland). Observations indicate herbivorous arthropod (grasshoppers and crickets) abundance follows drought severity, with high abundance of many species in Texas, and low abundance of few species in Nebraska. Small mammal (rodents) abundance follows the inverse pattern with 0.8%, 3.2% and 17.2% capture success in Texas, Kansas and Nebraska, respectively. The inverse abundance patterns of consumer groups may result from greater sensitivity of small mammal consumers with high metabolic needs to lower local net primary productivity and forage quality under drought conditions. As a

  18. Top value platform chemicals: bio-based production of organic acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Judith; Lange, Anna; Fabarius, Jonathan; Wittmann, Christoph

    2015-12-01

    Driven by the quest for sustainability, recent years have seen a tremendous progress in bio-based production routes from renewable raw materials to commercial goods. Particularly, the production of organic acids has crystallized as a competitive and fast-evolving field, related to the broad applicability of organic acids for direct use, as polymer building blocks, and as commodity chemicals. Here, we review recent advances in metabolic engineering and industrial market scenarios with focus on organic acids as top value products from biomass, accessible through fermentation and biotransformation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. To Participate or Not Participate. Exploring the Perceived Value of Co-production

    OpenAIRE

    Merken, Anne; Streukens, Sandra; Leroi-Werelds, Sara

    2013-01-01

    Self check-outs, self-scanning, online ticket buying, designing your own shoes and dresses. Since co-production is seen as a source of competitive advantage, firms are more and more trying to involve the customer in their production process. But why are customers willing to co-produce? What is in it for them? Building on the notion of customer value, customers only co-produce when the benefits outweigh the costs. To elicit the co-production costs and benefits we conducted in-depth interviews....

  20. Some theoretical perspectives of co-creation and co-production of value by customers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nic S. Terblanche

    2014-05-01

    Motivation for the study: No real attention was paid to the concepts of co-production and co-creation by marketing academics after the initial introduction of the concepts. Only after the year 2000 did co-production and co-creation begin to receive the attention of marketing academics, with a substantial increase in publications over the past few years. Contribution/value-add: The objective of this article was to present an overview of the origin and development of co-creation and co-production in marketing, to draw a distinction between the two concepts and to address the implications of these concepts for various decision areas in marketing.

  1. Valuing multiple eelgrass ecosystem services in Sweden: fish production and uptake of carbon and nitrogen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott Glenn Cole

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Valuing nature’s benefits in monetary terms is necessary for policy-makers facing trade-offs in how to spend limited financial resources on environmental protection. We provide information to assess trade-offs associated with the management of seagrass beds, which provide a number of ecosystem services, but are presently impacted by many stressors. We develop an interdisciplinary framework for valuing multiple ecosystem services and apply it to the case of eelgrass (Zostera marina, a dominant seagrass species in the northern hemisphere. We identify and quantify links between three eelgrass functions (habitat for fish, carbon and nitrogen uptake and economic goods in Sweden, quantify these using ecological endpoints, estimate the marginal average value of the impact of losing one hectare of eelgrass along the Swedish northwest coast on welfare in monetary terms, and aggregate these values while considering double-counting. Over a 20 to 50 year period we find that compared to unvegetated habitats, a hectare of eelgrass, including the organic material accumulated in the sediment, produces an additional 626 kg cod fishes and 7,535 wrasse individuals and sequesters 98.6 ton carbon and 466 kg nitrogen. We value the flow of future benefits associated with commercial fishing, avoided climate change damages, and reduced eutrophication at 170,000 SEK in 2014 (20,700 US$ or 11,000 SEK (1,300 US$ annualized at 4%. Fish production, which is the most commonly valued ecosystem service in the seagrass literature, only represented 25% of the total value whereas a conservative estimate of nitrogen regulation constituted 46%, suggesting that most seagrass beds are undervalued. Comparing these values with historic losses of eelgrass we show that the Swedish northwest coast has suffered a substantial reduction in fish production and mineral regulation. Future work should improve the understanding of the geographic scale of eelgrass functions, how local variables

  2. Chemical aspects of fission product transport in the primary circuit of a light water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bowsher, B.R.; Dickinson, S.; Nichols, A.L.; Ogden, J.S.; Potter, P.E.

    1985-01-01

    The transport and fission products in the primary circuit of a light water reactor are of fundamental importance in assessing the consequences of severe accidents. Recent experimental studies have concentrated upon the behaviour of simulant fission product species such as caesium iodide, caesium hydroxide and tellurium, in terms of their vapour deposition characteristics onto metals representative of primary circuit materials. An induction furnace has been used to generate high-density/structural materials aerosols for subsequent analysis, and similar equipment has been incorporated into a glove-box to study lightly-irradiated UO/sub 2/ clad in Zircaloy. Analytical techniques are being developed to assist in the identification of fission product chemical species released from the fuel at temperatures from 1000 to 2500 0 C. Matrix isolation-infrared spectroscopy has been used to identify species in the vapour phase, and specific data using this technique are reported

  3. Chemical aspects of fission product transport in the primary circuit of a light water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bowsher, B.R.; Dickinson, S.; Nichols, A.L.; Ogden, J.S.; Potter, P.E.

    1985-01-01

    The transport and deposition of fission products in the primary circuit of a light water reactor are of fundamental importance in assessing the consequences of severe accidents. Recent experimental studies have concentrated upon the behavior of simulant fission product species such as cesium iodide, cesium hydroxide and tellurium, in terms of their vapor deposition characteristics onto metals representative of primary circuit materials. An induction furnace has been used to generate high density/structural materials aerosols for subsequent analysis, and similar equipment has been incorporated into a glove-box to study lightly-irradiated UO 2 clad in Zircaloy. Analytical techniques are being developed to assist in the identification of fission product chemical species released from the fuel at temperatures from 1000 to 2500 0 C. Matrix isolation-infrared spectroscopy has been used to identify species in the vapor phase, and specific data using this technique are reported

  4. Modelling the behaviour of corrosion products in the primary heat transfer circuits of pressurised water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodliffe, R.S.; Polley, M.V.; Thornton, E.W.

    1985-05-01

    The redistribution of corrosion products from the primary circuit surfaces of a water reactor can result in increased flow resistance, poorer heat transfer performance, fuel failure and radioactive contamination of circuit surfaces. The environment is generally sufficiently well controlled to ensure that the first three effects are not limiting. The last effect is of particular importance since radioactive corrosion products are major contributors to shutdown fields and since it is necessary to ensure that the radiation exposure of personnel is as low as reasonably achievable. This review focusses attention on the principles which must form the basis for any mechanistic model describing the formation, transport and deposition of radioactive corrosion products. It is relevant to all water reactors in which the primary heat transfer medium is predominantly single-phase water and in which steam is generated in a secondary circuit, i.e. including CANDU pressurised heavy water reactors, Sovient VVERs, etc. (author)

  5. The Psycho-sensorial Value of the Food Products – a Provocative Component in Purchase Decision

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magdalena Bobe

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The psycho-sensorial value is a specific, complex and determinant concept of the food products that is reflected by means of psycho-sensorial properties such as: shape, size, aspect, colour, taste, smell, fragrance, bouquet, density, clarity. The assessment of these properties by the consumers is decisive for the acceptance or the rejection of foods and classifies the products into savoury, or non-savoury, attractive, indifferent, or unattractive. The psycho-sensorial features of food products allow us to make quick assessments of their qualities, but with a high degree of subjectivity among the common consumers and big individual variations, assessments that are highly influenced by the hedonic value of food products. The sensory analysis of foods is part of the modern analytical methods: when correctly and scientifically applied, it allows a real assessment of the quality of these products, evaluation which could not be obtained only by assessing physicochemical and microbiological methods. However, the scientific methods for sensorial assessment have a higher degree of objectivity and are used successfully in industry and trade, in evaluating the qualitative level of foods by authorised and qualified people. Otherwise, the design of the psycho-sensorial value of food products involves tests and sensorial analyses and has as main objective the establishment of concordances among the consumers’ demands and the level of the sensorial characteristics of the products. The present paper aims at underlining the necessity to design the psycho-sensorial value of processed foods, as well as the importance of educating and informing the consumers for a better capacity to get oriented on the market, and implicitly, for a right purchase decision.

  6. Modern microbial solid state fermentation technology for future biorefineries for the production of added-value products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Musaalbakri Abdul Manan

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The promise of industrial biotechnology has been around since Chaim Weizmann developed acetone–butanol–ethanol fermentation at the University of Manchester in 1917 and the prospects nowadays look brighter than ever. Today’s biorefinery technologies would be almost unthinkable without biotechnology. This is a growing trend and biorefineries have also increased in importance in agriculture and the food industry. Novel biorefinery processes using solid state fermentation (SSF technology have been developed as alternative to conventional processing routes, leading to the production of added-value products from agriculture and food industry raw materials. SSF involves the growth of microorganisms on moist solid substrate in the absence of free-flowing water. Future biorefineries based on SSF aim to exploit the vast complexity of the technology to modify biomass produced by agriculture and the food industry for valuable by-products through microbial bioconversion. In this review, a summary has been made of the attempts at using modern microbial SSF technology for future biorefineries for the production of many added-value products ranging from feedstock for the fermentation process and biodegradable plastics to fuels and chemicals.

  7. Lignin depolymerization and upgrading via fast pyrolysis and electrocatalysis for the production of liquid fuels and value-added products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garedew, Mahlet

    The production of liquid hydrocarbon fuels from biomass is needed to replace fossil fuels, which are decreasing in supply at an unsustainable rate. Renewable fuels also address the rising levels of greenhouse gases, an issue for which the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change implicated humanity in 2013. In response, the Energy Independence and Security Act (EISA) mandates the production of 21 billion gallons of advanced biofuels by 2022. Biomass fast pyrolysis (BFP) uses heat (400-600 °C) without oxygen to convert biomass to liquids fuel precursors offering an alternative to fossil fuels and a means to meet the EISA mandate. The major product, bio-oil, can be further upgraded to liquid hydrocarbon fuels, while biochar can serve as a solid fuel or soil amendment. The combustible gas co-product is typically burned for process heat. Though the most valuable of the pyrolysis products, the liquid bio-oil is highly oxygenated, corrosive, low in energy content and unstable during storage. As a means of improving bio-oil properties, electrocatalytic hydrogenation (ECH) is employed to reduce and deoxygenate reactive compounds. This work specifically focuses on lignin as a feed material for BFP. As lignin comprises up to 30% of the mass and 40% of the energy stored in biomass, it offers great potential for the production of liquid fuels and value-added products by utilizing fast pyrolysis as a conversion method coupled with electrocatalysis as an upgrading method.

  8. The role of value-informed pricing in market-oriented product innovation management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ingenbleek, P.; Frambach, R.T.; Verhallen, T.M.M.

    2010-01-01

    Although the positive effect of a market orientation on new product success is widely accepted and the market orientation literature has increased its understanding of how a market orientation leads to performance, the extant literature has overlooked the role of value-informed pricing in the

  9. The Role of Value-Informed Pricing in Market-Oriented Product Innovation Management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ingenbleek, P.T.M.; Frambach, R.T.; Verhallen, Th.M.M.

    2010-01-01

    Although the positive effect of a market orientation on new product success is widely accepted and the market orientation literature has increased its understanding of how a market orientation leads to performance, the extant literature has overlooked the role of value-informed pricing in the

  10. Production facility site selection factors for Texas value-added wood producers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Judd H. Michael; Joanna Teitel; James E. Granskog

    1998-01-01

    Value-added wood products manufacturers serve an important role in the economies of many U.S. regions and are therefore sought after by entities such as economic development agencies. The reasons why certain locations for a prospective prodution facility would be more attractive to secondary wood industry producers are not clearly understood. Therefore, this research...

  11. High value co-products from wine byproducts (II): polyphenols and antioxidant activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Femenia, A.; Gonzalez-Centeno, M. R.; Garau, M. C.; Sastre-Serrano, G.; Rosello, C.

    2009-07-01

    The by-products of the grape/wine industry have recently attracted considerable interest as important sources of high-value antioxidants. these can be extracted from stems, such as resveratrol,and from grape pomace which contains polyphenols, procyanidin and antrocyanins. (Author)

  12. Value creation strategies in credence food productions. The case of organic farming in Italy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pascucci, S.; Capitanio, F.; Giudice, Del T.

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we analyse different strategies used by Italian organic farmers to create value from credence food production. More specifically, we consider the following strategies: participation in policy support programmes (i.e. rural development measures and agro-environmental schemes), direct

  13. Increasing the Value of Agricultural Products in the Face of Global ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Paper examined the increasing value of agricultural products in the face of global economic recession in Anambra State. The paper revealed that Anambra State is endowed with human and natural resources and if properly harnessed, can go a long way in arresting the food insecurity in the State and alleviate the ...

  14. Productivity and nutritive value of three grass-legume mixtures in the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Productivity and nutritive value of three grass-legume mixtures in the Sudan savannah zone Kano state, Nigeria. ... Results of the study indicated that Sorghum almum-Lablab purpureus mixture recorded numerically higher dry matter yield (7806 kg dm/hectare) compared to other mixtures, similarly leaf area for grass (46.4) ...

  15. Greenhouse gas and carbon profile of the U.S. forest products industry value chain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linda S. Heath; Van Maltby; Reid Miner; Kenneth E. Skog; James E. Smith; Jay Unwin; Brad Upton

    2010-01-01

    A greenhouse gas and carbon accounting profile was developed for the U.S. forest products industry value chain for 1990 and 2004-2005 by examining net atmospheric fluxes of CO2 and other greenhouse gases (GHGs) using a variety of methods and data sources. Major GHG emission sources include direct and indirect (from purchased electricity...

  16. American and Chinese Similarities and Differences in Defining and Valuing Creative Products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lan, Lan; Kaufman, James C.

    2012-01-01

    This review of the literature explores how Americans and Chinese view creativity and what they expect from creative products. American and Chinese explicit beliefs about creativity (i.e., expert opinions) share many similarities. Implicit beliefs, however, show more divergence: Americans tend to value novelty and more "groundbreaking"…

  17. Behaviour of fission products in PWR primary coolant and defected fuel rods evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bourgeois, P.; Stora, J.P.

    1979-01-01

    The activity surveillance of the PWR primary coolant by γ spectometry gives some informations on fuel failures. The activity of different nuclides e.g. Xenons, Kryptons, Iodines, can be correlated with the number of the defected fuel rods. Therefore the precharacterization with eventually a prelocalization of the related fuel assemblies direct the sipping-test and allows a saving of time during refueling. A model is proposed to calculate the number of the defected rods from the activity measurements of the primary coolant. A semi-empirical model of the release of the fission products has been built from the activity measurements of the primary coolant in a 900 MWe PWR. This model allows to calculate the number of the defected rods and also a typical parameter of the mean damage. Fission product release is described by three stages: release from uranium dioxide, transport across the gas gap and behaviour in the primary coolant. The model of release from the oxide considers a diffusion process in the grains with trapping. The release then occurs either directly to free surfaces or with a delay due to a transit into closed porosity of the oxide. The amount released is the same for iodine and rare gas. With the gas gap transit is associated a transport time and a probability of trapping for the iodines. In the primary coolant the purification and the radioactive decay are considered. (orig.)

  18. The co-production of what? Knowledge, values, and social relations in health care.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela Filipe

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available "Co-production" is becoming an increasingly popular term in policymaking, governance, and research. While the shift from engagement and involvement to co-production in health care holds the promise of revolutionising health services and research, it is not always evident what counts as co-production: what is being produced, under what circumstances, and with what implications for participants. We discuss these questions and propose that co-production can be understood as an exploratory space and a generative process that leads to different, and sometimes unexpected, forms of knowledge, values, and social relations. By opening up this discussion, we hope to stimulate future debates on co-production as well as draw out ways of thinking differently about collaboration and participation in health care and research. Part of the title of this article is inspired by the book "The Social Construction of What?" by Ian Hacking (Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press; 2000.

  19. A “value for money” framework to study product competitiveness in the automotive market

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. lo Storto

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Assessing the value for money of a product is of paramount importance to get useful strategic information relative to market and technological trends and major determinants of technological innovation, and to conduct benchmarking studies and make comparison among competitive products. This paper note presents a methodological “value for money” framework to assess the market competitiveness of a passenger car. This framework uses both published data and industry expert judgements. In this framework, the value for money of a car is assumed to be dependent on the economic cost (i.e., price and fuel consumption that the consumer has to bear when using it, and on the car technical value (PTV which is built as a function of certain measurable features of the product. The framework is adopted to analyse a sample of 216 cars that were sold in the Italian domestic market between the 70s and the early 90s. The relationship between the car technical value, price, and fuel consumption is investigated using a translog regression equation.

  20. Formulation of gluten-free flour culinary products of high nutritional value

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. P. Dombrovskaya

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The article is devoted to the production of gluten-free foods that are necessary for people suffering from this disease as celiac disease. The article reveals the relevance of developing recipes for gluten-free foods, which are not inferior to traditional in many respects. Classic recipes gluten-free bakery products, mainly based on rice, buckwheat, corn flour, which have little nutritional value. In this regard, the current development of technologies and formulations pastry dishes with use of nonconventional vegetable raw materials rich in dietary fibers, proteins and other beneficial substances that improve the biological and nutritional value of these products. The paper describes the formulation of gluten-free muffins, was based on the recipe of the cake "Capital". The main raw material for the new compositions of selected rice flour, and as enriching additives – flax flour and flour from the eggshell. Was conducted baking tests on the basis of which was chosen percentage of the input substances and the assessment of quality of semifinished and finished products. The quality of semi-finished products was evaluated by such indicators as humidity and the microstructure of the test. The quality of finished products was assessed using organoleptic and physical-chemical parameters, the results presented in the tables. Investigated the antioxidant activity of products. Produced sensometrical evaluation of aroma of control and experimental samples. Calculated chemical composition. The content of protein, vitamins, mineral substances in the experimental sample is significantly increased compared to control. Making flour egg shell has achieved the ratio of Ca-Mg-P as close to a perfect 1:0,39:1,53 Replacement of wheat flour with flaxseed and rice flour and the introduction of egg shell improve the amino acid composition of the product. The biological value increased by 2.3%.