WorldWideScience

Sample records for previously drilled wells

  1. Geothermal well drilling manual at Cerro Prieto

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandez P., A.; Flores S., M.

    1982-08-10

    The objective of the drilling manual is to solve all problems directly related to drilling during the construction of a well. In this case, the topics dealt which are drilling fluids and hydraulics to be applied in the field to improve drilling progress, eliminate risks and achieve good well-completion. There are other topics that are applicable such as drill bits and the drilling string, which are closely linked to drilling progress. On this occasion drilling fluid and hydraulics programs are presented, in addition to a computing program for a Casio FX-502P calculator to be applied in the field to optimize hydraulics and in the analysis of hydraulics for development and exploration wells at their different intervals.

  2. PDVSA INTEVEP Technologies in oil well drilling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bolivar, C.; Rafael, A.; Davila, Manuel A.

    1998-01-01

    The orimulsion, the generation of catalytic technologies and the development of HDH (process which transform heavy crudes in light crudes), are examples of some of the well known technologies developed by PDVSA INTEVEP. But the drilling oil wells technologies developed by the same entreprise, even though are very important, are less known all around the world. This document describes some products developed through those technologies: THIXOGAS T M which is an antimigratory aditive; INTEFLOW T M which is a fluid for drilling, complementation and rehabilitation of oil drills; INTERCAB T M which is an aditive for fluids in drilling; orimatita which is a denser for drilling fluids; CARBOLIG T M which is an aditive for drilling fluids; and many other products and technologies in development, impacted considerably the venezuelan economy by preserving the environment and saving quite an important amount of money in 1997 (Bs. 3.000 M M)

  3. HORIZONTAL WELL DRILL-IN FLUIDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nediljka Gaurina-Međimurec

    1998-12-01

    Full Text Available Main objective of horizontal driling is to place a drain-hole for a long distance within the pay zone to enhance productivity or injectivity. In drilling horizontal wells, more serious problems appear than in drilling vertical wells. These problems are: poor hole cleaning, excessive torque and drag, hole filling, pipe stucking, wellbore instability, loss of circulation, formation damage, poor cement job, and difficulties at logging jobs. From that reason, successful drilling and production of horizontal well depends largely on the fluid used during drilling and completion phases. Several new fluids, that fulfill some or all of required properties (hole cleaning, cutting suspension, good lubrication, and relative low formation damage, are presented in this paper.

  4. Geothermal wells: a forecast of drilling activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, G.L.; Mansure, A.J.; Miewald, J.N.

    1981-07-01

    Numbers and problems for geothermal wells expected to be drilled in the United States between 1981 and 2000 AD are forecasted. The 3800 wells forecasted for major electric power projects (totaling 6 GWe of capacity) are categorized by type (production, etc.), and by location (The Geysers, etc.). 6000 wells are forecasted for direct heat projects (totaling 0.02 Quads per year). Equations are developed for forecasting the number of wells, and data is presented. Drilling and completion problems in The Geysers, The Imperial Valley, Roosevelt Hot Springs, the Valles Caldera, northern Nevada, Klamath Falls, Reno, Alaska, and Pagosa Springs are discussed. Likely areas for near term direct heat projects are identified.

  5. The Application of Biodiesel as an Environmental Friendly Drilling Fluid to Drill Oil and Gas Wells

    OpenAIRE

    Ismail, Abdul Razak

    2014-01-01

    The oil and gas industries need to use oil based drilling fluids to drill troublesome rock layers such as sensitive shale formation or to drill very deep oil and gas wells. However, using oil based drilling fluids will create pollution and therefore, environmental regulations on discharge of such drilling fluids have become more stringent because it will give tremendous impacts on the marine life and ecosystem. This research is conducted to formulate a new environmental friendly drilling flui...

  6. Aerated drilling cutting transport analysis in geothermal well

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakhyudin, Aris; Setiawan, Deni; Dwi Marjuan, Oscar

    2017-12-01

    Aeratad drilling widely used for geothermal drilling especially when drilled into predicted production zone. Aerated drilling give better performance on preventing lost circulation problem, improving rate of penetration, and avoiding drilling fluid invasion to productive zone. While well is drilled, cutting is produced and should be carried to surface by drilling fluid. Hole problem, especially pipe sticking will occur while the cutting is not lifted properly to surface. The problem will effect on drilling schedule; non-productive time finally result more cost to be spent. Geothermal formation has different characteristic comparing oil and gas formation. Geothermal mainly has igneous rock while oil and gas mostly sedimentary rock. In same depth, formation pressure in geothermal well commonly lower than oil and gas well while formation temperature geothermal well is higher. While aerated drilling is applied in geothermal well, Igneous rock density has higher density than sedimentary rock and aerated drilling fluid is lighter than water based mud hence minimum velocity requirement to transport cutting is larger than in oil/gas well drilling. Temperature and pressure also has impact on drilling fluid (aerated) density. High temperature in geothermal well decrease drilling fluid density hence the effect of pressure and temperature also considered. In this paper, Aerated drilling cutting transport performance on geothermal well will be analysed due to different rock and drilling fluid density. Additionally, temperature and pressure effect on drilling fluid density also presented to merge.

  7. REDUCTION OF AN ADVERSE IMPACT DURING WELL DRILLING BY MEANS OF DRILLING WASTE USAGE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir Sergeevich Kuznetsov

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The problem of drilling waste utilisation is assumed to be resolved through the implementation of the complex of environment protection production engineering measures. This includes, firstly, the usage in the process of well drilling of drilling mud on the basis of water-soluble biodegradable polymers and a four-stage drilling mud refining system. Secondly, the usage of the well site construction with trenching for allocation of expressed bore mud and a temporary ground tank for drilling waste water.

  8. Rheological study of a water based oil well drilling fluid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahto, Vikas; Sharma, V.P. [Department of Petroleum Engineering, Indian School of Mines, Dhanbad-826004, Jharkhand (India)

    2004-11-30

    Organic polymers are commonly used to control the rheology and filtrate loss required for water-based drilling fluids. An ecologically-friendly water-based drilling fluid was developed by studying the rheological behavior of tamarind gum and polyanionic cellulose on bentonite water suspensions. The effect of drilling fluid filtrate on formation damage was also analyzed. The drilling fluid that was developed has better rheological properties and fluid loss control which are required for optimum performance of oil well drilling. In addition, the drilling fluid filtrate exhibits minimum formation damage on sandstone cores.

  9. Drilling hazards inventory: The key to safer -and cheaper- wells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoetz, G.; Jaarsma, B.; Kortekaas, M.

    2013-01-01

    Safety and cost control are critical success factors in the realm of drilling. Actual well costs frequently exceed planned costs due to unexpected drilling incidents related to potentially avoidable geohazards. It is estimated that - in the Netherlands on average - around 20% of drilling time is

  10. Ecologically pure drilling muds for the drilling of variable purpose wells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kudaikulova, G.A.; Rakishev, B.R.; Aitugulova, B.A. [K.I. Satpaev Kazak National Technical Univ., (Kazakhstan)

    2010-07-01

    The volumes of prospecting and geotechnological rock drilling wells have increased considerably in Kazakhstan. Among the number of ores developed in Kazakhstan, the gold-containing, polymetallic and uranium ores are of particular interest. By working out the deposits, the creviced and cavernous zones often appear. Therefore, a high-quality polymer-clay drilling mud is needed to provide a high yield of core, increase mechanical speed of drilling, and increase the technical and economic indicators of drilling. This paper presented data on the development of ecologically pure polymer-clay drilling muds with application of Kazakhstan clays of various deposits and ecologically pure chemical reagents of companies around the world. The paper discussed the theory and experimental results. It was concluded that the newly created ecologically pure polymer-clay drilling muds had a low indicator of filtration, good removal ability and contained a minimum quantity of reagents. 3 refs., 1 tab., 2 figs.

  11. Comprehensive Approach to Oil Well Drilling Cost Estimation ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The comprehensive approach to oil well drilling cost estimation was presented. A formular was derived from the existing drilling cost estimation formulae that considered a parameter known as host community cost (HCC), which was introduced into the existing formula to make it more comprehensive. The host community ...

  12. Modeling the time and cost to drill an offshore well

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaiser, Mark J.

    2009-01-01

    The objective in drilling a hydrocarbon well is to make hole as quickly as possible subject to the technological, operational, quality, and safety constraints associated with the process. These objectives are frequently conflicting and depend on factors that are subject to significant private and market uncertainty. There is no way to identify all of the relevant characteristics of drilling operations, but through use of statistical analysis and empirical modeling, it is possible to develop relations that characterize and benchmark drilling performance under a suitable set of assumptions. The purpose of this paper is to develop the conceptual framework to model the time and cost to drill an offshore well and to illustrate the methodology on a test set of wells in the Gulf of Mexico. The physical characteristics of the wellbore and operational aspects of drilling, including variables such as the drilled interval, horizontal displacement, aspect ratio, number of casing strings, and mud weight, serve as the primary descriptive factors in the functional relations constructed.

  13. Environmentally Assisted Cracking of Drill Pipes in Deep Drilling Oil and Natural Gas Wells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziomek-Moroz, M.

    2012-06-01

    Corrosion fatigue (CF), hydrogen induced cracking (HIC) and sulfide stress cracking (SSC), or environmentally assisted cracking (EAC) have been identified as the most challenging causes of catastrophic brittle fracture of drill pipes during drilling operations of deep oil and natural gas wells. Although corrosion rates can be low and tensile stresses during service can be below the material yield stress, a simultaneous action between the stress and corrosive environment can cause a sudden brittle failure of a drill component. Overall, EAC failure consists of two stages: incubation and propagation. Defects, such as pits, second-phase inclusions, etc., serve as preferential sites for the EAC failure during the incubation stage. Deep oil and gas well environments are rich in chlorides and dissolved hydrogen sulfide, which are extremely detrimental to steels used in drilling operations. This article discusses catastrophic brittle fracture mechanisms due to EAC of drill pipe materials, and the corrosion challenges that need to be overcome for drilling ultra-deep oil and natural gas wells.

  14. A field guide for well site geologists: Cable tool drilling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Last, G.V.; Liikala, T.L.

    1987-12-01

    This field is intended for use by Pacific Northwest Laboratory well site geologists who are responsible for data collection during the drilling and construction of monitoring wells on the Hanford Site. This guide presents standardized methods for geologic sample collection and description, and well construction documentation. 5 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs

  15. Solicitation - Geothermal Drilling Development and Well Maintenance Projects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sattler, A.R.

    1999-07-07

    Energy (DOE)-industry research and development (R and D) organization, sponsors near-term technology development projects for reducing geothermal drilling and well maintenance costs. Sandia National Laboratories (Albuquerque, NM) administers DOE funds for GDO cost-shared projects and provides technical support. The GDO serves a very important function in fostering geothermal development. It encourages commercialization of emerging, cost-reducing drilling technologies, while fostering a spirit of cooperation among various segments of the geothermal industry. For Sandia, the GDO also serves as a means of identifying the geothermal industry's drilling fuel/or well maintenance problems, and provides an important forum for technology transfer. Successfully completed GDO projects include: the development of a high-temperature borehole televiewer, high-temperature rotating head rubbers, a retrievable whipstock, and a high-temperature/high-pressure valve-changing tool. Ongoing GDO projects include technology for stemming lost circulation; foam cement integrity log interpretation, insulated drill pipe, percussive mud hammers for geothermal drilling, a high-temperature/ high-pressure valve changing tool assembly (adding a milling capability), deformed casing remediation, high- temperature steering tools, diagnostic instrumentation for casing in geothermal wells, and elastomeric casing protectors.

  16. Propagation of Measurement-While-Drilling Mud Pulse during High Temperature Deep Well Drilling Operations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongtao Li

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Signal attenuates while Measurement-While-Drilling (MWD mud pulse is transmited in drill string during high temperature deep well drilling. In this work, an analytical model for the propagation of mud pulse was presented. The model consists of continuity, momentum, and state equations with analytical solutions based on the linear perturbation analysis. The model can predict the wave speed and attenuation coefficient of mud pulse. The calculated results were compared with the experimental data showing a good agreement. Effects of the angular frequency, static velocity, mud viscosity, and mud density behavior on speed and attenuation coefficients were included in this paper. Simulated results indicate that the effects of angular frequency, static velocity, and mud viscosity are important, and lower frequency, viscosity, and static velocity benefit the transmission of mud pulse. Influenced by density behavior, the speed and attenuation coefficients in drill string are seen to have different values with respect to well depth. For different circulation times, the profiles of speed and attenuation coefficients behave distinctly different especially in lower section. In general, the effects of variables above on speed are seen to be small in comparison.

  17. Casing pull tests for directionally drilled environmental wells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Staller, G.E.; Wemple, R.P. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Layne, R.R. [Charles Machine Works, Inc., Perry, OK (United States)

    1994-11-01

    A series of tests to evaluate several types of environmental well casings have been conducted by Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) and it`s industrial partner, The Charles Machine Works, Inc. (CMW). A test bed was constructed at the CMW test range to model a typical shallow, horizontal, directionally drilled wellbore. Four different types of casings were pulled through this test bed. The loads required to pull the casings through the test bed and the condition of the casing material were documented during the pulling operations. An additional test was conducted to make a comparison of test bed vs actual wellbore casing pull loads. A directionally drilled well was emplaced by CMW to closely match the test bed. An instrumented casing was installed in the well and the pull loads recorded. The completed tests are reviewed and the results reported.

  18. Casing pull tests for directionally drilled environmental wells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Staller, G.E.; Wemple, R.P.; Layne, R.R.

    1994-11-01

    A series of tests to evaluate several types of environmental well casings have been conducted by Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) and it's industrial partner, The Charles Machine Works, Inc. (CMW). A test bed was constructed at the CMW test range to model a typical shallow, horizontal, directionally drilled wellbore. Four different types of casings were pulled through this test bed. The loads required to pull the casings through the test bed and the condition of the casing material were documented during the pulling operations. An additional test was conducted to make a comparison of test bed vs actual wellbore casing pull loads. A directionally drilled well was emplaced by CMW to closely match the test bed. An instrumented casing was installed in the well and the pull loads recorded. The completed tests are reviewed and the results reported

  19. Factory-like Optimum Drilling Design of Cluster Well in Jimsar Well Block

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Yingbiao

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The deep heavy oil reservoir of Jimsar well block, which located in Xinjiang oilfield, was developed by cluster well in 2016. In view of the ground environment, long open hole section and poor wellbore stability, the scheme which based on the research of factory-like wellsite platform deployment, well trajectory design and reservoir protection, was designed and carried out in the block. Firstly, the platform was divided into different control regions according to the anti-collision requirement. Secondly, truck-mounted drilling rig and civil power were applied to the factory-like drilling. Thirdly, well track was designed to be three parts: straight, increase and steady. The design can improve the proportion of composite drilling footage. Fourthly, the method of plane scanning and normal surface scanning was adopted to ensure the safety of downhole trajectory. Finally, the natural polymer drilling fluid system and drilling fluid reuse system were used to protect environment and reduce drilling cost. The results show that the maximum reducing time of single drill rig is 32.5 day, and the penetration rate of whole platform is increasing continuously.

  20. Application program of CRUST-1 10km continental scientific drilling rig in SK-2 scientific drilling well

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Youhong; Gao, Ke; Yu, Ping; Liu, Baochang; Guo, Wei; Ma, Yinlong; Yang, Yang

    2014-05-01

    SK-2 Well is located in DaQing city,where is site of the largest oil field in China,Heilongjiang province, north-east of China.The objective of SK-2 well is to obtain full cores of cretaceous formation in Song Liao basin,and to build the time tunnel of Cretaceous greenhouse climate change,and to clarify the causes,processes and results of the formations of DaQing oil field. This will ensure to achieve our ultimate goals,to test the CRUST-1 drilling rig and improve China's deep scientific drilling technology,to form the scientific drilling technology,method and system with independent intellectual property rights,and to provide technical knowledge and information for China's ten kilometers super-deep scientific drilling technical resources.SK-2 Well is at 6400 meter depth, where the drilling inclination is 90 degree and the continuous coring length is 3535 meter that from 2865 to 6400 meter,the recovery rate of the core is greater or equal to 95 percent with 100 millimeters core diameter and 3.9 degree per 100 meter geothermal gradient.The CRUST-1 rig is designated with special drilling equipment for continental scientific drilling combined to the oil drilling equipment ability with advanced geological drilling technology which is highly automatic and intelligent. CRUST-1 drilling ability is 10000 meter with the maximum hook load 700 tons, the total power is 4610 Kilowatt.CRUST-1 will be integrated with a complete set of automation equipment,including big torque hydraulic top drive,high accuracy automatic drilling rod feeding system, suspended automatic drill string discharge device,hydraulic intelligent iron roughneck,and hydraulic automatic catwalk to fully meet the drilling process requirements of SK-2.Designed with advanced drilling technique for 260 degree in the bottom of SK-2 well and hard rock,including the drilling tools of high temperature hydraulic hammer,high temperature resistance and high strength aluminum drill pipe,high temperature preparation of mud

  1. Geothermal down-well instrumentation (during drilling). Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kent, W.H.; Mitchell, P.G.; Row, R.V.

    1979-06-01

    The object of the work was to investigate acoustic and electromagnetic telemetry methods which could be used as a basis for geothermal MWD systems. The emphasis has been on methods which employ the drill string and/or the formation surrounding the borehole as a signalling media. The investigations have been confined to the transmission characteristics of these media and have excluded the area of downwell measurements. Work performed includes: laboratory measurement of acoustic attenuation in drill pipe; field measurement of acoustic attenuation in drill pipe; measurements of drill string vibrations (drilling noise) during drilling; evaluation of drill string vibration dampers; modeling of electromagnetic propagation in the borehole region; and field measurements of attenuation of a downwell electromagnetic signal source. (MHR)

  2. Nephrotoxicity of uranium in drinking water from private drilled wells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Selden, Anders I., E-mail: anders.selden@orebroll.se [Department of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Orebro University Hospital, SE-701 85 Orebro (Sweden); Lundholm, Cecilia [Department of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Orebro University Hospital, SE-701 85 Orebro (Sweden); Edlund, Bror [Department of Clinical Chemistry, Orebro University Hospital, SE-701 85 Orebro (Sweden); Hoegdahl, Camilla [Office of Environment and Health, Arjaengs kommun, PO Box 906, SE-672 29 Arjaeng (Sweden); Ek, Britt-Marie [Geological Survey of Sweden, PO Box 670, SE-751 28 Uppsala (Sweden); Bergstroem, Bernt E.; Ohlson, Carl-Goeran [Department of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Orebro University Hospital, SE-701 85 Orebro (Sweden)

    2009-05-15

    Objectives: To investigate the association between uranium in drinking water from drilled wells and aspects of kidney function measured by sensitive urine tests. Methods: Three hundred and one of 398 eligible subjects (75.6%) aged 18-74 years with daily drinking water supplies from private drilled wells located in uranium-rich bedrock (exposed group) volunteered to participate along with 153 of 271 local controls (56.4%) who used municipal water. Participants responded to a questionnaire on their water consumption and general health, and provided a morning urine sample and drinking water for analysis. Results: The uranium content of well water samples (n=153) varied considerably (range <0.20-470 {mu}g/l, median 6.7 {mu}g/l, 5% >100 {mu}g/l), while uranium levels in all samples of municipal water (n=14) were below the limit of quantification (0.2 {mu}g/l). Urinary levels of uranium were more than eight times higher in exposed subjects than in controls (geometric means 38 and 4.3 ng/l, respectively; p<0.001), but their mean urine lead levels were not significantly different. There was a strong curvilinear correlation between uranium in drinking water and in urine (r{sup 2}=0.66). Levels of albumin, {beta}{sub 2}-microglobulin, protein HC as well as kappa and lambda immunoglobulin chains in urine from exposed and controls were similar. The N-acetyl-{beta}-D-glucosaminidase (NAG) activity was significantly lower in the exposed group vs. controls, possibly secondary to differential storage duration of samples from the two groups. Even in regression models adjusting for gender, age and smoking no association of uranium in water and the kidney function parameters was observed. Using uranium in urine in the entire study group as a marker of exposure, however, a tendency of exposure-related increases of {beta}{sub 2}-microglobulin, protein HC and kappa chains were noted. This tendency was enhanced after exclusion of subjects with diabetes mellitus from the analysis

  3. Nephrotoxicity of uranium in drinking water from private drilled wells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Selden, Anders I.; Lundholm, Cecilia; Edlund, Bror; Hoegdahl, Camilla; Ek, Britt-Marie; Bergstroem, Bernt E.; Ohlson, Carl-Goeran

    2009-01-01

    Objectives: To investigate the association between uranium in drinking water from drilled wells and aspects of kidney function measured by sensitive urine tests. Methods: Three hundred and one of 398 eligible subjects (75.6%) aged 18-74 years with daily drinking water supplies from private drilled wells located in uranium-rich bedrock (exposed group) volunteered to participate along with 153 of 271 local controls (56.4%) who used municipal water. Participants responded to a questionnaire on their water consumption and general health, and provided a morning urine sample and drinking water for analysis. Results: The uranium content of well water samples (n=153) varied considerably (range 100 μg/l), while uranium levels in all samples of municipal water (n=14) were below the limit of quantification (0.2 μg/l). Urinary levels of uranium were more than eight times higher in exposed subjects than in controls (geometric means 38 and 4.3 ng/l, respectively; p 2 =0.66). Levels of albumin, β 2 -microglobulin, protein HC as well as kappa and lambda immunoglobulin chains in urine from exposed and controls were similar. The N-acetyl-β-D-glucosaminidase (NAG) activity was significantly lower in the exposed group vs. controls, possibly secondary to differential storage duration of samples from the two groups. Even in regression models adjusting for gender, age and smoking no association of uranium in water and the kidney function parameters was observed. Using uranium in urine in the entire study group as a marker of exposure, however, a tendency of exposure-related increases of β 2 -microglobulin, protein HC and kappa chains were noted. This tendency was enhanced after exclusion of subjects with diabetes mellitus from the analysis. Conclusions: Uranium levels in urine were strongly correlated to levels in drinking water from drilled wells. There were no clear signs of nephrotoxicity from uranium in drinking water at levels recorded in this study, but some indications of an

  4. Well control during the drilling and testing of high pressure offshore wells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-05-01

    This Code has been prepared for use as a guide to safe practice for those concerned with well control during the drilling and testing of high pressure offshore wells. It is intended to provide information and guidance on those well control activities associated with high pressure wells which have an impact on safety offshore, and therefore require detailed care and attention. The Code has been produced in a United Kingdom Continental Shelf (UKCS) context, but the principles and recommendations have general relevance to similar operations elsewhere. Each chapter of the Code covers an important aspect of well control and has an introduction which describes the part each activity plays in the drilling and testing of high pressure offshore wells. (Author)

  5. Geopressured-geothermal well report. Volume I. Drilling and completion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1982-01-01

    Gladys McCall site activities are covered through the completion of the test well and salt water disposal well. The test well was drilled to a total depth of 16,510 feet, then plugged back to 15,831 feet. Three 4'' diameter diamond cores were taken for analysis. An existing well on site, the Getty-Butts Gladys McCall No. 1, was reentered and completed to a depth of 3514 feet as a salt water disposal well. The geologic interpretation of the Gladys McCall site indicated target sands for testing at 15,080 feet through 15, 831 feet. Reservoir fluid temperature at this depth is estimated to be approximately 313/sup 0/F and pressure is estimated to be +-12,800 psi. The preliminary reservoir volume estimate is 3.6 billion barrels of brine. The design wells program includes environmental monitoring of the Gladys McCall site by Louisiana State University. Field stations are set up to monitor surface and ground water quality, subsidence, land loss and shoreline erosion, and seismicity. As of December 31, 1981 the study shows no significant impact on the environment by site operations.

  6. 30 CFR 250.413 - What must my description of well drilling design criteria address?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... drilling design criteria address? Your description of well drilling design criteria must address: (a) Pore... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What must my description of well drilling design criteria address? 250.413 Section 250.413 Mineral Resources MINERALS MANAGEMENT SERVICE...

  7. Well control during the drilling and testing of high pressure offshore wells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-05-01

    This Code has been prepared for use as a guide to safe practice for those concerned with well control during the drilling and testing of high pressure offshore wells. It is intended to provide information and guidance on those well control activities associated with high pressure wells which have an impact on safety offshore, and therefore require detailed care and attention. The Code has been produced in a United Kingdom Continental Shelf (UKCS) context, but the principles and recommendations have general relevance to similar operations elsewhere. (author)

  8. Optimizing Drilling Efficiency by PWD (Pressure-While-Drilling) Sensor in wells which were drilled in the Khazar-Caspian Sea of the Azerbaijan Republic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amirov, Elnur

    2017-04-01

    Sperry Drilling Services' PWD sensor improve and support drilling efficiency by providing very important, real-time downhole pressure information that allows to make faster and better drilling decisions. The PWD service, provides accurate annular pressure, internal pressure and temperature measurements using any of well-known telemetry systems: positive mud pulse, negative mud pulse and electromagnetic. Pressure data can be transmitted in real time and recorded in downhole memory. In the pumpsoff mode, the minimum, maximum and average pressures observed during the non-circulating period are transmitted via mud pulse telemetry when circulation recommences. These measurements provide the knowledge to avoid lost circulation and detect flow/kicks before they happen. The PWD sensor also reduces the risk of problems related by unexpected fracture or collapse. Sperry's PWD sensor also helps to avoid lost circulation and flow/kick, which can lead to costly delays in drilling. Annular pressure increases often reflect ineffective cuttings removal and poor hole cleaning, both of which can lead to lost circulation. The PWD sensor detects the increase and drilling fluid parameters and operating procedures can be modified to improve hole-cleaning efficiency. On extended reach wells, real-time information helps to maintain wellbore pressures between safe operating limits and to monitor hole cleaning. The PWD sensor also provides early detection of well flows and kicks. A drop in pressure, can indicate gas, oil and water kicks. Because the sensor is making its measurement downhole, the PWD sensor makes it possible to detect such pressure drops earlier than more traditional surface measurements. The PWD sensor has high-accuracy quartz gauges and is able to record data because of its battery-powered operation. It is also extremely useful in specialized drilling environments, such as high-pressure/high-temperature, extended-reach and deepwater wells. When combined with the rig

  9. Drilling, construction, and caliper-log data for well 3-3505-25, North Lower Anahulu exploratory well, Oahu, Hawaii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presley, T.K.; Oki, D.S.

    1996-01-01

    The North Lower Anahulu exploratory well (State well number 3-3505-25) was drilled about 1.4 miles east-northeast of the town of Haleiwa. The well was drilled on agricultural land in the Kawailoa ground-water area. The well was drilled from an elevation of about 232 feet above mean sea level and penetrates about 22 feet into a basalt aquifer. Well-construction data, logs of drilling notes, geologic descriptions for the samples, and caliper-log data are presented for the well. The well is one of 12 exploratory wells drilled in the north-central Oahu area between July, 1993 and May, 1994 in cooperation with the Honolulu Board of Water Supply.

  10. Crump Geyser Exploration and Drilling Project. High Precision Geophysics and Detailed Structural Exploration and Slim Well Drilling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fairbank, Brian D. [Nevada Geothermal Power Company, Vancouver (Canada); Smith, Nicole [Nevada Geothermal Power Company, Vancouver (Canada)

    2015-06-10

    The Crump Geyser Exploration and Drilling Project – High Precision Geophysics and Detailed Structural Exploration and Slim Well Drilling ran from January 29, 2010 to September 30, 2013. During Phase 1 of the project, collection of all geophysical surveys was completed as outlined in the Statement of Project Objectives. In addition, a 5000-foot full sized exploration well was drilled by Ormat, and preexisting drilling data was discovered for multiple temperature gradient wells within the project area. Three dimensional modeling and interpretation of results from the geophysical surveys and drilling data gave confidence to move to the project into Phase 2 drilling. Geological and geophysical survey interpretations combined with existing downhole temperature data provided an ideal target for the first slim-hole drilled as the first task in Phase 2. Slim-hole 35-34 was drilled in September 2011 and tested temperature, lithology, and permeability along the primary range-bounding fault zone near its intersection with buried northwest-trending faults that have been identified using geophysical methods. Following analysis of the results of the first slim-hole 35-34, the second slim hole was not drilled and subsequent project tasks, including flowing differential self-potential (FDSP) surveys that were designed to detail the affect of production and injection on water flow in the shallow aquifer, were not completed. NGP sold the Crump project to Ormat in August 2014, afterwards, there was insufficient time and interest from Ormat available to complete the project objectives. NGP was unable to continue managing the award for a project they did not own due to liability issues and Novation of the award was not a viable option due to federal award timelines. NGP submitted a request to mutually terminate the award on February 18, 2015. The results of all of the technical surveys and drilling are included in this report. Fault interpretations from surface geology, aeromag

  11. Method and apparatus for determining fluid circulation conditions in well drilling operations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gehrig, G.F.; Speers, J.M.

    1986-09-09

    A system is described for monitoring the delta flow-rate of drilling fluid in the course of circulating drilling fluid through a well from a drilling rig, comprising: an inflow flowmeter adapted for establishing a first signal representing the rate at which drilling fluid is injected into the well from the drilling rig; an outflow flowmeter adapted for establishing a second signal representing the rate at which drilling fluid is returned to the drilling rig from the well; and a signal processing system adapted for receiving the first and second signals and calculating a third signal representing the filtered difference between the first and second signals, the signal processing system being adapted to repeatedly update the degree of filtering applied in calculating the third signal in accordance with a relation serving to increase the degree of filtering in response to an increase in the magnitude of the cyclical variations in the rate at which drilling fluid is returned to the drilling rig and to decrease the degree of filtering in response to a decrease in the magnitude of the cyclical variations in the rate at which drilling fluid is returned to the drilling rig.

  12. Drilling, construction, and caliper-log data for wells 3-3204-01, Kaheaka exploratory well, Oahu, Hawaii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presley, T.K.; Oki, D.S.

    1996-01-01

    The Kaheaka exploratory well (State well number 3-3204-01) was drilled about 3.3 miles southeast of the town of Haleiwa. The well is on agricultural land in the Waialua ground-water area. The well penetrates about 67 feet into a basalt aquifer. Well-construction data, logs of drilling notes, geologic descriptions for the samples, and caliper-log data are presented for the well. The well is one of 12 exploratory wells drilled in the north-central Oahu area between July 1993 and May 1994 in cooperation with the Honolulu Board of Water Supply.

  13. Ensemble-based methods for well drilling sequence and time optimization under uncertainty

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leeuwenburgh, O.; Chitu, A.G.; Nair, R.; Egberts, P.J.P.; Ghazaryan, L.; Feng, T.; Hustoft, L.

    2016-01-01

    One of the main activities in the (re-)development of large hydrocarbon fields is the drilling of new wells. The drilling process may involve a large number of wells and take several years to complete. Challenges include the selection of a limited set of wells from many possible well paths, and the

  14. Drilling, construction, and caliper-log data for well 3-3505-26, Opaeula exploratory well, Oahu, Hawaii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presley, T.K.; Oki, D.S.

    1996-01-01

    The Opaeula exploratory well (State well number 3-3505-26) was drilled about 1.2 miles east- southeast of the town of Haleiwa. The well is located on agricultural land in the Waialua ground-water area. The well was drilled at an elevation of about 287 feet above mean sea level and penetrates about 75 feet into a basalt aquifer. Well-construction data, logs of drilling notes, geologic descriptions for the samples, and caliper-log data are presented for the well. The well is one of 12 exploratory wells drilled in the north-central Oahu area between July 1993 and May 1994 in cooperation with the Honolulu Board of Water Supply.

  15. Drilling, construction, and caliper-log data for well 3-3503-01, North Upper Anahulu exploratory well, Oahu, Hawaii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presley, T.K.; Oki, D.S.

    1996-01-01

    The North Upper Anahulu exploratory well (Hawaii State well number 3-3503-01) was drilled about 3.1 miles east of the town of Haleiwa. The well is located on agricultural land in the Kawailoa ground-water area. The well was drilled to an elevation of about -103 feet below mean sea level and penetrates about 110 feet into a basalt aquifer. Well-construction data, logs of drilling notes, geologic descriptions for the samples, and caliper-log data are presented for the well. The well is one of 12 exploratory wells drilled in the north-central Oahu area between July 1993 and May 1994 in cooperation with the Honolulu Board of Water Supply.

  16. Technical and economic evaluation of selected compact drill rigs for drilling 10,000 foot geothermal production wells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huttrer, G.W. [Geothermal Management Company, Inc., Frisco, CO (United States)

    1997-11-01

    This report summarizes the investigation and evaluation of several {open_quotes}compact{close_quotes} drill rigs which could be used for drilling geothermal production wells. Use of these smaller rigs would save money by reducing mobilization costs, fuel consumption, crew sizes, and environmental impact. Advantages and disadvantages of currently-manufactured rigs are identified, and desirable characteristics for the {open_quotes}ideal{close_quotes} compact rig are defined. The report includes a detailed cost estimate of a specific rig, and an evaluation of the cost/benefit ratio of using this rig. Industry contacts for further information are given.

  17. You say you want a revolution: casing drilling targets 30 per cent well-cost saving

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Polczer, S.; Marsters, S.

    1999-10-01

    Casing drilling is a new method of drilling that eliminates drill strings by using standard casing to simultaneously drill and case wells. Tesco Corporation of Calgary acquired patent rights to casing drilling technology in 1995. The company now offers a conversion kit for existing drill rigs as well a new compact casing drilling rig for shallow markets. The single derrick will be rated at 1,500 meters, but initially it will be used to drill 700-800 meter gas wells in southeast Alberta. Some cost savings will be realized at these shallow depths, but the real cost saving advantages will be realized on deep holes. In the meantime, improvements are planned to the cutting structures of the under-rimming bit to increase safety and withstand higher torque loads. It will be also necessary to adapt techniques such as directional drilling and logging to the casing drilling conveyance mechanism which has been only partially successful thus far, especially in the retrieving mode. Another challenge already met, involved ensuring that casing could be run in high-compression loads without damage to connections. Despite these problems, the system attracted considerable attention with several international companies placing orders for immediate delivery. Another system, this one developed by Sperry-Sun Drilling Services and known as a 'casing while drilling' (CWD) system, is strictly a downhole assembly and is targeted for offshore use and deeper vertical holes. This system is currently being tested in two commercial operations in offshore Indonesia for Unocal Corporation. Despite numerous problems to fill casing with fluid during connections, penetration rates of 300-400 feet per hour were achieved.

  18. Demonstration of a utility industry horizontal drilling system: Horizontal well AMH-5 installation report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    The Department of Energy's Office of Technology Development initiated an integrated demonstration of innovative technologies and systems for cleanup of VOCs in soils and groundwater at the Savannah River Site (SRS) in 1989. The overall goal of the program is demonstration of multiple technologies and systems in the fields of drilling, characterization, monitoring, and remediation at a single test bed. Innovative technologies are compared to one another and to baseline technologies in terms of technical performance and cost effectiveness. Transfer of successfully demonstrated technologies and systems to DOE environmental restoration organizations, to other government agencies, and to industry is a critical part of the program. Directional drilling has been shown to be a successful technique for enhancing access to the subsurface, thus improving remediation systems, especially remediation systems which perform in situ. Demonstration of an innovative directional drilling system at the Integrated Demonstration Site at the SRS, was initiated in June of 1992. The directional drilling system was designed to install an in situ remediation system. The drilling system is an experimental compaction/dry drilling technique developed by Charles Machine Works (Ditch Witch reg-sign) of Perry, Oklahoma. A horizontal well was installed in the M Area of the SRS below and parallel to an abandoned tile process sewer line. The installation of the horizontal well was a two-part process. Part one consisted of drilling the borehole, and part two was the horizontal well completion

  19. Make-up wells drilling cost in financial model for a geothermal project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oktaviani Purwaningsih, Fitri; Husnie, Ruly; Afuar, Waldy; Abdurrahman, Gugun

    2017-12-01

    After commissioning of a power plant, geothermal reservoir will encounter pressure decline, which will affect wells productivity. Therefore, further drilling is carried out to enhance steam production. Make-up wells are production wells drilled inside an already confirmed reservoir to maintain steam production in a certain level. Based on Sanyal (2004), geothermal power cost consists of three components, those are capital cost, O&M cost and make-up drilling cost. The make-up drilling cost component is a major part of power cost which will give big influence in a whole economical value of the project. The objective of this paper it to analyse the make-up wells drilling cost component in financial model of a geothermal power project. The research will calculate make-up wells requirements, drilling costs as a function of time and how they influence the financial model and affect the power cost. The best scenario in determining make-up wells strategy in relation with the project financial model would be the result of this research.

  20. Numerical investigation of the prospects of high energy laser in drilling oil and gas wells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agha, K.R.; Belhaj, H.A.; Mustafiz, S.; Islam, M.R.; Bjorndalen, N.

    2004-01-01

    Rotary drilling is the primary method used to reach oil and gas formations that was developed over a century ago. Many problems persist with this method, including downtime due to dull bits, the lack of precise vertical or horizontal wells and formation fluid leakage during drilling due to the lack of a seal around the hole. Laser drilling is a new technology that has been proposed as a method to eliminate the current problems while drilling and provide a less expensive alternative to conventional methods. This paper discussed the development of a numerical model based on the fundamental heat transfer and fluid flow phenomena including conduction, melting and vaporization responsible for material removal by laser drilling process. The paper addressed the thermal process involved in laser drilling of sandstone and limestone rocks as well as aluminum and mild steel. The paper outlined the parametric study and discussed the design considerations for a field application. Economical and environmental impacts were also included. It was concluded that more experimental investigation is needed to fully understand the laser operation and to enhance the integrity of the numerical models. In addition, it was concluded that field equipment must be designed to meet the changes in drilling requirements. 19 refs., 10 figs

  1. Cuttings-carried theory and erosion rule in gas drilling horizontal well

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Na

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In gas horizontal drilling, the gas with cuttings will go through the annulus at high speed which will lead strong erosion to the drill tools. This paper proposes a cuttings-carried theory and modified the critical cuttings-carried model for the gas-solid flow. Meanwhile, the erosive energy is obtained through simulating the gas-solid mixture in different conditions. The study result has positive significance on the determination of reasonable injection volume by optimizing construction parameters of horizontal well in gas drilling.

  2. Drilling a deep geologic test well at Hilton Head Island, South Carolina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, Arthur P.; Seefelt, Ellen L.

    2011-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC), is drilling a deep geologic test well at Hilton Head Island, S.C. The test well is scheduled to run between mid-March and early May 2011. When completed, the well will be about 1,000 feet deep. The purpose of this test well is to gain knowledge about the regional-scale Floridan aquifer, an important source of groundwater in the Hilton Head area. Also, cores obtained during drilling will enable geologists to study the last 60 million years of Earth history in this area.

  3. Phase III Drilling Operations at the Long Valley Exploratory Well (LVF 51-20)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Finger, J.T.; Jacobson, R.D.

    1999-06-01

    During July-September, 1998, a jointly funded drilling operation deepened the Long Valley Exploratory Well from 7178 feet to 9832 feet. This was the third major drilling phase of a project that began in 1989, but had sporadic progress because of discontinuities in tiding. Support for Phase III came from the California Energy Commission (CEC), the International Continental Drilling Program (ICDP), the US Geological Survey (USGS), and DOE. Each of these agencies had a somewhat different agenda: the CEC wants to evaluate the energy potential (specifically energy extraction from magma) of Long Valley Caldera; the ICDP is studying the evolution and other characteristics of young, silicic calderas; the USGS will use this hole as an observatory in their Volcano Hazards program; and the DOE, through Sandia, has an opportunity to test new geothermal tools and techniques in a realistic field environment. This report gives a description of the equipment used in drilling and testing; a narrative of the drilling operations; compiled daily drilling reports; cost information on the project; and a brief summary of engineering results related to equipment performance and energy potential. Detailed description of the scientific results will appear in publications by the USGS and other researchers.

  4. Geophysical well-log measurements in three drill holes at Salt Valley, Utah

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daniels, J.J.; Hite, R.J.; Scott, J.H.

    1980-01-01

    Three exploratory drill holes were drilled at Salt Valley, Utah, to study the geologic, physical, geochemical, and hydrologic properties of the evaporite sequence in the Permian Paradox Member of the Hermosa Formation. The results of these studies will be used to help to determine the suitability of salt deposits in the Paradox basin as a storage medium for radioactive waste material. The following geophysical well-log measurements were made in each of the three drill holes: (1) density, (2) neutron, (3) acoustic velocity, (4) normal resistivity, and (5) gamma ray. Widely spaced resistivity and conductivity well-log measurements were made in the deep drill hole. Each of these well-log measurements shows the division of the evaporite sequence into halite and interbed sections. At the present time the most useful well-logging measurements for determining the individual lithologies in an evaporite sequence are gamma ray, neutron, density, and acoustic velocity. The high resistivity contrast between the drilling fluid (0.5 ohm-m) and salt (10,000 ohm-m) makes it difficult to obtain quantitative measurements of electrical properties in an evaporite sequence. Tests of widely spaced electrode configurations show that the effects of the brine on the resistivity measurements can be reduced, and the depth of investigation increased, by increasing the source-receiver electrode spacing. Tests of a single-coil induction probe show good resolution of the contrasting electrical properties of the various interbed lithologies

  5. Numerical solution of the start-up of well drilling fluid flows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira, Gabriel Merhy de; Negrao, Cezar Otaviano Ribeiro; Franco, Admilson Teixeira [UTFPR - Federal University of Technology - Parana - Curitiba, PR (Brazil)], e-mails: gabrielm@utfpr.edu.br, negrao@utfpr.edu.br, admilson@utfpr.edu.br; Martins, Andre Leibsohn; Gandelman, Roni Abensur [TEP/CENPES - PETROBRAS S/A, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)], e-mails: aleibsohn@petrobras.com.br, roniag@petrobras.com.br

    2010-07-01

    The drilling fluid is designed to build up a gel-like structure, when at rest, in order to avoid cuttings to drop at the bore bottom and therefore to prevent the bit obstruction. As consequence, high pressures, which can be larger than the formation pressure and can damage the well, are needed to break up the gel when circulation resumes. Due to its thixotropic effect, the gel viscosity remains high for a while after the circulation restarts. The gelation may have significant importance, specially, in deep waters where high pressures and low temperatures take place. The current work presents a compressible transient flow model of the start-up flow of drilling fluids, in order to predict borehole pressures. The model comprises one-dimensional conservation equations of mass and momentum and one state equation for the calculation of the fluid density as a function of the pressure. The considered geometry is a concentric annular pipe of length L. Its internal diameter is D1 and external one, D2. For a circular pipe, the internal diameter is made equal to zero. The main difference from previous model was the type of boundary condition: Constant flow rate at the pipe inlet rather than the constant pressure. Both Newtonian and non-Newtonian Bingham fluid flows are considered. The governing equations are discretized by the Finite Volume Method using the fully implicit formulation and the first-order upwind scheme. The resulting non-linear algebraic equations are iteratively solved. The model results were corroborated with an analytical solution for Newtonian flows. Case studies are conducted to evaluate the effect of fluid flow properties, well geometry and flow rate on borehole pressures. For Bingham fluid flow one can observe that large pressures (compared with Newtonian fluid flow) are observed when constant flow rate are input as boundary condition. Pressure peaks caused by the acoustic wave propagation can be more intense in low compressible fluid flow, low viscosity

  6. Comments on some of the drilling and completion problems in Cerro Prieto geothermal wells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dominguez A, B.; Sanchez G, G.

    1981-01-01

    From 1960 to the present, 85 wells with a total drilling length exceeding 160,000 m have been constructed at Cerro Prieto, a modest figure compared to an oil field. This activity took place in five stages, each characterized by changes and modifications required by various drilling and well-completion problems. Initially, the technical procedures followed were similar to those used in the oil industry. However, several problems emerged as a result of the relatively high temperatures found in the geothermal reservoir. The various problems that have been encountered can be considered to be related to drilling fluids, cements and cementing operations, lithology, geothermal fluid characteristics, and casings and their accessories. As the importance of high temperatures and the characteristics of the geothermal reservoir fluids were better understood, the criteria were modified to optimize well-completion operations, and satisfactory results have been achieved to date.

  7. Asphalts tests using onshore drilling oil wells residues; Ensaios asfalticos utilizando residuos de perfuracao onshore

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lucena, Adriano Elisio de F.L.; Rodrigues, John Kennedy G.; Ferreira, Heber Carlos; Lucena, Leda Christiane de F.L. [Universidade Federal de Campina Grande (UFCG), PB (Brazil); Lucena, Luciana de F.L. [Faculdade de Ciencias Sociais Aplicada (FACISA), Campina Grande, PB (Brazil)

    2008-07-01

    The drilling cuttings are one of the residues produced by the oils industries in large amounts during the drilling of oil wells. An alternative of final disposal of the drilling cutting residue is its utilization in asphalt mixtures. Based on this alternative, it was realized chemical and granulometric analysis and tests (Marshall and indirect tensile strength), on the asphaltic mixture using the residue from the oil drilling wells (well: 1-POTI-4-RN, located at Governador DIX-Sept Rosado - RN - Brazil). The achieved results to Marshall test indicated that for the analyzed mixture, the ideal content of residue that can be incorporated to the asphaltic composition and attend at the DNIT-ES 31 (2006) is 5%. To the indirect tensile strength test, the results showed a strength value higher than the minimum limit requested by the DNIT (0,65 MPa). The achieved results indicated the possibility of the utilization of the drilling cuttings in asphaltic pavements as fine aggregate, obeying the percentage limits, as an alternative to the final disposal. (author)

  8. Phase 2 Reese River Geothermal Project Slim Well 56-4 Drilling and Testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henkle, William R.; Ronne, Joel

    2008-06-15

    This report covers the drilling and testing of the slim well 56-4 at the Reese River Geothermal Project in Lander County, Nevada. This well was partially funded through a GRED III Cooperative Funding Agreement # DE-FC36-04GO14344, from USDOE.

  9. Initial yield to depth relation for water wells drilled into crystalline bedrock - Pinardville quadrangle, New Hampshire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drew, L.J.; Schuenemeyer, J.H.; Amstrong, T.R.; Sutphin, D.M.

    2001-01-01

    A model is proposed to explain the statistical relations between the mean initial water well yields from eight time increments from 1984 to 1998 for wells drilled into the crystalline bedrock aquifer system in the Pinardville area of southern New Hampshire and the type of bedrock, mean well depth, and mean well elevation. Statistical analyses show that the mean total yield of drilling increments is positively correlated with mean total well depth and mean well elevation. In addition, the mean total well yield varies with rock type from a minimum of 46.9 L/min (12.4 gpm) in the Damon Pond granite to a maximum of 74.5 L/min (19.7 gpm) in the Permian pegmatite and granite unit. Across the eight drilling increments that comprise 211 wells each, the percentages of very low-yield wells (1.9 L/min [0.5 gpm] or less) and high-yield wells (151.4 L/min [40 gpm] or more) increased, and those of intermediate-yield wells decreased. As housing development progressed during the 1984 to 1998 interval, the mean depth of the wells and their elevations increased, and the mix of percentages of the bedrock types drilled changed markedly. The proposed model uses a feed-forward mechanism to explain the interaction between the increasing mean elevation, mean well depth, and percentages of very low-yielding wells and the mean well yield. The increasing percentages of very low-yielding wells through time and the economics of the housing market may control the system that forces the mean well depths, percentages of high-yield wells, and mean well yields to increase. The reason for the increasing percentages of very low-yield wells is uncertain, but the explanation is believed to involve the complex structural geology and tectonic history of the Pinardville quadrangle.

  10. A Review of the Evaluation, Control, and Application Technologies for Drill String Vibrations and Shocks in Oil and Gas Well

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guangjian Dong

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Drill string vibrations and shocks (V&S can limit the optimization of drilling performance, which is a key problem for trajectory optimizing, wellbore design, increasing drill tools life, rate of penetration, and intelligent drilling. The directional wells and other special trajectory drilling technologies are often used in deep water, deep well, hard rock, and brittle shale formations. In drilling these complex wells, the cost caused by V&S increases. According to past theories, indoor experiments, and field studies, the relations among ten kinds of V&S, which contain basic forms, response frequency, and amplitude, are summarized and discussed. Two evaluation methods are compared systematically, such as theoretical and measurement methods. Typical vibration measurement tools are investigated and discussed. The control technologies for drill string V&S are divided into passive control, active control, and semiactive control. Key methods for and critical equipment of three control types are compared. Based on the past development, a controlling program of drill string V&S is devised. Application technologies of the drill string V&S are discussed, such as improving the rate of penetration, controlling borehole trajectory, finding source of seismic while drilling, and reducing the friction of drill string. Related discussions and recommendations for evaluating, controlling, and applying the drill string V&S are made.

  11. Theoretical analysis of multiphase flow during oil-well drilling by a conservative model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolas-Lopez, Ruben

    2005-11-01

    In order to decrease cost and improve drilling operations is necessary a better understood of the flow mechanisms. Therefore, it was carried out a multiphase conservative model that includes three mass equations and a momentum equation. Also, the measured geothermal gradient is utilized by state equations for estimating physical properties of the phases flowing. The mathematical model is solved by numerical conservative schemes. It is used to analyze the interaction among solid-liquid-gas phases. The circulating system consists as follow, the circulating fluid is pumped downward into the drilling pipe until the bottom of the open hole then it flows through the drill bit, and at this point formation cuttings are incorporated to the circulating fluid and carried upward to the surface. The mixture returns up to the surface by an annular flow area. The real operational conditions are fed to conservative model and the results are matched up to field measurements in several oil wells. Mainly, flow rates, drilling rate, well and tool geometries are data to estimate the profiles of pressure, mixture density, equivalent circulating density, gas fraction and solid carrying capacity. Even though the problem is very complex, the model describes, properly, the hydrodynamics of drilling techniques applied at oil fields. *Authors want to thank to Instituto Mexicano del Petroleo and Petroleos Mexicanos for supporting this research.

  12. SMART MONITORING AND DECISION MAKING FOR REGULATING ANNULUS BOTTOM HOLE PRESSURE WHILE DRILLING OIL WELLS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. P. Vega

    Full Text Available Abstract Real time measurements and development of sensor technology are research issues associated with robustness and safety during oil well drilling operations, making feasible the diagnosis of problems and the development of a regulatory strategy. The major objective of this paper is to use an experimental plant and also field data, collected from a basin operation, offshore Brazil, for implementing smart monitoring and decision making, in order to assure drilling inside operational window, despite the commonly observed disturbances that produce fluctuations in the well annulus bottom hole pressure. Using real time measurements, the performance of a continuous automated drilling unit is analyzed under a scenario of varying levels of rate of penetration; aiming pressure set point tracking (inside the operational drilling window and also rejecting kick, a phenomenon that occurs when the annulus bottom hole pressure is inferior to the porous pressure, producing the migration of reservoir fluids into the annulus region. Finally, an empirical model was built, using real experimental data from offshore Brazil basins, enabling diagnosing and regulating a real drilling site by employing classic and advanced control strategies.

  13. Running casing on conventional wells with Casing Drilling {sup TM} technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warren, T.M.; Schneider, W.P.; Johns, R.P.; Zipse, K.D. [Tesco Corp., Calgary, AB (Canada)

    2004-07-01

    Casing Drilling{sup TM} is a newly developed and efficient well construction method that combines drilling and casing running processes into a single operation. This radical change to the entire well casing running process eliminates standard components and processes that are inefficient and hazardous. The commercialization of this new technology has resulted in the development of custom equipment and procedures designed to efficiently handle casings on a drilling rig, including conventionally drilled wells. The technology offers safer casing running operations and makes it possible to ream casing to the bottom. In addition, less people are needed to operate the portable Casing Drive System (CDS). One of the primary components of the system is the top drive which provides the power for rotation and torque. The CDS supports full axial and torsional load for running the casing. The well can be circulated while running the casing. The casing can be washed and reamed to the bottom whenever a tight hole is encountered. Thirty one operators have successfully used the CDS on more than 150 onshore and offshore wells in 7 countries. 13 refs., 2 tabs., 12 figs.

  14. USE OF DRILLING FLUIDS IN MONITORING WELL NETWORK INSTALLATION: LANL AND OPEN DISCUSSION

    Science.gov (United States)

    Personnel at the EPA Ground Water and Ecosystems Restoration Division (GWERD) were requested by EPA Region 6 to provide a technical analysis of the impacts of well drilling practices implemented at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) as part of the development of their grou...

  15. Drilling and operating oil, gas, and geothermal wells in an H/sub 2/S environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dosch, M.W.; Hodgson, S.F.

    1981-01-01

    The following subjects are covered: facts about hydrogen sulfides; drilling and operating oil, gas, and geothermal wells; detection devices and protective equipment; hazard levels and safety procedures; first aid; and H/sub 2/S in California oil, gas, and geothermal fields. (MHR)

  16. USE OF SLIMHOLE DRILLING TO REDUCE WELL COSTS 30-50%: ARNIM PROSPECT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    WM. Stanton McDonald; Christopher M. Long

    2002-06-13

    This report highlights the drilling of two shallow oil wells in Fayette County, Texas. The operator of these two wells was Stanton Mineral Development, Inc. The aim of this project was to successfully complete the two (2) wells, emphasizing tight oversight of the technological aspects, neglect of which are the primary causes of failure in this mature producing region as well as unnecessarily expensive wells. Discussions contained here within are not limited to just the execution of the project itself, but a historical and technical analysis which forms a basis for the decisions made both during drilling and completion. Additionally, there is substantial dialogue covering the financial benefits associated with the findings of this project.

  17. Planning, drilling and completing a record horizontal well in the Gulf of Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnston, R.A.; Porter, D.A.; Hill, P.L.; Smolen, B.C.

    1993-01-01

    Maximizing profits is the ultimate business objective in all drilling and completion operations. By far and away the biggest contributor to profits is the productivity of the well. Reliability and costs certainly impact profits; however, they pale in comparison to productivity when a rigorous calculation of net present value is performed. The simplest and most effective way to improve productivity is to increase the quantity of net reservoir exposed to the wellbore. A horizontal trajectory is the ultimate way to maximize the length of formation exposed to the wellbore. Drilling completion technology development over the last several years has made the use of horizontal wellbores in unconsolidated formations practical. Utilizing a unique mixture of new and existing technology, BP recently brought their first horizontal well in the Gulf of Mexico on line in record setting fashion. The planning, installation and results of this team effort are detailed in this operations oriented paper

  18. Modeling of Methane Migration in Shallow Aquifers from Shale Gas Well Drilling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Liwei; Soeder, Daniel J

    2016-05-01

    The vertical portion of a shale gas well, known as the "tophole" is often drilled using an air-hammer bit that may introduce pressures as high as 2400 kPa (350 psi) into groundwater while penetrating shallow aquifers. A 3-D TOUGH2 model was used to simulate the flow of groundwater under the high hydraulic heads that may be imposed by such trapped compressed air, based on an observed case in West Virginia (USA) in 2012. The model realizations show that high-pressure air trapped in aquifers may cause groundwater to surge away from the drill site at observable velocities. If dissolved methane is present within the aquifer, the methane can be entrained and transported to a maximum distance of 10.6 m per day. Results from this study suggest that one cause of the reported increase in methane concentrations in groundwater near shale gas production wells may be the transport of pre-existing methane via groundwater surges induced by air drilling, not necessarily direct natural gas leakage from the unconventional gas reservoir. The primary transport mechanisms are advective transport of dissolved methane with water flow, and diffusive transport of dissolved methane. © 2015, National Ground Water Association.

  19. Recovery of benthic megafauna from anthropogenic disturbance at a hydrocarbon drilling well (380 m depth in the Norwegian Sea).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gates, Andrew R; Jones, Daniel O B

    2012-01-01

    Recovery from disturbance in deep water is poorly understood, but as anthropogenic impacts increase in deeper water it is important to quantify the process. Exploratory hydrocarbon drilling causes physical disturbance, smothering the seabed near the well. Video transects obtained by remotely operated vehicles were used to assess the change in invertebrate megafaunal density and diversity caused by drilling a well at 380 m depth in the Norwegian Sea in 2006. Transects were carried out one day before drilling commenced and 27 days, 76 days, and three years later. A background survey, further from the well, was also carried out in 2009. Porifera (45% of observations) and Cnidaria (40%) dominated the megafauna. Porifera accounted for 94% of hard-substratum organisms and cnidarians (Pennatulacea) dominated on the soft sediment (78%). Twenty seven and 76 days after drilling commenced, drill cuttings were visible, extending over 100 m from the well. In this area there were low invertebrate megafaunal densities (0.08 and 0.10 individuals m(-2)) in comparison to pre-drill conditions (0.21 individuals m(-2)). Three years later the visible extent of the cuttings had reduced, reaching 60 m from the well. Within this area the megafaunal density (0.05 individuals m(-2)) was lower than pre-drill and reference transects (0.23 individuals m(-2)). There was a significant increase in total megafaunal invertebrate densities with both distance from drilling and time since drilling although no significant interaction. Beyond the visible disturbance there were similar megafaunal densities (0.14 individuals m(-2)) to pre-drilling and background surveys. Species richness, Shannon-Weiner diversity and multivariate techniques showed similar patterns to density. At this site the effects of exploratory drilling on megafaunal invertebrate density and diversity seem confined to the extent of the visible cuttings pile. However, elevated Barium concentration and reduced sediment grain size suggest

  20. Research Drilling on the Mid-Atlantic Ridge: IDDP Wells of Opportunity at Reykjanes, Iceland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fridleifsson, G. O.; Franzson, H.; Thorhallsson, S.; Elders, W. A.

    2005-12-01

    There are some 10 new geothermal wells at Reykjanes, in SW-Iceland, being considered by the Iceland Deep Drilling Project (IDDP) as potential candidate wells of opportunity to explore for deep (4-5 km) supercritical fluids. The drill field is located where the Mid-Atlantic Ridge emerges from the Atlantic ocean at the tip of the Reykjanes Peninsula. The site is an ideal locality for a combined study on the evolution of a rifted oceanic crust and an active black smoker-type geothermal system. However, the oceanic pillow basaltic crust at Reykjanes is some 2-3 times thicker than normal ocean floor crust, which undoubtedly relates to it being part of the Icelandic Large Igneous Province. The deepest of the geothermal wells at Reykjanes is Drillhole RN-17, that was completed to 3082 m depth in February 2005. It is currently the prime candidate for deepening by the IDDP. The plan is to deepen it to 4 km in 2006, and to 5 km depth in 2007, with funding coming from Icelandic energy companies (Hitaveita Sudurnesja, Landsvirkjun and Orkuveita Reykjavikur), the Government of Iceland, the International Scientific Continental Drilling Program (ICDP) and the US National Science Foundation (NSF). The well RN-17 was drilled as a conventional production well with a 12 ¼ inch drillbit to 3082 m depth, and left barefoot, with a 13 3/8 inch production casing cemented down to 900 m. It will be flow tested this autumn. If the RN-17 well is selected by the IDDP for deepening, a 9 5/8 inch in casing will be cemented to 3081 m and drilling will be continued with an 8 ½ inch tricone bit to 4 km in the autumn of 2006. The ICDP and NSF will fund spot coring for scientific studies in this depth interval and a second flow test would be performed in winter 2007. The following autumn, a 7 inch casing would be cemented to 4 km depth and then a 5 inch retrievable liner would be inserted to support a hybrid coring system to continuously core down to 5 km depth, retrieving HQ sized core. A third

  1. Methodology for kick tolerance calculation and well killing in deepwater drilling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yequan Jin

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Kick tolerance is a key parameter to indicate whether shut-in operation can be carried out safely and a proper well killing method should be chosen in well drilling. At present, however, the calculation of kick tolerance in deepwater drilling is not efficient enough. In this paper, a calculation method for volume kick tolerance of deepwater drilling was developed by means of theoretical derivation and example verification. Based on deepwater borehole temperature profile, choke manifold and annulus circulating pressure loss, the calculation model of volume kick tolerance was established under the constraint of the pressure-bearing capacity of the formation at the casing shoe, resistance to internal pressure of casing, blowout preventer (BOP and choke control. Then, its reliability was verified by using the calculation results of a deepwater well in the South China Sea. It is indicated that the well can be shut in safely and the well killing will be safer if the Engineer's Method is used. The result is in agreement with the measures that were adopted on site. Finally, the newly developed calculation model was compared with those which don't take temperature and pressure loss into account, and the effect of choke manifold, annulus pressure loss and temperature inside wellbore on kick tolerance was analyzed. It is shown that the volume kick tolerance will get smaller if the effect of pressure loss and temperature is not taken into account, and the well killing conditions will be more rigorous. In addition, the technical measures to increase kick tolerance were proposed after the influential laws of pit gain and overflow depth on kick tolerance were analyzed.

  2. DEVELOPMENT OF GLASS AND GLASS CERAMIC PROPPANTS FROM GAS SHALE WELL DRILL CUTTINGS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, F.; Fox, K.

    2013-10-02

    The objective of this study was to develop a method of converting drill cuttings from gas shale wells into high strength proppants via flame spheroidization and devitrification processing. Conversion of drill cuttings to spherical particles was only possible for small particle sizes (< 53 {micro}m) using a flame former after a homogenizing melting step. This size limitation is likely to be impractical for application as conventional proppants due to particle packing characteristics. In an attempt to overcome the particle size limitation, sodium and calcium were added to the drill cuttings to act as fluxes during the spheroidization process. However, the flame former remained unable to form spheres from the fluxed material at the relatively large diameters (0.5 - 2 mm) targeted for proppants. For future work, the flame former could be modified to operate at higher temperature or longer residence time in order to produce larger, spherical materials. Post spheroidization heat treatments should be investigated to tailor the final phase assemblage for high strength and sufficient chemical durability.

  3. Environmental corrections of a dual-induction logging while drilling tool in vertical wells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Zhengming; Ke, Shizhen; Jiang, Ming; Yin, Chengfang; Li, Anzong; Li, Junjian

    2018-04-01

    With the development of Logging While Drilling (LWD) technology, dual-induction LWD logging is not only widely applied in deviated wells and horizontal wells, but it is used commonly in vertical wells. Accordingly, it is necessary to simulate the response of LWD tools in vertical wells for logging interpretation. In this paper, the investigation characteristics, the effects of the tool structure, skin effect and drilling environment of a dual-induction LWD tool are simulated by the three-dimensional (3D) finite element method (FEM). In order to closely simulate the actual situation, real structure of the tool is taking into account. The results demonstrate that the influence of the background value of the tool structure can be eliminated. The values of deducting the background of a tool structure and analytical solution have a quantitative agreement in homogeneous formations. The effect of measurement frequency could be effectively eliminated by chart of skin effect correction. In addition, the measurement environment, borehole size, mud resistivity, shoulder bed, layer thickness and invasion, have an effect on the true resistivity. To eliminate these effects, borehole correction charts, shoulder bed correction charts and tornado charts are computed based on real tool structure. Based on correction charts, well logging data can be corrected automatically by a suitable interpolation method, which is convenient and fast. Verified with actual logging data in vertical wells, this method could obtain the true resistivity of formation.

  4. Key technologies for well drilling and completion in ultra-deep sour gas reservoirs, Yuanba Gasfield, Sichuan Basin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiaxiang Xia

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The Yuanba Gasfield is a large gas field discovered by Sinopec in the Sichuan Basin in recent years, and another main exploration area for natural gas reserves and production increase after the Puguang Gasfield. The ultra-deep sour gas reservoir in the Yuanba Gasfield is characterized by complicated geologic structure, deep reservoirs and complex drilled formation, especially in the continental deep strata which are highly abrasive with low ROP (rate of penetration and long drilling period. After many years of drilling practice and technical research, the following six key drilling and completion technologies for this type reservoir are established by introducing new tools and technologies, developing specialized drill bits and optimizing drilling design. They are: casing program optimization technology for ROP increasing and safe well completion; gas drilling technology for shallow continental strata and high-efficiency drilling technology for deep high-abrasion continental strata; drilling fluid support technologies of gas–liquid conversion, ultra-deep highly-deviated wells and horizontal-well lubrication and drag reduction, hole stability control and sour gas contamination prevention; well cementing technologies for gas medium, deep-well long cementing intervals and ultra-high pressure small space; horizontal-well trajectory control technologies for measuring instrument, downhole motor optimization and bottom hole assembly design; and liner completion modes and completion string optimization technologies suitable for this gas reservoir. Field application shows that these key technologies are contributive to ROP increase and efficiency improvement of 7000 m deep horizontal wells and to significant operational cycle shortening.

  5. Rational ore deposit drilling pattern with construction of cluster pumping wells in the artesian flow conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matunov, A.; Pershin, M.

    2014-01-01

    Drilling pattern and quantity of technological (injection and production) wells in the uranium in-situ leaching is determined by the projection of ore deposit to the daylight surface, structure and hydrogeological characteristics of ore-bearing deposits and given well field productivity. The difference between the structure of production and injection wells lies in that the upper part of production well has a submersible pump which, compared to injection wells, requires installation in its the upper part of the casing string with larger diameter pipes to allow for the pump installation. As a result, the production wells can be operated in pumping and injection mode and injection wells only in injection mode. The essence of the new scheme is as follows: • All wells on the block are constructed as injection wells, i.e. without a larger diameter pipe being installed in the upper part of the string. • The wells selected for operation as production wells, are leak-proof connected with “cluster” pumping wells by plastic pipelines. • “Cluster” pumping wells up to 100 m deep equipped with dead-end string with no screen are constructed near the power sources. Submersible pumps are installed in such wells with the total capacity to be determined by the design flow rate of the block and to ensure the steady, directional flow from injection to production wells. The minimum number of such ''cluster'' pumping wells is one per a well field, which well can be piped to up to seven wells designed for production. As a result, the expenses on procurement of cable products and submersible pumps are reduced and funds for well drilling and their piping are saved. The proposed scheme of well field development used under the artesian flow conditions allows not only for the cost reduction on operating block piping but also for the use of injection wells as production wells at different stages of block development by selecting any necessary combinations of

  6. Analysis on the nitrogen drilling accident of Well Qionglai 1 (I: Major inducement events of the accident

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yingfeng Meng

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Nitrogen drilling in poor tight gas sandstone should be safe because of very low gas production. But a serious accident of fire blowout occurred during nitrogen drilling of Well Qionglai 1. This is the first nitrogen drilling accident in China, which was beyond people's knowledge about the safety of nitrogen drilling and brought negative effects on the development of gas drilling technology still in start-up phase and resulted in dramatic reduction in application of gas drilling. In order to form a correct understanding, the accident was systematically analyzed, the major events resulting in this accident were inferred. It is discovered for the first time that violent ejection of rock clasts and natural gas occurred due to the sudden burst of downhole rock when the fractured tight gas zone was penetrated during nitrogen drilling, which has been named as “rock burst and blowout by gas bomb”, short for “rock burst”. Then all the induced events related to the rock burst are as following: upthrust force on drilling string from rock burst, bridging-off formed and destructed repeatedly at bit and centralizer, and so on. However, the most direct important event of the accident turns out to be the blockage in the blooie pipe from rock burst clasts and the resulted high pressure at the wellhead. The high pressure at the wellhead causes the blooie pipe to crack and trigged blowout and deflagration of natural gas, which is the direct presentation of the accident.

  7. Determination of natural radioactivity in irrigation water of drilled wells in northwestern Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkhomashi, N; Al-Hamarneh, Ibrahim F; Almasoud, Fahad I

    2016-02-01

    The levels of natural radiation in bedrock groundwater extracted from drilled wells in selected farms in the northwestern part of Saudi Arabia were addressed. The investigated waters form a source of irrigation for vegetables, agricultural crops, wheat, and alfalfa to feed livestock consumed by the general public. Information about water radioactivity in this area is not available yet. Therefore, this study strives to contribute to the quality assessment of the groundwater of these wells that are drilled into the non-renewable Saq sandstone aquifer. Hence, gross alpha and beta activities as well as the concentrations of (224)Ra, (226)Ra, (228)Ra, (234)U, (238)U, and U(total) were measured, compared to national and international limits and contrasted with data quoted from the literature. Correlations between the activities of the analyzed radionuclides were discussed. The concentrations of gross alpha and beta activities as well as (228)Ra were identified by liquid scintillation counting whereas alpha spectrometry was used to determine (224)Ra, (226)Ra, (234)U and (238)U after separation from the matrix by extraction chromatography. The mean activity concentrations of gross α and β were 3.15 ± 0.26 Bq L(-1) and 5.39 ± 0.44 Bq L(-1), respectively. Radium isotopes ((228)Ra and (226)Ra) showed mean concentrations of 3.16 ± 0.17 Bq L(-1) and 1.12 ± 0.07 Bq L(-1), respectively, whereas lower levels of uranium isotopes ((234)U and (238)U) were obtained. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Drilling, construction, caliper-log, and specific-conductance data for well 3-3604-01, Kawailoa deep monitor well, Oahu, Hawaii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presley, T.K.; Oki, D.S.

    1996-01-01

    The Kawailoa deep monitor well (State well number 3-3604-01) was drilled about 1.9 miles east- northeast of the town of Haleiwa. The well is on agricultural land in the Kawailoa ground-water area. The well penetrates through the freshwater lens and into the freshwater-saltwater transition zone to an elevation of -392 feet below mean sea level. Well-construction data, logs of drilling notes, geologic descriptions for the samples, specific-conductance and caliper-log data are presented for the well. The well is one of 12 exploratory wells drilled in the north-central Oahu area between July 1993 and May 1994 in cooperation with the Honolulu Board of Water Supply.

  9. Drilling, construction, caliper-log, and specific-conductance data for well 3-3406-12, Twin Bridge Road deep monitor well, Oahu, Hawaii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presley, T.K.; Oki, D.S.

    1996-01-01

    The Twin Bridge Road deep monitor well (State well number 3-3406-12) was drilled about 2,000 feet northeast of Weed Circle in the town of Haleiwa. The well is on agricultural land. The well penetrates through the freshwater lens and into the freshwater-saltwater transition zone of the Waialua ground-water area to an elevation of -596 feet below mean sea level. Well-construction data, logs of drilling notes, geologic descriptions for the samples, caliper-log, and specific-conductance data are presented for the well. The well is one of 12 exploratory wells drilled in the north- central Oahu area between July 1993 and May 1994 in cooperation with the Honolulu Board of Water Supply.

  10. Recovery of benthic megafauna from anthropogenic disturbance at a hydrocarbon drilling well (380 m depth in the Norwegian Sea.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew R Gates

    Full Text Available Recovery from disturbance in deep water is poorly understood, but as anthropogenic impacts increase in deeper water it is important to quantify the process. Exploratory hydrocarbon drilling causes physical disturbance, smothering the seabed near the well. Video transects obtained by remotely operated vehicles were used to assess the change in invertebrate megafaunal density and diversity caused by drilling a well at 380 m depth in the Norwegian Sea in 2006. Transects were carried out one day before drilling commenced and 27 days, 76 days, and three years later. A background survey, further from the well, was also carried out in 2009. Porifera (45% of observations and Cnidaria (40% dominated the megafauna. Porifera accounted for 94% of hard-substratum organisms and cnidarians (Pennatulacea dominated on the soft sediment (78%. Twenty seven and 76 days after drilling commenced, drill cuttings were visible, extending over 100 m from the well. In this area there were low invertebrate megafaunal densities (0.08 and 0.10 individuals m(-2 in comparison to pre-drill conditions (0.21 individuals m(-2. Three years later the visible extent of the cuttings had reduced, reaching 60 m from the well. Within this area the megafaunal density (0.05 individuals m(-2 was lower than pre-drill and reference transects (0.23 individuals m(-2. There was a significant increase in total megafaunal invertebrate densities with both distance from drilling and time since drilling although no significant interaction. Beyond the visible disturbance there were similar megafaunal densities (0.14 individuals m(-2 to pre-drilling and background surveys. Species richness, Shannon-Weiner diversity and multivariate techniques showed similar patterns to density. At this site the effects of exploratory drilling on megafaunal invertebrate density and diversity seem confined to the extent of the visible cuttings pile. However, elevated Barium concentration and reduced sediment grain size

  11. Uranium theoretical speciation for drinking water from private drilled wells in Sweden – Implications for choice of removal method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Norrström, Ann Catrine; Löv, Åsa

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Neutral charge uranium complexes dominated in the pH range 6.7–7.8. • The Ca concentration influence which calcium-UO 2 carbonate complexes was formed. • In the acidic pH range several different U complexes can comprise a large fraction of total complexes. • It is crucial to include all relevant chemical compounds in the model. • Before removal method is selected, some crucial parameters should be measured. - Abstract: Elevated concentrations of uranium (U) from natural sources have been measured in drinking water from private drilled wells in Sweden and many other countries world-wide. Although U is a radioactive element, radioactivity is not the main concern, but rather chemical toxicity, e.g. kidney damage. Uranium chemistry is complex and U in water has a very high tendency to form complexes with other compounds. Since speciation is crucial for the properties of U, and therefore the removal efficiency, this study determined theoretical U species in drinking water from private drilled wells using the geochemical model Visual MINTEQ. The drinking water samples used in modelling were from two datasets: (1) 76 water samples selected from a previous survey of 722 wells; and (2) samples of drinking water from 21 private wells sampled in May 2013. The results showed that neutrally charged U complexes dominated in the pH range 6.7–7.8, which is common in private drilled wells. This has important implications for removal method, since charge is an important factor for U removal efficiency. In the alkaline pH range, one of two calcium-UO 2 carbonate complexes dominated and calcium (Ca) concentration proved to be a key factor determining the Ca-UO 2 carbonate complex formed: the neutral Ca 2 UO 2 (CO 3 ) 3 0 (aq) or the negative CaUO 2 (CO 3 ) 3 2− . Complexes with organic carbon (C) varied greatly in the acidic range, indicating that it is crucial to measure organic C content in the water since it is critical for the dissolved organic matter

  12. A Proposal for Research and Development of an Explosive Drilling Technique for Geothermal Wells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1975-10-01

    In order to make large scale use of the geothermal energy available it will be necessary to drill many thousands of holes deep into the earth. The objective of the proposed research is to greatly decrease drilling time and cost. Studies made of a new explosive drilling technique indicate that savings in time of from 70 to 80 percent. The research plan is to utilize explosive in the form of multiple-faced shaped charge capsules. [DJE-2005

  13. Drilling, construction, and caliper-log data for wells 3-3406-14 and -15, Helemano exploratory wells I and II, Oahu, Hawaii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presley, T.K.; Oki, D.S.

    1996-01-01

    The Helemano exploratory wells I and II (State well numbers 3-3406-14 and -15) were drilled near Weed Circle, about 3,000 feet south of the town of Haleiwa. The wells are located on agricultural land in the Waialua ground-water area. The wells penetrate through sedimentary deposits (caprock) and into a basalt aquifer. Both wells have short open intervals cased with well screen at the bottom of the hole, and are cased and sealed through the caprock and basalt to the well screen. The shallow well, Helemano exploratory well I, penetrates about 10 feet into the basalt aquifer below the contact of the caprock and basalt. The deep well, Helemano exploratory well II, penetrates about 210 feet into the basalt aquifer. The deep well has a 20-foot open interval at the bottom. Well construction data, logs of drilling notes, geologic descriptions for drill samples, and caliper-log data are presented for the wells. The wells are two of twelve exploratory wells drilled in the north-central Oahu area between July 1993 and May 1994 in cooperation with the Honolulu Board of Water Supply.

  14. Casing drilling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heenan, D. [Tesco Corp., Calgary, AB (Canada)

    2003-07-01

    This paper reviewed the experience that Tesco has gained by drilling several wells using only casings as the drill stem. Tesco has manufactured a mobile and compact hydraulic drilling rig called the Casing Drilling {sup TM} system. The system could be very effective and efficient for exploration and development of coalbed methane (CBM) reserves which typically require extensive coring. Continuous coring while drilling ahead, along wire line retrieval, can offer time savings and quick core recovery of large diameter core which is typically required for exploration core desorption tests. The proposed system may also have the potential to core or drill typically tight gas sands or underbalanced wells with air or foam. This would reduce drilling fluid damage while simultaneously finding gas. Compared to conventional drill pipes, Casing Drilling {sup TM} could also be effective with water production from shallow sands because of the smaller annual clearance which requires less air volumes to lift any produced water. 9 figs.

  15. Identification of carbonate reservoirs based on well logging data for boreholes drilled using oil base muds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdukhalikov, Ya.N; Serebrennikov, V.S.

    1979-01-01

    Experiment on carbonate reservoir identification according to well logging data for boreholes drilled using oil base muds is described. Pulse neutron-neutron logging (PNNL) was widely used at the territory of Pripyat' hole to solve the task. To evaluate volumetric clayiness of carbonate rocks the dependence of gamma-logging, that is data of gamma-logging against clayey rocks built for every hollow, is used. Quantitative estimation of clayiness of dense and clayey carbonate rocks-non-reservoirs is carried out on the basis of the data of neutron-gamma and acoustic logging. Porosity coefficient and lithological characteristic of rocks are also determined according to the data of acoustic and neutron gamma-logging

  16. Origin of a rhyolite that intruded a geothermal well while drilling at the Krafla volcano, Iceland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elders, W.A.; Fridleifsson, G.O.; Zierenberg, R.A.; Pope, E.C.; Mortensen, A.K.; Gudmundsson, A.; Lowenstern, J. B.; Marks, N.E.; Owens, L.; Bird, D.K.; Reed, M.; Olsen, N.J.; Schiffman, P.

    2011-01-01

    Magma flowed into an exploratory geothermal well at 2.1 km depth being drilled in the Krafla central volcano in Iceland, creating a unique opportunity to study rhyolite magma in situ in a basaltic environment. The quenched magma is a partly vesicular, sparsely phyric, glass containing ~1.8% of dissolved volatiles. Based on calculated H2O-CO2 saturation pressures, it degassed at a pressure intermediate between hydrostatic and lithostatic, and geothermometry indicates that the crystals in the melt formed at ~900 ??C. The glass shows no signs of hydrothermal alteration, but its hydrogen and oxygen isotopic ratios are much lower than those of typical mantle-derived magmas, indicating that this rhyolite originated by anhydrous mantle-derived magma assimilating partially melted hydrothermally altered basalts. ?? 2011 Geological Society of America.

  17. Real time, real fast : drilling horizontal wells in a heavy oil environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balke, S.C.; Rosauer, M.S. [Petrolera Ameriven/Phillips Petroleum, Caracas, (Venezuela)

    2002-07-01

    Eastern Venezuela's Orinoco Tar Belt or the Faja Petrolifera del Orinoco is one of the largest heavy oil fields in the world, containing more than 1.2 trillion barrels of heavy and extra heavy oil with API gravity of 10 to 6. The field is 320 miles long by 40 miles wide and is divided into the Machete, Zuata, Hamaca and Cerro Negro. It has been under production since the 1970s by Venezuela's national oil company, Petroleos de Venezuela SA. The region is only marginally cost effective because of the high costs associated with development. It is expected that the Hamaca Project, which is centrally located in the Orinoco Tar Belt can be effectively and economically developed by applying the latest technology and innovative techniques. Petrolera Ameriven has committed to develop the 250 square mile Hamaca area. The objective is to produce 165,000 acres at rate of 190,000 BOPD for the life of the project. The challenge is that when the oil is cooled and degasified it looks more like a tar or asphalt for paving roads. In addition, the major reservoirs within the field were deposited in low stand and transgressive system tracks consisting of meandering fluvial to fluvial-tidal deltaic deposits. Methods such as logging while drilling (LWD), satellite links and continuous updating and real-time visualization were applied to assess and mitigate risks. These methods made it possible to accurately place the shoe of the build sections for control of well directions. The methods also made it possible to identify sand/shale interfaces, determine the redirection of the drill bit, locate non-pay zones and help plan well paths to optimize production. The technologies developed were also effective in minimizing development costs, thereby improving the financial viability of the project. 1 ref., 16 figs.

  18. Bottom hole pressure control during oil well drilling; Controle da pressao de fundo durante a perfuracao de pocos de petroleo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Domiciano, Marcia Peixoto Vega; Araujo, Nathalia Ferreira de; Vieira, Frederico Ribeiro Belfort; Freitas, Marcela Galdino de [Universidade Federal Rural do Rio de Janeiro (UFRRJ). Instituto de Tecnologia. Departamento de Engenharia Quimica (Brazil)], e-mail: vega@ufrrj.br; Gandelman, Roni Abensur; Folsta, Mauricio Gimenes [Centro de Pesquisas da Petrobras (CENPES). Gerencia de Interacao Rocha-Fluido (Brazil)], e-mails: roniag@petrobras.com, folsta@petrobras.com.br

    2009-12-15

    In a conventional oil well drilling task, the pore pressure (minimum limit) and the fracture pressure (maximum limit) define the mud density range. During oil well drilling, several disturbances affect bottom hole pressure; for example, as the well depth increases, the bottom hole pressure varies with the growing hydrostatic pressure levels. In addition, the pipe connection procedure, performed at regular time intervals, stopping the drill rotation and mud injection, mounting a new pipe segment, restarting the drill fluid pump and rotation, causes severe fluctuations in well fluid flows, changing well pressure. The objective being sought is to operate within desired pressure levels yet simultaneously maximizing the penetration rate, which reduces costs, as some oil rig operation can demand more than U$500.000/day. In this scenario, modeling, optimization and control techniques are important tools for narrow operational windows, commonly encountered in deep water and pre-salt layer environments. This study developed a non linear mathematical model (gas-liquid-solid), representing an oil well drilling system, based on mass and momentum balances, to implement classic control (PI), using the mud pump flow rate as a manipulated variable, to control the annulus bottom hole pressure. An experimental unit was built to represent the control.

  19. Probabilistic risk analysis of casing drilling operation for an onshore Brazilian well; Analise probabilistica de risco de uma operacao de casing drilling para um poco terrestre no Brasil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacinto, Carlos M.C.; Petersen, Flavia C.; Placido, Joao C.R. [PETROBRAS, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Garcia, Pauli A.A. [Universidade Federal Fluminense (UFF), Niteroi, RJ (Brazil)

    2008-07-01

    In the present paper, one presents an approach to hazard identification and risks quantification concerning the use of retrievable BHA, of a casing drilling system, in 12 1/4 phase of an onshore well. The adopted approach can be subdivided as: execution of a hazard and operability study; prioritization of critical deviance; modeling of critical deviance by mean of event sequence diagram, fault tree and Bayesian network; modeling and simulation of a dynamic decision tree and experts' opinion analysis. As results, one has obtained: the time distribution to achieve the different ends modeled in the decision tree, i.e., sidetrack, or operation canceling, or success; the probabilities to achieve each modeled end and all recommendation to improve the success probability. The approach proved to be efficient in order that it presents significant results to support the decisions involving the casing drilling operations. (author)

  20. Multilateral wells drilling technology implementation in the Castilla Field - Colombia, to improve Guadalupe reservoirs drainage: Castilla 32, 33, and 34 ML wells cases study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Florez, Alberto; Mercado, Orlando; Rodriguez, Sandra; Rojas, Ricardo; Naranjo, Carlos A. [ECOPETROL, Bogota (Colombia); Velez, Jorge [Halliburton Latin-America, Santa Fe de Bogota (Colombia)

    2008-07-01

    National Colombian Petroleum Company - ECOPETROL, is in the process of evaluating different technologies to increase production and improve recovery factors in their mature oil and gas fields. As part of that process, a multidisciplinary team evaluated the feasibility of multilateral well technology implementation in some of their mature fields that are currently in the late-development phase. Castilla field, located in the eastern planes of Colombia, was selected as the first option for multilateral technology implementation based in reservoir features, type of oil, and field antecedents. This paper presents the process used to conceptualize the optimum multilateral well design for Castilla field, integrating all of the geological and engineering disciplines. Geology: geological model visualization, target zones definition, pay zones lateral continuity, petrophysical properties, and fluids distribution were evaluated to select the areas to drill with advanced architecture well design. Reservoir: basic reservoir performance simulation was performed to evaluate productivity with horizontal and multilateral wells, and the difference in final reserves recovery compared with current conventional directional wells. Water production and coning problems were identified as key factors to define the multilateral well implementation in this field. Drilling: trajectory design, multilateral junction depth definition and TAML level selection, casing point's definition, drilling time and AFE estimation were the technical aspects evaluated during the planning phase to determine if the technology would be feasible. A comparison with conventional pad design was conducted to validate economic value. Multilateral TAML level 4 system selection flow process is presented applying oil industry best practices. Completion: The optimum lateral completion and production assembly design were main concerns during the planning process. Slotted liners, screens, and open-hole completion

  1. Application of fine managed pressure drilling technique in complex wells with both blowout and lost circulation risks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ling Yan

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Fractured carbonate reservoirs are susceptible to blowout and lost circulation during drilling, which not only restricts drilling speed, but also poses big threat to well control. Moreover, there are few technical means available to reconstruct pressure balance in the borehole. Accordingly, the fine managed pressure drilling was used in the drilling of Well GS19 in the Qixia Formation with super-high pressure and narrow density window, which is a success: ① back pressure in the annular spaces will be adjusted to maintain a slightly over-balanced bottom-hole hydraulic pressure, and fluid level in the circulation tank will be kept in a slight dropping state to ensure that natural gas in the formation would not invade into the borehole in a massive volume; ② inlet drilling fluid density will be controlled at around 2.35 g/cm3, back pressures in the annular be maintained at 2–5 MPa, and bottom-hole pressure equivalent circulation density be controlled at 2.46–2.52 g/cm3; ③ during managed pressure drilling operations, if wellhead pressure exceeds or expects to exceed 7 MPa, semi-blind rams will be closed. Fluids will pass through the choke manifold of the rig to the choke manifold specifically for pressure control before entering gas/liquid separators to discharge gas; ④ during tripping back pressure will be kept at less than 5 MPa, volume of injected drilling fluid will be higher than the theoretical volume during tripping out, whereas the volume of returned drilling fluid will be higher than the theoretical volume during the out-tripping. This technique has been applied successfully in the drilling of the Qixia Formation, Liangshan Formation and Longmaxi Formation with a total footage of 216.60 m, as a good attempt in complicated wells with both blowout and lost circulation risks, which can provide valuable experiences and guidance for handling similar complexities in the future.

  2. Selection of area and specific site for drilling a horizontal well in Calhoun County, West Virginia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reeves, T.K.; Overbey, W.K. Jr.; Salamy, S.P.; Locke, C.D.

    1992-03-01

    This report discusses the data collection and analysis procedures used to establish criteria for geologic and engineering studies conducted by BDM to select a general area for more detailed study and a specific site for the drilling of a cooperative well with an industry partner, the Consolidated Natural Gas Development Company (CNGD). The results of detailed geologic studies are presented for two areas in Calhoun County, West Virginia, and one area along the Logan-Boone County line in West Virginia. The effects of Appalachian Basin tectonics and the Rome Trough Rift system were identified on seismic lines made available by (CNGD). These helped to identify and define the trapping mechanisms which had been effective in each area. Engineering analyses of past production histories provided data to support selection of target areas and then to select a specific site that met the project requirements for production, reservoir pressure, and risk. A final site was selected in Lee District at the southwestern margin of the Sand Ridge gas field based on the combination of a geologic trapping mechanism and reservoir pressures which were projected as 580 psi with a stress ratio of 0.53.

  3. Evaluation of Rehabilitation Efficiency of Clogged wells drilled in fractured bedrock and alluvium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, C.; Hamm, S.; Lee, J.; Ok, S.; Han, S.; Choo, C.; Kim, M.

    2011-12-01

    In Korea, more than one million of groundwater wells have been developed since 1990s. However, the groundwater wells have not been properly managed. Moreover, the importance of well maintenance and well rehabilitation has not been well recognized. In this circumstance, groundwater wells are usually terminated in 20-year operation due to well clogging, groundwater pollution, land use change, etc. which are originated from physical, chemical, biological, and artificial changes of and around the wells. The clogged state of the wells with diminished amount down to 80-85% can be ameliorated by various rehabilitation techniques as increasing discharge amount as well as extending the durability of the wells. In European countries and the USA, rehabilitation techniques of the clogged wells have been developed with understanding the cause and prevention of well bore clogging since 1990s. In recent years, the Korean Ministry of Environment (KME) recognized the importance of well rehabilitation. Under the support of the KME, this study evaluated the efficieny of rehabilitation using air surging, high-pressure water injection, brush & air surging, and explosive charge methods as applying to seven wells installed in fractured granite of Mt. Geumjeong and one well drilled in alluvial deposit of the Jeungsan-Ri area, Gyeongnam Province in the southeastern part of Korea. Hydraulic conductivity was estimated by using slug and pumping tests before and after well rehabilitation in order to assess physical, chemical, and biological changes of the wells. Hydraulic conductivity and pumping capacity of fractured bedrock are closely related to fracture characteristics such as fracture aperture, frequency, length, orientation, dip angle, interconnectivity, plane features, and filling materials. The evolution of clogging and filling of materials on and around the well makes decrease hydraulic conductivity and pumping capacity of the well. In this study, in addition of hydraulic conductivity

  4. Fiscal 1997 survey report. Survey on the innovative well drilling technology; 1997 nendo chosa hokokusho. Kakushinteki kosei kussaku gijutsu ni kansuru chosa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-03-01

    In the geothermal drilling, reduction of the cost of well drilling is an important subject for technical development. The geothermal resource development tends to be made at higher temperatures and at deeper wells. In the present drilling technology, the cost is rising with the exponentially increasing depth and temperature, and there is also occurring the technical limit. Accordingly, the survey clarified the limit of the present drilling technology/cost to point out the research trend of the drilling technology as substitute for the present one, possibilities of the introduction, and the R and D target and subjects. As to latest drilling systems abroad and in Japan, the following were surveyed to study and extract promising technologies and systems: improvement/application of drilling equipment/materials (enhancement of heat resistance of the main drilling equipment, etc., cooling effects of top drive, heat resistance verification of MWD tools, PDM, tricone bits, multi-stage cementing tools, etc.), heightening of drilling rates, trend surveys of slim hole drilling, control drilling, well maintenance/workover, and well design technology. 68 refs., 73 figs., 40 tabs.

  5. Better well control through safe drilling margin identification, influx analysis and direct bottom hole pressure control method for deep water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veeningen, Daan [National Oilwell Varco IntelliServ (NOV), Houston, TX (United States)

    2012-07-01

    Currently, well control events are almost exclusively detected by using surface measurements. Measuring a volume increase in the 'closed loop' mud circulation system; a standpipe pressure decrease; or changes in a variety of drilling parameters provide indicators of a kick. Especially in deep water, where the riser comprises a substantial section of the well bore, early kick detection is paramount for limiting the severity of a well bore influx and improve the ability to regain well control. While downhole data is presently available from downhole tools nearby the bit, available data rates are sparse as mud pulse telemetry bandwidth is limited and well bore measurements compete with transmission of other subsurface data. Further, data transfer is one-directional, latency is significant and conditions along the string are unknown. High-bandwidth downhole data transmission system, via a wired or networked drill string system, has the unique capability to acquire real-time pressure and temperature measurement at a number of locations along the drill string. This system provides high-resolution downhole data available at very high speed, eliminating latency and restrictions that typically limit the availability of downhole data. The paper describes well control opportunities for deep water operations through the use of downhole data independent from surface measurements. First, the networked drill string provides efficient ways to identify pore pressure, fracture gradient, and true mud weight that comprise the safe drilling margin. Second, the independent measurement capability provides early kick detection and improved ability to analyze an influx even with a heterogeneous mud column through distributed along-string annular pressure measurements. Third, a methodology is proposed for a direct measurement method using downhole real-time pressure for maintaining constant bottom hole pressure during well kills in deep water. (author)

  6. Water and clay based drilling fluids for oil wells; Fluidos hidroargilosos para perfuracao de pocos de petroleo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Medeiros, R.C.A. de; Amorim, L.V.; Santana, L.N. de L. [Universidade Federal de Campina Grande (UFCG), PB (Brazil)], e-mail: nalealves@hotmail.com

    2008-07-01

    In the onshore drilling of wells are commonly used aqueous fluids containing bentonite clays. However, to perform their functions generally there is the necessity of additives to drilling fluids, like viscositying, filtered reducer and lubricant. Thus, this work aims to develop water and clay base drilling fluids with low solid text, and with polymeric and lubricants additives. Were studied a sample of industrialized sodium bentonite clays, three polymeric compounds in the ternary form and a sample of lubricant, in different concentrations. Were determined the flow curves, the apparent and plastic viscosities, the yield limit and gel force in Fann 35A viscometer, the filtered volume in API filter-press and the lubricity coefficient in Ofite lubricimeter. The results showed that the fluid had pseudoplastic behavior, the polymeric additives adjusts their rheological properties and filtration and the addition of 1% of lubricant is sufficient to improve the lubricity of fluids. (author)

  7. Drilling fluids and lost circulation in hot-dry-rock geothermal wells at Fenton Hill

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nuckols, E.B.; Miles, D.; Laney, R.; Polk, G.; Friddle, H.; Simpson, G.

    1981-01-01

    Geothermal hot dry rock drilling at Fenton Hill in northern New Mexico encountered problems of catastrophic lost circulation in cavernous areas of limestones in the Sandia Formation, severe corrosion due to temperatures of up to 320/sup 0/C, and torque problems caused by 35/sup 0/ hole angle and the abrasiveness of Precambrian crystalline rock. The use of polymeric flocculated bentonite fluid, clear water, fibrous material, dry drilling, oxygen scavengers, a biodegradable lubricant mixture of modified triglicerides and alcohol, and maintenance of a high pH, were some of the approaches taken toward solving these problems.

  8. Geohydrologic and drill-hole data for test well USW H-4, Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitfield, M.S.; Thordarson, William; Eshom, E.P.

    1984-01-01

    Data are presented on drilling operations, lithology, geophysical well logs, sidewall-core samples, water-level monitoring, pumping tests, injection tests, radioactive-tracer borehole flow survey, and water chemistry for test well USW H-4. The well is one of a series of test wells drilled in the southwestern part of the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Energy. These test wells are part of the Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations to identify sites for storage of high-level radioactive wastes. Test well USW H-4 was drilled in ash-flow tuff to a total depth of 1,219 meters. Depth to water below land surface was 519 meters or at an altitude of 730 meters above sea level. After test pumping at a rate of 17.4 liters per second for approximately 9 days, the drawdown was 4.85 meters. A radioactive borehole-flow survey indicated that the Bullfrog Member was the most productive geologic unit, producing 36.5 percent of the water in the well. The second most productive geologic unit was the Tram Member, which produced 32 percent of the water. The water in test well USW H-4 is predominantly a soft, sodium bicarbonate type of water typical of water produced in tuffaceous rocks in southern Nevada. (USGS)

  9. Predicting drill well direction changes by regression model; Previsao de desvios na coluna de perfuracao via modelo de regressao

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Areli Mesquita da [Universidade Federal de Campina Grande, PB (Brazil). Programa de Recursos Humanos 25 da ANP]. E-mail: areli@dme.ufcg.edu.br; Souza, Francisco Antonio Morais de [Universidade Federal de Campina Grande, PB (Brazil)]. E-mail: fsouza@dme.ufcg.edu.br

    2004-07-01

    During the oil well perforation we are in concern to control its upright. Even when a well is projected to be vertical, we must have in mind that does not exist rigorously vertical well, a time that diverse factors contribute for the occurrence of deviance in the drill well. When these deviances exceed certain tolerance limits the well can reach the final depth in a position far away from the desired objective, making difficult its exploration. There are others aggravations for wells that deviate from the vertical line such as consuming for fatigue of the perforation pipes and retention of the commands at the moment of the withdrawal of the column beyond difficulties in the descending of covering columns. In this work, we consider to control the upright of the well through a regression model, having an angular variable as the dependent variable in the model. The objective consists in forecast deviance in the drill well, by using the hardness of the rock, the penetration rate and the weight on the drill. (author)

  10. Streptococcus agalactiae endocarditis presenting as acalculous cholecystitis in a previously well woman.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Brewer, Linda

    2013-01-01

    This case report describes the unusual presentation of a previously very well woman with Streptococcus agalactiae endocarditis in the emergency department. History, examination and preliminary laboratory and radiological investigations supported a diagnosis of acalculous cholecystitis, for which she was given intravenous broad spectrum antimicrobial therapy. One day following admission, the patient deteriorated and became unresponsive. Subsequent MRI of the brain revealed multiple bihemispheric cerebral emboli and a large, mobile mitral valve thrombus was visualised on her transoesophageal echocardiogram. S agalactiae was cultured from venous blood samples and her antimicrobial cover was adjusted accordingly. Despite her presumed guarded prognosis, this patient made a remarkable recovery. To our knowledge, the association of S agalactiae endocarditis with acalculous cholecystitis has not been previously described.

  11. Regulation of Water Pollution from Hydraulic Fracturing in Horizontally-Drilled Wells in the Marcellus Shale Region, USA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heather Hatzenbuhler

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Hydraulic fracturing is an industrial process used to extract fossil fuel reserves that lie deep underground. With the introduction of horizontal drilling, new commercial sources of energy have become available. Wells are drilled and injected with large quantities of water mixed with specially selected chemicals at high pressures that allow petroleum reserves to flow to the surface. While the increased economic activities and the outputs of domestic energy are welcomed, there is growing concern over negative environmental impacts from horizontal drilling in shale formations. The potential for water contamination, land destruction, air pollution, and geologic disruption has raised concerns about the merits of production activities used during extraction. This paper looks at the impacts of horizontal drilling using hydraulic fracturing on water supplies and takes a comprehensive look at legislative and regulatory approaches to mitigate environmental risks in the Marcellus shale region. The overview identifies shortcomings associated with regulatory controls by local and state governments and offers two policy suggestions to better protect waters of the region.

  12. Drill cutting release in Ingøydjupet, SW Barents Sea from a well drilled in 1987, and its impact on benthic foraminifera

    OpenAIRE

    Berg, Julie

    2017-01-01

    In the nearby areas of the SW Barents Sea, large hydrocarbon reserves have been identified. During drilling procedures, drill cuttings are produced and some are released to sea. The disposal of drill cuttings may cause environmental degradation to the marine environment. Increasing petroleum activities, therefore requires further knowledge of ocean current transportation of fine sediment particles (clay and silt) related to cuttings and their effect on the marine environment and fauna includi...

  13. Analysis on the nitrogen drilling accident of Well Qionglai 1 (II: Restoration of the accident process and lessons learned

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yingfeng Meng

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available All the important events of the accident of nitrogen drilling of Well Qionglai 1 have been speculated and analyzed in the paper I. In this paper II, based on the investigating information, the well log data and some calculating and simulating results, according to the analysis method of the fault tree of safe engineering, the every possible compositions, their possibilities and time schedule of the events of the accident of Well Qionglai 1 have been analyzed, the implications of the logging data have been revealed, the process of the accident of Well Qionglai 1 has been restored. Some important understandings have been obtained: the objective causes of the accident is the rock burst and the induced events form rock burst, the subjective cause of the accident is that the blooie pipe could not bear the flow burden of the clasts from rock burst and was blocked by the clasts. The blocking of blooie pipe caused high pressure in wellhead, the high pressure made the blooie pipe burst, natural gas came out and flared fire. This paper also thinks that the rock burst in gas drilling in fractured tight sandstone gas zone is objective and not avoidable, but the accidents induced from rock burst can be avoidable by improving the performance of the blooie pipe, wellhead assemblies and drilling tool accessories aiming at the downhole rock burst.

  14. More than 200 multilateral wells drilled in the Faja Del Orinoco extra-heavy oil recovery reservoir

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fipke, S.R. [Halliburton Energy Services, Calgary, AB (Canada)

    2008-07-01

    Reduced drilling costs, lower environmental impacts, increased recovery and improved well production are some of the benefits offered by multilateral wells over conventional horizontal wells. In the Faja Del Orinoco of Venezuela, multilateral technology has been successfully incorporated into heavy oil development. In order to achieve the maximum reservoir exposure and the best production rates per well, hundreds of wells have been drilled by heavy oil producers in the Orinoco area. The PetroAnzoategui is a project to produce, upgrade, and commercialize extra heavy crude oil from the San Diego field, located in the Anzoategui region of the Orinoco Belt in eastern Venezuela. This paper described the on-going successes of multilateral well design in this heavy oil development project, as well as many technical details of the multilateral technology that has been extensively utilized. The paper also discussed the variety of different well designs and unique applications for multilateral well architecture in heavy oil reservoirs. The paper discussed level 4 multilateral technology and the key features of the operational steps and technical specifications of the level 4 junction construction system, including recent improvement and innovations to improve operation and the quality of the junctions. The reliability of multilateral technology was also discussed. It was concluded that multilateral wells can be a more practical way to improve the recovery factor of interbedded heavy oil reservoirs. 4 refs., 13 figs.

  15. Use of Biostratigraphy to Increase Production, Reduce Operating Costs and Risks and Reduce Environmental Concerns in Oil Well Drilling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edward Marks

    2005-09-09

    In the Santa Maria Basin, Santa Barbara County, California, four wells were processed and examined to determine the age and environment parameters in the oil producing sections. From west to east, we examined Cabot No. 1 Ferrero-Hopkins,from 3917.7 m (12850 ft) to 4032 m (13225 ft); Sun No. 5 Blair, from 3412 m (11190 ft) to 3722.5 m (12210 ft); Triton No. 10 Blair, from 1552 m (5090 ft) to 1863 m (6110 ft); and OTEC No. 1 Boyne, from 2058 m (6750 ft) to 2528 m (8293 ft). Lithic reports with lithic charts were prepared and submitted on each well. These tested for Sisquoc Fm lithology to be found in the Santa Maria area. This was noted in the OTEC No. 1 Boyne interval studied. The wells also tested for Monterey Fm. lithology, which was noted in all four wells examined. Composite samples of those intervals [combined into 9.15 m (30 foot) intervals] were processed for paleontology. Although the samples were very refractory and siliceous, all but one (Sun 5 Blair) yielded index fossil specimens, and as Sun 5 Blair samples below 3686 m (12090 ft) were processed previously, we were able to make identifications that would aid this study. The intervals examined were of the Sisquoc Formation, the Low Resistivity and the High Resistivity sections of the Monterey Formation. The Lower Sisquoc and the top of the late Miocene were identified by six index fossils: Bolivina barbarana, Gyroidina soldanii rotundimargo, Bulimina montereyana, Prunopyle titan, Axoprunum angelinum and Glyphodiscus stellatus. The Low Resistivity Monterey Fm. was identified by eight index fossils, all of which died out at the top of the late Miocene, late Mohnian: Nonion goudkoffi, Brizalina girardensis, Cibicides illingi, Siphocampe nodosaria, Stephanogonia hanzawai, Uvigerina modeloensis, Buliminella brevior, Tytthodiscus sp.and the wide geographic ranging index pelagic fossil, Sphaeroidinellopsis subdehiscens. The High Resistivity Monterey Fm. was identified by eight index fossils, all of which died

  16. Zero air emission and zero drilling waste landfill leachate collection well installation method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, M.S.; Hornsby, R.G.

    1992-01-01

    Landfilling of industrial wastes is an extensively used means of disposal throughout the US. Prior to RCRA, many landfills were little more than excavated trenches. During the construction and filling of such trenches, the long-term environmental impact was seldom considered. Water (leachate) management for these early landfills was not part of engineering or operating considerations. Today, waste management facilities succeed or fail on the quality of their leachate management efforts, as judged by groundwater quality around the landfill. The CECOS International Inc. facility near Livingston, Louisiana has three pre-RCRA disposal units (landfills) that were designed, constructed, and closed by a previous owner. These disposal units were constructed without any type of leachate removal system. During 1984-1985, samples from two nearby monitor wells revealed evidence of groundwater contamination in the area, principally in the shallow (30-foot) zone. A one-year, state-approved groundwater assessment revealed the nature and extent of groundwater contamination. Later, the Louisiana Department of Environmental Quality (LDEQ) approved a remedial action plan (RAP) for this area that included: Installation of an engineered slurry wall surrounding the disposal units to isolate the shallow groundwater regime. Placement of an engineered cap over the units to prevent rainwater infiltration. Installation of several recovery wells inside the units to facilitate removal of leachate. While efforts are now underway to provide for removal of impacted groundwater in the vicinity of these old wells, the long-term solution is to reduce or, to the greatest extent possible, eliminate the liquid volume inside the cells. This paper deals with the installation of 16 leachate recovery wells inside the pre-RCRA disposal units

  17. Simultaneous sand control and liner cement system: keeping well productivity by optimizing drilling and completion operations in mature fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sa, Andrea Nicolino de; Silva, Dayana Nunes e; Calderon, Agostinho [Petroleo Brasileiro S.A. (PETROBRAS), Rio de janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2012-07-01

    The need to reduce oil extraction costs by increasing the recovery factor in mature fields unconsolidated sandstone reservoirs motivated the development of drilling and completion techniques that integrate the various interfaces of engineering the well, resulting in a final well configuration that provides maximum oil production at a lower cost. Due to the continued growth of drilling and completion of new wells or deviation of old wells in the design of mesh density field with an advanced degree of exploitation, PETROBRAS took the challenge to seek options for projects well, in order to maintain productivity and reduce their construction time, with the optimization of drilling and sand control systems. To achieve these goals, PETROBRAS developed the SCARS - Simultaneous Sand Control and Liner Cementing System, a pioneer technique in the global oil industry, which consists of a one trip sequence of operations in which sand control screens and liner are installed followed by the open hole gravel pack operation performed with the alpha and beta waves deposition technique, using a non aqueous system as a carrier fluid. The sequence is completed by liner cementing in the same trip. The great success of this project was based on the definition of a specific application scenario and demands allowing optimization of the system. This project started with the development of a non aqueous system as a gravel pack carrier fluid in order to perform an open hole gravel pack with the alpha/beta wave deposition technique along with the development and optimization of SCARS procedures. This article details the planning and execution phases of this project and also presents a broad description of the technical aspects. (author)

  18. Design of an ultra-high torque double shoulder drill-pipe tool joint for extended reach wells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaohua Zhu

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Drill-pipe tool joints in extended reach wells often suffer a shear failure. In view of this, an ultra-high torque double-shoulder pipe joint was designed according to the deformation compatibility relation of the drill-pipe tool joint under torque. It is structurally characterized by long primary and secondary shoulders, small thread taper and large fillet radius of bottom tooth. First, a 3D numerical simulation model was established for this type of joint, named the XSJ joint here, based on the principle of virtual work, the Von Mises yield criterion and the nonlinear contact theory. Second, orthogonal optimization was performed on its key structural parameters by means of the orthogonal optimization method. The optimal combination of key structural parameters of the XSJ joint is taper 1:16, thread pitch 6.55 mm, guiding surface angle 29°, bearing surface angle 28°, and tooth height 3.755 mm. Finally, the bearing performance and fatigue performance of this tool joint and the API tool joint were calculated and compared using the Simulia Abaqus fe-safe software. Compared with the API tool joint, the XSJ joint is better, and its tensile strength, torsion strength, bending strength and compression strength increase by 10.65%, 62.5%, 2.75% and 52%, respectively. Its tension compression fatigue life, bending fatigue life, torsion fatigue life and composite fatigue life increase by 1.19 times, 1.74 times, 550 times and 28.79%, respectively. It is concluded that the designed XSJ joint is significantly improved in term of torsion capacity while its tension strength, bending strength and compression strength are not decreased, so it can better meet the drilling conditions of extended reach wells. Keywords: Extended reach well, Tool joint, Shear failure, Torsion capacity, Bending capacity, Orthogonal optimization, Bearing property, Fatigue life

  19. Study of waste generation in the drilling and cementing operations during construction of offshore oil and gas wells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Letícia Ferraço de Campos

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This literature review aims to present drilling and cementing activities which take place during the construction of offshore oil and gas wells, listing the waste generated in each step. IBAMA, the environmental agency that regulates the activity, allows two disposal options for these wastes: disposal in open sea or treatment followed by disposal on shore. The documentary research applied in this article details the destination options showing that the monitoring required by the environmental agency is a way to track the actual results of the activities described.

  20. Trends in hydraulic fracturing distributions and treatment fluids, additives, proppants, and water volumes applied to wells drilled in the United States from 1947 through 2010: data analysis and comparison to the literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallegos, Tanya J.; Varela, Brian A.

    2015-01-01

    Hydraulic fracturing is presently the primary stimulation technique for oil and gas production in low-permeability, unconventional reservoirs. Comprehensive, published, and publicly available information regarding the extent, location, and character of hydraulic fracturing in the United States is scarce. This national spatial and temporal analysis of data on nearly 1 million hydraulically fractured wells and 1.8 million fracturing treatment records from 1947 through 2010 (aggregated in Data Series 868) is used to identify hydraulic fracturing trends in drilling methods and use of proppants, treatment fluids, additives, and water in the United States. These trends are compared to the literature in an effort to establish a common understanding of the differences in drilling methods, treatment fluids, and chemical additives and of how the newer technology has affected the water use volumes and areal distribution of hydraulic fracturing. Historically, Texas has had the highest number of records of hydraulic fracturing treatments and associated wells in the United States documented in the datasets described herein. Water-intensive horizontal/directional drilling has also increased from 6 percent of new hydraulically fractured wells drilled in the United States in 2000 to 42 percent of new wells drilled in 2010. Increases in horizontal drilling also coincided with the emergence of water-based “slick water” fracturing fluids. As such, the most current hydraulic fracturing materials and methods are notably different from those used in previous decades and have contributed to the development of previously inaccessible unconventional oil and gas production target areas, namely in shale and tight-sand reservoirs. Publicly available derivative datasets and locations developed from these analyses are described.

  1. High performance nature of biodegradable polymeric nanocomposites for oil-well drilling fluids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tarek M. Madkour

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT and graphene nanoplatelet reinforced thermoplastic poly(lactic acid (PLA biodegradable nanocomposites were designed and prepared using solution casting techniques. The prepared biodegradable polymers are expected to provide an environmentally friendly alternative to petroleum-based polymers. Both nanocomposite systems exhibited better thermal stability and improved mechanical performance over the unreinforced polymer exhibiting excellent strength and degradability. The addition of graphene nanofiller in varied amounts was aimed to enhance the thermal and mechanical properties of the nanocomposites even further and incorporate the outstanding characteristics of graphene nanoplatelets into the nanocomposites. The polymeric nanocomposites showed also superior advantages for oil drilling relevances, automotive lubricating purposes, membrane technology and food packaging. Scanning electron microscopy images indicated a homogeneous dispersion of the nanofiller within the polymeric matrix at low filler loadings and a cluster formation at higher loadings that could be responsible for the polymeric matrix movement restrictions. The enthalpy of mixing (the polymer and the nanofiller measured could explain the cause of the repulsive interactions between the nanoparticles and the polymeric chains, which created an additional excluded volume that the polymeric segments were restricted to occupy, thus forcing the conformational characteristics of the polymeric chains to deviate away from those of the bulk chains. The prepared polymeric nano composites (poly lactic acid carbon nano tube and poly lactic acid graphene nanoplatelets were utilized in the formulation of oil-base mud as a viscosifier. The rheological, filtration properties and electrical stability of the oil based mud formulation with the new polymeric nanocomposite were studied and the result compared to the oil-based mud formulation with commercial viscosifier.

  2. Drilling and geophysical logs of the tophole at an oil-and-gas well site, Central Venango County, Pennsylvania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, John H.; Bird, Philip H.; Conger, Randall W.; Anderson, J. Alton

    2014-01-01

    In a study conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Pennsylvania Department of Conservation and Natural Resources, Bureau of Topographic and Geologic Survey, drilling and geophysical logs were used to characterize the geohydrologic framework and the freshwater and saline-water zones penetrated by the tophole at an oil-and-gas well site in central Venango County, Pennsylvania. The geohydrologic setting of the well site is typical of the dissected Appalachian Plateau underlain by Pennsylvanian and Mississippian sandstone and shale. The drilling, gamma, and acoustic-televiewer logs collected from the 575-foot deep tophole define the penetrated Pennsylvanian and Mississippian stratigraphic units and their lithology. The caliper, video, and acoustic-televiewer logs delineate multiple bedding-related and high-angle fractures in the lower Pottsville Group and Shenango Formation from 22 to 249 feet below land surface. The caliper and acoustic-televiewer logs indicate a sparsity of fractures below 249 feet below land surface in the lowermost Shenango Formation, Cuyahoga Group, Corry Sandstone, “Drake Well” formation, and upper Riceville Formation.

  3. Drilling Specifications: Well Installations in the 300 Area to Support PNNL's Integrated Field-Scale Subsurface Research Challenge (IFC) Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bjornstad, Bruce N.; Vermeul, Vince R.

    2008-01-01

    Part of the 300 Area Integrated Field-Scale Subsurface Research Challenge (IFC) will be installation of a network of high density borings and wells to monitor migration of fluids and contaminants (uranium), both in groundwater and vadose zone, away from an surface infiltration plot (Figure A-1). The infiltration plot will be located over an area of suspected contamination at the former 300 Area South Process Pond (SPP). The SPP is located in the southeastern portion of the Hanford Site, within the 300-FF-5 Operable Unit. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) with the support of FH shall stake the well locations prior to the start of drilling. Final locations will be based on accessibility and will avoid any surface or underground structures or hazards as well as surface contamination

  4. Analysis of Water Well Quality Drilling Around Waste Disposal Site in Makassar City Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maru, R.; Baharuddin, I. I.; Badwi, N.; Nyompa, S.; Sudarso

    2018-02-01

    Clean water is one of human need which is very important in carrying out its life. Therefore, this article analyzes the quality of the well water dug around the landfill. The method used is a well water well sample taken from 4 wells around a landfill taken by a purposive sampling at a different distance. The parameters measured are physical, chemical, and biological properties. The results of the analysis were then compared with the standard of drinking water quality criteria allowed under The Regulation of Health Minister of Indonesia No. 416 year 1990 on the Terms and Supervision of Water Quality of the Minister of Health of the Republic of Indonesia. The result of the research shows that there are two wells whose water quality does not meet the physical requirement i.e Location of Points II and III, based on the construction of wells also does not meet the requirements of the wells in general. While at the well Locations Point I and IV the quality of water physically, chemically and biologically as well as well construction qualify. From the result of this research, the researcher give suggestion of the need to improve the physical condition of dug wells, it is necessary to do the extension to the well water user community for drinking water about the physical condition of the dug well, the need to monitor and supervise the quality of drinking water, and should involve the community to independently meet the needs absolute i.e clean water to drink.

  5. Physico-chemical forms of natural radionuclides in drilled well waters and their removal by ion exchange

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vaaramaa, K.

    2003-01-01

    Appreciable concentrations of natural uranium and its daughter radionuclides may occur in drinking water obtained from drilled wells when the bedrock contains these nuclides. Effective methods are needed to remove these radionuclides. A wide range of ion exchange materials, both organic and inorganic, were evaluated for the removal of 234,238 U, 226 Ra, 210 Po and 210 Pb from ground waters. Screenin tests were carried out, in which distribution coefficients (KD) were determined for the ion exchangers. The ion exchangers that gave the highest KD's were tested in column-mode experiments for the removal of the radionuclides from drilled well water. The most efficient exchanger for the removal of U from neutral and slightly alkaline waters was the strong base anion resin. The chelating aminophosphonate resin removed uranium very efficiently from slightly acidic water. As well, it was an efficient exchanger for the removal of toxic and harmful transition metals from drilled well waters. The strong and weak acid cation resins and zeolite A removed radium most efficiently. Large fractions of the total activity of polonium and lead were found to adsorb on equipment in the ion exchange studies. In investigation of this, the well waters were filtered through membranes to determine the soluble and particle-bound forms of 234,238 U, 226 Ra, 210 Po and 210 Pb. Eight of the waters were of Ca type and two were of Na-Cl type. Some of the waters also had high concentrations of Fe, Mn and humic substances. Uranium was present entirely in soluble form, probably as uranyl ion in soluble carbonate complexes. 226 Ra was in soluble form in the waters with low concentrations of Fe and Mn, but 10% of the total radium activity was bound to particles in Fe-Mn-rich waters. The speciation of Po is complex in natural waters; polonium was present in both soluble and particle-bound forms. A correlation was observed between the fractions of particle-bound 210 Po and the concentrations of iron in

  6. Logs of wells and boreholes drilled during hydrogeologic studies at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Site 300, January 1, 1991--September 1, 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crow, N.B.; McConihe, W.L.

    1992-01-01

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) Site 300 is located in the Altamont Hills between Livermore and Tracy, about 18 road miles southeast of Livermore, California. The site is used as a test facility to support national defense research carried out by LLNL. This Addendum 2 to the Logs of Wells and Boreholes Drilled During Hydrogeologic Studies at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Site 300 presents hydrogeologic logs for monitor wells and boreholes drilled primarily between January 1, 1991 and September 1, 1992. Some logs drilled earlier and not incorporated in earlier volumes of this document are also included here. A small number of logs drilled before September 1, 1992, are not available at the time of closing the report for publication of this volume (Addendum 2), but will be included in subsequent documents. By September 1, 1992, a total of 495 monitor wells and 285 exploratory boreholes had been drilled at Site 300 since the beginning of hydrogeologic studies in 1982. The primary purpose of these logs is to document lithologic and hydrogeologic conditions together with well completion information. For this reason, not all chemical analytical data are presented. These logs report concentrations of only the most commonly encountered volatile organic compounds, trace metals, and radionuclides detected in ground water and soil samples collected during drilling

  7. CASING DRILLING TECHNOLOGY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nediljka Gaurina-Međimurec

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Casing drilling is an alternative option to conventional drilling and uses standard oilfield casing instead of drillstring. This technology is one of the greatest developments in drilling operations. Casing drilling involves drilling and casing a well simultaneously. In casing driling process, downhole tools can be retrieved, through the casing on wire-line, meaning tool recovery or replacement of tools can take minutes versus hours under conventional methods. This process employs wireline-retrievable tools and a drill-lock assembly, permitting bit and BHA changes, coring, electrical logging and even directional or horizontal drilling. Once the casing point is reached, the casing is cemented in place without tripping pipe.

  8. Logs of wells and boreholes drilled during hydrogeologic studies at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Site 300, January 1, 1982--June 30, 1988: January 1, 1982 through June 30, 1988

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toney, K.C.; Crow, N.B.

    1988-01-01

    We present the hydrogeologic well logs for monitor wells and exploratory boreholes drilled at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) Site 300 between the beginning of environmental investigations in June 1982 and the end of June 1988. These wells and boreholes were drilled as part of studies made to determine the horizontal and vertical distribution of volatile organic compounds (VOCs), high explosive (HE) compounds, and tritium in soil, rock, and ground water at Site 300. The well logs for 293 installations comprise the bulk of this report. We have prepared summaries of Site 300 geology and project history that provide a context for the well logs. Many of the logs in this report have also been published in previous topical reports, but they are nevertheless included in order to make this report a complete record of the wells and boreholes drilled prior to July 1988. A commercially available computer program, LOGGER has been used since late 1985 to generate these logs. This report presents details of the software programs and the hardware used. We are presently completing a project to devise a computer-aided design (CAD) system to produce hydrogeologic cross sections and fence diagrams, utilizing the digitized form of these logs. We find that our system produces publication-quality well and exploratory borehole logs at a lower cost than that of logs drafted by traditional methods.

  9. Logs of wells and boreholes drilled during hydrogeologic studies at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Site 300, January 1, 1982--June 30, 1988: January 1, 1982 through June 30, 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toney, K.C.; Crow, N.B.

    1988-01-01

    We present the hydrogeologic well logs for monitor wells and exploratory boreholes drilled at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) Site 300 between the beginning of environmental investigations in June 1982 and the end of June 1988. These wells and boreholes were drilled as part of studies made to determine the horizontal and vertical distribution of volatile organic compounds (VOCs), high explosive (HE) compounds, and tritium in soil, rock, and ground water at Site 300. The well logs for 293 installations comprise the bulk of this report. We have prepared summaries of Site 300 geology and project history that provide a context for the well logs. Many of the logs in this report have also been published in previous topical reports, but they are nevertheless included in order to make this report a complete record of the wells and boreholes drilled prior to July 1988. A commercially available computer program, LOGGER has been used since late 1985 to generate these logs. This report presents details of the software programs and the hardware used. We are presently completing a project to devise a computer-aided design (CAD) system to produce hydrogeologic cross sections and fence diagrams, utilizing the digitized form of these logs. We find that our system produces publication-quality well and exploratory borehole logs at a lower cost than that of logs drafted by traditional methods

  10. Technologies in deep and ultra-deep well drilling: Present status, challenges and future trend in the 13th Five-Year Plan period (2016–2020

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haige Wang

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available During the 12th Five-Year Plan period (2011–2015, CNPC independently developed a series of new drilling equipment, tools and chemical materials for deep and ultra-deep wells, including six packages of key drilling equipment: rigs for wells up to 8000 m deep, quadruple-joint-stand rigs, automatic pipe handling devices for rigs for wells being 5000/7000 m deep, managed pressure drilling systems & equipment, gas/fuel alternative combustion engine units, and air/gas/underbalanced drilling systems; seven sets of key drilling tools: automatic vertical well drilling tools, downhole turbine tools, high-performance PDC bits, hybrid bits, bit jet pulsation devices, no-drilling-surprise monitoring system, & casing running devices for top drive; and five kinds of drilling fluids and cementing slurries: high temperature and high density water-based drilling fluids, oil-based drilling fluids, high temperature and large temperature difference cementing slurry, and ductile cement slurry system. These new development technologies have played an important role in supporting China's oil and gas exploration and development business. During the following 13th Five-Year Plan period (2016–2020, there are still many challenges to the drilling of deep and ultra-deep wells, such as high temperatures, high pressures, narrow pressure window, wellbore integrity and so on, as well as the enormous pressure on cost reduction and efficiency improvement. Therefore, the future development trend will be focused on the development of efficient and mobile rigs, high-performance drill bits and auxiliary tools, techniques for wellbore integrity and downhole broadband telemetry, etc. In conclusion, this study will help improve the ability and level of drilling ultra-deep wells and provide support for oil and gas exploration and development services in China. Keywords: Deep well, Ultra-deep well, Drilling techniques, Progress, Challenge, Strategy, CNPC

  11. Application of Formation Testing While Drilling (GeoTap) for acquiring formation pressure data from the Azeri, Chirag and Guneshli wells which were drilled in the Khazarian-Caspian Sea of the Azerbaijan Republic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amirov, Elnur

    2016-04-01

    A new technology to acquire wireline quality pressure tests using a Logging While Drilling approach has been successfully implemented few years ago in Azeri, Chirag and Guneshli wells which were drilled in the Khazarian-Caspian Sea of the Azerbaijan Republic. The Formation Tester While Drilling tool (GeoTap) uses a testing sequence similar to wireline tools. A single probe is extended to the borehole wall and a small pretest volume withdrawn from the formation. The resulting pressure transient is then analyzed for formation pressure, formation permeability and mobility information. Up-link and down-link capabilities have been added to achieve test control and quality feedback. An efficient downlink algorithm is used downhole to analyze the data. The parameters and pressure data are transmitted to the surface in real-time for continuous monitoring of the test. More detailed pressure data is recorded and retrieved after returning to surface. Use of a quartz gauge allows excellent accuracy. Azeri, Chirag and Guneshli fields consist of layered sand reservoirs alternation with shale sequences and detailed pressure data is acquired on a high percentage of wells in order to understand lateral and vertical continuity of different flow units. The formation tester can be utilized with the 'triple combo' Logging While Drilling string which eliminates the need to rig up wireline on many wells. Wireline formation tester runs are time consuming - particularly if high deviation or high overbalance conditions are encountered requiring pipe conveyed techniques. Non-Productive Time is high when the wireline tools are stuck and fishing operations are required. The Sperry Drilling GeoTap formation pressure tester service provides real-time formation pressure measurements. It bridges the critical gap between drilling safety and optimization, by providing early and reliable measurements of key reservoir properties, while improving reservoir understanding and completion design in real

  12. Recovery Act. Sub-Soil Gas and Fluid Inclusion Exploration and Slim Well Drilling, Pumpernickel Valley, Nevada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fairbank, Brian D. [Nevada Geothermal Power Company, Las Vegas, NV (United States)

    2015-03-27

    Nevada Geothermal Power Company (NGP) was awarded DOE Award DE-EE0002834 in January 2010 to conduct sub-soil gas and fluid inclusion studies and slim well drilling at its Black Warrior Project (now known as North Valley) in Washoe and Churchill Counties, Nevada. The project was designed to apply highly detailed, precise, low-cost subsoil and down-hole gas geochemistry methods from the oil and gas industry to identify upflow zone drilling targets in an undeveloped geothermal prospect. NGP ran into multiple institutional barriers with the Black Warrior project relating to property access and extensive cultural survey requirement. NGP requested that the award be transferred to NGP’s Pumpernickel Valley project, due to the timing delay in obtaining permits, along with additional over-budget costs required. Project planning and permit applications were developed for both the original Black Warrior location and at Pumpernickel. This included obtaining proposals from contractors able to conduct required environmental and cultural surveying, designing the two-meter probe survey methodology and locations, and submitting Notices of Intent and liaising with the Bureau of Land Management to have the two-meter probe work approved. The award had an expiry date of April 30, 2013; however, due to the initial project delays at Black Warrior, and the move of the project from Black Warrior to Pumpernickel, NGP requested that the award deadline be extended. DOE was amenable to this, and worked with NGP to extend the deadline. However, following the loss of the Blue Mountain geothermal power plant in Nevada, NGP’s board of directors changed the company’s mandate to one of cash preservation. NGP was unable to move forward with field work on the Pumpernickel property, or any of its other properties, until additional funding was secured. NGP worked to bring in a project partner to form a joint venture on the property, or to buy the property. This was unsuccessful, and NGP notified

  13. Radioactivity in drilled and dug well drinking water of Ogun state Southwestern Nigeria and consequent dose estimates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ajayi, O. S.; Achuka, J.

    2009-01-01

    Activity concentrations of 40 K, 226 Ra, 228 Ac and 235 U were measured in 11 dug and 9 drilled well water samples from 3 large cities in Ogun state, Southwestern Nigeria, consumed by the population living in the cities. The measurement was done using co-axial type high-purity germanium (HPGe) detector (Canberra Industries Inc.). The measured activity concentrations in the water samples ranged from 1.74 ± 1.83 to 4.69 ± 0.17 Bq l -1 ; 2.89 ± 0.62 to 7.79 ± 7.22 Bq l -1 ; 0.35 ± 0.07 to 1.17 ± 0.40 Bq l -1 and 0.18 ± 0.05 to 4.77 ± 0.34 Bq l -1 for 40 K, 226 Ra, 228 Ac and 235 U, respectively. Total annual effective dose rates from the ingestion of these radionuclides in the untreated wells were estimated using measured activity concentrations in the radionuclides and their ingested dose conversion factors. Estimated annual effective dose rates ranged from 0.04 to 6.82; 0.01 to 1.36 and 0.01 to 1.49 mSv y -1 for age groups -4 to 8.9 x 10 -2 Sv. The calculated annual effective dose values due to the ingestion of 226 Ra in the Awujale, Ake, Saboab, Alagbon, Alapora and Totoro samples exceeded International Commission on Radiological Protection limit of 1.0 mSv y -1 for individual public exposure. These wells are recommended for treatment that would remove radium from their waters. (authors)

  14. Radioactivity in drilled and dug well drinking water of Ogun state Southwestern Nigeria and consequent dose estimates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajayi, O S; Achuka, J

    2009-07-01

    Activity concentrations of (40)K, (226)Ra, (228)Ac and (235)U were measured in 11 dug and 9 drilled well water samples from 3 large cities in Ogun state, Southwestern Nigeria, consumed by the population living in the cities. The measurement was done using co-axial type high-purity germanium (HPGe) detector (Canberra Industries Inc.). The measured activity concentrations in the water samples ranged from 1.74 +/- 1.83 to 4.69 +/- 0.17 Bq l(-1); 2.89 +/- 0.62 to 7.79 +/- 7.22 Bq l(-1); 0.35 +/- 0.07 to 1.17 +/- 0.40 Bq l(-1) and 0.18 +/- 0.05 to 4.77 +/- 0.34 Bq l(-1) for (40)K, (226)Ra, (228)Ac and (235)U, respectively. Total annual effective dose rates from the ingestion of these radionuclides in the untreated wells were estimated using measured activity concentrations in the radionuclides and their ingested dose conversion factors. Estimated annual effective dose rates ranged from 0.04 to 6.82; 0.01 to 1.36 and 0.01 to 1.49 mSv y(-1) for age groups or =17 y, respectively. Committed dose for age group > or =17 y ranged from 8.8 x 10(-4) to 8.9 x 10(-2) Sv. The calculated annual effective dose values due to the ingestion of (226)Ra in the Awujale, Ake, Saboab, Alagbon, Alapora and Totoro samples exceeded International Commission on Radiological Protection limit of 1.0 mSv y(-1) for individual public exposure. These wells are recommended for treatment that would remove radium from their waters.

  15. Case history: high density weighted polymer drilling fluid used in the deepest horizontal well Dan no. 21 in Sichuan basin of China

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, J.; Zhang, J.; Luo, P.; Xiao, Y.; He, L. [East China Petroleum Inst., Dongying, SD (China)

    1996-12-31

    Hole cleaning, borehole stability, gas formation protection, and torque and drag program developed with high density weighted polymer drilling fluid for the horizontal well Dan no. 21 (China) was described. By using amphoteric polymer, improved rheology and inhibition performance were observed in weighted drilling fluid. The special rheological properties at low shear rate and initial structure yield stress were shown to prevent cutting bed form and barite sag. Wellbore stability had been achieved by use of amphoteric polymer in combination with soft particles to seal minifractures. The drilling fluid demonstrated a lower coefficient of friction and performed more effectively at lower torque and drag. This system proved to protect the formation from damage by limiting fluid loss, fine particles migration and solids invasion. 10 refs., 7 tabs., 5 figs.

  16. Effects of oil and gas well-drilling fluids on the biomass and community structure of microbiota that colonize sands in running seawater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, G A; Nickels, J S; Bobbie, R J; Richards, N L; White, D C

    1982-01-01

    Well-drilling fluid and a number of the known components (barite, clay, Aldacide, Surflo, and Dowicide, were tested for effects on the biomass and community structure of the microbiota that colonize marine sands exposed for eight weeks to running ambient seawater. Shading the microbiota from light depressed the microflora without a significant effect on the biomass, while well-drilling fluids layered on the surface or mixed with the sand significantly increased a component of the bacteria and the microfauna as reflected in changes in the fatty acid composition. There were some shading effects from the surface layering of well-drilling fluids as reflected in the fatty acids from the microflora when compared to the sands mixed with well-drilling fluids. Barite had essentially no effect on the biomass or community structure while clays increased nearly all of the biomass indicators for the bacteria as well as the microfauna; the clay overlay mirrors the effect of the drilling fluids. Aldacide shifted the bacterial composition, depressing the proportions of microbes containing the cyclopropane fatty acids and the anaerobic pathways of desaturation. Concentrations of 1 and 15 microgram/L increased the bacterial biomass as reflected in the total lipid (16:0) and extractable lipid phosphate coupled with a decrease in the total microeukaryotes. Surflo increased the biomass and shifted the bacterial community structure at concentrations between 4 and 800 microgram/L. The lowest level also stimulated the microfauna. Dowicide at 100 microgram/L increased the bacteria forming cis-vaccenic acid and the microfauna similar to low concentrations of Surflo.

  17. Environmental Assessment: Geothermal Energy Geopressure Subprogram. Gulf Coast Well Drilling and Testing Activity (Frio, Wilcox, and Tuscaloosa Formations, Texas and Louisiana)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1981-09-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has initiated a program to evaluate the feasibility of developing the geothermal-geopressured energy resources of the Louisiana-Texas Gulf Coast. As part of this effort, DOE is contracting for the drilling of design wells to define the nature and extent of the geopressure resource. At each of several sites, one deep well (4000-6400 m) will be drilled and flow tested. One or more shallow wells will also be drilled to dispose of geopressured brines. Each site will require about 2 ha (5 acres) of land. Construction and initial flow testing will take approximately one year. If initial flow testing is successful, a continuous one-year duration flow test will take place at a rate of up to 6400 m{sup 3} (40,000 bbl) per day. Extensive tests will be conducted on the physical and chemical composition of the fluids, on their temperature and flow rate, on fluid disposal techniques, and on the reliability and performance of equipment. Each project will require a maximum of three years to complete drilling, testing, and site restoration.

  18. Drilling technologies in hydrogeological survey

    OpenAIRE

    Vorlíček, Petr

    2014-01-01

    This work deals with the drilling technologies used in hydrogeology. The main aim of the work is to explore types of drilling technologies used at hydrogeological drilling wells and modern technologies that could potentially be used in the future. The work also summarizes a historical development of drilling techniques, a drilling process procedure, information obtained from boreholes and the most common types of drilling fluids.

  19. FY1997 report on test well drilling and well investigation for the Akinomiya area survey in the geothermal development promotion survey; 1997 nendo chinetsu sokushin chosa. Akinomiya chiiki chosa shisui kussaku koji oyobi kosei chosa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-03-01

    In order to extract promising areas with high geothermal feasibility, the Akinomiya area was surveyed by drilling test wells. In the N9-AY-3 excavating work, the first stage (depth from 15 to 33 m) used the water-free excavation to prevent adverse effects on the water sources. The second stage (depth from 33 to 409 m) reached the targeted depth with slanted excavation. The third stage drilled into depths from 409 to 1,006 m. The fourth stage was targeted to drill down to 1,802 m, but an entire lost returns have occurred at the depth of 1,598 m, whereas lost water drilling was performed by using fresh water, and the drilling was terminated at the targeted depth. The AY-4 excavation was also advanced with the first, second, third and fourth stage method, and when the entire lost returns have occurred at 1,196 m, the lost water drilling was carried out by using fresh water, and the drilling was terminated at the scheduled 1,505 m. The AY-5 excavation was also advanced with the first, second, third and fourth stage method. The first and second stages used water-free excavation (using air hammers) to avoid influence on the nearby spa areas. The third stage went down to 405 m performing coring, but the entire lost returns occurred at 298 m. The excavation rate was very high, and the core recovery rate reached 100%. The fourth stage presented the same coring condition as that for the third stage down to 1,002 m. (NEDO)

  20. Geopressured-geothermal drilling and testing plan. General Crude Oil--Dept. of Energy Pleasant Bayou No. 1 well, Brazoria County, Texas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1978-05-01

    As a result of geopressured resource assessment studies in the Gulf Coast region, the Brazoria fairway, located in Brazoria County, Texas was determined to be an optimum area for additional studies. A plan is presented for drilling, completion, and testing of one geopressured-geothermal well and two disposal wells in Brazoria County, Texas. The objectives of the well drilling and testing program are to determine the following parameters: reservoir permeability, porosity, thickness, rock material properties, depth, temperature, and pressure; reservoir fluid content, specific gravity, resistivity, viscosity, and hydrocarbons in solution; reservoir fluid production rates, pressure, temperature, production decline, and pressure decline; geopressured well and surface equipment design requirements for high-volume production and possible sand production; specific equipment design for surface operations, hydrocarbons distribution, and effluent disposal; and possibilities of reservoir compaction and/or surface subsidence. (JGB)

  1. Worsening anatomic outcomes following aflibercept for neovascular age-related macular degeneration in eyes previously well controlled with ranibizumab

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nudleman E

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Eric Nudleman,1 Jeremy D Wolfe,2,3 Maria A Woodward,4 Yoshihiro Yonekawa,2,3 George A Williams,2,3 Tarek S Hassan2,3 1Department of Ophthalmology, Shiley Eye Center, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA, 2Beaumont Eye Institute, Oakland University William Beaumont School of Medicine, 3Associated Retinal Consultants, Royal Oak, 4Kellogg Eye Center, University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, MI, USA Purpose: Antivascular endothelial growth factor injection is the mainstay of treating neovascular age-related macular degeneration (AMD. Previous studies have shown that switching treatment from ranibizumab to aflibercept led to an improvement in eyes with recalcitrant activity. Herein, we identify a unique subset of patients whose eyes with neovascular AMD were previously well controlled with ranibizumab injections were then worsened after being switched to aflibercept. Methods: This is a retrospective interventional case series. Eyes with neovascular AMD, previously well controlled with monthly injections of ranibizumab, which then developed worsening of subretinal fluid after being switched to aflibercept were included. Results: A total of 17 eyes were included. All eyes developed increased subretinal fluid when switched from ranibizumab to aflibercept. Fourteen patients were switched back to ranibizumab after a single injection of aflibercept and had subsequent rapid resolution of subretinal fluid. Three patients continued with monthly aflibercept injections for two subsequent months and demonstrated the persistence of the increased subretinal fluid until they were switched back to treatment with ranibizumab at which time the fluid resolved. No eye had persistent decline in visual acuity. Conclusion: Switching from intravitreal ranibizumab to aflibercept in eyes with well-controlled neovascular AMD may result in worsening in a subset of patients and resolves when therapy is switched back to ranibizumab. Keywords: anti

  2. Radon in the water from drilled wells. Results from an investigation in Oerebro; Radon i vatten fraan bergborrade brunnar. Resultat fraan en undersoekning i oerebro kommun

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liden, E.; Andersson, Lennart [Regionsjukhuset, Oerebro (Sweden). Yrkes- och miljoemedicinska kliniken; Linden, A. [Svensk Geofysik AB, Falun (Sweden); Aakerblom, G. [Statens Straalskyddsinstitut, Stockholm (Sweden); Aakesson, T. [Miljoe- och haelsoskyddsfoervaltningen, Oerebro (Sweden)

    1995-09-01

    In 1991 a drilled well containing water with a radon count of about 20,000 Bq/l was found in the city of Oerebro in southern Sweden. A study was started to develop measures to decrease the radon content of water, investigate public health risks and determine the prevalence of high-radon waters in Sweden. 1991-94 various techniques were tested to reduce the concentration of radon in water. The efficiency of aerating high-radon drinking water was studied under field conditions using two modified aerators in a well, in a pressure tank, and in a column of pellets. The efficiency varied from 20 to 99%. A survey of radon in water from 269 drilled wells was conducted in the Municipality of Oerebro. In water from 78 wells, the mean concentration of radon was 1336 Bq/l. The emanation of radon during normal household activities was studied in a home supplied with water from a drilled well whose radon count was approx 20,000 Bq/l. A geological investigation revealed the presence of thin Uranium-loaded fissures in the bedrock (granite) surrounding the well. 130 refs, 16 figs, 14 tabs.

  3. Design aspects to consider during drilling and completion of wells of the pilot test in the in situ combustion project, Bare field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vargas, D.; Garcia, J. [PDVSA Petroleos de Venezuela SA, Caracas (Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of). Exploration and Production; PDVSA Petroleos de Venezuela SA, Caracas (Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of). INTEVEP; Rodriguez, J.; Reverol, H. [PDVSA Petroleos de Venezuela SA, Caracas (Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of). Exploration and Production

    2009-07-01

    This paper discussed an in situ combustion demonstration project in Venezuela's Orinoco oil belt. Unconventional drilling and completion techniques are being implemented in order to assess well performance during different phases of the combustion process. Drilling, well completion and monitoring techniques planned in each of the project's wells were described. The purpose of the project is to minimize formation damage, reduce corrosion, and prevent formation sand production. Numerical analyses, sampling studies, and laboratory experiments will be conducted in order to define well arrangement and to select completion equipment. Thermocouples, pressure chambers, and fiber optics will be used to monitor temperature and pressure rates. To date, the analyses have demonstrated that the horizontal section of the production wells must be drilled with special directional and geo-navigational tools. The selected completion equipment must allow for the installation of high capacity mechanical pumping systems. Completion equipment must be capable of performing in high temperatures and with the corrosive gases produced during the combustion process. It was concluded that casings for the wells must be centralized in order to ensure good cement placement. Real time monitoring will be conducted to control firefloods. 3 refs., 1 tab., 8 figs.

  4. Well-logging method using well-logging tools run through a drill stem test string for determining in-situ change in formation water saturation values

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fertl, W.H.

    1975-01-01

    A logging tool (pulsed neutron or neutron-gamma ray) whose response indicates formation water saturation value, is run through an opening extending through a portion of a drill stem test string. A sample portion of the formation fluid in the zone of interest is removed and another logging run is made. The differences between the plots of the two logging runs indicate the formation potential productivity in the zone of interest

  5. Improved integral joint casing connections can reduce well costs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bethke, M. (Conoco Inc., Lafayette, LA (United States)); Moe, B. (Oil Technology Services Inc., Houston, TX (United States)); Morey, S. (Amoco Production Co., Houston, TX (United States)); Schwind, B. (Mobil Exploration and Producing U.S. Inc., Dallas, TX (United States))

    1994-11-07

    Improvements in integral joint connections (IJC) for casing in the past decade have allowed operators to drill wells previously not feasible to drill for economic or technology reasons. New integral joint connections can withstand greater loads, increasing their range of applications. The use of IJC casing can allow a slimmer well to be drilled, reducing total well costs. The paper describes integral joint connections, physical testing, computer technology, use in deep wells and deep water wells, drilling costs, and drawbacks.

  6. HydroPulse Drilling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J.J. Kolle

    2004-04-01

    Tempress HydroPulse{trademark} tool increases overbalanced drilling rates by generating intense suction pulses at the drill bit. This report describes the operation of the tool; results of pressure drilling tests, wear tests and downhole drilling tests; and the business case for field applications. The HydroPulse{trademark} tool is designed to operate on weighted drilling mud at conventional flow rates and pressures. Pressure drilling tests confirm that the HydroPulse{trademark} tool provides 33% to 200% increased rate of penetration. Field tests demonstrated conventional rotary and mud motor drilling operations. The tool has been operated continuous for 50 hours on weighted mud in a wear test stand. This level of reliability is the threshold for commercial application. A seismic-while-drilling version of the tool was also developed and tested. This tool was used to demonstrate reverse vertical seismic profiling while drilling an inclined test well with a PDC bit. The primary applications for the HydroPulse{trademark} tool are deep onshore and offshore drilling where rate of penetration drives costs. The application of the seismic tool is vertical seismic profiling-while-drilling and look-ahead seismic imaging while drilling.

  7. Application of ALD Images and Caliper Data for the breakout analysis from the wells which were drilled in the Caspian Sea of the Azerbaijan Republic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amirov, Elnur

    2016-04-01

    Wellbore instability while drilling, trip in or trip out can be cause of nonproductive time (NPT). Mainly this is the drilling surprises often encountered while drilling, trip in or trip out which were not predicted in advance, monitored, interpreted or recognized properly, which can give rise to wellbore instability problems. These surprises include also formation tops, overpressure zones occurring at different depths than predicted and the presence of unexpected faults or other fractured/fissile/compartmentalization zones. In general while drilling the wells, downhole PWD data cannot be very useful for understanding wellbore stability. Much of what we can use is indirect measurements such as torque and drag observations, rpm, vibrations, cavings, annular pressure measurements and etc. In order to understand what is going on in the subsurface and therefore mitigate the wellbore instability problems, we need more information from LWD (logging while drilling) tools. In order to monitor and get direct observations of the state of the borehole we need to determine where, how and in which direction the wellbore is failing and enlargement is taking place. LWD calipers and wellbore Azimuthal Lithodensity Images can provide such information for breakout analysis while drilling, trip in and trip out activity. The modes of wellbore instability can be generated in different ways and through different mechanisms. Therefore these zones of breakout can be potentially identified by the ALD imaging and LWD caliper tools. Instability can be governed by a combination of factors such as: the strength of the rock, the subsurface stress field, maximum and minimum horizontal stresses, pre-existing planes of weakness, the angle of the wellbore which intersects with these planes of weakness and chemical reaction of the rock (minerals) with the drilling fluid. Compressional failure (breakout) of an isotropic rock can occur when the compressive stresses around the borehole exceed the

  8. Sweet lake geopressured-geothermal project, Magma Gulf-Technadril/DOE Amoco Fee. Annual report, December 1, 1979-February 27, 1981. Volume I. Drilling and completion test well and disposal well

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodgers, R.W. (ed.)

    1982-06-01

    The Sweet lake site is located approximately 15 miles southeast of Lake Charles in Cameron Parish, Louisiana. A geological study showed that the major structure in this area is a graben. The dip of the beds is northwesterly into the basin. A well drilled into the deep basin would find the target sand below 18,000', at high pressures and temperatures. However, since there is no well control in the basin, the specific site was chosen on the 15,000' contour of the target sand in the eastern, more narrow part of the garben. Those key control wells are present within one mile of the test well. The information acquired by drilling the test well confirmed the earlier geologic study. The target sand was reached at 15,065', had a porosity of over 20% and a permeability to water of 300 md. The original reservoir pressure was 12,060 psi and the bottom hole temperature 299{sup 0}F. There are approximately 250 net feet of sand available for the perforation. The disposal well was drilled to a total depth of 7440'.

  9. Previous Crop and Cultivar Effects on Methane Emissions from Drill-Seeded, Delayed-Flood Rice Grown on a Clay Soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alden D. Smartt

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Due to anaerobic conditions that develop in soils under flooded-rice (Oryza sativa L. production, along with the global extent of rice production, it is estimated that rice cultivation is responsible for 11% of global anthropogenic methane (CH4 emissions. In order to adequately estimate CH4 emissions, it is important to include data representing the range of environmental, climatic, and cultural factors occurring in rice production, particularly from Arkansas, the leading rice-producing state in the US, and from clay soils. The objective of this study was to determine the effects of previous crop (i.e., rice or soybean (Glycine max L. and cultivar (i.e., Cheniere (pure-line, semidwarf, CLXL745 (hybrid, and Taggart (pure-line, standard-stature on CH4 fluxes and emissions from rice grown on a Sharkey clay (very-fine, smectitic, thermic Chromic Epiaquerts in eastern Arkansas. Rice following rice as a previous crop generally had greater (p<0.01 fluxes than rice following soybean, resulting in growing season emissions (p<0.01 of 19.6 and 7.0 kg CH4-C ha−1, respectively. The resulting emissions from CLXL745 (10.2 kg CH4-C ha−1 were less (p=0.03 than those from Cheniere or Taggart (15.5 and 14.2 kg CH4-C ha−1, resp., which did not differ. Results of this study indicate that common Arkansas practices, such as growing rice in rotation with soybean and planting hybrid cultivars, may result in reduced CH4 emissions relative to continuous rice rotations and pure-line cultivars, respectively.

  10. Quality in drilling operations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duncan, E.; Gervais, I. [Sedco Forex Jacintoport Facility, Channelview, TX (United States); Le Moign, Y.; Pangarkar, S.; Stibbs, B. [Sedco Forex, Montrouge (France); McMorran, P. [Sedco Forex, Pau (France); Nordquist, E. [Dubai Petroleum Company, Dubai (United Arab Emirates); Pittman, T. [Sedco Forex, Perth (Australia); Schindler, H. [Sedco Forex, Dubai (United Arab Emirates); Scott, P. [Woodside Offshore Petroleum Pty. Ltd., Perth (Australia)

    1996-12-31

    Driven by cost and profitability pressures, quality has taken on new meaning and importance in the oil field during the past decade. In drilling operations, new initiatives have led to cooperative team efforts between operators and drilling contractors to enhance quality. In this article examples are given of how one drilling contractor, by adopting a quality culture, is reaping major benefits for its clients as well as its employees. 22 figs., 19 refs.

  11. Evaluation of the aging of polymeric drilling fluids to oil wells; Avaliacao do envelhecimento de fluidos de perfuracao polimericos para pocos de petroleo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farias, K.V.; Amorim, L.V. [Universidade Federal de Campina Grande, PB (Brazil). Unidade Academica de Engenharia Mecanica, UAEM/CCT - UFCG], e-mail: kassie@dem.ufcg.edu.br; Leite, R.S. [Universidade Federal de Campina Grande, PB (Brazil). Graduacao Engenharia de Materiais; Lira, H.L. [Universidade Federal de Campina Grande, PB (Brazil). Unidade Academica de Engenharia de Materiais, UAEMa/ CCT - UFCG

    2010-07-01

    The aim of this work is to evaluate the aging of polymeric drilling fluids to oil wells, from the rheological, filtration and lubricity properties in the temperatures 100 degree F ({approx} 38 degree C) and 150 degree F ({approx} 66 degree C). The results had been compared with a standard fluid used for the oil industry and had evidenced that the polymeric fluids had presented good thermal stability, presenting a small reduction in the rheological properties and better values of lubricity coefficient that a reference fluid. (author)

  12. Drilling of bilateral wells: analysis and selection of wells in the Los Humeros, Pue., geothermal field; Perforacion de pozos bilaterales: analisis y seleccion de pozos en el campo geotermico de Los Humeros, Pue.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flores Armenta, Magaly del Carmen; Ramirez Montes, Miguel [Comision Federal de Electricidad, Gerencia de Proyectos Geotermoelectricos, Morelia, Michoacan (Mexico)]. E-mail: miguel.ramirez02@cfe.gob.mx

    2010-01-15

    Drilling bilateral geothermal wells has been conducted successfully in fields in the U.S., the Philippines and Japan, among other places. The reason for drilling a second leg in a well is to increase production by penetrating additional production zones. In this report, criteria are presented for selecting wells in Los Humeros, Pue., geothermal field to be considered for a second leg, taking into account the mechanical condition of the wells, geological targets, distances between wells, production characteristics and thermodynamic conditions. The cases of wells H-3, H-8, H-11, H-16, H-33, H-34 and H-36, which have low production, were reviewed. Wells H-3, H-8 and H-34 were selected as the best subjects for bi-directional drilling. A design is proposed for constructing a second leg in well H-8. [Spanish] La perforacion de pozos bilaterales se ha venido realizando de manera exitosa en campos geotermicos de Estados Unidos, Filipinas y Japon, entre otros. El objetivo de perforar una segunda pierna en un mismo pozo es incrementar su produccion, ya que habran mas zonas de produccion. En este reporte se presentan los criterios para la seleccion de pozos del campo geotermico de Los Humeros, Pue., candidatos para una segunda pierna, considerando el estado mecanico de los mismos, los objetivos geologicos, la distancia entre pozos, sus caracteristicas de produccion y sus condiciones termodinamicas. Para ello se revisaron los casos de los pozos H-3, H-8, H-11, H-16, H-33, H-34 y H-36, que presentan una produccion baja. Posteriormente, aplicando los criterios de evaluacion y con la informacion obtenida de cada pozo, se seleccionaron los pozos H-3, H-8 y H-34 como los que presentan mejores condiciones para la perforacion bidireccional. Finalmente, se establecio un diseno para la construccion de una segunda pierna en el pozo H-8.

  13. 300-Area VOC Program Slug Test Characterization Results for Selected Test/Depth Intervals Conducted During the Drilling of Well 399-3-21

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spane, Frank A.

    2007-07-19

    This report presents brief test descriptions and analysis results for multiple, stress-level slug tests that were performed at selected test/depth intervals within well 399-3-21 as part of the 300-Area volatile organic compound characterization program. The test intervals were characterized as the borehole was advanced to its final drill depth (45.7 m) and before its completion as a monitor-well facility. The primary objective of the slug tests was to provide information pertaining to the vertical distribution of hydraulic conductivity with depth at this location and to select the final screen-depth interval for the monitor well. This type of characterization information is important for predicting/simulating contaminant migration (i.e., numerical flow/transport modeling) and designing proper monitor-well strategies within this area.

  14. Metal and hydrocarbon behavior in sediments from Brazilian shallow waters drilling activities using nonaqueous drilling fluids (NAFs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    do Carmo R Peralba, Maria; Pozebon, Dirce; dos Santos, João H Z; Maia, Sandra M; Pizzolato, Tânia M; Cioccari, Giovani; Barrionuevo, Simone

    2010-08-01

    The impact of drilling oil activities in the Brazilian Bonito Field/Campos Basin (Rio de Janeiro) shell drilling (300 m) using nonaqueous fluids (NAFs) was investigated with respect to Al, Fe, Mn, Ba, Co, Pb, Cu, As, Hg, Cr, Ni, Zn, Cd, V, and aliphatic and polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons concentrations in the sediment. Sampling took place in three different times during approximately 33 months. For the metals Al, As, Co, Cr, Cu, Cd, Fe, Ni, Mn, V, and Zn, no significant variation was observed after drilling activities in most of the stations. However, an increase was found in Ba concentration--due to the drilling activity--without return to the levels found 22 months after drilling. High Ba contents was already detected prior to well drilling, probably due to drilling activities in other wells nearby. Hydrocarbon contents also suggest previous anthropogenic activities. Aliphatic hydrocarbon contents were in the range usually reported in other drilling sites. The same behavior was observed in the case of polyaromatic hydrocarbons. Nevertheless, the n-alkane concentration increased sharply after drilling, returning almost to predrilling levels 22 months after drilling activities.

  15. Previously published midazolam-alfentanil response surface model cannot predict patient response well in gastrointestinal endoscopy sedation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liou, Jing-Yang; Ting, Chien-Kun; Huang, Yu-Ying; Tsou, Mei-Yung

    2016-03-01

    A response surface model is a mathematical model used to predict multiple-drug pharmacodynamic interactions. With the use of a previously published volunteer model, we tested the accuracy of the midazolam-alfentanil response surface model during gastrointestinal endoscopy. We enrolled 35 adult patients scheduled for combined endoscopic procedures. Patients were sedated with intravenous midazolam and alfentanil, and monitored with real-time auditory evoked potential. Sedation Observer's Assessment of Alertness/Sedation (OAA/S) scores were recorded by an independent observer every 2 minutes. Patients with OAA/S scores of ≥ 4 were designated as "awake". Pharmacokinetic profiles were calculated using the TIVA trainer. The published response surface model was modified to make estimations more reasonable. Patient response (OAA/S score ≥ 4 or response during gastrointestinal endoscopic procedure sedation. Accuracy in predicting an OAA/S score of response ranged from 0.04% to 2.94% at the time of arousal (OAA/S score ≥ 4) and from 0.24% to 15.55% when the patient was asleep (OAA/S score response of patients undergoing sedated gastrointestinal endoscopic procedures. Future model parameter adjustments are required. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Taiwan LLC.

  16. Wellness Tourism among Seniors in Taiwan: Previous Experience, Service Encounter Expectations, Organizational Characteristics, Employee Characteristics, and Customer Satisfaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaung-Hwa Chen

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to investigate the influence of the service encounter expectations of senior customers during wellness tours on customer satisfaction. The organizational attributes of hotels, organizational characteristics and employee characteristics, were adopted as mediating variables. A total of 346 valid questionnaires were retrieved from 50 year-old and above seniors in Taiwan. The results showed that the service encounter expectations of seniors had an indirect influence on customer satisfaction and the organizational attributes mediated the service encounter expectations of seniors and customer satisfaction. The moment of truth in the interactions between service staff members and seniors represents the pivotal management implication of this study.

  17. A Novel Approach for Evaluation of Projects Using an Interval–Valued Fuzzy Additive Ratio Assessment (ARAS Method: A Case Study of Oil and Gas Well Drilling Projects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jalil Heidary Dahooie

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The beginning of the 21st-century resulted in a more developed multi-attribute decision-making (MADM tool and inspired new application areas that have resulted in discoveries in sustainable construction and building life cycle analysis. Construction and civil engineering stand for the central axis of a body consisting of a multidisciplinary (multi-dimensional world with ties to disciplines constituting the surface, and with the disciplines, as a consequence, tied to each other. When dealing with multi-attribute decision-making problems generally multiple solutions exist, especially when there is a large number of attributes, and the concept of Pareto-optimality is inefficient. The symmetry and structural regularity are essential concepts in many natural and man-made objects and play a crucial role in the design, engineering, and development of the world. The complexity and risks inherent in projects along with different effective indicators for success and failure may contribute to the difficulties in performance evaluation. In such situations, increasing the importance of uncertainty is observed. This paper proposes a novel integrated tool to find a balance between sustainable development, environmental impact and human well-being, i. e. to find symmetry axe with respect to goals, risks, and constraints (attributes to cope with the complicated problems. The concept of “optimal solution” as the maximum degree of implemented goals (attributes is very important. The model is built using the most relevant variables cited in the reviewed project literature and integrates two methods: the Step-Wise Weight Assessment Ratio Analysis (SWARA method and a novel interval-valued fuzzy extension of the Additive Ratio Assessment (ARAS method. This model was used to solve real case study of oil and gas well drilling projects evaluation. Despite the importance of oil and gas well drilling projects, there is lack of literature that describes and evaluates

  18. A vision for drilling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Millheim, K. [Montanuniversitaet Leoben (Austria)

    1995-12-31

    The future of drilling lies in its relationship with the oil and gas industry. This paper examines how the future of drilling is seen from the view point of the exploration manager, the drilling contractor, the drilling engineer and the company president or managing director. The various pressures on the oil and gas industry are examined, such as environmental issues, alternative energy sources, and the price of oil which determines how companies are run. Exploration activity is driven by the price of oil and gas. The development of wells with multiple horizontal wells or multiple horizontal wells with tributaries will reduce the cost of exploration. Companies will rely less and less on reservoir simulation and more on cheap well-bores, multi-lateral well-bores and will exploit oil that could not be exploited before. The cost of exploratory drilling will need to be kept down so that in the future the industry will get better at economically finding fields at the 10 million to 20 million barrel range that would not have been possible before. The future is expected to see drilling contractors tunnelling, making sewerage lines and drilling 10,000 foot wells with purpose built rigs. Franchising will become a feature of the industry as will the use of databases to answer key technical questions. Offshore platforms will be built to be moveable and disposable. The industry is capable of solving problems, meeting challenges and making ideas work, providing much hope for the future. 10 figs., 1 photo.

  19. Measurement of activity concentration of 222Rn in ground waters drawn from two wells drilled in the Amparo Complex metamorphic rocks, municipio de Amparo, SP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, Igor Jose Chaves de

    2008-01-01

    A sampling system was assembled for field 222 Rn activity concentration measurements in ground waters. The system consists of a sampling flask that prevents the contact between the water sample and the atmosphere and a closed line for radon extraction from water. The system, its operation and calibration, are described in full detail, as well as, the conversion of the measured alpha counting rates in activity concentrations. The assembled system was used in 222 Rn activity concentrations measurements in ground waters drawn from two wells drilled in the Amparo Complex metamorphic rocks. The wells are located at the urban area of the city of Amparo and are exploited for public use water. One well, named Vale Verde, is 56 meters deep and crosses 18 meters of soil, 26 meters of quartz rich gneiss and 12 meters of biotite-gneiss. The other well, named Seabra, is 117 meters deep, crosses 28 meters of soil and weathered rocks and ends in granite-gneiss. The mean activity concentrations for the year long observation were (377 +- 25) Bq/dm 3 , for Seabra well, and (1282 +- 57) Bq/dm3, for the Vale Verde well. The 222 Rn activity concentrations fall in the activity concentration range reported in the literature for similar geology areas and are larger than the concentrations found neighboring areas of the same metamorphic Complex. The seasonal activity concentration variations seem to correlate with rain fall variations in the study area. (author)

  20. Response to the independent technical review of the UMTRA Project procedures and practices for well drilling and development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-07-01

    This report is a response to the findings and recommendations contained in the ITR report. The text of this document summarizes each ITR finding and recommendation, presents the TAC response, and concludes that implementation of many of the recommendations would benefit the UMTRA Project. Implementation of the recommendations represents ongoing improvement to the TAC well installation and development procedures and will result, in lower overall project costs. Appendix B is an implementation plan that groups similar or complementary action items, provides a schedule for implementation, identifies the group or people responsible for the changes, and estimates hours to implement the changes. The four major action items are as follows: (1) ITR Reevaluation, (2) Well Installation SOP Review and Revision, (3) Well Installation Contract Review and Revision, and (4) TAC and DOE Communications Improvement. The hours listed to implement the improvements are intended to be estimates for budgeting and planning purposes for the remainder of this fiscal year and the upcoming fiscal year

  1. Response to the independent technical review of the UMTRA Project procedures and practices for well drilling and development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-07-01

    This report is a response to the findings and recommendations contained in the ITR report. The text of this document summarizes each ITR finding and recommendation, presents the TAC response, and concludes that implementation of many of the recommendations would benefit the UMTRA Project. Implementation of the recommendations represents ongoing improvement to the TAC well installation and development procedures and will result, in lower overall project costs. Appendix B is an implementation plan that groups similar or complementary action items, provides a schedule for implementation, identifies the group or people responsible for the changes, and estimates hours to implement the changes. The four major action items are as follows: (1) ITR Reevaluation, (2) Well Installation SOP Review and Revision, (3) Well Installation Contract Review and Revision, and (4) TAC and DOE Communications Improvement. The hours listed to implement the improvements are intended to be estimates for budgeting and planning purposes for the remainder of this fiscal year and the upcoming fiscal year.

  2. Réduction du nombre de puits par l'utilisation de forages horizontaux Reducing the Number of Wells by Using Horizontal Drilling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giger F.

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available L'un des intérêts du forage horizontal est le gain de productivité sur chaque puits. L'objet de cet article est de proposer des éléments d'analyse, comme la productivité surfacique, destinés à aider l'instance responsable du développement d'un champ confrontée au choix économique entre un schéma classique par puits verticaux et un autre schéma intégrant des puits d'un autre type, et notamment des drains horizontaux. Des méthodes de résolution approchées d'emploi simple sont proposées pour évaluer le nombre de puits verticaux que peut remplacer un drain ho-rizontal. One of the advantages of horizontal drilling is the increase in productivity of each well. The aim of this article is to propose bases for making an analysis, such as areal productivity, so as to help the decision-maker responsible for the development of a field when confronted with an economic choice between a conventional system using vertical wells and an alternative system including other types of wells, and in particular horizontal wells. Simple and approximate solutions are proposed for evaluating the number of vertical wells that can be replaced by a horizontal wells.

  3. Advanced drilling systems study.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pierce, Kenneth G.; Livesay, Billy Joe; Finger, John Travis (Livesay Consultants, Encintas, CA)

    1996-05-01

    This report documents the results of a study of advanced drilling concepts conducted jointly for the Natural Gas Technology Branch and the Geothermal Division of the U.S. Department of Energy. A number of alternative rock cutting concepts and drilling systems are examined. The systems cover the range from current technology, through ongoing efforts in drilling research, to highly speculative concepts. Cutting mechanisms that induce stress mechanically, hydraulically, and thermally are included. All functions necessary to drill and case a well are considered. Capital and operating costs are estimated and performance requirements, based on comparisons of the costs for alternative systems to conventional drilling technology, are developed. A number of problems common to several alternatives and to current technology are identified and discussed.

  4. Geothermal brine well: Mile-deep drill hole may tap ore-bearing magmatic water and rocks Undergoing Metamorphism

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, D.E.; Anderson, E.T.; Grubbs, D.K.

    1963-01-01

    A deep geothermal well in California has tapped a very saline brine extraordinarily high in heavy metals and other rare elements; copper and silver are precipitated during brine production. Preliminary evidence suggests that the brine may be pure magmatic water and an active ore-forming solution. Metamorphism of relatively young rocks may also be occurring within accessible depths.

  5. Data regarding hydraulic fracturing distributions and treatment fluids, additives, proppants, and water volumes applied to wells drilled in the United States from 1947 through 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallegos, Tanya J.; Varela, Brian A.

    2015-01-01

    Comprehensive, published, and publicly available data regarding the extent, location, and character of hydraulic fracturing in the United States are scarce. The objective of this data series is to publish data related to hydraulic fracturing in the public domain. The spreadsheets released with this data series contain derivative datasets aggregated temporally and spatially from the commercial and proprietary IHS database of U.S. oil and gas production and well data (IHS Energy, 2011). These datasets, served in 21 spreadsheets in Microsoft Excel (.xlsx) format, outline the geographical distributions of hydraulic fracturing treatments and associated wells (including well drill-hole directions) as well as water volumes, proppants, treatment fluids, and additives used in hydraulic fracturing treatments in the United States from 1947 through 2010. This report also describes the data—extraction/aggregation processing steps, field names and descriptions, field types and sources. An associated scientific investigation report (Gallegos and Varela, 2014) provides a detailed analysis of the data presented in this data series and comparisons of the data and trends to the literature.

  6. Synthesis of engineering designs of drilling facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porozhsky, K.

    2018-03-01

    The article sets forth key principles of engineering of drilling equipment based on successive analysis of the goals of the production method, technologies of its implementation and conditions of mineral mining using a new approach to systematization of drilling methods. Potential advancement in the technologies and equipment of drilling is illustrated in terms of oil-well drilling.

  7. Geothermal drill pipe corrosion test plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caskey, B.C.; Copass, K.S.

    1980-12-01

    Plans are presented for conducting a field test of drill pipe corrosion, comparing air and nitrogen as drilling fluids. This test will provide data for evaluating the potential of reducing geothermal well drilling costs by extending drill pipe life and reducing corrosion control costs. The 10-day test will take place during fall 1980 at the Baca Location in Sandoval County, New Mexico.

  8. Appreciation of environmental risks analysis methodologies in the offshore well drilling activities; Analise de metodologias na avaliacao de riscos ambientais relacionados as atividades de perfuracao de pocos maritimos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zampolli, Daniella M. [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (UNICAMP), Campinas, SP (Brazil); Morooka, Celso K. [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (UNICAMP), Campinas, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Engenharia Mecanica. Dept. de Engenharia de Petroleo

    2004-07-01

    Nowadays, the projects of products and processes are supposed to integrate environmental risks criteria, in addition to their inherent operation impacts. Industrial activities, in general, generate risks to the environment, and, in case of incidents occurrence, many of the possible consequences can be translated into serious impacts. The Risk Analysis is destined to act as a decision tool in the environmental area, and therefore, the use of one of these during the project phase of an enterprise becomes important, aiming the guarantee of the system reliability. The present article has the purpose of analyzing methodologies that are being employed for the environmental risk analysis, as well as usual procedures applied in the oil industry, specially for the offshore wells drilling, evaluating and discussing their peculiarities and possible improvement. It was intended to obtain a general overview of risk analysis methodologies, with the objective of verifying the existence of some characteristics that would positively contribute for the knowledge of the inherent risks in the activities of petroleum installations, where this kind of learning is something extremely technically necessary and legally mandatory. (author)

  9. Simulation of surge and swab pressures in well drilling operations; Simulacao do problema de 'surge' e 'swab' em atividades de perfuracao de pocos de petroleo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Almeida, Fernando T.G.M.C. de; Kimura, Hudson Faglioni; Ramalho, Vanessa; Negrao, Cezar O. Ribeiro; Junqueira, Silvio L.M. [Universidade Tecnologica Federal do Parana (UTFPR), Curitiba, PR (Brazil); Martins, Andre Leibsohn [PETROBRAS, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2008-07-01

    The movements of the well drilling pipe, known as trips, cause variations in the well inner pressure. When the pipe is moving downwards, in an operation called 'running', the pressure increases and is known as surge pressure and, when it is moving upwards, in an operation called 'pulling', the pressure decreases and it is so called a swab pressure. The study of this phenomenon is of great importance not only due to financial reasons but also for the determination of speeds and accelerations which should be used in running and pulling operations. Among the researchers have studied this problem, Fontenot and Clark are two of the most important. They formulated the problem solution through considerations about the friction factor. The present work's target is to develop a computational program which allows the calculus of those pressures, according to previous investigations and models found in the literature and for different types of fluids as well, such as Bingham fluid and Power Law fluid. (author)

  10. Research on ultrasonic excitation for the removal of drilling fluid plug, paraffin deposition plug, polymer plug and inorganic scale plug for near-well ultrasonic processing technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhenjun; Zeng, Jing; Song, Hao; Li, Feng

    2017-05-01

    Near-well ultrasonic processing technology attracts more attention due to its simple operation, high adaptability, low cost and no pollution to the formation. Although this technology has been investigated in detail through laboratory experiments and field tests, systematic and intensive researches are absent for certain major aspects, such as whether ultrasonic excitation is better than chemical agent for any plugs removal; whether ultrasound-chemical combination plug removal technology has the best plugs removal effect. In this paper, the comparison of removing drilling fluid plug, paraffin deposition plug, polymer plug and inorganic scale plug using ultrasonic excitation, chemical agent and ultrasound-chemical combination plug removal technology is investigated. Results show that the initial core permeability and ultrasonic frequency play a significant role in plug removal. Ultrasonic excitation and chemical agent have different impact on different plugs. The comparison results show that the effect of removing any plugs using ultrasound-chemicals composite plug removal technology is obviously better than that using ultrasonic excitation or chemical agent alone. Such conclusion proves that ultrasonic excitation and chemical agent can cause synergetic effects. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Drilling comparison in "warm ice" and drill design comparison

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Augustin, L.; Motoyama, H.; Wilhelms, F.

    2007-01-01

    For the deep ice-core drilling community, the 2005/06 Antarctic season was an exciting and fruitful one. In three different Antarctic locations, Dome Fuji, EPICA DML and Vostok, deep drillings approached bedrock (the ice-water interface in the case of Vostok), emulating what had previously been a...

  12. Rapid Response Fault Drilling Past, Present, and Future

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Demian M. Saffer

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available New information about large earthquakes can be acquired by drilling into the fault zone quickly following a large seismic event. Specifically, we can learn about the levels of friction and strength of the fault which determine the dynamic rupture, monitor the healing process of the fault, record the stress changes that trigger aftershocks and capture important physical and chemical properties of the fault that control the rupture process. These scientific and associated technical issues were the focus of a three-day workshop on Rapid Response Fault Drilling: Past, Present, and Future, sponsored by the International Continental Scientific Drilling Program (ICDP and the Southern California Earthquake Center (SCEC. The meeting drewtogether forty-four scientists representing ten countries in Tokyo, Japan during November 2008. The group discussed the scientific problems and how they could be addressed through rapid response drilling. Focused talks presented previous work on drilling after large earthquakes and in fault zones in general, as well as the state of the art of experimental techniques and measurement strategies. Detailed discussion weighed the tradeoffs between rapid drilling andthe ability to satisfy a diverse range of scientific objectives. Plausible drilling sites and scenarios were evaluated. This is a shortened summary of the workshop report that discusses key scientific questions, measurement strategies, and recommendations. This report can provide a starting point for quickly mobilizing a drilling program following future large earthquakes. The full report can be seen at http://www.pmc.ucsc.edu/~rapid/.

  13. Discharge of treated wastewater from drilling exploratory wells by infiltration of hydrocarbons in the ground; Vertido de aguas residuales tratadas provenientes de pozos de perforacion exploratoria de hidrocarburos mediante la infiltracion en el terreno

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodriguez Miranda, J. P.

    2009-07-01

    The discharge of treated waste water from a well drilling exploratory oil, such as the consideration ser out to determine the minimum area needed to saturate the ground is not where he planned the infiltration of the dumping in special conditions of soil type and permeability, limited space, water quality and influence of underground aquifers in the study area. (Author) 16 refs.

  14. Review of casing while drilling technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavković Bojan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Conventional drilling methods have been plagued with huge operational and financial challenges, such as cost of purchasing, inspecting, handling, transporting the drill equipment and most importantly, tripping in-and-out of the drill string whenever the Bottom Hole Assembly (BHA needs a replacement, needs of wiper trip or when total depth is reached. The tripping in-and-out of the drill string not only contributes to Non Productive Time (NPT but also leads to well control difficulties including wellbore instability and lost circulation. All this has led Oil and Gas industry, as well as any other engineering industry, to seek for new ways and methods in order to reduce these problems. Thanks to the advances in technical solutions and constant improvements of conventional drilling methods, a new drilling method - casing while drilling has been developed. Casing Drilling encompasses the process of simultaneously drilling and casing a well, using the active casing and thus optimizes the production. This paper presents a review of casing while drilling method (CwD and its practical usage in drilling wells. The comparison of conventional drilling method and casing while drilling is also presented. The CwD method achieves significantly better results than conventional drilling method.

  15. Determination of 234U and 238U activity concentrations in groundwaters from three deep wells drilled in Itu Intrusive Suite (SP)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Souza, Francisca de

    2006-01-01

    Activity concentrations of ( 234 U) and ( 238 U) were determined in groundwaters drawn from three deep wells drilled in rocks from Itu Intrusive Suite (SP), two located in Salto town (S and SY wells) and the other one in Itu (I well). Sampling was done from September, 2004 to December, 2005, and twelve samples of each well were collected monthly. For those determinations alpha spectrometry technique was used, providing high precision results, as shown by the very good agreement of the data obtained in the analyses of 23 duplicates. The waters from the three wells presented a considerable enrichment of 234 U in relation to 238 U, indicating an important radioactive disequilibrium of these isotopes. In well I, the activity concentrations of ( 238 U) varied from (1,06 +- 0,03) to (2,1+- 0,2) mBq/L and those of ( 234 U) spanned from (3,1 +- 0,2) to (6,0 +- 0,4) mBq/L, whereas ( 234 U/ 238 U) activity ratios did not present significant variation, during the sampling time interval, presenting an average of 2,8 +- 0,1. The S waters showed the lowest uranium concentrations and the largest diversity of ( 238 U) and ( 234 U) activity concentrations, which varied from (0,26 +- 0,02) to (1,07+- 0,08) mBq/L and from (1,8 +- 0,1) to (7,0 +- 0,5) mBq/L, respectively, and also presented variable ( 234 U/ 238 U) activity ratios, spanning from (2,79 +- 0,07) to (8,1+- 0,3). In SY well, ( 238 U) activities varied between (0,8 +- 0,1) and (4,2 +- 0,3) mBq/L and those ones of ( 234 U) from (14 +- 1) to (53 +- 4) mBq/L, whereas ( 234 U/ 238 U) ratios fell in the interval from 12,6 +- 0,3 to 18,3 +- 0,4, with the highest activities of both radioisotopes registered during the dry season and the lowest ones in the rainy time period. The ( 234 U/ 238 U) activity ratios, which were invariable during sampling period of well I, indicated the contribution of rainfall to recharge the aquifer. The observed correlation between those ratios and uranium concentrations, for S and SY wells, showed

  16. Synthesis of AL-MCM-41 using gravel drilling the source of silica from wells drilling; Sintese do AL-MCM-41 usando como fonte de silica o cascalho de perfuracao de pocos de petroleo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fontes, M.S.B.; Costa, C.C.; Melo, D.M.A.; Viana, L.M.; Viana, S.O.; Santos, L.M., E-mail: socorro.fontes@Yahoo.com.br [Universidade Federal do Rio grande do Norte (UFRN), Natal, RN (Brazil)

    2016-07-01

    The aim of this study was to synthesize Al-MCM-41 using gravel drilling as alternative source of silica, aiming at sustainable production and low cost. For hydrothermal synthesis of Al-MCM-41 was used gravel and sodium silicate as source of silica and sodium, respectively. The structural driver used was cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTMABr) and solvent distilled water. The hydrothermal synthesis was conducted at 100 ° C in a Teflon autoclave 45 ml jacketed stainless steel for a period of 120 hours with daily correcting pH (range 9-10) using 30% acetic acid. The material obtained was filtered, washed, dried at 100 ° C for 3 hours and then calcined at 550 ° C for 2 hours. Then it was characterized by XRD, FTIR and TG. For the results of characterization has been observed that the use of the gravel drilling as a source of silica was promising alternative for producing a mesoporous material with a high degree of hexagonal ordering. (author)

  17. Incentive drilling contracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moomjian, C.A. Jr.

    1992-01-01

    Incentive drilling contracts historically have been based on the footage and turnkey concepts. Because these concepts have not been used widely in the international and offshore arenas, this paper discusses other innovative approaches to incentive contracts. Case studies of recently completed or current international and offshore contracts are presented to describe incentive projects based on a performance bonus (Case 1), lump sum per well (Case 2), target time and cap for a specified hole section (Case 3), and per-well target time (Case 4). This paper concludes with a review and comparison of the case studies and a general discussion of factors that produce successful innovative incentive programs that enhance drilling efficiency

  18. Case drilling - an innovative approach to reducing drilling costs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Madell, G.; Tessari, R. M. [Tesco Corp., Calgary, AB (Canada); Warren, T. [Tesco Drilling Technology, Calgary, AB (Canada)

    1999-11-01

    Casing drilling is introduced as a new drilling technique that uses standard oil field casing to simultaneously drill and case the well. The technology includes both rig and downhole equipment, customized to function effectively as an integrated drilling system. This paper describes the testing program designed to identify and overcome technical challenges. Although not fully optimized, it appears that the system is functional. Test results indicate the need for improvements in the pump down cement float equipment and the tools and procedures for drilling up the cement plugs. The pump down latch and retrieval system also needs to be further developed and tested for high angle directional applications. Cost savings in the range of 10 to 15 per cent are expected for trouble-free wells. By eliminating the cost of unscheduled events encountered in troublesome wells, cost savings may reach as high as 30 per cent. 3 refs., 7 figs.

  19. Petrographic drill cutting analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thom, R. [Core Laboratories Canada Ltd., Calgary, AB (Canada)

    1999-11-01

    Some of the diagnostic tools which are available to determine valuable reservoir rock information from drill cuttings were described. For example, valuable information can be obtained from drill cuttings and petrographic thin sections regarding mineralogy, facies, pore systems, reservoir quality and fluid sensitivity. This paper described the best ways to pick representative drill cuttings from vials. Colour and texture are among the most important determining factors. New guidelines from the Alberta Energy and Utilities Board have made it possible to obtain thin sections from drill cuttings from a competitor`s wells. Up to 12 chips from each vial can be removed for thin section scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis. X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis of drill chips is not recommended because it is usually not possible to obtain enough sample material. Another powerful tool to investigate and characterize pore systems is the Mercury Injection Capillary Pressure technique. This technique makes it possible to characterize the pore system and to determine pore throat size distribution, permeability/porosity, producible reserves, capillary pressure, effective versus non-effective porosity, irreducible water saturation, and height above free water. The most reliable and valuable information is obtained from sandstone and carbonate aggregate chips in which the pore system is preserved. It was also noted that core porosity can be empirically derived if a trend line is constructed using sections prepared from an equivalent cored zone. Permeability can be derived in much the same way. 9 figs.

  20. The Iceland Deep Drilling Project 4.5 km deep well, IDDP-2, in the seawater-recharged Reykjanes geothermal field in SW Iceland has successfully reached its supercritical target

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friðleifsson, Guðmundur Ó.; Elders, Wilfred A.; Zierenberg, Robert A.; Stefánsson, Ari; Fowler, Andrew P. G.; Weisenberger, Tobias B.; Harðarson, Björn S.; Mesfin, Kiflom G.

    2017-11-01

    The Iceland Deep Drilling Project research well RN-15/IDDP-2 at Reykjanes, Iceland, reached its target of supercritical conditions at a depth of 4.5 km in January 2017. After only 6 days of heating, the measured bottom hole temperature was 426 °C, and the fluid pressure was 34 MPa. The southern tip of the Reykjanes peninsula is the landward extension of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge in Iceland. Reykjanes is unique among Icelandic geothermal systems in that it is recharged by seawater, which has a critical point of 406 °C at 29.8 MPa. The geologic setting and fluid characteristics at Reykjanes provide a geochemical analog that allows us to investigate the roots of a mid-ocean ridge submarine black smoker hydrothermal system. Drilling began with deepening an existing 2.5 km deep vertical production well (RN-15) to 3 km depth, followed by inclined drilling directed towards the main upflow zone of the system, for a total slant depth of 4659 m ( ˜ 4.5 km vertical depth). Total circulation losses of drilling fluid were encountered below 2.5 km, which could not be cured using lost circulation blocking materials or multiple cement jobs. Accordingly, drilling continued to the total depth without return of drill cuttings. Thirteen spot coring attempts were made below 3 km depth. Rocks in the cores are basalts and dolerites with alteration ranging from upper greenschist facies to amphibolite facies, suggesting that formation temperatures at depth exceed 450 °C. High-permeability circulation-fluid loss zones (feed points or feed zones) were detected at multiple depth levels below 3 km depth to bottom. The largest circulation losses (most permeable zones) occurred between the bottom of the casing and 3.4 km depth. Permeable zones encountered below 3.4 km accepted less than 5 % of the injected water. Currently, the project is attempting soft stimulation to increase deep permeability. While it is too early to speculate on the energy potential of this well and its economics, the IDDP

  1. Bucket drill

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bezverkhiy, V.M.; Nabokov, I.M.; Podoksik, D.Z.; Sadovskiy, S.S.; Shanyukevich, V.A.

    1983-01-01

    The bucket drill including a cylindrical housing with bottom, ground intake windows and cutting knives is hinged to the housing, the mechanism of rotation of the cutting knives including rods connected by the cutter knives, and drive shaft is distinguished by the fact that in order to improve the effectiveness of drilling by automatic change in the angle of cutting depending on the strength of the drillable rock, the drill is equipped with elastic elements and cap with annular slits in which there are elastic elements. The mechanism of rotation of the cutting knives is equipped with levers hinged to the housing, pins with shaft and rocker arm. The rods are made with a slit and from one end are rigidly connected to the cutting knives, and from the other end to the levers by means of pins which are arranged in slits of the rod with the possibility of movement. The upper ends of the levers are installed with the possibility of movement in the pins whose shafts are arranged with the possibility of rotation in the rocker arm rigidly connected to the drive shaft. The drive shaft is equipped with cantilevers installed in the cap with the possibility of rotation and interaction with the elastic elements.

  2. Geothermal drilling in Cerro Prieto

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dominguez A., Bernardo

    1982-08-10

    The number of characteristics of the different wells that have been drilled in the Cerro Prieto geothermal field to date enable one to summarize the basic factors in the applied technology, draw some conclusions, improve systems and procedures, and define some problems that have not yet been satisfactorily solved, although the existing solution is the best now available. For all practical purposes, the 100 wells drilled in the three areas or blocks into which the Cerro Prieto field has been divided have been completed. Both exploratory and production wells have been drilled; problems of partial or total lack of control have made it necessary to abandon some of these wells, since they were unsafe to keep in production or even to be used for observation and/or study. The wells and their type, the type of constructed wells and the accumulative meters that have been drilled for such wells are summarized.

  3. Automatic real time drilling support on Ekofisk utilizing eDrilling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rommetveit, Rolv; Bjorkevoll, Knut S.; Halsey, George W.; Kluge, Roald; Molde, Dag Ove; Odegard, Sven Inge [SINTEF Petroleum Research, Trondheim (Norway); Herbert, Mike [HITEC Products Drilling, Stavanger (Norway); ConocoPhillips Norge, Stavanger (Norway)

    2008-07-01

    eDrilling is a new and innovative system for real time drilling simulation, 3D visualization and control from a remote drilling expert centre. The concept uses all available real time drilling data (surface and downhole) in combination with real time modelling to monitor and optimize the drilling process. This information is used to visualize the wellbore in 3D in real time. eDrilling has been implemented in an Onshore Drilling Center in Norway. The system is composed of the following elements, some of which are unique and ground-breaking: an advanced and fast Integrated Drilling Simulator which is capable to model the different drilling sub-processes dynamically, and also the interaction between these sub-processes in real time; automatic quality check and corrections of drilling data; making them suitable for processing by computer models; real time supervision methodology for the drilling process using time based drilling data as well as drilling models / the integrated drilling simulator; methodology for diagnosis of the drilling state and conditions. This is obtained from comparing model predictions with measured data. Advisory technology for more optimal drilling. A Virtual Wellbore, with advanced visualization of the downhole process. Dat low and computer infrastructure. e-Drilling has been implemented in an Onshore Drilling Center on Ekofisk in Norway. The system is being used on drilling operations, and experiences from its use are presented. The supervision and diagnosis functionalities have been useful in particular, as the system has given early warnings on ECD and friction related problems. This paper will present the eDrilling system as well as experiences from its use. (author)

  4. Geologic cross section, gas desorption, and other data from four wells drilled for Alaska rural energy project, Wainwright, Alaska, coalbed methane project, 2007-2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Arthur C.; Roberts, Stephen B.; Warwick, Peter D.

    2010-01-01

    Energy costs in rural Alaskan communities are substantial. Diesel fuel, which must be delivered by barge or plane, is used for local power generation in most off-grid communities. In addition to high costs incurred for the purchase and transport of the fuel, the transport, transfer, and storage of fuel products pose significant difficulties in logistically challenging and environmentally sensitive areas. The Alaska Rural Energy Project (AREP) is a collaborative effort between the United States Geological Survey (USGS) and the Bureau of Land Management Alaska State Office along with State, local, and private partners. The project is designed to identify and evaluate shallow (Regional Corporation, and the Olgoonik Corporation, drilled and tested a 1,613 ft continuous core hole in Wainwright, Alaska, during the summer of 2007 to determine whether CBM represents a viable source of energy for the community. Although numerous gas-bearing coal beds were encountered, most are contained within the zone of permafrost that underlies the area to a depth of approximately 1,000 ft. Because the effective permeability of permafrost is near zero, the chances of producing gas from these beds are highly unlikely. A 7.5-ft-thick gas-bearing coal bed, informally named the Wainwright coal bed, was encountered in the sub-permafrost at a depth of 1,242 ft. Additional drilling and testing conducted during the summers of 2008 and 2009 indicated that the coal bed extended throughout the area outlined by the drill holes, which presently is limited to the access provided by the existing road system. These tests also confirmed the gas content of the coal reservoir within this area. If producible, the Wainwright coal bed contains sufficient gas to serve as a long-term source of energy for the community.

  5. Water-based inhibitive drilling fluids for oil wells: preliminary study; Fluidos aquosos inibidos para perfuracao de pocos de petroleo: estudo preliminar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farias, Kassie V.; Amorim, Luciana V.; Silva, Aline R.V.; Ferreira, Heber C. [Universidade Federal de Campina Grande (UFCG), PB (Brazil)

    2008-07-01

    The aim of this work is to do formulations of water-based inhibitive drilling fluids and to evaluate their rheologic, filtration and lubrication properties and the degree of swell of clays. It was studied eight formulations containing the following additives: viscosity, filtered reducer, controlling of pH, hydratable clays inhibitors, anti-foamy, bactericide, lubricant and sealant. The fluids were prepared according to the field practice that consists of adding to water the additives under constant agitation. After 24 h resting, it was carried out a study of the rheologic behavior, in a Fann 35 A viscosimeter, and of the filtration properties in a Fann press-filter and of lubricity in a Ofite Lubricity tester through the determination of the flow curves, apparent and plastic viscosities, yield limit, gel force, filtered volume, filter-cake thickness and lubricity coefficient. It was also been essays to evaluate the capacity of inhibition of clay with the chemical inhibitors isolated and in set. The results had proven that the presence of inhibitor of clay in drilling fluids has great importance and promotes the inhibition of the swell of clay in all concentrations studied and amongst the formulations developed, six had presented performance next to the fluid Standard. (author)

  6. Sediment compaction and pore pressure prediction in deepwater basin of the South China Sea: Estimation from ODP and IODP drilling well data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Yangbing; Wu, Tuoyu; Sun, Jin; Zhang, Hanyu; Wang, Jiliang; Gao, Jinwei; Chen, Chuanxu

    2018-02-01

    Overpressure in deepwater basins not only causes serious soft sediment deformation, but also significantly affects the safety of drilling operations. Therefore, prediction of overpressure in sediments has become an important task in deepwater oil exploration and development. In this study, we analyze the drilling data from ODP Leg 184 Sites 1144, 1146, and 1148, and IODP Leg 349 Sites U1431, U1432, U1433, and U1435 to study the sediment compaction and controls in the northern South China Sea. Sedimentation rate, sediment content, distribution area, and buried depth are the factors that influence sediment compaction in the deepwater basin of the South China Sea. Among these factors, the sediment content is the most important. The fitted normal compacted coefficients and mudline porosity for an interval of 50 m shows disciplinary variation versus depth. The pore pressure predicted from different fitted results shows varying overpressure situations. The normal compaction trend from Site 1144 reflects the porosity variation trend in stable deposition basins in the northern South China Sea. The predicted pore pressure shows overpressure at Site 1144, which is attributed to compaction disequilibrium. Nevertheless, the mixed lithology column may influence the predicted over-pressure at Site 1148, which is responsible for the confusing result. Above all, we find that sediment compaction should serve as a proxy for pore pressure in the deepwater basin of the South China Sea.

  7. Development of a Database Program for Managing Drilling Data in the Oil and Gas Industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suh, J.; Choi, Y.; Park, H.; Choe, J.

    2008-12-01

    This study presents a prototype of database program for managing drilling data for the oil and gas industry. The characteristics of petrophysical data from drilling cores were categorized to define the schema of database system such as data fields in tables, the relationships between those tables and key index fields to create the relationships. And many types of drilling reports and previous drilling database systems were reviewed to design of relational database program. Various algorithms of logging tool were analyzed to offer many kinds of function for user. Database program developed in this study provides well-organized graphic user interfaces for creating, editing, querying, exporting and visualizing the drilling data as well as for interchanging data with a spreadsheet such as MS-Excel.

  8. Drilling Performance of Rock Drill by High-Pressure Water Jet under Different Configuration Modes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Songyong Liu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In the rock drilling progress, the resistant force results in tools failure and the low drilling efficiency; thus, it is necessary to reduce the tools failure and enhance the drilling efficiency. In this paper, different configuration modes of drilling performance assisted with water jet are explored based on the mechanism and experiment analysis of rock drilling assisted with water jet. Moreover, the rotary sealing device with high pressure is designed to achieve the axial and rotation movement simultaneously as well as good sealing effect under high-pressure water jet. The results indicate that the NDB and NFB have better effects on drilling performance compared with that of NSB. Moreover, the high-pressure water jet is helpful not only to reduce the drill rod deflection, but also to reduce the probability of drill rod bending and improve the drill rod service life.

  9. Surgical drilling: design and performance of an improved drill.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, S; Pal, S; Albright, J A

    1982-08-01

    The majority of twist drills used in orthopaedics are very similar to chisel pointed metal drilling bits. Modifications usually observed are reduction of the point angle to 90 deg and sometimes grinding of the entire cutting lip at 0 deg rake angle, which appeared to have been made arbitrarily without any advantage. We have attempted to design a surgical drill bit with the objective of minimization of the drilling thrust and temperature and effective removal of bone chips. Our results showed that the presence of the chisel edge was mainly responsible for increasing the thrust force and the temperature developed. The effects of a constant feed rate and thrust on the peak temperature were also examined. The combined effect of the helix and the point angles on the rake angle which in turn determines the cutting efficiency was analyzed for various types of surgical bits. Based on our results and previously published data from the literature an optimized drill bit was designed with a split point, a point angle of 118 deg, a parabolic flute, and a helix angle of 36 deg and its performance was compared with other existing surgical drill bits. For drilling in compact bone, the new design decreased the thrust load by 45 percent an the peak temperature rise by 41 percent. Similar improvements were also recorded for drilling bone cement. The time of drilling a bone cortex was also significantly reduced and "walking" on the curved bone surface was eliminated and dimensional tolerance on hole sizes was improved. The new design is likely to reduce the time of surgery and also minimize the tissue damage.

  10. Parcperdue geopressure-geothermal project. Study a geopressured reservoir by drilling and producing a well in a limited geopressured water sand. Final technical report, September 28, 1979-December 31, 1983

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamilton, J.R.; Stanley, J.G. (eds.)

    1984-01-15

    The behavior of geopressured reservoirs was investigated by drilling and producing a well in small, well defined, geopressured reservoir; and performing detailed pressure transient analysis together with geological, geophysical, chemical, and physical studies. The Dow-DOE L. R. Sweezy No. 1 well was drilled to a depth of 13,600 feet in Parcperdue field, just south of Lafayette, Louisiana, and began production in April, 1982. The production zone was a poorly consolidated sandstone which constantly produced sand into the well stream, causing damage to equipment and causing other problems. The amount of sand production was kept manageable by limiting the flow rate to below 10,000 barrels per day. Reservoir properties of size, thickness, depth, temperature, pressure, salinity, porosity, and permeability were close to predicted values. The reservoir brine was undersaturated with respect to gas, containing approximately 20 standard cubic feet of gas per barrel of brine. Shale dewatering either did not occur or was insignificant as a drive mechanism. Production terminated when the gravel-pack completion failed and the production well totally sanded in, February, 1983. Total production up to the sanding incident was 1.94 million barrels brine and 31.5 million standard cubic feet gas.

  11. The Iceland Deep Drilling Project 4.5 km deep well, IDDP-2, in the seawater-recharged Reykjanes geothermal field in SW Iceland has successfully reached its supercritical target

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Ó. Friðleifsson

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The Iceland Deep Drilling Project research well RN-15/IDDP-2 at Reykjanes, Iceland, reached its target of supercritical conditions at a depth of 4.5 km in January 2017. After only 6 days of heating, the measured bottom hole temperature was 426 °C, and the fluid pressure was 34 MPa. The southern tip of the Reykjanes peninsula is the landward extension of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge in Iceland. Reykjanes is unique among Icelandic geothermal systems in that it is recharged by seawater, which has a critical point of 406 °C at 29.8 MPa. The geologic setting and fluid characteristics at Reykjanes provide a geochemical analog that allows us to investigate the roots of a mid-ocean ridge submarine black smoker hydrothermal system. Drilling began with deepening an existing 2.5 km deep vertical production well (RN-15 to 3 km depth, followed by inclined drilling directed towards the main upflow zone of the system, for a total slant depth of 4659 m ( ∼  4.5 km vertical depth. Total circulation losses of drilling fluid were encountered below 2.5 km, which could not be cured using lost circulation blocking materials or multiple cement jobs. Accordingly, drilling continued to the total depth without return of drill cuttings. Thirteen spot coring attempts were made below 3 km depth. Rocks in the cores are basalts and dolerites with alteration ranging from upper greenschist facies to amphibolite facies, suggesting that formation temperatures at depth exceed 450 °C. High-permeability circulation-fluid loss zones (feed points or feed zones were detected at multiple depth levels below 3 km depth to bottom. The largest circulation losses (most permeable zones occurred between the bottom of the casing and 3.4 km depth. Permeable zones encountered below 3.4 km accepted less than 5 % of the injected water. Currently, the project is attempting soft stimulation to increase deep permeability. While it is too early to speculate on the

  12. Acoustical properties of drill strings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drumheller, D.S.

    1988-08-01

    The recovery of petrochemical and geothermal resources requires extensive drilling of wells to increasingly greater depths. Real-time collection and telemetry of data about the drilling process while it occurs thousands of feet below the surface is an effective way of improving the efficiency of drilling operations. Unfortunately, due to hostile down-hole environments, telemetry of this data is an extremely difficult problem. Currently, commercial systems transmit data to the surface by producing pressure pulses within the portion of the drilling mud enclosed in the hollow steel drill string. Transmission rates are between two and four data bits per second. Any system capable of raising data rates without increasing the complexity of the drilling process will have significant economic impact. One alternative system is based upon acoustical carrier waves generated within the drill string itself. If developed, this method would accommodate data rates up to 100 bits per second. Unfortunately, the drill string is a periodic structure of pipe and threaded tool joints, the transmission characteristics are very complex and exhibit a banded and dispersive structure. Over the past forty years, attempts to field systems based upon this transmission method have resulted in little success. This paper examines this acoustical transmission problem in great detail. The basic principles of acoustic wave propagation in the periodic structure of the drill string are examined through theory, laboratory experiment, and field test. The results indicate the existence of frequency bands which are virtually free of attenuation and suitable for data transmission at high bit rates. 9 refs., 38 figs., 2 tabs.

  13. The Hans Tausen drill

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johnsen, Sigfus Johann; Dahl-Jensen, Dorthe; Steffensen, Jørgen Peder

    2007-01-01

    In the mid-1990s, excellent results from the GRIP and GISP2 deep drilling projects in Greenland opened up funding for continued ice-coring efforts in Antarctica (EPICA) and Greenland (NorthGRIP). The Glaciology Group of the Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen, was assigned the task...... had been introduced. The Berkner Island (Antarctica) drill is also an extended HT drill capable of drilling 2 m long cores. The success of the mechanical design of the HT drill is manifested by over 12 km of good-quality ice cores drilled by the HT drill and its derivatives since 1995. Udgivelsesdato...

  14. Testing methodology of diamond composite inserts to be used in the drilling of petroleum wells; Metodologia de testes de insertos compositos diamantados a serem usados na perfuracao de pocos de petroleo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bobrovnitchii, G.S.; Filgueira, M.; Skury, A.L.D.; Tardim, R.C. [Universidade Estadual do Norte Fluminense (UENF), Campos dos Goytacazes, RJ (Brazil)], e-mail: rtardim@terra.com.br

    2006-07-01

    The useful life of the inserts used in the cutters of the drills for perforation of oil wells determines the quality of the perforation as well as the productivity. Therefore, the research of the wear of insert is carried through with the objective to foretell the most important properties of the inserts. Due to the fact of the UENF to be developing the processes of composites sintering to the synthetic diamond base, it is interesting to define the testing methodology of the gotten inserts. The proposed methodology is based on the evaluation of the wear suffered by de sample. For this end a micro processed 'Abrasimeter', model AB800-E, manufactured for the Contenco Company was used. The instrument capacity is 1,36 kVA; axial load applied in the cutter up to 50 kgf; rotation of table speed 20 rpm; course of the tool in radial direction speed before 2 m/min; dimensions of the granite block D = 808 mm, d = 484 mm, h = 50 mm. The gotten results show that the proposed methodology can be used for the evaluation of the inserts of the cutters applied in perforation drills. (author)

  15. HIGH-POWER TURBODRILL AND DRILL BIT FOR DRILLING WITH COILED TUBING

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robert Radtke; David Glowka; Man Mohan Rai; David Conroy; Tim Beaton; Rocky Seale; Joseph Hanna; Smith Neyrfor; Homer Robertson

    2008-03-31

    Commercial introduction of Microhole Technology to the gas and oil drilling industry requires an effective downhole drive mechanism which operates efficiently at relatively high RPM and low bit weight for delivering efficient power to the special high RPM drill bit for ensuring both high penetration rate and long bit life. This project entails developing and testing a more efficient 2-7/8 in. diameter Turbodrill and a novel 4-1/8 in. diameter drill bit for drilling with coiled tubing. The high-power Turbodrill were developed to deliver efficient power, and the more durable drill bit employed high-temperature cutters that can more effectively drill hard and abrasive rock. This project teams Schlumberger Smith Neyrfor and Smith Bits, and NASA AMES Research Center with Technology International, Inc (TII), to deliver a downhole, hydraulically-driven power unit, matched with a custom drill bit designed to drill 4-1/8 in. boreholes with a purpose-built coiled tubing rig. The U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory has funded Technology International Inc. Houston, Texas to develop a higher power Turbodrill and drill bit for use in drilling with a coiled tubing unit. This project entails developing and testing an effective downhole drive mechanism and a novel drill bit for drilling 'microholes' with coiled tubing. The new higher power Turbodrill is shorter, delivers power more efficiently, operates at relatively high revolutions per minute, and requires low weight on bit. The more durable thermally stable diamond drill bit employs high-temperature TSP (thermally stable) diamond cutters that can more effectively drill hard and abrasive rock. Expectations are that widespread adoption of microhole technology could spawn a wave of 'infill development' drilling of wells spaced between existing wells, which could tap potentially billions of barrels of bypassed oil at shallow depths in mature producing areas. At the same time, microhole

  16. Drilling for energy resources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1976-01-01

    Drilling is integral to the exploration, development, and production of most energy resources. Oil and natural gas, which are dependent on drilling technology, together account for about 77% of the energy sources consumed in the US. Thus, the limitations of current drilling technology also restrict the rate at which new energy supplies can be found, extracted, and brought to the marketplace. The purpose of the study reported was to examine current drilling technology, suggest areas where additional research and development (R and D) might significantly increase drilling rates and capabilities, and suggest a strategy for improving drilling technology. An overview is provided of the US drilling industry. The drilling equipment and techniques now used for finding and recovering oil, natural gas, coal, shale oil, nuclear fuels, and geothermal energy are described. Although by no means exhaustive, these descriptions provide the background necessary to adequately understand the problems inherent in attempts to increase instantaneous and overall drilling rates.

  17. Estimation of a stress field in the earth`s crust using drilling-induced tensile fractures observed at well WD-1 in the Kakkonda geothermal field; Kakkonda WD-1 sei de kansokusareta drilling induced tensile fracture ni yoru chikaku oryokuba no suitei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okabe, T. [GERD Geothermal Energy Research and Development Co. Ltd., Tokyo (Japan); Hayashi, K. [Tohoku Univ., Sendai (Japan). Inst. of Fluid Science; Kato, O.; Doi, N.; Miyazaki, S. [Japan Metals and Chemicals Co. Ltd., Tokyo (Japan); Uchida, T. [New Energy and Industrial Technology Development Organization, Tokyo, (Japan)

    1997-05-27

    This paper describes estimation of a stress field in the earth`s crust in the Kakkonda geothermal field. Formation micro imager (FMI) logging known as a crack detecting logging was performed in the well WD-1. This FMI logging has made observation possible on cracks along well axis thought to indicate size and direction of the crust stress, and drilling-induced tensile fractures (DTF). It was verified that these DTFs are generated initially in an azimuth determined by in-situ stress (an angle up to the DTF as measured counterclockwise with due north as a starting point, expressed in {theta}) in the well`s circumferential direction. It was also confirmed that a large number of cracks incline at a certain angle to the well axis (an angle made by the well axis and the DTF, expressed in {gamma}). The DTF is a crack initially generated on well walls as a result of such tensile stresses as mud pressure and thermal stress acting on the well walls during well excavation, caused by the in-situ stress field. Measurement was made on the {theta} and {gamma} from the FMI logging result, and estimation was given on a three-dimensional stress field. Elucidating the three-dimensional crust stress field in a geothermal reservoir is important in making clear the formation mechanism thereof and the growth of water-permeable cracks. This method can be regarded as an effective method. 9 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  18. Vale exploratory slimhole: Drilling and testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Finger, J.T.; Jacobson, R.D.; Hickox, C.E.

    1996-06-01

    During April-May, 1995, Sandia National Laboratories, in cooperation with Trans-Pacific Geothermal Corporation, drilled a 5825{prime} exploratory slimhole (3.85 in. diameter) in the Vale Known Geothermal Resource Area (KGRA) near Vale, Oregon. This well was part of Sandia`s program to evaluate slimholes as a geothermal exploration tool. During drilling we performed several temperature logs, and after drilling was complete we performed injection tests, bailing from a zone isolated by a packer, and repeated temperature logs. In addition to these measurements, the well`s data set includes: 2714{prime} of continuous core (with detailed log); daily drilling reports from Sandia and from drilling contractor personnel; daily drilling fluid records; numerous temperature logs; pressure shut-in data from injection tests; and comparative data from other wells drilled in the Vale KGRA. This report contains: (1) a narrative account of the drilling and testing, (2) a description of equipment used, (3) a brief geologic description of the formation drilled, (4) a summary and preliminary interpretation of the data, and (5) recommendations for future work.

  19. Newberry exploratory slimhole: Drilling and testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Finger, J.T.; Jacobson, R.D.; Hickox, C.E.

    1997-11-01

    During July--November, 1995, Sandia National Laboratories, in cooperation with CE Exploration, drilled a 5,360 feet exploratory slimhole (3.895 inch diameter) in the Newberry Known Geothermal Resource Area (KGRA) near Bend, Oregon. This well was part of Sandia`s program to evaluate slimholes as a geothermal exploration tool. During and after drilling the authors performed numerous temperature logs, and at the completion of drilling attempted to perform injection tests. In addition to these measurements, the well`s data set includes: over 4,000 feet of continuous core (with detailed log); daily drilling reports from Sandia and from drilling contractor personnel; daily drilling fluid record; and comparative data from other wells drilled in the Newberry KGRA. This report contains: (1) a narrative account of the drilling and testing, (2) a description of equipment used, (3) a brief geologic description of the formation drilled, (4) a summary and preliminary interpretation of the data, and (5) recommendations for future work.

  20. Status Report A Review of Slimhole Drilling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Tao; Carroll, Herbert B.

    1994-09-01

    This 1994 report reviews the various applications of slimhole technology including for exploration in remote areas, low-cost development wells, reentering existing wells, and horizontal and multilateral drilling. Advantages of slimholes to regular holes are presented. Limitations and disadvantages of slimholes are also discussed. In 1994, slimhole drilling was still an ongoing development technology. (DJE 2005)

  1. Desenvolvimento de fluidos aquosos com bentonita para perfuração de poços de petróleo onshore Development of aqueous fluids with bentonite clay for drilling of onshore oil wells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. C. A. M Nascimento

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Devido aos grandes desafios encontrados na perfuração de poços, há a necessidade de se desenvolver fluidos com propriedades adequadas e capazes de atender todas as exigências da perfuração, como elevada capacidade de carreamento de sólidos e alta lubricidade, como também fluidos ambientalmente corretos. O grau de impacto dos fluidos de perfuração no meio ambiente depende especialmente do tipo de fluido utilizado, se de base aquosa, oleosa, sintética ou mesmo de base ar. Portanto, é de fundamental importância o desenvolvimento de fluidos com características específicas em cada etapa da perfuração. Sendo assim, este trabalho objetivou o desenvolvimento de fluidos aquosos, com baixo teor de sólidos e propriedades reológicas, de filtração e lubricidade adequadas à perfuração de poços de petróleo onshore. Os fluidos foram formulados utilizando em sua composição bentonita sódica industrializada, aditivos poliméricos e lubrificantes, em diferentes concentrações. O estudo reológico, de filtração e lubricidade mostrou que os fluidos apresentam comportamento pseudoplástico e que os aditivos selecionados desempenham com êxito suas funções de modificadores reológicos, redutores de filtrado e agente lubrificante. Além disto, ficou evidenciada a necessidade de aditivos lubrificantes em fluidos aquosos contendo argila bentonítica e polímeros. A adição de 1% de lubrificante no fluido é suficiente para adequar a capacidade lubrificante dos fluidos.Due to challenges encountered in drilling wells, there is a need to develop fluids that have properties suitable and able to meet all the requirements of drilling, such as, high capacity for carrying of solid and high lubricity. Besides that, they need to be environmentally friend. The degree of impact of drilling fluids in the environment depends on the type of fluid used, if water or oil or synthetic or air based. It is therefore of fundamental importance to develop

  2. Robotic Planetary Drill Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glass, Brian J.; Thompson, S.; Paulsen, G.

    2010-01-01

    Several proposed or planned planetary science missions to Mars and other Solar System bodies over the next decade require subsurface access by drilling. This paper discusses the problems of remote robotic drilling, an automation and control architecture based loosely on observed human behaviors in drilling on Earth, and an overview of robotic drilling field test results using this architecture since 2005. Both rotary-drag and rotary-percussive drills are targeted. A hybrid diagnostic approach incorporates heuristics, model-based reasoning and vibration monitoring with neural nets. Ongoing work leads to flight-ready drilling software.

  3. Ultrasonic drilling apparatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duran, E.L.; Lundin, R.L.

    1988-06-20

    Apparatus attachable to an ultrasonic drilling machine for drilling deep holes in very hard materials, such as boron carbide, is provided. The apparatus utilizes a hollow spindle attached to the output horn of the ultrasonic drilling machine. The spindle has a hollow drill bit attached at the opposite end. A housing surrounds the spindle, forming a cavity for holding slurry. In operation, slurry is provided into the housing, and into the spindle through inlets while the spindle is rotating and ultrasonically reciprocating. Slurry flows through the spindle and through the hollow drill bit to cleanse the cutting edge of the bit during a drilling operation. 3 figs.

  4. Well Completion Report for the Fiscal Year 1999 Drilling Within the Chromium Plume West of the 100-D/DR Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ford, B. H.

    1999-01-01

    This report describes the fiscal year (FY) 1999 field activities associated with installing 12 groundwater monitoring wells in the vicinity of the 100-D Area chromium plume west of the 100-D/DR Reactors (100-HR-3 Operable Unit [OU]). The wells were installed to further investigate the extent of the hexavalent chromium hot spot west of the 100-D/DR Reactors and to support future remedial action decisions associated with the 100-HR-3 OU. These wells were designed for multi-purpose use (i.e., monitoring, extraction, and injection). In addition, one of the wells was installed to support the initial deployment of the In Situ Redox Manipulation (ISRM) technology to remediate the chromium plume

  5. Geopressured-Geothermal Drilling and Testing Plan, Volume II, Testing Plan; Dow Chemical Co. - Dept. of Energy Dow-DOE Sweezy No. 1 Well, Vermilion Parish, Louisiana

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1982-02-01

    The Dow/D.O.E. L. R. Sweezy No. 1 geopressured geothermal production well was completed in August of 1981. The well was perforated and gravel packed in approximately 50 feet of sand from 13,344 feet to 13,395 feet. Permeabilities of 6 to 914 millidarcies were measured with porosity of 25 to 36%. Static surface pressure after well clean-up was 5000 psi. At 1000 B/D flow rate the drawdown was 50 psi. The water produced in clean-up contained 100,000 ppm TDS. This report details the plan for testing this well with the goal of obtaining sufficient data to define the total production curve of the small, 939 acre, reservoir. A production time of six to nine months is anticipated. The salt water disposal well is expected to be completed and surface equipment installed such that production testing will begin by April 1, 1982. The program should be finished and reports written by February 28, 1983. The brine will be produced from the No.1 well, passed through a separator where the gas is removed, then reinjected into the No.2 (SWD) well under separator pressure. Flow rates of up to 25,000 B/D are expected. The tests are divided into a two-week short-term test and six to nine-month long-term tests with periodic downhole measurement of drawdown and buildup rates. Data obtained in the testing will be relayed by phoneline computer hookup to Otis Engineering in Dallas, Texas, where the reservoir calculations and modeling will be done. At the point where sufficient data has been obtained to reach the objectives of the program, production will be ended, the wells plugged and abandoned, and a final report will be issued.

  6. Drilling fluids engineering to drill extra-heavy oil reservoir on the Orinoco Oil Belt, eastern Venezuela

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pino, R.; Gonazalez, W. [Proamsa, Maturin, Monagas (Venezuela)

    2008-07-01

    Petrocedeno is an exploration and development company operating in Venezuela. As part of a multidisciplinary group, Proamsa has been working with Petrocedeno to drill horizontal wells while minimizing issues related to the handling of drilling fluids. Proamsa is the only 100 per cent Venezuelan Company involved in drilling extra-heavy oil wells. The drilling plan for Petrocedeno was divided into two campaigns. More than 400 horizontal wells were drilled during the first campaign from 1999 to 2003 which represented over 2,500,000 drilled feet into the Oficina Formation (pay zone of the field). From 2006, during the second drilling campaign, and another 154 horizontal wells having been drilled until 2006 utilizing the xantam gum viscoelastic fluid. This paper discussed the field geology of the Orinoco oil belt. Well design was also explained and discussed and drilling fluid design and new fluid formations were presented. The benefits of xantam gum viscoelastic fluid were also discussed. It was concluded that recycling of drilling fluid from well to well minimized volume and reduced costs. In addition, centrifugation of drilling fluids either on intermediate or horizontals sections while the rig was skidding was always a very good practice avoiding mixing additional volumes. It was also demonstrated that the initial idea to provide a drilling fluid service company with a 100 per cent national value was a success, as demonstrated by the high performance shown by Proamsa during the second drilling campaign with external technologic support. 6 refs., 4 tabs., 4 figs.

  7. Berengario's drill: origin and inspiration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chorney, Michael A; Gandhi, Chirag D; Prestigiacomo, Charles J

    2014-04-01

    Craniotomies are among the oldest neurosurgical procedures, as evidenced by early human skulls discovered with holes in the calvaria. Though devices change, the principles to safely transgress the skull are identical. Modern neurosurgeons regularly use electric power drills in the operating theater; however, nonelectric trephining instruments remain trusted by professionals in certain emergent settings in the rare instance that an electric drill is unavailable. Until the late Middle Ages, innovation in craniotomy instrumentation remained stunted without much documented redesign. Jacopo Berengario da Carpi's (c. 1457-1530 CE) text Tractatus de Fractura Calvae sive Cranei depicts a drill previously unseen in a medical volume. Written in 1518 CE, the book was motivated by defeat over the course of Lorenzo II de'Medici's medical care. Berengario's interchangeable bit with a compound brace ("vertibulum"), known today as the Hudson brace, symbolizes a pivotal device in neurosurgery and medical tool design. This drill permitted surgeons to stock multiple bits, perform the craniotomy faster, and decrease equipment costs during a period of increased incidence of cranial fractures, and thus the need for craniotomies, which was attributable to the introduction of gunpowder. The inspiration stemmed from a school of thought growing within a population of physicians trained as mathematicians, engineers, and astrologers prior to entering the medical profession. Berengario may have been the first to record the use of such a unique drill, but whether he invented this instrument or merely adapted its use for the craniotomy remains clouded.

  8. Trends in the Drilling Waste Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucyna Czekaj

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Petroleum Industry is trying to achieve sustainable development goals. Each year new solutions are implemented to minimize the environmental impact of drilling operations. The paper presents trends in the drilling waste management caused by introducing the sustainable development into the petroleum industry. Old solutions such as the drilling waste disposal at the waste dump or dumping ground are not acceptable from the environmental point of view. The paper presents an analysis of new solutions as the sustainable solutions. The most important problem is the chemical pollution in cuttings and the waste drilling mud. The industrial solutions as well as the laboratory research on the pollution removing from drilling wastes are analysed. The most promising method seems to be the recycling and design for the environment of drilling mud.

  9. Evaluation of polymers of different degrees viscosities as additives for drilling fluids for oil well; Avaliacao de polimeros de diferentes graus de viscosidades como aditivos para fluidos de perfuracao de pocos de petroleo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farias, K.V.; Amorim, L.V.; Silva, A.V. [Universidade Federal de Campina Grande (DEMa/UFCG), PB (Brazil); Lira, H.L. [Universidade Federal de Campina Grande (CCT/UFCG), PB (Brazil). Centro de Ciencias e Tecnologia. Unidade Academica de Engenharia de Materiais], e-mail: kassiefarias@gmail.com

    2008-07-01

    The objective of this work is to study the polymers influence of different degrees of viscosity, used as viscositying and filtered reducer additives, in the rheological, filtration and lubricity properties of drilling fluids for oil wells. Were determined the rheological behavior, the apparent and plastic viscosities, the yield limit and gel force, the filtered volume and the lubricity coefficient in accordance with API standard. The fluids showed pseudoplastic behavior with properties close to the standard fluid; the increase of viscositying and filtered reducer concentrations lead to the increase of rheological properties and the filtered reducer values, from the concentration of 3,5g/350mL of water it acted as viscositying, increasing the values of apparent and plastic viscosities, yield limit and gel force, being 3,0g/350mL of water the adequate concentration of this additive, promoting better results of rheological and filtration properties. (author)

  10. Study for increasing micro-drill reliability by vibrating drilling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Zhaojun; Li Wei; Chen Yanhong; Wang Lijiang

    1998-01-01

    A study for increasing micro-drill reliability by vibrating drilling is described. Under the experimental conditions of this study it is observed, from reliability testing and the fitting of a life-distribution function, that the lives of micro-drills under ordinary drilling follow the log-normal distribution and the lives of micro-drills under vibrating drilling follow the Weibull distribution. Calculations for reliability analysis show that vibrating drilling can increase the lives of micro-drills and correspondingly reduce the scatter of drill lives. Therefore, vibrating drilling increases the reliability of micro-drills

  11. Laser Drilling - Drilling with the Power of Light

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iraj A. Salehi; Brian C. Gahan; Samih Batarseh

    2007-02-28

    Gas Technology Institute (GTI) has been the leading investigator in the field of high power laser applications research for well construction and completion applications. Since 1997, GTI (then as Gas Research Institute- GRI) has investigated several military and industrial laser systems and their ability to cut and drill into reservoir type rocks. In this report, GTI continues its investigation with a 5.34 kW ytterbium-doped multi-clad high power fiber laser (HPFL). When compared to its competitors; the HPFL represents a technology that is more cost effective to operate, capable of remote operations, and requires considerably less maintenance and repair. Work performed under this contract included design and implementation of laboratory experiments to investigate the effects of high power laser energy on a variety of rock types. All previous laser/rock interaction tests were performed on samples in the lab at atmospheric pressure. To determine the effect of downhole pressure conditions, a sophisticated tri-axial cell was designed and tested. For the first time, Berea sandstone, limestone and clad core samples were lased under various combinations of confining, axial and pore pressures. Composite core samples consisted of steel cemented to rock in an effort to represent material penetrated in a cased hole. The results of this experiment will assist in the development of a downhole laser perforation or side tracking prototype tool. To determine how this promising laser would perform under high pressure in-situ conditions, GTI performed a number of experiments with results directly comparable to previous data. Experiments were designed to investigate the effect of laser input parameters on representative reservoir rock types of sandstone and limestone. The focus of the experiments was on laser/rock interaction under confining pressure as would be the case for all drilling and completion operations. As such, the results would be applicable to drilling, perforation, and

  12. Drilling rates and expected oil prices: The own price elasticity of US oil supply

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaufmann, R.K.; Gruen, W.; Montesi, R.

    1994-01-01

    This paper evaluates the feasibility of policies to increase exploration and development by the oil industry. To do so, the authors estimate a new model for well completions in the United States that includes the effect of price expectations from survey data, that separates exploratory from development wells, and that uses a deflator based on the cost of drilling a well. The regression results indicate that the price elasticity of drilling is considerably smaller than previous estimates. When combined with recent analyses of drilling success, the results indicate that the own price elasticity of US oil supply is relatively small. The low price elasticity of supply indicates that efforts to increase domestic oil supplies by increasing well completions may be more expensive than believed previously

  13. An Infrared Drill Borehole Spectrometer for Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smythe, W.; Foote, M.; Johnson, E.; Daly, J.; Loges, P.; Puscasu, I.; Gorevan, S.; Chu, P.; Granahan, J.

    2005-08-01

    The best clues to Mars past may be hidden below the surface of Mars. Long exposure to the sun, high winds and dust storms, large diurnal temperature excursions, and eons of space weathering combine to render a greatly modified surface, in many instances remarkable for its appearance of uniform composition. Drilling can provide access to the layers in the caps, to the permafrost and possibly, to pristine crustal material. The drilling process is complex with high demand on support resources. It is vital to make the drilling process as efficient as possible. A most promising approach is to instrument the drill string itself, thereby avoiding the complexity of sample handling, speeding and simplifying drill operations, and allowing examination of freshly exposed surfaces within the borehole. A solid-state IR spectrometer is being integrated with a blackbody source into a package to fit within an existing Mars drill design. The borehole IR spectrometer is used to monitor facies encountered throughout the drilling process. The spectrometer/IR combination is used in reflectance spectrometer mode to monitor H2O and CO2 content, as well as iron and carbonate mineralogies. Integration required adapting the existing spectrometer to fit within the drill -- including attaching the detectors directly to the spectrometer waveguide, developing the techniques required to seal the micro-thermopile detectors to the waveguide, implementing miniaturized digital conversion electronics, combining the spectrometer with the IR source and coupling them to a suitable window, implementing a suitable sealed package to fit within the drill, integrating and testing the package on a drill, and establishing the proper gain for both stimulus and spectrometer to permit reasonable range of Mars soil analogs. Tests have shown that both sapphire and diamond windows perform well in the drilling environment. Testing of the integrated spectrometer and drill will be completed in the coming year.

  14. Drilling technology advances on four fronts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Budd, G.

    2002-01-01

    Trends and advances in drilling technology are discussed. Four different major trends have been identified. One of these is proprietary case drilling which is said to allow operators to simultaneously drill, case, and evaluate oil and gas wells. In proprietary case drilling, the well is drilled with standard oil field casing which remains in the hole all the time, eliminating the need for tripping. Drill bits and other downhole tools are lowered via wireline inside the casing and latched to the last joint of casing. Wells are drilled either by rotating the casing or by using a downhole mud motor for steering, using conventional directional tools. This technology was introduced by Tesco and is marketed in 25 countries along with a full range of drilling products and services. Super single rigs are an other trend which, owing to their versatility, combined with relatively small environmental footprint have become the rig of choice in a growing number of drilling programs. Super single rigs use 45-ft. joints of drill pipe, more versatile top drives and they have an automated pipe handling system. Super singles can be used on both vertical and slant wells and offer advantages of lower costs, higher efficiencies and greater drilling depths. Given their low environmental impact hydraulic capability, super singles also find application where zero disturbance rules are in effect, as for example, in some parts of southern Alberta. Directional drilling and MWD are most associated with SAGD projects but they also have been used and made significant difference in other spheres of oil recovery as well. The fact is that about 35 percent of wells drilled today are drilled with some form of directional drilling; this will stimulate the growth of ever more advanced MWD technology. Northern rigs are in a class of their own in that here the emphasis is on keeping the crew warm, as opposed to lots of gadgets. The most immediately-visible heat-conserving modification is the 60-ft wind

  15. Universal drill jig

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stringer, E. J.

    1973-01-01

    Inexpensive jig can steadily guide drill at selected angles to flat plane from any direction. Jig uses two mutually perpendicular bevel bodies, each corresponding to interval settings. Drill block has spline on one side to engage groove on bevel body at selected angle. Angles are set by loosening wing nuts, tilting drill block to desired angle until spline engages groove, and tightening nuts.

  16. Recovery Efficiency Test Project: Phase 1, Activity report. Volume 1: Site selection, drill plan preparation, drilling, logging, and coring operations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Overbey, W.K. Jr.; Carden, R.S.; Kirr, J.N.

    1987-04-01

    The recovery Efficiency Test well project addressed a number of technical issues. The primary objective was to determine the increased efficiency gas recovery of a long horizontal wellbore over that of a vertical wellbore and, more specifically, what improvements can be expected from inducing multiple hydraulic fractures from such a wellbore. BDM corporation located, planned, and drilled a long radius turn horizontal well in the Devonian shale Lower Huron section in Wayne County, West Virginia, demonstrating that state-of-the-art technology is capable of drilling such wells. BDM successfully tested drilling, coring, and logging in a horizontal well using air as the circulating medium; conducted reservoir modeling studies to protect flow rates and reserves in advance of drilling operations; observed two phase flow conditions in the wellbore not observed previously; cored a fracture zone which produced gas; observed that fractures in the core and the wellbore were not systematically spaced (varied from 5 to 68 feet in different parts of the wellbore); observed that highest gas show rates reported by the mud logger corresponded to zone with lowest fracture spacing (five feet) or high fracture frequency. Four and one-half inch casting was successfully installed in the borehole and was equipped to isolate the horizontal section into eight (8) zones for future testing and stimulation operations. 6 refs., 48 figs., 10 tabs.

  17. Recent drilling activities at the earth power resources Tuscarora geothermal power project's hot sulphur springs lease area.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goranson, Colin

    2005-03-01

    Earth Power Resources, Inc. recently completed a combined rotary/core hole to a depth of 3,813 feet at it's Hot Sulphur Springs Tuscarora Geothermal Power Project Lease Area located 70-miles north of Elko, Nevada. Previous geothermal exploration data were combined with geologic mapping and newly acquired seismic-reflection data to identify a northerly tending horst-graben structure approximately 2,000 feet wide by at least 6,000 feet long with up to 1,700 feet of vertical offset. The well (HSS-2) was successfully drilled through a shallow thick sequence of altered Tertiary Volcanic where previous exploration wells had severe hole-caving problems. The ''tight-hole'' drilling problems were reduced using drilling fluids consisting of Polymer-based mud mixed with 2% Potassium Chloride (KCl) to reduce Smectite-type clay swelling problems. Core from the 330 F fractured geothermal reservoir system at depths of 2,950 feet indicated 30% Smectite type clays existed in a fault-gouge zone where total loss of circulation occurred during coring. Smectite-type clays are not typically expected at temperatures above 300 F. The fracture zone at 2,950 feet exhibited a skin-damage during injection testing suggesting that the drilling fluids may have caused clay swelling and subsequent geothermal reservoir formation damage. The recent well drilling experiences indicate that drilling problems in the shallow clays at Hot Sulphur Springs can be reduced. In addition, average penetration rates through the caprock system can be on the order of 25 to 35 feet per hour. This information has greatly reduced the original estimated well costs that were based on previous exploration drilling efforts. Successful production formation drilling will depend on finding drilling fluids that will not cause formation damage in the Smectite-rich fractured geothermal reservoir system. Information obtained at Hot Sulphur Springs may apply to other geothermal systems developed in

  18. High Temperature 300°C Directional Drilling System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chatterjee, Kamalesh [Baker Hughes Oilfield Operations, Houston, TX (United States); Aaron, Dick [Baker Hughes Oilfield Operations, Houston, TX (United States); Macpherson, John [Baker Hughes Oilfield Operations, Houston, TX (United States)

    2015-07-31

    Many countries around the world, including the USA, have untapped geothermal energy potential. Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS) technology is needed to economically utilize this resource. Temperatures in some EGS reservoirs can exceed 300°C. To effectively utilize EGS resources, an array of injector and production wells must be accurately placed in the formation fracture network. This requires a high temperature directional drilling system. Most commercial services for directional drilling systems are rated for 175°C while geothermal wells require operation at much higher temperatures. Two U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Geothermal Technologies Program (GTP) projects have been initiated to develop a 300°C capable directional drilling system, the first developing a drill bit, directional motor, and drilling fluid, and the second adding navigation and telemetry systems. This report is for the first project, “High Temperature 300°C Directional Drilling System, including drill bit, directional motor and drilling fluid, for enhanced geothermal systems,” award number DE-EE0002782. The drilling system consists of a drill bit, a directional motor, and drilling fluid. The DOE deliverables are three prototype drilling systems. We have developed three drilling motors; we have developed four roller-cone and five Kymera® bits; and finally, we have developed a 300°C stable drilling fluid, along with a lubricant additive for the metal-to-metal motor. Metal-to-metal directional motors require coatings to the rotor and stator for wear and corrosion resistance, and this coating research has been a significant part of the project. The drill bits performed well in the drill bit simulator test, and the complete drilling system has been tested drilling granite at Baker Hughes’ Experimental Test Facility in Oklahoma. The metal-to-metal motor was additionally subjected to a flow loop test in Baker Hughes’ Celle Technology Center in Germany, where it ran for more than 100

  19. Improve Performance of Water-based Drilling Fluids

    OpenAIRE

    Ismail, Abdul Razak

    2014-01-01

    The significant of exploring deep wells is increasing rapidly to fulfill the global oil and gas demand. Deepwater drilling in offshore operations found negative impact on the drilling fluids rheological properties when exposed to high pressure high temperature conditions. Hence, designing drilling fluids for drilling in these type of wells are the major challenges. In this study, the impact of multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) and nano metal oxides (titanium oxide, aluminum oxide and coppe...

  20. Analysis of Single-Hole and Cross-Hole Tracer Tests Conducted at the Nye County Earl Warning Drilling Program Well Complex, Nye County, Nevada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A. Umari; J.D. Earle; M.F. Fahy

    2006-01-01

    As part of the effort to understand the flow and transport characteristics downgradient from the proposed high-level radioactive waste geologic repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, single- and cross-hole tracer tests were conducted from December 2004 through October 2005 in boreholes at the Nye County 22 well complex. The results were analyzed for transport properties using both numerical and analytical solutions of the governing advection dispersion equation. Preliminary results indicate effective flow porosity values ranging from 1.0 x 10 -2 for an individual flow path to 2.0 x 10 -1 for composite flow paths, longitudinal dispersivity ranging from 0.3 to 3 m, and a transverse horizontal dispersivity of 0.03 m. Individual flow paths identified from the cross-hole testing indicate some solute diffusion into the stagnant portion of the alluvial aquifer

  1. A Promising Material by Using Residue Waste from Bisphenol A Manufacturing to Prepare Fluid-Loss-Control Additive in Oil Well Drilling Fluid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhi-Lei Zhang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The residues mixture from Bisphenol A manufacturing process was analyzed. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR spectroscopy, gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS, and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR were used to characterize the residues. The results indicated that the residues were complex mixture of several molecules. 3-(2-Hydroxyphenyl-1,1,3-trimethyl-2,3-dihydro-1H-inden-5-ol and phenol were the main components of the residues. The technical feasibility of using it as phenol replacement in fluid-loss-control additive production was also investigated. The fluid-loss-control capacity of the novel additive was systematically investigated. It was discovered that the well fluid-loss performance of the prepared additive can be achieved, especially at high temperature.

  2. Effects of drilling fluids on marine organisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parrish, P.R.; Duke, T.W.

    1990-01-01

    This paper reports on drilling fluids, also called drilling muds, which are essential to drilling processes in the exploration and production of oil and gas from the U.S. Outer Continental Shelf (OCS). These fluids are usually discharged from drilling platforms into surrounding waters of the OCS and are regulated by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). In a program carried out by the EPA Environmental research Laboratory at Gulf Breeze, Florida, diverse marine species as well as microbiotic and macrobiotic communities were studied. Drilling fluids were toxic to marine organisms in certain concentrations and exposure regimes. Furthermore, the fluids adversely affected the benthos physically by burying them or by altering the substrates. Toxicity of the drilling-fluid components, used drilling fluids from active Gulf of Mexico sites, and laboratory-prepared drilling fluids varied considerably. for example 96-h LC 50 s were from 25 μ liter -1 to > 1500 μl liter -1 for clams, larval lobsters, mysids, and grass shrimp. In most instances, mortality was significantly (α = 0.05) correlated with the diesel-oil content of the fluids collected from the Gulf of Mexico. Data and model simulations suggest a rapid dilution of drilling fluids released into OCS waters, resulting in concentrations below the acute-effect concentration for the water column organisms tested

  3. Drilling contracts and incentives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osmundsen, Petter; Sorenes, Terje; Toft, Anders

    2008-01-01

    Shortages of rigs and personnel have encouraged discussion of designing incentive contracts in the drilling sector. However, for the drilling contracts, there are not a large variety of contract types in use. This article describes and analyses incentives for drilling contractors. These are directly represented by the compensation formats utilised in the present and in the consecutive drilling contracts. Indirectly, incentives are also provided by the evaluation criteria that oil companies use for awarding drilling assignments. Changes in contract format pose a number of relevant questions relating to resource management, and the article takes an in-depth look at some of these. Do evaluation criteria for awarding drilling assignments encourage the development of new technology and solutions? How will a stronger focus on drilling efficiency influence reservoir utilisation?

  4. Coiled tubing drilling with supercritical carbon dioxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolle , Jack J.

    2002-01-01

    A method for increasing the efficiency of drilling operations by using a drilling fluid material that exists as supercritical fluid or a dense gas at temperature and pressure conditions existing at a drill site. The material can be used to reduce mechanical drilling forces, to remove cuttings, or to jet erode a substrate. In one embodiment, carbon dioxide (CO.sub.2) is used as the material for drilling within wells in the earth, where the normal temperature and pressure conditions cause CO.sub.2 to exist as a supercritical fluid. Supercritical carbon dioxide (SC--CO.sub.2) is preferably used with coiled tube (CT) drilling equipment. The very low viscosity SC--CO.sub.2 provides efficient cooling of the drill head, and efficient cuttings removal. Further, the diffusivity of SC--CO.sub.2 within the pores of petroleum formations is significantly higher than that of water, making jet erosion using SC--CO.sub.2 much more effective than water jet erosion. SC--CO.sub.2 jets can be used to assist mechanical drilling, for erosion drilling, or for scale removal. A choke manifold at the well head or mud cap drilling equipment can be used to control the pressure within the borehole, to ensure that the temperature and pressure conditions necessary for CO.sub.2 to exist as either a supercritical fluid or a dense gas occur at the drill site. Spent CO.sub.2 can be vented to the atmosphere, collected for reuse, or directed into the formation to aid in the recovery of petroleum.

  5. A Comprehensive Prediction Model of Hydraulic Extended-Reach Limit Considering the Allowable Range of Drilling Fluid Flow Rate in Horizontal Drilling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xin; Gao, Deli; Chen, Xuyue

    2017-06-08

    Hydraulic extended-reach limit (HERL) model of horizontal extended-reach well (ERW) can predict the maximum measured depth (MMD) of the horizontal ERW. The HERL refers to the well's MMD when drilling fluid cannot be normally circulated by drilling pump. Previous model analyzed the following two constraint conditions, drilling pump rated pressure and rated power. However, effects of the allowable range of drilling fluid flow rate (Q min  ≤ Q ≤ Q max ) were not considered. In this study, three cases of HERL model are proposed according to the relationship between allowable range of drilling fluid flow rate and rated flow rate of drilling pump (Q r ). A horizontal ERW is analyzed to predict its HERL, especially its horizontal-section limit (L h ). Results show that when Q min  ≤ Q r  ≤ Q max (Case I), L h depends both on horizontal-section limit based on rated pump pressure (L h1 ) and horizontal-section limit based on rated pump power (L h2 ); when Q min  < Q max  < Q r (Case II), L h is exclusively controlled by L h1 ; while L h is only determined by L h2 when Q r  < Q min  < Q max (Case III). Furthermore, L h1 first increases and then decreases with the increase in drilling fluid flow rate, while L h2 keeps decreasing as the drilling fluid flow rate increases. The comprehensive model provides a more accurate prediction on HERL.

  6. Drilling azimuth gamma embedded design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhou Yi Ren

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Embedded drilling azimuth gamma design, the use of radioactive measuring principle embedded gamma measurement while drilling a short section analysis. Monte Carlo method, in response to the density of horizontal well logging numerical simulation of 16 orientation, the orientation of horizontal well analysed, calliper, bed boundary location, space, different formation density, formation thickness, and other factors inclined strata dip the impact by simulating 137Cs sources under different formation conditions of the gamma distribution, to determine the orientation of drilling density tool can detect window size and space, draw depth of the logging methods. The data 360° azimuth imaging, image processing method to obtain graph, display density of the formation, dip and strata thickness and other parameters, the logging methods obtain real-time geo-steering. To establish a theoretical basis for the orientation density logging while drilling method implementation and application of numerical simulation in-depth study of the MWD azimuth and density log response factors of horizontal wells.

  7. Drilling Predation on Serpulid Polychaetes (Ditrupa arietina) from the Pliocene of the Cope Basin, Murcia Region, Southeastern Spain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinell, Jordi; Kowalewski, Michał; Domènech, Rosa

    2012-01-01

    We report quantitative analyses of drilling predation on the free-living, tube-dwelling serpulid polychaete Ditrupa arietina from the Cope Cabo marine succession (Pliocene, Spain). Tubes of D. arietina are abundant in the sampled units: 9 bulk samples from 5 horizons yielded ∼5925 specimens of D. arietina. Except for fragmentation, tubes were well preserved. Complete specimens ranged from 3.1 to 13.4 mm in length and displayed allometric growth patterns, with larger specimens being relatively slimmer. Drilled Ditrupa tubes were observed in all samples. Drillholes, identified as Oichnus paraboloides, were characterized by circular to elliptical outline (drillhole eccentricity increased with its diameter), parabolic vertical profile, outer diameter larger than inner diameter, penetration of one tube wall only, narrow range of drill-hole sizes, and non-random (anterior) distribution of drillholes. A total of 233 drilled specimens were identified, with drilling frequencies varying across horizons from 2.7% to 21% (3.9% for pooled data). Many tube fragments were broken across a drillhole suggesting that the reported frequencies are conservative and that biologically-facilitated (drill-hole induced) fragmentation hampers fossil preservation of complete serpulid tubes. No failed or repaired holes were observed. Multiple complete drillholes were present (3.9%). Drilled specimens were significantly smaller than undrilled specimens and tube length and drill-hole diameter were weakly correlated. The results suggest that drillholes were produced by a size-selective, site-stereotypic predatory organism of unknown affinity. The qualitative and quantitative patterns reported here are mostly consistent with previous reports on recent and fossil Ditrupa and reveal parallels with drilling patterns documented for scaphopod mollusks, a group that is ecologically and morphologically similar to Ditrupa. Consistent with previous studies, the results suggest that free-dwelling serpulid

  8. Final Technical Report for “A Heliportable Sonic Drilling Platform for Microhole Drilling and Exploration”

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lucon, Peter [Resodyn Corporation, Butte, MT (United States)

    2008-05-05

    Exploration and development of new energy resources in remote and environmentally sensitive areas can benefit greatly from a reduction in the size of drilling equipment and the associated equipment for its operation. In particular, microhole sonic drilling technology can significantly reduce costs for: 1.) drilling equipment size, 2.) well construction, 3.) placement of subterranean instrumentation and 4.) exploratory drilling costs. The ultimate goal of the project is to provide reliable, small footprint, instrumentation deployment systems that can operate at lower costs and in environmentally sensitive areas that are not accessible to conventional drilling systems. Sonic drilling, combined with an advanced control technology, termed ResonantSonic Tracking™ (RST™) is proposed as a method to meet the DOE requirements.

  9. Steamboat Hills exploratory slimhole: Drilling and testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Finger, J.T.; Jacobson, F.D.; Hickox, C.E.; Eaton, R.R.

    1994-10-01

    During July-September, 1993, Sandia National Laboratories, in cooperation with Far West Capital, drilled a 4000 feet exploratory slimhole (3.9 inch diameter) in the Steamboat Hills geothermal field near Reno, Nevada. This well was part of Sandia`s program to evaluate slimholes as a geothermal exploration tool. During and after drilling the authors performed four series of production and injection tests while taking downhole (pressure-temperature-spinner) and surface (wellhead pressure and temperature, flow rate) data. In addition to these measurements, the well`s data set includes: continuous core (with detailed log); borehole televiewer images of the wellbore`s upper 500 feet; daily drilling reports from Sandia and from drilling contractor personnel; daily drilling fluid record; numerous temperature logs; and comparative data from production and injection wells in the same field. This report contains: (1) a narrative account of the drilling and testing, (2) a description of equipment used, (3) a brief geologic description of the formation drilled, (4) a summary and preliminary interpretation of the data, and (5) recommendations for future work.

  10. Active Suppression of Drilling System Vibrations For Deep Drilling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raymond, David W.; Blankenship, Douglas A.; Buerger, Stephen; Mesh, Mikhail; Radigan, William Thomas; Su, Jiann-Cherng

    2015-10-01

    The dynamic stability of deep drillstrings is challenged by an inability to impart controllability with ever-changing conditions introduced by geology, depth, structural dynamic properties and operating conditions. A multi-organizational LDRD project team at Sandia National Laboratories successfully demonstrated advanced technologies for mitigating drillstring vibrations to improve the reliability of drilling systems used for construction of deep, high-value wells. Using computational modeling and dynamic substructuring techniques, the benefit of controllable actuators at discrete locations in the drillstring is determined. Prototype downhole tools were developed and evaluated in laboratory test fixtures simulating the structural dynamic response of a deep drillstring. A laboratory-based drilling applicability demonstration was conducted to demonstrate the benefit available from deployment of an autonomous, downhole tool with self-actuation capabilities in response to the dynamic response of the host drillstring. A concept is presented for a prototype drilling tool based upon the technical advances. The technology described herein is the subject of U.S. Patent Application No. 62219481, entitled "DRILLING SYSTEM VIBRATION SUPPRESSION SYSTEMS AND METHODS", filed September 16, 2015.

  11. Development and application of the capacity to make tests of dynamic displacement in samples of oil well drilling cores; Desarrollo y aplicacion de la capacidad para realizar pruebas de desplazamiento dinamico en muestras de nucleos de perforacion de pozos petroleros

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Contreras L, Enrique; Garcia M, Pablo [Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas, Cuernavaca, Morelos (Mexico)

    2001-07-01

    In the Laboratory of Deposits of the Gerencia de Geotermia of the Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas (IIE) the capacity has been developed to make tests of dynamic oil displacement by means of gas or brine injection in samples of oil well drilling cores. Also the methodologies to interpret the results of these tests in terms of dynamics and the efficiency of the oil recovery in terms of the relative permeability have been developed. These capacities represent a very important contribution towards the improvement of the insufficiency that exists in the country to make the large amount of tests of dynamic displacement that demand the different Actives of PEMEX Exploration and Production (PEP), since they satisfy their necessities of data on which the activities of design and implementation of the most suitable techniques for the hydrocarbon recovery of the oil deposits lean. In the present work these capacities are described and some examples are presented of the results that have been obtained from their application in special studies of drilling cores, which have been recently made in the Laboratory of Deposits of the IIE for diverse Actives of PEP exploitation. [Spanish] En el laboratorio de yacimientos de la Gerencia de Geotermia del Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas (IIE) se ha desarrollado la capacidad de realizar pruebas de desplazamiento dinamico de aceite mediante inyeccion de salmuera o de gases en muestras de nucleos de perforacion de pozos petroleros. Tambien se han desarrollado las metodologias para interpretar los resultados de estas pruebas en terminos de la dinamica y la eficiencia de la recuperacion de aceite y en terminos de la permeabilidades relativas. Estas capacidades representan una contribucion muy importante hacia el mejoramiento de la insuficiencia que existe en el pais para realizar la gran cantidad de pruebas de desplazamiento dinamico que demandan los diferentes activos de explotacion de PEMEX Exploracion y Produccion (PEP), ya

  12. Rheological behavior of drilling fluids under low temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lomba, Rosana F.T.; Sa, Carlos H.M. de; Brandao, Edimir M. [PETROBRAS, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Centro de Pesquisas]. E-mails: rlomba, chsa, edimir@cenpes.petrobras.com.br

    2000-07-01

    The so-called solid-free fluids represent a good alternative to drill through productive zones. These drill-in fluids are known to be non-damaging to the formation and their formulation comprise polymers, salts and acid soluble solids. Xanthan gum is widely used as viscosifier and modified starch as fluid loss control additive. The salts most commonly used are sodium chloride and potassium chloride, although the use of organic salt brines has been increasing lately. Sized calcium carbonate is used as bridging material, when the situation requires. The low temperatures encountered during deep water drilling demand the knowledge of fluid rheology at this temperature range. The rheological behavior of drill-in fluids at temperatures as low as 5 deg C was experimentally evaluated. Special attention was given to the low shear rate behavior of the fluids. A methodology was developed to come up with correlations to calculate shear stress variations with temperature. The developed correlations do not depend on a previous choice of a rheological model. The results will be incorporated in a numerical simulator to account for temperature effects on well bore cleaning later on. (author)

  13. Microhole Drilling Tractor Technology Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Western Well Tool

    2007-07-09

    In an effort to increase the U.S. energy reserves and lower costs for finding and retrieving oil, the USDOE created a solicitation to encourage industry to focus on means to operate in small diameter well-Microhole. Partially in response to this solicitation and because Western Well Tool's (WWT) corporate objective to develop small diameter coiled tubing drilling tractor, WWT responded to and was awarded a contract to design, prototype, shop test, and field demonstrate a Microhole Drilling Tractor (MDT). The benefit to the oil industry and the US consumer from the project is that with the MDT's ability to facilitate Coiled Tubing drilled wells to be 1000-3000 feet longer horizontally, US brown fields can be more efficiently exploited resulting in fewer wells, less environmental impact, greater and faster oil recovery, and lower drilling costs. Shortly after award of the contract, WWT was approached by a major oil company that strongly indicated that the specified size of a tractor of 3.0 inches diameter was inappropriate and that immediate applications for a 3.38-inch diameter tractor would substantially increase the usefulness of the tool to the oil industry. Based on this along with an understanding with the oil company to use the tractor in multiple field applications, WWT applied for and was granted a no-cost change-of-scope contract amendment to design, manufacture, assemble, shop test and field demonstrate a prototype a 3.38 inch diameter MDT. Utilizing existing WWT tractor technology and conforming to an industry developed specification for the tool, the Microhole Drilling Tractor was designed. Specific features of the MDT that increase it usefulness are: (1) Operation on differential pressure of the drilling fluid, (2) On-Off Capability, (3) Patented unique gripping elements (4) High strength and flexibility, (5) Compatibility to existing Coiled Tubing drilling equipment and operations. The ability to power the MDT with drilling fluid results in a

  14. Counter-Rotating Tandem Motor Drilling System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kent Perry

    2009-04-30

    Gas Technology Institute (GTI), in partnership with Dennis Tool Company (DTC), has worked to develop an advanced drill bit system to be used with microhole drilling assemblies. One of the main objectives of this project was to utilize new and existing coiled tubing and slimhole drilling technologies to develop Microhole Technology (MHT) so as to make significant reductions in the cost of E&P down to 5000 feet in wellbores as small as 3.5 inches in diameter. This new technology was developed to work toward the DOE's goal of enabling domestic shallow oil and gas wells to be drilled inexpensively compared to wells drilled utilizing conventional drilling practices. Overall drilling costs can be lowered by drilling a well as quickly as possible. For this reason, a high drilling rate of penetration is always desired. In general, high drilling rates of penetration (ROP) can be achieved by increasing the weight on bit and increasing the rotary speed of the bit. As the weight on bit is increased, the cutting inserts penetrate deeper into the rock, resulting in a deeper depth of cut. As the depth of cut increases, the amount of torque required to turn the bit also increases. The Counter-Rotating Tandem Motor Drilling System (CRTMDS) was planned to achieve high rate of penetration (ROP) resulting in the reduction of the drilling cost. The system includes two counter-rotating cutter systems to reduce or eliminate the reactive torque the drillpipe or coiled tubing must resist. This would allow the application of maximum weight-on-bit and rotational velocities that a coiled tubing drilling unit is capable of delivering. Several variations of the CRTDMS were designed, manufactured and tested. The original tests failed leading to design modifications. Two versions of the modified system were tested and showed that the concept is both positive and practical; however, the tests showed that for the system to be robust and durable, borehole diameter should be substantially larger

  15. Conceptual design of modular fixture for frame welding and drilling process integration case study: Student chair in UNS industrial engineering integrated practicum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darmawan, Tofiq Dwiki; Priadythama, Ilham; Herdiman, Lobes

    2018-02-01

    Welding and drilling are main processes of making chair frame from metal material. Commonly, chair frame construction includes many arcs which bring difficulties for its welding and drilling process. In UNS industrial engineering integrated practicum there are welding fixtures which use to fixing frame component position for welding purpose. In order to achieve exact holes position for assembling purpose, manual drilling processes were conducted after the frame was joined. Unfortunately, after it was welded the frame material become hard and increase drilling tools wear rate as well as reduce holes position accuracy. The previous welding fixture was not equipped with clamping system and cannot accommodate drilling process. To solve this problem, our idea is to reorder the drilling process so that it can be execute before welding. Thus, this research aims to propose conceptual design of modular fixture which can integrate welding and drilling process. We used Generic Product Development Process to address the design concept. We collected design requirements from 3 source, jig and fixture theoretical concepts, user requirements, and clamping part standards. From 2 alternatives fixture tables, we propose the first which equipped with mounting slots instead of holes. We test the concept by building a full sized prototype and test its works by conducting welding and drilling of a student chair frame. Result from the welding and drilling trials showed that the holes are on precise position after welding. Based on this result, we conclude that the concept can be a consideration for application in UNS Industrial Engineering Integrated Practicum.

  16. Hydraulic rotary drill

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kacy, J.; Pochaba, K.

    1987-06-01

    Presents a novel patented hydraulic drill for use in soft and medium hard rock. Indicates its numerous advantages resulting mainly from the driving method employing water/oil emulsion or hydraulic systems of heading machines or cutter loaders in mines. Provides technical data of the new drill and compares it with the PWR and OWRO drills used until now. The drill has a feed pressure of 15-25 bar, maximum rotation (at 25 bar pressure) of 1400 per minute, maximum moment of inertia 200 Nm, working medium - 5% emulsion, hydraulic oil, weight - 14 kg. Describes applications of the drill which has been approved for operation in environments of the IVth methane hazard category.

  17. Drilling contract issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davison, G.B.; Worden, D.R.; Borbridge, G.K.D.

    1997-01-01

    Some selected issues which are facing both operators and contractors in drilling for oil and gas, such as the allocation of risk by contract and by statute and the implementation of new technologies, were discussed. There are three varieties of written drilling contracts used in Canada: (1) day work and meterage contracts, (2) master drilling agreements, and (3) contracts that are used in construction projects that do not specifically relate to drilling. Issues relevant to the contractual allocation of risk, to implementing new drilling technologies, to reconciling contract and statute liability, and the formation of strategic alliances for mutual benefit, and the factors contributing to the success of such alliances were explored. 12 refs

  18. Drill-motor holding fixture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chartier, E. N.; Culp, L. N.

    1980-01-01

    Guide improves accuracy and reduces likelihood of bit breakage in drilling large work pieces. Drill motor is mounted on pipe that slides on furniture clamp. Drill is driven into work piece by turning furniture-clamp handle.

  19. Facility for testing ice drills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielson, Dennis L.; Delahunty, Chris; Goodge, John W.; Severinghaus, Jeffery P.

    2017-05-01

    The Rapid Access Ice Drill (RAID) is designed for subsurface scientific investigations in Antarctica. Its objectives are to drill rapidly through ice, to core samples of the transition zone and bedrock, and to leave behind a borehole observatory. These objectives required the engineering and fabrication of an entirely new drilling system that included a modified mining-style coring rig, a unique fluid circulation system, a rod skid, a power unit, and a workshop with areas for the storage of supplies and consumables. An important milestone in fabrication of the RAID was the construction of a North American Test (NAT) facility where we were able to test drilling and fluid processing functions in an environment that is as close as possible to that expected in Antarctica. Our criteria for site selection was that the area should be cold during the winter months, be located in an area of low heat flow, and be at relatively high elevation. We selected a site for the facility near Bear Lake, Utah, USA. The general design of the NAT well (NAT-1) started with a 27.3 cm (10.75 in.) outer casing cemented in a 152 m deep hole. Within that casing, we hung a 14 cm (5.5 in.) casing string, and, within that casing, a column of ice was formed. The annulus between the 14 and 27.3 cm casings provided the path for circulation of a refrigerant. After in-depth study, we chose to use liquid CO2 to cool the hole. In order to minimize the likelihood of the casing splitting due to the volume increase associated with freezing water, the hole was first cooled and then ice was formed in increments from the bottom upward. First, ice cubes were placed in the inner liner and then water was added. Using this method, a column of ice was incrementally prepared for drilling tests. The drilling tests successfully demonstrated the functioning of the RAID system. Reproducing such a facility for testing of other ice drilling systems could be advantageous to other research programs in the future.

  20. Simplified Casing Program for Development Wells in Mahu Well Block

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu Zongyu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In the Mahu well block of Junggar basin, the complex formation has many sets of pressure system. Especially, the formation with microcracks in the middle layer is loose and the pressure bearing capacity is low. Lost circulation is prone to occur in this layer. At present, high investment and long drilling period were the main problems in the exploration and development process. The geostress 3D model of Mahu well block was established by means of logging and drilling data. The model provided the three-pressure profiles of Mahu well block for casing program optimization and safety drilling. Each well could be optimized the intermediate casing setting position. The intermediate casing was saved 160 meters long. The total of drilling speed was improved 5 times compared with the past drilling process. Slim hole drilling technology raised ROP 51.96% higher, and the average drilling period is shorten to 24.83 days.

  1. Tool geometry optimization for drilling CFRP/Al-Li stacks with a lightning strike protection

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Bouami, Souhail; Habak, Malek; Velasco, Raphaël; Santos, Baptise Dos; Franz, Gérald; Vantomme, Pascal

    2017-10-01

    One-shot drilling of Carbon Fiber-Reinforced Polymer materials with a Lightning Strike Protection (LSP)/metal stacks is a challenging task due to the inherent difference physical and mechanical properties and processing mechanisms of each component. The objective of the present work is to optimize tool geometry width in drilling of CFRP/Al-Li with a LSP. Firstly, a set of conventional uncoated carbide drills which are commercially available for the drilling of aeronautic composites was used to study the effect of tool geometry on drilled-hole quality. The set encompasses a twist drill bit, a step drill bit and a point spur drill bit. Based on references and cutting conditions recommended by drill manufacturers, the drilling tests performed are based on full-factorial experimental design using three cutting speeds and two feed rates. Results showed that, on the one hand, spur drill gave the best results causing small damage extension in the hole perimeter but we noticed a rapid tool wear at the spur which increases with feed. On the other hand, step drill presented higher LSP delamination located at the hole entrance but reduces the level of thrust force. The choice of tool geometry process should be a compromise in drilling aluminium as well as drilling carbon fiber with LSP. In the second phase of the current work, three different new uncoated carbide geometries were developed: a Spur Step Drill, a Three Steps Drill and a Square Step Drill. Same cutting conditions were used for the three drills. Results showed a rapid tool wear for the Spur Step Drill at the spur. In terms of LSP delamination, burr and drill wear, the drill adapted to drilling CFRP/Al-Li with LSP stacks is the three steps drill.

  2. The Newberry Deep Drilling Project (NDDP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonneville, A.; Cladouhos, T. T.; Petty, S.; Schultz, A.; Sorle, C.; Asanuma, H.; Friðleifsson, G. Ó.; Jaupart, C. P.; Moran, S. C.; de Natale, G.

    2017-12-01

    We present the arguments to drill a deep well to the ductile/brittle transition zone (T>400°C) at Newberry Volcano, central Oregon state, U.S.A. The main research goals are related to heat and mass transfer in the crust from the point of view of natural hazards and geothermal energy: enhanced geothermal system (EGS supercritical and beyond-brittle), volcanic hazards, mechanisms of magmatic intrusions, geomechanics close to a magmatic system, calibration of geophysical imaging techniques and drilling in a high temperature environment. Drilling at Newberry will bring additional information to a very promising field of research initiated by ICDP in the Deep Drilling project in Iceland with IDDP-1 on Krafla in 2009, followed by IDDP-2 on the Reykjanes ridge in 2016, and the future Japan Beyond-Brittle project and Krafla Magma Testbed. Newberry Volcano contains one of the largest geothermal heat reservoirs in the western United States, extensively studied for the last 40 years. All the knowledge and experience collected make this an excellent choice for drilling a well that will reach high temperatures at relatively shallow depths (< 5000 m). The large conductive thermal anomaly (320°C at 3000 m depth), has already been well-characterized by extensive drilling and geophysical surveys. This will extend current knowledge from the existing 3000 m deep boreholes at the sites into and through the brittle-ductile transition approaching regions of partial melt like lateral dykes. The important scientific questions that will form the basis of a full drilling proposal, have been addressed during an International Continental Drilling Program (ICDP) workshop held in Bend, Oregon in September 2017. They will be presented and discussed as well as the strategic plan to address them.

  3. 75 FR 54912 - Drill Pipe and Drill Collars From China

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-09

    ... COMMISSION Drill Pipe and Drill Collars From China AGENCY: United States International Trade Commission... retarded, by reason of subsidized and less-than-fair-value imports from China of drill pipe and drill... the Act (19 U.S.C. 1671b) are being provided to manufacturers, producers, or exporters in China of...

  4. 75 FR 10501 - Drill Pipe and Drill Collars from China

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-08

    ... COMMISSION Drill Pipe and Drill Collars from China Determinations On the basis of the record \\1\\ developed in... injury by reason of imports from China of drill pipe and drill collars, provided for in subheadings 7304... Government of China.\\2\\ \\1\\ The record is defined in sec. 207.2(f) of the Commission's Rules of Practice and...

  5. Development plan for an advanced drilling system with real-time diagnostics (Diagnostics-While-Drilling)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    FINGER,JOHN T.; MANSURE,ARTHUR J.; PRAIRIE,MICHAEL R.; GLOWKA,D.A.

    2000-02-01

    This proposal provides the rationale for an advanced system called Diagnostics-while-drilling (DWD) and describes its benefits, preliminary configuration, and essential characteristics. The central concept is a closed data circuit in which downhole sensors collect information and send it to the surface via a high-speed data link, where it is combined with surface measurements and processed through drilling advisory software. The driller then uses this information to adjust the drilling process, sending control signals back downhole with real-time knowledge of their effects on performance. The report presents background of related previous work, and defines a Program Plan for US Department of Energy (DOE), university, and industry cooperation.

  6. Tesco's Bob Tessari: launching a drilling revolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Budd, G.

    2002-07-01

    The 'Casing Drilling' technology, patented by Tesco, which allows operators to simultaneously drill, case and evaluate oil and gas wells, is described. The system is claimed to substantially reduce the amount of lost circulation, loss of well control and bore hole instability problems that have been documented to account for about 25 per cent of total rig time on a well, and at least $4 billion (or 10 per cent of the $40 billion annual global drilling tab) spent on 'unscheduled events' associated with tripping drill pipe. With the Casing Drilling process, wells are drilled using standard oilfield casing instead of drill pipe. The host of downhole problems associated with tripping in and out of the hole are avoided, as the casing pipe is never removed. Instead, drill bits and other downhole tools are tripped through the casing with wireline at a rate of about 500 ft per minute, drastically reducing tripping time. Tesco also developed the portable top drive, the manufacture and rental of which constitutes a large part of the company's business, besides helping technologically to make Casing Drilling possible. Much of the company's success is attributed to the tenacity and zest for innovative approaches of the company's CEO, Bob Tessari, who is largely responsible for the company finding itself at the centre of a drilling technology revolution.

  7. Subsurface drill string

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casper, William L [Rigby, ID; Clark, Don T [Idaho Falls, ID; Grover, Blair K [Idaho Falls, ID; Mathewson, Rodney O [Idaho Falls, ID; Seymour, Craig A [Idaho Falls, ID

    2008-10-07

    A drill string comprises a first drill string member having a male end; and a second drill string member having a female end configured to be joined to the male end of the first drill string member, the male end having a threaded portion including generally square threads, the male end having a non-threaded extension portion coaxial with the threaded portion, and the male end further having a bearing surface, the female end having a female threaded portion having corresponding female threads, the female end having a non-threaded extension portion coaxial with the female threaded portion, and the female end having a bearing surface. Installation methods, including methods of installing instrumented probes are also provided.

  8. Drill pipe protector development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomerson, C.; Kenne, R. [Regal International Corp., Corsicanna, TX (United States); Wemple, R.P. [Sandia National Lab., Albuquerque, NM (United States)] [ed.] [and others

    1996-03-01

    The Geothermal Drilling Organization (GDO), formed in the early 1980s by the geothermal industry and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Geothermal Division, sponsors specific development projects to advance the technologies used in geothermal exploration, drilling, and production phases. Individual GDO member companies can choose to participate in specific projects that are most beneficial to their industry segment. Sandia National Laboratories is the technical interface and contracting office for the DOE in these projects. Typical projects sponsored in the past have included a high temperature borehole televiewer, drill bits, muds/polymers, rotary head seals, and this project for drill pipe protectors. This report documents the development work of Regal International for high temperature geothermal pipe protectors.

  9. Humvee Armor Plate Drilling

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    2004-01-01

    When drilling holes in hard steel plate used in up-armor kits for Humvee light trucks, the Anniston Army Depot, Anniston, Alabama, requested the assistance of the National Center for Defense Manufacturing and Machining (NCDMM...

  10. STIMULATION TECHNOLOGIES FOR DEEP WELL COMPLETIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stephen Wolhart

    2003-06-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) is sponsoring a Deep Trek Program targeted at improving the economics of drilling and completing deep gas wells. Under the DOE program, Pinnacle Technologies is conducting a project to evaluate the stimulation of deep wells. The objective of the project is to assess U.S. deep well drilling & stimulation activity, review rock mechanics & fracture growth in deep, high pressure/temperature wells and evaluate stimulation technology in several key deep plays. Phase 1 was recently completed and consisted of assessing deep gas well drilling activity (1995-2007) and an industry survey on deep gas well stimulation practices by region. Of the 29,000 oil, gas and dry holes drilled in 2002, about 300 were drilled in the deep well; 25% were dry, 50% were high temperature/high pressure completions and 25% were simply deep completions. South Texas has about 30% of these wells, Oklahoma 20%, Gulf of Mexico Shelf 15% and the Gulf Coast about 15%. The Rockies represent only 2% of deep drilling. Of the 60 operators who drill deep and HTHP wells, the top 20 drill almost 80% of the wells. Six operators drill half the U.S. deep wells. Deep drilling peaked at 425 wells in 1998 and fell to 250 in 1999. Drilling is expected to rise through 2004 after which drilling should cycle down as overall drilling declines.

  11. Geothermal gradient drilling, north-central Cascades of Oregon, 1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Youngquist, W.

    1980-01-01

    A geothermal gradient drilling program was conducted on the western flank of the north-central Cascade Mountains in Oregon. Six wells were drilled during this program, although in effect seven were drilled, as two wells were drilled at site 3, the second well, however, actually going to a lesser depth than the first. Three of the wells (3, 4, and 5) were drilled in areas which topographically are subject to strong throughflows of ground water. None of these wells reached the regional water table, and all showed essentially isothermal geothermal gradients. The single well which was started essentially at the water table (well 6) shows a linear temperature rise with depth essentially from the top of the well bore. Well No. 2 shows an isothermal gradient down to the level of the regional water table and then shows a linear gradient of about 70/sup 0/C/km from the regional water table to total depth.

  12. Fiscal 1998 investigation of geothermal development and promotion in Akinomiya area survey. Report on exploratory drilling/well survey and incidental work (1/2); 1998 nendo chinetsu kaihatsu sokushin chosa Akinomiya chiiki chosa hokokusho. 1/2. Shisui kussaku koji kosei chosa oyobi futai koji

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-01-01

    Exploratory drilling and well survey were conducted, for the purpose of grasping underground geological structure, temperature and physical properties of Akinomiya area, Akita prefecture, as a part of fiscal 1998 investigation of geothermal development and promotion. The exploratory drilling well N10-AY-6 was excavated to the depth of 1,701 m. This well had a small lost circulation of about 4.2 kL/h at the end of drilling; hence, pressurized water injection was carried out for the purpose of enhancing the performance as a reducing well, resulting in an improvement to 21.6 kL/h. The well N10-AY-7 was in the bedrocks of the Old Tertiary system at the depth of 492 m or deeper, which revealed that the Old Tertiary bedrocks lay more shallowly than expected. At the depth of 1,900 m, the maximum temperature showed 223.3 degree C. In a temperature recovery test, it climbed to 277.2 degree C at the depth of 1,400 m. In the well N10-AY-8, the Old Tertiary bedrocks were found drilled at the depth of 87 m or deeper. Inside well temperatures at the time of temperature recovery test showed nearly the same degrees from the depth of 880 m to 1,090 m or about, thereafter rising until the depth of 1,330 m, further rising from 1,370 m until the bottom of the well, and showing the maximum temperature of 277.0 degree C at the depth of 1,450 m. (NEDO)

  13. MACHINERY RESONANCE AND DRILLING

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leishear, R.; Fowley, M.

    2010-01-23

    New developments in vibration analysis better explain machinery resonance, through an example of drill bit chattering during machining of rusted steel. The vibration of an operating drill motor was measured, the natural frequency of an attached spring was measured, and the two frequencies were compared to show that the system was resonant. For resonance to occur, one of the natural frequencies of a structural component must be excited by a cyclic force of the same frequency. In this case, the frequency of drill bit chattering due to motor rotation equaled the spring frequency (cycles per second), and the system was unstable. A soft rust coating on the steel to be drilled permitted chattering to start at the drill bit tip, and the bit oscillated on and off of the surface, which increased the wear rate of the drill bit. This resonant condition is typically referred to as a motor critical speed. The analysis presented here quantifies the vibration associated with this particular critical speed problem, using novel techniques to describe resonance.

  14. Modeling pellet impact drilling process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovalyov, A. V.; Ryabchikov, S. Ya; Isaev, Ye D.; Ulyanova, O. S.

    2016-03-01

    The paper describes pellet impact drilling which could be used to increase the drilling speed and the rate of penetration when drilling hard rocks. Pellet impact drilling implies rock destruction by metal pellets with high kinetic energy in the immediate vicinity of the earth formation encountered. The pellets are circulated in the bottom hole by a high velocity fluid jet, which is the principle component of the ejector pellet impact drill bit. The experiments conducted has allowed modeling the process of pellet impact drilling, which creates the scientific and methodological basis for engineering design of drilling operations under different geo-technical conditions.

  15. Lake Van deep drilling project PALEOVAN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litt, Thomas; Anselmetti, Flavio S.

    2014-11-01

    A complete succession of the lacustrine sediment sequence deposited during the last ˜600,000 years in Lake Van, Eastern Anatolia (Turkey) was drilled in 2010 supported by the International Continental Scientific Drilling Program (ICDP). Based on a detailed seismic site survey, two sites at a water depth of up to 360 m were drilled in summer 2010, and cores were retrieved from sub-lake-floor depths of 140 m (Northern Basin) and 220 m (Ahlat Ridge). To obtain a complete sedimentary section, the two sites were multiple cored in order to investigate the paleoclimate history of a sensitive semi-arid region between the Black, Caspian, and Mediterranean seas. This introductory paper provides background information of the deep drilling project and an overview of the studies presented in this special volume by the PALEOVAN science team dealing with chronology, paleomagnetism, paleoenvironmental proxies, geophysical and petrophysical investigations as well as pore-water and fluid transport.

  16. Site specific health and safety plan for drilling in support of in situ redox manipulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tuttle, B.G.

    1997-02-01

    This document contains the Site Specific Health and Safety Plan for Drilling in support of the In Situ REDOX Manipulation in the 100-HR-3 Operable Unit. Approximately eight wells will be drilled in the 100-D/DR Area using rotary, sonic, or cable tool drilling methods. Split-spoon sampling will be done in conjunction with the drilling. The drilling may be spread out over several months. Included in this document are checklists for health and safety procedures

  17. Utilisation des polymères organiques durant le forage et la cimentation des puits à haute température Using Organic Polymers During Drilling and Cementing of High Temperature Wells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin M.

    2006-11-01

    result of increasing depths. This threshold has already been largely surpassed in high enthalpy geothermal wells, with temperatures of as much as 400°C. In such cases, it is indispensable for drilling fluids and cementing materials to have sufficient stability. For water-base and oil-base drilling fluids, additives must be designed to prevent reversible and irreversible variations in viscosity and filtration characteristics during the cycle or during circulation shut downs of a few hours. Such additives are mostly polymers capable of being dispersed in the liquid phase. But their present stability is such that water-base fluids can hardly be used above 260°C and oilbase fluids above 285°C. For cementing jobs, it may be desirable to replace the hydraulic cement normally used by a materiel with a lower density and/or increased durability. During the entire lifetime of the well, planned for 20 to 30 years, this material will have to ensure the seal of the annular space and to maintain its mechanical strength. It will also have to withstand the sometimes aggressive environment of formation waters. Laboratory research on new cementing materials has concentrated on organic resins and organosiloxane-base compounds. Formulations have been found that are stable up to 300°C. But the possibilities of implementing them in wells still remain to be investigated, and the high cost of the basic products risks limiting their application.

  18. Evacuation drill at CMS

    CERN Multimedia

    Niels Dupont-Sagorin and Christoph Schaefer

    2012-01-01

    Training personnel, including evacuation guides and shifters, checking procedures, improving collaboration with the CERN Fire Brigade: the first real-life evacuation drill at CMS took place on Friday 3 February from 12p.m. to 3p.m. in the two caverns located at Point 5 of the LHC.   CERN personnel during the evacuation drill at CMS. Evacuation drills are required by law and have to be organized periodically in all areas of CERN, both above and below ground. The last drill at CMS, which took place in June 2007, revealed some desiderata, most notably the need for a public address system. With this equipment in place, it is now possible to broadcast audio messages from the CMS control room to the underground areas.   The CMS Technical Coordination Team and the GLIMOS have focused particularly on preparing collaborators for emergency situations by providing training and organizing regular safety drills with the HSE Unit and the CERN Fire Brigade. This Friday, the practical traini...

  19. Research on technical and technological parameters of inclined drilling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    М. В. Двойников

    2017-03-01

    Analysis of investigation results showed that the main source of oscillations is linked to bending and compressing stresses, caused by well deviations as well as rigidity of the drilling tool. In effect, in the bottom-hole assembly occur auto-oscillations, making it impossible to correct azimuth and zenith angles. Alteration of rigidity in the bottom part of the tool and drilling parameters, implying reduced rotation speed of the drill string and regulation of drill bit pressure, can partially solve this problem, though increase in rotation speed is limited by technical characteristics of existing top drive systems.

  20. Importance of the planning activities, cutting, handling and analysis of the nuclei of oil well drilling; Importancia de las actividades de planificacion, corte, manejo y analisis de los nucleos de perforacion de pozos petroleros

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Contreras L, Enrique A; Garcia M, Pablo [Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas, Cuernavaca, Morelos (Mexico)

    2007-07-01

    In the geologic formation where the oil deposits are located, diverse types of rocks perform functions as structural elements, storage containers for hydrocarbon water and calorific energy, as well as impermeable barriers and transport means of the energy and the fluids. Among the most important properties that are used to describe these functions are the porosity, the permeability, the compressibility of the pores volume, the formation resistivity factor, the saturation exponent, the velocity of acoustic waves P and S, the relative permeability, the capillary pressures, the elastic constants and other mechanical properties, the thermal expansion, coefficient, the thermal conductivity, the thermal diffusivity and the specific heat. The execution of an ample variety of activities related to the stages of exploration, location, evaluation and development of the oil deposits, depends strongly on having a good knowledge of the magnitude and the spatial variability of these properties. The technical feasibility as well as the economics in developing a prospectus of oil deposit, depends on that the intervening rocks exhibit a suitable combination of their properties, thus constituting a confining and storing geologic structure of hydrocarbons that is feasible to be developed technically, at the same time of having the economic potential of yielding an economic benefit. In this context, from the experience platform on the subject existing in the Laboratorio de Yacimientos of the Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas. The present article approaches the relevance which have the activities of cutting, handling and laboratory analysis of the oil well drilling nuclei, for the geologic evaluation of the formation, in relation to the characterization, the evaluation and the advantage of the oil deposits. [Spanish] En las formaciones geologicas donde se encuentran emplazados los yacimientos petroleros, diversos tipos de rocas desempenan funciones como elementos estructurales

  1. Stinger Enhanced Drill Bits For EGS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Durrand, Christopher J. [Novatek International, Inc., Provo, UT (United States); Skeem, Marcus R. [Novatek International, Inc., Provo, UT (United States); Crockett, Ron B. [Novatek International, Inc., Provo, UT (United States); Hall, David R. [Novatek International, Inc., Provo, UT (United States)

    2013-04-29

    The project objectives were to design, engineer, test, and commercialize a drill bit suitable for drilling in hard rock and high temperature environments (10,000 meters) likely to be encountered in drilling enhanced geothermal wells. The goal is provide a drill bit that can aid in the increased penetration rate of three times over conventional drilling. Novatek has sought to leverage its polycrystalline diamond technology and a new conical cutter shape, known as the Stinger®, for this purpose. Novatek has developed a fixed bladed bit, known as the JackBit®, populated with both shear cutter and Stingers that is currently being tested by major drilling companies for geothermal and oil and gas applications. The JackBit concept comprises a fixed bladed bit with a center indenter, referred to as the Jack. The JackBit has been extensively tested in the lab and in the field. The JackBit has been transferred to a major bit manufacturer and oil service company. Except for the attached published reports all other information is confidential.

  2. Using MPC for Managed Pressure Drilling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johannes Møgster

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available As production on the Norwegian shelf enters tail production, drilling wells with vanishing pressure windows become more attractive. This motivates use of automatic control systems for improved control of downhole pressure using Managed Pressure Drilling (MPD techniques. PID SISO control solutions for MPD are by now relatively standard, and well understood. This article explores the potential benefits of using linear Model Predictive Control (MPC for MPD. It is shown that in combination with wired drill pipe, the downhole pressure can be controlled at multiple locations in the open wellbore, by using both pumps and choke in applied backpressure MPD. Also, downhole pressure constraints (pore and fracture pressures fit naturally in MPC. Illustrative simulations are presented from using a high fidelity well simulator called WeMod, and Statoil's MPC software SEPTIC.

  3. Casing drilling TM : a viable technology for coal bed methane?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Madell, G.; Muqeem, M. [Tesco Corp., Calgary, AB (Canada)

    2001-07-01

    This paper highlighted the experience that Tesco has gained by drilling more than 30 wells using only casings as the drill stem, suggesting that such technology could be advantageous for Coal Bed Methane (CBM) exploration and development. Tesco has manufactured a mobile and compact hydraulic drilling rig that is ideal to meet the great demand for CBM development in Canada. The Casing Drilling TM system, when used in conjunction with the drilling rig, could be very effective and efficient for exploration and development of CBM reserves which typically require extensive coring. Continuous coring while drilling ahead and wire line retrieval can offer time savings and quick core recovery of large diameter core required for exploration core desorption tests. The proposed system may also have the potential to core or drill typically tight gas sands or coal beds under balanced with air or foam. This would reduce drilling fluid damage while finding gas at the same time. Compared to conventional drill pipes, Casing Drilling TM could also be effective with water production from shallow sands because of the smaller annual clearance which requires less air volumes to lift any produced water. 8 refs., 3 tabs., 9 figs.

  4. Preliminary Research on Possibilities of Drilling Process Robotization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawel, Stefaniak; Jacek, Wodecki; Jakubiak, Janusz; Zimroz, Radoslaw

    2017-12-01

    Nowadays, drilling & blasting is crucial technique for deposit excavation using in hard rock mining. Unfortunately, such approach requires qualified staff to perform, and consequently there is a serious risk related to rock mechanics when using explosives. Negative influence of explosives usage on safety issues of underground mine is a main cause of mining demands related to elimination of people from production area. Other aspects worth taking into consideration are drilling precision according to drilling pattern, blasting effectiveness, improvement of drilling tool reliability etc. In the literature different drilling support solutions are well-known in terms of positioning support systems, anti-jamming systems or cavity detection systems. For many years, teleoperation of drilling process is also developed. Unfortunately, available technologies have so far not fully met the industries expectation in hard rock. Mine of the future is expected to incorporate robotic system instead of current approaches. In this paper we present preliminary research related to robotization of drilling process and possibilities of its application in underground mine condition. A test rig has been proposed. To simulate drilling process several key assumptions have been accepted. As a result, algorithms for automation of drilling process have been proposed and tested on the test rig. Experiences gathered so far underline that there is a need for further developing robotic system for drilling process.

  5. Casing drilling - first experience in Brazil; Casing drilling - primeira experiencia no Brasil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Placido, Joao Carlos Ribeiro; Medeiros, Fernando; Lucena, Humberto; Medeiros, Joao Carlos Martins de; Costa, Vicente Abel Soares Rosa da; Silva, Paulo Roberto Correa da [PETROBRAS, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Alves, Renato J.M. [Tesco, London (United Kingdom)

    2004-07-01

    This paper describes the 'Casing Drilling' technology and its first experience in Brazil. This new process of casing while drilling was first developed to reduce costs. This system integrates the drilling process and casing running in one operation, promoting a more efficient well construction system, reducing trip time and costs of drill pipes and their transportation. Besides, this methodology intends to eliminate hole problems related to trouble zones with abnormal pressure with loss circulation, to overcome zones with wellbore instabilities, and to facilitate well control. Two companies have been identified using this technology: Tesco and Weatherford. However, there are differences between the techniques used by these companies, which are described in this paper. In the first experience in Brazil, it was decided to field test the technology developed by Tesco. This paper describes the preparation, the operation and the results of this first test. (author)

  6. 30 CFR 250.1605 - Drilling requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... of operations and the structural integrity of the drilling unit. (d) Foundation requirements. When... well and mud logs through the objective interval to determine the presence, quality, and quantity of... deposit. (2) Inclinational surveys shall be obtained on all vertical wells at intervals not exceeding 1...

  7. Measurement Space Drill Support

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-08-30

    calendar within the CoBP SharePoint portal but it is not updated or maintained. The center Ops are notified if they are hosting the event since a...Recommendation: It is recommended that the center operations office within TRAC maintain the SharePoint calendar with upcoming MS drills and notify other

  8. Geomechanical wellbore stability modeling of exploratory wells - study case at middle Magdalena basin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carvajal Jimenez, Jenny Mabel; Valera Lara, Luz Carime; Rueda, Alexander; Saavedra Trujillo, Nestor Fernando

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents the geomechanical wellbore stability modal of an exploratory well sited of middle Magdalena basin (MMB), which is based on the validity of linear elastic deformational theory for porous media; the use of correlations and field tools such as well and image logs to indirect determination of mechanical properties and stress state, additionally, it is shown the modal calibration and validation using drilling events which occurred at other previously drilled wells in the study area, of the exploratory well itself and experimentally evaluated mechanical properties on outcrop and core samples from the basin formations. this application allowed the Instituto Colombiano del Petroleo (ICP) of ECOPETROL S.A. to formally perform the geomechanical modeling of Colombian formations and to accomplish a complete and appropriate methodology to do so; such methodology has been standardized as part of the drilling support process of ECOPETROL S.A., supplying the possibility for taking decisions that contribute to reduce drilling costs and risks during operations

  9. Mars Science Laboratory Drill

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okon, Avi B.; Brown, Kyle M.; McGrath, Paul L.; Klein, Kerry J.; Cady, Ian W.; Lin, Justin Y.; Ramirez, Frank E.; Haberland, Matt

    2012-01-01

    This drill (see Figure 1) is the primary sample acquisition element of the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) that collects powdered samples from various types of rock (from clays to massive basalts) at depths up to 50 mm below the surface. A rotary-percussive sample acquisition device was developed with an emphasis on toughness and robustness to handle the harsh environment on Mars. It is the first rover-based sample acquisition device to be flight-qualified (see Figure 2). This drill features an autonomous tool change-out on a mobile robot, and novel voice-coil-based percussion. The drill comprises seven subelements. Starting at the end of the drill, there is a bit assembly that cuts the rock and collects the sample. Supporting the bit is a subassembly comprising a chuck mechanism to engage and release the new and worn bits, respectively, and a spindle mechanism to rotate the bit. Just aft of that is a percussion mechanism, which generates hammer blows to break the rock and create the dynamic environment used to flow the powdered sample. These components are mounted to a translation mechanism, which provides linear motion and senses weight-on-bit with a force sensor. There is a passive-contact sensor/stabilizer mechanism that secures the drill fs position on the rock surface, and flex harness management hardware to provide the power and signals to the translating components. The drill housing serves as the primary structure of the turret, to which the additional tools and instruments are attached. The drill bit assembly (DBA) is a passive device that is rotated and hammered in order to cut rock (i.e. science targets) and collect the cuttings (powder) in a sample chamber until ready for transfer to the CHIMRA (Collection and Handling for Interior Martian Rock Analysis). The DBA consists of a 5/8-in. (.1.6- cm) commercial hammer drill bit whose shank has been turned down and machined with deep flutes designed for aggressive cutting removal. Surrounding the shank of the

  10. Soil properties affecting wheat yields following drilling-fluid application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauder, T A; Barbarick, K A; Ippolito, J A; Shanahan, J F; Ayers, P D

    2005-01-01

    Oil and gas drilling operations use drilling fluids (mud) to lubricate the drill bit and stem, transport formation cuttings to the surface, and seal off porous geologic formations. Following completion of the well, waste drilling fluid is often applied to cropland. We studied potential changes in soil compaction as indicated by cone penetration resistance, pH, electrical conductivity (EC(e)), sodium adsorption ratio (SAR), extractable soil and total straw and grain trace metal and nutrient concentrations, and winter wheat (Triticum aestivum L. 'TAM 107') grain yield following water-based, bentonitic drilling-fluid application (0-94 Mg ha(-1)) to field test plots. Three methods of application (normal, splash-plate, and spreader-bar) were used to study compaction effects. We measured increasing SAR, EC(e), and pH with drilling-fluid rates, but not to levels detrimental to crop production. Field measurements revealed significantly higher compaction within areas affected by truck travel, but also not enough to affect crop yield. In three of four site years, neither drilling-fluid rate nor application method affected grain yield. Extractions representing plant availability and plant analyses results indicated that drilling fluid did not significantly increase most trace elements or nutrient concentrations. These results support land application of water-based bentonitic drilling fluids as an acceptable practice on well-drained soils using controlled rates.

  11. Overhead drilling: comparing three bases for aligning a drilling jig to vertical.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rempel, David; Star, Demetra; Barr, Alan; Janowitz, Ira

    2010-06-01

    Drilling overhead into concrete or metal ceilings is a strenuous task done by construction workers to hang ductwork, piping, and electrical equipment. The task is associated with upper body pain and musculoskeletal disorders. Previously, we described a field usability evaluation of a foot lever and inverted drill press intervention devices that were compared to the usual method for overhead drilling. Both interventions were rated as inferior to the usual method based on poor setup time and mobility. Three new interventions, which differed on the design used for aligning the drilling column to vertical, were compared to the usual method for overhead drilling by commercial construction workers (n=16). The usual method was associated with the highest levels of regional body fatigue and the poorest usability ratings when compared to the three interventions. Overall, the 'Collar Base' intervention design received the best usability ratings. Intervention designs developed for overhead drilling may reduce shoulder fatigue and prevent subsequent musculoskeletal disorders. These designs may also be useful for other overhead work such as lifting and supporting materials (e.g., piping, ducts) that are installed near the ceiling. Workplace health and safety interventions may require multiple rounds of field-testing prior to achieving acceptable usability ratings by the end users. (c) 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Advanced Seismic While Drilling System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robert Radtke; John Fontenot; David Glowka; Robert Stokes; Jeffery Sutherland; Ron Evans; Jim Musser

    2008-06-30

    A breakthrough has been discovered for controlling seismic sources to generate selectable low frequencies. Conventional seismic sources, including sparkers, rotary mechanical, hydraulic, air guns, and explosives, by their very nature produce high-frequencies. This is counter to the need for long signal transmission through rock. The patent pending SeismicPULSER{trademark} methodology has been developed for controlling otherwise high-frequency seismic sources to generate selectable low-frequency peak spectra applicable to many seismic applications. Specifically, we have demonstrated the application of a low-frequency sparker source which can be incorporated into a drill bit for Drill Bit Seismic While Drilling (SWD). To create the methodology of a controllable low-frequency sparker seismic source, it was necessary to learn how to maximize sparker efficiencies to couple to, and transmit through, rock with the study of sparker designs and mechanisms for (a) coupling the sparker-generated gas bubble expansion and contraction to the rock, (b) the effects of fluid properties and dynamics, (c) linear and non-linear acoustics, and (d) imparted force directionality. After extensive seismic modeling, the design of high-efficiency sparkers, laboratory high frequency sparker testing, and field tests were performed at the University of Texas Devine seismic test site. The conclusion of the field test was that extremely high power levels would be required to have the range required for deep, 15,000+ ft, high-temperature, high-pressure (HTHP) wells. Thereafter, more modeling and laboratory testing led to the discovery of a method to control a sparker that could generate low frequencies required for deep wells. The low frequency sparker was successfully tested at the Department of Energy Rocky Mountain Oilfield Test Center (DOE RMOTC) field test site in Casper, Wyoming. An 8-in diameter by 26-ft long SeismicPULSER{trademark} drill string tool was designed and manufactured by TII

  13. EIA completes corrections to drilling estimates series

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trapmann, W.; Shambaugh, P.

    1998-01-01

    The Energy Information Administration (EIA) has published monthly and annual estimates of US oil and gas drilling activity since 1978. These data are key information for many industry analysts, serving as a leading indicator of trends in the industry and a barometer of general industry status. They are assessed directly for trends, as well as in combination with other measures to assess the productivity and profitability of upstream industry operations. They are major reference points for federal and state policymakers. EIA does not itself collect drilling activity data. Instead, it relies on an external source for data on oil, bas, and dry well completions. These data are provided to EIA monthly on an as reported basis. During a recent effort to enhance EIA's well completion data system, the detection of unusual patterns in the well completion data as received led to an expanded examination of these data. Substantial discrepancies between the data as received by EIA and correct record counts since 1987 were identified. For total wells by year, the errors ranged up to more than 2,300 wells, 11% of the 1995 total, and the impact of these errors extended backward in time to at least the early 1980s. When the magnitude and extent of the as reported well completion data problem were confirmed, EIA suspended its publication and distribution of updated drilling data. EIA staff proceeded to acquire replacement files with the as reported records and then revise the statistical portion of its drilling data system to reflect the new information. The replacement files unfortunately also included erroneous data based on the improper allocation of wells between exploration and development. EIA has now resolved the two data problems and generated revised time series estimates for well completions and footage drilled. The paper describes the problems in the data, differences between the series, and maintaining future data quality

  14. Horizontal drilling assessment in Western Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Catania, Peter; Wilson, Malcolm

    1999-01-01

    The first horizontal well was drilled in Saskatchewan in 1987. Since then, the number of horizontal wells drilled has escalated rapidly, averaging approximately 500 per year since 1993. When combined with horizontal wells drilled in Alberta, the major Canadian oil-producing province, the total number drilled in 1995 was 978. This total exceeds the National Energy Board (NEB) projected maximum of 816 wells per year. The NEB projections were based on a break-even point for the drilling of horizontal wells of a return of CDN $285,000 using a discount rate of 15%. This corresponded to a cumulative production from each individual well of some 11,000 m 3 . The introduction of a royalty-free production volume of 12,000 m 3 per horizontal well in Saskatchewan was instrumental in stimulating the rapid expansion in the use of horizontal wells and helping Canada to exceed the forecasted drilling level. Within Saskatchewan, daily production from 1964 active horizontal wells is in excess of 20,000 m 3 . Comparative analysis indicates that the average daily production per well has increased from approximately by 40% with the advent of horizontal wells. In total production terms, provincial production has increased from 11.7 million cubic metres in 1989 to 20.9 million m 3 in 1996. This represents an increase of almost 79% based primarily on the extensive use of horizontal wells. In 1996, horizontal wells produced 36% of the province's oil from 12% of the active wells. In the southeastern producing areas of Saskatchewan, the Williston Basin, declining oil-production has jumped 100%, with horizontal wells accounting for approximately 50% of total regional production. Pay zones in this areas, as in most of the province, tend to be relatively thin, with net pay frequently less that 5 m. The modest investment of some CDN $5 million in government research funding 10 years ago to stimulate the development of horizontal wells, combined with a favourable royalty structure, has been at

  15. Gel Evolution in Oil Based Drilling Fluids

    OpenAIRE

    Sandvold, Ida

    2012-01-01

    Drilling fluids make up an essential part of the drilling operation. Successful drilling operations rely on adequate drilling fluid quality. With the development of new drilling techniques such as long deviated sections and drilling in ultra-deep waters, the standard of required performance of the drilling fluids continue to increase. Narrow pressure margins and low tolerance for barite sag requires accurate prediction of the gel evolution in drilling fluids. Increased knowledge of how dri...

  16. Post drill survey A6 - A6 2014

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Glorius, S.T.; Weide, van der B.E.; Kaag, N.H.B.M.

    2015-01-01

    A consortium has drilled a production well linked to the existing production platform A6-A. This platform is located in an ‘FFH-area’ with a Natura 2000 designation area. Wintershall (one of the consortium partners) has requested IMARES to conduct a post-drilling survey at the A6-A platform site to

  17. Potential environmental benefits from regulatory consideration of synthetic drilling muds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burke, C.J.; Veil, J.A.

    1995-02-01

    When drilling exploration and production wells for oil and gas, drillers use specialized drilling fluids, referred to as muds, to help maintain well control and to remove drill cuttings from the hole. Historically, either water-based muds (WBMs) or oil-based muds (OBMs) have been used for offshore wells. Recently, in response to US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) regulations and drilling-waste discharge requirements imposed by North Sea nations, the drilling industry has developed several types of synthetic-based muds (SBMs) that combine the desirable operating qualities of OBMs with the lower toxicity and environmental impact qualities of WBMs. This report describes the operational, environmental, and economic features of all three types of muds and discusses potential EPA regulatory barriers to wider use of SBMs

  18. Drilling subsurface wellbores with cutting structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansure, Arthur James; Guimerans, Rosalvina Ramona

    2010-11-30

    A system for forming a wellbore includes a drill tubular. A drill bit is coupled to the drill tubular. One or more cutting structures are coupled to the drill tubular above the drill bit. The cutting structures remove at least a portion of formation that extends into the wellbore formed by the drill bit.

  19. Method of drilling with magnetorheological fluid

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zitha, P.L.J.

    2003-01-01

    A method of drilling a bore hole into a stratum, wherein via the drill hole drilling fluid is introduced and fed to the drill head. In order to avoid dilution or leak-off of the drilling fluid the same is in accordance with the invention a magnetorheological drilling fluid, and when an undesirable

  20. Development and Testing of The Lunar Resource Prospector Drill

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zacny, K.; Paulsen, G.; Kleinhenz, J.; Smith, J. T.; Quinn, J.

    2017-12-01

    The goal of the Lunar Resource Prospector (RP) mission is to capture and identify volatiles species within the top one meter layer of the lunar surface. The RP drill has been designed to 1. Generate cuttings and place them on the surface for analysis by the Near InfraRed Volatiles Spectrometer Subsystem (NIRVSS), and 2. Capture cuttings and transfer them to the Oxygen and Volatile Extraction Node (OVEN) coupled with the Lunar Advanced Volatiles Analysis (LAVA) subsystem. The RP drill is based on the TRL4 Mars Icebreaker drill and TRL5 LITA drill developed for capturing samples of ice and ice cemented ground on Mars, and represents over a decade of technology development effort. The TRL6 RP drill weighs approximately 15 kg and is rated at just over 500 Watt. The drill consists of: 1. Rotary-Percussive Drill Head, 2. Sampling Auger, 3. Brushing Station, 4. Feed Stage, and 5. Deployment Stage. To reduce sample handling complexity, the drill auger is designed to capture cuttings as opposed to cores. High sampling efficiency is possible through a dual design of the auger. The lower section has deep and low pitch flutes for retaining of cuttings. The upper section has been designed to efficiently move the cuttings out of the hole. The drill uses a "bite" sampling approach where samples are captured in 10 cm depth intervals. The first generation, TRL4 Icebreaker drill was tested in Mars chamber as well as in Antarctica and the Arctic. It demonstrated drilling at 1-1-100-100 level (1 meter in 1 hour with 100 Watt and 100 N Weight on Bit) in ice, ice cemented ground, soil, and rocks. The second generation, TRL5 LITA drill was deployed on a Carnegie Mellon University rover, called Zoe, and tested in Atacama, Antarctica, the Arctic, and Greenland. The tests demonstrated fully autonomous sample acquisition and delivery to a carousel. The modified LITA drill was tested in NASA GRC's lunar vacuum chamber at <10^-5 torr and <200 K. It demonstrated successful capture and transfer

  1. Waste Management Plan for the Drilling Within the Chromium Plume West of 100-D/DR Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    R.E. Peterson

    1997-01-01

    This waste management plan provides guidance for managing drilling spoils generated during the installation of groundwater wells in the 100-D/DR Area, which is part of the 100-HR-3 Operable Unit. The wells are being installed to meet two objectives: (1) better define the nature and extent of a previously identified chromium plume in the area, and (2) act as groundwater extraction wells if the contamination warrants

  2. Reaching 1 m deep on Mars: the Icebreaker drill.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zacny, K; Paulsen, G; McKay, C P; Glass, B; Davé, A; Davila, A F; Marinova, M; Mellerowicz, B; Heldmann, J; Stoker, C; Cabrol, N; Hedlund, M; Craft, J

    2013-12-01

    The future exploration of Mars will require access to the subsurface, along with acquisition of samples for scientific analysis and ground-truthing of water ice and mineral reserves for in situ resource utilization. The Icebreaker drill is an integral part of the Icebreaker mission concept to search for life in ice-rich regions on Mars. Since the mission targets Mars Special Regions as defined by the Committee on Space Research (COSPAR), the drill has to meet the appropriate cleanliness standards as requested by NASA's Planetary Protection Office. In addition, the Icebreaker mission carries life-detection instruments; and in turn, the drill and sample delivery system have to meet stringent contamination requirements to prevent false positives. This paper reports on the development and testing of the Icebreaker drill, a 1 m class rotary-percussive drill and triple redundant sample delivery system. The drill acquires subsurface samples in short, approximately 10 cm bites, which makes the sampling system robust and prevents thawing and phase changes in the target materials. Autonomous drilling, sample acquisition, and sample transfer have been successfully demonstrated in Mars analog environments in the Arctic and the Antarctic Dry Valleys, as well as in a Mars environmental chamber. In all environments, the drill has been shown to perform at the "1-1-100-100" level; that is, it drilled to 1 m depth in approximately 1 hour with less than 100 N weight on bit and approximately 100 W of power. The drilled substrate varied and included pure ice, ice-rich regolith with and without rocks and with and without 2% perchlorate, and whole rocks. The drill is currently at a Technology Readiness Level (TRL) of 5. The next-generation Icebreaker drill weighs 10 kg, which is representative of the flightlike model at TRL 5/6.

  3. Drilling of a 2000-metre (6562-FT) Borehole for Geothermal Steam in Iceland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ragnars, K.; Benediktsson, S.

    1981-01-01

    Drilling for geothermal heat has been carried out in Iceland since 1928, when hot water was obtained for district heating in Reykjavik. From that time, in particular in the sixties, extensive drilling has resulted in the annual utilization of 54 million tons of water and 2 million tons of steam. Five drilling rigs are used for geothermal drilling, with depth capacity ranging from 400 to 3,600 meters (1,312 to 11,812 feet). Drilling procedures vary extensively and depend on whether a high- or low-temperature field is being drilled, the main difference being the well-casing program and the blowout equipment used.

  4. Tribological characterization of the drill collars and casing friction couples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ripeanu, R. G.; Badicioiu, M.; Caltaru, M.; Dinita, A.; Laudacescu, E.

    2018-01-01

    Drill collars are special pipes used in the drilling of wells for weighting the drill bit, enabling it to drill through the rock. In the drilling process, the drill collars are exposed to an intensive wear due to friction on inner surface of casing wall. In order to evaluate the tribological behaviour of this friction couple, paper presents the drill collars parent material, reconditioned and casing pipe chemical composition, microstructures, hardness and friction tests. For friction tests were prepared samples extracted from new and reconditioned drill collars and from casing pipes and tested on a universal tribometer. Were used plane-on-disk surface friction couples and tests were conducted at two sliding speeds and three normal loads for each materials couple. Plane static partner samples were extracted from casing pipes and disks samples were extracted from new and reconditioned drill collars. Were obtained friction coefficients values and also the temperatures increasing values due to friction working tests parameters. The temperature increasing values were obtained by measuring it with an infrared thermographic camera.

  5. Development and Manufacture of Cost-Effective Composite Drill Pipe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    James C. Leslie

    2008-12-31

    fields up to 74 kilohertz (KHz), a removable section of copper wire can be placed inside the composite pipe to short the tool joints electrically allowing electromagnetic signals inside the collar to induce and measure the same within the rock formation. By embedding a pair of wires in the composite section and using standard drill pipe box and pin ends equipped with a specially developed direct contact joint electrical interface, power can be supplied to measurement-while-drilling (MWD) and logging-while-drilling (LWD) bottom hole assemblies. Instantaneous high-speed data communications between near drill bit and the surface are obtainable utilizing this 'smart' drilling technology. The composite drill pipe developed by ACPT has been field tested successfully in several wells nationally and internationally. These tests were primarily for short radius and ultra short radius directional drilling. The CDP in most cases performed flawlessly with little or no appreciable wear. ACPT is currently marketing a complete line of composite drill collars, subs, isolators, casing, and drill pipe to meet the drilling industry's needs and tailored to replace metal for specific application requirements.

  6. Application of MRIL-WD (Magnetic Resonance Imaging Logging While Drilling) for irreducible water saturation, total reservoir, free-fluid, bound-fluid porosity measurements and its value for the petrophysical analysis of RT/RM data from the Shah Deniz well

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amirov, Elnur

    2016-04-01

    Sperry-Sun (Sperry Drilling Services) is the leader in MWD/LWD reliability, has developed the industry's first LWD NMR/MRIL-WD (nuclear magnetic resonance) tool. The MRIL-WD (magnetic resonance imaging logging-while-drilling) service directly measures the T1 component of hydrogen in subsurface rock units while drilling to obtain total reservoir porosity and to dissect the observed total porosity into its respective components of free fluid and bound fluid porosity. These T1 data are used to secure accurate total, free-fluid, capillary-bound water, and clay-bound water porosity of the reservoir sections which can be drilled in the several Runs. Over the last decade, results from Magnetic Resonance Imaging logs (NMR) have added significant value to petrophysical analysis and understanding by providing total, free-fluid and bound-fluid porosities, combined with fluid typing capabilities. With MRIL-WD very valuable Real-Time or Recorded Memory data/information is now available during or shortly after the drilling operation (formation properties measurement can be taken right after a drill bit penetration), while trip in and trip out as well. A key point in utilizing MRIL in an LWD environment is motion-tolerant measurements. Recent MRIL-WD logging runs from the Shah Deniz wells located in the Khazarian-Caspian Sea of the Azerbaijan Republic helped to delineate and assess hydrocarbon bearing zones. Acquired results demonstrate how MRIL data can be acquired while-drilling and provide reliable/high quality measurements. Magnetic Resonance Imaging logs at some developments wells have become a cornerstone in formation evaluation and petrophysical understanding. By providing total, free-fluid, and bound-fluid porosities together with fluid typing, MRIL results have significantly added to the assessment of reservoirs. In order to reduce NPT (Non-Productive Time) and save the rig operations time, there is always the desire to obtain logging results as soon as possible

  7. Demonstration of river crossing technology for installation of environmental horizontal wells: AMH-6 and AMH-7 installation report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moore, D. B.

    1993-07-01

    The Department of Energy`s (DOE) Office of Technology Development initiated an integrated demonstration of innovative technologies and systems for cleanup of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in soils and groundwater. This drilling project is part of the directional drilling task for the integrated technology demonstration at the Savannah River Site (SRS). One of the objectives of the drilling task is the demonstration of multiple drilling technologies. The technologies can then be compared and evaluated in terms of technical performance and cost effectiveness. Petroleum horizontal well technology and utility industry horizontal well technology have been previously demonstrated at the SRS. The petroleum industry directional drilling technology was demonstrated by Eastman Christensen Environmental Corporation (ECEC). ECEC directionally drilled and installed four horizontal wells in the M Area. Charles Machine Works, working with Sandia National Laboratory, demonstrated a utility industry directional drilling technology by installing one horizontal well in the M Area. The demonstration that is the subject of this report involved river crossing horizontal well technology for the installation of two M-Area Settling Basin soil gas extraction wells.

  8. Deep-Time drilling in the Australian Archean: the Agouron Institute geobiological drilling project. (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buick, R.

    2010-12-01

    of the Hamersley Group near Yilgalong Creek. This location had been previously drilled by a mining company in the 1980’s and the core provided the highest biomarker yields of any Archean rocks thus far sampled. As it has been suggested that these biomarkers are non-indigenous contaminants, one possibility is that they were introduced into the drill-core at some time between drilling and sampling, so this hole tests that hypothesis. If biomarker concentrations and ratios differ significantly between the two adjacent holes with differing exposures to post-drilling contaminants, then clearly contamination has affected one or other of the cores. The third hole sampled an off-shore equivalent, through banded irons and kerogenous shales of the ~2.65 Ga Marra Mamba and Jeerinah Formations of the Hamersley Group near Cowcumba Creek. Another opportunity for contamination may arise during post-depositional but pre-drilling hydrocarbon migration, when biomarkers can potentially be introduced into previously barren rocks by younger oils, so this hole tests that possibility. As it was drilled through the same stratigraphic interval and structural domain as the second hole but in a different environment, biomarker ratios should be similar if contaminated but different if indigenous.

  9. U.S. drilling contractors could face stiff challenges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simmons, M.R.

    1993-01-01

    Although the outlook for most segments of the contract drilling business is now more optimistic than in the past decade, the increased activity has brought several problems: the availability of fully trained crews, the need for new capital, and the limited number of quality drillstrings. These problems will grow in importance if natural gas deliverability begins to decline visibly and once the scramble to correct this decline begins. As the drilling recovery unfolds, the most important lesson to remember, based on worldwide activity in the past year, is how rapidly conditions can change and how quickly excess capacity can turn into chronic shortages. The various segments of the world wide contract drilling industry's prospects have changed dramatically during the past 12 months, and oddly, some market sectors have improved while others have become worse. These quick changes highlight the unpredictable and volatile nature of the markets for contract drilling and other services needed to drill and complete oil and gas wells. The paper describes the business of well drilling onshore and offshore in the US, drilling activities in Canada, international markets, capacity, the supplies of natural gas, Gulf of Mexico activities, drill pipe shortages, manpower shortages, and challenges offshore

  10. Slim-hole drilling in the Gulf of Suez, Egypt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghazaly, S.M.; Khalaf, F.

    1993-01-01

    This paper discusses the economical, operational and environmental aspects of the reduced hole size drilling now used in offshore operations in Gupco and other major petroleum companies operating in the Gulf of Suez Area Egypt. The results demonstrate that reduced hole size drilling saves cost: use of slim hole reduces time related intangible savings, fixed tangible savings, and tangible equipment savings. The advantages of small hole size and the reduction in the volume and size of oil wet drilling cuttings help minimize the environmental impact associated with the use of oil base mud. The reduction in drilling fluid volume and treatment cost, higher rates of penetration, better hole cleaning capabilities, savings in consumables (such as bits, mud, cement and diesel oil), less tangible cost, and easier equipment mobilization are interacted to produce significant operational gains. This results in savings to 40 to 50 percent of well costs versus the cost of conventional wells drilled in the same area. Although substantial savings were realized, there are elevated risks with the major one being the lack of a good contingency in the event unexpected hole condition or geological condition require an extra casing to be run prior to reaching the total depth. Effective preplanning between the drilling, exploration, and engineering to accurately define possible geologic targets and their potential drilling problems can minimize these risks associated with drilling slim holes and provide higher levels of success in meeting objectives

  11. Sand control systems used in completing wells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel Wittenberger

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Expandable Tubular Technology is transforming the face of well completion and construction. This technology provides: a substantially higher hydrocarbon production rates from the reservoir, a reduced well drilling and construction costs, new possibilities for previously unreachable or uneconomic reservoirs, and step a change towards the single diameter well. ESS (Expandable Sand Screen has an unrivalled performance worldwide for delivering a reliable sand control in a wide range of applications. Well costs typically cut by over 20 %, and the productivity increases up to 70 %.

  12. Increasing Geothermal Energy Demand: The Need for Urbanization of the Drilling Industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teodoriu, Catalin; Falcone, Gioia

    2008-01-01

    Drilling wells in urban spaces requires special types of rigs that do not conflict with the surrounding environment. For this, a mutation of the current drilling equipment is necessary into what can be defined as an "urbanized drilling rig." Noise reduction, small footprint, and "good looking" rigs all help persuade the general public to accept…

  13. Drilling in Underground Coal Gasification with Coiled Tubing Technologies

    OpenAIRE

    Monika Blišťanová; Lucia Sciranková

    2006-01-01

    Underground coal gasification is the potential to provide a clean, efficient and convenient source of energy from coal seams where traditional mining methods are either impossible or uneconomical. The latest drilling technology – drilling directional injection well with down well assembly. The is used world- wide from 1990 injection well is transmitting the coal seam along its location. The coil – tubing equipment transport the gasification agents (oxygen and water) into the coal cavity, wher...

  14. Drilling in Underground Coal Gasification with Coiled Tubing Technologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monika Blišťanová

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Underground coal gasification is the potential to provide a clean, efficient and convenient source of energy from coal seams where traditional mining methods are either impossible or uneconomical. The latest drilling technology – drilling directional injection well with down well assembly. The is used world- wide from 1990 injection well is transmitting the coal seam along its location. The coil – tubing equipment transport the gasification agents (oxygen and water into the coal cavity, where give out gasification.

  15. Geothermal drilling and completion technology development program. Quarterly progress report, January-March 1980

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Varnado, S.G. (ed.)

    1980-04-01

    The progress, status, and results of ongoing Research and Development (R and D) within the Geothermal Drilling and Completion Technology Development Program are described. The program emphasizes the development of geothermal drilling hardware, drilling fluids, completion technology, and lost circulation control methods. Advanced drilling systems are also under development. The goals of the program are to develop the technology required to reduce well costs by 25% by 1983 and by 50% by 1987.

  16. Geothermal drilling and completion technology development program. Annual progress report, October 1979-September 1980

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Varnado, S.G. (ed.)

    1980-11-01

    The progress, status, and results of ongoing research and development (R and D) within the Geothermal Drilling and Completion Technology Development Program are described. The program emphasizes the development of geothermal drilling hardware, drilling fluids, completion technology, and lost circulation control methods. Advanced drilling systems are also under development. The goals of the program are to develop the technology required to reduce well costs by 25% by 1983 and by 50% by 1987.

  17. Ellog Auger Drilling -"3-in-one" method for hydrogeological data collection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Kurt; Larsen, Flemming

    1999-01-01

    The Ellog auger drilling method is an integrated approach for hydrogeological data collection during auger drilling in unconsolidated sediments. The drill stem is a continuous flight, hollow-stem auger with integrated electrical and gamma logging tools. The geophysical logging is performed....... The Ellog auger drilling method provides detailed information on small-scale changes in lithology, sediment chemistry, and water, as well as gas compositions in aquifer systems - data essential to hydrogeological studies....

  18. Geothermal drilling and completion technology development program. Quarterly progress report, April-June 1980

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Varnado, S.G.

    1980-07-01

    The progress, status, and results of ongoing research and development (R and D) within the Geothermal Drilling and Completion Technology Development Program are reported. The program emphasizes the development of geothermal drilling hardware, drilling fluids, completion technology, and lost circulation control methods. Advanced drilling systems are also under development. The goals of the program are to develop the technology required to reduce well costs by 25% by 1983 and by 50% by 1987.

  19. Drill string gas data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siciliano, E.R.

    1998-05-12

    Data and supporting documentation were compiled and analyzed for 26 cases of gas grab samples taken during waste-tank core sampling activities between September 1, 1995 and December 31, 1997. These cases were tested against specific criteria to reduce uncertainties associated with in-tank sampling location and conditions. Of the 26 possible cases, 16 qualified as drill-string grab samples most likely to represent recently released waste gases. The data from these 16 ``confirmed`` cases were adjusted to remove non-waste gas contributions from core-sampling activities (argon or nitrogen purge), the atmospheric background, and laboratory sampler preparation (helium). The procedure for subtracting atmospheric, laboratory, and argon purge gases was unambiguous. No reliable method for determining the exact amount of nitrogen purge gas was established. Thus, the final set of ``Adjusted`` drill string gas data for the 6 nitrogen-purged cases had a greater degree of uncertainty than the final results for the 10 argon-purged cases. Including the appropriate amounts of uncertainty, this final set of data was added to the set of high-quality results from the Retained Gas Sampler (RGS), and good agreement was found for the N{sub 2}, H{sub 2}, and N{sub 2}O mole fractions sampled from common tanks. These results indicate that under favorable sampling conditions, Drill-String (DS) grab samples can provide reasonably accurate information about the dominant species of released gas. One conclusion from this set of total gas data is that the distribution of the H{sub 2} mole fractions is bimodal in shape, with an upper bound of 78%.

  20. Drilling rate for the Cerro Prieto stratigraphic sequence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prian C, R.

    1981-01-01

    Drilling practice at the field has been modified in several ways as better information is being obtained. The stratigraphic sequence of the area is made up of three sedimentary rock units of deltaic origin having different densities. These units have been named non-consolidated, semi-consolidated, and consolidated rocks; the thermal reservoirs are located in the latter. To investigate how the drilling rates are affected by the three rock units, plots of drilling advance versus time were made for a large number of wells. A typical plot is shown and drilling rates are practically constant in three different zones; that is, the drilling rate has only two breaks or changes in slope.

  1. Ultrasonic/Sonic Rotary-Hammer Drills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badescu, Mircea; Sherrit, Stewart; Bar-Cohen, Yoseph; Bao, Xiaoqi; Kassab, Steve

    2010-01-01

    Ultrasonic/sonic rotary-hammer drill (USRoHD) is a recent addition to the collection of apparatuses based on ultrasonic/sonic drill corer (USDC). As described below, the USRoHD has several features, not present in a basic USDC, that increase efficiency and provide some redundancy against partial failure. USDCs and related apparatuses were conceived for boring into, and/or acquiring samples of, rock or other hard, brittle materials of geological interest. They have been described in numerous previous NASA Tech Briefs articles. To recapitulate: A USDC can be characterized as a lightweight, lowpower, piezoelectrically driven jackhammer in which ultrasonic and sonic vibrations are generated and coupled to a tool bit. A basic USDC includes a piezoelectric stack, an ultrasonic transducer horn connected to the stack, a free mass ( free in the sense that it can bounce axially a short distance between hard stops on the horn and the bit), and a tool bit. The piezoelectric stack creates ultrasonic vibrations that are mechanically amplified by the horn. The bouncing of the free mass between the hard stops generates the sonic vibrations. The combination of ultrasonic and sonic vibrations gives rise to a hammering action (and a resulting chiseling action at the tip of the tool bit) that is more effective for drilling than is the microhammering action of ultrasonic vibrations alone. The hammering and chiseling actions are so effective that unlike in conventional twist drilling, little applied axial force is needed to make the apparatus advance into the material of interest. There are numerous potential applications for USDCs and related apparatuses in geological exploration on Earth and on remote planets. In early USDC experiments, it was observed that accumulation of cuttings in a drilled hole causes the rate of penetration of the USDC to decrease steeply with depth, and that the rate of penetration can be increased by removing the cuttings. The USRoHD concept provides for

  2. Big-hole drilling - the state of the art

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lackey, M.D.

    1983-01-01

    The art of big-hole drilling has been in a continual state of evolution at the Nevada Test Site since the start of underground testing in 1961. Emplacement holes for nuclear devices are still being drilled by the rotary-drilling process, but almost all the hardware and systems have undergone many changes during the intervening years. The current design of bits, cutters, and other big-hole-drilling hardware results from contributions of manufacturers and Test Site personnel. The dual-string, air-lift, reverse-circulation system was developed at the Test Site. Necessity was really the Mother of this invention, but this circulation system is worthy of consideration under almost any condition. Drill rigs for big-hole drilling are usually adaptations of large oil-well drill rigs with minor modifications required to handle the big bits and drilling assemblies. Steel remains the favorite shaft lining material, but a lot of thought is being given to concrete linings, especially precast concrete

  3. Effect of drilling fluids on coal permeability: Impact on horizontal wellbore stability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gentzis, Thomas [Petron Resources, L.P., 3000 Internet Boulevard, Suite 400, Frisco, TX 75034 (United States); Deisman, Nathan; Chalaturnyk, Richard J. [University of Alberta, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Edmonton, AB (Canada)

    2009-05-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate a series of mud systems and additives typically used in coalbed methane drilling in terms of formation of an instantaneous filter cake, ability of the coal reservoir to rid itself of the filter cake during production, and overall impact on coal permeability. To achieve this, a series of laboratory tests were conducted initially using artificially cleated gypstone rock (to simulate coal). This was followed by the use of large-diameter coal cores, which, unfortunately, did not allow for the tests to be done under in-situ confining stress conditions. The three mud systems tested against coal (Xantham Gum, HEC and Na-CMC) did not have a negative impact on coal permeability, in contrast to previous laboratory data that showed large decreases. Two fluid loss control additives, which have been used successfully in drilling clastic and carbonate rocks, were also tested using a non-ionic polymer mud system. During simulated drilling, these additives (FLC 2000 trademark and Q-Stop) were very effective in building a thin filter cake on the coal surface almost instantaneously, to the point that no solids were detected in the downstream fluid accumulator. During simulated production, a small pressure drop was sufficient to remove the filter cake. Coal permeability (to water) returned to its original (pre-test) value, which suggested that there was no permanent permeability damage caused by the two additives. When coal-derived fines were added to the drilling mud in another experiment using the same coal, the near wellbore coal permeability was reduced by 87.5%, indicating severe damage to the cleat system and in agreement with previously reported laboratory data. Following the very good performance of FLC 2000 trademark and Q-Stop in the laboratory tests, these two additives were then used in field applications. Their presence in the drilling fluid resulted in the successful drilling of 953 m and 1400 m of total horizontal length in

  4. Reconsidering Volcanic Ocean Island Hydrology: Recent Geophysical and Drilling Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, D. M.; Pierce, H. A.; Lautze, N. C.

    2017-12-01

    Recent results of geophysical surveys and exploratory drilling in Hawaii have suggested that Hawaii's hydrogeology may be more complex than has been generally recognized. Instead of a more-or-less homogeneous pile of highly permeable eruptive basalts that are intermittently punctuated by volcanic dikes confined to calderas and rift zones, we are finding that dike compartmentalization is occurring outside of recognized rift zones, leading to significantly higher volumes of stored groundwater within the island. Analysis of recent geophysical surveys have shown local water table elevations that are substantially higher than can be accounted for by the high hydraulic conductivities of Hawaiian basalts. Recent diamond wireline drilling results have also shown that sub-horizontal variations in permeability, associated with significant changes in eruptive character (e.g. explosive vs effusive activity) are acting as significant perching and confining bodies over significant aerial extents and suggest that these features also contribute to increased storage of recharge. Not only is storage much higher than previously assumed, these features appear to impact subsurface groundwater flow in ways that are not accounted for in traditional methods of computing sustainable yields for near shore aquifers: where buried confining formations extend to depths well below sea level, higher elevation recharge is being intercepted and diverted to deep submarine groundwater discharge well below depths that are typically investigated or quantified. We will provide a summary of the recent geophysical survey results along with a revised conceptual model for groundwater circulation within volcanic ocean islands.

  5. Drilling gas hydrates with the sea floor drill rig MARUM-MeBo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freudenthal, Tim; Bohrmann, Gerhard; Wefer, Gerold

    2015-04-01

    Large amounts of methane are bound in marine gas hydrate deposits. Local conditions like pressure, temperature, gas and pore water compositions define the boundaries of gas hydrate stability within the ocean sediments. Depending on those conditions gas hydrates can occur within marine sediments at depth down to several hundreds of meters up to sea floor. These oceanic methane deposits are widespread along continental margins. By forming cement in otherwise soft sediments gas hydrates are stabilizing the seafloor on continental slopes. Drilling operations are required for understanding the distribution of gas hydrates as well as for sampling them to study the composition, microstructure and its geomechanical and geophysical properties. The sea floor drill rig MARUM-MeBo200 has the capability to drill down to 200 m below sea floor well within the depth of major gas hydrate occurrences at continental margins. This drill rig is a transportable sea floor drill rig that can be deployed from a variety of multi-purpose research vessels. It is deployed on the sea bed and controlled from the vessel. It is the second generation MeBo (Freudenthal and Wefer, 2013) and was developed from 2011 to 2014 by MARUM in cooperation with BAUER Maschinen GmbH. Long term experiences with the first generation MeBo70 that was operated since 2005 on 15 research expeditions largely contributed to the development of MeBo200. It was first tested in October 2014 from the research vessel RV SONNE in the North Sea. In this presentation the suitability of MARUM-MeBo for drilling marine gas hydrates is discussed. We report on experiences drilling gas hydrates on two research expeditions with MeBo70. A research expedition for sampling gas hydrates in the Danube Paleodelta with MeBo200 as well as technical developments for improving the suitability of MeBo for gas hydrate exploration works are planned within the project SUGAR3 funded by the Federal Government for Economy and Energy (BMWi). Freudenthal

  6. 30 CFR 33.34 - Drilling test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Drilling test. 33.34 Section 33.34 Mineral... MINING PRODUCTS DUST COLLECTORS FOR USE IN CONNECTION WITH ROCK DRILLING IN COAL MINES Test Requirements § 33.34 Drilling test. (a) A drilling test shall consist of drilling a set of 10 test holes, without...

  7. Geological Results from Drilling in the Poihipi (Western) Sector of the Wairakei Geothermal Field, NZ

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bogie, I.; Lawless, J.V.; MacKenzie, K.M.

    1995-01-01

    Four wells drilled into the Poihipi Sector on the Western margin of the Wairakei geothermal field have found a similar lithostratigraphy to that encountered in wells previously drilled in the general area. Young pumice breccias overly the Huka Falls Formation, with the latter containing intercalations of the Rautehuia Breccia. This in turn overlies ignimbrites and tuffaceous sediments of the Waiora Formation, which contains flows of Haparangi Rhyolite. This sequence is cut by steeply dipping normal faults which strike to the northeast and for the most part dip towards the northwest. Hydrothermal alteration is virtually limited to the Waiora and Haparangi units where a sequence of interlayered illite-smectite and illite clays are found along with chlorite, quartz, pyrite and calcite. There is a minor occurrence of zeolites. Despite large changes in the area's hydrology in response to exploitation, changes in alteration are limited to a comparatively deep occurrence of kaolinite and minor overprinting of epidote by illitic clay.

  8. Recent Developments in Geothermal Drilling Fluids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kelsey, J. R.; Rand, P. B.; Nevins, M. J.; Clements, W. R.; Hilscher, L. W.; Remont, L. J.; Matula, G. W.; Balley, D. N.

    1981-01-01

    In the past, standard drilling muds have been used to drill most geothermal wells. However, the harsh thermal and chemical environment and the unique geothermal formations have led to such problems as excessive thickening of the fluid, formation damage, and lost circulation. This paper describes three recent development efforts aimed at solving some of these drilling fluid problems. Each of the efforts is at a different stage of development. The Sandia aqueous foam studies are still in the laboratory phase, NL Baroid's polymeric deflocculant is soon to be field tested, and the Mudtech high-temperature mud was field tested several months ago. Low density and the capability to suspend particles at low relative velocities are two factors which make foam an attractive drilling fluid. The stability of these foams and their material properties at high temperatures are presently unknown and this lack of information has precluded their use as a geothermal drilling fluid. The aqueous foam studies being conducted at Sandia are aimed at screening available surfactants for temperature and chemical stability. Approximately 100 surfactants have been tested at temperatures of 260 and 310 C (500 and 590 F), and several of these candidates appear very promising. NL Baroid has developed a polymeric deflocculant for water-based muds which shows promise in retarding thermal degradation effects and associated gelation. Formulations containing this new polymer have shown good rheological properties up to 260 C (500 F) in laboratory testing. A high-temperature mud consisting primarily of sepiolite, bentonite, and brown coal has been developed by Mudtech, Inc. A field test of this mud was conducted in a geothermal well in the Imperial Valley of California in May 1980. The fluid exhibited good hole-cleaning characteristics and good rheological properties throughout the test.

  9. Integral analysis of the drill string dynamic behaviour to optimize drilling operation; Analise integrada do comportamento dinamico da coluna para otimizacao de perfuracao

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lima, Araken [Smith International do Brasil, Macae, RJ (Brazil); Placido, Joao C.R.; Percy, Joseir G.; Falcao, Jose; Freire, Helena; Ono, Eduardo H.; Masculo, Miguel S. [PETROBRAS S.A., Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Azuaga, Denise; Frenzel, Mark [Smith International Inc., Houston, TX (United States)

    2008-07-01

    For a performance preview of a drilling system is necessary a dynamic and integrated modeling for understanding all system forces resulting from the combination of the rock strength, cut structure action, drilling parameters, BHA and all others drilling components. This study must predict, for the drill string, vibrations and torsions, from bit to surface, its origins and its effects, and provides the best way to reduce these vibrations, determining the best bit, BHA and drilling parameters. Thereby, this study eliminates the trial and error approach and the operation risks. This paper aims to present studies of optimization for two drilling wells conducted in Brazil, one in Santos Basin and other in Campos Basin, and compares the numerical simulations results with the data from drilling operations. (author)

  10. Red Dragon drill missions to Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heldmann, Jennifer L.; Stoker, Carol R.; Gonzales, Andrew; McKay, Christopher P.; Davila, Alfonso; Glass, Brian J.; Lemke, Larry L.; Paulsen, Gale; Willson, David; Zacny, Kris

    2017-12-01

    We present the concept of using a variant of a Space Exploration Technologies Corporation (SpaceX) Dragon space capsule as a low-cost, large-capacity, near-term, Mars lander (dubbed ;Red Dragon;) for scientific and human precursor missions. SpaceX initially designed the Dragon capsule for flight near Earth, and Dragon has successfully flown many times to low-Earth orbit (LEO) and successfully returned the Dragon spacecraft to Earth. Here we present capsule hardware modifications that are required to enable flight to Mars and operations on the martian surface. We discuss the use of the Dragon system to support NASA Discovery class missions to Mars and focus in particular on Dragon's applications for drilling missions. We find that a Red Dragon platform is well suited for missions capable of drilling deeper on Mars (at least 2 m) than has been accomplished to date due to its ability to land in a powered controlled mode, accommodate a long drill string, and provide payload space for sample processing and analysis. We show that a Red Dragon drill lander could conduct surface missions at three possible targets including the ice-cemented ground at the Phoenix landing site (68 °N), the subsurface ice discovered near the Viking 2 (49 °N) site by fresh impact craters, and the dark sedimentary subsurface material at the Curiosity site (4.5 °S).

  11. PREVIOUS SECOND TRIMESTER ABORTION

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PNLC

    PREVIOUS SECOND TRIMESTER ABORTION: A risk factor for third trimester uterine rupture in three ... for accurate diagnosis of uterine rupture. KEY WORDS: Induced second trimester abortion - Previous uterine surgery - Uterine rupture. ..... scarred uterus during second trimester misoprostol- induced labour for a missed ...

  12. Auto-Gopher: A Wire-Line Rotary-Hammer Ultrasonic Drill

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badescu, Mircea; Sherrit, Stewart; Bao, Xiaogi; Bar-Cohen, Yoseph; Chen, Beck

    2011-01-01

    Developing technologies that would enable NASA to sample rock, soil, and ice by coring, drilling or abrading at a significant depth is of great importance for a large number of in-situ exploration missions as well as for earth applications. Proven techniques to sample Mars subsurface will be critical for future NASA astrobiology missions that will search for records of past and present life on the planet, as well as, the search for water and other resources. A deep corer, called Auto-Gopher, is currently being developed as a joint effort of the JPL's NDEAA laboratory and Honeybee Robotics Corp. The Auto-Gopher is a wire-line rotary-hammer drill that combines rock breaking by hammering using an ultrasonic actuator and cuttings removal by rotating a fluted bit. The hammering mechanism is based on the Ultrasonic/Sonic Drill/Corer (USDC) that has been developed as an adaptable tool for many of drilling and coring applications. The USDC uses an intermediate free-flying mass to transform the high frequency vibrations of the horn tip into a sonic hammering of a drill bit. The USDC concept was used in a previous task to develop an Ultrasonic/Sonic Ice Gopher. The lessons learned from testing the ice gopher were implemented into the design of the Auto-Gopher by inducing a rotary motion onto the fluted coring bit. A wire-line version of such a system would allow penetration of significant depth without a large increase in mass. A laboratory version of the corer was developed in the NDEAA lab to determine the design and drive parameters of the integrated system. The design configuration lab version of the design and fabrication and preliminary testing results are presented in this paper

  13. Information Portal for the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miville, B.; Soeding, E.; Larsen, H.

    2005-12-01

    The Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) is preparing for the challenge of managing data from three scientific drilling platforms, operated by US, Japanese and European science operators, each using different data management systems. This includes organizing and distributing data to clients outside the program, developing interfaces with external global data and metadata catalogues, and making IODP data effectively searchable for data mining and visualization applications. To meet the needs of integrating data from a web of distributed operator databases and providing easy and seamless top-down access from the larger cyberspace infrastructure, IODP will develop an Information Portal for IODP (IPI), that will be a unique entry point for discovery of all IODP data, as well as legacy data from previous scientific ocean drilling programs (ODP, DSDP). It will consist of a central metadata catalogue based on the ISO 19115 standard, which will allow for easy construction of interfaces to access the IODP metadata and data sources. This requires that each contributor to the IPI provide metadata structured according to a common schema currently being devised by an IODP task force. The IPI will use the Open Archive Initiative Protocol to allow Metadata Harvesting (OAI-PMH) to gather the metadata from the different contributors. Initially the portal will allow multiple IODP contributors and in the future external providers to harvest data. Other metadata catalog services could also participate in this system, by either making their metadata available and/or by harvesting the IPI metadata. IODP Management International Inc. is supported by NSF OCE 0432224.

  14. Robotic and Human-Tended Collaborative Drilling Automation for Subsurface Exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glass, Brian; Cannon, Howard; Stoker, Carol; Davis, Kiel

    2005-01-01

    Future in-situ lunar/martian resource utilization and characterization, as well as the scientific search for life on Mars, will require access to the subsurface and hence drilling. Drilling on Earth is hard - an art form more than an engineering discipline. Human operators listen and feel drill string vibrations coming from kilometers underground. Abundant mass and energy make it possible for terrestrial drilling to employ brute-force approaches to failure recovery and system performance issues. Space drilling will require intelligent and autonomous systems for robotic exploration and to support human exploration. Eventual in-situ resource utilization will require deep drilling with probable human-tended operation of large-bore drills, but initial lunar subsurface exploration and near-term ISRU will be accomplished with lightweight, rover-deployable or standalone drills capable of penetrating a few tens of meters in depth. These lightweight exploration drills have a direct counterpart in terrestrial prospecting and ore-body location, and will be designed to operate either human-tended or automated. NASA and industry now are acquiring experience in developing and building low-mass automated planetary prototype drills to design and build a pre-flight lunar prototype targeted for 2011-12 flight opportunities. A successful system will include development of drilling hardware, and automated control software to operate it safely and effectively. This includes control of the drilling hardware, state estimation of both the hardware and the lithography being drilled and state of the hole, and potentially planning and scheduling software suitable for uncertain situations such as drilling. Given that Humans on the Moon or Mars are unlikely to be able to spend protracted EVA periods at a drill site, both human-tended and robotic access to planetary subsurfaces will require some degree of standalone, autonomous drilling capability. Human-robotic coordination will be important

  15. Ultrasonic rotary-hammer drill

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bar-Cohen, Yoseph (Inventor); Badescu, Mircea (Inventor); Sherrit, Stewart (Inventor); Bao, Xiaoqi (Inventor); Kassab, Steve (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A mechanism for drilling or coring by a combination of sonic hammering and rotation. The drill includes a hammering section with a set of preload weights mounted atop a hammering actuator and an axial passage through the hammering section. In addition, a rotary section includes a motor coupled to a drive shaft that traverses the axial passage through the hammering section. A drill bit is coupled to the drive shaft for drilling by a combination of sonic hammering and rotation. The drill bit includes a fluted shaft leading to a distal crown cutter with teeth. The bit penetrates sampled media by repeated hammering action. In addition, the bit is rotated. As it rotates the fluted bit carries powdered cuttings helically upward along the side of the bit to the surface.

  16. Drilling waste makes concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosfjord, A.

    1993-01-01

    The article deals with a method of drilling waste reclamation by utilizing the converted oil-containing cuttings from the North Sea in the concrete production in Norway. The oil content is to be removed in an incineration process by heating the cuttings to about 800 o C. The output capacity from the exhaust gas water cooling system is 7500 kW/hour, and is to be used in different industrial heating processes. The remaining content of pollutants in the cleaned exhaust gas outlet corresponds to the required limits with the exception of SO 2 and HCl. In addition, an exhaust gas washing plant is to be installed in the near future designed for the further reduction of pollutants by 90%. The converted raw materials are used as a supplement for lessening the demand of sand and cement in the production of concrete-made pipes. 1 fig

  17. Fiscal 1996 report on the results of the subsidy operation under the Sunshine Project on the development of a geothermal water use power plant, etc. Development of the binary cycle power plant (development of the measurement while drilling system for geothermal wells); 1996 nendo New Sunshine keikaku hojo jigyo seika hokokusho. Nessui riyo hatsuden plant nado kaihatsu (binary cycle hatsuden plant no kaihatsu (chinetsusei kussakuji kotei joho kenchi system no kaihatsu))

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-03-01

    The R and D were carried out of a detecting system for measurement of data on the bottom of geothermal well, data transmission and signal processing, and an analysis system for well drilling trajectory control and well assessment while geothermal well drilling based on the data obtained by the detecting system. The paper reported the results of the technology development in fiscal 1996. In the development of the detecting system, improvement/design were conducted on a mud pulse generator constituting sonde, well bottom signal processing equipment, mode switch and inclined information sensor, and the system equivalent to the actual one was manufactured to conduct a running test at high temperature/pressure. Moreover, a test to confirm heat resistance of electronic parts was made for further improvement in heat resistance of the sonde, in order to obtain the data. In the development of an analysis system, conducted were enhancement of operability of the planning/indication portions of the well drilling trajectory supporting system, improvement of the data intake system, etc. In relation to the well assessment supporting system, carried out were heightening of operability of the temperature analysis portion and confirmation of accuracy increase. 5 refs., 253 figs., 72 tabs.

  18. Slim hole drilling and testing strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielson, Dennis L.; Garg, Sabodh K.; Goranson, Colin

    2017-12-01

    The financial and geologic advantages of drilling slim holes instead of large production wells in the early stages of geothermal reservoir assessment has been understood for many years. However, the practice has not been fully embraced by geothermal developers. We believe that the reason for this is that there is a poor understanding of testing and reservoir analysis that can be conducted in slim holes. In addition to reservoir engineering information, coring through the cap rock and into the reservoir provides important data for designing subsequent production well drilling and completion. Core drilling requires significantly less mud volume than conventional rotary drilling, and it is typically not necessary to cure lost circulation zones (LCZ). LCZs should be tested by either production or injection methods as they are encountered. The testing methodologies are similar to those conducted on large-diameter wells; although produced and/or injected fluid volumes are much less. Pressure, temperature and spinner (PTS) surveys in slim holes under static conditions can used to characterize temperature and pressure distribution in the geothermal reservoir. In many cases it is possible to discharge slim holes and obtain fluid samples to delineate the geochemical properties of the reservoir fluid. Also in the latter case, drawdown and buildup data obtained using a downhole pressure tool can be employed to determine formation transmissivity and well properties. Even if it proves difficult to discharge a slim hole, an injection test can be performed to obtain formation transmissivity. Given the discharge (or injection) data from a slimhole, discharge properties of a large-diameter well can be inferred using wellbore modeling. Finally, slim hole data (pressure, temperature, transmissivity, fluid properties) together with reservoir simulation can help predict the ability of the geothermal reservoir to sustain power production.

  19. Benthic foraminiferal responses to operational drill cutting discharge in the SW Barents Sea - a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aagaard-Sørensen, Steffen; Junttila, Juho; Dijkstra, Noortje

    2016-04-01

    Petroleum related exploration activities started in the Barents Sea 1980, reaching 97 exploration wells drilled per January 2013. The biggest operational discharge from drilling operations in the Barents Sea is the release of drill cuttings (crushed seabed and/or bedrock) and water based drilling muds including the commonly used weighing material barite (BaSO4). Barium (Ba), a constituent of barite, does not degrade and can be used to evaluate dispersion and accumulation of drill waste. The environmental impact associated with exploration drilling within the Goliat Field, SW Barents Sea in 2006 was evaluated via a multiproxy investigation of local sediments. The sediments were retrieved in November 2014 at ~350 meters water depth and coring sites were selected at distances of 5, 30, 60, 125 and 250 meters from the drill hole in the eastward downstream direction. The dispersion pattern of drill waste was estimated via measurements of sediment parameters including grain size distribution and water content in addition to heavy metal and total organic carbon contents. The environmental impact was evaluated via micro faunal analysis based on benthic foraminiferal (marine shell bearing protists) fauna composition and concentration changes. Observing the sediment parameters, most notably Ba levels, reveals that dispersion of drill waste was limited to <125 meters from the drill site with drill waste thicknesses decreasing downstream. The abruptness and quantity of drill waste sedimentation initially smothered the foraminiferal fauna at ≤ 30 meters from the drill site, while at a distance of 60 meters, the fauna seemingly survived and bioturbation persisted. Analysis of the live (Nov 2014) foraminiferal fauna reveals a natural species composition at all distances from the drill site within the top sediments (0-5 cm core depth). Furthermore, the fossil foraminiferal fauna composition found within post-impacted top sediment sections, particularly in the cores situated at

  20. Cuttings Transport Models and Experimental Visualization of Underbalanced Horizontal Drilling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Na Wei

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aerated underbalanced horizontal drilling technology has become the focus of the drilling industry at home and abroad, and one of the engineering core issues is the horizontal borehole cleaning. Therefore, calculating the minimum injection volume of gas and liquid accurately is essential for the construction in aerated underbalanced horizontal drilling. This paper establishes a physical model of carrying cuttings and borehole cleaning in wellbore of horizontal well and a critical transport mathematical model according to gas-liquid-solid flow mechanism and large plane dunes particle transport theory.

  1. DALI - drilling advisor with logic interpretations: methodological issues for designing underbalanced drilling operations. Improving efficiency using case-based reasonic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santana, Gustavo A.; Velazquez C, David [Mexican Oil Institute, Mexico DF (Mexico)

    2004-07-01

    A system that applies a method of knowledge-intensive case-based reasoning, for repair and prevention of unwanted events in the domain of offshore oil well drilling, has been developed in cooperation with an oil company. From several reoccurring problems during oil well drilling the problem of 'lost circulation', i.e. loss of circulating drilling fluid into the geological formation, was picked out as a pilot problem. An extensive general knowledge model was developed for the domain of oil well drilling. Different cases were created on the basis of information from one Mexican Gulf operator. When the completed CBR-system was tested against a new case, cases with descending similarity were selected by the tool. In an informal evaluation, the two best fitting cases proved to give the operator valuable advise on how to go about solving the new case (author)

  2. Development and testing of underbalanced drilling products. Topical report, September 1994--September 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Medley, G.H., Jr; Maurer, W.C.; Liu, G.; Garkasi, A.Y.

    1995-09-01

    Underbalanced drilling is experiencing growth at a rate that rivals that of horizontal drilling in the mid-1980s. Problems remain, however, for applying underbalanced drilling in a wider range of geological settings and drilling environments. This report addresses the development and testing of two products designed to advance the application of underbalanced drilling techniques. A user-friendly foam fluid hydraulics model (FOAM) was developed for a PC Windows environment. The program predicts pressure and flow characteristics of foam fluids used in underbalanced drilling operations. FOAM is based on the best available mathematical models, and was validated through comparison to existing models, laboratory test well measurements, and field data. This model does not handle air or mist drilling where the foam quality is above 0.97. An incompressible drilling fluid was developed that utilizes lightweight solid additives (hollow glass spheres) to reduce the density of the mud to less than that of water. This fluid is designed for underbalanced drilling situations where compressible lightweight fluids are inadequate. In addition to development of these new products, an analysis was performed to determine the market potential of lightweight fluids, and a forecast of underbalanced drilling in the USA over the next decade was developed. This analysis indicated that up to 12,000 wells per year (i.e., 30 percent of all wells) will be drilled underbalanced in the USA within the next ten years.

  3. Application of air hammer drilling technology in igneous rocks of Junggar basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Hongshan; Feng, Guangtong; Yu, Haiye

    2018-03-01

    There were many technical problems such as serious well deviation, low penetration rate and long drilling cycle in igneous rocks because of its hardness, strong abrasive and poor drillability, which severely influenced the exploration and development process of Junggar basin. Through analyzing the difficulties of gas drilling with roller bits in Well HS 2, conducting the mechanics experiments about igneous rock, and deeply describing the rock-breaking mechanism of air hammer drilling and its adaptability in igneous rocks, air hammer drilling can realize deviation control and fast drilling in igneous rocks of piedmont zone and avoid the wear and fatigue fracture of drilling strings due to its characteristics of low WOB, low RPM and high frequency impact. Through firstly used in igneous rocks of Well HS 201, compared with gas drilling with cone bit, the average penetration rate and one-trip footage of air hammer drilling respectively increased by more than 2.45 times and 6.42 times while the well deviation was always controlled less than 2 degrees. Two records for Block HS were set up such as the fastest penetration rate of 14.29m/h in Φ444.5mm well hole and the highest one-trip footage of 470.62m in Φ311.2mm well hole. So air hammer drilling was an effective way to realize optimal and fast drilling in the igneous rock formation of Junggar basin.

  4. GRED STUDIES AND DRILLING OF AMERICULTURE STATE 2, AMERICULTURE TILAPIA FARM LIGHTNING DOCK KGRA, ANIMAS VALLEY, NM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Witcher, James

    2006-08-01

    This report summarizes the GRED drilling operations in the AmeriCulture State 2 well with an overview of the preliminary geologic and geothermal findings, from drill cuttings, core, geophysical logs and water geochemical sampling.

  5. Handbook of Best Practices for Geothermal Drilling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Finger, John Travis [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Blankenship, Douglas A. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2012-02-01

    This Handbook is a description of the complex process that comprises drilling a geothermal well. The focus of the detailed Chapters covering various aspects of the process (casing design, cementing, logging and instrumentation, etc) is on techniques and hardware that have proven successful in geothermal reservoirs around the world. The Handbook will eventually be linked to the GIA web site, with the hope and expectation that it can be continually updated as new methods are demonstrated or proven.

  6. New Proposed Drilling at Surtsey Volcano, Iceland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Marie D.

    2014-12-01

    Surtsey, an isolated oceanic island and a World Heritage Site of the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization, is a uniquely well-documented natural laboratory for investigating processes of rift zone volcanism, hydrothermal alteration of basaltic tephra, and biological colonization and succession in surface and subsurface pyroclastic deposits. Deposits from Surtsey's eruptions from 1963 to 1967 were first explored via a 181-meter hole drilled in 1979 by the U.S. Geological Survey and Icelandic Museum of Natural History.

  7. Drilling miniature holes, Part III

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gillespie, L.K.

    1978-07-01

    Miniature components for precision electromechanical mechanisms such as switches, timers, and actuators typically require a number of small holes. Because of the precision required, the workpiece materials, and the geometry of the parts, most of these holes must be produced by conventional drilling techniques. The use of such techniques is tedious and often requires considerable trial and error to prevent drill breakage, minimize hole mislocation and variations in hole diameter. This study of eight commercial drill designs revealed that printed circuit board drills produced better locational and size repeatability than did other drills when centerdrilling was not used. Boring holes 1 mm in dia, or less, as a general rule did not improve hole location in brass or stainless steel. Hole locations of patterns of 0.66-mm holes can be maintained within 25.4-..mu..m diametral positional tolerance if setup misalignments can be eliminated. Size tolerances of +- 3.8 ..mu..m can be maintained under some conditions when drilling flat plates. While these levels of precision are possible with existing off-the-shelf drills, they may not be practical in many cases.

  8. Sample Acqusition Drilling System for the the Resource Prospector Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zacny, K.; Paulsen, G.; Quinn, J.; Smith, J.; Kleinhenz, J.

    2015-12-01

    The goal of the Lunar Resource Prospector Mission (RPM) is to capture and identify volatiles species within the top meter of the lunar regolith. The RPM drill has been designed to 1. Generate cuttings and place them on the surface for analysis by the the Near InfraRed Volatiles Spectrometer Subsystem (NIRVSS), and 2. Capture cuttings and transfer them to the Oxygen and Volatile Extraction Node (OVEN) coupled with the Lunar Advanced Volatiles Analysis (LAVA) subsystem. The RPM drill is based on the Mars Icebreaker drill developed for capturing samples of ice and ice cemented ground on Mars. The drill weighs approximately 10 kg and is rated at ~300 Watt. It is a rotary-percussive, fully autonomous system designed to capture cuttings for analysis. The drill consists of: 1. Rotary-Percussive Drill Head, 2. Sampling Auger, 3. Brushing station, 4. Z-stage, 5. Deployment stage. To reduce sample handling complexity, the drill auger is designed to capture cuttings as opposed to cores. High sampling efficiency is possible through a dual design of the auger. The lower section has deep and low pitch flutes for retaining of cuttings. The upper section has been designed to efficiently move the cuttings out of the hole. The drill uses a "bite" sampling approach where samples are captured in ~10 cm intervals. The first generation drill was tested in Mars chamber as well as in Antarctica and the Arctic. It demonstrated drilling at 1-1-100-100 level (1 meter in 1 hour with 100 Watt and 100 N Weight on Bit) in ice, ice cemented ground, soil, and rocks. The second generation drill was deployed on a Carnegie Mellon University rover, called Zoe, and tested in Atacama in 2012. The tests demonstrated fully autonomous sample acquisition and delivery to a carousel. The third generation drill was tested in NASA GRC's vacuum chamber, VF13, at 10-5 torr and approximately 200 K. It demonstrated successful capture and transfer of icy samples to a crucible. The drill has been modified and

  9. Salton Sea Scientific Drilling Project: A summary of drilling and engineering activities and scientific results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ross, H.P.; Forsgren, C.K. (eds.)

    1992-04-01

    The Salton Sea Scientific g Project (SSSDP) completed the first major well in the United States Continental Scientific Drilling Program. The well (State 2-14) was drilled to 10,W ft (3,220 m) in the Salton Sea Geothermal Field in California's Imperial Valley, to permit scientific study of a deep, high-temperature portion of an active geothermal system. The program was designed to investigate, through drilling and testing, the subsurface thermal, chemical, and mineralogical environments of this geothermal area. Extensive samples and data, including cores, cuttings, geothermal fluids and gases, and geophysical logs, were collected for future scientific analysis, interpretation, and publication. Short duration flow tests were conducted on reservoirs at a depth of approximately 6,120 ft (1,865 m) and at 10,136 ft (3,089 m). This report summarizes all major activities of the SSSDP, from project inception in the fall of 1984 through brine-pond cleanup and site restoration, ending in February 1989. This report presents a balanced summary of drilling, coring, logging, and flow-test operations, and a brief summary of technical and scientific results. Frequent reference is made to original records, data, and publication of results. The report also reviews the proposed versus the final well design, and operational summaries, such as the bit record, the casing and cementing program, and the coring program. Summaries are and the results of three flow tests. Several teamed during the project.

  10. Well stability in shale formations

    OpenAIRE

    Tariq, Abdullah

    2014-01-01

    Master's thesis in Petroleum engineering Well instability in shale formations has been a very major problem due to physiochemical interactions between drilling fluid and formation. In this thesis, chemical, thermal and diffusion effects on the well collapse strength are evaluated in order to investigate the dominating driving forces. A case study on the designed Heidrun well program was also performed in order to study the dynamics of the collapse pressure during drilling phase due to vari...

  11. Measurement of activity concentration of {sup 222}Rn in ground waters drawn from two wells drilled in the Amparo Complex metamorphic rocks, municipio de Amparo, SP; Medida da atividade do {sup 222}Rn em aguas subterraneas extraidas de dois pocos perfurados em rochas metamorficas do Complexo Amparo, municipio de Amparo, SP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira, Igor Jose Chaves de

    2008-07-01

    A sampling system was assembled for field {sup 222}Rn activity concentration measurements in ground waters. The system consists of a sampling flask that prevents the contact between the water sample and the atmosphere and a closed line for radon extraction from water. The system, its operation and calibration, are described in full detail, as well as, the conversion of the measured alpha counting rates in activity concentrations. The assembled system was used in {sup 222}Rn activity concentrations measurements in ground waters drawn from two wells drilled in the Amparo Complex metamorphic rocks. The wells are located at the urban area of the city of Amparo and are exploited for public use water. One well, named Vale Verde, is 56 meters deep and crosses 18 meters of soil, 26 meters of quartz rich gneiss and 12 meters of biotite-gneiss. The other well, named Seabra, is 117 meters deep, crosses 28 meters of soil and weathered rocks and ends in granite-gneiss. The mean activity concentrations for the year long observation were (377 +- 25) Bq/dm{sup 3}, for Seabra well, and (1282 +- 57) Bq/dm3, for the Vale Verde well. The {sup 222}Rn activity concentrations fall in the activity concentration range reported in the literature for similar geology areas and are larger than the concentrations found neighboring areas of the same metamorphic Complex. The seasonal activity concentration variations seem to correlate with rain fall variations in the study area. (author)

  12. Advanced Mud System for Microhole Coiled Tubing Drilling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kenneth Oglesby

    2008-12-01

    An advanced mud system was designed and key components were built that augment a coiled tubing drilling (CTD) rig that is designed specifically to drill microholes (less than 4-inch diameter) with advanced drilling techniques. The mud system was tailored to the hydraulics of the hole geometries and rig characteristics required for microholes and is capable of mixing and circulating mud and removing solids while being self contained and having zero discharge capability. Key components of this system are two modified triplex mud pumps (High Pressure Slurry Pumps) for advanced Abrasive Slurry Jetting (ASJ) and a modified Gas-Liquid-Solid (GLS) Separator for well control, flow return and initial processing. The system developed also includes an additional component of an advanced version of ASJ which allows cutting through most all materials encountered in oil and gas wells including steel, cement, and all rock types. It includes new fluids and new ASJ nozzles. The jetting mechanism does not require rotation of the bottom hole assembly or drill string, which is essential for use with Coiled Tubing (CT). It also has low reactive forces acting on the CT and generates cuttings small enough to be easily cleaned from the well bore, which is important in horizontal drilling. These cutting and mud processing components and capabilities compliment the concepts put forth by DOE for microhole coiled tubing drilling (MHTCTD) and should help insure the reality of drilling small diameter holes quickly and inexpensively with a minimal environmental footprint and that is efficient, compact and portable. Other components (site liners, sump and transfer pumps, stacked shakers, filter membranes, etc.. ) of the overall mud system were identified as readily available in industry and will not be purchased until we are ready to drill a specific well.

  13. Finite element modeling of a micro-drill and experiments on high speed ultrasonically assisted micro-drilling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Z.; Babitsky, V. I.

    2011-05-01

    Modal characteristics of a generic micro-drill and experiments on the micro-drilling with superimposing of longitudinal ultrasonic vibration are presented. Finite element (FE) analysis is used for identification of eigenfrequencies and modes of the drill. Dynamic influence of the drill shank is discussed and a hybrid model is proposed to account for it. The model is proven to be efficient for complicated drill models and advanced analysis. A high speed ultrasonically assisted micro-drilling (UAMD) system is established with air bearings and longitudinally vibrating workpiece. During the experiments the thrust force reduction is studied as well as effects of ultrasonic vibration frequency and rotational speed. A correlation study was conducted between the thrust force measurements and simulations from a nonlinear force model. It can be seen that the current one-dimensional model is not sufficient to describe the complete behavior of the drill. The FE model and force experimental results can be utilized for a full dynamic model of the UAMD system to study vibration and the cutting mechanism in the future.

  14. Unconventional Oil Reserves Development in the Viking Play (Western Canada Using Horizontal Wells and Hydraulic Fracturing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T.B. Baishev

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Oil production from the Viking play in Saskatchewan province started in the 1950s and continues since that time. Horizontal drilling and multistage fracturing have caused resurgence in development of this play. Based on the production data from several fields, the comparative results of the Viking play development using vertical and horizontal wells are presented. Horizontal wells drilling made it possible to increase oil production in those formation zones that were previously considered predominantly gas-saturated, as well as in the zones affected by water injection using vertical wells in order to maintain reservoir pressure. Infill drilling combined with longer lateral completion length also positively affected the development of oil reserves from the Viking play.

  15. Drilling challenges in a high inclination exploratory well through thick layers of salt; Desafios da perfuracao de um poco exploratorio de alta inclinacao na area do pre-sal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alves, Ivan; Pimentel, Jose; Amaro, Renato [PETROBRAS S.A., Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Hargreaves, Adriana [Halliburton, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2008-07-01

    This paper analyses a proposed high inclination deep water well in the deep pre-salt area of the Santos Basin, to see its technical viability in terms of torque and drag analysis and also hydraulics. The geometry of the well and BHAs for the build-up and high inclination phases are proposed and he results in terms of drag and torque analysis are presented for the 14 3/4{sup '}' hole (10 3/4{sup '}' casing) and 9{sup '}' hole ( 7{sup '}' liner). A commercially available simulator was used for the purpose and the proposed well is the shown to be a viable alternative for the development of the area. (author)

  16. Impacts on seafloor geology of drilling disturbance in shallow waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corrêa, Iran C S; Toldo, Elírio E; Toledo, Felipe A L

    2010-08-01

    This paper describes the effects of drilling disturbance on the seafloor of the upper continental slope of the Campos Basin, Brazil, as a result of the project Environmental Monitoring of Offshore Drilling for Petroleum Exploration--MAPEM. Field sampling was carried out surrounding wells, operated by the company PETROBRAS, to compare sediment properties of the seafloor, including grain-size distribution, total organic carbon, and clay mineral composition, prior to drilling with samples obtained 3 and 22 months after drilling. The sampling grid used had 74 stations, 68 of which were located along 7 radials from the well up to a distance of 500 m. The other 6 stations were used as reference, and were located 2,500 m from the well. The results show no significant sedimentological variation in the area affected by drilling activity. The observed sedimentological changes include a fining of grain size, increase in total organic carbon, an increase in gibbsite, illite, and smectite, and a decrease in kaolinite after drilling took place.

  17. Limit of crustal drilling depth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y.S. Zhao

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Deep drilling is becoming the direct and the most efficient means in exploiting deep mineral resources, facilitating to understanding the earthquake mechanism and performing other scientific researches on the Earth's crust. In order to understand the limit of drilling depth in the Earth's crust, we first conducted tests on granite samples with respect to the borehole deformation and stability under high temperature and high pressure using the triaxial servo-controlled rock testing system. Then the critical temperature-pressure coupling conditions that result in borehole instability are derived. Finally, based on the testing results obtained and the requirements for the threshold values of borehole deformations during deep drilling, the limit of drilling depth in the Earth's crust is formulated with ground temperature.

  18. Drilling Damage in Composite Material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luís Miguel P. Durão

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The characteristics of carbon fibre reinforced laminates have widened their use from aerospace to domestic appliances, and new possibilities for their usage emerge almost daily. In many of the possible applications, the laminates need to be drilled for assembly purposes. It is known that a drilling process that reduces the drill thrust force can decrease the risk of delamination. In this work, damage assessment methods based on data extracted from radiographic images are compared and correlated with mechanical test results—bearing test and delamination onset test—and analytical models. The results demonstrate the importance of an adequate selection of drilling tools and machining parameters to extend the life cycle of these laminates as a consequence of enhanced reliability.

  19. Casing and liners for drilling and completion

    CERN Document Server

    Byrom, Ted G

    2007-01-01

    The Gulf Drilling Series is a joint project between Gulf Publishing Company and the International Association of Drilling Contractors. The first text in this Series presents casing design and mechanics in a concise, two-part format. The first part focuses on basic casing design and instructs engineers and engineering students how to design a safe casing string. The second part covers more advanced material and special problems in casing design in a user-friendly format. Learn how to select sizes and setting depths to achieve well objectives, determine casing loads for design purposes, design casing properties to meet burst, collapse and tensile strength requirements and conduct casing running operations safely and successfully.

  20. Arctic deepwater development drilling design considerations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kokkinis, Theodore; Brinkmann, Carl R.; Ding, John; Fenz, Daniel M. [ExxonMobil Upstream Research Company, Houston, Texas (United States)], email: ted.kokkinis@exxonmobil.com, email: carl.r.brinkmann@exxonmobil.com, email: john.ding@exxonmobil.com, email: daniel.m.fenz@exxonmobil.com

    2010-07-01

    In the world, important amounts of oil and gas reserves are north of the Arctic Circle and a large part of it is located offshore in water depths over 100 meters. Accessing those deepwater areas presents important challenges due to the harsh environment and current methods are not viable, year round operations would be required to drill a large number of wells. The aim of this paper is to determine the design requirements for economic development of Arctic deepwater reservoirs and to highlight the new technologies needed to do so. This paper showed that overall system design should integrate a rapid disconnection capacity and a caisson shaped hull with a breaking cone at the waterline. In addition, developing the disconnection, ice management and re-supply systems were found to be the key technical challenges and the development of topsides drilling equipment and of a method of estimation of the ice loads were determined among the technology development required.

  1. Laparoscopy After Previous Laparotomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zulfo Godinjak

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Following the abdominal surgery, extensive adhesions often occur and they can cause difficulties during laparoscopic operations. However, previous laparotomy is not considered to be a contraindication for laparoscopy. The aim of this study is to present that an insertion of Veres needle in the region of umbilicus is a safe method for creating a pneumoperitoneum for laparoscopic operations after previous laparotomy. In the last three years, we have performed 144 laparoscopic operations in patients that previously underwent one or two laparotomies. Pathology of digestive system, genital organs, Cesarean Section or abdominal war injuries were the most common causes of previouslaparotomy. During those operations or during entering into abdominal cavity we have not experienced any complications, while in 7 patients we performed conversion to laparotomy following the diagnostic laparoscopy. In all patients an insertion of Veres needle and trocar insertion in the umbilical region was performed, namely a technique of closed laparoscopy. Not even in one patient adhesions in the region of umbilicus were found, and no abdominal organs were injured.

  2. Deepwater drilling; Jakten paa de store dyp

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2003-07-01

    Recent technological development has made it possible to drill for oil and gas at the impressive depth of 3000 metres. An increasing part of the world's oil and gas discoveries are made in deep or ultra deep waters. Ultra deep waters are those exceeding 1500 metres. Since drilling at more than 500 metres started at the end of the 1970s, 32 discoveries of about 500 million barrels of extractable oil or gas have been made. These finds amount to almost 60 thousand millions barrels of oil equivalents. Most of the effort has been made in the coasts between Brazil, West Africa and the Gulf of Mexico. Deepwater projects have been a field of priority for Norwegian oil companies in their search for international commissions. It is frequently time-consuming, expensive and technologically challenging to drill at great depths. The article describes the Atlantis concept, which may reduce the complexities and costs of deepwater activities. This involves making an artificial sea bottom, which in the form of an air-filled buoy is anchored at a depth of 200 - 300 metres. Production wells or exploration wells and risers are extended from the real bottom to the artificial one.

  3. Oil and Natural Gas Wells, US, 2010, Platts

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The Oil and Natural Gas Well geospatial dataset contains point features representing permitted locations, most of which have been drilled and completed, or drilled...

  4. Superhot Drilling in Iceland, the Experience of the Iceland Deep Drilling Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elders, W. A.; Friðleifsson, G. Ó.; Zierenberg, R. A.; Fowler, A. P.

    2017-12-01

    The Iceland Deep Drilling Project aims to improve geothermal economics by producing supercritical fluids (www.iddp.is). Supercritical wells could yield an order of magnitude more usable energy than that from conventional geothermal wells because of higher enthalpy and enhanced flow properties. In 2009, the IDDP-1 well failed to reach supercritical conditions in the Krafla caldera in NE Iceland, after encountering rhyolite magma at only 2.1 km depth. The completed geothermal well became the world's hottest and produced superheated steam with a wellhead temperature of 452°C and flow sufficient to generate 35 MWe. The IDDP next moved SW to the Reykjanes Peninsula, the landward extension of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge, where it is possible to study an analog of the roots of a black smoker. Reykjanes is unique among Icelandic geothermal systems in being recharged by seawater, which has a critical point of 406°C at 298 bars. Drilling began by deepening an existing 2.5 km deep production well to 3 km depth, and then angling it towards the main upflow zone of the system, for a total slant depth of 4,659 m. Total circulation losses were encountered below 3 km that could not be cured by lost circulation materials or by multiple cement jobs. Accordingly, drilling continued to total depth without return of drill cuttings. We attempted 13 core runs below 3 km depth, only half of which recovered core. The cores are basalts and dolerites with alteration ranging from lower greenschist facies to lower amphibolite facies, suggesting formation temperatures >450°C. After the end of drilling in January 2017, following only six days of heating, supercritical conditions (426°C at 340 bars) were measured in the well at a depth of 4.5 km. The well has not yet been allowed to equilibrate to full in situ temperature. A perforated liner was inserted to 4,570 m, depth to facilitate temperature cycling to enhance permeability at depth through thermal cracking. In 2018 this will be followed by a

  5. Off the launch-pad: Tesco lays out plans to fully commercialize casing drilling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, M.

    2002-09-01

    A strategic plan to advance the company's patented casing drilling technology was recently unveiled by Calgary-based Tesco Corporation. The plans include construction of a $30 million Calgary manufacturing facility, construction and conversion of dozens of rigs for casing drilling capability and a training centre for engineers and operating personnel in Houston, Texas. Tesco Corporation expects to capture about five per cent of the market and generate one billion dollars in revenue within five years. The advantage of casing drilling is that it allows oil companies to drill wells without the need to constantly insert and withdraw drill strings in a process known as tripping, which is not only time consuming, but it opens up the well to such common downhole problems as sloughing, lost circulation and loss of well control. The technology can be used in virtually any drilling environment. Tesco has drilled straight, deviated and horizontal wells, reached depths of 12,000 feet and is pushing the limits well by well. Casing drilling has been shown to reduce the number of unscheduled events and reduce borehole instability that can cause delay or result in the loss of the well. It has also proven to be 30 per cent faster than conventional drilling. 3 figs.

  6. DOE HIGH-POWER SLIM-HOLE DRILLING SYSTEM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. William C. Maurer; John H. Cohen; J. Chris Hetmaniak; Curtis Leitko

    1999-09-01

    This project used a systems approach to improve slim-hole drilling performance. A high power mud motor, having a double-length power section, and hybrid PDC/TSP drill bit were developed to deliver maximum horsepower to the rock while providing a long life down hole. This high-power slim-hole drilling system drills much faster than conventional slim-hole motor and bit combinations and holds significant potential to reduce slim-hole drilling costs. The oil and gas industries have been faced with downward price pressures since the 1980s. These pressures are not expected to be relieved in the near future. To maintain profitability, companies have had to find ways to reduce the costs of producing oil and gas. Drilling is one of the more costly operations in the production process. One method to reduce costs of drilling is to use smaller more mobile equipment. Slim holes have been drilled in the past using this principle. These wells can save money not only from the use of smaller drilling equipment, but also from reduced tubular costs. Stepping down even one casing size results in significant savings. However, slim holes have not found wide spread use for three reasons. First, until recently, the price of oil has been high so there were no forces to move the industry in this direction. Second, small roller bits and motors were not very reliable and they drilled slowly, removing much of the economic benefit. The third and final reason was the misconception that large holes were needed everywhere to deliver the desired production. Several factors have changed that will encourage the use of slim holes. The industry now favors any method of reducing the costs of producing oil and gas. In addition, the industry now understands that large holes are not always needed. Gas, in particular, can have high production rates in smaller holes. New materials now make it possible to manufacture improved bits and motors that drill for long periods at high rates. All that remains is to

  7. Wireline Deep Drill for the Exploration of Icy Bodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulsen, G.; Zacny, K.; Mellerowicz, B.; Craft, J.; Bar-Cohen, Y.; Beegle, L.; Sherrit, S.; Badescu, M.; Corsetti, F.; Ibarra, Y.

    2013-01-01

    One of the most pressing current questions in space science is whether life has ever arisen anywhere else in the universe. Water is a critical prerequisite for all life-as-we-know-it, thus the possible exploration targets for extraterrestrial life are bodies that have or had copious liquid: Mars, Europa, and Enceladus. Due to the oxidizing nature of Mars' surface, as well as subsurface liquid water reservoirs present on Europa and Enceladus, the search for evidence of existing life must likely focus on subsurface locations, at depths sufficient to support liquid water or retain biologic signatures. To address these questions, an Auto-Gopher sampler has been developed that is a wireline type drill. This drill is suspended on a tether and its motors and mechanisms are built into a tube that ends with a coring bit. The tether provides the mechanical connection to a rover/lander on a surface as well as power and data communication. Upon penetrating to a target depth, the drill is retracted from the borehole, the core is deposited into a sample transfer system, and the drill is lowered back into the hole. Wireline operation sidesteps one of the major drawbacks of traditional continuous drill string systems by obviating the need for multiple drill sections, which add significantly to the mass and the complexity of the system (i.e. penetration rate was 40 cm per hour). Drilling to 2 meter depth and recovering of cores every 10 cm took a total time of 15 hours (a single step of drilling 10 cm and retrieving the core was 45 minutes). Total energy to reach the 2 m depth was 500 Whr. The Weight on Bit was limited to less than 70 Newton. The core recovery was 100%.

  8. Fundamental Research on Percussion Drilling: Improved rock mechanics analysis, advanced simulation technology, and full-scale laboratory investigations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michael S. Bruno

    2005-12-31

    drilling tests, as well as single impact tests, have been designed and executed. Both Berea sandstone and Mancos shale samples are used. In single impact tests, three impacts are sequentially loaded at the same rock location to investigate rock response to repetitive loadings. The crater depth and width are measured as well as the displacement and force in the rod and the force in the rock. Various pressure differences across the rock-indentor interface (i.e. bore pressure minus pore pressure) are used to investigate the pressure effect on rock penetration. For hammer drilling tests, an industrial fluid hammer is used to drill under both underbalanced and overbalanced conditions. Besides calibrating the modeling tool, the data and cuttings collected from the tests indicate several other important applications. For example, different rock penetrations during single impact tests may reveal why a fluid hammer behaves differently with diverse rock types and under various pressure conditions at the hole bottom. On the other hand, the shape of the cuttings from fluid hammer tests, comparing to those from traditional rotary drilling methods, may help to identify the dominant failure mechanism that percussion drilling relies on. If so, encouraging such a failure mechanism may improve hammer performance. The project is summarized in this report. Instead of compiling the information contained in the previous quarterly or other technical reports, this report focuses on the descriptions of tasks, findings, and conclusions, as well as the efforts on promoting percussion drilling technologies to industries including site visits, presentations, and publications. As a part of the final deliveries, the 3D numerical model for rock mechanics is also attached.

  9. Request by the Bure (Haute-Marne) CLIS related to the reading of well logging performed by the ANDRA from drilling located around Bure, to check rock characterization and properties. Report made by the ANCCLI's Scientific Committee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-01-01

    After having recalled the first conclusions of a work group built up by the Scientific Committee at the request of the Bure CLIS to assess studies performed by the ANDRA regarding the geological properties of the Bure site (site of deep geological storage of long life and high level radio-elements), this report proposes a critical discussion of measurements performed by the ANDRA, and more particularly of methodological aspects of this assessment of rock characteristics and properties based on well logging data. Thus, it comments the available raw data, the used instrumentation, the assessment of clay containment capacities (containment horizon homogeneity, stability of petrophysical properties, hydraulic studies with a focus on a noticed overpressure, modelling and data integration). Some brief propositions are stated. The appendix contains a set a questions to be submitted to the ANDRA by the Bure CLIS on the available data, on data calibration and homogenization, and on the assessment of containment capacities

  10. Deep drilling for geothermal energy in Finland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kukkonen, Ilmo

    2016-04-01

    There is a societal request to find renewable CO2-free energy resources. One of the biggest such resources is provided by geothermal energy. In addition to shallow ground heat already extensively used in Finland, deep geothermal energy provides an alternative so far not exploited. Temperatures are high at depth, but the challenge is, how to mine the heat? In this presentation, the geological and geophysical conditions for deep geothermal energy production in Finland are discussed as well as challenges for drilling and conditions at depth for geothermal energy production. Finland is located on ancient bedrock with much lower temperatures than geologically younger volcanically and tectonically active areas. In order to reach sufficiently high temperatures drilling to depths of several kilometres are needed. Further, mining of the heat with, e.g., the principle of Enhanced Geothermal System (EGS) requires high hydraulic conductivity for efficient circulation of fluid in natural or artificial fractures of the rock. There are many issues that must be solved and/or improved: Drilling technology, the EGS concept, rock stress and hydraulic fracturing, scale formation, induced seismicity and ground movements, possible microbial activity, etc. An industry-funded pilot project currently in progress in southern Finland is shortly introduced.

  11. Estimating Drilling Cost and Duration Using Copulas Dependencies Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Al Kindi

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Estimation of drilling budget and duration is a high-level challenge for oil and gas industry. This is due to the many uncertain activities in the drilling procedure such as material prices, overhead cost, inflation, oil prices, well type, and depth of drilling. Therefore, it is essential to consider all these uncertain variables and the nature of relationships between them. This eventually leads into the minimization of the level of uncertainty and yet makes a "good" estimation points for budget and duration given the well type. In this paper, the copula probability theory is used in order to model the dependencies between cost/duration and MRI (mechanical risk index. The MRI is a mathematical computation, which relates various drilling factors such as: water depth, measured depth, true vertical depth in addition to mud weight and horizontal displacement. In general, the value of MRI is utilized as an input for the drilling cost and duration estimations. Therefore, modeling the uncertain dependencies between MRI and both cost and duration using copulas is important. The cost and duration estimates for each well were extracted from the copula dependency model where research study simulate over 10,000 scenarios. These new estimates were later compared to the actual data in order to validate the performance of the procedure. Most of the wells show moderate - weak relationship of MRI dependence, which means that the variation in these wells can be related to MRI but to the extent that it is not the primary source.

  12. Use of Cutting-Edge Horizontal and Underbalanced Drilling Technologies and Subsurface Seismic Techniques to Explore, Drill and Produce Reservoired Oil and Gas from the Fractured Monterey Below 10,000 ft in the Santa Maria Basin of California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    George Witter; Robert Knoll; William Rehm; Thomas Williams

    2005-09-29

    This project was undertaken to demonstrate that oil and gas can be drilled and produced safely and economically from a fractured Monterey reservoir in the Santa Maria Basin of California by employing horizontal wellbores and underbalanced drilling technologies. Two vertical wells were previously drilled in this area with heavy mud and conventional completions; neither was commercially productive. A new well was drilled by the project team in 2004 with the objective of accessing an extended length of oil-bearing, high-resistivity Monterey shale via a horizontal wellbore, while implementing managed-pressure drilling (MPD) techniques to avoid formation damage. Initial project meetings were conducted in October 2003. The team confirmed that the demonstration well would be completed open-hole to minimize productivity impairment. Following an overview of the geologic setting and local field experience, critical aspects of the application were identified. At the pre-spud meeting in January 2004, the final well design was confirmed and the well programming/service company requirements assigned. Various design elements were reduced in scope due to significant budgetary constraints. Major alterations to the original plan included: (1) a VSP seismic survey was delayed to a later phase; (2) a new (larger) surface hole would be drilled rather than re-enter an existing well; (3) a 7-in. liner would be placed into the top of the Monterey target as quickly as possible to avoid problems with hole stability; (4) evaluation activities were reduced in scope; (5) geosteering observations for fracture access would be deduced from penetration rate, cuttings description and hydrocarbon in-flow; and (6) rather than use nitrogen, a novel air-injection MPD system was to be implemented. Drilling operations, delayed from the original schedule by capital constraints and lack of rig availability, were conducted from September 12 to November 11, 2004. The vertical and upper curved sections were

  13. Recommendations of the workshop on advanced geothermal drilling systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glowka, D.A.

    1997-12-01

    At the request of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Geothermal Technologies, Sandia National Laboratories convened a group of drilling experts in Berkeley, CA, on April 15-16, 1997, to discuss advanced geothermal drilling systems. The objective of the workshop was to develop one or more conceptual designs for an advanced geothermal drilling system that meets all of the criteria necessary to drill a model geothermal well. The drilling process was divided into ten essential functions. Each function was examined, and discussions were held on the conventional methods used to accomplish each function and the problems commonly encountered. Alternative methods of performing each function were then listed and evaluated by the group. Alternative methods considered feasible or at least worth further investigation were identified, while methods considered impractical or not potentially cost-saving were eliminated from further discussion. This report summarizes the recommendations of the workshop participants. For each of the ten functions, the conventional methods, common problems, and recommended alternative technologies and methods are listed. Each recommended alternative is discussed, and a description is given of the process by which this information will be used by the U.S. DOE to develop an advanced geothermal drilling research program.

  14. Drilling force and temperature of bone under dry and physiological drilling conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Linlin; Wang, Chengyong; Jiang, Min; He, Huiyu; Song, Yuexian; Chen, Hanyuan; Shen, Jingnan; Zhang, Jiayong

    2014-11-01

    Many researches on drilling force and temperature have been done with the aim to reduce the labour intensiveness of surgery, avoid unnecessary damage and improve drilling quality. However, there has not been a systematic study of mid- and high-speed drilling under dry and physiological conditions(injection of saline). Furthermore, there is no consensus on optimal drilling parameters. To study these parameters under dry and physiological drilling conditions, pig humerus bones are drilled with medical twist drills operated using a wide range of drilling speeds and feed rates. Drilling force and temperature are measured using a YDZ-II01W dynamometer and a NEC TVS-500EX thermal infrared imager, respectively, to evaluate internal bone damage. To evaluate drilling quality, bone debris and hole morphology are observed by SEM(scanning electron microscopy). Changes in drilling force and temperature give similar results during drilling such that the value of each parameter peaks just before the drill penetrates through the osteon of the compact bone into the trabeculae of the spongy bone. Drilling temperatures under physiological conditions are much lower than those observed under dry conditions, while a larger drilling force occurs under physiological conditions than dry conditions. Drilling speed and feed rate have a significant influence on drilling force, temperature, bone debris and hole morphology. The investigation of the effect of drilling force and temperature on internal bone damage reveals that a drilling speed of 4500 r/min and a feed rate of 50 mm/min are recommended for bone drilling under physiological conditions. Drilling quality peaks under these optimal parameter conditions. This paper proposes the optimal drilling parameters under mid- and high-speed surgical drilling, considering internal bone damage and drilling quality, which can be looked as a reference for surgeons performing orthopedic operations.

  15. Towards a distributed infrastructure for research drilling in Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mevel, C.; Gatliff, R.; Ludden, J.; Camoin, G.; Horsfield, B.; Kopf, A.

    2012-04-01

    The EC-funded project "Deep Sea and Sub-Seafloor Frontier" (DS3F) aims at developing seafloor and sub seafloor sampling strategies for enhanced understanding of deep-sea and sub seafloor processes by connecting marine research in life and geosciences, climate and environmental change, with socio-economic issues and policy building. DS3F has identified access to sub seafloor sampling and instrumentation as a key element of this approach. There is a strong expertise in Europe concerning direct access to the sub seafloor. Within the international program IODP (Integrated Ocean Drilling Program), ECORD (European Consortium for Ocean Research Drilling) has successfully developed the concept of mission specific platforms (MSPs), contracted on a project basis to drill in ice covered and shallow water areas. The ECORD Science Operator, lead by the British Geological Survey (BGS) has build a internationally recognized expertise in scientific ocean drilling, from coring in challenging environment, through down hole measurements and laboratory analysis to core curation and data management. MARUM, at the Bremen University in Germany, is one of the three IODP core repositories. Europe is also at the forefront of scientific seabed drills, with the MeBo developed by MARUM as well as the BGS seabed rocks drills. Europe also plays a important role in continental scientific drilling and the European component of ICDP (International Continental Scientific Drilling Program) is strengthening, with the recent addition of France and foreseen addition of UK. Oceanic and continental drilling have very similar scientific objectives. Moreover, they share not only common technologies, but also common data handling systems. To develop an integrated approach to technology development and usage, a move towards a a distributed infrastructure for research drilling in Europe has been initiated by these different groups. Built on existing research & operational groups across Europe, it will

  16. Effects of Temperature on the Density of Water Based Drilling Mud ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ADOWIE PERE

    geothermal wells and for drilling deep wells. A systematic examination of rheological properties. (viscosity, Fluid loss, mud density, gel strength, pH, and yield .... temperature and heat energy required to dissipate bonds, which vary with fluid properties (i.e. the continuous phases).Drilling through high temperature zone in a ...

  17. Uranium prospecting by percussive drilling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dionne, G.M.

    1980-01-01

    The Societe de developpent da la Baie James (SDBJ) is carrying out mineral exploration in the region surrounding its hydroelectric development, in partnership with several companies experienced in exploration. In 1977 one joint venture consisting of SDBJ, Eldorado Nuclear Ltd., and Seru Nucleaire (Canada) made use of percussive drilling techniques in its search for uranium, hoping to take advantage of the rapid progress and greater mobility offered by this method. Details of the equipment and techniques used, with particular adaptations made necessary by the remote and rugged terrain, are given. It was concluded that percussive drilling is a useful technique. It is capable of a depth of up to 150 meters; the cost is relatively low (around $11.40 per drilled foot); its mobility and the rapid emplacement of equipment are important factors; and productivity is good, ideally 10 meters per hour. (LL)

  18. Drilling techniques for mineral exploration (AMD Training Course Handbook. Vol. 1. 1992)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, Rajendra

    1992-01-01

    A training course on drilling techniques for mineral exploration was organised between 20 January to 7 February 1992 exclusively for drilling engineers of Atomic Minerals Division (AMD) of the Department of Atomic Energy. The objective was to give the engineers training in theoretical as well as practical aspects of drilling and resource management. The lectures delivered by the faculty members are included in this book. (M.G.B.)

  19. Determining the Area of Review for Industrial Waste Disposal Wells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-12-01

    represents the minimun ultimate gel strength expected to be encountered when eva - luating abandoned wells drilled with water-base drilling fluids. 7...Strini-Vasan, S., "A Study of Temperature on Flow Properties of Non-Newtonian Drilling Fluids,1" M. S. Teis, University of Tulsa, 1957. 22. Hiller , K

  20. ATUCHA I NPP - Emergency drill practice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanda, Alejandro; Rosales, Gabriel

    2008-01-01

    Full text: Atucha I NPP performs an Emergency Drill Practice once a year. Its main goals are: -) Fulfill the requirements of the Argentine Nuclear Regulatory Authority (ARN) regarding Atucha I NPP's Operating License; -) Fulfill the commitment with the community regarding the safe and reliable operation Atucha I NPP; -) Verify the response of the Civil Organizations, Security Forces, and Armed Forces, as well as the correct application of the Emergency Plan; -) Perform the 'General Alarm Drill' periodic control; -) Perform a re-training of the members of the Security Advisor Internal Committee (CIAS) on the Internal and External Aspects of the Emergency Plan and on the related procedures; -) Test the Emergency Communications System. New goals are added every year, considering the Drill's scope. This drill comprises two different kinds of practices: Internal practices (practices in the station, with our personnel) and external practices (practices outside the station with governmental organizations). Internal practices comprise: -) Internal and external communications practices; -) Acoustic alarms; -) Personnel gathering in the Meeting Points; -) Safety of selected Meeting Points; -) Personnel count, selective evacuation; -) Iodide Potassium pills distribution; -) CICE (Internal Group for Emergency Control) Coordination. External practices comprise: -) Nuclear Regulatory Authority; -) Argentine Navy, Comando Area Naval Fluvial, Base Naval Zarate; -) Lima firemen; -) Zarate firemen; -) Municipal Civil Defense (Zarate and Lima); -) National Guard, Escuadron Atucha; -) Zarate Regional Hospital; -) Lima Police Department; -) Zarate Police Department; -) Argentine Coast Guard, Zarate; -) Local radios: Radio FM Libre, FM El Sitio; -) First Aid clinic. The following activities are performed together with the aforementioned organizations: -) Formation of an 'Operative committee'; -) Evacuation of citizens in a 3 km radio; -) Control of every access to Lima; -) Control of

  1. Reservoir pressure evolution model during exploration drilling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Korotaev B. A.

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Based on the analysis of laboratory studies and literature data the method for estimating reservoir pressure in exploratory drilling has been proposed, it allows identify zones of abnormal reservoir pressure in the presence of seismic data on reservoir location depths. This method of assessment is based on developed at the end of the XX century methods using d- and σ-exponentials taking into account the mechanical drilling speed, rotor speed, bit load and its diameter, lithological constant and degree of rocks' compaction, mud density and "regional density". It is known that in exploratory drilling pulsation of pressure at the wellhead is observed. Such pulsation is a consequence of transferring reservoir pressure through clay. In the paper the mechanism for transferring pressure to the bottomhole as well as the behaviour of the clay layer during transmission of excess pressure has been described. A laboratory installation has been built, it has been used for modelling pressure propagation to the bottomhole of the well through a layer of clay. The bulge of the clay layer is established for 215.9 mm bottomhole diameter. Functional correlation of pressure propagation through the layer of clay has been determined and a reaction of the top clay layer has been shown to have bulge with a height of 25 mm. A pressure distribution scheme (balance has been developed, which takes into account the distance from layers with abnormal pressure to the bottomhole. A balance equation for reservoir pressure evaluation has been derived including well depth, distance from bottomhole to the top of the formation with abnormal pressure and density of clay.

  2. Bit selection using field drilling data and mathematical investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Momeni, M. S.; Ridha, S.; Hosseini, S. J.; Meyghani, B.; Emamian, S. S.

    2018-03-01

    A drilling process will not be complete without the usage of a drill bit. Therefore, bit selection is considered to be an important task in drilling optimization process. To select a bit is considered as an important issue in planning and designing a well. This is simply because the cost of drilling bit in total cost is quite high. Thus, to perform this task, aback propagation ANN Model is developed. This is done by training the model using several wells and it is done by the usage of drilling bit records from offset wells. In this project, two models are developed by the usage of the ANN. One is to find predicted IADC bit code and one is to find Predicted ROP. Stage 1 was to find the IADC bit code by using all the given filed data. The output is the Targeted IADC bit code. Stage 2 was to find the Predicted ROP values using the gained IADC bit code in Stage 1. Next is Stage 3 where the Predicted ROP value is used back again in the data set to gain Predicted IADC bit code value. The output is the Predicted IADC bit code. Thus, at the end, there are two models that give the Predicted ROP values and Predicted IADC bit code values.

  3. Exploration Drilling and Technology Demonstration At Fort Bliss

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barker, Ben; Moore, Joe [EGI; Segall, Marylin; Nash, Greg; Simmons, Stuart; Jones, Clay; Lear, Jon; Bennett, Carlon

    2014-02-26

    The Tularosa-Hueco basin in south-central New Mexico has long been known as an extensional area of high heat flow. Much of the basin is within the Fort Bliss military reservation, which is an exceptionally high value customer for power independent of the regional electric grid and for direct use energy in building climate control. A series of slim holes drilled in the 1990s established the existence of a thermal anomaly but not its practical value. This study began in 2009 with a demonstration of new exploration drilling technology. The subsequent phases reported here delivered a useful well, comparative exploration data sets and encouragement for further development. A production-size well, RMI56-5, was sited after extensive study of archival and newly collected data in 2010-2011. Most of 2012 was taken up with getting state and Federal authorities to agree on a lead agency for permitting purposes, getting a drilling permit and redesigning the drilling program to suit available equipment. In 2013 we drilled, logged and tested a 924 m well on the McGregor Range at Fort Bliss using a reverse circulation rig. Rig tests demonstrated commercial permeability and the well has a 7-inch slotted liner for use either in production or injection. An August 2013 survey of the completed well showed a temperature of 90 C with no reversal, the highest such temperature in the vicinity. The well’s proximity to demand suggests a potentially valuable resource for direct use heat and emergency power generation. The drilling produced cuttings of excellent size and quality. These were subjected to traditional analyses (thin sections, XRD) and to the QEMScan™ for comparison. QEMScan™ technology includes algorithms for determining such properties of rocks as density, mineralogy, heavy/light atoms, and porosity to be compared with direct measurements of the cuttings. In addition to a complete cuttings set, conventional and resistivity image logs were obtained in the open hole before

  4. Application of Ester based Drilling Fluid for Shale Gas Drilling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauki, Arina; Safwan Zazarli Shah, Mohamad; Bakar, Wan Zairani Wan

    2015-05-01

    Water based mud is the most commonly used mud in drilling operation. However, it is ineffective when dealing with water-sensitive shale that can lead to shale hydration, consequently wellbore instability is compromised. The alternative way to deal with this kind of shale is using synthetic-based mud (SBM) or oil-based mud (OBM). OBM is the best option in terms of technical requirement. Nevertheless, it is toxic and will create environmental problems when it is discharged to onshore or offshore environment. SBM is safer than the OBM. The aim of this research is to formulate a drilling mud system that can carry out its essential functions for shale gas drilling to avoid borehole instability. Ester based SBM has been chosen for the mud formulation. The ester used is methyl-ester C12-C14 derived from palm oil. The best formulation of ester-based drilling fluid was selected by manipulating the oil-water ratio content in the mud which are 70/30, 80/20 and 90/10 respectively. The feasibility of using this mud for shale gas drilling was investigated by measuring the rheological properties, shale reactivity and toxicity of the mud and the results were compared with a few types of OBM and WBM. The best rheological performance can be seen at 80/20 oil-water ratio of ester based mud. The findings revealed that the rheological performance of ester based mud is comparable with the excellent performance of sarapar based OBM and about 80% better than the WBM in terms of fluid loss. Apart from that, it is less toxic than other types of OBM which can maintain 60% prawn's survival even after 96 hours exposure in 100,000 ppm of mud concentration in artificial seawater.

  5. An Improved Triangular Element With Drilling Rotations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damkilde, Lars; Grønne, Mikael

    2002-01-01

    A new plane element with rotational degrees in the corner nodes is presented. The element has 12 degrees of freedom and the only difference from the well-known Linear Strain Triangular (LST) element is that the displacements perpendicular to the element sides in the mid-side nodes are replaced...... by rotations in the corner nodes. Compared to Allman's plane element which was the first succesfull implementation of drilling rotations the proposed element has extra displacements in the mid-side nodes parallel to the element sides. The performance should therefore be better and closer to the LST-element...

  6. Determination of concentrations and isotopic ratio of uranium in groundwaters drawn from two deep wells drilled in granitic rocks belonging to Itu intrusive suite; Determinacao das concentracoes e razoes isotopicas de uranio em aguas subterraneas extraidas de pocos perfurados em rochas da suite intrusiva de Itu (SP)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Souza, Francisca de; Reyes, Erika; Marques, Leila Soares [Sao Paulo Univ., SP (Brazil). Inst. de Astronomia, Geofisica e Ciencias Atmosfericas. Dept. de Geofisica]. E-mail: francisca@iag.usp.br; erika@iag.usp.br; leila@iag.usp.br

    2005-07-01

    This paper presents the first results obtained in the determination of dissolved uranium concentrations and ({sup 234}U/{sup 238}U) activity ratios of groundwaters drawn from two deep wells drilled in granitic rocks belonging to Itu Intrusive Suite, which is located at eastern Sao Paulo State. One of the wells, whose groundwaters have been analyzed, is located in Salto Town, while the other one is located in Itu Town. The groundwater sampling is monthly and begun on September, 2004, in order to investigate possible sazonal variations. The alpha spectrometry technique, associated with isotopic dilution method, has been used for these determinations. The data obtained up to now show that the groundwaters from Salto present uranium concentrations significantly lower ((0.098 {+-} 0.007) - (0.17 {+-} 0.01) ng/g) than those from Itu ((0.22 {+-} 0.02) - (0.31 {+-} 0.02) ng/g). The {sup 234}U and {sup 238}U isotopes of the investigated groundwaters from both wells are in radioactive disequilibrium, with ({sup 234}U/{sup 238}U) activity ratios systematically higher than unity. Although the groundwaters from Salto well are characterized by low {sup 234}U and {sup 238}U specific activities they present higher ({sup 234}U/{sup 238}U) activity ratios than those from Itu. The observed differences on the behavior of uranium concentrations and ({sup 234}U/{sup 238}U) activity ratios in the groundwaters from the two wells are very probably due to the large variety of granitic rocks from Itu Intrusive Suite, which are characterized by distinct uranium abundances. (author)

  7. Framework for a comparative environmental assessment of drilling fluids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meinhold, A.F.

    1998-11-01

    During the drilling of an oil or gas well, drilling fluid (or mud) is used to maintain well control and to remove drill cuttings from the hole. In response to effluent limitation guidelines promulgated by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) for discharge of drilling wastes offshore, alternatives to water and oil-based muds have been developed. These synthetic-based muds (SBMs) are more efficient than water-based muds (WBMs) for drilling difficult and complex formation intervals and have lower toxicity and smaller environmental impacts than diesel or conventional mineral oil-based muds (OBMs). A third category of drilling fluids, derived from petroleum and called enhanced mineral oils (EMOs), also have these advantages over the traditionally used OBMs and WBMs. EPA recognizes that SBMs and EMOs are new classes of drilling fluids, but their regulatory status is unclear. To address this uncertainty, EPA is following an innovative presumptive rulemaking process that will develop final regulations for SBM discharges offshore in less than three years. This report develops a framework for a comparative risk assessment for the discharge of SBMs and EMOs, to help support a risk-based, integrated approach to regulatory decision making. The framework will help identify potential impacts and benefits associated with the use of SBMs, EMOs, WBMs, and OBMs; identify areas where additional data are needed; and support early decision-making in the absence of complete data. As additional data becomes available, the framework can support a full quantitative comparative assessment. Detailed data are provided to support a comparative assessment in the areas of occupational and public health impacts.

  8. Drilling of metal matrix composites: cutting forces and chip formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Songmene, V.; Balout, B.; Masounave, J.

    2002-01-01

    Particulate metal matrix composites (MMCs) are known for their low weight and their high wear resistance, but also for the difficulties encountered during their machining. New aluminium MMCs containing with both soft lubricating graphite particles and hard particles (silicon carbide or alumina) with improved machinability were developed. This study investigates the drilling of these composites as compared to non-reinforced aluminium. The microstructure of chip, the cutting forces, the shear angles and the friction at tool-chip interface are used to compare the machinability of these composites. It was found that, during drilling of this new family of composites, the feed rate, and the nature of reinforcing particles govern the cutting forces. The mathematical models established by previous researchers for predicting the cutting forces when drilling metals were validated for these composites. The reinforcing particles within the composite help for chip segmentation, making the composite more brittle and easy to shear during the cutting process. (author)

  9. Voice Coil Percussive Mechanism Concept for Hammer Drill

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okon, Avi

    2009-01-01

    A hammer drill design of a voice coil linear actuator, spring, linear bearings, and a hammer head was proposed. The voice coil actuator moves the hammer head to produce impact to the end of the drill bit. The spring is used to store energy on the retraction and to capture the rebound energy after each impact for use in the next impact. The maximum actuator stroke is 20 mm with the hammer mass being 200 grams. This unit can create impact energy of 0.4 J with 0.8 J being the maximum. This mechanism is less complex than previous devices meant for the same task, so it has less mass and less volume. Its impact rate and energy are easily tunable without changing major hardware components. The drill can be driven by two half-bridges. Heat is removed from the voice coil via CO2 conduction.

  10. Wetting evaluation of silver based braze alloys onto zirconia metalized with reactive elements for application in oil well drill bots; Avaliacao do molhamento de ligas de adicao a base de prata sobre zirconia polida e metalizada com elementos ativos para aplicacao em brocas de perfuracao de pocos de petroleo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pereira, J.C.; Silva, J.M.; Santos, P.R.F.; Nascimento, R.M.; Martinelli, A.E. [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte (UFRN), Natal, RN (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia de Materiais], Email: jocabuzo@gmail.com; Pimenta, J.S. [Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina (UFSC), Florianopolis, SC (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia Mecanica

    2010-07-01

    Drill bits with hard ceramic inserts are often used on drilling operations. The cutting and crushing action of rocks will produce failures in the tricone bits, which are related to wear; total or partial rupture of the drill bit body or even the inserts; thermal shock and corrosion. The research of better drill bits with ceramic inserts thermally more stable and mechanically stronger, will lead to an increase of their lifetime, and so reducing costs of substitution and maintenance. In the present work, some silver based braze alloys were melted onto zirconia YSZ substrates metallized or not with active metals. inside a furnace with vacuum of 10{sup -5} mbar to evaluate the wetting behavior. The system with AgCuTi and the non metallized YSZ ceramic, showed low contact angles and stable interfaces, which may be appropriate for brazing metal/ceramic parts. (author)

  11. Additive to clay drilling muds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Voytenko, V.S.; Nekrasova, V.B.; Nikitinskiy, E.L.; Ponomarev, V.N.

    1984-01-01

    The purpose of the invention is to improve the lubricating and strengthening properties of clay drilling muds. This goal is achieved because the lubricating and strengthening additive used is waste from the pulp and paper industry at the stage of reprocessing crude sulfate soap into phytosterol.

  12. Stakeholder acceptance analysis ResonantSonic drilling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peterson, T.

    1995-12-01

    This report presents evaluations, recommendations, and requirements concerning ResonantSonic Drilling (Sonic Drilling), derived from a three-year program of stakeholder involvement. Sonic Drilling is an innovative method to reach contamination in soil and groundwater. The resonant sonic drill rig uses counter-rotating weights to generate energy, which causes the drill pipe to vibrate elastically along its entire length. In the resonant condition, forces of up to 200,000 pounds are transmitted to the drill bit face to create a cutting action. The resonant energy causes subsurface materials to move back into the adjacent formation, permitting the drill pipe to advance. This report is for technology developers and those responsible for making decisions about the use of technology to remediate contamination by volatile organic compounds. Stakeholders' perspectives help those responsible for technology deployment to make good decisions concerning the acceptability and applicability of sonic drilling to the remediation problems they face

  13. NMR of geophysical drill cores with a mobile Halbach scanner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Talnishnikh, E.

    2007-01-01

    This thesis is devoted to a mobile NMR with an improved Halbach scanner. This is a lightweight tube-shaped magnet with sensitive volume larger and a homogeneity of the magnetic field higher than the previous prototype version. The improved Halbach scanner is used for analysis of water-saturated drill cores and plugs with diameters up to 60 mm. To provide the analysis, the standard 1D technique with the CPMG sequence as well as 2D correlation experiments were successfully applied and adapted to study properties of fluid-saturated sediments. Afterwards the Halbach scanner was calibrated to fast non-destructive measurements of porosity, relaxation time distributions, and estimation of permeability. These properties can be calculated directly from the NMR data using the developed methodology. Any independent measurements of these properties with other methods are not needed. One of the main results of this work is the development of a new NMR on-line core scanner for measurements of porosity in long cylindrical and semi cylindrical drill cores. Also dedicated software was written to operate the NMR on-line core scanner. The physical background of this work is the study of the diffusion influence on transverse relaxation. The diffusion effect in the presence of internal gradients in porous media was probed by 1D and 2D experiments. The transverse relaxation time distributions obtained from 1D and from 2D experiments are comparable but different in fine details. Two new methodologies were developed based on the results of this study. First is the methodology quantifying the influence of diffusion in the internal gradients of water-saturated sediments on transverse relaxation from 2D correlation experiments. The second one is the correction of the permeability estimation from the NMR data taking in account the influence of the diffusion. Furthermore, PFG NMR technique was used to study restricted diffusion in the same kind of samples. Preliminary results are reported

  14. NMR of geophysical drill cores with a mobile Halbach scanner

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Talnishnikh, E.

    2007-08-21

    This thesis is devoted to a mobile NMR with an improved Halbach scanner. This is a lightweight tube-shaped magnet with sensitive volume larger and a homogeneity of the magnetic field higher than the previous prototype version. The improved Halbach scanner is used for analysis of water-saturated drill cores and plugs with diameters up to 60 mm. To provide the analysis, the standard 1D technique with the CPMG sequence as well as 2D correlation experiments were successfully applied and adapted to study properties of fluid-saturated sediments. Afterwards the Halbach scanner was calibrated to fast non-destructive measurements of porosity, relaxation time distributions, and estimation of permeability. These properties can be calculated directly from the NMR data using the developed methodology. Any independent measurements of these properties with other methods are not needed. One of the main results of this work is the development of a new NMR on-line core scanner for measurements of porosity in long cylindrical and semi cylindrical drill cores. Also dedicated software was written to operate the NMR on-line core scanner. The physical background of this work is the study of the diffusion influence on transverse relaxation. The diffusion effect in the presence of internal gradients in porous media was probed by 1D and 2D experiments. The transverse relaxation time distributions obtained from 1D and from 2D experiments are comparable but different in fine details. Two new methodologies were developed based on the results of this study. First is the methodology quantifying the influence of diffusion in the internal gradients of water-saturated sediments on transverse relaxation from 2D correlation experiments. The second one is the correction of the permeability estimation from the NMR data taking in account the influence of the diffusion. Furthermore, PFG NMR technique was used to study restricted diffusion in the same kind of samples. Preliminary results are reported

  15. Structure of La Primavera caldera, Jalisco, Mexico, deduced from gravity anomalies and drilling results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokoyama, I.; Mena, M.

    1991-07-01

    Previous studies of La Primavera caldera have mostly been based on surface geology and topography. Since 1980, many wells, exploring for geothermal energy, have reached depths of about 2 to 3 km at the center of the caldera. The results of the drillings, together with those of the gravity surveys, provide information about the subsurface structure of the caldera, and shed light on its formation. The drilling results and gravity anomalies at La Primavera caldera and San Marcos, located at about 40 km distance from the caldera, suggest that regional gravity anomalies can be interpreted in terms of depths of the granitic basements: the basement beneath La Primavera caldera is about 3 km deep and consists of roughly the same horizon as that beneath San Marcos. The drilling results within the caldera reveal that the depth of the caldera fills ranges from 0.3 to 1 km at the drilling sites. The andesite basement, about 1 km deep, remains approximately horizontal, and the granitic basement has a depth of about 3 km. The surface topographies, such as the postcaldera domes, scarcely disturb the subsurface strata. The local gravity anomalies show two lows within the caldera reflecting the configuration of caldera bottom, two funnel-shaped depressions, one of which corresponds to a vent of the Tala tuff deduced from geological observations. The mass deficiency within the caldera estimated from the gravity anomaly, satisfies the general relationship that the mass deficiency is proportional to the caldera diameter cubed. This means that caldera structure is three-dimensional: the larger the diameter, the deeper the funnel-shape. At present this argument may be limited to funnel-shaped calderas.

  16. Operational Review of the First Wireline In Situ Stress Test in Scientific Ocean Drilling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Casey Moore

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Scientific ocean drilling’s first in situ stress measurement was made at Site C0009A during Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP Expedition 319 as part of Nankai Trough Seismogenic Zone Experiment (NanTroSEIZE Stage 2. The Modular Formation Dynamics Tester (MDT, Schlumbergerwireline logging tool was deployed in riser Hole C0009A to measure in situ formation pore pressure, formation permeability (often reported as mobility=permeability/viscosity, and the least principal stress (S3 at several isolated depths (Saffer et al., 2009; Expedition 319 Scientists, 2010. The importance of in situ stress measurements is not only for scientific interests in active tectonic drilling, but also for geomechanical and well bore stability analyses. Certain in situ tools were not previously available for scientific ocean drilling due to the borehole diameter and open hole limits of riserless drilling. The riser-capable drillship, D/V Chikyu,now in service for IODP expeditions, allows all of the techniques available to estimate the magnitudes and orientations of 3-D stresses to be used. These techniques include downhole density logging for vertical stress, breakout and caliper log analyses for maximum horizontal stress, core-based anelastic strain recovery (ASR, used in the NanTroSEIZE expeditions in 2007–2008, and leak-off test (Lin et al., 2008 and minifrac/hydraulic fracturing (NanTroSEIZE Expedition319 in 2009. In this report, the whole operational planning process related to in situ measurements is reviewed, and lessons learned from Expedition 319 are summarized for efficient planning and testing in the future.

  17. Effects of drilling muds on lobster behavior. Progress report, 1 January-1 October 1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Atema, J; Ashkenas, L; Beale, E

    1979-01-01

    Drilling muds, used and discarded in great quantities during the drilling phase of exploration and production of oil wells, represent an unknown threat to the marine environment. The compositions of the muds vary greatly with drilling requirements. The toxicity of their components are largely unknown, but can range from apparently harmless to immediately lethal, as found recently in toxicity tests on a number of marine animals. This report contains eight sections, each describing an aspect of studies of lobster behavior, ecology, physiology and the effects of exposure to various levels of different drilling muds.

  18. Use of Cutting-Edge Horizontal and Underbalanced Drilling Technologies and Subsurface Seismic Techniques to Explore, Drill and Produce Reservoired Oil and Gas from the Fractured Monterey Below 10,000 ft in the Santa Maria Basin of California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    George Witter; Robert Knoll; William Rehm; Thomas Williams

    2006-06-30

    This project was undertaken to demonstrate that oil and gas can be drilled and produced safely and economically from a fractured Monterey reservoir in the Santa Maria Basin of California by employing horizontal wellbores and underbalanced drilling technologies. Two vertical wells were previously drilled in this area with heavy mud and conventional completions; neither was commercially productive. A new well was drilled by the project team in 2004 with the objective of accessing an extended length of oil-bearing, high-resistivity Monterey shale via a horizontal wellbore, while implementing managed-pressure drilling (MPD) techniques to avoid formation damage. Initial project meetings were conducted in October 2003. The team confirmed that the demonstration well would be completed open-hole to minimize productivity impairment. Following an overview of the geologic setting and local field experience, critical aspects of the application were identified. At the pre-spud meeting in January 2004, the final well design was confirmed and the well programming/service company requirements assigned. Various design elements were reduced in scope due to significant budgetary constraints. Major alterations to the original plan included: (1) a VSP seismic survey was delayed to a later phase; (2) a new (larger) surface hole would be drilled rather than re-enter an existing well; (3) a 7-in. liner would be placed into the top of the Monterey target as quickly as possible to avoid problems with hole stability; (4) evaluation activities were reduced in scope; (5) geosteering observations for fracture access would be deduced from penetration rate, cuttings description and hydrocarbon in-flow; and (6) rather than use nitrogen, a novel air-injection MPD system was to be implemented. Drilling operations, delayed from the original schedule by capital constraints and lack of rig availability, were conducted from September 12 to November 11, 2004. The vertical and upper curved sections were

  19. USE OF CUTTING-EDGE HORIZONTAL AND UNDERBALANCED DRILLING TECHNOLOGIES AND SUBSURFACE SEISMIC TECHNIQUES TO EXPLORE, DRILL AND PRODUCE RESERVOIRED OIL AND GAS FROM THE FRACTURED MONTEREY BELOW 10,000 FT IN THE SANTA MARIA BASIN OF CALIFORNIA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    George Witter; Robert Knoll; William Rehm; Thomas Williams

    2005-02-01

    This project was undertaken to demonstrate that oil and gas can be drilled and produced safely and economically from a fractured Monterey reservoir in the Santa Maria Basin of California by employing horizontal wellbores and underbalanced drilling technologies. Two vertical wells were previously drilled in this area by Temblor Petroleum with heavy mud and conventional completions; neither was commercially productive. A new well was drilled by the project team in 2004 with the objective of accessing an extended length of oil-bearing, high-resistivity Monterey shale via a horizontal wellbore, while implementing managed-pressure drilling (MPD) techniques to avoid formation damage. Initial project meetings were conducted in October 2003. The team confirmed that the demonstration well would be completed open-hole to minimize productivity impairment. Following an overview of the geologic setting and local field experience, critical aspects of the application were identified. At the pre-spud meeting in January 2004, the final well design was confirmed and the well programming/service company requirements assigned. Various design elements were reduced in scope due to significant budgetary constraints. Major alterations to the original plan included: (1) a VSP seismic survey was delayed to a later phase; (2) a new (larger) surface hole would be drilled rather than re-enter an existing well; (3) a 7-in. liner would be placed into the top of the Monterey target as quickly as possible to avoid problems with hole stability; (4) evaluation activities were reduced in scope; (5) geosteering observations for fracture access would be deduced from penetration rate, cuttings description and hydrocarbon in-flow; and (6) rather than use nitrogen, a novel air-injection MPD system was to be implemented. Drilling operations, delayed from the original schedule by capital constraints and lack of rig availability, were conducted from September 12 to November 11, 2004. The vertical and upper

  20. Pulmonary function and high-resolution computed tomography examinations among offshore drill floor workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkhus, Niels E; Skare, Øivind; Ulvestad, Bente; Aaløkken, Trond Mogens; Günther, Anne; Olsen, Raymond; Thomassen, Yngvar; Lund, May Brit; Ellingsen, Dag G

    2017-12-01

    The aim of this study was to assess short-term changes in pulmonary function in drill floor workers currently exposed to airborne contaminants generated as a result of drilling offshore. We also aimed to study the prevalence of pulmonary fibrosis using high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) scans of another group of previously exposed drill floor workers. Pulmonary function was measured before and after a 14-day work period in a follow-up study of 65 drill floor workers and 65 referents. Additionally, 57 other drill floor workers exposed to drilling fluids during the 1980s were examined with HRCT of the lungs in a cross-sectional study. The drill floor workers had a statistically significant decline in forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV 1 ) across the 14-day work period after adjustment for diurnal variations in pulmonary function (mean 90 mL, range 30-140 mL), while the small decline among the referents (mean 20 mL, range - 30 to 70 mL) was not of statistical significance. Larger declines in FEV 1 among drill workers were associated with the fewer number of days of active drilling. There were no signs of pulmonary fibrosis related to oil mist exposure among the other previously exposed drill floor workers. After 14 days offshore, a statistically significant decline in FEV 1 was observed in the drill floor workers, which may not be related to oil mist exposure. No pulmonary fibrosis related to oil mist exposure was observed.

  1. Microstructural analysis of the positive electrode of electrohydraulic drill

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusaiynov, K.; Shuyushbayeva, N. N.; Nusupbekov, B. R.; Turdybekov, K. M.; Shaimerdenova, K. M.; Akhmadiev, B. A.

    2015-12-01

    We consider the changes and the quality of the surface of the electrode system of the drill after electrohydraulic pulsed treatment. Spectral analysis of the microstructure of melted regions of the drill electrode surface, formed as a result of action of a spark discharge, is performed. The regularities of erosion wear of the electrodes depending on the energy parameters and the number of electrohydraulic pulses are established experimentally. This study is devoted to the method of electrohydraulic well-drilling based on the unique phenomenon of direct conversion of the electric energy into the mechanical energy of shock waves that effectively crush rocks in a bounded spatial volume in the well bottom. The electric-pulse treatment developed here is based on the Yutkin electrohydraulic effect [1-3].

  2. Mechanical Properties of Gas Shale During Drilling Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Chuanliang; Deng, Jingen; Cheng, Yuanfang; Li, Menglai; Feng, Yongcun; Li, Xiaorong

    2017-07-01

    The mechanical properties of gas shale significantly affect the designs of drilling, completion, and hydraulic fracturing treatments. In this paper, the microstructure characteristics of gas shale from southern China containing up to 45.1% clay were analyzed using a scanning electron microscope. The gas shale samples feature strongly anisotropic characteristics and well-developed bedding planes. Their strength is controlled by the strength of both the matrix and the bedding planes. Conventional triaxial tests and direct shear tests are further used to study the chemical effects of drilling fluids on the strength of shale matrix and bedding planes, respectively. The results show that the drilling fluid has a much larger impact on the strength of the bedding plane than that of the shale matrix. The impact of water-based mud (WBM) is much larger compared with oil-based mud. Furthermore, the borehole collapse pressure of shale gas wells considering the effects of drilling fluids are analyzed. The results show that the collapse pressure increases gradually with the increase of drilling time, especially for WBM.

  3. Fiscal 1995 report on the results of the subsidy operation under the Sunshine Project on the development of a geothermal water use power plant, etc. Development of the binary cycle power plant (development of the measurement while drilling system for geothermal wells); 1995 nendo New Sunshine keikaku hojo jigyo seika hokokusho. Nessui riyo hatsuden plant nado kaihatsu (binary cycle hatsuden plant no kaihatsu (chinetsusei kussakuji kotei joho kenchi system no kaihatsu))

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-03-01

    The R and D were conducted of a detection system for measurement of data on the bottom hole of geothermal well, data transmission and signal processing, and an analysis system for well drilling trajectory control and well assessment while drilling of geothermal wells based on the data obtained by the detection system, and the results were reported of the technical development in fiscal 1995. In the development of the downhole detection unit, the following developments were conducted: mud pulse generator, bottomhole signal processor, mode switches, inclination information sensor, power source, measures against vibration/shock, sonde external equipment, tests to confirm heat resistance of electronic parts, and design/manufacture of testing devices. In the development of the surface detection unit, the development was made of experimental analysis program, interface program, and simulation. In the development of the analysis system, as a well trajectory control support system, made were a trajectory planning/display system and a trajectory prediction system. As a downhole assessment support system, made were a temperature analysis system and a pressure analysis system. 4 refs., 298 figs., 88 tabs.

  4. The Drill Down Benchmark

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.A. Boncz (Peter); T. Rühl (Tim); F. Kwakkel

    1998-01-01

    textabstractData Mining places specific requirements on DBMS query performance that cannot be evaluated satisfactorily using existing OLAP benchmarks. The DD Benchmark - defined here - provides a practical case and yardstick to explore how well a DBMS is able to support Data Mining applications. It

  5. Surgical drill system and surgical drill bit to be used therein

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Margallo Balbas, E.; Wieringa, P.A.; French, P.J.; Lee, R.A.; Breedveld, P.

    2007-01-01

    Surgical drill system comprising a mechanical drill bit and means for imaging the vicinity of the drill bit tip, said means comprising: at least one optical fiber having a distal end and a proximal end, said distal end being located adjacent said drill bit tip, an optical processing unit, said

  6. Microhole High-Pressure Jet Drill for Coiled Tubing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ken Theimer; Jack Kolle

    2007-06-30

    Tempress Small Mechanically-Assisted High-Pressure Waterjet Drilling Tool project centered on the development of a downhole intensifier (DHI) to boost the hydraulic pressure available from conventional coiled tubing to the level required for high-pressure jet erosion of rock. We reviewed two techniques for implementing this technology (1) pure high-pressure jet drilling and (2) mechanically-assisted jet drilling. Due to the difficulties associated with modifying a downhole motor for mechanically-assisted jet drilling, it was determined that the pure high-pressure jet drilling tool was the best candidate for development and commercialization. It was also determined that this tool needs to run on commingled nitrogen and water to provide adequate downhole differential pressure and to facilitate controlled pressure drilling and descaling applications in low pressure wells. The resulting Microhole jet drilling bottomhole assembly (BHA) drills a 3.625-inch diameter hole with 2-inch coil tubing. The BHA consists of a self-rotating multi-nozzle drilling head, a high-pressure rotary seal/bearing section, an intensifier and a gas separator. Commingled nitrogen and water are separated into two streams in the gas separator. The water stream is pressurized to 3 times the inlet pressure by the downhole intensifier and discharged through nozzles in the drilling head. The energy in the gas-rich stream is used to power the intensifier. Gas-rich exhaust from the intensifier is conducted to the nozzle head where it is used to shroud the jets, increasing their effective range. The prototype BHA was tested at operational pressures and flows in a test chamber and on the end of conventional coiled tubing in a test well. During instrumented runs at downhole conditions, the BHA developed downhole differential pressures of 74 MPa (11,000 psi, median) and 90 MPa (13,000 psi, peaks). The median output differential pressure was nearly 3 times the input differential pressure available from the

  7. Estimation of lost circulation amount occurs during under balanced drilling using drilling data and neural network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pouria Behnoud far

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Lost circulation can cause an increase in time and cost of operation. Pipe sticking, formation damage and uncontrolled flow of oil and gas may be consequences of lost circulation. Dealing with this problem is a key factor to conduct a successful drilling operation. Estimation of lost circulation amount is necessary to find a solution. Lost circulation is influenced by different parameters such as mud weight, pump pressure, depth etc. Mud weight, pump pressure and flow rate of mud should be designed to prevent induced fractures and have the least amount of lost circulation. Artificial neural network is useful to find the relations of parameters with lost circulation. Genetic algorithm is applied on the achieved relations to determine the optimum mud weight, pump pressure, and flow rate. In an Iranian oil field, daily drilling reports of wells which are drilled using UBD technique are studied. Asmari formation is the most important oil reservoir of the studied field and UBD is used only in this interval. Three wells with the most, moderate and without lost circulation are chosen. In this article, the effect of mud weight, depth, pump pressure and flow rate of pump on lost circulation in UBD of Asmari formation in one of the Southwest Iranian fields is studied using drilling data and artificial neural network. In addition, the amount of lost circulation is predicted precisely with respect to two of the studied parameters using the presented correlations and the optimum mud weight, pump pressure and flow rate are calculated to minimize the lost circulation amount.

  8. Space weather effects on drilling accuracy in the North Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. J. Reay

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available The oil industry uses geomagnetic field information to aid directional drilling operations when drilling for oil and gas offshore. These operations involve continuous monitoring of the azimuth and inclination of the well path to ensure the target is reached and, for safety reasons, to avoid collisions with existing wells. Although the most accurate method of achieving this is through a gyroscopic survey, this can be time consuming and expensive. An alternative method is a magnetic survey, where measurements while drilling (MWD are made along the well by magnetometers housed in a tool within the drill string. These MWD magnetic surveys require estimates of the Earth's magnetic field at the drilling location to correct the downhole magnetometer readings. The most accurate corrections are obtained if all sources of the Earth's magnetic field are considered. Estimates of the main field generated in the core and the local crustal field can be obtained using mathematical models derived from suitable data sets. In order to quantify the external field, an analysis of UK observatory data from 1983 to 2004 has been carried out. By accounting for the external field, the directional error associated with estimated field values at a mid-latitude oil well (55° N in the North Sea is shown to be reduced by the order of 20%. This improvement varies with latitude, local time, season and phase of the geomagnetic activity cycle. By accounting for all sources of the field, using a technique called Interpolation In-Field Referencing (IIFR, directional drillers have access to data from a "virtual" magnetic observatory at the drill site. This leads to an error reduction in positional accuracy that is close to matching that of the gyroscopic survey method and provides a valuable independent technique for quality control purposes.

  9. Space weather effects on drilling accuracy in the North Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. J. Reay

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available The oil industry uses geomagnetic field information to aid directional drilling operations when drilling for oil and gas offshore. These operations involve continuous monitoring of the azimuth and inclination of the well path to ensure the target is reached and, for safety reasons, to avoid collisions with existing wells. Although the most accurate method of achieving this is through a gyroscopic survey, this can be time consuming and expensive. An alternative method is a magnetic survey, where measurements while drilling (MWD are made along the well by magnetometers housed in a tool within the drill string. These MWD magnetic surveys require estimates of the Earth's magnetic field at the drilling location to correct the downhole magnetometer readings. The most accurate corrections are obtained if all sources of the Earth's magnetic field are considered. Estimates of the main field generated in the core and the local crustal field can be obtained using mathematical models derived from suitable data sets. In order to quantify the external field, an analysis of UK observatory data from 1983 to 2004 has been carried out. By accounting for the external field, the directional error associated with estimated field values at a mid-latitude oil well (55° N in the North Sea is shown to be reduced by the order of 20%. This improvement varies with latitude, local time, season and phase of the geomagnetic activity cycle. By accounting for all sources of the field, using a technique called Interpolation In-Field Referencing (IIFR, directional drillers have access to data from a "virtual" magnetic observatory at the drill site. This leads to an error reduction in positional accuracy that is close to matching that of the gyroscopic survey method and provides a valuable independent technique for quality control purposes.

  10. Emission of pesticides during drilling and deposition in adjacent areas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heimbach, Udo

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available In seven experiments seeds of maize, oil seed rape and barley, treated with neonicotinoids, were sown using pneumatic drilling equipment with deflectors attached in case of pneumatic suction systems. Directly adjacent to the drilled area of usually about 50 m width were replicated areas with bare soil as well as with crops. During maize (Zea mays drilling flowering oil seed rape (Brassica napus and during drilling of barley (Hordeum vulgare and oil seed rape flowering white mustard (Sinapis alba was adjacent. The amount of residues in the adjacent non crop areas in Petri dishes being distributed on the bare soil declined only slowly from 1 to 20 m distance from the area drilled. Seed batches with more abrasion and higher content of active substances in the dust resulted in higher residues off crop. After drilling of maize in four experiments in Petri dishes in adjacent non crop areas in 1-5 m distance between 0.02 and 0.40 g a.s./ha of neonicotinoids and in the adjacent oil seed rape a total of 0.05–0.80 g a.s./ha were detected. After drilling oil seed rape or barley these values were only 0.02–0.06 g a.s./ha in Petri dishes in non crop areas and 0.03-0.08 g a.s./ha in total in adjacent white mustard. In gauze net samplers installed vertically in 3 m distance in non crop areas up to seven times higher values were detected compared to Petri dishes.

  11. Radioisotope techniques in oil wells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jain, Prabuddha

    1998-01-01

    Radioisotope techniques are quite useful in oil exploration and exploitation. Nuclear logging offers a way of gathering information on porosity, permeability, fluid saturations, hydrocarbon types and lithology. Some of the interesting applications in well drilling are determining depth of filtrate invasion, detection of lost circulation, drill-bit erosion control; primary cement measurements and well completions such as permanent tubular markers, perforation position marking, detection of channeling behind casing and gravel pack operations. Radioisotopes have been successfully used in optimizing production processes such as production profiling injection profiling, corrosion measurements and well to well tracer tests. (author)

  12. Well construction team approach creates a new future for one company's operations on the Dutch Continental Shelf

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stringer, R.B.; Bakker, T.W.; Mejnertsen, T.

    1994-01-01

    Rising costs and low energy prices were inhibiting the development of marginal fields on the Dutch Continental Shelf, resulting in a major reduction in drilling activity. This triggered a change from traditional operating and contracting strategies to a Well Construction Team approach based on partnering agreements with the principal drilling and service contractors. The change has resulted in major cost reductions coupled to improved well quality that are justifying the re-evaluation of previously sub-economic development prospects. This paper describes the strategies employed and presents the results achieved during the first year of the partnership

  13. Deep Rotary-Ultrasonic Core Drill for Exploration of Europa and Enceladus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulsen, G. L.; Zacny, K.; Bar-Cohen, Y.; Beegle, L. W.; Corsetti, F. A.; Mellerowicz, B.; Badescu, M.; Sherrit, S.; Ibarra, Y.

    2012-12-01

    Since water is an important requisite for life as we know it, likely exobiologic exploration targets in our Solar System include Mars, Europa, and Enceladus, where water/ice is known to exist. Because of oxidizing nature of Mars atmosphere, as well as increased radiation at the surfaces of Mars, Europa and Enceladus, samples must be acquired from the subsurface at greater depths, presenting a great challenge to off-world drilling design. For the past 3 years, we have been developing a prototype wireline coring drill, called the Auto-Gopher, for the capability to acquire samples from hundreds of meters depth. The drill is capable of penetrating both rock and ice. However, because of large geological uncertainty on Mars and issues related to borehole collapse, we specifically target ice formations present on Europa and Enceladus. The main feature of the Auto-Gopher is its wireline operation. The drill is essentially suspended on a tether and the motors and mechanisms are built into a tube that ends with a coring bit. The tether provides the mechanical connection to a rover/lander on a surface as well as power and data communication. Upon penetrating to a target depth, the drill (plus core) is retracted from the borehole by a pulley system (the pulley system can be either on the surface or integrated into a top part of the drill itself). Once on the surface, the core is deposited into a sample transfer system, and the drill is lowered back into the hole in order to drill the next segment. Each segment is typically 10 cm long. Wireline operation sidesteps one of the major drawbacks of traditional continuous drill string systems by obviating the need for multiple drill sections. With traditional continuous drill string systems (the major competition to the Autor-Gopher), new drill sections need to be added to the string as the drill gets deeper. This of course requires multiple drill sections, which add significantly to the mass of the system very quickly, and requires

  14. Long hole waterjet drilling for gas drainage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matt Stockwell; M. Gledhill; S. Hildebrand; S. Adam; Tim Meyer [CMTE (Australia)

    2003-04-01

    In-seam drilling for gas drainage is now an essential part of operations at many Australian underground coalmines. The objective of this project is to develop and trial a new drilling method for the accurate and efficient installation of long inseam boreholes (>1000 metres). This involves the integration of pure water-jet drilling technology (i.e. not water-jet assisted rotary drilling) developed by CMTE with conventional directional drilling technology. The system was similar to conventional directional drilling methods, but instead of relying on a down-hole-motor (DHM) rotating a mechanical drill bit for cutting, high pressure water-jets were used. The testing of the system did not achieve the full objectives set down in the project plan. A borehole greater than 1000 metres was not achieved. The first trial site had coal that was weathered, oxidized and dry. These conditions significantly affected the ability of the drilling tool to stay 'in-seam'. Due to the poor conditions at the first trial, many experimental objectives were forwarded to the second field trial. In the second trial drilling difficulties were experienced, this was due to the interaction between the confinement of the borehole and the dimensions of the down hole drilling assembly. This ultimately reduced the productivity of the system and the distance that could be drilled within the specified trial periods. Testing in the first field trial did not show any indication that the system would have this difficulty.

  15. Restored Drill Cuttings for Wetlands Creation: Results of Mesocosm Approach to Emulate Field Conditions Under Varying Salinity and Hydrologic Conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hester, Mark W.; Shaffer, Gary P.; Willis Jonathan M.; DesRoches, Dennis J.

    2001-02-21

    This study builds upon earlier research conducted by Southeastern Louisiana University concerning the efficacy of utilizing processed drill cuttings as an alternative substrate source for wetland rehabilitation (wetland creation and restoration). Previous research has indicated that processed drill cuttings exhibit a low degree of contaminant migration from the process drill cuttings to interstitial water and low toxicity, as tested by seven-day mysid shrimp chronic toxicity trials.

  16. Electric drill-string telemetry

    CERN Document Server

    Carcione, J M

    2003-01-01

    We design a numerical algorithm for simulation of low-frequency electric-signal transmission through a drill string. This is represented by a transmission line with varying geometrical and electromagnetic properties versus depth, depending on the characteristics of the drill-string/formation system. These properties are implicitly modeled by the series impedance and the shunt admittance of the transmission line. The differential equations are parabolic, since at low frequencies the wave field is diffusive. We use an explicit scheme for the solution of parabolic problems, based on a Chebyshev expansion of the evolution operator and the Fourier pseudospectral method to compute the spatial derivatives. The results are verified by comparison to analytical solutions obtained for the initial-value problem with a voltage source.

  17. Conventional oil and gas, tenure acquisition and drilling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    The natural gas industry in British Columbia is the second in importance in Canada, with expenditures reaching $4.3 billion in 2001, and 850 wells drilled during the same period. Concise business information concerning tenure acquisition and the drilling sector in British Columbia was presented in this document. The brief overview of the sector was followed by discussions of the following issues: land resource requirements and sensitivities; investment requirements; infrastructure; the market; the labour market; capacity; the regulatory regime; government revenues; and, regional cost variations. An input-output table was also included. 15 refs., 4 tabs

  18. Update on onshore disposal of offshore drilling wastes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veil, J. A.

    1999-11-29

    The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is developing effluent limitations guidelines to govern discharges of cuttings from wells drilled using synthetic-based muds. To support this rulemaking, Argonne National Laboratory was asked by EPA and the US Department of Energy (DOE) to collect current information about those onshore commercial disposal facilities that are permitted to receive offshore drilling wastes. Argonne contacted state officials in Louisiana, Texas, California and Alaska to obtain this information. The findings, collected during October and November 1999, are presented by state.

  19. Development of drilling fluids based on polysaccharides and natural minerals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhanar Nurakhmetova

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The technology of oil well drilling in complex geological conditions by applying the drilling muds based on the polysaccharides – gellan, xanthan and their mixture which potentially possess a good flocculation properties and the ability to reversible sol-gel transition in dependence of temperature and concentration of low molecular weight cations in water has been justified in this work. For the preparation of drilling muds, gellan and xanthan were used, these polymers were obtained from biomass by an aerobic fermentation using microorganisms Sphingomonas elodea and Xanthomonas campestris. Bentonite was used as a natural mineral. Physical and chemical characteristics of aqueous and aqueous-salt solutions of natural polysaccharide gellan including: density, intrinsic and effective viscosity, static shear stress, dynamic shear stress, sedimentation stability and other parameters were determined while varying polymer compositions and concentrations, ionic strength of the solution, nature of low molecular weight salts, concentration of dispersion phase, pH of the medium and temperature.

  20. Zona pellucida drilling by a 1.48-um laser: influence on the biomechanics of the hatching process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rink, Klaus; Descloux, Laurent; Delacretaz, Guy P.; Senn, Alfred; Nocera, Dorotha; Germond, Marc

    1996-01-01

    Efficient and well controlled laser drilling of the zona pellucida of mouse eggs has been demonstrated recently using a 1.48 micrometers laser diode. The zona pellucida openings (5 - 10 micrometers ) can be obtained within the culture dish in an either tangential or more poleward irradiation in respect to the spherical egg structure. Zone drilling is achieved at a laser power of 47 mW and typical irradiation times of 8 - 20 ms for mouse oocytes. Cultured mouse embryos evidence strongly modified hatching behavior when drilled. No increase of the outer diameter of the zona pellucida and no thinning are induced prior to hatching in the lased group, in contrast to the control non-drilled group. Drilled embryos hatches one day earlier than control non-drilled embryos. Obviously no mechanical constraint is induced on the zona pellucida during the initial development of the drilled blastocysts before hatching and hatching is facilitated.

  1. Ovarian capsular drilling in the treatment of clomiphene citrate ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Laparoscopic Ovarian Drilling (LOD) is an effective and a well evaluated surgical Treatment of Clomiphene Citrate resistant Polycystic ovarian syndrome. Transvaginal hydrolaparoscopy (TVHL) is a relatively new simple method of exploring the pelvis and has recently been introduced as a transvaginal ...

  2. Environmental effects monitoring for exploration drilling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buchanan, R.A.; Cook, J.A.; Mathieu, A.

    2003-01-01

    Strategies for monitoring the environmental effects of single exploratory offshore wells on the east coast of Canada were evaluated. The report was compiled from consultations with scientists, regulators and stakeholders as well as a review of regulatory regimes and toxicity results. The aim of the report was to develop a decision tree for determining when to conduct environmental effects monitoring (EEM). Respondents evinced lower levels of concern for single exploratory wells than for production developments. A number of scientists argued for full statistical treatment of all data, and many people argued that more assurance was needed that the marine environment was not being unduly harmed. Respondents also considered that biological effects should be a primary focus, rather than the occurrence of trace chemical signals, and that seabirds and mammals should be monitored. Concern was expressed over the value of data collected from monitoring the effects of exploratory drilling activities. It was suggested that local and site-specific issues should be considered in the design of EEM programs. Respondents expressed strong concern about potential cumulative effects with other industrial activities, and suggested that test cases should be established and monitored to develop a scientific rationale for the inclusion or exclusion of specific variables in future EEM programs. A decision tree was developed based on 3 scenarios: (1) compliance monitoring only in well known areas with no sensitive issues; opportunistic EEM surveys of sediments, benthos, seabirds and marine mammals in shallow or deep areas with no known sensitive issues; and (3) custom EEM surveys for sensitive areas. Currently, there are EEM requirements for drilling exploratory wells offshore Canada's east coast. 58 refs., 2 tabs., 7 figs

  3. Maximizing Drilling Performance through Enhanced Solid Control System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irawan, S.; Kinif, B. I.; Bayuaji, R.

    2017-11-01

    High solid content in drilling mud may affect its properties and result in uncertainties at downhole condition. It eventually contributes to poor rig operation performance and operating cost. This research focus on developing solid control system that is suit for drilling 12.25-inch hole. The first part discussed the performance of Rate of Penetration (ROP), Equivalent Circulating Density (ECD) and drill string drag while the second part of the research discussed about the effect of solid control system performance to mud properties Plastic Viscosity (PV), Yield Point (YP) and Low-Gravity Solid (LGS). The input parameters were gathered from two different set up of solid control systems that were used in Well A and Well B. The result is mainly based on the performance of original solid control system new design versus old design. Installation of distributor tank and channel the mud to respective shale shakers significantly enhanced the system and operational performance. The ROP at 12.25-inch drilling were improved by 20%. New design improved average the ECD margin by reducing additional pressure exerted using original mud from 4.9% to 2.9%. High ECD margin is not recommended because it can break the weak formation. Mud properties while drilling the 12.25-inch hole section; PV, YP and LGS values were improved by 14 %, 17 % and 25 % respectively. Proper mud flow control and routing system at new develop design of solid control system effectively removed the solid in the drilling fluid. This improvement minimizes the tendency of frequent mud flow, screen mesh plugging and tool wear issue. Mud properties such PV, YP and LGS were maintained with an acceptable mud design envelope.

  4. Cleaning oil sands drilling waste in Alberta

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mikic, N.; Nilsen, C.; Markabi, M. [Mi SWACO, Calgary, AB (Canada)

    2008-07-01

    The waste generated from steam assisted gravity drainage (SAGD) wells is brought to the surface and separated by shale shakers. The waste can include drilling fluids and sand contaminated with bitumen. This paper described a new technology developed to treat waste using the addition of hot water and various mixing and separation technologies to reduce the viscosity of the bitumen and separate it from the sand. The bitumen-contaminated drill cuttings were mixed with hot water to form a slurry that was then separated through the G-force created by a hydrocyclone. A secondary separation was then conducted in an elutriation column to remove residual contaminants from the sand. The flow rate of the process was controlled by the fine solids composition of the cuttings, the temperature of the cleaning process, and the performance of the individual components. Laboratory tests conducted to tests the method showed that the sand particles produced using the method were clean enough to be safely disposed in the environment. A pilot study will be conducted to test the sand cleaning technology at a commercial scale. 6 refs., 3 figs.

  5. Placental complications after a previous cesarean section

    OpenAIRE

    Milošević Jelena; Lilić Vekoslav; Tasić Marija; Radović-Janošević Dragana; Stefanović Milan; Antić Vladimir

    2009-01-01

    Introduction The incidence of cesarean section has been rising in the past 50 years. With the increased number of cesarean sections, the number of pregnancies with the previous cesarean section rises as well. The aim of this study was to establish the influence of the previous cesarean section on the development of placental complications: placenta previa, placental abruption and placenta accreta, as well as to determine the influence of the number of previous cesarean sections on the complic...

  6. Mineralogy of drill hole UE-25pnumber1 at Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chipera, S.J.; Bish, D.L.

    1988-05-01

    Drill hole UE-25p/number sign/1 is located east of the candidate repository block at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, and as such provides information on the geology of the accessible environment. The hole was drilled to a depth of 1807 m (5923 ft) and is unique in that it penetrates tuffs that are older than any volcanic units previously encountered in drill holes at Yucca Mountain. In addition, it is the only hole drilled to date that penetrates the base of the tuff sequence and enters the underlying Paleozoic dolomite basement. We have examined the mineralogy of drill cuttings, core, and sidewall samples from drill hole UE-25p/number sign/1 is similar to that in the other drill holes examined at Yucca Mountain. The only significant differences in mineralogy from other drill holes include the presence of dolomite in the Paleozoic carbonate rocks and the occurrence of up to 3% laumontite, a Ca-zeolite, in four samples of the Lithic Ridge Tuff. 15 refs., 5 figs., 4 tabs

  7. Slant rigs offer big payoffs in shallow drilling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, J.; Edwards, B.

    1992-01-01

    Slant hole drilling technology can result in considerable savings over conventionally drilled deviated holes because mud motors and deviation control with measurement while drilling tools are usually unnecessary. The benefits of using slant hole rigs for development drilling improve after the bit walk tendencies and the correct bottom hole assemblies have been determined for a particular area. This article discusses three recent drilling operations that successfully used slant drilling technology on land-based projects: drilling for heavy oil in Alberta, drilling for gas in Alberta, and drilling a river crossing for a gas pipeline in British Columbia. These examples demonstrate the flexibility of slant drilling technology

  8. ROP MATHEMATICAL MODEL OF ROTARY-ULTRASONIC CORE DRILLING OF BRITTLE MATERIAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mera Fayez Horne

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The results from the Phoenix mission led scientists to believe it is possible that primitive life exists below the Martian surface. Therefore, drilling in Martian soil in search for organisms is the next logical step. Drilling on Mars is a major engineering challenge due to the drilling depth requirement and extreme environment condition. Mars lacks a thick atmosphere and a continuous magnetic field that shield the planet’s surface from solar radiation and solar flares. As a result, the Martian surface is sterile and if life ever existed, it must be found below the surface. NASA’s Mars Exploration Payload Advisory Group proposed that drilling should be considered as a priority investigation on Mars in an effort of finding evidence of extinct or extant life. The results from the Curiosity mission suggested drilling six meters deep in the red planet in search for life. Excavation tools deployed to Mars so far have been able to drill to a maximum depth of 6.5 cm. Thus, the drilling capabilities need to be increased by a factor of approximately 100 to achieve the goal of drilling six meters deep. This requirement puts a demand on developing new and more effective technologies to reach this goal. Previous research shows evidence of a promising drilling mechanism in rotary-ultrasonic for what it offers in terms of high surface quality, faster rate of penetration and higher material removal rate. This research addresses the need to understand the mechanics of the drill bit tip and rock interface in rotary-ultrasonic drilling performance of one drill bit at a time drilling in three types of rocks that vary in strength. A mathematical model identifying all contributing independent parameters, such as drill bit design parameters, drilling process parameters, ultrasonic wave amplitude and rocks’ material properties, that have effect on rate of penetration is developed. Analytical and experimental results under ambient condition are presented to show

  9. Level best : drilling seasonal load leveling business case : final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2005-10-01

    Drilling and seismic costs in Western Canada are as much as 35 per cent higher during winter months. Favourable commodity pricing has prompted aggressive expansion of drilling programs in the Western Canada Sedimentary Basin (WCSB), and capacity is becoming a significant issue. Many operators are turning to load leveling in order to secure rigs and crew availability. However, many operators still adhere to the traditional view that drilling of oil and gas wells is best accomplished during the winter. The purpose of the project discussed in this paper was to develop and present a business case for greater seasonal load leveling in the WCSB and spreading it more evenly throughout the year. Using calendar year quarters, publicly available data for a 5 year period from 2000-2004 for drilling activity, safety, weather, and environmental restrictions were examined. A list of candidate fields with high levels of activity and a good representation of well depths was selected. Well cost and rig data from 14 different companies was used. A variety of industry participants, drilling contractors, load leveling technology suppliers and provincial agencies were consulted to supplement well cost analyses. The financial impacts of load leveling were examined. Benefits included lower well costs; advanced production; avoided rig construction; reduced incident rates; and reduced turnover. While the focus of the business case for load leveling was based on hard cost data, many indirect benefits were identified, including First Nations sustainability and greater job security and comfort for workers. Various policies and incentives that encouraged load leveling in British Columbia and Alberta were reviewed. 57 figs.

  10. Level best : drilling seasonal load leveling business case : final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-10-01

    Drilling and seismic costs in Western Canada are as much as 35 per cent higher during winter months. Favourable commodity pricing has prompted aggressive expansion of drilling programs in the Western Canada Sedimentary Basin (WCSB), and capacity is becoming a significant issue. Many operators are turning to load leveling in order to secure rigs and crew availability. However, many operators still adhere to the traditional view that drilling of oil and gas wells is best accomplished during the winter. The purpose of the project discussed in this paper was to develop and present a business case for greater seasonal load leveling in the WCSB and spreading it more evenly throughout the year. Using calendar year quarters, publicly available data for a 5 year period from 2000-2004 for drilling activity, safety, weather, and environmental restrictions were examined. A list of candidate fields with high levels of activity and a good representation of well depths was selected. Well cost and rig data from 14 different companies was used. A variety of industry participants, drilling contractors, load leveling technology suppliers and provincial agencies were consulted to supplement well cost analyses. The financial impacts of load leveling were examined. Benefits included lower well costs; advanced production; avoided rig construction; reduced incident rates; and reduced turnover. While the focus of the business case for load leveling was based on hard cost data, many indirect benefits were identified, including First Nations sustainability and greater job security and comfort for workers. Various policies and incentives that encouraged load leveling in British Columbia and Alberta were reviewed. 57 figs

  11. Precision drilling of fused silica with 157-nm excimer laser radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temme, Thorsten; Ostendorf, Andreas; Kulik, Christian; Meyer, Klaus

    2003-07-01

    μFor drilling fused silica, mechanical techniques like with diamond drills, ultrasonic machining, sand blasting or water jet machining are used. Also chemical techniques like laser assisted wet etching or thermal drilling with CO2-lasers are established. As an extension of these technologies, the drilling of micro-holes in fused silica with VUV laser radiation is presented here. The high absorption of the 157 nm radiation emitted by the F2 excimer laser and the short pulse duration lead to a material ablation with minimised impact on the surrounding material. Contrary to CO2-laser drilling, a molten and solidified phase around the bore can thus be avoided. The high photon energy of 7.9 eV requires either high purity nitrogen flushing or operation in vacuum, which also effects the processing results. Depending on the required precision, the laser can be used for percussion drilling as well as for excimer laser trepanning, by applying rotating masks. Rotating masks are especially used for high aspect ratio drilling with well defined edges and minimised debris. The technology is suitable particularly for holes with a diameter below 200 μm down to some microns in substrates with less than 200 μm thickness, that can not be achieved with mechanical methods. Drilling times in 200 μm fused silica substrates are in the range of ten seconds, which is sufficient to compete with conventional methods while providing similar or even better accuracy.

  12. Speeding up : new Atlas Copco rig meant to cut non-drilling time

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roche, P.

    2009-06-15

    Automation has significantly reduced the time needed to drill shallow to medium-depth wells. The time it takes for a drill to reach the production zone is decreasing because newly developed hydraulic systems are able to maintain a constant pace. However, a great deal of time is still consumed by demobilization, transportation and setting up to drill the next well. Atlas Copco Drilling Solutions, a Swedish-based global maker of industrial equipment such as mining and mineral exploration rigs, designed a new Predator drilling system that consists of a mobile rig, a substructure and a pipe-handling skate. The Predator drilling system reduces non-drilling time and the associated costs. This article described the design of this new drilling system with particular reference to how it combines the mobile rig, the substructure and the pipe-handling skate into a three-load package. In order to reduce rig weight and improve mobility, the system is designed so that the table, master bushing, hydraulic slips and iron roughneck are part of the substructure that travel together. The rig has a working hook load capacity of 200,000 pounds, translating into a nominal depth capacity of 8,000 to 10,000 feet. The article also described the mounting of the rig, maneuverability, hydraulic control, and pipe-handling safety. Its various components were also described. 1 ref., 1 fig.

  13. Exploratory hydrocarbon drilling impacts to Arctic lake ecosystems.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshua R Thienpont

    Full Text Available Recent attention regarding the impacts of oil and gas development and exploitation has focused on the unintentional release of hydrocarbons into the environment, whilst the potential negative effects of other possible avenues of environmental contamination are less well documented. In the hydrocarbon-rich and ecologically sensitive Mackenzie Delta region (NT, Canada, saline wastes associated with hydrocarbon exploration have typically been disposed of in drilling sumps (i.e., large pits excavated into the permafrost that were believed to be a permanent containment solution. However, failure of permafrost as a waste containment medium may cause impacts to lakes in this sensitive environment. Here, we examine the effects of degrading drilling sumps on water quality by combining paleolimnological approaches with the analysis of an extensive present-day water chemistry dataset. This dataset includes lakes believed to have been impacted by saline drilling fluids leaching from drilling sumps, lakes with no visible disturbances, and lakes impacted by significant, naturally occurring permafrost thaw in the form of retrogressive thaw slumps. We show that lakes impacted by compromised drilling sumps have significantly elevated lakewater conductivity levels compared to control sites. Chloride levels are particularly elevated in sump-impacted lakes relative to all other lakes included in the survey. Paleolimnological analyses showed that invertebrate assemblages appear to have responded to the leaching of drilling wastes by a discernible increase in a taxon known to be tolerant of elevated conductivity coincident with the timing of sump construction. This suggests construction and abandonment techniques at, or soon after, sump establishment may result in impacts to downstream aquatic ecosystems. With hydrocarbon development in the north predicted to expand in the coming decades, the use of sumps must be examined in light of the threat of accelerated

  14. Optimization of joint recycling process of drilling sludge and phosphogypsum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Yu. Ablieieva

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Joint recycling of drilling sludge and phosphogypsum with obtaining a building material is environmentally appropriate and cost-effective, as it helps not only to prevent environmental pollution, but also to solve the problem of rational nature management. Drilling sludge is a waste formed during drilling oil wells, and phosphogypsum is a waste of the chemical industry, formed as a result of the production of concentrational phosphoric acid. However, technogenic raw materials contain heavy metals that can be transformed into a finished product and leached out of it. The problem of minimizing the negative impact of pollutants is very important to reduce the risk to human health. The author's idea is to optimize ecological characteristics of drilling waste and phosphogypsum recycling process. The concentration of heavy metals in the extract of gypsum concrete was determined as the function of the target which depends primarily on structural and technological parameters. The purpose of the article is solution to mathematical programming task, i.e., finding optimal solutions for the factors values of drilling sludge and phosphogypsum recycling process. Mathematical programming solution to optimization problem of the gypsum concrete environmental characteristics (to minimize concentration of heavy metals in the extract was performed by the method of simple random search in the Borland C ++ programming environment using C programming language. It is necessary to observe the values of such factors to minimize concentration of heavy metals in the extract of gypsum concrete. The mass ratio of gypsum binder and drilling sludge is 2.93 units, the mass ratio of quick lime and gypsum binder is 0.09 units, the age of gypsum concrete is above 19 days, exposure time is 28 days.

  15. Rotary Percussive Auto-Gopher for Deep Drilling and Sampling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bar-Cohen, Yoseph; Badescu, Mircea; Sherrit, Stewart

    2009-01-01

    The term "rotary percussive auto-gopher" denotes a proposed addition to a family of apparatuses, based on ultrasonic/ sonic drill corers (USDCs), that have been described in numerous previous NASA Tech Briefs articles. These apparatuses have been designed, variously, for boring into, and/or acquiring samples of, rock or other hard, brittle materials of geological interest. In the case of the rotary percussive autogopher, the emphasis would be on developing an apparatus capable of penetrating to, and acquiring samples at, depths that could otherwise be reached only by use of much longer, heavier, conventional drilling-and-sampling apparatuses. To recapitulate from the prior articles about USDCs: A USDC can be characterized as a lightweight, low-power jackhammer in which a piezoelectrically driven actuator generates ultrasonic vibrations and is coupled to a tool bit through a free mass. The bouncing of the free mass between the actuator horn and the drill bit converts the actuator ultrasonic vibrations into sonic hammering of the drill bit. The combination of ultrasonic and sonic vibrations gives rise to a hammering action (and a resulting chiseling action at the tip of the tool bit) that is more effective for drilling than is the microhammering action of ultrasonic vibrations alone. The hammering and chiseling actions are so effective that the size of the axial force needed to make the tool bit advance into soil, rock, or another material of interest is much smaller than in ordinary rotary drilling, ordinary hammering, or ordinary steady pushing. The predecessor of the rotary percussive auto-gopher is an apparatus, now denoted an ultrasonic/sonic gopher and previously denoted an ultrasonic gopher, described in "Ultrasonic/ Sonic Mechanism for Drilling and Coring" (NPO-30291), NASA Tech Briefs Vol. 27, No. 9 (September 2003), page 65. The ultrasonic/sonic gopher is intended for use mainly in acquiring cores. The name of the apparatus reflects the fact that, like a

  16. Determination of {sup 234}U and {sup 238}U activity concentrations in groundwaters from three deep wells drilled in Itu Intrusive Suite (SP); Determinacao das concentracoes de atividade de {sup 234}U e {sup 238}U em aguas subterraneas de tres pocos perfurados em rochas da Suite Intrusiva de Itu (SP)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Souza, Francisca de

    2006-07-01

    Activity concentrations of ({sup 234}U) and ({sup 238}U) were determined in groundwaters drawn from three deep wells drilled in rocks from Itu Intrusive Suite (SP), two located in Salto town (S and SY wells) and the other one in Itu (I well). Sampling was done from September, 2004 to December, 2005, and twelve samples of each well were collected monthly. For those determinations alpha spectrometry technique was used, providing high precision results, as shown by the very good agreement of the data obtained in the analyses of 23 duplicates. The waters from the three wells presented a considerable enrichment of {sup 234}U in relation to {sup 238}U, indicating an important radioactive disequilibrium of these isotopes. In well I, the activity concentrations of ({sup 238}U) varied from (1,06 +- 0,03) to (2,1+- 0,2) mBq/L and those of ({sup 234}U) spanned from (3,1 +- 0,2) to (6,0 +- 0,4) mBq/L, whereas ({sup 234}U/{sup 238}U) activity ratios did not present significant variation, during the sampling time interval, presenting an average of 2,8 +- 0,1. The S waters showed the lowest uranium concentrations and the largest diversity of ({sup 238}U) and ({sup 234}U) activity concentrations, which varied from (0,26 +- 0,02) to (1,07+- 0,08) mBq/L and from (1,8 +- 0,1) to (7,0 +- 0,5) mBq/L, respectively, and also presented variable ({sup 234}U/{sup 238}U) activity ratios, spanning from (2,79 +- 0,07) to (8,1+- 0,3). In SY well, ({sup 238}U) activities varied between (0,8 +- 0,1) and (4,2 +- 0,3) mBq/L and those ones of ({sup 234}U) from (14 +- 1) to (53 +- 4) mBq/L, whereas ({sup 234}U/{sup 238}U) ratios fell in the interval from 12,6 +- 0,3 to 18,3 +- 0,4, with the highest activities of both radioisotopes registered during the dry season and the lowest ones in the rainy time period. The ({sup 234}U/{sup 238}U) activity ratios, which were invariable during sampling period of well I, indicated the contribution of rainfall to recharge the aquifer. The observed correlation

  17. Deep drilling KLX 02. Drilling and documentation of a 1700 m deep borehole at Laxemar, Sweden

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andersson, O.

    1994-08-01

    In this report the preparation and execution of the deep core drilling KLX 02 is described. The hole was drilled with the wireline methods, NQ dimension (diameter 76 mm), to a final depth of 1700.5 m. Prior to core drilling a diameter 215 mm pilot hole was pre drilled to 200 m with controlled hammer drilling (DTH). In this hole casing and air-lift equipment was installed with the aim to support the circulation of drilling fluid. During core drilling there was a measurement of major drilling parameters and drilling fluid in and out of hole. As a fluid tracer uranine was used. Each 300 m of core drilling air-lift pump tests were performed. After completion a flow-meter log was run to finalize the project phase. It can be concluded that both the pre drilling and core drilling methods used proved to be successful. No severe technical problem occurred. However, potential risks have been pointed at in the report. The air-lift system functioned only partly and has to be modified for further use. Also the technique for monitoring of drilling parameters needs improvement as does the method for air-lift pump tests with packer. The organisation model for planning and realization functioned satisfactory and can be recommended for similar future projects. 9 refs, numerous tabs and figs

  18. GEO-ECOLOGICAL PROBLEMS OF DRILLING WASTE DISPOSAL IN THE YAMAL PENINSULA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oreshkin Dmitrij Vladimirovich

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Crude oil and gas fields are located in remote areas known for their severe geological and climatic conditions that are aggravated by the presence of the paleocrystic frozen rock. Borehole drilling causes generation of the substantial amount of drilling waste. The sludge weighs millions of tons. Any rock is to remain frozen at any drilling site in the Yamal peninsula. Semifluid drilling waste occupies extensive areas around drilling sites; they prevent development of the surface infrastructure, they interfere with the work of drilling technicians and contribute to hazardous working conditions, they are a challenge to the local ecology. The above factors produce a negative impact on the environment and prevent sustainable development of the region. For example, disposal of drilling waste at condensed gas fields operated in the Yamal peninsula represents a substantial problem. Drilling waste contains drilling fluid used in the process of borehole drilling. It was discovered in the course of the preliminary research that drilling fluids were composite suspensions that contained bentonite, heavy spar, caustic soda, dilutants, and polymers. It was found out that the sludge was composed of silica, calcite, dolomite, aragonite, magnesite, some feldspars, heavy spar, gypsum and anhydrite, micas, hydromicas, clay minerals. Projections provided in the paper say that pre-neutralized sludge may be used in the manufacturing of building materials, such as bricks, claydite, small-size building units, etc. The authors argue that further research of the sludge elements and microstructure, as well as its chemical, mineral, granulometric and X-ray phase analyses need to be performed.

  19. Petrologic studies of drill cores USW-G2 and UE25b-1H, Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caporuscio, F.; Vaniman, D.; Bish, D.; Broxton, D.; Arney, B.; Heiken, G.; Byers, F.; Gooley, R.; Semarge, E.

    1982-07-01

    The tuffs of the Nevada Test Site are currently under investigation as a possible deep geologic site for high-level radioactive waste disposal. This report characterizes tuff retrieved in core from two drill holes, USW-G2 and UE25b-1H, at the Yucca Mountain block. The USW-G2 drill core is from the northernmost extent of the block, whereas UE25b-1H is adjacent to an earlier drill hole, UE25a-1. The drill cores USW-G2 and UE25b-1H bottomed at 6000 and 4200 ft, respectively. Petrographic and x-ray diffraction studies of the two drill cores are presented in this report and indicate that tuffs (composed primarily of variably welded ash flows) are partially recrystallized to secondary minerals. Correlations of stratigraphy are also made with previous drill cores from Yucca Mountain

  20. Replacement team of mining drilling rigs

    OpenAIRE

    Hamodi, Hussan; Lundberg, Jan

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a practical model to calculate the optimal replacement time (ORT) of drilling rigs used in underground mining. As a case study, cost data for drilling rig were collected over four years from a Swedish mine. The cost data include acquisition, operating, maintenance and downtime costs when using a redundant rig. A discount rate is used to determine the value of these costs over time. The study develops an optimisation model to identify the ORT of a mining drilling rig which ...

  1. Well engineering in the nineties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schaafsma, M.G.

    1993-01-01

    Shell U.K. Exploration and Production, Operator in the U.K. sector of the North Sea for Shell and Esso, has adopted a corporate strategy in line with the 'Drilling in the Nineties' concept proposed by Shell International Petroleum Maatschappij B.V. (SIPM) for all Shell Operating Companies. Within Shell Expro the 'Drilling in the Nineties' concept has been broadened to incorporate the drilling, well services and equipment supply areas with the resultant name change to iWell Engineering in the Nineties'. (WIN 90's). This strategy has now been implemented and has substantially changed the modus operandi between operator and contractor with a strong emphasis on long term partnership relations with lead contractors. This paper summarises the strategy that has been developed, the implications of implementing this strategy; the implications to both a major operator and numerous contractor suppliers; the results to date; and the course of future partnership relations. (orig.)

  2. Application of Numerical Simulation for the Analysis of the Processes of Rotary Ultrasonic Drilling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naď, Milan; Čičmancová, Lenka; Hajdu, Štefan

    2016-12-01

    Rotary ultrasonic machining (RUM) is a hybrid process that combines diamond grinding with ultrasonic machining. It is most suitable to machine hard brittle materials such as ceramics and composites. Due to its excellent machining performance, RUM is very often applied for drilling of hard machinable materials. In the final phase of drilling, the edge deterioration of the drilled hole can occur, which results in a phenomenon called edge chipping. During hole drilling, a change in the thickness of the bottom of the drilled hole occurs. Consequently, the bottom of the hole as a plate structure is exposed to the transfer through the resonance state. This resonance state can be considered as one of the important aspects leading to edge chipping. Effects of changes in the bottom thickness and as well as the fillet radius between the wall and bottom of the borehole on the stress-strain states during RUM are analyzed.

  3. Application of Numerical Simulation for the Analysis of the Processes of Rotary Ultrasonic Drilling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naď Milan

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Rotary ultrasonic machining (RUM is a hybrid process that combines diamond grinding with ultrasonic machining. It is most suitable to machine hard brittle materials such as ceramics and composites. Due to its excellent machining performance, RUM is very often applied for drilling of hard machinable materials. In the final phase of drilling, the edge deterioration of the drilled hole can occur, which results in a phenomenon called edge chipping. During hole drilling, a change in the thickness of the bottom of the drilled hole occurs. Consequently, the bottom of the hole as a plate structure is exposed to the transfer through the resonance state. This resonance state can be considered as one of the important aspects leading to edge chipping. Effects of changes in the bottom thickness and as well as the fillet radius between the wall and bottom of the borehole on the stress-strain states during RUM are analyzed.

  4. Study on the influence of parameters of medical drill on bone drilling temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    XU, Xianchun; Hu, Yahui; Han, Jingwang; Yue, Lin; Jiang, Wangbiao

    2018-03-01

    During surgical interventions, the temperature generated during cortical bone drilling can affect the activity of bone material, which may lead to necrosis. In this paper, with the purpose of reducing the temperature during cortical bone drilling, the influence of the parameters of medical drill were analyzed. The finite element model of the drilling process was established based on the parametric design of the dril. The relationship between the drill bit diameter, the point angle, and the helix angle to the drilling temperature was studied by the center composite experiment. The results showed that the drilling temperature is increased with the increase of drill diameter, vertex angle and helix angle in the range of certain research.

  5. COST ESTIMATING RELATIONSHIPS IN ONSHORE DRILLING PROJECTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo de Melo e Silva Accioly

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Cost estimating relationships (CERs are very important tools in the planning phases of an upstream project. CERs are, in general, multiple regression models developed to estimate the cost of a particular item or scope of a project. They are based in historical data that should pass through a normalization process before fitting a model. In the early phases they are the primary tool for cost estimating. In later phases they are usually used as an estimation validation tool and sometimes for benchmarking purposes. As in any other modeling methodology there are number of important steps to build a model. In this paper the process of building a CER to estimate drilling cost of onshore wells will be addressed.

  6. Columbia Gas preserves wetlands with directional drilling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luginbuhl, K.K.; Gartman, D.K.

    1995-01-01

    This paper reviews the use of directional drilling to install a 12 inch natural gas pipeline near Avon, Ohio. As a result of increased demand, the utility decided that it would need additional lines for pressure control with the only feasible route being through a forested and scrub/shrub wetland. This paper reviews the permitting requirements along with the directional drilling design and operation. Unfortunately during drilling, bentonite drilling fluids came to the surface requiring remedial action procedures. The paper then provides a detailed clean up strategy and makes recommendations on how to prevent such a break through in the future

  7. Drilling of polymer-matrix composites

    CERN Document Server

    Krishnaraj, Vijayan; Davim, J Paulo

    2013-01-01

    Polymeric composites are recognised as good candidates for structural components due to their inherent properties. However, they present several kinds of damages while creating holes for assembly. Delamination is considered the most serious damage since it reduces service life of the component. Thrust and delamination can be controlled by proper drill point geometry. Drilling at high speed is also a current requirement of the aerospace industry. This book focus on drilling of polymer matrix composites for aerospace and defence applications. The book presents introduction to machining of polymer composites and discusses drilling as a processing of composites.

  8. Numerical Modeling of Foam Drilling Hydraulics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ozcan Baris

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available The use of foam as a drilling fluid was developed to meet a special set of conditions under which other common drilling fluids had failed. Foam drilling is defined as the process of making boreholes by utilizing foam as the circulating fluid. When compared with conventional drilling, underbalanced or foam drilling has several advantages. These advantages include: avoidance of lost circulation problems, minimizing damage to pay zones, higher penetration rates and bit life. Foams are usually characterized by the quality, the ratio of the volume of gas, and the total foam volume. Obtaining dependable pressure profiles for aerated (gasified fluids and foam is more difficult than for single phase fluids, since in the former ones the drilling mud contains a gas phase that is entrained within the fluid system. The primary goal of this study is to expand the knowledge-base of the hydrodynamic phenomena that occur in a foam drilling operation. In order to gain a better understanding of foam drilling operations, a hydrodynamic model is developed and run at different operating conditions. For this purpose, the flow of foam through the drilling system is modeled by invoking the basic principles of continuum mechanics and thermodynamics. The model was designed to allow gas and liquid flow at desired volumetric flow rates through the drillstring and annulus. Parametric studies are conducted in order to identify the most influential variables in the hydrodynamic modeling of foam flow.

  9. The national drill for deterrence and fighting nuclear terrorism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cioflan, Constantin

    2006-01-01

    Full text: National Commission for Nuclear Activities Control (CNCAN) in cooperation with the Romanian Intelligence Service (SRI) organized the 'National Drill for Deterrence and Fighting the Nuclear Terrorism' which took place on May 10, 2006 in Cheile Rasnoavei, Brasov county, Romania. This event continues the activities undertaken by CNCAN, in its capacity of a national center ensuring the nuclear safeguards, physical protection of nuclear materials as well as for preventing and fighting against illicit traffic with radioactive nuclear materials and deterring the terrorist actions menacing the security and nuclear safety of the nation. The drill consisted in simulating a terrorist attack against a shipment of nuclear fuel (made available by the Nuclear Fuel Plant at Pitesti). It was a good opportunity for testing the reacting and organizing technical capacity of the national institutions committed with physical protection in emergency situations generated by terrorist actions. The objectives of the drill was the deployment of a counter-terrorist intervention in case of a terrorist attack intending to hijack a special expedition of dangerous materials. Hostages were seized and the demand was issued for clearing the traffic up to the national boundary. The anti-terrorist brigade (SRI) organized an ambush on the route of displacement in order to capture and annihilate the terrorist unit and re-establishing the legal order. CNCAN participated in this drill with its mobile intervention unit which is a team of experts correspondingly equipped with specific instruments for detecting the nuclear materials, special equipment for communication and locating as well as with two marked vehicles. The SRI employed a number higher than 80 officers and military technicians from anti-terrorist brigade, constituted in negotiators, storming squads, paratroopers, pyrotechnic experts, communication technicians. PUMA and Alouette helicopters for launching air attacks were employed

  10. Workshop on Marine Research Drilling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spezzaferri, Silvia

    2009-06-01

    Cold-Water Carbonate Reservoir Systems in Deep Environments (COCARDE): A Pilot Industry-Academia Partnership in Marine Research Drilling; Fribourg, Switzerland, 21-24 January 2009; Cold-water carbonate mounds supporting cold-water coral ecosystems, often dominated by Lophelia pertusa and Madrepora oculata, are widespread along the Atlantic margins from Norway to Mauritania. During the past 10 years, the scientific community has accumulated new insights on their occurrence and development and identified their potential role in reservoir formation, thus establishing a framework for collaboration with the hydrocarbon industry. A Magellan workshop, sponsored by the European Science Foundation (ESF; http://www.esf.org/), was held in Switzerland in January. The workshop gathered 35 scientists from 10 European and two extra-European countries (Canada and Morocco), representing 20 research teams, including members of two Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) proposals. Some of the participants were also involved with two ESF European Collaborative Research (EUROCORES) projects [Microbial Diversity and Functionality in Cold-Water Coral Reef Ecosystems (MiCROSYSTEMS) and Mid-Latitude Carbonate Systems: Complete Sequences From Cold-Water Coral Carbonate Mounds in the Northeast Atlantic (CARBONATE)], and the European Union Framework Program 6 integrated project Hotspot Ecosystem Research on the Margins of European Seas (HERMES).

  11. Environmental Measurement-While-Drilling System and Horizontal Directional Drilling Technology Demonstration, Hanford Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, C.V.; Lockwood, G.J.; Normann, R.A.; Myers, D.A.; Gardner, M.G.; Williamson, T.; Huffman, J.

    1999-06-01

    The Environmental Measurement-While-Drilling (EMWD) system and Horizontal Directional Drilling (HDD) were successfully demonstrated at the Mock Tank Leak Simulation Site and the Drilling Technology Test Site, Hanford, Washington. The use of directional drilling offers an alternative to vertical drilling site characterization. Directional drilling can develop a borehole under a structure, such as a waste tank, from an angled entry and leveling off to horizontal at the desired depth. The EMWD system represents an innovative blend of new and existing technology that provides the capability of producing real-time environmental and drill bit data during drilling operations. The technology demonstration consisted of the development of one borehole under a mock waste tank at a depth of {approximately} {minus}8 m ({minus}27 ft.), following a predetermined drill path, tracking the drill path to within a radius of {approximately}1.5 m (5 ft.), and monitoring for zones of radiological activity using the EMWD system. The purpose of the second borehole was to demonstrate the capability of drilling to a depth of {approximately} {minus}21 m ({minus}70 ft.), the depth needed to obtain access under the Hanford waste tanks, and continue drilling horizontally. This report presents information on the HDD and EMWD technologies, demonstration design, results of the demonstrations, and lessons learned.

  12. Environmental Measurement-While-Drilling System and Horizontal Directional Drilling Technology Demonstration, Hanford Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, C.V.; Lockwood, G.J.; Normann, R.A.; Myers, D.A.; Gardner, M.G.; Williamson, T.; Huffman, J.

    1999-01-01

    The Environmental Measurement-While-Drilling (EMWD) system and Horizontal Directional Drilling (HDD) were successfully demonstrated at the Mock Tank Leak Simulation Site and the Drilling Technology Test Site, Hanford, Washington. The use of directional drilling offers an alternative to vertical drilling site characterization. Directional drilling can develop a borehole under a structure, such as a waste tank, from an angled entry and leveling off to horizontal at the desired depth. The EMWD system represents an innovative blend of new and existing technology that provides the capability of producing real-time environmental and drill bit data during drilling operations. The technology demonstration consisted of the development of one borehole under a mock waste tank at a depth of approximately minus8 m (minus27 ft.), following a predetermined drill path, tracking the drill path to within a radius of approximately1.5 m (5 ft.), and monitoring for zones of radiological activity using the EMWD system. The purpose of the second borehole was to demonstrate the capability of drilling to a depth of ∼ -21 m (-70 ft.), the depth needed to obtain access under the Hanford waste tanks, and continue drilling horizontally. This report presents information on the HDD and EMWD technologies, demonstration design, results of the demonstrations, and lessons learned

  13. Percussive Augmenter of Rotary Drills (PARoD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badescu, Mircea; Hasenoehrl, Jennifer; Bar-Cohen, Yoseph; Sherrit, Stewart; Bao, Xiaoqi; Chang, Zensheu; Ostlund, Patrick; Aldrich, Jack

    2013-01-01

    Increasingly, NASA exploration mission objectives include sample acquisition tasks for in-situ analysis or for potential sample return to Earth. To address the requirements for samplers that could be operated at the conditions of the various bodies in the solar system, a piezoelectric actuated percussive sampling device was developed that requires low preload (as low as 10 N) which is important for operation at low gravity. This device can be made as light as 400 g, can be operated using low average power, and can drill rocks as hard as basalt. Significant improvement of the penetration rate was achieved by augmenting the hammering action by rotation and use of a fluted bit to provide effective cuttings removal. Generally, hammering is effective in fracturing drilled media while rotation of fluted bits is effective in cuttings removal. To benefit from these two actions, a novel configuration of a percussive mechanism was developed to produce an augmenter of rotary drills. The device was called Percussive Augmenter of Rotary Drills (PARoD). A breadboard PARoD was developed with a 6.4 mm (0.25 in) diameter bit and was demonstrated to increase the drilling rate of rotation alone by 1.5 to over 10 times. The test results of this configuration were published in a previous publication. Further, a larger PARoD breadboard with a 50.8 mm (2.0 in) diameter bit was developed and tested. This paper presents the design, analysis and test results of the large diameter bit percussive augmenter.

  14. Going Online With Ocean Drilling Publications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klaus, A. D.; Petronotis, K. E.

    2003-12-01

    distribution. And the CD-ROM product allows ODP to enhance the electronic resources available to researchers by including an index of all published IR/SR volume pairs on each CD, detailed site maps, movies, unlimited color images, and other supplementary data sets provided by authors. Our next venture is to digitize the older printed ODP volumes and the Deep Sea Drilling Project (DSDP) series and make these publications available online in HTML and PDF formats as well. This will provide the scientific community with more than 30 years of marine earth science research at the click of a mouse, a legacy that will be built upon by the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) in the near future.

  15. Stuck pipe risk reducing due drilling fluid treating

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    POPOV Anatoly Nikolaevich

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Drilling fluids for deep and extended reach wells are complex multicomponent systems that contain dissolved salts, polymers, surfactants and coarse solids. Complexity of drilling mud is caused by wide range of functions: creating pressure on the formation, retention of cuttings particles in suspension, bottomhole cleaning and transportation of sludge on the surface, preservation of reservoir properties of the target formation and other. Tribological properties are one of the most important properties of the drilling fluids. It is possible to control properties through introduction of lubricant additives. Their components are characterized by high, sometimes unique, surface activity, they create superplastic nanofilms on the surface of the protective pipe, contribute to chemical modification of the surface layers of metal. The choice of such components is complicated, first of all, by price (to construct wells one needs large volumes of mud, and secondly by strict environmental requirements. Therefore, when lubricant additive is developed, it is necessary to ground the choice of rational content for each of its components. This necessitates the use of mathematical modeling methods, i.e. construction of regression equations according to several experiments of the planned experiment. The paper presents a possible way to use the two-step method of choosing the rational ratio of the components in the lubricant additive. As a rule tribological properties of drilling fluids are considered from three different points of view or different positions – friction pairs: «metal – rock», «metal – metal» and «metal – filter cake». This article is devoted to the study of drilling fluids in relation to a pair of «metal – filter cake».

  16. Carbon Isotope Environmental Forensics: Fingerprinting Gas From Domestic Water Wells From petroleum Fields of Alberta, Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muehlenbachs, K.; Tilley, B.

    2008-12-01

    Sixty years of petroleum development has resulted in over 500,000 petroleum wells drilled in the Western Canada Sedimentary Basin, many in agricultural areas that rely on groundwater (GW). The impact on GW quality by petroleum development is increasingly becoming a societal and regulatory concern triggered by intensive, recent CBM development. To protect GW the production tubing of a resource well is encased by a larger diameter surface casing (SCV) that is set deeper than the depth of potable water. Because of poor cementing the SCVs and soils near the wells often contain gas heightening concern for integrity of GW. Carbon isotope analyses of thousands of SCV gases shows them only rarely to be sourced from the target zone of the resource well, but rather from an intermediate depth. It has long been known that many water wells produce methane and traces of ethane and it needs to be determined if the water wells have been impacted. Alberta now requires all water wells to be tested prior to drilling of nearby resource wells. Carbon isotope analyses are mandated on a proportion of all gases produced by water wells and many hundreds of gas analyses will be placed in a public data base. Carbon isotope values of gases vary within the basin and can be used to quantify natural gas contamination of GW. Two case studies will be presented where landowners have filed complaints about gas contamination of their water wells. Attributing specific contaminant sources to a given resource well has proven to be difficult in areas where there is ongoing CBM development. However, in one area, the problem gas can be attributed to previous conventional petroleum development rather than the current CBM drilling and production. Carbon isotope analyses of water wells in another area suggest a few per cent of CBM contamination in water wells. Unfortunately, lack of pre-drilling background water data prevents reliable quantification of the contamination.

  17. Geologic investigations of drill hole sloughing problems, Nevada Test Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drellack, S.L. Jr.; Davies, W.J.; Gonzales, J.L.; Hawkins, W.L.

    1983-01-01

    Severe sloughing zones encountered while drilling large diameter emplacement holes in Yucca Flat, Nevada Test Site, have been identified, correlated and predicted through detailed geologic investigations. In central and southeastern Area 7 and in northern Area 3, the unstable zones are a very fine-grained, well-sorted, unconsolidated sand deposit, probably eolian in origin, which will readily flow into large diameter drill holes. Other areas exhibit hole erosion related to poor induration or extensive zeolitization of the Tertiary tuff units which are very friable and porous. By examining drill hole samples, geophysical logs, caliper logs and drilling histories, these problem zones can be characterized, correlated and then projected into nearby sites. Maps have been generated to show the depth, thickness and areal extent of these strata. In some cases, they are local and have a lenticular geometry, while in others they are quite extensive. The ability to predict such features can enhance the quality of the hole construction and completion operations to avoid costly delays and the loss of valuable testing real estate. The control of hole enlargements will also eliminate related containment concerns, such as stemming uncertainties

  18. Neurosurgical robotic arm drilling navigation system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chung-Chih; Lin, Hsin-Cheng; Lee, Wen-Yo; Lee, Shih-Tseng; Wu, Chieh-Tsai

    2017-09-01

    The aim of this work was to develop a neurosurgical robotic arm drilling navigation system that provides assistance throughout the complete bone drilling process. The system comprised neurosurgical robotic arm navigation combining robotic and surgical navigation, 3D medical imaging based surgical planning that could identify lesion location and plan the surgical path on 3D images, and automatic bone drilling control that would stop drilling when the bone was to be drilled-through. Three kinds of experiment were designed. The average positioning error deduced from 3D images of the robotic arm was 0.502 ± 0.069 mm. The correlation between automatically and manually planned paths was 0.975. The average distance error between automatically planned paths and risky zones was 0.279 ± 0.401 mm. The drilling auto-stopping algorithm had 0.00% unstopped cases (26.32% in control group 1) and 70.53% non-drilled-through cases (8.42% and 4.21% in control groups 1 and 2). The system may be useful for neurosurgical robotic arm drilling navigation. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  19. Basic Land Drills for Swimming Stroke Acquisition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Peng

    2014-01-01

    Teaching swimming strokes can be a challenging task in physical education. The purpose of the article is to introduce 12 on land drills that can be utilized to facilitate the learning of swimming strokes, including elementary back stroke, sidestroke, front crawl, back stroke, breaststroke, and butterfly. Each drill consists of four components…

  20. 75 FR 877 - Drill Pipe From China

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-06

    ... COMMISSION Drill Pipe From China AGENCY: International Trade Commission. ACTION: Institution of antidumping... States is materially retarded, by reason of imports from China of drill pipe, provided for in subheadings... Government of China. Unless the Department of Commerce extends the time for initiation pursuant to sections...

  1. Westinghouse GOCO conduct of casualty drills

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ames, C.P.

    1996-02-01

    Purpose of this document is to provide Westinghouse Government Owned Contractor Operated (GOCO) Facilities with information that can be used to implement or improve drill programs. Elements of this guide are highly recommended for use when implementing a new drill program or when assessing an existing program. Casualty drills focus on response to abnormal conditions presenting a hazard to personnel, environment, or equipment; they are distinct from Emergency Response Exercises in which the training emphasis is on site, field office, and emergency management team interaction. The DOE documents which require team training and conducting drills in nuclear facilities and should be used as guidance in non-nuclear facilities are: DOE 5480.19 (Chapter 1 of Attachment I) and DOE 5480.20 (Chapter 1, paragraphs 7 a. and d. of continuing training). Casualty drills should be an integral part of the qualification and training program at every DOE facility

  2. Well completion report on installation of horizontal wells for in-situ remediation tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaback, D.S.; Looney, B.B.; Corey, J.C.; Wright, L.M.

    1989-08-01

    A project to drill and install two horizontal vapor extraction/air-injection wells at the Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, South Carolina, was performed in September and October of 1988. This study was performed to test the feasibility of horizontal drilling technologies in unconsolidated sediments and to evaluate the effectiveness of in-situ air stripping of volatile organics from the ground water and unsaturated soils. A tremendous amount of knowledge was obtained during the drilling and installation of the two test wells. Factors of importance to be considered during design of another horizontal well drilling program follow. (1) Trips in and out of the borehole should be minimized to maintain hole stability. No reaming to enlarge the hole should be attempted. (2) Drilling fluid performance should be maximized by utilizing a low solids, low weight, moderate viscosity, high lubricity fluid. Interruption of drilling fluid circulation should be minimized. (3) Well materials should possess adequate flexibility to negotiate the curve. A flexible guide should be attached to the front of the well screen to guide the screen downhole. (4) Sands containing a minor amount of clay are recommended for completion targets, as better drilling control in the laterals was obtained in these sections

  3. Air drilling: the first experience in the Amazon; Perfuracao a ar: primeira experiencia na Amazonia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abreu, Gabriel Raimundo L.; Santana, Esdras Gomes de; Souza, Gilberto Bellas de [PETROBRAS, Manaus, AM (Brazil). Distrito de Perfuracao da Amazonia. Superintendencia de Operacoes; Leme Junior, Leandro; Machado, Jorge Barreto [PETROBRAS, Manaus, AM (Brazil). Distrito de Perfuracao da Amazonia. Div. de Perfuracao

    1989-12-31

    The development of drilling techniques closely follows the difficulties of operating well events at low costs. In the Amazon Region, problems such as logistic support at high costs did not allow for the use of air drilling techniques as a means of obtaining the results necessary to the development of the field. Without these, there was no justification for promoting initial investments in air drilling equipment. After the Urucu/AM roads were completed, we were able to bring equipment to the area of operation. This equipment was tested in two wells, one directional and one vertical. In this paper, we describe the pioneer use of air drilling in their region and present the results obtained through it as well as the problems encountered and the techniques used to solve them. (author) 2 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs.

  4. Heat Generation During Bone Drilling: A Comparison Between Industrial and Orthopaedic Drill Bits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hein, Christopher; Inceoglu, Serkan; Juma, David; Zuckerman, Lee

    2017-02-01

    Cortical bone drilling for preparation of screw placement is common in multiple surgical fields. The heat generated while drilling may reach thresholds high enough to cause osteonecrosis. This can compromise implant stability. Orthopaedic drill bits are several orders more expensive than their similarly sized, publicly available industrial counterparts. We hypothesize that an industrial bit will generate less heat during drilling, and the bits will not generate more heat after multiple cortical passes. We compared 4 4.0 mm orthopaedic and 1 3.97 mm industrial drill bits. Three types of each bit were drilled into porcine femoral cortices 20 times. The temperature of the bone was measured with thermocouple transducers. The heat generated during the first 5 drill cycles for each bit was compared to the last 5 cycles. These data were analyzed with analysis of covariance. The industrial drill bit generated the smallest mean increase in temperature (2.8 ± 0.29°C) P industrial bit generated less heat during drilling than its orthopaedic counterparts. The bits maintained their performance after 20 drill cycles. Consideration should be given by manufacturers to design differences that may contribute to a more efficient cutting bit. Further investigation into the reuse of these drill bits may be warranted, as our data suggest their efficiency is maintained after multiple uses.

  5. Numerical modelling for quantitative environmental risk assessment for the disposal of drill cuttings and mud

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahab, Mohd Amirul Faiz Abdul; Shaufi Sokiman, Mohamad; Parsberg Jakobsen, Kim

    2017-10-01

    To investigate the fate of drilling waste and their impacts towards surrounding environment, numerical models were generated using an environmental software; MIKE by DHI. These numerical models were used to study the transportation of suspended drill waste plumes in the water column and its deposition on seabed in South China Sea (SCS). A random disposal site with the model area of 50 km × 25 km was selected near the Madalene Shoal in SCS and the ambient currents as well as other meteorological conditions were simulated in details at the proposed location. This paper was focusing on sensitivity study of different drill waste particle characteristics on impacts towards marine receiving environment. The drilling scenarios were obtained and adapted from the oil producer well at offshore Sabah (Case 1) and data from actual exploration drilling case at Pumbaa location (PL 469) in the Norwegian Sea (Case 2). The two cases were compared to study the effect of different drilling particle characteristics and their behavior in marine receiving environment after discharged. Using the Hydrodynamic and Sediment Transport models simulated in MIKE by DHI, the variation of currents and the behavior of the drilling waste particles can be analyzed and evaluated in terms of multiple degree zones of impacts.

  6. Drilling the North Anatolian Fault

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustafa Aktar

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available An international workshop entitled “GONAF: A deep Geophysical Observatory at the North Anatolian Fault”, was held 23–27 April 2007 in Istanbul, Turkey. The aim of this workshop was to refine plans for a deep drilling project at the North Anatolian Fault Zone (NAFZ in northwestern Turkey. The current drilling target is located in the Marmara Sea offshore the megacity of Istanbul in the direct vicinity of the main branch of the North Anatolian Fault on the PrinceIslands (Figs. 1 and 2.The NAFZ represents a 1600-km-long plate boundary that slips at an average rate of 20–30 mm·yr-1 (McClusky et al., 2000. It has developed in the framework of the northward moving Arabian plate and the Hellenic subduction zone where the African lithosphere is subducting below the Aegean. Comparison of long-term slip rates with Holocene and GPS-derived slip rates indicate an increasing westwardmovement of the Anatolian plate with respect to stable Eurasia. During the twentieth century, the NAFZ has ruptured over 900 km of its length. A series of large earthquakes starting in 1939 near Erzincan in Eastern Anatolia propagated westward towards the Istanbul-Marmara region in northwestern Turkey that today represents a seismic gap along a ≥100-km-long segment below the Sea of Marmara. This segment did not rupture since 1766 and, if locked, may have accumulated a slip deficit of 4–5 m. It is believed being capable of generating two M≥7.4 earthquakes within the next decades (Hubert-Ferrari et al., 2000; however, it could even rupture in a large single event (Le Pichon et al., 1999.

  7. REDUCTION OF COST AND TIME CONSUMPTION IN WELL-CONSTRUCTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mladen Zelenika

    1998-12-01

    Full Text Available A Contractor usually utilizes the available drilling equipment when constructing just one single well. Drilling cost and time consumption in constructing the well MB-1, using the percussion method, and the well MB-2, using the conventional rotary drilling method, call for a separate analysis in order to justify the investment cost for the acquisition of additional equipment for a single well only. The wells, located in a karst vrtača close to an estavelle near Tomislavgrad, with a diameter of 500 mm and approximately 80 m deep, have been accomplished with a low rate of penetration using the conventional Cable tool and resp. Rotary Drilling Method. In this paper results of analyses for the given circumstances are shown: both the efficiency and cost of the mentioned drilling methods performed by the crews of »Geotehnika d.d.« Zagreb, as well as the justifiability of investments in new equipment are evaluated.

  8. Well completion report - G. Friemel No. 1 (PD-5) well, Palo Duro Basin, Texas: unanalyzed data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-05-01

    This report provides a brief description and history of the drilling and testing program conducted at the G. Friemel No. 1 well, located in eastern Deaf Smith County about 4 miles north of Dawn, Texas. Drilling and testing were performed by Stone and Webster Engineering Corporation as a part of a nationwide program to identify potential locations for a nuclear waste repository. Figures showing site layout and final well design are provided. Testing programs are described, and stratigraphic data derived from the well are summarized. Data derived from geophysical well logs, drill-stem tests, and other testing programs are presented in the appendixes. Drilling of the well started on February 23, 1982, and was completed on March 31, 1982, at a total depth of 2710 feet. These data are preliminary. They have been neither analyzed nor evaluated

  9. New approaches to subglacial bedrock drilling technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talalay, Pavel; Sun, Youhong; Zhao, Yue; Xue, Jun; Chen, Chen; Markov, Alexey; Xu, Huiwen; Gong, Wenbin; Han, Wei; Zheng, Zhichuan; Cao, Pinlu; Wang, Rusheng; Zhang, Nan; Yu, Dahui; Fan, Xiaopeng; Hu, Zhengyi; Yang, Cheng; Han, Lili; Sysoev, Mikhail

    2013-04-01

    Drilling to bedrock of ice sheets and glaciers offers unique opportunities to research processes acting at the bed for paleo-climatic and paleo-environmental recording, basal sliding studies, subglacial geology and tectonics investigations, prospecting and exploration for minerals covered by ice. Retrieving bedrock samples under ice sheets and glaciers is a very difficult task. Drilling operations are complicated by extremely low temperature at the surface of, and within glaciers, and by glacier flow, the absence of roads and infrastructures, storms, winds, snowfalls, etc. In order to penetrate through the ice sheet or glacier up to the depth of at least 1000 m and to pierce the bedrock to the depth of several meters from ice - bedrock boundary the development activity already has been started in Polar Research Center at Jilin University, China. All drilling equipment (two 50-kW diesel generators, winch, control desk, fluid dumping station, etc.) is installed inside a movable sledge-mounted warm-keeping and wind-protecting drilling shelter that has dimensions of 8.8 ×2.8 × 3.0 m. Mast has two positions: horizontal for transportation and vertical working position (mast height is 12 m). Drilling shelter can be transported to the chosen site with crawler-tractor, aircraft or helicopter. In case of carriage by air the whole drilling shelter was designed to be disassembled into pieces "small" enough to ship by aircraft. Weight and sizes of each component has been minimized to lower the cost of transportation and to meet weight restrictions for transportation. Total weight of drilling equipment (without drilling fluid) is near 15 tons. Expected time of assembling and preparing for drilling is 2 weeks. If drilling shelter is transported with crawler-tractor (for example, in Antarctic traverses) all equipment is ready to start drilling immediately upon arrival to the site. To drill through ice and bedrock a new, modified version of the cable-suspended electromechanical

  10. Lithology and Stratigraphy of Holes Drilled in LANL-Use Areas of the Nevada Test Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lance B. Prothro; Sigmund L. Drellack, Jr.; Brian M. Allen

    1999-07-01

    Geologic data for ten holes drilled in areas used by Los Alamos National Laboratory at the Nevada Test Site are presented in this report. The holes include emplacement holes, instrumentation holes, and Underground Test Area wells drilled during calendar years 1991 through 1995. For each hole a stratigraphic log, a detailed lithologic log, and one or two geologic cross sections are presented, along with a supplemental data sheet containing information about the drilling operations, geology, or references. For three of the holes, graphic data summary sheets with geologic and geophysical data are provided as plates.

  11. Field evaluation of air-blocking shelf for dust control on blasthole drills

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. Drew Potts; W. Randolph Reed [Office of Mine Safety and Health Research, NIOSH, Pittsburgh, PA (United States). Dust Control, Ventilation, and Toxic Substance Branch

    2011-03-15

    In previous studies, an air-blocking shelf has been shown to be successful in reducing respirable dust leakage from the drill shroud in a laboratory setting. Dust reductions of up to 81% were achieved with the shelf under operating conditions consisting of a 1.9:1 collector-to-bailing airflow ratio and a 5.1-cm gap between the shroud and ground. Recent research focused on evaluating the shelf on two actual operating blasthole drills, in much more severe environments. In the field, the shelf reduced dust levels in the areas surrounding one operating blasthole drill by 70%. Dust reductions measured in the immediate vicinity of the shroud were reduced by 66% at one mine and 81% at the other mine. These field tests confirm that the air-blocking shelf is useful for reducing respirable dust generation from blasthole drills.

  12. A new design of automatic vertical drilling tool

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanfeng Ma

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available In order to effectively improve penetration rates and enhance wellbore quality for vertical wells, a new Automatic Vertical Drilling Tool (AVDT based on Eccentric Braced Structure (EBS is designed. Applying operating principle of rotary steering drilling, AVDT adds offset gravity block automatic induction inclination mechanism. When hole straightening happens, tools take essentric moment to be produced by gravity of offset gravity lock to control the bearing of guide force, so that well straightening is achieved. The normal tool's size of the AVDT is designed as 215.9 mm,other major components' sizes are worked out by the result of theoretical analysis, including the offset angle of EBS. This paper aims to introduce the structure, operating principle, theoretical analysis and describe the key components' parameters setting of the AVDT.

  13. CFD Method for Predicting Annular Pressure Losses and Cuttings Concentration in Eccentric Horizontal Wells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Titus N. Ofei

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In oil and gas drilling operations, predictions of pressure losses and cuttings concentration in the annulus are very complex due to the combination of interacting drilling parameters. Past studies have proposed many empirical correlations to estimate pressure losses and cuttings concentration. However, these developed correlations are limited to their experimental data range and setup, and hence, they cannot be applicable to all cases. CFD methods have the advantages of handling complex multiphase flow problems, as well as, an unlimited number of physical and operational conditions. The present study employs the inhomogeneous (Eulerian-Eulerian model to simulate a two-phase solid-fluid flow and predict pressure losses and cuttings concentration in eccentric horizontal annuli as a function of varying drilling parameters: fluid velocity, diameter ratio (ratio of inner pipe diameter to outer pipe diameter, inner pipe rotation speed, and fluid type. Experimental data for pressure losses and cuttings concentration from previous literature compared very well with simulation data, confirming the validity of the current model. The study shows how reliable CFD methods can replicate the actual, yet complex oil and gas drilling operations.

  14. Borehole Data Package for One CY 2005 CERCLA Well 699-S20-E10, 300-FF-5 Operable Unit, Hanford Site, Washington

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, Bruce A.; Bjornstad, Bruce N.; Lanigan, David C.; Keller, Jason M.; Rockhold, Mark L.

    2006-03-29

    This report supplies the information obtained during drilling, characterization, and installation of the new groundwater monitoring well. This document also provides a compilation of hydrogeologic and well construction information obtained during drilling, well development, and sample collection/analysis activities.

  15. Livestock poisoning from oil field drilling fluids, muds and additives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, W C; Gregory, D G

    1991-10-01

    The use and potential toxicity of various components of oil well drilling fluids, muds and additives are presented. Many components are extremely caustic resulting in rumenitis. Solvent and petroleum hydrocarbon components may cause aspiration pneumonia and rumen dysfunction. Some additives cause methemoglobinemia. The most frequently encountered heavy metals are lead, chromium, arsenic, lithium and copper. Considerations for investigating livestock poisoning cases and several typical cases are reviewed.

  16. Perfected oil rig for offshore drilling and exploitation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ninger, M.; Thomas, P.A.; Naudin, J.C.

    1988-01-15

    An oil rig consisting of a shell supported by legs resting on the sea bed is presented. At least one of the legs contains a space in which is found the equipment linking the shell to the sea bed. The drilling platform is in the shell, and can be moved above the crosswise section of the leg containing the equipment. This equipment is protected in a more efficient fashion, and the well head can be brought to the surface without stressing the rig.

  17. The Auto-Gopher Deep Drill

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badescu, Mircea

    2014-01-01

    Subsurface penetration by coring, drilling or abrading is of great importance for a large number of space and earth applications. An Ultrasonic/Sonic Drill/Corer (USDC) has been in development at JPL's Nondestructive Evaluation and Advanced Actuators (NDEAA) lab as an adaptable tool for many of these applications. The USDC uses a novel drive mechanism to transform the high frequency ultrasonic or sonic vibrations of the tip of a horn into a lower frequency sonic hammering of a drill bit through an intermediate free-flying mass. The USDC device idea has been implemented at various scales from handheld drills to large diameter coring devices. A series of computer programs that model the function and performance of the USDC device were developed and were later integrated into an automated modeling package. The USDC has also evolved from a purely hammering drill to a rotary hammer drill as the design requirements increased form small diameter shallow drilling to large diameter deep coring. A synthesis of the Auto-Gopher development is presented in this paper.

  18. Thermal and mineralogical characterization of drill cuttings from north capixaba: initial studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fialho, P.F.; Goncalves, G. dos R.; Calmon, J.L.; Tristao, F.A.; Nunes, E.; Cunha, A.G.

    2011-01-01

    The drilling of oil wells generates various wastes among which are the cuttings and drilling fluids. The management of these wastes have been a problem for the oil and gas industry because of the amount generated and its contaminants, which can be organic and inorganic. This paper presents initial studies of thermal and mineralogical characterization of the drill cuttings from oil wells and gas in Southeast Brazilian, state of Espirito Santo with aim of reuse them as raw material in building materials. Characterizations were performed physical, thermal and mineralogical by particle size distribution, thermogravimetric analysis, differential scanning calorimetry and X-ray diffraction. The results indicate that there are potential replacements of natural raw materials or drill cuttings in the production of building materials. (author)

  19. Stochastic programming of drilling rigs supplies; Programacao estocastica de suprimentos de sondas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vieira, Bruno Ferreira; Ferreira Filho, Virgilio Jose Martins [Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-Graduacao de Engenharia (COPPE/UFRJ), RJ (Brazil)

    2012-07-01

    The goal of this work is to use techniques of stochastic programming to reduce logistic costs regarding offshore drilling rigs. This theme is of great interest to Brazilian oil industry since there is an increasing number of wells that need to be perforated so that Brazilian oil production can reach its expected growth over the next ten years (PETROBRAS in particular has an ambitious strategy in this respect). Proper treatment of the uncertainties involved in the deliveries of supplies to offshore drilling rigs is essential, namely, these uncertainties need to be included in the models used in logistic models. Delays in the deliveries of products such as chemicals, perforation fluids and tubes may force drilling rigs to stop their operations what highly increases costs. The daily hiring rates of drilling rigs represent the highest cost in the perforation and completion of a well. (author)

  20. Development and Application of the Downhole Drilling String Shock-Absorption and Hydraulic Supercharging Device

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongwang Liu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available It is a hot topic for deep/ultradeep wells to improve rock-breaking efficiency and drilling speed by available downhole energy. Based on different downhole energies and working conditions, specialized plunger pump is proposed to convert longitudinal vibration of drilling string into rock-breaking energy. Technical design is developed to generate high-pressure water jet. And then a simulation model is built to verify feasibility of the technical design. Through simulation, the influence law of key factors is obtained. On this basis, this device is tested in several wells. The result indicates this device can increase drilling speed as much as 136%. Meanwhile the harmful vibration can be absorbed. The energy from drilling string vibration is of high frequency and increases as well depth and formation anisotropy increase. By reducing adverse vibration, this device is able to increase the drilling speed and the service life also meets the demand of field application. The longest working time lasts for more than 130 hours. The performance of this device demonstrates great application prospect in deep/ultradeep resources exploration. To provide more equipment support for deep/ultradeep wells, more effort should be put into fundamental study on downhole drill string vibration and related equipment.

  1. Monitoring radionuclides in subsurface drinking water sources near unconventional drilling operations: a pilot study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nelson, Andrew W.; Knight, Andrew W.; Eitrheim, Eric S.; Schultz, Michael K.

    2015-01-01

    Unconventional drilling (the combination of hydraulic fracturing and horizontal drilling) to extract oil and natural gas is expanding rapidly around the world. The rate of expansion challenges scientists and regulators to assess the risks of the new technologies on drinking water resources. One concern is the potential for subsurface drinking water resource contamination by naturally occurring radioactive materials co-extracted during unconventional drilling activities. Given the rate of expansion, opportunities to test drinking water resources in the pre- and post-fracturing setting are rare. This pilot study investigated the levels of natural uranium, lead-210, and polonium-210 in private drinking wells within 2000 m of a large-volume hydraulic fracturing operation – before and approximately one-year following the fracturing activities. Observed radionuclide concentrations in well waters tested did not exceed maximum contaminant levels recommended by state and federal agencies. No statistically-significant differences in radionuclide concentrations were observed in well-water samples collected before and after the hydraulic fracturing activities. Expanded monitoring of private drinking wells before and after hydraulic fracturing activities is needed to develop understanding of the potential for drinking water resource contamination from unconventional drilling and gas extraction activities. - Highlights: • Natural radionuclides in ground water near unconventional drilling operations were investigated. • Natural uranium ( nat U), lead-210 ( 210 Pb), and polonium-210 ( 210 Po) levels are described. • No statistically significant increases in natural radioactivity post-drilling were observed

  2. Deep drilling in the Chesapeake Bay impact structure - An overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gohn, G.S.; Koeberl, C.; Miller, K.G.; Reimold, W.U.

    2009-01-01

    The late Eocene Chesapeake Bay impact structure lies buried at moderate depths below Chesapeake Bay and surrounding landmasses in southeastern Virginia, USA. Numerous characteristics made this impact structure an inviting target for scientific drilling, including the location of the impact on the Eocene continental shelf, its threelayer target structure, its large size (??85 km diameter), its status as the source of the North American tektite strewn field, its temporal association with other late Eocene terrestrial impacts, its documented effects on the regional groundwater system, and its previously unstudied effects on the deep microbial biosphere. The Chesapeake Bay Impact Structure Deep Drilling Project was designed to drill a deep, continuously cored test hole into the central part of the structure. A project workshop, funding proposals, and the acceptance of those proposals occurred during 2003-2005. Initial drilling funds were provided by the International Continental Scientific Drilling Program (ICDP) and the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS). Supplementary funds were provided by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Science Mission Directorate, ICDP, and USGS. Field operations were conducted at Eyreville Farm, Northampton County, Virginia, by Drilling, Observation, and Sampling of the Earth's Continental Crust (DOSECC) and the project staff during September-December 2005, resulting in two continuously cored, deep holes. The USGS and Rutgers University cored a shallow hole to 140 m in April-May 2006 to complete the recovered section from land surface to 1766 m depth. The recovered section consists of 1322 m of crater materials and 444 m of overlying postimpact Eocene to Pleistocene sediments. The crater section consists of, from base to top: basement-derived blocks of crystalline rocks (215 m); a section of suevite, impact melt rock, lithic impact breccia, and cataclasites (154 m); a thin interval of quartz sand and lithic blocks (26 m); a

  3. Hole fluids for deep ice core drilling

    OpenAIRE

    Talalay, P.G.; Gundestrup, N.S.

    2002-01-01

    This paper is based on the data published in research report of P. G. Talalay and N. S. Gundestrup; Hole fluids for deep ice core drilling : A review. Copenhagen University, Copenhagen, 1999,120p. In the practice of deep ice core drilling only three types of bore-hole fluids have been used : 1) petroleum oil products (fuels or solvents) containing densifier, 2) aqueous ethylene glycol or ethanol solutions, 3) n-butyl acetate. The main parameters of drilling fluids are 1) density and fluid top...

  4. Fatigue analysis of aluminum drill pipes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Carlos Ribeiro Plácido

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available An experimental program was performed to investigate the fundamental fatigue mechanisms of aluminum drill pipes. Initially, the fatigue properties were determined through small-scale tests performed in an optic-mechanical fatigue apparatus. Additionally, full-scale fatigue tests were carried out with three aluminum drill pipe specimens under combined loading of cyclic bending and constant axial tension. Finally, a finite element model was developed to simulate the stress field along the aluminum drill pipe during the fatigue tests and to estimate the stress concentration factors inside the tool joints. By this way, it was possible to estimate the stress values in regions not monitored during the fatigue tests.

  5. Scientific Drilling in the Arctic Ocean: A challenge for the next decades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, R.; Coakley, B.

    2009-04-01

    Although major progress in Arctic Ocean research has been made during the last decades, the knowledge of its short- and long-term paleoceanographic and paleoclimatic history as well as its plate-tectonic evolution is much behind that from the other world's oceans. That means - despite the importance of the Arctic in the climate system - the data base we have from this area is still very weak, and large parts of the climate history have not been recovered at all in sedimentary sections. This lack of knowledge is mainly caused by the major technological/ logistic problems in reaching this permanently ice-covered region with normal research vessels and in retrieving long and undisturbed sediment cores. With the successful completion of IODP Expedition 302 ("Arctic Coring Expedition" - ACEX), the first Mission Specific Platform (MSP) expedition within the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program - IODP, a new era in Arctic research has begun. For the first time, a scientific drilling in the permanently ice-covered Arctic Ocean was carried out, penetrating about 430 meters of Quaternary, Neogene, Paleogene and Campanian sediment on the crest of Lomonosov Ridge close to the North Pole. The success of ACEX has certainly opened the door for further scientific drilling in the Arctic Ocean, and will frame the next round of questions to be answered from new drill holes to be taken during the next decades. In order to discuss and plan the future of scientific drilling in the Arctic Ocean, an international workshop was held at the Alfred Wegener Institute (AWI) in Bremerhaven/Germany, (Nov 03-05, 2008; convenors: Bernard Coakley/University of Alaska Fairbanks and Ruediger Stein/AWI Bremerhaven). About 95 scientists from Europe, US, Canada, Russia, Japan, and Korea, and observers from oil companies participated in the workshop. Funding of the workshop was provided by the Consortium for Ocean Leadership (US), the European Science Foundation, the Arctic Ocean Sciences Board, and the

  6. Evaluating the Level of Pollutants from Spent Drilling Fluids in an Oil ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The environmental pollution hazards due to the use of drilling fluids in the oil and gas sector were studied. Grab samples of spent drilling fluids (SDF), water and soil were collected from 7 locations in the oil field when the depth of the well was 3,658m, before the 3,962m pay zone. Samples were analyzed to determine the ...

  7. An Investigation for Disposal of Drill Cuttings into Unconsolidated Sandstones and Clayey Sands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mese, Ali; Dvorkin, Jack; Shillinglaw, John

    2000-09-11

    This project include experimental data and a set of models for relating elastic moduli/porosity/texture and static-to-dynamic moduli to strength and failure relationships for unconsolidated sands and clayey sands. The results of the project should provide the industry with a basis for wider use of oil base drilling fluids in water sensitive formations by implementing drill cutting injection into existing wells at abandoned formations and controlling fracture geometry to prevent ground water contamination.

  8. Temperature analysis in CFRP drilling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumura, Takashi; Tamura, Shoichi

    2016-10-01

    The cutting temperature in drilling of carbon fiber reinforced plastics (CFRPs) is simulated numerically in finite difference analysis. The cutting force is predicted to estimate heat generation on the shear plane and the rake face by an energy approach. In the force model, three dimensional chip flow is interpreted as a piling up of the orthogonal cuttings in the planes containing the cutting velocities and the chip flow velocities, in which the chip flow direction is determined to minimize the cutting energy. Then, the cutting force is predicted in the determined chip flow model. The cutting temperature distribution is simulated with the thermal conductions, the thermal convections and the heat generations in the discrete elements of the tool, the chip and the workpiece. The heat generations on the shear plane and the rake face are given by stress distributions based on the cutting force predicted. The cutting temperature is analyzed on assumption that all mechanical works contribute the heat generation. The temperature of CFRP is compared with that of carbon steel in the numerical simulation. The maximum temperature of CFRP is much lower than carbon steel. The position at the maximum temperature is near the tool tip due to a low thermal conductivity of CFRP.

  9. Stimulation Technologies for Deep Well Completions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2003-09-30

    The Department of Energy (DOE) is sponsoring the Deep Trek Program targeted at improving the economics of drilling and completing deep gas wells. Under the DOE program, Pinnacle Technologies is conducting a study to evaluate the stimulation of deep wells. The objective of the project is to assess U.S. deep well drilling & stimulation activity, review rock mechanics & fracture growth in deep, high pressure/temperature wells and evaluate stimulation technology in several key deep plays. An assessment of historical deep gas well drilling activity and forecast of future trends was completed during the first six months of the project; this segment of the project was covered in Technical Project Report No. 1. The second progress report covers the next six months of the project during which efforts were primarily split between summarizing rock mechanics and fracture growth in deep reservoirs and contacting operators about case studies of deep gas well stimulation.

  10. MODELING AND ANALYSIS OF UNSTEADY FLOW BEHAVIOR IN DEEPWATER CONTROLLED MUD-CAP DRILLING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiwei Li

    Full Text Available Abstract A new mathematical model was developed in this study to simulate the unsteady flow in controlled mud-cap drilling systems. The model can predict the time-dependent flow inside the drill string and annulus after a circulation break. This model consists of the continuity and momentum equations solved using the explicit Euler method. The model considers both Newtonian and non-Newtonian fluids flowing inside the drill string and annular space. The model predicts the transient flow velocity of mud, the equilibrium time, and the change in the bottom hole pressure (BHP during the unsteady flow. The model was verified using data from U-tube flow experiments reported in the literature. The result shows that the model is accurate, with a maximum average error of 3.56% for the velocity prediction. Together with the measured data, the computed transient flow behavior can be used to better detect well kick and a loss of circulation after the mud pump is shut down. The model sensitivity analysis show that the water depth, mud density and drill string size are the three major factors affecting the fluctuation of the BHP after a circulation break. These factors should be carefully examined in well design and drilling operations to minimize BHP fluctuation and well kick. This study provides the fundamentals for designing a safe system in controlled mud-cap drilling operati.

  11. Raytheon Downhole Information System: Electromagnetic lithospheric information system for geothermal drilling. Interim report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kolker, M.; Greene, A.H.; Robertson, J.C.; Grossi, M.D.

    1977-03-31

    The Raytheon Downhole Information System (RDIS), which is designed to reduce the drilling cost and increase the energy yield of deep geothermal wells, is described. The RDIS consists of a downhole sensor package located just above the drill bit, a telemetry link in the drill string, and a well head data management and control system. The RDIS assists the driller to speed drilling, select the best depth locations for geothermal energy exploitation, and protect against catastrophes. Cost savings for drilling optimization are estimated at 24% for a 15,000 foot well under routine conditions. Even greater savings may accrue for catastrophe prevention. The telemetry link operates at an extremely low electromagnetic carrier frequency because propagation occurs directly through the earth. The resulting bit rates, 1 to 10 Hz, are adequate, however, because drilling is characterized by very long time constants, and sensor package data is efficiently preprocessed downhole. Sensors and telemetry units must withstand temperatures in excess of 200/sup 0/C. Studies and tests suggest that a goal of 275/sup 0/C is achievable with modest improvement in available solid state circuitry and power supplies. A three phase development plan is presented to provide a first commercial system in 26 months after start of Phase I field tests.

  12. Hard rock drilling: from conventional technologies to the potential use of laser; Perfuracao em rochas duras: das tecnologias convencionais ate o potencial uso do laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amaro, Renato; Lomba, Rosana Fatima Teixieira [Petroleo Brasileiro S.A. (PETROBRAS), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Perez, Maria Angelica Acosta; Valente, Luiz Carlos Guedes; Braga, Arthur Martins Barbosa [Pontificia Universidade Catolica do Rio de Janeiro (PUC-Rio), RJ (Brazil)

    2012-07-01

    One of the biggest challenges in the drilling of the carbonate rocks of the Pre-salt is to overcome the low penetration rates that have been obtained in the drilling of the reservoir rock in the vertical and directional wells. To overcome this challenge, a great effort is being developed in several lines of research, both in developing new concepts in drill bits and in the selection of a drilling system that together with appropriate type of bit provide an expected improvement in performance. To achieve these results, procedures are being prioritized and drilling systems with lower vibration levels are being used, since this phenomenon of vibration reduces the performance of penetration rate also affecting the lifetime of the equipment and consequently causes a reduction in reliability of all system and raises the cost per meter of drilling. Thus, new drill bit technology and new drilling systems are under development and, among these technologies we can distinguish those that promote improvements in conventional technologies and innovative technologies frankly which uses new mechanisms to cut or weaken the rock. This paper presents an overview of the conventional technology of drilling systems and drill bits, and provides information about the researches that have been developed with the use of innovative technologies which is presented as highly promising, among these innovative technologies, laser drilling and the drilling itself assisted by laser. In this process the laser beam has the main function to weaken the rock improving the rate of penetration. This paper presents a summary of studies and analyzes which are underway to investigate the potential of laser technology, also presents some results of laboratory tests already carried out. The drilling fluid in which the laser will have to pass through in the future applications is analyzed on the approach of their physicochemical properties. Thus, a better understanding of the interaction with the drilling

  13. DEVELOPMENT AND TESTING OF UNDERBALANCED DRILLING PRODUCTS. Final Report, Oct 1995 - July 2001

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    William C. Maurer; William J. McDonald; Thomas E. Williams; John H. Cohen

    2001-07-01

    Underbalanced drilling is experiencing growth at a rate that rivals that of horizontal drilling in the mid-1980s and coiled-tubing drilling in the 1990s. Problems remain, however, for applying underbalanced drilling in a wider range of geological settings and drilling environments. This report addresses developments under this DOE project to develop products aimed at overcoming these problems. During Phase I of the DOE project, market analyses showed that up to 12,000 wells per year (i.e., 30% of all wells) will be drilled underbalanced in the U.S.A. within the next ten years. A user-friendly foam fluid hydraulics model (FOAM) was developed for a PC Windows environment during Phase I. FOAM predicts circulating pressures and flow characteristics of foam fluids used in underbalanced drilling operations. FOAM is based on the best available mathematical models, and was validated through comparison to existing models, laboratory test data and field data. This model does not handle two-phase flow or air and mist drilling where the foam quality is above 0.97. This FOAM model was greatly expanded during Phase II including adding an improved foam rheological model and a ''matching'' feature that allows the model to be field calibrated. During Phase I, a lightweight drilling fluid was developed that uses hollow glass spheres (HGS) to reduce the density of the mud to less than that of water. HGS fluids have several advantages over aerated fluids, including they are incompressible, they reduce corrosion and vibration problems, they allow the use of mud-pulse MWD tools, and they eliminate high compressor and nitrogen costs. Phase II tests showed that HGS significantly reduce formation damage with water-based drilling and completion fluids and thereby potentially can increase oil and gas production in wells drilled with water-based fluids. Extensive rheological testing was conducted with HGS drilling and completion fluids during Phase II. These tests showed

  14. Drill Embedded Nanosensors for Planetary Subsurface Exploration

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We have developed a carbon nanotube (CNT) sensor for water vapor detection under Martian Conditions and the miniaturized electronics can be embedded in the drill bit...

  15. 75 FR 8113 - Drill Pipe From China

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-23

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION Drill Pipe From China AGENCY: United States International Trade Commission. ACTION: Revised schedule for the subject antidumping and countervailing duty investigations. DATES: Effective Date...

  16. Wear Detection of Drill Bit by Image-based Technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukeri, Maziyah; Zulhilmi Paiz Ismadi, Mohd; Rahim Othman, Abdul; Kamaruddin, Shahrul

    2018-03-01

    Image processing for computer vision function plays an essential aspect in the manufacturing industries for the tool condition monitoring. This study proposes a dependable direct measurement method to measure the tool wear using image-based analysis. Segmentation and thresholding technique were used as the means to filter and convert the colour image to binary datasets. Then, the edge detection method was applied to characterize the edge of the drill bit. By using cross-correlation method, the edges of original and worn drill bits were correlated to each other. Cross-correlation graphs were able to detect the difference of the worn edge despite small difference between the graphs. Future development will focus on quantifying the worn profile as well as enhancing the sensitivity of the technique.

  17. Environmental issues and solutions for exploratory drilling in sensitive areas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, R.M.

    1995-01-01

    Chevron USA Production Company (CPDN), the National Forest Service (FS) and the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) successfully utilized a multi-disciplinary team approach to design and implement innovative environmental solutions to drill the 8,000 foot deep, Hunter Creek exploratory well. The project was located in the Bridger-Teton National Forest, less than 20 miles from Grand Teton National Park. Acquiring permission from the FS, the BLM, and ultimately, the public to drill the Hunter Creek well involved substantial teamwork in identifying many potential, environmental pitfalls. Creative, workable and cost-effective mitigation measures employed at Hunter Creek included: utilizing a helicopter and limiting vehicle use of an existing road, conducting environmental and safety training, an erosion control and reclamation plan, designing an environmentally friendly, near-zero-discharge drilling location, initiating a water quality monitoring program to establish baseline data and to ensure protection of surface and ground water, designing a waste minimization plan, identifying threatened and endangered and special status species possibly affected by project activities, and ensuring compliance with all mitigation measures and Federal and State regulations. The Hunter Creek project successfully demonstrates that oil and gas exploration can be conducted with a soft footprint in environmentally sensitive areas if mitigation measures are front-end loaded in the project and honored by all personnel involved. Teamwork, training and communication were found to be indispensable components of achieving success at Hunter Creek

  18. A reagent for processing drilling muds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Polyakov, G.A.; Khon-Pak, A.T.; Khon, A.V.; Normatov, L.N.; Telegin, B.V.

    1983-01-01

    A reagent is proposed for processing drilling muds. It contains an acrylic polymer and potassium permanganate. The reagent is distinguished by the fact that in order to improve the quality of the drilling muds by increasing their salt resistance, the reagent contains hydrolized nitron fiber as the acrylic polymer with the following component relationship (in percent by weight): potassium permanganate, 0.015 to 0.065 and hydrolyzed nitron fiber, the remainder.

  19. A self propelled drilling system for hard-rock, horizontal and coiled tube drilling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biglin, D.; Wassell, M.

    1997-12-31

    Several advancements are needed to improve the efficiency and reliability of both hard rock drilling and extended reach drilling. This paper will present a Self Propelled Drilling System (SPDS) which can grip the borehole wall in order to provide a stable platform for the application of weight on bit (WOB) and resisting the reactive torque created by the downhole drilling motor, bit and formation interaction. The system will also dampen the damaging effects of drill string vibration. This tool employs two hydraulically activated anchors (front and rear) to grip the borehole wall, and a two-way thrust mandrel to apply both the drilling force to the bit, and a retraction force to pull the drill string into the hole. Forward drilling motion will commence by sequencing the anchor pistons and thrust mandrel to allow the tool to walk in a stepping motion. The SPDS has a microprocessor to control valve timing, sensing and communication functions. An optional Measurement While Drilling (MWD) interface can provide two-way communication of critical operating parameters such as hydraulic pressure and piston location. This information can then be telemetered to the surface, or used downhole to autonomously control system parameters such as anchor and thrust force or damping characteristics.

  20. Percussive Augmenter of Rotary Drills for Operating as a Rotary-Hammer Drill

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldrich, Jack Barron (Inventor); Bar-Cohen, Yoseph (Inventor); Sherrit, Stewart (Inventor); Badescu, Mircea (Inventor); Bao, Xiaoqi (Inventor); Scott, James Samson (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    A percussive augmenter bit includes a connection shaft for mounting the bit onto a rotary drill. In a first modality, an actuator percussively drives the bit, and an electric slip-ring provides power to the actuator while being rotated by the drill. Hammering action from the actuator and rotation from the drill are applied directly to material being drilled. In a second modality, a percussive augmenter includes an actuator that operates as a hammering mechanism that drives a free mass into the bit creating stress pulses that fracture material that is in contact with the bit.

  1. Thermal numerical assessment of jawbone drilling factor during implantology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adel Pirjamali Neisiani

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: Optimization drilling parameters in order to temperature decrease during creation of hole in the bone is an interested issue. The aim of this study was to achieve optimum values of drilling parameters based on the creation of minimum temperature during jawbone drilling. Materials and Methods: In this study two models of mandible and maxilla was created and teeth 2, 5 and 8 from maxilla and teeth 25, 28 and 31 from mandible were removed. The drilling operation was performed under different conditions on jawbone models using finite element analysis and the maximum temperatures were measured in adjacent of holes. Results: Drill bit head angle of 70 degrees was created the lowest maximum temperature during drilling operation. The lowest maximum temperatures were observed in the drill bit rotational speed, drill bit feed rate and the force exerted on the drill bit equal to 200 rpm, 120 mm/min and 60 N, respectively. The use of irrigation can decrease the maximum bone temperature about 7ºC. The maximum temperature differences in various regions of mandible and maxilla were approximately about 1ºC. Conclusion: Sharpness of drill bit head angle, reduction of drill bit rotational speed, increasing drill bit feed rate and exerted force on drill bit and also the use of irrigation played effective roles in temperature decrease during jawbone drilling. Drilling site did not have important effect on the temperature changes during jawbone drilling.

  2. Investigation of a North Sea oil platform drill cuttings pile

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hartley, J.P.; Watson, T.N.

    1993-01-01

    A comprehensive study of the drill cuttings pile at North West Hutton was undertaken in August, 1992. Fifty one wells have been drilled in the field, mainly using mineral oil based drill fluids, with the cuttings discharged to sea. The cuttings pile was mapped using a 3D side scan sonar system and the periphery was defined by towed side scan sonar and gamma ray spectrometer surveys. The pile was cored by vibrocorer to a maximum depth of 2.35m. The cores were assessed geotechnically and subsampled for physical and chemical analyses. Environmental impact was investigated by grab sampling at 12 stations out to 7,500m, selected on the basis of cuttings distribution. The results are relevant to the corrosion and long-term environmental effects of oily cuttings piles, the remove/leave alone debate, and abandonment planning. The cores were subsampled for hydrocarbon, trace metals and sulphide content and grain size analysis. Metals analyses included identification of metal species to estimate bioavailability and implications of pile disturbance. Estimates of oil migration within the pile are made from correlation of the chemical analyses results with the drilling history, in particular the change from diesel to low toxicity base oil in 1984. Strong gradients were found in the faunal data which correlate well with the physical and chemical results. Dense populations of opportunists species were present adjacent to the platform, including a novel molluscan opportunist. This is the first comprehensive study of an oily cuttings pile and is a contribution to the debate on their long term impact and fate on abandonment

  3. A review on the effect of mechanical drilling on polymer nanocomposites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Starost, Kristof; Njuguna, James

    2014-01-01

    Over the past decade, polymer nanocomposites have undergone intensive research and development ensued by its increasing implementation within commercial applications. Consequently, the full life-cycle performance and any health risks associated with these materials have become of major interest. Throughout its use, a nanocomposite will undergo industrial machining where drilling can lead to material damage and/or exposure to the potentially toxic nanoparticles. This study assesses the existing and perspective research on nanocomposite drilling. Currently, although considerable amount of studies have investigated machining on conventional composite materials, there is a lack in knowledge on the effect of drilling on nanocomposites. The data underlines the various drilling parameters that will affect and influence the damage to the material and nano-sized particles released. Importantly, previous studies have identified potential mechanical damage caused by drilling and the release-ability of toxic nanoparticles from nanocomposites. It is therefore crucial to develop a full understanding and characterization on the effect of drilling on polymer nanocomposites

  4. Measurement of Nanoparticles Release during Drilling of Polymer Nanocomposites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gendre, L.; Marchante Rodriguez, V.; Abhyankar, H.; Blackburn, K.; Brighton, J. L.

    2015-05-01

    Nanomaterials are one of the promising technologies of this century. The Project on Emerging Nanotechnologies [1] reports more than 1600 consumer products based on nanotechnology that are currently on the market and advantages link to the reinforcement of polymeric materials using nano-fillers are not to demonstrate anymore. However, the concerns about safety and its consumer perception can slow down the acceptance of nanocomposites. Indeed, during its life-cycle, a nanotechnology-based product can release nano-sized particles exposing workers, consumers and environment and the risk involved in the use and disposal of such particles is not well known. The current legislation concerning chemicals and environment protection doesn't explicitly cover nanomaterials and changes undergone by nanoparticles during the products’ life cycle. Also, the possible physio-chemical changes that the nanoparticles may undergo during its life cycle are unknown. Industries need a standard method to evaluate nanoparticles release during products’ life cycle in order to improve the knowledge in nanomaterials risk assessment and the legislation, and to inform customers about the safety of nanomaterials and nanoproducts. This work aims to propose a replicable method in order to assess the release of nanoparticles during the machining of nanocomposites in a controlled environment. For this purpose, a new experimental set-up was implemented and issues observed in previous methods (background noise due to uncontrolled ambient environment and the process itself, unrepeatable machining parameters) were solved. A characterisation and validation of the chamber used is presented in this paper. Also, preliminary testing on drilling of polymer-based nanocomposites (Polyamide-6/Glass Fibre reinforced with nano-SiO2) manufactured by extrusion and injection moulding were achieved.

  5. Measurement of Nanoparticles Release during Drilling of Polymer Nanocomposites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gendre, L; Rodriguez, V Marchante; Abhyankar, H; Blackburn, K; Brighton, J L

    2015-01-01

    Nanomaterials are one of the promising technologies of this century. The Project on Emerging Nanotechnologies [1] reports more than 1600 consumer products based on nanotechnology that are currently on the market and advantages link to the reinforcement of polymeric materials using nano-fillers are not to demonstrate anymore. However, the concerns about safety and its consumer perception can slow down the acceptance of nanocomposites. Indeed, during its life-cycle, a nanotechnology-based product can release nano-sized particles exposing workers, consumers and environment and the risk involved in the use and disposal of such particles is not well known. The current legislation concerning chemicals and environment protection doesn't explicitly cover nanomaterials and changes undergone by nanoparticles during the products’ life cycle. Also, the possible physio-chemical changes that the nanoparticles may undergo during its life cycle are unknown. Industries need a standard method to evaluate nanoparticles release during products’ life cycle in order to improve the knowledge in nanomaterials risk assessment and the legislation, and to inform customers about the safety of nanomaterials and nanoproducts. This work aims to propose a replicable method in order to assess the release of nanoparticles during the machining of nanocomposites in a controlled environment. For this purpose, a new experimental set-up was implemented and issues observed in previous methods (background noise due to uncontrolled ambient environment and the process itself, unrepeatable machining parameters) were solved. A characterisation and validation of the chamber used is presented in this paper. Also, preliminary testing on drilling of polymer-based nanocomposites (Polyamide-6/Glass Fibre reinforced with nano-SiO 2 ) manufactured by extrusion and injection moulding were achieved. (paper)

  6. Implementation of improved underbalanced drilling in AbuDhabi onshore field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alhammadi, Adel Mohammed

    Abu Dhabi Company for Onshore Oil Operations (ADCO) is considering Underbalanced Drilling (UBD) as a means to develop lower permeability units in its fields. In addition to productivity and recovery gains, ADCO also expects reservoir characterization benefits from UBD. Reservoir screening studies were carried out on all of ADCO's reservoirs to determine their applicability for UBD. The primary business benefits of UBD were determined to be reservoir characterization, damage Mitigation, and rate of Penetration "ROP" Improvement. Apart from the primary benefits, some of the secondary benefits of UBD that were identified beforehand included rig performance. Since it's a trial wells, the challenge was to drill these wells safely, efficiently and of course meeting well objectives. Many operators worldwide drill these well in underbalanced mode but complete it overbalanced. In our case the plan was to drill and complete these wells in underbalanced condition. But we had to challenge most operators and come up with special and unique casing hanger design to ensure well control barriers exists while fishing the control line of the Downhole Deployment Valve "DDV". After intensive studies and planning, the hanger was designed as per our recommendations and found to be effective equipment that optimized the operational time and the cost as well. This report will provide better understanding of UBD technique in general and shade on the special designed casing hanger compared to conventional or what's most used worldwide. Even thought there were some issues while running the casing hanger prior drilling but managed to capture the learning's from each well and re-modified the hanger and come up with better deign for the future wells. Finally, the new design perform a good performance of saving the operation time and assisting the project to be done in a safe and an easy way without a major impact on the well cost. This design helped to drill and complete these wells safely with

  7. Effect of drilling fluids on permeability of uranium sandstone. Report of Investigations/1984

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahlness, J.K.; Johnson, D.I.; Tweeton, D.R.

    1984-01-01

    The Bureau of Mines conducted laboratory and field experiments to determine the amount of permeability reduction in uranium sandstone after its exposure to different drilling fluids. Seven polymer and two bentonite fluids were laboratory-tested in their clean condition, and six polymer fluids were tested with simulated drill cuttings added. Sandstone cores cut from samples collected at an open pit uranium mine were the test medium. The clean fluid that resulted in the least permeability reduction was an hydroxyethyl cellulose polymer fluid. The greatest permeability reduction of the clean polymers came from a shale-inhibiting synthetic polymer. Six polymer fluids were tested with simulated drill cuttings added to represent field use. The least permeability reduction was obtained from a multi-polymer blend fluid. A field experiment was performed to compare how two polymer fluids affect formation permeability when used for drilling in situ uranium leaching wells

  8. Delta flow: An accurate, reliable system for detecting kicks and loss of circulation during drilling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Speers, J.M.; Gehrig, G.F.

    1987-12-01

    A system to monitor drilling-fluid flow rate has been developed that detects kicks and lost returns in floating, fixed-platform, and land-base drilling operations. The system uses flowmeters that monitor the flow rates of drilling fluids entering the borehole through the standpipe and leaving the well through the return flowline. These readings are processed in a computer-based, data-acquisition system to form a filtered delta-flow signal that identified the occurrence of downhole fluid gains or losses. The system is designed to trip an alarm when a gain or loss exceeds 25 gal/min (1.6 dm/sup 3//s), even in a floating drilling environment. This sensitivity will generally keep gains or losses to less than 5 bbl (0.8 m/sup 3/).

  9. Research on high speed drilling technology and economic integration evaluation in Oilfield

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kun; Ni, Hongjian; Cheng, Na; Song, Jingbo

    2018-01-01

    The carbonate reservoir in the oilfield mainly formed in Ordovician System and Carboniferous System. The geology here is very complicated, with high heterogeneity. It gets much more difficult to control the well deflection in Permian system so that high accident ratio could be expected. The buried depth of the reservoir is large, normally 4600-6600m deep. The temperature of the layer is higher than 132 and the pressure is greater than 62MPa. The reservoir is with a high fluid properties, mainly including thin oil, heavy oil, condensate oil, gas and so on; the ground is very hard to drill, so we can foresee low drilling speed, long drilling period and high drilling cost, which will surely restrict the employing progress of the reservoir.

  10. Stimulation Technologies for Deep Well Completions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stephen Wolhart

    2005-06-30

    The Department of Energy (DOE) is sponsoring the Deep Trek Program targeted at improving the economics of drilling and completing deep gas wells. Under the DOE program, Pinnacle Technologies conducted a study to evaluate the stimulation of deep wells. The objective of the project was to review U.S. deep well drilling and stimulation activity, review rock mechanics and fracture growth in deep, high-pressure/temperature wells and evaluate stimulation technology in several key deep plays. This report documents results from this project.

  11. Recent developments in geothermal drilling fluids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kelsey, J.R.; Rand, P.B.; Nevins, M.J.; Clements, W.R.; Hilscher, L.W.; Remont, L.J.; Matula, G.W.; Bailey, D.N.

    1981-01-01

    Three recent development efforts are described, aimed at solving some of these drilling fluid problems. The Sandia aqueous foam studies are still in the laboratory phase; NL Baroid's polymeric deflocculant is being field tested; and the Mudtech high temperature mud was field tested several months ago. The aqueous foam studies are aimed at screening available surfactants for temperture and chemical stability. Approximately 100 surfactants have been tested at temperatures of 260/sup 0/C and 310/sup 0/C and several of these candidates appear very promising. A polymeric deflocculant was developed for water-based muds which shows promise in laboratory tests of retarding thermal degradation effects and associated gelation. Formulations containing this new polymer have shown good rheological properties up to 500/sup 0/F. A high temperature mud consisting primarily of sepiolite, bentonite, and brown coal has been developed. A field test of this mud was conducted in a geothermal well in the Imperial Valley of California in May of last year. The fluid exhibited good hole-cleaning characteristics and good rheological properties throughout the test. (MHR)

  12. Lateral Drilling and Completion Technologies for Shallow-Shelf Carbonates of the Red River and Ratcliffe Formations, Williston Basin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David Gibbons; Larry A. Carrell; Richard D. George

    1997-07-31

    Luff Exploration Company (LEC) focused on involvement in technologies being developed utilizing horizontal drilling concepts to enhance oil- well productivity starting in 1992. Initial efforts were directed toward high-pressure lateral jetting techniques to be applied in existing vertical wells. After involvement in several failed field attempts with jetting technologies, emphasis shifted to application of emerging technologies for drilling short-radius laterals in existing wellbores and medium-radius technologies in new wells. These lateral drilling technologies were applied in the Mississippi Ratcliffe and Ordovician Red River formations at depths of 2590 to 2890 m (8500 to 9500 ft) in Richland Co., MT; Bowman Co., ND; and Harding Co., SD.

  13. Investigation of Radon in drinking water from wells of the North-Eastern region of Bosnia and Herzegovina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adrovic, Feriz; Dedic, Amela

    2008-01-01

    Some areas of the Tuzla region (B and H) suffer heavily from the shortage of quality drinking water. The only real long-term water resource in this region is the Lake Modrac, the largest accumulation lake in Bosnia and Herzegovina. Due to the fact that radon is soluble in water it can be transported by water to long distances. In cases of intake of waters rich in radon the most affected are sensitive cells within the abdomen and other internal organs. In order to satisfy the needs for drinking water, people are forced to excavate and drill wells. In the area of Tuzla region and the entire B and H excavated wells are very frequent, and so are drilled wells lately, due to more developed and cheaper technology for soil drilling. Such activities in this area, and the whole of B and H, are carried out in an unorderly manner and without previously completed chemical and radiological analyses of soil and water samples. The University of Tuzla formed the Laboratory for detection of radon in all environments, and the survey displayed in this paper have been the first investigation of that kind in B and H. Here we presented the results of radon survey of drinking waters from excavated and drilled wells in the area of Tuzla region (North-Eastern region of B and H). The measurements were conducted over the period of one year (2006), so as to make possible monitoring of variations of radon concentrations in dependence of meteorological changes. These investigation works showed that radon concentration at most locations was significantly higher in drilled wells than in excavated wells. Mean values of radon concentration in the tested water samples ranged within the interval of 101-4200 Bq/m 3 . Radon activity concentration was measured with the Alpha GAURD radon system (Genitron instruments-Frankfurt). (author)

  14. Applicability of petroleum horizontal drilling technology to hazardous waste site characterization and remediation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goranson, C.

    1992-09-01

    Horizontal wells have the potential to become an important tool for use in characterization, remediation and monitoring operations at hazardous waste disposal, chemical manufacturing, refining and other sites where subsurface pollution may develop from operations or spills. Subsurface pollution of groundwater aquifers can occur at these sites by leakage of surface disposal ponds, surface storage tanks, underground storage tanks (UST), subsurface pipelines or leakage from surface operations. Characterization and remediation of aquifers at or near these sites requires drilling operations that are typically shallow, less than 500-feet in depth. Due to the shallow nature of polluted aquifers, waste site subsurface geologic formations frequently consist of unconsolidated materials. Fractured, jointed and/or layered high compressive strength formations or compacted caliche type formations can also be encountered. Some formations are unsaturated and have pore spaces that are only partially filled with water. Completely saturated underpressured aquifers may be encountered in areas where the static ground water levels are well below the ground surface. Each of these subsurface conditions can complicate the drilling and completion of wells needed for monitoring, characterization and remediation activities. This report describes some of the equipment that is available from petroleum drilling operations that has direct application to groundwater characterization and remediation activities. A brief discussion of petroleum directional and horizontal well drilling methodologies is given to allow the reader to gain an understanding of the equipment needed to drill and complete horizontal wells. Equipment used in river crossing drilling technology is also discussed. The final portion of this report is a description of the drilling equipment available and how it can be applied to groundwater characterization and remediation activities

  15. Structure optimization of a micro drill bit with nonlinear constraints considering the effects of eccentricity, gyroscopic moments, lateral and torsional vibrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Danh-Tuyen; Hoang, Tien-Dat; Lee, An-Chen

    2017-10-01

    A micro drill structure was optimized to give minimum lateral displacement at its drill tip, which plays an extremely important role on the quality of drilled holes. A drilling system includes a spindle, chuck and micro drill bit, which are modeled as rotating Timoshenko beam elements considering axial drilling force, torque, gyroscopic moments, eccentricity and bearing reaction force. Based on our previous work, the lateral vibration at the drill tip is evaluated. It is treated as an objective function in the optimization problem. Design variables are diameter and lengths of cylindrical and conical parts of the micro drill, along with nonlinear constraints on its mass and mass center location. Results showed that the lateral vibration was reduced by 15.83 % at a cutting speed of 70000 rpm as compared to that for a commercial UNION drill. Among the design variables, we found that the length of the conical part connecting to the drill shank plays the most important factor on the lateral vibration during cutting process.

  16. Cutting and drilling studies using high power visible lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kautz, D.D.; Dragon, E.P.; Werve, M.E.; Hargrove, R.S.; Warner, B.E.

    1993-01-01

    High power and radiance laser technologies developed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory such as copper-vapor and dye lasers show great promise for material processing tasks. Evaluation of models suggests significant increases in welding, cutting, and drilling capabilities, as well as applications in emerging technologies such as micromachining, surface treatment, and stereolithography. Copper lasers currently operate at 1.8 kW output at approximately three times the diffraction limit and achieve mean time between failures of more than 1,000 hours. Dye lasers have near diffraction limited beam quality at greater than 1.0 kW. Results from cutting and drilling studies in titanium and stainless steel alloys show that cuts and holes with extremely fine features can be made with dye and copper-vapor lasers. High radiance beams produce low distortion and small heat-affected zones. The authors have accomplished very high aspect ratios (> 60:1) and features with micron scale (5-50 μm) sizes. The paper gives a description of the equipment; discusses cutting theory; and gives experimental results of cutting and drilling studies on Ti-6Al-4V and 304 stainless steel

  17. Federal Environmental Regulations Impacting Hydrocarbon Exploration, Drilling, and Production Operations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carroll, Herbert B.; Johnson, William I.

    1999-04-27

    Waste handling and disposal from hydrocarbon exploration, drilling, and production are regulated by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) through federal and state regulations and/or through implementation of federal regulations. Some wastes generated in these operations are exempt under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) but are not exempt under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA), Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA), and other federal environmental laws. Exempt wastes remain exempt only if they are not mixed with hazardous wastes or hazardous substances. Once mixture occurs, the waste must be disposed as a hazardous material in an approved hazardous waste disposal facility. Before the Clean Air Act as amended in 1990, air emissions from production, storage, steam generation, and compression facilities associated with hydrocarbon exploration, drilling, and production industry were not regulated. A critical proposed regulatory change which will significantly effect Class II injection wells for disposal of produced brine and injection for enhanced oil recovery is imminent. Federal regulations affecting hydrocarbon exploration, drilling and production, proposed EPA regulatory changes, and a recent significant US Court of Appeals decision are covered in this report. It appears that this industry will, in the future, fall under more stringent environmental regulations leading to increased costs for operators.