WorldWideScience

Sample records for previous gastric surgery

  1. Pregnancy and perinatal outcomes according to surgery to conception interval and gestational weight gain in women with previous gastric bypass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laage Stentebjerg, Louise; Andersen, Lise Lotte Torvin; Renault, Kristina

    2017-01-01

    's recommendations for GWG. Secondary outcomes were birthweight, preterm delivery, cesarean section (CS), iron deficiency and post partum hemorrhage (PPH). RESULTS: Forty-three (61%) women conceived less than 18 months after gastric bypass surgery. Women in the late group had a significantly higher risk of requiring...

  2. Gastric and intestinal surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fossum, Theresa W; Hedlund, Cheryl S

    2003-09-01

    Gastric surgery is commonly performed to remove foreign bodies and correct gastric dilatation-volvulus and is less commonly performed to treat gastric ulceration or erosion, neoplasia, and benign gastric outflow obstruction. Intestinal surgery, although commonly performed by veterinarians, should never be considered routine. The most common procedures of the small intestinal tract performed in dogs and cats include enterotomy and resection/anastomosis. Surgery of the large intestine is indicated for lesions causing obstruction, perforations, colonic inertia, or chronic inflammation.

  3. Trashepatic left gastric vein embolization in the treatment of recurrent hemorrhaging in patients with schistosomiasis previously submitted to non-derivative surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Fernandes Saad

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: Non-derivative surgical techniques are the treatment of choice for the control of upper digestive tract hemorrhages after schistosomotic portal hypertension. However, recurrent hemorrhaging due to gastroesophagic varices is frequent. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the outcome of treatment based on embolization of the left gastric vein to control the reoccurrence of hemorrhages caused by gastroesophagic varices in patients with schistosomiasis previously submitted to non-derivative surgery. METHODS: Rates of reoccurrence of hemorrhages and the qualitative and quantitative reduction of gastroesophagic varices in patients undergoing transhepatic embolization of the left gastric vein between December 1999 and January 2009 were studied based on medical charts and follow-up reports. RESULTS: Seven patients with a mean age of 39.3 years underwent percutaneous transhepatic embolization of the left gastric vein. The mean time between azigoportal disconnections employed in combination with splenectomy and the percutaneous approach was 8.4 ± 7.3 years, and the number of episodes of digestive hemorrhaging ranged from 1 to 7 years. No episodes of reoccurrence of hemorrhaging were found during a follow-up period which ranged from 6 months to 7 years. Endoscopic postembolization studies revealed reductions in gastroesophagic varices in all patients compared to preembolization endoscopy. CONCLUSIONS: Percutaneous transhepatic embolization of the left gastric vein in patients with schistosomiasis previously submitted to surgery resulted in a decrease in gastroesophagic varices and was shown to be effective in controlling hemorrhage reoccurrence.

  4. Pregnancy and perinatal outcomes according to surgery to conception interval and gestational weight gain in women with previous gastric bypass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stentebjerg, Louise Laage; Andersen, Lise Lotte Torvin; Renault, Kristina; Støving, René Klinkby; Jensen, Dorte Møller

    2017-05-01

    To compare perinatal and pregnancy outcomes including adherence to the Institute of Medicine's (IOM) recommendations for gestational weight gain (GWG) in pregnant women with conception surgery. Women in the late group had a significantly higher risk of requiring CS or receiving intravenous iron supplementation compared to the early group (57% versus 30%, p = 0.03 and 29% versus 7%, p = 0.02, respectively). Early conception was not significantly associated with insufficient GWG, preterm delivery or birthweight. Among 54 women with information on GWG, only 13 (24%) had an appropriate GWG. The majority of pregnant women with gastric bypass did not fulfill guidelines for GWG; however, this study could not support the recommendation to postpone pregnancy.

  5. Gastric Sleeve Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... regular exercise has family members who will provide emotional and practical support (like driving to every doctor's visit or buying healthy food ) Preparing for Gastric Sleeve Surgery Preparing for this ...

  6. Gastric bypass surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Buchwald H, ed. Buchwald's Atlas of Metabolic and Bariatric Surgical Techniques and Procedures . Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2012:chap 5. Halperin F, Ding SA, Simonson DC, et al. Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery or lifestyle with intensive medical management in patients ...

  7. Gastric Bypass Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... gastrointestinal system Death (rare) Longer term risks and complications of weight-loss surgery vary depending on the type of surgery. They ... room, where medical staff monitors you for any complications. Your hospital stay may ... of bariatric surgery Each type of bariatric surgery has pros and ...

  8. Mortality from gastric cancer following gastric surgery for peptic ulcer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caygill, C P; Hill, M J; Kirkham, J S; Northfield, T C

    1986-04-26

    When compared with a matched population group, 4466 ulcer patients who had had gastric surgery between 1940 and 1960 showed no difference in the risk of death from gastric cancer in the first 20 years of follow-up but a 4.5-fold increase thereafter. In duodenal ulcer patients there was an initial decrease in risk followed by a 3.7-fold increase after 20 or more years. Since the initial decrease was seen only in the gastrectomy patients and not in those who had truncal vagotomy and drainage, it may have been due to the reduction in mucosal surface. The increased risk 20 years after duodenal ulcer surgery was greater in vagotomy patients than in gastrectomy patients. In gastric ulcer patients a 3.0-fold increase in risk for the first 20 years rose to a 5.5-fold increase thereafter. After 20 years, patients treated with the Bilroth II operation were at higher risk than those treated with Bilroth I, consistent with a role for bile reflux in gastric carcinogenesis. The finding that the risk differs according to original pathology and type of operation may explain the discrepancies between previous studies.

  9. Postprandial proximal gastric acid pocket and gastric pressure in patients after gastric surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Herbella, F. A. M. [UNIFESP; Vicentine, F. P. P. [UNIFESP; Del Grande, J. C. [UNIFESP; Patti, M. G.

    2011-01-01

    BackgroundAn unbuffered postprandial proximal gastric acid pocket (PPGAP) has been demonstrated in normal individuals (NI) and patients with gastro-esophageal reflux disease (GERD). the role of gastric anatomy and gastric motility in the physiology of the PPGAP remains elusive. This study aims to analyze the correlation of PPGAP with proximal gastric pressure after gastric surgery.MethodsA total of 26 individuals were studied: eight patients after open Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) for morb...

  10. Redefining surgery for gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whiting, J. L.; Hallissey, M. T.; Rowlands, D. C.; Fielding, J. W. L.

    1999-12-01

    BACKGROUND: Despite encouraging retrospective and non-randomized trials, two large prospective, randomized trials of D1 vs D2 resections show double the mortality in the D2 group, with no increase in long-term survival. However, the D2 resection still offers the only hope of cure when N2 nodes are involved. We propose a reclassification of the International Union Against Cancer TNM "N" staging to a system with an anatomical basis that is useful in defining the surgery performed. Junctional nodes lying between the N1 and N2 tiers will act as a guide to surgery. Where these nodes are uninvolved, the probability of gastric bed (N2) involvement is low and the radical D2 dissection with its higher mortality and morbidity can be avoided.CONCLUSION: Such "stage-appropriate" surgery will reduce the number of D2 resections while ensuring that patients with N2 disease are not denied curative surgery. A prospective, randomized, controlled trial of targeted surgery is required.

  11. Robot-assisted surgery for gastric cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Procopiuc, Livia; Tudor, Ştefan; Mănuc, Mircea; Diculescu, Mircea; Vasilescu, Cătălin

    2016-01-01

    Minimally invasive surgery for gastric cancer is a relatively new research field, with convincing results mostly stemming from Asian countries. The use of the robotic surgery platform, thus far assessed as a safe procedure, which is also easier to learn, sets the background for a wider spread of minimally invasive technique in the treatment of gastric cancer. This review will cover the literature published so far, analyzing the pros and cons of robotic surgery and highlighting the remaining study questions. PMID:26798433

  12. Laparoscopic gastric surgery in an enhanced recovery programme

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grantcharov, T P; Kehlet, H

    2010-01-01

    Laparoscopy is associated with less pain and organ dysfunction than open surgery. Improved perioperative care (enhanced recovery programmes, fast-track methodology) has also led to reduced morbidity and a shorter hospital stay. The effects of a combination of laparoscopic resection and accelerated...... recovery have not been examined previously in the context of gastric surgery....

  13. Analgesic Treatment in Laparoscopic Gastric Bypass Surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Lars P H; Werner, Mads U; Rosenberg, Jacob

    2014-01-01

    This review aimed to present an overview of the randomized controlled trials investigating analgesic regimens used in laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (LRYGB) surgery. Literature search was performed in PubMed and EMBASE databases in August 2013 in accordance to PRISMA guidelines...... analgesic treatment in LRYGB surgery....

  14. Enhanced recovery after surgery in gastric resections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruna Esteban, Marcos; Vorwald, Peter; Ortega Lucea, Sonia; Ramírez Rodríguez, Jose Manuel

    2017-02-01

    Enhanced recovery after surgery is a modality of perioperative management with the purpose of improving results and providing a faster recovery of patients. This kind of protocol has been applied frequently in colorectal surgery, presenting less available experience and evidence in gastric surgery. According to the RICA guidelines published in 2015, a review of the bibliography and the consensus established in a multidisciplinary meeting in Zaragoza on the 9th of October 2015, we present a protocol that contains the basic procedures of fast-track for resective gastric surgery. The measures to be applied are divided in a preoperative, perioperative and postoperative stage. This document provides recommendations concerning the appropriate information, limited fasting and administration of carbohydrate drinks 2hours before surgery, specialized anesthetic strategies, minimal invasive surgery, no routine use of drainages and tubes, mobilization and early oral tolerance during the immediate postoperative period, as well as criteria for discharge. The application of a protocol of enhanced recovery after surgery in resective gastric surgery can improve and accelerate the functional recovery of our patients, requiring an appropriate multidisciplinary coordination, the evaluation of obtained results with the application of these measures and the investigation of controversial topics about which we currently have limited evidence. Copyright © 2016 AEC. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  15. Pregnancy outcomes after gastric-bypass surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dao, Tuoc; Kuhn, Joseph; Ehmer, Dale; Fisher, Tammy; McCarty, Todd

    2006-12-01

    The purpose of this study is to compare outcomes of patients who become pregnant within the first year after surgery and those who delayed pregnancy until after 1 year after surgery. A retrospective review was performed to identify patients who became pregnant after their gastric-bypass surgery from 2001 to 2004. Endpoints included pregnancy complications, fetal birth weight and outcome, delivery method, weight change during pregnancy, and nutrition. Of 2,423 patients who had undergone bariatric surgery from 2001 to 2004, 21 patients became pregnant within the first year after surgery and 13 became pregnant after 1 year. Similar outcomes were seen between the 2 groups regarding fetal weight, term pregnancy, and complications. Pregnancy outcomes within the first year after weight-loss surgery revealed no significant episodes of malnutrition, adverse fetal outcomes, or pregnancy complications. Anxiety over poor outcomes of pregnancy during the first year after bariatric surgery can be allayed.

  16. Gastric cancer surgery in elderly patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gretschel, Stephen; Estevez-Schwarz, Lope; Hünerbein, Michael; Schneider, Ulrike; Schlag, Peter M

    2006-08-01

    To investigate the value of individual risk-adapted therapy in geriatric patients, we performed a consecutive analysis of 363 patients undergoing potentially curative surgery for gastric cancer. All patients underwent extensive preoperative workup to assess surgical risk. The following criteria were evaluated in 3 age groups (75 years): comorbidity, tumor characteristics, type of resection, postoperative morbidity and mortality, recurrence rate, overall survival, and disease-free survival. There was an increased rate of comorbidity in the higher age groups (51% vs 76% vs 83%; PPatient selection and risk-adapted surgery in elderly patients can result in acceptable therapeutic results comparable to younger patients. Limited surgery in elderly gastric cancer patients with high comorbidity does not necessarily compromise oncological outcome.

  17. Minimal invasive gastric surgery: A systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirti Bushan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: As an alternate to open surgery, laparoscopic gastrectomy (LG is currently being performed in many centers, and has gained a wide clinical acceptance. The aim of this review article is to compare oncologic adequacy and safety of LG with open surgery for gastric adenocarcinomas with respect to lymphadenectomy, short-term outcomes (postoperative morbidity and mortality and long-term outcome (5 years overall survival and disease-free survival. Materials and Methods: PubMed was searched using query “LG” for literature published in English from January 2000 to April 2014. A total of 875 entries were retrieved. These articles were screened and 59 manuscripts ultimately formed the basis of current review. Results: There is high-quality evidence to support short-term efficacy, safety and feasibility of LG for gastric adenocarcinomas, although accounts on long-term survivals are still infrequent.

  18. Revisional Surgery Following Laparoscopic Gastric Plication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zerrweck, Carlos; Rodríguez, José G; Aramburo, Elmo; Vizcarra, Rafael; Rodríguez, José L; Solórzano, Andrea; Maydón, Hernán G; Sepúlveda, Elisa M

    2017-01-01

    The laparoscopic gastric plication (LGP) is a relative new bariatric procedure that has gained popularity over the last few years, but no real consensus exists and the evidence is unclear, especially in its real efficacy, safety, and durability. Retrospective study analyzing the records patients submitted to LGP between 2009 and 2010. The primary objective was to describe the characteristics and outcomes of patients submitted to revisional surgery. Baseline data and evolution were obtained and analyzed. Surgical analysis included revision cause, perioperative outcome, type of surgery, complications, and weight loss after 18 months. A comparison between gastric bypass and sleeve gastrectomy was performed. One hundred LGP were performed. After a mean time of 13.5 months, 42 patients presented an overall excess weight loss (EWL) surgery with BMI before conversion of 38.6 ± 4.2 kg/m 2 . There were 17 laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy (LSG) and 13 laparoscopic gastric bypass (LGBP) with comparable preoperative characteristics. The LSG group had lower pneumoperitoneum time and less hospital stay. At 18 months, the LGBP group had lower BMI (24.1 ± 1.1 vs. 25.8 ± 1.3 kg/m 2 for the LSG; p = 0.006) and higher %EWL (75.7 ± 16.1 vs. 61.4 ± 14.5 % for the LSG; p = 0.008). In our series, LGP presented a high failure rate and an increased number of symptomatic patients. Revisional surgery proved to be safe and effective. Revision to LSG was faster and had less hospital stay. Revision to LGBP showed better %EWL at 18 months.

  19. Outcomes From an Enhanced Recovery Program for Laparoscopic Gastric Surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wong-Chong, Nathalie; Kehlet, Henrik; Grantcharov, Teodor P

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: To examine the outcomes from an enhanced recovery after surgery (ERAS) program for laparoscopic gastric surgery. MATERIALS AND METHODS: This was a prospective study of patients undergoing elective laparoscopic gastric resection in an ERAS protocol at a single institution between 2008 and...

  20. Percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy following previous abdominal surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stellato, T A; Gauderer, M W; Ponsky, J L

    1984-01-01

    During a 36-month period, 89 patients have undergone percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy without mortality. Of these patients, 25 (13 infants and children, 12 adults) had prior abdominal procedures that increased their risk for the endoscopic procedure. With two exceptions, all gastrostomies were performed utilizing local anesthesia. There was one major complication, a gastrocolic fistula, which was successfully managed by repeating the endoscopic gastrostomy procedure at a location more cephalad in the stomach. Twenty-two of the gastrostomies were placed for feeding purposes and all of these patients were able to leave the hospital with alimentation accomplished via the tube. Three of the endoscopically placed gastrostomies were for gastrointestinal tract decompression. A total of 255 patient months have been accumulated in these patients with the endoscopically placed gastrostomy in situ. The technique can be safely performed in patients with prior abdominal surgery and in the majority of cases is the technique of choice for establishing a tube gastrostomy. PMID:6428334

  1. Changing Trends in Gastric Cancer Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    İlter Özer

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Gastric cancer is one of the most common causes of cancer-related death. It requires multimodal treatment and surgery is the most effective treatment modality. Radical surgery includes total or subtotal gastrectomy with lymph node dissection. The extent of lymphadenectomy still remains controversial. Eastern surgeons have performed D2 or more extended lymphadenectomy while their Western colleagues have performed more limited lymph node dissection. However, the trend has been changing in favour of D2 lymph node dissection in both hemispheres. Currently, D2 is the recommended type of lymphadenectomy in experienced centres in the west. In Japan, D2 lymph node dissection is the standard surgical approach. More extensive lymphadenectomy than D2 has not been found to be associated with improved survival and generally is not performed. Bursectomy and splenectomy are additional controversial issues in surgical performance, and trends regarding them will be discussed. The performance of bursectomy is controversial and there is no clear evidence of its clinical benefit. However, a trend toward better survival in patients with serosal invasion has been reported. Routine splenectomy as a part of lymph node dissection has largely been abandoned, although splenectomy is recommended in selected cases. Minimally invasive surgery has gained wide popularity and indications for minimally invasive procedures have been expanding due to increasing experience and improving technology. Neoadjuvant therapy has been shown to have beneficial effects and seems necessary to provide a survival benefit. Diagnostic laparoscopy should be kept in mind prior to treatment

  2. Current status of robot-assisted gastric surgery

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    Baek, Se-Jin; Lee, Dong-Woo; Park, Sung-Soo; Kim, Seon-Hahn

    2011-01-01

    In an effort to minimize the limitations of laparoscopy, a robotic surgery system was introduced, but its role for gastric cancer is still unclear. The objective of this article is to assess the current status of robotic surgery for gastric cancer and to predict future prospects. Although the current study was limited by its small number of patients and retrospective nature, robot-assisted gastrectomy with lymphadenectomy for the treatment of gastric cancer is a feasible and safe procedure for experienced laparoscopic surgeons. Most studies have reported satisfactory results for postoperative short-term coutcomes, such as: postoperative oral feeding, gas out, hospital stay and complications, compared with laparoscopic surgery; the difference is a longer operation time. However, robotic surgery showed a shallow learning curve compared with the familarity of conventional open surgery; after the accumulation of several cases, robotic surgery could be expected to result in a similar operation time. Robotic-assisted gastrectomy can expand the indications of minimally invasive surgery to include advanced gastric cancer by improving the ability to perform lymphadenectomy. Moreover, ”total” robotic gastrectomy can be facilitated using a robot-sewing technique and gastric submucosal tumors near the gastroesophageal junction or pylorus can be resected safely by this novel technique. In conclusion, robot-assisted gastrectomy may offer a good alternative to conventional open or laparoscopic surgery for gastric cancer, provided that long-term oncologic outcomes can be confirmed. PMID:22046490

  3. [Influence of previous abdominopelvic surgery on gynecological laparoscopic operation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Haoran; Shi, Wei; Zhou, Yingfang; Wu, Beisheng; Peng, Chao

    2014-09-01

    To investigate the influence of previous abdominopelvic surgery on gynecological laparoscopic operation. A retrospective analysis of 3 283 cases of gynecological diseases by laparoscopic operation patients in Peking University First Hospital from 2007 January to 2012 December, among them, 719 (21.90%) patients with previous abdominopelvic surgery history (study Group), 2 564 (78.10%)patients have no history of abdominopelvic surgery (control group). Study group 719 patients, previous operation times: one time in 525 cases, 194 cases were multiple; previous operation: 185 cases of gynecological surgery, 305 cases of obstetric surgery, 108 cases of general surgery, and 121 complex surgery (include at least two kinds of surgery); previous operative approach: 650 cases laparotomy and 69 cases laparoscopy. Compared two groups of patients with abdominopelvic adhesion and the gynecologic laparoscopic operation situation, analyzed the influence of previous abdominopelvic surgery on abdominopelvic adhesion on and gynecological laparoscopic operation. The incidence of abdominopelvic adhesion in the patients with previous abdominopelvic surgery was 51.2% (368/719), which was significantly higher than that of 8.2% (211/2 564)in patients without previous abdominopelvic surgery (P surgery (23.1%, 166/719) was significantly higher than that in the control group (3.3% , 85/2 564;P laparotomy was 0.6% (4/719) significantly more than the control groups (0.1%, 2/2 564; P = 0.023). Compared with other groups, patients with gynecological or complex surgery or multiple operation history presented more severe abdominopelvic adhesion both in the score and degree (P laparotomy showed no statistical difference between the two groups (P > 0.05). The laparoscopic operation could be carried out successfully and safely in patients with a history of various abdominopelvic operations, but the conversion rate increases, for patients with a history of multiple operation because of pelvic adhesion

  4. Esophageal replacement by gastric tube: is three-stage surgery ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    useful alternative under a resource-limited condition, with optimal outcome. Ann Pediatr Surg 10:7–9 c 2014 Annals of Pediatric Surgery. Annals of Pediatric Surgery 2014, 10:7–9. Keywords: esophageal replacement, gastric tube, long gap esophageal atresia, pure esophageal atresia. Departments of aPediatric Surgery ...

  5. Influence of obesity and bariatric surgery on gastric cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dantas, Anna Carolina Batista; Santo, Marco Aurelio; Cleva, Roberto de; Sallum, Rubens Antônio Aissar; Cecconello, Ivan

    2016-01-01

    Esophageal and gastric cancer (GC) are related to obesity and bariatric surgery. Risk factors, such as gastroesophageal reflux and Helicobacter pylori, must be investigated and treated in obese population. After surgery, GC reports are anecdotal and treatment is not standardized. This review aims to discuss GC related to obesity before and after bariatric surgery

  6. Reemergence of pica following gastric bypass surgery for obesity: a new presentation of an old problem.

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    Kushner, Robert F; Gleason, Briana; Shanta-Retelny, Victoria

    2004-09-01

    Abstract Pica, the compulsive ingestion of nonnutritive substances, has been a fascinating and poorly understood phenomenon for centuries. Pagophagia, or ice eating, is one of the most common forms of pica and is closely associated with the development of iron-deficiency anemia. Although this condition has been well described among pregnant women and malnourished children, particularly in developing countries, it has not been previously reported to occur following gastric bypass surgery for treatment of severe obesity. This article presents two cases of women who experienced a recurrence of pagophagia following gastric bypass surgery, along with an updated review of the literature.

  7. Inflammatory response in laparoscopic vs. open surgery for gastric cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Okholm, Cecilie; Goetze, Jens Peter; Svendsen, Lars Bo

    2014-01-01

    lead to an increased susceptibility to complications and morbidity. The aim of this review was to investigate if laparoscopic surgery reduces the immunological response compared to open surgery in gastric cancer. METHODS: We conducted a literature search identifying relevant studies comparing......OBJECTIVE: Laparoscopic surgery may offer advantages compared to open surgery, such as earlier mobilization, less pain and lower post-surgical morbidity. Surgical stress is thought to be associated with the postoperative immunological changes in the body as an impaired immune function, which may...... laparoscopy or laparoscopic-assisted surgery with open gastric surgery. The main outcome was postoperative immunological status defined as surgical stress parameters, including inflammatory cytokines and blood parameters. RESULTS: We identified seven studies that addressed the immunological status in patients...

  8. Crohn’s disease after gastric bypass surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Janczewska, Izabella; Nekzada, Qayium; Kapraali, Marjo

    2011-01-01

    Bariatric surgery for the treatment of severe obesity has increased dramatically in recent years in the USA and parts of Western Europe. The most commonly used technique is the Roux-en Y gastric bypass (RYGBP). Several nutritional and gastrointestinal complications after bariatric surgery have been described during the last 10 years. The authors present two patients with diarrhoea and malnutrition; one after RYGBP and the other after jejunoileal bypass surgery. These patients were subsequentl...

  9. Nutritional Status of Children from Women with Previously Bariatric Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gimenes, Jessica Cristina; Nicoletti, Carolina Ferreira; de Souza Pinhel, Marcela Augusta; Cortes-Oliveira, Cristiana; Salgado Júnior, Wilson; Nonino, Carla Barbosa

    2018-04-01

    Number of pregnancies has been increasing in women of childbearing age after the gastric bypass. The objective of this study was to evaluate the nutritional status of children of women submitted to gastric bypass. We evaluated anthropometric, breastfeeding and biochemical profile, body composition, and dietary intake indicators of children of both sexes who were born alive after the surgery. For statistical analysis, were performed Shapiro-Wilk and ANOVA test (p deficiency of iron and vitamin A. 7.6 and 30.7% of children presented carbohydrate and lipid, respectively, lower than the recommendation. Fiber intake was inadequate in all children, calcium in 61.5%, vitamin A in 30.7%, and folate in 76.9% of them. Also, 84.6% presented sodium intake higher than the recommendations. The blood glucose levels were lower in children with maternal breastfeeding (65.5 ± 2.1 mg/dL, p deficiency of iron and vitamin A and inadequate alimentary intake mainly of sodium and fibers. Breastfeeding may play a protective role in the development of obesity in these children.

  10. Suburethral sling procedures after previous surgery for urinary ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective. To compare the outcome of suburethral sling procedures (tension-free vaginal tape (TVT), obturator tape (Ob-tape)) for stress urinary incontinence (SUI) in women with previous surgery for SUI or pelvic organ prolapse (POP). Methods. A comparative, descriptive, retrospective study was done using information ...

  11. Gastric, pancreatic, and colorectal carcinogenesis following remote peptic ulcer surgery. Review of the literature with the emphasis on risk assessment and underlying mechanism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Offerhaus, G. J.; Tersmette, A. C.; Tersmette, K. W.; Tytgat, G. N.; Hoedemaeker, P. J.; Vandenbroucke, J. P.

    1988-01-01

    Based upon literature data, a 2-fold risk for gastric and colorectal cancer and a 2- to 5-fold risk for pancreatic cancer are predicted after remote peptic ulcer surgery. The association between previous ulcer surgery and subsequent gastric cancer appears firm; the linkage between colorectal and

  12. Your diet after gastric bypass surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and American Society for Metabolic & Bariatric Surgery medical guidelines for clinical practice for the perioperative nutritional, metabolic, and nonsurgical support of the bariatric surgery patient. Obesity (Silver Spring) . 2009;17 Suppl 1:S1- ...

  13. Effect of previous abdominal surgery on outcomes following laparoscopic colorectal surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Masashi; Okuda, Junji; Tanaka, Keitaro; Kondo, Keisaku; Asai, Keiko; Kayano, Hajime; Masubuchi, Shinsuke; Uchiyama, Kazuhisa

    2013-03-01

    The impact of previous abdominal surgeries on the need for conversion to open surgery and on short-term outcomes during/after laparoscopic colectomy was retrospectively investigated. This retrospective cohort study was conducted from December 1996 through December 2009. This study was conducted at Osaka Medical College Hospital. A total of 1701 consecutive patients who had undergone laparoscopic resection of the colon and rectum were classified as not having previous abdominal surgery (n = 1121) or as having previous abdominal surgery (n = 580). Short-term outcomes were recorded, and risk factors for conversion to open surgery were analyzed. There were no significant differences in operative time, blood loss, number of lymph nodes removed, or conversion rate between the groups. The rate of inadvertent enterotomy was significantly higher in the previous abdominal surgery group than in the not having previous abdominal surgery group (0.9% versus 0.1%; p = 0.03), and the postoperative recovery time was significantly longer in the previous abdominal surgery group than in the not having previous abdominal surgery group. Ileus was more frequent in the previous abdominal surgery group than in the not having previous abdominal surgery group (3.8% versus 2.1%; p = 0.04). Significant risk factors for conversion to open surgery were T stage ≥3 (OR, 2.81; 95% CI, 1.89-3.75), median incision (OR, 4.34; 95% CI, 1.23-9.41), upper median incision (OR, 2.78; 95% CI, 1.29-5.42), lower median incision (OR, 1.82; 95% CI, 1.09-3.12), and transverse colectomy (OR, 1.76; 95% CI, 1.29-2.41). The incidence of successfully completed laparoscopic colectomy after previous abdominal surgery remains high, and the short-term outcomes are acceptable.

  14. Radical Gastrectomy Combined with Modified Gastric Bypass Surgery for Gastric Cancer Patients with Type 2 Diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Tao; Xie, Guang-Wei; Tian, Qing-Zhong; Li, Jin

    2015-07-01

    The aim of the study is to explore the effectiveness of radical gastrectomy with modified gastric bypass surgery in treating gastric cancer patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). A total of 93 patients with gastric cancer and T2DM were treated in our hospital and enrolled in this study. Patients in group A (n = 30) had a body mass index (BMI) of >28 kg/m(2). Radical total gastrectomy and modified esophagojejunal Roux-en-y anastomosis were performed on 13 patients, and radical distal subtotal gastrectomy and gastric remnant jejunal Roux-en-y anastomosis were performed on 17 patients. The data from groups B, C, and D were derived from 63 patients with gastric cancer and diabetes who were admitted to our hospital from January 2005 to July 2012. All patients underwent radical gastrectomy (including 21 cases of gastric cancer surgery with Billroth I anastomosis, 25 cases of radical gastrectomy with Roux-en-Y anastomosis and BMI >28 kg/m(2), and 17 cases with BMI PBG), C-peptide (C-P), and glycosylated hemoglobin (HbAIC) data were collected before and 6 and 12 months after surgery. In groups A and D, BMI, FBG, 2 h PBG, C-P, and HbAIC at the 6th and 12th post-operative months were significantly lower than those before the surgery. In group B, BMI, FBG, 2 h PBG, C-P, and HbAIC at the 6th and 12th post-operative months did not decrease significantly, when compared with the pre-operative levels. In group C, BMI, FBG, 2 h PBG, C-P, and HbAIC at the 6th and 12th post-operative months decreased but showed no statistical significance. However, in comparison, groups A C showed significant differences after the surgeries. Radical gastrectomy combined with modified gastric bypass surgery is effective in treating patients with gastric cancer with type 2 diabetes, although this requires further investigation.

  15. HEART TRANSPLANTATION IN PATIENTS WITH PREVIOUS OPEN HEART SURGERY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Sh. Saitgareev

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Heart Transplantation (HTx to date remains the most effective and radical method of treatment of patients with end-stage heart failure. The defi cit of donor hearts is forcing to resort increasingly to the use of different longterm mechanical circulatory support systems, including as a «bridge» to the follow-up HTx. According to the ISHLT Registry the number of recipients underwent cardiopulmonary bypass surgery increased from 40% in the period from 2004 to 2008 to 49.6% for the period from 2009 to 2015. HTx performed in repeated patients, on the one hand, involves considerable technical diffi culties and high risks; on the other hand, there is often no alternative medical intervention to HTx, and if not dictated by absolute contradictions the denial of the surgery is equivalent to 100% mortality. This review summarizes the results of a number of published studies aimed at understanding the immediate and late results of HTx in patients, previously underwent open heart surgery. The effect of resternotomy during HTx and that of the specifi c features associated with its implementation in recipients previously operated on open heart, and its effects on the immediate and long-term survival were considered in this review. Results of studies analyzing the risk factors for perioperative complications in repeated recipients were also demonstrated. Separately, HTx risks after implantation of prolonged mechanical circulatory support systems were examined. The literature does not allow to clearly defi ning the impact factor of earlier performed open heart surgery on the course of perioperative period and on the prognosis of survival in recipients who underwent HTx. On the other hand, subject to the regular fl ow of HTx and the perioperative period the risks in this clinical situation are justifi ed as a long-term prognosis of recipients previously conducted open heart surgery and are comparable to those of patients who underwent primary HTx. Studies

  16. The Patient Journey to Gastric Band Surgery: A Qualitative Exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulford, Amanda; Mahon, David; Ferguson, Yasmin; Lewis, Michael PN

    2013-01-01

    Aims This study explored the views and experiences of obese people preparing to undergo laparoscopic gastric banding (LAGB) leading up to the time of surgery. Background Weight loss surgery (WLS) is the most successful intervention available for the treatment of morbid obesity, and LAGB is among the most commonly used procedures in bariatric surgery. So far, the patient experience of deciding to undergo LAGB has been explored rarely and predominantly retrospectively. Design Semi-structured interviews took place with 23 patients about to undergo LAGB between June 2011 and March 2012. Data were analyzed using thematic analysis. Demographic and quality of life data situated the sample within the LAGB patient population. Results Three overarching themes were described. Participants were “living with obesity,” including the physical, social, and psychological challenges and consequences of being obese. These created in them a “desire to change,” expressed in multiple unsuccessful attempts to lose weight, and a quest for information, finally focusing on WLS. Eventually, “expectations toward LAGB” were formed, mainly to hand back a measure of control that enabled them to achieve, as well as ultimately to maintain, weight loss. This active process resulted in the patients' decision to undergo LAGB. When combined, these themes outline a distinct patient journey toward gastric banding. Conclusion Knowledge of the patient journey can inform both selection and care of patients awaiting gastric band surgery and is required by all health professionals working with this patient group. PMID:24761368

  17. Reconstruction of short bowel syndrome after internal hernia in a pregnant woman with previous bariatric surgery ?

    OpenAIRE

    Borghede, M?rta Kristina; Vinter-Jensen, Lars; Andersen, Jens Christian; Mortensen, Peter Br?ndum; Rasmussen, Henrik H?jgaard

    2013-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Bariatric surgery is most often performed with the laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass. A complication to the laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass is internal hernia, which occurs in up to 16% of the patients. Since the laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass is performed in women of fertile age, internal hernia may occur during pregnancy. PRESENTATION OF CASE A 22-year old woman with a history of laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass suffered from massive internal hernia during...

  18. Autopsy findings following gastric bypass surgery for morbid obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melinek, Judy; Livingston, Edward; Cortina, Galen; Fishbein, Michael C

    2002-09-01

    Roux-en-Y gastric bypass, currently the most frequently performed surgical procedure for morbid obesity, has a low but significant mortality rate. There are limited data documenting the findings at necropsy in patients who have died following this procedure. To determine cause of death and pathologic processes present in obese subjects dying after gastric bypass surgery. We studied 10 patients who underwent autopsy following gastric bypass surgery for morbid obesity between the years 1994 and 2000. There were 6 men and 4 women. The mean age of the patients was 48 years (range, 28-62 years). The mean preoperative weight was 162 kg (range, 112-245 kg), and the mean body mass index was 54 kg/m(2) (range, 39-76 kg/m(2)), similar to all patients undergoing gastric bypass at our institution during the same period. Five deaths were directly attributable to technical complications. Five deaths were attributed to underlying comorbid conditions. One patient died of cirrhosis and one of pulmonary hemorrhage. Three patients died from pulmonary embolism. However, 8 of 10 patients had microscopic evidence of pulmonary emboli, despite prophylaxis for deep vein thrombosis. Most patients had some degree of steatohepatitis and hepatic fibrosis (80% and 70%, respectively). There were no deaths from primary cardiac events. In patients who die after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass, half die due to technical complications, whereas the other half die of complications of their obesity. Clinically, only 20% of patients were suspected to have pulmonary emboli, yet at autopsy, 80% of patients had pulmonary emboli. In morbidly obese patients undergoing Roux-en-Y gastric bypass, there is an unexpectedly high rate of clinically silent pulmonary emboli contributing to morbidity and mortality.

  19. Trashepatic left gastric vein embolization in the treatment of recurrent hemorrhaging in patients with schistosomiasis previously submitted to non-derivative surgery Embolização transhepática da veia gástrica esquerda no tratamento da recidiva hemorrágica em esquistossomóticos submetidos previamente a cirurgia não derivativa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Fernandes Saad

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: Non-derivative surgical techniques are the treatment of choice for the control of upper digestive tract hemorrhages after schistosomotic portal hypertension. However, recurrent hemorrhaging due to gastroesophagic varices is frequent. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the outcome of treatment based on embolization of the left gastric vein to control the reoccurrence of hemorrhages caused by gastroesophagic varices in patients with schistosomiasis previously submitted to non-derivative surgery. METHODS: Rates of reoccurrence of hemorrhages and the qualitative and quantitative reduction of gastroesophagic varices in patients undergoing transhepatic embolization of the left gastric vein between December 1999 and January 2009 were studied based on medical charts and follow-up reports. RESULTS: Seven patients with a mean age of 39.3 years underwent percutaneous transhepatic embolization of the left gastric vein. The mean time between azigoportal disconnections employed in combination with splenectomy and the percutaneous approach was 8.4 ± 7.3 years, and the number of episodes of digestive hemorrhaging ranged from 1 to 7 years. No episodes of reoccurrence of hemorrhaging were found during a follow-up period which ranged from 6 months to 7 years. Endoscopic postembolization studies revealed reductions in gastroesophagic varices in all patients compared to preembolization endoscopy. CONCLUSIONS: Percutaneous transhepatic embolization of the left gastric vein in patients with schistosomiasis previously submitted to surgery resulted in a decrease in gastroesophagic varices and was shown to be effective in controlling hemorrhage reoccurrence.INTRODUÇÃO: A cirurgia por técnicas não derivativas é o tratamento de escolha para o controle da hemorragia digestiva alta secundária à hipertensão portal esquistossomótica. Contudo, a recidiva hemorrágica em decorrência das varizes gastroesofágicas é um evento frequente. O programa de erradicação endosc

  20. [Outcome of gastric bypass surgery in Iceland 2001-2015].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorarinsdottir, Rosamunda; Palmason, Vilhjalmur; Leifsson, Bjorn Geir; Gislason, Hjortur

    2016-01-01

    Laparoscopic roux-en-y gastric bypass (LRYGB) has been performed at Landspitali University Hospital (LSH) since 2001. The procedure represents an important treatment option for morbidly obese patients. The aim of this study is to evaluate the long-term results of these operations in Iceland. All 772 consecutive patients undergoing LRYGB at LSH during 2001-2015 were included. Information was collected from a prospective database. Successful weight loss was defined as body mass index (BMI) less than 33 kg/m2 or excess body mass index loss (EBMIL) more than 50%. Mean age of patients was 41 years and 83% were females. Mean pre-operative weight was 127 kg (±20) and mean BMI was 44 (±6). Mean %EBMIL was 80% after 1.5 year, 70% after 5 years and 64% after 10-13 years. 85% of patients had successful weight loss with a mean follow-up time of 7.4 years. Pre-operatively patients on average had 2.8 obesity related comorbid diseases. 71% of patients with type 2 diabetes were in full remission after surgery. One third of patients with hypertension and one third of patients with hyperlipidemia achieved full remission after surgery. 37 patients (5%) had an early complication and 174 (25%) had a late complication that frequently needed surgical solution. Most patients (78%) needed repeated adjustment of vitamins and minerals often many years after surgery. Majority of patients achieved a successful weight loss and most obesity related comorbidities are still in remission 7.4 years after surgery. Early complications were rare but one fourth of patients had late complications. Life long follow-up is of utmost importance after gastric bypass surgery. Key words: gastric bypass surgery in Iceland 2001-2015. Correspondence: Hjörtur Gíslason, hjorturg@landspitali.is.

  1. Changing tastes: learning hunger and fullness after gastric bypass surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillersdal, Line; Christensen, Bodil J; Holm, Lotte

    2017-03-01

    Gastric bypass surgery is a specific medical technology that alters the body in ways that force patients to fundamentally change their eating habits. When patients enrol for surgery, they enter a learning process, encountering new and at times contested ways of sensing their bodies, tasting, and experiencing hunger and fullness. In this paper, we explore how patients begin to eat again after gastric bypass surgery. The empirical data used here are drawn from a Danish fieldwork study of individuals undergoing obesity surgery. The material presented shows how the patients used instructions on how to eat. We explore the ways in which diverse new experiences and practices of hunger and fullness are part of the process of undergoing surgery for severe obesity. New sensory experiences lead to uncertainty; as a result, patients practice what we term mimetic eating, which reflects a 'sensory displacement' and hence a rupture in the person's sense of self and social relations. We suggest that eating should be conceptualised as a practice that extends beyond the boundaries of our bodies and into diverse realms of relations and practices, and that changing the way we eat also changes the fundamentally embodied experience of who we are. © 2016 Foundation for the Sociology of Health & Illness.

  2. STRESS-RESPONSE TO RADICAL SURGERIES FOR GASTRIC CANCER

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    S. V. Avdeev

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the study was to evaluate the anesthetic effect of the combination of xenon and dexmedetomidine during surgery for gastric cancer. Material and methods. The prospective randomized study included 53 patients with operable II–III stage gastric cancer. The age range was from 26 to 75 years. The patients underwent gastrectomy (n=21 and subtotal distal gastrectomy (n=32. The study group comprised 27 patients who received anesthesia with xenon and dexmedetomidine combined with epidural analgesia. The control group consisted of 26 patients who received anesthesia with sevoflurane in combination with epidural analgesia. Intraoperative patient monitoring was performed according to Harvard intraoperative monitoring standards. Plasma levels of ACTH, STH cortisole, IL-1β, IL-6, and CRP as well as cytokine profile were used to evaluate the effect of two anesthetic methods. Results. In the perioperative period, the combination of xenon and dexmedetomidine in combination with epidural analgesia was characterized by significant inhibition of systemic inflammatory reactions and a lower release of stress hormones as components of a surgical stress response expressed by a lower level of pro-inflammatory cytokines and somatotropic hormone. The frequency of postoperative inflammatory complications was lower in the xenon group than in the control group. Conclusion. The use of the combination of xenon and dexmedetomidine during surgery for gastric cancer provides a more adequate course of the perioperative period. 

  3. Robotic Gastric Bypass Surgery in the Swiss Health Care System: Analysis of Hospital Costs and Reimbursement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagen, Monika E; Rohner, Peter; Jung, Minoa K; Amirghasemi, Nicolas; Buchs, Nicolas C; Fakhro, Jassim; Buehler, Leo; Morel, Philippe

    2017-08-01

    Robotic technology shows some promising early outcomes indicating potentially improved outcomes particularly for challenging bariatric procedures. Still, health care providers face significant clinical and economic challenges when introducing innovations. Prospectively derived administrative cost data of patients who were coded with a primary diagnosis of obesity (ICD-10 code E.66.X), a procedure of gastric bypass surgery (CHOP code 44.3), and a robotic identifier (CHOP codes 00.90.50 or 00.39) during the years 2012 to 2015 was analyzed and compared to the triggered reimbursement for this patient cohort. A total of 348 patients were identified. The mean number of diagnoses was 2.7 and the mean length of stay was 5.9 days. The overall mean cost per patients was Swiss Francs (CHF) from 2012 to 2014 that was 21,527, with a mean reimbursement of CHF 24,917. Cost of the surgery in 2015 was comparable to the previous years with CHF 22,550.0 (p = 0.6618), but reimbursement decreased significantly to CHF 20,499.0 (0.0001). The average cost for robotic gastric bypass surgery fell well below the average reimbursement within the Swiss DRG system between 2012 and 2014, and this robotic procedure was a DRG winner for that period. However, the Swiss DRG system has matured over the years with a significant decrease resulting in a deficit for robotic gastric bypass surgery in 2015. This stipulates a discussion as to how health care providers should continue offering robotic gastric bypass surgery, particularly in the light of developing clinical evidence.

  4. Fracture Risk After Bariatric Surgery: Roux-en-Y Gastric Bypass Versus Adjustable Gastric Banding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Elaine W; Lee, Moa P; Landon, Joan E; Lindeman, Katherine G; Kim, Seoyoung C

    2017-06-01

    The long-term consequences of bariatric surgery on fracture risk are unclear but are likely to vary by procedure type. In physiologic studies, Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) and adjustable gastric banding (AGB) have differential effects on rates of bone loss. Therefore, our objective was to compare fracture risk in obese adults after RYGB and AGB procedures. Using claims data from a US commercial health plan, we analyzed rates of nonvertebral fractures within a propensity score-matched cohort (n = 15,032) of morbidly obese adults who received either RYGB or AGB surgery between 2005 and 2013. A total of 281 nonvertebral fractures occurred during a mean follow-up time of 2.3 ± 1.9 years. RYGB patients had an increased risk of nonvertebral fracture (hazard ratio [HR] = 1.43, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.13-1.81) compared with AGB patients. In fracture site-specific analyses, RYGB patients had increased risk of fracture at the hip (HR = 1.54, 95% CI 1.03-2.30) and wrist (HR = 1.45, 95% CI 1.01-2.07). Nonvertebral fracture risk associated with RYGB manifested >2 years after surgery and increased in subsequent years, with the highest risk in the fifth year after surgery (HR = 3.91, 95% CI 1.58-9.64). In summary, RYGB is associated with a 43% increased risk of nonvertebral fracture compared with AGB, with risk increasing >2 years after surgery. Fracture risk should be considered in risk/benefit discussions of bariatric surgery, particularly among patients with high baseline risk of osteoporosis who are deciding between RYGB and AGB procedures. © 2017 American Society for Bone and Mineral Research. © 2017 American Society for Bone and Mineral Research.

  5. [Clinicopathological Study of Perforated Gastric Cancer Treated with Surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishiguro, Toru; Fukuchi, Minoru; Kumagai, Youichi; Ishibashi, Keiichiro; Mochiki, Erito; Ishida, Hideyuki

    2018-02-01

    This retrospective study evaluated an appropriate surgical treatment in patients with perforated gastric cancer. The clinicopathological and survival data on 17 perforated gastric cancer patients treated with surgery were analyzed. The one-stage or two-stage gastrectomy was performed in 8 and 5 patients, respectively. The omental patch repair was performed in 4 patients. In univariate analysis, non-curative(R2)resection with gross residual tumor(p<0.01)and postoperative complications( p=0.01)were found to be significant unfavorable factors for overall survival(OS). In multivariate analysis, R2 resection was identified to be an only independent significant unfavorable factor for OS. Patients who underwent curative(R0) resection had long-term survival, while patients with R2 resection and postoperative complication had limited survival times. These results suggest that R0 resection may be optimal to improve survival in patients with perforated gastric cancer, regardless of whether patients underwent a one-stage or two-stage gastrectomy based on the patient's condition.

  6. Intussusception after Laparoscopic Gastric Bypass Surgery: An Underrecognized Complication

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    Smit Singla

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Intussusception after bariatric surgery is an uncommon complication that is now being frequently reported. Most people consider dysmotility to be the causative mechanism in the absence of obvious etiology. Material and Methods. A worldwide search identified literature describing intussusception after bariatric surgery. We also included our own patients and analyzed information regarding demographic profile, risk factors, presentation, diagnosis, and post treatment course. Results. Seventy one patients were identified between 1991 and 2011. Majority of the affected patients were females (=70, 98.6%; median time to presentation after gastric bypass surgery was 36 months. Most patients presented with abdominal pain, nausea and vomiting, but without obvious peritonitis. Sixty eight patients (96% required surgery; 48 (70.6% underwent revision of anastomosis, 16 (23.5% had reduction without resection, while 4 patients (5.9% had plication only. Amongst these, most patients (=51, 75% were found to have retrograde intussusception. Post-operatively, 9 patients presented with recurrence (range, 0.5–32 months. Five patients, who had earlier been treated without resection, eventually required revision of the anastomosis. There was no mortality noted. Conclusion. Intussusception after bariatric surgery is uncommon and its diagnosis is based on a combination of physicial, radiological and operative findings. An early surgical intervention reduces morbidity and prevents recurrence.

  7. Reconstruction of short bowel syndrome after internal hernia in a pregnant woman with previous bariatric surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borghede, Märta Kristina; Vinter-Jensen, Lars; Andersen, Jens Christian; Mortensen, Peter Brøndum; Rasmussen, Henrik Højgaard

    2013-01-01

    Bariatric surgery is most often performed with the laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass. A complication to the laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass is internal hernia, which occurs in up to 16% of the patients. Since the laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass is performed in women of fertile age, internal hernia may occur during pregnancy. A 22-year old woman with a history of laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass suffered from massive internal hernia during pregnancy with widespread bowel necrosis. Extensive surgery was performed leaving the patient with an intact duodenum, 15cm of jejunum, 35cm of ileum and colon. Parenteral nutrition was initiated and ten months after the internal hernia, intestinal continuity was re-established. Ten weeks later the patient reached parenteral nutrition independence. Internal hernia after laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass can be difficult to diagnose, especially during pregnancy and might be severe and life threatening for both mother and child. Obstetricians and abdominal surgeons must be aware of this condition. Surgery should be performed on a wide indication. When bowel necrosis is found it should be resected and in case of extensive bowel resection the patient should be evaluated in centres specialized in intestinal failure. Copyright © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  8. Association between previous splenectomy and gastric dilatation-volvulus in dogs: 453 cases (2004-2009).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sartor, Angela J; Bentley, Adrienne M; Brown, Dorothy C

    2013-05-15

    To evaluate the association between previous splenectomy and gastric dilatation-volvulus (GDV) in dogs. Multi-institutional retrospective case-control study. Animals-151 dogs treated surgically for GDV and 302 control dogs with no history of GDV. Computerized records of dogs evaluated via exploratory laparotomy or abdominal ultrasonography were searched, and dogs with GDV and dogs without GDV (control dogs) were identified. Two control dogs were matched with respect to age, body weight, sex, neuter status, and breed to each dog with GDV. Data were collected on the presence or absence of the spleen for both dogs with GDV and control dogs. Conditional logistic regression analysis was used to investigate the association of previous splenectomy with GDV. 6 (4%) dogs in the GDV group and 3 (1%) dogs in the control group had a history of previous splenectomy. The odds of GDV in dogs with a history of previous splenectomy in this population of dogs were 5.3 times those of dogs without a history of previous splenectomy (95% confidence interval, 1.1 to 26.8). For the patients in the present study, there was an increased odds of GDV in dogs with a history of splenectomy. Prophylactic gastropexy may be considered in dogs undergoing a splenectomy, particularly if other risk factors for GDV are present.

  9. Laparoscopic revisional surgery after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass and sleeve gastrectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales, Mario P; Wheeler, Andrew A; Ramaswamy, Archana; Scott, J Stephen; de la Torre, Roger A

    2010-01-01

    Failure of primary bariatric surgery is frequently due to weight recidivism, intractable gastric reflux, gastrojejunal strictures, fistulas, and malnutrition. Of these patients, 10-60% will undergo reoperative bariatric surgery, depending on the primary procedure performed. Open reoperative approaches for revision to Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) have traditionally been advocated secondary to the perceived difficulty and safety with laparoscopic techniques. Few studies have addressed revisions after RYGB. The aim of the present study was to provide our experience regarding the safety, efficacy, and weight loss results of laparoscopic revisional surgery after previous RYGB and sleeve gastrectomy procedures. A retrospective analysis of patients who underwent laparoscopic revisional bariatric surgery for complications after previous RYGB and sleeve gastrectomy from November 2005 to May 2007 was performed. Technical revisions included isolation and transection of gastrogastric fistulas with partial gastrectomy, sleeve gastrectomy conversion to RYGB, and revision of RYGB. The data collected included the pre- and postoperative body mass index, operative time, blood loss, length of hospital stay, and intraoperative and postoperative complications. A total of 26 patients underwent laparoscopic revisional surgery. The primary operations had consisted of RYGB and sleeve gastrectomy. The complications from primary operations included gastrogastric fistulas, refractory gastroesophageal reflux disease, weight recidivism, and gastric outlet obstruction. The mean prerevision body mass index was 42 ± 10 kg/m(2). The average follow-up was 240 days (range 11-476). The average body mass index during follow-up was 37 ± 8 kg/m(2). Laparoscopic revision was successful in all but 1 patient, who required conversion to laparotomy for staple line leak. The average operating room time and estimated blood loss was 131 ± 66 minutes and 70 mL, respectively. The average hospital stay was 6

  10. Endoscopic gastric pouch plication – a novel endoluminal incision free approach to revisional bariatric surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Virk CS

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available 10-40% of Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB patients regain significant weight after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery due to dilation of the pouch and/or the gastrojejunal (GJ anastomosis. Traditional revision surgery is associated with significant morbidity (e.g. post-anastomotic GJ leak where less invasive endoluminal procedures may represent safer alternatives. The present article reports a case of the safe and successful use of endoluminal gastric pouch plication (EGPP using the StomaphyX™ device to correct both a dilated gastric pouch and a dilated gastrojejunostomy in a post-RYGB patient who regained significant weight.

  11. Pregnancy following gastric bypass surgery (Roux-en-Y) for morbid obesity

    OpenAIRE

    Anasiudu, R; Gajjar, K; Osoba, O; Soliman, N

    2011-01-01

    Morbidly obese women are at increased risk of obstetric complications and poor neonatal outcomes. Gastric bypass surgery is being performed with increased frequency in reproductive-aged women to treat morbid obesity. Both maternal and fetal complications have been reported in women who underwent gastric bypass surgery. Current recommendations advise delaying pregnancy for at least 1 year following bariatric surgery. This guideline is meant to discourage women from becoming pregnant during the...

  12. Does gastric bypass surgery change body weight set point?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Z; Mumphrey, M B; Morrison, C D; Münzberg, H; Ye, J; Berthoud, H R

    2016-12-01

    The relatively stable body weight during adulthood is attributed to a homeostatic regulatory mechanism residing in the brain which uses feedback from the body to control energy intake and expenditure. This mechanism guarantees that if perturbed up or down by design, body weight will return to pre-perturbation levels, defined as the defended level or set point. The fact that weight re-gain is common after dieting suggests that obese subjects defend a higher level of body weight. Thus, the set point for body weight is flexible and likely determined by the complex interaction of genetic, epigenetic and environmental factors. Unlike dieting, bariatric surgery does a much better job in producing sustained suppression of food intake and body weight, and an intensive search for the underlying mechanisms has started. Although one explanation for this lasting effect of particularly Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery (RYGB) is simple physical restriction due to the invasive surgery, a more exciting explanation is that the surgery physiologically reprograms the body weight defense mechanism. In this non-systematic review, we present behavioral evidence from our own and other studies that defended body weight is lowered after RYGB and sleeve gastrectomy. After these surgeries, rodents return to their preferred lower body weight if over- or underfed for a period of time, and the ability to drastically increase food intake during the anabolic phase strongly argues against the physical restriction hypothesis. However, the underlying mechanisms remain obscure. Although the mechanism involves central leptin and melanocortin signaling pathways, other peripheral signals such as gut hormones and their neural effector pathways likely contribute. Future research using both targeted and non-targeted 'omics' techniques in both humans and rodents as well as modern, genetically targeted, neuronal manipulation techniques in rodents will be necessary.

  13. Reconstruction of leaking gastric pouch after redo Rouxen-Y gastric bypass – revisionary surgery strategy

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    Wojciech K. Karcz

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available With the rapid development of the knowledge and techniques in bariatric surgery, as well as extensive expansion of indications for metabolic operations, surgeons have started to realize that the procedures they choose are not always suited to the needs and behavior of patients. Second and very frequently third revisional procedures are thus necessary in order to achieve desired outcomes and fulfill patients’ expectations. Restoration of restriction is commonly the first procedure, but not all may benefit from it. We hence want to illustrate the decision-making process by presenting a patient with the background of initial Rouxen-Y gastric bypass (RYGB and redo-RYGB, who then underwent a further revision by a 2-stage approach due to weight regain. The first stage involved shortening of the common channel and the second one reconstruction of his gastric pouch with duodenal switch (DS. Consequently we wish to focus here on a discussion about operative techniques and strategies to improve outcomes in such patients.

  14. Severe scurvy after gastric bypass surgery and a poor postoperative diet

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Esben P K; Metzsche, Carsten; Henningsen, Emil

    2012-01-01

    After bariatric gastric bypass surgery patients are at risk of developing micronutrient deficiencies. If gastric bypass surgery is followed by a vitamin deficient diet the patients have a risk of developing vitamin-C deficiency. When spontaneous ecchymosis is observed in the skin, in at......-risk patients, scurvy must be considered. When treated with large doses of vitamin-C the symptoms of scurvy rapidly improve even if the patient has developed multiple organ dysfunction syndrome. KEYWORDS: Scurvy; Gastric bypass surgery; Multiorgan dysfunction....

  15. Origins of and recognition of micronutrient deficiencies after gastric bypass surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bal, Bikram S; Finelli, Frederick C; Koch, Timothy R

    2011-04-01

    Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery remains the major surgical option for individuals with medically complicated obesity. The importance of preoperative evaluation to permit identification of micronutrient deficiencies is being re-evaluated. The risk of complications related to pregnancy after gastric bypass supports careful follow-up. Micronutrient deficiencies are common in postoperative gastric bypass patients, despite the suggested use of routine vitamin and mineral supplements after surgery. Copper deficiency must be considered as an origin for visual disorders after gastric bypass. Vitamin D deficiency with metabolic bone disease remains common after gastric bypass and the results suggest that the present postoperative supplements of calcium and vitamin D are inadequate. Major nutritional complications of bariatric surgery are occurring more than 20 years after surgery. There is no evidence for intestinal adaptation as there remains decreased intestinal absorption of iron up to 18 months after gastric bypass surgery. This article supports ongoing examination of nutritional complications after gastric bypass surgery and supports the notion that the daily doses of micronutrient supplements, such as vitamin D, may need to be revised.

  16. Advances in Gastric and Gastro-Esophageal Junction Surgery for Cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haverkamp, L.

    2015-01-01

    Chapter 1 – Introduction Gastric cancer is conventionally treated by means of open distal or total gastrectomy. The open surgical approach is associated with high morbity and long postoperative hospital stay. Minimally invasive surgery is upcoming for gastric cancer, since promosing results in the

  17. The IGF-Axis and Diabetic Retinopathy Before and After Gastric Bypass Surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brynskov, Troels; Laugesen, Caroline Schmidt; Floyd, Andrea Karen

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Laparoscopic gastric bypass (LGB) abruptly causes remission of type 2 diabetes (T2D). Such dramatic metabolic changes have previously been found to cause worsening of diabetic retinopathy (DR) and circulating insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) has been suggested as a causal mediator...... 3 months after bariatric surgery. IGFBP-1 increased while IGFBP-3 and total IGF-II decreased postoperatively, but these changes were unassociated with the development of DR. Markers of the metabolic syndrome improved....... at the two postoperative visits (p ≤ 0.001). Total IGF-I showed no significant changes. HbA1c, glucose, HOMA-IR and lipids improved after surgery. Two patients did not complete the 12-month visit. CONCLUSIONS: In obese T2D patients, bioactive IGF is a potential biomarker for DR and levels tended to increase...

  18. Development and Verification of a Mouse Model for Roux-en-Y Gastric Bypass Surgery with a Small Gastric Pouch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Zheng; Zhao, Zhiyun; Berthoud, Hans-Rudolf; Ye, Jianping

    2013-01-01

    Existing mouse models of Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) surgery are not comparable to human RYGB in gastric pouch volume for a large or absent gastric volume. The aim of this study was to develop and characterize a mouse RYGB model that closely replicates gastric pouch size of human RYGB surgery of about 5% of total gastric volume. We established this model in diet-induced obese (DIO) mice of C57BL/6J. This surgery resulted in a sustained 30% weight loss, entirely accounted for by decreased fat mass but not lean mass, compared to sham-operated mice on the high fat diet. Compared to sham-operated mice, energy expenditure corrected for total body weight was significantly increased by about 25%, and substrate utilization was shifted toward higher carbohydrate utilization at 8 weeks after RYGB when body weight had stabilized at the lower level. The energy expenditure persisted and carbohydrate utilization was even more pronounced when the mice were fed chow diet. Although significantly increased during daytime, overall locomotor activity was not significantly different. In response to cold exposure, RYGB mice exhibited an improved capacity to maintain the body temperature. In insulin tolerance test, exogenous insulin-induced suppression of plasma glucose levels was significantly greater in RYGB mice at 4 weeks after surgery. Paradoxically, food intake measured at 5 weeks after surgery was significantly increased, possibly in compensation for increased fecal energy loss and energy expenditure. In conclusion, this new model is a viable alternative to existing murine RYGB models and the model matches human RYGB surgery in anatomy. This model will be useful for studying molecular mechanisms involved in the beneficial effects of RYGB on body weight and glucose homeostasis. PMID:23326365

  19. Development and verification of a mouse model for Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery with a small gastric pouch.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zheng Hao

    Full Text Available Existing mouse models of Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB surgery are not comparable to human RYGB in gastric pouch volume for a large or absent gastric volume. The aim of this study was to develop and characterize a mouse RYGB model that closely replicates gastric pouch size of human RYGB surgery of about 5% of total gastric volume. We established this model in diet-induced obese (DIO mice of C57BL/6J. This surgery resulted in a sustained 30% weight loss, entirely accounted for by decreased fat mass but not lean mass, compared to sham-operated mice on the high fat diet. Compared to sham-operated mice, energy expenditure corrected for total body weight was significantly increased by about 25%, and substrate utilization was shifted toward higher carbohydrate utilization at 8 weeks after RYGB when body weight had stabilized at the lower level. The energy expenditure persisted and carbohydrate utilization was even more pronounced when the mice were fed chow diet. Although significantly increased during daytime, overall locomotor activity was not significantly different. In response to cold exposure, RYGB mice exhibited an improved capacity to maintain the body temperature. In insulin tolerance test, exogenous insulin-induced suppression of plasma glucose levels was significantly greater in RYGB mice at 4 weeks after surgery. Paradoxically, food intake measured at 5 weeks after surgery was significantly increased, possibly in compensation for increased fecal energy loss and energy expenditure. In conclusion, this new model is a viable alternative to existing murine RYGB models and the model matches human RYGB surgery in anatomy. This model will be useful for studying molecular mechanisms involved in the beneficial effects of RYGB on body weight and glucose homeostasis.

  20. “Fast-track” and “Minimally Invasive” Surgery for Gastric Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin-Xin Liu

    2016-01-01

    Conclusions: ERAS protocols alone could significantly bring fast recovery after surgery regardless of the surgical technique. MIS further reduces postoperative hospital stay. It is safe and effective to apply ERAS protocols combined with MIS for gastric cancer.

  1. 3D-MSCT gastric pouch volumetry in bariatric surgery-preliminary clinical results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karcz, W K; Kuesters, S; Marjanovic, G; Suesslin, D; Kotter, E; Thomusch, O; Hopt, U T; Felmerer, G; Langer, M; Baumann, T

    2009-04-01

    Insufficient weight loss or persistent abdominal complaints are reasons for revisionary operations in bariatric surgery. The selection of the secondary procedure is influenced by clinical and by patho-anatomical factors like the size of the gastric pouch. The purpose of this study was to evaluate multi-slice computed tomography (MSCT)-based volumetric assessment of gastric pouches, gastric sleeves, and anastomoses in patients after bariatric surgery. Twenty-six patients after bariatric surgery received abdominal MSCT immediately after oral administration of an ionic contrast agent solution and intravenous administration of buthylscopalamine. Indications were insufficient weight loss after primary operation, persistent upper abdominal complaints, and decline of bariatric analysis and reporting outcomes system (BAROS) score. The gastric volumes, diameter of the gastrojejunostomy, and the proximal part of the Roux limb were measured on volume rendering images and freely angulated reformations. Evaluation of gastric volumes was successful in 25 examinations (96%). The diameters of gastrojejunostomy as well as the dimensions of the Roux limb were evaluable in all cases. After gastric bypass surgery, a pouch volume >30 ml was found in ten, a widening of the gastrojejunostomy in eight, and a dilated Roux limb in six cases. Two patients presented a combination of a wide anastomosis and a strongly dilated Roux limb. Patients after biliopancreatic diversion had gastric volumes between 210 and 840 ml. Other findings were a fistula, an intragastral stenosis, and internal hernias. MSCT allows crucial patho-anatomical measurements and provides helpful information for selecting the appropriate revisionary operation after bariatric surgery.

  2. Psychiatric Factors and Weight Loss Patterns Following Gastric Bypass Surgery in a Veteran Population

    OpenAIRE

    Rutledge, Thomas; Groesz, Lisa M.; Savu, Michelle

    2009-01-01

    Background Although pre-surgical psychological evaluations are commonly administered to patients considered for weight loss surgeries, the value of these evaluations for predicting weight loss success has been questioned. In this study, we addressed this issue by examining patient’s total number of psychiatric indicators rather than individual psychological factors as predictors of weight loss/weight regain. Methods Sixty adult veterans completed gastric bypass surgery or laparoscopic gastric...

  3. [Clinical research status of laparoscopic gastric cancer surgery in China, Japan and South Korea].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Guoxin; Chen, Xinhua; Yu, Jiang; Liu, Hao

    2018-02-25

    Laparoscopic surgery has its unique minimally invasive advantages, however, taking the complex and difficult D2 lymph node dissection for advanced gastric cancer into consideration, laparoscopic gastrectomy was only applied in the treatment of early gastric cancer at its preliminary stage. With the development of more than a decade, many multicenter clinical data have confirmed the safety, feasibility and effectiveness of laparoscopic radical gastrectomy for early gastric cancer. Based on high-quality evidence-based medicine evidence, laparoscopic gastrectomy has been recommended as an optional treatment for stage I( gastric cancer by the Japanese Gastric Cancer Treatment Guidelines 2014(ver.4). However, the safety and effectiveness of laparoscopic gastrectomy for advanced gastric cancer remains controversial due to the lack of high-level evidence-based clinical evidence. Currently, China, Japan and South Korea are trying to clarify its safety and effectiveness by conducting well-designed multicenter prospective randomized controlled trials. To date, CLASS-01 trial in China, whose secondary endpoint indicated that laparoscopic gastrectomy with D2 lymphadenectomy for advanced gastric cancer can be safely performed by experienced surgeons, has provided the highest level evidence for the controversy in the world. At ASCO 2016, the safety reports from Korea's KLASS-02 trial also presented the similar conclusion. The long-term oncologic outcomes of the both researches were particularly promising. Retrospecting the whole development of gastric cancer surgery, it is not difficult to find that its mainstream direction is gradually shifted from "extended and standardized surgical resection" to "individual and precise surgery" for the safety and postoperative quality of life. The new concept of minimally invasive surgery built on laparoscopic surgery emphasizes more than shortening the surgical incision, but minimizing tissue trauma and maximizing functional preservation. On

  4. Tier 3 multidisciplinary medical weight management improves outcome of Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, P; Hartland, A; Hollis, A; Ali, R; Elshaw, A; Jain, S; Khan, A; Mirza, S

    2015-04-01

    In 2013 the Department of Health specified eligibility for bariatric surgery funded by the National Health Service. This included a mandatory specification that patients first complete a Tier 3 medical weight management programme. The clinical effectiveness of this recommendation has not been evaluated previously. Our bariatric centre has provided a Tier 3 programme six months prior to bariatric surgery since 2009. The aim of our retrospective study was to compare weight loss in two cohorts: Roux-en-Y gastric bypass only (RYGB only cohort) versus Tier 3 weight management followed by RYGB (Tier 3 cohort). A total of 110 patients were selected for the study: 66 in the RYGB only cohort and 44 in the Tier 3 cohort. Patients in both cohorts were matched for age, sex, preoperative body mass index and pre-existing co-morbidities. The principal variable was therefore whether they undertook the weight management programme prior to RYGB. Patients from both cohorts were followed up at 6 and 12 months to assess weight loss. The mean weight loss at 6 months for the Tier 3 cohort was 31% (range: 18-69%, standard deviation [SD]: 0.10 percentage points) compared with 23% (range: 4-93%, SD: 0.12 percentage points) for the RYGB only cohort (p=0.0002). The mean weight loss at 12 months for the Tier 3 cohort was 34% (range: 17-51%, SD: 0.09 percentage points) compared with 27% (range: 14-48%, SD: 0.87 percentage points) in the RYGB only cohort (p=0.0037). Our study revealed that in our matched cohorts, patients receiving Tier 3 specialist medical weight management input prior to RYGB lost significantly more weight at 6 and 12 months than RYGB only patients. This confirms the clinical efficacy of such a weight management programme prior to gastric bypass surgery and supports its inclusion in eligibility criteria for bariatric surgery.

  5. Randomized trials and quality assurance in gastric cancer surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dikken, Johan L; Cats, Annemieke; Verheij, Marcel; van de Velde, Cornelis J H

    2013-03-01

    A D2 lymphadenectomy can be considered standard of surgical care for advanced resectable gastric cancer. Currently, several multimodality strategies are used, including postoperative monochemotherapy in Asia, postoperative chemoradiotherapy in the United States, and perioperative chemotherapy in Europe. As the majority of gastric cancer patients are treated outside the framework of clinical trials, quality assurance programs, including referral to high-volume centers and clinical auditing are needed to improve gastric cancer care on a nationwide level. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Presurgical Weight Is Associated with Pain, Functional Impairment, and Anxiety among Gastric Bypass Surgery Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharlene Wedin

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic pain and obesity are significant public health concerns in the United States associated with significant levels of health-care expenses and lost productivity. Previous research suggests that obesity is a risk factor for chronic pain, mainly due to excessive weight placed on the joints. However, the obesity-pain relationship appears to be complex and reciprocal. Little work to date has focused on the relationship between weight and pain among patients undergoing gastric bypass surgery for weight loss. Patients scheduled to undergo bariatric surgery for weight loss at a large southeastern academic medical center ( completed the Brief Pain Inventory (BPI, the Center for Epidemiological Studies 10-item Depression scale (CESD-10, and the Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI. Higher presurgical weight was associated with higher pain-on-average ratings, higher functional impairment due to pain across the domains of physical activity, mood, walking ability, relationships, and enjoyment of life. Higher presurgical weight was associated with higher BAI scores, but weight was not related to depression. Findings suggest that bariatric surgery candidates report a moderate amount of pain prior to surgery and that presurgical weight is associated with higher pain, increased functional impairment due to pain, and increased anxiety. Anxiety was found to mediate the relationship between increased weight and pain.

  7. Fetal Growth in Pregnancies Conceived after Gastric Bypass Surgery in Relation to Surgery-to-Conception Interval

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørgaard, Lone Nikoline; Gjerris, Anne Cathrine Roslev; Kirkegaard, Ida

    2014-01-01

    Medicine Database). Main outcome measures were early and late fetal growth in relation to time from bariatric surgery to conception of the pregnancy. Early fetal growth was expressed as "Fetal Growth Index": the ratio between the estimated number of days from first trimester ultrasound to second trimester......OBJECTIVE: To describe early and late fetal growth in pregnancies conceived after gastric bypass surgery in relation to time from surgery to conception of pregnancy. METHODS: National cohort study on 387 Danish women, who had laparoscopic or open gastric bypass surgery prior to a singleton...... ultrasound biometries and the actual calender time elapsed in days. Late fetal growth was expressed as the observed versus expected birthweight according to gestational age (GA). RESULTS: The surgery-to-conception interval ranged from 3 to 1851 days with a mean value of 502 (SD, 351) days. The mean "fetal...

  8. Preoperative weight gain might increase risk of gastric bypass surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Istfan, Nawfal W; Anderson, Wendy A; Apovian, Caroline M; Hess, Donald T; Forse, R Armour

    2011-01-01

    Weight loss improves the cardiovascular and metabolic risk associated with obesity. However, insufficient data are available about the health effects of weight gain, separate from the obesity itself. We sought to determine whether the changes in body weight before open gastric bypass surgery (OGB) would have a significant effect on the immediate perioperative hospital course. A retrospective chart review of 100 consecutive patients was performed to examine the effects of co-morbidities and body weight changes in the immediate preoperative period on the hospital length of stay and the rate of admission to the surgical intensive care unit (SICU). Of our class III obese patients undergoing OGB, 95% had ≥1 co-morbid condition and an overall SICU admission rate of 18%. Compared with the patients with no perioperative SICU admission, the patients admitted to the SICU had a greater degree of insulin resistance (homeostatic model analysis-insulin resistance 10.8 ± 1.3 versus 5.9 ± 0.5, P = .001), greater serum triglyceride levels (225 ± 47 versus 143 ± 8 mg/dL, P = .003), and had gained more weight preoperatively (.52 ± .13 versus .06 ± .06 lb/wk, P = .003). The multivariate analyses showed that preoperative weight gain was a risk factor for a longer length of stay and more SICU admissions lasting ≥3 days, as were a diagnosis of sleep apnea and an elevated serum triglyceride concentration. The results of the present retrospective study suggest that weight gain increases the risk of perioperative SICU admission associated with OGB, independent of the body mass index. Sleep apnea and elevated serum triglyceride levels were also important determinants of perioperative morbidity. In view of the increasing epidemic of obesity and the popularity of bariatric surgical procedures, we propose that additional clinical and metabolic research focusing on the understanding of the complex relationship among obesity, positive energy balance, weight gain, and perioperative

  9. Iatrogenic lower urinary tract injury at the time of pelvic reconstructive surgery: does previous pelvic surgery increase the risk?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saguan, Docile; Northington, Gina; Chinthakanan, Orawee; Hudson, Catherine; Karp, Deborah

    2014-08-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate whether a history of previous pelvic surgery is associated with lower urinary tract (LUT) injury at the time of pelvic reconstructive surgery (PRS). A retrospective analysis of patients undergoing pelvic reconstructive surgery from 2006 to 2011 was performed. Patients were divided into two groups: those with previous pelvic surgery and those without previous pelvic surgery. A sample size analysis was performed to determine the number needed to detect at least a 3-fold difference in the rate of LUT injury. Demographic, historical, clinical, intraoperative, and postoperative data were analyzed. Associations between LUT injury and demographics, previous pelvic surgery, or other clinical risk factors were assessed using univariate and multivariate analyses. 685 women were included in the analysis: 514 (74.9%) with and 171 (25.1%) without prior pelvic surgery. The overall rate of LUT injury was 6%. Of the injuries, 3.2% were cystotomies, and 1.9% were ureteral obstructions. Previous pelvic surgery did not significantly affect the rate of LUT injury (OR 0.76, 95%CI 0.38-1.54). A diagnosis of prolapse, concurrent hysterectomy, anterior repair, and apical repair were significantly associated with LUT injury. After controlling for age and race, a diagnosis of prolapse remained significantly associated with LUT injury (OR 3.38, 95% CI 1.11-14.75). Prior pelvic surgery does not affect the rate of LUT injury in pelvic reconstructive surgery. The diagnosis of prolapse is a risk factor for LUT injury in women undergoing pelvic reconstructive surgery.

  10. Intragastric laparoscopic surgery: An option for gastric lesions not resectable by endoscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manuel Vázquez, Alba; Hernández Matías, Alberto; Bertomeu García, Agustín; Ruiz de Adana Belbel, Juan Carlos

    2016-03-01

    Gastric mucosal and submucosal lesions can be resected by endoscopy, laparoscopy or open surgery. Operative methods have varied depending on the location, endophytic growth and size of the lesion. Interest in minimally invasive surgery has increased and many surgeons are attempting laparoscopic approaches, especially in lesions of the stomach near the esophagogastric junction not amendable to endoscopic removal, because conventional surgery can produce stenosis and distort the postoperative anatomy, and increase morbimortality. We report our experience with laparoscopic intragastric surgery in 3 consecutive patients, with no complications. Laparoscopic intragastric surgery extends the surgeons' armamentarium to resect complex gastric lesions, while offering patients the benefits of minimal access surgery. Copyright © 2015 AEC. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  11. Hematological disorders following gastric bypass surgery: emerging concepts of the interplay between nutritional deficiency and inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Mingyi; Krishnamurthy, Amrita; Mohamed, Ali R; Green, Ralph

    2013-01-01

    Obesity and the associated metabolic syndrome are among the most common and detrimental metabolic diseases of the modern era, affecting over 50% of the adult population in the United States. Surgeries designed to promote weight loss, known as bariatric surgery, typically involve a gastric bypass procedure and have shown high success rates for treating morbid obesity. However, following gastric bypass surgery, many patients develop chronic anemia, most commonly due to iron deficiency. Deficiencies of vitamins B1, B12, folate, A, K, D, and E and copper have also been reported after surgery. Copper deficiency can cause hematological abnormalities with or without neurological complications. Despite oral supplementation and normal serum concentrations of iron, copper, folate, and vitamin B12, some patients present with persistent anemia after surgery. The evaluation of hematologic disorders after gastric bypass surgery must take into account issues unique to the postsurgery setting that influence the development of anemia and other cytopenias. In this paper, the clinical characteristics and differential diagnosis of the hematological disorders associated with gastric bypass surgery are reviewed, and the underlying molecular mechanisms are discussed.

  12. Hematological Disorders following Gastric Bypass Surgery: Emerging Concepts of the Interplay between Nutritional Deficiency and Inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingyi Chen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Obesity and the associated metabolic syndrome are among the most common and detrimental metabolic diseases of the modern era, affecting over 50% of the adult population in the United States. Surgeries designed to promote weight loss, known as bariatric surgery, typically involve a gastric bypass procedure and have shown high success rates for treating morbid obesity. However, following gastric bypass surgery, many patients develop chronic anemia, most commonly due to iron deficiency. Deficiencies of vitamins B1, B12, folate, A, K, D, and E and copper have also been reported after surgery. Copper deficiency can cause hematological abnormalities with or without neurological complications. Despite oral supplementation and normal serum concentrations of iron, copper, folate, and vitamin B12, some patients present with persistent anemia after surgery. The evaluation of hematologic disorders after gastric bypass surgery must take into account issues unique to the postsurgery setting that influence the development of anemia and other cytopenias. In this paper, the clinical characteristics and differential diagnosis of the hematological disorders associated with gastric bypass surgery are reviewed, and the underlying molecular mechanisms are discussed.

  13. [2017 hotspots review and outlook on gastric cancer surgery in China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Zhenggang

    2018-01-25

    The 12th International Gastric Cancer Congress (12th IGCC ) was successfully held in Beijing, China on 20th-23rd April, 2017, which gave Chinese surgeons a great opportunity to share clinical progress and experience in the surgical treatment of gastric cancer with colleagues from different countries. At the end of 2017, this article hereby reviews briefly the achievements of surgical work of gastric cancer, which was done by our Chinese surgeons in this year. Some aspects will be reviewed, aiming at summarizing experience, affirming achievement, finding out the gap and promoting improvement in the future. These aspects include the conversion therapy for stageIIII( gastric cancer; the minimally invasive surgery for gastric cancer; the alimentary tract reconstruction after gastrectomy; enhanced recovery after radical gastrectomy and surgery quality control and patient's quality of life after surgery. In 2017, the gastric cancer surgery in China has made some new progress in many fields, and some achievements have reached or are close to international advanced level. However, looking ahead to the coming year and the future, there are still some important works to be done in the field of clinical surgery for gastric cancer in China, which include (1) strengthening big clinical data in gastric cancer collection and analysis platform construction for the promotion of scientific decision in therapeutic strategy; (2) further participating in international academic exchange and cooperation with taking advantages of our big number of gastric cancer cases, great amount of bio-tissue samples and big number of professional surgeons to actively join the international clinical research and expand our academic influence in the world;(3)developing more multicentre prospective randomized controlled trials in order to further improve the scientific significance in Chinese clinical guideline, norms and expert consensus in surgical treatment for gastric cancer; (4) further improving

  14. Incidence of metachronous gastric cancer in the remnant stomach after synchronous multiple cancer surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nozaki, Isao; Hato, Shinji; Kobatake, Takaya; Ohta, Koji; Kubo, Yoshirou; Nishimura, Rieko; Kurita, Akira

    2014-01-01

    In the preoperative evaluation for gastric cancer, high-resolution endoscopic technologies allow us to detect small accessory lesions. However, it is not known if the gastric remnant after partial gastrectomy for synchronous multiple gastric cancers has a greater risk for metachronous cancer. The purpose of this study was to determine the incidence of metachronous cancer in this patient subset compared with that after solitary cancer surgery. Data on a consecutive series of 1,281 patients gastrectomized for early gastric cancer from 1991 to 2007 were analyzed retrospectively. The 715 gastric remnants after distal gastrectomy were periodically surveyed by endoscopic examination in Shikoku Cancer Center. Among those surveyed cases, 642 patients were pathologically diagnosed with solitary lesion (SO group) and 73 patients with synchronous multiple lesions (MU group) at the time of the initial surgery. In the follow-up period, 15 patients in the SO group and 3 patients in the MU group were diagnosed as having metachronous cancer in the gastric remnant. The cumulative 4-year incidence rate was 1.9 % in the SO group and 5.5 % in the MU group. The difference did not reach the significant level by the log-rank test. The incidence of metachronous cancer is higher after multiple cancer surgery; however, the difference is not statistically significant.

  15. Outcomes following major emergency gastric surgery: the importance of specialist surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, O A; McGlone, E R; Mercer, S J; Somers, S S; Toh, S K C

    2015-01-01

    The increasing subspecialisation of general surgeons in their elective work may result in problems for the provision of expert care for emergency cases. There is very little evidence of the impact of subspecialism on outcomes following emergency major upper gastrointestinal surgery. This prospective study investigated whether elective subspecialism of general surgeon is associated with a difference in outcome following major emergency gastric surgery. Between February 1994 and June 2010, the data from all emergency major gastric procedures (defined as patients who underwent laparotomy within 12 hours of referral to the surgical service for bleeding gastroduodenal ulcer and/or undergoing major gastric resection) was prospectively recorded. The sub-specialty interest of operating surgeon was noted and related to post-operative outcomes. Over the study period, a total of 63 major gastric procedures were performed of which 23 (37%) were performed by specialist upper gastrointestinal (UGI) consultants. Surgery performed by a specialist UGI surgeon was associated with a significantly lower surgical complication (4% vs. 28% of cases; p=0.04) and in-patient mortality rate (22% vs. 50%; p=0.03). Major emergency gastric surgery has significantly better clinical outcomes when performed by a specialist UGI surgeon. These results have important implications for provision of an emergency general surgical service. Copyright© Acta Chirurgica Belgica.

  16. [Era of enhanced recovery after surgery and robotic gastric cancer surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yanbing

    2017-05-25

    Enhanced recovery after surgery (ERAS) has been rapidly developing by combining several techniques with evidence-based adjustments, including preoperative education, preoperative carbohydrate loading, epidural or regional anesthesia, early initiation of enteral nutrition, ambulation and multi-modal pain management. The core part of ERAS is to reduce and reverse surgical stress and therefore greatly improve clinical outcome. Under the guidance of ERAS, perioperative management of robotic gastric cancer operation should follow the basic principles of ERAS and clinical pathway to maximize the advantages of the robotic surgery. ERAS protocol is safe and feasible for patients undergoing robotic radical gastrectomy and it can reduce surgical stress, shorten hospital stay, improve quality of life and does not increase complications, whose mechanism may be associated with the reduction of inflammation and insulin resistance, the decrease of resting energy exposure, and the protection of mitochondria function. It is worth emphasizing that it is very important to fully understand the changes of pathophysiology during perioperative period, to strictly implement the ERAS pathway based on optimized evidence-based medicine, to cooperate closely with the multidisciplinary team, to observe and manage the postoperative complications dynamically by systemic classification. The improvement of ERAS program on the outcome of patients should be summarized regularly and the new interventional strategies should be evaluated further according to the international standard.

  17. Antimetabolites in cataract surgery to prevent failure of a previous trabeculectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Roger E; Crichton, Andrew; Thomas, Bennett C

    2014-07-28

    Patients having cataract surgery have often earlier undergone a trabeculectomy for glaucoma. However, cataract surgery may be associated with failure of the previous glaucoma surgery and antimetabolites may be used with cataract surgery to prevent such failure. There is no systematic review on whether antimetabolites with cataract surgery prevent failure of a previous trabeculectomy. To assess the effects of antimetabolites with cataract surgery on functioning of a previous trabeculectomy. We searched CENTRAL (which contains the Cochrane Eyes and Vision Group Trials Register) (2014, Issue 5), Ovid MEDLINE, Ovid MEDLINE In-Process and Other Non-Indexed Citations, Ovid MEDLINE Daily, Ovid OLDMEDLINE (January 1946 to June 2014), EMBASE (January 1980 to June 2014), Latin American and Caribbean Health Sciences Literature Database (LILACS) (January 1982 to June 2014), the metaRegister of Controlled Trials (mRCT) (www.controlled-trials.com), ClinicalTrials.gov (www.clinicaltrials.gov) and the World Health Organization (WHO) International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (ICTRP) (www.who.int/ictrp/search/en). We did not use any date or language restrictions in the electronic searches for trials. We last searched the electronic databases on 10 June 2014. We also searched the Science Citation Index database (July 2013) and reference lists of potentially relevant studies. Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) of antimetabolites with cataract surgery in people with a functioning trabeculectomy. Two review authors independently reviewed the titles and abstracts from the electronic searches. Two review authors independently assessed relevant full-text articles and entered data. We identified no RCTs to test the effectiveness of antimetabolites with cataract surgery in individuals with the intention of preventing failure of a previous trabeculectomy. There are no RCTs of antimetabolites with cataract surgery in people with a functioning trabeculectomy. Appropriately powered RCTs

  18. Gastric emptying

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vitti, R.A.; Malmud, L.S.; Fisher, R.S.

    1986-01-01

    Radionuclide techniques appear to be the current method of choice for determining the rate and pattern of gastric emptying. Isotopic methods are quantitative, noninvasive in that they do not require intubation, may be used with solid meals for greater sensitivity, present a low radiation burden to the patient compared to the burden of radiographic techniques, and are suitable and acceptable to the patient for repetitive studies. By comparison, other methods are either invasive, nonquantitative, or nonphysiologic. Of the radionuclide methods currently available, the solid meals (either liver or egg) are best, and dual liquid-solid studies offer additional physiologic data. It is now known that gastric emptying abnormalities may result from common disorders such as diabetes mellitus or gastric or duodenal ulcer disease, may be caused by a variety of medications, may follow gastric surgery, or may result from less well understood disorders, such as Zollinger-Ellison syndrome. By helping to clarify these gastric emptying abnormalities, the physician's ability to treat disorders of gastric emptying with diet, medication, and surgery is enhanced in accuracy and precision. Using these newer radionuclide techniques will permit both the clinician and the investigator a better understanding than was previously possible of gastric physiology in both health and disease

  19. Gastric bypass surgery reveals independency of obesity and diabetes melitus type 2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fenger, Mogens; Hansen, Dorte Lindqvist; Worm, Dorte

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery is widely applied to ameliorate morbid obesity, including diabetes in people with type 2 diabetes. The latter vanish a few days after surgery for many, but not in all patients before any weight reduction has occurred. The explanation for this change...... in metabolic status is poorly understood, but the observation may suggest that the fate obesity and diabetes is only partly linked after surgery. METHODS: The trajectories of weight reduction measured as reduced body mass index (BMI) in 741obese subjects with and without diabetes were evaluated. Evaluation...... was performed on three groups: 1) subjects that were non-diabetic before and after surgery; 2) subjects that were diabetics before surgery but non-diabetics after surgery; and 3) subjects that were diabetics before surgery and remained diabetics after surgery. The diabetic state was established at HbA1c above...

  20. Impact of Transient and Persistent Acute Kidney Injury on Chronic Kidney Disease Progression and Mortality after Gastric Surgery for Gastric Cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang Seong Kim

    Full Text Available Acute kidney injury (AKI is common after gastric surgery for gastric cancer and associated with adverse outcomes. However, the impact of transient or persistent AKI on clinical outcomes after gastric surgery for gastric cancer has not been described. We performed a retrospective study of 4,886 patients with normal renal function who underwent partial or total gastrectomy for gastric cancer between June 2002 and December 2012. AKI patients were classified as transient and persistent AKI based on the return of serum creatinine to the level indicating no AKI within 7 days. Our outcomes included occurrence of new-onset chronic kidney disease (CKD and mortality 1 year after gastric surgery. AKI occurred in 638 (13.1% after gastric surgery. Transient AKI was documented in 574 (90%. Use of diuretics and contrast agents was a common risk factor for persistent and transient AKI. Length of intensive care unit (ICU and hospital stay, and ICU admission rate were higher in patients with transient AKI than in those without AKI. Although patients with persistent AKI had a higher new-onset CKD 1 year after gastric surgery after adjusting for multiple covariates, transient AKI was not associated with new-onset CKD. The 1-year mortality rates were significantly higher in patients with transient and persistent AKI. Not only persistent AKI but transient AKI is associated with increased risk of hospital complications and a significantly higher risk of long-term mortality than patients without AKI after gastric surgery. Moreover, persistent AKI, but not transient AKI, is associated with CKD progression at 1 year.

  1. Results of adjuvant chemo radiation after curative surgery for gastric cancer. A retrospective study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muller, Bettina; Balbontin, Paulina; Trujillo, Cristian; Becerra, Sergio; Sola, Antonio; Neveu, Rodrigo; Fernandez, Roberto; Buchholtz, Martin; Villanueva, Luis; Cerda, Berta

    2009-01-01

    Background: Survival rates after curative surgery for gastric cancer are disappointing. Therefore adjuvant therapeutic strategies are required. Aim: To analyze survival and side effects of treatment among gastric cancer patients treated with adjuvant chemoradiotherapy after curative resection of gastric adenocarcinoma. Material and methods: Retrospective review of medical records of 74 patients aged 20 to 74 years, treated with complete resection of gastric adenocarcinoma followed by adjuvant chemo radiation. Survival analysis was based on the records and information from the National Mortality Registry. Results: Five years survival fluctuated from 50% among patients in stage 1B to 25% among those is stage IV. Significant acute toxicity was observed in 23 patients (31%). No patients died due to acute toxicity. Eleven patients (16.4%) developed significant late toxicity, with two possible deaths related to treatment. Conclusions: Postoperative chemoradiotherapy is feasible in our experience. Continuos infusion of 5- fluoruracil is recommended to reduce toxicity

  2. Comparative effectiveness of 3 bariatric surgery procedures: Roux-en-Y gastric bypass, laparoscopic adjustable gastric band, and sleeve gastrectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jenny H; Nguyen, Quynh-Nhu; Le, Quang A

    2016-06-01

    Bariatric surgery is associated with improved co-morbidities, quality of life, and survival in severely obese patients. Common bariatric surgery procedures include Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB), laparoscopic adjustable gastric band (LAGB), and sleeve gastrectomy (SG). Currently, literature studying comparative effectiveness on different bariatric surgery procedures in veterans is limited. To compare effectiveness of 3 bariatric surgery procedures performed in veterans. Veterans Affairs Loma Linda Healthcare Systems (VALLHS), Loma Linda, California, United States. This study was a single-institution, retrospective cohort study. Primary outcome was weight reduction, expressed as kilograms lost, body mass index (BMI) reduction, percentage weight loss (%WL), and percentage excess weight loss (%EWL) after 12 months of bariatric surgery. Secondary outcomes were reduction in number of medications and laboratory markers for obesity-related chronic conditions. Inverse-probability weighting propensity score method was used to balance baseline characteristics among the procedures. A total of 162 patients were included in the study. At 12 months, the kilograms lost, BMI reduction, %WL, and %EWL were 40.7±14.5 kg, 13.4±4.1 kg/m(2), 31.5±8.5%, and 41.4±11.6% for RYGB; 24.4±22.1 kg, 7.9±7.3 kg/m(2), 20.2±21.5%, and 26.7±27.6% for SG; and 15.3±15.7 kg, 5.0±5.0 kg/m(2), 12.0±11.7%, and 16.1±15.9% for LAGB, respectively (RYGB versus SG, RYGB versus LAGB, and SG versus LAGB, all Psurgery procedure in patients who are not candidates for RYGB. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Bariatric Surgery. All rights reserved.

  3. Changes in Hematology and Calcium Metabolism After Gastric Bypass Surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Worm, Dorte; Madsbad, Sten; Kristiansen, Viggo B

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Concerns regarding nutritional deficiencies have recently emerged after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB). METHODS: A total of 835 subjects underwent RYGB, age 43.3 years, body mass index (BMI) 47.2 kg/m(2). Hematological and calcium metabolic variables were measured before, 6, 12, and 24...

  4. Gastric bypass surgery: Improving psoriasis through a GLP-1-dependent mechanism?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Faurschou, Annesofie; Zachariae, Claus; Skov, Lone

    2011-01-01

    surgery. This most likely contributes importantly to the acute remission of type 2 diabetes, which is often induced by gastric bypass operations. The hormone is not hypersecreted after the purely restrictive bariatric procedure gastric banding and no case reports exist on improvement in psoriasis......, both a direct anti-inflammatory effect of GLP-1 as well as an indirect effect through weight loss could contribute to improvement in psoriasis. A potential involvement of GLP-1 in the remission of psoriasis observed after bariatric surgery offers exciting possibilities for research and eventually...... bypass surgery in patients with psoriasis may result in complete remission of the disease. A substantial weight loss is achieved in the months following surgery, which is likely to reduce psoriasis symptoms and risk of comorbidities. Interestingly, however, it has been described that improvement...

  5. Eating in mice with gastric bypass surgery causes exaggerated activation of brainstem anorexia circuit

    OpenAIRE

    Mumphrey, Michael B.; Hao, Zheng; Townsend, R. Leigh; Patterson, Laurel M.; M?nzberg, Heike; Morrison, Christopher C.; Ye, Jianping; Berthoud, Hans-Rudolf

    2016-01-01

    Background/Objective Obesity and metabolic diseases are at an alarming level globally and increasingly affect children and adolescents. Gastric bypass and other bariatric surgeries have proven remarkably successful and are increasingly performed worldwide. Reduced desire to eat and changes in eating behavior and food choice account for most of the initial weight loss and diabetes remission after surgery, but the underlying mechanisms of altered gut-brain communication are unknown. Subjects/Me...

  6. Association between urinary incontinence in women and a previous history of surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mommsen, S.; Foldspang, Anders; Elving, L.

    1993-01-01

    In a cross-sectional study, 85% of 3114 women responded to a questionnaire on urinary incontinence and a history of abdominal, gynaecological and urological surgery. In 1987 the prevalence of urinary incontinence was 17%; 63% had undergone surgery, mainly gynaecological, and almost one-third of t......In a cross-sectional study, 85% of 3114 women responded to a questionnaire on urinary incontinence and a history of abdominal, gynaecological and urological surgery. In 1987 the prevalence of urinary incontinence was 17%; 63% had undergone surgery, mainly gynaecological, and almost one......-third of the respondents had had more than one operation. Bivariate and multivariate analysis showed stress urinary incontinence to be associated with previous exposure to surgery....

  7. Does the closure of mesenteric defects during laparoscopic gastric bypass surgery cause complications?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Sara Danshøj; Floyd, Andrea Karen; Naver, Lars

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: A well-known complication of laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery (LRYGB) is bowel obstruction due to internal herniation (IH). Evidence suggests that mesenteric defects should be closed during LRYGB to reduce the risk of IH. Therefore, surgeons are now closing mesenteric...

  8. A short or a long Roux limb in gastric bypass surgery: does it matter?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dogan, K.; Homan, J.; Aarts, E.O.; Laarhoven, C.J.H.M. van; Janssen, I.M.C.; Berends, F.J.

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) still remains the gold standard in bariatric surgery. However, no consensus exists on the optimal limb lengths to induce maximum weight reduction. The aim of the present study was to assess the effect of a longer alimentary limb (AL) length on weight

  9. [Operative problems during simultaneous laparoscopic surgery for gastric and colorectal cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasuga, Masataka; Komatsu, Shuhei; Ichikawa, Daisuke; Okamoto, Kazuma; Shiozaki, Atsushi; Fujiwara, Hitoshi; Murayama, Yasutoshi; Kuriu, Yoshiaki; Ikoma, Hisashi; Nakanishi, Masayoshi; Ochiai, Toshiya; Kokuba, Yukihito; Otsuji, Eigo

    2012-11-01

    Recent technological advances in optical and surgical devices have resulted in laparoscopic surgery for gastric and colorectal cancer, gaining wider acceptance and becoming more common. Simultaneous laparoscopic surgery for gastric and colorectal cancer has many potential advantages, including a small incision, good cosmetic result, less postoperative pain, and less mobility. However, some problems have to be resolved. To clarify the anastomotic problem of combined abdominal minilaparotomy, we present here 2 typical cases of simultaneous laparoscopic surgery for gastric and colorectal cancer. Case 1: The anastomoses after laparoscopic right hemicolectomy and distal gastrectomy were easily performed by combined upper abdominal minilaparotomy. Case 2: The anastomosis after laparoscopic right hemicolectomy was easily performed by upper abdominal minilaparotomy. However, the ensuing esophago-jejuno anastomosis after laparoscopic total gastrectomy resulted in failure during combined upper abdominal minilaparotomy because the anastomotic angle was incomplete. In conclusion, the choice of abdominal mini-incision site is crucial during simultaneous laparoscopic surgery for gastric and colorectal cancer. Surgeons should not hesitate to perform an additional mini-incision or change other anastomotic procedures if the operation is difficult, requires a long time to complete, and is likely to cause intraoperative complications.

  10. Effect of probiotics on postoperative quality of gastric bypass surgeries: a prospective randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jung-Chien; Lee, Wei-Jei; Tsou, Jun-Juin; Liu, Tsang-Pai; Tsai, Pei-Ling

    2016-01-01

    Gastric bypass surgery is the recommended treatment for severely obese patients. However, postoperative symptomatic gastrointestinal (GI) episodes are common complaints. To determine if administration of probiotics improves symptomatic GI episodes after gastric bypass surgery. Hospital-based bariatric center. This double-blind, randomized trial was conducted between March 2010 and September 2010 with 60 patients who underwent gastric bypass for severe obesity and experienced postoperative symptomatic GI episodes. Patients were randomly assigned to the probiotics group A (n = 20; 1 g Clostridium butyricum MIYAIRI twice daily); probiotics group B (n = 20; Bifidobacterium longum BB536 twice daily); or digestive enzymes group (n = 20; Aczym, containing 100 mg takadiastase N, 20 mg cellulase AP, 50 mg lipase MY, and 100 mg pancreatin, twice daily). Quality of life was measured using the modified Gastrointestinal Quality of Life Index (mGIQLI) before and after the 2-week intervention. Preintervention patient characteristics and mGIQLI scores were similar among the 3 groups. After the 2-week intervention, the mean mGIQLI score improved from 57.4 to 63.9 points in the entire sample and also within each group for 7 items specifically for 7: excessive passage of gas, foul smell of flatulence, belching, heartburn, abdominal noises, abdominal bloating, and abdominal pain. Administration of probiotics or digestive enzymes may improve symptomatic GI episodes after gastric bypass surgeries and improve quality of life, at least initially. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Bariatric Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Does previous open renal surgery or percutaneous nephrolithotomy affect the outcomes and complications of percutaneous nephrolithotomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozgor, Faruk; Kucuktopcu, Onur; Sarılar, Omer; Toptas, Mehmet; Simsek, Abdulmuttalip; Gurbuz, Zafer Gokhan; Akbulut, Mehmet Fatih; Muslumanoglu, Ahmet Yaser; Binbay, Murat

    2015-11-01

    In this study, we aim to evaluate the effectiveness and safety of PNL in patients with a history of open renal surgery or PNL by comparing with primary patients and to compare impact of previous open renal surgery and PNL on the success and complications of subsequent PNL. Charts of patients, who underwent PNL at our institute, were analyzed retrospectively. Patients were divided into three groups according to history of renal stone surgery. Patients without history of renal surgery were enrolled into Group 1. Other patients with previous PNL and previous open surgery were categorized as Group 2 and Group 3. Preoperative characteristic, perioperative data, stone-free status, and complication rates were compared between the groups. Stone-free status was accepted as completing clearance of stone and residual fragment smaller than 4 mm. Eventually, 2070 patients were enrolled into the study. Open renal surgery and PNL had been done in 410 (Group 2) and 131 (Group 3) patients, retrospectively. The mean operation time was longer (71.3 ± 33.5 min) in Group 2 and the mean fluoroscopy time was longer (8.6 ± 5.0) in Group 3 but there was no statistically significant difference between the groups. Highest stone clearance was achieved in primary PNL patients (81.62%) compared to the other groups (77.10% in Group 2 and 75.61% in Group 3). Stone-free rate was not significantly different between Group 2 and Group 3. Fever, pulmonary complications, and blood transfusion requirement were not statically different between groups but angioembolization was significantly higher in Group 2. Percutaneous nephrolithotomy is a safe and effective treatment modality for patients with renal stones regardless history of previous PNL or open renal surgery. However, history of open renal surgery but not PNL significantly reduced PNL success.

  12. Feasibility and safety of laparoscopic nephrectomy for nonfunctioning kidney in patients with previous renal surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nouralizadeh, Akbar; Azizi, Valiollah; Lashay, Alireza; Amini, Erfan; Ghaed, Mohammad Ali; Ziaee, Seyed Amir Mohsen; Simforoosh, Nasser

    2012-09-01

    Performing laparoscopic nephrectomy in the setting of previous renal surgery may be challenging and associated with a higher complication rate. We conducted this study to assess the feasibility and safety of laparoscopic nephrectomy among patients with a history of ipsilateral renal surgery. We reviewed the chart of 193 patients who underwent transperitoneal laparoscopic nephrectomy for nonfunctioning kidney between April 2007 and March 2011. The study population was divided into two groups: Group 1 comprised 37 patients with a history of ipsilateral renal surgery, and Group 2 consisted of 156 patients with no history of previous renal surgery. Baseline characteristics and preoperative variables were similar in both groups. Mean operative time, complication rate, and hospital stay were comparable between the two groups. A nonstatistically significant trend toward a higher transfusion rate was noted in Group 1 patients. The operation was converted to open nephrectomy in 1 (2.7%) and 3 (1.9%) patients of Groups 1 and 2, respectively (P=.765). Laparoscopic nephrectomy of the nonfunctioning kidney is a feasible and safe procedure in the setting of previous renal surgery and is not associated with a significant increase in operative time and complication rate compared with patients with no prior ipsilateral renal surgery.

  13. Influence of previous breast surgery in sentinel lymph node biopsy in patients with breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Prior, V; Díaz-Expósito, R; Casáns Tormo, I

    The aim of this study was to review the feasibility of selective sentinel lymph node biopsy in patients with previous surgery for breast cancer, as well as to examine the factors that may interfere with sentinel node detection. A retrospective review was performed on 91 patients with breast cancer and previous breast surgery, and who underwent sentinel lymph node biopsy. Patients were divided into two groups according to their previous treatment: aesthetic breast surgery in 30 patients (group I) and breast-conserving surgery in 61 (group II). Lymphoscintigraphy was performed after an intra-tumour injection in 21 cases and a peri-areolar injection in 70 cases. An analysis was made of lymphatic drainage patterns and overall sentinel node detection according to clinical, pathological and surgical variables. The overall detection of the sentinel lymph node in the lymphoscintigraphy was 92.3%, with 7.7% of extra-axillary drainages. The identification rate was similar after aesthetic breast surgery (93.3%) and breast-conserving surgery (91.8%). Sentinel lymph nodes were found in the contralateral axilla in two patients (2.2%), and they were included in the histopathology study. The non-identification rate in the lymphoscintigraphy was 7.7%. There was a significantly higher non-detection rate in the highest histological grade tumours (28.6% grade III, 4.5% grade I and 3.6% grade II). Sentinel lymph node biopsy in patients with previous breast surgery is feasible and deserves further studies to assess the influence of different aspects in sentinel node detection in this clinical scenario. A high histological grade was significantly associated with a lower detection. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y SEMNIM. All rights reserved.

  14. Immediate free jejunum transfer for salvage surgery of gastric tube necrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umezawa, Hiroki; Matsutani, Takeshi; Ogawa, Rei; Hyakusoku, Hiko

    2014-01-01

    Gastric tube necrosis after esophagus cancer surgery is a rare but critical situation. Salvage reconstruction of the esophagus remains a challenging procedure for head and neck surgeons. Historically, surgeons have employed a two-stage salvage surgery consisting of debridement followed by reconstruction. While this procedure generates good results, the time to restart oral alimentation is long. The present report describes the case of a 62-year-old male who developed gastric tube necrosis 3 days after undergoing surgery for thoracic-cervical esophageal cancer and immediate reconstruction with the retrosternal gastric pullup technique. He was treated with debridement and simultaneous free jejunum transfer 4 days after the primary surgery. He was able to restart oral alimentation 10 days after the salvage surgery. This rapid return to oral alimentation is a major advantage of the one-stage immediate esophagus salvage reconstruction. Another advantage is the ease of the reconstructive procedure: the absence of scarring and prolonged inflammation, which are disadvantages of the two-stage procedure, meant that recipient vessel selection and anastomosis were uncomplicated. The one-step procedure may be particularly useful in cases where the inflammation is discovered early.

  15. Lung Transplantation From Donors After Previous Cardiac Surgery: Ideal Graft in Marginal Donor?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palleschi, A; Mendogni, P; Tosi, D; Montoli, M; Carrinola, R; Mariolo, A V; Briganti, F; Nosotti, M

    2017-05-01

    Lung transplantation is a limited by donor pool shortage. Despite the efforts to extend the graft acceptability with recurrent donor criteria reformulations, previous cardiothoracic surgery is still considered a contraindication. A donor who underwent cardiac surgery could potentially provide an ideal lung but high intraoperative risks and intrinsic technical challenges are expected during the graft harvesting. The purpose of this study is to present our dedicated protocol and four clinical cases of successful lung procurements from donors who had a previous major cardiac surgery. One donor had ascending aortic root (AAR) substitution, another had mitral valve substitution, and two had coronary artery bypass surgery. The others' eligibility criteria for organ allocation, such as ABO compatibility, PaO 2 /FiO 2 ratio, absence of aspiration, or sepsis were respected. In one of the cases with previous coronary bypass grafting, the donor had a veno-arterial extracorporeal membrane oxygenation support. Consequently, the grafts required an ex vivo lung perfusion evaluation. We report the technical details of procurement and postoperative courses of recipients. All procurements were uneventful, without lung damage or waste of abdominal organs related to catastrophic intraoperative events. All recipients had a successful clinical outcome. We believe that successful transplantation is achievable even in a complicated setting, such as cases involving donors with previous cardiac surgery frequently are. Facing lung donor shortage, we strongly support any effort to avoid the loss of possible acceptable lungs. In particular, previous major cardiac surgery does not strictly imply a poor quality of lungs as well as unsustainable graft procurement. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Bone Structural Changes and Estimated Strength After Gastric Bypass Surgery Evaluated by HR-pQCT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frederiksen, Katrine Diemer; Hanson, Stine; Hansen, Stinus

    2016-01-01

    Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery (RYGB) is an effective treatment of morbid obesity, with positive effects on obesity-related complications. The treatment is associated with bone loss, which in turn might increase fracture risk. The aim of this study was to evaluate changes in bone mineral densit...... increased risk of fracture in bariatric patients after surgery. We only observed bone structural changes in the weight-bearing bone, which indicates that mechanical un-loading is the primary mediator.......Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery (RYGB) is an effective treatment of morbid obesity, with positive effects on obesity-related complications. The treatment is associated with bone loss, which in turn might increase fracture risk. The aim of this study was to evaluate changes in bone mineral density...

  17. Effects of Peripheral Neurotensin on Appetite Regulation and Its Role in Gastric Bypass Surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ratner, Cecilia; Skov, Louise J; Raida, Zindy

    2016-01-01

    increased proopiomelanocortin mRNA in the arcuate nucleus. We also investigated the importance of NT for the decreased food intake after gastric bypass surgery in a rat model of Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB). NT was increased in plasma and in the gastrointestinal tract in RYGB rats, and pharmacological......Neurotensin (NT) is a peptide expressed in the brain and in the gastrointestinal tract. Brain NT inhibits food intake, but the effects of peripheral NT are less investigated. In this study, peripheral NT decreased food intake in both mice and rats, which was abolished by a NT antagonist. Using c...

  18. Evaluating ranitidine, pantoprazole and placebo on gastric pH in elective surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tapas Bhattacharyya

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Concern about the grim nature of postoperative acid aspiration syndrome grew among the anesthesiologist over the years warranting the need for pre-emptive intervention. The aim of the study is to compare the effects of preoperative oral ranitidine versus pantoprazole given in regulating gastric pH in elective surgery. Methods: This prospective, parallel group, controlled, randomized, single-blind study was conducted at a tertiary care postgraduate teaching institute at Kolkata, involving 120 participants of either sex, aged 18-60 years of American Society of Anesthesiologists physical status I and II, who were scheduled for elective surgery under general anesthesia lasting for more than 2 h. The participants were divided into three groups. In group A (n=40 participants received placebo tablet, in group B (n=40 participants received ranitidine tablet while in group C (n=40, participants received pantoprazole tablet and their gastric pH estimated serially. Results: The participants in the three groups were comparable in terms of age, sex, body weight, duration of surgery and type of surgery distribution. In regard to changes in gastric pH trends, there was no statistically significant difference between serial pH values in group A (Friedman test; P>0.05 and group C participants. (P>0.05. However, the mean preoperative gastric pH values (7.140±.7652 were significantly lower than mean pH values (7.253±.7514 after 2 h postoperatively in group B participants (P<0.05. Conclusion: From the observations and analyses of the present study, it can be inferred that ranitidine is more effective than pantoprazole to raise the gastric pH for prevention of aspiration pneumonitis.

  19. Erythromycin for Gastric Emptying in Patients Undergoing General Anesthesia for Emergency Surgery: A Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czarnetzki, Christoph; Elia, Nadia; Frossard, Jean-Louis; Giostra, Emiliano; Spahr, Laurent; Waeber, Jean-Luc; Pavlovic, Gordana; Lysakowski, Christopher; Tramèr, Martin R

    2015-08-01

    Patients undergoing emergency procedures under general anesthesia have impaired gastric emptying and are at high risk for aspiration of gastric contents. Erythromycin has strong gastric prokinetic properties. To evaluate the efficacy of erythromycin lactobionate in gastric emptying in patients undergoing emergency surgery. The Erythro-Emerge trial was a single-center, randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled clinical trial in patients undergoing emergency surgery under general anesthesia at Geneva University Hospitals. We included 132 patients from March 25, 2009, through April 10, 2013, and all patients completed the study. Randomization was stratified for trauma and nontrauma procedures. The randomization code was opened on April 23, 2013, and analyses were performed through July 26, 2013. We performed an intention-to-treat analysis. Patients were randomized to intravenous erythromycin lactobionate, 3 mg/kg, or placebo 15 minutes before tracheal intubation. Patients were followed up for 24 hours. The primary outcome was a clear stomach, defined as less than 40 mL of liquids and no solids and identified through endoscopy immediately after intubation. The secondary outcome was the pH level of residual gastric content. A clear stomach was diagnosed in 42 of 66 patients (64%) receiving placebo compared with 53 of 66 patients (80%) receiving erythromycin (risk ratio, 1.26 [95% CI, 1.01-1.57]). In the population undergoing surgery for nontrauma, the association between receipt of erythromycin and having a clear stomach (adjusted odds ratio [95% CI]) was statistically significant (13.4 [1.49-120]; P = .02); in the population undergoing surgery for trauma, it was not (1.81 [0.64-5.16]; P = .26). Median (interquartile range) pH of the residual gastric liquid was 2 (1-4) in 36 patients receiving placebo and 6 (3-7) in 16 receiving erythromycin (P = .002). Patients receiving erythromycin had nausea (20 [30%] vs 4 [6%]) and stomach cramps (15 [23%] vs 2 [3

  20. Reconstructive surgery after jejunoileal bypass or gastric partition operations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bingham, H G

    1982-05-01

    Twenty-five morbidly obese patients had plastic operations to remove redundant tissue after either jejunoileal bypass or gastric partition. The average weight loss in this group of patients was 79.9 kg (176 lb) and the average age was 32 years. Abdominoplasty was the most common operation, and, although there was no mortality, postoperative complications were common and usually related to wound healing. The average hospital stay was ten days. Most of these patients were pleased with their results and lived happier and more productive lives.

  1. Reirradiation, surgery and IORT for recurrent rectal cancer in previously irradiated patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vermaas, Maarten; Nuyttens, Joost J.M.E.; Ferenschild, Floris T.J.; Verhoef, Cornelis; Eggermont, Alexander M.M.; Wilt, Johannes H.W. de

    2008-01-01

    A total of 11 patients with recurrent rectal cancer who had been previously irradiated were treated with preoperative reirradiation (median dose 30 Gy), surgery and IORT. This treatment was related with high morbidity, a short pain-free survival (5 months) and poor local control (27% after 3 years), although some patients have long-term distant control and survival

  2. Co-existence of exfoliation syndrome, previous iris surgery, and heterochromia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konstas, A G; Williamson, T H

    1993-12-01

    A case is described where exfoliation syndrome developed in a relatively young patient with heterochromia. The patient had previously undergone large radial iridotomies as part of penetrating keratoplasty procedures. This case illustrates an association between iris surgery and early manifestation of exfoliation syndrome.

  3. Psychosocial Predictors of Change in Depressive Symptoms Following Gastric Banding Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preiss, Kymberlie; Clarke, David; O'Brien, Paul; de la Piedad Garcia, Xochitl; Hindle, Annemarie; Brennan, Leah

    2018-02-08

    The aim of this study is to identify psychosocial variables associated with the relationship between weight loss and change in depressive symptoms following gastric banding surgery. Ninety-nine adults completed self-report questionnaires assessing depressive symptoms and other psychosocial variables (self-esteem, body image dissatisfaction, perceived physical health, and perceived weight-based stigmatisation) prior to gastric-band surgery and monthly for 6-month post-surgery. Weight, depressive symptoms, and other psychosocial variables improved significantly 1-month post-surgery and remained lower to 6 months. Weight loss from baseline to 1- and 6-months post-surgery significantly correlated with change in depressive symptoms. Body image dissatisfaction and self-esteem accounted for some of the variance in change in depressive symptoms from baseline to 1-month and baseline to 6-months post-surgery. Depressive symptoms improved significantly and rapidly after bariatric surgery, and body image dissatisfaction and self-esteem predicted change in depressive symptoms. Interventions targeting body image and self-esteem may improve depressive symptoms for those undergoing weight loss interventions.

  4. Current role of endovascular therapy in Marfan patients with previous aortic surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ibrahim Akin

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Ibrahim Akin, Stephan Kische, Tim C Rehders, Tushar Chatterjee, Henrik Schneider, Thomas Körber, Christoph A Nienaber, Hüseyin InceDepartment of Medicine, Division of Cardiology at the University Hospital Rostock, Rostock School of Medicine, Ernst-Heydemann-Str. 6, 18057 Rostock, GermanyAbstract: The Marfan syndrome is a heritable disorder of the connective tissue which affects the cardiovascular, ocular, and skeletal system. The cardiovascular manifestation with aortic root dilatation, aortic valve regurgitation, and aortic dissection has a prevalence of 60% to 90% and determines the premature death of these patients. Thirty-four percent of the patients with Marfan syndrome will have serious cardiovascular complications requiring surgery in the first 10 years after diagnosis. Before aortic surgery became available, the majority of the patients died by the age of 32 years. Introduction in the aortic surgery techniques caused an increase of the 10 year survival rate up to 97%. The purpose of this article is to give an overview about the feasibility and outcome of stent-graft placement in the descending thoracic aorta in Marfan patients with previous aortic surgery.Keywords: Marfan syndrome, aortic dissection, root replacement, stent-graft, previous aortic surgery

  5. [RETRACTED ARTICLE] Gastric and jejunal histopathological changes in patients undergoing bariatric surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosemary Simões Nomelini RODRIGUES

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT BACKGROUND Morbid obesity is a multifactorial disease that is increasingly treated by surgery. OBJECTIVE To evaluate gastric histopathological changes in obese, and to compare with patients who underwent gastrojejunal bypass and the jejunal mucosa after the surgery. METHODS This is an observational study performed at a tertiary public hospital, evaluating endoscopic biopsies from 36 preoperative patients and 35 postoperative. RESULTS In the preoperative group, 80.6% had chronic gastritis, which was active in 38.9% (77.1% and 20.1%, respectively, in the postoperative. The postoperative group had a significant reduction in Helicobacter pylori infection (P=0.0001. A longer length of the gastric stump and a time since surgery of more than two years were associated with Helicobacter pylori infection. The jejunal mucosa was normal in 91.4% and showed slight nonspecific chronic inflammation in 8.6%. CONCLUSION There was a reduction in the incidence of Helicobacter pylori infection in the postoperative group. A longer length of the gastric stump and longer time elapsed since surgery were associated with Helicobacter pylori infection. The jejunal mucosa was considered normal in an absolute majority of patients.

  6. Robot-assisted oesophageal and gastric surgery for benign disease: antireflux operations and Heller's myotomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falkenback, Dan; Lehane, Christopher W; Lord, Reginald V N

    2015-03-01

    Robot-assisted general surgery operations are being performed more frequently. This review investigates whether robotic assistance results in significant advantages or disadvantages for the operative treatment of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease and achalasia. The electronic databases (Medline, Embase, PubMed) were searched for original English language publications for antireflux surgery and Heller's myotomy between January 1990 and December 2013. Thirty-three publications included antireflux operations and 20 included Heller's myotomy. The publications indicate that the safety and effectiveness of robotic surgery is similar to that of conventional minimally invasive surgery for both operations. The six randomized trials of robot-assisted versus laparoscopic antireflux surgery showed no significant advantages but significantly higher costs for the robotic method. Gastric perforation during non-redo robotic fundoplication occurred in four trials. No consistent advantage for robot-assisted antireflux surgery has been demonstrated, and there is an increased cost with current robotic technology. A reported advantage for robotic in reducing the perforation rate during Heller's myotomy for achalasia remains unproven. Gastric perforation during robotic fundoplication may be due to the lack of haptic feedback combined with the superhuman strength of the robot. © 2014 Royal Australasian College of Surgeons.

  7. Gastric Bypass Surgery but Not Caloric Restriction Improves Reproductive Function in Obese Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Frank, Aaron P.; Zechner, Juliet F.; Clegg, Deborah J

    2016-01-01

    In women, obesity is associated with decrements in reproductive health that are improved with weight loss. Due to the difficulty of maintaining weight loss through lifestyle interventions, surgical interventions have become popular treatments for obesity. We examined how weight loss induced by Roux-en Y gastric bypass surgery (RYGB) or calorie restriction impacted expression of hypothalamic genes related to energy intake and reproduction. RYGB and calorie restriction induced equivalent weight...

  8. Gastric bypass surgery: Improving psoriasis through a GLP-1-dependent mechanism?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Faurschou, Annesofie; Zachariae, Claus; Skov, Lone

    2011-01-01

    Psoriasis is a common inflammatory skin disease and obesity constitutes a risk factor for the disease. Obese patients with psoriasis are often more difficult to treat and are at increased risk for dyslipidemia, diabetes, hypertension and cardiovascular disease. Case reports suggest that gastric...... bypass surgery in patients with psoriasis may result in complete remission of the disease. A substantial weight loss is achieved in the months following surgery, which is likely to reduce psoriasis symptoms and risk of comorbidities. Interestingly, however, it has been described that improvement...

  9. Cervicothoracic junction arthroplasty after previous fusion surgery for adjacent segment degeneration: case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekhon, Lali

    2005-01-01

    This is the first reported case of cervical arthroplasty using the Bryan Cervical Disc Prosthesis System (Medtronic Sofamor Danek, Inc., Memphis, TN) in the management of adjacent segment degeneration associated with previous fusion surgery and surgery at the cervicothoracic junction. This case report describes a 25-year-old woman who initially underwent a two-level anterior cervical fusion in 1998, 2 years after being involved in a motor vehicle accident. She was well until 18 months before presentation, when she developed bilateral shoulder pain, mechanical neck pain worse on flexion, and bilateral C8 distribution arm pain and paresthesia. On clinical examination, no focal deficits were found, although the range of motion was reduced. Preoperative cervical spine x-rays and magnetic resonance scanning confirmed accelerated degeneration of the C4-C5 and C7-T1 disc spaces, with evidence of neural compression at those levels. After careful consideration of various treatment options and failure of all conservative measures, the patient underwent an anterior C4-C5 and C7-T1 decompression with removal of the anterior cervical plate and placement of two artificial disc prostheses. After surgery, her course was uncomplicated and she was discharged from hospital well. There was complete resolution of the arm symptoms and reduction of the neck pain, with a reduction in the amount of analgesia she was taking. Seven months after surgery, she remains well with repeat x-rays confirming motion at the operated levels. This case demonstrates that cervical arthroplasty is a reasonable treatment option for patients who have had previous surgery in which interbody fusion has been performed and who have developed degeneration of adjacent levels. Despite the altered biomechanics at the cervicothoracic junction, no adverse features were noted with arthroplasty at this level.

  10. Cisapride does not alter gastric volume or pH in patients undergoing ambulatory surgery.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Lydon, A

    2012-02-03

    PURPOSE: To evaluate the efficacy of 20 mg cisapride p.o. in reducing residual gastric volume and pH in adult ambulatory surgical patients. METHODS: Using a prospective randomised double-blind controlled design, we administered either 20 mg cisapride p.o. or placebo preoperatively to 64 ASA 1-2 ambulatory surgical patients. Following induction of anesthesia we measured volume and pH of residual gastric contents, using blind aspiration through an orogastric tube. Parametric data were analysed using unpaired, one tail Students\\' t test. Non-parametric data were analysed using Fishers Exact test and Chi square analysis. Statistical significance was accepted at the probability level of < 0.05. RESULTS: Residual gastric volumes were similar in the two groups (19.5 +\\/- 23.8, 23.9 +\\/- 24.4 ml), in the cisapride and placebo groups respectively, P=0.24). Data shown are mean (+\\/- SD). The proportions of patients with a residual gastric volume exceeding 0.4 ml x kg(-1) were similar in the two groups (4 of 28, and 8 of 23 patients in the cisapride and placebo groups respectively, P=0.09). The pH of the residual gastric contents were similar in the cisapride and placebo groups (1.6 +\\/- 0.5, 1.4 +\\/- 0.5, respectively, P=0.26). The proportions of patients with pH < 2.5 was also similar in the cisapride and placebo groups (21 of 25, and 20 of 21 patients respectively, P=0.2). CONCLUSIONS: Preoperative administration of 20 mg cisapride p.o. to patients scheduled for outpatient surgery does not alter either the volume or the pH of gastric contents. Its use in this setting is of no apparent clinical benefit.

  11. Incidence and risk factors for hospital-acquired pneumonia after surgery for gastric cancer: results of prospective surveillance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohri, Yasuhiko; Tonouchi, Hitoshi; Miki, Chikao; Kobayashi, Minako; Kusunoki, Masato

    2008-06-01

    Postoperative hospital-acquired pneumonia (HAP) is recognized as a major risk associated with surgery. Although upper abdominal surgery is known to have the highest incidence of postoperative HAP, little is known about the risk factors that contribute to HAP after gastric cancer surgery. The aim of this study was to determine the incidence and risk factors for HAP after elective surgery for gastric cancer. We conducted prospective surveillance of all elective gastric resections by surgeons in ten affiliated hospitals, including ours, from May 2001 to May 2005. The outcome of interest was postoperative HAP. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to determine the predictive significance of variables in gastric cancer surgery. A total of 529 patients undergoing elective operations for gastric cancer were admitted to the program. Postoperative HAP was identified in 20 patients (3.6%). Univariate and multivariate analyses showed that male gender and intra- and/or postoperative blood transfusion were independently predictive of postoperative HAP. Male gender and intra- and/or postoperative blood transfusion were independent risk factors for the development of HAP after elective resection of gastric cancer. Surgeons should keep these risk factors in mind when managing postoperative patients.

  12. Impaired alcohol metabolism after gastric bypass surgery: a case-crossover trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodard, Gavitt A; Downey, John; Hernandez-Boussard, Tina; Morton, John M

    2011-02-01

    Severe obesity remains the leading public health crisis of the industrialized world, with bariatric surgery the only effective and enduring treatment. Poor psychological adjustment has been occasionally reported postoperatively. In addition, evidence suggests that patients can metabolize alcohol differently after gastric bypass. Preoperatively and at 3 and 6 months postoperatively, 19 Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) patients' breath alcohol content (BAC) was measured every 5 minutes after drinking 5 oz red wine to determine peak BAC and time until sober in a case-crossover design preoperatively and at 6 months postoperatively. Patients reported symptoms experienced when intoxicated and answered a questionnaire of drinking habits. The peak BAC in patients after RYGB was considerably higher at 3 months (0.059%) and 6 months (0.088%) postoperatively than matched preoperative levels (0.024%). Patients also took considerably more time to return to sober at 3 months (61 minutes) and 6 months (88 minutes) than preoperatively (49 minutes). Postoperative intoxication was associated with lower levels of diaphoresis, flushing, and hyperactivity and higher levels of dizziness, warmth, and double vision. Postoperative patients reported drinking considerably less alcohol, fewer preferred beer, and more preferred wine than before surgery. This is the first study to match preoperative and postoperative alcohol metabolism in gastric bypass patients. Post-RYGB patients have much higher peak BAC after ingesting alcohol and require more time to become sober. Patients who drink alcohol after gastric bypass surgery should exercise caution. Copyright © 2011 American College of Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Two-step conversion surgery after failed laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding. Comparison between laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass and laparoscopic gastric sleeve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carandina, Sergio; Maldonado, Pablo S; Tabbara, Malek; Valenti, Antonio; Rivkine, Emmanuel; Polliand, Claude; Barrat, Christophe

    2014-01-01

    Despite its worldwide popularity, laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding (LAGB) requires revisional surgery for failures or complications, in 20-60% of cases. The purpose of this study was to compare in terms of efficacy and safety, the conversion of failed LAGB to laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (LRYGB) and laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy. (LSG). The bariatric database of our institution was reviewed to identify patients who had undergone conversion of failed LAGB to LRYGB or to LSG, from November 2007 to June 2012. A total of 108 patients were included. Of these, 74 (68.5%) underwent conversion to LRYGB and 34 to LSG. All of the procedures were performed in 2-stage and laparoscopically. The mean follow-up for the LRYGB group was 29.1±17.9 months while for the LSG patients was 24.2±14.3 months. The mean body mass index (BMI) prior LRYGB and LSG was 45.6±7.8 and 47.5±5.6 (P = .09), respectively. Postoperative complications occurred in 16.2% of the LRYGB patients and in 2.9% of the LSG group (P = .04). Mean percentage of excess weight loss was 59.9%±16.2% and 70.2%±16.7% in LRYGB, and it was 52.2%±11.4% and 59.9%±14.4% in LSG at 12 months (P = .007) and 24 months (P = .01) after conversion. In this series, LRYGB and LSG are both effective and adequate revisional procedure after failure of LAGB. While LRYGB seems to ensure greater weight loss at 24 months follow-up, LSG is associated with a lower postoperative morbidity. Copyright © 2014 American Society for Bariatric Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Cumulative Radiation Exposure during Follow-Up after Curative Surgery for Gastric Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Yeo Jin; Chung, Yong Eun; Lim, Joon Seok; Kim, Joo Hee; Kim, Young Jin; Lee, Hye Jeong; Kim, Myeong Jin; Kim, Ki Whang; You, Je Sung

    2012-01-01

    To quantify the cumulative effective dose (cED) of radiation due to repeated CT and PET/CT examinations after curative resection of gastric cancer and to assess the lifetime attributable risk (LAR) estimates based on Biological Effects of Ionizing Radiation VII models. Patients who underwent a curative resection for gastric cancer between January 2006 and December 2006 and were followed-up until May 2010 were included in this study. The cED was calculated by using the dose-length product values and conversion factors for quantitative risk assessment of radiation exposure. cED and LAR were compared between early and advanced gastric cancer patients and among American Joint Committee on Cancer TNM stage groups (stage I, II, and III). The nonparametric Mann-Whitney U and Kruskal-Wallis tests, followed by a post-hoc analysis with Bonferroni adjustment, were employed as part of the statistical analysis. The overall median cED was 57.8 mSv (interquartile range [IQR], 43.9-74.7). The cED was significantly higher in the advanced (median, 67.0; IQR, 49.1-102.3) than in the early gastric cancer group (median, 52.3; IQR, 41.5-67.9) (p < 0.001), and increased as the TNM stage increased. For radiation exposure, 62% of all patients received an estimated cED of over 50 mSv, while 11% of patients received over 100 mSv. The median LAR of cancer incidence was 0.28% (IQR, 0.20-0.40) and there were significant differences between the early gastric cancer and advanced gastric cancer group (p < 0.001) as well as among the three TNM stage groups (p = 0.015). The LAR of cancer incidence exceeded 1% in 2.4% of the patients. The cED increases proportionally along with tumor stage and, even in early gastric cancer or stage I patients, cED is much higher than that found among the general population. Considering the very good prognosis of early gastric cancer after curative surgery, the cED should be considered when designing a postoperative follow-up CT protocol.

  15. Clinical outcomes of Laparoscopically Assisted Vaginal Hysterectomy at patients who had previous abdominopelvic surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Riza Odabasi

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To determine clinical outcomes of Laparoscopically Assisted Vaginal Hysterectomy (LAVH at patients who had previous abdominopelvic surgery.\tDesign: A clinical observational, prospective, non randomised trial comparing outcomes of 13 patients who had previous abdominopelvic surgery with outcomes of 19 patients who had not surgery.\tSetting: Adnan Menderes University Faculty of Medicine, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology.\tPatients: Thirty-two subjects [average age 51,1±6,9 (37-66] who had indication of total abdominal hysterectomy and bilateral\tsalpingooferectomy due to benign pathologies.\tInterventions: According to ACOG, LAVH was performed by using the Garry technique at the trocar insertions, the Reich technique\tat the laparoscopic phase and the Heaney technique at the vaginal phase by the same operator. After adhesiolysis and diagnostic procedures, ureters were dissected medially. By coagulating, bilateral round and infundibulopelvic ligaments were cut after the\tmobilisation of bladder. The operation was completed by the same operation team by vaginal approach consequently. At all operations, 80 W unipolar or 150 W bipolar diathermic dissection and 25-35 W unipolar diathermic cutting were performed.\tMain outcome measures: Age, parity, menopausal status, preoperative indications, type of previous abdominopelvic surgey and incision, intraoperative indications, adhesion scores, rate of unintended laparotomy, operative time, uterus weight, loss of blood,\tcomplications, postoperative pain scores and analgesic requirements, time necessary for returning to normal intestinal function, length of hospitalisation and rate of readmission to hospital.\tRESULTS: When compared with the patients who had not previous abdominopelvic surgery, all adhesion scores, uterus weight, operative time and the number of total postoperative complications were found significantly high at patients who had previous\tsurgery. Loss of blood, the rate

  16. Acute gastric incarceration from thoracic herniation in pregnancy following laparoscopic antireflux surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brygger, Louise; Fristrup, Claus Wilki; Severin Gråe Harbo, Frederik

    2013-01-01

    Diaphragmatic hernia is a rare complication in pregnancy which due to misdiagnosis or management delays may be life-threatening. We report a case of a woman in the third trimester of pregnancy who presented with sudden onset of severe epigastric and thoracic pain radiating to the back. Earlier...... in the index pregnancy, she had undergone laparoscopic antireflux surgery (ARS) for a hiatus hernia because of severe gastro-oesophageal reflux. Owing to increasing epigastric pain a CT scan was carried out which diagnosed wrap disruption with gastric herniation into the thoracic cavity and threatened...... incarceration. This is, to our knowledge, the first report of severe adverse outcome after ARS during pregnancy, with acute intrathoracic gastric herniation. We recommend the avoidance of ARS in pregnancy, and the need to advise women undergoing ARS of the postoperative risks if pregnancy occurs within a few...

  17. Gastrointestinal complications of bariatric Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sandrasegaran, Kumaresan; Rajesh, Arumugam; Lall, Chandana; Maglinte, Dean D.; Gomez, Gerardo A.; Lappas, John C.

    2005-01-01

    Obesity is rapidly becoming the most important public health issue in USA and Europe. Roux-en-Y gastric bypass is now established as the gold standard for treating intractable morbid or super obesity. We reviewed the imaging findings following this surgery in 234 patients. In this pictorial essay we present the CT and upper gastrointestinal contrast study appearances of the expected postoperative anatomy as well as a range of abdominal complications. The complications are classified into leaks, fistula and obstruction. Postoperative gastric outlet and small bowel obstruction can be caused by anastomotic stenosis, mesocolic tunnel stenosis, adhesions, stomal ulcer, obturation, intussusception and internal or external hernia. Small bowel obstruction may be of a simple, closed loop and/or strangulating type. The radiologist should be able to diagnose the type and possible cause of obstruction. (orig.)

  18. Gastrointestinal complications of bariatric Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sandrasegaran, Kumaresan; Rajesh, Arumugam; Lall, Chandana; Maglinte, Dean D. [Indiana University Medical Center, UH 0279, Department of Radiology, Indianapolis, IN (United States); Gomez, Gerardo A. [Wishard Memorial Hospital, Department of Surgery, Indianapolis (United States); Lappas, John C. [Wishard Memorial Hospital, Department of Radiology, Indianapolis (United States)

    2005-02-01

    Obesity is rapidly becoming the most important public health issue in USA and Europe. Roux-en-Y gastric bypass is now established as the gold standard for treating intractable morbid or super obesity. We reviewed the imaging findings following this surgery in 234 patients. In this pictorial essay we present the CT and upper gastrointestinal contrast study appearances of the expected postoperative anatomy as well as a range of abdominal complications. The complications are classified into leaks, fistula and obstruction. Postoperative gastric outlet and small bowel obstruction can be caused by anastomotic stenosis, mesocolic tunnel stenosis, adhesions, stomal ulcer, obturation, intussusception and internal or external hernia. Small bowel obstruction may be of a simple, closed loop and/or strangulating type. The radiologist should be able to diagnose the type and possible cause of obstruction. (orig.)

  19. Cure and prevention strategy for postoperative gastrointestinal fistula after esophageal and gastric cardiac cancer surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Youkui; Zhao, Hui; Xu, HongRui; Liu, Shuzhong; Li, Li; Jiang, Chunyang; Yang, Bingjun

    2014-01-01

    Gastrointestinal fistula is the most serious complication of esophageal and gastric cardiac cancer surgery. According to occurrence of organ, gastrointestinal fistula can be divided into anastomotic fistula, gastric fistula; According to occurrence site, fistula can be divided into cervical fistula, thoracic fistula; According to time of occurrence, can be divided into early, middle and late fistula. There are special types of fistula including ‘thoracic cavity’-stomach-bronchial fistula, ‘thoracic cavity’-stomach-aortic fistula. Early diagnosis needs familiarity with various types of clinical gastrointestinal fistulas. However, Prevention of gastrointestinal fistula is better than cure, including perioperative nutritional support, respiratory tract management, and acid suppression, positive treatment of complications, antibiotic prophylaxis, and gastrointestinal decompression and eating timing. Prevention can effectively reduce the incidence of postoperative gastrointestinal fistula. Collectively, early diagnosis and treatment, nutritional supports are key to reducing mortality of gastrointestinal fistula.

  20. Wernicke’s encephalopathy following Roux en Y gastric bypass surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azra Zafar

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Wernicke’s encephalopathy (WE is a serious neurological disorder characterized by a classical triad of acute mental confusion, ataxia, and opthalmoplegia due to thiamine deficiency. It was initially described in chronic alcoholics; however, any condition resulting in poor nutritional status places the patient at risk of WE. Bariatric surgery is now considered as an emergent cause of WE. The number of bariatric surgery is increasing for morbid obesity. We present a case of a 40-year-old male who presented with confusion and difficulty in maintaining the balance while walking 3 months after Roux en Y gastric bypass surgery. Diagnosis of WE was made on clinical ground and confirmed by magnetic resonance imaging of the brain, which showed bilateral hyperintense signals in paramedian thalami. Parenteral thiamine replacemen

  1. Psychological characteristics and associations with weight outcomes two years after gastric bypass surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beck, Nina Nonboe; Mehlsen, Mimi Yung; Støving, René Klinkby

    2012-01-01

    (EDI-2), Harvard Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS), and questions related specifically to binge eating. Forty-five patients (8 men, 37 women) out of 65 (67%) responded. Scores were significant higher on impulse regulation, interoceptive awareness, ineffectiveness, maturity fears and interpersonal......This study investigated symptoms of eating disorder, depression, and anxiety among Roux-en-Y gastric bypass patients two years after surgery, and the relationship between these characteristics and weight loss. Respondents completed assessment questionnaires including Eating Disorder Inventory-2...... distrust in comparison with a Danish norm group (p≤0.05). The weight losses obtained after surgery varied from 12 to 60% of the starting weights. Binge eating and ineffectiveness were found to significantly correlate with weight loss variations after surgery (p≤0.05). The results of this study indicate...

  2. Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery is effective in fibroblast growth factor-21 deficient mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Christopher D; Hao, Zheng; Mumphrey, Michael B; Townsend, R Leigh; Münzberg, Heike; Ye, Jianping; Berthoud, Hans-Rudolf

    2016-10-01

    The mechanisms by which bariatric surgeries so effectively and lastingly reduce body weight and normalize metabolic dysfunction are not well understood. Fibroblast growth fator-21 (FGF21) is a key regulator of metabolism and is currently considered for treatment of obesity. Although elevated by acute food deprivation, it is downregulated after weight loss induced by chronic calorie restriction but not after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery. Therefore, the goal of the present study was to assess the role of FGF21-signaling in the beneficial effects of Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery (RYGB). High-fat diet-induced obese FGF21-deficient (FGF21(-/-)) and wildtype (WT) mice were subjected to RYGB, sham surgery, or caloric restriction to match body weight of RYGB mice. Body weight, body composition, food intake, energy expenditure, glucose tolerance, and insulin sensitivity, as well as plasma levels and hepatic mRNA expression of FGF21 were measured. Hepatic expression and plasma levels of FGF21 are higher after RYGB compared with similar weight loss induced by caloric restriction, suggesting that elevated FGF21 might play a role in preventing increased hunger and weight regain after RYGB. However, although the body weight differential between RYGB and sham surgery was significantly reduced in FGF21(-/-) mice, RYGB induced similarly sustained body weight and fat mass loss, initial reduction of food intake, increased energy expenditure, and improvements in glycemic control in FGF21(-/-) and WT mice. FGF21 signaling is not a critical single factor for the beneficial metabolic effects of RYGB. This may open up the possibility to use FGF21 as adjuvant therapy in patients with ineffective bariatric surgeries.

  3. Peripheral Signals Mediate the Beneficial Effects of Gastric Surgery in Obesity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Barja-Fernández

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Obesity is nowadays a public health problem both in the industrialized world and developing countries. The different treatments to fight against obesity are not very successful with the exception of gastric surgery. The mechanism behind the achievement of this procedure remains unclear although the modifications in the pattern of gastrointestinal hormones production appear to be responsible for the beneficial effect. The gastrointestinal tract has emerged in the last time as an endocrine organ in charge of response to the different stimulus related to nutritional status by the modulation of more than 30 signals acting at central level to modulate food intake and body weight. The production of some of these gastric derived signals has been proved to be altered in obesity (ghrelin, CCK, and GLP-1. In fact, bariatric surgery modifies the production of both gastrointestinal and adipose tissue peripheral signals beyond the gut microbiota composition. Through this paper the main peripheral signals altered in obesity will be reviewed together with their modifications after bariatric surgery.

  4. Association Between Previous Meniscal Surgery and the Incidence of Chondral Lesions at Revision Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brophy, Robert H.; Wright, Rick W.; David, Tal S.; McCormack, Robert G.; Sekiya, Jon K.; Svoboda, Steven J.; Huston, Laura J.; Haas, Amanda K.; Steger-May, Karen

    2013-01-01

    Background Knees undergoing revision anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction typically have more intra-articular injuries than do knees undergoing primary reconstruction. Hypothesis Previous partial meniscectomy (PM) is associated with a higher rate of chondral lesions at revision ACL reconstruction, whereas previous meniscal repair (MR) is not associated with a higher rate of chondral lesions at revision ACL reconstruction, compared with knees undergoing revision ACL with no previous meniscal surgery. Study design Cohort study (Prevalence); Level of evidence, 2. Methods Data from a multicenter cohort was reviewed to determine the history of prior meniscal surgery (PM/MR) and the presence of grade II/III/IV chondral lesions at revision ACL reconstruction. The association between previous meniscal surgery and the incidence of chondral lesions was examined. Patient age was included as a covariate to determine if surgery type contributes predictive information independent of patient age. Results The cohort included 725 ACL revision surgeries. Chondrosis was associated with patient age (P meniscal surgery (P meniscal surgery (P meniscal surgery and knees with previous MR (P = .7). Previous partial meniscectomy was associated with a higher rate of chondrosis in the same compartment compared with knees without previous meniscal surgery (P meniscal surgery independent of the effect of patient age. Previous partial meniscectomy is associated with a higher incidence of articular cartilage lesions, whereas previous meniscal repair is not. Although this association may reflect underlying differences in the knee at the time of prior surgery, it does suggest that meniscal repair is preferable when possible at the time of ACL reconstruction. PMID:22374942

  5. Clinical significance of surgery for gastric submucosal tumours with size enlargement during watchful waiting period.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyazaki, Yasuhiro; Nakajima, Kiyokazu; Kurokawa, Yukinori; Takahashi, Tsuyoshi; Takiguchi, Shuji; Miyata, Hiroshi; Yamasaki, Makoto; Hirota, Seiichi; Nishida, Toshirou; Mori, Masaki; Doki, Yuichiro

    2013-08-01

    The true impact of surgery for small, asymptomatic and biopsy-negative gastric submucosal tumours (SMTs) with size enlargement during 'watchful waiting' period has not been fully understood. From 2005 to 2012, 100 patients with gastric SMTs underwent surgery. Twenty-three of them with size enlargement during observation period were enrolled in the retrospective analysis. Data included clinicopathologic findings, genetic findings, operative outcomes and prognoses. All patients (13 males, 10 females), with median age of 54 (41-71), had their lesions detected by routine health check-up (n=21) or incidentally (2). The tumours were 1.8 (0.5-4.0)cm in size at their initial detection, and enlarged up to 3.2 (2.0-7.0)cm at the operation during 63.0 (14.6-233.7) months. As surgical procedure, laparoscopic partial gastrectomy accounted for the majority (78.3%). Histologic examination revealed gastrointestinal stromal tumour (GIST) (21) and schwannoma (2). Although 16 out of 21 GISTs were categorised into 'Very low' (1), and 'Low' (13) risk according to Fletcher's classification, 'Intermediate' (5) and 'High' (2) risk were identified in the series. No recurrences/metastases were noted in 23.2 (0.9-87) months of postoperative follow-up. Our study revealed the existence of high mitotic GISTs in asymptomatic, small gastric SMTs with size enlargement, and laparoscopic surgery was safely applied to majority of those cases. Prompt surgical intervention should therefore be considered for those lesions. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Population pharmacokinetics of trastuzumab emtansine in previously treated patients with HER2-positive advanced gastric cancer (AGC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shang-Chiung; Kagedal, Matts; Gao, Yuying; Wang, Bei; Harle-Yge, Marie-Laurence; Girish, Sandhya; Jin, Jin; Li, Chunze

    2017-12-01

    Ado-trastuzumab emtansine (T-DM1) is an antibody-drug conjugate comprising trastuzumab conjugated via a stable thioether linker to DM1, a highly potent cytotoxic agent. A population pharmacokinetics (PK) analysis was performed to characterize T-DM1 PK and evaluate the impact of patient characteristics on T-DM1 PK in previously treated patients with HER2-positive advanced gastric cancer (AGC). Following T-DM1 weekly or every three weeks dosing, T-DM1 concentration measurements (n = 780) were collected from 136 patients in the GATSBY (NCT01641939) study and analyzed using nonlinear mixed effects modeling. The influence of demographic, baseline laboratory, and disease characteristics on T-DM1 PK was examined. T-DM1 PK was best described by a two-compartment model with parallel linear and nonlinear (Michaelis-Menten) elimination from the central compartment. The final population model estimated linear clearance (CL) of 0.79 L/day, volume of distribution in the central compartment (V c ) of 4.48 L, distribution clearance (Q) of 0.62 L/day, volume of distribution in the peripheral compartment (V p ) of 1.49 L, nonlinear CL of 2.06 L/day, and KM of 1.63 μg/mL. Parameter uncertainty was low to moderate for fixed effects, except KM (estimated with poor precision). Patients with high body weight and low baseline trastuzumab concentrations had significantly faster linear CL; those with higher body weight had significantly larger V c . In a HER2-positive AGC population, T-DM1 PK was best described by a two-compartment model with parallel linear and nonlinear elimination. Baseline body weight and trastuzumab concentration were identified as significant covariates for T-DM1 PK in a HER2-positive AGC population.

  7. Gastric bypass surgery reveals independency of obesity and diabetes melitus type 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenger, Mogens; Hansen, Dorte Lindqvist; Worm, Dorte; Hvolris, Lisbeth; Kristiansen, Viggo B; Carlsson, Elin Rebecka; Madsbad, Sten

    2016-11-09

    Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery is widely applied to ameliorate morbid obesity, including diabetes in people with type 2 diabetes. The latter vanish a few days after surgery for many, but not in all patients before any weight reduction has occurred. The explanation for this change in metabolic status is poorly understood, but the observation may suggest that the fate obesity and diabetes is only partly linked after surgery. The trajectories of weight reduction measured as reduced body mass index (BMI) in 741obese subjects with and without diabetes were evaluated. Evaluation was performed on three groups: 1) subjects that were non-diabetic before and after surgery; 2) subjects that were diabetics before surgery but non-diabetics after surgery; and 3) subjects that were diabetics before surgery and remained diabetics after surgery. The diabetic state was established at HbA1c above 48 mmol/mol. The trajectories differ significantly between groups and any sub-populations of groups, the latter identified by the distance between individual trajectories using a k-means procedure. The results suggest that different domains in the enormous genetic network governing basic metabolism are perturbed in obesity and diabetes, and in fact some of the patients are affected by two distinct diseases: obesity and diabetes mellitus type 2. Although RYGB "normalized" many glycaemic parameters in some of the diabetic subjects apparently converting to a non-diabetics state, other diabetic subjects stay diabetic in the context of the new gut anatomy after surgery. Thus, the obesity part of the glycaemic derangement may have been ameliorated, but some defects of the diabetic state had not.

  8. Predictors of psychological symptoms in morbidly obese patients after gastric bypass surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortega, Joaquin; Fernandez-Canet, Regina; Alvarez-Valdeita, Sagrario; Cassinello, Norberto; Baguena-Puigcerver, Maria Jose

    2012-01-01

    Morbid obesity is associated with debilitating psychosocial consequences, such as depression, anxiety, and low self-esteem. One of the main goals of bariatric surgery should not only be reducing weight and counteracting co-morbid conditions, but also improving postoperative psychosocial functioning. The objective of our study was to determine the preoperative variables that could predict the psychological symptoms 6 and 12 months after surgery to improve the clinical outcome of morbidly obese patients undergoing bariatric surgery. The setting was a university hospital in Spain. The study group consisted of 60 morbidly obese patients (46 women and 14 men) who had undergone gastric bypass surgery for weight reduction and had ≥ 1 year of follow-up. The patients were evaluated using different questionnaires (Symptom Checklist-90-Revised, Body Shape Questionnaire, Rosenberg Self-Esteem Questionnaire, COPE, Medical Outcomes Study Social Support Survey) at 3 points: before surgery, at 6 months postoperatively, and at 1 year postoperatively. To determine the influence of preoperative variables on long-term psychological status, a step-by-step multivariate linear regression analysis was performed, taking P self-esteem, instrumental support, and coping focused in the emotions were the main preoperative predictors for psychological symptoms 6 months after surgery. Preoperative drug abuse as a strategy of problem solving and mainly body image significantly predicted most of the psychological disorders 1 year after surgery. The study of different psychosocial variables in patients before bariatric surgery is an important aid to predict postoperative psychological functioning. Self-esteem and body image were the most influential factors in the postoperative psychological outcome of morbidly obese patients in our study. Copyright © 2012 American Society for Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Radiologic evaluation following Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery for morbid obesity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carucci, Laura R.; Turner, Mary Ann

    2005-01-01

    Morbid obesity is an increasing health problem, and bariatric surgery is becoming a popular treatment option. Radiologists must be familiar with performing and interpreting studies in this patient population. The typical postoperative findings of the Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGBP) procedure for morbid obesity on upper gastrointestinal (UGI) series are presented. An overview of the potential complications that may be diagnosed with contrast studies and computed tomography (CT) is provided in addition to a description of potential pitfalls in interpreting these studies

  10. Radiologic evaluation following Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery for morbid obesity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carucci, Laura R. [Department of Radiology, Virginia Commonwealth University Medical Center, P.O. Box 980615, Richmond, VA 23298-0615 (United States)]. E-mail: lcarucci@vcu.edu; Turner, Mary Ann [Department of Radiology, Virginia Commonwealth University Medical Center, P.O. Box 980615, Richmond, VA 23298-0615 (United States)

    2005-03-01

    Morbid obesity is an increasing health problem, and bariatric surgery is becoming a popular treatment option. Radiologists must be familiar with performing and interpreting studies in this patient population. The typical postoperative findings of the Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGBP) procedure for morbid obesity on upper gastrointestinal (UGI) series are presented. An overview of the potential complications that may be diagnosed with contrast studies and computed tomography (CT) is provided in addition to a description of potential pitfalls in interpreting these studies.

  11. Reasons and outcomes of laparoscopic revisional surgery after laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding for morbid obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Sheetal; Eckstein, Jeremy; Acholonu, Emeka; Abu-Jaish, Wasef; Szomstein, Samuel; Rosenthal, Raul J

    2010-01-01

    Laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding (LAGB) is a purely restrictive procedure that has been proved to be an effective tool in achieving weight loss. The low operative morbidity and reversibility are often seen as advantages of this procedure compared with other bariatric approaches. We have attempted to define the reasons for revisional surgery after LAGB and the outcomes. A retrospective review of a prospectively maintained database was performed from February 2001 to October 2008 at a center of excellence after institutional review board approval. The patients who had undergone revisional surgery after primary LAGB were evaluated. Of 343 patients who had undergone primary LAGB, 60 subsequently underwent a revisional procedure. In addition, 28 revisional procedures were performed on patients who had undergone primary LAGB at an outside institution. These procedures included 39 (44.3%) band removals alone, 12 (13.6%) band removals with conversion to sleeve gastrectomy, 13 (14.8%) band removals with conversion to Roux-en-Y gastric bypass, 9 (10.2%) band repositioning, and 2 (2.3%) band replacements. In addition, 13 (14.8%) port-related procedures (3 relocations, 6 reconnections, and 4 replacements/removals) were performed. Although reversible and efficacious, LAGB appears to have a high incidence of complications requiring revisional surgery and/or band removal. The results of our study have shown that laparoscopic revisional surgery after primary LAGB is safe and can be performed with minimal morbidity. Copyright 2010 American Society for Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Eating in mice with gastric bypass surgery causes exaggerated activation of brainstem anorexia circuit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mumphrey, M B; Hao, Z; Townsend, R L; Patterson, L M; Münzberg, H; Morrison, C D; Ye, J; Berthoud, H-R

    2016-06-01

    Obesity and metabolic diseases are at an alarming level globally and increasingly affect children and adolescents. Gastric bypass and other bariatric surgeries have proven remarkably successful and are increasingly performed worldwide. Reduced desire to eat and changes in eating behavior and food choice account for most of the initial weight loss and diabetes remission after surgery, but the underlying mechanisms of altered gut-brain communication are unknown. To explore the potential involvement of a powerful brainstem anorexia pathway centered around the lateral parabrachial nucleus (lPBN), we measured meal-induced neuronal activation by means of c-Fos immunohistochemistry in a new high-fat diet-induced obese mouse model of Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) at 10 and 40 days after RYGB or sham surgery. Voluntary ingestion of a meal 10 days after RYGB, but not after sham surgery, strongly and selectively activates calcitonin gene-related peptide neurons in the external lPBN as well as neurons in the nucleus tractus solitarius, area postrema and medial amygdala. At 40 days after surgery, meal-induced activation in all these areas was greatly diminished and did not reach statistical significance. The neural activation pattern and dynamics suggest a role of the brainstem anorexia pathway in the early effects of RYGB on meal size and food intake that may lead to adaptive neural and behavioral changes involved in the control of food intake and body weight at a lower level. However, selective inhibition of this pathway will be required for a more causal implication.

  13. Eating in mice with gastric bypass surgery causes exaggerated activation of brainstem anorexia circuit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mumphrey, Michael B.; Hao, Zheng; Townsend, R. Leigh; Patterson, Laurel M.; Münzberg, Heike; Morrison, Christopher C.; Ye, Jianping; Berthoud, Hans-Rudolf

    2016-01-01

    Background/Objective Obesity and metabolic diseases are at an alarming level globally and increasingly affect children and adolescents. Gastric bypass and other bariatric surgeries have proven remarkably successful and are increasingly performed worldwide. Reduced desire to eat and changes in eating behavior and food choice account for most of the initial weight loss and diabetes remission after surgery, but the underlying mechanisms of altered gut-brain communication are unknown. Subjects/Methods To explore the potential involvement of a powerful brainstem anorexia pathway centered around the lateral parabrachial nucleus (lPBN) we measured meal-induced neuronal activation by means of c-Fos immunohistochemistry in a new high-fat diet-induced obese mouse model of Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) at 10 and 40 days after RYGB or sham surgery. Results Voluntary ingestion of a meal 10 days after RYGB, but not after sham surgery, strongly and selectively activates calcitonin gene-related peptide neurons in the external lPBN as well as neurons in the nucleus tractus solitaries, area postrema, and medial amygdala. At 40 days after surgery, meal-induced activation in all these areas was greatly diminished and did not reach statistical significance. Conclusions The neural activation pattern and dynamics suggest a role of the brainstem anorexia pathway in the early effects of RYGB on meal size and food intake that may lead to adaptive neural and behavioral changes involved in the control of food intake and body weight at a lower level. However, selective inhibition of this pathway will be required for a more causal implication. PMID:26984418

  14. Outcomes of Two-Step Revisional Bariatric Surgery: Reasons for the Gastric Banding Explantation Matter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barreto, Savio George; Chisholm, Jacob; Schloithe, Ann; Collins, Jane; Kow, Lilian

    2018-02-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine whether the reason for gastric band explantation would influence percentage excess weight loss (%EWL) following revisional Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) or sleeve gastrectomy (SG). This is a retrospective cohort study, whose data are maintained in a prospective surgical database. The study period was from January 2012 to March 2017. Revisional surgeries were performed in a two-step manner, namely, first surgery LAGB explantation and second surgery (RYGB or SG). Two-way between-groups analysis of variance was used to examine effects of reason for band explantation (failed versus complication) and type of revisional surgery (RYGB versus SG) on %EWL at 10 months, 1 and 2 years. Cohort included 171 patients-146 women (85.4%) and 25 men, median age 51 years (range 22-76). Band-related complications accounted for 55% of explantations. Overall, 95 patients (56%) underwent a revisional RYGB, and 76 patients underwent a revisional SG. There was no difference in age or gender in terms of reason for band explantation or choice of revisional surgery. There was no difference in morbidity between the two groups (SG 2.6% versus RYGB 4.2%; p = .464). Patients undergoing revisional RYGB for failed weight loss had a significantly lower %EWL at 2 years compared to patients undergoing an SG for failed weight loss (p = .014) or an RYGB for band-related complications (p = .021). Patients undergoing revisional RYGB following band explantation for failed weight loss have a significantly lower %EWL at 2 years compared to patients undergoing an SG for failed weight loss or an RYGB for band-related complications.

  15. Three United Laparoscopic Surgery for the Treatment of Gastric Cardia Cancer-A Comparative Study with Laparotomy and Laparoscopy-Assisted Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhanxue; Sun, Shuyuan; Qi, Jinchun; Qiu, Shaofan; Wang, Haijun; Ru, Lina; Lin, Lin; Li, Zhong; Zhao, Zongmao

    2017-02-01

    Gastric cancer is a leading cause of cancer-related mortality worldwide. We have invented a novel hand-assist device that allows the placement of surgical instruments and the maneuvering of the surgeon's hand, and we have established a new hand-assisted laparoscopic technique called Three United Laparoscopic Surgery (TULS) for laparoscopic dissection of advanced gastric cancer. The present study aimed at exploring the usefulness of TULS in the treatment of advanced gastric cardia cancer. A retrospective study on 100 patients with advanced gastric cardia cancer admitted from January 2014 to June 2015 was done. There were 38 cases of TULS, 30 cases of laparotomy, and 32 cases of laparoscopy-assisted surgery. Statistical comparisons between three treatment groups in operative time, incision length, amount of bleeding, number of lymph nodes dissected, time to flatus after surgery, rate of postoperative complications, hospital stay, and expense were done. For lymph node dissection, there were no significant differences between TULS, laparotomy, and laparoscopy-assisted surgery. However, compared with conventional laparotomy, TULS and laparoscopy-assisted surgery were found to be able to minimize incision length, reduce blood loss during surgery, lower postoperative complication rate, and shorten time to flatus and hospital stay. The differences were statistically significant (P laparoscopy-assisted surgery (P < .05), and it was comparable to that of laparotomy. TULS is as efficient as laparotomy in lymph node dissection, and it shows the advantages of minimally invasive surgery. It can be considered a novel and promising surgical intervention for treatment of advanced gastric cancer.

  16. Motivation, readiness to change, and weight loss following adjustable gastric band surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixon, John B; Laurie, Cheryl P; Anderson, Margaret L; Hayden, Melissa J; Dixon, Maureen E; O'Brien, Paul E

    2009-04-01

    High levels of readiness to change (RTC) are considered critical to the long-term success of weight management programs including bariatric surgery. However, there are no data to support this assertion. We hypothesize that RTC level will not influence weight outcomes following surgery. In 227 consecutive patients undergoing adjustable gastric banding surgery, we recorded reasons for seeking surgery, and RTC measured with the University of Rhode Island Change Assessment. Scores were blinded until study completion. The primary outcome measure was percentage of excess BMI loss at 2 years (%EBMIL-2); others included compliance and surgical complications. Of 227 subjects, 204 (90%) had weight measurement at 2 years. There was no significant correlation between RTC score and %EBMIL-2 (r = 0.047, P = 0.5). Using the median split for RTC score the lowest 102 subjects mean %EBMIL-2 was 52.9 +/- 26.9% and the highest 52.2 +/- 28.3%, P = 0.869. There was no weight loss difference between highest and lowest quartiles, or a nonlinear relationship between weight loss and RTC score. There was no significant relationship between RCT score and compliance, or likelihood of complications. Those motivated by appearance were more likely to be younger women who lost more weight at 2 years. Poor attendance at follow-up visits was associated with less weight loss, especially in men. Measures of RTC did not predict weight loss, compliance, or surgical complications. Caution is advised when using assessments of RTC to predict outcomes of bariatric surgery.

  17. The impact of gastric bypass surgery on sex hormones and menstrual cycles in premenopausal women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjær, Mette Mandrup; Madsbad, Sten; Hougaard, David M.

    2017-01-01

    postoperative months. SHBG increased progressively and was doubled after 12 months. In contrast, total and free androgens and DHEA declined about 50% during the first three postoperative months and remained fairly constant hereafter. One year after surgery, 85% (11/13) of the women with oligo-/amenorrhea gained...... regular menstrual cycles. Our results indicate that some of the endocrine changes related to regulation of ovarian function occur very early after bariatric surgery.......Obesity has adverse effects on ovulation, menstrual cyclicity and oocyte development leading to clinical symptoms such as infertility and menstrual disorders. The Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) leads to weight loss, improved insulin sensitivity and may improve ovarian function. In 31 premenopausal...

  18. Supervised Physical Training Improves Weight Loss After Roux-en-Y Gastric Bypass Surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mundbjerg, Lene Hymøller; Stolberg, Charlotte Røn; Cecere, Stefano

    2018-01-01

    the effects of 6 months of supervised physical training following Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery (RYGB) on body weight and cardiovascular risk markers. Methods: Sixty participants eligible for RYGB were included. Six months post surgery, the participants were randomly assigned to either twice......, and an abdominal computed tomography scan. Results: RYGB significantly reduced body weight and improved cardiovascular risk markers (all Ptraining intervention resulted in a 4.2-kg (CI: -0.2 to -8.3 kg) lower body weight in INT compared with CON at the study end (P=0.042). The high......-density lipoprotein concentration was significantly higher in INT than in CON at the termination of the intervention, but this was not maintained at the 24-months examination. Conclusions: Physical training following RYGB improves weight loss and cardiovascular health....

  19. Development of significant disordered eating in an adolescent following gastric bypass surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sondike, Stephen B; Pisetsky, Emily M; Luzier, Jessica L

    2016-03-01

    The development of eating pathology is a concern following bariatric surgery, even in the absence of any pre-surgical psychopathology. No consistent risk factors have emerged in the literature to identify those at greatest risk. However, post-surgical guidelines encourage eating behaviors that would be considered disordered in other contexts. We present a case of an adolescent developing bulimia nervosa following gastric bypass surgery and the escalation of her symptoms from diligently following recommended food behaviors to a full-syndrome clinical eating disorder. We discuss the differences between appropriate post-surgical eating behaviors and disordered eating behaviors. We provide recommendations for clinicians to screen for eating pathology and referrals to an interprofessional treatment team to address eating disordered behaviors and cognitions.

  20. Enhanced insulin signaling in human skeletal muscle and adipose tissue following gastric bypass surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Albers, Peter Hjorth; Bojsen-Moller, Kirstine N; Dirksen, Carsten

    2015-01-01

    Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) leads to increased peripheral insulin sensitivity. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of RYGB on expression and regulation of proteins involved in regulation of peripheral glucose metabolism. Skeletal muscle and adipose tissue biopsies from glucose......-surgery when major weight loss was evident and occurred concomitantly with alterations in plasma adiponectin and in protein expression/signaling in peripheral tissues. In skeletal muscle, protein expression of GLUT4, phosphorylated levels of TBC1D4 as well as insulin-induced changes in phosphorylation of Akt...... and glycogen synthase activity were enhanced 12 months post-surgery. In adipose tissue, protein expression of GLUT4, Akt2, TBC1D4 and acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC), phosphorylated levels of AMP-activated protein kinase and ACC as well as insulin-induced changes in phosphorylation of Akt and TBC1D4 were enhanced...

  1. The role of dumping syndrome in weight loss after gastric bypass surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Ambar; Ding, Yi; Mikami, Dean J; Needleman, Bradley J

    2013-05-01

    Roux-en-Y gastric bypass is the most commonly performed operation for the treatment of morbid obesity in the US. Dumping syndrome is an expected and desired part of the behavior modification caused by gastric bypass surgery; it can deter patients from consuming energy-dense food. In this study we assessed the role dumping has in weight loss and its relationship with the patient's eating behavior. Fifty patients who underwent gastric bypass between January 2008 and June 2008 were enrolled. Two questionnaires, the dumping syndrome questionnaire and the Three-Factor Eating Questionnaire (TFEQ), were used to record the patients' responses. The diagnosis of dumping syndrome was based on the Sigstad scoring system, where a score of 7 and above was considered positive. TFEQ evaluated the patients' eating behavior under three scales: cognitive restraint, uncontrolled eating, and emotional eating. The results were analyzed with descriptive and parametric statistics where applicable. The prevalence of dumping syndrome was 42 %, with 66.7 % of the subjects being women. The nondumpers were observed to have a greater mean decrease in body mass index than the dumpers at 1 and 2 years (18.5 and 17.8 vs. 14.4 and 13.7 respectively). There was no definite relationship between the presence of dumping syndrome and the eating behavior of the patient. However, the cognitive restraint scores, greater than 80 %, were associated with an average decrease in BMI of 19 and 20.8 at 1 and 2 years compared with 14.6 and 12.4 in those with scores less than 80 % (p = 0.01 and p = 0.03, respectively). The presence of dumping syndrome after gastric bypass does not influence weight loss, though eating behaviors may directly influence it.

  2. Link Between Increased Satiety Gut Hormones and Reduced Food Reward After Gastric Bypass Surgery for Obesity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miras, Alexander D.; Scholtz, Samantha; Jackson, Sabrina; Neff, Karl J.; Pénicaud, Luc; Geoghegan, Justin; Chhina, Navpreet; Durighel, Giuliana; Bell, Jimmy D.; Meillon, Sophie; le Roux, Carel W.

    2016-01-01

    Context: Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) surgery is an effective long-term intervention for weight loss maintenance, reducing appetite, and also food reward, via unclear mechanisms. Objective: To investigate the role of elevated satiety gut hormones after RYGB, we examined food hedonic-reward responses after their acute post-prandial suppression. Design: These were randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind, crossover experimental medicine studies. Patients: Two groups, more than 5 months after RYGB for obesity (n = 7–11), compared with nonobese controls (n = 10), or patients after gastric banding (BAND) surgery (n = 9) participated in the studies. Intervention: Studies were performed after acute administration of the somatostatin analog octreotide or saline. In one study, patients after RYGB, and nonobese controls, performed a behavioral progressive ratio task for chocolate sweets. In another study, patients after RYGB, and controls after BAND surgery, performed a functional magnetic resonance imaging food picture evaluation task. Main Outcome Measures: Octreotide increased both appetitive food reward (breakpoint) in the progressive ratio task (n = 9), and food appeal (n = 9) and reward system blood oxygen level-dependent signal (n = 7) in the functional magnetic resonance imaging task, in the RYGB group, but not in the control groups. Results: Octreotide suppressed postprandial plasma peptide YY, glucagon-like peptide-1, and fibroblast growth factor-19 after RYGB. The reduction in plasma peptide YY with octreotide positively correlated with the increase in brain reward system blood oxygen level-dependent signal in RYGB/BAND subjects, with a similar trend for glucagon-like peptide-1. Conclusions: Enhanced satiety gut hormone responses after RYGB may be a causative mechanism by which anatomical alterations of the gut in obesity surgery modify behavioral and brain reward responses to food. PMID:26580235

  3. Association between reduction of plasma adiponectin levels and risk of bacterial infection after gastric cancer surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Hiroshi; Maeda, Kazuhisa; Uji, Yoshitaka; Tsuchihashi, Hiroshi; Mori, Tsuyoshi; Shimizu, Tomoharu; Endo, Yoshihiro; Kadota, Aya; Miura, Katsuyuki; Koga, Yusuke; Ito, Toshinori; Tani, Tohru

    2013-01-01

    Infections are important causes of postoperative morbidity after gastric surgery; currently, no factors have been identified that can predict postoperative infection. Adiponectin (ADN) mediates energy metabolism and functions as an immunomodulator. Perioperative ADN levels and perioperative immune functioning could be mutually related. Here we evaluated a potential biological marker to reliably predict the incidence of postoperative infections to prevent such comorbidities. We analyzed 150 consecutive patients who underwent elective gastric cancer surgery at the Shiga University of Medical Science Hospital (Shiga, Japan) from 1997 to 2009; of these, most surgeries (n = 100) were performed 2008 onwards. The patient characteristics and surgery-related factors between two groups (with and without infection) were compared by the paired t-test and χ(2) test, including preoperative ADN levels, postoperative day 1 ADN levels, and ADN ratio (postoperative ADN levels/preoperative ADN levels) as baseline factors. Logistic regression analysis was performed to access the independent association between ADN ratio and postoperative infection. Finally, receiver operating curves (ROCs) were constructed to examine its clinical utility. Sixty patients (40%) experienced postoperative infections. The baseline values of age, American Society of Anesthesiologists physical status, total operating time, blood loss, surgical procedure, C-reactive protein (CRP) levels, preoperative ADN levels, and ADN ratio were significantly different between groups. Logistic regression analysis using these factors indicated that type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and ADN ratio were significantly independent variables (*pADN levels, ADN ratio, blood loss, operating time, and CRP levels were 8.81(0.567/0.568), 0.76 (0.767/0.761), 405 g (0.717/0.693), 342 min (0.617/0.614), and 8.94 mg/dl (0.583/0.591), respectively. T2DM and ADN ratio were independent predictors of postoperative infection and ADN ratio

  4. Link Between Increased Satiety Gut Hormones and Reduced Food Reward After Gastric Bypass Surgery for Obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstone, Anthony P; Miras, Alexander D; Scholtz, Samantha; Jackson, Sabrina; Neff, Karl J; Pénicaud, Luc; Geoghegan, Justin; Chhina, Navpreet; Durighel, Giuliana; Bell, Jimmy D; Meillon, Sophie; le Roux, Carel W

    2016-02-01

    Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) surgery is an effective long-term intervention for weight loss maintenance, reducing appetite, and also food reward, via unclear mechanisms. To investigate the role of elevated satiety gut hormones after RYGB, we examined food hedonic-reward responses after their acute post-prandial suppression. These were randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind, crossover experimental medicine studies. Two groups, more than 5 months after RYGB for obesity (n = 7-11), compared with nonobese controls (n = 10), or patients after gastric banding (BAND) surgery (n = 9) participated in the studies. Studies were performed after acute administration of the somatostatin analog octreotide or saline. In one study, patients after RYGB, and nonobese controls, performed a behavioral progressive ratio task for chocolate sweets. In another study, patients after RYGB, and controls after BAND surgery, performed a functional magnetic resonance imaging food picture evaluation task. Octreotide increased both appetitive food reward (breakpoint) in the progressive ratio task (n = 9), and food appeal (n = 9) and reward system blood oxygen level-dependent signal (n = 7) in the functional magnetic resonance imaging task, in the RYGB group, but not in the control groups. Octreotide suppressed postprandial plasma peptide YY, glucagon-like peptide-1, and fibroblast growth factor-19 after RYGB. The reduction in plasma peptide YY with octreotide positively correlated with the increase in brain reward system blood oxygen level-dependent signal in RYGB/BAND subjects, with a similar trend for glucagon-like peptide-1. Enhanced satiety gut hormone responses after RYGB may be a causative mechanism by which anatomical alterations of the gut in obesity surgery modify behavioral and brain reward responses to food.

  5. Esophagus-duodenum Gastric Bypass Surgery Improves Glucose and Lipid Metabolism in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Rui; Yin, Yue; Li, Yin; Li, Ziru; Zhao, Jing; Zhang, Weizhen

    2018-02-01

    Despite of its significant therapeutic effects on obesity and metabolic diseases, Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) has limited clinical application because of considerable impacts on the gastrointestinal structure and postoperative complications. This study aims to develop a simplified surgical approach with less damage and complication but efficient metabolic benefit. The effects of Esophagus-Duodenum gastric bypass (EDGB) on body weight, food intake, glucose and lipid metabolism were compared to RYGB in mice. EDGB is simple, has higher survival rate and less complication. Relative to RYGB, EDGB demonstrated modest body weight control, identical improvement of glucose and lipid metabolism in obese mice. Blood glucose increased significantly 15 and 30min after oral glucose administration, then markedly decreased in both EDGB and RYGB groups relative to the sham surgery, indicating a quicker absorption of oral glucose and improvement in glucose uptake by insulin targeted tissues. Insulin sensitivity was identically improved. EDGB significantly decreased plasma and hepatic triglyceride levels, while increased browning in visceral and subcutaneous white adipose tissue to the extent identical to RYGB. Levels of ghrelin and nesfatin-1 increased significantly after EDGB and RYGB. EDGB is a valuable model to study the metabolic benefit of bariatric surgery in mice. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. CT findings suggesting anastomotic leak and predicting the recovery period following gastric surgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Tae Ho; Kim, Jung Hoon; Shin, Cheong-Il; Kim, Se Hyung; Han, Joon Koo; Choi, Byung Ihn [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Institute of Radiation Medicine, Jongno-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-07-15

    To assess diagnostic performance of routine CT for detecting anastomotic leak after gastric surgery, and analyse the relationship between recovery period and CT findings. We included 179 patients who underwent immediate CT and fluoroscopy after gastric surgery. Two reviewers retrospectively rated the possibility of leak on CT using a five-point scale focused on predefined CT findings. They also evaluated CT findings. Patients were categorised as: Group I, leak on fluoroscopy; Group II, possible leak on CT but negative on fluoroscopy; Group III, no leak. We analysed the relationship between recovery period and group. Area under the curve for detecting leak on CT was 0.886 in R1 and 0.668 in R2 with moderate agreement (k = 0.482). Statistically common CT findings for leak included discontinuity, large amount of air-fluid and wall thickening at anastomosis site (p < 0.05). Discontinuity at anastomosis site and a large air-fluid collection were independently associated with leak (p < 0.05). The recovery period including hospitalisation and postoperative fasting period was longer in Group I than Group II or III (p < 0.05). Group II showed a longer recovery period than Group III (p < 0.05). Postoperative routine CT was useful for predicting anastomotic leak using specific findings, and for predicting length of recovery period. (orig.)

  7. A patient with profound weight loss after gastric bypass surgery: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael T Flannery

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: A case of profound weight loss after gastric bypass surgery with multiple negative evaluations. Case presentation: A 41-year-old African-American female presented with greater-than-expected weight loss after gastric bypass and increasing abdominal pain over a 2-year period. An extensive workup was pursued for the patient with blood analysis, tumor markers, imaging studies both computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging, arterial studies, and endoscopy from above and below, all of which demonstrated normal results. The patient was followed up without improvement, and repeated studies were also normal. The patient was labeled with a nonorganic etiology for her symptoms, which led to a psychiatry referral which was refused. Conclusion: The patient’s surgeon, who already had removed a normal appendix and gallbladder, repeated a laparoscopic exam. The exam was normal except for a small focus of pancreatic cancer in the celiac plexus. The patient died from perioperative sepsis from peritonitis 2 days after surgery. The case is discussed and findings reviewed.

  8. Incidence and prevalence of copper deficiency following roux-en-y gastric bypass surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gletsu-Miller, N; Broderius, M; Frediani, J K; Zhao, V M; Griffith, D P; Davis, S S; Sweeney, J F; Lin, E; Prohaska, J R; Ziegler, T R

    2012-03-01

    The frequency of copper deficiency and clinical manifestations following roux-en-y gastric bypass (RYGB) surgery is not yet clear. Objectives were to determine the prevalence and incidence of copper deficiency in patients who have undergone RYGB. We sought to determine the number of RYGB patients undergoing medical and nutritional follow-up visits at the Emory Bariatric Center who experienced copper deficiency and associated hematological and neurological complaints (n=136). Separately, in patients followed longitudinally before and during 6 and 24 months following RYGB surgery, we obtained measures of copper status (n=16). Systemic blood cell counts and measures of copper, zinc and ceruloplasmin were determined using standardized assays in reference laboratories including atomic absorption spectrometry and immunoassays. Thirteen patients were identified to have copper deficiency suggesting a prevalence of copper deficiency of 9.6%, and the majority of these had concomitant complications including anemia, leukopenia and various neuro-muscular abnormalities. In the longitudinal study, plasma copper concentrations and ceruloplasmin activity decreased over 6 and 24 months following surgery, respectively (Pdeficiency in these subjects was determined to be 18.8%. The prevalence and incidence of copper deficiency following RYGB surgery was determined to be 9.6% and 18.8%, respectively, with many patients experiencing mild-to-moderate symptoms. Given that copper deficiency can lead to serious and irreversible complications if untreated, frequent monitoring of the copper status of RYGB patients is warranted.

  9. Knee Osteoarthritis Is Associated With Previous Meniscus and Anterior Cruciate Ligament Surgery Among Elite College American Football Athletes

    OpenAIRE

    Smith, Matthew V.; Nepple, Jeffrey J.; Wright, Rick W.; Matava, Matthew J.; Brophy, Robert H.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Football puts athletes at risk for knee injuries such meniscus and anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tears, which are associated with the development of osteoarthritis (OA). Previous knee surgery, player position, and body mass index (BMI) may be associated with knee OA. Hypothesis: In elite football players undergoing knee magnetic resonance imaging at the National Football League’s Invitational Combine, the prevalence of knee OA is associated with previous knee surgery and BMI. S...

  10. Vagal innervation of intestine contributes to weight loss After Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Zheng; Townsend, R Leigh; Mumphrey, Michael B; Patterson, Laurel M; Ye, Jianping; Berthoud, Hans-Rudolf

    2014-12-01

    It is conceivable that overstimulation of chemo- and mechano-sensors in the Roux and common limbs by uncontrolled influx of undigested nutrients after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery (RYGB) could lead to exaggerated satiety signaling via vagal afferents and contribute to body weight loss. Because previous clinical and preclinical studies using vagotomy came to different conclusions, the aim was to examine the effects of selective and histologically verified celiac branch vagotomy on reduced food intake and body weight loss induced by RYGB. Male Sprague-Dawley rats underwent either RYGB + celiac branch vagotomy (RYGB/VgX, n=15), RYGB + sham celiac branch vagotomy (RYGB/Sham VgX; n=6), Sham RYGB + celiac branch vagotomy (Sham/VgX; n=6), or sham RYGB + sham celiac branch vagotomy (Sham/Sham; n=6), and body weight, body composition, and food choice were monitored for 3 months after intervention. In rats with RYGB, histologically confirmed celiac branch vagotomy significantly moderated weight loss during the first 40 days after surgery, compared to either sham or failed vagotomy (PRYGB rats compared to sham/sham rats. Furthermore, the significant food intake suppression during the first 32 days after RYGB (PRYGB-induced body weight loss and reduction of food intake.

  11. [Robot-assisted vs laparoscopic gastric bypass : First experiences with the DaVinci system in bariatric surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckmann, J H; Aselmann, H; Egberts, J H; Bernsmeier, A; Laudes, M; Becker, T; Schafmayer, C; Ahrens, M

    2018-03-27

    Conventional laparoscopy is the gold standard in bariatric surgery. Internationally, robot-assisted surgery is gaining in importance. Up to now there are only few reports from Germany on the use of the system in bariatric surgery. Since January 2017 we have been performing robot-assisted gastric bypass surgery. It remains unclear whether the use of the robotic system has advantages over the well-established laparoscopic technique. Within a period from January to early August 2017 a total of 53 gastric bypass operations were performed. Of these 16 proximal redo Roux-en-Y gastric bypass operations were performed with the DaVinci Si system versus 29 laparoscopic procedures. A retrospective analysis of the perioperative course was carried out. Body weight, body mass index (BMI), Edmonton obesity staging system (EOSS) and American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) classification did not show significant differences. There were also no significant differences in terms of estimated blood loss, intraoperative complications, duration of surgery, postoperative inflammatory parameters and weight loss. There was no mortality and no need for revisional surgery in either group. After laparoscopic surgery there was a delayed occurrence of a leak of the gastrojejunostomy followed by readmission and endoscopic negative pressure wound therapy. The results show that the proximal Roux-en-Y gastric bypass can be performed safely and efficiently using the DaVinci surgical system. Significant differences to the conventional laparoscopic procedure were not found. Larger randomized controlled trials are needed to define the role of the DaVinci system in bariatric surgery.

  12. Effects of Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery on energy expenditure and bone metabolism in rats

    OpenAIRE

    Abegg, Kathrin

    2014-01-01

    Bariatric surgery, including the Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB), is currently the only effective long-term treatment for morbid obesity. Contrary to the traditional classification of RYGB as a restrictive and malabsorptive procedure, these factors seem to play a minor role. Increasing evidence suggests that changes in gut hormone levels, such as glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), may account for the majority of the effects. One major side effect of RYGB surgery is a decrease in bone density...

  13. Endoscopic extraction of adjustable gastric bands after intragastric migration as a complication of bariatric surgery: technique and advice

    OpenAIRE

    Collado-Pacheco, David; R?bago-Torre, Luis Ramon; Arias-Rivera, Maria; Ortega-Carbonel, Alejandro; Olivares-Valles, Ana; Alonso-Prada, Alicia; V?zquez-Echarri, Jaime; Herrera-Merino, Norberto

    2016-01-01

    Background: Surgery has been the method most widely used to manage the extraction of gastric bands with inclusion as a late complication of bariatric surgery; however, surgical extraction entails morbidity and limits future surgical procedures. The development of endoscopic techniques has provided an important means of improving the treatment of this complication, enabling minimally invasive and safe procedures that have a high success rate. Methods: A retrospective analysis was conducted of ...

  14. Health-related quality of life and survival in the two years after surgery for gastric cancer

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background This prospective study examined health-related quality of life (HRQL) and survival in patients with potentially curable gastric cancer. Methods Consecutive patients (n=58) selected for curative surgery completed a validated questionnaire (EORTC QLQ-C30) and site-specific module (QLQ-STO22) before surgery and regularly for two years afterwards. Changes of 10 or more points on a 0 to 100 scale were considered clinically significant...

  15. The effects of previous open renal stone surgery types on PNL outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozgor, Faruk; Kucuktopcu, Onur; Ucpinar, Burak; Sarilar, Omer; Erbin, Akif; Yanaral, Fatih; Sahan, Murat; Binbay, Murat

    2016-01-01

    Our aim was to demonstrate the effect of insicion of renal parenchyma during open renal stone surgery (ORSS) on percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PNL) outcomes. Patients with history of ORSS who underwent PNL operation between June 2005 and June 2015 were analyzed retrospectively. Patients were divided into two groups according to their type of previous ORSS. Patients who had a history of ORSS with parenchymal insicion, such as radial nephrotomies, anatrophic nephrolithotomy, lower pole resection, and partial nephrectomy, were included in Group 1. Other patients with a history of open pyelolithotomy were enrolled in Group 2. Preoperative characteristics, perioperative data, stone-free status, and complications were compared between the groups. Stone-free status was defined as complete clearance of stone(s) or presence of residual fragments smaller than 4 mm. The retrospective nature of our study, different experience level of surgeons, and lack of the evaluation of anesthetic agents and cost of procedures were limitations of our study. 123 and 111 patients were enrolled in Groups 1 and 2, respectively. Preoperative characteristics were similar between groups. In Group 1, the mean operative time was statistically longer than in Group 2 (p=0.013). Stone-free status was significantly higher in Group 2 than in Group 1 (p=0.027). Complication rates were similar between groups. Hemorrhage requiring blood transfusion was the most common complication in both groups (10.5% vs. 9.9%). Our study demonstrated that a history of previous ORSS with parenchymal insicion significantly reduces the success rates of PNL procedure.

  16. Systems Signatures Reveal Unique Remission-path of Type 2 Diabetes Following Roux-en-Y Gastric Bypass Surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Qing-Run; Wang, Zi-Ming; Wewer Albrechtsen, Nicolai J

    2018-01-01

    Roux-en-Y Gastric bypass surgery (RYGB) is emerging as a powerful tool for treatment of obesity and may also cause remission of type 2 diabetes. However, the molecular mechanism of RYGB leading to diabetes remission independent of weight loss remains elusive. In this study, we profiled plasma...

  17. MINIMALLY INVASIVE SURGERY FOR GASTRIC CANCER: TIME TO CHANGE THE PARADIGM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barchi, Leandro Cardoso; Jacob, Carlos Eduardos; Bresciani, Cláudio José Caldas; Yagi, Osmar Kenji; Mucerino, Donato Roberto; Lopasso, Fábio Pinatel; Mester, Marcelo; Ribeiro-Júnior, Ulysses; Dias, André Roncon; Ramos, Marcus Fernando Kodama Pertille; Cecconello, Ivan; Zilberstein, Bruno

    2016-01-01

    Minimally invasive surgery widely used to treat benign disorders of the digestive system, has become the focus of intense study in recent years in the field of surgical oncology. Since then, the experience with this kind of approach has grown, aiming to provide the same oncological outcomes and survival to conventional surgery. Regarding gastric cancer, surgery is still considered the only curative treatment, considering the extent of resection and lymphadenectomy performed. Conventional surgery remains the main modality performed worldwide. Notwithstanding, the role of the minimally invasive access is yet to be clarified. To evaluate and summarize the current status of minimally invasive resection of gastric cancer. A literature review was performed using Medline/PubMed, Cochrane Library and SciELO with the following headings: gastric cancer, minimally invasive surgery, robotic gastrectomy, laparoscopic gastrectomy, stomach cancer. The language used for the research was English. 28 articles were considered, including randomized controlled trials, meta-analyzes, prospective and retrospective cohort studies. Minimally invasive gastrectomy may be considered as a technical option in the treatment of early gastric cancer. As for advanced cancer, recent studies have demonstrated the safety and feasibility of the laparoscopic approach. Robotic gastrectomy will probably improve outcomes obtained with laparoscopy. However, high cost is still a barrier to its use on a large scale. A cirurgia minimamente invasiva amplamente usada para tratar doenças benignas do aparelho digestivo, tornou-se o foco de intenso estudo nos últimos anos no campo da oncologia cirúrgica. Desde então, a experiência com este tipo de abordagem tem crescido, com o objetivo de fornecer os mesmos resultados oncológicos e sobrevivência à cirurgia convencional. Em relação ao câncer gástrico, o tratamento cirúrgico ainda é considerado o único tratamento curativo, considerando a extensão da

  18. The OTSC®-clip in revisional endoscopy against weight gain after bariatric gastric bypass surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heylen, Alex Marie Florent; Jacobs, Anja; Lybeer, Monika; Prosst, Ruediger L

    2011-10-01

    The maintenance of the restrictive component of the Fobi pouch gastric bypass is essential for permanent weight control. Dilatation of the pouch-outlet and of the pouch itself is responsible for substantial weight gain by an increased volume per meal and binge-eating due to the rapid emptying. An endoscopic over-the-scope clip (OTSC®; Ovesco AG, Tübingen, Germany) was applied in 94 patients following gastric bypass and unintended weight gain by dilated gastro-jejunostomy to narrow the pouch-outlet. The OTSC®-clip application was safe and efficient to reduce the pouch-outlet in all cases. Best clinical results were obtained by narrowing the gastro-jejunostomy by placing two clips at opposite sites, hence reducing the outlet of more than 80%. Preferably, the clip approximated the whole thickness of the wall to avoid further dilatation of the anastomosis. Between surgery and OTSC®-clip application the mean BMI dropped from 45.8 (±3.6) to 32.8 (±1.9). At the first follow-up about 3 months (mean 118 days, ±46 days) after OTSC®-clip application the mean BMI was 29.7 (±1.8). At the second follow-up about 1 year (mean 352 days, ±66 days) after OTSC®-clip application the mean BMI was 27.4 (±3.8). The OTSC®-clip for revisional endoscopy after gastric bypass is reliable and effective in treating weight gain due to a dilated pouch-outlet with favorable short- and midterm results.

  19. Weight gain after bariatric surgery as a result of a large gastric stoma: endotherapy with sodium morrhuate may prevent the need for surgical revision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catalano, Marc F; Rudic, Goran; Anderson, Alfred J; Chua, Thomas Y

    2007-08-01

    Obesity affects more than 30% of the U.S. population and is associated with the development of life-threatening complications. Numerous therapeutic approaches to the problem have been advocated, including low-calorie diets, anoretic drugs, behavior modifications, and exercise therapy. The only treatment proven to be effective in the long-term management of morbid obesity is surgical intervention. Complications of bariatric surgery include stomal stenosis and/or ulcer and stomal dilation (secondary to overeating). The latter complication can result in a gain of previously lost weight. To determine the effect of endoscopic injection by using a sclerosant (sodium morrhuate) to induce stomal stenosis in patients who present with stomal dilatation complicated by weight gain. Bariatric patients with a large gastric stoma were treated with sodium morrhuate stomal injection. Diameters of the stoma were followed at repeat endoscopy. Weight loss at scheduled clinic visits were compared with pretherapy weights. Twenty-eight patients (10 men, 18 women; age range, 27-58 years), after bariatric surgery with GI bypass, were referred with weight gain after initial weight loss. Weight gain was believed to be the result of a large gastric stoma. Treatment included injection of sodium morrhuate (1-2 mL circumferentially) surrounding the stoma. A total of 1 to 3 injection sessions were performed in an attempt to achieve a stoma diameter of 1.2 cm or smaller. Treatment success was defined as a decrease of stoma size to weight loss >or=75% of the weight the patient gained after establishing a steady state post bariatric surgery weight. A total of 2.3 injection sessions were performed. Successful endotherapy was achieved in 18 of 28 patients (64%). One patient developed symptoms of stomal stenosis, which required 2 separate balloon dilating sessions. No other complications were encountered. Retrospective case series. Endoscopic injection of sodium morrhuate surrounding the dilated

  20. Gastric surgery and restraint from food as triggering factors of eating disorders in morbid obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guisado, Juan A; Vaz, Francisco J; López-Ibor, Juan J; López-Ibor, M Inés; del Río, Julia; Rubio, Miguel A

    2002-01-01

    Obese patients may share some clinical features with anorexia nervosa patients because they risk developing an eating disorder when they diet. Methods and Results Some common etiological, psychological, and social factors have been proposed for both disorders. We present two cases of patients suffering from morbid obesity who, after weight loss, presented an intense fear of regaining weight and developed anorexic-like symptoms. In the first case, the symptoms appeared after gastric reduction surgery. In the second case, a strict diet was the triggering factor. This paper stresses the need for psychiatric evaluation of all patients with morbid obesity who seek treatment in clinical settings, in order to identify the factors that may lead to psychiatric complications. Copyright 2002 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  1. Central 5-HT Neurotransmission Modulates Weight Loss following Gastric Bypass Surgery in Obese Individuals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haahr, M. E.; Hansen, D. L.; Fisher, P. M.

    2015-01-01

    The cerebral serotonin (5-HT) system shows distinct differences in obesity compared with the lean state. Here, it was investigated whether serotonergic neurotransmission in obesity is a stable trait or changes in association with weight loss induced by Roux-in-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) surgery......, it was confirmed that obese individuals have higher cerebral 5-HT2A receptor binding than lean individuals. Importantly, we found that higher presurgical 5-HT2A receptor binding predicted greater weight loss after RYGB and that the change in 5-HT2A receptor and 5-HT transporter binding correlated with weight loss...... after RYGB. The changes in the 5-HT neurotransmission before and after RYGB are in accordance with a model wherein the cerebral extracellular 5-HT level modulates the regulation of body weight. Our findings support that the cerebral 5-HT system contributes both to establish the obese condition...

  2. Knee Osteoarthritis Is Associated With Previous Meniscus and Anterior Cruciate Ligament Surgery Among Elite College American Football Athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Matthew V; Nepple, Jeffrey J; Wright, Rick W; Matava, Matthew J; Brophy, Robert H

    Football puts athletes at risk for knee injuries such meniscus and anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tears, which are associated with the development of osteoarthritis (OA). Previous knee surgery, player position, and body mass index (BMI) may be associated with knee OA. In elite football players undergoing knee magnetic resonance imaging at the National Football League's Invitational Combine, the prevalence of knee OA is associated with previous knee surgery and BMI. Retrospective cohort. Level 4. A retrospective review was performed of all participants of the National Football League Combine from 2005 to 2009 who underwent magnetic resonance imaging of the knee because of prior knee injury, surgery, or knee-related symptoms or concerning examination findings. Imaging studies were reviewed for evidence of OA. History of previous knee surgery-including ACL reconstruction, meniscal procedures, and articular cartilage surgery-and position were recorded for each athlete. BMI was calculated based on height and weight. There was a higher prevalence of OA in knees with a history of previous knee surgery (23% vs 4.0%, P 30 kg/m 2 was also associated with a higher risk of OA ( P = 0.007) but player position was not associated with knee OA. Previous knee surgery, particularly ACL reconstruction and partial meniscectomy, and elevated BMI are associated with knee OA in elite football players. Future research should investigate ways to minimize the risk of OA after knee surgery in these athletes. Treatment of knee injuries in football athletes should consider chondroprotection, including meniscal preservation and cartilage repair, when possible.

  3. A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis of the Effect of Gastric Bypass Surgery on Plasma Lipid Levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carswell, Kirstin A; Belgaumkar, Ajay P; Amiel, Stephanie A; Patel, Ameet G

    2016-04-01

    Obesity-related dyslipidaemia comprises hypercholesterolaemia, hypertriglyceridaemia, low HDL-cholesterol and normal to raised LDL-cholesterol levels. 40% of morbidly obese surgical patients have dyslipidaemia. Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) surgery has many beneficial metabolic effects, but the full impact on plasma lipids has not been clearly defined. A systematic review of electronic databases (Ovid; Medline; PubMed; Embase) between 1960 and March 2012 was performed using search terms including the following: obesity surgery, bariatric surgery, gastric bypass, cholesterol, lipids, triglycerides and non-esterified fatty acids. A total of 2442 manuscripts were screened. Papers with paired plasma lipid levels around RYGB surgery were included. Exclusions included the following: editorials, dual publications, n effect of RYGB surgery upon plasma lipids at different time points up to 4 years following surgery, using a random effects model. Paired data were available for 7815 subjects around RYGB surgery for morbid obesity with a baseline BMI 48 kg/m(2) (n = 2331). There was a reduction in plasma total cholesterol and LDL-C from 1 month up to 4 years post-RYGB (p RYGB, HDL-C increased from 1 year onwards (p RYGB surgery reverses the dyslipidaemia of obesity. These findings support the use of RYGB in the management of high cardiovascular risk lipid profiles in morbid obesity.

  4. Percutaneous gastric remnant gastrostomy following Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery: a single tertiary center's 13-year experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaikh, Shehbaz Hasam; Stenz, Justin Jay; McVinnie, David W; Morrison, James J; Getzen, Todd; Carlin, Arthur M; Mir, Farhaan R

    2017-09-19

    The purpose of the study is to evaluate the indications, techniques, and outcomes for percutaneous gastrostomy placement in the gastric remnant following Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) in bariatric patients. Retrospective chart review and summary statistical analysis was performed on all RYGB patients that underwent attempted percutaneous remnant gastrostomy placement at our institution between April 2003 and November 2016. A total of 38 patients post-RYGB who underwent gastric remnant gastrostomy placement were identified, 32 women and 6 men, in which a total of 41 procedures were attempted. Technical success was achieved in 39 of the 41 cases (95%). Indications for the procedure were delayed gastric remnant emptying/biliopancreatic limb obstruction (n = 8), malnutrition related to RYGB (n = 17), nutritional support for conditions unrelated to RYGB (n = 15), and access for endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP, n = 1). Insufflation of the gastric remnant was performed via a clear window (n = 35), transhepatic (n = 5), and transjejunal (n = 1) routes. Five complications were encountered. The four major complications (9.8%) included early tube dislodgement with peritonitis, early tube dislodgement requiring repeat intervention, intractable pain, and upper gastrointestinal bleeding. A single minor complication occurred (2.4%), cellulitis. Patients with a history of RYGB present a technical challenge for excluded gastric remnant gastrostomy placement. As the RYGB population increases and ages, obtaining and maintaining access to the gastric remnant is likely to become an important part of interventional radiology's role in the management of the bariatric patient.

  5. Association between reduction of plasma adiponectin levels and risk of bacterial infection after gastric cancer surgery.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroshi Yamamoto

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Infections are important causes of postoperative morbidity after gastric surgery; currently, no factors have been identified that can predict postoperative infection. Adiponectin (ADN mediates energy metabolism and functions as an immunomodulator. Perioperative ADN levels and perioperative immune functioning could be mutually related. Here we evaluated a potential biological marker to reliably predict the incidence of postoperative infections to prevent such comorbidities. METHODS: We analyzed 150 consecutive patients who underwent elective gastric cancer surgery at the Shiga University of Medical Science Hospital (Shiga, Japan from 1997 to 2009; of these, most surgeries (n = 100 were performed 2008 onwards. The patient characteristics and surgery-related factors between two groups (with and without infection were compared by the paired t-test and χ(2 test, including preoperative ADN levels, postoperative day 1 ADN levels, and ADN ratio (postoperative ADN levels/preoperative ADN levels as baseline factors. Logistic regression analysis was performed to access the independent association between ADN ratio and postoperative infection. Finally, receiver operating curves (ROCs were constructed to examine its clinical utility. RESULTS: Sixty patients (40% experienced postoperative infections. The baseline values of age, American Society of Anesthesiologists physical status, total operating time, blood loss, surgical procedure, C-reactive protein (CRP levels, preoperative ADN levels, and ADN ratio were significantly different between groups. Logistic regression analysis using these factors indicated that type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM and ADN ratio were significantly independent variables (*p<0.05, ** p<0.01, respectively. ROC analysis revealed that the useful cutoff values (sensitivity/specificity for preoperative ADN levels, ADN ratio, blood loss, operating time, and CRP levels were 8.81(0.567/0.568, 0.76 (0

  6. Compulsive eating and gastric bypass surgery: what does hunger have to do with it?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saunders, R

    2001-12-01

    Binge eating and other patterns of disordered eating in obese patients need further investigation. In a previous study by this author, one-third of patients presenting for bariatric surgery met strict criteria for Binge Eating Disorder. It is important to clarify the role of such eating behaviors on outcome of surgery to determine whether treatments targeted specifically at these behaviors and associated psychological issues can improve surgical outcome. The aim of this paper is to raise awareness of the range of disordered eating patterns in bariatric patients, describe an approach used, and discuss issues reported by patients after surgery. Patients completed questionnaires before surgery (QWEP, BES, BDI) and were seen for a pre-surgery mental health evaluation. High risk patients were identified and invited to attend a post-surgery group (CBT approach) as a preventive measure to help them deal with eating patterns as well as emotional adjustment. Disordered eating patterns can persist after surgery. While surgery may decrease actual physical hunger and reduce physical capacity for food, it is still possible to eat compulsively, although the patterns may change somewhat due to the surgical procedure. Since long-term weight maintenance depends on post-operative changes in eating behaviors, it is important to identify patients at risk for a range of disordered eating patterns so that a comprehensive treatment plan that targets the eating disturbances and associated psychological components can be implemented.

  7. Roux-en-Y Gastric Bypass Surgery Induces Early Plasma Metabolomic and Lipidomic Alterations in Humans Associated with Diabetes Remission

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arora, Tulika; Velagapudi, Vidya; Pournaras, Dimitri J

    2015-01-01

    -surgery levels. At 4 days after surgery, insulin levels correlated positively with metabolites of branched chain and aromatic amino acid metabolism and negatively with triglycerides with long-chain fatty acids. Of the 14 subjects with diabetes prior to surgery, 7 were in remission 2 years after surgery......Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) is an effective method to attain sustained weight loss and diabetes remission. We aimed to elucidate early changes in the plasma metabolome and lipidome after RYGB. Plasma samples from 16 insulin-resistant morbidly obese subjects, of whom 14 had diabetes, were...... subjected to global metabolomics and lipidomics analysis at pre-surgery and 4 and 42 days after RYGB. Metabolites and lipid species were compared between time points and between subjects who were in remission and not in remission from diabetes 2 years after surgery. We found that the variables that were...

  8. The influence of previous orbital irradiation on the outcome of rehabilitative decompression surgery in graves orbitopathy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baldeschi, Lelio; Macandie, Kerr; Koetsier, Eva; Blank, Leo E. C. M.; Wiersinga, Wilmar M.

    2008-01-01

    PURPOSE: To investigate whether orbital irradiation influences the outcome of decompression surgery in Graves orbitopathy. DESIGN: Retrospective, comparative case series. METHODS: The medical records of all the patients with Graves orbitopathy treated with a three-wall orbital decompression through

  9. Comparative evaluation of gastric pH and volume in morbidly obese and lean patients undergoing elective surgery and effect of aspiration prophylaxis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahajan, Vikram; Hashmi, Junaid; Singh, Rahil; Samra, Tanvir; Aneja, Sanjeev

    2015-08-01

    The anesthetic management of patients with morbid obesity is challenging. There is no consensus on the routine use of aspiration prophylaxis in morbidly obese patients undergoing elective surgery. The aim of this study is to assess the risk of pulmonary aspiration and effect of premedication with ranitidine and metoclopramide on gastric pH and volume in morbidly obese and lean patients. Gastric volume and pH were measured in 3 groups of 20 patients each: group I (lean, no aspiration prophylaxis), group II (morbidly obese, no aspiration prophylaxis), and group III (morbidly obese; tablet ranitidine, 150 mg; and tablet metoclopramide, 10 mg administered the night before and 2 hours before surgery). Patients with critical gastric volume >25 mL and critical pH gastric volume >25 mL and pH gastric volume and increases gastric pH and thus should be routinely prescribed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Fetal growth in pregnancies conceived after gastric bypass surgery in relation to surgery-to-conception interval: a Danish national cohort study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lone Nikoline Nørgaard

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To describe early and late fetal growth in pregnancies conceived after gastric bypass surgery in relation to time from surgery to conception of pregnancy. METHODS: National cohort study on 387 Danish women, who had laparoscopic or open gastric bypass surgery prior to a singleton pregnancy in which first trimester screening was performed between January 2008 and June 2011. Data were derived from national registers (Danish National Registry of Patients and Danish National Birth Registry, Pregnancy Complications and Abortion-clinical quality database (PreCAb and the Danish Fetal Medicine Database. Main outcome measures were early and late fetal growth in relation to time from bariatric surgery to conception of the pregnancy. Early fetal growth was expressed as "Fetal Growth Index": the ratio between the estimated number of days from first trimester ultrasound to second trimester ultrasound biometries and the actual calender time elapsed in days. Late fetal growth was expressed as the observed versus expected birthweight according to gestational age (GA. RESULTS: The surgery-to-conception interval ranged from 3 to 1851 days with a mean value of 502 (SD, 351 days. The mean "fetal growth index" was 0.99 (SD, 0.02 days/day and thus significantly lower than in the background population (mean, 1.04 (SD, 0.09 days/day, p<0.0001. The proportion of infants being small for gestational age was 18.8% and the proportion of large for gestational age infants was 6.7%. The correlation coefficients between surgery-to-conception time and "fetal growth index" and birthweight according to GA were 0.01 (p = 0.8 and 0.04 (p = 0.4, respectively. CONCLUSION: Fetal growth index was lower than reported in the background population. No correlation was found between the surgery-to-conception interval and early or late fetal growth in pregnancies conceived after gastric bypass surgery.

  11. Prevalence of Self-reported Symptoms After Gastric Bypass Surgery for Obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gribsholt, Sigrid Bjerge; Pedersen, Ane Mathilde; Svensson, Elisabeth; Thomsen, Reimar Wernich; Richelsen, Bjørn

    2016-06-01

    Population-based studies on the prevalence of symptoms after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) surgery are sparse. Knowledge about possible predictors of these symptoms is important for prevention. To examine patients' overall well-being and the prevalence and predictors of medical, nutritional, and surgical symptoms after RYGB surgery, and their association with quality of life. A survey was conducted from March 3 to July 31, 2014, among 2238 patients who underwent RYGB surgery between January 1, 2006, and December 31, 2011, in the Central Denmark Region. A comparison cohort of 89 individuals who were matched with patients according to sex and body mass index but who did not undergo RYGB surgery were surveyed as a point of reference. Data analysis was conducted from September 1, 2014, to June 25, 2015. Prevalence and severity (based on contacts with health care system, ranging from no contact to hospitalization) of self-reported symptoms following RYGB surgery. Prevalence ratios (PRs) of symptoms associated with different predictors were computed. The association between number of symptoms and quality of life was investigated using the Spearman rank correlation coefficient. Of 2238 patients undergoing RYGB surgery, 1429 (63.7%) responded to the survey. Among these patients, 1266 (88.6%) reported 1 or more symptoms a median of 4.7 years after RYGB surgery. Mean age at the time of the survey was 47.1 years (range, 26.9-68.0 years), and 286 were men (20.0%). A total of 1219 of 1394 patients (87.4%) reported that their well-being was improved after vs before RYGB surgery, while 113 (8.1%) reported reduced well-being. Symptoms after RYGB surgery were reported by 1266 patients (88.6%); 966 patients (67.6%) had been in contact with the health care system about their symptoms vs 31 [34.8%] of those in the comparison group, and 416 (29.1%) had been hospitalized vs 6 [6.7%] of those in the comparison group. The symptoms most commonly leading to health care contact after RYGB

  12. Children's weight status, body esteem, and self-concept after maternal gastric bypass surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willmer, Mikaela; Berglind, Daniel; Tynelius, Per; Ghaderi, Ata; Näslund, Erik; Rasmussen, Finn

    2015-01-01

    There is little research on the effects of Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) surgery on the patients' offspring's weight and psychosocial well-being. The present study investigates how children are affected in terms of weight status, body esteem, and self-concept after maternal RYGB. Sixty-nine women and their families were recruited from RYGB waiting lists at 5 Swedish hospitals. Data was collected during home visits 3 months before and 12 months after RYGB. Anthropometrical measures were taken, and the children completed the Body Esteem Scale (BES) and the Beck Self-Concept Inventory (BYI-S). Prevalence or relative risk in weight status between the time points were explored using Poisson regression models (General Estimating Equations). We found stronger statistical evidence for a decreased risk of overweight (RR = .85, 57.0% versus 48.6%, P = .048), than for obesity (RR = .87, 18.2% versus 15.9%, P = .447). The boys' body esteem increased slightly, whilst the girls' did not. There were no significant differences in mean BYI-S scores. The reasons behind the statistically significant decrease in overweight but not obesity risk in children after maternal RYGB may be caused by insufficient statistical power to detect changes in obesity risk alone. Body esteem seems to be slightly positively affected in boys 9 months after maternal RYGB. Longer follow-up times and larger samples would be useful in future research. Copyright © 2015 American Society for Bariatric Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Successful application of laparoscopic and endoscopic cooperative surgery (LECS) for a lateral-spreading mucosal gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunobe, Souya; Hiki, Naoki; Gotoda, Takuji; Murao, Takahisa; Haruma, Ken; Matsumoto, Hideo; Hirai, Toshihiro; Tanimura, Shinya; Sano, Takeshi; Yamaguchi, Toshiharu

    2012-07-01

    In the current era of endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) for early gastric cancer, which carries a negligible risk of lymph node metastasis, local resection of the stomach remains an option for these lesions. This is particularly so for a large intramucosal lesion or a lesion with a strong ulcer scar, for which ESD becomes a difficult option. Here, we describe a case of lateral-spreading intramucosal gastric cancer of 6-cm diameter located at the fornix of the stomach, which was successfully treated by laparoscopic and endoscopic cooperative surgery (LECS) because of the expected risk of complications during ESD. In the LECS procedure, the resection margin was appropriately determined by the endoscopic evaluation in detail and by the ESD technique. If early gastric cancer fits the criteria for endoscopic resection but would present difficulty if performing ESD, this is a good indication for the LECS procedure.

  14. One versus two-step Roux-en-Y gastric bypass after gastric banding—data analysis of the German Bariatric Surgery Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stroh, Christine; Weiner, R; Wolff, S; Lerche, C; Knoll, C; Keller, Th; Bruns, C; Manger, Th

    2015-05-01

    Bariatric surgery outcomes have been examined in Germany since January 1, 2005. All data were registered prospectively in cooperation with the Institute of Quality Assurance in Surgery at the Otto-von-Guericke University Magdeburg. The data were collected from an online data bank. Data collection began in 2005 for gastric banding (GB) and Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) results. In addition to primary bariatric operations, data regarding the complications of revision procedures and redo operations were analyzed. Participation in the quality assurance study was required for all certified centers in Germany. RYGBs are a popular redo operation after failed gastric banding. In the German Bariatric Surgery Registry (GBSR), we analyzed data from 263 RYGB operations that used a one-step approach after GB and 116 operations that used a two-step approach. The leakage rates for primary RYGB decreased to 1.8%. The incidence of leakage after a one-step RYGB after GB was lower (1.9%) than after the two-step procedure (2.6%). RYGBs are popular procedures after failed GB in Germany. The multivariable analysis for overall intraoperative complications revealed a significant difference between the two-step and the one-step procedure. In an unadjusted and multivariate assessment, the one-step procedure had statistically lower general postoperative complications than the two-step approach. Therefore, we suggest performing band removal and RYGB as a one-step procedure. Further analysis is necessary to evaluate the risk factors for the one-step procedure. Follow-up investigations must be performed to determine whether RYGB is an effective and safe option after GB.

  15. Analysis of postoperative morbidity and mortality following surgery for gastric cancer. Surgeon volume as the most significant prognostic factor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maciej Ciesielski

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction : Surgical resection is the only potentially curative modality for gastric cancer and it is associated with substantial morbidity and mortality. Aim: To determine risk factors for postoperative morbidity and mortality following major surgery for gastric cancer. Material and methods : Between 1.08.2006 and 30.11.2014 in the Department of Oncological Surgery of Gdynia Oncology Centre 162 patients underwent gastric resection for adenocarcinoma. All procedures were performed by 13 surgeons. Five of them performed at least two gastrectomies per year (n = 106. The remaining 56 resections were done by eight surgeons with annual volume lower than two. Perioperative mortality was defined as every in-hospital death and death within 30 days after surgery. Causes of perioperative deaths were the matter of in-depth analysis. Results: Overall morbidity was 23.5%, including 4.3% rate of proximal anastomosis leak. Mortality rate was 4.3%. Morbidity and mortality were not dependent on: age, gender, body mass index, tumour location, extent of surgery, splenectomy performance, or pTNM stage. The rates of morbidity (50% vs. 21.3% and mortality (16.7% vs. 3.3% were significantly higher in cases of tumour infiltration to adjacent organs (pT4b. Perioperative morbidity and mortality were 37.5% and 8.9% for surgeons performing less than two gastrectomies per year and 16% and 0.9% for surgeons performing more than two resections annually. The differences were statistically significant (p = 0.002, p = 0.003. Conclusions : Annual surgeon case load and adjacent organ infiltration (pT4b were significant risk factors for morbidity and mortality following major surgery for gastric cancer. The most common complications leading to perioperative death were cardiac failure and proximal anastomosis leak.

  16. Knee Osteoarthritis Is Associated With Previous Meniscus and Anterior Cruciate Ligament Surgery Among Elite College American Football Athletes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Matthew V.; Nepple, Jeffrey J.; Wright, Rick W.; Matava, Matthew J.; Brophy, Robert H.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Football puts athletes at risk for knee injuries such meniscus and anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tears, which are associated with the development of osteoarthritis (OA). Previous knee surgery, player position, and body mass index (BMI) may be associated with knee OA. Hypothesis: In elite football players undergoing knee magnetic resonance imaging at the National Football League’s Invitational Combine, the prevalence of knee OA is associated with previous knee surgery and BMI. Study Design: Retrospective cohort. Level of Evidence: Level 4. Methods: A retrospective review was performed of all participants of the National Football League Combine from 2005 to 2009 who underwent magnetic resonance imaging of the knee because of prior knee injury, surgery, or knee-related symptoms or concerning examination findings. Imaging studies were reviewed for evidence of OA. History of previous knee surgery—including ACL reconstruction, meniscal procedures, and articular cartilage surgery—and position were recorded for each athlete. BMI was calculated based on height and weight. Results: There was a higher prevalence of OA in knees with a history of previous knee surgery (23% vs 4.0%, P 30 kg/m2 was also associated with a higher risk of OA (P = 0.007) but player position was not associated with knee OA. Conclusions: Previous knee surgery, particularly ACL reconstruction and partial meniscectomy, and elevated BMI are associated with knee OA in elite football players. Future research should investigate ways to minimize the risk of OA after knee surgery in these athletes. Clinical Relevance: Treatment of knee injuries in football athletes should consider chondroprotection, including meniscal preservation and cartilage repair, when possible. PMID:27940573

  17. Change in Use of Sleep Medications After Gastric Bypass Surgery or Intensive Lifestyle Treatment in Adults with Obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Winda L; Peeters, Anna; Näslund, Ingmar; Ottosson, Johan; Johansson, Kari; Marcus, Claude; Shaw, Jonathan E; Bruze, Gustaf; Sundström, Johan; Neovius, Martin

    2017-08-01

    To examine the change in use of hypnotics and/or sedatives after gastric bypass surgery or intensive lifestyle modification in adults with obesity. Adults with obesity who underwent gastric bypass surgery or initiated intensive lifestyle modification between 2007 and 2012 were identified through the Scandinavian Obesity Surgery Registry and a Swedish commercial weight loss database. The two cohorts were matched on BMI, age, sex, education, history of hypnotics and/or sedatives use, and treatment year (surgery n = 20,626; lifestyle n = 11,973; 77% women, mean age 41 years, mean BMI 41 kg/m 2 ). The proportion of participants with filled hypnotics and/or sedatives prescriptions was compared yearly for 3 years. In the matched treatment cohorts, 4% had filled prescriptions for hypnotics and/or sedatives during the year before treatment. At 1 year follow-up, following an average weight loss of 37 kg and 18 kg in the surgery and intensive lifestyle cohorts, respectively, this proportion had increased to 7% in the surgery cohort but remained at 4% in the intensive lifestyle cohort (risk ratio 1.7; 95% CI: 1.4-2.1); at 2 years, the proportion had increased to 11% versus 5% (risk ratio 2.0; 95% CI: 1.7-2.4); and at 3 years, it had increased to 14% versus 6% (risk ratio 2.2; 95% CI: 1.9-2.6). Gastric bypass surgery was associated with increased use of hypnotics and/or sedatives compared with intensive lifestyle modification. © 2017 The Authors. Obesity published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of The Obesity Society (TOS).

  18. Roux-en-Y Gastric Bypass Surgery Increases Respiratory Quotient and Energy Expenditure during Food Intake.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malin Werling

    Full Text Available The mechanisms determining long-term weight maintenance after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB remain unclear. Cross sectional studies have suggested that enhanced energy expenditure (EE may play a significant role and the aim of this study was to reveal the impact of RYGB on each major component constituting total EE.Six obese female subjects, without other co-morbidities, were assessed before and at 10 days, 3 and 20 months after RYGB. Indirect calorimetry in a metabolic chamber was used to assess 24 h EE at each study visit. Other measurements included body composition by DEXA, gut hormone profiles and physical activity (PA using high sensitivity accelerometers.Median Body Mass Index decreased from 41.1 (range 39.1-44.8 at baseline to 28 kg/m2 (range 22.3-30.3 after 20 months (p<0.05. Lean tissue decreased from 55.9 (range 47.5-59.3 to 49.5 (range 41.1-54.9 kg and adipose tissue from 61 (range 56-64.6 to 27 (range 12-34.3 kg (both p<0.05. PA over 24 h did not change after surgery whereas 24 h EE and basal metabolic rate (BMR decreased. EE after a standard meal increased after surgery when adjusted for total tissue (p<0.05. After an initial drop, RQ (respiratory quotient had increased at 20 months, both as measured during 24 h and after food intake (p<0.05.RYGB surgery up-regulates RQ and EE after food intake resulting in an increased contribution to total EE over 24 h when corrected for total tissue.

  19. Perinatal Outcomes and the Influence of Maternal Characteristics After Roux-en-Y Gastric Bypass Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chagas, Cristiane; Saunders, Cláudia; Pereira, Silvia; Silva, Jacqueline; Saboya, Carlos; Ramalho, Andréa

    2017-01-01

    Assess the perinatal outcomes and identify what maternal characteristics can influence them in women who had undergone Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB). Analytical, prospective, and longitudinal study with pregnant adult women. chronological age >20 years; singleton pregnancy; RYGB surgery before pregnancy. prior malabsorptive or restrictive surgeries; malabsorption syndrome. Data analysis was performed using SPSS statistics software, version 17. Thirty pregnant women with 30.22 ± 4.38 years, the interval between surgery and the date of last menstrual period was 17.7 ± 9.07 months. The average prepregnancy body mass index was characterized as overweight (27.36 ± 3.26 kg/m 2 ), total gestational weight gain was 7.68 ± 3.73 kg. The most common pregnancy complications were anemia (73.3%), urinary tract infection (33.4%), and dumping syndrome (33.4%). As for newborns, 58% were male, with a mean of 39.28 ± 0.84 weeks, 90% were classified as appropriate for gestational age, and 93.4% were born at term with adequate weight (39.28 ± 0.84 weeks and 3128.79 ± 271.49 g). Positive and significant correlation was observed between gestational weekly gain in the first trimester and birth weight (r = 0.42, p = 0.024) and between gestational weekly gain in the second trimester and birth weight (r = 0.48, p = 0.008). Despite the completion of RYGB, in general, there was no apparent fetal compromise when considering the analysis of the variables proposed by this study.

  20. Neo-adjuvant chemotherapy followed by surgery and chemotherapy or by surgery and chemoradiotherapy for patients with resectable gastric cancer (CRITICS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dikken, Johan L; Verheij, Marcel; Cats, Annemieke; Sandick, Johanna W van; Maurits Swellengrebel, HA; Lind, Pehr A; Putter, Hein; Jansen, Edwin PM; Boot, Henk; Grieken, Nicole CT van; Velde, Cornelis JH van de

    2011-01-01

    Radical surgery is the cornerstone in the treatment of resectable gastric cancer. The Intergroup 0116 and MAGIC trials have shown benefit of postoperative chemoradiation and perioperative chemotherapy, respectively. Since these trials cannot be compared directly, both regimens are evaluated prospectively in the CRITICS trial. This study aims to obtain an improved overall survival for patients treated with preoperative chemotherapy and surgery by incorporating radiotherapy concurrently with chemotherapy postoperatively. In this phase III multicentre study, patients with resectable gastric cancer are treated with three cycles of preoperative ECC (epirubicin, cisplatin and capecitabine), followed by surgery with adequate lymph node dissection, and then either another three cycles of ECC or concurrent chemoradiation (45 Gy, cisplatin and capecitabine). Surgical, pathological, and radiotherapeutic quality control is performed. The primary endpoint is overall survival, secondary endpoints are disease-free survival (DFS), toxicity, health-related quality of life (HRQL), prediction of response, and recurrence risk assessed by genomic and expression profiling. Accrual for the CRITICS trial is from the Netherlands, Sweden, and Denmark, and more countries are invited to participate. Results of this study will demonstrate whether the combination of preoperative chemotherapy and postoperative chemoradiotherapy will improve the clinical outcome of the current European standard of perioperative chemotherapy, and will therefore play a key role in the future management of patients with resectable gastric cancer. clinicaltrials.gov http://www.clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT00407186

  1. Chemoradiation Therapy for Potentially Resectable Gastric Cancer: Clinical Outcomes Among Patients Who Do Not Undergo Planned Surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Michelle M.; Mansfield, Paul F.; Das, Prajnan; Janjan, Nora A.; Badgwell, Brian D.; Phan, Alexandria T.; Delclos, Marc E.; Maru, Dipen; Ajani, Jaffer A.; Crane, Christopher H.; Krishnan, Sunil

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: We retrospectively analyzed treatment outcomes among resectable gastric cancer patients treated preoperatively with chemoradiation therapy (CRT) but rendered ineligible for planned surgery because of clinical deterioration or development of overt metastatic disease. Methods and Materials: Between 1996 and 2004, 39 patients with potentially resectable gastric cancer received preoperative CRT but failed to undergo surgery. At baseline clinical staging, 33 (85%) patients had T3-T4 disease, and 27 (69%) patients had nodal involvement. Most patients received 45 Gy of radiotherapy with concurrent 5-fluorouracil-based chemotherapy. Twenty-one patients underwent induction chemotherapy before CRT. Actuarial times to local control (LC), distant control (DC), and overall survival (OS) were calculated by the Kaplan-Meier method. Results: The cause for surgical ineligibility was development of metastatic disease (28 patients, 72%; predominantly peritoneal, 18 patients), poor performance status (5 patients, 13%), patient/physician preference (4 patients, 10%), and treatment-related death (2 patients, 5%). With a median follow-up of 8 months (range, 1-95 months), actuarial 1-year LC, DC, and OS were 46%, 12%, and 36%, respectively. Median LC and OS were 11.0 and 10.1 months, respectively. Conclusions: Patients with potentially resectable gastric cancer treated with preoperative CRT are found to be ineligible for surgery principally because of peritoneal progression. Patients who are unable to undergo planned surgery have outcomes comparable to that of patients with advanced gastric cancer treated with chemotherapy alone. CRT provides durable LC for the majority of the remaining life of these patients

  2. Diagnosis and treatment of gastric emptying disorders. Clinical usefulness of radionuclide measurements of gastric emptying

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pellegrini, C.A.; Broderick, W.C.; Van Dyke, D.; Way, L.W.

    1983-01-01

    We studied 53 patients with severe gastrointestinal symptoms thought to be due to a gastric motility disorder. Sixty-six percent had had a previous operation on the stomach, and 21 percent had insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus. Based on clinical, radiographic, and endoscopic findings, 48 patients were thought to have gastroparesis, 3 were thought to have dumping, and 2 had no diagnosis. Measurement of gastric emptying of solids showed that gastric emptying was normal in 12 patients, rapid in 15 patients, and slow in 26 patients. Further evaluation showed that half of the patients with normal gastric emptying, and one third of those with rapid gastric emptying had other diseases of the gastrointestinal tract that responded well to surgery. Of those patients with dumping, diet modification was effective in 40 percent, and half of those who did not respond to dietary manipulations did well after reoperation. Nineteen patients with delayed gastric emptying were treated with metoclopramide. Sixty percent of those without previous gastric surgery responded, whereas only 25 percent of those with previous gastric surgery had good results. The rate of gastric emptying improved following reoperation in 9 (90 percent) of 10 patients with delayed gastric emptying (4 who had not responded to metoclopramide). Gastric emptying was measured again in 15 patients after treatment. The changes after treatment paralleled the clinical response. These studies indicate that gastroparesis cannot be reliably diagnosed on the basis of clinical findings and standard tests. Gastric emptying studies are essential to diagnose and treat patients thought to have gastric motility disorders, and to evaluate the results of therapy

  3. [Current status of diagnosis and treatment of early gastric cancer in China--Data from China Gastrointestinal Cancer Surgery Union].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yinkui; Li, Ziyu; Shan, Fei; Miao, Rulin; Xue, Kan; Li, Zhemin; Gao, Chao; Chen, Nan; Gao, Xiangyu; Li, Shen; Ji, Jiafu

    2018-02-25

    To investigate the current status of diagnosis and treatment of early gastric cancer in China, based on the nationwide survey by China Gastrointestinal Cancer Surgery Union. The union sent questionnaires on basic diagnosis and treatment data of gastric and colorectal cancer to all the centers of the union. Different centers collected and summarized their data by year and sent back the questionnaires to the e-mail of theunion(gi_union@foxmail.com) for summary. From 2014 to 2016, the union collected 285 questionnaires from 85 centers all over China. In these 3 years, a total of 88 340 cases of gastric cancer were summarized and there were 17 187 cases of early gastric cancer (part of the data was not available in some centers). The proportion of early gastric cancer varied from 19.5%(5711/29290) in 2014 to 19.0%(6081/32050) in 2015 and 20.0%(5395/27000) in 2016. Significant difference was found among them (χ 2 =9.553, P=0.008). Significant differences existed not only in the proportion of early gastric cancer between the south (20.9%, 7618/ 36518) and the north (18.5%, 9569/51822) of China (χ 2 =78.468, P=0.000), but also between the general (20.4%, 11991/58672) and the specialized (17.5%, 5196/29668) hospitals(χ 2 =107.473, P=0.000). Ultrasonic endoscope was used as routine practice in 10(17.5%, 10/57) general hospitals and 9(56.2%,9/16) specialized hospitals, and significant difference was found between them (χ 2 =9.721, P=0.002). A total of 4555 early gastric cancer patients received endoscopic therapy. The proportion of patients receiving endoscopic therapy was significantly different between the hospitals in the first-tier cities (36.0%, 2243/6233) and the other cities (21.1%, 2312/10954) (χ 2 =451.526, P=0.000), and between the hospitals with more than 800 gastric cancer patients per year (28.9%, 3434/11884) and those with less than 800 gastric cancer patients (21.1%, 1121/5303)(χ 2 =113.270, P=0.000). 37.1%(5270/14186) of early gastric cancer patients

  4. Aspirin in Patients With Previous Percutaneous Coronary Intervention Undergoing Noncardiac Surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Graham, Michelle M; Sessler, Daniel I; Parlow, Joel L

    2018-01-01

    Background: Uncertainty remains about the effects of aspirin in patients with prior percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) having noncardiac surgery. Objective: To evaluate benefits and harms of perioperative aspirin in patients with prior PCI. Design: Nonprespecified subgroup analysis of a mul......Background: Uncertainty remains about the effects of aspirin in patients with prior percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) having noncardiac surgery. Objective: To evaluate benefits and harms of perioperative aspirin in patients with prior PCI. Design: Nonprespecified subgroup analysis...... of a multicenter factorial trial. Computerized Internet randomization was done between 2010 and 2013. Patients, clinicians, data collectors, and outcome adjudicators were blinded to treatment assignment. (ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01082874). Setting: 135 centers in 23 countries. Patients: Adults aged 45 years......, aspirin increased the risk for major bleeding (absolute risk increase, 0.8% [CI, 0.1% to 1.6%]; HR, 1.22 [CI, 1.01 to 1.48]; P for interaction = 0.50). Limitation: Nonprespecified subgroup analysis with small sample. Conclusion: Perioperative aspirin may be more likely to benefit rather than harm patients...

  5. Predictors of weight regain in patients who underwent Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shantavasinkul, Prapimporn Chattranukulchai; Omotosho, Philip; Corsino, Leonor; Portenier, Dana; Torquati, Alfonso

    2016-11-01

    Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) is a highly effective treatment for obesity and results in long-term weight loss and resolution of co-morbidities. However, weight regain may occur as soon as 1-2 years after surgery. This retrospective study aimed to investigate the prevalence of weight regain and possible preoperative predictors of this phenomenon after RYGB. An academic medical center in the United States. A total of 1426 obese patients (15.8% male) who underwent RYGB during January 2000 to 2012 and had at least a 2-year follow-up were reviewed. We included only patients who were initially successful, having achieved at least 50% excess weight loss at 1 year postoperatively. Patients were then categorized into either the weight regain group (WR) or sustained weight loss (SWL) group based upon whether they gained≥15% of their 1-year postoperative weight. Weight regain was observed in 244 patients (17.1%). Preoperative body mass index was similar between groups. Body mass index was significantly higher and percent excess weight loss was significantly lower in the WR group (Pweight regain was 19.5±9.3 kg and-.8±8.5 in the WR and SWL groups, respectively (Pweight loss. Moreover, a longer duration after RYGB was associated with weight regain. Multivariate analysis revealed that younger age was a significant predictor of weight regain even after adjusting for time since RYGB. The present study confirmed that a longer interval after RYGB was associated with weight regain. Younger age was a significant predictor of weight regain even after adjusting for time since RYGB. The findings of this study underscore the complexity of the mechanisms underlying weight loss and regain after RYGB. Future prospective studies are needed to further explore the prevalence, predictors, and mechanisms of weight regain after RYGB. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Bariatric Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Trends in Weight Regain Following Roux-en-Y Gastric Bypass (RYGB) Bariatric Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Timothy C; Simmons, Elizabeth B; Webb, Kirsten; Burns, James L; Kushner, Robert F

    2015-08-01

    The primary purpose of this study was to assess weight loss and occurrence of weight regain among patients who underwent Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) using categorical analysis. Study participants were selected from patients who underwent RYGB from a single institution. Participants (n = 300, mean procedure age = 45.6 ± 9.9) completed surveys for self-reported preoperative weight, current weight, and subsequent weights over postoperative years. Measured weights and confirmed procedure dates were acquired from patient medical records. Mean preoperative weight and BMI were 140.8 kg ± 32.1 and 49.7 ± 9.9, respectively, and mean years since surgery was 6.9 ± 4.9. Study subjects were mostly Caucasian (56.7 %) and female (80.3 %). Participants were stratified a priori into four cohorts based on percent of weight loss at 1 year, 35 % (n = 113). General linear model analyses were conducted to assess the effect of year one weight loss on percent weight regain. The mean weight regain for all patients was 23.4 % of maximum weight loss. Using categorical analysis, mean weight regain in the 35 % weight loss cohorts was 29.1, 21.9, 20.9, and 23.8 %, respectively. Excessive weight regain, defined as ≥25 % of total lost weight, occurred in 37 % of patients. Weight gain is a common complication following RYGB surgery. Despite the percentage of weight loss over the first year, all cohort patient groups regained on average between 21 and 29 % of lost weight. Excessive weight gain was experienced by over one third of patients. Greater initial absolute weight loss leads to more successful long-term weight outcomes.

  7. Dose response of exercise training following roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery: A randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodlief, Tracey L; Carnero, Elvis A; Standley, Robert A; Distefano, Giovanna; Anthony, Steve J; Dubis, Gabe S; Jakicic, John M; Houmard, Joseph A; Coen, Paul M; Goodpaster, Bret H

    2015-12-01

    Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) surgery can cause profound weight loss and improve overall cardiometabolic risk factors. Exercise (EX) training following RYGB can provide additional improvements in insulin sensitivity (SI ) and cardiorespiratory fitness. However, it remains unknown whether a specific amount of EX post-RYGB is required to achieve additional benefits. We performed a post hoc analysis of participants who were randomized into either a 6-month structured EX program or a health education control (CON). The EX group (n = 56) was divided into tertiles according to the amount of weekly exercise performed, compared with CON (n = 42): low-EX = 54 ± 8; middle-EX = 129 ± 4; and high-EX = 286 ± 40 min per week. The high-EX lost a significantly greater amount of body weight, total fat mass, and abdominal deep subcutaneous abdominal fat compared with CON (P weight loss, changes in body composition, and improvements in cardiorespiratory fitness and skeletal muscle mitochondrial capacity. © 2015 The Obesity Society.

  8. Effects of roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery on postprandial fructose metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surowska, Anna; De Giorgi, Sara; Theytaz, Fanny; Campos, Vanessa; Hodson, Leanne; Stefanoni, Nathalie; Rey, Valentine; Schneiter, Philippe; Laville, Martine; Giusti, Vittorio; Gabert, Laure; Tappy, Luc

    2016-03-01

    Fructose is partly metabolized in small bowel enterocytes, where it can be converted into glucose or fatty acids. It was therefore hypothesized that Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) may significantly alter fructose metabolism. We performed a randomized clinical study in eight patients 12-17 months after RYGB and eight control (Ctrl) subjects. Each participant was studied after ingestion of a protein and lipid meal (PL) and after ingestion of a protein+lipid+fructose+glucose meal labeled with (13) C-fructose (PLFG). Postprandial blood glucose, fructose, lactate, apolipoprotein B48 (apoB48), and triglyceride (TG) concentrations, (13) C-palmitate concentrations in chylomicron-TG and VLDL-TG, fructose oxidation ((13) CO2 production), and gluconeogenesis from fructose (GNGf) were measured over 6 hours. After ingestion of PLFG, postprandial plasma fructose, glucose, insulin, and lactate concentrations increased earlier and reached higher peak values in RYGB than in Ctrl. GNGf was 33% lower in RYGB than Ctrl (P = 0.041), while fructose oxidation was unchanged. Postprandial incremental areas under the curves for total TG and chylomicrons-TG were 72% and 91% lower in RYGB than Ctrl (P = 0.064 and P = 0.024, respectively). ApoB48 and (13) C-palmitate concentrations were not significantly different. Postprandial fructose metabolism was not grossly altered, but postprandial lipid concentrations were markedly decreased in subjects having had RYGB surgery. © 2015 The Obesity Society.

  9. Endoscopic extraction of adjustable gastric bands after intragastric migration as a complication of bariatric surgery: technique and advice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collado-Pacheco, David; Rábago-Torre, Luis Ramon; Arias-Rivera, Maria; Ortega-Carbonel, Alejandro; Olivares-Valles, Ana; Alonso-Prada, Alicia; Vázquez-Echarri, Jaime; Herrera-Merino, Norberto

    2016-06-01

    Surgery has been the method most widely used to manage the extraction of gastric bands with inclusion as a late complication of bariatric surgery; however, surgical extraction entails morbidity and limits future surgical procedures. The development of endoscopic techniques has provided an important means of improving the treatment of this complication, enabling minimally invasive and safe procedures that have a high success rate. A retrospective analysis was conducted of patients who had laparoscopic gastric banding complicated by intragastric migration and were treated endoscopically. A technique already described for managing this complication was employed. An MTW Endoskopie Dormia basket for mechanical lithotripsy or a standard 0.0035-in guidewire was placed around the band, and an MTW Endoskopie emergency lithotripter was used to section it, after which the band was extracted with a standard polypectomy snare. Also analyzed were the initial symptoms of patients with this complication, the mean time from surgery to development of the event, the success rate of endoscopic treatment, and complications, Results: A total of 127 patients had undergone gastric banding surgery in our Bariatric Surgery Center; of these, 12 patients (9.4 %) developed a complication such as intragastric migration of the band. Weight gain and pain were the main symptoms in 11 patients (92 %), and the mean time to the development of symptoms was 51.3 months. A single endoscopic treatment was successful in 7 of 9 patients (78 %). Only 1 complication, involving ventilation during anesthesia, occurred; no other adverse events were recorded. The endoscopic extraction of bands with inclusion is feasible and can be performed easily and successfully. The procedure is available in all hospitals and has a low incidence of related complications, so that unnecessary surgical procedures can be avoided.

  10. Plasma Ghrelin Levels and Weight Regain After Roux-en-Y Gastric Bypass Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu Dayyeh, Barham K; Jirapinyo, Pichamol; Thompson, Christopher C

    2017-04-01

    Ghrelin is a gut hormone that induces hunger, gastric acid secretion, and gastrointestinal motility. A number of studies have previously demonstrated a possible correlation between a decrease in ghrelin level and weight loss after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB). This study aimed to assess if there was a relationship between ghrelin level and weight regain after RYGB nadir weight had been achieved. Sixty-three consecutive RYGB patients who were referred for an upper endoscopy were enrolled. Weight and responses to the 21-item Three-Factor Eating Questionnaire (TFEQ-R21) were collected. Ghrelin levels were measured. Upper endoscopy was performed to evaluate pouch length and stoma diameter. Multivariate linear regression was performed to assess an association between ghrelin level, TFEQ-R21 score, pouch length, stoma diameter, and percentage of weight regained. Subjects were 47 ± 10 years old and had a BMI of 38 ± 7.7 kg/m 2 . Out of 63 patients, 76 % had weight regain (gaining of ≥20 % of maximal weight lost after the RYGB) and 24 % did not. Average pouch length was 44 ± 13 mm, stoma diameter 20 ± 6.6 mm, and ghrelin levels 125 ± 99 ng/ml. Ghrelin level was not associated with weight regain (β = 0.17, p = 0.2). GJ stoma diameter was associated with weight regain (β = 0.39, p Ghrelin levels do not appear to correlate with weight change after RYGB nadir weight has been achieved. A dilated GJ stoma diameter is a risk factor for weight regain and uncontrolled eating behavior after RYGB.

  11. Roux-en-Y Gastric Bypass Surgery Induces Early Plasma Metabolomic and Lipidomic Alterations in Humans Associated with Diabetes Remission.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tulika Arora

    Full Text Available Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB is an effective method to attain sustained weight loss and diabetes remission. We aimed to elucidate early changes in the plasma metabolome and lipidome after RYGB. Plasma samples from 16 insulin-resistant morbidly obese subjects, of whom 14 had diabetes, were subjected to global metabolomics and lipidomics analysis at pre-surgery and 4 and 42 days after RYGB. Metabolites and lipid species were compared between time points and between subjects who were in remission and not in remission from diabetes 2 years after surgery. We found that the variables that were most discriminatory between time points were decanoic acid and octanoic acid, which were elevated 42 days after surgery, and sphingomyelins (18:1/21:0 and 18:1/23:3, which were at their lowest level 42 days after surgery. Insulin levels were lower at 4 and 42 days after surgery compared with pre-surgery levels. At 4 days after surgery, insulin levels correlated positively with metabolites of branched chain and aromatic amino acid metabolism and negatively with triglycerides with long-chain fatty acids. Of the 14 subjects with diabetes prior to surgery, 7 were in remission 2 years after surgery. The subjects in remission displayed higher pre-surgery levels of tricarboxylic acid cycle intermediates and triglycerides with long-chain fatty acids compared with subjects not in remission. Thus, metabolic alterations are induced soon after surgery and subjects with diabetes remission differ in the metabolic profiles at pre- and early post-surgery time points compared to patients not in remission.

  12. Effect of prolonged general anesthesia with sevoflurane and laparoscopic surgery on gastric and small bowel propulsive motility and pH in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boscan, Pedro; Cochran, Shannon; Monnet, Eric; Webb, Craig; Twedt, David

    2014-01-01

    To determine if general anesthesia with sevoflurane and laparoscopic surgery changed gastric and small bowel propulsive motility or pH in dogs. Prospective, controlled trial. Twelve, 19-24 months old, female, Treeing Walker Hound dogs, weighing 23-30 kg. Dogs were anesthetized for a median of 8.5 hours during another study to determine the minimum alveolar concentration of sevoflurane using a visceral stimulus. Gastric and small bowel motility were determined using a sensor capsule that measures pressure, pH and temperature. Gastric transit time and motility index were calculated. For 8/12 dogs, gastric motility, pH and transit time were measured. In 4/12 dogs, small bowel motility and pH were measured. Anesthesia decreased gastric and small bowel motility but did not change luminal pH. Mean gastric contraction force decreased from median (range) 11 (8-20) to 3 (1-10) mmHg (p gastric motility index decreased from 0.63 (0-1.58) to 0 (0-0.31; p = 0.01). Frequency of contractions did not change, 3.7 (1.6-4.4) versus 2.8 (0.1-5.1) contractions minute(-1) (p = 0.1). Gastric motility returned to normal 12-15 hours following anesthesia. Gastric emptying was prolonged from 12 (5.3-16) to 49 (9.75-56.25) hours (p gastric or small bowel parameters beyond those produced by general anesthesia. The force of gastric and small bowel contractions decreased during sevoflurane anesthesia for laparoscopy. Although gastric motility returned to normal within 12-15 hours the impairment of gastric emptying lasted 30-40 hours, predisposing dogs to postoperative ileus. © 2013 Association of Veterinary Anaesthetists and the American College of Veterinary Anesthesia and Analgesia.

  13. Analysis of radiation parameters to control the effects of Nd:YAG laser surgery on gastric malignancies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelayo-Fernández, M. L.; Fanjul-Vélez, F.; Salas-García, I.; Hernández-González, A.; Arce-Diego, J. L.

    2015-07-01

    Endoscopic laser surgery provides an advantageous alternative to Argon Plasma Coagulation, endoscopic tweezers or electro-ablation in gastroenterology that facilitates a selective ablation of stomach tumors with an additional hemostatic effect in the surrounding tissue. This coagulation effect can also be employed for the treatment of gastric ulcers. It is mandatory to control the laser parameters regardless of the desired effect, either cancerous tissue ablation or coagulation to prevent ulcerous bleeding, in order to avoid stomach wall perforation or an insufficient therapeutic outcome. Dosimetric models constitute an attractive tool to determine the proper light dose in order to offer a customized therapy planning that optimizes the treatment results. In this work, a model for Nd:YAG laser surgery is applied to predict both the coagulation zone in gastric ulcers and the removal in adenocarcinomas under different laser setups. Results show clear differences in the effective zone of the gastric malignancy affected by both coagulation and ablation. Therefore the current model could be employed in the clinical practice to plan the optimal laser beam parameters to treat a certain type of pathologic stomach tissue with variable morphology and without risk of perforation or undertreated parts.

  14. Topography-guided laser in situ keratomileusis (TOPOLINK) to correct irregular astigmatism after previous refractive surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alió, Jorge L; Belda, Jose I; Osman, Amr A; Shalaby, Ahmad M M

    2003-01-01

    To assess whether topography-driven laser in situ keratomileusis (LASIK) can correct induced corneal irregular astigmatism. A prospective non-comparative case series of 41 eyes (38 patients) with irregular astigmatism following corneal refractive surgery, included two groups: Group 1 (26 eyes) with a defined topographic pattern and Group 2 (15 eyes) with no pattern. Ablation was performed using the Technolas 217C excimer laser with a software ablation program (TOPOLINK) based on corneal topography. Uncorrected and best spectacle-corrected visual acuity, manifest and cycloplegic refraction, corneal topography, superficial corneal surface quality, and image distortion were measured. At 6 months follow-up in Group 1 eyes (defined topographic pattern) mean preoperative BSCVA improved from 0.16 +/- 0.11 LogMAR (0.4 to 0) to 0.09 +/- 0.10 LogMAR (0.2 to 0) (P = .001) (safety index of 1.1). In Group 2 eyes (no pattern), mean preoperative BSCVA was 0.18 +/- 0.11 LogMAR (0.4 to 0), similar to the postoperative BSCVA of 0.17 +/- 0.10 LogMAR (0.3 to 0) (safety index of 0.98). Mean postoperative UCVA was > or = 0.3 LogMAR in 25 eyes (96.2%) in Group 1 (efficacy index of 0.8) and 7 eyes (46.6%) in Group 2 (efficacy index of 0.5). Both superficial corneal surface quality and image distortion significantly improved in Group 1; there were no significant changes in Group 2. We reoperated nine eyes (21.9%). Topographic-assisted LASIK was helpful in selected cases where irregular astigmatism showed a pattern. It was ineffective in undefined irregular astigmatism. Partial correction of the irregularity and regression of the obtained effect was common.

  15. Validity and Clinical Utility of Subtyping by the Beck Depression Inventory in Women Seeking Gastric Bypass Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivezaj, Valentina; Barnes, Rachel D; Grilo, Carlos M

    2016-09-01

    The Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) is commonly used in the screening and evaluation process with bariatric surgery candidates despite relatively limited psychometric evidence in this patient group. We examined the validity of the BDI and its clinical utility for subtyping women seeking gastric bypass surgery. One hundred twenty-four women evaluated for gastric bypass surgery were administered the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV (SCID-I/P) and completed a self-report battery of psychosocial measures including the BDI. Based on the SCID-I/P, 12.9 % (n = 16) met criteria for current mood disorder. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis revealed the BDI had a good area under the curve (0.788) for predicting SCID-I/P mood disorder diagnosis; BDI score of >15 optimized both sensitivity and specificity. Patients diagnosed with SCID-I/P mood disorders had significantly higher levels of eating disorder psychopathology, self-esteem, and shame, than those without mood disorders. Based on a BDI cut-off score of >15, 41.9 % (n = 52) were categorized as high-BDI and 58.1 % (n = 72) as low-BDI. Patients characterized as high-BDI also had significantly higher levels of all associated measures than those with low-BDI; effect sizes for the differences by BDI subtyping were generally 2-3 times greater than those observed when comparing SCID-I/P-based mood versus no mood disorder subgroups. In women seeking gastric bypass surgery, the BDI demonstrated limited acceptability efficiency for identifying mood disorders with a cut-point score of >15. When identifying clinical severity, however, subtyping women by BDI scores of >15 may identify a significantly more disturbed subgroup than relying on a SCID-I/P-generated mood disorder diagnosis.

  16. Decreased Cardiovascular Risk after Roux-en-Y Gastric Bypass Surgery in Chinese Diabetic Patients with Obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xue; Duan, Wenyan; Sun, Chenglin; Li, Zhuo; Liu, Yujia; Xiao, Xianchao; Wang, Gang; Gang, Xiaokun; Wang, Guixia

    2017-01-01

    The influence of bariatric surgery on cardiovascular risks in Chinese diabetic patients remains unclear. Here, we aimed to explore the impact of Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery (RYGB) on cardiovascular risks in Chinese diabetic patients with obesity. Twenty Chinese patients with T2DM and obesity undergoing RYGB surgery were included in this study. Cardiovascular risk factors were measured before and 18 months after surgery. A 10-year cardiovascular risk was calculated by the UKPDS risk engine. Linear regression analysis was performed on CHD risk, stroke risk, and baseline metabolic parameters. The complete remission rate of diabetes was 90% after RYGB surgery, with significant improvements in blood pressure, BMI, glucose, and lipid metabolism ( P women,  5 years, using noninsulin therapy presented more obvious improvements in the 10-year cardiovascular risk after RYGB surgery. WHR, age, LDL-C, and HbA1c were the most important factors influencing CHD or stroke risk after RYGB surgery ( P treatment to reduce cardiovascular risk in Chinese diabetic patients with obesity.

  17. Gastric Band Removal in Revisional Bariatric Surgery, One-Step Versus Two-Step: a Systematic Review and Meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dang, Jerry T; Switzer, Noah J; Wu, Jeremy; Gill, Richdeep S; Shi, Xinzhe; Thereaux, Jérémie; Birch, Daniel W; de Gara, Christopher; Karmali, Shahzeer

    2016-04-01

    We aimed to systematically review the literature comparing the safety of one-step versus two-step revisional bariatric surgery from laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding (LAGB) to Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) or sleeve gastrectomy (SG). There is debate on the safety of removing the gastric band and performing revisional surgery immediately or in a delayed, two-step fashion due to potential higher complications in one-step revisions. A systematic and comprehensive search of the literature was conducted. Included studies directly compared one-step and two-step revisional surgery. Eleven studies were included with 1370 patients. Meta-analysis found comparable rates of complications, morbidity, and mortality between one-step and two-step revisions for both RYGB and SG groups. This suggests that immediate or delayed revisional bariatric surgeries are both safe options for LAGB revisions.

  18. Surgery for a gastric Dieulafoy’s lesion reveals an occult bleeding jejunal diverticulum. A case report

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Jejunal diverticulosis is an uncommon disease and usually asymptomatic. It can be complicated not only by diverticulitis, but by hemorrhage, perforation, intussusception, volvulus, malabsorption and even small bowel obstruction due to enteroliths formed and expelled from these diverticula. Methods We describe a case of an occult bleeding jejunal diverticulum, casually discovered in a patient that was taken to surgery for a Dieulafoy’s lesion after unsuccessful endoscopic treatment. We performed a gastric resection together with an ileocecal resection. Macroscopic and microscopic examinations confirmed the gastric Dieulafoy’s lesion and demonstrated the presence of another source of occult bleeding in asymptomatic jejunal diverticulum. Discussion The current case emphasizes that some gastrointestinal bleeding lesions, although rare, can be multiple and result in potentially life-threatening bleeding. The clinician must be mindful to the possibility of multisite lesions and to the correlation between results of the investigations and clinical condition of the bleeding patient. PMID:23173883

  19. A Methylene Blue–assisted Technique for Harvesting Lymph Nodes After Radical Surgery for Gastric Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoyama, Toru; Fujikawa, Hirohito; Cho, Haruhiko; Ogata, Takashi; Shirai, Junya; Hayashi, Tsutomu; Rino, Yasushi; Masuda, Munetaka; Oba, Mari S.; Morita, Satoshi

    2015-01-01

    Harvesting lymph nodes (LNs) after gastrectomy is essential for accurate staging. This trial evaluated the efficiency and quality of a conventional method and a methylene blue–assisted method in a randomized manner. The key eligibility criteria were as follows: (i) histologically proven adenocarcinoma of the stomach; (ii) clinical stage I-III; (iii) R0 resection planned by gastrectomy with D1+ or D2 lymphadenectomy. The primary endpoint was the ratio of the pathologic number of harvested LNs per time (minutes) as an efficacy measure. The secondary endpoint was the number of harvested LNs, as a quality measure. Between August 2012 and December 2012, 60 patients were assigned to undergo treatment using the conventional method (n=29) and the methylene blue dye method (n=31). The baseline demographics were mostly well balanced between the 2 groups. The number of harvested LNs (mean±SD) was 33.6±11.9 in the conventional arm and 43.4±13.9 in the methylene blue arm (P=0.005). The ratio of the number of the harvested LNs per time was 1.12±0.46 LNs/min in the conventional arm and 1.49±0.59 LNs/min in the methylene blue arm (P=0.010). In the subgroup analyses, the quality and efficacy were both superior for the methylene blue dye method compared with the conventional method. The methylene blue technique is recommended for harvesting LNs during gastric cancer surgery on the basis of both the quality and efficacy. PMID:25356528

  20. Striatal Dopamine Homeostasis is Altered in Mice Following Roux-en-Y Gastric Bypass Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) is an effective treatment for obesity. Importantly, weight loss following RYGB is thought to result in part from changes in brain-mediated regulation of appetite and food intake. Dopamine (DA) within the dorsal striatum plays an important role in feeding behavior; we therefore hypothesized that RYGB alters DA homeostasis in this subcortical region. In the current study, obese RYGB-operated mice consumed significantly less of a high-fat diet, weighed less by the end of the study, and exhibited lower adiposity than obese sham-operated mice. Interestingly, both RYGB and caloric restriction (pair feeding) resulted in elevated DA and reduced norepinephrine (NE) tissue levels compared with ad libitum fed sham animals. Consequently, the ratio of NE to DA, a measure of DA turnover, was significantly reduced in both of these groups. The RYGB mice additionally exhibited a significant increase in phosphorylation of tyrosine hydroxylase at position Ser31, a key regulatory site of DA synthesis. This increase was associated with augmented expression of extracellular-signal-regulated kinases ERK1/2, the kinase targeting Ser31. Additionally, RYGB has been shown in animal models and humans to improve insulin sensitivity and glycemic control. Curiously, we noted a significant increase in the expression of insulin receptor-β in RYGB animals in striatum (a glucosensing brain region) compared to sham ad libitum fed mice. These data demonstrate that RYGB surgery is associated with altered monoamine homeostasis at the level of the dorsal striatum, thus providing a critical foundation for future studies exploring central mechanisms of weight loss in RYGB. PMID:25068716

  1. Gastric volume reduction is essential for the remission of type 2 diabetes mellitus after bariatric surgery in nonobese rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiong; Yu, Bo; Yang, Dan; Qiao, Zhengdong; Cao, Ting; Zhang, Peng

    Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) has shown positive outcomes in the remission of type 2 diabetes (T2D) and weight loss in obese patients by inhibiting food intake and nutrient absorption as well as inducing favorable hormonal changes. The purpose of the present study was to investigate whether gastric volume reduction is still required in addition to intestinal bypass for the purpose of T2D remission in nonobese patients. University Medical Center. Nonobese T2D Goto-Kakizaki rats were employed in the study. All rats were randomized into 3 groups according to the surgical procedure performed, including (1) RYGB, (2) duodeno-jejunal bypass (DJB) without gastric volume reduction, and (3) sham surgery (control). In addition, age-matched Wistar rats were adopted as normal nondiabetic controls. Weight, food intake, fasting plasma glucose, and intraperitoneal glucose tolerance test were measured in vivo before and 2, 4, and 8 weeks after the treatment. Whole body metabolic parameters including respiratory exchange ratio, energy expenditure, and activities were also recorded in all animals at the third week postoperatively. Compared with DJB and sham animals, the RYGB group had lower weight, less food intake, lower fasting plasma glucose, and improved glucose tolerance at all measuring time points postoperatively. By measuring whole body metabolic parameters, we found that RYGB, but not DJB, increased metabolic rate manifested by increased energy expenditure but less activity at night. In the meantime, respiratory exchange ratio was lower in RYGB group than in the other 3 groups at daytime, meaning adipose tissue became the main source of internal energy production during the resting phase in the group. For nonobese T2D patients, adding gastric volume reduction to intestine bypass gave better efficacy in remission of T2D by increasing metabolic rate and adipolysis, especially during the resting period. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Bariatric Surgery. Published by

  2. Role of Enteral Immunonutrition in Patients Undergoing Surgery for Gastric Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Guo-Min; Tian, Xu; Liang, Hui; Yi, Li-Juan; Zhou, Jian-Guo; Zeng, Zi; Shuai, Ting; Ou, Yang-Xiang; Zhang, Lei; Wang, Yan

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Gastric cancer (GC) is one of the most common upper gastrointestinal malignancies. Surgical resection remains the mainstay of curative treatment for GC. Enteral immunonutrition (EIN) has been increasingly used to enhance host immunity and relieve inflammatory response of patients undergoing surgery for GC; however, conclusions across studies still remain unclear. We aimed to evaluate the effects of EIN for such patients. We searched some electronic databases including PubMed, EBSCO-Medline, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), and EMBASE to identify any latent studies which investigated the effects of EIN compared with standard EN on GC patients who undergoing surgery until the end of December 30, 2014. Relative risk (RR), mean difference (MD), or standard mean difference (SMD) with 95% confidence interval (CI) were calculated and we also assessed heterogeneity by using Cochrane Q and I2 statistic combined with corresponding P-value. We included 9 eligible studies which included 785 patients eventually. The meta-analysis results shown that EIN increased level of IgA (MD, 0.31; 95% CI, 0.12–0.51), IgG (MD, 1.5; 95% CI, 0.73–2.28), IgM (MD, 0.22; 95% CI, 0.06–0.39), CD4+ (SMD, 0.81; 95% CI, 0.53–1.09), CD3+ (SMD, 0.68; 95% CI, 0.21–1.15), CD4+/CD8+ ratio (MD, 0.56; 95% CI, 0.12–1.01), and NK cell (MD, 2.35; 95% CI, 0.66–4.05); decreased IL-6 (MD, −98.22; 95% CI, −156.16 to −40.28) and TNF-α (MD, −118.29; 95% CI, −162.00 to −74.58), but not improve remained outcomes of interest involving postoperative complications, length of hospitalization, serum total protein, and CD8+. Descriptive analysis suggested that EIN also increased the concentration of IL-2 but not CRP. Impact on lymphocytes remains inconsistent. EIN is effective for enhancing host immunity and relieving the inflammatory response in GC patients undergoing gastrectomy, but clinical outcomes cannot be benefit from it. Heterogeneity caused by different

  3. Effect of morbid obesity, gastric banding and gastric bypass on esophageal symptoms, mucosa and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borovicka, Jan; Krieger-Grübel, Claudia; van der Weg, Boudewijn; Thurnheer, Martin; Schultes, Bernd; Sulz, Michael Christian; Gutzwiler, Jean-Pierre; Bisang, Philipp; Pohl, Daniel; Fried, Michael; Meyenberger, Christa; Tutuian, Radu

    2017-02-01

    Obesity and gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) are commonly associated diseases. Bariatric surgery has been shown to have various impacts on esophageal function and GERD. Our aim was to evaluate changes in symptoms, endoscopic findings, bolus passage and esophageal function in patients after primary gastric bypass surgery as compared to patients converted from gastric banding to gastric bypass. Obese patients scheduled for laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (naïve-to-bypass) and patients who previously underwent gastric banding and were considered for conversion from gastric banding to gastric bypass (band-to-bypass) were included. Patients rated esophageal and epigastric symptoms (100 point VAS) and underwent upper endoscopy, impedance-manometry, and modified "timed barium swallow" before/after surgery. Data from 66 naïve-to-bypass patients (51/66, 77 % females, mean age 41.2 ± 11.1 years) and 68 band-to-bypass patients (53/68, 78 % females, mean age 43.8 ± 10.0 years) were available for analysis. Esophageal symptoms, esophagitis, esophageal motility abnormalities and impaired esophageal bolus transit were more common in patients that underwent gastric banding compared to those that underwent gastric bypass. The majority of symptoms, lesions and abnormalities induced by gastric banding were decreased by conversion to gastric bypass. Esophagitis was present in 28/68 (41 %) and 13/47 (28 %) patients in the band-to-bypass group, pre- versus postoperatively, respectively, (p symptoms and should be therefore favored over gastric banding in difficult to treat obese patients at risk of repeated bariatric surgery.

  4. The decline in hip bone density after gastric bypass surgery is associated with extent of weight loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleischer, J; Stein, E M; Bessler, M; Della Badia, M; Restuccia, N; Olivero-Rivera, L; McMahon, D J; Silverberg, S J

    2008-10-01

    Bariatric surgery is common and may be associated with deleterious effects on the skeleton. Our objective was to assess bone metabolism and bone mineral density (BMD) after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass. We conducted a 1-yr prospective longitudinal study at a university hospital bariatric surgery practice and metabolic bone disease unit. Participants included 23 obese (mean body mass index 47 kg/m(2)) men and women, aged 20-64 yr. Serum PTH, 25-hydroxyvitamin D, osteocalcin, and urinary N-telopeptide, and BMD were assessed. Patients lost 45 +/- 2 kg 1 yr postoperatively (P rose (P hip (8.0%, P hip: r = 0.65, P = 0.02). Lumbar spine and distal radius sites did not change. After Roux-en-Y gastric bypass, there was evidence of calcium and vitamin D malabsorption. Bone turnover increased, and hip bone density rapidly declined. The decline in hip BMD was strongly associated with weight loss itself. Vigilance for nutritional deficiencies and bone loss in patients both before and after bariatric surgery is crucial.

  5. Evaluation of insulin resistance improvement after laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy or gastric bypass surgery with HOMA-IR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yubing; Sun, Zhipeng; Du, Yanmin; Xu, Guangzhong; Gong, Ke; Zhu, Bin; Zhang, Nengwei

    2017-01-01

    Our purpose was to explore the remission of insulin resistance after bariatric surgery to discover the mechanism of diabetes remission excluding dietary factors. A retrospective case control study was conducted on patients with type 2 diabetes, who underwent laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy (LSG) or laparoscopic gastric bypass surgery (LGB) in Beijing Shijitan Hospital from April 1, 2012 to April 1, 2013. The laboratory and anthropometric data was analyzed pre-surgery and during a 2-year follow-up. HOMA-IR was calculated and evaluated. The two surgical procedures were compared. No significant difference in complete remission rate was observed between the two groups (LGB group: 62.1%, LSG group: 60.0%, p = 0.892). HOMA-IR was reduced to a stable level at the 3 rd month after surgery. The cut-off value of HOMA-IR was 2.38 (sensitivity: 0.938, specificity: 0.75) and 2.33 (sensitivity: 0.941, specificity: 0.778) respectively for complete remission after LSG or LGB surgery. Insulin resistance was improved while GLP-1 and Ghrelin was changed significantly in patients with type 2 diabetes prior to weight loss either in the LSG or LGB group. HOMA-IR decreased to less than the cut-off value at the 3 rd month and was closely related to complete remission. The mechanism of bariatric surgery was not due just to simply dietary factors or body weight loss but also the remission of insulin resistance.

  6. Four years’ follow-up changes of physical activity and sedentary time in women undergoing roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery and appurtenant children

    OpenAIRE

    Sellberg, Fanny; Willmer, Mikaela; Tynelius, Per; Berglind, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    Background Objectively measured levels of physical activity (PA) in patients undergoing Roux-en-Y Gastric Bypass (RYGB) surgery remain essentially unchanged from before to one year after surgery. Effects from RYGB on objectively measured levels of PA among women undergoing RYGB and appurtenant children beyond one year post-surgery are unknown. The aim of the present study was to objectively assess longitudinal changes in PA and sedentary time (ST), among women undergoing RYGB and appurtenant ...

  7. Body Contouring Surgery and the Maintenance of Weight-Loss Following Roux-En-Y Gastric Bypass: A Retrospective Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Oliver J; Hachach-Haram, Nadine; Greenfield, Max; Bystrzonowski, Nicki; Pucci, Andrea; Batterham, Rachel L; Hashemi, Majid; Mosahebi, Afshin

    2018-02-17

    Bariatric surgery leads to significant weight loss with reduced morbidity and mortality. However, excess skin as a consequence of weight loss represents a major problem, impacting upon patient's functionality with potential negative effects on weight loss. We evaluated the effect of body-contouring surgery on weight-loss maintenance following bariatric surgery. We undertook a retrospective analysis of patients undergoing Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) +/- body-contouring surgery (BC). The control group (n = 61) received RYGB, the test group (n = 30) received RYGB+BC 12 to 18 months after bariatric surgery. Each RYGB+BC patient was matched to two control patients for age, sex, glycaemic status, and weight on day of surgery. Per cent weight loss (%WL) was calculated at 3, 6, 12, 24, 36, 48, and 60 months post-RYGB for both groups. The %WL was similar at 3, 6, and 12 months post-RYGB. At 24 months, %WL was 35.6% in the RYGB+BC group and 30.0% in the RYGB group (P RYGB+BC group maintained their weight loss (%WL 33.0%), in contrast, the RYGB gained weight (%WL = 27.3%, P RYGB+BC vs RYGB) at 48 months (%WL 30.8% vs 27.0%) and at 60 months (%WL 32.2% vs 22.7%, P < 0.05). Our results suggest patients who undergo body contouring after bariatric surgery are able to lose significantly more weight and maintain weight loss at five years of follow up compared to those undergoing bariatric surgery alone. © 2017 The American Society for Aesthetic Plastic Surgery, Inc. Reprints and permission: journals.permissions@oup.com

  8. Roux-en-Y Gastric Bypass Surgery But Not Vertical Sleeve Gastrectomy Decreases Bone Mass in Male Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stemmer, Kerstin; Bielohuby, Maximilian; Grayson, Bernadette E.; Begg, Denovan P.; Chambers, Adam P.; Neff, Christina; Woods, Stephen C.; Erben, Reinhold G.; Tschöp, Matthias H.; Bidlingmaier, Martin; Clemens, Thomas L.

    2013-01-01

    The most effective treatment for obesity is bariatric surgery. However, there is increasing concern that bariatric surgery can cause nutrient deficiencies that translate into metabolic bone disease. Whether this is true for all surgery types is not yet clear. We therefore investigated the effects of 2 commonly applied bariatric surgeries (Roux-en-Y gastric bypass [RYGB] and vertical sleeve gastrectomy) on energy and bone metabolism in rats 60 days after surgery. Both surgeries resulted in similar reductions of body weight, body fat, and food intake. Glucose tolerance was improved to a similar extent after both surgeries and was accompanied by increased postprandial secretion of glucose-dependent insulinotropic peptide. Using microcomputed tomography, we found that, relative to sham-operated rats, bone volume was significantly reduced after RYGB but not vertical sleeve gastrectomy. RYGB rats also had markedly reduced lipid absorption from the intestine and significantly lower serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D and calcium levels. Importantly, dietary supplementation with calcium and vitamin D could not fully rescue the reduced bone volume after RYGB surgery. Both surgeries resulted in a significant increase in stomach pH, which may have worsened the malabsorption in RYGB rats. Our findings suggest that bone loss in RYGB rats is not exclusively driven by calcium and vitamin D malabsorption but also by additional factors that may not be rescuable by dietary supplementation. These data point toward important similarities and differences between bariatric procedures that should be considered in clinical settings as guidance for which procedure will be best for specific patient populations. PMID:23554454

  9. Esophagus-duodenum Gastric Bypass Surgery Improves Glucose and Lipid Metabolism in Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Rui He; Yue Yin; Yin Li; Ziru Li; Jing Zhao; Weizhen Zhang

    2018-01-01

    Background: Despite of its significant therapeutic effects on obesity and metabolic diseases, Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) has limited clinical application because of considerable impacts on the gastrointestinal structure and postoperative complications. This study aims to develop a simplified surgical approach with less damage and complication but efficient metabolic benefit. Methods: The effects of Esophagus-Duodenum gastric bypass (EDGB) on body weight, food intake, glucose and lipid...

  10. Improvement in weight loss and ambulation outcomes after gastric sleeve surgery for a person with chronic motor-incomplete tetraplegia: clinical case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perreault, J R; Geigle, P R; Gorman, P H; Scott, W H

    2016-09-01

    To measure body mass index (BMI) and ambulation changes for a morbidly obese, 47-year-old man with chronic motor-incomplete tetraplegia after gastric sleeve surgery. A morbidly obese man, BMI=44 kg m(-)(2), with chronic C5 AIS D tetraplegia underwent elective gastric sleeve surgery. Assessment of BMI and function via the 6-minute walk test (6MWT), 10-meter walk test (10MWT) and ambulation parameters (CIR Systems/GAITRite, Franklin, NJ, USA) was performed preoperatively and at 12, 24, 36 and 52 weeks postoperatively, and additionally after 3 weeks of both a prescribed coached (3 × /week facility based) and a non-coached (3 × /week home based) walking program initiated at 52 weeks. A step activity monitor assessed daily ambulation preoperatively, prior to and during the third and sixth week of the walking program. Results included a 34.3% peak BMI decrease at 52 weeks post surgery and a peak increase in 6MWT distance of 58% at 52 weeks post surgery, 10MWT preferred speed of 56% at 55 weeks and step activity monitor of 82% at 58 weeks post surgery. At 58 weeks, gait data demonstrated a decrease in double limb stance of 38% and decrease in base of support of 72%. This empirical case assessment of BMI and functional mobility before and after gastric sleeve surgery may encourage further investigation into mobility and general health effects post gastric procedures for people with chronic motor-incomplete spinal cord injury.

  11. Supervised Physical Training Improves Weight Loss After Roux-en-Y Gastric Bypass Surgery: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mundbjerg, Lene Hymøller; Stolberg, Charlotte Røn; Cecere, Stefano; Bladbjerg, Else-Marie; Funch-Jensen, Peter; Gram, Bibi; Juhl, Claus Bogh

    2018-03-22

    Bariatric surgery results in significant weight loss and reduces cardiovascular morbidity. However, a large variation in postsurgery weight loss is seen. Physical activity promotes weight loss in nonsurgically treated subjects with obesity. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of 6 months of supervised physical training following Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery (RYGB) on body weight and cardiovascular risk markers. Sixty participants eligible for RYGB were included. Six months post surgery, the participants were randomly assigned to either twice-weekly supervised physical training sessions in a fitness center (INT) or a control group (CON) for 26 weeks. Before surgery and 6, 12, and 24 months after surgery, the participants underwent an examination program that included anthropometric measurements, blood pressure, heart rate, blood samples, and an abdominal computed tomography scan. RYGB significantly reduced body weight and improved cardiovascular risk markers (all P physical training intervention resulted in a 4.2-kg (CI: -0.2 to -8.3 kg) lower body weight in INT compared with CON at the study end (P = 0.042). The high-density lipoprotein concentration was significantly higher in INT than in CON at the termination of the intervention, but this was not maintained at the 24-months examination. Physical training following RYGB improves weight loss and cardiovascular health. © 2018 The Obesity Society.

  12. Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery reduces bone mineral density and induces metabolic acidosis in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abegg, Kathrin; Gehring, Nicole; Wagner, Carsten A; Liesegang, Annette; Schiesser, Marc; Bueter, Marco; Lutz, Thomas A

    2013-11-01

    Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) surgery leads to bone loss in humans, which may be caused by vitamin D and calcium malabsorption and subsequent secondary hyperparathyroidism. However, because these conditions occur frequently in obese people, it is unclear whether they are the primary causes of bone loss after RYGB. To determine the contribution of calcium and vitamin D malabsorption to bone loss in a rat RYGB model, adult male Wistar rats were randomized for RYGB surgery, sham-operation-ad libitum fed, or sham-operation-body weight-matched. Bone mineral density, calcium and phosphorus balance, acid-base status, and markers of bone turnover were assessed at different time points for 14 wk after surgery. Bone mineral density decreased for several weeks after RYGB. Intestinal calcium absorption was reduced early after surgery, but plasma calcium and parathyroid hormone levels were normal. 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels decreased, while levels of active 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D increased after surgery. RYGB rats displayed metabolic acidosis due to increased plasma lactate levels and increased urinary calcium loss throughout the study. These results suggest that initial calcium malabsorption may play a key role in bone loss early after RYGB in rats, but other factors, including chronic metabolic acidosis, contribute to insufficient bone restoration after normalization of intestinal calcium absorption. Secondary hyperparathyroidism is not involved in postoperative bone loss. Upregulated vitamin D activation may compensate for any vitamin D malabsorption.

  13. Differential Changes in Gut Microbiota After Gastric Bypass and Sleeve Gastrectomy Bariatric Surgery Vary According to Diabetes Remission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Rinki; Tsai, Peter; Jüllig, Mia; Liu, Amy; Plank, Lindsay; Booth, Michael

    2017-04-01

    It is unclear whether specific gut microbiota is associated with remission of type 2 diabetes (T2D) after distinct types of bariatric surgery. The aim of this study is to examine gut microbiota changes after laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) or sleeve gastrectomy (SG) surgery in obese patients with T2D. Whole-metagenome shotgun sequencing of DNA fragments using Illumina HiSeq2000 was obtained from stool samples collected from 14 obese T2D patients pre-operatively (while on very low calorie diet) and 1 year after randomisation to laparoscopic SG (n = 7) or RYGB (n = 7). Resulting shotgun reads were annotated with Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG). Body weight reduction and dietary change was similar 1 year after both surgery types. Identical proportions (n = 5/7) achieved diabetes remission (HbA1c surgery types. KEGG Orthology and pathway analysis predicted contrasting and greater gut microbiota metabolism changes after diabetes remission following RYGB than after SG. Those with persistent diabetes post-operatively had higher Desulfovibrio species pre-operatively. Overall, RYGB produces greater and more predicted favourable changes in gut microbiota functional capacity than SG. An increase in Roseburia species was the only compositional change common to both types of surgery among those achieving diabetes remission.

  14. Differential pre-mRNA splicing regulates Nnat isoforms in the hypothalamus after gastric bypass surgery in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William R Scott

    Full Text Available Neuronatin (NNAT is an endoplasmic reticulum proteolipid implicated in intracellular signalling. Nnat is highly-expressed in the hypothalamus, where it is acutely regulated by nutrients and leptin. Nnat pre-mRNA is differentially spliced to create Nnat-α and -β isoforms. Genetic variation of NNAT is associated with severe obesity. Currently, little is known about the long-term regulation of Nnat.Expression of Nnat isoforms were examined in the hypothalamus of mice in response to acute fast/feed, chronic caloric restriction, diet-induced obesity and modified gastric bypass surgery. Nnat expression was assessed in the central nervous system and gastrointestinal tissues. RTqPCR was used to determine isoform-specific expression of Nnat mRNA.Hypothalamic expression of both Nnat isoforms was comparably decreased by overnight and 24-h fasting. Nnat expression was unaltered in diet-induced obesity, or subsequent switch to a calorie restricted diet. Nnat isoforms showed differential expression in the hypothalamus but not brainstem after bypass surgery. Hypothalamic Nnat-β expression was significantly reduced after bypass compared with sham surgery (P = 0.003, and was positively correlated with post-operative weight-loss (R(2 = 0.38, P = 0.01. In contrast, Nnat-α expression was not suppressed after bypass surgery (P = 0.19, and expression did not correlate with reduction in weight after surgery (R(2 = 0.06, P = 0.34. Hypothalamic expression of Nnat-β correlated weakly with circulating leptin, but neither isoform correlated with fasting gut hormone levels post- surgery. Nnat expression was detected in brainstem, brown-adipose tissue, stomach and small intestine.Nnat expression in hypothalamus is regulated by short-term nutrient availability, but unaltered by diet-induced obesity or calorie restriction. While Nnat isoforms in the hypothalamus are co-ordinately regulated by acute nutrient supply, after modified gastric bypass

  15. Surgical models of Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery and sleeve gastrectomy in rats and mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruinsma, Bote G; Uygun, Korkut; Yarmush, Martin L; Saeidi, Nima

    2015-03-01

    Bariatric surgery is the only definitive solution currently available for the present obesity pandemic. These operations typically involve reconfiguration of gastrointestinal tract anatomy and impose profound metabolic and physiological benefits, such as substantially reducing body weight and ameliorating type II diabetes. Therefore, animal models of these surgeries offer unique and exciting opportunities to delineate the underlying mechanisms that contribute to the resolution of obesity and diabetes. Here we describe a standardized procedure for mouse and rat models of Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (80-90 min operative time) and sleeve gastrectomy (30-45 min operative time), which, to a high degree, resembles operations in humans. We also provide detailed protocols for both pre- and postoperative techniques that ensure a high success rate in the operations. These protocols provide the opportunity to mechanistically investigate the systemic effects of the surgical interventions, such as regulation of body weight, glucose homeostasis and gut microbiome.

  16. Gastric bypass surgery has a weight-loss independent effect on post-challenge serum glucose levels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hofsø, Dag; Birkeland, Kåre I; Holst, Jens J

    2015-01-01

    -h glucose levels were significantly lower in the surgery group than in the lifestyle group, 4.7 (0.4) versus 5.4 (0.7) mmol/l and 3.4 (0.8) versus 6.0 (2.4) mmol/l, respectively (both p ... (95 % CI) 1.4 (0.6-2.3) mmol/l and 0.4 (0.1-0.7) mmol/l per 10 % weight-loss, respectively]. Fasting glucose levels were determined by weight change [0.2 (0.1-0.3) mmol/l per 10 % weight-loss] and not by type of treatment. CONCLUSIONS: Gastric bypass surgery has a clinically relevant glucose...

  17. Metabolite profiling identifies candidate markers reflecting the clinical adaptations associated with Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David M Mutch

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB surgery is associated with weight loss, improved insulin sensitivity and glucose homeostasis, and a reduction in co-morbidities such as diabetes and coronary heart disease. To generate further insight into the numerous metabolic adaptations associated with RYGB surgery, we profiled serum metabolites before and after gastric bypass surgery and integrated metabolite changes with clinical data. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Serum metabolites were detected by gas and liquid chromatography-coupled mass spectrometry before, and 3 and 6 months after RYGB in morbidly obese female subjects (n = 14; BMI = 46.2+/-1.7. Subjects showed decreases in weight-related parameters and improvements in insulin sensitivity post surgery. The abundance of 48% (83 of 172 of the measured metabolites changed significantly within the first 3 months post RYGB (p<0.05, including sphingosines, unsaturated fatty acids, and branched chain amino acids. Dividing subjects into obese (n = 9 and obese/diabetic (n = 5 groups identified 8 metabolites that differed consistently at all time points and whose serum levels changed following RYGB: asparagine, lysophosphatidylcholine (C18:2, nervonic (C24:1 acid, p-Cresol sulfate, lactate, lycopene, glucose, and mannose. Changes in the aforementioned metabolites were integrated with clinical data for body mass index (BMI and estimates for insulin resistance (HOMA-IR. Of these, nervonic acid was significantly and negatively correlated with HOMA-IR (p = 0.001, R = -0.55. CONCLUSIONS: Global metabolite profiling in morbidly obese subjects after RYGB has provided new information regarding the considerable metabolic alterations associated with this surgical procedure. Integrating clinical measurements with metabolomics data is capable of identifying markers that reflect the metabolic adaptations following RYGB.

  18. Psychological, behavioral, and weight-related aspects of patients undergoing reoperative bariatric surgery after gastric band: comparison with primary surgery patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conceição, Eva; Pinto-Bastos, Ana; de Lourdes, Marta; Brandão, Isabel; Teixeira, Cristina; Machado, Paulo P P

    2018-02-15

    Patients experiencing insufficient weight loss or weight regain in their first bariatric surgery may represent a high-risk group with greater problematic eating and general psychopathology levels, which may compromise the success of a reoperative procedure. This study seeks to describe and compare disordered eating-related psychological and behavioral features of primary and reoperative surgery candidates after gastric band. Hospital center and university in Portugal. The baseline (preoperative) data from a longitudinal observational study are presented. Patients were interviewed by trained psychologists to identify binge-eating episodes and grazing and responded to a set of self-report measures: disordered eating, grazing, negative urgency, depression, anxiety, and stress. Two hundred twenty-five patients were undergoing primary surgery, and 166 were undergoing reoperative (REOP group) surgery. The groups did not differ in body mass index preoperatively, but the REOP group had greater weight suppression (t 387 = -5.35, P = .001), higher highest (t 387 = -3.40, P = .001) and lower lowest body mass index (t 381 = 2.22, P = .03). The main reasons for reoperative surgery were weight regain/poor weight loss (42.8%) or medical complications (32.5%). REOP patients with objective binge eating reported a higher frequency of these episodes (t 47 = 2.15, P = .04). No significant difference was found for the self-report measures assessed (only shape concern was higher for REOP group, F 1,216 = 8.30, Psurgeries, the differences in binge eating and weight-related variables may associate with postoperative difficulties. The link between binge eating, weight suppression, and weight gain found in other samples suggests that patients undergoing reoperative surgery may be at increased risk for poor weight outcomes. Copyright © 2018 American Society for Bariatric Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Systemic Chemotherapy using FLOT - Regimen Combined with Cytoreductive Surgery plus HIPEC for Treatment of Peritoneal Metastasized Gastric Cancer. .

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, H; Hotopp, Th; Tofeili, A; Wutke, K

    2014-05-01

    The aim was to evaluate the feasibility and the effectiveness of neoadjuvant systemic chemotherapy using FLOT - protocol followed by cytoreductive surgery (CRS), hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy (HIPEC) followed by systemic chemotherapyand in patients with peritoneal carciriomatosis (PC) from gastric cancer. Twenty six (median age 53 years, range 39 - 71) were scheduled for three cycles of neoadjuvant systemic chemotherapy using bi-weekly FLOT - protocol followed by CRS + HIPEC. Thereafter 3 additional cycles of FLOT were given. During HIPEC in Colliseum technique Oxaliplatin was given in a dosage of 200 mg/m2 and Docetaxel in a dosage of 80 mg/m2. All patients underwent cytoreductive surgery plus HIPEC. Peritoneal Cancer index was > 15 in 3 cases only. Complete resection could be carried out in all cases (CC-O 18, CC-18). Postoperative complication rate was 23% with no mortality within 30 days. Anastomotic leakage rate was 3.2%. Overall survival was 19.0 months with a 2-year survival rate 38%. Regression analysis demonstrated a Peritoneal Cancer Index PCI > 12 as negative factor for survival. Neoadju- vant chemotherapy using FLOT - protocol followed by CRS + HIPEC seems to be associated with prolonged OS in patients with peritoneal carcinomatosis from gastric cancer. This treatment is not recommended for patients with extensive peritoneal involvement and PCI > 12.

  20. Conversional Weight Loss Surgery: an Australian Experience of Converting Laparoscopic Adjustable Gastric Bands to Laparoscopic Sleeve Gastrectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devadas, M; Ku, D J

    2018-02-17

    Bariatric surgery is the most effective treatment for severe obesity, capable of producing more than 50% excess weight loss at 10-year follow-up (James Clin Dermatol 1; 22:276-80; O'Brien Br J Surg 2; 102:611-17; Buchwald et al. Metab Syndr 3; 347-56). The success of bariatric surgery extends far beyond weight loss, with up to 80-90% of patients having improvement or resolution of many of their weight-related co-morbidities including type II diabetes mellitus and hypertension (Puzziferri et al. JAMA 4; 312:934-42; Buchwald et al. Am J Med 5; 122:248-56). However, there is a paucity of data regarding conversional bariatric surgery. This study aims to explore the efficacy, safety and feasibility of conversional surgery. This study represents the largest Australasian series focusing on conversional bariatric surgery. The study was conducted in the Norwest Private Hospital and Hospital for Specialist Surgery (HSS), both private Hospitals in Sydney, Australia. Data was collected prospectively at regular intervals for more than 12 months from 1 January 2012 to 1st November 2015 for all patients requiring a laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy (LSG) as secondary procedure after prior laparoscopic adjustable gastric band (LAGB). Excess weight loss (EWL), percentage total body weight loss (TWL) and excess BMI loss (EBMIL) as well as any complications were recorded. There were low rates of morbidity (1.1%) and no mortality at 12-month follow-up. Satisfactory EWL of 60% (95% CI: 56.6-63.4%), EBMIL of 60.1% (95% CI: 48.8-71.4%) and 16% TWL was achieved at 12-month follow-up. We therefore conclude that sleeve gastrectomy is a safe and valid option for conversional bariatric surgery following LAGB.

  1. Secondary surgery after sleeve gastrectomy: Roux-en-Y gastric bypass or biliopancreatic diversion with duodenal switch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Homan, Jens; Betzel, Bark; Aarts, Edo O; van Laarhoven, Kees J H M; Janssen, Ignace M C; Berends, Frits J

    2015-01-01

    Laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy (LSG) has gained popularity as a stand-alone procedure with good short-term results for weight loss. However, in the long-term, weight regain and other complications are reported. Demand for secondary surgery is rising, partly for these reasons. To review the indications and effects of secondary surgery, biliopancreatic diversion with duodenal switch (BPD/DS) versus laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (LRYGB), after LSG. Data from all patients who underwent revision of LSG was retrospectively analyzed, concerning data on indications for secondary surgery, weight loss, and complications. 43 Patients underwent secondary surgery after LSG; 25 BPD/DS and 18 LRYGB, respectively. Main indications for secondary surgery were inadequate weight loss (n = 17 [40%]) and weight regain (n = 8 [19%]). For these indications, the median excess weight loss was greater for BPD/DS (59% [range 15-113]) compared to LRYGB (23% [range -49-84]) (P = .008) after 34 months (range 14-79). In case of dysphagia or gastroesophageal reflux disease the complaints resolved after converting to LRYGB. BPD/DS patients were more likely to develop a short-term complication and vitamin deficiencies compared to LRYGB. Secondary surgery of LSG to BPD/DS or LRYGB is feasible with slightly more complications after BPD/DS. Conversion to LRYGB is preferred in cases of dysphagia or gastroesophageal reflux disease. In cases of weight regain or insufficient weight loss after LSG, patients had better weight loss with a BPD/DS; however, this procedure has the risk of complications, such as severe vitamin deficiencies. Copyright © 2015 American Society for Bariatric Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Risks of cardiovascular adverse events and death in patients with previous stroke undergoing emergency noncardiac, nonintracranial surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Mia N.; Andersson, Charlotte; Gislason, Gunnar H.

    2017-01-01

    mortality and major adverse cardiovascular events were estimated as odds ratios (ORs) and 95% CIs using adjusted logistic regression models in a priori defined groups (reference was no previous stroke). In patients undergoing surgery immediately (within 1 to 3 days) or early after stroke (within 4 to 14...... and general anesthesia less frequent in patients with previous stroke (all P adverse cardiovascular events and mortality were high for patients with stroke less than 3 months (20.7 and 16.4% events; OR = 4.71 [95% CI, 4.18 to 5.32] and 1.65 [95% CI, 1.45 to 1.88]), and remained...... increased for stroke within 3 to 9 months (10.3 and 12.3%; OR = 1.93 [95% CI, 1.55 to 2.40] and 1.20 [95% CI, 0.98 to 1.47]) and stroke more than 9 months (8.8 and 11.7%; OR = 1.62 [95% CI, 1.43 to 1.84] and 1.20 [95% CI, 1.08 to 1.34]) compared with no previous stroke (2.3 and 4.8% events). Major adverse...

  3. The influence of goal-directed fluid therapy on the prognosis of elderly patients with hypertension and gastric cancer surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeng K

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Kai Zeng,* Yanzhen Li,* Min Liang, Youguang Gao, Hongda Cai, Caizhu LinDepartment of Anesthesia, the First Affiliated Hospital, Fujian Medical University, Fuzhou, People’s Republic of China*These authors contributed equally to this workPurpose: We aimed to investigate the influence of perioperative goal-directed fluid therapy (GDFT on the prognosis of elderly patients with gastric cancer and hypertension. Methods: Sixty elderly patients (>60 years old with primary hypertension who received gastric cancer radical surgery and who were American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA class II or III were enrolled in the current study. Selected patients were divided randomly into two arms, comprising a conventional intraoperative fluid management arm (arm C, n=30 and a GDFT arm (arm G, n=30. Patients in arm C were infused with crystalloids or colloids according to the methods of Miller’s Anesthesia (6th edition, while those in arm G were infused with 200 mL hydroxyethyl starch over 15 minutes under the FloTrac/Vigileo monitoring system, with stroke volume variation between 8% and 13%. Hemodynamics and tissue perfusion laboratory indicators in patients were recorded continuously from 30 minutes before the operation to 24 hours after the operation. Results: Compared with arm C, the average intraoperative intravenous infusion quantity in arm G was significantly reduced (2,732±488 mL versus 3,135±346 mL, P<0.05, whereas average colloid fluid volume was significantly increased (1,235±360 mL versus 760±280 mL, P<0.05. In addition, there were more patients exhibiting intraoperatively and postoperatively stable hemodynamics and less patients with low blood pressure in arm G. Postoperative complications were less frequent, and the time of postoperative hospital stay shorter, in arm G. No significant differences were observed in mortality between the two arms.Conclusion: Our research showed that GDFT stabilized perioperative hemodynamics and reduced the

  4. Simultaneous dynamic study of gastric emptying and changes of serum levels of gut hormones in patients after peptic ulcer surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Obradovic, V. B.; Artiko, V.; Petrovic, N.S.; Petrovic, M. N.; Stefanovic, B. M.

    2006-01-01

    The aim was to examine the influence of different modalities of peptic ulcer surgery on the gastric emptying (GE) pattern and related serum level changes of selected gut hormones. Fifty eight subjects were examined. In 48 of them peptic ulcer surgery was performed at least six months before the examination: Billroth I (B1) in 11, Billroth II (B2) in 16, B1 with the selective vagotomy - Harkins 1 (H1) in 9 and B2 with the selective vagotomy - Harkins 2 (H2) in 12. Ten healthy volunteers (C) were also examined. The results of gastric emptying showed that the lag phase duration was inversely related to the GE rates, and the GE pattern was linear in both controls (C) and in operated patients, except in B2 group, in which the GE pattern was exponential. In comparison with C group, GE was slower in B1, H1 and H2 groups, and faster in B2 group. The plasma gastrin values in C group, showing two peaks, were higher in relation to other groups. In relation to C group, higher values of motilyn were obtained in patients after the selective vagotomy. The plasma somatostatin values recorded in B1 and H1 groups, showing the marked peaks, were higher in relation to C group. In relation to C group the highest plasma neurotensin values were obtained in B2 group. In order to understand entirely the influence of peptic ulcer surgery on the GI function, further research of the role of specific hormones and neuropeptides is needed, which would enable more precise selection of the therapy in order to prevent postvagotomy and postgastrectomy syndromes. (author)

  5. Awakening from anesthesia using propofol or sevoflurane with epidural block in radical surgery for senile gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ling; Chen, Chen; Wang, Lin; Cheng, Gao; Wu, Wei-Wei; Li, Yuan-Hai

    2015-01-01

    To study the awakening of the elderly patients from propofol intravenous general anesthesia or sevoflurane inhalation general anesthesia combined with epidural block after radical gastric cancer surgery. Eighty cases receiving selective radical surgery for gastric cancer were included. They were aged 65-78 years and classified as ASA grade I-II. Using a random number table, the cases were divided into 4 groups (n = 20): propofol intravenous general anesthesia (P group), sevoflurane inhalation general anesthesia (S group), propofol intravenous general anesthesia combined with epidural block (PE group), and sevoflurane inhalation general anesthesia combined with epidural block (SE group). For P and PE group, target controlled infusion of propofol was performed; for S and SE group, sevoflurane was inhaled to induce and maintain general anesthesia; for PE and SE group, before general anesthesia induction, epidural puncture and catheterization at T7-8 was performed. After surgery, perform patient controlled intravenous analgesia (PCIA) or patient controlled epidural analgesia (PCEA), and maintain VAS ≤ 3. The recorded indicators were as follows: time to recovery of spontaneous respiration, time to awakening, time of endotracheal tube removal, time to orientation, time to achieve modified Aldrete scores ≥ 9, modified OAA/S and Aldrete scores upon endotracheal tube removal (T1), 5 min after removal (T2), 15 min after removal (T3) and 30 min after removal (T4), dose of intraoperative remifentanil, intraoperative hypotension, and emergence agitation. Time to awakening, time of endotracheal tube removal, time to orientation, and time to achieve modified Aldrete scores ≥ 9 in PE and SE group were obviously shortened compared with P and S group (P sevofluorane inhalation general anesthesia combined with epidural block achieved a more stable hemodynamics and a shortened time to awakening.

  6. Prevalence and impact of dumping syndrome on qol after primary gastric bypass surgery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Emous, M.; Ubels, F.L.; Apers, J.A.; Wolffenbuttel, B.H.R.; Totté, E.; Van Beek, A.P.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Worldwide gastric bypass is still the most frequent performed weight loss operations for morbid obesity and it's effectively is proven. Although dumping has been widely recognized as complication after RYGB, almost no data are available on the prevalence and the consequences of this

  7. Suboptimal Weight Loss and Weight Regain after Gastric Bypass Surgery?Postoperative Status of Energy Intake, Eating Behavior, Physical Activity, and Psychometrics

    OpenAIRE

    Amundsen, Tina; Str?mmen, Magnus; Martins, Catia

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Suboptimal weight loss (SWL) and weight regain (WR) after gastric bypass surgery (GB) remains poorly understood. OBJECTIVES: This study aims to compare GB patients experiencing SWL or significant WR (SigWR) with successful controls, regarding postoperative food intake, eating behavior, physical activity (PA), and psychometrics. METHODS: Forty-nine patients with >1 year post-surgery were classified as either experiencing SWL (excess body weight loss, EWL,

  8. Carotid intima-media thickness is reduced 12 months after gastric bypass surgery in obese patients with type 2 diabetes or impaired glucose tolerance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundby-Christensen, Louise; Tarnow, Lise; Hansen, Dorte L

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To investigate whether Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery (RYGB) - an in vivo model for normalisation of hyperglycaemia - improves carotid intima-media thickness (IMT) in patients with type 2 diabetes (T2D)/impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) and normal glucose tolerance (NGT). METHODS: Observati...

  9. S100A8/A9 (Calprotectin), Interleukin-6, and C-Reactive Protein in Obesity and Diabetes before and after Roux-en-Y Gastric Bypass Surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lylloff, Louise; Bathum, Lise; Madsbad, Sten

    2017-01-01

    Background: In obesity, which is a major contributor to insulin resistance and diabetes, the circulating level of S100A8/A9 (calprotectin) is elevated and declines after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery (RYGB). However, studies on S100A8/A9 and the pathophysiological mechanisms in insulin...

  10. The Effect of Roux-en-Y Gastric Bypass Surgery in Morbidly Obese Patients on Pharmacokinetics of (Acetyl)Salicylic Acid and Omeprazole : the ERY-PAO Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mitrov-Winkelmolen, Lieke; van Buul-Gast, Marie-Christine W; Swank, Dingeman J; Overdiek, Hans W P M; van Schaik, Ron H N; Touw, Daan J

    Data on the absorption of orally administered drugs following Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) surgery in obese patients are limited and inconclusive. As it is difficult to predict changes in absorption, studies on frequently used drugs in this population are necessary. Acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) and

  11. Effect of Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery on bile acid metabolism in normal and obese diabetic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhutta, Hina Y; Rajpal, Neetu; White, Wendy; Freudenberg, Johannes M; Liu, Yaping; Way, James; Rajpal, Deepak; Cooper, David C; Young, Andrew; Tavakkoli, Ali; Chen, Lihong

    2015-01-01

    In addition to classic functions of facilitating hepatobiliary secretion and intestinal absorption of lipophilic nutrients, bile acids (BA) are also endocrine factors and regulate glucose and lipid metabolism. Recent data indicate that antiobesity bariatric procedures e.g. Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery (RYGB), which also remit diabetes, increase plasma BAs in humans, leading to the hypothesis that BAs may play a role in diabetes resolution following surgery. To investigate the effect of RYGB on BA physiology and its relationship with glucose homeostasis, we undertook RYGB and SHAM surgery in Zucker diabetic fatty (ZDF) and normoglycemic Sprague Dawley (SD) rats and measured plasma and fecal BA levels, as well as plasma glucose, insulin, Glucagon like peptide 1 (GLP-1) and Peptide YY (PYY), 2 days before and 3, 7, 14 and 28 days after surgery. RYGB decreased body weight and increased plasma GLP-1 in both SD and ZDF rats while decreasing plasma insulin and glucose in ZDF rats starting from the first week. Compared to SHAM groups, both SD-RYGB and ZDF-RYGB groups started to have increases in plasma total BAs in the second week, which might not contribute to early post-surgery metabolic changes. While there was no significant difference in fecal BA excretion between SD-RYGB and SD-SHAM groups, the ZDF-RYGB group had a transient 4.2-fold increase (PRYGB groups. In addition, tissue mRNA expression analysis suggested early intestinal BA reabsorption and potentially reduced hepatic cholic acid production in RYGB groups. In summary, we present novel data on RYGB-mediated changes in BA metabolism to further understand the role of BAs in RYGB-induced metabolic effects in humans.

  12. Is Daily Low-Dose Aspirin Safe to Take Following Laparoscopic Roux-en-Y Gastric Bypass for Obesity Surgery?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Xian; Hong, Dennis; Anvari, Mehran; Tiboni, Maria; Amin, Nalin; Gmora, Scott

    2017-05-01

    Laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (LRYGB) surgery is a safe and effective procedure for patients with severe obesity. One potential complication of LRYGB is the development of marginal ulcers (MUs). Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are known to significantly increase the likelihood of developing marginal ulcers after surgery. However, the risk associated with low-dose aspirin consumption is not well defined. We examined the impact of daily low-dose aspirin (81 mg) on the development of marginal ulcers following LRYGB. A retrospective cohort design studied patients undergoing LRYGB surgery, between January 2009 and January 2013, at a single, high-volume bariatric center in Ontario, Canada. The marginal ulcer rate of patients taking low-dose aspirin after surgery was compared to that of the control patients who did not take any NSAID. Diagnosis of MU was confirmed by upper endoscopy in patients presenting with symptoms and a history indicative of marginal ulceration. A chi-square test of independence was performed to examine the difference in marginal ulcer rates. A total of 1016 patients underwent LRYGB. Patients taking aspirin were more likely to be male, older, and have diabetes than patients not taking NSAIDs. Of the 1016 patients, 145 (14.3%) took low-dose aspirin following LRYGB and the rest did not (n = 871, 85.7%). The incidence of marginal ulceration was not significantly different between the two treatment groups (12/145, 8.3% versus 90/871, 10.3%; p = 0.45). Patients treated with LRYGB at our institution were not at increased risk of marginal ulcer formation when taking low-dose aspirin after surgery.

  13. Resting-state brain connectivity changes in obese women after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery: A longitudinal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olivo, Gaia; Zhou, Wei; Sundbom, Magnus; Zhukovsky, Christina; Hogenkamp, Pleunie; Nikontovic, Lamia; Stark, Julia; Wiemerslage, Lyle; Larsson, Elna-Marie; Benedict, Christian; Schiöth, Helgi B

    2017-07-26

    Bariatric surgery is an effective method to rapidly induce weight loss in severely obese people, however its impact on brain functional connectivity after longer periods of follow-up is yet to be assessed. We investigated changes in connectivity in 16 severely obese women one month before, one month after and one year after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery (RYGB). 12 lean controls were also enrolled. Resting-state fMRI was acquired for all participants following an overnight fast and after a 260 kcal load. Connectivity between regions involved in food-related saliency attribution and reward-driven eating behavior was stronger in presurgery patients compared to controls, but progressively weakened after follow-up. At one year, changes in networks related to cognitive control over eating and bodily perception also occurred. Connectivity between regions involved in emotional control and social cognition had a temporary reduction early after treatment but had increased again after one year of follow-up. Furthermore, we could predict the BMI loss by presurgery connectivity in areas linked to emotional control and social interaction. RYGBP seems to reshape brain functional connectivity, early affecting cognitive control over eating, and these changes could be an important part of the therapeutic effect of bariatric surgery.

  14. Reprogramming of defended body weight after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery in diet-induced obese mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Zheng; Mumphrey, Michael B.; Townsend, R. Leigh; Morrison, Christopher D.; Münzberg, Heike; Ye, Jianping; Berthoud, Hans-Rudolf

    2015-01-01

    Objective Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery (RYGB) results in sustained lowering of body weight in most patients, but the mechanisms involved are poorly understood. The aim of this study was to obtain support for the notion that reprogramming of defended body weight, rather than passive restriction of energy intake, is a fundamental mechanism of RYGB. Methods Male C57BL6J mice reaching different degrees of obesity on a high-fat diet either with ad libitum access or with caloric restriction (weight-reduced) were subjected to RYGB. Results RYGB-induced weight loss and fat mass loss was proportional to pre-surgical levels, with moderately obese mice losing less body weight and fat compared with very obese mice. Remarkably, mice that were weight-reduced to the level of chow controls before surgery, immediately gained weight after surgery, exclusively accounted for by lean mass gain. Conclusions The results provide additional evidence for re-programming of a new defended body weight as an important principle by which RYGB lastingly suppresses body weight. RYGB appears to selectively abolish defense of a higher fat mass level, while remaining sensitive to the defense of lean mass. The molecular and physiological mechanisms underlying this re-programming remain to be elucidated. PMID:26847390

  15. Bone structural changes after gastric bypass surgery evaluated by HR-pQCT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shanbhogue, Vikram V; Støving, René Klinkby; Frederiksen, Katrine Hartmund

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE, DESIGN AND METHODS: Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) has proved successful in attaining sustained weight loss but may lead to metabolic bone disease. To assess impact on bone mass and structure, we measured a real bone mineral density at the hip and spine by dual-energy X-ray absorptiom......OBJECTIVE, DESIGN AND METHODS: Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) has proved successful in attaining sustained weight loss but may lead to metabolic bone disease. To assess impact on bone mass and structure, we measured a real bone mineral density at the hip and spine by dual-energy X...... of increased risk of developing osteoporosis and fragility fractures remain an important concern....

  16. [Work-up and treatment of iron deficiency anaemia after bariatric surgery with gastric bypass].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gribsholt, Sigrid Bjerge; Nielsen, Joan Bach; Melén, Charlotte-Joséphine Ström; Richelsen, Bjørn

    2014-06-09

    Treatment of severe obesity with Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) results in pronounced weight loss but also in various nutritional complications. Iron deficiency anaemia is one of the most common nutritional complications due to reduced uptake of iron after this operation. Premenopausal women are particularly at risk of developing iron deficiency anaemia because of menstruation. In the present article the pathophysiology, diagnostic considerations, and treatment of iron deficiency anaemia after RYGB are discussed.

  17. gastric pneumatosis of emphysematous gastritis?

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    gastric pneumatosis (also known as gastric emphysema) or emphysematous gastritis. We present the case of a 27-year-old white female patient with a history of thoracic and abdominal surgery who presented with intractable vomiting, clinically suspected to be as a result of gastric outlet obstruction. Intramural gastric air was ...

  18. Can low BMI Chinese patients with type 2 diabetes benefit from laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guohui; Zhu, Liyong; Li, Weizheng; Yang, Xiangwu; Li, Pengzhou; Zhu, Shaihong

    2016-12-01

    The efficacy of laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (LRYGB) in type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2D) is closely associated with the preoperative body mass index (BMI) of the patient. There is a lack of long-term and large sampling evidence on the efficacy of LRYGB in T2D patients with low BMI in China. This retrospective study aimed to evaluate the efficacy of surgical treatment in a Chinese population with T2D (especially patients with BMIBMI≥27.5 kg/m 2 in group 1 (high BMI group) had significant improvements in waist circumference, blood glucose levels, homeostasis model assessment-insulin resistance index, and C-peptide levels after LRYGB (PBMIBMI group, including 19 T2D patients with BMIBMI<27.5 kg/m 2 in China. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Bariatric Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Suboptimal Weight Loss and Weight Regain after Gastric Bypass Surgery-Postoperative Status of Energy Intake, Eating Behavior, Physical Activity, and Psychometrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amundsen, Tina; Strømmen, Magnus; Martins, Catia

    2017-05-01

    Suboptimal weight loss (SWL) and weight regain (WR) after gastric bypass surgery (GB) remains poorly understood. This study aims to compare GB patients experiencing SWL or significant WR (SigWR) with successful controls, regarding postoperative food intake, eating behavior, physical activity (PA), and psychometrics. Forty-nine patients with >1 year post-surgery were classified as either experiencing SWL (excess body weight loss, EWL, weight regain ≥15%, n = 38), with respective control groups. Energy intake (EI) was measured with a Food Frequency Questionnaire, eating behavior using the Dutch Eating Behavior Questionnaire and the Three-Factor Eating Questionnaire, and PA using both SenseWear Armbands and the International Physical Activity Questionnaire. Eating disorders, depression, and quality of life (QoL) were measured using the Eating Disorder Examination Questionnaire, Beck Depression Inventory II, and Impact of Weight on Quality of Life, respectively. EI, macronutrient distribution, and meal frequency were similar among groups. However, disinhibited eating behavior score was higher, while most subcategories from IWQOL were significantly lower in both SWL and SigWR groups compared with their respective controls. PA was significantly lower in the SWL and SigWR groups compared with the respective controls. There were no differences between groups regarding depression. Lower PA levels, disordered eating behavior and lower QoL are associated with unsuccessful weigh loss outcome after GB surgery. Longitudinal studies are needed to clarify the potential causal relationship between the previously described variables and SWL/SigWR after GB.

  20. Breast conserving surgery in combination with intraoperative radiotherapy after previous external beam therapy: an option to avoid mastectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thangarajah, F; Heilmann, J; Malter, W; Kunze, S; Marnitz, S; Mallmann, P; Wenz, F; Sperk, E

    2018-04-01

    Mastectomy is the standard procedure in patients with in-breast tumor recurrence (IBTR) or breast cancer after irradiation of the chest due to Hodgkin's disease. In certain cases a second breast conserving surgery (BCS) in combination with intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT) is possible. To date, data concerning BCS in combination with IORT in pre-irradiated patients are limited. This is the first pooled analysis of this special indication with a mature follow-up of 5 years. Patients with IBTR after external beam radiotherapy (EBRT; treated in two centers) for breast cancer were included. Patients with previous EBRT including the breast tissue due to other diseases were also included. IORT was performed with the Intrabeam™-device using low kV X-rays. Clinical data including outcome for all patients and toxicity for a representative cohort (LENT-SOMA scales) were obtained. Statistical analyses were done including Kaplan-Meier estimates for local recurrence, distant metastasis and overall survival. A total of 41 patients were identified (39 patients with IBTR, 2 with Hodgkin`s disease in previous medical history). Median follow-up was 58 months (range 4-170). No grade 3/4 acute toxicity occurred within 9 weeks. Local recurrence-free survival rate was 89.9% and overall survival was 82.7% at 5 years. Seven patients developed metastasis within the whole follow-up. BCS in combination with IORT in IBTR in pre-irradiated patients is a feasible method to avoid mastectomy with a low risk of side effects and an excellent local control and good overall survival.

  1. Perioperative morbi-mortality associated with bariatric surgery: from systematic biliopancreatic diversion to a tailored laparoscopic gastric bypass or sleeve gastrectomy approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Matta-Martín, Manuel; Acosta-Martínez, Jesús; Morales-Conde, Salvador; Herrera-González, Augusto

    2012-07-01

    The effectiveness and safety of the different bariatric surgical procedures currently available depend, partly, on the characteristics of the populations under study, the technical approach, the expertise of surgical teams, and on institutional factors. To evaluate the effectiveness and safety of these procedures, we compared the surgical results for biliopancreatic diversion surgery versus laparoscopic gastric bypass and sleeve gastrectomies performed in our institution. This was a retrospective observational study of 296 patients undergoing bariatric surgery from January 2005 through October 2010. We analyzed mortality rate, cardiocirculatory and pulmonary perioperative complications, duration of surgery, intensive care unit admissions, and length of stay. We describe the changes in the choice of the surgical procedures throughout the study period. We observed a rate of pulmonary complications of 2.3 % and a mortality rate 3 months after discharge of 2.36 % with sepsis secondary to anastomotic leak as the main cause of death. Biliopancreatic diversion surgery was associated with higher mortality rates (p value = 0.014) and longer hospital stay (median of 9 versus 6 days for laparoscopic gastric bypass and sleeve gastrectomy, p value laparoscopic restrictive and mixed techniques in our institution (from 0 % in 2005 to 87 % of all procedures in 2010). Bariatric surgery in our institution has dramatically shifted from systematic biliopancreatic diversion to a tailored laparoscopic gastric bypass or sleeve gastrectomy approach, which has made it possible to reduce hospital stay and mortality rates.

  2. Fusion of duodeno-ileal omega switch and stomach pouch reconstruction as revisionary surgery for failed laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding and sleeved lesser curvature resection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wojciech K. Karcz

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Revisionary bariatric surgery procedures are becoming more frequent. Facing the challenge of complicated digestive tract changes after redo surgery, it is crucial to choose an appropriate method. Duodeno-ileal omega switch (DIOS, with growing clinical value as an easy malabsorptive procedure, has emerged as a treatment option. We would like to present a case of a 52-year-old obese male patient with a history of laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding and removal of a lesser curvature as a revision procedure to restore the restriction. In order to improve the patient’s health outcome, a two-stage re-revision procedure was performed, including DIOS to reduce the weight of the patient and a gastric pouch reconstruction in order to achieve a better satiety effect. This case study illustrates the intrinsic potential of malabsorption surgery and makes us believe that it may be used as the primary operation in two-staged procedures for revisionary surgical treatment.

  3. The longer-term effects of Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery on sodium excretion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Celik, Funda; Ahdi, Mohamed; Meesters, Eelco W.; van de Laar, Arnold; Brandjes, Dees P. M.; Gerdes, Victor E. A.

    2013-01-01

    Obesity is an independent risk factor for hypertension and chronic kidney disease. During the first months after bariatric surgery, an improvement of sodium excretion has been described. The aim of this work was to study the influence of bariatric surgery on sodium excretion at more than a year

  4. Enterogastric reflux and gastric clearance of refluxate in normal subjects and in patients with and without bile vomiting following peptic ulcer surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mackie, C.; Hulks, G.; Cuschieri, A.

    1986-01-01

    A noninvasive scintigraphic technique was used to estimate enterogastric reflux and subsequent gastric evacuation of refluxate in 35 normal, healthy subjects and 55 patients previously treated by vagotomy or partial gastrectomy. Reflux was provoked by a milk drink and quantitated by counting 99Tcm-EHIDA activity within the gastric area during gamma camera imaging. Seven normal subjects (20%) showed reflux of 5-18% of initial activity (mean: 10%), with peak values occurring at 5-30 minutes (mean: 14 minutes) following the milk. Gastric evacuation of activity in these subjects was monoexponential (r = 0.993, T1/2 = 24.1 minutes). Reflux occurred more frequently than normal in patients with truncal vagotomy and drainage (22/28 patients) and partial gastrectomy (20/21 patients). All of 16 patients with Billroth II anastomoses exhibited reflux, which was excessive compared with refluxing normal subjects (mean: 25%; p less than 0.01) and occurred later into the study (mean: 34 minutes; p less than 0.01). Ten of 11 asymptomatic patients showed reflux of similar amounts of activity (mean: 21%) compared with 16 patients who complained of bile vomiting (mean: 22%). However, asymptomatic patients exhibited gastric evacuation of refluxate at a rate similar to that of refluxing normal subjects, while bile vomiters showed significant gastric retention of refluxate at 25-30 minutes following peak gastric activity (p less than 0.05). This result confirms that post-operative bile vomiting is essentially a problem of gastric emptying

  5. A Genetic Risk Score Is Associated with Weight Loss Following Roux-en Y Gastric Bypass Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandstein, Marcus; Voisin, Sarah; Nilsson, Emil K; Schultes, Bernd; Ernst, Barbara; Thurnheer, Martin; Benedict, Christian; Mwinyi, Jessica; Schiöth, Helgi B

    2016-09-01

    Currently, Roux-en Y gastric bypass (RYGB) is the most efficient therapy for severe obesity. Weight loss after surgery is, however, highly variable and genetically influenced. Genome-wide association studies have identified several single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) associated with body mass index (BMI) and waist-hip ratio (WHR). We aimed to identify two genetic risk scores (GRS) composed of weighted BMI and WHR-associated SNPs to estimate their impact on excess BMI loss (EBMIL) after RYGB surgery. Two hundred and thirty-eight obese patients (BMI 45.1 ± 6.2 kg/m(2), 74 % women), who underwent RYGB, were genotyped for 35 BMI and WHR-associated SNPs and were followed up after 2 years. SNPs with high impact on post-surgical weight loss were filtered out using a random forest model. The filtered SNPs were combined into a GRS and analyzed in a linear regression model. An up to 11 % lower EBMIL with higher risk score was estimated for two GRS models (P = 0.026 resp. P = 0.021) composed of seven BMI-associated SNPs (closest genes: MC4R, TMEM160, PTBP2, NUDT3, TFAP2B, ZNF608, MAP2K5, GNPDA2, and MTCH2) and of three WHR-associated SNPs (closest genes: HOXC13, LYPLAL1, and DNM3-PIGC). Patients within the lowest GRS quartile had higher EBMIL compared to patients within the other three quartiles in both models. We identified two GRSs composed of BMI and WHR-associated SNPs with significant impact on weight loss after RYGB surgery using random forest analysis as a SNP selection tool. The GRS may be useful to pre-surgically evaluate the risks for patients undergoing RYGB surgery.

  6. Comparison of the effects of Roux-en-Y gastric bypass and ileal transposition surgeries on food intake, body weight, and circulating peptide YY concentrations in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chelikani, Prasanth K; Shah, Imran H; Taqi, Esmaeel; Sigalet, David L; Koopmans, Henry H

    2010-09-01

    Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) surgery is one of the most effective treatments for obesity producing long-term weight loss. The anorexia and weight loss from RYGB could be due to gastric restriction, malabsorption, enhanced lower gut stimulation, increased energy expenditure, and/or other metabolic adaptations. In ileal transposition (IT) surgery, a segment of the ileum is transposed to the upper jejunum with no gastric restriction or malabsorption. Our objective is to compare the effects of RYGB and IT surgeries on food intake, body weight, and plasma concentrations of the anorexigenic lower gut hormone Peptide YY (PYY) in rats. Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to either RYGB (n = 9), IT (n = 9) or sham surgeries (n = 16). A subset of sham animals were either pair-fed to RYGB (n = 9) or ad lib fed (n = 7) on a highly palatable mixed nutrient liquid food (Ensure). Food intake, body weight and plasma PYY concentrations were measured. The data demonstrate that (1) RYGB produces a sustained reduction in food intake and weight gain, (2) the anorexic effects of IT are relatively transient lasting for 5 weeks, (3) the reduction in weight gain resulting from IT is similar to that of animals pair-fed to RYGB, and (4) RYGB and IT surgeries are associated with elevated postprandial plasma PYY concentrations. We demonstrate in our rat models that RYGB surgery produces a greater reduction in food intake and weight gain than IT surgery, and that both surgeries are associated with enhanced plasma concentrations of Peptide YY.

  7. Intraabdominal Pressure and Postoperative Discomfort in Laparoscopic Roux-en-Y Gastric Bypass (RYGB) Surgery: a Randomized Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caesar, Y; Sidlovskaja, I; Lindqvist, A; Gislason, H; Hedenbro, J L

    2016-09-01

    High intraabdominal pressure (IAP) during laparoscopic surgery has been associated with postoperative discomfort. Effects on nausea and access have not been subjected to randomized studies. In cholecystectomy, lower IAP may cause less pain, but nausea and surgical access in RYGB surgery have not been investigated. We studied the influence of two IAP levels on surgical access, operation time, postoperative pain, and nausea. Fifty consecutive female gastric bypass patients were randomized to intraabdominal pressure of 12 (IAP12) or 18 (IAP18) mm Hg. Surgeons and personnel were blinded to randomization; study groups were well matched for age and BMI. Operative time was noted in minutes. Visual analogue scales were used for assessing access and for patients assessing pain (abdomen-shoulder) and nausea (supine-standing) at six time points during the first 16 postoperative hours. Rescue medication was recorded. In 3/25 patients in the IAP12 group, the code was broken due to access problems vs. 0/25 in the IAP18 group (p = 0.1398). Operative time did not differ. Access was significantly better for IAP18 (92.2 ± 2.3 vs. 69.3 ± 4.2; p = 0.0001). Postoperative shoulder pain was maximal after 6 h but throughout less than in the abdomen (p effect on pain or nausea.

  8. Positive end-expiratory pressure optimization using electric impedance tomography in morbidly obese patients during laparoscopic gastric bypass surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erlandsson, K; Odenstedt, H; Lundin, S; Stenqvist, O

    2006-08-01

    Morbidly obese patients have an increased risk for peri-operative lung complications and develop a decrease in functional residual capacity (FRC). Electric impedance tomography (EIT) can be used for continuous, fast-response measurement of lung volume changes. This method was used to optimize positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) to maintain FRC. Fifteen patients with a body mass index of 49 +/- 8 kg/m(2) were studied during anaesthesia for laparoscopic gastric bypass surgery. Before induction, 16 electrodes were placed around the thorax to monitor ventilation-induced impedance changes. Calibration of the electric impedance tomograph against lung volume changes was made by increasing the tidal volume in steps of 200 ml. PEEP was titrated stepwise to maintain a horizontal baseline of the EIT curve, corresponding to a stable FRC. Absolute FRC was measured with a nitrogen wash-out/wash-in technique. Cardiac output was measured with an oesophageal Doppler method. Volume expanders, 1 +/- 0.5 l, were given to prevent PEEP-induced haemodynamic impairment. Impedance changes closely followed tidal volume changes (R(2) > 0.95). The optimal PEEP level was 15 +/- 1 cmH(2)O, and FRC at this PEEP level was 1706 +/- 447 ml before and 2210 +/- 540 ml after surgery (P depression in spite of a high PEEP level.

  9. The impact of Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery on normal metabolism in a porcine model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindqvist, Andreas; Ekelund, Mikael; Garcia-Vaz, Eliana

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: A growing body of literature on Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery (RYGB) has generated inconclusive results on the mechanism underlying the beneficial effects on weight loss and glycaemia, partially due to the problems of designing clinical studies with the appropriate controls. Moreov...... were compensated for by increased plasma amino acids, suggesting a switch from lipid to protein metabolism during fasting in the immediate postoperative period......., RYGB is only performed in obese individuals, in whom metabolism is perturbed and not completely understood. METHODS: In an attempt to isolate the effects of RYGB and its effects on normal metabolism, we investigated the effect of RYGB in lean pigs, using sham-operated pair-fed pigs as controls. Two...... weeks post-surgery, pigs were subjected to an intravenous glucose tolerance test (IVGTT) and circulating metabolites, hormones and lipids measured. Bile acid composition was profiled after extraction from blood, faeces and the gallbladder. RESULTS: A similar weight development in both groups of pigs...

  10. Weight loss after gastric bypass surgery in human obesity remodels promoter methylation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barres, Romain; Kirchner, Henriette; Rasmussen, Morten

    2013-01-01

    DNA methylation provides a mechanism by which environmental factors can control insulin sensitivity in obesity. Here, we assessed DNA methylation in skeletal muscle from obese people before and after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB). Obesity was associated with altered expression of a subset of ge...... is associated with hypermethylation at CpG shores and exonic regions close to transcription start sites. Our results provide evidence that obesity and RYGB-induced weight loss have a dynamic effect on the epigenome.......DNA methylation provides a mechanism by which environmental factors can control insulin sensitivity in obesity. Here, we assessed DNA methylation in skeletal muscle from obese people before and after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB). Obesity was associated with altered expression of a subset...... observed in the normal-weight, healthy subjects. Using bisulfite sequencing, we show that promoter methylation of PGC-1a and PDK4 is altered with obesity and restored to nonobese levels after RYGB-induced weight loss. A genome-wide DNA methylation analysis of skeletal muscle revealed that obesity...

  11. Bone structural changes after gastric bypass surgery evaluated by HR-pQCT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shanbhogue, Vikram Vinod; Støving, René Klinkby; Frederiksen, Katrine Diemer

    2017-01-01

    Objective, design and methods: Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) has proved successful in attaining sustained weight loss but may lead to metabolic bone disease. To assess impact on bone mass and structure, we measured areal bone mineral density at the hip and spine by dual-energy x-ray absorptiome......Objective, design and methods: Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) has proved successful in attaining sustained weight loss but may lead to metabolic bone disease. To assess impact on bone mass and structure, we measured areal bone mineral density at the hip and spine by dual-energy x...... in estimated bone strength at the radius and tibia respectively (both pinsulin were seen at 24 months, these changes were...... maximal at month 12 and stabilized from month 12 to 24. CONCLUSIONS: Despite weight stabilization and maintenance of metabolic parameters, bone loss and deterioration in bone strength continued and were substantial in the second year. The clinical importance of these changes in terms of increased risk...

  12. Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery is effective in fibroblast growth factor-21 deficient mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher D. Morrison

    2016-10-01

    Conclusions: FGF21 signaling is not a critical single factor for the beneficial metabolic effects of RYGB. This may open up the possibility to use FGF21 as adjuvant therapy in patients with ineffective bariatric surgeries.

  13. Long-term outcome of palliative therapy for gastric outlet obstruction caused by unresectable gastric cancer in patients with good performance status: endoscopic stenting versus surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    No, Jin Hee; Kim, Sang Woo; Lim, Chul-Hyun; Kim, Jin Su; Cho, Yu Kyung; Park, Jae Myung; Lee, In Seok; Choi, Myung-Gyu; Choi, Kyu Yong

    2013-07-01

    In patients with gastric outlet obstruction (GOO) caused by gastric cancer, choosing between self-expandable metal stent (SEMS) placement and gastrojejunostomy (GJJ) is of concern, especially in those with good performance status. To compare SEMS placement and GJJ. Retrospective study. Single tertiary referral center. Patients with an Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG) performance status of 0-2 who had GOO caused by unresectable gastric cancer. SEMS placement and GJJ. Success rate, adverse events, patency, and survival duration. Of the 113 patients in this study, 72 underwent SEMS placement and 41 underwent GJJ. The 2 groups did not differ in the technical and clinical success and incidence of early adverse events. However, the rate of late adverse events was significantly higher in the SEMS group (44.4% vs 12.2%; P gastric cancer in patients with a good performance status, especially ECOG 0-1. Copyright © 2013 American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Trocar Injuries in 17,446 Laparoscopic Gastric Bypass-a Nationwide Survey from the Scandinavian Obesity Surgery Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundbom, Magnus; Ottosson, Johan

    2016-09-01

    Although, the vast majority of bariatric procedures worldwide are performed laparoscopically, there is no consensus on the best technique to enter the first trocar, a potentially dangerous maneuver. Three principally different techniques exist: initial pneumoperitoneum by Verres needle, open Hasson technique, and direct placement of an optical trocar. In this nationwide survey, we have studied the presently used technique to place the first trocar and identified any intraabdominal injuries in 2012-2014. A questionnaire concerning techniques for placing the first trocar and identified intraabdominal injuries was sent to all 41 centers performing laparoscopic Roux en-Y gastric bypass (LRYGB) in Sweden. Total number of procedures were collected from the national quality registry, Scandinavian Obesity Surgery Registry (SOReg), also searched for reports on intraabdominal injuries. During the present study period, 17,446 LRYGBs were performed. Twelve intraabdominal injuries (0.07 %) were found: bleedings from the omentum, small bowel mesentery and liver (n = 8), and gastric or small bowel perforation (n = 4). The injuries were evenly distributed between the Veress technique and direct placement of an optical trocar, while no injuries occurred with the Hasson technique. Concerning placement of the first trocar, initial pneumoperitoneum with Veress needle was most common (59 %), followed by direct placement of an optical trocar (30 %). This indicates a switch from 2009-2010 (Veress 45 % and optical trocar 45 %, p < 0.001). Twelve intraabdominal injuries (0.07 %) were found in this nationwide survey. The most common technique for placing the first trocar had switched from directly placing an optical trocar to prior establishment of pneumoperitoneum.

  15. Differential effects of Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery on brown and beige adipose tissue thermogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hankir, Mohammed K; Bronisch, Felix; Hintschich, Constantin; Krügel, Ute; Seyfried, Florian; Fenske, Wiebke K

    2015-10-01

    There are numerous reports of increased energy expenditure after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) surgery in humans and rodent models but the underlying mechanisms remain poorly understood. In the present study we assessed at the gene expression level whether RYGB leads to recruitment of brown adipose tissue (BAT) and/or beige adipose tissue (BeAT) as a means of enhanced facultative thermogenesis and increased energy expenditure after surgery. Diet-induced obese male Wistar rats were randomized into RYGB-operated (n=10), sham-operated ad libitum fed (Sham) (n=7) or sham-operated body weight matched (BWM) to RYGB groups (n=7). At a stage of postoperatively stabilized weight reduction, BAT (interscapular), subcutaneous (inguinal) and visceral (epididymal and perirenal) white adipose tissue (WAT) depots were collected in the fasted state. Expression of thermoregulatory genes (UCP1, CIDEA and PRDM16) in BAT and WAT as well as specific markers of BeAT (Ear2 and TMEM26) in WAT was analyzed using RT-qPCR. Compared to Sham rats, UCP1 mRNA expression in BAT was significantly reduced in BWM, but not in RYGB rats. No differences in mRNA expression were found for thermoregulatory proteins or for markers of BeAT in subcutaneous or visceral WAT depots between RYGB and Sham groups. The compensatory decrease in BAT thermogenic gene expression typically associated with body weight loss is attenuated after RYGB which, as opposed to recruitment of BeAT, may contribute to overall increases in energy expenditure and weight loss maintenance after surgery. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Bariatric surgery in elderly patients. A comparison between gastric banding and sleeve gastrectomy with five years of follow up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musella, Mario; Milone, Marco; Maietta, Paola; Bianco, Paolo; Coretti, Guido; Pisapia, Anna; Gaudioso, Dario; Milone, Francesco

    2014-01-01

    The prevalence of obesity is rising progressively, even among elderly patients. Many studies investigated about safety and efficacy of bariatric surgery among aged obese patients. The objective of this review is to assess the benefits relative to risks of weight loss that may be obtained by performing two common bariatric procedures in obese elderly patient. We retrospectively evaluated 10 morbid obese patients older than 60 years reaching 5 years of follow up who respectively underwent Laparoscopic Sleeve Gastrectomy (LSG) or Laparoscopic Adjustable Gastric Banding (LAGB). Eventual changes in comorbidities, weight loss, EWL% were investigated. Although LSG patients required a longer postoperative hospital stay than LAGB patients (p elderly patients. Whereas all patients showed comorbidities resolution, no significant difference in weight loss between LAGB group and LSG group was found at 1 year (EWL% p = 0.87; BMI p = 0.32), 3 years (EWL% p = 0.62; BMI p = 0.79) and 5 years (EWL% p = 0.52; BMI p = 0.46) of follow up. Bariatric surgery is safe and effective to reach obesity related comorbidities resolution among elderly obese patients. Both LAGB and LSG determine a weight loss lesser than observed in a standard bariatric population. In this study LSG is significantly less cost effective than LAGB. Larger studies with longer follow up are however needed to evaluate the real impact of bariatric surgery on weight loss, resolution of comorbidities and improvement of quality of life in elderly obese patients. Copyright © 2014 Surgical Associates Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Higher plasma motilin levels in obese patients decrease after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery and regulate hunger.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deloose, E; Janssen, P; Lannoo, M; Van der Schueren, B; Depoortere, I; Tack, J

    2016-07-01

    Motilin-induced phase III contractions of the migrating motor complex (MMC) signal hunger in healthy volunteers. The current aim was to study the role of motilin as a hunger-inducing factor in obese patients and to evaluate the effect of Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) surgery on plasma motilin levels and hunger scores. Motilin and ghrelin plasma levels were determined during a complete MMC cycle in controls and obese patients selected for RYGB before, 6 months and 1 year after surgery. 20 min after the end of the second phase III, obese patients received an intravenous infusion of 40 mg erythromycin. Hunger was scored every 5 min. Hedonic hunger was assessed in obese patients with the Power of Food Scale questionnaire. Obesity caused a switch in the origin of phase III from antrum to duodenum. Obese patients had significantly higher motilin levels compared with controls during the MMC but tended to lack the motilin peak prior to phase III necessary to trigger hunger. Hunger scores during phase III were significantly lower in obese patients, but could be restored to control levels through the administration of a low dose of the motilin agonist, erythromycin. After RYGB surgery motilin, but not ghrelin, levels decreased in parallel with hedonic hunger scores. Motilin may be an important regulator involved in the pathogenesis of obesity. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  18. Significance of lymphadenectomy with splenectomy in radical surgery for advanced (pT3/pT4) remnant gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugita, Hiroki; Oda, Eri; Hirota, Masahiko; Ishikawa, Shinji; Tomiyasu, Shinjiro; Tanaka, Hiroshi; Arita, Tetsumasa; Yagi, Yasushi; Baba, Hideo

    2016-04-01

    To date, the optimal surgical strategy for remnant gastric cancer has not been determined. The purpose of this study was to clarify the significance of lymphadenectomy with splenectomy in remnant gastric cancer surgery. This retrospective cohort study was conducted at the Kumamoto Regional Medical Center. The primary endpoint was overall survival after surgery. We retrospectively analyzed the clinicopathologic features, surgical treatments, and long-term prognosis of remnant gastric cancer patients treated with total gastrectomy. A total of 80 patients with gastric cancer in the remnant stomach after distal gastrectomy and who underwent total gastrectomy were enrolled in the study. Splenectomy was performed in 38 patients. Lymph node metastasis in the splenic hilum was not observed in the patients with pT1/pT2 tumors, whereas nodal metastasis at the splenic hilum was detected in 30.4% of the patients with pT3/pT4 tumors. The survival rate of the patients with pT3/pT4 tumors who underwent splenectomy was significantly higher than that of the patients who did not undergo splenectomy, although there was no difference in the patients with pT1/pT2 tumors. Among the patients classified as R0, the survival rate of the patients with pT3/pT4 tumors who underwent splenectomy was significantly higher than that of the patients who did not undergo splenectomy. Lymphadenectomy with splenectomy in radical surgery is beneficial for patients with advanced (pT3/pT4) remnant gastric cancer. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Comparison of the effect of a single dose of erythromycin with pantoprazole on gastric content volume and acidity in elective general surgery patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nidhi Bhatia

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Pulmonary aspiration of gastric contents remains one of the most feared complications of anesthesia. A gastric pH of 2.5 or less and a volume of 25 ml (0.4 ml/kg body weight or more in average adult patients are considered critical factors for the development of pulmonary damage in adults. Materials and Methods: This study compared the efficacy of a single oral dose of erythromycin (a macrolide antibiotic with oral pantoprazole (a proton pump inhibitor on pre-operative gastric fluid volume and pH in a prospective, randomized, double-blind controlled fashion in 80 adult patients (of ASA physical status I and II planned for elective surgery under general anesthesia. Patients were divided into two groups of 40 patients each. The pantoprazole group (Group I received oral pantoprazole 40 mg and the erythromycin group (Group II received oral erythromycin 250 mg at least 1 h prior to the induction of anesthesia. After tracheal intubation, gastric fluid was aspirated via a Salem Sump tube and its volume and pH were measured. Results: Although both erythromycin and pantoprazole decreased the gastric fluid volume to a similar extent, the decrease in gastric fluid acidity by pantoprazole was significantly greater than that by erythromycin. The proportion of patients at risk of pulmonary aspiration according to traditional criteria, i.e. pH ≤2.5 and volume ≥25ml, was lower in the pantoprazole group. Conclusion: Administration of pantoprazole was found to be more useful than a sub-therapeutic dose of erythromycin in decreasing both volume and acidity of gastric content.

  20. Relationships between type 2 diabetes remission after gastric bypass and different weight loss metrics: arguments against excess weight loss in metabolic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van de Laar, A W; de Brauw, L M; Meesters, E W

    2016-02-01

    Percentage excess weight loss (%EWL) outcome of bariatric surgery is distorted by deviations in baseline body mass index (BMI). It has been reported that this can lead to false conclusions, most likely because bariatric weight loss in fact is baseline-BMI independent. If the metabolic effect of bariatric surgery is baseline-BMI independent as well, could %EWL also lead to false conclusions on metabolic surgery? Bariatric Center of Excellence, general hospital, Netherlands. Retrospective analysis of 1-year outcome of all consecutive primary gastric bypass patients with type 2 diabetes (T2DM). Metabolic outcome (glycated hemoglobin [HbA1c], T2DM medication) was compared with bariatric outcome (weight loss) using 3 different metrics: %EWL, the most popular weight loss metric among bariatric surgeons; percentage (total) weight loss (%WL), most commonly used by nonsurgical professionals; and percentage alterable weight loss (%AWL), the only metric rendering weight loss outcome independent of baseline BMI. Metabolic success (HbA1c≤6.0%, T2DM remission) was compared with different definitions of bariatric success (≥50 %EWL, BMIsuccessful for patients withsuccess criterion are problematic in comparing bariatric and metabolic outcome of gastric bypass surgery. They should be abandoned. The %WL metric is the best and most commonly used alternative, whereas %AWL is ideal for selected logistics in bariatric research. Weight loss percentiles are best suited for defining bariatric success in metabolic surgery. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Bariatric Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Gastric emptying

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonaz, B.; Hostein, J.; Caravel, J.P.

    1990-01-01

    Gastric emptying (GE) of nutriments is a major function of the stomach. GE disorders are observed after gastric surgery and with various diseases, either of a strictly gastroenterologic kind or interesting other specialities (especially diabetes mellitus). Scintigraphy, which has allowed a better knowledge of GE physiological and pathological mechanisms, has now become the reference method for studying the emptying of solids and liquids. In a near future, it could well have two major applications: a diagnostic approach of functional digestive disorders and an assessment of the various effects of pharmacological drugs with digestive affinity [fr

  2. Effect of Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery on bile acid metabolism in normal and obese diabetic rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hina Y Bhutta

    Full Text Available In addition to classic functions of facilitating hepatobiliary secretion and intestinal absorption of lipophilic nutrients, bile acids (BA are also endocrine factors and regulate glucose and lipid metabolism. Recent data indicate that antiobesity bariatric procedures e.g. Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery (RYGB, which also remit diabetes, increase plasma BAs in humans, leading to the hypothesis that BAs may play a role in diabetes resolution following surgery. To investigate the effect of RYGB on BA physiology and its relationship with glucose homeostasis, we undertook RYGB and SHAM surgery in Zucker diabetic fatty (ZDF and normoglycemic Sprague Dawley (SD rats and measured plasma and fecal BA levels, as well as plasma glucose, insulin, Glucagon like peptide 1 (GLP-1 and Peptide YY (PYY, 2 days before and 3, 7, 14 and 28 days after surgery. RYGB decreased body weight and increased plasma GLP-1 in both SD and ZDF rats while decreasing plasma insulin and glucose in ZDF rats starting from the first week. Compared to SHAM groups, both SD-RYGB and ZDF-RYGB groups started to have increases in plasma total BAs in the second week, which might not contribute to early post-surgery metabolic changes. While there was no significant difference in fecal BA excretion between SD-RYGB and SD-SHAM groups, the ZDF-RYGB group had a transient 4.2-fold increase (P<0.001 in 24-hour fecal BA excretion on post-operative day 3 compared to ZDF-SHAM, which paralleled a significant increase in plasma PYY. Ratios of plasma and fecal cholic acid/chenodeoxycholic acid derived BAs were decreased in RYGB groups. In addition, tissue mRNA expression analysis suggested early intestinal BA reabsorption and potentially reduced hepatic cholic acid production in RYGB groups. In summary, we present novel data on RYGB-mediated changes in BA metabolism to further understand the role of BAs in RYGB-induced metabolic effects in humans.

  3. Cost-effectiveness of gastric band surgery for overweight but not obese adults with type 2 diabetes in the U.S.

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    Wentworth, John M; Dalziel, Kim M; O'Brien, Paul E; Burton, Paul; Shaba, Frackson; Clarke, Philip M; Laiteerapong, Neda; Brown, Wendy A

    2017-07-01

    To determine the cost-effectiveness of gastric band surgery in overweight but not obese people who receive standard diabetes care. A microsimulation model (United Kingdom Prospective Diabetes Study outcomes model) was used to project diabetes outcomes and costs from a two-year Australian randomized trial of gastric band (GB) surgery in overweight but not obese people (BMI 25 to 30kg/m 2 ) on to a comparable population of U.S. adults from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (N=254). Estimates of cost-effectiveness were calculated based on the incremental cost-effectiveness ratios (ICERs) for different treatment scenarios. Costs were inflated to 2015 U.S. dollar values and an ICER of less than $50,000 per QALY gained was considered cost-effective. The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio for GB surgery at two years exceeded $90,000 per quality-adjusted life year gained but decreased to $52,000, $29,000 and $22,000 when the health benefits of surgery were assumed to endure for 5, 10 and 15 years respectively. The cost-effectiveness of GB surgery was sensitive to utility gained from weight loss and, to a lesser degree, the costs of GB surgery. However, the cost-effectiveness of GB surgery was affected minimally by improvements in HbA1c, systolic blood pressure and cholesterol. GB surgery for overweight but not obese people with T2D appears to be cost-effective in the U.S. setting if weight loss endures for more than five years. Health utility gained from weight loss is a critical input to cost-effectiveness estimates and therefore should be routinely measured in populations undergoing bariatric surgery. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. NEW TECHNIQUE FOR OBESITY SURGERY: INTERNAL GASTRIC PLICATION TECHNIQUE USING INTRAGASTRIC SINGLE-PORT (IGS-IGP) IN EXPERIMENTAL MODEL.

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    Müller, Verena; Fikatas, Panagiotis; Gül, Safak; Noesser, Maximilian; Fuehrer, Kirs Ten; Sauer, Igor; Pratschke, Johann; Zorron, Ricardo

    2017-01-01

    Bariatric surgery is currently the most effective method to ameliorate co-morbidities as consequence of morbidly obese patients with BMI over 35 kg/m2. Endoscopic techniques have been developed to treat patients with mild obesity and ameliorate comorbidities, but endoscopic skills are needed, beside the costs of the devices. To report a new technique for internal gastric plication using an intragastric single port device in an experimental swine model. Twenty experiments using fresh pig cadaver stomachs in a laparoscopic trainer were performed. The procedure was performed as follow in ten pigs: 1) volume measure; 2) insufflation of the stomach with CO2; 3) extroversion of the stomach through the simulator and installation of the single port device (Gelpoint Applied Mini) through a gastrotomy close to the pylorus; 4) performance of four intragastric handsewn 4-point sutures with Prolene 2-0, from the gastric fundus to the antrum; 5) after the performance, the residual volume was measured. Sleeve gastrectomy was also performed in further ten pigs and pre- and post-procedure gastric volume were measured. The internal gastric plication technique was performed successfully in the ten swine experiments. The mean procedure time was 27±4 min. It produced a reduction of gastric volume of a mean of 51%, and sleeve gastrectomy, a mean of 90% in this swine model. The internal gastric plication technique using an intragastric single port device required few skills to perform, had low operative time and achieved good reduction (51%) of gastric volume in an in vitro experimental model. A cirurgia bariátrica é atualmente o método mais efetivo para melhorar as co-morbidades decorrentes da obesidade mórbida com IMC acima de 35 kg/m2. Técnicas endoscópicas foram desenvolvidas para tratar pacientes com obesidade leve e melhorar as comorbidades, mas habilidades endoscópicas são necessárias, além dos custos. Relatar uma nova técnica para a plicatura gástrica interna

  5. Long-term nutritional status in patients following Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery.

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    Dogan, Kemal; Homan, Jens; Aarts, Edo O; de Boer, Hans; van Laarhoven, Cees J H M; Berends, Frits J

    2018-04-01

    Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) is an effective treatment for obesity. However, it also leads to multiple nutritional deficiencies. Much is known about the short term prevalence, but hardly any long term data is available on deficiencies. The aim of this study was to assess the long term outcome of nutritional status after RYGB. We performed a retrospective analysis of prospectively collected data obtained from 51 morbidly obese patients who underwent a primary laparoscopic RYGB. Primary outcomes were iron, vitamin B12 and vitamin D deficiencies. Secondary outcomes were deficiencies of other vitamins and minerals and compliance of the patients to multivitamin use. The mean follow-up was 81 ± 27 months. A total of 35%, 16% and 55% of the patients had deficiencies for iron, vitamin B12 and vitamin D respectively. Sixty-nine percent of patients used a (nonspecific) multivitamin supplement on a daily basis. Patients with multivitamin usage had a lower rate of iron deficiency (26% vs. 56%, p = 0.034), vitamin B12 (11% vs. 25%, p = 0.46) and vitamin D (46% vs. 75%, p = 0.07), compared to non-compliant patients. Nutritional deficiencies are common after a RYGB operation. Therefore, strict follow-up by a bariatric surgeon, endocrinologist or general practitioner is required, both short and long term. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd and European Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism. All rights reserved.

  6. Patients with neuroglycopenia after gastric bypass surgery have exaggerated incretin and insulin secretory responses to a mixed meal.

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    Goldfine, A B; Mun, E C; Devine, E; Bernier, R; Baz-Hecht, M; Jones, D B; Schneider, B E; Holst, J J; Patti, M E

    2007-12-01

    Hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia is newly recognized as a rare but important complication after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (GB). The etiology of the syndrome and metabolic characteristics remain incompletely understood. Recent studies suggest that levels of incretin hormones are increased after GB and may promote excessive beta-cell function and/or growth. We performed a cross-sectional analysis of metabolic variables, in both the fasting state and after a liquid mixed-meal challenge, in four subject groups: 1) with clinically significant hypoglycemia [neuroglycopenia (NG)] after GB surgery, 2) with no symptoms of hypoglycemia at similar duration after GB surgery, 3) without GB similar to preoperative body mass index of the surgical cohorts, and 4) without GB similar to current body mass index of the surgical cohorts. Insulin and C-peptide after the liquid mixed meal were both higher relative to the glucose level achieved in persons after GB with NG compared with asymptomatic individuals. Glucagon, glucagon-like peptide 1, and glucose-dependent insulinotropic peptide levels were higher in both post-GB surgical groups compared with both overweight and morbidly obese persons, and glucagon-like peptide 1 was markedly higher in the group with NG. Insulin resistance, assessed by homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance, the composite insulin sensitivity index, or adiponectin, was similar in both post-GB groups. Dumping score was also higher in both GB groups but did not discriminate between asymptomatic and symptomatic patients. Notably, the frequency of asymptomatic hypoglycemia after a liquid mixed meal was high in post-GB patients. A robust insulin secretory response was associated with postprandial hypoglycemia in patients after GB presenting with NG. Increased incretin levels may contribute to the increased insulin secretory response.

  7. Erectile dysfunction and hormonal imbalance in morbidly obese male is reversed after gastric bypass surgery: a prospective randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reis, L O; Favaro, W J; Barreiro, G C; de Oliveira, L C; Chaim, E A; Fregonesi, A; Ferreira, U

    2010-10-01

    The effects of weight loss on erectile function and hormones have not been well studied. The aim of this study was to measure the degree to which sexual function and in particular erectile function and hormonal environment change after substantial weight loss, surgically and non-surgically induced in the morbidly obese male in a prospective randomized long-term controlled trial. Furthermore, how surgery makes a difference when treating morbidly obese men was envisaged in this context. We prospectively studied 20 morbidly obese men for 24 months, divided into two groups: group A included 10 patients who underwent life style modifications (exercise and diet) for 4 months and subsequently gastric bypass, and another 10 patients in group B were kept on weekly follow-up. None of the men were taking phosphodiesterase type-5 inhibitors. All patients underwent International Index of Erectile Function (IIEF)-5 questionnaire, serum oestradiol, prolactin (PRL), luteinizing (LH) and follicle-stimulating (FSH) hormones, free and total testosterone (FT and TT) at baseline (time 0), surgery - 4 months latter baseline (time 1) and final evaluation - 24 months (time 2). From times 0 to 1, group A presented a mean body mass index (BMI) reduction of 12.6 (p 0.05). The BMI reductions between times 0 and 2 were 24.7 (p 0.05) for groups A and B respectively. BMI average between the two groups was similar at time 0 (p = 0.2142), and different at times 1 (p = 0.0033) and 2 (p hormonal impact verified could justify the improvement in erectile function. Lifestyle modifications impacted BMI without hormonal or sexual impact in morbidly obese. New studies are warranted in the field to support our data.

  8. Gastric inhibitory polypeptide (GIP is selectively decreased in the roux-limb of dietary obese mice after RYGB surgery.

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    Jiaqiang Zhou

    Full Text Available Gastric inhibitory polypeptide (GIP, glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide is expressed by intestinal K cells to regulate glucose-induced insulin secretion. The impact of Roux-en Y bypass (RYGB surgery on blood GIP is highly contraversial. This study was conducted to address the mechanism of controversy. GIP mRNA was examined in the intestine, and serum GIP was determined using Luminex and ELISA in diet-induced obese (DIO mice. The assays were conducted in RYGB mice in fasting and fed conditions. Food preference, weight loss and insulin sensitivity were monitored in RYGB mice. In DIO mice, GIP mRNA was increased by 80% in all sections of the small intestine over the lean control. The increase was observed in both fasting and fed conditions. After RYGB surgery, the food-induced GIP expression was selectively reduced in the Roux-limb, but not in the biliopancreatic and common limbs of intestine in fed condition. Lack of stimulation by glucose or cholesterol contributed to the reduction. Jejunal mucosa of Roux-limb exhibited hypertrophy, but villous surface was decreased by the undigested food. Serum GIP (total was significantly higher in the fasting condition, but not in the fed condition due to attenuated GIP response to food intake in RYGB mice. The GIP alteration was associated with chow diet preference, sustained weight loss and insulin sensitization in RYGB mice. RYGB increased serum GIP in the fasting, but not in the fed conditions. The loss of food-induced GIP response in Roux-limb of intestine likely contributes to the attenuated serum GIP response to feeding.

  9. "Candy cane syndrome:" an underappreciated cause of abdominal pain and nausea after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery.

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    Aryaie, Amir H; Fayezizadeh, Mojtaba; Wen, Yuxiang; Alshehri, Mohammed; Abbas, Mujjahid; Khaitan, Leena

    2017-09-01

    "Candy cane" syndrome (a blind afferent Roux limb at the gastrojejunostomy) has been implicated as a cause of abdominal pain, nausea, and emesis after Roux-n-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) but remains poorly described. To report that "candy cane" syndrome is real and can be treated effectively with revisional bariatric surgery SETTING: All patients underwent "candy cane" resection at University Hospitals of Cleveland. All patients who underwent resection of the "candy cane" between January 2011 and July 2015 were included. All had preoperative workup to identify "candy cane" syndrome. Demographic data; pre-, peri-, and postoperative symptoms; data regarding hospitalization; and postoperative weight loss were assessed through retrospective chart review. Data were analyzed using Student's t test and χ 2 analysis where appropriate. Nineteen patients had resection of the "candy cane" (94% female, mean age 50±11 yr), within 3 to 11 years after initial RYGB. Primary presenting symptoms were epigastric abdominal pain (68%) and nausea/vomiting (32%), particularly with fibrous foods and meats. On upper gastrointestinal study and endoscopy, the afferent blind limb was the most direct outlet from the gastrojejunostomy. Only patients with these preoperative findings were deemed to have "candy cane" syndrome. Eighteen (94%) cases were completed laparoscopically. Length of the "candy cane" ranged from 3 to 22 cm. Median length of stay was 1 day. After resection, 18 (94%) patients had complete resolution of their symptoms (PCandy cane" syndrome is a real phenomenon that can be managed safely with excellent outcomes with resection of the blind afferent limb. A thorough diagnostic workup is paramount to proper identification of this syndrome. Surgeons should minimize the size of the blind afferent loop left at the time of initial RYGB. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Bariatric Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Effects of gastric bypass surgery on glucose absorption and metabolism during a mixed meal in glucose-tolerant individuals.

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    Jacobsen, Siv H; Bojsen-Møller, Kirstine N; Dirksen, Carsten; Jørgensen, Nils B; Clausen, Trine R; Wulff, Birgitte S; Kristiansen, Viggo B; Worm, Dorte; Hansen, Dorte L; Holst, Jens J; van Hall, Gerrit; Madsbad, Sten

    2013-10-01

    Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery (RYGB) improves glucose tolerance in patients with type 2 diabetes, but also changes the glucose profile in response to a meal in glucose-tolerant individuals. We hypothesised that the driving force for the changed postprandial glucose profiles after RYGB is rapid entry of glucose into the systemic circulation due to modified gastrointestinal anatomy, causing hypersecretion of insulin and other hormones influencing glucose disappearance and endogenous glucose production. We determined glucose absorption and metabolism and the rate of lipolysis before and 3 months after RYGB in obese glucose-tolerant individuals using the double-tracer technique during a mixed meal. After RYGB, the postprandial plasma glucose profile changed, with a higher peak glucose concentration followed by a faster return to lower than basal levels. These changes were brought about by changes in glucose kinetics: (1) a more rapid appearance of ingested glucose in the systemic circulation, and a concomitant increase in insulin and glucagon-like peptide-1 secretion; (2) postprandial glucose disappearance was maintained at a high rate for a longer time after RYGB. Endogenous glucose production was similar before and after surgery. Postoperative glucagon secretion increased and showed a biphasic response after RYGB. Adipose tissue basal rate of lipolysis was higher after RYGB. A rapid rate of absorption of ingested glucose into the systemic circulation, followed by increased insulin secretion and glucose disappearance appears to drive the changes in the glucose profile observed after RYGB, while endogenous glucose production remains unchanged. ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01559792. The study was part of the UNIK program: Food, Fitness & Pharma for Health and Disease (see www.foodfitnesspharma.ku.dk ). Funding was received from the Novo Nordisk foundation and the Strategic Research Counsel for the Capital Area and Danish Research Agency. The primary investigator received a

  11. The impact of Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery on normal metabolism in a porcine model.

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    Lindqvist, Andreas; Ekelund, Mikael; Garcia-Vaz, Eliana; Ståhlman, Marcus; Pierzynowski, Stefan; Gomez, Maria F; Rehfeld, Jens F; Groop, Leif; Hedenbro, Jan; Wierup, Nils; Spégel, Peter

    2017-01-01

    A growing body of literature on Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery (RYGB) has generated inconclusive results on the mechanism underlying the beneficial effects on weight loss and glycaemia, partially due to the problems of designing clinical studies with the appropriate controls. Moreover, RYGB is only performed in obese individuals, in whom metabolism is perturbed and not completely understood. In an attempt to isolate the effects of RYGB and its effects on normal metabolism, we investigated the effect of RYGB in lean pigs, using sham-operated pair-fed pigs as controls. Two weeks post-surgery, pigs were subjected to an intravenous glucose tolerance test (IVGTT) and circulating metabolites, hormones and lipids measured. Bile acid composition was profiled after extraction from blood, faeces and the gallbladder. A similar weight development in both groups of pigs validated our experimental model. Despite similar changes in fasting insulin, RYGB-pigs had lower fasting glucose levels. During an IVGTT RYGB-pigs had higher insulin and lower glucose levels. VLDL and IDL were lower in RYGB- than in sham-pigs. RYGB-pigs had increased levels of most amino acids, including branched-chain amino acids, but these were more efficiently suppressed by glucose. Levels of bile acids in the gallbladder were higher, whereas plasma and faecal bile acid levels were lower in RYGB- than in sham-pigs. In a lean model RYGB caused lower plasma lipid and bile acid levels, which were compensated for by increased plasma amino acids, suggesting a switch from lipid to protein metabolism during fasting in the immediate postoperative period.

  12. The impact of Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery on normal metabolism in a porcine model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Lindqvist

    Full Text Available A growing body of literature on Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery (RYGB has generated inconclusive results on the mechanism underlying the beneficial effects on weight loss and glycaemia, partially due to the problems of designing clinical studies with the appropriate controls. Moreover, RYGB is only performed in obese individuals, in whom metabolism is perturbed and not completely understood.In an attempt to isolate the effects of RYGB and its effects on normal metabolism, we investigated the effect of RYGB in lean pigs, using sham-operated pair-fed pigs as controls. Two weeks post-surgery, pigs were subjected to an intravenous glucose tolerance test (IVGTT and circulating metabolites, hormones and lipids measured. Bile acid composition was profiled after extraction from blood, faeces and the gallbladder.A similar weight development in both groups of pigs validated our experimental model. Despite similar changes in fasting insulin, RYGB-pigs had lower fasting glucose levels. During an IVGTT RYGB-pigs had higher insulin and lower glucose levels. VLDL and IDL were lower in RYGB- than in sham-pigs. RYGB-pigs had increased levels of most amino acids, including branched-chain amino acids, but these were more efficiently suppressed by glucose. Levels of bile acids in the gallbladder were higher, whereas plasma and faecal bile acid levels were lower in RYGB- than in sham-pigs.In a lean model RYGB caused lower plasma lipid and bile acid levels, which were compensated for by increased plasma amino acids, suggesting a switch from lipid to protein metabolism during fasting in the immediate postoperative period.

  13. ERCP via gastrostomy vs. double balloon enteroscopy in patients with prior bariatric Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery.

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    Choi, Eun Kwang; Chiorean, Michael V; Coté, Gregory A; El Hajj, Ihab I; El Hajj, Ihab; Ballard, Darren; Fogel, Evan L; Watkins, James L; McHenry, Lee; Sherman, Stuart; Lehman, Glen A

    2013-08-01

    Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) is the most common bariatric surgery. The performance of ERCP in bariatric RYGB is challenging due to the long Roux limb. We herein compared the indications and technical outcomes of ERCP via percutaneous gastrostomy (GERCP) and double balloon enteroscopy (DBERCP) for patients with prior bariatric RYGB anatomy. Between December 2005 and November 2011, consecutive ERCP patients who had undergone RYGB were identified using a prospectively maintained electronic ERCP database. Medical records were abstracted for ERCP indications and outcomes. In most cases, the gastrostomy was done by either laparoscopic or open surgery and allowed to mature at least 1 month before performing ERCP. The choice of route for ERCP was at discretion of managing physician. Forty-four patients (F = 42) with GERCP and 28 patients (F = 26) with DBERCP were identified. The mean age was younger in GERCP than DBERCP (44.8 vs. 56.1, p successful in all but two (97 %), whereas duct cannulation and interventions were successful in all. In DBERCP, the success rate of accessing major papilla, cannulation and therapeutic intervention was 78, 63, 56 %, respectively. There was one (3.1 %) post-ERCP pancreatitis in DBERCP. Complications occurred in 11 GERCP procedures (14.5 %) and 10 were related to the gastrostomy. This was significantly higher than that of DBERCP (p = 0.022). GERCP is more effective than DBERCP in gaining access to the pancreatobiliary tree in patients with RYGB, but it is hindered by the gastrostomy maturation delay and a higher morbidity. Technical improvements in each method are needed.

  14. Laparoscopy-assisted ERCP (LA-ERCP) following bariatric gastric bypass surgery: initial experience of a single UK centre.

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    Paranandi, Bharat; Joshi, Deepak; Mohammadi, Borzoueh; Jenkinson, Andrew; Adamo, Marco; Read, Samantha; Johnson, Gavin J; Chapman, Michael H; Pereira, Stephen P; Webster, George J

    2016-01-01

    Bariatric gastric bypass surgery is being increasingly performed, but endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) in these patients poses a unique challenge because of a lack of per-oral access to the stomach. Small series suggest a higher technical success rate using laparoscopy-assisted ERCP (LA-ERCP) than with an enteroscopic approach via the Roux-en-Y anastomosis. We present initial experience of LA-ERCP in our unit. Retrospective case series of consecutive patients undergoing LA-ERCP in our unit between September 2011 and July 2014. Data was retrieved from electronic, clinical and endoscopy records. Seven LA-ERCPs were performed. All seven patients were female, with median age 44 years (range 36-71). Indications included symptomatic bile duct stones (5/7), benign papillary fibrosis (1/7) and retained biliary stent (1/7). 5/7 (71%) patients had had a prior cholecystectomy. To facilitate LA-ERCP, laparoscopic gastrostomy ports were created in all patients. Duodenal access, biliary cannulation and completion of therapeutic aim were achieved in all patients. 6/7 (86%) patients required endoscopic sphincterotomy. The median duration of procedures was 94 min (range 70-135). Median postoperative length of stay was 2 days (range 1-9). One patient developed mild postprocedural acute pancreatitis, and another patient developed a mild port-site infection. Otherwise, no procedure-related complications were seen. All patients remained well on follow-up (median 14 months (range 1-35) from date of ERCP), with no evidence of further biliary symptoms. Our early experience of LA-ERCP is that it is safe and effective. The technique may require particular consideration, as bariatric surgery is increasingly performed, in a patient group at significant risk of bile duct stones.

  15. Eating behavior in morbidly obese patients undergoing gastric surgery: differences between obese people with and without psychiatric disorders.

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    Guisado, J A; Vaz, F J; López-Ibor, J J; Rubio, M A

    2001-10-01

    This study analyzes eating behavior in a group of morbidly obese patients who have undergone gastric reduction surgery for weight loss, and evaluates whether the existence of psychiatric comorbidity marks significant differences in their eating behavior. The study group was composed of 100 morbidly obese patients (85 females, 15 males) who had received surgical treatment for weight reduction (vertical banded gastroplasty). 40 of these patients (40%) met ICD-10 criteria for the diagnosis of psychiatric disorders and were included in the "Psychiatric Obese group" (PO). The other 60 patients (60%) did not show ICD-10 diagnostic criteria and were included in the "Non-Psychiatric Obese group" (NO). Each patients completed the Binge Eating Scale (BES), the Three Factor Eating Questionnaire, the Bulimia Investigatory Test-Edinburgh (BITE), and the Eating Disorder Inventory (EDI). Significant differences were found between the two groups (PO and NO) in the Binge Eating Scale (p < 0.001), Three Factor Eating Questionnaire subscale Disinhibition (p < 0.001), BITE (p < 0.001), Eating Disorder Inventory subscale Perfectionism (p < 0.002), and Global EDI (p < 0.001). Logistic regression analysis showed correlation between PO group and Global EDI (Odds Ratio OR = 1.43) and BITE (OR = 1.16). No significant gender differences were found for eating behavior, clinical diagnosis, age, percentage of weight loss, time after operation, and BMI before surgery. Surgically treated morbidly obese patients with a psychiatric disorder (PO) have a more destructured eating pattern (with a predominance of binge eating and disinhibition) than NO.

  16. [Body weight evolution and classification of body weight in relation to the results of bariatric surgery: roux-en-Y gastric bypass].

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    Novais, Patrícia Fátima Sousa; Rasera Junior, Irineu; Leite, Celso Vieira de Souza; Oliveira, Maria Rita Marques de

    2010-03-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the evolution and classification of body weight in relation to the results of bariatric surgery in women who underwent the procedure more than two years ago. A total of 141 women underwent banded Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB). The participants were divided according to the time elapsed since surgery and the percentage of excess weight lost (%EWL): 75. The women in the group with %EWL 75 (36.2%) ranged from normal to pre-obese and presented lower late weight gain than the women in the other groups. Weight evolution two or more years after surgery showed the expected reductions, with some individuals responding better to surgery than others. This shows that it is necessary to monitor, investigate and intervene to obtain the desired results.

  17. Prophylactic plastic surgery closure of neurosurgical scalp incisions reduces the incidence of wound complications in previously-operated patients treated with bevacizumab (Avastin®) and radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golas, Alyssa Reiffel; Boyko, Tatiana; Schwartz, Theodore H; Stieg, Philip E; Boockvar, John A; Spector, Jason A

    2014-09-01

    Neurosurgical craniotomy, craniectomy, or other trans-galeal interventions are performed for a variety of indications, including the resection of benign or malignant tumors, hematoma evacuation, and for the management of intractable seizure disorders. Despite an overall low complication rate of intervention, wound healing complications such as dehiscence, surgical site infection, and cerebrospinal fluid leak are not uncommon. A retrospective review was performed of all patients who underwent scalp incision closure at a single institution by a single plastic surgeon between 2006 and 2013. Sixty patients (83 procedures) were included in the study. Fifty-seven patients (95.0 %) underwent previous craniotomy, craniectomy, or other trans-galeal procedure. Of the total 60 patients, 35 patients received preoperative radiation. Sixteen patients received bevacizumab prior to their index case, while 12 received bevacizumab postoperatively. Ten patients (16.7 %) required additional plastic surgical intervention for wound complications after their index plastic surgery procedure. Plastic surgery was consulted prophylactically in 34 patients (38 procedures). When plastic surgery was consulted prophylactically, 4 patients (11.8 %) required further wound revision. None of the 14 patients who underwent prophylactic plastic surgery closure for previous scalp incision, preoperative bevacizumab, and XRT administration required re-intervention. Plastic surgery closure of complex scalp incisions reduces the incidence of wound complications among patients who underwent previous neurosurgical intervention, XRT administration, and preoperative bevacizumab administration. This is particularly true when plastic surgery closure is performed "prophylactically." Further collaboration between the neurosurgical and plastic surgery teams is therefore warranted, particularly in the setting of these high-risk cases.

  18. Effects of Gastric Bypass Surgery on Bone Mass and Microarchitecture Occur Early and Particularly Impact Postmenopausal Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schafer, Anne L; Kazakia, Galateia J; Vittinghoff, Eric; Stewart, Lygia; Rogers, Stanley J; Kim, Tiffany Y; Carter, Jonathan T; Posselt, Andrew M; Pasco, Courtney; Shoback, Dolores M; Black, Dennis M

    2017-12-27

    Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) surgery is a highly effective treatment for obesity but negatively affects the skeleton. Studies of skeletal effects have generally examined areal bone mineral density (BMD) by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA), but DXA may be inaccurate in the setting of marked weight loss. Further, as a result of modestly sized samples of mostly premenopausal women and very few men, effects of RYGB by sex and menopausal status are unknown. We prospectively studied the effects of RYGB on skeletal health, including axial and appendicular volumetric BMD and appendicular bone microarchitecture and estimated strength. Obese adults (N = 48; 27 premenopausal and 11 postmenopausal women, 10 men) with mean ± SD body mass index (BMI) 44 ± 7 kg/m 2 were assessed before and 6 and 12 months after RYGB. Participants underwent spine and hip DXA, spine QCT, radius and tibia HR-pQCT, and laboratory evaluation. Mean 12-month weight loss was 37 kg (30% of preoperative weight). Overall median 12-month increase in serum collagen type I C-telopeptide (CTx) was 278% (p effects of RYGB on axial and appendicular bone mass and microarchitecture are detectable as early as 6 months postoperatively. Postmenopausal women are at highest risk for skeletal consequences and may warrant targeted screening or interventions. © 2017 American Society for Bone and Mineral Research. © 2017 American Society for Bone and Mineral Research.

  19. The feasibility and safety of single-incision totally extraperitoneal inguinal hernia repair after previous lower abdominal surgery: 350 procedures at a single center.

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    Wakasugi, Masaki; Suzuki, Yozo; Tei, Mitsuyoshi; Anno, Kana; Mikami, Tsubasa; Tsukada, Ryo; Koh, Masahiro; Furukawa, Kenta; Masuzawa, Toru; Kishi, Kentaro; Tanemura, Masahiro; Akamatsu, Hiroki

    2017-03-01

    To evaluate the feasibility and safety of single-incision laparoscopic surgery for totally extraperitoneal inguinal hernia repair (SILS-TEP) with previous lower abdominal surgery (PLAS). A retrospective analysis of 350 patients undergoing SILS-TEP for a primary inguinal hernia from January 2012 to December 2015 at Osaka Police Hospital was performed, and the outcomes of the patients with and without PLAS were compared. SILS-TEP was performed in 84 patients with PLAS and 266 patients without PLAS. Appendectomy was the most common previous operative procedure. There were more patients with an ASA score of ≥3 in the PLAS group than in the control group (p < 0.05). The mean operative time, and the rates of conversion and postoperative complications were comparable between the two groups. There were no cases of recurrence in either group. SILS-TEP could be safely performed in patients with PLAS and achieved better cosmetic outcomes than conventional laparoscopic surgery.

  20. Effect of Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery on ventricular function and cardiac risk factors in obese patients: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alireza Abdollahi Moghaddam

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Weight gain and obesity are two important public health problems, which are associated with many diseases such as cardiovascular disorders. Various policies such as bariatric surgery have been proposed for the treatment of morbid obesity. Methods: PubMed and Scopus were searched thoroughly with the following search terms (roux-en-y gastric bypass surgery AND (ventricular function, OR cardiac risk factors OR heart AND (BMI OR body mass index to find the articles in which the effect of roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB surgery had been evaluated in severely obese patients.Result: Out of 120 articles which were found in PubMed, and 28 records which were found in Scopus, only 18 articles fully met the inclusion criteria. Out of 2740 participants in the included studied, 1706 were patients with body mass index (BMI over 40 kg/m2 who had undergone RYGB surgery, and 1034 were control participants. Results of the studies showed that RYGB surgery could reduce BMI, and cardiac risk factors, and improve diastolic function, systolic and diastolic blood pressures, and aortic function, postoperatively.Discussion: Obesity is associated with increased risk of cardiovascular diseases, impaired cardiac function, and hypertension. It is shown that RYGB surgery reduces the serum level of biochemical markers of cardiac diseases. Cardiac structure, parasympathetic indices of autonomic function, coronary circulatory function, hypertension, epicardial fat thickness, and ventricular performance improve after bariatric surgery.Conclusions: It is concluded that RYGB surgery is an effective strategy to improve ventricular function and cardiac risk factors in morbid obese patients.

  1. Acarbose improves hypoglycaemia following gastric bypass surgery without increasing glucagon-like peptide 1 levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valderas, Juan Patricio; Ahuad, Jessica; Rubio, Lorena; Escalona, Manuel; Pollak, Felipe; Maiz, Alberto

    2012-04-01

    Postprandial hypoglycaemia is a severe complication of Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGBP). Acarbose, an α-glucosidase inhibitor (AGI), is employed in its treatment. Several studies have shown that AGIs increase the postprandial levels of glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1). However, an excessive level of GLP-1 is one of the factors involved in the physiopathology of this condition. We analysed the effect of acarbose oral administration in eight RYBGP patients with clinically significant hypoglycaemia or dumping syndrome. Glucose, insulin and GLP-1 plasma levels in fasting and after ingestion of a standard meal (Ensure Plus®; 13 g protein, 50 g carbohydrate, 11 g fat) were measured. The test was repeated the following week with the oral administration of 100 mg of acarbose 15 min prior to the meal. Five patients developed asymptomatic hypoglycaemia during the test (glucose level <50 mg/dl) with inappropriately high insulin levels and exaggerated GLP-1 response. Acarbose ingestion avoided hypoglycaemia in all of the patients and increased the lowest plasma glucose level (46.4 ± 4.8 vs. 59.0 ± 2.6 mg/dl, p < 0.01). Acarbose ingestion decreased the area under the curve for serum insulin and GLP-1 levels at 15 min after the meal. Acarbose avoided postprandial hypoglycaemia following RYGBP by decreasing the hyperinsulinemic response. This was associated with a decrease in early GLP-1 secretion, in contrast to that observed in non-surgical subjects. This finding could be explained by the reduction of glucose load in the jejunum produced by the α-glucosidase inhibition, which is the main stimulus for GLP-1 secretion.

  2. [Changes in quality of life in patients undergoing bariatric surgery following 24-months: comparison between gastric bypass and tubular vertical gastrectomy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vander Hofstadt Román, C J; Escribano Cubas, S; Tirado González, S; Pérez Martínez, E; Estrada Caballero, J L; Ortiz Sebastián, S; Rodríguez-Marín, J; Leal Costa, C

    2017-08-31

    Bariatric surgery has become the procedure of choice to deal with morbid and super-morbid obesity, with the greatest chance of success. The objectives of this study were: a) to analyse the evolution of the percentage of excess BMI lost (PEBMIL) and quality of life in the medium and long term after bariatric surgery; b) to evaluate the differences in PEBMIL and quality of life according to the surgical technique performed; and c) examine the relationship between PEBMIL and quality of life. One hundred and ninety-one subjects participated in the present study, undergoing bariatric surgery with follow-up at 12 and 24 months after surgery. The SF-36 and OP-53 questionnaires were administered to assess the quality of life after surgery. There was a statistically significant reduction in the percentage of excess BMI lost at 12 and 24 months; and a significant improvement in quality of life at 12 months, which remained stable at 24 months for most variables. Taking into account the surgical technique, those undergoing gastric bypass surgery show a greater loss of PEBMIL at 12 and 24 months, and significant improvement at one year of evaluation in most of the dimensions that measure quality of life with respect to the tubular vertical gastrectomy technique. Bariatric surgery is effective in reducing the excess of BMI lost and significantly improving the quality of life of morbidly obese patients in the long term. Key words. Bariatric surgery. Quality of life. Morbid obesity.

  3. “Omics” Prospective Monitoring of Bariatric Surgery: Roux-En-Y Gastric Bypass Outcomes Using Mixed-Meal Tolerance Test and Time-Resolved 1H NMR-Based Metabolomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, Thiago I.B.; Geloneze, Bruno; Pareja, José C.; Calixto, Antônio R.; Ferreira, Márcia M.C.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) surgery goes beyond weight loss to induce early beneficial hormonal changes that favor glycemic control. In this prospective study, ten obese subjects diagnosed with type 2 diabetes underwent bariatric surgery. Mixed-meal tolerance test was performed before and 12 months after RYGB, and the outcomes were investigated by a time-resolved hydrogen nuclear magnetic resonance (1H NMR)-based metabolomics. To the best of our knowledge, no previous omics-driven study has used time-resolved 1H NMR-based metabolomics to investigate bariatric surgery outcomes. Our results presented here show a significant decrease in glucose levels after bariatric surgery (from 159.80 ± 61.43 to 100.00 ± 22.94 mg/dL), demonstrating type 2 diabetes remission (p < 0.05). The metabolic profile indicated lower levels of lactate, alanine, and branched chain amino acids for the operated subject at fasting state after the surgery. However, soon after food ingestion, the levels of these metabolites increased faster in operated than in nonoperated subjects. The lipoprotein profile achieved before and after RYGB at fasting was also significantly different, but converging 180 min after food ingestion. For example, the very low-density lipoprotein, low-density lipoprotein, N-acetyl-glycoproteins, and unsaturated lipid levels decreased after RYGB, while phosphatidylcholine and high-density lipoprotein increased. This study provides important insights on RYGB surgery and attendant type 2 diabetes outcomes using an “omics” systems science approach. Further research on metabolomic correlates of RYGB surgery in larger study samples is called for. PMID:27428253

  4. A review of studies comparing three laparoscopic procedures in bariatric surgery: sleeve gastrectomy, Roux-en-Y gastric bypass and adjustable gastric banding.

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    Franco, Juan Victor A; Ruiz, Pablo Adrian; Palermo, Mariano; Gagner, Michel

    2011-09-01

    Obesity is a major worldwide problem in public health, reaching epidemic proportions in many countries, especially in urbanized regions. Bariatric procedures have been shown to be more effective in the management of morbid obesity, compared to medical treatments in terms of weight loss and its sustainability. The two most commonly performed procedures are laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (LRYGB), laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding (LAGB), and the novel laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy (LSG). The MEDLINE database (cutoff date September 2010), LILACS, and the Cochrane Library were searched using the key words "gastric bypass," "sleeve gastrectomy," and "gastric banding." Only studies that compared at least two of the laparoscopic procedures were included. Reviews and meta-analysis, editorial letters or comments, case reports, animal or in vitro studies, comparisons with medical treatment, comparisons with open (non-laparoscopic) procedures were excluded. Most studies indicated that LRYGB and LSG could be more effective achieving weight loss than LAGB. However, LAGB seems to be a safer procedure with frequent, but less severe, long-term complications. Although not uniformly reported, a resolution of obesity-related comorbidities was achieved with most bariatric procedures. The three procedures have acceptable efficacy and safety. We believe that patients should be informed in detail on the advantages and disadvantages of each available procedure, possibly in several interviews and always accompanied by a specialized interdisciplinary team, warranting long-term follow-up.

  5. Differences in open versus laparoscopic gastric bypass mortality risk using the Obesity Surgery Mortality Risk Score (OS-MRS).

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    Brolin, Robert E; Cody, Ronald P; Marcella, Stephen W

    2015-01-01

    The Obesity Surgery Mortality Risk Score (OS-MRS) was developed to ascertain preoperative mortality risk of patients having bariatric surgery. To date there has not been a comparison between open and laparoscopic operations using the OS-MRS. To determine whether there are differences in mortality risk between open and laparoscopic Roux-en-Y Gastric Bypass (RYGB) using the OS-MRS. Three university-affiliated hospitals. The 90-day mortality of 2467 consecutive patients who had primary open (1574) or laparoscopic (893) RYGB performed by one surgeon was determined. Univariate and multivariate analysis using 5 OS-MRS risk factors including body mass index (BMI) gender, age>45, presence of hypertension and preoperative deep vein thrombosis (DVT) risk was performed in each group. Each patient was placed in 1 of 3 OS-MRS risk classes based on the number of risks: A (0-1), B (2-3), and C (4-5). Preoperative BMI and DVT risk factors were significantly greater in the open group (OG). Preoperative age was significantly greater in the laparoscopic group (LG). There were significantly more class B and C patients in LG. Ninety-day mortality rates for OG and LG patients were 1.0% and .9%, respectively. Pulmonary embolism was the most common cause of death. All deaths in LG occurred during first 4 years of that experience. Mortality rate by class was A = .1%; B = 1.5%; C = 2.3%. The difference in mortality between class B and C patients was not significant. Univariate analysis in the OG indicated that BMI, age, gender, and DVT risk were significant predictors of mortality. In the LG only BMI and DVT were significant predictors of death. Presence of hypertension was not a significant predictor in either group. Multivariate analysis excluding hypertension found that age was predictive of mortality in the OG while BMI (P = .057) and gender (P = .065) approached statistical significance. Conversely, only BMI was predictive of mortality in the LG with age approaching significance (P

  6. Quantitative fetal fibronectin and cervical length to predict preterm birth in asymptomatic women with previous cervical surgery.

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    Vandermolen, Brooke I; Hezelgrave, Natasha L; Smout, Elizabeth M; Abbott, Danielle S; Seed, Paul T; Shennan, Andrew H

    2016-10-01

    Quantitative fetal fibronectin testing has demonstrated accuracy for prediction of spontaneous preterm birth in asymptomatic women with a history of preterm birth. Predictive accuracy in women with previous cervical surgery (a potentially different risk mechanism) is not known. We sought to compare the predictive accuracy of cervicovaginal fluid quantitative fetal fibronectin and cervical length testing in asymptomatic women with previous cervical surgery to that in women with 1 previous preterm birth. We conducted a prospective blinded secondary analysis of a larger observational study of cervicovaginal fluid quantitative fetal fibronectin concentration in asymptomatic women measured with a Hologic 10Q system (Hologic, Marlborough, MA). Prediction of spontaneous preterm birth (<30, <34, and <37 weeks) with cervicovaginal fluid quantitative fetal fibronectin concentration in primiparous women who had undergone at least 1 invasive cervical procedure (n = 473) was compared with prediction in women who had previous spontaneous preterm birth, preterm prelabor rupture of membranes, or late miscarriage (n = 821). Relationship with cervical length was explored. The rate of spontaneous preterm birth <34 weeks in the cervical surgery group was 3% compared with 9% in previous spontaneous preterm birth group. Receiver operating characteristic curves comparing quantitative fetal fibronectin for prediction at all 3 gestational end points were comparable between the cervical surgery and previous spontaneous preterm birth groups (34 weeks: area under the curve, 0.78 [95% confidence interval 0.64-0.93] vs 0.71 [95% confidence interval 0.64-0.78]; P = .39). Prediction of spontaneous preterm birth using cervical length compared with quantitative fetal fibronectin for prediction of preterm birth <34 weeks of gestation offered similar prediction (area under the curve, 0.88 [95% confidence interval 0.79-0.96] vs 0.77 [95% confidence interval 0.62-0.92], P = .12 in the cervical

  7. Successful Outcome of Triangle Tilt as Revision Surgery in a Pediatric Obstetric Brachial Plexus Patient with Multiple Previous Operations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahul K. Nath

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Obstetric brachial plexus injury (OBPI occurs during the process of labor and childbirth. OBPI has been reported to be associated with shoulder dystocia, macrosomia, and breech delivery. Its occurrence in uncomplicated delivery is possible as well. Case Presentation. The patient in the present report is a 6.5-year-old girl, who suffered a severe brachial plexus injury at birth and had many reconstructive surgical procedures at an outside brachial plexus center before presenting to us. Discussion. The traditional surgical treatments by other surgical groups were unsuccessful and therefore the patient came to our clinic for further treatment. She had triangle tilt surgery with us, as a salvage procedure. Conclusion. The OBPI patient in this study clearly showed noticeable clinical and functional improvements after triangle tilt surgical management. The posture of the arm at rest was greatly improved to a more normal position, and hand to mouth movement was improved as well. Triangle tilt surgery should be conducted as a first choice treatment for medial rotation contracture of the shoulder in OBPI patients.

  8. Can GSTM1 and GSTT1 polymorphisms predict clinical outcomes of chemotherapy in gastric and colorectal cancers? A result based on the previous reports

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu H

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Haixia Liu,1,* Wei Shi,2,* Lianli Zhao,3 Dianlu Dai,4 Jinghua Gao,5 Xiangjun Kong6 1Department of Ultrasound, 2Office of Medical Statistics, 3Human Resource Department, 4Department of Surgical Oncology, 5Department of Medical Oncology, 6Central Laboratory, Cangzhou Central Hospital, Yunhe District, Cangzhou, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this study and should be considered cofirst authors Background: Gastric and colorectal cancers remain the major causes of cancer-related death. Although chemotherapy improves the prognosis of the patients with gastrointestinal cancers, some patients do not benefit from therapy and are exposed to the adverse effects. The polymorphisms in genes including GSTM1 and GSTT1 have been explored to predict therapeutic efficacy; however, the results were inconsistent and inconclusive. Materials and methods: A systematic review and meta-analysis was performed by searching relevant studies about the association between the GSTM1 and GSTT1 polymorphisms and chemotherapy efficacy in gastrointestinal cancers in databases such as PubMed, EMBASE, Web of Science, Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure, and Wanfang database up to January 10, 2016. Subgroup analyses were also performed according to ethnicity, cancer type, evaluation criteria, study type, chemotherapy type, and age. Results: A total of 19 articles containing 3,217 cases were finally included. Overall analysis suggested that no significance was found between overall toxicity, neurotoxicity, neutropenia, gastrointestinal toxicity, tumor response, and progression-free survival, and the polymorphisms in GSTM1 and GSTT1, while GSTM1 polymorphism associated with overall survival (OS; hazard ratio =1.213, 95% confidence interval =1.060–1.388, P=0.005. Subgroup analyses suggested that neurotoxicity was associated with GSTM1 polymorphism in the Asian population, neutropenia was associated with GSTM1 polymorphism in palliative

  9. Low-dose aspirin-associated upper gastric and duodenal ulcers in Japanese patients with no previous history of peptic ulcers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawamura, Naohiko; Ito, Yoshitsugu; Sasaki, Makoto; Iida, Akihito; Mizuno, Mari; Ogasawara, Naotaka; Funaki, Yasushi; Kasugai, Kunio

    2013-11-12

    Long-term administration of low-dose aspirin (LDA) is associated with a greater risk of adverse events, including gastroduodenal ulcers. The purpose of this study was to identify the risk factors for and assess the role of medication use in the development of peptic ulcer disease in Japanese patients with no history of peptic ulcers. Consecutive outpatients receiving LDA (75 mg/day) who underwent esophagogastroduodenoscopy between January and December 2010 were enrolled. Clinical parameters, peptic ulcer history, concomitant drugs, the presence of Helicobacter pylori infection, reason for endoscopy, and endoscopic findings were analysed. Of 226 total patients, 14 (6.2%) were endoscopically diagnosed with peptic ulcer. Age, sex, current smoking status, current alcohol consumption, endoscopic gastric mucosal atrophy, and abdominal symptoms were not significantly associated with peptic ulcers. Diabetes mellitus was more frequent (42.9% vs. 16.5%; P = 0.024) in patients with peptic ulcers than in those without peptic ulcers. Using multiple logistic regression analysis, co-treatment with anticoagulants or proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) was significantly associated with increased and decreased risk for peptic ulcer, respectively (odds ratio [OR], 5.88; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.19 - 28.99; P = 0.03 and OR, 0.13; 95% CI, 0.02 - 0.73; P = 0.02, respectively). Co-treatment with additional antiplatelet agents, H2-receptor antagonists, angiotensin II Type 1 receptor blockers, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor, 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase inhibitor, or nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs was not associated with peptic ulcer development. The use of PPIs reduces the risk of developing gastric or duodenal ulcers in Japanese patients taking LDA without pre-existing gastroduodenal ulcers. However, this risk is significantly increased in both patients ingesting anticoagulants and patients with diabetes. These results may help identify

  10. Calcification of Arteries Supplying the Gastric Tube : A New Risk Factor for Anastomotic Leakage after Esophageal Surgery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Rossum, Peter S N; Haverkamp, Leonie; Verkooijen, Helena M; van Leeuwen, Maarten S; van Hillegersberg, Richard; Ruurda, Jelle P

    PURPOSE: To evaluate the association between the amount and location of calcifications of the supplying arteries of the gastric tube, as determined with a vascular calcification scoring system, and the occurrence of anastomotic leakage after esophagectomy with gastric tube reconstruction in patients

  11. Down-Regulation of Renal Gluconeogenesis in Type II Diabetic Rats Following Roux-en-Y Gastric Bypass Surgery: A Potential Mechanism in Hypoglycemic Effect

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    Yi Wen

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This study was initiated to evaluate the effects of Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery on renal gluconeogenesis in type 2 diabetic rats and its relationship with hormonal parameters. Methods: Diabetic rats were induced by intraperitoneal injection of streptozotocin (STZ; 35 mg/kg combined with a high-fat diet. They were then randomly divided into three groups: diabetes model group (DM group, n = 8, sham Roux-en-Y gastric bypass group (SRYGB group, n = 8, and Roux-en-Y gastric bypass group (RYGB group, n = 14. Another 8 normal rats comprised the normal control group (NC group, n = 8. Body weight, glucose, serum lipid, insulin, glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1, leptin, and adiponectin were measured pre- and postoperatively. Glucose-6-phosphatase (G6Pase, phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK, insulin receptor-α (IR-α, insulin receptor-β (IR-β, and glycogen synthase kinase 3 beta (Gsk3b were measured in renal cortex by using RT-PCR and Western immune-blot analyses on the 4th week after operation. Results: Following RYGB surgery, surgery-treated rats showed significantly improved oral glucose tolerance, dyslipidemia and insulin resistance as well as increased post-gavage insulin levels and serum circulating levels of GLP-1 and adiponectin. RT-PCR and Western immune-blot analyses showed PEPCK and G6Pase protein and mRNA to be significantly decreased in the renal cortex in the RYGB group (p Conclusion: Down-regulation of renal gluconeogenic enzymes might be a potential mechanism in hypoglycemia. An improved insulin signal pathway in the renal cortex and increased circulating adiponectin concentrations may contribute to the decline of renal gluconeogenesis following RYGB surgery.

  12. Multiple-hook fixation in revision spinal deformity surgery for patients with a previous multilevel fusion mass: technical note and preliminary outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ning; Wood, Kirkham B

    2017-03-01

    OBJECTIVE A previous multilevel fusion mass encountered during revision spinal deformity surgery may obscure anatomical landmarks, making instrumentation unworkable or incurring substantial blood loss and operative time. This study introduced a surgical technique of multiple-hook fixation for fixating previous multilevel fusion masses in revision spinal deformity surgeries and then evaluated its outcomes. METHODS Patients with a previous multilevel fusion mass who underwent revision corrective surgery down to the lumbosacral junction were retrospectively studied. Multiple hooks were used to fixate the fusion mass and linked to distal pedicle screws in the lumbosacral-pelvic complex. Radiological and clinical outcomes were evaluated. RESULTS The charts of 8 consecutive patients with spinal deformity were retrospectively reviewed (7 women, 1 man; mean age 56 years). The primary diagnoses included flat-back deformity (6 cases), thoracolumbar kyphoscoliosis (1 case), and lumbar spondylosis secondary to a previous scoliosis fusion (1 case). The mean follow-up duration was 30.1 months. Operations were performed at T3/4-ilium (4 cases), T7-ilium (1 case), T6-S1 (1 case), T12-S1 (1 case), and T9-L5 (1 case). Of 8 patients, 7 had sagittal imbalance preoperatively, and their mean C-7 plumb line improved from 10.8 ± 2.9 cm preoperatively to 5.3 ± 3.6 cm at final follow-up (p = 0.003). The mean lumbar lordosis of these patients at final follow-up was significantly greater than that preoperatively (35.2° ± 12.6° vs 16.8° ± 11.8°, respectively; p = 0.005). Two perioperative complications included osteotomy-related leg weakness in 1 patient and a stitch abscess in another. CONCLUSIONS The multiple-hook technique provides a viable alternative option for fixating a previous multilevel fusion mass in revision spinal deformity surgery.

  13. Extending the reach of stapled anastomosis with a prepared OrVil™ device in laparoscopic oesophageal and gastric cancer surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salih, Abdelmonim E A; Bass, Gary A; D'Cruz, Yvonne; Brennan, Robert P; Smolarek, Sebastian; Arumugasamy, Mayilone; Walsh, Thomas N

    2015-04-01

    The introduction of minimally invasive surgery and the use of laparoscopic techniques have significantly improved patient outcomes and have offered a new range of options for the restoration of intestinal continuity. Various reconstruction techniques have been described and various devices employed but none has been established as superior. This study evaluates our experience with, and modifications of, the orally inserted anvil (OrVil™). We conducted a prospective observational study on 72 consecutive patients who underwent OrVil™-assisted oesophago-gastric or oesophago-jejunal anastomosis between September 2010 and September 2013. We collected data including patient demographics, disease site, type of procedure, location of the anastomosis, involvement of resection margins and peri-operative complications. Seventy-two patients were included in the study. Patient ages ranged from 45 to 92 years (median ± SD = 69 ± 10 years). Total gastrectomy with Roux-en-Y anastomosis was the most-commonly performed procedure (n = 41; 57 %). R 0 resection was achieved in 67 patients (93 %). There were no Orvil™-related clinical leaks during the study period, and just two patients (2.8 %) demonstrated radiological evidence of leak, both of whom were managed conservatively. There were three in-hospital mortalities during the study period; these were unrelated to the anastomotic technique. Despite a steep learning curve, the OrVil™ device is safe and reliable. It also permits the creation of higher trans-hiatal anastomoses without resorting to thoracotomy in high-risk patients with cardia tumours. Certain shortcomings of the device, that had implications for patient safety, were identified and addressed by intra-operative modification during the study period. We commend the use of a prepared OrVil™ device, as a game changer, for upper gastrointestinal reconstruction.

  14. Safety and feasibility of laparoscopic sigmoid colon and rectal cancer surgery in patients with previous vertical abdominal laparotomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haksal, Mustafa; Ozdenkaya, Yasar; Atici, Ali Emre; Okkabaz, Nuri; Aksakal, Nihat; Erdemir, Ayhan; Civil, Osman; Oncel, Mustafa

    2015-09-01

    Current study aims to analyze the impact of previous vertical laparotomy on safety and feasibility of laparoscopic sigmoid colon and rectal cancer operations. All consecutive patients who underwent a laparoscopic resection for sigmoid colon or rectal cancer were included. These aspects were abstracted and compared within no laparotomy and previous vertical laparotomy groups: demographics, perioperative aspects, pathological features and survival. There were 252 patients in no laparotomy group, and 25 cases with previous vertical incisions including lower (n = 12, 48%), upper (n = 7, 28%), and lower&upper (n = 2, 8%) midline and paramedian (n = 4, 16%) laparotomies. Veress insufflation and open technique were used in 19 (76%) and 6 (24%) cases, respectively, during the insertion of the first trocar in previous laparotomy group. Patients in previous laparotomy group were significantly older (59.2 ± 13.4 vs. 66.2 ± 10.1, p = 0.01), but gender, ASA scores, tumor and technique related factors were similar within the groups, including operation time (200 [70-600] vs. 200 [130-390] min, p = 0.353), blood loss (250 [100-1500] vs. 250 [0-2200] ml, p = 0.46), additional trocar insertion (10 [4%] vs. 3 [12%], p = 0.101), conversion (20 [7.9%] vs. 4 [16%], p = 0.25), postoperative complication (59 [23.4%] vs. 4 [16%], p = 0.06) and 30-day mortality (7 [2.8%] vs. 1 [4%], p = 0.536) rates. Oncological outcomes regarding pathological features and 5-year survival rates (65% vs. 73.2%, p = 0.678) were not different. The presence of a previous laparotomy does not worsen the outcomes in patients undergoing laparoscopic removal of sigmoid or rectal cancer, thus laparoscopy may be considered to be safe and feasible in these cases. Copyright © 2015 IJS Publishing Group Limited. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Gastric bypass surgery is followed by lowered blood pressure and increased diuresis - long term results from the Swedish Obese Subjects (SOS study.

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    Peter Hallersund

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To compare two bariatric surgical principles with regard to effects on blood pressure and salt intake. BACKGROUND: In most patients bariatric surgery induces a sustained weight loss and a reduced cardiovascular risk profile but the long-term effect on blood pressure is uncertain. METHODS: Cohort study with data from the prospective, controlled Swedish Obese Subjects (SOS study involving 480 primary health care centres and 25 surgical departments in Sweden. Obese patients treated with non-surgical methods (Controls, n = 1636 and n = 1132 at 2 y and 10 y follow up, respectively were compared to patients treated with gastric bypass (GBP, n = 245 and n = 277, respectively or purely restrictive procedures (vertical banded gastroplasty or gastric banding; VBG/B, n = 1534 and n = 1064, respectively. RESULTS: At long-term follow-up (median 10 y GBP was associated with lowered systolic (mean: -5.1 mm Hg and diastolic pressure (-5.6 mmHg differing significantly from both VBG/B (-1.5 and -2.1 mmHg, respectively; p<0.001 and Controls (+1.2 and -3.8 mmHg, respectively; p<0.01. Diurnal urinary output was +100 ml (P<0.05 and +170 ml (P<0.001 higher in GBP subjects than in weight-loss matched VBG/B subjects at the 2 y and 10 y follow-ups, respectively. Urinary output was linearly associated with blood pressure only after GBP and these patients consumed approximately 1 g salt per day more at the follow-ups than did VBG/B (P<0.01. CONCLUSIONS: The purely restrictive techniques VBG/B exerted a transient blood pressure lowering effect, whereas gastric bypass was associated with a sustained blood pressure reduction and an increased diuresis. The daily salt consumption was higher after gastric bypass than after restrictive bariatric surgery.

  16. Robot-assisted surgery for gastric carcinoma: Five years follow-up and beyond: A single western center experience and long-term oncological outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coratti, A; Fernandes, E; Lombardi, A; Di Marino, M; Annecchiarico, M; Felicioni, L; Giulianotti, P C

    2015-08-01

    Robot-assisted surgery for the treatment of gastric cancer is considered to be safe and feasible with early post-operative outcomes comparable to open and laparoscopic series. However, data regarding long-term oncological outcomes are lacking. Aim of this study is to evaluate long-term oncological outcomes of a cohort of gastric cancer patients treated surgically with the robot-assisted approach. A prospectively collected database of robot-assisted gastrectomies performed for gastric cancer at the 'Misericordia Hospital' between September 2001 and October 2011 was retrospectively analysed. Data regarding surgical procedures, early postoperative course, and long-term follow-up were analysed. The study included 98 consecutive robot-assisted gastrectomies. Fifty-nine distal gastrectomies, 38 total gastrectomies, and 1 proximal gastrectomy. Open conversion occurred in seven patients (7.1%) due to locally advanced disease. Postoperative morbidity and mortality were 12.2% and 4.1% respectively. Post-operative staging showed 46 patients (46.9%) with stage I disease, 25 patients (25.5%) with stage II, 26 (26.5%) with stage III and 1 (1.02%) with stage IV. The mean follow-up was 46.9 months. Cumulative 5-year overall survival (OS) was 73.3% (95% CI: 62.2-84.4). Five-year survival by stage subgroups was 100% for patients with stage IA, 84.6% for stage IB, 76.9% for stage II, and 21.5% for stage III. The only patient in stage IV of this series died eight months after surgery. Robot-assisted gastrectomy for the treatment of gastric cancer is safe and feasible. It provides long-term outcomes comparable to most open and laparoscopic series. Further studies are necessary to better define its indication. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Self-nanoemulsifying drug delivery systems ameliorate the oral delivery of silymarin in rats with Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery

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    Chen CH

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Chun-Han Chen,1,2 Cheng-Chih Chang,1 Tsung-Hsien Shih,2 Ibrahim A Aljuffali,3 Ta-Sen Yeh,4,5 Jia-You Fang6–8 1Division of General Surgery, Department of Surgery, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Chiayi, 2Graduate Institute of Clinical Medical Sciences, College of Medicine, Chang Gung University, Kweishan, Taoyuan, Taiwan; 3Department of Pharmaceutics, College of Pharmacy, King Saud University, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia; 4Department of Surgery, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, 5School of Medicine, College of Medicine, 6Pharmaceutics Laboratory, Graduate Institute of Natural Products, 7Chinese Herbal Medicine Research Team, Healthy Aging Research Center, Chang Gung University, 8Research Center for Industry of Human Ecology, Chang Gung University of Science and Technology, Kweishan, Taoyuan, Taiwan Abstract: Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB is a popular surgery to reduce the body weight of obese patients. Although food intake is restricted by RYGB, drug absorption is also decreased. The purpose of this study was to develop novel self-nanoemulsifying drug delivery systems (SNEDDS for enhancing the oral delivery of silymarin, which has poor water solubility. The SNEDDS were characterized by size, zeta potential, droplet number, and morphology. A technique of RYGB was performed in Sprague-Dawley rats. SNEDDS were administered at a silymarin dose of 600 mg/kg in normal and RYGB rats for comparison with silymarin aqueous suspension and polyethylene glycol (PEG 400 solution. Plasma silibinin, the main active ingredient in silymarin, was chosen for estimating the pharmacokinetic parameters. SNEDDS diluted in simulated gastric fluid exhibited a droplet size of 190 nm with a spherical shape. The nanocarriers promoted silibinin availability via oral ingestion in RYGB rats by 2.5-fold and 1.5-fold compared to the suspension and PEG 400 solution, respectively. A significant double-peak concentration of silibinin was detected for RYGB rats receiving SNEDDS. Fluorescence

  18. Roux-en Y gastric bypass surgery induces genome-wide promoter-specific changes in DNA methylation in whole blood of obese patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emil K Nilsson

    Full Text Available DNA methylation has been proposed to play a critical role in many cellular and biological processes.To examine the influence of Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB surgery on genome-wide promoter-specific DNA methylation in obese patients. Promoters are involved in the initiation and regulation of gene transcription.Promoter-specific DNA methylation in whole blood was measured in 11 obese patients (presurgery BMI >35 kg/m(2, 4 females, both before and 6 months after RYGB surgery, as well as once only in a control group of 16 normal-weight men. In addition, body weight and fasting plasma glucose were measured after an overnight fast.The mean genome-wide distance between promoter-specific DNA methylation of obese patients at six months after RYGB surgery and controls was shorter, as compared to that at baseline (p<0.001. Moreover, postsurgically, the DNA methylation of 51 promoters was significantly different from corresponding values that had been measured at baseline (28 upregulated and 23 downregulated, P<0.05 for all promoters, Bonferroni corrected. Among these promoters, an enrichment for genes involved in metabolic processes was found (n = 36, P<0.05. In addition, the mean DNA methylation of these 51 promoters was more similar after surgery to that of controls, than it had been at baseline (P<0.0001. When controlling for the RYGB surgery-induced drop in weight (-24% of respective baseline value and fasting plasma glucose concentration (-16% of respective baseline value, the DNA methylation of only one out of 51 promoters (~2% remained significantly different between the pre-and postsurgery time points.Epigenetic modifications are proposed to play an important role in the development of and predisposition to metabolic diseases, including type II diabetes and obesity. Thus, our findings may form the basis for further investigations to unravel the molecular effects of gastric bypass surgery.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01730742.

  19. Treatment of osteochondral defects of the talus with a metal resurfacing inlay implant after failed previous surgery: a prospective study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Bergen, C. J. A.; van Eekeren, I. C. M.; Reilingh, M. L.; Sierevelt, I. N.; van Dijk, C. N.

    2013-01-01

    We have evaluated the clinical effectiveness of a metal resurfacing inlay implant for osteochondral defects of the medial talar dome after failed previous surgical treatment. We prospectively studied 20 consecutive patients with a mean age of 38 years (20 to 60), for a mean of three years (2 to 5)

  20. [Gastric tuberculosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, E; Oliveira, A; Costa, A; Sa, L; Vieira, A; Oliveira, A

    1994-12-01

    A 37 year old woman with duodenal ulcer not responsive to medical treatment was operated. Antrectomy, truncal vagotomy and Bilroth II gastrojejunostomy were performed. The histopathology revealed epithelioid cell granulomas with multinucleated cells and central ceseation, in the gastric side of the pylorus and in three isolated lymph nodes. With Ziehl-Neelsen staining there were multiple acid-fast bacilli. There was no evidence or previous history, personal or familial, or tuberculosis in an other localization. Epidemiology, pathology, diagnosis, and treatment of gastric tuberculosis are discussed according to the literature.

  1. The effect of bevacizumab for anterior segment neovascularization after silicone oil removal in eyes with previous vitreoretinal surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batman, C; Ozdamar, Y

    2010-07-01

    To report the outcomes of the use of intracameral bevacizumab for iris neovascularization occurring after silicone oil (SO) removal in eyes undergoing vitreoretinal surgery (VRS). This study included 12 eyes that had iris neovascularization after SO removal. The clinical outcomes of 12 eyes after intravitreal bevacizumab injection were reviewed. There were eight men and four women with an average age of 41.58+/-12.68 years. All eyes had VRS for various vitreoretinal diseases. After the mean follow-up period of 9.7+/-5.3 months, SO removal was performed. Then, the patients were followed for more than 2 months and detailed retinal examinations and intraocular pressure (IOP) were normal during this period, but rubeosis iridis (RI) developed. RI was treated with 1 dose of 1.25 mg bevacizumab into the anterior chamber. After a mean follow-up period of 4.8+/-2.2 months, the regression of iris neovacularization was detected and IOP was below 21 mmHg in all eyes. Anterior segment neovascularization (ASNV) may develop through various mechanisms in patients with VRS after SO removal, and anterior chamber injection of bevacizumab may lead to regression of ASNV.

  2. Association of Bariatric Surgery Using Laparoscopic Banding, Roux-en-Y Gastric Bypass, or Laparoscopic Sleeve Gastrectomy vs Usual Care Obesity Management With All-Cause Mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reges, Orna; Greenland, Philip; Dicker, Dror; Leibowitz, Morton; Hoshen, Moshe; Gofer, Ilan; Rasmussen-Torvik, Laura J; Balicer, Ran D

    2018-01-16

    Bariatric surgery is an effective and safe approach for weight loss and short-term improvement in metabolic disorders such as diabetes. However, studies have been limited in most settings by lack of a nonsurgical group, losses to follow-up, missing data, and small sample sizes in clinical trials and observational studies. To assess the association of 3 common types of bariatric surgery compared with nonsurgical treatment with mortality and other clinical outcomes among obese patients. Retrospective cohort study in a large Israeli integrated health fund covering 54% of Israeli citizens with less than 1% turnover of members annually. Obese adult patients who underwent bariatric surgery between January 1, 2005, and December 31, 2014, were selected and compared with obese nonsurgical patients matched on age, sex, body mass index (BMI), and diabetes, with a final follow-up date of December 31, 2015. A total of 33 540 patients were included in this study. Bariatric surgery (laparoscopic banding, Roux-en-Y gastric bypass, or laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy) or usual care obesity management only (provided by a primary care physician and which may include dietary counseling and behavior modification). The primary outcome, all-cause mortality, matched and adjusted for BMI prior to surgery, age, sex, socioeconomic status, diabetes, hyperlipidemia, hypertension, cardiovascular disease, and smoking. The study population included 8385 patients who underwent bariatric surgery (median age, 46 [IQR, 37-54] years; 5490 [65.5%] women; baseline median BMI, 40.6 [IQR, 38.5-43.7]; laparoscopic banding [n = 3635], gastric bypass [n = 1388], laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy [n = 3362], and 25 155 nonsurgical matched patients (median age, 46 [IQR, 37-54] years; 16 470 [65.5%] women; baseline median BMI, 40.5 [IQR, 37.0-43.5]). The availability of follow-up data was 100% for all-cause mortality. There were 105 deaths (1.3%) among surgical patients during a median follow

  3. CT findings in Petersen’s hernia as a complication of bariatric surgery with a Roux-en-Y gastric bypass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauricio Álvares Salum Ximenes

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To describe tomographic findings in Petersen’s herniaassociated with laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery.Methods: Two radiologists, experts in abdominal radiology,independently and retrospectively reviewed four cases of Petersen’shernia confirmed surgically in three patients, between March 2007and July 2008, who had undergone laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastricbypass surgery with an antecolic anastomosis for treating morbidobesity. The main imaging findings were the presence and locationof abdominal distention, the herniated intestinal loop segment, thepresence of mesenteric vessel rotation and haziness of mesentericfat, the position of the Treitz angle ligament and the course of theileum. Results: In all cases, abdominal distention was located inthe upper abdomen; the herniated jejunal loop was located abovethe gastric level; mesenteric vessel rotation was associated withmesenteric fat haziness; the middle/distal ileum descended from theleft hypochondrium; and the Treiz angle was displaced anteriorly andto the right. Both examiners fully agreed with the analysis of findings.Conclusions: The association of computed tomography findingsdescribed in patients with a history of bariatric surgery is a strongpredictor of Petersen’s hernia.

  4. Improvement in cardiovascular risk in women after bariatric surgery as measured by carotid intima-media thickness: comparison of sleeve gastrectomy versus gastric bypass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Martin, Jesús M; Aracil, Enrique; Galindo, Julio; Escobar-Morreale, Héctor F; Balsa, José A; Botella-Carretero, José I

    2017-05-01

    Bariatric surgery may diminish cardiovascular risk (CVR) and its associated mortality. However, studies that compare these effects with different techniques are scarce. To evaluate the changes in CVR as estimated by carotid intima-media thickness (IMT) after obesity surgery in women with high CVR as defined by the presence of metabolic syndrome. Academic hospital. We studied 40 severely obese women, of whom 20 received laparoscopic Roux en Y gastric bypass (RYGB) and 20 received sleeve gastrectomy (SG). Twenty control women matched for age and cardiovascular risk were also included. Patients and controls were evaluated at baseline and 1 year after surgery or conventional treatment with diet and exercise, respectively. Only 18 of the 20 women in the control group were available for analysis after 1 year. None of the women who had bariatric surgery was lost to follow-up. Mean carotid IMT decreased 1 year after surgery irrespective of the surgical technique used, whereas no changes were observed in the control women who had conventional therapy (Wilks´ λ = .802, P = .002 for the interaction, P = .011 for RYGB versus controls, P = .002 for SG versus controls, P = .349 for RYGB versus SG). Both RYGB and SG decrease CVR as measured by carotid IMT in obese women. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Bariatric Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Long-term changes in leptin, chemerin and ghrelin levels following different bariatric surgery procedures: Roux-en-Y gastric bypass and sleeve gastrectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terra, Ximena; Auguet, Teresa; Guiu-Jurado, Esther; Berlanga, Alba; Orellana-Gavaldà, Josep Maria; Hernández, Mercè; Sabench, Fàtima; Porras, Jose Antonio; Llutart, Jordi; Martinez, Salomé; Aguilar, Carmen; Del Castillo, Daniel; Richart, Cristóbal

    2013-11-01

    Different studies have evaluated changes in adipo/cytokine levels after bariatric surgery and have given conflicting results. The adipo/cytokines, leptin and chemerin, and the orexigenic hormone, ghrelin, have been shown to play a role in the regulation of metabolism and appetite. The aims of our study were to test the levels of these molecules after bariatric surgery and to compare the results between Roux-en-Y gastric bypass and laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy. We analysed circulating levels of chemerin, ghrelin and leptin in 30 morbidly obese women (body mass index of >40 kg/m2). Subjects were studied at three time points: baseline (before the surgery started), and after 6 and 12 months. After surgery, chemerin (baseline, 95.03 ± 23.79; after 12 months, 76.80 ± 21.51; p = 0.034) and leptin levels (baseline, 248.17 ± 89.16; after 12 months, 63.85 ± 33.48; p surgery in terms of weight reduction, general metabolic state or adipo/cytokine levels after surgery. Our study demonstrates a marked decrease in fasting leptin and chemerin levels, and an increase in ghrelin levels, after bariatric surgery-induced weight loss, independently of the type of surgery performed. Further studies are needed on the interrelation between the changes in the circulating levels of these molecules and the efficacy of the bariatric surgery procedures to induce the beneficial metabolic changes and to sustain body weight loss.

  6. Robot-assisted radical prostatectomy in the setting of previous abdominal surgery: Perioperative results, oncological and functional outcomes, and complications in a single surgeon's series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Pierro, Giovanni Battista; Grande, Pietro; Mordasini, Livio; Danuser, Hansjörg; Mattei, Agostino

    2016-12-01

    Data on safety and efficacy of robot-assisted radical prostatectomy (RARP) after previous abdominal surgery are scarce. Hence, we assessed perioperative, oncological and functional outcomes, and complications of RARP in patients with previous abdominal surgery after 1-year minimum follow-up. Prospectively collected data from 339 consecutive patients undergoing transperitoneal RARP by a single surgeon (AM) between November 2008 and May 2014 were analysed. Complications were classified according to Modified Clavien System. Biochemical recurrence (BCR) was defined as two consecutive PSA values ≥ 0.2 ng/ml. Functional outcomes were assessed using validated, self-administered questionnaires. In particular, only patients undergoing nerve-sparing RARP with no erectile dysfunction (baseline IIEF-5 score >21) and no use of phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitors preoperatively who were interested in erections and required no adjuvant therapy (radiation, orchiectomy and androgen-deprivation therapy) were evaluated concerning potency recovery. Patients without and with previous abdominal surgery were compared using Mann-Whitney and chi-square tests (or Fisher exact test). On 339 patients, 247 (71.6%) had not undergone previous abdominal surgery (Group 1) and 92 (28.4%) were pre-operated (Group 2). There were no statistically significant differences between Groups 1 and 2 regarding mean operative time (260 vs. 257 min; p = 0.597), median number of resected nodes (16 vs. 17; p = 0.484), mean length of stay (7.2 vs. 7.1 d; p = 0.151), positive surgical margin (12.5% vs. 16.3%; p = 0.233) and complication rates (26.7% vs. 31.5%; p = 0.187). Median (IQR) follow-up was 36 (12-48) months. For Groups 1 and 2, BCR-free survival rates were 78.5% and 79.8% (p = 0.467); continence rates were 97.9% and 100% (p = 0.329), whereas a potency recovery was achieved in 69.5% and 62.2% of patients (p = 0.460), respectively. Transperitoneal RARP is a safe and efficient treatment for

  7. Gastric Bypass Surgery Produces a Durable Reduction in Cardiovascular Disease Risk Factors and Reduces the Long-Term Risks of Congestive Heart Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benotti, Peter N; Wood, G Craig; Carey, David J; Mehra, Vishal C; Mirshahi, Tooraj; Lent, Michelle R; Petrick, Anthony T; Still, Christopher; Gerhard, Glenn S; Hirsch, Annemarie G

    2017-05-23

    Obesity and its association with reduced life expectancy are well established, with cardiovascular disease as one of the major causes of fatality. Metabolic surgery is a powerful intervention for severe obesity, resulting in improvement in comorbid diseases and in cardiovascular risk factors. This study investigates the relationship between metabolic surgery and long-term cardiovascular events. A cohort of Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery (RYGB) patients was tightly matched by age, body mass index, sex, Framingham Risk Score, smoking history, use of antihypertension medication, diabetes mellitus status, and calendar year with a concurrent cohort of nonoperated control patients. The primary study end points of major cardiovascular events (myocardial infarction, stroke, and congestive heart failure) were evaluated using Cox regression. Secondary end points of longitudinal cardiovascular risk factors were evaluated using repeated-measures regression. The RYGB and matched controls (N=1724 in each cohort) were followed for up to 12 years after surgery (overall median of 6.3 years). Kaplan-Meier analysis revealed a statistically significant reduction in incident major composite cardiovascular events ( P =0.017) and congestive heart failure (0.0077) for the RYGB cohort. Adjusted Cox regression models confirmed the reductions in severe composite cardiovascular events in the RYGB cohort (hazard ratio=0.58, 95% CI=0.42-0.82). Improvements of cardiovascular risk factors (eg, 10-year cardiovascular risk score, total cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein, systolic blood pressure, and diabetes mellitus) were observed within the RYGB cohort after surgery. Gastric bypass is associated with a reduced risk of major cardiovascular events and the development of congestive heart failure. © 2017 The Authors and Geisinger Clinic. Published on behalf of the American Heart Association, Inc., by Wiley.

  8. Accuracy of preoperative real-time dynamic transvaginal ultrasound sliding sign in prediction of pelvic adhesions in women with previous abdominopelvic surgery: prospective, multicenter, double-blind study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayachi, A; Bouchahda, R; Derouich, S; Mkaouer, L; Kehila, M; Abouda, H; Channoufi, B; Bouyahia, M; Braham, M; Zhioua, F; Bouchahda, H; Mourali, M

    2018-02-01

    To investigate the role of the transvaginal sonographic (TVS) sliding sign in predicting pelvic adhesions in women with previous abdominopelvic surgery. This was a multicenter, prospective, interventional, double-blind study of patients with a history of abdominopelvic surgery who were undergoing laparoscopy or laparotomy during the 6-month period from March to August 2016 in one of three academic obstetrics and gynecology departments. Prior to surgery, patients were examined by TVS to assess the vesicouterine pouch, uterus, ovaries and pouch of Douglas, using the TVS pelvic sliding sign. Ultrasound findings and medical and surgical data were recorded. We assessed the accuracy of the preoperative TVS sliding sign in the prediction of pelvic adhesions overall and in each compartment separately. During the study period, complete TVS sliding sign and laparoscopic or laparotomic data were available for 107 women. Their mean age was 44.0 (95% CI, 41.6-46.4; range, 20-79) years. Their mean parity was 2.0 (95% CI, 1.7-2.3; range, 0-9) and the mean number of previous abdominal surgical procedures per patient was 1.3 (95% CI, 1.2-1.5; range, 1-4). Adhesions were noted in 27/107 (25.2%) patients. The TVS sliding sign had a sensitivity of 96.3% and specificity of 92.6% in predicting pelvic adhesions. There was a significant relationship between adhesions in each compartment and the TVS sliding sign (P sign is an effective means to detect preoperatively pelvic adhesions in patients with previous abdominopelvic surgery. Use of such a non-invasive and well-tolerated technique could help in the planning of laparoscopy or laparotomy and counseling of these patients. Copyright © 2017 ISUOG. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. Copyright © 2017 ISUOG. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. The effects of convenient vagorrhaphy on the early recovery of gastric secretion and emptying: an experimental study on function-preserving gastric cancer surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kodama, M; Arakawa, A; Ito, M; Koyama, K

    1997-01-01

    An experimental study was conducted using a canine model to elucidate whether the once transected vagal nerve can be conveniently anastomosed, and to determine when and to what degree the vagorrhaphy retains its functions. In the vagorrhaphy group (n = 5), the anterior and posterior vagal trunks were transected 1.5 cm above the diaphragma and the cut ends were anastomosed using two stitches of 8-0 nylon and fibria glue adhesive without microsurgery. In the nonvagorrhaphy group (n = 5), a 1-cm length of the nerve segment was resected to prevent reinnervation. A microscopic study of the anastomotic site performed on postoperative day (POD) 10 indicated the intervention of nerve fibers between the cut ends. No differences were found in the gastric secretory function, as assessed by the Hollander insulin test, or in the emptying function, as assessed by the acetaminophen test, between the vagorrhaphy group and the control preoperative values. However, both of these functions were superior in the vagorrhaphy group compared to the nonvagorrhaphy group. These results indicate that the technique of convenient vagal anastomosis could be put to practical use in gastric cancer operations to avoid postvagotomy syndrome.

  10. Assessment of gastric motility using meal labeled with technetium-99m sulfur colloid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matolo, N.M.; Stadalnik, R.C.

    1983-12-01

    During a 2 year period, 83 patients with gastric motility problems were evaluated using radionuclide imaging. The patients presented with epigastric distress, postprandial fullness, pain, nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea; signs and symptoms suggestive of either gastroparesis or gastric outlet obstruction. Upper gastrointestinal series or endoscopy, or both, demonstrated no mechanical obstruction. After oral administration of a 300 g meal labeled with 600 muCi of technetium-99m sulfur colloid, a gastric emptying study consisting of serial images and data acquisition was performed. Of the patients studied, 52 had had peptic ulcer surgery, 17 were suspected of having gastroesophageal reflux, 8 were diabetic and suspected of having visceral enteropathy, and 6 had a history of irritable bowel syndrome. The normal mean gastric half emptying time was 77 +/- 16 minutes. Of the patients who had had gastric surgery, 90.4 percent had abnormal emptying: 69.2 percent had delayed gastric emptying and 21.2 percent had rapid gastric emptying time; 9.6 percent had normal emptying time. Of the gastroesophageal reflux group, all but two had normal gastric emptying time; 65 percent demonstrated gastroesophageal reflux within 15 minutes. Two of the patients with irritable bowel syndrome had prolonged emptying; the rest had normal emptying. All diabetic patients with gastroparesis had prolonged gastric emptying time, and all responded favorably to metoclopramide. Of the patients who previously had peptic ulcer surgery and had prolonged emptying time, 72 percent also responded favorably to metoclopramide. We conclude that radionuclide gastric imaging is a useful diagnostic test for the measurement of gastric emptying in patients with a variety of gastrointestinal motility disorders and may be helpful in assessing medical therapy and selecting those who may be candidates for surgery.

  11. Assessment of gastric motility using meal labeled with technetium-99m sulfur colloid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matolo, N.M.; Stadalnik, R.C.

    1983-01-01

    During a 2 year period, 83 patients with gastric motility problems were evaluated using radionuclide imaging. The patients presented with epigastric distress, postprandial fullness, pain, nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea; signs and symptoms suggestive of either gastroparesis or gastric outlet obstruction. Upper gastrointestinal series or endoscopy, or both, demonstrated no mechanical obstruction. After oral administration of a 300 g meal labeled with 600 muCi of technetium-99m sulfur colloid, a gastric emptying study consisting of serial images and data acquisition was performed. Of the patients studied, 52 had had peptic ulcer surgery, 17 were suspected of having gastroesophageal reflux, 8 were diabetic and suspected of having visceral enteropathy, and 6 had a history of irritable bowel syndrome. The normal mean gastric half emptying time was 77 +/- 16 minutes. Of the patients who had had gastric surgery, 90.4 percent had abnormal emptying: 69.2 percent had delayed gastric emptying and 21.2 percent had rapid gastric emptying time; 9.6 percent had normal emptying time. Of the gastroesophageal reflux group, all but two had normal gastric emptying time; 65 percent demonstrated gastroesophageal reflux within 15 minutes. Two of the patients with irritable bowel syndrome had prolonged emptying; the rest had normal emptying. All diabetic patients with gastroparesis had prolonged gastric emptying time, and all responded favorably to metoclopramide. Of the patients who previously had peptic ulcer surgery and had prolonged emptying time, 72 percent also responded favorably to metoclopramide. We conclude that radionuclide gastric imaging is a useful diagnostic test for the measurement of gastric emptying in patients with a variety of gastrointestinal motility disorders and may be helpful in assessing medical therapy and selecting those who may be candidates for surgery

  12. Gastric Bypass Surgery Recruits a Gut PPAR-α-Striatal D1R Pathway to Reduce Fat Appetite in Obese Rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hankir, Mohammed K; Seyfried, Florian; Hintschich, Constantin A

    2017-01-01

    Bariatric surgery remains the single most effective long-term treatment modality for morbid obesity, achieved mainly by lowering caloric intake through as yet ill-defined mechanisms. Here we show in rats that Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB)-like rerouting of ingested fat mobilizes lower small...... intestine production of the fat-satiety molecule oleoylethanolamide (OEA). This was associated with vagus nerve-driven increases in dorsal striatal dopamine release. We also demonstrate that RYGB upregulates striatal dopamine 1 receptor (D1R) expression specifically under high-fat diet feeding conditions....... Mechanistically, interfering with local OEA, vagal, and dorsal striatal D1R signaling negated the beneficial effects of RYGB on fat intake and preferences. These findings delineate a molecular/systems pathway through which bariatric surgery improves feeding behavior and may aid in the development of novel weight...

  13. A controlled clinical study of serosa-invasive gastric carcinoma patients who underwent surgery plus intraperitoneal hyperthermo-chemo-perfusion (IHCP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, J Y; Bae, H S

    2001-01-01

    Despite recent advances in the treatment of advanced gastric carcinomas, no satisfactory outcomes are available because of micrometastases and free-floating carcinoma cells already existing in the peritoneal cavity. From 1990, we started using intraperitoneal hyperthermo-chemo-perfusion (IHCP) to prevent and to treat peritoneal metastasis after surgical resection of stomach cancer. We analyzed 103 serosa-invasive gastric carcinoma patients who underwent surgical resection between 1990 and 1995. Fifty-two patients who received surgery plus IHCP were compared with 51 patients who underwent surgery only, as controls. IHCP was administered for 2 h with an automatic IHCP device (closed-circuit system) just after surgical resection, with the patient under hypothermic general anesthesia (32.4 degrees C-34.0 degrees C). As perfusate, we used 1.5% peritoneal dialysis solution mixed with 10 micrograms/ml of mitomycin-C (MMC), warmed at an inflow temperature of over 44 degrees C. The overall 5-year survival rate (5-YSR) of the 103 patients was 29.97%. The 5-YSR was higher in the IHCP group than in the control group, at 32.7% and 27.1%, respectively, but this difference was not significant. However, in the 65 serosa-invasive gastric carcinoma patients (excluding those in stage IV) the 5-YSR was significantly higher (P = 0.0379) in the IHCP group than in the control group, at 58.6% and 44.4%, respectively. On multivariate analysis of all 103 patients, depth of tumor invasion and lymph node metastasis were significant factors for survival, whereas significant factors on univariate analysis, such as combined operation, distant metastasis, and peritoneal metastasis, were not significant. The most common recurrence patterns were loco-regional in the IHCP group and peritoneal in the control group. Complete cytoreductive surgery plus IHCP is effective to prevent and to treat peritoneal metastasis, and it should lead to long-term survival for serosa-invasive gastric carcinoma patients

  14. Costs of bariatric surgery in a randomised control trial (RCT) comparing Roux en Y gastric bypass vs sleeve gastrectomy in morbidly obese diabetic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gounder, Siva T; Wijayanayaka, Delendra Rasith; Murphy, Rinki; Armstrong, Delwyn; Cutfield, Richard G; Kim, David Dw; Clarke, Michael Graham; Evennett, Nicholas J; Humphreys, Martyn Lee; Robinson, Steven John; Booth, Michael Wc

    2016-10-14

    To provide a longitudinal analysis of the direct healthcare costs of providing laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy (LSG) and laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (LRYGB) surgery service in the context of a randomised control trial (RCT) of obese patients with type 2 diabetes in Waitemata District Health Board, Auckland, New Zealand. The Waitemata District Health Board costing system was used to calculate costs in New Zealand Dollars (NZD) associated with all pre- and post-operative hospital clinic visits, peri-operative care, hospitalisations and medication costs up to one year after bariatric surgery. Healthcare costs of medications, laboratory investigations and hospital clinic visits for one year prior to enrolment into the RCT were also calculated. One hundred and fourteen patients were randomised to undergo laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy (LSG, n=58) or laparoscopic Roux en Y gastric bypass (LRYGB, n=56). Total costs one year pre-enrolment was $203,926 for all patients (mean $1,789 per patient). Total cost of surgery was $1,208,005 (mean $9,131 per LSG patient and mean $12,456 per LRYGB patient). Total cost one year post-operatively was $542,656 (mean $4,760 per patient). The total medication cost reduced from $118,993.72(mean $1,044 per patient) to $31,304.93 (mean $274.60 per patient), psurgery than in the year before, although prescription costs were lower post-operatively. There was no significant difference in reduction in prescription cost by surgical procedure at 12 months. However, the LRYGB surgery was more expensive than LSG, primarily because of the longer operative time required.

  15. Gastric bypass surgery - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... on it. DO NOT soak in a bathtub, swimming pool, or hot tub until your provider says ... American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association Task Force on Practice Guidelines and The Obesity Society. J ...

  16. Laparoscopic Conversion of Gastric Bypass Complication to Sleeve Gastrectomy: Technique and Early Results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chung-Yen; Lee, Wei-Jei; Lee, Hui-Ming; Chen, Jung-Chien; Ser, Kong-Han; Lee, Yi-Chih; Chen, Shu-Chun

    2016-09-01

    Laparoscopic gastric bypass is a commonly performed bariatric surgery for the treatment of morbid obesity. Revision surgery for patients who have gastric bypass complications is a challenge for bariatric surgeon. Our aim is to present the early results of the conversions of gastric bypass complications to sleeve gastrectomies. From January 2001 to April 2015, 49 of 2382 gastric bypasses underwent revisional surgery to convert gastric bypasses to sleeve gastrectomies. The demographic data, surgical parameters, and outcomes were studied. The mean age of the study group was 35.0 years (range 20 to 55), and the average body mass index (BMI) prior to the reoperation was 25.3 kg/m(2). Seven patients had previous laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypasses (LRYGBs), and 42 had laparoscopic single anastomosis (mini-) gastric bypasses (LSAGBs). The main reasons for the revisions were malnutrition (58 %), weight regain (10 %), intolerance (18 %), and others (14 %). The revisional surgeries had longer operative times, greater blood loss, and longer flatus passage times than the primary gastric bypass surgeries. Four patients (8.1 %) developed major complications during revisional surgery, including three (6.1 %) cases of leakage and one (2.0 %) case of internal bleeding. No mortality was noted. After conversion to sleeve gastrectomy, the body weights of the patients remained stable, and all patients improved in terms of malnutrition, including anemia, hypoalbuminemia, and secondary hyperparathyroidism. Conversion to sleeve gastrectomy is an effective and safe option for patients with gastric bypass complications. The conversions to sleeve gastrectomy resulted in significant improvements in malnutrition and maintained weight loss at the early follow-ups.

  17. The bariatric surgery and weight losing: a meta-analysis in the long- and very long-term effects of laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding, laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass and laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy on weight loss in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golzarand, Mahdieh; Toolabi, Karamollah; Farid, Roya

    2017-11-01

    Several studies have been investigated to find the long-term effect of bariatric surgery on weight loss; nevertheless, a meta-analysis can detailedly demonstrate the effect of bariatric surgery on weight in morbidly obese patients. This study aimed to assess the long- and very long-term effects of laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding (LAGB), laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (LRYGB), and laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy (LSG) on weight loss in adults. An electronic search using PubMed, Scopus, and Google scholar databases was performed for all English-language articles up to May 15, 2016 with no publication date restriction. Outcome was long-term (≥5-10 years) and very long-term (≥10 years) weight reduction that reported as the mean %EWL and changes in BMI from baseline. Eighty articles with 87 arms were included in this meta-analysis. The excess weight loss percentage (%EWL) was 47.94% and 47.43% after LAGB at ≥5 and ≥10 years, respectively. After LRYGB the %EWL was 62.58% at ≥5 years and 63.52% at ≥10 years. It was 53.25% at ≥5 years after LSG. Results of subgroup analyses have indicated that LRYGB leads to higher %EWL in America and Asia compared with Europe. Meta-regression analyses have shown that there is no significant association between %EWL and baseline age, BMI and length of follow-up after three procedures. However, there is a positive association between gender and %EWL after LRYGB (β = 1.24). No publication bias was found. These findings suggest that LRYGB is an effective procedure in morbidly obese patients that leads to sustainable weight loss over the long- and very long-term periods in compared with LAGB and LSG.

  18. A meta-analysis of 2-year effect after surgery: laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass versus laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy for morbid obesity and diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chengda; Yuan, Yuan; Qiu, Cuiqiong; Zhang, Weidong

    2014-09-01

    Literature search was performed for bariatric surgery from inception to September 2013, in which the effects of laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (LRYGB) and laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy (LSG) on body mass index (BMI), percentage of excess weight loss (EWL%), and diabetes mellitus (DM) were compared 2 years post-surgery. A total of 9,756 cases of bariatric surgery from 16 studies were analyzed. Patients receiving LRYGB had significantly lower BMI and higher EWL% compared with those receiving LSG (BMI mean difference (MD) = -1.38, 95% confidence interval (CI) = -1.72 to -1.03; EWL% MD = 5.06, 95% CI = 0.24 to 9.89). Improvement rate of DM was of no difference between the two types of bariatric surgeries (RR = 1.05, 95% CI = 0.90 to 1.23). LRYGB had better long-term effect on body weight, while both LRYGB and LSG showed similar effects on DM.

  19. A genetic variant in proximity to the gene LYPLAL1 is associated with lower hunger feelings and increased weight loss following Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandstein, Marcus; Mwinyi, Jessica; Ernst, Barbara; Thurnheer, Martin; Schultes, Bernd; Schiöth, Helgi B.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective: Bariatric surgery is the most efficient treatment of severe obesity. We investigated to what extent BMI- or waist-hip ratio (WHR)-related genetic variants are associated with excess BMI loss (EBMIL) two years after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) surgery, and elucidated the affected biological pathways. Methods: Two-hundred fifty-one obese patients (age: 43 ± 10.7, preoperative BMI: 45.1 ± 6.1 kg/m2, 186 women) underwent RYGB surgery and were followed up after two years with regard to BMI. Patients were genotyped for 32 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that were investigated with regard to their impact on response to RYGB and preoperatively measured Three Factor Eating Questionnaire (TFEQ) scores. Results: Homozygous T carriers of the SNP rs4846567 in proximity to the Lysophospholipase-like 1 (LYPLAL1) gene showed a 7% higher EBMIL compared to wild-type and heterozygous carriers (p = 0.031). TT-allele carriers showed furthermore lower scores for Hunger (74%, p Hunger scores had a 32% greater EBMIL compared to patients in the highest quartile (p behavior and loss of extensive body weight following RYGB surgery. Genotyping and the use of eating behavior-related questionnaires may help to estimate the RYGB-associated therapy success. PMID:27181159

  20. Circulating Apolipoprotein A-IV presurgical levels are associated with improvement in insulin sensitivity after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Raghavendra; Roche, Alexander; Febres, Gerardo; Bessler, Marc; Tso, Patrick; Korner, Judith

    2017-03-01

    Apolipoprotein A-IV (ApoA-IV) has been shown to be involved in obesity and diabetes pathogenesis in animal studies, but its role in humans is uncertain. The objective of this study was to determine the relation of ApoA-IV with changes in glucose metabolism and weight after bariatric surgery. University Hospital. The patients (n = 49) included lean controls (n = 8) and patients before and after a mean of 7 months after laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding (LAGB, n = 12), laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB, n = 22), or laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy (SG, n = 11). ApoA-IV and other hormone assays were performed in the fasting and the postprandial state. Pearson's correlation analyses controlled for baseline BMI and percent excess weight loss (EWL) were used to determine relationships between ApoA-IV levels and insulin resistance (HOMA-IR). With all bariatric procedures combined, the change in ApoA-IV [533 versus 518 microg/L, P = .813] or ApoA-IV area under the curve (AUC - 1072 versus 1042, P = .939) was not significant. None of the surgeries individually affected levels of fasting or ApoA-IV AUC. Bariatric surgery resulted in a decrease in HOMA-IR (5.3 versus 2.0, PHOMA-IR [r = -.6, P = .008]. This relationship was independent of EWL and was not observed in the LAGB or SG group. There was no association of ApoA-IV levels with EWL, insulin secretion, Peptide-YY, or leptin levels. Preoperative ApoA-IV levels, rather than changes in levels, positively correlate with improvements in insulin sensitivity independent of weight loss after RYGB. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  1. Diabetes surgery in type 2 BMI 24-29 vs IMC 30-34 diabetic patients: is there differences among restrictive, malabsorptive and gastric bypass procedures?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garciacaballero, M; Navarrete, S; Favretti, F; Celik, A; Del Castillo, D

    2013-03-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a public health problem with a prevalence of 345 million people worldwide that it may double by the year 2030 and have a high costs and mortality. Gastrointestinal surgery is accepted as a form of treatment that was already suggested for obese in 1987 by Pories, confirmed for obese patients by the metaanalysis of Buchwald and the direct comparison of gastric bypass with medical treatment in the study of Schauer that demonstrate a 4 fold greater resolution rate of DM with surgery. Improvement occurs immediately after surgery, before the patients lose weight in with BMI > 35; but there is doubt if the existent evidence is enough to extrapolate these results to patients with BMI DM2 demonstrated the same results when stomach, duodenum and part of jejunum is bypassed as happen gastric bypass (better results with this of one anastomosis than of two anastomosis, Roux-en-Y) BPD. For patients with a BMI between 30 and 35 restrictive techniques: LAGB and SGL are good but not better than the mixed: RYGB, BAGUA, or SG-DJB with remission from 60 to 100%, minor in the derivative: BPD and above on the IID with a 81% of remission. There are no differences in the metabolic control in comparison to the obese, It is progressively better with DJB, SDS, IID and BAGUA especially in patients who do not require insulin, have less time with disease, have normal C peptide levels, and not so much relation with the initial BMI that is only important to decide the degree of restriction. Although several mechanisms has been suggested for explaining these results such as caloric intake, hormonal changes, bypass of the anterior or early stimulation of posterior intestine, fundectomy, intestinal gluconeogenesis and others, new ones will appear in the near future. Copyright © AULA MEDICA EDICIONES 2013. Published by AULA MEDICA. All rights reserved.

  2. Influence of Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery on vitamin C, myeloperoxidase, and oral clinical manifestations: a 2-year follow-up study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Netto, Bárbara Dal Molin; Moreira, Emilia Addison Machado; Patiño, Juliana Sedrez Reis; Benincá, Jucélia Pizzetti; Jordão, Alceu Afonso; Fröde, Tânia Silvia

    2012-02-01

    Bariatric surgery influences the intake and absorption of nutrients, which, when associated with vomiting, can damage the oral cavity. The serum concentrations of vitamin C and myeloperoxidase (MPO) and oral clinical manifestations were examined in patients 2 years after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB). Clinical prospective study with control group (CG; n = 26), assessed only once, and the bariatric group (BG; n = 26), assessed in the basal period and at 12 and 24 months after surgery. The mean ages in the CG and BG were 37.8 ± 1.51 and 39.6 ± 1.93 years, respectively, and their body mass indices were 22.07 ± 0.29 and 45.62 ± 1.46 kg/m(2), respectively. At 12 months after surgery, increased episodes of vomiting (P saliva-buffering capacity of 21.3% ± 2.9% (P = .004). At 24 months after RYGB, a significant reduction in serum vitamin C was detected (32.9% ± 5.3%, P MPO values were higher than in the basal period (P = .032). With regard to oral hygiene habits, 92.3% of patients reported frequent tooth brushing and 96.1% used fluoride, which were similar across the 2 years. However, dental hypersensitivity (P = .048) was significantly increased than baseline. The results demonstrated that vitamin C deficiency and increased vomiting after gastric bypass for morbid obesity may contribute to increased periodontal disease. The fact that it is impossible to determine which factor or factors (diet, poor compliance with supplementation, vomiting, poor oral hygiene) contributed to the dental problems in these patients is a shortcoming of the report.

  3. Reliable gastric tonometry after coronary artery surgery : need for acid secretion suppression despite transient failure of acid secretion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bams, JL; Kolkman, JJ; Roukens, MP; Douma, DPN; Loef, BG; Meuwissen, SGM; Groeneveld, ABJ

    1998-01-01

    Objective:To study the need for suppression of gastric acid secretion for reliable intragastric partial pressure of carbon dioxide (PCO2) tonometry by evaluating the effect of an oral dose of: sodium bicarbonate before and after administration of the H-2-blocker ranitidine to mimic CO2 generation

  4. Differential acute and chronic responses in insulin action in cultured myotubes following from nondiabetic severely obese humans following gastric bypass surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinkley, J Matthew; Zou, Kai; Park, Sanghee; Zheng, Donghai; Dohm, G Lynis; Houmard, Joseph A

    2017-11-01

    Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) surgery has been shown to induce positive metabolic adaptations for individuals with severe obesity (body mass index ≥40 kg/m 2 ), including improved peripheral insulin action. Although a major site of insulin action, the time course changes in skeletal muscle glucose metabolism following RYGB is unclear. To investigate the acute and chronic effects of RYGB surgery on insulin-stimulated glucose metabolism in cultured human primary myotubes derived from nondiabetic severely obese humans. East Carolina University Bariatric Surgery Center and East Carolina Diabetes and Obesity Institute. Primary human skeletal muscle cells were isolated from biopsies obtained from 8 women with severe obesity before, 1 month, and 7 months following RYGB surgery. Glucose metabolism, glycogen content, and insulin signal transduction were determined in differentiated myotubes. Insulin-stimulated glycogen synthesis and glucose oxidation increased in human myotubes derived from patients with severe obesity at both 1 and 7 months post-RYGB. However, there were no alterations indicative of enhanced insulin signal transduction. At 1 month post-RYGB, muscle glycogen levels were lower (-23%) and phosphorylation of acetyl CoA carboxylase 2 (ACC2) was elevated (+16%); both returned to presurgery levels at 7 months after RYGB in myotubes derived from patients. At 7 months post-RYGB, there was an increase in peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator 1 alpha (PGC1α) protein content (+54%). These data indicate that insulin action intrinsically improves in cultured human primary myotubes derived from nondiabetic severely obese patients following RYGB surgery; however, the cellular alterations involved appear to consist of distinct acute and chronic components. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Bariatric Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Study protocol of a phase II clinical trial (KSCC1501A) examining oxaliplatin + S-1 for treatment of HER2-negative advanced/recurrent gastric cancer previously untreated with chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saeki, Hiroshi; Emi, Yasunori; Oki, Eiji; Tokunaga, Shoji; Kakeji, Yoshihiro; Akagi, Yoshito; Baba, Hideo; Baba, Eishi; Maehara, Yoshihiko

    2018-01-08

    Oxaliplatin + S-1 is a recognized treatment regimen in Japan, but there are no Japanese clinical data on an oxaliplatin dose of 130 mg/m 2 . The current research involves a single-arm, prospective, phase II clinical trial to examine the efficacy and safety of oxaliplatin + S-1 with an oxaliplatin dose of 130 mg/m 2 to treat HER2-negative advanced/recurrent gastric cancer previously untreated with chemotherapy in Japan. The primary endpoint of this trial will be the response rate, and the secondary endpoints will be the safety profile of oxaliplatin + S-1, progression-free survival, the response rate in subjects under the age of 75, overall survival, time to treatment failure, duration of treatment, time to failure of strategy, and dose intensity. The threshold response rate is 45% and the expected response rate is 60%. Assuming that a one-tailed score test will be performed with an α of 0.05, 68 patients are needed to ensure a statistical power of 80%. Planned enrollment is 70 subjects and the total duration of this trial is expected to be 3 years. Since replacing cisplatin with oxaliplatin should provide the same level of therapeutic efficacy while limiting adverse events and simplifying treatment, oxaliplatin + S-1 may be increasingly used to treat gastric cancer in Japan. Verifying the efficacy and safety of oxaliplatin + S-1 with an oxaliplatin dose of 130 mg is an important task that the current trial has set out to achieve. The protocol was registered at the website of the University Hospital Medical Information Network (UMIN), Japan (protocol ID UMIN000017550) on May 29, 2015. The details are available at the following web address: http://www.umin.ac.jp/ctr/ .

  6. Managing obstructive gastric volvulus: challenges and solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodriguez-Garcia HA

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Hector Alejandro Rodriguez-Garcia,1 Andrew S Wright,2–4 Robert B Yates1–3 1Department of Surgery, Center for Esophageal and Gastric Surgery, 2Center for Videoendoscopic Surgery, 3Hernia Center, 4Institute for Simulation and Interprofessional Studies, UWMC, University of Washington, Seattle, USA Abstract: Gastric volvulus is the abnormal torsion of the stomach along its short or long axis. Most patients who experience gastric volvulus present with mild or intermittent gastric obstructive symptoms. However, severe acute gastric volvulus can result in complete gastric outlet obstruction and ischemia. Consequently, acute gastric volvulus warrants immediate evaluation and management. The goals of management are to relieve the obstruction and prevent recurrent volvulus. Techniques to manage gastric volvulus depend on patient characteristics and the presence of gastric ischemia. In the absence of gastric ischemia, gastric volvulus can be managed with anterior abdominal wall gastropexy or paraesophageal hernia repair. If gastric ischemia is present, operative resection of the affected portion of the stomach is indicated. When operative management is indicated, many patients with gastric volvulus can be managed with minimally invasive (laparoscopic, endoscopic, or laparoendoscopic techniques. Keywords: gastric volvulus, paraesophageal hernia, hiatal hernia

  7. Gastric bypass surgery is protective from high-fat diet-induced non-alcoholic fatty liver disease and hepatic endoplasmic reticulum stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosinski, J D; Pagadala, M R; Mulya, A; Huang, H; Dan, O; Shimizu, H; Batayyah, E; Pai, R K; Schauer, P R; Brethauer, S A; Kirwan, J P

    2016-06-01

    High-fat diets are known to contribute to the development of obesity and related co-morbidities including non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). The accumulation of hepatic lipid may increase endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and contribute to non-alcoholic steatohepatitis and metabolic disease. We hypothesized that bariatric surgery would counter the effects of a high-fat diet (HFD) on obesity-associated NAFLD. Sixteen of 24 male Sprague Dawley rats were randomized to Sham (N = 8) or Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) surgery (N = 8) and compared to Lean controls (N = 8). Obese rats were maintained on a HFD throughout the study. Insulin resistance (HOMA-IR), and hepatic steatosis, triglyceride accumulation, ER stress and apoptosis were assessed at 90 days post-surgery. Despite eating a HFD for 90 days post-surgery, the RYGB group lost weight (-20.7 ± 6%, P Hepatic steatosis and ER stress, specifically glucose-regulated protein-78 (Grp78, P < 0.001), X-box binding protein-1 (XBP-1) and spliced XBP-1 (P < 0.01), and fibroblast growth factor 21 (FGF21) gene expression, were normalized in the RYGB group compared to both Sham and Lean controls. Significant TUNEL staining in liver sections from the Obese Sham group, indicative of accelerated cell death, was absent in the RYGB and Lean control groups. Additionally, fasting plasma glucagon like peptide-1 was increased in RYGB compared to Sham (P < 0.02). These data suggest that in obese rats, RYGB surgery protects the liver against HFD-induced fatty liver disease by attenuating ER stress and excess apoptosis. © 2015 Scandinavian Physiological Society. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Four years' follow-up changes of physical activity and sedentary time in women undergoing roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery and appurtenant children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sellberg, Fanny; Willmer, Mikaela; Tynelius, Per; Berglind, Daniel

    2017-12-11

    Objectively measured levels of physical activity (PA) in patients undergoing Roux-en-Y Gastric Bypass (RYGB) surgery remain essentially unchanged from before to one year after surgery. Effects from RYGB on objectively measured levels of PA among women undergoing RYGB and appurtenant children beyond one year post-surgery are unknown. The aim of the present study was to objectively assess longitudinal changes in PA and sedentary time (ST), among women undergoing RYGB and appurtenant children, from three months before to nine and 48 months after maternal surgery. Thirty women undergoing RYGB and 40 children provided anthropometric measures during home visits and valid accelerometer assessed (Actigraph GT3X+) PA data, three months before and nine and 48 months after maternal RYGB surgery. Women undergoing RYGB decreased time spent in moderate to vigorous PA (MVPA) with 2.0 min/day (p = 0.65) and increased ST with 14.4 min/day (p = 0.35), whereas their children decreased time spent in MVPA with 13.2 min/day (p = 0.04) and increased ST with 110.5 min/day (p RYGB, respectively. Objectively measured PA in women remains unchanged, while appurtenant children decrease time spent in MVPA and increase ST, from three months before through nine and 48 months after maternal RYGB. The majority of both women undergoing RYGB and children are insufficiently active 48 months after maternal RYGB.

  9. Benign gastric filling defect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oh, K. K.; Lee, Y. H.; Cho, O. K.; Park, C. Y. [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1979-06-15

    The gastric lesion is a common source of complaints to Orientals, however, evaluation of gastric symptoms and laboratory examination offer little specific aid in the diagnosis of gastric diseases. Thus roentgenography of gastrointestinal tract is one of the most reliable method for detail diagnosis. On double contract study of stomach, gastric filling defect is mostly caused by malignant gastric cancer, however, other benign lesions can cause similar pictures which can be successfully treated by surgery. 66 cases of benign causes of gastric filling defect were analyzed at this point of view, which was verified pathologically by endoscope or surgery during recent 7 years in Yensei University College of Medicine, Severance Hospital. The characteristic radiological picture of each disease was discussed for precise radiologic diagnosis. 1. Of total 66 cases, there were 52 cases of benign gastric tumor 10 cases of gastric varices, 5 cases of gastric bezoar, 5 cases of corrosive gastritis, 3 cases of granulomatous disease and one case of gastric hematoma. 2. The most frequent causes of benign tumors were adenomatous polyp (35/42) and the next was leiomyoma (4/42). Others were one of case of carcinoid, neurofibroma and cyst. 3. Characteristic of benign adenomatous polyp were relatively small in size, smooth surface and were observed that large size, benign polyp was frequently type IV lesion with a stalk. 4. Submucosal tumors such as leiomyoma needed differential diagnosis with polypoid malignant cancer. However, the characteristic points of differentiation was well circumscribed smooth margined filling defect without definite mucosal destruction on surface. 5. Gastric varices showed multiple lobulated filling defected especially on gastric fundus that changed its size and shape by respiration and posture of patients. Same varices lesions on esophagus and history of liver disease were helpful for easier diagnosis. 6. Gastric bezoar showed well defined movable mass

  10. Benign gastric filling defect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oh, K. K.; Lee, Y. H.; Cho, O. K.; Park, C. Y.

    1979-01-01

    The gastric lesion is a common source of complaints to Orientals, however, evaluation of gastric symptoms and laboratory examination offer little specific aid in the diagnosis of gastric diseases. Thus roentgenography of gastrointestinal tract is one of the most reliable method for detail diagnosis. On double contract study of stomach, gastric filling defect is mostly caused by malignant gastric cancer, however, other benign lesions can cause similar pictures which can be successfully treated by surgery. 66 cases of benign causes of gastric filling defect were analyzed at this point of view, which was verified pathologically by endoscope or surgery during recent 7 years in Yensei University College of Medicine, Severance Hospital. The characteristic radiological picture of each disease was discussed for precise radiologic diagnosis. 1. Of total 66 cases, there were 52 cases of benign gastric tumor 10 cases of gastric varices, 5 cases of gastric bezoar, 5 cases of corrosive gastritis, 3 cases of granulomatous disease and one case of gastric hematoma. 2. The most frequent causes of benign tumors were adenomatous polyp (35/42) and the next was leiomyoma (4/42). Others were one of case of carcinoid, neurofibroma and cyst. 3. Characteristic of benign adenomatous polyp were relatively small in size, smooth surface and were observed that large size, benign polyp was frequently type IV lesion with a stalk. 4. Submucosal tumors such as leiomyoma needed differential diagnosis with polypoid malignant cancer. However, the characteristic points of differentiation was well circumscribed smooth margined filling defect without definite mucosal destruction on surface. 5. Gastric varices showed multiple lobulated filling defected especially on gastric fundus that changed its size and shape by respiration and posture of patients. Same varices lesions on esophagus and history of liver disease were helpful for easier diagnosis. 6. Gastric bezoar showed well defined movable mass

  11. Peptide YY and glucagon-like peptide-1 contribute to decreased food intake after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svane, M S; Jørgensen, Nils B; Bojsen-Møller, K N

    2016-01-01

    -regulating gut hormones and appetite ratings during a standard mixed-meal test and effects on subsequent ad libitum food intake were evaluated in two studies: in study 1, nine patients with type 2 diabetes were examined prospectively before and 3 months after RYGB with and without Ex-9. In study 2, 12 RYGB...... increased secretion of the other, probably explaining the absent effect on food intake on these experimental days. Combined blockade of GLP-1 and PYY actions increased food intake after RYGB, supporting that these hormones have a role in decreased food intake postoperatively.International Journal of Obesity......BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES: Exaggerated postprandial secretion of glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) and peptide YY (PYY) may explain appetite reduction and weight loss after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB), but causality has not been established. We hypothesized that food intake decreases after surgery...

  12. Primary Closure versus Gastric Resection for Perforated Gastric

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2017 Nigerian Journal of Surgery | Published by Wolters Kluwer - Medknow. Perforated gastric ulcer is one of the most ... Review Article. Abstract. Access this article online. Quick Response Code: ... Figure 1: Destructive defect in the mesocolon. Figure 2: Giant perforated gastric ulcer of the posterior wall of the antrum.

  13. Gastrocolic Fistula Presented as an Early Complication of Gastric Surgery in a 42-year-old Man.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahedi, Mohammad Javad; Shafiei Pour, Sara; Dehghani, Masood; Eslami, Nazanin

    2017-04-01

    Currently, surgery is less needed for the treatment of refractory peptic ulcer disease (PUD) or its complications. So, the complications of PUD surgery have been clearly declined. Here in, we present a 42-year-old man with chronic watery diarrhea and significant weight loss during 2 years after gastrojejunostomy for the treatment of obstructive PUD. Small bowel gastrointestinal series showed rapid transit without passage of contrast in the parts of small bowel. The patient was scheduled for exploratory laparotomy. During the surgery a large fistula was detected between the stomach and transverse colon, which was repaired. At the follow-up 6 months after the surgery, the patient did not have any history of recurrence of diarrhea and had 10 kg weight gain. Gastrocolic fistula is a very rare complication of surgical management of PUD. Barium enema is the most helpful imaging procedure for the diagnosis of gastrocolic fistula and surgery after correction of nutritional status is suggested especially for malnourished patients.

  14. A case of laparoscopic surgery for endometrial cancer in a patient previously treated with a transvaginal mesh procedure for pelvic organ prolapse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kiyoshi Yoshino

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Transvaginal mesh (TVM surgery is an effective treatment option for women with pelvic organ prolapse (POP. Because the TVM procedure preserves the uterus, it is possible for endometrial cancer to occur at a later date. We herein present the first report of such an endometrial cancer, diagnosed well after TVM surgery for POP, and the use of laparoscopic surgery to conduct a simple total hysterectomy to treat it. Keywords: endometrial cancer, laparoscopic surgery, pelvic organ prolapse, transvaginal mesh

  15. Emergence of pica (ingestion of non-food substances) accompanying iron deficiency anemia after gastric bypass surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kushner, Robert F; Shanta Retelny, Victoria

    2005-01-01

    Pica, the compulsive ingestion of non-food substances, is a common, yet less well known symptom of iron deficiency anemia (IDA). Ice eating or pagophagia is one of the most common forms of pica associated with iron deficiency and IDA, and has only recently been identified among patients who had undergone Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGBP). This article presents additional cases of pagophagia in women which emerged after RYGBP and resolved with iron treatment. These cases, added to the literature, lead to further discussion of how healthcare providers can subtly probe patients for the presence of pica.

  16. Metabolomics Study of Roux-en-Y Gastric Bypass Surgery (RYGB) to Treat Type 2 Diabetes Patients Based on Ultraperformance Liquid Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Ping; Yu, Haoyong; Zhao, Xinjie; Bao, Yuqian; Hong, Christopher S; Zhang, Pin; Tu, Yinfang; Yin, Peiyuan; Gao, Peng; Wei, Li; Zhuang, Zhengping; Jia, Weiping; Xu, Guowang

    2016-04-01

    Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) is one of the most effective treatments for long-term weight loss and diabetes remission; however, the mechanisms underlying these changes are not clearly understood. In this study, the serum metabolic profiles of 23 remission and 12 nonremission patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) were measured at baseline, 6- and 12-months after RYGB. A metabolomics analysis was performed based on ultra-performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. Clinical improvements in insulin sensitivity, energy metabolism, and inflammation were related to metabolic alterations of free fatty acids (FFAs), acylcarnitines, amino acids, bile acids, and lipids species. Differential metabolic profiles were observed between the two T2DM subgroups, and patients with severity fat accumulation and oxidation stress may be more suitable for RYGB. Baseline levels of tryptophan, bilirubin, and indoxyl sulfate measured prior to surgery as well as levels of FFA 16:0, FFA 18:3, FFA 17:2, and hippuric acid measured at 6 months after surgery best predicted the suitability and efficacy of RYGB for patients with T2DM. These metabolites represent potential biomarkers that may be clinically helpful in individualized treatment for T2DM patients by RYGB.

  17. Impact of Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery on appetite, alcohol intake behaviors, and midbrain ghrelin signaling in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirohi, Sunil; Richardson, Ben D; Lugo, Janelle M; Rossi, David J; Davis, Jon F

    2017-07-01

    Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) surgery reduces appetite and stimulates new onset alcohol misuse; however, the genesis of these behavioral changes is unclear. This study is hypothesized that new onset alcohol intake is a behavioral adaptation that occurs secondary to reduced appetite and correlates with altered central ghrelin signaling. Hedonic high-fat diet (HFD) intake was evaluated prior to the assessment of alcohol intake behaviors in RYGB and control rats. Measurements were also taken of circulating ghrelin and ghrelin receptor (GHSR) regulation of neuronal firing in ventral tegmental area (VTA) dopamine (DA) neurons. RYGB rats displayed reduced HFD intake relative to controls. Sham and RYGB rats consumed more alcohol and preferred lower concentrations of alcohol, whereas only RYGB rats escalated alcohol intake during acute withdrawal. Remarkably, GHSR activity, independent of peripheral ghrelin release, set the tonic firing of VTA DA neurons, a response selectively diminished in RYGB rats. This study indicates that gut manipulations lead to increased alcohol intake, whereas RYGB promotes behaviors that may maintain alcohol misuse. Reductions in hedonic feeding and diminished GHSR control of VTA firing further distinguish gut manipulation from complete bypass and present a potential mechanism linking reduced appetite with alcohol misuse after RYGB surgery. © 2017 The Obesity Society.

  18. Effects of Roux-en-Y gastric bypass and ileal transposition surgeries on glucose and lipid metabolism in skeletal muscle and liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pezeshki, Adel; Chelikani, Prasanth K

    2014-01-01

    Roux-en Y gastric bypass (RYGB) and ileal transposition (IT) surgeries produce weight loss and improve diabetic control; however, the mechanisms of glycemic improvements are largely unknown. Because skeletal muscle and liver play a key role in glucose homeostasis, we compared the effects of RYGB and IT surgeries on key molecules of glucose and lipid metabolism in muscle and liver. Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to RYGB, IT, or sham surgeries; sham-animals were ad-lib fed or pair-fed to RYGB rats (n = 7-9/group). At 8 weeks postoperatively, blood samples were collected for glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) and insulin analyses by ELISA. Leg muscle and liver tissues were analyzed for mRNA (RT-qPCR) and/or protein abundance (immuno blotting) of important molecules of glucose and lipid metabolism [glucose transporter-4 (GLUT-4), hexokinase, phosphofructokinase (PFK), adenosine monophosphate activated protein kinase-α (AMPKα), cytochrome C oxidase-IV (COX-IV), citrate synthase, carnitine palmitoyl transferase-1 (CPT-1), medium-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (MCAD), peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma co-activator 1 α (PGC-1 α), PGC-1-related coactivator (PRC), uncoupling protein-3 (UCP-3)]. Plasma GLP-1 concentrations were increased comparably with RYGB and IT. RYGB and IT increased muscle GLUT-4 protein content, muscle hexokinase mRNA, and liver PFK mRNA. IT increased muscle AMPKα and COX-IV protein content and liver citrate synthase activity. IT increased muscle CPT-1, MCAD and PRC mRNA, whereas RYGB increased UCP-3 mRNA in muscle and liver, and PGC-1 α mRNA in liver. The data suggest that RYGB and IT surgeries lead to enhanced GLP-1 secretion and produce similar stimulatory effects on important molecules of glucose metabolism but differential effects on key molecules of lipid oxidation in muscle and liver. © 2014 American Society for Bariatric Surgery Published by American Society for Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery All rights reserved.

  19. Gastric Bezoar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samer Assaf

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available History of present illness: A 12-year-old female with no past medical history presented with abdominal pain for 3 months. The pain was intermittent, located at the epigastric region, non-radiating, fluctuating intensity up to 8/10, and had worsened over the past month. She did not have fever, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, constipation, or blood in her stool. The patient also endorsed hair loss over the same time period and noted that her previously long hair was now short and thin. On exam, patient was noted to have shoulder-length hair, a soft, non-distended abdomen with mild tenderness to the epigastric region, and a 5cm hard mass palpated at the epigastrium. Significant findings: In the abdominal radiograph, a nonspecific and non-obstructive bowel gas pattern with no air-fluid level was noted, however the stomach was distended with soft tissue. The CT abdomen/pelvis revealed a distended stomach with undigested heterogeneous contents (presumed bezoar. Discussion: A bezoar is a mass of incompletely digested material typically originating in the stomach and consisting of vegetable fibers, hair, or drugs.1 Bezoars develop after ingested foreign material accumulates in the gastrointestinal tract due to indigestibility, gastric outlet obstruction, or intestinal stasis. Trichobezoars are comprised of hair and classically form in young females with an underlying psychiatric disorder resulting in the urge to pull one’s hair out (trichotillomania and swallow it (trichophagia.2,3 Gastric bezoars are rare with an approximate incidence of 0.3 percent of patients undergoing upper endoscopy.4 Patients tend to remain asymptomatic for long periods, but may develop abdominal pain, nausea/vomiting, early satiety, anorexia, and weight loss.5 Complications may include gastrointestinal ulcerations, perforations, intussusception, pancreatitis, obstructive jaundice, and death.6-8 The diagnosis of a gastric bezoar can be made using plain films, ultrasound, or CT, and

  20. PREVIOUS SECOND TRIMESTER ABORTION

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PNLC

    PREVIOUS SECOND TRIMESTER ABORTION: A risk factor for third trimester uterine rupture in three ... for accurate diagnosis of uterine rupture. KEY WORDS: Induced second trimester abortion - Previous uterine surgery - Uterine rupture. ..... scarred uterus during second trimester misoprostol- induced labour for a missed ...

  1. Laparoscopic proximal gastrectomy with jejunal interposition for gastric cancer in the proximal third of the stomach: a retrospective comparison with open surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinoshita, Takahiro; Gotohda, Naoto; Kato, Yuichiro; Takahashi, Shinichiro; Konishi, Masaru; Kinoshita, Taira

    2013-01-01

    The incidence of cancer in the proximal third of the stomach is increasing. Laparoscopic proximal gastrectomy (LPG) seems an attractive option for the treatment of early-stage proximal gastric cancer but has not gained wide acceptance because of technical difficulties, including the prevention of severe reflux. In this study, we describe our technique for LPG with jejunal interposition (LPG-IP) and evaluate its safety and feasibility. In this retrospective analysis, we reviewed the data of patients with proximal gastric cancer who underwent LPG-IP (n = 22) or the same procedure with open surgery (OPG-IP; n = 68) between January 2008 and September 2011. Short-term surgical variables and outcomes were compared between the groups. The reconstruction method was the same in both groups, with creation of a 15 cm, single-loop, jejunal interposition for anastomosis. There were no differences in patient or tumor characteristics between the groups. Operation time was longer in the LGP-IP group (233 vs. 201 min, p = 0.0002) and estimated blood loss was significantly less (20 vs. 242 g, p < 0.0001). The average number of harvested lymph nodes did not differ between the two groups (17 vs. 20). There also were no differences in the incidence of leakage at the esophagojejunostomy anastomosis (9.1 vs. 7.4%) or other postoperative complications (27 vs. 32%). The number of times additional postoperative analgesia was required was significantly less in the LPG-IP group compared with the OPG-IP group (2 vs. 4, p < 0.0001). LPG-IP has equivalent safety and curability compared with OPG-IP. Our results imply that LPG-IP may lead to faster recovery, better cosmesis, and improved quality of life in the short-term compared with OPG-IP. Because of the limitations of retrospective analysis, a further study should be conducted to obtain definitive conclusions.

  2. Bariatric surgery in old age: a comparative study of laparoscopic Roux–en-Y gastric bypass and sleeve gastrectomy in an Asia centre of excellence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chih-Kun; Garg, Amit; Kuao, Hsin-Chih; Chang, Po-Chih; Hsin, Ming-Che

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Bariatric surgery has been proved to be the safest and efficient procedure in treating morbid obese patients, but data is still lacking in the elderly population. The aim of our study was to compare the safety and efficacy of laparoscopic Roux–en-Y gastric bypass (LRYGB) and sleeve gastrectomy (LSG) in patients aged more than 55 years. We performed a retrospective review of a prospectively collected database. All patients with body mass index (BMI) ≧32 kg/m2 and aged more than 55 years undergoing LRYGB or LSG in BMI Surgery Centre, E-Da Hospital between January 2008 and December 2011 with at least one year of follow up were included for the analysis. Demography, peri-operative data, weight loss and surgical complications were all recorded and analyzed. Mean age and BMI of these 68 patients (22 males and 46 female) were 58.8 years (55–79 years) and 39.5 kg/m2 (32.00–60.40 kg/m2). LRYGB was performed in 44 patients and LSG in 24 patients. The two groups were comparable in their preoperative BMI, American Society of Anaesthesia (ASA) score and gender distribution. LSG patients were significantly older than patients receiving LRYGB. The proportion of type 2 diabetes preoperatively was significantly higher in LRYGB patients as compared to LSG patients (88.63% vs. 50%; P elderly patients, both surgeries achieved good weight loss and resolution of comorbidities. LRYGB is superior to LSG in terms of diabetes remission but carries higher complication rates even at high volume centres. PMID:25859266

  3. Effects of preoperative exposure to a high-fat versus a low-fat diet on ingestive behavior after gastric bypass surgery in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seyfried, Florian; Miras, Alexander D; Bueter, Marco; Prechtl, Christina G; Spector, Alan C; le Roux, Carel W

    2013-11-01

    The consumption of high fat and sugar diets is decreased after gastric bypass surgery (GB). The mechanisms remain unclear, with tests of motivated behavior toward fat and sugar producing conflicting results in a rat model. These discrepancies may be due to differences in presurgical maintenance diets. The authors used their GB rat model to determine whether the fat content of preoperative maintenance diets affects weight loss, calorie intake, and macronutrient selection after surgery. Male Wistar rats were either low-fat diet fed (LFDF) with normal chow or high-fat diet fed (HFDF) before randomization to GB or sham surgery. In food preference test 1, the animals were offered the choice of a vegetable drink (V8) or a high-calorie liquid (Ensure), and in food preference test 2, they could choose normal chow or a solid high-fat diet. The GB groups did not differ significantly in terms of body weight loss or caloric intake. In food preference test 1, both groups responded similarly by reducing their preference for Ensure and increasing their preference for V8. In food preference test 2, the HFDF-GB rats reduced their preference for a solid high-fat diet gradually compared with the immediate reduction observed in the LFDF-GB rats. The consumption of presurgical maintenance diets with different fat contents did not affect postoperative weight loss outcomes. Both the LFDF-GB and HFDF-GB rats exhibited behaviors consistent with the possible expression of a conditioned taste aversion to a high-fat stimulus. These results suggest that for some physiologic parameters, low-fat-induced obesity models can be used for the study of changes after GB and have relevance to many obese humans who consume high-calorie but low-fat diets.

  4. Is the eCura system useful for selecting patients who require radical surgery after noncurative endoscopic submucosal dissection for early gastric cancer? A comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatta, Waku; Gotoda, Takuji; Oyama, Tsuneo; Kawata, Noboru; Takahashi, Akiko; Yoshifuku, Yoshikazu; Hoteya, Shu; Nakagawa, Masahiro; Hirano, Masaaki; Esaki, Mitsuru; Matsuda, Mitsuru; Ohnita, Ken; Yamanouchi, Kohei; Yoshida, Motoyuki; Dohi, Osamu; Takada, Jun; Tanaka, Keiko; Yamada, Shinya; Tsuji, Tsuyotoshi; Ito, Hirotaka; Hayashi, Yoshiaki; Nakamura, Tomohiro; Nakaya, Naoki; Shimosegawa, Tooru

    2017-10-05

    We have established a risk-scoring system, termed the "eCura system," for the risk stratification of lymph node metastasis in patients who have received noncurative endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) for early gastric cancer (EGC). We aimed to clarify whether this system contributes to the selection of patients requiring radical surgery after ESD. Between 2000 and 2011, 1,969 patients with noncurative ESD for EGC were included in this multicenter study. Depending on the treatment strategy after ESD, we had patients with no additional treatment (n = 905) and those with radical surgery after ESD (n = 1,064). After the application of the eCura system to these patients, cancer recurrence and cancer-specific mortality in each risk category of the system were compared between the two patient groups. Multivariate Cox analysis revealed that in the high-risk category, cancer recurrence was significantly higher (hazard ratio = 3.13, p = 0.024) and cancer-specific mortality tended to be higher (hazard ratio = 2.66, p = 0.063) in patients with no additional treatment than in those with radical surgery after ESD, whereas no significant differences were observed in the intermediate-risk and low-risk categories. In addition, cancer-specific survival in the low-risk category was high in both patient groups (99.6 and 99.7%). A limitation of this study is that it included a small number of cases with undifferentiated-type EGC (292 cases). The eCura system is a useful aid for selecting the appropriate treatment strategy after noncurative ESD for EGC. However, caution is needed when applying this system to patients with undifferentiated-type EGC.

  5. Effects of endogenous GLP-1 and GIP on glucose tolerance after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svane, Maria S; Bojsen-Moller, Kirstine N; Nielsen, Signe

    2016-01-01

    Exaggerated secretion of glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) is important for postprandial glucose tolerance after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB), whereas the role of glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP) remains to be resolved. We aimed to explore the relative importance of endogenously...... secreted GLP-1 and GIP on glucose tolerance and beta-cell function after RYGB. We used DPP-4 inhibition to enhance concentrations of intact GIP and GLP-1 and the GLP-1 receptor antagonist exendin 9-39 (Ex-9) for specific blockage of GLP-1 actions. Twelve glucose tolerant patients were studied after RYGB...... postprandial hyperglucagonaemia compared with placebo, whereas sitagliptin had no effect despite 2-3-fold increased concentrations of intact GLP-1 and GIP. Similarly, sitagliptin did not affect glucose tolerance or beta-cell function during GLP-1R blockage. This study confirms the importance of GLP-1...

  6. The impact assessment of weight loss on an aggressive behavior and satisfaction with the connubial or cohabitation relationship in patients after Roux-en-Y gastric-by-pass surgery performed laparoscopically.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bielecka, Ilona; Osemek, Paweł; Paśnik, Krzysztof

    2012-09-01

    was an assesment the impact of weight loss in patients undergoing gastric by-pass surgery on an aggressive behavior affecting the satisfaction with the connubial or cohabitation relationship The study included a total number of 100 people (50 people with morbid obesity underwent gastric-bypass surgery and their male or female partners). The study was conducted by using two questionnaires: the Psychological Inventory of Aggression Syndrome-1 authorship by Z.B. Gaś as well as Extinguishes and the Chosen Marriage Questionnaire-2 developed by M. Plop and J. Rostowski The analysis of the results showed the influence of the weight loss on the aggressive behaviour at the examined group. Important differences were shown in the first phase of the examination among the examined group and the control group on scales: emotional self-aggression, the hostility towards surroundings and directed outside aggression. Regression analysis showed a statistical relationship between outward aggression and disappointment, 0.346 pcohabitation relationship.

  7. Influence of dietary protein and its amino acid composition on postoperative outcomes after gastric bypass surgery : a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Broek, Merel; de Heide, Loek J. M.; Veeger, Nic J. G. M.; van der Wal-Oost, Alies M.; van Beek, Andre P.

    2016-01-01

    CONTEXT: Bariatric surgery is an effective method to reduce morbid obesity. Nutritional counseling is essential to achieve maximal treatment success and to avoid long-term complications. Increased dietary protein intake may improve various postoperative results. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this systematic

  8. Extending the reach of stapled anastomosis with a prepared OrVil™ device in laparoscopic oesophageal and gastric cancer surgery.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Salih, Abdelmonim E A

    2014-08-27

    The introduction of minimally invasive surgery and the use of laparoscopic techniques have significantly improved patient outcomes and have offered a new range of options for the restoration of intestinal continuity. Various reconstruction techniques have been described and various devices employed but none has been established as superior. This study evaluates our experience with, and modifications of, the orally inserted anvil (OrVil™).

  9. In vitro comparison and evaluation of seven gastric closure modalities for natural orifice transluminal endoscopic surgery (NOTES)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voermans, R. P.; Worm, A. M.; van Berge Henegouwen, M. I.; Breedveld, P.; Bemelman, W. A.; Fockens, P.

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND STUDY AIMS: Secure transluminal closure is the most fundamental prerequisite for the safe introduction of natural orifice transluminal endoscopic surgery (NOTES). The aim was to compare acute strength of various gastrotomy closure techniques in an in vitro porcine stomach model by

  10. Laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass: Outcomes of a case-matched comparison of primary versus revisional surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pradeep K Chowbey

    2018-01-01

    Conclusion: Comorbidity resolution after revisional and pLRYGB are similar. Less weight loss is achieved after revision than after pLRYGB, but total weight loss is comparable. Revisional surgery is safe when performed by experienced surgeons in high-volume centres.

  11. Secondary surgery after sleeve gastrectomy: Roux-en-Y gastric bypass or biliopancreatic diversion with duodenal switch

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Homan, J.; Betzel, B; Aarts, E.O.; Laarhoven, K.J. van; Janssen, I.M.C.; Berends, F.J.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy (LSG) has gained popularity as a stand-alone procedure with good short-term results for weight loss. However, in the long-term, weight regain and other complications are reported. Demand for secondary surgery is rising, partly for these reasons.

  12. Pregnant woman with fatal complication after laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Renault, Kristina; Gyrtrup, Hans Jørgen; Damgaard, Karen

    2012-01-01

    In Europe, an increasing number of women have bariatric surgery; therefore, obstetricians are likely to encounter these patients. We report a 22-year-old woman, who had previously undergone uncomplicated laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass. She was admitted with severe abdominal pain at 35 weeks...

  13. [Laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery for morbid obesity. Experience at the Nacional de Ciencias Médicas y Nutrición Salvador Zubirán].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero-Lbargüengoitia, María Elena; Lerman-Garber, Israel; Herrera-Hernández, Miguel Francisco; Pablo-Pantoja, Juan; Sierra-Salazar, Mauricio; López-Rosales, Federico; Zamora-Barrón, Margarita; Vargas-Martínez, Angeles; García-García, Eduardo

    2009-01-01

    Morbid obesity is a serious health problem associated to a significant reduction in life expectancy. To evaluate the anthropometric and metabolic changes observed in obese patients, 3, 6 and 12 months after laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery and the complications associated with the procedure. Retrospective study that included 128 consecutive obese patients submitted for bariatric surgery at the INCMNSZ (2004-2006). Their mean age was 38 +/- 10 years, 83% were women with a BMI of 48 +/- 6 Kg/m2. 65% were hypertensives, 55% had hypertriglyceridemia and 34% diabetes. A year after surgery all patients had at least reduced 20% their body weight and the percentage of excess body weight loss was 73%. The prevalence of hypertension, hypertrigliceridemia and diabetes was reduced to 24%, 17% and 12%, respectively (p < 0.001). Four patients died (3%), all of them had a leak of the anastomosis and intra-abdominal abscess. One died because pulmonary embolism, another with a myocardial infarction (after surgical reinterventions) and the other two with sepsis. Laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery in morbid obese patients favors significant reductions in body weight and associated co morbidities. This surgery is not free of complications and mortality, reason why it must be done only by surgical and interdisciplinary groups with experience in these procedures.

  14. Redo Surgery after Failed Open VBG: Laparoscopic Minigastric Bypass versus Laparoscopic Roux en Y Gastric Bypass—Which Is Better?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamer M. S. Salama

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Long-term studies have reported that the rate of conversion surgeries after open VBG ranged from 49.7 to 56%. This study is aiming to compare between LMGB and LRYGB as conversion surgeries after failed open VBG with respect to indications and operative and postoperative outcomes. Methods. Sixty patients (48 females and 12 males presenting with failed VBG, with an average BMI of 39.7 kg/m2 ranging between 26.5 kg/m2 and 53 kg/m2, and a mean age of 38.7 ranging between 24 and 51 years were enrolled in this study. Operative and postoperative data was recorded up to one year after the operation. Results. MGB is a simple procedure that is associated with short operative time and low rate of complications. However, MGB may not be applicable in all cases with failed VBG and therefore RYGB may be needed in such cases. Conclusion. LMGB is a safe and feasible revisional bariatric surgery after failed VBG and can achieve early good weight loss results similar to that of LRYGP. However, the decision to convert to lap RYGB or MGB should be taken intraoperatively depending mainly on the actual intraoperative pouch length.

  15. Improvements in hippocampal-dependent memory and microglial infiltration with calorie restriction and gastric bypass surgery, but not with vertical sleeve gastrectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grayson, B E; Fitzgerald, M F; Hakala-Finch, A P; Ferris, V M; Begg, D P; Tong, J; Woods, S C; Seeley, R J; Davidson, T L; Benoit, S C

    2014-03-01

    Much recent evidence suggest that obesity and related comorbidities contribute to cognitive decline, including the development of non age-related dementia and Alzheimer's disease. Obesity is a serious threat to public health, and few treatments offer proven long-term weight loss. In fact, bariatric surgery remains the most effective long-term therapy to reduce weight and alleviate other aspects of the metabolic syndrome (MetS). Unlike the demonstrated benefits of caloric restriction to prevent weight gain, few if any studies have compared various means of weight loss on central nervous system function and hippocampal-dependent cognitive processes. Our studies comprise the first direct comparisons of caloric restriction to two bariatric surgeries (Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) and vertical sleeve gastrectomy (VSG)) on cognitive function. Weight loss following caloric restriction, RYGB and VSG was associated with generalized improvements in metabolic health and hippocampal-dependent learning, as measured in the radial arm maze and spontaneous alternation tests. However, VSG-treated rats exhibited deficits on spatial learning tasks in the Morris water maze. In addition, whereas VSG animals had elevated hippocampal inflammation, comparable to that of obese controls, RYGB and calorie-restricted (pair-fed, PF) controls exhibited an amelioration of inflammation, as measured by the microglial protein ionized calcium binding adaptor molecule 1 (IBA1). We also assessed whether GHR (ghrelin) replacement would attenuate hippocampal inflammation in VSG, as post-surgical GHR levels are significantly reduced in VSG relative to RYGB and PF rats. However, GHR treatment did not attenuate the hippocampal inflammation. Although VSG was comparably effective at reducing body weight and improving glucose regulation as RYGB, VSG did not appear to confer an equal benefit on cognitive function and markers of inflammation.

  16. Oxyntomodulin Identified as a Marker of Type 2 Diabetes and Gastric Bypass Surgery by Mass-spectrometry Based Profiling of Human Plasma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolai J. Wewer Albrechtsen

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Low-abundance regulatory peptides, including metabolically important gut hormones, have shown promising therapeutic potential. Here, we present a streamlined mass spectrometry-based platform for identifying and characterizing low-abundance regulatory peptides in humans. We demonstrate the clinical applicability of this platform by studying a hitherto neglected glucose- and appetite-regulating gut hormone, namely, oxyntomodulin. Our results show that the secretion of oxyntomodulin in patients with type 2 diabetes is significantly impaired, and that its level is increased by more than 10-fold after gastric bypass surgery. Furthermore, we report that oxyntomodulin is co-distributed and co-secreted with the insulin-stimulating and appetite-regulating gut hormone glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1, is inactivated by the same protease (dipeptidyl peptidase-4 as GLP-1 and acts through its receptor. Thus, oxyntomodulin may participate with GLP-1 in the regulation of glucose metabolism and appetite in humans. In conclusion, this mass spectrometry-based platform is a powerful resource for identifying and characterizing metabolically active low-abundance peptides.

  17. Chemotherapy versus chemoradiotherapy after surgery and preoperative chemotherapy for resectable gastric cancer (CRITICS): an international, open-label, randomised phase 3 trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cats, Annemieke; Jansen, Edwin P M; van Grieken, Nicole C T; Sikorska, Karolina; Lind, Pehr; Nordsmark, Marianne; Meershoek-Klein Kranenbarg, Elma; Boot, Henk; Trip, Anouk K; Swellengrebel, H A Maurits; van Laarhoven, Hanneke W M; Putter, Hein; van Sandick, Johanna W; van Berge Henegouwen, Mark I; Hartgrink, Henk H; van Tinteren, Harm; van de Velde, Cornelis J H; Verheij, Marcel

    2018-04-09

    Both perioperative chemotherapy and postoperative chemoradiotherapy improve survival in patients with resectable gastric cancer from Europe and North America. To our knowledge, these treatment strategies have not been investigated in a head to head comparison. We aimed to compare perioperative chemotherapy with preoperative chemotherapy and postoperative chemoradiotherapy in patients with resectable gastric adenocarcinoma. In this investigator-initiated, open-label, randomised phase 3 trial, we enrolled patients aged 18 years or older who had stage IB- IVA resectable gastric or gastro-oesophageal adenocarcinoma (as defined by the American Joint Committee on Cancer, sixth edition), with a WHO performance status of 0 or 1, and adequate cardiac, bone marrow, liver, and kidney function. Patients were enrolled from 56 hospitals in the Netherlands, Sweden, and Denmark, and were randomly assigned (1:1) with a computerised minimisation programme with a random element to either perioperative chemotherapy (chemotherapy group) or preoperative chemotherapy with postoperative chemoradiotherapy (chemoradiotherapy group). Randomisation was done before patients were given any preoperative chemotherapy treatment and was stratified by histological subtype, tumour localisation, and hospital. Patients and investigators were not masked to treatment allocation. Surgery consisted of a radical resection of the primary tumour and at least a D1+ lymph node dissection. Postoperative treatment started within 4-12 weeks after surgery. Chemotherapy consisted of three preoperative 21-day cycles and three postoperative cycles of intravenous epirubicin (50 mg/m 2 on day 1), cisplatin (60 mg/m 2 on day 1) or oxaliplatin (130 mg/m 2 on day 1), and capecitabine (1000 mg/m 2 orally as tablets twice daily for 14 days in combination with epirubicin and cisplatin, or 625 mg/m 2 orally as tablets twice daily for 21 days in combination with epirubicin and oxaliplatin), received once every three weeks

  18. Metabolic responses to xenin-25 are altered in humans with Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oestricker, Lauren; Wallendorf, Michael J; Patterson, Bruce W.; Reeds, Dominic N.; Wice, Burton M

    2016-01-01

    Xenin-25 (Xen) is a neurotensin-related peptide secreted by a subset of enteroendocrine cells located in the proximal small intestine. Many effects of Xen are mediated by neurotensin receptor-1 on neurons. In healthy humans with normal glucose tolerance (NGT), Xen administration causes diarrhea and inhibits postprandial glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) release but not insulin secretion. This study determines i) if Xen has similar effects in humans with Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) and ii) whether neural pathways potentially mediate effects of Xen on glucose homeostasis. Eight females with RYGB and no history of type 2 diabetes received infusions with 0, 4 or 12 pmoles Xen/kg/min with liquid meals on separate occasions. Plasma glucose and gastrointestinal hormone levels were measured and insulin secretion rates calculated. Pancreatic polypeptide and neuropeptide Y levels were surrogate markers for parasympathetic input to islets and sympathetic tone, respectively. Responses were compared to those in well-matched non-surgical participants with NGT from our earlier study. Xen similarly increased pancreatic polypeptide and neuropeptide Y responses in patients with and without RYGB. In contrast, the ability of Xen to inhibit GLP-1 release and cause diarrhea was severely blunted in patients with RYGB. With RYGB, Xen had no statistically significant effect on glucose, insulin secretory, GLP-1, glucose-dependent insulinotropic peptide, and glucagon responses. However, insulin and glucose-dependent insulinotropic peptide secretion preceded GLP-1 release suggesting circulating GLP-1 does not mediate exaggerated insulin release after RYGB. Thus, Xen has unmasked neural circuits to the distal gut that inhibit GLP-1 secretion, cause diarrhea, and are altered by RYGB. PMID:27288245

  19. Management of gastrogastric fistulas after divided Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery for morbid obesity: analysis of 1,292 consecutive patients and review of literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrodeguas, Lester; Szomstein, Samuel; Soto, Flavia; Whipple, Oliver; Simpfendorfer, Conrad; Gonzalvo, John Paul; Villares, Alexander; Zundel, Natan; Rosenthal, Raul

    2005-01-01

    Laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) is the most commonly performed bariatric operation in the United States. Although rare, gastrogastric fistulas are an important complication of this procedure. We report a series of 1,292 consecutive patients who underwent a divided RYGB procedure at our institution between January 2000 and November 2004. Of the 1,292 patients, we identified 15 (1.2%) who presented with gastrogastric fistulas after surgery. The mean age, weight, and body mass index of these patients was 39.5 years, 377.5 lb, and 54.9 kg/m(2), respectively. The mean postoperative follow-up was 17.6 months. The overall follow-up success rate in this series at 1 and 2 years postoperatively was 85% and 77%, respectively. Of the 15 patients, 12 (80%) presented with symptoms of nausea, vomiting, and epigastric pain. Esophagogastroscopy revealed marginal ulcers in 8 (53%) of these symptomatic patients. The most sensitive test for the diagnosis of gastrogastric fistula was an upper gastrointestinal contrast study. The mean time to fistula diagnosis was 80 days. Four patients (27%) had had a known leak before their diagnosis of gastrogastric fistula. In all cases, the leaks were managed nonoperatively with drainage, parenteral nutrition, and bowel rest. In this subset of patients, the mean time to fistula diagnosis was 25 days. Four patients (27%) presented to the clinic unsatisfied with their weight loss. The mean excess percentage of weight loss was 60.9%. Of the 15 patients with a diagnosed gastrogastric fistula, 8 (53.3%) presented with concomitant marginal ulcers. When present, marginal ulcers were managed with chronic acid suppressive therapy consisting of proton pump inhibitors and sucralfate. Revisional surgery was performed in 5 (33.3%) of 15 patients because of the combination of constant pain and ulceration refractory to optimal medical treatment and in 1 patient (7%) because of refractory pain unresponsive to medical therapy and weight regain. All

  20. Optimization of Vitamin D Status After Roux-en-Y Gastric Bypass Surgery in Obese Patients Living in Northern Climate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Lingtak-Neander; Neilson, Charlotte H; Kirk, Elizabeth A; Colovos, Tiana F; Javelli, Diane R; Khandelwal, Saurabh

    2015-12-01

    Patients who undergo bariatric surgery are at risk for micronutrient deficiencies. The aims of this study were to determine the prevalence and predictors of vitamin D deficiency in obese patients residing in the northern climate, and to evaluate the effectiveness of a daily maintenance dose of vitamin D 2000 IU in preventing hypovitaminosis D within 1 year after bariatric surgery. A cohort study involving adult patients undergoing RYGB was conducted. Longitudinal changes in serum vitamin D concentrations and clinical parameters were measured and collected. Data from 134 recipients of RYGB were analyzed. Hypovitaminosis D was identified in 86 patients (64 %), and was significantly affected by seasonal change and the number of comorbidities. Follow-up data were available in 60 patients. Vitamin D sufficiency was achieved in 62.5 % of those patients with baseline vitamin D insufficiency. A dose-response relationship of vitamin D intake was observed, with the most significant increase in 25(OH)D associated with daily vitamin D intakes ≥ 2000 IU. The prevalence of hypovitaminosis D before RYGB was comparable to patients living in the non-northern climate. Daily vitamin D intake meeting at least 2000 IU is associated with greater improvement in serum vitamin D concentration.

  1. Effects of gastric bypass surgery on glucose absorption and metabolism during a mixed meal in glucose-tolerant individuals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Siv H; Bojsen-Møller, Kirstine N; Dirksen, Carsten

    2013-01-01

    after RYGB is rapid entry of glucose into the systemic circulation due to modified gastrointestinal anatomy, causing hypersecretion of insulin and other hormones influencing glucose disappearance and endogenous glucose production. METHODS: We determined glucose absorption and metabolism and the rate...... RYGB. Endogenous glucose production was similar before and after surgery. Postoperative glucagon secretion increased and showed a biphasic response after RYGB. Adipose tissue basal rate of lipolysis was higher after RYGB. CONCLUSIONS/INTERPRETATION: A rapid rate of absorption of ingested glucose...... into the systemic circulation, followed by increased insulin secretion and glucose disappearance appears to drive the changes in the glucose profile observed after RYGB, while endogenous glucose production remains unchanged. TRIAL REGISTRATION: ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01559792. FUNDING: The study was part of the UNIK...

  2. Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and sterile gloves. Before the surgery begins, a time out is held during which the surgical team confirms ... the Consumer Version. DOCTORS: Click here for the Professional Version What Participants Need to Know About Clinical ...

  3. Do current indications for surgery of primary gastric lymphoma exist? ¿Existen indicaciones actuales para la cirugía en el linfoma gástrico?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. C. Rodríguez-Sanjuán

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to analyze the results of our series in order to assess whether surgical excision is still a valid therapeutic option in case the patient needs surgery. Secondarily, to analyze Helicobacter pylori infection rate. Patients and method: a retrospective study of 69 consecutive patients having stage IE-IIE primary gastric lymphoma; of these, 65 were treated by gastrectomy between 1974 and 1999. Mean age: 62.6 years (28-85. New staining of paraffin-embedded samples from the surgical specimen were carried out (hematoxiline-eosine, Giemsa, immunohistochemistry and reviewed. The histological classification was performed according to Isaacson's criteria. The statistical analysis was done by Chi-squared and Fisher's exact tests, as well as Kaplan-Meier and Log-Rank tests. Results: mortality was 9.2%. There were non-fatal complications in 10.8%. Helicobacter pylori was identified in 62.7%. Seven patients (11.9% suffered a relapse. The 5-year survival probability was 87%. The statistical analysis did not show any influences of Ann Arbor stage, gastric wall invasion, Helicobacter pylori infection, histological type, or margin resection involvement on survival. Conclusions: surgical excision provides a high rate of complete remissions and excellent long-term survival with acceptable mortality. Therefore it appears to be a valid treatment in case of emergency surgery, incidental finding, or lack of histological diagnosis.Objetivo: analizar los resultados de nuestra serie a fin de establecer si la extirpación quirúrgica continúa siendo una opción terapéutica válida para las situaciones en las que pudiera precisarse cirugía. Como objetivo secundario, analizar la prevalencia de infección por Helicobacter pylori. Pacientes y método: estudio retrospectivo de 69 pacientes consecutivos diagnosticados de linfoma gástrico primario, en estadio I E y II E de Ann Arbor, 65 de los cuales fueron tratados mediante gastrectomía entre 1974 y 1999. Edad

  4. A method for establishing human primary gastric epithelial cell culture from fresh surgical gastric tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aziz, Faisal; Yang, Xuesong; Wen, Qingping; Yan, Qiu

    2015-08-01

    At present, biopsy specimens, cancer cell lines and tissues obtained by gastric surgery are used in the study and analysis of gastric cancer, including the molecular mechanisms and proteomics. However, fibroblasts and other tissue components may interfere with these techniques. Therefore, the present study aimed to develop a procedure for the isolation of viable human gastric epithelial cells from gastric surgical tissues. A method was developed to culture human gastric epithelial cells using fresh, surgically excised tissues and was evaluated using immunocytochemistry, periodic acid-Schiff (PAS) staining and cell viability assays. Low cell growth was observed surrounding the gastric tissue on the seventh day of tissue explant culture. Cell growth subsequently increased, and at 12 days post-explant a high number of pure epithelial cells were detected. The gastric cancer cells exhibited rapid growth with a doubling time of 13-52 h, as compared to normal cells, which had a doubling time of 20-53 h. Immunocytochemical analyses of primary gastric cells revealed positive staining for cytokeratin 18 and 19, which indicated that the culture was comprised of pure epithelial cells and contained no fibroblasts. Furthermore, PAS staining demonstrated that the cultured gastric cells produced neutral mucin. Granulin and carbohydrate antigen 724 staining confirmed the purity of gastric cancer and normal cells in culture. This method of cell culture indicated that the gastric cells in primary culture consisted of mucin-secreting gastric epithelial cells, which may be useful for the study of gastric infection with Helicobacter pylori and gastric cancer.

  5. A methylene blue-assisted technique for harvesting lymph nodes after radical surgery for gastric cancer: a prospective, randomized, controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoyama, Toru; Fujikawa, Hirohito; Cho, Haruhiko; Ogata, Takashi; Shirai, Junya; Hayashi, Tsutomu; Rino, Yasushi; Masuda, Munetaka; Oba, Mari S; Morita, Satoshi; Yoshikawa, Takaki

    2015-02-01

    Harvesting lymph nodes (LNs) after gastrectomy is essential for accurate staging. This trial evaluated the efficiency and quality of a conventional method and a methylene blue-assisted method in a randomized manner. The key eligibility criteria were as follows: (i) histologically proven adenocarcinoma of the stomach; (ii) clinical stage I-III; (iii) R0 resection planned by gastrectomy with D1+ or D2 lymphadenectomy. The primary endpoint was the ratio of the pathologic number of harvested LNs per time (minutes) as an efficacy measure. The secondary endpoint was the number of harvested LNs, as a quality measure. Between August 2012 and December 2012, 60 patients were assigned to undergo treatment using the conventional method (n=29) and the methylene blue dye method (n=31). The baseline demographics were mostly well balanced between the 2 groups. The number of harvested LNs (mean±SD) was 33.6±11.9 in the conventional arm and 43.4±13.9 in the methylene blue arm (P=0.005). The ratio of the number of the harvested LNs per time was 1.12±0.46 LNs/min in the conventional arm and 1.49±0.59 LNs/min in the methylene blue arm (P=0.010). In the subgroup analyses, the quality and efficacy were both superior for the methylene blue dye method compared with the conventional method. The methylene blue technique is recommended for harvesting LNs during gastric cancer surgery on the basis of both the quality and efficacy.

  6. S100A8/A9 (Calprotectin, Interleukin-6, and C-Reactive Protein in Obesity and Diabetes before and after Roux-en-Y Gastric Bypass Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Louise Lylloff

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: In obesity, which is a major contributor to insulin resistance and diabetes, the circulating level of S100A8/A9 (calprotectin is elevated and declines after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery (RYGB. However, studies on S100A8/A9 and the pathophysiological mechanisms in insulin resistance and diabetes are few and contradictory. Methods: We studied 48 subjects who underwent RYGB, comprising a non-diabetic control group and two diabetic groups in whom diabetes either regressed or persisted, 6-12 months post-surgically. S100A8/A9, interleukin 6 (IL-6 as well as other inflammatory and diabetes-related markers were measured pre- and post-surgically. Results: Significant and similar decreases of BMI were found in all groups. S100A8/A9 and IL-6 decreased significantly in the group with diabetes remission and in the control group, but not in the group with persistent diabetes. The relative changes in S100A8/A9 and IL-6 correlated significantly (r = 0.905, p = 0.005 only in the group with persistent diabetes. In contrast, leukocyte count and C-reactive protein correlated significantly to S100A8/A9 only in the control group. Conclusion: Our study is suggestive of S100A8/A9 and IL-6 being related to a persistent diabetes status post-surgically and of different pathophysiological mechanisms being involved in the post-surgical changes in the three groups, despite similar decreases in BMI.

  7. Assessment of perioperative complications following primary bariatric surgery according to the Clavien-Dindo classification: comparison of sleeve gastrectomy and Roux-Y gastric bypass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goitein, David; Raziel, Asnat; Szold, Amir; Sakran, Nasser

    2016-01-01

    Laparoscopic Roux-Y gastric bypass (LRYGBP) is the gold-standard procedure for the treatment of morbid obesity. It has been reported to be somewhat more efficient and durable than laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy (LSG). However, it is considered more invasive and, therefore, more hazardous. There is a lack of unity in complication reporting following bariatric surgery. Thus, there is a possible misconception regarding the relative safety of the two major bariatric procedures performed worldwide. This may have contributed to a shift in practice with LSG gaining momentum "at the expense" of LRYGBP. The aim of this study was to evaluate the relative safety of primary LSG and LRYGBP according to the Clavien-Dindo complication grading system. A total of 2651 and 554 patients underwent primary LSG and LRYGBP, respectively at three high-volume centers. Thirty-day perioperative complications were recorded and graded. Length of hospital stays (LOS) and readmission rates were collected as well. Complications occurred in 110 (3.7%) and 24 (4.3%) patients following LSG and LRYGBP, respectively (p = 0.9). No significant difference was found between the groups regarding overall and complication-grade-specific rates. Individual complication types were unevenly distributed, but not significantly so. Patients with complications were older than those without (47 and 43 years, respectively; p = 0.01). Gender was not a risk factor for complication. Median LOS and readmission rates were not significantly different. LSG and LRYGBP are equally safe, at least in the perioperative period. Acknowledging and conveying this finding to surgeons and patients alike is important and might cause a pendulum shift in the distribution of bariatric procedures performed.

  8. Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease in Japanese patients with severe obesity who received laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery (LRYGB) in comparison to non-Japanese patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kakizaki, Satoru; Takizawa, Daichi; Yamazaki, Yuichi; Nakajima, Yuka; Ichikawa, Takeshi; Sato, Ken; Takagi, Hitoshi; Mori, Masatomo; Kasama, Kazunori

    2008-01-01

    The number of patients with morbid obesity is increasing worldwide. However, the prevalence of morbid obesity is still low in Japan, and therefore few systematic investigations of liver dysfunction in this population have so far been carried out. This study aimed to investigate the clinical characteristics in severe obese Japanese patients undergoing laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery (LRYGB). Eighty-four patients with severe obesity, including 61 Japanese and 23 non-Japanese patients, were analyzed. The mean body mass index (BMI) was 43.7±7.8 kg/m 2 , and there was no difference between Japanese and non-Japanese patients. Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) was observed in 45/59 (76.2%) of the Japanese patients. Although there were no differences in the BMI and body weight, serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT) was higher in Japanese patients in comparison to non-Japanese patients (P<0.05). The indices for insulin resistance were significantly higher in the Japanese patients in comparison to non-Japanese patients (P<0.01). The liver/spleen computed tomography (CT) ratios were lower in Japanese patients (P<0.05). The laboratory data and BMI significantly improved at 1 year after LRYGB in both groups. Racial difference may exist difference may exist in NAFLD in patients with severe obesity. When the BMI is similar, liver dysfunction among Japanese patients with severe obesity tends to be higher than in non-Japanese patients. Japanese patients with severe obesity must therefore reduce their body weight to a greater degree in comparison to non-Japanese patients with the same BMI. LRYGB can achieve effective weight control and lower ALT levels in Japanese patients with severe obesity. (author)

  9. Long-term Follow-up for Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus after Gastrectomy in Non-morbidly Obese Patients with Gastric Cancer: the Legitimacy of Onco-metabolic Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Tae-Hoon; Lee, Chang Min; Park, Sungsoo; Jung, Do Hyun; Jang, You Jin; Kim, Jong-Han; Park, Seong-Heum; Mok, Young-Jae

    2017-12-01

    This study primarily aimed to investigate the short- and long-term remission rates of type 2 diabetes (T2D) in patients who underwent surgical treatment for gastric cancer, especially patients who were non-obese, and secondarily to determine the potential factors associated with remission. We retrospectively reviewed the clinical records of patients with T2D who underwent radical gastrectomy for gastric cancer, from January 2008 to December 2012. T2D improved in 39 out of 70 (55.7%) patients at the postoperative 2-year follow-up and 21 of 42 (50.0%) at the 5-year follow-up. In the 2-year data analysis, preoperative body mass index (BMI) (P=0.043), glycated hemoglobin (A1C) level (P=0.039), number of anti-diabetic medications at baseline (P=0.040), reconstruction method (statistical difference was noted between Roux-en-Y reconstruction and Billroth I; P=0.035) were significantly related to the improvement in glycemic control. Unlike the results at 2 years, the 5-year data analysis revealed that only preoperative BMI (P=0.043) and A1C level (P=0.039) were statistically significant for the improvement in glycemic control; however, the reconstruction method was not. All types of gastric cancer surgery can be effective in short- and long-term T2D control in non-obese patients. In addition, unless long-limb bypass is considered in gastric cancer surgery, the long-term glycemic control is not expected to be different between the reconstruction methods.

  10. EFFECTS OF LONG-TERM ROUX-EN-Y GASTRIC BYPASS ON BODY WEIGHT AND CLINICAL METABOLIC COMORBIDITIES IN BARIATRIC SURGERY SERVICE OF A UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Cátia Ferreira da; Cohen, Larissa; Sarmento, Luciana d'Abreu; Rosa, Felipe Monnerat Marino; Rosado, Eliane Lopes; Carneiro, João Régis Ivar; Souza, Antônio Augusto Peixoto de; Magno, Fernanda Cristina Carvalho Mattos

    Due to the high failure rate observed in the clinical treatment of morbid obesity an increase in bariatric surgery indications, as an alternative for the control of obesity and comorbidities, is noticeable. To evaluate the performance of type 2 diabetes mellitus, high blood pressure and dyslipidemia in patients submitted to Roux-en-Y gastric bypass in late follow-up. Retrospective analysis of 59 patients included in the bariatric surgery program. Anthropometric (height and body weight) and laboratory (LDLc, HDLc, VLDLc, triglyceride -TG - and glucose) data were collected on pre- and postoperative stages, through medical records. Among the patients, 86% were female aged 43±11, of whom 52% had attended high school. The average postoperative time was 7±3 years. During the postoperative period, there were decreases of weight and body mass index, respectively (133±06 kg vs 91±04 kg pEm função do alto grau de falência que se observa no tratamento clínico da obesidade mórbida, observa-se um aumento da procura pela cirurgia bariátrica como alternativa para o controle da obesidade e comorbidades. Avaliar a evolução do diabete melito tipo 2, da hipertensão arterial sistêmica e da dislipidemia em pacientes submetidos à gastroplastia redutora em Y-de-Roux no período de pós-operatório tardio. Análise retrospectiva de 59 pacientes inseridos em programa de cirurgia bariátrica. Foram coletados dados antropométricos (altura e peso corporal) e laboratoriais (LDLc, HDLc, VLDLc, triglicerídeo -TG - e glicose) nos períodos pré e pós-operatório por meio de prontuários médicos. Entre os pacientes, 86% eram mulheres com idade de 43±11 anos e 52% tinham cursado o ensino médio. O tempo médio de pós-operatório foi de 7±3 anos. Houve redução no peso e no índice de massa corporal no pós-operatório, respectivamente (133±06 kg vs 91±04 kg pem tratamento para hipertensão arterial sistêmica. Houve remissão do diabete melito tipo 2 e da dislipidemia em 81

  11. Clinicopathologic Features of Gastric Schwannoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Kaixiong; Chang, Weilong; Zhao, Ende; Deng, Rui; Gao, Jinbo; Cai, Kailin; Wang, Guobin; Zhang, Peng

    2015-01-01

    Abstract To explore the clinicopathologic characteristics, diagnosis, treatment, and prognosis of gastric schwannoma in the imatinib era. The clinicopathologic characteristics and postoperative outcomes of patients diagnosed with gastric schwannoma at our institution between January 2007 and February 2015 were retrospectively collected and analyzed. The main patient complaint was epigastric pain or discomfort. Tumor sizes ranged from 15 to 80 mm (mean, 57.1 mm). In 17 patients, the tumors were located in the body of the stomach. A total of 20 patients were preoperatively misdiagnosed with a gastrointestinal stromal tumor. The rate of correct preoperative diagnosis was only 3.3%. All patients underwent surgical resection and showed strong S-100 protein positivity. Laparoscopic surgery for gastric schwannoma was associated with less blood loss and a shorter postoperative hospital stay than open surgery (P Gastric schwannoma is often preoperatively misdiagnosed as gastric gastrointestinal stromal tumor. Laparoscopic resection of gastric schwannoma is considered safe and effective, and it may be the preferred surgery for most small- and moderate-sized tumors. The long-term outcome is excellent, as this type of neoplasm is uniformly benign. PMID:26559271

  12. Sarcopenia and Visceral Obesity in Esophageal and Gastric Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-02-17

    Esophageal Cancer; Gastric Cancer; Sarcopenia; Sarcopenic Obesity; Obesity; Visceral Obesity; Quality of Life; Surgery; Complication of Treatment; Chemotherapeutic Toxicity; Physical Activity; Oncology

  13. Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... surgery has several common causes, including the following: Infections at the operative site Lung problems such as pneumonia or collapsed lung ... the trauma of an operation. The risk of infections at the operative site, DVTs, and UTIs can be decreased by meticulous ...

  14. Ultrasound Demonstration of a Benign Gastric Ulcer with Gastric Outlet Obstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    PL Pattee

    1994-01-01

    Full Text Available A benign antral gastric ulcer in an adult causing gastric outlet obstruction was demonstrated by ultrasonography. The extent and benign nature of the ulcer was suggested by ultrasound before gastric surgery was performed. Features implying a benign gastric ulcer were: observation of peristaltic waves through the underlying muscular layer, homogenicity of the ulcer crater and characteristic mound or volcano-like appearance of the heaped-up folds of mucosa. The differential diagnosis and the role of ultrasound in the diagnosis of gastric ulcers are discussed.

  15. Restrictive techniques: gastric banding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katia Cristina da Cunha

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Surgery for the treatment of severe obesity has a definite role onthe therapeutic armamentarium all over the world. Initiated 40years ago, bariatric surgery has already a long way thanks tohundred of surgeons, who had constantly searched for the besttechnique for the adequate control of severe obesity. Among theimportant breakthroughs in obesity surgery there is theadjustable gastric band. It is a sylastic band, inflatable andadjustable, which is placed on the top of the stomach in order tocreate a 15-20 cc pouch, with an outlet of 1.3cm. The adjustablegastric band has also a subcutaneous reservoir through whichadjustments can be made, according to the patient evolution.The main feature of the adjustable gastric band is the fact thatis minimal invasive, reversible, adjustable and placedlaparoscopically. Then greatly diminishing the surgical traumato the severe obese patient. Belachew and Favretti’s techniqueof laparoscopic application of the adjustable gastric band isdescribed and the evolution of the technique during this years,as we has been practiced since 1998. The perioperative care ofthe patient is also described, as well as the follow-up and shortand long term controls.

  16. CASE REPORT Gastric trichobezoar: Food for thought

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    with focal alopecia.[2] Bezoars may occur following gastric surgery such as pyloroplasty or partial gastrectomy in association with vagotomy.[3]. They may occur too in cases of delayed gastric emptying secondary to diabetes mellitus, hypothyroidism or mixed connective tissue diseases. The clinical spectrum in GI bezoars ...

  17. Evaluation of gastric motility by Fourier analysis of condensed images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Linke, R.; Muenzing, W.; Hahn, K.; Tatsch, K.

    2000-01-01

    In this study Fourier analysis was applied to condensed images of gastric emptying with the aim of evaluating the amplitude and frequency of gastric contractions as well as gastric emptying in patients with various well-defined disorders. In 15 controls, 65 patients with progressive systemic sclerosis (PSS), 41 patients with diabetes mellitus type I (DM), 12 patients with pyloric stenosis and 9 patients who had undergone gastric surgery, gastric emptying was determined after ingestion of a semi-solid test meal. In addition, condensed images were generated to evaluate the amplitude and frequency of gastric contractions by means of Fourier analysis. In PSS and DM patients, gastric emptying and contraction amplitudes were significantly reduced (P<0.01). Patients with pyloric stenosis displayed regular peristalsis but significantly delayed emptying (P<0.01). Patients who had undergone gastric surgery showed normal or rapid gastric emptying associated with decreased amplitudes (P<0.01). The frequency of gastric contractions in the patient groups was not different from that in controls. This study showed Fourier analysis of condensed images to be a rapid and feasible approach for the evaluation of gastric contractions. Depending on the underlying disorder, gastric emptying and peristalsis showed both corresponding and discrepant findings. Data on gastric contractions provided additional information compared with results obtained by conventional emptying studies. Therefore, both parameters should be routinely assessed to further improve characterisation of gastric dysfunction by scintigraphy. (orig.)

  18. Evaluation of gastric motility by Fourier analysis of condensed images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Linke, R.; Muenzing, W.; Hahn, K.; Tatsch, K. [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Univ. of Munich, Munich (Germany)

    2000-10-01

    In this study Fourier analysis was applied to condensed images of gastric emptying with the aim of evaluating the amplitude and frequency of gastric contractions as well as gastric emptying in patients with various well-defined disorders. In 15 controls, 65 patients with progressive systemic sclerosis (PSS), 41 patients with diabetes mellitus type I (DM), 12 patients with pyloric stenosis and 9 patients who had undergone gastric surgery, gastric emptying was determined after ingestion of a semi-solid test meal. In addition, condensed images were generated to evaluate the amplitude and frequency of gastric contractions by means of Fourier analysis. In PSS and DM patients, gastric emptying and contraction amplitudes were significantly reduced (P<0.01). Patients with pyloric stenosis displayed regular peristalsis but significantly delayed emptying (P<0.01). Patients who had undergone gastric surgery showed normal or rapid gastric emptying associated with decreased amplitudes (P<0.01). The frequency of gastric contractions in the patient groups was not different from that in controls. This study showed Fourier analysis of condensed images to be a rapid and feasible approach for the evaluation of gastric contractions. Depending on the underlying disorder, gastric emptying and peristalsis showed both corresponding and discrepant findings. Data on gastric contractions provided additional information compared with results obtained by conventional emptying studies. Therefore, both parameters should be routinely assessed to further improve characterisation of gastric dysfunction by scintigraphy. (orig.)

  19. Comparing Outcomes of Two Types of Bariatric Surgery in an Adolescent Obese Population: Roux-en-Y Gastric Bypass versus Sleeve Gastrectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovana D Maffazioli

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Obesity is prevalent among adolescents and is associated with serious health consequences. Roux-en-Y Gastric Bypass (RYGB and Sleeve Gastrectomy (SG are bariatric procedures that cause significant weight loss in adults and are increasingly being performed in adolescents with morbid obesity. Data comparing outcomes of RYGB versus SG in this age-group are scarce. This study aims to compare short-term (1-6 months and longer-term (7-18 months body mass index (BMI and biochemical outcomes following RYGB and SG in adolescents/young adults.Methods: A retrospective study using data extracted from medical records of patients 16-21 years who underwent RYGB or SG between 2012-2014 at a tertiary care academic medical center. Results: Forty-six patients were included in this study: 24 underwent RYGB and 22 underwent SG. Groups did not differ for baseline age, sex, race or BMI. BMI reductions were significant at 1-6 months and 7-18 months within groups (p<0.0001, but did not differ by surgery type (p= 0.65 and 0.09, for 1-6 months and 7-18 months, respectively. Over 7-18 months, within-group improvement in low density lipoprotein (LDL (-24±6 in RYGB, p=0.003, vs. -7±9mg/dL in SG, p=0.50 and non-high density lipoprotein (non-HDL cholesterol (-23±8 in RYGB, p=0.02, vs. -12±7 in SG, p=0.18 appeared to be of greater magnitude following RYGB. However, differences between groups did not reach statistical significance. When divided by non-alcoholic steatohepatitis stages (NASH, patients with Stage II-III NASH had greater reductions in ALT levels vs. those with Stage 0-I NASH (-45±18 vs -9±3, p=0.01 after 7-18 months. RYGB and SG groups did not differ for the magnitude of post-surgical changes in liver enzymes. Conclusion: RYGB and SG did not differ for the magnitude of BMI reduction across groups, though changes trended higher following RYGB. Further prospective studies are needed to confirm these findings.

  20. Scintigraphic evaluation of gastric emptying and motility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Linke, R.

    2003-01-01

    The stomach consists of two functionally distinct parts. The fundus and upper corpus mainly serve as a reservoir and exert primarily a tonic activity, which presses ingesta towards the antrum and duodenum. The phasic contractility of the lower corpus and antrum cause mechanical breakdown and mixing of the food particels. A complex regulation of these mechanisms provides a regular gastric emptying. Various disorders such as diabetes mellitus, mixed connective tissue diseases, gastritis, tumors, dyspeptic disorders but also drugs and gastric surgery may influence or impair gastric function and may cause typical symptoms such as upper abdominal discomfort, bloating, nausea and vomiting. However, the interpretation of gastrointestinal symptoms often is difficult. Radionuclide studies of gastric emptying and motility are the most physiologic tools available for studying gastric motor function. Gastric scintigraphy is non-invasive, uses physiologic meal and is quantitative. Emptying curves generated from the gastric ROI offer information whether a disorder is accompanied by a regular, fast or slow gastric emptying. Data on gastric contractions (amplitude and frequency) provide additional information to results obtained by conventional emptying studies. Depending on the underlying disorder, gastric emptying and peristalsis showed both corresponding and discrepant findings. Therefore, both parameters should be routinely assessed to further improve characterisation of gastric dysfunction by scintigraphy. (orig.) [de

  1. Gastric blow-out: komplikation efter fedmekirurgi

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Torrens, Ayoe Sabrina; Born, Pernille Wolder; Naver, Lars

    2009-01-01

    with computed tomography and acute surgical treatment is vital as the complication can lead to gastric necrosis, pancreatitis, biliary stasis, sepsis and multi-organ failure within a very short time. Prompt contact to specialized surgeons is advocated. Udgivelsesdato: 2009-Nov......Laparoscopic gastric bypass is the most common type of surgery for morbid obesity in Denmark. The most frequent late complications after gastric bypass are ulcer, internal hernia and stenosis. Two cases of stenosis of the bileopancreatic limb with gastric blow-out are described. Urgent diagnosis...

  2. Gastric blow-out: komplikation efter fedmekirurgi

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Torrens, Ayoe Sabrina; Born, Pernille Wolder; Naver, Lars

    2009-01-01

    Laparoscopic gastric bypass is the most common type of surgery for morbid obesity in Denmark. The most frequent late complications after gastric bypass are ulcer, internal hernia and stenosis. Two cases of stenosis of the bileopancreatic limb with gastric blow-out are described. Urgent diagnosis ...... with computed tomography and acute surgical treatment is vital as the complication can lead to gastric necrosis, pancreatitis, biliary stasis, sepsis and multi-organ failure within a very short time. Prompt contact to specialized surgeons is advocated. Udgivelsesdato: 2009-Nov...

  3. Closed-perforation of gastric fundus and gastric outlet obstruction caused by a giant gastric trichobezoar: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gürbulak, Bünyamin; Seğmen, Özgür; Rakıcı, Taşkın; Büyükaşık, Kenan; Yavaş, Mazlum

    2017-01-01

    A bezoar is a mass formed because of the accumulation of indigestible material in the stomach and/or small intestine. Bezoars are rare but occasionally occur with acute abdomen findings. Bezoars form as a result of changes in the gastrointestinal system anatomy and physiology and repetitive exposure to the ingested material. These materials can include vegetables with high fiber content (phytobezoars), non-animal origin fats, hair (trichobezoars), or drugs such as anti-acids (pharmobezoars). Gastric bezoars frequently occur after gastric surgery. Psychiatric disorders such as trichotillomania (an irresistible urge to remove and swallow one's own hair) are frequently the underlying reason in patients without a history of gastric surgery. In this article, we presented a giant gastric trichobezoar obstructing outlet and causing closed-perforation and abscess formation of gastric fundus in a 30-year-old woman.

  4. [Gastric stump cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolinescu, C; Dragomir, C; Pleşa, C; Kreisler, S; Răileanu, R; Stoian, M; Frunzăreanu, N; Diaconu, C; Vasile, V

    1982-01-01

    The cases of gastric stump cancer recorded at the III-rd Surgical Clinic of Iaoi during the last 5 years are analysed. Based upon the personal experience and data in the literature 7 cases are discussed. Out of the 7 cases, in 3 an initial resection for gastric ulcer and in 4 for duodenal ulcer was performed 17-40 years previously (with an average of 26 years). All the patients presented Bilroth II anastomoses. The diagnosis was determined by radiological, endoscopic and endobioptic examinations after a mean interval of 10 month since the occurence of the clinical symptoms. The site of the lesion was the following: in 3 cases on the anastomosis line and in 4 on the reminder of the stump. Out of the 7 cases, 5 were operable and in 4 the resection was completed. Two days post-operatively a death was recorded. The conclusions of this paper insist upon the fact that the occurance of the tumor on the gastric resection stump mainly depends on the initial lesion (gastric lesion) and less on the type of anastomosis. The long-term surveillance of the gastric resection patients is thus essential.

  5. Diagnostic role of 18F-FDG PET in gastric MALT lymphoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ambrosini, V.; Castellucci, P.; Nanni, C.; Farsad, M.; Fanti, S.; Rubello, D.; Zinzani, P.; Alavi, A.; Tehranipour, N.; Al-Nahhas, A.

    2006-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the usefulness of 18 F-FDG-PET in patients with gastric lymphoma, in particular those affected by mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) type and aggressive gastric non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL). The study group consists of 15 patients with a previous diagnosis of gastric NHL referred to our PET centres in Bologna Hospital and Rovigo Hospital, Italy, in the period 2003-2004. In 9/15 patients the subsequent histological evaluation was consistent with a gastric MALT lymphoma, while aggressive gastric NHL was diagnosed in the other 6/15. PET scan was carried out in patients with known active disease in order to stage or re-stage disease prior to treatment or in patients in complete clinical remission to monitor disease during follow up. Patients were considered in complete clinical remission if free from disease for at least 8 months after chemotherapy or surgery. 18 F-FDG PET was performed following standard procedures. 18 F-FDG-PET was true positive in all cases of gastric MALT and non-MALT aggressive NHL with known active disease, while no pathological 18 F-FDG uptake was evident in the subjects who were in complete clinical remission. The degree of 18 F-FDG uptake (mean SUVmax values) in MALT lymphoma was much less intense in comparison to aggressive gastric NHL, suggesting a prognostic role of SUV calculation in gastric lymphomas. Our data demonstrate the significant accuracy of 18 F-FDG-PET in detecting active disease in gastric lymphoma of both MALT and non-MALT NHL type. A higher SUV value appears to be related to a more aggressive disease. (author)

  6. Gastric schwannoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chen-Sung; Hsu, Han-Shui; Tsai, Chien-Ho; Li, Wing-Yin; Huang, Min-Hsiung

    2004-11-01

    Gastrointestinal mesenchymal tumors are a group of tumors originated from the mesenchymal stem cells of the gastrointestinal tract, consisting of gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST), leiomyomas or leiomyosarcomas or schwannomas. Gastric schwannoma is a very rare gastrointestinal mesenchymal tumor, which represents only 0.2% of all gastric tumors and 4% of all benign gastric neoplasms. We report a 24-year-old girl who suffered from an episode of upper gastrointestinal bleeding. The endoscopic examination showed a round submucosal tumor with a central ulceration and bleeding over the high body of the stomach. Surgical resection of the tumor was performed. The pathological examination revealed a picture of spindle cell tumor that was strongly positive for S-100 protein stain, and non-reactive for CD34, CD117, actin, HHF-35, desmin, melan-A and HMB-45, consistent with gastric schwannoma. The literature is reviewed.

  7. Sex Effect on Obesity Indices and Metabolic Outcomes in Patients with Obese Obstructive Sleep Apnea and Type 2 Diabetes After Laparoscopic Roux-en-Y Gastric Bypass Surgery: a Preliminary Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Huajun; Zhang, Pin; Han, Xiaodong; Yu, Haoyong; Di, Jianzhong; Zou, Jianyin; Wang, Yuyu; Qian, Yingjun; Tu, Yinfang; Bao, Yuqian; Yi, Hongliang; Guan, Jian; Yin, Shankai; Jia, Weiping

    2016-11-01

    Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) surgery is an effective therapy for obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). However, little attention has been paid to the treatment goals systematically stratified by sex. The objective of this study was to assess how sex differences affect obesity indices and metabolic outcomes after RYGB surgery. A sleep questionnaire was conducted and medical histories were taken. Full-night polysomnography (PSG), anthropometric variables, and blood samples were collected. Thirty-five consecutive patients with OSA who underwent laparoscopic RYGB surgery were prospectively examined for at least 6 months were included in the study. Significant improvements (p obesity indices, and metabolic outcomes [except low-density lipoprotein in men and high-density lipoprotein (HDL) in women] were obtained in men and women with OSA. Men had higher baseline triglyceride (TG) (p women. However, only TG in men improved more than in women (p = 0.02). Sleep parameters, obesity indices, and metabolic outcomes after RYGB surgery were of similar magnitude in women and men with OSA. Alleviating sleep and obesity problems was correlated with metabolic outcomes in men and women.

  8. Hereditary diffuse gastric cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van der Post, Rachel S; Vogelaar, Ingrid P; Carneiro, Fátima

    2015-01-01

    Germline CDH1 mutations confer a high lifetime risk of developing diffuse gastric (DGC) and lobular breast cancer (LBC). A multidisciplinary workshop was organised to discuss genetic testing, surgery, surveillance strategies, pathology reporting and the patient's perspective on multiple aspects......, including diet post gastrectomy. The updated guidelines include revised CDH1 testing criteria (taking into account first-degree and second-degree relatives): (1) families with two or more patients with gastric cancer at any age, one confirmed DGC; (2) individuals with DGC before the age of 40 and (3...... the high mortality associated with invasive disease, prophylactic total gastrectomy at a centre of expertise is advised for individuals with pathogenic CDH1 mutations. Breast cancer surveillance with annual breast MRI starting at age 30 for women with a CDH1 mutation is recommended. Standardised endoscopic...

  9. Laparoscopic Adjustable Gastric Banding: Effect on gastroesophageal reflux, esophageal motility and gastric function

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jong, J.R.

    2009-01-01

    Bariatric surgery is the only treatment option for individuals who have clinically severe obesity and are at the high risk for obesity-related mortality and co-morbidity. In order to get more insight in the effect of laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding on reflux, esophageal motility and gastric

  10. Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery, but not calorie restriction, reduces plasma branched-chain amino acids in obese women independent of weight loss or the presence of type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lips, Mirjam A; Van Klinken, Jan B; van Harmelen, Vanessa; Dharuri, Harish K; 't Hoen, Peter A C; Laros, Jeroen F J; van Ommen, Gert-Jan; Janssen, Ignace M; Van Ramshorst, Bert; Van Wagensveld, Bart A; Swank, Dingeman J; Van Dielen, Francois; Dane, Adrie; Harms, Amy; Vreeken, Rob; Hankemeier, Thomas; Smit, Johannes W A; Pijl, Hanno; Willems van Dijk, Ko

    2014-12-01

    Obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) have been associated with increased levels of circulating branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs) that may be involved in the pathogenesis of insulin resistance. However, weight loss has not been consistently associated with the reduction of BCAA levels. We included 30 obese normal glucose-tolerant (NGT) subjects, 32 obese subjects with T2DM, and 12 lean female subjects. Obese subjects underwent either a restrictive procedure (gastric banding [GB], a very low-calorie diet [VLCD]), or a restrictive/bypass procedure (Roux-en-Y gastric bypass [RYGB] surgery). Fasting blood samples were taken for the determination of amine group containing metabolites 4 weeks before, as well as 3 weeks and 3 months after the intervention. BCAA levels were higher in T2DM subjects, but not in NGT subjects, compared with lean subjects. Principal component (PC) analysis revealed a concise PC consisting of all BCAAs, which showed a correlation with measures of insulin sensitivity and glucose tolerance. Only after the RYGB procedure, and at both 3 weeks and 3 months, were circulating BCAA levels reduced. Our data confirm an association between deregulation of BCAA metabolism in plasma and insulin resistance and glucose intolerance. Three weeks after undergoing RYGB surgery, a significant decrease in BCAAs in both NGT as well as T2DM subjects was observed. After 3 months, despite inducing significant weight loss, neither GB nor VLCD induced a reduction in BCAA levels. Our results indicate that the bypass procedure of RYGB surgery, independent of weight loss or the presence of T2DM, reduces BCAA levels in obese subjects. © 2014 by the American Diabetes Association. Readers may use this article as long as the work is properly cited, the use is educational and not for profit, and the work is not altered.

  11. Is endoscopic resection an alternative to surgery for early low-risk submucosal gastric cancers: analysis of a large surgical database

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tae, Chung Hyun; Pouw, Roos E.; Duits, Lucas C.; Sung, Young Kyung; Min, Byung-Hoon; Lee, Jun Haeng; Rhee, Poong-Lyul; Kim, Kyoung-Mee; Bergman, Jacques J. G. H. M.; Kim, Jae J.

    2015-01-01

    Although endoscopic resection (ER) for early gastric cancers (EGCs) has become popular with the development of endoscopic instruments and skillful endoscopists, the risk of lymph node metastasis (LNM) is still an obstacle in performing ER. In this study, we aimed to identify the risk factors of LNM

  12. Effect of anxiety on the rate of gastric emptying of liquids.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Lydon, A

    2012-02-03

    The efficacy of preoperative fasting is reduced in the presence of any factor which delays gastric emptying. We examined the association between anxiety and gastric emptying in adult patients undergoing elective surgery. Immediately before operation, 21 patients completed both a Spielberger state trait inventory (used to quantify current anxiety state (STAIs) and anxiety predisposition (STAIt)), and the Amsterdam preoperative anxiety and information scale (used to quantify anxiety and need for information). Gastric emptying was measured using the paracetamol absorption technique. Four to 10 weeks later, gastric emptying and STAI were measured again. Patients were more anxious before than after operation (STAIs = mean 35.4 (SD 10.9) and 25 (4.1), respectively; P = 0.0004). Neither anxiety state (P = 0.40) nor measures of anxiety relative to anxiety predisposition (P = 0.86) influenced gastric emptying (as measured by area under the paracetamol absorption-time curve). This contrasts with previous findings that anxiety in patients with low anxiety predisposition scores delays gastric emptying.

  13. Roux-en-Y gastric bypass versus calorie restriction: support for surgery per se as the direct contributor to altered responses of insulin and incretins to a mixed meal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berggren, Johan; Lindqvist, Andreas; Hedenbro, Jan; Groop, Leif; Wierup, Nils

    2017-02-01

    To study the immediate effects of Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) on glucose homeostasis, insulin, and incretin responses to mixed-meal tests compared with the effects of calorie restriction (CR). University-affiliated bariatric surgery clinic. RYGB induces remission of type 2 diabetes (T2D) long before significant weight loss occurs. The time course and underlying mechanisms of this remission remain enigmatic. A prevailing theory is that secretory patterns of incretin hormones are altered due to rearrangement of the gastrointestinal tract. To what extent reduced calorie intake contributes to the remission of T2D is unknown. Nine normoglycemic patients and 10 T2D patients were subjected to mixed-meal tests (MMT) 4 weeks before surgery before initiation of a very low calorie diet regimen (MMT -4 w ), 1 day before surgery on a very low calorie diet regimen (MMT -1 d ), on the morning of the first day after surgery (MMT +1 d ; first postsurgical meal), and 6 weeks after surgery (MMT +6 w ). Insulin, glucose, active glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1), and glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP) were measured. CR lowered insulin in T2D patients, whereas glucose, GIP, and GLP-1 were unaffected. RYGB immediately increased plasma insulin and GIP. The GLP-1 response was delayed compared with the GIP response. T2D patients exhibited lower insulin responses after RYGB compared with normoglycemic patients. GIP responses were similar in both groups at all occasions, whereas T2D patients displayed markedly elevated GLP-1 responses 6 weeks after RYGB. Glucose was unaffected by CR and RYGB in both groups. Insulin sensitivity was unaffected by CR but improved with RYGB. RYGB exerts powerful and immediate effects on insulin and incretin responses to food, independently of changes caused by CR. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Bariatric Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Recurrent gastric outlet obstruction due to an inguinal hernia.

    OpenAIRE

    Naraynsingh, V.; Sieunarine, K.; Raju, G. C.

    1987-01-01

    Although gastric strangulation in an inguinal hernia has been reported on three previous occasions, recurrent gastric outlet obstruction due to this hernia has not been previously documented. Prolonged traction on the distal stomach by omentum and transverse colon can draw the antrum and pylorus into the hernia and produce gastric outlet obstruction.

  15. Anatomical measurements of the gastric cardia in obese patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hindle, A Katherine; Gonzalez, Florencia; Brody, Fred

    2009-11-01

    Currently, surgeons implant a variety of laparoscopic adjustable gastric bands. However, there is little data to guide the selection process. This study aims to determine the relationship between a patient's body mass index (BMI), height, and weight and the anatomical measurements of the gastric cardia in morbidly obese patients undergoing laparoscopic adjustable gastric band (LAGB) surgery. A total of 67 morbidly obese patients undergoing LAGB surgery were studied. Intraoperative measurements of the gastric cardia were obtained. The relative circumference and posterior diameter of the gastric cardia were measured along with the patient's height, weight, and BMI. Pearson's correlation coefficient was used to measure the relationship between the circumference and posterior diameter of the gastric cardia and the BMI, height, and weight. A p < 0.05 was considered significant. No correlation exists between a patient's BMI or weight and the circumference or diameter of the gastric cardia. A correlation exists between a patient's height and the posterior diameter of the gastric cardia (p = 0.02). Of note, there is a correlation between the relative circumference and the posterior diameter of the gastric cardia for each patient (p = 0.05). Our unique data show no significant correlation between a patient's BMI and weight and the measurements of the gastric cardia. There was a correlation between a patient's height and the posterior diameter of the gastric cardia. These intraoperative measurements may help surgeons objectively select the appropriate band for each respective patient undergoing LAGB surgery. This may potentially decrease postoperative dysphagia.

  16. Mast Cells Density Positive to Tryptase Correlate with Microvascular Density in both Primary Gastric Cancer Tissue and Loco-Regional Lymph Node Metastases from Patients That Have Undergone Radical Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michele Ammendola

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Mast Cells (MCs play a role in immune responses and more recently MCs have been involved in tumoral angiogenesis. In particular MCs can release tryptase, a potent in vivo and in vitro pro-angiogenic factor via proteinase-activated receptor-2 (PAR-2 activation and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK phosphorylation. MCs can release tryptase following c-Kit receptor activation. Nevertheless, no data are available concerning the relationship among MCs Density Positive to Tryptase (MCDPT and Microvascular Density (MVD in both primary gastric cancer tissue and loco-regional lymph node metastases. A series of 75 GC patients with stage T2–3N2–3M0 (by AJCC for Gastric Cancer Seventh Edition undergone to radical surgery were selected for the study. MCDPT and MVD were evaluated by immunohistochemistry and by image analysis system and results were correlated each to other in primary tumor tissue and in metastatic lymph nodes harvested. Furthermore, tissue parameters were correlated with important clinico-pathological features. A significant correlation between MCDPT and MVD was found in primary gastric cancer tissue and lymph node metastases. Pearson t-test analysis (r ranged from 0.74 to 0.79; p-value ranged from 0.001 to 0.003. These preliminary data suggest that MCDPT play a role in angiogenesis in both primary tumor and in lymph node metastases from GC. We suggest that MCs and tryptase could be further evaluated as novel targets for anti-angiogenic therapies.

  17. Gastric cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mineur, L.; Jaegle, E.; Pointreau, Y.; Denis, F.

    2010-01-01

    Radio-chemotherapy Gastro-intestinal inter-group study have demonstrated a convincing local control and overall survival benefit. Oncologists and GI workshops have in the present not had a major interest in the radiotherapy treatment of gastric cancer due to a number of factors. Primary because toxicities may be severe, second physicians may have low experience in definition of clinical target volume and in third perioperative chemotherapy is widely used in this indication. In Summary this issue should be used as guides for defining appropriate radiation planning treatment for the adjuvant postoperative therapy of gastric cancer. (authors)

  18. Intravesical surgical gauze from previous surgery complicating ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this report, we describe the case of surgical gauze left in the abdominal cavity, most probably in the urinary bladder producing massive haematuria 13 years after. This occurred after the patient had received a combination cytotoxic chemotherapy including cyclophosphamide for advanced phase chronic myeloid leukemia.

  19. Preoperative β-cell function in patients with type 2 diabetes is important for the outcome of Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Michael Taulo; Hansen, Merethe; Skaaby, Stinna

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: A major part of the patients with type 2 diabetes (T2DM) show remission after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB). This is the result of increased postoperative insulin sensitivity and β-cell secretion. The aim of the present study was to elucidate the importance of the preoperative β......: Our findings emphasize the importance of the preoperative of β-cell function for remission of diabetes after RYGB. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved....

  20. Portal vein thrombosis following laparoscopic gastric plication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rikabi, S; Chang, A; Durkin, N; Ramar, S

    2017-01-01

    Portal vein thrombosis (PVT) following laparoscopic surgery including Roux-en-Y bypass, sleeve gastrectomy and Nissen’s fundoplication is a rare but recognised complication. Laparoscopic gastric plication in a new procedure that is popular in some parts of the world. We report a case of a patient suffering PVT as a complication of this surgery. PMID:27652795

  1. Portal vein thrombosis following laparoscopic gastric plication

    OpenAIRE

    Som, R; Rikabi, S; Chang, A; Durkin, N; Ramar, S

    2017-01-01

    Portal vein thrombosis (PVT) following laparoscopic surgery including Roux-en-Y bypass, sleeve gastrectomy and Nissen’s fundoplication is a rare but recognised complication. Laparoscopic gastric plication in a new procedure that is popular in some parts of the world. We report a case of a patient suffering PVT as a complication of this surgery.

  2. Diffuse neonatal gastric infarction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, J.F.; Woisard, K.K.; Cooper, G.L.

    1988-01-01

    Diffuse neonatal gastric infarction can be a devastating complication of invasion of the gastric wall and vessels by fungi colonizing the gastric mucosa. Even in the presence of extensive transmural necrosis, however, the radiographs do not necessarily show evidence of gastric mucosal abnormality. Instead, plain films and positive contrast studies may erroneously suggest a mechanical gastric outlet obstruction. Ancillary evidence of a devitalized viscus in a baby who appears to have complete gastric outlet obstruction should suggest the diagnosis of gastric infarction. (orig.)

  3. Diffuse neonatal gastric infarction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, J.F.; Woisard, K.K.; Cooper, G.L.

    1988-02-01

    Diffuse neonatal gastric infarction can be a devastating complication of invasion of the gastric wall and vessels by fungi colonizing the gastric mucosa. Even in the presence of extensive transmural necrosis, however, the radiographs do not necessarily show evidence of gastric mucosal abnormality. Instead, plain films and positive contrast studies may erroneously suggest a mechanical gastric outlet obstruction. Ancillary evidence of a devitalized viscus in a baby who appears to have complete gastric outlet obstruction should suggest the diagnosis of gastric infarction.

  4. Pseudotumoural gastric lesion caused by fish bone perforation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walid Al-Deeb

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available

    We report the case of a 34-year-old previously fit and healthy male who presented to the accident & emergency department with non-specific abdominal pain. The patient proceeded to undergo laparotomy at which a large mass was found adjacent to the stomach. The impression at surgery was of a lymphoma or gastric carcinoma though CT had reported the likelihood of a fish bone or foreign body causing duodenal perforation. Histology later confirmed the presence of a fish bone surrounded by reactive tissue.

  5. and Gastric Cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebahattin Celik

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To examine the relationship between esophageal and gastric cancers commonly seen in Van Lake region and the traditional eating habits of the geography. Materials and Methods. Esophageal and gastric cancer cases, who underwent surgery between January 1, 2012, and December 31, 2013, were examined. Pathology reports of the patients and presence of Helicobacter pylori (HP were recorded. Surveys were filled by face to face meeting or telephone call. Control group was created with randomly selected individuals without any cancer diagnosis having age, gender, and socioeconomic characteristics similar to patient group. All data were analyzed using SAS.9.3 statistical programme. Results. Compared with the control group, herby cheese consumption (a component of eating habits and smoking were significantly higher in the patient group (P<0.001. Tandoor exposure is compared in terms of female gender, and significant difference was found between the groups (P=0.0013. As a result of the analysis with logistic regression more than 150 gr of herby cheese consumption per day was found to increase the cancer risk (odds ratio 1.017; 95% CI: 1.012–1.022. Conclusion. A high consumption of herby cheese, cooking bread on tandoor, and heavy smoking were seen to be important risk factors for esophageal and gastric cancers.

  6. Primary gastric tuberculosis – report of 5 cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patel Nikhil D

    2003-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gastric tuberculosis is rare, and usually associated with pulmonary tuberculosis or an immunodeficient state. Here, we report five cases of gastric tuberculosis in immunocompetent patients without evidence of pulmonary involvement. Case presentation Three patients presented with gastric outlet obstruction that required surgery to relieve the obstruction as well as to confirm the diagnosis. The remaining two had involvement of gastroesophageal junction. All of them responded well to standard antitubercular treatment. Conclusion Though gastric tuberculosis is rare, it should be considered a possibility when patients present with gastric outlet obstruction or with endoscopic evidence of diffuse chronic inflammatory activity, particularly in areas endemic for tuberculosis.

  7. Laparoscopy After Previous Laparotomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zulfo Godinjak

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Following the abdominal surgery, extensive adhesions often occur and they can cause difficulties during laparoscopic operations. However, previous laparotomy is not considered to be a contraindication for laparoscopy. The aim of this study is to present that an insertion of Veres needle in the region of umbilicus is a safe method for creating a pneumoperitoneum for laparoscopic operations after previous laparotomy. In the last three years, we have performed 144 laparoscopic operations in patients that previously underwent one or two laparotomies. Pathology of digestive system, genital organs, Cesarean Section or abdominal war injuries were the most common causes of previouslaparotomy. During those operations or during entering into abdominal cavity we have not experienced any complications, while in 7 patients we performed conversion to laparotomy following the diagnostic laparoscopy. In all patients an insertion of Veres needle and trocar insertion in the umbilical region was performed, namely a technique of closed laparoscopy. Not even in one patient adhesions in the region of umbilicus were found, and no abdominal organs were injured.

  8. Differential Acute Impacts of Sleeve Gastrectomy, Roux-en-Y Gastric Bypass Surgery and Matched Caloric Restriction Diet on Insulin Secretion, Insulin Effectiveness and Non-Esterified Fatty Acid Levels Among Patients with Type 2 Diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Felicity; Smith, Greg C; Lu, Jun; Babor, Richard; Booth, Michael; Beban, Grant; Chase, J Geoffrey; Murphy, Rinki

    2016-08-01

    Bariatric surgery is an increasingly common option for control of type 2 diabetes (T2D) and obesity. Mechanisms underlying rapid improvement of T2D after different types of bariatric surgery are not clear. Caloric deprivation and altered levels of non-esterified fatty acid (NEFA) have been proposed. This study examines how sleeve gastrectomy (SG), Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (GBP) or matched hypocaloric diet (DT) achieves improvements in T2D by characterising components of the glucose metabolism and NEFA levels before and 3 days after each intervention. Plasma samples at five time points during oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) from subjects with T2D undergoing GBP (N = 11) or SG (N = 12) were analysed for C-peptide, insulin and glucose before surgery and 3-day post-intervention or after DT (N = 5). Fasting palmitic, linoleic, oleic and stearic acid were measured. C-peptide measurements were used to model insulin secretion rate (ISR) using deconvolution. Subjects who underwent GBP surgery experienced the greatest improvement in glycaemia (median reduction in blood glucose (BG) from basal by 29 % [IQR -57, -18]) and the greatest reduction in all NEFA measured. SG achieved improvement in glycaemia with lower ISR and reduction in all but palmitoleic acid. DT subjects achieved improvement in glycaemia with an increase in ISR, 105 % [IQR, 20, 220] and stearic acid. GBP, SG and DT each improve glucose metabolism through different effects on pancreatic beta cell function, insulin sensitivity and free fatty acids.

  9. Breed predisposition to canine gastric carcinoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seim-Wikse, Tonje; Jörundsson, Einar; Nødtvedt, Ane

    2013-01-01

    Previous research has indicated a breed predisposition to gastric carcinoma in dogs. However, results to date are inconsistent since several studies have failed to prove such a predisposition. Better knowledge of breeds at risk could facilitate early detection of gastric carcinoma in dogs. The aim...

  10. Ulcer, gastric surgery and pancreatic cancer risk: an analysis from the International Pancreatic Cancer Case–Control Consortium (PanC4)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosetti, C.; Lucenteforte, E.; Bracci, P. M.; Negri, E.; Neale, R. E.; Risch, H. A.; Olson, S. H.; Gallinger, S.; Miller, A. B.; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H. B.; Talamini, R.; Polesel, J.; Ghadirian, P.; Baghurst, P. A.; Zatonski, W.; Fontham, E.; Holly, E. A.; Gao, Y. T.; Yu, H.; Kurtz, R. C.; Cotterchio, M.; Maisonneuve, P.; Zeegers, M. P.; Duell, E. J.; Boffetta, P.; La Vecchia, C.

    2013-01-01

    Background Peptic ulcer and its treatments have been associated to pancreatic cancer risk, although the evidence is inconsistent. Methods We pooled 10 case–control studies within the Pancreatic Cancer Case–control Consortium (PanC4), including 4717 pancreatic cancer cases and 9374 controls, and estimated summary odds ratios (OR) using multivariable logistic regression models. Results The OR for pancreatic cancer was 1.10 [95% confidence interval (CI) 0.98–1.23] for history of ulcer (OR = 1.08 for gastric and 0.97 for duodenal ulcer). The association was stronger for a diagnosis within 2 years before cancer diagnosis (OR = 2.43 for peptic, 1.75 for gastric, and 1.98 for duodenal ulcer). The OR was 1.53 (95% CI 1.15–2.03) for history of gastrectomy; however, the excess risk was limited to a gastrectomy within 2 years before cancer diagnosis (OR = 6.18, 95% CI 1.82–20.96), while no significant increased risk was observed for longer time since gastrectomy. No associations were observed for pharmacological treatments for ulcer, such as antacids, H2-receptor antagonists, or proton-pump inhibitors. Conclusions This uniquely large collaborative study does not support the hypothesis that peptic ulcer and its treatment materially affect pancreatic cancer risk. The increased risk for short-term history of ulcer and gastrectomy suggests that any such association is due to increased cancer surveillance. PMID:23970016

  11. Ulcer, gastric surgery and pancreatic cancer risk: an analysis from the International Pancreatic Cancer Case-Control Consortium (PanC4).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosetti, C; Lucenteforte, E; Bracci, P M; Negri, E; Neale, R E; Risch, H A; Olson, S H; Gallinger, S; Miller, A B; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H B; Talamini, R; Polesel, J; Ghadirian, P; Baghurst, P A; Zatonski, W; Fontham, E; Holly, E A; Gao, Y T; Yu, H; Kurtz, R C; Cotterchio, M; Maisonneuve, P; Zeegers, M P; Duell, E J; Boffetta, P; La Vecchia, C

    2013-11-01

    Peptic ulcer and its treatments have been associated to pancreatic cancer risk, although the evidence is inconsistent. We pooled 10 case-control studies within the Pancreatic Cancer Case-control Consortium (PanC4), including 4717 pancreatic cancer cases and 9374 controls, and estimated summary odds ratios (OR) using multivariable logistic regression models. The OR for pancreatic cancer was 1.10 [95% confidence interval (CI) 0.98-1.23] for history of ulcer (OR = 1.08 for gastric and 0.97 for duodenal ulcer). The association was stronger for a diagnosis within 2 years before cancer diagnosis (OR = 2.43 for peptic, 1.75 for gastric, and 1.98 for duodenal ulcer). The OR was 1.53 (95% CI 1.15-2.03) for history of gastrectomy; however, the excess risk was limited to a gastrectomy within 2 years before cancer diagnosis (OR = 6.18, 95% CI 1.82-20.96), while no significant increased risk was observed for longer time since gastrectomy. No associations were observed for pharmacological treatments for ulcer, such as antacids, H2-receptor antagonists, or proton-pump inhibitors. This uniquely large collaborative study does not support the hypothesis that peptic ulcer and its treatment materially affect pancreatic cancer risk. The increased risk for short-term history of ulcer and gastrectomy suggests that any such association is due to increased cancer surveillance.

  12. Difficulties of Bariatric Surgery after Abdominoplasty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bora Karip

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available During laparoscopy, the main problems of patients who have undergone previous abdominoplasty are inadequate pneumoperitoneum secondary to fibrosis and reconstructed anatomic landmarks for trocar placement. In this study, we present our laparoscopic bariatric experience in two patients with previous abdominoplasty. The procedures were a laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy and a robotic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass. Both operations were done successfully by an abdominal wall traction technique, cutting fibrotic tissue and choosing new landmarks. We conclude that after abdominoplasty bariatric surgery can be performed safely either using conventional laparoscopic technique or robotically.

  13. Gastric schwannoma: CT findings and clinicopathologic correlation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Jian-song; Lu, Chen-ying; Mao, Wei-bo; Wang, Zu-fei; Xu, Min

    2015-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the computed tomography (CT) imaging characteristics of gastric schwannoma. Eight cases of gastric schwannomas confirmed by surgery and pathology were retrospectively analyzed by CT. We reviewed the CT findings of gastric schwannomas for the following characteristics: tumor location, size, contour, margin, growth pattern, enhancement pattern, the presence or absence of necrosis, and perigastric lymph nodes. The tumors were located in the lesser curvature of gastric body (n = 5) and greater curvature of the gastric antrum (n = 3) with a median size of 4.8 cm (range 1.7-11.4 cm). Gastric schwannomas appeared as submucosal tumors with CT features of ovoid (7/8 patients), well-defined (8/8) and exophytic (4/8) or mixed (3/8) growth patterns. On dynamic CT examination, the tumors displayed homogeneous enhancement in seven cases and heterogeneous enhancement in one case. Solid parts of eight tumors demonstrated mild enhancement during the arterial phase and strengthened progressive enhancement during the venous and delayed phases. Two cases had perigastric lymph nodes. Gastric schwannomas typically manifested as ovoid, well-defined, exophytic, or mixed growth pattern masses on CT. Homogeneous progressive enhancement on dynamic CT is a characteristic finding of gastric schwannoma.

  14. Gastric bypass for obesity in the elderly: is it as appropriate as for young and middle-aged populations?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert, Maud; Pasquer, Arnaud; Espalieu, Philippe; Laville, Martine; Gouillat, Christian; Disse, Emmanuel

    2014-10-01

    Obesity prevalence increases in elderly population. Bariatric surgery has been underused in patients over 60 because of fears of complications and lower weight loss. We postulated worse outcomes in the elderly in comparison to young and middle-aged population 1 year after gastric bypass. We retrospectively analyzed gastric bypass outcomes in young (elderly (>60 years) patients between 2007 and 2013. Each subject over 60 (n = 24) was matched with one subject of both the other groups according to gender, preoperative body mass index (BMI), surgical procedure, and history of previous bariatric surgery (n = 72). Older subjects demonstrated higher prevalence of preoperative metabolic comorbidities (70 vs 30 % in the elderly patients (percentage of excess BMI loss (EBL%), 74.4 ± 3.5; 78.9 ± 4.5, and 73.7 ± 4.5 respectively, p = 0.69). Age was not predictive of weight loss failure 1 year after surgery. Remission and improvement rates of comorbidities were similar between age groups 6 months after surgery. Our study confirms weight loss efficacy of gastric bypass in the elderly with acceptable risks. Further studies evaluating the benefit-risk balance of bariatric surgery in the elderly population will be required so as to confirm the relevance of increasing age limit.

  15. Reoperative bariatric surgery for treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Jingliang; Cohen, Ricardo; Aminian, Ali

    2017-08-01

    Primary bariatric surgery has been proven to be effective in weight loss and improvement of weight-related metabolic co-morbidities. However, a small proportion of patients after bariatric surgery either have persistent hyperglycemia or relapse after initial remission of their metabolic disease. Revisional bariatric surgery has been evaluated extensively for weight recidivism and postoperative complications. However, there has not been any high-level evidence validating the utility of revisional bariatric surgery on recurrent metabolic diseases, especially diabetes. In this review of 30 studies, we aimed to summarize the evidence and determine whether revisional surgery can have a positive impact on metabolic diseases that were not reversed by initial bariatric intervention. Overall, 14-38% of patients had residual diabetes at the time of revisional surgery. Depending on the index surgery and subsequent reconstruction, revisions induced 20-80% additional excess weight loss, or further decrease of body mass index by 10-30%. Improvement of diabetes was seen in 65-100% of patients. Specifically, conversion to Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) yielded improvement of diabetes in 79%, 72%, and 62% of patients who previously had vertical banded gastroplasty (VBG), adjustable gastric banding (AGB), or sleeve gastrectomy (SG), respectively. Converting AGB to SG improved diabetes in 65% of patients, and SG to duodenal switch improved diabetes in 79% of patients. Revision of the gastric pouch or stoma in RYGB yielded improvement of diabetes in 79% of patients. Further clinical and mechanistic research is needed to better delineate the role of revisional bariatric surgery in patients with residual metabolic disease. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Bariatric Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery of morbidly obese patients induces swift and persistent changes of the individual gut microbiota

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Palleja, Albert; Kashani, Alireza; Allin, Kristine Højgaard

    2016-01-01

    Background: Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) is an effective means to achieve sustained weight loss for morbidly obese individuals. Besides rapid weight reduction, patients achieve major improvements of insulin sensitivity and glucose homeostasis. Dysbiosis of gut microbiota has been associated...... with obesity and some of its co-morbidities, like type 2 diabetes, and major changes of gut microbial communities have been hypothesized to mediate part of the beneficial metabolic effects observed after RYGB. Here we describe changes in gut microbial taxonomic composition and functional potential following...... RYGB. Methods: We recruited 13 morbidly obese patients who underwent RYGB, carefully phenotyped them, and had their gut microbiomes quantified before (n = 13) and 3 months (n = 12) and 12 months (n = 8) after RYGB. Following shotgun metagenomic sequencing of the fecal microbial DNA purified from stools...

  17. Improvements in glucose metabolism early after gastric bypass surgery are not explained by increases in total bile acids and fibroblast growth factor 19 concentrations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Nils B; Dirksen, Carsten; Bojsen-Møller, Kirstine N

    2015-01-01

    RYGB and relate them to parameters of glucose metabolism, glucagon-like peptide-1, cholecystokinin, and cholesterol fractions. Design and Setting: A prospective descriptive study was performed at the Department of Endocrinology, Hvidovre Hospital, Hvidovre, Denmark. Patients: Thirteen type 2 diabetic......-density lipoprotein-cholesterol and high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol decreased, and cholecystokinin and glucagon-like peptide-1 secretion increased, whereas FFA concentrations were unchanged. Conclusion: TBA and FGF19 do not explain acute changes in glucose metabolism, cholesterol fractions, and gut hormone......Context: Bile acids and fibroblast growth factor 19 (FGF19) have been suggested as key mediators of the improvements in glucose metabolism after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB). Objective: To describe fasting and postprandial state total bile acid (TBA) and FGF19 concentrations before and after...

  18. Calorie restriction is a major determinant of the short-term metabolic effects of gastric bypass surgery in obese type 2 diabetic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lips, Mirjam A; de Groot, Gerrit H; van Klinken, Jan B; Aarts, Edo; Berends, Frits J; Janssen, Ignace M; Van Ramshorst, Bert; Van Wagensveld, Bart A; Swank, Dingeman J; Van Dielen, Francois; Willems van Dijk, Ko; Pijl, Hanno

    2014-06-01

    Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) and restrictive weight loss interventions, such as gastric banding (GB) and very-low-calorie diets (VLCD) directly impact glucose metabolism, possibly by calorie restriction and/or altered secretion of gut hormones. We aimed to establish the direct endocrine and metabolic effects of RYGB compared to restrictive interventions in obese glucose-tolerant (NGT) subjects and subjects with type 2 diabetes (T2DM). Controlled, nonrandomized observational trial. Four groups of obese females received a mixed meal at baseline and 3 weeks after intervention; NGT-GB (n = 11), NGT-RYGB (n = 16), T2DM-RYGB (n = 15) and T2DM-VLCD (n = 12). Normal weight controls (n = 12) were studied once. At baseline, all obese subjects were hyperinsulinemic. T2DM was associated with hyperglycaemia and decreased GLP-1 levels. RYGB and VLCD reduced glucose levels to a similar extent in T2DM, insulin levels decreased only after VLCD. Comparison of restrictive intervention vs RYGB showed a more pronounced decrease in glucose and insulin AUC after restriction. In NGT and T2DM subjects, RYGB increased GLP-1 and PYY levels and decreased ghrelin levels, whereas VLCD and GB only increased GIP levels. These data indicate that deterioration of glucose metabolism in T2DM is associated with a decline of GLP-1 levels. Calorie restriction facilitates glucose metabolism and blunts hyperinsulinemia in obese (diabetic) humans. Additional duodenal exclusion through RYGB induces gut hormone release and hyperinsulinemia but does not improve postprandial glucose levels any further. Our data thus strongly suggest that calorie restriction underlies the short-term metabolic benefits of RYGB in obese T2DM patients. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Acute gastric dilatation secondary to septicemia in newborn: A rare ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... case of acute gastric dilatation that developed in a two-days old child who was born premature and was suffering from septicemia and respiratory distress. The causes and the differential diagnosis of the rare condition are discussed. Keywords: Acute, dilatation, gastric, newborn. African Journal of Paediatric Surgery Vol.

  20. Gastric Outlet Obstruction from Duodenal Lipoma in an Adult ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Gastric Outlet Obstruction from Duodenal Lipoma in an Adult. ... Nigerian Journal of Surgery ... Although, peptic ulcer disease remains the most common benign cause of gastric outlet obstruction (GOO), duodenal lipomas remain a rare, but possible cause of GOO and could pose a diagnostic challenge, especially in ...

  1. Ectopic pancreas causing partial gastric outlet obstruction: a case ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ectopic pancreas causing partial gastric outlet obstruction: a case report and review of literature. ... Nigerian Journal of Surgery ... Gastric outlet obstruction resulting from ectopic pancreas in an adult is the first of its kind in our center; we, therefore, present this case to describe the challenges faced with diagnosis, treatment, ...

  2. Gastrojejunostomy for gastric outlet obstruction in patients with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Sixty patients were discharged from hospital having resumed normal eating. Their median survival after surgery was 9 months. Conclusion. Gastrojejunostomy offers worthwhile palliation and may prolong survival in a significant group of patients with irresectable gastric carcinoma and gastric outlet obstruction. South African ...

  3. Predisposing factors for developing gastric volvulus and the role of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A barium upper gastrointestinal tract study demonstrated a sliding hiatus hernia, mesentero-axial gastric volvulus and no outlet obstruction (Fig. 2a and b), accounting for the presenting symptoms. The patient was referred for decompression of the stomach and surgery to address the underlying cause of the gastric volvulus.

  4. Diagnostic tools for post-gastric bypass hypoglycaemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Emous, M.; Ubels, F. L.; van Beek, A. P.

    2015-01-01

    In spite of its evident success, several late complications can occur after gastric bypass surgery. One of these is post-gastric bypass hypoglycaemia. No evidence-based guidelines exist in the literature on how to confirm the presence of this syndrome. This study aims to describe and compare the

  5. [Difficult and unusual diagnostic and therapeutic gastric Schwannoma case].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frejlich, Ewelina; Rudno-Rudzińska, Julia; Hałoń, Agnieszka; Kielan, Wojciech; Grzebianiak, Zygmunt

    2013-01-01

    Schwannoma is a rare, usually benign, generally slow growing, asymptomatic mesenchymal neoplasm derived from nerve cells. In the gastrointestinal tract the most common localization is stomach and the gastric schwannomas represent about 0.2% of all gastric neoplasms. We present a case of 44-years-old male admitted to 2nd Department of General Surgery and Oncological Surgery Medical University for treatment of a submucosal gastric tumor detected in upper gastrointestinal endoscopy, endoscopic ultrasonography and computed tomography (CT). Patient presented with no gastrointestinal disorders and the random endoscopy revealed a gastric tumor, but the biopsy of the lesion showed no carcinomas' cells and the suspicion of GIST. CT confirms the presence of the 5 cm large gastric tumor and intraabdominal lymphadenopathy. The patient was directed to surgery because of the malignant risk. The subtotal gastrectomy with BII anastomosis was performed and no perioperative complications were observed. The postoperative histopathological examination revealed a typical morphology and immunophenotype of tumor. The neoplastic cells were immunoreactive with S-100 protein, but lacked immunoreactivity with CD 117, CD 34 and smooth-muscle actin (SMA). The histopathologic features and immunohistochemical staining pattern were consistent with a gastric schwannoma. The lymph nodes resected, during the operation revealed reactive inflammatory changes without evidence of neoplastic cells and any malignancy. 10-month after the surgery patient has no complains but the follow up will be continued. This case underscores the importance of including gastric schwannomas in the differential diagnosis when preoperative imaging studies reveal a submucosal, exophytic gastric mass.

  6. Gastropulmonary Fistula after Bariatric Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maya Doumit

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The Roux-en-Y gastric bypass is one of the most common operations for morbid obesity. Although rare, gastropulmonary fistulas are an important complication of this procedure. There is only one recently reported case of this complication. The present report describes the serious nature of this complication in a patient after an uneventful laparoscopic gastric bypass surgery.

  7. Optimizing postoperative outcomes after gastric bypass surgery-the influence of dietary protein and its amino acid composition: A systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Den Broek, M.; De Heide, L.J.M.; Veeger, N.J.G.M.; Van Der Wal-Oost, A.M.; Van Beek, A.P.

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims: Bariatric surgery has emerged as an effective method to reduce morbid obesity. Nutritional counseling is essential in order to achieve maximal treatment success and to avoid long term complications. Increased dietary protein intake or its amino acid composition could have

  8. Prolonged successful therapy for hyperinsulinaemic hypoglycaemia after gastric bypass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Myint, K S; Greenfield, J R; Farooqi, I S

    2012-01-01

    Spontaneous hyperinsulinaemic hypoglycaemia following gastric bypass surgery (GBS) is increasingly recognised. However, its pathophysiology remains unclear. Some patients require pancreatectomy. Medical therapy with calcium channel blockers, acarbose and diazoxide has been reported to be beneficial...

  9. Delayed ulcer recurrence after gastric resection: a new postgastrectomy syndrome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Browder, W; Thompson, J; Youngberg, G; Walters, D

    1997-12-01

    Recurrent ulceration following gastrectomy for peptic ulcer disease typically occurs within the first several years postoperatively. Since 1990, we have managed 20 patients who had undergone previous gastrectomy for peptic ulcer and developed ulcer recurrence more than 10 years postoperatively. Mean age at recurrence was 64 years, and the average time from original surgery to recurrent ulceration was 21 years (range, 10-36 years). All patients had undergone vagotomy and antrectomy (17 patients) or subtotal gastrectomy (3 patients). Presenting symptoms included gastric outlet obstruction (70%) and bezoar formation (60%). Endoscopic findings in this group of patients included a stenotic gastric outlet (70%) and marginal ulcerations (80%). Thirteen of 15 patients tested (87%) were Helicobacter pylori positive. Reoperation included partial resection of the gastric pouch and exploration for persistent vagus nerve. Twelve patients underwent Roux-en-Y reconstruction, whereas eight patients had Bilroth II reconstruction. Three of the latter group also had Braun enteroenterostomy performed. Good to excellent clinical results were obtained in 80 per cent of patients. The four patients with poor outcomes shared the following characteristics: 1) H. pylori-positive status, 2) presence of a preoperative bezoar, 3) Roux-en-Y reconstruction. Our current approach is to avoid Roux-en-Y construction in favor of Braun enteroenterostomy. Further prospective analysis of long-term postgastrectomy patients is needed to determine whether this clinical picture represents a new postgastrectomy syndrome.

  10. Hypocalcemia after thyroidectomy in patients with a history of bariatric surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chereau, Nathalie; Vuillermet, Cindy; Tilly, Camille; Buffet, Camille; Trésallet, Christophe; du Montcel, Sophie Tezenas; Menegaux, Fabrice

    2017-03-01

    Hypocalcemia is a common complication after total thyroidectomy. Previous bariatric surgery could be a higher factor risk for hypocalcemia due to alterations in calcium absorption and vitamin D deficiency. To evaluate incidence and factors involved in the risk of hypocalcemia (transient and permanent) and the postoperative outcomes of these patients after total thyroidectomy. University hospital in Paris, France. All patients who had previously undergone obesity surgery (i.e., Roux-en-Y gastric bypass, sleeve gastrectomy, or adjustable gastric band) who had a total thyroidectomy from 2006 to 2015 were included. No patient was lost to follow-up. Each patient was matched 1:1 with a patient who had no previous bariatric surgery for age, gender, body mass index, and year of surgery. Forty-eight patients were identified (43 female; mean age 48.9±9.2 yr). Nineteen patients (40%) had a postoperative hypocalcemia: transient in 14 patients (29.2%) and permanent in 5 patients (10.4%). No significant predictive clinical or biochemical factors were found for hypocalcemia risk, except for the type of bariatric procedure: Bypass surgery had a 2-fold increased risk of hypocalcemia compared to others procedures (60% versus 30%, P = .05). In the matched pair analysis, the risk of hypocalcemia was significantly higher in patients with previous bariatric surgery than in the matched cohort (40% versus 15%, P = .006). Patients with previous bariatric surgery have an increased risk for hypocalcemia after total thyroidectomy, especially after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass. Careful and prolonged follow-up of calcium, vitamin D, and parathyroid hormone levels should be suggested for these patients. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Bariatric Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Gastric lactobezoar - a rare disorder?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heinz-Erian Peter

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Gastric lactobezoar, a pathological conglomeration of milk and mucus in the stomach of milk-fed infants often causing gastric outlet obstruction, is a rarely reported disorder (96 cases since its first description in 1959. While most patients were described 1975-1985 only 26 children have been published since 1986. Clinically, gastric lactobezoars frequently manifest as acute abdomen with abdominal distension (61.0% of 96 patients, vomiting (54.2%, diarrhea (21.9%, and/or a palpable abdominal mass (19.8%. Respiratory (23.0% and cardiocirculatory (16.7% symptoms are not uncommon. The pathogenesis of lactobezoar formation is multifactorial: exogenous influences such as high casein content (54.2%, medium chain triglycerides (54.2% or enhanced caloric density (65.6% of infant milk as well as endogenous factors including immature gastrointestinal functions (66.0%, dehydration (27.5% and many other mechanisms have been suggested. Diagnosis is easy if the potential presence of a gastric lactobezoar is thought of, and is based on a history of inappropriate milk feeding, signs of acute abdomen and characteristic features of diagnostic imaging. Previously, plain and/or air-, clear fluid- or opaque contrast medium radiography techniques were used to demonstrate a mass free-floating in the lumen of the stomach. This feature differentiates a gastric lactobezoar from intussusception or an abdominal neoplasm. Currently, abdominal ultrasound, showing highly echogenic intrabezoaric air trapping, is the diagnostic method of choice. However, identifying a gastric lactobezoar requires an investigator experienced in gastrointestinal problems of infancy as can be appreciated from the results of our review which show that in not even a single patient gastric lactobezoar was initially considered as a possible differential diagnosis. Furthermore, in over 30% of plain radiographs reported, diagnosis was initially missed although a lactobezoar was clearly

  12. [Gastric mesenchymal tumours (GIST)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spivach, Arrigo; Fezzi, Margherita; Sartori, Alberto; Belgrano, Manuel; Rimondini, Alessandra; Cuttin-Zernich, Roberto; Covab, Maria Assunta; Bonifacio, Daniela; Buri, Luigi; Pagani, Carlo; Zanconati, Fabrizio

    2008-01-01

    The incidence of gastrointestinal stromal tumours (GIST) has increased in recent years. A number of authors have attempted to define the actual nature of these tumours. Immunohistochemistry highlighting the positivity of tyrosine-kinase (CD117/c-Kit) has revealed the difference between gastrointestinal stromal tumours and other mesenchymal tumours and, therefore, the possibility of medical rather than surgical therapy. We retrospectively reviewed 19 patients affected by primary gastric GIST, who underwent surgery in recent years with subsequent follow-up. Gastroscopy and gastrointestinal tract radiography were used not only to obtain the diagnosis but also to establish the size, density, contours, ulceration, regional lymphadenopathy, mesenteric infiltration and the presence of metastases. The aim of this study was to evaluate the roles of endoscopy and radiology in this pathology and the advantages and limitations of each individual technique.

  13. Automated analysis of gastric emptying

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abutaleb, A.; Frey, D.; Spicer, K.; Spivey, M.; Buckles, D.

    1986-01-01

    The authors devised a novel method to automate the analysis of nuclear gastric emptying studies. Many previous methods have been used to measure gastric emptying but, are cumbersome and require continuing interference by the operator to use. Two specific problems that occur are related to patient movement between images and changes in the location of the radioactive material within the stomach. Their method can be used with either dual or single phase studies. For dual phase studies the authors use In-111 labeled water and Tc-99MSC (Sulfur Colloid) labeled scrambled eggs. For single phase studies either the liquid or solid phase material is used

  14. Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery of morbidly obese patients induces swift and persistent changes of the individual gut microbiota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palleja, Albert; Kashani, Alireza; Allin, Kristine H; Nielsen, Trine; Zhang, Chenchen; Li, Yin; Brach, Thorsten; Liang, Suisha; Feng, Qiang; Jørgensen, Nils Bruun; Bojsen-Møller, Kirstine N; Dirksen, Carsten; Burgdorf, Kristoffer S; Holst, Jens J; Madsbad, Sten; Wang, Jun; Pedersen, Oluf; Hansen, Torben; Arumugam, Manimozhiyan

    2016-06-15

    Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) is an effective means to achieve sustained weight loss for morbidly obese individuals. Besides rapid weight reduction, patients achieve major improvements of insulin sensitivity and glucose homeostasis. Dysbiosis of gut microbiota has been associated with obesity and some of its co-morbidities, like type 2 diabetes, and major changes of gut microbial communities have been hypothesized to mediate part of the beneficial metabolic effects observed after RYGB. Here we describe changes in gut microbial taxonomic composition and functional potential following RYGB. We recruited 13 morbidly obese patients who underwent RYGB, carefully phenotyped them, and had their gut microbiomes quantified before (n = 13) and 3 months (n = 12) and 12 months (n = 8) after RYGB. Following shotgun metagenomic sequencing of the fecal microbial DNA purified from stools, we characterized the gut microbial composition at species and gene levels followed by functional annotation. In parallel with the weight loss and metabolic improvements, gut microbial diversity increased within the first 3 months after RYGB and remained high 1 year later. RYGB led to altered relative abundances of 31 species (P RYGB, their gut microbiota featured an increased diversity, an altered composition, an increased potential for oxygen tolerance, and an increased potential for microbial utilization of macro- and micro-nutrients. These changes were maintained for the first year post-RYGB. Current controlled trials (ID NCT00810823 , NCT01579981 , and NCT01993511 ).

  15. PYY-Dependent Restoration of Impaired Insulin and Glucagon Secretion in Type 2 Diabetes following Roux-En-Y Gastric Bypass Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reshma D. Ramracheya

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB is a weight-reduction procedure resulting in rapid resolution of type 2 diabetes (T2D. The role of pancreatic islet function in this restoration of normoglycemia has not been fully elucidated. Using the diabetic Goto-Kakizaki (GK rat model, we demonstrate that RYGB restores normal glucose regulation of glucagon and insulin secretion and normalizes islet morphology. Culture of isolated islets with serum from RYGB animals mimicked these effects, implicating a humoral factor. These latter effects were reversed following neutralization of the gut hormone peptide tyrosine tyrosine (PYY but persisted in the presence of a glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1 receptor antagonist. The effects of RYGB on secretion were replicated by chronic exposure of diabetic rat islets to PYY in vitro. These findings indicate that the mechanism underlying T2D remission may be mediated by PYY and suggest that drugs promoting PYY release or action may restore pancreatic islet function in T2D.

  16. The role of perioperative chewing gum on gastric fluid volume and gastric pH: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouanes, Jean-Pierre P; Bicket, Mark C; Togioka, Brandon; Tomas, Vicente Garcia; Wu, Christopher L; Murphy, Jamie D

    2015-03-01

    To determine if preoperative gum chewing affects gastric pH and gastric fluid volume. Systematic review and meta-analysis. Data sources included Cochrane, PubMed, and EMBASE databases from inception to June 2012 and reference lists of known relevant articles without language restriction. Randomized controlled trials in which a treatment group that chewed gum was compared to a control group that fasted were included. Relevant data, including main outcomes of gastric fluid volume and gastric pH, were extracted. Four studies involving 287 patients were included. The presence of chewing gum was associated with small but statically significant increases in gastric fluid volume (mean difference = 0.21 mL/kg; 95% confidence interval, 0.02-0.39; P = .03) but not in gastric pH (mean difference = 0.11 mL/kg; 95% confidence interval, -0.14 to 0.36; P = .38). Gastric fluid volume and gastric pH remained unchanged in subgroup analysis by either sugar or sugarless gum type. Chewing gum in the perioperative period causes small but statically significant increases in gastric fluid volume and no change in gastric pH. The increase in gastric fluid most likely is of no clinical significance in terms of aspiration risk for the patient. Elective surgery should not necessarily be canceled or delayed in healthy patients who accidentally chew gum preoperatively. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Malnutrition secondary to non-compliance with vitamin and mineral supplements after gastric bypass surgery: What can we do about it?

    OpenAIRE

    Ahmad, Dina S.; Esmadi, Mohammad; Hammad, Hazem

    2012-01-01

    Summary Background: Nutritional deficiency due to loss of follow up and non-compliance with routine mineral and multivitamin supplements is not uncommonly encountered following bariatric surgery. In this report, and utilizing a case study, we will address issues related to loss of long term medical follow up and the measures that can be taken to prevent it in this patient population. Case Report: The case of a 38-year-old female patient who was recently managed for severe vitamin deficiency a...

  18. Minimally invasive surgery for stomach cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunobe, Souya; Kumagai, Koshi; Ida, Satoshi; Ohashi, Manabu; Hiki, Naoki

    2016-05-01

    Laparoscopic surgery for gastric cancer has become extremely widespread in recent years especially in Asian countries due to its low invasiveness. As to evidence of indication for laparoscopic surgery for gastric cancer, laparoscopic surgery for gastric cancer often appears to be indicated for early gastric cancer at many institutions, while evidence was considered to be insufficient to recommend laparoscopic surgery for gastric cancer at Stage II and above. There are also problems with indications for cases other than tumour factors. No meta-analyses and prospective studies have been reported, but outcomes of laparoscopic surgery for gastric cancer in gastric cancer patients with co-morbid and/or existing diseases have been reported in retrospective studies. Indications in the elderly appear to be favourable in terms of post-operative ambulation considering factors such as the degree of dissection in accordance with the status of the patient. Meta-analyses, randomized controlled trials and several retrospective studies have compared the short-term usefulness of laparoscopic surgery for gastric cancer with that of conventional gastrectomy. The superiority of laparoscopic surgery for gastric cancer has been reported in terms of the reduced amount of bleeding, a reduction in the administration frequency and period of analgesic doses, a reduction in the duration of fever, early recovery of intestinal movement and early return to oral intake. A small-scale randomized controlled trial and several retrospective studies have demonstrated no significant differences in survival rate, recurrence rate and type of recurrence between laparoscopic surgery for gastric cancer and conventional gastrectomy. The results of the aforementioned trials in early gastric cancer in Japan and Korea for which enrolment is complete remain to be published. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. The Effect of Roux-en-Y Gastric Bypass and Sleeve Gastrectomy Surgery on Dietary Intake, Food Preferences, and Gastrointestinal Symptoms in Post-Surgical Morbidly Obese Lebanese Subjects: A Cross-Sectional Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Labban, Sibelle; Safadi, Bassem; Olabi, Ammar

    2015-12-01

    Data on gastrointestinal (GI) and dietary changes following bariatric surgery are scarce in the Middle Eastern region. The objective of this work was to retrospectively compare dietary intake, food preferences, and GI symptoms in subjects with extreme obesity after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) and sleeve gastrectomy (SG). Sixty subjects equally divided between RYGB and SG with a postoperative period of ≥6 months were recruited for a retrospective, non-randomized, and observational study. All subjects completed three questionnaires (GI symptoms, food preferences, and quantitative food frequency questionnaire (FFQ)) and three 24-h recalls. At one year postoperatively, both surgical groups showed similar percentage of excess weight loss that exceeded 50%. In addition, percentage of carbohydrate, protein, and sugar intake from total energy, frequency of daily consumption from the eight food categories and daily energy intake were comparable between surgical groups. RYGB subjects consumed significantly more fruits and juices from total energy (P fast heartbeat (P food preferences between RYGB and SG groups. There was a trend for sweet-eating in SG subjects with less dumping symptoms to suggest different mechanisms of action for each procedure, which might impact eating behavior.

  20. Gastric metastasis from invasive lobular breast cancer, mimicking primary gastric cancer: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dae Hoon; Son, Seung-Myoung; Choi, Young Jin

    2018-03-01

    Gastric metastasis from invasive lobular breast cancer is relatively rare, commonly presented among multiple metastases, several years after primary diagnosis of breast cancer. Importantly, gastric cancer that is synchronously presented with lobular breast cancer can be misdiagnosed as primary gastric cancer; therefore, accurate differential diagnosis is required. A 39-year-old woman was visited to our hospital because of right breast mass and progressive dyspepsia. Invasive lobular carcinoma of breast was diagnosed on core needle biopsy. Gastroscopy revealed a diffuse scirrhous mass at the prepyloric antrum and diagnosed as poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma on biopsy. Synchronous double primary breast and gastric cancers were considered. Detailed pathological analysis focused on immunohistochemical studies of selected antibodies, including those of estrogen receptors, gross cystic disease fluid protein-15, and caudal-type homeobox transcription factor 2, were studied. As a result, gastric lesion was diagnosed as metastatic gastric cancer originating from breast. Right breast conserving surgery was performed, and duodenal stent was inserted under endoscopic guidance to relieve the patient's symptoms. Systemic chemotherapy with combined administration of paclitaxel and trastuzumab was initiated. Forty-one months after the diagnosis, the patient is still undergoing the same therapy. No recurrent lesion has been identified in the breast and evidence of a partial remission of gastric wall thickening has been observed on follow-up studies without new metastatic lesions. Clinical suspicion, repeat endoscopic biopsy, and detailed histological analysis, including immunohistochemistry, are necessary for diagnosis of metastatic gastric cancer from the breast.

  1. Roux-en-Y Gastric Bypass Surgery Suppresses Hepatic Gluconeogenesis and Increases Intestinal Gluconeogenesis in a T2DM Rat Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Yong; Zhou, Zhou; Kong, Fanzhi; Feng, Suibin; Li, Xuzhong; Sha, Yanhua; Zhang, Guangjun; Liu, Haijun; Zhang, Haiqing; Wang, Shiguang; Hu, Cheng; Zhang, Xueli

    2016-11-01

    Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) is an effective surgical treatment for type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). The present study aimed to investigate the effects of RYGB on glucose homeostasis, lipid metabolism, and intestinal morphological adaption, as well as hepatic and intestinal gluconeogenesis. Twenty adult male T2DM rats induced by high-fat diet and low dose of streptozotocin were randomly divided into sham and RYGB groups. The parameters of body weight, food intake, glucose tolerance, insulin sensitivity, and serum lipid profiles were assessed to evaluate metabolic changes. Intestinal sections were stained with hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) for light microscopy examination. The messenger RNA (mRNA) and protein expression levels of key regulatory enzymes of gluconeogenesis [phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK), glucose-6-phosphatase (G6Pase)] were determined through reverse-transcription PCR (RT-PCR) and Western blotting, respectively. RYGB induced significant improvements in glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity, along with weight loss and decreased food intake. RYGB also decreased serum triglyceride (TG) and free fatty acid (FFA) levels. The jejunum and ileum exhibited a marked increase in the length and number of intestinal villi after RYGB. The RYGB group exhibited downregulated mRNA and protein expression levels of PEPCK and G6Pase in the liver and upregulated expression of these enzymes in the jejunum and ileum tissues. RYGB ameliorates glucose and lipid metabolism accompanied by weight loss and calorie restriction. The small intestine shows hyperplasia and hypertrophy after RYGB. Meanwhile, our study demonstrated that the reduced hepatic gluconeogenesis and increased intestinal gluconeogenesis may contribute to improved glucose homeostasis after RYGB.

  2. Long-term effects of gastric bypass surgery on psychosocial well-being and eating behavior: not all that glitters is gold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vangoitsenhoven, Roman; Frederiks, Pascal; Gijbels, Brecht; Lannoo, Matthias; Van der Borght, Wout; Van den Eynde, Amber; Mertens, Ann; Mathieu, Chantal; Van der Schueren, Bart

    2016-12-01

    The aim of this pilot study was to evaluate long-term effects of Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) on physical and psychosocial health as well as eating behavior of obese patients. We compared 23 patients 7 years after RYGB to 23 body mass index (BMI), sex, and age matched obese control patients by means of self-reporting questionnaires: Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS), Quality of Life Enjoyment and Satisfaction Questionnaire - Short Form (Q-LES-Q SF), Dutch Eating Behavior Questionnaire (DEBQ), and Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test (AUDIT). Data are presented as median ± interquartile rage. Physical health had improved and body image (80 ± 25% vs. 20 ± 49%, p physical health (2 ± 2 vs. 2 ± 1, p = 0.037), daily life functioning (4 ± 2 vs. 2 ± 2, p = 0.050), and hobbies (4 ± 1 vs. 2 ± 2, p = 0.011) was higher post-RYGB, but social relationships and sexual performance were not perceived as superior. In addition, post-RYGB patients were more prone to eat on external cues (13 ± 7 vs. 19 ± 13; p = 0.007). Seven years post-RYGB, patients reported a significant improvement of physical health and higher satisfaction with daily life, but not with social relationships or sexual performance. Eating behavior post-RYGB was more influenced by external cues.

  3. Obstetrical and neonatal outcomes in women following gastric bypass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berlac, Janne Foss; Skovlund, Charlotte Wessel; Lidegaard, Ojvind

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess obstetrical and neonatal outcomes in women following gastric bypass, compared with adipose women without surgery and with a normal weight control population. DESIGN: Historical controlled cohort study. SETTING: Denmark. POPULATION: All women undergoing gastric bypass during...... the period 1996-2011, and subsequently giving birth. METHODS AND MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Obstetrical and neonatal outcomes in women without gastric bypass matched on age, parity, plurality, year, and body mass index, and normal weight women. RESULTS: In 415 women giving birth after gastric bypass we found...... more admissions to neonatal intensive care unit compared with newborn of normal weight mothers; RR = 1.5 (1.1-2.0). CONCLUSIONS: Gastric bypass may reduce the risk of preeclampsia, emergency cesarean section, and perinatal asphyxia, compared with adipose women without surgery. Compared with normal...

  4. Preoperative thiamine deficiency in obese population undergoing laparoscopic bariatric surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrodeguas, Lester; Kaidar-Person, Orit; Szomstein, Samuel; Antozzi, Priscila; Rosenthal, Raul

    2005-01-01

    Nutritional deficiencies are a recognized complication of bariatric surgery. Thiamine deficiency has been reported as a possible consequence of both restrictive and malabsorptive bariatric procedures. Most of the reported cases occurred after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) surgery; fewer were described after biliopancreatic diversion, vertical banded gastroplasty, or duodenal switch. Adults who have a high carbohydrate intake derived mainly from refined sugars and milled rice are at greater risk of developing thiamine deficiency, because thiamine is absent from fats, oils, and refined sugars. Currently, no reports have evaluated the preoperative thiamine status of bariatric patients. The aim of this study was to evaluate the degree of thiamine deficiency in obese patients before bariatric surgery at our institution. The medical records of consecutive patients who underwent laparoscopic RYGB or laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding at our institution between March 2003 and February 2004 were retrospectively reviewed. Patients were selected for this study on the basis of predetermined criteria. Preoperative thiamine levels were retrospectively recorded. Excluded from this study were patients who had been taking multivitamins or other nutritional supplements before surgical intervention, had a history of frequent alcohol consumption, any malabsorptive diseases, or previous restrictive-malabsorptive surgical interventions, such as RYGB, biliopancreatic diversion, or adjustable gastric banding, according to the initial evaluation and questionnaire. Of 437 consecutive patients who underwent laparoscopic RYGB or laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding, 303 were included in the study. Forty-seven patients (15.5%) presented with low preoperative thiamine levels. The mean age and body mass index of these patients was 46 years and 60 kg/m(2), respectively. Male patients presented with greater mean preoperative thiamine levels (3.2 microg /dL) than female patients (2

  5. [Research progression of translational medicine in gastric cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Maoran; Zhao, Gang; Zhu, Chunchao

    2014-02-01

    Gastric cancer is one of the most common malignant tumors which is a great threat to human health. In recent years, the reform of surgical mordalities and the optimization of radiation and chemotherapy is still far from reducing morbidity and mortality of gastric cancer. As a new research pattern, translational medicine has emerged in various clinical subjects, which leads to remarkable effects. In this paper, the definition and development of translational medicine, molecular markers and drug treatment of gastric cancer will be discussed and the feasibility of translational medicine in the treatment of gastric cancer will be explained. In our opinion, the intervention of translational medicine could change the current situation that scientific researches is severely disconnected with clinical practice and increase the detection rate of gastric cancer and the effective rate of adjuvant therapy after surgery to improve the prognosis of patients with gastric cancer.

  6. Normal alcohol metabolism after gastric banding and sleeve gastrectomy: a case-cross-over trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Changchien, Eric M; Woodard, Gavitt A; Hernandez-Boussard, Tina; Morton, John M

    2012-10-01

    Severe obesity remains the leading public health concern of the industrialized world, with bariatric surgery as the only current effective enduring treatment. In addition to gastric bypass, gastric banding and sleeve gastrectomy have emerged as viable treatment options for the severely obese. Occasionally, poor postoperative psychological adjustment has been reported. It has been previously demonstrated that breath alcohol content (BAC) levels and time to sober were increased in postoperative gastric bypass patients. The aim of this study was to examine whether alcohol metabolism in patients undergoing restrictive-type bariatric procedures is also altered. Nine patients undergoing laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding (LAGB) and 7 patients undergoing laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy (LSG) were recruited. Preoperatively, 3-month and 6-month BAC and time to sober were measured after administration of 5 ounces of red wine. In addition, participants were asked to complete a questionnaire of drinking habits. The 16 total participants achieved a mean 44.7% 6-month excess weight loss. There were no significant changes in peak BAC or time to sober from preoperative levels (0.033%, 67.8 min, respectively) to 3 months (0.032%, 77.1 min, respectively, p = 0.421) or 6 months (0.035%, 81.2 min, respectively, p = 0.198). Patients undergoing LAGB and LSG do not share the same altered alcohol metabolism as seen in gastric bypass patients. However, all bariatric surgery patients should be counseled regarding alcohol use. Copyright © 2012 American College of Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. The link between obesity and vitamin D in bariatric patients with omega-loop gastric bypass surgery - a vitamin D supplementation trial to compare the efficacy of postoperative cholecalciferol loading (LOAD): study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luger, Maria; Kruschitz, Renate; Marculescu, Rodrig; Haslacher, Helmuth; Hoppichler, Friedrich; Kallay, Enikö; Kienbacher, Christian; Klammer, Carmen; Kral, Melanie; Langer, Felix; Luger, Eva; Prager, Gerhard; Trauner, Michael; Traussnigg, Stefan; Würger, Tanja; Schindler, Karin; Ludvik, Bernhard

    2015-08-05

    Beyond its classical role in calcium homoeostasis and bone metabolism, vitamin D deficiency has been found to be associated with several diseases, including diabetes, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, and even obesity itself. Importantly, there are limited data on therapeutic strategies for vitamin D deficiency in bariatric patients, and the procedure-specific guidelines may not be sufficient. To improve long-term outcomes, nutritional screening and appropriate supplementation to prevent nutrient deficiencies are urgently needed. Therefore, the aim of this study is to examine effects and safety of a forced dosing regimen of vitamin D versus conventional dose supplementation on vitamin D levels and other parameters in bariatric patients. The study includes loading plus repeat dosing compared with repeated administration of vitamin D without a loading dose, according to guidelines, in a prospective, double-blind, randomized controlled trial. Up to a triple oral loading dose is given on day 1, then 2 and 4 weeks after surgery (100,000 IU dose each time), followed by an oral maintenance dose (3420 IU/day). The control group (n = 25) will receive placebo, followed by administration of a standard dose (3420 IU/day). We hypothesize that a significant increase in vitamin D levels will occur in patients in the treatment group (n = 25) by 24 weeks after surgery. Further measurements are aimed at evaluating changes in inflammation, bone turnover, insulin resistance, blood pressure, liver, mental health, and gut microbiota of patients undergoing omega-loop gastric bypass surgery. Furthermore, possible associations between concentrations of vitamin D, the involved enzymes, or vitamin D receptor in adipose and/or liver tissues will be determined. To our knowledge, this trial is the first of its kind with this type of vitamin D supplementation in bariatric patients. Its major strength is the design and implementation of evaluation of influencing factors such as liver

  8. Autoimmunity and Gastric Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bizzaro, Nicola; Antico, Antonio; Villalta, Danilo

    2018-01-01

    Alterations in the immune response of patients with autoimmune diseases may predispose to malignancies, and a link between chronic autoimmune gastritis and gastric cancer has been reported in many studies. Intestinal metaplasia with dysplasia of the gastric corpus-fundus mucosa and hyperplasia of chromaffin cells, which are typical features of late-stage autoimmune gastritis, are considered precursor lesions. Autoimmune gastritis has been associated with the development of two types of gastric neoplasms: intestinal type and type I gastric carcinoid. Here, we review the association of autoimmune gastritis with gastric cancer and other autoimmune features present in gastric neoplasms. PMID:29373557

  9. Autoimmunity and Gastric Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicola Bizzaro

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Alterations in the immune response of patients with autoimmune diseases may predispose to malignancies, and a link between chronic autoimmune gastritis and gastric cancer has been reported in many studies. Intestinal metaplasia with dysplasia of the gastric corpus-fundus mucosa and hyperplasia of chromaffin cells, which are typical features of late-stage autoimmune gastritis, are considered precursor lesions. Autoimmune gastritis has been associated with the development of two types of gastric neoplasms: intestinal type and type I gastric carcinoid. Here, we review the association of autoimmune gastritis with gastric cancer and other autoimmune features present in gastric neoplasms.

  10. Effect of ethnicity on weight loss after bariatric surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khorgami, Zhamak; Arheart, Kristopher L; Zhang, Chi; Messiah, Sarah E; de la Cruz-Muñoz, Nestor

    2015-05-01

    Previous studies have reported better weight loss after bariatric surgery among non-Hispanic whites (NHW) versus non-Hispanic blacks (NHB) and Hispanics. The majority of these studies took place in areas where NHW are the majority. This study aimed to compare post-surgery weight outcomes by ethnicity in a geographic area where Hispanics are the majority. A retrospective medical chart review of 3268 patients (1561 Hispanic, 660 NHB, and 1047 NHW) who underwent Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) or Adjustable Gastric Band (AGB) placement from 2002 to 2012 were analyzed. Percentages of excess weight loss (EWL) and body mass index (BMI) changes at 6, 12, and 24 months post-surgery were compared by ethnic group. At 6 months, EWL was significantly different by ethnicity (52.7 ± 15.9 Hispanics, 49.7 ± 15.7 NHW, 43.0 ± 17.3 NHB, P surgery, and BMI category (40 kg/m(2). Up to 2 years after RYGB, mean EWL and BMI reduction patterns are similar among NHW and Hispanics and significantly better than NHB. These patterns were comparable but not as pronounced among patients with AGB surgery. Our findings suggest that social factors may contribute to successful weight loss after bariatric surgery.

  11. Evaluation of Metabolic Syndrome in morbidly Obese Patients Submitted to Laparoscopic Bariatric Surgery: Comparison of the Results between Roux-En-Y Gastric Bypass and Sleeve Gastrectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menguer, Rodrigo Koprovski; Weston, Antônio Carlos; Schmid, Helena

    2017-07-01

    Morbid obesity is a state of insulin resistance combined with excess of visceral fat, which contributes to the development of metabolic syndrome (MetS). Nonsurgical treatment of obesity usually improves MetS, but there is no ultimate resolution and weight regain is common. Surgical options like Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) and sleeve gastrectomy (SG) result in a significant and sustained weight loss accompanied by improvement of MetS. The aim of this study was to compare the weight loss and improvement of MetS parameters between degree II and III obese patients with MetS undergoing RYGB or SG in a period of 12 months. Analysis of medical records of 102 patients diagnosed with MetS (63 undergoing RYGB and 39 undergoing SG) in a reference center (CTO ISCMPA) between 2010 and 2013. After 1-year follow-up, an excess weight loss (EWL) of 77.2 ± 22.5% and of 63.4 ± 20.1% (p = 0.033) was observed in the RYGB and SG groups, respectively. The rate of MetS resolution was very similar (87.3 and 84.6%, respectively; p = 0.971). The percentage of patients with type 2 diabetes was 3.3% for RYGB and 15.4% for SG (p = 0.025). Fasting blood glucose levels followed the same trend with mean values reaching 87.6 ± 16.9 mg/dl in the RYGB group and 97.7 ± 35.5 mg/dl in the group undergoing SG (p = 0.023). Among the patients studied, both surgical techniques were safe and effective for MetS resolution in 12 months. However, RYGB was more effective for EWL and improvement of some parameters related to glucose metabolism.

  12. ENDOSCOPIC STUDY OF GASTRIC ULCER WITH REFERENCE TO MALIGNANCY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudhansu Sekhar Mohanty

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND It is fundamental that any gastric ulcer should be regarded as being malignant, no matter how classic the features of a benign gastric ulcer. Multiple well-targeted biopsies, as many as 10, should always be taken before an ulcer can be definitely accepted as benign, which can be detected by a simple outpatient procedure of upper gastrointestinal endoscopy. MATERIALS AND METHODS Cases undergoing upper GI endoscopy in the Department of General Surgery, M.K.C.G. Medical College Hospital, from June 2015 - July 2017 were included in the study to determine the malignancy developing in cases of gastric ulcer keeping in mind the above-mentioned facts. RESULTS Out of 1782 cases of total upper GI endoscopy performed, 197 cases were detected as gastric ulcer. The incidence of malignancy in a gastric ulcer in this study was 3.04%. Peptic ulcer disease was more common in male sex compared to females. Incidence of malignancy in gastric ulcer was higher in smokers and alcoholics. The patients with H. pylori were more prone to gastric ulceration and its subsequent malignant transformation are well established. CONCLUSION Gastric ulcer maybe a precursor lesion of gastric malignancy. Multiple well-targeted biopsy from ulcer at endoscopy may lead to detection of early gastric cancer.

  13. Stomach (Gastric) Cancer Screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... certain chronic conditions increase the risk of stomach cancer. Stomach cancer is a disease in which malignant (cancer) ... following PDQ summaries for more information about stomach cancer: Stomach (Gastric) Cancer Prevention Gastric Cancer Treatment Stomach cancer ...

  14. Preoperative nutritional deficiencies in severely obese bariatric candidates are not linked to gastric Helicobacter pylori infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerig, Rahel; Ernst, Barbara; Wilms, Britta; Thurnheer, Martin; Schultes, Bernd

    2013-05-01

    Severely obese subjects have been found to show a high prevalence of distinct nutritional deficiencies even without any bariatric intervention but the underlying reasons remain obscure. We tested the hypothesis that gastric Helicobacter pylori infection is associated with increased nutritional deficiency rates. Taking advantage of our large database, we identified 404 patients who had undergone a gastroscopy--as a standard diagnostic assessment before bariatric surgery--along with a histological examination of gastric mucosal biopsies with concurrent nutritional blood measurements. Eighty-five (21 %) of the obese patients included in the study displayed a gastric H. pylori infection. Sex distribution, age and body mass index did not differ between H. pylori+ and H. pylori- patients (P > 0.29). Referring to nutritional markers, neither serum levels of total protein, albumin, calcium, phosphate, magnesium, ferritin, zinc, copper, vitamin B12, folate and 25-OH vitamin D3 nor respective deficiency rates differed between the H. pylori+ and H. pylori- patients group (all P > 0.13). Overall, 49.5 % of the bariatric candidates displayed at least one nutritional deficiency. Our data confirm previous reports on high prevalences of nutritional deficiencies in severely obese subjects. However, they do not provide evidence for a contributing role of gastric H. pylori infection to these nutritional alterations.

  15. Incidence of gastric dilatation-volvulus following a splenectomy in 238 dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maki, Lynn C; Males, Kristina N; Byrnes, Madeline J; El-Saad, Anthony A; Coronado, George S

    2017-12-01

    There is contradicting information in the veterinary literature regarding canine splenectomy and the increased risk for subsequent gastric dilatation-volvulus. The main purpose of this study was to determine the rate of occurrence of gastric dilatation-volvulus following splenectomy in medium to large breed dogs compared with a control group undergoing other abdominal procedures. Follow-up was performed by reviewing the medical records and conducting phone interviews. Weight, gender, and presence of a hemoabdomen at the time of surgery were not significantly associated with occurrence of gastric dilatation-volvulus, while increasing age was. Ten of 238 (4%) dogs in the splenectomy group and 3/209 (1.4%) dogs in the control group subsequently developed gastric dilatation-volvulus, which was not significantly different ( P = 0.08). While the findings approach significance and support a need for future investigation, the current recommendation for gastropexy at time of splenic removal should be made on a case by case basis and while considering previously documented risk factors.

  16. [Simplified laparoscopic gastric bypass. Initial experience].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Miguelena, Luis; Maldonado-Vázquez, Angélica; Cortes-Romano, Pablo; Ríos-Cruz, Daniel; Marín-Domínguez, Raúl; Castillo-González, Armando

    2014-01-01

    Obesity surgery includes various gastrointestinal procedures. Roux-en-Y gastric bypass is the prototype of mixed procedures being the most practiced worldwide. A similar and novel technique has been adopted by Dr. Almino Cardoso Ramos and Dr. Manoel Galvao called "simplified bypass," which has been accepted due to the greater ease and very similar results to the conventional technique. The aim of this study is to describe the results of the simplified gastric bypass for treatment of morbid obesity in our institution. We performed a descriptive, retrospective study of all patients undergoing simplified gastric bypass from January 2008 to July 2012 in the obesity clinic of a private hospital in Mexico City. A total of 90 patients diagnosed with morbid obesity underwent simplified gastric bypass. Complications occurred in 10% of patients; these were more frequent bleeding and internal hernia. Mortality in the study period was 0%. The average weight loss at 12 months was 72.7%. Simplified gastric bypass surgery is safe with good mid-term results and a loss of adequate weight in 71% of cases.

  17. PREDICTORS FOR WEIGHT LOSS FAILURE FOLLOWING ROUX-EN-Y GASTRIC BYPASS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Everton CAZZO

    Full Text Available Context Weight loss failure is a widely recognized occurrence following Roux-en-Y gastric bypass. Objectives This study aims to identify predictors associated with weight loss failure. Methods It is a retrospective cohort which enrolled 187 subjects who underwent RYGB. Comparisons were made between patients’ features at baseline and 24 months after surgery. Results A weight loss failure rate of 11.2% was found. Advanced age and diabetes were statistically associated with failure. Conclusions The results found were close to previous reports. As weight loss failure represents an important concern, there is the possibility to perform revisional surgeries, which may emphasize the restrictive or malabsorptive characteristics of RYGB, leading to varied results. It is reinforced that weight loss cannot be used as the unique outcome to evaluate the success of surgery.

  18. Improvement in severe pulmonary hypertension in obese patients after laparoscopic gastric bypass or sleeve gastrectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheu, Eric G; Channick, Richard; Gee, Denise W

    2016-02-01

    Case reports have suggested that bariatric surgery improves pulmonary hypertension. We performed a retrospective, case-control study to evaluate the safety and efficacy of bariatric surgery in obese patients with severe pulmonary hypertension. Morbidly obese patients followed in a specialty pulmonary hypertension clinic who underwent laparoscopic gastric bypass or sleeve gastrectomy between 2008 and 2013 (n = 10) were compared to a BMI-matched cohort managed with maximal medical therapy (n = 10). Patients with advanced malignancy, prior heart/lung transplantation, and pulmonary hypertension from thromboembolism were excluded. Primary outcomes assessed were changes in use of pulmonary vasodilatory and diuretic medications, need for home oxygen therapy, and mean pulmonary arterial pressures. Secondary outcomes measured were excess body weight loss, perioperative mortality and morbidity, and hospital length of stay. More patients who underwent bariatric surgery experienced improvements in pulmonary arterial pressures (75 vs. 0%, p = 0.02), reduction in or discontinuation of pulmonary vasodilatory therapy (67 vs. 0%, p = 0.01), and decreased diuretic requirements (86 vs. 13%, p = 0.01) than the control cohort. Seventy-five percent of patients previously on home oxygen discontinued therapy after surgery, while oxygen requirements increased in 50% of the control cohort. Excess body weight loss was greater in the surgical group (EWL 68 vs. 19%, p Laparoscopic gastric bypass and sleeve gastrectomy in obese patients improves pulmonary hypertension in the short term.

  19. Roux-en-Y Gastric Bypass Following Nissen Fundoplication: Higher Risk Same Reward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Michael D; Hunter Mehaffey, J; Schirmer, Bruce D; Hallowell, Peter T

    2017-09-01

    Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) effectively treats obesity and gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). As more surgeons recommend RYGB to treat GERD in patients with obesity, there are concerns about this approach in patients with previous non-bariatric foregut surgery. This study aims to evaluate the effect of previous non-bariatric foregut surgery on subsequent RYGB. Retrospective review of 2089 patients undergoing RYGB between January 1985 and June 2015 was conducted to identify all patients with previous non-bariatric foregut surgery. Perioperative and postoperative data was collected by retrospective chart review. A total of 11 patients with prior non-bariatric foregut surgery underwent RYGB with median time between operations of 95.6 months. Of note, 7/11 (63.6%) had previous Nissen fundoplication. Conversion to open operation was required in 3/7 (42.9%) with previous Nissen compared to 1/4 (25%) in those without previous Nissen. The average length of stay (LOS) was 3.9 ± 0.9 days, significantly longer than our institutional average for RYGB of 3.2 ± 3.2 days (p = 0.02). Mean percentage of excess body mass index loss (%EBMIL) was 64.7 ± 23.5 at 4-year median follow-up, comparable to our institution's previously reported data. No mortalities were attributed to RYGB and the overall complication rate was 18.2%, compared to our institutional complication rate for RYGB of 8.5% (p = 0.253). Despite increased technical difficulty and increase perioperative morbidity, patients undergoing RYGB with previous non-bariatric foregut surgery had long-term symptom resolution and robust weight loss. This indicates that in the right hands, RYGB after non-bariatric foregut surgery may be performed safely and effectively.

  20. Gastric outlet obstruction in gastric cancer: a comparison of three palliative methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keränen, Ilona; Kylänpää, Leena; Udd, Marianne; Louhimo, Johanna; Lepistö, Anna; Halttunen, Jorma; Kokkola, Arto

    2013-12-01

    Gastric outlet obstruction (GOO) commonly occurs in advanced gastric cancer. Our aim was to evaluate the results of endoscopic stenting (ES), palliative resection (PR), and gastrojejunostomy (GJ) as palliation of GOO. A total of 97 patients (50 ES, 26 PR, 21 GJ) were included in this retrospective study. All the patients had primary gastric cancer and symptoms of GOO. Compared to surgery, ES resulted in a faster improvement on oral intake and symptom relief (P obstruction, and the number of patients receiving chemotherapy were similar. The median symptom-free and overall survival were longest in the PR group (P gastric cancer and GOO, the clinical condition of the patient before treatment affects survival and should be taken into account in determining the treatment. PR seems to provide a survival benefit and should be considered as treatment option for patients suitable for surgery. For patients unfit for surgery, ES provides rapid and efficient palliation. Chemotherapy also seems to improve survival in gastric cancer and GOO. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Percutaneous endoscopy to diagnose malignancy in gastric outlet obstruction of excluded stomach after gastric bypass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Waseem; Rubin, Joshua; Kwong, Wilson

    2017-01-01

    Gastric cancer in the excluded stomach after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass is a rare finding and most reported diagnoses are made via surgery. Endoscopic access to the excluded stomach is difficult, even with balloon-assisted enteroscopy. We present the case of a 74-year-old woman with malignant gastric outlet obstruction of the excluded stomach, 41 years after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass. Minimally invasive access to the excluded stomach was obtained by placement of a percutaneous gastrostomy tube, followed by insertion of a pediatric gastroscope through the gastrostomy tube tract. This novel approach provides minimally invasive access to the excluded stomach in patients with high suspicion of pathology in the excluded stomach, when balloon-assisted enteroscopy is not technically feasible or available.

  2. Gastric Outlet Obstruction due to Gastrointestinal Amyloidosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Jared A; An, Jong; Brown, Alexander W; Spearman, Darren; Paredes, Angelo

    2017-03-01

    A 64- year-old man with smoldering myeloma presented to the hospital for nausea, vomiting, and PO intolerance. Abdominal CT demonstrated massive gastric distention and collapsed proximal duodenum consistent with gastric outlet obstruction (GOO). Esophagogastroduodenoscopy demonstrated pyloric edema. Duodenal biopsies were consistent with AL amyloidosis. Given the concerns for bleeding risk and immediate need to start chemotherapy, surgery was deferred. Chemotherapy was initiated with a good clinical response. Our non-operative approach is novel, eliminates perioperative adverse events, allows for early initiation of chemotherapy, and can serve as a model for patients with GOO resulting from AL amyloidosis who are not surgical candidates.

  3. Osteogenesis Imperfecta, Pseudoachalasia, and Gastric Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dilsa Mizrak

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI is a rare, inherited skeletal disorder characterized by abnormalities of type 1 collagen. Malignancy is rarely reported in patients with OI and it was suggested that this disease can protect against cancer. Here, we report a 41-year-old woman with symptoms of achalasia where repeated treatment of pneumatic dilation and stent replacement was unsuccessful; therefore, surgery was performed. Pathology showed gastric adenocarcinoma unexpectedly. Chemotherapy was given after assessing dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase (DPD enzyme activity, which can be deficient in OI patients. This is the first report of gastric cancer mimicking achalasia in a patient with OI.

  4. Intermittent gastric outlet obstruction caused by a prolapsing antral gastric polyp

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parikh, Mehul; Kelley, Brian; Rendon, Gabriel; Abraham, Bincy

    2010-01-01

    Most gastric polyps have an asymptomatic presentation and are an incidental finding on upper endoscopy. Symptomatic presentations can range from an ulcerated polyp leading to anemia and occult bleed to complete gastric outlet obstruction. We report a case of an 89-year-old woman who presented with postprandial nausea and early satiety. Her upper endoscopy revealed a 2 cm pedunculated hyperplastic polyp arising from the antrum of the stomach which was seen prolapsing into the pylorus causing intermittent gastric outlet obstruction. In the present report, we statistically analyzed 39 prolapsing gastric polyps previously reported in the English literature and demonstrate the current utility of monopolar snare polypectomy in establishing a histological diagnosis while offering simultaneous treatment. Additionally, we review the literature for the management of all hyperplastic gastric polyps in relation to advancements in digestive endoscopy. PMID:21160624

  5. Total gastric necrosis: A case report and literature review | Huang ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    During the surgery, we found a total of 3500ml unclotted blood in the abdomen, splenic infarction and gastric necrosis. Total gastrectomy with Roux-en-Y esophagojejunostromy and splenectomy was performed. However, the patient died on the second day after the surgery. This case suggests that surgical treatment should ...

  6. Gastropericardial Fistula as a Late Complication of Laparoscopic Gastric Banding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam A Rudd

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding (LAGB is a bariatric procedure that is being performed with increasing frequency as an alternative management option for morbid obesity. Several common complications have been reported including gastric band slippage and associated pouch dilatation, intragastric erosion of the band, gastric wall perforation, and abscess formation. We present a case of gastropericardial fistula occurring nine years after an LAGB. There have been no previous documented cases of the complication after this procedure.

  7. Comparison of different gastric bypass procedures in gastric carcinoma patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Shao-Wei; Zhang, Dong-Yun; Liu, Xian-Ming; Liu, Zeng; Zhang, Fang-Ting

    2014-12-28

    To determine the effect of different Roux-en-Y gastric bypass procedures in gastric carcinoma patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. A retrospective analysis of the clinical data of 54 patients with gastric cancer and type 2 diabetes mellitus treated in the Department of General Surgery from January 2006 to June 2013 was conducted. The patients underwent gastrectomy using different Roux-en-Y gastric bypass procedures (traditional, n = 26; modified, n = 28). Fasting plasma glucose (FPG), two hour postprandial blood glucose (2 h PBG) and hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) were analyzed before surgery (0 mo) and 1, 3 and 6 mo after surgery. FPG and 2 h PBG levels were significantly decreased 1 mo after surgery in the traditional Roux-en-Y gastric bypass group (FPG 7.5 ± 1.3 vs 10.7 ± 1.2, P PBG 10.2 ± 1.8 vs 13.8 ± 3.2, P PBG levels were significantly decreased after surgery in the modified Roux-en-Y gastric bypass group (FPG 6.9 ± 1.2 vs 10.5 ± 1.1, 6.5 ± 1.3 vs 10.5 ± 1.1, 6.4 ± 1.2 vs 10.5 ± 1.1, P PBG 9.9 ± 2.2 vs 14.1 ± 2.9, 9.2 ± 2.4 vs 14.1 ± 2.9, 8.9 ± 2.6 vs 14.1 ± 2.9, P PBG and HbA1c concentration were observed 3 and 6 mo after surgery (FPG 10.1 ± 1.5 vs 6.5 ± 1.3, 10.3 ± 1.4 vs 6.4 ± 1.2, P PBG 13.1 ± 2.8 vs 9.2 ± 2.4, 13.6 ± 3.1 vs 8.9 ± 2.6, P < 0.05) (HbA1c 10.1 ± 1.4 vs 7.2 ± 1.1, 10.5 ± 1.3 vs 5.5 ± 1.1, P < 0.05). Modified Roux-en-Y gastric bypass can improve glucose metabolism in type 2 diabetic patients with gastric cancer.

  8. CT-Guided Percutaneous Drainage of Infected Collections Due to Gastric Leak After Sleeve Gastrectomy for Morbid Obesity: Initial Experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelogrigoris, M.; Sotiropoulou, E.; Stathopoulos, K.; Georgiadou, V.; Philippousis, P.; Thanos, L.

    2011-01-01

    This study was designed to evaluate the efficacy and safety of computed tomography (CT)-guided drainage in treating infected collections due to gastric leak after laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy for morbid obesity. From January 2007 to June 2009, 21 patients (9 men and 12 women; mean age, 39.2 (range, 26–52) years) with infected collections due to gastric leak after laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy for morbid obesity underwent image-guided percutaneous drainage. All procedures were performed using CT guidance and 8- to 12-Fr pigtail drainage catheters. Immediate technical success was achieved in all 21 infected collections. In 18 of 21 collections, we obtained progressive shrinkage of the collection with consequent clinical success (success rate 86%). In three cases, the abdominal fluid collection was not resolved, and the patients were reoperated. Among the 18 patients who avoided surgery, 2 needed replacement of the catheter due to obstruction. No major complications occurred during the procedure. The results of our study support that CT-guided percutaneous drainage is an effective and safe method to treat infected abdominal fluid collections due to gastric leak in patients who had previously underwent laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy for morbid obesity. It may be considered both as a preparatory step for surgery and a valuable alternative to open surgery. Failure of the procedure does not, however, preclude a subsequent surgical operation.

  9. A case report of large gastric diverticulum with literature review

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    Chee Marianne

    Full Text Available Introduction: A gastric diverticulum is a rare form of diverticular disease due to outpouching of the gastric wall. It is equally presented within both sexes and commonly occurs in fifth and sixth decades of life. Patients mostly asymptomatic but may present with mild gastric symptoms. Surgical treatment is largely dependent on the patient’s symptoms, and a laparoscopic approach is usually recommended for surgery. Case presentation: A 77-year-old gentleman presented to the outpatient clinic with a one-month history of passing black stools. He was arranged for an oesophagogastroduodenoscopy (OGD which revealed a gastric body polyp and a diverticulum in the fundus of the stomach. Discussion: Gastric diverticulum is defined as an outpouching of the gastric wall. They are uncommon, with an incidence between 0.01–0.11%. Predisposing factors include: areas of weakness caused by splitting of the longitudinal muscle fibres, an absence of peritoneal membrane and perforating arterioles. The management of patients with gastric diverticulum depend largely on their symptoms. There is no specific treatment required for an asymptomatic diverticulum. Conclusion: Gastric diverticula are rare conditions which are largely asymptomatic bu