WorldWideScience

Sample records for primary flow structures

  1. Primary volcanic structures from a type section of Deccan Trap flows ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Swanson 1967; Macdonald 1967; Long and Wood. Keywords. Deccan Traps; lava flows; volcanism; isotherm; cooling history. J. Earth Syst. Sci. 115, No. ...... Kilauea Volcanic island of Hawaii; J. Geophys. Res. 103. 27,303–27,323. Lightfoot ...

  2. Primary vesicles, vesicle-rich segregation structures and recognition of primary and secondary porosities in lava flows from the Paraná igneous province, southern Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barreto, Carla Joana S.; de Lima, Evandro F.; Goldberg, Karin

    2017-04-01

    This study focuses on a volcanic succession of pāhoehoe to rubbly lavas of the Paraná-Etendeka Province exposed in a single road profile in southernmost Brazil. This work provides an integrated approach for examining primary vesicles and vesicle-rich segregation structures at the mesoscopic scale. In addition, this study provides a quantitative analysis of pore types in thin section. We documented distinct distribution patterns of vesicle and vesicle-rich segregation structures according to lava thickness. In compound pāhoehoe lavas, the cooling allows only vesicles (pipe vesicles to be frozen into place. In inflated pāhoehoe lavas, vesicles of different sizes are common, including pipe vesicles, and also segregation structures such as proto-cylinders, cylinders, cylinder sheets, vesicle sheets, and pods. In rubbly lavas, only vesicles of varying sizes occur. Gas release from melt caused the formation of primary porosity, while hydrothermal alteration and tectonic fracturing are the main processes that generated secondary porosity. Although several forms of porosity were created in the basaltic lava flows, the precipitation of secondary minerals within the pores has tended to reduce the original porosities. Late-stage fractures could create efficient channel networks for possible hydrocarbon/groundwater migration and entrapment owing to their ability to connect single pores. Quantitative permeability data should be gathered in future studies to confirm the potential of these lavas for store hydrocarbons or groundwater.

  3. Bellefonte primary containment structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olyniec, J.H.

    1981-01-01

    Construction of the reactor building primary containment structure at the Bellefonte Nuclear Plant involved several specialized construction techniques. This two unit plant is one of the nine nuclear units at six different sites now under construction by the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA). The post-Tensioned, cast-in-place interior steel lined containment structure is unique within TVA. Problems during construction were identified at weekly planning meetings, and options were discussed. Close coordination between craft supervisors and on-site engineering personnel drew together ''hands-on''experience and technical background. Details of the construction techniques, problems, and solutions are presented

  4. Structural power flow measurement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Falter, K.J.; Keltie, R.F.

    1988-12-01

    Previous investigations of structural power flow through beam-like structures resulted in some unexplained anomalies in the calculated data. In order to develop structural power flow measurement as a viable technique for machine tool design, the causes of these anomalies needed to be found. Once found, techniques for eliminating the errors could be developed. Error sources were found in the experimental apparatus itself as well as in the instrumentation. Although flexural waves are the carriers of power in the experimental apparatus, at some frequencies longitudinal waves were excited which were picked up by the accelerometers and altered power measurements. Errors were found in the phase and gain response of the sensors and amplifiers used for measurement. A transfer function correction technique was employed to compensate for these instrumentation errors.

  5. Structures in the primary spectrum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kempa, J.; Knurenko, S.P.; Malecki, R.

    2009-01-01

    Structures in the energy spectrum of primary cosmic rays at the 'knee' region and for energies higher than 1 EeV are obtained through studying extensive air showers (EAS). The main problem of the research is the fact that we work in the ranges of highly fluctuating parameters used to obtain the primary energy spectrum. In this paper the log-normal distribution for the error function has been used in convolution with the power spectrum to explain the Yakutsk experimental data. Similar results have been obtained for the gamma distribution as the error function. Using the power law primary spectrum in the energy region around 10 19 eV we will argue that the primary Yakutsk spectrum is overestimated. In the best case this overestimation is not less than 42%.

  6. Malaysia commercial energy flow: status and structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ridzuan Abdul Mutalib; Maragatham Kumar; Nik Arlina Nik Ali; Abi Muttaqin Jalal Bayar; Aisya Raihan Abdul Kadir; Muhammed Zulfakar Zolkaffly; Azlinda Aziz; Jamal Khaer Ibrahim

    2008-08-01

    With further growth of Malaysia economy, future development of the energy sector in Malaysia is vital to ensure targeted growth. Commercial Energy continues to play a major role in ensuring a balanced energy mix for power generation due to a potential increase in energy demand from various sectors, especially the industrial sector. This paper presents the status and structure of Malaysia Commercial Energy Flow, which gives an overview of the flow of all types of energy sources from primary energy supply to final energy use, and also the potential for nuclear power in electricity generation in Malaysia. (Author)

  7. Structure - Riverine Flow Structure (Dike/Wingdam)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Army Corps of Engineers, Department of the Army, Department of Defense — A natural or man-made flow (or sediment) control structure in a water course or water body such as a dike or weir. This feature should not be used to model a levee....

  8. Flow Control of Flexible Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-06

    levels of modeling [Dowell and Hall, 2001]. Fur- thermore, even for the most complex models, the main research goal has been a mathe - matical description...possibility for localized, discrete actuation to coun- teract detrimental flow developments before they result in significant structural loads and

  9. The flow measurement plan for the primary system of SMART

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jun; Seo, J. K.; Park, C. T.; Yoon, J. H.; Cho, B. H.; Lee, D. J.

    2001-08-01

    It is the common features of the integrated reactor that the main components of the primary system are installed within the reactor vessel, and so there are no any flow pipes connecting the reactor coolant pumps or steam generators. Due to no any flow pipes, it is impossible to measure the differential pressure at the primary system of the integrated reactor, and it also makes impossible measure the primary coolant flow rate. SMART is also a integrated reactor type, and have a problem as same as the above case. The objective of the study is to draw up the flow measurement plan for the primary system of SMART. In this study, firstly we reviewed the flow measurement methods at the primary system for the existing commercial nuclear power reactors. As a result of the review, we selected preliminarily the 3 methods which is a good possibility of application to SMART. The 3 methods are as follows. Flow measurement method by MCP rotation speed, flow measurement method by HBM, flow measurement method by pump motor power. For the above methods, we have evaluated whether they actually can be applied to SMART, and also have set up the concrete methodology. Finally we have made a selection of the above methods as the flow measurement plan for the primary system of SMART. Peculiarly, we did not found out a precedent which the direct pump motor power-flow rate curve is used as the flow measurement method in the existing commercial nuclear power reactors. Therefore, to use this method for SMART, it is needed to bear the follow-up measures in mind. The follow-up measures is included in this report

  10. Structuring of Road Traffic Flows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Planko Rožić

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Systemic traffic count on the Croatian road network hasbeen carried out for more than three decades in different ways.During this period a large number of automatic traffic countershave been installed, and they operate on different principles.The traffic count has been analyzed from the aspect of vehicleclassification. The count results can be only partly comparedsince they yield different structures of traffic flows. Special analysisrefers to the classification of vehicles by automatic trafficcounters.During the research, a database has been formed with physicalelements of vehicles of over five thousand vehicle types. Theresearch results prove that the vehicle length only is not sufficientfor the classification of vehicles, the way it is used in thepresent automatic traffic counts, but rather the number of axles,the wheelbase as well as the front and rear overhangs needto be considered as well. Therefore, the detector system shouldapply also the detector of axles.The results have been presented that were obtained as partof the program TEST- Technological, research, developmentproject supported by the Minist1y of Science, Education andSport.

  11. 3D Printing of Fluid Flow Structures

    OpenAIRE

    Taira, Kunihiko; Sun, Yiyang; Canuto, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    We discuss the use of 3D printing to physically visualize (materialize) fluid flow structures. Such 3D models can serve as a refreshing hands-on means to gain deeper physical insights into the formation of complex coherent structures in fluid flows. In this short paper, we present a general procedure for taking 3D flow field data and producing a file format that can be supplied to a 3D printer, with two examples of 3D printed flow structures. A sample code to perform this process is also prov...

  12. Modal Structures in flow past a cylinder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murshed, Mohammad

    2017-11-01

    With the advent of data, there have been opportunities to apply formalism to detect patterns or simple relations. For instance, a phenomenon can be defined through a partial differential equation which may not be very useful right away, whereas a formula for the evolution of a primary variable may be interpreted quite easily. Having access to data is not enough to move on since doing advanced linear algebra can put strain on the way computations are being done. A canonical problem in the field of aerodynamics is the transient flow past a cylinder where the viscosity can be adjusted to set the Reynolds number (Re). We observe the effect of the critical Re on the certain modes of behavior in time scale. A 2D-velocity field works as an input to analyze the modal structure of the flow using the Proper Orthogonal Decomposition and Koopman Mode/Dynamic Mode Decomposition. This will enable prediction of the solution further in time (taking into account the dependence on Re) and help us evaluate and discuss the associated error in the mechanism.

  13. Regional cerebral blood flow in primary degenerative dementia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawakatsu, Shinobu; Totsuka, Shiro; Shinohara, Masao; Koyama, Hideki; Sagawa, Katsuo; Morinobu, Shigeru; Oiji, Arata; Komatani, Akio

    1991-01-01

    Regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) was examined, using SPECT by Xe-133 inhalation, in patients with primary degenerative dementia who were subgrouped according to predominant symptoms with respect to amnesia, apraxia, agnosia, aphasia, and personality changes. Also the effect of sex and age at dementia onset on the rCBF patterns was assessed. (author). 26 refs.; 1 fig.; 7 tabs

  14. Beyond lognormal inequality: The Lorenz Flow Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eliazar, Iddo

    2016-11-01

    Observed from a socioeconomic perspective, the intrinsic inequality of the lognormal law happens to manifest a flow generated by an underlying ordinary differential equation. In this paper we extend this feature of the lognormal law to a general ;Lorenz Flow Structure; of Lorenz curves-objects that quantify socioeconomic inequality. The Lorenz Flow Structure establishes a general framework of size distributions that span continuous spectra of socioeconomic states ranging from the pure-communism extreme to the absolute-monarchy extreme. This study introduces and explores the Lorenz Flow Structure, analyzes its statistical properties and its inequality properties, unveils the unique role of the lognormal law within this general structure, and presents various examples of this general structure. Beyond the lognormal law, the examples include the inverse-Pareto and Pareto laws-which often govern the tails of composite size distributions.

  15. Flow and scour around vertical submerged structures

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The safety of the foundations of submerged hydraulic structures due to excessive local scour is threatened by the erosive action of the waves and currents passing around these structures. Fish and aquatic habitat is seriously affected due to the modification of the flow field caused by these submerged structures. Hence, the ...

  16. Oscillatory fluid flow influences primary cilia and microtubule mechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espinha, Lina C; Hoey, David A; Fernandes, Paulo R; Rodrigues, Hélder C; Jacobs, Christopher R

    2014-07-01

    Many tissues are sensitive to mechanical stimuli; however, the mechanotransduction mechanism used by cells remains unknown in many cases. The primary cilium is a solitary, immotile microtubule-based extension present on nearly every mammalian cell which extends from the basal body. The cilium is a mechanosensitive organelle and has been shown to transduce fluid flow-induced shear stress in tissues, such as the kidney and bone. The majority of microtubules assemble from the mother centriole (basal body), contributing significantly to the anchoring of the primary cilium. Several studies have attempted to quantify the number of microtubules emanating from the basal body and the results vary depending on the cell type. It has also been shown that cellular response to shear stress depends on microtubular integrity. This study hypothesizes that changing the microtubule attachment of primary cilia in response to a mechanical stimulus could change primary cilia mechanics and, possibly, mechanosensitivity. Oscillatory fluid flow was applied to two different cell types and the microtubule attachment to the ciliary base was quantified. For the first time, an increase in microtubules around primary cilia both with time and shear rate in response to oscillatory fluid flow stimulation was demonstrated. Moreover, it is presented that the primary cilium is required for this loading-induced cellular response. This study has demonstrated a new role for the cilium in regulating alterations in the cytoplasmic microtubule network in response to mechanical stimulation, and therefore provides a new insight into how cilia may regulate its mechanics and thus the cells mechanosensitivity. Copyright © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Pressure fluctuation characteristics of flow field of mixed flow nuclear primary pump

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Chunlin; Yang Xiaoyong; Li Changjun; Jia Fei; Zhao Binjuan

    2013-01-01

    In order to research the pressure fluctuation characteristics of flow field of mixed flow nuclear primary pump, this study used the technique of ANSYS-Workbench and CFX fluid solid heat coupling to do numerical simulation analysis for model pump. According to the situation of pressure fluctuation of time domain and frequency domain, the main cause of pressure fluctuation was discussed. For different flow, the pressure fluctuations were compared. This study shows it is feasible that large eddy simulation method is used for the research of pressure fluctuation. The pressure fluctuation amplitudes of four sections are increasing from wheel hub to wheel rim. The pressure fluctuation of inlet and outlet of impeller depends on the rotational frequency of impeller. Along with the fluid flowing away from the impeller, the effect of the impeller on the fluid pressure fluctuation weakens gradually. Comparing the different results of three flow conditions, the pressure fluctuation in design condition flow is superior to the others. (authors)

  18. Flow-induced structure in colloidal suspensions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vermant, J [Department of Chemical Engineering, K U Leuven, W de Croylaan 46, B-3001 Leuven (Belgium); Solomon, M J [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-2136 (United States)

    2005-02-02

    We review the sequences of structural states that can be induced in colloidal suspensions by the application of flow. Structure formation during flow is strongly affected by the delicate balance among interparticle forces, Brownian motion and hydrodynamic interactions. The resulting non-equilibrium microstructure is in turn a principal determinant of the suspension rheology. Colloidal suspensions with near hard-sphere interactions develop an anisotropic, amorphous structure at low dimensionless shear rates. At high rates, clustering due to strong hydrodynamic forces leads to shear thickening rheology. Application of steady-shear flow to suspensions with repulsive interactions induces a rich sequence of transitions to one-, two-and three-dimensional order. Oscillatory-shear flow generates metastable ordering in suspensions with equilibrium liquid structure. On the other hand, short-range attractive interactions can lead to a fluid-to-gel transition under quiescent suspensions. Application of flow leads to orientation, breakup, densification and spatial reorganization of aggregates. Using a non-Newtonian suspending medium leads to additional possibilities for organization. We examine the extent to which theory and simulation have yielded mechanistic understanding of the microstructural transitions that have been observed. (topical review)

  19. Network structure of subway passenger flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Q.; Mao, B. H.; Bai, Y.

    2016-03-01

    The results of transportation infrastructure network analyses have been used to analyze complex networks in a topological context. However, most modeling approaches, including those based on complex network theory, do not fully account for real-life traffic patterns and may provide an incomplete view of network functions. This study utilizes trip data obtained from the Beijing Subway System to characterize individual passenger movement patterns. A directed weighted passenger flow network was constructed from the subway infrastructure network topology by incorporating trip data. The passenger flow networks exhibit several properties that can be characterized by power-law distributions based on flow size, and log-logistic distributions based on the fraction of boarding and departing passengers. The study also characterizes the temporal patterns of in-transit and waiting passengers and provides a hierarchical clustering structure for passenger flows. This hierarchical flow organization varies in the spatial domain. Ten cluster groups were identified, indicating a hierarchical urban polycentric structure composed of large concentrated flows at urban activity centers. These empirical findings provide insights regarding urban human mobility patterns within a large subway network.

  20. Structure and kinematics of bubble flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lackme, C.

    1967-01-01

    This report deals with the components and use of resistivity probes in bubble flow. With a single probe, we have studied the longitudinal and radial structure of the flow. The very complicated evolution of the radial structure is shown by the measurement of the mean bubble flux at several points in the tube. A double probe associated with a device the principle of which is given in this report, permits the measure of the local velocity of bubbles. Unlike the mean bubble flux profile, the change in the velocity profile along the tube is not significant. We have achieved the synthesis of these two pieces of information, mean local bubble flux and local velocity, by computing the mean weighed velocity in the tube. This weighed velocity compares remarkably with the velocity computed from the volumetric gas flow rate and the mean void fraction. (author) [fr

  1. Power Flow and Structure-Borne Noise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wachulec, Marcin

    The method of power flow analysis within a structure depends on the frequency considered. For the low frequencies the standard Finite Element Method (FEM) can be used efficiently. In the high frequencies the Statistical Energy Analysis (SEA) proved its usefulness. The distinction between low and ...

  2. Internal wave structures in abyssal cataract flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makarenko, Nikolay; Liapidevskii, Valery; Morozov, Eugene; Tarakanov, Roman

    2014-05-01

    We discuss some theoretical approaches, experimental results and field data concerning wave phenomena in ocean near-bottom stratified flows. Such strong flows of cold water form everywhere in the Atlantic abyssal channels, and these currents play significant role in the global water exchange. Most interesting wave structures arise in a powerful cataract flows near orographic obstacles which disturb gravity currents by forced lee waves, attached hydraulic jumps, mixing layers etc. All these effects were observed by the authors in the Romanche and Chain fracture zones of Atlantic Ocean during recent cruises of the R/V Akademik Ioffe and R/V Akademik Sergei Vavilov (Morozov et al., Dokl. Earth Sci., 2012, 446(2)). In a general way, deep-water cataract flows down the slope are similar to the stratified flows examined in laboratory experiments. Strong mixing in the sill region leads to the splitting of the gravity current into the layers having the fluids with different densities. Another peculiarity is the presence of critical layers in shear flows sustained over the sill. In the case under consideration, this critical level separates the flow of near-bottom cold water from opposite overflow. In accordance with known theoretical models and laboratory measurements, the critical layer can absorb and reflect internal waves generated by the topography, so the upward propagation of these perturbations is blocked from above. High velocity gradients were registered downstream in the vicinity of cataract and it indicates the existence of developed wave structures beyond the sill formed by intense internal waves. This work was supported by RFBR (grants No 12-01-00671-a, 12-08-10001-k and 13-08-10001-k).

  3. Turbulent structure of stably stratified inhomogeneous flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iida, Oaki

    2018-04-01

    Effects of buoyancy force stabilizing disturbances are investigated on the inhomogeneous flow where disturbances are dispersed from the turbulent to non-turbulent field in the direction perpendicular to the gravity force. Attaching the fringe region, where disturbances are excited by the artificial body force, a Fourier spectral method is used for the inhomogeneous flow stirred at one side of the cuboid computational box. As a result, it is found that the turbulent kinetic energy is dispersed as layered structures elongated in the streamwise direction through the vibrating motion. A close look at the layered structures shows that they are flanked by colder fluids at the top and hotter fluids at the bottom, and hence vertically compressed and horizontally expanded by the buoyancy related to the countergradient heat flux, though they are punctuated by the vertical expansion of fluids at the forefront of the layered structures, which is related to the downgradient heat flux, indicating that the layered structures are gravity currents. However, the phase between temperature fluctuations and vertical velocity is shifted by π/2 rad, indicating that temperature fluctuations are generated by the propagation of internal gravity waves.

  4. Flow structure in front of the broad-crested weir

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zachoval Zbyněk

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with research focused on description of flow structure in front of broad-crested weir. Based on experimental measurement, the flow structure in front of the weir (the recirculation zone of flow and tornado vortices and flow structure on the weir crest has been described. The determined flow character has been simulated using numerical model and based on comparing results the suitable model of turbulence has been recommended.

  5. Nuclear fuel assembly incorporating primary and secondary structural support members

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlson, W.R.; Gjertsen, R.K.; Miller, J.V.

    1987-01-01

    A nuclear fuel assembly, comprising: (a) an upper end structure; (b) a lower end structure; (c) elongated primary structural members extending longitudinally between and rigidly interconnecting the upper and lower end structures, the upper and lower end structures and primary structural members together forming a rigid structural skeleton of the fuel assembly; (d) transverse grids supported on the primary structural members at axially spaced locations therealong between the upper and lower end structures; (e) fuel rods extending through and supported by the grids between the upper and lower end structures so as to extend in generally side-by-side spaced relation to one another and to the primary structural members; and (f) elongated secondary structural members extending longitudinally between but unconnected with the upper and lower end structures, the secondary structural members extending through and rigidly interconnected with the grids to extend in generally side-by-side spaced relation to one another, to the fuel rods and to the primary structural members so as to bolster the stiffness of the structural skeleton of the fuel assembly

  6. Regional cerebral blood flow abnormalities in patients with primary hyperparathyroidism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cermik, Tevfik F.; Kaya, Meryem; Bedel, Deniz; Berkarda, Sakir; Yigitbasi, Oemer N.; Ugur-Altun, Betuel

    2007-01-01

    We assessed the alterations in regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) in patients with primary hyperparathyroidism (PHP) before parathyroidectomy by semiquantitative analysis of brain single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) images. Included in this prospective study were 14 patients (mean age 47.6 ± 10.4 years; 3 male, 11 female) and 10 control subjects (mean age 36.0 ± 8.5 years, 6 male, 4 female) were SPECT imaging was performed using a dual-headed gamma camera 60-90 min after intravenous administration of 925 MBq Tc-99m HMPAO. The corticocerebellar rCBF ratios were calculated from 52 brain areas and reference lower values (RLVs) were calculated from the rCBF ratios of control subjects. The regional ratios that were below the corresponding RLV were considered abnormal (hypoperfused). Hypoperfusion was shown in 171 out of 728 regions (23%) and there was a significant correlation between serum calcium, PTH levels and the sum of hypoperfused regions in the patient group (R = 0.75 and P = 0.001, and R = 0.75, P = 0.001, respectively). Significantly reduced rCBF were found in the following cortical regions: bilateral cingulate cortex, superior and inferior frontal cortex, anterior temporal cortex, precentral gyrus, postcentral gyrus and parietal cortex, and right posterior temporal cortex. Our results indicate that alterations in rCBF in patients with PHP can be demonstrated with brain SPECT. The correlation between serum calcium, PTH levels and the sum of hypoperfused regions indicates that there may be a strong relationship between rCBF abnormalities and increased levels of serum calcium and PTH. In addition, the degree of rCBF abnormalities could be determined by brain SPECT in PHP patients with or without psychiatric symptoms. (orig.)

  7. Flow cytometry of human primary epidermal and follicular keratinocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gragnani, Alfredo; Ipolito, Michelle Zampieri; Sobral, Christiane S; Brunialti, Milena Karina Coló; Salomão, Reinaldo; Ferreira, Lydia Masako

    2008-02-19

    The aim of this study was to characterize using flow cytometry cultured human primary keratinocytes isolated from the epidermis and hair follicles by different methods. Human keratinocytes derived from discarded fragments of total skin and scalp hair follicles from patients who underwent plastic surgery in the Plastic Surgery Division at UNIFESP were used. The epidermal keratinocytes were isolated by using 3 different methods: the standard method, upon exposure to trypsin for 30 minutes; the second, by treatment with dispase for 18 hours and with trypsin for 10 minutes; and the third, by treatment with dispase for 18 hours and with trypsin for 30 minutes. Follicular keratinocytes were isolated using the standard method. On comparing the group treated with dispase for 18 hours and with trypsin for 10 minutes with the group treated with dispase for 18 hours and with trypsin for 30 minutes, it was observed that the first group presented the largest number of viable cells, the smallest number of cells in late apoptosis and necrosis with statistical significance, and no difference in apoptosis. When we compared the group treated with dispase for 18 hours and with trypsin for 10 minutes with the group treated with trypsin, the first group presented the largest number of viable cells, the smallest number of cells in apoptosis with statistical significance, and no difference in late apoptosis and necrosis. When we compared the results of the group treated with dispase for 18 hours and with trypsin for 10 minutes with the results for follical isolation, there was a statistical difference in apoptosis and viable cells. The isolation method of treatment with dispase for 18 hours and with trypsin for 10 minutes produced the largest number of viable cells and the smallest number of cells in apoptosis/necrosis.

  8. Regional cerebral blood flow abnormalities in patients with primary hyperparathyroidism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cermik, Tevfik F. [Hospital of the University of Trakya, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Edirne (Turkey); Trakya Universitesi Hastanesi, Nukleer Tip Anabilim Dali, Gullapoglu Yerleskesi, Edirne (Turkey); Kaya, Meryem; Bedel, Deniz; Berkarda, Sakir; Yigitbasi, Oemer N. [Hospital of the University of Trakya, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Edirne (Turkey); Ugur-Altun, Betuel [Hospital of the University of Trakya, Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Endocrinology, Edirne (Turkey)

    2007-04-15

    We assessed the alterations in regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) in patients with primary hyperparathyroidism (PHP) before parathyroidectomy by semiquantitative analysis of brain single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) images. Included in this prospective study were 14 patients (mean age 47.6 {+-} 10.4 years; 3 male, 11 female) and 10 control subjects (mean age 36.0 {+-} 8.5 years, 6 male, 4 female) were SPECT imaging was performed using a dual-headed gamma camera 60-90 min after intravenous administration of 925 MBq Tc-99m HMPAO. The corticocerebellar rCBF ratios were calculated from 52 brain areas and reference lower values (RLVs) were calculated from the rCBF ratios of control subjects. The regional ratios that were below the corresponding RLV were considered abnormal (hypoperfused). Hypoperfusion was shown in 171 out of 728 regions (23%) and there was a significant correlation between serum calcium, PTH levels and the sum of hypoperfused regions in the patient group (R = 0.75 and P = 0.001, and R = 0.75, P = 0.001, respectively). Significantly reduced rCBF were found in the following cortical regions: bilateral cingulate cortex, superior and inferior frontal cortex, anterior temporal cortex, precentral gyrus, postcentral gyrus and parietal cortex, and right posterior temporal cortex. Our results indicate that alterations in rCBF in patients with PHP can be demonstrated with brain SPECT. The correlation between serum calcium, PTH levels and the sum of hypoperfused regions indicates that there may be a strong relationship between rCBF abnormalities and increased levels of serum calcium and PTH. In addition, the degree of rCBF abnormalities could be determined by brain SPECT in PHP patients with or without psychiatric symptoms. (orig.)

  9. The flows structure in unsteady gas flow in pipes with different cross-sections

    OpenAIRE

    Plotnikov Leonid; Nevolin Alexandr; Nikolaev Dmitrij

    2017-01-01

    The results of numerical simulation and experimental study of the structure of unsteady flows in pipes with different cross sections are presented in the article. It is shown that the unsteady gas flow in a circular pipe is axisymmetric without secondary currents. Steady vortex structures (secondary flows) are observed in pipes with cross sections in the form of a square and an equilateral triangle. It was found that these secondary flows have a significant impact on gas flows in pipes of com...

  10. Adaptive compliant structures for flow regulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brinkmeyer, Alex; Theunissen, Raf; M. Weaver, Paul; Pirrera, Alberto

    2017-01-01

    This paper introduces conceptual design principles for a novel class of adaptive structures that provide both flow regulation and control. While of general applicability, these design principles, which revolve around the idea of using the instabilities and elastically nonlinear behaviour of post-buckled panels, are exemplified through a case study: the design of a shape-adaptive air inlet. The inlet comprises a deformable post-buckled member that changes shape depending on the pressure field applied by the surrounding fluid, thereby regulating the inlet aperture. By tailoring the stress field in the post-buckled state and the geometry of the initial, stress-free configuration, the deformable section can snap through to close or open the inlet completely. Owing to its inherent ability to change shape in response to external stimuli—i.e. the aerodynamic loads imposed by different operating conditions—the inlet does not have to rely on linkages and mechanisms for actuation, unlike conventional flow-controlling devices. PMID:28878567

  11. The CFRP primary structure of the MIRI instrument onboard the James Webb Space Telescope

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jessen, Niels Christian; Nørgaard-Nielsen, Hans Ulrik; Schroll, J

    2004-01-01

    The design of the Primary Structure of the Mid Infra-Red Instrument (MIRI) onboard the NASA/ESA James Webb Space Telescope will be presented. The main design driver is the energy flow from the 35 K "hot" satellite interface to the 7 K "cold" MIRI interface. Carbon fibre reinforced plastic (CFRP...

  12. Flow-induced vibrations of circular cylindrical structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, S.

    1977-06-01

    The problems of flow-induced vibrations of circular cylindrical structures are reviewed. First, the general method of analysis and classification of structural responses are presented. Then, the presentation is broken up along the lines with stationary fluid, parallel flow, and cross flow. Finally, design considerations and future research needs are pointed out. 234 references

  13. The european primary care monitor: structure, process and outcome indicators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilson Andrew

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Scientific research has provided evidence on benefits of well developed primary care systems. The relevance of some of this research for the European situation is limited. There is currently a lack of up to date comprehensive and comparable information on variation in development of primary care, and a lack of knowledge of structures and strategies conducive to strengthening primary care in Europe. The EC funded project Primary Health Care Activity Monitor for Europe (PHAMEU aims to fill this gap by developing a Primary Care Monitoring System (PC Monitor for application in 31 European countries. This article describes the development of the indicators of the PC Monitor, which will make it possible to create an alternative model for holistic analyses of primary care. Methods A systematic review of the primary care literature published between 2003 and July 2008 was carried out. This resulted in an overview of: (1 the dimensions of primary care and their relevance to outcomes at (primary health system level; (2 essential features per dimension; (3 applied indicators to measure the features of primary care dimensions. The indicators were evaluated by the project team against criteria of relevance, precision, flexibility, and discriminating power. The resulting indicator set was evaluated on its suitability for Europe-wide comparison of primary care systems by a panel of primary care experts from various European countries (representing a variety of primary care systems. Results The developed PC Monitor approaches primary care in Europe as a multidimensional concept. It describes the key dimensions of primary care systems at three levels: structure, process, and outcome level. On structure level, it includes indicators for governance, economic conditions, and workforce development. On process level, indicators describe access, comprehensiveness, continuity, and coordination of primary care services. On outcome level, indicators

  14. The flow measurement methods for the primary system of integral reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, J.; Seo, J. K.; Lee, D. J.

    2001-01-01

    It is the common features of the integral reactors that the main components of the primary system are installed within the reactor vessel, and so there are no any flow pipes connecting the reactor coolant pumps or steam generators. Due to no any flow pipes, it is impossible to measure the differential pressure at the primary system of the integral reactors, and it also makes impossible measure the primary coolant flow rate. The objective of the study is to draw up the flow measurement methods for the primary system of integral reactors. As a result of the review, we have made a selection of the flow measurement method by pump speed, bt HBM, and by pump motor power as the flow measurement methods for the primary system of integral reactors. Peculiarly, we did not found out a precedent which the direct pump motor power-flow rate curve is used as the flow measurement method in the existing commercial nuclear power reactors. Therefore, to use this method for integral reactors, it is needed to bear the follow-up measures in mind. The follow-up measures is included in this report

  15. Vascular structure determines pulmonary blood flow distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hlastala, M. P.; Glenny, R. W.

    1999-01-01

    Scientific knowledge develops through the evolution of new concepts. This process is usually driven by new methodologies that provide observations not previously available. Understanding of pulmonary blood flow determinants advanced significantly in the 1960s and is now changing rapidly again, because of increased spatial resolution of regional pulmonary blood flow measurements.

  16. Criteria for the selection of PEC primary circuit structural material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antoni, R.; Brunori, G.; Maesa, S.; Scibona, G.; Tomassetti, G.

    1977-01-01

    The choice of the structural materials is generally a compromise between the project requirements, the characteristics (mechanical and environmental) of the materials and the available technology to construct the various parts of the components. The criteria of selection of structural materials for the primary circuit of fast reactor are reported. The criteria concern both general and utilization aspects

  17. Complex networks from experimental horizontal oil–water flows: Community structure detection versus flow pattern discrimination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao, Zhong-Ke; Fang, Peng-Cheng; Ding, Mei-Shuang; Yang, Dan; Jin, Ning-De

    2015-01-01

    We propose a complex network-based method to distinguish complex patterns arising from experimental horizontal oil–water two-phase flow. We first use the adaptive optimal kernel time–frequency representation (AOK TFR) to characterize flow pattern behaviors from the energy and frequency point of view. Then, we infer two-phase flow complex networks from experimental measurements and detect the community structures associated with flow patterns. The results suggest that the community detection in two-phase flow complex network allows objectively discriminating complex horizontal oil–water flow patterns, especially for the segregated and dispersed flow patterns, a task that existing method based on AOK TFR fails to work. - Highlights: • We combine time–frequency analysis and complex network to identify flow patterns. • We explore the transitional flow behaviors in terms of betweenness centrality. • Our analysis provides a novel way for recognizing complex flow patterns. • Broader applicability of our method is demonstrated and articulated

  18. Chaotic Flows Correlation effects and coherent structures

    CERN Document Server

    Bakunin, Oleg G

    2011-01-01

    The book introduces readers to and summarizes the current ideas and theories about the basic mechanisms for transport in chaotic flows. Typically no single paradigmatic approach exists as this topic is relevant for fields as diverse as plasma physics, geophysical flows and various branches of engineering. Accordingly, the dispersion of matter in chaotic or turbulent flows is analyzed from different perspectives. Partly based on lecture courses given by the author, this book addresses both graduate students and researchers in search of a high-level but approachable and broad introduction to the topic.

  19. Distillation and Visualization of Spatiotemporal Structures in Turbulent Flow Fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hege, Hans-Christian; Hotz, Ingrid; Kasten, Jens

    2011-01-01

    Although turbulence suggests randomness and disorder, organized motions that cause spatiotemporal 'coherent structures' are of particular interest. Revealing such structures in numerically given turbulent or semi-turbulent flows is of interest both for practically working engineers and theoretically oriented physicists. However, as long as there is no common agreement about the mathematical definition of coherent structures, extracting such structures is a vaguely defined task. Instead of searching for a general definition, the data visualization community takes a pragmatic approach and provides various tool chains implemented in flexible software frameworks that allow the user to extract distinct flow field structures. Thus physicists or engineers can select those flow structures which might advance their insight best. We present different approaches to distill important features from turbulent flows and discuss the necessary steps to be taken on the example of Lagrangian coherent structures.

  20. Constructal tree-shaped flow structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bejan, A.; Lorente, S.

    2007-01-01

    This paper is an introduction to a new trend in the conceptual design of energy systems: the generation of flow configuration based on the 'constructal' principle that the global performance is maximized by balancing and arranging the various flow resistances (the irreversibilities) in a flow system that is free to morph. The paper focuses on distribution and collection, which are flows that connect one point (source, or sink) with an infinity of points (volume, area, curve). The flow configurations that emerge from this principle are tree-shaped, and the systems that employ them are 'vascularized'. The paper traces the most recent progress made on constructal vascularization. The direction is from large-scale applications toward microscales. The large-scale tree-shaped designs of electric power distribution systems and networks for natural gas and water are now invading small-scale designs such as fuel cells, heat exchangers and cooled packages of electronics. These flow configurations have several properties in common: freedom to morph, multiple scales, hierarchy, nonuniform (optimal) distribution of scales through the available volume, compactness and finite complexity

  1. The primary cilium as sensor of fluid flow: new building blocks to the model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prætorius, Helle

    2015-01-01

    functionally as an organelle that makes cells more susceptible to changes in fluid flow. Thus the primary cilium was suggested to function as a flow-sensing device. This characterization has been substantiated for many epithelial cell types over the years. Nevertheless, part of the central mechanism of signal...

  2. FDG metabolism and uptake versus blood flow in women with untreated primary breast cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zasadny, Kenneth R.; Tatsumi, Mitsuaki; Wahl, Richard L.

    2003-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the relationship between tumor blood flow and glucose utilization in women with untreated primary breast carcinomas. Noninvasive determinations of blood flow and glucose utilization with positron emission tomography (PET) were performed in 101 regions of tumor from nine women with untreated primary breast carcinoma. [ 15 O]H 2 O PET scans of tumor blood flow were compared with fluorine-18 fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG) PET scans of tumor glucose metabolism. Modeling of multiple parameters was undertaken and flow and glucose utilization compared. Mean whole-tumor blood flow was 14.9 ml dl -1 min -1 , but ranged from 7.6 to 29.2 ml dl -1 min -1 . Mean whole-tumor standardized uptake value corrected for lean body mass, SUV-lean (50-60 min), was 2.32±0.19 while mean K i was 1.2 ml dl -1 min -1 for FDG. SUV-lean and blood flow were strongly correlated (r=0.82, P=0.007) as were K 1 for FDG and flow (r=0.84, P=0.004). In these women with untreated breast cancers, FDG uptake (SUV-lean) and tumor blood flow are strongly correlated. The slope of FDG uptake versus blood flow appears higher at low flow rates, suggesting the possible presence of areas of tumor hypoxia. (orig.)

  3. The Use of Energy in Malaysia: Tracing Energy Flows from Primary Source to End Use

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chinhao Chong

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Malaysia is a rapidly developing country in Southeast Asia that aims to achieve high-income country status by 2020; its economic growth is highly dependent on its abundant energy resources, especially natural gas and crude oil. In this paper, a complete picture of Malaysia’s energy use from primary source to end use is presented by mapping a Sankey diagram of Malaysia’s energy flows, together with ongoing trends analysis of the main factors influencing the energy flows. The results indicate that Malaysia’s energy use depends heavily on fossil fuels, including oil, gas and coal. In the past 30 years, Malaysia has successfully diversified its energy structure by introducing more natural gas and coal into its power generation. To sustainably feed the rapidly growing energy demand in end-use sectors with the challenge of global climate change, Malaysia must pay more attention to the development of renewable energy, green technology and energy conservation in the future.

  4. Structural effects on electromagnetic flow coupler performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aoyama, Goro; Yokota, Norikatsu; Mine, Masao; Watanabe, Takashi; Takuma, Tadasu; Takenaka, Kiyoshi.

    1992-01-01

    A prototype electromagnetic flow coupler was tested using 300degC liquid sodium to estimate the effect on performance of generator flow velocity, magnetic flux density, magnetic core length and bus bar length. Its performance was not affected by changes in fluid velocity and magnetic flux density up to 8.3 m/s and 0.51 T, respectively. Besides the experiments, a two-dimensional numerical analysis program based on Ohm's law and the current continuity equation was prepared to estimate the effects of magnetic core length and bus bar construction. The current transferred from the generator to the pump, the current transfer ratio, increased by lengthening the magnetic core being a maximum of 0.706 for a 100 mm core and 0.764 for a 300 mm core. The numerical results showed that the presence of the bus bar in the outer region of the magnetic core gave inferior performance to that in its absence. (author)

  5. Resin transfer molding for advanced composite primary aircraft structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markus, Alan; Palmer, Ray

    1991-01-01

    Resin Transfer Molding (RTM) has been identified by Douglas Aircraft Company (DAC) and industry to be one of the promising processes being developed today which can break the cost barrier of implementing composite primary structures into a commercial aircraft production environment. The RTM process developments and scale-up plans Douglas Aircrart will be conducting under the NASA ACT contract are discussed.

  6. Structure of cellulose microfibrils in primary cell walls from Collenchyma

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Thomas, L. H.; Forsyth, V. T.; Šturcová, Adriana; Kennedy, C. J.; May, R. P.; Altaner, C. M.; Apperley, D. C.; Wess, T. J.; Jarvis, M. C.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 161, č. 1 (2013), s. 465-476 ISSN 0032-0889 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP108/12/0703 Institutional support: RVO:61389013 Keywords : primary cell wall * cellulose microfibril structure * chain packing disorder Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry Impact factor: 7.394, year: 2013

  7. Knowledge flow and exchange in interdisciplinary primary health care teams (PHCTs): an exploratory study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sibbald, Shannon L.; Wathen, C. Nadine; Kothari, Anita; Day, Adam M. B.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Improving the process of evidence-based practice in primary health care requires an understanding of information exchange among colleagues. This study explored how clinically oriented research knowledge flows through multidisciplinary primary health care teams (PHCTs) and influences clinical decisions. Methods: This was an exploratory mixed-methods study with members of six PHCTs in Ontario, Canada. Quantitative data were collected using a questionnaire and analyzed with social network analysis (SNA) using UCINet. Qualitative data were collected using semi-structured interviews and analyzed with content analysis procedures using NVivo8. Results: It was found that obtaining research knowledge was perceived to be a shared responsibility among team members, whereas its application in patient care was seen as the responsibility of the team leader, usually the senior physician. PHCT members acknowledged the need for resources for information access, synthesis, interpretation, or management. Conclusion: Information sharing in interdisciplinary teams is a complex and multifaceted process. Specific interventions need to be improved such as formalizing modes of communication, better organizing knowledge-sharing activities, and improving the active use of allied health professionals. Despite movement toward team-based models, senior physicians are often gatekeepers of uptake of new evidence and changes in practice. PMID:23646028

  8. Design development of graphite primary structures enables SSTO success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biagiotti, V. A.; Yahiro, J. S.; Suh, Daniel E.; Hodges, Eric R.; Prior, Donald J.

    1997-01-01

    This paper describes the development of a graphite composite wing and a graphite composite intertank primary structure for application toward Single-Stage to Orbit space vehicles such as those under development in NASA's X-33/Reusable Launch Vehicle (RLV) Program. The trade study and designs are based on a Rockwell vertical take-off and horizontal landing (VTHL) wing-body RLV vehicle. Northrop Grumman's approach using a building block development technique is described. Composite Graphite/Bismaleimide (Gr/BMI) material characterization test results are presented. Unique intertank and wing composite subcomponent test article designs are described and test results to date are presented. Wing and intertank Full Scale Section Test Article (FSTA) objectives and designs are outlined. Trade studies, supporting building block testing, and FSTA demonstrations combine to develop graphite primary structure composite technology that enables developing X-33/RLV design programs to meet critical SSTO structural weight and operations performance criteria.

  9. Non-uniform volumetric structures in Richtmyer-Meshkov flows

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Staniç, M.; McFarland, J.; Stellingwerf, R.F.; Cassibry, J.T.; Ranjan, D.; Bonazza, R.; Greenough, J.A.; Abarzhi, S.I.

    2013-01-01

    We perform an integrated study of volumetric structures in Richtmyer-Meshkov (RM) flows induced by moderate shocks. Experiments, theoretical analyses, Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics simulations, and ARES Arbitrary Lagrange Eulerian simulations are employed to analyze RM evolution for fluids with

  10. Flow-Structural Interaction in Solid Rocket Motors

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Murdock, John

    2004-01-01

    .... The static test failure of the Titan solid rocket motor upgrade (SRMU) that occurred on 1 April, 1991, demonstrated the importance of flow-structural modeling in the design of large, solid rocket motors...

  11. Flow acoustics in solid-fluid structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Willatzen, Morten; Mads, Mikhail Vladimirovich Deryabin

    2008-01-01

    along the x direction. In the first part of the paper, the governing set of differential equations are derived as well as the imposed boundary conditions. Solutions are provided using Hamilton's equations for the wavenumber vs. frequency as a function of the number and thickness of solid layers......The governing two-dimensional equations of a heterogeneous material composed of a fluid (allowed to flow in the absence of acoustic excitations) and a crystalline piezoelectric cubic solid stacked one-dimensionally (along the z direction) are derived and special emphasis is given to the discussion...

  12. Vibration test on KMRR reactor structure and primary cooling system piping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, Seung Hoh; Kim, Tae Ryong; Park, Jin Hoh; Park, Jin Suk; Ryoo, Jung Soo [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1994-10-01

    Most equipments, piping systems and reactor structures in nuclear power plants are subjected to flow induced vibration due to high temperature and high pressure coolant flowing inside or outside of the equipments, systems and structures. Because the flow induced vibration sometimes causes significant damage to reactor structures and piping systems, it is important and necessary to evaluate the vibration effect on them and to prove their structural integrity. Korea Multipurpose Research Reactor (KMRR) being constructed by KAERI is 30 MWt pool type research reactor. Since its main structures and piping systems were designed and manufactured in accordance with the standards and guidelines for commercial nuclear power plant, it was decided to evaluate their vibratory response in accordance with the standards and guidelines for commercial NPP. The objective of this vibration test is the assessment of vibration levels of KMRR reactor structure and primary cooling piping system for their structural integrity under the steady-state or transient operating condition. 38 figs, 14 tabs, 2 refs. (Author).

  13. Vibration test on KMRR reactor structure and primary cooling system piping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, Seung Hoh; Kim, Tae Ryong; Park, Jin Hoh; Park, Jin Suk; Ryoo, Jung Soo

    1994-10-01

    Most equipments, piping systems and reactor structures in nuclear power plants are subjected to flow induced vibration due to high temperature and high pressure coolant flowing inside or outside of the equipments, systems and structures. Because the flow induced vibration sometimes causes significant damage to reactor structures and piping systems, it is important and necessary to evaluate the vibration effect on them and to prove their structural integrity. Korea Multipurpose Research Reactor (KMRR) being constructed by KAERI is 30 MWt pool type research reactor. Since its main structures and piping systems were designed and manufactured in accordance with the standards and guidelines for commercial nuclear power plant, it was decided to evaluate their vibratory response in accordance with the standards and guidelines for commercial NPP. The objective of this vibration test is the assessment of vibration levels of KMRR reactor structure and primary cooling piping system for their structural integrity under the steady-state or transient operating condition. 38 figs, 14 tabs, 2 refs. (Author)

  14. Bone and bone-marrow blood flow in chronic granulocytic leukemia and primary myelofibrosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lahtinen, R.; Lahtinen, T.; Romppanen, T.

    1982-01-01

    Blood flow in hematopoietic bone marrow and in nonhematopoietic bone has been measured with a Xe-133 washout method in 20 patients with chronic granulocytic leukemia (CGL) and in seven with primary myelofibrosis. Age-matched healthy persons served as controls. Bone-marrow blood flow in CGL was dependent upon the phase of the disease. In the metamorphosis phase, bone-marrow blood flow was high compared with that in the well-controlled phase. Apart from the initial phase, the mean values for bone blood flow in CGL were increased compared with the values of the healthy controls. In myelofibrosis the bone blood flow was also increased. Bone-marrow blood flow in these diseases was dependent upon the cellularity of bone marrow as measured morphometrically

  15. Flow-Induced Vibration of Circular Cylindrical Structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Shoei-Sheng [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Components Technology Division

    1985-06-01

    Flow-induced vibration is a term to denote those phenomena associated with the response of structures placed in or conveying fluid flow. More specifically, the terra covers those cases in which an interaction develops between fluid-dynamic forces and the inertia, damping or elastic forces in the structures. The study of these phenomena draws on three disciplines: (1) structural mechanics, (2) mechanical vibration, and (3) fluid dynamics. The vibration of circular cylinders subject to flow has been known to man since ancient times; the vibration of a wire at its natural frequency in response to vortex shedding was known in ancient Greece as aeolian tones. But systematic studies of the problem were not made until a century ago when Strouhal established the relationship between vortex shedding frequency and flow velocity for a given cylinder diameter. The early research in this area has beer summarized by Zdravkovich (1985) and Goldstein (1965). Flow-induced structural vibration has been experienced in numerous fields, including the aerospace industry, power generation/transmission (turbine blades, heat exchanger tubes, nuclear reactor components), civil engineering (bridges, building, smoke stacks), and undersea technology. The problems have usually been encountered or created accidentally through improper design. In most cases, a structural or mechanical component, designed to meet specific objectives, develops problems when the undesired effects of flow field have not been accounted for in the design. When a flow-induced vibration problem is noted in the design stage, the engineer has different options to eliminate the detrimental vibration. Unfortunately, in many situations, the problems occur after the components are already in operation; the "fix" usually is very costly. Flow-induced vibration comprises complex and diverse phenomena; subcritical vibration of nuclear fuel assemblies, galloping of transmission lines, flutter of pipes conveying fluid, and whirling

  16. Interfacial structures in downward two-phase bubbly flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paranjape, S.S.; Kim, S.; Ishii, M.; Kelly, J.

    2003-01-01

    Downward two-phase flow was studied considering its significance in view of Light Water Reactor Accidents (LWR) such as Loss of Heat Sink (LOHS) by feed water loss or secondary pipe break. The flow studied, was an adiabatic, air-water, co-current, vertically downward two-phase flow. The experimental test sections had internal hydraulic diameters of 25.4 mm and 50.8 mm. Flow regime map was obtained using the characteristic signals obtained from an impedance void meter, employing neural network based identification methodology to minimize the subjective judgment in determining the flow regimes. A four sensor conductivity probe was used to measure the local two phase flow parameters, which characterize the interfacial structures. The local time averaged two-phase flow parameters measured were: void fraction (α), interfacial area concentration (a i ), bubble velocity (v g ), and Sauter mean diameter (D Sm ). The flow conditions were from the bubbly flow regime. The local profiles of these parameters as well as their axial development revealed the nature of the interfacial structures and the bubble interaction mechanisms occurring in the flow. Furthermore, this study provided a good database for the development of the interfacial area transport equation, which dynamically models the changes in the interfacial area along the flow field. An interfacial area transport equation was developed for downward flow based on that developed for the upward flow, with certain modifications in the bubble interaction terms. The area averaged values of the interfacial area concentration were compared with those predicted by the interfacial area transport model. (author)

  17. Response of EBR-II to a complete loss of primary forced flow during power operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singer, R.M.; Gillette, J.L.; Mohr, D.; Tokar, J.V.; Sullivan, J.E.; Dean, E.M.

    1980-01-01

    Detailed measurements of the thermal, hydraulic, and neutronic response of EBR-II to a complete loss of primary forced flow followed by a PPS-activated scram are presented. The experimental results clearly indicate a smooth transition to natural convective flow with a quite modest incore temperature transient. The accompanying calculations using the NATDEMO code agree quite well with the measured temperatures and flow rates throughout the primary system. The only region of the plant where a significant discrepancy between the measurements and calculations occurred was in the IHX. The reasons for this result could not be definitively determined, but it is speculated that the one-dimensional assumptions used in the modeling may not be valid in the IHX during buoyancy driver flows

  18. Novel cost controlled materials and processing for primary structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dastin, S. J.

    1993-01-01

    Textile laminates, developed a number of years ago, have recently been shown to be applicable to primary aircraft structures for both small and large components. Such structures have the potential to reduce acquisition costs but require advanced automated processing to keep costs controlled while verifying product reliability and assuring structural integrity, durability and affordable life-cycle costs. Recently, resin systems and graphite-reinforced woven shapes have been developed that have the potential for improved RTM processes for aircraft structures. Ciba-Geigy, Brochier Division has registered an RTM prepreg reinforcement called 'Injectex' that has shown effectivity for aircraft components. Other novel approaches discussed are thermotropic resins producing components by injection molding and ceramic polymers for long-duration hot structures. The potential of such materials and processing will be reviewed along with initial information/data available to date.

  19. Coherent Structure Phenomena in Drift Wave-Zonal Flow Turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smolyakov, A. I.; Diamond, P. H.; Malkov, M.

    2000-01-01

    Zonal flows are azimuthally symmetric plasma potential perturbations spontaneously generated from small-scale drift-wave fluctuations via the action of Reynolds stresses. We show that, after initial linear growth, zonal flows can undergo further nonlinear evolution leading to the formation of long-lived coherent structures which consist of self-bound wave packets supporting stationary shear layers. Such coherent zonal flow structures constitute dynamical paradigms for intermittency in drift-wave turbulence that manifests itself by the intermittent distribution of regions with a reduced level of anomalous transport. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society

  20. Analysis of physical flows in primary commodity trade. A case study in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma, Tao; Li, Bo; Fang, Changming; Zhao, Bin; Luo, Yiqi; Chen, Jiakuan

    2006-01-01

    How globalization and international trade affect sustainable development and environment has attracted worldwide attention. Associated with the import and export of primary commodities, ecologically important materials have been exchanged among regions and countries. China, having the largest population in the world and the highest economic growth rate in last decades, may have an important influence on global sustainable development through the trade of primary commodities. Using the data from Almanac of China's Foreign Economic Relations and Trade, we analyzed material flows in the trade of primary commodity in China from 1950 to 2001. Our analysis shows that: (1) China has turned from a net exporter of primary commodities to a net importer; (2) minerals and fuels have been the major imports of primary commodities since 1992, just as well as foods and minerals did in 1980s; (3) most of the net imported primary commodities come from Oceania, Africa and Latin America. (author)

  1. STRUCTURES OF TURBULENT VORTICES AND THEIR INFLUENCE ON FLOW PROPERTIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfonsas Rimkus

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available In spite of the many investigations that have been conducted on turbulent flows, the generation and development of turbulent vortices has not been investigated sufficiently yet. This prevents to understand well the processes involved in the flow. That is unfavorable for the further investigations. The developing vortex structures are interacting, and this needs to be estimated. Physical summing of velocities, formed by all structures, can be unfavorable for investigations, therefore they must be separated; otherwise bias errors can occur. The difficulty for investigations is that the widely employed Particle Image Velocity (PIV method, when a detailed picture of velocity field picture is necessary, can provide photos covering only a short interval of flow, which can’t include the largest flow structures, i.e. macro whirlpools. Consequently, action of these structures could not be investigated. Therefore, in this study it is tried to obtain the necessary data about the flow structure by analyzing the instantaneous velocity measurements by 3D means, which lasts for several minutes, therefore the existence and interaction of these structures become visible in measurement data. The investigations conducted in this way have been already discussed in the article, published earlier. Mostly the generation and development of bottom vortices was analyzed. In this article, the analysis of these turbulent velocity measurements is continued and the additional data about the structure of turbulent vortices is obtained.

  2. Primary flow and temperature measurements in PWRS using non-invasive techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Favennec, J.M.; Jossinet, G.; Thomas, P.

    1995-08-01

    PWR primary flow and temperature measurements are classically done with either indirect or invasive techniques. EDF has developed and installed non-invasive innovative techniques on an industrial nuclear power plant (Chooz N1 type PWR). Primary flow-rate is determined by measurement of velocity of primary water in the hot leg: the time fluctuation of γ-ray activity from Nitrogen-16 (produced by neutron activation of 016) is measured outside of the pipe by two specially-designed detectors. The signals from both detectors are then cross-correlated to determine the transit time of primary water between the two detectors; primary flow-rate is then deduced Primary temperature is determined by measurement of sound velocity in hot and cold leg: two pairs of ultrasonic transducers, installed on pipe outer wall, emit pulses periodically, for which the time of flight along the two pipes diameters are determined. The sound velocity thus computed (diameter over time of flight) is then converted into temperature, by use of a calibration formula relating sound velocity to temperature and pressure. This paper addresses metrological and technical aspects of the methods. Experience feedback on industrial PWRs is also presented. (author). 4 refs., 13 figs

  3. On turbulence structure in vertical pipe flow of fiber suspensions [refractivity, flow measurement, turbulent flow, glass fibers, fluid flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steen, M.

    1989-01-01

    A suspension of glass fibers in alcohol has been used to investigate a upward vertical developing pipe flow. The refractive index of the alcohol was matched to that of the glass fibers, making the whole suspension transparent. Laser Doppler Anemometry (LDA) was applied, and fluid velocities could then be measured for consistencies up to c = 12 g/l. Radial profiles of axial U-velocity and turbulence spectra have been recorded at various positions (z/D = 2, 5, 36) downstream of an orifice (step) with 64% open area. Measurements were taken for different consistencies (c = 1.2, 12 g/l), fiber lengths (l = 1, 3 mm) and Reynolds numbers (R e = 8.5 ⋅ 10 3 , 6.5 ⋅ 10 4 ). The fiber crowding factor (n f ) has been used to discuss the observed effects of the present fibers on momentum transfer and turbulence structure. The results show both an increase (l= 1 mm, c= 1.2 g/l) and decrease (l=3 mm, c = 12 g/l) in turbulence levels in the presence of fibers. Suspensions with long fibers at the highest consistency show plug flow in parts of the core. This causes damping of the turbulence mainly at smaller length scales. For short fibers at low consistency, the increased turbulent energy was mainly observed at small length scales in the spectrum. (author)

  4. Factor structure of functional state of primary school age children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davidenko O.V.

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The examination of primary school children to determine the ranking of significant factors that determine the structure of their functional state depending on the level of physical health. It is shown that the main factor in the structure of the functional state of younger schoolchildren in low-and lower-middle level of physical fitness is selected morpho-functional status, which characterizes the functions of the body at rest. For children with average or above average level of physical fitness is a leading factor in physical fitness of schoolchildren.

  5. The flow field structure of highly stabilized partially premixed flames in a concentric flow conical nozzle burner with coflow

    KAUST Repository

    Elbaz, Ayman M.; Zayed, M.F.; Samy, M.; Roberts, William L.; Mansour, Mohy S.

    2015-01-01

    The stability limits, the stabilization mechanism, and the flow field structure of highly stabilized partially premixed methane flames in a concentric flow conical nozzle burner with air co-flow have been investigated and presented in this work

  6. Three-dimensional investigation of the two-phase flow structure in a bubbly pipe flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidl, W.; Hassan, Y.A.; Ortiz-Villafuerte, J.

    1996-01-01

    Particle image velocimetry (PIV) is a nonintrusive measurement technique that can be used to study the structure of various fluid flows. PIV is used to measure the time-varying, full-field velocity data of a particle-seeded flow field within either a two-dimensional plane or three-dimensional volume. PIV is a very efficient measurement technique since it can obtain both qualitative and quantitative spatial information about the flow field being studied. The quantitative spatial velocity information can be further processed into information of flow parameters such as vorticity and turbulence over extended areas. The objective of this study was to apply recent advances and improvements in the PIV flow measurement technique to the full-field, nonintrusive analysis of a three-dimensional, two-phase fluid flow system in such a manner that both components of the two-phase system could be experimentally quantified

  7. FBR structural material test facility in flowing sodium environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shanmugasundaram, M.; Kumar, Hemant; Ravi, S.

    2016-01-01

    In Fast Breeder Reactor (FBR), components such as Control and Safety Rod Drive Mechanism (CSRDM), Diverse Safety Rod Drive Mechanism (DSRDM), Transfer arm and primary sodium pumps etc., are experiencing friction and wear between the moving parts in contact with liquid sodium at high temperature. Hence, it is essential to evaluate the friction and wear behaviour to validate the design of components. In addition, the above core structural reactor components such as core cover plate, control plugs etc., undergoes thermal striping which is random thermal cycling induced by flow stream resulting from the mixing of non isothermal jets near that component. This leads to development of surface cracks and assist in crack growth which in turn may lead to failure of the structural component. Further, high temperature components are often subjected to low cycle fatigue due to temperature gradient induced cyclic thermal stresses caused by start-ups, shutdowns and transients. Also steady state operation at elevated temperature introduces creep and the combination of creep and fatigue leads to creep-fatigue interactions. Therefore, resistance to low cycle fatigue, creep and creep-fatigue are important considerations in the design of FBR components. Liquid sodium is used as coolant and hence the study of the above properties in dynamic sodium are equally important. In view of the above, facility for materials testing in sodium (INSOT) has been constructed and in operation for conducting the experiments such as tribology, thermal stripping, low cycle fatigue, creep and creep-fatigue interaction etc. The salient features of the operation and maintenance of creep and fatigue loops of INSOT facility are discussed in detail. (author)

  8. High frequency flow-structural interaction in dense subsonic fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Baw-Lin; Ofarrell, J. M.

    1995-01-01

    Prediction of the detailed dynamic behavior in rocket propellant feed systems and engines and other such high-energy fluid systems requires precise analysis to assure structural performance. Designs sometimes require placement of bluff bodies in a flow passage. Additionally, there are flexibilities in ducts, liners, and piping systems. A design handbook and interactive data base have been developed for assessing flow/structural interactions to be used as a tool in design and development, to evaluate applicable geometries before problems develop, or to eliminate or minimize problems with existing hardware. This is a compilation of analytical/empirical data and techniques to evaluate detailed dynamic characteristics of both the fluid and structures. These techniques have direct applicability to rocket engine internal flow passages, hot gas drive systems, and vehicle propellant feed systems. Organization of the handbook is by basic geometries for estimating Strouhal numbers, added mass effects, mode shapes for various end constraints, critical onset flow conditions, and possible structural response amplitudes. Emphasis is on dense fluids and high structural loading potential for fatigue at low subsonic flow speeds where high-frequency excitations are possible. Avoidance and corrective measure illustrations are presented together with analytical curve fits for predictions compiled from a comprehensive data base.

  9. Tracking coherent structures in massively-separated and turbulent flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rockwood, Matthew; Huang, Yangzi; Green, Melissa

    2018-01-01

    Coherent vortex structures are tracked in simulations of massively-separated and turbulent flows. Topological Lagrangian saddle points are found using intersections of the positive and negative finite-time Lyapunov exponent ridges, and these points are then followed in order to track individual coherent structure motion both in a complex interacting three-dimensional flow (turbulent channel) and during vortex formation (two-dimensional bluff body shedding). For a simulation of wall-bounded turbulence in a channel flow, tracking Lagrangian saddles shows that the average structure convection speed exhibits a similar trend as a previously published result based on velocity and pressure correlations, giving validity to the method. When this tracking method is applied in a study of a circular cylinder in cross-flow it shows that Lagrangian saddles rapidly accelerate away from the cylinder surface as the vortex sheds. This saddle behavior is compared with the time-resolved static pressure distribution on the circular cylinder, yielding locations on a cylinder surface where common sensors could detect this phenomenon, which is not available from force measurements or vortex circulation calculations. The current method of tracking coherent structures yields insight into the behavior of the coherent structures in both of the diverse flows presented, highlighting the breadth of its potential application.

  10. Secondary flow structures under stent-induced perturbations for cardiovascular flow in a curved artery model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glenn, Autumn L.; Bulusu, Kartik V.; Shu Fangjun; Plesniak, Michael W.

    2012-01-01

    Secondary flows within curved arteries with unsteady forcing result from amplified centrifugal instabilities and are expected to be driven by the rapid accelerations and decelerations inherent in physiological waveforms. These secondary flows may also affect the function of curved arteries through pro-atherogenic wall shear stresses, platelet residence time and other vascular response mechanisms. Planar PIV measurements were performed under multi-harmonic non-zero-mean and physiological carotid artery waveforms at various locations in a rigid bent-pipe curved artery model. Results revealed symmetric counter-rotating vortex pairs that developed during the acceleration phases of both multi-harmonic and physiological waveforms. An idealized stent model was placed upstream of the bend, which initiated flow perturbations under physiological inflow conditions. Changes in the secondary flow structures were observed during the systolic deceleration phase (t/T ≈ 0.20–0.50). Proper Orthogonal Decomposition (POD) analysis of the flow morphologies under unsteady conditions indicated similarities in the coherent secondary-flow structures and correlation with phase-averaged velocity fields. A regime map was created that characterizes the kaleidoscope of vortical secondary flows with multiple vortex pairs and interesting secondary flow morphologies. This regime map in the curved artery model was created by plotting the secondary Reynolds number against another dimensionless acceleration-based parameter marking numbered regions of vortex pairs.

  11. Secondary flow structures under stent-induced perturbations for cardiovascular flow in a curved artery model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glenn, Autumn L.; Bulusu, Kartik V. [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, George Washington University, 801 22nd Street, NW., Washington, DC 20052 (United States); Shu Fangjun [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, New Mexico State University, MSC 3450, P.O. Box 30001, Las Cruces, NM 88003-8001 (United States); Plesniak, Michael W., E-mail: plesniak@gwu.edu [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, George Washington University, 801 22nd Street, NW., Washington, DC 20052 (United States)

    2012-06-15

    Secondary flows within curved arteries with unsteady forcing result from amplified centrifugal instabilities and are expected to be driven by the rapid accelerations and decelerations inherent in physiological waveforms. These secondary flows may also affect the function of curved arteries through pro-atherogenic wall shear stresses, platelet residence time and other vascular response mechanisms. Planar PIV measurements were performed under multi-harmonic non-zero-mean and physiological carotid artery waveforms at various locations in a rigid bent-pipe curved artery model. Results revealed symmetric counter-rotating vortex pairs that developed during the acceleration phases of both multi-harmonic and physiological waveforms. An idealized stent model was placed upstream of the bend, which initiated flow perturbations under physiological inflow conditions. Changes in the secondary flow structures were observed during the systolic deceleration phase (t/T Almost-Equal-To 0.20-0.50). Proper Orthogonal Decomposition (POD) analysis of the flow morphologies under unsteady conditions indicated similarities in the coherent secondary-flow structures and correlation with phase-averaged velocity fields. A regime map was created that characterizes the kaleidoscope of vortical secondary flows with multiple vortex pairs and interesting secondary flow morphologies. This regime map in the curved artery model was created by plotting the secondary Reynolds number against another dimensionless acceleration-based parameter marking numbered regions of vortex pairs.

  12. Characterization of turbulent coherent structures in square duct flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atzori, Marco; Vinuesa, Ricardo; Lozano-Durán, Adrián; Schlatter, Philipp

    2018-04-01

    This work is aimed at a first characterization of coherent structures in turbulent square duct flows. Coherent structures are defined as connected components in the domain identified as places where a quantity of interest (such as Reynolds stress or vorticity) is larger than a prescribed non-uniform threshold. Firstly, we qualitatively discuss how a percolation analysis can be used to assess the effectiveness of the threshold function, and how it can be affected by statistical uncertainty. Secondly, various physical quantities that are expected to play an important role in the dynamics of the secondary flow of Prandtl’s second kind are studied. Furthermore, a characterization of intense Reynolds-stress events in square duct flow, together with a comparison of their shape for analogous events in channel flow at the same Reynolds number, is presented.

  13. Visualization and analysis of flow structures in an open cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jun; Cai, Jinsheng; Yang, Dangguo; Wu, Junqiang; Wang, Xiansheng

    2018-05-01

    A numerical study is performed on the supersonic flow over an open cavity at Mach number of 1.5. A newly developed visualization method is employed to visualize the complicated flow structures, which provide an insight into major flow physics. Four types of shock/compressive waves which existed in experimental schlieren are observed in numerical visualization results. Furthermore, other flow structures such as multi-scale vortices are also obtained in the numerical results. And a new type of shocklet which is beneath large vortices is found. The shocklet beneath the vortex originates from leading edge, then, is strengthened by successive interactions between feedback compressive waves and its attached vortex. Finally, it collides against the trailing surface and generates a large number of feedback compressive waves and intensive pressure fluctuations. It is suggested that the shocklets beneath vortex play an important role of cavity self-sustained oscillation.

  14. Advanced composites structural concepts and materials technologies for primary aircraft structures: Structural response and failure analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorris, William J.; Hairr, John W.; Huang, Jui-Tien; Ingram, J. Edward; Shah, Bharat M.

    1992-01-01

    Non-linear analysis methods were adapted and incorporated in a finite element based DIAL code. These methods are necessary to evaluate the global response of a stiffened structure under combined in-plane and out-of-plane loading. These methods include the Arc Length method and target point analysis procedure. A new interface material model was implemented that can model elastic-plastic behavior of the bond adhesive. Direct application of this method is in skin/stiffener interface failure assessment. Addition of the AML (angle minus longitudinal or load) failure procedure and Hasin's failure criteria provides added capability in the failure predictions. Interactive Stiffened Panel Analysis modules were developed as interactive pre-and post-processors. Each module provides the means of performing self-initiated finite elements based analysis of primary structures such as a flat or curved stiffened panel; a corrugated flat sandwich panel; and a curved geodesic fuselage panel. This module brings finite element analysis into the design of composite structures without the requirement for the user to know much about the techniques and procedures needed to actually perform a finite element analysis from scratch. An interactive finite element code was developed to predict bolted joint strength considering material and geometrical non-linearity. The developed method conducts an ultimate strength failure analysis using a set of material degradation models.

  15. Convection flow structure in the central polar cap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bristow, W. A.

    2017-12-01

    A previous study of spatially averaged flow velocity in the central polar cap [Bristow et al., 2015] observed under steady IMF conditions found that it was extremely rare for the average to exceed 850 m/s (less than 0.2 % of the time). Anecdotally, however it is not uncommon to observe line-of-sight velocities in excess of 100 m/s in the McMurdo radar field of view directly over the magnetic pole. This discrepancy motivated this study, which examines the conditions under which high-velocity flows are observed at latitudes greater than 80° magnetic latitude. It was found that highly structured flows are common in the central polar cap, which leads to the flow within regions to have significant deviation from the average. In addition, the high-speed flow regions are usually directed away from the earth-sun line. No specific set of driving conditions was identified to be associated with high-speed flows. The study did conclude that 1)Polar cap velocities are generally highly structured. 2)Flow patterns typically illustrate narrow channels, vortical flow regions, and propagating features. 3) Persistent waves are a regular occurrence. 3)Features are observed to propagate from day side to night side, and from night side to day side.. 4)Convection often exhibits significant difference between the two hemispheres. And 5)About 10% of the time the velocity somewhere in the cap exceeds 1 Km/s The presentation will conclude with a discussion of the physical reasons for the flow structure. Bristow, W. A., E. Amata, J. Spaleta, and M. F. Marcucci (2015), Observations of the relationship between ionospheric central polar cap and dayside throat convection velocities, and solar wind/IMF driving, J. Geophys. Res. Space Physics, 120, doi:10.1002/2015JA021199.

  16. Structural characteristics of cohesive flow deposits, and a sedimentological approach on their flow mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripsanas, E. K.; Bryant, W. R.; Prior, D. B.

    2003-04-01

    A large number of Jumbo Piston cores (up to 20 m long), acquired from the continental slope and rise of the Northwest Gulf of Mexico (Bryant Canyon area and eastern Sigsbee Escarpment), have recovered various mass-transport deposits. The main cause of slope instabilities over these areas is oversteepening of the slopes due to the seaward mobilization of the underlying allochthonous salt masses. Cohesive flow deposits were the most common recoveries in the sediment cores. Four types of cohesive flow deposits have been recognized: a) fluid debris flow, b) mud flow, c) mud-matrix dominated debris flow, and d) clast-dominated debris flow deposits. The first type is characterized by its relatively small thickness (less than 1 m), a mud matrix with small (less than 0.5 cm) and soft mud-clasts, and a faint layering. The mud-clasts reveal a normal grading and become more abundant towards the base of each layer. That reveals that their deposition resulted by several successive surges/pulses, developed in the main flow, than the sudden “freezing” of the whole flow. The main difference between mud flow and mud-matrix dominated debris flow deposits is the presence of small to large mud-clasts in the later. Both deposits consist of a chaotic mud-matrix, and a basal shear laminated zone, where the strongest shearing of the flow was exhibited. Convolute laminations, fault-like surfaces, thrust faults, and microfaults are interpreted as occurring during the “freezing” of the flows and/or by adjustments of the rested deposits. Clast-dominated debris flow deposits consist of three zones: a) an upper plug-zone, characterized by large interlocked clasts, b) a mid-zone, of higher reworked, inversely graded clasts, floating in a mud-matrix, and c) a lower shear laminated zone. The structure of the last three cohesive flow deposits indicate that they represent deposition of typical Bingham flows, consisting of an upper plug-zone in which the yield stress is not exceeded and an

  17. Structure design of primary heat-exchanger for the MHWRR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Yanshui; Cao Zhibin

    1999-01-01

    Primary heat-exchanger is one of the key equipment in the Multi-application Heavy Water Research Reactor (MHWRR). Its structure design ought to meet as much possible as the demands for safety, feasibility and economy. To reduce the liquid resistance, the locating structure between inner tube and outer tube is distributed spirally. The edge of outer tube is processed in the shape of hexahedron and then splice-welded into honeycomb structure thereby the heat-exchanger has the smallest outer diameter compared with that with the same heat-exchanging area according to 'Normal Design', 'Anabasis Design' is applied to the design for parts with Safety Class I, to ensure safety of the heat-exchanger

  18. Zonal structure of unbounded external-flow and aerodynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, L Q; Kang, L L; Wu, J Z, E-mail: lqliu@pku.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Turbulence and Complex System, Center for Applied Physics and Technology, College of Engineering, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)

    2017-08-15

    This paper starts from the far-field behaviors of velocity field in externally unbounded flow. We find that the well-known algebraic decay of disturbance velocity as derived kinematically is too conservative. Once the kinetics are taken into account by working on the fundamental solutions of far-field linearized Navier–Stokes equations, it is proven that the furthest far-field zone adjacent to the uniform fluid at infinity must be unsteady, viscous and compressible, where all disturbances degenerate to sound waves that decay exponentially. But this optimal rate does not exist in some commonly used simplified flow models, such as steady flow, incompressible flow and inviscid flow, because they actually work in true subspaces of the unbounded free space, which are surrounded by further far fields of different nature. This finding naturally leads to a zonal structure of externally unbounded flow field. The significance of the zonal structure is demonstrated by its close relevance to existing theories of aerodynamic force and moment in external flows, including the removal of the difficulties or paradoxes inherent in the simplified models. (paper)

  19. Primary flow meter for calibrating a sniffer test leak artefact by a pressure rise method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arai, Kenta; Yoshida, Hajime

    2014-10-01

    Sniffer tests are used to locate leaks in equipment during operation. The sensitivity of a sniffer leak detector must be calibrated against a known gas flow to atmospheric pressure generated by a sniffer test leak artefact. We have developed a primary flow meter for calibrating gas flows to atmospheric pressure through the leak artefact. The flow meter is based on a pressure rise method and two chambers are used to measure the pressure rise with small uncertainty even at atmospheric pressure. The calibration range of the flow rate is 5 × 10-7 Pa m3 s-1 to 7 × 10-4 Pa m3 s-1 to atmospheric pressure at 23.0 °C with a minimum uncertainty of 1.4% (k = 2), as well as 4 × 10-8 Pa m3 s-1 to 5 × 10-4 Pa m3 s-1 to a vacuum at 23.0 °C. The long term stability of the flow meter was determined as 0.41% by repeated measurements of the conductance of the leak artefact. In case of the flow rate into a vacuum, the flow meter was successfully linked to the international reference value of CCM.P-K12 by a lab-internal comparison.

  20. Observations and Measurements on Unsteady Cloud Cavitation Flow Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, L. X.; Yan, G. J.; Huang, B.

    2015-12-01

    The objectives of this paper are to investigate the unsteady structures and hydrodynamics of cavitating flows. Experimental results are presented for a Clark-Y hydrofoil, which is fixed at α=0°, 5° and 8°. The high-speed video camera and Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) are applied to investigate the transient flow structures. The dynamic measurement system is used to record the dynamic characteristics. The cloud cavitation exhibits noticeable unsteady characteristics. For the case of α=0°, there exit strong interactions between the attached cavity and the re-entrant flow. While for the case of α=8°, the re-entrant flow is relatively thin and the interaction between the cavity and re-entrant flow is limited. The results also present that the periodic collapse and shedding of the large-scale cloud cavitation, which leads to substantial increase of turbulent velocity fluctuations in the cavity region. Experimental evidence indicates that the hydrodynamics are clearly affected by the cavitating flow structures, the amplitude of load fluctuation are much higher for the cloud cavitating cases.

  1. Observations and Measurements on Unsteady Cloud Cavitation Flow Structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gu, L X; Yan, G J; Huang, B

    2015-01-01

    The objectives of this paper are to investigate the unsteady structures and hydrodynamics of cavitating flows. Experimental results are presented for a Clark-Y hydrofoil, which is fixed at α=0°, 5° and 8°. The high-speed video camera and Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) are applied to investigate the transient flow structures. The dynamic measurement system is used to record the dynamic characteristics. The cloud cavitation exhibits noticeable unsteady characteristics. For the case of α=0°, there exit strong interactions between the attached cavity and the re-entrant flow. While for the case of α=8°, the re-entrant flow is relatively thin and the interaction between the cavity and re-entrant flow is limited. The results also present that the periodic collapse and shedding of the large-scale cloud cavitation, which leads to substantial increase of turbulent velocity fluctuations in the cavity region. Experimental evidence indicates that the hydrodynamics are clearly affected by the cavitating flow structures, the amplitude of load fluctuation are much higher for the cloud cavitating cases. (paper)

  2. Flow structure from a horizontal cylinder coincident with a free surface in shallow water flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kahraman Ali

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Vortex formation from a horizontal cylinder coincident with a free surface of a shallow water flow having a depth of 25.4 [mm] was experimentally investigated using the PIV technique. Instantaneous and time-averaged flow patterns in the wake region of the cylinder were examined for three different cylinder diameter values under the fully developed turbulent boundary layer condition. Reynolds numbers were in the range of 1124£ Re£ 3374 and Froude numbers were in the range of 0.41 £ Fr £ 0.71 based on the cylinder diameter. It was found that a jet-like flow giving rise to increasing the flow entrainment between the core and wake regions depending on the cylinder diameter was formed between the lower surface of the cylinder and bottom surface of the channel. Vorticity intensity, Reynolds stress correlations and the primary recirculating bubble lengths were grown to higher values with increasing the cylinder diameter. On the other hand, in the case of the lowest level of the jet-like flow emanating from the beneath of the smallest cylinder, the variation of flow characteristics were attenuated significantly in a shorter distance. The variation of the reattachment location of the separated flow to the free-surface is a strong function of the cylinder diameter and the Froude number.

  3. Primary structure of the human M2 mitochondrial autoantigen of primary biliary cirrhosis: Dihydrolipoamide acetyltransferase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coppel, R.L.; McNeilage, L.J.; Surh, C.D.; Van De Water, J.; Spithill, T.W.; Whittingham, S.; Gershwin, M.E.

    1988-01-01

    Primary biliary cirrhosis is a chronic, destructive autoimmune liver disease of humans. Patient sera are characterized by a high frequency of autoantibodies to a M r 70,000 mitochondrial antigen a component of the M2 antigen complex. The authors have identified a human cDNA clone encoding the complete amino acid sequence of this autoantigen. The predicted structure has significant similarity with the dihydrolipoamide acetyltransferase of the Escherichia coli pyruvate dehydrogenase multienzyme complex. The human sequence preserves the Glu-Thr-Asp-Lys-Ala motif of the lipoyl-binding site and has two potential binding sites. Expressed fragments of the cDNA react strongly with sera from patients with primary biliary cirrhosis but not with sera from patients with autoimmune chronic active hepatitis or sera from healthy subjects

  4. Large-scale structures in turbulent Couette flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jung Hoon; Lee, Jae Hwa

    2016-11-01

    Direct numerical simulation of fully developed turbulent Couette flow is performed with a large computational domain in the streamwise and spanwise directions (40 πh and 6 πh) to investigate streamwise-scale growth mechanism of the streamwise velocity fluctuating structures in the core region, where h is the channel half height. It is shown that long streamwise-scale structures (> 3 h) are highly energetic and they contribute to more than 80% of the turbulent kinetic energy and Reynolds shear stress, compared to previous studies in canonical Poiseuille flows. Instantaneous and statistical analysis show that negative-u' structures on the bottom wall in the Couette flow continuously grow in the streamwise direction due to mean shear, and they penetrate to the opposite moving wall. The geometric center of the log layer is observed in the centerline with a dominant outer peak in streamwise spectrum, and the maximum streamwise extent for structure is found in the centerline, similar to previous observation in turbulent Poiseuille flows at high Reynolds number. Further inspection of time-evolving instantaneous fields clearly exhibits that adjacent long structures combine to form a longer structure in the centerline. This research was supported by Basic Science Research Program through the National Research Foundation of Korea (NRF) funded by the Ministry of Education (NRF-2014R1A1A2057031).

  5. Turbulent flow in a ribbed channel: Flow structures in the vicinity of a rib

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Lei; Salewski, Mirko; Sundén, Bengt

    2010-01-01

    PIV measurements are performed in a channel with periodic ribs on one wall. The emphasis of this study is to investigate the flow structures in the vicinity of a rib in terms of mean velocities, Reynolds stresses, probability density functions (PDF), and two-point correlations. The PDF distribution......-based visualization is applied to the separation bubble upstream of the rib. Salient critical points and limit cycles are extracted, which gives clues to the physical processes occurring in the flow....

  6. Aerodynamic structures and processes in rotationally augmented flow fields

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schreck, S.J.; Sørensen, Niels N.; Robinson, M.C.

    2007-01-01

    . Experimental measurements consisted of surface pressure data statistics used to infer sectional boundary layer state and to quantify normal force levels. Computed predictions included high-resolution boundary layer topologies and detailed above-surface flow field structures. This synergy was exploited...... to reliably identify and track pertinent features in the rotating blade boundary layer topology as they evolved in response to varying wind speed. Subsequently, boundary layer state was linked to above-surface flow field structure and used to deduce mechanisms; underlying augmented aerodynamic force...

  7. Three-dimensional investigation of the two-phase flow structure in a bubbly pipe flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hassan, Y.A.; Schmidl, W.D.; Ortiz-Villafuerte, J.

    1997-01-01

    Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) is a non-intrusive measurement technique, which can be used to study the structure of various fluid flows. PIV is used to measure the time varying full field velocity data of a particle-seeded flow field within either a two-dimensional plane or three-dimensional volume. PIV is a very efficient measurement technique since it can obtain both qualitative and quantitative spatial information about the flow field being studied. This information can be further processed into information such as vorticity and pathlines. Other flow measurement techniques (Laser Doppler Velocimetry, Hot Wire Anemometry, etc...) only provide quantitative information at a single point. PIV can be used to study turbulence structures if a sufficient amount of data can be acquired and analyzed, and it can also be extended to study two-phase flows if both phases can be distinguished. In this study, the flow structure around a bubble rising in a pipe filled with water was studied in three-dimensions. The velocity of the rising bubble and the velocity field of the surrounding water was measured. Then the turbulence intensities and Reynolds stresses were calculated from the experimental data. (author)

  8. The flows structure in unsteady gas flow in pipes with different cross-sections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plotnikov, Leonid; Nevolin, Alexandr; Nikolaev, Dmitrij

    2017-10-01

    The results of numerical simulation and experimental study of the structure of unsteady flows in pipes with different cross sections are presented in the article. It is shown that the unsteady gas flow in a circular pipe is axisymmetric without secondary currents. Steady vortex structures (secondary flows) are observed in pipes with cross sections in the form of a square and an equilateral triangle. It was found that these secondary flows have a significant impact on gas flows in pipes of complex configuration. On the basis of experimental researches it is established that the strong oscillatory phenomena exist in the inlet pipe of the piston engine arising after the closing of the intake valve. The placement of the profiled plots (with a cross section of a square or an equilateral triangle) in the intake pipe leads to the damping of the oscillatory phenomena and a more rapid stabilization of pulsating flow. This is due to the stabilizing effect of the vortex structures formed in the corners of this configuration.

  9. The flows structure in unsteady gas flow in pipes with different cross-sections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Plotnikov Leonid

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The results of numerical simulation and experimental study of the structure of unsteady flows in pipes with different cross sections are presented in the article. It is shown that the unsteady gas flow in a circular pipe is axisymmetric without secondary currents. Steady vortex structures (secondary flows are observed in pipes with cross sections in the form of a square and an equilateral triangle. It was found that these secondary flows have a significant impact on gas flows in pipes of complex configuration. On the basis of experimental researches it is established that the strong oscillatory phenomena exist in the inlet pipe of the piston engine arising after the closing of the intake valve. The placement of the profiled plots (with a cross section of a square or an equilateral triangle in the intake pipe leads to the damping of the oscillatory phenomena and a more rapid stabilization of pulsating flow. This is due to the stabilizing effect of the vortex structures formed in the corners of this configuration.

  10. Primary structure, gene organization and polypeptide expression of poliovirus RNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kitamura, N. (State Univ. of New York, Stony Brook); Semler, B.L.; Rothberg, P.G.

    1981-06-18

    The primary structure of the poliovirus genome has been determined. The RNA molecule is 7433 nucleotides long, polyadenylated at the 3' terminus, and covalently linked to a small protein (VPg) at the 5' terminus. An open reading frame of 2207 consecutive triplets spans over 89% of the nucleotide sequence and codes for the viral polyprotein NCVPOO. Twelve viral polypeptides have been mapped by amino acid sequence analysis and were found to be proteolytic cleavage products of the polyprotein, cleavages occurring predominantly at Gln-Gly pairs.

  11. Purification and primary structure determination of human lysosomal dipeptidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolenc, Iztok; Mihelic, Marko

    2003-02-01

    The lysosomal metallopeptidase is an enzyme that acts preferentially on dipeptides with unsubstituted N- and C-termini. Its activity is highest in slightly acidic pH. Here we describe the isolation and characterization of lysosomal dipeptidase from human kidney. The isolated enzyme has the amino-terminal sequence DVAKAIINLAVY and is a homodimer with a molecular mass of 100 kDa. So far no amino acid sequence has been determined for this metallopeptidase. The complete primary structure as deduced from the nucleotide sequence revealed that the isolated dipeptidase is similar to blood plasma glutamate carboxypeptidase.

  12. Reverse primary-side flow in steam generators during natural circulation cooling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stumpf, H.; Motley, F.; Schultz, R.; Chapman, J.; Kukita, Y.

    1987-01-01

    A TRAC model of the Large Scale Test Facility with a 3-tube steam-generator model was used to analyze natural-circulation test ST-NC-02. For the steady state at 100% primary mass inventory, TRAC was in excellent agreement with the natural-circulation flow rate, the temperature distribution in the steam-generator tubes, and the temperature drop from the hot leg to the steam-generator inlet plenum. TRAC also predicted reverse flow in the long tubes. At reduced primary mass inventories, TRAC predicted the three natural-circulation flow regimes: single phase, two phase, and reflux condensation. TRAC did not predict the cyclic fill-and-dump phenomenon seen briefly in the test. TRAC overpredicted the two-phase natural-circulation flow rate. Since the core is well cooled at this time, the result is conservative. An important result of the analysis is that TRAC was able to predict the core dryout and heatup at approximately the same primary mass inventory as in the test. 4 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs

  13. Efficiency of the pre-heater against flow rate on primary the beta test loop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edy Sumarno; Kiswanta; Bambang Heru; Ainur R; Joko P

    2013-01-01

    Calculation of efficiency of the pre-heater has been carried out against the flow rate on primary the BETA Test Loop. BETA test loop (UUB) is a facilities of experiments to study the thermal hydraulic phenomenon, especially for thermal hydraulic post-LOCA (Lost of Coolant Accident). Sequences removal on the BETA Test Loop contained a pre-heater that serves as a getter heat from the primary side to the secondary side, determination of efficiency is to compare the incoming heat energy with the energy taken out by a secondary fluid. Characterization is intended to determine the performance of a pre-heater, then used as tool for analysis, and as a reference design experiments. Calculation of efficiency methods performed by operating the pre-heater with fluid flow rate variation on the primary side. Calculation of efficiency on the results obtained that the efficiency change with every change of flow rate, the flow rate is 71.26% on 163.50 ml/s and 60.65% on 850.90 ml/s. Efficiency value can be even greater if the pre-heater tank is wrapped with thermal insulation so there is no heat leakage. (author)

  14. Effects of lower plenum flow structure on core inlet flow of ABWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watanabe, Shun; Abe, Yutaka; Kaneko, Akiko; Watanabe, Fumitoshi; Tezuka, Kenichi

    2010-01-01

    The evaluation of coolant flow structure at a lower plenum of an advanced boiling water reactor (ABWR) in which there are many structures is very important in order to improve generating power. Although the simulation results by CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics) codes can predict such complicated flow in the lower plenum, it is required to establish the database of flow structure in lower plenum of ABWR experimentally for the benchmark of the CFD codes. In the model of the lower plenum, we measured velocity profiles with LDV and PIV. And differential pressure of constructed model is measured with differential pressure instrument. It was identified that the velocity and differential pressure profiles also showed the tendency to be flat in the core inlet. Moreover, vortexes were observed around side entry orifice by PIV measurement. (author)

  15. Reduced coronary flow and resistance reserve in primary scleroderma myocardial disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nitenberg, A.; Foult, J.M.; Kahan, A.; Perennec, J.; Devaux, J.Y.; Menkes, C.J.; Amor, B.

    1986-01-01

    The maximum coronary vasodilator capacity after intravenous dipyridamole (0.14 mg X kg-1 X min-1 X 4 minutes) was studied in seven patients with primary scleroderma myocardial disease and compared to that of seven control subjects. Hemodynamic data and left ventricular angiographic data were not different in the two groups. The coronary flow reserve was evaluated by the dipyridamole/basal coronary sinus blood flow ratio (D/B CSBF) and the coronary resistance reserve by the dipyridamole/basal coronary resistance ratio (D/B CR). Coronary reserve was greatly impaired in the group with primary scleroderma myocardial disease: D/B CSBF was lower than in the control group (2.54 +/- 1.37 vs 4.01 +/- 0.56, respectively; p less than 0.05) and D/B CR was higher than in the control group (0.47 +/- 0.25 vs 0.23 +/- 0.04, respectively; p less than 0.05). Such a decreased coronary flow and resistance reserve in patients with primary scleroderma myocardial disease was not explained by an alteration of left ventricular function. It may be an important contributing factor in the pathogenesis of primary scleroderma myocardial disease

  16. Continuous-flow oxidative cyanation of primary and secondary amines using singlet oxygen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ushakov, Dmitry B; Gilmore, Kerry; Kopetzki, Daniel; McQuade, D Tyler; Seeberger, Peter H

    2014-01-07

    Primary and secondary amines can be rapidly and quantitatively oxidized to the corresponding imines by singlet oxygen. This reactive form of oxygen was produced using a variable-temperature continuous-flow LED-photoreactor with a catalytic amount of tetraphenylporphyrin as the sensitizer. α-Aminonitriles were obtained in good to excellent yields when trimethylsilyl cyanide served as an in situ imine trap. At 25°C, primary amines were found to undergo oxidative coupling prior to cyanide addition and yielded secondary α-aminonitriles. Primary α-aminonitriles were synthesized from the corresponding primary amines for the first time, by an oxidative Strecker reaction at -50 °C. This atom-economic and protecting-group-free pathway provides a route to racemic amino acids, which was exemplified by the synthesis of tert-leucine hydrochloride from neopentylamine. Copyright © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Performance study of ejector cooling cycle at critical mode under superheated primary flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tashtoush, Bourhan; Alshare, Aiman; Al-Rifai, Saja

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • The ECC is modeled using EES Software and it is validated with published data. • Detailed analysis of the ECC with different refrigerants is conducted. • The constant pressure mixing is better than constant area mixing ejectors. • R134a is the selected refrigerant for the best cooling cycle performance. • The superheated primary flow at critical mode is achieved with EJ2 ejector used. - Abstract: In this work the performance of the ejector cooling cycle is investigated at critical mode, where, the effects of ejector geometry, refrigerant type, and operating condition are studied. The ejector cooling cycle is modeled with EES Software. The mass, momentum, and energy conservation principles are applied to the secondary and primary flows to investigate the performance of the ejector cooling cycle under superheated primary flow. The refrigerant R134 a is selected based on the merit of its environmental and performance characteristics. The primary working fluid in the refrigeration cycle is maintained at superheated conditions for optimal ejector performance. The solar generator temperature ranges are 80–100 °C. The operating temperature of evaporator range is 8–12 °C and the optimal condensation temperature is in the range of 28–40 °C. It is found that constant-pressure mixing ejector generates higher backpressure than constant-area mixing ejector for the same entrainment ratio and COP. The type of ejector is selected based on the performance criteria of the critical backpressure and choking condition of the primary flow, the so called EJ2 type ejector meets the criteria. The COP is found to be in the range of 0.59–0.67 at condenser backpressure of 24 bar due to higher critical condenser pressure and higher generator temperature

  18. Influence of chemistry on steam generator primary-to-secondary stabilized low leak flow rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hervouet, C.; Pages, D.; Fauchon, C.; Bretelle, J.L.; Bus, F.

    2002-01-01

    The comparison of the leak flow rate behavior between the previous and the new boron/lithium coordination, the second one corresponding to an higher pH during the cycle than the first one, leads to the following conclusions, confirmed by the experimental and theoretical studies: Low leak flow rate is extremely sensitive to pH in the zone of pH of primary water because the behavior of metallic oxide is changing drastically in that range of pH (from precipitation to dissolution); Leak flow rate is often maintained lower with low pH. Let's recall however that pH can not reach a too low value which could enhance corrosion product deposition, increase dose rates along the primary circuit, and lead to reactor outages due to problems on fuel assemblies. The understanding of the governing phenomena led to adapt in 2000 the reactor cooling system chemical conditioning for the French Pressurized Water reactors facing problems with the management of the stabilized leak flow rate fluctuations, once no degradation of tube bundle integrity is proved. Each part of the cycle and operating conditions lead to an advised operating action. In general, the new recommendations for the reactors facing problems with the management of low leak flow rate are based on the principle of helping the precipitation of metallic oxide within the crack and preventing their dissolution. (authors)

  19. Coherent structures in compressible free-shear-layer flows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aeschliman, D.P.; Baty, R.S. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Engineering Sciences Center; Kennedy, C.A.; Chen, J.H. [Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States). Combustion and Physical Sciences Center

    1997-08-01

    Large scale coherent structures are intrinsic fluid mechanical characteristics of all free-shear flows, from incompressible to compressible, and laminar to fully turbulent. These quasi-periodic fluid structures, eddies of size comparable to the thickness of the shear layer, dominate the mixing process at the free-shear interface. As a result, large scale coherent structures greatly influence the operation and efficiency of many important commercial and defense technologies. Large scale coherent structures have been studied here in a research program that combines a synergistic blend of experiment, direct numerical simulation, and analysis. This report summarizes the work completed for this Sandia Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project.

  20. Biofilm Effect on Flow Structure over a Permeable Bed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazemifar, F.; Blois, G.; Aybar, M.; Perez-Calleja, P.; Nerenberg, R.; Sinha, S.; Hardy, R. J.; Best, J.; Sambrook Smith, G.; Christensen, K. T.

    2017-12-01

    Biofilms constitute an important form of bacterial life in aquatic environments and are present at the fluid-solid interfaces in natural and industrial settings, such as water distribution systems and riverbeds among others. The permeable, heterogeneous, and deformable structure of biofilms can influence mass and momentum transport between the subsurface and freestream. However, this interaction is not fully understood, in part due to technical obstacles impeding quantitative experimental investigations. In this work, the effect of biofilm on flow structure over a permeable bed is studied. Experiments are conducted in a closed water channel equipped with an idealized two-dimensional permeable bed. Prior to conducting flow experiments, the models are placed within an independent recirculating reactor for biofilm growth. Once a targeted biofilm growth stage is achieved, the models are transferred to the water channel and subjected to transitional and turbulent flows. Long-distance microscopic particle image velocimetry measurements are performed to quantify the effect of biofilm on the turbulence structure of the free flow as well as the freestream-subsurface flow interaction.

  1. Channel flow structure measurements using particle image velocimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Norazizi Mohamed; Noraeini Mokhtar; Aziz Ibrahim; Ramli Abu Hassan

    1996-01-01

    Two different flow structures in a laboratory channel were examined using a flow visualization technique, known as Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV). The first channel flow structure was that of a steady flow over a horizontal channel bottom. Photographs of particle displacements were taken in the boundary layer in a plane parallel to the flow. These photographs were analyzed to give simultaneous measurements of two components of the velocity at hundreds of points in the plane. Averaging these photographs gave the velocity profile a few millimeters from the bottom of the channel to the water surface. The results gave good agreement with the known boundary layer theory. This technique is extended to the study of the structure under a progressive wave in the channel. A wavelength of the propagating wave is divided into sections by photographing it continously for a number of frames. Each frame is analyzed and a velocity field under this wave at various phase points were produced with their respective directions. The results show that velocity vectors in a plane under the wave could be achieved instantaneously and in good agreement with the small amplitude wave theory

  2. Two-phase flow structure in large diameter pipes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, T.R.; Schlegel, J.P.; Hibiki, T.; Ishii, M.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Local profiles of various quantities measured in large diameter pipe. ► Database for interfacial area in large pipes extended to churn-turbulent flow. ► Flow regime map confirms previous models for flow regime transitions. ► Data will be useful in developing interfacial area transport models for large pipes. - Abstract: Flow in large pipes is important in a wide variety of applications. In the nuclear industry in particular, understanding of flow in large diameter pipes is essential in predicting the behavior of reactor systems. This is especially true of natural circulation Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) designs, where a large-diameter chimney above the core provides the gravity head to drive circulation of the coolant through the reactor. The behavior of such reactors during transients and during normal operation will be predicted using advanced thermal–hydraulics analysis codes utilizing the two-fluid model. Essential to accurate two-fluid model calculations is reliable and accurate computation of the interfacial transfer terms. These interfacial transfer terms can be expressed as the product of one term describing the potential driving the transfer and a second term describing the available surface area for transfer, or interfacial area concentration. Currently, the interfacial area is predicted using flow regime dependent empirical correlations; however the interfacial area concentration is best computed through the use of the one-dimensional interfacial area transport equation (IATE). To facilitate the development of IATE source and sink term models in large-diameter pipes a fundamental understanding of the structure of the two-phase flow is essential. This understanding is improved through measurement of the local void fraction, interfacial area concentration and gas velocity profiles in pipes with diameters of 0.102 m and 0.152 m under a wide variety of flow conditions. Additionally, flow regime identification has been performed to

  3. Flow Structure and Surface Topology on a UCAV Planform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elkhoury, Michel; Yavuz, Metin; Rockwell, Donald

    2003-11-01

    Flow past a X-45 UCAV planform involves the complex generation and interaction of vortices, their breakdown and occurrence of surface separation and stall. A cinema technique of high-image-density particle image velocimetry, in conjunction with dye visualization, allows characterization of the time-averaged and instantaneous states of the flow, in terms of critical points of the near-surface streamlines. These features are related to patterns of surface normal vorticity and velocity fluctuation. Spectral analysis of the naturally occurring unsteadiness of the flow allows definition of the most effective frequencies for small-amplitude perturbation of the wing, which leads to substantial alterations of the aforementioned patterns of flow structure and topology adjacent to the surface.

  4. The Use of Energy in Malaysia: Tracing Energy Flows from Primary Source to End Use

    OpenAIRE

    Chinhao Chong; Weidou Ni; Linwei Ma; Pei Liu; Zheng Li

    2015-01-01

    Malaysia is a rapidly developing country in Southeast Asia that aims to achieve high-income country status by 2020; its economic growth is highly dependent on its abundant energy resources, especially natural gas and crude oil. In this paper, a complete picture of Malaysia’s energy use from primary source to end use is presented by mapping a Sankey diagram of Malaysia’s energy flows, together with ongoing trends analysis of the main factors influencing the energy flows. The results indicate t...

  5. Turbulent Mixing of Primary and Secondary Flow Streams in a Rocket-Based Combined Cycle Engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cramer, J. M.; Greene, M. U.; Pal, S.; Santoro, R. J.; Turner, Jim (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation gives an overview of the turbulent mixing of primary and secondary flow streams in a rocket-based combined cycle (RBCC) engine. A significant RBCC ejector mode database has been generated, detailing single and twin thruster configurations and global and local measurements. On-going analysis and correlation efforts include Marshall Space Flight Center computational fluid dynamics modeling and turbulent shear layer analysis. Potential follow-on activities include detailed measurements of air flow static pressure and velocity profiles, investigations into other thruster spacing configurations, performing a fundamental shear layer mixing study, and demonstrating single-shot Raman measurements.

  6. Structural integrated sensor and actuator systems for active flow control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behr, Christian; Schwerter, Martin; Leester-Schädel, Monika; Wierach, Peter; Dietzel, Andreas; Sinapius, Michael

    2016-04-01

    An adaptive flow separation control system is designed and implemented as an essential part of a novel high-lift device for future aircraft. The system consists of MEMS pressure sensors to determine the flow conditions and adaptive lips to regulate the mass flow and the velocity of a wall near stream over the internally blown Coanda flap. By the oscillating lip the mass flow in the blowing slot changes dynamically, consequently the momentum exchange of the boundary layer over a high lift flap required mass flow can be reduced. These new compact and highly integrated systems provide a real-time monitoring and manipulation of the flow conditions. In this context the integration of pressure sensors into flow sensing airfoils of composite material is investigated. Mechanical and electrical properties of the integrated sensors are investigated under mechanical loads during tensile tests. The sensors contain a reference pressure chamber isolated to the ambient by a deformable membrane with integrated piezoresistors connected as a Wheatstone bridge, which outputs voltage signals depending on the ambient pressure. The composite material in which the sensors are embedded consists of 22 individual layers of unidirectional glass fiber reinforced plastic (GFRP) prepreg. The results of the experiments are used for adapting the design of the sensors and the layout of the laminate to ensure an optimized flux of force in highly loaded structures primarily for future aeronautical applications. It can be shown that the pressure sensor withstands the embedding process into fiber composites with full functional capability and predictable behavior under stress.

  7. Combustor with two stage primary fuel tube with concentric members and flow regulating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, David Marchant; Whidden, Graydon Lane; Zolyomi, Wendel

    1999-01-01

    A combustor for a gas turbine having a centrally located fuel nozzle and inner, middle and outer concentric cylindrical liners, the inner liner enclosing a primary combustion zone. The combustor has an air inlet that forms two passages for pre-mixing primary fuel and air to be supplied to the primary combustion zone. Each of the pre-mixing passages has a circumferential array of swirl vanes. A plurality of primary fuel tube assemblies extend through both pre-mixing passages, with each primary fuel tube assembly located between a pair of swirl vanes. Each primary fuel tube assembly is comprised of two tubular members. The first member supplies fuel to the first pre-mixing passage, while the second member, which extends through the first member, supplies fuel to the second pre-mixing passage. An annular fuel manifold is divided into first and second chambers by a circumferentially extending baffle. The proximal end of the first member is attached to the manifold itself while the proximal end of the second member is attached to the baffle. The distal end of the first member is attached directly to the second member at around its mid-point. The inlets of the first and second members are in flow communication with the first and second manifold chambers, respectively. Control valves separately regulate the flow of fuel to the two chambers and, therefore, to the two members of the fuel tube assemblies, thereby allowing the flow of fuel to the first and second pre-mixing passages to be separately controlled.

  8. Automated structure and flow measurement - a promising tool in nailfold capillaroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berks, Michael; Dinsdale, Graham; Murray, Andrea; Moore, Tonia; Manning, Joanne; Taylor, Chris; Herrick, Ariane L

    2018-07-01

    Despite increasing interest in nailfold capillaroscopy, objective measures of capillary structure and blood flow have been little studied. We aimed to test the hypothesis that structural measurements, capillary flow, and a combined measure have the predictive power to separate patients with systemic sclerosis (SSc) from those with primary Raynaud's phenomenon (PRP) and healthy controls (HC). 50 patients with SSc, 12 with PRP, and 50 HC were imaged using a novel capillaroscopy system that generates high-quality nailfold images and provides fully-automated measurements of capillary structure and blood flow (capillary density, mean width, maximum width, shape score, derangement and mean flow velocity). Population statistics summarise the differences between the three groups. Areas under ROC curves (A Z ) were used to measure classification accuracy when assigning individuals to SSc and HC/PRP groups. Statistically significant differences in group means were found between patients with SSc and both HC and patients with PRP, for all measurements, e.g. mean width (μm) ± SE: 15.0 ± 0.71, 12.7 ± 0.74 and 11.8 ± 0.23 for SSc, PRP and HC respectively. Combining the five structural measurements gave better classification (A Z  = 0.919 ± 0.026) than the best single measurement (mean width, A Z  = 0.874 ± 0.043), whilst adding flow further improved classification (A Z  = 0.930 ± 0.024). Structural and blood flow measurements are both able to distinguish patients with SSc from those with PRP/HC. Importantly, these hold promise as clinical trial outcome measures for treatments aimed at improving finger blood flow or microvascular remodelling. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Social dilemma structures hidden behind traffic flow with lane changes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanimoto, Jun; Kukida, Shinji; Hagishima, Aya

    2014-01-01

    Aiming to merge traffic flow analysis with evolutionary game theory, we investigated the question of whether such structures can be formed from frequent lane changes in usual traffic flow without any explicit bottlenecks. In our model system, two classes of driver-agents coexist: C-agents (cooperative strategy) always remain in the lane they are initially assigned, whereas D-agents (defective strategy) try to change lanes to move ahead. In relatively high-density flows, such as the metastable and high-density phases, we found structures that correspond to either n-person prisoner dilemma (n-PD) games or quasi-PD games. In these situations, lane changes by D-agents create heavy traffic jams that reduce social efficiency. (paper)

  10. Flowing-water optical power meter for primary-standard, multi-kilowatt laser power measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, P. A.; Hadler, J. A.; Cromer, C.; West, J.; Li, X.; Lehman, J. H.

    2018-06-01

    A primary-standard flowing-water optical power meter for measuring multi-kilowatt laser emission has been built and operated. The design and operational details of this primary standard are described, and a full uncertainty analysis is provided covering the measurement range from 1–10 kW with an expanded uncertainty of 1.2%. Validating measurements at 5 kW and 10 kW show agreement with other measurement techniques to within the measurement uncertainty. This work of the U.S. Government is not subject to U.S. copyright.

  11. Structure, deformation, and failure of flow-oriented semicrystalline polymers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schrauwen, B.A.G.; Breemen, van L.C.A.; Spoelstra, A.B.; Govaert, L.E.; Peters, G.W.M.; Meijer, H.E.H.

    2004-01-01

    This study deals with the influence of processing induced crystalline orientation on the macroscopic deformation and failure behavior of thin samples of polyethylene and polypropylene. Distribution and structure of flow-induced orientations were characterized by optical microscopy, X-ray diffraction

  12. Carbon-carbon primary structure for SSTO vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croop, Harold C.; Lowndes, Holland B.

    1997-01-01

    A hot structures development program is nearing completion to validate use of carbon-carbon composite structure for primary load carrying members in a single-stage-to-orbit, or SSTO, vehicle. A four phase program was pursued which involved design development and fabrication of a full-scale wing torque box demonstration component. The design development included vehicle and component selection, design criteria and approach, design data development, demonstration component design and analysis, test fixture design and analysis, demonstration component test planning, and high temperature test instrumentation development. The fabrication effort encompassed fabrication of structural elements for mechanical property verification as well as fabrication of the demonstration component itself and associated test fixturing. The demonstration component features 3D woven graphite preforms, integral spars, oxidation inhibited matrix, chemical vapor deposited (CVD) SiC oxidation protection coating, and ceramic matrix composite fasteners. The demonstration component has been delivered to the United States Air Force (USAF) for testing in the Wright Laboratory Structural Test Facility, WPAFB, OH. Multiple thermal-mechanical load cycles will be applied simulating two atmospheric cruise missions and one orbital mission. This paper discusses the overall approach to validation testing of the wing box component and presents some preliminary analytical test predictions.

  13. The efficacy of IntraFlow intraosseous injection as a primary anesthesia technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remmers, Todd; Glickman, Gerald; Spears, Robert; He, Jianing

    2008-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the efficacy of intraosseous injection and inferior alveolar (IA) nerve block in anesthetizing mandibular posterior teeth with irreversible pulpitis. Thirty human subjects were randomly assigned to receive either intraosseous injection using the IntraFlow system (Pro-Dex Inc, Santa Ana, CA) or IA block as the primary anesthesia method. Pulpal anesthesia was evaluated via electric pulp testing at 4-minute intervals for 20 minutes. Two consecutive 80/80 readings were considered successful pulpal anesthesia. Anesthesia success or failure was recorded and groups compared. Intraosseous injection provided successful anesthesia in 13 of 15 subjects (87%). The IA block provided successful anesthesia in 9 of 15 subjects (60%). Although this difference was not statistically significant (p = 0.2148), the results of this preliminary study indicate that the IntraFlow system can be used as the primary anesthesia method in teeth with irreversible pulpitis to achieve predictable pulpal anesthesia.

  14. Structural hierarchy in flow-aligned hexagonally self-organized microphases with parallel polyelectrolytic structures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruotsalainen, T; Torkkeli, M; Serimaa, R; Makela, T; Maki-Ontto, R; Ruokolainen, J; ten Brinke, G; Ikkala, O; Mäkelä, Tapio; Mäki-Ontto, Riikka

    2003-01-01

    We report a novel structural hierarchy where a flow-aligned hexagonal self-organized structure is combined with a polyelectrolytic self-organization on a smaller length scale and where the two structures are mutually parallel. Polystyrene-block-poly(4-vinylpyridine) (PS-block-P4VP) is selected with

  15. Modelling the flow structure in local scour around bridge pier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghani, U.

    2014-01-01

    Bridge pier scouring is an important issue of any bridge design work. If it is not taken into account properly, then results will be disastrous. A number of bridges have failed due to clear water local scouring of piers. This research paper presents a numerical model study in which an attempt has been made to explore the flow variables which exist in and around a scoured bridge pier. A finite volume based model of bridge pier was developed using 3D (Three Dimensional) numerical code FLUENT and GAMBIT. After validation process, different discharge values were considered and its impact on three dimensional characteristics of flow such as stream-wise velocities on longitudinal and transverse sections, turbulance circulation cells, and boundary shear stresses was investigated. It was observed that increasing the discharge results in more turbulance around the pier on its downstream side and turbulence properties are intensified in such a situation. However, the primary velocities on the downstream side remain almost unchanged. The results have been presented in the form of contours, vector of primary velocities and x-y plots of bed shear stresses. This study can be used for enhanced understanding of flow features and improvement of formulae for prediction of scour holes around piers. (author)

  16. Determination of primary flow by correlation of temperatures of the coolant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Villanueva, Jose

    2003-01-01

    Correlation techniques are often used to assess primary coolant flow in nuclear reactors. Observable fluctuations of some physical or chemical coolant properties are suitable for this purpose. This work describes a development carried out at the National Atomic Energy Commission of Argentina (CNEA) to apply this technique to correlate temperature fluctuations. A laboratory test was performed. Two thermocouples were installed on a hydraulic loop. A stationary flow of water circulated by the mentioned loop, where a mechanical turbine type flowmeter was installed. Transit times given by the correlation flowmeter, for different flow values measured with the mechanical flowmeter, were registered and a calibration between them was done. A very good linear behavior was obtained in all the measured range. It was necessary to increase the fluctuation level by adding water at different temperatures at the measuring system input. (author)

  17. Analysis of data obtained in two-phase flow tests of primary heat transport pumps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Currie, T.C.

    1986-06-01

    This report analyzes data obtained in two-phase flow tests of primary heat transport pumps performed during the period 1980-1983. Phenomena which have been known to cause pump-induced flow oscillations in pressurized piping systems under two-phase conditions are reviewed and the data analyzed to determine whether any of the identified phenomena could have been responsible for the instabilities observed in those tests. Tentative explanations for the most severe instabilities are given based on those analyses. It is shown that suction pipe geometry probably plays an important role in promoting instabilities, so additional experiments to investigate the effect of suction pipe geometry on the stability of flow in a closed pipe loop under two-phase conditions are recommended

  18. Two-phase flow induced parametric vibrations in structural systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hara, Fumio

    1980-01-01

    This paper is divided into two parts concerning piping systems and a nuclear fuel pin system. The significant experimental results concerning the random vibration induced in an L-shaped pipe by air-water two-phase flow and the theoretical analysis of the vibration are described in the first part. It was clarified for the first time that the parametric excitation due to the periodic changes of system mass, centrifugal force and Coriolis force was the mechanism of exciting the vibration. Moreover, the experimental and theoretical analyses of the mechanism of exciting vibration by air-water two-phase flow in a straight, horizontal pipe were carried out, and the first natural frequency of the piping system was strongly related to the dominant frequency of void signals. The experimental results on the vibration of a nuclear fuel pin model in parallel air-water two-phase flow are reported in the latter part. The relations between vibrational strain variance and two-phase flow velocity or pressure fluctuation, and the frequency characteristics of vibrational strain variance were obtained. The theoretical analysis of the dynamic interaction between air-water two-phase flow and a fuel pin structure, and the vibrational instability of fuel pins in alternate air and water slugs or in large bubble flow are also reported. (Kako, I.)

  19. Three-dimensional flow and turbulence structure in electrostatic precipitator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ullum, Thorvald Uhrskov; Larsen, Poul Scheel; Özcan, Oktay

    2002-01-01

    Stereo PIV is employed to study the three-dimensional velocity and turbulence fields in a laboratory model of a negative corona, barbed-wire, smooth-plate, electrostatic precipitator (figure 1). The study is focused on determining the parametric effects of axial development, mean current density Jm...... and bulk velocity U0 on secondary flows and turbulence levels and structures due to the action of the three-dimensional electrostatic field on the charged gas. At constant bulk velocity (U0 = 1 m/s) and current density (Jm = 0.4 mA/m2), secondary flows in the form of rolls of axial vorticity with swirl...

  20. Vertical structure of turbulence in offshore flow during RASEX

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mahrt, L.; Vickers, D.; Edson, J.

    2001-01-01

    and dissipation. However, weakly stable and weakly unstable cases exhibit completely different vertical structure. With flow of warm air from land over cooler water, modest buoyancy destruction of turbulence and reduced shear generation of turbulence over the less rough sea surface cause the turbulence to rapidly...... with height and downward transport of turbulence energy toward the surface. With flow of cool air over a warmer sea surface, a convective internal boundary layer develops downstream from the coast. An overlying relatively thick layer of downward buoyancy flux (virtual temperature flux) is sometimes maintained...

  1. The structure of turbulence in a rapid tidal flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milne, I A; Sharma, R N; Flay, R G J

    2017-08-01

    The structure of turbulence in a rapid tidal flow is characterized through new observations of fundamental statistical properties at a site in the UK which has a simple geometry and sedate surface wave action. The mean flow at the Sound of Islay exceeded 2.5 m s -1 and the turbulent boundary layer occupied the majority of the water column, with an approximately logarithmic mean velocity profile identifiable close to the seabed. The anisotropic ratios, spectral scales and higher-order statistics of the turbulence generally agree well with values reported for two-dimensional open channels in the laboratory and other tidal channels, therefore providing further support for the application of universal models. The results of the study can assist in developing numerical models of turbulence in rapid tidal flows such as those proposed for tidal energy generation.

  2. Epistemic uncertainty propagation in energy flows between structural vibrating systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Menghui; Du, Xiaoping; Qiu, Zhiping; Wang, Chong

    2016-03-01

    A dimension-wise method for predicting fuzzy energy flows between structural vibrating systems coupled by joints with epistemic uncertainties is established. Based on its Legendre polynomial approximation at α=0, both the minimum and maximum point vectors of the energy flow of interest are calculated dimension by dimension within the space spanned by the interval parameters determined by fuzzy those at α=0 and the resulted interval bounds are used to assemble the concerned fuzzy energy flows. Besides the proposed method, vertex method as well as two current methods is also applied. Comparisons among results by different methods are accomplished by two numerical examples and the accuracy of all methods is simultaneously verified by Monte Carlo simulation.

  3. High-resolution flow structure measurements in a rod bundle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ylönen, A. T.

    2013-07-01

    Flow behaviour inside a rod bundle has been an active research topic since the early days of the nuclear power industry. Of particular interest in previous studies have been topics such as flow mixing, two-phase flow structure and mapping of two-phase flow transitions. The optimisation of fuel element design can only be achieved by truly understanding the nature of flow. The ultimate goal in this research is to enhance the heat transfer and increase the critical heat flux, which would improve the fuel economy. A better understanding of the flow would also improve nuclear safety as departure from nucleate boiling (DNB) can be predicted more accurately. The motivation for the current project (SUBFLOW) was to increase knowledge of the complex flow phenomena inside a rod bundle. A dedicated sub-channel flow test facility was designed and constructed at the Paul Scherrer Institut (PSI), Villigen, Switzerland. An adiabatic test loop has an up-scaled (1:2.6) vertical fuel rod bundle model with a 4 × 4 geometry. For the very first time, the wire-mesh sensor measurement technique was implemented in a rod bundle as two 64×64 conductivity wire-mesh sensors were installed in the upper part of the test section. The measurement technique enables one to study single- and two-phase flow behaviour with high spatial and temporal resolution. The research topics addressed in this thesis cover a wide range of flow conditions with and without a spacer grid in a rod bundle. The experimental campaign was started by studying natural mixing of a passive scalar to characterise the development of turbulent diffusion in an injection sub-channel and, later on, cross-mixing between adjacent sub-channels. The results were also used in comparison with the in-house CFD code PSI-Boil that is being developed at PSI. The code could estimate the mixing inside the sub-channel and the transition to cross-mixing with a good accuracy. As a natural transition, the SUBFLOW experiments were continued by

  4. High-resolution flow structure measurements in a rod bundle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ylönen, A. T.

    2013-01-01

    Flow behaviour inside a rod bundle has been an active research topic since the early days of the nuclear power industry. Of particular interest in previous studies have been topics such as flow mixing, two-phase flow structure and mapping of two-phase flow transitions. The optimisation of fuel element design can only be achieved by truly understanding the nature of flow. The ultimate goal in this research is to enhance the heat transfer and increase the critical heat flux, which would improve the fuel economy. A better understanding of the flow would also improve nuclear safety as departure from nucleate boiling (DNB) can be predicted more accurately. The motivation for the current project (SUBFLOW) was to increase knowledge of the complex flow phenomena inside a rod bundle. A dedicated sub-channel flow test facility was designed and constructed at the Paul Scherrer Institut (PSI), Villigen, Switzerland. An adiabatic test loop has an up-scaled (1:2.6) vertical fuel rod bundle model with a 4 × 4 geometry. For the very first time, the wire-mesh sensor measurement technique was implemented in a rod bundle as two 64×64 conductivity wire-mesh sensors were installed in the upper part of the test section. The measurement technique enables one to study single- and two-phase flow behaviour with high spatial and temporal resolution. The research topics addressed in this thesis cover a wide range of flow conditions with and without a spacer grid in a rod bundle. The experimental campaign was started by studying natural mixing of a passive scalar to characterise the development of turbulent diffusion in an injection sub-channel and, later on, cross-mixing between adjacent sub-channels. The results were also used in comparison with the in-house CFD code PSI-Boil that is being developed at PSI. The code could estimate the mixing inside the sub-channel and the transition to cross-mixing with a good accuracy. As a natural transition, the SUBFLOW experiments were continued by

  5. Amino Acid Molecular Units: Building Primary and Secondary Protein Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aparecido R. Silva

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available In order to guarantee the learning quality and suitable knowledge  use  about structural biology, it is fundamental to  exist, since the beginning of  students’ formation, the possibility of clear visualization of biomolecule structures. Nevertheless, the didactic books can only bring  schematic  drawings; even more elaborated figures and graphic computation  do not permit the necessary interaction.  The representation of three-dimensional molecular structures with ludic models, built with representative units, have supplied to the students and teachers a successfully experience to  visualize such structures and correlate them to the real molecules.  The design and applicability of the representative units were discussed with researchers and teachers before mould implementation.  In this stage  it  will be presented the  developed  kit  containing the  representative  plastic parts of the main amino acids.  The kit can demonstrate the interaction among the amino acids  functional groups  (represented by colors, shapes,  sizes and  the peptidic bonds between them  facilitating the assembly and visuali zation of the primary and secondary protein structure.  The models were designed for  Ca,  amino,  carboxyl groups  and  hydrogen. The  lateral chains have  well defined models that represent their geometrical shape.  The completed kit set  will be presented in this meeting (patent requested.  In the last phase of the project will be realized  an effective evaluation  of the kit  as a facilitative didactic tool of the teaching/learning process in the Structural Molecular Biology area.

  6. Flow structure of steam-water mixed spray

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanada, Toshiyuki; Mitsuhashi, Yuki; Mizutani, Hiroya; Saito, Takayuki

    2010-01-01

    In this study, the flow structure of a steam-water mixed spray is studied both numerically and experimentally. The velocity and pressure profiles of single-phase flow are calculated using numerical methods. On the basis of the calculated flow fields, the droplet behavior is predicted by a one-way interaction model. This numerical analysis reveals that the droplets are accelerated even after they are sprayed from the nozzle. Experimentally, the mixed spray is observed using an ultra-high-speed video camera, and the velocity field is measured by using the oarticle image velocimetry (PIV) technique. Along with this PIV velocity field measurement, the velocities and diameters of droplets are measured by phase Doppler anemometry. Furthermore, the mixing process of steam and water and the atomization process of a liquid film are observed using a transparent nozzle. High-speed photography observations reveal that the flow inside the nozzle is annular flow and that most of the liquid film is atomized at the nozzle throat and nozzle outlet. Finally, the optimum mixing method for steam and water is determined.

  7. Flow structure of steam-water mixed spray

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanada, Toshiyuki, E-mail: ttsanad@ipc.shizuoka.ac.j [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Shizuoka University, 3-5-1 Johoku, Naka-ku, Hamamatsu 432-8561, Shizuoka (Japan); Mitsuhashi, Yuki; Mizutani, Hiroya; Saito, Takayuki [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Shizuoka University, 3-5-1 Johoku, Naka-ku, Hamamatsu 432-8561, Shizuoka (Japan)

    2010-12-15

    In this study, the flow structure of a steam-water mixed spray is studied both numerically and experimentally. The velocity and pressure profiles of single-phase flow are calculated using numerical methods. On the basis of the calculated flow fields, the droplet behavior is predicted by a one-way interaction model. This numerical analysis reveals that the droplets are accelerated even after they are sprayed from the nozzle. Experimentally, the mixed spray is observed using an ultra-high-speed video camera, and the velocity field is measured by using the oarticle image velocimetry (PIV) technique. Along with this PIV velocity field measurement, the velocities and diameters of droplets are measured by phase Doppler anemometry. Furthermore, the mixing process of steam and water and the atomization process of a liquid film are observed using a transparent nozzle. High-speed photography observations reveal that the flow inside the nozzle is annular flow and that most of the liquid film is atomized at the nozzle throat and nozzle outlet. Finally, the optimum mixing method for steam and water is determined.

  8. Origin of Permeability and Structure of Flows in Fractured Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Dreuzy, J.; Darcel, C.; Davy, P.; Erhel, J.; Le Goc, R.; Maillot, J.; Meheust, Y.; Pichot, G.; Poirriez, B.

    2013-12-01

    After more than three decades of research, flows in fractured media have been shown to result from multi-scale geological structures. Flows result non-exclusively from the damage zone of the large faults, from the percolation within denser networks of smaller fractures, from the aperture heterogeneity within the fracture planes and from some remaining permeability within the matrix. While the effect of each of these causes has been studied independently, global assessments of the main determinisms is still needed. We propose a general approach to determine the geological structures responsible for flows, their permeability and their organization based on field data and numerical modeling [de Dreuzy et al., 2012b]. Multi-scale synthetic networks are reconstructed from field data and simplified mechanical modeling [Davy et al., 2010]. High-performance numerical methods are developed to comply with the specificities of the geometry and physical properties of the fractured media [Pichot et al., 2010; Pichot et al., 2012]. And, based on a large Monte-Carlo sampling, we determine the key determinisms of fractured permeability and flows (Figure). We illustrate our approach on the respective influence of fracture apertures and fracture correlation patterns at large scale. We show the potential role of fracture intersections, so far overlooked between the fracture and the network scales. We also demonstrate how fracture correlations reduce the bulk fracture permeability. Using this analysis, we highlight the need for more specific in-situ characterization of fracture flow structures. Fracture modeling and characterization are necessary to meet the new requirements of a growing number of applications where fractures appear both as potential advantages to enhance permeability and drawbacks for safety, e.g. in energy storage, stimulated geothermal energy and non-conventional gas productions. References Davy, P., et al. (2010), A likely universal model of fracture scaling and

  9. Cross flow response of a cylindrical structure under local shear flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoo-Chul Kim

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The VIV (Vortex-Induced Vibration analysis of a flexible cylindrical structure under locally strong shear flow is presented. The model is made of Teflon and has 9.5m length, 0.0127m diameter, and 0.001m wall thickness. 11 2-dimensional accelerometers are installed along the model. The experiment has been conducted at the ocean engineering basin in the University of Tokyo in which uniform current can be generated. The model is installed at about 30 degree of slope and submerged by almost overall length. Local shear flow is made by superposing uniform current and accelerated flow generated by an impeller. The results of frequency and modal analysis are presented.

  10. Theoretical investigations on the determination of cavitation-free primary flow after compacting the reactor FRG-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pihowicz, W.

    1997-01-01

    Basing on an extensive analysis of the influence of compacting the FRG-1 reactor core upon the change in flow, heat exchange, as well as cavitation behavior of the primary circuit the underlying principles of the determination procedure for a cavitations-free primary flow have been developed theoretically. It was found that the problem has to be treated in a complex manner, i.e. considering the coupled flow, temperature, as well as cavitation fields, and that for a successful solution of the problem it is absolutely necessary to simultaneously induce an optimized fixation of the main primary coolant pump. (orig.) [de

  11. Structure of urban movements: polycentric activity and entangled hierarchical flows.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camille Roth

    Full Text Available The spatial arrangement of urban hubs and centers and how individuals interact with these centers is a crucial problem with many applications ranging from urban planning to epidemiology. We utilize here in an unprecedented manner the large scale, real-time 'Oyster' card database of individual person movements in the London subway to reveal the structure and organization of the city. We show that patterns of intraurban movement are strongly heterogeneous in terms of volume, but not in terms of distance travelled, and that there is a polycentric structure composed of large flows organized around a limited number of activity centers. For smaller flows, the pattern of connections becomes richer and more complex and is not strictly hierarchical since it mixes different levels consisting of different orders of magnitude. This new understanding can shed light on the impact of new urban projects on the evolution of the polycentric configuration of a city and the dense structure of its centers and it provides an initial approach to modeling flows in an urban system.

  12. Flow induced vibrational excitation of nuclear reactor structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gibert, R.J.

    1979-01-01

    The pressure fluctuations generated by disturbed flows, encountered in nuclear reactors induce vibrations in the structures. In order to make forecastings for these vibrational levels, it is necessary to know the characteristics of the random pressure fluctuations induced in the walls by the main flow peculiarities of the circuits. This knowledge is essentially provided by experimentation which shows that most of the energy from these fluctuations is in the low frequency area. It is also necessary to determine the transfer functions of the fluid-structure coupled system. Given the frequency range of the excitations, a calculation of the characteristics of the first eigenmodes is generally sufficient. This calculation is carried out by finite element codes, the modal dampings being assessed separately. In this paper, emphasis is placed mainly on the analysis of the sources of excitation due to flow peculiarities. Some examples will also be given of assessments of vibrations in real structures (pipes, reactor internals, etc.) and of comparisons with the experimental results obtained on models or on a site [fr

  13. Lagrangian structures in time-periodic vortical flows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. V. Kostrykin

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The Lagrangian trajectories of fluid particles are experimentally studied in an oscillating four-vortex velocity field. The oscillations occur due to a loss of stability of a steady flow and result in a regular reclosure of streamlines between the vortices of the same sign. The Eulerian velocity field is visualized by tracer displacements over a short time period. The obtained data on tracer motions during a number of oscillation periods show that the Lagrangian trajectories form quasi-regular structures. The destruction of these structures is determined by two characteristic time scales: the tracers are redistributed sufficiently fast between the vortices of the same sign and much more slowly transported into the vortices of opposite sign. The observed behavior of the Lagrangian trajectories is quantitatively reproduced in a new numerical experiment with two-dimensional model of the velocity field with a small number of spatial harmonics. A qualitative interpretation of phenomena observed on the basis of the theory of adiabatic chaos in the Hamiltonian systems is given. The Lagrangian trajectories are numerically simulated under varying flow parameters. It is shown that the spatial-temporal characteristics of the Lagrangian structures depend on the properties of temporal change in the streamlines topology and on the adiabatic parameter corresponding to the flow. The condition for the occurrence of traps (the regions where the Lagrangian particles reside for a long time is obtained.

  14. Influence of elbow curvature on flow structure at elbow outlet under high Reynolds number condition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ono, A., E-mail: ono.ayako@jaea.go.jp [Oarai Research and Development Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Narita 4002, Oarai, Ibaraki 311-1393 (Japan); Kimura, N.; Kamide, H.; Tobita, A. [Oarai Research and Development Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Narita 4002, Oarai, Ibaraki 311-1393 (Japan)

    2011-11-15

    In the design of Japan Sodium-cooled Fast Reactor (JSFR), coolant velocity is beyond 9 m/s in the primary hot leg pipe of 1.27 m diameter. The Reynolds number in the piping reaches 4.2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 7}. Moreover, a short-elbow is adopted in the hot leg pipe in order to achieve compact plant layout and to reduce plant construction cost. Therefore, the flow-induced vibration (FIV) arising from the piping geometry may occur in the short-elbow pipe. The FIV is due to the excitation source which is caused by the pressure fluctuation in the pipe. The pressure fluctuation in the pipe is closely related with the velocity fluctuation. As the first step of clarification of the FIV mechanism, it is important to grasp the mechanism of flow fluctuation in the elbow. In this study, water experiments with two types of elbows with different curvature ratios were conducted in order to investigate the interaction between flow separation and the secondary flow due to the elbow curvature. The experiments were conducted with the short-elbow and the long-elbow under Re = 1.8 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 5} and 5.4 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 5} conditions. The velocity fields in the elbows were measured using a high-speed Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV). The time-series of axial velocity fields and the cross-section velocity fields obtained by the high-speed PIV measurements revealed the unsteady and complex flow structure in the elbow. The flow separation always occurred in the short-elbow while the flow separation occurred intermittently in the long-elbow case. The circumferential secondary flows in clockwise and counterclockwise directions flowed forward downstream of reattachment point alternately in both elbows.

  15. Using Sankey diagrams to map energy flow from primary fuel to end use

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Subramanyam, Veena; Paramshivan, Deepak; Kumar, Amit; Mondal, Md. Alam Hossain

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Energy flows from both supply and demand sides shown through Sankey diagrams. • Energy flows from reserves to energy end uses for primary and secondary fuels shown. • Five main energy demand sectors in Alberta are analyzed. • In residential/commercial sectors, highest energy consumption is in space heating. • In the industrial sector, highest energy use is in the mining subsector. - Abstract: The energy sector is the largest contributor to gross domestic product (GDP), income, employment, and government revenue in both developing and developed nations. But the energy sector has a significant environmental footprint due to greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. Efficient production, conversion, and use of energy resources are key factors for reducing the environmental footprint. Hence it is necessary to understand energy flows from both the supply and the demand sides. Most energy analyses focus on improving energy efficiency broadly without considering the aggregate energy flow. We developed Sankey diagrams that map energy flow for both the demand and supply sides for the province of Alberta, Canada. The diagrams will help policy/decision makers, researchers, and others to understand energy flow from reserves through to final energy end uses for primary and secondary fuels in the five main energy demand sectors in Alberta: residential, commercial, industrial, agricultural, and transportation. The Sankey diagrams created for this study show total energy consumption, useful energy, and energy intensities of various end-use devices. The Long-range Energy Alternatives Planning System (LEAP) model is used in this study. The model showed that Alberta’s total input energy in the five demand sectors was 189 PJ, 186 PJ, 828.5PJ, 398 PJ, and 50.83 PJ, respectively. On the supply side, the total energy input and output were found to be 644.84 PJ and 239 PJ, respectively. These results, along with the associated energy flows were depicted pictorially using

  16. Q-factor of coolant flow in the primary circuit of NPP with pressurised water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Proskuryakov, K.N.; Belikov, S.O.; Novikov, K.S.

    2011-01-01

    Systems of preoperational vibration dynamic monitoring in of WWER are presented. The results of measurements during commission of NPP with WWER are presented. The paper provides the result of the research, that estimation of coolant fluctuations caused by pulse perturbation of pressure in the primary circuit NPP. It is shown that results could be received at known value of a Q - factor of acoustical oscillatory system only. The research demonstrates the results of dependence of the sound speed from the mass steam content in the coolant flow thru reactor core. The worked out results can be used for identification of the reasons of abnormal growth of level of vibrations of fuel assembly, fuel rod, equipment and internals, and for forecasting the operation conditions which provide of vibration - acoustical resonances in the primary loop equipment. (author)

  17. The relationship between the cerebral blood flow, oxygen consumption and glucose metabolism in primary degenerative dementia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuwabara, Yasuo; Ichiya, Yuichi; Ichimiya, Atsushi; Sasaki, Masayuki; Akashi, Yuko; Yoshida, Tsuyoshi; Fukumura, Toshimitsu; Masada, Kouji

    1995-01-01

    The CBF, CMRO 2 and CMRGlu were measured in patients with primary degenerative dementia including 5 patients with dementia of Alzheimer's type and 4 patients with Pick's disease, and then the correlation between the cerebral blood flow and energy metabolism was evaluated. The control subjects consisted of 5 age-matched normal volunteers. The CBF, CMRO 2 and CMRGlu decreased in the bilateral frontal, temporal and parietal regions in the patients with Alzheimer's dementia, while they decreased in the bilateral frontal and temporal regions in the patients with Pick's disease. Both the CBF and CMRO 2 were closely correlated with each other. However, the CMRGlu was more severely impaired than the CBF or CMRO 2 in both pathological conditions. These results suggested that CMRGlu began to decrease before the reduction of the aerobic metabolism and thus measuring the CMRGlu is considered to be the most sensitive method for detecting abnormal regions in primary degenerative dementia. (author)

  18. Modelling of steam condensation in the primary flow channel of a gas-heated steam generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawamura, H.; Meister, G.

    1982-10-01

    A new simulation code has been developed for the analysis of steam ingress accidents in high temperatures reactors which evaluates the heat transfer in a steam generator headed by a mixture of helium and water steam. Special emphasis is laid on the analysis of steam condensation in the primary circuit of the steam generator. The code takes wall and bulk condensation into account. A new method is proposed to describe the entrainment of water droplets in the primary gas flow. Some typical results are given. Steam condensation in the primary channel may have a significant effect on temperature distributions. The effect on the heat transferred by the steam generator, however, is found to be not so prominent as might be expected. The reason is discussed. A simplified code will also be described, which gives results with reasonable accuracy within much shorter execution times. This code may be used as a program module in a program simulating the total primary circuit of a high temperature reactor. (orig.) [de

  19. A Few Expanding Integrable Models, Hamiltonian Structures and Constrained Flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Yufeng

    2011-01-01

    Two kinds of higher-dimensional Lie algebras and their loop algebras are introduced, for which a few expanding integrable models including the coupling integrable couplings of the Broer-Kaup (BK) hierarchy and the dispersive long wave (DLW) hierarchy as well as the TB hierarchy are obtained. From the reductions of the coupling integrable couplings, the corresponding coupled integrable couplings of the BK equation, the DLW equation, and the TB equation are obtained, respectively. Especially, the coupling integrable coupling of the TB equation reduces to a few integrable couplings of the well-known mKdV equation. The Hamiltonian structures of the coupling integrable couplings of the three kinds of soliton hierarchies are worked out, respectively, by employing the variational identity. Finally, we decompose the BK hierarchy of evolution equations into x-constrained flows and t n -constrained flows whose adjoint representations and the Lax pairs are given. (general)

  20. Advanced composite structural concepts and material technologies for primary aircraft structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Anthony

    1991-01-01

    Structural weight savings using advanced composites have been demonstrated for many years. Most military aircraft today use these materials extensively and Europe has taken the lead in their use in commercial aircraft primary structures. A major inhibiter to the use of advanced composites in the United States is cost. Material costs are high and will remain high relative to aluminum. The key therefore lies in the significant reduction in fabrication and assembly costs. The largest cost in most structures today is assembly. As part of the NASA Advanced Composite Technology Program, Lockheed Aeronautical Systems Company has a contract to explore and develop advanced structural and manufacturing concepts using advanced composites for transport aircraft. Wing and fuselage concepts and related trade studies are discussed. These concepts are intended to lower cost and weight through the use of innovative material forms, processes, structural configurations and minimization of parts. The approach to the trade studies and the downselect to the primary wing and fuselage concepts is detailed. The expectations for the development of these concepts is reviewed.

  1. Measurement of multi-dimensional flow structure for flow boiling in a tube

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adachi, Yu; Ito, Daisuke; Saito, Yasushi

    2014-01-01

    With an aim of the measurement of multi-dimensional flow structure of in-tube boiling two-phase flow, the authors built their own wire mesh measurement system based on electrical conductivity measurement, and examined the relationship between the electrical conductivity obtained by the wire mesh sensor and the void fraction. In addition, the authors measured the void fraction using neutron radiography, and compared the result with the measured value using the wire mesh sensor. From the comparison with neutron radiography, it was found that the new method underestimated the void fraction in the flow in the vicinity of the void fraction of 0.2-0.5, similarly to the conventional result. In addition, since the wire mesh sensor cannot measure dispersed droplets, it tends to overestimate the void fraction in the high void fraction region, such as churn flow accompanied by droplet generation. In the electrical conductivity wire-mesh sensor method, it is necessary to correctly take into account the effect of liquid film or droplets. The authors also built a measurement system based on the capacitance wire mesh sensor method using the difference in dielectric constant, performed the confirmation of transmission and reception signals using deionized water as a medium, and showed the validity of the system. As for the dispersed droplets, the capacitance method has a potential to be able to measure them. (A.O.)

  2. Visualization of the structure of vortex breakdown in free swirling jet flow

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vanierschot, M.; Perçin, M.; van Oudheusden, B.W.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we investigate the three dimensional flow structures in a free annular swirling jet flow undergoing vortex breakdown. The flow field is analyzed by means of time-resolved Tomographic Particle Image Velocimetry measurements. Both time-averaged and instantaneous flow structures are

  3. Improving Ambient Wind Environments of a Cross-flow Wind Turbine near a Structure by using an Inlet Guide Structure and a Flow Deflector

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tadakazu TANINO; Shinichiro NAKAO; Genki UEBAYASHI

    2005-01-01

    A cross-flow wind turbine near a structure was tested for the performance. The results showed that the performance of a cross-flow wind turbine near a structure was up to 30% higher than the one without a structure.In addition, we tried to get higher performance of a cross-flow wind turbine by using an Inlet Guide Structure and a Flow Deflector. An Inlet Guide Structure was placed on the edge of a structure and a Flow Deflector was set near a cross-flow wind turbine and can improve ambient wind environments of the wind turbine, the maximum power coefficients were about 15 to 40% higher and the tip speed ratio range showing the high power coefficient was wide and the positive gradients were steep apparently.

  4. Flow Structures and Efficiency of Swimming Fish school: Numerical Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yatagai, Yuzuru; Hattori, Yuji

    2013-11-01

    The flow structure and energy-saving mechanism in fish school is numerically investigated by using the volume penalization method. We calculate the various patterns of configuration of fishes and investigate the relation between spatial arrangement and the performance of fish. It is found that the down-stream fish gains a hydrodynamic advantage from the upstream wake shed by the upstream fish. The most efficient configuration is that the downstream fish is placed in the wake. It reduces the drag force of the downstream fish in comparison with that in solo swimming.

  5. Modification of Flow Structure Over a Van Model By Suction Flow Control to Reduce Aerodynamics Drag

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harinaldi Harinaldi

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Automobile aerodynamic studies are typically undertaken to improve safety and increase fuel efficiency as well as to  find new innovation in automobile technology to deal with the problem of energy crisis and global warming. Some car companies have the objective to develop control solutions that enable to reduce the aerodynamic drag of vehicle and  significant modification progress is still possible by reducing the mass, rolling friction or aerodynamic drag. Some flow  control method provides the possibility to modify the flow separation to reduce the development of the swirling structures around the vehicle. In this study, a family van is modeled with a modified form of Ahmed's body by changing the orientation of the flow from its original form (modified/reversed Ahmed body. This model is equipped with a suction on the rear side to comprehensively examine the pressure field modifications that occur. The investigation combines computational and experimental work. Computational approach used  a commercial software with standard k-epsilon flow turbulence model, and the objectives was  to determine the characteristics of the flow field and aerodynamic drag reduction that occurred in the test model. Experimental approach used load cell in order to validate the aerodynamic drag reduction obtained by computational approach. The results show that the application of a suction in the rear part of the van model give the effect of reducing the wake and the vortex formation. Futhermore, aerodynamic drag reduction close to 13.86% for the computational approach and 16.32% for the experimental have been obtained.

  6. Gazprom: internal structure, management principles and financial flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kryukov, Valery; Moe, Arild.

    1996-01-01

    Gazprom is responsible for over 95% of total Russian natural gas production and is one of the largest companies in the world. As well as being of major importance in the Russian domestic energy balance, it is also the largest gas trader in the world, supplying about half the gas imported into western and east-central Europe. The scale of these external activities means that the terms on which it supplies gas to its customers will have an impact on business beyond the gas industry. This study investigates the roots of the company and analyses its current organisation, management structure and financial flows. The main topics covered are: the Russian gas industry in the Soviet era; the organisational structure of Gazprom after privatisation; pricing policy; the company's financial position; Gazprom in relation to the domestic economy and the outside world. (9 figures; 7 tables). (author)

  7. Effects of flow intermittency and pharmaceutical exposure on the structure and metabolism of stream biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corcoll, Natàlia; Casellas, Maria; Huerta, Belinda; Guasch, Helena; Acuña, Vicenç; Rodríguez-Mozaz, Sara; Serra-Compte, Albert; Barceló, Damià; Sabater, Sergi

    2015-01-15

    Increasing concentrations of pharmaceutical compounds occur in many rivers, but their environmental risk remains poorly studied in stream biofilms. Flow intermittency shapes the structure and functions of ecosystems, and may enhance their sensitivity to toxicants. This study evaluates the effects of a long-term exposure of biofilm communities to a mixture of pharmaceutical compounds at environmental concentrations on biofilm bioaccumulation capacity, the structure and metabolic processes of algae and bacteria communities, and how their potential effects were enhanced or not by the occurrence of flow intermittency. To assess the interaction between those two stressors, an experiment with artificial streams was performed. Stream biofilms were exposed to a mixture of pharmaceuticals, as well as to a short period of flow intermittency. Results indicate that biofilms were negatively affected by pharmaceuticals. The algal biomass and taxa richness decreased and unicellular green algae relatively increased. The structure of the bacterial (based on denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis of amplified 16S rRNA genes) changed and showed a reduction of the operational taxonomic units (OTUs) richness. Exposed biofilms showed higher rates of metabolic processes, such as primary production and community respiration, attributed to pharmaceuticals stimulated an increase of green algae and heterotrophs, respectively. Flow intermittency modulated the effects of chemicals on natural communities. The algal community became more sensitive to short-term exposure of pharmaceuticals (lower EC50 value) when exposed to water intermittency, indicating cumulative effects between the two assessed stressors. In contrast to algae, the bacterial community became less sensitive to short-term exposure of pharmaceuticals (higher EC50) when exposed to water intermittency, indicating co-tolerance phenomena. According to the observed effects, the environmental risk of pharmaceuticals in nature is high

  8. Primary structure of human alpha 2-macroglobulin. V. The complete structure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sottrup-Jensen, Lars; Stepanik, Terrence M; Kristensen, Torsten

    1984-01-01

    The primary structure of the tetrameric plasma glycoprotein human alpha 2-macroglobulin has been determined. The identical subunits contain 1451 amino acid residues. Glucosamine-based oligosaccharide groups are attached to asparagine residues 32, 47, 224, 373, 387, 846, 968, and 1401. Eleven......-SH group of Cys-949 is thiol esterified to the gamma-carbonyl group of Glx-952, thus forming an activatable reactive site which can mediate covalent binding of nucleophiles. A putative transglutaminase cross-linking site is constituted by Gln-670 and Gln-671. The primary sites of proteolytic cleavage......-macroglobulin subunit is discussed. A comparison of stretches of sequences from alpha 2-macroglobulin with partial sequence data for complement components C3 and C4 indicates that these proteins are evolutionary related. The properties of alpha 2-macroglobulin are discussed within the context of proteolytically...

  9. CFD simulations of flow erosion and flow-induced deformation of needle valve: Effects of operation, structure and fluid parameters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Hongjun, E-mail: ticky863@126.com [State Key Laboratory of Oil and Gas Reservoir Geology and Exploitation, Southwest Petroleum University, Chengdu 610500, Sichuan (China); State Key Laboratory of Hydraulics and Mountain River Engineering, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610065, Sichuan (China); Pan, Qian; Zhang, Wenli; Feng, Guang; Li, Xue [State Key Laboratory of Oil and Gas Reservoir Geology and Exploitation, Southwest Petroleum University, Chengdu 610500, Sichuan (China)

    2014-07-01

    Highlights: • A combined FSI–CFD and DPM computational method is used to investigate flow erosion and deformation of needle valve. • The numerical model is validated with the comparison of measured and predicted erosion rate. • Effects of operation, structure and fluid parameters on flow erosion and flow-induced deformation are discussed. • Particle diameter has the most significant effect on flow erosion. • Inlet rate has the most obvious effect on flow-induced deformation. - Abstract: A three-dimensional fluid–structure interaction (FSI) computational model coupling with a combined continuum and discrete model has been used to predict the flow erosion rate and flow-induced deformation of needle valve. Comparisons with measured data demonstrate good agreement with the predictions of erosion rate. The flow field distribution of gas-particle flow and the erosion rate and deformation of valve core are captured under different operating and structural conditions with different fluid parameters. The effects of inlet velocity, valve opening and inlet valve channel size, particle concentration, particle diameter and particle phase components are discussed in detail. The results indicate that valve tip has the most severe erosion and deformation, and flow field, erosion rate and deformation of valve are all sensitive to inlet condition changes, structural changes and fluid properties changes. The effect of particle diameter on erosion is the most significant, while the influence of inlet rate on deformation is the greatest one.

  10. Cardiac structure and functions in patients with asymptomatic primary hyperparathyroidism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aktas Yılmaz, B; Akyel, A; Kan, E; Ercin, U; Tavil, Y; Bilgihan, A; Cakır, N; Arslan, M; Balos Toruner, F

    2013-11-01

    The data about cardiovascular (CV) changes in patients with asymptomatic primary hyperparathyroidism (PHPT) are scarce. The aim of this study is to compare cardiac structure and functions in patients with asymptomatic PHPT and controls by using tissue Doppler echocardiography. Thirty-eight patients with asymptomatic PHPT and 31 sex- and age-matched controls with similar cardiac risk factors were evaluated. There was no significant difference in ejection fraction (EF) between the patients and the controls [64±5.95 vs 62±3.25% (p=0.094)]. Left ventricular mass index (LVMI) was significantly higher in patients than controls [105.96 (66.45-167.24) vs 93.79 (64.25- 139.25) g/m2, p=0.014]. There was a significant correlation between LVMI and serum calcium (Ca) (r=0.240, p<0.005). Myocardial performance index (MPI) was significantly higher in patients than controls [0.49 (0.35-0.60) vs 0.39 (0.33-0.62), p<0.001]. There was positive correlation between theMPI and serumCa levels (r=0.505, p<0.001), parathyroid hormone (PTH) levels (r=0.464, p<0.001) and LVMI (r=0.270, p<0.005). When the normotensive patients and controls were evaluated, the difference between the groups remained statistically significant considering LVMI and MPI [109 (66.45-167.24) g/m2 vs 94.17 (64.25-75.10) g/m2, p=0.03; and 0.49 (0.35-0.60) vs 0.39 (0.33-0.62), p<0.01, respectively]. There were significant correlations between MPI and Ca (r=0.566, p<0.001), and PTH (r=0.472, p<0.001). Our study results showed that cardiacmorphology and diastolic functions are altered in the patients with asymptomatic PHPT. High serum PTH and Ca levels may have an impact on these CV changes. Whether these subtle CV changes would affect cardiac systolic functions and mortality in patients with asymptomatic PHPT should be investigated in further prospective studies.

  11. Undulating fins produce off-axis thrust and flow structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neveln, Izaak D; Bale, Rahul; Bhalla, Amneet Pal Singh; Curet, Oscar M; Patankar, Neelesh A; MacIver, Malcolm A

    2014-01-15

    While wake structures of many forms of swimming and flying are well characterized, the wake generated by a freely swimming undulating fin has not yet been analyzed. These elongated fins allow fish to achieve enhanced agility exemplified by the forward, backward and vertical swimming capabilities of knifefish, and also have potential applications in the design of more maneuverable underwater vehicles. We present the flow structure of an undulating robotic fin model using particle image velocimetry to measure fluid velocity fields in the wake. We supplement the experimental robotic work with high-fidelity computational fluid dynamics, simulating the hydrodynamics of both a virtual fish, whose fin kinematics and fin plus body morphology are measured from a freely swimming knifefish, and a virtual rendering of our robot. Our results indicate that a series of linked vortex tubes is shed off the long edge of the fin as the undulatory wave travels lengthwise along the fin. A jet at an oblique angle to the fin is associated with the successive vortex tubes, propelling the fish forward. The vortex structure bears similarity to the linked vortex ring structure trailing the oscillating caudal fin of a carangiform swimmer, though the vortex rings are distorted because of the undulatory kinematics of the elongated fin.

  12. Flow structure and vorticity transport on a plunging wing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eslam Panah, Azar

    The structure and dynamics of the flow field created by a plunging flat plate airfoil are investigated at a chord Reynolds number of 10,000 while varying plunge amplitude and Strouhal number. Digital particle image velocimetry measurements are used to characterize the shedding patterns and the interactions between the leading and trailing edge vortex structures (LEV and TEV), resulting in the development of a wake classification system based on the nature and timing of interactions between the leading- and trailing-edge vortices. The convection speed of the LEV and its resulting interaction with the TEV is primarily dependent on reduced frequency; however, at Strouhal numbers above approximately 0.4, a significant influence of Strouhal number (or plunge amplitude) is observed in which LEV convection is retarded, and the contribution of the LEV to the wake is diminished. It is shown that this effect is caused by an enhanced interaction between the LEV and the airfoil surface, due to a significant increase in the strength of the vortices in this Strouhal number range, for all plunge amplitudes investigated. Comparison with low-Reynolds-number studies of plunging airfoil aerodynamics reveals a high degree of consistency and suggests applicability of the classification system beyond the range examined in the present work. Some important differences are also observed. The three-dimensional flow field was characterized for a plunging two-dimensional flat-plate airfoil using three-dimensional reconstructions of planar PIV data. Whereas the phase-averaged description of the flow field shows the secondary vortex penetrating the leading-edge shear layer to terminate LEV formation on the airfoil, time-resolved, instantaneous PIV measurements show a continuous and growing entrainment of secondary vorticity into the shear layer and LEV. A planar control volume analysis on the airfoil indicated that the generation of secondary vorticity produced approximately one half the

  13. Status of LWR primary pressure boundary structural materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chi, Se Hwan; Hong, Jun Hwa; Byun, Taek Sang; Kang, Sung Sik; Ryu, Woo Seog; Lee, Bong Sang; Kook, Il Hyun [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1994-07-01

    The integrity of major systems, structures and components is a prerequisite to the economy and safety of an existing light water reactor and also for the next generation reactors. As few reactor structural materials are being manufactured by domestic companies, based on economic and safety reasons, a new demand to improve the quality of domestic reactor structural materials and to develop reactor structural steels has arisen. Investigations on the state-of-the-art of the materials specifications, performance and current state of structural materials development were performed as a first step to domestic reactor structural steel development and summarized the result in the present report. (Author) 10 refs., 10 figs., 21 tabs.

  14. Process and system for stirring liquid sodium flowing through the primary circuit of a steam generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fabregue, J.P.

    1982-01-01

    The invention concerns the stirring of the liquid sodium of a steam generator comprising a primary circuit composed of an elongated vessel through which the liquid sodium flows, a secondary circuit composed of a number of tubes extending inside the long cyclindrical vessel. The process consists in imparting simultaneously to the liquid sodium, during its passage through the cylindrical vessel, a movement of continuous rotation about the longitudinal axis of the cylindrical vessel and an alternating series of radial movements, centripetal and centrifugal, in relation to the longitudinal axis, so that each unit quantity of the sodium comes into contact with a large number of tubes. The application particularly concerns steam generators for nuclear power stations [fr

  15. Considerations in providing purification flows for 500 MWe PHWR primary circuits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, A.K.; Goswami, S.; Bapat, C.N.; Sharma, V.K.

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of the purification system is to keep the primary heat transport (PHT) system clean by removing traces of impurities arising due to corrosion of the carbon steel pipes and heat transfer surfaces and erosion/corrosion of valve trims, pipes and mechanical seals or due to presence of soluble or insoluble fission products. These impurities are undesirable because they are usually radioactive, either naturally or through activation by the neutron flux as they are carried by the coolant through the reactor core. The purification system minimizes the probability of generation of radioactive impurities by controlling the chemistry of PHT coolant so that corrosion is minimum. Various considerations for providing the requisite purification flow to fulfill the above functions for a typical 500 MWe PHWR are presented. (author). 4 refs., 2 tabs., 2 figs

  16. The study on evaluation method for primary stress of 3-D structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sadahiro, Daisuke; Shibamoto, Hiroshi; Nagashima, Hideaki; Inoue, Kazuhiko; Kasahara, Naoto

    2005-01-01

    This paper describes an evaluation method of primary stress in 3-D structures. In 'Design by Analysis' for nuclear components, the stresses in structures are classified into the primary and the secondary stresses. The primary stress in axisymmetric structures can be evaluated by linearization of stress distribution in the specified section, but it is difficult to define the evaluation section in the 3-D structures, and to evaluate the primary stress with the conventional procedure. From this reason, the alternative evaluation method is needed. In this paper, the evaluation method of primary stress in 3-D structures is presented utilizing the feature of primary stress that is independent from stress re-distribution. (author)

  17. Numerical and Experimental Study of the Flow Field Structure Evolution in the Circular Recess of Oil Cavity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng Shen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The laminar radial flow in the oil cavity of heavy-duty computer numerical control (CNC machines is very complicated and has not been fully explored. Navier-Stokes equations have been applied through the whole flow region using finite volume approach to explore this complicated flow phenomenon, including the influences of the clearance height (h, inlet nozzle Reynolds number (Re, and geometrical aspect ratio (e on flow behaviors. A fluid dynamic experiment has been conducted to study the flow structure by using particle image velocimetry (PIV. Numerical simulation results have been compared with the experimental results, finding a good agreement with the studied cases. The results suggest that there are complex vortices in the oil cavity. Flow field structure of the oil cavity largely depends on h, Re, and e. Re and e have a great influence on the size and amount of vortices, and h has slight effects on the size of the vortices. The lengths of primary, secondary, and tertiary isolated vortices have a linear relationship with h. The lengths of the primary and secondary isolated vortices increase linearly with ascending e as e is small. But when Re and e are large enough, the size of the three vortices decreases.

  18. Structural Control and Groundwater Flow in the Nubian Aquifer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fathy, K.; Sultan, M.; Ahmed, M.; Save, H.; Emil, M. K.; Elkaliouby, B.

    2017-12-01

    An integrated research approach (remote sensing, field, geophysics) was conducted to investigate the structural control on groundwater flow in large aquifers using the less studied Nubian Sandstone Aquifer System (NSAS) of NE Africa as a test site. The aquifer extends over 2.2 x 106 km2 in Egypt, Libya, Chad, and Sudan and consists of thick (> 3 kms), water-bearing, Paleozoic and Mesozoic sandstone with intercalations of Tertiary shale and clay. It is subdivided into three sub-basins (Northern Sudan Platform [NSP], Dakhla [DAS], and Kufra) that are separated by basement uplifts (e.g., E-W trending Uweinat-Aswan uplift that separates DAS from the NSP). Aquifer recharge occurs in the south (NSP and southern Kufra) where the aquifer is unconfined and precipitation is high (Average Annual Precipitation [AAP]: 117 mm/yr.) and discharge is concentrated in the north (DAS and northern Kufra). Our approach is a three-fold exercise. Firstly, we compared GOCE-based Global Geopotential Models (GGMs) to terrestrial gravity anomalies for 21262 sites to select the optimum model for deriving Bouguer gravity anomalies. Secondly, structures and uplifts were mapped using hill shade images and their extension in the subsurface were mapped using the Eigen_6C4 model-derived Bouguer anomalies and their Tilt Derivative products (TDR). Thirdly, hydrological analysis was conducted using GRACE CSR 1° x 1° mascon solutions to investigate the mass variations in relation to the mapped structures. Our findings include: (1) The Eigen-6C4 is the optimum model having the lowest deviation (9.122 mGal) from the terrestrial gravity anomalies; (2) the surface expressions of structures matched fairly well with their postulated extensions in the subsurface; (3) identified fault systems include: Red Sea rift-related N-S to NW-SE trending grabens formed by reactivating basement structures during Red Sea opening and Syrian arc-related NE-SW trending dextral shear systems; (4) TWS patterns are uniform

  19. Research on the spatial structure of crude oil flow and the characteristics of its flow field in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao, Yuan; Hao, Li-Sha; Wan, Lu

    2007-01-01

    Crude oil flow is a sort of oil spatial movement, and in China, it is large scale and covers wide area with extensive social-economic effects. This paper analyses the spatial structure of crude oil flow in China, the characters of its flow field and the layout of its flow track. The results show that oil flow in China has a spatial characteristic of centralized output and decentralized input; its spatial structure is composed of Source System in the shape of right-angled triangle, Confluence System in the shape of right-angled trapezium and Multiplex System in the shape of obtuse-angled triangle, which are mutually nested, and on a whole, the presence of Multiplex System balances and optimizes the flow layout; oil flow field in China can be divided into four parts, i.e. the North, North-west, East and South Field, two or three of which overlap with each other, extending the oil flow and making the flow more flexible and maneuverable; oil flow track is a multi-objective decision-making route and in the decision-making process oil transportation cost is one of the essential factors, in China, oil flow track falls into the Northeast, North, East, Northwest and South five cluster regions, which connect with each other, and series-parallel connection between various kinds of transportation channels is widely seen in them, reinforcing the supply security of crude oil

  20. The relationship between the cerebral blood flow, oxygen consumption and glucose metabolism in primary degenerative dementia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuwabara, Yasuo; Ichiya, Yuichi; Ichimiya, Atsushi; Sasaki, Masayuki; Akashi, Yuko; Yoshida, Tsuyoshi; Fukumura, Toshimitsu; Masada, Kouji [Kyushu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan). Faculty of Medicine

    1995-03-01

    The CBF, CMRO{sub 2} and CMRGlu were measured in patients with primary degenerative dementia including 5 patients with dementia of Alzheimer`s type and 4 patients with Pick`s disease, and then the correlation between the cerebral blood flow and energy metabolism was evaluated. The control subjects consisted of 5 age-matched normal volunteers. The CBF, CMRO{sub 2} and CMRGlu decreased in the bilateral frontal, temporal and parietal regions in the patients with Alzheimer`s dementia, while they decreased in the bilateral frontal and temporal regions in the patients with Pick`s disease. Both the CBF and CMRO{sub 2} were closely correlated with each other. However, the CMRGlu was more severely impaired than the CBF or CMRO{sub 2} in both pathological conditions. These results suggested that CMRGlu began to decrease before the reduction of the aerobic metabolism and thus measuring the CMRGlu is considered to be the most sensitive method for detecting abnormal regions in primary degenerative dementia. (author).

  1. Large-eddy simulation of cavitating nozzle flow and primary jet break-up

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Örley, F., E-mail: felix.oerley@aer.mw.tum.de; Trummler, T.; Mihatsch, M. S.; Schmidt, S. J.; Adams, N. A. [Institute of Aerodynamics and Fluid Mechanics, Technische Universität München, Boltzmannstr. 15, 85748 Garching bei München (Germany); Hickel, S. [Institute of Aerodynamics and Fluid Mechanics, Technische Universität München, Boltzmannstr. 15, 85748 Garching bei München (Germany); Chair of Computational Aerodynamics, Faculty of Aerospace Engineering, TU Delft, Kluyverweg 1, 2629 HS Delft (Netherlands)

    2015-08-15

    We employ a barotropic two-phase/two-fluid model to study the primary break-up of cavitating liquid jets emanating from a rectangular nozzle, which resembles a high aspect-ratio slot flow. All components (i.e., gas, liquid, and vapor) are represented by a homogeneous mixture approach. The cavitating fluid model is based on a thermodynamic-equilibrium assumption. Compressibility of all phases enables full resolution of collapse-induced pressure wave dynamics. The thermodynamic model is embedded into an implicit large-eddy simulation (LES) environment. The considered configuration follows the general setup of a reference experiment and is a generic reproduction of a scaled-up fuel injector or control valve as found in an automotive engine. Due to the experimental conditions, it operates, however, at significantly lower pressures. LES results are compared to the experimental reference for validation. Three different operating points are studied, which differ in terms of the development of cavitation regions and the jet break-up characteristics. Observed differences between experimental and numerical data in some of the investigated cases can be caused by uncertainties in meeting nominal parameters by the experiment. The investigation reveals that three main mechanisms promote primary jet break-up: collapse-induced turbulent fluctuations near the outlet, entrainment of free gas into the nozzle, and collapse events inside the jet near the liquid-gas interface.

  2. Vortical flow structure of thermoacoustic oscillations in a closed tube

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishii, Katsuya; Kitagawa, Shyun; Ishigaki, Masahiro; Adachi, Shizuko

    2014-01-01

    Spontaneous thermoacoustic oscillations of a gas in a closed cylindrical tube are studied. Numerical simulations of the flow field in the tube on which a temperature gradient along the axis is imposed are performed by solving the axisymmetric compressible Navier–Stokes equations. The wall temperature of the hot part near both ends (300 K) and that of the cold part near the center (20 K) are fixed. The computations are done for various values of the length ratio ξ of the hot part to the cold part between 0.3 and 1.0, and steady oscillatory states are obtained. These states are divided into three groups according to the magnitude of the pressure amplitude. The state in each group has distinguished features of the flow field. We analyze the effect of vortices on the structure of the temperature distribution. The difference of the boundary layer thickness between the hot part and the cold part is shown to play an important role. (paper)

  3. The process flow and structure of an integrated stroke strategy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emma F. van Bussel

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: In the Canadian province of Alberta access and quality of stroke care were suboptimal, especially in remote areas. The government introduced the Alberta Provincial Stroke Strategy (APSS in 2005, an integrated strategy to improve access to stroke care, quality and efficiency which utilizes telehealth. Research question: What is the process flow and the structure of the care pathways of the APSS? Methodology: Information for this article was obtained using documentation, archival APSS records, interviews with experts, direct observation and participant observation. Results: The process flow is described. The APSS integrated evidence-based practice, multidisciplinary communication, and telestroke services. It includes regular quality evaluation and improvement. Conclusion: Access, efficiency and quality of care improved since the start of the APSS across many domains, through improvement of expertise and equipment in small hospitals, accessible consultation of stroke specialists using telestroke, enhancing preventive care, enhancing multidisciplinary collaboration, introducing uniform best practice protocols and bypass-protocols for the emergency medical services. Discussion: The APSS overcame substantial obstacles to decrease discrepancies and to deliver integrated higher quality care. Telestroke has proven itself to be safe and feasible. The APSS works efficiently, which is in line to other projects worldwide, and is, based on limited results, cost effective. Further research on cost-effectiveness is necessary.

  4. Vortical flow structure of thermoacoustic oscillations in a closed tube

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishii, Katsuya [Information Technology Center, Nagoya University, Furou-chou, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya, Aichi 464-8601 (Japan); Kitagawa, Shyun [Department of Computational Science and Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Nagoya University, Furou-chou, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya, Aichi 464-8603 (Japan); Ishigaki, Masahiro [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 2–4 Shirakata-shirane, Tokai-mura, Naka-gun, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Adachi, Shizuko, E-mail: ishii@cc.nagoya-u.ac.jp [School of Business and Commerce, Tokyo International University, Matoba-kita, Kawagoe-shi, Saitama 350-1197 (Japan)

    2014-12-01

    Spontaneous thermoacoustic oscillations of a gas in a closed cylindrical tube are studied. Numerical simulations of the flow field in the tube on which a temperature gradient along the axis is imposed are performed by solving the axisymmetric compressible Navier–Stokes equations. The wall temperature of the hot part near both ends (300 K) and that of the cold part near the center (20 K) are fixed. The computations are done for various values of the length ratio ξ of the hot part to the cold part between 0.3 and 1.0, and steady oscillatory states are obtained. These states are divided into three groups according to the magnitude of the pressure amplitude. The state in each group has distinguished features of the flow field. We analyze the effect of vortices on the structure of the temperature distribution. The difference of the boundary layer thickness between the hot part and the cold part is shown to play an important role. (paper)

  5. Structure of wall-bounded flows at transcritical conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Peter C.; Yang, Xiang I. A.; Ihme, Matthias

    2018-03-01

    At transcritical conditions, the transition of a fluid from a liquidlike state to a gaslike state occurs continuously, which is associated with significant changes in fluid properties. Therefore, boiling in its conventional sense does not exist and the phase transition at transcritical conditions is known as "pseudoboiling." In this work, direct numerical simulations (DNS) of a channel flow at transcritical conditions are conducted in which the bottom and top walls are kept at temperatures below and above the pseudoboiling temperature, respectively. Over this temperature range, the density changes by a factor of 18 between both walls. Using the DNS data, the usefulness of the semilocal scaling and the Townsend attached-eddy hypothesis are examined in the context of flows at transcritical conditions—both models have received much empirical support from previous studies. It is found that while the semilocal scaling works reasonably well near the bottom cooled wall, where the fluid density changes only moderately, the same scaling has only limited success near the top wall. In addition, it is shown that the streamwise velocity structure function follows a logarithmic scaling and the streamwise energy spectrum exhibits an inverse wave-number scaling, thus providing support to the attached-eddy model at transcritical conditions.

  6. The Structure of Primary School Teachers' Professional Competence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakirova, Ranija A.

    2016-01-01

    At the present stage of higher education development related to the transition of a competent model of learning, the problem of professional training of future teachers is actualized. To determine the problems in the preparation of future experts in the field of primary education, it is not enough to list the competencies that a graduate must…

  7. Hamiltonian flow over saddles for exploring molecular phase space structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farantos, Stavros C.

    2018-03-01

    Despite using potential energy surfaces, multivariable functions on molecular configuration space, to comprehend chemical dynamics for decades, the real happenings in molecules occur in phase space, in which the states of a classical dynamical system are completely determined by the coordinates and their conjugate momenta. Theoretical and numerical results are presented, employing alanine dipeptide as a model system, to support the view that geometrical structures in phase space dictate the dynamics of molecules, the fingerprints of which are traced by following the Hamiltonian flow above saddles. By properly selecting initial conditions in alanine dipeptide, we have found internally free rotor trajectories the existence of which can only be justified in a phase space perspective. This article is part of the theme issue `Modern theoretical chemistry'.

  8. Experimental analysis of flow structure in contra-rotating axial flow pump designed with different rotational speed concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Linlin; Watanabe, Satoshi; Imanishi, Toshiki; Yoshimura, Hiroaki; Furukawa, Akinori

    2013-08-01

    As a high specific speed pump, the contra-rotating axial flow pump distinguishes itself in a rear rotor rotating in the opposite direction of the front rotor, which remarkably contributes to the energy conversion, the reduction of the pump size, better hydraulic and cavitation performances. However, with two rotors rotating reversely, the significant interaction between blade rows was observed in our prototype contra-rotating rotors, which highly affected the pump performance compared with the conventional axial flow pumps. Consequently, a new type of rear rotor was designed by the rotational speed optimization methodology with some additional considerations, aiming at better cavitation performance, the reduction of blade rows interaction and the secondary flow suppression. The new rear rotor showed a satisfactory performance at the design flow rate but an unfavorable positive slope of the head — flow rate curve in the partial flow rate range less than 40% of the design flow rate, which should be avoided for the reliability of pump-pipe systems. In the present research, to understand the internal flow field of new rear rotor and its relation to the performances at the partial flow rates, the velocity distributions at the inlets and outlets of the rotors are firstly investigated. Then, the boundary layer flows on rotor surfaces, which clearly reflect the secondary flow inside the rotors, are analyzed through the limiting streamline observations using the multi-color oil-film method. Finally, the unsteady numerical simulations are carried out to understand the complicated internal flow structures in the rotors.

  9. Structural Dynamics of Education Reforms and Quality of Primary Education in Uganda

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyenje, Aida

    2016-01-01

    This paper examines Uganda's recent undertaking to reform her Primary School education System with a focus on the effect of structural dynamics of education reforms and the quality of primary education. Structural dynamics in the context of this study is in reference to the organizational composition of the education system at the government,…

  10. Flow and coherent structures around circular cylinders in shallow water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Jie; Constantinescu, George

    2017-06-01

    Eddy-resolving numerical simulations are conducted to investigate the dynamics of the large-scale coherent structures around a circular cylinder in an open channel under very shallow flow conditions where the bed friction significantly affects the wake structure. Results are reported for three test cases, for which the ratio between the cylinder diameter, D, and the channel depth, H, is D/H = 10, 25, and 50, respectively. Simulation results show that a horseshoe vortex system forms in all test cases and the dynamics of the necklace vortices is similar to that during the breakaway sub-regime observed for cases when a laminar horseshoe vortex forms around the base of the cylinder. Given the shallow conditions and turbulence in the incoming channel flow, the necklace vortices occupy a large fraction of the flow depth (they penetrate until the free surface in the shallower cases with D/H = 25 and 50). The oscillations of the necklace vortices become less regular with increasing polar angle magnitude and can induce strong amplification of the bed shear stress beneath their cores. Strong interactions are observed between the legs of the necklace vortices and the eddies shed in the separated shear layers in the cases with D/H = 25 and 50. In these two cases, a vortex-street type wake is formed and strong three-dimensional effects are observed in the near-wake flow. A secondary instability in the form of arrays of co-rotating parallel horizontal vortices develops. Once the roller vortices get away from the cylinder, the horizontal vortices in the array orient themselves along the streamwise direction. This instability is not present for moderately shallow conditions (e.g., D/H ≈ 1) nor for very shallow cases when the wake changes to an unsteady bubble type (e.g., D/H = 50). For cases when this secondary instability is present, the horizontal vortices extend vertically over a large fraction of the flow depth and play an important role in the vertical mixing of fluid

  11. Coherent structures and flow topology of transitional separated-reattached flow over two and three dimensional geometrical shapes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diabil, Hayder Azeez; Li, Xin Kai; Abdalla, Ibrahim Elrayah

    2017-09-01

    Large-scale organized motions (commonly referred to coherent structures) and flow topology of a transitional separated-reattached flow have been visualised and investigated using flow visualisation techniques. Two geometrical shapes including two-dimensional flat plate with rectangular leading edge and three-dimensional square cylinder are chosen to shed a light on the flow topology and present coherent structures of the flow over these shapes. For both geometries and in the early stage of the transition, two-dimensional Kelvin-Helmholtz rolls are formed downstream of the leading edge. They are observed to be twisting around the square cylinder while they stay flat in the case of the two-dimensional flat plate. For both geometrical shapes, the two-dimensional Kelvin-Helmholtz rolls move downstream of the leading edge and they are subjected to distortion to form three-dimensional hairpin structures. The flow topology in the flat plate is different from that in the square cylinder. For the flat plate, there is a merging process by a pairing of the Kelvin-Helmholtz rolls to form a large structure that breaks down directly into many hairpin structures. For the squire cylinder case, the Kelvin-Helmholtz roll evolves topologically to form a hairpin structure. In the squire cylinder case, the reattachment length is much shorter and a forming of the three-dimensional structures is closer to the leading edge than that in the flat plate case.

  12. Constraints on the design of flow measuring structures over a large dynamic flow range

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hickey, M.J.; Holmes, R.M.

    1979-01-01

    Topographical restraints for design storm flow are described as sharp-crested weirs for low flows in series with broad-crested weirs for the high flows. These design selections are considered to be most economical while providing the specified flow measuring capabilities for movement of radionuclides from the solid waste disposal areas into the surface streams around ORNL

  13. Turbulent flow field structure of initially asymmetric jets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Kyung Hoon; Kim, Bong Whan; Kim, Suk Woo

    2000-01-01

    The near field structure of round turbulent jets with initially asymmetric velocity distributions is investigated experimentally. Experiments are carried out using a constant temperature hot-wire anemomentry system to measure streamwise velocity in the jets. The measurements are undertaken across the jet at various streamwise stations in a range starting from the jet exit plane and up to a downstream location of twelve diameters. The experimental results include the distributions of mean and instantaneous velocities, vorticity field, turbulence intensity, and the Reynolds shear stresses. The asymmetry of the jet exit plane was obtained by using circular cross-section pipes with a bend upstream of the exit. Three pipes used here include a straight pipe, and 90 and 160 degree-bend pipes. Therefore, at the upstream of the pipe exit, secondary flow through the bend and mean streamwise velocity distribution could be controlled by changing the curvature of pipes. The jets into the atmosphere have two levels of initial velocity skewness in addition to an axisymmetric jet from a straight pipe. In case of the curved pipe, a six diameterlong straight pipe section follows the bend upstream of the exit. The Reynolds number based on the exit bulk velocity is 13,400. The results indicate that the near field structure is considerably modified by the skewness of an initial mean velocity distribution. As the skewness increases, the decay rate of mean velocity at the centerline also increases

  14. Effect of cavitation on flow structure of a tip vortex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthieu, Dreyer; Reclari, Martino; Farhat, Mohamed

    2013-11-01

    Tip vortices, which may develop in axial turbines and marine propellers, are often associated with the occurrence of cavitation because of the low pressure in their core. Although this issue has received a great deal of attention, it is still unclear how the phase transition affects the flow structure of such a vortex. In the present work, we investigate the change of the vortex structure due to cavitation incipience. The measurement of the velocity field is performed in the case of a tip vortex generated by an elliptical hydrofoil placed in the test section of EPFL high speed cavitation tunnel. To this end, a 3D stereo PIV is used with fluorescent seeding particles. A cost effective method is developed to produce in-house fluorescent seeding material, based on polyamide particles and Rhodamine-B dye. The amount of cavitation in the vortex core is controlled by the inlet pressure in the test section, starting with the non-cavitating case. We present an extensive analysis of the vorticity distribution, the vortex intensity and core size for various cavitation developments. This research is supported by CCEM and swisselectric research.

  15. A video-image study of electrolytic flow structure in parallel electric-magnetic fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gu, Z.H.; Fahidy, T.Z.

    1987-01-01

    The structure of free convective flow propagating from a vertical cathode into the electrolyte bulk has been studied via video-imaging. The enhancing effect of imposed horizontal uniform magnetic fields is manifest by vortex propagation and bifurcating flow

  16. Inflatable Habitat with Integrated Primary and Secondary Structure, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Paragon Space Development Corp (Paragon) and Thin Red Line Aerospace (TRLA) proposes to explore the utilization of inflatable structures by designing a habitation...

  17. Modelling of structural effects on chemical reactions in turbulent flows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gammelsaeter, H.R.

    1997-12-31

    Turbulence-chemistry interactions are analysed using algebraic moment closure for the chemical reaction term. The coupling between turbulence and chemical length and time scales generate a complex interaction process. This interaction process is called structural effects in this work. The structural effects are shown to take place on all scales between the largest scale of turbulence and the scales of the molecular motions. The set of equations describing turbulent correlations involved in turbulent reacting flows are derived. Interactions are shown schematically using interaction charts. Algebraic equations for the turbulent correlations in the reaction rate are given using the interaction charts to include the most significant couplings. In the frame of fundamental combustion physics, the structural effects appearing on the small scales of turbulence are proposed modelled using a discrete spectrum of turbulent scales. The well-known problem of averaging the Arrhenius law, the specific reaction rate, is proposed solved using a presumed single variable probability density function and a sub scale model for the reaction volume. Although some uncertainties are expected, the principles are addressed. Fast chemistry modelling is shown to be consistent in the frame of algebraic moment closure when the turbulence-chemistry interaction is accounted for in the turbulent diffusion. The modelling proposed in this thesis is compared with experimental data for an laboratory methane flame and advanced probability density function modelling. The results show promising features. Finally it is shown a comparison with full scale measurements for an industrial burner. All features of the burner are captured with the model. 41 refs., 33 figs.

  18. Three dimensional calculations of the primary coolant flow in a 900 MW PWR vessel. Numerical simulation of the accurate RCP start-up flow rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, A.; Alvarez, D.; Cases, F.; Stelletta, S.

    1997-06-01

    This report explains the last results about the mixing in the 900 MW PWR vessels. The accurate fluid flow transient, induced by the RCP starting-up, is represented. In a first time, we present the Thermalhydraulic Finite Element Code N3S used for the 3D numerical computations. After that, results obtained for one reactor operation case are given. This case is dealing with the transient mixing of a clear plug in the vessel when one primary pump starts-up. A comparison made between two injection modes; a steady state fluid flow conditions or the accurate RCP transient fluid flow conditions. The results giving the local minimum of concentration and the time response of the mean concentration at the core inlet are compared. The results show the real importance of the unsteadiness characteristics of the fluid flow transport of the clear water plug. (author)

  19. Flow structures around a flapping wing considering ground effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Truong, Tien; Kim, Jihoon; Kim, Min Jun; Park, Hoon Cheol; Yoon, Kwang Joon; Byun, Doyoung

    2013-07-01

    Over the past several decades, there has been great interest in understanding the aerodynamics of flapping flight, namely the two flight modes of hovering and forward flight. However, there has been little focus on the aerodynamic characteristics during takeoff of insects. In a previous study we found that the Rhinoceros Beetle ( Trypoxylusdichotomus) takes off without jumping, which is uncommon for other insects. In this study we built a scaled-up electromechanical model of a flapping wing and investigated fluid flow around the beetle's wing model. In particular, the present dynamically scaled mechanical model has the wing kinematics pattern achieved from the real beetle's wing kinematics during takeoff. In addition, we could systematically change the three-dimensional inclined motion of the flapping model through each stroke. We used digital particle image velocimetry with high spatial resolution, and were able to qualitatively and quantitatively study the flow field around the wing at a Reynolds number of approximately 10,000. The present results provide insight into the aerodynamics and the evolution of vortical structures, as well as the ground effect experienced by a beetle's wing during takeoff. The main unsteady mechanisms of beetles have been identified and intensively analyzed as the stability of the leading edge vortex (LEV) during strokes, the delayed stall during upstroke, the rotational circulation in pronation periods, and wake capture in supination periods. Due to the ground effect, the LEV was enhanced during half downstroke, and the lift force could thus be increased to lift the beetle during takeoff. This is useful for researchers in developing a micro air vehicle that has a beetle-like flapping wing motion.

  20. Power flow analysis for islanded microgrid in hierarchical structure of control system using optimal control theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thang Diep Thanh

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available In environmental uncertainties, the power flow problem in islanded microgrid (MG becomes complex and non-trivial. The optimal power flow (OPL problem is described in this paper by using the energy balance between the power generation and load demand. The paper also presents the hierarchical control structure which consists of primary, secondary, tertiary, and emergency controls. Clearly, optimal power flow (OPL which implements a distributed tertiary control in hierarchical control. MG consists of diesel engine generator (DEG, wind turbine generator (WTG, and photovoltaic (PV power. In the control system considered, operation planning is realized based on profiles such that the MG, load, wind and photovoltaic power must be forecasted in short-period, meanwhile the dispatch source (i.e., DEG needs to be scheduled. The aim of the control problem is to find the dispatch output power by minimizing the total cost of energy that leads to the Hamilton-Jacobi-Bellman equation. Experimental results are presented, showing the effectiveness of optimal control such that the generation allows demand profile.

  1. Dislocation structures and anomalous flow in L12 compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimiduk, D. M.

    1991-06-01

    The theory of the anomalous flow behavior of LI2 compounds has developed over the last 30 years. This theory has a foundation in the early estimates of the crystallographic anisotropy of antiphase boundary (APB) energy in these compounds. In spite of this critical aspect of the theory, it is only in the last five years that electron microscopy has been employed to quantify the APB energies and to determine the detailed nature of dislocation structures at each stage of deformation. The recent studies of several research groups have provided essentially consistent new details about the nature of dislocations in Ni3AI and a few other LI2 compounds which exhibit anomalous flow behavior. These studies have introduced several new concepts for the controlling dislocation mechanisms. Additionally, these studies have shown that in Ni3AI, the APB energies have only small variations in magnitude with change of the APB plane (they are nearly isotropic), are relatively insensitive to changes in solute content, and the anisotropy ratio does not correlate with alloy strength. The present manuscript provides a critical review of the new transmission electron microscopy (TEM) results along with the new concepts for the mechanism of anomalous flow. Inconsistencies and deficiencies within these new concepts are identified and discussed. The collective set of electron-microscopy results is discussed within the context of both the mechanical behavior of LI2 compounds and the Greenberg and Paidar, Pope and Vitek (PPV) models for anomalous flow. Conceptual consistency with these models can only be constructed if the Kear-Wilsdorf (K-W) configurations are treated as an irreversible work hardening or relaxation artifact and, specific details of these two models cannot be shown by electron microscopy. Alternatively, the structural features recently revealed by electron microscopy have not been assembled into a self-consistent model for yielding which fully addresses the mechanical behavior

  2. Granular flows on erodible layers: type and evolution of flow and deposit structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crosta, G.; De Blasio, F.; De Caro, M.; Volpi, G.; Frattini, P.

    2012-04-01

    The interaction of a fast moving landslide mass with the basal layer over which movement takes place has been discussed in previous contributions. Nevertheless, the evolution of the structures within the moving mass and the erodible layer are still to be described in detail (Hungr and Evans, 2004; Crosta et al., 1992, 2006, 2009, 2011; Dufresne et al., 2010; Mangeney et al., 2010) and modeling results (Crosta et al., 2006, 2009, 2011; Mangeney et al., 2010). We present some of the results from a campaign of laboratory experiments aimed at studying the evolution of a granular flow at the impact with and during the successive spreading over a cohesionless erodible layer. We performed these test to study the processes and to collect data and evidences to compare them with the results of numerical simulations and to verify capabilities of numerical codes. The laboratory setup consists of an inclined slope and an horizontal sector where release and transport, and deposition take place, respectively. Materials used for the tests are: a uniform rounded siliceous sand (Hostun sand; 0.125-0.5 mm) commonly adopted in lab tests because free of scale effects, and a gravel made of angular elements (12 mm in ave. size). Both the materials have been tested in dry conditions. Different slope angles have been tested (40, 45, 50, 55, 50, 66°) as well as different thicknesses of the erodible layer (0, 0.5, 1, 2 cm) and volumes of the released material (1.5, 3, 5, 9.6 liters). Tests have been monitored by means of a high speed camera and the pre- and post-failure geometries have been surveyed by means of a laser scanner. Deposit description allowed also the computation of volumes and the characterization of the different structures developed and frozen into the deposit. Experiments allowed us to observe the extreme processes occurring during the movement and the mise en place of the deposits. In particular, we observe the formation of a clear wave-like feature developing during the

  3. The flow field structure of highly stabilized partially premixed flames in a concentric flow conical nozzle burner with coflow

    KAUST Repository

    Elbaz, Ayman M.

    2015-08-29

    The stability limits, the stabilization mechanism, and the flow field structure of highly stabilized partially premixed methane flames in a concentric flow conical nozzle burner with air co-flow have been investigated and presented in this work. The stability map of partial premixed flames illustrates that the flames are stable between two extinction limits. A low extinction limit when partial premixed flames approach non-premixed flame conditions, and a high extinction limit, with the partial premixed flames approach fully premixed flame conditions. These two limits showed that the most stable flame conditions are achieved at a certain degree of partial premixed. The stability is improved by adding air co-flow. As the air co-flow velocity increases the most stable flames are those that approach fully premixed. The turbulent flow field of three flames at 0, 5, 10 m/s co-flow velocity are investigated using Stereo Particle Image Velocimetry (SPIV) in order to explore the improvement of the flame stability due to the use of air co-flow. The three flames are all at a jet equivalence ratio (Φj) of 2, fixed level of partial premixing and jet Reynolds number (Rej) of 10,000. The use of co-flow results in the formation of two vortices at the cone exit. These vortices act like stabilization anchors for the flames to the nozzle tip. With these vortices in the flow field, the reaction zone shifts toward the reduced turbulence intensity at the nozzle rim of the cone. Interesting information about the structure of the flow field with and without co-flow are identified and reported in this work.

  4. Crosslinked anion exchange membranes with primary diamine-based crosslinkers for vanadium redox flow battery application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cha, Min Suc; Jeong, Hwan Yeop; Shin, Hee Young; Hong, Soo Hyun; Kim, Tae-Ho; Oh, Seong-Geun; Lee, Jang Yong; Hong, Young Taik

    2017-09-01

    A series of polysulfone-based crosslinked anion exchange membranes (AEMs) with primary diamine-based crosslinkers has been prepared via simple a crosslinking process as low-cost and durable membranes for vanadium redox flow batteries (VRFBs). Chloromethylated polysulfone is used as a precursor polymer for crosslinked AEMs (CAPSU-x) with different degrees of crosslinking. Among the developed AEMs, CAPSU-2.5 shows outstanding dimensional stability and anion (Cl-, SO42-, and OH-) conductivity. Moreover, CAPSU-2.5 exhibits much lower vanadium ion permeability (2.72 × 10-8 cm2 min-1) than Nafion 115 (2.88 × 10-6 cm2 min-1), which results in an excellent coulombic efficiency of 100%. The chemical and operational stabilities of the membranes have been investigated via ex situ soaking tests in 0.1 M VO2+ solution and in situ operation tests for 100 cycles, respectively. The excellent chemical, physical, and electrochemical properties of the CAPSU-2.5 membrane make it suitable for use in VRFBs.

  5. Multiscale properties of DNA primary structure: cross-scale correlations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Altajskij, M.V.; Ivanov, V.V.; Polozov, R.V.

    2000-01-01

    Cross-scale correlations of wavelet coefficients of the DNA coding sequences are calculated and compared to that of the generated random sequence of the same length. The coding sequences are shown to have strong correlation between large and small scale structures, while random sequences have not

  6. Numerically stable fluid–structure interactions between compressible flow and solid structures

    KAUST Repository

    Grétarsson, Jón Tómas

    2011-04-01

    We propose a novel method to implicitly two-way couple Eulerian compressible flow to volumetric Lagrangian solids. The method works for both deformable and rigid solids and for arbitrary equations of state. The method exploits the formulation of [11] which solves compressible fluid in a semi-implicit manner, solving for the advection part explicitly and then correcting the intermediate state to time tn+1 using an implicit pressure, obtained by solving a modified Poisson system. Similar to previous fluid-structure interaction methods, we apply pressure forces to the solid and enforce a velocity boundary condition on the fluid in order to satisfy a no-slip constraint. Unlike previous methods, however, we apply these coupled interactions implicitly by adding the constraint to the pressure system and combining it with any implicit solid forces in order to obtain a strongly coupled, symmetric indefinite system (similar to [17], which only handles incompressible flow). We also show that, under a few reasonable assumptions, this system can be made symmetric positive-definite by following the methodology of [16]. Because our method handles the fluid-structure interactions implicitly, we avoid introducing any new time step restrictions and obtain stable results even for high density-to-mass ratios, where explicit methods struggle or fail. We exactly conserve momentum and kinetic energy (thermal fluid-structure interactions are not considered) at the fluid-structure interface, and hence naturally handle highly non-linear phenomenon such as shocks, contacts and rarefactions. © 2011 Elsevier Inc.

  7. Reconstructing Data Flow Diagrams from Structure Charts Based on the Input and Output Relationship

    OpenAIRE

    YAMAMOTO, Shuichiro

    1995-01-01

    The traceability of data flow diagrams against structure charts is very important for large software development. Specifying if there is a relationship between a data flow diagram and a structure chart is a time consuming task. Existing CASE tools provide a way to maintain traceability. If we can extract the input-output relationship of a system from a structure chart, the corresponding data flow diagram can be automatically generated from the relationship. For example, Benedusi et al. propos...

  8. LiDAR observation of the flow structure in typhoons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yu-Ting; Hsuan, Chung-Yao; Lin, Ta-Hui

    2015-04-01

    Taiwan is subject to 3.4 landfall typhoons each year in average, generally occurring in the third quarter of every year (July-September). Understanding of boundary-layer turbulence characteristics of a typhoon is needed to ensure the safety of both onshore and offshore wind turbines used for power generation. In this study, a floating LiDAR (Light Detection and Ranging) was deployed in a harbor to collect data of wind turbulence, atmospheric pressure, and temperature in three typhoon events (Matmo typhoon, Soulik typhoon, Trami typhoon). Data collected from the floating LiDAR and from meteorological stations located at Taipei, Taichung and Kaohsiung are adopted to analyse the wind turbulence characteristics in the three typhoon events. The measurement results show that the maximum 10-min average wind speed measured with the floating LiDAR is up to 24 m/s at a height of 200 m. Compared with other normal days, the turbulence intensity is lower in the three typhoon events where the wind speed has a rapid increase. Changes of wind direction take place clearly as the typhoons cross Taiwan from East to West. Within the crossing intervals, the vertical momentum flux is observed to have a significant pattern with both upward and downward propagating waves which are relevant to the flow structure of the typhoons.

  9. Structure and kinematics of bubble flow; Structure et cinematique des ecoulements diphasiques a bulles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lackme, C [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Grenoble (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1967-07-01

    This report deals with the components and use of resistivity probes in bubble flow. With a single probe, we have studied the longitudinal and radial structure of the flow. The very complicated evolution of the radial structure is shown by the measurement of the mean bubble flux at several points in the tube. A double probe associated with a device the principle of which is given in this report, permits the measure of the local velocity of bubbles. Unlike the mean bubble flux profile, the change in the velocity profile along the tube is not significant. We have achieved the synthesis of these two pieces of information, mean local bubble flux and local velocity, by computing the mean weighed velocity in the tube. This weighed velocity compares remarkably with the velocity computed from the volumetric gas flow rate and the mean void fraction. (author) [French] Ce rapport traite d'une etude methodologique des ecoulements diphasiques a bulles. Les fluides sont l'air et l'eau, ils circulent du bas vers le haut dans un tube vertical de 32 mm de diametre et 2 metres de long. Cette etude a pour but de permettre une description fine de l'ecoulement. Pour cela, il a ete necessaire de developper des appareillages nouveaux et de mettre au point les methodes d'analyses correspondantes. La valeur des mesures effectuees et des methodes utilisees apparait dans une comparaison concluante et conclusive entre des resultats de mesures globales et des resultats integres de mesures locales. (auteur)

  10. Test plan for evaluation of primary exhaust ventilation flow meters for double shell hydrogen watch list tanks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Willingham, W.E.

    1996-01-01

    This document is a plan for testing four different flow meters for use in the primary exhaust ventilation ducts of Double Shell Tanks on the hydrogen watch list that do not already have this capability. This currently includes tanks 241-AW-101, 241-AN-103, 241-AN-104, 241-AN-105, and 241-SY-103. The anticipated airflow velocity in these tanks range from 0.25 m/s(50 ft/min) to 1.78 m/s (350 ft/min). Past experiences at Hanford are forcing the evaluation and selection of instruments to be used at the low flow and relatively high humidity conditions found in these tanks. Based on the results of this test, a flow meter shall be chosen for installation in the primary exhaust ventilation ducts of the above mentioned waste tanks

  11. Modeling the Structure and Effectiveness of Intelligence Organizations: Dynamic Information Flow Simulation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Behrman, Robert; Carley, Kathleen

    2003-01-01

    This paper describes the Dynamic Information Flow Simulation (DIFS), an abstract model for analyzing the structure and function of intelligence support organizations and the activities of entities within...

  12. Flow Quality Analysis of Shape Morphing Structures for Hypersonic Ground Testing Applications

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Background: Shape morphing, high temperature, ceramic structural materials are now becoming available and can revolutionize ground testing by providing dynamic flow...

  13. Effect of intracoronary nitroprusside injection on flow recovery during primary PCI in acute STEMI patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Lixia; Mu, Lihua; Sun, Linhui; Qi, Feng; Guo, Ruiwei

    2017-04-01

    The no/slow reflow phenomenon during primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PPCI) causes the destruction of the coronary microcirculation and further myocardial damage. Some studies have shown that intracoronary nitroprusside infusion is a safe and effective method for managing the no/slow reflow phenomenon. However, it is uncertain whether the injection of nitroprusside at a specific time point during PPCI can most effectively prevent no-reflow. In this study, we investigated the effect of the timing of an intracoronary nitroprusside injection on flow recovery during PPCI in patients with ST elevation acute myocardial infarction (STEMI). One hundred twenty consecutive patients with STEMI who underwent PPCI were enrolled in the study. Patients who fulfilled the eligibility criteria were randomly allocated to three groups: control group (N.=40) received no nitroprusside before they completed PCI; the second group (N.=40) received nitroprusside before balloon dilatation; and the third group (N.=40) received nitroprusside after each balloon dilatation and before contrast agent refilling. The baseline clinical variables and the details of the PCI procedure were collected. The thrombolysis in myocardial infarction (TIMI) flow grades and the corrected TIMI frame count (cTFC) were evaluated immediately after stent implantation was completed. There were no significant differences in the baseline characteristics, antithrombotic drugs given before PCI, and details of the PCI procedure among the three groups (P>0.05). The incidence of TIMI grade 3 after PCI was significantly higher in the nitroprusside group than in the control group (P=0.025), whereas cTFC was significantly lower in the nitroprusside group (26.6±15.2) than in the control group (38.1±21.3, P=0.001). The incidence of TIMI grade 3 after PCI was significantly higher in the third group than in the second group (P=0.045), and cTFC was significantly lower in the third group (21.5±9.5) than in the second

  14. Analyzing Pre-Service Primary Teachers' Fraction Knowledge Structures through Problem Posing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilic, Cigdem

    2015-01-01

    In this study it was aimed to determine pre-service primary teachers' knowledge structures of fraction through problem posing activities. A total of 90 pre-service primary teachers participated in this study. A problem posing test consisting of two questions was used and the participants were asked to generate as many as problems based on the…

  15. Relationship between Professional Learning Community, Bureaucratic Structure and Organisational Trust in Primary Education Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalkan, Fatma

    2016-01-01

    This research uses relational survey method to determine the relationship between professional learning community, bureaucratic structure and organisational trust according to the perceptions of teachers who work in primary education schools. Data were collected from 805 teachers who work in primary education schools in the districts (Altindag,…

  16. Structure of Primary Health Care: Lessons from a Rural Area in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Structure of Primary Health Care: Lessons from a Rural Area in South-West Nigeria. ... of the facilities enjoyed community participation in planning and management. There ... None of the facilities had a functional 2-way referral system in place.

  17. Flow-induced vibration of circular cylindrical structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, S.S.

    1985-06-01

    This report summarizes the flow-induced vibration of circular cylinders in quiescent fluid, axial flow, and crossflow, and applications of the analytical methods and experimental data in design evaluation of various system components consisting of circular cylinders. 219 figs., 30 tabs

  18. Identification of dominant flow structures in rapidly rotating convection of liquid metals using Dynamic Mode Decomposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horn, S.; Schmid, P. J.; Aurnou, J. M.

    2016-12-01

    The Earth's metal core acts as a dynamo whose efficiency in generating and maintaining the magnetic field is essentially determined by the rotation rate and the convective motions occurring in its outer liquid part. For the description of the primary physics in the outer core the idealized system of rotating Rayleigh-Bénard convection is often invoked, with the majority of studies considering only working fluids with Prandtl numbers of Pr ≳ 1. However, liquid metals are characterized by distinctly smaller Prandtl numbers which in turn result in an inherently different type of convection. Here, we will present results from direct numerical simulations of rapidly rotating convection in a fluid with Pr ≈ 0.025 in cylindrical containers and Ekman numbers as low as 5 × 10-6. In this system, the Coriolis force is the source of two types of inertial modes, the so-called wall modes, that also exist at moderate Prandtl numbers, and cylinder-filling oscillatory modes, that are a unique feature of small Prandtl number convection. The obtained flow fields were analyzed using the Dynamic Mode Decomposition (DMD). This technique allows to extract and identify the structures that govern the dynamics of the system as well as their corresponding frequencies. We have investigated both the regime where the flow is purely oscillatory and the regime where wall modes and oscillatory modes co-exist. In the purely oscillatory regime, high and low frequency oscillatory modes characterize the flow. When both types of modes are present, the DMD reveals that the wall-attached modes dominate the flow dynamics. They precess with a relatively low frequency in retrograde direction. Nonetheless, also in this case, high frequency oscillations have a significant contribution.

  19. Numerical simulation of fluid-structure interaction of compressible flow and elastic structure

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hasnedlová, J.; Feistauer, M.; Horáček, Jaromír; Kosík, A.; Kučera, V.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 95, Suppl 1 (2013), s. 343-361 ISSN 0010-485X R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP101/11/0207 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20760514 Institutional support: RVO:61388998 Keywords : fluid–structure interaction * compressible flow * discontinuous Galerkin finite element method * coupling algorithms Subject RIV: BI - Acoustics Impact factor: 1.055, year: 2013 http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs00607-012-0240-x

  20. Evaluation of Restoration and Flow Interactions on River Structure and Function: Channel Widening of the Thur River, Switzerland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo J. Martín

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Removal of lateral constraints to restore rivers has become increasingly common in river resource management, but little is known how the interaction of de-channelization with flow influences ecosystem structure and function. We evaluated the ecosystem effects of river widening to improve sediment relations in the Thur River, Switzerland, 12 years after implementation. We tested if restored and non-restored reaches differed in water physico-chemistry, hyporheic function, primary production, and macroinvertebrate density and composition in relation to the flow regime. Our results showed that (i spatio-temporal variation in sediment respiration and macroinvertebrate taxonomic richness were driven by interactions between restoration and flow; (ii riverbed conditions including substrate size, organic matter content, and groundwater–surface water exchange changed due to restoration, but (iii physico-chemistry, hydraulic conditions, and primary production were not altered by restoration. Importantly, our study revealed that abiotic conditions, except channel morphology, changed only marginally, whereas other ecosystem attributes responded markedly to changes in flow-restoration interactions. These results highlight integrating a more holistic ecosystem perspective in the design and monitoring of restoration projects such as river widening in resource management, preferably in relation to flow-sediment regimes and interactions with the biotic components of the ecosystem.

  1. The structure of a jet in cross flow at low velocity ratios

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gopalan, Shridhar; Abraham, Bruce M.; Katz, Joseph

    2004-01-01

    This paper examines in detail the flow structure and associated wall pressure fluctuations caused by the injection of a round, turbulent jet into a turbulent boundary layer. The velocity ratio, r, ratio of mean jet velocity to the mean cross flow, varies from 0.5 to 2.5 and the Reynolds number based on the cross flow speed and jet diameter is 1.9x10 4 . Particle image velocimetry is used to measure the flow and flush mounted pressure sensors installed at several locations used to determine the wall pressure. The results consist of sample instantaneous flow structures, distributions of mean velocity, vorticity and turbulence intensity, as well as wall pressure spectra. The flow structure depends strongly on the velocity ratio and there are two distinctly different regions. At low velocity ratios, namely r 2, the near-wall flow behind the jet resembles a Karman vortex street and the wall-normal vortical structures contain cross flow boundary layer vorticity. Autospectra of the pressure signals show that the effect of the jet is mainly in the 15-100 Hz range. At r 2, the wall pressure levels reach a plateau demonstrating the diminishing effect of the jet on the near-wall flow. Consistent with the flow structure, the highest wall pressure fluctuations occur off the jet centerline for r 2. Also, the advection speed of near-wall vortical structures increase with r at r 2 it is a constant

  2. Analysis of the flow structure and heat transfer in a vertical mantle heat exchanger

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Søren; Morrison, GL; Behnia, M

    2005-01-01

    initially mixed and initially stratified inner tank and mantle. The analysis of the heat transfer showed that the flow in the mantle near the inlet is mixed convection flow and that the heat transfer is dependent on the mantle inlet temperature relative to the core tank temperature at the mantle level. (C......The flow structure inside the inner tank and inside the mantle of a vertical mantle heat exchanger was investigated using a full-scale tank designed to facilitate flow visualisation. The flow structure and velocities in the inner tank and in the mantle were measured using a Particle Image...... Velocimetry (PIV) system. A Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) model of the vertical mantle heat exchanger was also developed for a detailed evaluation of the heat flux at the mantle wall and at the tank wall. The flow structure was evaluated for both high and low temperature incoming flows and for both...

  3. Study of the heat transport primary system flow of Embalse nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coutsiers, Eduardo E.; Moreno, Carlos A.; Pomerantz, Marcelo E.

    1999-01-01

    In this work, the HTPS coolant channels flow and associate aleatory errors are estimated. The objective of this estimation is to verify the validity of the flow calculated using the Canadian thermalhydraulic design code 'NUCIRC'. From measurements it can also be observed the evolution of the calculated flow with power of the reactor and to correct the maximum flow with power. The percentage of standard deviation discrepancies of flow estimated by measurements and those calculated using NUCIRC code is 5,7%. As the average aleatory error in flow estimation is 8,0%, it is concluded that the flow distribution calculated using NUCIRC is representative of the current state of the reactor channels. (author)

  4. Studies on turbulence structure and liquid film behavior in annular two-phase flow flowing in a throat section

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, Kenji; Miyabe, Masaya; Matsumoto, Tadayoshi; Kataoka, Isao; Ohmori, Shuichi; Mori, Michitsugu

    2004-01-01

    Experimental studies on turbulence structure and liquid film behavior in annular two-phase flow were carried out concerned with the steam injector systems for a next-generation nuclear reactor. In the steam injector, steam/water annular two-phase flow is formed at the mixing nozzle. To make an appropriate design for high-performance steam injector system, it is very important to accumulate the fundamental data of thermo-hydro dynamic characteristics of annular flow in the steam injector. Especially, the turbulence modification in multi-phase flow due to the phase interaction is one of the most important phenomena and has attracted research attention. In this study, the liquid film behavior and the resultant turbulence modification due to the phase interaction were investigated. The behavior of the interfacial waves on liquid film flow such as the ripple or disturbance waves were observed to make clear the interfacial velocity and the special structure of the interfacial waves by using the high-speed video camera and the digital camera. The measurements for gas-phase velocity profiles and turbulent intensity in annular flow passing through the throat section were precisely performed to investigate quantitatively the turbulent modification in annular flow by using the constant temperature hot-wire anemometer. The measurements for liquid film thickness by the electrode needle method were also carried out. (author)

  5. Structural Analysis of Silicic Lavas Reveals the Importance of Endogenous Flow During Emplacement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, G. D.; Martens, A.; Isom, S.; Maxwell, A.; Brown, S. R.

    2017-12-01

    Recent observations of silicic lava flows in Chile strongly suggest sustained, endogeneous flow beneath an insulating carapace, where the flow advances through breakouts at the flow margin. New mapping of vertical exposures around the margin of Obsidian Dome, California, has identified discreet lobe structures in cross-section, suggesting that flow-front breakouts occured there during emplacement. The flow lobes are identified through structural measurements of flow-banding orientation and the stretching directions of vesicles. Newly acquired lidar of the Inyo Domes, including Obsidian Dome, is being analyzed to better understand the patterns of folding on the upper surface of the lavas, and to test for fold vergence patterns that may distinguish between endogenous and exogenous flow.

  6. Primary and secondary structure of U8 small nuclear RNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reddy, R.; Henning, D.; Busch, H.

    1985-01-01

    U8 small nuclear RNA is a new, capped, 140 nucleotides long RNA species found in Novikoff hepatoma cells. Its sequence is: m3GpppAmUmCGUCAGGA GGUUAAUCCU UACCUGUCCC UCCUUUCGGA GGGCAGAUAG AAAAUGAUGA UUGGAGCUUG CAUGAUCUGC UGAUUAUAGC AUUUCCGUGU AAUCAGGACC UGACAACAUC CUGAUUGCUU CUAUCUGAUUOH. This RNA is present in approximately 25,000 copies/cell, and it is enriched in nucleolar preparations. Like U1, U2, U4/U6, and U5 RNAs, U8 RNA was also present as a ribonucleoprotein associated with the Sm antigen. The rat U8 RNA was highly homologous (greater than 90%) to a recently characterized 5.4 S RNA from mouse cells infected with spleen focus-forming virus. In addition to the U8 RNA, three other U small nuclear RNAs were found in anti-Sm antibody immunoprecipitates from labeled rat and HeLa cells. Each of these contained a m3GpppAm cap structure; their apparent chain lengths were 60, 130, and 65 nucleotides. These U small nuclear RNAs are designated U7, U9, and U10 RNAs, respectively

  7. Structure and statistics of turbulent flow over riblets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, R. D.; Crawford, C. H.; Karniadakis, G. E.

    1993-01-01

    In this paper we present comparisons of turbulence statistics obtained from direct numerical simulation of flow over streamwise aligned triangular riblets with experimental results. We also present visualizations of the instantaneous velocity field inside and around the riblet valleys. In light of the behavior of the statistics and flowfields inside the riblet valleys, we investigate previously reported physical mechanisms for the drag reducing effect of riblets; our results here support the hypothesis of flow anchoring by the riblet valleys and the corresponding inhibition of spanwise flow motions.

  8. Plane waves and structures in turbulent channel flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirovich, L.; Ball, K. S.; Keefe, L. R.

    1990-01-01

    A direct simulation of turbulent flow in a channel is analyzed by the method of empirical eigenfunctions (Karhunen-Loeve procedure, proper orthogonal decomposition). This analysis reveals the presence of propagating plane waves in the turbulent flow. The velocity of propagation is determined by the flow velocity at the location of maximal Reynolds stress. The analysis further suggests that the interaction of these waves appears to be essential to the local production of turbulence via bursting or sweeping events in the turbulent boundary layer, with the additional suggestion that the fast acting plane waves act as triggers.

  9. On the relation between primary and eutectic solidification structures in gray iron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elmquist, L; Sonawane, P A

    2012-01-01

    The solidification of hypoeutectic gray cast iron starts with the nucleation of primary austenite crystals. Before graphite is nucleated, and the eutectic structure is formed, these crystals start to grow as columnar or equiaxed dendrites. However, very little is known about these dendrites, and especially how they influence the subsequent eutectic structure. Besides, it has previously been shown that the primary solidification structure influences the formation of defects. Shrinkage porosity was found between the dendrites, in the grain boundaries, and the formation of the primary solidification structure was found to influence problems related to metal expansion penetration. Therefore a better understanding about the formation of this structure is of importance. In this work, different inoculants and their influence on the formation of the micro- and macrostructures has been investigated. The inoculants considered are commercially used inoculants, i.e. inoculants used in the foundries, as well as different iron powders. The addition of iron powder is used to promote the primary solidification structure. It is shown that the nucleation of the dendrites is influenced by the amount of iron powder. Secondary dendrite arm spacing is a quantitative measurement in the microstructure related to these dendrites, which in turn depends on the solidification time. Eutectic cell size, on the other hand, is found to depend on secondary dendrite arm spacing. It is shown how the addition of inoculants influences both primary and eutectic solidification structures, and how they are related to each other.

  10. Signatures of non-universal large scales in conditional structure functions from various turbulent flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blum, Daniel B; Voth, Greg A; Bewley, Gregory P; Bodenschatz, Eberhard; Gibert, Mathieu; Xu Haitao; Gylfason, Ármann; Mydlarski, Laurent; Yeung, P K

    2011-01-01

    We present a systematic comparison of conditional structure functions in nine turbulent flows. The flows studied include forced isotropic turbulence simulated on a periodic domain, passive grid wind tunnel turbulence in air and in pressurized SF 6 , active grid wind tunnel turbulence (in both synchronous and random driving modes), the flow between counter-rotating discs, oscillating grid turbulence and the flow in the Lagrangian exploration module (in both constant and random driving modes). We compare longitudinal Eulerian second-order structure functions conditioned on the instantaneous large-scale velocity in each flow to assess the ways in which the large scales affect the small scales in a variety of turbulent flows. Structure functions are shown to have larger values when the large-scale velocity significantly deviates from the mean in most flows, suggesting that dependence on the large scales is typical in many turbulent flows. The effects of the large-scale velocity on the structure functions can be quite strong, with the structure function varying by up to a factor of 2 when the large-scale velocity deviates from the mean by ±2 standard deviations. In several flows, the effects of the large-scale velocity are similar at all the length scales we measured, indicating that the large-scale effects are scale independent. In a few flows, the effects of the large-scale velocity are larger on the smallest length scales. (paper)

  11. Advanced composites structural concepts and materials technologies for primary aircraft structures. Structural response and failure analysis: ISPAN modules users manual

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hairr, John W.; Huang, Jui-Ten; Ingram, J. Edward; Shah, Bharat M.

    1992-01-01

    The ISPAN Program (Interactive Stiffened Panel Analysis) is an interactive design tool that is intended to provide a means of performing simple and self contained preliminary analysis of aircraft primary structures made of composite materials. The program combines a series of modules with the finite element code DIAL as its backbone. Four ISPAN Modules were developed and are documented. These include: (1) flat stiffened panel; (2) curved stiffened panel; (3) flat tubular panel; and (4) curved geodesic panel. Users are instructed to input geometric and material properties, load information and types of analysis (linear, bifurcation buckling, or post-buckling) interactively. The program utilizing this information will generate finite element mesh and perform analysis. The output in the form of summary tables of stress or margins of safety, contour plots of loads or stress, and deflected shape plots may be generalized and used to evaluate specific design.

  12. Associations between structural capabilities of primary care practices and performance on selected quality measures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedberg, Mark W; Coltin, Kathryn L; Safran, Dana Gelb; Dresser, Marguerite; Zaslavsky, Alan M; Schneider, Eric C

    2009-10-06

    Recent proposals to reform primary care have encouraged physician practices to adopt such structural capabilities as performance feedback and electronic health records. Whether practices with these capabilities have higher performance on measures of primary care quality is unknown. To measure associations between structural capabilities of primary care practices and performance on commonly used quality measures. Cross-sectional analysis. Massachusetts. 412 primary care practices. During 2007, 1 physician from each participating primary care practice (median size, 4 physicians) was surveyed about structural capabilities of the practice (responses representing 308 practices were obtained). Data on practice structural capabilities were linked to multipayer performance data on 13 Healthcare Effectiveness Data and Information Set (HEDIS) process measures in 4 clinical areas: screening, diabetes, depression, and overuse. Frequently used multifunctional electronic health records were associated with higher performance on 5 HEDIS measures (3 in screening and 2 in diabetes), with statistically significant differences in performance ranging from 3.1 to 7.6 percentage points. Frequent meetings to discuss quality were associated with higher performance on 3 measures of diabetes care (differences ranging from 2.3 to 3.1 percentage points). Physician awareness of patient experience ratings was associated with higher performance on screening for breast cancer and cervical cancer (1.9 and 2.2 percentage points, respectively). No other structural capabilities were associated with performance on more than 1 measure. No capabilities were associated with performance on depression care or overuse. Structural capabilities of primary care practices were assessed by physician survey. Among the investigated structural capabilities of primary care practices, electronic health records were associated with higher performance across multiple HEDIS measures. Overall, the modest magnitude and

  13. Identification of individual coherent sets associated with flow trajectories using coherent structure coloring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlueter-Kuck, Kristy L.; Dabiri, John O.

    2017-09-01

    We present a method for identifying the coherent structures associated with individual Lagrangian flow trajectories even where only sparse particle trajectory data are available. The method, based on techniques in spectral graph theory, uses the Coherent Structure Coloring vector and associated eigenvectors to analyze the distance in higher-dimensional eigenspace between a selected reference trajectory and other tracer trajectories in the flow. By analyzing this distance metric in a hierarchical clustering, the coherent structure of which the reference particle is a member can be identified. This algorithm is proven successful in identifying coherent structures of varying complexities in canonical unsteady flows. Additionally, the method is able to assess the relative coherence of the associated structure in comparison to the surrounding flow. Although the method is demonstrated here in the context of fluid flow kinematics, the generality of the approach allows for its potential application to other unsupervised clustering problems in dynamical systems such as neuronal activity, gene expression, or social networks.

  14. Self-flowing underwater concrete mixtures for high rise structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yousri, K.M.

    2005-01-01

    Placement of conventional concrete mixtures in underwater construction results in a high percentage of material loss due to washout of cement paste. This paper presents the influence of anti washout admixture (AWA) on various properties of concrete. Eleven self-flowing concrete (SFC) mixtures using type II cement were proportioned. A combination of low water cement (w/c), high cement contents, anti washout admixtures, fly ash, and silica fume were used to enhance the resistance of fresh concrete to washout. The concrete mixtures proportioned to be highly flow able, self-leveling and cohesive. The water-cementitious materials ratios ranged between 0.356 and 0.392 which correspond a typical underwater concrete mixture. The concrete mixtures were tested for slump, slump flow, washout resistance and compressive strength. The compressive strength of each concrete mixture cast underwater was determined at 3, 7, 28 days and compared with the compressive strength of the same concrete mixture cast in normal condition (in air). Test results indicated that the use of an AWA facilitates the production of flow able concrete mixtures with the added benefit of lower washout loss. Concrete mixture proportioned using Type II cement and fly ash at level of replacement of 15% was found to develop self flowing concrete with better fresh and hardened properties and more resistant to washout. The self-flowing underwater concretes developed a 28-day compressive strengths ranging from 20 to 28 MPa

  15. Primary standards for measuring flow rates from 100 nl/min to 1 ml/min - gravimetric principle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bissig, Hugo; Petter, Harm Tido; Lucas, Peter; Batista, Elsa; Filipe, Eduarda; Almeida, Nelson; Ribeiro, Luis Filipe; Gala, João; Martins, Rui; Savanier, Benoit; Ogheard, Florestan; Niemann, Anders Koustrup; Lötters, Joost; Sparreboom, Wouter

    2015-08-01

    Microflow and nanoflow rate calibrations are important in several applications such as liquid chromatography, (scaled-down) process technology, and special health-care applications. However, traceability in the microflow and nanoflow range does not go below 16 μl/min in Europe. Furthermore, the European metrology organization EURAMET did not yet validate this traceability by means of an intercomparison between different National Metrology Institutes (NMIs). The NMIs METAS, Centre Technique des Industries Aérauliques et Thermiques, IPQ, Danish Technological Institute, and VSL have therefore developed and validated primary standards to cover the flow rate range from 0.1 μl/min to at least 1 ml/min. In this article, we describe the different designs and methods of the primary standards of the gravimetric principle and the results obtained at the intercomparison for the upper flow rate range for the various NMIs and Bronkhorst High-Tech, the manufacturer of the transfer standards used.

  16. Identification of dominant structures and their flow dynamics in the turbulent two-phase flow using POD technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Munir, Shahzad; Siddiqui, Muhammad Israr; Heikal, Morgan; Aziz, Abdul Rashid Abdul [Universiti Teknologi PETRONAS, Bander Seri Iskandar (Malaysia); Sercey, Guillaume de [University of Brighton, Brighton (United Kingdom)

    2015-11-15

    The Proper orthogonal decomposition (POD) method has seen increasingly used in the last two decades and has a lot of applications for the comparison of experimental and numerically simulated data. The POD technique is often used to extract information about coherent structures dominating the flow. The two-dimensional and two-component instantaneous velocity fields of both liquid and gas phases of a slug flow were obtained by Particle image velocimetry (PIV) combined with Laser induced fluorescence (LIF). POD was applied to the velocity fields of both phases separately to identify the coherent flow structures. We focused on POD eigenmodes and their corresponding energy contents of both liquid and gas phases. The sum of first few eigenmodes that contain maximum turbulent kinetic energy of the flow represents the coherent structures. In the case of liquid phase the first eigenmode contained 42% of the total energy, while in the gas phase the decaying energy distribution was flat. The POD results showed that the coefficient of mode 1 for the liquid phase oscillated between positive and negative values and had the highest amplitude. For the visualization of coherent motion different linear combinations of eigenmodes for liquid and gas phases were used. The phenomena of turbulent bursting events associated with Q2 events (low momentum fluid moving away from the wall) and Q4 events (high momentum flow moving towards the wall) were also discussed to assess its contribution in turbulence production.

  17. A numerical study of the complex flow structure in a compound meandering channel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moncho-Esteve, Ignacio J.; García-Villalba, Manuel; Muto, Yasu; Shiono, Koji; Palau-Salvador, Guillermo

    2018-06-01

    In this study, we report large eddy simulations of turbulent flow in a periodic compound meandering channel for three different depth conditions: one in-bank and two overbank conditions. The flow configuration corresponds to the experiments of Shiono and Muto (1998). The predicted mean streamwise velocities, mean secondary motions, velocity fluctuations, turbulent kinetic energy as well as mean flood flow angle to meandering channel are in good agreement with the experimental measurements. We have analyzed the flow structure as a function of the inundation level, with particular emphasis on the development of the secondary motions due to the interaction between the main channel and the floodplain flow. Bed shear stresses have been also estimated in the simulations. Floodplain flow has a significant impact on the flow structure leading to significantly different bed shear stress patterns within the main meandering channel. The implications of these results for natural compound meandering channels are also discussed.

  18. Cell proliferation and apoptosis in the primary enamel knot measured by flow cytometry of laser microdissected samples

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Matalová, Eva; Dubská, L.; Fleischmannová, Jana; Chlastáková, Ivana; Janečková, Eva; Tucker, A. S.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 55, č. 8 (2010), s. 570-575 ISSN 0003-9969 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KJB500450802; GA AV ČR IAA600450904; GA ČR GA203/08/1680 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50450515 Keywords : Laser capture microdissection * Flow cytometry * Primary enamel knot Subject RIV: EA - Cell Biology Impact factor: 1.463, year: 2010

  19. Interfacial structures and area transport in upward and downward two-phase flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paranjape, S. S.; Kim, S.; Ishii, M.; Kelly, J.

    2003-01-01

    An experimental study has been carried out for upward and downward two-phase flow to study local interfacial structures and interfacial area transport. The flow studied, is an adiabatic, air-water, co-current, two-phase flow, in 25.4 mm and 50.8 mm ID test sections. Flow regime map is obtained using the characteristic signals obtained from an impedance void meter, employing neural network based identification methodology. A four sensor conductivity probe is used to measure the local two phase flow parameters, in bubbly flow regime. The local profiles of these parameters as well as their axial development reveal the nature of the interfacial structures and the bubble interaction mechanisms occurring in the flow. Furthermore, this study provides a good database for the development of the interfacial area transport equation, which dynamically models the changes in the interfacial area along a flow field. An interfacial area transport equation is used for downward flow based on that developed for the upward flow, with certain modifications in the bubble interaction terms. The area averaged values of the interfacial area concentration are compared with those predicted by the interfacial area transport model. The differences in the interfacial structures and interfacial area transport in co-current downward and upward two-phase flows are studied

  20. Fluid-Structure Interaction for Coolant Flow in Research-type Nuclear Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Curtis, Franklin G.; Ekici, Kivanc; Freels, James D.

    2011-01-01

    The High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR), located at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), is scheduled to undergo a conversion of the fuel used and this proposed change requires an extensive analysis of the flow through the reactor core. The core consists of 540 very thin and long fuel plates through which the coolant (water) flows at a very high rate. Therefore, the design and the flow conditions make the plates prone to dynamic and static deflections, which may result in flow blockage and structural failure which in turn may cause core damage. To investigate the coolant flow between fuel plates and associated structural deflections, the Fluid-Structure Interaction (FSI) module in COMSOL will be used. Flow induced flutter and static deflections will be examined. To verify the FSI module, a test case of a cylinder in crossflow, with vortex induced vibrations was performed and validated.

  1. THREE DIMENSIONAL CFD MODELLING OF FLOW STRUCTURE IN COMPOUND CHANNELS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Usman Ghani

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The computational modeling of three dimensional flows in a meandering compound channel has been performed in this research work. The flow calculations are performed by solving 3D steady state continuity and Reynolds averaged Navier-Stokes equations. The turbulence closure is approximated with standard - turbulence model. The model equations are solved numerically with a general purpose software package. A comprehensive validation of the simulated results against the experimental data and a demonstration that the software used in this study has matured enough for investigating practical engineering problems are the major contributions of this paper. The model was initially validated. This was achieved by computing streamwise point velocities at different depths of various sections and depth averaged velocities at three cross sections along the main channel and comparing these results with experimental data. After the validation of the model, predictions were made for different flow parameters including velocity contours at the surface, pressure distribution, turbulence intensity etc. The results gave an overall understanding of these flow variables in meandering channels. The simulation also established the good prediction capability of the standard - turbulence model for flows in compound channels.

  2. Internal Flow Structures in Columnar Jointed Basalt from HREPPHÓLAR, Iceland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattsson, H. B.; Bosshard, S. A.; Hetenyi, G.; Almqvist, B.; Hirt, A. M.; Caricchi, L.; Caddick, M.

    2010-12-01

    Columnar jointed basalt from Hrepphólar in southern Iceland display spectacular internal structures when cut. These structures follow the overall orientation of the columns and display semi-circular to circular features when cross-cut. It was previously believed that these internal structures formed as a result of alteration due to circulation of meteoric water within the column-bounding fractures after emplacement. However, new field observations of viscous fingering within the columns and the fact that approximately 80% of the semi-circular features are found within the column whereas the remaining 20% are cut by the column-bounding fractures clearly shows that these internal structures must have formed prior to crack-propagation (and are thus primary features). Here we present the results of textural and petrological analyses through a cross-section of a column, in combination with magnetic susceptibility and anisotropy measurements of the same samples. The variation in textures and geochemistry can be attributed to the presence of diffuse banding caused by variations in the modal proportions of the main phenocryst phases (i.e., plagioclase, clinopyroxene, olivine and titanomagnetite/ilmenite). Orientation of plagioclase laths and titanomagnetite crystals (based on measurements in thin sections and AMS-measurements) are consistent with vertical flow alignment. Nowhere in the column can evidence for downwards flow be found (excluding the possibility of small-scale convection cells generating these features). It is proposed here, that the volume decrease associated with solidification (typically 10-15 vol.% for basaltic systems) and the increasing weight of the overlying crust results in upwelling of partially crystallized material into the centre of the columns. Preliminary numerical modeling indicates that the isotherms within individual columns become steeper with increasing depth in a lava flow (allowing for larger displacement distances). We propose that

  3. Simulation and Assessment of Whole Life-Cycle Carbon Emission Flows from Different Residential Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rikun Wen

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available To explore the differences in carbon emissions over the whole life-cycle of different building structures, the published calculated carbon emissions from residential buildings in China and abroad were normalized. Embodied carbon emission flows, operations stage carbon emission flows, demolition and reclamation stage carbon emission flows and total life-cycle carbon emission flows from concrete, steel, and wood structures were obtained. This study is based on the theory of the social cost of carbon, with an adequately demonstrated social cost of carbon and social discount rate. Taking into consideration both static and dynamic situations and using a social discount rate of 3.5%, the total life-cycle carbon emission flows, absolute carbon emission and building carbon costs were calculated and assessed. The results indicated that concrete structures had the highest embodied carbon emission flows and negative carbon emission flows in the waste and reclamation stage. Wood structures that started the life-cycle with stored carbon had the lowest carbon emission flows in the operations stage and relatively high negative carbon emission flows in the reclamation stage. Wood structures present the smallest carbon footprints for residential buildings.

  4. Intraflow structures of the Cohassett flow at east Sentinel Gap and Sentinel Mountain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cross, R.W.; Fairchild, K.R.

    1988-04-01

    This report presents the results of outcrop intraflow structure studies in the Cohassett flow at east Sentinel Gap and Sentinel Mountain on the northwestern margin of the Pasco Basin. This study is the first of several Cohassett outcrop studies. The studies will aid in characterizing intraflow structures of the Cohassett flow to support design and construction and to aid in assessing the performance of a possible high-level nuclear waste repository in the subsurface of the reference repository location at the Hanford Site. A total of twenty-four intraflow structure sections of the Cohassett flow were measured at two, adjacent study areas. The measured sections provide positions, thicknesses, and descriptions of every intraflow structure encountered within the Cohassett flow. Graphic logs of each section display the sequence of intraflow structures per measured section. Correlation diagrams depict interpretations of the lateral continuity and thickness variations of each intraflow structure across the total of 6 km of the two study areas. Consistencies of intraflow structures are observed across the study area. The Cohassett flow interior in outcrop is consistently thick and never thins to less than 51 m. The flow interior is interpreted as laterally continuous across the study areas, and no features are observed to interrupt its horizontal extent. Based on the field observations, there is interpreted lateral continuity of packets of intraflow structures within the flow interior. 20 refs., 24 figs

  5. Therapeutical effect on blood-flow in three-phase scanning in primary malignant tumours and acute osteomyelitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kovacic, K; Kusic, Z [Clinical Hospital Sestre Milosrdnice, Zagreb (Croatia). Dept. of Oncology and Nuclear Medicine; Cepulic, M [Children` s Hospital, Zagreb (Croatia)

    1994-10-01

    In the studies where the bone scan was limited only to the late static image, the main disadvantage was its nonspecifity. With three-phase bone scan the number of false positive findings was reduced by some peculiar diseases; for instance, acute hematogenous osteomyelitis. It is well known that various diseases, such as nonunion of the fracture, some surgical interventions, avascular necrosis... can imitate acute osteomyelitis on the static image. These diseases can only be differentiated from inflammation by blood-flow. Therefore, in all patients with the diagnosis of primary bone disease tumor, inflammation, trauma, aseptic necrosis... three-phase bone scintigraphy is performed. Here, only the patients with acute osteomyelitis and primary malignant bone tumors will be presented: the basic scintigram was done before the therapy started, and the second one as a part of the follow-up - in some patients during the therapy and in some after its ending. We noticed that the most reliable part of three-phase bone scan responding to the therapy is angioscintigraphy (blood-flow) and in some cases early static (blood-pool) image. These two phases, especially the first one, are in good correlation with the clinic, in contrast to the third phase which is delayed. From the presented cases it could be concluded that in acute osteomyelitis and primary malignant tumors, blood-flow and blood-pool images are unavoidable phases of the bone scanning when we want to correctly evaluate the effects of the therapy. (author).

  6. Comparative research of finite element methods for perforated structures of nuclear power plant primary equipment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiong Guangming; Deng Xiaoyun; Jin Ting

    2013-01-01

    Many perforated structures are used for nuclear power plant primary equipment, and they are complex, and have various forms. In order to explore the analysis and evaluation method, this paper used finite element method and equivalent analytic method to do the comparative analysis of perforated structures. The paper considered the main influence factors (including perforated forms, arrangements, and etc.), obtaining the systematic analysis methods of perforated structures. (authors)

  7. Evaluation of tests for coastdown of reactor coolant flow and measure of primary circuit flow of Angra-1 nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galetti, M.R.S.; Camargo, C.T.M.; Pontedeiro, A.C.

    1987-05-01

    The Angra 1 Nuclear Power Plant first reload license was issued after several technical discussions among CNEN, FURNAS and KWU. During the license process CNEN has established that the plant could return to anormal operation if the requirements described in the letter CNEN-DExL-C 06/86 were satisfied. The requirements according to the CNEN Transient and Thermohydraulic Group Analysis were to do again the following tests: 'Primary Flow Measurement' to check if the excess flow measured in the first cycle was held; and Pump Coastdown' to check if the Westinghouse and KWU fuel elements are thermo-hydraulicaly compatibles during transients. The mixed core must keep at least the same safety margin presented on Angra 1 FSAR for the original core. The tests and the analysis of results are described. (Author) [pt

  8. Embodied memory: effective and stable perception by combining optic flow and image structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Jing Samantha; Bingham, Ned; Bingham, Geoffrey P

    2013-12-01

    Visual perception studies typically focus either on optic flow structure or image structure, but not on the combination and interaction of these two sources of information. Each offers unique strengths in contrast to the other's weaknesses. Optic flow yields intrinsically powerful information about 3D structure, but is ephemeral. It ceases when motion stops. Image structure is less powerful in specifying 3D structure, but is stable. It remains when motion stops. Optic flow and image structure are intrinsically related in vision because the optic flow carries one image to the next. This relation is especially important in the context of progressive occlusion, in which optic flow provides information about the location of targets hidden in subsequent image structure. In four experiments, we investigated the role of image structure in "embodied memory" in contrast to memory that is only in the head. We found that either optic flow (Experiment 1) or image structure (Experiment 2) alone were relatively ineffective, whereas the combination was effective and, in contrast to conditions requiring reliance on memory-in-the-head, much more stable over extended time (Experiments 2 through 4). Limits well documented for visual short memory (that is, memory-in-the-head) were strongly exceeded by embodied memory. The findings support J. J. Gibson's (1979/1986, The Ecological Approach to Visual Perception, Boston, MA, Houghton Mifflin) insights about progressive occlusion and the embodied nature of perception and memory.

  9. Hydraulic modeling of flow impact on bridge structures: a case study on Citarum bridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siregar, R. I.

    2018-02-01

    Flood waves because of the rapid catchment response to high intense rainfall, breaches of flood defenses may induce huge impact forces on structures, causing structural damage or even failures. Overflowing stream that passes over the bridge, it means to discharge flood water level is smaller than the capacity of the river flow. In this study, the researches present the methodological approach of flood modeling on bridge structures. The amount of force that obtained because of the hydrostatic pressure received by the bridge at the time of the flood caused the bridge structure disrupted. This paper presents simulation of flow impact on bridge structures with some event flood conditions. Estimating the hydrostatic pressure developed new model components, to quantify the flow impact on structures. Flow parameters applied the model for analyzing, such as discharge, velocity, and water level or head that effect of bridge structures. The simulation will illustrate the capability of bridge structures with some event flood river and observe the behavior of the flow that occurred during the flood. Hydraulic flood modeling use HEC-RAS for simulation. This modeling will describe the impact on bridge structures. Based on the above modelling resulted, in 2008 has flood effect more than other years on the Citarum Bridge, because its flow overflow on the bridge.

  10. Flow in Porous Media with Special Reference to Breakwater Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, O. Holst

    coefficients are found from the literature. For the non-stationary flow case, existing expressions are discussed, and with the aim of decribing the inertia term a new analogy based on cylinders/spheres is presented. The predicted variation of the virtual mass coefficient with the porosity compares to a series...

  11. Formation of coherent structures in 3D laminar mixing flows

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Speetjens, M.F.M.; Clercx, H.J.H.

    2009-01-01

    Mixing under laminar flow conditions is key to a wide variety of industrial systems of size extending from microns to meters. Examples range from the traditional (and still very relevant) mixing of viscous fluids via compact processing equipment down to emerging micro-fluidics applications. Profound

  12. A Classification of Clay-Rich Subaqueous Density Flow Structures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hermidas, N.; Eggenhuisen, Joris T.; Jacinto, Ricardo Silva; Luthi, S.M.; Toth, Ferenc; Pohl, Florian

    2018-01-01

    This study presents a classification for subaqueous clay-laden sediment gravity flows. A series of laboratory flume experiments were performed using 9%, 15%, and 21% sediment mixture concentrations composed of sand, silt, clay, and tap water, on varying bed slopes of 6°, 8°, and 9.5°, and with

  13. Thrust generation and wake structure for flow across a pitching ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... condition for the generation of thrust. The vortex strength is found to be invariant of the pitching frequency. Certain differences from the reported results are noted, which may be because of difference in the airfoil shape. These results can help improve understanding of the flow behavior as the low Reynolds number range ...

  14. Surface topography regulates wnt signaling through control of primary cilia structure in mesenchymal stem cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMurray, R. J.; Wann, A. K. T.; Thompson, C. L.; Connelly, J. T.; Knight, M. M.

    2013-01-01

    The primary cilium regulates cellular signalling including influencing wnt sensitivity by sequestering β-catenin within the ciliary compartment. Topographic regulation of intracellular actin-myosin tension can control stem cell fate of which wnt is an important mediator. We hypothesized that topography influences mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) wnt signaling through the regulation of primary cilia structure and function. MSCs cultured on grooves expressed elongated primary cilia, through reduced actin organization. siRNA inhibition of anterograde intraflagellar transport (IFT88) reduced cilia length and increased active nuclear β-catenin. Conversely, increased primary cilia assembly in MSCs cultured on the grooves was associated with decreased levels of nuclear active β-catenin, axin-2 induction and proliferation, in response to wnt3a. This negative regulation, on grooved topography, was reversed by siRNA to IFT88. This indicates that subtle regulation of IFT and associated cilia structure, tunes the wnt response controlling stem cell differentiation. PMID:24346024

  15. Multi-frequency complex network from time series for uncovering oil-water flow structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Zhong-Ke; Yang, Yu-Xuan; Fang, Peng-Cheng; Jin, Ning-De; Xia, Cheng-Yi; Hu, Li-Dan

    2015-02-04

    Uncovering complex oil-water flow structure represents a challenge in diverse scientific disciplines. This challenge stimulates us to develop a new distributed conductance sensor for measuring local flow signals at different positions and then propose a novel approach based on multi-frequency complex network to uncover the flow structures from experimental multivariate measurements. In particular, based on the Fast Fourier transform, we demonstrate how to derive multi-frequency complex network from multivariate time series. We construct complex networks at different frequencies and then detect community structures. Our results indicate that the community structures faithfully represent the structural features of oil-water flow patterns. Furthermore, we investigate the network statistic at different frequencies for each derived network and find that the frequency clustering coefficient enables to uncover the evolution of flow patterns and yield deep insights into the formation of flow structures. Current results present a first step towards a network visualization of complex flow patterns from a community structure perspective.

  16. Experimental study of flow patterns near tube support structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rummens, H.E.C.; Turner, C.W.

    1994-07-01

    Extensive blockage of broached support plates in steam generators has occurred at the Bruce A Nuclear Generating Station (NGS), forcing unit derating in 1988 March. Blockage has also been found on the lower broached plates of the Pickering B and Point Lepreau NGSs. Water chemistry and operating conditions are known to influence fouling directly. We suspect that flow patterns also play a role, that these patterns are influenced by the geometry of steam generator (SG) components, and that particularly the broached plate design actively creates an environment favorable to deposition. Experiments are in progress to examine the flow patterns near various tube supports: the broached plate, two types of lattice bars, and the formed bars. Preliminary tests in an air/water loop with 1/2- and 7-tube SG mockups containing the tube supports have been completed. Flow patterns were visualized using injected air bubbles. Local velocities and turbulence levels were measured using a laser technique, which confirmed observations of flow recirculation and stagnation. Axial pressure profiles were measured to determine overall resistance coefficients, and to identify local pressure extremes. Some visualization tests were also carried out on an artificially fouled broached plate. Based on results to date, several deposition mechanisms are proposed: deposition of particles in stagnant regions, deposition of solubles due to flashing in low-pressure regions, and deposition in smaller channels due to steam migration toward larger channels. A qualitative assessment of the tube support designs based on these mechanisms implies that the relative resistances to fouling are: (WORST) broach plate << lattice bars << formed bars (BEST). As the air/water simulation shows only hydraulic flow patterns, further tests will be done in a simple liquid/vapor Freon loop to examine thermal effects. (author). 3 refs., 10 figs

  17. Structure-Function Correlations using Scanning Laser Polarimetry in Primary Angle-Closure Glaucoma and Primary Open Angle Glaucoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Pei-Jung; Liu, Catherine Jui-Ling.; Wojciechowski, Robert; Bailey-Wilson, Joan E.; Cheng, Ching-Yu

    2010-01-01

    Purpose To assess the correlations between retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) thickness measured with scanning laser polarimetry (SLP) and visual field (VF) sensitivity in primary open angle glaucoma (POAG) and primary angle-closure glaucoma (PACG). Design Prospective, comparative, observational cases series Methods Fifty patients with POAG and 56 with PACG were examined using SLP with variable corneal compensation (GDx VCC) and Humphrey VF analyzer between August 2005 and July 2006 at Taipei Veterans General Hospital. Correlations between RNFL thickness and VF sensitivity, expressed as mean sensitivity (MS) in both decibel (dB) and 1/Lambert (L) scales, were estimated by Spearman's rank correlation coefficient (rs) and multivariate median regression models (pseudo R2). The correlations were determined globally and for six RNFL sectors and their corresponding VF regions. Results The correlation between RNFL thickness and MS (in dB) was weaker in the PACG group (rs = 0.38, P = 0.004, pseudo R2 = 0.17) than in the POAG group (rs = 0.51, P <0.001, pseudo R2 = 0.31), but the difference in the magnitude of correlation was not significant (P = 0.42).With Bonferroni correction, the structure-function correlation was significant in the superotemporal (rs = 0.62), superonasal (rs = 0.56), inferonasal (rs = 0.53), and inferotemporal (rs = 0.50) sectors in the POAG group (all P <0.001), while it was significant only in the superotemporal (rs = 0.53) and inferotemporal (rs = 0.48) sectors in the PACG group (both P <0.001). The results were similar when MS was expressed as 1/L scale. Conclusions Both POAG and PACG eyes had moderate structure-function correlations using SLP. Compared to eyes with POAG, fewer RNFL sectors have significant structure-function correlations in eyes with PACG. PMID:20202618

  18. Turbulent structure of three-dimensional flow behind a model car: 1. Exposed to uniform approach flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozaka, Orçun E.; Özkan, Gökhan; Özdemir, Bedii I.

    2004-01-01

    Turbulent structure of flow behind a model car is investigated with local velocity measurements with emphasis on large structures and their relevance to aerodynamic forces. Results show that two counter-rotating helical vortices, which are formed within the inner wake region, play a key role in determining the flux of kinetic energy. The turbulence is generated within the outermost shear layers due to the instabilities, which also seem to be the basic drive for these relatively organized structures. The measured terms of the turbulent kinetic energy production, which are only part of the full expression, indicate that vortex centres act similar to the manifolds draining the energy in the streamwise direction. As the approach velocity increases, the streamwise convection becomes the dominant means of turbulent transport and, thus, the acquisition of turbulence by relatively non-turbulent flow around the wake region is suppressed.

  19. Lagrangian structure of flows in the Chesapeake Bay: challenges and perspectives on the analysis of estuarine flows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Branicki

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available In this work we discuss applications of Lagrangian techniques to study transport properties of flows generated by shallow water models of estuarine flows. We focus on the flow in the Chesapeake Bay generated by Quoddy (see Lynch and Werner, 1991, a finite-element (shallow water model adopted to the bay by Gross et al. (2001. The main goal of this analysis is to outline the potential benefits of using Lagrangian tools for both understanding transport properties of such flows, and for validating the model output and identifying model deficiencies. We argue that the currently available 2-D Lagrangian tools, including the stable and unstable manifolds of hyperbolic trajectories and techniques exploiting 2-D finite-time Lyapunov exponent fields, are of limited use in the case of partially mixed estuarine flows. A further development and efficient implementation of three-dimensional Lagrangian techniques, as well as improvements in the shallow-water modelling of 3-D velocity fields, are required for reliable transport analysis in such flows. Some aspects of the 3-D trajectory structure in the Chesapeake Bay, based on the Quoddy output, are also discussed.

  20. Relationship among visual field, blood flow, and neural structure measurements in glaucoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, John C; Konduru, Ranjith; Zhang, Xinbo; Tan, Ou; Francis, Brian A; Varma, Rohit; Sehi, Mitra; Greenfield, David S; Sadda, Srinivas R; Huang, David

    2012-05-17

    To determine the relationship among visual field, neural structural, and blood flow measurements in glaucoma. Case-control study. Forty-seven eyes of 42 patients with perimetric glaucoma were age-matched with 27 normal eyes of 27 patients. All patients underwent Doppler Fourier-domain optical coherence tomography to measure retinal blood flow and standard glaucoma evaluation with visual field testing and quantitative structural imaging. Linear regression analysis was performed to analyze the relationship among visual field, blood flow, and structure, after all variables were converted to logarithmic decibel scale. Retinal blood flow was reduced in glaucoma eyes compared to normal eyes (P flow and structural loss of rim area and retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL). There was no correlation or paradoxical correlation between blood flow and structure. Multivariate regression analysis revealed that reduced blood flow and structural loss are independent predictors of visual field loss. Each dB decrease in blood flow was associated with at least 1.62 dB loss in mean deviation (P ≤ 0.001), whereas each dB decrease in rim area and RNFL was associated with 1.15 dB and 2.56 dB loss in mean deviation, respectively (P ≤ 0.03). There is a close link between reduced retinal blood flow and visual field loss in glaucoma that is largely independent of structural loss. Further studies are needed to elucidate the causes of the vascular dysfunction and potential avenues for therapeutic intervention. Blood flow measurement may be useful as an independent assessment of glaucoma severity.

  1. Analysis of serial coronary artery flow patterns early after primary angioplasty: new insights into the dynamics of the microcirculation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharif, Dawod; Rofe, Guy; Sharif-Rasslan, Amal; Goldhammer, Ehud; Makhoul, Nabeel; Shefer, Arie; Hassan, Amin; Rauchfleisch, Shmuel; Rosenschein, Uri

    2008-06-01

    The temporal behavior of the coronary microcirculation in acute myocardial infarction may affect outcome. Diastolic deceleration time and early systolic flow reversal derived from coronary artery blood flow velocity patterns reflect microcirculatory function. To assess left anterior descending coronary artery flow velocity patterns using Doppler transthoracic echocardiography after primary percutaneous coronary intervention, in patients with anterior AMI. Patterns of flow velocity patterns of the LAD were obtained using transthoracic echocardiography-Doppler in 31 consecutive patients who presented with anterior AMI. Measurements were done at 6 hours, 36-48 hours, and 5 days after successful PPCI. Measurements of DDT and pressure half times (Pt%), as well as observation for ESFR were performed. In the first 2 days following PPCI, the average DDT (600 +/- 340 msec) was shorter than on day 5 (807 +/- 332 msec) (P 600 msec) and vice versa. On day 5 most DDTs became longer. Pt1/2 at 6 hours was not different than at day 2 (174 +/- 96 vs. 193 +/- 99 msec, P = NS) and became longer on day 5 (235 +/- 98 msec, P = 0.012). Bidirectional patterns were also observed in the ESFR in 6 patients (19%) at baseline, in 4 (13%) at 36 hours, and in 2 (6.5%) on day 5 after PPCI. Flow velocity patterns of the LAD after PPCI in AMI are dynamic and reflect unpredictable changes in microcirculation.

  2. Groundwater Flow Systems at the Nevada Test Site, Nevada: A Synthesis of Potentiometric Contours, Hydrostratigraphy, and Geologic Structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fenelon, Joseph M.; Sweetkind, Donald S.; Laczniak, Randell J.

    2010-01-25

    Contaminants introduced into the subsurface of the Nevada Test Site by underground nuclear testing are of concern to the U.S. Department of Energy and regulators responsible for protecting human health and safety. The potential for contaminant movement away from the underground test areas and into the accessible environment is greatest by groundwater transport. The primary hydrologic control on this transport is evaluated and examined through a series of contour maps developed to represent the hydraulic-head distribution within each of the major aquifers underlying the area. Aquifers were identified and their extents delineated by merging and analyzing multiple hydrostratigraphic framework models developed by other investigators from existing geologic information. A map of the hydraulic-head distribution in each major aquifer was developed from a detailed evaluation and assessment of available water-level measurements. Multiple spreadsheets that accompany this report provide pertinent water-level and geologic data by well or drill hole. Aquifers are mapped and discussed in general terms as being one of two types: alluvial-volcanic, or carbonate. Both aquifer types are subdivided and mapped as independent regional and local aquifers, based on the continuity of their component rock. Groundwater-flow directions, approximated from potentiometric contours that were developed from the hydraulic-head distribution, are indicated on the maps and discussed for each of the regional aquifers and for selected local aquifers. Hydraulic heads vary across the study area and are interpreted to range in altitude from greater than 5,000 feet in a regional alluvial-volcanic aquifer beneath a recharge area in the northern part of the study area to less than 2,300 feet in regional alluvial-volcanic and carbonate aquifers in the southwestern part of the study area. Flow directions throughout the study area are dominantly south-southwest with some local deviations. Vertical hydraulic

  3. Groundwater Flow Systems at the Nevada Test Site, Nevada: A Synthesis of Potentiometric Contours, Hydrostratigraphy, and Geologic Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenelon, Joseph M.; Sweetkind, Donald S.; Laczniak, Randell J.

    2010-01-01

    Contaminants introduced into the subsurface of the Nevada Test Site by underground nuclear testing are of concern to the U.S. Department of Energy and regulators responsible for protecting human health and safety. The potential for contaminant movement away from the underground test areas and into the accessible environment is greatest by groundwater transport. The primary hydrologic control on this transport is evaluated and examined through a series of contour maps developed to represent the hydraulic-head distribution within each of the major aquifers underlying the area. Aquifers were identified and their extents delineated by merging and analyzing multiple hydrostratigraphic framework models developed by other investigators from existing geologic information. A map of the hydraulic-head distribution in each major aquifer was developed from a detailed evaluation and assessment of available water-level measurements. Multiple spreadsheets that accompany this report provide pertinent water-level and geologic data by well or drill hole. Aquifers are mapped and discussed in general terms as being one of two types: alluvial-volcanic, or carbonate. Both aquifer types are subdivided and mapped as independent regional and local aquifers, based on the continuity of their component rock. Groundwater-flow directions, approximated from potentiometric contours that were developed from the hydraulic-head distribution, are indicated on the maps and discussed for each of the regional aquifers and for selected local aquifers. Hydraulic heads vary across the study area and are interpreted to range in altitude from greater than 5,000 feet in a regional alluvial-volcanic aquifer beneath a recharge area in the northern part of the study area to less than 2,300 feet in regional alluvial-volcanic and carbonate aquifers in the southwestern part of the study area. Flow directions throughout the study area are dominantly south-southwest with some local deviations. Vertical hydraulic

  4. Biomimetic structures for fluid drag reduction in laminar and turbulent flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, Yong Chae; Bhushan, Bharat

    2010-01-01

    Biomimetics allows one to mimic nature to develop materials and devices of commercial interest for engineers. Drag reduction in fluid flow is one of the examples found in nature. In this study, nano, micro, and hierarchical structures found in lotus plant surfaces, as well as shark skin replica and a rib patterned surface to simulate shark skin structure were fabricated. Drag reduction efficiency studies on the surfaces were systematically carried out using water flow. An experimental flow channel was used to measure the pressure drop in laminar and turbulent flows, and the trends were explained in terms of the measured and predicted values by using fluid dynamics models. The slip length for various surfaces in laminar flow was also investigated based on the measured pressure drop. For comparison, the pressure drop for various surfaces was also measured using air flow.

  5. Large Eddy Simulation of stratified flows over structures

    OpenAIRE

    Brechler J.; Fuka V.

    2013-01-01

    We tested the ability of the LES model CLMM (Charles University Large-Eddy Microscale Model) to model the stratified flow around three dimensional hills. We compared the quantities, as the height of the dividing streamline, recirculation zone length or length of the lee waves with experiments by Hunt and Snyder[3] and numerical computations by Ding, Calhoun and Street[5]. The results mostly agreed with the references, but some important differences are present.

  6. Large Eddy Simulation of stratified flows over structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brechler J.

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available We tested the ability of the LES model CLMM (Charles University Large-Eddy Microscale Model to model the stratified flow around three dimensional hills. We compared the quantities, as the height of the dividing streamline, recirculation zone length or length of the lee waves with experiments by Hunt and Snyder[3] and numerical computations by Ding, Calhoun and Street[5]. The results mostly agreed with the references, but some important differences are present.

  7. Large Eddy Simulation of stratified flows over structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuka, V.; Brechler, J.

    2013-04-01

    We tested the ability of the LES model CLMM (Charles University Large-Eddy Microscale Model) to model the stratified flow around three dimensional hills. We compared the quantities, as the height of the dividing streamline, recirculation zone length or length of the lee waves with experiments by Hunt and Snyder[3] and numerical computations by Ding, Calhoun and Street[5]. The results mostly agreed with the references, but some important differences are present.

  8. Experimental investigation of torque scaling and coherent structures in turbulent Taylor–Couette flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tokgoz, S; Elsinga, G E; Delfos, R; Westerweel, J

    2011-01-01

    The effect of flow structures to the torque values of fully turbulent Taylor-Couette flow was experimentally studied using tomographic PIV. The measurements were performed for various relative cylinder rotation speeds and Reynolds numbers, based on a study of Ravelet et al. (2010). We confirmed that the flow structures are strongly influenced by the rotation number. Our analyses using time-averaged mean flow showed the presence of Taylor vortices for the two smallest rotation numbers that were studied. Increasing the rotation number initially resulted in the shape deformation of the Taylor vortices. Further increment towards only outer cylinder rotation, showed transition to the dominance of the small scale vortices and absence of Taylor vortex-like structures. We compared the transition of the flow structures with the curves of dimensionless torque. Sudden changes of the flow structures confirmed the presence of transition points on the torque curve, where the dominance of small and large scale vortical structures on the mean flow interchanges.

  9. Improved Flow-Field Structures for Direct Methanol Fuel Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gurau, Bogdan [Nuvant Systems Inc., Crown Point, IN (United States)

    2013-05-31

    The direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC) is ideal if high energy-density liquid fuels are required. Liquid fuels have advantages over compressed hydrogen including higher energy density and ease of handling. Although state-of-the-art DMFCs exhibit manageable degradation rates, excessive fuel crossover diminishes system energy and power density. Although use of dilute methanol mitigates crossover, the concomitant lowering of the gross fuel energy density (GFED) demands a complex balance-of-plant (BOP) that includes higher flow rates, external exhaust recirculation, etc. An alternative approach is redesign of the fuel delivery system to accommodate concentrated methanol. NuVant Systems Inc. (NuVant) will maximize the GFED by design and assembly of a DMFC that uses near neat methanol. The approach is to tune the diffusion of highly concentrated methanol (to the anode catalytic layer) to the back-diffusion of water formed at the cathode (i.e. in situ generation of dilute methanol at the anode layer). Crossover will be minimized without compromising the GFED by innovative integration of the anode flow-field and the diffusion layer. The integrated flow-field-diffusion-layers (IFDLs) will widen the current and potential DMFC operating ranges and enable the use of cathodes optimized for hydrogen-air fuel cells.

  10. Large eddy simulation of a buoyancy-aided flow in a non-uniform channel – Buoyancy effects on large flow structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duan, Y. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Sheffield, Sheffield S1 3JD (United Kingdom); School of Mechanical, Aerospace and Civil Engineering, University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); He, S., E-mail: s.he@sheffield.ac.uk [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Sheffield, Sheffield S1 3JD (United Kingdom)

    2017-02-15

    Highlights: • Buoyancy may greatly redistribute the flow in a non-uniform channel. • Flow structures in the narrow gap are greatly changed when buoyancy is strong. • Large flow structures exist in wider gap, which is enhanced when heat is strong. • Buoyancy reduces mixing factor caused by large flow structures in narrow gap. - Abstract: It has been a long time since the ‘abnormal’ turbulent intensity distribution and high inter-sub-channel mixing rates were observed in the vicinity of the narrow gaps formed by the fuel rods in nuclear reactors. The extraordinary flow behaviour was first described as periodic flow structures by Hooper and Rehme (1984). Since then, the existences of large flow structures were demonstrated by many researchers in various non-uniform flow channels. It has been proved by many authors that the Strouhal number of the flow structure in the isothermal flow is dependent on the size of the narrow gap, not the Reynolds number once it is sufficiently large. This paper reports a numerical investigation on the effect of buoyancy on the large flow structures. A buoyancy-aided flow in a tightly-packed rod-bundle-like channel is modelled using large eddy simulation (LES) together with the Boussinesq approximation. The behaviour of the large flow structures in the gaps of the flow passage are studied using instantaneous flow fields, spectrum analysis and correlation analysis. It is found that the non-uniform buoyancy force in the cross section of the flow channel may greatly redistribute the velocity field once the overall buoyancy force is sufficiently strong, and consequently modify the large flow structures. The temporal and axial spatial scales of the large flow structures are influenced by buoyancy in a way similar to that turbulence is influenced. These scales reduce when the flow is laminarised, but start increasing in the turbulence regeneration region. The spanwise scale of the flow structures in the narrow gap remains more or

  11. Specialists meeting on properties of primary circuit structural materials including environmental effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1977-07-01

    The Specialists Meeting on Properties of Primary Circuit Structural Materials of LMFBRs covered the following topics: overview of materials program in different countries; mechanical properties of materials in air; fracture mechanics studies - component related activities; impact of environmental influences on mechanical properties; relationship of material properties and design methods. The purpose of the meeting was to provide a forum for exchange of information on structural materials behaviour in primary circuit of fast breeder reactors. Special emphasis was placed on environmental effects such as influence of sodium and irradiation on mechanical properties of reactor materials.

  12. Specialists meeting on properties of primary circuit structural materials including environmental effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-01-01

    The Specialists Meeting on Properties of Primary Circuit Structural Materials of LMFBRs covered the following topics: overview of materials program in different countries; mechanical properties of materials in air; fracture mechanics studies - component related activities; impact of environmental influences on mechanical properties; relationship of material properties and design methods. The purpose of the meeting was to provide a forum for exchange of information on structural materials behaviour in primary circuit of fast breeder reactors. Special emphasis was placed on environmental effects such as influence of sodium and irradiation on mechanical properties of reactor materials

  13. Turbulent structure at the midsection of an annular flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghaemi, S.; Rafati, S.; Bizhani, M.; Kuru, E.

    2015-10-01

    The turbulent flow in the midsection of an annular gap between two concentric tubes at Reynolds number of 59 200-90 800 based on hydraulic diameter (dh = 57 mm) and average velocity is experimentally investigated. Measurements are carried out using particle tracking velocimetry (PTV) and planar particle image velocimetry (PIV) with spatial resolution of 0.0068dh (size of the binning window) and 0.0129dh (size of the interrogation window), respectively. Both PTV and PIV results show that the location of maximum mean streamwise velocity (yU) does not coincide with the locations of zero shear stress (yuv), minimum streamwise velocity fluctuation (yu2), and minimum radial velocity fluctuation (yv2). The separation between yU and yuv is 0.013dh based on PTV while PIV underestimates the separation distance as 0.0063dh. Conditional averages of turbulent fluctuations based on the four quadrants across the annulus demonstrate that the inner and outer wall flows overlap in the midsection. In the midsection, the flow is subject to opposing sweep/ejection events originating from both the inner and outer walls. The opposite quadrant events of the two boundary layers cancel out at yuv while the local minimum of spatial correlation of u (maximum mixing of the two wall flows) occurs at yU. Investigation of the budget of Reynolds shear stress showed that production and advection terms act towards the coincidence of the yU and yuv while the dissipation term works against the coincidence of the two points. The location of max also overlaps with zero dissipation of . The production of turbulent kinetic energy is slightly negative in the narrow region between yU and yuv. This negative production acts towards smoothing the mean velocity profile at the joint of the two wall flows by equalizing its curvature (∂2/∂y2) on the two sides of yU. The small separation distance of the yU and yuv is associated with slight deviation from the fully developed condition.

  14. Structure-function correlations using scanning laser polarimetry in primary angle-closure glaucoma and primary open-angle glaucoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Pei-Jung; Liu, Catherine Jui-Ling; Wojciechowski, Robert; Bailey-Wilson, Joan E; Cheng, Ching-Yu

    2010-05-01

    To assess the correlations between retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) thickness measured with scanning laser polarimetry and visual field (VF) sensitivity in primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG) and primary angle-closure glaucoma (PACG). Prospective, comparative, observational cases series. Fifty patients with POAG and 56 patients with PACG were examined using scanning laser polarimetry with variable corneal compensation (GDx VCC; Laser Diagnostic Technologies, Inc.) and Humphrey VF analyzer (Carl Zeiss Meditec, Inc.) between August 2005 and July 2006 at Taipei Veterans General Hospital. Correlations between RNFL thickness and VF sensitivity, expressed as mean sensitivity in both decibel and 1/Lambert scales, were estimated by the Spearman rank correlation coefficient (r(s)) and multivariate median regression models (pseudo R(2)). The correlations were determined globally and for 6 RNFL sectors and their corresponding VF regions. The correlation between RNFL thickness and mean sensitivity (in decibels) was weaker in the PACG group (r(s) = 0.38; P = .004; pseudo R(2) = 0.17) than in the POAG group (r(s) = 0.51; P polarimetry. Compared with eyes with POAG, fewer RNFL sectors have significant structure-function correlations in eyes with PACG. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Structural and contextual dimensions of Iranian primary health care system at local level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanganeh Baygi, Mehdi; Seyedin, Hesam; Salehi, Masoud; Jafari Sirizi, Mehdi

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, family physician plan was established as the main strategy of health system in Iran, while organizational structure of the primary health care system has remained the same as thirty years ago. This study was performed to illustrate structural and contextual dimensions of organizational structure and relationship between them in Iranian primary health care system at local level. A cross-sectional quantitative study was conducted from January to June 2013, during which 121 questionnaires were distributed among senior and junior managers of city health centers at Medical Sciences universities in Iran. Validity of the questionnaire was confirmed by experts (CVI = 0.089 and CVR more than 0.85) and Cronbach α was utilized for reliability (α = 0.904). We used multistage sampling method in this study and analysis of the data was performed by SPSS software using different tests. Local level of primary health care system in Iran had mechanical structure, but in contextual dimensions the results showed different types. There was a significant relationship between structural and contextual dimensions (r = 0.642, P value structural dimensions. Because of the changes in goals and strategies of Iranian health system in recent years, it is urgently recommended to reform the current structure to increase efficiency and effectiveness of the system.

  16. An analysis of transient flow in upland watersheds: interactions between structure and process

    Science.gov (United States)

    David Lawrence Brown

    1995-01-01

    The physical structure and hydrological processes of upland watersheds interact in response to forcing functions such as rainfall, leading to storm runoff generation and pore pressure evolution. Transient fluid flow through distinct flow paths such as the soil matrix, macropores, saprolite, and bedrock may be viewed as a consequence of such interactions. Field...

  17. Vortical Structures and Turbulent Bursts Behind Magnetic Obstacles in Transitional Flow Regimes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kenjeres, S.; Ten Cate, S.; Voesenek, C.J.

    2011-01-01

    The present paper reports on numerical investigations of vortical structures in transient flow regimes generated by the local action of the Lorentz force on an electrically conductive fluid. The locally imposed non-uniform magnetic field generates similar effects as observed for flows over submerged

  18. Anthraquinone with Tailored Structure for Nonaqueous Metal-Organic Redox Flow Battery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Wei; Xu, Wu; Cosimbescu, Lelia; Choi, Daiwon; Li, Liyu; Yang, Zhenguo

    2012-06-08

    A nonaqueous, hybrid metal-organic redox flow battery based on tailored anthraquinone structure is demonstrated to have an energy efficiency of {approx}82% and a specific discharge energy density similar to aqueous redox flow batteries, which is due to the significantly improved solubility of anthraquinone in supporting electrolytes.

  19. Anthraquinone with tailored structure for a nonaqueous metal-organic redox flow battery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei; Xu, Wu; Cosimbescu, Lelia; Choi, Daiwon; Li, Liyu; Yang, Zhenguo

    2012-07-07

    A nonaqueous, hybrid metal-organic redox flow battery based on tailored anthraquinone structure is demonstrated to have an energy efficiency of ~82% and a specific discharge energy density similar to those of aqueous redox flow batteries, which is due to the significantly improved solubility of anthraquinone in supporting electrolytes.

  20. Toward Design Guidelines for Stream Restoration Structures: Measuring and Modeling Unsteady Turbulent Flows in Natural Streams with Complex Hydraulic Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lightbody, A.; Sotiropoulos, F.; Kang, S.; Diplas, P.

    2009-12-01

    Despite their widespread application to prevent lateral river migration, stabilize banks, and promote aquatic habitat, shallow transverse flow training structures such as rock vanes and stream barbs lack quantitative design guidelines. Due to the lack of fundamental knowledge about the interaction of the flow field with the sediment bed, existing engineering standards are typically based on various subjective criteria or on cross-sectionally-averaged shear stresses rather than local values. Here, we examine the performance and stability of in-stream structures within a field-scale single-threaded sand-bed meandering stream channel in the newly developed Outdoor StreamLab (OSL) at the St. Anthony Falls Laboratory (SAFL). Before and after the installation of a rock vane along the outer bank of the middle meander bend, high-resolution topography data were obtained for the entire 50-m-long reach at 1-cm spatial scale in the horizontal and sub-millimeter spatial scale in the vertical. In addition, detailed measurements of flow and turbulence were obtained using acoustic Doppler velocimetry at twelve cross-sections focused on the vicinity of the structure. Measurements were repeated at a range of extreme events, including in-bank flows with an approximate flow rate of 44 L/s (1.4 cfs) and bankfull floods with an approximate flow rate of 280 L/s (10 cfs). Under both flow rates, the structure reduced near-bank shear stresses and resulted in both a deeper thalweg and near-bank aggradation. The resulting comprehensive dataset has been used to validate a large eddy simulation carried out by SAFL’s computational fluid dynamics model, the Virtual StreamLab (VSL). This versatile computational framework is able to efficiently simulate 3D unsteady turbulent flows in natural streams with complex in-stream structures and as a result holds promise for the development of much-needed quantitative design guidelines.

  1. Thermal structure and flow patterns around Seychelles group of Islands (Indian Ocean) during austral autumn

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Vethamony, P.; RameshBabu, V.; RameshKumar, M.R.

    Properties of thermal structure in the upper 750 m around the Seychelles group of islands in the Indian Ocean, based on Expendable Bathythermograph (XBT) data collected in March 1984, are presented along with the inferred flow patterns...

  2. Flow structure formation in an ion-unmagnetized plasma: The HYPER-II experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terasaka, K.; Tanaka, M. Y.; Yoshimura, S.; Aramaki, M.; Sakamoto, Y.; Kawazu, F.; Furuta, K.; Takatsuka, N.; Masuda, M.; Nakano, R.

    2015-01-01

    The HYPER-II device has been constructed in Kyushu University to investigate the flow structure formation in an ion-unmagnetized plasma, which is an intermediate state of plasma and consists of unmagnetized ions and magnetized electrons. High density plasmas are produced by electron cyclotron resonance heating, and the flow field structure in an inhomogeneous magnetic field is investigated with a directional Langmuir probe method and a laser-induced fluorescence method. The experimental setup has been completed and the diagnostic systems have been installed to start the experiments. A set of coaxial electrodes will be introduced to control the azimuthal plasma rotation, and the effect of plasma rotation to generation of rectilinear flow structure will be studied. The HYPER-II experiments will clarify the overall flow structure in the inhomogeneous magnetic field and contribute to understanding characteristic feature of the intermediate state of plasma.

  3. Flow analysis for efficient design of wavy structured microchannel mixing devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanchan, Mithun; Maniyeri, Ranjith

    2018-04-01

    Microfluidics is a rapidly growing field of applied research which is strongly driven by demands of bio-technology and medical innovation. Lab-on-chip (LOC) is one such application which deals with integrating bio-laboratory on micro-channel based single fluidic chip. Since fluid flow in such devices is restricted to laminar regime, designing an efficient passive modulator to induce chaotic mixing for such diffusion based flow is a major challenge. In the present work two-dimensional numerical simulation of viscous incompressible flow is carried out using immersed boundary method (IBM) to obtain an efficient design for wavy structured micro-channel mixing devices. The continuity and Navier-Stokes equations governing the flow are solved by fractional step based finite volume method on a staggered Cartesian grid system. IBM uses Eulerian co-ordinates to describe fluid flow and Lagrangian co-ordinates to describe solid boundary. Dirac delta function is used to couple both these co-ordinate variables. A tether forcing term is used to impose the no-slip boundary condition on the wavy structure and fluid interface. Fluid flow analysis by varying Reynolds number is carried out for four wavy structure models and one straight line model. By analyzing fluid accumulation zones and flow velocities, it can be concluded that straight line structure performs better mixing for low Reynolds number and Model 2 for higher Reynolds number. Thus wavy structures can be incorporated in micro-channels to improve mixing efficiency.

  4. STRUCTURAL AND HIDDEN BARRIERS TO A LOCAL PRIMARY HEALTH CARE INFRASTRUCTURE: AUTONOMY, DECISIONS ABOUT PRIMARY HEALTH CARE, AND THE CENTRALITY AND SIGNIFICANCE OF POWER.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freed, Christopher R; Hansberry, Shantisha T; Arrieta, Martha I

    2013-09-01

    To examine a local primary health care infrastructure and the reality of primary health care from the perspective of residents of a small, urban community in the southern United States. Data derive from 13 semi-structured focus groups, plus three semi-structured interviews, and were analyzed inductively consistent with a grounded theory approach. Structural barriers to the local primary health care infrastructure include transportation, clinic and appointment wait time, and co-payments and health insurance. Hidden barriers consist of knowledge about local health care services, non-physician gatekeepers, and fear of medical care. Community residents have used home remedies and the emergency department at the local academic medical center to manage these structural and hidden barriers. Findings might not generalize to primary health care infrastructures in other communities, respondent perspectives can be biased, and the data are subject to various interpretations and conceptual and thematic frameworks. Nevertheless, the structural and hidden barriers to the local primary health care infrastructure have considerably diminished the autonomy community residents have been able to exercise over their decisions about primary health care, ultimately suggesting that efforts concerned with increasing the access of medically underserved groups to primary health care in local communities should recognize the centrality and significance of power. This study addresses a gap in the sociological literature regarding the impact of specific barriers to primary health care among medically underserved groups.

  5. STRUYA a code for two-dimensional fluid flow analysis with and without structure coupling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katz, F.W.; Schlechtendahl, E.G.; Stoelting, K.

    1979-11-01

    STRUYA is a code for two-dimensional subsonic and supersonic flow analysis. Both Eulerian and Lagrangian grids are allowed. In the third dimension the flow domain may be bounded by a moving wall. The wall movement may be prescribed in a time-and space varying way or computed by a structural model. STRUYA offers a general scheme for adapting various structural models. As a standard feature it includes a cylindrical shell model (CYLDY2). (orig.) [de

  6. Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics Simulations of Dam-Break Flows Around Movable Structures

    OpenAIRE

    Jian, Wei; Liang, Dongfang; Shao, Songdong; Chen, Ridong; Yang, Kejun

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, 3D weakly compressible and incompressible Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (WCSPH & ISPH) models are used to study dam-break flows impacting on either a fixed or a movable structure. First, the two models’ performances are compared in terms of CPU time efficiency and numerical accuracy, as well as the water surface shapes and pressure fields. Then, they are applied to investigate dam-break flow interactions with structures placed in the path of the flood. The study found that th...

  7. A Systematic Review of Outcomes and Complications of Primary Fingertip Reconstruction Using Reverse-Flow Homodigital Island Flaps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regmi, Subhash; Gu, Jia-xiang; Zhang, Nai-chen; Liu, Hong-jun

    2016-04-01

    Fingertip reconstruction using reverse-flow homodigital island flaps has been very popular over the years. However, the outcomes of reconstruction have not been clearly understood. In these circumstances, a systematic review of available literature is warranted. To assess the outcomes and complications of fingertip reconstruction using reverse-flow homodigital island flaps. To justify the usage of reverse-flow homodigital island flaps for fingertip reconstruction. A PubMed [MEDLINE] electronic database was searched (1985 to 15 April 2015). Retrospective case series that met the following criteria were included: (1) Study reported primary data; (2) Study included at least five cases of fingertip defects treated using reverse-flow homodigital island flaps; (3) Study reported outcomes and complications of fingertip reconstruction, either primary or delayed, using reverse-flow homodigital island flaps; (4) The study presented at least one of the following functional outcomes: Static two-point discrimination, return-to-work time, range of motion of distal interphalangeal joints; (5) The study presented at least one complication. Two review authors independently assessed search results, and two other review authors analyzed the data and resolved disagreements. The following endpoints were analyzed: survival rate of the flap, sensibility, and functional outcomes and complications. Eight studies were included in this review. The included studies were published between 1995 and 2014, and a total of 207 patients with 230 fingertip defects were reported. The overall survival rate of the flap was 98 % (including partial survival). The mean static two-point discrimination (2PD) was 7.2 mm. The average range of motion of the DIP joint was 63°. The average return-to-work time was 7 weeks after injury. On average, 2 % of the patient had complete flap necrosis, 5 % had partial flap necrosis, 4 % developed venous congestion, 4 % developed flexion contracture, and 12 % experienced

  8. Near-field flow structures about subcritical surface roughness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doolittle, Charles J.; Drews, Scott D.; Goldstein, David B.

    2014-12-01

    Laminar flow over a periodic array of cylindrical surface roughness elements is simulated with an immersed boundary spectral method both to validate the method for subsequent studies and to examine how persistent streamwise vortices are introduced by a low Reynolds number roughness element. Direct comparisons are made with prior studies at a roughness-based Reynolds number Rek (=U(k) k/ν) of 205 and a diameter to spanwise spacing ratio d/λ of 1/3. Downstream velocity contours match present and past experiments very well. The shear layer developed over the top of the roughness element produces the downstream velocity deficit. Upstream of the roughness element, the vortex topology is found to be consistent with juncture flow experiments, creating three cores along the recirculation line. Streamtraces stemming from these upstream cores, however, have unexpectedly little effect on the downstream flowfield as lateral divergence of the boundary layer quickly dissipates their vorticity. Long physical relaxation time of the recirculating wake behind the roughness remains a prominent issue for simulating this type of flowfield.

  9. Labelling Of Coolant Flow Anomaly Using Fractal Structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Djainal, Djen Djen

    1996-01-01

    This research deals with the instrumentation of the detection and characterization of vertical two-phase flow coolant. This type of work is particularly intended to find alternative method for the detection and identification of noise in vertical two-phase flow in a nuclear reactor environment. Various new methods have been introduced in the past few years, an attempt to developed an objective indicator off low patterns. One of new method is Fractal analysis which can complement conventional methods in the description of highly irregular fluctuations. In the present work, Fractal analysis was applied to analyze simulated boiling coolant signal. This simulated signals were built by sum random elements in small subchannels of the coolant channel. Two modes are defined and both are characterized by their void fractions. In the case of uni modal -PDF signals, the difference between these modes is relatively small. On other hand, bimodal -PDF signals have relative large range. In this research, Fractal dimension can indicate the characters of that signals simulation

  10. Flow structures around a beetle in a tethered flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Boogeon; Oh, Sehyeong; Park, Hyungmin; Choi, Haecheon

    2017-11-01

    In the present study, through a wind-tunnel experiment, we visualize the flow in a tethered flight of a rhinoceros beetle using a smoke-wire visualization technique. Measurements are done at five side planes along the wind span while varying the body angle (angle between the horizontal and the body axis) to investigate the influence of the stroke plane angle that was observed to change depending on the flight mode such as hovering, forward and takeoff flights so on. Observing that a large attached leading-edge vortex is only found on the hindwing, it is inferred that most of the aerodynamic forces would be generated by hindwings (flexible inner wings) compared to the elytra (hard outer wings). In addition, it is observed to use unsteady lift-generating mechanisms such as clap-and-fling, wing-wing interaction and wake capture. Finally, we discuss the relation between the advance ratio and Strouhal number by adjusting free-stream velocity and the body angle (i.e., angle of wake-induced flow). Supported by a Grant to Bio-Mimetic Robot Research Center Funded by Defense Acquisition Program Administration, and by ADD, Korea (UD130070ID).

  11. Stress analysis for CANDU reactor structure assembly following a postulated p/t, c/t rupture after flow blockage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soliman, S A; Lee, T; Ibrahim, A M; Hodgson, S [Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd., Saskatoon, SK (Canada)

    1996-12-31

    This paper describes the collapse load calculations for the reactor structure assembly under the postulated fuel channel flow blockage Level D (faulted) loading condition. Under the flow blockage condition, the primary coolant flow path is obstructed between the inlet and outlet feeder connections to the headers. This, in turn, is postulated to cause the pressure tube and calandria tube to rupture and release hot molten fuel into the moderator, producing a hydrodynamic transient within the calandria shell. The most severe hydrodynamic loads occur within a fraction of a second (0.14 second). The peak pressure for the limiting case scenario for Level D condition is 120 psig, due to a single channel failure event. Under this accident condition, it is shown that the reactor structure assembly can withstand the pressure transient and the structural integrity of the core is assured. A finite element model is generated and used to calculate the minimum collapse load. The ANSYS code is used with element type Stif-43 for elastic/plastic, large deformation and small strain analysis. (author). 1 ref., 3 tabs., 9 figs.

  12. Stress analysis for CANDU reactor structure assembly following a postulated p/t, c/t rupture after flow blockage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soliman, S.A.; Lee, T.; Ibrahim, A.M.; Hodgson, S.

    1995-01-01

    This paper describes the collapse load calculations for the reactor structure assembly under the postulated fuel channel flow blockage Level D (faulted) loading condition. Under the flow blockage condition, the primary coolant flow path is obstructed between the inlet and outlet feeder connections to the headers. This, in turn, is postulated to cause the pressure tube and calandria tube to rupture and release hot molten fuel into the moderator, producing a hydrodynamic transient within the calandria shell. The most severe hydrodynamic loads occur within a fraction of a second (0.14 second). The peak pressure for the limiting case scenario for Level D condition is 120 psig, due to a single channel failure event. Under this accident condition, it is shown that the reactor structure assembly can withstand the pressure transient and the structural integrity of the core is assured. A finite element model is generated and used to calculate the minimum collapse load. The ANSYS code is used with element type Stif-43 for elastic/plastic, large deformation and small strain analysis. (author). 1 ref., 3 tabs., 9 figs

  13. Examination of the effect of blowing on the near-surface flow structure over a dimpled surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borchetta, C. G.; Martin, A.; Bailey, S. C. C.

    2018-03-01

    The near surface flow over a dimpled surface with flow injection through it was documented using time-resolved particle image velocimetry. The instantaneous flow structure, time-averaged statistics, and results from snapshot proper orthogonal decomposition were used to examine the coherent structures forming near the dimpled surface. In particular, the modifications made to the flow structures by the addition of flow injection through the surface were studied. It was observed that without flow injection, inclined flow structures with alternating vorticity from neighboring dimples are generated by the dimples and advect downstream. This behavior is coupled with fluid becoming entrained inside the dimples, recirculating and ejecting away from the surface. When flow injection was introduced through the surface, the flow structures became more disorganized, but some of the features of the semi-periodic structures observed without flow injection were preserved. The structures with flow injection appear in multiple wall-normal layers, formed from vortical structures shed from upstream dimples, with a corresponding increase in the size of the advecting structures. As a result of the more complex flow field observed with flow injection, there was an increase in turbulent kinetic energy and Reynolds shear stress, with the Reynolds shear stress representing an increase in vertical transport of momentum by sweeping and ejecting motions that were not present without flow injection.

  14. Large eddy simulation study of the kinetic energy entrainment by energetic turbulent flow structures in large wind farms

    Science.gov (United States)

    VerHulst, Claire; Meneveau, Charles

    2014-02-01

    In this study, we address the question of how kinetic energy is entrained into large wind turbine arrays and, in particular, how large-scale flow structures contribute to such entrainment. Previous research has shown this entrainment to be an important limiting factor in the performance of very large arrays where the flow becomes fully developed and there is a balance between the forcing of the atmospheric boundary layer and the resistance of the wind turbines. Given the high Reynolds numbers and domain sizes on the order of kilometers, we rely on wall-modeled large eddy simulation (LES) to simulate turbulent flow within the wind farm. Three-dimensional proper orthogonal decomposition (POD) analysis is then used to identify the most energetic flow structures present in the LES data. We quantify the contribution of each POD mode to the kinetic energy entrainment and its dependence on the layout of the wind turbine array. The primary large-scale structures are found to be streamwise, counter-rotating vortices located above the height of the wind turbines. While the flow is periodic, the geometry is not invariant to all horizontal translations due to the presence of the wind turbines and thus POD modes need not be Fourier modes. Differences of the obtained modes with Fourier modes are documented. Some of the modes are responsible for a large fraction of the kinetic energy flux to the wind turbine region. Surprisingly, more flow structures (POD modes) are needed to capture at least 40% of the turbulent kinetic energy, for which the POD analysis is optimal, than are needed to capture at least 40% of the kinetic energy flux to the turbines. For comparison, we consider the cases of aligned and staggered wind turbine arrays in a neutral atmospheric boundary layer as well as a reference case without wind turbines. While the general characteristics of the flow structures are robust, the net kinetic energy entrainment to the turbines depends on the presence and relative

  15. Assertion based verification methodology for HDL designs of primary sodium pump speed and eddy current flow measurement systems of PFBR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Misra, M.K.; Menon, Saritha P.; Thirugnana Murthy, D.

    2013-01-01

    With the growing complexity and size of digital designs, functional verification has become a huge challenge. The validation and testing process accounts for a significant percentage of the overall development effort and cost for electronic systems. Many studies have shown that up to 70% of the design development time and resources are spent on functional verification. Functional errors manifest themselves very early in the design flow, and unless they are detected upfront, they can result in severe consequences - both financially and from a safety viewpoint. This paper covers the various types of verification methodologies and focuses on Assertion Based Verification Methodology for HDL designs, taking as case studies, the Primary Sodium Pump Speed and Eddy Current Flow Measurement Systems of PFBR. (author)

  16. Factor Structure of the 10 WISC-V Primary Subtests across Four Standardization Age Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dombrowski, Stefan C.; Canivez, Gary L.; Watkins, Marley W.

    2018-01-01

    The Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children-Fifth Edition (WISC-V; Wechsler 2014a) "Technical and Interpretation Manual" (Wechsler 2014b) dedicated only a single page to discussing the 10-subtest WISC-V primary battery across the entire 6 to 16 age range. Users are left to extrapolate the structure of the 10-subtest battery from the…

  17. Bifactor Structure of the Wechsler Preschool and Primary Scale of Intelligence-Fourth Edition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watkins, Marley W.; Beaujean, A. Alexander

    2014-01-01

    The Wechsler Preschool and Primary Scale of Intelligence-Fourth Edition (WPPSI-IV; Wechsler, 2012) represents a substantial departure from its predecessor, including omission of 4 subtests, addition of 5 new subtests, and modification of the contents of the 5 retained subtests. Wechsler (2012) explicitly assumed a higher-order structure with…

  18. THE PRIMARY STRUCTURE OF HEVAMINE, AN ENZYME WITH LYSOZYME CHITINASE ACTIVITY FROM HEVEA-BRASILIENSIS LATEX

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    JEKEL, PA; HARTMANN, JBH; BEINTEMA, JJ

    1991-01-01

    The primary structure of hevamine, an enzyme with lysozyme/chitinase activity from Hevea brasiliensis latex, has been determined predominantly with conventional non-automatic methods. The positions of three disulfide bridges have been determined. The sequence has about 60% identity with that of a

  19. cDNA cloning and primary structure analysis of invariant chain in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    cDNA cloning and primary structure analysis of invariant chain in Chinese Pengze crucian carp. X Liu, W Yu, J Li, F Chen, S Liu, C Wu, J Xu. Abstract. Invariant chain (Ii) plays an important role in MHC class II molecules assembly and exogenous peptide presentation in vertebrates. Although mammalian Ii has been ...

  20. Challenges in Scale-Resolving Simulations of turbulent wake flows with coherent structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Filipe S.; Eça, Luís; Vaz, Guilherme; Girimaji, Sharath S.

    2018-06-01

    The objective of this work is to investigate the challenges encountered in Scale-Resolving Simulations (SRS) of turbulent wake flows driven by spatially-developing coherent structures. SRS of practical interest are expressly intended for efficiently computing such flows by resolving only the most important features of the coherent structures and modelling the remainder as stochastic field. The success of SRS methods depends upon three important factors: i) ability to identify key flow mechanisms responsible for the generation of coherent structures; ii) determine the optimum range of resolution required to adequately capture key elements of coherent structures; and iii) ensure that the modelled part is comprised nearly exclusively of fully-developed stochastic turbulence. This study considers the canonical case of the flow around a circular cylinder to address the aforementioned three key issues. It is first demonstrated using experimental evidence that the vortex-shedding instability and flow-structure development involves four important stages. A series of SRS computations of progressively increasing resolution (decreasing cut-off length) are performed. An a priori basis for locating the origin of the coherent structures development is proposed and examined. The criterion is based on the fact that the coherent structures are generated by the Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH) instability. The most important finding is that the key aspects of coherent structures can be resolved only if the effective computational Reynolds number (based on total viscosity) exceeds the critical value of the KH instability in laminar flows. Finally, a quantitative criterion assessing the nature of the unresolved field based on the strain-rate ratio of mean and unresolved fields is examined. The two proposed conditions and rationale offer a quantitative basis for developing "good practice" guidelines for SRS of complex turbulent wake flows with coherent structures.

  1. Algebraic structure of general electromagnetic fields and energy flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hacyan, Shahen

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Algebraic structure of general electromagnetic fields in stationary spacetime. → Eigenvalues and eigenvectors of the electomagnetic field tensor. → Energy-momentum in terms of eigenvectors and Killing vector. → Explicit form of reference frame with vanishing Poynting vector. → Application of formalism to Bessel beams. - Abstract: The algebraic structures of a general electromagnetic field and its energy-momentum tensor in a stationary space-time are analyzed. The explicit form of the reference frame in which the energy of the field appears at rest is obtained in terms of the eigenvectors of the electromagnetic tensor and the existing Killing vector. The case of a stationary electromagnetic field is also studied and a comparison is made with the standard short-wave approximation. The results can be applied to the general case of a structured light beams, in flat or curved spaces. Bessel beams are worked out as example.

  2. Reconstruction of 3D flow structures in a cylindrical cavity with a rotating lid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meyer, Knud Erik

    is difficult to capture experimentally since the flow is fully three-dimensional and also varies in time. A measurement in a point or in a plane will by itself not give the full picture of the flow.Measurement with Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) analyzed with Proper Orthogonal Decomposition (POD......) and that the presence of helical vortices can be detected. However, the interpretation of the resulting flow still is done with an element of guessing on whether a specific variation is caused by an actual time variation of a structure or is caused by the rotation of a three-dimensional structure.The present work...

  3. Fluid-structure coupling between a vibrating cylinder and a narrow annular flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perotin, L.

    1994-01-01

    This paper presents an analytical investigation of the fluidelastic coupling between an axial annular flow and a flexible vibrating axisymmetrical structure. The model presented is suited to single-phase, incompressible, viscous fluids and to annular flows of variable cross-section, axially symmetrical when the structure is motionless.An experimental validation of this model is presented at the end of the paper: the results obtained with the numerical model are compared with experimental data for an oscillating cylinder free to vibrate under the effect of a variable-cross-section annular flow. ((orig.))

  4. Wavelet Analysis on Turbulent Structure in Drag-Reducing Channel Flow Based on Direct Numerical Simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuan Wu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Direct numerical simulation has been performed to study a polymer drag-reducing channel flow by using a discrete-element model. And then, wavelet analyses are employed to investigate the multiresolution characteristics of velocity components based on DNS data. Wavelet decomposition is applied to decompose velocity fluctuation time series into ten different frequency components including approximate component and detailed components, which show more regular intermittency and burst events in drag-reducing flow. The energy contribution, intermittent factor, and intermittent energy are calculated to investigate characteristics of different frequency components. The results indicate that energy contributions of different frequency components are redistributed by polymer additives. The energy contribution of streamwise approximate component in drag-reducing flow is up to 82%, much more than 25% in the Newtonian flow. Feature of turbulent multiscale structures is shown intuitively by continuous wavelet transform, verifying that turbulent structures become much more regular in drag-reducing flow.

  5. Modeling turbulence structure. Chemical kinetics interaction in turbulent reactive flows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Magnussen, B F [The Norwegian Univ. of Science and Technology, Trondheim (Norway)

    1998-12-31

    The challenge of the mathematical modelling is to transfer basic physical knowledge into a mathematical formulation such that this knowledge can be utilized in computational simulation of practical problems. The combustion phenomena can be subdivided into a large set of interconnected phenomena like flow, turbulence, thermodynamics, chemical kinetics, radiation, extinction, ignition etc. Combustion in one application differs from combustion in another area by the relative importance of the various phenomena. The difference in fuel, geometry and operational conditions often causes the differences. The computer offers the opportunity to treat the individual phenomena and their interactions by models with wide operational domains. The relative magnitude of the various phenomena therefore becomes the consequence of operational conditions and geometry and need not to be specified on the basis of experience for the given problem. In mathematical modelling of turbulent combustion, one of the big challenges is how to treat the interaction between the chemical reactions and the fluid flow i.e. the turbulence. Different scientists adhere to different concepts like the laminar flamelet approach, the pdf approach of the Eddy Dissipation Concept. Each of these approaches offers different opportunities and problems. All these models are based on a sound physical basis, however none of these have general validity in taking into consideration all detail of the physical chemical interaction. The merits of the models can only be judged by their ability to reproduce physical reality and consequences of operational and geometric conditions in a combustion system. The presentation demonstrates and discusses the development of a coherent combustion technology for energy conversion and safety based on the Eddy Dissipation Concept by Magnussen. (author) 30 refs.

  6. Stop Flow Lithography Synthesis and Characterization of Structured Microparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Baah

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the synthesis of nonspherical composite particles of poly(ethylene glycol diacrylate (PEG-DA/SiO2 and PEG-DA/Al2O3 with single or multiple vias and the corresponding inorganic particles of SiO2 and Al2O3 synthesized using the Stop Flow Lithography (SFL method is reported. Precursor suspensions of PEG-DA, 2-hydroxy-2-methylpropiophenone, and SiO2 or Al2O3 nanoparticles were prepared. The precursor suspension flows through a microfluidic device mounted on an upright microscope and is polymerized in an automated process. A patterned photomask with transparent geometric features masks UV light to synthesize the particles. Composite particles with vias were synthesized and corresponding inorganic SiO2 and Al2O3 particles were obtained through polymer burn-off and sintering of the composites. The synthesis of porous inorganic particles of SiO2 and Al2O3 with vias and overall dimensions in the range of ~35–90 µm was achieved. BET specific surface area measurements for single via inorganic particles were 56–69 m2/g for SiO2 particles and 73–81 m2/g for Al2O3 particles. Surface areas as high as 114 m2/g were measured for multivia cubic SiO2 particles. The findings suggest that, with optimization, the particles should have applications in areas where high surface area is important such as catalysis and sieving.

  7. Modeling turbulence structure. Chemical kinetics interaction in turbulent reactive flows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Magnussen, B.F. [The Norwegian Univ. of Science and Technology, Trondheim (Norway)

    1997-12-31

    The challenge of the mathematical modelling is to transfer basic physical knowledge into a mathematical formulation such that this knowledge can be utilized in computational simulation of practical problems. The combustion phenomena can be subdivided into a large set of interconnected phenomena like flow, turbulence, thermodynamics, chemical kinetics, radiation, extinction, ignition etc. Combustion in one application differs from combustion in another area by the relative importance of the various phenomena. The difference in fuel, geometry and operational conditions often causes the differences. The computer offers the opportunity to treat the individual phenomena and their interactions by models with wide operational domains. The relative magnitude of the various phenomena therefore becomes the consequence of operational conditions and geometry and need not to be specified on the basis of experience for the given problem. In mathematical modelling of turbulent combustion, one of the big challenges is how to treat the interaction between the chemical reactions and the fluid flow i.e. the turbulence. Different scientists adhere to different concepts like the laminar flamelet approach, the pdf approach of the Eddy Dissipation Concept. Each of these approaches offers different opportunities and problems. All these models are based on a sound physical basis, however none of these have general validity in taking into consideration all detail of the physical chemical interaction. The merits of the models can only be judged by their ability to reproduce physical reality and consequences of operational and geometric conditions in a combustion system. The presentation demonstrates and discusses the development of a coherent combustion technology for energy conversion and safety based on the Eddy Dissipation Concept by Magnussen. (author) 30 refs.

  8. Catastrophic shifts in the aquatic primary production revealed by a small low-flow section of tropical downstream after dredging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marotta, H; Enrich-Prast, A

    2015-11-01

    Dredging is a catastrophic disturbance that directly affects key biological processes in aquatic ecosystems, especially in those small and shallow. In the tropics, metabolic responses could still be enhanced by the high temperatures and solar incidence. Here, we assessed changes in the aquatic primary production along a small section of low-flow tropical downstream (Imboassica Stream, Brazil) after dredging. Our results suggested that these ecosystems may show catastrophic shifts between net heterotrophy and autotrophy in waters based on three short-term stages following the dredging: (I) a strongly heterotrophic net primary production -NPP- coupled to an intense respiration -R- likely supported by high resuspended organic sediments and nutrients from the bottom; (II) a strongly autotrophic NPP coupled to an intense gross primary production -GPP- favored by the high nutrient levels and low solar light attenuation from suspended solids or aquatic macrophytes; and (III) a NPP near to the equilibrium coupled to low GPP and R rates following, respectively, the shading by aquatic macrophytes and high particulate sedimentation. In conclusion, changes in aquatic primary production could be an important threshold for controlling drastic shifts in the organic matter cycling and the subsequent silting up of small tropical streams after dredging events.

  9. Experimental and numerical study of hydrodynamics of flow-accelerated corrosion in CANDU primary coolant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Supa-Amornkul, S

    2006-07-01

    In CANDU-6 reactors, the pressurised high-temperature coolant flows through 380 fuel channels passing horizontally through the core. Each end of a fuel channel has a stainless steel annular end-fitting connected to a carbon steel feeder pipe. The outlet coolant, which is at 310{sup o}C with up to 0.30 steam voidage, turns through 90{sup o} as it passes from flow in the annular end-fitting to pipe flow in the feeder via a Grayloc connector. Since 1996, several CANDU stations reported excessive corrosion of their outlet feeder pipes, especially over the first metre, which consists of single or double bends. Early studies related the attack to the hydrodynamics of the coolant and verified that it was a type of flow-accelerated corrosion (FAC). Local shear stress, which is believed to be one of the important factors contributing to FAC, was approximated in the studies with standard empirical correlations. In order to understand the hydrodynamics of the coolant in the outlet feeders, flow-visualisation studies were done at AECL and UNB. At AECL, the observations were confined to a transparent simulation of an outlet feeder bend but at UNB a full-scale transparent test section simulating the geometry and orientation of an outlet feeder bend with its upstream annular end-fitting was fabricated. The feeder consisted of a 54 mm (inside diameter) acrylic pipe with a 73{sup o} bend, connected to an acrylic simulation of a Grayloc flanged fitting and annular end-fitting. The annular end-fitting consisted of an inner pipe, 110 mm outside diameter, and an outer pipe, 150 mm inside diameter, both 1.907 m long. The tests were performed with water and air at atmospheric pressure and room temperature. The maximum water volumetric flow rate was 0.019 m{sup 3}/s and the volume fraction of air varied from 0.05 to 0.56. In characterizing the flow in the UNB study, particular attention was paid to the patterns at the inside of the bend, where a CFD (computational fluid dynamics) code

  10. Experimental and numerical study of hydrodynamics of flow-accelerated corrosion in CANDU primary coolant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Supa-Amornkul, S.

    2006-01-01

    In CANDU-6 reactors, the pressurised high-temperature coolant flows through 380 fuel channels passing horizontally through the core. Each end of a fuel channel has a stainless steel annular end-fitting connected to a carbon steel feeder pipe. The outlet coolant, which is at 310 o C with up to 0.30 steam voidage, turns through 90 o as it passes from flow in the annular end-fitting to pipe flow in the feeder via a Grayloc connector. Since 1996, several CANDU stations reported excessive corrosion of their outlet feeder pipes, especially over the first metre, which consists of single or double bends. Early studies related the attack to the hydrodynamics of the coolant and verified that it was a type of flow-accelerated corrosion (FAC). Local shear stress, which is believed to be one of the important factors contributing to FAC, was approximated in the studies with standard empirical correlations. In order to understand the hydrodynamics of the coolant in the outlet feeders, flow-visualisation studies were done at AECL and UNB. At AECL, the observations were confined to a transparent simulation of an outlet feeder bend but at UNB a full-scale transparent test section simulating the geometry and orientation of an outlet feeder bend with its upstream annular end-fitting was fabricated. The feeder consisted of a 54 mm (inside diameter) acrylic pipe with a 73 o bend, connected to an acrylic simulation of a Grayloc flanged fitting and annular end-fitting. The annular end-fitting consisted of an inner pipe, 110 mm outside diameter, and an outer pipe, 150 mm inside diameter, both 1.907 m long. The tests were performed with water and air at atmospheric pressure and room temperature. The maximum water volumetric flow rate was 0.019 m 3 /s and the volume fraction of air varied from 0.05 to 0.56. In characterizing the flow in the UNB study, particular attention was paid to the patterns at the inside of the bend, where a CFD (computational fluid dynamics) code - Fluent 6.1- had

  11. Measurements of the solar UVR protection provided by shade structures in New Zealand primary schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gies, Peter; Mackay, Christina

    2004-01-01

    To reduce ultraviolet radiation (UVR) exposure during childhood, shade structures are being erected in primary schools to provide areas where children can more safely undertake outdoor activities. This study to evaluate the effectiveness of existing and purpose built shade structures in providing solar UVR protection was carried out on 29 such structures in 10 schools in New Zealand. Measurements of the direct and scattered solar UVR doses within the central region of the shade structures were made during the school lunch break period using UVR-sensitive polysulfone film badges. These measurements indicate that many of the structures had UVR protection factors (PF) of 4-8, which was sufficient to provide protection during the school lunch hour. However, of the 29 structures examined, only six would meet the suggested requirements of UVR PF greater than 15 required to provide all-day protection.

  12. Population Genetic Structure and Gene Flow Among Nigerian Goats ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Population Genetic structure in 200 indigenous goats sampled across four states from the South-Western and South Southern region of Nigeria was assessed using 7 microsatellite DNA markers. Observed Analysis of molecular genetic variation (AMOVA) was higher within populations (3.47) than among populations (1.84) ...

  13. Flow-induced structuring of dense protein dispersions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Manski, J.M.

    2007-01-01

    Both health and sustainability are drivers for the increased interest in the creation of novel foods comprising a high protein content. The key challenge is the formation of an attractive, stable and palatable food texture, which is mainly determined by the food structure. In this research, new

  14. Flow Structures within a Helicopter Rotor Hub Wake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elbing, Brian; Reich, David; Schmitz, Sven

    2015-11-01

    A scaled model of a notional helicopter rotor hub was tested in the 48'' Garfield Thomas Water Tunnel at the Applied Research Laboratory Penn State. The measurement suite included total hub drag and wake velocity measurements (LDV, PIV, stereo-PIV) at three downstream locations. The main objective was to understand the spatiotemporal evolution of the unsteady wake between the rotor hub and the nominal location of the empennage (tail). Initial analysis of the data revealed prominent two- and four-per-revolution fluid structures linked to geometric hub features persisting into the wake far-field. In addition, a six-per-revolution fluid structure was observed in the far-field, which is unexpected due to the lack of any hub feature with the corresponding symmetry. This suggests a nonlinear interaction is occurring within the wake to generate these structures. This presentation will provide an overview of the experimental data and analysis with particular emphasis on these six-per-revolution structures.

  15. Morphodynamics and sedimentary structures of bedforms under supercritical-flow conditions: new insights from flume experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cartigny, Matthieu; Ventra, Dario; Postma, George; Van den Berg, Jan H.

    2014-05-01

    Supercritical-flow phenomena are fairly common in modern sedimentary environments, yet their recognition remains subordinate in the rock record. This is commonly ascribed to the poor preservation potential of deposits from supercritical flows. However, the number of documented flume datasets on supercritical-flow dynamics and sedimentary structures is very limited in comparison with available data from subcritical-flow experiments, and our inability to identify and interpret such deposits might also be due to insufficient knowledge. This article describes the results of systematic experiments spanning the full range of supercritical-flow bedforms (antidunes, chutes-and-pools, cyclic steps) developed over mobile sand beds of variable grain sizes. Flow character and related bedform patterns are constrained through time-series measurements of the bed configuration, flow depth, flow velocity and Froude number. The results allow the refinement and extension of current bedform stability diagrams in the supercritical-flow domain. The experimental dataset and the stability diagram clarify morphodynamic relationships between antidune and cyclic steps. The onset of antidunes is controlled by the flow passing a threshold value of the Froude parameter. The transition from antidunes to cyclic steps instead is completed at a threshold value of the mobility parameter, and this transition spans a wider range of values for the mobility parameter as grain size increases. Sedimentary structures associated with the development of supercritical bedforms under variable aggradation rates are revealed by means of a synthetic aggradation technique and compared with examples from field and flume studies. Aggradation rate bears an important influence on the geometry of supercritical structures, and it should be held in consideration for the identification and mutual distinction of supercritical-flow bedforms in the stratigraphic record.

  16. Experimental Investigation on Zonal Structure in Drag-Reducing Channel Flow with Surfactant Additives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masaaki Motozawa

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The spatial structure of a drag-reducing channel flow with surfactant additives in a two-dimensional channel was investigated experimentally. We carried out detailed measurements of the instantaneous velocity in the streamwise wall-normal plane and streamwise spanwise plane by using particle image velocimetry (PIV. The surfactant used in this experiment is a kind of cationic surfactant CTAC. The weight concentrations of the CTAC solution were 25 and 40 ppm on the flow. We considered the effects of Reynolds number ranging from 10000 to 25000 and the weight concentration of CTAC. The results of this paper showed that in the drag-reducing flow, there appeared an area where the root mean square of streamwise velocity fluctuation and the vorticity fluctuation sharply decreased. This indicated that two layers with different turbulent structure coexisted on the boundary of this area. Moreover, these layers had characteristic flow structures, as confirmed by observation of the instantaneous vorticity fluctuation map.

  17. Nonlinear vortex structures and Rayleigh instability condition in shear flow plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haque, Q.; Saleem, H.; Mirza, A.M.

    2009-01-01

    Full text: It is shown that the shear flow produced by externally applied electric field can unstable the drift waves. Due to shear flow, the Rayleigh instability condition is modified, which is obtained for both electron-ion and electron-positron-ion plasmas. These shear flow driven drift waves can be responsible for large amplitude electrostatic fluctuations in tokamak edges. In the nonlinear regime, the stationary structures may appear in electron-positron-ion plasmas similar to electron-ion plasmas. The nonlinear vortex structures like counter rotating dipole vortices and vortex chains can be formed with the aid of special type of shear flows. The positrons can be used as a probe in laboratory plasmas, which make it a multi-component plasma. The presence of positrons in electron-ion plasma system can affect the speed and amplitude of the nonlinear vortex structures. This investigation can have application in both laboratory and astrophysical plasmas. (author)

  18. Metallic and Non-Metallic Materials for the Primary Support Structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    RA Wolf; RP Corson

    2006-01-01

    The primary support structure (PSS) is required for mechanical support of reactor module (RM) components and mounting of the RM to the spacecraft. The PSS would provide support and accept all loads associated with dynamic (e. g., launch and maneuvering) or thermally induced loading. Prior to termination of NRPCT involvement in Project Prometheus, the NRPCT Mechanical Systems team developed preliminary finite element models to gain a basic understanding of the behavior of the structure, but optimization of the models, specification of the final design, and materials selection were not completed. The Space Plant Materials team had evaluated several materials for potential use in the primary support structure, namely titanium alloys, beryllium, aluminum alloys and carbon-carbon composites. The feasibility of application of each material system was compared based on mass, stiffness, thermal expansion, and ease of fabrication. Due to insufficient data on environmental factors, such as temperatures and radiation, and limited modeling support, a final materials selection was not made

  19. Primary Structure and Mechanical Properties of AlSi2 Alloy Continuous Ingots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wróbel T.

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the research results of horizontal continuous casting of ingots of aluminium alloy containing 2% wt. silicon (AlSi2. Together with the casting velocity (velocity of ingot movement we considered the influence of electromagnetic stirring in the area of the continuous casting mould on refinement of the ingot’s primary structure and their selected mechanical properties, i.e. tensile strength, yield strength, hardness and elongation. The effect of primary structure refinement and mechanical properties obtained by electromagnetic stirring was compared with refinement obtained by using traditional inoculation, which consists in introducing additives, i.e. Ti, B and Sr, to the metal bath. On the basis of the obtained results we confirmed that inoculation done by electromagnetic stirring in the range of the continuous casting mould guarantees improved mechanical properties and also decreases the negative influence of casting velocity, thus increasing the structure of AlSi2 continuous ingots.

  20. Structure of the radial electric field and toroidal/poloidal flow in high temperature toroidal plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ida, Katsumi

    2001-01-01

    The structure of the radial electric field and toroidal/poloidal flow is discussed for the high temperature plasma in toroidal systems, tokamak and Heliotron type magnetic configurations. The spontaneous toroidal and poloidal flows are observed in the plasma with improved confinement. The radial electric field is mainly determined by the poloidal flow, because the contribution of toroidal flow to the radial electric field is small. The jump of radial electric field and poloidal flow are commonly observed near the plasma edge in the so-called high confinement mode (H-mode) plasmas in tokamaks and electron root plasma in stellarators including Heliotrons. In general the toroidal flow is driven by the momentum input from neutral beam injected toroidally. There is toroidal flow not driven by neutral beam in the plasma and it will be more significant in the plasma with large electric field. The direction of these spontaneous toroidal flows depends on the symmetry of magnetic field. The spontaneous toroidal flow driven by the ion temperature gradient is in the direction to increase the negative radial electric field in tokamak. The direction of spontaneous toroidal flow in Heliotron plasmas is opposite to that in tokamak plasma because of the helicity of symmetry of the magnetic field configuration. (author)

  1. Birkeland current flow in a structured auroral arc

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Casserly, R.T. Jr.

    1975-01-01

    At 0722 UT on 25 February 1972 a Nike-Tomahawk rocket payload was launched over a structured auroral arc which had a visual intensity of greater than or equal to 40 kR. An array of charged particle detectors measured the auroral electrons and protons in the energy range 0.5-20 keV while a cesium vapor magnetometer made vector magnetic field measurements along the rocket's trajectory. Perturbations in the magnetic field profile are inferred to be the result of a system of two electrojets and a pair of oppositely directed Birkeland currents. Movement and structure in the Birkeland current sheets is shown to be due to the presence of fold motion along the visual auroral band. These results are compared to the observations of the other onboard detectors and discussed in the light of related current auroral research

  2. Development of evaluation method on flow-induced vibration and corrosion of components in two-phase flow by coupled analysis. 1. Evaluation of effects of flow-induced vibration on structural material integrity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naitoh, Masanori; Uchida, Shunsuke; Koshizuka, Seiichi; Ninokata, Hisashi; Anahara, Naoki; Dosaki, Koji; Katono, Kenichi; Akiyama, Minoru; Saitoh, Hiroaki

    2007-01-01

    Problems in major components and structural materials in nuclear power plants have often been caused by flow induced vibration, corrosion and their overlapping effects. In order to establish safe and reliable plant operation, it is necessary to predict future problems for structural materials based on combined analyses of flow dynamics and corrosion and to mitigate them before they become serious issues for plant operation. An innovative method for flow induced vibration of structures in two phase flow by combined analyses of three dimensional flow dynamics and structures is to be introduced. (author)

  3. A Solution Adaptive Structured/Unstructured Overset Grid Flow Solver with Applications to Helicopter Rotor Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duque, Earl P. N.; Biswas, Rupak; Strawn, Roger C.

    1995-01-01

    This paper summarizes a method that solves both the three dimensional thin-layer Navier-Stokes equations and the Euler equations using overset structured and solution adaptive unstructured grids with applications to helicopter rotor flowfields. The overset structured grids use an implicit finite-difference method to solve the thin-layer Navier-Stokes/Euler equations while the unstructured grid uses an explicit finite-volume method to solve the Euler equations. Solutions on a helicopter rotor in hover show the ability to accurately convect the rotor wake. However, isotropic subdivision of the tetrahedral mesh rapidly increases the overall problem size.

  4. Phase flow and statistical structure of Galton-board systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lue, A.; Brenner, H.

    1993-01-01

    Galton boards, found in museum exhibits devoted to science and technology, are often used to demonstrate visually the ubiquity of so-called ''laws of probability'' via an experimental realization of normal distributions. A detailed theoretical study of Galton-board phase-space dynamics and statistical behavior is presented. The study is based on a simple inelastic-collision model employing a particle fall- ing through a spatially periodic lattice of rigid, convex scatterers. We show that such systems exhibit indeterminate behavior through the presence of strange attractors or strange repellers in phase space; nevertheless, we also show that these systems exhibit regular and predictable behavior under specific circumstances. Phase-space strange attractors, periodic attractors, and strange repellers are present in numerical simulations, confirming results anticipated from geometric analysis. The system's geometry (dictated by lattice geometry and density as well as the direction of gravity) is observed to play a dominant role in stability, phase-flow topology, and statistical observations. Smale horseshoes appear to exist in the low-lattice-density limit and may exist in other regimes. These horseshoes are generated by homoclinic orbits whose existence is dictated by system characteristics. The horseshoes lead directly to deterministic chaos in the system. Strong evidence exists for ergodicity in all attractors. Phase-space complexities are manifested at all observed levels, particularly statistical ones. Consequently, statistical observations are critically dependent upon system details. Under well-defined circumstances, these observations display behavior which does not constitute a realization of the ''laws of probability.''

  5. Turbulent flow structure at a discordant river confluence: Asymmetric jet dynamics with implications for channel morphology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukhodolov, Alexander N.; Krick, Julian; Sukhodolova, Tatiana A.; Cheng, Zhengyang; Rhoads, Bruce L.; Constantinescu, George S.

    2017-06-01

    Only a handful of field studies have examined turbulent flow structure at discordant confluences; the dynamics of flow at such confluences have mainly been examined in the laboratory. This paper reports results of a field-based investigation of turbulent flow structure at a discordant river confluence. These results support the hypothesis that flow at a discordant alluvial confluence with a velocity ratio greater than 2 exhibits jet-like characteristics. Scaling analysis shows that the dynamics of the jet core are quite similar to those of free jets but that the complex structure of flow at the confluence imposes strong effects that can locally suppress or enhance the spreading rate of the jet. This jet-like behavior of the flow has important implications for morphodynamic processes at these types of confluences. The highly energetic core of the jet at this discordant confluence is displaced away from the riverbed, thereby inhibiting scour; however, helical motion develops adjacent to the jet, particularly at high flows, which may promote scour. Numerical experiments demonstrate that the presence or absence of a depositional wedge at the mouth of the tributary can strongly influence detachment of the jet from the bed and the angle of the jet within the confluence.

  6. Heat transfer and flow structure evaluation of a synthetic jet emanating from a planar heat sink

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manning, Paul; Persoons, Tim; Murray, Darina

    2014-01-01

    Direct impinging synthetic jets are a proven method for heat transfer enhancement, and have been subject to extensive research. However, despite the vast amount of research into direct synthetic jet impingement, there has been little research investigating the effects of a synthetic jet emanating from a heated surface, this forms the basis of the current research investigation. Both single and multiple orifices are integrated into a planar heat sink forming a synthetic jet, thus allowing the heat transfer enhancement and flow structures to be assessed. The heat transfer analysis highlighted that the multiple orifice synthetic jet resulted in the greatest heat transfer enhancements. The flow structures responsible for these enhancements were identified using a combination of flow visualisation, thermal imaging and thermal boundary layer analysis. The flow structure analysis identified that the synthetic jets decreased the thermal boundary layer thickness resulting in a more effective convective heat transfer process. Flow visualisation revealed entrainment of local air adjacent to the heated surface; this occurred from vortex roll-up at the surface of the heat sink and from the highly sheared jet flow. Furthermore, a secondary entrainment was identified which created a surface impingement effect. It is proposed that all three flow features enhance the heat transfer characteristics of the system.

  7. Formation of coherent structures in a class of realistic 3D unsteady flows

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Speetjens, M.F.M.; Clercx, H.J.H.; Klapp, J.; Medina, A.; Cros, A.; Vargas, C.

    2013-01-01

    The formation of coherent structures in three-dimensional (3D) unsteady laminar flows in a cylindrical cavity is reviewed. The discussion concentrates on two main topics: the role of symmetries and fluid inertia in the formation of coherent structures and the ramifications for the Lagrangian

  8. Interfacial structures in confined cap-turbulent and churn-turbulent flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Xiaodong; Kim, Seungjin; Cheng Ling; Ishii, Mamoru; Beus, Stephen G.

    2004-01-01

    The objective of the present work is to study and model the interfacial structure development of air-water two-phase flow in a confined flow passage. Experiments of a total of 13 flow conditions in cap-turbulent and churn-turbulent flow regimes are carried out in a vertical air-water upward two-phase flow experimental loop with a test section of 200 mm in width and 10 mm in gap. Miniaturized four-sensor conductivity probes are used to measure local two-phase parameters at three different elevations for each flow condition. Bubble characteristics captured by the probes are categorized into two groups in view of the two-group interfacial area transport equation, i.e., spherical/distorted bubbles as Group 1 and cap/churn-turbulent bubbles as Group 2. The acquired local parameters are time-averaged void fraction, interfacial velocity, bubble number frequency, interfacial area concentration, and bubble Sauter mean diameter for each group of bubbles. Also, the line-averaged and area-averaged data are presented and discussed in detail. The comparisons of these parameters at different elevations demonstrate the development of interfacial structures along the flow direction due to bubble interactions and the hydrodynamic effects. Furthermore, these data can serve as one part of the experimental data for investigation of the interfacial area transport in a confined two-phase flow

  9. Internal structure and interfacial velocity development for bubbly two-phase flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kocamustafaogullari, G.; Huang, W.D.

    1994-01-01

    This paper describes an experimental study of the internal structure of air-water flowing horizontally. The double-sensor resistivity probe technique was applied for measurements of local interfacial parameters, including void fraction, interfacial area concentration, bubble size distributions, bubble passing frequency and bubble interface velocity. Bubbly flow patterns at several flow conditions were examined at three axial locations, L/D=25, 148 and 253, in which the first measurement represents the entrance region where the flow develops, and the second and third may represent near fully developed bubbly flow patterns. The experimental results are presented in three-dimensional perspective plots of the interfacial parameters over the cross-section. These multi-dimensional presentations showed that the local values of the void fraction, interfacial area concentration and bubble passing frequency were nearly constant over the cross-section at L/D=25, with slight local peaking close to the channel wall. Although similar local peakings were observed at the second and third locations, the internal flow structure segregation due to buoyancy appeared to be very strong in the axial direction. A simple comparison of profiles of the interfacial parameters at the three locations indicated that the flow pattern development was a continuous process. Finally, it was shown that the so-called ''fully developed'' bubbly two-phase flow pattern cannot be established in a horizontal pipe and that there was no strong correspondence between void fraction and interface velocity profiles. ((orig.))

  10. Rotating coherent flow structures as a source for narrowband tip clearance noise from axial fans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Tao; Lallier-Daniels, Dominic; Sanjosé, Marlène; Moreau, Stéphane; Carolus, Thomas

    2018-03-01

    Noise from axial fans typically increases significantly as the tip clearance is increased. In addition to the broadband tip clearance noise at the design flow rate, narrowband humps also associated with the tip flow are observed in the far-field acoustic spectra at lower flow rate. In this study, both experimental and numerical methods are used to shed more light on the noise generation mechanism of this narrowband tip clearance noise and provide a unified description of this source. Unsteady aeroacoustic predictions with the Lattice-Boltzmann Method (LBM) are successfully compared with experiment. Such a validation allows using LBM data to conduct a detailed modal analysis of the pressure field for detecting rotating coherent flow structures which might be considered as noise sources. As previously found in ring fans the narrowband humps in the far-field noise spectra are found to be related to the tip clearance noise that is generated by an interaction of coherent flow structures present in the tip region with the leading edge of the impeller blades. The visualization of the coherent structures shows that they are indeed part of the unsteady tip clearance vortex structures. They are hidden in a complex, spatially and temporally inhomogeneous flow field, but can be recovered by means of appropriate filtering techniques. Their pressure trace corresponds to the so-called rotational instability identified in previous turbomachinery studies, which brings a unified picture of this tip-noise phenomenon for the first time.

  11. Effect of Thickness-to-Chord Ratio on Flow Structure of Low Swept Delta Wing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulsacan, Burak; Sencan, Gizem; Yavuz, Mehmet Metin

    2017-11-01

    The effect of thickness-to-chord (t/C) ratio on flow structure of a delta wing with sweep angle of 35 degree is characterized in a low speed wind tunnel using laser illuminated smoke visualization, particle image velocimetry, and surface pressure measurements. Four different t/C ratio varying from 4.75% to 19% are tested at angles of attack 4, 6, 8, and 10 degrees for Reynolds numbers Re =10,000 and 35,000. The results indicate that the effect of thickness-to-chord ratio on flow structure is quite substantial, such that, as the wing thickness increases, the flow structure transforms from leading edge vortex to three-dimensional separated flow regime. The wing with low t/C ratio of 4.75% experiences pronounced surface separation at significantly higher angle of attack compared to the wing with high t/C ratio. The results might explain some of the discrepancies reported in previously conducted studies related to delta wings. In addition, it is observed that the thickness of the shear layer separated from windward side of the wing is directly correlated with the thickness of the wing. To conclude, the flow structure on low swept delta wing is highly affected by t/C ratio, which in turn might indicate the potential usage of wing thickness as an effective flow control parameter.

  12. Measuring three-dimensional flow structures in the conductive airways using 3D-PTV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janke, Thomas; Schwarze, Rüdiger; Bauer, Katrin

    2017-10-01

    Detailed information about flow patterns and mass transport in the conductive airways is of crucial interest to improve ventilation strategies as well as targeted drug delivery. Despite a vast number of flow studies in this field, there is still a dearth in experimental data of three-dimensional flow patterns, in particular for the validation of numerical results. Therefore, oscillating flow within a realistic model of the upper human conductive airways is studied here experimentally. The investigated range of Reynolds numbers is Re = 250-2000 and the Womersley number is varied between α = 1.9-5.1, whereby physiological flow at rest conditions is included. In employing the three-dimensional particle tracking velocimetry measurement technique, we can directly visualize airway specific flow structures as well as examine Lagrangian trajectory statistics, which has not been covered to date. The systematic variation of characteristic flow parameters in combination with the advanced visualization technique sheds new light on the mechanisms of evolving flow patterns. By determining Lagrangian properties such as pathline curvature and torsion, we find that both strongly depend on the Reynolds number. Moreover, the probability density function of the curvature reveals a unique shape for certain flow regions and resembles a turbulent like behavior at the small scales.

  13. Damping of cylindrical structures subject to annular flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hobson, D.E.; Dolding, M.

    1989-01-01

    In previous reports theoretical methods have been described for estimating the aerodynamic forces acting on cylinders vibrating laterally when surrounded by an annulus carrying high velocity gas. For a certain restricted set of geometries it is possible to predict whether a particular structure is stable or unstable and to determine the level of aerodynamic damping positive or negative due to the presence of the gas. This report describes experimental work which validates the computer program in which the theoretical methods are embodied; in particular the damping, inertial and decentralising forces acting on a cylinder in an annulus are measured and compared with theory over a range of frequencies from 0 to 25 Hz, and of Reynolds numbers from zero to 10 4 . In addition a summary of simple relationships is provided which can be used to provide credible initial estimates of both the positive and negative damping of cylinders in a range of annular geometries. (author)

  14. Fluid Structure Interaction in a Cold Flow Test and Transient CFD Analysis of Out-of-Round Nozzles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruf, Joseph; Brown, Andrew; McDaniels, David; Wang, Ten-See

    2010-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation describes two nozzle fluid flow interactions. They include: 1) Cold flow nozzle tests with fluid-structure interaction at nozzle separated flow; and 2) CFD analysis for nozzle flow and side loads of nozzle extensions with various out-of-round cases.

  15. Ratiometric analysis of fura red by flow cytometry: a technique for monitoring intracellular calcium flux in primary cell subsets.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily R Wendt

    Full Text Available Calcium flux is a rapid and sensitive measure of cell activation whose utility could be enhanced with better techniques for data extraction. We describe a technique to monitor calcium flux by flow cytometry, measuring Fura Red calcium dye by ratiometric analysis. This technique has several advantages: 1 using a single calcium dye provides an additional channel for surface marker characterization, 2 allows robust detection of calcium flux by minority cell populations within a heterogeneous population of primary T cells and monocytes 3 can measure total calcium flux and additionally, the proportion of responding cells, 4 can be applied to studying the effects of drug treatment, simultaneously stimulating and monitoring untreated and drug treated cells. Using chemokine receptor activation as an example, we highlight the utility of this assay, demonstrating that only cells expressing a specific chemokine receptor are activated by cognate chemokine ligand. Furthermore, we describe a technique for simultaneously stimulating and monitoring calcium flux in vehicle and drug treated cells, demonstrating the effects of the Gαi inhibitor, pertussis toxin (PTX, on chemokine stimulated calcium flux. The described real time calcium flux assay provides a robust platform for characterizing cell activation within primary cells, and offers a more accurate technique for studying the effect of drug treatment on receptor activation in a heterogeneous population of primary cells.

  16. Equilibrium structures and flows of polar and nonpolar liquids in different carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abramyan, Andrey K.; Bessonov, Nick M.; Mirantsev, Leonid V.; Chevrychkina, Anastasiia A.

    2018-03-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of equilibrium structures and flows of polar water and nonpolar methane confined by single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) with circular and square cross sections and bounding walls with regular graphene structure and random (amorphous) distribution of carbon atoms have been performed. The results of these simulations show that equilibrium structures of both confined liquids depend strongly on the shape of the cross section of SWCNTs, whereas the structure of their bounding walls has a minor influence on these structures. On contrary, the external pressure driven water and methane flows through above mentioned SWCNTs depend significantly on both the shape of their cross sections and the structure of their bounding walls.

  17. Readiness for the Patient-Centered Medical Home: structural capabilities of Massachusetts primary care practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedberg, Mark W; Safran, Dana G; Coltin, Kathryn L; Dresser, Marguerite; Schneider, Eric C

    2009-02-01

    The Patient-Centered Medical Home (PCMH), a popular model for primary care reorganization, includes several structural capabilities intended to enhance quality of care. The extent to which different types of primary care practices have adopted these capabilities has not been previously studied. To measure the prevalence of recommended structural capabilities among primary care practices and to determine whether prevalence varies among practices of different size (number of physicians) and administrative affiliation with networks of practices. Cross-sectional analysis. One physician chosen at random from each of 412 primary care practices in Massachusetts was surveyed about practice capabilities during 2007. Practice size and network affiliation were obtained from an existing database. Presence of 13 structural capabilities representing 4 domains relevant to quality: patient assistance and reminders, culture of quality, enhanced access, and electronic health records (EHRs). Three hundred eight (75%) physicians responded, representing practices with a median size of 4 physicians (range 2-74). Among these practices, 64% were affiliated with 1 of 9 networks. The prevalence of surveyed capabilities ranged from 24% to 88%. Larger practice size was associated with higher prevalence for 9 of the 13 capabilities spanning all 4 domains (P < 0.05). Network affiliation was associated with higher prevalence of 5 capabilities (P < 0.05) in 3 domains. Associations were not substantively altered by statistical adjustment for other practice characteristics. Larger and network-affiliated primary care practices are more likely than smaller, non-affiliated practices to have adopted several recommended capabilities. In order to achieve PCMH designation, smaller non-affiliated practices may require the greatest investments.

  18. National Structural Survey of Veterans Affairs Home-Based Primary Care Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karuza, Jurgis; Gillespie, Suzanne M; Olsan, Tobie; Cai, Xeuya; Dang, Stuti; Intrator, Orna; Li, Jiejin; Gao, Shan; Kinosian, Bruce; Edes, Thomas

    2017-12-01

    To describe the current structural and practice characteristics of the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) Home-Based Primary Care (HBPC) program. We designed a national survey and surveyed HBPC program directors on-line using REDCap. We received 236 surveys from 394 identified HBPC sites (60% response rate). HBPC site characteristics were quantified using closed-ended formats. HBPC program directors were most often registered nurses, and HBPC programs primarily served veterans with complex chronic illnesses that were at high risk of hospitalization and nursing home care. Primary care was delivered using interdisciplinary teams, with nurses, social workers, and registered dietitians as team members in more than 90% of the sites. Most often, nurse practitioners were the principal primary care providers (PCPs), typically working with nurse case managers. Nearly 60% of the sites reported dual PCPs involving VA and community-based physicians. Nearly all sites provided access to a core set of comprehensive services and programs (e.g., case management, supportive home health care). At the same time, there were variations according to site (e.g., size, location (urban, rural), use of non-VA hospitals, primary care models used). HBPC sites reflected the rationale and mission of HBPC by focusing on complex chronic illness of home-based veterans and providing comprehensive primary care using interdisciplinary teams. Our next series of studies will examine how HBPC site structural characteristics and care models are related to the processes and outcomes of care to determine whether there are best practice standards that define an optimal HBPC structure and care model or whether multiple approaches to HBPC better serve the needs of veterans. Published 2017. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  19. Breaking camouflage and detecting targets require optic flow and image structure information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Jing Samantha; Bingham, Ned; Chen, Chang; Bingham, Geoffrey P

    2017-08-01

    Use of motion to break camouflage extends back to the Cambrian [In the Blink of an Eye: How Vision Sparked the Big Bang of Evolution (New York Basic Books, 2003)]. We investigated the ability to break camouflage and continue to see camouflaged targets after motion stops. This is crucial for the survival of hunting predators. With camouflage, visual targets and distracters cannot be distinguished using only static image structure (i.e., appearance). Motion generates another source of optical information, optic flow, which breaks camouflage and specifies target locations. Optic flow calibrates image structure with respect to spatial relations among targets and distracters, and calibrated image structure makes previously camouflaged targets perceptible in a temporally stable fashion after motion stops. We investigated this proposal using laboratory experiments and compared how many camouflaged targets were identified either with optic flow information alone or with combined optic flow and image structure information. Our results show that the combination of motion-generated optic flow and target-projected image structure information yielded efficient and stable perception of camouflaged targets.

  20. Formation of structural steady states in lamellar/sponge phase-separating fluids under shear flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panizza, P.; Courbin, L.; Cristobal, G.; Rouch, J.; Narayanan, T.

    2003-05-01

    We investigate the effect of shear flow on a lamellar-sponge phase-separating fluid when subjected to shear flow. We show the existence of two different steady states (droplets and ribbons structures) whose nature does not depend on the way to reach the two-phase unstable region of the phase diagram (temperature quench or stirring). The transition between ribbons and droplets is shear thickening and its nature strongly depends on what dynamical variable is imposed. If the stress is fixed, flow visualization shows the existence of shear bands at the transition, characteristic of coexistence in the cell between ribbons and droplets. In this shear-banding region, the viscosity oscillates. When the shear rate is fixed, no shear bands are observed. Instead, the transition exhibits a hysteretic behavior leading to a structural bi-stability of the phase-separating fluid under flow.

  1. Numerical investigation of flow structure and pressure pulsation in the Francis-99 turbine during startup

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minakov, A.; Sentyabov, A.; Platonov, D.

    2017-01-01

    We performed numerical simulation of flow in a laboratory model of a Francis hydroturbine at startup regimes. Numerical technique for calculating of low frequency pressure pulsations in a water turbine is based on the use of DES (k-ω Shear Stress Transport) turbulence model and the approach of “frozen rotor”. The structure of the flow behind the runner of turbine was analysed. Shows the effect of flow structure on the frequency and intensity of non-stationary processes in the flow path. Two version of the inlet boundary conditions were considered. The first one corresponded measured time dependence of the discharge. Comparison of the calculation results with the experimental data shows the considerable delay of the discharge in this calculation. Second version corresponded linear approximation of time dependence of the discharge. This calculation shows good agreement with experimental results.

  2. Flow structures in end-view plane of slender delta wing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sahin Besir

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Present investigation focuses on unsteady flow structures in end-view planes at the trailing edge of delta wing, X/C=1.0, where consequences of vortex bursting and stall phenomena vary according to angles of attack over the range of 25° ≤ α ≤ 35° and yaw angles, β over the range of 0° ≤ β ≤ 20°. Basic features of counter rotating vortices in end-view planes of delta win with 70° sweep angle, Λ are examined both qualitatively and quantitatively using Rhodamine dye and the PIV system. In the light of present experiments it is seen that with increasing yaw angle, β symmetrical flow structure is disrupted continuously. Dispersed wind-ward side leading edge vortices cover a large part of flow domain, on the other hand, lee-ward side leading edge vortices cover only a small portion of flow domain.

  3. Primary disability and its structure at liquidators of the Chernobyl accident consequences in post-Chernobyl period

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kravchenko, L.I.; Pzheutskij, V.A.; Vojtik, A.A.; Suvorova, I.V.; Yakimovich, I.F.

    2002-01-01

    The primary disability in persons participated in Chernobyl catastrophe liquidation was studied for 1986-1987, for 1988 and for 1994-2000. The structure of the disease caused the primary disability of those persons was analyzed. The primary invalidity indices were determined to increase for certain nosologic forms such as for the blood circulation disease, malignant neoplasms, eye pathology (authors)

  4. Practical applications of probabilistic structural reliability analyses to primary pressure systems of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Witt, F.J.

    1980-01-01

    Primary pressure systems of nuclear power plants are built to exacting codes and standards with provisions for inservice inspection and repair if necessary. Analyses and experiments have demonstrated by deterministic means that very large margins exist on safety impacting failures under normal operating and upset conditions. Probabilistic structural reliability analyses provide additional support that failures of significance are very, very remote. They may range in degree of sophistication from very simple calculations to very complex computer analyses involving highly developed mathematical techniques. The end result however should be consistent with the desired usage. In this paper a probabilistic structural reliability analysis is performed as a supplement to in-depth deterministic evaluations with the primary objective to demonstrate an acceptably low probability of failure for the conditions considered. (author)

  5. Advanced composites structural concepts and materials technologies for primary aircraft structures: Design/manufacturing concept assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Robert L.; Bayha, Tom D.; Davis, HU; Ingram, J. ED; Shukla, Jay G.

    1992-01-01

    Composite Wing and Fuselage Structural Design/Manufacturing Concepts have been developed and evaluated. Trade studies were performed to determine how well the concepts satisfy the program goals of 25 percent cost savings, 40 percent weight savings with aircraft resizing, and 50 percent part count reduction as compared to the aluminum Lockheed L-1011 baseline. The concepts developed using emerging technologies such as large scale resin transfer molding (RTM), automatic tow placed (ATP), braiding, out-of-autoclave and automated manufacturing processes for both thermoset and thermoplastic materials were evaluated for possible application in the design concepts. Trade studies were used to determine which concepts carry into the detailed design development subtask.

  6. Flow structure of coarse-grained slurry in a horizontal pipe

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vlasák, Pavel; Kysela, Bohuš; Chára, Zdeněk

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 60, č. 2 (2012), s. 115-124 ISSN 0042-790X R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP105/10/1574 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20600510 Keywords : coarse-grained slurry * turbulent flow * pressure drop * velocity distribution * flow structure * concentration effect Subject RIV: BK - Fluid Dynamics Impact factor: 0.653, year: 2012

  7. Isolation and primary structural analysis of two conjugated polyketone reductases from Candida parapsilosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hidalgo, A R; Akond, M A; Kita, K; Kataoka, M; Shimizu, S

    2001-12-01

    Two conjugated polyketone reductases (CPRs) were isolated from Candida parapsilosis IFO 0708. The primary structures of CPRs (C1 and C2) were analyzed by amino acid sequencing. The amino acid sequences of both enzymes had high similarity to those of several proteins of the aldo-keto-reductase (AKR) superfamily. However, several amino acid residues in the putative active sites of AKRs were not conserved in CPRs-C1 and -C2.

  8. Fast computational methods for predicting protein structure from primary amino acid sequence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Pratul Kumar [Knoxville, TN

    2011-07-19

    The present invention provides a method utilizing primary amino acid sequence of a protein, energy minimization, molecular dynamics and protein vibrational modes to predict three-dimensional structure of a protein. The present invention also determines possible intermediates in the protein folding pathway. The present invention has important applications to the design of novel drugs as well as protein engineering. The present invention predicts the three-dimensional structure of a protein independent of size of the protein, overcoming a significant limitation in the prior art.

  9. Improved purification, crystallization and primary structure of pyruvate:ferredoxin oxidoreductase from Halobacterium halobium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plaga, W; Lottspeich, F; Oesterhelt, D

    1992-04-01

    An improved purification procedure, including nickel chelate affinity chromatography, is reported which resulted in a crystallizable pyruvate:ferredoxin oxidoreductase preparation from Halobacterium halobium. Crystals of the enzyme were obtained using potassium citrate as the precipitant. The genes coding for pyruvate:ferredoxin oxidoreductase were cloned and their nucleotide sequences determined. The genes of both subunits were adjacent to one another on the halobacterial genome. The derived amino acid sequences were confirmed by partial primary structure analysis of the purified protein. The structural motif of thiamin-diphosphate-binding enzymes was unequivocally located in the deduced amino acid sequence of the small subunit.

  10. Structural brain alterations in primary open angle glaucoma: a 3T MRI study

    OpenAIRE

    Jieqiong Wang; Ting Li; Bernhard A. Sabel; Zhiqiang Chen; Hongwei Wen; Jianhong Li; Xiaobin Xie; Diya Yang; Weiwei Chen; Ningli Wang; Junfang Xian; Huiguang He

    2016-01-01

    Glaucoma is not only an eye disease but is also associated with degeneration of brain structures. We now investigated the pattern of visual and non-visual brain structural changes in 25 primary open angle glaucoma (POAG) patients and 25 age-gender-matched normal controls using T1-weighted imaging. MRI images were subjected to volume-based analysis (VBA) and surface-based analysis (SBA) in the whole brain as well as ROI-based analysis of the lateral geniculate nucleus (LGN), visual cortex (V1/...

  11. On a fine structure of a primary impulse of a magnetic storm sudden commencement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parkhomov, V.A.

    1985-01-01

    A fine structure of a primary reverse impulse of a sudden commencement (SSC*) of a magnetic storm is analyzed. 200 cases of SSC* recorded in 1965-79 have been chosen for the investigation. It is shown that the preliminary impulse of the sudden copmencement of magnetic storms has a fine structure in the form of the train of damped oscillations in Pc2-3 range of < or approximately 2 min durations. The excitation of oscillations is related with the propagation of the fast magnetoacoustic wave which is generated during interaction of the interplanetary shock wave with the earth magnetosphere

  12. Disorder structure of free-flow and global jams in the extended BML model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Xiaomei; Xie Dongfan; Jia Bin; Jiang Rui; Gao Ziyou

    2011-01-01

    The original BML model is extended by introducing extended sites, which can hold several vehicles at each time-step. Unexpectedly, the flow in the extended model sharply transits from free-flow to global jams, but the transition is not one-order in original BML model. And congestion in the extended model appears more easily. This can ascribe to the mixture of vehicles from different directions in one site, leading to the drop-off of the capacity of the site. Furthermore, the typical configuration of free flowing and global jams in the extended models is disorder, different from the regular structure in the original model.

  13. Influence of air flow rate on structural and electrical properties of undoped indium oxide thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mirzapour, S.; Rozati, S.M.; Takwale, M.G.; Marathe, B.R.; Bhide, V.G.

    1993-01-01

    Using the spray pyrolysis technique thin films of indium oxide were prepared on Corning glass (7059) at a substrate temperature of 425 C at different flow rates. The electrical and structural properties of these films were studied. The Hall measurements at room temperature showed that the films prepared in an air flow rate of 7 litre min -1 have the highest mobility of 47 cm 2 V -1 s -1 and a minimum resistivity of 1.125 x 10 -3 Ω cm. The X-ray diffraction patterns showed that the films have a preferred orientation of [400] which peaks at the air flow rate of 7 litre min -1 . (orig.)

  14. Numerical Simulation on the Performance of a Mixed-Flow Pump under Various Casing Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu Dazhuan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available With regard to the reactor coolant pump and high flow-rate circulating pump, the requirements on the compactness of the structure, safety, and hydraulic performance are particularly important. Thus, the mixed-flow pump with cylindrical casing is adopted in some occasions. Due to the different characteristics between the special cylindrical casing and the common pump casing, the influence of the special casing on a mixed-flow pump characteristics was numerically investigated to obtain better performance and flow structure in the casing. The results show that the models with cylindrical casing have much worse head and efficiency characteristics than the experimental model, and this is caused by the flow in the pump casing. By moving the guide vanes half inside the pump casing, the efficiency gets improved while the low pressure zone at the corner of outlet pipe and pump casing disappeared. When the length of pump casing increases from the size equal to the diameter of outlet pipe to that larger than it, the efficiency drops obviously and the flow field in the outlet pipe improved without curved flow. In addition, the length of the pump casing has greater impacts on the pump performance than the radius of it.

  15. Flow structure and unsteadiness in the supersonic wake of a generic space launcher

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreyer, Anne-Marie; Stephan, Sören; Radespiel, Rolf

    2015-11-01

    At the junction between the rocket engine and the main body of a classical space launcher, a separation-dominated and highly unstable flow field develops and induces strong wall-pressure oscillations. These can excite structural vibrations detrimental to the launcher. It is desirable to minimize these effects, for which a better understanding of the flow field is required. We study the wake flow of a generic axisymmetric space-launcher model with and without propulsive jet (cold air). Experimental investigations are performed at Mach 2.9 and a Reynolds number ReD = 1 . 3 .106 based on model diameter D. The jet exits the nozzle at Mach 2.5. Velocity measurements by means of Particle Image Velocimetry and mean and unsteady wall-pressure measurements on the main-body base are performed simultaneously. Additionally, we performed hot-wire measurements at selected points in the wake. We can thus observe the evolution of the wake flow along with its spectral content. We describe the mean and turbulent flow topology and evolution of the structures in the wake flow and discuss the origin of characteristic frequencies observed in the pressure signal at the launcher base. The influence of a propulsive jet on the evolution and topology of the wake flow is discussed in detail. The German Research Foundation DFG is gratefully acknowledged for funding this research within the SFB-TR40 ``Technological foundations for the design of thermally and mechanically highly loaded components of future space transportation systems.''

  16. NMR strategies to support medicinal chemistry workflows for primary structure determination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oguadinma, Paul; Bilodeau, Francois; LaPlante, Steven R

    2017-01-15

    Central to drug discovery is the correct characterization of the primary structures of compounds. In general, medicinal chemists make great synthetic and characterization efforts to deliver the intended compounds. However, there are occasions which incorrect compounds are presented, such as those reported for Bosutinib and TIC10. This may be due to a variety of reasons such as uncontrolled reaction schemes, reliance on limited characterization techniques (LC-MS and/or 1D 1H NMR spectra), or even the lack of availability or knowledge of characterization strategies. Here, we present practical NMR approaches that support medicinal chemist workflows for addressing compound characterization issues and allow for reliable primary structure determinations. These strategies serve to differentiate between regioisomers and geometric isomers, distinguish between N- versus O-alkyl analogues, and identify rotamers and atropisomers. Overall, awareness and application of these available NMR methods (e.g. HMBC/HSQC, ROESY and VT experiments, to name only a few) should help practicing chemists to reveal chemical phenomena and avoid mis-assignment of the primary structures of compounds. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Some aspects of floor spectra of 1DOF nonlinear primary structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Politopoulos, I.; Feau, C.

    2007-01-01

    In this paper the influence of the nonlinear behaviour of the primary structure on floor spectra is investigated by means of simple models. The general trends of floor spectra for different types of nonlinear behaviour of one degree of freedom (1DOF) primary structure are shown and we point out their common futures and their differences. A special attention is given to the cases of elastoplastic and nonlinear elastic behaviours and methods to determine an equivalent linear oscillator are proposed. The properties (frequency and damping) of this equivalent linear oscillator are quite different from the properties of equivalent linear oscillators commonly considered in practice. In particular, in the case of elastoplastic behaviour, there is no frequency shift and damping is smaller than assumed by other methods commonly used. In the case of nonlinear elastic behaviour, the concept of an equivalent frequency which is a random variable is used. Finally, a design floor spectrum of primary structures, exhibiting energy dissipating nonlinear behaviour is proposed. (authors)

  18. Imbalance between Goals and Organizational Structure in Primary Health Care in Iran- a Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanganeh Baygi, Mehdi; Seyedin, Hesam

    2013-07-01

    In recent years, the main focus of health sector reforms in Iran is the family physician and referral system plan. Fundamental changes in the goals and strategies, has increased the necessity of the need to reform the organizational structure. This study tries to review and summarize all cases about the organizational structure of Iran and its challenges in primary health care system. This study was a systematic review of published and grey literature. We searched the relevant databases, bibliography of related papers, and laws, using appropriate search strategies and key words. The CASP tool was used by two experts to evaluate the quality of retrieved papers and inconsistencies were resolved by discussion. After removal of duplicate citations, a total of 52 titles were identified through database searching, among which 30 met the inclusion criteria. Considering the research quality criteria, 14 papers were recognized qualified, which were categorized into two groups of: articles and policies. The results showed ineffectiveness of the current organizational structure at different level. The majority of the papers recommend performing reforms in the system because of changes in goals and strategies. Also, some suggest an appropriate information system to be designed in the current structures. Centralization and delegation process are the main discussions for the studies. Because of fundamental changes in goals and strategies, reforms in the organizational structure of primary health system in Iran especially in peripheral levels are highly recommended.

  19. Analyzing vortex breakdown flow structures by assignment of colors to tensor invariants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rütten, Markus; Chong, Min S

    2006-01-01

    Topological methods are often used to describe flow structures in fluid dynamics and topological flow field analysis usually relies on the invariants of the associated tensor fields. A visual impression of the local properties of tensor fields is often complex and the search of a suitable technique for achieving this is an ongoing topic in visualization. This paper introduces and assesses a method of representing the topological properties of tensor fields and their respective flow patterns with the use of colors. First, a tensor norm is introduced, which preserves the properties of the tensor and assigns the tensor invariants to values of the RGB color space. Secondly, the RGB colors of the tensor invariants are transferred to corresponding hue values as an alternative color representation. The vectorial tensor invariants field is reduced to a scalar hue field and visualization of iso-surfaces of this hue value field allows us to identify locations with equivalent flow topology. Additionally highlighting by the maximum of the eigenvalue difference field reflects the magnitude of the structural change of the flow. The method is applied on a vortex breakdown flow structure inside a cylinder with a rotating lid.

  20. Structural state diagram of concentrated suspensions of jammed soft particles in oscillatory shear flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khabaz, Fardin; Cloitre, Michel; Bonnecaze, Roger T.

    2018-03-01

    In a recent study [Khabaz et al., Phys. Rev. Fluids 2, 093301 (2017), 10.1103/PhysRevFluids.2.093301], we showed that jammed soft particle glasses (SPGs) crystallize and order in steady shear flow. Here we investigate the rheology and microstructures of these suspensions in oscillatory shear flow using particle-dynamics simulations. The microstructures in both types of flows are similar, but their evolutions are very different. In both cases the monodisperse and polydisperse suspensions form crystalline and layered structures, respectively, at high shear rates. The crystals obtained in the oscillatory shear flow show fewer defects compared to those in the steady shear. SPGs remain glassy for maximum oscillatory strains less than about the yield strain of the material. For maximum strains greater than the yield strain, microstructural and rheological transitions occur for SPGs. Polydisperse SPGs rearrange into a layered structure parallel to the flow-vorticity plane for sufficiently high maximum shear rates and maximum strains about 10 times greater than the yield strain. Monodisperse suspensions form a face-centered cubic (FCC) structure when the maximum shear rate is low and hexagonal close-packed (HCP) structure when the maximum shear rate is high. In steady shear, the transition from a glassy state to a layered one for polydisperse suspensions included a significant induction strain before the transformation. In oscillatory shear, the transformation begins to occur immediately and with different microstructural changes. A state diagram for suspensions in large amplitude oscillatory shear flow is found to be in close but not exact agreement with the state diagram for steady shear flow. For more modest amplitudes of around one to five times the yield strain, there is a transition from a glassy structure to FCC and HCP crystals, at low and high frequencies, respectively, for monodisperse suspensions. At moderate frequencies, the transition is from glassy to HCP via

  1. The feasible study of the water flow in the micro channel with the Y-junction and narrow structure for various flow rates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jasikova D.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Here we present the results of measurement in micro-channel with the Y-junction and narrow structure for various flow rates. There was used BSG micro-channel with trapezoidal cross-section. The parameters of the channel are described in the paper. The flow in the micro-channel was invested with micro-PIV technique and various flow rates were set on each inlet. The resulting flow rate in the steady area follows the laminar flow with very low Re 30. Here we are focused on the flow characteristic in the Y-junction and in selected narrow structure. The fluid flow is evaluated with vector and scalar maps and the profile plots that were taken in the point of interest.

  2. Flow-structure Interaction Modeling of a Fish Caudal Fin during Steady Swimming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Geng; Geng, Biao; Zheng, Xudong; Xue, Qian; Dong, Haibo

    2017-11-01

    It's widely thought that the flexibilities of fish fins play critical roles in propulsive performance enhancement (such as thrust augment and efficiency improvement) in nature. In order to explore the formation mechanisms of the fish fin's flexible morphing and its hydrodynamic benefits as well, a high-fidelity flow-structure/membrane interaction modeling of the fish caudal fin is conducted in this work. Following the realistic configuration of the fish caudal fin, a thin membrane supported by a series of beams is constructed. The material properties of the membrane and the beams are reversely determined by the realistic fin morphing obtained from the high-speed videos and the high fidelity flow-structure interaction simulations. With the accurate material property, we investigate the interplay between structure, kinematics and fluid flow in caudal fin propulsion. Detailed analyses on the relationship between the flexural stiffness, fin morphing patterns, hydrodynamic forces and vortex dynamics are then conducted.

  3. Navier-Stokes structure of merged layer flow on the spherical nose of a space vehicle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, A. C.; Woods, G. H.

    1988-01-01

    Hypersonic merged layer flow on the forepart of a spherical surface of a space vehicle has been investigated on the basis of the full steady-state Navier-Stokes equations using slip and temperature jump boundary conditions at the surface and free-stream conditions far from the surface. The shockwave-like structure was determined as part of the computations. Using an equivalent body concept, computations were carried out under conditions that the Aeroassist Flight Experiment (AFE) Vehicle would encounter at 15 and 20 seconds in its flight path. Emphasis was placed on understanding the basic nature of the flow structure under low density conditions. Particular attention was paid to the understanding of the structure of the outer shockwave-like region as the fluid expands around the sphere. Plots were drawn for flow profiles and surface characteristics to understand the role of dissipation processes in the merged layer of the spherical nose of the vehicle.

  4. Computational Investigation on Fully Developed Periodic Laminar Flow Structure in Baffled Circular Tube with Various BR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Withada Jedsadaratanachai

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a 3D numerical analysis of fully developed periodic laminar flow in a circular tube fitted with 45° inclined baffles with inline arrangement. The computations are based on a finite volume method, and the SIMPLE algorithm has been implemented. The characteristics of fluid flow are presented for Reynolds number, Re = 100–1000, based on the hydraulic diameter (D of the tube. The angled baffles were repeatedly inserted at the middle of the test tube with inline arrangement to generate vortex flows over the tested tube. Effects of different Reynolds numbers and blockage ratios (b/D, BR with a single pitch ratio of 1 on flow structure in the tested tube were emphasized. The flows in baffled tube show periodic flow at x/D ≈ 2-3, and become a fully developed periodic flow profiles at x/D ≈ 6-7, depending on Re, BR and transverse plane positions. The computational results reveal that the higher of BR and closer position of turbulators, the faster of fully developed periodic flow profiles.

  5. Kinematic morphology of large-scale structure: evolution from potential to rotational flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Xin; Szalay, Alex; Aragón-Calvo, Miguel A.; Neyrinck, Mark C.; Eyink, Gregory L.

    2014-01-01

    As an alternative way to describe the cosmological velocity field, we discuss the evolution of rotational invariants constructed from the velocity gradient tensor. Compared with the traditional divergence-vorticity decomposition, these invariants, defined as coefficients of the characteristic equation of the velocity gradient tensor, enable a complete classification of all possible flow patterns in the dark-matter comoving frame, including both potential and vortical flows. We show that this tool, first introduced in turbulence two decades ago, is very useful for understanding the evolution of the cosmic web structure, and in classifying its morphology. Before shell crossing, different categories of potential flow are highly associated with the cosmic web structure because of the coherent evolution of density and velocity. This correspondence is even preserved at some level when vorticity is generated after shell crossing. The evolution from the potential to vortical flow can be traced continuously by these invariants. With the help of this tool, we show that the vorticity is generated in a particular way that is highly correlated with the large-scale structure. This includes a distinct spatial distribution and different types of alignment between the cosmic web and vorticity direction for various vortical flows. Incorporating shell crossing into closed dynamical systems is highly non-trivial, but we propose a possible statistical explanation for some of the phenomena relating to the internal structure of the three-dimensional invariant space.

  6. Kinematic morphology of large-scale structure: evolution from potential to rotational flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Xin; Szalay, Alex; Aragón-Calvo, Miguel A.; Neyrinck, Mark C.; Eyink, Gregory L. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States)

    2014-09-20

    As an alternative way to describe the cosmological velocity field, we discuss the evolution of rotational invariants constructed from the velocity gradient tensor. Compared with the traditional divergence-vorticity decomposition, these invariants, defined as coefficients of the characteristic equation of the velocity gradient tensor, enable a complete classification of all possible flow patterns in the dark-matter comoving frame, including both potential and vortical flows. We show that this tool, first introduced in turbulence two decades ago, is very useful for understanding the evolution of the cosmic web structure, and in classifying its morphology. Before shell crossing, different categories of potential flow are highly associated with the cosmic web structure because of the coherent evolution of density and velocity. This correspondence is even preserved at some level when vorticity is generated after shell crossing. The evolution from the potential to vortical flow can be traced continuously by these invariants. With the help of this tool, we show that the vorticity is generated in a particular way that is highly correlated with the large-scale structure. This includes a distinct spatial distribution and different types of alignment between the cosmic web and vorticity direction for various vortical flows. Incorporating shell crossing into closed dynamical systems is highly non-trivial, but we propose a possible statistical explanation for some of the phenomena relating to the internal structure of the three-dimensional invariant space.

  7. Curative procedures of oral health and structural characteristics of primary dental care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Baumgarten

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE To evaluate if the provision of clinical dental care, by means of the main curative procedures recommended in Primary Health Care, is associated with team structural characteristics, considering the presence of a minimum set of equipment, instrument, and supplies in Brazil’s primary health care services. METHODS A cross-sectional exploratory study based on data collected from 18,114 primary healthcare services with dental health teams in Brazil, in 2014. The outcome was created from the confirmation of five clinical procedures performed by the dentist, accounting for the presence of minimum equipment, instrument, and supplies to carry them out. Covariables were related to structural characteristics. Poisson regression with robust variance was used to obtain crude and adjusted prevalence ratios, with 95% confidence intervals. RESULTS A total of 1,190 (6.5% dental health teams did not present the minimum equipment to provide clinical dental care and only 2,498 (14.8% had all the instrument and supplies needed and provided the five curative procedures assessed. There was a positive association between the outcome and the composition of dental health teams, higher workload, performing analysis of health condition, and monitoring of oral health indicators. Additionally, the dental health teams that planned and programmed oral health actions with the primary care team monthly provided the procedures more frequently. Dentists with better employment status, career plans, graduation in public health or those who underwent permanent education activities provided the procedures more frequently. CONCLUSIONS A relevant number of Primary Health Care services did not have the infrastructure to provide clinical dental care. However, better results were found in dental health teams with oral health technicians, with higher workload and that plan their activities, as well as in those that employed dentists with better working relationships

  8. Curative procedures of oral health and structural characteristics of primary dental care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumgarten, Alexandre; Hugo, Fernando Neves; Bulgarelli, Alexandre Fávero; Hilgert, Juliana Balbinot

    2018-01-01

    ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE To evaluate if the provision of clinical dental care, by means of the main curative procedures recommended in Primary Health Care, is associated with team structural characteristics, considering the presence of a minimum set of equipment, instrument, and supplies in Brazil’s primary health care services. METHODS A cross-sectional exploratory study based on data collected from 18,114 primary healthcare services with dental health teams in Brazil, in 2014. The outcome was created from the confirmation of five clinical procedures performed by the dentist, accounting for the presence of minimum equipment, instrument, and supplies to carry them out. Covariables were related to structural characteristics. Poisson regression with robust variance was used to obtain crude and adjusted prevalence ratios, with 95% confidence intervals. RESULTS A total of 1,190 (6.5%) dental health teams did not present the minimum equipment to provide clinical dental care and only 2,498 (14.8%) had all the instrument and supplies needed and provided the five curative procedures assessed. There was a positive association between the outcome and the composition of dental health teams, higher workload, performing analysis of health condition, and monitoring of oral health indicators. Additionally, the dental health teams that planned and programmed oral health actions with the primary care team monthly provided the procedures more frequently. Dentists with better employment status, career plans, graduation in public health or those who underwent permanent education activities provided the procedures more frequently. CONCLUSIONS A relevant number of Primary Health Care services did not have the infrastructure to provide clinical dental care. However, better results were found in dental health teams with oral health technicians, with higher workload and that plan their activities, as well as in those that employed dentists with better working relationships, who had dentists

  9. Curative procedures of oral health and structural characteristics of primary dental care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumgarten, Alexandre; Hugo, Fernando Neves; Bulgarelli, Alexandre Fávero; Hilgert, Juliana Balbinot

    2018-04-09

    To evaluate if the provision of clinical dental care, by means of the main curative procedures recommended in Primary Health Care, is associated with team structural characteristics, considering the presence of a minimum set of equipment, instrument, and supplies in Brazil's primary health care services. A cross-sectional exploratory study based on data collected from 18,114 primary healthcare services with dental health teams in Brazil, in 2014. The outcome was created from the confirmation of five clinical procedures performed by the dentist, accounting for the presence of minimum equipment, instrument, and supplies to carry them out. Covariables were related to structural characteristics. Poisson regression with robust variance was used to obtain crude and adjusted prevalence ratios, with 95% confidence intervals. A total of 1,190 (6.5%) dental health teams did not present the minimum equipment to provide clinical dental care and only 2,498 (14.8%) had all the instrument and supplies needed and provided the five curative procedures assessed. There was a positive association between the outcome and the composition of dental health teams, higher workload, performing analysis of health condition, and monitoring of oral health indicators. Additionally, the dental health teams that planned and programmed oral health actions with the primary care team monthly provided the procedures more frequently. Dentists with better employment status, career plans, graduation in public health or those who underwent permanent education activities provided the procedures more frequently. A relevant number of Primary Health Care services did not have the infrastructure to provide clinical dental care. However, better results were found in dental health teams with oral health technicians, with higher workload and that plan their activities, as well as in those that employed dentists with better working relationships, who had dentists with degrees in public health and who underwent

  10. Isolation of Primary Murine Retinal Ganglion Cells (RGCs) by Flow Cytometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chintalapudi, Sumana R; Patel, Need N; Goldsmith, Zachary K; Djenderedjian, Levon; Wang, Xiang Di; Marion, Tony N; Jablonski, Monica M; Morales-Tirado, Vanessa M

    2017-07-05

    Neurodegenerative diseases often have a devastating impact on those affected. Retinal ganglion cell (RGC) loss is implicated in an array of diseases, including diabetic retinopathy and glaucoma, in addition to normal aging. Despite their importance, RGCs have been extremely difficult to study until now due in part to the fact that they comprise only a small percentage of the wide variety of cells in the retina. In addition, current isolation methods use intracellular markers to identify RGCs, which produce non-viable cells. These techniques also involve lengthy isolation protocols, so there is a lack of practical, standardized, and dependable methods to obtain and isolate RGCs. This work describes an efficient, comprehensive, and reliable method to isolate primary RGCs from mice retinae using a protocol based on both positive and negative selection criteria. The presented methods allow for the future study of RGCs, with the goal of better understanding the major decline in visual acuity that results from the loss of functional RGCs in neurodegenerative diseases.

  11. Validation of Computational Fluid Dynamics Calculation Using Rossendorf Coolant Mixing Model Flow Measurements in Primary Loop of Coolant in a Pressurized Water Reactor Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Istvan Farkas

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work is to simulate the thermohydraulic consequences of a main steam line break and to compare the obtained results with Rossendorf Coolant Mixing Model (ROCOM 1.1 experimental results. The objective is to utilize data from steady-state mixing experiments and computational fluid dynamics (CFD calculations to determine the flow distribution and the effect of thermal mixing phenomena in the primary loops for the improvement of normal operation conditions and structural integrity assessment of pressurized water reactors. The numerical model of ROCOM was developed using the FLUENT code. The positions of the inlet and outlet boundary conditions and the distribution of detailed velocity/turbulence parameters were determined by preliminary calculations. The temperature fields of transient calculation were averaged in time and compared with time-averaged experimental data. The perforated barrel under the core inlet homogenizes the flow, and therefore, a uniform temperature distribution is formed in the pressure vessel bottom. The calculated and measured values of lowest temperature were equal. The inlet temperature is an essential parameter for safety assessment. The calculation predicts precisely the experimental results at the core inlet central region. CFD results showed a good agreement (both qualitatively and quantitatively with experimental results.

  12. Flow and pressure profiles for the primary heat transport system of Rajasthan Atomic Power Station for the operation with few isolated reactor channels near the end shield cracks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaikwad, A J; Chaki, S K; Sehgal, R L; Venkat Raj, V [Reactor Safety Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai (India)

    1994-06-01

    The RAPS (Rajasthan Atomic Power Station) unit-1 is now operating at reduced power due to the removal of fifteen fuel channels for repair of south end shield cracks. The power level is restricted to 50% of the full power capacity as a precautionary measure. The relative difference that operation at 50% power and higher power would make to the end shield structure is being currently analysed with a view to operate this reactor at higher power levels. As a prerequisite, a detailed thermal hydraulic analysis is essential to assess the effect of reactor operation with isolated channels on the primary heat transport (PHT) system pressure, flow, temperature. The adequacy of the existing trip set points for the plant operation under this mode is also required to be assessed. In the present study, analysis of the PHT system has been carried out to determine the flow and pressure profiles for the RAPS heat transport system for operation of the reactor with isolated channels. (author). 5 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  13. The dynamics of coherent flow structures within a submerged permeable bed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blois, G.; Best, J.; Sambrook Smith, G.; Hardy, R. J.; Lead, J.

    2009-12-01

    The existence of complex 3D coherent vortical structures in turbulent boundary layers has been widely reported from experimental observations (Adrian et al., 2007, Christensen and Adrian, 2001) and investigations of natural open channel flows (e.g. Kostaschuk and Church, 1993; Best, 2005). The interaction between these flow structures and the solid boundary that is responsible for their generation is also receiving increasing attention due to the central role played by turbulence in governing erosion-deposition processes. Yet, for the majority of studies, the bed roughness has been represented using rough impermeable surfaces. While not inherently acknowledged, most research in this area is thus only strictly applicable to those natural river beds composed either of bedrock or clay, or that have armoured, impermeable, surfaces. Recently, many researchers have noted the need to account for the role of bed permeability in order to accurately reproduce the true nature of flow over permeable gravel-bed rivers. For these cases, the near-bed flow is inherently and mutually linked to the interstitial-flow occurring in the porous solid matrix. This interaction is established through turbulence mechanisms occurring across the interface that may be important for influencing the incipient motion of cohesionless sediment. However, the nature of this turbulence and the formation of coherent structures within such permeable beds remain substantially unresolved due to the technical challenges of collecting direct data in this region. In this paper, we detail the existence and dynamic nature of coherent vortical structures within the individual pore spaces of a permeable bed submerged by a free stream flow. Laboratory experiments are reported in which a permeable flume bed was constructed using spheres packed in an offset cubic arrangement. We applied a high resolution E-PIV (Endoscopic Particle Image Velocimetry) approach in order to fully resolve the instantaneous structure of

  14. Multiplex flow cytometry barcoding and antibody arrays identify surface antigen profiles of primary and metastatic colon cancer cell lines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumar Sukhdeo

    Full Text Available Colon cancer is a deadly disease affecting millions of people worldwide. Current treatment challenges include management of disease burden as well as improvements in detection and targeting of tumor cells. To identify disease state-specific surface antigen signatures, we combined fluorescent cell barcoding with high-throughput flow cytometric profiling of primary and metastatic colon cancer lines (SW480, SW620, and HCT116. Our multiplexed technique offers improvements over conventional methods by permitting the simultaneous and rapid screening of cancer cells with reduced effort and cost. The method uses a protein-level analysis with commercially available antibodies on live cells with intact epitopes to detect potential tumor-specific targets that can be further investigated for their clinical utility. Multiplexed antibody arrays can easily be applied to other tumor types or pathologies for discovery-based approaches to target identification.

  15. Three dimensional calculations of the primary coolant flow in a 900 MW PWR vessel. Steady state and transients computations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, A.; Alvarez, D.; Cases, F.

    1996-03-01

    The paper explains the chronological account and the first results obtained in the R and D program on the mixing in the 900 MW PWR vessels. After the presentation of the plant type simulated, we define the numerical tool, the (Finite Element Modelling) FEM N3S code. Two results are presented with a comparison with the experiment results issued of the BORA BORA mock up. The first case is dealing with the isothermal steady state mixing in the vessel with the three loops mass flow rate balanced. This case identified as a validation of our numerical tool shows a good agreement. The second case is dealing with the transient mixing of a clear plug in the vessel when one primary pump starts-up. We compare the numerical and experiment results giving the mean boron concentration at the core inlet for several clear water plugs. The results show again a good agreement. (authors). 12 refs., 10 figs., 1 tab

  16. Identifying Structural Flow Defects in Disordered Solids Using Machine-Learning Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cubuk, E. D.; Schoenholz, S. S.; Rieser, J. M.; Malone, B. D.; Rottler, J.; Durian, D. J.; Kaxiras, E.; Liu, A. J.

    2015-03-01

    We use machine-learning methods on local structure to identify flow defects—or particles susceptible to rearrangement—in jammed and glassy systems. We apply this method successfully to two very different systems: a two-dimensional experimental realization of a granular pillar under compression and a Lennard-Jones glass in both two and three dimensions above and below its glass transition temperature. We also identify characteristics of flow defects that differentiate them from the rest of the sample. Our results show it is possible to discern subtle structural features responsible for heterogeneous dynamics observed across a broad range of disordered materials.

  17. Diagnostics of spatial structure of vortex multiplets in a swirl flow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Naumov, I. V.; Okulov, Valery; Sørensen, Jens Nørkær

    2011-01-01

    Results on investigation of vortex unstable breakdown are presented. The structure of vortex multiplets was visualized in a vertical cylindrical container made of transparent organic glass of the optic quality with the inner diameter of 288 mm and rotating upper lid. Visualization was performed....... Visualization of flow structure for unstable swirl flows and cylinder aspect ratios from 3.2 to 5.5 allowed first identification of these regimes as multispiral breakdowns with formation of helical-like vortex duplets, triplets and quadruplets....

  18. Adjoint shape optimization for fluid-structure interaction of ducted flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heners, J. P.; Radtke, L.; Hinze, M.; Düster, A.

    2018-03-01

    Based on the coupled problem of time-dependent fluid-structure interaction, equations for an appropriate adjoint problem are derived by the consequent use of the formal Lagrange calculus. Solutions of both primal and adjoint equations are computed in a partitioned fashion and enable the formulation of a surface sensitivity. This sensitivity is used in the context of a steepest descent algorithm for the computation of the required gradient of an appropriate cost functional. The efficiency of the developed optimization approach is demonstrated by minimization of the pressure drop in a simple two-dimensional channel flow and in a three-dimensional ducted flow surrounded by a thin-walled structure.

  19. PIV measurements in a microfluidic 3D-sheathing structure with three-dimensional flow behaviour

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klank, Henning; Goranovic, Goran; Kutter, Jörg Peter

    2002-01-01

    . The structures are often of complex geometry and include strongly three-dimensional flow behaviour, which poses a challenge for the micro particle image velocimetry (micro-PIV) technique. The flow in a microfluidic 3D-sheathing structure has been measured throughout the volume using micro-PIV. In addition......, a stereoscopic principle was applied to obtain all three velocity components, showing the feasibility of obtaining full volume mapping (x, y, z, U, V, W) from micro-PIV measurements. The results are compared with computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations....

  20. Flow Structure and Channel Morphology at a Confluent-Meander Bend

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley, J. D.; Rhoads, B. L.

    2009-12-01

    Flow structure and channel morphology in meander bends have been well documented. Channel curvature subjects flow through a bend to centrifugal acceleration, inducing a counterbalancing pressure-gradient force that initiates secondary circulation. Transverse variations in boundary shear stress and bedload transport parallel cross-stream movement of high velocity flow and determine spatial patterns of erosion along the outer bank and deposition along the inner bank. Laboratory experiments and numerical modeling of confluent-meander bends, a junction planform that develops when a tributary joins a meandering river along the outer bank of a bend, suggest that flow and channel morphology in such bends deviate from typical patterns. The purpose of this study is to examine three-dimensional (3-D) flow structure and channel morphology at a natural confluent-meander bend. Field data were collected in southeastern Illinois where Big Muddy Creek joins the Little Wabash River near a local maximum of curvature along an elongated meander loop. Measurements of 3-D velocity components were obtained with an acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP) for two flow events with differing momentum ratios. Channel bathymetry was also resolved from the four-beam depths of the ADCP. Analysis of velocity data reveals a distinct shear layer flanked by dual helical cells within the bend immediately downstream of the confluence. Flow from the tributary confines flow from the main channel along the inner part of the channel cross section, displacing the thalweg inward, limiting the downstream extent of the point bar, protecting the outer bank from erosion and enabling bar-building along this bank. Overall, this pattern of flow and channel morphology is quite different from typical patterns in meander bends, but is consistent with a conceptual model derived from laboratory experiments and numerical modeling.

  1. Structure of Cellulose Microfibrils in Primary Cell Walls from Collenchyma1[C][W][OA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Lynne H.; Forsyth, V. Trevor; Šturcová, Adriana; Kennedy, Craig J.; May, Roland P.; Altaner, Clemens M.; Apperley, David C.; Wess, Timothy J.; Jarvis, Michael C.

    2013-01-01

    In the primary walls of growing plant cells, the glucose polymer cellulose is assembled into long microfibrils a few nanometers in diameter. The rigidity and orientation of these microfibrils control cell expansion; therefore, cellulose synthesis is a key factor in the growth and morphogenesis of plants. Celery (Apium graveolens) collenchyma is a useful model system for the study of primary wall microfibril structure because its microfibrils are oriented with unusual uniformity, facilitating spectroscopic and diffraction experiments. Using a combination of x-ray and neutron scattering methods with vibrational and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, we show that celery collenchyma microfibrils were 2.9 to 3.0 nm in mean diameter, with a most probable structure containing 24 chains in cross section, arranged in eight hydrogen-bonded sheets of three chains, with extensive disorder in lateral packing, conformation, and hydrogen bonding. A similar 18-chain structure, and 24-chain structures of different shape, fitted the data less well. Conformational disorder was largely restricted to the surface chains, but disorder in chain packing was not. That is, in position and orientation, the surface chains conformed to the disordered lattice constituting the core of each microfibril. There was evidence that adjacent microfibrils were noncovalently aggregated together over part of their length, suggesting that the need to disrupt these aggregates might be a constraining factor in growth and in the hydrolysis of cellulose for biofuel production. PMID:23175754

  2. Inferred vs Realized Patterns of Gene Flow: An Analysis of Population Structure in the Andros Island Rock Iguana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colosimo, Giuliano; Knapp, Charles R.; Wallace, Lisa E.; Welch, Mark E.

    2014-01-01

    Ecological data, the primary source of information on patterns and rates of migration, can be integrated with genetic data to more accurately describe the realized connectivity between geographically isolated demes. In this paper we implement this approach and discuss its implications for managing populations of the endangered Andros Island Rock Iguana, Cyclura cychlura cychlura. This iguana is endemic to Andros, a highly fragmented landmass of large islands and smaller cays. Field observations suggest that geographically isolated demes were panmictic due to high, inferred rates of gene flow. We expand on these observations using 16 polymorphic microsatellites to investigate the genetic structure and rates of gene flow from 188 Andros Iguanas collected across 23 island sites. Bayesian clustering of specimens assigned individuals to three distinct genotypic clusters. An analysis of molecular variance (AMOVA) indicates that allele frequency differences are responsible for a significant portion of the genetic variance across the three defined clusters (Fst =  0.117, p0.01). These clusters are associated with larger islands and satellite cays isolated by broad water channels with strong currents. These findings imply that broad water channels present greater obstacles to gene flow than was inferred from field observation alone. Additionally, rates of gene flow were indirectly estimated using BAYESASS 3.0. The proportion of individuals originating from within each identified cluster varied from 94.5 to 98.7%, providing further support for local isolation. Our assessment reveals a major disparity between inferred and realized gene flow. We discuss our results in a conservation perspective for species inhabiting highly fragmented landscapes. PMID:25229344

  3. Inferred vs realized patterns of gene flow: an analysis of population structure in the Andros Island Rock Iguana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colosimo, Giuliano; Knapp, Charles R; Wallace, Lisa E; Welch, Mark E

    2014-01-01

    Ecological data, the primary source of information on patterns and rates of migration, can be integrated with genetic data to more accurately describe the realized connectivity between geographically isolated demes. In this paper we implement this approach and discuss its implications for managing populations of the endangered Andros Island Rock Iguana, Cyclura cychlura cychlura. This iguana is endemic to Andros, a highly fragmented landmass of large islands and smaller cays. Field observations suggest that geographically isolated demes were panmictic due to high, inferred rates of gene flow. We expand on these observations using 16 polymorphic microsatellites to investigate the genetic structure and rates of gene flow from 188 Andros Iguanas collected across 23 island sites. Bayesian clustering of specimens assigned individuals to three distinct genotypic clusters. An analysis of molecular variance (AMOVA) indicates that allele frequency differences are responsible for a significant portion of the genetic variance across the three defined clusters (Fst =  0.117, p<0.01). These clusters are associated with larger islands and satellite cays isolated by broad water channels with strong currents. These findings imply that broad water channels present greater obstacles to gene flow than was inferred from field observation alone. Additionally, rates of gene flow were indirectly estimated using BAYESASS 3.0. The proportion of individuals originating from within each identified cluster varied from 94.5 to 98.7%, providing further support for local isolation. Our assessment reveals a major disparity between inferred and realized gene flow. We discuss our results in a conservation perspective for species inhabiting highly fragmented landscapes.

  4. Inferred vs realized patterns of gene flow: an analysis of population structure in the Andros Island Rock Iguana.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuliano Colosimo

    Full Text Available Ecological data, the primary source of information on patterns and rates of migration, can be integrated with genetic data to more accurately describe the realized connectivity between geographically isolated demes. In this paper we implement this approach and discuss its implications for managing populations of the endangered Andros Island Rock Iguana, Cyclura cychlura cychlura. This iguana is endemic to Andros, a highly fragmented landmass of large islands and smaller cays. Field observations suggest that geographically isolated demes were panmictic due to high, inferred rates of gene flow. We expand on these observations using 16 polymorphic microsatellites to investigate the genetic structure and rates of gene flow from 188 Andros Iguanas collected across 23 island sites. Bayesian clustering of specimens assigned individuals to three distinct genotypic clusters. An analysis of molecular variance (AMOVA indicates that allele frequency differences are responsible for a significant portion of the genetic variance across the three defined clusters (Fst =  0.117, p<<0.01. These clusters are associated with larger islands and satellite cays isolated by broad water channels with strong currents. These findings imply that broad water channels present greater obstacles to gene flow than was inferred from field observation alone. Additionally, rates of gene flow were indirectly estimated using BAYESASS 3.0. The proportion of individuals originating from within each identified cluster varied from 94.5 to 98.7%, providing further support for local isolation. Our assessment reveals a major disparity between inferred and realized gene flow. We discuss our results in a conservation perspective for species inhabiting highly fragmented landscapes.

  5. Probabilistic Estimation of Critical Flaw Sizes in the Primary Structure Welds of the Ares I-X Launch Vehicle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pai, Shantaram S.; Hoge, Peter A.; Patel, B. M.; Nagpal, Vinod K.

    2009-01-01

    The primary structure of the Ares I-X Upper Stage Simulator (USS) launch vehicle is constructed of welded mild steel plates. There is some concern over the possibility of structural failure due to welding flaws. It was considered critical to quantify the impact of uncertainties in residual stress, material porosity, applied loads, and material and crack growth properties on the reliability of the welds during its pre-flight and flight. A criterion--an existing maximum size crack at the weld toe must be smaller than the maximum allowable flaw size--was established to estimate the reliability of the welds. A spectrum of maximum allowable flaw sizes was developed for different possible combinations of all of the above listed variables by performing probabilistic crack growth analyses using the ANSYS finite element analysis code in conjunction with the NASGRO crack growth code. Two alternative methods were used to account for residual stresses: (1) The mean residual stress was assumed to be 41 ksi and a limit was set on the net section flow stress during crack propagation. The critical flaw size was determined by parametrically increasing the initial flaw size and detecting if this limit was exceeded during four complete flight cycles, and (2) The mean residual stress was assumed to be 49.6 ksi (the parent material s yield strength) and the net section flow stress limit was ignored. The critical flaw size was determined by parametrically increasing the initial flaw size and detecting if catastrophic crack growth occurred during four complete flight cycles. Both surface-crack models and through-crack models were utilized to characterize cracks in the weld toe.

  6. Structural evaluation of IEA-R1 primary system pump nozzles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fainer, Gerson; Faloppa, Altair A.; Oliveira, Carlos A. de; Mattar Neto, Miguel, E-mail: gfainer@ipen.br, E-mail: afaloppa@ipen.br, E-mail: calberto@ipen.br, E-mail: mmattar@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2017-11-01

    The IEA-R1 pumps of the primary coolant system may be required to withstand design and operational conditions. IEA-R1 nuclear research reactor is an open pool type reactor operated by IPEN since 1957. The reactor can be operated up to 5MW heating power since it was upgraded in a modernization program conducted by IPEN. The primary coolant system is composed by the piping system, decay tank, two heat pumps and two heat exchangers. In the latest arrangement upgrade of the primary system, conducted in 2014 as part of an aging management program, a partial replacement of the coolant piping and total replacement of piping and pump supports were done. As consequence, reviewed loads in the pump nozzles were obtained demanding a new evaluation of them. The aim of this report is to present the structural evaluation of the pump nozzles, considering the new loads coming from the new piping layout, according to: API 610 code verification, Supplier loads and structural analysis applying finite element method, by using the ANSYS computer program, regarding ASME VIII Div 1 & 2 recommendations. (author)

  7. A novel structural risk index for primary spontaneous pneumothorax: Ankara Numune Risk Index.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akkas, Yucel; Peri, Neslihan Gulay; Kocer, Bulent; Kaplan, Tevfik; Alhan, Aslihan

    2017-07-01

    In this study, we aimed to reveal a novel risk index as a structural risk marker for primary spontanoeus pneumothorax using body mass index and chest height, structural risk factors for pneumothorax development. Records of 86 cases admitted between February 2014 and January 2015 with or without primary spontaneous pneumothorax were analysed retrospectively. The patients were allocated to two groups as Group I and Group II. The patients were evaluated with regard to age, gender, pneumothorax side, duration of hospital stay, treatment type, recurrence, chest height and transverse diameter on posteroanterior chest graphy and body mass index. Body mass index ratio per cm of chest height was calculated by dividing body mass index with chest height. We named this risk index ratio which is defined first as 'Ankara Numune Risk Index'. Diagnostic value of Ankara Numune Risk Index value for prediction of primary spontaneous pneumothorax development was analysed with Receiver Operating Characteristics curver. Of 86 patients, 69 (80.2%) were male and 17 (19.8%) were female. Each group was composed of 43 (50%) patients. When Receiver Operating Characteristics curve analysis was done for optimal limit value 0.74 of Ankara Numune Risk Index determined for prediction of pneumothorax development risk, area under the curve was 0.925 (95% Cl, 0.872-0.977, p pneumothorax development however it is insufficient for determining recurrence. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Taiwan.

  8. Structural evaluation of IEA-R1 primary system pump nozzles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fainer, Gerson; Faloppa, Altair A.; Oliveira, Carlos A. de; Mattar Neto, Miguel

    2017-01-01

    The IEA-R1 pumps of the primary coolant system may be required to withstand design and operational conditions. IEA-R1 nuclear research reactor is an open pool type reactor operated by IPEN since 1957. The reactor can be operated up to 5MW heating power since it was upgraded in a modernization program conducted by IPEN. The primary coolant system is composed by the piping system, decay tank, two heat pumps and two heat exchangers. In the latest arrangement upgrade of the primary system, conducted in 2014 as part of an aging management program, a partial replacement of the coolant piping and total replacement of piping and pump supports were done. As consequence, reviewed loads in the pump nozzles were obtained demanding a new evaluation of them. The aim of this report is to present the structural evaluation of the pump nozzles, considering the new loads coming from the new piping layout, according to: API 610 code verification, Supplier loads and structural analysis applying finite element method, by using the ANSYS computer program, regarding ASME VIII Div 1 & 2 recommendations. (author)

  9. A mechanistic model for predicting flow-assisted and general corrosion of carbon steel in reactor primary coolants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lister, D. [University of New Brunswick, Fredericton, NB (Canada). Dept. of Chemical Engineering; Lang, L.C. [Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd., Chalk River Lab., ON (Canada)

    2002-07-01

    Flow-assisted corrosion (FAC) of carbon steel in high-temperature lithiated water can be described with a model that invokes dissolution of the protective oxide film and erosion of oxide particles that are loosened as a result. General corrosion under coolant conditions where oxide is not dissolved is described as well. In the model, the electrochemistry of magnetite dissolution and precipitation and the effect of particle size on solubility move the dependence on film thickness of the diffusion processes (and therefore the corrosion rate) away from reciprocal. Particle erosion under dissolving conditions is treated stochastically and depends upon the fluid shear stress at the surface. The corrosion rate dependence on coolant flow under FAC conditions then becomes somewhat less than that arising purely from fluid shear (proportional to the velocity squared). Under non-dissolving conditions, particle erosion occurs infrequently and general corrosion is almost unaffected by flow For application to a CANDU primary circuit and its feeders, the model was bench-marked against the outlet feeder S08 removed from the Point Lepreau reactor, which furnished one value of film thickness and one of corrosion rate for a computed average coolant velocity. Several constants and parameters in the model had to be assumed or were optimised, since values for them were not available. These uncertainties are no doubt responsible for the rather high values of potential that evolved as steps in the computation. The model predicts film thickness development and corrosion rate for the whole range of coolant velocities in outlet feeders very well. In particular, the detailed modelling of FAC in the complex geometry of one outlet feeder (F11) is in good agreement with measurements. When the particle erosion computations are inserted in the balance equations for the circuit, realistic values of crud level are obtained. The model also predicts low corrosion rates and thick oxide films for inlet

  10. A mechanistic model for predicting flow-assisted and general corrosion of carbon steel in reactor primary coolants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lister, D.

    2002-01-01

    Flow-assisted corrosion (FAC) of carbon steel in high-temperature lithiated water can be described with a model that invokes dissolution of the protective oxide film and erosion of oxide particles that are loosened as a result. General corrosion under coolant conditions where oxide is not dissolved is described as well. In the model, the electrochemistry of magnetite dissolution and precipitation and the effect of particle size on solubility move the dependence on film thickness of the diffusion processes (and therefore the corrosion rate) away from reciprocal. Particle erosion under dissolving conditions is treated stochastically and depends upon the fluid shear stress at the surface. The corrosion rate dependence on coolant flow under FAC conditions then becomes somewhat less than that arising purely from fluid shear (proportional to the velocity squared). Under non-dissolving conditions, particle erosion occurs infrequently and general corrosion is almost unaffected by flow For application to a CANDU primary circuit and its feeders, the model was bench-marked against the outlet feeder S08 removed from the Point Lepreau reactor, which furnished one value of film thickness and one of corrosion rate for a computed average coolant velocity. Several constants and parameters in the model had to be assumed or were optimised, since values for them were not available. These uncertainties are no doubt responsible for the rather high values of potential that evolved as steps in the computation. The model predicts film thickness development and corrosion rate for the whole range of coolant velocities in outlet feeders very well. In particular, the detailed modelling of FAC in the complex geometry of one outlet feeder (F11) is in good agreement with measurements. When the particle erosion computations are inserted in the balance equations for the circuit, realistic values of crud level are obtained. The model also predicts low corrosion rates and thick oxide films for inlet

  11. An integrated simulator of structure and anisotropic flow in gas diffusion layers with hydrophobic additives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burganos, Vasilis N.; Skouras, Eugene D.; Kalarakis, Alexandros N.

    2017-10-01

    The lattice-Boltzmann (LB) method is used in this work to reproduce the controlled addition of binder and hydrophobicity-promoting agents, like polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE), into gas diffusion layers (GDLs) and to predict flow permeabilities in the through- and in-plane directions. The present simulator manages to reproduce spreading of binder and hydrophobic additives, sequentially, into the neat fibrous layer using a two-phase flow model. Gas flow simulation is achieved by the same code, sidestepping the need for a post-processing flow code and avoiding the usual input/output and data interface problems that arise in other techniques. Compression effects on flow anisotropy of the impregnated GDL are also studied. The permeability predictions for different compression levels and for different binder or PTFE loadings are found to compare well with experimental data for commercial GDL products and with computational fluid dynamics (CFD) predictions. Alternatively, the PTFE-impregnated structure is reproduced from Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) images using an independent, purely geometrical approach. A comparison of the two approaches is made regarding their adequacy to reproduce correctly the main structural features of the GDL and to predict anisotropic flow permeabilities at different volume fractions of binder and hydrophobic additives.

  12. The performance of double layer structure membrane prepared from flowing coagulant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mieow Kee, Chan; Xeng, Anthony Leong Chan; Regal, Sasiskala; Singh, Balvinder; Raoo, Preeshaath; Koon Eu, Yap; Sok Choo, Ng

    2017-12-01

    Membrane with double layer structure is favourable as it exhibits smooth surface and macrovoids free structure. However, its’ performance in terms of permeability, porosity and strength has not been studied thoroughly. Additionally, the effect of flowing coagulant on the formation of double layer membrane has not been reported. Thus, the objective of this study is to investigate the performance of double layer membranes, which were prepared using flowing coagulant. Results showed that when the coagulant flow changed from laminar to turbulent, the pure water permeation of the membrane increased. It was due to the higher porosity in the membrane, which prepared by turbulent flow (CA-Turbulent) compared to the membrane which fabricated under laminar condition (CA-Laminar). This can be explained by the rapid solvent-coagulant exchange rate between the polymer solution and the turbulent coagulant. In term of strength, the tensile strength of the CA-Turbulent was ~32 MPa, which was 100% higher compared to CA-Laminar. This may due to the presence of large amount of nodules on its surface, which reduced the surface integrity. In conclusion, flowing coagulant altered the membrane properties and adopting turbulent coagulant flow in membrane fabrication would improve the porosity, surface roughness and the strength of the membrane.

  13. Structure analysis of bubble driven flow by time-resolved PIV and POD techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Hyun Dong; Yi, Seung Jae; Kim, Jong Wook; Kim, Kyung Chun

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, the recirculation flow motion and turbulence characteristics of liquid flow driven by air bubble stream in a rectangular water tank are studied. The time-resolved Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) technique is adopted for the quantitative visualization and analysis. 532nm Diode CW laser is used for illumination and orange fluorescent (λex = 540nm, λem = 584nm) particle images are acquired by a 1280X1024 high-speed camera. To obtain clean particle images, 545nm long pass optical filter and an image intensifier are employed and the flow rate of compressed air is 3/min at 0.5MPa. The recirculation and mixing flow field is further investigated by timeresolved Proper Orthogonal Decomposition (POD) analysis technique. It is observed that the large scale recirculation resulting from the interaction between rising bubble stream and side wall is the most dominant flow structure and there are small scale vortical structures moving along with the large scale recirculation flow. It is also verified that the sum of 20 modes of velocity field has about 67.4% of total turbulent energy

  14. Statistical Investigation on Coherent Vortex Structure in Turbulent Drag Reducing Channel Flow with Blown Polymer Solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishitsuka, Shota; Motozawa, Masaaki; Kawaguchi, Yasuo; Iwamoto, Kaoru; Ando, Hirotomo; Senda, Tetsuya

    2011-01-01

    Coherent vortex structure in turbulent drag-reducing channel flow with blown polymer solution from the wall was investigated. As a statistical analysis, we carried out Galilean decomposition, swirling strength and linear stochastic estimation of the PIV data obtained by the PIV measurement in x – y plane. Reynolds number based on bulk velocity and channel height was set to 40000. As a result, the angle of shear layer that cleared up by using Galilean decomposition becomes small in the drag-reducing flow. Q3 events were observed near the shear layer. In addition, as a result of linear stochastic estimation (LSE) based on swirling strength, we confirmed that the velocity under the vortex core is strong in the water flow. This result shows Q2 (ejection) are dominant in the water flow. However, in the drag-reducing flow with blown polymer solution, the velocity above the vortex core become strong, that is, Q4 (sweep) events are relatively strong around the vortex core. This is the result of Q4 events to come from the channel center region because the polymer solution does not exist in this region. The typical structure like this was observed in the drag -reducing flow with blown polymer solution from the wall.

  15. Regional structural differences across functionally parcellated Brodmann areas of human primary somatosensory cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Panchuelo, Rosa-María; Besle, Julien; Mougin, Olivier; Gowland, Penny; Bowtell, Richard; Schluppeck, Denis; Francis, Susan

    2014-06-01

    Ultra-high-field (UHF) MRI is ideally suited for structural and functional imaging of the brain. High-resolution structural MRI can be used to map the anatomical boundaries between functional domains of the brain by identifying changes related to the pattern of myelination within cortical gray matter, opening up the possibility to study the relationship between functional domains and underlying structure in vivo. In a recent study, we demonstrated the correspondence between functional (based on retinotopic mapping) and structural (based on changes in T2(⁎)-weighted images linked to myelination) parcellations of the primary visual cortex (V1) in vivo at 7T (Sanchez-Panchuelo et al., 2012b). Here, we take advantage of the improved BOLD CNR and high spatial resolution achievable at 7T to study regional structural variations across the functionally defined areas within the primary somatosensory cortex (S1) in individual subjects. Using a traveling wave fMRI paradigm to map the internal somatotopic representation of the index, middle, and ring fingers in S1, we were able to identify multiple map reversals at the tip and base, corresponding to the boundaries between Brodmann areas 3a, 3b, 1 and 2. Based on high resolution structural MRI data acquired in the same subjects, we inspected these functionally-parcellated Brodmann areas for differences in cortical thickness and MR contrast measures (magnetization transfer ratio (MTR) and signal intensity in phase sensitive inversion recovery (PSIR) images) that are sensitive to myelination. Consistent area-related differences in cortical thickness and MTR/PSIR measurements were found across subjects. However these measures did not have sufficient sensitivity to allow definition of areal boundaries. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Analysis of fluid flow and heat transfer in a double pipe heat exchanger with porous structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Targui, N.; Kahalerras, H.

    2008-01-01

    A numerical study of flow and heat transfer characteristics is made in a double pipe heat exchanger with porous structures inserted in the annular gap in two configurations: on the inner cylinder (A) and on both the cylinders in a staggered fashion (B). The flow field in the porous regions is modelled by the Darcy-Brinkman-Forchheimer model and the finite volume method is used to solve the governing equations. The effects of several parameters such as Darcy number, porous structures thickness and spacing and thermal conductivity ratio are considered in order to look for the most appropriate properties of the porous structures that allow optimal heat transfer enhancement. It is found that the highest heat transfer rates are obtained when the porous structures are attached in configuration B especially at small spacing and high thicknesses

  17. Exact coherent structures in an asymptotically reduced description of parallel shear flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaume, Cédric; Knobloch, Edgar; Chini, Gregory P.; Julien, Keith

    2015-02-01

    A reduced description of shear flows motivated by the Reynolds number scaling of lower-branch exact coherent states in plane Couette flow (Wang J, Gibson J and Waleffe F 2007 Phys. Rev. Lett. 98 204501) is constructed. Exact time-independent nonlinear solutions of the reduced equations corresponding to both lower and upper branch states are found for a sinusoidal, body-forced shear flow. The lower branch solution is characterized by fluctuations that vary slowly along the critical layer while the upper branch solutions display a bimodal structure and are more strongly focused on the critical layer. The reduced equations provide a rational framework for investigations of subcritical spatiotemporal patterns in parallel shear flows.

  18. Exact coherent structures in an asymptotically reduced description of parallel shear flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beaume, Cédric; Knobloch, Edgar; Chini, Gregory P; Julien, Keith

    2015-01-01

    A reduced description of shear flows motivated by the Reynolds number scaling of lower-branch exact coherent states in plane Couette flow (Wang J, Gibson J and Waleffe F 2007 Phys. Rev. Lett. 98 204501) is constructed. Exact time-independent nonlinear solutions of the reduced equations corresponding to both lower and upper branch states are found for a sinusoidal, body-forced shear flow. The lower branch solution is characterized by fluctuations that vary slowly along the critical layer while the upper branch solutions display a bimodal structure and are more strongly focused on the critical layer. The reduced equations provide a rational framework for investigations of subcritical spatiotemporal patterns in parallel shear flows. (paper)

  19. Renormalization-group flow of the effective action of cosmological large-scale structures

    CERN Document Server

    Floerchinger, Stefan

    2017-01-01

    Following an approach of Matarrese and Pietroni, we derive the functional renormalization group (RG) flow of the effective action of cosmological large-scale structures. Perturbative solutions of this RG flow equation are shown to be consistent with standard cosmological perturbation theory. Non-perturbative approximate solutions can be obtained by truncating the a priori infinite set of possible effective actions to a finite subspace. Using for the truncated effective action a form dictated by dissipative fluid dynamics, we derive RG flow equations for the scale dependence of the effective viscosity and sound velocity of non-interacting dark matter, and we solve them numerically. Physically, the effective viscosity and sound velocity account for the interactions of long-wavelength fluctuations with the spectrum of smaller-scale perturbations. We find that the RG flow exhibits an attractor behaviour in the IR that significantly reduces the dependence of the effective viscosity and sound velocity on the input ...

  20. Flow environment and matrix structure interact to determine spatial competition in Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadell, Carey D; Ricaurte, Deirdre; Yan, Jing; Drescher, Knut; Bassler, Bonnie L

    2017-01-13

    Bacteria often live in biofilms, which are microbial communities surrounded by a secreted extracellular matrix. Here, we demonstrate that hydrodynamic flow and matrix organization interact to shape competitive dynamics in Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms. Irrespective of initial frequency, in competition with matrix mutants, wild-type cells always increase in relative abundance in planar microfluidic devices under simple flow regimes. By contrast, in microenvironments with complex, irregular flow profiles - which are common in natural environments - wild-type matrix-producing and isogenic non-producing strains can coexist. This result stems from local obstruction of flow by wild-type matrix producers, which generates regions of near-zero shear that allow matrix mutants to locally accumulate. Our findings connect the evolutionary stability of matrix production with the hydrodynamics and spatial structure of the surrounding environment, providing a potential explanation for the variation in biofilm matrix secretion observed among bacteria in natural environments.

  1. Mode decomposition and Lagrangian structures of the flow dynamics in orbitally shaken bioreactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weheliye, Weheliye Hashi; Cagney, Neil; Rodriguez, Gregorio; Micheletti, Martina; Ducci, Andrea

    2018-03-01

    In this study, two mode decomposition techniques were applied and compared to assess the flow dynamics in an orbital shaken bioreactor (OSB) of cylindrical geometry and flat bottom: proper orthogonal decomposition and dynamic mode decomposition. Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) experiments were carried out for different operating conditions including fluid height, h, and shaker rotational speed, N. A detailed flow analysis is provided for conditions when the fluid and vessel motions are in-phase (Fr = 0.23) and out-of-phase (Fr = 0.47). PIV measurements in vertical and horizontal planes were combined to reconstruct low order models of the full 3D flow and to determine its Finite-Time Lyapunov Exponent (FTLE) within OSBs. The combined results from the mode decomposition and the FTLE fields provide a useful insight into the flow dynamics and Lagrangian coherent structures in OSBs and offer a valuable tool to optimise bioprocess design in terms of mixing and cell suspension.

  2. Primary Dystonia: Conceptualizing the Disorder through a Structural Brain Imaging Lens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristina Simonyan

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Dystonia is a hyperkinetic movement disorder of involuntary, twisting repetitive movements. The anatomical structures and pathways implicated in its pathogenesis as well as their relationship to the neurophysiological paradigm of abnormal surround inhibition, maladaptive plasticity and impaired sensorimotor integration remain not well delineated. Objective: We review the use of high-resolution structural brain imaging using voxel-based morphometry (VBM and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI techniques for evaluation of brain changes in primary torsion dystonia and their relationships to the pathophysiology of this disorder. Methods: A search in PubMed was conducted to identify the relevant literature. Discussion: Structural imaging has enhanced our understanding of the pathophysiological mechanisms of dystonia. In particular, VBM and DTI data have revealed microstructural disturbances in the basal ganglia, sensorimotor cortices and cerebellum along with aberrations in the cortico-striato-pallido-thalamic and cerebello-thalamo-cortical pathways.  When combined with functional brain imaging and neurophysiological modalities, a structure-function relationship can be established in the dystonia brain network at the sensorimotor, plasticity, cortical disinhibition and cerebellar outflow connectivity levels. Structural imaging highlighted new anatomical substrates and, with a combined structural-functional approach, has offered new opportunities for investigation of the neurodevelopmental, environmental and/or genetic interplay in the brain networks of dystonia patients. 

  3. Effect of trailing edge ramp on cavity flow structures and pressure drag

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pey, Yin Yin; Chua, Leok Poh; Siauw, Wei Long

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Trailing edge ramps were used to reduce unsteadiness and pressure drag of a cavity. • Proper Orthogonal Decomposition was used to educe the coherent structures. • The 30° ramp was successful in redistributing the energy content within the cavity. • The 30° ramp guides the flow smoothly out of the cavity, reducing flow impingement. • A substantial reduction of pressure drag was achieved by the 30° ramp. -- Abstract: The effects of trailing edge ramp modifications on time-averaged velocity and pressure distributions within a cavity with a length to depth ratio of 2, at a speed of 15 m/s were investigated. The ramp angles were varied at 30°, 45° and 60° and ramp heights were varied at 0.25 times and 0.5 times of cavity depth. The mean flow within the cavity differed significantly from the baseline case when ramp angle was 30° and 45° with ramp height 0.5 times of cavity depth. At these 2 configurations, moment about the center of the cavity floor was reduced significantly. These could be attributed to the more steady flow within the cavity as compared to the baseline case. Spatial correlation of velocity in the cavity of ramp angle 30° showed that internal cavity flow was less sensitive to flow changes in the shear layer as compared to the baseline case. In the same cavity, snapshot Proper Orthogonal Decomposition revealed a redistribution of energy content where energetic structures exist only in the shear layer as opposed to energetic structures in both the shear layer and internal cavity for the baseline case. A reduction of pressure drag was also observed as the gentle ramp angle of 30° guides the flow smoothly out of the cavity and reduces trailing edge impingement

  4. A MEMS-based Air Flow Sensor with a Free-standing Micro-cantilever Structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yu-Hsiang; Lee, Chia-Yen; Chiang, Che-Ming

    2007-10-17

    This paper presents a micro-scale air flow sensor based on a free-standingcantilever structure. In the fabrication process, MEMS techniques are used to deposit asilicon nitride layer on a silicon wafer. A platinum layer is deposited on the silicon nitridelayer to form a piezoresistor, and the resulting structure is then etched to create afreestanding micro-cantilever. When an air flow passes over the surface of the cantileverbeam, the beam deflects in the downward direction, resulting in a small variation in theresistance of the piezoelectric layer. The air flow velocity is determined by measuring thechange in resistance using an external LCR meter. The experimental results indicate that theflow sensor has a high sensitivity (0.0284 ω/ms -1 ), a high velocity measurement limit (45ms -1 ) and a rapid response time (0.53 s).

  5. A MEMS-based Air Flow Sensor with a Free-standing Micro-cantilever Structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Che-Ming Chiang

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a micro-scale air flow sensor based on a free-standingcantilever structure. In the fabrication process, MEMS techniques are used to deposit asilicon nitride layer on a silicon wafer. A platinum layer is deposited on the silicon nitridelayer to form a piezoresistor, and the resulting structure is then etched to create afreestanding micro-cantilever. When an air flow passes over the surface of the cantileverbeam, the beam deflects in the downward direction, resulting in a small variation in theresistance of the piezoelectric layer. The air flow velocity is determined by measuring thechange in resistance using an external LCR meter. The experimental results indicate that theflow sensor has a high sensitivity (0.0284 ω/ms-1, a high velocity measurement limit (45ms-1 and a rapid response time (0.53 s.

  6. Wave structure in the radial film flow with a circular hydraulic jump

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, A.; Arakeri, J. H.

    A circular hydraulic jump is commonly seen when a circular liquid jet impinges on a horizontal plate. Measurements of the film thickness, jump radius and the wave structure for various jet Reynolds numbers are reported. Film thickness measurements are made using an electrical contact method for regions both upstream and downstream of the jump over circular plates without a barrier at the edge. The jump radius and the separation bubble length are measured for various flow rates, plate edge conditions, and radii. Flow visualization using high-speed photography is used to study wave structure and transition. Waves on the jet amplify in the film region upstream of the jump. At high flow rates, the waves amplify enough to cause three-dimensional breakdown and what seems like transition to turbulence. This surface wave induced transition is different from the traditional route and can be exploited to enhance heat and mass transfer rates.

  7. Control of 2D Flexible Structures by Confinement of Vibrations and Regulation of Their Energy Flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fakhreddine Landolsi

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we investigate the control of 2D flexible structures by vibration confinement and the regulation of their energy flow along prespecified spatial paths. A discretized-model-based feedback strategy, aiming at confining and suppressing simultaneously the vibration, is proposed. It is assumed that the structure consists of parts that are sensitive to vibrations. The control design introduces a new pseudo-modal matrix derived from the computed eigenvectors of the discretized model. Simulations are presented to show the efficacy of the proposed control law. A parametric study is carried out to examine the effects of the different control parameters on the simultaneous confinement and suppression of vibrations. In addition, we conducted a set of simulations to investigate the flow control of vibrational energy during the confinement-suppression process. We found that the energy flow can be regulated via a set of control parameters for different confinement configurations.

  8. Structural instability of atmospheric flows under perturbations of the mass balance and effect in transport calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Núñez, M A; Mendoza, R

    2015-01-01

    Several methods to estimate the velocity field of atmospheric flows, have been proposed to the date for applications such as emergency response systems, transport calculations and for budget studies of all kinds. These applications require a wind field that satisfies the conservation of mass but, in general, estimated wind fields do not satisfy exactly the continuity equation. An approach to reduce the effect of using a divergent wind field as input in the transport-diffusion equations, was proposed in the literature. In this work, a linear local analysis of a wind field, is used to show analytically that the perturbation of a large-scale nondivergent flow can yield a divergent flow with a substantially different structure. The effects of these structural changes in transport calculations are illustrated by means of analytic solutions of the transport equation

  9. Wave structure in the radial film flow with a circular hydraulic jump

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rao, A.; Arakeri, J.H. [Indian Inst. of Science, Bangalore (India). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

    2001-11-01

    A circular hydraulic jump is commonly seen when a circular liquid jet impinges on a horizontal plate. Measurements of the film thickness, jump radius and the wave structure for various jet Reynolds numbers are reported. Film thickness measurements are made using an electrical contact method for regions both upstream and downstream of the jump over circular plates without a barrier at the edge. The jump radius and the separation bubble length are measured for various flow rates, plate edge conditions, and radii. Flow visualization using high-speed photography is used to study wave structure and transition. Waves on the jet amplify in the film region upstream of the jump. At high flow rates, the waves amplify enough to cause three-dimensional breakdown and what seems like transition to turbulence. This surface wave induced transition is different from the traditional route and can be exploited to enhance heat and mass transfer rates. (orig.)

  10. Advances in Computational Fluid-Structure Interaction and Flow Simulation Conference

    CERN Document Server

    Takizawa, Kenji

    2016-01-01

    This contributed volume celebrates the work of Tayfun E. Tezduyar on the occasion of his 60th birthday. The articles it contains were born out of the Advances in Computational Fluid-Structure Interaction and Flow Simulation (AFSI 2014) conference, also dedicated to Prof. Tezduyar and held at Waseda University in Tokyo, Japan on March 19-21, 2014. The contributing authors represent a group of international experts in the field who discuss recent trends and new directions in computational fluid dynamics (CFD) and fluid-structure interaction (FSI). Organized into seven distinct parts arranged by thematic topics, the papers included cover basic methods and applications of CFD, flows with moving boundaries and interfaces, phase-field modeling, computer science and high-performance computing (HPC) aspects of flow simulation, mathematical methods, biomedical applications, and FSI. Researchers, practitioners, and advanced graduate students working on CFD, FSI, and related topics will find this collection to be a defi...

  11. Fluid Flow through Porous Sandstone with Overprinting and Intersecting Geological Structures of Various Types

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, X.; Karimi-Fard, M.; Durlofsky, L.; Aydin, A.

    2010-12-01

    Impact of a wide variety of structural heterogeneities on fluid flow in an aeolian sandstone in the Valley of Fire State Park (NV), such as (1) dilatant fractures (joints), (2) shear fractures (faults), and (3) contraction/compaction structures (compaction bands), are considered. Each type of these structures has its own geometry, spacing, distribution, connectivity, and hydraulic properties, which either enhance or impede subsurface fluid flow. Permeability of these structures may, on average, be a few orders of magnitude higher or lower than those of the corresponding matrix rocks. In recent years, the influence of a single type of these heterogeneities on fluid flow has been studied individually, such as joints, compaction bands or faults. However, as different types of geological structures are commonly present together in the same rock volume, their combined effect requires a more detailed assessment. In this study, fluid flow simulations are performed using a special finite-volume discretization technique that was developed by Karimi-Fard et al. (2004; 2006). Using this approach, thin features such as fractures and compaction bands are represented as linear elements in unstructured 2D models and as planar elements in 3D models, which significantly reduces the total number of cells and simplifies grid generation. The cell geometric information and the cell-to-cell transmissibility obtained from this discretization technique are input to Stanford’s General Purpose Research Simulator (GPRS) for fluid flow simulation. To account for the effects of the various geological structures on subsurface flow, we perform permeability upscaling over regions corresponding to large-scale simulation grid blocks in order to obtain equivalent permeability components in two principal directions. We will focus on the following problems: (1) compaction bands of multisets; (2) compartmentalization of compaction bands of high-angle, low-angle and horizontal; (3) joints overprinting

  12. Surface (glyco-)proteins: primary structure and crystallization under microgravity conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claus, H.; Akca, E.; Schultz, N.; Karbach, G.; Schlott, B.; Debaerdemaeker, T.; De Clercq, J.-P.; König, H.

    2001-08-01

    The Archaea comprise microorganisms that live under environmental extremes, like high temperature, low pH value or high salt concentration. Their cells are often covered by a single layer of (glyco)protein subunits (S-layer) in hexagonal arrangement. In order to get further hints about the molecular mechanisms of protein stabilization we compared the primary and secondary structures of archaeal S-layer (glyco)proteins. We found an increase of charged amino acids in the S-layer proteins of the extreme thermophilic species compared to their mesophilic counterparts. Our data and those of other authors suggest that ionic interactions, e.g., salt bridges seem to be played a major role in protein stabilization at high temperatures. Despite the differences in the growth optima and the predominance of some amino acids the primary structures of S-layers revealed also a significant degree of identity between phylogenetically related archaea. These obervations indicate that protein sequences of S-layers have been conserved during the evolution from extremely thermophilic to mesophilic life. To support these findings the three-dimensional structure of the S-layer proteins has to be elucidated. Recently, we described the first successful crystallization of an extreme thermophilic surface(glyco)protein under microgravity conditions.

  13. Primary structure of an adipokinetic neuropeptide from the rhinoceros beetle, Oryctes rhinoceros L (Coleoptera: Dynastidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajay Kumar, A P; Gokuldas, M

    2011-07-01

    Neuropeptides play an important role in cellular communication in vertebrates. This is also true for insects in which many physiological, developmental and behavioral processes are affected by neuropeptides produced in neurosecretory cells of the retrocerebral complex. Small neuropeptides of the adipokinetic hormone/red pigment concentrating hormone family (AKH/RPCH) are one of the important groups of peptides that regulate physiological homeostasis. The present investigation was carried out to elucidate the primary structure of adipokinetic neuropeptides in the rhinoceros beetle, O. rhinoceros. In the present investigation, an adipokinetic neuropeptide from the coconut pest, Oryctes rhinoceros was isolated from corpora cardiaca by HPLC; the chromatographic fractions were tested for adipokinetic activity in the plant bug, Iphita limbata in vivo. Two UV absorbance peaks were found to be significantly active in elevating haemolymph lipid levels. MALDI-MS analysis of the extract indicated that the molecular mass, 1003.70 Da is similar to the already known AKH from another beetle, Melolontha melolontha. MALDI-MS/MS analysis confirmed that its primary structure is exactly similar to the structure reported for the Melme-AKH (pE-L-N-Y-S-P-D-W-NH2). The findings suggest that the distribution of AKH peptides has shown that there exists a taxonomic order or family specificity. This data can be used as additional information to aid in the construction of phylogenetic trees by means of computer programme and protein parsimony algorithms.

  14. Lee-side flow structures of very low aspect ratio cruciform wing–body configurations

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Tuling, S

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available A numerical and experimental investigation was performed to study the dominant flow structures in the lee side of a cruciform wing–body configuration at supersonic speeds in the + orientation. The wings or strakes are of very low aspect ratio...

  15. [Correlation of substrate structure and hydraulic characteristics in subsurface flow constructed wetlands].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Shao-Yuan; Song, Zhi-Xin; Ding, Yan-Li; You, Shao-Hong; He, Shan

    2014-02-01

    The correlation of substrate structure and hydraulic characteristics was studied by numerical simulation combined with experimental method. The numerical simulation results showed that the permeability coefficient of matrix had a great influence on hydraulic efficiency in subsurface flow constructed wetlands. The filler with a high permeability coefficient had a worse flow field distribution in the constructed wetland with single layer structure. The layered substrate structure with the filler permeability coefficient increased from surface to bottom could avoid the short-circuited flow and dead-zones, and thus, increased the hydraulic efficiency. Two parallel pilot-scale constructed wetlands were built according to the numerical simulation results, and tracer experiments were conducted to validate the simulation results. The tracer experiment result showed that hydraulic characteristics in the layered constructed wetland were obviously better than that in the single layer system, and the substrate effective utilization rates were 0.87 and 0.49, respectively. It was appeared that numerical simulation would be favorable for substrate structure optimization in subsurface flow constructed wetlands.

  16. Micro-flow synthesis and structural analysis of sterically crowded diimine ligands with five aryl rings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shinichiro Fuse

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Sterically crowded diimine ligands with five aryl rings were prepared in one step in good yields using a micro-flow technique. X-ray crystallographic analysis revealed the detailed structure of the bulky ligands. The nickel complexes prepared from the ligands exerted high polymerization activity in the ethylene homopolymerization and copolymerization of ethylene with polar monomers.

  17. Evaluating shallow-flow rock structures as scour countermeasures at bridges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-12-01

    A study to determine whether or not shallow-flow rock structures could reliably be used at bridge abutments in place of riprap. Research was conducted in a two-phase effort beginning with numerical modeling and ending with field verification of model...

  18. Simulant-material experimental investigation of flow dynamics in the CRBR Upper-Core Structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilhelm, D.; Starkovich, V.S.; Chapyak, E.J.

    1982-09-01

    The results of a simulant-material experimental investigation of flow dynamics in the Clinch River Breeder Reactor (CRBR) Upper Core Structure are described. The methodology used to design the experimental apparatus and select test conditions is detailed. Numerous comparisons between experimental data and SIMMER-II Code calculations are presented with both advantages and limitations of the SIMMER modeling features identified

  19. Structural Relationships among E-Learners' Sense of Presence, Usage, Flow, Satisfaction, and Persistence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joo, Young Ju; Joung, Sunyoung; Kim, Eun Kyung

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the structural relationships among teaching presence, cognitive presence, usage, learning flow, satisfaction, and learning persistence in corporate e-learners. The research participants were 462 e-learners registered for cyber-lectures through an electronics company in South Korea. The extrinsic variables were sense…

  20. Structural Controls on Groundwater Flow in Basement Terrains: Geophysical, Remote Sensing, and Field Investigations in Sinai

    KAUST Repository

    Mohamed, Lamees; Sultan, Mohamed; Ahmed, Mohamed; Zaki, Abotalib; Sauck, William; Soliman, Farouk; Yan, Eugene; Elkadiri, Racha; Abouelmagd, Abdou

    2015-01-01

    of the structural controls on the groundwater flow. The increase in satellite-based radar backscattering values following a large precipitation event (34 mm on 17–18 January 2010) was used to identify water-bearing features, here interpreted as preferred pathways

  1. Investigating the structure of a vortex flow in the closed polygonal containers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podolskaya, I. Yu; Bakakin, G. V.; Naumov, I. V.

    2018-03-01

    The structure of confined vortex flow generated by a rotating lid in a closed container with polygonal cross-section geometry (eight, six and five angles) has been investigated numerically for different height/radius aspect ratios h from 3.0 to 4.5 and for Reynold numbers ranging from 1500 to 3000. The critical Reynolds numbers at which the flow becomes unsteady were determined numerically by STAR-CCM+ computational fluid dynamics software for pentagonal and hexagonal cross-section configurations. The obtained results were compared with the flow structure in the closed cylindrical container. The boundary of a nonstationarity in polygonal containers is found to shift to the region of smaller aspect ratio and smaller Reynolds numbers with a decrease in the number of angles in the cross-section of the container relative to the boundary in a cylindrical container. It is additionally established that the structure of the flow in the near-axis region remains similar to the vortex structure in the cylinder, therefore the shape of the container does not influence the near-axis region.

  2. Disinfection of an advanced primary effluent with peracetic acid and ultraviolet combined treatment: a continuous-flow pilot plant study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, Abelardo; Gehr, Ronald; Vaca, Mabel; López, Raymundo

    2012-03-01

    Disinfection of an advanced primary effluent using a continuous-flow combined peracetic acid/ultraviolet (PAA/UV) radiation system was evaluated. The purpose was to determine whether the maximum microbial content, established under Mexican standards for treated wastewaters meant for reuse--less than 240 most probable number fecal coliforms (FC)/100 mL--could be feasibly accomplished using either disinfectant individually, or the combined PAA/UV system. This meant achieving reduction of up to 5 logs, considering initial concentrations of 6.4 x 10(+6) to 5.8 x 10(+7) colony forming units/100 mL. During the tests performed under these experiments, total coliforms (TC) were counted because FC, at the most, will be equal to TC. Peracetic acid disinfection achieved less than 1.5 logs TC reduction when the C(t) x t product was less than 2.26 mg x minimum (min)/L; 3.8 logs for C(t) x t 4.40 mg x min/L; and 5.9 logs for C(t) x t 24.2 mg x min/L. In continuous-flow UV irradiation tests, at a low-operating flow (21 L/min; conditions which produced an average UV fluence of 13.0 mJ/cm2), the highest TC reduction was close to 2.5 logs. The only condition that produced a disinfection efficiency of approximately 5 logs, when both disinfection agents were used together, was the combined process dosing 30 mg PAA/L at a pilot plant flow of 21 L/min and contact time of 10 minutes to attain an average C(t) x t product of 24.2 mg x min/L and an average UV fluence of 13 mJ/cm2. There was no conclusive evidence of a synergistic effect when both disinfectants were employed in combination as compared to the individual effects achieved when used separately, but this does not take into account the nonlinearity (tailing-off) of the dose-response curve.

  3. Secondary flow structures in a 180∘ elastic curved vessel with torsion under steady and pulsatile inflow conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Najjari, Mohammad Reza; Plesniak, Michael W.

    2017-11-01

    Secondary flow vortical structures were investigated in an elastic 180° curved pipe with and without torsion under steady and pulsatile flow using particle image velocimetry (PIV). The elastic thin-walled curved pipes were constructed using Sylgard 184, and inserted into a bath of refractive index matched fluid to perform PIV. A vortex identification method was employed to identify various vortical structures in the flow. The secondary flow structures in the planar compliant model with dilatation of 0.61%-3.23% under pulsatile flow rate were compared with the rigid vessel model results, and it was found that local vessel compliance has a negligible effect on secondary flow morphology. The secondary flow structures were found to be more sensitive to out of plane curvature (torsion) than to vessel compliance. Torsion distorts the symmetry of secondary flow and results in more complex vortical structures in both steady and pulsatile flows. In high Re number steady flow with torsion, a single dominant vortical structure can be detected at the middle of the 90° cross section. In pulsatile flow with torsion, the split-Dean and Lyne-type vortices with same rotation direction originating from opposite sides of the cross section tend to merge together. supported by GW Center for Biomimetics and Bioinspired Engineering.

  4. Two-Phase Gas-Liquid Flow Structure Characteristics under Periodic Cross Forces Action

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Perevezentsev

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The article presents a study of two-phase gas-liquid flow under the action of periodic cross forces. The work objective is to obtain experimental data for further analysis and have structure characteristics of the two-phase flow movement. For research, to obtain data without disturbing effect on the flow were used optic PIV (Particle Image Visualization methods because of their noninvasiveness. The cross forces influence was provided by an experimental stand design to change the angular amplitudes and the periods of channel movement cycle with two-phase flow. In the range of volume gas rates was shown a water flow rate versus the inclination angle of immovable riser section and the characteristic angular amplitudes and periods of riser section inclination cycle under periodic cross forces. Data on distribution of average water velocity in twophase flow in abovementioned cases were also obtained. These data allowed us to draw a conclusion that a velocity distribution depends on the angular amplitude and on the period of the riser section roll cycle. This article belongs to publications, which study two-phase flows with no disturbing effect on them. Obtained data give an insight into understanding a pattern of twophase gas-liquid flow under the action of periodic cross forces and can be used to verify the mathematical models of the CFD thermo-hydraulic codes. In the future, the work development expects taking measurements with more frequent interval in the ranges of angular amplitudes and periods of the channel movement cycle and create a mathematical model to show the action of periodic cross forces on two-phase gas-liquid flow.

  5. Structure of the gas-liquid annular two-phase flow in a nozzle section

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, Kenji; Kataoka, Isao; Ohmori, Syuichi; Mori, Michitsugu

    2006-01-01

    Experimental studies on the flow behavior of gas-liquid annular two-phase flow passing through a nozzle section were carried out. This study is concerned with the central steam jet injector for a next generation nuclear reactor. In the central steam jet injector, steam/water annular two-phase flow is formed at the mixing nozzle. To make an appropriate design and to establish the high-performance steam injector system, it is very important to accumulate the fundamental data of the thermo-hydro dynamic characteristics of annular flow passing through a nozzle section. On the other hand, the transient behavior of multiphase flow, in which the interactions between two-phases occur, is one of the most interesting scientific issues and has attracted research attention. In this study, the transient gas-phase turbulence modification in annular flow due to the gas-liquid phase interaction is experimentally investigated. The annular flow passing through a throat section is under the transient state due to the changing cross sectional area of the channel and resultantly the superficial velocities of both phases are changed compared with a fully developed flow in a straight pipe. The measurements for the gas-phase turbulence were precisely performed by using a constant temperature hot-wire anemometer, and made clear the turbulence structure such as velocity profiles, fluctuation velocity profiles. The behavior of the interfacial waves in the liquid film flow such as the ripple or disturbance waves was also observed. The measurements for the liquid film thickness by the electrode needle method were also performed to measure the base film thickness, mean film thickness, maximum film thickness and wave height of the ripple or the disturbance waves. (author)

  6. Specific features of the flow structure in a reactive type turbine stage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chernikov, V. A.; Semakina, E. Yu.

    2017-04-01

    The results of experimental studies of the gas dynamics for a reactive type turbine stage are presented. The objective of the studies is the measurement of the 3D flow fields in reference cross sections, experimental determination of the stage characteristics, and analysis of the flow structure for detecting the sources of kinetic energy losses. The integral characteristics of the studied stage are obtained by averaging the results of traversing the 3D flow over the area of the reference cross sections before and behind the stage. The averaging is performed using the conservation equations for mass, total energy flux, angular momentum with respect to the axis z of the turbine, entropy flow, and the radial projection of the momentum flux equation. The flow parameter distributions along the channel height behind the stage are obtained in the same way. More thorough analysis of the flow structure is performed after interpolation of the experimentally measured point parameter values and 3D flow velocities behind the stage. The obtained continuous velocity distributions in the absolute and relative coordinate systems are presented in the form of vector fields. The coordinates of the centers and the vectors of secondary vortices are determined using the results of point measurements of velocity vectors in the cross section behind the turbine stage and their subsequent interpolation. The approach to analysis of experimental data on aerodynamics of the turbine stage applied in this study allows one to find the detailed space structure of the working medium flow, including secondary coherent vortices at the root and peripheral regions of the air-gas part of the stage. The measured 3D flow parameter fields and their interpolation, on the one hand, point to possible sources of increased power losses, and, on the other hand, may serve as the basis for detailed testing of CFD models of the flow using both integral and local characteristics. The comparison of the numerical and

  7. New modeling and experimental approaches for characterization of two-phase flow interfacial structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishii, Mamoru; Sun, Xiaodong

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents new experimental and modeling approaches in characterizing interfacial structures in gas-liquid two-phase flow. For the experiments, two objective approaches are developed to identify flow regimes and to obtain local interfacial structure data. First, a global measurement technique using a non-intrusive ring-type impedance void-meter and a self-organizing neural network is presented to identify the one-dimensional'' flow regimes. In the application of this measurement technique, two methods are discussed, namely, one based on the probability density function of the impedance probe measurement (PDF input method) and the other based on the sorted impedance signals, which is essentially the cumulative probability distribution function of the impedance signals (instantaneous direct signal input method). In the latter method, the identification can be made close to instantaneously since the required signals can be acquired over a very short time period. In addition, a double-sensor conductivity probe can also be used to obtain ''local'' flow regimes by using the instantaneous direct signal input method with the bubble chord length information. Furthermore, a newly designed conductivity probe with multiple double-sensor heads is proposed to obtain ''two-dimensional'' flow regimes across the flow channel. Secondly, a state-of-the-art four-sensor conductivity probe technique has been developed to obtain detailed local interfacial structure information. The four-sensor conductivity probe accommodates the double-sensor probe capability and can be applied in a wide range of flow regimes spanning from bubbly to churn-turbulent flows. The signal processing scheme is developed such that it categorizes the acquired parameters into two groups based on bubble cord length information. Furthermore, for the modeling of the interfacial structure characterization, the interfacial area transport equation proposed earlier has been studied to provide a dynamic and

  8. 3D CAFE modeling of grain structures: application to primary dendritic and secondary eutectic solidification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carozzani, T; Digonnet, H; Gandin, Ch-A

    2012-01-01

    A three-dimensional model is presented for the prediction of grain structures formed in casting. It is based on direct tracking of grain boundaries using a cellular automaton (CA) method. The model is fully coupled with a solution of the heat flow computed with a finite element (FE) method. Several unique capabilities are implemented including (i) the possibility to track the development of several types of grain structures, e.g. dendritic and eutectic grains, (ii) a coupling scheme that permits iterations between the FE method and the CA method, and (iii) tabulated enthalpy curves for the solid and liquid phases that offer the possibility to work with multicomponent alloys. The present CAFE model is also fully parallelized and runs on a cluster of computers. Demonstration is provided by direct comparison between simulated and recorded cooling curves for a directionally solidified aluminum–7 wt% silicon alloy

  9. The most important structures utilizing primary and secondary hydroenergetic potential for electric energy production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zacharovsky, M.

    1997-01-01

    In this paper the construction, technological parameters and operation of Gabcikovo (primary hydro energy power) and Cierny Vah (secondary hydro energy power) are described. Construction of the hydroelectric power plant (HPP) Gabcikovo started in 1978 as a part of a system of hydro power projects Gabcikovo-Nagymaros. Basic technical data are: installed capacity 8 x 90 MW, production in an average aqueous year 2.650 GWh, number of hydroelectric generating sets (HGS) 8, turbine flow 8 x 413-636 m 3 /s, head 12.9-24 m.The Gabcikovo plant produced 9.163 GWh of electricity from the beginning of its operation till the end of 1966. The construction of the pumped storage plant (PSP) Cierny Vah started in 1976 and it was put into operation at the end of 1980. The main goal of the PSP Cierny Vah is to meet the control functions of an electrification system of the Slovak Republic, a substitute function in the cases of unexpected power outages and a planned electricity production from re-pumping. Technological parts are: six re-pumping vertical HGS in a three machine arrangement - a motor-generator, a turbine, a pump - are located in three double-blocks. Basic technical data: installed capacity 6 x 122.4 MW + 0.768 MW, yearly production 1,281 GWh, number of HGS 6, number of domestic hydroelectric generating sets 1, turbine flow 3 x 30 m / s, pump flow 6 x 22 m 3 /s, upper reservoir volume 3.7 mil. m 3 , max. head 434 m, peak time 5.71 hour, pumping time 7.78 hour, re-pumping cycle efficiency 74.36%. From putting the PSP into operation till the end of 1996, the HGS in operation 145,269 hours in total, including 53,332 hours in a turbine mode of operation, 70,293 hours in a pumping mode operation and 21,644 hours in a compensation mode operation. Whereas they supplied 5,346 GWh in the mains and the consumed 6,933 GWh of electricity for pumping. Hydroenergetic potential is a primary source of energy which is recyclable, i.e. unexhaustible and also ecologically the most tolerable

  10. The most important structures utilizing primary and secondary hydroenergetic potential for electric energy production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zacharovsky, M [Slovenske elektrarne, a.s., Vodne elektrarne Trencin (Slovakia)

    1997-12-01

    In this paper the construction, technological parameters and operation of Gabcikovo (primary hydro energy power) and Cierny Vah (secondary hydro energy power) are described. Construction of the hydroelectric power plant (HPP) Gabcikovo started in 1978 as a part of a system of hydro power projects Gabcikovo-Nagymaros. Basic technical data are: installed capacity 8 x 90 MW, production in an average aqueous year 2.650 GWh, number of hydroelectric generating sets (HGS) 8, turbine flow 8 x 413-636 m{sup 3}/s, head 12.9-24 m.The Gabcikovo plant produced 9.163 GWh of electricity from the beginning of its operation till the end of 1966. The construction of the pumped storage plant (PSP) Cierny Vah started in 1976 and it was put into operation at the end of 1980. The main goal of the PSP Cierny Vah is to meet the control functions of an electrification system of the Slovak Republic, a substitute function in the cases of unexpected power outages and a planned electricity production from re-pumping. Technological parts are: six re-pumping vertical HGS in a three machine arrangement - a motor-generator, a turbine, a pump - are located in three double-blocks. Basic technical data: installed capacity 6 x 122.4 MW + 0.768 MW, yearly production 1,281 GWh, number of HGS 6, number of domestic hydroelectric generating sets 1, turbine flow 3 x 30 m{sup /}s, pump flow 6 x 22 m{sup 3}/s, upper reservoir volume 3.7 mil. m{sup 3}, max. head 434 m, peak time 5.71 hour, pumping time 7.78 hour, re-pumping cycle efficiency 74.36%. From putting the PSP into operation till the end of 1996, the HGS in operation 145,269 hours in total, including 53,332 hours in a turbine mode of operation, 70,293 hours in a pumping mode operation and 21,644 hours in a compensation mode operation. Whereas they supplied 5,346 GWh in the mains and the consumed 6,933 GWh of electricity for pumping. Hydroenergetic potential is a primary source of energy which is recyclable, i.e. unexhaustible and also ecologically the

  11. Primary structure of the hemoglobin beta-chain of rose-ringed parakeet (Psittacula krameri).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, A; Persson, B; Zaidi, Z H; Jörnvall, H

    1989-08-01

    The primary structure of Rose-ringed Parakeet hemoglobin beta-chain was established, completing the analysis of this hemoglobin. Comparison with other avian beta-chains show variations smaller than those for the corresponding alpha-chains. There are 11 amino acid exchanges in relationship to the only other characterized psittaciform beta-chain, and a total of 35 positions are affected by differences among all avian beta-chains analyzed (versus 61 for the alpha-chains). At three positions, the Psittacula beta-chain has residues unique to this species. Three alpha 1 beta 1 contacts are modified, by substitutions at positions beta 51, beta 116, and beta 125.

  12. Structural brain alterations in primary open angle glaucoma: a 3T MRI study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jieqiong; Li, Ting; Sabel, Bernhard A.; Chen, Zhiqiang; Wen, Hongwei; Li, Jianhong; Xie, Xiaobin; Yang, Diya; Chen, Weiwei; Wang, Ningli; Xian, Junfang; He, Huiguang

    2016-01-01

    Glaucoma is not only an eye disease but is also associated with degeneration of brain structures. We now investigated the pattern of visual and non-visual brain structural changes in 25 primary open angle glaucoma (POAG) patients and 25 age-gender-matched normal controls using T1-weighted imaging. MRI images were subjected to volume-based analysis (VBA) and surface-based analysis (SBA) in the whole brain as well as ROI-based analysis of the lateral geniculate nucleus (LGN), visual cortex (V1/2), amygdala and hippocampus. While VBA showed no significant differences in the gray matter volumes of patients, SBA revealed significantly reduced cortical thickness in the right frontal pole and ROI-based analysis volume shrinkage in LGN bilaterally, right V1 and left amygdala. Structural abnormalities were correlated with clinical parameters in a subset of the patients revealing that the left LGN volume was negatively correlated with bilateral cup-to-disk ratio (CDR), the right LGN volume was positively correlated with the mean deviation of the right visual hemifield, and the right V1 cortical thickness was negatively correlated with the right CDR in glaucoma. These results demonstrate that POAG affects both vision-related structures and non-visual cortical regions. Moreover, alterations of the brain visual structures reflect the clinical severity of glaucoma. PMID:26743811

  13. A microfluidic device for study of the effect of tumor vascular structures on the flow field and HepG2 cellular flow behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ke, Ming; Cai, Shaoxi; Zou, Misha; Zhao, Yi; Li, Bo; Chen, Sijia; Chen, Longcong

    2018-01-29

    To build a microfluidic device with various morphological features of the tumor vasculature for study of the effects of tumor vascular structures on the flow field and tumor cellular flow behaviors. The designed microfluidic device was able to approximatively simulate the in vivo structures of tumor vessels and the flow within it. In this models, the influences of the angle of bifurcation, the number of branches, and the narrow channels on the flow field and the influence of vorticity on the retention of HepG2 cells were significant. Additionally, shear stress below physiological conditions of blood circulation has considerable effect on the formation of the lumen-like structures (LLSs) of HepG2 cells. These results can provide some data and reference in the understanding of the interaction between hemorheological properties and tumor vascular structures in solid tumors. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  14. Passive control of flow structure interaction between a sphere and free-surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akilli Huseyin

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Flow characteristics for both a smooth and a vented sphere such as velocity vectors, patterns of streamlines, vorticity contours, stream-wise fluctuations, cross-stream velocity fluctuations and Reynolds stress correlations between a sphere and free-surface for various submerged ratio at Re =5,000 are studied by using dye visualization and the particle image velocimetry technique. Passive control of flow structure interaction between sphere and free surface was examined by using a modified geometry which has a 15% sphere diameter hole passing through the sphere equator. Both of the spheres were separately placed beneath the free surface with different positions from touching to the free surface to two sphere diameters below the free surface. It is demonstrated that reattachment point of the separated flow to the free surface varies for both of the sphere cases as the sphere position alters vertically through the water flow while the flow structure for the vented sphere occurs considerably symmetrical due to forming of a pair of counter-rotating ring vortices.

  15. Two-dimensional flow characteristics of wave interactions with a free-rolling rectangular structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwang Hyo Jung; Kuang-An Chang [Texas A and M University, College Station, TX (United States). Dept. of Civil Engineering; Huang, E.T. [Naval Facilities Engineering Service Center, Port Hueneme, CA (United States). Amphibious System Div.

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents laboratory observations of flow characteristics for regular waves passing a rectangular structure in a two-dimensional wave tank. The structure with a draft one-half of its height was hinged at the center of gravity and free to roll (one degree of freedom) by waves. Particle image velocimetry (PIV) was used to measure the velocity field in the vicinity of the structure. The mean velocity and turbulence properties were obtained by phase-averaging the PIV velocity maps from repeated test runs. Since the viscous damping (also called the eddy making damping) in a vortical flow affects the roll motion of a blunt body, the quantitative flow pattern was represented to elucidate the coupled interactions between the body motion and the waves. Additionally, the turbulence properties including the turbulence length scale and the turbulent kinetic energy budget were investigated to characterize the interactions. The results show that vortices were generated near the structure corners at locations opposing to that of the roll damping effect for waves with a period longer than the roll natural period of the structure. (Author)

  16. Identification and the primary structure of equine alpha-lactalbumin B and C (Equus caballus, Perissodactyla).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godovac-Zimmermann, J; Shaw, D; Conti, A; McKenzie, H

    1987-04-01

    The presence of two new alpha-lactalbumins has been demonstrated in the colostrum of a single mare (Equus caballus, Persian Arab). They have been designated equine alpha-lactalbumin B and C, and that isolated previously from the milk of Australian horses (English Thoroughbred) as alpha-lactalbumin A. The primary structures of B/C have been determined by automatic Edman degradation of enzymatic cleavage of the oxidized protein. Cyanogen bromide cleavage of S-carbamoyl-methylated protein provided necessary overlapping peptides. Comparison of the sequences of B and C with that of A indicates 3 and 4 amino-acid exchanges, respectively. The phylogenetic difference of equine alpha-lactalbumin B/C from bovine alpha-lactalbumin B is indicated by 39 and 40 amino-acid exchanges, respectively. The structure-function relationship, calcium binding sites and variants of alpha-lactalbumin are discussed.

  17. Correlative studies of structural and functional imaging in primary progressive aphasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panegyres, P K; McCarthy, M; Campbell, A; Lenzo, N; Fallon, M; Thompson, J

    2008-01-01

    To compare and contrast structural and functional imaging in primary progressive aphasia (PPA). A cohort of 8 patients diagnosed with PPA presenting with nonfluency were prospectively evaluated. All patients had structural imaging in the form of MRI and in 1 patient CAT scanning on account of a cardiac pacemaker. All patients had single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and positron emission tomography (PET) imaging. SPECT and PET imaging had 100% correlation. Anatomical imaging was abnormal in only 6 of the 8 patients. Wernicke's area showed greater peak Z score reduction and extent of area affected than Broca's area (McNemar paired test: P = .008 for Z score reduction; P = .0003 for extent). PET scanning revealed significant involvement of the anterior cingulum. Functional imaging in PPA: (a) identified more patients correctly than anatomic imaging highlighting the importance of SPECT and PET in the diagnosis; and (b) demonstrated the heterogeneous involvement of disordered linguistic networks in PPA suggesting its syndromic nature.

  18. Magnetic field structure influence on primary electron cusp losses for micro-scale discharges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dankongkakul, Ben; Araki, Samuel J.; Wirz, Richard E.

    2014-01-01

    An experimental effort was used to examine the primary electron loss behavior for micro-scale (≲3 cm diameter) discharges. The experiment uses an electron flood gun source and an axially aligned arrangement of ring-cusps to guide the electrons to a downstream point cusp. Measurements of the electron current collected at the point cusp show an unexpectedly complex loss pattern with azimuthally periodic structures. Additionally, in contrast to conventional theory for cusp losses, the overall radii of the measured collection areas are over an order of magnitude larger than the electron gyroradius. Comparing these results to Monte Carlo particle tracking simulations and a simplified analytical analysis shows that azimuthal asymmetries of the magnetic field far upstream of the collection surface can substantially affect the electron loss structure and overall loss area

  19. Measurement of tonal-noise characteristics and periodic flow structure around NACA0018 airfoil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakano, T.; Fujisawa, N. [Niigata University, Department Mechanical Engineering, Niigata (Japan); Lee, S. [Inha University, Department Mechanical Engineering, Incheon (Korea)

    2006-03-15

    The characteristics of tonal noise and the variations of flow structure around NACA0018 airfoil in a uniform flow are studied by means of simultaneous measurement of noise and velocity field by particle-image velocimetry to understand the generation mechanism of tonal noise. Measurements are made on the noise characteristics, the phase-averaged velocity field with respect to the noise signal, and the cross-correlation contour of velocity fluctuations and noise signal. These experimental results indicate that the tonal noise is generated from the periodic vortex structure on the pressure surface of the airfoil near the trailing edge of the airfoil. It is found that the vortex structure is highly correlated with the noise signal, which indicates the presence of noise-source distribution on the pressure surface. The vorticity distribution on the pressure surface breaks down near the trailing edge of the airfoil and forms a staggered vortex street in the wake of the airfoil. (orig.)

  20. Understanding characteristics in multivariate traffic flow time series from complex network structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Ying; Zhang, Shen; Tang, Jinjun; Wang, Xiaofei

    2017-07-01

    Discovering dynamic characteristics in traffic flow is the significant step to design effective traffic managing and controlling strategy for relieving traffic congestion in urban cities. A new method based on complex network theory is proposed to study multivariate traffic flow time series. The data were collected from loop detectors on freeway during a year. In order to construct complex network from original traffic flow, a weighted Froenius norm is adopt to estimate similarity between multivariate time series, and Principal Component Analysis is implemented to determine the weights. We discuss how to select optimal critical threshold for networks at different hour in term of cumulative probability distribution of degree. Furthermore, two statistical properties of networks: normalized network structure entropy and cumulative probability of degree, are utilized to explore hourly variation in traffic flow. The results demonstrate these two statistical quantities express similar pattern to traffic flow parameters with morning and evening peak hours. Accordingly, we detect three traffic states: trough, peak and transitional hours, according to the correlation between two aforementioned properties. The classifying results of states can actually represent hourly fluctuation in traffic flow by analyzing annual average hourly values of traffic volume, occupancy and speed in corresponding hours.

  1. ACCELEROMETERS IN FLOW FIELDS: A STRUCTURAL ANALYSIS OF THE CHOPPED DUMMY INPILE TUBE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Howard, T. K.; Marcum, W. R.; Latimer, G. D.; Weiss, A.; Jones, W. F.; Phillips, A. M.; Woolstenhulme, N.; Holdaway, K.; Campbell, J.

    2016-06-01

    Four tests characterizing the structural response of the Chopped-Dummy In-Pile tube (CDIPT) experiment design were measured in the Hydro-Mechanical Fuel Test Facility (HMFTF). Four different test configurations were tried. These configurations tested the pressure drop and flow impact of various plate configurations and flow control orifices to be used later at different reactor power levels. Accelerometers were placed on the test vehicle and flow simulation housing. A total of five accelerometers were used with one on the top and bottom of the flow simulator and vehicle, and one on the outside of the flow simulator. Data were collected at a series of flow rates for 5 seconds each at an acquisition rate of 2 kHz for a Nyquist frequency of 1 kHz. The data were then analyzed using a Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) algorithm. The results show very coherent vibrations of the CDIPT experiment on the order of 50 Hz in frequency and 0.01 m/s2 in magnitude. The coherent vibrations, although small in magnitude pose a potential design problem if the frequencies coincide with the natural frequency of the fueled plates or test vehicle. The accelerometer data was integrated and combined to create a 3D trace of the experiment during the test. The merits of this data as well as further anomalies and artifacts are also discussed as well as their relation to the instrumentation and experiment design.

  2. Simulation of the effect of defence structures on granular flows using SPH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Lachamp

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the SPH (Smoothed Particles Hydrodynamics numerical method adapted to complex rheology and free surface flow. It has been developed to simulate the local effect of a simple obstacle on a granular flow. We have introduced this specific rheology to the classical formalism of the method and thanks to experimental devices, we were able to validate the results. Two viscosity values have been simultaneously computed to simulate "plugs" and "dead zone" with the same code. First, some experiments have been done on a simple inclined slope to show the accuracy of the numerical results. We have fixed the mass flow rate to see the variations of the flow depth according to the channel slope. Then we put a weir to block the flow and we analysed the dependence between the obstacle height and the length of influence upstream from the obstacle. After having shown that numerical results were consistent, we have studied speed profiles and pressure impact on the structure. Also results with any topography will be presented. This will have a great interest to study real flow over natural topography while using the model for decision help.

  3. Structural Changes of International Trade Flows under the Impact of Globalization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anca Dachin

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Structural changes of international trade flows indicate modifications in competitiveness of countries, in terms of production, technological upgrading and exports under the pressure of globalization. The paper aims to point out sources of competitive advantages especially in manufacturing exports of different groups of countries. The focus is on the shifts in the structure of manufacturing in the European Union and their effects on international rankings in export performances. An important issue refers to the opportunities given by the enlargement of the European Union and their impact on EU trade structures.

  4. Time-Dependent Thermally-Driven Interfacial Flows in Multilayered Fluid Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haj-Hariri, Hossein; Borhan, A.

    1996-01-01

    A computational study of thermally-driven convection in multilayered fluid structures will be performed to examine the effect of interactions among deformable fluid-fluid interfaces on the structure of time-dependent flow in these systems. Multilayered fluid structures in two models configurations will be considered: the differentially heated rectangular cavity with a free surface, and the encapsulated cylindrical liquid bridge. An extension of a numerical method developed as part of our recent NASA Fluid Physics grant will be used to account for finite deformations of fluid-fluid interfaces.

  5. Cine magnetic resonance imaging for evaluation of cardiac structure and flow dynamics in congenital heart disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akagi, Teiji; Kiyomatsu, Yumi; Ohara, Nobutoshi; Takagi, Junichi; Sato, Noboru; Kato, Hirohisa; Eto, Takaharu.

    1989-01-01

    Cine magnetic resonance imaging (Cine MRI) was performed in 20 patients aged 19 days to 13 years (mean 4.0 years), who had congenital heart disease confirmed at echocardiography or angiography. Prior to cine MRI, gated MRI was performed to evaluate for cardiac structure. Cine MRI was demonstrated by fast low fip angle shot imaging technique with a 30deg flip angle, 15 msec echo time, 30-40 msec pulse repetition time, and 128 x 128 acquisition matrix. Abnormalities of cardiac structure were extremely well defined in all patients by gated MRI. Intracardiac or intravascular blood flow were visualized in 17 (85%) of 20 patients by cine MRI. Left to right shunt flow through ventricular septal defect, atrial septal defect, and endocardial cushion defect were visualized with low signal intensity area. Low intensity jets flow through the site of re-coarctation of the aorta were also visualized. However, the good recording of cine MRI was not obtained because of artifacts in 3 of 20 patients (15%) who had severe congestive heart failure or respiratory arrhythmia. Gated MRI provides excellent visualization of fine structure, and cine MRI can provide high spatial resolution imaging of flow dynamic in a variety of congenital heart disease, noninvasively. (author)

  6. Modification of near-wall coherent structures in polymer drag reduced flow: simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubief, Yves; White, Christopher; Shaqfeh, Eric; Moin, Parviz; Lele, Sanjiva

    2002-11-01

    Polymer drag reduced flows are investigated through direct numerical simulations of viscoelastic flows. The solver for the viscoelastic model (FENE-P) is based on higher-order finite difference schemes and a novel implicit time integration method. Its robustness allows the simulation of all drag reduction (DR) regimes from the onset to the maximum drag reduction (MDR). It also permits the use of realistic polymer length and concentration. The maximum polymer extension in our simulation matches that of a polystyrene molecule of 10^6 molecular weight. Two distinct regimes of polymer drag reduced flows are observed: at low drag reduction (LDR, DR< 40-50%), the near-wall structure is essentially similar to Newtonian wall turbulence whereas the high drag reduction regime (HDR, DR from 40-50% to MDR) shows significant differences in the organization of the coherent structures. The 3D information provided by numerical simulations allows the determination of the interaction of polymers and near-wall coherent structures. To isolate the contribution of polymers in the viscous sublayer, the buffer and the outer region of the flow, numerical experiments are performed where the polymer concentration is varied in the wall-normal direction. Finally a mechanism of polymer drag reduction derived from our results and PIV measurements is discussed.

  7. Two-phase flow stability structure in a natural circulation system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Zhiwei [Nuclear Engineering Laboratory Zurich (Switzerland)

    1995-09-01

    The present study reports a numerical analysis of two-phase flow stability structures in a natural circulation system with two parallel, heated channels. The numerical model is derived, based on the Galerkin moving nodal method. This analysis is related to some design options applicable to integral heating reactors with a slightly-boiling operation mode, and is also of general interest to similar facilities. The options include: (1) Symmetric heating and throttling; (2) Asymmetric heating and symmetric throttling; (3) Asymmetric heating and throttling. The oscillation modes for these variants are discussed. Comparisons with the data from the INET two-phase flow stability experiment have qualitatively validated the present analysis.

  8. Swirl effect on flow structure and mixing in a turbulent jet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kravtsov, Z. D.; Sharaborin, D. K.; Dulin, V. M.

    2018-03-01

    The paper reports on experimental study of turbulent transport in the initial region of swirling turbulent jets. The particle image velocimetry and planar laser-induced fluorescence techniques are used to investigate the flow structure and passive scalar concentration, respectively, in free air jet with acetone vapor. Three flow cases are considered, viz., non-swirling jets and swirling jets with and without vortex breakdown and central recirculation zone. Without vortex breakdown, the swirl is shown to promote jet mixing with surrounding air and to decrease the jet core length. The vortex core breakdown further enhances mixing as the jet core disintegrates at the nozzle exit.

  9. Field Investigation of Flow Structure and Channel Morphology at Confluent-Meander Bends

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley, J. D.; Rhoads, B. L.

    2007-12-01

    The movement of water and sediment through drainage networks is inevitably influenced by the convergence of streams and rivers at channel confluences. These focal components of fluvial systems produce a complex hydrodynamic environment, where rapid changes in flow structure and sediment transport occur to accommodate the merging of separate channel flows. The inherent geometric and hydraulic change at confluences also initiates the development of distinct geomorphic features, reflected in the bedform and shape of the channel. An underlying assumption of previous experimental and theoretical models of confluence dynamics has been that converging streams have straight channels with angular configurations. This generalized conceptualization was necessary to establish confluence planform as symmetrical or asymmetrical and to describe subsequent flow structure and geomorphic features at confluences. However, natural channels, particularly those of meandering rivers, curve and bend. This property and observation of channel curvature at natural junctions have led to the hypothesis that natural stream and river confluences tend to occur on the concave outer bank of meander bends. The resulting confluence planform, referred to as a confluent-meander bend, was observed over a century ago but has received little scientific attention. This paper examines preliminary data on three-dimensional flow structure and channel morphology at two natural confluent-meander bends of varying size and with differing tributary entrance locations. The large river confluence of the Vermilion River and Wabash River in west central Indiana and the comparatively small junction of the Little Wabash River and Big Muddy Creek in southeastern Illinois are the location of study sites for field investigation. Measurements of time-averaged three-dimensional velocity components were obtained at these confluences with an acoustic Doppler current profiler for flow events with differing momentum ratios. Bed

  10. Development of a flow structure interaction methodology applicable to a convertible car roof

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knight, Jason J.

    2003-01-01

    The current research investigates the flow-induced deformation of a convertible roof of a vehicle using experimental and numerical methods. A computational methodology is developed that entails the coupling of a commercial Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) code with an in-house structural code. A model two-dimensional problem is first studied. The CFD code and a Source Panel Method (SPM) code are used to predict the pressure acting on the surface of a rigid roof of a scale model. Good agreement is found between predicted pressure distribution and that obtained in a parallel wind-tunnel experimental programme. The validated computational modelling of the fluid flow is then used in a coupling strategy with a line-element structural model that incorporates initial slackness of the flexible roof material. The computed flow-structure interaction yields stable solutions, the aerodynamically loaded flexible roof settling into static equilibrium. The effects of slackness and material properties on deformation and convergence are investigated using the coupled code. The three-dimensional problem is addressed by extending the two-dimensional structural solver to represent a surface by a matrix of line elements with constant tension along their length. This has been successfully coupled with the three-dimensional CFD flow-solution technique. Computed deformations show good agreement with the results of wind tunnel experiments for the well prescribed geometry. In both two-and three-dimensional computations, the flow-structure interaction is found to yield a static deformation to within 1% difference in the displacement variable after three iterations between the fluid and structural codes. The same computational methodology is applied to a real-car application using a third-party structural solver. The methodology is shown to be robust even under conditions beyond those likely to be encountered. The full methodology could be used as a design tool. The present work

  11. Outgassing of Out-of-Autoclave Composite Primary Structures for Small Satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komus, Alastair

    Out-of-autoclave vacuum-bagged-only (VBO) processing is capable of producing lower cost composite primary structures for small satellites than autoclave processing. However, the outgassing performance of VBO structures in a vacuum environment has not been examined. Panels were manufactured from CYCOM 5320-1 and TC275-1 carbon fiber/epoxy prepreg using VBO processing. The humidity level, pre-cure dwell time, and cure cycle parameters were varied during manufacturing. The degree of cure and glass transition temperature were shown to increase with increasing oven temperature. Processing humidity levels and the length of pre-cure dwell times had no discernable effect on the total mass loss (TML) and collected volatile condensable material (CVCM) that were outgassed under vacuum. Instead the TML was controlled by moisture saturation after manufacturing. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy showed that epoxy oligomers were the primary CVCM. The study showed the VBO laminates had outgassing values that were comparable to the autoclave-cured laminates.

  12. Impacts of temperature on primary productivity and respiration in naturally structured macroalgal assemblages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leigh W Tait

    Full Text Available Rising global temperatures caused by human-mediated change has already triggered significant responses in organismal physiology, distribution and ecosystem functioning. Although the effects of rising temperature on the physiology of individual organisms are well understood, the effect on community-wide processes has remained elusive. The fixation of carbon via primary productivity is an essential ecosystem function and any shifts in the balance of primary productivity and respiration could alter the carbon balance of ecosystems. Here we show through a series of tests that respiration of naturally structured algal assemblages in southern New Zealand greatly increases with rising temperature, with implications for net primary productivity (NPP. The NPP of in situ macroalgal assemblages was minimally affected by natural temperature variation, possibly through photo-acclimation or temperature acclimation responses, but respiration rates and compensating irradiance were negatively affected. However, laboratory experiments testing the impacts of rising temperature on several photosynthetic parameters showed a decline in NPP, increasing respiration rates and increasing compensating irradiance. The respiration Q10 of laboratory assemblages (the difference in metabolic rates over 10°C averaged 2.9 compared to a Q10 of 2 often seen in other autotrophs. However, gross primary productivity (GPP Q10 averaged 2, indicating that respiration was more severely affected by rising temperature. Furthermore, combined high irradiance and high temperature caused photoinhibition in the laboratory, and resulted in 50% lower NPP at high irradiance. Our study shows that communities may be more severely affected by rising global temperatures than would be expected by responses of individual species. In particular, enhanced respiration rates and rising compensation points have the potential to greatly affect the carbon balance of macroalgal assemblages through declines in

  13. Effect of short-chain branching on interfacial polymer structure and dynamics under shear flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Sohdam; Kim, Jun Mo; Cho, Soowon; Baig, Chunggi

    2017-11-22

    We present a detailed analysis on the effect of short-chain branches on the structure and dynamics of interfacial chains using atomistic nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulations of confined polyethylene melts in a wide range of shear rates. The intrinsically fast random motions of the short branches constantly disturb the overall chain conformation, leading to a more compact and less deformed chain structure of the short-chain branched (SCB) polymer against the imposed flow field in comparison with the corresponding linear polymer. Moreover, such highly mobile short branches along the backbone of the SCB polymer lead to relatively weaker out-of-plane wagging dynamics of interfacial chains, with highly curvy backbone structures in the intermediate flow regime. In conjunction with the contribution of short branches (as opposed to that of the backbone) to the total interfacial friction between the chains and the wall, the SCB polymer shows a nearly constant behavior in the degree of slip (d s ) with respect to shear rate in the weak-to-intermediate flow regimes. On the contrary, in the strong flow regime where irregular chain rotation and tumbling dynamics occur via intensive dynamical collisions between interfacial chains and the wall, an enhancement effect on the chain detachment from the wall, caused by short branches, leads to a steeper increase in d s for the SCB polymer than for the linear polymer. Remarkably, the SCB chains at the interface exhibit two distinct types of rolling mechanisms along the backbone, with a half-dumbbell mesoscopic structure at strong flow fields, in addition to the typical hairpin-like tumbling behavior displayed by the linear chains.

  14. A Parallel Multiblock Structured Grid Method with Automated Interblocked Unstructured Grids for Chemically Reacting Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiegel, Seth Christian

    An automated method for using unstructured grids to patch non- C0 interfaces between structured blocks has been developed in conjunction with a finite-volume method for solving chemically reacting flows on unstructured grids. Although the standalone unstructured solver, FVFLO-NCSU, is capable of resolving flows for high-speed aeropropulsion devices with complex geometries, unstructured-mesh algorithms are inherently inefficient when compared to their structured counterparts. However, the advantages of structured algorithms in developing a flow solution in a timely manner can be negated by the amount of time required to develop a mesh for complex geometries. The global domain can be split up into numerous smaller blocks during the grid-generation process to alleviate some of the difficulties in creating these complex meshes. An even greater abatement can be found by allowing the nodes on abutting block interfaces to be nonmatching or non-C 0 continuous. One code capable of solving chemically reacting flows on these multiblock grids is VULCAN, which uses a nonconservative approach for patching non-C0 block interfaces. The developed automated unstructured-grid patching algorithm has been installed within VULCAN to provide it the capability of a fully conservative approach for patching non-C0 block interfaces. Additionally, the FVFLO-NCSU solver algorithms have been deeply intertwined with the VULCAN source code to solve chemically reacting flows on these unstructured patches. Finally, the CGNS software library was added to the VULCAN postprocessor so structured and unstructured data can be stored in a single compact file. This final upgrade to VULCAN has been successfully installed and verified using test cases with particular interest towards those involving grids with non- C0 block interfaces.

  15. Thermo-mechanical cyclic testing of carbon-carbon primary structure for an SSTO vehicle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croop, Harold C.; Leger, Kenneth B.; Lowndes, Holland B.; Hahn, Steven E.; Barthel, Chris A.

    1999-01-01

    An advanced carbon-carbon structural component is being experimentally evaluated for use as primary load carrying structure for future single-stage-to-orbit (SSTO) vehicles. The component is a wing torque box section featuring an advanced, three-spar design. This design features 3D-woven, angle-interlock skins, 3D integrally woven spar webs and caps, oxidation inhibited matrix, chemical vapor deposited (CVD) oxidation protection coating, and ceramic matrix composite fasteners. The box spar caps are nested into the skins which, when processed together through the carbon-carbon processing cycle, resulted in monolithic box halves. The box half sections were then joined at the spar web intersections using ceramic matrix composite fasteners. This method of fabrication eliminated fasteners through both the upper and lower skins. Development of the carbon-carbon wing box structure was accomplished in a four phase design and fabrication effort, conducted by Boeing, Information, Space and Defense Systems, Seattle, WA, under contract to the Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL). The box is now set up for testing and will soon begin cyclic loads testing in the AFRL Structural Test Facility at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base (WPAFB), OH. This paper discusses the latest test setup accomplishments and the results of the pre-cyclic loads testing performed to date.

  16. Relating the Structure of Noise Correlations in Macaque Primary Visual Cortex to Decoder Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Or P. Mendels

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Noise correlations in neuronal responses can have a strong influence on the information available in large populations. In addition, the structure of noise correlations may have a great impact on the utility of different algorithms to extract this information that may depend on the specific algorithm, and hence may affect our understanding of population codes in the brain. Thus, a better understanding of the structure of noise correlations and their interplay with different readout algorithms is required. Here we use eigendecomposition to investigate the structure of noise correlations in populations of about 50–100 simultaneously recorded neurons in the primary visual cortex of anesthetized monkeys, and we relate this structure to the performance of two common decoders: the population vector and the optimal linear estimator. Our analysis reveals a non-trivial correlation structure, in which the eigenvalue spectrum is composed of several distinct large eigenvalues that represent different shared modes of fluctuation extending over most of the population, and a semi-continuous tail. The largest eigenvalue represents a uniform collective mode of fluctuation. The second and third eigenvalues typically show either a clear functional (i.e., dependent on the preferred orientation of the neurons or spatial structure (i.e., dependent on the physical position of the neurons. We find that the number of shared modes increases with the population size, being roughly 10% of that size. Furthermore, we find that the noise in each of these collective modes grows linearly with the population. This linear growth of correlated noise power can have limiting effects on the utility of averaging neuronal responses across large populations, depending on the readout. Specifically, the collective modes of fluctuation limit the accuracy of the population vector but not of the optimal linear estimator.

  17. Controlling Heat Transport and Flow Structures in Thermal Turbulence Using Ratchet Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Hechuan; Zhu, Xiaojue; Mathai, Varghese; Verzicco, Roberto; Lohse, Detlef; Sun, Chao

    2018-01-01

    In this combined experimental and numerical study on thermally driven turbulence in a rectangular cell, the global heat transport and the coherent flow structures are controlled with an asymmetric ratchetlike roughness on the top and bottom plates. We show that, by means of symmetry breaking due to the presence of the ratchet structures on the conducting plates, the orientation of the large scale circulation roll (LSCR) can be locked to a preferred direction even when the cell is perfectly leveled out. By introducing a small tilt to the system, we show that the LSCR orientation can be tuned and controlled. The two different orientations of LSCR give two quite different heat transport efficiencies, indicating that heat transport is sensitive to the LSCR direction over the asymmetric roughness structure. Through a quantitative analysis of the dynamics of thermal plume emissions and the orientation of the LSCR over the asymmetric structure, we provide a physical explanation for these findings. The current work has important implications for passive and active flow control in engineering, biofluid dynamics, and geophysical flows.

  18. Passive control of coherent structures in a modified backwards-facing step flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ormonde, Pedro C.; Cavalieri, André V. G.; Silva, Roberto G. A. da; Avelar, Ana C.

    2018-05-01

    We study a modified backwards-facing step flow, with the addition of two different plates; one is a baseline, impermeable plate and the second a perforated one. An experimental investigation is carried out for a turbulent reattaching shear layer downstream of the two plates. The proposed setup is a model configuration to study how the plate characteristics affect the separated shear layer and how turbulent kinetic energies and large-scale coherent structures are modified. Measurements show that the perforated plate changes the mean flow field, mostly by reducing the intensity of reverse flow close to the bottom wall. Disturbance amplitudes are significantly reduced up to five step heights downstream of the trailing edge of the plate, more specifically in the recirculation region. A loudspeaker is then used to introduce phase-locked, low-amplitude perturbations upstream of the plates, and phase-averaged measurements allow a quantitative study of large-scale structures in the shear-layer. The evolution of such coherent structures is evaluated in light of linear stability theory, comparing the eigenfunction of the Kelvin-Helmholtz mode to the experimental results. We observe a close match of linear-stability eigenfunctions with phase-averaged amplitudes for the two tested Strouhal numbers. The perforated plate is found to reduce the amplitude of the Kelvin-Helmholtz coherent structures in comparison to the baseline, impermeable plate, a behavior consistent with the predicted amplification trends from linear stability.

  19. Numerical Investigation of the Flow Structure in a Kaplan Draft Tube at Part Load

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maddahian, R.; Cervantes, M. J.; Sotoudeh, N.

    2016-11-01

    This research presents numerical simulation of the unsteady flow field inside the draft tube of a Kaplan turbine at part load condition. Due to curvature of streamlines, the ordinary two-equations turbulence models fail to predict the flow features. Therefore, a modification of the Shear Stress Transport (SST-SAS) model is utilized to approximate the turbulent stresses. A guide vane, complete runner and draft tube are considered to insure the real boundary conditions at the draft tube inlet. The outlet boundary is assumed to discharge into the atmosphere. The obtained pressure fluctuations inside the draft tube are in good agreement with available experimental data. In order to further investigate the RVR formation and its movement, the λ2 criterion, relating the position of the vortex core and strength to the second largest Eigen value of the velocity gradient tensor, is employed. The method used for vortex identification shows the flow structure and vortex motion inside the draft tube accurately.

  20. Interfacial structures of confined air-water two-phase bubbly flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, S.; Ishii, M.; Wu, Q.; McCreary, D.; Beus, S.G.

    2000-08-01

    The interfacial structure of the two-phase flows is of great importance in view of theoretical modeling and practical applications. In the present study, the focus is made on obtaining detailed local two-phase parameters in the air-water bubbly flow in a rectangular vertical duct using the double-sensor conductivity probe. The characteristic wall-peak is observed in the profiles of the interracial area concentration and the void fraction. The development of the interfacial area concentration along the axial direction of the flow is studied in view of the interfacial area transport and bubble interactions. The experimental data is compared with the drift flux model with C{sub 0} = 1.35.

  1. Interfacial structures of confined air-water two-phase bubbly flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, S.; Ishii, M.; Wu, Q.; McCreary, D.; Beus, S.G.

    2000-01-01

    The interfacial structure of the two-phase flows is of great importance in view of theoretical modeling and practical applications. In the present study, the focus is made on obtaining detailed local two-phase parameters in the air-water bubbly flow in a rectangular vertical duct using the double-sensor conductivity probe. The characteristic wall-peak is observed in the profiles of the interracial area concentration and the void fraction. The development of the interfacial area concentration along the axial direction of the flow is studied in view of the interfacial area transport and bubble interactions. The experimental data is compared with the drift flux model with C 0 = 1.35

  2. A theory of self-organized zonal flow with fine radial structure in tokamak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Y. Z.; Liu, Z. Y.; Xie, T.; Mahajan, S. M.; Liu, J.

    2017-12-01

    The (low frequency) zonal flow-ion temperature gradient (ITG) wave system, constructed on Braginskii's fluid model in tokamak, is shown to be a reaction-diffusion-advection system; it is derived by making use of a multiple spatiotemporal scale technique and two-dimensional (2D) ballooning theory. For real regular group velocities of ITG waves, two distinct temporal processes, sharing a very similar meso-scale radial structure, are identified in the nonlinear self-organized stage. The stationary and quasi-stationary structures reflect a particular feature of the poloidal group velocity. The equation set posed to be an initial value problem is numerically solved for JET low mode parameters; the results are presented in several figures and two movies that show the spatiotemporal evolutions as well as the spectrum analysis—frequency-wave number spectrum, auto power spectrum, and Lissajous diagram. This approach reveals that the zonal flow in tokamak is a local traveling wave. For the quasi-stationary process, the cycle of ITG wave energy is composed of two consecutive phases in distinct spatiotemporal structures: a pair of Cavitons growing and breathing slowly without long range propagation, followed by a sudden decay into many Instantons that carry negative wave energy rapidly into infinity. A spotlight onto the motion of Instantons for a given radial position reproduces a Blob-Hole temporal structure; the occurrence as well as the rapid decay of Caviton into Instantons is triggered by zero-crossing of radial group velocity. A sample of the radial profile of zonal flow contributed from 31 nonlinearly coupled rational surfaces near plasma edge is found to be very similar to that observed in the JET Ohmic phase [J. C. Hillesheim et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 116, 165002 (2016)]. The theory predicts an interior asymmetric dipole structure associated with the zonal flow that is driven by the gradients of ITG turbulence intensity.

  3. Form and function in hillslope hydrology: in situ imaging and characterization of flow-relevant structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Jackisch

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The study deals with the identification and characterization of rapid subsurface flow structures through pedo- and geo-physical measurements and irrigation experiments at the point, plot and hillslope scale. Our investigation of flow-relevant structures and hydrological responses refers to the general interplay of form and function, respectively. To obtain a holistic picture of the subsurface, a large set of different laboratory, exploratory and experimental methods was used at the different scales. For exploration these methods included drilled soil core profiles, in situ measurements of infiltration capacity and saturated hydraulic conductivity, and laboratory analyses of soil water retention and saturated hydraulic conductivity. The irrigation experiments at the plot scale were monitored through a combination of dye tracer, salt tracer, soil moisture dynamics, and 3-D time-lapse ground penetrating radar (GPR methods. At the hillslope scale the subsurface was explored by a 3-D GPR survey. A natural storm event and an irrigation experiment were monitored by a dense network of soil moisture observations and a cascade of 2-D time-lapse GPR trenches. We show that the shift between activated and non-activated state of the flow paths is needed to distinguish structures from overall heterogeneity. Pedo-physical analyses of point-scale samples are the basis for sub-scale structure inference. At the plot and hillslope scale 3-D and 2-D time-lapse GPR applications are successfully employed as non-invasive means to image subsurface response patterns and to identify flow-relevant paths. Tracer recovery and soil water responses from irrigation experiments deliver a consistent estimate of response velocities. The combined observation of form and function under active conditions provides the means to localize and characterize the structures (this study and the hydrological processes (companion study Angermann et al., 2017, this issue.

  4. Form and function in hillslope hydrology: in situ imaging and characterization of flow-relevant structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackisch, Conrad; Angermann, Lisa; Allroggen, Niklas; Sprenger, Matthias; Blume, Theresa; Tronicke, Jens; Zehe, Erwin

    2017-07-01

    The study deals with the identification and characterization of rapid subsurface flow structures through pedo- and geo-physical measurements and irrigation experiments at the point, plot and hillslope scale. Our investigation of flow-relevant structures and hydrological responses refers to the general interplay of form and function, respectively. To obtain a holistic picture of the subsurface, a large set of different laboratory, exploratory and experimental methods was used at the different scales. For exploration these methods included drilled soil core profiles, in situ measurements of infiltration capacity and saturated hydraulic conductivity, and laboratory analyses of soil water retention and saturated hydraulic conductivity. The irrigation experiments at the plot scale were monitored through a combination of dye tracer, salt tracer, soil moisture dynamics, and 3-D time-lapse ground penetrating radar (GPR) methods. At the hillslope scale the subsurface was explored by a 3-D GPR survey. A natural storm event and an irrigation experiment were monitored by a dense network of soil moisture observations and a cascade of 2-D time-lapse GPR trenches. We show that the shift between activated and non-activated state of the flow paths is needed to distinguish structures from overall heterogeneity. Pedo-physical analyses of point-scale samples are the basis for sub-scale structure inference. At the plot and hillslope scale 3-D and 2-D time-lapse GPR applications are successfully employed as non-invasive means to image subsurface response patterns and to identify flow-relevant paths. Tracer recovery and soil water responses from irrigation experiments deliver a consistent estimate of response velocities. The combined observation of form and function under active conditions provides the means to localize and characterize the structures (this study) and the hydrological processes (companion study Angermann et al., 2017, this issue).

  5. Mathematical modeling of a zinc/bromine flow cell and a lithium/thionyl chloride primary cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evans, T.I.

    1988-01-01

    Three mathematical models are presented, one for the secondary zinc/bromine flow cell and two for the lithium/thionyl chloride primary cell. The objectives in this modeling work are to aid in understanding the physical phenomena affecting cell performance, determine methods of improving cell performance and safety, and reduce the experimental efforts needed to develop these electrochemical systems. The zinc/bromine cell model is the first such model to include a porous layer on the bromine electrode and to predict discharge behavior. The model is used to solve simultaneously the component material balances and the electroneutrality condition for the unknowns, species concentrations and the solution potential. Two models are presented for the lithium/thionyl chloride cell. The first model is a detailed one-dimensional model which is used to solve simultaneously the component material balances, Ohm's law relations, and current balance. The independent design criteria are identified from the model development. The second model presented here is a two-dimensional thermal model for the spirally would configuration of the lithium/thionyl chloride cell. This is the first model to address the effects of the spiral geometry on heat transfer in the cell.

  6. Geographical and organisational variation in the structure of primary care services: implications for study design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Geoffrey; Gulliford, Martin; Ukoumunne, Obioha; Chinn, Susan; Campbell, Michael

    2003-04-01

    To evaluate the extent to which structural variation between English general practices is accounted for at higher organisational levels in the National Health Service (NHS). We analysed data for 11 structural characteristics of all general practices in England. These included characteristics of general practitioners (GPs), the practice list and the services provided by practices. A four-level random effects model was used for analysis and components of variance were estimated at the levels of practice, primary care group (PCG), health authority and region. The proportion of single-handed practices ranged from 0% to 74% at PCG level and from 14% to 43% in different regions. The proportion of practices providing diabetes services ranged from 0% to 100% at PCG level and from 71% to 96% in different regions. The list size per GP ranged from 1314 to 2704 patients per GP at PCG level and from 1721 to 2225 at regional level. Across the 11 variables analysed, components of variance at general practice level accounted for between 43% and 95% of the total variance. The PCG level accounted for between 1% and 29%, the health authority level for between 2% and 15% and the regional level for between 0% and 13% of the total variance. Adjusting for an index of deprivation and the supply of GPs gave a median 8% decrease in the sum of variance components. Geographical and organisational variation in the structure of primary care services should be considered in designing studies in health systems such as the English NHS. Stratified designs may be used to increase study efficiency, but variation between areas may sometimes compromise generalisability.

  7. Flow structure through pool-riffle sequences and a conceptual model for their sustainability in gravel-bed rivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    D. Caamano; P. Goodwin; J. M. Buffington

    2010-01-01

    Detailed field measurements and simulations of three-dimensional flow structure were used to develop a conceptual model to explain the sustainability of self-formed pool-riffle sequences in gravel-bed rivers. The analysis was conducted at the Red River Wildlife Management Area in Idaho, USA, and enabled characterization of the flow structure through two consecutive...

  8. Reconstruction of 3D flow structures in a cylindrical cavity with a rotating lid using time-resolved stereo PIV

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meyer, Knud Erik; Sørensen, Jens Nørkær; Naumov, Igor

    2009-01-01

    variations. The flow in a cylindrical cavity with a rotating lid of a height of three radii and a Reynolds number of about 3500 is used as example. The reconstruction identifies a series of flow structures including axisymmetric vortex breakdown and distinct vortex structures along the cylinder wall....

  9. Using cross correlations of turbulent flow-induced ambient vibrations to estimate the structural impulse response. Application to structural health monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabra, Karim G; Winkel, Eric S; Bourgoyne, Dwayne A; Elbing, Brian R; Ceccio, Steve L; Perlin, Marc; Dowling, David R

    2007-04-01

    It has been demonstrated theoretically and experimentally that an estimate of the impulse response (or Green's function) between two receivers can be obtained from the cross correlation of diffuse wave fields at these two receivers in various environments and frequency ranges: ultrasonics, civil engineering, underwater acoustics, and seismology. This result provides a means for structural monitoring using ambient structure-borne noise only, without the use of active sources. This paper presents experimental results obtained from flow-induced random vibration data recorded by pairs of accelerometers mounted within a flat plate or hydrofoil in the test section of the U.S. Navy's William B. Morgan Large Cavitation Channel. The experiments were conducted at high Reynolds number (Re > 50 million) with the primary excitation source being turbulent boundary layer pressure fluctuations on the upper and lower surfaces of the plate or foil. Identical deterministic time signatures emerge from the noise cross-correlation function computed via robust and simple processing of noise measured on different days by a pair of passive sensors. These time signatures are used to determine and/or monitor the structural response of the test models from a few hundred to a few thousand Hertz.

  10. Directed weighted network structure analysis of complex impedance measurements for characterizing oil-in-water bubbly flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Zhong-Ke; Dang, Wei-Dong; Xue, Le; Zhang, Shan-Shan

    2017-03-01

    Characterizing the flow structure underlying the evolution of oil-in-water bubbly flow remains a contemporary challenge of great interests and complexity. In particular, the oil droplets dispersing in a water continuum with diverse size make the study of oil-in-water bubbly flow really difficult. To study this issue, we first design a novel complex impedance sensor and systematically conduct vertical oil-water flow experiments. Based on the multivariate complex impedance measurements, we define modalities associated with the spatial transient flow structures and construct modality transition-based network for each flow condition to study the evolution of flow structures. In order to reveal the unique flow structures underlying the oil-in-water bubbly flow, we filter the inferred modality transition-based network by removing the edges with small weight and resulting isolated nodes. Then, the weighted clustering coefficient entropy and weighted average path length are employed for quantitatively assessing the original network and filtered network. The differences in network measures enable to efficiently characterize the evolution of the oil-in-water bubbly flow structures.

  11. Theory and computer simulation of structure, transport, and flow of fluid in micropores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davis, H.T.; Bitsanis, I.; Vanderlick, T.K.; Tirrell, M.V.

    1987-01-01

    An overview is given of recent progress made in our laboratory on this topic. The density profiles of fluid in micropores are found by solving numerically an approximate Yvon-Born-Green equation. A related local average density model (LADM) allows prediction of transport and flow in inhomogeneous fluids from density profiles. A rigorous extension of the Enskog theory of transport is also outlined. Simple results of this general approach for the tracer diffusion and Couette flow between planar micropore walls are presented. Equilibrium and flow (molecular dynamics) simulations are compared with the theoretical predictions. Simulated density profiles of the micropore fluid exhibit substantial fluid layering. The number and sharpness of fluid layers depend sensitively on the pore width. The solvation force and the pore average density and diffusivity are oscillating functions of the pore width. The theoretical predictions for these quantities agree qualitatively with the simulation results. The flow simulations indicate that the flow does not affect the fluid structure and diffusivity even at extremely high shear rates (10/sup 10/s/sup -1/). The fluid structure induces large deviations of the shear stress and the effective viscosity from the bulk fluid values. The flow velocity profiles are correlated with the density profiles and differ from those of a bulk fluid. The LADM and extended Enskog theory predictions for the velocity profiles and the pore average diffusivity agree very well with each other and with the simulation results. The LADM predictions for the shear stress and the effective viscosity agrees fairly well with the simulation results

  12. The coupling of cerebral blood flow and oxygen metabolism with brain activation is similar for simple and complex stimuli in human primary visual cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffeth, Valerie E M; Simon, Aaron B; Buxton, Richard B

    2015-01-01

    Quantitative functional MRI (fMRI) experiments to measure blood flow and oxygen metabolism coupling in the brain typically rely on simple repetitive stimuli. Here we compared such stimuli with a more naturalistic stimulus. Previous work on the primary visual cortex showed that direct attentional modulation evokes a blood flow (CBF) response with a relatively large oxygen metabolism (CMRO2) response in comparison to an unattended stimulus, which evokes a much smaller metabolic response relative to the flow response. We hypothesized that a similar effect would be associated with a more engaging stimulus, and tested this by measuring the primary human visual cortex response to two contrast levels of a radial flickering checkerboard in comparison to the response to free viewing of brief movie clips. We did not find a significant difference in the blood flow-metabolism coupling (n=%ΔCBF/%ΔCMRO2) between the movie stimulus and the flickering checkerboards employing two different analysis methods: a standard analysis using the Davis model and a new analysis using a heuristic model dependent only on measured quantities. This finding suggests that in the primary visual cortex a naturalistic stimulus (in comparison to a simple repetitive stimulus) is either not sufficient to provoke a change in flow-metabolism coupling by attentional modulation as hypothesized, that the experimental design disrupted the cognitive processes underlying the response to a more natural stimulus, or that the technique used is not sensitive enough to detect a small difference. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Thermal Flow and Structure Stability Analyses of High Power Waterload for 2450 MHz microwave applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seon, S. W.; Kim, H. J.; Wang, S. J.; Kim, J. N.

    2016-01-01

    This study is focused on analyzing the internal flow dynamics in the waterload by changing the inlet and outlet locations and adding guide pipeline to the inlet. The internal flow field simulation is done with CFX tool to compare the water flow velocity and temperature distributions in the waterload. The waterload absorbs RF power, converts it to thermal power, and increases the water temperature so that heat could be quickly removed by the water injection. And it is installed on the end of transmission line and is used to absorb reflected RF power. High power waterload with cone-shaped quartz is designed for 10-30 kW power handling at 2450 MHz microwave system. The thermal flow and structural stability analysis for the 2450 MHz waterload is done using ANSYS and the results are presented in this work. Relocation of the inlet and addition of the guide pipeline in the simulation shows a decrease in the localized maximum water temperature and increased water velocity around the heat source. It is also shown that the modified waterload is structurally more stable

  14. Thermal Flow and Structure Stability Analyses of High Power Waterload for 2450 MHz microwave applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seon, S. W.; Kim, H. J.; Wang, S. J. [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, J. N. [KRF, Anyang (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    This study is focused on analyzing the internal flow dynamics in the waterload by changing the inlet and outlet locations and adding guide pipeline to the inlet. The internal flow field simulation is done with CFX tool to compare the water flow velocity and temperature distributions in the waterload. The waterload absorbs RF power, converts it to thermal power, and increases the water temperature so that heat could be quickly removed by the water injection. And it is installed on the end of transmission line and is used to absorb reflected RF power. High power waterload with cone-shaped quartz is designed for 10-30 kW power handling at 2450 MHz microwave system. The thermal flow and structural stability analysis for the 2450 MHz waterload is done using ANSYS and the results are presented in this work. Relocation of the inlet and addition of the guide pipeline in the simulation shows a decrease in the localized maximum water temperature and increased water velocity around the heat source. It is also shown that the modified waterload is structurally more stable.

  15. Differential geometric structures of stream functions: incompressible two-dimensional flow and curvatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamasaki, K; Iwayama, T; Yajima, T

    2011-01-01

    The Okubo-Weiss field, frequently used for partitioning incompressible two-dimensional (2D) fluids into coherent and incoherent regions, corresponds to the Gaussian curvature of the stream function. Therefore, we consider the differential geometric structures of stream functions and calculate the Gaussian curvatures of some basic flows. We find the following. (I) The vorticity corresponds to the mean curvature of the stream function. Thus, the stream-function surface for an irrotational flow and that for a parallel shear flow correspond to the minimal surface and a developable surface, respectively. (II) The relationship between the coherency and the magnitude of the vorticity is interpreted by the curvatures. (III) Using the Gaussian curvature, stability of single and double point vortex streets is analyzed. The results of this analysis are compared with the well-known linear stability analysis. (IV) Conformal mapping in fluid mechanics is the physical expression of the geometric fact that the sign of the Gaussian curvature does not change in conformal mapping. These findings suggest that the curvatures of stream functions are useful for understanding the geometric structure of an incompressible 2D flow.

  16. Identification of individual coherent sets associated with flow trajectories using Coherent Structure Coloring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlueter-Kuck, Kristy; Dabiri, John

    2017-11-01

    In recent years, there has been a proliferation of techniques that aim to characterize fluid flow kinematics on the basis of Lagrangian trajectories of collections of tracer particles. Most of these techniques depend on presence of tracer particles that are initially closely-spaced, in order to compute local gradients of their trajectories. In many applications, the requirement of close tracer spacing cannot be satisfied, especially when the tracers are naturally occurring and their distribution is dictated by the underlying flow. Moreover, current methods often focus on determination of the boundaries of coherent sets, whereas in practice it is often valuable to identify the complete set of trajectories that are coherent with an individual trajectory of interest. We extend the concept of Coherent Structure Coloring to achieve identification of the coherent set associated with individual Lagrangian trajectories. This algorithm is proven successful in identifying coherent structures of varying complexities in canonical unsteady flows. Importantly, although the method is demonstrated here in the context of fluid flow kinematics, the generality of the approach allows for its potential application to other unsupervised clustering problems in dynamical systems. This work was supported by the Department of Defense (DoD) through the National Defense Science & Engineering Graduate Fellowship (NDSEG) Program.

  17. Structural Controls on Groundwater Flow in Basement Terrains: Geophysical, Remote Sensing, and Field Investigations in Sinai

    KAUST Repository

    Mohamed, Lamees

    2015-07-09

    An integrated [very low frequency (VLF) electromagnetic, magnetic, remote sensing, field, and geographic information system (GIS)] study was conducted over the basement complex in southern Sinai (Feiran watershed) for a better understanding of the structural controls on the groundwater flow. The increase in satellite-based radar backscattering values following a large precipitation event (34 mm on 17–18 January 2010) was used to identify water-bearing features, here interpreted as preferred pathways for surface water infiltration. Findings include: (1) spatial analysis in a GIS environment revealed that the distribution of the water-bearing features (conductive features) corresponds to that of fractures, faults, shear zones, dike swarms, and wadi networks; (2) using VLF (43 profiles), magnetic (7 profiles) techniques, and field observations, the majority (85 %) of the investigated conductive features were determined to be preferred pathways for groundwater flow; (3) northwest–southeast- to north–south-trending conductive features that intersect the groundwater flow (southeast to northwest) at low angles capture groundwater flow, whereas northeast–southwest to east–west features that intersect the flow at high angles impound groundwater upstream and could provide potential productive well locations; and (4) similar findings are observed in central Sinai: east–west-trending dextral shear zones (Themed and Sinai Hinge Belt) impede south to north groundwater flow as evidenced by the significant drop in hydraulic head (from 467 to 248 m above mean sea level) across shear zones and by reorientation of regional flow (south–north to southwest–northeast). The adopted integrated methodologies could be readily applied to similar highly fractured basement arid terrains elsewhere. © 2015 Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht

  18. Engineering Mathematical Analysis Method for Productivity Rate in Linear Arrangement Serial Structure Automated Flow Assembly Line

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tan Chan Sin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Productivity rate (Q or production rate is one of the important indicator criteria for industrial engineer to improve the system and finish good output in production or assembly line. Mathematical and statistical analysis method is required to be applied for productivity rate in industry visual overviews of the failure factors and further improvement within the production line especially for automated flow line since it is complicated. Mathematical model of productivity rate in linear arrangement serial structure automated flow line with different failure rate and bottleneck machining time parameters becomes the basic model for this productivity analysis. This paper presents the engineering mathematical analysis method which is applied in an automotive company which possesses automated flow assembly line in final assembly line to produce motorcycle in Malaysia. DCAS engineering and mathematical analysis method that consists of four stages known as data collection, calculation and comparison, analysis, and sustainable improvement is used to analyze productivity in automated flow assembly line based on particular mathematical model. Variety of failure rate that causes loss of productivity and bottleneck machining time is shown specifically in mathematic figure and presents the sustainable solution for productivity improvement for this final assembly automated flow line.

  19. Experimental Visualization of the Flow Structure for Jet in Crossflow with a Curved Hole Passage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Yu Liang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this paper is to investigate the influence of a hole curvature on the flow structure and characteristics downstream of JICF (jet in cross-Flow by means of smoke visualization and particle image velocimetry (PIV. The experiment was performed in a low speed wind tunnel with Reynolds numbers of about 480 and 1000, based on the hole diameter and main flow speed. Two geometries were tested: a circular hole with 90° curvature and a circular straight hole for comparison, under blowing ratios 0.5 and 1.0. The measurements were done in the symmetric plane and four cross-sections. The results show that the curved hole could decrease the mixing behavior of jet flow with the main flow as the hole leading edge also increases the chance of transportingthecoolant to the wall surface and the transverse coverage. The curved hole shows a high potential to increase the cooling effectiveness once it is applied to the turbine blades.

  20. Simplified Eigen-structure decomposition solver for the simulation of two-phase flow systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumbaro, Anela

    2012-01-01

    This paper discusses the development of a new solver for a system of first-order non-linear differential equations that model the dynamics of compressible two-phase flow. The solver presents a lower-complexity alternative to Roe-type solvers because it only makes use of a partial Eigen-structure information while maintaining its accuracy: the outcome is hence a good complexity-tractability trade-off to consider as relevant in a large number of situations in the scope of two-phase flow numerical simulation. A number of numerical and physical benchmarks are presented to assess the solver. Comparison between the computational results from the simplified Eigen-structure decomposition solver and the conventional Roe-type solver gives insight upon the issues of accuracy, robustness and efficiency. (authors)

  1. Analysis of the Impact Caused by Coherent Structures in Swirling Flow Combustion Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valera-Medina A.

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Amongst the technologies used in the energy and propulsion generation for the reduction of emissions, the use of swirling flows has demonstrated its high performance in anchoring the flame inside of the combustion systems. This, added to the use of premixing in the pre-chambers, has created one of the most innovative methods for the reduction of highly polluting particles such as NOx. However, the lack of understanding of these flows makes it necessary to increase the research on the topic in order to clarify themes as complex as the role of the coherent structures inside of the system. This paper explains some of the phenomena produced by some of the coherent structures observed in the system. The results showed the existence of complex Recirculation Zones (RZ, Precessing Vortex Core (PVC and Combustion Induced Vortex Breakdown (CIVB.

  2. Effect of Anisotropy Structure on Plume Entropy and Reactive Mixing in Helical Flows

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ye, Yu; Chiogna, Gabriele; Lu, Chunhui

    2018-01-01

    Plume dilution and reactive mixing can be considerably enhanced by helical flows occurring in three-dimensional anisotropic porous media. In this study, we perform conservative and reactive transport simulations considering different anisotropy structures of a single inclusion with the objective...... of exploring the effect of the inclusion’s geometry and orientation on the patterns of twisted streamlines and on the overall dilution and reaction of solute plumes. We analyzed 100 different scenarios by varying key parameters such as the angle of the anisotropic structures with respect to the average flow...... velocity, the spacing between alternated heterogeneous zones of coarse and fine materials, the permeability contrast between such matrices, and the magnitude of the seepage velocity. Entropy conservation equations and entropy-based metrics for both conservative and reactive species were adopted to quantify...

  3. Vortex Structure Effects on Impingement, Effusion, and Cross Flow Cooling of a Double Wall Configuration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ligrani, P. M.

    2018-03-01

    A variety of different types of vortices and vortex structures have important influences on thermal protection, heat transfer augmentation, and cooling performance of impingement cooling, effusion cooling, and cross flow cooling. Of particular interest are horseshoe vortices, which form around the upstream portions of effusion coolant concentrations just after they exit individual holes, hairpin vortices, which develop nearby and adjacent to effusion coolant trajectories, and Kelvin-Helmholtz vortices which form within the shear layers that form around each impingement cooling jet. The influences of these different vortex structures are described as they affect and alter the thermal performance of effusion cooling, impingement cooling, and cross flow cooling, as applied to a double wall configuration.

  4. Thermo-mechanical evaluation of carbon-carbon primary structure for SSTO vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croop, Harold C.; Lowndes, Holland B.; Hahn, Steven E.; Barthel, Chris A.

    1998-01-01

    An advanced development program to demonstrate carbon-carbon composite structure for use as primary load carrying structure has entered the experimental validation phase. The component being evaluated is a wing torque box section for a single-stage-to-orbit (SSTO) vehicle. The validation or demonstration component features an advanced carbon-carbon design incorporating 3D woven graphite preforms, integral spars, oxidation inhibited matrix, chemical vapor deposited (CVD) oxidation protection coating, and ceramic matrix composite fasteners. The validation component represents the culmination of a four phase design and fabrication development effort. Extensive developmental testing was performed to verify material properties and integrity of basic design features before committing to fabrication of the full scale box. The wing box component is now being set up for testing in the Air Force Research Laboratory Structural Test Facility at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio. One of the important developmental tests performed in support of the design and planned testing of the full scale box was the fabrication and test of a skin/spar trial subcomponent. The trial subcomponent incorporated critical features of the full scale wing box design. This paper discusses the results of the trial subcomponent test which served as a pathfinder for the upcoming full scale box test.

  5. Structural analysis of surface film on alloy 600 formed under environment of PWR primary water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Terachi, Takumi; Totsuka, Nobuo; Yamada, Takuyo; Nakagawa, Tomokazu [Inst. of Nuclear Safety System Inc., Mihama, Fukui (Japan); Deguchi, Hiroshi [Kansai Electric Power Co., Inc., Osaka (Japan); Horiuchi, Masaki; Oshitani, Masato [Kanden Kako Co., Ltd., Osaka (Japan)

    2002-09-01

    It has been shown by one of the present authors and so forth that PWSCC of alloy 600 relates to dissolved hydrogen concentration (DH) in water and oxide film structure. However, the mechanism of PWSCC has not been clear yet. Therefore, in order to investigate relationship between them, structural analysis of the oxide film formed under the environment of PWR primary water was carried out by using X-ray diffraction, the scanning electron microscope and the transmission electron microscope. Especially, to perform accurate analysis, the synchrotron orbital radiation with SPring-8 was tried to use for thin film X-ray diffraction measurement. From the results, observed are as follows: 1. the oxide film is mainly composed of NiO, under the condition without hydrogen. 2. In the environment of DH 2.75ppm, the oxide film forms thin spinel structures. 3. On the other hand, needlelike oxides are formed at DH 1ppm. For this reason, around 1ppm of DH there would be the boundary that stable NiO and spinel oxide generate, and it agrees with the peak range of the PWSCC susceptibility on hydrogen. From this, it is suggested that the boundary of NiO/spinel oxide affects the SCC susceptibility. (author)

  6. Structural and social constraints influencing HIV/AIDS teaching in Malawi primary schools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grames Ghirwa

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The Ministry of Education in Malawi introduced a Life Skills Education programwith the intention to empower children with appropriate information and skills to deal with social and health problems affecting the nation including the fight against HIV infections. This study investigated factors affecting the teaching of the Life skills education in four primary schools in the Zomba District, Malawi. Cornbleth’s (1990 notions of the structural and social contexts and Whitaker’s (1993 identification of key role players in curriculum implementation framed the study. Findings suggest that the teaching of Life skills is constrained by a variety of social and structural contextual factors such as the poor conditions under which teachers are working; greater attention given to subjects such as Maths and Languages; the cascade model of training teachers and the short duration of training; the language in teachers guides were not accesibile to teachers; hunger and poverty of learners; lack of community support for sexual education; both teachers and learners being infected or affected by the AIDS/HIV pandemic; teachers felt it is inappropriate to teach sexual education to 9 and 10 year old learners.  These findings indicate structural and social barriers to effective life skills education within the current framework.

  7. Atrophy and structural covariance of the cholinergic basal forebrain in primary progressive aphasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teipel, Stefan; Raiser, Theresa; Riedl, Lina; Riederer, Isabelle; Schroeter, Matthias L; Bisenius, Sandrine; Schneider, Anja; Kornhuber, Johannes; Fliessbach, Klaus; Spottke, Annika; Grothe, Michel J; Prudlo, Johannes; Kassubek, Jan; Ludolph, Albert; Landwehrmeyer, Bernhard; Straub, Sarah; Otto, Markus; Danek, Adrian

    2016-10-01

    Primary progressive aphasia (PPA) is characterized by profound destruction of cortical language areas. Anatomical studies suggest an involvement of cholinergic basal forebrain (BF) in PPA syndromes, particularly in the area of the nucleus subputaminalis (NSP). Here we aimed to determine the pattern of atrophy and structural covariance as a proxy of structural connectivity of BF nuclei in PPA variants. We studied 62 prospectively recruited cases with the clinical diagnosis of PPA and 31 healthy older control participants from the cohort study of the German consortium for frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD). We determined cortical and BF atrophy based on high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans. Patterns of structural covariance of BF with cortical regions were determined using voxel-based partial least square analysis. We found significant atrophy of total BF and BF subregions in PPA patients compared with controls [F(1, 82) = 20.2, p covariance analysis in healthy controls revealed associations of the BF nuclei, particularly the NSP, with left hemispheric predominant prefrontal, lateral temporal, and parietal cortical areas, including Broca's speech area (p covariance of the BF nuclei mostly with right but not with left hemispheric cortical areas (p covariance of the BF with left hemispheric cortical areas in healthy aging towards right hemispheric cortical areas in PPA, possibly reflecting a consequence of the profound and early destruction of cortical language areas in PPA. Copyright © 2016 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  8. Genetic Structure and Gene Flows within Horses: A Genealogical Study at the French Population Scale

    OpenAIRE

    Pirault, Pauline; Danvy, Sophy; Verrier, Etienne; Leroy, Gr?goire

    2013-01-01

    Since horse breeds constitute populations submitted to variable and multiple outcrossing events, we analyzed the genetic structure and gene flows considering horses raised in France. We used genealogical data, with a reference population of 547,620 horses born in France between 2002 and 2011, grouped according to 55 breed origins. On average, individuals had 6.3 equivalent generations known. Considering different population levels, fixation index decreased from an overall species FIT of 1.37%...

  9. Pulsed flows, tributary inputs, and food web structure in a highly regulated river

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabo, John; Caron, Melanie; Doucett, Richard R.; Dibble, Kimberly L.; Ruhi, Albert; Marks, Jane; Hungate, Bruce; Kennedy, Theodore A.

    2018-01-01

    1.Dams disrupt the river continuum, altering hydrology, biodiversity, and energy flow. Although research indicates that tributary inputs have the potential to dilute these effects, knowledge at the food web level is still scarce.2.Here we examined the riverine food web structure of the Colorado River below Glen Canyon Dam, focusing on organic matter sources, trophic diversity, and food chain length. We asked how these components respond to pulsed flows from tributaries following monsoon thunderstorms that seasonally increase streamflow in the American Southwest.3.Tributaries increased the relative importance of terrestrial organic matter, particularly during the wet season below junctures of key tributaries. This contrasted with the algal-based food web present immediately below Glen Canyon Dam.4.Tributary inputs during the monsoon also increased trophic diversity and food chain length: food chain length peaked below the confluence with the largest tributary (by discharge) in Grand Canyon, increasing by >1 trophic level over a 4-5 kilometre reach possibly due to aquatic prey being flushed into the mainstem during heavy rain events.5.Our results illustrate that large tributaries can create seasonal discontinuities, influencing riverine food web structure in terms of allochthony, food web diversity, and food chain length.6.Synthesis and applications. Pulsed flows from unregulated tributaries following seasonal monsoon rains increase the importance of terrestrially-derived organic matter in large, regulated river food webs, increasing food chain length and trophic diversity downstream of tributary inputs. Protecting unregulated tributaries within hydropower cascades may be important if we are to mitigate food web structure alteration due to flow regulation by large dams. This is critical in the light of global hydropower development, especially in megadiverse, developing countries where dam placement (including completed and planned structures) is in tributaries.

  10. Elevated admission microalbuminuria predicts poor myocardial blood flow and 6-month mortality in ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction patients undergoing primary percutaneous coronary intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jia Wei; Wang, Yong Liang; Li, Hong Wei

    2012-04-01

    Microalbuminuria (MA) is considered a major risk factor predisposing to cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Outcomes after percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) for patients with acute myocardial infarction (AMI) complicated by MA have been well described. However, data regarding admission MA and coronary and myocardial flow are scant. The aims of this study were to evaluate the effects of admission MA on coronary blood flow and prognosis in ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) patients undergoing primary PCI. Did elevated admission microalbuminuria predict poor myocardial blood flow and 6-month mortality in ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction patients undergoing primary percutaneous coronary intervention? A total of 247 patients undergoing primary PCI for STEMI within 12 hours after symptom onset were studied. Patients were divided into 2 groups according to admission urinary albumin extraction rate (UAER): (1) an MA group (UAER 20-200 µg/min), and (2) a normoalbuminuria (NA) group (UAER < 20 µg/min). Microalbuminuria was observed in 108 patients. Univariate analyses showed statistical differences between the NA and MA groups in serum creatine level, plasma glucose level, and peak creatine kinase level on presentation. Thrombolysis In Myocardial Infarction (TIMI) flow grades (TFGs) 0-2 in the MA group were more frequent (9.4% vs 21.2%, P < 0.05) than in the NA group, and corrected TIMI frame count was higher (23.9 ± 18.5 vs 29.8 ± 23.5, P < 0.05). Admission MA was an independent predictor of poor myocardial perfusion (adjusted relative risk: 3.14, 95% confidence interval: 0.99-6.78) and a higher rate of 6-month mortality in STEMI patients undergoing primary PCI (adjusted relative risk: 1.58, 95% confidence interval: 0.74-3.39). Admission MA levels are associated with impaired myocardial flow and poor prognosis in STEMI patients undergoing primary PCI. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Thermodynamics, maximum power, and the dynamics of preferential river flow structures at the continental scale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Kleidon

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The organization of drainage basins shows some reproducible phenomena, as exemplified by self-similar fractal river network structures and typical scaling laws, and these have been related to energetic optimization principles, such as minimization of stream power, minimum energy expenditure or maximum "access". Here we describe the organization and dynamics of drainage systems using thermodynamics, focusing on the generation, dissipation and transfer of free energy associated with river flow and sediment transport. We argue that the organization of drainage basins reflects the fundamental tendency of natural systems to deplete driving gradients as fast as possible through the maximization of free energy generation, thereby accelerating the dynamics of the system. This effectively results in the maximization of sediment export to deplete topographic gradients as fast as possible and potentially involves large-scale feedbacks to continental uplift. We illustrate this thermodynamic description with a set of three highly simplified models related to water and sediment flow and describe the mechanisms and feedbacks involved in the evolution and dynamics of the associated structures. We close by discussing how this thermodynamic perspective is consistent with previous approaches and the implications that such a thermodynamic description has for the understanding and prediction of sub-grid scale organization of drainage systems and preferential flow structures in general.

  12. The Hidden Flow Structure and Metric Space of Network Embedding Algorithms Based on Random Walks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Weiwei; Gong, Li; Lou, Xiaodan; Zhang, Jiang

    2017-10-13

    Network embedding which encodes all vertices in a network as a set of numerical vectors in accordance with it's local and global structures, has drawn widespread attention. Network embedding not only learns significant features of a network, such as the clustering and linking prediction but also learns the latent vector representation of the nodes which provides theoretical support for a variety of applications, such as visualization, link prediction, node classification, and recommendation. As the latest progress of the research, several algorithms based on random walks have been devised. Although those algorithms have drawn much attention for their high scores in learning efficiency and accuracy, there is still a lack of theoretical explanation, and the transparency of those algorithms has been doubted. Here, we propose an approach based on the open-flow network model to reveal the underlying flow structure and its hidden metric space of different random walk strategies on networks. We show that the essence of embedding based on random walks is the latent metric structure defined on the open-flow network. This not only deepens our understanding of random- walk-based embedding algorithms but also helps in finding new potential applications in network embedding.

  13. Optimized Structure of the Traffic Flow Forecasting Model With a Deep Learning Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hao-Fan; Dillon, Tharam S; Chen, Yi-Ping Phoebe

    2017-10-01

    Forecasting accuracy is an important issue for successful intelligent traffic management, especially in the domain of traffic efficiency and congestion reduction. The dawning of the big data era brings opportunities to greatly improve prediction accuracy. In this paper, we propose a novel model, stacked autoencoder Levenberg-Marquardt model, which is a type of deep architecture of neural network approach aiming to improve forecasting accuracy. The proposed model is designed using the Taguchi method to develop an optimized structure and to learn traffic flow features through layer-by-layer feature granulation with a greedy layerwise unsupervised learning algorithm. It is applied to real-world data collected from the M6 freeway in the U.K. and is compared with three existing traffic predictors. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time that an optimized structure of the traffic flow forecasting model with a deep learning approach is presented. The evaluation results demonstrate that the proposed model with an optimized structure has superior performance in traffic flow forecasting.

  14. Equivalent linearization method for limit cycle flutter analysis of plate-type structure in axial flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu Li; Yang Yiren

    2009-01-01

    The responses and limit cycle flutter of a plate-type structure with cubic stiffness in viscous flow were studied. The continuous system was dispersed by utilizing Galerkin Method. The equivalent linearization concept was performed to predict the ranges of limit cycle flutter velocities. The coupled map of flutter amplitude-equivalent linear stiffness-critical velocity was used to analyze the stability of limit cycle flutter. The theoretical results agree well with the results of numerical integration, which indicates that the equivalent linearization concept is available to the analysis of limit cycle flutter of plate-type structure. (authors)

  15. "Ladder" structure in tonal noise generated by laminar flow around an airfoil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chong, Tze Pei; Joseph, Phillip

    2012-06-01

    The presence of a "ladder" structure in the airfoil tonal noise was discovered in the 1970s, but its mechanism hitherto remains a subject of continual investigation in the research community. Based on the measured noise results and some numerical analysis presented in this letter, the variations of four types of airfoil tonal noise frequencies with the flow velocity were analyzed individually. The ladder structure is proposed to be caused by the acoustic/hydrodynamic frequency lag between the scattering of the boundary layer instability noise and the discrete noise produced by an aeroacoustic feedback loop.

  16. Modeling the Link between Left Ventricular Flow and Thromboembolic Risk Using Lagrangian Coherent Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen May-Newman

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available A thrombus is a blood clot that forms on a surface, and can grow and detach, presenting a high risk for stroke and pulmonary embolism. This risk increases with blood-contacting medical devices, due to the immunological response to foreign surfaces and altered flow patterns that activate the blood and promote thromboembolism (TE. Abnormal blood transport, including vortex behavior and regional stasis, can be assessed from Lagrangian Coherent Structures (LCS. LCS are flow structures that bound transport within a flow field and divide the flow into regions with maximally attracting/repelling surfaces that maximize local shear. LCS can be identified from finite time Lyapunov exponent (FTLE fields, which are computed from velocity field data. In this study, the goal was to use FTLE analysis to evaluate LCS in the left ventricle (LV using velocity data obtained from flow visualization of a mock circulatory loop. A model of dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM was used to investigate the effect of left ventricular assist device (LVAD support on diastolic filling and transport in the LV. A small thrombus in the left ventricular outflow tract was also considered using data from a corresponding LV model. The DCM LV exhibited a direct flow of 0.8 L/cardiac cycle, which was tripled during LVAD support Delayed ejection flow was doubled, further illustrating the impact of LVAD support on blood transport. An examination of the attracting LCS ridges during diastolic filling showed that the increase is due primarily to augmentation of A wave inflow, which is associated with increased vortex circulation, kinetic energy and Forward FTLE. The introduction of a small thrombus in the left ventricular outflow tract (LVOT of the LV had a minimal effect on diastolic inflow, but obstructed systolic outflow leading to decreased transport compared with the unobstructed LVOT geometry. Localized FTLE in the LVOT increased dramatically with the small thrombus model, which reflects

  17. Structures, Compositions, and Activities of Live Shewanella Biofilms Formed on Graphite Electrodes in Electrochemical Flow Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitayama, Miho; Koga, Ryota; Kasai, Takuya; Kouzuma, Atsushi; Watanabe, Kazuya

    2017-09-01

    An electrochemical flow cell equipped with a graphite working electrode (WE) at the bottom was inoculated with Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 expressing an anaerobic fluorescent protein, and biofilm formation on the WE was observed over time during current generation at WE potentials of +0.4 and 0 V (versus standard hydrogen electrodes), under electrolyte-flow conditions. Electrochemical analyses suggested the presence of unique electron-transfer mechanisms in the +0.4-V biofilm. Microscopic analyses revealed that, in contrast to aerobic biofilms, current-generating biofilm (at +0.4 V) was thin and flat (∼10 μm in thickness), and cells were evenly and densely distributed in the biofilm. In contrast, cells were unevenly distributed in biofilm formed at 0 V. In situ fluorescence staining and biofilm recovery experiments showed that the amounts of extracellular polysaccharides (EPSs) in the +0.4-V biofilm were much smaller than those in the aerobic and 0-V biofilms, suggesting that Shewanella cells suppress the production of EPSs at +0.4 V under flow conditions. We suggest that Shewanella cells perceive electrode potentials and modulate the structure and composition of biofilms to efficiently transfer electrons to electrodes. IMPORTANCE A promising application of microbial fuel cells (MFCs) is to save energy in wastewater treatment. Since current is generated in these MFCs by biofilm microbes under horizontal flows of wastewater, it is important to understand the mechanisms for biofilm formation and current generation under water-flow conditions. Although massive work has been done to analyze the molecular mechanisms for current generation by model exoelectrogenic bacteria, such as Shewanella oneidensis , limited information is available regarding the formation of current-generating biofilms over time under water-flow conditions. The present study developed electrochemical flow cells and used them to examine the electrochemical and structural features of current

  18. Survey on structural material investigations for the primary circuit of the SNR 300

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grosser, E.D.; Lorenz, H.

    1977-01-01

    The material programs described so far cover major Important areas of structural material behavior in the primary system of a sodium cooled reactor. The results demonstrate that a good base is available for the design and safe operation of sodium systems. For complementation purposes some further work is needed in certain areas: creep-fatigue interaction mechanism and description of base material and weld metal behavior for design purposes, irradiation effects in the low-dose range on time-dependent material behavior, impact of heat-to-heat variation on materials properties data, establishment of a profound data base to evaluate sodium impact on mechanical properties, application of the leak-before-break concept in plant design, confirmation of laboratory test results by the operational experience of sodium cooled reactor systems. (author)

  19. Primary structure of Lep d I, the main Lepidoglyphus destructor allergen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varela, J; Ventas, P; Carreira, J; Barbas, J A; Gimenez-Gallego, G; Polo, F

    1994-10-01

    The most relevant allergen of the storage mite Lepidoglyphus destructor (Lep d I) has been characterized. Lep d I is a monomer protein of 13273 Da. The primary structure of Lep d I was determined by N-terminal Edman degradation and partially confirmed by cDNA sequencing. Sequence polymorphism was observed at six positions, with non-conservative substitutions in three of them. No potential N-glycosylation site was revealed by peptide sequencing. The 125-residue sequence of Lep d I shows approximately 40% identity (including the six cysteines) with the overlapping regions of group II allergens from the genus Dermatophagoides, which, however, do not share common allergenic epitopes with Lep d I.

  20. How best to structure interdisciplinary primary care teams: the study protocol for a systematic review with narrative framework synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wranik, W Dominika; Hayden, Jill A; Price, Sheri; Parker, Robin M N; Haydt, Susan M; Edwards, Jeanette M; Suter, Esther; Katz, Alan; Gambold, Liesl L; Levy, Adrian R

    2016-10-04

    Western publicly funded health care systems increasingly rely on interdisciplinary teams to support primary care delivery and management of chronic conditions. This knowledge synthesis focuses on what is known in the academic and grey literature about optimal structural characteristics of teams. Its goal is to assess which factors contribute to the effective functioning of interdisciplinary primary care teams and improved health system outcomes, with specific focus on (i) team structure contribution to team process, (ii) team process contribution to primary care goals, and (iii) team structure contribution to primary care goals. The systematic search of academic literature focuses on four chronic conditions and co-morbidities. Within this scope, qualitative and quantitative studies that assess the effects of team characteristics (funding, governance, organization) on care process and patient outcomes will be searched. Electronic databases (Ovid MEDLINE, Embase, CINAHL, PAIS, Web of Science) will be searched systematically. Online web-based searches will be supported by the Grey Matters Tool. Studies will be included, if they report on interdisciplinary primary care in publicly funded Western health systems, and address the relationships between team structure, process, and/or patient outcomes. Studies will be selected in a three-stage screening process (title/abstract/full text) by two independent reviewers in each stage. Study quality will be assessed using the Mixed Methods Assessment Tool. An a priori framework will be applied to data extraction, and a narrative framework approach is used for the synthesis. Using an integrated knowledge translation approach, an electronic decision support tool will be developed for decision makers. It will be searchable along two axes of inquiry: (i) what primary care goals are supported by specific team characteristics and (ii) how should teams be structured to support specific primary care goals? The results of this evidence

  1. Modelling and simulating the forming of new dry automated lay-up reinforcements for primary structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouquerel, Laure; Moulin, Nicolas; Drapier, Sylvain; Boisse, Philippe; Beraud, Jean-Marc

    2017-10-01

    While weight has been so far the main driver for the development of prepreg based-composites solutions for aeronautics, a new weight-cost trade-off tends to drive choices for next-generation aircrafts. As a response, Hexcel has designed a new dry reinforcement type for aircraft primary structures, which combines the benefits of automation, out-of-autoclave process cost-effectiveness, and mechanical performances competitive to prepreg solutions: HiTape® is a unidirectional (UD) dry carbon reinforcement with thermoplastic veil on each side designed for aircraft primary structures [1-3]. One privileged process route for HiTape® in high volume automated processes consists in forming initially flat dry reinforcement stacks, before resin infusion [4] or injection. Simulation of the forming step aims at predicting the geometry and mechanical properties of the formed stack (so-called preform) for process optimisation. Extensive work has been carried out on prepreg and dry woven fabrics forming behaviour and simulation, but the interest for dry non-woven reinforcements has emerged more recently. Some work has been achieved on non crimp fabrics but studies on the forming behaviour of UDs are seldom and deal with UD prepregs only. Tension and bending in the fibre direction, along with inter-ply friction have been identified as the main mechanisms controlling the HiTape® response during forming. Bending has been characterised using a modified Peirce's flexometer [5] and inter-ply friction study is under development. Anisotropic hyperelastic constitutive models have been selected to represent the assumed decoupled deformation mechanisms. Model parameters are then identified from associated experimental results. For forming simulation, a continuous approach at the macroscopic scale has been selected first, and simulation is carried out in the Zset framework [6] using proper shell finite elements.

  2. Near-wake flow structure downwind of a wind turbine in a turbulent boundary layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Wei; Markfort, Corey D. [University of Minnesota, Saint Anthony Falls Laboratory, Department of Civil Engineering, Minneapolis, MN (United States); Porte-Agel, Fernando [Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne (EPFL), ENAC-IIE-WIRE, Wind Engineering and Renewable Energy Laboratory (WIRE), Lausanne (Switzerland)

    2012-05-15

    Wind turbines operate in the surface layer of the atmospheric boundary layer, where they are subjected to strong wind shear and relatively high turbulence levels. These incoming boundary layer flow characteristics are expected to affect the structure of wind turbine wakes. The near-wake region is characterized by a complex coupled vortex system (including helicoidal tip vortices), unsteadiness and strong turbulence heterogeneity. Limited information about the spatial distribution of turbulence in the near wake, the vortex behavior and their influence on the downwind development of the far wake hinders our capability to predict wind turbine power production and fatigue loads in wind farms. This calls for a better understanding of the spatial distribution of the 3D flow and coherent turbulence structures in the near wake. Systematic wind-tunnel experiments were designed and carried out to characterize the structure of the near-wake flow downwind of a model wind turbine placed in a neutral boundary layer flow. A horizontal-axis, three-blade wind turbine model, with a rotor diameter of 13 cm and the hub height at 10.5 cm, occupied the lowest one-third of the boundary layer. High-resolution particle image velocimetry (PIV) was used to measure velocities in multiple vertical stream-wise planes (x-z) and vertical span-wise planes (y-z). In particular, we identified localized regions of strong vorticity and swirling strength, which are the signature of helicoidal tip vortices. These vortices are most pronounced at the top-tip level and persist up to a distance of two to three rotor diameters downwind. The measurements also reveal strong flow rotation and a highly non-axisymmetric distribution of the mean flow and turbulence structure in the near wake. The results provide new insight into the physical mechanisms that govern the development of the near wake of a wind turbine immersed in a neutral boundary layer. They also serve as important data for the development and

  3. Shock Structure Analysis and Aerodynamics in a Weakly Ionized Gas Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saeks, R.; Popovic, S.; Chow, A. S.

    2006-01-01

    The structure of a shock wave propagating through a weakly ionized gas is analyzed using an electrofluid dynamics model composed of classical conservation laws and Gauss Law. A viscosity model is included to correctly model the spatial scale of the shock structure, and quasi-neutrality is not assumed. A detailed analysis of the structure of a shock wave propagating in a weakly ionized gas is presented, together with a discussion of the physics underlying the key features of the shock structure. A model for the flow behind a shock wave propagating through a weakly ionized gas is developed and used to analyze the effect of the ionization on the aerodynamics and performance of a two-dimensional hypersonic lifting body.

  4. Flow Energy Piezoelectric Bimorph Nozzle Harvester

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherrit, Stewart (Inventor); Walkemeyer, Phillip E. (Inventor); Hall, Jeffrey L. (Inventor); Lee, Hyeong Jae (Inventor); Colonius, Tim (Inventor); Tosi, Phillipe (Inventor); Kim, Namhyo (Inventor); Sun, Kai (Inventor); Corbett, Thomas Gary (Inventor); Arrazola, Alvaro Jose (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    A flow energy harvesting device having a harvester pipe includes a flow inlet that receives flow from a primary pipe, a flow outlet that returns the flow into the primary pipe, and a flow diverter within the harvester pipe having an inlet section coupled to the flow inlet, a flow constriction section coupled to the inlet section and positioned at a midpoint of the harvester pipe and having a spline shape with a substantially reduced flow opening size at a constriction point along the spline shape, and an outlet section coupled to the constriction section. The harvester pipe may further include a piezoelectric structure extending from the inlet section through the constriction section and point such that the fluid flow past the constriction point results in oscillatory pressure amplitude inducing vibrations in the piezoelectric structure sufficient to cause a direct piezoelectric effect and to generate electrical power for harvesting.

  5. Flocculation kinetics and aggregate structure of kaolinite mixtures in laminar tube flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaezi G, Farid; Sanders, R Sean; Masliyah, Jacob H

    2011-03-01

    Flocculation is commonly used in various solid-liquid separation processes in chemical and mineral industries to separate desired products or to treat waste streams. This paper presents an experimental technique to study flocculation processes in laminar tube flow. This approach allows for more realistic estimation of the shear rate to which an aggregate is exposed, as compared to more complicated shear fields (e.g. stirred tanks). A direct sampling method is used to minimize the effect of sampling on the aggregate structure. A combination of aggregate settling velocity and image analysis was used to quantify the structure of the aggregate. Aggregate size, density, and fractal dimension were found to be the most important aggregate structural parameters. The two methods used to determine aggregate fractal dimension were in good agreement. The effects of advective flow through an aggregate's porous structure and transition-regime drag coefficient on the evaluation of aggregate density were considered. The technique was applied to investigate the flocculation kinetics and the evolution of the aggregate structure of kaolin particles with an anionic flocculant under conditions similar to those of oil sands fine tailings. Aggregates were formed using a well controlled two-stage aggregation process. Detailed statistical analysis was performed to investigate the establishment of dynamic equilibrium condition in terms of aggregate size and density evolution. An equilibrium steady state condition was obtained within 90 s of the start of flocculation; after which no further change in aggregate structure was observed. Although longer flocculation times inside the shear field could conceivably cause aggregate structure conformation, statistical analysis indicated that this did not occur for the studied conditions. The results show that the technique and experimental conditions employed here produce aggregates having a well-defined, reproducible structure. Copyright © 2011

  6. Controls of vegetation structure and net primary production in restored grasslands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munson, Seth M.; Lauenroth, William K.

    2014-01-01

    1. Vegetation structure and net primary production (NPP) are fundamental properties of ecosystems. Understanding how restoration practices following disturbance interact with environmental factors to control these properties can provide insight on how ecosystems recover and guide management efforts. 2. We assessed the relative contribution of environmental and restoration factors in controlling vegetation structure, above- and below-ground investment in production across a chronosequence of semiarid Conservation Reserve Program (CRP) fields recovering from dryland wheat cropping relative to undisturbed grassland. Importantly, we determined the role of plant diversity and how seeding either native or introduced perennial grasses influenced the recovery of vegetation properties. 3. Plant basal cover increased with field age and was highest in CRP fields seeded with native perennial grasses. In contrast, fields seeded with introduced perennial grasses had tall-growing plants with relatively low basal cover. These vegetation structural characteristics interacted with precipitation, but not soil characteristics, to influence above-ground NPP (ANPP). Fields enrolled in the CRP program for >7 years supported twice as much ANPP as undisturbed shortgrass steppe in the first wet year of the study, but all CRP fields converged on a common low amount of ANPP in the following dry year and invested less than half as much as the shortgrass steppe in below-ground biomass. 4. ANPP in CRP fields seeded with native perennial grasses for more than 7 years was positively related to species richness, whereas ANPP in CRP fields seeded with introduced perennial grasses were controlled more by dominant species. 5. Synthesis and applications. Seeding with introduced, instead of native, perennial grasses had a strong direct influence on vegetation structure, including species richness, which indirectly affected NPP through time. However, the effects of restoring either native or introduced

  7. Primary and secondary structural analyses of glutathione S-transferase pi from human placenta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, H; Wilson, D E; Fritz, R R; Singh, S V; Medh, R D; Nagle, G T; Awasthi, Y C; Kurosky, A

    1990-05-01

    The primary structure of glutathione S-transferase (GST) pi from a single human placenta was determined. The structure was established by chemical characterization of tryptic and cyanogen bromide peptides as well as automated sequence analysis of the intact enzyme. The structural analysis indicated that the protein is comprised of 209 amino acid residues and gave no evidence of post-translational modifications. The amino acid sequence differed from that of the deduced amino acid sequence determined by nucleotide sequence analysis of a cDNA clone (Kano, T., Sakai, M., and Muramatsu, M., 1987, Cancer Res. 47, 5626-5630) at position 104 which contained both valine and isoleucine whereas the deduced sequence from nucleotide sequence analysis identified only isoleucine at this position. These results demonstrated that in the one individual placenta studied at least two GST pi genes are coexpressed, probably as a result of allelomorphism. Computer assisted consensus sequence evaluation identified a hydrophobic region in GST pi (residues 155-181) that was predicted to be either a buried transmembrane helical region or a signal sequence region. The significance of this hydrophobic region was interpreted in relation to the mode of action of the enzyme especially in regard to the potential involvement of a histidine in the active site mechanism. A comparison of the chemical similarity of five known human GST complete enzyme structures, one of pi, one of mu, two of alpha, and one microsomal, gave evidence that all five enzymes have evolved by a divergent evolutionary process after gene duplication, with the microsomal enzyme representing the most divergent form.

  8. Physical modeling of river spanning rock structures: Evaluating interstitial flow, local hydraulics, downstream scour development, and structure stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, K.L.; Thornton, C.I.; Mefford, B.; Holmquist-Johnson, C. L.

    2009-01-01

    Rock weir and ramp structures uniquely serve a necessary role in river management: to meet water deliveries in an ecologically sound manner. Uses include functioning as low head diversion dams, permitting fish passage, creating habitat diversity, and stabilizing stream banks and profiles. Existing information on design and performance of in-stream rock structures does not provide the guidance necessary to implement repeatable and sustainable construction and retrofit techniques. As widespread use of rock structures increases, the need for reliable design methods with a broad range of applicability at individual sites grows as well. Rigorous laboratory testing programs were implemented at the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation (Reclamation) and at Colorado State University (CSU) as part of a multifaceted research project focused on expanding the current knowledge base and developing design methods to improve the success rate of river spanning rock structures in meeting project goals. Physical modeling at Reclamation is being used to measure, predict, and reduce interstitial flow through rock ramps. CSU is using physical testing to quantify and predict scour development downstream of rock weirs and its impact on the stability of rock structures. ?? 2009 ASCE.

  9. The population genomics of begomoviruses: global scale population structure and gene flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prasanna HC

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The rapidly growing availability of diverse full genome sequences from across the world is increasing the feasibility of studying the large-scale population processes that underly observable pattern of virus diversity. In particular, characterizing the genetic structure of virus populations could potentially reveal much about how factors such as geographical distributions, host ranges and gene flow between populations combine to produce the discontinuous patterns of genetic diversity that we perceive as distinct virus species. Among the richest and most diverse full genome datasets that are available is that for the dicotyledonous plant infecting genus, Begomovirus, in the Family Geminiviridae. The begomoviruses all share the same whitefly vector, are highly recombinogenic and are distributed throughout tropical and subtropical regions where they seriously threaten the food security of the world's poorest people. Results We focus here on using a model-based population genetic approach to identify the genetically distinct sub-populations within the global begomovirus meta-population. We demonstrate the existence of at least seven major sub-populations that can further be sub-divided into as many as thirty four significantly differentiated and genetically cohesive minor sub-populations. Using the population structure framework revealed in the present study, we further explored the extent of gene flow and recombination between genetic populations. Conclusions Although geographical barriers are apparently the most significant underlying cause of the seven major population sub-divisions, within the framework of these sub-divisions, we explore patterns of gene flow to reveal that both host range differences and genetic barriers to recombination have probably been major contributors to the minor population sub-divisions that we have identified. We believe that the global Begomovirus population structure revealed here could

  10. Functional and Structural Changes in a Canine Model of Hereditary Primary Angle-Closure Glaucoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kecova, Helga; Harper, Matthew M.; Nilaweera, Wijitha; Kuehn, Markus H.; Kardon, Randy H.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose. To characterize functional and structural changes in a canine model of hereditary primary angle-closure glaucoma. Methods. Intraocular pressure (IOP) was evaluated with tonometry in a colony of glaucomatous dogs at 8, 15, 18, 20, and 30 months of age. Retinal function was evaluated using electroretinography (scotopic, photopic, and pattern). Examination of anterior segment structures was performed using gonioscopy and high-frequency ultrasonography (HFU). Results. A gradual rise in IOP was observed with an increase in age: 8 months, 14 mm Hg (median value); 15 months, 15.5 mm Hg; 18 months, 17.5 mm Hg; 20 months, 24 mm Hg; 30 months, 36 mm Hg. Provocative testing with mydriatic agents (tropicamide and atropine 1%) caused significant increases in IOP (35% and 50%, respectively). HFU analysis showed complete collapse of iridocorneal angles by 20 months of age. Scotopic and photopic ERG analysis did not reveal significant deficits, but pattern ERG analysis showed significantly reduced amplitudes in glaucomatous dogs (glaucoma, 3.5 ± 0.4 μV; control, 6.2 ± 0.3 μV; P = 0.004; Student's t-test). Histologic analysis revealed collapse of the iridocorneal angle, posterior bowing of the lamina cribrosa, swelling and loss of large retinal ganglion cells, increased glial reactivity, and increased thickening of the lamina cribrosa. Conclusions. Canine hereditary angle-closure glaucoma is characterized by a progressive increase in intraocular pressure, loss of optic nerve function, and retinal ganglion cell loss. PMID:19661222

  11. Identification of the gate regions in the primary structure of the secretin pIV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spagnuolo, Julian; Opalka, Natacha; Wen, Wesley X; Gagic, Dragana; Chabaud, Elodie; Bellini, Pierdomenico; Bennett, Matthew D; Norris, Gillian E; Darst, Seth A; Russel, Marjorie; Rakonjac, Jasna

    2010-04-01

    Secretins are a family of large bacterial outer membrane channels that serve as exit ports for folded proteins, filamentous phage and surface structures. Despite the large size of their substrates, secretins do not compromise the barrier function of the outer membrane, implying a gating mechanism. The region in the primary structure that forms the putative gate has not previously been determined for any secretin. To identify residues involved in gating the pIV secretin of filamentous bacteriophage f1, we used random mutagenesis of the gene followed by positive selection for mutants with compromised barrier function ('leaky' mutants). We identified mutations in 34 residues, 30 of which were clustered into two regions located in the centre of the conserved C-terminal secretin family domain: GATE1 (that spanned 39 residues) and GATE2 (that spanned 14 residues). An internal deletion constructed in the GATE2 region resulted in a severely leaky phenotype. Three of the four remaining mutations are located in the region that encodes the N-terminal, periplasmic portion of pIV and could be involved in triggering gate opening. Two missense mutations in the 24-residue region that separates GATE1 and GATE2 were also constructed. These mutant proteins were unstable, defective in multimerization and non-functional.

  12. STRUCTURAL HETEROGENEITIES AND PALEO FLUID FLOW IN AN ANALOG SANDSTONE RESERVOIR 2001-2004

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pollard, David; Aydin, Atilla

    2005-01-01

    Fractures and faults are brittle structural heterogeneities that can act both as conduits and barriers with respect to fluid flow in rock. This range in the hydraulic effects of fractures and faults greatly complicates the challenges faced by geoscientists working on important problems: from groundwater aquifer and hydrocarbon reservoir management, to subsurface contaminant fate and transport, to underground nuclear waste isolation, to the subsurface sequestration of CO2 produced during fossil-fuel combustion. The research performed under DOE grant DE-FG03-94ER14462 aimed to address these challenges by laying a solid foundation, based on detailed geological mapping, laboratory experiments, and physical process modeling, on which to build our interpretive and predictive capabilities regarding the structure, patterns, and fluid flow properties of fractures and faults in sandstone reservoirs. The material in this final technical report focuses on the period of the investigation from July 1, 2001 to October 31, 2004. The Aztec Sandstone at the Valley of Fire, Nevada, provides an unusually rich natural laboratory in which exposures of joints, shear deformation bands, compaction bands and faults at scales ranging from centimeters to kilometers can be studied in an analog for sandstone aquifers and reservoirs. The suite of structures there has been documented and studied in detail using a combination of low-altitude aerial photography, outcrop-scale mapping and advanced computational analysis. In addition, chemical alteration patterns indicative of multiple paleo fluid flow events have been mapped at outcrop, local and regional scales. The Valley of Fire region has experienced multiple episodes of fluid flow and this is readily evident in the vibrant patterns of chemical alteration from which the Valley of Fire derives its name. We have successfully integrated detailed field and petrographic observation and analysis, process-based mechanical modeling, and numerical

  13. Wake structures of two side by side spheres in a tripped boundary layer flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Canli Eyüb

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Two independent spheres were placed in a side by side arrangement and flow structure in the wake region of the spheres was investigated with a Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV system when the spheres were in a boundary layer over a flat plate as a special case. Reynolds number was 5000 based on the sphere diameter which was 42.5 mm. Boundary layer was tripped 8mm away from the leading edge of the flat plate with a 5 mm trip wire. The thickness of the hydrodynamically developed boundary layer was determined as 63mm which was larger than the sphere diameter of D=42.5mm. Wake region of the spheres was examined from point of flow physics for the different sphere locations in the ranges of 0≤G/D ≤1.5 and 0≤S/D ≤1.5 where G and S were the distance between the spheres and the distance between the bottom point of the spheres and the flat plate surface, respectively. Depending on the different sphere locations, instantaneous and time averaged vorticity data, scalar values of time-averaged velocity components and their root mean square (rms values and time averaged vorticity data are presented in the study for the evaluation of wake region of the spheres. It is demonstrated that the gap between the two spheres and the interaction between the gap and the boundary layer greatly affects flow pattern, especially when spheres are located near to the flat plate surface, i.e. S/D=0.1 for 0≤G/D ≤1.5. Different distances between the spheres resulted in various flow patterns as the spheres were approached to the flat plate. The distance S/D=0.1 for all gap values has the strongest effect on the wake structures. Beyond G/D=1.0, the sphere wakes tend to be similar to single sphere case. The instantaneous vorticity fields of the side by side arrangements comprised wavy structures in higher level comparing to an individual sphere case. The gap flow intensifies the occurrence of small scale eddies in the wake region. The submersion rate of the spheres

  14. Fluid-structure-interaction analysis for welded pipes with flow-accelerated corrosion wall thinning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, L.; Ding, Y., E-mail: lan.sun@cnl.ca [Canadian Nuclear Laboratories, Chalk River, Ontario (Canada)

    2016-06-15

    The flow-accelerated corrosion (FAC) entrance effect results in enhanced wall thinning immediately downstream of a weld if the weld connects an upstream FAC-resistant material with a downstream less resistant material. The weld regions, especially those with local repairs, are susceptible to cracking due to the high residual stresses induced by fabrication. The combined effects of the FAC entrance effect and high stresses at a weld might compromise the structural integrity of the piping and lead to a failure. Weld degradation by FAC entrance effect has been observed at nuclear and fossil power plants. This paper describes an application using fluid-structure-interaction (FSI) modelling to study the combined effects of FAC wall thinning, weld residual stresses, and in-service loads on welded structures. Simplified cases analyzed were based on CANDU outlet feeder conditions. The analysis includes the flow and mass transfer modelling of the FAC entrance effect using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) and nonlinear structural analyses of the welded structures with wall thinning and an assumed weld residual stress and strain distribution. The FSI analyses were performed using ANSYS Workbench, an integrated platform that enables the coupling of CFD and structural analysis solutions. The obtained results show that the combination of FAC, weld residual stresses, in-service loads (including the internal pressure) and (or) extreme loads could cause high stresses and affect the integrity of the welded pipes. The present work demonstrated that the FSI modelling can be used as an effective approach to assess the integrity of welded structures. (author)

  15. Modelling and Simulation of Structural Deformation of Isothermal Subsurface Flow and Carbon Dioxide Injection

    KAUST Repository

    El-Amin, Mohamed

    2011-05-15

    Injection of CO2 in hydrocarbon reservoir has double benefit. On the one hand, it is a profitable method due to issues related to global warming, and on the other hand it is an effective mechanism to enhance hydrocarbon recovery. Such injection associates complex processes involving, e.g., solute transport of dissolved materials, in addition to local changes in density of the phases. Also, increasing carbon dioxide injection may cause a structural deformation of the medium, so it is important to include such effect into the model. The structural deformation modelling in carbon sequestration is important to evaluate the medium stability to avoid CO2 leakage to the atmosphere. On the other hand, geologic formation of the medium is usually heterogeneous and consists of several layers of different permeability. In this work we conduct numerical simulation of two-phase flow in a heterogeneous porous medium domain with dissolved solute transport as well as structural deformation effects. The solute transport of the dissolved component is described by concentration equation. The structural deformation for geomechanics is derived from a general local differential balance equation with neglecting the local mass balance of solid phase and the inertial force term. The flux continuity condition is used at interfaces between different permeability layers of the heterogeneous medium. We analyze the vertical migration of a CO2 plume injected into a 2D layered reservoir. Analysis of distribution of flow field components such as saturation, pressures, velocities, and CO2 concentration are presented.

  16. Family structure and fertility in Taiwan: an extension and modification of Caldwell's wealth flows theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsuing, P C

    1988-06-01

    Based on the data from a nationwide survey of labor force participation conducted in 1985 by the Office of the Directorate-General of Budget, Accounting and Statistics, Executive Yuan, Republic of China, this project tries to modify Caldwell's Wealth Flows Theory in order to analyze fertility behavior of married women. Caldwell's Wealth Flows Theory indicates that a patriarchal family has a significant effect on fertility. Unless the patriarchal family structure is replaced by a nuclear family system, he claims, fertility levels will remain relatively high in developing countries. However, he does not discuss social factors which may influence the process of change in the family structure and which factors in the patriarchal family may influence fertility. To make up this shortcoming, this paper shows that female educational level, employment patterns, and occupational prestige brings about change in the family structure. This research also indicates that women with higher education and occupational prestige have lower fertility. In addition, it finds that female occupational status is a main factor to bring about change in the family structure. (author's)

  17. Modification of Turbulence Structures in a Channel Flow by Uniform Magnetic Fluxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, D.; Choi, H.; Kim, J.

    1997-11-01

    Effects of electromagnetic forcing on the near-wall turbulence are investigated by applying a uniform magnetic flux in a turbulent channel flow in the streamwise and spanwise directions, respectively. The base flow is a fully developed turbulent channel flow and the direct numerical simulation technique is used. The electromagnetic force induced from the magnetic fluxes reduces the intensity of the wall-layer structures and thus drag is significantly reduced. The wall-normal and spanwise velocity fluctuations and the Reynolds shear stress decrease with the increased magnetic flux in both directions. The streamwise velocity fluctuations increase with the streamwise magnetic flux, whereas they decrease with the spanwise magnetic flux. It is also shown that the spanwise magnetic flux is much more effective than the streamwise magnetic flux in reducing the skin-friction drag. Instantaneous Lorentz force vectors show that the flow motions by the near-wall vortices are directly inhibited by the spanwise magnetic flux, while they are less effectively inhibited by the streamwise magnetic flux. Other turbulence statistics that reveal the effects of the applied magnetic forcing will be presented. ^* Supported by KOSEF Contract No. 965-1008-003-2 and ONR Grant No. N00014-95-1-0352.

  18. A Structured Grid Based Solution-Adaptive Technique for Complex Separated Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thornburg, Hugh; Soni, Bharat K.; Kishore, Boyalakuntla; Yu, Robert

    1996-01-01

    The objective of this work was to enhance the predictive capability of widely used computational fluid dynamic (CFD) codes through the use of solution adaptive gridding. Most problems of engineering interest involve multi-block grids