WorldWideScience

Sample records for primarily neptunium plutonium

  1. Fluorescent determination of neptunium in plutonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alexandruk, V.M.; Babaev, A.S.; Dem'yanova, T.A.; Stepanov, A.V.

    1991-01-01

    This paper describes a new procedure for direct determination of Neptunium in Plutonium using laser induced time resolved fluorescence method. The procedure based on measurement of fluorescence intensity of Neptunium followed its concentration in effective layer of pellet of calcium fluoride. Detection limit of determination of Neptunium is 2 10 -12 g. At the level of Neptunium content in Plutonium more than 5 ppm relative standard deviation is equal 0.08-0.12. For carrying out of single measurement it is necessary neither more nor less 5 mkg Plutonium

  2. Cyclopentadienyl uranium, neptunium and plutonium chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plews, M.J.

    1985-01-01

    The thesis presents the preparation and characterisation of a number of mono, bis and tris(cyclopentadienyl) complexes of uranium(IV), neptunium(IV) and plutonium(IV). The work of previous studies on mono(cyclopentadienyl) thorium and uranium complexes has been extended, and a range of isostructural neptunium species isolated. Their mode of formation and stability in tetrahydrofuran and acetonitrile solutions was investigated. (author)

  3. Study of an automatic dosing of neptunium in the industrial process of separation neptunium 237-plutonium 238

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ros, Pierre

    1973-01-01

    The objective is to study and to adapt a method of automatic dosing of neptunium to the industrial process of separation and purification of plutonium 238, while taking the information quality and economic aspects into account. After a recall of some generalities on the production of plutonium 238, and the process of separation plutonium-neptunium, the author addresses the dosing of neptunium. The adopted measurement technique is spectrophotometry (of neptunium, of neptunium peroxide) which is the most flexible and economic to adapt to automatic control. The author proposes a project of chemical automatic machine, and discusses the complex (stoichiometry, form) and some aspects of neptunium dosing (redox reactions, process control) [fr

  4. Adsorption of neptunium and plutonium on metal phosphites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silver, G.L.

    1979-01-01

    The removal of neptunium and plutonium from water by adsorption on titanium, zirconium, bismuth, thorium, and uranium phosphites was investigated. These phosphites hydrolyze in neutral or alkaline solution producing the hydrous metal oxides that are more effective adsorbents than the original phosphite compounds. Ageing the plutonium-238 polymer changes its adsorption characteristics on commercial bone char. 37 figures, 7 tables

  5. Electroanalytical studies of uranium, neptunium, and plutonium ions in solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, Zenko; Aoyagi, Hisao; Kihara, Sorin

    1989-01-01

    Redox behavior of uranium, neptunium, and plutonium ions, whose oxidation states in acid solutions are between (VI) and (III), were investigated by flow-coulometry with a column electrode of glassy carbon fibers as well as ordinary voltammetry with a rotating disc electrode. Based on current-potential curves the electrode processes were elucidated taking their disproportionation and/or complexation reactions into account. The flow-coulometry, which provides rapid and quantitative electrolysis, was applied to such analytical purposes as follows; the determination of uranium and plutonium in the solution or the solid with discerning their oxidation states, the preparation of species in a desired oxidation state, even in an unstable state which cannot be prepared by ordinary procedure, and the separation of trace amount of uranium in solutions by the electrodeposition of its hydroxide

  6. Rapid and Automated Determination of Plutonium and Neptunium in Environmental Samples

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qiao, Jixin

    This thesis presents improved analytical methods for rapid and automated determination of plutonium and neptunium in environmental samples using sequential injection (SI) based chromatography and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). The progress of methodology development...... and optimization for rapid determination of plutonium in environmental samples using SIextraction chromatography prior to inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (Paper III); (3) Development of an SI-chromatographic method for simultaneous determination of plutonium and neptunium in environmental samples...... for rapid and simultaneous determination of plutonium and neptunium within an SI system (Paper VI). The results demonstrate that the developed methods in this study are reliable and efficient for accurate assays of trace levels of plutonium and neptunium as demanded in different situations including...

  7. Uranium/plutonium and uranium/neptunium separation by the Purex process using hydroxyurea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Zhaowu; He Jianyu; Zhang Zefu; Zhang Yu; Zhu Jianmin; Zhen Weifang

    2004-01-01

    Hydroxyurea dissolved in nitric acid can strip plutonium and neptunium from tri-butyl phosphate efficiently and has little influence on the uranium distribution between the two phases. Simulating the 1B contactor of the Purex process by hydroxyurea with nitric acid solution as a stripping agent, the separation factors of uranium/plutonium and uranium/neptunium can reach values as high as 4.7 x 10 4 and 260, respectively. This indicates that hydroxyurea is a promising salt free agent for uranium/plutonium and uranium/neptunium separations. (author)

  8. Rapid and automated determination of plutonium and neptunium in environmental samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qiao, J.

    2011-03-01

    This thesis presents improved analytical methods for rapid and automated determination of plutonium and neptunium in environmental samples using sequential injection (SI) based chromatography and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). The progress of methodology development in this work consists of 5 subjects stated as follows: 1) Development and optimization of an SI-anion exchange chromatographic method for rapid determination of plutonium in environmental samples in combination of inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry detection (Paper II); (2) Methodology development and optimization for rapid determination of plutonium in environmental samples using SI-extraction chromatography prior to inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (Paper III); (3) Development of an SI-chromatographic method for simultaneous determination of plutonium and neptunium in environmental samples (Paper IV); (4) Investigation of the suitability and applicability of 242 Pu as a tracer for rapid neptunium determination using anion exchange chromatography in an SI-network coupled with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (Paper V); (5) Exploration of macro-porous anion exchange chromatography for rapid and simultaneous determination of plutonium and neptunium within an SI system (Paper VI). The results demonstrate that the developed methods in this study are reliable and efficient for accurate assays of trace levels of plutonium and neptunium as demanded in different situations including environmental risk monitoring and assessment, emergency preparedness and surveillance of contaminated areas. (Author)

  9. Rapid and automated determination of plutonium and neptunium in environmental samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qiao, J.

    2011-03-15

    This thesis presents improved analytical methods for rapid and automated determination of plutonium and neptunium in environmental samples using sequential injection (SI) based chromatography and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). The progress of methodology development in this work consists of 5 subjects stated as follows: 1) Development and optimization of an SI-anion exchange chromatographic method for rapid determination of plutonium in environmental samples in combination of inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry detection (Paper II); (2) Methodology development and optimization for rapid determination of plutonium in environmental samples using SI-extraction chromatography prior to inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (Paper III); (3) Development of an SI-chromatographic method for simultaneous determination of plutonium and neptunium in environmental samples (Paper IV); (4) Investigation of the suitability and applicability of 242Pu as a tracer for rapid neptunium determination using anion exchange chromatography in an SI-network coupled with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (Paper V); (5) Exploration of macro-porous anion exchange chromatography for rapid and simultaneous determination of plutonium and neptunium within an SI system (Paper VI). The results demonstrate that the developed methods in this study are reliable and efficient for accurate assays of trace levels of plutonium and neptunium as demanded in different situations including environmental risk monitoring and assessment, emergency preparedness and surveillance of contaminated areas. (Author)

  10. Coprecipitation of neptunium and plutonium with iron and zirconium dibutyl phosphates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sokhina, L.P.; Rovnyj, S.I.; Goncharuk, L.V.

    1988-01-01

    Neptunium and plutonium coprecipitation with precipitates of dibutyl phosphates of some elements significant for radiochemical technology is studied. By the ability to coprecipitation of actinides with precipitates of dibutyl phosphates the cations may be arranged in the series Fe > Al > La > ≥ Zr ≥ Th. The composition of neptunium and plutonium mixed precipitates on the basis of iron dibutyl phosphates corresponding to the formula (Me(NO 3 ) 2 Al 2 ) n x · FeA 3 , where Me-neptunium or plutonium, A-anion of dibutyl phosphoric acid, n=1-4, is determined. Solubility of mixed precipitations in nitric acid and carbonate solutions is studied. Mixed precipitations on the basis of iron dibutyl phosphates are found to have the least solubility, their solubility being lower than that of individual compounds of dibutyl phoshates. The mechanism of formation of mixed precipitates is suggested and discussed

  11. Selective leaching studies of deep-sea sediments loaded with americium, neptunium and plutonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cole, T.G.; Higgo, J.J.W.; Cronan, D.S.; Rees, L.V.C.

    1984-07-01

    A series of selective leaching experiments were undertaken to investigate the solid phase speciation and distribution of americium, neptunium and plutonium which had been experimentally loaded onto different marine sediment types. The chemical leaches employed showed rather poor selectivity but certain trends were evident. Adsorption was not by ion exchange. Americium showed a preferential affinity for carbonate and plutonium for organic matter. Neptunium appeared to have no preferential affinities. Americium was sorbed by acetic acid residues (CaCO 3 removed) and by unleached carbonate-rich sediments with equal efficiency. This indicates that it is able to diversify its solid phase affinity/distribution depending upon which solid phases are available. (author)

  12. Purification process of uranium hexafluoride containing traces of plutonium fluoride and/or neptunium fluoride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aubert, J.; Bethuel, L.; Carles, M.

    1983-01-01

    In this process impure uranium hexafluoride is contacted with a metallic fluoride chosen in the group containing lead fluoride PbF 2 , uranium fluorides UFsub(4+x) (0 3 at a temperature such as plutonium and/or neptunium are reduced and pure uranium hexafluoride is recovered. Application is made to uranium hexafluoride purification in spent fuel reprocessing [fr

  13. Factors Controlling Redox Speciation of Plutonium and Neptunium in Extraction Separation Processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paulenova, Alena [Principal Investigator; Vandegrift, III, George F. [Collaborator

    2013-09-24

    The objective of the project was to examine the factors controlling redox speciation of plutonium and neptunium in UREX+ extraction in terms of redox potentials, redox mechanism, kinetics and thermodynamics. Researchers employed redox-speciation extractions schemes in parallel to the spectroscopic experiments. The resulting distribution of redox species w studied uring spectroscopic, electrochemical, and spectro-electrochemical methods. This work reulted in collection of data on redox stability and distribution of redox couples in the nitric acid/nitrate electrolyte and the development of redox buffers to stabilize the desired oxidation state of separated radionuclides. The effects of temperature and concentrations on the redox behavior of neptunium were evaluated.

  14. Development of analytical methods for the separation of plutonium, americium, curium and neptunium from environmental samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salminen, S.

    2009-07-01

    In this work, separation methods have been developed for the analysis of anthropogenic transuranium elements plutonium, americium, curium and neptunium from environmental samples contaminated by global nuclear weapons testing and the Chernobyl accident. The analytical methods utilized in this study are based on extraction chromatography. Highly varying atmospheric plutonium isotope concentrations and activity ratios were found at both Kurchatov (Kazakhstan), near the former Semipalatinsk test site, and Sodankylae (Finland). The origin of plutonium is almost impossible to identify at Kurchatov, since hundreds of nuclear tests were performed at the Semipalatinsk test site. In Sodankylae, plutonium in the surface air originated from nuclear weapons testing, conducted mostly by USSR and USA before the sampling year 1963. The variation in americium, curium and neptunium concentrations was great as well in peat samples collected in southern and central Finland in 1986 immediately after the Chernobyl accident. The main source of transuranium contamination in peats was from global nuclear test fallout, although there are wide regional differences in the fraction of Chernobyl-originated activity (of the total activity) for americium, curium and neptunium. The separation methods developed in this study yielded good chemical recovery for the elements investigated and adequately pure fractions for radiometric activity determination. The extraction chromatographic methods were faster compared to older methods based on ion exchange chromatography. In addition, extraction chromatography is a more environmentally friendly separation method than ion exchange, because less acidic waste solutions are produced during the analytical procedures. (orig.)

  15. Stability constants and solubility of neptunium and plutonium complexes with alkylphosphoric acids in TBP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fedoseev, D.A.; Romanovskaya, I.A.; Artemova, L.A.; Gubina, M.Yu.

    1988-01-01

    Stability concetration constants K and solubility of neptunium and plutonium complexes with di- and monobuthylphosphoric acids (APC) and with orthophosphoric and di-2-ethylhexyl-phosphoric acids in 30% TBP solution-n-dodecane system are determined by spectrophotometric titration and radiometry methods. Posibility of forecasting radiation-chemical behaviour of actinids according to data on K and APC radiation-chemical yield values is demonstrated

  16. Stability constants and solubility of neptunium and plutonium complexes with alkylphosphoric acids in TBP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fedoseev, D.A.; Romanovskaya, I.A.; Artemova, L.A.; Gibina, M.Yu.

    1989-01-01

    The concentration stability constants (K s ) and solubility of neptunium and plutonium complexes with di- and monobutylphosphoric acids (APA), as well as with orthophosphoric acid in the system composed of 30% TBP + n-dodecane, have been determined by spectrophotometric titration and radiometry. The feasibility of predicting the radiative chemical behavior of actinides based on their K s values and the radiative chemical yield of APA has been demonstrated

  17. Simulation study of the chemical forms of neptunium and plutonium in groundwater from a borehole in the northwest region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma Yingming; Jin Yuren; Wang Zhiqiang; Liu Dongxu; Liu Wei; Liu Yan

    2009-01-01

    According to physics-chymistry characteristic of groundwater from a borehole in the northwest region, we performed simulation study of the chemical forms of neptunium and plutonium by the geochemistry modeling program EQ3/6. The main conclusions are as follows: the main chemical form of neptunium in the groundwater is Np(V)'s NpO 2 + , subordination chemical forms are NpO 2 Cl, NpO 2 CO 3 - , NpO 2 OH, NpO 2 SO 4 - ; the main existing form of plutonium in the groundwater is Pu(IV)'s Pu(OH)5-and subordination chemical form is Pu(V)'s PuO 2 + . In addition,the temperature, pH and Eh also have different impacts on the chemical form of neptunium and plutonium. (authors)

  18. HF effect on dissociation kinetics of plutonium and neptunium complexes with 1,2-diaminocyclohexanetetraacetic acid in nitric acid solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nikitina, S.A.; Stepanov, A.V.

    1982-01-01

    Dissociation kinetics of Pusup((4)) and Np sup((4)) complexes with DCTA were investigated in HNO/sub 3/ solutions in the presence of HF and arsenazo 3. It was found that HF or NaF produced a differentiating effect on the reactivity of the complexes at (HNO/sub 3/)=1-6 mol/l as well as inhibiting effect at (HNO/sub 3/)=0.01 mol/l. Conditions of the differential kinetic analysis of plutonium and neptunium in the mixture and differential spectrophotometric analysis of uranium (6) during the camouflage of neptunium (4) and plutonium (4) were determined.

  19. HF effect on dissociation kinetics of plutonium and neptunium complexes with 1,2-diaminocyclohexanetetraacetic acid in nitric acid solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nikitina, S.A.; Stepanov, A.V.

    1982-01-01

    Dissociation kinetics of Pusup((4)) and Np sup((4)) complexes with DCTA were investigated in HNO 3 solutions in the presence of HF and arsenazo 3. It was found that HF or NaF produced a differentiating effect on the reactivity of the complexes at [HNO 3 ]=1-6 mol/l as well as inhibiting effect at [HNO 3 ]=0.01 mol/l. Conditions of the differential kinetic analysis of plutonium and neptunium in the mixture and differential spectrophotometric analysis of uranium (6) during the camouflage of neptunium (4) and plutonium (4) were determined

  20. Comparison of sample preparation methods for reliable plutonium and neptunium urinalysis using automatic extraction chromatography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qiao, Jixin; Xu, Yihong; Hou, Xiaolin

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes improvement and comparison of analytical methods for simultaneous determination of trace-level plutonium and neptunium in urine samples by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). Four sample pre-concentration techniques, including calcium phosphate, iron......), it endows urinalysis methods with better reliability and repeatability compared with co-precipitation techniques. In view of the applicability of different pre-concentration techniques proposed previously in the literature, the main challenge behind relevant method development is pointed to be the release...

  1. Action of copper (3) in periodate complex on hexavalent neptunium and plutonium in alkaline medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shatokhina, O.B.; Alekseeva, D.P.; Peretrukhin, B.F.; Krot, N.N.

    1977-01-01

    A complex of trivalent copper connected with periodate has been studied in order to determine its possible use for oxidizing hexavalent transuranium elements. Proceeding from the dependence of formal potentials of the pairs Cusup((3))-Cusup((2)), Npsup((7))-Npsup((6)), Pusup((7))-Pusup((6)) on alkali concentration, it has been established that beginning with concentration 1M the potential of the pair Cusup((3))-Cusup((2)) is higher than that of the pair Npsup((7))-Npsup((6)) by approximately 50 mV. This means that a rather complete oxidation of hexavalent neptunium to heptavalent is possible by the action of copper (3) excess on neptunium (6) when KOH concentration is 1M and higher. Oxidation close to quantitative is attained in 1M KOH when excess of copper(3) is used and the ratio Npsup((6)): Cusup((3)) is 1:4 and higher. When KOH concentration is more than 1M a sufficiently complete oxidation (96-97%) of neptunium (6) is attained at Npsup((6)):Cusup((3))=1:2 or 1:3. Optimum conditions for oxidizing plutonium are 11M KOH and 2-3-fold excess of copper (3) reagent. At 9M KOH and a ratio Pusup((6)):Cusup((3))=1:2 the yield of Pu (7) is 33 %

  2. Kinetics of the reaction between plutonium (4) and neptunium (4) in nitric acid solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koltunov, V S; Zhuravleva, G I; Marchenko, V I

    1976-01-01

    The kinetics of the oxidation of neptunium(IV) to neptunium(V) by tetravalent plutonium ions in solutions of HNO/sub 3/ + NaNO/sub 3/ at constant (..mu.. = 2) and variable (..mu.. = 0.7-2.0) ionic strengths of the solution was investigated by a spectrophotometric method. It was established that in the range of concentrations (Np(IV)) = (4.25-10.6) x 10/sup 13/; (Pu(IV)) = (2.6-3.9)x10/sup -3/ M; (H/sup +/) 0.37-1.91 M, a first order is observed with respect to the reagents, while the order of the reaction with respect to H/sup +/ ions is equal to -3. The average value of the true rate constant of the reaction is k = 27.9+-1.3 M/sup 2/xmin/sup -1/ at ..mu..=2 and 39/sup 0/C. It was shown that with increasing analytical concentration of HNO/sub 3/ and NO/sub 3//sup -/ ions (in a mixture of HNO/sub 3/ +HClO/sub 4/), the value of K decreases. On the basis of an invetigation of the dependence of the reaction rate on the temperature in the interval 31-44.8/sup 0/, we calculated the values of the energy (E = 34.6 kcal/mole), enthalpy (..delta..H* = 34 kcal/mole), free energy (..delta..F* = 19.6 kcal/mole, entropy (..delta..S* = 49 entropy units) of activation of the reaction and the formal ionic entropy of the activated complex (PuOOHNp/sup 5 +/)*, S* = -87 entropy units. A reaction mechanism including an interaction of hydrolyzed neptunium and plutonium ions as the rate-determining step was proposed and discusses. The results obtained are compared with data for this reaction in perchloric acid wolution and for other similar redox reactions.

  3. Study of oxidation-reduction reactions of plutonium and neptunium in sulphuric-phosphoric acid media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moiseev, I.V.; Kuperman, A.Ya.; Borodina, N.N.; Galkina, V.N.; Vinokurov, V.A.

    1976-01-01

    Potentiostatic, coulometric, potentiometric, and amperometric methods have been used for determining the rate constants of disproportionation (ksub(d)) of plutonium(5) and neptunium (5) and normal real redox potentials (Esub(0)sup(p)) of the following ion pairs in sulphur-phosphoric-acid media: PuOsub(2)sup(2)sup(+) (PuO 2 + , Pu 4+ /Pu 3+ , NpO 2 2+ /NpO 2 + , NpO 2 2+ /Np 4+ , NpO 2 + /Np 4+ , and Fe 3+ /Fe 2+ . The regularities have been shown of changing ksub(d) and Esub(o)sup(p) as a function of H 2 SO 4 and H 3 PO 4 concentration. It has been established that for plutonium and neptunium a linear correlation is observed between lg ksub(d) and Esub(o)sup(p) of the ion pairs NpO 2 2+ /NpO 2 + , NpO 2 2 /Np 4+ , NpO 2 + /Np 4+ and PuO 2 2+ /PuO 2 + in a wide range of their values. The correlation coefficient is close to unity in all cases (no less than 0.96). The results of investigations have made it possible to recommend optimum compositions of background electrolytes for performing continuous amperostatic coulometric titration of Pusup((6)) and Npsup((6)) up to four valent state by electrogenerated ions of iron (2)

  4. Sorption of cesium, radium, protactinium, uranium, neptunium and plutonium on rapakivi granite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huitti, T.; Hakanen, M.

    1996-12-01

    The aim of the study is to determine the sorption of cesium, radium, protactinium, uranium, neptunium and plutonium on rapakivi granite in the brackish groundwater of Haestholmen (site of the Loviisa-1, Loviisa-2 reactors). The studies were carried out under aerobic (Cs, Ra, Pa, U, Np, Pu) and anaerobic (Np, Pa, Pu, Tc) laboratory conditions. The cation exchange capasity was determined for the rock and the diffusion of tritiated water in the rocks of different degree of alteration. The sorption and diffusion properties of the rocks are briefly compared with those of host rocks at other sites under investigation by the Finnish company Posiva Oy for the final disposal of spent fuel. (29 refs.)

  5. Gamma radiolysis of alkaline aqueous solutions of neptunium and plutonium ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pikaev, A.K.; Gogolev, A.V.; Shilov, V.P.

    1998-01-01

    Full text: The paper is a brief review of data obtained by the authors from the study on redox reactions of neptunium and plutonium ions upon γ radiolysis of their aerated alkaline aqueous solutions. It includes the information on radiolytic reduction of Np(V), Np(VI) and Pu(VI) ions under various experimental conditions. It was found that the values of Np(VI) and Pu(VI) reduction yields do not depend on alkali concentration. The values considerably increase in the presence of some organic compounds (EDTA and formate were investigated). The formation of the Np(V) peroxo complex was observed in the γ radiolysis of alkaline aqueous solutions of Np(VI) and Np(V) in the presence of nitrate. The mechanism of radiolytic redox reactions of the ions is discussed in some detail

  6. Separation of neptunium from uranium and plutonium in the Purex process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kolarik, Z.; Schuler, R.

    1984-01-01

    The possibility of removing neptunium from the Purex process in the first extraction cycle was investigated. Butyraldehyde was found to reduce Np(VI) to Np(V), but not Pu(IV) to Pu(III). Up to 99.7% Np can be separated from uranium and plutonium in the 1A extractor or, much more favourably, in an additional partitioning extractor. Hydroxylamine nitrate can be used for reducing Np(VI) to Np(V) in a uranium purification cycle at a high U concentration in the feed solution. Here the decontamination factor for Np can be as high as 2300 and is lowered if iron is present in the feed. (author)

  7. Uranium, neptunium and plutonium kinetics of extraction by tributylphosphate and trilaurylamine in a centrifugal contactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergeonneau, P.; Jaouen, C.; Germain, M.; Bathellier, A.

    1977-01-01

    Uranium, plutonium and neptunium kinetics of transfer between various aqueous nitric solutions and solvents have been measured at the laboratory scale, using a centrifugal contactor especially developed in the laboratory. The transfer kinetics of nitric acid, hexavalent U, tetravalent U, Np and Pu from nitric acid solutions into 30% TBP in r-dodecane and 10% trilaurylamine in r-dodecane have been studied. The effects of rotation speed, temperature, initial nitric acid concentration, metal concentration on extraction and stripping kinetics have been investigated. The results obtained show that TBP extraction and stripping are more rapid than trilaurylamine ones. The low activation energies of transfer reactions with TBP suggest that both in extraction and stripping, the transfer rate is limited by the diffusion of the species in the aqueous and organic phases. For trilaurylamine, the transfer mechanism appears more complex

  8. Sequential injection approach for simultaneous determination of ultratrace plutonium and neptunium in urine with accelerator mass spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qiao, Jixin; Hou, Xiaolin; Roos, Per

    2013-01-01

    An analytical method was developed for simultaneous determination of ultratrace level plutonium (Pu) and neptunium (Np) using iron hydroxide coprecipitation in combination with automated sequential injection extraction chromatography separation and accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) measurement...... show that preboiling and aging are important for obtaining high chemical yields for both Pu and Np, which is possibly related to the aggregation and adsorption behavior of organic substances contained in urine. Although the optimal condition for Np and Pu simultaneous determination requires 5-day aging...

  9. X-ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS) study of uranium, neptunium and plutonium oxides in silicate-based glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lam, D.J.; Veal, B.W.; Paulikas, A.P.

    1982-11-01

    Using XPS as the principal investigative tool, we are in the process of examining the bonding properties of selected metal oxides added to silicate glass. In this paper, we present results of XPS studies of uranium, neptunium, and plutonium in binary and multicomponent silicate-based glasses. Models are proposed to account for the very diverse bonding properties of 6+ and 4+ actinide ions in the glasses

  10. Application of extraction chromatography to the recovery of neptunium, plutonium and americium from an industrial waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Madic, C.; Kertesz, C.; Sontag, R.; Koehly, G.

    1980-01-01

    A pilot scale investigation was made to evaluate the possible application of the extraction chromatographic method (LLC) to the partitioning of alpha emitters from liquid wastes containing traces of transuranium elements. A secondary purpose was to obtain pure Am0 2 , which is used to produce alpha, gamma, and neutron sources. The process developed for alpha partitioning consists essentially of the extraction of macro amounts of uranium with 30% TBP in dodecane in mixer-settlers, then coextraction of Np-237, Pu-239, and Am-241 by LLC on a macro column filled with di-n-hexyl-octoxy-methyl-phosphine oxide (POX.11) adsorbed on an inert support. In each run about 200 liters of initial waste are decontaminated of alpha emitters. The loading step is followed by selective elution of americium, neptunium, and plutonium. The americium eluate is then subjected to the following operations: (1) separation of Am from Fe and Cd by LLC on a TBP column and (2) separation of Am from lanthanide traces by LLC on an HD(DiBM)P column after oxidation of Am(III) to Am(VI). The Am in the eluate is subsequently reduced to Am(III) and precipitated as oxalate with oxalic acid. The oxalate is then filtered and calcined to yield pure AmO 2

  11. Investigation of separation factors of neptunium and plutonium in the process of mass transfer through liquid impregnated membranes with di-2-ethylhexylphosphoric acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Novikov, A.P.; Mikheeva, M.N.; Myasoedov, B.F.

    1990-01-01

    Kinetics of joint transfer of neptunium(6) and plutonium(4) through liquid membranes with di-2-ethylhexylphosphoric acid, depending on the concentration of the carrier, nature of reextracting agent and ratio of metal concentrations, was investigated. The optimal conditions for selective isolation of microimpurity of one of the elements from solutions of the other were determined. Solution of ammonium carbonate with carrier concentration of 0.1-0.2 mol/l can be expediently utilized as reextracting phase for neptunium impurity removal

  12. Rapid and simultaneous determination of neptunium and plutonium isotopes in environmental samples by extraction chromatography using sequential injection analysis and ICP-MS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qiao, Jixin; Hou, Xiaolin; Roos, Per

    2010-01-01

    plutonium and neptunium in three reference materials were in agreement with the recommended or literature values at the 0.05 significance level. The developed method is suitable for the analysis of up to 10 g of soil and 20 g of seaweed samples. The extraction chromatographic separation within the SI system......This paper reports an automated analytical method for rapid and simultaneous determination of plutonium isotopes (239Pu and 240Pu) and neptunium (237Np) in environmental samples. An extraction chromatographic column packed with TrisKem TEVA® resin was incorporated in a sequential injection (SI...... for a single sample takes less than 1.5 h. As compared to batchwise procedures, the developed method significantly improves the analysis efficiency, reduces the labor intensity and expedites the simultaneous determination of plutonium and neptunium as demanded in emergency actions....

  13. The reduction of plutonium (IV) and neptunium (VI) ions by N,N-ethyl (hydroxyethyl) hydroxylamine in nitric acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koltunov, V.S.; Baranov, S.M.; Mezhov, E.A.; Taylor, R.J.; May, I.

    1999-01-01

    The kinetics of the reduction of neptunium (VI) and plutonium (IV) ions in nitric acid solution by a new rapid salt free reductant, N,N-ethyl (hydroxyethyl) hydroxylamine, have been studied and rate equations determined. Under equivalent conditions, both Np(VI) and Pu(IV) are reduced faster than by the related reagent, N,N-diethyl hydroxylamine, and it is suggested that this is due to the introduction of the hydroxy group into the reductant molecule. Possible reaction mechanisms have been suggested to account for the observed reaction stoichiometry. (orig.)

  14. The 'overlooked trio' of hypothetical terrorist nuclear weapons - reactor grade plutonium, neptunium-237 and tritium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sholly, S.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: Considerations revolving around physical protection of nuclear material are quite commonly and naturally focused on protecting weapons-grade plutonium (WGPu) and highly enriched uranium (HEU) from theft and diversion. These two materials are the center of attention because of their well-known (and demonstrated) potential for use in first-generation nuclear explosive devices of which potential terrorists are widely thought to be capable. They are also the center of attention because of retirements of these materials from military use as the Russian Federation and the United States reduce the number of nuclear weapons in their arsenals. Three other materials - an 'overlooked trio' - must also be borne in mind within this context: (1) reactor-grade plutonium (RGPu); (2) neptunium-237 (Np-237); and (3) tritium (H-3). Although there are still some authorities who either contend that RGPu cannot be used in a nuclear explosive or that there are (for a terrorist) insurmountable difficulties in doing so, the knowledgeable scientific and technical community, recognizes the potential utility of RGPu for hypothetical terrorist nuclear devices. A much smaller community of experts recognizes the usefulness of Np-237 for nuclear devices, but Np-237 is as straight-forwardly and easily usable as HEU and similarly abundant (but not often in separated form). Tritium can be used (with a modest increase in design sophistication) in a conventional first-generation nuclear device with any of the weapons-usable materials (WGPu, HEU, RGPu or Np-237) to increase the yield and/or increase the reliability of a non-fizzle yield. Given the presence of RGPu and Np-237 in abundant quantities in spent commercial reactor fuel, widely available knowledge of how to separate these materials, and a world-wide total of more than 400 nuclear power plants, spent reactor fuel also requires stringent controls. This is especially true of old spent fuel which has far less radiation dose

  15. Osteosarcoma induction by plutonium-239, americium-241 and neptunium-237 : the problem of deriving risk estimates for man

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, D.M.

    1988-01-01

    Spontaneous bone cancer (osteosarcoma) represents only about 0.3% of all human cancers, but is well known to be inducible in humans by internal contamination with radium-226 and radium-224. plutonium-239, americium-241 and neptunium-237 form, or will form, the principal long-lived alpha particle emitting components of high activity waste and burnt-up nuclear fuel elements. These three nuclides deposit extensively in human bone and although, fortunately, no case of a human osteosarcoma induced by any of these nuclides is known, evidence from animal studies suggests that all three are more effective than radium-226 in inducing osteosarcoma. The assumption that the ratio of the risk factors, the number of osteosarcoma expected per 10000 person/animal Gy, for radium-226 and any other bone-seeking alpha-emitter will be independent of animal species has formed the basis of all the important studies of the radiotoxicity of actinide nuclides in experimental animals. The aim of this communication is to review the risk factors which may be calculated from the various animal studies carried out over the last thirty years with plutonium-237, americium-241 and neptunium-237 and to consider the problems which may arise in extrapolating these risk factors to homo sapiens

  16. Comparison of extraction chromatography and a procedure based on the molecular recognition method as separation methods in the determination of neptunium and plutonium radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strisovska, Jana; Galanda, Dusan; Drabova, Veronika; Kuruc, Jozef

    2012-01-01

    The potential of various types of sorbents for separation of radionuclides of plutonium and neptunium were examined. Extraction chromatography and a procedure based on the molecular recognition method were used for the separation. The suitability of the various sorbent types and brands for this purpose was determined. (orig.)

  17. The incorporation of neptunium and plutonium in thorutite (ThTi{sub 2}O{sub 6})

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Yingjie, E-mail: yzx@ansto.gov.au; Gregg, Daniel J.; Lumpkin, Gregory R.; Begg, Bruce D.; Jovanovic, Miodrag

    2013-12-25

    Highlights: •The incorporation of neptunium (Np) and plutonium (Pu) in thorutite (ThTi{sub 2}O{sub 6}) has been studied. •The effect of Np/Pu doping on the unit cell parameter changes has been discussed from the structure point of view. •The effect of Y as charge compensator to encourage the formation of higher valences of Np and Pu has been explored. •The resulting Np/Pu doped thorutite samples have been characterised by using XRD, SEM and DRS. -- Abstract: The incorporation of neptunium (Np) and plutonium (Pu) into the brannerite structured lattice was studied using thorutite (ThTi{sub 2}O{sub 6}) as host lattice and sintering in air. The uncompensated Np and Pu doped samples and the low Y-charge compensated Np and Pu doped samples showed main phases as designed together with trace amounts of rutile. Those samples with larger amounts of Y produced yttrium pyrochlores as an additional minor phase. XRD analyses reveal anisotropic changes of the cell parameters; the a-parameter contracts while b- and c-parameters expand with mean cationic radius. This is in reasonable agreement with previous experimental data on ThTi{sub 2}O{sub 6} and Ce{sub 0.975}Ti{sub 2}O{sub 5.95}. Attempts to form Np or Pu valences >4+ by adding Y as a charge compensator were unsuccessful, suggesting that tetravalent Np and Pu ions are favoured in air-fired thorutite.

  18. Potential for radionuclide immobilization in the EBS/NFE: solubility limiting phases for neptunium, plutonium, and uranium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rard, J. A., LLNL

    1997-10-01

    Retardation and dispersion in the far field of radionuclides released from the engineered barrier system/near field environment (EBS/NFE) may not be sufficient to prevent regulatory limits being exceeded at the accessible environment. Hence, a greater emphasis must be placed on retardation and/or immobilization of radionuclides in the EBS/NFE. The present document represents a survey of radionuclide-bearing solid phases that could potentially form in the EBS/NFE and immobilize radionuclides released from the waste package and significantly reduce the source term. A detailed literature search was undertaken for experimental solubilities of the oxides, hydroxides, and various salts of neptunium, plutonium, and uranium in aqueous solutions as functions of pH, temperature, and the concentrations of added electrolytes. Numerous solubility studies and reviews were identified and copies of most of the articles were acquired. However, this project was only two months in duration, and copies of some the identified solubility studies could not be obtained at short notice. The results of this survey are intended to be used to assess whether a more detailed study of identified low- solubility phase(s) is warranted, and not as a data base suitable for predicting radionuclide solubility. The results of this survey may also prove useful in a preliminary evaluation of the efficacy of incorporating chemical additives to the EBS/NFE that will enhance radionuclide immobilization.

  19. Use of radioanalytical methods for determination of uranium, neptunium, plutonium, americium and curium isotopes in radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geraldo, Bianca

    2012-01-01

    Activated charcoal is a common type of radioactive waste that contains high concentrations of fission and activation products. The management of this waste includes its characterization aiming the determination and quantification of the specific radionuclides including those known as Difficult-to-Measure Radionuclides (RDM). The analysis of the RDM's generally involves complex radiochemical analysis for purification and separation of the radionuclides, which are expensive and time-consuming. The objective of this work was to define a methodology for sequential analysis of the isotopes of uranium, neptunium, plutonium, americium and curium present in a type of radioactive waste, evaluating chemical yield, analysis of time spent, amount of secondary waste generated and cost. Three methodologies were compared and validated that employ ion exchange (TI + EC), extraction chromatography (EC) and extraction with polymers (ECP). The waste chosen was the activated charcoal from the purification system of primary circuit water cooling the reactor IEA-R1. The charcoal samples were dissolved by acid digestion followed by purification and separation of isotopes with ion exchange resins, extraction and chromatographic extraction polymers. Isotopes were analyzed on an alpha spectrometer, equipped with surface barrier detectors. The chemical yields were satisfactory for the methods TI + EC and EC. ECP method was comparable with those methods only for uranium. Statistical analysis as well the analysis of time spent, amount of secondary waste generated and cost revealed that EC method is the most effective for identifying and quantifying U, Np, Pu, Am and Cm present in charcoal. (author)

  20. Investigation on neptunium behavior in electrolytic partitioning process of uranium and plutonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Qingxuan; Zhang Jiajun; Tian Baosheng; Jiang Dongliang; Li Zhaoyi; He Jianyu

    1988-01-01

    The electrolytic oxidation-raduction of Np(V, VI) in HNO 3 solution was studied. Experimental results showed that the electrode process of Np(V)-Np(VI) couple is reversible, and the half reaction time of the process mentioned above is about 1.5 minutes under given conditions. The overpotential of reduction of Np(V) is high, which makes it difficult to reduce Np(V) into Np(IV) directly at cathode. Owing to a large quantity of U(IV) produced through electrolysis, it is presaged that neptunium will be mainly in tetravalent state in the electrolytic M-S battery. A new type of electrolytic M-S battery was developed, in which anodes were installed in each settling chamber without any specific anode chamber in the battery. Owing to using of the mechanical stirrer driven by a wheel gear, stage efficiency is high. Demonstration campaign was carried out. It follows from the results that the yield of Pu is 99.90 ∼ 99.99%. Separation factor of U from Pu is 3900 ∼ 33000. Material balance of U and Pu is satisfactory. Heavy accumulation of Np in the battery was observed. Np in the battery is mainly in the tetravalent state. It is believed that it is difficult to recover Np quantitatively from single fluent (e.g. 1BP or 1BU) under normal conditions of partitioning step of the PUREX process

  1. Plutonium and neptunium absorption from the gastrointestinal tract of neonatal baboons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lataillade, Ghislaine; Duserre, Claude; Rateau, Gerard; Verry, Monique; Fritsch, Paul; Metivier, Henri

    1992-06-01

    Nineteen baboons aged 1 to 310 days were given oral doses of 238 Pu citrate or 239 Np nitrate. Gastrointestinal (GI) absorption of Pu and Np were higher than those observed in adults. The values of Pu GI absorption were 0.22% at 1 d, 0.17% at 17 d then about 0.10% until 177 d of age. From 195 d onwards, GI absorption was about 0.02% vs adult values (0.008%). GI absorption of neptunium decreased rapidly with age from 1.71% at 4 d to 0.14% at 6 d and remained at this value until 26 d. From 77 d onwards Np GI absorption was decreased to adult value (0.042%). Gastrointestinal retention associated with GI absorption was small, below 0.4% for Pu and 0.2% for Np. Np and Pu was mainly retained in the small intestine. Pu was retained in the ileum wall till 66 d, and afterwards in the duodenum wall. Histological study of Pu retention showed that it was confined to the macrophages under the ileum villi epithelial cells. Np did not seem to have a well-defined retention compartment. Retention occurred first in the ileum wall up to 6 d, afterwards it was divided between the ileum and duodenum walls up to 77 d and finally, between the duodenum and jejunum walls from 132 days of age onwards. The study shows a difference between Np and Pu GI absorption in neonatal baboons. Np GI absorption decreased to adult value in less than 3 months whereas Pu GI absorption decreased to adult value within 195 days. Our Pu results demonstrated that, the tenfold increase of actinides gastrointestinal transfer proposed by ICRP up to 12 months of age in newborn humans seems acceptable. (authors) [fr

  2. Radionuclide sorption in Yucca Mountain tuffs with J-13 well water: Neptunium, uranium, and plutonium. Yucca Mountain site characterization program milestone 3338

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Triay, I.R.; Cotter, C.R.; Kraus, S.M.; Huddleston, M.H.

    1996-08-01

    We studied the retardation of actinides (neptunium, uranium, and plutonium) by sorption as a function of radionuclide concentration in water from Well J-13 and of tuffs from Yucca Mountain. Three major tuff types were examined: devitrified, vitric, and zeolitic. To identify the sorbing minerals in the tuffs, we conducted batch sorption experiments with pure mineral separates. These experiments were performed with water from Well J-13 (a sodium bicarbonate groundwater) under oxidizing conditions in the pH range from 7 to 8.5. The results indicate that all actinides studied sorb strongly to synthetic hematite and also that Np(V) and U(VI) do not sorb appreciably to devitrified or vitric tuffs, albite, or quartz. The sorption of neptunium onto clinoptilolite-rich tuffs and pure clinoptilolite can be fitted with a sorption distribution coefficient in the concentration range from 1 X 10 -7 to 3 X 10 -5 M. The sorption of uranium onto clinoptilolite-rich tuffs and pure clinoptilolite is not linear in the concentration range from 8 X 10 -8 to 1 X 10 -4 M, and it can be fitted with nonlinear isotherm models (such as the Langmuir or the Freundlich Isotherms). The sorption of neptunium and uranium onto clinoptilolite in J-13 well water increases with decreasing pH in the range from 7 to 8.5. The sorption of plutonium (initially in the Pu(V) oxidation state) onto tuffs and pure mineral separates in J-13 well water at pH 7 is significant. Plutonium sorption decreases as a function of tuff type in the order: zeolitic > vitric > devitrified; and as a function of mineralogy in the order: hematite > clinoptilolite > albite > quartz

  3. Measurement of total alpha activity of neptunium, plutonium, and americium in highly radioactive Hanford waste by iron hydroxide precipitation and 2-heptanone solvent extraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maiti, T.C.; Kaye, J.H.

    1992-06-01

    An improved method has been developed to concentrate the major alpha-emitting actinide elements neptunium, plutonium, and americium from samples with high salt content such as those resulting from efforts to characterize Hanford storage tank waste. Actinide elements are concentrated by coprecipitation of their hydroxides using iron carrier. The iron is removed by extraction from 8M HCI with 2-heptanone. The actinide elements remain in the aqueous phase free from salts, iron, and long-lived fission products. Recoveries averaged 98 percent

  4. New Synthetic Methods and Structure-Property Relationships in Neptunium, Plutonium, and Americium Borates. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albrecht-Schmitt, Thomas Edward

    2013-09-14

    The past three years of support by the Heavy Elements Chemistry Program have been highly productive in terms of advanced degrees awarded, currently supported graduate students, peer-reviewed publications, and presentations made at universities, national laboratories, and at international conferences. Ph.D. degrees were granted to Shuao Wang and Juan Diwu, who both went on to post-doctoral appointments at the Glenn T. Seaborg Center at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory with Jeff Long and Ken Raymond, respectively. Pius Adelani completed his Ph.D. with me and is now a post-doc with Peter C. Burns. Andrea Alsobrook finished her Ph.D. and is now a post-doc at Savannah River with Dave Hobbs. Anna Nelson completed her Ph.D. and is now a post-doc with Rod Ewing at the University of Michigan. As can be gleaned from this list, students supported by the Heavy Elements Chemistry grant have remained interested in actinide science after leaving my program. This follows in line with previous graduates in this program such as Richard E. Sykora, who did his post-doctoral work at Oak Ridge National Laboratory with R. G. Haire, and Amanda C. Bean, who is a staff scientist at Los Alamos National Laboratory, and Philip M. Almond and Thomas C. Shehee, who are both staff scientists at Savannah River National Laboratory, Gengbang Jin who is a staff scientist at Argonne National Lab, and Travis Bray who has been a post-doc at both LBNL and ANL. Clearly this program is serving as a pipe-line for students to enter into careers in the national laboratories. About half of my students depart the DOE complex for academia or industry. My undergraduate researchers also remain active in actinide chemistry after leaving my group. Dan Wells was a productive undergraduate of mine, and went on to pursue a Ph.D. on uranium and neptunium chalcogenides with Jim Ibers at Northwestern. After earning his Ph.D., he went directly into the nuclear industry.

  5. New Synthetic Methods and Structure-Property Relationships in Neptunium, Plutonium, and Americium Borates. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Albrecht-Schmitt, Thomas Edward

    2013-01-01

    The past three years of support by the Heavy Elements Chemistry Program have been highly productive in terms of advanced degrees awarded, currently supported graduate students, peer-reviewed publications, and presentations made at universities, national laboratories, and at international conferences. Ph.D. degrees were granted to Shuao Wang and Juan Diwu, who both went on to post-doctoral appointments at the Glenn T. Seaborg Center at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory with Jeff Long and Ken Raymond, respectively. Pius Adelani completed his Ph.D. with me and is now a post-doc with Peter C. Burns. Andrea Alsobrook finished her Ph.D. and is now a post-doc at Savannah River with Dave Hobbs. Anna Nelson completed her Ph.D. and is now a post-doc with Rod Ewing at the University of Michigan. As can be gleaned from this list, students supported by the Heavy Elements Chemistry grant have remained interested in actinide science after leaving my program. This follows in line with previous graduates in this program such as Richard E. Sykora, who did his post-doctoral work at Oak Ridge National Laboratory with R. G. Haire, and Amanda C. Bean, who is a staff scientist at Los Alamos National Laboratory, and Philip M. Almond and Thomas C. Shehee, who are both staff scientists at Savannah River National Laboratory, Gengbang Jin who is a staff scientist at Argonne National Lab, and Travis Bray who has been a post-doc at both LBNL and ANL. Clearly this program is serving as a pipe-line for students to enter into careers in the national laboratories. About half of my students depart the DOE complex for academia or industry. My undergraduate researchers also remain active in actinide chemistry after leaving my group. Dan Wells was a productive undergraduate of mine, and went on to pursue a Ph.D. on uranium and neptunium chalcogenides with Jim Ibers at Northwestern. After earning his Ph.D., he went directly into the nuclear industry

  6. Determination of milligram amounts of neptunium by potentiometric titration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryzhinskij, M.V.; Solntseva, L.F.

    1981-01-01

    Two procedures of potentiometric titration of about 1 mg Np are reported which are based on its oxidation to neptunium (6) with silver (2) oxide followed by titration with iron (2) to neptunium (5) in one case and to neptunium (4) in the alternative one. The error is not greater than 0.2% rel. Ten-fold uranium excess does not interfere. Up to 1% of plutonium relative to neptunium does not interfere in the case of the titration to neptunium (5). In the titration to neptunium (4), plutonium is titrated stoichiometrically [ru

  7. Direct complexonometric determination of thorium (IV), uranium (IV), neptunium (IV), plutonium (IV) by titration of diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid with xylenol orange as indicator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rykov, A.G.; Piskunov, E.M.; Timofeev, G.A.

    1975-01-01

    The purpose of the present work was to develop a method of determining Th(IV), U(IV), Np(N) and Pu(IV) in acid solutions by titration with diethylenetriamine pentacetic acid, the indicator being xylenol orange. It has been established that Th, U, Np and Pu can be determined to within 0.5-1.5%. Th and U in quantities of tens of milligrams can be determined with greater accuracy, attaining hundredths of one per cent. During titration the determination is not hindered by singly- and doubly-charged metal ions, trivalent lanthanides and actinides, except plutonium. The proposed method can be used to determine U(IV) in the presence of considerable quantities of U(VI) and Np(IV) in the presence of Np(V). Total concentrations of uranium or neptunium are determined by reducing uranium (VI) or neptunium (V) by a standard method (for example, using metallic lead, cadmium or zinc amalgam) to the tetravalent state and applying the method described in the paper. (E.P.)

  8. The extraction neptunium by trilaurylamine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Champion, J.; Chesne, A.

    1964-01-01

    The extraction by trilaurylamine of neptunium (IV) from nitric acid and sulfuric acid-nitric acid media has been studied with the aim of developing a purification process for this element. Relative to the plutonium-neptunium separation, conditions are given for the oxidation of neptunium (IV) in sulfuric acid-nitric acid medium and data are presented on the stabilisation of the + 4 oxidation state by the organic solvent. Two procedures have been developed for the simultaneous purification of the two actinides. Both are based on the trilaurylamine extraction of the tetravalent nitrate species. The first utilises a constant redox potential fixed by Fe +++ /Fe ++ couple, while in the second, valencies are determined by successive addition of nitrite and ferrous ions. Gram quantities of neptunium 237 has been recovered from plutonium process solution. Alternate procedures are suggested for the chemical processing of irradiated Np 237 . (authors) [fr

  9. JAEA thermodynamic database for performance assessment of geological disposal of high-level and TRU wastes. Refinement of thermodynamic data for tetravalent thorium, uranium, neptunium and plutonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujiwara, Kenso; Kitamura, Akira; Yui, Mikazu

    2010-03-01

    Within the scope of the JAEA thermodynamic database project for performance assessment of geological disposal of high-level and TRU radioactive wastes, the refinement of the thermodynamic data for the inorganic compounds and complexes of Thorium(IV), Uranium(IV), Neptunium(IV) and Plutonium(IV) was carried out. Refinement of thermodynamic data for the element was performed on a basis of the thermodynamic database for actinide published by the Nuclear Energy Agency in the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD/NEA). Additionally, the latest data after publication of thermodynamic data by OECD/NEA were reevaluated to determine whether the data should be included in the JAEA-TDB. (author)

  10. Contribution to the study of liquid-liquid extraction dynamics in the case of fast transfers. Extractions of uranium, plutonium and neptunium in a laboratory centrifugal extractor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergeonneau, Philippe

    1978-01-01

    The liquid-liquid extraction (also named solvent-based extraction) is a very important technique for the reprocessing of irradiated nuclear fuels. This research thesis is based on the use of a laboratory centrifugal extractor which allows interesting conditions to be achieved: fast transfer due to an intense solution mixing, very short duration of contact between solutions. Thus, after a report of a bibliographical study on chemical mechanisms of extraction, on the composition of extracted species, on extraction kinetics, and on centrifugal extractors, this thesis reports the design, fabrication and use of a centrifugal extractor: presentation of fundamental principles, description and characteristics (materials, hydrodynamic operation test and problems, prototype). It reports studies of fast transfer kinetics: mathematical processing, result interpretation, results and discussions of extraction kinetics for nitric acid, uranium VI and IV, plutonium IV, neptunium IV, and comparison of the different extraction kinetics

  11. The measurement of neptunium in fast reactor fuel reprocessing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mair, M.A.; Savage, D.J.; Kyffin, T.W.

    1986-02-01

    Analytical techniques have been developed to measure neptunium in the feed, waste and product streams of a fast reactor fuel reprocessing plant. The estimated level of one microgram per milligram of plutonium in some solutions presented severe separation and measurement problems. An initial separation stage was essential, and both ion exchange and solvent extraction using thenoyltrifluoroacetone were studied. The redox chemistry of neptunium necessary to achieve good separation is considered. Spectrophotometry measurement of the stable neptunium/arsenazo III complex was selected for the final neptunium determination with additional analysis by radiometric methods. Incomplete recovery of neptunium during the separation stages necessitated yield measurements, using either neptunium-237 as an internal standard or the short lived gamma active neptunium-239 isotope as a tracer. The distribution of neptunium between the waste and product streams is discussed, in relation to the chemistry of neptunium in the reprocessing plant. (author)

  12. Separation by sequential chromatography of americium, plutonium and neptunium elements: application to the study of trans-uranian elements migration in a European lacustrine system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michel, H.

    1999-01-01

    The nuclear tests carried out in the atmosphere in the Sixties, the accidents and in particular that to the power station of Chernobyl in 1986, were at the origin of the dispersion of a significant quantity of transuranic elements and fission products. The study of a lake system, such that of the Blelham Tarn in Great Britain, presented in this memory, can bring interesting answers to the problems of management of the environment. The determination of the radionuclides in sediment cores made it possible not only to establish the history of the depositions and consequently the origin of the radionuclides, but also to evaluate the various transfers which took place according to the parameters of the site and the properties of the elements. The studied transuranic elements are plutonium 238, 239-240, americium 241 and neptunium 237. Alpha emitting radionuclides, their determination requires complex radiochemical separations. A method was worked out to successively separate the three radioelements by using a same chromatographic column. Cesium 137 is the studied fission product, its determination is done by direct Gamma spectrometry. Lead 210, natural radionuclide, whose atmospheric flow can be supposed constant. makes it possible to obtain a chronology of the various events. The detailed vertical study of sediment cores showed that the accumulation mode of the studied elements is the same one and that the methods of dating converge. The cesium, more mobile than transuranic elements in the atmosphere, was detected in the 1963 and 1986 fallout whereas an activity out of transuranic elements appears only for the 1963 fallout. The activity of the 1963 cesium fallout is of the same order of magnitude as that of 1986. The calculation of the diffusion coefficients of the elements in the sediments shows an increased migration of cesium compared to transuranic elements. An inventory on the whole of the lake made it possible to note that the atmospheric fallout constitute the

  13. The use of neptunium-239 to assess neptunium distribution throughout a nuclear fuel reprocessing plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mair, M.A.; Savage, D.J.; Prentice, P.C.

    1989-08-01

    A radiometric technique has been devised to use the gamma emission from the neptunium-239 daughter of americium-243 to estimate neptunium distribution in a plant reprocessing irradiated plutonium based fuels. Three trials were undertaken with samples from the Prototype Fast Reactor at Dounreay. The trials have confirmed the previous chemical measurements and the usefulness of this technique to highlight the effect of altered flowsheet conditions. (author)

  14. Plutonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koelzer, W.

    1989-03-01

    This report contains with regard to 'plutonium' statements on chemistry, occurrence and reactions in the environment, handling procedures in the nuclear fuel cycle, radiation protection methods, biokinetics, toxicology and medical treatment to make available reliable data for the public discussion on plutonium especially its use in nuclear power plants and its radiological assessment. (orig.) [de

  15. Nuclear forensics of a non-traditional sample: Neptunium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doyle, Jamie L.; Schwartz, Daniel; Tandon, Lav

    2016-01-01

    Recent nuclear forensics cases have focused primarily on plutonium (Pu) and uranium (U) materials. By definition however, nuclear forensics can apply to any diverted nuclear material. This includes neptunium (Np), an internationally safeguarded material like Pu and U, that could offer a nuclear security concern if significant quantities were found outside of regulatory control. This case study couples scanning electron microscopy (SEM) with quantitative analysis using newly developed specialized software, to evaluate a non-traditional nuclear forensic sample of Np. Here, the results of the morphological analyses were compared with another Np sample of known pedigree, as well as other traditional actinide materials in order to determine potential processing and point-of-origin

  16. Plutonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watson, G.M.

    1976-01-01

    Discovery of the neutron made it easy to create elements which do not exist in nature. One of these is plutonium, and its isotope with mass number 239 has nuclear properties which make it both a good fuel for nuclear power reactors and a good explosive for nuclear weapons. Since it was discovered during a war the latter characteristic was put to use, but it is now evident that use of plutonium in a particular kind of nuclear reactor, the fast breeder reactor, will allow the world's resources of uranium to last for millennia as a major source of energy. Plutonium is very radiotoxic, resembling radium in this respect. Therefore the widespread introduction of fast breeder reactors to meet energy demands can be contemplated only after assurances on two points; that adequate control of the radiological hazard resulting from the handling of very large amounts of plutonium can be guaranteed, and that diversion of plutonium to illicit use can be prevented. The problems exist to a lesser degree already, since all types of nuclear reactor produce some plutonium. Some plutonium has already been dispersed in the environment, the bulk of it from atmospheric tests of nuclear weapons. (author)

  17. Plutonium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miner, William N

    1964-01-01

    This pamphlet discusses plutonium from discovery to its production, separation, properties, fabrication, handling, and uses, including use as a reactor fuel and use in isotope power generators and neutron sources.

  18. Use of radioanalytical methods for determination of uranium, neptunium, plutonium, americium and curium isotopes in radioactive wastes; Utilizacao de metodos radioanaliticos para a determinacao de isotopos de uranio, plutonio, americio e curio em rejeitos radioativos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geraldo, Bianca

    2012-07-01

    Activated charcoal is a common type of radioactive waste that contains high concentrations of fission and activation products. The management of this waste includes its characterization aiming the determination and quantification of the specific radionuclides including those known as Difficult-to-Measure Radionuclides (RDM). The analysis of the RDM's generally involves complex radiochemical analysis for purification and separation of the radionuclides, which are expensive and time-consuming. The objective of this work was to define a methodology for sequential analysis of the isotopes of uranium, neptunium, plutonium, americium and curium present in a type of radioactive waste, evaluating chemical yield, analysis of time spent, amount of secondary waste generated and cost. Three methodologies were compared and validated that employ ion exchange (TI + EC), extraction chromatography (EC) and extraction with polymers (ECP). The waste chosen was the activated charcoal from the purification system of primary circuit water cooling the reactor IEA-R1. The charcoal samples were dissolved by acid digestion followed by purification and separation of isotopes with ion exchange resins, extraction and chromatographic extraction polymers. Isotopes were analyzed on an alpha spectrometer, equipped with surface barrier detectors. The chemical yields were satisfactory for the methods TI + EC and EC. ECP method was comparable with those methods only for uranium. Statistical analysis as well the analysis of time spent, amount of secondary waste generated and cost revealed that EC method is the most effective for identifying and quantifying U, Np, Pu, Am and Cm present in charcoal. (author)

  19. Plutonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1995-01-01

    Plutonium, which was obtained and identified for the first time in 1941 by chemist Glenn Seaborg - through neutron irradiation of uranium 238 - is closely related to the history of nuclear energy. From the very beginning, because of the high radiotoxicity of plutonium, a tremendous amount of research work has been devoted to the study of the biological effects and the consequences on the environment. It can be said that plutonium is presently one of the elements, whose nuclear and physico-chemical characteristics are the best known. The first part of this issue is a survey of the knowledge acquired on the subject, which emphasizes the sanitary effects and transfer into the environment. Then the properties of plutonium related to energy generation are dealt with. Fissionable, like uranium 235, plutonium has proved a high-performance nuclear fuel. Originally used in breeder reactors, it is now being more and more widely recycled in light water reactors, in MOX fuel. Reprocessing, recycling and manufacturing of these new types of fuel, bound of become more and more widespread, are now part of a self-consistent series of operations, whose technical, economical, industrial and strategical aspects are reviewed. (author)

  20. Process chemistry of neptunium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Srinivasan, N.; Ramaniah, M. V.; Nadkarni, M. N.; Kumar, S. V.; Patil, S. K.; Ramakrishna, V. V.; Swarup, R.; Avadhany, G. V.N.; Sonawane, R. R.; Kartha, P. K.S.

    1973-07-01

    Research progress is reported on the recovery of neptunium from reprocessing of irradiated uranium. Areas considered are: use of vanadium(V) for oxidation of Np(V) to Np(VI); path of neptunium under partitioning column conditions; co-stability of Np(IV) and Pu(IV); and extraction of Np(IV) by tricaprylmethylammonium nitrate. (DHM)

  1. The extraction neptunium by trilaurylamine; L'extraction du neptunium par le trilaurylamine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Champion, J.; Chesne, A. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Fontenay-aux-Roses (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1964-07-01

    The extraction by trilaurylamine of neptunium (IV) from nitric acid and sulfuric acid-nitric acid media has been studied with the aim of developing a purification process for this element. Relative to the plutonium-neptunium separation, conditions are given for the oxidation of neptunium (IV) in sulfuric acid-nitric acid medium and data are presented on the stabilisation of the + 4 oxidation state by the organic solvent. Two procedures have been developed for the simultaneous purification of the two actinides. Both are based on the trilaurylamine extraction of the tetravalent nitrate species. The first utilises a constant redox potential fixed by Fe{sup +++} /Fe{sup ++} couple, while in the second, valencies are determined by successive addition of nitrite and ferrous ions. Gram quantities of neptunium 237 has been recovered from plutonium process solution. Alternate procedures are suggested for the chemical processing of irradiated Np{sup 237}. (authors) [French] L'extraction du neptunium par le trilaurylamine en milieu nitrique et sulfonitrique a ete etudiee dans le cadre de la recherche des procedes de purification de cet element. En vue d'effectuer la separation neptunium-plutonium on a precise d'une part les conditions d'oxydation du Np{sup 4+} en milieu sulfonitrique, d'autre part l'influence du solvant sur la stabilite des valences de ces deux elements. Deux procedes de purification simultanee des deux actinides ont ete developpes. Ils sont bases sur l'extraction du nitrate des elements tetravalents dans la trilaury lamine. Dans l'un, la solution a extraire a un potentiel redox fixe par un systeme auxiliaire (Fe{sup +++}/Fe{sup ++}), dans l'autre elle subit dans le meme extracteur des additions successives de nitrite et de fer ferreux. On decrit un essai semi-industriel de recuperation de neptunium 237 a partir de solution provenant de l'usine de production de plutonium de Marcoule. Differents schemas

  2. The extraction neptunium by trilaurylamine; L'extraction du neptunium par le trilaurylamine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Champion, J; Chesne, A [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Fontenay-aux-Roses (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1964-07-01

    The extraction by trilaurylamine of neptunium (IV) from nitric acid and sulfuric acid-nitric acid media has been studied with the aim of developing a purification process for this element. Relative to the plutonium-neptunium separation, conditions are given for the oxidation of neptunium (IV) in sulfuric acid-nitric acid medium and data are presented on the stabilisation of the + 4 oxidation state by the organic solvent. Two procedures have been developed for the simultaneous purification of the two actinides. Both are based on the trilaurylamine extraction of the tetravalent nitrate species. The first utilises a constant redox potential fixed by Fe{sup +++} /Fe{sup ++} couple, while in the second, valencies are determined by successive addition of nitrite and ferrous ions. Gram quantities of neptunium 237 has been recovered from plutonium process solution. Alternate procedures are suggested for the chemical processing of irradiated Np{sup 237}. (authors) [French] L'extraction du neptunium par le trilaurylamine en milieu nitrique et sulfonitrique a ete etudiee dans le cadre de la recherche des procedes de purification de cet element. En vue d'effectuer la separation neptunium-plutonium on a precise d'une part les conditions d'oxydation du Np{sup 4+} en milieu sulfonitrique, d'autre part l'influence du solvant sur la stabilite des valences de ces deux elements. Deux procedes de purification simultanee des deux actinides ont ete developpes. Ils sont bases sur l'extraction du nitrate des elements tetravalents dans la trilaury lamine. Dans l'un, la solution a extraire a un potentiel redox fixe par un systeme auxiliaire (Fe{sup +++}/Fe{sup ++}), dans l'autre elle subit dans le meme extracteur des additions successives de nitrite et de fer ferreux. On decrit un essai semi-industriel de recuperation de neptunium 237 a partir de solution provenant de l'usine de production de plutonium de Marcoule. Differents schemas utilisables lors du traitement chimique des cibles de

  3. Plutonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller-Christiansen, K.; Wollesen, M.

    1979-01-01

    As emotions and fear of plutonium are neither useful for the non-professionals nor for the political decision makers and the advantages and disadvantages of plutonium can only put against each other under difficulties, the paper wants to present the most essential scientific data of plutonium in a generally understandable way. Each of the individual sections is concluded and they try to give an answer to the most discussed questions. In order to make understanding easier, the scientific facts are only brought at points where it cannot be done without for the correctness of the presentation. Many details were left out knowingly. On the other hand, important details are dealt with several times if it seems necessary for making the presentation correct. The graphical presentations and the figures in many cases contain more than said in the text. They give the interested reader hints to scientific-technical coherences. The total material is to enable the reader to form his own opinion on plutonium problems which are being discussed in public. (orig./HP) [de

  4. Investigation of Neptunium Precipitator Cleanout Options

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hill, B.C.

    2003-01-01

    Oxalate precipitation followed by filtration is used to prepare plutonium oxalate. Historically, plutonium oxalate has tended to accumulate in the precipitation tanks. These solids are periodically removed by flushing with concentrated (64 percent) nitric acid. The same precipitation tanks will now be used in the processing of neptunium. Literature values indicate that neptunium oxalate may not be as soluble as plutonium oxalate in nitric acid. Although a wide variety of options is available to improve neptunium oxalate solubility for precipitator flushing, most of these options are not practical for use. Many of these options require the use of incompatible or difficult to handle chemicals. Other options would require expensive equipment modifications or are likely to lead to product contamination. Based on review of literature and experimental results, the two best options for flushing the precipitator are (1) 64 percent nitric acid and (2) addition of sodium permanganate follow ed by sodium nitrite. Nitric acid is the easiest option to implement. It is already used in the facility and will not lead to product contamination. Experimental results indicate that neptunium oxalate can be dissolved in concentrated nitric acid (64 percent) at 60 degree C to a concentration of 2.6 to 5.6 grams of Np/liter after at least three hours of heating. A lower concentration (1.1 grams of Np/liter) was measured at 60 degree C after less than two hours of heating. These concentrations are acceptable for flushing if precipitator holdup is low (approximately 100-250 grams), but a second method is required for effective flushing if precipitator holdup is high (approximately 2 kilograms). The most effective method for obtaining higher neptunium concentrations is the use of sodium permanganate followed by the addition of sodium nitrite. There is concern that residual manganese from these flushes could impact product purity. Gas generation during permanganate addition is also a concern

  5. Process chemistry of neptunium. Part II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Srinivasan, N.; Ramaniah, M. V.; Patil, S. K.; Ramakrishna, V. V.; Swarup, R.; Chadha, A.; Avadhany, G. V.N.

    1974-07-01

    The oxidation state analysis of neptunium in the aqueous feed solution from the Plutonium Plant at Trombay was carried out and it was found that neptunium existed mainly as Np(V) in the feed solution. Batch extraction data for Np(IV) and Np(VI) into 30% TBP/Shell Sol T at different aqueous nitric acid concentration and uranium saturation of the organic phase were obtained at 45 deg C and 60 deg C and the results are summarized. The distribution coefficients of Np(IV) and Np(VI) were obtained as a function of TBP concentration and the data are reported. The effect of nitrous acid on the extraction of neptunium, present in the aqueous phase as Np(IV) and Np(V), by 30% TBP was studied and the data obtained are given. The data on the rate of reduction of NP(VI) and Np(V) to Np(IV) by U(IV) were obtained for different U(IV) and nitric acid concentrations. Some redox reactions involving Np(IV), Pu(IV) and V(V) were investigated and their possible application in the purex process for neptunium recovery were explored. (auth)

  6. Method of recovering neptunium from spent nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsuboya, T.; N.

    1976-01-01

    An improved Purex wet recovery process including the step of extracting and separating uranium and plutonium simultaneously from the fission products in the presence of nitric acid and nitrous acid by using a multistage extractor unit having an extracting section and a washing section is provided for separating and recovering neptunium simultaneously with uranium and plutonium contained in spent nuclear fuel. The improved method comprises the steps of maintaining the nitrous acid concentration in said extracting section at a level suited for effecting oxidation of neptunium from (V) to (VI) valence, while lowering the nitrous acid concentration in said washing section so as to suppress reduction of neptunium from (VI) to (V) valence, and maintaining the nitric acid concentration in said washing section at a high level

  7. Neptunium (IV) oxalate solubility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luerkens, D.W.

    1983-07-01

    The equilibrium solubility of neptunium (IV) oxalate in nitric/oxalic acid solutions was determined at 22 0 C, 45 0 C, and 60 0 C. The concentrations of nitric/oxalic acid solutions represented a wide range of free oxalate ion concentration. A mathematical solubility model was developed which is based on the formation of the known complexes of neptunium (IV) oxalate. the solubility model uses a simplified concentration parameter which is proportional to the free oxalate ion concentration. The solubility model can be used to estimate the equilibrium solubility of neptunium (IV) oxalate over a wide range of oxalic and nitric acid concentrations at each temperature

  8. Counter-current extraction studies for the recovery of neptunium by the Purex process. Part I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Srinivasan, N.; Nadkarni, M. N.; Kumar, S. V.; Kartha, P. K.S.; Sonavane, R. R.; Ramaniah, M. V.; Patil, S. K.

    1974-07-01

    It is proposed to recover neptunium-237, along with uranium and plutonium, during the fuel reprocessing in the PREFRE plant at Tarapur. Counter-current extraction studies, relevant to the code contamination (HA) and partitioning (IA) cycles of the purex process, were carried out to arrive at suitable chemical flowsheet conditions which would enable the co-extraction of neptunium along with uranium and plutonium. The results of the studies carried out using a laboratory mixer-settler unit and synthetic mixtures of neptunium and uranium are reported here. Based on these results, the chemical flowsheet conditions are proposed for the co-extraction of neptunium even if it exists as Np(V) in the aqueous feed solution. (auth)

  9. Neptunium: a bibliographic reference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mosley, R.E.

    1979-06-01

    A comprehensive bibliograhy of the literature on the element neptunium published prior to January 1976 is presented. A short abstract is given for each listed reference, with a few exceptions. The references are divided into sections categorized as General, Man-Made Sources (Reactors), Man-Made Sources (Fuel Reprocessing), Chemistry (Solubility), Chemistry (Compounds), Chemistry (Isotopes), Analyses (Instrumental), Analyses (Chemical), Chemical (Animal), Biological (Effects), Biological (Animal-Metabolism-Retention), Biological (Air Movement), Biological (Human Inhalation), Measurement, and Dosimetry. The bibliography contains author and keyword indexes and was compiled to serve as a quick reference source for neptunium-related work. 184 citations

  10. Biology of neptunium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wirth, R.E.

    1985-11-01

    This work contains detailed information about fractional absorption of neptunium through gastrointestinal tract in vivo as well as about organ and subcellular distribution in rats. Biochemical investigations have shown, that neptunium is bound to the iron transport protein transferrin in the blood serum. A long-term experiment resulted in osteosarkomincidences of 11% (0.2 mp Np-237/kg) and 36% (1 mg Np-237/kg); simultaneous the whole-body retention was measured during the natural lifespan of the animals of 2.5 years. (orig.) [de

  11. The distribution and history of nuclear weapons related contamination in sediments from the Ob River, Siberia as determined by isotopic ratios of plutonium and neptunium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kenna, T.C.; Sayles, F.L.

    2002-01-01

    Isotopic ratios of Pu and Np measured in sediment cores from 5 locations in the Ob River drainage basin show clear evidence of input from sources other than global fallout (non-fallout sources). Historical contaminant records obtained by combining isotopic ratio information with chronological information indicate that non-fallout inputs are from several sources that have varied significantly over the past 50 years. Unique isotopic signatures observed in sediments from tributaries that drain areas containing known or suspected sources of non-fallout contamination are used to identify the source of materials in sediments collected at downstream locations. These data can lead to a better understanding of the transport behavior, fate, and relative importance of particle reactive, weapons related contaminants originating from the nuclear facilities Mayak, Tomsk-7, and Semipalitinsk, which lie within the drainage basin. From our work to date, we draw the following conclusions: (1) Persistent non-fallout contamination is observed in the Ob River above its confluence with the Irtysh River, indicating contamination from the Tomsk-7 facility. (2) Non-fallout contamination in the Tobol River above its confluence with the Irtysh River indicates contamination from the Mayak facility. (3) Non-fallout contamination in the Irtysh River above its confluence with the Tobol River indicates contamination from the Semipalitinsk weapons test site. (4) The occurrence of isotopic ratios in Ob Delta sediments that are similar to those observed in source tributaries suggests that contamination from at least two sources has been transported along the length of the river system. (5) Global fallout, a result of high-yield atmospheric weapons tests conducted by the FSU and USA primarily, is the dominant source of Pu and Np to the region; however, there have been brief periods when inputs from non-fallout sources exceeded those from global fallout

  12. Process for neptunium analysis by absorption spectrophotometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wagner, J.F.

    1987-01-01

    An aqueous solution of a neptunium compounds is treated by a reagent, preferentially a vanadyl sulfate oxidized by cerium IV ions, to obtain neptunium V by oxidation of neptunium IV and reduction of neptunium VI. The reagent is chosen for a negligible absorption at the wavelength used for neptunium V absorption spectrophotometry for instance 981 nm [fr

  13. Neptunium determination in PUREX process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rawat, Neetika; Kar, Aishwarya S.; Tomar, B.S.; Pandey, M.P.; Umadevi, K.

    2016-10-01

    237 Np is one of the most important minor actinides present in nuclear spent fuel both from environmental and application point of view. The routing of neptunium to the particular stream of PUREX process is necessary for its separation and purification as 237 Np is the target nuclide for production of 238 Pu. The routing of neptunium to a particular PUREX stream will also help in better nuclear waste management, which in turn, will impart less bearing on the environment considering its long half life, alpha emitting properties and mobile nature. In order to route Neptunium to a particular stream of PUREX process, it is imperative to understand the distribution of neptunium in various process streams. Owing to high dose of actual samples, the neptunium distribution was studied using 239 Np tracer by simulating actual column conditions of PUREX streams in lab scale. The present study deals with neptunium determination in actual PUREX streams samples also. (author)

  14. Metabolism and toxicity of neptunium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nenot, J.C.

    1983-08-01

    The biological behaviour and toxicity of neptunium were studied. Neptunium was administered either intravenously or intramuscularly in rats. In contrast to other transuranium elements the distribution patterns of neptunium in the case of intravenous injection is not dependent on the physico-chemical state. Urinary excretion is high. The distribution after intramuscular injection showed a rather fast migration from the injection site. 237 Neptonium in urine was approximately equal to bone deposit. Neptunium behaviour followed that of alkaline earths rather than that of transplutonium elements

  15. Modeling of Diffusion of Plutonium in Other Metals and of Gaseous Species in Plutonium-Based Systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cooper, Bernard R.; Gayanath W. Fernando; Beiden, S.; Setty, A.; Sevilla, E.H.

    2004-01-01

    Establish standards for temperature conditions under which plutonium, uranium, or neptunium from nuclear wastes permeates steel, with which it is in contact, by diffusion processes. The primary focus is on plutonium because of the greater difficulties created by the peculiarities of face-centered-cubic-stabilized (delta) plutonium (the form used in the technology generating the waste)

  16. Solvent extraction of irradiated neptunium targets. I. Valence stabilization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, G.H.; Thompson, M.C.

    1977-01-01

    Solvent extraction of 237 Np and 238 Pu from irradiated neptunium is being investigated as a possible replacement for the currently used anion exchange process at the Savannah River Plant. Solvent extraction would reduce separations costs and waste volume and increase the production rate. The major difficulty in solvent extraction processing is maintaining neptunium and plutonium in the extractable IV or VI valence states during initial extraction. This study investigated the stability of these states. Results show that: The extractable M(IV) valence states of neptunium and plutonium are mutually unstable in plant dissolver solution (2 g/l 237 Np, 0.4 g/l 238 Pu, 1.2M Al 3+ , 4.6M NO 3 - , and 1M H + ). The reaction rates producing inextractable species from extractable M(IV) or M(VI) are fast enough that greater than or equal to 99.9 percent extractable species in 237 Np-- 238 Pu mixtures cannot be maintained for a practicable processing period

  17. Appraisal of available information on uptake by plants of transplutonium elements and neptunium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, R.L.; Healy, J.W.

    1976-07-01

    A critical review was made of reported information from laboratory studies of plant uptake of transplutonic elements plus neptunium. The available data are meager but indicate that the uptake of Np is the greatest followed by Am and Cm. The data are not sufficient to provide recommended values for use in hazard calculations but they do indicate that the actinides other than plutonium will be accumulated in plants to a greater degree than plutonium

  18. Gastrointestinal absorption and retention of neptunium by fasted and fed mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larsen, R.P.; Bhattacharyya, M.H.; Oldham, R.D.; Moretti, E.S.

    1982-01-01

    The retention of neptunium in liver and bone subsequent to its gastrointestinal absorption has been determined in both fasted and fed mice. The values obtained for fractional retention were 3 x 10 - 3 and 1 x 10 - 4 , respectively, and are within a factor of two the same as those for plutonium in fasted and fed mice

  19. Determination of microamounts of neptunium by differential pulse polarography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cauchetier, Ph.

    1979-01-01

    Neptunium is produced in significant amounts in the ''light-water'' reactors and must be controlled at different steps of fuel reprocessing. For this purpose a method of differential pulse polarography has been developed. A tight cell containing 10 ml solution is set up in a Faraday cage. Adjustment to the tetravalent state, Np(IV), is carried out electrochemically on a mercury layer and the Np(IV) concentration is determined by differential pulse polarography, using a dropping mercury electrode. In 0.5M sulfuric acid medium, the redox potential of the reversible couple Np(IV)/Np(III) is -0.3 V/SCE. Concentrations as low as 5x10 -7 M neptunium can be measured and detection at the 2x10 -7 M level is still possible (0.5 μg in the polarographic cell). Precision is about 2% in the 10 -5 M and 10% in the 10 -6 M range. The method has been applied to aqueous and organic (TBP-dodecane) solutions. Neptunium can be determined without separation in the presence of plutonium or uranium at M/Np ratios of 10 3 and 5x10 4 , respectively. In the presence of fission products a separation is needed. (author)

  20. Determination of microamounts of neptunium by differential pulse polarography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cauchetier, P.

    1978-01-01

    Neptunium is produced in significant amounts in the light water reactors and must be controlled at different steps of the fuel reprocessing. For this purpose, a method of differential pulse polarography was developed. A tight cell containing 10 ml of solution is set up in a Faraday's cage. Adjustment to the tetravalent state, Np (IV), is carried out electrochemically on a mercury layer and the Np (IV) concentration is determined by differential pulse polarography, using a dropping mercury electrode. In 0,5 M sulfuric acid medium, the redox potential of the reversible system Np (IV)/Np (III) is - 0,3 V/SCE. Concentrations as low as 5.10 -7 M of neptunium can be measured and detection at the 2.10 -7 M level is still possible (0,5 μg in the polarographic cell). Precision is about 2% in the 10 -5 M and 10% in 10 -6 M range. The method has been applied to the case of aqueous and organic (TBP dodecane) solutions. Neptunium can be determined without separation in the presence of plutonium or uranium in the M/Np ratios of 10 3 and 5.10 4 respectively. In the presence of fission products a separation is needed

  1. The organometallic chemistry of neptunium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bohlander, R.

    1986-09-01

    Organometallic compounds of neptunium with carbocyclic ligands (C 5 H 5 - =cp, C 8 H 8 2- =cot) have been prepared and investigated. Starting from tetrakis(cyclopentadienyle)neptunium(IV) (cp 4 Np) and tris(cyclopentadienyle)neptunium(IV) chloride (cp 3 NpCl) a lot of other Np(IV)-compounds can be obtained by ligand-exchange reactions. These have the general formula cp 3 NpL with either inorganic ionic (L=Br - , I - , 1/2SO 4 2- , NCS - , AlCl 4 - ) or organic ligands (L=NC 4 H 4 - , N 2 C 3 H 3 - , C=CH - , 1/2C= 2- , CH 3 - , C 2 H 5 - , C 6 H 5 - ). Produced by reduction, tris(cyclopentadienyle)neptunium(III), cp 3 Np) gives similar structured 1:1-adduct complexes, cp 3 Np * B, with Lewis-bases like THF, diethylether, acetonitrile. Physico-chemical properties and changes in the molecular structure of the complexes have been studied using IR-, FTIR- and optical spectroscopy (in the NIR, VIS and UV region) as well as by magnetic and EPR measurements and Moessbauer spectrometry. The results are discussed as to their classification within the actinide complex chemistry and to the comparison with lanthanide complexes. (orig./RB) [de

  2. An evaluation of safeguards approaches for neptunium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burr, Tom; Stanbro, William D.; Charlton, William

    2001-01-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency has recently drawn attention to the fact that neptunium (Np), a byproduct of the nuclear power industry, can be used to make nuclear weapons. Current monitoring approaches for Np do not rely on material balance accounting as is used for uranium and plutonium. In the future this may change. Although full material balance accounting is not anticipated for Np, it is informative to evaluate the impact and benefit of full material balance accounting when considering other options. Therefore, this paper will apply systems analysis to evaluate ways to convert the current system to full materials balance accounting that will minimize the intrusiveness of the verification system and minimize costs to both the facility operator and the inspection agency. We then compare full material balance accounting to partial material balance accounting and to a ratio-monitoring technique referred to as flow sheet verification. We conclude that sampling approximately 25% of the batches is likely to be adequate and that Pu (or perhaps 137 Cs) will be the most effective surrogate for estimating the Np in the input accountability tank. (author)

  3. Direct chemical reduction of neptunium oxide to neptunium metal using calcium and calcium chloride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Squires, Leah N.; Lessing, Paul

    2016-01-01

    A process of direct reduction of neptunium oxide to neptunium metal using calcium metal as the reducing agent is discussed. After reduction of the oxide to metal, the metal is separated by density from the other components of the reaction mixture and can be easily removed upon cooling. The direct reduction technique consistently produces high purity (98%–99% pure) neptunium metal.

  4. Investigation on neptunium in a borosilicate glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poirot, I.

    1988-03-01

    The oxidization state and coordination of neptunium, introduced as dopant in borosilicate glasses were studied through optical, Mossbauer spectroscopies and magnetic measurements. The neptunium oxide, introduced previously as NpO 2 is reduced during the melting process of the glass. This leads to an equilibrium in which the ratio of Np 4+ to Np 3+ valences depends on experimental conditions. Spectroscopic analysises conduct to postulate the presence of different sites for each of the oxydation states of neptunium [fr

  5. Absorption, distribution, and fate of neptunium in plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cataldo, D.A.; Garland, T.R.; Wildung, R.E.

    1988-01-01

    Soil-plant concentration ratios (CR) for neptunium (Np) in bushbean, measured over the range of 5.2 /times/ 10/sup /minus/7/ to 4.1 mg of Np/g of soil, are approximately 2 at soil concentrations below 4 /times/ 10/sup /minus/4/ mg/g and increase to 12 at higher soil levels. The CR values determined for soybean, bushbean, barley, and alfalfa range from 0.5 to 4 at a soil concentration of 2.6 /times/ 10/sup /minus/6/ mg/g. Root absorption by soybean seedlings of Np from solutions containing 7 /times/ 10/sup /minus/7/ to 473 mg of Np(V)/mL is generally proportional to concentration but exhibits some saturation in root absorption at higher concentrations. Seed concentrations in bushbean and wheat are a factor of 10 lower than vegetative tissues. Neptunium is transported within the plant in organic complexes containing one or more organic acid residues. Fractionation of plant tissues indicates that Np is substantially more soluble than plutonium, especially in seeds, with approximately 50% of the soluble Np in roots and leaves associated with plant ligands of less than 5000 molecular weight

  6. Metabolism and gastrointestinal absorption of neptunium and protactinium in adult baboons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ralston, L.G.; Cohen, N.; Bhattacharyya, M.H.; Larsen, R.P.; Ayres, L.; Oldham, R.D.; Moretti, E.S.

    1985-01-01

    The metabolism of neptunium and protactinium was studied in adult female baboons following intravenous injection and intragastric intubation. Immediately following intravenous injection (10 -1 to 10 -10 mg Np per kg body wt), neptunium cleared rapidly from blood, deposited primarily in the skeleton (54 +- 5%) and liver (3 +- 0.2%), and was excreted predominantly via urine (40 +- 3%). For the first year post injection, neptunium was retained with a biological half-time of approx.100 days in liver and 1.5 +- 0.2 yr in bone. In comparison, injected protactinium (10 -9 mg/kg) was retained in blood in higher concentrations and was initially eliminated in urine to a lesser extent (6 +- 3%). In vivo measurements indicated that protactinium was retained in bone (65 +- 0.3%) with a half-time of 3.5 +- 0.6 yr. Differences in the physicochemical states of the neptunium or protactinium solutions injected did not alter the metabolic behavior of these nuclides. The gastrointestinal absorption value for neptunium in two fasted baboons, sacrificed at 1 day post administration, was determined to be 0.92 +- 0.04%. Of the total amount of neptunium absorbed, 52 +- 3% was retained in bone, 6 +- 2% was in liver, and 42 +- 0.1% was excreted in urine. A method was developed to estimate GI absorption values for both nuclides in baboons which were not sacrificed. Absorption values calculated by this method for neptunium and protactinium in fasted baboons were 1.8 +- 0.8% and 0.65 +- 0.01%, respectively. Values for fed animals were 1 to 2 orders of magnitude less than those for fasted animals. 14 refs., 3 figs., 4 tabs. (DT)

  7. Metabolism and gastrointestinal absorption of neptunium and protactinium in adult baboons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ralston, L.G.; Cohen, N.; Bhattacharyya, M.H.; Larsen, R.P.; Ayres, L.; Oldham, R.D.; Moretti, E.S.

    1985-01-01

    The metabolism of neptunium and protactinium was studied in adult female baboons following intravenous injection and intragastric intubation. Immediately following intravenous injection (10/sup -1/ to 10/sup -10/ mg Np per kg body wt), neptunium cleared rapidly from blood, deposited primarily in the skeleton (54 +- 5%) and liver (3 +- 0.2%), and was excreted predominantly via urine (40 +- 3%). For the first year post injection, neptunium was retained with a biological half-time of approx.100 days in liver and 1.5 +- 0.2 yr in bone. In comparison, injected protactinium (10/sup -9/ mg/kg) was retained in blood in higher concentrations and was initially eliminated in urine to a lesser extent (6 +- 3%). In vivo measurements indicated that protactinium was retained in bone (65 +- 0.3%) with a half-time of 3.5 +- 0.6 yr. Differences in the physicochemical states of the neptunium or protactinium solutions injected did not alter the metabolic behavior of these nuclides. The gastrointestinal absorption value for neptunium in two fasted baboons, sacrificed at 1 day post administration, was determined to be 0.92 +- 0.04%. Of the total amount of neptunium absorbed, 52 +- 3% was retained in bone, 6 +- 2% was in liver, and 42 +- 0.1% was excreted in urine. A method was developed to estimate GI absorption values for both nuclides in baboons which were not sacrificed. Absorption values calculated by this method for neptunium and protactinium in fasted baboons were 1.8 +- 0.8% and 0.65 +- 0.01%, respectively. Values for fed animals were 1 to 2 orders of magnitude less than those for fasted animals. 14 refs., 3 figs., 4 tabs. (DT)

  8. Stop plutonium; Stop plutonium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2003-02-01

    This press document aims to inform the public on the hazards bound to the plutonium exploitation in France and especially the plutonium transport. The first part is a technical presentation of the plutonium and the MOX (Mixed Oxide Fuel). The second part presents the installation of the plutonium industry in France. The third part is devoted to the plutonium convoys safety. The highlight is done on the problem of the leak of ''secret'' of such transports. (A.L.B.)

  9. Organometallic neptunium(III) complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutkiewicz, Michał S.; Farnaby, Joy H.; Apostolidis, Christos; Colineau, Eric; Walter, Olaf; Magnani, Nicola; Gardiner, Michael G.; Love, Jason B.; Kaltsoyannis, Nikolas; Caciuffo, Roberto; Arnold, Polly L.

    2016-08-01

    Studies of transuranic organometallic complexes provide a particularly valuable insight into covalent contributions to the metal-ligand bonding, in which the subtle differences between the transuranium actinide ions and their lighter lanthanide counterparts are of fundamental importance for the effective remediation of nuclear waste. Unlike the organometallic chemistry of uranium, which has focused strongly on UIII and has seen some spectacular advances, that of the transuranics is significantly technically more challenging and has remained dormant. In the case of neptunium, it is limited mainly to NpIV. Here we report the synthesis of three new NpIII organometallic compounds and the characterization of their molecular and electronic structures. These studies suggest that NpIII complexes could act as single-molecule magnets, and that the lower oxidation state of NpII is chemically accessible. In comparison with lanthanide analogues, significant d- and f-electron contributions to key NpIII orbitals are observed, which shows that fundamental neptunium organometallic chemistry can provide new insights into the behaviour of f-elements.

  10. Organometallic neptunium(III) complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutkiewicz, Michał S; Farnaby, Joy H; Apostolidis, Christos; Colineau, Eric; Walter, Olaf; Magnani, Nicola; Gardiner, Michael G; Love, Jason B; Kaltsoyannis, Nikolas; Caciuffo, Roberto; Arnold, Polly L

    2016-08-01

    Studies of transuranic organometallic complexes provide a particularly valuable insight into covalent contributions to the metal-ligand bonding, in which the subtle differences between the transuranium actinide ions and their lighter lanthanide counterparts are of fundamental importance for the effective remediation of nuclear waste. Unlike the organometallic chemistry of uranium, which has focused strongly on U(III) and has seen some spectacular advances, that of the transuranics is significantly technically more challenging and has remained dormant. In the case of neptunium, it is limited mainly to Np(IV). Here we report the synthesis of three new Np(III) organometallic compounds and the characterization of their molecular and electronic structures. These studies suggest that Np(III) complexes could act as single-molecule magnets, and that the lower oxidation state of Np(II) is chemically accessible. In comparison with lanthanide analogues, significant d- and f-electron contributions to key Np(III) orbitals are observed, which shows that fundamental neptunium organometallic chemistry can provide new insights into the behaviour of f-elements.

  11. CANDU - a versatile reactor for plutonium disposition or actinide burning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chan, P.S.W.; Gagnon, M.J.N.; Boczar, P.G.; Ellis, R.J.; Verrall, R.A.

    1997-10-01

    High neutron economy, on-line refuelling, and a simple fuel-bundle design result in a high degree of versatility in the use of the CANDU reactor for the disposition of weapons-derived plutonium and for the annihilation of long-lived radioactive actinides, such as plutonium, neptunium, and americium isotopes, created in civilian nuclear power reactors. Inherent safety features are incorporated into the design of the bundles carrying the plutonium and actinide fuels. This approach enables existing CANDU reactors to operate with various plutonium-based fuel cycles without requiring major changes to the current reactor design. (author)

  12. Perspective on plutonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun, L.S.

    1993-01-01

    This paper is intended as a brief overview on the element plutonium. Plutonium is the first primarily man-made element to play a significant role not only in technological development, but also in the economic growth of many countries. The importance of plutonium centers around its enormous energy making it ideal for wide-scale use in reactors, while the nuclear industry continues to work toward improving safety and efficiency of plutonium as a reactor fuel politicians and the public still debate over the safety and benefits of nuclear power. (30 refs.)

  13. Effect of time dependence of neutron flux on the plutonium 238 production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rudik, A.P.

    1975-01-01

    An analytical treatment is given of the dependence of a plutonium-238 yield when irradiating neptunium-237 on the time variation of the neutron flux. This dependence is governed by the two physical factors: the competition between the beta decay and the neptunium-238 depletion, and the differences in the depletion rate of neptunium-237, neptunium-238 and plutonium-238 with thermal and resonance neutrons. The role of the neptunium-238 nonprompt decay has been studied and the order of the effect determined, and it has been established that it is advantageous to irradiate neptunium-237 in the lowest central neutron flux possible for thermal and resonance neutron reactors. A perturbation theory has been developed to determine the role of the time variation of the thermal neutron flux and it has been established that, the integral neutron flux being the same, it is advantageous to irradiate the material in a drooping rather than a constant flux of neutrons. The simplest example of great time variations of a neutron flux has been considered and it has been established that in this particular case the conclusions made in the framework of the perturbation theory find a qualitative support. Convenient formulas are given for determining the number of neutrons used to produce plutonium-238

  14. On formation of neptunium(5) and (6) during thermal decomposition of neptunium(4) compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bessonov, A.A.; Afonas'eva, T.V.; Krot, N.N.

    1989-01-01

    A study was made on thermal behaviour of neptunium(4) peroxide (1), binary nitrate of neptunium(4) and ammonium (2), as well as neptunium(4) oxalate (3). It was established that 1 decomposed to NpO 2 in three stages with formation of neptunium(5) hydroxide at 80-100 deg C, transformed to Np 2 O 5 during further heating. The compound 2 is stable up to 150 deg C, and then decomposition, accompanied by intramolecular neptunium oxidation with formation of NH 4 NpO 2 (NO 3 ) 3 , takes place. This compound is transformed to Np 2 O 5 at 260-290 deg C. It was revealed that during 3 heating in the air at 270-330 deg C more than 70 % of metal could be transformed to pentavalent form, which was probably related with (NpO 2 ) 2 C 2 O 4 formation

  15. Unusual high-temperature behavior of neptunium and plutonium systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brewer, L.

    1991-01-01

    The initial Manhattan Project effort to predict the properties of transuranium elements was based on the assumption that the lanthanides would serve as models. However, since then, many unexpected differences have been found. With the extensive work on the electronic configurations of the gaseous atoms, it is now possible to understand the reasons for the different behavior of the 5f elements compared to the 4f elements. In this paper a review of these differences are presented along with examples of other unexpected behavior such as the very strong generalized Lewis acid-base interactions of the 5f elements with the platinum-group metals that provide techniques for preparation of pure metal samples. The thermodynamic properties of the transuranium metals and some of the compounds will be reviewed

  16. The transuranium elements: From neptunium and plutonium to element 112

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoffman, D.C.

    1996-01-01

    Beginning in the 1930's, both chemists and physicists became interested in synthesizing new artificial elements. The first transuranium element, Np, was synthesized in 1940. Over the past six decades, 20 transuranium elements have been produced. A review of the synthesis is given. The procedure of naming the heavy elements is also discussed. It appears feasible to produce elements 113 and 114. With the Berkeley Gas-filled Separator, it should be possible to reach the superheavy elements in the region of the spherical Z=114 shell, but with fewer neutrons than the N=184 spherical shell. 57 refs, 6 figs

  17. Minutes of the 28th Annual Plutonium Sample Exchange Meeting. Part II: metal sample exchange

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-01-01

    Contents of this publication include the following list of participating laboratories; agenda; attendees; minutes of October 25 and 26 meeting; and handout materials supplied by speakers. The handout materials cover the following: statistics and reporting; plutonium - chemical assay 100% minus impurities; americium neptunium, uranium, carbon and iron data; emission spectroscopy data; plutonium metal sample exchange; the calorimetry sample exchange; chlorine determination in plutonium metal using phyrohydrolysis; spectrophotometric determination of 238-plutonium in oxide; plutonium measurement capabilities at the Savannah River Plant; and robotics in radiochemical laboratory

  18. Partitioning and recovery of neptunium from high level waste streams of PUREX origin using 30% TBP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mathur, J.N.; Murali, M.S.; Balarama Krishna, M.V.; Iyer, R.H.; Chitnis, R.R.; Wattal, P.K.; Theyyunni, T.K.; Ramanujam, A.; Dhami, P.S.; Gopalakrishnan, V.

    1995-01-01

    237 Np is one of the longest-lived nuclides among the actinides present in the high level waste solutions of reprocessing origin. Its separation, recovery and transmutation can reduce the problem of long term storage of the vitrified waste to a great extent. With this objective, the present work was initiated to study the extraction of neptunium into TBP under the conditions relevant to high level waste, along with uranium and plutonium by oxidising it to hexavalent state using potassium dichromate and subsequently recovering it by selective stripping. Three types of simulated HLW solutions namely sulphate bearing (SB), with an acidity of ∼ 0.3 M and non-sulphate wastes originating from the reprocessing of fuels from pressurised heavy water reactor (PHWR) and fast breeder reactor (FBR) with acidities of 3.0 M HNO 3 were employed in these studies. The extraction of U(VI), Np(VI) and Pu(VI) was very high for PHWR- and FBR-HLW solutions, whereas for the SB-HLW solution, these values were less but reasonably high. Quantitative recovery of neptunium and plutonium was achieved using a stripping solution containing 0.1 M H 2 O 2 and 0.01 M ascorbic acid at an acidity of 2.0 M. Since, cerium present in the waste solutions is expected to undergo oxidation in presence of K 2 Cr 2 O 7 , its extraction behaviour was also studied under similar conditions. Based on the results, a scheme was formulated for the recovery of neptunium along with plutonium and was successfully applied to actual high level waste solution originating from the reprocessing of research reactor fuels. (author). 19 refs., 2 figs., 17 tabs

  19. Method of purification of solutions containing plutonium and/or neptunium by plutonium and/or neptunium separation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herz, D; Kankura, R; Wenzel, U

    1975-03-27

    Aqueous solutions containing, amongst other radiation sources, 10/sup -2/ to 10/sup -7/ mol per litre Pu and/or Np - especially aqueous solutions produced when reprocessing fuel elements, in particular of HTR reactors, e.g. according to the Thorex process - can be cleaned from the two metals without much expenditure by using a separating column: determination of the H/sup +/ ion concentration (0.5-6 mol/litre solution), addition of a stabilizing agent (NaNO/sub 2/ or Fe (NH/sub 2/SO/sub 3/)/sub 2/) and passage across a separating column in which the granulate charge is wetted with a long-chain alkylamine (e.g. trioctylamine) which retains the metal. The production of a charge (of Voltalef UF 300) is described. The process may also be carried out continuously.

  20. Unusual radiolytic behavior of neptunium ions in aqueous bicarbonate solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shilov, V.P.; Gogolev, A.V.; Pikaev, A.K.

    2000-01-01

    Behavior of neptunium ions in carbonate and bicarbonate aqueous solutions saturated with air, oxygen or argon during gamma radiation ( 60 Co) by doses up to 3 kGy at dose rates 10 and 25 Gy/min was studied by the method of spectrophotometry. It is shown that in neptunium (5) bicarbonate solution nearly complete (95%) neptunium ion oxidation occurs under the effect of radiation, whereas no oxidation is observed in carbonate solution. Radiation-chemical yield of neptunium (5) oxidation and stationary concentration of neptunium (6) ions depend on concentration of bicarbonate-ions. Explanation to the results obtained is made from the viewpoint of potential radiolytic reactions [ru

  1. Plutonium fires; Incendies de plutonium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mestre, E.

    1959-06-23

    The author reports an information survey on accidents which occurred when handling plutonium. He first addresses accidents reported in documents. He indicates the circumstances and consequences of these accidents (explosion in glove boxes, fires of plutonium chips, plutonium fire followed by filter destruction, explosion during plutonium chip dissolution followed by chip fire). He describes hazards associated with plutonium fires: atmosphere and surface contamination, criticality. The author gives some advices to avoid plutonium fires. These advices concern electric installations, the use of flammable solvents, general cautions associated with plutonium handling, venting and filtration. He finally describes how to fight plutonium fires, and measures to be taken after the fire (staff contamination control, atmosphere control)

  2. Stop plutonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-02-01

    This press document aims to inform the public on the hazards bound to the plutonium exploitation in France and especially the plutonium transport. The first part is a technical presentation of the plutonium and the MOX (Mixed Oxide Fuel). The second part presents the installation of the plutonium industry in France. The third part is devoted to the plutonium convoys safety. The highlight is done on the problem of the leak of ''secret'' of such transports. (A.L.B.)

  3. Modified titrimetric determination of plutonium using photometric end-point detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baughman, W.J.; Dahlby, J.W.

    1980-04-01

    A method used at LASL for the accurate and precise assay of plutonium metal was modified for the measurement of plutonium in plutonium oxides, nitrate solutions, and in other samples containing large quantities of plutonium in oxidized states higher than +3. In this modified method, the plutonium oxide or other sample is dissolved using the sealed-reflux dissolution method or other appropriate methods. Weighed aliquots, containing approximately 100 mg of plutonium, of the dissolved sample or plutonium nitrate solution are fumed to dryness with an HC1O 4 -H 2 SO 4 mixture. The dried residue is dissolved in dilute H 2 SO 4 , and the plutonium is reduced to plutonium (III) with zinc metal. The excess zinc metal is dissolved with HCl, and the solution is passed through a lead reductor column to ensure complete reduction of the plutonium to plutonium (III). The solution, with added ferroin indicator, is then titrated immediately with standardized ceric solution to a photometric end point. For the analysis of plutonium metal solutions, plutonium oxides, and nitrate solutions, the relative standard deviation are 0.06, 0.08, and 0.14%, respectively. Of the elements most likely to be found with the plutonium, only iron, neptunium, and uranium interfere. Small amounts of uranium and iron, which titrate quantitatively in the method, are determined by separate analytical methods, and suitable corrections are applied to the plutonium value. 4 tables, 4 figures

  4. Sorption of neptunium under oxidizing and reducing groundwater conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hakanen, M.

    1991-01-01

    Sorption of neptunium was studied under aerobic, anoxic and reducing groundwater conditions using solutions with initial Np concentrations of 10 -14 to 10 -8 mol/l. Under aerobic conditions the sorption was the same for all concentrations. Under anoxic conditions the same proportion of neptunium (70-80%) was removed from the water. The neptunium sorbed on rock surfaces was of mixed oxidation states. Only Np(V) was found in waters. Under reducing groundwater conditions, nearly all the neptunium was removed from water. The sorbed neptunium was at first almost completely in the form of Np(IV). The submicrogram amounts of neptunium were partly oxidized with time, but Np(V) did not dissolve in reducing water. The holding oxidant character of the tonalite to Np(V) and, the holding reductant character of rocks to small amounts of Np(IV), was demonstrated under anaerobic and reducing groundwater conditions, respectively. (orig.)

  5. Plutonium controversy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richmond, C.R.

    1980-01-01

    The toxicity of plutonium is discussed, particularly in relation to controversies surrounding the setting of radiation protection standards. The sources, amounts of, and exposure pathways of plutonium are given and the public risk estimated

  6. Plutonium controversy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richmond, C.R.

    1980-01-01

    The toxicity of plutonium is discussed, particularly in relation to controversies surrounding the setting of radiation protection standards. The sources, amounts of, and exposure pathways of plutonium are given and the public risk estimated. (ACR)

  7. Lewis base binding affinities and redox properties of plutonium complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oldham, Susan M.; Schake, Ann R.; Burns, Carol J.; Morgan, Arthur N. III; Schnabel, Richard C.; Warner, Benjamin P.; Costa, David A.; Smith, Wayne H.

    2000-01-01

    As part of the actinide molecular science competency development effort, the initial goal of this work is to synthesize and investigate several series of complexes, varying by actinide metal, ligand set, and oxidation state. We are examining the reactivity of plutonium and neptunium organometallic complexes to elucidate fundamental chemical parameters of the metals. These reactions will be compared to those of the known corresponding uranium complexes in order to recognize trends among the actinide elements and to document differences in chemical behavior

  8. Comparison of neptunium sorption results using batch and column techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Triay, I.R.; Furlano, A.C.; Weaver, S.C.; Chipera, S.J.; Bish, D.L.

    1996-08-01

    We used crushed-rock columns to study the sorption retardation of neptunium by zeolitic, devitrified, and vitric tuffs typical of those at the site of the potential high-level nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. We used two sodium bicarbonate waters (groundwater from Well J-13 at the site and water prepared to simulate groundwater from Well UE-25p No. 1) under oxidizing conditions. It was found that values of the sorption distribution coefficient, Kd, obtained from these column experiments under flowing conditions, regardless of the water or the water velocity used, agreed well with those obtained earlier from batch sorption experiments under static conditions. The batch sorption distribution coefficient can be used to predict the arrival time for neptunium eluted through the columns. On the other hand, the elution curves showed dispersivity, which implies that neptunium sorption in these tuffs may be nonlinear, irreversible, or noninstantaneous. As a result, use of a batch sorption distribution coefficient to calculate neptunium transport through Yucca Mountain tuffs would yield conservative values for neptunium release from the site. We also noted that neptunium (present as the anionic neptunyl carbonate complex) never eluted prior to tritiated water, which implies that charge exclusion does not appear to exclude neptunium from the tuff pores. The column experiments corroborated the trends observed in batch sorption experiments: neptunium sorption onto devitrified and vitric tuffs is minimal and sorption onto zeolitic tuffs decreases as the amount of sodium and bicarbonate/carbonate in the water increases

  9. The generation of denatured reactor plutonium by different options of the fuel cycle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Broeders, C.H.M.; Kessler, G. [Inst. for Neutron Physics and Reactor Technology, Research Center Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2006-11-15

    Denatured (proliferation resistant) reactor plutonium can be generated in a number of different fuel cycle options. First denatured reactor plutonium can be obtained if, instead of low enriched U-235 PWR fuel, re-enriched U-235/U-236 from reprocessed uranium is used (fuel type A). Also the envisaged existing 2,500 t of reactor plutonium (being generated world wide up to the year 2010), mostly stored in intermediate fuel storage facilities at present, could be converted during a transition phase into denatured reactor plutonium by the options fuel type B and D. Denatured reactor plutonium could have the same safeguards standard as present low enriched (<20% U-235) LWR fuel. It could be incinerated by recycling once or twice in PWRs and subsequently by multi-recycling in FRs (CAPRA type or IFRs). Once denatured, such reactor plutonium could remain denatured during multiple recycling. In a PWR, e.g., denatured reactor plutonium could be destroyed at a rate of about 250 kg/GWey. While denatured reactor plutonium could be recycled and incinerated under relieved IAEA safeguards, neptunium would still have to be monitored by the IAEA in future for all cases in which considerable amounts of neptunium are produced. (orig.)

  10. Plutonium Speciation, Solubilization and Migration in Soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neu, M.; Runde, W.

    1999-01-01

    This report summarizes research completed in the first half of a three-year project. As outlined in the authors' proposal they are focusing on (1) characterizing the plutonium at an actinide contaminated site, RFETS, including determining the origin, dispersion, and speciation of the plutonium, (2) studying environmentally important plutonium complexes, primarily hydroxides and carbonates, and (3) examining the interactions of plutonium species with manganese minerals. In the first year the authors focused on site based studies. This year they continue to characterize samples from the RFETS, study the formation and structural and spectroscopic features of environmentally relevant Pu species, and begin modeling the environmental behavior of plutonium

  11. Determination of neptunium by redox titration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Godbole, A.G.; Patil, S.K.

    1979-01-01

    A simple and quick method for the potentiometric determination of neptunium on the 2 to 5 mg scale has been developed. It consists of oxidation to Np(VI) by AgO or fuming with HClO 4 , destruction of excess of AgO by sulphamic acid, reduction of Np(VI) to Np(IV) with a slight excess of standard Fe(II) in 2M H 2 SO 4 and potentiometric titration of the excess of Fe(II) with standard Ce(IV). The precision is +- 0.5%. (author)

  12. Transport of neptunium through Yucca Mountain tuffs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Triay, I.R.; Robinson, B.A.; Mitchell, A.J.; Overly, C.M.; Lopez, R.M.

    1993-01-01

    Neptunium has a high solubility in groundwaters from Yucca Mountain [1]. Uranium in nuclear reactors produces 237 Np which has a half-life of 2.1 4 x 10 6 years. Consequently, the transport of 237 Np through tuffs is of major importance in assessing the performance of a high-level nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain. The objective of this work is to determine the amount of Np retardation that is provided by the minerals in Yucca Mountain tuffs as a function of groundwater chemistry

  13. Historical aspects of the discovery of plutonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clark, David L.

    2016-01-01

    The historical events that led up to the discovery of plutonium and subsequently, how that discovery helped shape the modern period table of the elements, and ushered in a new era of nuclear science and technology are discussed. When the first of the transuranium elements, neptunium was discovered, it was realized that the radioactive βdecay of "2"3"9Np should lead to the formation of element 94. The scale of the experiments at that time, however, precluded its identification. Plutonium was first produced late in 1940 by Seaborg, McMillan, Kennedy, and Wahl1,2 by bombarding uranium with deuterons to produce the isotope "2"3"8Pu

  14. Redox reactions of neptunium in tributyl phosphate-dodecane mixtures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wehrey, F.

    1989-01-01

    In relation with the reprocessing of irradiated fuels, disproportionation and oxidation by nitric acid of pentavalent neptunium in tributyl phosphate-dodecane mixtures have been studied. The experimental part of this work is based on spectrophotometric measurements. The disproportionation of pentavalent neptunium in organic perchloric medium is a second order reaction with respect to neptunium V. The reaction rate is strongly influenced by the perchloric acid concentration and has a higher value than in an aqueous medium. The reverse reaction in nitric media is a first order with respect to tetravalent and hexavalent ions. The reaction rate is a function of the reverse of the square of the nitric acid concentration. The energy of activation is the same than in aqueous medium. The oxidation rate of pentavalent neptunium by nitric acid is increased by nitrous acid. When no nitrous acid is added to the mixture, the reaction revealed to be autocatalytic, possesses an induction period. When nitrous and nitric acids are in excess to neptunium the reaction is first order with respect to neptunium. The reaction rate depends on the concentration of nitric acid and is a linear function of the concentration of nitrous acid. In tributyl phosphate dodecane mixtures the reaction occurs spontaneously. It is not the case in aqueous media. The values of thermodynamical and kinetical constants determined in this work could be used in a modelization of the behavior of neptunium in the reprocessing of irradiated fuels, which has to eliminate this element among its tasks [fr

  15. Precipitaion of neptunium(6) by urotropin from the heated solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Logvis', A.I.; Krot, N.N.

    1992-01-01

    The composition of precipitate, formed in the course of neptunium(6) nitric acid solution heating with urotropin under different conditions was studied by the methods of X-ray phase analysis, gravimetry and spectrophotometry. The compound studied is determined as NpO 3 ·xH 2 O·yNH 3 , where x <= 2, y <= 0.28. It is shown that not less than 12 % of the initial amount of neptunium remain in solution in the form of neptunium(5)

  16. Neptunium 237 behaviour in subcellular fractions of rat kidneys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kreslov, V.V.; Maksutova, A.Ya.; Mushkacheva, G.S.

    1978-01-01

    Subcellular distribution of intravenously injected (1 and 0.5 μCi/rat) neptunium nitrate (5- and 6-valent) in kidneys of rat males and females has been investigated. It has been shown that the radionuclide was unevenly distributed within the cell. As early as 24 hours after administration, about 50 per cent of neptunium were concentrated in the mitochondrial fraction. The data are presented on variations in neptunium behaviour within subcellular fractions of rat kidneys depending on the sex of animals, valency and dose of the isotope

  17. Plutonium controversy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gofman, J.W.

    1976-01-01

    If the world chooses to seek a solution to the energy dilemma through nuclear energy, the element plutonium will become an article of commerce to be handled in quantities of thousands of tonnes annually. Plutonium is a uniquely potent inhalation carcinogen, the potential induction of lung cancer dwarfing other possible toxic effects. For reasons to be presented here, it is the author's opinion that plutonium's carcinogenicity has been very seriously underestimated. If one couples the corrected carcinogenicity with the probable degree of industrial containment of the plutonium, it appears that the commercialization of a plutonium-based energy economy is not an acceptable option for society. Sagan's statement that ''the experience of 30 years supports the contention that plutonium can be used safely'' is manifestly indefensible. No meaningful epidemiological study of plutonium-exposed workers for that 30-year period has ever been done. Since thousands of those possibly exposed have left the industry and are not even available to follow-up, it is doubtful that any meaningful study of ''the experience of 30 years'' will ever be accomplished

  18. Surface Complexation of Neptunium(V) with Goethite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jerden, James L.; Kropf, A. Jeremy

    2007-01-01

    Batch adsorption experiments in which neptunium-bearing solutions were reacted with goethite (alpha-FeOOH) have been performed to study uptake mechanisms in sodium chloride and calcium-bearing sodium silicate solutions. This paper presents results identifying and quantifying the mechanisms by which neptunium is adsorbed as a function of pH and reaction time (aging). Also presented are results from tests in which neptunium is reacted with goethite in the presence of other cations (uranyl and calcium) that may compete with neptunium for sorption sites. The desorption of neptunium from goethite has been studied by re-suspending the neptunium-loaded goethite samples in solutions containing no neptunium. Selected reacted sorbent samples were analyzed by x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) to determine the oxidation state and molecular speciation of the adsorbed neptunium. Results have been used to establish the pH adsorption edge of neptunium on goethite in sodium chloride and calcium-bearing sodium silicate solutions. The results indicate that neptunium uptake on goethite reaches 95% at a pH of approximately 7 and begins to decrease at pH values greater than 8.5. Distribution coefficients for neptunium sorption range from less than 1000 (moles/kg) sorbed / (moles/kg) solution at pH less than 5.0 to greater than 10,000 (moles/kg) sorbed / (moles/kg) solution at pH greater than 7.0. Distribution coefficients as high as 100,000 (moles/kg) sorbed / (moles/kg) solution were recorded for the tests done in calcite equilibrated sodium silicate solutions. XAS results show that neptunium complexes with the goethite surface mainly as Np(V) (although Np(IV) is prevalent in some of the longer-duration sorption tests). The neptunium adsorbed to goethite shows Np-O bond length of approximately 1.8 angstroms which is representative of the Np-O axial bond in the neptunyl(V) complex. This neptunyl(V) ion is coordinated to 5 or 6 equatorial oxygens with Np-O bond lengths of 2

  19. Sorption of americium and neptunium by deep-sea sediments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Higgo, J.J.W.; Rees, L.V.C.; Cronan, D.S.

    1983-01-01

    The sorption and desorption of americium and neptunium by a wide range of deep-sea sediments from natural sea water at 4 0 C has been studied using a carefully controlled batch technique. All the sediments studied should form an excellent barrier to the migration of americium since distribution coefficients were uniformly greater than 10 5 and the sorption-desorption reaction may not be reversible. The sorption of neptunium was reversible and, except for one red clay, the distribution coefficients were greater than 10 3 for all the sediments investigated. Nevertheless the migration of neptunium should also be effectively retarded by most deep-sea sediments even under relatively oxidizing conditions. The neptunium in solution remained in the V oxidation state throughout the experiments. Under the experimental conditions used colloidal americium was trapped by the sediment and solubility did not seem to be the controlling factor in the desorption of americium. (Auth.)

  20. Two-stage precipitation of neptunium (IV) oxalate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luerkens, D.W.

    1983-07-01

    Neptunium (IV) oxalate was precipitated using a two-stage precipitation system. A series of precipitation experiments was used to identify the significant process variables affecting precipitate characteristics. Process variables tested were input concentrations, solubility conditions in the first stage precipitator, precipitation temperatures, and residence time in the first stage precipitator. A procedure has been demonstrated that produces neptunium (IV) oxalate particles that filter well and readily calcine to the oxide

  1. Plutonium solubilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Puigdomnech, I.; Bruno, J.

    1991-02-01

    Thermochemical data has been selected for plutonium oxide, hydroxide, carbonate and phosphate equilibria. Equilibrium constants have been evaluated in the temperature range 0 to 300 degrees C at a pressure of 1 bar to T≤100 degrees C and at the steam saturated pressure at higher temperatures. Measured solubilities of plutonium that are reported in the literature for laboratory experiments have been collected. Solubility data on oxides, hydroxides, carbonates and phosphates have been selected. No solubility data were found at temperatures higher than 60 degrees C. The literature solubility data have been compared with plutonium solubilities calculated with the EQ3/6 geochemical modelling programs, using the selected thermodynamic data for plutonium. (authors)

  2. PLUTONIUM PURIFICATION PROCESS EMPLOYING THORIUM PYROPHOSPHATE CARRIER

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, E.L.

    1959-04-28

    The separation and purification of plutonium from the radioactive elements of lower atomic weight is described. The process of this invention comprises forming a 0.5 to 2 M aqueous acidffc solution containing plutonium fons in the tetravalent state and elements with which it is normally contaminated in neutron irradiated uranium, treating the solution with a double thorium compound and a soluble pyrophosphate compound (Na/sub 4/P/sub 2/O/sub 7/) whereby a carrier precipitate of thorium A method is presented of reducing neptunium and - trite is advantageous since it destroys any hydrazine f so that they can be removed from solutions in which they are contained is described. In the carrier precipitation process for the separation of plutonium from uranium and fission products including zirconium and columbium, the precipitated blsmuth phosphate carries some zirconium, columbium, and uranium impurities. According to the invention such impurities can be complexed and removed by dissolving the contaminated carrier precipitate in 10M nitric acid, followed by addition of fluosilicic acid to about 1M, diluting the solution to about 1M in nitric acid, and then adding phosphoric acid to re-precipitate bismuth phosphate carrying plutonium.

  3. Alpha spectrum profiling of plutonium in leached simulated high-level radioactive waste-glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diamond, H.; Friedman, A.M.

    1981-01-01

    Low-geometry X-ray spectra from /sup 239/Pu and /sup 237/Np, incorporated into simulated high-level radioactive waste-glass, were transformed into depth distributions for these elements. Changes in the depth profiles were observed for a series of static leachings in 75/degree/C water. Radiochemical assay of the leach solutions revealed that little neptunium or plutonium was leached, and that the amount leached was independent of leaching time. The depth profiles of the leached specimens showed that there was selective leaching of nonradioactive components of the glass, concentrating the remaining neptunium and plutonium in a broad zone near (but not at) the glass surface. Eventual redeposition of nonradioactive material onto the glass surface inhibited further leaching

  4. Plutonium titration by controlled potential coulometry; Dosage du plutonium par coulometrie a potentiel impose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leguay, N.

    2011-07-01

    The LAMMAN (Nuclear Materials Metrology Laboratory) is the support laboratory of the CETAMA (Analytical Method Committee), whose two main activities are developing analytic methods, and making and characterizing reference materials. The LAMMAN chose to develop the controlled potential coulometry because it is a very accurate analytical technique which allows the connection between the quantity of element electrolysed to the quantity of electricity measured thanks to the Faraday's law: it does not require the use of a chemical standard. This method was first used for the plutonium titration and was developed in the Materials Analysis and Metrology Laboratory (LAMM), for upgrading its performances and developing it to the titration of other actinides. The equipment and the material used were developed to allow the work in confined atmosphere (in a glove box), with all the restrictions involved. Plutonium standard solutions are used to qualify the method, and in particular to do titrations with an uncertainty better than 0.1 %. The present study allowed making a bibliographic research about controlled potential coulometry applied to the actinides (plutonium, uranium, neptunium, americium and curium). A full procedure was written to set all the steps of plutonium titration, from the preparation of samples to equipments storage. A method validation was done to check the full procedure, and the experimental conditions: working range, uncertainty, performance... Coulometric titration of the plutonium from pure solution (without interfering elements) was developed to the coulometric titration of the plutonium in presence of uranium, which allows to do accurate analyses for the analyses of some parts of the reprocessing of the spent nuclear fuel. The possibility of developing this method to other actinides than plutonium was highlighted thanks to voltammetric studies, like the coulometric titration of uranium with a working carbon electrode in sulphuric medium. (author)

  5. The effect of carbonate on neptunium sorption by hydroxyapatite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moore, R.C.; Holt, K.

    2005-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: Hydroxyapatite, Ca 10 (PO 4 ) 6 (OH) 2 , is a common mineral, the main inorganic compound in bone and exhibits strong sorptive properties for many radionuclides. It has been widely studied and proposed as a backfill material for nuclear waste repositories. Neptunium is one the radionuclides sorbed by hydroxyapatite. Neptunium is of particular importance to nuclear waste repository performance because of its relatively high aqueous solubility, high mobility in the environment and long half-life. In this work, we report on the effects of carbonate on sorption of neptunium by hydroxyapatite. Batch sorption and desorption studies for neptunium were performed as a function of carbonate concentration in water using a synthetic hydroxyapatite. The results indicate even low concentrations of carbonate significantly reduce neptunium sorption and enhance desorption. The data were fit to several simple isotherm equations with the Langmuir equation giving the best results. The results of the work are discussed with respect to nuclear waste repository performance. (authors)

  6. CONVERSION OF PLUTONIUM TRIFLUORIDE TO PLUTONIUM TETRAFLUORIDE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fried, S.; Davidson, N.R.

    1957-09-10

    A large proportion of the trifluoride of plutonium can be converted, in the absence of hydrogen fluoride, to the tetrafiuoride of plutonium. This is done by heating plutonium trifluoride with oxygen at temperatures between 250 and 900 deg C. The trifiuoride of plutonium reacts with oxygen to form plutonium tetrafluoride and plutonium oxide, in a ratio of about 3 to 1. In the presence of moisture, plutonium tetrafluoride tends to hydrolyze at elevated temperatures and therefore it is desirable to have the process take place under anhydrous conditions.

  7. Plutonium (Pu)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    This pedagogical document presents the properties and uses of plutonium: where does it come from, the history of its discovery, its uses and energy content, its recycling and reuse in MOX fuels, its half-life, toxicity and presence in the environment. (J.S.)

  8. Effect of natural organic materials on cadmium and neptunium sorption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kung, K.S.; Triay, I.R.

    1994-01-01

    In a batch sorption study of the effect of naturally occurring organic materials on the sorption of cadmium and neptunium on oxides and tuff surfaces, the model sorbents were synthetic goethite, boehmite, amorphous silicon oxides, and a crushed tuff material from Yucca Mountain, Nevada. An amino acid, 3-(3,4-dihydroxypheny)-DL-alanine (DOPA), and an aquatic-originated fulvic material, Nordic aquatic fulvic acid (NAFA), were used as model organic chemicals. Sorption isotherm results showed that DOPA sorption followed the order aluminum oxide > iron oxide > silicon oxide and that the amount of DOAP sorption for a given sorbent increased as the solution pH was raised. The sorption of cadmium and neptunium on the iron oxide was about ten times higher than that on the aluminum oxide. The sorption of cadmium and neptunium on natural tuff material was much lower than that on aluminum and iron oxides. The sorption of cadmium on iron and aluminum oxides was found to be influenced by the presence of DOPA, and increasing the amount of DOPA coating resulted in higher cadmium sorption on aluminum oxide. However, for iron oxide, cadmium sorption decreased with increasing DOPA concentration. The presence of the model organic materials DOPA and NAFA did not affect the sorption of neptunium on tuff material or on the iron and aluminum oxides. Spectroscopic results indicate that cadmium complexes strongly with DOPA. Therefore, the effect of the organic material, DOPA, on the cadmium sorption is readily observed. However, neptunium is possibly complexed weakly with organic material. Thus, DOPA and NAFA have little effect on neptunium sorption on all sorbents selected for study

  9. Learning more about plutonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-01-01

    This document offers chemical, metallurgical and economical information on the plutonium, a hard white radioelement. It deals also on the plutonium formation in the earth, the plutonium use in the nuclear industry, the plutonium in the environment and the plutonium toxicity. (A.L.B.)

  10. Plutonium in nature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Madic, C.

    1994-01-01

    Plutonium in nature comes from natural sources and anthropogenic ones. Plutonium at the earth surface comes principally from anthropogenic sources. It is easily detectable in environment. The plutonium behaviour in environment is complex. It seems necessary for the future to reduce releases in environment, to improve predictive models of plutonium behaviour in geosphere, to precise biological impact of anthropogenic plutonium releases

  11. Radiation-chemical behaviour of neptunium ions in nitric acid solutions in the presence of curium-244

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frolova, L.M.; Frolov, A.A.; Vasil'ev, V.Ya.

    1984-01-01

    Radiation-chemical behaviour of neptunium ions in nitric acid solutions is studied under the action of intensive internal alpha-irradiation conditioned by curium nuclides. In 0.3-1.1 mol/l solutions of nitric acid radiation-chemical oxidation of neptunium (4) and reduction of neptunium (6) is obeyed to the first order law of reaction rate in respect to neptunium concentration. Effective constants of neptunium (4) oxidation rates and neptuniumi(6) reduction rates are not dependent on neptunium ion in1tial concentration and increase with a growth of a dose rate of alpha-irradiation of solution. In equilibrium only neptunium (5) and neptunium (6) are present in solutions with HNO 3 concentration less than 1 mol/l. In more concentrated solutions equilibrium between sexa-, penta- and tetravalent neptunium forms is established. Equilibrium concentrations of neptunium valent forms are not dependent on neptunium initial oxidation state under the same initial conditions (dose rate, neptunium concentration and acidity. It is shown form experimental data that under the action of alpha-irradiation neptunium (5) both is oxidated to neptunium (6) and is reduced to neptunium (4)

  12. The Macdonald and Savage titrimetric procedure scaled down to 4 mg sized plutonium samples. P. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuvik, V.; Lecouteux, C.; Doubek, N.; Ronesch, K.; Jammet, G.; Bagliano, G.; Deron, S.

    1992-01-01

    The original Macdonald and Savage amperometric method scaled down to milligram-sized plutonium samples was further modified. The electro-chemical process of each redox step and the end-point of the final titration were monitored potentiometrically. The method is designed to determine 4 mg of plutonium dissolved in nitric acid solution. It is suitable for the direct determination of plutonium in non-irradiated fuel with a uranium-to-plutonium ratio of up to 30. The precision and accuracy are ca. 0.05-0.1% (relative standard deviation). Although the procedure is very selective, the following species interfere: vanadyl(IV) and vanadate (almost quantitatively), neptunium (one electron exchange per mole), nitrites, fluorosilicates (milligram amounts yield a slight bias) and iodates. (author). 15 refs.; 8 figs.; 7 tabs

  13. Plutonium uniqueness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silver, G.L.

    1984-01-01

    A standard is suggested against which the putative uniqueness of plutonium may be tested. It is common folklore that plutonium is unique among the chemical elements because its four common oxidation states can coexist in the same solution. Whether this putative uniqueness appears only during transit to equilibrium, or only at equilibrium, or all of the time, is not generally made clear. But while the folklore may contain some truth, it cannot be put to test until some measure of 'uniqueness' is agreed upon so that quantitative comparisons are possible. One way of measuring uniqueness is as the magnitude of the product of the mole fractions of the element at equilibrium. A 'coexistence index' is defined and discussed. (author)

  14. Plutonium story

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seaborg, G.T.

    1981-09-01

    The first nuclear synthesis and identification (i.e., the discovery) of the synthetic transuranium element plutonium (isotope 238 Pu) and the demonstration of its fissionability with slow neutrons (isotope 239 Pu) took place at the University of California, Berkeley, through the use of the 60-inch and 37-inch cyclotrons, in late 1940 and early 1941. This led to the development of industrial scale methods in secret work centered at the University of Chicago's Metallurgical Laboratory and the application of these methods to industrial scale production, at manufacturing plants in Tennessee and Washington, during the World War II years 1942 to 1945. The chemical properties of plutonium, needed to devise the procedures for its industrial scale production, were studied by tracer and ultramicrochemical methods during this period on an extraordinarily urgent basis. This work, and subsequent investigations on a worldwide basis, have made the properties of plutonium very well known. Its well studied electronic structure and chemical properties give it a very interesting position in the actinide series of inner transition elements

  15. Separation of different valency states of neptunium from processing solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shabana, R.; EL-Naggar, H.A.

    1990-01-01

    The three main oxidation states of neptunium (Np(IV),Np(V) and Np(V I)) have been separated from each other by solvent extraction and extraction chromatographic techniques. The separation procedure is based on a systematic study of the extraction behaviour of each oxidation state using TBP as an extractant. The purity of separated species is identified using spectrophotometry

  16. Determination of neptunium in soil by ICP-MS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ayranov, M.; Kraehenbuehl, U.

    2005-01-01

    A fast and simple method for the determination of 237 Np in soil is presented. The borate fusion decreases the sample pre-treatment time and a TEVA extraction chromatography separates neptunium from uranium and the interfering matrix components. A comparison of the sensitivities of alpha spectrometry and sector field ICP-MS for determination of 237 Np is presented. (orig.)

  17. Interaction of neptunium with humic acid and anaerobic bacteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kubota, Takumi; Sasaki, Takayuki; Kudo, Akira

    2002-01-01

    Humic acid and bacteria play an important role in the migration of radionuclides in groundwaters. The interaction of neptunium with humic acid and anaerobic bacteria has been investigated by liquid/liquid and solid/liquid extraction systems. For liquid/liquid extraction, the apparent complex formation constant, β α was obtained from the distribution between two phases of neptunium. For solid/liquid extraction, the ratio of sorption to bacteria, K d , was measured. K d of humic acid can be evaluated from β α . The large value of β α and K d means strong interaction of neptunium with organisms. In order to examine the effect of the nature of organism on interaction, the interaction with humic acid was compared to that with non-sterilized or sterilized mixed anaerobic bacteria. The value of β α of humate depended on neptunium ion concentration as well as pH, which showed the effect of polyelectrolyte properties and heterogeneous composition of humic acid. The comparison of interaction with humic acid and bacteria indicated that the K d value of humic acid was larger than that of bacteria and more strongly depend on pH. (author)

  18. Plutonium and U-233 mines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milgram, M.S.

    1983-08-01

    A comparison is made among second generation reactor systems fuelled primarily with fissile plutonium and/or U-233 in uranium or thorium. This material is obtained from irradiated fuel from first generation CANDU reactors fuelled by natural or enriched uranium and thorium. Except for plutonium-thorium reactors, second generation reactors demand similar amounts of reprocessing throughput, but the most efficient plutonium burning systems require a large prior allocation of uranium. Second generation reactors fuelled by U-233 make more efficient use of resources and lead to more flexible fuelling strategies, but require development of first generation once-through thorium cycles and early demonstration of the commercial viability of thorium fuel reprocessing. No early implementation of reprocessing technology is required for these cycles

  19. Neptunium(V) sorption on kaolinite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amayri, S.; Jermolajev, A.; Reich, T. [Mainz Univ. (Germany). Inst. of Nuclear Chemistry

    2011-07-01

    The sorption behavior of neptunium(V) onto the clay mineral kaolinite was studied in batch experiments under different experimental conditions: [Np(V)] = 7 x 10{sup -12}-8 x 10{sup -6} M, solid-to-liquid ratio 2-20 g L{sup -1}, I = 0.1 and 0.01 M NaClO{sub 4}, pH = 6-10, ambient air and Ar atmosphere. The short-lived isotope {sup 239}Np (T{sub 1/2} = 2.36 d) was used instead of {sup 237}Np (T{sub 1/2} = 2.14 x 10{sup 6} a) to study the sorption behavior of Np(V) at environmentally-relevant concentrations, i.e., 7 x 10{sup -12} M Np. In addition, {sup 239}Np(V) served as tracer to measure sorption isotherms over six orders of magnitude in Np concentration (4.8 x 10{sup -12}-1.0 x 10{sup -4} M). The results show that Np(V) sorption on kaolinite is strongly influenced by pH, CO{sub 2}, and ionic strength. The sorption of 8 x 10{sup -6} M Np(V) at pH 9.0, and ionic strength of 0.1 M NaClO{sub 4} was proportional to the solid-to-liquid ratio of kaolinite in the range of 2-10 g L{sup -1}. In the absence of CO{sub 2}, the Np(V) uptake increased continuously with increasing pH value up to 97% at pH 10. Under ambient CO{sub 2}, the sorption of Np decreased above pH 8 up to zero at pH 10. An increase of Np(V) concentration from 7 x 10{sup -12} to 8 x 10{sup -6} M resulted in a shift of the sorption pH edge by up to one pH unit to higher pH values. The ionic strength influenced the Np(V) sorption onto kaolinite only in the presence of ambient CO{sub 2}. Under Ar atmosphere the sorption of Np(V) was independent from ionic strength, indicating the formation of inner-sphere complexes of Np(V) with kaolinite. Time-dependent batch experiments at pH 9.0 under ambient CO{sub 2} showed that the sorption of Np(V) on kaolinite is fast and fully reversible over six orders in Np(V) concentration. (orig.)

  20. The proliferation potential of neptunium and americium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    An, J. S.; Shin, J. S.; Kim, J. S.; Kwack, E. H.; Kim, B. K

    2000-05-01

    It is recognized that some trans-uranic elements other than plutonium, in particular Np and Am, if will be available in sufficient quantities, could be used for nuclear explosive devices. The spent fuel has been accumulating in number of nuclear power plant and operation of large scale commercial reprocessing plants. However, these materials are not covered by the definition of special fissionable material in the Agency Statute. At the time when the Statute was adopted, the availability of meaningful quantities of separated Np and Am was remote and they were not included in the definition of special fissionable material. Then, IAEA Board decided a measure for control of Np and Am on September 1999. This report contains the control method and the characteristic of Np and Am for using domestic nuclear industries, and it can be useful for understanding how to report and account of Np and Am. (author)

  1. Corrosion of type 304L stainless steel in boiling dilute neptunium nitrate solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Motooka, Takafumi; Kiuchi, Kiyoshi

    2003-01-01

    Corrosion of type 304L stainless steel in nitric acid solution containing neptunium was studied under immersion and heat-transfer condition. Corrosion rates of stainless steel were obtained by the weight loss measurement and the quantitative analysis of metallic ions dissolved in solution. The surface morphology was observed by scanning electron microscopy. The corrosion acceleration mechanism was investigated by polarization measurement and spectrophotometry. The corrosion rate in boiling 9M nitric acid was accelerated by addition of neptunium. The corrosion of stainless steel was promoted under heat-transfer condition compared to immersion condition. In polarization measurements, the cathodic current was increased by addition of neptunium. Spectrophotometric measurements showed the oxidization of neptunium in boiling nitric acid. It was suggested that the accelerated corrosion in nitric acid solution containing neptunium was caused by re-oxidation of neptunium. (author)

  2. PRODUCTION OF PLUTONIUM METAL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyon, W.L.; Moore, R.H.

    1961-01-17

    A process is given for producing plutonium metal by the reduction of plutonium chloride, dissolved in alkali metal chloride plus or minus aluminum chloride, with magnesium or a magnesium-aluminum alloy at between 700 and 800 deg C and separating the plutonium or plutonium-aluminum alloy formed from the salt.

  3. SEPARATION OF PLUTONIUM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maddock, A.G.; Smith, F.

    1959-08-25

    A method is described for separating plutonium from uranium and fission products by treating a nitrate solution of fission products, uranium, and hexavalent plutonium with a relatively water-insoluble fluoride to adsorb fission products on the fluoride, treating the residual solution with a reducing agent for plutonium to reduce its valence to four and less, treating the reduced plutonium solution with a relatively insoluble fluoride to adsorb the plutonium on the fluoride, removing the solution, and subsequently treating the fluoride with its adsorbed plutonium with a concentrated aqueous solution of at least one of a group consisting of aluminum nitrate, ferric nitrate, and manganous nitrate to remove the plutonium from the fluoride.

  4. Sorption behavior of neptunium on bentonite -- Effect of calcium ion on the sorption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kozai, Naofumi; Ohnuki, Toshihiko; Muraoka, Susumu

    1995-01-01

    The sorption behavior of neptunium on bentonite was studied with batch type sorption and desorption experiments over a pH range of 2 to 8. A series of parallel studies using Na-smectite, Ca-smectite and admixtures of Na-smectite and calcite quantified the capacity of Ca 2+ (which occurs in bentonite as an exchangeable cation of smectite and as a component of calcite) to inhibit the sorption of neptunium. The distribution coefficient (K d ) of neptunium for bentonite was constant from pH 2 to 7, while for pure Na-smectite K d increased below pH 5 due to specific sorption of neptunium on Na-smectite. Specific sorption was defined as occurring when neptunium could be desorbed by a strong acid (1 M HCl) but was stable in the presence of 1 M KCl. It was found that the quantity of neptunium sorbed on Na-smectite was inversely proportional to the concentration of Ca 2+ in solution, an effect most pronounced at pH 2+ limits the specific sorption capacity of Na-smectite for neptunium. Similarly, in the mixture of Na-smectite and calcite, sufficient Ca 2+ was solubilized to depress neptunium sorption. This investigation demonstrates that Ca 2+ contained in bentonite as exchangeable cation and released from calcite reduces the specific sorption of neptunium

  5. Natural Transmutation of Actinides via the Fission Reaction in the Closed Thorium-Uranium-Plutonium Fuel Cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshalkin, V. Ye.; Povyshev, V. M.

    2017-12-01

    It is shown for a closed thorium-uranium-plutonium fuel cycle that, upon processing of one metric ton of irradiated fuel after each four-year campaign, the radioactive wastes contain 54 kg of fission products, 0.8 kg of thorium, 0.10 kg of uranium isotopes, 0.005 kg of plutonium isotopes, 0.002 kg of neptunium, and "trace" amounts of americium and curium isotopes. This qualitatively simplifies the handling of high-level wastes in nuclear power engineering.

  6. Plutonium-239

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ammerich, Marc; Frot, Patricia; Gambini, Denis-Jean; Gauron, Christine; Moureaux, Patrick; Herbelet, Gilbert; Lahaye, Thierry; Pihet, Pascal; Rannou, Alain

    2014-06-01

    This sheet belongs to a collection which relates to the use of radionuclides essentially in unsealed sources. Its goal is to gather on a single document the most relevant information as well as the best prevention practices to be implemented. These sheets are made for the persons in charge of radiation protection: users, radioprotection-skill persons, labor physicians. Each sheet treats of: 1 - the radio-physical and biological properties; 2 - the main uses; 3 - the dosimetric parameters; 4 - the measurement; 5 - the protection means; 6 - the areas delimitation and monitoring; 7 - the personnel classification, training and monitoring; 8 - the effluents and wastes; 9 - the authorization and declaration administrative procedures; 10 - the transport; and 11 - the right conduct to adopt in case of incident or accident. This sheet deals specifically with Plutonium-239

  7. XAS and TRLIF spectroscopy of uranium and neptunium in seawater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maloubier, Melody; Solari, Pier Lorenzo; Moisy, Philippe; Monfort, Marguerite; Den Auwer, Christophe; Moulin, Christophe

    2015-03-28

    Seawater contains radionuclides at environmental levels; some are naturally present and others come from anthropogenic nuclear activity. In this report, the molecular speciation in seawater of uranium(VI) and neptunium(V) at a concentration of 5 × 10(-5) M has been investigated for the first time using a combination of two spectroscopic techniques: Time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence (TRLIF) for U and extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) for U and Np at the LIII edge. In parallel, the theoretical speciation of uranium and neptunium in seawater at the same concentration is also discussed and compared to spectroscopic data. The uranium complex was identified as the neutral carbonato calcic complex UO2(CO3)3Ca2, which has been previously described in other natural systems. In the case of neptunium, the complex identified is mainly a carbonato complex whose exact stoichiometry is more difficult to assess. The knowledge of the actinide molecular speciation and reactivity in seawater is of fundamental interest in the particular case of uranium recovery and more generally regarding the actinide life cycle within the biosphere in the case of accidental release. This is the first report of actinide direct speciation in seawater medium that can complement inventory data.

  8. The photochemistry of neptunium in aqueous perchloric acid solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Friedman, H.A.; Toth, L.M.; Osborne, M.M.

    1979-01-01

    The photochemistry of neptunium ions in aqueous perchloric acid has been investigated using 254 and 300 nm UV radiation. In the absence of other reagents, Np(IV) and (V) oxidized to Np(VI), in a stepwise fashion, with individual quantum efficiencies for each step that vary from 0.02 to 0.004. Decreasing acid concentration favors the Np(IV) → Np(V) reaction whereas it hinders the Np(V) → Np(VI) photo-oxidation. When ethanol, acetaldehyde and other mild reducing agents are added to neptunium-perchloric acid solutions which are then photolyzed, the Np species are reduced to Np(III) in a stepwise fashion with individual quantum efficiencies that vary from 0.07 to 0.006. The overall photoredox reactions of neptunium are subject to competing secondary product reactions that become significant as the photolysis products accumulate. Absorption spectrophotometry was used to monitor the changes in Np oxidation states and reference spectra of the various Np oxidation states are given for 1.0 N HClO 4 . The Np species have absorption bands in the 300 to 1320 nm region that obey Beer's law only when they were properly resolved. (author)

  9. The plutonium fuel cycles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pigford, T.H.; Ang, K.P.

    1975-01-01

    The quantities of plutonium and other fuel actinides have been calculated for equilibrium fuel cycles for 1000-MW water reactors fueled with slightly enriched uranium, water reactors fueled with plutonium and natural uranium, fast-breder reactors, gas-cooled reactors fueled with thorium and highly enriched uranium, and gas-cooled reactors fueled with thorium, plutonium and recycled uranium. The radioactivity quantities of plutonium, americium and curium processed yearly in these fuel cycles are greatest for the water reactors fueled with natural uranium and recycled plutonium. The total amount of actinides processed is calculated for the predicted future growth of the U.S. nuclear power industry. For the same total installed nuclear power capacity, the introduction of the plutonium breeder has little effect upon the total amount of plutonium in this century. The estimated amount of plutonium in the low-level process wastes in the plutonium fuel cycles is comparable to the amount of plutonium in the high-level fission product wastes. The amount of plutonium processed in the nuclear fuel cycles can be considerably reduced by using gas-cooled reactors to consume plutonium produced in uranium-fueled water reactors. These, and other reactors dedicated for plutonium utilization, could be co-located with facilities for fuel reprocessing ad fuel fabrication to eliminate the off-site transport of separated plutonium. (author)

  10. Study of the influence of radiolysis on the stability of plutonium III. Application to a heterogeneous medium formed by a nitric solution of ferrous ions and an organic solution of trilauryl-ammonium nitrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fourmaux, J.M.

    1980-01-01

    The objective of this research thesis is to study the behaviour of plutonium 238 in media which are commonly used to isolate it from other elements such as neptunium and fission products created during the neutron irradiation of the neptunium 237 isotope. As plutonium 238 purification processes are all based on redox reaction, it is essential to know the influence of radiolysis on the redox behaviour, and on the distribution coefficients of this isotope in solutions used during its separation from the neptunium 237 isotope. Therefore, it is necessary to study the influence of radiolysis on the stability of plutonium with an oxidation III level. As this extraction is performed by an organic solvent (trilauryl-ammonium nitrate), this study addresses the behaviour of plutonium in an emulsion formed by this solvent and the nitric aqueous solution previously adjusted in terms of Fe 2+ ions. After a brief recall of bibliographical generalities related to radiolysis, the author presents and comments the Nernst law in the case of a two-phase system (emulsion), and reports the use of this law to obtain the plutonium potential-distribution coefficient relationship. The last part reports experimental data

  11. Direct reduction of plutonium from dicesium hexachloroplutonate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Averill, W.A.; Boyd, T.E.

    1991-01-01

    The Rocky Flats Plant produces dicesium hexachloroplutonate (DCHP) primarily as a reagent in the molten salt extraction of americium from plutonium metal. DCHP is precipitated from aqueous chloride solutions derived from the leaching of process residues with a high degree of selectivity. DCHP is a chloride salt of plutonium, while the traditional aqueous precipitate is a hydrated oxide. Plutonium metal preparation from the oxide involves either the conversion of oxide to a halide followed by metallothermic reduction or direct reduction of the oxide using a flux. Either method generates at least three times as much radioactively contaminated waste as metal produced. Plutonium concentration by DCHP precipitation, however, produces a chloride salt that can be reduced using calcium metal at a temperature of approximately 1000K. In this paper the advantages and limitations of this process are discussed

  12. Prediction Models for Plutonium, Strontium, Uranium and Neptunium Loading onto Monosodium Titanate (MST)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fondeur, F. F.; Hobbs, D. T.; Barnes, M. J.; Peters, T. B.; Fink, S. D.

    2005-01-01

    The DA isotherm parameters for U, Pu, Sr and Np have been updated to include additional data obtained since the original derivation. The DA isotherms were modified to include a kinetic function derived by Rahn to describe sorbate loading from the beginning of sorption up to equilibrium. The final functions describe both kinetic and thermodynamic sorption. We selected the Rahn function to describe radionuclide sorption because it originates from diffusion and absorption controlled sorption. An investigation of the thermal behavior of radionuclide sorption on MST as shown by this data revealed the sorption process is diffusion (or transport) controlled (in solution). Transport in solution can in theory be accelerated by vigorous mixing but the range of available mixing speed in the facility design will probably not be sufficient to markedly increase radionuclide sorption rate on MST from diffusion-controlled sorption. The laboratory studies included mixing energies hydraulically-scaled to match those of the Actinide Removal Process and these likely approximate the range of energies available in the Salt Waste Processing Facility

  13. Fission cross sections of some thorium, uranium, neptunium and plutonium isotopes relative to /sup 235/U

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meadows, J W

    1983-10-01

    Earlier results from the measurements, at this Laboratory, of the fission cross sections of /sup 230/Th, /sup 232/Th, /sup 233/U, /sup 234/U, /sup 236/U, /sup 238/U, /sup 237/Np, /sup 239/Pu, /sup 240/Pu, and /sup 242/Pu relative to /sup 235/U are reviewed with revisions to include changes in data processing procedures, alpha half lives and thermal fission cross sections. Some new data have also been included. The current experimental methods and procedures and the sample assay methods are described in detail and the sources of error are presented in a systematic manner. 38 references.

  14. Uptake of plutonium, americium, curium, and neptunium in plants cultivated under greenhouse conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pimpl, M.; Schmidt, W.

    1984-01-01

    The root-uptake of Np, Pu, Am, and Cm from three different artificially contaminated soils in grass, maize, spring wheat, and potatoes was investigated under greenhouse conditions in pots filled with 9 kg contaminated soil and in lysimeters with a surface area of 0,5 m 2 containing the soils in undisturbed profils up to a depth of 80 cm. Only the plough layer of 30 cm was contaminated with Np, Pu, Am, and Cm. Crop cultivation was done corresponding to usual practice in agriculture. Results of the 1st vegetation period are represented. Transfer factors obtained deviate considerably from those which are recommended for the estimation of long-term exposure of man in the Federal Republic of Germany. (orig.)

  15. Separation method for uranium, plutonium, and neptunium with each other from spent nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uchiyama, Gunzo; Hotoku, Shinobu; Fujine, Sachio; Maeda, Mitsuru.

    1994-01-01

    In a nuclear fuel reprocessing step of the present invention, an Np oxidation step is provided on a high level side of a co-contamination step, and an Np separation step and a U/Pu recovering step provided preceding to a U/Pu distribution step. Np oxidation step uses an oxidizer which is not extracted by an organic solvent such as ammonium vanadate for oxidizing Np from pentavalence to hexavalence. The Np separation step uses n-butylaldehyde for selectively reducing only hexavalent Np into pentavalent Np in a system in which hexavalent Np and tetravalent Pu are present together. In the U/Pu recovering step, pentavalent U and tetravalent Pu which shift by so much as distribution equilibrium are extracted together with pentavalent Np by using an organic solvent. The U/Pu distribution step uses iso-butylaldehyde as a reagent for selectively reducing only tetravalent Pu present together with hexavalent U into trivalent. With such procedures, U, Pu and Np can be separated with each other by more simplified fuel processing process. (T.M.)

  16. Contribution to the prediction of americium, plutonium and neptunium behaviour in the geosphere: chemical data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robouch, P.

    1989-01-01

    An exhaustive bibliographic review on hydrolysis of americium gives the stability constants, at zero ionic strength. No evidence of Am(OH) 4 - formation was found by solubility studies up to pH 2 (CO 3 ) 3 characterised by its X-ray diffraction pattern is studied at a high ionic strength. All the published results on Am in carbonate media are reinterpreted using these stability constants (Am-OH-CO 3 complexes are not needed). No evidence of Am(CO 3 ) 4 5- formation was found by spectrophotometry up to 3M. Literature results are used to determine the formal redox potentials at pH = 9.4 and to calculate the formation constants, at zero ionic strength. The formation of complexes between americium and humic materials (purified fulvic and humic acids) has been studied by a spectrophotometric technique. The results are interpreted by the formation of a 1:1 complexe. Solubility of the solid PuO 2 (CO 3 ) is measured in bicarbonate media at high ionic strength, to obtain the solubility product and formation constants of the PuO 2 (CO 3 ) i 2-2i complexes [fr

  17. Determination of plutonium and neptunium in various materials by coulometric titration with amperometric indicating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moiseev, I.V.; Kuperman, A.Ya.; Borodina, N.N.; Galkina, V.N.; Nikitskaya, V.N.

    1976-01-01

    Coulometric methods of determining Pu and Np in the products of complex composition containing, in addition to Pu and Np, Cr and Nn have been developed. The methods are based on titration of Pusup((6)) and Npsup((6)) to tetravalent state in H 2 SO 4 -H 3 PO 4 with iron (2) ions generated continuously. A new variant of amperometric method has been proposed for determining end-point of titration. The methods of preparing Pusup((6)) and Npsup((6)) solutions have been developed. It has been shown that, upon dissolution of PuO 2 and NpO 2 by boiling with a mixture of nitric and perchloric acids Pusup((4)) and Npsup((4)) are oxidized quantitatively to Pusup((6)) and Npsup((6)) while Cl 2 , Crsup((6)) and Mnsup((7,4,3)) in the solution obtained are selectively reduced by CHOOH and CH 2 (COOH) 2 . In 6-8 M in terms of H 2 SO 4 solution, ammonium bichromate oxidizes Npsup((4)) to Npsup((6)), Pusup((3)) to Pusup((4)), and Mnsup((2)) to Mnsup((3)). Oxidized Mn and excess of Crsup((6)) are selectively reduced by CHOOH and H 2 C 2 O 4 in 4M in terms of H 2 SO 4 solution

  18. A novel concept of QUADRISO particles Part I: Transmutation of Neptunium and Plutonium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Talamo, Alberto [Nuclear Engineering Division, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South Cass Avenue, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States)], E-mail: alby@anl.gov

    2008-10-15

    In quadruple isotropic (QUADRISO) coated particles, a burnable absorber layer surrounds the fuel kernel; consequently, during irradiation, the poison depletion allows more neutrons to stream into the kernel and to produce more fission reactions that attenuate the reactivity loss due to fuel depletion. In our previous studies, we have proposed for the first time the novel concept of QUADRISO particles for managing the long term excess of reactivity and we have shown in details how the new concept flattens the reactivity curve as function of time compared to traditional designs of burnable absorbers. In the present study, we apply the new concept of QUADRISO particles for transmuting Light Water Reactors waste in a prismatic high temperature reactor. We simulated two irradiation periods of 500 and 200 days that allow to transmute over 95% and 52% of {sup 239}Pu and actinides, respectively, without any reprocessing of the irradiated fuel in-between. During the first irradiation period the high initial excess of reactivity is managed by the QUADRISO particles; during the second irradiation period, there is no need of QUADRISO particles because of the small initial fissile inventory in the core.

  19. A novel concept of QUADRISO particles Part I: Transmutation of Neptunium and Plutonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Talamo, Alberto

    2008-01-01

    In quadruple isotropic (QUADRISO) coated particles, a burnable absorber layer surrounds the fuel kernel; consequently, during irradiation, the poison depletion allows more neutrons to stream into the kernel and to produce more fission reactions that attenuate the reactivity loss due to fuel depletion. In our previous studies, we have proposed for the first time the novel concept of QUADRISO particles for managing the long term excess of reactivity and we have shown in details how the new concept flattens the reactivity curve as function of time compared to traditional designs of burnable absorbers. In the present study, we apply the new concept of QUADRISO particles for transmuting Light Water Reactors waste in a prismatic high temperature reactor. We simulated two irradiation periods of 500 and 200 days that allow to transmute over 95% and 52% of 239 Pu and actinides, respectively, without any reprocessing of the irradiated fuel in-between. During the first irradiation period the high initial excess of reactivity is managed by the QUADRISO particles; during the second irradiation period, there is no need of QUADRISO particles because of the small initial fissile inventory in the core

  20. Investigation of quantitative separation of thorium, uranium, neptunium and plutonium from complex radiochemical mixtures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ushatskij, V.N.; Preobrazhenskaya, L.D.; Kolychev, V.B.; Gugel', E.S.

    1979-01-01

    Quantitative separation of actinides and their radiochemical purification with the aid of TBP with subsequent separation of thorium and quantitative separation of U, Np and Pu with the aid of D2EHPA have been studied. The method has been developed for quantitative extraction-chromatographic separation and radiochemical purification of nanogram amounts of U, Pu and microgram amounts of Th and Np from complex radiochemical mixtures containing both fragment radioisotopes and non-radioactive macrocomponents ( Fe,Al,Mg,Mn, Na and others). The method calls for application of one-extraction-chromatographic column with TBP and one column with D2EHPA. Thorium is separated at the first stage since it does not form complexes in a chloride solution during washing of the sorption column with 6. OM HCl. Npsup((4)) and Pusup((3)) required for separation are stabilized with the aid of hydrazine and hydroxylamine mixture. The yield of each of the above-cited actinide elements during the complete two-stage separation and at the stage of their separation varies within the range of 98.5-99.3%

  1. Kinetics of the oxidation-reduction reactions of uranium, neptunium, plutonium, and americium in aqueous solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Newton, T.W.

    1975-01-01

    This is a review with about 250 references. Data for 240 reactions are cataloged and quantitative activation parameters are tabulated for 79 of these. Some empirical correlations are given. Twelve typical reactions are discussed in detail, along with the effects of self-irradiation and ionic strength. (U.S.)

  2. TOWARD AN IMPROVED UNDERSTANDING OF STRUCTURE AND MAGNETISM IN NEPTUNIUM AND PLUTONIUM PHOSPHONATES AND SULFONATES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albrecht-Schmitt, Thomas

    2012-03-01

    This grant supported the exploratory synthesis of new actinide materials with all of the actinides from thorium to californium with the exceptions of protactinium and berkelium. We developed detailed structure-property relationships that allowed for the identification of novel materials with selective ion-exchange, selective oxidation, and long-range magnetic ordering. We found novel bonding motifs and identified periodic trends across the actinide series. We identified structural building units that would lead to desired structural features and novel topologies. We also characterized many different spectroscopic trends across the actinide series. The grant support the preparation of approximately 1200 new compounds all of which were structurally characterized.

  3. Comparative uptake and distribution of plutonium, americium, curium and neptunium in four plant species

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schreckhise, R E; Cline, J F [Battelle Pacific Northwest Labs., Richland, WA (USA)

    1980-05-01

    Uptake of the nitrate forms of /sup 238/Pu, /sup 239/Pu, /sup 241/Am, /sup 244/Cm and /sup 237/Np from soil into selected parts of four different plant species grown under field conditions was compared Alfalfa, barley, peas and cheatgrass were grown outdoors in small weighing lysimeters filled with soil containing these radionuclides. The plants were harvested at maturity, divided into selected components and radiochemically analyzed by alpha-energy analysis. Soil concentration did not appear to affect the plant uptake of /sup 238/Pu, /sup 239/Pu, /sup 241/Am or /sup 244/Cm for the two levels utilized. The relative plant uptake of the five different transuranics was /sup 237/Np>/sup 244/Cm approximately equal /sup 241/Am>/sup 239/Pu approximately equal/sup 238/Pu. Relative uptake values of Np for various plant parts ranged from 2200 to 45,000 times as great as for Pu, while Am and Cm values were 10-20 times as great. The values for seeds were significantly lower than those for the other aboveground plant parts for all four transuranic elements. The legumes accumulated approx. 10 times more than the grasses. A comparison of the postulated radionuclide content of plants grown in soil contaminated with material from spent liquid metal fast breeder reactor fuels indicated that concentrations of isotopes of Am, Cm and Np would exceed /sup 239/Pu values.

  4. Separation of neptunium, plutonium and uranium by using butyraldehydes as reductants in reprocessing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uchiyama, Gunzo; Hotoku, Shinobu; Fujine, Sachio; Maeda, Mitsuru

    1993-10-01

    A new separation process of Np, Pu and U using n- and iso-butyraldehydes as reductants for Np(VI) and Pu(IV), respectively, in the reprocessing has been investigated. In the kinetics study of Np, Pu and U reduction, it was found that n-butyraldehyde reduced Np(VI) to Np(V) in the Purex solution but did not reduce Pu(IV) and U(VI), and iso-butyraldehyde reduced Np(VI) and Pu(IV) but did not reduce U(VI). Based on these results, a new selective separation process of Np, Pu and U was proposed. The main process consists of three steps: co-decontamination, Np separation and U/Pu partition steps. In the Np separation step, Np(VI) extracted together with Pu(IV) and U(VI) by the solvent of 30 % tri-n-bytyl phosphate/n-dodecane was selectively reduced to Np(V) by using n-butyraldehyde and was back-extracted from the solvent. In the U/Pu partition step, iso-butyraldehyde was used as a reductant for Pu(IV). The effectiveness of the new process was demonstrated in the flow sheet study using miniature mixer-settlers. In the Np separation step, 99.98 % of Np extracted together with U(VI) in the co-decontamination step was reduced by n-butyraldehyde and separated from U. In the U/Pu partition step, more than 99 % of Pu was reduced by iso-butyraldehyde and separated from U. (author)

  5. Re-evaluating neptunium in uranyl phases derived from corroded spent fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fortner, J. A.; Finch, R. J.; Kropf, A. J.; Cunnane, J. C.; Chemical Engineering

    2004-01-01

    Interest in mechanisms that may control radioelement release from corroded commercial spent nuclear fuel (CSNF) has been heightened by the selection of the Yucca Mountain site in Nevada as the repository for high-level nuclear waste in the United States. Neptunium is an important radionuclide in repository models owing to its relatively long half-life and its high aqueous mobility as neptunyl [Np(V)O+2]. The possibility of neptunium sequestration into uranyl alteration phases produced by corroding CSNF would suggest-a process for lowering neptunium concentration and subsequent migration from a geologic repository. However, there remains little experimental evidence that uranyl compounds will, in fact, serve as long-term host phases for the retention of neptunium under conditions expected in a deep geologic repository. To directly explore this possibility, we examined specimens of uranyl alteration phases derived from humid-air-corroded CSNF by X-ray absorption spectroscopy to better determine neptunium uptake in these phases. Although neptunium fluorescence was readily observed from as-received CSNF, it was not observed from the uranyl alteration rind. We establish upper limits for neptunium incorporation into CSNF alteration phases that are significantly below previously reported concentrations obtained by using electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS). We attribute the discrepancy to a plural-scattering event that creates a spurious EELS peak at the neptunium-MV energy

  6. Plutonium economy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Traube, K.

    1984-01-01

    The author expresses his opinion on the situation, describes the energy-economic setting, indicates the alternatives: fuel reprocessing or immediate long-term storage, and investigates the prospects for economic utilization of the breeder reactors. All the facts suggest that the breeder reactor will never be able to stand economic competition with light-water reactors. However, there is no way to prove the future. It is naive to think that every doubt could and must be removed before stopping the development of breeder reactors - and thus also the reprocessing of the fuel of light-water reactors. On the basis of the current state of knowledge an unbiased cost-benefit-analysis can only lead to the recommendation to stop construction immediately. But can 'experts', who for years or even decades have called for and supported the development of breeder reactors be expected to make an unbiased analysis. Klaus Traube strikes the balance of the state Germany's nuclear economy is in: although there is no chance of definitively abandoning that energy-political cul-de-sac, no new adventures must be embarked upon. Responsible handling of currently used nuclear technology means to give up breeder technology and waive plutonium economy. It is no supreme technology with the aid of which structural unemployment or any other economic problem could be solved. (orig.) [de

  7. Application of Moessbauer spectroscopy to the study of neptunium adsorbed on deep-sea sediments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bennett, B.A.; Rees, L.V.C.

    1987-03-01

    A Neptunium Moessbauer spectrometer (the first in Great Britain) was constructed and the Moessbauer spectra of NpAl Laves phase alloy obtained. Neptunium was sorbed onto a calcareous deep-sea sediment from sea water, using a successive-loading technique. Sorption appeared to be by an equilibrium reaction, and because of the low solubility of neptunium in seawater, this meant that the maximum loading that could be achieved was 8mg 237 Np/g sediment. This proved to be an adequate concentration for Moessbauer measurements and a Moessbauer spectrum was obtained. This showed that most of the neptunium was in exchange sites and not present as precipitates of neptunium compounds. It was probably in the 4+ state indicating that reduction had occurred during sorption. This work has demonstrated that Moessbauer Spectroscopy has great potential as an aid to understanding the mechanism of actinide sorption in natural systems. (author)

  8. Counter-current extraction studies for the recovery of neptunium by the Purex process. Part II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Srinivasan, N.; Nadkarni, M. N.; Kumar, S. V.; Kartha, P. K.S.; Sonavane, R. R.; Ramaniah, M. V.; Patil, S. K.

    1974-07-01

    Counter-extraction experiments were carried out under the conditions relevant to the partitioning column (IBX) in the purex process to know the path of neptunium present as Np (VI) the organic phase during the partitioning step. The results obtained show that when ferrous sulphamates is used as the reducing agent, most of the neptunium continues to remain with uranium in the organic stream while with hydrazine stabilized uranous nitrate as the reducing agent, a major fraction of neptunium follows the aqueous stream. Mixer-settler experiments were also carried out under the conditions relevant to the uranium purification cycle (2D) to establish the conditions for forcing neptunium to the aqueous raffinate or for partitioning it from uranium if both neptunium and uranium are co-extracted in this cycle and the results obtained are reported here. (auth)

  9. Plutonium Finishing Plant

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Plutonium Finishing Plant, also known as PFP, represented the end of the line (the final procedure) associated with plutonium production at Hanford.PFP was also...

  10. Plutonium biokinetics in humans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Popplewell, D.; Ham, G.; McCarthy, W.; Lands, C.

    1994-01-01

    By using an 'unusual' isotope it is possible to carry out experiments with plutonium in volunteers at minimal radiation dose levels. Measurements have been made of the gut transfer factor and the urinary excretion of plutonium after intravenous injection. (author)

  11. Plutonium in uranium deposits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Curtis, D.; Fabryka-Martin, J.; Aguilar, R.; Attrep, M. Jr.; Roensch, F.

    1992-01-01

    Plutonium-239 (t 1/2 , 24,100 yr) is one of the most persistent radioactive constituents of high-level wastes from nuclear fission power reactors. Effective containment of such a long-lived constituent will rely heavily upon its containment by the geologic environment of a repository. Uranium ore deposits offer a means to evaluate the geochemical properties of plutonium under natural conditions. In this paper, analyses of natural plutonium in several ores are compared to calculated plutonium production rates in order to evaluate the degree of retention of plutonium by the ore. The authors find that current methods for estimating production rates are neither sufficiently accurate nor precise to provide unambiguous measures of plutonium retention. However, alternative methods for evaluating plutonium mobility are being investigated, including its measurement in natural ground waters. Preliminary results are reported and establish the foundation for a comprehensive characterization of plutonium geochemistry in other natural environments

  12. Plutonium metal burning facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hausburg, D.E.; Leebl, R.G.

    1977-01-01

    A glove-box facility was designed to convert plutonium skull metal or unburned oxide to an oxide acceptable for plutonium recovery and purification. A discussion of the operation, safety aspects, and electrical schematics are included

  13. Plutonium Training Opportunities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balatsky, Galya Ivanovna [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Wolkov, Benjamin [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-03-26

    This report was created to examine the current state of plutonium training in the United States and to discover ways in which to ensure that the next generation of plutonium workers are fully qualified.

  14. Optimization and plutonium equilibrium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silver, G.L.

    1976-01-01

    The sequential simplex method has been used to estimate the extent of disproportionation of tetravalent plutonium in dilute acid. A method for simulating potentiometric titrations is proposed, and this method suggests that the stoichiometric end point and the inflection point may not always correspond in the potentiometric titration of plutonium. A possible characteristic equation for the nitrite-plutonium reaction is illustrated, and the method of proportional equations is extended to the iron-plutonium reaction

  15. Cigarette smoke and plutonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Filipy, R.E.

    1985-01-01

    Autoradiographic techniques with liquid photographic emulsion and cellulose nitrate track-etch film are being used to investigate the spatial distribution of inhaled plutonium in the lungs of beagle dogs exposed to cigarette smoke or to the plutonium aerosol only. More plutonium than expected was detected on the inner surfaces of bronchi, and particles were observed beneath the bronchial mucosa. 2 figures, 2 tables

  16. Optimizing Plutonium stock management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niquil, Y.; Guillot, J.

    1997-01-01

    Plutonium from spent fuel reprocessing is reused in new MOX assemblies. Since plutonium isotopic composition deteriorates with time, it is necessary to optimize plutonium stock management over a long period, to guarantee safe procurement, and contribute to a nuclear fuel cycle policy at the lowest cost. This optimization is provided by the prototype software POMAR

  17. Treatment of plutonium contaminations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lafuma, J.

    1983-01-01

    Three kinds of plutonium contaminations were considered: skin contamination; contaminated wounds; contamination by inhalation. The treatment of these contaminations was studied for insoluble (oxide and metal forms) and soluble plutonium (complexes). The use of DTPA and therapeutic problems encountered with stable plutonium complexes were analyzed. The new possibilities of internal decontamination using Puchel and LICAM were evaluated [fr

  18. Speciation of neptunium during migration in clay rock; Speziation von Neptunium bei der Migration in Tongestein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Froehlich, Daniel

    2011-12-15

    The present work was performed within a fellowship of the interdisciplinary research training group 826 ''trace analysis of elemental species: method development and application'' funded by the German Research Foundation (DFG) and the federal state Rheinland-Pfalz. Aim of this work was to gain new knowledge of the interaction between neptunium and natural clay rock with respect to the disposal of high-level nuclear waste in deep geological formations. The isotope {sup 237}Np with its long half-life of more than two million years will be one of main contributors to the radiotoxicity of the radioactive waste material after storage times of more than 1000 years. In aqueous solution under environmental relevant conditions Np can exist in the oxidation states +IV and +V. Due to its high solubility and higher mobility Np(V) is the much more hazardous species compared to Np(IV). Opalinus Clay (OPA) from Mont Terri, Switzerland, was used as a natural reference material in the migration studies. The focus of this work was on speciation of Np on the mineral surface by synchrotron based X-ray absorption spectroscopy (EXAFS/XANES). The interaction between Np(V) and OPA was studied in batch sorption and diffusion experiments in dependence of various experimental parameters (e.g. pH, temperature, background electrolyte, effect of humic acid, concurrence with U(VI), aerobic/anaerobic conditions). The investigation of Np speciation was performed on two types of samples. Powder samples from batch experiments were prepared under aerobic and anaerobic conditions and measured by EXAFS spectroscopy. Diffusion samples and OPA thin sections contacted with Np(V) were analyzed by locally resolved μ-XANES measurements on enrichments of Np. A combination with μ-XRF (X-ray fluorescence) mapping and μ-XRD (X-ray diffraction) measurements provided further information about the spatial distribution of Np and other elements contained in OPA as well as crystalline mineral

  19. Plutonium, nuclear fuel; Le plutonium, combustible nucleaire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grison, E [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Fontenay aux Roses (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires, Saclay

    1960-07-01

    A review of the physical properties of metallic plutonium, its preparation, and the alloys which it forms with the main nuclear metals. Appreciation of its future as a nuclear fuel. (author) [French] Apercu sur les proprietes physiques du plutonium metallique, sa preparation, ses alliages avec les principaux metaux nucleaires. Consideration sur son avenir en tant que combustible nucleaire. (auteur)

  20. Plutonium economy. Plutonium-Wirtschaft

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Traube, K

    1984-01-01

    The author expresses his opinion on the situation, describes the energy-economic setting, indicates the alternatives: fuel reprocessing or immediate long-term storage, and investigates the prospects for economic utilization of the breeder reactors. All the facts suggest that the breeder reactor will never be able to stand economic competition with light-water reactors. However, there is no way to prove the future. It is naive to think that every doubt could and must be removed before stopping the development of breeder reactors - and thus also the reprocessing of the fuel of light-water reactors. On the basis of the current state of knowledge an unbiased cost-benefit-analysis can only lead to the recommendation to stop construction immediately. But can 'experts', who for years or even decades have called for and supported the development of breeder reactors be expected to make an unbiased analysis. Klaus Traube strikes the balance of the state Germany's nuclear economy is in: although there is no chance of definitively abandoning that energy-political cul-de-sac, no new adventures must be embarked upon. Responsible handling of currently used nuclear technology means to give up breeder technology and waive plutonium economy. It is no supreme technology with the aid of which structural unemployment or any other economic problem could be solved.

  1. Neptunium and manganese biocycling in nuclear legacy sediment systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thorpe, Clare L.; Morris, Katherine; Lloyd, Jonathan R.; Denecke, Melissa A.; Law, Kathleen A.; Dardenne, Kathy; Boothman, Christopher; Bots, Pieter; Law, Gareth T.W.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the behaviour of the highly radiotoxic, long half-life radionuclide neptunium in the environment is important for the management of radioactively contaminated land and the safe disposal of radioactive wastes. Recent studies have identified that microbial reduction can reduce the mobility of neptunium via reduction of soluble Np(V) to poorly soluble Np(IV), with coupling to both Mn- and Fe(III)- reduction implicated in neptunyl reduction. To further explore these processes Mn(IV) as δMnO 2 was added to sediment microcosms to create a sediment microcosm experiment “poised” under Mn-reducing conditions. Enhanced removal of Np(V) from solution occurred during Mn-reduction, and parallel X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) studies confirmed Np(V) reduction to Np(IV) commensurate with microbially-mediated Mn-reduction. Molecular ecology analysis of the XAS systems, which contained up to 0.2 mM Np showed no significant impact of elevated Np concentrations on the microbial population. These results demonstrate the importance of Mn cycling on Np biogeochemistry, and clearly highlight new pathways to reductive immobilisation for this highly radiotoxic actinide. - Highlights: • Neptunium is a high radiotoxicity, alpha emitting actinide. • Biostimulation of Mn(IV)-enriched sediments leads to reductive removal of soluble Np(V) from groundwater onto sediments as Np(IV). • Np(V) reduction occurs under defined Mn-reducing conditions. • Under Mn-reducing conditions, enzymatic processes may be important for Np(V) reduction.

  2. Sorption and migration of neptunium in porous sedimentary materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Tadao; Mukai, Masayuki; Nakayama, Shinichi

    2005-01-01

    Column migration experiments of neptunium were conducted for porous sedimentary materials: coastal sand, tuffaceous sand, ando soil, reddish soil, yellowish soil and loess, and migration behavior, sorption mechanisms and chemical formation of Np were investigated. The migration behavior of Np in each material was much different each other, due to chemical formation in solution and/or sorption mechanism of Np. Mathematical models of different concepts were applied to the experimental results to interpret the sorption mechanism and the migration behavior. It can be concluded that both of instantaneous equilibrium sorption and sorption-desorption kinetics have to be considered to model the Np migration in sedimentary materials. (author)

  3. The plutonium society

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mez, L.; Richter, M.

    1981-01-01

    The lectures of an institute are reported on, which took place between 25th and 27th January 1980 in Berlin. The subsequent public panel discussion with representations from the political parties is then documentated in a few press-reports. The themes of the 8 lectures are: views and facts on plutonium, plutonium as an energy resource, military aspects of the production of plutonium, economic aspects of the plutonium economy, the position of the trade unions on the industrial reconversion, the alleged inevitability of a plutonium society and the socio-political alternatives and perspectives of nuclear waste disposal. (UA) [de

  4. The use of plutonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marshall, W.

    1980-01-01

    The use of plutonium as a vital energy source producing maximum economic benefit with minimum proliferation risks is discussed. Having considered the production of plutonium, several possible plutonium fuel cycle options are identified and the economic value to be attached to plutonium for each examined. It is shown how the use of plutonium in fast reactors gives an opportunity for a non-proliferation policy not available when plutonium is used only in thermal reactors. From the technical considerations reviewed concerning plutonium and fast reactors it is shown that an economic regime involving international trade in spent thermal reactor fuel is possible which benefits equally those countries with fast reactors and those without and also assists in avoiding the proliferation of nuclear weapons. (U.K.)

  5. Plutonium in nature; Le plutonium dans la nature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Madic, C.

    1994-12-31

    Plutonium in nature comes from natural sources and anthropogenic ones. Plutonium at the earth surface comes principally from anthropogenic sources. It is easily detectable in environment. The plutonium behaviour in environment is complex. It seems necessary for the future to reduce releases in environment, to improve predictive models of plutonium behaviour in geosphere, to precise biological impact of anthropogenic plutonium releases.

  6. Transuranium element chalcogenides. Crystallochemistry and Moessbauer spectrometry of neptunium 237 chalcogenides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thevenin, T.; Pages, M.; Damien, D.

    1981-09-01

    To study actinide compounds , neptunium 237 has been studied by Moessbauer resonance. The different oxidation degrees of neptunium (7, 6, 5, 4 and 3) have a very important effect on isomeric displacements. In the study of chalcogenides, the isomeric displacement value of NpS 3 confirms the valency 4+ of neptunium in this compound. Results obtained with Np 3 S 5 show two valency state +3 and +4 in this compound. There is a good agreement with the two crystalline sites determined by crystallography [fr

  7. Neptunium separation in trace levels from uranium solutions by extraction chromatography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cotrim, M.B.; Matsuda, H.T.

    1994-01-01

    Neptunium and uranium behavior in extraction chromatograph system, aiming the separation of micro quantities of neptunium from uranyl solutions is described. Tri-n-octylamine (TOA), Tri-n-butylphosphate (TBP) as stationary phase, alumine, Voltalef UF-300 as support material were verified. The impregnation conditions as well as the best stationary phase/support material ratio were established. TBP/alumine, TBP/Voltalef and TOA/alumine system were selected to uranium and neptunium separation studies. (author) . 12 refs., 03 tabs., 03 figs

  8. Properties of plutonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahn, Jin Su; Yoon, Hwan Ki; Min, Kyung Sik; Kim, Hyun Tae; Ahn, Jong Sung; Kwag, Eon Ho; Ryu, Keon Joong

    1996-03-01

    Plutonium has unique chemical and physical properties. Its uniqueness in use has led to rare publications, in Korea. This report covers physical aspects of phase change of metal plutonium, mechanical properties, thermal conductivity, etc, chemical aspects of corrosion, oxidation, how to produce plutonium from spent fuels by describing various chemical treatment methods, which are currently used and were used in the past. It also contains characteristics of the purex reprocessing process which is the most widely used nowadays. And show processes to purify and metalize from recovered plutonium solution. Detection and analysis methods are introduced with key pints for handling, critical safety, toxicity, and effects on peoples. This report gives not only a general idea on what plutonium is, rather than deep technical description, but also basic knowledge on plutonium production and safeguards diversion from the view point of nonproliferation. 18 refs. (Author) .new

  9. Civil plutonium management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sicard, B.; Zaetta, A.

    2004-01-01

    During 1960 and 1970 the researches on the plutonium recycling in fast neutrons reactors were stimulated by the fear of uranium reserves diminishing. At the beginning of 1980, the plutonium mono-recycling for water cooled reactors is implementing. After 1990 the public opinion concerning the radioactive wastes management and the consequences of the disarmament agreements between Russia and United States, modified the context. This paper presents the today situation and technology associated to the different options and strategical solutions of the plutonium management: the plutonium use in the world, the neutronic characteristics, the plutonium effect on the reactors characteristics, the MOX behavior in the reactors, the MOX fabrication and treatment, the possible improvements to the plutonium use, the concepts performance in a nuclear park. (A.L.B.)

  10. Properties of plutonium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahn, Jin Su; Yoon, Hwan Ki; Min, Kyung Sik; Kim, Hyun Tae; Ahn, Jong Sung; Kwag, Eon Ho; Ryu, Keon Joong [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daeduk (Korea, Republic of)

    1996-03-01

    Plutonium has unique chemical and physical properties. Its uniqueness in use has led to rare publications, in Korea. This report covers physical aspects of phase change of metal plutonium, mechanical properties, thermal conductivity, etc, chemical aspects of corrosion, oxidation, how to produce plutonium from spent fuels by describing various chemical treatment methods, which are currently used and were used in the past. It also contains characteristics of the purex reprocessing process which is the most widely used nowadays. And show processes to purify and metalize from recovered plutonium solution. Detection and analysis methods are introduced with key pints for handling, critical safety, toxicity, and effects on peoples. This report gives not only a general idea on what plutonium is, rather than deep technical description, but also basic knowledge on plutonium production and safeguards diversion from the view point of nonproliferation. 18 refs. (Author) .new.

  11. World status report: plutonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dircks, W.

    1992-01-01

    In a recent speech in Japan, the Deputy Director General of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) said that the economic case for reprocessing spent nuclear fuel had been severely eroded. An edited version of the speech is given. The changed prospects for nuclear energy is given as the reason why the demand for plutonium has declined sharply. The oil crisis of the 1970s reduced the demand for electric power and the economic justification for the use of recycled plutonium. The stockpile of isolated plutonium is growing rapidly giving rise to worries about its security. From this point of view, isolated plutonium is best kept in reactor fuel not separated out. In this connection the IAEA has offered to help in the storage of plutonium so that vigorous safety and security requirements are met. In Japan there is a debate about the plutonium which is dependent on the future of the fast breeder reactor programme. (UK)

  12. Progress on plutonium stabilization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hurt, D.

    1996-01-01

    The Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board has safety oversight responsibility for most of the facilities where unstable forms of plutonium are being processed and packaged for interim storage. The Board has issued recommendations on plutonium stabilization and has has a considerable influence on DOE's stabilization schedules and priorities. The Board has not made any recommendations on long-term plutonium disposition, although it may get more involved in the future if DOE develops plans to use defense nuclear facilities for disposition activities

  13. PLUTONIUM-ZIRCONIUM ALLOYS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schonfeld, F.W.; Waber, J.T.

    1960-08-30

    A series of nuclear reactor fuel alloys consisting of from about 5 to about 50 at.% zirconium (or higher zirconium alloys such as Zircaloy), balance plutonium, and having the structural composition of a plutonium are described. Zirconium is a satisfactory diluent because it alloys readily with plutonium and has desirable nuclear properties. Additional advantages are corrosion resistance, excellent fabrication propenties, an isotropie structure, and initial softness.

  14. Cigarette smoke and plutonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Filipy, R.E.

    1983-01-01

    The major objective of this project is to obtain experimental data that are directly applicable to resolving the question of whether cigarette smokers are at greater risk than nonsmokers to potential health effects of inhaled plutonium. Because cigarette smokers constitute a large fraction of the population, a synergistic effect of plutonium and cigarette smoke might influence estimates of the health risk for plutonium and other transuranics released to the environment

  15. Neptunium speciation (complexation and redox behaviour) in aqueous citrate medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonin, L.; Ansoborlo, E.; Moisy, Ph.

    2005-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: In the framework of the French Environmental Nuclear Toxicology programme, additional experiments related to the decorporation of actinides are planned. The lack of information on the neptunium behaviour within blood and the inefficiency of therapeutic treatments, led us to study the complexation of this element with basic anions. Within this purpose, the in vitro behaviour of Np IV and Np V in simple media simulating biological media was studied: blood plasma is one of the media of interest and it can be simulated, from a chemical point of view, by an aqueous solution with pH 7.4, containing ions such as citrate (1.6 10 -4 mol/L), lactate (1.5 10 -3 mol/L), CO 3 2- (2.5 10 -2 mol/L), PO 4 3- (1.1 10 -3 mol/L), SO 4 2- (3.3 10 -4 mol/L) and Cl - (9 10 -2 mol/L). This study was more specifically focused on the behaviour of neptunium with citrate ion, which is also a basic ligand to consider when one wishes to study the migration of actinides in the environment, since it exists in significant amounts in the ground due to its production by the plants. In order to determine the speciation of this system, spectrophotometry was more particularly used. Concerning the complexation phenomenon, the existence of several complexes of Np V with various acid-basic forms of the citrate anion was observed; regarding Np IV , two complexes, with 1:1 and 1:2 stoichiometry, have been respectively observed. The reactivity of Np VI is probably similar to the behaviour of U VI , which is reported in literature to form a complex with a 1:1 stoichiometry with the Cit 3- anion From the quantitative study of these equilibria, it has been possible to determine the values of various equilibrium constants. Concerning the stability of neptunium towards oxido-reduction, it was confirmed that Np VI was very quickly reduced to Np V by the citrate anions, whereas Np IV was stable. In the case of Np V , it was observed that, depending on the pH and the citrate

  16. Interaction of neptunium (7) with some oxidation products of normal and secondary alcohols

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tananaev, I.G.

    1990-01-01

    Interaction of neptunium (7) with formaldehyde and acetone -products of methane and isopropanol oxidation in alkali medium -was studied. With increase in KOH concentration neptunium (7) reduction rate decreases. The reaction order in the range of 0.2-1.0 mol/l KOH equals -1. The reaction order with regard to reducing agent is 0.9 at acetone concentrations 0.07-0.35 mol/l and 1.0 at formaldehyde concentration 2.5-10 mmol/l. Activation energies are equal to 49±2 kJ/mol for neptunium (7) reduction by acetone and 59±4 kJ/mol - by formaldehyde. Formaldehyde is oxidized by neptunium (7) to formic acid

  17. Speciation of the plutonium at trace levels by capillary electrophoresis-ICP-MS coupling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ambard, Ch.

    2007-01-01

    The CE-ICP-MS coupling allowed the development of new analytical methods for the study of plutonium speciation at trace levels including complexation studies of this element by organic and inorganic ligands. First, a method, called dual detection, based on the simultaneous use of the UV-Visible spectrophotometer integrated in the capillary electrophoresis and the ICPMS was developed and validated. It allows the unambiguous determination of electrophoretic mobilities for separated chemical species and gives a powerful tool for speciation studies. Then, the influence on plutonium redox speciation of the buffer from the background electrolyte was evaluated. This study showed the implications of the electrolyte constituents' choice on plutonium redox equilibrium in the sample. Furthermore, the CE-ICP-MS coupling was used for studying the plutonium complexation at trace levels by some organic (NTA and DTPA) and inorganic ligands (carbonates). The behaviour of plutonium valence +III, +IV and +VI was studied in the presence of buffer at near neutral pH. Different species of plutonium were observed depending on the initial oxidation state of the plutonium. This study showed the potential of poly-amino-carboxylic acids, such as NTA and DTPA, for dissolving plutonium precipitates, regardless its initial speciation. Finally, the carbonation of pentavalent neptunium, as an analogue of Pu(V), was achieved at very low concentration of Np (10 -8 mol.L -1 ). The formation constant of NpO 2 (CO 3 )- at 25 deg. C and 2,5 x 10 -2 mol.L -1 ionic strength was measured by CE-ICP-MS and found to be consistent with literature data. (author)

  18. Selective localization of neptunium-237 in the nuclei of mammalian cells. Localisation selective du neptunium-237 au sein des noyaux des cellules de mammiferes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galle, P.; Boulahdour, H. (Faculte de Medecine, 94 - Creteil (FR)); Metivier, H. (CEA Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires de Fontenay-aux-Roses, 92 (FR). Inst. de Protection et de Surete Nucleaire)

    1992-01-01

    After injection in the rat of soluble neptunium salt, the distribution of this element was studied at the subcellular level by electron microscopy and electron probe microanalysis. Abnormal structures have been observed by electron microscopy in the nuclei of hepatocytes, and the same structures have also been observed in the nuclei of the proximal tubules cells of the kidney. These structures are formed of clusters of very small and dense particles, several nanometers in diameter. The clusters are localized in the central part of the nuclei and they are separate from nucleoli and heterochromatin. Electron probe X-ray analysis of this cluster have shown that they contain neptunium associated with phosphorus. In the cell containing neptunium inclusions, other non specific lesions are also observed (nuclear pycnosis, mitochondrial depletion).

  19. Mechanisms of sorption of neptunium and technetium on argillaceous materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hooker, P.J.; West, J.M.; Noy, D.J.

    1986-01-01

    It is of pressing concern to understand the behaviour of radionuclides in the environment and in particular long-lived ones (e.g. Np-237 and Te-99) in argillaceous rocks. Clay formations have been chosen as likely candidates for holding low level radioactive waste repositories and in the event of leakage of radionuclides into the geosphere some knowledge of their fate is required in a far-field safety assessment study. The objectives of this present work were to examine the properties of neptunium and technetium in ground-waters associated with clay-rich materials and to ascertain the variations in sorption of these radionuclides under different environmental conditions and to use the information in a forecast of transport through a clay layer

  20. Photochemical reactions of neptunium in nitric acid solution containing photocatalyst

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukasawa, Tetsuo; Kawamura, Fumio

    1991-01-01

    Photochemical oxidation and reduction behaviors of neptunium were preliminarily investigated in 3 mol/l nitric acid solution. Nitric acid of 3 mol/l simulated the high level waste solution from a spent fuel reprocessing process. Concentrations of Np(V), Np(VI) and nitrous acid were determined with a photospectrometer, and solution potential with an electrode. Without additives, Np(VI) was reduced to Np(V) by nitrous acid which was photolytically generated from nitric acid. With a scavenger for nitrous acid, Np(V) was oxidized to extractable Np(VI) by a photolytically generated oxidizing reagent which were predicted by the solution potential measurement. The reduction rate was higher than the oxidation rate because of the larger quantity and higher reactivity of nitrous acid than an oxidizing reagent. Photocatalyst was proved to be effective for the oxidation of Np(V) to Np(VI). (author)

  1. Neptunium detector using fiber-optic light guides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spencer, W.A.; Killeen, T.E.; Herold, T.R.

    1981-01-01

    A colorimeter has been constructed and installed to detect neptunium (IV) on-line as it elutes from an ion exchange column in a plant process stream. Because of the high radiation and corrosive atmosphere at the monitoring location, the instrument was designed using remote electronics and glass fiber optic cables. The five-foot cables transmit pulsed white light into a glass monitoring window in a containment box and return the transmitted portion to a photosensor. A simple spring clamp was designed to couple the cables to the monitoring window without modifying existing processes. Details of the design, installation, and operational problems are discussed. Other applications and modifications of the present colorimeter for other actinides, as well as preliminary results on a fiber optic spectrophotometer, are presented

  2. Geomicrobiological redox cycling of the transuranic element neptunium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Law, Gareth T W; Geissler, Andrea; Lloyd, Jonathan R; Livens, Francis R; Boothman, Christopher; Begg, James D C; Denecke, Melissa A; Rothe, Jörg; Dardenne, Kathy; Burke, Ian T; Charnock, John M; Morris, Katherine

    2010-12-01

    Microbial processes can affect the environmental behavior of redox sensitive radionuclides, and understanding these reactions is essential for the safe management of radioactive wastes. Neptunium, an alpha-emitting transuranic element, is of particular importance because of its long half-life, high radiotoxicity, and relatively high solubility as Np(V)O(2)(+) under oxic conditions. Here, we describe experiments to explore the biogeochemistry of Np where Np(V) was added to oxic sediment microcosms with indigenous microorganisms and anaerobically incubated. Enhanced Np removal to sediments occurred during microbially mediated metal reduction, and X-ray absorption spectroscopy showed this was due to reduction to poorly soluble Np(IV) on solids. In subsequent reoxidation experiments, sediment-associated Np(IV) was somewhat resistant to oxidative remobilization. These results demonstrate the influence of microbial processes on Np solubility and highlight the critical importance of radionuclide biogeochemistry in nuclear legacy management.

  3. Diffusion of water, cesium and neptunium in pores of rocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Puukko, E.; Heikkinen, T.; Hakanen, M.

    1993-10-01

    Teollisuuden Voima Oy (TVO) is investigating the feasibility to dispose of spent nuclear fuel within Finland. The present plan calls for the repository to be located in crystalline rock at a depth of several hundred meters. The safety assessment of the repository includes calculations of migration of waste nuclides. The flow of waste elements in groundwater will be retarded through sorption interaction with minerals and through diffusion into rock. Diffusion is the only mechanism retarding the migration of non-sorbing species and, it is expected to be the dominating retardation mechanism of many of the sorbing elements. In the investigation the simultaneous diffusion of tritiated water (HTO), cesium and neptunium in rocks of TVO investigation sites at Kivetty, Olkiluoto and Romuvaara were studied. (11 refs., 33 figs., 9 tabs.)

  4. Pressure effects on magnetism in the uranium and neptunium monopnictides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braithwaite, D.; Demuer, A.; Ichas, V.; Rebizant, J.; Spirlet, J.C.; Zwirner, S.; Vogt, O.

    1998-01-01

    The magnetic properties of the cubic NaCl uranium and neptunium monopnictides (UX, NpX; X=N, P, As, Sb, Bi) have been widely studied at ambient pressure. Properties ranging from itinerant to localized magnetism, and a variety of ordered magnetic structures have been observed. In particular the profusion of non-collinear double-k or triple-k structures is a consequence of strongly anisotropic exchange interactions. The application of pressure is a clean way of continuously varying the lattice parameter, and the exchange interactions, from one compound to another. A number of studies have been performed using different high pressure techniques. Some of the effects of pressure can be understood in a simple picture of a continuous variation of the lattice parameter, but some highly anomalous effects are also found which are discussed in relation to the possible nature of the magnetic interactions. (orig.)

  5. Fundamental studies of uranium and neptunium redox flow batteries (II)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shiokawa, Y.; Yamamura, T.; Watanabe, N.

    2002-01-01

    The atomic power generation entails production of so-called minor actinides and accumulation of depleted uranium. The theoretical and experimental investigations are underway to transmute minor actinides for minimizing the long-term radiotoxicity and reducing the radioactive waste. The utilization, however, would be alternative means. The actinide redox couples, An(VI)/An(V) and An(IV)/An(III), have excellent properties as battery active materials. Here j the uranium and neptunium redox flow batteries for the electric power storage are discussed from the electrochemical properties of U, Np, Pu and Am [1,2]. One of the required properties for the batteries for electric power storage is high energy efficiency, which is defined by the ratio of the discharge energy to the charge energy. These energies are dependent on the rapidness of kinetics in the electrode reactions, namely the standard rate constants and also the internal resistance of the battery

  6. Reduction and precipitation of neptunium(V) by sulfate-reducing bacteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Banaszak, J. E.; Rittmann, B. E.; Reed, D. T.

    1999-01-01

    Migration of neptunium, as NpO 2 + , has been identified as a potentially important pathway for actinide release at nuclear waste repositories and existing sites of subsurface contamination. Reduction of Np(V) to Np(IV) will likely reduce its volubility, resulting in lowered subsurface migration. The ability of sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) to utilize Np(V) as an electron acceptor was investigated, because these bacteria are active in many anaerobic aquifers and are known to facilitate the reduction of metals and radionuclides. Pure and mixed cultures of SRB were able to precipitate neptunium during utilization of pyruvate, lactate, and hydrogen as electron donors in the presence and absence of sulfate. The neptunium in the precipitate was identified as Np(IV) using X-ray absorption near edge spectroscopy (XANES) analysis. In mixed-culture studies, the addition of hydrogen to consortia grown by pyruvate fermentation stimulated neptunium reduction and precipitation. Experiments with pure cultures of Desulfovibrio vulgaris, growing by lactate fermentation in the absence of sulfate or by sulfate reduction, confirm that the organism is active in neptunium reduction and precipitation. Based on our results, the activity of SRB in the subsurface may have a significant, and potentially beneficial, impact on actinide mobility by reducing neptunium volubility

  7. An Update on the Status of the Supply of Plutonium-238 for Future NASA Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wham, R. M.

    2016-12-01

    For more than five decades, Radioisotope Power Systems (RPSs) have enabled space missions to operate in locations where the Sun's intensity is too weak, obscured, or otherwise inadequate for solar power or other conventional power‒generation technologies. The natural decay heat (0.57 W/g) from the radioisotope, plutonium-238 (238Pu), provides the thermal energy source used by an RPS to generate electricity for operation of instrumentation, as well as heat to keep key subsystems warm for missions such as Voyagers 1 and 2, the Cassini mission to Saturn, the New Horizons flyby of Pluto, and the Mars Curiosity rover which were sponsored by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). Plutonium-238 is produced by irradiation of neptunium-237 in a nuclear reactor a relatively high neutron flux. The United States has not produced new quantities of 238Pu since the early 1990s. RPS‒powered missions have continued since then using existing 238Pu inventory managed by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), including material purchased from Russia. A new domestic supply is needed to ensure the continued availability of RPSs for future NASA missions. NASA and DOE are currently executing a project to reestablish a 238Pu supply capability using its existing facilities and reactors, which are much smaller than the large-scale production reactors and processing canyon equipment used previously. The project is led by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Target rods, containing NpO2, will be fabricated at ORNL and irradiated in the ORNL High Flux Isotope Reactor and the Advanced Test Reactor at Idaho National Laboratory. Irradiated targets will be processed in chemical separations at the ORNL Radiochemical Engineering Center to recover the plutonium product and unconverted neptunium for recycle. The 238PuO2 product will be shipped to Los Alamos National Laboratory for fabrication of heat source pellets. Key activities, such as transport of the neptunium to ORNL

  8. Technetium and neptunium reactions in basalt/groundwater systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyer, R.E.; Arnold, W.D.; Kelmers, A.D.; Kessler, J.H.; Clark, R.J.; Johnson, J.S. Jr.; Young, G.C.; Case, F.I.; Westmoreland, C.G.

    1985-01-01

    Sorption isotherms and apparent concentration limits for Tc(VII) and Np(V) for a variety of groundwater/basalt systems were determined using Grande Ronde basalt samples representative of the Hanford Site candidate high-level waste repository. Under oxic redox conditions (air present), little or no sorption of technetium was observed; neptunium exhibited low to moderate sorption ratios. Under anoxic redox conditions (oxygen-free), low to moderate sorption of technetium was often observed, but the extent of sorption was highly dependent upon the groundwater composition and the method of pretreatment (if any) of the basalt. Sorption isotherms for technetium under reducing redox conditions (hydrazine added) indicate an apparent concentration limit of approximately 10 -6 mol/l Tc. No apparent concentration limit was found for neptunium for concentrations in groundwater up to 10 -6 mol/l and 8 x 10 -7 mol/l under oxic and reducing (hydrazine added) redox conditions, respectively. Valence control and valence analysis experiments suggest that the sorption or precipitation of Tc and Np from groundwater in the presence of basalt may result from a heterogeneous reaction occurring on the surface of the basalt. One of the critical factors of this reduction reaction appears to be the accessibility of the reactive ferrous iron component of the basalt. The laboratory simulation of groundwater redox conditions representative of the repository environment through the use of solution phase redox reagents is of questionable validity, and information obtained by such experimental methods may not be defensible for site performance assessment calculations. Anoxic experiments conducted in an argon-filled glove box appear better suited for the laboratory simulation of in situ redox conditions. 15 references, 6 figures

  9. Technetium and neptunium reactions in basalt/groundwater systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyer, R.E.; Arnold, W.D.; Kelmers, A.D.; Kessler, J.H.; Clark, R.J.; Johnson, J.S. Jr.; Young, G.C.; Case, F.I.; Westmoreland, C.G.; Florida State Univ., Tallahassee)

    1984-01-01

    Sorption isotherms and apparent concentration limits for Tc(VII) and Np(V) for a variety of groundwater/basalt systems were determined using Grande Ronde basalt samples representative of the Hanford Site candidate high-level waste repository. Under oxic redox conditions (air present), little or no sorption of technetium was observed; neptunium exhibited low to moderate sorption ratios. Under anoxic redox conditions (oxygen-free), low to moderate sorption of technetium was often observed, but the extent of sorption was highly dependent upon the groundwater composition and the method of pretreatment (if any) of the basalt. Sorption isotherms for technetium under reducing redox conditions (hydrazine added) indicate an apparent concentration limit of approximately 10 -6 mol/L Tc. No apparent concentration limit was found for neptunium for concentrations in groundwater up to approx. 10 -6 mol/L and 8 x 10 -7 mol/L under oxic and reducing (hydrazine added) redox conditions, respectively. Valence control and valence analysis experiments suggest that the sorption or precipitation of Tc and Np from groundwater in the presence of basalt may result from a heterogeneous reaction occurring on the surface of the basalt. One of the critical factors of this reduction reaction appears to be the accessibility of the reactive ferrous iron component of the basalt. The laboratory simulation of groundwater redox conditions representative of the repository environment through the use of solution phase redox reagents is of questionable validity, and information obtained by such experimental methods may not be defensible for site performance assessment calculations. Anoxic experiments conducted in an argon-filled glove box appear better suited for the laboratory simulation of in situ redox conditions. 15 refs., 6 tabs

  10. Cigarette smoke and plutonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1981-01-01

    The overall objective of this study is to determine whether cigarette smoking increases the probability of plutonium-induced lung cancer. Initial experiments, designed to characterize the effect of chronic cigarette smoke exposure on pulmonary clearance of plutonium aerosols, are described

  11. Plutonium valence state distributions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silver, G.L.

    1974-01-01

    A calculational method for ascertaining equilibrium valence state distributions of plutonium in acid solutions as a function of the plutonium oxidation number and the solution acidity is illustrated with an example. The method may be more practical for manual use than methods based upon polynomial equations. (T.G.)

  12. The toxicity of plutonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crouse, P.L.

    1994-01-01

    Shipments of plutonium occasionally pass around the Cape coastal waters on its way to Japan from Europe. This invariably leads to a great deal of speculation of the dangers involved and of the extreme toxicity of plutonium, with the media and environmental groups claiming that (a) plutonium is the most toxic substance known to man, and that (b) a few kilograms of plutonium ground finely and dispersed in the atmosphere could kill every human being on earth. Comparisons with other poisons are drawn, e.g. common inorganic chemicals and biological agents. The original scare around the extraordinary toxicity of Pu seems to have started in 1974 with the claims of Tamplin and Cochran's hot particle theory about plutonium lodging in the sensitive portions of the lungs in small concentrated aggregates where they are much more effective in producing cancers. This theory, however, is regarded as thoroughly discredited by the experts in the field of radiotoxicity. 8 refs

  13. Plutonium storage criteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, D. [Scientech, Inc., Germantown, MD (United States); Ascanio, X. [Dept. of Energy, Germantown, MD (United States)

    1996-05-01

    The Department of Energy has issued a technical standard for long-term (>50 years) storage and will soon issue a criteria document for interim (<20 years) storage of plutonium materials. The long-term technical standard, {open_quotes}Criteria for Safe Storage of Plutonium Metals and Oxides,{close_quotes} addresses the requirements for storing metals and oxides with greater than 50 wt % plutonium. It calls for a standardized package that meets both off-site transportation requirements, as well as remote handling requirements from future storage facilities. The interim criteria document, {open_quotes}Criteria for Interim Safe Storage of Plutonium-Bearing Solid Materials{close_quotes}, addresses requirements for storing materials with less than 50 wt% plutonium. The interim criteria document assumes the materials will be stored on existing sites, and existing facilities and equipment will be used for repackaging to improve the margin of safety.

  14. Plutonium roundtable discussion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Penneman, R.A.

    1982-01-01

    The roundtable discussion began with remarks by the chairman who pointed out the complicated nature of plutonium chemistry. Judging from the papers presented at this symposium, he noticed a pattern which indicated to him the result of diminished funding for investigation of basic plutonium chemistry and funding focused on certain problem areas. Dr. G.L. silver pointed to plutonium chemists' erroneous use of a simplified summary equation involving the disproportionation of Pu(EV) and their each of appreciation of alpha coefficients. To his appreciation of alpha coefficients. To his charges, Dr. J.T. Bell spoke in defense of the chemists. This discussion was followed by W.W. Schulz's comments on the need for experimental work to determine solubility data for plutonium in its various oxidation states under geologic repository conditions. Discussion then turned to plutonium pyrachemical process with Dana C. Christensen as the main speaker. This paper presents edited versions of participants' written version

  15. Plutonium storage phenomenology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szempruch, R.

    1995-12-01

    Plutonium has been produced, handled, and stored at Department of Energy (DOE) facilities since the 1940s. Many changes have occurred during the last 40 years in the sources, production demands, and end uses of plutonium. These have resulted in corresponding changes in the isotopic composition as well as the chemical and physical forms of the processed and stored plutonium. Thousands of ordinary food pack tin cans have been used successfully for many years to handle and store plutonium. Other containers have been used with equal success. This paper addressees the exceptions to this satisfactory experience. To aid in understanding the challenges of handling plutonium for storage or immobilization the lessons learned from past storage experience and the necessary countermeasures to improve storage performance are discussed

  16. The metabolism and gastrointestinal absorption of neptunium and protactinium in adult baboons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ralston, L.G.; Cohen, N.; Bhattacharyya, H.; Larsen, R.P.; Ayres, L.; Oldham, R.D.; Moretti, E.S.

    1985-01-01

    The metabolism of neptunium and protactinium was studied in adult female baboons following intravenous injection and intragastric intubation. Neptunium-239, Np-237, and Pa-233 were prepared as either citrate-buffer, nitrate, or bicarbonate solutions with oxidation states of (V) and (VI). Samples of blood, urine, feces and autopsy tissues were measured by gamma spectrometry. Retention of neptunium and protactinium was determined in vivo using whole and partial body gamma-scintillation spectrometry with [NaI-CsI(T1)] detectors. Fed and fasted baboons were administered solutions of Np(VI) bicarbonate (10/sup -8/ to 10/sup -1/ mg/kg) and Pa(V) citrate-buffer (10/sup -9/ mg/kg) by gavage. The gastrointestinal absorption value for neptunium in two fasted baboons, sacrificed at 1 day post administration, was determined to be 0.92 +- 0.04%. Of the total amount of neptunium absorbed, 52 +- 3% was retained in bone, 6 + 2% was in liver, and 42 +- 0.1% was excreted in urine. The metabolism of neptunium followed oral and iv administrations was found to be similar. This observation was also true for baboons which had received oral and iv doses of protactinium. A method was developed to estimate GI absorption values for both nuclides in baboons, which were not sacrificed, by comparison of activities present in bioassay samples after injection and gavage. Absorption values calculated by this method for neptunium and protactinium in fasted baboons were 1.8 +- 0.8% and 0.65 +- 0.01%, respectively. Values for fed animals were 1 to 2 orders of magnitude less than those for fasted animals. Further experiments are currently underway to evaluate this assay technique

  17. Toxicology of plutonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bair, W.J.

    1974-01-01

    Data are reviewed from studies on the toxicity of Pu in experimental animals. Of the several plutonium isotopes, only 238 Pu and 239 Pu have been studied well. Sufficient results have been obtained to show that the behavior of 238 Pu in biological systems and the resulting biological effects cannot be precisely predicted from studies of 239 Pu. This probably applies also to other radiologically important plutonium isotopes which have half-lives ranging from 45 days to 10 7 years and decay by β-emission, electron capture, and spontaneous fission, as well as by emission of α-particles. All the biological effects of plutonium described in this review are attributed to alpha-particle radiation emitted by the plutonium. However, since plutonium is a chemically active heavy metal, one cannot ignore the possibility of chemical toxicity of the low-specific-activity isotopes, 239 Pu, 242 Pu, and 244 Pu. The preponderance of our knowledge of plutonium toxicology has come from short-term studies of relatively high dosage levels in several animal species. The consequences of high-level internal exposures can be predicted with confidence in experimental animals and probably also in man. However, considering the care with which plutonium is handled in the nuclear industry, a high-level contamination event is unlikely. Considerably less is known about the long-term effects of low levels of contamination. (250 references) (U.S.)

  18. Neptunium speciation (complexation and redox behaviour) in aqueous citrate medium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonin, L.; Ansoborlo, E.; Moisy, Ph. [CEA Marcoule (France)

    2005-07-01

    Full text of publication follows: In the framework of the French Environmental Nuclear Toxicology programme, additional experiments related to the decorporation of actinides are planned. The lack of information on the neptunium behaviour within blood and the inefficiency of therapeutic treatments, led us to study the complexation of this element with basic anions. Within this purpose, the in vitro behaviour of Np{sup IV} and Np{sup V} in simple media simulating biological media was studied: blood plasma is one of the media of interest and it can be simulated, from a chemical point of view, by an aqueous solution with pH 7.4, containing ions such as citrate (1.6 10{sup -4} mol/L), lactate (1.5 10{sup -3} mol/L), CO{sub 3}{sup 2-} (2.5 10{sup -2} mol/L), PO{sub 4}{sup 3-} (1.1 10{sup -3} mol/L), SO{sub 4}{sup 2-} (3.3 10{sup -4} mol/L) and Cl{sup -} (9 10{sup -2} mol/L). This study was more specifically focused on the behaviour of neptunium with citrate ion, which is also a basic ligand to consider when one wishes to study the migration of actinides in the environment, since it exists in significant amounts in the ground due to its production by the plants. In order to determine the speciation of this system, spectrophotometry was more particularly used. Concerning the complexation phenomenon, the existence of several complexes of Np{sup V} with various acid-basic forms of the citrate anion was observed; regarding Np{sup IV}, two complexes, with 1:1 and 1:2 stoichiometry, have been respectively observed. The reactivity of Np{sup VI} is probably similar to the behaviour of U{sup VI}, which is reported in literature to form a complex with a 1:1 stoichiometry with the Cit{sup 3-}anion From the quantitative study of these equilibria, it has been possible to determine the values of various equilibrium constants. Concerning the stability of neptunium towards oxido-reduction, it was confirmed that Np{sup VI} was very quickly reduced to Np{sup V} by the citrate anions

  19. The plutonium danger

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruiter, W. de

    1983-01-01

    Nobody can ignore the fact that plutonium is potentially very dangerous and the greatest danger concerning it lies in the spreading of nuclear weapons via nuclear energy programmes. The following seven different attitudes towards this problem are presented and discussed: 1) There is no connection between peaceful and military applications; 2) The problem cannot be prevented; 3) A technical solution must be found; 4) plutonium must be totally inaccessible to countries involved in acquiring nuclear weapons; 5) The use of plutonium for energy production should only occur in one multinational centre; 6) Dogmas in the nuclear industry must be enfeebled; 7) All developments in this area should stop. (C.F.)

  20. Automation of plutonium spectrophotometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perez, J.J.; Boisde, G.; Goujon de Beauvivier, M.; Chevalier, G.; Isaac, M.

    1980-01-01

    Instrumentation was designed and constructed for automatic control of plutonium by molecular absorption spectrophotometry, on behalf of the reprocessing facilities, to meet two objectives: on-line measurement, of the valency state of plutonium, on by-pass, with the measured concentration covering the process concentration range up to a few mg.l -1 ; laboratory measurement of plutonium adjusted to valency VI, with operation carried out using a preparative system meeting the required containment specifications. For this two objectives, the photometer, optical cell connections are made by optical fibers resistant to β, γ radiation. Except this characteristic the devices are different according to the quality required for result [fr

  1. Plutonium Vulnerability Management Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-03-01

    This Plutonium Vulnerability Management Plan describes the Department of Energy's response to the vulnerabilities identified in the Plutonium Working Group Report which are a result of the cessation of nuclear weapons production. The responses contained in this document are only part of an overall, coordinated approach designed to enable the Department to accelerate conversion of all nuclear materials, including plutonium, to forms suitable for safe, interim storage. The overall actions being taken are discussed in detail in the Department's Implementation Plan in response to the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (DNFSB) Recommendation 94-1. This is included as Attachment B

  2. Plutonium Plant, Trombay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yadav, J.S.; Agarwal, K.

    2017-01-01

    The journey of Indian nuclear fuel reprocessing started with the commissioning of Plutonium Plant (PP) at Trombay on 22"n"d January, 1965 with an aim to reprocess the spent fuel from research reactor CIRUS. The basic process chosen for the plant was Plutonium Uranium Reduction EXtraction (PUREX) process. In seventies, the plant was subjected to major design modifications and replacement of hardware, which later met the additional demand from research reactor DHRUVA. The augmented plutonium plant has been operating since 1983. Experience gained from this plant was very much helpful to design future reprocessing plant in the country

  3. Progress on plutonium stabilization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hurt, D. [Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board, Washington, DC (United States)

    1996-05-01

    The Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board has safety oversight responsibility for most of the facilities where unstable forms of plutonium are being processed and packaged for interim storage. The Board has issued recommendations on plutonium stabilization and has has a considerable influence on DOE`s stabilization schedules and priorities. The Board has not made any recommendations on long-term plutonium disposition, although it may get more involved in the future if DOE develops plans to use defense nuclear facilities for disposition activities.

  4. Cigarette smoke and plutonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Filipy, R.E.

    1982-01-01

    The major objective of this project is to obtain experimental data that are directly applicable to resolving the question of whether cigarette smokers are at greater risk than nonsmokers to potential health effects of inhaled plutonium. Progress was made on two fronts during the past year. The autoradiographic technique developed from detection of plutonium on the interior surface of pulmonary airways (Annual Report, 1978) has been adapted to routine use in examining tracheas and bronchi of rats. Also, dogs exposed to cigarette smoke for over a year after inhalation of plutonium were killed and necropsied

  5. The effect of high ionic strength on neptunium (V) adsorption to a halophilic bacterium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ams, David A.; Swanson, Juliet S.; Szymanowski, Jennifer E. S.; Fein, Jeremy B.; Richmann, Michael; Reed, Donald T.

    2013-06-01

    The mobility of neptunium (V) in subsurface high ionic strength aqueous systems may be strongly influenced by adsorption to the cell wall of the halophilic bacteria Chromohalobacter sp. This study is the first to evaluate the adsorption of neptunium (V) to the surface of a halophilic bacterium as a function of pH from approximately 2 to 10 and at ionic strengths of 2 and 4 M. This is also the first study to evaluate the effects of carbonate complexation with neptunium (V) on adsorption to whole bacterial cells under high pH conditions. A thermodynamically-based surface complexation model was adapted to describe experimental adsorption data under high ionic strength conditions where traditional corrections for aqueous ion activity are invalid. Adsorption of neptunium (V) was rapid and reversible under the conditions of the study. Adsorption was significant over the entire pH range evaluated for both ionic strength conditions and was shown to be dependent on the speciation of the sites on the bacterial surface and neptunium (V) in solution. Adsorption behavior was controlled by the relatively strong electrostatic attraction of the positively charged neptunyl ion to the negatively charged bacterial surface at pH below circum-neutral. At pH above circum-neutral, the adsorption behavior was controlled by the presence of negatively charged neptunium (V) carbonate complexes resulting in decreased adsorption, although adsorption was still significant due to the adsorption of negatively charged neptunyl-carbonate species. Adsorption in 4 M NaClO4 was enhanced relative to adsorption in 2 M NaClO4 over the majority of the pH range evaluated, likely due to the effect of increasing aqueous ion activity at high ionic strength. The protonation/deprotonation characteristics of the cell wall of Chromohalobacter sp. were evaluated by potentiometric titrations in 2 and 4 M NaClO4. Bacterial titration results indicated that Chromohalobacter sp. exhibits similar proton buffering

  6. Investigation of composition and properties of some neptunium (5) oxalate compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zubarev, V.G.; Krot, N.N.

    1981-01-01

    A simple way of neptunium (5) oxalate synthesis is described and its composition is determined: (NpO 2 ) 2 C 2 O 4 xH 2 O. The compound is precipitated from solution during pouring together stoichiometric quantities of neptunium (5) nitrate and ammonium, sodium or potassium oxalate at pH=4-5. An explanation to unusual effect of solubility change with time of neptunium (5) monooxalate complexes and alkali metal or ammonium ion is found taking into account the slow formation of precipitate and low solubility of the compound obtained (0.62 g/l as to metal). Thermal decomposition of the compound is studied. At 180 deg C a water molecule is split off and at 260 deg C decomposition of neptunium oxalate starts. IR spectra and interplane distances (dsub(hkl)) of the compound crystal lattice are determined. New data on the synthesis and properties of complex neptunium (5) oxalates and monovalent cation in second sphere with the ratio ligand: metal=2:1 and 3:1 are presented. On the basis of results of IR spectroscopy and X-ray phase analyses a supposition is made on the existence of such complex compounds [ru

  7. Energy efficiency of neptunium redox battery in comparison with vanadium battery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamura, T.; Watanabe, N.; Shiokawa, Y.

    2006-01-01

    A neptunium ion possesses two isostructural and reversible redox couples (Np 3+ /Np 4+ and NpO 2 + /NpO 2 2+ ) and is therefore suitable as an active material for a redox-flow battery. Since the plastic formed carbon (PFC) is known to show the largest k values for Np(IV)/Np(III) and Np(V)/Np(VI) reactions among various carbon electrodes, a cell was constructed by using the PFC, with the circulation induced by bubbling gas through the electrolyte. In discharge experiments with a neptunium and a vanadium battery using the cell, the former showed a lower voltage loss which suggests a smaller reaction overvoltage. Because of the high radioactivity of the neptunium, it was difficult to obtain sufficient circulation required for the redox-flow battery, therefore a model for evaluating the energy efficiency of the redox-flow battery was developed. By using the known k values for neptunium and vanadium electrode reactions at PFC electrodes, the energy efficiency of the neptunium battery was calculated to be 99.1% at 70 mA cm -2 , which exceeds that of the vanadium battery by ca. 16%

  8. Plutonium spectrophotometric analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Esteban, A.; Cassaniti, P.; Orosco, E.H.

    1990-01-01

    Plutonium ions in solution have absorption spectra so different that it is possible to use them for analytical purposes. Detailed studies have been performed in nitric solutions. Some very convenient methods for the determination of plutonium and its oxidation states, especially the ratios Pu(III):Pu(IV) and Pu(IV):Pu(VI) in a mixture of both, have been developed. These methods are described in this paper, including: a) Absorption spectra for plutonium (III), (IV), (VI) and mixtures. b) Relative extinction coefficients for the above mentioned species. c) Dependences of the relative extinction coefficients on the nitric acid concentration and the plutonium VI deviation from the Beer-Lambert law. The developed methods are simple and rapid and then, suitable in process control. Accuracy is improved when relative absorbance measurements are performed or controlled the variables which have effect on the spectra and extinction coefficients. (Author) [es

  9. French plutonium management program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greneche, D.

    2002-01-01

    The French plutonium management program is summarized in this paper. The program considers nuclear generation as a major component of national electric power supply and includes the reprocessing of the spent fuel. (author)

  10. Learning more about plutonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    This digest brochure explains what plutonium is, where it comes from, how it is used, its recycling into Mox fuel, its half life, historical discovery, its presence in the environment, toxicity and radioactivity. (J.S.)

  11. Plutonium safe handling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tvehlov, Yu.

    2000-01-01

    The abstract, prepared on the basis of materials of the IAEA new leadership on the plutonium safe handling and its storage (the publication no. 9 in the Safety Reports Series), aimed at presenting internationally acknowledged criteria on the radiation danger evaluation and summarizing the experience in the safe management of great quantities of plutonium, accumulated in the nuclear states, is presented. The data on the weapon-class and civil plutonium, the degree of its danger, the measures for provision of its safety, including the data on accident radiation consequences with the fission number 10 18 , are presented. The recommendations, making it possible to eliminate the super- criticality danger, as well as ignition and explosion, to maintain the tightness of the facility, aimed at excluding the radioactive contamination and the possibility of internal irradiation, to provide for the plutonium security, physical protection and to reduce irradiation are given [ru

  12. Determination of plutonium in pure plutonium nitrate solutions - Gravimetric method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-01-01

    This International Standard specifies a precise and accurate gravimetric method for determining the concentration of plutonium in pure plutonium nitrate solutions and reference solutions, containing between 100 and 300 g of plutonium per litre, in a nitric acid medium. The weighed portion of the plutonium nitrate is treated with sulfuric acid and evaporated to dryness. The plutonium sulfate is decomposed and formed to oxide by heating in air. The oxide is ignited in air at 1200 to 1250 deg. C and weighed as stoichiometric plutonium dioxide, which is stable and non-hygroscopic

  13. Plutonium in coniferous forests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rantavaara, A.; Kostiainen, E.

    2002-01-01

    Our aim was to study the uptake of plutonium by trees, undervegetation and some wild foods. The ratio of 238 Pu/ 239,240 Pu in soil samples was determined for comparisons of the fallout origin. In twelve years the Chernobyl derived plutonium has not reached the mineral soil. This refers to a very slow downward migration in podsolic soil. The study confirmed also the low Pu uptake by vegetation and an insignificant contribution to human doses through wild foods. (au)

  14. Neptunium immobilization and recovery using phase separated glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meaker, T.F.

    1997-01-01

    A phase separated (amorphous) glass has been developed which allows very efficient recovery of +4 valence actinides. The total amount of crystal formation in a heat treated vycor-type glass can be controlled with time, temperature and loading. Heat treatments at lower temperatures and for less time inhibit crystal formation while still allowing significant phase separation. If the Thorium loading exceeds 10 weight percent oxide, crystal formation during heat treatment may not be avoided. The total amount of crystal growth has a direct affect on thorium leachability. An increase in crystal formation limits the Th recovery significantly. High thorium loaded glasses (15 weight percent) with heat treatments (increased crystal formation) leach at approximately the same rate as non-heat treated glasses. A phase separated (amorphous) glass has been produced using thorium as a surrogate for neptunium. Two different homogeneous vycor compositions targeting 10 and 15 weight percent thorium oxide have been processed, heat treated and leached with concentrated nitric acid at 110 degrees C. Thorium recovery rates have been shown to be considerably better when the glass has been heat treated inducing phase separation that is relatively crystal free. Non-heat treated and crystalline (due to heat treatment) glasses have similar Th recovery rates with respect to surface area. Phase separated amorphous samples were found to have significantly higher thorium concentrations in the leachate compared to non-heat treated and crystalline glasses for all mesh sizes. All glasses had increased thorium concentration in the leachate as surface area increased

  15. Fate of neptunium in an anaerobic, methanogenic microcosm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Banaszak, J.E.; Webb, S.M.; Rittmann, B.E.; Gaillard, J.F.; Reed, D.T.

    1999-01-01

    Neptunium is found predominantly as Np(IV) in reducing environments, but as Np(V) in aerobic environments. Currently, it is not known how the interplay between biotic and abiotic processes affects Np redox speciation in the environment. To evaluate the effect of anaerobic microbial activity on the fate of Np in natural systems, Np(V) was added to a microcosm inoculated with anaerobic sediments from a metal-contaminated freshwater lake. The consortium included metal-reducing, sulfate-reducing, and methanogenic microorganisms, and acetate was supplied as the only exogenous substrate. Addition of more than 10 -5 M Np did not inhibit methane production. Total Np solubility in the active microcosm, as well as in sterilized control samples, decreased by nearly two orders of magnitude. A combination of analytical techniques, including VIS-NIR absorption spectroscopy and XANES, identified Np(IV) as the oxidation state associated with the sediments. The similar results from the active microcosm and the abiotic controls suggest that microbially produced Mn(II/III) and Fe(II) may serve as electron donors for Np reduction

  16. An assessment of the thermodynamic behaviour of neptunium in water and model groundwaters from 25 to 150 degrees C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lemire, R.J.

    1984-03-01

    Standard molal Gibbs energy of formation and entropy data for simple neptunium solids and aqueous neptunium complexes with OH - , Cl - , F - , CO 3 2- , PO 4 3- , SO-4 2- and Na + have been critically reviewed. Selected values are used with estimated heat capacity values to derive self-consistent analytical expressions for the temperature dependence of the standard molal Gibbs energies of formation of the species from 25 to 150 degrees C. The Gibbs energies have been used to evaluate the effect of different concentrations of ligands on the solubility of neptunium solids as a function of temperature. Potential-pH diagrams are given for neptunium in pure water and in two model groundwaters. Important deficiencies in the available thermodynamic data for neptunium species are discussed

  17. Assessment of the thermodynamic behavior of neptunium in water and model groundwaters from 25 to 150/sup 0/C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lemire, R J

    1984-03-15

    Standard molal Gibbs energy of formation and entropy data for simple neptunium solids and aqueous neptunium complexes with OH/sup -/, Cl/sup -/, F/sup -/, CO/sub 3//sup 2 -/, PO/sub 4//sup 3 -/, SO/sub 4//sup 2 -/ and Na/sup +/ have been critically reviewed. Selected values are used with estimated heat capacity values to derive self-consistent analytical expressions for the temperature dependence of the standard molal Gibbs energies of formation of the species from 25 to 150/sup 0/C. The Gibbs energies have been used to evaluate the effect of different concentrations of ligands on the solubility of neptunium solids as a function of temperature. Potential-pH diagrams are given for neptunium in pure water and in two model groundwaters. Important deficiencies in the available thermodynamic data for neptunium species are discussed. 90 references, 12 figures, 6 tables.

  18. Quaternary ammonium based task specific ionic liquid for the efficient and selective extraction of neptunium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gupta, Nishesh Kumar [National Institute of Technology, Odisha (India). Dept. of Chemistry; Sengupta, Arijit [Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai (India). Radiochemistry Div.; Biswas, Sujoy [Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai (India). Uranium Extraction Div.

    2017-07-01

    Liquid-liquid extraction of neptunium from aqueous acidic solution using quaternary ammonium based task specific ionic liquid (TSIL) was investigated. The extraction of Np was predominated by the 'cation exchange' mechanism via [NpO{sub 2}.Hpth]{sup +} species for NpO{sub 2}{sup 2+}, while NpO{sub 2}{sup +} was extracted in ionic liquid as [NpO{sub 2}.H.Hpth]{sup +}. The extraction process was thermodynamically spontaneous while kinetically slower. Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} as strippant showed quantitative back extraction of neptunium ions from TSIL. TSIL showed excellent radiolytic stability upto 500 kGy gamma exposure. Finally, the TSIL was employed for the processing of simulated high level waste solutions revealing high selectivity of TSIL towards neptunium.

  19. The XPS study of physical and chemical forms of neptunium group on the surface of minerals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teterin Anton Yu.

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The sorption behavior and the physical and chemical forms of neptunium on the surface of minerals of the two chlorate samples, biotite and kaolin, with different contents of Fe(II was studied. The liquid-liquid extraction and the X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy were employed to identify the valence forms of neptunium. On the basis of the obtained data the quantitative elemental composition of the surface of the studied minerals, as well as the ionic composition of the formed neptunium complexes was determined. It was shown that the Np(IV and Np(VI containing compounds did not form, while the complexes Np(VO+ -hydroxyl did form on the surface. The oxygen ions bonded with iron and oxygen belonging to water and/or of carboxyl were suggested to be present in the equatorial plane of the neptunyl group NpO+.

  20. Neptunium-the neglected actinide: a review of the biological and environmental literature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, R.C.

    1982-01-01

    Data from 89 references relating to the biological and environmental behavior of neptunium are reviewed with particular attention to the potential risks from possible releases of neptunium isotopes by the nuclear industry. The behavior of neptunium differs in many significant respects from that of other transuranic elements. It is more mobile environmentally and more readily absorbed by man, although some of the higher reported values for gastrointestinal absorption appear to have been influenced by the very high mass levels of 237 Np required for experimental study. In studies with experimental animals its ratio of deposition in bone/liver is greater than that of other transuranic elements. Its long-term toxicity in experimental animals is similar to that of other transuranics

  1. Plutonium-236 traces determination in plutonium-238 by α spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Acena, M.L.; Pottier, R.; Berger, R.

    1969-01-01

    Two methods are described in this report for the determination of plutonium-236 traces in plutonium-238 by a spectrometry using semi-conductor detectors. The first method involves a direct comparison of the areas under the peaks of the α spectra of plutonium-236 and plutonium-238. The electrolytic preparation of the sources is carried out after preliminary purification of the plutonium. The second method makes it possible to determine the 236 Pu/ 238 Pu ratio by comparing the areas of the α peaks of uranium-232 and uranium-234, which are the decay products of the two plutonium isotopes respectively. The uranium in the source, also deposited by electrolysis, is separated from a 1 mg amount of plutonium either by a T.L.A. extraction, or by the use of ion-exchange resins. The report ends with a discussion of the results obtained with plutonium of two different origins. (authors) [fr

  2. Speciation and solubility of neptunium in underground environments by paper electrophoresis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagasaki, S.; Tanaka, Satoru; Takahashi, Yoichi

    1988-01-01

    Speciation and solubility of neptunium were studied using paper electrophoresis, ion exchange and ultrafiltration. Among these methods, the paper electrophoresis was found to be suitable for measuring speciation and solubility of neptunium of low concentration, if chemical species had opposite charge to each other or dissolved species had a charge. Using paper electrophoresis, hydrolysis constants of NpO 2 OH 0 and NpO 2 - (OH) 2 - and solubility product of NpO 2 were obtained and ionic-strength dependence of speciation was observed. (author) 9 refs.; 3 figs.; 2 tabs

  3. Characterization of Neptunium Oxide Generated Using the HB-Line Phase II Flowsheet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duffey, J

    2003-08-29

    Approximately 98 grams of neptunium(IV) oxide (NpO{sub 2}) were produced at the Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC) for use in gas generation tests to support the neptunium stabilization program at the Savannah River Site (SRS). The NpO{sub 2} was produced according to the anticipated HB-Line flowsheet consisting of anion exchange, oxalate precipitation, filtration, and calcination. Characterization of the NpO{sub 2} product to be used in gas generation tests included bulk and tap density measurements, X-ray diffraction, particle size distribution, specific surface area measurements, and moisture analysis.

  4. Conversion of metal plutonium to plutonium dioxide by pyrochemical method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Panov, A.V.; Subbotin, V.G. [Russian Federal Nuclear Center, ALL-Russian Science and Research Institute of Technical Physics, Snezhinsk (Russian Federation); Mashirev, V.P. [ALL-Russian Science and Research Institute of Chemical Technology, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2000-07-01

    Report contains experimental results on metal plutonium of weapon origin samples conversion to plutonium dioxide by pyrochemical method. Circuits of processes are described. Their advantages and shortcomings are shown. Parameters of plutonium dioxide powders (phase and fraction compositions, poured density) manufactured by pyrochemical method in RFNC-VNIITF are shown as well. (authors)

  5. Hydrolysis constants of tetravalent neptunium by using solvent extraction method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujiwara, K.; Kohara, Y.

    2008-01-01

    The hydrolysis constants of tetravalent neptunium (Np(IV)) were determined by solvent extraction method using thenoyltrifluoroacetone(TTA). In order to avoid colloid formation, a stock solution of carrier-free 239 Np(V) was from 243 Am milked. The valence of Np in the solution was then reduced to Np(IV) by using zinc amalgam. The hydrolysis constants (β m ) of the reactions, Np 4+ + mOH - = Np(OH) m (4-m)+ was evaluated by using distribution ratios at ionic strengths (I) = 0.1, 0.5 and 1.0. All experiments were performed in oxygen-free 0.5% H 2 -N 2 atmosphere (below 1.0 ppm of O 2 ) in a glove-box at room temperature (23 ± 2 C) to avoid oxidation of Np(IV). The β m values were extrapolated to the standard state (I = 0) by using the specific ion interaction theory (SIT), and the formation constants at I = 0 were determined to be log β 1 = 13.91 ± 0.23, log β 2 = 27.13 ± 0.15, log β 3 = 37.70 ± 0.30 and log β 4 = 46.16 ± 0.30. The ion interaction coefficients were also evaluated to be ε(NpOH 3+ , ClO 4 - ) = 0.49 ± 0.15, ε(Np(OH) 2 2+ , ClO 4 - ) = 0.35 ± 0.11, and ε(Np(OH) 3 + , ClO 4 - ) = 0.29 ± 0.15. (orig.)

  6. Hydrolysis constants of tetravalent neptunium by using solvent extraction method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujiwara, K. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), Naka-gun, Ibaraki-ken (Japan); Kohara, Y. [Inspection and Development Co., Naka-gun, Ibaraki-ken (Japan)

    2008-07-01

    The hydrolysis constants of tetravalent neptunium (Np(IV)) were determined by solvent extraction method using thenoyltrifluoroacetone(TTA). In order to avoid colloid formation, a stock solution of carrier-free {sup 239}Np(V) was from {sup 243}Am milked. The valence of Np in the solution was then reduced to Np(IV) by using zinc amalgam. The hydrolysis constants ({beta}{sub m}) of the reactions, Np{sup 4+} + mOH{sup -} = Np(OH){sub m}{sup (4-m)+} was evaluated by using distribution ratios at ionic strengths (I) = 0.1, 0.5 and 1.0. All experiments were performed in oxygen-free 0.5% H{sub 2}-N{sub 2} atmosphere (below 1.0 ppm of O{sub 2}) in a glove-box at room temperature (23 {+-} 2 C) to avoid oxidation of Np(IV). The {beta}{sub m} values were extrapolated to the standard state (I = 0) by using the specific ion interaction theory (SIT), and the formation constants at I = 0 were determined to be log {beta}{sub 1} = 13.91 {+-} 0.23, log {beta}{sub 2} = 27.13 {+-} 0.15, log {beta}{sub 3} = 37.70 {+-} 0.30 and log {beta}{sub 4} = 46.16 {+-} 0.30. The ion interaction coefficients were also evaluated to be {epsilon}(NpOH{sup 3+}, ClO{sub 4}{sup -}) = 0.49 {+-} 0.15, {epsilon}(Np(OH){sub 2}{sup 2+}, ClO{sub 4}{sup -}) = 0.35 {+-} 0.11, and {epsilon}(Np(OH){sub 3}{sup +}, ClO{sub 4}{sup -}) = 0.29 {+-} 0.15. (orig.)

  7. Experimental study on neptunium migration under in situ geochemical conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumata, M.; Vandergraaf, T. T.

    1998-12-01

    Results are reported for migration experiments performed with Np under in situ geochemical conditions over a range of groundwater flow rates in columns of crushed rock in a specially designed facility at the 240-level of the Underground Research Laboratory (URL) near Pinawa, Manitoba, Canada. This laboratory is situated in an intrusive granitic rock formation, the Lac du Bonnet batholith. Highly altered granitic rock and groundwater were obtained from a major subhorizontal fracture zone at a depth of 250 m in the URL. The granite was wet-crushed and wet-sieved with groundwater from this fracture zone. The 180-850-μm size fraction was selected and packed in 20-cm long, 2.54-cm in diameter Teflon™-lined stainless steel columns. Approximately 30-ml vols of groundwater containing 3HHO and 237Np were injected into the columns at flow rates of 0.3, 1, and 3 ml/h, followed by elution with groundwater, obtained from the subhorizontal fracture, at the same flow rates, for a period of 95 days. Elution profiles for 3HHO were obtained, but no 237Np was detected in the eluted groundwater. After terminating the migration experiments, the columns were frozen, the column material was removed and cut into twenty 1-cm thick sections and each section was analyzed by gamma spectrometry. Profiles of 237Np were obtained for the three columns. A one-dimensional transport model was fitted to the 3HHO breakthrough curves to obtain flow parameters for this experiment. These flow parameters were in turn applied to the 237Np concentration profiles in the columns to produce sorption and dispersion coefficients for Np. The results show a strong dependence of retardation factors ( Rf) on flow rate. The decrease in the retarded velocity of the neptunium ( Vn) varied over one order of magnitude under the geochemical conditions for these experiments.

  8. Evaluation of the Magnesium Hydroxide Treatment Process for Stabilizing PFP Plutonium/Nitric Acid Solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerber, Mark A.; Schmidt, Andrew J.; Delegard, Calvin H.; Silvers, Kurt L.; Baker, Aaron B.; Gano, Susan R.; Thornton, Brenda M.

    2000-09-28

    This document summarizes an evaluation of the magnesium hydroxide [Mg(OH)2] process to be used at the Hanford Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) for stabilizing plutonium/nitric acid solutions to meet the goal of stabilizing the plutonium in an oxide form suitable for storage under DOE-STD-3013-99. During the treatment process, nitric acid solutions bearing plutonium nitrate are neutralized with Mg(OH)2 in an air sparge reactor. The resulting slurry, containing plutonium hydroxide, is filtered and calcined. The process evaluation included a literature review and extensive laboratory- and bench-scale testing. The testing was conducted using cerium as a surrogate for plutonium to identify and quantify the effects of key processing variables on processing time (primarily neutralization and filtration time) and calcined product properties.

  9. METHOD OF PRODUCING PLUTONIUM TETRAFLUORIDE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolley, W.B.; Smith, R.C.

    1959-12-15

    A process is presented for preparing plutonium tetrafluoride from plutonium(IV) oxalate. The oxalate is dried and decomposed at about 300 deg C to the dioxide, mixed with ammonium bifluoride, and the mixture is heated to between 50 and 150 deg C whereby ammonium plutonium fluoride is formed. The ammonium plutonium fluoride is then heated to about 300 deg C for volatilization of ammonium fluoride. Both heating steps are preferably carried out in an inert atmosphere.

  10. Plutonium Elastic Moduli, Electron Localization, and Temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Migliori, Albert; Mihut-Stroe, Izabella; Betts, Jon B.

    2008-01-01

    In almost all materials, compression is accompanied naturally by stiffening. Even in materials with zero or negative thermal expansion, where warming is accompanied by volume contraction it is the volume change that primarily controls elastic stiffness. Not so in the metal plutonium. In plutonium, alloying with gallium can change the sign of thermal expansion, but for the positive thermal- expansion monoclinic phase as well as the face-centered-cubic phase with either sign of thermal expansion, and the orthorhombic phase, recent measurements of elastic moduli show soften on warming by an order of magnitude more than expected, the shear and compressional moduli track, and volume seems irrelevant. These effects point toward a novel mechanism for electron localization, and have important implication for the pressure dependence of the bulk compressibility. (authors)

  11. Aqueous Solution Chemistry of Plutonium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clark, David L. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2014-01-28

    Things I have learned working with plutonium: Chemistry of plutonium is complex; Redox equilibria make Pu solution chemistry particularly challenging in the absence of complexing ligands; Understanding this behavior is key to successful Pu chemistry experiments; There is no suitable chemical analog for plutonium.

  12. EXPECTED IMPACT OF HANFORD PROCESSING ORGANICS OF PLUTONIUM DURING TANK WASTE SLUDGE RETRIEVAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    TROYER, G.L.; WINTERS, W.I.

    2004-01-01

    This document evaluates the potential for extracting plutonium from Hanford waste tanks into residual organic solvents and how this process may have an impact on criticality specifications during the retrieval of wastes. The two controlling factors for concentrating plutonium are the solubility of the plutonium in the wastes and the extraction efficiency of the potential organic extractants that may be found in these wastes. Residual Hanford tank sludges contain plutonium in solid forms that are expected to be primarily insoluble Pu(IV) hydroxides. Evaluation of thermodynamic Pourbaix diagrams, documentation on solubility studies of various components in waste tank matrices, and actual analysis of plutonium in tank supernates all indicate that the solubility of Pu in the alkaline waste is on the order of 10 -6 M. Based on an upper limit plutonium solubility of 10 -5 M in high pH and a conservative distribution coefficient for organic extractants of a 0 for plutonium in 30% TBP at 0.07 M HNO 3 ), the estimated concentration for plutonium in the organic phase would be -7 M. This is well below the process control criteria. A significant increase in plutonium solubility or the E a o would have to occur to raise this concentration to the 0.01 M concern level for organics. Measured tank chemical component values, expected operating conditions, and the characteristics of the expected chemistry and extraction mechanisms indicate that concentration of plutonium from Hanford tank residual sludges to associated process organic extractants is significantly below levels of concern

  13. Physics of plutonium recycling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    The commercial recycling of plutonium as PuO 2 /UO 2 mixed-oxide (MOX) fuel is an established practice in pressurised water reactors (PWRs) in several countries, the main motivation being the consumption of plutonium arising from spent fuel reprocessing. Although the same motivating factors apply in the case of boiling water reactors (BWRs), they have lagged behind PWRs for various reasons, and MOX utilisation in BWRs has been implemented in only a few reactors to date. One of the reasons is that the nuclear design of BWR MOX assemblies (or bundles) is more complex than that of PWR assemblies. Recognizing the need and the timeliness to address this issue at the international level, the OECD/NEA Working Party on the Physics of Plutonium Fuels and Innovative Fuel Cycles (WPPR) conducted a physics code benchmark test for a BWR assembly. This volume reports on the benchmark results and conclusions that can be drawn from it. (authors)

  14. Plutonium microstructures. Part 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cramer, E.M.; Bergin, J.B.

    1981-09-01

    This report is the first of three parts in which Los Alamos and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory metallographers exhibit a consolidated set of illustrations of inclusions that are seen in plutonium metal as a consequence of inherent and tramp impurities, alloy additions, and thermal or mechanical treatments. This part includes illustrations of nonmetallic and intermetallic inclusions characteristic of major impurity elements as an aid to identifying unknowns. It also describes historical aspects of the increased purity of laboratory plutonium samples, and it gives the composition of the etchant solutions and describes the etching procedure used in the preparation of each illustrated sample. 25 figures

  15. Potentiometric titration of plutonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silver, G.L.

    1978-01-01

    In the potentiometric titration of plutonium(III), it has been customary to take the equivalence point as the inflection point on a plot of potential vs. volume of titrant. It have not been, however, demonstrated, that the stoichiometric end point corresponds to the inflection point. Suggestions are made according to which these points may not correspond in the potentiometric titration of plutonium(III), as these titrations are ordinarily concluded in a period of time which is short compared to the time required for valence state rearrangement through disproportionation. (T.G.)

  16. Precipitation of plutonium (III) oxalate and calcination to plutonium oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Esteban, A.; Orosco, E.H.; Cassaniti, P.; Greco, L.; Adelfang, P.

    1989-01-01

    The plutonium based fuel fabrication requires the conversion of the plutonium nitrate solution from nuclear fuel reprocessing into pure PuO2. The conversion method based on the precipitation of plutonium (III) oxalate and subsequent calcination has been studied in detail. In this procedure, plutonium (III) oxalate is precipitated, at room temperature, by the slow addition of 1M oxalic acid to the feed solution, containing from 5-100 g/l of plutonium in 1M nitric acid. Before precipitation, the plutonium is adjusted to trivalent state by addition of 1M ascorbic acid in the presence of an oxidation inhibitor such as hydrazine. Finally, the precipitate is calcinated at 700 deg C to obtain PuO2. A flowsheet is proposed in this paper including: a) A study about the conditions to adjust the plutonium valence. b) Solubility data of plutonium (III) oxalate and measurements of plutonium losses to the filtrate and wash solution. c) Characterization of the obtained products. Plutonium (III) oxalate has several potential advantages over similar conversion processes. These include: 1) Formation of small particle sizes powder with good pellets fabrication characteristics. 2) The process is rather insensitive to most process variables, except nitric acid concentration. 3) Ambient temperature operations. 4) The losses of plutonium to the filtrate are less than in other conversion processes. (Author) [es

  17. Experimental thermochemistry of neptunium oxides: Np2O5 and NpO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lei; Dzik, Ewa A.; Sigmon, Ginger E.; Szymanowski, Jennifer E. S.; Navrotsky, Alexandra; Burns, Peter C.

    2018-04-01

    Neptunium (Np) compounds are important in the nuclear fuel cycle because of the buildup and long half-life (2.14 Ma) of Np-237 in nuclear waste, especially during long-term disposal in a geological repository. Neptunium in environmental conditions exists mainly in two oxidation states (+5 and + 4) and can substitute for uranium and/or rare earths in solid phases. Yet thermochemical data for solid neptunium compounds are scarce, despite being critical for evaluating the environmental transport of this radioactive and toxic element. Although high temperature oxide melt solution calorimetry has proven very useful in obtaining thermodynamic data for the formation of uranium and thorium oxide materials, it has not yet been applied to transuranium compounds. Continuing a program at Notre Dame to study the thermodynamics of transuranium compounds, we report the first determination of the enthalpies of drop solution of well-characterized neptunium oxides (Np2O5 and NpO2) using oxide melt solution calorimetry in molten sodium molybdate solvent at 973 K. The enthalpy of the decomposition reaction, Np2O5(cr) = 2NpO2(cr) + 1/2O2(g) at 298 K, is determined to be 7.70 ± 5.86 kJ/mol, and this direct measurement is consistent with existing thermodynamic data. The calorimetric methodology is straightforward and produces reliable data using milligram quantities of radioactive materials, and can be applied to many other transuranium compounds.

  18. Gastrointestinal absorption of neptunium in primates: effect of ingested mass, diet, and fasting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Metivier, H.; Bourges, J.; Fritsch, P.; Nolibe, D.; Masse, R.

    1986-01-01

    Absorption and retention of neptunium were determined in baboons after intragastric administration of neptunium nitrate solutions at pH 1. The effects of mass, diet, and fasting on absorption were studied. At higher mass levels (400-800 micrograms Np/kg), absorption was about 1%; at lower mass intakes (0.0009-0.005 micrograms Np/kg), absorption was reduced by 10- to 20-fold. The addition of an oxidizing agent (Fe3+) increased gastrointestinal absorption and supported the hypothesis of a reduction of Np (V) when loss masses were ingested. Diets depleted of or enriched with hydroxy acids did not modify retention of neptunium but increased urinary excretion with increasing hydroxy acid content. The diet enriched with milk components reduced absorption by a factor of 5. Potatoes increased absorption and retention by a factor 5, not necessarily due to the effect of phytate. Fasting for 12 or 24 h increased retention and absorption by factors of about 3 and 10, respectively. Data obtained in baboons when low masses of neptunium were administered suggest that the f1 factor used by ICRP should be decreased. However, fasting as encountered in certain nutritional habits is a factor to be taken into consideration

  19. Neptunium sorption and co-precipitation of strontium in simulated DWPF salt solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McIntyre, P.F.; Orebaugh, E.G.; King, C.M.

    1988-01-01

    Batch experiments performed using crushed slag saltstone (∼40 mesh) removed >80% of 237 Np from simulated Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) salt solution. The concentration of 237 Np (110 pCi/ml) used was 1000x greater than levels in actual DWPF solutions. Neptunium-239 was used as a tracer and was formed by neutron activation of uranyl nitrate. Results showed that small amounts of crushed saltstone (as little as 0.05 grams), removed >80% of neptunium from 15 ml of simulated DWPF solution after several hours equilibration. The neptunium is sorbed on insoluble carbonates formed in and on the saltstone matrix. Further testing showed that addition of 0.01 and 0.10 ml of 1 molar Ca +2 (ie. Ca (NO 3 ) 2 , CaCl 2 ) into 15 ml of simulated DWPF solution yielded a white carbonate precipitate which also removed >80% of the neptunium after 1 hour equilibration. Further experiments were performed to determine the effectiveness of this procedure to co-precipitate strontium

  20. Neptunium separation in trace levels from uranium solutions by extraction chromatography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Figols, M.E.B.

    1991-01-01

    Neptunium and uranium behavior in extraction chromatography system, aiming the separation of microquantities of neptunium from uranyl nitrate solutions is described. Tri-n-octylamina (TOA), tri-n-butylphosphate (TBP), thenoyltrifluoroacetone (TTA) as stationary phase, alumina, Voltalef-UF-300, silica as support material were verified. The impregnation conditions as well as the best stationary phase/support material ratio were established. TBP/alumina, TBP/Voltalef and TOA/alumina system were selected to uranium and neptunium separation studies. In the system using TBP as extractant agent uranium and neptunium separation was reached by selective elution after the retention of both elements on the column. U-Np separation by selective retention of Np was possible with TOA system. The capacity of the column was the 66.6 mg U/mL and 191.6mg U/mL for the TBP/alumina and TBP/Voltalef systems, respectively. An application of extraction chromatography system in the final phase of irradiated uranium treatment process is proposed. (author)

  1. The complex reaction kinetics of neptunium including redox and extraction process in 30% TBP-nitric acid system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu Zhang; Zhan-yuan Liu; Xian-ming Zhou; Li Li

    2017-01-01

    In order to understand the complex and dynamic neptunium process chemistry in the TBP-HNO_3 system, the kinetics involved reversible redox reaction and extraction mass transfer was investigated. The results indicates that the mass transfer rate of Np(VI) is much faster than the redox reaction in aqueous solution. The concentrations of nitric acid and nitrous acid not only can change the Np(V) oxidation reaction and Np(VI) reduction reaction rate, but also can ultimately determine the distribution of neptunium extraction equilibrium. The variety of temperature can only influence the extraction equilibrium time, but cannot alter the equilibrium state of neptunium. (author)

  2. Plutonium isotopes in the environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holm, E.

    1977-12-01

    Determination of plutonium and americium by ion exchange and alpha-spectrometry. Deposition of global fall-out and accumulated area-content of 238 Pu, 239 Pu, 240 Pu, 241 Pu, 242 Pu and 241 Am in central Sweden (62.3 deg N, 12.4 deg E), by using the lichen species Cladonia alpestris as bioindicator. Retention and distribution of plutonium in carpets of lichen and soil. Transfer of plutonium from lichen to reindeer and man. Absorbed dose in reindeer and man from plutonium. Basic studies of plutonium and americium in the western Mediterranean surface waters, with emphases on particulate form of the transuranics. (author)

  3. Investigation of plutonium (4) hydroxoformates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andryushin, V.G.; Belov, V.A.; Galaktionov, S.V.; Kozhevnikov, P.B.; Matyukha, V.A.; Shmidt, V.S.

    1982-01-01

    Deposition processes of plutonium (4) hydroxoformates in the system Pu(NO 3 ) 4 -HNO 3 -HCoOH-N6 4 OH-H 2 O have been studied in pH range 0.2-10.7 at total plutonium concentration in the system 100 g/l. It is shown that under the conditions plutonium (4) hydrolysis takes place with the formation of hydroxoformates. A local maximum of plutonium (4) hydroxoformate solubility in the range pH=3.8-4.8, which is evidently conditioned by the formation of soluble formate complex of plutonium in the region, is pointed out. The basic plutonium (4) formates of the composition PuOsub(x)(OH)sub(y)(COOH)sub(4-2x-y)xnHsub(2)O, where 1,3 >=x >= 0.7, 1.7 >= y >= 1.0 and n=1.5-7.0, are singled out, their thermal stability being studied. Density of the crystals and plutonium dioxide, formed during their thermal decomposition, is measured. It is established that for plutonium (4) hydroxoformates common regularities of the influence of salt composition (OH - -, CHOO - - and H 2 O-group numbers in the mulecule) on position of temperature decomposition effects and on the density of compounds, which have been previously found during the study of thorium and plutonium hydroxosalts are observed. It is shown that the density of plutonium dioxide decreases with the increase of hydration and hydrolysis degree of the initial plutonium hydroxoformate

  4. Magnetic and electronic properties of Neptunium chalcogenides from GGA + U + SOC and DFT investigations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khan, Wilayat [New Technologies – Research Center, University of West Bohemia, Univerzitni 8, 306 14 Pilsen (Czech Republic); Goumri-Said, Souraya, E-mail: sosaid@alfaisal.edu [College of Science, Physics Department, Alfaisal University, Riyadh 11533 (Saudi Arabia)

    2017-06-15

    Highlights: • Electronic and magnetic properties of Neptunium chalcogenides were explored theoretically using DFT approach. • Spin orbit coupling and GGA + U approach described successfully the f–f coupling. • Np{sub 2}X{sub 5} ate metallic with high magnetic character due to the Neptunium. • Fermi surfaces of Np{sub 2}Te{sub 5} have shown a greater electrical conductivity compared to Np{sub 2}Se{sub 5} and Np{sub 2}S{sub 5}. - Abstract: First-principles calculations techniques were employed to explore the structural, electronic and magnetic properties of Neptunium chalcogenides (Np{sub 2}X{sub 5}, X = S, Se and Te). No experimental or theoretical studies of their physical properties have been previously reported in the literature. The presence of highly localized f states has requested the employment of the spin orbit coupling and GGA + U approach in order to describe correctly the f–f coupling. Np{sub 2}X{sub 5} was found metallic with high magnetic character due to the Neptunium presence. Fermi surfaces of Np{sub 2}Te{sub 5} have shown a greater electrical conductivity compared to Np{sub 2}Se{sub 5} and Np{sub 2}S{sub 5}. The magnetic moment was found to be between 13.24 and 13.92μ{sub B}, principally induced by Np f and d-orbitals as well as the spin-polarization of the chalcogenes (Te, Se, S) induced by Np. Neptunium chalcogenides have shown interesting magnetic properties and should be manipulated with precaution due to their radioactive properties.

  5. Study of neptunium hexafluoride formation and its adsorption on metallic fluorides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matcheret, Georges

    1970-01-01

    This report involves two parts. The first part deals with the action of elementary fluorine on neptunium compounds by a thermogravimetric method. The mechanism and the kinetics of this reaction vary according to the nature of the compound. 1 - With neptunium tetrafluoride the reaction, proceeds in a single step. The kinetics corresponds to a uniform attack of the entire surface of the sample and follows the kinetics law: (1-α) 1/3 1-k rel t . 2 - The reaction with neptunium dioxyde involves two steps, neptunium tetrafluoride being the intermediate compound. The kinetics of the first step corresponds to a diffusion process and follows the kinetic law: log (1-α) = kt 1/2 . The kinetics of the second step corresponds to an uniform attack of the entire sur face of the sample. The object of the second part is a study of the adsorption of uranium hexafluoride and neptunium hexafluoride on sodium, magnesium and barium fluorides by a volumetric method. The adsorption of UF 6 on MgF 2 has been investigated at 20 deg. C. The isothermal curve obtained is characteristic of a physical one layer monomolecular adsorption. In a way similar to the behaviour of UF 6 the adsorption of NpF 6 involves in addition a chemical reduction with formation of NpF 5 and release of fluorine. The reaction of NpF 6 with BaF 2 permitted to confirm the influence of the polarizing power of the Ba ++ ion on formation and stability of the product of addition. (author) [fr

  6. International plutonium policy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-02-01

    As any other fissile material, the plutonium raises several utilization problems, particularly as far as diversion by sub-national groups or proliferation are concerned. The purpose of this paper is to show that these problems can be given reasonable solutions avoiding over penalties on energy production

  7. Plutonium safety training course

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moe, H.J.

    1976-03-01

    This course seeks to achieve two objectives: to provide initial safety training for people just beginning work with plutonium, and to serve as a review and reference source for those already engaged in such work. Numerous references have been included to provide information sources for those wishing to pursue certain topics more fully. The first part of the course content deals with the general safety approach used in dealing with hazardous materials. Following is a discussion of the four properties of plutonium that lead to potential hazards: radioactivity, toxicity, nuclear properties, and spontaneous ignition. Next, the various hazards arising from these properties are treated. The relative hazards of both internal and external radiation sources are discussed, as well as the specific hazards when plutonium is the source. Similarly, the general hazards involved in a criticality, fire, or explosion are treated. Comments are made concerning the specific hazards when plutonium is involved. A brief summary comparison between the hazards of the transplutonium nuclides relative to 239 Pu follows. The final portion deals with control procedures with respect to contamination, internal and external exposure, nuclear safety, and fire protection. The philosophy and approach to emergency planning are also discussed

  8. Atomic spectrum of plutonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blaise, J.; Fred, M.; Gutmacher, R.G.

    1984-08-01

    This report contains plutonium wavelengths, energy level classifications, and other spectroscopic data accumulated over the past twenty years at Laboratoire Aime Cotton (LAC) Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The primary purpose was term analysis: deriving the energy levels in terms of quantum numbers and electron configurations, and evaluating the Slater-Condon and other parameters from the levels

  9. Plutonium: An introduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Condit, R.H.

    1993-10-01

    This report is a summary of the history and properties of plutonium. It presents information on the atoms, comparing chemical and nuclear properties. It looks at the history of the atom, including its discovery and production methods. It summarizes the metallurgy and chemistry of the element. It also describes means of detecting and measuring the presence and quantity of the element

  10. Plutonium Disposition by Immobilization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gould, T.; DiSabatino, A.; Mitchell, M.

    2000-01-01

    The ultimate goal of the Department of Energy (DOE) Immobilization Project is to develop, construct, and operate facilities that will immobilize between 17 to 50 tonnes (MT) of U.S. surplus weapons-usable plutonium materials in waste forms that meet the ''spent fuel'' standard and are acceptable for disposal in a geologic repository. Using the ceramic can-in-canister technology selected for immobilization, surplus plutonium materials will be chemically combined into ceramic forms which will be encapsulated within large canisters of high level waste (HLW) glass. Deployment of the immobilization capability should occur by 2008 and be completed within 10 years. In support of this goal, the DOE Office of Fissile Materials Disposition (MD) is conducting development and testing (D and T) activities at four DOE laboratories under the technical leadership of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The Savannah River Site has been selected as the site for the planned Plutonium Immobilization Plant (PIP). The D and T effort, now in its third year, will establish the technical bases for the design, construction, and operation of the U. S. capability to immobilize surplus plutonium in a suitable and cost-effective manner. Based on the D and T effort and on the development of a conceptual design of the PIP, automation is expected to play a key role in the design and operation of the Immobilization Plant. Automation and remote handling are needed to achieve required dose reduction and to enhance operational efficiency

  11. Plutonium cores of zenith

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barclay, F R; Cameron, I R; Drageset, A; Freemantle, R G; Wilson, D J

    1965-03-15

    The report describes a series of experiments carried out with plutonium fuel in the heated zero power reactor ZENITH, with the aim of testing current theoretical methods, with particular reference to excess reactivity, temperature coefficients, differential spectrum and reaction rate distributions. Two cores of widely different fissile/moderator atom ratios were loaded in order to test the theory under significantly varied spectrum conditions.

  12. Plutonium and textbooks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silver, G.L.

    2008-01-01

    Chemical equilibrium is not characterized by equilibrium constants alone. At least one conservation principle is necessary. Textbook descriptions of plutonium chemistry that are based on two-reaction-product disproportionation equations, or do not recognize the conservation principles, are incomplete and potentially misleading. (author)

  13. Japan's plutonium economy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hecht, M.M.

    1994-01-01

    Japan's plutonium economy is based on the most efficient use of nuclear energy, as envisioned under the Atoms for Peace program of the 1950s and 1960s. The nuclear pioneers assumed that all nations would want to take full advantage of atomic energy, recycling waste into new fuel to derive as much energy as possible from this resource

  14. Transport of plutonium nitrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-02-01

    This leaflet discusses the subject under the headings: why do we need plutonium; why must we transport it; what action is carried out; how is it moved; what are the risks. The transport of the material in specially designed containers, from Dounreay in Caithness by road and sea to Sellafield in Cumbria, is described. (U.K.)

  15. Investigation of the system ThO2-NpO2-P2O5. Solid solutions of thorium-neptunium (IV) phosphate-diphosphate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dacheux, N.; Thomas, A.C.; Brandel, V.; Genet, M.

    1998-01-01

    Considering that phosphate matrices could be potential candidates for the immobilization of actinides or for the final disposal of the excess plutonium from dismantled nuclear weapons, the chemistry of thorium phosphates has been re-examined. In the ThO 2 -P 2 O 5 system, the thorium phosphate-diphosphate Th 4 (PO 4 ) 4 P 2 O 7 (TPD) can be synthesized by wet and dry chemical processes. The substitution of thorium by other tetravalent actinides like uranium or plutonium can be obtained for 0 4-x Np x (PO 4 ) 4 P 2 O 7 (TNPD) with 0 4+ by Np 4+ in the TPD structure is evaluated to 2.08 (which corresponds to about 52 mol% of thorium replaced by neptunium (IV)). The field of existence of solid solutions Th 4-x U -x Np -x Pu U x U Np x Np Pu x Pu (PO 4 )4P 2 O 7 has been calculated. These solid solutions should be synthesized for 5x U +7x Np +9x Pu ≤15. In the NpO 2 -P 2 O 5 system, the unit cell parameters of Np 2 O(PO 4 ) 2 were refined by analogy with U 2 O(PO 4 ) 2 which crystallographic data have been published recently. For Np 2 O(PO 4 ) 2 the unit cell is orthorhombic with the following cell parameters: a=7.033(2)A, b=9.024(3)A, c=12.587(6)A and V=799(1)A 3 . The unit cell parameter obtained for α-NpP 2 O 7 (a=8.586(1)A) is in good agreement with those already reported in literature. (orig.)

  16. Determination of uranium in plutonium--238 metal and oxide by differential pulse polarography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fawcett, N.C.

    1976-01-01

    A differential pulse polarographic method was developed for the determination of total uranium in 238 Pu metal and oxides. A supporting electrolyte of 0.5 M ascorbic acid in 0.15 N H 2 SO 4 was found satisfactory for the determination of 500 ppM or more of uranium in 10 mg or less of plutonium. A relative standard deviation of 0.27 to 4.3 percent was obtained in the analysis of samples ranging in uranium content from 0.65 to 2.79 percent. The limit of detection was 0.18 μg ml -1 . Peak current was a linear function of uranium concentration up to at least 100 μg ml -1 . Amounts of neptunium equal to the uranium content were tolerated. The possible interference of a number of other cations and anions were investigated

  17. Plutonium interaction with a bacterial strain isolated from the waste isolation pilot plant (WIPP) environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strietelmeier, B.A.; Kraus, S.M.; Leonard, P.A.; Triay, I.R.

    1996-01-01

    This work was conducted as part of a series of experiments to determine the association and interaction of various actinides with bacteria isolated from the WIPP site. The majority of bacteria that exist at the site are expected to be halophiles, or extreme halophiles, due to the high concentration of salt minerals at the location. Experiments were conducted to determine the toxicity of plutonium-n-239, neptunium-237 and americium-243 to several species of these halophiles and the results were reported elsewhere. As an extension of these experiments, we report an investigation of the type of association that occurs between 239 Pu and the isolate WIPP-1A, isolated by staff at Brookhaven National Laboratory, when grown in a high-salt, defined medium. Using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) techniques, we demonstrate a surface association of the 239 Pu with the bacterial cells

  18. Use of plutonium for power production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1965-01-01

    The panel reviewed available information on various aspects of plutonium utilization, such as physics of plutonium, technology of plutonium fuels in thermal and fast reactors, behaviour of plutonium fuel under reactor irradiation, technological and economic aspects of plutonium fuel cycle. Refs, figs and tabs

  19. Guide to good practices at plutonium facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faust, L.G.; Brackenbush, L.W.; Carter, L.A.; Endres, G.W.R.; Glenn, R.D.; Jech, J.J.; Selby, J.M.; Smith, R.C.; Waite, D.A.; Walsh, W.P.

    1977-09-01

    This manual establishes guidelines and principles for use in setting up a sound radiation protection program for work with plutonium. The guidance presented is based on the experiences of Energy Research and Development Administration (ERDA) contractors and those portions of private industry concerned with the operation of plutonium facilities, specifically with the fabrication of mixed oxide reactor fuel. The manual is directed primarily to those facilities which have as their sole purpose the handling of large quantities of plutonium for military or industrial uses. It is not intended for use by facilities engaged in reactor or chemical separation operations nor for partial or occasional use by analytical laboratories; while these facilities would find the manual beneficial, it would be incomplete for their needs. The manual addresses good practices that should be observed by management, staff and designers, since the benefits of a good radiation protection program are the result of their joint efforts. Methods for the diagnostic evaluation of internally deposited Pu are included

  20. Hematologic effects of inhaled plutonium in beagles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ragan, H.A.; Buschbom, R.L.; Park, J.F.; Dagle, G.E.; Weller, R.E.

    1986-01-01

    Beagle dogs were exposed, by inhalation, 5 to 11 years ago, to aerosols of 239 PuO 2 , 238 PuO 2 , or 239 Pu(NO 3 ) 4 , at six dose levels resulting in initial lung burdens ranging from ∼2 to ∼5500 nCi. Translocation of the plutonium to extrapulmonary sites was related to the physical-chemical characteristics of the plutonium compound. The highly insoluble 239 PuO 2 was retained primarily in the lung and associated lymph nodes, whereas 239 Pu(NO 3 ) 4 was much more soluble and translocated relatively rapidly to the skeleton and other extrapulmonary tissues. The 238 PuO 2 was intermediate in solubility and translocation characteristics. The hematologic effects of plutonium inhalation were most pronounced on lymphocyte populations. Evidence suggests that these effects result from irradiation of lymphocytes via the pulmonary lymph nodes with insoluble 239 PuO 2 , and via these same lymph nodes, extrapulmonary lymph nodes, and bone marrow lymphocytes with the more soluble forms, i.e., 238 PuO 2 and 239 Pu(NO 3 ) 4 . There is no evidence suggesting that these exposures increase the risk of developing myeloid or lymphoid neoplasia. 8 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs

  1. Uranium, Plutonium and Neptunium Co-recovery with Irradiated Fast Reactor MOX Fuel by Single Cycle Extraction Process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Masaumi Nakahara; Yuichi Sano; Kazunori Nomura; Tadahiro Washiya; Jun Komaki [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 4-33 Muramatsu, Tokai-mura, Naka-gun, Ibaraki, 319-1194 (Japan)

    2008-07-01

    The behavior of Np in single cycle extraction processes using tri-n-butylphosphate (TBP) as an extractant for U, Pu and Np co-recovery was investigated as a part of NEXT (New Extraction System for Transuranium) process. Two approaches for Np co-recovery with U and Pu were carried out with irradiated MOX fuel from fast reactor 'JOYO'; one was the counter current experiment using a feed solution with a high HNO{sub 3} concentration and the other used a scrubbing solution with a high HNO{sub 3} concentration. Experimental results showed that the leakage of Np to the raffinate were 0.986 % and 5.96 % under the condition of high HNO{sub 3} concentration in the feed solution and scrubbing solution, respectively. The simulation results based on these experiments indicated that most of Np could be extracted and co-recovered with U and Pu, just by increasing HNO{sub 3} concentrations in the feed and scrubbing solution on the single cycle extraction process. (authors)

  2. Final report on production of Pu-238 in commercial power reactors: target fabrication, postirradiation examination, and plutonium and neptunium recovery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pobereskin, M.; Langendorfer, W.; Lowry, L.; Farmelo, D.; Scotti, V.; Kruger, O.

    1975-01-01

    Considerable interest has been generated in more extensive applications of radioisotope thermoelectric generator (RTG) systems. This raises questions concerning the availability of 238 Pu to supply an expanding demand. The development of much of this demand will depend upon a considerable reduction in cost of 238 Pu. Two neptunia--zirconia--fuel target rods, containing four sections each of different NpO 2 concentrations, were irradiated in the Connecticut Yankee Reactor for approximately one year. Following irradiation both target rods were subjected to nondestructive examination. One rod was chosen for destructive testing and analysis. Post-irradiation chemical analyses included total Pu and Np, ppM 236 Pu/ 238 Pu, and Pu isotopic abundance. The results of these analyses and of electron microprobe analysis which provided the relative Pu concentration across the pellet diameters are tabulated. It was concluded that the feasibility of all operations involved in the production of 238 Pu by irradiation of 237 NpO 2 targets in commercial nuclear power reactors was demonstrated and that the demonstration should be extended to a pilot-scale leading to installation of a full production capacity. (U.S.)

  3. Ultra-trace determination of neptunium-237 and plutonium isotopes in urine samples by compact accelerator mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dai, X.; Christl, M.; Kramer-Tremblay, S., E-mail: sheila.kramer-tremblay@cnl.ca [Canadian Nuclear Laboratories, Chalk River, Ontario (Canada); Synal, H-A. [ETH Zurich, Lab. of Ion Beam Physics, Zurich (Switzerland)

    2015-12-15

    Ultra-trace analysis of actinides, such as Pu isotopes and {sup 237}Np, in bioassay samples is often needed for radiation protection programs at nuclear facilities. Accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS), particularly the compact ETH Zurich system “Tandy”, has evolved over the years as one of the most sensitive, selective, and robust techniques for actinide analysis. Employment of the AMS technique can reduce the demands on sample preparation chemistry and increase sample analysis throughput, due to very low instrumental detection limit, high rejection of interferences, and low susceptibility to adverse sample matrices. Initial research and development tests were performed to explore and demonstrate the analytical capability of AMS for Pu and Np urine bioassay. In this study, urine samples spiked with femtogram levels of Np and Pu isotopes were prepared and measured using compact ETH AMS system and the results showed excellent analytical capability for measuring Np and Pu isotopes at femtogram/litre levels in urine. (author)

  4. Plutonium Finishing Plant. Interim plutonium stabilization engineering study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sevigny, G.J.; Gallucci, R.H.; Garrett, S.M.K.; Geeting, J.G.H.; Goheen, R.S.; Molton, P.M.; Templeton, K.J.; Villegas, A.J. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Nass, R. [Nuclear Fuel Services, Inc. (United States)

    1995-08-01

    This report provides the results of an engineering study that evaluated the available technologies for stabilizing the plutonium stored at the Plutonium Finishing Plant located at the hanford Site in southeastern Washington. Further processing of the plutonium may be required to prepare the plutonium for interim (<50 years) storage. Specifically this document provides the current plutonium inventory and characterization, the initial screening process, and the process descriptions and flowsheets of the technologies that passed the initial screening. The conclusions and recommendations also are provided. The information contained in this report will be used to assist in the preparation of the environmental impact statement and to help decision makers determine which is the preferred technology to process the plutonium for interim storage.

  5. Plutonium Finishing Plant. Interim plutonium stabilization engineering study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sevigny, G.J.; Gallucci, R.H.; Garrett, S.M.K.; Geeting, J.G.H.; Goheen, R.S.; Molton, P.M.; Templeton, K.J.; Villegas, A.J.; Nass, R.

    1995-08-01

    This report provides the results of an engineering study that evaluated the available technologies for stabilizing the plutonium stored at the Plutonium Finishing Plant located at the hanford Site in southeastern Washington. Further processing of the plutonium may be required to prepare the plutonium for interim (<50 years) storage. Specifically this document provides the current plutonium inventory and characterization, the initial screening process, and the process descriptions and flowsheets of the technologies that passed the initial screening. The conclusions and recommendations also are provided. The information contained in this report will be used to assist in the preparation of the environmental impact statement and to help decision makers determine which is the preferred technology to process the plutonium for interim storage

  6. Method of neptunium recovery into the product stream of the Purex second codecontamination step for LWR fuel reprocessing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsuboya, T; Nemoto, S; Hoshino, T; Segawa, T [Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corp., Tokyo (Japan)

    1973-04-01

    The neptunium behavior in the second codecontamination step in Purex process of Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation was experimentally studied, and the conditions for discharging neptunium in product stream were examined. Improved nitrous acid method was applied to the second codecontamination step. Nitrous acid (NaNO/sub 2/) was supplied to the 1st stage of extraction section at feed rate of 7.5 mM/hr, and hydrazine (hydrazine nitrate) was supplied to some stages near feed point at feed rate of 1.6 mM/hr, by using laboratory scale mixer-settlers having 6 ml of mixing volume and 17 ml of settling volume. Neptunium extraction behavior was analyzed by the code NEPTUN-I simulating neptunium concentration profile and by the code NEPTUN-II for calculating Np (V) and Np (VI) concentration. Batch experiments were performed for explaining the reduction reaction of Np (VI) in organic phase. After shaking the aqueous solution containing Np (VI) in 3 M nitric acid with the various volume ratios of TBP, both phases were separated, and the neptunium concentration was determined. In conclusion, the improved nitrous acid method was effective for the neptunium discharge in product stream when the flow ratio of organic phase to aqueous phase was increased to about three times.

  7. A study of specific sorption of neptunium(V) on smectite in low pH solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kozai, Naofumi; Ohnuki, Toshihiko; Matsumoto, Junko; Banba, Tsunetaka; Ito, Yoshimoto

    1996-01-01

    The 'specific sorption' of neptunium(V) on smectite, in other words, a strong sorption undesorbable by 1 M KCl, is studied with a combination of batch type sorption and desorption experiments over a pH range of 2 to 5. Six types of homoionic smectite (Li-, Na-, K-, Cs-, Mg-, and Ca-smectite) are used in this study. Distribution coefficients (K d ) of neptunium for smectite vary over a wide pH range; the maximum K d value of ∝300 cm 3 x g -1 at around pH 2 for Li- and Na-smectite and the minimum value of ∝2 cm 3 x g -1 for Cs-smectite. The specific sorption of neptunium depends on pH and on the affinity of the exchangeable cation for smectite; the lower the pH of solution or the affinity, the larger the specific sorption. The neptunium-smectite association varies with the elapse of contact time. Within the first day of the neptunium-smectite contact the neptunium sorbed on na-smectite at low pH is desorbable by 1 M KCl solution, and on the passage of time most of the neuptunium sorbed becomes undesorbable by KCl (the specific sorption). Hydronium ion in solution is sorbed on smectite at low pH and dissociates the exchangeable cation from smectite into solution, and the specific sorption of neuptunium increases with increasing the exchangeable cation that is dissociated from smectite. (orig.)

  8. Chemistry of plutonium revealed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Connick, R.E.

    1992-01-01

    In 1941 one goal of the Manhattan Project was to unravel the chemistry of the synthetic element plutonium as rapidly as possible. In this paper the work carried out at Berkeley from the spring of 1942 to the summer of 1945 is described briefly. The aqueous chemistry of plutonium is quite remarkable. Important insights were obtained from tracer experiments, but the full complexity was not revealed until macroscopic amounts (milligrams) became available. Because processes for separation from fission products were based on aqueous solutions, such solution chemistry was emphasized, particularly precipitation and oxidation-reduction behavior. The latter turned out to be unusually intricate when it was discovered that two more oxidation states existed in aqueous solution than had previously been suspected. Further, an equilibrium was rapidly established among the four aqueous oxidation states, while at the same time any three were not in equilibrium. These and other observations made while doing a crash study of a previously unknown element are reported

  9. International plutonium policy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-12-01

    The need to distinguish between diversion by sub-national groups and by governments is clearly stated. The paper identifies the international safeguards measures which already exist for the handling of plutonium. It proposes that the implementation of Article XII A5 of the IAEA statute concerning the international storage of plutonium could be an important additional measure. The paper also mentions the concept of using confinement as a complimentary safeguards measure and identifies the PIPEX concept. In addition, greater use is proposed of containment and surveillance procedures. The multiplication of small reprocessing plants spread over many countries is perceived as a proliferation risk. Other means such as co-location of reprocessing and fuel fabrication facilities are relevant to diversion by sub-national groups

  10. Spectrophotometric study of neptunium (VI) complexation by nitrate ions; Etude par spectrophotometrie de la complexation du neptunium au degre d'oxydation (VI) par les ions nitrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pochon, P. [CEA/VALRHO - site de Marcoule, Dept. de Recherche en Retraitement et en Vitrification (DRRV), 30 - Marcoule (France)]|[Conservatoire National des Arts et Metiers (CNAM), 75 - Paris (France)]|[Centre Regional Associe de Lyon, 69 (France)

    2000-07-01

    Neptunium(VI) complexation by nitrate ions was investigated by visible and near-infrared spectrophotometry, a technique suitable for observing the appearance and evolution of the species in solution. In the absence of reference spectra for Np(VI) nitrate- complexes, mathematical (factor analysis) tools were used to interpret the spectra. These chemo-metric techniques were first tested and validated on a simpler chemical system: Np(VI)complexation by the SiW{sub 11}O{sub 39}{sup 8-} anion. The test media used to investigate Np(VI) nitrate- complexes generally contain nitrate and perchlorate salts at high concentrations (high ionic strength). Media effects arising from the presence of cations, acidity or the perchlorate ion concentration are therefore significant, and no doubt account for the scattered values of the complexation constants published in the literature. The evolution of the neptunium spectra according to the parameters of the reaction medium illustrated these effects and allowed them to be quantified by a global 'perturbation constant'. In order to minimize the spectrum modifications due to media effects, the neptunium nitrate-complexes were studied at constant ionic strength in weak acidic media (2 mol.kg{sup -1}{sub H2O}) in the presence of sodium salts. The bulk formation constants and the spectrum of the NpO{sub 2}(NO{sub 3}){sup +} complex were determined for ionic strength values of 2.2, 4, 6 and 8 mol.kg{sup -1}{sub H2O}. The constants remained on the same order of magnitude regardless of the ionic strength; the thermodynamic constant {beta}{sub 1}{sup 0} determined from them according to specific interaction theory is thus probably of little significance. Conversely, the bulk constants can be corrected for the effects of the perchlorate ions by taking the global 'perturbation constant' into account. (author)

  11. Strategies for the plutonium utilization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zouain, D.M.; Lima, J.O.V.; Sakamoto, L.H.

    1981-11-01

    A review of the activities involving plutonium (its recycle, utilization and technological status and perspectives) is done. These informations are useful for an economic viability study for the plutonium utilization in thermal reactors (recycling) and in fast breeders reactor (FBR), trying to collect the major number of informations about these subjects. The initial phase describes the present status and projections of plutonium accumulation and requirements. Then, the technological process are described and some strategies are analyzed. (E.G.) [pt

  12. Plutonium in the environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kudo, A.

    2001-01-01

    The first volume of the new series, Radioactivity in the Environment, focuses on the environmental occurrence, the speciation, the behaviour, the fate, the applications and the health consequences of that much-feared and much-publicised element, plutonium. Featuring a collection of selected, peer-reviewed, up-to-date papers by leading researchers in the field, this work provides a state-of-the-art description of plutonium in the environment. This title helps to explain where present frontiers are drawn in our continuing efforts to understand the science of environmental plutonium and will help to place widespread concerns into perspective. As a whole this new book series on environmental radioactivity addresses, at academic research level, the key aspects of this socially important and complex interdisciplinary subject. Presented objectively and with the ultimate authority gained from the many contributions by the world's leading experts, the negative and positive consequences of having a radioactive world around us will be documented and given perspective. refs

  13. F. Biological hazards of plutonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-01-01

    Plutonium is an unavoidable result of present nuclear power programmes. Its predominant isotopes are extremely long-lived and very toxic if absorbed in the body. In view of the increasing potential for plutonium and man to come into contact, the consequences of any plutonium release into the environment should be scientifically examined. This report is an attempt to place in one document a fully referenced account of the on-going work in many areas. There are three sections. Part 1 deals with the amounts of plutonium available in the fuel cycle, its properties and the probability of routine or accidental release. Part 2 examines the ways in which plutonium can reach man, in particular through food chains or inhalation. Part 3 details the biological effects of plutonium once it is absorbed into the body, assesses the amounts likely to be harmful and discusses the adequacy of present standards for plutonium burdens. There are two appendices. The likely differences between Pu-239, the most studied isotope, and other plutonium isotopes or transuranic nuclides are outlined in Appendix A. Appendix B contains a fuller account of the ways in which the fate of ingested or inhaled plutonium have been determined

  14. Plutonium in the marine environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jarvis, N.V.; Linder, P.W.; Wade, P.W.

    1994-01-01

    The shipping of plutonium from Europe to Japan around the Cape is a contentious issue which has raised public concern that South Africa may be at risk to plutonium exposure should an accident occur. The paper describes the containers in which the plutonium (in the form of plutonium oxide, PuO 2 ) is housed and consequences of the unlikely event of these becoming ruptured. Wind-borne pollution is considered not to be a likely scenario, with the plutonium oxide particles more likely to remain practically insoluble and sediment. Plutonium aqueous and environmental chemistry is briefly discussed. Some computer modelling whereby plutonium oxide is brought into contact with seawater has been performed and the results are presented. The impact on marine organisms is discussed in terms of studies performed at marine dump sites and after the crash of a bomber carrying nuclear warheads in Thule, Greenland in 1968. Various pathways from the sea to land are considered in the light of studies done at Sellafield, a reprocessing plant in the United Kingdom. Some recent debates in the popular scientific press, such as that on the leukemia cluster at Sellafield, are described. Plutonium biochemistry and toxicity are discussed as well as medical histories of workers exposed to plutonium. 35 refs., 2 tabs., 1 fig

  15. Laboratory studies of plutonium in marine systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morse, J.W.; Choppin, G.R.

    1986-01-01

    The chemistry of plutonium in natural waters is among the most complex of any element. Much of this complexity is due to the fact that Pu can exist in up to four oxidation states (III, IV, V, VI) at one time under conditions encountered in the marine environment. The chemical properties of Pu in these different oxidation states differ dramatically. Our examination of thermodynamic and environmental data indicates that speciation of Pu in natural waters is primarily governed by kinetic factors, and that interactions with organic compounds, such as humates, are important. Pu is primarily removed from oceanic waters by adsorption on particle surfaces. Adsorption processes are also governed by reaction kinetics. A major aspect of the adsorption chemistry of Pu on metal oxide surfaces is their ability to promote redox reactions which change the oxidation state of the adsorbed Pu. (Auth.)

  16. Chemical speciation of neptunium in spent fuel. Annual report for period 15 August 1999 to 15 August 2000

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ken Czerwinski; Don Reed

    2000-09-01

    (B204) This project will examine the chemical speciation of neptunium in spent nuclear fuel. The R&D fields covered by the project include waste host materials and actinide chemistry. Examination of neptunium is chosen since it was identified as a radionuclide of concern by the NERI workshop. Additionally, information on the chemical form of neptunium in spent fuel is lacking. The identification of the neptunium species in spent fuel would allow a greater scientific based understanding of its long-term fate and behavior in waste forms. Research to establish the application and development of X-ray synchrotrons radiation (XSR) techniques to determine the structure of aqueous, adsorbed, and solid actinide species of importance to nuclear considerations is being conducted at Argonne. These studies extend current efforts within the Chemical Technology Division at Argonne National Laboratory to investigate actinide speciation with more conventional spectroscopic and solids characterization (e.g. SEM, TEM, and XRD) methods. Our project will utilize all these techniques for determining neptunium speciation in spent fuel. We intend to determine the chemical species and oxidation state of neptunium in spent fuel and alteration phases. Different types of spent fuel will be examined. Once characterized, the chemical behavior of the identified neptunium species will be evaluated if it is not present in the literature. Special attention will be given to the behavior of the neptunium species under typical repository near-field conditions (elevated temperature, high pH, varying Eh). This will permit a timely inclusion of project results into near-field geochemical models. Additionally, project results and methodologies have applications to neptunium in the environment, or treatment of neptunium containing waste. Another important aspect of this project is the close cooperation between a university and a national laboratory. The PI has a transuranic laboratory at MIT where

  17. Chemical speciation of neptunium in spent fuel. Annual report for period 15 August 1999 to 15 August 2000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ken Czerwinski; Don Reed

    2000-01-01

    (B204) This project will examine the chemical speciation of neptunium in spent nuclear fuel. The R and D fields covered by the project include waste host materials and actinide chemistry. Examination of neptunium is chosen since it was identified as a radionuclide of concern by the NERI workshop. Additionally, information on the chemical form of neptunium in spent fuel is lacking. The identification of the neptunium species in spent fuel would allow a greater scientific based understanding of its long-term fate and behavior in waste forms. Research to establish the application and development of X-ray synchrotrons radiation (XSR) techniques to determine the structure of aqueous, adsorbed, and solid actinide species of importance to nuclear considerations is being conducted at Argonne. These studies extend current efforts within the Chemical Technology Division at Argonne National Laboratory to investigate actinide speciation with more conventional spectroscopic and solids characterization (e.g. SEM, TEM, and XRD) methods. Our project will utilize all these techniques for determining neptunium speciation in spent fuel. We intend to determine the chemical species and oxidation state of neptunium in spent fuel and alteration phases. Different types of spent fuel will be examined. Once characterized, the chemical behavior of the identified neptunium species will be evaluated if it is not present in the literature. Special attention will be given to the behavior of the neptunium species under typical repository near-field conditions (elevated temperature, high pH, varying Eh). This will permit a timely inclusion of project results into near-field geochemical models. Additionally, project results and methodologies have applications to neptunium in the environment, or treatment of neptunium containing waste. Another important aspect of this project is the close cooperation between a university and a national laboratory. The PI has a transuranic laboratory at MIT where

  18. Plutonium oxides and uranium and plutonium mixed oxides. Carbon determination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    Determination of carbon in plutonium oxides and uranium plutonium mixed oxides, suitable for a carbon content between 20 to 3000 ppm. The sample is roasted in oxygen at 1200 0 C, the carbon dioxide produced by combustion is neutralized by barium hydroxide generated automatically by coulometry [fr

  19. Stabilization of neptunium valence states in nitric media for spent nuclear fuel reprocessing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feldhaus, P.

    1996-12-01

    A possibility of standarizing the extraction-behavior of Neptunium during the reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel corresponding to PUREX-Process was investigated. The aim of the work was a qualitative dirigation of the Transuraniumelement (TRUE) into the raffinat of the first extraction cycle by a complete redoxconversion of the Neptunium valence states to unextractable Np(V). In the beginning the theoretical and experimental research focussed on the redoxchemistry of the actinide during the fuel dissolution and the feed preparation. Thereby the nitrous acid, which is produced by a radiological, photochemical and reductive degradation of the nitric acid, revealed an ambivalent influence on the Neptunium valences. By a short-term increase in HNO 2 -concentration the Np(V)-fraction could be obviously risen. The use of some stabilizing reagents inhibited a later reoxidation to Np(VI) also catalyzed by nitrous acid. The urea used for this purpose also led to a further increase in the obtained conversion rates due to a Np(VI)-reduction. The analysis of the valence distribution was performed by an extraction method. This had been compared to chromatographic separation in some preliminary investigations and had turned out to be comparably reliable and easily manageable. (orig.) [de

  20. Study on reduction reactions of neptunium(V) on magnetite surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitamura, Akira; Kamei, Gento; Nakata, Kotaro; Tanaka, Satoru; Tomura, Tsutomu

    2004-01-01

    Redox reactions between neptunium(V) (Np(V)) and magnetite (Fe(II) 1 Fe(III) 2 O 4 ) surface were investigated in N 2 gas atmosphere. A batch method was applied to the experiment. A magnetite sample and a 0.1 M NaCl solution were mixed in a polypropylene tube, and pH, redox potential and concentration of dissolved neptunium were measured as a function of shaking time, temperature and liquid/solid ratio. The concentration of dissolved neptunium was reduced rapidly within a day, due to the reducing reaction of Np(V) to Np(IV) and the precipitation of Np(IV). The rate constant of the redox reaction and the activation energy for the rate constant were preliminarily obtained. On the other hand, redox reactions between Np(V) and aqueous Fe(II) were hardly observed. Considering the number of transferred electrons, it was suggested that the redox reaction was promoted by not only Fe(II) on the magnetite surface, but also Fe(II) inside the magnetite. (author)

  1. Influence of dissolved organic substances in groundwater on sorption behavior of americium and neptunium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boggs, S. Jr.; Seitz, M.G.

    1984-01-01

    Groundwaters typically contain dissolved organic carbon consisting largely of high molecular weight compounds of humic and fulvic acids. To evaluate whether these dissolved organic substances can enhance the tranport of radionuclides through the groundwater system, experiments were conducted to examine the sorption of americium and neptunium onto crushed basalt in the presence of dissolved humic- and fulvic-acid organic carbon introduced into synthetic groundwater. The partitioning experiments with synthetic groundwater show that increasing the concentration of either humic or fulvic acid in the water has a significant inhibiting effect on sorption of both americium and neptunium. At 22 0 C, adsorption of these radionuclides, as measured by distribution ratios (the ratio of nuclide sorbed onto the solid to nuclide in solution at the end of the experiment), decreased by 25% to 50% by addition of as little as 1 mg/L dissolved organic carbon and by one to two orders of magnitude by addition of 100 to 200 mg/L dissolved organic carbon. Distribution ratios measured in solutions reacted at 90 0 C similarly decreased with the addition of dissolved organic carbon but generally ranged from one to two orders of magnitude higher than those determined in the 22 0 C experiment. These results suggest that organic carbon dissolved in deep groundwaters may significantly enhance the mobility of radionuclides of americium and neptunium. 23 references, 5 figures, 11 tables

  2. Formation, characterization, and stability of plutonium (IV) colloid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hobart, D.E.; Morris, D.E.; Palmer, P.D.; Newton, T.W.

    1989-01-01

    Plutonium is expected to be a major component of the waste element package in any high-level nuclear waste repository. Plutonium(IV) is known to form colloids under chemical conditions similar to those found in typical groundwaters. In the event of a breach of a repository, these colloids represent a source of radionuclide transport to the far-field environment, in parallel with the transport of dissolved waste element species. In addition, the colloids may decompose or disaggregate into soluble ionic species. Thus, colloids represent an additional term in determining waste element solubility limits. A thorough characterization of the physical and chemical properties of these colloids under relevant conditions is essential to assess the concentration limits and transport mechanisms for the waste elements at the proposed Yucca Mountain Repository site. This report is concerned primarily with recent results obtained by the Yucca Mountain Project (YMP) Solubility Determination Task pertaining to the characterization of the structural and chemical properties of Pu(IV) colloid. Important results will be presented which provides further evidence that colloidal plutonium(IV) is structurally similar to plutonium dioxide and that colloidal plutonium(IV) is electrochemically reactive. 13 refs., 7 figs

  3. Recovery of americium-241 from aged plutonium metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gray, L.W.; Burney, G.A.; Reilly, T.A.; Wilson, T.W.; McKibben, J.M.

    1980-12-01

    About 5 kg of ingrown 241 Am was recovered from 850 kg of aged plutonium using a process developed specifically for Savannah River Plant application. The aged plutonium metal was first dissolved in sulfamic acid. Sodium nitrite was added to oxidize the plutonium to Pu(IV) and the residual sulfamate ion was oxidized to nitrogen gas and sulfate. The plutonium and americium were separated by one cycle of solvent extraction. The recovered products were subsequently purified by cation exchange chromatography, precipitated as oxalates, and calcined to the oxides. Plutonium processng was routine. Before cation exchange purification, the aqueous americium solution from solvent extraction was concentrated and stripped of nitric acid. More than 98% of the 241 Am was then recovered from the cation exchange column where it was effectively decontaminated from all major impurities except nickel and chromium. This partially purified product solution was concentrated further by evaporation and then denitrated by reaction with formic acid. Individual batches of americium oxalate were then precipitated, filtered, washed, and calcined. About 98.5% of the americium was recovered. The final product purity averaged 98% 241 AmO 2 ; residual impurities were primarily lead and nickel

  4. High-temperature enthalpies of plutonium monocarbide and plutonium sesquicarbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oetting, F.L.

    1979-01-01

    The high-temperature enthalpies of plutonium monocarbide and plutonium sesquicarbide have been determined with a copper-block calorimeter of the isoperibol type. The experimental enthalpy data, which was measured relative to 298 K, covered the temperature range from 400 to 1500 K. The calculation of the temperature rise of the calorimeter takes into account the added heat evolution from the radioactive decay of the plutonium samples. These enthalpy results, combined with the heat capacity and entropy of the respective carbide at 298 K available from the literature, has made it possible to generate tables of thermodynamic functions for the plutonium carbides. The behavior of the heat capacity of both of the plutonium carbides, i.e., a relatively steep increase in the heat capacity as the temperature increases, may be attributed to a premelting effect with the formation of vacancies within the crystal lattice although a theoretical treatment of this phenomenon is not given

  5. Determination of plutonium in environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakanoue, Masanobu

    1978-01-01

    Past and present methods of determining the amount of plutonium in the environment are summarized. Determination of the amount of plutonium in uranium ore began in 1941. Plutonium present in polluted environments due to nuclear explosions, nuclear power stations, etc. was measured in soil and sand in Nagasaki in 1951 and in ash in Bikini in 1954. Analytical methods of measuring the least amount of plutonium in the environment were developed twenty years later. Many studies on and reviews of these methods have been reported all over the world, and a standard analytical procedure has been adopted. A basic analytical method of measurement was drafted in Japan in 1976. The yield, treatment of samples, dissolution, separation, control of measurable ray sources determination by α spectrometry, cross-check determination, and treatment of samples containing hardly soluble plutonium were examined. At present, the amount of plutonium can be determined by all of these methods. The presence of plutonium was studied further, and the usefulness of determination of the plutonium isotope ratio is discussed. (Kumagai, S.)

  6. Work surface for soluble plutonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silver, G.L.

    2005-01-01

    A three-dimensional work surface for aqueous plutonium is illustrated. It is constructed by means of estimating work as a function of the ambient pH and redox potential in a plutonium solution. The surface is useful for illustrating the chemistry of disproportionation reactions. Work expressions are easier to use than work integrals. (author)

  7. The economics of plutonium recycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    James, R.A.

    1977-11-01

    The individual cost components and the total fuel cycle costs for natural uranium and uranium-plutonium mixed oxide fuel cycles for CANDU-PHW reactors are discussed. A calculation is performed to establish the economic conditions under which plutonium recycle would be economically attractive. (auth)

  8. Human health issues for plutonium inhalation: Perspectives from laboratory animal studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muggenburg, B.A.; Hahn, F.F.; Guilmette, R.A.

    1997-01-01

    Since the first production of plutonium in the 1940s, potential health effects from plutonium have been a concern for humans. The few people exposed to plutonium and the relatively small intakes that have occurred, at least in the Western world, have resulted in very little direct information from human population studies. The Manhattan Project workers have been followed for decades, and few health effects have been observed. The situation is similar for the population of workers at the Rocky Flats facility. Some information is now being released from the former Soviet Union on selected worker populations who show biological effects, primarily pulmonary fibrosis and some increase in lung cancers

  9. Plutonium Round Robin Test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dudder, G.B.; Herbillon, G.H.

    2001-01-01

    Full text: The goal of nuclear forensics is to develop a preferred approach to illicit trafficking investigations. This approach must be widely understood and acceptable as credible. The principle objectives of the Round Robin Test are to prioritize the forensic techniques and methods, evaluate attribution capabilities, and examine the utility of database. The Plutonium Round Robin has made a tremendous contribution to fulfilling these goals through a collaborative learning experience that resulted from the outstanding efforts of the six participating international laboratories. A prioritize list of techniques and methods has been developed based on this exercise. Future work will focus on a Highly Enriched Round Robin and extent to which the techniques and methods can be generalized. The Plutonium Round Robin demonstrated a rather high level of capability to determine the important characteristics of the materials and processes using analytical methods. When this capability to was combined with the appropriate knowledge and database, it resulted in a demonstrated capability to attribute the source of the materials to a specific nuclear fuel, reactor, and reprocessing facility. A number of shortfalls were also identified in our current capabilities. These included alternative dating techniques. Light Water Reactor discrimination techniques, and the lack of a comprehensive network of data/knowledge bases. The result of the Round Robin will be used to develop guidelines or a 'recommended protocol' to be made available to the interested authorities and countries to use in real cases. The poster will present a summary of the results of the Plutonium Round Robin and describe the plans the subsequent Highly Enriched Uranium Round Robin Test. (author)

  10. Solvent anode for plutonium purification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bowersox, D.F.; Fife, K.W.; Christensen, D.C.

    1986-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to develop a technique to allow complete oxidation of plutonium from the anode during plutonium electrorefining. This will eliminate the generation of a ''spent'' anode heel which requires further treatment for recovery. Our approach is to employ a solvent metal in the anode to provide a liquid anode pool throughout electrorefining. We use molten salts and metals in ceramic crucibles at 700 0 C. Our goal is to produce plutonium metal at 99.9% purity with oxidation and transfer of more than 98% of the impure plutonium feed metal from the anode into the salt and product phases. We have met these criteria in experiments on the 100 to 1000 g scale. We plan to scale our operations to 4 kg of feed plutonium and to optimize the process parameters

  11. Using Biomolecules to Separate Plutonium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gogolski, Jarrod

    Used nuclear fuel has traditionally been treated through chemical separations of the radionuclides for recycle or disposal. This research considers a biological approach to such separations based on a series of complex and interdependent interactions that occur naturally in the human body with plutonium. These biological interactions are mediated by the proteins serum transferrin and the transferrin receptor. Transferrin to plutonium in vivo and can deposit plutonium into cells after interacting with the transferrin receptor protein at the cell surface. Using cerium as a non-radioactive surrogate for plutonium, it was found that cerium(IV) required multiple synergistic anions to bind in the N-lobe of the bilobal transferrin protein, creating a conformation of the cerium-loaded protein that would be unable to interact with the transferrin receptor protein to achieve a separation. The behavior of cerium binding to transferrin has contributed to understanding how plutonium(IV)-transferrin interacts in vivo and in biological separations.

  12. Cycle downstream: the plutonium question

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zask, G.; Rome, M.; Delpech, M.

    1998-01-01

    This day, organized by the SFEN, took place at Paris the 4 june 1998. Nine papers were presented. They take stock on the plutonium physics and its utilization as a nuclear fuel. This day tried to bring information to answer the following questions: do people have to keep the plutonium in the UOX fuel or in the MOX fuel in order to use it for future fast reactors? Do people have to continue obstinately the plutonium reprocessing in the MOX for the PWR type reactors? Will it be realized a underground disposal? Can it be technically developed plutonium incinerators and is it economically interesting? The plutonium physics, the experimental programs and the possible solutions are presented. (A.L.B.)

  13. Plutonium storage study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-01-01

    This Spanish study gives a more detailed analysis of a possible store for plutonium oxide. The capacity of the store is assumed to be 30 t Pu and the minimum storage time 2 years. The study includes a general description of the store and its design philosophy; comments on the quality and properties of the material stored; a detailed criticality study and comments on gas and heat generation and shielding requirements; and a brief cost evaluation. Costs are estimated to be about $110/kg PuO 2 /year

  14. Profileration-proof uranium/plutonium and thorium/uranium fuel cycles. Safeguards and non-profileration. 2. rev. ed.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kessler, G.

    2017-07-01

    A brief outline of the historical development of the proliferation problem is followed by a description of the uranium-plutonium nuclear fuel cycle with uranium enrichment, fuel fabrication, the light-water reactors mainly in operation, and the breeder reactors still under development. The next item discussed is reprocessing of spent fuel with plutonium recycling and the future possibility to incinerate plutonium and the minor actinides: neptunium, americium, and curium. Much attention is devoted to the technical and scientific treatment of the IAEA surveillance concept of the uranium-plutonium fuel cycle. In this context, especially the physically possible accuracy of measuring U/Pu flow in the fuel cycle, and the criticism expressed of the accuracy in measuring the plutonium balance in large reprocessing plants of non-nuclear weapon states are analyzed. The second part of the book initially examines the assertion that reactor-grade plutonium could be used to build nuclear weapons whose explosive yield cannot be predicted accurately, but whose minimum explosive yield is still far above that of chemical explosive charges. Methods employed in reactor physics are used to show that such hypothetical nuclear explosive devices (HNEDs) would attain too high temperatures in the required implosion lenses as a result of the heat generated by the Pu-238 isotope always present in reactor plutonium of current light-water reactors. These lenses would either melt or tend to undergo chemical auto-explosion. Limits to the content of the Pu-238 isotope are determined above which such hypothetical nuclear weapons are not feasible on technical grounds. This situation is analyzed for various possibilities of the technical state of the art of making implosion lenses and various ways of cooling up to the use of liquid helium. The outcome is that, depending on the existing state of the art, reactor-grade plutonium from spent fuel elements of light-water reactors with a burnup of 35 to 58

  15. Trans-Uranium Doping Utilization for Increasing Protected Plutonium Proliferation of Small Long Life Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Permana, Sidik [Research Laboratory for Nuclear Reactors, Tokyo Institute of Technology 2-12-1-N1-17, O-okayama, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 152-8550 (Japan); Nuclear and Biophysics Research Group, Department of Physics, Bandung Institute of Technology, Gedung Fisika, Jl. Ganesha 10, Bandung 40132 (Indonesia); Suud, Zaki [Nuclear and Biophysics Research Group, Department of Physics, Bandung Institute of Technology, Gedung Fisika, Jl. Ganesha 10, Bandung 40132 (Indonesia); Suzuki, Mitsutoshi [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Nuclear Non-proliferation Science and Technology Center, 2-4 Shirane Shirakata, Tokai-mura, Ibaraki, 319-1195 (Japan)

    2009-06-15

    for different power output and core operation time. The two dimensional core optimization analysis (SRAC-CITATION) has been used with nuclear data library (JENDL-33). Higher plutonium production rate of Pu-238 can be achieved by Neptunium (NP)-237 doping compared with Minor Actinide (MA) doping. However, higher plutonium production rate of Pu-240 can be obtained by MA doping. Pu-238 production decreases and Pu-240 production increases with increasing core operation time for both MA and NP-237 doping materials. In case of different doping rate of MA, it shows Pu-238 and Pu-240 productions are strongly depends on the content of MA doping and different core operation time. Finally, some plutonium characterizations will be shown based on several basic criteria which have been adopted in this study. (authors)

  16. A method of neptunium recovery into the product stream of the Purex 1st codecontamination step for LWR fuel reprocessing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsuboya, Takao; Nemoto, Shinichi; Hoshino, Tadaya; Segawa, Takeshi

    1973-01-01

    An improved nitrous acid method was applied for recovering neptunium in spent fuel. Counter-current solvent extraction has been performed to find out its recovery conditions. The nitrous acid in the form of sodium salt solution was fed to the 1st stage of extraction section, and hydrazine nitrate was fed to some stages near feed point. Flow rate and the concentration of additives were altered for finding out optimum condition. Laboratory scale mixer-settlers having 6 ml of mixing volume and 17 ml of settling volume for each stage were used. The nitrous acid method was improved so that the reduction reaction in scrub section can be eliminated by the decomposition of the nitrous acid using a reagent such as sulfamic acid, urea, or hydrazine. In operation, the feed rate of the nitrous acid was about 3 mM/hr, and about 61% of neptunium charged was discharged in the product stream of Purex-1st codecontamination step designed for the LWR fuel reprocessing plant of Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation. The calculated value of Δx/x for extraction section agreed with the experimental value, where Δx is the quantity of oxidation, and x is the inventory for neptunium in each stage. In conclusion, the improved nitrous acid method is effective for the neptunium discharge in product stream, and the difference of neptunium extraction between estimate and experiment is caused by some of reduction reaction in scrub section. (Iwakiri, K.)

  17. Absorption, transport, and chemical fate of plutonium in soybean plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garland, T.R.; Cataldo, D.A.; Wildung, R.E.

    1981-01-01

    Absorption of plutonium (Pu) by soybean plants (Glycine max cv. Williams) is limited by Pu solubility in soils. Changes in Pu concentration in different tissues with time to senescence indicate Pu is freely transported through the xylem during growth but not subject to remobilization on flowering. Studies in which the DTPA complex of 238 Pu was supplied to the plant suggest a change in chemical form following root absorption. Of the Pu in roots, stems, and leaves at senescence, 28, 54, and 67%, respectively, were soluble. The Pu in the solluble fraction was primarily associated with components of >10000 equivalent molecular weight in leaves and roots, whereas stems exhibited an equal distribution between components in the >10000 and <500 molecular weight fractions. Plutonium associated with mature seeds is concentrated in the seed hull (85%) and cotyledons (14%). The Pu associated with the cotyledon was primarily in the insoluble residues and soluble soy whey

  18. The toxicity of plutonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramsden, D.; Johns, T.F.

    1977-01-01

    Reference is made to recent publications concerned with the radiotoxicity of inhaled insoluble Pu compounds. The publications are a paper by Thorne and Vennart (Nature 263:555 (1976)), a report entitled 'The Toxicity of Plutonium', (London (HMSO), 1975), and the 'Sixth Report of the Royal Commission on Environmental Pollution', (Cmnd. 6618, London (HMSO), 1976). Thorne and Vennart concluded that the previously accepted value for the maximum permissible annual intake (MPAI) of such compounds may be too high by a factor of about five, and a similar conclusion was reached in the other two publications. It is thought by the present authors that the methods which have been used to suggest new values for the MPAI are unduly pessimistic for high-fired PuO 2 ; calculations have been based on the lung model of ICRP Publication 19 'The Metabolism of Compounds of Plutonium and the Other Actinides', (International Commission of Radiological Protection, 1972). This involves concluding that the risks to bone and liver are comparable to those for lung. This is discussed and it is thought that the previously established idea that the lung is the critical organ remains substantially correct for the case of high-fired PuO 2 . (U.K.)

  19. Plutonium oxide dissolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gray, J.H.

    1992-01-01

    Several processing options for dissolving plutonium oxide (PuO 2 ) from high-fired materials have been studied. The scoping studies performed on these options were focused on PuO 2 typically generated by burning plutonium metal and PuO 2 produced during incineration of alpha contaminated waste. At least two processing options remain applicable for dissolving high-fired PuO 2 in canyon dissolvers. The options involve solid solution formation of PuO 2 With uranium oxide (UO 2 ) and alloying incinerator ash with aluminum. An oxidative dissolution process involving nitric acid solutions containing a strong oxidizing agent, such as cerium (IV), was neither proven nor rejected. This uncertainty was due to difficulty in regenerating cerium (IV) ions during dissolution. However, recent work on silver-catalyzed dissolution of PuO 2 with persulfate has demonstrated that persulfate ions regenerate silver (II). Use of persulfate to regenerate cerium (IV) or bismuth (V) ions during dissolution of PuO 2 materials may warrant further study

  20. Investigations into the sorption of neptunium by loose rock from the cap rock of the Gorleben salt dome under aerobic and anaerobic conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muehlenweg, U.

    1988-01-01

    In the experiments with the natural loose rock the sorption behaviour of neptunium was essentially determined by the chemical form in which the neptunium occurred in the ground waters. Under aerobic conditions with Eh values of 300 mV, neptunium in its oxidation state +5 occurred. At a pH of 2 + , and at pH > 8 as carbonato complex. The found neptunium species were relatively mobile, with sorption values from 1 ml/g to 20 ml/g. The sorption of neptunium is comparable to that of alkali and alkaline earth ions, such as Cs + or Sr 2+ . Cations attached to the rock surface are exchanged for NpO 2 + . Sorption in this case is reversible. (orig.) [de

  1. Hazards of plutonium and fuel reprocessing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watson, G.M.

    1978-01-01

    Apart from the possibility that civil plutonium may be diverted to military use the main argument against the introduction of a plutonium economy seems to be the supposedly unmanageable biological risk attached to plutonium itself. The author points out weaknesses in many of the opponents' arguments against the increased use of plutonium and argues that current safety practices are more than adequate in handling plutonium and other radioactive materials

  2. Recovery of plutonium by pyroredox processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McNeese, J.A.; Bowersox, D.F.; Christensen, D.C.

    1985-09-01

    Using pyrochemical oxidation and reduction, we have developed a process to recover the plutonium in impure scrap with less than 95% plutonium. This plutonium metal was further purified by pyrochemical electrorefining. During development of the procedures, depleted electrorefining anodes were processed, and over 80% of the plutonium was recovered as high-purity metal in one electrorefining cycle. Over 40 kg of plutonium has been recovered from 55 kg of impure anodes with our procedures. 6 refs., 7 figs., 4 tabs

  3. Recovery of plutonium by pyroredox processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McNeese, J.A.; Bowersox, D.F.; Christensen, D.C.

    1985-01-01

    Using pyrochemical oxidation and reduction, we have developed a process to recover the plutonium in impure scrap with less than 95% plutonium. This plutonium metal was further purified by pyrochemical electrorefining. During development of the procedures, depleted electrorefining anodes were processed, and over 80% of the plutonium was recovered as high-purity metal in one electrorefining cycle. Over 40 kg of plutonium has been recovered from 55 kg of impure anodes with our procedures. 6 refs., 2 figs., 5 tabs

  4. Probing phonons in plutonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wong, Joe; Krisch, M.; Farber, D.; Occelli, F.; Schwartz, A.; Chiang, T.C.; Wall, M.; Boro, C.; Xu, Ruqing

    2010-01-01

    Plutonium (Pu) is well known to have complex and unique physico-chemical properties. Notably, the pure metal exhibits six solid-state phase transformations with large volume expansions and contractions along the way to the liquid state: α → β → γ → (delta) → (delta)(prime) → (var e psilon) → liquid. Unalloyed Pu melts at a relatively low temperature ∼640 C to yield a higher density liquid than that of the solid from which it melts, (Figure 1). Detailed understanding of the properties of plutonium and plutonium-based alloys is critical for the safe handling, utilization, and long-term storage of these important, but highly toxic materials. However, both technical and and safety issues have made experimental observations extremely difficult. Phonon dispersion curves (PDCs) are key experimenta l data to the understanding of the basic properties of Pu materials such as: force constants, sound velocities, elastic constants, thermodynamics, phase stability, electron-phonon coupling, structural relaxation, etc. However, phonon dispersion curves (PDCs) in plutonium (Pu) and its alloys have defied measurement for the past few decades since the discovery of this element in 1941. This is due to a combination of the high thermal-neutron absorption cross section of plutonium and the inability to grow the large single crystals (with dimensions of a few millimeters) necessary for inelastic neutron scattering. Theoretical simulations of the Pu PDC continue to be hampered by the lack of suitable inter -atomic potentials. Thus, until recently the PDCs for Pu and its alloys have remained unknown experimentally and theoretically. The experimental limitations have recently been overcome by using a tightly focused undulator x-ray micro-beam scattered from single -grain domains in polycrystalline specimens. This experimental approach has been applied successfully to map the complete PDCs of an fcc d-Pu-Ga alloy using the high resolution inelastic x-ray scattering (HRIXS

  5. A novel concept of QUADRISO particles Part III: applications to the plutonium-thorium fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Talamo, A.

    2009-01-01

    In the present study, a plutonium-thorium fuel cycle is investigated including the 233 U production and utilization. A prismatic thermal High Temperature Gas Reactor (HTGR) and the novel concept of quadruple isotropic (QUADRISO) coated particles, designed at the Argonne National Laboratory, have been used for the study. In absorbing QUADRISO particles, a burnable poison layer surrounds the central fuel kernel to flatten the reactivity curve as a function of time. At the beginning of life, the fuel in the QUADRISO particles is hidden from neutrons, since they get absorbed in the burnable poison before they reach the fuel kernel. Only when the burnable poison depletes, neutrons start streaming into the fuel kernel inducing fission reactions and compensating the fuel depletion of ordinary TRISO particles. In fertile QUADRISO particles, the absorber layer is replaced by natural thorium with the purpose of flattening the excess of reactivity by the thorium resonances and producing 233 U. The above configuration has been compared with a configuration where fissile (neptunium-plutonium oxide from Light Water Reactors irradiated fuel) and fertile (natural thorium oxide) fuels are homogeneously mixed in the kernel of ordinary TRISO particles. For the 233 U utilization, the core has been equipped with europium oxide absorbing QUADRISO particles.

  6. A method for the gravimetric determination of plutonium in pure plutonium nitrate concentrate solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mair, M.A.; Savage, D.J.

    1986-12-01

    Plutonium nitrate solution is treated with sulphuric acid before being heated and finally ignited. The stoichiometric plutonium dioxide so formed is weighed and hence the plutonium content is calculated. (author)

  7. Plutonium contaminated materials research programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Higson, S.G.

    1986-01-01

    The paper is a progress report for 1985 from the Plutonium Contaminated Materials Working Party (PCMWP). The PCMWP co-ordinates research and development on a national basis in the areas of management, treatment and immobilisation of plutonium contaminated materials, for the purpose of waste management. The progress report contains a review of the development work carried out in eight areas, including: reduction of arisings, plutonium measurement, sorting and packaging, washing of shredded combustible PCM, decommissioning and non-combustible PCM treatment, PCM immobilisation, treatment of alpha bearing liquid wastes, and engineering objectives. (UK)

  8. Plutonium again (smuggling and movements)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1994-01-01

    A link is discounted between nuclear proliferation and the recently discovered smuggled plutonium from the former Soviet Union at Munich airport and other places in Germany. It is argued that governments wishing to obtain nuclear materials to develop a weapons programme would not arrange to have it smuggled in a suitcase. Instead, it is speculated that a link exists between the plutonium smuggling incidents and the desire to promote the production of mixed oxide (MOX) fuel. Such incidents, by further raising public anxiety, may be intended to turn public opinion in favour of MOX fuel production as a sensible way of getting rid of surplus plutonium. (UK)

  9. Learning more about plutonium; En savoir plus sur le plutonium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2008-07-01

    This digest brochure explains what plutonium is, where it comes from, how it is used, its recycling into Mox fuel, its half life, historical discovery, its presence in the environment, toxicity and radioactivity. (J.S.)

  10. Radioactive waste management and plutonium recovery within the context of the development of nuclear energy in Russia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kushnikov, V. [V.G. Khlopin Radium Institute, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation)

    1996-05-01

    The Russian strategy for radioactive waste and plutonium management is based on the concept of the closed fuel cycle that has been adopted in Russia, and, to a great degree, falls under the jurisdiction of the existing Russian nuclear energy structures. From its very beginning, Russian atomic energy policy was based on finding the most effective method of developing the new fuel direction with the maximum possible utilization of the energy potential from the fission of heavy atoms and the achievement of fuel self-sufficiency through the recycling of secondary fuel. Although there can be no doubt about the importance of economic considerations (for the future), concerns for the safety of the environment are currently of the utmost importance. In this context, spent NPP fuel can be viewed as a waste to be buried only if there is persuasive evidence that such an approach is both economically and environmentally sound. The production of I GW of energy per year is accompanied by the accumulation of up to 800-1000 kg of highly radioactive fission products and approximately 250 kg of plutonium. Currently, spent fuel from the VVER 100 and the RBNK reactors contains approximately 25 tons of plutonium. There is an additional 30 tons of fuel-grade plutonium in the form of purified oxide, separated from spent fuels used in VVER440 reactors and other power production facilities, as well as approximately 100 tons of weapons-grade plutonium from dismantled warheads. The spent fuel accumulates significant amounts of small actinoids - neptunium americium, and curium. Science and technology have not yet found technical solutions for safe and secure burial of non-reprocessed spent fuel with such a broad range of products, which are typically highly radioactive and will continue to pose a threat for hundreds of thousands of years.

  11. Supercritical Fluid Extraction of Plutonium and Americium from Soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fox, R.V.; Mincher, B.J.

    2002-01-01

    Supercritical fluid extraction (SFE) of plutonium and americium from soil was successfully demonstrated using supercritical fluid carbon dioxide solvent augmented with organophosphorus and beta-diketone complexants. Spiked Idaho soils were chemically and radiologically characterized, then extracted with supercritical fluid carbon dioxide at 2,900 psi and 65 C containing varying concentrations of tributyl phosphate (TBP) and thenoyltrifluoroacetone (TTA). A single 45 minute SFE with 2.7 mol% TBP and 3.2 mol% TTA provided as much as 88% ± 6.0 extraction of americium and 69% ± 5.0 extraction of plutonium. Use of 5.3 mol% TBP with 6.8 mol% of the more acidic beta-diketone hexafluoroacetylacetone (HFA) provided 95% ± 3.0 extraction of americium and 83% ± 5.0 extraction of plutonium in a single 45 minute SFE at 3,750 psi and 95 C. Sequential chemical extraction techniques were used to chemically characterize soil partitioning of plutonium and americium in pre-SFE soil samples. Sequential chemical extraction techniques demonstrated that spiked plutonium resides primarily (76.6%) in the sesquioxide fraction with minor amounts being absorbed by the oxidizable fraction (10.6%) and residual fractions (12.8%). Post-SFE soils subjected to sequential chemical extraction characterization demonstrated that 97% of the oxidizable, 78% of the sesquioxide and 80% of the residual plutonium could be removed using SFE. These preliminary results show that SFE may be an effective solvent extraction technique for removal of actinide contaminants from soil

  12. Plutonium waste container identification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmierer, T.J.

    1979-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to define the parameters of a method for identifying plutonium waste containers. This information will form the basis for a permanent committee to develop a complete identification program for use throughout the world. Although a large portion of the information will be on handwritten notebooks and may not be as extensive as is desired, it will all be helpful. The final information will be programmed into computer language and be available to all interested parties as well as a central control committee which will have the expertise to provide each government with advice on the packaging, storage, and measurement of the waste for which it is responsible. As time progresses, this central control committee should develop permanent storage sites and establish a system of records which will last for hundreds of years

  13. Uranium plutonium oxide fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cox, C.M.; Leggett, R.D.; Weber, E.T.

    1981-01-01

    Uranium plutonium oxide is the principal fuel material for liquid metal fast breeder reactors (LMFBR's) throughout the world. Development of this material has been a reasonably straightforward evolution from the UO 2 used routinely in the light water reactor (LWR's); but, because of the lower neutron capture cross sections and much lower coolant pressures in the sodium cooled LMFBR's, the fuel is operated to much higher discharge exposures than that of a LWR. A typical LMFBR fuel assembly is shown. Depending on the required power output and the configuration of the reactor, some 70 to 400 such fuel assemblies are clustered to form the core. There is a wide variation in cross section and length of the assemblies where the increasing size reflects a chronological increase in plant size and power output as well as considerations of decreasing the net fuel cycle cost. Design and performance characteristics are described

  14. The plutonium ban

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1977-01-01

    'Nuclear Power Issues and Choices' is the title of a recent report which has been performed by a study group sponsored by the Ford Foundation and administered by the MITRE Corporation. The main concern of this study is to prevent the proliferation of nuclear weapons. Since the reprocessing of spent fuel elements yields among others plutonium of bomb quality, the report of the Ford Foundation comes to the conclusion that the USA should defer the closing of the fuel cycle, defer the reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel, deposit the spent fuel elemenets as a whole, and defer the breeder which can not run without fuel reprocessing. The German attitude however is that we can not relinquish on reprocessing and recycling of nuclear fuel because we are lacking such rich resources of coal, oil and uranium as the USA have. Furthermore, the deposition of spent fuel elements may be more dangerous than the deposition of the radioactive waste from reprocessing plants. (orig.) [de

  15. Differential spectrophotometric determination of plutonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lecat, J.

    1980-01-01

    Differential spectrophotometric method is used for determination of plutonium reduced to oxydation state III+ by ascorbic acid, at 560 nm. Concentration of solutions is 4 g/l and accuracy of the method is better than 0,3% [fr

  16. The first milligrams of plutonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldschmidt, B.

    1996-01-01

    This paper relates the discovery of the different plutonium chemical extraction processes in their historical context. The first experiments started during the second world war in 1942 with the American ''Metallurgical Laboratory'' project which brought together Arthur Compton, Enrico Fermi and Glenn Seaborg. During the same period, a competitive English-Canadian project, the ''Montreal Project'', was carried out to test different plutonium solvent extraction techniques. The author participated in both projects and joined the CEA in 1946, where he was in charge of the uranium and plutonium chemistry. By the end of 1949, his team could isolate the first milligrams of French plutonium from uranium oxide pellets of the ZOE reactor. In the beginning of 1952 he developed with his team the PUREX process. (J.S.)

  17. Technological alternatives for plutonium transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-12-01

    This paper considers alternative transport modes (air, sea, road, rail) for moving (1) plutonium from a reprocessing plant to a store or a fuel fabrication facility, and (2) MOX fuel from the latter to a reactor. These transport modes and differing forms of plutonium are considered in terms of: their proliferation resistance and safeguards; environmental and safety aspects; and economic aspects. It is tentatively proposed that the transport of plutonium could continue by air or sea where long distances are involved and by road or rail over shorter distances; this would be acceptable from the non-proliferation, environmental impact and economic aspects - there may be advantages in protection if plutonium is transported in the form of mixed oxide

  18. Plutonium helps probe protein, superconductor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1990-01-01

    Scientists are finding that plutonium can be a useful research tool that may help them answer important questions in fields as diverse as biochemistry and solid-state physics. This paper reports that U.S. research involving plutonium is confined to the Department of Energy's national laboratories and centers around nuclear weapons technology, waste cleanup and disposal, and health effects. But at Los Alamos National Laboratory, scientists also are using plutonium to probe the biochemical behavior of calmodulin, a key calcium-binding protein that mediates calcium-regulated processes in biological systems. At Argonne National Laboratory, another team is trying to learn how a superconductor's properties are affected by the 5f electrons of an actinide like plutonium

  19. An alternative plutonium disposition method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kueppers, C.

    2002-01-01

    This paper provides a feasibility study on vitrification of plutonium with high active waste concentrate, and fabrication of MOX fuel rods for direct final disposal. These are potential alternatives to the direct use of MOX fuel in a reactor. (author)

  20. Chloride removal from plutonium alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holcomb, H.P.

    1983-01-01

    SRP is evaluating a program to recover plutonium from a metallic alloy that will contain chloride salt impurities. Removal of chloride to sufficiently low levels to prevent damaging corrosion to canyon equipment is feasible as a head-end step following dissolution. Silver nitrate and mercurous nitrate were each successfully used in laboratory tests to remove chloride from simulated alloy dissolver solution containing plutonium. Levels less than 10 ppM chloride were achieved in the supernates over the precipitated and centrifuged insoluble salts. Also, less than 0.05% loss of plutonium in the +3, +4, or +6 oxidation states was incurred via precipitate carrying. These results provide impetus for further study and development of a plant-scale process to recover plutonium from metal alloy at SRP

  1. Mathematical modeling of the radiation-chemical behavior of neptunium in HNO3. Equilibrium states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vladimirova, M.V.

    1995-01-01

    A mathematical model of the radiation-chemical behavior of neptunium is presented for a wide range of α-and γ-irradiation doses. Equations determining the equilibrium concentrations of NP(IV), Np(V), and Np(VI) are derived for various concentrations of HNO 3 and dose rates of the ionizing irradiation. The rate constants of the reactions NP(IV) + OH, Np(IV) + NO 3 , Np(V) + NO 2 , Np(V) + H, Np(IV), and Np(V) + Np(V) are obtained by the mathematical modeling

  2. Source-driven noise analysis measurements with neptunium metal reflected by high enriched uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valentine, Timothy E.; Mattingly, John K.

    2003-01-01

    Subcritical noise analysis measurements have been performed with neptunium ( 237 Np) sphere reflected by highly enriched uranium. These measurements were performed at the Los Alamos Critical Experiment Facility in December 2002 to provide an estimate of the subcriticality of 237 Np reflected by various amounts of high-enriched uranium. This paper provides a description of the measurements and presents some preliminary results of the analysis of the measurements. The measured and calculated spectral ratios differ by 15% whereas the 'interpreted' and calculated k eff values differ by approximately 1%. (author)

  3. Inhaled plutonium oxide in dogs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1981-01-01

    This project is concerned with long-term experiments to determine the life-span dose-effect relationships of inhaled 239 PuO 2 and 238 PuO 2 in beagles. The data will be used to estimate the health effects of inhaled transuranics. The tissue distribution of plutonium, radiation effects in the lung and hematologic changes in plutonium-exposed beagles with lung tumors were evaluated

  4. Plutonium contamination in italian population

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cave-Bondi, G.; Merli, S.; Rogo, M.; Sgarbazzini, M.; Clemente, G.F.; Mancini, L.; Santori, G.; Tardella, Q.

    1983-01-01

    The literature data concerning the biological and the chemical physical characteristics of plutonium are summarized in the first part of the paper. The experimental results of the plutonium concentration in complete diets, single food items and some human autopsy tissues, regarding the Italian situation, are then presented and discussed. Our experimental data are in good agreement with similar data reported in several studies carried out in some countries of the north emisphere

  5. Plutonium: real and false problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bemden, E. van den

    1981-01-01

    This paper deals with technical and technological state of the possibilities of using plutonium as fuel in the thermal and fast reactors. It also describes the political blockage restraining its use and the reasons for it. The accent is put on some fundamental lacks of international coordination and on some problems of commercial policy, which impede, in a certain way, the industrial use of plutonium as a fuel. (author)

  6. Monitoring the risks of plutonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holliday, B.

    1978-01-01

    The difficulties in monitoring the environment in work areas where plutonium is handled are identified and both continuous and personal air sampling techniques considered. Methods of estimating the amounts of plutonium retained in the body are: (1) Direct external counting over the chest of the 'soft' low energy X-rays and gamma rays emitted by the plutonium deposited in the lungs. (2) Measuring plutonium excreted in urine. (3) Analysing faeces soon after a suspected contamination. Limitation of these techniques are discussed and it is shown that estimating the amount of plutonium in the body, or a specific organ, is extremely difficult, both because of the lack of sensitivity of the measuring techniques (especially chest scanning) and because of the problems in interpreting data, stemming from a lack of knowledge of crucial characteristics of the inhaled plutonium (such as particle size and solubility). Nevertheless it is felt that the judicious integration of all the options creates a level of certainty that no individual technique can possibly inspire. (U.K.)

  7. Biological transfer of plutonium via in vivo labeled goat's milk. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sutton, W.W.; Mullen, A.A.; Lloyd, S.R.; Mosley, R.E.

    1976-03-01

    The long physical and biological half-life and high relative toxicity have dictated that considerable effort be devoted to quantifying plutonium transport through the various trophic levels. Despite the fact that biological transport of plutonium has been studied for many years, quantitative values for its transfer to milk, and its subsequent uptake by suckling animals have not been established. Three lactating goats were given intravenous injections of citrate-buffered plutonium nitrate at a rate of 75 microcuries per animal per day for three consecutive days. In all three goats approximately one percent of the total plutonium dose was transferred to the milk by the fifth post-treatment day. Plutonium retained by the tissues was deposited primarily in the liver and bone. In vitro plutonium-labeled milk was also fed to groups of rats and juvenile goats. Tissue concentrations of plutonium from juvenile goats which had received either in vivo or in vitro labeled milk were somewhat variable. Due possibly to this, within group variability and the small number of animals per group (two) there were no clearly discernible differences between treatments. The only comparison point to show a consistent trend was the observation that, as expected, juvenile rats retained more of the ingested dose than the adult animals

  8. Atomic energy policy of Japan, especially plutonium utilization policy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moriguchi, Y.

    1993-01-01

    The necessity of plutonium use in Japan is discussed. Basic policy regarding plutonium use and future plutonium utilization programme is described including such an aspect as management of plutonium from dismantled nuclear weapons

  9. Plutonium re-cycle in HTR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Desoisa, J. A.

    1974-03-15

    The study of plutonium cycles in HTRs using reprocessed plutonium from Magnox and AGR fuel cycles has shown that full core plutonium/uranium loadings are in general not feasible, burn-up is limited due the need for lower loadings of plutonium to meet reload core reactivity limits, on-line refueling is not practicable due to the need for higher burnable poison loadings, and low conversion rates in the plutonium-uranium cycles cannot be mitigated by axial loading schemes so that fissile make-up is needed if HTR plutonium recycle is desired.

  10. Recent irradiation tests of uranium-plutonium-zirconium metal fuel elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pahl, R.G.; Lahm, C.E.; Villarreal, R.; Hofman, G.L.; Beck, W.N.

    1986-09-01

    Uranium-Plutonium-Zirconium metal fuel irradiation tests to support the ANL Integral Fast Reactor concept are discussed. Satisfactory performance has been demonstrated to 2.9 at.% peak burnup in three alloys having 0, 8, and 19 wt % plutonium. Fuel swelling measurements at low burnup in alloys to 26 wt % plutonium show that fuel deformation is primarily radial in direction. Increasing the plutonium content in the fuel diminishes the rate of fuel-cladding gap closure and axial fuel column growth. Chemical redistribution occurs by 2.1 at.% peak burnup and generally involves the inward migration of zirconium and outward migration of uranium. Fission gas release to the plenum ranges from 46% to 56% in the alloys irradiated to 2.9 at.% peak burnup. No evidence of deleterious fuel-cladding chemical or mechanical interaction was observed

  11. Neptunium(V) sorption on quartz and albite in aqueous suspension

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kohler, M.; Leckie, J.O.

    1991-10-01

    The behavior of neptunium in the subsurface environment is of interest since neptunium isotopes are included in nuclear waste. Previous work investigated the sorption behavior of Np onto α-Fe 2 O 3 (hematite), an accessory mineral of the Yucca Mountain repository. The work reported herein involves the much more abundant silicate minerals quartz and albite, and is a logical continuation of the ongoing task. In previous work increased sorption was observed in systems containing hematite and EDTA, a ligand which acts as a surrogate for organic complexing agents. In addition, increased partial pressures of CO 2 are common in many ground waters and the effects of carbonate on sorption of radionuclides have to be studied as well. At concentration levels of 10 -7 M, Np(V) does not adsorb strongly on quartz and albite up to pH values of approximately 9 at solid/solution ratios of 30 to 40 g/l. Significant adsorption (> 20%) occurs on both minerals only at pH > 9. Pretreatment of albite affects the sorption behavior of this mineral at pH > 9, possibly due to the formation of secondary mineral phases at the albite surface. EDTA does not adsorb on quartz at concentrations of 10 -6 M. In the presence of 50 μM EDTA, Np(V) sorption seems to be restricted. EDTA at the 10 -6 M level adsorbs onto albite to an appreciable degree at pH values 3 - is the predominant solution species

  12. Erosional losses of fallout plutonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foster, G.R.; Hakonson, T.E.

    1987-01-01

    Plutonium from fallout after atmospheric explosion of nuclear weapons in the 1950's and 1960s is being redistributed over the landscape by soil erosion and carried on sediment by streams to oceans. Erosion rates computed with the Universal Soil Loss Equation for more than 200,000 sample points on nonfederal land across the US were used to estimate plutonium removal rates by soil erosion. On the average, only about 4% of the eroded sediment reaches the outlet of a major river. The remaining sediment is deposited en route, and because deposition is a selective process, the sediment is enriched in fine particles having the highest concentration of plutonium because of the element's strong association with clay and silt-sized sediment. Estimated enrichment ratios, sediment delivery ratios, and erosion rates were used to estimate annual delivery of fallout plutonium. These estimates ranged from 0.002% of the initial fallout plutonium inventory for the Savannah River basin to 0.01% for the Columbia River basin, to 0.02% for the Hudson and Rio Grande River basins, to 0.08% for the Mississippi River basin. If the deposition of plutonium had been uniformly 1 mCi/km 2 , the estimated plutonium activity on suspended sediment would range from about 7 fCi/g of sediment of the Savannah River basin, to 9 fCi/g for the Mississippi River basin, to 12 fCi/g for the Hudson River basin, to 14 fCi/g for the Columbia and Rio Grande River basins. 45 references, 2 figures, 17 tables

  13. Status of plutonium ceramic immobilization processes and immobilization forms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ebbinghaus, B.B.; Van Konynenburg, R.A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Vance, E.R.; Jostsons, A. [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organization, Menai (Australia)] [and others

    1996-05-01

    Immobilization in a ceramic followed by permanent emplacement in a repository or borehole is one of the alternatives currently being considered by the Fissile Materials Disposition Program for the ultimate disposal of excess weapons-grade plutonium. To make Pu recovery more difficult, radioactive cesium may also be incorporated into the immobilization form. Valuable data are already available for ceramics form R&D efforts to immobilize high-level and mixed wastes. Ceramics have a high capacity for actinides, cesium, and some neutron absorbers. A unique characteristic of ceramics is the existence of mineral analogues found in nature that have demonstrated actinide immobilization over geologic time periods. The ceramic form currently being considered for plutonium disposition is a synthetic rock (SYNROC) material composed primarily of zirconolite (CaZrTi{sub 2}O{sub 7}), the desired actinide host phase, with lesser amounts of hollandite (BaAl{sub 2}Ti{sub 6}O{sub 16}) and rutile (TiO{sub 2}). Alternative actinide host phases are also being considered. These include pyrochlore (Gd{sub 2}Ti{sub 2}O{sub 7}), zircon (ZrSiO{sub 4}), and monazite (CePO{sub 4}), to name a few of the most promising. R&D activities to address important technical issues are discussed. Primarily these include moderate scale hot press fabrications with plutonium, direct loading of PuO{sub 2} powder, cold press and sinter fabrication methods, and immobilization form formulation issues.

  14. Status of plutonium ceramic immobilization processes and immobilization forms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ebbinghaus, B.B.; Van Konynenburg, R.A.; Vance, E.R.; Jostsons, A.

    1996-01-01

    Immobilization in a ceramic followed by permanent emplacement in a repository or borehole is one of the alternatives currently being considered by the Fissile Materials Disposition Program for the ultimate disposal of excess weapons-grade plutonium. To make Pu recovery more difficult, radioactive cesium may also be incorporated into the immobilization form. Valuable data are already available for ceramics form R ampersand D efforts to immobilize high-level and mixed wastes. Ceramics have a high capacity for actinides, cesium, and some neutron absorbers. A unique characteristic of ceramics is the existence of mineral analogues found in nature that have demonstrated actinide immobilization over geologic time periods. The ceramic form currently being considered for plutonium disposition is a synthetic rock (SYNROC) material composed primarily of zirconolite (CaZrTi 2 O 7 ), the desired actinide host phase, with lesser amounts of hollandite (BaAl 2 Ti 6 O 16 ) and rutile (TiO 2 ). Alternative actinide host phases are also being considered. These include pyrochlore (Gd 2 Ti 2 O 7 ), zircon (ZrSiO 4 ), and monazite (CePO 4 ), to name a few of the most promising. R ampersand D activities to address important technical issues are discussed. Primarily these include moderate scale hot press fabrications with plutonium, direct loading of PuO 2 powder, cold press and sinter fabrication methods, and immobilization form formulation issues

  15. Study of extraction chromatography methods of separation of neptunium and its radiometric determination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reich, M.

    2009-04-01

    In presented dissertation thesis the separation procedure for determination of neptunium in model solutions and also in soil samples was designed. 1. The sorbent was prepared on basis of hydrophobised silica gel with silica oil for hydrophobisation - Lukooil H. Extraction agent was anchored on this modified surface -quarternary ammonium salt Aliquat 336. In experiments was proved, that sorbent prepared like this is resist enough to the elution solutions using in separation procedures. It was found out that maximal concentration of deposited Aliquat 336 in benzene on hydrophobised silica gel selected granulate size is 40%. Sorbent prepared with silica gel lower granulate size and also with higher concentration of Aliquat 336 in benzene became sticky and unsuitable for using in separation columns. 2. The prepared sorbent is similar to commercial produced TEVA resin made by company Eichrom and for purpose of this project it was cheaper but the same effective alternative in comparing to mentioned commercial resin. 3. The separation procedure for isolation of 237 Np from radionuclides interfering during its radiometric determination with alpha spectrometry was designed -in scientific publications hasn't been described yet. The procedure consists of using formic acid for reduction of radionuclides interfering by alpha spectrometric determination of 237 Np and subsequent purification of neptunium on the next column by using ferrous sulphamate as reduction agent. This procedure was applied to the model solutions and also to the soil samples. The model solutions and soil samples for these experiments were contaminated with known amounts of 237 Np, 238 pU, 232 Th and mixture of 234 U/ 238 U. The effective separation of neptunium from described radionuclides was achieved with application of the described separation procedure. 4. The separation procedure for separation of 239 Np from its mother radionuclide 241 Am was designed with prepared sorbent. Different washing and

  16. Sorption and direct speciation of neptunium(V) on aluminium oxide and montmorillonite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wendt, Sonja

    2009-01-01

    This study comprised batch experiments, direct speciation studies via EXAFS, and modelling with the 2SPNE SC/CE model to elucidate the mechanisms of Np(V) sorption on montmorillonite and, for reference, on γ-Al 2 O 3 . The sorption of pM 239 Np(V) and μM 237 Np(V) on montmorillonite (STx-1, 4 g/L) and γ-Al 2 O 3 (0.5 g/L) was studied at room temperature in the presence and absence of ambient CO 2 covering a pH-range from 2.5 (STx-1) or 5 (γ-Al 2 O 3 ) to 10.5 with 0.01 or 0.1M NaClO 4 as background electrolyte. The Np(V) uptake was determined by γ spectroscopy of the supernatants and calculated as percentage as well as distribution coefficient K d . Sorption starts from pH ∼6 and, under exclusion of CO 2 , increases continuously, while, in the presence of ambient air, it reaches a maximum at pH ∝8.5 (γ-Al 2 O 3 : logK d max ∼ 4 mL/g; STx-1: logK d max ∼ 2.7 mL/g). Beyond that it decreases again due to the formation of aqueous neptunium carbonate complexes. Furthermore, neptunium sorption on montmorillonite is influenced by ionic strength at pH <6 through ion exchange processes pointing towards the formation of outer-sphere surface complexes there. Isotherms measured at the sorption maximum showed the precipitation of presumably neptunium carbonate complexes above 3.10 -5 M under ambient air conditions. Additionally, they indicated progressive saturation of the sorption sites of γ-Al 2 O 3 . At selected pH (STx-1: 5.0, 7.0, 8.0, 8.5, 9.0, 9.5; γ-Al 2 O 3 : 8.5, 9.5) EXAFS samples were prepared as wet pastes with μM 237 Np and measured at room temperature in fluorescence mode at ANKA and ESRF. Several spectra were averaged and analysed with EXAFSPAK and FEFF 8.20 employing models of NaNpO 2 (CO 3 ) or soddyite, (UO 2 ) 2 SiO 4 .2(H 2 O). The shorter atomic distances of the neptunyl ion at pH 5 compared to the others hinted at the retention of the hydration shell and, thus, at outer-sphere sorption. On average the bond lengths for Np(V) sorbed on STx

  17. Plutonium focus area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-08-01

    To ensure research and development programs focus on the most pressing environmental restoration and waste management problems at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), the Assistant Secretary for the Office of Environmental Management (EM) established a working group in August 1993 to implement a new approach to research and technology development. As part of this new approach, EM developed a management structure and principles that led to the creation of specific Focus Areas. These organizations were designed to focus the scientific and technical talent throughout DOE and the national scientific community on the major environmental restoration and waste management problems facing DOE. The Focus Area approach provides the framework for intersite cooperation and leveraging of resources on common problems. After the original establishment of five major Focus Areas within the Office of Technology Development (EM-50, now called the Office of Science and Technology), the Nuclear Materials Stabilization Task Group (EM-66) followed the structure already in place in EM-50 and chartered the Plutonium Focus Area (PFA). The following information outlines the scope and mission of the EM, EM-60, and EM-66 organizations as related to the PFA organizational structure

  18. Plutonium solution analyzer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burns, D.A.

    1994-09-01

    A fully automated analyzer has been developed for plutonium solutions. It was assembled from several commercially available modules, is based upon segmented flow analysis, and exhibits precision about an order of magnitude better than commercial units (0.5%-O.05% RSD). The system was designed to accept unmeasured, untreated liquid samples in the concentration range 40-240 g/L and produce a report with sample identification, sample concentrations, and an abundance of statistics. Optional hydraulics can accommodate samples in the concentration range 0.4-4.0 g/L. Operating at a typical rate of 30 to 40 samples per hour, it consumes only 0.074 mL of each sample and standard, and generates waste at the rate of about 1.5 mL per minute. No radioactive material passes through its multichannel peristaltic pump (which remains outside the glovebox, uncontaminated) but rather is handled by a 6-port, 2-position chromatography-type loop valve. An accompanying computer is programmed in QuickBASIC 4.5 to provide both instrument control and data reduction. The program is truly user-friendly and communication between operator and instrument is via computer screen displays and keyboard. Two important issues which have been addressed are waste minimization and operator safety (the analyzer can run in the absence of an operator, once its autosampler has been loaded)

  19. Plutonium oxide shipment report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-01-01

    While following procedures for unloading shipping containers containing plutonium oxide, SRP personnel experienced problems. While using a pipe cutter to cut through the wall of the inner container, the pipe section fell to the floor. Three empty food cans in the bottom of the inner canister also fell to the floor and a puff of smoke was observed. Personnel were evacuated and contamination was detected in the room. As a result of the investigations conducted by Westinghouse and SRP, thermal effects, food can coatings, and fuel volatiles were eliminated as the cause of the problem. Helium used to leak test the RL070 shipping container seals entered the inner canister through two weld defects resulting in a pressurization of the contents. When the end cap was removed, the inner canister vented rapidly, the food cans did not, thus creating a differential pressure across the food cans. This caused the food cans to swell. It was recommended that a dye penetrant test of all inner container welds be added. Additional unloading procedures were also recommended

  20. Plutonium solution analyzer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burns, D.A.

    1994-09-01

    A fully automated analyzer has been developed for plutonium solutions. It was assembled from several commercially available modules, is based upon segmented flow analysis, and exhibits precision about an order of magnitude better than commercial units (0.5%-O.05% RSD). The system was designed to accept unmeasured, untreated liquid samples in the concentration range 40-240 g/L and produce a report with sample identification, sample concentrations, and an abundance of statistics. Optional hydraulics can accommodate samples in the concentration range 0.4-4.0 g/L. Operating at a typical rate of 30 to 40 samples per hour, it consumes only 0.074 mL of each sample and standard, and generates waste at the rate of about 1.5 mL per minute. No radioactive material passes through its multichannel peristaltic pump (which remains outside the glovebox, uncontaminated) but rather is handled by a 6-port, 2-position chromatography-type loop valve. An accompanying computer is programmed in QuickBASIC 4.5 to provide both instrument control and data reduction. The program is truly user-friendly and communication between operator and instrument is via computer screen displays and keyboard. Two important issues which have been addressed are waste minimization and operator safety (the analyzer can run in the absence of an operator, once its autosampler has been loaded).

  1. Plutonium dispositioning in CANDU

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boczar, P.G.; Feinroth, H.; Luxat, J.C.

    1995-07-01

    Recently, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) sponsored Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL) to evaluate salient technical, strategic, schedule, and cost-related parameters of using CANDU reactors for dispositioning of weapons-grade plutonium in the form of Mixed OXide (MOX) fuel. A study team, consisting of key staff from the CANDU reactor designers and researchers (AECL), operators (Ontario Hydro) and fuel suppliers, analyzed all significant factors involved in such application, with the objective of identifying an arrangement that would permit the burning of MOX in CANDU at the earliest date. One of Ontario Hydro's multi-unit stations, Bruce A nuclear generating station (4x769 MW(e)), was chosen as the reference for the study. The assessment showed that no significant modifications of reactor or process systems are necessary to operate with a full MOX core. Plant modifications would be limited to fuel handling and modifications necessary to accommodate enhanced security and safeguards requirements. No safety limitations were identified

  2. Reduction of Tetravalent Plutonium in the Presence of Acetohydroxamic Acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tkac, Peter [Radiation Center, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR (United States); Precek, Martin [Department of Chemistry, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR (United States); Paulenova, Alena [Department of Nuclear Engineering and Radiation Health Physics, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR (United States)

    2009-06-15

    Acetohydroxamic acid (AHA) has been proposed as a salt-free stripping reagent in the modified PUREX process for the spent nuclear fuel re-processing. AHA is a capable reductant of Np(VI) and Pu(VI) and a strong complexant for tetravalent neptunium and plutonium; hence, its behavior must be studied in detail. For better characterization of the all relevant chemical processes and successful design of the future separation flowsheets it is important to predict the speciation and partitioning of Pu between the organic and aqueous phases in the proposed extraction systems containing acetohydroxamic acid. The hydrolytic instability of hydroxamic group under acidic conditions causes a slow degradation of AHA followed by formation of acetic acid and hydroxylamine which also acts as a reductant of Pu(IV). The complexes of Pu(IV) with AHA are very strong; however, under acidic conditions, the chelate ring prevents the acidic hydrolysis only temporarily. The decomposition of Pu-aceto-hydroxamate complex and reduction of Pu(IV) to Pu(III) observed for these systems was investigated in the present paper. Reduction of Pu(IV) in the presence of AHA was monitored by Vis-NIR spectroscopy in the range of 400-700 nm. All complexes between Pu(IV) and AHA have a very intense absorption in this region; therefore, for a better resolution of spectra, all experiments were performed under low AHA:Pu ratios, where only two species, non-complexed Pu(IV) and Pu(IV)-mono-aceto-hydroxamate complex, are initially present in relevant concentrations. To characterize the rate and the reaction mechanism, spectra were collected as a function of time for different initial concentrations of reactants and analyzed at several wavelengths using the data on extinction coefficients for all absorbing species. The extinction coefficient for Pu(IV)-AHA complex was resolved by fitting the absorption spectra with the chemical equilibrium modeling software FITEQL 4.0. The analysis of the experimental data obtained

  3. Long time contamination from plutonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fueloep, M.; Patzeltova, N.; Ragan, P.; Matel, L.

    1995-01-01

    Plutonium isotopes in the organism of the patient (who had participated in the liquidation works after the Chernobyl accident; for three month he had stayed in the epicenter, where he acted as a chauffeur driving a radioactive material to the place of destination) from urine were determined. For determination of the concentration of Pu-239, Pu-240 in urine a modified radiochemical method was used. After mineralization the sample was separated as an anion-nitrate complex with contact by the anion form of the resin in the column. The resin was washed by 8 M HNO 3 , the 8 M HCl with 0.3 M HNO 3 for removing the other radionuclides. The solution 0.36 M HCl with 0.01 M HF was used for the elution of plutonium. Using the lanthanum fluoride technique the sample was filtrated through a membrane filter. The plutonium was detected in the dry sample. The Pu-239 tracer was used for the evaluation of the plutonium separation efficiency. The alpha spectrometric measurements were carried out with a large area silicon detector. The samples were measured and evaluated in the energy region 4.98-5.18 MeV. The detection limit of alpha spectrometry measurements has been 0.01 Bq dm -3 . The concentration of plutonium in the 24-hour urine was determined three times in the quarter year intervals. The results are: 54 mBq, 63.2 mBq, 53 mBq, with average 56,7 mBq. From the results of the analyses of plutonium depositions calculated according to ICRP 54 the intake of this radionuclide for the patient was 56.7 kBq. To estimate a committed effective dose (50 years) from the intake of plutonium was used a conversion factor 6.8.10 -5 Sv.Bq -1 (class W). So the expressed committed effective dose received from the plutonium intake is 3.8 Sv. This number is relatively high and all the effective dose will be higher, because the patient was exposed to the other radionuclides too. For example the determination of the rate radionuclides Am-241/Pu-239,Pu-240 was 32-36 % in the fallout after the Chernobyl

  4. Double shell tanks plutonium inventory assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tusler, L.A.

    1995-01-01

    This report provides an evaluation that establishes plutonium inventory estimates for all DSTs based on known tank history information, the DST plutonium inventory tracking system, tank characterization measurements, tank transfer records, and estimated average concentration values for the various types of waste. These estimates use data through December 31, 1994, and give plutonium estimates as of January 1, 1995. The plutonium inventory values for the DSTs are given in Section 31. The plutonium inventory estimate is 224 kg for the DSTs and 854 kg for the SSTs for a total of 1078 kg. This value compares favorably with the total plutonium inventory value of 981 kg obtained from the total plutonium production minus plutonium recovery analysis estimates

  5. Oxidation-state maxima in plutonium chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silver, G.L.

    2013-01-01

    Maxima in the fractions of the trivalent and hexavalent oxidation states of plutonium are inherent in the algebra of its disproportionation reactions. The maxima do not support overall disproportionation equations as satisfactory representations of aqueous plutonium. (author)

  6. Recovery studies for plutonium machining oil coolant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Navratil, J.D.; Baldwin, C.E.

    1977-01-01

    Lathe coolant oil, contaminated with plutonium and having a carbon tetrachloride diluent, is generated in plutonium machining areas at Rocky Flats. A research program was initiated to determine the nature of plutonium in this mixture of oil and carbon tetrachloride. Appropriate methods then could be developed to remove the plutonium and to recycle the oil and carbon tetrachloride. Studies showed that the mixtures of spent oil and carbon tetrachloride contained particulate plutonium and plutonium species that are soluble in water or in oil and carbon tetrachloride. The particulate plutonium was removed by filtration; the nonfilterable plutonium was removed by adsorption on various materials. Laboratory-scale tests indicated the lathe-coolant oil mixture could be separated by distilling the carbon tetrachloride to yield recyclable products

  7. Plutonium and americium separation from salts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hagan, P.G.; Miner, F.J.

    1976-01-01

    Salts or materials containing plutonium and americium are dissolved in hydrochloric acid, heated, and contacted with an alkali metal carbonate solution to precipitate plutonium and americium carbonates which are thereafter readily separable from the solution

  8. Plutonium-238 and plutonium-239 metabolism in dairy cows following ingestion of mixed oxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patzer, R.G.; Mullen, A.A.; Sutton, W.W.; Potter, G.D.; Mosley, R.E.; Efurd, D.W.; Stalnaker, N.D.

    1985-01-01

    Dairy cows were given oral dosage of plutonium-238 and plutonium-239 dioxide particles in a study to determine the relative gastrointestinal absorption and tissue distribution of the nuclides. Two cows were given particles in which the two isotopes were homogeneously mixed within the particles. A third cow was given two batches of particles which contained either plutonium-238 or plutonium-239. Results indicate that, when the two isotopes of plutonium are homogeneous within the particles, there is no difference between plutonium-238 and plutonium-239 in the relative gastrointestinal absorption and tissue distribution

  9. Plutonium Disposition Now exclamation point

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buckner, M.R.

    1995-01-01

    A means for use of existing processing facilities and reactors for plutonium disposition is described which requires a minimum capital investment and allows rapid implementation. The scenario includes interim storage and processing under IAEA control, and fabrication into MOX fuel in existing or planned facilities in Europe for use in operating reactors in the two home countries. Conceptual studies indicate that existing Westinghouse four-loop designs can safety dispose of 0.94 MT of plutonium per calendar year. Thus, it would be possible to consume the expected US excess stockpile of about 50 MT in two to three units of this type, and it is highly likely that a comparable amount of the FSU excess plutonium could be deposed of in a few VVER-1000's. The only major capital project for this mode of plutonium disposition would be the weapons-grade plutonium processing which could be done in a dedicated international facility or using existing facilities in the US and FSU under IAEA control. This option offers the potential for quick implementation at a very low cost to the governments of the two countries

  10. Fuel cycles using adulterated plutonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brooksbank, R.E.; Bigelow, J.E.; Campbell, D.O.; Kitts, F.G.; Lindauer, R.B.

    1978-01-01

    Adjustments in the U-Pu fuel cycle necessitated by decisions made to improve the nonproliferation objectives of the US are examined. The uranium-based fuel cycle, using bred plutonium to provide the fissile enrichment, is the fuel system with the highest degree of commercial development at the present time. However, because purified plutonium can be used in weapons, this fuel cycle is potentially vulnerable to diversion of that plutonium. It does appear that there are technologically sound ways in which the plutonium might be adulterated by admixture with 238 U and/or radioisotopes, and maintained in that state throughout the fuel cycle, so that the likelihood of a successful diversion is small. Adulteration of the plutonium in this manner would have relatively little effect on the operations of existing or planned reactors. Studies now in progress should show within a year or two whether the less expensive coprocessing scheme would provide adequate protection (coupled perhaps with elaborate conventional safeguards procedures) or if the more expensive spiked fuel cycle is needed as in the proposed civex pocess. If the latter is the case, it will be further necessary to determine the optimum spiking level, which could vary as much as a factor of a billion. A very basic question hangs on these determinations: What is to be the nature of the recycle fuel fabrication facilities. If the hot, fully remote fuel fabrication is required, then a great deal of further development work will be required to make the full cycle fully commercial

  11. Selecting a plutonium vitrification process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jouan, A. [Centre d`Etudes de la Vallee du Rhone, Bagnols sur Ceze (France)

    1996-05-01

    Vitrification of plutonium is one means of mitigating its potential danger. This option is technically feasible, even if it is not the solution advocated in France. Two situations are possible, depending on whether or not the glass matrix also contains fission products; concentrations of up to 15% should be achievable for plutonium alone, whereas the upper limit is 3% in the presence of fission products. The French continuous vitrification process appears to be particularly suitable for plutonium vitrification: its capacity is compatible with the required throughout, and the compact dimensions of the process equipment prevent a criticality hazard. Preprocessing of plutonium metal, to convert it to PuO{sub 2} or to a nitric acid solution, may prove advantageous or even necessary depending on whether a dry or wet process is adopted. The process may involve a single step (vitrification of Pu or PuO{sub 2} mixed with glass frit) or may include a prior calcination step - notably if the plutonium is to be incorporated into a fission product glass. It is important to weigh the advantages and drawbacks of all the possible options in terms of feasibility, safety and cost-effectiveness.

  12. Plutonium in depleted uranium penetrators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McLaughlin, J.P.; Leon-Vintro, L.; Smith, K.; Mitchell, P.I.; Zunic, Z.S.

    2002-01-01

    Depleted Uranium (DU) penetrators used in the recent Balkan conflicts have been found to be contaminated with trace amounts of transuranic materials such as plutonium. This contamination is usually a consequence of DU fabrication being carried out in facilities also using uranium recycled from spent military and civilian nuclear reactor fuel. Specific activities of 239+240 Plutonium generally in the range 1 to 12 Bq/kg have been found to be present in DU penetrators recovered from the attack sites of the 1999 NATO bombardment of Kosovo. A DU penetrator recovered from a May 1999 attack site at Bratoselce in southern Serbia and analysed by University College Dublin was found to contain 43.7 +/- 1.9 Bq/kg of 239+240 Plutonium. This analysis is described. An account is also given of the general population radiation dose implications arising from both the DU itself and from the presence of plutonium in the penetrators. According to current dosimetric models, in all scenarios considered likely ,the dose from the plutonium is estimated to be much smaller than that due to the uranium isotopes present in the penetrators. (author)

  13. A World made of Plutonium?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Broda, E.

    1976-01-01

    This lecture by Engelbert Broda was written for the 26th Pugwash Conference in Mühlhausen, Germany, 26 – 31 August 1976: Public doubts about nuclear energy are generally directed at the problems of routine emissions of radionuclides, of catastrophic accidents, and of terminal waste disposal. Curiously, the most important problem is not being given sufficient attention: The use of plutonium from civilian reactors fpr weapons production. According to current ideas about a nuclear future, 5000 tons (order of magnitude) of plutonium are to be made annually by year 2000, and about 10 000 tons will all the time be in circulation (transport, reprocessing, reproduction of fuel elements, etc.). It is a misconception that plutonium from power reactors is unsuitable as a nuclear explosive. 5000 tons are enough for several hundred thousand (!) of bombs, Nagasaki type. By the year 2000 maybe 40 – 50 countries will have home-made plutonium. Plutonium production and proliferation are the most serious problems in a nuclear world. (author)

  14. Plutonium determination by isotope dilution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lucas, M.

    1980-01-01

    The principle is to add to a known amount of the analysed solution a known amount of a spike solution consisting of plutonium 242. The isotopic composition of the resulting mixture is then determined by surface ionization mass spectrometry, and the plutonium concentration in the solution is deduced, from this measurement. For irradiated fuels neutronic studies or for fissile materials balance measurements, requiring the knowledge of the ratio U/Pu or of concentration both uranium and plutonium, it is better to use the double spike isotope dilution method, with a spike solution of known 233 U- 242 Pu ratio. Using this method, the ratio of uranium to plutonium concentration in the irradiated fuel solution can be determined without any accurate measurement of the mixed amounts of sample and spike solutions. For fissile material balance measurements, the uranium concentration is determined by using single isotope dilution, and the plutonium concentration is deduced from the ratio Pu/U and U concentration. The main advantages of isotope dilution are its selectivity, accuracy and very high sensitivity. The recent improvements made to surface ionization mass spectrometers have considerably increased the precision of the measurements; a relative precision of about 0.2% to 0.3% is obtained currently, but it could be reduced to 0.1%, in the future, with a careful control of the experimental procedures. The detection limite is around 0.1 ppb [fr

  15. Production of Plutonium Metal from Aqueous Solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orth, D.A.

    2003-01-16

    The primary separation of plutonium from irradiated uranium by the Purex solvent extraction process at the Savannah River Plant produces a dilute plutonium solution containing residual fission products and uranium. A cation exchange process is used for concentration and further decontamination of the plutonium, as the first step in the final preparation of metal. This paper discusses the production of plutonium metal from the aqueous solutions.

  16. Plutonium Proliferation: The Achilles Heel of Disarmament

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leventhal, Paul

    2001-01-01

    Plutonium is a byproduct of nuclear fission, and it is produced at the rate of about 70 metric tons a year in the world's nuclear power reactors. Concerns about civilian plutonium ran high in the 1970s and prompted enactment of the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Act of 1978 to give the United States a veto over separating plutonium from U.S.-supplied uranium fuel. Over the years, however, so-called reactor-grade plutonium has become the orphan issue of nuclear non-proliferation, largely as a consequence of pressures from plutonium-separating countries. The demise of the fast breeder reactor and the reluctance of utilities to introduce plutonium fuel in light-water reactors have resulted in large surpluses of civilian, weapons-usable plutonium, which now approach in size the 250 tons of military plutonium in the world. Yet reprocessing of spent fuel for recovery and use of plutonium proceeds apace outside the United States and threatens to overwhelm safeguards and security measures for keeping this material out of the hands of nations and terrorists for weapons. A number of historical and current developments are reviewed to demonstrate that plutonium commerce is undercutting efforts both to stop the spread of nuclear weapons and to work toward eliminating existing nuclear arsenals. These developments include the breakdown of U.S. anti-plutonium policy, the production of nuclear weapons by India with Atoms-for-Peace plutonium, the U.S.-Russian plan to introduce excess military plutonium as fuel in civilian power reactors, the failure to include civilian plutonium and bomb-grade uranium in the proposed Fissile Material Cutoff Treaty, and the perception of emerging proliferation threats as the rationale for development of a ballistic missile defense system. Finally, immobilization of separated plutonium in high-level waste is explored as a proliferation-resistant and disarmament-friendly solution for eliminating excess stocks of civilian and military plutonium.

  17. Plutonium Oxide Process Capability Work Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meier, David E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Tingey, Joel M. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2014-02-28

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has been tasked to develop a Pilot-scale Plutonium-oxide Processing Unit (P3U) providing a flexible capability to produce 200g (Pu basis) samples of plutonium oxide using different chemical processes for use in identifying and validating nuclear forensics signatures associated with plutonium production. Materials produced can also be used as exercise and reference materials.

  18. Civil plutonium amounts in the world

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naudet, G.

    1994-01-01

    The experience of plutonium reprocessing in water reactors is positive and today the use of this nuclear fuel is at industrial level. Plutonium quantities in spent fuel go on increasing, plutonium stock coming from reprocessing can be controlled: according to conjuncture, it will evolve by stabilization or decreasing at the beginning of next century

  19. The use of calorimetry for plutonium assay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mason, J.A.

    1982-12-01

    Calorimetry is a technique for measuring the thermal power of heat-producing substances. The technique may be applied to the measurement of plutonium-bearing materials which evolve heat as a result of alpha and beta decay. A calorimetric measurement of the thermal power of a plutonium sample, combined with a knowledge or measurement of the plutonium isotopic mass ratios of the sample provides a convenient and accurate, non-destructive measure of the total plutonium mass of the sample. The present report provides a description, and an assessment of the calorimetry technique applied to the assay of plutonium-bearing materials. Types and characteristics of plutonium calorimeters are considered, as well as calibration and operating procedures. The instrumentation used with plutonium calorimeters is described and the use of computer control for calorimeter automation is discussed. A critical review and assessment of plutonium calorimetry literature since 1970 is presented. Both fuel element and plutonium-bearing material calorimeters are considered. The different types of plutonium calorimeters are evaluated and their relative merits are discussed. A combined calorimeter and gamma-ray measurement assay system is considered. The design principles of plutonium assay calorimeters are considered. An automatic, computer-based calorimeter control system is proposed in conjunction with a general plutonium assay calorimeter design. (author)

  20. Tabulated Neutron Emission Rates for Plutonium Oxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shores, Erik Frederick [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-07-24

    This work tabulates neutron emission rates for 80 plutonium oxide samples as reported in the literature. Plutonium-­238 and plutonium-­239 oxides are included and such emission rates are useful for scaling tallies from Monte Carlo simulations and estimating dose rates for health physics applications.

  1. Preventing pollution from plutonium processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pillay, K.K.S.

    1993-01-01

    The plutonium processing facility at Los Alamos has adopted the strategic goal of becoming a facility that processes plutonium in a way that produces only environmentally benign waste streams. Pollution prevention through source reduction and environmentally sound recycling are being pursued. General approaches to waste reductions are administrative controls, modification of process technologies, and additional waste polishing. Recycling of waste materials, such as spent acids and salts, are technical possibilities and are being pursued to accomplish additional waste reduction. Liquid waste stream polishing to remove final traces of plutonium and hazardous chemical constituents is accomplished through (a) process modifications, (b) use of alternative chemicals and sorbents for residue removal, (c) acid recycling, and (d) judicious use of a variety of waste polishing technologies. Technologies that show promise in waste minimization and pollution prevention are identified. Working toward this goal of pollution prevention is a worthwhile endeavor, not only for Los Alamos, but for the Nuclear Complex of the future

  2. Technological alternatives for plutonium storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-12-01

    This paper discusses the problems of large long term storage since stores at fabrication plants may depend on the form of plutonium ultimately chosen for transport. The paper's conclusion includes: MOX can be regarded as more proliferation resistant than PUO 2 but no experience of long term storage is available, therefore further R and D is required; co-location of the store with reprocessing plants (and fuel fabrication plant) would appear to have advantages in non-proliferation, safeguards implementation, environmental protection and economic aspects; there are strong non-proliferation and security arguments for not moving plutonium away from the site where it was separated until there is an identifiable and scheduled end use. The design of the store, the form in which plutonium should be stored, particularly as MOX, and the costs and further R and D required are considered. The possible location of stores is also discussed and institutional questions briefly considered

  3. Political influences in plutonium recycling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patak, H.N.

    1982-01-01

    The history of plutonium safeguards is one of political error and misunderstandings, as well as a lack of technical knowledge. Although there was widespread support for preventing the proliferation of nuclear explosives, with over 100 nations signing the Nonproliferation Treaty of 1969, India's 1974 nuclear test brought renewed political activity to prevent another such occurrence. Opposition has been directed only at how to pursue this goal, but the status of four major experiments aimed at minimizing weapons proliferation is one of failure, intensified by a weakening of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). If the link between plutonium power and weapons production can be broken through on-site reprocessing, the situation could improve. One course would be for the nuclear power industry to adopt its own system for safe guarding plutonium

  4. Plutonium and latent nuclear proliferation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quester, G.H.

    1992-01-01

    A country producing nuclear electric power acquires an ability to produce atomic bombs quite easily and without taking many steps beyond that which would be perfectly normal for civilian purposes. The role of plutonium in the three fold list of the gains that must be sought in arms control formulated by Schelling and Halpevin are discussed. On the first, that we should seek to reduce the likelihood of war, it can be argued that plutonium reduces the likelihood in some cases. The second, that we should seek to reduce the destruction in war, is made worse by plutonium. On the third criterion, that we should seek to reduce the burdens in peacetime of everyone's being prepared for war, the situation is confusing and depends on the prospects for nuclear electrical power. It is concluded that latent capability to produce nuclear weapons may be sufficient without the need for actual detonations and deployment of bombs. (UK)

  5. Plutonium accident resistant container project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andersen, J.A.

    1978-09-01

    The PARC (plutonium accident resistant container) project resulted in the design, development, and certification testing of a crashworthy air-transportable plutonium package (shipping container) for certification by the USNRC (Nuclear Regulatory Commission). This PAT-1 (plutonium air transportable) package survives a very severe sequential test program of impact, crush, puncture, slash, burn, and water immersion. There is also an individual hydrostatic pressure test. The package has a payload mass capacity of 2 kg of PuO 2 and a thermal capacity of 25 watts. The design rationale for very high energy absorption (impact, crush, puncture, and slash protection) with residual high-level fire protection, resulted in a reasonably small air-transportable package, advancing the packaging state-of-art. Optimization design iterations were utilized in the areas of impact energy absorption and stress and thermal analysis. Package test results are presented in relation to radioactive materials containment acceptance criteria, shielding and criticality standards

  6. Plutonium accident resistant container project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andersen, J.A.

    1978-05-01

    The PARC (plutonium accident resistant container) project resulted in the design, development, and certification testing of a crashworthy air-transportable plutonium package (shipping container) for certification by the USNRC. This PAT-1 (plutonium air transportable) package survives a very severe sequential test program of impact, crush, puncture, slash, burn, and water immersion. There is also an individual hydrostatic pressure test. The package has a payload mass capacity of 2 kg of PuO2 and a thermal capacity of 25 watts. The design rationale for very high energy absorption (impact, crush, puncture, and slash protection) with residual high-level fire protection, resulted in a reasonalby small air-transportable package, advancing the packaging state-of-art. Optimization design iterations were utilized in the areas of impact energy absorption and stress and thermal analysis. Package test results are presented in relation to radioactive materials containment acceptance criteria, shielding and criticality standards

  7. Shielding calculational system for plutonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zimmerman, M.G.; Thomsen, D.H.

    1975-08-01

    A computer calculational system has been developed and assembled specifically for calculating dose rates in AEC plutonium fabrication facilities. The system consists of two computer codes and all nuclear data necessary for calculation of neutron and gamma dose rates from plutonium. The codes include the multigroup version of the Battelle Monte Carlo code for solution of general neutron and gamma shielding problems and the PUSHLD code for solution of shielding problems where low energy gamma and x-rays are important. The nuclear data consists of built in neutron and gamma yields and spectra for various plutonium compounds, an automatic calculation of age effects and all cross-sections commonly used. Experimental correlations have been performed to verify portions of the calculational system. (23 tables, 7 figs, 16 refs) (U.S.)

  8. Preventing pollution from plutonium processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pillay, K.K.S.

    1995-01-01

    The plutonium processing facility at Los Alamos has adopted the strategic goal of becoming a facility that processes plutonium in a way that produces only environmentally benign waste streams. Pollution prevention through source reduction and environmentally sound recycling are being pursued. General approaches to waste reductions are administrative controls, modification of process technologies, and additional waste polishing. Recycling of waste materials, such as spent acids and salts, are technical possibilities and are being pursued to accomplish additional waste reduction. Liquid waste stream polishing to remove final traces of plutonium and hazardous chemical constituents is accomplished through process modifications, use of alternative chemicals and sorbents for residue removal, acid recycling, and judicious use of a variety of waste polishing technologies. Technologies that show promise in waste minimization and pollution prevention are identified. Working toward this goal of pollution prevention is a worthwhile endeavor , not only for Los Alamos, but for the Nuclear Complex of the future. (author) 12 refs.; 2 figs

  9. Safeguarding the Plutonium Fuel Cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, S.J.; Lockwood, D.

    2013-01-01

    In developing a Safeguards Approach for a plutonium process facility, two general diversion and misuse scenarios must be addressed: 1) Unreported batches of undeclared nuclear material being processed through the plant and bypassing the accountancy measurement points, and 2) The operator removing plutonium at a rate that cannot be detected with confidence due to measurement uncertainties. This paper will look at the implementation of international safeguards at plutonium fuel cycle facilities in light of past lessons learned and current safeguards approaches. It will then discuss technical areas which are currently being addressed as future tools to improve on the efficiency of safeguards implementation, while maintaining its effectiveness. The discussion of new improvements will include: safeguards by design (SBD), process monitoring (PM), measurement and monitoring equipment, and data management. The paper is illustrated with the implementation of international safeguards at the Rokkasho Reprocessing Plant in Japan and its accountancy structure is detailed. The paper is followed by the slides of the presentation

  10. Nukem's plutonium hitches a ride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1988-01-01

    The European repercussions of a scandal involving the illegal movement of plutonium and cobalt 60 in canisters in which it was claimed there was only low-level radioactive waste, from West Germany to the reprocessing centre at Mol, Belgium are considered. Large bribes were paid to employees of the nuclear industry and government inspectors to allow this illicit transport to carry on over a number of years. It is not yet clear where the plutonium came from or where it was going. The suggestion that it may have been sold to Libya or Pakistan for nuclear weapons is very damaging to the nuclear safety argument. Even if the plutonium was being disposed of because it could not be accounted for, the safeguard procedures do not give confidence to the European public more aware of nuclear safety than ever. (UK)

  11. Plutonium-238 Decision Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, Mike; Lechel, David J.; Leigh, C.D.

    1999-01-01

    Five transuranic (TRU) waste sites in the Department of Energy (DOE) complex, collectively, have more than 2,100 cubic meters of Plutonium-238 (Pu-238) TRU waste that exceed the wattage restrictions of the Transuranic Package Transporter-II (TRUPACT-11). The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) is being developed by the DOE as a repository for TRU waste. With the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) opening in 1999, these sites are faced with a need to develop waste management practices that will enable the transportation of Pu-238 TRU waste to WIPP for disposal. This paper describes a decision analysis that provided a logical framework for addressing the Pu-238 TRU waste issue. The insights that can be gained by performing a formalized decision analysis are multifold. First and foremost, the very process. of formulating a decision tree forces the decision maker into structured, logical thinking where alternatives can be evaluated one against the other using a uniform set of criteria. In the process of developing the decision tree for transportation of Pu-238 TRU waste, several alternatives were eliminated and the logical order for decision making was discovered. Moreover, the key areas of uncertainty for proposed alternatives were identified and quantified. The decision analysis showed that the DOE can employ a combination approach where they will (1) use headspace gas analyses to show that a fraction of the Pu-238 TRU waste drums are no longer generating hydrogen gas and can be shipped to WIPP ''as-is'', (2) use drums and bags with advanced filter systems to repackage Pu-238 TRU waste drums that are still generating hydrogen, and (3) add hydrogen getter materials to the inner containment vessel of the TRUPACT-11to relieve the build-up of hydrogen gas during transportation of the Pu-238 TRU waste drums

  12. Plutonium in a grassland ecosystem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Little, C.A.

    1976-01-01

    This study was concerned with plutonium contamination of grassland at the U.S. Energy Research and Development Administration Rocky Flats plant northwest of Denver, Colorado. Of interest were: the definition of major plutonium-containing ecosystem compartments; the relative amounts in those compartments; how those values related to studies done in other geogrphical areas; whether or not the predominant isotopes, 238 Pu and 239 Pu, behaved differently; and what mechanisms might have allowed for the observed patterns of contamination. Samples of soil, litter, vegetation, arthropods, and small mammals were collected for plutonium analysis and mass determination from each of two macroplots. Small aliquots (5 g or less) were analyzed by a rapid liquid scintillation technique and by alpha spectrometry. Of the compartments sampled, greater than 99% of the total plutonium was contained in the soil. The concentrations of plutonium in soil were significantly inversely correlated with distance from the contamination source, depth of the sample, and particle size of the sieved soil samples. The soil data suggested that the distribution of contamination largely resulted from physical transport processes. A mechanism of agglomerated submicron plutonium oxide particles and larger (1-500 μm) host soil particles was proposed. Concentrations of Pu in litter and vegetation were inversely correlated to distance from the source and directly correlated to soil concentrations at the same location. Comparatively high concentration ratios of vegetation to soil suggested wind resuspension of contamination as an important transport mechanism. Arthropod and small mammal samples were highly skewed, kurtotic, and quite variable, having coefficients of variation (standard deviation/mean) as high as 600%. Bone Pu concentrations were lower than other tissues. Hide, GI, and lung were generally not higher in Pu than kidney, liver and muscle

  13. Some examples of the estimation of error for calorimetric assay of plutonium-bearing solids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodenburg, W.W.

    1977-04-01

    This report provides numerical examples of error estimation and related measurement assurance programs for the calorimetric assay of plutonium. It is primarily intended for users who do not consider themselves experts in the field of calorimetry. These examples will provide practical and useful information in establishing a calorimetric assay capability which fulfills regulatory requirements. 10 tables, 5 figures

  14. Plutonium stabilization and packaging system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    This document describes the functional design of the Plutonium Stabilization and Packaging System (Pu SPS). The objective of this system is to stabilize and package plutonium metals and oxides of greater than 50% wt, as well as other selected isotopes, in accordance with the requirements of the DOE standard for safe storage of these materials for 50 years. This system will support completion of stabilization and packaging campaigns of the inventory at a number of affected sites before the year 2002. The package will be standard for all sites and will provide a minimum of two uncontaminated, organics free confinement barriers for the packaged material

  15. Long time contamination from plutonium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fueloep, M; Patzeltova, N; Ragan, P [Inst. of Preventive and Clinical Medicine, Bratislava (Slovakia); Matel, L [Comenius Univ., Bratislava (Slovakia). Department of Nuclear Chemistry

    1996-12-31

    Plutonium isotopes in the organism of the patient (who had participated in the liquidation works after the Chernobyl accident; for three month he had stayed in the epicenter, where he acted as a chauffeur driving a radioactive material to the place of destination) from urine were determined. For determination of the concentration of Pu-239, Pu-240 in urine a modified radiochemical method was used. After mineralization the sample was separated as an anion-nitrate complex with contact by the anion form of the resin in the column. The resin was washed by 8 M HNO{sub 3}, the 8 M HCl with 0.3 M HNO{sub 3} for removing the other radionuclides. The solution 0.36 M HCl with 0.01 M HF was used for the elution of plutonium. Using the lanthanum fluoride technique the sample was filtrated through a membrane filter. The plutonium was detected in the dry sample. The Pu-239 tracer was used for the evaluation of the plutonium separation efficiency. The alpha spectrometric measurements were carried out with a large area silicon detector. The samples were measured and evaluated in the energy region 4.98-5.18 MeV. The detection limit of alpha spectrometry measurements has been 0.01 Bq dm{sup -3}. The concentration of plutonium in the 24-hour urine was determined three times in the quarter year intervals. The results are: 54 mBq, 63.2 mBq, 53 mBq, with average 56,7 mBq. From the results of the analyses of plutonium depositions calculated according to ICRP 54 the intake of this radionuclide for the patient was 56.7 kBq. To estimate a committed effective dose (50 years) from the intake of plutonium was used a conversion factor 6.8.10{sup -5} Sv.Bq{sup -1} (class W). So the expressed committed effective dose received from the plutonium intake is 3.8 Sv. This number is relatively high and all the effective dose will be higher, because the patient was exposed to the other radionuclides too. (Abstract Truncated)

  16. Neptunium(V) Adsorption to Bacteria at Low and High Ionic Strength

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ams, D.; Swanson, J. S.; Reed, D. T.

    2010-12-01

    Np(V) is expected to be the predominant oxidation state of neptunium in aerobic natural waters. Np(V), as the NpO2+ aquo and associated complexed species, is readily soluble, interacts weakly with geologic media, and has a high redox stability under a relatively wide range of subsurface conditions. These chemical properties, along with a long half-life make it a primary element of concern regarding long-term nuclear waste storage and subsurface containment. The fate and transport of neptunium in the environment may be influenced by adsorption onto bacterial surfaces. The adsorption of neptunium to bacterial surfaces ties the mobility of the contaminant to the mobility of the bacterium. In this study, the adsorption of the neptunyl (NpO2+) ion was evaluated at low ionic strength on a common soil bacterium and at high ionic strength on a halophilic bacterium isolated from a briny groundwater near the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) in southeast New Mexico. Adsorption experiments were performed in batch reactors as a function of pH, ionic strength, and bacteria/Np mass ratio. Np(V) adsorption was modeled using a surface complexation approach with the mathematical program FITEQL to determine functional group specific binding constants. The data from acid and base titrations of the bacteria used were also modeled to estimate the concentrations and deprotonation constants of discrete bacterial surface functional groups. Bacterial functional group characteristics and Np(V) adsorption behavior between the soil bacterium and the halophilic bacterium were compared. These results highlight key similarities and differences in actinide adsorption behavior in environments of significantly different ionic strength. The observed adsorption behavior may be linked to similarities and differences in the characteristics of the moieties between the cell walls of common gram-negative soil and halophilic bacteria. Moreover, differences in adsorption behavior may also reflect ionic

  17. Neptunium(V) adsorption to bacteria at low and high ionic strength

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ams, David A.; Swanson, Juliet S.; Reed, Donald T.; Fein, Jeremy B.

    2010-01-01

    Np(V) is expected to be the predominant oxidation state of neptunium in aerobic natural waters. Np(V), as the NpO 2 + aquo and associated complexed species, is readily soluble, weakly interacting with geologic media, and has a high redox stability under a relatively wide range of subsurface conditions. These chemical properties, along with a long half-life make it a primary element of concern regarding long-term nuclear waste storage and subsurface contaminant. The fate and transport of neptunium in the environment may be influenced by adsorption onto bacterial surfaces. The adsorption of neptunium to bacterial surfaces ties the mobility of the contaminant to the mobility of the bacterium. In this study, the adsorption of the neptunyl (NpO 2 + ) ion was evaluated at low ionic strength on a common soil bacterium and at high ionic strength on a halophilic bacterium isolated from a briny groundwater near the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) in southeast New Mexico. Adsorption experiments were performed in batch reactors as a function of pH, ionic strength, and bacterialNp mass ratio. Np(V) adsorption was modeled using a surface complexation approach with the mathematical program FITEQL to determine functional group specific binding constants. The data from acid and base titrations of the bacteria were also modeled to estimate the concentrations and deprotonation constants of discrete bacterial surface functional groups. Bacterial functional group characteristics and Np(V) adsorption behavior between the soil bacterium and the halophilic bacterium were compared. These results highlight the key similarities and differences in actinide adsorption behavior in environments of significantly different ionic strength. Similarities in adsorption behavior may be linked to similarities in the characteristics of the moieties between all bacterial cell walls. Differences in adsorption behavior may reflect differences in ionic strength effects, rather than differences in bacteria

  18. Neptunium(V) adsorption to bacteria at low and high ionic strength

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ams, David A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Swanson, Juliet S [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Reed, Donald T [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Fein, Jeremy B [UNIV OF NOTRE DAME

    2010-12-08

    Np(V) is expected to be the predominant oxidation state of neptunium in aerobic natural waters. Np(V), as the NpO{sub 2}{sup +} aquo and associated complexed species, is readily soluble, weakly interacting with geologic media, and has a high redox stability under a relatively wide range of subsurface conditions. These chemical properties, along with a long half-life make it a primary element of concern regarding long-term nuclear waste storage and subsurface contaminant. The fate and transport of neptunium in the environment may be influenced by adsorption onto bacterial surfaces. The adsorption of neptunium to bacterial surfaces ties the mobility of the contaminant to the mobility of the bacterium. In this study, the adsorption of the neptunyl (NpO{sub 2}{sup +}) ion was evaluated at low ionic strength on a common soil bacterium and at high ionic strength on a halophilic bacterium isolated from a briny groundwater near the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) in southeast New Mexico. Adsorption experiments were performed in batch reactors as a function of pH, ionic strength, and bacterialNp mass ratio. Np(V) adsorption was modeled using a surface complexation approach with the mathematical program FITEQL to determine functional group specific binding constants. The data from acid and base titrations of the bacteria were also modeled to estimate the concentrations and deprotonation constants of discrete bacterial surface functional groups. Bacterial functional group characteristics and Np(V) adsorption behavior between the soil bacterium and the halophilic bacterium were compared. These results highlight the key similarities and differences in actinide adsorption behavior in environments of significantly different ionic strength. Similarities in adsorption behavior may be linked to similarities in the characteristics of the moieties between all bacterial cell walls. Differences in adsorption behavior may reflect differences in ionic strength effects, rather than

  19. Determination of plutonium-238 in plutonium by alpha spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aggarwal, S.K.; Jain, H.C.; Mathews, C.K.; Ramaniah, M.V.

    1975-01-01

    A method is presented for the determination of 238 Pu in plutonium samples by alpha spectrometry. Various factors attributing towards the energy degradation, a problem usually encountered in alpha spectrometry, are discussed. A computer programme is given for the evaluation of peak areas when the alpha spectrum is degraded. The results are compared with those obtained by mass spectrometry. (author)

  20. Plutonium recovery from carbonate wash solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gray, J.H.; Reif, D.J.; Chostner, D.F.; Holcomb, H.P.

    1991-01-01

    540Periodically higher than expected levels of plutonium are found in carbonate solutions used to wash second plutonium cycle solvent. The recent accumulation of plutonium in carbonate wash solutions has led to studies to determine the cause of that plutonium accumulation, to evaluate the quality of all canyon solvents, and to develop additional criteria needed to establish when solvent quality is acceptable. Solvent from three canyon solvent extraction cycles was used to evaluate technology required to measure tributyl phosphate (TBP) degradation products and was used to evaluate solvent quality criteria during the development of plutonium recovery processes. 1 fig

  1. Structural variability in neptunium(V) oxalate compounds: synthesis and structural characterization of Na2NpO2(C2O4)OH.H2O.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bean, Amanda C; Garcia, Eduardo; Scott, Brian L; Runde, Wolfgang

    2004-10-04

    Reaction of a (237)Np(V) stock solution in the presence of oxalic acid, calcium chloride, and sodium hydroxide under hydrothermal conditions produces single crystals of a neptunium(V) oxalate, Na(2)NpO(2)(C(2)O(4))OH.H(2)O. The structure consists of one-dimensional chains running down the a axis and is the first example of a neptunium(V) oxalate compound containing hydroxide anions.

  2. Low-Level Plutonium Bioassay Measurements at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamilton, T; Brown, T; Hickman, D; Marchetti, A; Williams, R; Kehl, S

    2007-06-18

    Plutonium-239 ({sup 239}Pu) and plutonium-240 ({sup 240}Pu) are important alpha emitting radionuclides contained in radioactive debris from nuclear weapons testing. {sup 239}Pu and {sup 240}Pu are long-lived radionuclides with half-lives of 24,400 years and 6580 years, respectively. Concerns over human exposure to plutonium stem from knowledge about the persistence of plutonium isotopes in the environment and the high relative effectiveness of alpha-radiation to cause potential harm to cells once incorporated into the human body. In vitro bioassay tests have been developed to assess uptakes of plutonium based on measured urinary excretion patterns and modeled metabolic behaviors of the absorbed radionuclides. Systemic plutonium absorbed by the deep lung or from the gastrointestinal tract after ingestion is either excreted or distributed to other organs, primarily to the liver and skeleton, where it is retained for biological half-times of around 20 and 50 years, respectively. Dose assessment and atoll rehabilitation programs in the Marshall Islands have historically given special consideration to residual concentrations of plutonium in the environment even though the predicted dose from inhalation and/or ingestion of plutonium accounts for less than 5% of the annual effective dose from exposure to fallout contamination. Scientists from the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) have developed a state-of-the-art bioassay test to assess urinary excretion rates of plutonium from Marshallese populations. This new heavy-isotope measurement system is based on Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS). The AMS system at LLNL far exceeds the standard measurement requirements established under the latest United States Department of Energy (DOE) regulation, 10CFR 835, for occupational monitoring of plutonium, and offers several advantages over classical as well as competing new technologies for low-level detection and measurement of plutonium isotopes. The United States

  3. Plutonium inventories for stabilization and stabilized materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, A.K.

    1996-05-01

    The objective of the breakout session was to identify characteristics of materials containing plutonium, the need to stabilize these materials for storage, and plans to accomplish the stabilization activities. All current stabilization activities are driven by the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board Recommendation 94-1 (May 26, 1994) and by the recently completed Plutonium ES&H Vulnerability Assessment (DOE-EH-0415). The Implementation Plan for accomplishing stabilization of plutonium-bearing residues in response to the Recommendation and the Assessment was published by DOE on February 28, 1995. This Implementation Plan (IP) commits to stabilizing problem materials within 3 years, and stabilizing all other materials within 8 years. The IP identifies approximately 20 metric tons of plutonium requiring stabilization and/or repackaging. A further breakdown shows this material to consist of 8.5 metric tons of plutonium metal and alloys, 5.5 metric tons of plutonium as oxide, and 6 metric tons of plutonium as residues. Stabilization of the metal and oxide categories containing greater than 50 weight percent plutonium is covered by DOE Standard {open_quotes}Criteria for Safe Storage of Plutonium Metals and Oxides{close_quotes} December, 1994 (DOE-STD-3013-94). This standard establishes criteria for safe storage of stabilized plutonium metals and oxides for up to 50 years. Each of the DOE sites and contractors with large plutonium inventories has either started or is preparing to start stabilization activities to meet these criteria.

  4. Burning weapons-grade plutonium in reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Newman, D.F.

    1993-06-01

    As a result of massive reductions in deployed nuclear warheads, and their subsequent dismantlement, large quantities of surplus weapons- grade plutonium will be stored until its ultimate disposition is achieved in both the US and Russia. Ultimate disposition has the following minimum requirements: (1) preclude return of plutonium to the US and Russian stockpiles, (2) prevent environmental damage by precluding release of plutonium contamination, and (3) prevent proliferation by precluding plutonium diversion to sub-national groups or nonweapons states. The most efficient and effective way to dispose of surplus weapons-grade plutonium is to fabricate it into fuel and use it for generation of electrical energy in commercial nuclear power plants. Weapons-grade plutonium can be used as fuel in existing commercial nuclear power plants, such as those in the US and Russia. This recovers energy and economic value from weapons-grade plutonium, which otherwise represents a large cost liability to maintain in safeguarded and secure storage. The plutonium remaining in spent MOX fuel is reactor-grade, essentially the same as that being discharged in spent UO 2 fuels. MOX fuels are well developed and are currently used in a number of LWRs in Europe. Plutonium-bearing fuels without uranium (non-fertile fuels) would require some development. However, such non-fertile fuels are attractive from a nonproliferation perspective because they avoid the insitu production of additional plutonium and enhance the annihilation of the plutonium inventory on a once-through fuel cycle

  5. Effect of mass of neptunium V in intestinal absorption in the monkey and the rat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Metivier, H.; Masse, R.; Lafuma, J.

    1983-01-01

    The coefficient of gastrointestinal transfer of neptunium as pentavalent neptunyl nitrate was studied in rats and monkeys as a function of the ingested mass. In both species, the transfer coefficient ranged between 1.10 - 3 - 1.10 - 2 when the administered mass varied from 0.3 ng to 2 mg per kg. At low concentrations, the values obtained in the monkey are about twice as low as thoses obtained in the rat. Considering the strong urinary excretion, the amounts retained at the organ levels represent about 0.1% in the rat and 0.04% in the monkey for low concentrations. The values obtained are usually in good agreement with the few data published on the rat [fr

  6. Forefront of PUREX system engineering. Chemistry and engineering of ruthenium, technetium and neptunium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-07-01

    The paper reports the activity of the research committee organized by the Atomic Energy Society of Japan on 'Ruthenium and Technetium Chemistry in the PUREX System', with focusing on basic behaviors of ruthenium, technetium and neptunium in the PUREX process, the principles of plant design, and behaviors during the final waste treatment. The scope of the work includes the following major topics: (1) basic solution and solid-state chemistry; (2) basic solution and solid-state chemistry of minor actinides in particular, Np; (3) partitioning chemistry in the PUREX system and environmental behavior of the components; (4) processes of recovery, purification, and utilization of rare metal fission products; (5) field data on plant design, operation, decontamination, and decommissioning; (6) numerical process simulations and process control technologies; (7) compilation of a data base for process chemistry and plant engineering. (S. Ohno)

  7. The first weighing of plutonium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1967-09-10

    The following text, transcribed from the remarks of those scientists who gathered at the University of Chicago on September 10, 1967, to celebrate the 25th anniversary of the first weighing of plutonium, tells an important part of the story of this fascinating new element that is destined to play an increasingly significant role in the future of man.

  8. Spectrographic analysis of plutonium (1960)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Artaud, J.; Chaput, M.; Robichet, J.

    1960-01-01

    Various possibilities for the spectrographic determination of impurities in plutonium are considered. The application of the 'copper spark' method, of sparking on graphite and of fractional distillation in the arc are described and discussed in some detail (apparatus, accessories, results obtained). (author) [fr

  9. Plutonium waste incineration using pyrohydrolysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyer, M.L.

    1991-01-01

    Waste generated by Savannah River Site (SRS) plutonium operations includes a contaminated organic waste stream. A conventional method for disposing of the organic waste stream and recovering the nuclear material is by incineration. When the organic material is burned, the plutonium remains in the incinerator ash. Plutonium recovery from incinerator ash is highly dependent on the maximum temperature to which the oxide is exposed. Recovery via acid leaching is reduced for a high fired ash (>800 degree C), while plutonium oxides fired at lower decomposition temperatures (400--800 degrees C) are more soluble at any given acid concentration. To determine the feasibility of using a lower temperature process, tests were conducted using an electrically heated, controlled-air incinerator. Nine nonradioactive, solid, waste materials were batch-fed and processed in a top-heated cylindrical furnace. Waste material processing was completed using a 19-liter batch over a nominal 8-hour cycle. A processing cycle consisted of 1 hour for heating, 4 hours for reacting, and 3 hours for chamber cooling. The water gas shift reaction was used to hydrolyze waste materials in an atmosphere of 336% steam and 4.4% oxygen. Throughput ranged from 0.14 to 0.27 kg/hr depending on the variability in the waste material composition and density

  10. The first weighing of plutonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1967-01-01

    The following text, transcribed from the remarks of those scientists who gathered at the University of Chicago on September 10, 1967, to celebrate the 25th anniversary of the first weighing of plutonium, tells an important part of the story of this fascinating new element that is destined to play an increasingly significant role in the future of man

  11. Safe disposal of surplus plutonium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, W. L.; Naz, S.; Lutze, W.; Busch, R.; Prinja, A.; Stoll, W.

    2001-06-01

    About 150 tons of weapons grade and weapons usable plutonium (metal, oxide, and in residues) have been declared surplus in the USA and Russia. Both countries plan to convert the metal and oxide into mixed oxide fuel for nuclear power reactors. Russia has not yet decided what to do with the residues. The US will convert residues into a ceramic, which will then be over-poured with highly radioactive borosilicate glass. The radioactive glass is meant to provide a deterrent to recovery of plutonium, as required by a US standard. Here we show a waste form for plutonium residues, zirconia/boron carbide (ZrO 2/B 4C), with an unprecedented combination of properties: a single, radiation-resistant, and chemically durable phase contains the residues; billion-year-old natural analogs are available; and criticality safety is given under all conceivable disposal conditions. ZrO 2/B 4C can be disposed of directly, without further processing, making it attractive to all countries facing the task of plutonium disposal. The US standard for protection against recovery can be met by disposal of the waste form together with used reactor fuel.

  12. Design of plutonium processing facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Derbyshire, W.; Sills, R.J.

    1982-01-01

    Five considerations for the design of plutonium processing facilities are identified. These are: Toxicity, Radiation, Criticality, Containment and Remote Operation. They are examined with reference to reprocessing spent nuclear fuel and application is detailed both for liquid and dry processes. (author)

  13. On plutonium, journalism and ethics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rundo, J.

    1994-01-01

    This editorial comments on the furore resulting from three lay articles published by E. Welsome in the Albuquerque Tribune for 15 November 1993, concerning the injection of plutonium into humans in the 1940s, and discusses the ethics of administration of radioactive materials with and without informed consent. (Author)

  14. Management of Russian military plutonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaleski, C.P.

    1996-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to propose and discuss a solution which enables storing as quickly as possible all weapons-grade plutonium from Russian military program in a way which would prevent diversion. Two main conditions apply to this solution. First, it should be achieved in a manner acceptable to Russian government, notably by preserving plutonium for possible future energy production, and second, the economics of the total system should be good enough to ensure no charge or limited charge for the storage of plutonium. A proposal is made to store plutonium in a specially designed fast reactor or specially designed reactor core. This solution could be favorable in comparison to other solutions applying the above mentioned goal and conditions. Additionally the proposed solution would have the following side advantages: utilizing available personnel and installations of the Russian nuclear complex; providing possible basis for decommissioning of older and less safe Russian reactors; giving experience of construction and operation of a series of sodium-cooled fast reactors. The major problem however is the need for large capital investment with the risk of getting no adequate return on investment due to difficult political and economic situation in Russia

  15. Comments on a paper entitled: Toxicity and carcinogenicity of plutonium-239

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stocum, W.E.; Pigg, C.J.

    1978-06-01

    Studies on carcinogenic effects of Pu-239 on animals have been reviewed often in the literature. A summary of these studies, which were done primarily with dogs or rats, shows that the inhalation of Pu-239 results in plutonium being retained in highest concentrations in bone, liver, lung, and lymph nodes. This may result in the induction of specific kinds of cancer, primarily lung and bone carcinomas, and to a lesser extent, bile duct tumors. These animal studies have been extremely useful in the analysis of the limited number of studies available on humans exposed to plutonium and in the prediction of plutonium cancer risk to man. One of the most significant and relevant studies on human exposures to Pu-239 is that of the 1944-45 exposure at Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory. Twenty-five men associated with the Manhattan Project were identified as having had significant plutonium exposures; total initial lung burden across the group was approximately 10 μCi. These individuals have been monitored clinically and in laboratory studies for the past 30 years. None of the individuals has shown cancer incidence and none shows medical findings attributable to internally deposited plutonium. There has been no recorded instance of cancer in man resulting from the internal deposition of any plutonium isotope in the more than three decades in which plutonium has been used. This excellent record illustrates the effectiveness of control measures and safety standards imposed on the handling of radioactive materials. These facts lead to a high level of confidence that the transportation of radioactive materials to and around the WIPP would not have a markedly different record

  16. How not to reduce plutonium stocks. The danger of MOX-fuelled nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    Plutonium is a radioactive by-product of nuclear reactor operation and one of the most toxic substances known. The world would be a safer place if the governments of countries with stocks of it, including Britain, would adopt effective policies for reducing and managing them. Two recent authoritative reports recommend that the British government take urgent action to reduce its 'civil' plutonium stock - currently one quarter of the world's total and set to rise to about two-thirds by the year 2010. The March 1999 House of Lords report, Management of Nuclear Waste, concludes that British government policy on plutonium 'should be the maintenance of the minimum strategic stock, and the declaration of the remainder as waste'. A report from the Royal Society, Britain's main learned society, meanwhile states that: 'In addition to disposing of some of the plutonium already in the stockpile, steps should be taken to reduce the amount added to it each year, primarily by reducing the amount of reprocessing carried out'. The government's reply to the House of Lords is expected to be followed by a public consultation before changes in legislation are proposed. But, at the same time, the government is considering an application from British Nuclear Fuels Limited (BNFL), the government-owned company which separates plutonium from spent nuclear fuel rods, for a licence to operate a new plant at Sellafield in Cumbria to produce mixed-oxide (MOX) nuclear fuel from its plutonium stockpile. The nuclear industry justifies the Sellafield MOX plant as one way of reducing plutonium stocks. But critics point out that this is not a rational way to manage plutonium. This briefing aims to contribute to an informed debate during the current flurry of British government nuclear policymaking by explaining why. (author)

  17. Primarily Experimental Results for a W Wire Array Z Pinch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuai Bin; Aici, Qiu; Wang Liangping; Zeng Zhengzhong; Wang Wensheng; Cong Peitian; Gai Tongyang; Wei Fuli; Guo Ning; Zhang Zhong

    2006-01-01

    Primarily experimental results are given for a W wire array Z pinch imploded with up to 2 MA in 100 ns on a Qiangguang-I pulsed power generator. The configuration and parameters of the generator, the W wire array load assembly and the diagnostic system for the experiment are described. The total X-ray energy has been obtained with a averaged power of X-ray radiation of 1.28 TW

  18. Uranium, plutonium and co

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sauerbrey, Roland; Joehnk, Peter

    2016-01-01

    To date there is no repository facility for highly radioactive and heat-generating waste in Germany. This politically ''hot'' topic is undeniably a very big, urgent problem in our society. The Helmholtz Association of German Research Centers is dedicated to developing scientific solutions for such issues. It looks back on 20 years of history: In 1995 the loosely organized collective bearing the name ''Working Association of Large-Scale Research Institutes'' (Arbeitsgemeinschaft der Grossforschungseinrichtungen) became an association of now 18 research centers. These centers collectively work in a total of six research areas. While the HZDR has only belonged to the largest research association in Germany since 2011, repository research was already on the agenda way back when the Rossendorf research center established itself in 1992 after the fall of the Berlin Wall. A good enough reason to examine the results from about 20 years of repository research in Dresden in more detail. In this issue of ''discovered'' we will take an inside look at radiochemical, radiogeological, and microbiological labs, look over the shoulders of researchers using the ''Rossendorf Beamline'' at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility in Grenoble, and descend hundreds of meters into Finnish, Swedish, and Swiss research labs. How do ''uranium, plutonium, and co.'' react with mineral surfaces in environments that are low in oxygen or watery? How do they interact with microorganisms deep underground? And how can host rock or other materials be used as technical barriers to prevent the spread of radioactive substances? In order to answer these and further questions, the researchers of the HZDR use a wide range of spectroscopic methods. They expose test samples to lasers, infrared light, and X-rays or use the fluorescent properties of certain compounds to learn about the behavior of actinides

  19. Uranium, plutonium and co

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sauerbrey, Roland; Joehnk, Peter (eds.)

    2016-04-15

    To date there is no repository facility for highly radioactive and heat-generating waste in Germany. This politically ''hot'' topic is undeniably a very big, urgent problem in our society. The Helmholtz Association of German Research Centers is dedicated to developing scientific solutions for such issues. It looks back on 20 years of history: In 1995 the loosely organized collective bearing the name ''Working Association of Large-Scale Research Institutes'' (Arbeitsgemeinschaft der Grossforschungseinrichtungen) became an association of now 18 research centers. These centers collectively work in a total of six research areas. While the HZDR has only belonged to the largest research association in Germany since 2011, repository research was already on the agenda way back when the Rossendorf research center established itself in 1992 after the fall of the Berlin Wall. A good enough reason to examine the results from about 20 years of repository research in Dresden in more detail. In this issue of ''discovered'' we will take an inside look at radiochemical, radiogeological, and microbiological labs, look over the shoulders of researchers using the ''Rossendorf Beamline'' at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility in Grenoble, and descend hundreds of meters into Finnish, Swedish, and Swiss research labs. How do ''uranium, plutonium, and co.'' react with mineral surfaces in environments that are low in oxygen or watery? How do they interact with microorganisms deep underground? And how can host rock or other materials be used as technical barriers to prevent the spread of radioactive substances? In order to answer these and further questions, the researchers of the HZDR use a wide range of spectroscopic methods. They expose test samples to lasers, infrared light, and X-rays or use the fluorescent properties of certain compounds to learn about the behavior of actinides

  20. A literature study of the behaviour of cesium, strontium and plutonium in the soil-plant ecosystem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nielsen, B.; Strandberg, M.

    1988-07-01

    Literature on the occurrence of radiocesium (primarily 137CS) in the soil-plant system with emphasis on the influence of treatment on its root uptake, was reviewed. The aim was to study root uptake of radiocesium in order to estimate the applicability of suitable counter measures in cases of contamination of arable land with plutonium, radiostrontium and, in particular, radiocesium. To what extent 136CS is available to, and absorbed by, the plant and how it is distributed and absorbed in the soil is described. The physiological uptake of plutonium from soil through roots to plant parts lying above ground constitutes minor health hazards to population from the ingestion of vegetables. Extensive use of root fruits, might indicate that there is a risk present in areas of high plutonium soil concentration, because plutonium is adsorbed to root molecules, especially if soil and peel are not discarded. Another risk lies in the resuspension of plutonium deposited on the soil surface. As mentioned above, the impact of the leakage of plutonium from the Chernobyl accident was negligible in distant areas. The effects in the vicinity of the reactor, might have been important. In small areas with high levels of plutonium contamination removal of the top soil layer will be effective. Because of the high toxity and long half-life of plutonium, the risk involved merely in isolating such an area will be to high, because the plutonium may be further dispersed. In larger areas, deep ploughing to a depth of 30-40 cm or more, if feasible, is a possibility. Local factors have to be considered, e.g. position of bedrock, groundwater, soil parameters etc. Deep ploughing combined with previous dispersion of clay minerals, lime or humus or a combination, might be a solution, and should be followed by limiting crops to those with roots concentrated in the surface layer and with smallest attainable concentration ratios for plutonium. Cereals might fill this demand. 188 refs. (AB)

  1. Physics of Plutonium Recycling in Thermal Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kinchin, G.H.

    1967-01-01

    A substantial programme of experimental reactor physics work with plutonium fuels has been carried out in the UK; the purpose of this paper is to review the experimental and theoretical work, with emphasis on plutonium recycling in thermal reactors. Although the main incentive for some of the work may have been to study plutonium build-up in uranium-fuelled reactors, it is nevertheless relevant to plutonium recycling and no distinction is drawn between build-up and enrichment studies. A variety of techniques have been for determining reactivity, neutron spectrum and reaction rates in simple assemblies of plutonium-aluminium fuel with water, graphite and beryllia moderators. These experiments give confidence in the basic data and methods of calculation for near-homogeneous mixtures of plutonium and moderator. In the practical case of plutonium recycling it is necessary to confirm that satisfactory predictions can be made for heterogeneous lattices enriched with plutonium. In this field, experiments have been carried out with plutonium-uranium metal and oxide-cluster fuels in graphite-moderated lattices and in SGHW lattices, and the effects of 240 Pu have been studied by perturbation measurements with single fuel elements. The exponential and critical experiments have used tonne quantities of fuel with plutonium contents ranging from 0.25 to 1.2% and the perturbation experiments have extended both the range of plutonium contents and the range of isotopic compositions of plutonium. In addition to reactivity and reactivity coefficients, such as the temperature coefficients, attention has been concentrated on relative reaction rate distributions which provide evidence for variations of neutron spectrum. .Theoretical comparisons, together with similar comparisons for non-uniform lattices, establish the validity of methods of calculation which have been used to study the feasibility of plutonium recycling in thermal reactors. (author)

  2. Physics of Plutonium Recycling in Thermal Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kinchin, G. H. [Atomic Energy Establishment, Winfrith, Dorchester, Dorset (United Kingdom)

    1967-09-15

    A substantial programme of experimental reactor physics work with plutonium fuels has been carried out in the UK; the purpose of this paper is to review the experimental and theoretical work, with emphasis on plutonium recycling in thermal reactors. Although the main incentive for some of the work may have been to study plutonium build-up in uranium-fuelled reactors, it is nevertheless relevant to plutonium recycling and no distinction is drawn between build-up and enrichment studies. A variety of techniques have been for determining reactivity, neutron spectrum and reaction rates in simple assemblies of plutonium-aluminium fuel with water, graphite and beryllia moderators. These experiments give confidence in the basic data and methods of calculation for near-homogeneous mixtures of plutonium and moderator. In the practical case of plutonium recycling it is necessary to confirm that satisfactory predictions can be made for heterogeneous lattices enriched with plutonium. In this field, experiments have been carried out with plutonium-uranium metal and oxide-cluster fuels in graphite-moderated lattices and in SGHW lattices, and the effects of {sup 240}Pu have been studied by perturbation measurements with single fuel elements. The exponential and critical experiments have used tonne quantities of fuel with plutonium contents ranging from 0.25 to 1.2% and the perturbation experiments have extended both the range of plutonium contents and the range of isotopic compositions of plutonium. In addition to reactivity and reactivity coefficients, such as the temperature coefficients, attention has been concentrated on relative reaction rate distributions which provide evidence for variations of neutron spectrum. .Theoretical comparisons, together with similar comparisons for non-uniform lattices, establish the validity of methods of calculation which have been used to study the feasibility of plutonium recycling in thermal reactors. (author)

  3. Speciation of plutonium during sorption and diffusion in Opalinus clay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaplan, Ugras

    2013-01-01

    The presented work was carried out in the framework of the BMWi-project ''Interaction and migration of actinides in natural clay rocks taking into account humic substances and clay organic matter - Interactions of neptunium and plutonium with natural clay rocks''. For the long-term safety assessments of nuclear repositories, the possible migration of the radiotoxic wastes into the environment must be considered. Due to its long half-life (T 1/2 = 24000 y) 239 Pu has a significant contribution to the radiotoxicity of spent nuclear fuel in a repository after long periods of storage. The redox-sensitive plutonium has a very complicated chemical behavior. In aqueous solution under environmental relevant conditions Pu can exist in oxidation states +III to +VI and it can exist in up to four oxidation states simultaneously in a solution. Clays are considered as a possible host rock formation for of high-level radioactive waste disposal. Therefore, detailed information on the mobilization and immobilization of plutonium through / into the groundwater from a repository are of special interest. In this work new insights into the interaction between Pu and natural Opalinus clay (OPA, Mont Terri, Switzerland) are obtained with regard to the disposal of heat-generating radioactive waste in a deep geological repository.rnThe focus of this work was on the determination of the speciation of Pu on the mineral surface after sorption and diffusion process by different synchrotron based techniques (μ-XRF, μ-XANES/-EXAFS, μ-XRD, and EXAFS/XANES). The interaction between Pu and OPA was studied in batch sorption and diffusion experiments in dependence of various experimental parameters (e.g. pH, Pu oxidation state). Sorption experiments showed that some experimental parameters (e.g. temperature, humic acid) have a significant impact on the sorption of Pu on OPA. Speciation studies were performed as a function of various chemical parameters on powder samples form batch experiments as

  4. The radiological hazard of plutonium isotopes and specific plutonium mixtures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heindel, G.; Clow, J.; Inkret, W.; Miller, G.

    1995-11-01

    The US Department of Energy defines the hazard categories of its nuclear facilities based upon the potential for accidents to have significant effects on specific populations and the environment. In this report, the authors consider the time dependence of hazard category 2 (significant on-site effects) for facilities with inventories of plutonium isotopes and specific weapons-grade and heat-source mixtures of plutonium isotopes. The authors also define relative hazard as the reciprocal of the hazard category 2 threshold value and determine its time dependence. The time dependence of both hazard category 2 thresholds and relative hazards are determined and plotted for 10,000 years to provide useful information for planning long-term storage or disposal facilities

  5. Microdistribution and Long-Term Retention of 239Pu (NO3)4 in the Respiratory Tracts of an Acutely Exposed Plutonium Worker and Experimental Beagle Dogs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nielsen, Christopher E.; Wilson, Dulaney A.; Brooks, Antone L.; McCord, Stacey; Dagle, Gerald E.; James, Anthony C.; Tolmachev, Sergei Y.; Thrall, Brian D.; Morgan, William F.

    2012-11-01

    The long-term retention of inhaled soluble forms of plutonium raises concerns as to the potential health effects in persons working in nuclear energy or the nuclear weapons program. The distributions of long-term retained inhaled plutonium-nitrate [239Pu (NO3)4] deposited in the lungs of an accidentally exposed nuclear worker (Human Case 0269) and in the lungs of experimentally exposed beagle dogs with varying initial lung depositions were determined via autoradiographs of selected histological lung, lymph node, trachea, and nasal turbinate tissue sections. These studies showed that both the human and dogs had a non-uniform distribution of plutonium throughout the lung tissue. Fibrotic scar tissue effectively encapsulated a portion of the plutonium and prevented its clearance from the body or translocation to other tissues and diminished dose to organ parenchyma. Alpha radiation activity from deposited plutonium in Human Case 0269 was observed primarily along the sub-pleural regions while no alpha activity was seen in the tracheobronchial lymph nodes of this individual. However, relatively high activity levels in the tracheobronchial lymph nodes of the beagles indicated the lymphatic system was effective in clearing deposited plutonium from the lung tissues. In both the human case and beagle dogs, the appearance of retained plutonium within the respiratory tract was inconsistent with current biokinetic models of clearance for soluble forms of plutonium. Bound plutonium can have a marked effect on the dose to the lungs and subsequent radiation exposure has the potential increase in cancer risk.

  6. The redox chemistry of neptunium in gamma-irradiated aqueous nitric acid in the presence of an organic phase

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mincher, B.J.; Přeček, Martin; Paulenova, A.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 308, č. 3 (2016), s. 1005-1009 ISSN 0236-5731 R&D Projects: GA MŠk EE2.3.30.0057 Grant - others:OP VK 4 POSTDOK(XE) CZ.1.07/2.3.00/30.0057 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : neptunium * redox chemistry * radiation chemistry * solvent extraction Subject RIV: CH - Nuclear ; Quantum Chemistry OBOR OECD: Inorganic and nuclear chemistry Impact factor: 1.282, year: 2016

  7. Plutonium vulnerability issues at Hanford's Plutonium Finishing Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feldt, E.; Templeton, D.W.; Tholen, E.

    1995-01-01

    The Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) at the Hanford, Washington Site was operated to produce plutonium (Pu) metal and oxide for national defense purposes. Due to the production requirements and methods utilized to meet national needs and the abrupt shutdown of the plant in the late 1980s, the plant was left in a condition that poses a risk of radiation exposure to plant workers, of accidental radioactive material release to the environment, and of radiation exposure to the public. In early 1994, an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) to determine the best methods for cleaning out and stabilizing Pu materials in the PFP was started. While the EIS is being prepared, a number of immediate actions have been completed or are underway to significantly reduce the greatest hazards in the PFP. Recently, increased attention his been paid to Pu risks at Department of Energy (DOE) facilities resulting in the Department-wide Plutonium Vulnerability Assessment and a recommendation by the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (DNFSB) for DOE to develop integrated plans for managing its nuclear materials

  8. Bibliography on plutonium and its compounds; Bibliographie sur le plutonium et ses composes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dirian, J; Choquet, J [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1958-07-01

    Collection of bibliographical references on plutonium and its principal compounds from 1942 to end of 1957. (author) [French] Compilation de references bibliographiques sur le plutonium et ses principaux composes de 1942 a fin 1957. (auteur)

  9. Speciation of the plutonium at trace levels by capillary electrophoresis-ICP-MS coupling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ambard, Ch.

    2007-01-01

    The CE-ICP-MS coupling allowed the development of new analytical methods for the study of plutonium (Pu) speciation at trace levels including complexation studies of this element by organic and inorganic ligands. First, a method, called dual detection, based on the simultaneous use of the UV-Visible spectrophotometer integrated in the capillary electrophoresis and the ICP-MS was developed and validated. It allows the unambiguous determination of electrophoretic mobilities for separated chemical species and gives a powerful tool for speciation studies. Then, the influence on Pu redox speciation of the buffer from the background electrolyte was evaluated. This study showed the implications of the electrolyte constituents' choice on Pu redox equilibrium in the sample. Furthermore, the CE-ICP-MS coupling was used for studying the Pu complexation at trace levels by some organic (NTA and DTPA) and inorganic ligands (carbonates). The behaviour of Pu valence +III, +IV and +VI was studied in the presence of buffer at near neutral pH. Different species of Pu were observed depending on the initial oxidation state of the plutonium. The study showed the potential of poly-amino-carboxylic acids, such as NTA and DTPA, for dissolving Pu precipitates, regardless its initial speciation. Finally, the carbonation of pentavalent neptunium, as an analogue of Pu(V), was achieved at very low concentration of Np (10 -8 mol.L -1 ). The formation of NpO 2 (CO 3 ) - at 25 C and 2,5*10 -2 mol.L -1 ionic strength was measured by CE-ICP-MS and found to consistent with literature data. (author)

  10. Multi-generational stewardship of plutonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pillay, K.K.S.

    1997-01-01

    The post-cold war era has greatly enhanced the interest in the long-term stewardship of plutonium. The management of excess plutonium from proposed nuclear weapons dismantlement has been the subject of numerous intellectual discussions during the past several years. In this context, issues relevant to long-term management of all plutonium as a valuable energy resource are also being examined. While there are differing views about the future role of plutonium in the economy, there is a recognition of the environmental and health related problems and proliferation potentials of weapons-grade plutonium. The long-term management of plutonium as an energy resource will require a new strategy to maintain stewardship for many generations to come

  11. Plutonium Immobilization Can Loading Concepts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kriikku, E.; Ward, C.; Stokes, M.; Randall, B.; Steed, J.; Jones, R.; Hamilton, L.; Rogers, L.; Fiscus, J.; Dyches, G.

    1998-05-01

    The Plutonium Immobilization Facility will encapsulate plutonium in ceramic pucks and seal the pucks inside welded cans. Remote equipment will place these cans in magazines and the magazines in a Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) canister. The DWPF will fill the canister with glass for permanent storage. This report discusses five can loading conceptual designs and the lists the advantages and disadvantages for each concept. This report identifies loading pucks into cans and backfilling cans with helium as the top priority can loading development areas. The can loading welder and cutter are very similar to the existing Savannah River Site (SRS) FB-Line bagless transfer welder and cutter and thus they are a low priority development item

  12. The chemistry of plutonium revealed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Connick, R.E.

    1990-01-01

    In 1941 one goal of the Manhattan Project was to unravel the chemistry of the synthetic element plutonium as rapidly as possible. Important insights were obtained from tracer experiments, but the full complexity of plutonium chemistry was not revealed until macroscopic amounts (milligrams) became available. Because processes for separation from fission products were aqueous solution based, such solution chemistry was emphasized, particularly precipitation and oxidation-reduction behavior. The latter turned out to be unusually intricate when it was discovered that two more oxidation states existed in aqueous solution than had previously been suspected. Further, it was found that an equilibrium was rapidly established among the four aqueous oxidation states while at the same time any three were not in equilibrium. These and other observations made while doing a crash study of a previously unknown element will be reported

  13. Plutonium chemistry of the ocean

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Folsom, T.R.

    1972-01-01

    Plutonium is a man-made element whose behavior in the marine environment is inadequately known at present. It has been studied intensively in connection with production of weapons and power sources and has been characterized as an extremely toxic substance. Nevertheless, only a few dozen measurements have been made of concentrations in seawater and in the associated organisms and sediments. The first of these were as recent as 1964. There are reasons to believe its chemical behavior in the ocean is different from what has been observed on land, and that it will be difficult to predict how plutonium will distribute itself in the ocean. The consequences of increased environmental concentrations of Pu are discussed

  14. The first milligrams of plutonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldschmidt, B.

    1997-01-01

    A historical review of the development of the very first quantities of plutonium produced during World War II in the United States and in Canada, as remembered by the French nuclear chemist, Mr Goldschmidt, who participated to the various programs which were involved in the development of the atomic bomb, and to the first steps of the French atomic program after the war. Mr Goldschmidt worked especially on organic solvent extraction, with the selection, in 1945, of non volatile tri glycol dichloride, and the development of the Chalk River plant. In 1949, at the Bouchet plant, his team has isolated the first milligrams of French plutonium from uranium oxide; and in 1952, the PUREX process was developed

  15. The MacDonald and savage titrimetric procedure for plutonium scaled-down to the milligram level: Automated procedure for routine analysis of safeguards samples containing 2 to 5 mg plutonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ronesch, K.; Jammet, G.; Berger, J.; Doubek, N.; Bagliano, G.; Deron, S.

    1992-08-01

    A selective titrimetric procedure directly applicable to both input and product solutions from fast reactor fuel reprocessing was set up by MacDonald and Savage and scaled down to 3 mg of plutonium in sample aliquots at the request of the Safeguards Analytical Laboratory (SAL) of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), which needed to replace its silver (II) oxide titration procedure by a more selective electrochemical method. Although the procedure is very selective the following species still interfere: Vanadates (almost quantitatively), Neptunium (one electron exchange per mole); Nitrites, Fluorosilicates and Iodates present in mg amount yield slight biases. This paper describes the fully automatized procedure presently applied in SAL for the routine determination of 2 to 5 mg plutonium dissolved in nitric acid solution. The method allows the unattended analysis of 20 aliquots within a five hour period. The equipment including the reagent distribution system, the sample changer and the control units are introduced and the principle design of the software is shortly described. Safety requirements have been addressed and are also reviewed in the report. Results obtained on standard reference materials, international intercomparison samples and actual safeguards samples routinely analyzed with the proposed procedure are presented and compared with results achieved with the semiautomatic mode to demonstrate the performance. International requirements to reduce the amount of radioactive materials in waste will certainly lead to a further reduction of the amount of plutonium in one aliquot. Some future perspective to titrate 1 mg samples are presented in the discussion. 12 refs, 10 figs, 8 tabs

  16. Confinement facilities for handling plutonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maraman, W.J.; McNeese, W.D.; Stafford, R.G.

    1975-01-01

    Plutonium handling on a multigram scale began in 1944. Early criteria, equipment, and techniques for confining contamination have been superseded by more stringent criteria and vastly improved equipment and techniques for in-process contamination control, effluent air cleaning and treatment of liquid wastes. This paper describes the evolution of equipment and practices to minimize exposure of workers and escape of contamination into work areas and into the environment. Early and current contamination controls are compared. (author)

  17. Plutonium decontamination studies using Reverse Osmosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plock, C.E.; Travis, T.N.

    1980-01-01

    Water in batches of 45 gallons each, from a creek crossing the Rocky Flats Plant, was transferred to the Reverse Osmosis (RO) laboratory for experimental testing. The testing involved using RO for plutonium decontamination. For each test, the water was spiked with plutonium, had its pH adjusted, and was then processed by RO. At a water recovery level of 87%, the plutonium decontamination factors ranged from near 100 to 1200, depending on the pH of the processed water

  18. Safe handling of plutonium in research laboratories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-01-01

    The training film illustrates the main basic requirements for the safe handling of small amounts of plutonium. The film is intended not only for people setting up plutonium research laboratories but also for all those who work in existing plutonium research laboratories. It was awarded the first prize in the category ''Protection of Workers'' at the international film festival organized by the 4th World Congress of the International Radiation Protection Association (IRPA) in Paris in April 1977

  19. Addressing mixed waste in plutonium processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christensen, D.C.; Sohn, C.L.; Reid, R.A.

    1991-01-01

    The overall goal is the minimization of all waste generated in actinide processing facilities. Current emphasis is directed toward reducing and managing mixed waste in plutonium processing facilities. More specifically, the focus is on prioritizing plutonium processing technologies for development that will address major problems in mixed waste management. A five step methodological approach to identify, analyze, solve, and initiate corrective action for mixed waste problems in plutonium processing facilities has been developed

  20. Plutonium recycle. In-core fuel management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vincent, F.; Berthet, A.; Le Bars, M.

    1985-01-01

    Plutonium recycle in France will concern a dozen of PWR 900 MWe controlled in gray mode till 1995. This paper presents the main characteristics of fuel management with plutonium recycle. The organization of management studies will be copied from this developed for classical management studies. Up these studies, a ''feasibility report'' aims at establishing at each stage of the fuel cycle, the impact of the utilization of fuel containing plutonium [fr

  1. Plutonium-induced lymphadenitis in beagles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dagle, G.E.; Park, J.F.

    1976-01-01

    Plutonium oxide particles accumulate in the tracheobronchial lymph nodes of beagles exposed by inhalation and in the popliteal lymph nodes after subcutaneous injection in the hind paws. The sequence of histopathologic changes after phagocytosis of particles included necrosis, increased numbers of macrophages, and fibroplasia. Scar tissue eventually replaced the normal architecture of the lymph nodes and sequestered the plutonium particles from surrounding parenchyma. Electron microscopy showed that plutonium particles were aggregated in phagolysosomes of macrophages

  2. Safe handling of plutonium in research laboratories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1977-12-31

    The training film illustrates the main basic requirements for the safe handling of small amounts of plutonium. The film is intended not only for people setting up plutonium research laboratories but also for all those who work in existing plutonium research laboratories. It was awarded the first prize in the category ``Protection of Workers`` at the international film festival organized by the 4th World Congress of the International Radiation Protection Association (IRPA) in Paris in April 1977

  3. Weapons-grade plutonium dispositioning. Volume 4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sterbentz, J.W.; Olsen, C.S.; Sinha, U.P.

    1993-06-01

    This study is in response to a request by the Reactor Panel Subcommittee of the National Academy of Sciences (NAS) Committee on International Security and Arms Control (CISAC) to evaluate the feasibility of using plutonium fuels (without uranium) for disposal in existing conventional or advanced light water reactor (LWR) designs and in low temperature/pressure LWR designs that might be developed for plutonium disposal. Three plutonium-based fuel forms (oxides, aluminum metallics, and carbides) are evaluated for neutronic performance, fabrication technology, and material and compatibility issues. For the carbides, only the fabrication technologies are addressed. Viable plutonium oxide fuels for conventional or advanced LWRs include plutonium-zirconium-calcium oxide (PuO 2 -ZrO 2 -CaO) with the addition of thorium oxide (ThO 2 ) or a burnable poison such as erbium oxide (Er 2 O 3 ) or europium oxide (Eu 2 O 3 ) to achieve acceptable neutronic performance. Thorium will breed fissile uranium that may be unacceptable from a proliferation standpoint. Fabrication of uranium and mixed uranium-plutonium oxide fuels is well established; however, fabrication of plutonium-based oxide fuels will require further development. Viable aluminum-plutonium metallic fuels for a low temperature/pressure LWR include plutonium aluminide in an aluminum matrix (PuAl 4 -Al) with the addition of a burnable poison such as erbium (Er) or europium (Eu). Fabrication of low-enriched plutonium in aluminum-plutonium metallic fuel rods was initially established 30 years ago and will require development to recapture and adapt the technology to meet current environmental and safety regulations. Fabrication of high-enriched uranium plate fuel by the picture-frame process is a well established process, but the use of plutonium would require the process to be upgraded in the United States to conform with current regulations and minimize the waste streams

  4. Preliminary studies on the spatial-temporal microdistribution of inhaled soluble plutonium in the lungs of dogs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, M.W.; Dagle, G.E.

    1987-01-01

    The pulmonary microdistribution of inhaled soluble plutonium in four beagle dogs was studied in autoradiographs of histologic sections and transmission electron micrographs of lungs. Dogs were exposed to a single nose-only aerosol of 239 Pu nitrate with a post-exposure time ranging from 1 month to 42 months. At one month after the exposure, the plutonium was dispersed throughout the lung section, with a higher percentage of the activity found on alveolar macrophages and alveolar septa. However, a nonrandom localization of the plutonium was observed as time passed. The focal concentrations were primarily in nodular or diffuse interstitial fibrotic tissues typically contiguous with subpleural, peribronchial, or perivascular areas. More than 50% of the total activity was in the form of single-tracks at one month exposure, and this percentage increased with time. In summary, this preliminary study suggests an initial random dispersion of soluble plutonium with increased concentration of activity to nonrandom focal locations with time

  5. Plutonium in a grassland ecosystem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Little, C.A.

    1976-08-01

    A study was made of plutonium contamination of grassland at the Rocky Flats plant northwest of Denver, Colorado. Of interest were: the definition of major plutonium-containing ecosystem compartments; the relative amounts in those compartments; how those values related to studies done in other geographical areas; whether or not the predominant isotopes, 238 Pu and 239 Pu, behaved differently; and what mechanisms might have allowed for the observed patterns of contamination. Samples of soil, litter, vegetation, arthropods, and small mammals were collected for Pu analysis and mass determination from each of two macroplots. Small aliquots (5 g or less) were analyzed by a rapid liquid scintillation technique and by alpha spectrometry. Of the compartments sampled, greater than 99 percent of the total plutonium was contained in the soil and the concentrations were significantly inversely correlated with distance from the contamination source, depth of the sample, and particle size of the sieved soil samples. The soil data suggested that the distribution of contamination largely resulted from physical transport processes

  6. Improving Efficiency with 3-D Imaging: Technology Essential in Removing Plutonium Processing Equipment from Plutonium Finishing Plant Gloveboxes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crow, Stephen H.; Kyle, Richard N.; Minette, Michael J.

    2008-01-01

    The Plutonium Finishing Plant at Hanford, Washington began operations in 1949 to process plutonium and plutonium products. Its primary mission was to produce plutonium metal, fabricate weapons parts, and stabilize reactive materials. These operations, and subsequent activities, were performed in remote production lines, consisting primarily of hundreds of gloveboxes. Over the years these gloveboxes and processes have been continuously modified. The plant is currently inactive and Fluor Hanford has been tasked to clean out contaminated equipment and gloveboxes from the facility so it can be demolished in the near future. Approximately 100 gloveboxes at PFP have been cleaned out in the past four years and about 90 gloveboxes remain to be cleaned out. Because specific commitment dates for this work have been established with the State of Washington and other entities, it is important to adopt work practices that increase the safety and speed of this effort. The most recent work practice to be adopted by Fluor Hanford D and D workers is the use of 3-D models to improve the efficiency of cleaning out radioactive gloveboxes at the plant. The use of 3-D models has significantly improved the work planning process by providing workers with a clear image of glovebox construction and composition, which is then used to determine cleanout methods and work sequences. The 3-D visual products enhance safety by enabling workers to more easily identify hazards and implement controls. In addition, the ability to identify and target the removal of radiological materials early in the D and D process provides substantial dose reduction for the workers

  7. An Improved Plutonium Trifluoride Precipitation Flowsheet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harmon, H.D.

    2001-06-26

    This report discusses results of the plutonium trifluoride two-stage precipitation study. A series of precipitation experiments was used to identify the significant process variables affecting precipitation performance. A mathematical model of the precipitation process was developed which is based on the formation of plutonium fluoride complexes. The precipitation model relates all process variables, in a single equation, to a single parameter which can be used to control the performance of the plutonium trifluoride precipitation process. Recommendations have been made which will optimize the FB-Line plutonium trifluoride precipitation process.

  8. Safe handling of plutonium: a panel report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1974-01-01

    This guide results from a meeting of a Panel of Experts held by the International Atomic Energy Agency on 8 to 12 November 1971. It is directed to workers in research laboratories handling plutonium in gram amounts. Contents: aspects of the physical and chemical properties of plutonium; metabolic features of plutonium; facility design features for safe handling of plutonium (layout of facility, working zones, decontamination room, etc.); glove boxes; health surveillance (surveillance of environment and supervision of workers); emergencies; organization. Annexes: types of glove boxes; tables; mobile ..cap alpha.. air sampler; aerosol monitor; bio-assay limits of detection; examples of contamination control monitors.

  9. Plutonium use in foreign countries (03)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Otagaki, Takao

    2004-03-01

    European countries and Japan had been implementing the strategy of spent fuel reprocessing in order to use nuclear material to the maximum. Plutonium recovered from reprocessing, however, must be recycle on light water reactors (LWRs) because of considerable delay of fast reactor development. In Europe, much of experiences of plutonium recycling have been accumulated until now. Thus, the status of plutonium recycling up to the end of 2003 in France, Germany, The U.K., Belgium, Switzerland and other countries were studied based on the following scope. (1) Basic policy and present status of plutonium recycling in primary countries of France, Germany, The U.K., Belgium, Switzerland, and Sweden which plans to recycle a part of plutonium: Backend policy and the status of spent fuel management were studied, then integrated analysis and evaluation of the position of plutonium recycling in backend and the status of plutonium recycling development were performed. (2) Plan and experience of Mixed Oxide (MOX) fuel fabrication and reprocessing of spent fuels: The data and information on plan and experience of MOX fuel fabrication and reprocessing in foreign countries were collected. (3) Plutonium inventories: The data and information of plutonium inventories of foreign countries were collected. (author)

  10. Plutonium use in foreign countries (01)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Otagaki, Takao

    2002-03-01

    European countries and Japan had been implementing the strategy of spent fuel reprocessing in order to use nuclear material to the maximum. Plutonium recovered from reprocessing, however, must be recycle on light water reactors (LWRs) because of considerable delay of fast reactor development. In Europe, much of experience of plutonium recycling have been accumulated until now. Thus, the status of plutonium recycling up to the end of 2001 in France, Germany, The U.K., Belgium, Switzerland and other countries were studied based on the following scope. (1) Basic policy and present status of plutonium recycling in primary countries of France, Germany, The U.K., Belgium, Switzerland, and Sweden which recently appears the move of recycling a part of plutonium. Backend policy and the status of spent fuel management were studied, then integrated analysis and evaluation of the position of plutonium recycling in backend and the status of plutonium recycling development were performed. (2) Plan and experience of Mixed Oxide (MOX) fuel fabrication and reprocessing of spent fuels. The data and information on plan and experience of MOX fuel fabrication and reprocessing in foreign countries were collected. (3) Plutonium inventories. The data and information on plutonium inventories of foreign countries were collected. (author)

  11. Plutonium use in foreign countries (99)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Otagaki, Takao

    2000-03-01

    European countries and Japan had been implementing the strategy of spent fuel reprocessing in order to use nuclear material to the maximum. Plutonium recovered from reprocessing, however, must be recycle on light water reactors (LWRs) because of considerable delay of fast reactor development. In Europe, much of experience of plutonium recycling have been accumulated until now. Thus, the status of plutonium recycling up to the end of 1999 in France, Germany, The U.K., Belgium, Switzerland and other countries were studied based on the following scope. (1) Basic policy and present status of plutonium recycling in primary countries of France, Germany, The U.K., Belgium, Switzerland, and Sweden which recently appears the move to recycling a part of plutonium backend policy and the status of spent fuel management were studied, then integrated analysis and evaluation of the position of plutonium recycling in backend and the status of plutonium recycling development were performed. (2) Plan and experience of Mixed Oxide (MOX) fuel fabrication and reprocessing of spent fuels. The data and information on plan and experience of MOX fuel fabrication and reprocessing in foreign countries were collected. (3) Plutonium inventories. The data and information on plutonium inventories of foreign counties were collected. (author)

  12. Plutonium use in foreign countries (02)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Otagaki, Takao

    2003-02-01

    European countries and Japan had been implementing the strategy of spent fuel reprocessing in order to use nuclear material to the maximum. Plutonium recovered from reprocessing, however, must be recycle on light water reactors (LWRs) because of considerable delay of fast reactor development. In Europe, much of experience of plutonium recycling have been accumulated until now. Thus, the status of plutonium recycling up to the end of 2002 in France, Germany, The U.K., Belgium, Switzerland and other countries were studied based on the following scope. (1) Basic policy and present status of plutonium recycling in primary countries of France, Germany, The U.K., Belgium, Switzerland, and Sweden which recently appears the move of recycling a part of plutonium. Backend policy and the status of spent fuel management were studied, then integrated analysis and evaluation of the position of plutonium recycling in backend and the status of plutonium recycling development were performed. (2) Plan and experience of Mixed Oside (MOX) fuel fabrication and reprocessing of spent fuels. The data and information on plan and experience of MOX fuel fabrication and reprocessing in foreign countries were collected. (3) Plutonium inventories. The data and information on plutonium inventories of foreign countries were collected. (author)

  13. Plutonium use in foreign countries. (04)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Otagaki, Takao

    2005-03-01

    European countries and Japan had been implementing the strategy of spent fuel reprocessing in order to use nuclear material to the maximum. Plutonium recovered from reprocessing, however, must be recycle on light water reactors (LWRs) because of considerable delay of fast reactor development. In Europe, much of experience of plutonium recycling have been accumulated until now. Thus, the status of plutonium recycling up to the end of 2004 in France, Germany, The U.K., Belgium, Switzerland and other countries were studied based on the following scope. (1) Basic policy and present status of plutonium recycling in primary countries of France, Germany, the U.K., Belgium, Switzerland, and Sweden which plans to recycle a limited amount of plutonium: Backend policy and the status of spent fuel management were studied, then integrated analysis and evaluation of the position of plutonium recycling in backend and the status of plutonium recycling development were performed. (2) Plan and experience of Mixed Oxide (MOX) fuel fabrication and reprocessing of spent fuels: The data and information on plan and experience of MOX fuel fabrication and reprocessing in foreign countries were collected. (3) Plutonium inventories: The data and information on plutonium inventories of foreign countries were collected. (author)

  14. An Improved Plutonium Trifluoride Precipitation Flowsheet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harmon, H.D.

    2001-01-01

    This report discusses results of the plutonium trifluoride two-stage precipitation study. A series of precipitation experiments was used to identify the significant process variables affecting precipitation performance. A mathematical model of the precipitation process was developed which is based on the formation of plutonium fluoride complexes. The precipitation model relates all process variables, in a single equation, to a single parameter which can be used to control the performance of the plutonium trifluoride precipitation process. Recommendations have been made which will optimize the FB-Line plutonium trifluoride precipitation process

  15. Assay of low-level plutonium effluents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hsue, S.T.; Hsue, F.; Bowersox, D.F.

    1981-01-01

    In the plutonium recovery section at the Los Alamos National Laboratory, an effluent solution is generated that contains low plutonium concentration and relatively high americium concentration. Nondestructive assay of this solution is demonstrated by measuring the passive L x-rays following alpha decay. Preliminary results indicate that an average deviation of 30% between L x-ray and alpha counting can be achieved for plutonium concentrations above 10 mg/L and Am/Pu ratios of up to 3; for plutonium concentrations less than 10 mg/L, the average deviation is 40%. The sensitivity of the L x-ray assay is approx. 1 mg Pu/L

  16. Plutonium mobilization from sedimentary sources to solution in the marine environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noshkin, V.E.; Wong, K.M.

    1979-01-01

    Inventories of plutonium radionuclides greatly in excess of global fallout levels persists in the benthic environments of Bikini and Eniwetok Atolls. It now appears that the atolls have reached a chemical steadystate condition with respect to the partitioning of 239+240 Pu between solution and solid phases of the environment. The mobilized 239+240 Pu has solute-like characteristics, passes rapidly and readily through dialysis membranes, has adsorption characteristics similar to those of fallout plutonium in the open ocean, and exists in solution primarily as some oxidized +5 or +6 chemical species. Water-column profiles of 239+240 Pu taken outside the atolls show a plutonium excess in the deep water mass. This remobilized 239+240 Pu possibly originates from the contaminated sediments previously deposited on the outer slopes of the atolls and surrounding basins

  17. Human punishment is not primarily motivated by inequality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marczyk, Jesse

    2017-01-01

    Previous theorizing about punishment has suggested that humans desire to punish inequality per se. However, the research supporting such an interpretation contains important methodological confounds. The main objective of the current experiment was to remove those confounds in order to test whether generating inequality per se is punished. Participants were recruited from an online market to take part in a wealth-alteration game with an ostensible second player. The participants were given an option to deduct from the other player's payment as punishment for their behavior during the game. The results suggest that human punishment does not appear to be motivated by inequality per se, as inequality that was generated without inflicting costs on others was not reliably punished. Instead, punishment seems to respond primarily to the infliction of costs, with inequality only becoming relevant as a secondary input for punishment decisions. The theoretical significance of this finding is discussed in the context of its possible adaptive value.

  18. Human punishment is not primarily motivated by inequality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marczyk, Jesse

    2017-01-01

    Previous theorizing about punishment has suggested that humans desire to punish inequality per se. However, the research supporting such an interpretation contains important methodological confounds. The main objective of the current experiment was to remove those confounds in order to test whether generating inequality per se is punished. Participants were recruited from an online market to take part in a wealth-alteration game with an ostensible second player. The participants were given an option to deduct from the other player’s payment as punishment for their behavior during the game. The results suggest that human punishment does not appear to be motivated by inequality per se, as inequality that was generated without inflicting costs on others was not reliably punished. Instead, punishment seems to respond primarily to the infliction of costs, with inequality only becoming relevant as a secondary input for punishment decisions. The theoretical significance of this finding is discussed in the context of its possible adaptive value. PMID:28187166

  19. Human punishment is not primarily motivated by inequality.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesse Marczyk

    Full Text Available Previous theorizing about punishment has suggested that humans desire to punish inequality per se. However, the research supporting such an interpretation contains important methodological confounds. The main objective of the current experiment was to remove those confounds in order to test whether generating inequality per se is punished. Participants were recruited from an online market to take part in a wealth-alteration game with an ostensible second player. The participants were given an option to deduct from the other player's payment as punishment for their behavior during the game. The results suggest that human punishment does not appear to be motivated by inequality per se, as inequality that was generated without inflicting costs on others was not reliably punished. Instead, punishment seems to respond primarily to the infliction of costs, with inequality only becoming relevant as a secondary input for punishment decisions. The theoretical significance of this finding is discussed in the context of its possible adaptive value.

  20. Investigation of environmental samples from Fukushima with respect to uranium and plutonium by AMS; Untersuchung von Umweltproben aus Fukushima in Bezug auf Plutonium und Uran mittels AMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schneider, Stephanie

    2017-02-01

    In March 2011, the nuclear power plant Fukushima Dai-ichi was seriously damaged by a tsunami caused by an earthquake. During the accident large quantities of radionuclides, mainly of the volatile elements cesium and iodine, were released to the environment. In small amounts refractory elements such as plutonium and uranium have also been released. Plutonium and the uraniumisotope {sup 236}U have primarily been delivered by human activities in the environment. Large amounts were released during the atmospheric nuclear weapons tests. Additional sources are accidents in nuclear facilities, like Chernobyl. Every source has its own characteristic isotopic composition. It is therefore possible to determine the origin of the contamination by measuring the isotopic ratios of {sup 240}Pu/{sup 239}Pu and {sup 236}U/{sup 238}U. These ratios can be determined by using accelerator mass spectrometry. Due to its high sensitivity, it is possible to measure even small amounts of plutonium and especially of {sup 236}U. These measurements were performed using the compact 500 kV facility ''TANDY'' of ETH Zurich. In 2013 and 2015 vegetation, litter and soil drill core samples were taken in the contaminated area in Fukushima prefecture. In 2015 samples were taken as close to the sampling locations of the 2013 campaign as possible. After isolation of plutonium and uranium by chemical extraction, separate targets were prepared for the measurement. The {sup 240}Pu/{sup 239}Pu ratios indicate global fallout as the plutonium source for most samples. The plutonium of the reactors of Fukushima Dai-ichi is located in the upper layers like in vegetation or litter. From the uranium ratios alone the reactors could not unambigously be identified as the source of {sup 236}U. However, this is plausible in the cases were reactor plutonium was detected. None of the samples contained higher plutonium activity concentrations than in the rest of Japan, caused by global fallout. This

  1. Neptunium(V) sorption onto kaolinite in the absence and presence of CO2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amayri, S.; Reich, Ta.; Reich, T.

    2005-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: The adsorption of heavy metals on clay minerals such as kaolinite is an important process that affects the migration and retardation of neptunium and other actinides in the geosphere. The sorption of Np(V) onto the reference clay mineral kaolinite KGa-1b was investigated both by batch experiments and EXAFS measurements. The aim of our study was to combine macroscopic studies (batch experiments) with microscopic techniques (EXAFS) to study the Np(V) speciation at the kaolinite surface. The batch experiments were done under relevant environmental conditions with Np(V) concentrations of 10 -11 and 10 -12 mol/L. Sorption samples were prepared in 0.1 mol/L NaClO 4 , 4 g/L kaolinite, pH 6.0 to 10.5, presence and absence of ambient CO 2 , and 60-h equilibration. The sorption curves for 10 -11 and 10 -12 mol/L Np(V) obtained in the presence and absence of CO 2 , respectively, show that the adsorption edge occurs at pH 8.5. The uptake of Np(V) by kaolinite strongly increased above pH 7.0 and reached its sorption maximum (70 %) at pH 9.0. Above pH 9.0, the amount of Np(V) sorbed onto kaolinite decreased and reached ca. 30 % at pH 10.5 due to the formation of Np(V) carbonato species in the aqueous solution. In the CO 2 -free system, the sorption of Np(V) increased continuously with pH until the sorption maximum of 100 % was reached at pH 10.5. The same sorption behavior was found in batch experiments in the CO 2 equilibrated system with Np concentrations ranging from 1 μmol/L to 10 μmol/L. EXAFS experiments on some of these batch samples indicated the formation of Np(V) carbonato species at the kaolinite surface at pH 9.0 where the uptake of Np(V) by kaolinite reaches its maximum [1]. [1] T. Reich, S. Amayri, Ta. Reich, J. Drebert, A. Jermolajev, P. Thoerle, N. Trautmann, C. Hennig, S. Sachs, Feasibility of EXAFS experiments at the Np L-edge to investigate neptunium sorption on kaolinite, Institut fuer Kernchemie, Universitaet Mainz, Annual

  2. Plutonium in the desert environment of the Nevada Test Site and the Tonopah Test Range

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romney, E.M.; Essington, E.H.; Fowler, E.B.; Tamura, T.; Gilbert, R.O.

    1987-01-01

    Several safety shot tests were conducted in the desert environment of the Nevada Test Site and the Tonopah Test Range during the period 1955 to 1963. Follow-up studies were conducted in fallout areas resulting from these tests to investigate the distribution in soils and the availability to animals and plants of plutonium (and americium) after residence times of 10 to 20 years. Soil profile studies disclosed that more than 95% of the plutonium (and americium) dispersed as fallout to the environment had remained in the top 5 cm of soil in undisturbed areas. Significant amounts had been redistributed into blow-sand mounds formed underneath clumps of vegetation. That redistribution should be expected because the contaminant was associated primarily with the coarse silt and fine sand particle size fractions. Resuspension factors were calculated that varied from 9.1 x 10 -11 m -1 to 5.4 x 10 -9 m -1 with geometric mean and arithmetic averages of 2.9 x 10 -10 m -1 and 6.8 x 10 -10 m -1 , respectively; however, the plutonium essentially remained in place when the soil surface was left undisturbed. Vegetation in the fallout areas was contaminated primarily by resuspendable material deposited on the surface of plant foliage; plutonium concentration ratios ranged from 10 -3 to 10 0 . Carcass samples of small vertebrate animals collected from fallout areas contained only trace amounts of plutonium compared to the environmental exposure levels. Furthermore, only trace amounts of plutonium (and americium) were found in muscle and organ tissues of grazing cattle during a 3-year on-site residence experiment. 36 references, 4 figures

  3. The plutonium challenge for the future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gray, L.W.

    2000-01-01

    In this paper author deal with the weapons-usable plutonium and with the possibilities of their managing. Russia has not disclosed the amount of plutonium produced, but various estimates indicate that the production was about 130 tonnes. Production has been curtailed in Russia; three dual-purpose reactors still produce weapons-grade plutonium - two at Tomsk-7 (renamed Seversk) and one at Krasnoyarsk-26 (renamed Zheleznogorsk Mining and Chemical Combine). In a 1994 United States-Russian agreement that has yet to enter into force, Russia agreed to close the remaining operating reactors by the year 2000. Treaties between the United States and Russia have already cut the number of nuclear warheads from more than 10,000 to about 6,000 under START 1, which has been ratified, and to about 3,500 under START 2, which still awaits approval. If Russia and the United States conclude START 3, that number could drop to between 2,000 and 2,500. On September 2, 1998, the Presidents of the United States and Russia signed the 'Joint statement of principles for Management and Disposition of Plutonium, Designated as No Longer Required for Defense Purposes.' In this joint statement the Presidents affirm the intention of each country to remove by stages approximately 50 metric tons of plutonium and to convert the nuclear weapons programs, and to convert this material so that it can never be used in nuclear weapons. These 100 tonne of plutonium must be managed in proper way such that it becomes neither a proliferation for an environmental risk. The United States has proposed that it manage it's 50 tonnes by a dual approach-once through MOX burning of a portion of the plutonium and immobilization in a ceramic matrix followed by en- casement in high level waste glass. Russia has proposed that it manage its full 50 tonnes by burning in a reactor. The MOX program in the United States would bum the cleaner plutonium metal and residues. Weapons components would be converted to plutonium oxide

  4. Decontaminaion of metals containing plutonium and americium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seitz, M.G.; Gerding, T.J.; Steindler, M.J.

    1979-06-01

    Melt-slagging (melt-refining) techniques were evaluated as a decontamination and consolidation step for metals contaminated with oxides of plutonium and americium. Experiments were performed in which mild steel, stainless steel, and nickel contaminated with oxides of plutonium and americium were melted in the presence of silicate slags of various compositions. The metal products were low in contamination, with the plutonium and americium strongly fractionated to the slags. Partition coefficients (plutonium in slag/plutonium in steel) of 7 x 10 6 were measured with boro-silicate slag and of 3 x 10 6 with calcium, magnesium silicate slag. Decontamination of metals containing as much as 14,000 ppM plutonium appears to be as efficient as for metals with plutonium levels of 400 ppM. Staged extraction, that is, a remelting of processed metal with clean slag, results in further decontamination of the metal. The second extraction is effective with either resistance-furnace melting or electric-arc melting. Slag adhering to the metal ingots and in defects within the ingots is in the important contributors to plutonium retained in processed metals. If these sources of plutonium are controlled, the melt-refining process can be used on a large scale to convert highly contaminated metals to homogeneous and compact forms with very low concentrations of plutonium and americium. A conceptual design of a melt-refining process to decontaminate plutonium- and americium-contaminated metals is described. The process includes single-stage refining of contaminated metals to produce a metal product which would have less than 10 nCi/g of TRU-element contamination. Two plant sizes were considered. The smaller conceptual plant processes 77 kg of metal per 8-h period and may be portable.The larger one processes 140 kg of metal per 8-h period, is stationary, and may be near te maximum size that is practical for a metal decontamination process

  5. Assessment and reduction of proliferation risk of reactor-grade plutonium regarding construction of ‘fizzle bombs’ by terrorists

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serfontein, Dawid E.; Mulder, Eben J.; Reitsma, Frederik

    2014-01-01

    The approximately 23.7 wt% 240 Pu in reactor-grade plutonium denatures the 239 Pu to the extent that it cannot fuel high yield nuclear weapons. 240 Pu has a high spontaneous fission rate, which increases the spontaneous neutron flux within the fuel. When such a nuclear weapon is triggered, these neutrons cause the nuclear fission chain reaction to pre-detonate which blows the imploding fuel shell apart before the designed level of compression and reactivity could be attained, thereby greatly reducing the average energy yield of such “fizzle” bombs. Therefore reactor-grade plutonium is normally viewed as highly proliferation resistant. In this article the literature on the proliferation resistance of reactor-grade plutonium and on the mechanism and effect of fizzle bombs is reviewed in order to test this view. It is shown that even very low yield fizzle bombs, exploded in urban areas, would still cause serious blast damage as well as radioactive contamination. Combined with the high levels of induced terror, fizzle bombs might thus be attractive psychological weapons for terrorists. Therefore reactor-grade plutonium may not be sufficiently proliferation resistant against nuclear terrorism. However, denaturisation with more than 9% 238 Pu produces high levels of decay heat which will melt or explode the high explosives around uncooled implosion type weapons, rendering them useless. Unfortunately, reactor-grade Pu contains only 2.7% 238 Pu and is thus not sufficiently proliferation resistant in this respect. It is also shown that the associated neptunium poses a substantial proliferation risk. In the present study strong improvement of the proliferation resistance was demonstrated by simulation of incineration of reactor-grade plutonium in the 400 MW th Pebble Bed Modular Reactor Demonstration Power Plant. Results for modified fuel cycles, aimed at transmutating 237 Np to 238 Pu are also reported. However, these modifications increased the disloaded heavy metal

  6. Assessment and reduction of proliferation risk of reactor-grade plutonium regarding construction of ‘fizzle bombs’ by terrorists

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serfontein, Dawid E., E-mail: Dawid.Serfontein@nwu.ac.za [School for Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering, North West University (PUK-Campus), PRIVATE BAG X6001 (Internal Post Box 360), Potchefstroom 2520 (South Africa); Mulder, Eben J. [School for Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering, North West University (South Africa); Reitsma, Frederik [Calvera Consultants (South Africa)

    2014-05-01

    The approximately 23.7 wt% {sup 240}Pu in reactor-grade plutonium denatures the {sup 239}Pu to the extent that it cannot fuel high yield nuclear weapons. {sup 240}Pu has a high spontaneous fission rate, which increases the spontaneous neutron flux within the fuel. When such a nuclear weapon is triggered, these neutrons cause the nuclear fission chain reaction to pre-detonate which blows the imploding fuel shell apart before the designed level of compression and reactivity could be attained, thereby greatly reducing the average energy yield of such “fizzle” bombs. Therefore reactor-grade plutonium is normally viewed as highly proliferation resistant. In this article the literature on the proliferation resistance of reactor-grade plutonium and on the mechanism and effect of fizzle bombs is reviewed in order to test this view. It is shown that even very low yield fizzle bombs, exploded in urban areas, would still cause serious blast damage as well as radioactive contamination. Combined with the high levels of induced terror, fizzle bombs might thus be attractive psychological weapons for terrorists. Therefore reactor-grade plutonium may not be sufficiently proliferation resistant against nuclear terrorism. However, denaturisation with more than 9% {sup 238}Pu produces high levels of decay heat which will melt or explode the high explosives around uncooled implosion type weapons, rendering them useless. Unfortunately, reactor-grade Pu contains only 2.7% {sup 238}Pu and is thus not sufficiently proliferation resistant in this respect. It is also shown that the associated neptunium poses a substantial proliferation risk. In the present study strong improvement of the proliferation resistance was demonstrated by simulation of incineration of reactor-grade plutonium in the 400 MW{sub th} Pebble Bed Modular Reactor Demonstration Power Plant. Results for modified fuel cycles, aimed at transmutating {sup 237}Np to {sup 238}Pu are also reported. However, these

  7. Computational Study on Mössbauer Isomer Shifts of Some Organic-neptunium (IV Complexes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masashi Kaneko

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Relativistic DFT calculations are applied to some organo-neptunium (IV complexes, Cp3NpIVX (Cp = η5-C5H5; X = BH4, Cl, OtBu, Ph, nBu, in order to understand their bonding properties between Np and the ligands. We employ scalar-relativistic ZORA Hamiltonian with all-electron basis set (SARC. The calculated electron densities at Np nucleus position in the complexes at B2PLYP / SARC theory strongly correlate to the experimental Mössbauer isomer shifts of 237Np system. The result of bond overlap population analysis indicates that the bonding strength decreases in order of X = BH4, Cl, OtBu, Ph and nBu. The tendency depends on the degree of the covalent interaction between Np 5f-electron and X ligand. It is suggested that it is important to estimate the bonding contribution of 5f-orbital to understand the electronic state for organo-actinide complexes.

  8. Creation of a simplified benchmark model for the neptunium sphere experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mosteller, Russell D.; Loaiza, David J.; Sanchez, Rene G.

    2004-01-01

    Although neptunium is produced in significant amounts by nuclear power reactors, its critical mass is not well known. In addition, sizeable uncertainties exist for its cross sections. As an important step toward resolution of these issues, a critical experiment was conducted in 2002 at the Los Alamos Critical Experiments Facility. In the experiment, a 6-kg sphere of 237 Np was surrounded by nested hemispherical shells of highly enriched uranium. The shells were required in order to reach a critical condition. Subsequently, a detailed model of the experiment was developed. This model faithfully reproduces the components of the experiment, but it is geometrically complex. Furthermore, the isotopics analysis upon which that model is based omits nearly 1 % of the mass of the sphere. A simplified benchmark model has been constructed that retains all of the neutronically important aspects of the detailed model and substantially reduces the computer resources required for the calculation. The reactivity impact, of each of the simplifications is quantified, including the effect of the missing mass. A complete set of specifications for the benchmark is included in the full paper. Both the detailed and simplified benchmark models underpredict k eff by more than 1% Δk. This discrepancy supports the suspicion that better cross sections are needed for 237 Np.

  9. Complex formation between neptunium(V) and various thiosemicarbazide derivatives in aqueous solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chuguryan, D.G.; Dzyubenko, V.I.; Gerbeleu, N.V.

    1987-01-01

    Complex formation between neptunium(V) and various thiosemicarbazide derivatives in solution has been studied spectrophotometrically in the pH range 4-10. Stepwise formation of three types of complexes, with composition NpO 2 HA, NpO 2 A - , and NpOHA 2- , has been demonstrated with salicylaldehyde thiosemicarbazone (H 2 L) and salicylaldehyde S-methyl-isothiosemicarbazone (H 2 Q) at t = 25 +/- 1 0 C and μ = 0.05. The logarithmic stability constants of the first two complexes are 5.14 +/- 0.06, 11.85 +/- 0.04 and 8.42 +/- 0.09, 13.33 +/- 0.015 for H 2 L and H 2 Q, respectively; equilibrium constants for the formation of hydroxo complexes of the form NpO 2 OHL 2- and NpO 2 OHQ 2- were also determined, and found to be equal to (2.23 +/-0.37) x 10 -5 and (5.02 +/- 0.9) x 10 -5 , respectively. In the case of S-methyl-N 1 ,N 4 -bis(salicylidene)isothiosemicarbazide (H 2 Z), only one type of complex is formed under these experimental conditions, namely, NpO 2 Z - , with a logarithmic stability constant of 4.78 +/- 0.03. Dissociation constants for H 2 Q and H 2 Z were also determined

  10. Plutonium in domestic animals and man

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coughtrey, P.J.; Jackson, D.; Jones, C.H.; Kane, P.; Thorne, M.C.

    1984-01-01

    This chapter deals with plutonium adsorption, retention and translocation rates in lungs, the gastrointestinal tract, liver and in body tissues of domestic animals and man. Urinary and faecal excretion of plutonium is discussed. Transfer rates to eggs, milk, foetus and newborn are considered. Of all these subjects, data are presented extracted from literature and cast in tables

  11. Two-stage precipitation of plutonium trifluoride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luerkens, D.W.

    1984-04-01

    Plutonium trifluoride was precipitated using a two-stage precipitation system. A series of precipitation experiments identified the significant process variables affecting precipitate characteristics. A mathematical precipitation model was developed which was based on the formation of plutonium fluoride complexes. The precipitation model relates all process variables, in a single equation, to a single parameter that can be used to control particle characteristics

  12. Plutonium production and utilization forecasts in Europe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haijtink, B.

    1976-01-01

    The planned accelerated growth of nuclear energy generation in the near future will lead to a large production of plutonium in the thermal reactors. Therefore, up to 1985, the major part of the available plutonium will be plutonium recovered from spent uranium-metal, particularly in the United Kingdom and in France. Because of the low demand for fuelling the fast breeder reactors within the near future, a surplus of fissile plutonium will be accumulated in Europe. Even if the planned availability of the oxide reprocessing capacity will be delayed with two or three years, a plutonium surplus will still exist in Europe, e.g.; in 1985: 25-20 tons. On longer term, up to 2000, the plutonium production in thermal reactors will be sufficient to meet the estimated demand for fast breeder reactors at their commercial introduction foreseen for the nineties. That means that all the plutonium surplus needs not to be stocked for use in fast breeder reactors later on but could be recycled in thermal reactors. The magnitude of the available fissionable materials give an idea of the importance to promote, on an industrial scale, the plutonium recycling technology

  13. Plutonium in the Gulf of Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scott, M.R.; Salter, P.F.

    The geochemistry of fallout plutonium in the sediments of the Gulf of Mexico was studied. A series of sediment cores was collected in a traverse from the deep Gulf of Mexico to the Mississippi Delta. The cores were sliced into 1 cm intervals and analyzed for plutonium. Explanations for the variations in concentration are presented

  14. The transport of civil plutonium by air

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    The paper presents the review entitled ''The Transport of Civil Plutonium by Air'' reported by the Advisory Committee on the Safe Transport of Radioactive Materials (ACTRAM) 1988. The contents contain chapters on the following topics:- the reasons for air transport, the various regulations, packagings for plutonium transport, testing of the packagings, accidents, the consequences of a release, and emergency arrangements. (U.K.)

  15. Ventilation design for new plutonium recovery facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliver, A.J.; Amos, C.L.

    1975-01-01

    In 1972 the Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) issued revised guidelines on ''Minimum Design Criteria for New Plutonium Facilities.'' With these criteria as guidelines, a new Plutonium Recovery Facility is being designed and constructed at the AEC Rocky Flats Plant. The methods by which the confinement of contamination and air treatment are being handled in this facility are described. (U.S.)

  16. Plutonium use - present status and perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dievoet, J. van; Fossoul, E.; Jonckheere, E.; Bemden, E. van den

    1977-01-01

    Plutonium is being produced in increasing quantities in the so-called proven reactors, which are mostly of the light-water type. Evaluation of this production on a world scale shows that it would be theoretically possible to construct a large number of breeders and thus to make the best use of the intrinsic qualities of plutonium as a fissionable material, while considerably reducing the consumption of uranium. This source of plutonium is nevertheless dependent on an essential stage of the fuel cycle, namely reprocessing of irradiated fuel. The long delays in installing an adequate world reprocessing capacity are substantially weakening the prospects for the introduction of breeders. Furthermore, the critical situation as regards reprocessing may delay the development of complementary reprocessing methods for fuels with a high plutonium content and high burn-up. When it is recalled that fast reactors themselves may suffer some delay in their technological development, if only because of the intention to build power plants of very high unit capacity immediately, it must be concluded that another use will have to be considered for the plutonium available in future -use in thermal reactors, i.e. recycling. The recycling of plutonium is a well-known technique today and the objections which could be raised against it hardly stand up to analysis. Utilization of plutonium offers an appreciable saving in terms of uranium and separative work units, the consumption being of a low order of magnitude in comparison with the total amount of plutonium needed for the eventual fabrication of the first fast reactor cores. It can also be shown that immediate reprocessing of the recycling fuel is not essential for the economics of the concept. Temporary storage of recycled fuel has the advantage of concentrating plutonium in a particularly safe form, namely in irradiated plutonium-bearing fuel assemblies. Lastly, recycling offers such flexibility that it does not in practice represent

  17. Constitutional problems in the handling of plutonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Witt, S. de.

    1989-01-01

    Reprocessing and final storage involve two different systems of nuclear energy utilization: with or without the use of plutonium. There is a choice available between these two systems. The paper discusss the constitutional implications of this choice. The permission of the use of plutonium as nuclear fuel by the Atomic Energy Law is irreconcilable with the Basic Law, i.e. the Constitution. If the corresponding provisions of the Atomic Energy Law are repealed, then only the plutonium-related branch will be revoked and not the legal permission of nuclear energy as a whole. The fact is not ignored that the Atomic Energy law does not permit the construction and operation of a plant or the handling of plutonium if this were to violate a basic right. However, the plutonium-related branch of nculear energy utilization inevitably results in such basic right violations; hence the Atomic Energy law is unconstitutional in this respect. (orig./HSCH) [de

  18. Nuclear legacy. Democracy in a plutonium economy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnaby, F.

    1997-01-01

    There have already been a few hundred known incidents of nuclear smuggling, mostly of small quantities not close to weapons grade material - but one gram of plutonium is more than sufficient to cause significant harm and to pose a substantial threat. The potential for further thefts is growing as the world produces ever more quantities of plutonium, not only from the dismantling of nuclear weapons but also from the separation out of plutonium from spent uranium nuclear reactor fuel elements. Trying to prevent the theft of gram quantities of plutonium would require levels of protection and surveillance unacceptably high in a democratic society. It is unlikely, therefore, that democracy could survive in a plutonium economy

  19. Disposing of the world's excess plutonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCormick, J.M.; Bullen, D.B.

    1998-01-01

    The authors undertake three key objectives in addressing the issue of plutonium disposition at the end of the Cold War. First, the authors estimate the total global inventory of plutonium both from weapons dismantlement and civil nuclear power reactors. Second, they review past and current policy toward handling this metal by the US, Russia, and other key countries. Third, they evaluate the feasibility of several options (but especially the vitrification and mixed oxide fuel options announced by the Clinton administration) for disposing of the increasing amounts of plutonium available today. To undertake this analysis, the authors consider both the political and scientific problems confronting policymakers in dealing with this global plutonium issue. Interview data with political and technical officials in Washington and at the International Atomic Energy Agency in Vienna, Austria, and empirical inventory data on plutonium from a variety of sources form the basis of their analysis

  20. Plutonium fallout at Fayetteville, AR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sandoval, D.N.; Essien, I.O.; Kuroda, P.K.

    1985-01-01

    It is well established that atmospheric Pu fallout has its origin in the testing of nuclear devices and satellite accidents. Monitoring injections of Pu during the testing of nuclear devices can be useful in characterizing the detonation and subsequently tagging its global fallout. Since Pu uptake pathway into humans is mainly through the respiratory and digestive systems, it is important to know about the behavior of Pu in the atmosphere. Snow and rain samples were collected between Jan 1981 and April 1983, and analyzed for plutonium

  1. Sandia Laboratories plutonium protection system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernard, E.A.; Miyoshi, D.S.; Gutierrez, F.D.

    1977-01-01

    Sandia Laboratories is developing an improved plutonium protection system (PPS) to demonstrate new concepts for enhancing special nuclear materials safeguards. PPS concepts include separation of functions, real-time item accountability and improved means for control of materials, activities and personnel access. Physical barriers and a secure communications network are designed into the system to offer greater protection against sabotage, diversion and theft attempts. Prototype systems are being constructed at Hanford, Washington and Albuquerque, New Mexico and will be subjected to a comprehensive testing and evaluation program

  2. Inhaled plutonium nitrate in dogs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dagle, G.E.

    1987-01-01

    The major objective of this project is to determine dose-effect relationships of inhaled plutonium nitrate in dogs to aid in predicting health effects of accidental exposure in man. For lifespan dose-effect studies, beagle dogs were given a single inhalation exposure to 239 Pu(NO 3 ) 4 , in 1976 and 1977. The earliest biological effect was on the hematopoietic system; lymphopenia and neutropenia occurred at the two highest dose levels. They have also observed radiation pneumonitis, lung cancer, and bone cancer at the three highest dose levels. 1 figure, 3 tables

  3. Inhaled plutonium nitrate in dogs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dagle, G.E.

    1986-01-01

    The major objective of this project is to determine dose-effect relationships of inhaled plutonium nitrate in dogs to aid in predicting health effects of accidental exposure in man. For lifespan dose-effect studies, beagle dogs were given a single inhalation exposure to 239 Pu(NO 3 ) 4 , in 1976 and 1977. The earliest biological effect was on the hematopoietic system; lymphopenia and neutropenia occurred at the two highest dose levels. The authors have also observed radiation pneumonitis, lung cancer, and bone cancer at the three highest dose levels. 1 figure, 4 tables

  4. Inhaled plutonium nitrate in dogs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dagle, G.E.

    1982-01-01

    The major objective of this project is to determine dose-effect relationships of inhaled plutonium nitrate in dogs to aid in the prediction of health effects of accidental exposure in man. For lifespan dose-effect studies, beagle dogs were given a single inhalation exposure to 239 Pu(NO 3 ) 4 , in 1976 and 1977. The earliest biological effect was on the hematopoietic system; as described in previous Annual Reports, lymphopenia and neutropenia occurred at the two highest dose levels. Radiation pneumonitis, lung cancer, and bone cancer have been observed at the highest dose levels

  5. Waste forms for plutonium disposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, S.G.; O'Holleran, T.P.; Frank, S.M.; Meyer, M.K.; Hanson, M.; Staples, B.A.; Knecht, D.A.; Kong, P.C.

    1997-01-01

    The field of plutonium disposition is varied and of much importance, since the Department of Energy has decided on the hybrid option for disposing of the weapons materials. This consists of either placing the Pu into mixed oxide fuel for reactors or placing the material into a stable waste form such as glass. The waste form used for Pu disposition should exhibit certain qualities: (1) provide for a suitable deterrent to guard against proliferation; (2) be of minimal volume, i.e., maximize the loading; and (3) be reasonably durable under repository-like conditions. This paper will discuss several Pu waste forms that display promising characteristics

  6. The plutonium mountain: preventing diversion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pohling-Brown, Pamela.

    1997-01-01

    With continued arms-reduction between the USA and the former Soviet Union, surplus nuclear materials, from dismantled weapons, requires handling. A number of risks are identified including occupational safety for workers involved with handling nuclear materials, and environmental protection. Perhaps the most sinister is the extra security needed to ensure that these materials are not diverted to rogue states or terrorist groups, as materials are handled in a larger number of countries. In particular, the author addresses the problem of plutonium reserves, and discusses the role of reprocessing in preventing diversion. (UK)

  7. Current status of the plutonium hot particle problem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richmond, C.R.

    1975-01-01

    Information now available on the question of lung irradiation from particulate plutonium is reviewed. Careful consideration of the available data shows that particulate plutonium is not more hazardous than the same amount of plutonium distributed uniformly. The data also suggest that the potential hazard from plutonium increases as the dispersion throughout the lung becomes more uniform

  8. Contamination of living environment and human organism with plutonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benes, J.

    1981-01-01

    The applicability of 239 Pu in nuclear power is discussed. The radiotoxic properties of plutonium, its tissue distribution and the effects of internal and external contamination are described. The contamination of the atmosphere, water, and soil with plutonium isotopes is discussed. Dosimetry is described of plutonium in the living and working environments as is plutonium determination in the human organism. (H.S.)

  9. The fission cross section ratios and error analysis for ten thorium, uranium, neptunium and plutonium isotopes at 14. 74 MeV neutron energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meadows, J.W.

    1987-03-01

    The error information from the recent measurements of the fission cross section ratios of nine isotopes, /sup 230/Th, /sup 232/Th, /sup 233/U, /sup 234/U, /sup 236/U, /sup 238/U, /sup 237/Np, /sup 239/Pu, and /sup 242/Pu, relative to /sup 235/U at 14.74 MeV neutron energy was used to calculate their correlations. The remaining 36 non-trivial and non-reciprocal cross section ratios and their errors were determined and compared to evaluated (ENDF/B-V) values. There are serious differences but it was concluded that the reduction of three of the evaluated cross sections would remove most of them. The cross sections to be reduced are /sup 230/Th - 13%, /sup 237/Np - 9.6% and /sup 239/Pu - 7.6%. 5 refs., 6 tabs.

  10. Fast radiochemical procedure to measure neptunium, plutonium, americium and curium in environmental samples for application in environmental monitoring and in radioecology research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pimpel, M.; Schuettelkopf, H.

    1984-01-01

    A radiochemical method is described by which Np, Pu, Am and Cm in environmental samples can be determined. The transuranium elements are dissolved with acids out of the ashed material. Np/Pu is separated from Am/Cm by sequential extraction using TOPO/cyclohexane. The two fractions are radiochemically purified. Np-237, Pu-239+240, Pu-238 and Pu-236 as well as Am-243, Am-241, Cm-244 and Cm-242 are measured by alpha spectrometery. Pu-236, Am-243 and Np-239 are used to determine the respective yields. A fast method of Np-239 preparation is described. The chemical yields range from 60 to 90%. The detection limit attained per nuclide is 10 fCi/sample. 20 reference, 1 table

  11. Preparation of neptunium and plutonium tracers in nuclear reactions of sup 2 sup 3 sup 6 U with (21-60)MeV sup 3 He ions

    CERN Document Server

    Aaltonen, J; Trzaska, V; Gromova, E A; Yakovlev, V A

    2001-01-01

    Preparation of sup 2 sup 3 sup 6 Pu, sup 2 sup 3 sup 7 Pu and sup 2 sup 3 sup 5 Np by reactions sup 2 sup 3 sup 6 U( sup 3 He, t beta sup -) sup 2 sup 3 sup 6 Pu, sup 2 sup 3 sup 6 U( sup 3 He, 2n) sup 2 sup 3 sup 7 Pu and sup 2 sup 3 sup 6 U( sup 3 He, p3n) sup 2 sup 3 sup 5 Np in sup 3 He ion beams, their energy 43 and 60 MeV, in the K-130 cyclotron at Yuvyaskyul University (Finland) was studied. Cross sections of the reactions were determined. Yield curves for thick targets were calculated. The results are discussed and compared with previously obtained data on other reactions giving rise to formation of the same products. Methods of radiochemical separation of the products and sample preparation for alpha- and gamma-spectrometry are described

  12. Investigation of neptunium (5), plutonium (5) and americium (5) complexing with some anions of inorganic acids by the method of coprecipitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moskvin, A.I.; Poznyakov, A.N.; AN SSSR, Moscow. Inst. Geokhimii i Analiticheskoj Khimii)

    1979-01-01

    By using the method of coprecipitation with ferric hydroxide a study has been made of Np(5), Pu(5) and Am(5) ions complexing with the anions of inorganic acids SO 4 2- , SO 3 2- , HCO 3 - and HPO 4 2- . Consideration has been also given to how the process of coprecipitation is affected by such factors as collector mass, microcomponent concentration and solution pH. A composition and stability constants of actinide complexes appearing in the systems under study have been found

  13. The fission cross section ratios and error analysis for ten thorium, uranium, neptunium and plutonium isotopes at 14.74 MeV neutron energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meadows, J.W.

    1987-03-01

    The error information from the recent measurements of the fission cross section ratios of nine isotopes, 230 Th, 232 Th, 233 U, 234 U, 236 U, 238 U, 237 Np, 239 Pu, and 242 Pu, relative to 235 U at 14.74 MeV neutron energy was used to calculate their correlations. The remaining 36 non-trivial and non-reciprocal cross section ratios and their errors were determined and compared to evaluated (ENDF/B-V) values. There are serious differences but it was concluded that the reduction of three of the evaluated cross sections would remove most of them. The cross sections to be reduced are 230 Th - 13%, 237 Np - 9.6% and 239 Pu - 7.6%. 5 refs., 6 tabs

  14. Complexation of neptunium(V) by salicylate, phthalate and citrate ligands in a pH 7.5 phosphate buffered system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rees, T.F.; Daniel, S.R.

    1984-01-01

    Conditional stability constants, enthalpies and entropies of complexation at pH 7.5 and ionic strength 0.1 have been determined for neptunium(V) complexes of phosphate, salicylate, phthalate and citrate. Results are given and discussed. At pH 7.5 salicylate does not form a complex with neptunium(V) due to the low charge density of the NpO 2 + ion and incomplete ionization of the salicylate ion. In all cases, only 1:1 complexes were identified. (U.K.)

  15. Plutonium use - Present status and prospects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dievoet, J. van; Fossoul, E.; Jonckheere, E.; Bemden, E. van den

    1977-01-01

    The use of plutonium in thermal and fast reactors is a demonstrated, if not proven, technology. Moreover, plutonium is being produced in increasing quantities. Evaluation of this production on a world scale shows that it would be theoretically possible to construct numerous breeders and thus to make the best use of plutonium, while considerably reducing uranium consumption. This source of plutonium is nevertheless dependent on the reprocessing of irradiated fuel. Long delays in installing and adequate world reprocessing capacity are weakening the prospects for introducing breeders. Furthermore, the critical situation regarding reprocessing may delay the development of complementary reprocessing methods for fuels with a high plutonium content and high burnup. The recycling of plutonium is now a well-known technique and any objections to it hardly bear analysis. Utilization of plutonium offers an appreciable saving in terms of uranium and separative work units; and it can also be shown that immediate reprocessing of the recycling fuel is not essential for the economics of the concept. Temporary storage of recycled fuel is a particularly safe form of concentrating plutonium, namely in irradiated plutonium-bearing fuel assemblies. Finally, recycling offers such flexibility that it represents no obstacle to fuel management at power plants with light-water reactors. These strategic considerations imply that the technology of using plutonium for fabricating thermal or fast reactor fuels is both technically reliable and economically viable. The methods used in industrial facilities are fully reassuring in this respect. Although various unsolved problems exist, none seems likely to impede current developments, while the industrial experience gained has enabled the economics and reliability of the methods to be improved appreciably. Apart from the techno-economic aspects, the plutonium industry must face extremely important problems in connection with the safety of personnel

  16. Preparation of hexavalent plutonium and its determination in the presence of tetravalent plutonium; Preparation de plutonium hexavalent et dosage en presence de plutonium tetravalent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Corpel, J [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires; Corpel, J [Institut du Radium, 75 - Paris (France)

    1958-07-01

    In order to study the eventual reduction of plutonium from the VI-valent state to the IV-valent state, in sulphuric medium, under the influence of its own {alpha} radiation or of the {gamma}-rays from a cobalt-60 source, we have developed a method for preparing pure hexavalent plutonium and two methods for determining solutions containing tetravalent and hexavalent plutonium simultaneously. Hexavalent plutonium was prepared by anodic oxidation at a platinum electrode. Study of the oxidation yield as a function of various factors has made it possible to define experimental conditions giving complete oxidation. For concentrations in total plutonium greater than 1.5 x 10{sup -3} M, determination of the two valencies IV and VI was carried out by spectrophotometry at two wavelengths. For lower concentrations, the determination was done by counting, after separation of the tetravalent plutonium in the form of fluoride in the presence of a carrier. (author) [French] Afin d'etudier l'eventuelle reduction du plutonium de l'etat de valence VI a l'etat de valence IV, en milieu sulfurique sous l'influence de son propre rayonnement {alpha} ou des rayons {gamma} d'une source de cobalt-60, nous avons mis au point une methode de preparation de plutonium hexavalent pur et deux methodes de dosage des solutions contenant simultanement du plutonium tetravalent et du plutonium hexavalent. Nous avons prepare le plutonium hexavalent par oxydation anodique au contact d'une electrode de platine. L'etude de rendement de l'oxydation en fonction des divers facteurs nous a permis de definir des conditions experimentales donnant une oxydation complete. Pour des concentrations en plutonium total superieures a 1,5.10{sup -3} M, le dosage des deux valences IV et VI a ete realise par spectrophotometrie a deux longueurs d'onde. Pour des concentrations inferieures, le dosage a ete effectue par comptage apres separation du plutonium tetravalent sous la forme du fluorure en presence d'un entraineur

  17. Plutonium focus area. Technology summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-09-01

    The Assistant Secretary for the Office of Environmental Management (EM) at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) chartered the Plutonium Focus Area (PFA) in October 1995. The PFA open-quotes...provides for peer and technical reviews of research and development in plutonium stabilization activities...close quotes In addition, the PFA identifies and develops relevant research and technology. The purpose of this document is to focus attention on the requirements used to develop research and technology for stabilization, storage, and preparation for disposition of nuclear materials. The PFA Technology Summary presents the approach the PFA uses to identify, recommend, and review research. It lists research requirements, research being conducted, and gaps where research is needed. It also summarizes research performed by the PFA in the traditional research summary format. This document encourages researchers and commercial enterprises to do business with PFA by submitting research proposals or open-quotes white papers.close quotes In addition, it suggests ways to increase the likelihood that PFA will recommend proposed research to the Nuclear Materials Stabilization Task Group (NMSTG) of DOE

  18. Automated amperometric plutonium assay system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burt, M.C.

    1985-01-01

    The amperometric titration for plutonium assay has been used in the nuclear industry for over twenty years and has been in routine use at the Hanford Engineering Development Laboratory since 1976 for the analysis of plutonium oxide and mixed oxide fuel material for the Fast Flux Test Facility. It has proven itself to be an accurate and reliable method. The method may be used as a direct end point titration or an excess of titrant may be added and a back titration performed to aid in determination of the end point. Due to the slowness of the PuVI-FeII reaction it is difficult to recognize when the end point is being approached and is very time consuming if the current is allowed to decay to the residual value after each titrant addition. For this reason the back titration in which the rapid FeII-CrVI reaction occurs is used by most laboratories. The back titration is performed by the addition of excess ferrous solution followed by two measured aliquots of standard dichromate with measurement of cell current after each addition

  19. Ceramification: A plutonium immobilization process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rask, W.C. [Dept. of Energy, Golden, CO (United States); Phillips, A.G. [Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, Golden, CO (United States)

    1996-05-01

    This paper describes a low temperature technique for stabilizing and immobilizing actinide compounds using a combination process/storage vessel of stainless steel, in which measured amounts of actinide nitrate solutions and actinide oxides (and/or residues) are systematically treated to yield a solid article. The chemical ceramic process is based on a coating technology that produces rare earth oxide coatings for defense applications involving plutonium. The final product of this application is a solid, coherent actinide oxide with process-generated encapsulation that has long-term environmental stability. Actinide compounds can be stabilized as pure materials for ease of re-use or as intimate mixtures with additives such as rare earth oxides to increase their degree of proliferation resistance. Starting materials for the process can include nitrate solutions, powders, aggregates, sludges, incinerator ashes, and others. Agents such as cerium oxide or zirconium oxide may be added as powders or precursors to enhance the properties of the resulting solid product. Additives may be included to produce a final product suitable for use in nuclear fuel pellet production. The process is simple and reduces the time and expense for stabilizing plutonium compounds. It requires a very low equipment expenditure and can be readily implemented into existing gloveboxes. The process is easily conducted with less associated risk than proposed alternative technologies.

  20. Cancer hazard from inhaled plutonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gofman, J.W.

    1975-01-01

    The best estimate of the lung cancer potential in humans for inhaled insoluble compounds of plutonium (such as PuO 2 particles) has been grossly underestimated by such authoritative bodies as the International Commission on Radiological Protection and the British Medical Research Council. Calculations are presented of lung cancer induction by 239 Pu as insoluble particles and for deposited reactor-grade Pu. The reason for the gross underestimate of the carcinogenic effects of Pu by ICRP or the British Medical Research Council (BMRC) is their use of a totally unrealistic idealized model for the clearance of deposited Pu from the lungs and bronchi plus their non-recognition of the bronchi as the true site for most human lung cancers. The erroneous model used by such organizations also fails totally to take into account the effect of cigarette-smoking upon the physiological function of human lungs. Plutonium nuclides, such as 239 Pu, or other alpha particle-emitting nuclides, in an insoluble form represent an inhalation cancer hazard in a class some 100,000 times more potent than the potent chemical carcinogens, weight for weight. The already-existing lung cancer data for beagle dogs inhaling insoluble PuO 2 particles is clearly in order of magnitude agreement with calculations for humans