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Sample records for prickle-spiny-legs pk functions

  1. Beyond DNA repair: DNA-PK function in cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Goodwin, Jonathan F.; Knudsen, Karen E.

    2014-01-01

    The DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) is a pivotal component of the DNA repair machinery that governs the response to DNA damage, serving to maintain genome integrity. However, the DNA-PK kinase component was initially isolated with transcriptional complexes, and recent findings have illuminated the impact of DNA-PK-mediated transcriptional regulation on tumor progression and therapeutic response. DNA-PK expression has also been correlated with poor outcome in selected tumor types, furthe...

  2. Bessong, PK

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Bessong, PK. Vol 11, No 2 (2012) - Articles The Accounting Implication of Cultural Dimensions on Financial Reporting: A Study of Selected Manufacturing Companies in Nigeria Abstract PDF · Vol 11, No 2 (2012) - Articles Human Resource Valuation and the Performance of Selected Banks in Nigeria Abstract PDF.

  3. Functional characteristics of a renal H+/lipophilic cation antiport system in porcine LLC-PK1 cells and rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsui, Ryutaro; Hattori, Ryutaro; Usami, Youhei; Koyama, Masumi; Hirayama, Yuki; Matsuba, Emi; Hashimoto, Yukiya

    2018-02-01

    We have recently found an H + /quinidine (a lipophilic cation, QND) antiport system in Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells. The primary aim of the present study was to evaluate whether the H + /lipophilic cation antiport system is expressed in porcine LLC-PK 1 cells. That is, we investigated uptake and/or efflux of QND and another cation, bisoprolol, in LLC-PK 1 cells. In addition, we studied the renal clearance of bisoprolol in rats. Uptake of QND into LLC-PK 1 cells was decreased by acidification of the extracellular pH or alkalization of the intracellular pH. Cellular uptake of QND from the apical side was much greater than from the basolateral side. In addition, apical efflux of QND from LLC-PK 1 cells was increased by acidification of the extracellular pH. Furthermore, lipophilic cationic drugs significantly reduced uptake of bisoprolol in LLC-PK 1 cells. Renal clearance of bisoprolol in rats was approximately 7-fold higher than that of creatinine, and was markedly decreased by alkalization of the urine pH. The present study suggests that the H + /lipophilic cation antiport system is expressed in the apical membrane of LLC-PK 1 cells. Moreover, the H + /lipophilic cation antiport system may be responsible for renal tubular secretion of bisoprolol in rats. Copyright © 2017 The Japanese Society for the Study of Xenobiotics. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. PK-yritysten kybervalmius

    OpenAIRE

    Matilainen, Juhani

    2018-01-01

    Pienet ja keskisuuret yritykset joutuvat yhä enenemissä määrin kyberhyökkäyksen kohteeksi. PK-yrityksen päätöksenteko keskittyy yrityksen toimitusjohtajalle ja häntä avustaville avainhenkilöille, joiden tietämys ei aina riitä kattamaan yrityksen kyberturvallisuutta. Johtuen pienestä henkilöstömäärästä ja suurista suhteellisista koulutuskustannuksista, PK-yritykset suhtautuvat epäröiden henkilöstön kouluttamiseen kyberturvallisuuden alalla. Kyberturvallisuuden näkökulmasta PK-yritystä uhkaavat...

  5. Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus PK-1 is essential for nucleocapsid assembly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liang, Changyong, E-mail: cyliang@yzu.edu.cn [College of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Yangzhou University, Yangzhou 225009 (China); Li, Min; Dai, Xuejuan; Zhao, Shuling; Hou, Yanling; Zhang, Yongli; Lan, Dandan [College of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Yangzhou University, Yangzhou 225009 (China); Wang, Yun; Chen, Xinwen [State Key Laboratory of Virology, Wuhan Institute of Virology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Wuhan 430071 (China)

    2013-09-01

    PK-1 (Ac10) is a baculovirus-encoded serine/threonine kinase and its function is unclear. Our results showed that a pk-1 knockout AcMNPV failed to produce infectious progeny, while the pk-1 repair virus could rescue this defect. qPCR analysis demonstrated that pk-1 deletion did not affect viral DNA replication. Analysis of the repaired recombinants with truncated pk-1 mutants demonstrated that the catalytic domain of protein kinases of PK-1 was essential to viral infectivity. Moreover, those PK-1 mutants that could rescue the infectious BV production defect exhibited kinase activity in vitro. Therefore, it is suggested that the kinase activity of PK-1 is essential in regulating viral propagation. Electron microscopy revealed that pk-1 deletion affected the formation of normal nucleocapsids. Masses of electron-lucent tubular structures were present in cell transfected with pk-1 knockout bacmid. Therefore, PK-1 appears to phosphorylate some viral or cellular proteins that are essential for DNA packaging to regulate nucleocapsid assembly. - Highlights: • A pk-1 knockout AcMNPV failed to produce infectious progeny. • The pk-1 deletion did not affect viral DNA replication. • The catalytic domain of protein kinases (PKc) of PK-1 was essential to viral infectivity. • The kinase activity of PK-1 is essential in regulating viral propagation. • PK-1 appears to phosphorylate some viral proteins that are essential for DNA packaging to regulate nucleocapsid assembly.

  6. Effects of advanced glycation end products on ezrin-dependent functions in LLC-PK1 proximal tubule cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bach, Leon A; Gallicchio, Marisa A; McRobert, E Anne; Tikoo, Anjali; Cooper, Mark E

    2005-06-01

    We have recently shown that advanced glycation products (AGEs) bind to the ERM (ezrin, radixin, moesin) family of proteins. ERM proteins act as cross-linkers between cell membrane proteins and the actin cytoskeleton. They are also involved in signal transduction pathways. They therefore have a critical role in normal cell processes, including modulation of cell shape, adhesion, and motility. We postulate that AGEs may contribute to diabetic complications by disrupting ERM function. In support of this hypothesis, AGEs inhibit ezrin-dependent tubulogenesis of proximal tubule cells. Phosphorylation is an important activating mechanism for ERM proteins, and AGEs inhibit ezrin phosphorylation mediated by the epidermal growth factor receptor.

  7. Open Circuit Potential Changes upon Protonation/Deprotonation of ω-Functionalized Alkanethiols on Au: Determination of Surface pK {sub 1/2} in Aqueous and Non-Aqueous System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoo, Seung Ryul; Park, Kyung Soon; Jang, Jae Won; Hwang, Seong Pil [Korea Univ., Sejong (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-09-15

    The controlled assembly of functional nanomaterials has been drawing significant interest for making devices by integration of nanomaterials. The building blocks of functional nanomaterials might be confined spatially on the chemically patterned surface through both covalent and non-covalent bonds. Potentiometric measurement is affordable technique for various researchers because it requires only voltmeter and reference electrode. Moreover, it can be applied to various polar solvent such as methanol and ethanol. The open circuit potential (OCP) is measured indicating the potential difference between reference electrode and working electrode. The potential of working electrode might be affected by redox chemical reaction and charge state/separation. Our results provide the simple and affordable method to investigate pK {sub 1/2} of thin film both in aqueous phase and in non-aqueous phase, which has significant role in colloidal chemistry, nanochemistry, surface chemistry, electrochemistry, and others.

  8. E-KAUPPAPORTAALIN MAHDOLLISUUDET PK-YRITYKSELLE

    OpenAIRE

    Järvenpää, Juho

    2011-01-01

    Opinnäytetyön aiheena oli tutkia e-kauppaportaalin mahdollisuuksia ja hyötyjä pk-yritykselle. Opinnäytetyön tarkoituksena oli tarjota pk-yrityksille tietoa, miksi e-kauppaportaalin käyttöönotto olisi varteen otettava vaihtoehto, kun yritys harkitsee verkkokaupan perustamista. Opinnäyte jakaantuu teorioiden ja tutkimusten esittelyyn ja niiden soveltamiseen pk-yrityksen hyväksi. Opinnäytetyössä käytettiin hyväksi Tieken tutkimuksia ja muita e-kauppaan liittyviä tutkimuksia ja teorioita. Opi...

  9. Novel Mechanism of Plasma Prekallikrein (PK) Activation by Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells: Evidence of the presence of PK Activator

    OpenAIRE

    Keum, Joo-Seob; Jaffa, Miran A; Luttrell, Louis M; Jaffa, Ayad A.

    2014-01-01

    The contribution of plasma prekallikrein (PK) to vascular remodeling is becoming increasingly recognized. Plasma PK is activated when the zymogen PK is digested to an active enzyme by activated factor XII (FXII). Here, we present our findings that vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) activate plasma PK in the absence of FXII. Extracted plasma membrane and cytosolic fractions of VSMCs activate PK, but the rate of PK activation was greater by the membrane fraction. FXII neutralizing antibody did...

  10. Adaptation of the migrant worker’s body to the occupational risk factors from the position of functional system of P.K. Anokhin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    М. Khodzhiev

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The adverse factors of labor process of migrants were studied as the factors of risk of formation of unsatisfactory adaptation and damage to health. The results of the study of adaptation of migrants to the labor process from the standpoint of the theory of functional systems were presented. The first subsystem of physical activities and neuro-emotional tension of labor determines the formation of certain stages of the adaptation process in terms of heart rate variability (the second sub-system. The result of migrant workers’ sympathetic chain of regulation’s activity level shows that the adaptive stress syndrome on the physiological indicators is expressed in a change of heart rate variability: different levels of stress index of SI associated with high physical (muscle, neuro-emotional stresses; marked increase in the power of spectrum of very low-frequency component (VLF, while the increase in heart rate. The features of the functional state of the body and the degree of adaptation in terms of activity of regulatory systems – PARS (optimal 1.19 ± 0.28; allowable stress 40.5 ± 0.62; overvoltage 6.21 ± 0.82 points were determined. On the basis of the production studies of migrant workers, the approaches to quantitative evaluation to the degree of adaptation of workers to the labor process associated with the combined effects of physical, neural and emotional labor intensity on the human body were science-based and developed. The degree of stress adaptation process corresponds to the stage of self-control (optimum stress activation (allowable stress, the mobilization of the 1st, 2nd, 3-th degree (degrees of over-stress of 1,2,3 degrees. Unfavorable stage of mobilization of 2–3 degrees of migrant workers was determined (an increase in the stress index S1, PARS indicator, the relative power of VLF range, a reduction in the SDNN. Events of medical and social support represent the third sub-system in the general system theory.

  11. Coincident In Vitro Analysis of DNA-PK-Dependent and -Independent Nonhomologous End Joining

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cynthia L. Hendrickson

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In mammalian cells, DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs are primarily repaired by nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ. The current model suggests that the Ku 70/80 heterodimer binds to DSB ends and recruits DNA-PKcs to form the active DNA-dependent protein kinase, DNA-PK. Subsequently, XRCC4, DNA ligase IV, XLF and most likely, other unidentified components participate in the final DSB ligation step. Therefore, DNA-PK plays a key role in NHEJ due to its structural and regulatory functions that mediate DSB end joining. However, recent studies show that additional DNA-PK-independent NHEJ pathways also exist. Unfortunately, the presence of DNA-PKcs appears to inhibit DNA-PK-independent NHEJ, and in vitro analysis of DNA-PK-independent NHEJ in the presence of the DNA-PKcs protein remains problematic. We have developed an in vitro assay that is preferentially active for DNA-PK-independent DSB repair based solely on its reaction conditions, facilitating coincident differential biochemical analysis of the two pathways. The results indicate the biochemically distinct nature of the end-joining mechanisms represented by the DNA-PK-dependent and -independent NHEJ assays as well as functional differences between the two pathways.

  12. Algebra task sheets : grades pk-2

    CERN Document Server

    Reed, Nat

    2009-01-01

    For grades PK-2, our Common Core State Standards-based resource meets the algebraic concepts addressed by the NCTM standards and encourages the students to learn and review the concepts in unique ways. Each task sheet is organized around a central problem taken from real-life experiences of the students.

  13. Geometry task sheets : grades pk-2

    CERN Document Server

    Rosenberg, Mary

    2009-01-01

    For grades PK-2, our Common Core State Standards-based resource meets the geometry concepts addressed by the NCTM standards and encourages the students to learn and review the concepts in unique ways. Each task sheet is organized around a central problem taken from real-life experiences of the students.

  14. Instagram-opas pk-yrityksille

    OpenAIRE

    Seppälä, Marjaana

    2016-01-01

    Tämän opinnäytetyön aihe on Instagram-opas pienille ja keskisuurille yrityksille. Tarkoituksena on luoda pk-yrityksille sopiva Instagram-opas, jonka sisältöä voidaan hyödyntää Instagram-palvelun käyttöönotossa ja markkinointia suunniteltaessa. Opas toteutetaan Business-to-Consumer (B2C)– kentällä toimivan yrityksen näkökulmasta. Oppaan tarkoituksena on laskea pk-yrityksen kynnystä lähteä mukaan Instagram-palveluun ja lisätä tietämystä palvelun käytöstä. Tässä opinnäytetyössä tarkastella...

  15. Small molecules, inhibitors of DNA-PK, targeting DNA repair and beyond

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David eDavidson

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Many current chemotherapies function by damaging genomic DNA in rapidly dividing cells ultimately leading to cell death. This therapeutic approach differentially targets cancer cells that generally display rapid cell division compared to normal tissue cells. However, although these treatments are initially effective in arresting tumor growth and reducing tumor burden, resistance and disease progression eventually occur. A major mechanism underlying this resistance is increased levels of cellular DNA repair. Most cells have complex mechanisms in place to repair DNA damage that occurs due to environmental exposures or normal metabolic processes. These systems, initially overwhelmed when faced with chemotherapy induced DNA damage, become more efficient under constant selective pressure and as a result chemotherapies become less effective. Thus, inhibiting DNA repair pathways using target specific small molecule inhibitors may overcome cellular resistance to DNA damaging chemotherapies. Non-homologous end joining (NHEJ a major mechanism for the repair of double strand breaks (DSB in DNA is regulated in part by the serine/threonine kinase, DNA dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK. The DNA-PK holoenzyme acts as a scaffold protein tethering broken DNA ends and recruiting other repair molecules. It also has enzymatic activity that may be involved in DNA damage signaling. Because of its’ central role in repair of DSBs, DNA-PK has been the focus of a number of small molecule studies. In these studies specific DNA-PK inhibitors have shown efficacy in synergizing chemotherapies in vitro. However, compounds currently known to specifically inhibit DNA-PK are limited by poor pharmacokinetics: these compounds have poor solubility and have high metabolic lability in vivo leading to short serum half-lives. Future improvement in DNA-PK inhibition will likely be achieved by designing new molecules based on the recently reported crystallographic structure of DNA-PK

  16. Liikelahjat mikro- ja pk-yrityksissä

    OpenAIRE

    Danhammer, Joni

    2014-01-01

    Liikelahjat ovat osa yrityksen menekinedistämistä ja kuuluvat tiiviisti yrityksen markkinointiviestintään. Kuitenkin yleinen talouden kiristynyt tilanne ja vuoden 2014 alussa voimaan astunut verouudistus liikelahjojen verovähennyksissä ovat asioita, jotka vaikuttavat liikelahjojen menekkiin ja niiden antamistapojen muuttumiseen mikro- ja pk-yrityksissä. Näin ollen yrityksillä tulisi tässä tilanteessa olla selkeä käsitys siitä, millaisia liikelahjoja yritys haluaa nykyisin henkilökunnalleen ja...

  17. In cellulo phosphorylation of XRCC4 Ser320 by DNA-PK induced by DNA damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, Mukesh Kumar; Imamichi, Shoji; Fukuchi, Mikoto; Samarth, Ravindra Mahadeo; Tomita, Masanori; Matsumoto, Yoshihisa

    2016-01-01

    XRCC4 is a protein associated with DNA Ligase IV, which is thought to join two DNA ends at the final step of DNA double-strand break repair through non-homologous end joining. In response to treatment with ionizing radiation or DNA damaging agents, XRCC4 undergoes DNA-PK-dependent phosphorylation. Furthermore, Ser260 and Ser320 (or Ser318 in alternatively spliced form) of XRCC4 were identified as the major phosphorylation sites by purified DNA-PK in vitro through mass spectrometry. However, it has not been clear whether these sites are phosphorylated in vivo in response to DNA damage. In the present study, we generated an antibody that reacts with XRCC4 phosphorylated at Ser320 and examined in cellulo phosphorylation status of XRCC4 Ser320. The phosphorylation of XRCC4 Ser320 was induced by γ-ray irradiation and treatment with Zeocin. The phosphorylation of XRCC4 Ser320 was detected even after 1 Gy irradiation and increased in a manner dependent on radiation dose. The phosphorylation was observed immediately after irradiation and remained mostly unchanged for up to 4 h. The phosphorylation was inhibited by DNA-PK inhibitor NU7441 and was undetectable in DNA-PKcs-deficient cells, indicating that the phosphorylation was mainly mediated by DNA-PK. These results suggested potential usefulness of the phosphorylation status of XRCC4 Ser320 as an indicator of DNA-PK functionality in living cells

  18. Imipenem in burn patients: pharmacokinetic profile and PK/PD target attainment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez, David S; Sanches-Giraud, Cristina; Silva, Carlindo V; Oliveira, Amanda M Ribas Rosa; da Silva, Joao Manoel; Gemperli, Rolf; Santos, Silvia R C J

    2015-03-01

    Unpredictable pharmacokinetics (PK) in burn patients may result in plasma concentrations below concentrations that are effective against common pathogens. The present study evaluated the imipenem PK profile and pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamics (PK/PD) correlation in burn patients. Fifty-one burn patients, 38.7 years of age (mean), 68.0 kg, 36.3% total burn surface area (TBSA), of whom 84% (43/51) exhibited thermal injury, 63% inhalation injury and 16% electrical injury (8/51), all of whom were receiving imipenem treatment were investigated. Drug plasma monitoring, PK study (120 sets of plasma levels) and PK/PD correlation were performed in a series of blood samples. Only 250 μl of plasma samples were required for drug plasma measurements using the ultra filtration technique for the purification of biological matrix and quantification using liquid chromatography. Probability of target attainment (PTA) was calculated using a PD target of 40% free drug concentrations above the minimum inhibitory concentration (40%fT>MIC). Significant differences in PK parameters (medians), such as biological half-life (2.2 vs 5.5 h), plasma clearance (16.2 vs 1.4 l h(-1)) and volume of distribution (0.86 vs 0.19 l kg(-1)), were registered in burn patients via comparisons of set periods with normal renal function against periods of renal failure. Correlations between creatinine clearance and total body plasma clearance were also obtained. In addition, the PK profile did not change according to TBSA during sets when renal function was preserved. PTA was >89% for MIC values up to 4 mg l(-1). In conclusion, imipenem efficacy for the control of hospital infection on the basis of PK/PD correlation was guaranteed for burn in patients at the recommended dose regimens for normal renal function (31.1±9.7 mg kg(-1) daily), but the daily dose must be reduced to 17.2±9.7 mg kg(-1) during renal failure to avoid neurotoxicity.

  19. Absence of mutations in the coding sequence of the potential tumor suppressor 3pK in metastatic melanoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Houben Roland

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Activation of Ras or Raf contributes to tumorigenesis of melanoma. However, constitutive Raf activation is also a characteristic of the majority of benign melanocytic nevi and high intensity signaling of either Ras or Raf was found to induce growth inhibition and senescence rather than transformation. Since the chromosome 3p kinase (3pK is a target of the Ras/Raf/Mek/Erk signaling pathway which antagonizes the function of the oncogene and anti-differentiation factor Bmi-1, 3pK may function as a tumor suppressor in tumors with constitutive Ras/Raf activation. Consequently, we tested whether inactivating 3pK mutations are present in melanoma. Methods 30 metastatic melanoma samples, which were positive for activating mutations of either BRaf or NRas, were analyzed for possible mutations in the 3pk gene. The 10 coding exons and their flanking intron sequences were amplified by PCR and direct sequencing of the PCR products was performed. Results This analysis revealed that besides the presence of some single nucleotide polymorphisms in the 3pk gene, we could not detect any possible loss of function mutation in any of these 30 metastatic melanoma samples selected for the presence of activating mutations within the Ras/Raf/Mek/Erk signaling pathway. Conclusion Hence, in melanoma with constitutively active Ras/Raf inactivating mutations within the 3pk gene do not contribute to the oncogenic phenotype of this highly malignant tumor.

  20. Tools for predicting the PK/PD of therapeutic proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diao, Lei; Meibohm, Bernd

    2015-07-01

    Assessments of the pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) characteristics are an integral part in the development of novel therapeutic agents. Compared with traditional small molecule drugs, therapeutic proteins possess many distinct PK/PD features that necessitate the application of modified or separate approaches for assessing their PK/PD relationships. In this review, the authors discuss tools that are utilized to describe and predict the PK/PD features of therapeutic proteins and that are valuable additions in the armamentarium of drug development approaches to facilitate and accelerate their successful preclinical and clinical development. A variety of state-of-the-art PK/PD tools is currently being applied and has been adjusted to support the development of proteins as therapeutics, including allometric scaling approaches, target-mediated disposition models, first-in-man dose calculations, physiologically based PK models and empirical and semi-mechanistic PK/PD modeling. With the advent of the next generation of biologics including bioengineered antibody constructs being developed, these tools will need to be further refined and adapted to ensure their applicability and successful facilitation of the drug development process for these novel scaffolds.

  1. Quantification of (R)-[11C]PK11195 binding in rheumatoid arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kropholler, M.A.; Boellaard, R.; Kloet, R.W.; Lammertsma, A.A.; Elzinga, E.H.; Voskuyl, A.E.; Laken, C.J. van der; Dijkmans, B.A.C.; Maruyama, K.

    2009-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) involves migration of macrophages into inflamed areas. (R)-[ 11 C]PK11195 binds to peripheral benzodiazepine receptors, expressed on macrophages, and may be used to quantify inflammation using positron emission tomography (PET). This study evaluated methods for the quantification of (R)-[ 11 C]PK11195 binding in the knee joints of RA patients. Data from six patients with RA were analysed. Dynamic PET scans were acquired in 3-D mode following (R)-[ 11 C]PK11195 injection. During scanning arterial radioactivity concentrations were measured to determine the plasma (R)-[ 11 C]PK11195 concentrations. Data were analysed using irreversible and reversible one-tissue and two-tissue compartment models and input functions with various types of metabolite correction. Model preferences according to the Akaike information criterion (AIC) and correlations between measures were evaluated. Correlations between distribution volume (V d ) and standardized uptake values (SUV) were evaluated. AIC indicated optimal performance for a one-tissue reversible compartment model including blood volume. High correlations were observed between V d obtained using different input functions (R 2 =0.80-1.00) and between V d obtained with one- and two-tissue reversible compartment models (R 2 =0.75-0.94). A high correlation was observed between optimal V d and SUV after injection (R 2 =0.73). (R)-[ 11 C]PK11195 kinetics in the knee were best described by a reversible single-tissue compartment model including blood volume. Applying metabolite corrections did not increase sensitivity. Due to the high correlation with V d , SUV is a practical alternative for clinical use. (orig.)

  2. The pkI gene encoding pyruvate kinase I links to the luxZ gene which enhances bioluminescence of the lux operon from Photobacterium leiognathi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, J W; Lu, H C; Chen, H Y; Weng, S F

    1997-10-09

    Partial 3'-end nucleotide sequence of the pkI gene (GenBank accession No. AF019143) from Photobacterium leiognathi ATCC 25521 has been determined, and the encoded pyruvate kinase I is deduced. Pyruvate kinase I is the key enzyme of glycolysis, which converts phosphoenol pyruvate to pyruvate. Alignment and comparison of pyruvate kinase Is from P. leiognathi, E. coli and Salmonella typhimurium show that they are homologous. Nucleotide sequence reveals that the pkI gene is linked to the luxZ gene that enhances bioluminescence of the lux operon from P. leiognathi. The gene order of the pkI and luxZ genes is-pk1-ter-->-R&R"-luxZ-ter"-->, whereas ter is transcriptional terminator for the pkI and related genes, and R&R" is the regulatory region and ter" is transcriptional terminator for the luxZ gene. It clearly elicits that the pkI gene and luxZ gene are divided to two operons. Functional analysis confirms that the potential hairpin loop omega T is the transcriptional terminator for the pkI and related genes. It infers that the pkI and related genes are simply linked to the luxZ gene in P. leiognathi genome.

  3. The expression of one ankyrin pk2 allele of the WO prophage is correlated with the Wolbachia feminizing effect in isopods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pichon Samuel

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The maternally inherited α-Proteobacteria Wolbachia pipientis is an obligate endosymbiont of nematodes and arthropods, in which they induce a variety of reproductive alterations, including Cytoplasmic Incompatibility (CI and feminization. The genome of the feminizing wVulC Wolbachia strain harboured by the isopod Armadillidium vulgare has been sequenced and is now at the final assembly step. It contains an unusually high number of ankyrin motif-containing genes, two of which are homologous to the phage-related pk1 and pk2 genes thought to contribute to the CI phenotype in Culex pipiens. These genes encode putative bacterial effectors mediating Wolbachia-host protein-protein interactions via their ankyrin motifs. Results To test whether these Wolbachia homologs are potentially involved in altering terrestrial isopod reproduction, we determined the distribution and expression of both pk1 and pk2 genes in the 3 Wolbachia strains that induce CI and in 5 inducing feminization of their isopod hosts. Aside from the genes being highly conserved, we found a substantial copy number variation among strains, and that is linked to prophage diversity. Transcriptional analyses revealed expression of one pk2 allele (pk2b2 only in the feminizing Wolbachia strains of isopods. Conclusions These results reveal the need to investigate the functions of Wolbachia ankyrin gene products, in particular those of Pk2, and their host targets with respect to host sex manipulation.

  4. Valores, Creencias Y Objectivos: Base del programa de la Escuela Experimental P.K. Yonge. (Values, Beliefs and Objectives: The Basis of Experimental Schools P.K. Yonge's Program.)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florida Univ., Gainesville. Coll. of Education.

    The values, beliefs, and objectives that form the core of the program at the Experimental School P.K. Yonge in the University of Florida are presented in this paper which is written in Spanish. This experimental school serves approximately 900 students from grades one through twelve. The function of the school is to conduct research to solve…

  5. Comparison of the proteomes of three yeast wild type strains: CEN.PK2, FY1679 and W303

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rogowska-Wrzesinska, A.; Mose Larsen, P.; Blomberg, A.

    2001-01-01

    Yeast deletion strains created during gene function analysis projects very often show drastic phenotypic differences depending on the genetic background used. These results indicate the existence of important molecular differences between the CEN.PK2, FY1679 and W303 wild type strains...

  6. Physiologically-based PK/PD modelling of therapeutic macromolecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thygesen, Peter; Macheras, Panos; Van Peer, Achiel

    2009-12-01

    Therapeutic proteins are a diverse class of drugs consisting of naturally occurring or modified proteins, and due to their size and physico-chemical properties, they can pose challenges for the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic studies. Physiologically-based pharmacokinetics (PBPK) modelling has been effective for early in silico prediction of pharmacokinetic properties of new drugs. The aim of the present workshop was to discuss the feasibility of PBPK modelling of macromolecules. The classical PBPK approach was discussed with a presentation of the successful example of PBPK modelling of cyclosporine A. PBPK model was performed with transport of the cyclosporine across cell membranes, affinity to plasma proteins and active membrane transporters included to describe drug transport between physiological compartments. For macromolecules, complex PBPK modelling or permeability-limited and/or target-mediated distribution was discussed. It was generally agreed that PBPK modelling was feasible and desirable. The role of the lymphatic system should be considered when absorption after extravascular administration is modelled. Target-mediated drug disposition was regarded as an important feature for generation of PK models. Complex PK-models may not be necessary when a limited number of organs are affected. More mechanistic PK/PD models will be relevant when adverse events/toxicity are included in the PK/PD modelling.

  7. Data analysis & probability task sheets : grades pk-2

    CERN Document Server

    Cook, Tanya

    2009-01-01

    For grades PK-2, our Common Core State Standards-based resource meets the data analysis & probability concepts addressed by the NCTM standards and encourages your students to learn and review the concepts in unique ways. Each task sheet is organized around a central problem taken from real-life experiences of the students.

  8. MIDAS/PK code development using point kinetics model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Y. M.; Park, S. H.

    1999-01-01

    In this study, a MIDAS/PK code has been developed for analyzing the ATWS (Anticipated Transients Without Scram) which can be one of severe accident initiating events. The MIDAS is an integrated computer code based on the MELCOR code to develop a severe accident risk reduction strategy by Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute. In the mean time, the Chexal-Layman correlation in the current MELCOR, which was developed under a BWR condition, is appeared to be inappropriate for a PWR. So as to provide ATWS analysis capability to the MIDAS code, a point kinetics module, PKINETIC, has first been developed as a stand-alone code whose reference model was selected from the current accident analysis codes. In the next step, the MIDAS/PK code has been developed via coupling PKINETIC with the MIDAS code by inter-connecting several thermal hydraulic parameters between the two codes. Since the major concern in the ATWS analysis is the primary peak pressure during the early few minutes into the accident, the peak pressure from the PKINETIC module and the MIDAS/PK are compared with the RETRAN calculations showing a good agreement between them. The MIDAS/PK code is considered to be valuable for analyzing the plant response during ATWS deterministically, especially for the early domestic Westinghouse plants which rely on the operator procedure instead of an AMSAC (ATWS Mitigating System Actuation Circuitry) against ATWS. This capability of ATWS analysis is also important from the view point of accident management and mitigation

  9. Genetic Diversity, Natural Selection and Haplotype Grouping of Plasmodium knowlesi Gamma Protein Region II (PkγRII): Comparison with the Duffy Binding Protein (PkDBPαRII).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fong, Mun Yik; Rashdi, Sarah A A; Yusof, Ruhani; Lau, Yee Ling

    2016-01-01

    Plasmodium knowlesi is a simian malaria parasite that has been reported to cause malaria in humans in Southeast Asia. This parasite invades the erythrocytes of humans and of its natural host, the macaque Macaca fascicularis, via interaction between the Duffy binding protein region II (PkDBPαRII) and the Duffy antigen receptor on the host erythrocytes. In contrast, the P. knowlesi gamma protein region II (PkγRII) is not involved in the invasion of P. knowlesi into humans. PkγRII, however, mediates the invasion of P. knowlesi into the erythrocytes of M. mulata, a non-natural host of P. knowlesi via a hitherto unknown receptor. The haplotypes of PkDBPαRII in P. knowlesi isolates from Peninsular Malaysia and North Borneo have been shown to be genetically distinct and geographically clustered. Also, the PkDBPαRII was observed to be undergoing purifying (negative) selection. The present study aimed to determine whether similar phenomena occur in PkγRII. Blood samples from 78 knowlesi malaria patients were used. Forty-eight of the samples were from Peninsular Malaysia, and 30 were from Malaysia Borneo. The genomic DNA of the samples was extracted and used as template for the PCR amplification of the PkγRII. The PCR product was cloned and sequenced. The sequences obtained were analysed for genetic diversity and natural selection using MEGA6 and DnaSP (version 5.10.00) programmes. Genetic differentiation between the PkγRII of Peninsular Malaysia and North Borneo isolates was estimated using the Wright's FST fixation index in DnaSP (version 5.10.00). Haplotype analysis was carried out using the Median-Joining approach in NETWORK (version 4.6.1.3). A total of 78 PkγRII sequences was obtained. Comparative analysis showed that the PkγRII have similar range of haplotype (Hd) and nucleotide diversity (π) with that of PkDBPαRII. Other similarities between PkγRII and PkDBPαRII include undergoing purifying (negative) selection, geographical clustering of haplotypes

  10. Genetic Diversity, Natural Selection and Haplotype Grouping of Plasmodium knowlesi Gamma Protein Region II (PkγRII: Comparison with the Duffy Binding Protein (PkDBPαRII.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mun Yik Fong

    Full Text Available Plasmodium knowlesi is a simian malaria parasite that has been reported to cause malaria in humans in Southeast Asia. This parasite invades the erythrocytes of humans and of its natural host, the macaque Macaca fascicularis, via interaction between the Duffy binding protein region II (PkDBPαRII and the Duffy antigen receptor on the host erythrocytes. In contrast, the P. knowlesi gamma protein region II (PkγRII is not involved in the invasion of P. knowlesi into humans. PkγRII, however, mediates the invasion of P. knowlesi into the erythrocytes of M. mulata, a non-natural host of P. knowlesi via a hitherto unknown receptor. The haplotypes of PkDBPαRII in P. knowlesi isolates from Peninsular Malaysia and North Borneo have been shown to be genetically distinct and geographically clustered. Also, the PkDBPαRII was observed to be undergoing purifying (negative selection. The present study aimed to determine whether similar phenomena occur in PkγRII.Blood samples from 78 knowlesi malaria patients were used. Forty-eight of the samples were from Peninsular Malaysia, and 30 were from Malaysia Borneo. The genomic DNA of the samples was extracted and used as template for the PCR amplification of the PkγRII. The PCR product was cloned and sequenced. The sequences obtained were analysed for genetic diversity and natural selection using MEGA6 and DnaSP (version 5.10.00 programmes. Genetic differentiation between the PkγRII of Peninsular Malaysia and North Borneo isolates was estimated using the Wright's FST fixation index in DnaSP (version 5.10.00. Haplotype analysis was carried out using the Median-Joining approach in NETWORK (version 4.6.1.3.A total of 78 PkγRII sequences was obtained. Comparative analysis showed that the PkγRII have similar range of haplotype (Hd and nucleotide diversity (π with that of PkDBPαRII. Other similarities between PkγRII and PkDBPαRII include undergoing purifying (negative selection, geographical clustering of

  11. The role of infection models and PK/PD modelling for optimising care of critically ill patients with severe infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tängdén, T; Ramos Martín, V; Felton, T W; Nielsen, E I; Marchand, S; Brüggemann, R J; Bulitta, J B; Bassetti, M; Theuretzbacher, U; Tsuji, B T; Wareham, D W; Friberg, L E; De Waele, J J; Tam, V H; Roberts, Jason A

    2017-07-01

    Critically ill patients with severe infections are at high risk of suboptimal antimicrobial dosing. The pharmacokinetics (PK) and pharmacodynamics (PD) of antimicrobials in these patients differ significantly from the patient groups from whose data the conventional dosing regimens were developed. Use of such regimens often results in inadequate antimicrobial concentrations at the site of infection and is associated with poor patient outcomes. In this article, we describe the potential of in vitro and in vivo infection models, clinical pharmacokinetic data and pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic models to guide the design of more effective antimicrobial dosing regimens. Individualised dosing, based on population PK models and patient factors (e.g. renal function and weight) known to influence antimicrobial PK, increases the probability of achieving therapeutic drug exposures while at the same time avoiding toxic concentrations. When therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM) is applied, early dose adaptation to the needs of the individual patient is possible. TDM is likely to be of particular importance for infected critically ill patients, where profound PK changes are present and prompt appropriate antibiotic therapy is crucial. In the light of the continued high mortality rates in critically ill patients with severe infections, a paradigm shift to refined dosing strategies for antimicrobials is warranted to enhance the probability of achieving drug concentrations that increase the likelihood of clinical success.

  12. DNA-PK. The major target for wortmannin-mediated radiosensitization by the inhibition of DSB repair via NHEJ pathway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hashimoto, Mitsumasa; Rao, S.; Tokuno, Osamu; Utsumi, Hiroshi; Takeda, Shunichi

    2003-01-01

    The effect of wortmannin posttreatment was studied in cells derived from different species (hamster, mouse, chicken, and human) with normal and defective DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) activity, cells with and without the ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) gene, and cells lacking other regulatory proteins involved in the DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair pathways. Clonogenic assays were used to obtain all results. Wortmannin radiosensitization was observed in Chinese hamster cells (V79-B310H, CHO-K1), mouse mammary carcinoma cells (SR-1), transformed human fibroblast (N2KYSV), chicken B lymphocyte wild-type cells (DT40), and chicken Rad54 knockout cells (Rad54 -/- ). However, mouse mammary carcinoma cells (SX9) with defects in the DNA-PK and chicken DNA-PK catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs) knockout cells (DNA-PKcs -/-/- ) failed to exhibit wortmannin radiosensitization. On the other hand, severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) mouse cells (SC3VA2) exposed to wortmannin exhibited significant increases in radiosensitivity, possibly because of some residual function of DNA-PKcs. Moreover, the transformed human cells derived from AT patients (AT2KYSV) and chicken ATM knockout cells (ATM -/- ) showed pronounced wortmannin radiosensitization. These studies demonstrate confirm that the mechanism underlying wortmannin radiosensitization is the inhibition of DNA-PK, but not of ATM, thereby resulting in the inhibition of DSB repair via nonhomologous endjoining (NHEJ). (author)

  13. Translational PK/PD of anti-infective therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rathi, Chetan; Lee, Richard E; Meibohm, Bernd

    Translational PK/PD modeling has emerged as a critical technique for quantitative analysis of the relationship between dose, exposure and response of antibiotics. By combining model components for pharmacokinetics, bacterial growth kinetics and concentration-dependent drug effects, these models are able to quantitatively capture and simulate the complex interplay between antibiotic, bacterium and host organism. Fine-tuning of these basic model structures allows to further account for complicating factors such as resistance development, combination therapy, or host responses. With this tool set at hand, mechanism-based PK/PD modeling and simulation allows to develop optimal dosing regimens for novel and established antibiotics for maximum efficacy and minimal resistance development. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Sandia reactor kinetics codes: SAK and PK1D

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pickard, P.S.; Odom, J.P.

    1978-01-01

    The Sandia Kinetics code (SAK) is a one-dimensional coupled thermal-neutronics transient analysis code for use in simulation of reactor transients. The time-dependent cross section routines allow arbitrary time-dependent changes in material properties. The one-dimensional heat transfer routines are for cylindrical geometry and allow arbitrary mesh structure, temperature-dependent thermal properties, radiation treatment, and coolant flow and heat-transfer properties at the surface of a fuel element. The Point Kinetics 1 Dimensional Heat Transfer Code (PK1D) solves the point kinetics equations and has essentially the same heat-transfer treatment as SAK. PK1D can address extended reactor transients with minimal computer execution time

  15. Five strands of math tasks big book : grades pk-2

    CERN Document Server

    Reed, Nat; Forest, Chris

    2009-01-01

    For grades PK-2, our Common Core State Standards-based resource meets the five strands of math concepts addressed by the NCTM standards and encourages the students to learn and review the concepts in unique ways. Included are challenging problem-solving tasks which will push the boundaries of critical thought and demonstrate to students the importance of mathematical problems in Number & Operations, Geometry, Measurement, Data Analysis & Probability and Algebra using real world situations.

  16. Five strands of math drills big book : grades PK-2

    CERN Document Server

    Reed, Nat; Forest, Chris

    2011-01-01

    For grades PK-2, our Common Core State Standards-based resource meets the five strands of math concepts addressed by the NCTM standards and encourages the students to review the concepts in unique ways. Included are warm-up and timed drill activities which will push the boundaries of critical thought and demonstrate to students the importance of mathematical problems in Number & Operations, Geometry, Measurement, Data Analysis & Probability and Algebra using real world situations.

  17. PK Tradesman Tmi Developing marketing in a multicultural environment

    OpenAIRE

    Juutilainen, Tomi; Kangasperko, Pyry

    2010-01-01

    Purpose of the thesis was to find ways to improve PK Tradesman Tmi's customer and partner relations and marketing processes as well as research the viability of its product offering. This was accomplished by researching the concepts of guerrilla marketing and customer relationship management, and comparing different aspects of the Finnish and Chinese culture. The thesis consists in part of exploring the theory of aforementioned concepts, and in part of a ques-tionnaire which was implement...

  18. EARLY ULTRAVIOLET OBSERVATIONS OF A TYPE IIn SUPERNOVA (2007pk)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pritchard, T. A.; Roming, P. W. A.; Brown, P. J.; Kuin, N. P. M.; Oates, S. R.; Bayless, Amanda J.; Holland, S. T.; Immler, S.; Milne, P.

    2012-01-01

    We present some of the earliest UV observations of a Type IIn supernova (SN)—SN 2007pk, where UV and optical observations using Swift's Ultra-Violet/Optical Telescope began 3 days after discovery or ∼5 days after shock breakout. The SN observations commence at approximately maximum light in the UV and u-band filters, suggesting that the UV light curve peaks begin very rapidly after the initial explosion, and subsequently exhibit a linear decay of 0.20, 0.21, 0.16 mag day –1 in the UVOT uvw2, uvm2, uvw1 (λ c = 1928, 2246, 2600 Å) filters. Meanwhile the b- and v-band light curves begin approximately seven days before v-band peak and exhibit a shallow rise followed by a subsequent decay. A series of optical/near-IR spectra taken with the Hobby-Eberly Telescope at days 3-26 after discovery show spectra similar to that of the peculiar Type IIn 1998S. The emission from 2007pk falls below detection ∼20 days after discovery in the UV and 50 days in the optical, showing no sign of the long duration emission seen in other Type IIn SNe. We examine the physical and spectral characteristics of 2007pk and compare its UV light curve and decay rate with other Type II SNe.

  19. Improving the Accuracy of Predicting Maximal Oxygen Consumption (VO2pk)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downs, Meghan E.; Lee, Stuart M. C.; Ploutz-Snyder, Lori; Feiveson, Alan

    2016-01-01

    Maximal oxygen (VO2pk) is the maximum amount of oxygen that the body can use during intense exercise and is used for benchmarking endurance exercise capacity. The most accurate method to determineVO2pk requires continuous measurements of ventilation and gas exchange during an exercise test to maximal effort, which necessitates expensive equipment, a trained staff, and time to set-up the equipment. For astronauts, accurate VO2pk measures are important to assess mission critical task performance capabilities and to prescribe exercise intensities to optimize performance. Currently, astronauts perform submaximal exercise tests during flight to predict VO2pk; however, while submaximal VO2pk prediction equations provide reliable estimates of mean VO2pk for populations, they can be unacceptably inaccurate for a given individual. The error in current predictions and logistical limitations of measuring VO2pk, particularly during spaceflight, highlights the need for improved estimation methods.

  20. The old and the new in prekallikrein deficiency: historical context and a family from Argentina with PK deficiency due to a new mutation (Arg541Gln) in exon 14 associated with a common polymorphysm (Asn124Ser) in exon 5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girolami, Antonio; Vidal, Josè; Sabagh, Marcela; Salagh, Marcela; Gervan, Nora; Parody, Maria; Peroni, Edoardo; Sambado, Luisa; Guglielmone, Hugo

    2014-07-01

    Prekallikrein (PK) is one of the clotting factors involved in the contact phase of blood. PK has an important historical role as its deficiency state represents the second instance of a clotting defect without bleeding manifestations, the first one being factor XII deficiency. PK deficiency is a rare clotting disorder. Moreover, only 11 patients have been investigated so far by molecular biology techniques. In this article, we briefly review some of the history around PK and also present some recent data on a newly identified family from Argentina suffering from PK deficiency. Two patients are homozygous whereas other family members are heterozygous. PK activity and antigen are 1% of normal in the homozygotes and around 60 to 70% of normal in the heterozygotes. As expected, all patients are asymptomatic of bleeding or thrombosis presentations. However, the two homozygotes showed essential hypertension. The PK deficiency in this family is due to a new mutation (Arg541Gln) in exon 14. The defect segregates together with a known polymorphism, Asn124Ser, in exon 5. The significance of the presence of hypertension in the two homozygotes is discussed in view of the extra coagulation effects of PK on vasodilation, vessel permeability, and the control of blood pressure. Structure function analysis indicates that the substitution of Arg with Gln probably impedes the transmembrane diffusion of the molecule, which therefore cannot be secreted in the homozygotes. The presence of hypertension in patients with PK deficiency has been previously reported in some but not all patients. Future research activities will probably concentrate on the effect of PK and other contact phase factors on the vascular system. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  1. A Business Plan for PK Handbags Manufacturing Company

    OpenAIRE

    Somchatvong, Laddaporn

    2009-01-01

    PK Co. Limited is a small family-business-owned company located in Thailand. Since established in 1998, the company’s business is manufacturing women’s fashion handbags for wholesale apparel trading company in Thailand. The company also produces and merchandises premium gifts for Kasikorn Bank, one of the largest banks in Thailand. Over the past ten years, the company has generated more than 200 million Baht in revenue or £ 3.6 million . The founders, Likit and Duangporn Somchatvong, have ...

  2. DNA-dependent protein kinase (DAN-PK), a key enzyme in the re-ligation of DNA double-strand breaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hennequin, C.; Averbeck, D.

    1999-01-01

    Repair pathways of DNA are now defined and some important findings have been discovered in the last few years. DNA non-homologous end-joining (NEH) is a crucial process in the repair of radiation-induced double-strand breaks (DSBs). NHEj implies at least three steps: the DNA free-ends must get closer, preparation of the free-ends by exonucleases and then a transient hybridization in a region of DNA with weak homology. DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) is the key enzyme in this process. DNA-PK is a nuclear serine/threonine kinase that comprises three components: a catalytic subunit (DNA-PK cs ) and two regulatory subunits, DNA-binding proteins, Ku80 and Ku70. The severe combined immuno-deficient (scid) mice are deficient in DNA-PK cs : this protein is involved both in DNA repair and in the V(D)J recombination of immunoglobulin and T-cell receptor genes. It is a protein-kinase of the P13-kinase family and which can phosphorylate Ku proteins, p53 and probably some other proteins still unknown. DNA-PK is an important actor of DSBs repair (induced by ionising radiations or by drugs like etoposide), but obviously it is not the only mechanism existing in the cell for this function. Some others, like homologous recombination, seem also to have a great importance for cell survival. (authors)

  3. Microglia activation in multiple sclerosis black holes predicts outcome in progressive patients: an in vivo [(11)C](R)-PK11195-PET pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giannetti, Paolo; Politis, Marios; Su, Paul; Turkheimer, Federico; Malik, Omar; Keihaninejad, Shiva; Wu, Kit; Reynolds, Richard; Nicholas, Richard; Piccini, Paola

    2014-05-01

    The pathophysiological correlates and the contribution to persisting disability of hypointense T1-weighted MRI lesions, black holes (BH), in multiple sclerosis (MS) are still unclear. In order to study the in vivo functional correlates of this MRI finding, we used 11C-PK11195 PET (PK-PET) to investigate changes in microglial activity. Ten relapsing and 9 progressive MS subjects had a PK-PET scan and a MRI scan alongside a full clinical assessment, including the expanded disability status scale (EDSS) for evaluation of disability. We studied the PK binding potential of the specifically bound radioligand relative to the non-displaceable radioligand in tissue (BPND) in T1 BHs. Out of a total of 1242 BHs identified, 947 were PK enhancing. The PKBPND was correlated with the EDSS (r=0.818; pholes" representing loss of axons and myelin, but display inflammatory activity in the form of activated microglia. The significant association between PKBPND, neurological impairment and outcome in progressive subjects supports a role for activated microglia in disability progression. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Inhibition of radiation-induced EGFR nuclear import by C225 (Cetuximab) suppresses DNA-PK activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dittmann, Klaus; Mayer, Claus; Rodemann, Hans-Peter

    2005-01-01

    Background and purpose: Inhibition of EGFR-function can induce radiosensitization in tumor cells. Purpose of our investigation was to identify the possible molecular mechanism of radiosensitization following treatment with anti-EGFR-antibody C225 (Cetuximab). Materials and methods: The effect of C225 on radiation response was determined in human cell lines of bronchial carcinoma (A549) and breast adenoma cells (MDA MB 231). The molecular effects of C225 on EGFR-function after irradiation were analyzed applying western blotting, immune-precipitation and kinase assays. Effects on DNA-repair were detected by quantification of γ-H2AX positive foci 24 h after irradiation. Results: The EGFR specific antibody C225 induced radiosensitization in A549 and also in MDA MB 231 cells. Radiosensitization in A549 was associated with blockage of radiation-induced EGFR transport into the nucleus, and immobilized the complex of EGFR with DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) in the cytoplasm. As a consequence radiation-induced DNA-PK activation was abolished, a process that is essential for DNA-repair after radiation exposure. Likewise C225 treatment increased the residual amount of γ-H2AX-positive foci 24 h after irradiation in A549 and in MDA MB 231 cells. Conclusions: Our results suggest that irradiation induced DNA-PK activation-essential for DNA repair-may be hampered specifically by use of the anti-EGFR-antibody C225. This process is associated with radiosensitization

  5. Model Informed Pediatric Development Applied to Bilastine: Ontogenic PK Model Development, Dose Selection for First Time in Children and PK Study Design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vozmediano, Valvanera; Sologuren, Ander; Lukas, John C; Leal, Nerea; Rodriguez, Mónica

    2017-12-01

    Bilastine is an H 1 antagonist whose pharmacokinetics (PK) and pharmacodynamics (PD) have been resolved in adults with a therapeutic oral dose of 20 mg/day. Bilastine has favorable characteristics for use in pediatrics but the PK/PD and the optimal dose in children had yet to be clinically explored. The purpose is to: (1) Develop an ontogenic predictive model of bilastine PK linked to the PD in adults by integrating current knowledge; (2) Use the model to design a PK study in children; (3) Confirm the selected dose and the study design through the evaluation of model predictability in the first recruited children; (4) Consider for inclusion the group of younger children (design an adaptive PK trial in children that was then confirmed using data from the first recruits by comparing observations with model predictions. PK/PD simulations supported the selection of 10 mg/day in 2 to design hence trial continuation. The model successfully predicted bilastine PK in pediatrics and optimally assisted the selection of the dose and sampling scheme for the trial in children. The selected dose was considered suitable for younger children and the forthcoming safety study in children aged 2 to <12 years.

  6. Semiparametric mixed-effects analysis of PK/PD models using differential equations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yi; Eskridge, Kent M; Zhang, Shunpu

    2008-08-01

    Motivated by the use of semiparametric nonlinear mixed-effects modeling on longitudinal data, we develop a new semiparametric modeling approach to address potential structural model misspecification for population pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) analysis. Specifically, we use a set of ordinary differential equations (ODEs) with form dx/dt = A(t)x + B(t) where B(t) is a nonparametric function that is estimated using penalized splines. The inclusion of a nonparametric function in the ODEs makes identification of structural model misspecification feasible by quantifying the model uncertainty and provides flexibility for accommodating possible structural model deficiencies. The resulting model will be implemented in a nonlinear mixed-effects modeling setup for population analysis. We illustrate the method with an application to cefamandole data and evaluate its performance through simulations.

  7. PK/DB: database for pharmacokinetic properties and predictive in silico ADME models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moda, Tiago L; Torres, Leonardo G; Carrara, Alexandre E; Andricopulo, Adriano D

    2008-10-01

    The study of pharmacokinetic properties (PK) is of great importance in drug discovery and development. In the present work, PK/DB (a new freely available database for PK) was designed with the aim of creating robust databases for pharmacokinetic studies and in silico absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion (ADME) prediction. Comprehensive, web-based and easy to access, PK/DB manages 1203 compounds which represent 2973 pharmacokinetic measurements, including five models for in silico ADME prediction (human intestinal absorption, human oral bioavailability, plasma protein binding, blood-brain barrier and water solubility). http://www.pkdb.ifsc.usp.br

  8. Role of XRCC4 phosphorylation by DNA-PK in the regulation of NHEJ repair pathway of DNA double strand break

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, Mukesh Kumar; Imamichi, Shoji; Fukuchi, Mikoto; Kamdar, Radhika P.; Sicheng, Liu; Wanotayan, Rujira; Matsumoto, Yoshihisa

    2014-01-01

    Non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) is the predominant pathway of DNA double strand breaks in higher eukaryotes and is active throughout the cell cycle. NHEJ repair includes many factors as Ku70/86, DNA-PKcs, XRCC4-Ligase IV complex and XLF (also known as Cernunnos). In these factors, DNA-PKcs acts as central regulator in NHEJ repair. It recruited at the DNA damages site after DNA damage and after association with Ku its kinase activity is activated. It phosphorylates many of important NHEJ proteins in vitro including XRCC4, Ku 70/86, Artemis, and even DNA-PKcs but till now, very less studies have been done to know the role and significance of phosphorylation in the NHEJ repair. Studies by other researchers identified various phosphorylation sites in XRCC4 by DNA-PK using mass spectrometry but these phosphorylation sites were shown to be dispensable for DSB repair. In the present investigation, we identified 3 serine and one new threonine phosphorylation sites in XRCC4 protein by DNA-PK. In vivo phosphorylation at these sites was verified by generating phosphorylation specific antibodies and the requirement for DNA-PK therein was verified by using DNA-PK inhibitor and DNA-PK proficient and deficient cell lines in response to radiation and zeocin treatment. We have also found that phosphorylation at these sites showed dose dependency in response to radiation treatment. The two serine and one threonine phosphorylation site is also biological important as their mutation into alanine significantly elevated radiosensitivity as measured by colony formation assay. Neutral comet assay showed delayed kinetics in DSB repair of these mutants. Furthermore, we have found a protein, with putative DSB repair function, which interacts with domain including the phosphorylation sites.These results indicate that these phosphorylation sites would mediate functional link between XRCC4 and DNA-PK. (author)

  9. Dual Identification and Analysis of Differentially Expressed Transcripts of Porcine PK-15 Cells and Toxoplasma gondii during in vitro Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun-Xue eZhou

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Toxoplasma gondii is responsible for causing toxoplasmosis, one of the most prevalent zoonotic parasitoses worldwide. The mechanisms that mediate T. gondii infection of pigs (the most common source of human infection and renal tissues are still unknown. To identify the critical alterations that take place in the transcriptome of both porcine kidney (PK-15 cells and T. gondii following infection, infected cell samples were collected at 1, 3, 6, 9, 12, 18, and 24 h post infection and RNA-Seq data were acquired using Illumina Deep Sequencing. Differential Expression of Genes (DEGs analysis was performed to study the concomitant gene-specific temporal patterns of induction of mRNA expression of PK-15 cells and T. gondii. High sequence coverage enabled us to thoroughly characterize T. gondii transcriptome and identify the activated molecular pathways in host cells. More than 6G clean bases/ sample, including > 40 million clean reads were obtained. These were aligned to the reference genome of T. gondii and wild boar (Sus scrofa. DEGs involved in metabolic activities of T. gondii showed time-dependent down-regulation. However, DEGs involved in immune or disease related pathways of PK-15 cells peaked at 6 h PI, and were highly enriched as evidenced by KEGG analysis. Protein-protein interaction analysis revealed that TGME49_120110 (PCNA, TGME49_049180 (DHFR-TS, TGME49_055320 and TGME49_002300 (ITPase are the four hub genes with most interactions with T. gondii at the onset of infection. These results reveal altered profiles of gene expressed by PK-15 cells and T. gondii during infection and provide the groundwork for future virulence studies to uncover the mechanisms of T. gondii interaction with porcine renal tissue by functional analysis of these DEGs.

  10. Vitamin E protects against the mitochondrial damage caused by cyclosporin A in LLC-PK1 cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arriba, G. de; Perez de Hornedo, J.; Ramirez Rubio, S.; Calvino Fernandez, M.; Benito Martinez, S.; Maiques Camarero, M.; Parra Cid, T.

    2009-01-01

    Cyclosporin A (CsA) has nephrotoxic effects known to involve reactive oxygen species (ROS), since antioxidants prevent the kidney damage induced by this drug. Given that mitochondria are among the main sources of intracellular ROS, the aims of our study were to examine the mitochondrial effects of CsA in the porcine renal endothelial cell line LLC-PK1 and the influence of the antioxidant Vitamin E (Vit E). Following the treatment of LLC-PK1 cells with CsA, we assessed the mitochondrial synthesis of superoxide anion, permeability transition pore opening, mitochondrial membrane potential, cardiolipin peroxidation, cytochrome c release and cellular apoptosis, using flow cytometry and confocal microscopy procedures. Similar experiments were done after Vit E preincubation of cells. CsA treatment increased superoxide anion in a dose-dependent way. CsA opened the permeability transition pores, caused Bax migration to mitochondria, and decreased mitochondrial membrane potential and cardiolipin content. Also CsA released cytochrome c into cytosol and provoked cellular apoptosis. Vit E pretreatment inhibited the effects that CsA induced on mitochondrial structure and function in LLC-PK1 cells and avoided apoptosis. CsA modifies mitochondrial LLC-PK1 cell physiology with loss of negative electrochemical gradient across the inner mitochondrial membrane and increased lipid peroxidation. These features are related to apoptosis and can explain the cellular damage that CsA induces. As Vit E inhibited these effects, our results suggest that they were mediated by an increase in ROS production by mitochondria.

  11. Lentviral-mediated RNAi to inhibit target gene expression of the porcine integrin αv subunit, the FMDV receptor, and against FMDV infection in PK-15 cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Tong

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background shRNA targeting the integrin αv subunit, which is the foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV receptor, plays a key role in virus attachment to susceptible cells. We constructed a RNAi lentiviral vector, iαv pLenti6/BLOCK -iT™, which expressed siRNA targeting the FMDV receptor, the porcine integrin αv subunit, on PK-15 cells. We also produced a lentiviral stock, established an iαv-PK-15 cell line, evaluated the gene silencing efficiency of mRNA using real-time qRT-PCR, integrand αv expression by indirect immunofluorescence assay (IIF and cell enzyme linked immunosorbent assays (cell ELISA, and investigated the in vivo inhibitory effect of shRNA on FMDV replication in PK-15 cells. Results Our results indicated successful establishment of the iαv U6 RNAi entry vector and the iαv pLenti6/BLOCK -iT expression vector. The functional titer of obtained virus was 1.0 × 106 TU/mL. To compare with the control and mock group, the iαv-PK-15 group αv mRNA expression rate in group was reduced by 89.5%, whilst IIF and cell ELISA clearly indicated suppression in the experimental group. Thus, iαv-PK-15 cells could reduce virus growth by more than three-fold and there was a > 99% reduction in virus titer when cells were challenged with 102 TCID50 of FMDV. Conclusions Iαv-PK-15 cells were demonstrated as a cell model for anti-FMDV potency testing, and this study suggests that shRNA could be a viable therapeutic approach for controlling the severity of FMD infection and spread.

  12. A physiologically-based pharmacokinetic(PB-PK) model for ethylene dibromide : relevance of extrahepatic metabolism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hissink, A M; Wormhoudt, L.W.; Sherratt, P.J.; Hayes, D.J.; Commandeur, J N; Vermeulen, N P; van Bladeren, P.J.

    A physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (PB-PK) model was developed for ethylene dibromide (1,2-dibromoethane, EDB) for rats and humans, partly based on previously published in vitro data (Ploemen et al., 1997). In the present study, this PB-PK model has been validated for the rat. In addition, new

  13. A physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (PB-PK) model for ethylene dibromide : relevance of extrahepatic metabolism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hissink, A.M.; Wormhoudt, L.W.; Sherratt, P.J.; Hayes, J.D.; Commandeur, J.N.M.; Vermeulen, N.P.E.; Bladeren, P.J. van

    2000-01-01

    A physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (PB-PK) model was developed for ethylene dibromide (1,2-dibromoethane, EDB) for rats and humans, partly based on previously published in vitro data (Ploemen et al., 1997). In the present study, this PB-PK model has been validated for the rat. In addition, new

  14. Native American Women Perceptions in Pk-12 Administrative Positions in North Dakota Public Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeCoteau, Lanelia Irene

    2012-01-01

    Historically Native American women have experienced barriers in their rise to Pk-12 educational leadership positions. There is limited research available on Native American women in educational leadership. Therefore, the purpose for this survey study was to discover what inspired current Pk-12 Native American women educational leaders to choose…

  15. Pharmacological considerations for predicting PK/PD at the site of action for therapeutic proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Weirong; Zhou, Honghui

    For therapeutic proteins whose sites of action are distal to the systemic circulation, both drug and target concentrations at the tissue sites are not necessarily proportional to those in systemic circulation, highlighting the importance of understanding pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) relationship at the sites of action. This review summarizes the pharmacological considerations for predicting local PK/PD and the importance of measuring PK and PD at site of action. Three case examples are presented to show how mechanistic and physiologically based PK/PD (PBPK/PD) models which incorporated the PK and PD at the tissue site can be used to facilitate understanding the exposure-response relationship for therapeutic proteins. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  16. Impact of Shed/Soluble targets on the PK/PD of approved therapeutic monoclonal antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samineni, Divya; Girish, Sandhya; Li, Chunze

    2016-12-01

    Suboptimal treatment for monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) directed against endogenous circulating soluble targets and the shed extracellular domains (ECD) of the membrane-bound targets is an important clinical concern due to the potential impact of mAbs on the in vivo efficacy and safety. Consequently, there are considerable challenges in the determination of an optimal dose and/or dosing regimen. Areas covered: This review outlines the impact of shed antigen targets from membrane-bound proteins and soluble targets on the PK and/or PD of therapeutic mAbs that have been approved in the last decade. We discuss various bioanalytical techniques that have facilitated the interpretation of the PK/PD properties of therapeutic mAbs and also considered the factors that may impact such measurements. Quantitative approaches include target-mediated PK models and bi- or tri-molecular interaction PK/PD models that describe the relationships between the antibody PK and the ensuing effects on PD biomarkers, to facilitate the mAb PK/PD characterization. Expert commentary: The proper interpretation of PK/PD relationships through the integrated PK/PD modeling and bioanalytical strategy facilitates a mechanistic understanding of the disease processes and dosing regimen optimization, thereby offering insights into developing effective therapeutic regimens. This review provides an overview of the impact of soluble targets or shed ECD on mAb PK/PD properties. We provide examples of quantitative approaches that facilitate the characterization of mAb PK/PD characteristics and their corresponding bioanalytical strategies.

  17. Uptake of inflammatory cell marker [{sup 11}C]PK11195 into mouse atherosclerotic plaques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laitinen, Iina; Marjamaeki, Paeivi; Naagren, Kjell; Roivainen, Anne; Knuuti, Juhani [University of Turku, Turku PET Centre, Turku (Finland); Laine, V.J.O. [Turku University Hospital, Department of Pathology, Turku (Finland); Wilson, Ian [GE Healthcare Biosciences, Medical Diagnostics, London (United Kingdom); Leppaenen, Pia; Ylae-Herttuala, Seppo [University of Kuopio, A.I. Virtanen Institute, Kuopio (Finland)

    2009-01-15

    The ligand [{sup 11}C]PK11195 binds with high affinity and selectivity to peripheral benzodiazepine receptor, expressed in high amounts in macrophages. In humans, [{sup 11}C]PK11195 has been used successfully for the in vivo imaging of inflammatory processes of brain tissue. The purpose of this study was to explore the feasibility of [{sup 11}C]PK11195 in imaging inflammation in the atherosclerotic plaques. The presence of PK11195 binding sites in the atherosclerotic plaques was verified by examining the in vitro binding of [{sup 3}H]PK11195 onto mouse aortic sections. Uptake of intravenously administered [{sup 11}C]PK11195 was studied ex vivo in excised tissue samples and aortic sections of a LDLR/ApoB48 atherosclerotic mice. Accumulation of the tracer was compared between the atherosclerotic plaques and non-atherosclerotic arterial sites by autoradiography and histological analyses. The [{sup 3}H]PK11195 was found to bind to both the atherosclerotic plaques and the healthy wall. The autoradiography analysis revealed that the uptake of [{sup 11}C]PK11195 to inflamed regions in plaques was more prominent (p = 0.011) than to non-inflamed plaque regions, but overall it was not higher than the uptake to the healthy vessel wall. Also, the accumulation of {sup 11}C radioactivity into the aorta of the atherosclerotic mice was not increased compared to the healthy control mice. Our results indicate that the uptake of [{sup 11}C]PK11195 is higher in inflamed atherosclerotic plaques containing a large number of inflammatory cells than in the non-inflamed plaques. However, the tracer uptake to other structures of the artery wall was also prominent and may limit the use of [{sup 11}C]PK11195 in clinical imaging of atherosclerotic plaques. (orig.)

  18. Synthesis and characterization of [{sup 11}C]PK11195 as a PET radiopharmaceutical

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Almeida, Fernanda A. F.; Silveira, Marina B.; Oliveira, Amanda P.; Nascimento, Leonardo T.C.; Silva, Juliana B.; Mamede, Marcelo, E-mail: nanda10a@gmail.com, E-mail: mamede.mm@gmail.com [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizontge, MG (Brazil). Unidade de Pesquisa e Produção de Radiofármacos

    2017-07-01

    The radiopharmaceutical [{sup 11}C]PK11195 has been used for Positron Emission Tomography (PET) imaging of neuroinflammatory diseases. PK11195 is a tracer that binds to the benzodiazepine peripheral receptor (PBR) currently known as membrane translocator protein (TSPO). [{sup 11}C]PK11195 is differentially accumulated in tissues which have high TSPO expression, typically microglia activation in brain tissue, which has normally low TSPO expression. The aim of this work was to synthesize and characterize [{sup 11}C]PK11195 at the Radiopharmaceutical Production Unit of CDTN to make it available for future studies and applications in major brain inflammatory diseases. The [{sup 11}C]PK11195 syntheses were performed using Tracerlab™ FXC PRO (GE) by [{sup 11}C]methylation of the precursor (R)-[N-desmethyl] PK11195. Optimizations of the reaction conditions for the synthesis of [{sup 11}C]PK11195 were: Anhydrous dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) volume, mass of precursor, and potassium hydroxide (KOH), labelling reaction temperature and time. After comparison of the results obtained for each condition evaluated, the standard best reaction parameters were defined as: 1mg of the precursor dissolved in 300 μL of DMSO (anhydrous); 10-15mg of KOH; and labeling reaction temperature of 40°C during 2 minutes. The total synthesis time was 40 minutes and the mean non-decay-corrected radiochemical yield was 10.93 ± 3.44%. All quality control criteria were met according to previous specifications. (author)

  19. Synthesis and characterization of [11C]PK11195 as a PET radiopharmaceutical

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Almeida, Fernanda A. F.; Silveira, Marina B.; Oliveira, Amanda P.; Nascimento, Leonardo T.C.; Silva, Juliana B.; Mamede, Marcelo

    2017-01-01

    The radiopharmaceutical [ 11 C]PK11195 has been used for Positron Emission Tomography (PET) imaging of neuroinflammatory diseases. PK11195 is a tracer that binds to the benzodiazepine peripheral receptor (PBR) currently known as membrane translocator protein (TSPO). [ 11 C]PK11195 is differentially accumulated in tissues which have high TSPO expression, typically microglia activation in brain tissue, which has normally low TSPO expression. The aim of this work was to synthesize and characterize [ 11 C]PK11195 at the Radiopharmaceutical Production Unit of CDTN to make it available for future studies and applications in major brain inflammatory diseases. The [ 11 C]PK11195 syntheses were performed using Tracerlab™ FXC PRO (GE) by [ 11 C]methylation of the precursor (R)-[N-desmethyl] PK11195. Optimizations of the reaction conditions for the synthesis of [ 11 C]PK11195 were: Anhydrous dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) volume, mass of precursor, and potassium hydroxide (KOH), labelling reaction temperature and time. After comparison of the results obtained for each condition evaluated, the standard best reaction parameters were defined as: 1mg of the precursor dissolved in 300 μL of DMSO (anhydrous); 10-15mg of KOH; and labeling reaction temperature of 40°C during 2 minutes. The total synthesis time was 40 minutes and the mean non-decay-corrected radiochemical yield was 10.93 ± 3.44%. All quality control criteria were met according to previous specifications. (author)

  20. Cellular response to DNA damage. Link between p53 and DNA-PK

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salles-Passador, I.; Fotedar, R.; Fotedar, A.

    1999-01-01

    Cells which lack DNA-activated protein kinase (DNA-PK) are very susceptible to ionizing radiation and display an inability to repair double-strand DNA breaks. DNA-PK is a member of a protein kinase family that includes ATR and ATM which have strong homology in their carboxy-terminal kinase domain with Pl-3 kinase. ATM has been proposed to act upstream of p53 in cellular response to ionizing radiation. DNA-PK may similarly interact with p53 in cellular growth control and in mediation of the response to ionizing radiation. (author)

  1. Search for a narrow baryonic state decaying to pK0S and anti pK0S in deep inelastic scattering at HERA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abramowicz, H.; Abt, I.; Adamczyk, L.

    2016-06-01

    A search for a narrow baryonic state in the pK 0 S and anti pK 0 S system has been performed in ep collisions at HERA with the ZEUS detector using an integrated luminosity of 358 pb -1 taken in 2003-2007. The search was performed with deep inelastic scattering events at an ep centre-of-mass energy of 318 GeV for exchanged photon virtuality, Q 2 , between 20 and 100 GeV 2 . Contrary to evidence presented for such a state around 1.52 GeV in a previous ZEUS analysis using a sample of 121 pb -1 taken in 1996-2000, no resonance peak was found in the p(anti p)K 0 S invariant-mass distribution in the range 1.45-1.7 GeV. Upper limits on the production cross section are set.

  2. In vitro evaluation of the anti-leishmanial activity and toxicity of PK11195

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Eduardo Sampaio Guedes

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Leishmaniasis, one of the most neglected diseases, is a serious public health problem in many countries, including Brazil. Currently available treatments require long-term use and have serious side effects, necessitating the development of new therapeutic interventions. Because translocator protein (TSPO levels are reduced in Leishmania amazonensis-infected cells and because this protein participates in apoptosis and immunomodulation, TSPO represents a potential target for Leishmania chemotherapy. The present study evaluated PK11195, a ligand of this protein, as an anti-leishmanial agent. OBJECTIVE To evaluate the leishmanicidal activity of PK11195 against L. amazonensis in infected CBA mouse macrophages in vitro. METHODS The viability of axenic L. amazonensis, Leishmania major, and Leishmania braziliensis promastigotes was assessed after 48 h treatment with PK11195 (0.2-400 µM. Additionally, intracellular parasite viability was evaluated to determine IC50 values and the number of viable parasites in infected macrophages treated with PK11195 (50-100 µM. Infected macrophages were then treated with PK11195 (25-100 µM to determine the percentage of L. amazonensis-infected cells and the number of parasites per infected cell. Electron microscopy was used to investigate morphological changes caused by PK11195. The production of free oxygen radicals, nitric oxide, and pro-inflammatory cytokines was also evaluated in infected macrophages treated with PK11195 and primed or not primed with IFN-γ. FINDINGS Median IC50 values for PK11195 were 14.2 µM for L. amazonensis, 8.2 µM for L. major, and 3.5 µM for L. braziliensis. The selective index value for L. amazonensis was 13.7, indicating the safety of PK11195 for future testing in mammals. Time- and dose-dependent reductions in the percentage of infected macrophages, the number of parasites per infected macrophage, and the number of viable intracellular parasites were observed. Electron

  3. Characterization of CoPK02, a Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase in mushroom Coprinopsis cinerea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamashita, Masashi; Sueyoshi, Noriyuki; Yamada, Hiroki; Katayama, Syouichi; Senga, Yukako; Takenaka, Yasuhiro; Ishida, Atsuhiko; Kameshita, Isamu; Shigeri, Yasushi

    2018-04-20

    We surveyed genome sequences from the basidiomycetous mushroom Coprinopsis cinerea and isolated a cDNA homologous to CMKA, a calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (CaMK) in Aspergillus nidulans. We designated this sequence, encoding 580 amino acids with a molecular weight of 63,987, as CoPK02. CoPK02 possessed twelve subdomains specific to protein kinases and exhibited 43, 35, 40% identity with rat CaMKI, CaMKII, CaMKIV, respectively, and 40% identity with CoPK12, one of the CaMK orthologs in C. cinerea. CoPK02 showed significant autophosphorylation activity and phosphorylated exogenous proteins in the presence of Ca 2+ /CaM. By the CaM-overlay assay we confirmed that the C-terminal sequence (Trp346-Arg358) was the calmodulin-binding site, and that the binding of Ca 2+ /CaM to CoPK02 was reduced by the autophosphorylation of CoPK02. Since CoPK02 evolved in a different clade from CoPK12, and showed different gene expression compared to that of CoPK32, which is homologous to mitogen-activated protein kinase-activated protein kinase, CoPK02 and CoPK12 might cooperatively regulate Ca 2+ -signaling in C. cinerea.

  4. BCR/ABL downregulates DNA-PK(CS)-dependent and upregulates backup non-homologous end joining in leukemic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poplawski, Tomasz; Blasiak, Janusz

    2010-06-01

    Non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) and homologous recombination repair (HRR) are the main mechanisms involved in the processing of DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) in humans. We showed previously that the oncogenic tyrosine kinase BCR/ABL stimulated DSBs repair by HRR. To evaluate the role of BCR/ABL in DSBs repair by NHEJ we examined the ability of leukemic BCR/ABL-expressing cell line BV173 to repair DNA damage induced by two DNA topoisomerase II inhibitors: etoposide and sobuzoxane. DNA lesions induced by sobuzoxane are repaired by a NHEJ pathway which is dependent on the catalytic subunit of protein kinase dependent on DNA (DNA-PK(CS); D-NHEJ), whereas damage evoked by etoposide are repaired by two distinct NHEJ pathways, dependent on or independent of DNA-PK(CS) (backup NHEJ, B-NHEJ). Cells incubated with STI571, a highly specific inhibitor of BCR/ABL, displayed resistance to these agents associated with an accelerated kinetics of DSBs repair, as measured by the neutral comet assay and pulsed field gel electrophoresis. However, in a functional NHEJ assay, cells preincubated with STI571 repaired DSBs induced by a restriction enzyme with a lower efficacy than without the preincubation and addition of wortmannin, a specific inhibitor of DNA-PK(CS), did not change efficacy of the NHEJ reaction. We suggest that BCR/ABL switch on B-NHEJ which is more error-prone then D-NHEJ and in such manner contribute to the increase of the genomic instability of leukemic cells.

  5. Adequate & Equitable U.S. PK-12 Infrastructure: Priority Actions for Systemic Reform. A Report from the Planning for PK-12 School Infrastructure National Initiative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filardo, Mary; Vincent, Jeffrey M.

    2017-01-01

    To formulate a "systems-based" plan to address the PK-12 infrastructure crisis, in 2016, the 21st Century School Fund (21CSF) and the University of California-Berkeley's Center for Cities + Schools (CC+S), in partnership with the National Council on School Facilities and the Center for Green Schools at the U.S. Green Building Council,…

  6. Cytotoxic effects of 125I-labeled PBZr ligand PK 11195 in prostatic tumor cells: therapeutic implications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alenfall, J.; Kant, R.; Batra, S.

    1998-01-01

    The effect of [ 125 I]PK 11195 was examined in human prostatic tumor cells (DU 145) in culture and compared with Na[ 125 I] and non-radioactive PK 11195. [ 125 I]PK 11195 was clearly cytocidal. The data for dose-related cell survival with [ 125 I]PK 11195 showed a linear relationship. Na[ 125 I] or non-labeled PK 11195 at similar concentrations did not lead to any cell killing. The uptake of [ 125 I]PK 11195 and [ 3 H]PK 11195 in cells was very similar. Fragmentation of DNA measured by agarose gel electrophoresis showed that exposure of DU 145 cells to [ 125 I]PK 11195 for 1, 4 or 24 h caused no fragmentation. These results indicate that nuclear DNA is not the prime binding site for [ 125 I]PK 11195, which is consistent with the presence of specific peripheral benzodiazepine receptors (PBZr) in the mitochondria. The cell killing effect of [ 125 I]PK 11195 suggests the use of PBZr ligand for radiotherapy

  7. Population pharmacokinetic (PK) analysis of laromustine, an emerging alkylating agent, in cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nassar, Ala F; Wisnewski, Adam V; King, Ivan

    2017-05-01

    1. Alkylating agents are capable of introducing an alkyl group into nucleophilic sites on DNA or RNA through covalent bond. Laromustine is an active member of a relatively new class of sulfonylhydrazine prodrugs under development as antineoplastic alkylating agents, and displays significant single-agent activity. 2. This is the first report of the population pharmacokinetic analysis of laromustine, 106 patients, 66 with hematologic malignancies and 40 with solid tumors, participated in five clinical trials worldwide. Of these, 104 patients were included in the final NONMEM analysis. 3. The population estimates for total clearance (CL) and volume of distribution of the central compartment (V 1 ) were 96.3 L/h and 45.9 L, associated with high inter-patient variability of 52.9% and 79.8% and inter-occasion variability of 26.7% and 49.3%, respectively. The population estimates for Q and V 2 were 73.2 L/h and 29.9 L, and inter-patient variability in V 2 was 63.1%, respectively. 4. The estimate of V ss (75.8 L) exceeds total body water, indicating that laromustine is distributed to tissues. The half-life is short, less than 1 h, reflecting rapid clearance. Population PK analysis showed laromustine pharmacokinetics to be independent of dose and organ function with no effect on subsequent dosing cycles.

  8. DNA ligase III is involved in a DNA-PK independent pathway of NHEJ in human cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, H.; Perrault, A.R.; Qin, W.; Wang, H.; Iliakis, G.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: Double strand breaks (DSB) induced by ionizing radiation (IR) and other cytotoxic agents in the genome of higher eukaryotes are thought to be repaired either by homologous recombination repair (HRR), or non-homologous endjoining (NHEJ). We previously reported the operation of two components of NHEJ in vivo: a DNA-PK dependent component that operates with fast kinetics (D-NHEJ), and a DNA-PK independent component that acts as a backup (basic or B-NHEJ) and operates with kinetics an order of magnitude slower. To gain further insight into the mechanisms of B-NHEJ, we investigated DNA endjoining in extracts 180BR, a human cell line deficient in DNA ligase IV, using an in vitro plasmid-based DNA endjoining assay. An anti DNA ligase III antibody inhibited almost completely DNA endjoining activity in these extracts. On the other hand, an anti DNA ligase I antibody had no measurable effect in DNA endjoining activity. Immunodepletion of DNA ligase III from 180BR cell extracts abolished the DNA endjoining activity, which could be restored by addition of purified human DNA ligase IIIb. Full-length DNA ligase III bound to double stranded DNA and stimulated DNA endjoining in both intermolecular and intramolecular ligation. Furthermore, fractionation of HeLa cell extracts demonstrated the presence of an activity stimulating the function of DNA ligase III. Based on these observations we propose that DNA ligase III is the ligase operating in B-NHEJ

  9. [Advenella kashmirensis subsp. methylica PK1, a facultative methylotroph from carex rhizosphere].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poroshina, M N; Doronina, N V; Kaparullina, E N; Trotsenko, Iu A

    2015-01-01

    A strain (PK1) of facultative methylobacteria growing on methanol as a carbon and energy source was isolated from carex rhizosphere (Pamukkale National Park, Turkey). The cells were nonmotile gram-negative rods propagating by binary fission. The organism was a strict anaerobe, oxidase- and catalase-positive. Optimal growth occurred at 29°C, pH 8.0-8.5, and 0.5% NaCl; no growth occurred at 2% NaCl. The organism used the ribulose bisphosphate pathway of C1 assimilation. Predominant fatty acids were 11-octodecenoic (18:1ω7) and cis-hexadecenoic (16:1ω7c). Phosphatidylethanolamine and diphosphatidylglycerol were the dominant phospholipids. Q8 was the main ubiquinone. DNA G+C content was 55.4 mol % (mp). Sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene revealed that strain PK1 belonged to the genus Advenella with 98.8 and 99.2% similarity to the type strains A. incenata CCUG 45225T and A. kashmirensis WT001T, respectively. DNA-DNA homology of strain PK1 and A. kashmirensis WT001T was 70%. While MALDI analysis confirmed their close clusterization, RAPD analysis revealed the differences between strain PKI and other Advenella strains. Based on its geno- and phenotypic properties, the isolate PK1 was classified as A. kashmirensis subsp. methylica PK1 (VKM-B 2850 = DSM 27514), the first known methylotroph of the genus Advenella.

  10. Porcine circovirus-2 capsid protein induces cell death in PK15 cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walia, Rupali; Dardari, Rkia, E-mail: rdardari@ucalgary.ca; Chaiyakul, Mark; Czub, Markus

    2014-11-15

    Studies have shown that Porcine circovirus (PCV)-2 induces apoptosis in PK15 cells. Here we report that cell death is induced in PCV2b-infected PK15 cells that express Capsid (Cap) protein and this effect is enhanced in interferon gamma (IFN-γ)-treated cells. We further show that transient PCV2a and 2b-Cap protein expression induces cell death in PK15 cells at rate similar to PCV2 infection, regardless of Cap protein localization. These data suggest that Cap protein may have the capacity to trigger different signaling pathways involved in cell death. Although further investigation is needed to gain deeper insights into the nature of the pathways involved in Cap-induced cell death, this study provides evidence that PCV2-induced cell death in kidney epithelial PK15 cells can be mapped to the Cap protein and establishes the need for future research regarding the role of Cap-induced cell death in PCV2 pathogenesis. - Highlights: • IFN-γ enhances PCV2 replication that leads to cell death in PK15 cells. • IFN-γ enhances nuclear localization of the PCV2 Capsid protein. • Transient PCV2a and 2b-Capsid protein expression induces cell death. • Cell death is not dictated by specific Capsid protein sub-localization.

  11. Sustained release ophthalmic dexamethasone: In vitro in vivo correlations derived from the PK-Eye.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awwad, Sahar; Day, Richard M; Khaw, Peng T; Brocchini, Steve; Fadda, Hala M

    2017-04-30

    Corticosteroids have long been used to treat intraocular inflammation by intravitreal injection. We describe dexamethasone loaded poly-DL-lactide-co-glycolide (PLGA) microparticles that were fabricated by thermally induced phase separation (TIPS). The dexamethasone loaded microparticles were evaluated using a two-compartment, in vitro aqueous outflow model of the eye (PK-Eye) that estimates drug clearance time from the back of the eye via aqueous outflow by the anterior route. A dexamethasone dose of 0.20±0.02mg in a 50μL volume of TIPS microparticles resulted in a clearance t 1/2 of 9.6±0.3days using simulated vitreous in the PK-Eye. Since corticosteroids can also clear through the retina, it is necessary to account for clearance through the back of the eye. Retinal permeability data, published human ocular pharmacokinetics (PK) and the PK-Eye clearance times were then used to establish in vitro in vivo correlations (IVIVCs) for intraocular clearance times of corticosteroid formulations. A t 1/2 of 48h was estimated for the dexamethasone-TIPS microparticles, which is almost 9 times longer than that reported for dexamethasone suspension in humans. The prediction of human clearance times of permeable molecules from the vitreous compartment can be determined by accounting for drug retinal permeation and determining the experimental clearance via the anterior aqueous outflow pathway using the PK-Eye. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  12. Structure of Pseudoknot PK26 Shows 3D Domain Swapping in an RNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lietzke, Susan E; Barnes, Cindy L.

    1998-01-01

    3D domain swapping provides a facile pathway for the evolution of oligomeric proteins and allosteric mechanisms and a means for using monomer-oligomer equilibria to regulate biological activity. The term "3D domain swapping" describes the exchange of identical domains between two protein monomers to create an oligomer. 3D domain swapping has, so far, only been recognized in proteins. In this study, the structure of the pseudoknot PK26 is reported and it is a clear example of 3D domain swapping in RNA. PK26 was chosen for study because RNA pseudoknots are required structures in several biological processes and they arise frequently in in vitro selection experiments directed against protein targets. PK26 specifically inhibits HIV-1 reverse transcriptase with nanomolar affinity. We have now determined the 3.1 A resolution crystal structure of PK26 and find that it forms a 3D domain swapped dimer. PK26 shows extensive base pairing between and within strands. Formation of the dimer requires the linker region between the pseudoknot folds to adopt a unique conformation that allows a base within a helical stem to skip one base in the stacking register. Rearrangement of the linker would permit a monomeric pseudoknot to form. This structure shows how RNA can use 3D domain swapping to build large scale oligomers like the putative hexamer in the packaging RNA of bacteriophage Phi29.

  13. Radioligands for PET studies of central benzodiazepine receptors and PK (peripheral benzodiazepine) binding sites -current status

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pike, V.W.; Osman, S.; Shah, F.; Turton, D.R.; Waters, S.L.; Crouzel, C.; Nutt, D.J.

    1993-01-01

    The status of the radiochemical development and biological evaluation of radioligands for PET studies of central benzodiazepine (BZ) receptors and the so-called peripheral benzodiazepine binding sites, here discriminated and referred to as PK binding sites, is reviewed against current pharmacological knowledge, indicating those agents with present value and those with future potential. Practical recommendations are given for the preparation of two useful radioligands for PET studies, [N-methyl- 11 C]flumazenil for central BZ receptors, and [N-methyl- 11 C]PK 11195 for PK binding sites. Quality assurance and plasma metabolite analysis are also reviewed for these radioligands and practical recommendations are given on methodology for their performance. (Author)

  14. Applications of the pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) analysis of antimicrobial agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asín-Prieto, Eduardo; Rodríguez-Gascón, Alicia; Isla, Arantxazu

    2015-05-01

    The alarming increase of resistance against multiple currently available antibiotics is leading to a rapid lose of treatment options against infectious diseases. Since the antibiotic resistance is partially due to a misuse or abuse of the antibiotics, this situation can be reverted when improving their use. One strategy is the optimization of the antimicrobial dosing regimens. In fact, inappropriate drug choice and suboptimal dosing are two major factors that should be considered because they lead to the emergence of drug resistance and consequently, poorer clinical outcomes. Pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) analysis in combination with Monte Carlo simulation allows to optimize dosing regimens of the antibiotic agents in order to conserve their therapeutic value. Therefore, the aim of this review is to explain the basis of the PK/PD analysis and associated techniques, and provide a brief revision of the applications of PK/PD analysis from a therapeutic point-of-view. The establishment and reevaluation of clinical breakpoints is the sticking point in antibiotic therapy as the clinical use of the antibiotics depends on them. Two methodologies are described to establish the PK/PD breakpoints, which are a big part of the clinical breakpoint setting machine. Furthermore, the main subpopulations of patients with altered characteristics that can condition the PK/PD behavior (such as critically ill, elderly, pediatric or obese patients) and therefore, the outcome of the antibiotic therapy, are reviewed. Finally, some recommendations are provided from a PK/PD point of view to enhance the efficacy of prophylaxis protocols used in surgery. Copyright © 2015 Japanese Society of Chemotherapy and The Japanese Association for Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Sosiaalisen median kehittäminen pk-yrityksissä Töpseli-verkoston avulla

    OpenAIRE

    Palander, Laura

    2010-01-01

    Tämän opinnäytetyön tarkoituksena oli selvittää, minkälaisena mahdollisuutena pk-yrittäjät kokevat sosiaalisen median ja miten he ymmärtävät sen. Läntisellä Uudellamaalla toimivia yrityksiä on osallistunut Laurea-ammattikorkeakoulun Lohjan toimipisteen Töpseli-verkostoon. Verkoston tarkoituksena on vahvistaa länsi Uudellamaalla toimivien pk-yritysten kilpailukykyä, parantamalla yrittäjien ymmärrystä sosiaalisen median tarjoamista mahdollisuuksista. Työtä varten selvitettiin myös ammattikorkea...

  16. Mechanism-based PK/PD modeling of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geldof, Marian

    2007-01-01

    The main objective of the investigations was to explore the PK/PD correlations of fluvoxamine, as a prototype for the Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors (SSRIs). In the various investigations, a spectrum of different biomarkers was used, each reflecting a specific process on the causal path

  17. Comparison of Plasma Tu-M2-PK and CA19-9 in Pancreatic Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Joergensen, Maiken Thyregod; Heegaard, Niels H H; Schaffalitzky de Muckadell, Ove B

    2009-01-01

    because of suspicion of pancreatic cancer. Of these, 51 patients had their conditions diagnosed as PDAC, whereas this diagnosis was ruled out in 52 after 12 months of follow-up. The performance of Tu-M2-PK was compared with that of CA19-9 using cutoff values 15 and 37 U/mL, respectively. RESULTS...

  18. Seizing the Opportunity: Building PK3 Systems in New Jersey's School Districts. Policy Brief

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, Cynthia

    2008-01-01

    This policy brief discusses how the implementation of high quality preschool required by the expansion initiative can set the stage for a more expansive view of the first stage of children's education: the development of a preschool-through third-grade (PK3) system. By adopting a broader view of early childhood education as a period extending from…

  19. The influence of ebselen on the toxicity of cisplatin in LLC-PK1 cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baldew, G S; Boymans, A P; Mol, J G; Vermeulen, N P

    1992-01-01

    LLC-PK1 cells have been used as an in vitro model to study the nephrotoxicity of the antitumor drug cisplatin. A concentration-dependent cytotoxicity of cisplatin, measured as lactate dehydrogenase leakage and amount of protein remaining attached to the culture plate, was observed. At a cisplatin

  20. Application of PK/PD Modeling in Veterinary Field: Dose Optimization and Drug Resistance Prediction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ijaz Ahmad

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Among veterinary drugs, antibiotics are frequently used. The true mean of antibiotic treatment is to administer dose of drug that will have enough high possibility of attaining the preferred curative effect, with adequately low chance of concentration associated toxicity. Rising of antibacterial resistance and lack of novel antibiotic is a global crisis; therefore there is an urgent need to overcome this problem. Inappropriate antibiotic selection, group treatment, and suboptimal dosing are mostly responsible for the mentioned problem. One approach to minimizing the antibacterial resistance is to optimize the dosage regimen. PK/PD model is important realm to be used for that purpose from several years. PK/PD model describes the relationship between drug potency, microorganism exposed to drug, and the effect observed. Proper use of the most modern PK/PD modeling approaches in veterinary medicine can optimize the dosage for patient, which in turn reduce toxicity and reduce the emergence of resistance. The aim of this review is to look at the existing state and application of PK/PD in veterinary medicine based on in vitro, in vivo, healthy, and disease model.

  1. Neuroinflammation in bipolar disorder : A [C-11]-(R)-PK11195 positron emission tomography study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haarman, Bartholomeus C.M.; Riemersma -van der Lek, Rixt; de Groot, Jan Cees; Ruhe, Eric; Klein, Hans C; Zandstra, Tjitske E; Burger, Huibert; Schoevers, Robert A.; de Vries, Erik F.J.; Drexhage, Hemmo A; Nolen, Willem A.; Doorduin, Janine

    Background: The "monocyte-T-cell theory of mood disorders" regards neuroinflammation, i.e. marked activation of microglia, as a driving force in bipolar disorder. Microglia activation can be visualized in vivo using [C-11]-(R)-PK11195 PET. Indirect evidence suggests the hippocampus as a potential

  2. Optimalisasi Pengelolaan dan Pemanfaatan Aset Tanah dan Bangunan Perguruan Tinggi Negeri (PTN yang Melaksanakan Pengelolaan Keuangan Badan Layanan Umum (PK BLU0 dalam Rangka Meningkatkan Pelayanan Pendidikan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dewi Kania Sugiharti

    2014-08-01

    Regulation 6/2006 amended by Government Regulation 38/2008, its flexibility applies only in financial management. Land and building in the possession of the State University PK BLU, are to be used in accordance with their designated tasks and functions. Normatively, there is no regulation that gives authority to the proxy of asset user to perform optimization beyond its designated purpose. Regulation gives opportunity to utilize state owned assets which are not used in accordance with the designated tasks and functions in forms lease, 'pinjam pakai', cooperative utilization, 'bangun serah guna'/ 'bangun guna serah' without ownership changing. However, the utilization could only be conducted by asset manager, not the proxy of asset user. The proxy asset user of state owned asset has only the right and responsibility to assign unused land and building for the interest of the asset users.

  3. PK-ISIS: a new superconducting ECR ion source at Pantechnik

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Villari, A.C.; Bieth, C.; Bougy, W.; Brionne, N.; Donzel, X.; Gaubert, G.; Leroy, R.; Sineau, A.; Tasset, O.; Vallerand, C.; Thuillier, T.

    2012-01-01

    The new ECR ion source PK-ISIS was recently commissioned at Pantechnik. Three superconducting coils generate the axial magnetic field configuration while the radial magnetic field is done with multi-layer permanent magnets. Special care was devoted in the design of the hexapolar structure, allowing a maximum magnetic field of 1.32 T at the wall of the 82 mm diameter plasma chamber. The three superconducting coils using Low Temperature Superconducting wires are cooled by a single double stage cryo-cooler (4.2 K). Cryogen-free technology is used, providing reliability, easy maintenance at low cost. The maximum installed RF power (18.0 GHz) is of 2 kW. Metallic beams can be produced with an oven (T max = 1400 C) installed with an angle of 5 degrees with respect to the source axis or a sputtering system, mounted in the axis of the source. The beam extraction system is constituted of three electrodes in accel-decel configuration. The new source of Pantechnik is conceived for reaching optimum performances at 18 GHz RF frequencies. PK-ISIS delivers 5 to 10 times more beam intensity than the original PK-DELIS and/or shifting the charge state distribution to higher values. PK-ISIS is built with Low Temperature Superconducting wire technology (LTS), but keeps the He-free concept, extremely important for a reliable and easy operation. The radial field circuit is permanent magnet made. Finally, PK-ISIS is also conceived for using in a High-Voltage platform with minor power consumption. The paper is followed by the slides of the presentation. (A.C.)

  4. Involvement of DNA-PK and ATM in radiation- and heat-induced DNA damage recognition and apoptotic cell death

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomita, Masanori

    2010-01-01

    Exposure to ionizing radiation and hyperthermia results in important biological consequences, e.g. cell death, chromosomal aberrations, mutations, and DNA strand breaks. There is good evidence that the nucleus, specifically cellular DNA, is the principal target for radiation-induced cell lethality. DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are considered to be the most serious type of DNA damage induced by ionizing radiation. On the other hand, verifiable mechanisms which can lead to heat-induced cell death are damage to the plasma membrane and/or inactivation of heat-labile proteins caused by protein denaturation and subsequent aggregation. Recently, several reports have suggested that DSBs can be induced after hyperthermia because heat-induced phosphorylated histone H2AX (γ-H2AX) foci formation can be observed in several mammalian cell lines. In mammalian cells, DSBs are repaired primarily through two distinct and complementary mechanisms: non-homologous end joining (NHEJ), and homologous recombination (HR) or homology-directed repair (HDR). DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) and ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM) are key players in the initiation of DSB repair and phosphorylate and/or activate many substrates, including themselves. These phosphorylated substrates have important roles in the functioning of cell cycle checkpoints and in cell death, as well as in DSB repair. Apoptotic cell death is a crucial cell suicide mechanism during development and in the defense of homeostasis. If DSBs are unrepaired or misrepaired, apoptosis is a very important system which can protect an organism against carcinogenesis. This paper reviews recently obtained results and current topics concerning the role of DNA-PK and ATM in heat- or radiation-induced apoptotic cell death. (author)

  5. TANGGUNGJAWAB REKTOR SEBAGAI KPA DALAM PENGELOLAAN KEUANGAN PERGURUAN TINGGI NEGERI YANG MENYELENGGARAKAN PENGELOLAAN KEUANGAN BADAN LAYANAN UMUM (PTN PK-BLU

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dewi Kania Sugiharti

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Perguruan Tinggi yang menerapkan konsep Badan Layanan Umum (PTN PKBLU dalam menjalankan fungsi sebagai organ yang bergerak dalam bidang pelayanan adalah dukungan sarana dan prasarana melalui barang atau jasa. Sebagai institusi yang berada dalam naungan pemerintah dan menerima anggaran negara maka PTN PK-BLU melaksanakan mekanisme untuk memperoleh barang atau jasa sesuai ketentuan hukum. Namun proses pengadaan dalam memperoleh barang atau jasa terkadang menimbulkan persoalan yang muncul sebagai konsekuensi berjalannya proses pengadaan barang atau jasa yang melibatkan organ-organ di dalamnya seperti PA/KPA, PPK, ULP, dan Panitia/Pejabat Penerima Pengadaan. Rektor sebagai KPA dalam PTN PK-BLU memiliki wewenang dalam melakukan kontrol terhadap organ-organ yang melaksanakan proses pengadaan barang/jasa pada lingkungannya. Kesalahan dalam proses pengadaan barang/jasa yang dilakukan oleh PPK dan ULP/Pejabat Pengadaan menyebabkan kerugian negara akibat kesalahan tersebut, baik akibat kelalaian atau tindakan melanggar hukum. Sebagai KPA dalam proses pengadaan barang/jasa Rektor dapat melakukan kontrol pada organ-organ tersebut sesuai dengan wewenang yang diberikan. Konsekuensi yang diterima jika pada akhirnya pejabat pelaksanaan pengadaan barang/jasa tidak mengindahkan teguran Rektor maka pejabat yang terkait proses pengadaan barang/jasa akan menerima sanksi. Universities that apply the concept of Public Service Agency (BLU - PK PTN in performing functions as an organ which isengaged in the service infrastructure support through goods or services . As an institution under the auspices of the government and the state budget receives PTN PK - BLU implement mechanisms to acquire goods or services in accordance with the law . However, the procurement process in obtaining goods or services sometimes poses problems that arise as a consequence of the passage of the procurement of goods or services involving the organs in it as PA / KPA , KDP , ULP , and

  6. Why the nth-root function is not a rational function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobbs, David E.

    2017-11-01

    The set of functions ? is linearly independent over ? (with respect to any open subinterval of (0, ∞)). The titular result is a corollary for any integer n ≥ 2 (and the domain [0, ∞)). Some more accessible proofs of that result are also given. Let F be a finite field of characteristic p and cardinality pk. Then the pth-root function F → F is a polynomial function of degree at most pk - 2 if pk ≠ 2 (resp., the identity function if pk = 2). Also, for any integer n ≥ 2, every element of F has an nth root in F if and only if, for each prime number q dividing n, q is not a factor of pk - 1. Various parts of this note could find classroom use in courses at various levels, on precalculus, calculus or abstract algebra. A final section addresses educational benefits of such coverage and offers some recommendations to practitioners.

  7. Semi-physiological pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic (PK-PD) modeling and simulation of 5-fluorouracil for thrombocytopenia in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobuchi, Shinji; Ito, Yukako; Hayakawa, Taro; Nishimura, Asako; Shibata, Nobuhito; Takada, Kanji; Sakaeda, Toshiyuki

    2015-01-01

    1. The aim of this study was to develop a simple pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic (PK-PD) model that could characterize the complete time-course of alterations in platelet counts to predict the onset and degree of thrombocytopenia, which severely limits the use of the anticancer agent 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), in rats. 2. Platelet counts were measured in rats following the intravenous administration of various doses of 5-FU for 4 days to obtain data for an analysis of the PK-PD model. Our PK-PD model consisted of a two-compartment PK model, with three compartments for the PD model and 10 structural PK-PD model parameters. 3. After the 5-FU treatment, platelet counts transiently decreased to a nadir level, showed a rebound to above the baseline level before recovering to baseline levels. Nadir platelet counts and rebounds varied with the AUC0-∞ level. The final PK-PD model effectively characterized platelet count data and final PD parameters were estimated with high certainty. 4. This PK-PD model and simulation may represent a valuable tool for quantifying and predicting the complete time-course of alterations in blood cell counts, and could contribute to the development of therapeutic strategies with 5-FU and assessments of various novel anticancer agents that are difficult to examine in humans.

  8. Changes in the responsiveness of hypothalamic PK2 and PKR1 gene expression to fasting in developing male rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwasa, Takeshi; Matsuzaki, Toshiya; Tungalagsuvd, Altankhuu; Munkhzaya, Munkhsaikhan; Kawami, Takako; Yamasaki, Mikio; Murakami, Masahiro; Kato, Takeshi; Kuwahara, Akira; Yasui, Toshiyuki; Irahara, Minoru

    2014-11-01

    Prokineticin (PK2) and its receptors (PKRs) are expressed in several regions of the central nervous system, including the hypothalamus. It has been reported that PK2 inhibits food intake via PKR1 and that the hypothalamic PK2 mRNA levels of adult rodents were reduced by food deprivation. However, some hypothalamic factors do not exhibit sensitivity to undernutrition in the early neonatal period, but subsequently become sensitive to it during the neonatal to pre-pubertal period. In this study, we investigated the changes in the sensitivity of hypothalamic PK2 and PKR1 mRNA expression to fasting during the developmental period in male rats. Under the fed conditions, the rats' hypothalamic PK2 and/or PKR1 mRNA levels were higher on postnatal day (PND) 10 than on PND20 or PND30. In addition, the hypothalamic PK2 and/or PKR1 mRNA levels of the male rats were higher than those of the females at all examined ages (PND10, 20, and 30). Hypothalamic PK2 mRNA expression was decreased by 24h fasting at PND10 and 30, but not at PND20. In addition, hypothalamic PKR1 mRNA expression was decreased by 24h fasting at PND10, but not at PND20 or 30. These results indicate that both PK2 and PKR1 are sensitive to nutritional status in male rats and that this sensitivity has already been established by the early neonatal period. It can be speculated that the PK2 system might compensate for the immaturity of other appetite regulatory factors in the early neonatal period. Copyright © 2014 ISDN. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Automated DBS microsampling, microscale automation and microflow LC-MS for therapeutic protein PK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qian; Tomazela, Daniela; Vasicek, Lisa A; Spellman, Daniel S; Beaumont, Maribel; Shyong, BaoJen; Kenny, Jacqueline; Fauty, Scott; Fillgrove, Kerry; Harrelson, Jane; Bateman, Kevin P

    2016-04-01

    Reduce animal usage for discovery-stage PK studies for biologics programs using microsampling-based approaches and microscale LC-MS. We report the development of an automated DBS-based serial microsampling approach for studying the PK of therapeutic proteins in mice. Automated sample preparation and microflow LC-MS were used to enable assay miniaturization and improve overall assay throughput. Serial sampling of mice was possible over the full 21-day study period with the first six time points over 24 h being collected using automated DBS sample collection. Overall, this approach demonstrated comparable data to a previous study using single mice per time point liquid samples while reducing animal and compound requirements by 14-fold. Reduction in animals and drug material is enabled by the use of automated serial DBS microsampling for mice studies in discovery-stage studies of protein therapeutics.

  10. Nuclear imaging of neuroinflammation: a comprehensive review of [11C]PK11195 challengers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chauveau, Fabien; Camp, Nadja van; Tavitian, Bertrand; Boutin, Herve; Dolle, Frederic

    2008-01-01

    Neurodegenerative, inflammatory and neoplastic brain disorders involve neuroinflammatory reactions, and a biomarker of neuroinflammation would be useful for diagnostic, drug development and therapy control of these frequent diseases. In vivo imaging can document the expression of the peripheral benzodiazepine receptor (PBR)/translocator protein 18 kDa (TSPO) that is linked to microglial activation and considered a hallmark of neuroinflammation. The prototype positron emission tomography tracer for PBR, [ 11 C]PK11195, has shown limitations that until now have slowed the clinical applications of PBR imaging. In recent years, dozens of new PET and SPECT radioligands for the PBR have been radiolabelled, and several have been evaluated in imaging protocols. Here we review the new PBR ligands proposed as challengers of [ 11 C]PK11195, critically analyze preclinical imaging studies and discuss their potential as neuroinflammation imaging agents. (orig.)

  11. Critical role of bioanalytical strategies in investigation of clinical PK observations, a Phase I case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Kun; Xu, Keyang; Liu, Luna; Hendricks, Robert; Delarosa, Reginald; Erickson, Rich; Budha, Nageshwar; Leabman, Maya; Song, An; Kaur, Surinder; Fischer, Saloumeh K

    2014-01-01

    RG7652 is a human immunoglobulin 1 (IgG1) monoclonal antibody (mAb) targeting proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PCSK9) and is designed for the treatment of hypercholesterolemia. A target-binding enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was developed to measure RG7652 levels in human serum in a Phase I study. Although target-binding assay formats are generally used to quantify free therapeutic, the actual therapeutic species being measured are affected by assay conditions, such as sample dilution and incubation time, and levels of soluble target in the samples. Therefore, in the presence of high concentrations of circulating target, the choice of reagents and assay conditions can have a significant effect on the observed pharmacokinetic (PK) profiles. Phase I RG7652 PK analysis using the ELISA data resulted in a nonlinear dose normalized exposure. An investigation was conducted to characterize the ELISA to determine whether the assay format and reagents may have contributed to the PK observation. In addition, to confirm the ELISA results, a second orthogonal method, liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) using a signature peptide as surrogate, was developed and implemented. A subset of PK samples, randomly selected from half of the subjects in the 6 single ascending dose (SAD) cohorts in the Phase I clinical study, was analyzed with the LC-MS/MS assay, and the data were found to be comparable to the ELISA data. This paper illustrates the importance of reagent characterization, as well as the benefits of using an orthogonal approach to eliminate bioanalytical contributions when encountering unexpected observations. PMID:25484037

  12. Effects of cyclosporin A on a kidney epithelial cell line (LLC-PK1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, G M; Gandolfi, A J; Nagle, R B

    1987-05-01

    Cyclosporin A (CSA), a potent immunosuppressant with the adverse side effect of nephrotoxicity, inhibited cell growth of pig kidney tubule cells (LLC-PK1) in culture. CSA (10(-5) M) also induced intense cytoplasmic vacuolation and the formation of dense granules. At the same concentration an analogue of CSA, cyclosporin G, had much less effect. This cell line may prove useful for revealing the mechanism of CSA-nephrotoxicity and testing the nephrotoxic potential of new analogues of cyclosporine.

  13. HARP preferentially co-purifies with RPA bound to DNA-PK and blocks RPA phosphorylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quan, Jinhua; Yusufzai, Timur

    2014-05-01

    The HepA-related protein (HARP/SMARCAL1) is an ATP-dependent annealing helicase that is capable of rewinding DNA structures that are stably unwound due to binding of the single-stranded DNA (ssDNA)-binding protein Replication Protein A (RPA). HARP has been implicated in maintaining genome integrity through its role in DNA replication and repair, two processes that generate RPA-coated ssDNA. In addition, mutations in HARP cause a rare disease known as Schimke immuno-osseous dysplasia. In this study, we purified HARP containing complexes with the goal of identifying the predominant factors that stably associate with HARP. We found that HARP preferentially interacts with RPA molecules that are bound to the DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK). We also found that RPA is phosphorylated by DNA-PK in vitro, while the RPA-HARP complexes are not. Our results suggest that, in addition to its annealing helicase activity, which eliminates the natural binding substrate for RPA, HARP blocks the phosphorylation of RPA by DNA-PK.

  14. PK20, a new opioid-neurotensin hybrid peptide that exhibits central and peripheral antinociceptive effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsuda Yuko

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The clinical treatment of various types of pain relies upon the use of opioid analgesics. However most of them produce, in addition to the analgesic effect, several side effects such as the development of dependence and addiction as well as sedation, dysphoria, and constipation. One solution to these problems are chimeric compounds in which the opioid pharmacophore is hybridized with another type of compound to incease antinociceptive effects. Neurotensin-induced antinociception is not mediated through the opioid system. Therefore, hybridizing neurotensin with opioid elements may result in a potent synergistic antinociceptor. Results Using the known structure-activity relationships of neurotensin we have synthesized a new chimeric opioid-neurotensin compound PK20 which is characterized by a very strong antinociceptive potency. The observation that the opioid antagonist naltrexone did not completely reverse the antinociceptive effect, indicates the partial involvement of the nonopioid component in PK20 in the produced analgesia. Conclusions The opioid-neurotensin hybrid analogue PK20, in which opioid and neurotensin pharmacophores overlap partially, expresses high antinociceptive tail-flick effects after central as well as peripheral applications.

  15. A generic whole body physiologically based pharmacokinetic model for therapeutic proteins in PK-Sim.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niederalt, Christoph; Kuepfer, Lars; Solodenko, Juri; Eissing, Thomas; Siegmund, Hans-Ulrich; Block, Michael; Willmann, Stefan; Lippert, Jörg

    2018-04-01

    Proteins are an increasingly important class of drugs used as therapeutic as well as diagnostic agents. A generic physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model was developed in order to represent at whole body level the fundamental mechanisms driving the distribution and clearance of large molecules like therapeutic proteins. The model was built as an extension of the PK-Sim model for small molecules incorporating (i) the two-pore formalism for drug extravasation from blood plasma to interstitial space, (ii) lymph flow, (iii) endosomal clearance and (iv) protection from endosomal clearance by neonatal Fc receptor (FcRn) mediated recycling as especially relevant for antibodies. For model development and evaluation, PK data was used for compounds with a wide range of solute radii. The model supports the integration of knowledge gained during all development phases of therapeutic proteins, enables translation from pre-clinical species to human and allows predictions of tissue concentration profiles which are of relevance for the analysis of on-target pharmacodynamic effects as well as off-target toxicity. The current implementation of the model replaces the generic protein PBPK model available in PK-Sim since version 4.2 and becomes part of the Open Systems Pharmacology Suite.

  16. The pharmacology of PEGylation: balancing PD with PK to generate novel therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fishburn, C Simone

    2008-10-01

    Conjugation of macromolecules to polyethylene glycol (PEG) has emerged recently as an effective strategy to alter the pharmacokinetic (PK) profiles of a variety of drugs, and thereby to improve their therapeutic potential. PEG conjugation increases retention of drugs in the circulation by protecting against enzymatic digestion, slowing filtration by the kidneys and reducing the generation of neutralizing antibodies. Often, PEGylation leads to a loss in binding affinity due to steric interference with the drug-target binding interaction. This loss in potency is offset by the longer circulating half-life of the drugs, and the resulting change in PK-PD profile has led in some cases to enabling of drugs that otherwise could not be developed, and in others to improvements in existing drugs. Thus, whereas most approaches to drug development seek to increase the activity of drugs directly, the creation of PEGylated drugs seeks to balance the pharmacodynamic (PD) and pharmacokinetic properties to produce novel therapies that will meet with both increased efficacy and greater compliance in the clinical setting. This review examines some of the PEGylated drugs developed in recent years, and highlights some of the different strategies taken to employ PEG to maximize the overall PK-PD profiles of these compounds. (c) 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc. and the American Pharmacists Association

  17. Nano Copper Induces Apoptosis in PK-15 Cells via a Mitochondria-Mediated Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hui; Chang, Zhenyu; Mehmood, Khalid; Abbas, Rao Zahid; Nabi, Fazul; Rehman, Mujeeb Ur; Wu, Xiaoxing; Tian, Xinxin; Yuan, Xiaodan; Li, Zhaoyang; Zhou, Donghai

    2018-01-01

    Nano-sized copper particles are widely used in various chemical, physical, and biological fields. However, earlier studies have shown that nano copper particles (40-100 μg/mL) can induce cell toxicity and apoptosis. Therefore, this study was conducted to investigate the role of nano copper in mitochondrion-mediated apoptosis in PK-15 cells. The cells were treated with different doses of nano copper (20, 40, 60, and 80 μg/mL) to determine the effects of apoptosis using acridine orange/ethidium bromide (AO/EB) fluorescence staining and a flow cytometry assay. The levels of malondialdehyde (MDA) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) in the PK-15 cells were examined using commercially available kits. Moreover, the mRNA levels of the Bax, Bid, Caspase-3, and CYCS genes were assessed by real-time PCR. The results revealed that nano copper exposure induced apoptosis and changed the mitochondrial membrane potential. In addition, nano copper significantly altered the levels of the Bax, Bid, Caspase-3, and CYCS genes at a concentration of 40 μg/mL. To summarize, nano copper significantly (P nano copper can play an important role in inducing the apoptotic pathway in PK-15 cells, which may be the mechanism by which nano copper induces nephrotoxicity.

  18. Pharmacokinetics (PK), pharmacodynamics (PD), and PK-PD integration of ceftiofur after a single intravenous, subcutaneous and subcutaneous-LA administration in lactating goats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Varón, Emilio; Cárceles-García, Carlos; Serrano-Rodríguez, Juan Manuel; Cárceles-Rodríguez, Carlos M

    2016-10-13

    Bacterial pneumonia in goats is usually caused by Mannheimia haemolytica and Pasteurella multocida. Another important infection disease in lactating goats is intramammary infection producing mastitis, usually associated with coagulase-negative Staphylococcus spp. However, treatment of bacterial pneumonia in goats not affected by mastitis problems should be restricted to antimicrobials with scant penetration to milk in order to avoid long withdrawal times. Ceftiofur is a third-generation cephalosporin antimicrobial with activity against various gram-positive and gram-negative, aerobic and anaerobic bacteria encountered by domestic animals. The objectives of the present study were to establish the serum concentration-time profile for ceftiofur in lactating goats after intravenous, subcutaneous and a SC-long-acting ceftiofur formulation; to determine ceftiofur penetration into milk; to determine in vitro and ex vivo activity of ceftiofur establishing MIC, MBC, MPC and time-kill profiles against field strains of M. haemolytica and finally to calculate the main surrogate markers of efficacy. The pharmacokinetics studies revealed an optimal PK properties for the SC-LA formulation tested. Ceftiofur was well absorbed following SC and SC-LA administration, with absolute bioavailabilities (F) of 85.16 and 84.43 %, respectively. After ceftiofur analysis from milk samples, no concentrations were found at any sampling time. The MIC, MBC and MPC data of ceftiofur against five M. haemolytica strains isolated from goats affected by pneumonia were tested showing excelent sensitivity of ceftiofur against this pathogen. For PK-PD analysis, ratios were calculated suggesting a high level of bacterial kill against the five strains of M. haemolytica tested. The systemic ceftiofur exposure achieved in lactating goats following IV, SC and especially with the SC-LA administration is consistent with the predicted PK-PD ratios needed for a positive therapeutic outcome for M. haemolytica

  19. The proteasome inhibitor MG-132 sensitizes PC-3 prostate cancer cells to ionizing radiation by a DNA-PK-independent mechanism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pajonk, Frank; Ophoven, Arndt van; Weissenberger, Christian; McBride, William H

    2005-01-01

    By modulating the expression levels of specific signal transduction molecules, the 26S proteasome plays a central role in determining cell cycle progression or arrest and cell survival or death in response to stress stimuli, including ionizing radiation. Inhibition of proteasome function by specific drugs results in cell cycle arrest, apoptosis and radiosensitization of many cancer cell lines. This study investigates whether there is also a concomitant increase in cellular radiosensitivity if proteasome inhibition occurs only transiently before radiation. Further, since proteasome inhibition has been shown to activate caspase-3, which is involved in apoptosis, and caspase-3 can cleave DNA-PKcs, which is involved in DNA-double strand repair, the hypothesis was tested that caspase-3 activation was essential for both apoptosis and radiosensitization following proteasome inhibition. Prostate carcinoma PC-3 cells were treated with the reversible proteasome inhibitor MG-132. Cell cycle distribution, apoptosis, caspase-3 activity, DNA-PKcs protein levels and DNA-PK activity were monitored. Radiosensitivity was assessed using a clonogenic assay. Inhibition of proteasome function caused cell cycle arrest and apoptosis but this did not involve early activation of caspase-3. Short-time inhibition of proteasome function also caused radiosensitization but this did not involve a decrease in DNA-PKcs protein levels or DNA-PK activity. We conclude that caspase-dependent cleavage of DNA-PKcs during apoptosis does not contribute to the radiosensitizing effects of MG-132

  20. The role of infection models and PK/PD modelling for optimising care of critically ill patients with severe infections

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tangden, T.; Martin, V.; Felton, T.W.; Nielsen, E.I.; Marchand, S.; Bruggemann, R.J.M.; Bulitta, J.B.; Bassetti, M.; Theuretzbacher, U.; Tsuji, B.T.; Wareham, D.W.; Friberg, L.E.; Waele, J.J. De; Tam, V.H.; Roberts, J.A.

    2017-01-01

    Critically ill patients with severe infections are at high risk of suboptimal antimicrobial dosing. The pharmacokinetics (PK) and pharmacodynamics (PD) of antimicrobials in these patients differ significantly from the patient groups from whose data the conventional dosing regimens were developed.

  1. Population PK modelling and simulation based on fluoxetine and norfluoxetine concentrations in milk: a milk concentration-based prediction model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanoshima, Reo; Bournissen, Facundo Garcia; Tanigawara, Yusuke; Kristensen, Judith H; Taddio, Anna; Ilett, Kenneth F; Begg, Evan J; Wallach, Izhar; Ito, Shinya

    2014-10-01

    Population pharmacokinetic (pop PK) modelling can be used for PK assessment of drugs in breast milk. However, complex mechanistic modelling of a parent and an active metabolite using both blood and milk samples is challenging. We aimed to develop a simple predictive pop PK model for milk concentration-time profiles of a parent and a metabolite, using data on fluoxetine (FX) and its active metabolite, norfluoxetine (NFX), in milk. Using a previously published data set of drug concentrations in milk from 25 women treated with FX, a pop PK model predictive of milk concentration-time profiles of FX and NFX was developed. Simulation was performed with the model to generate FX and NFX concentration-time profiles in milk of 1000 mothers. This milk concentration-based pop PK model was compared with the previously validated plasma/milk concentration-based pop PK model of FX. Milk FX and NFX concentration-time profiles were described reasonably well by a one compartment model with a FX-to-NFX conversion coefficient. Median values of the simulated relative infant dose on a weight basis (sRID: weight-adjusted daily doses of FX and NFX through breastmilk to the infant, expressed as a fraction of therapeutic FX daily dose per body weight) were 0.028 for FX and 0.029 for NFX. The FX sRID estimates were consistent with those of the plasma/milk-based pop PK model. A predictive pop PK model based on only milk concentrations can be developed for simultaneous estimation of milk concentration-time profiles of a parent (FX) and an active metabolite (NFX). © 2014 The British Pharmacological Society.

  2. Study of the production of A0 b and B0 hadrons in pp collisions and first measurement of the ∧ o b !J= pK.. branching fraction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aaij, R.; Adeva, B.; Adinolfi, M.; Affolder, A.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Akar, S.; Albrecht, J.; Alessio, F.; Alexander, M.; Ali, S.; Alkhazov, G.; Alvarez Cartelle, P.; Alves, A. A.; Amato, S.; Amerio, S.; Amhis, Y.; Everse, LA; Anderlini, L.; Anderson, J.; Andreassi, G.; Andreotti, M.; Andrews, J.E.; Appleby, R. B.; Aquines Gutierrez, O.; Archilli, F.; d'Argent, P.; Artamonov, A.; Artuso, M.; Aslanides, E.; Auriemma, G.; Baalouch, M.; Bachmann, S.; Back, J. J.; Badalov, A.; Baesso, C.; Baldini, W.; Barlow, R. J.; Barschel, C.; Barsuk, S.; Barter, W.; Batozskaya, V.; Battista, V.; Bay, A.; Beaucourt, L.; Beddow, J.; Bedeschi, F.; Bediaga, I.; Bel, L. J.; Bellee, V.; Belloli, N.; Belyaev, I.; Ben-Haim, E.; Bencivenni, G.; Benson, S.; Benton, J.; Berezhnoy, A.; Bernet, R.; Bertolin, A.; Bettler, M-O.; Van Beuzekom, Martin; Bien, A.; Bifani, S.; Billoir, P.; Bird, T.D.; Birnkraut, A.; Bizzeti, A.; Blake, T.; Blanc, F.; Blouw, J.; Blusk, S.; Bocci, V.; Bondar, A.; Bondar, N.; Bonivento, W.; Borghi, S.; Borsato, M.; Bowcock, T. J. V.; Bowen, E.; Bozzi, C.; Braun, S.; Britsch, M.; Britton, T.; Brodzicka, J.; Brook, N. H.; Buchanan, E.; Bursche, A.; Buytaert, J.; Cadeddu, S.; Calabrese, R.; Calvi, M.; Calvo Gomez, M.; Campana, P.; Campora Perez, D.; Capriotti, L.; Carbone, A.; Carboni, G.; Cardinale, R.; Cardini, A.; Carniti, P.; Carson, L.; Carvalho Akiba, K.; Casse, G.; Cassina, L.; Castillo Garcia, L.; Cattaneo, M.; Cauet, Ch; Cavallero, G.; Cenci, R.; Charles, M.; Charpentier, Ph; Chefdeville, M.; Chen, S.; Cheung, S-F.; Chiapolini, N.; Chrzaszcz, M.; Cid Vidal, X.; Ciezarek, G.; Clarke, P. E. L.; Clemencic, M.; Cliff, H. V.; Closier, J.; Coco, V.; Cogan, J.; Cogneras, E.; Cogoni, V.; Cojocariu, L.; Collazuol, G.; Collins, P.; Comerma-Montells, A.; Contu, A.; Cook, A.; Coombes, M.; Coquereau, S.; Corti, G.; Corvo, M.; Couturier, B.; Cowan, G. A.; Craik, D. C.; Crocombe, A.; Cruz Torres, M.; Cunliffe, S.; Currie, C.R.; D'Ambrosio, C.; Dall'Occo, E.; Dalseno, J.; David, P. N.Y.; Davis, A.; De Bruyn, K.; De Capua, S.; De Cian, M.; de Miranda, J. M.; Paula, L.E.; De Simone, P.; Dean, C-T.; Decamp, D.; Deckenhoff, M.; Del Buono, L.; Déleáge, N.; Demmer, M.; Derkach, D.; Deschamps, O.; Dettori, F.; Dey, B.; Di Canto, A.; Di Ruscio, F.; Dijkstra, H.; Donleavy, S.; Dordei, F.; Dorigo, M.; Dosil Suárez, A.; Dossett, D.; Dovbnya, A.; Dreimanis, K.; Dufour, L.; Dujany, G.; Dupertuis, F.; Durante, P.; Dzhelyadin, R.; Dziurda, A.; Dzyuba, A.; Easo, S.; Egede, U.; Egorychev, V.; Eidelman, S.; Eisenhardt, S.; Eitschberger, U.; Ekelhof, R.; Eklund, L.; El Rifai, I.; Elsasser, Ch.; Ely, S.; Esen, S.; Evans, H. M.; Evans, T. M.; Falabella, A.; Färber, C.; Farley, N.; Farry, S.; Fay, R.; Ferguson, D.; Fernandez Albor, V.; Ferrari, F.; Ferreira Rodrigues, F.; Ferro-Luzzi, M.; Filippov, S.; Fiore, M.; Fiorini, M.; Firlej, M.; Fitzpatrick, C.; Fiutowski, T.; Fohl, K.; Fol, P.; Fontana, Mark; Fontanelli, F.; Forty, R.; De Aguiar Francisco, O.; Frank, M.; Frei, C.; Frosini, M.; Fu, J.; Furfaro, E.; Gallas Torreira, A.; Galli, D.; Gallorini, S.; Gambetta, S.; Gandelman, M.; Gandini, P.; Gao, Y.; Garciá Pardinãs, J.; Garra Tico, J.; Garrido, L.; Gascon, D.; Carvalho-Gaspar, M.; Gauld, Rhorry; Gavardi, L.; Gazzoni, G.; Gerick, D.; Gersabeck, E.; Gersabeck, M.; Gershon, T. J.; Ghez, Ph; Gianì, S.; Gibson, V.; Girard, O. G.; Giubega, L.; Gligorov, V. V.; Göbel, C.; Golubkov, D.; Golutvin, A.; Gomes, A.Q.; Gotti, C.; Grabalosa Gándara, M.; Graciani Diaz, R.; Granado Cardoso, L. A.; Graugés, E.; Graverini, E.; Graziani, G.; Grecu, A.; Greening, E.; Gregson, S.; Griffith, P.; Grillo, L.; Grünberg, O.; Gui, B.; Gushchin, E.; Guz, Yu; Gys, T.; Hadavizadeh, T.; Hadjivasiliou, C.; Haefeli, G.; Haen, C.; Haines, S. C.; Hall, S.; Hamilton, B.; Han, X.; Hansmann-Menzemer, S.; Harnew, N.; Harnew, S. T.; Harrison, J.; He, J.; Head, T.; Heijne, V.; Hennessy, K.; Henrard, P.; Henry, L.; van Herwijnen, E.; Heß, M.; Hicheur, A.; Hill, D.; Hoballah, M.; Hombach, C.; Hulsbergen, W.; Humair, T.; Hussain, N.; Hutchcroft, D. E.; Hynds, D.; Idzik, M.; Ilten, P.; Jacobsson, R.; Jaeger, A.; Jalocha, J.; Jans, E.; Jawahery, A.; Jing, F.; John, M.; Johnson, D.; Jones, C. R.; Joram, C.; Jost, B.; Jurik, N.; Kandybei, S.; Kanso, W.; Karacson, M.; Karbach, T. M.; Karodia, S.; Kecke, M.; Kelsey, M. H.; Kenyon, I. R.; Kenzie, M.; Ketel, T.; Khanji, B.; Khurewathanakul, C.; Klaver, S.M.; Klimaszewski, K.; Kochebina, O.; Kolpin, M.; Komarov, I.; Koopman, R. F.; Koppenburg, P.; Kozeiha, M.; Kravchuk, L.; Kreplin, K.; Kreps, M.; Krocker, G.; Krokovny, P.; Kruse, F.; Krzemien, W.; Kucewicz, W.; Kucharczyk, M.; Kudryavtsev, V.; Kuonen, A. K.; Kurek, K.; Kvaratskheliya, T.; Lacarrere, D.; Lafferty, G. D.; Lai, A.; Lambert, D.M.; Lanfranchi, G.; Langenbruch, C.; Langhans, B.; Latham, T. E.; Lazzeroni, C.; Le Gac, R.; Van Leerdam, J.; Lees, J. P.; Lefèvre, R.; Leflat, A.; Lefrançois, J.; Lemos Cid, E.; Leroy, O.; Lesiak, T.; Leverington, B.; Li, Y.; Likhomanenko, T.; Liles, M.; Lindner, R.; Linn, S.C.; Lionetto, F.; Liu, B.; Liu, X.; Loh, D.; Longstaff, I.; Lopes, J. H.; Lucchesi, D.; Lucio Martinez, M.; Luo, H.; Lupato, A.; Luppi, E.; Lupton, O.; Lusiani, A.; Machefert, F.; Maciuc, F.; Maev, O.; Maguire, K.; Malde, S.; Malinin, A.; Manca, G.; Mancinelli, G.; Manning, P.; Mapelli, A.; Maratas, J.; Marchand, J. F.; Marconi, U.; Marin Benito, C.; Marino, P.; Marks, J.; Martellotti, G.; Martin, M.; Martinelli-Boneschi, F.; Martinez-Santos, D.; Martinez-Vidal, F.; Martins Tostes, D.; Massafferri, A.; Matev, R.; Mathad, A.; Mathe, Z.; Matteuzzi, C.; Mauri, A.; Maurin, B.; Mazurov, A.; McCann, M.; McCarthy, J.; Mcnab, A.; McNulty, R.; Meadows, B. T.; Meier, F.; Meissner, M.; Melnychuk, D.; Merk, M.; Michielin, E.; Milanes, D. A.; Minard, M. N.; Mitzel, D. S.; Molina Rodriguez, J.; Monroy, I. A.; Monteil, S.; Morandin, M.; Morawski, P.; Mordà, A.; Morello, M. J.; Moron, J.; Morris, A. B.; Mountain, R.; Muheim, F.; Müller, D.; Müller, J.; Müller, Karl; von Müller, L.; Mussini, M.; Muster, B.; Naik, P.; Nakada, T.; Nandakumar, R.; Nandi, A.; Nasteva, I.; Needham, M.; Neri, N.; Neubert, S.; Neufeld, N.; Neuner, M.; Nguyen, A. D.; Nguyen, T. D.; Nguyen-Mau, C.; Niess, V.; Niet, R.; Nikitin, N.; Nikodem, T.; Ninci, D.; Novoselov, A.; O'Hanlon, D. P.; Oblakowska-Mucha, A.; Obraztsov, V.; Ogilvy, S.; Okhrimenko, O.; Oldeman, R.; Onderwater, C. J.G.; Osorio Rodrigues, B.; Otalora Goicochea, J. M.; Otto, E.A.; Owen, R.P.; Oyanguren, A.; Palano, A.; Palombo, F.; Palutan, M.; Panman, J.; Papanestis, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Pappalardo, L.L.; Pappenheimer, C.; Parkes, C.; Passaleva, G.; Patel, G. D.; Patel, M.; Patrignani, C.; Pearce, D.A.; Pellegrino, A.; Penso, G.; Pepe Altarelli, M.; Perazzini, S.; Perret, P.; Pescatore, L.; Petridis, K.; Petrolini, A.; Petruzzo, M.; Picatoste Olloqui, E.; Pietrzyk, B.; Pilar, T.; Pinci, D.; Pistone, A.; Piucci, A.; Playfer, S.; Plo Casasus, M.; Poikela, T.; Polci, F.; Poluektov, A.; Polyakov, I.; Polycarpo, E.; Popov, A.; Popov, D.; Popovici, B.; Potterat, C.; Price, M. E.; Price, J.D.; Prisciandaro, J.; Pritchard, C.A.; Prouve, C.; Pugatch, V.; Puig Navarro, A.; Punzi, G.; Qian, Y.W.; Quagliani, R.; Rachwal, B.; Rademacker, J. H.; Rama, M.; Rangel, M. S.; Raniuk, I.; Rauschmayr, N.; Raven, G.; Redi, F.; Reichert, S.; Reid, M.; dos Reis, A. C.; Ricciardi, S.; Richards, Jennifer S; Rihl, M.; Rinnert, K.; Rives Molina, V.; Robbe, P.; Rodrigues, A. B.; Rodrigues, L.E.T.; Rodriguez Lopez, J. A.; Rodriguez Perez, P.; Roiser, S.; Romanovsky, V.; Romero Vidal, A.; Ronayne, J. W.; Rotondo, M.; Rouvinet, J.; Ruf, T.; Ruiz Valls, P.; Saborido Silva, J. J.; Sagidova, N.; Sail, P.; Saitta, B.; Salustino Guimaraes, V.; Sanchez Mayordomo, C.; Sanmartin Sedes, B.; Santacesaria, R.; Santamarina Rios, C.; Santimaria, M.; Santovetti, E.; Sarti, A.; Satriano, C.; Satta, A.; Saunders, D. M.; Savrina, D.; Schiller, M.; Schindler, R. H.; Schlupp, M.; Schmelling, M.; Schmelzer, T.; Schmidt, B.; Schneider, O.; Schopper, A.; Schubiger, M.; Schune, M. H.; Schwemmer, R.; Sciascia, B.; Sciubba, A.; Semennikov, A.; Serra, N.; Serrano, J.; Sestini, L.; Seyfert, P.; Shapkin, M.; Shapoval, I.; Shcheglov, Y.; Shears, T.; Shekhtman, L.; Shevchenko, V.; Shires, A.; Siddi, B. G.; Silva Coutinho, R.; Silva de Oliveira, L.; Simi, G.; Sirendi, M.; Skidmore, N.; Skwarnicki, T.; Smith, E.; Smith, E.; Smith, I. T.; Smith, J; Smith, M.; Snoek, H.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Soler, F. J. P.; Soomro, F.; de Souza, D.K.; Souza De Paula, B.; Spaan, B.; Spradlin, P.; Sridharan, S.; Stagni, F.; Stahl, M.; Stahl, S.; Stefkova, S.; Steinkamp, O.; Stenyakin, O.; Stevenson-Moore, P.; Stoica, S.; Stone, S.; Storaci, B.; Stracka, S.; Straticiuc, M.; Straumann, U.; Sun, L.; Sutcliffe, W.; Swientek, K.; Swientek, S.; Syropoulos, V.; Szczekowski, M.; Szczypka, P.; Szumlak, T.; T'Jampens, S.; Tayduganov, A.; Tekampe, T.; Teklishyn, M.; Tellarini, G.; Teubert, F.; Thomas, C.; Thomas, E.; Van Tilburg, J.; Tisserand, V.; Tobin, M. N.; Todd, Jim; Tolk, S.; Tomassetti, L.; Tonelli, D.; Topp-Joergensen, S.; Torr, N.; Tournefier, E.; Tourneur, S.; Trabelsi, K.; Tran, N.T.M.T.; Tresch, M.; Trisovic, A.; Tsaregorodtsev, A.; Tsopelas, P.; Tuning, N.; Ukleja, A.; Ustyuzhanin, A.; Uwer, U.; Vacca, C.; Vagnoni, V.; Valenti, G.; Vallier, A.; Vazquez Gomez, R.; Vazquez Regueiro, P.; Vázquez Sierra, C.; Vecchi, S.; Velthuis, M.J.; Veltri, M.; Veneziano, G.; Vesterinen, M.; Viaud, B.; Vieira, D.; Vieites Diaz, M.; Vilasis-Cardona, X.; Volkov, V.; Vollhardt, A.; Volyanskyy, D.; Voong, D.; Vorobyev, A.; Vorobyev, V.; Voß, C.; De Vries, J. A.; Waldi, R.; Wallace, C.; Wallace, R.; Walsh, John; Wandernoth, S.; Wang, J.; Ward, D. R.; Watson, N. K.; Websdale, D.; Weiden, A.; Whitehead, M.; Wilkinson, G.; Wilkinson, M.; Williams, M.; Williams, M.P.; Williams, M.; Williams, T.; Wilson, James F; Wimberley, J.; Wishahi, J.; Wislicki, W.; Witek, M.; Wormser, G.; Wotton, S. A.; Wright, S.J.; Wyllie, K.; Xie, Y.; Xu, Z.; Yang, Z.; Yu, J.; Yuan, X.; Yushchenko, O.; Zangoli, M.; Zavertyaev, M.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, Y.; Zhelezov, A.; Zhokhov, A.; Zhong, L.; Zucchelli, S.

    2016-01-01

    The product of the Λ0 b (B0) differential production cross-section and the branching fraction of the decay Λ0 bJ= pK.. (B0!J= K Λ (892)0) is measured as a function of the beauty hadron transverse momentum, pT, and rapidity, y. The kinematic region of the measurements is pT >20 GeV=c and 2:0>y>4:5.

  3. Mutant prevention concentration and PK-PD relationships of enrofloxacin for Pasteurella multocida in buffalo calves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balaje, R M; Sidhu, P K; Kaur, G; Rampal, S

    2013-12-01

    This study validated the use of mutant prevention concentration (MPC) and pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic (PK-PD) modeling approach for optimization of dose regimen of enrofloxacin to contain the emergence of Pasteurella multocida resistance. The PK and PD characteristics of enrofloxacin were investigated in buffalo calves after intramuscular administration at a dose rate of 12 mg/kg. The concentration of enrofloxacin and ciprofloxacin in serum were determined by high-performance liquid chromatography. The serum peak concentration (Cmax), terminal half-life (t1/2K10), volume of distribution (Vd(area)/F) and mean residence time (MRT) of enrofloxacin were 1.89 ± 0.35 μg/ml, 5.14 ± 0.66 h, 5.59 ± 0.99 l/kg/h and 8.52 ± 1.29 h, respectively. The percent metabolite conversion ratio of ciprofloxacin to enrofloxacin was 79. The binding of enrofloxacin to plasma proteins was 11%. The MIC, MBC and MPC for enrofloxacin against P. multocida were 0.05, 0.06 μg/ml and 1.50 μg/ml.In vitro and ex-vivo bactericidal activity of enrofloxacin was concentration dependent. Modeling of ex-vivo growth inhibition data to the sigmoid Emax equation provided AUC24h/MIC values to produce bacteriostatic (19 h), bactericidal (43 h) and bacterial eradication (64 h). PK-PD data in conjunction with MPC and MIC90 data predicted dosage schedules for enrofloxacin that may achieve optimum efficacy in respect of bacteriological and clinical cure and minimize the risk of emergence of resistance. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. One hundred cases of laparoscopic subtotal hysterectomy using the PK and Lap Loop systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erian, John; El-Toukhy, Tarek; Chandakas, Stefanos; Theodoridis, Theo; Hill, Nicholas

    2005-01-01

    To evaluate the safety and short-term outcomes of laparoscopic subtotal hysterectomy using the PK and Lap Loop systems. Prospective observational study (Canadian Task Force classification II-2). Princess Royal University and Chelsfield Park Hospitals, Kent, UK. One hundred women who underwent laparoscopic subtotal hysterectomy for menorrhagia from February 2003 through July 2004. The procedure was performed using the Plasma Kinetic (PK) system to seal the vascular pedicles and the Lap Loop system to separate the uterus at the level of the internal os. The uterus was removed from the abdominal cavity mainly by morcellation or posterior colpotomy. Of 100 patients, 59 were operated on as outpatients. Mean patient age was 44.6 years, median parity was 2, mean body mass index was 26.8, and mean duration of symptoms was 4 years. Clinically, the uterus was enlarged in 70 patients, and preoperative ultrasound scanning suggested the presence of uterine myomas in 42 patients. In addition to hysterectomy, 47 patients had concomitant pelvic surgery. The mean total operating time was 45.5 minutes, and mean estimated blood loss was 114 mL. The overall major complication rate was 2%; two patients required blood transfusion after surgery. There were no bowel or urinary tract injuries, unintended laparotomy, return to operating room, or anesthetic complications. At follow-up, all patients were satisfied with surgery. Laparoscopic subtotal hysterectomy using the PK and Lap Loop systems for treatment of therapy-resistant menorrhagia is safe, can be performed as an outpatient procedure, and is associated with reduced operating time and high patient satisfaction.

  5. A PK-PD model of ketamine-induced high-frequency oscillations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores, Francisco J.; Ching, ShiNung; Hartnack, Katharine; Fath, Amanda B.; Purdon, Patrick L.; Wilson, Matthew A.; Brown, Emery N.

    2015-10-01

    Objective. Ketamine is a widely used drug with clinical and research applications, and also known to be used as a recreational drug. Ketamine produces conspicuous changes in the electrocorticographic (ECoG) signals observed both in humans and rodents. In rodents, the intracranial ECoG displays a high-frequency oscillation (HFO) which power is modulated nonlinearly by ketamine dose. Despite the widespread use of ketamine there is no model description of the relationship between the pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamics (PK-PDs) of ketamine and the observed HFO power. Approach. In the present study, we developed a PK-PD model based on estimated ketamine concentration, its known pharmacological actions, and observed ECoG effects. The main pharmacological action of ketamine is antagonism of the NMDA receptor (NMDAR), which in rodents is accompanied by an HFO observed in the ECoG. At high doses, however, ketamine also acts at non-NMDAR sites, produces loss of consciousness, and the transient disappearance of the HFO. We propose a two-compartment PK model that represents the concentration of ketamine, and a PD model based in opposing effects of the NMDAR and non-NMDAR actions on the HFO power. Main results. We recorded ECoG from the cortex of rats after two doses of ketamine, and extracted the HFO power from the ECoG spectrograms. We fit the PK-PD model to the time course of the HFO power, and showed that the model reproduces the dose-dependent profile of the HFO power. The model provides good fits even in the presence of high variability in HFO power across animals. As expected, the model does not provide good fits to the HFO power after dosing the pure NMDAR antagonist MK-801. Significance. Our study provides a simple model to relate the observed electrophysiological effects of ketamine to its actions at the molecular level at different concentrations. This will improve the study of ketamine and rodent models of schizophrenia to better understand the wide and divergent

  6. [11C]-(R)-PK11195 positron emission tomography in patients with complex regional pain syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, So Yeon; Seo, Seongho; Lee, Jae Sung; Choi, Soo-Hee; Lee, Do-Hyeong; Jung, Ye-Ha; Song, Man-Kyu; Lee, Kyung-Jun; Kim, Yong Chul; Kwon, Hyun Woo; Im, Hyung-Jun; Lee, Dong Soo; Cheon, Gi Jeong; Kang, Do-Hyung

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) is characterized by severe and chronic pain, but the pathophysiology of this disease are not clearly understood. The primary aim of our case–control study was to explore neuroinflammation in patients with CRPS using positron emission tomography (PET), with an 18-kDa translocator protein specific radioligand [11C]-(R)-PK11195. [11C]-(R)-PK11195 PET scans were acquired for 11 patients with CRPS (30–55 years) and 12 control subjects (30–52 years). Parametric image of distribution volume ratio (DVR) for each participant was generated by applying a relative equilibrium-based graphical analysis. The DVR of [11C]-(R)-PK11195 in the caudate nucleus (t(21) = −3.209, P = 0.004), putamen (t(21) = −2.492, P = 0.022), nucleus accumbens (t(21) = −2.218, P = 0.040), and thalamus (t(21) = −2.395, P = 0.026) were significantly higher in CRPS patients than in healthy controls. Those of globus pallidus (t(21) = −2.045, P = 0.054) tended to be higher in CRPS patients than in healthy controls. In patients with CRPS, there was a positive correlation between the DVR of [11C]-(R)-PK11195 in the caudate nucleus and the pain score, the visual analog scale (r = 0.661, P = 0.026, R2 = 0.408) and affective subscales of McGill Pain Questionnaire (r = 0.604, P = 0.049, R2 = 0.364). We demonstrated that neuroinflammation of CRPS patients in basal ganglia. Our results suggest that microglial pathology can be an important pathophysiology of CRPS. Association between the level of caudate nucleus and pain severity indicated that neuroinflammation in this region might play a key role. These results may be essential for developing effective medical treatments. PMID:28072713

  7. Role of DNA-PK in cellular responses to DNA double-strand breaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, D.J.

    2003-01-01

    DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are probably the most dangerous of the many different types of DNA damage that occur within the cell. DSBs are generated by exogenous agents such as ionizing radiation (IR) or by endogenously generated reactive oxygen species and occur as intermediates during meiotic and V(D)J recombination. The repair of DSBs is of paramount importance to the cell as misrepair of DSBs can lead to cell death or promote tumorigenesis. In eukaryotes there exists two distinct mechanisms for DNA DSB repair: homologous recombination (HR) and non-homologous end joining (NHEJ). In mammalian cells, however, it is clear that nonhomologous repair of DSBs is highly active and plays a major role in conferring radiation resistance to the cell. The NHEJ machinery minimally consists of the DNA-dependent Protein Kinase (DNA-PK) and a complex of XRCC4 and DNA Ligase IV. The DNA-PK complex is composed of a 470 kDa catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs), and the heterodimeric Ku70 and Ku80 DNA end-binding complex. DNA-PKcs is a PI-3 kinase with homology to ATM and ATR in its C-terminal kinase domain. The DNA-PK complex protects and tethers the ends, and directs assembly and, perhaps, the activation of other NHEJ proteins. We have previously demonstrated that the kinase activity of DNA-PK is essential for DNA DSB repair and V(D)J recombination. It is, therefore, of immense interest to determine the in vivo targets of DNA-PKcs and the mechanisms by which phosphorylation of these targets modulates NHEJ. Recent studies have resulted in the identification of a number of protein targets that are phosphorylated by and/or interact with DNA-PKcs. Our laboratory has recently identified autophosphorylation site(s) on DNA-PKcs. We find that phosphorylation at these sites in vivo is an early and essential response to DSBs and demonstrate, for the first time, the localization of DNA-PKcs to the sites of DNA damage in vivo. Furthermore, mutation of these phosphorylation sites in mammalian

  8. Identification and analysis of differential miRNAs in PK-15 cells after foot-and-mouth disease virus infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ke-Shan Zhang

    Full Text Available The alterations of MicroRNAs(miRNAs in host cell after foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV infection is still obscure. To increase our understanding of the pathogenesis of FMDV at the post-transcriptional regulation level, Solexa high-throu MicroRNAs (miRNAs play an important role both in the post-transcriptional regulation of gene expression and host-virus interactions. Despite investigations of miRNA expression ghput sequencing and bioinformatic tools were used to identify differentially expressed miRNAs and analyze their functions during FMDV infection of PK-15 cells. Results indicated that 9,165,674 and 9,230,378 clean reads were obtained, with 172 known and 72 novel miRNAs differently expressed in infected and uninfected groups respectively. Some of differently expressed miRNAs were validated using stem-loop real-time quantitative RT-PCR. The GO annotation and KEGG pathway analysis for target genes revealed that differently expressed miRNAs were involved in immune response and cell death pathways.

  9. Determining the pk(a) of N,N-dimethylsphingosine and the flip-flop rate of related compounds with deuterium nuclear magnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lau, Bienca

    1995-01-01

    Deuterium nuclear magnetic resonance ( 2 H-NMR) spectroscopy was applied to determine the pk(a) of the protein kinase C (PKC) inhibitor, N,N-dimethylsphingosine (DMS), when bound to 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (POPC) bilayers. The quadrupolar splittings from deuterium labels at the α- and the β-positions of the POPC headgroup responded in a manner indicative of a positive surface charge density at pH 7.0. Conversely, at pH 10.0 DMS had virtually no influence on either quadrupolar splitting, an effect attributed to titration of the dimethylamino group of DMS to its neutral form. A DMS titration curve was obtained by quantifying the charge in the quadrupolar splittings as a function of pH. Simulation of this curve yielded a pk(a) of 8.8 of membrane-bound DMS. Using a similar approach, the dynamic process of flip-flop was examined in two DMS analogues. We discuss here the quantitative and the qualitative aspects as well as the limitations of this application. (author)

  10. Optimizing an online SPE-HPLC method for analysis of (R)-[11C]1-(2-chlorophenyl)-N-methyl-N-(1-methylpropyl)- 3-isoquinolinecarboxamide [(R)-[11C]PK11195] and its metabolites in humans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greuter, Henri N.J.M.; van Ophemert, Patricia L.B.; Luurtsema, Gert; van Berckel, Bart N.M.; Franssen, Eric J.F.; Windhorst, Bert D.; Lammertsma, Adriaan A.

    2005-01-01

    (R)-[ 11 C]PK11195 is used as a positron emission tomography tracer for activated microglia in several neurological disorders. Quantification of specific binding requires a metabolite-corrected plasma input function. In this study, a high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) procedure with online solid phase extraction was modified for analyzing (R)-[ 11 C]PK11195 plasma samples, yielding total sample recoveries of more than 98%. When applied to human studies, the use of two HPLC systems enabled analysis of up to seven plasma samples under regular conditions. Online radioactivity detection was compared with offline sample measurements of HPLC profiles. Offline measurements provided the most reliable results especially for late plasma samples. In 10 patients, an average decrease of parent compound from 94.6% at 2.5 min to 45.2% at 1 h after administration was observed

  11. PK of immunoconjugate anticancer agent CMD-193 in rats: ligand-binding assay approach to determine in vivo immunoconjugate stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, Azher; Gorovits, Boris; Leal, Mauricio; Fluhler, Eric

    2014-01-01

    Antibody-drug conjugates (ADCs) are a new generation of anticancer therapeutics. The objective of this manuscript is to propose a methodology that can be used to assess the stability of the ADCs by using the PK data obtained by ligand-binding assays that measure various components of ADCs. The ligand-binding assays format of different components of ADCs provided unique valuable PK information. The mathematical manipulation of the bioanalytical data provided an insight into the in vivo integrity, indicating that the loading of the calicheamicin on the G193 antibody declines in an apparent slow first-order process. This report demonstrates the value of analyzing various components of the ADC and their PK profiles to better understand the disposition and in vivo stability of ADCs.

  12. DNA-PK inhibition causes a low level of H2AX phosphorylation and homologous recombination repair in Medaka (Oryzias latipes) cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Urushihara, Yusuke; Kobayashi, Junya; Matsumoto, Yoshihisa; Komatsu, Kenshi; Oda, Shoji; Mitani, Hiroshi

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► We investigated the effect of DNA-PK inhibition on DSB repair using fish cells. ► A radiation sensitive mutant RIC1 strain showed a low level of DNA-PK activity. ► DNA-PK dysfunction leads defects in HR repair and DNA-PKcs autophosphorylation. ► DNA-PK dysfunction leads a slight increase in the number of 53BP1 foci after DSBs. ► DNA-PK dysfunction leads an alternative NHEJ that depends on 53BP1. -- Abstract: Nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ) and homologous recombination (HR) are known as DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair pathways. It has been reported that DNA-PK, a member of PI3 kinase family, promotes NHEJ and aberrant DNA-PK causes NHEJ deficiency. However, in this study, we demonstrate that a wild-type cell line treated with DNA-PK inhibitor and a mutant cell line with dysfunctional DNA-PK showed decreased HR efficiency in fish cells (Medaka, Oryzias latipes). Previously, we reported that the radiation-sensitive mutant RIC1 strain has a defect in the Histone H2AX phosphorylation after γ-irradiation. Here, we showed that a DNA-PK inhibitor, NU7026, treatment resulted in significant reduction in the number of γH2AX foci after γ-irradiation in wild-type cells, but had no significant effect in RIC1 cells. In addition, RIC1 cells showed significantly lower levels of DNA-PK kinase activity compared with wild-type cells. We investigated NHEJ and HR efficiency after induction of DSBs. Wild-type cells treated with NU7026 and RIC1 cells showed decreased HR efficiency. These results indicated that aberrant DNA-PK causes the reduction in the number of γH2AX foci and HR efficiency in RIC1 cells. We performed phosphorylated DNA-PKcs (Thr2609) and 53BP1 focus assay after γ-irradiation. RIC1 cells showed significant reduction in the number of phosphorylated DNA-PKcs foci and no deference in the number of 53BP1 foci compared with wild-type cells. These results suggest that low level of DNA-PK activity causes aberrant DNA-PKcs autophosphorylation

  13. SPM analysis of parametric (R)-[11C]PK11195 binding images: plasma input versus reference tissue parametric methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuitemaker, Alie; van Berckel, Bart N M; Kropholler, Marc A; Veltman, Dick J; Scheltens, Philip; Jonker, Cees; Lammertsma, Adriaan A; Boellaard, Ronald

    2007-05-01

    (R)-[11C]PK11195 has been used for quantifying cerebral microglial activation in vivo. In previous studies, both plasma input and reference tissue methods have been used, usually in combination with a region of interest (ROI) approach. Definition of ROIs, however, can be labourious and prone to interobserver variation. In addition, results are only obtained for predefined areas and (unexpected) signals in undefined areas may be missed. On the other hand, standard pharmacokinetic models are too sensitive to noise to calculate (R)-[11C]PK11195 binding on a voxel-by-voxel basis. Linearised versions of both plasma input and reference tissue models have been described, and these are more suitable for parametric imaging. The purpose of this study was to compare the performance of these plasma input and reference tissue parametric methods on the outcome of statistical parametric mapping (SPM) analysis of (R)-[11C]PK11195 binding. Dynamic (R)-[11C]PK11195 PET scans with arterial blood sampling were performed in 7 younger and 11 elderly healthy subjects. Parametric images of volume of distribution (Vd) and binding potential (BP) were generated using linearised versions of plasma input (Logan) and reference tissue (Reference Parametric Mapping) models. Images were compared at the group level using SPM with a two-sample t-test per voxel, both with and without proportional scaling. Parametric BP images without scaling provided the most sensitive framework for determining differences in (R)-[11C]PK11195 binding between younger and elderly subjects. Vd images could only demonstrate differences in (R)-[11C]PK11195 binding when analysed with proportional scaling due to intersubject variation in K1/k2 (blood-brain barrier transport and non-specific binding).

  14. SUPER-RAMP PK2 cases by START-3. Preliminary Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Novikov, Vladimir; Kuznetsov, Vladimir; Chulkin, Dmitriy

    2013-01-01

    The Studsvik SUPER-RAMP Project, an internationally sponsored research project, investigated the failure propensity of typical LWR fuel in the form of test rods when subjected to power ramps, after base irradiation to high burn-up. The following information summarizing the project is abstracted from the Final Report of the SUPER-RAMP project (STSR-32). The Project power ramped 28 individual PWR rods and 16 BWR rods. The PWR rods were all tested using high ramp rates. Due to different objectives for the BWR subprogramme, one set of the BWR rods was tested using a high ramp rate, and another set were tested with a very slow ramp rate. All rods underwent a thorough examination programme, comprising characterisation prior to base irradiation, examination between base and ramp irradiation and examination after ramp irradiation. This consisted of 6 groups of rods with variations in design and material parameters. The rods were base irradiated in a power reactor environment KK Obrigheim or BR-3 at time averaged heat ratings mainly in the range 14-26 kW/m to peak burn-ups in the range 33-45 MWd/kgU and were subsequently ramp tested in the research reactor R2 at Studsvik, Sweden. The result can be summarized as follows: In this document some calculations are made on the PK2 group fuel rods. The rods were standard rods manufactured by Kraftwerk Union AG/Combustion Engineering (KWU/CE). All these rods sustained ramping to power levels in the range 41 to 49 kW/m and power changes 16-24 kW/m without failure, in spite of large deformations, fuel restructuring and fission gas release particularly for the PK2 rods. Though the results of this paper seem to be based on the incomplete dataset (ambiguity in power raise rates, undefined fuel pellet and cladding surface roughness), we think that START-3 Zircalloy-4 model requires further improvements. In order to do them, we kindly ask IAEA to provide us with more detailed irradiation histories (more than 3 axial zones, power increase

  15. Pk-yrityksen kansainvälistyminen : Taide esineitä liikelahjoina Japaniin ja Etelä-Koreaan

    OpenAIRE

    Takala, Sanna; Ristikankare, Roosa

    2009-01-01

    Tämän opinnäytetyön taustalla oli Laurea-ammattikorkeakoulun ESR-rahoitteinen projekti “Teollisen palveluliiketoiminnan koulutustarpeen selvittäminen Lohjan ja Tammisaaren seutukunnissa ja näiden alueiden pk-yritysten osaamisperustan kehittäminen”. Opinnäytetyö sijoittui hankkeen toimenpidekokonaisuuteen ”Teemakoulutus ja kehityshankkeet yritysryppäälle”, pk-yrityksen kansainvälistymiseen liittyvänä tutkimus- ja kehittämishankkeena. Tutkimus- ja kehittämishankkeen tarkoituksena oli tuotta...

  16. Study of the production of $\\Lambda_b^0$ and $\\overline{B}^0$ hadrons in $pp$ collisions and first measurement of the $\\Lambda_b^0\\rightarrow J/\\psi pK^-$ branching fraction

    CERN Document Server

    Aaij, R.; Adinolfi, Marco; Affolder, Anthony; Ajaltouni, Ziad; Akar, Simon; Albrecht, Johannes; Alessio, Federico; Alexander, Michael; Ali, Suvayu; Alkhazov, Georgy; Alvarez Cartelle, Paula; Alves Jr, Antonio Augusto; Amato, Sandra; Amerio, Silvia; Amhis, Yasmine; An, Liupan; Anderlini, Lucio; Anderson, Jonathan; Andreassi, Guido; Andreotti, Mirco; Andrews, Jason; Appleby, Robert; Aquines Gutierrez, Osvaldo; Archilli, Flavio; d'Argent, Philippe; Artamonov, Alexander; Artuso, Marina; Aslanides, Elie; Auriemma, Giulio; Baalouch, Marouen; Bachmann, Sebastian; Back, John; Badalov, Alexey; Baesso, Clarissa; Baldini, Wander; Barlow, Roger; Barschel, Colin; Barsuk, Sergey; Barter, William; Batozskaya, Varvara; Battista, Vincenzo; Bay, Aurelio; Beaucourt, Leo; Beddow, John; Bedeschi, Franco; Bediaga, Ignacio; Bel, Lennaert; Bellee, Violaine; Belloli, Nicoletta; Belyaev, Ivan; Ben-Haim, Eli; Bencivenni, Giovanni; Benson, Sean; Benton, Jack; Berezhnoy, Alexander; Bernet, Roland; Bertolin, Alessandro; Bettler, Marc-Olivier; van Beuzekom, Martinus; Bien, Alexander; Bifani, Simone; Billoir, Pierre; Bird, Thomas; Birnkraut, Alex; Bizzeti, Andrea; Blake, Thomas; Blanc, Frédéric; Blouw, Johan; Blusk, Steven; Bocci, Valerio; Bondar, Alexander; Bondar, Nikolay; Bonivento, Walter; Borghi, Silvia; Borsato, Martino; Bowcock, Themistocles; Bowen, Espen Eie; Bozzi, Concezio; Braun, Svende; Britsch, Markward; Britton, Thomas; Brodzicka, Jolanta; Brook, Nicholas; Buchanan, Emma; Bursche, Albert; Buytaert, Jan; Cadeddu, Sandro; Calabrese, Roberto; Calvi, Marta; Calvo Gomez, Miriam; Campana, Pierluigi; Campora Perez, Daniel; Capriotti, Lorenzo; Carbone, Angelo; Carboni, Giovanni; Cardinale, Roberta; Cardini, Alessandro; Carniti, Paolo; Carson, Laurence; Carvalho Akiba, Kazuyoshi; Casse, Gianluigi; Cassina, Lorenzo; Castillo Garcia, Lucia; Cattaneo, Marco; Cauet, Christophe; Cavallero, Giovanni; Cenci, Riccardo; Charles, Matthew; Charpentier, Philippe; Chefdeville, Maximilien; Chen, Shanzhen; Cheung, Shu-Faye; Chiapolini, Nicola; Chrzaszcz, Marcin; Cid Vidal, Xabier; Ciezarek, Gregory; Clarke, Peter; Clemencic, Marco; Cliff, Harry; Closier, Joel; Coco, Victor; Cogan, Julien; Cogneras, Eric; Cogoni, Violetta; Cojocariu, Lucian; Collazuol, Gianmaria; Collins, Paula; Comerma-Montells, Albert; Contu, Andrea; Cook, Andrew; Coombes, Matthew; Coquereau, Samuel; Corti, Gloria; Corvo, Marco; Couturier, Benjamin; Cowan, Greig; Craik, Daniel Charles; Crocombe, Andrew; Cruz Torres, Melissa Maria; Cunliffe, Samuel; Currie, Robert; D'Ambrosio, Carmelo; Dall'Occo, Elena; Dalseno, Jeremy; David, Pieter; Davis, Adam; De Bruyn, Kristof; De Capua, Stefano; De Cian, Michel; De Miranda, Jussara; De Paula, Leandro; De Simone, Patrizia; Dean, Cameron Thomas; Decamp, Daniel; Deckenhoff, Mirko; Del Buono, Luigi; Déléage, Nicolas; Demmer, Moritz; Derkach, Denis; Deschamps, Olivier; Dettori, Francesco; Dey, Biplab; Di Canto, Angelo; Di Ruscio, Francesco; Dijkstra, Hans; Donleavy, Stephanie; Dordei, Francesca; Dorigo, Mirco; Dosil Suárez, Alvaro; Dossett, David; Dovbnya, Anatoliy; Dreimanis, Karlis; Dufour, Laurent; Dujany, Giulio; Dupertuis, Frederic; Durante, Paolo; Dzhelyadin, Rustem; Dziurda, Agnieszka; Dzyuba, Alexey; Easo, Sajan; Egede, Ulrik; Egorychev, Victor; Eidelman, Semen; Eisenhardt, Stephan; Eitschberger, Ulrich; Ekelhof, Robert; Eklund, Lars; El Rifai, Ibrahim; Elsasser, Christian; Ely, Scott; Esen, Sevda; Evans, Hannah Mary; Evans, Timothy; Falabella, Antonio; Färber, Christian; Farley, Nathanael; Farry, Stephen; Fay, Robert; Ferguson, Dianne; Fernandez Albor, Victor; Ferrari, Fabio; Ferreira Rodrigues, Fernando; Ferro-Luzzi, Massimiliano; Filippov, Sergey; Fiore, Marco; Fiorini, Massimiliano; Firlej, Miroslaw; Fitzpatrick, Conor; Fiutowski, Tomasz; Fohl, Klaus; Fol, Philip; Fontana, Marianna; Fontanelli, Flavio; Forty, Roger; Francisco, Oscar; Frank, Markus; Frei, Christoph; Frosini, Maddalena; Fu, Jinlin; Furfaro, Emiliano; Gallas Torreira, Abraham; Galli, Domenico; Gallorini, Stefano; Gambetta, Silvia; Gandelman, Miriam; Gandini, Paolo; Gao, Yuanning; García Pardiñas, Julián; Garra Tico, Jordi; Garrido, Lluis; Gascon, David; Gaspar, Clara; Gauld, Rhorry; Gavardi, Laura; Gazzoni, Giulio; Gerick, David; Gersabeck, Evelina; Gersabeck, Marco; Gershon, Timothy; Ghez, Philippe; Gianì, Sebastiana; Gibson, Valerie; Girard, Olivier Göran; Giubega, Lavinia-Helena; Gligorov, V.V.; Göbel, Carla; Golubkov, Dmitry; Golutvin, Andrey; Gomes, Alvaro; Gotti, Claudio; Grabalosa Gándara, Marc; Graciani Diaz, Ricardo; Granado Cardoso, Luis Alberto; Graugés, Eugeni; Graverini, Elena; Graziani, Giacomo; Grecu, Alexandru; Greening, Edward; Gregson, Sam; Griffith, Peter; Grillo, Lucia; Grünberg, Oliver; Gui, Bin; Gushchin, Evgeny; Guz, Yury; Gys, Thierry; Hadavizadeh, Thomas; Hadjivasiliou, Christos; Haefeli, Guido; Haen, Christophe; Haines, Susan; Hall, Samuel; Hamilton, Brian; Han, Xiaoxue; Hansmann-Menzemer, Stephanie; Harnew, Neville; Harnew, Samuel; Harrison, Jonathan; He, Jibo; Head, Timothy; Heijne, Veerle; Hennessy, Karol; Henrard, Pierre; Henry, Louis; van Herwijnen, Eric; Heß, Miriam; Hicheur, Adlène; Hill, Donal; Hoballah, Mostafa; Hombach, Christoph; Hulsbergen, Wouter; Humair, Thibaud; Hussain, Nazim; Hutchcroft, David; Hynds, Daniel; Idzik, Marek; Ilten, Philip; Jacobsson, Richard; Jaeger, Andreas; Jalocha, Pawel; Jans, Eddy; Jawahery, Abolhassan; Jing, Fanfan; John, Malcolm; Johnson, Daniel; Jones, Christopher; Joram, Christian; Jost, Beat; Jurik, Nathan; Kandybei, Sergii; Kanso, Walaa; Karacson, Matthias; Karbach, Moritz; Karodia, Sarah; Kecke, Matthieu; Kelsey, Matthew; Kenyon, Ian; Kenzie, Matthew; Ketel, Tjeerd; Khanji, Basem; Khurewathanakul, Chitsanu; Klaver, Suzanne; Klimaszewski, Konrad; Kochebina, Olga; Kolpin, Michael; Komarov, Ilya; Koopman, Rose; Koppenburg, Patrick; Kozeiha, Mohamad; Kravchuk, Leonid; Kreplin, Katharina; Kreps, Michal; Krocker, Georg; Krokovny, Pavel; Kruse, Florian; Krzemien, Wojciech; Kucewicz, Wojciech; Kucharczyk, Marcin; Kudryavtsev, Vasily; Kuonen, Axel Kevin; Kurek, Krzysztof; Kvaratskheliya, Tengiz; Lacarrere, Daniel; Lafferty, George; Lai, Adriano; Lambert, Dean; Lanfranchi, Gaia; Langenbruch, Christoph; Langhans, Benedikt; Latham, Thomas; Lazzeroni, Cristina; Le Gac, Renaud; van Leerdam, Jeroen; Lees, Jean-Pierre; Lefèvre, Regis; Leflat, Alexander; Lefrançois, Jacques; Lemos Cid, Edgar; Leroy, Olivier; Lesiak, Tadeusz; Leverington, Blake; Li, Yiming; Likhomanenko, Tatiana; Liles, Myfanwy; Lindner, Rolf; Linn, Christian; Lionetto, Federica; Liu, Bo; Liu, Xuesong; Loh, David; Longstaff, Iain; Lopes, Jose; Lucchesi, Donatella; Lucio Martinez, Miriam; Luo, Haofei; Lupato, Anna; Luppi, Eleonora; Lupton, Oliver; Lusiani, Alberto; Machefert, Frederic; Maciuc, Florin; Maev, Oleg; Maguire, Kevin; Malde, Sneha; Malinin, Alexander; Manca, Giulia; Mancinelli, Giampiero; Manning, Peter Michael; Mapelli, Alessandro; Maratas, Jan; Marchand, Jean François; Marconi, Umberto; Marin Benito, Carla; Marino, Pietro; Marks, Jörg; Martellotti, Giuseppe; Martin, Morgan; Martinelli, Maurizio; Martinez Santos, Diego; Martinez Vidal, Fernando; Martins Tostes, Danielle; Massafferri, André; Matev, Rosen; Mathad, Abhijit; Mathe, Zoltan; Matteuzzi, Clara; Mauri, Andrea; Maurin, Brice; Mazurov, Alexander; McCann, Michael; McCarthy, James; McNab, Andrew; McNulty, Ronan; Meadows, Brian; Meier, Frank; Meissner, Marco; Melnychuk, Dmytro; Merk, Marcel; Michielin, Emanuele; Milanes, Diego Alejandro; Minard, Marie-Noelle; Mitzel, Dominik Stefan; Molina Rodriguez, Josue; Monroy, Ignacio Alberto; Monteil, Stephane; Morandin, Mauro; Morawski, Piotr; Mordà, Alessandro; Morello, Michael Joseph; Moron, Jakub; Morris, Adam Benjamin; Mountain, Raymond; Muheim, Franz; Müller, Dominik; Müller, Janine; Müller, Katharina; Müller, Vanessa; Mussini, Manuel; Muster, Bastien; Naik, Paras; Nakada, Tatsuya; Nandakumar, Raja; Nandi, Anita; Nasteva, Irina; Needham, Matthew; Neri, Nicola; Neubert, Sebastian; Neufeld, Niko; Neuner, Max; Nguyen, Anh Duc; Nguyen, Thi-Dung; Nguyen-Mau, Chung; Niess, Valentin; Niet, Ramon; Nikitin, Nikolay; Nikodem, Thomas; Ninci, Daniele; Novoselov, Alexey; O'Hanlon, Daniel Patrick; Oblakowska-Mucha, Agnieszka; Obraztsov, Vladimir; Ogilvy, Stephen; Okhrimenko, Oleksandr; Oldeman, Rudolf; Onderwater, Gerco; Osorio Rodrigues, Bruno; Otalora Goicochea, Juan Martin; Otto, Adam; Owen, Patrick; Oyanguren, Maria Aranzazu; Palano, Antimo; Palombo, Fernando; Palutan, Matteo; Panman, Jacob; Papanestis, Antonios; Pappagallo, Marco; Pappalardo, Luciano; Pappenheimer, Cheryl; Parkes, Christopher; Passaleva, Giovanni; Patel, Girish; Patel, Mitesh; Patrignani, Claudia; Pearce, Alex; Pellegrino, Antonio; Penso, Gianni; Pepe Altarelli, Monica; Perazzini, Stefano; Perret, Pascal; Pescatore, Luca; Petridis, Konstantinos; Petrolini, Alessandro; Petruzzo, Marco; Picatoste Olloqui, Eduardo; Pietrzyk, Boleslaw; Pilař, Tomas; Pinci, Davide; Pistone, Alessandro; Piucci, Alessio; Playfer, Stephen; Plo Casasus, Maximo; Poikela, Tuomas; Polci, Francesco; Poluektov, Anton; Polyakov, Ivan; Polycarpo, Erica; Popov, Alexander; Popov, Dmitry; Popovici, Bogdan; Potterat, Cédric; Price, Eugenia; Price, Joseph David; Prisciandaro, Jessica; Pritchard, Adrian; Prouve, Claire; Pugatch, Valery; Puig Navarro, Albert; Punzi, Giovanni; Qian, Wenbin; Quagliani, Renato; Rachwal, Bartolomiej; Rademacker, Jonas; Rama, Matteo; Rangel, Murilo; Raniuk, Iurii; Rauschmayr, Nathalie; Raven, Gerhard; Redi, Federico; Reichert, Stefanie; Reid, Matthew; dos Reis, Alberto; Ricciardi, Stefania; Richards, Sophie; Rihl, Mariana; Rinnert, Kurt; Rives Molina, Vincente; Robbe, Patrick; Rodrigues, Ana Barbara; Rodrigues, Eduardo; Rodriguez Lopez, Jairo Alexis; Rodriguez Perez, Pablo; Roiser, Stefan; Romanovsky, Vladimir; Romero Vidal, Antonio; Ronayne, John William; Rotondo, Marcello; Rouvinet, Julien; Ruf, Thomas; Ruiz Valls, Pablo; Saborido Silva, Juan Jose; Sagidova, Naylya; Sail, Paul; Saitta, Biagio; Salustino Guimaraes, Valdir; Sanchez Mayordomo, Carlos; Sanmartin Sedes, Brais; Santacesaria, Roberta; Santamarina Rios, Cibran; Santimaria, Marco; Santovetti, Emanuele; Sarti, Alessio; Satriano, Celestina; Satta, Alessia; Saunders, Daniel Martin; Savrina, Darya; Schiller, Manuel; Schindler, Heinrich; Schlupp, Maximilian; Schmelling, Michael; Schmelzer, Timon; Schmidt, Burkhard; Schneider, Olivier; Schopper, Andreas; Schubiger, Maxime; Schune, Marie Helene; Schwemmer, Rainer; Sciascia, Barbara; Sciubba, Adalberto; Semennikov, Alexander; Serra, Nicola; Serrano, Justine; Sestini, Lorenzo; Seyfert, Paul; Shapkin, Mikhail; Shapoval, Illya; Shcheglov, Yury; Shears, Tara; Shekhtman, Lev; Shevchenko, Vladimir; Shires, Alexander; Siddi, Benedetto Gianluca; Silva Coutinho, Rafael; Silva de Oliveira, Luiz Gustavo; Simi, Gabriele; Sirendi, Marek; Skidmore, Nicola; Skwarnicki, Tomasz; Smith, Edmund; Smith, Eluned; Smith, Iwan Thomas; Smith, Jackson; Smith, Mark; Snoek, Hella; Sokoloff, Michael; Soler, Paul; Soomro, Fatima; Souza, Daniel; Souza De Paula, Bruno; Spaan, Bernhard; Spradlin, Patrick; Sridharan, Srikanth; Stagni, Federico; Stahl, Marian; Stahl, Sascha; Stefkova, Slavorima; Steinkamp, Olaf; Stenyakin, Oleg; Stevenson, Scott; Stoica, Sabin; Stone, Sheldon; Storaci, Barbara; Stracka, Simone; Straticiuc, Mihai; Straumann, Ulrich; Sun, Liang; Sutcliffe, William; Swientek, Krzysztof; Swientek, Stefan; Syropoulos, Vasileios; Szczekowski, Marek; Szczypka, Paul; Szumlak, Tomasz; T'Jampens, Stephane; Tayduganov, Andrey; Tekampe, Tobias; Teklishyn, Maksym; Tellarini, Giulia; Teubert, Frederic; Thomas, Christopher; Thomas, Eric; van Tilburg, Jeroen; Tisserand, Vincent; Tobin, Mark; Todd, Jacob; Tolk, Siim; Tomassetti, Luca; Tonelli, Diego; Topp-Joergensen, Stig; Torr, Nicholas; Tournefier, Edwige; Tourneur, Stephane; Trabelsi, Karim; Tran, Minh Tâm; Tresch, Marco; Trisovic, Ana; Tsaregorodtsev, Andrei; Tsopelas, Panagiotis; Tuning, Niels; Ukleja, Artur; Ustyuzhanin, Andrey; Uwer, Ulrich; Vacca, Claudia; Vagnoni, Vincenzo; Valenti, Giovanni; Vallier, Alexis; Vazquez Gomez, Ricardo; Vazquez Regueiro, Pablo; Vázquez Sierra, Carlos; Vecchi, Stefania; Velthuis, Jaap; Veltri, Michele; Veneziano, Giovanni; Vesterinen, Mika; Viaud, Benoit; Vieira, Daniel; Vieites Diaz, Maria; Vilasis-Cardona, Xavier; Volkov, Vladimir; Vollhardt, Achim; Volyanskyy, Dmytro; Voong, David; Vorobyev, Alexey; Vorobyev, Vitaly; Voß, Christian; de Vries, Jacco; Waldi, Roland; Wallace, Charlotte; Wallace, Ronan; Walsh, John; Wandernoth, Sebastian; Wang, Jianchun; Ward, David; Watson, Nigel; Websdale, David; Weiden, Andreas; Whitehead, Mark; Wilkinson, Guy; Wilkinson, Michael; Williams, Mark Richard James; Williams, Matthew; Williams, Mike; Williams, Timothy; Wilson, Fergus; Wimberley, Jack; Wishahi, Julian; Wislicki, Wojciech; Witek, Mariusz; Wormser, Guy; Wotton, Stephen; Wright, Simon; Wyllie, Kenneth; Xie, Yuehong; Xu, Zhirui; Yang, Zhenwei; Yu, Jiesheng; Yuan, Xuhao; Yushchenko, Oleg; Zangoli, Maria; Zavertyaev, Mikhail; Zhang, Liming; Zhang, Yanxi; Zhelezov, Alexey; Zhokhov, Anatoly; Zhong, Liang; Zucchelli, Stefano

    2016-01-27

    The product of the $\\Lambda_b^0$ ($\\overline{B}^0$) differential production cross-section and the branching fraction of the decay $\\Lambda_b^0\\rightarrow J/\\psi pK^-$ ($\\overline{B}^0\\rightarrow J/\\psi\\overline{K}^*(892)^0$) is measured as a function of the beauty hadron transverse momentum, $p_{\\rm T}$, and rapidity, $y$. The kinematic region of the measurements is $p_{\\rm T}<20~{\\rm GeV}/c$ and $2.0 < y < 4.5$. The measurements use a data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of $3~{\\rm fb}^{-1}$ collected by the LHCb detector in $pp$ collisions at centre-of-mass energies $\\sqrt{s}=7~{\\rm TeV}$ in 2011 and $\\sqrt{s}=8~{\\rm TeV}$ in 2012. Based on previous LHCb results of the fragmentation fraction ratio, $f_{\\Lambda_B^0}/f_d$, the branching fraction of the decay $\\Lambda_b^0\\rightarrow J/\\psi pK^-$ is measured to be \\begin{equation*} \\mathcal{B}(\\Lambda_b^0\\rightarrow J/\\psi pK^-)= (3.04\\pm0.04\\pm0.06\\pm0.33^{+0.43}_{-0.27})\\times10^{-4}, \\end{equation*} where the first uncertainty is st...

  17. IPv6:n käyttöönotto PK-yrityksessä

    OpenAIRE

    Salonen, Arttu Petteri

    2011-01-01

    Tämän opinnäytetyön tarkoituksena on selvittää, kuinka IPv6-yhteydet otetaan käyt-töön PK-yrityksessä. Työssä selvitetään minkälaiset vaatimukset IPv6 asettaa lait-teistolle ja minkälaisia käytännön asioita yrityksen täytyy huomioida IPv6:n käyt-töönotossa. Lisäksi työssä on laboratoriosimulaation avulla havainnollistettu eri käyt-töjärjestelmien tukea IPv6:lle ja käyttöönottoon liittyviä reititin- ja osoitekonfiguraati-oita. Käyttöönoton lisäksi opinnäytetyössä esitellään IPv6-protokoll...

  18. Pharmacokinetics, bioavailability and PK/PD relationship of cefquinome for Escherichia coli in Beagle dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Y F; Zhao, D H; Yu, Y; Yang, X; Shi, W; Peng, Y B; Liu, Y H

    2015-12-01

    The pharmacokinetics and bioavailability of cefquinome in Beagle dogs were determined by intravenous (IV), intramuscular (IM) or subcutaneous (SC) injection at a single dose of 2 mg/kg body weight (BW). The minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC) of cefquinome against 217 Escherichia coli isolated from dogs were also investigated. After IV injection, the plasma concentration-time curve of cefquinome was analyzed using a two-compartmental model, and the mean values of t1/2α (h), t1/2β (h), Vss (L/kg), ClB (L/kg/h) and AUC (μg·h/mL) were 0.12, 0.98, 0.30, 0.24 and 8.51, respectively. After IM and SC administration, the PK data were best described by a one-compartmental model with first-order absorption. The mean values of t1/2Kel , t1/2Ka , tmax (h), Cmax (μg/mL) and AUC (μg·h/mL) were corresponding 0.85, 0.14, 0.43, 4.83 and 8.24 for IM administration, 0.99, 0.29, 0.72, 3.88 and 9.13 for SC injection. The duration of time that drug levels exceed the MIC (%T > MIC) were calculated using the determined MIC90 (0.125 μg/mL) and the PK data obtained in this study. The results indicated that the dosage regimen of cefquinome at 2 mg/kg BW with 12-h intervals could achieve %T > MIC above 50% that generally produced a satisfactory bactericidal effect against E. coli isolated from dogs in this study. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Oxidation of Helix-3 methionines precedes the formation of PK resistant PrP.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamar Canello

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available While elucidating the peculiar epitope of the alpha-PrP mAb IPC2, we found that PrPSc exhibits the sulfoxidation of residue M213 as a covalent signature. Subsequent computational analysis predicted that the presence of sulfoxide groups at both Met residues 206 and 213 destabilize the alpha-fold, suggesting oxidation may facilitate the conversion of PrPC into PrPSc. To further study the effect of oxidation on prion formation, we generated pAbs to linear PrP peptides encompassing the Helix-3 region, as opposed to the non-linear complexed epitope of IPC2. We now show that pAbs, whose epitopes comprise Met residues, readily detected PrPC, but could not recognize most PrPSc bands unless they were vigorously reduced. Next, we showed that the alpha-Met pAbs did not recognize newly formed PrPSc, as is the case for the PK resistant PrP present in lines of prion infected cells. In addition, these reagents did not detect intermediate forms such as PK sensitive and partially aggregated PrPs present in infected brains. Finally, we show that PrP molecules harboring the pathogenic mutation E200K, which is linked to the most common form of familial CJD, may be spontaneously oxidized. We conclude that the oxidation of methionine residues in Helix-3 represents an early and important event in the conversion of PrPC to PrPSc. We believe that further investigation into the mechanism and role of PrP oxidation will be central in finally elucidating the mechanism by which a normal cell protein converts into a pathogenic entity that causes fatal brain degeneration.

  20. Gentamicin-induced apoptosis in LLC-PK1 cells: Involvement of lysosomes and mitochondria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Servais, Helene; Van Der Smissen, Patrick; Thirion, Gaetan; Van der Essen, Gauthier; Van Bambeke, Francoise; Tulkens, Paul M.; Mingeot-Leclercq, Marie-Paule

    2005-01-01

    Gentamicin accumulates in lysosomes and induces apoptosis in kidney proximal tubules and renal cell lines. Using LLC-PK1 cells, we have examined the concentration- and time-dependency of the effects exerted by gentamicin (1-3 mM; 0-3 days) on (i) lysosomal stability; (ii) activation of mitochondrial pathway; (iii) occurrence of apoptosis (concentrations larger than 3 mM caused extensive necrosis as assessed by the measurement of lactate dehydrogenase release). Within 2 h, gentamicin induced a partial relocalization [from lysosomes to cytosol] of the weak organic base acridine orange. We thereafter observed (a) a loss of mitochondrial membrane potential (as from 10 h, based on spectrophotometric and confocal microscopy using JC1 probe) and (b) the release of cytochrome c from granules to cytosol, and the activation of caspase-9 (as from 12 h; evidenced by Western blot analysis). Increase in caspase-3 activity (assayed with Ac-DEVD-AFC in the presence of z-VAD-fmk]) and appearance of fragmented nuclei (DAPI staining) was then detected as from 16 to 24 h together with nuclear fragmentation. Gentamicin produces a fast (within 4 h) release of calcein from negatively-charged liposomes at pH 5.4, which was slowed down by raising the pH to 7.4, or when phosphatidylinositol was replaced by cardiolipin (to mimic the inner mitochondrial membrane). The present data provide temporal evidence that gentamicin causes apoptosis in LLC-PK1 with successive alteration of the permeability of lysosomes, triggering of the mitochondrial pathway, and activation of caspase-3

  1. Regulation of intracellular pH in LLC-PK1 cells by Na+/H+ exchange.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montrose, M H; Murer, H

    1986-01-01

    Suspensions of LLC-PK1 cells (a continuous epitheliod cell line with renal characteristics) are examined for mechanisms of intracellular pH regulation using the fluorescent probe BCECF. Initial experiments determine suitable calibration procedures for use of the BCECF fluorescent signal. They also determine that the cell suspension contains cells which (after 4 hr in suspension) have Na+ and K+ gradients comparable to those of cells in monolayer culture. The steady-state intracellular pH (7.05 +/- 0.01, n = 5) of cells which have recovered in (pH 7.4) Na+-containing medium is not affected over several minutes by addition of 100 microM amiloride or removal of extracellular Na+ (Na+o less than 1 mM). In contrast, when the cells recover from an acid load (caused by NH4 preincubation and removal), the recovery is largely Na+ dependent and is sensitive to 100 microM amiloride. These results suggest that with resting pH near neutrality, both Na+o/H+i and Na+i/H+o exchange reactions are functionally inactive (compared to cellular buffering capacity). In contrast, Na+o/H+i exchange is activated by an increased cellular acid load. This activation may be observed directly either as a stimulation of net H+ efflux or net Na+ influx with decreasing intracellular pH. The extrapolation of this latter data suggests a "set point" of Na+/H+ exchange of approximately pH 7.0, consistent with the observed resting intracellular pH of approximately 7.05.

  2. Aliphatic semisynthetic amino terminal variants of myoglobin: enrichment with carbon-13, determination and interpretation of terminal pK values and motions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Busch, M.R.

    1985-01-01

    The synthesis of a series of myoglobins substituted in the amino terminal residue to provide variation in the aliphatic nature of the side chain and enrichment in 13 C was accomplished by semisynthetic methods. The replacements of valine, the native first residue, included 13 C enriched glycine, alanine, valine, leucine, and isoleucine. The products were extensively characterized and found to be virtually indistinguishable by most physical methods. 13 C NMR spectroscopy showed significant differences in the amino terminal pK value, ranging from 7.72 for myoglobin to 7.15 for myoglobin. Consideration of the electrostatic effects of the charge array indicated a balance of interactions at this site not significantly altered by variations in the side chain. By examination of the crystal structure, consideration of earlier work regarding the interactions of the side chain of Leu-2, and data regarding the motions of the terminal residue, it was concluded that the interaction of the side chain of the first residue with the hydrophobic cluster formed primarily by close contact of invariant residues Leu-2 and Leu-137 was the primary cause for the reduction in the terminal pK values seen for the larger aliphatics. By restricting the freedom of the residue, this interaction limits the available hydration volume, and consequently favors the unprotonated form of the amine. The concurrent observation of both functional elements in the series of α amino terminal residues brings out the interrelated consequences for the two categories of solvent interactions controlling structural and functional properties in a graded way

  3. IMPLEMENTASI PEMERINTAHAN YANG BERSIH DALAM KERANGKA RENCANA AKSI DAERAH PEMBERANTASAN KORUPSI (RAD-PK (Studi Di Kabupaten Pemalang

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Fauzan

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available This research related to the implementation of good governance, free from corruption, collusion and nepotism. The approach used in this research is a descriptive qualitative approach. The Location of research conducted in the District of Pemalang. Based on the research results can presented that the District of Pemalang is committed and fully supports the government policy in eradicating corruption. District of Pemalang support to efforts to more information accelerate the eradication of corruption stated in the the Regional Action Plan to Accelerate the Eradication of Corruption (RAD-PK in 2011 -2016 which refers to the Medium Term Development Plan (RPJM District of Pemalang from 2011 to 2016 and the National Action Plan for Eradication of Corruption (RAN-PK and the President of Republic of Indonesia Instruction No. 5 Year 2004 on Accelerating the eradication of corruption. RAD-PK 2011-2016 District of Pemalang is a document that contains an action program that aims to accelerate the eradication of corruption. RAD-PK as a program of action containing concrete measures that have been agreed by the stakeholders in the area, so it has been a commitment of local governments prevention efforts corruption through the development of programs and activities aimed at improving public services and the application of the principles of good governance.

  4. Effect of α1-adrenergic stimulation on phosphoinositide metabolism and protein kinase C (PK-C) in rat cardiomyocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaku, T.; Lakatta, E.; Filburn, C.R.

    1986-01-01

    Alpha 1 -adrenergic stimulation is known to enhance membrane phospholipid metabolism resulting in increases in inositol phosphates (IP's) and diacylglycerol (DAG). Cardiomyocytes prelabeled with 3 H-myo-inositol were treated with norepinephrine (NE) for 1-15 min, acid extracted, and IP's separated by ion exchange chromatography. Addition of NE (10 -5 M) in the presence of propranolol (10 -5 M) and LiCl (9 mM) enhanced the accumulation of IP's, linearly with time up to 15 min, and reached 7.3, and 1.5-fold at 15 min for IP 1 , IP 2 , and IP 3 , respectively. KCl at 30 mM had no effect on accumulation of IP's, but augmented the effect of NE. PK-C activity was measured in both cytosol (S) and particulate (P) fractions of treated cells. NE alone had a negligible effect on membrane PK-C, while 30 mM KCl caused a small increase. However, pretreatment with KCl followed by NE produced a significant increase above that seen with KCl alone. Dioctanoylglycerol also stimulated membrane association of PK-C in these cells. These data suggest that α 1 -adrenergic stimulation of membrane association of myocardial PK-C is mediated by DAG but may be dependent on membrane potential and/or the extent of Ca 2+ loading

  5. SPM analysis of parametric (R)-[11C]PK11195 binding images: plasma input versus reference tissue parametric methods

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schuitemaker, Alie; van Berckel, Bart N. M.; Kropholler, Marc A.; Veltman, Dick J.; Scheltens, Philip; Jonker, Cees; Lammertsma, Adriaan A.; Boellaard, Ronald

    2007-01-01

    (R)-[11C]PK11195 has been used for quantifying cerebral microglial activation in vivo. In previous studies, both plasma input and reference tissue methods have been used, usually in combination with a region of interest (ROI) approach. Definition of ROIs, however, can be labourious and prone to

  6. Identification of RFLP and NBS/PK profiling markers for disease resistance loci in genetic maps of oats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sanz, M.J.; Loarce, Y.; Fominaya, A.; Vossen, J.H.; Ferrer, E.

    2013-01-01

    Two of the domains most widely shared among R genes are the nucleotide binding site (NBS) and protein kinase (PK) domains. The present study describes and maps a number of new oat resistance gene analogues (RGAs) with two purposes in mind: (1) to identify genetic regions that contain R genes and (2)

  7. A physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PB/PK) model for multiple exposure routes for soman in multiple species

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sweeney, R.E.; Langenberg, J.P.; Maxwell, D.M.

    2006-01-01

    A physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PB/PK) model has been developed in advanced computer simulation language (ACSL) to describe blood and tissue concentration-time profiles of the C(±)P(-) stereoisomers of soman after inhalation, subcutaneous and intravenous exposures at low (0.8-1.0 × LD50),

  8. Mechanisms of prickle1a function in zebrafish epilepsy and retinal neurogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xue Mei

    2013-05-01

    Epilepsy is a complex neurological disorder characterized by unprovoked seizures. The etiology is heterogeneous with both genetic and environmental causes. Genes that regulate neurotransmitters and ion channels in the central nervous system have been associated with epilepsy. However, a recent screening in human epilepsy patients identified mutations in the PRICKLE1 (PK1 locus, highlighting a potentially novel mechanism underlying seizures. PK1 is a core component of the planar cell polarity network that regulates tissue polarity. Zebrafish studies have shown that Pk1 coordinates cell movement, neuronal migration and axonal outgrowth during embryonic development. Yet how dysfunction of Pk1 relates to epilepsy is unknown. To address the mechanism underlying epileptogenesis, we used zebrafish to characterize Pk1a function and epilepsy-related mutant forms. We show that knockdown of pk1a activity sensitizes zebrafish larva to a convulsant drug. To model defects in the central nervous system, we used the retina and found that pk1a knockdown induces neurite outgrowth defects; yet visual function is maintained. Furthermore, we characterized the functional and biochemical properties of the PK1 mutant forms identified in human patients. Functional analyses demonstrate that the wild-type Pk1a partially suppresses the gene knockdown retinal defects but not the mutant forms. Biochemical analysis reveals increased ubiquitylation of one mutant form and decreased translational efficiency of another mutant form compared with the wild-type Pk1a. Taken together, our results indicate that mutation of human PK1 could lead to defects in neurodevelopment and signal processing, providing insight into seizure predisposition in these patients.

  9. Rapid and efficient radiosynthesis of [{sup 123}I]I-PK11195, a single photon emission computed tomography tracer for peripheral benzodiazepine receptors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pimlott, Sally L. [Department of Clinical Physics, West of Scotland Radionuclide Dispensary, Western Infirmary, G11 6NT Glasgow (United Kingdom)], E-mail: s.pimlott@clinmed.gla.ac.uk; Stevenson, Louise [Department of Chemistry, WestCHEM, University of Glasgow, G12 8QQ Glasgow (United Kingdom); Wyper, David J. [Institute of Neurological Sciences, Southern General Hospital, G51 4TF Glasgow (United Kingdom); Sutherland, Andrew [Department of Chemistry, WestCHEM, University of Glasgow, G12 8QQ Glasgow (United Kingdom)

    2008-07-15

    Introduction: [{sup 123}I]I-PK11195 is a high-affinity single photon emission computed tomography radiotracer for peripheral benzodiazepine receptors that has previously been used to measure activated microglia and to assess neuroinflammation in the living human brain. This study investigates the radiosynthesis of [{sup 123}I]I-PK11195 in order to develop a rapid and efficient method that obtains [{sup 123}I]I-PK11195 with a high specific activity for in vivo animal and human imaging studies. Methods: The synthesis of [{sup 123}I]I-PK11195 was evaluated using a solid-state interhalogen exchange method and an electrophilic iododestannylation method, where bromine and trimethylstannyl derivatives were used as precursors, respectively. In the electrophilic iododestannylation method, the oxidants peracetic acid and chloramine-T were both investigated. Results: Electrophilic iododestannylation produced [{sup 123}I]I-PK11195 with a higher isolated radiochemical yield and a higher specific activity than achievable using the halogen exchange method investigated. Using chloramine-T as oxidant provided a rapid and efficient method of choice for the synthesis of [{sup 123}I]I-PK11195. Conclusions: [{sup 123}I]I-PK11195 has been successfully synthesized via a rapid and efficient electrophilic iododestannylation method, producing [{sup 123}I]I-PK11195 with a higher isolated radiochemical yield and a higher specific activity than previously achieved.

  10. Rapid and efficient radiosynthesis of [123I]I-PK11195, a single photon emission computed tomography tracer for peripheral benzodiazepine receptors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pimlott, Sally L.; Stevenson, Louise; Wyper, David J.; Sutherland, Andrew

    2008-01-01

    Introduction: [ 123 I]I-PK11195 is a high-affinity single photon emission computed tomography radiotracer for peripheral benzodiazepine receptors that has previously been used to measure activated microglia and to assess neuroinflammation in the living human brain. This study investigates the radiosynthesis of [ 123 I]I-PK11195 in order to develop a rapid and efficient method that obtains [ 123 I]I-PK11195 with a high specific activity for in vivo animal and human imaging studies. Methods: The synthesis of [ 123 I]I-PK11195 was evaluated using a solid-state interhalogen exchange method and an electrophilic iododestannylation method, where bromine and trimethylstannyl derivatives were used as precursors, respectively. In the electrophilic iododestannylation method, the oxidants peracetic acid and chloramine-T were both investigated. Results: Electrophilic iododestannylation produced [ 123 I]I-PK11195 with a higher isolated radiochemical yield and a higher specific activity than achievable using the halogen exchange method investigated. Using chloramine-T as oxidant provided a rapid and efficient method of choice for the synthesis of [ 123 I]I-PK11195. Conclusions: [ 123 I]I-PK11195 has been successfully synthesized via a rapid and efficient electrophilic iododestannylation method, producing [ 123 I]I-PK11195 with a higher isolated radiochemical yield and a higher specific activity than previously achieved

  11. Biomeasures and mechanistic modeling highlight PK/PD risks for a monoclonal antibody targeting Fn14 in kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiaoying; Farrokhi, Vahid; Singh, Pratap; Ocana, Mireia Fernandez; Patel, Jenil; Lin, Lih-Ling; Neubert, Hendrik; Brodfuehrer, Joanne

    2018-01-01

    Discovery of the upregulation of fibroblast growth factor-inducible-14 (Fn14) receptor following tissue injury has prompted investigation into biotherapeutic targeting of the Fn14 receptor for the treatment of conditions such as chronic kidney diseases. In the development of monoclonal antibody (mAb) therapeutics, there is an increasing trend to use biomeasures combined with mechanistic pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) modeling to enable decision making in early discovery. With the aim of guiding preclinical efforts on designing an antibody with optimized properties, we developed a mechanistic site-of-action (SoA) PK/PD model for human application. This model incorporates experimental biomeasures, including concentration of soluble Fn14 (sFn14) in human plasma and membrane Fn14 (mFn14) in human kidney tissue, and turnover rate of human sFn14. Pulse-chase studies using stable isotope-labeled amino acids and mass spectrometry indicated the sFn14 half-life to be approximately 5 hours in healthy volunteers. The biomeasures (concentration, turnover) of sFn14 in plasma reveals a significant hurdle in designing an antibody against Fn14 with desired characteristics. The projected dose (>1 mg/kg/wk for 90% target coverage) derived from the human PK/PD model revealed potential high and frequent dosing requirements under certain conditions. The PK/PD model suggested a unique bell-shaped relationship between target coverage and antibody affinity for anti-Fn14 mAb, which could be applied to direct the antibody engineering towards an optimized affinity. This investigation highlighted potential applications, including assessment of PK/PD risks during early target validation, human dose prediction and drug candidate optimization.

  12. Translational PK-PD modelling of molecular target modulation for the AMPA receptor positive allosteric modulator Org 26576.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bursi, Roberta; Erdemli, Gul; Campbell, Robert; Hutmacher, Matthew M; Kerbusch, Thomas; Spanswick, David; Jeggo, Ross; Nations, Kari R; Dogterom, Peter; Schipper, Jacques; Shahid, Mohammed

    2011-12-01

    The α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methylisoxazole-4-propionic acid (AMPA) receptor potentiator Org 26576 represents an interesting pharmacological tool to evaluate the utility of glutamatergic enhancement towards the treatment of psychiatric disorders. In this study, a rat-human translational pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic (PK-PD) model of AMPA receptor modulation was used to predict human target engagement and inform dose selection in efficacy clinical trials. Modelling and simulation was applied to rat plasma and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic measurements to identify a target concentration (EC(80)) for AMPA receptor modulation. Human plasma pharmacokinetics was determined from 33 healthy volunteers and eight major depressive disorder patients. From four out of these eight patients, CSF PK was also determined. Simulations of human CSF levels were performed for several doses of Org 26576. Org 26576 (0.1-10 mg/kg, i.v.) potentiated rat hippocampal AMPA receptor responses in an exposure-dependant manner. The rat plasma and CSF PK data were fitted by one-compartment model each. The rat CSF PK-PD model yielded an EC(80) value of 593 ng/ml (90% confidence interval 406.8, 1,264.1). The human plasma and CSF PK data were simultaneously well described by a two-compartment model. Simulations showed that in humans at 100 mg QD, CSF levels of Org 26576 would exceed the EC(80) target concentration for about 2 h and that 400 mg BID would engage AMPA receptors for 24 h. The modelling approach provided useful insight on the likely human dose-molecular target engagement relationship for Org 26576. Based on the current analysis, 100 and 400 mg BID would be suitable to provide 'phasic' and 'continuous' AMPA receptor engagement, respectively.

  13. Population PK and IgE pharmacodynamic analysis of a fully human monoclonal antibody against IL4 receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakkar, Tarundeep; Sung, Cynthia; Gibiansky, Leonid; Vu, Thuy; Narayanan, Adimoolam; Lin, Shao-Lee; Vincent, Michael; Banfield, Christopher; Colbert, Alex; Hoofring, Sarah; Starcevic, Marta; Ma, Peiming

    2011-10-01

    For AMG 317, a fully human monoclonal antibody to interleukin receptor IL-4Rα, we developed a population pharmacokinetic (PK) model by fitting data from four early phase clinical trials of intravenous and subcutaneous (SC) routes simultaneously, investigated important PK covariates, and explored the relationship between exposure and IgE response. Data for 294 subjects and 2183 AMG 317 plasma concentrations from three Phase 1 and 1 Phase 2 studies were analyzed by nonlinear mixed effects modeling using first-order conditional estimation with interaction. The relationship of IgE response with post hoc estimates of exposure generated from the final PK model was explored based on data from asthmatic patients. The best structural model was a two-compartment quasi-steady-state target-mediated drug disposition model with linear and non-linear clearances. For a typical 80-kg, 40-year subject, linear clearance was 35.0 mL/hr, central and peripheral volumes of distribution were 1.78 and 5.03 L, respectively, and SC bioavailability was 24.3%. Body weight was an important covariate on linear clearance and central volume; age influenced absorption rate. A significant treatment effect was observable between the cumulative AUC and IgE response measured. The population PK model adequately described AMG 317 PK from IV and SC routes over a 60-fold range of doses with two dosing strengths across multiple studies covering healthy volunteers and patients with mild to severe asthma. IgE response across a range of doses and over the sampling time points was found to be related to cumulative AMG 317 exposure.

  14. Perpendicular diffusion of a dilute beam of charged particles in the PK-4 dusty plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Bin; Goree, John

    2015-09-01

    We study the random walk of a dilute beam of projectile dust particles that drift through a target dusty plasma. This random walk is a diffusion that occurs mainly due to Coulomb collisions with target particles that have a different size. In the direction parallel to the drift, projectiles exhibit mobility-limited motion with a constant average velocity. We use a 3D molecular dynamics (MD) simulation of the dust particle motion to determine the diffusion and mobility coefficients for the dilute beam. The dust particles are assumed to interact with a shielded Coulomb repulsion. They also experience gas drag. The beam particles are driven by a prescribed net force that is not applied to the target particles; in the experiments this net force is due to an imbalance of the electric and ion drag forces. This simulation is motivated by microgravity experiments, with the expectation that the scattering of projectiles studied here will be observed in upcoming PK-4 experiments on the International Space Station. Supported by NASA and DOE.

  15. Calcidiol and vitamin D binding protein uptake by LLC-PK1 cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keenan, M.J.; Holmes, R.P.

    1986-01-01

    The process by which target cells take up vitamin D and its metabolites is not known. The authors studied the uptake of both 3 H-calcidiol and 125 I-Vitamin D Binding Protein (DBP) by LLC-PK 1 cells. Uptake was directly related to their extracellular concentrations. In the presence of 55 serum in the growth media cells previously incubated with 10 nM calcitriol for 4 hr had a greater uptake of calcidiol than those cells not incubated with calcitriol. This effect of calcitriol on calcidiol uptake was absent when cells were grown in hormone-supplemented, serum-free media, despite these cells having a cytosolic calcitriol receptor. Equal uptake of calcidiol occurred when DBP was absent and when DBP was present in a one to one molar ratio to calcidiol. With a 1:1 ratio of DBP to calcidiol and a measured K/sub D/ of 2 x 10 -8 M, the uptake of calcidiol could not be accounted for by uptake of the free ligand alone. A large excess of DBP (100:1) in relation to calcidiol suppressed uptake of calcidiol by approx. 90%. The authors have not been able to identify a saturable, specific uptake of either calcidiol or DBP despite DBP appearing to facilitate calcidiol uptake

  16. Nitrofuranyl Methyl Piperazines as New Anti-TB Agents: Identification, Validation, Medicinal Chemistry, and PK Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Whole-cell screening of 20,000 drug-like small molecules led to the identification of nitrofuranyl methylpiperazines as potent anti-TB agents. In the present study, validation followed by medicinal chemistry has been used to explore the structure–activity relationship. Ten compounds demonstrated potent MIC in the range of 0.17–0.0072 μM against H37Rv Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) and were further investigated against nonreplicating and resistant (RifR and MDR) strains of MTB. These compounds were also tested for cytotoxicity. Among the 10 tested compounds, five showed submicromolar to nanomolar potency against nonreplicating and resistant (RifR and MDR) strains of MTB along with a good safety index. Based on their overall in vitro profiles, the solubility and pharmacokinetic properties of five potent compounds were studied, and two analogues, 14f and 16g, were found to have comparatively better solubility than others tested and acceptable pharmacokinetic properties. This study presents the rediscovery of a nitrofuranyl class of compounds with improved aqueous solubility and acceptable oral PK properties, opening a new direction for further development. PMID:26487909

  17. Mafic inclusions in Yosemite granites and Lassen Pk lavas: records of complex crust-mantle interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reid, J.B. Jr.; Flinn, J.E.

    1985-01-01

    This study compares three small-scale magmatic systems dominated by mafic/felsic interaction that appear to be analogs to the evolution of their larger host systems: mafic inclusions from modern Lassen Pk lavas along with inclusions and related synplutonic dike materials from granitoids in the Tuolumne Intrusive Series. Each system represents quickly chilled mafic melt previously contaminated by digestion of rewarmed, super-solidus felsic hosts. Contaminants occur in part as megacrysts of reworked oligoclase with lesser hb and biot. Within each group MgO-variation diagrams for Fe, Ca, Ti, Si are strikingly linear (r>.96); alkalis are decidedly less regular, and many hybrid rocks show a curious, pronounced Na enrichment. Field data, petrography, and best fit modeling suggests this may result from flow concentration of oligoclase xenocrysts within contaminated synplutonic dikes, and is preserved in the inclusions when dike cores chill as pillows in their felsic host. Dissolution of mafic inclusions erases these anomalies and creates a more regular series of two-component mafic-felsic mixtures in the large host system. The inclusions and dikes thus appear to record a variety of late-stage mafic-felsic interactive processes that earlier and on a larger scale created much of the compositional variety of their intermediate host rocks.

  18. Semi quantification study of [{sup 11}C]-(R)-PK11195 PET brain images in multiple sclerosis; Estudo da semiquantificacao de imagens PET cerebrais de [{sup 11}C]-(R)-PK11195 na esclerose multipla

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Narciso, Lucas D.L.; Schuck, Phelipi N.; Dartora, Caroline M.; Matushita, Cristina S.; Becker, Jefferson; Silva, Ana M. Marques da, E-mail: lucas.narciso@acad.pucrs.br [Pontificia Universidade Catolica do Rio Grande do Sul (PUC-RS), Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil)

    2016-07-01

    PET brain images with [{sup 11}C]-(R)-PK11195 are being widely used to visualize microglial activation in vivo in neuro degenerative diseases, such as multiple sclerosis (MS). The aim of this study is to investigate the uptake behavior in justacortical and periventricular regions of [{sup 11}C]-(R)-PK11195 PET brain images reformatted in different time intervals by applying three methods, seeking method and time interval that significantly differentiate MS patients from healthy controls. Semi-quantitative SUV and uptake relative to a reference region methods were applied to PET images from different time intervals acquired from 10 patients with MS and 5 healthy controls. The results show significant SUV values difference (p = 0.01, 40 to 60 min) in justacortical and periventricular regions between groups and using the normalization method in which the uptake is relative to the mean concentration activity in the white matter (p <0.01, 10 to 60 min). (author)

  19. Surface binding and uptake of cadmium (Cd2+) by LLC-PK1 cells on permeable membrane supports

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prozialeck, W.C.; Lamar, P.C.

    1993-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that Cd 2+ has relatively specific damaging effects on cell-cell junctions in the renal epithelial cell line, LLC-PK 1 . The objective of the present studies was to examine the surface binding and uptake of Cd 2+ by LLC-PK 1 cells in relation to the disruption of cell-cell junctions. LLC-PK 1 cells on Falcon Cell Culture Inserts were exposed to CdCl 2 containing trace amounts of 109 Cd 2+ from either the apical or the basolateral compartments, and the accumulation of 109 Cd 2+ was monitored for up to 8 h. The integrity of cell-cell junctions was assessed by monitoring the transepithelial electrical resistance. The results showed that the cells accumulated 3-4 times more Cd 2+ from the basolateral compartment than from the apical compartment. The accumulation of Cd 2+ from the basolateral compartment occurred in two phases: a rapid, exponential phase that occurred in 1-2 h and coincided with a decrease in transepithelial resistance, and a slower, linear phase that continued for 6-8 h. The Cd 2+ that accumulated during the rapid phase was easily removed by washing the cells in EGTA, indicating that most of it was bound to sites on the cell surface. By contrast, most of the Cd 2+ that accumulated during the slower phase could not be removed by EGTA, indicating that it had been taken up by the cells. Additional studies showed that the rapid phase of Cd 2+ accumulation was enhanced when Ca 2+ was present at low concentrations (0.1 mM), and was greatly reduced when Ca 2+ was present at high concentrations (10 mM). These results suggest that ld 2+ damages the junctions between LLC-PK 1 cells by interacting with Ca 2+ -sensitive sites on the basolateral cell surface. (orig.)

  20. Study on the PK profiles of magnoflorine and its potential interaction in Cortex phellodendri decoction by LC-MS/MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Xiaoting; Li, Zhixiong; Lin, Yunfei; Chen, Mingcang; Pan, Guoyu; Huang, Chenggang

    2014-01-01

    Magnoflorine, an aporphine alkaloid in Cortex phellodendri, is increasingly attracting research attention because of its antidiabetic effects. However, at present, little information on its pharmacokinetics (PK) in vivo is available. In this study, a sensitive, rapid, and selective method was developed to determine the magnoflorine content in rat plasma using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. Following liquid-liquid extraction, the calibration curve showed good linearity within the concentration range of 2.93 to 1,500 ng ml(-1). The intra- and inter-day precisions were all below 7.8 %, and the accuracy ranged from 94.9 to 103.4 %. The method was successfully applied in investigating the PK of magnoflorine in rats. The compound had low bioavailability, a high absorption rate, and a high elimination rate. However, area under the curve, T 1/2, and MRT increased approximately twofold when the same dosage of the compound was administered in a C. phellodendri decoction (20.8 g kg(-1)). Moreover, T max was prolonged from 0.3 to 3.33 h. Furthermore, a comparison of coadministration of the mixture group, magnoflorine (40 mg kg(-1)) and berberine (696.4 mg kg(-1)), with the C. phellodendri decoction group, revealed that no statistical difference (P > 0.05) was found in the parameter AUC, and certain similar changes in the PK trend to the herbal medicine group were also observed. These results suggested that oral administration of the herbal medicine decreased the absorption and elimination rates of magnoflorine and increased its bioavailability. Berberine played a significant role in interacting with magnoflorine and in affecting the PK profiles of magnoflorine in the C. phellodendri decoction group.

  1. Role of neurotensin and opioid receptors in the cardiorespiratory effects of [Ile⁹]PK20, a novel antinociceptive chimeric peptide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaczyńska, Katarzyna; Szereda-Przestaszewska, Małgorzata; Kleczkowska, Patrycja; Lipkowski, Andrzej W

    2014-10-15

    Ile(9)PK20 is a novel hybrid of opioid-neurotensin peptides synthesized from the C-terminal hexapeptide of neurotensin and endomorphin-2 pharmacophore. This chimeric compound shows potent central and peripheral antinociceptive activity in experimental animals, however nothing is known about its influence on the respiratory and cardiovascular parameters. The present study was designed to determine the cardiorespiratory effects exerted by an intravenous injection (i.v.) of [Ile(9)]PK20. Share of the vagal afferentation and the contribution of NTS1 neurotensin and opioid receptors were tested. Intravenous injection of the hybrid at a dose of 100 μg/kg in the intact, anaesthetized rats provoked an increase in tidal volume preceded by a prompt short-lived decrease. Immediately after the end of injection brief acceleration of the respiratory rhythm appeared, and was ensued by the slowing down of breathing. Changes in respiration were concomitant with a bi-phasic response of the blood pressure: an immediate increase was followed by a sustained hypotension. Midcervical vagotomy eliminated the increase in tidal volume and respiratory rate responses. Antagonist of opioid receptors - naloxone hydrochloride eliminated only [Ile(9)]PK20-evoked decline in tidal volume response. Blockade of NTS1 receptors with an intravenous dose of SR 142,948, lessened the remaining cardiorespiratory effects. This study depicts that [Ile(9)]PK20 acting through neurotensin NTS1 receptors augments the tidal component of the breathing pattern and activates respiratory timing response through the vagal pathway. Blood pressure effects occur outside vagal afferentation and might result from activation of the central and peripheral vascular NTS1 receptors. In summary the respiratory effects of the hybrid appeared not to be profound, but they were accompanied with unfavourable prolonged hypotension. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Effects on field- and bottom-layer species in an experiment with repeated PK- and NPK-fertilization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nohrstedt, H.Oe.

    1994-01-01

    Long-term changes in forest ground vegetation because of repeated PK- and NPK-fertilization were examined in an old field experiment, located in a 85-year-old Pinus sylvestris stand in northern Sweden. Fertilizers were added at 5-(PK, NPK) or 10-(PK) year intervals, beginning 26 years prior to the study. The treatments were tested in two replicates on plots sized 40 x 40 m. The total doses added were N 720 kg/ha, P 222-380 kg/ha and K 318-620 kg/ha. N was given as ammonium nitrate, P as superphosphate and K as potassium chloride. The vegetation on control plots was of the Vaccinium vitis-idaea type. The field layer was dominated by V.vitis-idaea and V.myrtillus, and the bottom layer by Pleurozium schreberi. The effect of fertilization was quantified by examining the areal cover of individual species. This was done in 25 0.25 m 2 frames systematically placed in a grid over each treatment plot. The only pronounced effect in the field layer was on V.myrtillus. The cover was strongly reduced by fertilization with PK. The reduction was 70% for the 5-year interval and 34% for the 10-year interval. The cover more than doubled after NPK-fertilization. Among the cryptogams, a reduction in cover was indicated for Cladina arbuscula and C.rangiferina because of fertilization with NPK. NPK reduced the number of species that were found, totally depending on negative effects on several lichen species. For species absent in the examined frame areas but present somewhere else on the treatment plots, it was seen that Deschampsia flexuosa increased after NPK-fertilization, while Peltigera apthosa and Steroecaulon tomentosum decreased. Hylocomium splendens occurred on both control plots, but only on one fertilized plot. 30 refs, 1 fig, 5 tabs

  3. Porcine parvovirus infection induces apoptosis in PK-15 cells through activation of p53 and mitochondria-mediated pathway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Hongling; Huang, Yong; Du, Qian; Luo, Xiaomao; Zhang, Liang; Zhao, Xiaomin; Tong, Dewen

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • PPV reduces PK-15 cells viability by inducing apoptosis. • PPV infection induces apoptosis through mitochondria-mediated pathway. • PPV infection activates p53 to regulate the mitochondria apoptotic signaling. - Abstract: Porcine parvovirus (PPV) infection has been reported to induce the cytopathic effects (CPE) in some special host cells and contribute the occurrence of porcine parvovirus disease, but the molecular mechanisms underlying PPV-induced CPE are not clear. In this study, we investigated the morphological and molecular changes of porcine kidney cell line (PK-15 cells) infected with PPV. The results showed that PPV infection inhibited the viability of PK-15 cells in a time and concentration dependent manner. PPV infection induced typical apoptotic features including chromatin condensation, apoptotic body formation, nuclear fragmentation, and Annexin V-binding activity. Further studies showed that Bax was increased and translocated to mitochondria, whereas Bcl-2 was decreased in PPV-infected cells, which caused mitochondrial outer-membrane permeabilization, resulting in the release of mitochondrial cytochrome c, followed by caspase-9 and caspase-3 activation. However, the expression of Fas and Fas ligand (FasL) did not appear significant changes in the process of PPV-induced apoptosis. Moreover, PPV infection activated p53 signaling, which was involved in the activation of apoptotic signaling induced by PPV infection via regulation of Bax and Bcl-2. Taken together, our results demonstrated that PPV infection induced apoptosis in PK-15 cells through activation of p53 and mitochondria-mediated apoptosis pathway. This study may contribute to shed light on the molecular pathogenesis of PPV infection

  4. Porcine parvovirus infection induces apoptosis in PK-15 cells through activation of p53 and mitochondria-mediated pathway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Hongling; Huang, Yong; Du, Qian; Luo, Xiaomao; Zhang, Liang; Zhao, Xiaomin; Tong, Dewen, E-mail: dwtong@nwsuaf.edu.cn

    2015-01-09

    Highlights: • PPV reduces PK-15 cells viability by inducing apoptosis. • PPV infection induces apoptosis through mitochondria-mediated pathway. • PPV infection activates p53 to regulate the mitochondria apoptotic signaling. - Abstract: Porcine parvovirus (PPV) infection has been reported to induce the cytopathic effects (CPE) in some special host cells and contribute the occurrence of porcine parvovirus disease, but the molecular mechanisms underlying PPV-induced CPE are not clear. In this study, we investigated the morphological and molecular changes of porcine kidney cell line (PK-15 cells) infected with PPV. The results showed that PPV infection inhibited the viability of PK-15 cells in a time and concentration dependent manner. PPV infection induced typical apoptotic features including chromatin condensation, apoptotic body formation, nuclear fragmentation, and Annexin V-binding activity. Further studies showed that Bax was increased and translocated to mitochondria, whereas Bcl-2 was decreased in PPV-infected cells, which caused mitochondrial outer-membrane permeabilization, resulting in the release of mitochondrial cytochrome c, followed by caspase-9 and caspase-3 activation. However, the expression of Fas and Fas ligand (FasL) did not appear significant changes in the process of PPV-induced apoptosis. Moreover, PPV infection activated p53 signaling, which was involved in the activation of apoptotic signaling induced by PPV infection via regulation of Bax and Bcl-2. Taken together, our results demonstrated that PPV infection induced apoptosis in PK-15 cells through activation of p53 and mitochondria-mediated apoptosis pathway. This study may contribute to shed light on the molecular pathogenesis of PPV infection.

  5. DNA-PK, ATM and ATR collaboratively regulate p53-RPA interaction to facilitate homologous recombination DNA repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrano, M A; Li, Z; Dangeti, M; Musich, P R; Patrick, S; Roginskaya, M; Cartwright, B; Zou, Y

    2013-05-09

    Homologous recombination (HR) and nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ) are two distinct DNA double-stranded break (DSB) repair pathways. Here, we report that DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK), the core component of NHEJ, partnering with DNA-damage checkpoint kinases ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) and ATM- and Rad3-related (ATR), regulates HR repair of DSBs. The regulation was accomplished through modulation of the p53 and replication protein A (RPA) interaction. We show that upon DNA damage, p53 and RPA were freed from a p53-RPA complex by simultaneous phosphorylations of RPA at the N-terminus of RPA32 subunit by DNA-PK and of p53 at Ser37 and Ser46 in a Chk1/Chk2-independent manner by ATR and ATM, respectively. Neither the phosphorylation of RPA nor of p53 alone could dissociate p53 and RPA. Furthermore, disruption of the release significantly compromised HR repair of DSBs. Our results reveal a mechanism for the crosstalk between HR repair and NHEJ through the co-regulation of p53-RPA interaction by DNA-PK, ATM and ATR.

  6. Latest Results on Complex Plasmas with the PK-3 Plus Laboratory on Board the International Space Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwabe, M.; Du, C.-R.; Huber, P.; Lipaev, A. M.; Molotkov, V. I.; Naumkin, V. N.; Zhdanov, S. K.; Zhukhovitskii, D. I.; Fortov, V. E.; Thomas, H. M.

    2018-03-01

    Complex plasmas are low temperature plasmas that contain microparticles in addition to ions, electrons, and neutral particles. The microparticles acquire high charges, interact with each other and can be considered as model particles for effects in classical condensed matter systems, such as crystallization and fluid dynamics. In contrast to atoms in ordinary systems, their movement can be traced on the most basic level, that of individual particles. In order to avoid disturbances caused by gravity, experiments on complex plasmas are often performed under microgravity conditions. The PK-3 Plus Laboratory was operated on board the International Space Station from 2006 - 2013. Its heart consisted of a capacitively coupled radio-frequency plasma chamber. Microparticles were inserted into the low-temperature plasma, forming large, homogeneous complex plasma clouds. Here, we review the results obtained with recent analyzes of PK-3 Plus data: We study the formation of crystallization fronts, as well as the microparticle motion in, and structure of crystalline complex plasmas. We investigate fluid effects such as wave transmission across an interface, and the development of the energy spectra during the onset of turbulent microparticle movement. We explore how abnormal particles move through, and how macroscopic spheres interact with the microparticle cloud. These examples demonstrate the versatility of the PK-3 Plus Laboratory.

  7. Distinct genetic difference between the Duffy binding protein (PkDBPαII) of Plasmodium knowlesi clinical isolates from North Borneo and Peninsular Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fong, Mun-Yik; Rashdi, Sarah A A; Yusof, Ruhani; Lau, Yee-Ling

    2015-02-21

    Plasmodium knowlesi is one of the monkey malaria parasites that can cause human malaria. The Duffy binding protein of P. knowlesi (PkDBPαII) is essential for the parasite's invasion into human and monkey erythrocytes. A previous study on P. knowlesi clinical isolates from Peninsular Malaysia reported high level of genetic diversity in the PkDBPαII. Furthermore, 36 amino acid haplotypes were identified and these haplotypes could be separated into allele group I and allele group II. In the present study, the PkDBPαII of clinical isolates from the Malaysian states of Sarawak and Sabah in North Borneo was investigated, and compared with the PkDBPαII of Peninsular Malaysia isolates. Blood samples from 28 knowlesi malaria patients were used. These samples were collected between 2011 and 2013 from hospitals in North Borneo. The PkDBPαII region of the isolates was amplified by PCR, cloned into Escherichia coli, and sequenced. The genetic diversity, natural selection and phylogenetics of PkDBPαII haplotypes were analysed using MEGA5 and DnaSP ver. 5.10.00 programmes. Forty-nine PkDBPαII sequences were obtained. Comparison at the nucleotide level against P. knowlesi strain H as reference sequence revealed 58 synonymous and 102 non-synonymous mutations. Analysis on these mutations showed that PkDBPαII was under purifying (negative) selection. At the amino acid level, 38 different PkDBPαII haplotypes were identified. Twelve of the 28 blood samples had mixed haplotype infections. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that all the haplotypes were in allele group I, but they formed a sub-group that was distinct from those of Peninsular Malaysia. Wright's FST fixation index indicated high genetic differentiation between the North Borneo and Peninsular Malaysia haplotypes. This study is the first to report the genetic diversity and natural selection of PkDBPαII of P. knowlesi from Borneo Island. The PkDBPαII haplotypes found in this study were distinct from those from

  8. DNA-activated protein kinase (DNA-PK) and significance in its responses to radiation. The end is the beginning of the story

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsumoto, Yoshihisa

    1996-01-01

    This review described findings hitherto and future perspective on the DNA-PK. The enzyme was activated by double-strand DNA, required the end of the DNA and was the major component of p350 protein. Ku-antigen (an autoimmune antigen) was found a subunit. It phosphorylated p53, c-Myc, RPAp34, DNA ligase I, DNA topoisomerase I and II. Therefore DNA-PK can be a trigger factor which recognizes DNA break induced by radiation, and phosphorylates proteins participating in the DNA repair, cell cycle regulation and cell death. Recently p350 was found to be a responsible gene product to SCID syndrome of mice hypersensitive to ionizing radiation. The review included; On the DNA-PK: Discovery, relation to Ku antigen and molecular properties. On the DNA-PK and radiation sensitivity, and V(D)J recombination: Ku80 was the product of X-ray repair cross-complementing (XRCC). p350 was found the gene product whose lack causing SCID syndrome of radiosensitive mice. On the significance of phosphorylation of DNA-PK and the substrate: p53. RPA (replication protein A, alias RF-A or SSB). P1/MCM3, a possible substrate. On the other properties of DNA-PK: DNA-helicase activity. Suppression of transcription by RNA polymerase. DNA-PKp350 and ATM (ataxia-telangiectasia). Family molecules of p53 and ATM (MEI-41, Tel1p and Mec1p, and Rad3). (H.O). 70 refs

  9. PK-PD Integration Modeling and Cutoff Value of Florfenicol against Streptococcus suis in Pigs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhixin Lei

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The aims of the present study were to establish optimal doses and provide an alternate COPD for florfenicol against Streptococcus suis based on pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic integration modeling. The recommended dose (30 mg/kg b.w. were administered in healthy pigs through intramuscular and intravenous routes for pharmacokinetic studies. The main pharmacokinetic parameters of Cmax, AUC0-24h, AUC, Ke, t1/2ke, MRT, Tmax, and Clb, were estimated as 4.44 μg/ml, 88.85 μg⋅h/ml, 158.56 μg⋅h/ml, 0.048 h-1, 14.46 h, 26.11 h, 4 h and 0.185 L/h⋅kg, respectively. The bioavailability of florfenicol was calculated to be 99.14% after I.M administration. A total of 124 Streptococcus suis from most cities of China were isolated to determine the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC of florfenicol. The MIC50 and MIC90 were calculated as 1 and 2 μg/ml. A serotype 2 Streptococcus suis (WH-2, with MIC value similar to MIC90, was selected as a representative for an in vitro and ex vivo pharmacodynamics study. The MIC values of WH-2 in TSB and plasma were 2 μg/ml, and the MBC/MIC ratios were 2 in TSB and plasma. The MPC was detected to be 3.2 μg/ml. According to inhibitory sigmoid Emax model, plasma AUC0-24h/MIC values of florfenicol versus Streptococcus suis were 37.89, 44.02, and 46.42 h for the bactericidal, bacteriostatic, and elimination activity, respectively. Monte Carlo simulations the optimal doses for bactericidal, bacteriostatic, and elimination effects were calculated as 16.5, 19.17, and 20.14 mg/kg b.w. for 50% target attainment rates (TAR, and 21.55, 25.02, and 26.85 mg/kg b.w. for 90% TAR, respectively. The PK-PD cutoff value (COPD analyzed from MCS for florfenicol against Streptococcus suis was 1 μg/ml which could provide a sensitivity cutoff value. These results contributed an optimized alternative to clinical veterinary medicine and showed that the dose of 25.02 mg/kg florfenicol for 24 h could have a bactericidal action against

  10. Observation of the Decays Λ_{b}^{0}→χ_{c1}pK^{-} and Λ_{b}^{0}→χ_{c2}pK^{-}.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aaij, R; Adeva, B; Adinolfi, M; Ajaltouni, Z; Akar, S; Albrecht, J; Alessio, F; Alexander, M; Ali, S; Alkhazov, G; Alvarez Cartelle, P; Alves, A A; Amato, S; Amerio, S; Amhis, Y; An, L; Anderlini, L; Andreassi, G; Andreotti, M; Andrews, J E; Appleby, R B; Archilli, F; d'Argent, P; Arnau Romeu, J; Artamonov, A; Artuso, M; Aslanides, E; Auriemma, G; Baalouch, M; Babuschkin, I; Bachmann, S; Back, J J; Badalov, A; Baesso, C; Baker, S; Balagura, V; Baldini, W; Baranov, A; Barlow, R J; Barschel, C; Barsuk, S; Barter, W; Baryshnikov, F; Baszczyk, M; Batozskaya, V; Battista, V; Bay, A; Beaucourt, L; Beddow, J; Bedeschi, F; Bediaga, I; Beiter, A; Bel, L J; Bellee, V; Belloli, N; Belous, K; Belyaev, I; Ben-Haim, E; Bencivenni, G; Benson, S; Beranek, S; Berezhnoy, A; Bernet, R; Bertolin, A; Betancourt, C; Betti, F; Bettler, M-O; van Beuzekom, M; Bezshyiko, Ia; Bifani, S; Billoir, P; Birnkraut, A; Bitadze, A; Bizzeti, A; Blake, T; Blanc, F; Blouw, J; Blusk, S; Bocci, V; Boettcher, T; Bondar, A; Bondar, N; Bonivento, W; Bordyuzhin, I; Borgheresi, A; Borghi, S; Borisyak, M; Borsato, M; Bossu, F; Boubdir, M; Bowcock, T J V; Bowen, E; Bozzi, C; Braun, S; Britton, T; Brodzicka, J; Buchanan, E; Burr, C; Bursche, A; Buytaert, J; Cadeddu, S; Calabrese, R; Calvi, M; Calvo Gomez, M; Camboni, A; Campana, P; Campora Perez, D H; Capriotti, L; Carbone, A; Carboni, G; Cardinale, R; Cardini, A; Carniti, P; Carson, L; Carvalho Akiba, K; Casse, G; Cassina, L; Castillo Garcia, L; Cattaneo, M; Cavallero, G; Cenci, R; Chamont, D; Charles, M; Charpentier, Ph; Chatzikonstantinidis, G; Chefdeville, M; Chen, S; Cheung, S F; Chobanova, V; Chrzaszcz, M; Chubykin, A; Cid Vidal, X; Ciezarek, G; Clarke, P E L; Clemencic, M; Cliff, H V; Closier, J; Coco, V; Cogan, J; Cogneras, E; Cogoni, V; Cojocariu, L; Collins, P; Comerma-Montells, A; Contu, A; Cook, A; Coombs, G; Coquereau, S; Corti, G; Corvo, M; Costa Sobral, C M; Couturier, B; Cowan, G A; Craik, D C; Crocombe, A; Cruz Torres, M; Cunliffe, S; Currie, R; D'Ambrosio, C; Da Cunha Marinho, F; Dall'Occo, E; Dalseno, J; Davis, A; De Aguiar Francisco, O; De Bruyn, K; De Capua, S; De Cian, M; De Miranda, J M; De Paula, L; De Serio, M; De Simone, P; Dean, C T; Decamp, D; Deckenhoff, M; Del Buono, L; Dembinski, H-P; Demmer, M; Dendek, A; Derkach, D; Deschamps, O; Dettori, F; Dey, B; Di Canto, A; Di Nezza, P; Dijkstra, H; Dordei, F; Dorigo, M; Dosil Suárez, A; Dovbnya, A; Dreimanis, K; Dufour, L; Dujany, G; Dungs, K; Durante, P; Dzhelyadin, R; Dziewiecki, M; Dziurda, A; Dzyuba, A; Déléage, N; Easo, S; Ebert, M; Egede, U; Egorychev, V; Eidelman, S; Eisenhardt, S; Eitschberger, U; Ekelhof, R; Eklund, L; Ely, S; Esen, S; Evans, H M; Evans, T; Falabella, A; Farley, N; Farry, S; Fay, R; Fazzini, D; Ferguson, D; Fernandez, G; Fernandez Prieto, A; Ferrari, F; Ferreira Rodrigues, F; Ferro-Luzzi, M; Filippov, S; Fini, R A; Fiore, M; Fiorini, M; Firlej, M; Fitzpatrick, C; Fiutowski, T; Fleuret, F; Fohl, K; Fontana, M; Fontanelli, F; Forshaw, D C; Forty, R; Franco Lima, V; Frank, M; Frei, C; Fu, J; Funk, W; Furfaro, E; Färber, C; Gabriel, E; Gallas Torreira, A; Galli, D; Gallorini, S; Gambetta, S; Gandelman, M; Gandini, P; Gao, Y; Garcia Martin, L M; García Pardiñas, J; Garra Tico, J; Garrido, L; Garsed, P J; Gascon, D; Gaspar, C; Gavardi, L; Gazzoni, G; Gerick, D; Gersabeck, E; Gersabeck, M; Gershon, T; Ghez, Ph; Gianì, S; Gibson, V; Girard, O G; Giubega, L; Gizdov, K; Gligorov, V V; Golubkov, D; Golutvin, A; Gomes, A; Gorelov, I V; Gotti, C; Govorkova, E; Graciani Diaz, R; Granado Cardoso, L A; Graugés, E; Graverini, E; Graziani, G; Grecu, A; Greim, R; Griffith, P; Grillo, L; Gruber, L; Gruberg Cazon, B R; Grünberg, O; Gushchin, E; Guz, Yu; Gys, T; Göbel, C; Hadavizadeh, T; Hadjivasiliou, C; Haefeli, G; Haen, C; Haines, S C; Hamilton, B; Han, X; Hansmann-Menzemer, S; Harnew, N; Harnew, S T; Harrison, J; Hatch, M; He, J; Head, T; Heister, A; Hennessy, K; Henrard, P; Henry, L; van Herwijnen, E; Heß, M; Hicheur, A; Hill, D; Hombach, C; Hopchev, P H; Huard, Z-C; Hulsbergen, W; Humair, T; Hushchyn, M; Hutchcroft, D; Idzik, M; Ilten, P; Jacobsson, R; Jalocha, J; Jans, E; Jawahery, A; Jiang, F; John, M; Johnson, D; Jones, C R; Joram, C; Jost, B; Jurik, N; Kandybei, S; Karacson, M; Kariuki, J M; Karodia, S; Kecke, M; Kelsey, M; Kenzie, M; Ketel, T; Khairullin, E; Khanji, B; Khurewathanakul, C; Kirn, T; Klaver, S; Klimaszewski, K; Klimkovich, T; Koliiev, S; Kolpin, M; Komarov, I; Kopecna, R; Koppenburg, P; Kosmyntseva, A; Kotriakhova, S; Kozachuk, A; Kozeiha, M; Kravchuk, L; Kreps, M; Krokovny, P; Kruse, F; Krzemien, W; Kucewicz, W; Kucharczyk, M; Kudryavtsev, V; Kuonen, A K; Kurek, K; Kvaratskheliya, T; Lacarrere, D; Lafferty, G; Lai, A; Lanfranchi, G; Langenbruch, C; Latham, T; Lazzeroni, C; Le Gac, R; van Leerdam, J; Leflat, A; Lefrançois, J; Lefèvre, R; Lemaitre, F; Lemos Cid, E; Leroy, O; Lesiak, T; Leverington, B; Li, T; Li, Y; Li, Z; Likhomanenko, T; Lindner, R; Lionetto, F; Liu, X; Loh, D; Longstaff, I; Lopes, J H; Lucchesi, D; Lucio Martinez, M; Luo, H; Lupato, A; Luppi, E; Lupton, O; Lusiani, A; Lyu, X; Machefert, F; Maciuc, F; Maev, O; Maguire, K; Malde, S; Malinin, A; Maltsev, T; Manca, G; Mancinelli, G; Manning, P; Maratas, J; Marchand, J F; Marconi, U; Marin Benito, C; Marinangeli, M; Marino, P; Marks, J; Martellotti, G; Martin, M; Martinelli, M; Martinez Santos, D; Martinez Vidal, F; Martins Tostes, D; Massacrier, L M; Massafferri, A; Matev, R; Mathad, A; Mathe, Z; Matteuzzi, C; Mauri, A; Maurice, E; Maurin, B; Mazurov, A; McCann, M; McNab, A; McNulty, R; Meadows, B; Meier, F; Melnychuk, D; Merk, M; Merli, A; Michielin, E; Milanes, D A; Minard, M-N; Mitzel, D S; Mogini, A; Molina Rodriguez, J; Monroy, I A; Monteil, S; Morandin, M; Morello, M J; Morgunova, O; Moron, J; Morris, A B; Morris, A P; Mountain, R; Muheim, F; Mulder, M; Mussini, M; Müller, D; Müller, J; Müller, K; Müller, V; Naik, P; Nakada, T; Nandakumar, R; Nandi, A; Nasteva, I; Needham, M; Neri, N; Neubert, S; Neufeld, N; Neuner, M; Nguyen, T D; Nguyen-Mau, C; Nieswand, S; Niet, R; Nikitin, N; Nikodem, T; Nogay, A; O'Hanlon, D P; Oblakowska-Mucha, A; Obraztsov, V; Ogilvy, S; Oldeman, R; Onderwater, C J G; Ossowska, A; Otalora Goicochea, J M; Owen, P; Oyanguren, A; Pais, P R; Palano, A; Palutan, M; Papanestis, A; Pappagallo, M; Pappalardo, L L; Pappenheimer, C; Parker, W; Parkes, C; Passaleva, G; Pastore, A; Patel, M; Patrignani, C; Pearce, A; Pellegrino, A; Penso, G; Pepe Altarelli, M; Perazzini, S; Perret, P; Pescatore, L; Petridis, K; Petrolini, A; Petrov, A; Petruzzo, M; Picatoste Olloqui, E; Pietrzyk, B; Pikies, M; Pinci, D; Pistone, A; Piucci, A; Placinta, V; Playfer, S; Plo Casasus, M; Poikela, T; Polci, F; Poli Lener, M; Poluektov, A; Polyakov, I; Polycarpo, E; Pomery, G J; Ponce, S; Popov, A; Popov, D; Popovici, B; Poslavskii, S; Potterat, C; Price, E; Prisciandaro, J; Prouve, C; Pugatch, V; Puig Navarro, A; Punzi, G; Qian, C; Qian, W; Quagliani, R; Rachwal, B; Rademacker, J H; Rama, M; Ramos Pernas, M; Rangel, M S; Raniuk, I; Ratnikov, F; Raven, G; Ravonel Salzgeber, M; Reboud, M; Redi, F; Reichert, S; Dos Reis, A C; Remon Alepuz, C; Renaudin, V; Ricciardi, S; Richards, S; Rihl, M; Rinnert, K; Rives Molina, V; Robbe, P; Rodrigues, A B; Rodrigues, E; Rodriguez Lopez, J A; Rodriguez Perez, P; Rogozhnikov, A; Roiser, S; Rollings, A; Romanovskiy, V; Romero Vidal, A; Ronayne, J W; Rotondo, M; Rudolph, M S; Ruf, T; Ruiz Valls, P; Saborido Silva, J J; Sadykhov, E; Sagidova, N; Saitta, B; Salustino Guimaraes, V; Sanchez Gonzalo, D; Sanchez Mayordomo, C; Sanmartin Sedes, B; Santacesaria, R; Santamarina Rios, C; Santimaria, M; Santovetti, E; Sarti, A; Satriano, C; Satta, A; Saunders, D M; Savrina, D; Schael, S; Schellenberg, M; Schiller, M; Schindler, H; Schlupp, M; Schmelling, M; Schmelzer, T; Schmidt, B; Schneider, O; Schopper, A; Schreiner, H F; Schubert, K; Schubiger, M; Schune, M-H; Schwemmer, R; Sciascia, B; Sciubba, A; Semennikov, A; Sergi, A; Serra, N; Serrano, J; Sestini, L; Seyfert, P; Shapkin, M; Shapoval, I; Shcheglov, Y; Shears, T; Shekhtman, L; Shevchenko, V; Siddi, B G; Silva Coutinho, R; Silva de Oliveira, L; Simi, G; Simone, S; Sirendi, M; Skidmore, N; Skwarnicki, T; Smith, E; Smith, I T; Smith, J; Smith, M; Soares Lavra, L; Sokoloff, M D; Soler, F J P; Souza De Paula, B; Spaan, B; Spradlin, P; Sridharan, S; Stagni, F; Stahl, M; Stahl, S; Stefko, P; Stefkova, S; Steinkamp, O; Stemmle, S; Stenyakin, O; Stevens, H; Stoica, S; Stone, S; Storaci, B; Stracka, S; Stramaglia, M E; Straticiuc, M; Straumann, U; Sun, L; Sutcliffe, W; Swientek, K; Syropoulos, V; Szczekowski, M; Szumlak, T; T'Jampens, S; Tayduganov, A; Tekampe, T; Tellarini, G; Teubert, F; Thomas, E; van Tilburg, J; Tilley, M J; Tisserand, V; Tobin, M; Tolk, S; Tomassetti, L; Tonelli, D; Topp-Joergensen, S; Toriello, F; Tourinho Jadallah Aoude, R; Tournefier, E; Tourneur, S; Trabelsi, K; Traill, M; Tran, M T; Tresch, M; Trisovic, A; Tsaregorodtsev, A; Tsopelas, P; Tully, A; Tuning, N; Ukleja, A; Ustyuzhanin, A; Uwer, U; Vacca, C; Vagnoni, V; Valassi, A; Valat, S; Valenti, G; Vazquez Gomez, R; Vazquez Regueiro, P; Vecchi, S; van Veghel, M; Velthuis, J J; Veltri, M; Veneziano, G; Venkateswaran, A; Verlage, T A; Vernet, M; Vesterinen, M; Viana Barbosa, J V; Viaud, B; Vieira, D; Vieites Diaz, M; Viemann, H; Vilasis-Cardona, X; Vitti, M; Volkov, V; Vollhardt, A; Voneki, B; Vorobyev, A; Vorobyev, V; Voß, C; de Vries, J A; Vázquez Sierra, C; Waldi, R; Wallace, C; Wallace, R; Walsh, J; Wang, J; Ward, D R; Wark, H M; Watson, N K; Websdale, D; Weiden, A; Whitehead, M; Wicht, J; Wilkinson, G; Wilkinson, M; Williams, M; Williams, M P; Williams, M; Williams, T; Wilson, F F; Wimberley, J; Winn, M A; Wishahi, J; Wislicki, W; Witek, M; Wormser, G; Wotton, S A; Wraight, K; Wyllie, K; Xie, Y; Xu, Z; Yang, Z; Yang, Z; Yao, Y; Yin, H; Yu, J; Yuan, X; Yushchenko, O; Zarebski, K A; Zavertyaev, M; Zhang, L; Zhang, Y; Zhelezov, A; Zheng, Y; Zhu, X; Zhukov, V; Zonneveld, J B; Zucchelli, S

    2017-08-11

    The first observation of the decays Λ_{b}^{0}→χ_{c1}pK^{-} and Λ_{b}^{0}→χ_{c2}pK^{-} is reported using a data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 3.0  fb^{-1}, collected by the LHCb experiment in pp collisions at center-of-mass energies of 7 and 8 TeV. The following ratios of branching fractions are measured: B(Λ_{b}^{0}→χ_{c1}pK^{-})/B(Λ_{b}^{0}→J/ψpK^{-})=0.242±0.014±0.013±0.009,B(Λ_{b}^{0}→χ_{c2}pK^{-})/B(Λ_{b}^{0}→J/ψpK^{-})=0.248±0.020±0.014±0.009,B(Λ_{b}^{0}→χ_{c2}pK^{-})/B(Λ_{b}^{0}→χ_{c1}pK^{-})=1.02±0.10±0.02±0.05,where the first uncertainty is statistical, the second systematic, and the third due to the uncertainty on the branching fractions of the χ_{c1}→J/ψγ and χ_{c2}→J/ψγ decays. Using both decay modes, the mass of the Λ_{b}^{0} baryon is also measured to be m_{Λ_{b}^{0}}=5619.44±0.28±0.26  MeV/c^{2}, where the first and second uncertainties are statistical and systematic, respectively.

  11. Functional analysis of the kinome of the wheat scab fungus Fusarium graminearum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chenfang Wang

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available As in other eukaryotes, protein kinases play major regulatory roles in filamentous fungi. Although the genomes of many plant pathogenic fungi have been sequenced, systematic characterization of their kinomes has not been reported. The wheat scab fungus Fusarium graminearum has 116 protein kinases (PK genes. Although twenty of them appeared to be essential, we generated deletion mutants for the other 96 PK genes, including 12 orthologs of essential genes in yeast. All of the PK mutants were assayed for changes in 17 phenotypes, including growth, conidiation, pathogenesis, stress responses, and sexual reproduction. Overall, deletion of 64 PK genes resulted in at least one of the phenotypes examined, including three mutants blocked in conidiation and five mutants with increased tolerance to hyperosmotic stress. In total, 42 PK mutants were significantly reduced in virulence or non-pathogenic, including mutants deleted of key components of the cAMP signaling and three MAPK pathways. A number of these PK genes, including Fg03146 and Fg04770 that are unique to filamentous fungi, are dispensable for hyphal growth and likely encode novel fungal virulence factors. Ascospores play a critical role in the initiation of wheat scab. Twenty-six PK mutants were blocked in perithecia formation or aborted in ascosporogenesis. Additional 19 mutants were defective in ascospore release or morphology. Interestingly, F. graminearum contains two aurora kinase genes with distinct functions, which has not been reported in fungi. In addition, we used the interlog approach to predict the PK-PK and PK-protein interaction networks of F. graminearum. Several predicted interactions were verified with yeast two-hybrid or co-immunoprecipitation assays. To our knowledge, this is the first functional characterization of the kinome in plant pathogenic fungi. Protein kinase genes important for various aspects of growth, developmental, and infection processes in F. graminearum were

  12. Estimating the arterial input function from dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI data with compensation for flow enhancement (II): Applications in spine diagnostics and assessment of crohn's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Schie, Jeroen J. N.; Lavini, Cristina; van Vliet, Lucas J.; Kramer, Gem; Pieters-van den Bos, Indra; Marcus, J. T.; Stoker, Jaap; Vos, Frans M.

    2017-01-01

    Pharmacokinetic (PK) models can describe microvascular density and integrity. An essential component of PK models is the arterial input function (AIF) representing the time-dependent concentration of contrast agent (CA) in the blood plasma supplied to a tissue. To evaluate a novel method for

  13. The Duffy binding protein (PkDBPαII) of Plasmodium knowlesi from Peninsular Malaysia and Malaysian Borneo show different binding activity level to human erythrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Khai Lone; Amir, Amirah; Lau, Yee Ling; Fong, Mun Yik

    2017-08-11

    The zoonotic Plasmodium knowlesi is a major cause of human malaria in Malaysia. This parasite uses the Duffy binding protein (PkDBPαII) to interact with the Duffy antigen receptor for chemokines (DARC) receptor on human and macaque erythrocytes to initiate invasion. Previous studies on P. knowlesi have reported distinct Peninsular Malaysia and Malaysian Borneo PkDBPαII haplotypes. In the present study, the differential binding activity of these haplotypes with human and macaque (Macaca fascicularis) erythrocytes was investigated. The PkDBPαII of Peninsular Malaysia and Malaysian Borneo were expressed on the surface of COS-7 cells and tested with human and monkey erythrocytes, with and without anti-Fy6 (anti-Duffy) monoclonal antibody treatment. Binding activity level was determined by counting the number of rosettes formed between the transfected COS-7 cells and the erythrocytes. Anti-Fy6 treatment was shown to completely block the binding of human erythrocytes with the transfected COS-7 cells, thus verifying the specific binding of human DARC with PkDBPαII. Interestingly, the PkDBPαII of Peninsular Malaysia displayed a higher binding activity with human erythrocytes when compared with the Malaysian Borneo PkDBPαII haplotype (mean number of rosettes formed = 156.89 ± 6.62 and 46.00 ± 3.57, respectively; P < 0.0001). However, no difference in binding activity level was seen in the binding assay using M. fascicularis erythrocytes. This study is the first report of phenotypic difference between PkDBPαII haplotypes. The biological implication of this finding is yet to be determined. Therefore, further studies need to be carried out to determine whether this differential binding level can be associated with severity of knowlesi malaria in human.

  14. Lesions inflammatory activity quantification in multiple sclerosis using [{sup 11}C]-(R)-PK11195 PET brain images; Quantificacao da atividade inflamatoria em lesoes na esclerose multipla usando imagens PET cerebrais com [{sup 11}C]-(R)-PK11195

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schuck, Phelipi N.; Narciso, Lucas D.L.; Dartora, Caroline M.; Silva, Ana M. Marques da, E-mail: phelipi.schuck@acad.pucrs.br [Pontificia Universidade Catolica do Rio Grande do Sul (PUC-RS), Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil). Nucleo de Pesquisa em Imagens Medicas

    2016-07-01

    The criteria for multiple sclerosis (MS) diagnosis include the presence of lesions in brain regions called black holes (BH), characterized by low signal on magnetic resonance imaging T1-weighted. Studies suggest that lesions in MS, if there is an inflammatory process, can be detected in PET imaging with [{sup 11}C]- (R)-PK11195. The aim of this study is to investigate the uptake of [{sup 11}C]-(R)-PK11195 in BH in PET images, searching for inflammation activity in lesions and neighborhoods. Semiquantitative methods of SUV and uptake normalization were applied to PET images, in different time intervals, acquired from 8 MS patients and 5 healthy controls. Higher uptake was identified in BH and its edges, when compared with health controls white matter, when the SUV method is applied (p < 0,01, 40 to 60 min). When uptake normalization method is applied, smaller uptake in black holes and its your edges is observed, when compared with white matter apparently healthy (p < 0,01, 0 to 60 min). (author)

  15. Increasing the reach of the PK-3R continuous Miner; Desarrollo y Ensayo de un Sistema para aumentar el alcance de la Pina de Rozado en un Minador PK-3R

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-12-01

    The objective of this project is the development and implementation of a system designed to increase the reach of the cutting head of a PK-3R continuous miner working in our coal operations. Justification for the project stems from our method of coal extraction, whereby once the sub-level gallery has been advanced to it`s limit, extraction of the coal is undertaken by retreat mining, using a room and pillar method. In this method the roof is blasted to allow greater coal recovery. Due to it`s short length, the original position of the cutting arm of the PK-3R miner did not permit the total recovery of the blasted coal piled up on the gallery floor. Therefore an increase in the reach of the arm is very beneficial, facilitating the recovery of coal that previously could not be recovered. The system also permits excavation for support methods to be undertaken more rapidly, and a better adaptation of the miner to the irregularities of the wall, thus permitting it to move up or down more quickly, reducing the movements required. The system has not caused significant breakdowns, and the availability of the miner is good. In addition, the substitution of the turret in the case of a breakdown is an easy task, as during the design stage, the ease of mounting and dismounting the turret was considered as a fundamental parameter. (Author)

  16. Multiconformation, Density Functional Theory-Based pKa Prediction in Application to Large, Flexible Organic Molecules with Diverse Functional Groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bochevarov, Art D; Watson, Mark A; Greenwood, Jeremy R; Philipp, Dean M

    2016-12-13

    We consider the conformational flexibility of molecules and its implications for micro- and macro-pK a . The corresponding formulas are derived and discussed against the background of a comprehensive scientific and algorithmic description of the latest version of our computer program Jaguar pK a , a density functional theory-based pK a predictor, which is now capable of acting on multiple conformations explicitly. Jaguar pK a is essentially a complex computational workflow incorporating research and technologies from the fields of cheminformatics, molecular mechanics, quantum mechanics, and implicit solvation models. The workflow also makes use of automatically applied empirical corrections which account for the systematic errors resulting from the neglect of explicit solvent interactions in the algorithm's implicit solvent model. Applications of our program to large, flexible organic molecules representing several classes of functional groups are shown, with a particular emphasis in illustrations laid on drug-like molecules. It is demonstrated that a combination of aggressive conformational search and an explicit consideration of multiple conformations nearly eliminates the dependence of results on the initially chosen conformation. In certain cases this leads to unprecedented accuracy, which is sufficient for distinguishing stereoisomers that have slightly different pK a values. An application of Jaguar pK a to proton sponges, the pK a of which are strongly influenced by steric effects, showcases the advantages that pK a predictors based on quantum mechanical calculations have over similar empirical programs.

  17. Population PK/PD model of homocysteine concentrations after high-dose methotrexate treatment in patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hauke Rühs

    Full Text Available Elevated homocysteine concentrations have been associated with methotrexate-induced neurotoxicity. Based on methotrexate and homocysteine plasma concentrations of 494 children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia treated with high-dose methotrexate in the TOTAL XV study, a pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK/PD model was built with NONMEM. Several compartment and indirect response models were investigated. The pharmacokinetic disposition of methotrexate was best described by a two-compartment model. Homocysteine concentrations were included by an indirect response model where methotrexate inhibition of the homocysteine elimination rate was described by an E(max model. The homocysteine baseline level was found to be age-dependent. Simulations revealed that folinate rescue therapy does not affect peak concentrations of homocysteine but leads to a modestly reduced homocysteine exposure. In conclusion, our PK/PD model describes the increase of methotrexate-induced HCY concentrations with satisfactory precision and can be applied to assess the effect of folinate regimens on the HCY concentration-time course.

  18. Lesions inflammatory activity quantification in multiple sclerosis using ["1"1C]-(R)-PK11195 PET brain images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schuck, Phelipi N.; Narciso, Lucas D.L.; Dartora, Caroline M.; Silva, Ana M. Marques da

    2016-01-01

    The criteria for multiple sclerosis (MS) diagnosis include the presence of lesions in brain regions called black holes (BH), characterized by low signal on magnetic resonance imaging T1-weighted. Studies suggest that lesions in MS, if there is an inflammatory process, can be detected in PET imaging with ["1"1C]- (R)-PK11195. The aim of this study is to investigate the uptake of ["1"1C]-(R)-PK11195 in BH in PET images, searching for inflammation activity in lesions and neighborhoods. Semiquantitative methods of SUV and uptake normalization were applied to PET images, in different time intervals, acquired from 8 MS patients and 5 healthy controls. Higher uptake was identified in BH and its edges, when compared with health controls white matter, when the SUV method is applied (p < 0,01, 40 to 60 min). When uptake normalization method is applied, smaller uptake in black holes and its your edges is observed, when compared with white matter apparently healthy (p < 0,01, 0 to 60 min). (author)

  19. Standard PK/PD concepts can be applied to determine a dosage regimen for a macrolide: the case of tulathromycin in the calf.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toutain, P-L; Potter, T; Pelligand, L; Lacroix, M; Illambas, J; Lees, P

    2017-01-01

    The pharmacokinetic (PK) profile of tulathromycin, administered to calves subcutaneously at the dosage of 2.5 mg/kg, was established in serum, inflamed (exudate), and noninflamed (transudate) fluids in a tissue cage model. The PK profile of tulathromycin was also established in pneumonic calves. For Mannheimia haemolytica and Pasteurella multocida, tulathromycin minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC) were approximately 50 times lower in calf serum than in Mueller-Hinton broth. The breakpoint value of the PK/pharmacodynamic (PD) index (AUC (0-24 h) /MIC) to achieve a bactericidal effect was estimated from in vitro time-kill studies to be approximately 24 h for M. haemolytica and P. multocida. A population model was developed from healthy and pneumonic calves and, using Monte Carlo simulations, PK/PD cutoffs required for the development of antimicrobial susceptibility testing (AST) were determined. The population distributions of tulathromycin doses were established by Monte Carlo computation (MCC). The computation predicted a target attainment rate (TAR) for a tulathromycin dosage of 2.5 mg/kg of 66% for M. haemolytica and 87% for P. multocida. The findings indicate that free tulathromycin concentrations in serum suffice to explain the efficacy of single-dose tulathromycin in clinical use, and that a dosage regimen can be computed for tulathromycin using classical PK/PD concepts. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Survey of Quantification and Distance Functions Used for Internet-based Weak-link Sociological Phenomena

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-01

    1967), pp. 360–363. [6] M. Benzi, E. Estrada, and C. Klymko, Ranking hubs and authorities using matrix functions, Linear Algebra and its Applications...PageRank, Linear Algebra Appl. 386 (2004) 51-65. [26] R.H. Keshavan, A. Montanari, and S. Oh. Matrix completion from a few entries. IEEE Transactions on...P1 = 1/N , Pk+1 = GPk, ∀k = 1, 2, · · · (5) until the difference of Pk+1 and Pk within a given tolerance. For an elementary explanation of Google

  1. Systemic injection of kainic acid: Gliosis in olfactory and limbic brain regions quantified with [3H]PK 11195 binding autoradiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Altar, C.A.; Baudry, M.

    1990-01-01

    Neurodegenerative diseases may result from excessive stimulation of excitatory amino acid receptors by endogenous ligands. Because neuronal degeneration is associated with glial proliferation and hypertrophy, the degenerative changes throughout rat brain following the systemic administration of kainic acid (12 mg/kg) were mapped with quantitative autoradiography of [3H]PK 11195. This radioligand binds to a mitochondrial benzodiazepine binding site (MBBS) on microglia and astrocytes. Analysis of eight horizontal and four coronal brain levels revealed up to 16-fold increases in [3H]PK 11195 binding from 1 to 5 weeks but not 1 day after kainate injection. Increases in [3H]PK 11195 binding were predominantly in ventral limbic brain regions and olfactory projections to neocortical areas, with the olfactory cortex greater than subiculum/CA1 greater than anterior olfactory nucleus, medial thalamic nucleus, and piriform cortex greater than cingulate cortex and rostral hippocampus greater than dentate gyrus, septum, and amygdala greater than entorhinal cortex and temporal cortex. Little or no enhancement of [3H]PK 11195 binding was observed in numerous regions including the caudate-putamen, substantia nigra, nucleus accumbens, olfactory tubercle, cerebellum, thalamic nuclei, choroid plexus, medulla, parietal or occipital cortex, or pons. A 2-fold greater extent of neurodegeneration was obtained in ventral portions of the olfactory bulb, entorhinal cortex, temporal cortex, and dentate gyrus compared with the dorsal portions of these structures. The pattern of increase in [3H]PK 11195 binding closely matched the patterns of neuronal degeneration reported following parenteral kainate injection. These findings strengthen the notion that quantitative autoradiography of [3H]PK 11195 is a valuable tool to quantify the extent of neuronal degeneration

  2. A phenylalanine ammonia-lyase ortholog (PkPAL1) from Picrorhiza kurrooa Royle ex. Benth: molecular cloning, promoter analysis and response to biotic and abiotic elicitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhat, Wajid Waheed; Razdan, Sumeer; Rana, Satiander; Dhar, Niha; Wani, Tariq Ahmad; Qazi, Parvaiz; Vishwakarma, Ram; Lattoo, Surrinder K

    2014-09-01

    Picrorhiza kurrooa Royle ex Benth. is a highly reputed medicinal herb utilised in the preparation of a number of herbal drug formulations, principally due to the presence of novel monoterpene iridoid glycosides kenned as picrosides. Phenylalanine ammonia-lyase catalyses an important rate-limiting step in phenylpropanoid pathway and supplies precursors like cinnamic acid, vanillic acid, ferulic acid, etc., to a variety of secondary metabolites including picrosides. The imperilled status of P. kurrooa coupled with lack of information regarding biogenesis of picrosides necessitates deciphering the biosynthetic pathway for picrosides. In the present study, a PAL gene, designated PkPAL1 was isolated from P. kurrooa. The cDNA is 2312 bp in length, consisting of an ORF of 2142 bp encoding for a 713 amino acid protein having a predicted molecular weight of 77.66 kDa and an isoelectric point of pH 6.82. qRT-PCR analysis of various tissues of P. kurrooa showed that PkPAL1 transcript levels were highest in the leaves, consistent with picroside accumulation pattern. Using Genome walking, a 718 bp promoter region was also isolated resulting in identification of distinct cis-regulatory elements including TGA-element, TGACG-motif, CGTCA-motif, etc. qRT-PCR indicated up-regulation of PkPAL1 by methyl jasmonate, salicylic acid, 2,4-dicholorophenoxy acetic acid and UV-B elicitations that corroborated positively with the identified cis-elements within the promoter region. Moreover, altitude was found to have a positive effect on the PkPAL1 transcript levels, driving the expression of PkPAL1 abundantly. Based on docking analysis, we identified eight residues as potentially essential for substrate binding in PkPAL1. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Tacrolimus Updated Guidelines through popPK Modeling: How to Benefit More from CYP3A Pre-emptive Genotyping Prior to Kidney Transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Baptiste Woillard

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Tacrolimus (Tac is a profoundly effective immunosuppressant that reduces the risk of rejection after solid organ transplantation. However, its use is hampered by its narrow therapeutic window along with its highly variable pharmacological (pharmacokinetic [PK] and pharmacodynamic [PD] profile. Part of this variability is explained by genetic polymorphisms affecting the metabolic pathway. The integration of CYP3A4 and CY3A5 genotype in tacrolimus population-based PK (PopPK modeling approaches has been proven to accurately predict the dose requirement to reach the therapeutic window. The objective of the present study was to develop an accurate PopPK model in a cohort of 59 kidney transplant patients to deliver this information to clinicians in a clear and actionable manner. We conducted a non-parametric non-linear effects PopPK modeling analysis in Pmetrics®. Patients were genotyped for the CYP3A4∗22 and CYP3A5∗3 alleles and were classified into 3 different categories [poor-metabolizers (PM, Intermediate-metabolizers (IM or extensive-metabolizers (EM]. A one-compartment model with double gamma absorption route described very accurately the tacrolimus PK. In covariate analysis, only CYP3A genotype was retained in the final model (Δ-2LL = -73. Our model estimated that tacrolimus concentrations were 33% IC95%[20–26%], 41% IC95%[36–45%] lower in CYP3A IM and EM when compared to PM, respectively. Virtually, we proved that defining different starting doses for PM, IM and EM would be beneficial by ensuring better probability of target concentrations attainment allowing us to define new dosage recommendations according to patient CYP3A genetic profile.

  4. Improving Dispersion and Barrier Properties of Polyketone/Graphene Nanoplatelet Composites via Noncovalent Functionalization Using Aminopyrene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Jaehyun; Jeon, Ikseong; Kim, Seong Yun; Lim, Soonho; Jho, Jae Young

    2017-08-23

    A series of polyketone (PK) nanocomposite films with varying content of noncovalently functionalized graphene nanoplatelet with 1-aminopyrene (GNP/APy) is prepared by solution blending with a solvent of hexafluoro-2-propanol. GNP/APy, prepared by a facile method, can effectively induce specific interaction such as hydrogen bonding between the amine functional group of GNP/APy and the carbonyl functional group of the PK matrix. With comparison of GNP and GNP/Py as reference materials, intensive investigation on filler-matrix interaction is achieved. In addition, the dispersion state of the functionalized GNP (f-GNPs; GNP/Py and GNP/APy) in the PK matrix is analyzed by three-dimensional nondestructive X-ray microcomputed tomography, and the increased dispersion state of those fillers results in significant improvement in the water vapor transmission rate (WVTR). The enhancement in WVTR of the PK/GNP/APy nanocomposite film at 1 wt % loading of filler leads to a barrier performance approximately 2 times larger compared to that of PK/GNP nanocomposite film and an approximately 92% reduction in WVTR compared to the case of pristine PK film. We expect that this facile method of graphene functionalization to enhance graphene dispersibility as well as interfacial interaction with the polymer matrix will be widely utilized to expand the potential of graphene materials to barrier film applications.

  5. Transport of S-cysteine conjugates in LL-PK1 cells and its role in toxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schaeffer, V.; Stevens, J.

    1986-01-01

    In order to study its role in S-cysteine conjugate toxicity, the transport of the nephrotoxic cysteine conjugate, S-1,2-dichlorovinyl-L-cysteine (L-DCVC), was investigated in the kidney cell line, LLC-PK1. When incubated with [ 35 S]-DCVC, accumulation of radioactivity within the cells was linear for at least 5 min with 92% of the 35 S present as unmetabolized L-DCVC. Kinetic analysis indicated two saturable uptake systems; Km = 6.8 μM and 1.6 mM; V/sub max/ = .048 and 1.4 nmol/min/mg protein. Both systems were Na + -independent and were inhibited by amino acid transport system L substrates but not substrates of systems A, ASC or organic anion transport. L-DCVC uptake at 5 μM and 500 μM was significantly greater in subconfluent cells than in confluent cultures by 5 and 2.8 fold, respectively. The presence of the non-toxic conjugates S-methyl-(SMC), S-ethyl-(SEC), S-benzyl-L- cysteine (SBC) and the D isomer of DCVC blocked the toxicity and inhibited the transport of L-DCVC in LLC-PK1 cells in the rank order of SBC > SEC congruent to D-DCVC > SMC. The metabolism of L-DCVC, previously shown to be required for cytotoxicity, was only slightly inhibited by these conjugates and did not correlate with their relative protection against toxicity. This study suggests that L-DCVC is transported into these cells by the system L transporter and that protection against toxicity by non-toxic S-cysteine conjugates is due to the inhibition of transport

  6. Widespread Dependence of Backup NHEJ on Growth State: Ramifications for the Use of DNA-PK Inhibitors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, Satyendra K.; Wu Wenqi; Zhang Lihua; Klammer, Holger; Wang Minli; Iliakis, George

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The backup pathway of nonhomologous end joining (B-NHEJ) enables cells to process DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) when the DNA-PK-dependent pathway of NHEJ (D-NHEJ) is compromised. Our previous results show marked reduction in the activity of B-NHEJ when LIG4 -/- mouse embryo fibroblasts (MEFs) cease to grow and enter a plateau phase. The dependence of B-NHEJ on growth state is substantially stronger than that of D-NHEJ and points to regulatory mechanisms or processing determinants that require elucidation. Because the different D-NHEJ mutants show phenotypes distinct in their details, it is necessary to characterize the dependence of their DSB repair capacity on growth state and to explore species-specific responses. Methods and Materials: DSB repair was measured in cells of different genetic background from various species using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, or the formation of γ-H2AX foci, at different stages of growth. Results: Using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, we report a marked reduction of B-NHEJ during the plateau phase of growth in KU and XRCC4, mouse or Chinese hamster, mutants. Notably, this reduction is only marginal in DNA-PKcs-deficient cells. However, reduced B-NHEJ is also observed in repair proficient, plateau-phase cells after treatment with DNA-PK inhibitors. The reduction of B-NHEJ activity in the plateau phase of growth does not derive from the reduced expression of participating proteins, is detectable by γ-H2AX foci analysis, and leads to enhanced cell killing. Conclusions: These results further document the marked dependence on growth state of an essential DSB repair pathway and show the general nature of the effect. Molecular characterization of the mechanism underlying this response will help to optimize the administration of DNA repair inhibitors as adjuvants in radiation therapy.

  7. DNA-PK dependent targeting of DNA-ends to a protein complex assembled on matrix attachment region DNA sequences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mauldin, S.K.; Getts, R.C.; Perez, M.L.; DiRienzo, S.; Stamato, T.D.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: We find that nuclear protein extracts from mammalian cells contain an activity that allows DNA ends to associate with circular pUC18 plasmid DNA. This activity requires the catalytic subunit of DNA-PK (DNA-PKcs) and Ku since it was not observed in mutants lacking Ku or DNA-PKcs but was observed when purified Ku/DNA-PKcs was added to these mutant extracts. Competition experiments between pUC18 and pUC18 plasmids containing various nuclear matrix attachment region (MAR) sequences suggest that DNA ends preferentially associate with plasmids containing MAR DNA sequences. At a 1:5 mass ratio of MAR to pUC18, approximately equal amounts of DNA end binding to the two plasmids were observed, while at a 1:1 ratio no pUC18 end-binding was observed. Calculation of relative binding activities indicates that DNA-end binding activities to MAR sequences was 7 to 21 fold higher than pUC18. Western analysis of proteins bound to pUC18 and MAR plasmids indicates that XRCC4, DNA ligase IV, scaffold attachment factor A, topoisomerase II, and poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase preferentially associate with the MAR plasmid in the absence or presence of DNA ends. In contrast, Ku and DNA-PKcs were found on the MAR plasmid only in the presence of DNA ends. After electroporation of a 32P-labeled DNA probe into human cells and cell fractionation, 87% of the total intercellular radioactivity remained in nuclei after a 0.5M NaCl extraction suggesting the probe was strongly bound in the nucleus. The above observations raise the possibility that DNA-PK targets DNA-ends to a repair and/or DNA damage signaling complex which is assembled on MAR sites in the nucleus

  8. Overexpression of pig selenoprotein S blocks OTA-induced promotion of PCV2 replication by inhibiting oxidative stress and p38 phosphorylation in PK15 cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gan, Fang; Hu, Zhihua; Huang, Yu; Xue, Hongxia; Huang, Da; Qian, Gang; Hu, Junfa; Chen, Xingxiang; Wang, Tian; Huang, Kehe

    2016-01-01

    Porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2) is the primary cause of porcine circovirus disease, and ochratoxin A (OTA)-induced oxidative stress promotes PCV2 replication. In humans, selenoprotein S (SelS) has antioxidant ability, but it is unclear whether SelS affects viral infection. Here, we stably transfected PK15 cells with pig pCDNA3.1-SelS to overexpress SelS. Selenium (Se) at 2 or 4 μM and SelS overexpression blocked the OTA-induced increases of PCV2 DNA copy number and infected cell numbers. SelS overexpression also increased glutathione (GSH), NF-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) mRNA, and γ-glutamyl-cysteine synthetase mRNA levels; decreased reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels; and inhibited p38 phosphorylation in PCV2-infected PK15 cells, regardless of OTA treatment. Buthionine sulfoximine reversed all of the above SelS-induced changes. siRNA-mediated SelS knockdown decreased Nrf2 mRNA and GSH levels, increased ROS levels, and promoted PCV2 replication in OTA-treated PK15 cells. These data indicate that pig SelS blocks OTA-induced promotion of PCV2 replication by inhibiting the oxidative stress and p38 phosphorylation in PK15 cells. PMID:26943035

  9. Optimal transfection methods and comparison of PK-15 and Dulac cells for rescue of chimeric porcine circovirus type 1-2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jizong; Yu, Tianqi; Zhou, Jinzhu; Tu, Wei; Gao, Song; Liu, Xiufan

    2014-11-01

    A chimeric porcine circovirus type 1-2 (PCV1-2) infectious DNA clone has low transfection efficiency and exhibits low levels of proliferation. Electroporation and lipofection parameters were optimized for PK-15 and Dulac cells with the purpose of increasing the efficiency for rescuing infectious PCV1-2. Titers of PCV1-2 in Dulac cells were 100-fold higher than those in PK-15 cells following transfection. The electroporation efficiency into Dulac cells was high when three 400 μs pulses at 250 V with 6 μg of plasmid DNA was used, lipofection efficiency was high when the ratio of DNA to transfection reagent was 1:3. The proportion of infected cells was 55.6% compared with 44.2%, for the electroporation and lipofection techniques respectively. Virus titers were higher in Dulac cells, from 10(4.44) to 10(5.32)TCID50/mL compared with 10(1.90)-10(3.38)TCID(50)/mL for PK-15 cells. Dulac cells were more permissive to PCV1-2 than PK-15 cells regardless of the transfection technique. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Antioxidative effects of fermented sesame sauce against hydrogen peroxide-induced oxidative damage in LLC-PK1 porcine renal tubule cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Jia-Le; Choi, Jung-Ho; Seo, Jae-Hoon; Kil, Jeung-Ha

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES This study was performed to investigate the in vitro antioxidant and cytoprotective effects of fermented sesame sauce (FSeS) against hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-induced oxidative damage in renal proximal tubule LLC-PK1 cells. MATERIALS/METHODS 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH), hydroxyl radical (•OH), and H2O2 scavenging assay was used to evaluate the in vitro antioxidant activity of FSeS. To investigate the cytoprotective effect of FSeS against H2O2-induced oxidative damage in LLC-PK1 cells, the cellular levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS), lipid peroxidation, and endogenous antioxidant enzymes including catalase (CAT), superoxide dismutase (SOD), and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-px) were measured. RESULTS The ability of FSeS to scavenge DPPH, •OH and H2O2 was greater than that of FSS and AHSS. FSeS also significantly inhibited H2O2-induced (500 µM) oxidative damage in the LLC-PK1 cells compared to FSS and AHSS (P sauces, FSeS also significantly increased cellular CAT, SOD, and GSH-px activities and mRNA expression (P < 0.05). CONCULUSIONS These results from the present study suggest that FSeS is an effective radical scavenger and protects against H2O2-induced oxidative damage in LLC-PK1 cells by reducing ROS levels, inhibiting lipid peroxidation, and stimulating antioxidant enzyme activity. PMID:24741396

  11. Predictive performance of two PK-PD models of D2 receptor occupancy of the antipsychotics risperidone and paliperidone in rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kozielska, Magdalena; Johnson, Martin; Pilla Reddy, Venkatesh; Vermeulen, An; de Greef, Rik; Li, Cheryl; Grimwood, Sarah; Liu, Jing; Groothuis, Genoveva; Danhof, Meindert; Proost, Johannes

    2010-01-01

    Objectives: The level of dopamine D2 receptor occupancy is predictive of efficacy and safety in schizophrenia. Population PK-PD modelling has been used to link observed plasma and brain concentrations to receptor occupancy. The objective of this study was to compare the predictive performance of two

  12. Differential effect of detergents on [3H]Ro 5-4864 and [3H]PK 11195 binding to peripheral-type benzodiazepine-binding sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Awad, M.; Gavish, M.

    1988-01-01

    The present study demonstrates a differential effect of various detergent treatments on [ 3 H]Ro 5-4864 and [ 3 H]PK 11195 binding to peripheral benzodiazepine binding sites (PBS). Triton X-100 caused a decrease of about 70% in [ 3 H]Ro 5-4864 binding to membranes from various peripheral tissues of rat, but had only a negligible effect on [ 3 H]PK 11195 binding. A similar effect of Triton X-100 was observed on guinea pig and rabbit kidney membranes. The decrease in [ 3 H]Ro 5-4864 binding after treatment with Triton X-100 was apparently due to a decrease in the density of PBS, since the affinity remained unaltered. The detergents 3-[(3-cholamidopropyl)-dimethylammonio]-1-propane sulfonate (CHAPS), Tween 20, deoxycholic acid, or digitonin (0.0125%) caused only a minor change in [ 3 H]Ro 5-4864 and [ 3 H]PK 11195 binding to rat kidney membranes; but when concentrations were substantially increased (0.1%), all detergents caused a decrease of at least 50% in [ 3 H]Ro 5-4864 binding, while [ 3 H]PK 11195 binding to rat kidney membranes remained unaffected by the first three detergents, with only a minor decrease (15%) after treatment with digitonin

  13. Biomass Yield and N Uptake in Tall Fescue and Reed Canary Grass Depending on N and PK Fertilization on Two Marginal Sites in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ugilt Larsen, Søren; Jørgensen, Uffe; Lærke, Poul Erik

    2016-01-01

    areas with limited suitability for cereal production. Plots with TF and RCG were sown in April 2011, and fertilization trials were established in spring 2012 with three factors: (a) grass species, (b) PK fertilization (either no P and K or 24 and 250 kg ha−1 y−1 of P and K, respectively), and (c) N...... fertilization (0, 150, 300, or 450 kg ha−1 y−1 N). Three cuts were taken annually from 2012 to 2014. Both species responded strongly to N fertilization. In TF, 450 kg ha−1 y−1 N combined with PK fertilization gave DM yields of 19.3, 12.1, and 14.2 t ha−1 y−1 in the 3 years, respectively, and corresponding...... yields for RCG were 17.3, 14.4, and 14.3 t ha−1 y−1. Without PK fertilization yields were significantly lower: 15.2, 7.5, and 7.3 t ha−1 y−1 in TF and 16.3, 8.7, and 4.8 ha−1 y−1 in RCG. When fertilized with PK, N uptake in harvested biomass balanced with N fertilization at rates of 244, 187, and 172 kg...

  14. Cimetidine-induced Leydig cell apoptosis and reduced EG-VEGF (PK-1) immunoexpression in rats: Evidence for the testicular vasculature atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beltrame, Flávia L; Cerri, Paulo S; Sasso-Cerri, Estela

    2015-11-01

    The antiulcer drug cimetidine has shown to cause changes in the testicular microvasculature of adult rats. Since Leydig cells (LCs) produce the pro-angiogenic factor, EG-VEGF (endocrine gland-derived vascular endothelial growth factor), also known as prokineticin 1 (PK-1), this study examined the effect that cimetidine might have on LCs in testes with damaged vasculature. Rats received intraperitoneal injections of 100mg/kg of cimetidine (cimetidine group) or saline vehicle (control group) for 50 days. Serum testosterone levels were measured by chemiluminescence immunoassay and testicular sections were subjected to TUNEL and immunohistochemical reactions for caspase-3, 17β-HSD6, CD163 (ED2 macrophage), PK-1 and androgen receptor (AR). LCs in the cimetidine group showed TUNEL and caspase-3 positive labeling and apoptotic ultrastructural features. Moreover, the presence of 17β-HSD6-positive inclusions inside macrophages and the reduced number of LCs, AR immunoreactivity and serum testosterone levels correlated with a decrease in either the number of PK-1-immunostained LCs or PK-1 immunoreactivity. Although it is not clear which cell type is the primary target of cimetidine in the testicular interstitial compartment, these findings support a direct link between cimetidine-induced testicular vascular atrophy and LCs damage. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. [18F]DPA-714: direct comparison with [11C]PK11195 in a model of cerebral ischemia in rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hervé Boutin

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Neuroinflammation is involved in several brain disorders and can be monitored through expression of the translocator protein 18 kDa (TSPO on activated microglia. In recent years, several new PET radioligands for TSPO have been evaluated in disease models. [(18F]DPA-714 is a TSPO radiotracer with great promise; however results vary between different experimental models of neuroinflammation. To further examine the potential of [(18F]DPA-714, it was compared directly to [(11C]PK11195 in experimental cerebral ischaemia in rats. METHODS: Under anaesthesia, the middle cerebral artery of adult rats was occluded for 60 min using the filament model. Rats were allowed recovery for 5 to 7 days before one hour dynamic PET scans with [(11C]PK11195 and/or [(18F]DPA-714 under anaesthesia. RESULTS: Uptake of [(11C]PK11195 vs [(18F]DPA-714 in the ischemic lesion was similar (core/contralateral ratio: 2.84±0.67 vs 2.28±0.34 respectively, but severity of the brain ischemia and hence ligand uptake in the lesion appeared to vary greatly between animals scanned with [(11C]PK11195 or with [(18F]DPA-714. To solve this issue of inter-individual variability, we performed a direct comparison of [(11C]PK11195 and [(18F]DPA-714 by scanning the same animals sequentially with both tracers within 24 h. In this direct comparison, the core/contralateral ratio (3.35±1.21 vs 4.66±2.50 for [(11C]PK11195 vs [(18F]DPA-714 respectively showed a significantly better signal-to-noise ratio (1.6 (1.3-1.9, 95%CI fold by linear regression for [(18F]DPA-714. CONCLUSIONS: In a clinically relevant model of neuroinflammation, uptake for both radiotracers appeared to be similar at first, but a high variability was observed in our model. Therefore, to truly compare tracers in such models, we performed scans with both tracers in the same animals. By doing so, our result demonstrated that [(18F]DPA-714 displayed a higher signal-to-noise ratio than [(11C]PK11195. Our results suggest

  16. [18F]DPA-714: Direct comparison with [11C]PK11195 in a model of cerebral ischemia in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boutin, Herve; Prenant, Christian; Smigova, Alison; Cawthorne, Christopher; Brown, Gavin; Herholz, Karl; Maroy, Renaud; Galea, James; Greenhalgh, Andrew D.; Rothwell, Nancy J.; Julyan, Peter; Wilkinson, Shane M.; Banister, Samuel D.; Kassiou, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Neuro-inflammation is involved in several brain disorders and can be monitored through expression of the translocator protein 18 kDa (TSPO) on activated micro-glia. In recent years, several new PET radioligands for TSPO have been evaluated in disease models. [ 18 F]DPA-714 is a TSPO radiotracer with great promise; however results vary between different experimental models of neuro-inflammation. To further examine the potential of [ 18 F]DPA-714, it was compared directly to [ 11 C]PK11195 in experimental cerebral ischaemia in rats. Under anaesthesia, the middle cerebral artery of adult rats was occluded for 60 min using the filament model. Rats were allowed recovery for 5 to 7 days before one hour dynamic PET scans with [ 11 C]PK11195 and/or [ 18 F]DPA-714 under anaesthesia. Uptake of [ 11 C]PK11195 vs [ 18 F]DPA-714 in the ischemic lesion was similar (core/contralateral ratio: 2.8460.67 vs 2.2860.34 respectively), but severity of the brain ischemia and hence ligand uptake in the lesion appeared to vary greatly between animals scanned with [ 11 C]PK11195 or with [ 18 F]DPA-714. To solve this issue of inter-individual variability, we performed a direct comparison of [ 11 C]PK11195 and [ 18 F]DPA-714 by scanning the same animals sequentially with both tracers within 24 h. In this direct comparison, the core/contralateral ratio (3.3561.21 vs 4.6662.50 for [ 11 C]PK11195 vs [ 18 F]DPA-714 respectively) showed a significantly better signal-to-noise ratio (1.6 (1.3-1.9, 95%CI) fold by linear regression) for [ 18 F]DPA-714. In a clinically relevant model of neuro-inflammation, uptake for both radiotracers appeared to be similar at first, but a high variability was observed in our model. Therefore, to truly compare tracers in such models, we performed scans with both tracers in the same animals. By doing so, our result demonstrated that [ 18 F]DPA-714 displayed a higher signal-to-noise ratio than [ 11 C]PK11195. Our results suggest that, with the longer half-life of [ 18 F

  17. Concordant and opposite roles of DNA-PK and the "facilitator of chromatin transcription" (FACT in DNA repair, apoptosis and necrosis after cisplatin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Calkins Anne S

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Platinum-containing chemotherapy produces specific DNA damage and is used to treat several human solid tumors. Tumors initially sensitive to platinum-based drugs frequently become resistant. Inhibition of DNA repair is a potential strategy to enhance cisplatin effectiveness. After cisplatin treatment, a balance between repair and apoptosis determines whether cancer cells proliferate or die. DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK binds to DNA double strand breaks (DSBs through its Ku subunits and initiates non-homologous end joining. Inhibition of DNA-PK sensitizes cancer cells to cisplatin killing. The goal of this study is to elucidate the mechanism underlying the effects of DNA-PK on cisplatin sensitivity. Results Silencing the expression of the catalytic subunit of DNA-PK (DNA-PKcs increased sensitivity to cisplatin and decreased the appearance of γH2AX after cisplatin treatment. We purified DNA-PK by its Ku86 subunit and identified interactors by tandem mass spectrometry before and after cisplatin treatment. The structure specific recognition protein 1 (SSRP1, Spt16 and γH2AX appeared in the Ku86 complex 5 hours after cisplatin treatment. SSRP1 and Spt16 form the facilitator of chromatin transcription (FACT. The cisplatin-induced association of FACT with Ku86 and γH2AX was abrogated by DNase treatment. In living cells, SSRP1 and Ku86 were recruited at sites of DSBs induced by laser beams. Silencing SSRP1 expression increased sensitivity to cisplatin and decreased γH2AX appearance. However, while silencing SSRP1 in cisplatin-treated cells increased both apoptosis and necrosis, DNA-PKcs silencing, in contrast, favored necrosis over apoptosis. Conclusions DNA-PK and FACT both play roles in DNA repair. Therefore both are putative targets for therapeutic inhibition. Since DNA-PK regulates apoptosis, silencing DNA-PKcs redirects cells treated with cisplatin toward necrosis. Silencing FACT however, allows both apoptosis and

  18. Model based population PK-PD analysis of furosemide for BP lowering effect: A comparative study in primary and secondary hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukla, Mahendra; Ibrahim, Moustafa M A; Jain, Moon; Jaiswal, Swati; Sharma, Abhisheak; Hanif, Kashif; Lal, Jawahar

    2017-11-15

    Though numerous reports have demonstrated multiple mechanisms by which furosemide can exert its anti-hypertensive response. However, lack of studies describing PK-PD relationship for furosemide featuring its anti-hypertensive property has limited its usage as a blood pressure (BP) lowering agent. Serum concentrations and mean arterial BP were monitored following 40 and 80mgkg -1 multiple oral dose of furosemide in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) and DOCA-salt induced hypertensive (DOCA-salt) rats. A simultaneous population PK-PD relationship using E max model with effect compartment was developed to compare the anti-hypertensive efficacy of furosemide in these rat models. A two-compartment PK model with Weibull-type absorption and first-order elimination best described the serum concentration-time profile of furosemide. In the present study, post dose serum concentrations of furosemide were found to be lower than the EC 50 . The EC 50 predicted in DOCA-salt rats was found to be lower (4.5-fold), whereas the tolerance development was higher than that in SHR model. The PK-PD parameter estimates, particularly lower values of EC 50 , K e and Q in DOCA-salt rats as compared to SHR, pinpointed the higher BP lowering efficacy of furosemide in volume overload induced hypertensive conditions. Insignificantly altered serum creatinine and electrolyte levels indicated a favorable side effect profile of furosemide. In conclusion, the final PK-PD model described the data well and provides detailed insights into the use of furosemide as an anti-hypertensive agent. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  19. Development of Na+-dependent hexose transport in cultured renal epithelial cells (LLC-PK1)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weiss, E.R.; Amsler, K.; Dawson, W.D.; Cook, J.S.

    1984-01-01

    A number of factors were explored to analyze how they interact to yield the increasing transport capacity in differentiating cell populations. These factors include the number of functional transporters in the population, the distribution of these transporters among the individual cells, the Na + chemical gradient, the transmembrane potential, the pathways and activities of these pathways for efflux of glucoside, and cell-cell coupling between accumulating and non-accumulating cells. 35 references, 9 figures, 2 tables

  20. Vectorial transport of unconjugated and conjugated bile salts by monolayers of LLC-PK1 cells doubly transfected with human NTCP and BSEP or with rat Ntcp and Bsep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mita, Sachiko; Suzuki, Hiroshi; Akita, Hidetaka; Hayashi, Hisamitsu; Onuki, Reiko; Hofmann, Alan F; Sugiyama, Yuichi

    2006-03-01

    Na(+)-taurocholate-cotransporting peptide (NTCP)/SLC10A1 and bile salt export pump (BSEP)/ABCB11 synergistically play an important role in the transport of bile salts by the hepatocyte. In this study, we transfected human NTCP and BSEP or rat Ntcp and Bsep into LLC-PK1 cells, a cell line devoid of bile salts transporters. Transport by these cells was characterized with a focus on substrate specificity between rats and humans. The basal to apical flux of taurocholate across NTCP- and BSEP-expressing LLC-PK1 monolayers was 10 times higher than that in the opposite direction, whereas the flux across the monolayer of control and NTCP or BSEP single-expressing cells did not show any vectorial transport. The basal to apical flux of taurocholate was saturated with a K(m) value of 20 microM. Vectorial transcellular transport was also observed for cholate, chenodeoxycholate, ursodeoxycholate, their taurine and glycine conjugates, and taurodeoxycholate and glycodeoxycholate, whereas no transport of lithocholate was detected. To evaluate the respective functions of NTCP and BSEP and to compare them with those of rat Ntcp and Bsep, we calculated the clearance by each transporter in this system. A good correlation in the clearance of the examined bile salts (cholate, chenodeoxycholate, ursodeoxycholate, and their taurine or glycine conjugates) was observed between transport by human and that of rat transporters in terms of their rank order: for NTCP, taurine conjugates > glycine conjugates > unconjugated bile salts, and for BSEP, unconjugated bile salts and glycine conjugates > taurine conjugates. In conclusion, the substrate specificity of human and rat NTCP and BSEP appear to be very similar at least for monovalent bile salts under physiological conditions.

  1. Urinary Excretion of Tetrodotoxin Modeled in a Porcine Renal Proximal Tubule Epithelial Cell Line, LLC-PK1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takuya Matsumoto

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available This study examined the urinary excretion of tetrodotoxin (TTX modeled in a porcine renal proximal tubule epithelial cell line, LLC-PK1. Time course profiles of TTX excretion and reabsorption across the cell monolayers at 37 °C showed that the amount of TTX transported increased linearly for 60 min. However, at 4 °C, the amount of TTX transported was approximately 20% of the value at 37 °C. These results indicate that TTX transport is both a transcellular and carrier-mediated process. Using a transport inhibition assay in which cell monolayers were incubated with 50 µM TTX and 5 mM of a transport inhibitor at 37 °C for 30 min, urinary excretion was significantly reduced by probenecid, tetraethylammonium (TEA, l-carnitine, and cimetidine, slightly reduced by p-aminohippuric acid (PAH, and unaffected by 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium (MPP+, oxaliplatin, and cefalexin. Renal reabsorption was significantly reduced by PAH, but was unaffected by probenecid, TEA and l-carnitine. These findings indicate that TTX is primarily excreted by organic cation transporters (OCTs and organic cation/carnitine transporters (OCTNs, partially transported by organic anion transporters (OATs and multidrug resistance-associated proteins (MRPs, and negligibly transported by multidrug and toxic compound extrusion transporters (MATEs.

  2. DNA-PK/Ku complex binds to latency-associated nuclear antigen and negatively regulates Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus latent replication

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cha, Seho [Department of Life Science, Dongguk Univ-Seoul, Seoul 100-715 (Korea, Republic of); Lim, Chunghun [Department of Biological Sciences, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jae Young [Department of Life Science, Dongguk Univ-Seoul, Seoul 100-715 (Korea, Republic of); Song, Yoon-Jae [Department of Life Science, Kyungwon University, Seongnam-Si, Kyeonggi-Do 461-701 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Junsoo [Division of Biological Science and Technology, Yonsei University, Wonju 220-100 (Korea, Republic of); Choe, Joonho [Department of Biological Sciences, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of); Seo, Taegun, E-mail: tseo@dongguk.edu [Department of Life Science, Dongguk Univ-Seoul, Seoul 100-715 (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-04-16

    During latent infection, latency-associated nuclear antigen (LANA) of Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) plays important roles in episomal persistence and replication. Several host factors are associated with KSHV latent replication. Here, we show that the catalytic subunit of DNA protein kinase (DNA-PKcs), Ku70, and Ku86 bind the N-terminal region of LANA. LANA was phosphorylated by DNA-PK and overexpression of Ku70, but not Ku86, impaired transient replication. The efficiency of transient replication was significantly increased in the HCT116 (Ku86 +/-) cell line, compared to the HCT116 (Ku86 +/+) cell line, suggesting that the DNA-PK/Ku complex negatively regulates KSHV latent replication.

  3. DNA-PK/Ku complex binds to latency-associated nuclear antigen and negatively regulates Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus latent replication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cha, Seho; Lim, Chunghun; Lee, Jae Young; Song, Yoon-Jae; Park, Junsoo; Choe, Joonho; Seo, Taegun

    2010-01-01

    During latent infection, latency-associated nuclear antigen (LANA) of Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) plays important roles in episomal persistence and replication. Several host factors are associated with KSHV latent replication. Here, we show that the catalytic subunit of DNA protein kinase (DNA-PKcs), Ku70, and Ku86 bind the N-terminal region of LANA. LANA was phosphorylated by DNA-PK and overexpression of Ku70, but not Ku86, impaired transient replication. The efficiency of transient replication was significantly increased in the HCT116 (Ku86 +/-) cell line, compared to the HCT116 (Ku86 +/+) cell line, suggesting that the DNA-PK/Ku complex negatively regulates KSHV latent replication.

  4. PK11195 binding to the peripheral benzodiazepine receptor as a marker of microglia activation in multiple sclerosis and experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vowinckel, E; Reutens, D; Becher, B

    1997-01-01

    Activated glial cells are implicated in regulating and effecting the immune response that occurs within the CNS as part of multiple sclerosis (MS) and its animal model experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). The peripheral benzodiazepine receptor (PBR) is expressed in glial cells. We...... examined the utility of using in vitro and in vivo ligand binding to the PBR as a measure of lesion activity in autoimmune CNS demyelinating diseases. Applying a combined autoradiography and immunohistochemical approach to spinal cord and brain tissues from mice with EAE, we found a correlation at sites...... of inflammatory lesions between [3H]-PK11195 binding and immunoreactivity for the activated microglial/macrophage marker Mac-1/CD11b. In MS tissues, [3H]-PK11195 binding correlated with sites of immunoreactivity for the microglial/macrophage marker CD68, at the edges of chronic active plaques. Positron emission...

  5. Prediction of brain target site concentrations on the basis of CSF PK : impact of mechanisms of blood-to-brain transport and within brain distribution

    OpenAIRE

    Westerhout, J.

    2014-01-01

    In the development of drugs for the treatment of central nervous system (CNS) disorders, the prediction of human CNS drug action is a big challenge. Direct measurement of brain extracellular fluid (brainECF) concentrations is highly restricted in human. Therefore, unbound drug concentrations in human cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) are used as a surrogate for human brainECF concentrations. Due to qualitative and quantitative differences in processes that govern the pharmacokinetics (PK) of drugs in...

  6. Assessing the relative potency of (S)- and (R)-warfarin with a new PK-PD model, in relation to VKORC1 genotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrari, Myriam; Pengo, Vittorio; Barolo, Massimiliano; Bezzo, Fabrizio; Padrini, Roberto

    2017-06-01

    The purpose of this study is to develop a new pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic (PK-PD) model to characterise the contribution of (S)- and (R)-warfarin to the anticoagulant effect on patients in treatment with rac-warfarin. Fifty-seven patients starting warfarin (W) therapy were studied, from the first dose and during chronic treatment at INR stabilization. Plasma concentrations of (S)- and (R)-W and INRs were measured 12, 36 and 60 h after the first dose and at steady state 12-14 h after dosing. Patients were also genotyped for the G>A VKORC1 polymorphism. The PK-PD model assumed a linear relationship between W enantiomer concentration and INR and included a scaling factor k to account for a different potency of (R)-W. Two parallel compartment chains with different transit times (MTT 1 and MTT 2 ) were used to model the delay in the W effect. PD parameters were estimated with the maximum likelihood approach. The model satisfactorily described the mean time-course of INR, both after the initial dose and during long-term treatment. (R)-W contributed to the rac-W anticoagulant effect with a potency of about 27% that of (S)-W. This effect was independent of VKORC1 genotype. As expected, the slope of the PK/PD linear correlation increased stepwise from GG to GA and from GA to AA VKORC1 genotype (0.71, 0.90 and 1.49, respectively). Our PK-PD linear model can quantify the partial pharmacodynamic activity of (R)-W in patients contemporaneously exposed to therapeutic (S)-W plasma levels. This concept may be useful in improving the performance of future algorithms aiming at identifying the most appropriate W maintenance dose.

  7. Naxos disease in an Arab family is not caused by the Pk2157del2 mutation; evidance for exclusion of the plakoglobin gene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stuhmann, M.; El-Harith, A.; Bukhari, Iqbal A.

    2004-01-01

    Nax os disease is a rare hereditary disorder characterized by palmoplantar keratoderma, woolly hair and cardiomyopathy. This study aims to determine whether Naxos disease in a Saudi Arab family is caused by the Pk2157del2 mutation that was identified in Greek families from Naxos Island where the disease had originally been described. This study was undertaken at King Fahad Hospital of the University, Al-Khobar, and the Medical University of Hannover, in the spring of 2003. Naxos disease has been encountered in a 2-year-old girl and her 30-year-old aunt of a Saudi Arab family. Deoxyribonucleic acid samples of this family were analyzed by polymerase chain-reaction (PCR) amplification of the respective region of the plakoglobin gene, and direct nucleotide sequencing of the PCR-products. Segregation analysis was performed employing the newly detected IVS11+22G/A polymorphism. Molecular genetic analysis of the DNA sample of the child diagnosed with Naxos disease showed absence of the Pk2157del2 mutation. In addition, the segregation analysis revealed heterozygosity for IVS11+22G/A in the affected girl. Absence of the Pk2157del2 frameshift in the affected child proved that Naxos disease in this Saudi Arab family is not caused by the same mutation that was identified in the Greek families. Furthermore, heterozygosity for the IVS11+22G/A polymorphism provided evidence for exclusion of the plakoglobin gene in this consanguineous family. (author)

  8. Measurement of $CP$ asymmetries in $\\Lambda_{b}^{0} \\to pK^{-}$ and $\\Lambda_{b}^{0} \\to p\\pi^-$ decays at LHCb

    CERN Document Server

    Ferrari, F

    2016-01-01

    The LHCb experiment has been designed to perform precision measurements in the flavour physics sector at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The measurement of the CP-violating observable defined as ΔACP = ACP (Λ0b → pK − ) − ACP (Λ0b → pπ − ), where ACP (Λ0b → pK − ) and ACP (Λ0b → pπ − ) are the direct CP asymmetries in Λ0b → pK − and Λ0b → pπ − decays, is presented for the first time using LHCb data. Using the full 2011 and 2012 data sets of pp collisions collected with the LHCb detector, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of about 3 fb −1, the value ΔACP = (0.8 ± 2.1 ± 0.2)% is obtained. The first uncertainty is statistical and the second corresponds to one of the dominant systematic effects. As the result is compatible with zero, no evidence of CP violation is found. This is the most precise measurement of CP violation in the decays of baryons containing the b quark to date. Once the analysis will be completed with an exhaustive study of systematic uncertainti...

  9. Pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic (PK-PD) modeling and the rational selection of dosage regimes for the prudent use of antimicrobial drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papich, Mark G

    2014-07-16

    One of the strategies to decrease inappropriate antimicrobial use in veterinary medicine is to apply pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic (PK-PD) principles to dosing regimens. If antimicrobials are used appropriately by applying these principles to attain targets for area-under-the-curve to MIC ratio (AUC/MIC), peak concentration to MIC ratio (CMAX/MIC), and time above MIC (T>MIC), more effective antibiotic therapy is possible, thus avoiding ineffective administration. Another mechanism whereby inappropriate antibiotic administration can be avoided is to use accurate Interpretive Criteria established by the Clinical Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) for breakpoint selection. Inaccurate breakpoints will encourage antibiotic administration that is likely to be ineffective. For newly approved antimicrobials, three criteria are used for determining breakpoints: PK-PD criteria, MIC distributions, and clinical response. For older (often generic drugs) evaluated by the CLSI, recent clinical data may not be available and breakpoints are derived from PK-PD principles, wild-type distributions, and Monte Carlo simulations. It is the goal of the CLSI subcommittee that these revised breakpoints will encourage more effective antimicrobial use and avoid unnecessary antimicrobial administration. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Increased cerebral (R-[11C]PK11195 uptake and glutamate release in a rat model of traumatic brain injury: a longitudinal pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lammertsma Adriaan A

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aim of the present study was to investigate microglia activation over time following traumatic brain injury (TBI and to relate these findings to glutamate release. Procedures Sequential dynamic (R-[11C]PK11195 PET scans were performed in rats 24 hours before (baseline, and one and ten days after TBI using controlled cortical impact, or a sham procedure. Extracellular fluid (ECF glutamate concentrations were measured using cerebral microdialysis. Brains were processed for histopathology and (immuno-histochemistry. Results Ten days after TBI, (R-[11C]PK11195 binding was significantly increased in TBI rats compared with both baseline values and sham controls (p -1 as compared with the sham procedure (6.4 ± 3.6 μmol·L-1. Significant differences were found between TBI and sham for ED-1, OX-6, GFAP, Perl's, and Fluoro-Jade B. Conclusions Increased cerebral uptake of (R-[11C]PK11195 ten days after TBI points to prolonged and ongoing activation of microglia. This activation followed a significant acute posttraumatic increase in ECF glutamate levels.

  11. Pro-apoptotic effect of a Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae putative type I signal peptidase on PK(15) swine cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paes, Jéssica A; Virginio, Veridiana G; Cancela, Martín; Leal, Fernanda M A; Borges, Thiago J; Jaeger, Natália; Bonorino, Cristina; Schrank, Irene S; Ferreira, Henrique B

    2017-03-01

    Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae is an economically significant swine pathogen that causes porcine enzootic pneumonia (PEP). Important processes for swine infection by M. hyopneumoniae depend on cell surface proteins, many of which are secreted by secretion pathways not completely elucidated so far. A putative type I signal peptidase (SPase I), a possible component of a putative Sec-dependent pathway, was annotated as a product of the sipS gene in the pathogenic M. hyopneumoniae 7448 genome. This M. hyopneumoniae putative SPase I (MhSPase I) displays only 14% and 23% of sequence identity/similarity to Escherichia coli bona fide SPase I, and, in complementation assays performed with a conditional E. coli SPase I mutant, only a partial restoration of growth was achieved with the heterologous expression of a recombinant MhSPase I (rMhSPase I). Considering the putative surface location of MhSPase I and its previously demonstrated capacity to induce a strong humoral response, we then assessed its potential to elicit a cellular and possible immunomodulatory response. In assays for immunogenicity assessment, rMhSPase I unexpectedly showed a cytotoxic effect on murine splenocytes. This cytotoxic effect was further confirmed using the swine epithelial PK(15) cell line in MTT and annexin V-flow cytometry assays, which showed that rMhSPase I induces apoptosis in a dose dependent-way. It was also demonstrated that this pro-apoptotic effect of rMhSPase I involves activation of a caspase-3 cascade. The potential relevance of the rMhSPase I pro-apoptotic effect for M. hyopneumoniae-host interactions in the context of PEP is discussed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Generation of static PET images with [{sup 11}C]-(R)-PK11195: Defining time interval; Geração de imagens PET Estáticas com [{sup 11}C]-(R)-PK11195: definição do intervalo temporal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schuck, Phelipi Nunes; Dartora, Caroline Machado; Silva, Ana Maria Marques da, E-mail: phelipi.schuck@acad.pucrs.br [Pontificia Universidade catolica do Rio Grande do Sul (PUC-RS), Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil). Núcleo de Pesquisa em Imagens Médicas

    2017-07-01

    [{sup 11}C]-(R)-PK11195 radiotracer shows microglia affinity in PET images and can be used as neuro inflammatory disease indicator, such as in Multiple Sclerosis (MS). There is no consensus about appropriate time interval to generate static PET images with [{sup 11}C]-(R)-PK11195. The aim of this study is to define the most appropriate time interval to generate static brain PET images with [{sup 11}C]-(R)-PK11195 for quantification. For this study, images from 10 remittent-recurrent MS patients and 5 healthy controls were used. Static images were generated from list-mode dynamic acquisition in the following time intervals: 0-60min, 5-20min, 5-30min, 10-60min, 30-60min e 40-60min. The ratio between SUV mean of juxtacortical and periventricular regions and normal appearing white matter, denominated SUVR{sup WM}, was used for image quantification. Results shown high variation in time intervals that include radiotracer perfusion. SUVRWM higher stability was observed in two time intervals (30-60min and 40-60min), for both control and MS patients groups. In conclusion, the best acquisition time interval to generate static PET images for quantification is from 40 to 60 minutes after administration, meaning an image acquired 40 minutes after [{sup 11}C]-(R)-PK11195 injection, during 20 min. (author)

  13. Eficiência e efeito residual de biofertilizantes de rochas com PK e enxofre com Acidithiobacillus em alface Efficiency and residual effect of PK rock biofertilizers with sulfur and Acidithiobacillus on lettuce

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rita de Cássia Matias de Lima

    2007-09-01

    PB2 and KB2 and 150% the recommended level PB3 and KB3 for SSP and KCl and a control treatment with no P and K (P0K0. The experimental design was a factorial 5² in the randomized block, with four replicates. There was similar performance of the PK rock biofertilizers compared to the mineral fertilizers, especially when the level BP2BK3 was applied. The consecutive crop showed residual effect on lettuce yield (fresh shoot biomass, height, number of leaves, commercial evaluation, and P and K accumulation on shoot dry biomass. The results suggest that P and K rock biofertilizers may be used as an alternative in mineral fertilization.

  14. Another Class of Perfect Nonlinear Polynomial Functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Menglong Su

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Perfect nonlinear (PN functions have been an interesting subject of study for a long time and have applications in coding theory, cryptography, combinatorial designs, and so on. In this paper, the planarity of the trinomials xpk+1+ux2+vx2pk over GF(p2k are presented. This class of PN functions are all EA-equivalent to x2.

  15. Effects of the benzodiazepine antagonists RO 15-1788, CGS-8216 and PK-11195 on amygdaloid kindled seizures and the anticonvulsant efficacy of diazepam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albertson, T E; Walby, W F

    1986-11-01

    The anticonvulsant effectiveness of the benzodiazepine antagonists RO 15-1788, CGS-8216 and PK-11195 were evaluated against threshold and suprathreshold (400 microA) stimulation in fully amygdaloid-kindled rats. Pretreatment with either RO 15-1788 (3, 10 and 30 mg/kg), CGS-8216 (3, 10 and 30 mg/kg) or PK-11195 (10 and 60 mg/kg) failed in this study to modify consistently either the afterdischarge thresholds or elicited suprathreshold seizures or duration of afterdischarge. Using a double injection paradigm, the effectiveness of these three benzodiazepine antagonists to reverse the anti-convulsant and behavioral effects of diazepam were studied. When diazepam (3 mg/kg) was injected 15 min before or after a second injection of the vehicle control DMSO (0.25 ml/kg), a significant reduction in the duration of afterdischarge and seizure rank, elicited by a suprathreshold stimulation in amygdaloid-kindled rats, occurred. When either CGS 8216 (10 mg/kg) or RO 15-1788 (10 mg/kg) were given 15 min before diazepam (3 mg/kg) prior to stimulation, the anticonvulsant properties of diazepam were blocked. When RO 15-1788 (10 mg/kg) was given 15 min after diazepam, antagonism of the anticonvulsant effects on diazepam was shown. However, when either CGS-8216 (10 mg/kg) or PK-11195 (10 and 60 mg/kg) were given 15 min after diazepam (3 mg/kg), the anticonvulsant properties of diazepam were not blocked. The anticonvulsant effects of diazepam were reversed when CGS-8216 (10 mg/kg) was given 5 min after diazepam (3 mg/kg) or when a larger dose (30 mg/kg) was given at the same 15 min interval.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  16. Preclinical PK/PD model for combined administration of erlotinib and sunitinib in the treatment of A549 human NSCLC xenograft mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jing-Yun; Ren, Yu-Peng; Yuan, Yin; Ji, Shuang-Min; Zhou, Shu-Pei; Wang, Li-Jie; Mou, Zhen-Zhen; Li, Liang; Lu, Wei; Zhou, Tian-Yan

    2016-07-01

    Combined therapy of EGFR TKI and VEGFR TKI may produce a greater therapeutic benefit and overcome EGFR TKI-induced resistance. However, a previous study shows that a combination of EGFR TKI erlotinib (ER) with VEGFR TKI sunitinib (SU) did not improve the overall survival in patients with non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). In this study we examined the anticancer effect of ER, SU and their combination in the treatment of A549 human NSCLC xenograft mice, and conducted PK/PD modeling and simulations to optimize the dose regimen. ER (20, 50 mg·kg(-1)·d(-1)) or SU (5, 10, 20 mg·kg(-1)·d(-1)) alone, or their combination were administered to BALB/c nude mice bearing A549 tumors for 22 days. The tumor size and body weight were recorded daily. The experimental data were used to develop PK/PD models describing the quantitative relationship between the plasma concentrations and tumor suppression in different dose regimens. The models were further evaluated and validated, and used to predict the efficacy of different combination regimens and to select the optimal regimen. The in vivo anticancer efficacy of the combination groups was much stronger than that of either drug administered alone. A PK/PD model was developed with a combination index (φ) of 4.4, revealing a strong synergistic effect between ER and SU. The model simulation predicted the tumor growth in different dosage regimens, and showed that the dose of SU played a decisive role in the combination treatment, and suggested that a lower dose of ER (≤5 mg·kg(-1)·d(-1)) and adjusting the dose of SU might yield a better dosage regimen for clinical research. The experimental data and modeling confirm synergistic anticancer effect of ER and SU in the treatment of A549 xenograft mice. The optimal dosage regimen determined by the PK/PD modeling and simulation can be used in future preclinical study and provide a reference for clinical application.

  17. Medium pressure boiler water chemistry optimization using neutralizing amines mixture reagent AMINAT™ PK-2 at CEPP “Borovichi Refractories Plant” of JSC “BKO”

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guseva, O. V.; Butakova, M. V.; Orlov, K. A.; Vinogradov, S. V.; Pavlenko, L. S.

    2017-11-01

    An overview of the neutralizing amine based reagent AMINAT PK-2 usage for water chemistry of steam boilers for medium pressure boiler was given. Long term experiment showed that new reagent allows to decrease corrosion rate comparing with old water chemistry based on ammonia only. Two dosage schemes in different cycle places discussed. Scheme with two points on injection showed better results. Results of corrosion rates experiments and photos of tubes inner surfaces are presented. Based on fuel savings due to reducing scale formation the total annual economy for last year was 5.1 million Russian roubles.

  18. Proyecto del paso superior sobre la carretera M-503 y accesos. Enlace con Villanueva del Pardillo en el P.K. 3+290 (Madrid)

    OpenAIRE

    Alonso Placín, Alba

    2009-01-01

    El presente Proyecto tiene por objeto definir y valorar las obras necesarias para la construcción del paso superior sobre la carretera M-503 en el PK 3+290, entre el tramo comprendido entre la M-50 y la M-600, así como los accesos correspondientes desde las glorietas colindantes. La carretera sobre la que discurre el paso superior objeto de proyecto tiene previsto un desdoblamiento para soportar más capacidad, con lo cual se harán referencias en ciertos casos, a esta nueva c...

  19. Sequence specific DNA binding by P53 is enhanced by ionizing radiation and is mediated via DNA-PK activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kachnic, L.A.; Wunsch, H.; Mekeel, K.L.; De Frank, J.S.; Powell, S.N.

    1996-01-01

    ataxia-telangiectasia (A-T) cells. In parallel with the 3-fold increase in levels of p53 seen following IR in FC and FS cells, oligonucleotide binding increased greater than 20-fold in FC cells, and showed only a 3-fold increase in FS cells. Oligonucleotide binding by p53 is currently being measured in A-T cells. Conclusions: The sequence-specific binding of p53 is enhanced in response to ionizing radiation damage, above and beyond changes in the level of p53 protein. The scid gene product (p350, catalytic sub-unit of the DNA-dependent protein kinase, DNA-PK) appears to regulate the post translational modification of p53, presumably by phosphorylation. Confirmation of differences in phosphorylation between normal cells and scid cells is awaited, as are attempts to map the site of post-translational modification resulting in enhanced sequence-specific DNA binding

  20. Porcine proximal tubular cells (LLC-PK1) are able to tolerate high levels of lithium chloride in vitro: assessment of the influence of 1-20 mM LiCl on cell death and alterations in cell biology and biochemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas, Kirsten C; Hart, David A; Becker, Rolf W

    2010-01-25

    Lithium, a prophylactic drug for the treatment of bipolar disorder, is prescribed with caution due to its side effects, including renal damage. In this study porcine LLC-PK1 renal tubular cells were used to establish the direct toxicity of lithium on proximal cells and gain insights into the molecular mechanisms involved. In the presence of LiCl, cell proliferation exhibited insignificant decreases in a concentration-dependent manner, but once confluent, constant cell numbers were observed. Cell cycle studies indicated a small dose-dependent accumulation of cells in the G2/M stage after 24 h, as well as an increase in cells in the G0/G1 phase after treatment with 1-10 mM LiCl, but not at 20 mM LiCl. No evidence of apoptosis was observed based on cell morphology or DNA fragmentation studies, or evidence of protein expression changes for Bax, Bcl-2, and p53 proteins using immunocytochemistry. In addition caspases 3, 8 and 9 activity remained unaltered between control and lithium-treated cultures. To conclude, exposure to high concentrations of lithium did not result in overt toxic effects to LLC-PK1 renal cells, although LiCl did alter some aspects of cell behaviour, which could potentially influence function over time.

  1. Pharmacokinetics of enrofloxacin HCl-2H2O (ENRO-C) in dogs and PK/PD Monte Carlo simulations against Leptospira sp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumano, Hector; Ocampo, Luis; Tapia, Graciela; Mendoza, C de Jesus; Gutierrez, Lilia

    2018-04-12

    Pharmacokinetics/pharmacodynamics (PK/PD) ratios of reference enrofloxacin (Enro-R) and enrofloxacin as HCl-2H 2 O (Enro-C), as well as Monte Carlo simulations based on composite MIC 50 and MIC 90 vs. Leptospira sp., were carried out in dogs after their IM and oral administration (10 mg/kg). Plasma determination of enrofloxacin was achieved by means of high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Maximum plasma concentration values after oral administration were 1.47 ± 0.19 µg/mL and 5.3 ± 0.84 µg/mL for Enro-R and Enro-C, respectively, and 1.6 ± 0.12 µg/mL and 7.6 ± 0.93 µg/mL after IM administration. Area under the plasma vs. time concentrations in 24 h (AUC 0-24 ) were 8.02 µg/mL/h and 36.2 µg/mL/h for Enro-R oral and Enro-C oral , respectively, and 8.55 ± 0.85 µg/mL/h and 56.4 ± 6.21 µg/mL/h after IM administration of these drugs. Only PK/PD ratios and Monte Carlo simulations obtained with Enro-C, anticipate that its IM administration to dogs will result in therapeutic concentrations to treat leptospirosis. This is the first time enrofloxacin has been recommended to treat this disease in dogs.

  2. In Silico Absorption, Distribution, Metabolism, Excretion, and Pharmacokinetics (ADME-PK): Utility and Best Practices. An Industry Perspective from the International Consortium for Innovation through Quality in Pharmaceutical Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lombardo, Franco; Desai, Prashant V; Arimoto, Rieko; Desino, Kelly E; Fischer, Holger; Keefer, Christopher E; Petersson, Carl; Winiwarter, Susanne; Broccatelli, Fabio

    2017-11-22

    In silico tools to investigate absorption, distribution, metabolism, excretion, and pharmacokinetics (ADME-PK) properties of new chemical entities are an integral part of the current industrial drug discovery paradigm. While many companies are active in the field, scientists engaged in this area do not necessarily share the same background and have limited resources when seeking guidance on how to initiate and maintain an in silico ADME-PK infrastructure in an industrial setting. This work summarizes the views of a group of industrial in silico and experimental ADME scientists, participating in the In Silico ADME Working Group, a subgroup of the International Consortium for Innovation through Quality in Pharmaceutical Development (IQ) Drug Metabolism Leadership Group. This overview on the benefits, caveats, and impact of in silico ADME-PK should serve as a resource for medicinal chemists, computational chemists, and DMPK scientists working in drug design to increase their knowledge in the area.

  3. In vivo evaluation in mice and metabolism in blood of human volunteers of [123I]iodo-PK11195: a possible single-photon emission tomography tracer for visualization of inflammation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dumont, F.; Vos, F. de; Slegers, G.; Versijpt, J.; Jansen, H.M.L.; Dierckx, R.A.; Korf, J.

    1999-01-01

    We report the in vivo evaluation (biodistribution, displacement and metabolization in blood, brain and heart) in mice and the metabolism in blood of human volunteers of iodine-123 labelled 1-(2-iodophenyl)-N-methyl-N-(1-methyl-propyl)-3-isoquinoline carboxamide ([ 123 I]iodo-PK11195), a potential radioligand for visualization of inflammation in humans by single-photon emission tomography. In three series of 18 white mice (NMRI, 20-25 g), the concentration of radioactivity was measured during 48 h. Blood samples were taken, organs and intestines were excised, excretion was collected and all tissues were weighed and counted for radioactivity. The tissue uptake of radioactivity was measured as % of the injected activity/g of tissue. The excretion was expressed as % of the injected activity. Selective tissue uptake was investigated by pretreatment of another three series of 18 mice with cold PK11195 (1 mg/kg body weight). There was an inflow of [ 123 I]iodo-PK11195 in the brain and among peripheral organs, heart (42.3%), lungs (133.5%) and kidneys (18.4%) had the highest uptake. After pretreatment with cold PK11195, there was a decrease in accumulation in the latter three organs, especially in heart (ca. 55%) and lungs (ca. 80%). Metabolite analysis was performed using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). First, the extraction yield of [ 123 I]iodo-PK11195 from blood and tissue was assessed, and found to be >90%. From blank blood samples and organs spiked with [ 123 I]iodo-PK11195 it was concluded that no metabolization took place during the extraction procedure. Analysis of plasma, brain and heart of mice showed that 10 min p.i. [ 123 I]iodo-PK11195 was the only significant (ca. 95%) radioactive compound in brain and heart where-as in plasma other radioactive products (>60%) appeared. Analysis of plasma samples of the three human volunteers at 7, 20, 37 and 50 min p.i. showed that [ 123 I]iodo-PK11195 rapidly decomposes into two polar metabolites, which at

  4. Search for a narrow baryonic state decaying to ${pK^0_S}$ and ${\\overline{p}K^0_S}$ in deep inelastic scattering at HERA

    CERN Document Server

    Abramowicz, H.; Adamczyk, L.; Adamus, M.; Antonelli, S.; Aushev, V.; Behnke, O.; Behrens, U.; Bertolin, A.; Bhadra, S.; Bloch, I.; Boos, E.G.; Brock, I.; Brook, N.H.; Brugnera, R.; Bruni, A.; Bussey, P.J.; Caldwell, A.; Capua, M.; Catterall, C.D.; Chwastowski, J.; Ciborowski, J.; Ciesielski, R.; Cooper-Sarkar, A.M.; Corradi, M.; Dementiev, R.K.; Devenish, RCE; Dusini, S.; Foster, B.; Gach, G; Gallo, E.; Garfagnini, A.; Geiser, A.; Gizhko, A.; Gladilin, L.K.; Golubkov, Yu.A.; Grzelak, G.; Guzik, M.; Gwenlan, C.; Hain, W.; Hlushchenko, O.; Hochman, D.; Hori, R.; Ibrahim, Z.A.; Iga, Y.; Ishitsuka, M.; Januschek, F.; Jomhari, N.Z.; Kadenko, I.; Kananov, S.; Karshon, U.; Kaur, P.; Kisielewska, D.; Klanner, R.; Klein, U.; Korzhavina, I.A.; Kotański, A.; Kötz, U.; Kovalchuk, N.; Kowalski, H.; Krupa, B.; Kuprash, O.; Kuze, M; Levchenko, B.B.; Levy, A.; Limentani, S.; Lisovyi, M.; Lobodzinska, E.; Löhr, B.; Lohrmann, E.; Longhin, A.; Lontkovskyi, D.; Lukina, O.Yu.; Makarenko, I.; Malka, J.; Mastroberardino, A.; Mohamad Idris, F.; Mohammad Nasir, N; Myronenko, V.; Nagano, K.; Nobe, T.; Nowak, R.J.; Onishchuk, Yu.; Paul, E.; Perlański, W.; Pokrovskiy, N.S.; Polini, A.; Przybycien, M.; Roloff, P.; Ruspa, M.; Saxon, D.H.; Schioppa, M.; Schneekloth, U.; Schörner-Sadenius, T.; Shcheglova, L.M.; Shevchenko, R.; Shkola, O.; Shyrma, Yu.; Singh, I.; Skillicorn, I.O.; Słomiński, W.; Solano, A.; Stanco, L.; Stefaniuk, N.; Stern, A.; Stopa, P.; Sztuk-Dambietz, J.; Tassi, E.; Tokushuku, K.; Tomaszewska, J.; Tsurugai, T.; Turcato, M.; Turkot, O.; Tymieniecka, T.; Verbytskyi, A.; Wan Abdullah, W.A.T.; Wichmann, K.; Wing, M.; Yamada, S.; Yamazaki, Y.; Zakharchuk, N.; Żarnecki, A.F.; Zawiejski, L.; Zenaiev, O.; Zhautykov, B.O.; Zotkin, D.S.; Mastroberardino, A

    2016-08-10

    A search for a narrow baryonic state in the $pK^0_S$ and $\\overline{p}K^0_S$ system has been performed in $ep$ collisions at HERA with the ZEUS detector using an integrated luminosity of 358 pb$^{-1}$ taken in 2003-2007. The search was performed with deep inelastic scattering events at an $ep$ centre-of-mass energy of 318 GeV for exchanged photon virtuality, $Q^2$, between 20 and 100 $\\rm{} GeV^{2}$. Contrary to evidence presented for such a state around 1.52 GeV in a previous ZEUS analysis using a sample of 121 pb$^{-1}$ taken in 1996-2000, no resonance peak was found in the $p(\\overline{p})K^0_S$ invariant-mass distribution in the range 1.45-1.7 GeV. Upper limits on the production cross section are set.

  5. Complete genomic and transcriptional landscape analysis using third-generation sequencing: a case study of Saccharomyces cerevisiae CEN.PK113-7D

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jenjaroenpun, Piroon; Wongsurawat, Thidathip; Pereira, Rui

    2018-01-01

    Completion of eukaryal genomes can be difficult task with the highly repetitive sequences along the chromosomes and short read lengths of secondgeneration sequencing. Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain CEN. PK113-7D, widely used as a model organism and a cell factory, was selected for this study...... to demonstrate the superior capability of very long sequence reads for de novo genome assembly. We generated long reads using two common third-generation sequencing technologies (Oxford Nanopore Technology (ONT) and Pacific Biosciences (PacBio)) and used short reads obtained using Illumina sequencing for error...... correction. Assembly of the reads derived from all three technologies resulted in complete sequences for all 16 yeast chromosomes, as well as themitochondrial chromosome, in one step. Further, we identified three types of DNA methylation (5mC, 4mC and 6mA). Comparison between the reference strain S288C...

  6. Hsp27, Hsp70, and metallothionein in MDCK and LLC-PK1 renal epithelial cells: effects of prolonged exposure to cadmium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonham, Rita T.; Fine, Michael R.; Pollock, Fiona M.; Shelden, Eric A.

    2003-01-01

    Cadmium is a widely distributed industrial and environmental toxin. The principal target organ of chronic sublethal cadmium exposure is the kidney. In renal epithelial cells, acute high-dose cadmium exposure induces differential expression of proteins, including heat shock proteins. However, few studies have examined heat shock protein expression in cells after prolonged exposure to cadmium at sublethal concentrations. Here, we assayed total cell protein, neutral red uptake, cell death, and levels of metallothionein and heat shock proteins Hsp27 and inducible Hsp70 in cultures of MDCK and LLC-PK1 renal epithelial cells treated with cadmium for 3 days. Treatment with cadmium at concentrations equal to or greater than 10 μM (LLC-PK1) or 25 μM (MDCK) reduced measures of cell vitality and induced cell death. However, a concentration-dependent increase in Hsp27 was detected in both cell types treated with as little as 5 μM cadmium. Accumulation of Hsp70 was correlated only with cadmium treatment at concentrations also causing cell death. Metallothionein was maximally detected in cells treated with cadmium at concentrations that did not reduce cell vitality, and further increases were not detected at greater concentrations. These results reveal that heat shock proteins accumulate in renal epithelial cells during prolonged cadmium exposure, that cadmium induces differential expression of heat shock protein in epithelial cells, and that protein expression patterns in epithelial cells are specific to the cadmium concentration and degree of cellular injury. A potential role for Hsp27 in the cellular response to sublethal cadmium-induced injury is also implicated by our results

  7. [Pharmacokinetics/pharmacodinamic (PK/PD) evaluation of a short course of oral administration of metronidazole for the management of infections caused by Bacteroides fragilis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales-León, Felipe; von Plessing-Rossel, Carlos; Villa-Zapata, Lorenzo; Fernández-Rocca, Pola; Sanhueza-Sanhueza, Cindy; Bello-Toledo, Helia; Mella-Montecinos, Sergio

    2015-04-01

    Metronidazole is the antibiotic of choice for the management of infections caused by anaerobes. Its administration requires multiple daily doses causing increased medication errors. Due to its high post-antibiotic effect and rapid concentration-dependent bactericidal activity, administration of this antibiotic in an extended dosing interval would achieve PK/PD parameters effectively. To assess the probability of achieving effective PK/PD relationship with the administration of 1,000 mg every 24 hours of metronidazole for Bacteroides fragilis infections. A clinical trial was conducted in a group of volunteers who received a single oral dose of 500 or 1,000 mg of metronidazole. Determinations of values of Cmax, t max, and AUCC0-24 h. determined using the trapezoidal method, were obtained for a Markov simulation that would allow for determining the likelihood of achieving a AUC0-24 h/MIC ratio above 70 for infections caused by susceptible B. fragilis. Cmax (24,03 ± 6,89 mg/L) and t max (1,20 ± 0.80 hrs) and the value of AUC0-24 h (241.91 ± 48.14 mg * h/L) were determined. The probability of obtaining a AUC0-24 h/MIC ratio greater than 70 was greater than 99%. From a pharmacokinetic perspective, with the administration of a daily dose of 1,000 mg of metronidazole, it is possible to achieve a therapeutic goal of AUC0-24 h/MIC ratio above 70 for the treatment of anaerobic infections.

  8. Erythropoietin suppresses epithelial to mesenchymal transition and intercepts Smad signal transduction through a MEK-dependent mechanism in pig kidney (LLC-PK1) cell lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Chien-Liang; Chou, Kang-Ju; Lee, Po-Tsang; Chen, Ying-Shou; Chang, Tsu-Yuan; Hsu, Chih-Yang; Huang, Wei-Chieh; Chung, Hsiao-Min; Fang, Hua-Chang

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Tumor growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) plays a pivotal role in processes like kidney epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and interstitial fibrosis, which correlate well with progression of renal disease. Little is known about underlying mechanisms that regulate EMT. Based on the anatomical relationship between erythropoietin (EPO)-producing interstitial fibroblasts and adjacent tubular cells, we investigated the role of EPO in TGF-β1-mediated EMT and fibrosis in kidney injury. Methods: We examined apoptosis and EMT in TGF-β1-treated LLC-PK1 cells in the presence or absence of EPO. We examined the effect of EPO on TGF-β1-mediated Smad signaling. Apoptosis and cell proliferation were assessed with flow cytometry and hemocytometry. We used Western blotting and indirect immunofluorescence to evaluate expression levels of TGF-β1 signal pathway proteins and EMT markers. Results: We demonstrated that ZVAD-FMK (a caspase inhibitor) inhibited TGF-β1-induced apoptosis but did not inhibit EMT. In contrast, EPO reversed TGF-β1-mediated apoptosis and also partially inhibited TGF-β1-mediated EMT. We showed that EPO treatment suppressed TGF-β1-mediated signaling by inhibiting the phosphorylation and nuclear translocation of Smad 3. Inhibition of mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase 1 (MEK 1) either directly with PD98059 or with MEK 1 siRNA resulted in inhibition of EPO-mediated suppression of EMT and Smad signal transduction in TGF-β1-treated cells. Conclusions: EPO inhibited apoptosis and EMT in TGF-β1-treated LLC-PK1 cells. This effect of EPO was partially mediated by a mitogen-activated protein kinase-dependent inhibition of Smad signal transduction.

  9. [PK/PD breakpoints and clinical/bacteriological effects of cefcapene pivoxil fine granules for children at free drug concentrations in pediatric patients with respiratory infection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toyonaga, Yoshikiyo; Iwai, Naoichi; Motohiro, Takashi; Sunakawa, Keisuke; Fujii, Ryochi

    2008-06-01

    A post-marketing clinical study was previously conducted in pediatric patients with respiratory infection to evaluate the pharmacokinetics, efficacy and safety of cefcapene pivoxil (CFPN-PI) fine granules for children. Based on the results from this study, we evaluated PK/PD breakpoints and clinical/bacteriological effects of CFPN-PI at free drug concentrations in pediatric patients with respiratory infection to determine an effective and safe dosage regimen of CFPN-PI. The following results were obtained from 61 pediatric patients evaluated in our research. 1) The response rate of pediatric respiratory infection to CFPN-PI was 100% for laryngopharyngitis, 84.6% for acute bronchitis, 100% for tonsillitis, 100% for pneumonia and 95.8% for all. 2) The bacteriological response (eradication rate of Haemophilus influenzae, Streptococcus pyogenes, Moraxella catarrhalis, Streptococcus pneumoniae, etc.) of pediatric respiratory infection to CFPN-PI was 87.5% for laryngopharyngitis, 66.7% for acute bronchitis, 75.0% for tonsillitis, 63.6% for pneumonia and 73.8% for all. 3) The blood concentration simulation demonstrated that the PK/PD breakpoint exceeding the time above MIC (TAM) of 40% after administration of CFPN-PI 3 mg/kg three times daily was 0.27 microg/mL. 4) The pediatric patients with respiratory infection were stratified by the TAM (%) of CFPN-PI into 40% to 100% (TAM > or = 40% group) and 0% to 40% (TAM or = 40% group, and 88.9% and 62.5% in the TAM or = 40% group than in the TAM < 40% group, although the between-group difference was not statistically significant.

  10. Omega 3 (peripheral type benzodiazepine binding) site distribution in the rat immune system: an autoradiographic study with the photoaffinity ligand [3H]PK 14105

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benavides, J.; Dubois, A.; Dennis, T.; Hamel, E.; Scatton, B.

    1989-01-01

    The anatomical distribution of omega 3 (peripheral type benzodiazepine binding) sites in the immune system organs of the rat has been studied autoradiographically at both macroscopic and microscopic levels of resolution using either reversible or irreversible (UV irradiation) labeling with [ 3 H]PK 14105. In thymus sections, [ 3 H]PK 14105 labeled with high affinity (Kd, derived from saturation experiments = 10.8 nM) a single population of sites which possessed the pharmacological characteristics of omega 3 sites. In the thymus gland, higher omega 3 site densities were detected in the cortex than in the medulla; in these subregions, silver grains were associated to small (10-18 microns diameter) cells. In the spleen, omega 3 sites were more abundant in the white than in the red pulp. In the white pulp, silver grains were denser in the marginal zone than in the vicinity of the central artery and labeling was, as in the thymus, associated to small cytoplasm-poor cells. In the red pulp, omega 3 site associated silver grains were observed mainly in the Bilroth cords. In the lymph nodes, the medullary region showed a higher labeling than the surrounding follicles and paracortex. A significant accumulation of silver grains was observed in the lymph node medullary cords. In the intestine, Peyer patches were particularly enriched in omega 3 sites (especially in the periphery of the follicles). The distribution of omega 3 sites in the immune system organs suggests a preferential labeling of cells of T and monocytic lineages. This is consistent with the proposed immunoregulatory properties of some omega 3 site ligands

  11. Rescue of DNA-PK Signaling and T-Cell Differentiation by Targeted Genome Editing in a prkdc Deficient iPSC Disease Model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shamim H Rahman

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available In vitro disease modeling based on induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs provides a powerful system to study cellular pathophysiology, especially in combination with targeted genome editing and protocols to differentiate iPSCs into affected cell types. In this study, we established zinc-finger nuclease-mediated genome editing in primary fibroblasts and iPSCs generated from a mouse model for radiosensitive severe combined immunodeficiency (RS-SCID, a rare disorder characterized by cellular sensitivity to radiation and the absence of lymphocytes due to impaired DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK activity. Our results demonstrate that gene editing in RS-SCID fibroblasts rescued DNA-PK dependent signaling to overcome radiosensitivity. Furthermore, in vitro T-cell differentiation from iPSCs was employed to model the stage-specific T-cell maturation block induced by the disease causing mutation. Genetic correction of the RS-SCID iPSCs restored T-lymphocyte maturation, polyclonal V(DJ recombination of the T-cell receptor followed by successful beta-selection. In conclusion, we provide proof that iPSC-based in vitro T-cell differentiation is a valuable paradigm for SCID disease modeling, which can be utilized to investigate disorders of T-cell development and to validate gene therapy strategies for T-cell deficiencies. Moreover, this study emphasizes the significance of designer nucleases as a tool for generating isogenic disease models and their future role in producing autologous, genetically corrected transplants for various clinical applications.

  12. Cell surface acid-base properties of Escherichia coli and Bacillus brevis and variation as a function of growth phase, nitrogen source and C:N ratio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Yongsuk; Brown, Derick G

    2006-07-01

    Potentiometric titration has been conducted to systematically examine the acid-base properties of the cell surfaces of Escherichia coli K-12 and Bacillus brevis as a function of growth phase, nitrogen source (ammonium or nitrate), and carbon to nitrogen (C:N) ratio of the growth substrate. The two bacterial species revealed four distinct proton binding sites, with pK(a) values in the range of 3.08-4.05 (pK(1)), 4.62-5.57 (pK(2)), 6.47-7.30 (pK(3)), and 9.68-10.89 (pK(4)) corresponding to phosphoric/carboxylic, carboxylic, phosphoric, and hydroxyl/amine groups, respectively. Two general observations in the data are that for B. brevis the first site concentration (N(1)), corresponding to phosphoric/carboxylic groups (pK(1)), varied as a function of nitrogen source, while for E. coli the fourth site concentration (N(4)), corresponding to hydroxyl/amine groups (pK(4)), varied as a function of C:N ratio. Correspondingly, it was found that N(1) was the highest of the four site concentrations for B. brevis and N(4) was the highest for E. coli. The concentrations of the remaining sites showed little variation. Finally, comparison between the titration data and a number of cell surface compositional studies in the literature indicates one distinct difference between the two bacteria is that pK(4) of the Gram-negative E. coli can be attributed to hydroxyl groups while that of the Gram-positive B. brevis can be attributed to amine groups.

  13. Comparison of autologous 111In-leukocytes, 18F-FDG, 11C-methionine, 11C-PK11195 and 68Ga-citrate for diagnostic nuclear imaging in a juvenile porcine haematogenous Staphylococcus aureus osteomyelitis model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Ole L.; Afzelius, Pia; Bender, Dirk

    characterized as abscesses/cellulitis, arthritis in three joints and five enlarged lymph nodes. None of the tracers accumulated in joints with arthritis. By comparing the 10 infectious lesions, 18F-FDG accumulated in nine, 111In-leukocytes in eight, 11C-methionine in six, 68Ga-citrate in four and 11C-PK11195...

  14. Halogenated benzimidazole inhibitors of phosphorylation, ''in vitro'' and ''in vivo'', of the surface acidic proteins of the yeast ribosomal 60S subunit by endogenous protein kinases CK-II and PK60S

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szyszka, Ryszard; Boguszewska, Aleksandra; Grankowski, Nikodem; Shugar, David

    1996-01-01

    Several halogeno benzimidazoles and 2-azabenzimidazoles, previously shown to be relatively selective inhibitors of protein kinases CK-I and/or CK-II from various sources, including CK-II from yeast [Szyszka et al. (1995) Biochem. Biophys. Res. Commun. 208, 418-424] inhibit also the yeast ribosomal protein kinase PK60S. The most effective inhibitor of CK-II and PK60S was tetrabromo-2-azabenzimidazole (TetraBr-2-azaBz), which was competitive with respect to ATP (and GTP in the case of CK-II) with K i values of 0.7 μM for CK-II, and 0.1 μM for PK60S. PK60S phosphorylates only three (YP1β, YB1β', YP2α) out of five polypeptides of pp13 kDa acidic proteins of 60S subunit phosphorylated by CK-II [Szyszka et al. (1995) Acta Biochim. Polon. 42, 357-362]. Accordingly, TetraBr-azaBz inhibits phosphorylation only of these polypeptides, catalysed by PK60S. Addition of TetraBr-2Bz to cultures of yeast cells, at concentrations which were without effect on cell growth, led to inhibition of intracellular phosphorylation of ribosomal acidic proteins, paralleling that observed ''in vitro''. TetraBr-2-azaBz is shown to be a useful tool for studies on the intracellular regulation of phosphorylation of the ribosomal 60S acidic proteins, which are involved in formation of active ribosomes. (author). 36 refs, 4 figs, 2 tabs

  15. Transcellular transport of radioiodinated 3-iodo-α-methyl-L-tyrosine across monolayers of kidney epithelial cell line LLC-PK1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shikano, Naoto; Nakajima, Syuichi; Kubota, Nobuo; Ishikawa, Nobuyoshi; Kawai, Keiichi; Kubodera, Akiko; Saji, Hideo

    2004-01-01

    3-[ 123 I]iodo-α-methyl-L-tyrosine ([ 123 I]IMT) is an imaging agent for amino acid transport. In order to obtain fundamental data related to tumor imaging with [ 123 I]IMT and renal physiological accumulation of [ 123 I]IMT, we investigated the transport characteristics of [ 125 I]IMT in porcine kidney epithelial cell line LLC-PK 1 using cell monolayers grown on microporous membrane filters. LLC-PK 1 monolayers were created on a collagen-coated microporous (3 μm) membrane (4.7 cm 2 ). To examine transcellular transport (secretion and reabsorption) and accumulation, the monolayers were incubated for up to 90 min at 37 deg C with 18.5 kBq [ 125 I]IMT in Dulbecco's phosphate-buffered saline (pH 7.4) as an uptake solution. After incubation, transcellular transport was assessed by quantifying the radioactivity of the solutions on each side of the monolayer. For the accumulation experiment, the cells were solubilized in NaOH solution, and the radioactivity was quantified. For the inhibition experiment, the inhibitor was added at a final concentration of 1 mM. For the pH dependence experiment, the pH of the apical-side uptake solution was varied from pH 5 to pH 8. Transport of [ 14 C]Tyr was examined for comparison. Bi-directional transcellular transport of [ 125 I]IMT was observed, corresponding to secretion and reabsorption in proximal tubule. Accumulation of [ 125 I]IMT from the basolateral side (1.62±0.15%) and the apical side (2.62±0.35%) was observed at 90 min. 2-Amino-bicyclo[2,2,1]heptane-2-carboxylic acid (a specific inhibitor of system L), L -Tyr (mother compound of [ 125 I]IMT) and 2-aminoisobutyric acid (an inhibitor of system L and A) inhibited both directional transport (p 125 I]IMT from both sides (p 125 I]IMT transport is system L, rather than Na + -dependent transport, in both apical and basolateral membrane. [ 125 I]IMT was transported by the system that transported L-Tyr, but the observed pH dependence of transport suggests that different

  16. Intracellular reprogramming of expression, glycosylation, and function of a plant-derived antiviral therapeutic monoclonal antibody.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeong-Hwan Lee

    Full Text Available Plant genetic engineering, which has led to the production of plant-derived monoclonal antibodies (mAb(Ps, provides a safe and economically effective alternative to conventional antibody expression methods. In this study, the expression levels and biological properties of the anti-rabies virus mAb(P SO57 with or without an endoplasmic reticulum (ER-retention peptide signal (Lys-Asp-Glu-Leu; KDEL in transgenic tobacco plants (Nicotiana tabacum were analyzed. The expression levels of mAb(P SO57 with KDEL (mAb(PK were significantly higher than those of mAb(P SO57 without KDEL (mAb(P regardless of the transcription level. The Fc domains of both purified mAb(P and mAb(PK and hybridoma-derived mAb (mAb(H had similar levels of binding activity to the FcγRI receptor (CD64. The mAb(PK had glycan profiles of both oligomannose (OM type (91.7% and Golgi type (8.3%, whereas the mAb(P had mainly Golgi type glycans (96.8% similar to those seen with mAb(H. Confocal analysis showed that the mAb(PK was co-localized to ER-tracker signal and cellular areas surrounding the nucleus indicating accumulation of the mAb(P with KDEL in the ER. Both mAb(P and mAb(PK disappeared with similar trends to mAb(H in BALB/c mice. In addition, mAb(PK was as effective as mAb(H at neutralizing the activity of the rabies virus CVS-11. These results suggest that the ER localization of the recombinant mAb(P by KDEL reprograms OM glycosylation and enhances the production of the functional antivirus therapeutic antibody in the plant.

  17. Colouring of PK cells nucleoli with silver in case of hyperactivation and activation of RNA nucleoli synthesis under ultraviolet radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sacharov, V.N.; Voronkova, L.N.; Valova, T.M.

    1988-01-01

    Localization and redistribution of silver-coloured nucleolus proteins in pig embryo kidney cell nuclei under postmitotic formation and evolution of nucleoli in order and under UV-microirradiation stimulated degradation and neature nucleolus compensator hyperactivation in the interphase are studied. In the anaphase chromosome set only 4 silver granules colouring the nucleolus organizer proteins were usually detected. At the initial stages of nucleolus postmitotic formation the number of silver granules in nucleolus organizer increased rapidly up to 25-30 per a nucleus, and at subsequent cellular cycle stages it doubled gradually. Under the natural growth and stimulated modifications of nucleoli the change of silver granule number in nucleoli correlated with the changes of nucleolus sizes and with the change of nucleolus RNA synthesis level. A possible connection between the nucleolus functional activity and the presence of proteins coloured with silver is discussed

  18. A measurement of the CP asymmetry difference between Λ c + → pK - K + and pπ-π+ decays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aaij, R.; Adeva, B.; Adinolfi, M.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Akar, S.; Albrecht, J.; Alessio, F.; Alexander, M.; Alfonso Albero, A.; Ali, S.; Alkhazov, G.; Alvarez Cartelle, P.; Alves, A. A.; Amato, S.; Amerio, S.; Amhis, Y.; An, L.; Anderlini, L.; Andreassi, G.; Andreotti, M.; Andrews, J. E.; Appleby, R. B.; Archilli, F.; d'Argent, P.; Arnau Romeu, J.; Artamonov, A.; Artuso, M.; Aslanides, E.; Atzeni, M.; Auriemma, G.; Baalouch, M.; Babuschkin, I.; Bachmann, S.; Back, J. J.; Badalov, A.; Baesso, C.; Baker, S.; Balagura, V.; Baldini, W.; Baranov, A.; Barlow, R. J.; Barschel, C.; Barsuk, S.; Barter, W.; Baryshnikov, F.; Batozskaya, V.; Battista, V.; Bay, A.; Beaucourt, L.; Beddow, J.; Bedeschi, F.; Bediaga, I.; Beiter, A.; Bel, L. J.; Beliy, N.; Bellee, V.; Belloli, N.; Belous, K.; Belyaev, I.; Ben-Haim, E.; Bencivenni, G.; Benson, S.; Beranek, S.; Berezhnoy, A.; Bernet, R.; Berninghoff, D.; Bertholet, E.; Bertolin, A.; Betancourt, C.; Betti, F.; Bettler, M. O.; van Beuzekom, M.; Bezshyiko, Ia.; Bifani, S.; Billoir, P.; Birnkraut, A.; Bizzeti, A.; Bjørn, M.; Blake, T.; Blanc, F.; Blusk, S.; Bocci, V.; Boettcher, T.; Bondar, A.; Bondar, N.; Bordyuzhin, I.; Borghi, S.; Borisyak, M.; Borsato, M.; Bossu, F.; Boubdir, M.; Bowcock, T. J. V.; Bowen, E.; Bozzi, C.; Braun, S.; Brodzicka, J.; Brundu, D.; Buchanan, E.; Burr, C.; Bursche, A.; Buytaert, J.; Byczynski, W.; Cadeddu, S.; Cai, H.; Calabrese, R.; Calladine, R.; Calvi, M.; Calvo Gomez, M.; Camboni, A.; Campana, P.; Campora Perez, D. H.; Capriotti, L.; Carbone, A.; Carboni, G.; Cardinale, R.; Cardini, A.; Carniti, P.; Carson, L.; Carvalho Akiba, K.; Casse, G.; Cassina, L.; Cattaneo, M.; Cavallero, G.; Cenci, R.; Chamont, D.; Chapman, M. G.; Charles, M.; Charpentier, Ph.; Chatzikonstantinidis, G.; Chefdeville, M.; Chen, S.; Cheung, S. F.; Chitic, S.-G.; Chobanova, V.; Chrzaszcz, M.; Chubykin, A.; Ciambrone, P.; Cid Vidal, X.; Ciezarek, G.; Clarke, P. E. L.; Clemencic, M.; Cliff, H. V.; Closier, J.; Coco, V.; Cogan, J.; Cogneras, E.; Cogoni, V.; Cojocariu, L.; Collins, P.; Colombo, T.; Comerma-Montells, A.; Contu, A.; Coombs, G.; Coquereau, S.; Corti, G.; Corvo, M.; Costa Sobral, C. M.; Couturier, B.; Cowan, G. A.; Craik, D. C.; Crocombe, A.; Cruz Torres, M.; Currie, R.; D'Ambrosio, C.; Da Cunha Marinho, F.; Da Silva, C. L.; Dall'Occo, E.; Dalseno, J.; Davis, A.; De Aguiar Francisco, O.; De Bruyn, K.; De Capua, S.; De Cian, M.; De Miranda, J. M.; De Paula, L.; De Serio, M.; De Simone, P.; Dean, C. T.; Decamp, D.; Del Buono, L.; Dembinski, H.-P.; Demmer, M.; Dendek, A.; Derkach, D.; Deschamps, O.; Dettori, F.; Dey, B.; Di Canto, A.; Di Nezza, P.; Dijkstra, H.; Dordei, F.; Dorigo, M.; Dosil Suárez, A.; Douglas, L.; Dovbnya, A.; Dreimanis, K.; Dufour, L.; Dujany, G.; Durante, P.; Durham, J. M.; Dutta, D.; Dzhelyadin, R.; Dziewiecki, M.; Dziurda, A.; Dzyuba, A.; Easo, S.; Ebert, M.; Egede, U.; Egorychev, V.; Eidelman, S.; Eisenhardt, S.; Eitschberger, U.; Ekelhof, R.; Eklund, L.; Ely, S.; Esen, S.; Evans, H. M.; Evans, T.; Falabella, A.; Farley, N.; Farry, S.; Fazzini, D.; Federici, L.; Ferguson, D.; Fernandez, G.; Fernandez Declara, P.; Fernandez Prieto, A.; Ferrari, F.; Ferreira Lopes, L.; Ferreira Rodrigues, F.; Ferro-Luzzi, M.; Filippov, S.; Fini, R. A.; Fiorini, M.; Firlej, M.; Fitzpatrick, C.; Fiutowski, T.; Fleuret, F.; Fontana, M.; Fontanelli, F.; Forty, R.; Franco Lima, V.; Frank, M.; Frei, C.; Fu, J.; Funk, W.; Furfaro, E.; Färber, C.; Gabriel, E.; Gallas Torreira, A.; Galli, D.; Gallorini, S.; Gambetta, S.; Gandelman, M.; Gandini, P.; Gao, Y.; Garcia Martin, L. M.; García Pardiñas, J.; Garra Tico, J.; Garrido, L.; Gascon, D.; Gaspar, C.; Gavardi, L.; Gazzoni, G.; Gerick, D.; Gersabeck, E.; Gersabeck, M.; Gershon, T.; Ghez, Ph.; Gianì, S.; Gibson, V.; Girard, O. G.; Giubega, L.; Gizdov, K.; Gligorov, V. V.; Golubkov, D.; Golutvin, A.; Gomes, A.; Gorelov, I. V.; Gotti, C.; Govorkova, E.; Grabowski, J. P.; Graciani Diaz, R.; Granado Cardoso, L. A.; Graugés, E.; Graverini, E.; Graziani, G.; Grecu, A.; Greim, R.; Griffith, P.; Grillo, L.; Gruber, L.; Gruberg Cazon, B. R.; Grünberg, O.; Gushchin, E.; Guz, Yu.; Gys, T.; Göbel, C.; Hadavizadeh, T.; Hadjivasiliou, C.; Haefeli, G.; Haen, C.; Haines, S. C.; Hamilton, B.; Han, X.; Hancock, T. H.; Hansmann-Menzemer, S.; Harnew, N.; Harnew, S. T.; Hasse, C.; Hatch, M.; He, J.; Hecker, M.; Heinicke, K.; Heister, A.; Hennessy, K.; Henrard, P.; Henry, L.; van Herwijnen, E.; Heß, M.; Hicheur, A.; Hill, D.; Hopchev, P. H.; Hu, W.; Huang, W.; Huard, Z. C.; Hulsbergen, W.; Humair, T.; Hushchyn, M.; Hutchcroft, D.; Ibis, P.; Idzik, M.; Ilten, P.; Jacobsson, R.; Jalocha, J.; Jans, E.; Jawahery, A.; Jiang, F.; John, M.; Johnson, D.; Jones, C. R.; Joram, C.; Jost, B.; Jurik, N.; Kandybei, S.; Karacson, M.; Kariuki, J. M.; Karodia, S.; Kazeev, N.; Kecke, M.; Keizer, F.; Kelsey, M.; Kenzie, M.; Ketel, T.; Khairullin, E.; Khanji, B.; Khurewathanakul, C.; Kirn, T.; Klaver, S.; Klimaszewski, K.; Klimkovich, T.; Koliiev, S.; Kolpin, M.; Kopecna, R.; Koppenburg, P.; Kosmyntseva, A.; Kotriakhova, S.; Kozeiha, M.; Kravchuk, L.; Kreps, M.; Kress, F.; Krokovny, P.; Krzemien, W.; Kucewicz, W.; Kucharczyk, M.; Kudryavtsev, V.; Kuonen, A. K.; Kvaratskheliya, T.; Lacarrere, D.; Lafferty, G.; Lai, A.; Lanfranchi, G.; Langenbruch, C.; Latham, T.; Lazzeroni, C.; Le Gac, R.; Leflat, A.; Lefrançois, J.; Lefèvre, R.; Lemaitre, F.; Lemos Cid, E.; Leroy, O.; Lesiak, T.; Leverington, B.; Li, P.-R.; Li, T.; Li, Y.; Li, Z.; Liang, X.; Likhomanenko, T.; Lindner, R.; Lionetto, F.; Lisovskyi, V.; Liu, X.; Loh, D.; Loi, A.; Longstaff, I.; Lopes, J. H.; Lucchesi, D.; Lucio Martinez, M.; Luo, H.; Lupato, A.; Luppi, E.; Lupton, O.; Lusiani, A.; Lyu, X.; Machefert, F.; Maciuc, F.; Macko, V.; Mackowiak, P.; Maddrell-Mander, S.; Maev, O.; Maguire, K.; Maisuzenko, D.; Majewski, M. W.; Malde, S.; Malecki, B.; Malinin, A.; Maltsev, T.; Manca, G.; Mancinelli, G.; Marangotto, D.; Maratas, J.; Marchand, J. F.; Marconi, U.; Marin Benito, C.; Marinangeli, M.; Marino, P.; Marks, J.; Martellotti, G.; Martin, M.; Martinelli, M.; Martinez Santos, D.; Martinez Vidal, F.; Massafferri, A.; Matev, R.; Mathad, A.; Mathe, Z.; Matteuzzi, C.; Mauri, A.; Maurice, E.; Maurin, B.; Mazurov, A.; McCann, M.; McNab, A.; McNulty, R.; Mead, J. V.; Meadows, B.; Meaux, C.; Meier, F.; Meinert, N.; Melnychuk, D.; Merk, M.; Merli, A.; Michielin, E.; Milanes, D. A.; Millard, E.; Minard, M.-N.; Minzoni, L.; Mitzel, D. S.; Mogini, A.; Molina Rodriguez, J.; Mombächer, T.; Monroy, I. A.; Monteil, S.; Morandin, M.; Morello, M. J.; Morgunova, O.; Moron, J.; Morris, A. B.; Mountain, R.; Muheim, F.; Mulder, M.; Müller, D.; Müller, J.; Müller, K.; Müller, V.; Naik, P.; Nakada, T.; Nandakumar, R.; Nandi, A.; Nasteva, I.; Needham, M.; Neri, N.; Neubert, S.; Neufeld, N.; Neuner, M.; Nguyen, T. D.; Nguyen-Mau, C.; Nieswand, S.; Niet, R.; Nikitin, N.; Nikodem, T.; Nogay, A.; O'Hanlon, D. P.; Oblakowska-Mucha, A.; Obraztsov, V.; Ogilvy, S.; Oldeman, R.; Onderwater, C. J. G.; Ossowska, A.; Otalora Goicochea, J. M.; Owen, P.; Oyanguren, A.; Pais, P. R.; Palano, A.; Palutan, M.; Papanestis, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Pappalardo, L. L.; Parker, W.; Parkes, C.; Passaleva, G.; Pastore, A.; Patel, M.; Patrignani, C.; Pearce, A.; Pellegrino, A.; Penso, G.; Pepe Altarelli, M.; Perazzini, S.; Pereima, D.; Perret, P.; Pescatore, L.; Petridis, K.; Petrolini, A.; Petrov, A.; Petruzzo, M.; Picatoste Olloqui, E.; Pietrzyk, B.; Pietrzyk, G.; Pikies, M.; Pinci, D.; Pisani, F.; Pistone, A.; Piucci, A.; Placinta, V.; Playfer, S.; Plo Casasus, M.; Polci, F.; Poli Lener, M.; Poluektov, A.; Polyakov, I.; Polycarpo, E.; Pomery, G. J.; Ponce, S.; Popov, A.; Popov, D.; Poslavskii, S.; Potterat, C.; Price, E.; Prisciandaro, J.; Prouve, C.; Pugatch, V.; Puig Navarro, A.; Pullen, H.; Punzi, G.; Qian, W.; Qin, J.; Quagliani, R.; Quintana, B.; Rachwal, B.; Rademacker, J. H.; Rama, M.; Ramos Pernas, M.; Rangel, M. S.; Raniuk, I.; Ratnikov, F.; Raven, G.; Ravonel Salzgeber, M.; Reboud, M.; Redi, F.; Reichert, S.; dos Reis, A. C.; Remon Alepuz, C.; Renaudin, V.; Ricciardi, S.; Richards, S.; Rihl, M.; Rinnert, K.; Robbe, P.; Robert, A.; Rodrigues, A. B.; Rodrigues, E.; Rodriguez Lopez, J. A.; Rogozhnikov, A.; Roiser, S.; Rollings, A.; Romanovskiy, V.; Romero Vidal, A.; Rotondo, M.; Rudolph, M. S.; Ruf, T.; Ruiz Valls, P.; Ruiz Vidal, J.; Saborido Silva, J. J.; Sadykhov, E.; Sagidova, N.; Saitta, B.; Salustino Guimaraes, V.; Sanchez Mayordomo, C.; Sanmartin Sedes, B.; Santacesaria, R.; Santamarina Rios, C.; Santimaria, M.; Santovetti, E.; Sarpis, G.; Sarti, A.; Satriano, C.; Satta, A.; Saunders, D. M.; Savrina, D.; Schael, S.; Schellenberg, M.; Schiller, M.; Schindler, H.; Schmelling, M.; Schmelzer, T.; Schmidt, B.; Schneider, O.; Schopper, A.; Schreiner, H. F.; Schubiger, M.; Schune, M. H.; Schwemmer, R.; Sciascia, B.; Sciubba, A.; Semennikov, A.; Sepulveda, E. S.; Sergi, A.; Serra, N.; Serrano, J.; Sestini, L.; Seyfert, P.; Shapkin, M.; Shapoval, I.; Shcheglov, Y.; Shears, T.; Shekhtman, L.; Shevchenko, V.; Siddi, B. G.; Silva Coutinho, R.; Silva de Oliveira, L.; Simi, G.; Simone, S.; Sirendi, M.; Skidmore, N.; Skwarnicki, T.; Smith, I. T.; Smith, J.; Smith, M.; Soares Lavra, l.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Soler, F. J. P.; Souza De Paula, B.; Spaan, B.; Spradlin, P.; Sridharan, S.; Stagni, F.; Stahl, M.; Stahl, S.; Stefko, P.; Stefkova, S.; Steinkamp, O.; Stemmle, S.; Stenyakin, O.; Stepanova, M.; Stevens, H.; Stone, S.; Storaci, B.; Stracka, S.; Stramaglia, M. E.; Straticiuc, M.; Straumann, U.; Sun, J.; Sun, L.; Swientek, K.; Syropoulos, V.; Szumlak, T.; Szymanski, M.; T'Jampens, S.; Tayduganov, A.; Tekampe, T.; Tellarini, G.; Teubert, F.; Thomas, E.; van Tilburg, J.; Tilley, M. J.; Tisserand, V.; Tobin, M.; Tolk, S.; Tomassetti, L.; Tonelli, D.; Tourinho Jadallah Aoude, R.; Tournefier, E.; Traill, M.; Tran, M. T.; Tresch, M.; Trisovic, A.; Tsaregorodtsev, A.; Tsopelas, P.; Tully, A.; Tuning, N.; Ukleja, A.; Usachov, A.; Ustyuzhanin, A.; Uwer, U.; Vacca, C.; Vagner, A.; Vagnoni, V.; Valassi, A.; Valat, S.; Valenti, G.; Vazquez Gomez, R.; Vazquez Regueiro, P.; Vecchi, S.; van Veghel, M.; Velthuis, J. J.; Veltri, M.; Veneziano, G.; Venkateswaran, A.; Verlage, T. A.; Vernet, M.; Vesterinen, M.; Viana Barbosa, J. V.; Vieira, D.; Vieites Diaz, M.; Viemann, H.; Vilasis-Cardona, X.; Vitti, M.; Volkov, V.; Vollhardt, A.; Voneki, B.; Vorobyev, A.; Vorobyev, V.; Voß, C.; de Vries, J. A.; Vázquez Sierra, C.; Waldi, R.; Walsh, J.; Wang, J.; Wang, Y.; Ward, D. R.; Wark, H. M.; Watson, N. K.; Websdale, D.; Weiden, A.; Weisser, C.; Whitehead, M.; Wicht, J.; Wilkinson, G.; Wilkinson, M.; Williams, M.; Williams, M.; Williams, T.; Wilson, F. F.; Wimberley, J.; Winn, M.; Wishahi, J.; Wislicki, W.; Witek, M.; Wormser, G.; Wotton, S. A.; Wyllie, K.; Xie, Y.; Xu, M.; Xu, Q.; Xu, Z.; Xu, Z.; Yang, Z.; Yang, Z.; Yao, Y.; Yin, H.; Yu, J.; Yuan, X.; Yushchenko, O.; Zarebski, K. A.; Zavertyaev, M.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, Y.; Zhelezov, A.; Zheng, Y.; Zhu, X.; Zhukov, V.; Zonneveld, J. B.; Zucchelli, S.

    2018-03-01

    The difference between the CP asymmetries in the decays Λ c + → pK - K + and Λ c + → pπ - π + is presented. Proton-proton collision data taken at centre-of-mass energies of 7 and 8 TeV collected by the LHCb detector in 2011 and 2012 are used, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 3 fb-1. The Λ c + candidates are reconstructed as part of the Λ b 0 → Λ c + μ - X decay chain. In order to maximize the cancellation of production and detection asymmetries in the difference, the final-state kinematic distributions of the two samples are aligned by applying phase-space-dependent weights to the Λ c + → pπ - π + sample. This alters the definition of the integrated CP asymmetry to A CP wgt ( pπ - π +). Both samples are corrected for reconstruction and selection efficiencies across the five-dimensional Λ c + decay phase space. The difference in CP asymmetries is found to be Δ {A}_{CP}^{wgt}={A}_{CP}(p{K}-{K}+) - {A}_{CP}^{wgt}(p{π}-{π}+) = (0.30 ± 0.91 ± 0.61) %, where the first uncertainty is statistical and the second is systematic.

  19. The MLH1 c.1852_1853delinsGC (p.K618A variant in colorectal cancer: genetic association study in 18,723 individuals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Abulí

    Full Text Available Colorectal cancer is one of the most frequent neoplasms and an important cause of mortality in the developed world. Mendelian syndromes account for about 5% of the total burden of CRC, being Lynch syndrome and familial adenomatous polyposis the most common forms. Lynch syndrome tumors develop mainly as a consequence of defective DNA mismatch repair associated with germline mutations in MLH1, MSH2, MSH6 and PMS2. A significant proportion of variants identified by screening these genes correspond to missense or noncoding changes without a clear pathogenic consequence, and they are designated as "variants of uncertain significance", being the c.1852_1853delinsGC (p.K618A variant in the MLH1 gene a clear example. The implication of this variant as a low-penetrance risk variant for CRC was assessed in the present study by performing a case-control study within a large cohort from the COGENT consortium-COST Action BM1206 including 18,723 individuals (8,055 colorectal cancer cases and 10,668 controls and a case-only genotype-phenotype correlation with several clinical and pathological characteristics restricted to the Epicolon cohort. Our results showed no involvement of this variant as a low-penetrance variant for colorectal cancer genetic susceptibility and no association with any clinical and pathological characteristics including family history for this neoplasm or Lynch syndrome.

  20. Simple synthesis of carbon-11-labeled chromen-4-one derivatives as new potential PET agents for imaging of DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) in cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao, Mingzhang; Wang, Min; Miller, Kathy D.; Zheng, Qi-Huang

    2012-01-01

    Carbon-11-labeled chromen-4-one derivatives were synthesized as new potential PET agents for imaging of DNA repair enzyme DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) in cancer. The target tracers, X-[ 11 C]methoxy-2-morpholino-4H-chromen-4-ones (X=8, 7, 6, 5; [ 11 C]4a–d), were prepared from their corresponding precursors, X-hydroxy-2-morpholino-4H-chromen-4-ones (X=8, 7, 6, 5; 5a–d), with [ 11 C]CH 3 OTf through O-[ 11 C]methylation and isolated by a simplified solid-phase extraction (SPE) method using a C-18 Sep-Pak Plus cartridge. The radiochemical yields decay corrected to end of bombardment (EOB), from [ 11 C]CO 2 , were 40–60%. The specific activity at end of synthesis (EOS) was 185–370 GBq/μmol. - Highlights: ► New chromen-4-one derivatives were synthesized. ► New carbon-11-labeled chromen-4-one derivatives were synthesized. ► Simple solid-phase extraction (SPE) method was employed in radiosynthesis.

  1. H++ 3.0: automating pK prediction and the preparation of biomolecular structures for atomistic molecular modeling and simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anandakrishnan, Ramu; Aguilar, Boris; Onufriev, Alexey V

    2012-07-01

    The accuracy of atomistic biomolecular modeling and simulation studies depend on the accuracy of the input structures. Preparing these structures for an atomistic modeling task, such as molecular dynamics (MD) simulation, can involve the use of a variety of different tools for: correcting errors, adding missing atoms, filling valences with hydrogens, predicting pK values for titratable amino acids, assigning predefined partial charges and radii to all atoms, and generating force field parameter/topology files for MD. Identifying, installing and effectively using the appropriate tools for each of these tasks can be difficult for novice and time-consuming for experienced users. H++ (http://biophysics.cs.vt.edu/) is a free open-source web server that automates the above key steps in the preparation of biomolecular structures for molecular modeling and simulations. H++ also performs extensive error and consistency checking, providing error/warning messages together with the suggested corrections. In addition to numerous minor improvements, the latest version of H++ includes several new capabilities and options: fix erroneous (flipped) side chain conformations for HIS, GLN and ASN, include a ligand in the input structure, process nucleic acid structures and generate a solvent box with specified number of common ions for explicit solvent MD.

  2. Cross-linking of rubber in the presence of multi-functional cross-linking aids via thermoreversible Diels-Alder chemistry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Polgar, L. M.; Fortunato, G.; Araya-Hermosilla, R.; van Duin, M.; Pucci, A.; Picchioni, F.

    Furan-functionalized polyketone (PK-FU) was added to a furan-functionalized ethylene-propylene rubber (EPM-FU). The mixture was subsequently cross-linked with a bismaleimide through Diels-Alder chemistry in order to improve the mechanical properties of the rubber. Infrared spectroscopy showed the

  3. Addition of ash and PK with or without N on a peatland in southern Sweden. Effects on tree growth and needle element concentrate; Tillfoersel av aska och PK med eller utan N paa en torvmark i soedra Sverige. Effekter paa traedtillvaext och aemneshalter i barr

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sikstroem, Ulf (Forestry Research Inst. of Sweden, Uppsala (Sweden))

    2008-04-15

    In Sweden, about 1.3 million tonnes of ash are produced annually. Out of that amount, 150 000 - 300 000 tonnes have been estimated to originate from forest fuels, i.e. ashes that potentially can be brought back to the forest. Apart from being a compensatory measure after intensive forest harvest (e.g. including tops and branches), the ash may be used to increase the tree growth on peat soils (ash fertilization). On peat soils, tree growth is generally increased after addition of ash or phosphorous (P) and potassium (K) fertilizers. However, in some cases also nitrogen (N) addition is required. On sparsely stocked mires, fertilization may promote the regeneration as well as increase the growth of the trees. Sufficient drainage and supply of plant-available N are some prerequisites for increasing tree growth by PK-addition. In 1982, Skogforsk established a field experiment (168 Perstorp) located in the province of Scania in a sparsely stocked Pinus Sylvestris (L.) sapling stand on a ditched mire where different nutrient regimes were tested. The experiment had a randomized block design including four blocks and seven treatments. Ash and different dozes of P (raw phosphate) and K (potassium chloride), with or without simultaneous N addition, were included as well as un untreated control. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effects on tree growth and needle elemental concentrations 26 years after treatment. The addition of similar dozes of P (approx. 40 kg P/ha), as ash (2.5 tonnes/ha) or as PK-fertilizer rendered similar growth responses. The increase in stem-wood growth was in the order of 1,6 - 1,9 m3/ha/yr during the 26-year period. The N-addition had no additional effect. On the control plots, the growth was more or less negligible (approx. 0,04 m3sk/ha/yr). On average, the high dozes of raw-phosphate and potassium chloride (40 kg P/ha and 80 kg K/ha) gave a higher growth increase than the low dozes (20 kg P/ha and 40 kg K/ha), although this effect was

  4. The functions of the variable lipoprotein family of Mycoplasma hyorhinis in adherence to host cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Qiyan; Wang, Jia; Ji, Yan; Ni, Bo; Zhang, Bixiong; Ma, Qinghong; Wei, Yanna; Xiao, Shaobo; Feng, Zhixin; Liu, Maojun; Shao, Guoqing

    2016-04-15

    Mycoplasma hyorhinis (M. hyorhinis) is a swine pathogen that is associated with various human cancers and contamination in cell cultures. However, no studies on the adhesion molecules of this pathogen have yet been reported. The variable lipoprotein (Vlp) family is an important surface component of M. hyorhinis. Herein, we performed several experiments to identify the function of the Vlp family in adherence to host cells. Seven recombinant Vlp (rVlp) proteins were expressed in Escherichia coli and purified by affinity chromatography. The potential role of rVlp adherence to pig kidney (PK-15) and swine tracheal epithelial (STEC) cells was then studied by indirect immunofluorescence assay and microtiter plate adherence assay. Adhesion of M. hyorhinis to PK-15 and STEC cells was specifically inhibited by the addition of a cocktail of rVlp proteins. The rVlp protein mixture was shown to bind to both PK-15 and STEC cells. The binding increased in a dose-dependent manner and could be blocked by antisera against the rVlp proteins. Most of the rVlp proteins could bind individually to both PK-15 and STEC cells except for rVlpD and rVlpF, which bound only to STEC cells. Because Vlp members vary in size among different strains and generations, they may vary in their cytoadhesion capabilities in various strains. In summary, the present results indicate that the Vlp family functions as adhesins of M. hyorhinis. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  5. Experimental investigation of statistical density function of decaying radioactive sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salma, I.; Zemplen-Papp, E.

    1991-01-01

    The validity of the Poisson and the λ P(k) modified Poisson statistical density functions of observing k events in a short time interval is investigated experimentally in radioactive decay detection for various measuring times. The experiments to measure radioactive decay were performed with 89m Y, using a multichannel analyzer. According to the results, Poisson statistics adequately describes the counting experiment for short measuring times. (author) 13 refs.; 4 figs

  6. Determination of the pK values of 5-aminosalicylic acid and N-acetylaminosalicylic acid and comparison of the pH dependent lipid-water partition coefficients of sulphasalazine and its metabolites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allgayer, H; Sonnenbichler, J; Kruis, W; Paumgartner, G

    1985-01-01

    Sulphasalazine (SASP), used in the treatment of inflammatory bowel disease, is split into sulphapyridine (SP) and 5-aminosalicylic acid (5-ASA) in the colon. Lower plasma levels of SASP and 5-ASA as compared to those of SP may be due to different absorption rates from the colon because of different pK values and pH dependent lipid-water partition coefficients. In this study we determined the pK values of 5-ASA and its major metabolite, N-acetyl amino-salicylic acid (AcASA), by 13C-NMR spectroscopy and compared the pH dependent apparent benzene-water partition coefficients (Papp) of SASP, SP and 5-ASA with respect to their different plasma levels. The COOH group of 5-ASA had a pK value of 3.0, the -NH3+ group had 6.0, the -OH group 13.9; the -COOH group of AcASA had 2.7 and the -OH group 12.9; The Papp of SASP (0.042 +/- 0.004) and 5-ASA (0.059 +/- 0.01) were significantly lower than that of SP (0.092 +/- 0.03) (at pH 5.5).

  7. Preservation of peripheral benzodiazepine receptors: differential effects of freezing on [3H]Ro 5-4864 and [3H]PK 11195 binding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basile, A.S.; Ostrowski, N.L.; Skolnick, P.

    1987-01-01

    A statistically significant decrease in the density of peripheral benzodiazepine receptors was observed in renal membranes of rats beginning 2 weeks after adrenalectomy when compared with sham-operated controls. This decrease in peripheral benzodiazepine receptor density was manifest as a decrease in the Bmax of two ligands [ 3 H]Ro 5-4864 and [ 3 H]PK 11195, without accompanying changes in their apparent affinity (Kd) for this site. Similar changes were not seen in another aldosterone-sensitive organ, the submandibular salivary gland. The decrease in peripheral benzodiazepine receptor density in observed in adrenalectomized rat renal membranes was restored to control levels after 1 week of aldosterone administration using a dose (12.5 micrograms/kg/day) that had no effect on peripheral benzodiazepine receptor density in sham-operated animals. In contrast, dexamethasone administration (50 micrograms/kg/day, 1 week) had no effect on renal peripheral benzodiazepine receptor density when administered to either adrenalectomized or sham-operated rats. Further, adrenal demedullation had no effect on renal peripheral benzodiazepine receptor density or affinity. The decrease in peripheral benzodiazepine receptor density was localized to the renal cortex and the outer stripe of the medulla by gross dissection of renal slices and renal tissue section autoradiography. The specific effect of adrenalectomy on renal peripheral benzodiazepine receptor density, the lack of direct effect of aldosterone on [ 3 H]Ro 5-4864 binding, and the localization of the change in peripheral benzodiazepine receptor density to the renal cortex and outer stripe suggests that these changes may reflect an adaptation of the renal nephron (possibly the distal convoluted tubule, intermediate tubule and/or the collecting duct) to the loss of mineralocorticoid hormones

  8. WDR-PK-AK-018

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hollister, R

    2009-08-26

    Method - CES SOP-HW-P556 'Field and Bulk Gamma Analysis'. Detector - High-purity germanium, 40% relative efficiency. Calibration - The detector was calibrated on February 8, 2006 using a NIST-traceable sealed source, and the calibration was verified using an independent sealed source. Count Time and Geometry - The sample was counted for 20 minutes at 72 inches from the detector. A lead collimator was used to limit the field-of-view to the region of the sample. The drum was rotated 180 degrees halfway through the count time. Date and Location of Scans - June 1,2006 in Building 235 Room 1136. Spectral Analysis Spectra were analyzed with ORTEC GammaVision software. Matrix and geometry corrections were calculated using OR TEC Isotopic software. A background spectrum was measured at the counting location. No man-made radioactivity was observed in the background. Results were determined from the sample spectra without background subtraction. Minimum detectable activities were calculated by the Nureg 4.16 method. Results - Detected Pu-238, Pu-239, Am-241 and Am-243.

  9. Pk-yrityksen aggressiivinen verosuunnittelu

    OpenAIRE

    Koivisto, Milla

    2015-01-01

    Opinnäytetyössä tarkastellaan pienten ja keskisuurten yritysten ja näiden yrittäjäomistajien verotusta ja sen suunnittelua. Työn tarkoituksena ja tärkeimpänä tavoitteena pidetään aggressiivisen verosuunnittelun keinojen pohdintaa sekä tulkitsemista erityisesti osakeyhtiö-muotoisten yritysten kannalta. Ensin selvitetään yleisesti verotuskäytäntöjä sekä eri yritysmuotojen verotuksellista eroavaisuutta. Tämän jälkeen käsitellään varsinaisen verosuunnittelun teoreettista pohjaa sekä käytäntö...

  10. Gefitinib Radiosensitizes Stem-Like Glioma Cells: Inhibition of Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor-Akt-DNA-PK Signaling, Accompanied by Inhibition of DNA Double-Strand Break Repair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Khong Bee; Zhu Congju; Wong Yinling; Gao Qiuhan; Ty, Albert; Wong, Meng Cheong

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: We compared radiosensitivity of brain tumor stem cells (BTSCs) with matched nonstem glioma cells, and determined whether gefitinib enhanced BTSC radiosensitivity by inhibiting epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)–Akt-DNA–dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) signaling, followed by enhanced DNA double-stand breaks (DSBs) and inhibition of DSB repair. Methods and Materials: Radiosensitivity of stem-like gliomaspheres and nonstem glioma cells (obtained at patient neurosurgical resection) were evaluated by clonogenic assays, γ-H 2 AX immunostaining and cell cycle distribution. Survival of irradiated and nonirradiated NOD-SCID mice intracranially implanted with stem-like gliomaspheres were monitored. Glioma cells treated with gefitinib, irradiation, or both were assayed for clonogenic survival, γ-H 2 AX immunostaining, DNA-PKcs expression, and phosphorylation of EGFR and Akt. Results: Stem-like gliomaspheres displayed BTSC characteristics of self-renewal; differentiation into lineages of neurons, oligodendrocytes, and astrocytes; and initiation of glioma growth in NOD-SCID mice. Irradiation dose-dependently reduced clonogenic survival, induced G 2 /M arrest and increased γ-H 2 AX immunostaining of nonstem glioma cells, but not stem-like gliomaspheres. There was no difference in survival of irradiated and nonirradiated mice implanted with stem-like gliomaspheres. The addition of gefitinib significantly inhibited clonogenic survival, increased γ-H 2 AX immunostaining, and reduced DNA-PKcs expression of irradiated stem-like gliomaspheres, without affecting irradiated-nonstem glioma cells. Gefitinib alone, and when combined with irradiation, inhibited phosphorylation of EGFR (Y1068 and Y1045) and Akt (S473) in stem-like gliomaspheres. In nonstem glioma cells, gefitinib alone inhibited EGFR Y1068 phosphorylation, with further inhibition by combined gefitinib and irradiation. Conclusions: Stem-like gliomaspheres are resistant to irradiation

  11. Gefitinib radiosensitizes stem-like glioma cells: inhibition of epidermal growth factor receptor-Akt-DNA-PK signaling, accompanied by inhibition of DNA double-strand break repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Khong Bee; Zhu, Congju; Wong, Yin Ling; Gao, Qiuhan; Ty, Albert; Wong, Meng Cheong

    2012-05-01

    We compared radiosensitivity of brain tumor stem cells (BTSCs) with matched nonstem glioma cells, and determined whether gefitinib enhanced BTSC radiosensitivity by inhibiting epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)-Akt-DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) signaling, followed by enhanced DNA double-stand breaks (DSBs) and inhibition of DSB repair. Radiosensitivity of stem-like gliomaspheres and nonstem glioma cells (obtained at patient neurosurgical resection) were evaluated by clonogenic assays, γ-H(2)AX immunostaining and cell cycle distribution. Survival of irradiated and nonirradiated NOD-SCID mice intracranially implanted with stem-like gliomaspheres were monitored. Glioma cells treated with gefitinib, irradiation, or both were assayed for clonogenic survival, γ-H(2)AX immunostaining, DNA-PKcs expression, and phosphorylation of EGFR and Akt. Stem-like gliomaspheres displayed BTSC characteristics of self-renewal; differentiation into lineages of neurons, oligodendrocytes, and astrocytes; and initiation of glioma growth in NOD-SCID mice. Irradiation dose-dependently reduced clonogenic survival, induced G(2)/M arrest and increased γ-H(2)AX immunostaining of nonstem glioma cells, but not stem-like gliomaspheres. There was no difference in survival of irradiated and nonirradiated mice implanted with stem-like gliomaspheres. The addition of gefitinib significantly inhibited clonogenic survival, increased γ-H(2)AX immunostaining, and reduced DNA-PKcs expression of irradiated stem-like gliomaspheres, without affecting irradiated-nonstem glioma cells. Gefitinib alone, and when combined with irradiation, inhibited phosphorylation of EGFR (Y1068 and Y1045) and Akt (S473) in stem-like gliomaspheres. In nonstem glioma cells, gefitinib alone inhibited EGFR Y1068 phosphorylation, with further inhibition by combined gefitinib and irradiation. Stem-like gliomaspheres are resistant to irradiation-induced cytotoxicity, G(2)/M arrest, and DNA DSBs, compared with nonstem

  12. Gefitinib Radiosensitizes Stem-Like Glioma Cells: Inhibition of Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor-Akt-DNA-PK Signaling, Accompanied by Inhibition of DNA Double-Strand Break Repair

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Khong Bee, E-mail: dmskkb@nccs.com.sg [Brain Tumour Research Laboratory, Division of Medical Sciences, National Cancer Centre Singapore (Singapore); Zhu Congju; Wong Yinling; Gao Qiuhan; Ty, Albert; Wong, Meng Cheong [Brain Tumour Research Laboratory, Division of Medical Sciences, National Cancer Centre Singapore (Singapore)

    2012-05-01

    Purpose: We compared radiosensitivity of brain tumor stem cells (BTSCs) with matched nonstem glioma cells, and determined whether gefitinib enhanced BTSC radiosensitivity by inhibiting epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)-Akt-DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) signaling, followed by enhanced DNA double-stand breaks (DSBs) and inhibition of DSB repair. Methods and Materials: Radiosensitivity of stem-like gliomaspheres and nonstem glioma cells (obtained at patient neurosurgical resection) were evaluated by clonogenic assays, {gamma}-H{sub 2}AX immunostaining and cell cycle distribution. Survival of irradiated and nonirradiated NOD-SCID mice intracranially implanted with stem-like gliomaspheres were monitored. Glioma cells treated with gefitinib, irradiation, or both were assayed for clonogenic survival, {gamma}-H{sub 2}AX immunostaining, DNA-PKcs expression, and phosphorylation of EGFR and Akt. Results: Stem-like gliomaspheres displayed BTSC characteristics of self-renewal; differentiation into lineages of neurons, oligodendrocytes, and astrocytes; and initiation of glioma growth in NOD-SCID mice. Irradiation dose-dependently reduced clonogenic survival, induced G{sub 2}/M arrest and increased {gamma}-H{sub 2}AX immunostaining of nonstem glioma cells, but not stem-like gliomaspheres. There was no difference in survival of irradiated and nonirradiated mice implanted with stem-like gliomaspheres. The addition of gefitinib significantly inhibited clonogenic survival, increased {gamma}-H{sub 2}AX immunostaining, and reduced DNA-PKcs expression of irradiated stem-like gliomaspheres, without affecting irradiated-nonstem glioma cells. Gefitinib alone, and when combined with irradiation, inhibited phosphorylation of EGFR (Y1068 and Y1045) and Akt (S473) in stem-like gliomaspheres. In nonstem glioma cells, gefitinib alone inhibited EGFR Y1068 phosphorylation, with further inhibition by combined gefitinib and irradiation. Conclusions: Stem-like gliomaspheres are

  13. Open-label, randomized study of individualized, pharmacokinetically (PK)-guided dosing of paclitaxel combined with carboplatin or cisplatin in patients with advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joerger, M; von Pawel, J; Kraff, S; Fischer, J R; Eberhardt, W; Gauler, T C; Mueller, L; Reinmuth, N; Reck, M; Kimmich, M; Mayer, F; Kopp, H-G; Behringer, D M; Ko, Y-D; Hilger, R A; Roessler, M; Kloft, C; Henrich, A; Moritz, B; Miller, M C; Salamone, S J; Jaehde, U

    2016-10-01

    Variable chemotherapy exposure may cause toxicity or lack of efficacy. This study was initiated to validate pharmacokinetically (PK)-guided paclitaxel dosing in patients with advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) to avoid supra- or subtherapeutic exposure. Patients with newly diagnosed, advanced NSCLC were randomly assigned to receive up to 6 cycles of 3-weekly carboplatin AUC 6 or cisplatin 80 mg/m(2) either with standard paclitaxel at 200 mg/m(2) (arm A) or PK-guided dosing of paclitaxel (arm B). In arm B, initial paclitaxel dose was adjusted to body surface area, age, sex, and subsequent doses were guided by neutropenia and previous-cycle paclitaxel exposure [time above a plasma concentration of 0.05 µM (Tc>0.05)] determined from a single blood sample on day 2. The primary end point was grade 4 neutropenia; secondary end points included neuropathy, radiological response, progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS). Among 365 patients randomly assigned, grade 4 neutropenia was similar in both arms (19% versus 16%; P = 0.10). Neuropathy grade ≥2 (38% versus 23%, P PK-guided dosing of paclitaxel does not improve severe neutropenia, but reduces paclitaxel-associated neuropathy and thereby improves the benefit-risk profile in patients with advanced NSCLC. NCT01326767 (https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT01326767). © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Society for Medical Oncology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. Utility of a Novel Three-Dimensional and Dynamic (3DD Cell Culture System for PK/PD Studies: Evaluation of a Triple Combination Therapy at Overcoming Anti-HER2 Treatment Resistance in Breast Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anusha Ande

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Emergence of Human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2 therapy resistance in HER2-positive (HER2+ breast cancer (BC poses a major clinical challenge. Mechanisms of resistance include the over-activation of the PI3K/mTOR and Src pathways. This work aims to investigate a novel combination therapy that employs paclitaxel (PAC, a mitotic inhibitor, with everolimus (EVE, an mTOR inhibitor, and dasatinib (DAS, an Src kinase inhibitor, as a modality to overcome resistance.Methods: Static (two dimensional, 2D and three-dimensional dynamic (3DD cell culture studies were conducted using JIMT-1 cells, a HER2+ BC cell line refractory to HER2 therapies. Cell viability and caspase-3 expression were examined after JIMT-1 cell exposure to agents as monotherapy or in combination using a 2D setting. A pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK/PD combination study with PAC+DAS+EVE was conducted over 3 weeks in a 3DD setting. PAC was administered into the system via a 3 h infusion followed by the addition of a continuous infusion of EVE+DAS 24 h post-PAC dosing. Cell counts and caspase-3 expression were quantified every 2 days. A semi-mechanistic PK/PD model was developed using the 2D data and scaled up to capture the 3DD data. The final model integrated active caspase-3 as a biomarker to bridge between drug exposures and cancer cell dynamics. Model fittings were performed using Monolix software.Results: The triple combination significantly induced caspase-3 activity in the 2D cell culture setting. In the 3DD cell culture setting, sequential dosing of PAC then EVE+DAS showed a 5-fold increase in caspase-3 activity and 8.5-fold decrease in the total cell number compared to the control. The semi-mechanistic PK/PD models fit the data well, capturing the time-course profiles of drug concentrations, caspase-3 expression, and cell counts in the 2D and 3DD settings.Conclusion: A novel, sequential triple combination therapeutic regimen was successfully evaluated

  15. A structure-function analysis in patients with prekallikrein deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girolami, Antonio; Ferrari, Silvia; Cosi, Elisabetta; Lombardi, Anna Maria

    2017-11-22

    To investigate the structure-function relation in prekallikrein (PK) deficiency. PK is one of the proteins of the contact phase of blood coagulation which at the present time is the object of a revival of interest. All patients with PK deficiency who had been investigated by molecular biology techniques are the object of the present investigation. Details of patients were obtained from personal files and a time-unlimited PubMed search. Only cases with a molecular-biology-based diagnosis were included. Twelve families were included. The total number of missense mutation was 10, together with 3 stop codons and 2 insertions. These mutations involved mainly exons 11 and 14. There were eight proved homozygotes and three compound heterozygotes. In one instance, homozygosity was probable but not proved. In nine cases, the defect was Type I, whereas it was Type II in the remaining three. No bleeding manifestations were present in 11 of the 12 probands. One proband had epistaxis, but she had hypertension. Altogether, four patients had hypertension and one of them had also two myocardial infarctions. Despite the paucity of cases, it was established that the majority of mutations involved the catalytic domain. It is auspicable that future reports of patients with this disorder should include molecular studies. This would certainly contribute to the understanding of the contact phase of blood coagulation.

  16. Observation of $S=+1$ Narrow Resonances in the System $pK^0_s$ from $p+\\rm {C_3H_8}$ Collision at 10 GeV/$c$

    CERN Document Server

    Aslanyan, P Zh; Rikhvitskaya, G G

    2004-01-01

    Experimental data from a 2 m propane bubble chamber have been analyzed to search for an exotic baryon state, the $\\Theta^+$ baryon, in the $pK^0_s$ decay mode for the reaction $p+{\\rm C_3H_8}$ at 10 GeV/$c$. The $pK^0_s$ invariant mass spectrum shows resonant structures with $M_{p K_s^0}=1540\\pm 8$, $1613\\pm10$, $1821\\pm11$ MeV/$c^2$ and $\\Gamma_{p K_s^0}= 9.2\\pm1.8$, $16.1\\pm4.1$, $28.0\\pm9.4$ MeV/$c^2$. The statistical significance of these peaks has been estimated as $5.5$, $4.8$ and $5.0$ s.d., respectively. There are also small peaks in mass regions of 1487 (3.0 s.d.), 1690 (3.6 s.d.) and 1980 (3.0 s.d.) MeV/$c^2$.

  17. Comparative Evaluation of the Translocator Protein Radioligands 11C-DPA-713, 18F-DPA- 714, and 11C-PK11195 in a Rat Model of Acute Neuro-inflammation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chauveau, F.; Van Camp, N.; Dolle, F.; Kuhnast, B.; Hinnen, F.; Damont, A.; Boutin, H.; Tavitian, B.; Chauveau, F.; Van Camp, N.; Boutin, H; Tavitian, B.; Chauveau, F.; Boutin, H.; James, M.; Kassiou, M.; Kassiou, M.

    2009-01-01

    Overexpression of the translocator protein, TSPO (18 kDa), formerly known as the peripheral benzodiazepine receptor, is a hallmark of activation of cells of monocytic lineage (micro-glia and macrophages) during neuro-inflammation. Radiolabeling of TSPO ligands enables the detection of neuro-inflammatory lesions by PET. Two new radioligands, 11 C-labeled N, N-diethyl-2-[2-(4- methoxy-phenyl)-5, 7-dimethylpyrazolo[1, 5-a]pyrimidin-3-yl] acetamide (DPA-713) and 18 F-labeled N, N-diethyl-2-(2-(4-(2- fluoroethoxy)phenyl)-5, 7-dimethylpyrazolo[1, 5-a]pyrimidin-3-yl) acetamide (DPA-714), both belonging to the pyrazolopyrimidine class, were compared in vivo and in vitro using a rodent model of neuro-inflammation. Methods: 11 C-DPA-713 and 18 F-DPA-714, as well as the classic radioligand 11 C-labeled (R)-N-methyl- N-(1-methylpropyl)-1-(2-chlorophenyl)isoquinoline-3-carboxamide (PK11195), were used in the same rat model, in which intra-striatal injection of (R, S)-a-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolopropionique gave rise to a strong neuro-inflammatory response. Comparative endpoints included in vitro autoradiography and in vivo imaging on a dedicated small-animal PET scanner under identical conditions. Results: 11 C-DPA-713 and 18 F-DPA-714 could specifically localize the neuro-inflammatory site with a similar signal-to-noise ratio in vitro. In vivo, 18 F-DPA-714 performed better than 11 C-DPA-713 and 11 C-PK11195, with the highest ratio of ipsilateral to contralateral uptake and the highest binding potential. Conclusion: 18 F-DPA-714 appears to be an attractive alternative to 11 C-PK11195 because of its increased bioavailability in brain tissue and its reduced nonspecific binding. Moreover, its labeling with 18 F, the preferred PET isotope for radiopharmaceutical chemistry, favors its dissemination and wide clinical use. 18 F-DPA-714 will be further evaluated in longitudinal studies of neuro-inflammatory conditions such as are encountered in stroke or neuro

  18. The acidic functional groups of humic acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shanxiang, Li; Shuhe, Sun; Zhai Zongxi, Wu Qihu

    1983-09-01

    The acidic functional groups content, pK value, DELTAH and DELTAS of humic acid (HA) and nitro-humic acid (NHA) were determined by potentiometry, conductometry and calorimetric titration. The thermodynamic parameters of carboxylic groups and phenolic hydroxyl groups of humic acid are similar to that of simple hydroxy-benzoic acid. The configuration sites of acidic functional groups in humic acid from different coals are different. The carbonyl groups on aromatic rings are probably ortho to phenolic -OH for HA and NHA extracted from Huangxian's brown coal and Japanese lignite, while those from Lingshi's weathered coal are not. The weak -COOH groups of the latter possess higher chemical activity. The -COOH content in HA increases, phenolic -OH group decreases and the chemical acidity of acidic functional groups increases when HA is oxidized by nitric acid. (14 refs.)

  19. Corrección del deslizamiento de una ladera en la autovia A-4. PK. 340 en el término municipal de Marmolejo, Jaén mediante pantalla de pilotes y sistemas de drenaje

    OpenAIRE

    Sastre Alonso, Julio

    2013-01-01

    En este proyecto se describe el cálculo y diseño de una serie de medidas correctoras propuestas a raíz de un deslizamiento de ladera que tuvo lugar en noviembre de 2010 y afectó a parte de la calzada de la autovía A-4 en el P.K. 340 entre Córdoba y Jaén; principalmente en la ejecución de una pantalla de pilotes como elemento estructural de estabilización y contención del terreno, por medio del método de equilibrio límite y cálculo del módulo de reacción o coeficiente de balasto horizontal, a ...

  20. Synovial and systemic pharmacokinetics (PK) of triamcinolone acetonide (TA) following intra-articular (IA) injection of an extended-release microsphere-based formulation (FX006) or standard crystalline suspension in patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraus, V B; Conaghan, P G; Aazami, H A; Mehra, P; Kivitz, A J; Lufkin, J; Hauben, J; Johnson, J R; Bodick, N

    2018-01-01

    Intra-articular (IA) corticosteroids relieve osteoarthritis (OA) pain, but rapid absorption into systemic circulation may limit efficacy and produce untoward effects. We compared the pharmacokinetics (PK) of IA triamcinolone acetonide (TA) delivered as an extended-release, microsphere-based formulation (FX006) vs a crystalline suspension (TAcs) in knee OA patients. This Phase 2 open-label study sequentially enrolled 81 patients who received a single IA injection of FX006 (5 mL, 32 mg delivered dose, N = 63) or TAcs (1 mL, 40 mg, N = 18). Synovial fluid (SF) aspiration was attempted in each patient at baseline and one post-IA-injection visit (FX006: Week 1, Week 6, Week 12, Week 16 or Week 20; TAcs: Week 6). Blood was collected at baseline and multiple post-injection times. TA concentrations (validated LC-MS/MS, geometric means (GMs)), PK (non-compartmental analysis models), and adverse events (AEs) were assessed. SF TA concentrations following FX006 were quantifiable through Week 12 (pg/mL: 231,328.9 at Week 1; 3590.0 at Week 6; 290.6 at Week 12); post-TAcs, only two of eight patients had quantifiable SF TA at Week 6 (7.7 pg/mL). Following FX006, plasma TA gradually increased to peak (836.4 pg/mL) over 24 h and slowly declined to IA injection prolonged SF joint residency, diminished peak plasma levels, and thus reduced systemic TA exposure relative to TAcs. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  1. $\\pi \\pi $ phase-shifts in the reaction $\\pi p\\rightarrow p \\pi ^{+} \\pi ^{+} \\pi ^{-} $ at 8 GeV/c and $K \\pi $ Chew-Low anlysis in the reaction $\\K ^{-}p \\rightarrow pK ^{-} \\pi ^{+} \\pi ^{-}$ at 10 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva

    1971-01-01

    $\\pi \\pi $ phase-shifts in the reaction $\\pi p\\rightarrow p \\pi ^{+} \\pi ^{+} \\pi ^{-} $ at 8 GeV/c and $K \\pi $ Chew-Low anlysis in the reaction $\\K ^{-}p \\rightarrow pK ^{-} \\pi ^{+} \\pi ^{-}$ at 10 GeV

  2. Biodistribution of the radionuclides 18F-FDG, 11C-methionine, 11C-PK11195, and 68Ga-citrate in domestic juvenile female pigs and morphological and molecular imaging of the tracers in hematogenously disseminated Staphylococcus aureus lesions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Afzelius, Pia; Nielsen, Ole Lerberg; Alstrup, Aage K. O.

    2016-01-01

    with experimental bacterial infection. Four juvenile 14-15 weeks old female domestic pigs were scanned seven days after intra-arterial inoculation in the right femoral artery with a porcine strain of S. aureus using a sequential scanning protocol with 18F-FDG, 11C-methionine, 11C-PK11195 and 68Ga...

  3. Three Month Follow-Up of Rat Mild Traumatic Brain Injury : A Combined [18F]FDG and [11C]PK11195 Positron Emission Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vállez García, David; Otte, Andreas; Dierckx, Rudi A. J. O.; Doorduin, Janine

    2016-01-01

    Mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) is the most common cause of head trauma. The time course of functional pathology is not well defined, however. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the consequences of mTBI in rats over a period of 3 months by determining the presence of neuroinflammation

  4. Investigation of the acid-base and electromigration properties of 5-azacytosine derivatives using capillary electrophoresis and density functional theory calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geffertová, Denisa; Ali, Syed Tahir; Šolínová, Veronika; Krečmerová, Marcela; Holý, Antonín; Havlas, Zdeněk; Kašička, Václav

    2017-01-06

    Capillary electrophoresis (CE) and quantum mechanical density functional theory (DFT) were applied to the investigation of the acid-base and electromigration properties of important compounds: newly synthesized derivatives of 5-azacytosine - analogs of efficient antiviral drug cidofovir. These compounds exhibit a strong antiviral activity and they are considered as potential new antiviral agents. For their characterization and application, it is necessary to know their acid-base properties, particularly the acidity constants (pK a ) of their ionogenic groups (the basic N 3 atom of the triazine ring and the acidic phosphonic acid group in the alkyl chain). First, the mixed acidity constants (pK a mix ) of these ionogenic groups and the ionic mobilities of these compounds were determined by nonlinear regression analysis of the pH dependence of their effective electrophoretic mobilities. Effective mobilities were measured by CE in a series of background electrolytes in a wide pH range (2.0-10.5), at constant ionic strength (25mM) and constant temperature (25°C). Subsequently, the pK a mix values were recalculated to thermodynamic pK a values using the Debye-Hückel theory. The thermodynamic pK a value of the NH + moiety at the N 3 atom of the triazine ring was found to be in the range 2.82-3.30, whereas the pK a of the hydrogenphosphonate group reached values from 7.19 to 7.47, depending on the structure of the analyzed compounds. These experimentally determined pK a values were in good agreement with those calculated by quantum mechanical DFT. In addition, DFT calculations revealed that from the four nitrogen atoms in the 5-azacytosine moiety, the N 3 atom of the triazine ring is preferentially protonated. Effective charges of analyzed compounds ranged from zero or close-to-zero values at pH 2 to -2 elementary charges at pH≥9. Ionic mobilities were in the range (-16.7 to -19.1)×10 -9 m 2 V -1 s -1 for univalent anions and in the interval (-26.9 to -30.3)×10 -9 m

  5. Connection of functional quality of partial removable dentures and the degree of patients' phonetic adaptation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artjomenko, Victoria; Vidzis, Aldis; Zigurs, Guntis

    2015-01-01

    Phonetic adaptation is a complex biological phenomenon with a highly individual course, depending on the patient's motivation to use prosthesis, on the functional quality of removable dentures. The aim of the study was to estimate phonetic adaptation in patients with partial dentures, connecting it to alteration in speech quality and dentures functional value. We examined some peculiarities of phonetic adaptation in 50 patients with removable dentures (50 patients with natural dentition were invited for the control group). The standardized evaluation protocols (12 speech quality determining parameters) were developed separately for Latvian and Russian native speakers. 500 speech video samples were recorded and analysed according to pre-established guidelines. The connection of speech quality and the functional quality of the dentures was assessed. Statistical analysis was performed using SPSS 20.0. P values equal to or less than 0.05 were considered to be statistically significant. In patients with appropriate functional quality of removable dentures distorted speech production was detected in 25% (pk=0.008) cases and in patients with inappropriate functional quality of the prosthesis - in 40% (pkdentures functional value were satisfied with their speech performance in 96% (pk=0.674), in the group with inappropriate dentures functional value only 59% (premovable dentures depends on the patient's individual adaptation capacity, prosthetic design and functional value. Thus statistically significant correlation between removable partial dentures functional value, duration of usage and the degree of patients' phonetic adaptation (p<0.001) may be considered to be confirmed.

  6. Functional analysis and molecular dynamics simulation of LOX-1 K167N polymorphism reveal alteration of receptor activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Biocca

    Full Text Available The human lectin-like oxidized low density lipoprotein receptor 1 LOX-1, encoded by the ORL1 gene, is the major scavenger receptor for oxidized low density lipoprotein in endothelial cells. Here we report on the functional effects of a coding SNP, c.501G>C, which produces a single amino acid change (K>N at codon 167. Our study was aimed at elucidating whether the c.501G>C polymorphism changes the binding affinity of LOX-1 receptor altering its function. The presence of p.K167N mutation reduces ox-LDL binding and uptake. Ox-LDL activated extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1 and 2 (ERK 1/2 is inhibited. Furthermore, ox-LDL induced biosynthesis of LOX-1 receptors is dependent on the p.K167N variation. In human macrophages, derived from c.501G>C heterozygous individuals, the ox-LDL induced LOX-1 46 kDa band is markedly lower than in induced macrophages derived from c.501G>C controls. Investigation of p.K167N mutation through molecular dynamics simulation and electrostatic analysis suggests that the ox-LDL binding may be attributed to the coupling between the electrostatic potential distribution and the asymmetric flexibility of the basic spine residues. The N/N-LOX-1 mutant has either interrupted electrostatic potential and asymmetric fluctuations of the basic spine arginines.

  7. Pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics in HIV prevention; current status and future directions: a summary of the DAIDS and BMGF sponsored think tank on pharmacokinetics (PK)/pharmacodynamics (PD) in HIV prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romano, Joseph; Kashuba, Angela; Becker, Stephen; Cummins, James; Turpin, Jim; Veronese, Fulvia

    2013-11-01

    Thirty years after its beginning, the HIV/AIDS epidemic is still raging around the world. According to UNAIDS, in 2011 alone 1.7M deaths were attributable to AIDS, and 2.5M people were newly infected by the virus. Despite the success in treating HIV-infected people with potent antiretroviral drugs, preventing HIV infection is the key to ending the epidemic. Recently, the efficacy of topical and systemic antiviral chemoprophylaxis (i.e., preexposure prophylaxis or "PrEP"), using the same drugs used for HIV treatment, has been demonstrated in a number of clinical trials. However, results from other trials have been inconsistent, especially those evaluating PrEP in women. These inconsistencies may result from our incomplete understanding of pharmacokinetics (PK)/pharmacodynamics (PD) at the mucosal sites of sexual transmission: the male and female gastrointestinal and reproductive tracts. The drug concentrations used in these trials were derived from those used for treatment; however, we still do not know the relationship between the therapeutic and the preventive dose. This article presents the first comprehensive review of the available data in the HIV pharmacology field from animal models to human studies, and outlines gaps, challenges, and future directions. Addressing these pharmacological gaps and challenges will be critical in selecting and advancing future PrEP candidates and strategies with the greatest impact on the HIV epidemic.

  8. Linoleic acid enhance the production of moncolin K and red pigments in Monascus ruber by activating mokH and mokA, and by accelerating cAMP-PkA pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jing; Liao, NanQing; Li, HaoMing

    2018-04-01

    Monacolin K, an inhibitor of HMG-CoA reductase, is a secondary metabolite synthesized by polyketide synthases (PKS) from Monascus ruber. The mokH gene encoding Zn(II)2Cys6 binding protein and mokA gene encoding polyketide synthase are presumed to activate monacolin K production. In this study, linoleic acid could be a quorum sensing signaling molecule to increase monacolin K production in the cyclic AMP(cAMP)-protein kinase A(PKA) signaling pathway. Analysis of the PKA activity and the cAMP concentration shows that linoleic acid could increase cAMP concentration and activate PKA. Analysis of the RT-qPCR products demonstrates that 256μM and 512μM linoleic acid can up-regulate mokH and mokA gene transcript levels. Especially with 512μM linoleic acid addition, linoleic acid increase 1.35 folds of monacolin K production, but 64μM linoleic acid increase 1.94 folds of red pigment production in Monascus ruber. These results show the cAMP-PkA pathway activity can up-regulate mokA and mokH gene, which enhance the yield of Monacolin K. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Protein kinase C-mediated ATP stimulation of Na(+)-ATPase activity in LLC-PK1 cells involves a P2Y2 and/or P2Y4 receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wengert, M; Ribeiro, M C; Abreu, T P; Coutinho-Silva, R; Leão-Ferreira, L R; Pinheiro, A A S; Caruso-Neves, C

    2013-07-15

    ATP-activated P2Y receptors play an important role in renal sodium excretion. The aim of this study was to evaluate the modulation of ATPase-driven sodium reabsorption in the proximal tubule by ATP or adenosine (Ado). LLC-PK1 cells, a model of porcine proximal tubule cells, were used. ATP (10(-6)M) or Ado (10(-6)M) specifically stimulated Na(+)-ATPase activity without any changes in (Na(+)+K(+))-ATPase activity. Our results show that the Ado effect is mediated by its conversion to ATP. Furthermore, it was observed that the effect of ATP was mimicked by UTP, ATPγS and 2-thio-UTP, an agonist of P2Y2 and P2Y4 receptors. In addition, ATP-stimulated Na(+)-ATPase activity involves protein kinase C (PKC). Our results indicate that ATP-induced stimulation of proximal tubule Na(+)-ATPase activity is mediated by a PKC-dependent P2Y2 and/or P2Y4 pathway. These findings provide new perspectives on the role of the effect of P2Y-mediated extracellular ATP on renal sodium handling. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Protective effect and mechanism of action of saponins isolated from the seeds of gac (Momordica cochinchinensis Spreng.) against cisplatin-induced damage in LLC-PK1 kidney cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Kiwon; Lee, Dahae; Yu, Jae Sik; Namgung, Hojin; Kang, Ki Sung; Kim, Ki Hyun

    2016-03-01

    This study was performed to investigate the renoprotective effect and mechanism of Momordicae Semen, gac seeds, against the cisplatin-induced damage in LLC-PK1 kidney cells. In order to identify the active components, three major saponins were isolated from extract of the gac seed, gypsogenin 3-O-β-d-galactopyranosyl(1→2)-[α-L-rhamnopyranosyl(1→3)]-β-d-glucuronopyranoside (1), quillaic acid 3-O-β-D-galactopyranosyl(1→2)-[α-L-rhamnopyranosyl(1→3)]-β-D-glucuronopyranoside (2), and momordica saponin I (3). Compounds 1 and 2 ameliorated cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity up to 80% of the control value at both 5 and 25μM. Phosphorylation of MAPKs was decreased along cisplatin treatment after treatment with compounds 1 and 2. These results show that blocking the MAPKs signaling cascade plays a critical role in mediating the renoprotective effect of Momordicae Semen extract and compounds 1 and 2. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Function of One Regular Separable Relation Set Decided for the Minimal Covering in Multiple Valued Logic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Yu Zhen

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Multiple-valued logic is an important branch of the computer science and technology. Multiple-valued logic studies the theory, multiple-valued circuit & multiple-valued system, and the applications of multiple-valued logic included.In the theory of multiple-valued logic, one primary and important problem is the completeness of function sets, which can be solved depending on the decision for all the precomplete sets(also called maximal closed sets of K-valued function sets noted by PK*, and another is the decision for Sheffer function, which can be totally solved by picking out all of the minimal covering of the precomplete sets. In the function structure theory of multi-logic, decision on Sheffer function is an important role. It contains structure and decision of full multi-logic and partial multi-logic. Its decision is closely related to decision of completeness of function which can be done by deciding the minimal covering of full multi-logic and partial-logic. By theory of completeness of partial multi-logic, we prove that function of one regular separable relation is not minimal covering of PK* under the condition of m = 2, σ = e.

  12. The function of DREAM gene mediated by NF-kB signal pathway in the pathogenesis of osteosarcoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Jize; Lv, Mingbo; Zhang, Wenbo

    2017-01-01

    To explore the function of DREAM gene mediated by NF-kB signal pathway in the pathogenesis of osteosarcoma. This study included 13 Sprague Dawley (SD) rats with osteosarcoma (treatment group) and 13 healthy rats (control group). NF-kB, DREAM and P105 mRNAs expression levels were determined using quantitative PCR (qPCR). The expression levels of NF-kB, DREAM and P105 proteins were evaluated using ELISA and western blot. Also, DREAM protein expression in rats was determined by immunofluorescence. NF-kB and DREAM levels in the treatment group were significantly higher than those in the control group (pkB and DREAM expression levels in the treatment group were significantly higher than in the control group (pkB and DREAM levels in the treatment group were 4.3±0.12 μg/l and 6.8±0.21 μg/l, respectively. These levels in the control group were 0.96±0.11 μg/l and 1.25±0.18 μg/l, respectively. P105 expression level in the treatment group was 0.37±0.11 μg/l which was significantly lower than that in the control group (1.63±0.21 μg/l) (pkB signal pathway promoted the expression of DREAM gene and also promoted the pathogenesis and worsening of osteosarcoma.

  13. Interaction of GABA-mimetics with the taurine transporter (TauT, Slc6a6) in hyperosmotic treated Caco-2, LLC-PK1 and rat renal SKPT cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen, Rune Nørgaard; Lagunas, Candela; Plum, Jakob; Holm, René; Nielsen, Carsten Uhd

    2016-01-20

    The aim of the present study was to investigate if basic GABA-mimetics interact with the taurine transporter (TauT, Slc6a6), and to find a suitable cell based model that is robust towards extracellular changes in osmolality during uptake studies. Taurine uptake was measured in human Caco-2 cells, porcine LLC-PK1 cells, and rat SKPT cells using radiolabelled taurine. Hyperosmotic conditions were obtained by incubation with raffinose (final osmolality of 500mOsm) for 24h prior to the uptake experiments. Expression of the taurine transporter, TauT, was investigated at the mRNA level by real-time PCR. Uptake of the GABA-mimetics gaboxadol and vigabatrin was investigated in SKPT cells, and quantified by liquid scintillation or HPLC-MS/MS analysis, respectively. The uptake rate of [(3)H]-taurine was Na(+) and Cl(-) and concentration dependent with taurine with an apparent Vmax of 6.3±1.6pmolcm(-2)min(-1) and a Km of 24.9±15.0μM. β-alanine, nipecotic acid, gaboxadol, GABA, vigabatrin, δ-ALA and guvacine inhibited the taurine uptake rate in a concentration dependent manner. The order of affinity for TauT was β-alanine>GABA>nipecotic acid>guvacine>δ-ALA>vigabatrin>gaboxadol with IC50-values of 0.04, 1.07, 2.02, 4.19, 4.94, 31.4 and 39.9mM, respectively. In conclusion, GABA mimetics inhibited taurine uptake in hyperosmotic rat renal SKPT cells. SKPT cells, which seem to be a useful model for investigating taurine transport in the short-term presence of high concentrations of osmolytes. Furthermore, analogues of β-alanine appear to have higher affinities for TauT than GABA-analogues. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Respostas do feijoeiro à aplicação de diversos tipos de matéria orgânica não decomposta, na presença de adubações minerais com P, PK, NPou NPK Responses of dry beans to applications of some undecomposed organic materials in the presence of mineral fertilizers containing, P, PK, NP or NPK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shiro Miyasaka

    1967-01-01

    Full Text Available Experiências conduzidas em Campinas (solo Latosol Roxo e Pindorama (solo Podzolizado de Lins e Marília, variação Marília, para estudar os efeitos de diversos tipos de matéria orgânica não decomposta, na presença de adubações minerais com P, PK, NP ou NPK, mostraram que, dos adubos minerais, sòmente o nitrogênio aumentou substancialmente a produção do feijoeiro. Dos adubos orgânicos comparados - ramas de soja perene, capim-gordura, fôlhas de café e serapilheira - o primeiro foi o mais eficiente. Em Campinas, as ramas de soja aumentaram a produção, tanto na ausência como na presença do nitrogênio mineral, quer aplicadas em sulcos laterais aos destinados às sementes de feijão, quer em cobertura, após a emergência das plantas. Em Pindorama, porém, só atuaram favoravelmente quando empregadas em sulcos laterais, na ausência do nitrogênio mineral.Experiments were conducted at Campinas and Pindorama, State of São Paulo, to study the effects of the indicated treatments on dry beans (Phaseolus vulgarisL. Of the mineral fertilizers, only nitrogen increased the yields in both localities. Of the organic materials - Glycine javanica, Melinis minutiflora, coffee tree leaves and forest litter - the first mentioned was the most effective. In the Campinas experiment, G. javanica induced considerable yield increases, either when side placed or top dressed in the absence or in the presence of mineral nitrogen. At Pindorama, however, it was effective only when side placed in the absence of mineral nitrogen.

  15. Pharmacokinetics, Safety and Cognitive Function Profile of Rupatadine 10, 20 and 40 mg in Healthy Japanese Subjects: A Randomised Placebo-Controlled Trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jörg Täubel

    Full Text Available Rupatadine is a marketed second generation antihistamine, with anti-PAF activity, indicated for symptomatic treatment of allergic rhinitis and urticaria. This study was conducted to evaluate the pharmacokinetics (PK, pharmacodynamics (PD, safety and tolerability of rupatadine in healthy Japanese subjects after single and multiple oral doses.In this randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled study, 27 male and female healthy Japanese subjects were administered single and multiple escalating rupatadine dose of 10, 20 and 40 mg or placebo. Blood samples were collected at different time points for PK measurements and subjects were assessed for safety and tolerability. The effect of rupatadine on cognitive functioning was evaluated by means of computerized cognitive tests: rapid visual information processing (RVP, reaction time (RT, spatial working memory (SWM and visual analogue scales (VAS.Exposure to rupatadine as measured by Cmax and AUC was found to increase in a dose dependent manner over the dose range of 10-40 mg for both single and multiple dose administration. The safety assessments showed that all treatment related side effects were of mild intensity and there were no serious adverse events (SAEs or withdrawals due to treatment-emergent adverse events (TEAEs in this study. The therapeutic dose of rupatadine did not show any CNS impairment in any of the cognitive tests.This study demonstrated that rupatadine is safe and well tolerated by Japanese healthy subjects. The PK-PD profile confirmed previous experience with rupatadine.

  16. Analytical FcRn affinity chromatography for functional characterization of monoclonal antibodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlothauer, Tilman; Rueger, Petra; Stracke, Jan Olaf; Hertenberger, Hubert; Fingas, Felix; Kling, Lothar; Emrich, Thomas; Drabner, Georg; Seeber, Stefan; Auer, Johannes; Koch, Stefan; Papadimitriou, Apollon

    2013-01-01

    The neonatal Fc receptor (FcRn) is important for the metabolic fate of IgG antibodies in vivo. Analysis of the interaction between FcRn and IgG in vitro might provide insight into the structural and functional integrity of therapeutic IgG that may affect pharmacokinetics (PK) in vivo. We developed a standardized pH gradient FcRn affinity liquid chromatography method with conditions closely resembling the physiological mechanism of interaction between IgG and FcRn. This method allows the separation of molecular IgG isoforms, degradation products and engineered molecules based on their affinity to FcRn. Human FcRn was immobilized on the column and a linear pH gradient from pH 5.5 to 8.8 was applied. FcRn chromatography was used in comparison to surface plasmon resonance to characterize different monoclonal IgG preparations, e.g., oxidized or aggregated species. Wild-type and engineered IgGs were compared in vitro by FcRn chromatography and in vivo by PK studies in huFcRn transgenic mice. Analytical FcRn chromatography allows differentiation of IgG samples and variants by peak pattern and retention time profile. The method can distinguish: 1) IgGs with different Fabs, 2) oxidized from native IgG, 3) aggregates from monomer and 4) antibodies with mutations in the Fc part from wild-type IgGs. Changes in the FcRn chromatographic behavior of mutant IgGs relative to the wild-type IgG correlate to changes in the PK profile in the FcRn transgenic mice. These results demonstrate that FcRn affinity chromatography is a useful new method for the assessment of IgG integrity. PMID:23765230

  17. Role of myristoylation in membrane attachment and function of G alpha i-3 on Golgi membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brand, S H; Holtzman, E J; Scher, D A; Ausiello, D A; Stow, J L

    1996-05-01

    Heterotrimeric G protein alpha-subunits localized on the cytoplasmic face of Golgi membranes are involved in regulating vesicle trafficking and protein secretion. We investigated the role of myristoylation in attachment of the G alpha i-3 subunit to Golgi membranes. G alpha i-3 was epitope-tagged by insertion of a FLAG sequence at an NH2-terminal site predicted to interfere with myristoylation, and the resulting NT-alpha i-3 construct was stably transfected and expressed in polarized epithelial LLC-PK1 cells. Metabolic labeling confirmed that the translation product of NT-alpha i-3 was not myristoylated. In contrast to endogenous G alpha 1-3, which is tightly bound to Golgi membranes, the unmyristoylated FLAG-tagged NT-alpha i-3 did not attach to membranes; it was localized by immunofluorescence in the cytoplasm of LLC-PK1 cells and was detected only in the cytosol fraction of cell homogenates. Pertussis toxin-dependent ADP-ribosylation was used to test the ability of NT-alpha i-3 to interact with membrane-bound beta gamma-subunits. In both in vitro and in vivo assays, cytosolic NT-alpha i-3 alone was not ADP-ribosylated, although in the presence of membranes it could interact with G beta gamma-subunits to form heterotrimers. The expression of NT-alpha i-3 in LLC-PK1 cells altered the rate of basolateral secretion of sulfated proteoglycans, consistent with the demonstrated function of endogenous G alpha i-3. These data are consistent with a model in which G alpha i-3 utilizes NH2-terminal myristoylation to bind to Golgi membranes and to maximize its interaction with G beta gamma-subunits. Furthermore, our results show that stable attachment of G alpha i-3 to Golgi membranes is not required for it to participate as a regulatory element in vesicle trafficking in the secretory pathway.

  18. The pharmacokinetics of peginterferon lambda-1a following single dose administration to subjects with impaired renal function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hruska, Matthew W; Adamczyk, Robert; Colston, Elizabeth; Hesney, Michael; Stonier, Michele; Myler, Heather; Bertz, Richard

    2015-09-01

    This open label study was conducted to assess the effect of renal impairment (RI) on the pharmacokinetics (PK) of peginterferon lambda-1a (Lambda). Subjects (age 18-75 years, BMI 18-35 kg m(-2) ) were enrolled into one of five renal function groups: normal (n = 12), mild RI (n = 8), moderate RI (n = 8), severe RI (n = 7), end-stage renal disease (ESRD, n = 8) based on estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) calculated using the Modification of Diet in Renal Disease (MDRD) equation. Subjects received a single dose of Lambda (180 µg) subcutaneously on day 1 followed by PK serum sample collections through day 29. Safety, tolerability and immunogenicity data were collected through day 43. PK parameters were estimated and summarized by group. Geometric mean ratios (GMR) and 90% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated between normal and RI groups. With decreasing eGFR, Lambda exposure (Cmax , AUC) increased while apparent clearance (CL/F) and apparent volume of distribution (V/F) decreased. Relative to subjects with normal renal function (geometric mean AUC = 99.5 ng ml(-1) h), Lambda exposure estimates (AUC) were slightly increased in the mild RI group (geometric mean [90% CI]: 1.20 [0.82, 1.77]) and greater in the moderate (1.95 [1.35, 2.83]), severe RI (1.95 [1.30, 2.93]) and ESRD (1.88 [1.30, 2.73]) groups. Lambda was generally well tolerated. The results demonstrated that RI reduces the clearance of Lambda and suggests that dose modifications may not be required in patients with mild RI but may be required in patients with moderate to severe RI or ESRD. © 2015 The British Pharmacological Society.

  19. PET Centre and Centre for Functionally Integrative Neuroscience, Aarhus University

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cumming, Paul; Pedersen, Mads Damgaard; Minuzzi, Luciano

    2006-01-01

    The cerebral distribution of peripheral-type benzodiazepine binding sites (PBBS) in human brain has been investigated by positron emission tomography (PET) with the specific radioligand [11C]PK11195 in diverse neuropathological conditions. However, little is known about the pattern of PK11195 bin...

  20. Pulmonary functions in air conditioner users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khaliq, Farah; Sharma, Sameer; Tandon, O P

    2006-01-01

    Air conditioning may affect human health since it has profound effect on our environment, than just lowering temperature. The present study was planned to assess the effect of air conditioners (AC) on pulmonary functions in young healthy non-smoker males. The study group comprised of ten subjects who were using AC's in their cars for at least 1 hr daily since last 6 months. While ten subjects who did not use AC at all served as controls. The pulmonary functions were assessed using PK Morgan 232 spirometer in a closed room. The peak expiratory flow rate (PEFR) and Forced expiratory flow between 25-75% of vital capacity (FEF25-75) were significantly reduced in subjects using car AC's. Inspiratory flow rates also showed a trend towards decline in AC users but could not reach the level of significance. The lung volumes and capacities were not significantly different in the two groups except for forced expiratory volume in 0.5 sec (FEV 0.5 sec), which also decreased in AC users. The airway resistance and lung compliance did not show significant change. In the presence of normal FEV1, reduced FEF25-75% which is the flow rate over the middle half of vital capacity, is an evidence of mild airflow limitation. The result is suggestive of predisposition of AC users towards respiratory disorders in form of mild airflow restriction.

  1. Estimating the arterial input function from dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI data with compensation for flow enhancement (II): Applications in spine diagnostics and assessment of crohn's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Schie, Jeroen J N; Lavini, Cristina; van Vliet, Lucas J; Kramer, Gem; Pieters-van den Bos, Indra; Marcus, J T; Stoker, Jaap; Vos, Frans M

    2018-05-01

    Pharmacokinetic (PK) models can describe microvascular density and integrity. An essential component of PK models is the arterial input function (AIF) representing the time-dependent concentration of contrast agent (CA) in the blood plasma supplied to a tissue. To evaluate a novel method for subject-specific AIF estimation that takes inflow effects into account. Retrospective study. Thirteen clinical patients referred for spine-related complaints; 21 patients from a study into luminal Crohn's disease with known Crohn's Disease Endoscopic Index of Severity (CDEIS). Dynamic fast spoiled gradient echo (FSPGR) at 3T. A population-averaged AIF, AIFs derived from distally placed regions of interest (ROIs), and the new AIF method were applied. Tofts' PK model parameters (including v p and K trans ) obtained with the three AIFs were compared. In the Crohn's patients K trans was correlated to CDEIS. The median values of the PK model parameters from the three methods were compared using a Mann-Whitney U-test. The associated variances were statistically assessed by the Brown-Forsythe test. Spearman's rank correlation coefficient was computed to test the correlation of K trans to CDEIS. The median v p was significantly larger when using the distal ROI approach, compared to the two other methods (P < 0.05 for both comparisons, in both applications). Also, the variances in v p were significantly larger with the ROI approach (P < 0.05 for all comparisons). In the Crohn's disease study, the estimated K trans parameter correlated better with the CDEIS (r = 0.733, P < 0.001) when the proposed AIF was used, compared to AIFs from the distal ROI method (r = 0.429, P = 0.067) or the population-averaged AIF (r = 0.567, P = 0.011). The proposed method yielded realistic PK model parameters and improved the correlation of the K trans parameter with CDEIS, compared to existing approaches. 3 Technical Efficacy Stage 1 J. Magn. Reson. Imaging 2018;47:1197-1204. © 2017

  2. D-Amino acid oxidase bio-functionalized platforms: Toward an enhanced enzymatic bio-activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera, Elisa; Valdez Taubas, Javier; Giacomelli, Carla E.

    2015-11-01

    The purpose of this work is to study the adsorption process and surface bio-activity of His-tagged D-amino acid oxidase (DAAO) from Rhodotorula gracilis (His6-RgDAAO) as the first step for the development of an electrochemical bio-functionalized platform. With such a purpose this work comprises: (a) the His6-RgDAAO bio-activity in solution determined by amperometry, (b) the adsorption mechanism of His6-RgDAAO on bare gold and carboxylated modified substrates in the absence (substrate/COO-) and presence of Ni(II) (substrate/COO- + Ni(II)) determined by reflectometry, and (c) the bio-activity of the His6-RgDAAO bio-functionalized platforms determined by amperometry. Comparing the adsorption behavior and bio-activity of His6-RgDAAO on these different solid substrates allows understanding the contribution of the diverse interactions responsible for the platform performance. His6-RgDAAO enzymatic performance in solution is highly improved when compared to the previously used pig kidney (pk) DAAO. His6-RgDAAO exhibits an amperometrically detectable bio-activity at concentrations as low as those expected on a bio-functional platform; hence, it is a viable bio-recognition element of D-amino acids to be coupled to electrochemical platforms. Moreover, His6-RgDAAO bio-functionalized platforms exhibit a higher surface activity than pkDAAO physically adsorbed on gold. The platform built on Ni(II) modified substrates present enhanced bio-activity because the surface complexes histidine-Ni(II) provide with site-oriented, native-like enzymes. The adsorption mechanism responsible of the excellent performance of the bio-functionalized platform takes place in two steps involving electrostatic and bio-affinity interactions whose prevalence depends on the degree of surface coverage.

  3. Multicomponent Density Functional Theory: Impact of Nuclear Quantum Effects on Proton Affinities and Geometries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brorsen, Kurt R; Yang, Yang; Hammes-Schiffer, Sharon

    2017-08-03

    Nuclear quantum effects such as zero point energy play a critical role in computational chemistry and often are included as energetic corrections following geometry optimizations. The nuclear-electronic orbital (NEO) multicomponent density functional theory (DFT) method treats select nuclei, typically protons, quantum mechanically on the same level as the electrons. Electron-proton correlation is highly significant, and inadequate treatments lead to highly overlocalized nuclear densities. A recently developed electron-proton correlation functional, epc17, has been shown to provide accurate nuclear densities for molecular systems. Herein, the NEO-DFT/epc17 method is used to compute the proton affinities for a set of molecules and to examine the role of nuclear quantum effects on the equilibrium geometry of FHF - . The agreement of the computed results with experimental and benchmark values demonstrates the promise of this approach for including nuclear quantum effects in calculations of proton affinities, pK a 's, optimized geometries, and reaction paths.

  4. Population Pharmacokinetic Analysis of Cefiderocol, a Parenteral Siderophore Cephalosporin, in Healthy Subjects, Subjects with Various Degrees of Renal Function, and Patients with Complicated Urinary Tract Infection or Acute Uncomplicated Pyelonephritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawaguchi, Nao; Katsube, Takayuki; Echols, Roger; Wajima, Toshihiro

    2018-02-01

    Cefiderocol, a novel parenteral siderophore cephalosporin, exhibits potent efficacy against most Gram-negative bacteria, including carbapenem-resistant strains. The aim of this study was to perform a population pharmacokinetic (PK) analysis based on plasma cefiderocol concentrations in healthy subjects, subjects with various degrees of renal function, and patients with complicated urinary tract infection (cUTI) or acute uncomplicated pyelonephritis (AUP) caused by Gram-negative pathogens and to calculate the fraction of the time during the dosing interval where the free drug concentration in plasma exceeds the MIC ( fT MIC ). Population PK models were developed with three renal function markers, body surface area-adjusted estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR), absolute eGFR, and creatinine clearance, on the basis of 2,571 plasma concentrations from 91 subjects without infection and 238 patients with infection. The population PK models with each renal function marker adequately described the plasma cefiderocol concentrations. Clear relationships of total clearance (CL) to all renal function markers were observed. Body weight and disease status (with or without infection) were also significant covariates. The CL in patients with infection was 26% higher than that in subjects without infection. The fT MIC values were more than 75% in all patients (and were 100% in most patients), suggesting that a sufficient exposure to cefiderocol was provided by the tested dose regimens (2 g every 8 h as the standard dose regimen) for the treatment of cUTI or AUP caused by Gram-negative pathogens. Copyright © 2018 Kawaguchi et al.

  5. Generalized functions

    CERN Document Server

    Gelfand, I M; Graev, M I; Vilenkin, N Y; Pyatetskii-Shapiro, I I

    Volume 1 is devoted to basics of the theory of generalized functions. The first chapter contains main definitions and most important properties of generalized functions as functional on the space of smooth functions with compact support. The second chapter talks about the Fourier transform of generalized functions. In Chapter 3, definitions and properties of some important classes of generalized functions are discussed; in particular, generalized functions supported on submanifolds of lower dimension, generalized functions associated with quadratic forms, and homogeneous generalized functions are studied in detail. Many simple basic examples make this book an excellent place for a novice to get acquainted with the theory of generalized functions. A long appendix presents basics of generalized functions of complex variables.

  6. An investigation of the functional groups on the surface of activated carbons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MARYTE DERVINYTE

    2004-05-01

    Full Text Available Activated carbons were produced in the laboratory from wood using a 20-run Plackett–Burman experimental design for 19 factors. The obtained batches of activated carbon were analysed by potentiometric titration and FTIR spectroscopy to determine the surface functional groups. The results obtained by potentiometric titration displayed the distribution of individual acidity constants of those groups in the pK range. Considering this parameter, the surface functional groups were divided into carboxyl, lactone and phenol. The linear regression equations reflecting the influence of each operation used for the synthesis on the amount of these functional groups in the obtained activated carbons were generated. The FTIR spectra were used in parallel for the evaluation of the amount and the type of the surface functional groups. Relationships between the two data sets obtained by potentiometric titration and FTIR spectroscopy were evaluated by correlation analysis. It was established that the amount of surface functional groups determined by potentiometric titration positively correlates with the intensity of the peaks of hydrophilic functional groups in the FTIR spectra. At the same time, the negative correlation between potentiometrically determined amount of surface functional groups and the intensity of peaks of hydrophobic functional groups was observed. Most probably, these non-polar formations can take part in the interaction of carbon surface with H+/OH- ions and diminish the strength of existent functional groups.

  7. Functional Boxplots

    KAUST Repository

    Sun, Ying

    2011-01-01

    This article proposes an informative exploratory tool, the functional boxplot, for visualizing functional data, as well as its generalization, the enhanced functional boxplot. Based on the center outward ordering induced by band depth for functional data, the descriptive statistics of a functional boxplot are: the envelope of the 50% central region, the median curve, and the maximum non-outlying envelope. In addition, outliers can be detected in a functional boxplot by the 1.5 times the 50% central region empirical rule, analogous to the rule for classical boxplots. The construction of a functional boxplot is illustrated on a series of sea surface temperatures related to the El Niño phenomenon and its outlier detection performance is explored by simulations. As applications, the functional boxplot and enhanced functional boxplot are demonstrated on children growth data and spatio-temporal U.S. precipitation data for nine climatic regions, respectively. This article has supplementary material online. © 2011 American Statistical Association.

  8. Orbit Functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anatoliy Klimyk

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available In the paper, properties of orbit functions are reviewed and further developed. Orbit functions on the Euclidean space E_n are symmetrized exponential functions. The symmetrization is fulfilled by a Weyl group corresponding to a Coxeter-Dynkin diagram. Properties of such functions will be described. An orbit function is the contribution to an irreducible character of a compact semisimple Lie group G of rank n from one of its Weyl group orbits. It is shown that values of orbit functions are repeated on copies of the fundamental domain F of the affine Weyl group (determined by the initial Weyl group in the entire Euclidean space E_n. Orbit functions are solutions of the corresponding Laplace equation in E_n, satisfying the Neumann condition on the boundary of F. Orbit functions determine a symmetrized Fourier transform and a transform on a finite set of points.

  9. Functional displays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Angelis De, F.; Haentjens, J.

    1995-01-01

    The Functional Displays are directly derived from the Man-Machine Design key document: Function-Based Task Analysis. The presentation defines and describes the goals-means structure of the plant function along with applicable control volumes and parameters of interest. The purpose of the subject is to show, through an example of a preliminary design, what the main parts of a function are. (3 figs.)

  10. Functional Programming

    OpenAIRE

    Chitil, Olaf

    2009-01-01

    Functional programming is a programming paradigm like object-oriented programming and logic programming. Functional programming comprises both a specific programming style and a class of programming languages that encourage and support this programming style. Functional programming enables the programmer to describe an algorithm on a high-level, in terms of the problem domain, without having to deal with machine-related details. A program is constructed from functions that only map inputs to ...

  11. Functionalized amphipols

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Della Pia, Eduardo Antonio; Hansen, Randi Westh; Zoonens, Manuela

    2014-01-01

    Amphipols are amphipathic polymers that stabilize membrane proteins isolated from their native membrane. They have been functionalized with various chemical groups in the past years for protein labeling and protein immobilization. This large toolbox of functionalized amphipols combined with their...... surfaces for various applications in synthetic biology. This review summarizes the properties of functionalized amphipols suitable for synthetic biology approaches....

  12. Resonance-like QGP signals displayed in general charge balance functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pan, Yinghua; Zhang, Weining

    2014-01-01

    Experiment and lattice simulation show that the quark–gluon plasma (QGP) system displays strong interaction between constituents at temperature a few times the critical temperature T c . This QGP picture can be explained by assuming that the QGP matter above T c is rich in different kinds of bound states, namely resonance-like QGP (RQGP). The chemical composition of the QGP system produced in ultra-relativistic heavy-ion collisions can be investigated through a general charge balance function which describes two-wave quark production during expansion afterward. In this paper, we investigate the signals of this RQGP through general charge balance functions. We find that the quasiparticles in QGP contribute a little to the balance functions because of their heavy masses. The balance functions reduce to the situation discussed before where only one-wave charge production is involved if only the quasiparticles in QGP are considered. However, the baryonic bound states in QGP have a significant effect on the balance function B pp ¯(Δy), causing a dip in the pp¯ balance function at small Δy. The existence of the binary and baryonic bound states amplify the negative dip of the balance function B pK - (Δy) at Δy ∽ 1. (author)

  13. Lightness functions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Campi, Stefano; Gardner, Richard; Gronchi, Paolo

    2012-01-01

    Variants of the brightness function of a convex body K in n-dimensional Euclidean are investigated. The Lambertian lightness function L(K; v , w ) gives the total reflected light resulting from illumination by a light source at infinity in the direction w that is visible when looking...... in the direction v . The partial brightness function R( K ; v , w ) gives the area of the projection orthogonal to v of the portion of the surface of K that is both illuminated by a light source from the direction w and visible when looking in the direction v . A class of functions called lightness functions...... is introduced that includes L(K;.) and R(K;.) as special cases. Much of the theory of the brightness function like uniqueness, stability, and the existence and properties of convex bodies of maximal and minimal volume with finitely many function values equal to those of a given convex body, is extended...

  14. Functional analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Kantorovich, L V

    1982-01-01

    Functional Analysis examines trends in functional analysis as a mathematical discipline and the ever-increasing role played by its techniques in applications. The theory of topological vector spaces is emphasized, along with the applications of functional analysis to applied analysis. Some topics of functional analysis connected with applications to mathematical economics and control theory are also discussed. Comprised of 18 chapters, this book begins with an introduction to the elements of the theory of topological spaces, the theory of metric spaces, and the theory of abstract measure space

  15. Functional Boxplots

    KAUST Repository

    Sun, Ying; Genton, Marc G.

    2011-01-01

    data, the descriptive statistics of a functional boxplot are: the envelope of the 50% central region, the median curve, and the maximum non-outlying envelope. In addition, outliers can be detected in a functional boxplot by the 1.5 times the 50% central

  16. [Scientific potential of phenomics - functional direction of genetics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marasanov, A V; Valtseva, E A

    In this paper on the based on the integration of known theories, doctrines and concepts - principles of consistency and self-regulation of physiological functions (Pavlov I.P., 1950), the theory offunctional systems (Anokhin P.K., 1973), the theory of adaptive reactions (Selye H., 1960 ; Garkavi LKh et al, 1979), the doctrine of the dominant (Ukhtomsky A.A., 1966), doctrine on health (Baevsky R.M.), doctrine on the body type of the human by Merlin VS. conception on the “the interrelationship between the function and genetic apparatus” by Meyerson F.Z., Pshennikova M.G., Platonov V.N., and others, there is proposed to select phenomics - functional division of genetics considering the poolability of specific mechanisms of the body in an integral system of the adaptive act in favor of the development of a personalized approach to the diagnosis and prevention of non-communicable diseases, increasing life expectancy of working age into the particular scientific direction. The task of phenomics is the establishment of the phenotypic characteristics of the person, norms of the response of systems of his body, determination of the deviation of the level of the functioning of the each system from the norm of its response and the elaboration of the tactics for the correction of the functional state of the organism (the optimization of its life activity), with taking into account the directedness of the interaction of body systems. The description of the shaping of the mechanism of stereotyped response of the organism generated an important contribution to the development of phenomics. Stereotyped response being initiated by the non-specific response of the body is aimed at the shaping of the activity of its systems after a fashion of norms of the activity, promotes the recovery of the specificity of the body, plays an important role in the establishment of cause-effect relations of the disease.

  17. Functional coma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludwig, L; McWhirter, L; Williams, S; Derry, C; Stone, J

    2016-01-01

    Functional coma - here defined as a prolonged motionless dissociative attack with absent or reduced response to external stimuli - is a relatively rare presentation. In this chapter we examine a wide range of terms used to describe states of unresponsiveness in which psychologic factors are relevant to etiology, such as depressive stupor, catatonia, nonepileptic "pseudostatus," and factitious disorders, and discuss the place of functional or psychogenic coma among these. Historically, diagnosis of functional coma has sometimes been reached after prolonged investigation and exclusion of other diagnoses. However, as is the case with other functional disorders, diagnosis should preferably be made on the basis of positive findings that provide evidence of inconsistency between an apparent comatose state and normal waking nervous system functioning. In our review of physical signs, we find some evidence for the presence of firm resistance to eye opening as reasonably sensitive and specific for functional coma, as well as the eye gaze sign, in which patients tend to look to the ground when turned on to one side. Noxious stimuli such as Harvey's sign (application of high-frequency vibrating tuning fork to the nasal mucosa) can also be helpful, although patients with this disorder are often remarkably unresponsive to usually painful stimuli, particularly as more commonly applied using sternal or nail bed pressure. The use of repeated painful stimuli is therefore not recommended. We also discuss the role of general anesthesia and other physiologic triggers to functional coma. © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Rhinoplasty (Functional)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... RESOURCES Medical Societies Patient Education About this Website Font Size + - Home > TREATMENTS > Rhinoplasty (Functional) Nasal/Sinus Irrigation ... performed to restore breathing, it typically necessitates some type of change to the appearance of the nose. ...

  19. Functional tremor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwingenschuh, P; Deuschl, G

    2016-01-01

    Functional tremor is the commonest reported functional movement disorder. A confident clinical diagnosis of functional tremor is often possible based on the following "positive" criteria: a sudden tremor onset, unusual disease course, often with fluctuations or remissions, distractibility of the tremor if attention is removed from the affected body part, tremor entrainment, tremor variability, and a coactivation sign. Many patients show excessive exhaustion during examination. Other somatizations may be revealed in the medical history and patients may show additional functional neurologic symptoms and signs. In cases where the clinical diagnosis remains challenging, providing a "laboratory-supported" level of certainty aids an early positive diagnosis. In rare cases, in which the distinction from Parkinson's disease is difficult, dopamine transporter single-photon emission computed tomography (DAT-SPECT) can be indicated. © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Cognitive Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Because chemicals can adversely affect cognitive function in humans, considerable effort has been made to characterize their effects using animal models. Information from such models will be necessary to: evaluate whether chemicals identified as potentially neurotoxic by screenin...

  1. Functional unparsing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Danvy, Olivier

    2000-01-01

    A string-formatting function such as printf in C seemingly requires dependent types, because its control string determines the rest of its arguments. Examples: formula here We show how changing the representation of the control string makes it possible to program printf in ML (which does not allow...... dependent types). The result is well typed and perceptibly more efficient than the corresponding library functions in Standard ML of New Jersey and in Caml....

  2. Functional Unparsing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Danvy, Olivier

    1998-01-01

    A string-formatting function such as printf in C seemingly requires dependent types, because its control string determines the rest of its arguments. We show how changing the representation of the control string makes it possible to program printf in ML (which does not allow dependent types......). The result is well typed and perceptibly more efficient than the corresponding library functions in Standard ML of New Jersey and in Caml....

  3. Overlap functions

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bustince, H.; Fernández, J.; Mesiar, Radko; Montero, J.; Orduna, R.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 72, 3-4 (2010), s. 1488-1499 ISSN 0362-546X R&D Projects: GA ČR GA402/08/0618 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10750506 Keywords : t-norm * Migrative property * Homogeneity property * Overlap function Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics Impact factor: 1.279, year: 2010 http://library.utia.cas.cz/separaty/2009/E/mesiar-overlap functions.pdf

  4. Tumor Growth Model with PK Input for Neuroblastoma Drug Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-01

    Your credit card order has been processed on  Tuesday  2 December 2014 at 3:05 PM. Status: Complete 12/3/2014 Oasis, The Online Abstract Submission System...pharmacokinetic models. Toxicol Ind Health, 1997. 13(4): p. 407-84. PMID: 9249929 4. Davies, B. and T. Morris , Physiological parameters in laboratory animals and humans. Pharm Res, 1993. 10(7): p. 1093-5. PMID: 8378254

  5. Markkinointiviestinnän kanavien kartoitus PK-yritykselle

    OpenAIRE

    Laiho, Leena

    2013-01-01

    Opinnäytteen tarkoitus oli vertailla markkinoinnin keinoja ja mahdollisuuksia. Opinnäyte pyrki nostamaan esiin niitä mainonnan menetelmiä, joilla markkinointi saadaan toteutettua menestyksekkäästi taloudelliset resurssit huomioonottaen. Tutkimuksen tavoitteena oli mainonnan tehokkuuden mittaaminen markkinointitutkimuksen keinoja soveltamalla. Tutkimuksen avulla pyrittiin saamaan informaatiota siitä, miten asiakkaat seuraavat eri mainontakanavia, minkä tyyppiset mainokset herättävät mielenkiin...

  6. Pk-yrityksen arvonmääritys

    OpenAIRE

    Ikonen, Taneli

    2015-01-01

    Tämän opinnäytetyön tavoitteena on selvittää toimeksiantajayritykselle sen myyntihinta. Yritys on paikallinen keittiö- ja kodin kiintokalusteita valmistava ja myyvä listaamaton osakeyhtiö. Opinnäytetyössä tutustutaan arvonmääritysprosessiin ja arvonmääritysmalleihin, joita sovelletaan kohdeyrityksen arvon määrittämiseen. Opinnäytetyön arvonmääritys suoritetaan myyjän näkökulmasta ja kohdeyrityksen pyynnöstä tutkimuksessa ei käsitellä yrityksen ja siinä toimivien henkilöiden nimiä. Opinnäy...

  7. PK-yrityksen markkinoinnin ja verkkosivujen suunnittelu : case Rapurallaa

    OpenAIRE

    Alanto, Maria

    2013-01-01

    Tässä opinnäytetyössä suunniteltiin pienyrityksen sivuelinkeinolle verkkosivut. Yrittäjä on yksityinen elinkeinoharjoittaja, ja yrityksen toimiala on maatalous ja sivuelinkeinona on rapujen kasvatus. Yritys toimii Salon seudulla, mutta potentiaalinen markkina-alue on koko Suomi. Opinnäytetyö on toiminnallinen työ. Verkkosivun suunnittelun myötä tavoitteena oli yrityksen tunnettuuden ja näkyvyyden lisääminen digitaalisen markkinoinnin keinoilla. Digitaalisella markkinointiviestinnällä yrit...

  8. Bessel functions

    CERN Document Server

    Nambudiripad, K B M

    2014-01-01

    After presenting the theory in engineers' language without the unfriendly abstraction of pure mathematics, several illustrative examples are discussed in great detail to see how the various functions of the Bessel family enter into the solution of technically important problems. Axisymmetric vibrations of a circular membrane, oscillations of a uniform chain, heat transfer in circular fins, buckling of columns of varying cross-section, vibrations of a circular plate and current density in a conductor of circular cross-section are considered. The problems are formulated purely from physical considerations (using, for example, Newton's law of motion, Fourier's law of heat conduction electromagnetic field equations, etc.) Infinite series expansions, recurrence relations, manipulation of expressions involving Bessel functions, orthogonality and expansion in Fourier-Bessel series are also covered in some detail. Some important topics such as asymptotic expansions, generating function and Sturm-Lioville theory are r...

  9. Functional inequalities

    CERN Document Server

    Ghoussoub, Nassif

    2013-01-01

    The book describes how functional inequalities are often manifestations of natural mathematical structures and physical phenomena, and how a few general principles validate large classes of analytic/geometric inequalities, old and new. This point of view leads to "systematic" approaches for proving the most basic inequalities, but also for improving them, and for devising new ones--sometimes at will and often on demand. These general principles also offer novel ways for estimating best constants and for deciding whether these are attained in appropriate function spaces. As such, improvements of Hardy and Hardy-Rellich type inequalities involving radially symmetric weights are variational manifestations of Sturm's theory on the oscillatory behavior of certain ordinary differential equations. On the other hand, most geometric inequalities, including those of Sobolev and Log-Sobolev type, are simply expressions of the convexity of certain free energy functionals along the geodesics on the Wasserstein manifold of...

  10. Algebraic functions

    CERN Document Server

    Bliss, Gilbert Ames

    1933-01-01

    This book, immediately striking for its conciseness, is one of the most remarkable works ever produced on the subject of algebraic functions and their integrals. The distinguishing feature of the book is its third chapter, on rational functions, which gives an extremely brief and clear account of the theory of divisors.... A very readable account is given of the topology of Riemann surfaces and of the general properties of abelian integrals. Abel's theorem is presented, with some simple applications. The inversion problem is studied for the cases of genus zero and genus unity. The chapter on t

  11. Safety, pharmacokinetic, and functional effects of the nogo-a monoclonal antibody in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis: a randomized, first-in-human clinical trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincent Meininger

    Full Text Available The neurite outgrowth inhibitor, Nogo-A, has been shown to be overexpressed in skeletal muscle in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS; it is both a potential biomarker and therapeutic target. We performed a double-blind, two-part, dose-escalation study, in subjects with ALS, assessing safety, pharmacokinetics (PK and functional effects of ozanezumab, a humanized monoclonal antibody against Nogo-A. In Part 1, 40 subjects were randomized (3∶1 to receive single dose intravenous ozanezumab (0.01, 0.1, 1, 5, or 15 mg/kg or placebo. In Part 2, 36 subjects were randomized (3∶1 to receive two repeat doses of intravenous ozanezumab (0.5, 2.5, or 15 mg/kg or placebo, approximately 4 weeks apart. The primary endpoints were safety and tolerability (adverse events [AEs], vital signs, electrocardiogram (ECG, and clinical laboratory tests. Secondary endpoints included PK, immunogenicity, functional endpoints (clinical and electrophysiological, and biomarker parameters. Overall, ozanezumab treatment (0.01-15 mg/kg was well tolerated. The overall incidence of AEs in the repeat dose 2.5 mg/kg and 15 mg/kg ozanezumab groups was higher than in the repeat dose placebo group and repeat dose 0.5 mg/kg ozanezumab group. The majority were considered not related to study drug by the investigators. Six serious AEs were reported in three subjects receiving ozanezumab; none were considered related to study drug. No study drug-related patterns were identified for ECG, laboratory, or vital signs parameters. One subject (repeat dose 15 mg/kg ozanezumab showed a weak, positive anti-ozanezumab-antibody result. PK results were generally consistent with monoclonal antibody treatments. No apparent treatment effects were observed for functional endpoints or muscle biomarkers. Immunohistochemical staining showed dose-dependent co-localization of ozanezumab with Nogo-A in skeletal muscle. In conclusion, single and repeat dose ozanezumab treatment was well tolerated and demonstrated

  12. Functional dyspepsia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kleibeuker, JH; Thijs, JC

    2004-01-01

    Purpose of review Functional dyspepsia is a common disorder, most of the time of unknown etiology and with variable pathophysiology. Therapy has been and still is largely empirical. Data from recent studies provide new clues for targeted therapy based on knowledge of etiology and pathophysiologic

  13. Interaction of Human Dopa Decarboxylase with L-Dopa: Spectroscopic and Kinetic Studies as a Function of pH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riccardo Montioli

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Human Dopa decarboxylase (hDDC, a pyridoxal 5′-phosphate (PLP enzyme, displays maxima at 420 and 335 nm and emits fluorescence at 384 and 504 nm upon excitation at 335 nm and at 504 nm when excited at 420 nm. Absorbance and fluorescence titrations of hDDC-bound coenzyme identify a single pKspec of ~7.2. This pKspec could not represent the ionization of a functional group on the Schiff base but that of an enzymic residue governing the equilibrium between the low- and the high-pH forms of the internal aldimine. During the reaction of hDDC with L-Dopa, monitored by stopped-flow spectrophotometry, a 420 nm band attributed to the 4′-N-protonated external aldimine first appears, and its decrease parallels the emergence of a 390 nm peak, assigned to the 4′-N-unprotonated external aldimine. The pH profile of the spectral change at 390 nm displays a pK of 6.4, a value similar to that (~6.3 observed in both kcat and kcat/Km profiles. This suggests that this pK represents the ESH+ → ES catalytic step. The assignment of the pKs of 7.9 and 8.3 observed on the basic side of kcat and the PLP binding affinity profiles, respectively, is also analyzed and discussed.

  14. Functional Literacy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fani Nolimal

    2000-12-01

    Full Text Available The author first defines literacy as the ability of co-operation in all fields of life and points at the features of illiterate or semi-literate individuals. The main stress is laid upon the assessment of literacy and illiteracy. In her opinion the main weak­ ness of this kind of evaluation are its vague psycho-metric characteristics, which leads to results valid in a single geographical or cultural environment only. She also determines the factors causing illiteracy, and she states that the level of functional literacy is more and more becoming a national indicator of successfulness.

  15. Lung function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sorichter, S.

    2009-01-01

    The term lung function is often restricted to the assessment of volume time curves measured at the mouth. Spirometry includes the assessment of lung volumes which can be mobilised with the corresponding flow-volume curves. In addition, lung volumes that can not be mobilised, such as the residual volume, or only partially as FRC and TLC can be measured by body plethysmography combined with the determination of the airway resistance. Body plethysmography allows the correct positioning of forced breathing manoeuvres on the volume-axis, e.g. before and after pharmacotherapy. Adding the CO single breath transfer factor (T LCO ), which includes the measurement of the ventilated lung volume using He, enables a clear diagnosis of different obstructive, restrictive or mixed ventilatory defects with and without trapped air. Tests of reversibility and provocation, as well as the assessment of inspiratory mouth pressures (PI max , P 0.1 ) help to classify the underlying disorder and to clarify treatment strategies. For further information and to complete the diagnostic of disturbances of the ventilation, diffusion and/or perfusion (capillar-)arterial bloodgases at rest and under physical strain sometimes amended by ergospirometry are recommended. Ideally, lung function measurements are amended by radiological and nuclear medicine techniques. (orig.) [de

  16. Functional phlebology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weber, J.; May, R.; Biland, L.; Endert, G.; Gottlob, R.; Justich, E.; Luebcke, P.; Mignon, G.; Moltz, L.; Partsch, H.; Petter, A.; Ritter, H.; Soerensen, R.; Widmer, L.K.; Widmer, M.T.; Zemp, E.

    1990-01-01

    The book presents a complete survey of the problems occurring in the venous system of the legs, pelvis, and abdomen. The material is arranged in the following main chapters: (1) Introduction to the phlebology of the low-pressure system in the lower part of the body; (2) Phlebographic methods; (3) Instrumented function studies and methods; (4) Pathologic findings; (5) Diagnostic methods and vein therapy; (6) Interventional radiology; (7) Expert opinions on venous lesions including insurance aspects. The first chapter encompasses a section briefly discussing the available instrumented diagnostic imaging methods. In view of the novel imaging methods, namely digital subtraction phlebology, sonography, CT and MRI, the classical phlebography remains the gold standard, so to speak: all currently available phlebographic methods for imaging the venes in the legs, pelvis and abdomen are explained and comparatively evaluated. Instrumented function tests such as Doppler effect ultrasound testing, plethysmography, peripheral and central phlebodynamometry (venous pressure measurement) are analysed for their diagnostic value and as alternative or supplementing techniques in comparison to phlebology. (orig./MG) With 843 figs., 101 tabs [de

  17. Functional Credentials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deuber Dominic

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available A functional credential allows a user to anonymously prove possession of a set of attributes that fulfills a certain policy. The policies are arbitrary polynomially computable predicates that are evaluated over arbitrary attributes. The key feature of this primitive is the delegation of verification to third parties, called designated verifiers. The delegation protects the privacy of the policy: A designated verifier can verify that a user satisfies a certain policy without learning anything about the policy itself. We illustrate the usefulness of this property in different applications, including outsourced databases with access control. We present a new framework to construct functional credentials that does not require (non-interactive zero-knowledge proofs. This is important in settings where the statements are complex and thus the resulting zero-knowledge proofs are not efficient. Our construction is based on any predicate encryption scheme and the security relies on standard assumptions. A complexity analysis and an experimental evaluation confirm the practicality of our approach.

  18. Functional Angioplasty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rohit Tewari

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Coronary angiography underestimates or overestimates lesion severity, but still remains the cornerstone in the decision making for revascularization for an overwhelming majority of interventional cardiologists. Guidelines recommend and endorse non invasive functional evaluation ought to precede revascularization. In real world practice, this is adopted in less than 50% of patients who go on to have some form of revascularization. Fractional flow reserve (FFR is the ratio of maximal blood flow in a stenotic coronary relative to maximal flow in the same vessel, were it normal. Being independent of changes in heart rate, BP or prior infarction; and take into account the contribution of collateral blood flow. It is a majorly specific index with a reasonably high sensitivity (88%, specificity (100%, positive predictive value (100%, and overall accuracy (93%. Whilst FFR provides objective determination of ischemia and helps select appropriate candidates for revascularization (for both CABG and PCI in to cath lab itself before intervention, whereas intravascular ultrasound/optical coherence tomography guidance in PCI can secure the procedure by optimizing stent expansion. Functional angioplasty simply is incorporating both intravascular ultrasound and FFR into our daily Intervention practices.

  19. Charge characteristics of humic and fulvic acids: comparative analysis by colloid titration and potentiometric titration with continuous pK-distribution function model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bratskaya, S; Golikov, A; Lutsenko, T; Nesterova, O; Dudarchik, V

    2008-09-01

    Charge characteristics of humic and fulvic acids of a different origin (inshore soils, peat, marine sediments, and soil (lysimetric) waters) were evaluated by means of two alternative methods - colloid titration and potentiometric titration. In order to elucidate possible limitations of the colloid titration as an express method of analysis of low content of humic substances we monitored changes in acid-base properties and charge densities of humic substances with soil depth, fractionation, and origin. We have shown that both factors - strength of acidic groups and molecular weight distribution in humic and fulvic acids - can affect the reliability of colloid titration. Due to deviations from 1:1 stoichiometry in interactions of humic substances with polymeric cationic titrant, the colloid titration can underestimate total acidity (charge density) of humic substances with domination of weak acidic functional groups (pK>6) and high content of the fractions with molecular weight below 1kDa.

  20. Thyroid Function Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home » Thyroid Function Tests Leer en Español Thyroid Function Tests FUNCTION HOW DOES THE THYROID GLAND FUNCTION? ... Cancer Thyroid Nodules in Children and Adolescents Thyroid Function Tests Resources Thyroid Function Tests Brochure PDF En ...

  1. Functional materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, J. Y.; Hong, G. W.; Lee, H. J.

    2002-05-01

    Development of fabrication process of functional ceramic materials, evaluation of characteristics and experiments for understanding of irradiation behavior of ceramics were carried out for application of ceramics to the nuclear industry. The developed processes were the SiC surface coating technology with large area for improvement of wear resistance and corrosion resistance, the fabrication technology of SiC composites for excellent irradiation resistance, performance improvement technology of SiC fiber and nano-sized powder processing by combustion ignition and spray. Typical results were CVD SiC coating with diameter of 25cm and thickness of 100μm, highly dense SiC composite by F-CVI, heat-treating technology of SiC fiber using B4C power, and nano-sized powders of ODS-Cu, Li-based breeding materials, Ni-based metal powders with primary particle diameter of 20∼50nm. Furthermore, test equipment, data productions and damage evaluations were performed to understand corrosion resistance and wear resistance of alumina, silicon carbide and silicon nitride under PWR or PHWR operation conditions. Experimental procedures and basic technologies for evaluation of irradiation behavior were also established. Additionally, highly reactive precursor powders were developed by various technologies and the powders were applied to the fabrication of 100 m long Ag/Bi-2223 multi-filamentary wires. High Tc magnets and fly wheel for energy storage were developed, as well

  2. Effects of genetic deficiency of cyclooxygenase-1 or cyclooxygenase-2 on functional and histological outcomes following traumatic brain injury in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scheff Stephen W

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Neuroinflammation contributes to the pathophysiology of acute CNS injury, including traumatic brain injury (TBI. Although prostaglandin lipid mediators of inflammation contribute to a variety of inflammatory responses, their importance in neuroinflammation is not clear. There are conflicting reports as to the efficacy of inhibiting the enzymes required for prostaglandin formation, cyclooxygenase (COX -1 and COX-2, for improving outcomes following TBI. The purpose of the current study was to determine the role of the COX isoforms in contributing to pathological processes resulting from TBI by utilizing mice deficient in COX-1 or COX-2. Results Following a mild controlled cortical impact injury, the amount of cortical tissue loss, the level of microglial activation, and the capacity for functional recovery was compared between COX-1-deficient mice or COX-2-deficient mice, and their matching wild-type controls. The deficiency of COX-2 resulted in a minor (6%, although statistically significant, increase in the sparing of cortical tissue following TBI. The deficiency of COX-1 resulted in no detectable effect on cortical tissue loss following TBI. As determined by 3[H]-PK11195 autoradiography, TBI produced a similar increase in microglial activation in multiple brain regions of both COX-1 wild-type and COX-1-deficient mice. In COX-2 wild-type and COX-2-deficient mice, TBI increased 3[H]-PK11195 binding in all brain regions that were analyzed. Following injury, 3[H]-PK11195 binding in the dentate gyrus and CA1 region of the hippocampus was greater in COX-2-deficient mice, as compared to COX-2 wild-type mice. Cognitive assessment was performed in the wild-type, COX-1-deficient and COX-2-deficient mice following 4 days of recovery from TBI. There was no significant cognitive effect that resulted from the deficiency of either COX-1 or COX-2, as determined by acquisition and spatial memory retention testing in a Morris water maze

  3. Multipronged regulatory functions of a novel endonuclease (TieA) from Helicobacter pylori.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devi, Savita; Ansari, Suhail A; Tenguria, Shivendra; Kumar, Naveen; Ahmed, Niyaz

    2016-11-02

    Helicobacter pylori portrays a classical paradigm of persistent bacterial infections. A well balanced homeostasis of bacterial effector functions and host responses is purported to be the key in achieving long term colonization in specific hosts. H. pylori nucleases have been shown to assist in natural transformation, but their role in virulence and colonization remains elusive. Therefore, it is imperative to understand the involvement of these nucleases in the pathogenesis of H. pylori Here, we report the multifaceted role of a TNFR-1 interacting endonuclease A (TieA) from H. pylori. tieA expression is differentially regulated in response to environmental stress and post adherence to gastric epithelial cells. Studies with isogenic knockouts of tieA revealed it to be a secretory protein which translocates into the host gastric epithelial cells independent of a type IV secretion system, gets phosphorylated by DNA-PK kinase and auto-phosphorylates as serine kinase. Furthermore, TieA binds to and cleaves DNA in a non-specific manner and promotes Fas mediated apoptosis in AGS cells. Additionally, TieA induced pro-inflammatory cytokine secretion via activation of transcription factor AP-1 and signaled through MAP kinase pathway. Collectively, TieA with its multipronged and moonlighting functions could facilitate H. pylori in maintaining a balance of bacterial adaptation, and elimination by the host responses. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  4. Special functions & their applications

    CERN Document Server

    Lebedev, N N

    1972-01-01

    Famous Russian work discusses the application of cylinder functions and spherical harmonics; gamma function; probability integral and related functions; Airy functions; hyper-geometric functions; more. Translated by Richard Silverman.

  5. Functional Programming in R

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mailund, Thomas

    Master functions and discover how to write functional programs in R. In this book, you'll make your functions pure by avoiding side-effects; you’ll write functions that manipulate other functions, and you’ll construct complex functions using simpler functions as building blocks. In Functional...... Programming in R, you’ll see how we can replace loops, which can have side-effects, with recursive functions that can more easily avoid them. In addition, the book covers why you shouldn't use recursion when loops are more efficient and how you can get the best of both worlds. Functional programming...... functions by combining simpler functions. You will: Write functions in R including infix operators and replacement functions Create higher order functions Pass functions to other functions and start using functions as data you can manipulate Use Filer, Map and Reduce functions to express the intent behind...

  6. Resummed coefficient function for the shape function

    OpenAIRE

    Aglietti, U.

    2001-01-01

    We present a leading evaluation of the resummed coefficient function for the shape function. It is also shown that the coefficient function is short-distance-dominated. Our results allow relating the shape function computed on the lattice to the physical QCD distributions.

  7. Time functions function best as functions of multiple times

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Desain, P.; Honing, H.

    1992-01-01

    This article presents an elegant way of representing control functions at an abstractlevel. It introduces time functions that have multiple times as arguments. In this waythe generalized concept of a time function can support absolute and relative kinds of time behavior. Furthermore the

  8. Functional tuning of the catalytic residue pKa in a de novo designed esterase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiebler, Katharina; Lengyel, Zsófia; Castañeda, Carlos A; Makhlynets, Olga V

    2017-09-01

    AlleyCatE is a de novo designed esterase that can be allosterically regulated by calcium ions. This artificial enzyme has been shown to hydrolyze p-nitrophenyl acetate (pNPA) and 4-nitrophenyl-(2-phenyl)-propanoate (pNPP) with high catalytic efficiency. AlleyCatE was created by introducing a single-histidine residue (His 144 ) into a hydrophobic pocket of calmodulin. In this work, we explore the determinants of catalytic properties of AlleyCatE. We obtained the pK a value of the catalytic histidine using experimental measurements by NMR and pH rate profile and compared these values to those predicted from electrostatics pK a calculations (from both empirical and continuum electrostatics calculations). Surprisingly, the pK a value of the catalytic histidine inside the hydrophobic pocket of calmodulin is elevated as compared to the model compound pK a value of this residue in water. We determined that a short-range favorable interaction with Glu 127 contributes to the elevated pK a of His 144 . We have rationally modulated local electrostatic potential in AlleyCatE to decrease the pK a of its active nucleophile, His 144 , by 0.7 units. As a direct result of the decrease in the His 144 pK a value, catalytic efficiency of the enzyme increased by 45% at pH 6. This work shows that a series of simple NMR experiments that can be performed using low field spectrometers, combined with straightforward computational analysis, provide rapid and accurate guidance to rationally improve catalytic efficiency of histidine-promoted catalysis. Proteins 2017; 85:1656-1665. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Mitochondrial biogenesis and energy production in differentiating murine stem cells: a functional metabolic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Sungwon; Auger, Christopher; Thomas, Sean C; Beites, Crestina L; Appanna, Vasu D

    2014-02-01

    The significance of metabolic networks in guiding the fate of the stem cell differentiation is only beginning to emerge. Oxidative metabolism has been suggested to play a major role during this process. Therefore, it is critical to understand the underlying mechanisms of metabolic alterations occurring in stem cells to manipulate the ultimate outcome of these pluripotent cells. Here, using P19 murine embryonal carcinoma cells as a model system, the role of mitochondrial biogenesis and the modulation of metabolic networks during dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO)-induced differentiation are revealed. Blue native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (BN-PAGE) technology aided in profiling key enzymes, such as hexokinase (HK) [EC 2.7.1.1], glucose-6-phosphate isomerase (GPI) [EC 5.3.1.9], pyruvate kinase (PK) [EC 2.7.1.40], Complex I [EC 1.6.5.3], and Complex IV [EC 1.9.3.1], that are involved in the energy budget of the differentiated cells. Mitochondrial adenosine triphosphate (ATP) production was shown to be increased in DMSO-treated cells upon exposure to the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle substrates, such as succinate and malate. The increased mitochondrial activity and biogenesis were further confirmed by immunofluorescence microscopy. Collectively, the results indicate that oxidative energy metabolism and mitochondrial biogenesis were sharply upregulated in DMSO-differentiated P19 cells. This functional metabolic and proteomic study provides further evidence that modulation of mitochondrial energy metabolism is a pivotal component of the cellular differentiation process and may dictate the final destiny of stem cells.

  10. Tezkire-i Buğra Han’ın Çağatayca Yazılmış Bir Nüshası Metin- Dil İncelemesi- Tıpkıbasım A Manuscript Of Tazkira-i Bughra Khan Written In Chagatay Turkısh Texte- Grammar Notes- Facsimile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Erdem DAĞISTANLIOĞLU

    2012-12-01

    ındaki bilgiler oldukça sınırlıdır. Bu dönem hakkındaki bilinmezliklerin benzeri, İslamiyet’in Türkler arasında yayılmasında büyük bir yeri bulunan ve efsanevi özellikler taşıyan Satuk Buğra Han için de geçerlidir.Bu makale, Türklerin İslamiyeti kitle hâlinde kabul edişlerini ve ilk Müslüman Türk hükümdarının efsanevi hayatını anlatan Tezkire-i Buğra Han kitabının 19. yüzyılda Çağatayca olarak kaleme alınmış bir nüshasının çeviri yazı ve dil incelemesini içermektedir.Çalışmamıza konu olan eser, Klasik Çağataycanın dil özelliklerini taşımakla beraber, Özbekçe ve Çağdaş Uygurcanın ses ve şekil bilgisi özelliklerini de barındırmaktadır. Tezkire-i Buğra Han kitabı gerek ses gerekse şekil bilgisi bakımından Çağatayca öncesi arkaik örnekleri de içermektedir. Eser bu özellikleriyle, hem Çağataycadan çağdaş Türk lehçelerine geçişi yansıtmakta hem de içerdiği arkaik yapılarla dikkat çekmektedir.Yazmanın Çağatayca dışında en çok Çağdaş Uygurcanın dil özelliklerini barındırdığı görülmektedir. Kitabın ilk sayfasındaki karışık bir hâlde yazılmış ifadelerin içinden tespit edebildiğimiz tārįħķa bir min g iki yüz yėtmiş1 ….. inal aķsuluķ taĥrįri āħir boldı cümlesi eserin Çağdaş Uygurcayla olan bağını da açıklar niteliktedir.Bu makalede söz konusu yazma eserin bütünü hakkında, yazarı, yazıldığı yüzyıl, diğer nüshaları vb. özellikleri bakımından bilgi verilmiş olup yalnızca Satuk Buğra Han menkabesinin geçtiği kısmın çeviri yazılı metni sunulmuştur. Ayrıca incelenen kısmın tıpkıbasımı da makalenin sonuna eklenmiştir.Bu yazıda, British Library’deki Or. 8161 numaralı metnin 83a-102b varakları arasındaki Satuk Buğra Han menkabesini esas almakla birlikte, dil incelemesinde gerek duyuldukça yazmanın bütünü göz önünde bulundurularak açıklamalar yapılmıştır.

  11. Wave-function functionals for the density

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slamet, Marlina; Pan Xiaoyin; Sahni, Viraht

    2011-01-01

    We extend the idea of the constrained-search variational method for the construction of wave-function functionals ψ[χ] of functions χ. The search is constrained to those functions χ such that ψ[χ] reproduces the density ρ(r) while simultaneously leading to an upper bound to the energy. The functionals are thereby normalized and automatically satisfy the electron-nucleus coalescence condition. The functionals ψ[χ] are also constructed to satisfy the electron-electron coalescence condition. The method is applied to the ground state of the helium atom to construct functionals ψ[χ] that reproduce the density as given by the Kinoshita correlated wave function. The expectation of single-particle operators W=Σ i r i n , n=-2,-1,1,2, W=Σ i δ(r i ) are exact, as must be the case. The expectations of the kinetic energy operator W=-(1/2)Σ i ∇ i 2 , the two-particle operators W=Σ n u n , n=-2,-1,1,2, where u=|r i -r j |, and the energy are accurate. We note that the construction of such functionals ψ[χ] is an application of the Levy-Lieb constrained-search definition of density functional theory. It is thereby possible to rigorously determine which functional ψ[χ] is closer to the true wave function.

  12. Nonlocal kinetic energy functionals by functional integration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mi, Wenhui; Genova, Alessandro; Pavanello, Michele

    2018-05-01

    Since the seminal studies of Thomas and Fermi, researchers in the Density-Functional Theory (DFT) community are searching for accurate electron density functionals. Arguably, the toughest functional to approximate is the noninteracting kinetic energy, Ts[ρ], the subject of this work. The typical paradigm is to first approximate the energy functional and then take its functional derivative, δ/Ts[ρ ] δ ρ (r ) , yielding a potential that can be used in orbital-free DFT or subsystem DFT simulations. Here, this paradigm is challenged by constructing the potential from the second-functional derivative via functional integration. A new nonlocal functional for Ts[ρ] is prescribed [which we dub Mi-Genova-Pavanello (MGP)] having a density independent kernel. MGP is constructed to satisfy three exact conditions: (1) a nonzero "Kinetic electron" arising from a nonzero exchange hole; (2) the second functional derivative must reduce to the inverse Lindhard function in the limit of homogenous densities; (3) the potential is derived from functional integration of the second functional derivative. Pilot calculations show that MGP is capable of reproducing accurate equilibrium volumes, bulk moduli, total energy, and electron densities for metallic (body-centered cubic, face-centered cubic) and semiconducting (crystal diamond) phases of silicon as well as of III-V semiconductors. The MGP functional is found to be numerically stable typically reaching self-consistency within 12 iterations of a truncated Newton minimization algorithm. MGP's computational cost and memory requirements are low and comparable to the Wang-Teter nonlocal functional or any generalized gradient approximation functional.

  13. Hydrazine functionalized probes for chromogenic and fluorescent ratiometric sensing of pH and F-: experimental and DFT studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy Chowdhury, Additi; Mondal, Amita; Roy, Biswajit Gopal; K, Jagadeesh C Bose; Mukhopadhyay, Sudit; Banerjee, Priyabrata

    2017-11-08

    Two novel hydrazine based sensors, BPPIH (N 1 ,N 3 -bis(perfluorophenyl)isophthalohydrazide) and BPBIH (N 1' ,N 3' -bis(perfluorobenzylidene)isophthalohydrazide), are presented here. BPPIH is found to be a highly sensitive pH sensor in the pH range 5.0 to 10.0 in a DMSO-water solvent mixture with a pK a value of 9.22. Interesting optical responses have been observed for BPPIH in the above mentioned pH range. BPBIH on the other hand turns out to be a less effective pH sensor in the above mentioned pH range. The increase in fluorescence intensity at a lower pH for BPPIH was explained by using density functional theory. The ability of BPPIH to monitor the pH changes inside cancer cells is a useful application of the sensor as a functional material. In addition fluoride (F - ) selectivity studies of these two chemosensors have been performed and show that between them, BPBIH shows greater selectivity towards F - . The interaction energy calculated from the DFT-D3 supports the experimental findings. The pH sensor (BPPIH) can be further interfaced with suitable circuitry interfaced with desired programming for ease of access and enhancement of practical applications.

  14. The role of DNA dependent protein kinase in synapsis of DNA ends

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.P.W.C. Weterings (Eric); N.S. Verkaik (Nicole); H.T. Brüggenwirth (Hennie); D.C. van Gent (Dik); J.H.J. Hoeijmakers (Jan)

    2003-01-01

    textabstractDNA dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) plays a central role in the non-homologous end-joining pathway of DNA double strand break repair. Its catalytic subunit (DNA-PK(CS)) functions as a serine/threonine protein kinase. We show that DNA-PK forms a stable complex at DNA termini that blocks

  15. Pharmacokinetics of cotinine in rats: a potential therapeutic agent for disorders of cognitive function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Pei; Beck, Wayne D; Callahan, Patrick M; Terry, Alvin V; Bartlett, Michael G

    2015-06-01

    Attention has been paid to cotinine (COT), one of the major metabolites of nicotine (NIC), for its pro-cognitive effects and potential therapeutic activities against Alzheimer's disease (AD) and other types of cognitive impairment. In order to facilitate pharmacological and toxicological studies on COT for its pro-cognitive activities, we conducted a pharmacokinetic (PK) study of COT in rats, providing important oral and intravenously (iv) PK information. In this study, plasma samples were obtained up to 48 h after COT was dosed to rats orally and iv at a dose of 3mg/kg. Plasma samples were prepared and analyzed using a sensitive liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) bioanalytical method, providing concentration profiles of COT and metabolites after oral and iv administrations. The data were fitted into a one-compartment model and a two-compartment model for the oral and iv groups, respectively, providing important PK information for COT including PK profiles, half-life, clearance and bioavailability. The results suggested fast absorption, slow elimination and high bioavailability of COT in rats. Several important facts about the PK properties in rats suggested COT could be a potential pro-cognitive agent. Information about the pharmacokinetics of COT in rats revealed in this study is of great importance for the future studies on COT or potential COT analogs as agents for improving cognition. Copyright © 2014 Institute of Pharmacology, Polish Academy of Sciences. Published by Elsevier Urban & Partner Sp. z o.o. All rights reserved.

  16. Generalized Probability Functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Souto Martinez

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available From the integration of nonsymmetrical hyperboles, a one-parameter generalization of the logarithmic function is obtained. Inverting this function, one obtains the generalized exponential function. Motivated by the mathematical curiosity, we show that these generalized functions are suitable to generalize some probability density functions (pdfs. A very reliable rank distribution can be conveniently described by the generalized exponential function. Finally, we turn the attention to the generalization of one- and two-tail stretched exponential functions. We obtain, as particular cases, the generalized error function, the Zipf-Mandelbrot pdf, the generalized Gaussian and Laplace pdf. Their cumulative functions and moments were also obtained analytically.

  17. Functionality and homogeneity.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    2011-01-01

    Functionality and homogeneity are two of the five Sustainable Safety principles. The functionality principle aims for roads to have but one exclusive function and distinguishes between traffic function (flow) and access function (residence). The homogeneity principle aims at differences in mass,

  18. Extraocular muscle function testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003397.htm Extraocular muscle function testing To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Extraocular muscle function testing examines the function of the eye muscles. ...

  19. Congenital platelet function defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... pool disorder; Glanzmann's thrombasthenia; Bernard-Soulier syndrome; Platelet function defects - congenital ... Congenital platelet function defects are bleeding disorders that cause reduced platelet function. Most of the time, people with these disorders have ...

  20. Hepatic (Liver) Function Panel

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Educators Search English Español Blood Test: Hepatic (Liver) Function Panel KidsHealth / For Parents / Blood Test: Hepatic (Liver) ... kidneys ) is working. What Is a Hepatic (Liver) Function Panel? A liver function panel is a blood ...

  1. Platelet Function Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Patient Resources For Health Professionals Subscribe Search Platelet Function Tests Send Us Your Feedback Choose Topic At ... Also Known As Platelet Aggregation Studies PFT Platelet Function Assay PFA Formal Name Platelet Function Tests This ...

  2. On Poisson functions

    OpenAIRE

    Terashima, Yuji

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, defining Poisson functions on super manifolds, we show that the graphs of Poisson functions are Dirac structures, and find Poisson functions which include as special cases both quasi-Poisson structures and twisted Poisson structures.

  3. Investigating body function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monks, R.; Riley, A.L.M.

    1981-01-01

    This invention relates to the investigation of body function, especially small bowel function but also liver function, using bile acids and bile salts or their metabolic precursors labelled with radio isotopes and selenium or tellurium. (author)

  4. Functional bowel disorders and functional abdominal pain

    OpenAIRE

    Thompson, W; Longstreth, G; Drossman, D; Heaton, K; Irvine, E; Muller-Lissner, S

    1999-01-01

    The Rome diagnostic criteria for the functional bowel disorders and functional abdominal pain are used widely in research and practice. A committee consensus approach, including criticism from multinational expert reviewers, was used to revise the diagnostic criteria and update diagnosis and treatment recommendations, based on research results. The terminology was clarified and the diagnostic criteria and management recommendations were revised. A functional bowel disorder (FBD) is diagnosed ...

  5. Functional microorganisms for functional food quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gobbetti, M; Cagno, R Di; De Angelis, M

    2010-09-01

    Functional microorganisms and health benefits represent a binomial with great potential for fermented functional foods. The health benefits of fermented functional foods are expressed either directly through the interactions of ingested live microorganisms with the host (probiotic effect) or indirectly as the result of the ingestion of microbial metabolites synthesized during fermentation (biogenic effect). Since the importance of high viability for probiotic effect, two major options are currently pursued for improving it--to enhance bacterial stress response and to use alternative products for incorporating probiotics (e.g., ice cream, cheeses, cereals, fruit juices, vegetables, and soy beans). Further, it seems that quorum sensing signal molecules released by probiotics may interact with human epithelial cells from intestine thus modulating several physiological functions. Under optimal processing conditions, functional microorganisms contribute to food functionality through their enzyme portfolio and the release of metabolites. Overproduction of free amino acids and vitamins are two classical examples. Besides, bioactive compounds (e.g., peptides, γ-amino butyric acid, and conjugated linoleic acid) may be released during food processing above the physiological threshold and they may exert various in vivo health benefits. Functional microorganisms are even more used in novel strategies for decreasing phenomenon of food intolerance (e.g., gluten intolerance) and allergy. By a critical approach, this review will aim at showing the potential of functional microorganisms for the quality of functional foods.

  6. The Interpretive Function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agerbo, Heidi

    2017-01-01

    Approximately a decade ago, it was suggested that a new function should be added to the lexicographical function theory: the interpretive function(1). However, hardly any research has been conducted into this function, and though it was only suggested that this new function was relevant...... to incorporate into lexicographical theory, some scholars have since then assumed that this function exists(2), including the author of this contribution. In Agerbo (2016), I present arguments supporting the incorporation of the interpretive function into the function theory and suggest how non-linguistic signs...... can be treated in specific dictionary articles. However, in the current article, due to the results of recent research, I argue that the interpretive function should not be considered an individual main function. The interpretive function, contrary to some of its definitions, is not connected...

  7. Every storage function is a state function

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Trentelman, H.L.; Willems, J.C.

    1997-01-01

    It is shown that for linear dynamical systems with quadratic supply rates, a storage function can always be written as a quadratic function of the state of an associated linear dynamical system. This dynamical system is obtained by combining the dynamics of the original system with the dynamics of

  8. Persistent Functional Languages: Toward Functional Relational Databases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wevers, L.

    2014-01-01

    Functional languages provide new approaches to concurrency control, based on techniques such as lazy evaluation and memoization. We have designed and implemented a persistent functional language based on these ideas, which we plan to use for the implementation of a relational database system. With

  9. Museums and Their Functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osborne, Harold

    1985-01-01

    Historical background concerning the nature and function of museums is provided, and the aesthetic functions of museums are discussed. The first major aesthetic function of museums is to preserve the artistic heritage of mankind and to make it widely available. The second major function is patronage. (RM)

  10. Hierarchical wave functions revisited

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Dingping.

    1997-11-01

    We study the hierarchical wave functions on a sphere and on a torus. We simplify some wave functions on a sphere or a torus using the analytic properties of wave functions. The open question, the construction of the wave function for quasi electron excitation on a torus, is also solved in this paper. (author)

  11. Functional Programming in R

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mailund, Thomas

    Master functions and discover how to write functional programs in R. In this book, you'll make your functions pure by avoiding side-effects; you’ll write functions that manipulate other functions, and you’ll construct complex functions using simpler functions as building blocks. In Functional...... Programming in R, you’ll see how we can replace loops, which can have side-effects, with recursive functions that can more easily avoid them. In addition, the book covers why you shouldn't use recursion when loops are more efficient and how you can get the best of both worlds. Functional programming...... is a style of programming, like object-oriented programming, but one that focuses on data transformations and calculations rather than objects and state. Where in object-oriented programming you model your programs by describing which states an object can be in and how methods will reveal or modify...

  12. Functional Programming in R

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mailund, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    Master functions and discover how to write functional programs in R. In this book, you'll make your functions pure by avoiding side-effects; you’ll write functions that manipulate other functions, and you’ll construct complex functions using simpler functions as building blocks. In Functional...... Programming in R, you’ll see how we can replace loops, which can have side-effects, with recursive functions that can more easily avoid them. In addition, the book covers why you shouldn't use recursion when loops are more efficient and how you can get the best of both worlds. Functional programming...... is a style of programming, like object-oriented programming, but one that focuses on data transformations and calculations rather than objects and state. Where in object-oriented programming you model your programs by describing which states an object can be in and how methods will reveal or modify...

  13. Teager Correlation Function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bysted, Tommy Kristensen; Hamila, R.; Gabbouj, M.

    1998-01-01

    A new correlation function called the Teager correlation function is introduced in this paper. The connection between this function, the Teager energy operator and the conventional correlation function is established. Two applications are presented. The first is the minimization of the Teager error...... norm and the second one is the use of the instantaneous Teager correlation function for simultaneous estimation of TDOA and FDOA (Time and Frequency Difference of Arrivals)....

  14. Properties of Ambiguity Functions

    OpenAIRE

    Mulcahy-Stanislawczyk, John

    2014-01-01

    The use of ambiguity functions in radar signal design and analysis is very common. Understanding the various properties and meanings of ambiguity functions allow a signal designer to understand the time delay and doppler shift properties of a given signal. Through the years, several different versions of the ambiguity function have been used. Each of these functions essentially have the same physical meaning; however, the use of different functions makes it difficult to be sure that certai...

  15. Ergotic / epistemic / semiotic functions

    OpenAIRE

    Luciani , Annie

    2007-01-01

    International audience; Claude Cadoz has introduced a typology of human-environment relation, identifying three functions. This typology allows characterizing univocally, i.e. in a non-redundant manner, the computer devices and interfaces that allow human to interact with environment through and by computers. These three functions are: the epistemic function, the semiotic function, the ergotic function. Conversely to the terms epistemic and semiotic that are usual, the term ergotic has been s...

  16. Variational functionals which admit discontinuous trial functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nelson, P. Jr.

    1975-01-01

    It is argued that variational synthesis with discontinuous trial functions requires variational principles applicable to equations involving operators acting between distinct Hilbert spaces. A description is given of a Roussopoulos-type variational principle generalized to cover this situation. This principle is suggested as the basis for a unified approach to the derivation of variational functionals. In addition to esthetics, this approach has the advantage that the mathematical details increase the understanding of the derived functional, particularly the sense in which a synthesized solution should be regarded as an approximation to the true solution. By way of illustration, the generalized Roussopoulos principle is applied to derive a class of first-order diffusion functionals which admit trial functions containing approximations at an interface. These ''asymptotic'' interface quantities are independent of the limiting approximations from either side and permit use of different trial spectra at and on either side of an interface. The class of functionals derived contains as special cases both the Lagrange multiplier method of Buslik and two functionals of Lambropoulos and Luco. Some numerical results for a simple two-group model confirm that the ''multipliers'' can closely approximate the appropriate quantity in the region near an interface. (U.S.)

  17. Sacrificial spacer and non-covalent routes toward the molecular imprinting of 'poorly-functionalized' N-heterocycles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirsch, N.; Alexander, C.; Davies, S.; Whitcombe, M.J.

    2004-01-01

    A comparison of three different methods for the imprinting of small aromatic heterocycles containing only a single nitrogen atom, for the preparation of specific analytical phases, was carried out. A conventional non-covalent approach to the imprinting of pyridine using methacrylic acid as the functional monomer was compared with two sacrificial spacer methods, in which heterocycles were imprinted as covalent template analogues. The results of binding experiments showed that discrimination based on ligand size was possible when polymers were prepared using a silyl ester-based template. The most selective polymer was able to bind pyridine in preference to quinoline or acridine which is opposite to the trend predicted by the pK HB values for the three ligands. Curve fitting of the isotherm for pyridine binding to this polymer to the Langmuir model gave an approximate K d of 1.1±0.1 mM and a binding site concentration of 57±2 mmol g -1 . Acridine binding did not show saturation behaviour and was non-specific and cooperative in nature

  18. A Blue Lagoon Function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Markvorsen, Steen

    2007-01-01

    We consider a specific function of two variables whose graph surface resembles a blue lagoon. The function has a saddle point $p$, but when the function is restricted to any given straight line through $p$ it has a {\\em{strict local minimum}} along that line at $p$.......We consider a specific function of two variables whose graph surface resembles a blue lagoon. The function has a saddle point $p$, but when the function is restricted to any given straight line through $p$ it has a {\\em{strict local minimum}} along that line at $p$....

  19. Quality function deployment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-10-01

    This book indicates quality function deployment with quality and deployment of quality function, process and prospect of quality function deployment and development, product process and conception of quality table, deployment of quality demand, design of quality table and application of concurrent multi design, progress design and quality development, main safe part and management of important function part, quality development and deployment of method of construction, quality deployment and economics, total system of quality function deployment and task of quality function deployment in the present and future.

  20. Functional Object Analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raket, Lars Lau

    We propose a direction it the field of statistics which we will call functional object analysis. This subfields considers the analysis of functional objects defined on continuous domains. In this setting we will focus on model-based statistics, with a particularly emphasis on mixed......-effect formulations, where the observed functional signal is assumed to consist of both fixed and random functional effects. This thesis takes the initial steps toward the development of likelihood-based methodology for functional objects. We first consider analysis of functional data defined on high...

  1. High spin structure functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, H.

    1990-01-01

    This thesis explores deep inelastic scattering of a lepton beam from a polarized nuclear target with spin J=1. After reviewing the formation for spin-1/2, the structure functions for a spin-1 target are defined in terms of the helicity amplitudes for forward compton scattering. A version of the convolution model, which incorporates relativistic and binding energy corrections is used to calculate the structure functions of a neutron target. A simple parameterization of these structure functions is given in terms of a few neutron wave function parameters and the free nucleon structure functions. This allows for an easy comparison of structure functions calculated using different neutron models. (author)

  2. From functional architecture to functional connectomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, R Clay

    2012-07-26

    "Receptive Fields, Binocular Interaction and Functional Architecture in the Cat's Visual Cortex" by Hubel and Wiesel (1962) reported several important discoveries: orientation columns, the distinct structures of simple and complex receptive fields, and binocular integration. But perhaps the paper's greatest influence came from the concept of functional architecture (the complex relationship between in vivo physiology and the spatial arrangement of neurons) and several models of functionally specific connectivity. They thus identified two distinct concepts, topographic specificity and functional specificity, which together with cell-type specificity constitute the major determinants of nonrandom cortical connectivity. Orientation columns are iconic examples of topographic specificity, whereby axons within a column connect with cells of a single orientation preference. Hubel and Wiesel also saw the need for functional specificity at a finer scale in their model of thalamic inputs to simple cells, verified in the 1990s. The difficult but potentially more important question of functional specificity between cortical neurons is only now becoming tractable with new experimental techniques. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Functional Median Polish

    KAUST Repository

    Sun, Ying

    2012-08-03

    This article proposes functional median polish, an extension of univariate median polish, for one-way and two-way functional analysis of variance (ANOVA). The functional median polish estimates the functional grand effect and functional main factor effects based on functional medians in an additive functional ANOVA model assuming no interaction among factors. A functional rank test is used to assess whether the functional main factor effects are significant. The robustness of the functional median polish is demonstrated by comparing its performance with the traditional functional ANOVA fitted by means under different outlier models in simulation studies. The functional median polish is illustrated on various applications in climate science, including one-way and two-way ANOVA when functional data are either curves or images. Specifically, Canadian temperature data, U. S. precipitation observations and outputs of global and regional climate models are considered, which can facilitate the research on the close link between local climate and the occurrence or severity of some diseases and other threats to human health. © 2012 International Biometric Society.

  4. Operations Between Functions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gardner, Richard J.; Kiderlen, Markus

    A structural theory of operations between real-valued (or extended-real-valued) functions on a nonempty subset A of Rn is initiated. It is shown, for example, that any operation ∗ on a cone of functions containing the constant functions, which is pointwise, positively homogeneous, monotonic......, and associative, must be one of 40 explicitly given types. In particular, this is the case for operations between pairs of arbitrary, or continuous, or differentiable functions. The term pointwise means that (f ∗g)(x) = F(f(x), g(x)), for all x ∈ A and some function F of two variables. Several results in the same...... spirit are obtained for operations between convex functions or between support functions. For example, it is shown that ordinary addition is the unique pointwise operation between convex functions satisfying the identity property, i.e., f ∗ 0 = 0 ∗ f = f, for all convex f, while other results classify Lp...

  5. Kidney function tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kidney function tests are common lab tests used to evaluate how well the kidneys are working. Such tests include: ... Oh MS, Briefel G. Evaluation of renal function, water, electrolytes ... and Management by Laboratory Methods . 23rd ed. Philadelphia, ...

  6. Liver Function Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... digest food, store energy, and remove poisons. Liver function tests are blood tests that check to see ... as hepatitis and cirrhosis. You may have liver function tests as part of a regular checkup. Or ...

  7. Functionalized diamond nanoparticles

    KAUST Repository

    Beaujuge, Pierre M.; El Tall, Omar; Raja, Inam U.

    2014-01-01

    A diamond nanoparticle can be functionalized with a substituted dienophile under ambient conditions, and in the absence of catalysts or additional reagents. The functionalization is thought to proceed through an addition reaction.

  8. Smart hydrogel functional materials

    CERN Document Server

    Chu, Liang-Yin; Ju, Xiao-Jie

    2014-01-01

    This book systematically introduces smart hydrogel functional materials with the configurations ranging from hydrogels to microgels. It serves as an excellent reference for designing and fabricating artificial smart hydrogel functional materials.

  9. Integrals of Bessel functions

    OpenAIRE

    Babusci, D.; Dattoli, G.; Germano, B.; Martinelli, M. R.; Ricci, P. E.

    2011-01-01

    We use the operator method to evaluate a class of integrals involving Bessel or Bessel-type functions. The technique we propose is based on the formal reduction of these family of functions to Gaussians.

  10. Functional Python programming

    CERN Document Server

    Lott, Steven

    2015-01-01

    This book is for developers who want to use Python to write programs that lean heavily on functional programming design patterns. You should be comfortable with Python programming, but no knowledge of functional programming paradigms is needed.

  11. Functionalized diamond nanoparticles

    KAUST Repository

    Beaujuge, Pierre M.

    2014-10-21

    A diamond nanoparticle can be functionalized with a substituted dienophile under ambient conditions, and in the absence of catalysts or additional reagents. The functionalization is thought to proceed through an addition reaction.

  12. Ecological Functions of Landscapes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiryushin, V. I.

    2018-01-01

    Ecological functions of landscapes are considered a system of processes ensuring the development, preservation, and evolution of ecosystems and the biosphere as a whole. The concept of biogeocenosis can be considered a model that integrates biotic and environmental functions. The most general biogeocenotic functions specify the biodiversity, biotic links, self-organization, and evolution of ecosystems. Close interaction between biocenosis and the biotope (ecotope) is ensured by the continuous exchange of matter, energy, and information. Ecotope determines the biocenosis. The group of ecotopic functions includes atmospheric (gas exchange, heat exchange, hydroatmospheric, climate-forming), lithospheric (geodynamic, geophysical, and geochemical), hydrologic and hydrogeologic functions of landscape and ecotopic functions of soils. Bioecological functions emerge as a result of the biotope and ecotope interaction; these are the bioproductive, destructive, organoaccumulative, biochemical (gas, concentration, redox, biochemical, biopedological), pedogenetic, and energy functions

  13. Functional Median Polish

    KAUST Repository

    Sun, Ying; Genton, Marc G.

    2012-01-01

    polish is demonstrated by comparing its performance with the traditional functional ANOVA fitted by means under different outlier models in simulation studies. The functional median polish is illustrated on various applications in climate science

  14. Hybrid functional pseudopotentials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jing; Tan, Liang Z.; Rappe, Andrew M.

    2018-02-01

    The consistency between the exchange-correlation functional used in pseudopotential construction and in the actual density functional theory calculation is essential for the accurate prediction of fundamental properties of materials. However, routine hybrid density functional calculations at present still rely on generalized gradient approximation pseudopotentials due to the lack of hybrid functional pseudopotentials. Here, we present a scheme for generating hybrid functional pseudopotentials, and we analyze the importance of pseudopotential density functional consistency for hybrid functionals. For the PBE0 hybrid functional, we benchmark our pseudopotentials for structural parameters and fundamental electronic gaps of the Gaussian-2 (G2) molecular dataset and some simple solids. Our results show that using our PBE0 pseudopotentials in PBE0 calculations improves agreement with respect to all-electron calculations.

  15. Photon structure function - theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bardeen, W.A.

    1984-12-01

    The theoretical status of the photon structure function is reviewed. Particular attention is paid to the hadronic mixing problem and the ability of perturbative QCD to make definitive predictions for the photon structure function. 11 references

  16. Monotone Boolean functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korshunov, A D

    2003-01-01

    Monotone Boolean functions are an important object in discrete mathematics and mathematical cybernetics. Topics related to these functions have been actively studied for several decades. Many results have been obtained, and many papers published. However, until now there has been no sufficiently complete monograph or survey of results of investigations concerning monotone Boolean functions. The object of this survey is to present the main results on monotone Boolean functions obtained during the last 50 years

  17. and chebyshev functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohsen Razzaghi

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available A direct method for finding the solution of variational problems using a hybrid function is discussed. The hybrid functions which consist of block-pulse functions plus Chebyshev polynomials are introduced. An operational matrix of integration and the integration of the cross product of two hybrid function vectors are presented and are utilized to reduce a variational problem to the solution of an algebraic equation. Illustrative examples are included to demonstrate the validity and applicability of the technique.

  18. Functional Task Test (FTT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloomberg, Jacob J.; Mulavara, Ajitkumar; Peters, Brian T.; Rescheke, Millard F.; Wood, Scott; Lawrence, Emily; Koffman, Igor; Ploutz-Snyder, Lori; Spiering, Barry A.; Feeback, Daniel L.; hide

    2009-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the Functional Task Test (FTT), an interdisciplinary testing regimen that has been developed to evaluate astronaut postflight functional performance and related physiological changes. The objectives of the project are: (1) to develop a set of functional tasks that represent critical mission tasks for the Constellation Program, (2) determine the ability to perform these tasks after space flight, (3) Identify the key physiological factors that contribute to functional decrements and (4) Use this information to develop targeted countermeasures.

  19. Pseudolinear functions and optimization

    CERN Document Server

    Mishra, Shashi Kant

    2015-01-01

    Pseudolinear Functions and Optimization is the first book to focus exclusively on pseudolinear functions, a class of generalized convex functions. It discusses the properties, characterizations, and applications of pseudolinear functions in nonlinear optimization problems.The book describes the characterizations of solution sets of various optimization problems. It examines multiobjective pseudolinear, multiobjective fractional pseudolinear, static minmax pseudolinear, and static minmax fractional pseudolinear optimization problems and their results. The authors extend these results to locally

  20. Photon wave function

    OpenAIRE

    Bialynicki-Birula, Iwo

    2005-01-01

    Photon wave function is a controversial concept. Controversies stem from the fact that photon wave functions can not have all the properties of the Schroedinger wave functions of nonrelativistic wave mechanics. Insistence on those properties that, owing to peculiarities of photon dynamics, cannot be rendered, led some physicists to the extreme opinion that the photon wave function does not exist. I reject such a fundamentalist point of view in favor of a more pragmatic approach. In my view, t...

  1. On Functional Calculus Estimates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schwenninger, F.L.

    2015-01-01

    This thesis presents various results within the field of operator theory that are formulated in estimates for functional calculi. Functional calculus is the general concept of defining operators of the form $f(A)$, where f is a function and $A$ is an operator, typically on a Banach space. Norm

  2. Phylogenetic molecular function annotation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Engelhardt, Barbara E; Jordan, Michael I; Repo, Susanna T; Brenner, Steven E

    2009-01-01

    It is now easier to discover thousands of protein sequences in a new microbial genome than it is to biochemically characterize the specific activity of a single protein of unknown function. The molecular functions of protein sequences have typically been predicted using homology-based computational methods, which rely on the principle that homologous proteins share a similar function. However, some protein families include groups of proteins with different molecular functions. A phylogenetic approach for predicting molecular function (sometimes called 'phylogenomics') is an effective means to predict protein molecular function. These methods incorporate functional evidence from all members of a family that have functional characterizations using the evolutionary history of the protein family to make robust predictions for the uncharacterized proteins. However, they are often difficult to apply on a genome-wide scale because of the time-consuming step of reconstructing the phylogenies of each protein to be annotated. Our automated approach for function annotation using phylogeny, the SIFTER (Statistical Inference of Function Through Evolutionary Relationships) methodology, uses a statistical graphical model to compute the probabilities of molecular functions for unannotated proteins. Our benchmark tests showed that SIFTER provides accurate functional predictions on various protein families, outperforming other available methods.

  3. New Similarity Functions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yazdani, Hossein; Ortiz-Arroyo, Daniel; Kwasnicka, Halina

    2016-01-01

    spaces, in addition to their similarity in the vector space. Prioritized Weighted Feature Distance (PWFD) works similarly as WFD, but provides the ability to give priorities to desirable features. The accuracy of the proposed functions are compared with other similarity functions on several data sets....... Our results show that the proposed functions work better than other methods proposed in the literature....

  4. Two Functions of Language

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldman, Carol Fleisher

    1977-01-01

    Author advocates the view that meaning is necessarily dependent upon the communicative function of language and examines the objections, particularly those of Noam Chomsky, to this view. Argues that while Chomsky disagrees with the idea that communication is the essential function of language, he implicitly agrees that it has a function.…

  5. Automatic differentiation of functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Douglas, S.R.

    1990-06-01

    Automatic differentiation is a method of computing derivatives of functions to any order in any number of variables. The functions must be expressible as combinations of elementary functions. When evaluated at specific numerical points, the derivatives have no truncation error and are automatically found. The method is illustrated by simple examples. Source code in FORTRAN is provided

  6. Nonparametric Transfer Function Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jun M.; Chen, Rong; Yao, Qiwei

    2009-01-01

    In this paper a class of nonparametric transfer function models is proposed to model nonlinear relationships between ‘input’ and ‘output’ time series. The transfer function is smooth with unknown functional forms, and the noise is assumed to be a stationary autoregressive-moving average (ARMA) process. The nonparametric transfer function is estimated jointly with the ARMA parameters. By modeling the correlation in the noise, the transfer function can be estimated more efficiently. The parsimonious ARMA structure improves the estimation efficiency in finite samples. The asymptotic properties of the estimators are investigated. The finite-sample properties are illustrated through simulations and one empirical example. PMID:20628584

  7. Weakly clopen functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Son, Mi Jung; Park, Jin Han; Lim, Ki Moon

    2007-01-01

    We introduce a new class of functions called weakly clopen function which includes the class of almost clopen functions due to Ekici [Ekici E. Generalization of perfectly continuous, regular set-connected and clopen functions. Acta Math Hungar 2005;107:193-206] and is included in the class of weakly continuous functions due to Levine [Levine N. A decomposition of continuity in topological spaces. Am Math Mon 1961;68:44-6]. Some characterizations and several properties concerning weakly clopenness are obtained. Furthermore, relationships among weak clopenness, almost clopenness, clopenness and weak continuity are investigated

  8. Implementing function spreadsheets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sestoft, Peter

    2008-01-01

    : that of turning an expression into a named function. Hence they proposed a way to define a function in terms of a worksheet with designated input and output cells; we shall call it a function sheet. The goal of our work is to develop implementations of function sheets and study their application to realistic...... examples. Therefore, we are also developing a simple yet comprehensive spreadsheet core implementation for experimentation with this technology. Here we report briefly on our experiments with function sheets as well as other uses of our spreadsheet core implementation....

  9. Transfer function combinations

    KAUST Repository

    Zhou, Liang; Schott, Mathias; Hansen, Charles

    2012-01-01

    Direct volume rendering has been an active area of research for over two decades. Transfer function design remains a difficult task since current methods, such as traditional 1D and 2D transfer functions, are not always effective for all data sets. Various 1D or 2D transfer function spaces have been proposed to improve classification exploiting different aspects, such as using the gradient magnitude for boundary location and statistical, occlusion, or size metrics. In this paper, we present a novel transfer function method which can provide more specificity for data classification by combining different transfer function spaces. In this work, a 2D transfer function can be combined with 1D transfer functions which improve the classification. Specifically, we use the traditional 2D scalar/gradient magnitude, 2D statistical, and 2D occlusion spectrum transfer functions and combine these with occlusion and/or size-based transfer functions to provide better specificity. We demonstrate the usefulness of the new method by comparing to the following previous techniques: 2D gradient magnitude, 2D occlusion spectrum, 2D statistical transfer functions and 2D size based transfer functions. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd.

  10. Transfer function combinations

    KAUST Repository

    Zhou, Liang

    2012-10-01

    Direct volume rendering has been an active area of research for over two decades. Transfer function design remains a difficult task since current methods, such as traditional 1D and 2D transfer functions, are not always effective for all data sets. Various 1D or 2D transfer function spaces have been proposed to improve classification exploiting different aspects, such as using the gradient magnitude for boundary location and statistical, occlusion, or size metrics. In this paper, we present a novel transfer function method which can provide more specificity for data classification by combining different transfer function spaces. In this work, a 2D transfer function can be combined with 1D transfer functions which improve the classification. Specifically, we use the traditional 2D scalar/gradient magnitude, 2D statistical, and 2D occlusion spectrum transfer functions and combine these with occlusion and/or size-based transfer functions to provide better specificity. We demonstrate the usefulness of the new method by comparing to the following previous techniques: 2D gradient magnitude, 2D occlusion spectrum, 2D statistical transfer functions and 2D size based transfer functions. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd.

  11. Functional Maximum Autocorrelation Factors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Rasmus; Nielsen, Allan Aasbjerg

    2005-01-01

    MAF outperforms the functional PCA in concentrating the interesting' spectra/shape variation in one end of the eigenvalue spectrum and allows for easier interpretation of effects. Conclusions. Functional MAF analysis is a useful methods for extracting low dimensional models of temporally or spatially......Purpose. We aim at data where samples of an underlying function are observed in a spatial or temporal layout. Examples of underlying functions are reflectance spectra and biological shapes. We apply functional models based on smoothing splines and generalize the functional PCA in......\\verb+~+\\$\\backslash\\$cite{ramsay97} to functional maximum autocorrelation factors (MAF)\\verb+~+\\$\\backslash\\$cite{switzer85,larsen2001d}. We apply the method to biological shapes as well as reflectance spectra. {\\$\\backslash\\$bf Methods}. MAF seeks linear combination of the original variables that maximize autocorrelation between...

  12. Electronic Customer Relationship Management (eCRM) from the Perspective of Two Banks with Online Marketing in Pakistan : case of HSBC PK and Standard Chartered Bank PK

    OpenAIRE

    Abdul, Shakoor

    2011-01-01

    This study observes an approach which is known as explorative because it aims to evaluate and examine online media as a tool for e-CRM. In addition, this involves the approach known as iterative also depends on the data, which is qualitative in congestion with observational information. This study builds on the existing literature and theories within customer relationship marketing (CRM). The subfield to CRM, called e-CRM, is further studied the phenomenon of online marketing and online CRM (...

  13. E-Orbit Functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiri Patera

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available We review and further develop the theory of $E$-orbit functions. They are functions on the Euclidean space $E_n$ obtained from the multivariate exponential function by symmetrization by means of an even part $W_{e}$ of a Weyl group $W$, corresponding to a Coxeter-Dynkin diagram. Properties of such functions are described. They are closely related to symmetric and antisymmetric orbit functions which are received from exponential functions by symmetrization and antisymmetrization procedure by means of a Weyl group $W$. The $E$-orbit functions, determined by integral parameters, are invariant withrespect to even part $W^{aff}_{e}$ of the affine Weyl group corresponding to $W$. The $E$-orbit functions determine a symmetrized Fourier transform, where these functions serve as a kernel of the transform. They also determine a transform on a finite set of points of the fundamental domain $F^{e}$ of the group $W^{aff}_{e}$ (the discrete $E$-orbit function transform.

  14. Antisymmetric Orbit Functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anatoliy Klimyk

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available In the paper, properties of antisymmetric orbit functions are reviewed and further developed. Antisymmetric orbit functions on the Euclidean space $E_n$ are antisymmetrized exponential functions. Antisymmetrization is fulfilled by a Weyl group, corresponding to a Coxeter-Dynkin diagram. Properties of such functions are described. These functions are closely related to irreducible characters of a compact semisimple Lie group $G$ of rank $n$. Up to a sign, values of antisymmetric orbit functions are repeated on copies of the fundamental domain $F$ of the affine Weyl group (determined by the initial Weyl group in the entire Euclidean space $E_n$. Antisymmetric orbit functions are solutions of the corresponding Laplace equation in $E_n$, vanishing on the boundary of the fundamental domain $F$. Antisymmetric orbit functions determine a so-called antisymmetrized Fourier transform which is closely related to expansions of central functions in characters of irreducible representations of the group $G$. They also determine a transform on a finite set of points of $F$ (the discrete antisymmetric orbit function transform. Symmetric and antisymmetric multivariate exponential, sine and cosine discrete transforms are given.

  15. Functional and evolutionary characterization of Ohr proteins in eukaryotes reveals many active homologs among pathogenic fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meireles, D A; Domingos, R M; Gaiarsa, J W; Ragnoni, E G; Bannitz-Fernandes, R; da Silva Neto, J F; de Souza, R F; Netto, L E S

    2017-08-01

    Ohr and OsmC proteins comprise two subfamilies within a large group of proteins that display Cys-based, thiol dependent peroxidase activity. These proteins were previously thought to be restricted to prokaryotes, but we show here, using iterated sequence searches, that Ohr/OsmC homologs are also present in 217 species of eukaryotes with a massive presence in Fungi (186 species). Many of these eukaryotic Ohr proteins possess an N-terminal extension that is predicted to target them to mitochondria. We obtained recombinant proteins for four eukaryotic members of the Ohr/OsmC family and three of them displayed lipoyl peroxidase activity. Further functional and biochemical characterization of the Ohr homologs from the ascomycete fungus Mycosphaerella fijiensis Mf_1 (MfOhr), the causative agent of Black Sigatoka disease in banana plants, was pursued. Similarly to what has been observed for the bacterial proteins, we found that: (i) the peroxidase activity of MfOhr was supported by DTT or dihydrolipoamide (dithiols), but not by β-mercaptoethanol or GSH (monothiols), even in large excess; (ii) MfOhr displayed preference for organic hydroperoxides (CuOOH and tBOOH) over hydrogen peroxide; (iii) MfOhr presented extraordinary reactivity towards linoleic acid hydroperoxides (k=3.18 (±2.13)×10 8 M -1 s -1 ). Both Cys 87 and Cys 154 were essential to the peroxidase activity, since single mutants for each Cys residue presented no activity and no formation of intramolecular disulfide bond upon treatment with hydroperoxides. The pK a value of the Cys p residue was determined as 5.7±0.1 by a monobromobimane alkylation method. Therefore, eukaryotic Ohr peroxidases share several biochemical features with prokaryotic orthologues and are preferentially located in mitochondria. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  16. B Plant function analysis report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lund, D.P.

    1995-09-01

    The document contains the functions, function definitions, function interfaces, function interface definitions, Input Computer Automated Manufacturing Definition (IDEFO) diagrams, and a function hierarchy chart that describe what needs to be performed to deactivate B Plant

  17. Rδ-Supercontinuous Functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kohli J. K.

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available A new class of functions called ‘Rδ-supercontinuous functions’ is introduced. Their basic properties are studied and their place in the hierarchy of strong variants of continuity which already exist in the literature is elaborated. The class of Rδ-supercontinuous functions (Math. Bohem., to appear properly contains the class of Rz-supercontinuous functions which in its turn properly contains the class of Rcl- supercontinuous functions (Demonstratio Math. 46(1 (2013, 229-244 and so includes all Rcl-supercontinuous (≡clopen continuous functions (Applied Gen. Topol. 8(2 (2007, 293-300; Indian J. Pure Appl. Math. 14(6 (1983, 767-772 and is properly contained in the class of R-supercontinuous functions (Demonstratio Math. 43(3 (2010, 703-723.

  18. Intrinsic-density functionals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Engel, J.

    2007-01-01

    The Hohenberg-Kohn theorem and Kohn-Sham procedure are extended to functionals of the localized intrinsic density of a self-bound system such as a nucleus. After defining the intrinsic-density functional, we modify the usual Kohn-Sham procedure slightly to evaluate the mean-field approximation to the functional, and carefully describe the construction of the leading corrections for a system of fermions in one dimension with a spin-degeneracy equal to the number of particles N. Despite the fact that the corrections are complicated and nonlocal, we are able to construct a local Skyrme-like intrinsic-density functional that, while different from the exact functional, shares with it a minimum value equal to the exact ground-state energy at the exact ground-state intrinsic density, to next-to-leading order in 1/N. We briefly discuss implications for real Skyrme functionals

  19. Functional analysis and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Siddiqi, Abul Hasan

    2018-01-01

    This self-contained textbook discusses all major topics in functional analysis. Combining classical materials with new methods, it supplies numerous relevant solved examples and problems and discusses the applications of functional analysis in diverse fields. The book is unique in its scope, and a variety of applications of functional analysis and operator-theoretic methods are devoted to each area of application. Each chapter includes a set of problems, some of which are routine and elementary, and some of which are more advanced. The book is primarily intended as a textbook for graduate and advanced undergraduate students in applied mathematics and engineering. It offers several attractive features making it ideally suited for courses on functional analysis intended to provide a basic introduction to the subject and the impact of functional analysis on applied and computational mathematics, nonlinear functional analysis and optimization. It introduces emerging topics like wavelets, Gabor system, inverse pro...

  20. Counting with symmetric functions

    CERN Document Server

    Mendes, Anthony

    2015-01-01

    This monograph provides a self-contained introduction to symmetric functions and their use in enumerative combinatorics.  It is the first book to explore many of the methods and results that the authors present. Numerous exercises are included throughout, along with full solutions, to illustrate concepts and also highlight many interesting mathematical ideas. The text begins by introducing fundamental combinatorial objects such as permutations and integer partitions, as well as generating functions.  Symmetric functions are considered in the next chapter, with a unique emphasis on the combinatorics of the transition matrices between bases of symmetric functions.  Chapter 3 uses this introductory material to describe how to find an assortment of generating functions for permutation statistics, and then these techniques are extended to find generating functions for a variety of objects in Chapter 4.  The next two chapters present the Robinson-Schensted-Knuth algorithm and a method for proving Pólya’s enu...

  1. Relativistic plasma dispersion functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robinson, P.A.

    1986-01-01

    The known properties of plasma dispersion functions (PDF's) for waves in weakly relativistic, magnetized, thermal plasmas are reviewed and a large number of new results are presented. The PDF's required for the description of waves with small wave number perpendicular to the magnetic field (Dnestrovskii and Shkarofsky functions) are considered in detail; these functions also arise in certain quantum electrodynamical calculations involving strongly magnetized plasmas. Series, asymptotic series, recursion relations, integral forms, derivatives, differential equations, and approximations for these functions are discussed as are their analytic properties and connections with standard transcendental functions. In addition a more general class of PDF's relevant to waves of arbitrary perpendicular wave number is introduced and a range of properties of these functions are derived

  2. dftools: Distribution function fitting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obreschkow, Danail

    2018-05-01

    dftools, written in R, finds the most likely P parameters of a D-dimensional distribution function (DF) generating N objects, where each object is specified by D observables with measurement uncertainties. For instance, if the objects are galaxies, it can fit a mass function (D=1), a mass-size distribution (D=2) or the mass-spin-morphology distribution (D=3). Unlike most common fitting approaches, this method accurately accounts for measurement in uncertainties and complex selection functions.

  3. Entropy and wigner functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manfredi; Feix

    2000-10-01

    The properties of an alternative definition of quantum entropy, based on Wigner functions, are discussed. Such a definition emerges naturally from the Wigner representation of quantum mechanics, and can easily quantify the amount of entanglement of a quantum state. It is shown that smoothing of the Wigner function induces an increase in entropy. This fact is used to derive some simple rules to construct positive-definite probability distributions which are also admissible Wigner functions.

  4. Entropy and Wigner Functions

    OpenAIRE

    Manfredi, G.; Feix, M. R.

    2002-01-01

    The properties of an alternative definition of quantum entropy, based on Wigner functions, are discussed. Such definition emerges naturally from the Wigner representation of quantum mechanics, and can easily quantify the amount of entanglement of a quantum state. It is shown that smoothing of the Wigner function induces an increase in entropy. This fact is used to derive some simple rules to construct positive definite probability distributions which are also admissible Wigner functions

  5. Time functions revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fathi, Albert

    2015-07-01

    In this paper we revisit our joint work with Antonio Siconolfi on time functions. We will give a brief introduction to the subject. We will then show how to construct a Lipschitz time function in a simplified setting. We will end with a new result showing that the Aubry set is not an artifact of our proof of existence of time functions for stably causal manifolds.

  6. SPLINE, Spline Interpolation Function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allouard, Y.

    1977-01-01

    1 - Nature of physical problem solved: The problem is to obtain an interpolated function, as smooth as possible, that passes through given points. The derivatives of these functions are continuous up to the (2Q-1) order. The program consists of the following two subprograms: ASPLERQ. Transport of relations method for the spline functions of interpolation. SPLQ. Spline interpolation. 2 - Method of solution: The methods are described in the reference under item 10

  7. Hadron structure functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, F.

    1981-03-01

    The x dependence of hadron structure functions is investigated. If quarks can exist in very low mass states (10 MeV for d and u quarks) the pion structure function is predicted to behave like (1-x) and not (1-x) 2 in a x-region around 1. Relativistic and non-relativistic quark bound state pictures of hadrons are considered together with their relation with the Q 2 evolution of structure functions. Good agreement with data is in general obtained

  8. Calculus of bivariant function

    OpenAIRE

    PTÁČNÍK, Jan

    2011-01-01

    This thesis deals with the introduction of function of two variables and differential calculus of this function. This work should serve as a textbook for students of elementary school's teacher. Each chapter contains a summary of basic concepts and explanations of relationships, then solved model exercises of the topic and finally the exercises, which should solve the student himself. Thesis have transmit to students basic knowledges of differential calculus of functions of two variables, inc...

  9. Functional esophageal disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Clouse, R; Richter, J; Heading, R; Janssens, J; Wilson, J

    1999-01-01

    The functional esophageal disorders include globus, rumination syndrome, and symptoms that typify esophageal diseases (chest pain, heartburn, and dysphagia). Factors responsible for symptom production are poorly understood. The criteria for diagnosis rest not only on compatible symptoms but also on exclusion of structural and metabolic disorders that might mimic the functional disorders. Additionally, a functional diagnosis is precluded by the presence of a pathology-based motor disorder or p...

  10. Functional Programming With Relations

    OpenAIRE

    Hutton, Graham

    1991-01-01

    While programming in a relational framework has much to offer over the functional style in terms of expressiveness, computing with relations is less efficient, and more semantically troublesome. In this paper we propose a novel blend of the functional and relational styles. We identify a class of "causal relations", which inherit some of the bi-directionality properties of relations, but retain the efficiency and semantic foundations of the functional style.

  11. Photon structure function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bardeen, W.A.

    1980-11-01

    Theoretical understanding of the photon structure function is reviewed. As an illustration of the pointlike component, the parton model is briefly discussed. However, the systematic study of the photon structure function is presented through the framework of the operator product expansion. Perturbative QCD is used as the theoretical basis for the calculation of leading contributions to the operator product expansion. The influence of higher order QCD effects on these results is discussed. Recent results for the polarized structure functions are discussed

  12. Nonrespiratory lung function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isawa, Toyoharu

    1994-01-01

    The function of the lungs is primarily the function as a gas exchanger: the venous blood returning to the lungs is arterialized with oxygen in the lungs and the arterialized blood is sent back again to the peripheral tissues of the whole body to be utilized for metabolic oxygenation. Besides the gas exchanging function which we call ''respiratory lung function'' the lungs have functions that have little to do with gas exchange itself. We categorically call the latter function of the lungs as ''nonrespiratory lung function''. The lungs consist of the conductive airways, the gas exchanging units like the alveoli, and the interstitial space that surrounds the former two compartments. The interstitial space contains the blood and lymphatic capillaries, collagen and elastic fibers and cement substances. The conductive airways and the gas exchanging units are directly exposed to the atmosphere that contains various toxic and nontoxic gases, fume and biological or nonbiological particles. Because the conductive airways are equipped with defense mechanisms like mucociliary clearance or coughs to get rid of these toxic gases, particles or locally produced biological debris, we are usually free from being succumbed to ill effects of inhaled materials. By use of nuclear medicine techniques, we can now evaluate mucociliary clearance function, and other nonrespiratory lung functions as well in vivo

  13. Subordination by convex functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosihan M. Ali

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available For a fixed analytic function g(z=z+∑n=2∞gnzn defined on the open unit disk and γ<1, let Tg(γ denote the class of all analytic functions f(z=z+∑n=2∞anzn satisfying ∑n=2∞|angn|≤1−γ. For functions in Tg(γ, a subordination result is derived involving the convolution with a normalized convex function. Our result includes as special cases several earlier works.

  14. Renormalization Group Functional Equations

    CERN Document Server

    Curtright, Thomas L

    2011-01-01

    Functional conjugation methods are used to analyze the global structure of various renormalization group trajectories. With minimal assumptions, the methods produce continuous flows from step-scaling {\\sigma} functions, and lead to exact functional relations for the local flow {\\beta} functions, whose solutions may have novel, exotic features, including multiple branches. As a result, fixed points of {\\sigma} are sometimes not true fixed points under continuous changes in scale, and zeroes of {\\beta} do not necessarily signal fixed points of the flow, but instead may only indicate turning points of the trajectories.

  15. Perceptual Audio Hashing Functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emin Anarım

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Perceptual hash functions provide a tool for fast and reliable identification of content. We present new audio hash functions based on summarization of the time-frequency spectral characteristics of an audio document. The proposed hash functions are based on the periodicity series of the fundamental frequency and on singular-value description of the cepstral frequencies. They are found, on one hand, to perform very satisfactorily in identification and verification tests, and on the other hand, to be very resilient to a large variety of attacks. Moreover, we address the issue of security of hashes and propose a keying technique, and thereby a key-dependent hash function.

  16. Nonrespiratory lung function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Isawa, Toyoharu [Tohoku University Research Institute for Chest Disease and Cancer, Sendai (Japan)

    1994-07-01

    The function of the lungs is primarily the function as a gas exchanger: the venous blood returning to the lungs is arterialized with oxygen in the lungs and the arterialized blood is sent back again to the peripheral tissues of the whole body to be utilized for metabolic oxygenation. Besides the gas exchanging function which we call ''respiratory lung function'' the lungs have functions that have little to do with gas exchange itself. We categorically call the latter function of the lungs as ''nonrespiratory lung function''. The lungs consist of the conductive airways, the gas exchanging units like the alveoli, and the interstitial space that surrounds the former two compartments. The interstitial space contains the blood and lymphatic capillaries, collagen and elastic fibers and cement substances. The conductive airways and the gas exchanging units are directly exposed to the atmosphere that contains various toxic and nontoxic gases, fume and biological or nonbiological particles. Because the conductive airways are equipped with defense mechanisms like mucociliary clearance or coughs to get rid of these toxic gases, particles or locally produced biological debris, we are usually free from being succumbed to ill effects of inhaled materials. By use of nuclear medicine techniques, we can now evaluate mucociliary clearance function, and other nonrespiratory lung functions as well in vivo.

  17. Control functions in MFM

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lind, Morten

    2011-01-01

    Multilevel Flow Modeling (MFM) has been proposed as a tool for representing goals and functions of complex industrial plants and suggested as a basis for reasoning about control situations. Lind presents an introduction to MFM but do not describe how control functions are used in the modeling....... The purpose of the present paper is to serve as a companion paper to this introduction by explaining the basic principles used in MFM for representation of control functions. A theoretical foundation for modeling control functions is presented and modeling examples are given for illustration....

  18. Regulated functions and integrability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ján Gunčaga

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Properties of functions defined on a bounded closed interval, weaker than continuity, have been considered by many mathematicians. Functions having both sides limits at each point are called regulated and were considered by J. Dieudonné [2], D. Fraňková [3] and others (see for example S. Banach [1], S. Saks [8]. The main class of functions we deal with consists of piece-wise constant ones. These functions play a fundamental role in the integration theory which had been developed by Igor Kluvanek (see Š. Tkacik [9]. We present an outline of this theory.

  19. Introduction to functional methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faddeev, L.D.

    1976-01-01

    The functional integral is considered in relation to Feynman diagrams and phase space. The holomorphic form of the functional integral is then discussed. The main problem of the lectures, viz. the construction of the S-matrix by means of the functional integral, is considered. The functional methods described explicitly take into account the Bose statistics of the fields involved. The different procedure used to treat fermions is discussed. An introduction to the problem of quantization of gauge fields is given. (B.R.H.)

  20. The gamma function

    CERN Document Server

    Artin, Emil

    2015-01-01

    This brief monograph on the gamma function was designed by the author to fill what he perceived as a gap in the literature of mathematics, which often treated the gamma function in a manner he described as both sketchy and overly complicated. Author Emil Artin, one of the twentieth century's leading mathematicians, wrote in his Preface to this book, ""I feel that this monograph will help to show that the gamma function can be thought of as one of the elementary functions, and that all of its basic properties can be established using elementary methods of the calculus."" Generations of teachers

  1. Normal Functions As A New Way Of Defining Computable Functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leszek Dubiel

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Report sets new method of defining computable functions. This is formalization of traditional function descriptions, so it allows to define functions in very intuitive way. Discovery of Ackermann function proved that not all functions that can be easily computed can be so easily described with Hilbert’s system of recursive functions. Normal functions lack this disadvantage.

  2. Normal Functions as a New Way of Defining Computable Functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leszek Dubiel

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Report sets new method of defining computable functions. This is formalization of traditional function descriptions, so it allows to define functions in very intuitive way. Discovery of Ackermann function proved that not all functions that can be easily computed can be so easily described with Hilbert's system of recursive functions. Normal functions lack this disadvantage.

  3. Function spaces, 1

    CERN Document Server

    Pick, Luboš; John, Oldrich; Fucík, Svatopluk

    2012-01-01

    This is the first part of the second revised and extended edition of a well established monograph. It is an introduction to function spaces defined in terms of differentiability and integrability classes. It provides a catalogue of various spaces and benefits as a handbook for those who use function spaces to study other topics such as partial differential equations. Volum

  4. F-supercontinuous functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.K. Kohli

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available A strong variant of continuity called ‘F-supercontinuity’ is introduced. The class of F-supercontinuous functions strictly contains the class of z-supercontinuous functions (Indian J. Pure Appl. Math. 33 (7 (2002, 1097–1108 which in turn properly contains the class of cl-supercontinuous functions ( clopen maps (Appl. Gen. Topology 8 (2 (2007, 293–300; Indian J. Pure Appl. Math. 14 (6 (1983, 762–772. Further, the class of F-supercontinuous functions is properly contained in the class of R-supercontinuous functions which in turn is strictly contained in the class of continuous functions. Basic properties of F-supercontinuous functions are studied and their place in the hierarchy of strong variants of continuity, which already exist in the mathematical literature, is elaborated. If either domain or range is a functionally regular space (Indagationes Math. 15 (1951, 359–368; 38 (1976, 281–288, then the notions of continuity, F-supercontinuity and R-supercontinuity coincide.

  5. Photon strength functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergqvist, I.

    1976-01-01

    Methods for extracting photon strength functions are briefly discussed. We follow the Brink-Axel approach to relate the strength functions to the giant resonances observed in photonuclear work and summarize the available data on the E1, E2 and M1 resonances. Some experimental and theoretical problems are outlined. (author)

  6. A Functional HAZOP Methodology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liin, Netta; Lind, Morten; Jensen, Niels

    2010-01-01

    A HAZOP methodology is presented where a functional plant model assists in a goal oriented decomposition of the plant purpose into the means of achieving the purpose. This approach leads to nodes with simple functions from which the selection of process and deviation variables follow directly...

  7. Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voos, Avery; Pelphrey, Kevin

    2013-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), with its excellent spatial resolution and ability to visualize networks of neuroanatomical structures involved in complex information processing, has become the dominant technique for the study of brain function and its development. The accessibility of in-vivo pediatric brain-imaging techniques…

  8. Cryptographic Hash Functions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gauravaram, Praveen; Knudsen, Lars Ramkilde

    2010-01-01

    functions, also called message authentication codes (MACs) serve data integrity and data origin authentication in the secret key setting. The building blocks of hash functions can be designed using block ciphers, modular arithmetic or from scratch. The design principles of the popular Merkle...

  9. Functional Assessment Inventory Manual.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crewe, Nancy M.; Athelstan, Gary T.

    This manual, which provides extensive new instructions for administering the Functional Assessment Inventory (FAI), is intended to enable counselors to begin using the inventory without undergoing any special training. The first two sections deal with the need for functional assessment and issues in the development and use of the inventory. The…

  10. Functional and cognitive grammars

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Anna Siewierska

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a comprehensive review of the functional approach and cognitive approach to the nature of language and its relation to other aspects of human cognition. The paper starts with a brief discussion of the origins and the core tenets of the two approaches in Section 1. Section 2 discusses the similarities and differences between the three full-fledged structural functional grammars subsumed in the functional approach: Halliday's Systemic Functional Grammar (SFG), Dik's Functional Grammar (FG), and Van Valin's Role and Reference Grammar (RRG). Section 3 deals with the major features of the three cognitive frameworks: Langacker's Cognitive Grammar (CG), Goldberg's Cognitive Construction Grammar (CCG), and Croft's Radical Construction Grammar (RCG). Section 4 compares the two approaches and attempts to provide a unified functional-cognitive grammar. In the last section, the author concludes the paper with remarks on the unidirectional shift from functional grammar to cognitive grammar that may indicate a reinterpretation of the traditional relationship between functional and cognitive models of grammar.

  11. Heterogeneity in kinesin function

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reddy, Babu J N; Tripathy, Suvranta; Vershinin, Michael; Tanenbaum, Marvin E; Xu, Jing; Mattson-Hoss, Michelle; Arabi, Karim; Chapman, Dail; Doolin, Tory; Hyeon, Changbong; Gross, Steven P

    2017-01-01

    The kinesin family proteins are often studied as prototypical molecular motors; a deeper understanding of them can illuminate regulation of intracellular transport. It is typically assumed that they function identically. Here we find that this assumption of homogeneous function appears incorrect:

  12. Thermal dielectric function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moneta, M.

    1999-01-01

    Thermal dielectric functions ε(k,ω) for homogeneous electron gas were determined and discussed. The ground state of the gas is described by the Fermi-Dirac momentum distribution. The low and high temperature limits of ε(k,ω) were related to the Lindhard dielectric function and to ε(k, omega) derived for Boltzmann and for classical momentum distributions, respectively. (author)

  13. Monadic Functional Reactive Programming

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.J. van der Ploeg (Atze); C Shan

    2013-01-01

    htmlabstractFunctional Reactive Programming (FRP) is a way to program reactive systems in functional style, eliminating many of the problems that arise from imperative techniques. In this paper, we present an alternative FRP formulation that is based on the notion of a reactive computation: a

  14. The Grindahl Hash Functions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Lars Ramkilde; Rechberger, Christian; Thomsen, Søren Steffen

    2007-01-01

    to the state. We propose two concrete hash functions, Grindahl-256 and Grindahl-512 with claimed security levels with respect to collision, preimage and second preimage attacks of 2^128 and 2^256, respectively. Both proposals have lower memory requirements than other hash functions at comparable speeds...

  15. Neurophysiology of functional imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Eijsden, Pieter; Hyder, Fahmeed; Rothman, Douglas L.; Shulman, Robert G.

    2009-01-01

    The successes of PET and fMRI in non-invasively localizing sensory functions had encouraged efforts to transform the subjective concepts of cognitive psychology into objective physical measures. The assumption was that mental functions could be decomposed into non-overlapping, context-independent

  16. properties and luminosity functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hektor Monteiro

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available In this article, we present an investigation of a sample of 1072 stars extracted from the Villanova Catalog of Spectroscopically Identified White Dwarfs (2005 on-line version, studying their distribution in the Galaxy, their physical properties and their luminosity functions. The distances and physical properties of the white dwarfs are determined through interpolation of their (B-V or (b-y colors in model grids. The solar position relative to the Galactic plane, luminosity function, as well as separate functions for each white dwarf spectral type are derived and discussed. We show that the binary fraction does not vary significantly as a function of distance from the Galactic disk out to 100 pc. We propose that the formation rates of DA and non-DAs have changed over time and/or that DAs evolve into non-DA types. The luminosity functions for DAs and DBs have peaks possibly related to a star burst event.

  17. The triad value function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vedel, Mette

    2016-01-01

    the triad value function. Next, the applicability and validity of the concept is examined in a case study of four closed vertical supply chain triads. Findings - The case study demonstrates that the triad value function facilitates the analysis and understanding of an apparent paradox; that distributors...... are not dis-intermediated in spite of their limited contribution to activities in the triads. The results indicate practical adequacy of the triad value function. Research limitations/implications - The triad value function is difficult to apply in the study of expanded networks as the number of connections...... expands exponentially with the number of ties in the network. Moreover, it must be applied in the study of service triads and open vertical supply chain triads to further verify the practical adequacy of the concept. Practical implications - The triad value function cannot be used normatively...

  18. Pair Correlation Function Integrals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wedberg, Nils Hejle Rasmus Ingemar; O'Connell, John P.; Peters, Günther H.J.

    2011-01-01

    We describe a method for extending radial distribution functions obtained from molecular simulations of pure and mixed molecular fluids to arbitrary distances. The method allows total correlation function integrals to be reliably calculated from simulations of relatively small systems. The long......-distance behavior of radial distribution functions is determined by requiring that the corresponding direct correlation functions follow certain approximations at long distances. We have briefly described the method and tested its performance in previous communications [R. Wedberg, J. P. O’Connell, G. H. Peters......, and J. Abildskov, Mol. Simul. 36, 1243 (2010); Fluid Phase Equilib. 302, 32 (2011)], but describe here its theoretical basis more thoroughly and derive long-distance approximations for the direct correlation functions. We describe the numerical implementation of the method in detail, and report...

  19. Managing Functional Power

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenstand, Claus Andreas Foss; Laursen, Per Kyed

    2013-01-01

    How does one manage functional power relations between leading functions in vision driven digital media creation, and this from idea to master during the creation cycle? Functional power is informal, and it is understood as roles, e.g. project manager, that provide opportunities to contribute...... to the product quality. The area of interest is the vision driven digital media industry in general; however, the point of departure is the game industry due to its aesthetic complexity. The article's contribution to the area is a power graph, which shows the functional power of the leading functions according...... to a general digital media creation cycle. This is used to point out potential power conflicts and their consequences. It is concluded that there is normally more conflict potential in vision driven digital media creation than in digital media creation in general or in software development. The method...

  20. Functional data analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Ramsay, J O

    1997-01-01

    Scientists today collect samples of curves and other functional observations. This monograph presents many ideas and techniques for such data. Included are expressions in the functional domain of such classics as linear regression, principal components analysis, linear modelling, and canonical correlation analysis, as well as specifically functional techniques such as curve registration and principal differential analysis. Data arising in real applications are used throughout for both motivation and illustration, showing how functional approaches allow us to see new things, especially by exploiting the smoothness of the processes generating the data. The data sets exemplify the wide scope of functional data analysis; they are drwan from growth analysis, meterology, biomechanics, equine science, economics, and medicine. The book presents novel statistical technology while keeping the mathematical level widely accessible. It is designed to appeal to students, to applied data analysts, and to experienced researc...

  1. The function of introns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liran eCarmel

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The intron-exon architecture of many eukaryotic genes raises the intriguing question of whether this unique organization serves any function, or is it simply a result of the spread of functionless introns in eukaryotic genomes. In this review, we show that introns in contemporary species fulfill a broad spectrum of functions, and are involved in virtually every step of mRNA processing. We propose that this great diversity of intronic functions supports the notion that introns were indeed selfish elements in early eukaryotes, but then independently gained numerous functions in different eukaryotic lineages. We suggest a novel criterion of evolutionary conservation, dubbed intron positional conservation, which can identify functional introns.

  2. A phased translation function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Read, R.J.; Schierbeek, A.J.

    1988-01-01

    A phased translation function, which takes advantage of prior phase information to determine the position of an oriented mulecular replacement model, is examined. The function is the coefficient of correlation between the electron density computed with the prior phases and the electron density of the translated model, evaluated in reciprocal space as a Fourier transform. The correlation coefficient used in this work is closely related to an overlap function devised by Colman, Fehlhammer and Bartels. Tests with two protein structures, one of which was solved with the help of the phased translation function, show that little phase information is required to resolve the translation problem, and that the function is relatively insensitive to misorientation of the model. (orig.)

  3. Submodular functions and optimization

    CERN Document Server

    Fujishige, Satoru

    2005-01-01

    It has widely been recognized that submodular functions play essential roles in efficiently solvable combinatorial optimization problems. Since the publication of the 1st edition of this book fifteen years ago, submodular functions have been showing further increasing importance in optimization, combinatorics, discrete mathematics, algorithmic computer science, and algorithmic economics, and there have been made remarkable developments of theory and algorithms in submodular functions. The 2nd edition of the book supplements the 1st edition with a lot of remarks and with new two chapters: "Submodular Function Minimization" and "Discrete Convex Analysis." The present 2nd edition is still a unique book on submodular functions, which is essential to students and researchers interested in combinatorial optimization, discrete mathematics, and discrete algorithms in the fields of mathematics, operations research, computer science, and economics. Key features: - Self-contained exposition of the theory of submodular ...

  4. Time Functions as Utilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minguzzi, E.

    2010-09-01

    Every time function on spacetime gives a (continuous) total preordering of the spacetime events which respects the notion of causal precedence. The problem of the existence of a (semi-)time function on spacetime and the problem of recovering the causal structure starting from the set of time functions are studied. It is pointed out that these problems have an analog in the field of microeconomics known as utility theory. In a chronological spacetime the semi-time functions correspond to the utilities for the chronological relation, while in a K-causal (stably causal) spacetime the time functions correspond to the utilities for the K + relation (Seifert’s relation). By exploiting this analogy, we are able to import some mathematical results, most notably Peleg’s and Levin’s theorems, to the spacetime framework. As a consequence, we prove that a K-causal (i.e. stably causal) spacetime admits a time function and that the time or temporal functions can be used to recover the K + (or Seifert) relation which indeed turns out to be the intersection of the time or temporal orderings. This result tells us in which circumstances it is possible to recover the chronological or causal relation starting from the set of time or temporal functions allowed by the spacetime. Moreover, it is proved that a chronological spacetime in which the closure of the causal relation is transitive (for instance a reflective spacetime) admits a semi-time function. Along the way a new proof avoiding smoothing techniques is given that the existence of a time function implies stable causality, and a new short proof of the equivalence between K-causality and stable causality is given which takes advantage of Levin’s theorem and smoothing techniques.

  5. Multidisciplinary team functioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovitz, K E; Dougan, P; Riese, R; Brummitt, J R

    1984-01-01

    This paper advocates the need to move beyond interdisciplinary team composition as a minimum criterion for multidisciplinary functioning in child abuse treatment. Recent developments within the field reflect the practice of shared professional responsibility for detection, case management and treatment. Adherence to this particular model for intervention requires cooperative service planning and implementation as task related functions. Implicitly, this model also carries the potential to incorporate the supportive functioning essential to effective group process. However, explicit attention to the dynamics and process of small groups has been neglected in prescriptive accounts of multidisciplinary child abuse team organization. The present paper therefore focuses upon the maintenance and enhancement aspects of multidisciplinary group functioning. First, the development and philosophy of service for the Alberta Children's Hospital Child Abuse Program are reviewed. Second, composition of the team, it's mandate for service, and the population it serves are briefly described. Third, the conceptual framework within which the program functions is outlined. Strategies for effective group functioning are presented and the difficulties encountered with this model are highlighted. Finally, recommendations are offered for planning and implementing a multidisciplinary child abuse team and for maintaining its effective group functioning.

  6. The Enzyme Function Initiative†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerlt, John A.; Allen, Karen N.; Almo, Steven C.; Armstrong, Richard N.; Babbitt, Patricia C.; Cronan, John E.; Dunaway-Mariano, Debra; Imker, Heidi J.; Jacobson, Matthew P.; Minor, Wladek; Poulter, C. Dale; Raushel, Frank M.; Sali, Andrej; Shoichet, Brian K.; Sweedler, Jonathan V.

    2011-01-01

    The Enzyme Function Initiative (EFI) was recently established to address the challenge of assigning reliable functions to enzymes discovered in bacterial genome projects; in this Current Topic we review the structure and operations of the EFI. The EFI includes the Superfamily/Genome, Protein, Structure, Computation, and Data/Dissemination Cores that provide the infrastructure for reliably predicting the in vitro functions of unknown enzymes. The initial targets for functional assignment are selected from five functionally diverse superfamilies (amidohydrolase, enolase, glutathione transferase, haloalkanoic acid dehalogenase, and isoprenoid synthase), with five superfamily-specific Bridging Projects experimentally testing the predicted in vitro enzymatic activities. The EFI also includes the Microbiology Core that evaluates the in vivo context of in vitro enzymatic functions and confirms the functional predictions of the EFI. The deliverables of the EFI to the scientific community include: 1) development of a large-scale, multidisciplinary sequence/structure-based strategy for functional assignment of unknown enzymes discovered in genome projects (target selection, protein production, structure determination, computation, experimental enzymology, microbiology, and structure-based annotation); 2) dissemination of the strategy to the community via publications, collaborations, workshops, and symposia; 3) computational and bioinformatic tools for using the strategy; 4) provision of experimental protocols and/or reagents for enzyme production and characterization; and 5) dissemination of data via the EFI’s website, enzymefunction.org. The realization of multidisciplinary strategies for functional assignment will begin to define the full metabolic diversity that exists in nature and will impact basic biochemical and evolutionary understanding, as well as a wide range of applications of central importance to industrial, medicinal and pharmaceutical efforts. PMID

  7. The Enzyme Function Initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerlt, John A; Allen, Karen N; Almo, Steven C; Armstrong, Richard N; Babbitt, Patricia C; Cronan, John E; Dunaway-Mariano, Debra; Imker, Heidi J; Jacobson, Matthew P; Minor, Wladek; Poulter, C Dale; Raushel, Frank M; Sali, Andrej; Shoichet, Brian K; Sweedler, Jonathan V

    2011-11-22

    The Enzyme Function Initiative (EFI) was recently established to address the challenge of assigning reliable functions to enzymes discovered in bacterial genome projects; in this Current Topic, we review the structure and operations of the EFI. The EFI includes the Superfamily/Genome, Protein, Structure, Computation, and Data/Dissemination Cores that provide the infrastructure for reliably predicting the in vitro functions of unknown enzymes. The initial targets for functional assignment are selected from five functionally diverse superfamilies (amidohydrolase, enolase, glutathione transferase, haloalkanoic acid dehalogenase, and isoprenoid synthase), with five superfamily specific Bridging Projects experimentally testing the predicted in vitro enzymatic activities. The EFI also includes the Microbiology Core that evaluates the in vivo context of in vitro enzymatic functions and confirms the functional predictions of the EFI. The deliverables of the EFI to the scientific community include (1) development of a large-scale, multidisciplinary sequence/structure-based strategy for functional assignment of unknown enzymes discovered in genome projects (target selection, protein production, structure determination, computation, experimental enzymology, microbiology, and structure-based annotation), (2) dissemination of the strategy to the community via publications, collaborations, workshops, and symposia, (3) computational and bioinformatic tools for using the strategy, (4) provision of experimental protocols and/or reagents for enzyme production and characterization, and (5) dissemination of data via the EFI's Website, http://enzymefunction.org. The realization of multidisciplinary strategies for functional assignment will begin to define the full metabolic diversity that exists in nature and will impact basic biochemical and evolutionary understanding, as well as a wide range of applications of central importance to industrial, medicinal, and pharmaceutical efforts.

  8. Potentially functional SNPs (pfSNPs as novel genomic predictors of 5-FU response in metastatic colorectal cancer patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingbo Wang

    Full Text Available 5-Fluorouracil (5-FU and its pro-drug Capecitabine have been widely used in treating colorectal cancer. However, not all patients will respond to the drug, hence there is a need to develop reliable early predictive biomarkers for 5-FU response. Here, we report a novel potentially functional Single Nucleotide Polymorphism (pfSNP approach to identify SNPs that may serve as predictive biomarkers of response to 5-FU in Chinese metastatic colorectal cancer (CRC patients. 1547 pfSNPs and one variable number tandem repeat (VNTR in 139 genes in 5-FU drug (both PK and PD pathway and colorectal cancer disease pathways were examined in 2 groups of CRC patients. Shrinkage of liver metastasis measured by RECIST criteria was used as the clinical end point. Four non-responder-specific pfSNPs were found to account for 37.5% of all non-responders (P<0.0003. Five additional pfSNPs were identified from a multivariate model (AUC under ROC = 0.875 that was applied for all other pfSNPs, excluding the non-responder-specific pfSNPs. These pfSNPs, which can differentiate the other non-responders from responders, mainly reside in tumor suppressor genes or genes implicated in colorectal cancer risk. Hence, a total of 9 novel SNPs with potential functional significance may be able to distinguish non-responders from responders to 5-FU. These pfSNPs may be useful biomarkers for predicting response to 5-FU.

  9. Polysheroidal periodic functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Truskova, N.F.

    1985-01-01

    Separation of variables in the Helmholtz N-dimensional (N≥4) equation in polyspheroidal coordinate systems leads to the necessity of solving equations going over into equations for polyspheroidal periodic functions used for solving the two-centre problem in quantum mechanics, the three-body problem with Coulomb interaction, etc. For these functions the expansions are derived in terms of the Jacobi polynomials and Bessel functions. Their basic properties, asymptotics are considered. The algorithm of their computer calculations is developed. The results of numerical calculations are given

  10. cl-Supercontinuous Functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Singh

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Basic properties of cl-supercontinuity, a strong variant of continuity, due to Reilly and Vamanamurthy [Indian J. Pure Appl. Math., 14 (1983, 767–772], who call such maps clopen continuous, are studied. Sufficient conditions on domain or range for a continuous function to be cl-supercontinuous are observed. Direct and inverse transfer of certain topological properties under cl-supercontinuous functions are studied and existence or nonexistence of certain cl-supercontinuous function with specified domain or range is outlined.

  11. Mean-periodic functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos A. Berenstein

    1980-01-01

    Full Text Available We show that any mean-periodic function f can be represented in terms of exponential-polynomial solutions of the same convolution equation f satisfies, i.e., u∗f=0(μ∈E′(ℝn. This extends to n-variables the work of L. Schwartz on mean-periodicity and also extends L. Ehrenpreis' work on partial differential equations with constant coefficients to arbitrary convolutors. We also answer a number of open questions about mean-periodic functions of one variable. The basic ingredient is our work on interpolation by entire functions in one and several complex variables.

  12. Functional Amyloids in Reproduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hewetson, Aveline; Do, Hoa Quynh; Myers, Caitlyn; Muthusubramanian, Archana; Sutton, Roger Bryan; Wylie, Benjamin J; Cornwall, Gail A

    2017-06-29

    Amyloids are traditionally considered pathological protein aggregates that play causative roles in neurodegenerative disease, diabetes and prionopathies. However, increasing evidence indicates that in many biological systems nonpathological amyloids are formed for functional purposes. In this review, we will specifically describe amyloids that carry out biological roles in sexual reproduction including the processes of gametogenesis, germline specification, sperm maturation and fertilization. Several of these functional amyloids are evolutionarily conserved across several taxa, including human, emphasizing the critical role amyloids perform in reproduction. Evidence will also be presented suggesting that, if altered, some functional amyloids may become pathological.

  13. Functional defect of truncated hepatocyte nuclear factor-1{alpha} (G554fsX556) associated with maturity-onset diabetes of the young

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kooptiwut, Suwattanee, E-mail: S_kooptiwut@hotmail.com [Department of Physiology, Faculty of Medicine Siriraj Hospital, Mahidol University, Bangkok 10700 (Thailand); Sujjitjoon, Jatuporn [Department of Immunology and Immunology Graduate Program, Faculty of Medicine Siriraj Hospital, Mahidol University, Bangkok 10700 (Thailand); Plengvidhya, Nattachet [Department of Immunology and Immunology Graduate Program, Faculty of Medicine Siriraj Hospital, Mahidol University, Bangkok 10700 (Thailand); Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Department of Medicine, Faculty of Medicine Siriraj Hospital, Mahidol University, Bangkok 10700 (Thailand); Boonyasrisawat, Watip; Chongjaroen, Nalinee; Jungtrakoon, Prapapron [Department of Immunology and Immunology Graduate Program, Faculty of Medicine Siriraj Hospital, Mahidol University, Bangkok 10700 (Thailand); Semprasert, Namoiy [Department of Physiology, Faculty of Medicine Siriraj Hospital, Mahidol University, Bangkok 10700 (Thailand); Furuta, Hiroto; Nanjo, Kishio [The First Department, Wakayama Medical University (Japan); Banchuin, Napatawn [Department of Immunology and Immunology Graduate Program, Faculty of Medicine Siriraj Hospital, Mahidol University, Bangkok 10700 (Thailand); Yenchitsomanus, Pa-thai [Division of Medical Molecular Biology, Medicine Department of Research and Development, Faculty of Medicine Siriraj Hospital, Mahidol University, Bangkok 10700 (Thailand); Medical Biotechnology Unit, National Center for Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology (BIOTEC), National Science and Technology Development Agency (NSTDA), Bangkok (Thailand)

    2009-05-22

    A novel frameshift mutation attributable to 14-nucleotide insertion in hepatocyte nuclear factor-1{alpha} (HNF-1{alpha}) encoding a truncated HNF-1{alpha} (G554fsX556) with 76-amino acid deletion at its carboxyl terminus was identified in a Thai family with maturity-onset diabetes of the young (MODY). The wild-type and mutant HNF-1{alpha} proteins were expressed by in vitro transcription and translation (TNT) assay and by transfection in HeLa cells. The wild-type and mutant HNF-1{alpha} could similarly bind to human glucose-transporter 2 (GLUT2) promoter examined by electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA). However, the transactivation activities of mutant HNF-1{alpha} on human GLUT2 and rat L-type pyruvate kinase (L-PK) promoters in HeLa cells determined by luciferase reporter assay were reduced to approximately 55-60% of the wild-type protein. These results suggested that the functional defect of novel truncated HNF-1{alpha} (G554fsX556) on the transactivation of its target-gene promoters would account for the {beta}-cell dysfunction associated with the pathogenesis of MODY.

  14. Functional defect of truncated hepatocyte nuclear factor-1α (G554fsX556) associated with maturity-onset diabetes of the young

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kooptiwut, Suwattanee; Sujjitjoon, Jatuporn; Plengvidhya, Nattachet; Boonyasrisawat, Watip; Chongjaroen, Nalinee; Jungtrakoon, Prapapron; Semprasert, Namoiy; Furuta, Hiroto; Nanjo, Kishio; Banchuin, Napatawn; Yenchitsomanus, Pa-thai

    2009-01-01

    A novel frameshift mutation attributable to 14-nucleotide insertion in hepatocyte nuclear factor-1α (HNF-1α) encoding a truncated HNF-1α (G554fsX556) with 76-amino acid deletion at its carboxyl terminus was identified in a Thai family with maturity-onset diabetes of the young (MODY). The wild-type and mutant HNF-1α proteins were expressed by in vitro transcription and translation (TNT) assay and by transfection in HeLa cells. The wild-type and mutant HNF-1α could similarly bind to human glucose-transporter 2 (GLUT2) promoter examined by electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA). However, the transactivation activities of mutant HNF-1α on human GLUT2 and rat L-type pyruvate kinase (L-PK) promoters in HeLa cells determined by luciferase reporter assay were reduced to approximately 55-60% of the wild-type protein. These results suggested that the functional defect of novel truncated HNF-1α (G554fsX556) on the transactivation of its target-gene promoters would account for the β-cell dysfunction associated with the pathogenesis of MODY.

  15. THE PSEUDO-SMARANDACHE FUNCTION

    OpenAIRE

    David Gorski

    2007-01-01

    The Pseudo-Smarandache Function is part of number theory. The function comes from the Smarandache Function. The Pseudo-Smarandache Function is represented by Z(n) where n represents any natural number.

  16. Coded Network Function Virtualization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Al-Shuwaili, A.; Simone, O.; Kliewer, J.

    2016-01-01

    Network function virtualization (NFV) prescribes the instantiation of network functions on general-purpose network devices, such as servers and switches. While yielding a more flexible and cost-effective network architecture, NFV is potentially limited by the fact that commercial off......-the-shelf hardware is less reliable than the dedicated network elements used in conventional cellular deployments. The typical solution for this problem is to duplicate network functions across geographically distributed hardware in order to ensure diversity. In contrast, this letter proposes to leverage channel...... coding in order to enhance the robustness on NFV to hardware failure. The proposed approach targets the network function of uplink channel decoding, and builds on the algebraic structure of the encoded data frames in order to perform in-network coding on the signals to be processed at different servers...

  17. Functional Use Database (FUse)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — There are five different files for this dataset: 1. A dataset listing the reported functional uses of chemicals (FUse) 2. All 729 ToxPrint descriptors obtained from...

  18. Contributing to Functionality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Törpel, Bettina

    2006-01-01

    The objective of this paper is the design of computer supported joint action spaces. It is argued against a view of functionality as residing in computer applications. In such a view the creation of functionality is equivalent to the creation of computer applications. Functionality, in the view...... advocated in this paper, emerges in the specific dynamic interplay of actors, objectives, structures, practices and means. In this view, functionality is the result of creating, harnessing and inhabiting computer supported joint action spaces. The successful creation and further development of a computer...... supported joint action space comprises a whole range of appropriate design contributions. The approach is illustrated by the example of the creation of the computer supported joint action space "exchange network of voluntary union educators". As part of the effort a group of participants created...

  19. Liver Function Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Liver Function Tests Clinical Trials Liver Transplant FAQs Medical Terminology Diseases of the Liver Alagille Syndrome Alcohol-Related ... the Liver The Progression of Liver Disease FAQs Medical Terminology HOW YOU CAN HELP Sponsorship Ways to Give ...

  20. Introduction to structure functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwiecinski, J.

    1996-07-01

    The theory of deep inelastic scattering structure functions is reviewed with an emphasis put on the QCD expectations of their behaviour in the region of small values of Bjorken parameter x. (author). 56 refs

  1. Bioprinting: Functional droplet networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durmus, Naside Gozde; Tasoglu, Savas; Demirci, Utkan

    2013-06-01

    Tissue-mimicking printed networks of droplets separated by lipid bilayers that can be functionalized with membrane proteins are able to spontaneously fold and transmit electrical currents along predefined paths.

  2. Center for Functional Nanomaterials

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Center for Functional Nanomaterials (CFN) explores the unique properties of materials and processes at the nanoscale. The CFN is a user-oriented research center...

  3. density functional theory approach

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    YOGESH ERANDE

    2017-07-27

    Jul 27, 2017 ... a key role in all optical switching devices, since their optical properties can be .... optimized in the gas phase using Density Functional Theory. (DFT).39 The ...... The Mediation of Electrostatic Effects by Sol- vents J. Am. Chem.

  4. Reasoning about Function Objects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordio, Martin; Calcagno, Cristiano; Meyer, Bertrand; Müller, Peter; Tschannen, Julian

    Modern object-oriented languages support higher-order implementations through function objects such as delegates in C#, agents in Eiffel, or closures in Scala. Function objects bring a new level of abstraction to the object-oriented programming model, and require a comparable extension to specification and verification techniques. We introduce a verification methodology that extends function objects with auxiliary side-effect free (pure) methods to model logical artifacts: preconditions, postconditions and modifies clauses. These pure methods can be used to specify client code abstractly, that is, independently from specific instantiations of the function objects. To demonstrate the feasibility of our approach, we have implemented an automatic prover, which verifies several non-trivial examples.

  5. Normal Functioning Family

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Spread the Word Shop AAP Find a Pediatrician Family Life Medical Home Family Dynamics Adoption & Foster Care ... Español Text Size Email Print Share Normal Functioning Family Page Content Article Body Is there any way ...

  6. Fundamentals of functional analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Farenick, Douglas

    2016-01-01

    This book provides a unique path for graduate or advanced undergraduate students to begin studying the rich subject of functional analysis with fewer prerequisites than is normally required. The text begins with a self-contained and highly efficient introduction to topology and measure theory, which focuses on the essential notions required for the study of functional analysis, and which are often buried within full-length overviews of the subjects. This is particularly useful for those in applied mathematics, engineering, or physics who need to have a firm grasp of functional analysis, but not necessarily some of the more abstruse aspects of topology and measure theory normally encountered. The reader is assumed to only have knowledge of basic real analysis, complex analysis, and algebra. The latter part of the text provides an outstanding treatment of Banach space theory and operator theory, covering topics not usually found together in other books on functional analysis. Written in a clear, concise manner,...

  7. Smooth functions statistics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arnold, V.I.

    2006-03-01

    To describe the topological structure of a real smooth function one associates to it the graph, formed by the topological variety, whose points are the connected components of the level hypersurface of the function. For a Morse function, such a graph is a tree. Generically, it has T triple vertices, T + 2 endpoints, 2T + 2 vertices and 2T + 1 arrows. The main goal of the present paper is to study the statistics of the graphs, corresponding to T triple points: what is the growth rate of the number φ(T) of different graphs? Which part of these graphs is representable by the polynomial functions of corresponding degree? A generic polynomial of degree n has at most (n - 1) 2 critical points on R 2 , corresponding to 2T + 2 = (n - 1) 2 + 1, that is to T = 2k(k - 1) saddle-points for degree n = 2k

  8. Structure function monitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGraw, John T [Placitas, NM; Zimmer, Peter C [Albuquerque, NM; Ackermann, Mark R [Albuquerque, NM

    2012-01-24

    Methods and apparatus for a structure function monitor provide for generation of parameters characterizing a refractive medium. In an embodiment, a structure function monitor acquires images of a pupil plane and an image plane and, from these images, retrieves the phase over an aperture, unwraps the retrieved phase, and analyzes the unwrapped retrieved phase. In an embodiment, analysis yields atmospheric parameters measured at spatial scales from zero to the diameter of a telescope used to collect light from a source.

  9. Sexual Function Across Aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clayton, Anita H; Harsh, Veronica

    2016-03-01

    Women experience multiple changes in social and reproductive statuses across the life span which can affect sexual functioning. Various phases of the sexual response cycle may be impacted and can lead to sexual dysfunction. Screening for sexual problems and consideration of contributing factors such as neurobiology, reproductive life events, medical problems, medication use, and depression can help guide appropriate treatment and thereby improve the sexual functioning and quality of life of affected women. Treatment options include psychotropic medications, hormone therapy, and psychotherapy.

  10. Inequalities for Humbert functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayman Shehata

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper is motivated by an open problem of Luke’s theorem. We consider the problem of developing a unified point of view on the theory of inequalities of Humbert functions and of their general ratios are obtained. Some particular cases and refinements are given. Finally, we obtain some important results involving inequalities of Bessel and Whittaker’s functions as applications.

  11. Functionally graded materials

    CERN Document Server

    Mahamood, Rasheedat Modupe

    2017-01-01

    This book presents the concept of functionally graded materials as well as their use and different fabrication processes. The authors describe the use of additive manufacturing technology for the production of very complex parts directly from the three dimension computer aided design of the part by adding material layer after layer. A case study is also presented in the book on the experimental analysis of functionally graded material using laser metal deposition process.

  12. [Functional (psychogenic) vertigo].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diukova, G M; Zamergrad, M V; Golubev, V L; Adilova, S M; Makarov, S A

    Psychogenic (functional) vertigo is in second place by frequency after benign positional paroxysmal vertigo. It is often difficult to make the diagnosis, diagnostic program is expensive and traditional treatment often is not effective. This literature review covers current concepts on the terminology, clinical signs, pathogenesis and treatment approaches with regard to functional vertigo. Special attention is given to cerebral mechanisms of the pathogenesis including cognitive aspects.

  13. NEUROFEEDBACK USING FUNCTIONAL SPECTROSCOPY

    OpenAIRE

    Hinds, Oliver; Wighton, Paul; Tisdall, M. Dylan; Hess, Aaron; Breiter, Hans; van der Kouwe, André

    2014-01-01

    Neurofeedback based on real-time measurement of the blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) signal has potential for treatment of neurological disorders and behavioral enhancement. Commonly employed methods are based on functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) sequences that sacrifice speed and accuracy for whole-brain coverage, which is unnecessary in most applications. We present multi-voxel functional spectroscopy (MVFS): a system for computing the BOLD signal from multiple volumes of...

  14. Applied functional analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Griffel, DH

    2002-01-01

    A stimulating introductory text, this volume examines many important applications of functional analysis to mechanics, fluid mechanics, diffusive growth, and approximation. Detailed enough to impart a thorough understanding, the text is also sufficiently straightforward for those unfamiliar with abstract analysis. Its four-part treatment begins with distribution theory and discussions of Green's functions. Essentially independent of the preceding material, the second and third parts deal with Banach spaces, Hilbert space, spectral theory, and variational techniques. The final part outlines the

  15. Pancreatic Exocrine Function Testing

    OpenAIRE

    Berk, J. Edward

    1982-01-01

    It is important to understand which pancreatic function tests are available and how to interpret them when evaluating patients with malabsorption. Available direct tests are the secretin stimulation test, the Lundh test meal, and measurement of serum or fecal enzymes. Indirect tests assess pancreatic exocrine function by measuring the effect of pancreatic secretion on various nutrients. These include triglycerides labeled with carbon 14, cobalamin labeled with cobalt 57 and cobalt 58, and par...

  16. Purely Functional Structured Programming

    OpenAIRE

    Obua, Steven

    2010-01-01

    The idea of functional programming has played a big role in shaping today's landscape of mainstream programming languages. Another concept that dominates the current programming style is Dijkstra's structured programming. Both concepts have been successfully married, for example in the programming language Scala. This paper proposes how the same can be achieved for structured programming and PURELY functional programming via the notion of LINEAR SCOPE. One advantage of this proposal is that m...

  17. Exponential and Logarithmic Functions

    OpenAIRE

    Todorova, Tamara

    2010-01-01

    Exponential functions find applications in economics in relation to growth and economic dynamics. In these fields, quite often the choice variable is time and economists are trying to determine the best timing for certain economic activities to take place. An exponential function is one in which the independent variable appears in the exponent. Very often that exponent is time. In highly mathematical courses, it is a truism that students learn by doing, not by reading. Tamara Todorova’s Pr...

  18. Handbook of functional equations functional inequalities

    CERN Document Server

    2014-01-01

    As Richard Bellman has so elegantly stated at the Second International Conference on General Inequalities (Oberwolfach, 1978), “There are three reasons for the study of inequalities: practical, theoretical, and aesthetic.” On the aesthetic aspects, he said, “As has been pointed out, beauty is in the eye of the beholder. However, it is generally agreed that certain pieces of music, art, or mathematics are beautiful. There is an elegance to inequalities that makes them very attractive.” The content of the Handbook focuses mainly on both old and recent developments on approximate homomorphisms, on a relation between the Hardy–Hilbert and the Gabriel inequality, generalized Hardy–Hilbert type inequalities on multiple weighted Orlicz spaces, half-discrete Hilbert-type inequalities, on affine mappings, on contractive operators, on multiplicative Ostrowski and trapezoid inequalities, Ostrowski type inequalities for the  Riemann–Stieltjes integral, means and related functional inequalities, Weighted G...

  19. Functional Neuroimaging in Psychopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Casale, Antonio; Kotzalidis, Georgios D; Rapinesi, Chiara; Di Pietro, Simone; Alessi, Maria Chiara; Di Cesare, Gianluigi; Criscuolo, Silvia; De Rossi, Pietro; Tatarelli, Roberto; Girardi, Paolo; Ferracuti, Stefano

    2015-01-01

    Psychopathy is associated with cognitive and affective deficits causing disruptive, harmful and selfish behaviour. These have considerable societal costs due to recurrent crime and property damage. A better understanding of the neurobiological bases of psychopathy could improve therapeutic interventions, reducing the related social costs. To analyse the major functional neural correlates of psychopathy, we reviewed functional neuroimaging studies conducted on persons with this condition. We searched the PubMed database for papers dealing with functional neuroimaging and psychopathy, with a specific focus on how neural functional changes may correlate with task performances and human behaviour. Psychopathy-related behavioural disorders consistently correlated with dysfunctions in brain areas of the orbitofrontal-limbic (emotional processing and somatic reaction to emotions; behavioural planning and responsibility taking), anterior cingulate-orbitofrontal (correct assignment of emotional valence to social stimuli; violent/aggressive behaviour and challenging attitude) and prefrontal-temporal-limbic (emotional stimuli processing/response) networks. Dysfunctional areas more consistently included the inferior frontal, orbitofrontal, dorsolateral prefrontal, ventromedial prefrontal, temporal (mainly the superior temporal sulcus) and cingulated cortices, the insula, amygdala, ventral striatum and other basal ganglia. Emotional processing and learning, and several social and affective decision-making functions are impaired in psychopathy, which correlates with specific changes in neural functions. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  20. Functional integration over geometries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mottola, E.

    1995-01-01

    The geometric construction of the functional integral over coset spaces M/G is reviewed. The inner product on the cotangent space of infinitesimal deformations of M defines an invariant distance and volume form, or functional integration measure on the full configuration space. Then, by a simple change of coordinates parameterizing the gauge fiber G, the functional measure on the coset space M/G is deduced. This change of integration variables leads to a Jacobian which is entirely equivalent to the Faddeev--Popov determinant of the more traditional gauge fixed approach in non-abelian gauge theory. If the general construction is applied to the case where G is the group of coordinate reparameterizations of spacetime, the continuum functional integral over geometries, i.e. metrics modulo coordinate reparameterizations may be defined. The invariant functional integration measure is used to derive the trace anomaly and effective action for the conformal part of the metric in two and four dimensional spacetime. In two dimensions this approach generates the Polyakov--Liouville action of closed bosonic non-critical string theory. In four dimensions the corresponding effective action leads to novel conclusions on the importance of quantum effects in gravity in the far infrared, and in particular, a dramatic modification of the classical Einstein theory at cosmological distance scales, signaled first by the quantum instability of classical de Sitter spacetime. Finite volume scaling relations for the functional integral of quantum gravity in two and four dimensions are derived, and comparison with the discretized dynamical triangulation approach to the integration over geometries are discussed. Outstanding unsolved problems in both the continuum definition and the simplicial approach to the functional integral over geometries are highlighted

  1. Renal Function in Hypothyroidism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khalid, S.; Khalid, M; Elfaki, M.; Hassan, N.; Suliman, S.M.

    2007-01-01

    Background Hypothyroidism induces significant changes in the function of organ systems such as the heart, muscles and brain. Renal function is also influenced by thyroid status. Physiological effects include changes in water and electrolyte metabolism, notably hyponatremia, and reliable alterations of renal hemodynamics, including decrements in renal blood flow, renal plasma flow, glomerular filtration rate (GFR). Objective Renal function is profoundly influenced by thyroid status; the purpose of the present study was to determine the relationship between renal function and thyroid status of patients with hypothyroidism. Design and Patients In 5 patients with primary hypothyroidism and control group renal functions are measured by serum creatinine and glomerular filtration rate (GFR) using modified in diet renal disease (MDRD) formula. Result In hypothyroidism, mean serum creatinine increased and mean estimated GFR decreased, compared to the control group mean serum creatinine decreased and mean estimated GFR Increased. The hypothyroid patients showed elevated serum creatinine levels (> 1.1mg/dl) compared to control group (p value .000). In patients mean estimated GFR decreased, compared to mean estimated GFR increased in the control group (p value= .002).

  2. The Functions of Sleep

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samson Z Assefa

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Sleep is a ubiquitous component of animal life including birds and mammals. The exact function of sleep has been one of the mysteries of biology. A considerable number of theories have been put forward to explain the reason(s for the necessity of sleep. To date, while a great deal is known about what happens when animals sleep, there is no definitive comprehensive explanation as to the reason that sleep is an inevitable part of animal functioning. It is well known that sleep is a homeostatically regulated body process, and that prolonged sleep deprivation is fatal in animals. In this paper, we present some of the theories as to the functions of sleep and provide a review of some hypotheses as to the overall physiologic function of sleep. To better understand the purpose for sleeping, we review the effects of sleep deprivation on physical, neurocognitive and psychic function. A better understanding of the purpose for sleeping will be a great advance in our understanding of the nature of the animal kingdom, including our own.

  3. Renal Function in Hypothyroidism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khalid, A. S; Ahmed, M.I; Elfaki, H.M; Hassan, N.; Suliman, S. M.

    2006-12-01

    Background hypothyroidism induces significant changes in the function of organ systems such as the heart, muscles and brain. Renal function is also influenced by thyroid status. Physiological effects include changes in water and electrolyte metabolism, notably hyponatraemia, and reliable alterations of renal hemodynamics, including decrements in renal blood flow, renal plasma flow, glomerular filtration rate (GFR). Objective renal function is profoundly influenced by thyroid status, the purpose of the present study was to determine the relationship between renal function and thyroid status of patients with hypothyroidism. Design and patients in 5 patients with primary hypothyroidism and control group renal functions are measured by serum creatinine and glomerular filtration rate(GFR) using modified in diet renal disease (MDRD) formula. Result in hypothyroidism, mean serum creatinine increased and mean estimated GFR decreased, compared to the control group mean serum creatinine decreased and mean estimated GFR increased. The hypothyroid patients showed elevated serum creatinine levels(>1.1 mg/d1) compared to control group (p value= 000). In patients mean estimated GFR increased in the control group (p value=.002).Conclusion thus the kidney, in addition to the brain, heart and muscle, is an important target of the action of thyroid hormones.(Author)

  4. The tensor distribution function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leow, A D; Zhu, S; Zhan, L; McMahon, K; de Zubicaray, G I; Meredith, M; Wright, M J; Toga, A W; Thompson, P M

    2009-01-01

    Diffusion weighted magnetic resonance imaging is a powerful tool that can be employed to study white matter microstructure by examining the 3D displacement profile of water molecules in brain tissue. By applying diffusion-sensitized gradients along a minimum of six directions, second-order tensors (represented by three-by-three positive definite matrices) can be computed to model dominant diffusion processes. However, conventional DTI is not sufficient to resolve more complicated white matter configurations, e.g., crossing fiber tracts. Recently, a number of high-angular resolution schemes with more than six gradient directions have been employed to address this issue. In this article, we introduce the tensor distribution function (TDF), a probability function defined on the space of symmetric positive definite matrices. Using the calculus of variations, we solve the TDF that optimally describes the observed data. Here, fiber crossing is modeled as an ensemble of Gaussian diffusion processes with weights specified by the TDF. Once this optimal TDF is determined, the orientation distribution function (ODF) can easily be computed by analytic integration of the resulting displacement probability function. Moreover, a tensor orientation distribution function (TOD) may also be derived from the TDF, allowing for the estimation of principal fiber directions and their corresponding eigenvalues.

  5. Lunar neutron source function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kornblum, J.J.

    1974-01-01

    The search for a quantitative neutron source function for the lunar surface region is justified because it contributes to our understanding of the history of the lunar surface and of nuclear process occurring on the moon since its formation. A knowledge of the neutron source function and neutron flux distribution is important for the interpretation of many experimental measurements. This dissertation uses the available pertinent experimental measurements together with theoretical calculations to obtain an estimate of the lunar neutron source function below 15 MeV. Based upon reasonable assumptions a lunar neutron source function having adjustable parameters is assumed for neutrons below 15 MeV. The lunar neutron source function is composed of several components resulting from the action of cosmic rays with lunar material. A comparison with previous neutron calculations is made and significant differences are discussed. Application of the results to the problem of lunar soil histories is examined using the statistical model for soil development proposed by Fireman. The conclusion is drawn that the moon is losing mass

  6. Functional (psychogenic) stereotypies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baizabal-Carvallo, José Fidel; Jankovic, Joseph

    2017-07-01

    Functional (psychogenic) movement disorders (FMDs) may present with a broad spectrum of phenomenology including stereotypic movements. We aimed to characterize the phenomenology of functional stereotypies and compare these features with those observed in 65 patients with tardive dyskinesia (TD). From a cohort of 184 patients with FMDs, we identified 19 (10.3%) with functional stereotypies (FS). There were 15 women and 4 men, with a mean age at onset of 38.6 ± 17.4 years. Among the patients with FS, there were 9 (47%) with orolingual dyskinesia/stereotypy, 9 (47%) with limb stereotypies, 6 (32%) with trunk stereotypies, and 2 (11%) with respiratory dyskinesia as part of orofacial-laryngeal-trunk stereotypy. These patients showed signs commonly seen in FMDs such as sudden onset (84%), prominent distractibility (58%), and periods of unexplained improvement (84%) that were not reported in patients with TD. Besides a much lower frequency of exposure to potential offending drugs, patients with FS differed from those with classic TD by a younger age at onset, lack of self-biting, uncommon chewing movements, more frequent lingual movements without mouth dyskinesia, and associated functional tremor and abnormal speech. Lack of self-biting showed the highest sensitivity (1.0) and abnormal speech showed the highest specificity (0.9) for the diagnosis of functional orolingual dyskinesia. FS represent part of the clinical spectrum of FMDs. Clinical and demographic features are helpful in distinguishing patients with FS from those with TD.

  7. Functional Anorectal Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Satish Sc; Bharucha, Adil E; Chiarioni, Giuseppe; Felt-Bersma, Richelle; Knowles, Charles; Malcolm, Allison; Wald, Arnold

    2016-03-25

    This report defines criteria and reviews the epidemiology, pathophysiology, and management of common anorectal disorders: fecal incontinence (FI), functional anorectal pain and functional defecation disorders. FI is defined as the recurrent uncontrolled passage of fecal material for at least 3 months. The clinical features of FI are useful for guiding diagnostic testing and therapy. Anorectal manometry and imaging are useful for evaluating anal and pelvic floor structure and function. Education, antidiarrheals and biofeedback therapy are the mainstay of management; surgery may be useful in refractory cases. Functional anorectal pain syndromes are defined by clinical features and categorized into three subtypes. In proctalgia fugax, the pain is typically fleeting and lasts for seconds to minutes. In levator ani syndrome (LAS) and unspecified anorectal pain the pain lasts more than 30 minutes, but in LAS there is puborectalis tenderness. Functional defecation disorders are defined by >2 symptoms of chronic constipation or irritable bowel syndrome with constipation, and with >2 features of impaired evacuation i.e., abnormal evacuation pattern on manometry, abnormal balloon expulsion test or impaired rectal evacuation by imaging. It includes two subtypes; dyssynergic defecation and inadequate defecatory propulsion. Pelvic floor biofeedback therapy is effective for treating LAS and defecatory disorders. Copyright © 2016 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Educating Executive Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blair, Clancy

    2016-01-01

    Executive functions are thinking skills that assist with reasoning, planning, problem solving, and managing one’s life. The brain areas that underlie these skills are interconnected with and influenced by activity in many different brain areas, some of which are associated with emotion and stress. One consequence of the stress-specific connections is that executive functions, which help us to organize our thinking, tend to be disrupted when stimulation is too high and we are stressed out, or too low when we are bored and lethargic. Given their central role in reasoning and also in managing stress and emotion, scientists have conducted studies, primarily with adults, to determine whether executive functions can be improved by training. By and large, results have shown that they can be, in part through computer-based videogame-like activities. Evidence of wider, more general benefits from such computer-based training, however, is mixed. Accordingly, scientists have reasoned that training will have wider benefits if it is implemented early, with very young children as the neural circuitry of executive functions is developing, and that it will be most effective if embedded in children’s everyday activities. Evidence produced by this research, however, is also mixed. In sum, much remains to be learned about executive function training. Without question, however, continued research on this important topic will yield valuable information about cognitive development. PMID:27906522

  9. The function of dreaming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staunton, H

    2001-01-01

    Theories on the function of REM sleep and dreaming, with which it has a contingent relationship, remain diverse. They include facilitation of memory storage, reverse learning, anatomical and functional brain maturation, catecholamine restoration, psychoanalytical (wish fulfilment or otherwise). It is possible that one function is grafted onto another as the personality develops. Given a close relationship between REM sleep and dreaming, and given that the neonate spends 18 hours asleep per day, of which 12 hours are spent in REM sleep, it is logical to look in the neonate for a primary function of dreaming. The two constants in the dreaming process are: 1) the dreamer is always present as first person observer; 2) there is always a topographical setting. Based on the foregoing, it is proposed that a major function of REM sleep is the development and maintenance of a sense of personal identity, through creating a 'being there' environment at regular intervals during prolonged periods of absence from a waking state in topographical surrounds. The infant cannot forget who he/she is. Thus, he/she develops a clear sense of his/her own identity, or the 'I'ness of me', and a sense of his/her separateness from the topographical world. At the same time, by largely forgetting the dreams, he/she is not burdened by the need for an elaborate method of storage of the vicarious and bizarre experiences.

  10. Effect of functional overreaching on executive functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dupuy, O; Renaud, M; Bherer, L; Bosquet, L

    2010-09-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether cognitive performance was a valid marker of overreaching. 10 well-trained male endurance athletes increased their training load by 100% for 2 weeks. They performed a maximal graded test, a constant speed test, a reaction time task and a computerized version of the Stroop color word-test before and after this overload period. Regarding performance results, five participants were considered as overreached and the five remaining were considered as well-trained. We found no significant differences between groups in performing the Stroop test. Noteworthy, we found a small increase in response time in the more complex condition in overreached athletes (1 188+/-261 to 1 297+/-231 ms, effect size=0.44), while it decreased moderately in the well-trained athletes (1 066+/-175 to 963+/-171 ms, effect size=-0.59). Furthermore, we found an interaction between time and group on initiation time of the reaction time task, since it increased in overreached athletes after the overload period (246+/-24 to 264+/-26 ms, p<0.05), while it remained unchanged in well-trained participants. Participants made very few anticipation errors, whatever the group or the period (error rate <2%).We concluded that an unaccustomed increase in training volume which is accompanied by a decrement in physical performance induces a deterioration of some executive functions. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart . New York.

  11. Functional illiteracy in Slovenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ester Možina

    1999-12-01

    Full Text Available The author draws attention to the fact that, in determining functional illiteracy, there remain many terminological disagreements and diverse opinions regarding illiteracy. Furthermore, there are also different methods for measuring writing abilities, thus leading to disparate results. The introductory section presents the dilemmas relating to the term of functional illiteracy, while the second part is concerned with the various methods for measuring literacy. Thus, the author also critically assesses the research studies aimed at evaluating the scope of literacy amongst adults in Slovenia during the past decade. ln this paper, she has adopted a methodology which would not determine what is functional and what is not in our society, in order to avoid limiting the richness of individual writing praxis.

  12. Functional studies using NMR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCready, V.R.; Leach, M.O.; Sutton; Ell, P.

    1986-01-01

    The object of this book is to discuss and evaluate an area of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance which to date has been less emphasized than it might be, namely the use of NMR for functional studies. The book commences with a discussion of the areas in which the NMR techniques might be needed due to deficiencies in other techniques. The physics of NMR especially relating to functional measurement are then explained. Technical factors in producing functional images are discussed and the use of paramagnetic substances for carrying out flow studies are detailed. Particular attention is paid to specific studies in the various organs. The book ends with a survey of imaging in each organ and the relation of NMR images to other techniques such as ultrasound, nuclear medicine and X-rays

  13. Quantal density functional theory

    CERN Document Server

    Sahni, Viraht

    2016-01-01

    This book deals with quantal density functional theory (QDFT) which is a time-dependent local effective potential theory of the electronic structure of matter. The treated time-independent QDFT constitutes a special case. In the 2nd edition, the theory is extended to include the presence of external magnetostatic fields. The theory is a description of matter based on the ‘quantal Newtonian’ first and second laws which is in terms of “classical” fields that pervade all space, and their quantal sources. The fields, which are explicitly defined, are separately representative of electron correlations due to the Pauli exclusion principle, Coulomb repulsion, correlation-kinetic, correlation-current-density, and correlation-magnetic effects. The book further describes Schrödinger theory from the new physical perspective of fields and quantal sources. It also describes traditional Hohenberg-Kohn-Sham DFT, and explains via QDFT the physics underlying the various energy functionals and functional derivatives o...

  14. Protein Functionalized Nanodiamond Arrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu YL

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Various nanoscale elements are currently being explored for bio-applications, such as in bio-images, bio-detection, and bio-sensors. Among them, nanodiamonds possess remarkable features such as low bio-cytotoxicity, good optical property in fluorescent and Raman spectra, and good photostability for bio-applications. In this work, we devise techniques to position functionalized nanodiamonds on self-assembled monolayer (SAMs arrays adsorbed on silicon and ITO substrates surface using electron beam lithography techniques. The nanodiamond arrays were functionalized with lysozyme to target a certain biomolecule or protein specifically. The optical properties of the nanodiamond-protein complex arrays were characterized by a high throughput confocal microscope. The synthesized nanodiamond-lysozyme complex arrays were found to still retain their functionality in interacting with E. coli.

  15. Choice probability generating functions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fosgerau, Mogens; McFadden, Daniel; Bierlaire, Michel

    2010-01-01

    This paper establishes that every random utility discrete choice model (RUM) has a representation that can be characterized by a choice-probability generating function (CPGF) with specific properties, and that every function with these specific properties is consistent with a RUM. The choice...... probabilities from the RUM are obtained from the gradient of the CPGF. Mixtures of RUM are characterized by logarithmic mixtures of their associated CPGF. The paper relates CPGF to multivariate extreme value distributions, and reviews and extends methods for constructing generating functions for applications....... The choice probabilities of any ARUM may be approximated by a cross-nested logit model. The results for ARUM are extended to competing risk survival models....

  16. Functional Programming Using F#

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Michael Reichhardt; Rischel, Hans

    This comprehensive introduction to the principles of functional programming using F# shows how to apply basic theoretical concepts to produce succinct and elegant programs. It demonstrates the role of functional programming in a wide spectrum of applications including databases and systems....... Coverage also includes advanced features in the .NET library, the imperative features of F# and topics such as text processing, sequences, computation expressions and asynchronous computation. With a broad spectrum of examples and exercises, the book is perfect for courses in functional programming...... and for self-study. Enhancing its use as a text is an accompanying website with downloadable programs, lecture slides, a mini-projects and links to further F# sources....

  17. Spaces of continuous functions

    CERN Document Server

    Groenewegen, G L M

    2016-01-01

    The space C(X) of all continuous functions on a compact space X carries the structure of a normed vector space, an algebra and a lattice. On the one hand we study the relations between these structures and the topology of X, on the other hand we discuss a number of classical results according to which an algebra or a vector lattice can be represented as a C(X). Various applications of these theorems are given. Some attention is devoted to related theorems, e.g. the Stone Theorem for Boolean algebras and the Riesz Representation Theorem. The book is functional analytic in character. It does not presuppose much knowledge of functional analysis; it contains introductions into subjects such as the weak topology, vector lattices and (some) integration theory.

  18. Expanding Pseudorandom Functions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damgård, Ivan Bjerre; Nielsen, Jesper Buus

    2002-01-01

    Given any weak pseudorandom function, we present a general and efficient technique transforming such a function to a new weak pseudorandom function with an arbitrary length output. This implies, among other things, an encryption mode for block ciphers. The mode is as efficient as known (and widely...... used) encryption modes as CBC mode and counter (CTR) mode, but is provably secure against chosen-plaintext attack (CPA) already if the underlying symmetric cipher is secure against known-plaintext attack (KPA). We prove that CBC, CTR and Jutla’s integrity aware modes do not have this property....... In particular, we prove that when using a KPA secure block cipher, then: CBC mode is KPA secure, but need not be CPA secure, Jutla’s modes need not be CPA secure, and CTR mode need not be even KPA secure. The analysis is done in a concrete security framework....

  19. Statistical wave function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levine, R.D.

    1988-01-01

    Statistical considerations are applied to quantum mechanical amplitudes. The physical motivation is the progress in the spectroscopy of highly excited states. The corresponding wave functions are strongly mixed. In terms of a basis set of eigenfunctions of a zeroth-order Hamiltonian with good quantum numbers, such wave functions have contributions from many basis states. The vector x is considered whose components are the expansion coefficients in that basis. Any amplitude can be written as a dagger x x. It is argued that the components of x and hence other amplitudes can be regarded as random variables. The maximum entropy formalism is applied to determine the corresponding distribution function. Two amplitudes a dagger x x and b dagger x x are independently distributed if b dagger x a = 0. It is suggested that the theory of quantal measurements implies that, in general, one can one determine the distribution of amplitudes and not the amplitudes themselves

  20. Platelet function in dogs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Line A.; Zois, Nora Elisabeth; Pedersen, Henrik D.

    2007-01-01

    Background: Clinical studies investigating platelet function in dogs have had conflicting results that may be caused by normal physiologic variation in platelet response to agonists. Objectives: The objective of this study was to investigate platelet function in clinically healthy dogs of 4...... different breeds by whole-blood aggregometry and with a point-of-care platelet function analyzer (PFA-100), and to evaluate the effect of acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) administration on the results from both methods. Methods: Forty-five clinically healthy dogs (12 Cavalier King Charles Spaniels [CKCS], 12...... applied. However, the importance of these breed differences remains to be investigated. The PFA-100 method with Col + Epi as agonists, and ADP-induced platelet aggregation appear to be sensitive to ASA in dogs....

  1. Path-dependent functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khrapko, R.I.

    1985-01-01

    A uniform description of various path-dependent functions is presented with the help of expansion of the type of the Taylor series. So called ''path-integrals'' and ''path-tensor'' are introduced which are systems of many-component quantities whose values are defined for arbitrary paths in coordinated region of space in such a way that they contain a complete information on the path. These constructions are considered as elementary path-dependent functions and are used instead of power monomials in the usual Taylor series. Coefficients of such an expansion are interpreted as partial derivatives dependent on the order of the differentiations or else as nonstandard cavariant derivatives called two-point derivatives. Some examples of pathdependent functions are presented.Space curvature tensor is considered whose geometrica properties are determined by the (non-transitive) translator of parallel transport of a general type. Covariant operation leading to the ''extension'' of tensor fiels is pointed out

  2. Functional bowel disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rumessen, J J; Gudmand-Høyer, E

    1988-01-01

    Twenty-five patients with functional bowel disease were given fructose, sorbitol, fructose-sorbitol mixtures, and sucrose. The occurrence of malabsorption was evaluated by means of hydrogen breath tests and the gastrointestinal symptoms, if any, were recorded. One patient could not be evaluated...... because of lack of H2 production. Based on a cut-off level of 10 ppm rise of H2 concentration, malabsorption was apparent in 13 patients, in 7 of which the calculated absorption capacities were below 15 g. In contrast, in patients given 50 g of sucrose, malabsorption could not be detected. Ingestion...... with functional bowel disease. The findings may have direct influence on the dietary guidance given to a major group of patients with functional bowel disease and may make it possible to define separate entities in this disease complex....

  3. Functional digital substraction sialography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yudin, L.; Saidkarimova, I.

    1994-01-01

    The proposed method of functional digital substraction sialography makes possible to reduce the amount of contrast substance used, by comparison to conventional sialography. The processing of the obtained image during different phases of the contrast visualisation of the gland allows for detecting and recording eventual functional disorders. A more clear-cut visualization of subtracted contrast images against the background of the eliminated bone structures is attained. A total of 37 patients presenting various diseases of salivary glands are covered in this study. The procedure applied contributes greatly to improving the quality of diagnosing information afforded by the counter-stained image of salivary glands at reduced radiation exposure and shorter time of examination. An essential advantage is the possibility provided to disclose functional and morphological changes, especially in the early phases of the disease. 11 refs. (orig.)

  4. The function of ornaments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glaveanu, Vlad Petre

    2014-01-01

    of their manifold functions that integrates aesthetic and utilitarian, individual and social roles. Ornaments help us to identify and locate, tell or communicate, remind and organise our action, they guide our attention, express and individualise, can generate an experience, beautify as well as re......-present. These functions are illustrated with examples from a study of Easter egg decoration practices in northern Romania. In the end, the ‘meta-function’ of emergence is discussed and consideration is given to the spatial and temporal contexts of ornaments. Future opportunities for theorising ornamentation...

  5. Complex function theory

    CERN Document Server

    Sarason, Donald

    2007-01-01

    Complex Function Theory is a concise and rigorous introduction to the theory of functions of a complex variable. Written in a classical style, it is in the spirit of the books by Ahlfors and by Saks and Zygmund. Being designed for a one-semester course, it is much shorter than many of the standard texts. Sarason covers the basic material through Cauchy's theorem and applications, plus the Riemann mapping theorem. It is suitable for either an introductory graduate course or an undergraduate course for students with adequate preparation. The first edition was published with the title Notes on Co

  6. Nucleon structure functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Virchaux, M.

    1992-11-01

    The present status of experimental measurements of the nucleon structure functions is reviewed. The results from nearly all deep inelastic experiments are in good mutual agreement. Principles of the analysis of these structure function data in the framework of QCD are described. The specific features of the perturbative QCD predictions are observed in the data. This provides quantitative tests of the validity of QCD as well as determinations of the various parton distributions in the nucleon and some of the most precise measurements of the strong coupling constant αs. The future of this field of experimental physics is sketched

  7. Harmonic supergraphs. Green functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galperin, A.; Ivanov, E.; Gievetsky, V.; Sokatchev, E.

    1985-01-01

    The quantization procedure in the harmonic superspace approach is worked out. Harmonic distributions are introduced and are used to construct the analytic superspace delta-functions and the Green functions for the hypermultiplet and the N=2 Yang-Mills superfields. The gauge fixing is described and the relevant Faddeev-Popov ghosts are defined. The corresponding BRST transformations are found. The harmonic superspace quantization of the N=2 gauge theory turns out to be rather simple and has many parallels with that for the standard (N=0) Yang-Mills theory. In particular, no ghosts-forghosts are needed

  8. Chromatin Structure and Function

    CERN Document Server

    Wolffe, Alan P

    1999-01-01

    The Third Edition of Chromatin: Structure and Function brings the reader up-to-date with the remarkable progress in chromatin research over the past three years. It has been extensively rewritten to cover new material on chromatin remodeling, histone modification, nuclear compartmentalization, DNA methylation, and transcriptional co-activators and co-repressors. The book is written in a clear and concise fashion, with 60 new illustrations. Chromatin: Structure and Function provides the reader with a concise and coherent account of the nature, structure, and assembly of chromatin and its active

  9. Unpolarized Structure Functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christy, M.E.; Melnitchouk, W.

    2011-01-01

    Over the past decade measurements of unpolarized structure functions with unprecedented precision have significantly advanced our knowledge of nucleon structure. These have for the first time allowed quantitative tests of the phenomenon of quark-hadron duality, and provided a deeper understanding of the transition from hadron to quark degrees of freedom in inclusive scattering. Dedicated Rosenbluth-separation experiments have yielded high-precision transverse and longitudinal structure functions in regions previously unexplored, and new techniques have enabled the first glimpses of the structure of the free neutron, without contamination from nuclear effects.

  10. Quantum functional oracles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jinsoo; Lee, Soojoon; Chi, Dong Pyo

    2002-01-01

    The limitation on the size of quantum computers makes it important to reuse qubits for auxiliary registers even though they are entangled with others and are occupied by other computational processes. We construct a quantum algorithm that performs the functional phase rotation, which is the generalized form of the conventional conditional phase transforms, using the functional evaluation oracle. The constructed algorithm works without any a priori knowledge of the state of an auxiliary register at the beginning and it recovers the initial state of an auxiliary register at the end. This provides ample scope to choose qubits for auxiliary registers at will. (author)

  11. Early Functional Abilities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lorentzen, Jakob; Poulsen, Ingrid

    2005-01-01

    Early Functional Abilities (EFA), - en skala til evaluering af behandlingsforløb af svært hjerneskadede patienter i forbindelse med tidlig rehabilitering. Formål At monitorere og dokumentere rehabiliteringsforløbet for svært hjerneskadede patienter, hvor funktionsniveauet endnu ikke kan registreres...

  12. Wine and endothelial function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caimi, G; Carollo, C; Lo Presti, R

    2003-01-01

    In recent years many studies have focused on the well-known relationship between wine consumption and cardiovascular risk. Wine exerts its protective effects through various changes in lipoprotein profile, coagulation and fibrinolytic cascades, platelet aggregation, oxidative mechanisms and endothelial function. The last has earned more attention for its implications in atherogenesis. Endothelium regulates vascular tone by a delicate balancing among vasorelaxing (nitric oxide [NO]) and vasoconstrincting (endothelins) factors produced by endothelium in response to various stimuli. In rat models, wine and other grape derivatives exerted an endothelium-dependent vasorelaxing capacity especially associated with the NO-stimulating activity of their polyphenol components. In experimental conditions, reservatrol (a stilbene polyphenol) protected hearts and kidneys from ischemia-reperfusion injury through antioxidant activity and upregulation of NO production. Wine polyphenols are also able to induce the expression of genes involved in the NO pathway within the arterial wall. The effects of wine on endothelial function in humans are not yet clearly understood. A favorable action of red wine or dealcoholized wine extract or purple grape juice on endothelial function has been observed by several authors, but discrimination between ethanol and polyphenol effects is controversial. It is, however likely that regular and prolonged moderate wine drinking positively affects endothelial function. The beneficial effects of wine on cardiovascular health are greater if wine is associated with a healthy diet. The most recent nutritional and epidemiologic studies show that the ideal diet closely resembles the Mediterranean diet.

  13. Fabrics in Function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bang, Anne Louise

    2007-01-01

    sensing of fabrics in function. It is proposed that tactile and visual sensing of fabrics is a way to investigate and express emotional utility values. The further purpose is to use experiments with repertory grid models as part of the mapping of the entire research project and also as a basis...

  14. DNA: Structure and function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sinden, Richard R.; E. Pearson, Christopher; N. Potaman, Vladimir

    1998-01-01

    This chapter discusses the structure and function of DNA. DNA occupies a critical role in cells, because it is the source of all intrinsic genetic information. Chemically, DNA is a very stable molecule, a characteristic important for a macromolecule that may have to persist in an intact form...

  15. Brown adipocyte function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winther, Sally

    . The first part of this thesis explores this by identifying and investigating two novel kinase regulators of brown adipocyte function. Study 1 demonstrates that spleen tyrosine kinase is a hitherto undescribed regulator of brown adipocyte differentiation and activation. Study 2 identifies glycogen synthase...

  16. Nonlinear functional analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Deimling, Klaus

    1985-01-01

    topics. However, only a modest preliminary knowledge is needed. In the first chapter, where we introduce an important topological concept, the so-called topological degree for continuous maps from subsets ofRn into Rn, you need not know anything about functional analysis. Starting with Chapter 2, where infinite dimensions first appear, one should be familiar with the essential step of consider­ ing a sequence or a function of some sort as a point in the corresponding vector space of all such sequences or functions, whenever this abstraction is worthwhile. One should also work out the things which are proved in § 7 and accept certain basic principles of linear functional analysis quoted there for easier references, until they are applied in later chapters. In other words, even the 'completely linear' sections which we have included for your convenience serve only as a vehicle for progress in nonlinearity. Another point that makes the text introductory is the use of an essentially uniform mathematical languag...

  17. Functional Group Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Walter T., Jr.; Patterson, John M.

    1984-01-01

    Literature on analytical methods related to the functional groups of 17 chemical compounds is reviewed. These compounds include acids, acid azides, alcohols, aldehydes, ketones, amino acids, aromatic hydrocarbons, carbodiimides, carbohydrates, ethers, nitro compounds, nitrosamines, organometallic compounds, peroxides, phenols, silicon compounds,…

  18. Empirical microeconomics action functionals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baaquie, Belal E.; Du, Xin; Tanputraman, Winson

    2015-06-01

    A statistical generalization of microeconomics has been made in Baaquie (2013), where the market price of every traded commodity, at each instant of time, is considered to be an independent random variable. The dynamics of commodity market prices is modeled by an action functional-and the focus of this paper is to empirically determine the action functionals for different commodities. The correlation functions of the model are defined using a Feynman path integral. The model is calibrated using the unequal time correlation of the market commodity prices as well as their cubic and quartic moments using a perturbation expansion. The consistency of the perturbation expansion is verified by a numerical evaluation of the path integral. Nine commodities drawn from the energy, metal and grain sectors are studied and their market behavior is described by the model to an accuracy of over 90% using only six parameters. The paper empirically establishes the existence of the action functional for commodity prices that was postulated to exist in Baaquie (2013).

  19. Functional System Dynamics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ligterink, N.E.

    2007-01-01

    Functional system dynamics is the analysis, modelling, and simulation of continuous systems usually described by partial differential equations. From the infinite degrees of freedom of such systems only a finite number of relevant variables have to be chosen for a practical model description. The

  20. Objectification and Semiotic Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santi, George

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to study students' difficulties when they have to ascribe the same meaning to different representations of the same mathematical object. We address two theoretical tools that are at the core of Radford's cultural semiotic and Godino's onto-semiotic approaches: objectification and the semiotic function. The analysis…