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Sample records for preventive care continues

  1. Continuing Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Can’t Grandma Remember My Name? Artwork for Purchase Support Articles Ten Signs of Caregiver Stress Therapeutic ... loved one with Alzheimer’s may be a difficult decision. It is best to make decisions about care ...

  2. [Perception of Primary Care physicians on the integration with cardiology through continuity of healthcare programs in secondary prevention].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosin-Sales, J; Orozco Beltrán, D; Ledesma Rodríguez, R; Barbon Ortiz Casado, A; Fernández, G

    2018-02-17

    To determine the perception of Primary Care (PC) physicians on the integration with cardiology (CA) through continuity of healthcare programs. A cross-sectional and multicentre study was conducted, in which a total of 200 PC physicians from all over Spain completed a qualitative survey that evaluated the level of integration with CA in secondary prevention. Physicians were grouped according to the level of PC-CA integration. The integration between CA and PC was good, but it was better in those centres with a higher integration (74.0% vs. 60.0%; p=.02) and in general, physicians considered that integration had improved (92.0% vs. 73.0%; pintegration. In 55.8%, 63.6%, and 51.3% of hospital discharge reports, indications were given on when to perform the follow-up blood analysis, as well as information about returning to working life and sexual activity, respectively. The most common communication method was the paper-based report (75 vs. 84%; p=NS). The communication between healthcare levels was greater in those Primary Care centres with a higher level of integration, as well as periodicity of the communication and the satisfaction of physicians (80.0% vs. 63.0%; p=.005). The level of integration between PC and CA is, in general, satisfactory, but those centres with a higher level of integration benefit more from a greater communication and satisfaction. Copyright © 2018 Sociedad Española de Médicos de Atención Primaria (SEMERGEN). Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  3. Prevention IS Care

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2009-03-26

    This podcast provides an overview of the Prevention IS Care campaign, which provides HIV prevention tools for medical care providers to use on a daily basis with patients who are living with HIV.  Created: 3/26/2009 by National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention (NCHHSTP).   Date Released: 3/26/2009.

  4. 42 CFR 441.60 - Continuing care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Continuing care. 441.60 Section 441.60 Public... Periodic Screening, Diagnosis, and Treatment (EPSDT) of Individuals Under Age 21 § 441.60 Continuing care. (a) Continuing care provider. For purposes of this subpart, a continuing care provider means a...

  5. [Continuity of care from the acute care hospital: Results].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solé-Casals, Montserrat; Chirveches-Pérez, Emilia; Alsina-Ribas, Anna; Puigoriol-Juvanteny, Emma; Oriol-Ruscalleda, Margarita; Subirana-Casacuberta, Mireia

    2015-01-01

    To describe the profile of patients treated by a Continuity of Care Manager in an acute-care center during the first six months of its activity, as well as the profile of patients treated and the resource allocation. A prospective cross-sectional study was conducted on patients with complex care needs requiring continuity of care liaison, and who were attended by the Continuity of Care Nurse during the period from October 2013 to March 2014. Patient characteristics, their social environment and healthcare resource allocation were registered and analyzed. A total of 1,034 cases of demand that corresponded to 907 patients (women 55.0%; age 80.57±10.1; chronic 47.8%) were analyzed, of whom 12.2% were readmitted. In the multivariate model, it was observed that the variables associated with readmission were polypharmacy (OR: 1.86; CI: 1.2-2.9) and fall history prior to admission (OR: 0.586; CI: 0.36-2-88). Patients treated by a Continuity of Care Nurse are over 80 years, with comorbidities, geriatric syndromes, complex care, and of life needs, to whom an alternative solution to hospitalization is provided, thus preventing readmissions. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  6. Wound Care: Preventing Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for specific medical advice or before making any purchasing decisions involving their care. National Limb Loss Resource ... Events Calendar Search Our Site Donate Memorial/Honor Gift Ways to Give Workplace Giving Program Donate Now ...

  7. Internet in Continuous Health Care

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Zvárová, Jana; Hanzlíček, Petr

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 13, č. 5 (2005), s. 451-452 ISSN 0928-7329. [MedNet 2005. World Congress on the Internet in Medicine /10./. 04.12.2005-07.12.2005, Prague] R&D Projects: GA AV ČR 1ET200300413 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10300504 Keywords : Internet * health care * technology Subject RIV: BD - Theory of Information

  8. Continuity of care: some experiences and thoughts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volpe, F J

    1994-09-01

    Continuity of health care is a goal to be achieved. Most are for it. Many claim to provide it. But how do we know we have it? What are the key features of continuity? While dictionaries do not define the phrase "continuity of health care," we do find definitions of "continuity." The Oxford English Dictionary, Second Edition, includes in its definitions: "the state or quality of being uninterrupted in sequence or succession, or in essence or idea; connectedness, coherence, unbroken..." Stedman's Medical Dictionary includes: "absence of interruption, a succession of parts intimately united..." These definitions stress an uninterrupted succession and include the concept that there needs to be a connection to the parts. Without that connection, continuity, in health care delivery or elsewhere, does not exist.

  9. Marriage, Cohabitation, and Men's Use of Preventive Health Care Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... from the 2011–2012 National Health Interview Survey (NHIS), selected measures of preventive health care service use ... any gender and age. Data source and methods NHIS is a multipurpose health survey conducted continuously throughout ...

  10. Preventive Care Recommendations for Adults with MS

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... risk factors including prolonged use of steroids or anticonvulsants, a family history of osteoporosis, and a sedentary ... care provider. Yearly. Monthly. The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends starting at age eighteen. Preventive Care Recommendations | ...

  11. Speak Up: Help Prevent Errors in Your Care: Home Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Your Care Home Care To prevent health care errors, patients are urged to... SpeakUP TM Everyone has a ... you think they have confused you with another patient. P ay attention to the care you ... for their identification (ID) badges. • Make sure you or family members ...

  12. Improving the delivery of preventive care services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Dorothy Y

    2007-05-01

    Performance of preventive services is an important indicator of high-quality health care, but many recommended services are not regularly offered in primary care practices. Health risk assessments, counseling, and referral to community-based programs help address risk behaviors, many of which are leading causes of preventable death and disability in the United States. This study examined various influences on the delivery of preventive services designed to address smoking, excessive consumption of alcohol, unhealthy diets, and sedentary lifestyles. More than 300 health care providers in 52 practices nationwide have contributed data to this study. Staff participation in quality improvement enhanced work relationships and also diminished the effect of practice size on the performance of preventive care. The use of nurse practitioners, allied health professionals, clinician reminders, and patient registries were positively associated with care delivery.

  13. Speak Up: Help Prevent Errors in Your Care: Ambulatory Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Your Care Ambulatory Care To prevent health care errors, patients are urged to... SpeakUP TM Everyone has a ... he or she has confused you with another patient. P ay attention to the ... for their identification (ID) badges. • Notice whether your caregivers have washed ...

  14. Phlebitis: treatment, care and prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higginson, Ray; Parry, Andrew

    Peripheral venous catheter-associated phlebitis is caused by inflammation to the vein at a cannula access site. It can have a mechanical, chemical or infectious cause. Good practice when inserting a cannula, including appropriate choice of device and site, can help to prevent phlebitis. Good infection control techniques are also vital in preventing the condition. There are two phlebitis scoring systems, which should be used in routine practice to identify and treat early signs of the Peripheral venous cannulation

  15. Prevention of health care-associated infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Vincent

    2014-09-15

    Health care-associated infections cause approximately 75,000 deaths annually, in addition to increasing morbidity and costs. Over the past decade, a downward trend in health care-associated infections has occurred nationwide. Basic prevention measures include administrative support, educating health care personnel, and hand hygiene and isolation precautions. Prevention of central line- or catheter-associated infections begins with avoidance of unnecessary insertion, adherence to aseptic technique when inserting, and device removal when no longer necessary. Specific recommendations for preventing central line-associated bloodstream infections include use of chlorhexidine for skin preparation, as a component of dressings, and for daily bathing of patients in intensive care units. Catheter-associated urinary tract infections are the most common device-related health care-associated infection. Maintaining a closed drainage system below the patient reduces the risk of infection. To prevent ventilator-associated pneumonia, which is associated with high mortality, mechanically ventilated patients should be placed in the semirecumbent position and receive antiseptic oral care. Prevention of surgical site infections includes hair removal using clippers, glucose control, and preoperative antibiotic prophylaxis. Reducing transmission of Clostridium difficile and multidrug-resistant organisms in the hospital setting begins with hand hygiene and contact precautions. Institutional efforts to reduce unnecessary antibiotic prescribing are also strongly recommended. Reducing rates of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infection can be achieved through active surveillance cultures and decolonization therapy with mupirocin.

  16. Opportunity Knocks: HIV Prevention in Primary Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thrun, Mark W

    2014-06-01

    Expansions in health care coverage, a comprehensive framework for HIV prevention and care, electronic medical records, and novel HIV prevention modalities create a current opportunity to change the trajectory of the HIV epidemic in the United States. HIV is increasingly disproportionately found in populations historically at higher risk, including gay men and other men who have sex with men, transgender women, injection drug users, and persons of color. This underscores the need for providers to identify persons at higher risk for HIV and assure the provision of screening and prevention services. In turn, universal screening for HIV-testing every adolescent and adult at least once in their lifetime-will increasingly be necessary to find the infrequent cases of HIV in lower risk populations. In both these domains, primary care providers will play a unique role in complementing traditional providers of HIV prevention and care services by increasing the proportion of their patients who have been screened for HIV, opening dialogues around sexual health, including asking about sexual orientation and gender identity, and prescribing antivirals as pre- and postexposure prophylaxis for their non-HIV-infected patients. Primary care providers must understand and embrace their importance along the HIV prevention and care continuum.

  17. Pressure ulcer prevention in care home settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Michael

    2017-03-31

    Pressure ulcer prevention in the care home setting can be challenging and is often compromised by a lack of access to education and resources. There are measures that have been shown to consistently improve outcomes in pressure ulcer prevention including assessment of the patient and their individual risks, delivery of a consistent plan of care that meets patients' needs, and regular evaluation to identify shortfalls. In addition, there should be a robust approach to investigating events that lead to a person developing a pressure ulcer and that information should be used to improve future practice. Pressure ulcer prevention in care homes is achievable and nurses should all be aware of the necessary measures detailed in this article.

  18. Effect of Health Care Professionals' Continuing Education ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To evaluate the impact of educational intervention by health care providers on clinical outcomes in type 2 diabetes patients in a Yemeni health facility. Methods: A prospective, one-group and pre- and post-test design to assess the effects of health care providers' education on clinical patient outcomes was ...

  19. Effect of Health Care Professionals' Continuing Education ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To evaluate the impact of educational intervention by health care providers on clinical outcomes in type 2 diabetes patients in a Yemeni health facility. Methods: A .... compliance, exercise and diets recommended for diabetes patients.

  20. Continuity of pharmaceutical care for psychiatric patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abdullah-Koolmees, Heshu

    2015-01-01

    Psychiatric diseases are common. The effective treatment of a psychiatric disease, its (somatic) side effects and any concurrent somatic diseases is important for the patient’s overall health and wellbeing. The studies conducted in psychiatric patients generally focus on the continuation of

  1. Optimal Preventive Bank Supervision: Combining Random Audits and Continuous Intervention

    OpenAIRE

    Mohamed Belhaj; Nataliya Klimenko

    2012-01-01

    Early regulator interventions into problem banks are one of the key suggestions of Basel II. However, no guidance is given on their design. To fill this gap, we outline an incentive-based preventive supervision strategy that eliminates bad asset management in banks. Two supervision techniques are combined: continuous regulator intervention and random audits. Random audit technologies differ as to quality and cost. Our design ensures good management without excessive supervision costs, through...

  2. 42 CFR 438.208 - Coordination and continuity of care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Improvement Access Standards § 438.208 Coordination and continuity of care. (a) Basic requirement—(1) General... MCO must meet the primary care coordination, identification, assessment, and treatment planning... those activities. (4) Ensure that in the process of coordinating care, each enrollee's privacy is...

  3. How unique is continuity of care? A review of continuity and related concepts.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Uijen, A.A.; Schers, H.J.; Schellevis, F.G.; Bosch, W.J.H.M. van den

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The concept of 'continuity of care' has changed over time and seems to be entangled with other care concepts, for example coordination and integration of care. These concepts may overlap, and differences between them often remain unclear. OBJECTIVE: In order to clarify the confusion of

  4. How unique is continuity of care? A review of continuity and related concepts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Uijen, A.A.; Schers, H.J.; Schellevis, F.G.; van den Bosch, W.J.H.M.

    2012-01-01

    Background: The concept of 'continuity of care' has changed over time and seems to be entangled with other care concepts, for example coordination and integration of care. These concepts may overlap, and differences between them often remain unclear. Objective: In order to clarify the confusion of

  5. Breaks in continuity of care and the rural senior transferred for medical care under regionalisation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Jay Biem

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available Continuity of care, defined as the patient experiencing coherent care over time and place, is challenged when a rural senior with multiple medical problems is transferred to a regional hospital for acute care. From an illustrative case of an older patient with pneumonia and atrial fibrillation, we catalogue potential breaks in continuity of care. Optimal continuity of care is characterised not only by regular contact with the providers who establish collaboration with patients and their caregivers, but also by communication, co-ordination, contingency, convenience, and consistency. Because it is not possible to have the same providers continuously available (relational continuity, for continuity of care, there is a need for integrative system approaches, such as: (1 policy and standards, disease management programs, integrated clinical pathways (management continuity, (2 electronic health information systems and telecommunications technology (communication continuity. The evaluation of these approaches requires measures that account for the multi-faceted nature of continuity of care.

  6. Association Between Number of Preventive Care Guidelines and Preventive Care Utilization by Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taksler, Glen B; Pfoh, Elizabeth R; Stange, Kurt C; Rothberg, Michael B

    2018-05-08

    The number of preventive care guidelines is rapidly increasing. It is unknown whether the number of guideline-recommended preventive services is associated with utilization. The authors used Poisson regression of 390,778 person-years of electronic medical records data from 2008 to 2015, in 80,773 individuals aged 50-75 years. Analyses considered eligibility for 11 preventive services most closely associated with guidelines: tobacco cessation; control of obesity, hypertension, lipids, or blood glucose; influenza vaccination; and screening for breast, cervical, or colorectal cancers, abdominal aortic aneurysm, or osteoporosis. The outcome was the rate of preventive care utilization over the following year. Results were adjusted for demographics and stratified by the number of disease risk factors (smoking, obesity, hypertension, hyperlipidemia, diabetes). Data were collected in 2016 and analyzed in 2017. Preventive care utilization was lower when the number of guideline-recommended preventive services was higher. The adjusted rate of preventive care utilization decreased from 38.67 per 100 (95% CI=38.16, 39.18) in patients eligible for one guideline-recommended service to 31.59 per 100 (95% CI=31.29, 31.89) in patients eligible for two services and 25.43 per 100 (95% CI=24.68, 26.18) in patients eligible for six or more services (p-trendvalue services. Copyright © 2018 American Journal of Preventive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Personnel decontamination and preventive skin care

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henning, Klaus; Gojowczyk, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Skin contamination arises from contact with contaminated aqueous solutions and from transmission of radioactively contaminated dirt particles. As long as the surface of the skin is neither inflamed nor showing any lesions, normally only a limited part of the top layer (epidermis), i.e. the upper layers of the stratum corneum, is contaminated. The intact horny layer has a barrier function protecting against the penetration of chemicals and dirt particles. The horny layer can be damaged by water, solvents, alkaline substances, and acids. In general, it is safe to say that the horny layer acts as a natural barrier to the penetration of liquid and particulate impurities into lower layers of the skin. As long as the horny layer is intact and free from lesions, the risk of incorporation can be considered low. When decontaminating and cleansing the skin, also in daily skin cleansing, care must be taken to prevent the acid protective layer and the horny layer from being compromised. Daily cleansing and cleansing for decontamination must be carried out with a mild, weakly acidic detergent. In addition, prevention should be achieved daily by applying a non-greasy skin lotion to protect the skin. Following a systematic regular regimen in skin cleansing and preventive skin care as well as a specific approach in skin decontamination and cleansing will avoid damage to the skin and remove any contamination incurred. This approach comprises a three-pronged concept, namely skin protection, cleansing and care. (orig.)

  8. Fall Prevention in a Primary Care Setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegrist, Monika; Freiberger, Ellen; Geilhof, Barbara; Salb, Johannes; Hentschke, Christian; Landendoerfer, Peter; Linde, Klause; Halle, Martin; Blank, Wolfgang A

    2016-05-27

    Falls and fall-related injuries are common in community-dwelling elderly people. Effective multifactorial fall prevention programs in the primary care setting may be a promising approach to reduce the incidence rate of falls. In a cluster randomized trial in 33 general practices 378 people living independently and at high risk of falling (65 to 94 years old; 285 women) were allocated to either a 16 week exercise-based fall prevention program including muscle strengthening and challenging balance training exercises, combined with a 12 week home-based exercise program (222 participants), or to usual care (156 participants). The main outcome was number of falls over a period of 12 months. Secondary outcomes were the number of fall-related injuries, physical function (Timed-Up-and-Go-Test, TUG, Chair-Stand-Test, CST, modified Romberg Test), and fear of falling. In the intervention group (n=222 patients in 17 general practices) 291 falls occurred, compared to 367 falls in the usual care group (n=156 patients in 16 general practices). We observed a lower incidence rate for falls in the intervention group (incidence rate ratio/IRR: 0.54; 95% confidence interval (CI): [0.35; 0.84], p=0.007) and for fall-related injuries (IRR: 0.66; [0.42; 0.94], p=0.033). Additionally, patients in the intervention group showed significant improvements in secondary endpoints (TUG: -2.39 s, [-3.91; -0.87], p=0.014; mRomberg: 1.70 s, [0.35; 3.04], p=0.037; fear of falling: -2.28 points, [-3.87; -0.69], p=0.022) compared to usual care. A complex falls prevention program in a primary care setting was effective in reducing falls and fall-related injuries in community dwelling older adults at risk.

  9. RFID Continuance Usage Intention in Health Care Industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iranmanesh, Mohammad; Zailani, Suhaiza; Nikbin, Davoud

    Radio-frequency identification (RFID) has been proved to be an effective tool both for improving operational efficiency and for gaining competitive advantage in the health care industry despite its relatively low-usage rate in hospitals. The sustained use of RFID by health care professionals will promote its development in the long term. This study evaluates the acceptance continuance of RFID among health care professionals through technology continuance theory (TCT). Data were collected from 178 medical professionals in Malaysia and were then analyzed using the partial least squares technique. The analysis showed that the TCT model provided not only a thorough understanding of the continuance behavior of health care professionals toward RFID but also the attitudes, satisfaction, and perceived usefulness of professionals toward it. The results of this study are expected to assist policy makers and managers in the health care industry in implementing the RFID technology in hospitals by understanding the determinants of continuance of RFID usage intention.

  10. Continuity of care: betrayed values or misplaced nostalgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roland, Martin

    2012-10-01

    Care is better coordinated when doctors have personal responsibility for their patients. Continuity and a sense of personal responsibility are becoming more difficult to provide in hospitals, in part because of the European Working Time Directive. However, in many countries general practitioners are self-employed and able to organise their practices as they wish. In the UK, they increasingly do so in ways that make it difficult for patients to get continuity of care. This is despite most patients being clear that they want to see a regular doctor, and professional bodies in primary care consistently promoting continuity as a core value. General practitioners need to decide whether continuity of care matters. If it does, then they need to take a lead in ensuring that care is organised so that patients who want to see a regular doctor are able to do so. Suggestions are included for how contemporary practice can be organised to promote this traditional but still highly relevant value.

  11. How unique is continuity of care? A review of continuity and related concepts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uijen, Annemarie A; Schers, Henk J; Schellevis, François G; van den Bosch, Wil J H M

    2012-06-01

    The concept of 'continuity of care' has changed over time and seems to be entangled with other care concepts, for example coordination and integration of care. These concepts may overlap, and differences between them often remain unclear. In order to clarify the confusion of tongues and to identify core values of these patient-centred concepts, we provide a historical overview of continuity of care and four related concepts: coordination of care, integration of care, patient-centred care and case management. We identified and reviewed articles including a definition of one of these concepts by performing an extensive literature search in PubMed. In addition, we checked the definition of these concepts in the Oxford English Dictionary. Definitions of continuity, coordination, integration, patient-centred care and case management vary over time. These concepts show both great entanglement and also demonstrate differences. Three major common themes could be identified within these concepts: personal relationship between patient and care provider, communication between providers and cooperation between providers. Most definitions of the concepts are formulated from the patient's perspective. The identified themes appear to be core elements of care to patients. Thus, it may be valuable to develop an instrument to measure these three common themes universally. In the patient-centred medical home, such an instrument might turn out to be an important quality measure, which will enable researchers and policy makers to compare care settings and practices and to evaluate new care interventions from the patient perspective.

  12. The continuous glucose monitoring sensor in neonatal intensive care

    OpenAIRE

    Beardsall, K; Ogilvy-Stuart, A; Ahluwalia, J; Thompson, M; Dunger, D

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To determine the feasibility of continuous glucose monitoring in the very low birthweight baby requiring intensive care, as these infants are known to be at high risk of abnormalities of glucose control.

  13. Speak Up: Help Prevent Errors in Your Care: Laboratory Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    SpeakUP TM Help Prevent Errors in Your Care Laboratory Services To prevent health care errors, patients are urged to... SpeakUP TM ... are more likely to get better faster. To help prevent health care mistakes, patients are urged to “ ...

  14. Prevention of anxiety disorders in primary care: A feasibility study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Batelaan Neeltje M

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Anxiety disorders are highly prevalent in primary care and cause a substantial burden of disease. Screening on risk status, followed by preventive interventions in those at risk may prevent the onset of anxiety disorders, and thereby reduce the disease burden. The willingness to participate in screening and interventions is crucial for the scope of preventive strategies, but unknown. This feasibility study, therefore, investigated participation rates of screening and preventive services for anxiety disorders in primary care, and explored reasons to refrain from screening. Methods In three general practices, screening was offered to individuals visiting their general practitioner (total n = 2454. To assess risk status, a 10-item questionnaire was followed by a telephone interview (including the CIDI when scoring above a predefined threshold. Preventive services were offered to those at risk. Participation rates for screening and preventive services for anxiety disorders were assessed. Those not willing to be screened were asked for their main reason to refrain from screening. Results Of all individuals, 17.3% participated in initial screening, and of those with a possible risk status, 56.0% continued screening. In 30.1% of those assessed, a risk status to develop an anxiety disorder was verified. Of these, 22.6% already received some form of mental health treatment and 38.7% of them agreed to participate in a preventive intervention and were referred. The most frequently mentioned reasons to refrain from screening were the emotional burden associated with elevated risk status, the assumption not to be at risk, and a lack of motivation to act upon an elevated risk status by using preventive services. Conclusions Screening in general practice, followed by offering services to prevent anxiety disorders in those at risk did not appear to be a feasible strategy due to low participation rates. To enable the development of

  15. Impact of diabetes continuing education on health care ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To evaluate the impact of a continuing education (CE) program on the attitudes of health care professionals (HCPs) towards diabetes care in Yemen. Methods: A pre- and post-intervention study was carried out in Mukalla City, Hadramout, Yemen and was offered to all physicians, pharmacists, and nurses ...

  16. Lapse in Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee Continuing Reviews.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min-Fu Tsan

    Full Text Available The United States federal animal welfare regulations and the Public Health Service Policy on Humane Care and Use of Laboratory Animals require that institutional animal care and use committees (IACUCs conduct continuing reviews of all animal research activities. However, little is known about the lapse rate of IACUC continuing reviews, and how frequently investigators continue research activities during the lapse. It is also not clear what factors may contribute to an institution's lapse in IACUC continuing reviews. As part of the quality assurance program, the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA has collected performance metric data for animal care and use programs since 2011. We analyzed IACUC continuing review performance data at 74-75 VA research facilities from 2011 through 2015. The IACUC continuing review lapse rates improved from 5.6% in 2011 to 2.7% in 2015. The rate of investigators continuing research activities during the lapse also decreased from 47.2% in 2012 to 7.4% in 2015. The type of IACUCs used and the size of animal research programs appeared to have no effect in facility's rates of lapse in IACUC continuing reviews. While approximately 80% of facilities reported no lapse in IACUC continuing reviews, approximately 14% of facilities had lapse rates of >10% each year. Some facilities appeared to be repeat offenders. Four facilities had IACUC lapse rates of >10% in at least 3 out of 5 years, suggesting a system problem in these facilities requiring remedial actions to improve their IACUC continuing review processes.

  17. How unique is continuity of care? A review of continuity and related concepts.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Uijen, A.A.; Schers, H.J.; Schellevis, F.G.; Bosch, W.J.H.M. van den

    2012-01-01

    Background: The concept of ‘continuity of care’ has changed over time and seems to be entangled with other care concepts, for example coordination and integration of care. These concepts may overlap, and differences between them often remain unclear. Objective: In order to clarify the confusion of

  18. Experienced continuity of care in patients at risk for depression in primary care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Uijen, Annemarie A.; Schers, Henk J.; Schene, Aart H.; Schellevis, Francois G.; Lucassen, Peter; van den Bosch, Wil J. H. M.

    2014-01-01

    Existing studies about continuity of care focus on patients with a severe mental illness. Explore the level of experienced continuity of care of patients at risk for depression in primary care, and compare these to those of patients with heart failure. Explorative study comparing patients at risk

  19. Experienced continuity of care in patients at risk for depression in primary care.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Uijen, A.A.; Schers, H.J.; Schene, A.H.; Schellevis, F.G.; Lucassen, P.; Bosch, W.J.H.M. van den

    2014-01-01

    Background: Existing studies about continuity of care focus on patients with a severe mental illness. Objectives: Explore the level of experienced continuity of care of patients at risk for depression in primary care, and compare these to those of patients with heart failure. Methods: Explorative

  20. Translating evidence into practice: Hong Kong Reference Framework for Preventive Care for Children in Primary Care Settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siu, Natalie P Y; Too, L C; Tsang, Caroline S H; Young, Betty W Y

    2015-06-01

    There is increasing evidence that supports the close relationship between childhood and adult health. Fostering healthy growth and development of children deserves attention and effort. The Reference Framework for Preventive Care for Children in Primary Care Settings has been published by the Task Force on Conceptual Model and Preventive Protocols under the direction of the Working Group on Primary Care. It aims to promote health and prevent disease in children and is based on the latest research, and contributions of the Clinical Advisory Group that comprises primary care physicians, paediatricians, allied health professionals, and patient groups. This article highlights the comprehensive, continuing, and patient-centred preventive care for children and discusses how primary care physicians can incorporate the evidence-based recommendations into clinical practice. It is anticipated that the adoption of this framework will contribute to improved health and wellbeing of children.

  1. Opportunities for Prevention: Assessing Where Low-Income Patients Seek Care for Preventable Coronary Artery Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klaiman, Tamar A; Valdmanis, Vivian G; Bernet, Patrick; Moises, James

    2015-10-01

    The Affordable Care Act has many aspects that are aimed at improving health care for all Americans, including mandated insurance coverage for individuals, as well as required community health needs assessments (CHNAs), and reporting of investments in community benefit by nonprofit hospitals in order to maintain tax exemptions. Although millions of Americans have gained access to health insurance, many--often the most vulnerable--remain uninsured, and will continue to depend on hospital community benefits for care. Understanding where patients go for care can assist hospitals and communities to develop their CHNA and implementation plans in order to focus resources where the need for prevention is greatest. This study evaluated patient care-seeking behavior among patients with coronary artery disease (CAD) in Florida in 2008--analyzed in 2013--to assess whether low-income patients accessed specific safety net hospitals for treatment or received care from hospitals that were geographically closer to their residence. This study found evidence that low-income patients went to hospitals that treated more low-income patients, regardless of where they lived. The findings demonstrate that hospitals-especially public safety net hospitals with a tradition of treating low-income patients suffering from CAD-should focus prevention activities where low-income patients reside.

  2. Patient Experienced Continuity of Care in the Psychiatric Healthcare System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Natasja Koitzsch; Johansen, Katrine Schepelern; Kastrup, Marianne

    2014-01-01

    Aim: The purpose of this study was to investigate continuity of care in the psychiatric healthcare system from the perspective of patients, including vulnerable groups such as immigrants and refugees. Method: The study is based on 19 narrative interviews conducted with 15 patients with diverse...... migration backgrounds (immigrants, descendents, refugees, and ethnic Danes). Patients were recruited from a community psychiatric centre situated in an area with a high proportion of immigrants and refugees. Data were analysed through the lens of a theoretical framework of continuity of care in psychiatry......, developed in 2004 by Joyce et al., which encompasses four domains: accessibility, individualised care, relationship base and service delivery. Results: Investigating continuity of care, we found issues of specific concern to immigrants and refugees, but also commonalities across the groups...

  3. Mobile phone messaging for preventive health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vodopivec-Jamsek, Vlasta; de Jongh, Thyra; Gurol-Urganci, Ipek; Atun, Rifat; Car, Josip

    2012-12-12

    Preventive health care promotes health and prevents disease or injuries by addressing factors that lead to the onset of a disease, and by detecting latent conditions to reduce or halt their progression. Many risk factors for costly and disabling conditions (such as cardiovascular diseases, cancer, diabetes, and chronic respiratory diseases) can be prevented, yet healthcare systems do not make the best use of their available resources to support this process. Mobile phone messaging applications, such as Short Message Service (SMS) and Multimedia Message Service (MMS), could offer a convenient and cost-effective way to support desirable health behaviours for preventive health care. To assess the effects of mobile phone messaging interventions as a mode of delivery for preventive health care, on health status and health behaviour outcomes. We searched: the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL, The Cochrane Library 2009, Issue 2), MEDLINE (OvidSP) (January 1993 to June 2009), EMBASE (OvidSP) (January 1993 to June 2009), PsycINFO (OvidSP) (January 1993 to June 2009), CINAHL (EbscoHOST) (January 1993 to June 2009), LILACS (January 1993 to June 2009) and African Health Anthology (January 1993 to June 2009).We also reviewed grey literature (including trial registers) and reference lists of articles. We included randomised controlled trials (RCTs), quasi-randomised controlled trials (QRCTs), controlled before-after (CBA) studies, and interrupted time series (ITS) studies with at least three time points before and after the intervention. We included studies using SMS or MMS as a mode of delivery for any type of preventive health care. We only included studies in which it was possible to assess the effects of mobile phone messaging independent of other technologies or interventions. Two review authors independently assessed all studies against the inclusion criteria, with any disagreements resolved by a third review author. Study design features

  4. Continuity of care: betrayed values or misplaced nostalgia?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Roland

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Care is better coordinated when doctors have personal responsibility for their patients. Continuity and a sense of personal responsibility are becoming more difficult to provide in hospitals, in part because of the European Working Time Directive. However, in many countries general practitioners are self-employed and able to organise their practices as they wish. In the UK, they increasingly do so in ways that make it difficult for patients to get continuity of care. This is despite most patients being clear that they want to see a regular doctor, and professional bodies in primary care consistently promoting continuity as a core value. General practitioners need to decide whether continuity of care matters. If it does, then they need to take a lead in ensuring that care is organised so that patients who want to see a regular doctor are able to do so. Suggestions are included for how contemporary practice can be organised to promote this traditional but still highly relevant value.

  5. [Skin care and prevention of bed sores in bedridden patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez Cuervo, Fernando; Soldevilla Agreda, J Javier; Verdú Soriano, José; Segovia Gómez, Teresa; García Fernández, Francisco Pedro; Pancorbo Hidalgo, Pedro Luís

    2007-12-01

    The aging process and environmental aggressions will leave their imprints on the state of a person's skin, possibly compromising some of its functions. Age is a risk factor for the development of bed sores, but not the only factor nor the most important one; therefore, we need to develop prevention programs directed to all patients who spend long periods of time sedentary or bedridden. Prevention programs for bed sores must be based on the best evidence available and include a risk evaluation on these factors: suffering a lesion due to pressure, specific skin treatment, incontinence control, excessive humidity posture changes and the use of special surfaces to manage pressure during an increase in mobility or activity by the patient, local pressure reducing devices as well as paying attention to special situations. All of these care measures have to be developed based on a continuity of treatment among the institutions and caretakers involved with treating each patient.

  6. Study of relation of continuing medical education to quality of family physicians' care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn, E V; Bass, M J; Williams, J I; Borgiel, A E; MacDonald, P; Spasoff, R A

    1988-10-01

    A random sample of 120 physicians in Ontario was studied to assess quality of care in primary care and test an hypothesis that quality of care was related to continuing medical education (CME) activities. The quality-of-care scores were obtained by an in-office audit of a random selection of charts. The scores were global scores for charting, prevention, the use of 13 classes of drugs, and care of a two-year period for 182 different diagnoses. There were no relationships between global quality-of-care scores based on these randomly chosen charts and either the type or quantity of the physicians' CME activities. These activities were reading journals, attending rounds, attending scientific conferences, having informal consultations, using audio and video cassettes, and engaging in self-assessment. The implications of these findings are significant for future research in CME and for planners of present CME programs.

  7. Opioid use in palliative care | Hosking | Continuing Medical Education

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Continuing Medical Education. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 21, No 5 (2003) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register. Opioid use in palliative care. M Hosking. Abstract.

  8. Continuity of care for patients on a waiting list for institutional long-term care.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Caris-Verhallen, W.M.C.M.; Kerkstra, A.

    2001-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine patients' satisfaction with continuity of care while on a waiting list for residential care or nursing home care. Two hundred and seventy-eight patients participated in the study, all living in the community setting of two cities in the Netherlands. These

  9. Preventative foot care in people with diabetes: Quality patient ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Keywords: preventative foot care; diabetes; risk stratification: self care. Introduction ... diabetes is considered to be a key indicator of the quality of foot ... loss of protective sensation, the importance of foot monitoring on a daily basis, the proper ...

  10. Outcomes Associated With Early Preventive Dental Care Among Medicaid-Enrolled Children in Alabama

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrisey, Michael A.; Sen, Bisakha

    2017-01-01

    Importance There is a recommendation for children to have a dental home by 6 months of age, but there is limited evidence supporting the effectiveness of early preventive dental care or whether primary care providers (PCPs) can deliver it. Objective To investigate the effectiveness of preventive dental care in reducing caries-related treatment visits among Medicaid enrollees. Design, Setting, and Participants High-dimensional propensity scores were used to address selection bias for a retrospective cohort study of children continuously enrolled in coverage from the Alabama Medicaid Agency from birth between 2008 and 2012, adjusting for demographics, access to care, and general health service use. Exposures Children receiving preventive dental care prior to age 2 years from PCPs or dentists vs no preventive dental care. Main Outcome and Measures Two-part models estimated caries-related treatment and expenditures. Results Among 19 658 eligible children, 25.8% (n = 3658) received early preventive dental care, of whom 44% were black, 37.6% were white, and 16.3% were Hispanic. Compared with matched children without early preventive dental care, children with dentist-delivered preventive dental care more frequently had a subsequent caries-related treatment (20.6% vs 11.3%, P dental expenditures ($168 vs $87 per year, P dental care was associated with an increase in the expected number of caries-related treatment visits by 0.14 per child per year (95% CI, 0.11-0.16) and caries-related treatment expenditures by $40.77 per child per year (95% CI, $30.48-$51.07). Primary care provider–delivered preventive dental care did not significantly affect caries-related treatment use or expenditures. Conclusions and Relevance Children with early preventive care visits from dentists were more likely to have subsequent dental care, including caries-related treatment, and greater expenditures than children without preventive dental care. There was no association with subsequent

  11. Outcome of alcohol dependence: The role of continued care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murthy Pratima

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims: This study attempted to determine the effects of continued care on subjects with alcohol dependence. Materials and Methods: Study patients were recruited from a slum in Bangalore. The control group comprised individuals from a lower socio-economic status. Both groups received identical treatment from a specialised de-addiction facility. The study group also received weekly continued care in the community, either at a clinic located within the slum or through home visits. Those patients without stable jobs were referred for employment. The control group was given routine hospital follow-up visits. Both groups were evaluated on the Alcohol Problem Questionnaire and quantity/frequency of drinking at baseline and every 3 month interval for one year after discharge. Results: Both groups showed improvement in terms of reduction of drinking at 3 months, with the study group showing a 64% improvement with respect to the number of non drinking days and the control group showed a 50% improvement. However, at 6 months, 9 months, and 12 months, the study group continued to maintain these gains while the control group showed a downward slide (differences significant at P < 0.05. At the end of 12 months, the study group maintained a 53% improvement with respect to the number of non drinking days as compared with baseline, while the control group had an improvement of only 28%. Conclusions: Follow-up support and continued care appear to significantly improve longer-term recovery in alcohol dependents.

  12. Multimorbidity and quality of preventive care in Swiss university primary care cohorts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sven Streit

    Full Text Available Caring for patients with multimorbidity is common for generalists, although such patients are often excluded from clinical trials, and thus such trials lack of generalizability. Data on the association between multimorbidity and preventive care are limited. We aimed to assess whether comorbidity number, severity and type were associated with preventive care among patients receiving care in Swiss University primary care settings.We examined a retrospective cohort composed of a random sample of 1,002 patients aged 50-80 years attending four Swiss university primary care settings. Multimorbidity was defined according to the literature and the Charlson index. We assessed the quality of preventive care and cardiovascular preventive care with RAND's Quality Assessment Tool indicators. Aggregate scores of quality of provided care were calculated by taking into account the number of eligible patients for each indicator.Participants (mean age 63.5 years, 44% women had a mean of 2.6 (SD 1.9 comorbidities and 67.5% had 2 or more comorbidities. The mean Charlson index was 1.8 (SD 1.9. Overall, participants received 69% of recommended preventive care and 84% of cardiovascular preventive care. Quality of care was not associated with higher numbers of comorbidities, both for preventive care and for cardiovascular preventive care. Results were similar in analyses using the Charlson index and after adjusting for age, gender, occupation, center and number of visits. Some patients may receive less preventive care including those with dementia (47% and those with schizophrenia (35%.In Swiss university primary care settings, two thirds of patients had 2 or more comorbidities. The receipt of preventive and cardiovascular preventive care was not affected by comorbidity count or severity, although patients with certain comorbidities may receive lower levels of preventive care.

  13. Preventive and Community Medicine in Primary Care. Teaching of Preventive Medicine Vol. 5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barker, William H., Ed.

    This monograph is the result of a conference on the role of preventive and community medicine in primary medical care and education. The following six papers were presented at the conference: (1) Roles of Departments of Preventive Medicine; (2) Competency-Based Objectives in Preventive Medicine for the Family Physician; (3) Preventive Medicine…

  14. Reform, change, and continuity in Finnish health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Häkkinen, Unto; Lehto, Juhani

    2005-01-01

    This article describes some essential aspects of the Finnish political and governmental system and the evolution of the basic institutional elements of the health care system. We examine the developments that gave rise to a series of health care reforms and reform proposals in the late 1980s and early 1990s and relate them to changes in health care expenditure, structure, and performance. Finally, we discuss the relationship between policy changes, reforms, and health system changes and the strength of neo-institutional theory in explaining both continuity and change. Much of the change in Finnish health care can be explained by institutional path dependency. The tradition of strong but small local authorities and the lack of legitimate democratic regional authorities as well as the coexistence of a dominant Beveridge-style health system with a marginal Bismarckian element explain the specific path of Finnish health care reform. Public responsibility for health care has been decentralized to smaller local authorities (known as municipalities) more than in any other country. Even an exceptionally deep economic recession in the early 1990s did not lead to systems change; rather, the economic imperative was met by the traditional centralized policy pattern. Some of the developments of the 1990s are, however, difficult to explain by institutional theory. Thus, there is a need for testing alternative theories as well.

  15. Managed care, consumerism, preventive medicine: does a causal connection exist?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizzo, John A; Xie, Yang

    2006-07-01

    Managed care plans, and HMOs in particular, have long touted that their emphasis is on preventive care, to avoid expensive illness later in life. However, few articles in the contemporary literature adequately address this claim. The available evidence seems to support that HMOs do, in fact, provide greater access to preventive services, but the limitations of this research are substantial. This article discusses the scientific evidence on the relationships between managed care arrangements and the implications for preventive care in the current era, emphasizing consumer choices and less-restrictive plan structures.

  16. The Social Work in the Continuous Care Unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Rita dos Santos de Pina Duarte

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The Social Worker is a qualified professional who, by proper training intervention and by research and analysis of social reality, is ready to act, execute and evaluate services, programs and social policies aiming to preserve, protect and expand human rights and social justice. The Portuguese National Network of Integrated Continuous Care (RNCCI emerged in 2006 considering the health care needs with the recognition that the system could not cope with the rehabilitation needs of the different groups of patients. Thus, this health structure was created to establish an intermediary between health and social care and as a way to connect hospitalization and clinical discharge, as well as re-integration into the community. The primary goal was to clearly assess the importance of the social service in one Continuous Care Unit by using, as methodology, questioner applications for different professionals (social service team and other health team members. The results were helpful and positive, allowing us to conclude that the social service area is valued by the team members at different levels with a fundamental goal of supporting patients, families / caregivers and the other health professionals in their interventions.

  17. Service Users' and Caregivers' Perspectives on Continuity of Care in Out-of-Hours Primary Care.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Gallagher, Niamh

    2012-12-20

    Modernization policies in primary care, such as the introduction of out-of-hours general practice cooperatives, signify a marked departure from many service users\\' traditional experiences of continuity of care. We report on a case study of accounts of service users with chronic conditions and their caregivers of continuity of care in an out-of-hours general practice cooperative in Ireland. Using Strauss and colleagues\\' Chronic Illness Trajectory Framework, we explored users\\' and caregivers\\' experiences of continuity in this context. Whereas those dealing with "routine trajectories" were largely satisfied with their experiences, those dealing with "problematic trajectories" (characterized by the presence of, for example, multimorbidity and complex care regimes) had considerable concerns about continuity of experiences in this service. Results highlight that modernization policies that have given rise to out-of-hours cooperatives have had a differential impact on service users with chronic conditions and their caregivers, with serious consequences for those who have "problematic" trajectories.

  18. Innovation or rebranding, acute care surgery diffusion will continue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Courtney E; Pringle, Patricia L; Santry, Heena P

    2015-08-01

    Patterns of adoption of acute care surgery (ACS) as a strategy for emergency general surgery (EGS) care are unknown. We conducted a qualitative study comprising face-to-face interviews with senior surgeons responsible for ACS at 18 teaching hospitals chosen to ensure diversity of opinions and practice environment (three practice types [community, public or charity, and university] in each of six geographic regions [Mid-Atlantic, Midwest, New England, Northeast, South, and West]). Interviews were recorded, transcribed, and analyzed using NVivo (QSR International, Melbourne, Australia). We applied the methods of investigator triangulation using an inductive approach to develop a final taxonomy of codes organized by themes related to respondents' views on the future of ACS as a strategy for EGS. We applied our findings to a conceptual model on diffusion of innovation. We found a paradox between ACS viewed as a health care delivery innovation versus a rebranding of comprehensive general surgery. Optimism for the future of ACS because of increased desirability for trauma and critical care careers as well as improved EGS outcomes was tempered by fear over lack of continuity, poor institutional resources, and uncertainty regarding financial viability. Our analysis suggests that the implementation of ACS, whether a true health care delivery innovation or an innovative rebranding, fits into the Rogers' diffusion of innovation theory. Despite concerns over resource allocation and the definition of the specialty, from the perspective of senior surgeons deeply entrenched in executing this care delivery model, ACS represents the new face of general surgery that will likely continue to diffuse from these early adopters. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  19. A Health Care Project Management Office's Strategies for Continual Change and Continuous Improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavoie-Tremblay, Mélanie; Aubry, Monique; Richer, Marie-Claire; Cyr, Guylaine

    Health care organizations need project and change management support in order to achieve successful transformations. A project management office (PMO) helps support the organizations through their transformations along with increasing their capabilities in project and change management. The aim of the present study was to extend understanding of the continuous improvement mechanisms used by PMOs and to describe PMO's strategies for continual change and continuous improvement in the context of major transformation in health care. This study is a descriptive case study design with interviews conducted from October to December 2015 with PMO's members (3 managers and 1 director) and 3 clients working with the PMO after a major redevelopment project ended (transition to the new facility). Participants suggested a number of elements including carefully selecting the members of the PMO, having a clear mandate for the PMO, having a method and a discipline at the same time as allowing openness and flexibility, clearly prioritizing projects, optimizing collaboration, planning for everything the PMO will need, not overlooking organizational culture, and retaining the existing support model. This study presents a number of factors ensuring the sustainability of changes.

  20. Wound Care Center of Excellence: A Process for Continuous Monitoring and Improvement of Wound Care Quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howell, Raelina S; Kohan, Lauren S; Woods, Jon S; Criscitelli, Theresa; Gillette, Brian M; Donovan, Virginia; Gorenstein, Scott

    2018-05-01

    To provide information about a study using a new process for continuous monitoring to improve chronic wound care quality.This continuing education activity is intended for physicians, physician assistants, nurse practitioners, and nurses with an interest in skin and wound care.After completing this continuing education activity, you should be better able to:1. Recognize problems associated with chronic wound care.2. Identify methods used in this project to improve care.3. Illustrate the findings from this and similar projects and implications for providing improved wound care.Patients with chronic wounds require complex care because of comorbidities that can affect healing. Therefore, the goal of this project was to develop a system of reviewing all hospitalized patients seen by the study authors' wound care service on a weekly basis to decrease readmissions, morbidity, and mortality. Weekly multidisciplinary conferences were conducted to evaluate patient data and systematically assess for adherence to wound care protocols, as well as to create and modify patient care plans. This review of pathology and the performance of root-cause analyses often led to improved patient care.

  1. Differentiating clinical care from disease prevention: a prerequisite for practicing quaternary prevention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles Dalcanale Tesser

    Full Text Available Abstract: This article contends that the distinction between clinical care (illness and prevention of future disease is essential to the practice of quaternary prevention. The authors argue that the ongoing entanglement of clinical care and prevention transforms healthy into "sick" people through changes in disease classification criteria and/or cut-off points for defining high-risk states. This diverts health care resources away from those in need of care and increases the risk of iatrogenic harm in healthy people. The distinction in focus is based on: (a management of uncertainty (more flexible when caring for ill persons; (b guarantee of benefit (required only in prevention; (c harm tolerance (nil or minimal in prevention. This implies attitudinal differences in the decision-making process: greater skepticism, scientism and resistance towards preventive action. These should be based on high-quality scientific evidence of end-outcomes that displays a net positive harm/benefit ratio.

  2. Preventing Rehospitalization through effective home health nursing care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasquez, Monica S

    2009-01-01

    To identify strategies to improve patient outcomes and prevent rehospitalizations in home healthcare. PRIMARY PRACTICE SETTINGS(S): Primarily for home healthcare but can also be a tool for all other fields in nursing. Through team collaboration and the proper resources, patient outcomes can improve and be cost-effective for home healthcare agencies despite the changes implemented after the Medicare change in payment for services, the prospective payment system. The main goal for home healthcare is to improve patient outcomes. Nurses experienced in case management can devise creative strategies to ensure patient outcomes are met in a cost-effective manner. With continuous changes in reimbursement and payment incentives, case managers in every level of care must know about, and be responsible for, fiscal initiatives.

  3. Association of Continuity of Primary Care and Statin Adherence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James R Warren

    Full Text Available Deficiencies in medication adherence are a major barrier to effectiveness of chronic condition management. Continuity of primary care may promote adherence. We assessed the association of continuity of primary care with adherence to long-term medication as exemplified by statins.We linked data from a prospective study of 267,091 Australians aged 45 years and over to national data sets on prescription reimbursements, general practice claims, hospitalisations and deaths. For participants having a statin dispense within 90 days of study entry, we computed medication possession ratio (MPR and usual provider continuity index (UPI for the subsequent two years. We used multivariate Poisson regression to calculate the relative risk (RR and 95% confidence interval (CI for the association between tertiles of UPI and MPR adjusted for socio-demographic and health-related patient factors, including age, gender, remoteness of residence, smoking, alcohol intake, fruit and vegetable intake, physical activity, prior heart disease and speaking a language other than English at home. We performed a comparison approach using propensity score matching on a subset of the sample.36,144 participants were eligible and included in the analysis among whom 58% had UPI greater than 75%. UPI was significantly associated with 5% increased MPR for statin adherence (95% CI 1.04-1.06 for highest versus lowest tertile. Dichotomised analysis using a cut-off of UPI at 75% showed a similar effect size. The association between UPI and statin adherence was independent of socio-demographic and health-related factors. Stratification analyses further showed a stronger association among those who were new to statins (RR 1.33, 95% CI 1.15-1.54.Greater continuity of care has a positive association with medication adherence for statins which is independent of socio-demographic and health-related factors.

  4. Association of Continuity of Primary Care and Statin Adherence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, James R; Falster, Michael O; Tran, Bich; Jorm, Louisa

    2015-01-01

    Deficiencies in medication adherence are a major barrier to effectiveness of chronic condition management. Continuity of primary care may promote adherence. We assessed the association of continuity of primary care with adherence to long-term medication as exemplified by statins. We linked data from a prospective study of 267,091 Australians aged 45 years and over to national data sets on prescription reimbursements, general practice claims, hospitalisations and deaths. For participants having a statin dispense within 90 days of study entry, we computed medication possession ratio (MPR) and usual provider continuity index (UPI) for the subsequent two years. We used multivariate Poisson regression to calculate the relative risk (RR) and 95% confidence interval (CI) for the association between tertiles of UPI and MPR adjusted for socio-demographic and health-related patient factors, including age, gender, remoteness of residence, smoking, alcohol intake, fruit and vegetable intake, physical activity, prior heart disease and speaking a language other than English at home. We performed a comparison approach using propensity score matching on a subset of the sample. 36,144 participants were eligible and included in the analysis among whom 58% had UPI greater than 75%. UPI was significantly associated with 5% increased MPR for statin adherence (95% CI 1.04-1.06) for highest versus lowest tertile. Dichotomised analysis using a cut-off of UPI at 75% showed a similar effect size. The association between UPI and statin adherence was independent of socio-demographic and health-related factors. Stratification analyses further showed a stronger association among those who were new to statins (RR 1.33, 95% CI 1.15-1.54). Greater continuity of care has a positive association with medication adherence for statins which is independent of socio-demographic and health-related factors.

  5. Continuity of midwifery care and gestational weight gain in obese women: a randomised controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patterson Denise

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The increased prevalence of obesity in pregnant women in Australia and other developed countries is a significant public health concern. Obese women are at increased risk of serious perinatal complications and guidelines recommend weight gain restriction and additional care. There is limited evidence to support the effectiveness of dietary and physical activity lifestyle interventions in preventing adverse perinatal outcomes and new strategies need to be evaluated. The primary aim of this project is to evaluate the effect of continuity of midwifery care on restricting gestational weight gain in obese women to the recommended range. The secondary aims of the study are to assess the impact of continuity of midwifery care on: women's experience of pregnancy care; women's satisfaction with care and a range of psychological factors. Methods/Design A two arm randomised controlled trial (RCT will be conducted with primigravid women recruited from maternity services in Victoria, Australia. Participants will be primigravid women, with a BMI≥30 who are less than 17 weeks gestation. Women allocated to the intervention arm will be cared for in a midwifery continuity of care model and receive an informational leaflet on managing weight gain in pregnancy. Women allocated to the control group will receive routine care in addition to the same informational leaflet. Weight gain during pregnancy, standards of care, medical and obstetric information will be extracted from medical records. Data collected at recruitment (self administered survey and at 36 weeks by postal survey will include socio-demographic information and the use of validated scales to measure secondary outcomes. Discussion Continuity of midwifery care models are well aligned with current Victorian, Australian and many international government policies on maternity care. Increasingly, midwifery continuity models of care are being introduced in low risk maternity care, and

  6. [The importance of longitudinality, comprehensiveness, coordination and continuity of nursing home care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corrales-Nevado, Dolores; Palomo-Cobos, Luis

    2014-01-01

    Home care is essential for dependent persons, in order to support the high levels of morbidity, for the elderly as well as their caregivers, as it enables patients to remain in their familiar environment as long as possible, fulfilling the wish expressed by most of the population. Home care is the activity that best represents the essential attributes (longitudinality, comprehensiveness, continuity, coordination) of the primary, and that suffers most when these attributes are not included in the activities undertaken by primary care teams, or due to cuts in health-care. Home care requires highly skilled, versatile and committed nursing staff, with whom the population identifies as a source of care, and where they are assessed for their relevance and effectiveness. Nurses with wide clinical care skills, with a balanced content of treatment and prevention, and the freedom to develop their work, are needed in order to continuously monitor the health problems of their acute and chronic patients, in the family and community. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  7. [Using eHealth in the Continuity Care of Chronic Kidney Disease: Opportunities and Considerations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yu-Chi; Chang, Polun

    2016-04-01

    Kidney disease is a common complication of chronic diseases among adult and elderly populations. As early-stage chronic kidney disease (CKD) is asymptomatic, CKD patients are frequently unaware of their condition and fail to implement requisite self-care in a timely fashion. Furthermore, the shortage of case-management manpower and difficulties in follow-up have led to high incidence rates for CKD worldwide. Integrative and continuous care is key to preventing CKD. How to implement this care effectively is a challenge. However, innovative technologies, online information, and cloud technology are increasingly providing access to good-quality healthcare beyond the traditional limitations of time and location. This environment is not only increasing the participation of patients in their care and collaboration among healthcare team members but is also improving the continuity, accessibility, and promptness of care service in order to promote the effectiveness of disease management. While the primary aim of innovative technologies is to make healthcare more cost-effective, it is also causing disparities in healthcare. Within the high-tech e-healthcare system, the ability of patients to utilize these new services relates directly to their health behaviors and quality of care. Thus, emergent e-healthcare system services should be made as patient-centered as possible in order to maximize the benefits in terms of both cost and patient care. Furthermore, improving the eHealth literacy of patients is crucial to promoting innovative technology within healthcare services.

  8. The association between continuity of care in the community and health outcomes: a population-based study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dreiher Jacob

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The study goal was to assess indices of continuity of care in the primary care setting and their association with health outcomes and healthcare services utilization, given the reported importance of continuity regarding quality of care and healthcare utilization. Methods The study included a random sample of enrollees from Clalit Health Services 19 years-of-age or older who visited their primary care clinic at least three times in 2009. Indices of continuity of care were computed, including the Usual Provider Index (UPC, Modified Modified Continuity Index (MMCI, Continuity of Care Index (COC, and Sequential Continuity (SECON. Quality measures of preventive medicine and healthcare services utilization and their costs were assessed as outcomes. Results 1,713 randomly sampled patients were included in the study (mean age: 48.9 ± 19.2, 42% males. Continuity of care indices were: UPC: 0.75; MMCI: 0.81; COC: 0.67; SECON: 0.70. After controlling for patient characteristics in a multivariate analysis, a statistically significant association was found between higher values of UPC, COC, and SECON and a decrease in the number and cost of ED visits. Higher MMCI values were associated with a greater number and higher costs of medical consultation visits. Continuity of care indices were associated with BMI measurements, and inversely associated with blood pressure measurements. No association was found with other quality indicators, e.g., screening tests for cancer. Conclusions Several continuity of care indices were associated with decreased number and costs of ED visits. There were both positive and negative associations of continuity of care indices with different aspects of healthcare utilization. The relatively small effects of continuity might be due to the consistently high levels of continuity in Clalit Health Services.

  9. Ambient-aware continuous care through semantic context dissemination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ongenae, Femke; Famaey, Jeroen; Verstichel, Stijn; De Zutter, Saar; Latré, Steven; Ackaert, Ann; Verhoeve, Piet; De Turck, Filip

    2014-12-04

    The ultimate ambient-intelligent care room contains numerous sensors and devices to monitor the patient, sense and adjust the environment and support the staff. This sensor-based approach results in a large amount of data, which can be processed by current and future applications, e.g., task management and alerting systems. Today, nurses are responsible for coordinating all these applications and supplied information, which reduces the added value and slows down the adoption rate.The aim of the presented research is the design of a pervasive and scalable framework that is able to optimize continuous care processes by intelligently reasoning on the large amount of heterogeneous care data. The developed Ontology-based Care Platform (OCarePlatform) consists of modular components that perform a specific reasoning task. Consequently, they can easily be replicated and distributed. Complex reasoning is achieved by combining the results of different components. To ensure that the components only receive information, which is of interest to them at that time, they are able to dynamically generate and register filter rules with a Semantic Communication Bus (SCB). This SCB semantically filters all the heterogeneous care data according to the registered rules by using a continuous care ontology. The SCB can be distributed and a cache can be employed to ensure scalability. A prototype implementation is presented consisting of a new-generation nurse call system supported by a localization and a home automation component. The amount of data that is filtered and the performance of the SCB are evaluated by testing the prototype in a living lab. The delay introduced by processing the filter rules is negligible when 10 or fewer rules are registered. The OCarePlatform allows disseminating relevant care data for the different applications and additionally supports composing complex applications from a set of smaller independent components. This way, the platform significantly reduces

  10. [Recognition, care and prevention of suicidal behaviour in adults].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rihmer, Zoltán; Németh, Attila; Kurimay, Tamás; Perczel-Forintos, Dóra; Purebl, György; Döme, Péter

    2017-01-01

    majority of suicidal patients have problems with relationships, work, school and lack functioning social networks. 4. A secure home, public and hospital environment, without access to suicidal means is a necessary strategy in suicide prevention. Each treatment option, prescription of medication and discharge of the patient from hospital should be carefully evaluated against the involved risks. 5. Education of treatment team: Training of general practitioners is effective in the prevention of suicide. It improves treatment of depression and anxiety, quality of the provided care and attitudes towards suicide. Continuous training including discussions about ethical and legal issues is necessary for psychiatrists and other mental health professionals. Multidisciplinary treatment teams including psychiatrist and other professionals such as psychologist, social worker, and occupational therapist are always preferable, as integration of pharmacological, psychological and social rehabilitation is recommended especially for patients with chronic suicidality. 6. Public aspects: Not only the health care workers are responsible for suicide prevention. All members of our society (including community/political leaders as well as religious and civil organizations) have their own task with more or less competence and responsibility.

  11. Indicators for continuous quality improvement for otitis media in primary health care for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sibthorpe, Beverly; Agostino, Jason; Coates, Harvey; Weeks, Sharon; Lehmann, Deborah; Wood, Marianne; Lannigan, Francis; McAullay, Daniel

    2017-04-01

    Otitis media is a common, generally self-limiting childhood illness that can progress to severe disease and have lifelong sequelae, including hearing loss and developmental delays. Severe disease is disproportionately prevalent among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children. Primary health care is at the frontline of appropriate prevention and treatment. Continuous quality improvement in the prevention and management of important causes of morbidity in client populations is accepted best practice in primary health care and now a requirement of Australian Government funding to services providing care for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children. To date, there have been no indicators for continuous quality improvement in the prevention and management of otitis media and its sequelae in primary health care. Through an expert group consensus process, seven evidence-based indicators, potentially extractable from electronic health records, have been developed. The development process and indicators are described.

  12. [Continuous subcutaneous infusion in palliative care, an undervalued method].

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Marum, R J; de Vogel, E M; Zylicz, Z

    2002-11-23

    Three patients, 2 men aged 55 and 54 years and a woman aged 86 years, were admitted to hospital for treatment of symptoms resulting from terminal disease (pain, agitation, nausea etc.). In all three patients, continuous subcutaneous infusion (CSI) of medication was successfully used to control the symptoms. Compared with intravenous infusion, the technique of CSI is easy to learn and is associated with fewer complications. Its reliability and ease-of-use make it a technique that can be used not only in a hospital setting, but also in general practice and nursing homes. Medication used in palliative care (e.g. morphine, haloperidol, metoclopramide, levomepromazine, midazolam) can often be administered safely by CSI. In palliative care, where goals should be accomplished with minimal burden to the patient, CSI must be considered the technique of choice in patients who are unable to swallow their medication.

  13. Disparities in the use of preventive health care among children with disabilities in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Wen-Chen; Kung, Pei-Tseng; Wang, Jong-Yi

    2012-01-01

    Children with disabilities face more barriers accessing preventive health services. Prior research has documented disparities in the receipt of these services. However, most are limited to specific types of disability or care. This study investigates disparities in the use of preventive health care among children with disabilities in Taiwan. Three nationwide databases from the Ministry of the Interior, Bureau of Health Promotion, and National Health Research Institutes were linked to gather related information between 2006 and 2008. A total of 8572 children with disabilities aged 1-7 years were included in this study. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was conducted to adjust for covariates. Nationally, only 37.58% of children with disabilities received preventive health care in 2008. Children with severe and very severe disabilities were less likely to use preventive care than those with mild severity. Children with disabilities from the lowest income family were less likely to have preventive care than other income groups. Urbanization was strongly associated with the receipt of preventive health care. However, surprisingly, urban children with disabilities were less likely to receive preventive care than all others. Under universal health insurance coverage, the overall usage of preventive health care is still low among children with disabilities. The study also identified several disparities in their usage. Potential factors affecting the lack of use deserve additional research. Policymakers should target low socioeconomic brackets and foster education about the importance of preventive care. Mobile health services should be continually provided in those areas in need. Capitation reimbursement and other incentives should be considered in improving the utilization among children with disabilities. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Improving the quality of pressure ulcer care with prevention: a cost-effectiveness analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padula, William V; Mishra, Manish K; Makic, Mary Beth F; Sullivan, Patrick W

    2011-04-01

    In October 2008, Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services discontinued reimbursement for hospital-acquired pressure ulcers (HAPUs), thus placing stress on hospitals to prevent incidence of this costly condition. To evaluate whether prevention methods are cost-effective compared with standard care in the management of HAPUs. A semi-Markov model simulated the admission of patients to an acute care hospital from the time of admission through 1 year using the societal perspective. The model simulated health states that could potentially lead to an HAPU through either the practice of "prevention" or "standard care." Univariate sensitivity analyses, threshold analyses, and Bayesian multivariate probabilistic sensitivity analysis using 10,000 Monte Carlo simulations were conducted. Cost per quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs) gained for the prevention of HAPUs. Prevention was cost saving and resulted in greater expected effectiveness compared with the standard care approach per hospitalization. The expected cost of prevention was $7276.35, and the expected effectiveness was 11.241 QALYs. The expected cost for standard care was $10,053.95, and the expected effectiveness was 9.342 QALYs. The multivariate probabilistic sensitivity analysis showed that prevention resulted in cost savings in 99.99% of the simulations. The threshold cost of prevention was $821.53 per day per person, whereas the cost of prevention was estimated to be $54.66 per day per person. This study suggests that it is more cost effective to pay for prevention of HAPUs compared with standard care. Continuous preventive care of HAPUs in acutely ill patients could potentially reduce incidence and prevalence, as well as lead to lower expenditures.

  15. Cultural factors in preventive care: Latinos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz, Victor Alejandro

    2002-09-01

    For many, the term "Hispanic" places undue emphasis on the European influence of Spanish colonialism and may even have negative connotations for some. "Latino" is a more encompassing term that gives recognition to the influences of the indigenous and African cultures on modern day Latin Americans. Nevertheless, recognition of typical Latino attitudes and beliefs may assist health care providers. Poverty, unemployment, and low level of education usually account for adverse health in this population. Anti-immigrant sentiment and discrimination in health care and education add adversity to the immigrant's experience. Lack of health insurance and access to quality health care typically plague the adult immigrant. For many, the nearest emergency department is their only source of medical care.

  16. Continued care of uranium mill sites: some economic considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harrington, W.; Sawyer, J.W. Jr.

    1978-01-01

    A critique of recently enacted legislation authorizing the New Mexico Environmental Improvement Agency to regulate uranium mills in the state is presented. Under this new legislation, the Agency is authorized to require payment of up to 10 cents per pound of yellowcake from each licensed mill in the state until a total of $1 million has been deposited by that mill. The continued care fund thus created will provide for maintenance in perpetuity of mill sites after being decommissioned. Arguments are presented, based on calculations for a typical 5,000 ton per day mill, that even the maximum amount is not likely to generate sufficient income to support an adequate maintenance program. The matter is further aggravated by the rate of inflation which will increase costs beyond the coverage provided by a fixed funding system. To correct this situation, it is proposed that (1) the fund should generate an income stream sufficient to meet all maintenance costs based on currently available information on costs, interest, and inflation rates, and (2) the terms of the continued care contribution should be readily alterable as new information becomes available. The latter condition should be coupled with removal of the upper statutory limit now established for the fund

  17. Suicide Prevention: An Emerging Priority For Health Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogan, Michael F; Grumet, Julie Goldstein

    2016-06-01

    Suicide is a significant public health problem. It is the tenth leading cause of death in the United States, and the rate has risen in recent years. Many suicide deaths are among people recently seen or currently under care in clinical settings, but suicide prevention has not been a core priority in health care. In recent years, new treatment and management strategies have been developed, tested, and implemented in some organizations, but they are not yet widely used. This article examines the feasibility of improving suicide prevention in health care settings. In particular, we consider Zero Suicide, a model for better identification and treatment of patients at risk for suicide. The approach incorporates new tools for screening, treatment, and support; it has been deployed with promising results in behavioral health programs and primary care settings. Broader adoption of improved suicide prevention care may be an effective strategy for reducing deaths by suicide. Project HOPE—The People-to-People Health Foundation, Inc.

  18. Preventive intervention in diabetes: a new model for continuing medical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaser, Richard S; Brown, Julie A

    2013-04-01

    Competence and skills in overcoming clinical inertia for diabetes treatment, and actually supporting and assisting the patient through adherence and compliance (as opposed to just reiterating what they "should" be doing and then assigning them the blame if they fail) is a key component to success in addressing diabetes, and to date it is a component that has received little formal attention. To improve and systematize diabetes care, it is critical to move beyond the "traditional" continuing medical education (CME) model of imparting knowledge as the entirety of the educational effort, and move toward a focus on Performance Improvement CME. This new approach does not just teach new information but also provides support for improvements where needed most within practice systems based on targeted data-based on self-assessments for the entire system of care. Joslin data conclude that this new approach will benefit support, clinical, and office teams as well as the specialist. In short, the Performance Improvement CME structure reflects the needed components of the successful practice today, particularly for chronic conditions such as diabetes, including the focus on interdisciplinary team care and on quality improvement, which is becoming more and more aligned with reimbursement schemes, public and private, in the U.S. Copyright © 2013 American Journal of Preventive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Continuity of care in the Health Care Network: negotiation between users and professionals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Denise Schimith

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to identify the negotiation and shared decision-making between professionals and users in a Family Health Unit and its influence on the continuity of care in the Health Care Network. Qualitative research created from a case study. One conducted 19 interviews, observation and document research. It was developed in a city in the countryside of Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil, in 2012. The results show that decisions used to happen unilaterally and that users and professionals looked for alternative ways to the continuity of care. It was not possible to identify the negotiation between professional and users and it was noticed that the user was alone looking for access. It is understood that primary care in the city researched needs to take responsibility for users and their access.

  20. [The prevention of pressure sores in paediatric intensive care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thueux, Emilie

    2014-01-01

    In paediatric intensive care, children develop pressure sores as a result of various mechanical and clinical factors. The prevention and assessment of the risk of pressure sores constitute a key concern for the nursing teams which establish prevention strategies adapted to the young patients.

  1. Wellness Programs: Preventive Medicine to Reduce Health Care Costs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martini, Gilbert R., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    A wellness program is a formalized approach to preventive health care that can positively affect employee lifestyle and reduce future health-care costs. Describes programs for health education, smoking cessation, early detection, employee assistance, and fitness, citing industry success figures. (eight references) (MLF)

  2. A guide for identification and continuing care of adult congenital heart disease patients in primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellison, S; Lamb, J; Haines, A; O'Dell, S; Thomas, G; Sethi, S; Ratcliffe, J; Chisholm, S; Vaughan, J; Mahadevan, V S

    2013-03-10

    Surgical and other advances in the treatment and care of congenital heart disease have resulted in a significant increase in the number of adults with congenital heart disease (ACHD), many of whom have no regular cardiology follow-up. Optimised care for ACHD patients requires continuity of specialist and shared care and education of practitioners and patients. The challenges for managing ACHD were identified by a Health Needs Assessment in the North West and are addressed within the UK Department of Health's ACHD Commissioning Guide. An ACHD model of care was recommended in the North West of England and developed by the three North West Cardiac & Stroke Networks. Within this, a Task Group focused on the role of primary care in the identification and continuing care of ACHD patients. A feasibility study demonstrated that existing diagnostic Read Codes can identify ACHD patients on general practice registers. An ACHD Toolkit was developed to provide algorithms to guide the appropriate management of ACHD patients through primary, secondary and/or specialist ACHD care and to improve education/knowledge amongst primary care staff about ACHD and its wider implications. Early findings during the development of this Toolkit illustrate a wide disparity of provision between current and optimal management strategies. Patients lost to follow-up have already been identified and their management modified. By focusing on identifying ACHD patients in primary care and organising/delivering ACHD services, the ACHD Toolkit could help to improve quality, timeliness of care, patient experience and wellbeing. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Estimated time spent on preventive services by primary care physicians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gradison Margaret

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Delivery of preventive health services in primary care is lacking. One of the main barriers is lack of time. We estimated the amount of time primary care physicians spend on important preventive health services. Methods We analyzed a large dataset of primary care (family and internal medicine visits using the National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey (2001–4; analyses were conducted 2007–8. Multiple linear regression was used to estimate the amount of time spent delivering each preventive service, controlling for demographic covariates. Results Preventive visits were longer than chronic care visits (M = 22.4, SD = 11.8, M = 18.9, SD = 9.2, respectively. New patients required more time from physicians. Services on which physicians spent relatively more time were prostate specific antigen (PSA, cholesterol, Papanicolaou (Pap smear, mammography, exercise counseling, and blood pressure. Physicians spent less time than recommended on two "A" rated ("good evidence" services, tobacco cessation and Pap smear (in preventive visits, and one "B" rated ("at least fair evidence" service, nutrition counseling. Physicians spent substantial time on two services that have an "I" rating ("inconclusive evidence of effectiveness", PSA and exercise counseling. Conclusion Even with limited time, physicians address many of the "A" rated services adequately. However, they may be spending less time than recommended for important services, especially smoking cessation, Pap smear, and nutrition counseling. Future research is needed to understand how physicians decide how to allocate their time to address preventive health.

  4. Breast cancer prevention across the cancer care continuum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klemp, Jennifer R

    2015-05-01

    To review the current state of breast cancer prevention from primary prevention through survivorship, highlight cross-cutting issues, and discuss strategies for clinical integration and future research. Published articles between 1985 and 2015 and original research. Cancer risk persists across the lifespan. Interprofessional strategies to reduce morbidity and mortality from cancer include primary, secondary, and tertiary prevention (survivorship). Prevention strategies across the cancer care continuum are cross-cutting and focus on measures to: prevent the onset of disease, identify and treat asymptomatic persons who have already developed risk factors or preclinical disease, and restore function, minimize the negative effects of disease, and prevent disease-related complications. Oncology nurses and advanced practice nurses are vital in the delivery of breast cancer prevention strategies. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  5. Storytelling: a care technology in continuing education for active ageing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Nadia Pinheiro da; Polaro, Sandra Helena Isse; Vahl, Eloá Aparecida Caliari; Gonçalves, Lucia Hisako Takase

    2016-01-01

    assessing relevance and effectiveness of care/educational technology in the form of "storytelling" as a strategy in the cultivation of active ageing (AA) for elderly users of a Basic Health Unit (BHU), from the Amazon region. convergent care research (CCR) held in a BHU in Belém, state of Pará, with eight elderly ladies for testing this technology. An active ageing assessment questionnaire and WHOQOL-BREF - quality of life assessment were applied. After training with a view to continuing education, elderly ladies told stories for an audience that addressed the question: "What did you learn from it for your life?" tThe popular stories elicited reactions from which the following categories emerged: solidarity; respect for the other; imagination, dreams, hopes and culture of the Amazonian. This practice had a positive result, producing changes in the quality of life of the elderly, particularly in the psychological domain. "storytelling" proved to be an innovative technology, a relevant and effective resource in health education, especially for active ageing.

  6. System care improves trauma outcome: patient care errors dominate reduced preventable death rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thoburn, E; Norris, P; Flores, R; Goode, S; Rodriguez, E; Adams, V; Campbell, S; Albrink, M; Rosemurgy, A

    1993-01-01

    A review of 452 trauma deaths in Hillsborough County, Florida, in 1984 documented that 23% of non-CNS trauma deaths were preventable and occurred because of inadequate resuscitation or delay in proper surgical care. In late 1988 Hillsborough County organized a County Trauma Agency (HCTA) to coordinate trauma care among prehospital providers and state-designated trauma centers. The purpose of this study was to review county trauma deaths after the inception of the HCTA to determine the frequency of preventable deaths. 504 trauma deaths occurring between October 1989 and April 1991 were reviewed. Through committee review, 10 deaths were deemed preventable; 2 occurred outside the trauma system. Of the 10 deaths, 5 preventable deaths occurred late in severely injured patients. The preventable death rate has decreased to 7.0% with system care. The causes of preventable deaths have changed from delayed or inadequate intervention to postoperative care errors.

  7. Communities Putting Prevention to Work: Results of an Obesity Prevention Initiative in Child Care Facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natale, Ruby; Camejo, Stephanie; Sanders, Lee M.

    2016-01-01

    Obesity is a significant public health issue affecting even our youngest children. Given that a significant amount of young children are enrolled in child care, the goal of this project was to evaluate the effectiveness of a child care facility-based obesity prevention program. Over 1,000 facilities participated in the study. The intervention…

  8. Role of oral care to prevent VAP in mechanically ventilated Intensive Care Unit patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Gupta

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Ventilator associated pneumonia (VAP is the most common nosocomial infection in Intensive Care Unit. One major factor causing VAP is the aspiration of oral colonization because of poor oral care practices. We feel the role of simple measure like oral care is neglected, despite the ample evidence of it being instrumental in preventing VAP.

  9. Role of oral care to prevent VAP in mechanically ventilated Intensive Care Unit patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, A; Gupta, A; Singh, T K; Saxsena, A

    2016-01-01

    Ventilator associated pneumonia (VAP) is the most common nosocomial infection in Intensive Care Unit. One major factor causing VAP is the aspiration of oral colonization because of poor oral care practices. We feel the role of simple measure like oral care is neglected, despite the ample evidence of it being instrumental in preventing VAP.

  10. Role of oral care to prevent VAP in mechanically ventilated Intensive Care Unit patients

    OpenAIRE

    A Gupta; A Gupta; T K Singh; A Saxsena

    2016-01-01

    Ventilator associated pneumonia (VAP) is the most common nosocomial infection in Intensive Care Unit. One major factor causing VAP is the aspiration of oral colonization because of poor oral care practices. We feel the role of simple measure like oral care is neglected, despite the ample evidence of it being instrumental in preventing VAP.

  11. [Continuous medical education of general practitioners/family doctors in chronic wound care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinozić, Tamara; Kovacević, Jadranka

    2014-10-01

    A number of healthcare professionals, specialists in different fields and with different levels of education, as well as non-healthcare professionals, are involved in the care of chronic wound patients, thus forming a multidisciplinary team that is not only responsible for the course and outcome of treatment, but also for the patient quality of life. Family doctor is also member of the team the task of which is to prevent, diagnose, monitor and anticipate complications and relapses, as well as complete recovery of chronic wound patients, with the overall care continuing even after the wound has healed, or is involved in palliative care. A family medicine practitioner with specialized education and their team of associates in the primary health care, along with material conditions and equipment improvement, can provide quality care for patients with peripheral cardiovascular diseases and chronic wounds, organized according to the holistic approach. It is essential that all professional associations of family medicine as well as professional associations of other specialties - fields that are involved in wound prevention and treatment - be included in developing the continuous medical education program. The benefits of modern information technology should be used to good advantage. The education should be adapted to the needs of family practitioners in terms of the form, place, time, volume, financial affordability and choice of topic. The interest shown in team education should be transformed into specialized programs in the creation of which it is essential to include both physicians and nurses and their respective professional associations. Special attention should be paid to education and training of young doctors/nurses, those with less work experience, those that have not yet been part of such education, those that lack experience in working with wound patients, those whose teams deal mostly with elderly patients, and also residents in family medicine and

  12. Pediatric Dentist Density and Preventive Care Utilization for Medicaid Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heidenreich, James F; Kim, Amy S; Scott, JoAnna M; Chi, Donald L

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate county-level pediatric dentist density and dental care utilization for Medicaid-enrolled children. This was a cross-sectional analysis of 604,885 zero- to 17-year-olds enrolled in the Washington State Medicaid Program for 11-12 months in 2012. The relationship between county-level pediatric dentist density, defined as the number of pediatric dentists per 10,000 Medicaid-enrolled children, and preventive dental care utilization was evaluated using linear regression models. In 2012, 179 pediatric dentists practiced in 16 of the 39 counties in Washington. County-level pediatric dentist density varied from zero to 5.98 pediatric dentists per 10,000 Medicaid-enrolled children. County-level preventive dental care utilization ranged from 32 percent to 81 percent, with 62 percent of Medicaid-enrolled children utilizing preventive dental services. County-level density was significantly associated with county-level dental care utilization (Slope equals 1.67, 95 percent confidence interval equals 0.02, 3.32, Pchildren who utilize preventive dental care services. Policies aimed at improving pediatric oral health disparities should include strategies to increase the number of oral health care providers, including pediatric dentists, in geographic areas with large proportions of Medicaid-enrolled children.

  13. Practice of preventive dentistry for nursing staff in primary care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acuña-Reyes, Raquel; Cigarroa-Martínez, Didier; Ureña-Bogarín, Enrique; Orgaz-Fernández, Jose David

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: Determine the domain of preventive dentistry in nursing personnel assigned to a primary care unit. Methods: Prospective descriptive study, questionnaire validation, and prevalence study. In the first stage, the questionnaire for the practice of preventive dentistry (CPEP, for the term in Spanish) was validated; consistency and reliability were measured by Cronbach's alpha, Pearson's correlation, factor analysis with intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC). In the second stage, the domain in preventive dental nurses was explored. Results: The overall internal consistency of CPEP is α= 0.66, ICC= 0.64, CI95%: 0.29-0.87 (p >0.01). Twenty-one subjects in the study, average age 43, 81.0% female, average seniority of 12.5 were included. A total of 71.5% showed weak domain, 28.5% regular domain, and there was no questionnaire with good domain result. The older the subjects were, the smaller the domain; female nurses showed greater mastery of preventive dentistry (29%, CI95%: 0.1-15.1) than male nurses. Public health nurses showed greater mastery with respect to other categories (50%, CI95%: 0.56-2.8). Conclusions: The CDEP has enough consistency to explore the domain of preventive dentistry in health-care staff. The domain of preventive dentistry in primary care nursing is poor, required to strengthen to provide education in preventive dentistry to the insured population. PMID:25386037

  14. Primary prevention of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Molen, Thys; Schokker, Siebrig

    2009-12-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a prevalent disease, with cigarette smoking being the main risk factor. Prevention is crucial in the fight against COPD. Whereas primary prevention is targeted on whole populations, patient populations are the focus of primary care; therefore, prevention in this setting is mainly aimed at preventing further deterioration of the disease in patients who present with the first signs of disease (secondary prevention). Prevention of COPD in primary care requires detection of COPD at an early stage. An accurate definition of COPD is crucial in this identification process. The benefits of detecting new patients with COPD should be determined before recommending screening and case-finding programs in primary care. No evidence is available that screening by spirometry results in significant health gains. Effective treatment options in patients with mild disease are lacking. Smoking cessation is the cornerstone of COPD prevention. Because cigarette smoking is not only a major cause of COPD but is also a major cause of many other diseases, a decline in tobacco smoking would result in substantial health benefits.

  15. Integration and Continuity of Primary Care: Polyclinics and Alternatives, a Patient-Centred Analysis of How Organisation Constrains Care Coordination

    OpenAIRE

    Sheaff, WR; Halliday, J; Øvretveit, J; Byng, R; Exworthy, M; Peckham, S; Asthana, S

    2015-01-01

    Background\\ud An ageing population, the increasing specialisation of clinical services and diverse health-care provider ownership make the co-ordination and continuity of complex care increasingly problematic. The way in which the provision of complex health care is co-ordinated produces – or fails to produce – six forms of continuity of care (cross-sectional, longitudinal, flexible, access, informational and relational). Care co-ordination is accomplished by a combination of activities by pa...

  16. Outlining a preventive oral health care system for China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saekel, Rüdiger

    2015-01-01

    The most recent Chinese health care reform, scheduled to run until 2020, has been underway for a number of years. Oral health care has not been explicitly mentioned in the context of this reform. However, oral health is an integral part of general health and the under-servicing of the Chinese population in the area of dental care is particularly high. The article describes how this problem could be addressed. Based on present scientific knowledge,specifically on evidence-based strategies and long-term empirical experience from Western industrialised countries, as well as findings from Chinese pilot studies, the author outlines a preventive oral health care system tailored specifically to the conditions prevailing in China. He describes the background and rationale for a clearly structured, preventive system and summarises the scientific cornerstones on which this concept is founded. The single steps of this model, that are adapted specifically to China, are presented so as to facilitate a critical discussion on the pros and cons of the approach. The author concludes that, by implementing preventive oral care, China could gradually reduce the under-servicing of great parts of the population with dental care that largely avoids dental disease and preserves teeth at a price that is affordable to both public health and patients. This approach would minimise the danger of starting a cycle of re-restorations, owing to outdated treatment methods. The proposal would both fit in well with and add to the current blueprint for Chinese health care reform.

  17. Preventive Care Quality of Medicare Accountable Care Organizations: Associations of Organizational Characteristics With Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albright, Benjamin B; Lewis, Valerie A; Ross, Joseph S; Colla, Carrie H

    2016-03-01

    Accountable Care Organizations (ACOs) are a delivery and payment model aiming to coordinate care, control costs, and improve quality. Medicare ACOs are responsible for 8 measures of preventive care quality. To create composite measures of preventive care quality and examine associations of ACO characteristics with performance. This is a cross-sectional study of Medicare Shared Savings Program and Pioneer participants. We linked quality performance to descriptive data from the National Survey of ACOs. We created composite measures using exploratory factor analysis, and used regression to assess associations with organizational characteristics. Of 252 eligible ACOs, 246 reported on preventive care quality, 177 of which completed the survey (response rate=72%). In their first year, ACOs lagged behind PPO performance on the majority of comparable measures. We identified 2 underlying factors among 8 measures and created composites for each: disease prevention, driven by vaccines and cancer screenings, and wellness screening, driven by annual health screenings. Participation in the Advanced Payment Model, having fewer specialists, and having more Medicare ACO beneficiaries per primary care provider were associated with significantly better performance on both composites. Better performance on disease prevention was also associated with inclusion of a hospital, greater electronic health record capabilities, a larger primary care workforce, and fewer minority beneficiaries. ACO preventive care quality performance is related to provider composition and benefitted by upfront investment. Vaccine and cancer screening quality performance is more dependent on organizational structure and characteristics than performance on annual wellness screenings, likely due to greater complexity in eligibility determination and service administration.

  18. Development of a Patient Charting System to Teach Family Practice Residents Disease Management and Preventive Care

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Dickerman, Joel

    1997-01-01

    .... Designing notes which 'prompt' residents to gather patient information vital to optimal care can teach residents the concepts of longitudinal care, particularly chronic disease management and preventive care...

  19. Improving Obesity Prevention and Management in Primary Care in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell-Scherer, Denise; Sharma, Arya Mitra

    2016-09-01

    Obesity is a major risk factor for chronic diseases with significant morbidity, mortality and health care cost. There is concern due to the dramatic increase in overweight and obesity in Canada in the last 20 years. The causes of obesity are multifactorial, with underestimation by patients and healthcare providers of the long-term nature of the condition, and its complexity. Solutions related to prevention and management will require multifaceted strategies involving education, health policy, public health and health systems across the care continuum. We believe that to support such strategies we need to have a strong primary care workforce equipped with appropriate knowledge, skills and attitudes to support persons at risk for, or with, obesity. To achieve this end, significant skills building is required to improve primary care obesity prevention and management efforts. This review will first examine the current state, and then will outline how we can improve.

  20. [Continuity of nutritional care at discharge in the era of ICT].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez Olmos, Miguel Ángel

    2015-05-07

    Telemedicine represents the union of information technology and telecommunication services in health. This allows the improvement of health care, especially in underserved areas, bringing professionals working in continuing education and improving patient care at home. The application of telemedicine in various hospital complexes, clinics and health centers, has helped to provide a better service, within the parameters of efficiency, effectiveness, cost-benefit, with increasing satisfaction of medical staff and patients. The development and application of various types of telemedicine, the technological development of audio, text, video and data, and constant improvement of infrastructure in telecommunications, have favored the expansion and development of telemedicine in various medical specialties. The use of electronic health records by different health professionals can have a positive impact on the care provided to patients. This should also be supported by the development of better health policies, legal security and greater awareness in health professionals and patients regarding the potential benefits. Regarding the clinical activity in Nutrition, new technologies also provide an opportunity to improve in various educational, preventive, diagnostic and treatment aspects, including shared track between Nutrition Units and Primary Care Teams, for patients who need home nutritional care at, with shared protocols, providing teleconsultation in required cases and avoiding unnecessary travel to hospital.

  1. Study of Continuance Rate and Related Causes of Discontinuance of Pregnancy Prevention Methods among Women in Yazd

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H Fallahzadeh

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: From maturity to menopause, women are worried about pregnancy. Abstinence from sex or use of pregnancy prevention methods are choices for them. As abstinence is impossible, the only remaining choice is use of pregnancy prevention methods. Effective control of pregnancy is really essential for the health of mother and infant and also control of unplanned increase in population. Regarding the importance of continuance rate of pregnancy prevention methods (OCP, IUD, Condom &DMPA & the reasons for their disruption, this study was carried out with the aim of determining the continuance rate and reasons for discontinuance of pregnancy prevention methods in Yazd women. Methods: This was a cross-sectional study. Six urban health care centers of Yazd were selected as study clusters and information of 15-49 year old women using the pregnancy prevention methods (OCP, IUD, Condom& injection was collected via a questionnaire. The data collected was analyzed by Coplan- Mayer statistic method and variance analysis test. Results: Pregnancy prevention methods were most prevalent in the 25-34 years old age group (57%. Mean duration of pregnancy prevention method usage was 27.98 months using Caplan-mayer method with a median of 24 months. 86.3% for 6 months, 72.8% for 12 months, 62.5% for 18 months, 47.9% for 24 months, 39.9% for 30 months and 37% for 37 months had used four certain methods of pregnancy prevention (OCP, IUD, Condom and Injection. The reasons of discontinuance were disease (15.6% for OCPS, bleeding (27% for IUD, unwanted pregnancy (21% for Condoms and also disease (75% for Injection method. Discussion: According to the results, not only education programs regarding family planning before starting each pregnancy prevention method to women is recommended, but a complete incentive consultation about these methods is essential. This educational & consultation programs should be implemented initially for women using OCP method.

  2. Facilitators and Barriers for Successful Implementation of Interconception Care in Preventive Child Health Care Services in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sijpkens, M.K. (Meertien K.); E.A.P. Steegers (Eric); Rosman, A.N. (Ageeth N.)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractObjectives Successful implementation of preconception and interconception care contributes to optimizing pregnancy outcomes. While interconception care to new mothers could potentially be provided by Preventive Child Health Care services, this care is currently not routinely available in

  3. Continuity, but at what cost? The impact of telemonitoring COPD on continuities of care: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fairbrother, Peter; Pinnock, Hilary; Hanley, Janet; McCloughan, Lucy; Sheikh, Aziz; Pagliari, Claudia; McKinstry, Brian

    2012-09-01

    Continuity of care is widely regarded as an important marker of quality in the management of patients with long-term conditions. New services that integrate telemonitoring into care pathways have potential to change aspects of continuity in both positive and negative ways. A telemonitoring service for patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) was introduced in Lothian, Scotland, in 2009. A qualitative study, nested within the TELESCOT COPD randomised control trial, was undertaken to explore the views of patients and professionals on telemonitoring. The perceived impact of telemonitoring on continuity of care was investigated as part of the research. Semi-structured interviews were undertaken with 38 patients (47% male, mean age 67.5 years). A maximum variation sample in relation to age, sex, socio-economic background, disease severity, and compliance with telemonitoring was recruited. Thirty-two stakeholders (healthcare professionals and managers) were interviewed. Transcribed coded data were analysed thematically using the framework approach. Interpretation was supported by multidisciplinary discussion. Patients and healthcare professionals considered that relationship-based continuity of care was important in the delivery of telemonitoring services. Managers placed emphasis on improved continuity of clinical management as a means of reducing healthcare costs. However, professionals described many operational challenges arising from the 'bolting-on' of telemonitoring provision to existing usual care provision which, they considered, resulted in the proliferation of additional managerial discontinuities. Managers and healthcare professionals face major challenges in meeting demands for both relationship continuity and continuity of clinical management in the development of telemonitoring services.

  4. Business continuity and pandemic preparedness: US health care versus non-health care agencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebmann, Terri; Wang, Jing; Swick, Zachary; Reddick, David; delRosario, John Leon

    2013-04-01

    Only limited data are available on US business continuity activities related to biologic events. A questionnaire was administered to human resource professionals during May-July 2011 to assess business continuity related to biologic events, incentives businesses are providing to maximize worker surge capacity, and seasonal influenza vaccination policy. Linear regressions were used to describe factors associated with higher business continuity and pandemic preparedness scores. The χ(2) and Fisher exact tests compared health care versus non-health care businesses on preparedness indicators. Possible business continuity and pandemic preparedness scores ranged from 0.5 to 27 and 0 to 15, with average resulting scores among participants at 13.2 and 7.3, respectively. Determinants of business continuity and pandemic preparedness were (1) business size (larger businesses were more prepared), (2) type of business (health care more prepared), (3) having human resource professional as company disaster planning committee member, and (4) risk perception of a pandemic in the next year. Most businesses (63.3%, n = 298) encourage staff influenza vaccination; 2.1% (n = 10) mandate it. Only 10% of businesses (11.0%, n = 52) provide employee incentives, and fewer than half (41.0%, n = 193) stockpile personal protective equipment. Despite the recent H1N1 pandemic, many US businesses lack adequate pandemic plans. It is critical that businesses of all sizes and types become better prepared for a biologic event. Copyright © 2013 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. A Role for Health Communication in the Continuum of HIV Care, Treatment, and Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomori, Cecilia; Risher, Kathryn; Limaye, Rupali J.; Lith, Lynn Van; Gibbs, Susannah; Smelyanskaya, Marina; Celentano, David D.

    2015-01-01

    Health communication has played a pivotal role in HIV prevention efforts since the beginning of the epidemic. The recent paradigm of combination prevention, which integrates behavioral, biomedical, and structural interventions, offers new opportunities for employing health communication approaches across the entire continuum of care. We describe key areas where health communication can significantly enhance HIV treatment, care, and prevention, presenting evidence from interventions that include health communication components. These interventions rely primarily on interpersonal communication, especially individual and group counseling, both within and beyond clinical settings to enhance the uptake of and continued engagement in care. Many successful interventions mobilize a network of trained community supporters or accompagnateurs, who provide education, counseling, psychosocial support, treatment supervision and other pragmatic assistance across the care continuum. Community treatment supporters reduce the burden on overworked medical providers, engage a wider segment of the community, and offer a more sustainable model for supporting people living with HIV. Additionally, mobile technologies are increasingly seen as promising avenues for ongoing cost-effective communication throughout the treatment cascade. A broader range of communication approaches, traditionally employed in HIV prevention efforts, that address community and sociopolitical levels through mass media, school- or workplace-based education, and entertainment modalities may be useful to interventions seeking to address the full care continuum. Future interventions would benefit from development of a framework that maps appropriate communication theories and approaches onto each step of the care continuum in order to evaluate the efficacy of communication components on treatment outcomes. PMID:25007201

  6. Using communities that care for community child maltreatment prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salazar, Amy M; Haggerty, Kevin P; de Haan, Benjamin; Catalano, Richard F; Vann, Terri; Vinson, Jean; Lansing, Michaele

    2016-03-01

    The prevention of mental, emotional, and behavioral (MEB) disorders among children and adolescents is a national priority. One mode of implementing community-wide MEB prevention efforts is through evidence-based community mobilization approaches such as Communities That Care (CTC). This article provides an overview of the CTC framework and discusses the adaptation process of CTC to prevent development of MEBs through preventing child abuse and neglect and bolstering child well-being in children aged 0 to 10. Adaptations include those to the intervention itself as well as those to the evaluation approach. Preliminary findings from the Keeping Families Together pilot study of this evolving approach suggest that the implementation was manageable for sites, and community board functioning and community adoption of a science-based approach to prevention in pilot sites looks promising. Implications and next steps are outlined. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  7. Cardiovascular preventive care for patients with serious mental illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritchie, Sarah; Muldoon, Laura

    2017-11-01

    To determine whether patients with serious mental illness (SMI) are receiving preventive care for cardiovascular disease at the same rate as those without SMI in an interprofessional practice with a mandate to care for persons with barriers to access to the health care system. Quality improvement exercise using a case-matched retrospective chart review. Somerset West Community Health Centre in downtown Ottawa, Ont. All patients with SMI were adult, current primary care patients from the Somerset West Community Health Centre with a recorded diagnosis of SMI (bipolar affective disorder, schizophrenia, or other psychosis) during the 2-year period from June 1, 2013, to May 31, 2015. Two control patients (current primary care patients without SMI and matched for age and sex) were randomly chosen for each patient with SMI. They had at least 1 record in their electronic chart during the 2-year study period of measurement of blood pressure, weight, body mass index, smoking status, lipid screening results, or diabetes screening results. Prevention score was calculated as the number of preventive tests documented out of the possible 6. Secondary measures included age, sex, comorbidities (diabetes, hypertension, or hyperlipidemia), mental illness diagnosis, involvement of a psychiatrist, and involvement of a mental health case worker. Patients with SMI had higher rates of diabetes, hypertension, and dyslipidemia. Screening rates for the 6 outcome measures were very similar between patients with and without SMI. Patients with SMI who were under the care of a psychiatrist or who had a case worker had more complete screening results than those who had neither provider. As expected, patients with SMI had higher rates of metabolic comorbidities than control patients had. Screening rates for cardiovascular risk factors were similar in the 2 groups. Involvement of mental health case workers and psychiatrists in the patients' care might be linked to more complete preventive screening

  8. Prevention Service System Transformation Using "Communities That Care"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Eric C.; Hawkins, J. David; Arthur, Michael W.; Briney, John S.; Fagan, Abigail A.

    2011-01-01

    This study examines prevention system transformation as part of a community-randomized controlled trial of Communities That Care (CTC). Using data from surveys of community leaders, we examine differences between CTC and control communities 4.5 years after CTC implementation. Significantly higher levels of adopting a science-based approach to…

  9. Preventing crime in cooperation with the mental health care profession

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Harte, J.M.

    2015-01-01

    Although major mental disorders do not have a central position in many criminological theories, there seems to be an evident relationship between these disorders and criminal behavior. In daily practice police officers and mental health care workers work jointly to prevent nuisance and crime and to

  10. The influence of care interventions on the continuity of sleep of intensive care unit patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamze, Fernanda Luiza; de Souza, Cristiane Chaves; Chianca, Tânia Couto Machado

    2015-01-01

    to identify care interventions, performed by the health team, and their influence on the continuity of sleep of patients hospitalized in the Intensive Care Unit. descriptive study with a sample of 12 patients. A filming technique was used for the data collection. The awakenings from sleep were measured using the actigraphy method. The analysis of the data was descriptive, processed using the Statistical Package for the Social Sciences software. 529 care interventions were identified, grouped into 28 different types, of which 12 (42.8%) caused awakening from sleep for the patients. A mean of 44.1 interventions/patient/day was observed, with 1.8 interventions/patient/hour. The administration of oral medicine and food were the interventions that caused higher frequencies of awakenings in the patients. it was identified that the health care interventions can harm the sleep of ICU patients. It is recommended that health professionals rethink the planning of interventions according to the individual demand of the patients, with the diversification of schedules and introduction of new practices to improve the quality of sleep of Intensive Care Unit patients.

  11. The influence of care interventions on the continuity of sleep of intensive care unit patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda Luiza Hamze

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to identify care interventions, performed by the health team, and their influence on the continuity of sleep of patients hospitalized in the Intensive Care Unit.Method: descriptive study with a sample of 12 patients. A filming technique was used for the data collection. The awakenings from sleep were measured using the actigraphy method. The analysis of the data was descriptive, processed using the Statistical Package for the Social Sciences software.Results: 529 care interventions were identified, grouped into 28 different types, of which 12 (42.8% caused awakening from sleep for the patients. A mean of 44.1 interventions/patient/day was observed, with 1.8 interventions/patient/hour. The administration of oral medicine and food were the interventions that caused higher frequencies of awakenings in the patients.Conclusion: it was identified that the health care interventions can harm the sleep of ICU patients. It is recommended that health professionals rethink the planning of interventions according to the individual demand of the patients, with the diversification of schedules and introduction of new practices to improve the quality of sleep of Intensive Care Unit patients.

  12. Youth suicide prevention: does access to care matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campo, John V

    2009-10-01

    Recent increases in adolescent suicide rates after a decade of decline highlight the relevance of pediatric suicide prevention. Existing strategies to intervene with youth at risk for suicide are largely based on the premise that access to effective services is of critical importance. This review aims to examine the relationship between youth suicide and access to care. Promising reductions in suicidal thinking and behavior have been associated with the application of manualized psychotherapies, collaborative interventions in primary care, lithium for mood-disordered adults, and clozapine in schizophrenia. Suicide rates correlate inversely with indices of care access across the lifespan, including antidepressant prescription rates. Suicide is a preventable cause of death, and any public health relevant effort to prevent youth suicide must include improving access to effective care for at-risk youth as a strategy. Education and training of professionals and consumers, the integration of mental health services in primary care, and the use of novel technologies to track and maintain contact with at-risk youth are worthy of study. Additional research on the relationship between specific treatments, especially antidepressants, and youth suicide risk reduction is desperately needed.

  13. Undocumented migrants lack access to pregnancy care and prevention

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    Andreoli Nicole

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Illegal migration is an increasing problem worldwide and the so-called undocumented migrants encounter major problems in access to prevention and health care. The objective of the study was to compare the use of preventive measures and pregnancy care of undocumented pregnant migrants with those of women from the general population of Geneva, Switzerland. Methods Prospective cohort study including pregnant undocumented migrants presenting to the University hospital from February 2005 to October 2006. The control group consisted of a systematic sample of pregnant women with legal residency permit wishing to deliver at the same public hospital during the same time period. Results 161 undocumented and 233 control women were included in the study. Mean ages were 29.4 y (SD 5.8 and 31.1 y (SD 4.8 (p Conclusion Compared to women who are legal residents of Geneva, undocumented migrants have more unintended pregnancies and delayed prenatal care, use fewer preventive measures and are exposed to more violence during pregnancy. Not having a legal residency permit therefore suggests a particular vulnerability for pregnant women. This study underscores the need for better access to prenatal care and routine screening for violence exposure during pregnancy for undocumented migrants. Furthermore, health care systems should provide language- and culturally-appropriate education on contraception, family planning and cervical cancer screening.

  14. Patients report better satisfaction with part-time primary care physicians, despite less continuity of care and access.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panattoni, Laura; Stone, Ashley; Chung, Sukyung; Tai-Seale, Ming

    2015-03-01

    The growing number of primary care physicians (PCPs) reducing their clinical work hours has raised concerns about meeting the future demand for services and fulfilling the continuity and access mandates for patient-centered care. However, the patient's experience of care with part-time physicians is relatively unknown, and may be mediated by continuity and access to care outcomes. We aimed to examine the relationships between a physicians' clinical full-time equivalent (FTE), continuity of care, access to care, and patient satisfaction with the physician. We used a multi-level structural equation estimation, with continuity and access modeled as mediators, for a cross-section in 2010. The study included family medicine (n = 104) and internal medicine (n = 101) physicians in a multi-specialty group practice, along with their patient satisfaction survey responses (n = 12,688). Physician level FTE, continuity of care received by patients, continuity of care provided by physician, and a Press Ganey patient satisfaction with the physician score, on a 0-100 % scale, were measured. Access to care was measured as days to the third next-available appointment. Physician FTE was directly associated with better continuity of care received (0.172% per FTE, p part-time PCPs in practice redesign efforts and initiatives to meet the demand for primary care services.

  15. Impact on continuity of care of decentralized versus partly centralized mental health care in Northern Norway

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    Lars Henrik Myklebust

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: The issue of continuity of care is central in contemporary psychiatric services research. In Norway, inpatient admissions are mainly to take place locally, in a system of small bed-units that represent an alternative to traditional central psychiatric hospitals. This type of organization may be advantageous for accessibility and cooperation, but has been given little scientific attention.Aims: To study whether inpatients' utilization of outpatient services differ between an area with a decentralized care model in comparison to an adjacent area with a partly centralized model.  Method: The study was based on data from a one-year registered prevalence sample, drawing on routinely sampled data supplemented with data from medical records. Service-utilization for 247 inpatients was analyzed. The results were controlled for diagnosis, demographic variables, type of service system, localization of inpatient admissions, and length of hospitalization. Results: Most inpatients in the area with the decentralized care model also utilized outpatient consultations, whereas a considerable number of inpatients in the area with a partly centralized model did not enter outpatient care at all. Type of service system, localization of inpatient admission, and length of hospitalization predicted inpatients' utilization of outpatient consultations. The results are discussed in the light of systems integration, particularly management-arrangements and clinical bridging over the transitional phase from inpatient to outpatient care. Conclusion: Inpatients' utilization of outpatient services differed between an area with a decentralized care model in comparison to an adjacent area with a partly centralized care model. In the areas studied, extensive decentralization of the psychiatric services positively affected coordination of inpatient and outpatient services for people with severe psychiatric disorders. Small, local-bed units may therefore represent a

  16. Impact on continuity of care of decentralized versus partly centralized mental health care in Northern Norway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lars Henrik Myklebust

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: The issue of continuity of care is central in contemporary psychiatric services research. In Norway, inpatient admissions are mainly to take place locally, in a system of small bed-units that represent an alternative to traditional central psychiatric hospitals. This type of organization may be advantageous for accessibility and cooperation, but has been given little scientific attention. Aims: To study whether inpatients' utilization of outpatient services differ between an area with a decentralized care model in comparison to an adjacent area with a partly centralized model.   Method: The study was based on data from a one-year registered prevalence sample, drawing on routinely sampled data supplemented with data from medical records. Service-utilization for 247 inpatients was analyzed. The results were controlled for diagnosis, demographic variables, type of service system, localization of inpatient admissions, and length of hospitalization.  Results: Most inpatients in the area with the decentralized care model also utilized outpatient consultations, whereas a considerable number of inpatients in the area with a partly centralized model did not enter outpatient care at all. Type of service system, localization of inpatient admission, and length of hospitalization predicted inpatients' utilization of outpatient consultations. The results are discussed in the light of systems integration, particularly management-arrangements and clinical bridging over the transitional phase from inpatient to outpatient care.  Conclusion: Inpatients' utilization of outpatient services differed between an area with a decentralized care model in comparison to an adjacent area with a partly centralized care model. In the areas studied, extensive decentralization of the psychiatric services positively affected coordination of inpatient and outpatient services for people with severe psychiatric disorders. Small, local-bed units may therefore

  17. Impact on continuity of care of decentralized versus partly centralized mental health care in Northern Norway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myklebust, Lars Henrik; Olstad, Reidun; Bjorbekkmo, Svein; Eisemann, Martin; Wynn, Rolf; Sørgaard, Knut

    2011-01-01

    Background The issue of continuity of care is central in contemporary psychiatric services research. In Norway, inpatient admissions are mainly to take place locally, in a system of small bed-units that represent an alternative to traditional central psychiatric hospitals. This type of organization may be advantageous for accessibility and cooperation, but has been given little scientific attention. Aims To study whether inpatients’ utilization of outpatient services differ between an area with a decentralized care model in comparison to an adjacent area with a partly centralized model. Method The study was based on data from a one-year registered prevalence sample, drawing on routinely sampled data supplemented with data from medical records. Service-utilization for 247 inpatients was analyzed. The results were controlled for diagnosis, demographic variables, type of service system, localization of inpatient admissions, and length of hospitalization. Results Most inpatients in the area with the decentralized care model also utilized outpatient consultations, whereas a considerable number of inpatients in the area with a partly centralized model did not enter outpatient care at all. Type of service system, localization of inpatient admission, and length of hospitalization predicted inpatients’ utilization of outpatient consultations. The results are discussed in the light of systems integration, particularly management-arrangements and clinical bridging over the transitional phase from inpatient to outpatient care. Conclusion Inpatients’ utilization of outpatient services differed between an area with a decentralized care model in comparison to an adjacent area with a partly centralized care model. In the areas studied, extensive decentralization of the psychiatric services positively affected coordination of inpatient and outpatient services for people with severe psychiatric disorders. Small, local-bed units may therefore represent a favourable alternative

  18. Impact of Provider Participation in ACO Programs on Preventive Care Services, Patient Experiences, and Health Care Expenditures in US Adults Aged 18-64.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Young-Rock; Sonawane, Kalyani; Larson, Samantha; Mainous, Arch G; Marlow, Nicole M

    2018-05-15

    Little is known about the impact of accountable care organization (ACO) on US adults aged 18-64. To examine whether having a usual source of care (USC) provider participating in an ACO affects receipt of preventive care services, patient experiences, and health care expenditures among nonelderly Americans. A cross-sectional analysis of the 2015 Medical Organizations Survey linked with the Medical Expenditure Panel Survey. Survey respondents aged 18-64 with an identified USC and continuous health insurance coverage during 2015. Preventative care services (routine checkup, flu vaccination, and cancer screening), patient experiences with health care (access to care, interaction quality with providers, and global satisfaction), and health care expenditures (total and out-of-pocket expenditures) for respondents with USC by ACO and non-ACO provider groups. Among 1563, nonelderly Americans having a USC, we found that nearly 62.7% [95% confidence interval (CI), 58.6%-66.7%; representing 15,722,208 Americans] were cared for by ACO providers. Our analysis showed no significant differences in preventive care services or patient experiences between ACO and non-ACO groups. Adjusted mean total health expenditures were slightly higher for the ACO than non-ACO group [$7016 (95% CI, $4949-$9914) vs. $6796 (95% CI, $4724-$9892)]; however, this difference was not statistically significant (P=0.250). Our findings suggest that having a USC provider participating in an ACO is not associated with preventive care services use, patient experiences, or health care expenditures among a nonelderly population.

  19. Delinquency and Crime Prevention: Overview of Research Comparing Treatment Foster Care and Group Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osei, Gershon K.; Gorey, Kevin M.; Jozefowicz, Debra M. Hernandez

    2016-01-01

    Background: Evidence of treatment foster care (TFC) and group care's (GC) potential to prevent delinquency and crime has been developing. Objectives: We clarified the state of comparative knowledge with a historical overview. Then we explored the hypothesis that smaller, probably better resourced group homes with smaller staff/resident ratios have…

  20. [Infection prevention and control in neonatal intensive care unit].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenzini, Elisiane; Lorenzini, Elisiane; da Costa, Tatiane Costa; da Silva, Eveline Franco

    2013-12-01

    This study was aimed to identify the knowledge of the nursing team of a Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) on infection control, identijfying the factors that facilitate or hinder the prevention and control of Healthcare Associated Infections (HICAI). A descriptive study using a qualitative research method conducted with three nurses and 15 nurse technicians, who work in a NICU of a charitable organization, in southern Brazil. It became evident that the nursing staff had great knowledge about the factors that facilitate the prevention and control of HCAI in NICU, the most important factor being proper hand hygiene. Among the factors that hinder infection prevention and control are to overcrowding and excessive workload. The efficient performance of the nursing staff is an important part of the strategy for prevention and control of HCAI.

  1. Electronic Immunization Alerts and Spillover Effects on Other Preventive Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Julia M; Rivera, Maria; Persing, Nichole; Bundy, David G; Psoter, Kevin J; Ghazarian, Sharon R; Miller, Marlene R; Solomon, Barry S

    2017-08-01

    The impact of electronic health record (EHR) immunization clinical alert systems on the delivery of other preventive services remains unknown. We assessed for spillover effects of an EHR immunization alert on delivery of 6 other preventive services, in children 18 to 30 months of age needing immunizations. We conducted a secondary data analysis, with additional primary data collection, of a randomized, historically controlled trial to improve immunization rates with EHR alerts, in an urban, primary care clinic. No significant differences were found in screening for anemia, lead, development, nutrition, and injury prevention counseling in children prompting EHR immunization alerts (n = 129), compared with controls (n = 135). Significant increases in oral health screening in patients prompting EHR alerts (odds ratio = 4.8, 95% CI = 1.8-13.0) were likely due to practice changes over time. An EHR clinical alert system targeting immunizations did not have a spillover effect on the delivery of other preventive services.

  2. Knowledge and attitude towards preventive dental care among dental faculties in Bangalore city

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikhil Ahuja

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: Preventive approach in dental practice has been cited as a reason for the decline in oral diseases and as a predominant part of the service-mix of dental practices in the future. Dental faculty′s knowledge and attitude toward prevention are important, since they have exceptionally important direct and indirect roles in shaping student′s preventive orientation and also potentially influencing their patient′s ability to take care of their teeth. Thus, this study was conducted to assess knowledge and attitudes toward preventive dental care among dental faculties and their relation to demographic and professional characteristics. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted among dental faculties in Bangalore city. Of 17 dental colleges, 4 were selected by simple random sampling. A total of 218 dental faculties was individually asked to complete a pretested questionnaire. The questionnaire requested information on dental faculty′s demographic and professional characteristics and their knowledge and attitudes toward preventive dental care. Descriptive, Chi-square tests, and ANOVA were used to analyze the data. Results: The highest knowledge was seen among dental faculties regarding prevention of malocclusion (3.51 ± 1.02 followed by oral cancer (2.95 ± 1.09 and periodontal diseases (2.86 ± 1.02. The least knowledge was seen for the prevention of caries (2.63 ± 1.35. The most positive attitudes regarding preventive dentistry was characterized as being essential (6.34 ± 1.05, useful (6.32 ± 1.07 and valuable (6.27 ± 1.00. Statistically significant differences were found in relation to knowledge and attitudes for all demographic and professional characteristics except for gender and Department of Teaching. Conclusion: Dental faculty seems to have differing levels of knowledge regarding oral diseases with positive attitudes seen regarding preventive dentistry. Continuing education activities and

  3. Visitation in the intensive care unit: impact on infection prevention and control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Sheila; Herrera, Amando; Miller, Laura; Soto, Rhonda

    2011-01-01

    Evidence-based practice has shown that open visitation in the intensive care setting positively impacts patient outcomes. However, many intensive care units continue to strictly limit visitation hours. One concern for nurses is that open visitation will expose their vulnerable patients to an increased risk of infection. This fear is unfounded in professional literature as well as in the experience of a busy intensive care unit in San Antonio, Texas. Keeping our patients safe from hospital-acquired infections requires vigilant attention to infection prevention procedures. Meanwhile, what may actually be bugging our patients is a health care culture that is based on tradition and is blind to the many benefits provided by a more liberal visitation policy rooted in patient-centered care.

  4. Continuity of care is an important and distinct aspect of childbirth experience : Findings of a survey evaluating experienced continuity of care, experienced quality of care and women's perception of labor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Perdok, Hilde; Verhoeven, Corine J.; van Dillen, Jeroen; Schuitmaker, Tjerk Jan; Hoogendoorn, Karla; Colli, Jolanda; Schellevis, François G.; de Jonge, Ank

    2018-01-01

    Background: To compare experienced continuity of care among women who received midwife-led versus obstetrician-led care. Secondly, to compare experienced continuity of care with a. experienced quality of care during labor and b. perception of labor. Methods: We conducted a questionnaire survey in a

  5. Predictors of relational continuity in primary care: patient, provider and practice factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristjansson, Elizabeth; Hogg, William; Dahrouge, Simone; Tuna, Meltem; Mayo-Bruinsma, Liesha; Gebremichael, Goshu

    2013-05-31

    Continuity is a fundamental tenet of primary care, and highly valued by patients; it may also improve patient outcomes and lower cost of health care. It is thus important to investigate factors that predict higher continuity. However, to date, little is known about the factors that contribute to continuity. The purpose of this study was to analyse practice, provider and patient predictors of continuity of care in a large sample of primary care practices in Ontario, Canada. Another goal was to assess whether there was a difference in the continuity of care provided by different models of primary care. This study is part of the larger a cross-sectional study of 137 primary care practices, their providers and patients. Several performance measures were evaluated; this paper focuses on relational continuity. Four items from the Primary Care Assessment Tool were used to assess relational continuity from the patient's perspective. Multilevel modeling revealed several patient factors that predicted continuity. Older patients and those with chronic disease reported higher continuity, while those who lived in rural areas, had higher education, poorer mental health status, no regular provider, and who were employed reported lower continuity. Providers with more years since graduation had higher patient-reported continuity. Several practice factors predicted lower continuity: number of MDs, nurses, opening on weekends, and having 24 hours a week or less on-call. Analyses that compared continuity across models showed that, in general, Health Service Organizations had better continuity than other models, even when adjusting for patient demographics. Some patients with greater health needs experience greater continuity of care. However, the lower continuity reported by those with mental health issues and those who live in rural areas is concerning. Furthermore, our finding that smaller practices have higher continuity suggests that physicians and policy makers need to consider

  6. [Continuity, coordination and integration of care: from theory to practice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaller, Philippe; Gaspoz, Jean-Michel

    2008-09-24

    If the Swiss health care system has reached several important objectives, fragmentation of its organization alter its efficacy, its effectiveness and its quality. Numerous experts put forward the necessity of coordinating care and services, particularly for complex and, most often, chronic diseases. Physicians have a key role to play in that coordination, but the exponential growth of medical knowledge, together with a more and more sophisticated technology, requires this role to be based on interdisciplinarity and network organization. This article proposes a model to implement, around the primary care physician, a first level organization of care to ensure this organization. Such a model may better meet future challenges of the Swiss health care system.

  7. Control beliefs are related to smoking prevention in prenatal care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemola, Sakari; Meyer-Leu, Yvonne; Samochowiec, Jakub; Grob, Alexander

    2013-10-01

    Smoking during pregnancy is one of the most important avoidable health risks for the unborn child. Gynaecologists and midwives play a fundamental role in the prevention of smoking during pregnancy. However, a large number of health care practitioners still do not address smoking in pregnant patients. We examined whether gynaecologists and midwives engage in screening and counselling of pregnant women and conducting interventions to prevent smoking during pregnancy. Further, we examined the role of gynaecologists' and midwives' control beliefs. Control beliefs involve efficacy expectations--the practitioner's confidence in his capacity to conduct prevention efforts adequately--and outcome expectations--the practitioner's expectation that such prevention efforts are successful in general. A total of 486 gynaecologists and 366 midwives completed a questionnaire on screening of smoking, counselling and other interventions they conduct to prevent smoking during pregnancy. Moreover, gynaecologists and midwives rated their control beliefs regarding their influence on pregnant patients' smoking habits. The majority of gynaecologists and midwives reported screening all pregnant patients regarding smoking, explaining the risks and recommending smoking cessation. By contrast, only a minority engages in more extensive prevention efforts. Strong control beliefs were predictive of a higher likelihood of screening and counselling, as well as of engaging in more extensive interventions. The findings point to the importance of strengthening gynaecologists' and midwives' control beliefs by professional education and training on smoking prevention. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Pressure Injury Prevention: Knowledge and Attitudes of Iranian Intensive Care Nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tirgari, Batool; Mirshekari, Leili; Forouzi, Mansooreh Azzizadeh

    2018-04-01

    Pressure injuries are the third most expensive condition after cancer and cardiovascular disease. Nurses are responsible for the direct and continuous care, treatment, and prevention of pressure injuries. To achieve optimal quality care, nursing knowledge and attitudes must be based on the best scientific evidence. This study aimed to examine the knowledge and attitudes of nurses working in intensive care units of hospitals affiliated with Zahedan Medical Sciences University regarding the prevention of pressure injuries. This was a descriptive analytic study involving 89 critical care nurses. Data analysis was conducted using a 3-part questionnaire: demographic data, knowledge, and attitudes of intensive care nurses toward the prevention of pressure injuries. Collected data were analyzed with SPSS version 19 (IBM, Armonk, New York), using descriptive and inferential statistics (such as Pearson correlation coefficient, independent t test, and analysis of variance). The results showed that the mean ± SD score of pressure injury knowledge was 0.44 ± 0.12, and the attitude of participants toward pressure injury prevention was 2.69 ± 0.47. Scores varied widely; "nutrition" showed the highest mean score (0.71 ± 0.45), but "etiology and development" (0.42 ± 0.21) and "classification and observation" (0.42 ± 0.24) showed the lowest mean scores. Of the different aspects of attitudes toward pressure injury prevention, "the impact of pressure injuries" showed the highest mean score (2.95 ± 0.56), and "confidence in the effectiveness of prevention" showed the lowest mean score (2.56 ± 0.46). A statistically significant relationship was observed between pressure injury knowledge and attitudes toward pressure injury prevention (P < .001). Pressure injury prevention is one of many nursing care priorities and is a key indicator of the quality of nursing care. In order to achieve optimal quality care in this area, nurse managers and other administrators should make efforts

  9. How do dentists and their teams incorporate evidence about preventive care? An empirical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sbaraini, Alexandra; Carter, Stacy Marie; Evans, Robin Wendell; Blinkhorn, Anthony

    2013-10-01

    To identify how dentists and their teams adopt evidence-based preventive care. A qualitative study using grounded theory methodology was conducted. We interviewed 23 participants working in eight dental practices about their experience and work processes, while adopting evidence-based preventive care. During the study, Charmaz's grounded theory methodology was employed to examine the social process of adopting preventive dental care in dental practices. Charmaz's iteration of the constant comparative method was used during the data analysis. This involved coding of interview transcripts, detailed memo-writing and drawing diagrams. The transcripts were analyzed as soon as possible after each round of interviews in each dental practice. Coding was conducted primarily by AS, supported by team meetings and discussions when researchers compared their interpretations. Participants engaged in a slow process of adapting evidence-based protocols and guidelines to the existing logistics of the practices. This process was influenced by practical, philosophical, and historical aspects of dental care, and a range of barriers and facilitators. In particular, dentists spoke spontaneously about two deeply held 'rules' underpinning continued restorative treatment, which acted as barriers to provide preventive care: (i) dentists believed that some patients were too 'unreliable' to benefit from prevention; and (ii) dentists believed that patients thought that only tangible restorative treatment offered 'value for money'. During the adaptation process, some dentists and teams transitioned from their initial state - selling restorative care - through an intermediary stage - learning by doing and educating patients about the importance of preventive care - and finally to a stage where they were offering patients more than just restorative care. Resources were needed for the adaptation process to occur, including: the ability to maintain the financial viability of the practice

  10. Measuring a critical stress for continuous prevention of marine biofouling accumulation with aeration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menesses, Mark; Belden, Jesse; Dickenson, Natasha; Bird, James

    2017-10-01

    When cleaning the hull of a ship, significant shear stresses are needed to remove established biofouling organisms. Given that there exists a link between the amount of time that fouling accumulates and the stress required to remove it, it is not surprising that more frequent grooming requires less shear stress. Yet, it is unclear if there is a minimum stress needed to prevent the growth of macrofouling in the limit of continuous grooming. This manuscript shows that single bubble stream aeration provides continuous grooming and prevents biofouling accumulation in regions where the average wall stress exceeds ~0.01 Pa. This value was found by comparing observations of biofouling growth from field studies with complementary laboratory measurements that probe the associated flow fields. These results suggest that aeration and other continuous grooming systems must exceed a wall stress of 0.01 Pa to prevent macrofouling accumulation.

  11. National infection prevention and control programmes: Endorsing quality of care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stempliuk, Valeska; Ramon-Pardo, Pilar; Holder, Reynaldo

    2014-01-01

    Core components Health care-associated infections (HAIs) are a major cause of morbidity and mortality. In addition to pain and suffering, HAIs increase the cost of health care and generates indirect costs from loss of productivity for patients and society as a whole. Since 2005, the Pan American Health Organization has provided support to countries for the assessment of their capacities in infection prevention and control (IPC). More than 130 hospitals in 18 countries were found to have poor IPC programmes. However, in the midst of many competing health priorities, IPC programmes are not high on the agenda of ministries of health, and the sustainability of national programmes is not viewed as a key point in making health care systems more consistent and trustworthy. Comprehensive IPC programmes will enable countries to reduce the mobility, mortality and cost of HAIs and improve quality of care. This paper addresses the relevance of national infection prevention and control (NIPC) programmes in promoting, supporting and reinforcing IPC interventions at the level of hospitals. A strong commitment from national health authorities in support of national IPC programmes is crucial to obtaining a steady decrease of HAIs, lowering health costs due to HAIs and ensuring safer care.

  12. Takotsubo Cardiomyopathy in Intensive Care Unit: Prevention, Diagnosis and Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hannah Masoud

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Accurate diagnosis of Takotsubo Cardiomyopathy has substantial prognostic implications in an intensive care unit, given its increased mortality risk and association with life-threatening complications. This report seeks to discuss diagnostic modalities that can be useful in accurately differentiating Takotsubo Cardiomyopathy from Acute Coronary Syndrome, and also briefly discuss prevention and management of this cardiomyopathy in an intensive care unit. For critically ill Takotsubo patients, intensive clinicians can consider establishment of diagnosis by specific electrocardiograph changes, distinctive marked release of cardiac enzymes, characteristic echocardiograph findings, as well as invasive coronary angiography or noninvasive cardiac magnetic imaging.

  13. Knowledge and practice for pressure injury prevention among care managers in a home care setting: a cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kohta M

    2017-08-01

    new risk assessment scale as a bridge between both medical professionals and social welfare professionals. Practically, the authors recommend care managers should receive continuous education and practical training for pressure injury prevention in a home care setting. Keywords: long term care, Braden scale, questionnaire, risk assessment, pressure ulcer

  14. Critical Care Nurses' Reasons for Poor Attendance at a Continuous Professional Development Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viljoen, Myra; Coetzee, Isabel; Heyns, Tanya

    2016-12-01

    Society demands competent and safe health care, which obligates professionals to deliver quality patient care using current knowledge and skills. Participation in continuous professional development programs is a way to ensure quality nursing care. Despite the importance of continuous professional development, however, critical care nurse practitioners' attendance rates at these programs is low. To explore critical care nurses' reasons for their unsatisfactory attendance at a continuous professional development program. A nominal group technique was used as a consensus method to involve the critical care nurses and provide them the opportunity to reflect on their experiences and challenges related to the current continuous professional development program for the critical care units. Participants were 14 critical care nurses from 3 critical care units in 1 private hospital. The consensus was that the central theme relating to the unsatisfactory attendance at the continuous professional development program was attitude. In order of importance, the 4 contributing priorities influencing attitude were communication, continuous professional development, time constraints, and financial implications. Attitude relating to attending a continuous professional development program can be changed if critical care nurses are aware of the program's importance and are involved in the planning and implementation of a program that focuses on the nurses' individual learning needs. ©2016 American Association of Critical-Care Nurses.

  15. Perceptions of oral health, preventive care, and care-seeking behaviors among rural adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodd, Virginia J; Logan, Henrietta; Brown, Cameron D; Calderon, Angela; Catalanotto, Frank

    2014-12-01

    An asymmetrical oral disease burden is endured by certain population subgroups, particularly children and adolescents. Reducing oral health disparities requires understanding multiple oral health perspectives, including those of adolescents. This qualitative study explores oral health perceptions and dental care behaviors among rural adolescents. Semistructured individual interviews with 100 rural, minority, low socioeconomic status adolescents revealed their current perceptions of oral health and dental care access. Respondents age ranged from 12 to 18 years. The sample was 80% black and 52% male. Perceived threat from dental disease was low. Adolescents perceived regular brushing and flossing as superseding the need for preventive care. Esthetic reasons were most often cited as reasons to seek dental care. Difficulties accessing dental care include finances, transportation, fear, issues with Medicaid coverage and parental responsibility. In general, adolescents and their parents are in need of information regarding the importance of preventive dental care. Findings illuminate barriers to dental care faced by low-income rural adolescents and counter public perceptions of government-sponsored dental care programs as being "free" or without cost. The importance of improved oral health knowledge, better access to care, and school-based dental care is discussed. © 2014, American School Health Association.

  16. Ethical decisions in endof- life care | Norval | Continuing Medical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Continuing Medical Education. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 21, No 5 (2003) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads.

  17. Assessment of the management factors that influence the development of preventive care in the New South Wales public dental service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masoe, Angela V; Blinkhorn, Anthony S; Taylor, Jane; Blinkhorn, Fiona A

    2015-01-01

    Oral diseases, particularly dental caries, remain one of the most common chronic health problems for adolescents, and are a major public health concern. Public dental services in New South Wales, Australia offer free clinical care and preventive advice to all adolescents under 18 years of age, particularly those from disadvantaged backgrounds. This care is provided by dental therapists and oral health therapists (therapists). It is incumbent upon clinical directors (CDs) and health service managers (HSMs) to ensure that the appropriate clinical preventive care is offered by clinicians to all their patients. The aims of this study were to 1) explore CDs' and HSMs' perceptions of the factors that could support the delivery of preventive care to adolescents, and to 2) record the strategies they have utilized to help therapists provide preventive care to adolescents. In-depth, semistructured interviews were undertaken with 19 CDs and HSMs from across NSW local health districts. A framework matrix was used to systematically code data and enable key themes to be identified for analysis. The 19 CDs and HSMs reported that fiscal accountability and meeting performance targets impacted on the levels and types of preventive care provided by therapists. Participants suggested that professional clinical structures for continuous quality improvement should be implemented and monitored, and that an adequate workforce mix and more resources for preventive dental care activities would enhance therapists' ability to provide appropriate levels of preventive care. CDs and HSMs stated that capitalizing on the strengths of visiting pediatric dental specialists and working with local health district clinical leaders would be a practical way to improve models of preventive oral health care for adolescents. The main issue raised in this study is that preventive dentistry per se lacks strong support from the central funding agency, and that increasing prevention activities is not a simple

  18. Knowledge of Critical Care Provider on Prevention of Ventilator Associated Pneumonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Passang Chiki Sherpa

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP continues to be an important cause of morbidity and mortality in ventilated patient. Prevention of VAP in critically ill patient is significant concern for health care team in intensive care units (ICUs. Knowledge on prevention of VAP would have a significant impact on patient outcome. Aims and Objectives: To assess knowledge on prevention of VAP in critical care providers and to find the association between knowledge on prevention of VAP and educational qualification and years of experience in ICUs. Settings and Design: The study was conducted in 5 different ICUs of Kasturba Hospital, Manipal, and using descriptive study design. Material and Methods: The study involved a purposive sample of 138 critical care providers. Critical care providers who were willing to participate in the study were included. Tools on demographic proforma and self-administered structured knowledge questionnaire on prevention of VAP were developed and content validity was established. The reliability of the tools was established.The data was categorized and analyzed by using descriptive and inferential statistics. The SPSS 16.0 version was used for the analysis of the study. Result: Majority 89.1% of the participant were 20-29 years, 63% unmarried 51.4% had completed diploma course and majority 81.2% were from nursing discipline. The study revealed that only 55.80% of subjects were having adequate knowledge on prevention of VAP based on median score. There was no significant association between knowledge score and educational qualification (÷²=0, p=0.833, years of experience in ICU (÷²= 2.221, p=0.329.

  19. Continuing Vocational Training for Teachers in Beauty and Hair Care : Teachers Act as Active Developers of their Work and Engage in Transferring Good Practices to their Students

    OpenAIRE

    Aalto-Korte, Kristiina; Kurimo, Ritva; Laitinen, Jaana; Pesonen, Maria; Takala, Esa-Pekka; Poutanen, Marjo

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes the experiences of students and organizers of the Hair and beauty care, the prevention of health hazards (HIKAT) project which offered nationwide continuing vocational training (CVT) for teachers in beauty and hair care to be further disseminated in vocational secondary education. The development of occupational skin diseases is one of the most important health risks related to the exposure to chemical and physical risks in hairdressing. The prevention of occupational...

  20. A compendium of strategies to prevent healthcare-associated infections in acute care hospitals: 2014 updates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokoe, Deborah S; Anderson, Deverick J; Berenholtz, Sean M; Calfee, David P; Dubberke, Erik R; Ellingson, Katherine D; Gerding, Dale N; Haas, Janet P; Kaye, Keith S; Klompas, Michael; Lo, Evelyn; Marschall, Jonas; Mermel, Leonard A; Nicolle, Lindsay E; Salgado, Cassandra D; Bryant, Kristina; Classen, David; Crist, Katrina; Deloney, Valerie M; Fishman, Neil O; Foster, Nancy; Goldmann, Donald A; Humphreys, Eve; Jernigan, John A; Padberg, Jennifer; Perl, Trish M; Podgorny, Kelly; Septimus, Edward J; VanAmringe, Margaret; Weaver, Tom; Weinstein, Robert A; Wise, Robert; Maragakis, Lisa L

    2014-08-01

    Since the publication of "A Compendium of Strategies to Prevent Healthcare-Associated Infections in Acute Care Hospitals" in 2008, prevention of healthcare-associated infections (HAIs) has become a national priority. Despite improvements, preventable HAIs continue to occur. The 2014 updates to the Compendium were created to provide acute care hospitals with up-to-date, practical, expert guidance to assist in prioritizing and implementing their HAI prevention efforts. They are the product of a highly collaborative effort led by the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America (SHEA), the Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA), the American Hospital Association (AHA), the Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology (APIC), and The Joint Commission, with major contributions from representatives of a number of organizations and societies with content expertise, including the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the Institute for Healthcare Improvement (IHI), the Pediatric Infectious Diseases Society (PIDS), the Society for Critical Care Medicine (SCCM), the Society for Hospital Medicine (SHM), and the Surgical Infection Society (SIS).

  1. Improving quality in Medicaid: the use of care management processes for chronic illness and preventive care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rittenhouse, Diane R; Robinson, James C

    2006-01-01

    Care management processes (CMPs), tools to improve the efficiency and quality of primary care delivery, are particularly important for low-income patients facing substantial barriers to care. To measure the adoption of CMPs by medical groups, Independent Practice Associations, community clinics, and hospital-based clinics in California's Medicaid program and the factors associated with CMP adoption. Telephone survey of every provider organization with at least 6 primary care physicians and at least 1 Medi-Cal HMO contract, Spring 2003. One hundred twenty-three organizations participated, accounting for 64% of provider organizations serving Medicaid managed care in California. We surveyed 30 measures of CMP use for asthma and diabetes, and for child and adolescent preventive services. The mean number of CMPs used by each organization was 4.5 for asthma and 4.9 for diabetes (of a possible 8). The mean number of CMPs for preventive services was 4.0 for children and 3.5 for adolescents (of a possible 7). Organizations with more extensive involvement in Medi-Cal managed care used more CMPs for chronic illness and preventive service. Community clinics and hospital-based clinics used more CMPs for asthma and diabetes than did Independent Practice Associations (IPAs), and profitable organizations used more CMPs for child and adolescent preventive services than did entities facing severe financial constraints. The use of CMPs by Medicaid HMOs and the presence of external (financial and nonfinancial) incentives for clinical performance were strongly associated with use of care management by provider organizations. Physician and provider organizations heavily involved in California's Medicaid program are extensively engaged in preventive and chronic care management programs.

  2. Optimizing the Primary Prevention of Type-2 Diabetes in Primary Health Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-08-18

    Interprofessional Relations; Primary Health Care/Organization & Administration; Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/Prevention & Control; Primary Prevention/Methods; Risk Reduction Behavior; Randomized Controlled Trial; Life Style

  3. [Improving the continuous care process in primary care during weekends and holidays: redesigning and FMEA].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cañada Dorado, A; Cárdenas Valladolid, J; Espejo Matorrales, F; García Ferradal, I; Sastre Páez, S; Vicente Martín, I

    2010-01-01

    To describe a project carried out in order to improve the process of Continuous Health Care (CHC) on Saturdays and bank holidays in Primary Care, area number 4, Madrid. The aim of this project was to guarantee a safe and error-free service to patients receiving home health care on weekends. The urgent need for improving CHC process was identified by the Risk Management Functional Unit (RMFU) of the area. In addition, some complaints had been received from the nurses involved in the process as well as from their patients. A SWOT (Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities and Threats) analysis performed in 2009 highlighted a number of problems with the process. As a result, a project for improvement was drawn up, to be implemented in the following stages: 1. Redesigning and improving the existing process. 2. Application of failure mode and effect analysis (FMEA) to the new process. 3. Follow up, managing and leading the project. 4. Nurse training. 5. Implementing the process in the whole area. 6. CHC nurse satisfaction surveys. After carrying out this project, the efficiency and level of automation improved considerably. Since implementation of the process enhancement measures, no complaints have been received from patients and surveys show that CHC nurse satisfaction has improved. By using FMEA, errors were given priority and enhancement steps were taken in order to: Inform professionals, back-up personnel and patients about the process. Improve the specialist follow-up report. Provide training in ulcer patient care. The process enhancement, and especially its automation, has resulted in a significant step forward toward achieving greater patient safety. FMEA was a useful tool, which helped in taking some important actions. Finally, CHC nurse satisfaction has clearly improved. Copyright © 2009 SECA. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  4. Mobile health applications for HIV prevention and care in Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forrest, Jamie I; Wiens, Matthew; Kanters, Steve; Nsanzimana, Sabin; Lester, Richard T; Mills, Edward J

    2015-11-01

    More people have mobile phones in Africa than at any point in history. Mobile health (m-health), the use of mobile phones to support the delivery of health services, has expanded in recent years. Several models have been proposed for conceptualizing m-health in the fields of maternal-child health and chronic diseases. We conducted a literature review of m-health interventions for HIV prevention and care in African countries and present the findings in the context of a simplified framework. Our review identified applications of m-health for HIV prevention and care categorized by the following three themes: patient-care focused applications, such as health behavior change, health system-focused applications, such as reporting and data collection, and population health-focused applications, including HIV awareness and testing campaigns. The potential for m-health in Africa is numerous and should not be limited only to direct patient-care focused applications. Although the use of smart phone technology is on the rise in Africa, text messaging remains the primary mode of delivering m-health interventions. The rate at which mobile phone technologies are being adopted may outpace the rate of evaluation. Other methods of evaluation should be considered beyond only randomized-controlled trials.

  5. Basic nursing care to prevent nonventilator hospital-acquired pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn, Barbara; Baker, Dian L; Cohen, Shannon; Stewart, Jennifer L; Lima, Christine A; Parise, Carol

    2014-01-01

    Nonventilator hospital-acquired pneumonia (NV-HAP) is an underreported and unstudied disease, with potential for measurable outcomes, fiscal savings, and improvement in quality of life. The purpose of our study was to (a) identify the incidence of NV-HAP in a convenience sample of U.S. hospitals and (b) determine the effectiveness of reliably delivered basic oral nursing care in reducing NV-HAP. A descriptive, quasi-experimental study using retrospective comparative outcomes to determine (a) the incidence of NV-HAP and (b) the effectiveness of enhanced basic oral nursing care versus usual care to prevent NV-HAP after introduction of a basic oral nursing care initiative. We used the International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Problems (ICD-9) codes for pneumonia not present on admission and verified NV-HAP diagnosis using the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention diagnostic criteria. We completed an evidence-based gap analysis and designed a site-specific oral care initiative designed to reduce NV-HAP. The intervention process was guided by the Influencer Model (see Figure) and participatory action research. We found a substantial amount of unreported NV-HAP. After we initiated our oral care protocols, the rate of NV-HAP per 100 patient days decreased from 0.49 to 0.3 (38.8%). The overall number of cases of NV-HAP was reduced by 37% during the 12-month intervention period. The avoidance of NV-HAP cases resulted in an estimated 8 lives saved, $1.72 million cost avoided, and 500 extra hospital days averted. The extra cost for therapeutic oral care equipment was $117,600 during the 12-month intervention period. Cost savings resulting from avoided NV-HAP was $1.72 million. Return on investment for the organization was $1.6 million in avoided costs. NV-HAP should be elevated to the same level of concern, attention, and effort as prevention of ventilator-associated pneumonia in hospitals. Nursing needs to lead the way in the design and

  6. Strategic prevention of musculoskeletal disorders in elderly care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seim, Rikke; Edwards, Kasper; Poulsen, Signe

    2015-01-01

    and the Institute of Medicine 2001). The first three risk factors are prevalent in the health care sector and employees are prone to develop MSDs due to the high level of manual labor e.g. physical handling of patients. The sector work environment council for the social and health care sector (BAR SOSU) has joint...... is a serious and comprehensive work environment problem. It is also recognized as such in the Danish National Work Environment Strategy 2020, where MSD is ranked as one of three main focus areas with the aim of reducing the number of MSD incidents with 20% by the year 2020 (WEA 2020). It is estimated...... forces with researchers at the Department of Management Engineering with the aim of developing a set of tools to strategically prevent MSDs in municipalities. The 98 municipalities in Denmark are the primary provider of elderly care in home and nursing home and we expect to find varied but systematic...

  7. Diabetes Preventive Care Practices in North Carolina, 2000-2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Huabin; Bell, Ronny A; Cummings, Doyle M; Chen, Zhuo Adam

    2018-03-22

    This analysis assessed trends in measures of diabetes preventive care overall and by race/ethnicity and socioeconomic status in the North Carolina Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (2000-2015). We found increasing trends in 5 measures: diabetes self-management education (DSME), daily blood glucose self-monitoring, hemoglobin A 1c tests, foot examinations, and flu shots. Non-Hispanic black and non-Hispanic white respondents showed increases in blood glucose self-monitoring, and a significant time-by-race interaction was observed for annual flu shots. Predisposing, enabling, and need factors were significantly associated with most measures. DSME was positively associated with 7 measures. Expanding access to health insurance and health care providers is key to improving diabetes management, with DSME being the gateway to optimal care.

  8. Air bubbles induce a critical continuous stress to prevent marine biofouling accumulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belden, Jesse; Menesses, Mark; Dickenson, Natasha; Bird, James

    2017-11-01

    Significant shear stresses are needed to remove established hard fouling organisms from a ship hull. Given that there is a link between the amount of time that fouling accumulates and the stress required to remove it, it is not surprising that more frequent grooming requires less shear stress. One approach to mitigate marine biofouling is to continuously introduce a curtain of air bubbles under a submerged surface; it is believed that this aeration exploits the small stresses induced by rising bubbles to continuously prevent accumulation. Although curtains of rising bubbles have successfully prevented biofouling accumulation, it is unclear if a single stream of bubbles could maintain a clean surface. In this talk, we show that single bubble stream aeration can prevent biofouling accumulation in regions for which the average wall stress exceeds approximately 0.01 Pa. This value is arrived at by comparing observations of biofouling growth and prevention from field studies with laboratory measurements that probe the associated flow fields. We also relate the spatial and temporal characteristics of the flow to the size and frequency of the rising bubbles, which informs the basic operating conditions required for aeration to continuously prevent biofouling accumulation.

  9. Continuous Positive Airway Pressure (CPAP for prevention of recurrent pneumonia in the Neuromyelitis Optica patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James A. Welker

    2014-01-01

    Conclusions: Patients with Neuromyelitis Optica differ from those with traumatic spinal cord injury as they have a chronic progressive systemic illness that causes continued deterioration of their nervous system resulting in the need for routine monitoring that ensures the timely addition of CPAP for the prevention of pneumonia and its associated medical expenses.

  10. Wound-care teams for preventing and treating pressure ulcers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Zena E H; Webster, Joan; Samuriwo, Ray

    2015-09-16

    Pressure ulcers, which are localised injury to the skin or underlying tissue, or both, occur when people are unable to reposition themselves to relieve pressure on bony prominences. Pressure ulcers are often difficult to heal, painful and impact negatively on the individual's quality of life. The cost implications of pressure ulcer treatment are considerable, compounding the challenges in providing cost effective, efficient health service delivery. International guidelines suggest that to prevent and manage pressure ulcers successfully a team approach is required. Therefore, this review has been conducted to clarify the role of wound-care teams in the prevention and management of pressure ulcers. To assess the impact of wound-care teams in preventing and treating pressure ulcers in people of any age, nursed in any healthcare setting. In April 2015 we searched: The Cochrane Wounds Group Specialised Register; The Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Library); Ovid MEDLINE; Ovid MEDLINE (In-Process & Other Non-Indexed Citations); Ovid EMBASE and EBSCO CINAHL. There were no restrictions with respect to language, date of publication or study setting. We considered RCTs that evaluated the effect of any configuration of wound-care teams in the treatment or prevention of pressure ulcers. Two review authors independently assessed titles and, where available, abstracts of the studies identified by the search strategy for their eligibility. We obtained full versions of potentially relevant studies and two review authors independently screened these against the inclusion criteria. We identified no studies that met the inclusion criteria. We set out to evaluate the RCT evidence pertaining to the impact of wound-care teams on the prevention and management of pressure ulcers. However, no studies met the inclusion criteria. There is a lack of evidence concerning whether wound-care teams make a difference to the incidence or healing of pressure

  11. Issues in treating depression in primary care | Horn | Continuing ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Issues in treating depression in primary care. NR Horn. Abstract. No Abstract. Full Text: EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT · AJOL African Journals Online. HOW TO USE AJOL... for Researchers · for Librarians · for Authors · FAQ's · More about AJOL ...

  12. Preventive physical therapy and care humanization in the treatment of a bedridden, home care, neurologic patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lina Faria

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction: This case study investigated the impact of preventive physical therapy on shoulder problems and the prevention of pressure ulcers (PU in a bedridden, home care, post-neurological surgery patient. Objective: To highlight the importance of physical therapy in the prevention of comorbidities, chronic neurological sequelae, and PU. Materials and Methods: In the immediate post-surgical phase, the patient was treated with preventive measures against PU, according to the Pressure Ulcer Prevention Protocol of the University of São Paulo, the National Pressure Ulcer Advisory Panel, and the Braden Scale. In addition, we used the modified Ashworth scale to assess spasticity. A kinesiotherapy program based on the Bobath's concept was used to prevent subluxation of the plegic arm and help in the recovery of functional movements. Results: The use of preventive measures and delivery of humanized care during a six-month period helped prevent the development of stage 3 and 4 PU and physical, functional, and respiratory complications. By the end of six months, the patient was found to be at low risk of developing PU. Conclusion: Notwithstanding the difficulties experienced during treatment, especially for the positioning of the arm and performance of transferring and positioning techniques, the results of this study are in agreement with aspects considered important for treatment outcomes.

  13. Prevention of Hypoxemia During Apnea Testing: A Comparison of Oxygen Insufflation And Continuous Positive Airway Pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, Andreas H; Couillard, Philippe; Bader, Ryan; Dhillon, Peter; Kutsogiannis, Demetrios J; Doig, Christopher J

    2017-08-01

    Apnea testing is an essential step in the clinical diagnosis of brain death. Current international guidelines recommend placement of an oxygen (O 2 ) insufflation catheter into the endotracheal tube to prevent hypoxemia, but use of a continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) valve may be more effective at limiting arterial partial pressure of O 2 (PO 2 ) reduction. We performed a multicenter study assessing consecutive apnea tests in 14 intensive care units (ICUs) in two cities utilizing differing protocols. In one city, O 2 catheters are placed and arterial blood gases (ABGs) performed at intervals determined by the attending physician. In the other city, a resuscitation bag with CPAP valve is attached to the endotracheal tube, and ABGs performed every 3-5 min. We assessed arterial PO 2 , partial pressure of carbon dioxide (PCO 2 ), pH, and blood pressure at the beginning and termination of each apnea test. Thirty-six apnea tests were performed using an O 2 catheter and 50 with a CPAP valve. One test per group was aborted because of physiological instability. There were no significant differences in the degree of PO 2 reduction (-59 vs. -32 mmHg, p = 0.72), rate of PCO 2 rise (3.2 vs. 3.9 mmHg per min, p = 0.22), or pH decline (-0.02 vs. -0.03 per min, p = 0.06). Performance of ABGs at regular intervals was associated with shorter test duration (10 vs. 7 min, p pressure decline (p = 0.006). Both methods of O 2 supplementation are associated with similar changes in arterial PO 2 and PCO 2 . Performance of ABGs at regular intervals shortens apnea test duration and may avoid excessive pH reduction and consequent hemodynamic effects.

  14. Pediatric primary care to help prevent child maltreatment: the Safe Environment for Every Kid (SEEK) Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubowitz, Howard; Feigelman, Susan; Lane, Wendy; Kim, Jeongeun

    2009-03-01

    Effective strategies for preventing child maltreatment are needed. Few primary care-based programs have been developed, and most have not been well evaluated. Our goal was to evaluate the efficacy of the Safe Environment for Every Kid model of pediatric primary care in reducing the occurrence of child maltreatment. A randomized trial was conducted from June 2002 to November 2005 in a university-based resident continuity clinic in Baltimore, Maryland. The study population consisted of English-speaking parents of children (0-5 years) brought in for child health supervision. Of the 1118 participants approached, 729 agreed to participate, and 558 of them completed the study protocol. Resident continuity clinics were cluster randomized by day of the week to the model (intervention) or standard care (control) groups. Model care consisted of (1) residents who received special training, (2) the Parent Screening Questionnaire, and (3) a social worker. Risk factors for child maltreatment were identified and addressed by the resident physician and/or social worker. Standard care involved routine pediatric primary care. A subset of the clinic population was sampled for the evaluation. Child maltreatment was measured in 3 ways: (1) child protective services reports using state agency data; (2) medical chart documentation of possible abuse or neglect; and (3) parental report of harsh punishment via the Parent-Child Conflict Tactics scale. Model care resulted in significantly lower rates of child maltreatment in all the outcome measures: fewer child protective services reports, fewer instances of possible medical neglect documented as treatment nonadherence, fewer children with delayed immunizations, and less harsh punishment reported by parents. One-tailed testing was conducted in accordance with the study hypothesis. The Safe Environment for Every Kid (SEEK) model of pediatric primary care seems promising as a practical strategy for helping prevent child maltreatment

  15. Reconstructing continuity of care in mental health services : a multilevel conceptual framework

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wierdsma, Andre; Mulder, Cornelis; de Vries, Sanne; Sytema, Sjoerd

    Continuity of mental health care is a key issue in the organization and evaluation of services for patients with disabling chronic conditions. Over many years, health services researchers have been exploring the conceptual boundaries between continuity of care and other service characteristics. On

  16. Technologies for HIV prevention and care: challenges for health services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maksud, Ivia; Fernandes, Nilo Martinez; Filgueiras, Sandra Lucia

    2015-09-01

    This article aims to consider some relevant challenges to the provision of "new prevention technologies" in health services in a scenario where the "advances" in the global response to AIDS control are visible. We take as material for analysis the information currently available on the HIV post-exposure prophylaxis (PEP) and pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP), treatment as prevention (TASP) and over the counter. The methodology consisted of the survey and analysis of the Biblioteca Virtual em Saúde (BVS: MEDLINE, LILACS, WHOLIS, PAHO, SciELO) articles that addressed the issue of HIV prevention and care in the context of so-called new prevention technologies. The results of the studies show that there is assistance on the ground of clinics for the treatment of disease responses, but there are several challenges related to the sphere of prevention. The articles list some challenges regarding to management, organization of services and the attention given by health professionals to users. The current context shows evidence of the effectiveness of antiretroviral therapy in reducing the risk of HIV transmission, but the challenges for the provision of preventive technologies in health services permeate health professionals and users in their individual dimensions and health services in organizational and structural dimension. Interventions should be made available in a context of community mobilization; there should be no pressure on people to make HIV testing, antiretroviral treatment or for prevention. In the management is responsible for the training of health professionals to inform, clarify and make available to users, partners and family information about the new antiretroviral use strategies.

  17. Electronic Health Record in Continuous Shared Health Care

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hanzlíček, Petr; Zvárová, Jana; Zvára, K.; Bureš, V.; Špidlen, Josef

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 11, - (2005), s. 1-6 ISSN 1727-1983. [EMBEC'05. European Medical and Biomedical Conference /3./. Prague, 20.11.2005-25.11.2005] R&D Projects: GA AV ČR 1ET200300413 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10300504 Keywords : electronic health record * shared health care * information technology Subject RIV: BD - Theory of Information

  18. Electronic Health Record for Continuous Shared Health Care

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hanzlíček, Petr; Zvárová, Jana

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 9, - (2005), s. 275-280 ISSN 1335-2393. [YBERC 2005. Young Biomedical Engineers and Researchers Conference. Stará Lesná, 13.07.2005-15.07.2005] R&D Projects: GA AV ČR 1ET200300413 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10300504 Keywords : information society * telemedicine * electronic health record * digital signature * personal data protection * biomedical informatics Subject RIV: FQ - Public Health Care, Social Medicine

  19. Continuity of care of outpatients with schizophrenia in Pretoria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A M E Kotze

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To study the needs of outpatients suffering from schizophrenia and their primary caregivers. Methods. A qualitative descriptive design was selected to study the needs of a non-probability purposive sample of 50 outpatients with schizophrenia and their primary caregivers. Data were collected on their compliance-related needs as well as psychosocial and aftercare treatment needs. Results. Compliance needs: Eighty-three per cent of the participants supported their medication treatment and aftercare, but needed more information on the illness than they had received or had managed to gather. Psychosocial needs: Participants had difficulty in accepting the illness and in understanding its consequences for their everyday functioning. Ninety-seven per cent of patients were aware that their illness had affected the health of their primary caregiver. The majority of participants had lost friendships since the diagnosis of schizophrenia. Eighty-eight of the primary caregivers supported the patient financially, despite the fact that many were over 60 years of age. Aftercare treatment needs: A strong need was expressed for services such as day-care centres, workshops, and psycho-educational and social work services. Conclusions. As South African health policy is moving towardsde-institutionalisation and treating mental health as part of primary care, support must be improved for sufferers of schizophrenia and their primary caregivers. Many people are prepared to face up to the challenge of caring for a mentally ill family member, yet are faced with significant needs that should be addressed.

  20. Understanding, Treating, and Preventing STDs / Questions to Ask your Health Care Professional

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Preventing STDs / Questions to Ask your Health Care Professional Past Issues / Fall 2008 Table of Contents For ... sexual partner Questions to Ask Your Health Care Professional How can I prevent getting an STD? If ...

  1. Nasal continuous positive airways pressure immediately after extubation for preventing morbidity in preterm infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, P G; Henderson-Smart, D J

    2003-01-01

    Preterm infants being extubated following a period of intermittent positive pressure ventilation via an endotracheal tube are at risk of developing respiratory failure as a result of apnea, respiratory acidosis and hypoxia. Nasal continuous positive airway pressure appears to stabilise the upper airway, improve lung function and reduce apnea and may therefore have a role in facilitating extubation in this population. In preterm infants having their endotracheal tube removed following a period of intermittent positive pressure ventilation (IPPV), does management with nasal continuous positive airways pressure (NCPAP) lead to an increased proportion remaining free of additional ventilatory support, compared to extubation directly to headbox oxygen? Searches were made of the Oxford Database of Perinatal Trials, MEDLINE up to November 2002, Cochrane Controlled Trials Register (The Cochrane Library, Issue 4, 2002), previous reviews including cross references, abstracts of conferences and symposia proceedings, expert informants and journal handsearching mainly in the English language. All trials utilising random or quasi-random patient allocation, in which NCPAP (delivered by any method) was compared with headbox oxygen for post-extubation care were included. Methodological quality was assessed independently by the two authors. Data were extracted independently by the two authors. Prespecified subgroup analysis to determine the impact of different levels of NCPAP, differences in duration of IPPV and use of aminophylline were also performed using the same package. Data were analysed using relative risk (RR), risk difference (RD) and number needed to treat (NNT). Nasal CPAP, when applied to preterm infants being extubated following IPPV, reduces the incidence of adverse clinical events (apnea, respiratory acidosis and increased oxygen requirements) indicating the need for additional ventilatory support [RR 0.62 (0.49, 0.77), RD -0.17 (-0.24,-0.10), NNT 6 (4,10)]. nasal

  2. Falls prevention in community care: 10 years on

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burton E

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Elissa Burton,1 Gill Lewin,2 Hilary O’Connell,3 Keith D Hill1 1School of Physiotherapy and Exercise Science, Curtin University, 2School of Nursing, Midwifery and Paramedicine, Curtin University, 3Independent Living Centre WA, Perth, WA, Australia Background: A million older people living in Australia receive community care services each year due to experiencing functional or mental health difficulties. This group may be at greater risk of falling than similar-aged people not receiving services. However, there is limited falls prevention research for this population.Purpose: The aim of this study was to identify the falls prevalence rates of older people from 10 Australian community care organizations and compare current falls prevention data to a study 10 years prior that utilized the same 10 organizations. This study also identified factors associated with falling for this population.Patients and methods: This is a cross-sectional descriptive study, in which 5,338 questionnaires were mailed to a random sample of community care recipients aged ≥65 years. Results: A total of 1,991 questionnaires were returned (37.3%, with 47.7% of respondents having fallen in the previous year, and 32.7% in the month prior to completing the questionnaire, similar to 10 years prior. Community care clients had a 50% higher falls rate than that reported for similar-aged people not receiving services, and this remained unchanged over the last 10 years. Eighty-six per cent of fallers had fallen once or twice, and 60% reported being injured. Thirty-six per cent of respondents reported not being able to get up independently, and only 27.4% of fallers were referred to a falls prevention program (significantly fewer than 10 years ago; 95% CI: 0.821–6.366, p=0.01. Balance issues (odds ratio [OR]: 2.06, 95% CI: 1.288–3.290, p=0.003 and perceived risk of falling in the future being “definite” (OR: 6.42, 95% CI: 1.890–21.808, p=0.003 or “unsure” (OR: 3

  3. The performance of integrated health care networks in continuity of care: a qualitative multiple case study of COPD patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sina Waibel

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Integrated health care networks (IHN are promoted in numerous countries as a response to fragmented care delivery by providing a coordinated continuum of services to a defined population. However, evidence on their effectiveness and outcome is scarce, particularly considering continuity across levels of care; that is the patient's experience of connected and coherent care received from professionals of the different care levels over time. The objective was to analyse the chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD patients’ perceptions of continuity of clinical management and information across care levels and continuity of relation in IHN of the public health care system of Catalonia.Methods: A qualitative multiple case study was conducted, where the cases are COPD patients. A theoretical sample was selected in two stages: (1 study contexts: IHN and (2 study cases consisting of COPD patients. Data were collected by means of individual, semi-structured interviews to the patients, their general practitioners and pulmonologists and review of records. A thematic content analysis segmented by IHN and cases with a triangulation of sources and analysists was carried out.Results: COPD patients of all networks perceived that continuity of clinical management was existent due to clear distribution of roles for COPD care across levels, rapid access to care during exacerbations and referrals to secondary care when needed; nevertheless, patients of some networks highlighted too long waiting times to non-urgent secondary care. Physicians generally agreed with patients, however, also indicated unclear distribution of roles, some inadequate referrals and long waiting times to primary care in some networks. Concerning continuity of information, patients across networks considered that their clinical information was transferred across levels via computer and that physicians also used informal communication mechanisms (e-mail, telephone; whereas

  4. Developing a diabetes prevention education programme for community health-care workers in Thailand: formative findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sranacharoenpong, Kitti; Hanning, Rhona M

    2011-10-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate barriers to and supports for implementing a diabetes prevention education programme for community health-care workers (CHCWs) in Chiang Mai province, Thailand. The study also aimed to get preliminary input into the design of a tailored diabetes prevention education programme for CHCWs. Thailand has faced under-nutrition and yet, paradoxically, the prevalence of diseases of over-nutrition, such as obesity and diabetes, has escalated. As access to diabetes prevention programme is limited in Thailand, especially in rural and semi-urban areas, it becomes critical to develop a health information delivery system that is relevant, cost-effective, and sustainable. Health-care professionals (n = 12) selected from health centres within one district participated in in-depth interviews. In addition, screened people at risk for diabetes participated in interviews (n = 8) and focus groups (n = 4 groups, 23 participants). Coded transcripts from audio-taped interviews or focus groups were analysed by hand and using NVivo software. Concept mapping illustrated the findings. Health-care professionals identified potential barriers to programme success as a motivation for regular participation, and lack of health policy support for programme sustainability. Health-care professionals identified opportunities to integrate health promotion and disease prevention into CHCWs' duties. Health-care professionals recommended small-group workshops, hands-on learning activities, case studies, and video presentations that bring knowledge to practice within their cultural context. CHCWs should receive a credit for continuing study. People at risk for diabetes lacked knowledge of nutrition, diabetes risk factors, and resources to access health information. They desired two-way communication with CHCWs. Formative research supports the need for an effective, sustainable programme to support knowledge translation to CHCWs and at-risk populations in the

  5. How is continuity of care experienced by people living with chronic kidney disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brand, Sarah; Pollock, Kristian

    2018-01-01

    To explore patients' perceptions of continuity of care within a hospital-based specialist service. Patient journeys through health care are becoming increasingly complex. For patients with chronic conditions, the longevity of their illness and common multiple co-morbidities make this complexity more pronounced. Continuity of care is most challenging to provide for these patients. A multifaceted model of continuity is widely accepted, but despite this, much literature focuses exclusively on relational aspects. In addition, the majority of the literature has focused on primary and family care settings whilst continuity within specialist and hospital care has not been widely researched. A qualitative descriptive design was used. Thirteen semi-structured interviews with patients accessing services as at a Renal and Transplant Unit at a UK hospital were conducted in 2014. Data were analysed thematically to identify commonality as well as diversity amongst participants. Five themes of time, being known, knowledge, knowing the system and responsibility were identified within patient experiences of continuity. The multidisciplinary team was more important in relational continuity than literature has previously suggested. Patients' expectations in relation to continuity were notably different in their interactions with hospital-based services in comparison with community and family-based care. Patients accessing specialist care services may perceive continuity differently to those receiving care in the community. Generic guidance concerned with patient experience outcomes may be difficult to implement in practice. Nurses and the wider healthcare team play a fundamental role within the provision of continuity, even in predominantly medically led specialist services. The differences between primary and secondary care in terms of patient expectation and experience should be recognised to ensure effective models of care are implemented which both meet patient expectations and

  6. Continuing Professional Development: Pedagogical Practices of Interprofessional Simulation in Health Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyström, Sofia; Dahlberg, Johanna; Edelbring, Samuel; Hult, Håkan; Abrandt Dahlgren, Madeleine

    2017-01-01

    The increasing complexity of health care practice makes continuing professional development (CPD) essential for health care professionals. Simulation-based training is a CPD activity that is often applied to improve interprofessional collaboration and the quality of care. The aim of this study is to explore simulation as a pedagogical practice for…

  7. The role of health centers in preventive care provision

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shemetova G.N.

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim: to assess the importance of the Centers of Health in the organization and provision of preventive care to the population, in the early detection of risk factors for the development of chronic non-communicable diseases and the development of a healthy lifestyle. Material and Methods. On the basis of the Health Center of Engels Center for Medical Prevention in the Saratov Region, the detection of risk factors for 2011-2015 was analyzed according to statistical reporting (form No. 68 and health cards (form025-CZ/y of 207 patients. To assess the satisfaction of visitors with the work of the Center, a specially developed questionnaire was conducted, which included 22 questions that characterize the patient profile, his attitude to the organization and the results of the survey, and the motivation to modify the way of life. Results. The study confirmed the important role of the Centers of Health in the organization and provision of preventive care to the population, the formation of a healthy lifestyle and the early detection of diseases and risk factors for their development. Conclusion. Only joint efforts of medical institutions, authorities, educational organizations, mass media can lead to the formation of the population's responsibility for their health and readiness to modify the way of life.

  8. The future of digital games for HIV prevention and care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hightow-Weidman, Lisa B; Muessig, Kathryn E; Bauermeister, José A; LeGrand, Sara; Fiellin, Lynn E

    2017-09-01

    Although there has been a significant increase in mHealth interventions addressing the HIV prevention and care continuum, interventions using game mechanics have been less explored. Digital games are rapidly becoming an important tool for improving health behaviors and supporting the delivery of care and education. The purpose of this review is to provide a historical context for the use of gamification and videogames (including those using virtual reality) used in technology-based HIV interventions and to review new research in the field. A review of recently published (1 January 2016-31 March 2017) or presented abstracts (2016) identified a paucity of technology-based interventions that included gamification elements or any terms associated with videogames or gameplay. A larger portfolio of digital gaming interventions is in the pipeline. Use of digital games that include elements of gamification or consist of standalone videogames or virtual-reality-based games, represent a promising intervention strategy to address the HIV prevention and care continuum, especially among youth. Our review demonstrates that there is significant room for growth in this area in designing, developing, testing and most importantly, implementation and dissemination these novel interventions.

  9. Experiences of security and continuity of care: Patients' and families' narratives about the work of specialized palliative home care teams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klarare, Anna; Rasmussen, Birgit H; Fossum, Bjöörn; Fürst, Carl Johan; Hansson, Johan; Hagelin, Carina Lundh

    2017-04-01

    Those who are seriously ill and facing death are often living with physical, emotional, social, and spiritual suffering. Teamwork is considered to be necessary to holistically meet the diverse needs of patients in palliative care. Reviews of studies regarding palliative care team outcomes have concluded that teams provide benefits, especially regarding pain and symptom management. Much of the research concerning palliative care teams has been performed from the perspective of the service providers and has less often focused on patients' and families' experiences of care. Our aim was to investigate how the team's work is manifested in care episodes narrated by patients and families in specialized palliative home care (SPHC). A total of 13 interviews were conducted with patients and families receiving specialized home care. Six patients and seven family members were recruited through SPHC team leaders. Interviews were transcribed verbatim and the transcripts qualitatively analyzed into themes. Two themes were constructed through thematic analysis: (1) security ("They are always available," "I get the help I need quickly"); and (2) continuity of care ("They know me/us, our whole situation and they really care"). Of the 74 care episodes, 50 were descriptions of regularly scheduled visits, while 24 related to acute care visits and/or interventions. Patients' and family members' descriptions of the work of SPHC teams are conceptualized through experiences of security and continuity of care. Experiences of security are fostered through the 24/7 availability of the team, sensitivity and flexibility in meeting patients' and families' needs, and practical adjustments to enable care at home. Experiences of continuity of care are fostered through the team's collective approach, where the individual team member knows the patients and family members, including their whole situation, and cares about the little things in life as well as caring for the family unit.

  10. Continuity of care by a midwife team versus routine care during pregnancy and birth: a randomised trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowley, M J; Hensley, M J; Brinsmead, M W; Wlodarczyk, J H

    1995-09-18

    To compare continuity of care from a midwife team with routine care from a variety of doctors and midwives. A stratified, randomised controlled trial. 814 women attending the antenatal clinic of a tertiary referral, university hospital. Women were randomly allocated to team care from a team of six midwives, or routine care from a variety of doctors and midwives. Antenatal, intrapartum and neonatal events; maternal satisfaction; and cost of treatment. 405 women were randomly allocated to team care and 409 to routine care; they delivered 385 and 386 babies, respectively. Team care women were more likely to attend antenatal classes (OR, 1.73; 95% CI, 1.23-2.42); less likely to use pethidine during labour (OR, 0.32; 95% CI, 0.22-0.46); and more likely to labour and deliver without intervention (OR, 1.73; 95% CI, 1.28-2.34). Babies of team care mothers received less neonatal resuscitation (OR, 0.59; 95% CI, 0.41-0.86), although there was no difference in Apgar scores at five minutes (OR, 0.86; 95% CI, 0.29-2.57). The stillbirth and neonatal death rate was the same for both groups of mothers with a singleton pregnancy (three deaths), but there were three deaths (birthweights of 600 g, 660 g, 1340 g) in twin pregnancies in the group receiving team care. Team care was rated better than routine care for all measures of maternal satisfaction. Team care meant a cost reduction of 4.5%. Continuity of care provided by a small team of midwives resulted in a more satisfying birth experience at less cost than routine care and fewer adverse maternal and neonatal outcomes. Although a much larger study would be required to provide adequate power to detect rare outcomes, our study found that continuity of care by a midwife team was as safe as routine care.

  11. Continuity of care in mental health: understanding and measuring a complex phenomenon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, T; Catty, J; White, S; Clement, S; Ellis, G; Jones, I R; Lissouba, P; McLaren, S; Rose, D; Wykes, T

    2009-02-01

    Continuity of care is considered by patients and clinicians an essential feature of good quality care in long-term disorders, yet there is general agreement that it is a complex concept. Most policies emphasize it and encourage systems to promote it. Despite this, there is no accepted definition or measure against which to test policies or interventions designed to improve continuity. We aimed to operationalize a multi-axial model of continuity of care and to use factor analysis to determine its validity for severe mental illness. A multi-axial model of continuity of care comprising eight facets was operationalized for quantitative data collection from mental health service users using 32 variables. Of these variables, 22 were subsequently entered into a factor analysis as independent components, using data from a clinical population considered to require long-term consistent care. Factor analysis produced seven independent continuity factors accounting for 62.5% of the total variance. These factors, Experience and Relationship, Regularity, Meeting Needs, Consolidation, Managed Transitions, Care Coordination and Supported Living, were close but not identical to the original theoretical model. We confirmed that continuity of care is multi-factorial. Our seven factors are intuitively meaningful and appear to work in mental health. These factors should be used as a starting-point in research into the determinants and outcomes of continuity of care in long-term disorders.

  12. Focus on Dementia Care: Continuing Education Preferences, Challenges, and Catalysts among Rural Home Care Providers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosteniuk, Julie G.; Morgan, Debra G.; O'Connell, Megan E.; Dal Bello-Haas, Vanina; Stewart, Norma J.

    2016-01-01

    Home care staff who provide housekeeping and personal care to individuals with dementia generally have lower levels of dementia care training compared with other health care providers. The study's purposes were to determine whether the professional role of home care staff in a predominantly rural region was associated with preferences for delivery…

  13. Infection control in intensive care units and prevention of ventilator-associated pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonten, M J; Weinstein, R A

    2000-12-01

    Ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) is considered the most frequent infection in the intensive care unit (ICU), although incidence rates depend on the diagnostic methods. Because VAP has been associated with increased mortality and greater costs for medical care, prevention remains an important goal for intensive care medicine. Selective digestive decontamination (SDD), the most frequently studied method of infection prevention, is still controversial despite more than 30 prospective randomized trials and 6 metaanalyses. SDD reduces the incidence of VAP diagnoses, but beneficial effects on duration of ventilation or ICU stay, antibiotic use, and patient survival have not been shown unequivocally. Although recent metaanalyses suggest a 20% to 40% decrease in ICU mortality for SDD used with systemic prophylaxis, this benefit should be confirmed in a large, prospective, randomized study, preferably with a cost-benefit analysis. Selection of pathogens resistant to the antibiotics used in SDD remains the most important drawback of SDD, rendering SDD contraindicated in wards with endemic resistant problems. Other methods of infection prevention that do not create a selective growth advantage for resistant microorganisms may be more useful. Among these are the use of endotracheal tubes with the possibility of continuous aspiration of subglottic secretions, oropharyngeal decontamination with antiseptics, or the semirecumbent treatment position of patients. Although these methods were successful in single studies, more data are needed. Notwithstanding the potential benefits of these interventions, such classic infection control measures as handwashing remain the cornerstone of infection prevention.

  14. The evidence base for professional and self-care prevention

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Twetman, Svante

    2015-01-01

    Med and the Cochrane library through April 2014 using established MeSH-terms and disease-related search words in various combinations. The search was restricted to SR's published in English or Scandinavian and all age groups were considered. The reference lists of the selected papers were hand-searched for additional...... review articles of potential interest. Meta-analyses, guidelines and treatment recommendations were considered only when SR's were lacking. In the event of updates or multiple systematic reviews covering the same topic, only the most recent article was included. No quality assessment of the systematic....... Likewise, the GRADE score for preventing erosions located in the enamel with fluoride supplements was low. The quality of evidence for various professional and self-care methods to prevent and manage dentine hypersensitivity was very low. CONCLUSIONS: There are knowledge gaps in many domains of cariology...

  15. OECD Health Care Quality Indicator Project. The expert panel on primary care prevention and health promotion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marshall, Martin; Klazinga, Niek; Leatherman, Sheila; Hardy, Charlie; Bergmann, Eckhard; Pisco, Luis; Mattke, Soeren; Mainz, Jan

    2006-01-01

    PURPOSE: This article describes a project undertaken as part of the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD)'s Healthcare Quality Indicator (HCQI) Project, which aimed to develop a set of quality indicators representing the domains of primary care, prevention and health

  16. Prehospital emergency care and injury prevention in Sudan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khalid Elbashir

    2014-12-01

    Conclusion: Due to an absence of published literature in Sudan, much of the data have been recorded from paper records and empirical observations. Prehospital care and injury prevention in the Sudan is a recent initiative, but it is developing into a promising model with many opportunities for improvement. This momentum should be nurtured and requires a purposive, collective collaboration to draw a blueprint for a locally relevant, effective and efficient prehospital system in Sudan. It is hoped that this article will highlight and encourage further progress.

  17. Fall prevention in acute care hospitals: a randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dykes, Patricia C; Carroll, Diane L; Hurley, Ann; Lipsitz, Stuart; Benoit, Angela; Chang, Frank; Meltzer, Seth; Tsurikova, Ruslana; Zuyov, Lyubov; Middleton, Blackford

    2010-11-03

    Falls cause injury and death for persons of all ages, but risk of falls increases markedly with age. Hospitalization further increases risk, yet no evidence exists to support short-stay hospital-based fall prevention strategies to reduce patient falls. To investigate whether a fall prevention tool kit (FPTK) using health information technology (HIT) decreases patient falls in hospitals. Cluster randomized study conducted January 1, 2009, through June 30, 2009, comparing patient fall rates in 4 urban US hospitals in units that received usual care (4 units and 5104 patients) or the intervention (4 units and 5160 patients). The FPTK integrated existing communication and workflow patterns into the HIT application. Based on a valid fall risk assessment scale completed by a nurse, the FPTK software tailored fall prevention interventions to address patients' specific determinants of fall risk. The FPTK produced bed posters composed of brief text with an accompanying icon, patient education handouts, and plans of care, all communicating patient-specific alerts to key stakeholders. The primary outcome was patient falls per 1000 patient-days adjusted for site and patient care unit. A secondary outcome was fall-related injuries. During the 6-month intervention period, the number of patients with falls differed between control (n = 87) and intervention (n = 67) units (P=.02). Site-adjusted fall rates were significantly higher in control units (4.18 [95% confidence interval {CI}, 3.45-5.06] per 1000 patient-days) than in intervention units (3.15 [95% CI, 2.54-3.90] per 1000 patient-days; P = .04). The FPTK was found to be particularly effective with patients aged 65 years or older (adjusted rate difference, 2.08 [95% CI, 0.61-3.56] per 1000 patient-days; P = .003). No significant effect was noted in fall-related injuries. The use of a fall prevention tool kit in hospital units compared with usual care significantly reduced rate of falls. clinicaltrials.gov Identifier: NCT

  18. Pathways to Preventing Substance Use Among Youth in Foster Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyoun K; Buchanan, Rohanna; Price, Joseph M

    2017-07-01

    Substance use problems are highly prevalent among youth in foster care. Such problems in adolescence have long-lasting implications for subsequent adjustment throughout adulthood and even across generations. Although several programs have demonstrated positive results in reducing substance use in at-risk youth, few studies have systemically examined how such programs work for foster youth and whether they are effective for both genders. This study examined the efficacy of KEEP SAFE, a family-based and skill-focused program designed to prevent substance use and other related health risking behaviors among youth in foster care. We hypothesized that improving the caregiver-youth relationship would lead to later reductions in youths' involvement with deviant peers, which subsequently would lead to less substance use, and that this mechanism would work comparably for both genders. A sample of 259 youth (154 girls, ages 11-17 years) in foster care and their caregivers participated in a randomized controlled trial and was followed for 18 months post-baseline. Results indicated that the intervention significantly reduced substance use in foster youth at 18 months post-baseline and that the intervention influenced substance use through two processes: youths' improved quality of relationships with caregivers at 6 months post-baseline and fewer associations with deviant peers at 12 months post-baseline. This suggests that these two processes may be fruitful immediate targets in substance use prevention programs for foster youth. We also found little gender differences in direct and mediating effects of the intervention, suggesting KEEP SAFE may be effective for both genders in foster care.

  19. The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act and Utilization of Preventive Health Care Services

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor Eno

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available We examined how (a health insurance coverage, and (b familiarity with the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA’s or ObamaCare mandate of cost-free access to preventive health services, affect the use of preventive services by residents of a minority community. It was based on primary data collected from a survey conducted during March to April 2012 among a sample of self-identified African American adults in Tallahassee-Leon County area of northwest Florida. The Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS Version 22 was used for running frequency analysis on the data set and multivariable regression modeling. The results showed that of 524 respondents, 382 (73% had health insurance while 142 (27% lacked insurance. Majority of insured respondents, 332 (87%, used preventive health services. However, the remaining 13% of respondents did not use preventive services because they were unfamiliar with the ACA provision of free access to preventive services for insured people. Regression analysis showed a high (91.04% probability that, among the insured, the use of preventive health services depended on the person’s age, income, and education. For uninsured residents, the lack of health insurance was the key reason for non-use of preventive health services, while among the insured, lack of knowledge about the ACA benefit of free access contributed to non-use of preventive services. Expansion of Medicaid eligibility can increase insurance coverage rates among African Americans and other minority populations. Health promotion and awareness campaigns about the law’s benefits by local and state health departments can enhance the use of preventive services.

  20. Vaccine-Preventable Admissions to an Irish Paediatric Intensive Care

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Doyle, Y

    2017-05-01

    In the Republic of Ireland, the schedule of state-funded immunisation for children is comprehensive and includes diphtheria, pertussis, tetanus, pneumococcus, hepatitis B, meningococcus C, haemophilus B, polio, measles, rubella and mumps. Varicella and meningococcal B vaccines are commercially available but are not currently funded by the government. Each of the illnesses preventable by these vaccines can cause substantial morbidity, and rarely mortality, in infants and children. Our PICU continues to see serious illness due to avoidable infection. There were 39 admissions in a 4 year period, with 34 children surviving to discharge. Nine children were infected with pneumococcus, with 4 deaths. There was one case of pertussis, causing death. Most infections occurred in previously healthy children. These preventable conditions represent a significant burden on children, families, and on social and healthcare resources

  1. Understanding nurses' views on a pressure ulcer prevention care bundle: a first step towards successful implementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaboyer, Wendy; Gillespie, Brigid M

    2014-12-01

    To explore nurses' views of the barriers and facilitators to the use of a newly devised patient-centred pressure ulcer prevention care bundle. Given pressure ulcer prevention strategies are not implemented consistently, the use of a pressure ulcer care bundle may improve implementation given bundles generally assist in standardising care. A quality improvement project was undertaken after a pressure ulcer prevention care bundle was developed and pilot-tested. Short, conversational interviews with nurse explored their views of a patient-centred pressure ulcer care bundle. Interviews were audio-taped and transcribed. Inductive content analysis was used to analyse the transcripts. A total of 20 nurses were interviewed. Five categories with corresponding subcategories emerged from the analysis. They were increasing awareness of pressure ulcer prevention, prompting pressure ulcer prevention activities, promoting active patient participation, barriers to using a pressure ulcer prevention care bundle and enabling integration of the pressure ulcer prevention care bundle into routine practice. Benefits of using a patient-centred pressure ulcer prevention care bundle may include prompting patients and staff to implement prevention strategies and promote active patient participation in care. The success of the care bundle relied on both patients' willingness to participate and nurses' willingness to incorporate it into their routine work. A patient-centred pressure ulcer prevention care bundle may facilitate more consistent implementation of pressure ulcer prevention strategies and active patient participation in care. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. EFFICIENT MEASURES FOR BURNOUT PREVENTION IN PALLIATIVE CARE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina DOBRE

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The term burnout, meaning ”professional exhaustion”, was introduced by Herbert Freudenberger in 1974. On May 21, 2014 , the World Health Assembly, the decisional organ of the World Health Organization, voted the resolution for the integration and development of the capacity of palliative care services as a constituent part of the health systems. The resolution represents a major pace in the development of palliative care at world level, once the ministers responsible for the field took upon themselves - by means of information and training programs - the task of services’ development, mainly at community level, the support from the part of the next of kins, the elaboration of educational programs, of guides and clinical protocols for specialists, of instruments for the monitorization of the quality of services provided, an easier access of patients to medication, as well as partnerships with the civil society. Burnout is a state of emotional, mental and physical overfatigue caused by excessive and prolongued stress. It is installed mainly when the person affected with it feels care-worn and uncapable of fulfilling his/her usual duties. As the stress continues, he/she will come to lose the interest or motivation which made him/her assume a certain position in the organizational hierarchy. The burnout phenomenon includes three components: emotional exhaustion, depersonalization and lack of professional accomplishment. The main observations on the phenomenon indicate that, apparently, the burnout level in palliative care is not higher than in other services, such as intensive therapy or surgery. Nevertheless, mention should be made of a characteristic of the palliative care services which influences the burnout level, namely the emotional relation created between the patient and the medical team, as a result of the prolongued duration of the care services

  3. Personal Continuity of Care in a University-Based Primary Care Practice: Impact on Blood Pressure Control.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nik Sherina Hanafi

    Full Text Available Continuity of care is an important quality outcome of patient care. This study aimed to investigate the relationship between personal continuity and blood pressure (BP control among the patients with hypertension in an academic primary care centre. Between January and May 2012, we conducted a retrospective review of medical records of patients with hypertension who had been followed up for at least 1 year in the Primary Care Clinic, University of Malaya Medical Centre, Malaysia. In this setting, doctors who provided care for hypertension included postgraduate family medicine trainees, non-trainee doctors and academic staff. Systematic random sampling (1:4 was used for patient selection. BP control was defined as less than 130/80 mm Hg for patients with diabetes mellitus, proteinuria and chronic kidney disease and less than 140/90 mm Hg for all other patients. Continuity of care was assessed using the usual provider continuity index (UPCI, which is the ratio of patient visits to the usual provider to the total number of visits to all providers in 1 year. A UPC index of zero denotes no continuity while an index of one reflects perfect continuity with only the usual provider. We reviewed a total of 1060 medical records. The patients' mean age was 62.0 years (SD 10.4. The majority was women (59.2% and married (85.7%. The mean number of visits in a year was 3.85 (SD 1.36. A total of 72 doctors had provided consultations (55 postgraduate family medicine trainees, 8 non-trainee doctors and 9 academic staff. The mean UPCI was 0.43 (SD 0.34. Target BP was achieved in 42% of the patients. There was no significant relationship between BP control and personal continuity after adjustment for total number of visits. Continuity of care was not associated with BP control in our centre. Further studies are needed to explore the reasons for this.

  4. Factors that influence the preventive care offered to adolescents accessing Public Oral Health Services, NSW, Australia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masoe AV

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Angela V Masoe,1 Anthony S Blinkhorn,2 Jane Taylor,1 Fiona A Blinkhorn1 1School of Health Sciences, Faculty of Health and Medicine, Oral Health, University of Newcastle, Ourimbah, NSW, Australia; 2Department of Population Oral Health, Faculty of Dentistry, University of Sydney, Westmead, NSW, Australia Background: Many adolescents are at risk of dental caries and periodontal disease, which may be controlled through health education and clinical preventive interventions provided by oral health and dental therapists (therapists. Senior clinicians (SCs can influence the focus of dental care in the New South Wales (NSW Public Oral Health Services as their role is to provide clinical support and advice to therapists, advocate for their communities, and inform Local Health District (LHD managers of areas for clinical quality improvement. The objective of this study was to record facilitating factors and strategies that are used by SCs to encourage therapists to provide preventive care and advice to adolescent patients. Methods: In-depth, semistructured interviews were undertaken with 16 SCs from all of the 15 NSW LHDs (nine rural and six metropolitan. A framework matrix was used to systematically code data and enable key themes to be identified for analysis. Results: All SCs from the 15 NSW Health LHDs participated in the study. Factors influencing SCs' ability to integrate preventive care into clinical practice were: 1 clinical leadership and administrative support, 2 professional support network, 3 clinical and educational resources, 4 the clinician's patient management aptitude, and 5 clinical governance processes. Clinical quality improvement and continuing professional development strategies equipped clinicians to manage and enhance adolescents' confidence toward self-care. Conclusion: This study shows that SCs have a clear understanding of strategies to enhance the therapist's offer of scientific-based preventive care to adolescents. The problem

  5. Incidence and preventability of adverse events requiring intensive care admission: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlayen, Annemie; Verelst, Sandra; Bekkering, Geertruida E; Schrooten, Ward; Hellings, Johan; Claes, Neree

    2012-04-01

    Adverse events are unintended patient injuries or complications that arise from health care management resulting in death, disability or prolonged hospital stay. Adverse events that require critical care are a considerable financial burden to the health care system, but also their global impact on patients and society is probably underestimated. The objectives of this systematic review were to synthesize the best available evidence regarding the estimates of the incidence and preventability of adverse events that necessitate intensive care admission, to determine the type and consequences [mortality, length of intensive care unit (ICU) stay and costs] of these adverse events. MEDLINE (from 1966 to present), EMBASE (from 1974 to present) and CENTRAL (version 1-2010) were searched for studies reporting on unplanned admissions on ICUs. Several other sources were searched for additional studies. Only quantitative studies that used chart review for the detection of adverse events requiring intensive care admission were considered for eligibility. For the purposes of this systematic review, ICUs were defined as specialized hospital facilities which provide continuous monitoring and intensive care for acutely ill patients. Studies that were published in the English, Dutch, German, French or Spanish language were eligible for inclusion. Two reviewers independently extracted data and assessed the methodological quality of the included studies. A total of 27 studies were reviewed. Meta-analysis of the data was not appropriate because of methodological and statistical heterogeneity between studies; therefore, results are presented in a descriptive way. The percentage of surgical and medical adverse events that required ICU admission ranged from 1.1% to 37.2%. ICU readmissions varied from 0% to 18.3%. Preventability of the adverse events varied from 17% to 76.5%. Preventable adverse events are further synthesized by type of event. Consequences of the adverse events included a

  6. Measuring quality of dental care: Caries prevention services for children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herndon, Jill Boylston; Tomar, Scott L; Catalanotto, Frank A; Rudner, Nancy; Huang, I-Chan; Aravamudhan, Krishna; Shenkman, Elizabeth A; Crall, James J

    2015-08-01

    The authors conducted a study to validate the following 3 evidence-based, process-of-care quality measures focused on dental caries prevention for children with an elevated risk of experiencing caries: sealants for 6- to 9-year-olds, sealants for 10- to 14-year-olds, and topical fluoride. Using evidence-based guidelines, the Dental Quality Alliance developed measures for implementation with administrative data at the plan and program levels. To validate the measures, the authors used data from the Florida and Texas Medicaid programs and Children's Health Insurance Programs and from national commercial dental benefit plans. Data were extracted from 414 randomly selected dental office records to validate the use of administrative data to accurately calculate the measures. The authors also assessed statistically significant variations in overall measure performance. Agreement between administrative data and dental records was 95% for sealants (κ = 0.82) and 90% for topical fluoride (κ = 0.78). Sensitivity and specificity were 90.7% and 88.5% for topical fluoride and 77.8% and 98.8% for sealants, respectively. Variation in overall measure performance was greatest for topical fluoride (χ(2) = 5,887.1; P caries received at least 2 topical fluoride applications during the reporting year. Although there was greater variation in performance for sealants for 6- to 9-year-olds (range, 21.0-31.3%; χ(2) = 548.6; P caries prevention process-of-care quality measures can be implemented feasibly and validly using administrative claims data. The measures can be used to assess, monitor, and improve the proportion of children with an elevated risk of experiencing dental caries who receive evidence-based caries prevention services. Copyright © 2015 American Dental Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. [Guidelines for the preventive health care of hairdressing apprentices].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golińska-Zach, Aleksandra; Wiszniewska, Marta; Walusiak-Skorupa, Jolanta

    2017-07-26

    Hairdressing is one of the most developing branch of the service industry in Poland. Providing representatives of this occupational group with preventive health care services it should be remembered that they are at risk of skin and respiratory diseases, which occur due to a quite frequent exposure to harmful agents in the work environment of hairdressers and hairdressing apprentices. Interestingly, a much lower number of researches concentrate on respiratory symptoms than on skin disorders in hairdressers. The authors of this article have carried out the first Polish follow-up study focused not only on skin disorders but also on respiratory tract symptoms in hairdressing apprentices. The results of the study have been reported in other publications while this paper presents a literature review based on EBSCO and PubMed databases, Elsevier and contained articles (on the subject discussed in this paper). On the basis of information obtained from the authors' own research evidence and from the literature review, the guidelines for the preventive health care of hairdressing apprentices were developed. It was confirmed that neither determination of allergen-specific immunoglobulin E (IgE) nor performance of skin prick tests (SPTs) and patch tests for hairdressing factors are necessary. They should be performed as a part of preventive medical examination only in those apprentice candidates and trainees in this profession who report work-related symptoms and it is suspected that they result from exposure to particular factor in the work environment. Med Pr 2017;68(5):677-687. This work is available in Open Access model and licensed under a CC BY-NC 3.0 PL license.

  8. Guidelines for the preventive health care of hairdressing apprentices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksandra Golińska-Zach

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Hairdressing is one of the most developing branch of the service industry in Poland. Providing representatives of this occupational group with preventive health care services it should be remembered that they are at risk of skin and respiratory diseases, which occur due to a quite frequent exposure to harmful agents in the work environment of hairdressers and hairdressing apprentices. Interestingly, a much lower number of researches concentrate on respiratory symptoms than on skin disorders in hairdressers. The authors of this article have carried out the first Polish follow-up study focused not only on skin disorders but also on respiratory tract symptoms in hairdressing apprentices. The results of the study have been reported in other publications while this paper presents a literature review based on EBSCO and PubMed databases, Elsevier and contained articles (on the subject discussed in this paper. On the basis of information obtained from the authors’ own research evidence and from the literature review, the guidelines for the preventive health care of hairdressing apprentices were developed. It was confirmed that neither determination of allergen-specific immunoglobulin E (IgE nor performance of skin prick tests (SPTs and patch tests for hairdressing factors are necessary. They should be performed as a part of preventive medical examination only in those apprentice candidates and trainees in this profession who report work-related symptoms and it is suspected that they result from exposure to particular factor in the work environment. Med Pr 2017;68(5:677–687

  9. Successful prevention of ventilator-associated pneumonia in an intensive care setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marra, Alexandre R; Cal, Ruy Guilherme Rodrigues; Silva, Cláudia Vallone; Caserta, Raquel Afonso; Paes, Angela Tavares; Moura, Denis Faria; dos Santos, Oscar Fernando Pavão; Edmond, Michael B; Durão, Marcelino Souza

    2009-10-01

    Ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) is one of the most common health care-associated infections (HAIs) in critical care settings. Our objective was to examine the effect of a series of interventions, implemented in 3 different periods to reduce the incidence of VAP in an intensive care unit (ICU). A quasiexperimental study was conducted in a medical-surgical ICU. Multiple interventions to optimize VAP prevention were performed during different phases. From March 2001 to December 2002 (phase 1: P1), some Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) evidence-based practices were implemented. From January 2003 to December 2006 (P2), we intervened in these processes at the same time that performance monitoring was occurring at the bedside, and, from January 2007 to September 2008 (P3), we continued P2 interventions and implemented the Institute for Healthcare Improvement's ventilator bundle plus oral decontamination with chlorhexidine and continuous aspiration of subglottic secretions. The incidence density of VAP in the ICU per 1000 patient-days was 16.4 in phase 1, 15.0 in phase 2, and 10.4 in phase 3, P=.05. Getting to zero VAP was possible only in P3 when compliance with all interventions exceeded 95%. These results suggest that reducing VAP rates to zero is a complex process that involves multiple performance measures and interventions.

  10. Preventing the Spread of Illness in Child Care or School

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Healthy Living Healthy Living Healthy Living Nutrition Fitness Sports Oral Health Emotional Wellness Growing Healthy Sleep Safety & Prevention Safety & Prevention Safety and Prevention Immunizations ...

  11. Policy choices in dementia care-An exploratory analysis of the Alberta continuing care system (ACCS) using system dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cepoiu-Martin, Monica; Bischak, Diane P

    2018-02-01

    The increase in the incidence of dementia in the aging population and the decrease in the availability of informal caregivers put pressure on continuing care systems to care for a growing number of people with disabilities. Policy changes in the continuing care system need to address this shift in the population structure. One of the most effective tools for assessing policies in complex systems is system dynamics. Nevertheless, this method is underused in continuing care capacity planning. A system dynamics model of the Alberta Continuing Care System was developed using stylized data. Sensitivity analyses and policy evaluations were conducted to demonstrate the use of system dynamics modelling in this area of public health planning. We focused our policy exploration on introducing staff/resident benchmarks in both supportive living and long-term care (LTC). The sensitivity analyses presented in this paper help identify leverage points in the system that need to be acknowledged when policy decisions are made. Our policy explorations showed that the deficits of staff increase dramatically when benchmarks are introduced, as expected, but at the end of the simulation period, the difference in deficits of both nurses and health care aids are similar between the 2 scenarios tested. Modifying the benchmarks in LTC only versus in both supportive living and LTC has similar effects on staff deficits in long term, under the assumptions of this particular model. The continuing care system dynamics model can be used to test various policy scenarios, allowing decision makers to visualize the effect of a certain policy choice on different system variables and to compare different policy options. Our exploration illustrates the use of system dynamics models for policy making in complex health care systems. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. i Engaging as an innovative approach to engage patients in their own fall prevention care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tzeng HM

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Huey-Ming Tzeng,1 Chang-Yi Yin21College of Nursing, Washington State University, Spokane, WA, USA; 2Department of History, Chinese Culture University, Taipei, TaiwanAbstract: Decreasing patient fall injuries during hospitalization continues to be a ­challenge at the bedside. Empowering patients to become active participants in their own fall ­prevention care could be a solution. In a previous study, elderly patients recently discharged from a United States hospital expressed a need for nurses to give and repeat directives about fall prevention; when the nurse left a brochure on the topic, but did not provide any (or limited verbal explanations about the content or the importance of the information, the patient felt that the information was insufficient. To address patients’ needs, we developed “i ­Engaging”, a Web-based software application for use at the bedside. i Engaging is an innovative approach that is used to engage patients in their own fall prevention care during hospital stays. The application was designed based on the assumption that patients are the best and most critical sources of information about their health status. i Engaging has not yet been tested in clinical trials.Keywords: patient, safety, hospital, nursing care, fall, consumer involvement

  13. Nursing care for patients carrying indwelling catheter in target vessel for continuous chemotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wen Lihong

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To reduce the occurrence of undesirable catheter-related events in patients with indwelling catheter during the course of continuous chemotherapy. Methods: (1)To enhance the propaganda,education and guidance to patients. (2) To standardize the nursing care operations. (3) To establish the reasonable care rules and procedures. (4) The nurses should take the daily nursing care,observations and recording work seriously. Results: Through the analysis of a variety of problems occurred in patients with indwelling catheter during the course of continuous chemotherapy the nursing care experience was summed up. Conclusion: Proper and effective care can reduce the occurrence of undesirable catheter-related events in patients with indwelling catheter during the course of continuous chemotherapy. (authors)

  14. Continuing education for primary health care nurse practitioners in Ontario, Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baxter, Pamela; DiCenso, Alba; Donald, Faith; Martin-Misener, Ruth; Opsteen, Joanne; Chambers, Tracey

    2013-04-01

    The Council of Ontario University Programs in Nursing offers a nine-university, consortium-based primary health care nurse practitioner education program and on-line continuing education courses for primary health care nurse practitioners. Our study sought to determine the continuing education needs of primary health care nurse practitioners across Ontario, how best to meet these needs, and the barriers they face in completing continuing education. Surveys were completed by 83 (40%) of 209 learners who had participated in continuing education offered by the Council of Ontario University Programs in Nursing between 2004 and 2007. While 83% (n=50) of nurse practitioners surveyed indicated that continuing education was extremely important to them, they also identified barriers to engaging in continuing education offerings including; time intensity of the courses, difficulty taking time off work, family obligations, finances and fatigue. The most common reason for withdrawal from a continuing education offering was the difficulty of balancing work and study demands. Continuing education opportunities are important to Ontario primary health care nurse practitioners, and on-line continuing education offerings have been well received, but in order to be taken up by their target audience they must be relevant, readily accessible, flexible, affordable and offered over brief, intense periods of time using technology that is easy to use and Internet sites that are easily navigated. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Treating alcoholism as a chronic disease: approaches to long-term continuing care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKay, James R; Hiller-Sturmhofel, Susanne

    2011-01-01

    For many patients, alcohol and other drug (AOD) use disorders are chronic, recurring conditions involving multiple cycles of treatment, abstinence, and relapse. To disrupt this cycle, treatment can include continuing care to reduce the risk of relapse. The most commonly used treatment approach is initial intensive inpatient or outpatient care based on 12-step principles, followed by continuing care involving self-help groups, 12-step group counseling, or individual therapy. Although these programs can be effective, many patients drop out of initial treatment or do not complete continuing care. Thus, researchers and clinicians have begun to develop alternative approaches to enhance treatment retention in both initial and continuing care. One focus of these efforts has been the design of extended treatment models. These approaches increasingly blur the distinction between initial and continuing care and aim to prolong treatment participation by providing a continuum of care. Other researchers have focused on developing alternative treatment strategies (e.g., telephone-based interventions) that go beyond traditional settings and adaptive treatment algorithms that may improve outcomes for clients who do not respond well to traditional approaches.

  16. Initiating and continuing behaviour change within a weight gain prevention trial: a qualitative investigation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samantha Kozica

    Full Text Available Preventing obesity is an international health priority. In Australia, young women who live in rural communities are at high risk of unhealthy weight gain. Interventions which engage young women and support sustainable behaviour change are needed and comprehensive evaluation of such interventions generates knowledge for population scale-up. This qualitative sub-study aims to identify enablers and barriers to behaviour change initiation and continuation within a community weight gain prevention program.In-depth semi-structured interviews were conducted with program participants 6 months after baseline. All interviews were audio-taped and transcribed verbatim. Transcripts were analysed independently by two investigators via thematic analysis.A total of 28 women with a mean age of 39.9±6.2years and a BMI of 28.6±5.2kg/m2 were purposively recruited from the larger cohort (n = 649 that participated in the prevention trial.Four behaviour change groups emerged were identified from participant interviews: (i no change, (ii relapse, (iii intermittent and (iv continued change. Factors influencing behaviour change initiation and continuation included realistic program expectations and the participant's ability to apply the core program elements including: setting small, achievable behaviour change goals, problem solving and using self-management techniques. Personal knowledge, skills, motivation, self-efficacy, accountability and perceived social and environmental barriers also affected behaviour change. Satisfaction with personal program progress and the perceived amount of program supports required to achieve ongoing behaviour change varied amongst participants. Women who relapsed expressed a desire for more intensive and regular support from health professionals, identified more barriers unrelated to the program, anticipated significant weight loss and had lower satisfaction with their progress.Initiating and continuing behaviour change is a complex

  17. Initiating and continuing behaviour change within a weight gain prevention trial: a qualitative investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozica, Samantha; Lombard, Catherine; Teede, Helena; Ilic, Dragan; Murphy, Kerry; Harrison, Cheryce

    2015-01-01

    Preventing obesity is an international health priority. In Australia, young women who live in rural communities are at high risk of unhealthy weight gain. Interventions which engage young women and support sustainable behaviour change are needed and comprehensive evaluation of such interventions generates knowledge for population scale-up. This qualitative sub-study aims to identify enablers and barriers to behaviour change initiation and continuation within a community weight gain prevention program. In-depth semi-structured interviews were conducted with program participants 6 months after baseline. All interviews were audio-taped and transcribed verbatim. Transcripts were analysed independently by two investigators via thematic analysis. A total of 28 women with a mean age of 39.9±6.2years and a BMI of 28.6±5.2kg/m2 were purposively recruited from the larger cohort (n = 649) that participated in the prevention trial. Four behaviour change groups emerged were identified from participant interviews: (i) no change, (ii) relapse, (iii) intermittent and (iv) continued change. Factors influencing behaviour change initiation and continuation included realistic program expectations and the participant's ability to apply the core program elements including: setting small, achievable behaviour change goals, problem solving and using self-management techniques. Personal knowledge, skills, motivation, self-efficacy, accountability and perceived social and environmental barriers also affected behaviour change. Satisfaction with personal program progress and the perceived amount of program supports required to achieve ongoing behaviour change varied amongst participants. Women who relapsed expressed a desire for more intensive and regular support from health professionals, identified more barriers unrelated to the program, anticipated significant weight loss and had lower satisfaction with their progress. Initiating and continuing behaviour change is a complex process. Our

  18. A fall prevention guideline for older adults living in long-term care facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, D; Shin, S; Kim, H

    2014-12-01

    Falls are among the most frequent critical health problems for older adults over 65 years of age and often result in consequential injuries. This study developed a guideline covering risk factors and interventions for falls in order to prevent them from occurring in long-term care facilities. This study was grounded in the methodological approach of the Scottish Intercollegiate Guideline Network for establishing evidence-based guidelines: (1) establishment of the target population and scope of the guideline, (2) systematic literature review and critical analysis, (3) determination of the recommendation grade, (4) development of a draft nursing intervention guideline and algorithm, (5) expert evaluation of the draft nursing intervention guideline, and (6) confirmation of the final intervention guideline and completion of the algorithm. The resulting evidence-based fall prevention guideline consists of a three-step factor assessment and a three-step intervention approach. The resulting guideline was based on the literature and clinical experts. Further research is required to test the guideline's feasibility in across long term care facilities. This guideline can be used by nurses to screen patients who are at a high risk of falling to provide patient interventions to help prevent falls. Considering the high rate of falls at long-term care facilities and the absence of evidence-based guidelines to prevent them, additional studies on falls at long-term care facilities are necessary. Meanwhile, given prior research that indicates the importance of human resources in the application of such guidelines, continuous investigations are needed as to whether the research outcomes are actually conveyed to nurses. © 2014 International Council of Nurses.

  19. Continuity and Change : Comparative Case Study of Hospital and Home Care Governance in The Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oomkens, Rosanne|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/314569286; Hoogenboom, Marcel|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/14667863X; Knijn, Trudie|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/072101032

    2015-01-01

    This article aims to understand the evolution of health care governance in the Dutch hospital and home care sector. We pay particular attention to how institutionalized governance structures shape policy reform. Professionally-dominated governance structures are likely to continue to exist to some

  20. Sustainable MSD prevention: management for continuous improvement between prevention and production. Ergonomic intervention in two assembly line companies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caroly, S; Coutarel, F; Landry, A; Mary-Cheray, I

    2010-07-01

    To increase output and meet customers' needs, companies have turned to the development of production management systems: Kaizen, one piece flow, Kanban, etc. The aim of such systems is to accelerate decisions, react to environmental issues and manage various productions. In the main, this type of management system has led to the continuous improvement of production performance. Consequently, such production management systems can have unexpected negative effects on operators' health and safety. Conversely, regulation and control systems focusing on work-related risks have obliged firms to implement health and safety management systems such as OHSAS 18001. The purpose of this type of system, also based on continuous improvement, is to reduce risks, facilitate work-related activities and identify solutions in terms of equipment and tools. However, the prevention actions introduced through health and safety systems often result in other unexpected and unwanted effects on production. This paper shows how companies can improve the way they are run by taking into account both types of management system. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. GPs' perspectives on preventive care for older people: a focus group study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drewes, Yvonne M; Koenen, Julia M; de Ruijter, Wouter; van Dijk-van Dijk, D J Annemarie; van der Weele, Gerda M; Middelkoop, Barend J C; Reis, Ria; Assendelft, Willem J J; Gussekloo, Jacobijn

    2012-11-01

    Preventive care traditionally aims to prevent diseases or injuries. For older people, different aims of prevention, such as maintenance of independence and wellbeing, are increasingly important. To explore GPs' perspectives on preventive care for older people. Qualitative study comprising six focus groups with GPs in the Netherlands. The focus-group discussions with 37 GPs were analysed using the framework analysis method. Whether or not to implement preventive care for older people depends on the patient's individual level of vitality, as perceived by the GP. For older people with a high level of vitality, GPs confine their role to standardised disease-oriented prevention on a patient's request; when the vitality levels in older people fall, the scope of preventive care shifts from prevention of disease to prevention of functional decline. For older, vulnerable people, GPs expect most benefit from a proactive, individualised approach, enabling them to live as independently as possible. Based on these perspectives, a conceptual model for preventive care was developed, which describes GPs' different perspectives toward older people who are vulnerable and those with high levels of vitality. It focuses on five main dimensions: aim of care (prevention of disease versus prevention of functional decline), concept of care (disease model versus functional model), initiator (older persons themselves versus GP), target groups (people with requests versus specified risk groups), and content of preventive care (mainly cardiovascular risk management versus functional decline). GPs' perspectives on preventive care are determined by their perception of the level of vitality of their older patients. Preventive care for older people with high levels of vitality may consist of a standardised disease-oriented approach; those who are vulnerable will need an individualised approach to prevent functional decline.

  2. Continuing Need for Sexually Transmitted Disease Clinics After the Affordable Care Act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoover, Karen W; Parsell, Bradley W; Leichliter, Jami S; Habel, Melissa A; Tao, Guoyu; Pearson, William S; Gift, Thomas L

    2015-11-01

    We assessed the characteristics of sexually transmitted disease (STD) clinic patients, their reasons for seeking health services in STD clinics, and their access to health care in other venues. In 2013, we surveyed persons who used publicly funded STD clinics in 21 US cities with the highest STD morbidity. Of the 4364 STD clinic patients we surveyed, 58.5% were younger than 30 years, 72.5% were non-White, and 49.9% were uninsured. They visited the clinic for STD symptoms (18.9%), STD screening (33.8%), and HIV testing (13.6%). Patients chose STD clinics because of walk-in, same-day appointments (49.5%), low cost (23.9%), and expert care (8.3%). Among STD clinic patients, 60.4% had access to another type of venue for sick care, and 58.5% had access to another type of venue for preventive care. Most insured patients (51.6%) were willing to use insurance to pay for care at the STD clinic. Despite access to other health care settings, patients chose STD clinics for sexual health care because of convenient, low-cost, and expert care. Policy Implication. STD clinics play an important role in STD prevention by offering walk-in care to uninsured patients.

  3. Implementation of Continuous Video-Electroencephalography at a Community Hospital Enhances Care and Reduces Costs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolls, Brad J; Mace, Brian E; Dombrowski, Keith E

    2017-10-24

    Despite data indicating the importance of continuous video-electroencephalography (cvEEG) monitoring, adoption has been slow outside major academic centers. Barriers to adoption include the need for technologists, equipment, and cvEEG readers. Advancements in lower-cost lead placement templates and commercial systems with remote review may reduce barriers to allow community centers to implement cvEEG. Here, we report our experience, lessons learned, and financial impact of implementing a community hospital cvEEG-monitoring program. We implemented an adult cvEEG service at Duke Regional Hospital (DRH), a community hospital affiliate, in June of 2012. Lead placement templates were used in the implementation to reduce the impact on technologists by using other bedside providers for EEG initiation. Utilization of the service, study quality, and patient outcomes were tracked over a 3-year period following initiation of service. Service was implemented at essentially no cost. Utilization varied from a number of factors: intensive care unit (ICU) attending awareness, limited willingness of bedside providers to perform lead placement, and variation in practice of the consulting neurologists. A total of 92 studies were performed on 88 patients in the first 3 years of the program, 24 in year one, 27 in year two, and 38 in year three, showing progressive adoption. Seizures were seen in 25 patients (27%), 19 were in status, of which 18 were successfully treated. Transfers to the main hospital, Duke University Medical Center, were prevented for 53 patients, producing an estimated cost savings of $145,750. The retained patients produced a direct contribution margin of about $75,000, and the margin was just over $100,000 for the entire monitored cohort. ICU cvEEG service is feasible and practical to implement at the community hospital level. Service was initiated at little to no cost and clearly enhanced care, increased breadth of care, increased ICU census, and reduced

  4. Continuity of care of emergency surgical admissions: impact on SpR training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ledwidge, S F C; Bryden, E; Halestrap, P; Galland, R B

    2008-06-01

    Continuity of patient care is an important component of surgical education. This study assesses continuity of care in the current working climate. Data were collected prospectively on consecutive emergency general surgical admissions during one month. Our SpR rota is a partial shift 24 hour on call with the SpR's own consultant. The SpR is free of commitments the next day following post-take work. The on call general surgery SpR was designated the 'assessor'. Data were analysed according to involvement of the 'assessor' at subsequent stages of the admission--consent, operation, review during admission and review on discharge. Data were also collected defining whether the 'assessor' and operator followed-up the patient. There were 200 admissions; 108 female and 92 male. Overall 23% admissions had the same 'assessor' for all stages of patient care. The 'assessor' dealt with an aspect of patient care in 11% of admissions who underwent an operation and 29% of admissions who were conservatively managed. SpR follow-up of admissions on whom they operated was 70% but only 41% of admissions who were conservatively managed were followed-up by the assessing SpR. Complete in-hospital continuity of care was poor, although SpR follow-up of patients on whom they had operated was better. Introduction of shift patterns has reduced continuity of patient care. This will have a negative impact on both surgical training and patient care.

  5. Decolonization in Prevention of Health Care-Associated Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schweizer, Marin L.

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Colonization with health care-associated pathogens such as Staphylococcus aureus, enterococci, Gram-negative organisms, and Clostridium difficile is associated with increased risk of infection. Decolonization is an evidence-based intervention that can be used to prevent health care-associated infections (HAIs). This review evaluates agents used for nasal topical decolonization, topical (e.g., skin) decolonization, oral decolonization, and selective digestive or oropharyngeal decontamination. Although the majority of studies performed to date have focused on S. aureus decolonization, there is increasing interest in how to apply decolonization strategies to reduce infections due to Gram-negative organisms, especially those that are multidrug resistant. Nasal topical decolonization agents reviewed include mupirocin, bacitracin, retapamulin, povidone-iodine, alcohol-based nasal antiseptic, tea tree oil, photodynamic therapy, omiganan pentahydrochloride, and lysostaphin. Mupirocin is still the gold standard agent for S. aureus nasal decolonization, but there is concern about mupirocin resistance, and alternative agents are needed. Of the other nasal decolonization agents, large clinical trials are still needed to evaluate the effectiveness of retapamulin, povidone-iodine, alcohol-based nasal antiseptic, tea tree oil, omiganan pentahydrochloride, and lysostaphin. Given inferior outcomes and increased risk of allergic dermatitis, the use of bacitracin-containing compounds cannot be recommended as a decolonization strategy. Topical decolonization agents reviewed included chlorhexidine gluconate (CHG), hexachlorophane, povidone-iodine, triclosan, and sodium hypochlorite. Of these, CHG is the skin decolonization agent that has the strongest evidence base, and sodium hypochlorite can also be recommended. CHG is associated with prevention of infections due to Gram-positive and Gram-negative organisms as well as Candida. Conversely, triclosan use is discouraged, and

  6. Estimating Demand for and Supply of Pediatric Preventive Dental Care for Children and Identifying Dental Care Shortage Areas, Georgia, 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Shanshan; Gentili, Monica; Griffin, Paul M; Griffin, Susan O; Harati, Pravara; Johnson, Ben; Serban, Nicoleta; Tomar, Scott

    Demand for dental care is expected to outpace supply through 2025. The objectives of this study were to determine the extent of pediatric dental care shortages in Georgia and to develop a general method for estimation that can be applied to other states. We estimated supply and demand for pediatric preventive dental care for the 159 counties in Georgia in 2015. We compared pediatric preventive dental care shortage areas (where demand exceeded twice the supply) designated by our methods with dental health professional shortage areas designated by the Health Resources & Services Administration. We estimated caries risk from a multivariate analysis of National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey data and national census data. We estimated county-level demand based on the time needed to perform preventive dental care services and the proportion of time that dentists spend on pediatric preventive dental care services from the Medical Expenditure Panel Survey. Pediatric preventive dental care supply exceeded demand in Georgia in 75 counties: the average annual county-level pediatric preventive dental care demand was 16 866 hours, and the supply was 32 969 hours. We identified 41 counties as pediatric dental care shortage areas, 14 of which had not been designated by the Health Resources & Services Administration. Age- and service-specific information on dental care shortage areas could result in more efficient provider staffing and geographic targeting.

  7. Assessment of the management factors that influence the development of preventive care in the New South Wales public dental service

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masoe AV

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Angela V Masoe,1 Anthony S Blinkhorn,2 Jane Taylor,1 Fiona A Blinkhorn1 1Faculty of Health and Medicine, School of Health Sciences, Oral Health, University of Newcastle, Ourimbah, 2Department of Population Oral Health, Faculty of Dentistry, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia Background: Oral diseases, particularly dental caries, remain one of the most common chronic health problems for adolescents, and are a major public health concern. Public dental services in New South Wales, Australia offer free clinical care and preventive advice to all adolescents under 18 years of age, particularly those from disadvantaged backgrounds. This care is provided by dental therapists and oral health therapists (therapists. It is incumbent upon clinical directors (CDs and health service managers (HSMs to ensure that the appropriate clinical preventive care is offered by clinicians to all their patients. The aims of this study were to 1 explore CDs’ and HSMs’ perceptions of the factors that could support the delivery of preventive care to adolescents, and to 2 record the strategies they have utilized to help therapists provide preventive care to adolescents. Subjects and methods: In-depth, semistructured interviews were undertaken with 19 CDs and HSMs from across NSW local health districts. A framework matrix was used to systematically code data and enable key themes to be identified for analysis. Results: The 19 CDs and HSMs reported that fiscal accountability and meeting performance targets impacted on the levels and types of preventive care provided by therapists. Participants suggested that professional clinical structures for continuous quality improvement should be implemented and monitored, and that an adequate workforce mix and more resources for preventive dental care activities would enhance therapists’ ability to provide appropriate levels of preventive care. CDs and HSMs stated that capitalizing on the strengths of visiting pediatric

  8. Health Care Aides' Struggle to Build and Maintain Relationships with Families in Complex Continuing Care Settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGilton, Katherine S.; Guruge, Sepali; Librado, Ruby; Bloch, Lois; Boscart, Veronique

    2008-01-01

    Research on the relationships between health care aides (HCAs) and families of clients has been situated mainly in long-term care settings and includes scant findings about the perceptions of HCAs. Based on the findings of a larger qualitative study using a grounded theory approach, this paper addresses the topic of HCA-family relationships in…

  9. "Macho men" and preventive health care: implications for older men in different social classes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Springer, Kristen W; Mouzon, Dawne M

    2011-06-01

    The gender paradox in mortality--where men die earlier than women despite having more socioeconomic resources--may be partly explained by men's lower levels of preventive health care. Stereotypical notions of masculinity reduce preventive health care; however, the relationship between masculinity, socioeconomic status (SES), and preventive health care is unknown. Using the Wisconsin Longitudinal Study, the authors conduct a population-based assessment of masculinity beliefs and preventive health care, including whether these relationships vary by SES. The results show that men with strong masculinity beliefs are half as likely as men with more moderate masculinity beliefs to receive preventive care. Furthermore, in contrast to the well-established SES gradient in health, men with strong masculinity beliefs do not benefit from higher education and their probability of obtaining preventive health care decreases as their occupational status, wealth, and/or income increases. Masculinity may be a partial explanation for the paradox of men's lower life expectancy, despite their higher SES.

  10. Design of intelligent proximity detection zones to prevent striking and pinning fatalities around continuous mining machines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bissert, P T; Carr, J L; DuCarme, J P; Smith, A K

    2016-01-01

    The continuous mining machine is a key piece of equipment used in underground coal mining operations. Over the past several decades these machines have been involved in a number of mine worker fatalities. Proximity detection systems have been developed to avert hazards associated with operating continuous mining machines. Incorporating intelligent design into proximity detection systems allows workers greater freedom to position themselves to see visual cues or avoid other hazards such as haulage equipment or unsupported roof or ribs. However, intelligent systems must be as safe as conventional proximity detection systems. An evaluation of the 39 fatal accidents for which the Mine Safety and Health Administration has published fatality investigation reports was conducted to determine whether the accident may have been prevented by conventional or intelligent proximity. Multiple zone configurations for the intelligent systems were studied to determine how system performance might be affected by the zone configuration. Researchers found that 32 of the 39 fatalities, or 82 percent, may have been prevented by both conventional and intelligent proximity systems. These results indicate that, by properly configuring the zones of an intelligent proximity detection system, equivalent protection to a conventional system is possible.

  11. Translating Pressure Ulcer Prevention Into Intensive Care Nursing Practice: Overlaying a Care Bundle Approach With a Model for Research Implementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tayyib, Nahla; Coyer, Fiona

    This article reports on the development and implementation process used to integrate a care bundle approach (a pressure ulcer [PU] prevention bundle to improve patients' skin integrity in intensive care) and the Ottawa Model of Research Use (OMRU). The PU prevention care bundle demonstrated significant reduction in PU incidence, with the OMRU model providing a consolidated framework for the implementation of bundled evidence in an effective and consistent manner into daily clinical nursing practice.

  12. The Role of eHealth in Optimizing Preventive Care in the Primary Care Setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carey, Mariko; Noble, Natasha; Mansfield, Elise; Waller, Amy; Henskens, Frans; Sanson-Fisher, Rob

    2015-05-22

    Modifiable health risk behaviors such as smoking, overweight and obesity, risky alcohol consumption, physical inactivity, and poor nutrition contribute to a substantial proportion of the world's morbidity and mortality burden. General practitioners (GPs) play a key role in identifying and managing modifiable health risk behaviors. However, these are often underdetected and undermanaged in the primary care setting. We describe the potential of eHealth to help patients and GPs to overcome some of the barriers to managing health risk behaviors. In particular, we discuss (1) the role of eHealth in facilitating routine collection of patient-reported data on lifestyle risk factors, and (2) the role of eHealth in improving clinical management of identified risk factors through provision of tailored feedback, point-of-care reminders, tailored educational materials, and referral to online self-management programs. Strategies to harness the capacity of the eHealth medium, including the use of dynamic features and tailoring to help end users engage with, understand, and apply information need to be considered and maximized. Finally, the potential challenges in implementing eHealth solutions in the primary care setting are discussed. In conclusion, there is significant potential for innovative eHealth solutions to make a contribution to improving preventive care in the primary care setting. However, attention to issues such as data security and designing eHealth interfaces that maximize engagement from end users will be important to moving this field forward.

  13. Older adults' attitudes about continuing cancer screening later in life: a pilot study interviewing residents of two continuing care communities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walter Louise C

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Individualized decision making has been recommended for cancer screening decisions in older adults. Because older adults' preferences are central to individualized decisions, we assessed older adults' perspectives about continuing cancer screening later in life. Methods Face to face interviews with 116 residents age 70 or over from two long-term care retirement communities. Interview content included questions about whether participants had discussed cancer screening with their physicians since turning age 70, their attitudes about information important for individualized decisions, and their attitudes about continuing cancer screening later in life. Results Forty-nine percent of participants reported that they had an opportunity to discuss cancer screening with their physician since turning age 70; 89% would have preferred to have had these discussions. Sixty-two percent believed their own life expectancy was not important for decision making, and 48% preferred not to discuss life expectancy. Attitudes about continuing cancer screening were favorable. Most participants reported that they would continue screening throughout their lives and 43% would consider getting screened even if their doctors recommended against it. Only 13% thought that they would not live long enough to benefit from cancer screening tests. Factors important to consider stopping include: age, deteriorating or poor health, concerns about the effectiveness of the tests, and doctors recommendations. Conclusion This select group of older adults held positive attitudes about continuing cancer screening later in life, and many may have had unrealistic expectations. Individualized decision making could help clarify how life expectancy affects the potential survival benefits of cancer screening. Future research is needed to determine whether educating older adults about the importance of longevity in screening decisions would be acceptable, affect older adults

  14. Responses of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Primary Health-Care Services to Continuous Quality Improvement Initiatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larkins, Sarah; Woods, Cindy E; Matthews, Veronica; Thompson, Sandra C; Schierhout, Gill; Mitropoulos, Maxwell; Patrao, Tania; Panzera, Annette; Bailie, Ross Stewart

    2015-01-01

    Indigenous primary health-care (PHC) services participating in continuous quality improvement (CQI) cycles show varying patterns of performance over time. Understanding this variation is essential to scaling up and sustaining quality improvement initiatives. The aim of this study is to examine trends in quality of care for services participating in the ABCD National Research Partnership and describe patterns of change over time and examine health service characteristics associated with positive and negative trends in quality of care. PHC services providing care for Indigenous people in urban, rural, and remote northern Australia that had completed at least three annual audits of service delivery for at least one aspect of care (n = 73). Longitudinal clinical audit data from use of four clinical audit tools (maternal health, child health, preventive health, Type 2 diabetes) between 2005 and 2013 were analyzed. Health center performance was classified into six patterns of change over time: consistent high improvement (positive), sustained high performance (positive), decline (negative), marked variability (negative), consistent low performance (negative), and no specific increase or decrease (neutral). Backwards stepwise multiple logistic regression analyses were used to examine the associations between health service characteristics and positive or negative trends in quality of care. Trends in quality of care varied widely between health services across the four audit tools. Regression analyses of health service characteristics revealed no consistent statistically significant associations of population size, remoteness, governance model, or accreditation status with positive or negative trends in quality of care. The variable trends in quality of care as reflected by CQI audit tools do not appear to be related to easily measurable health service characteristics. This points to the need for a deeper or more nuanced understanding of factors that moderate the

  15. Participation in preventive care programs: individual determinants, social interactions and program design.

    OpenAIRE

    Bouckaert, Nicolas

    2014-01-01

    This doctoral research focuses on existing medical preventive care programs. Because of externalities (e.g. in the prevention of communicable diseases) or the program cost-benefit ratio, preventive care programs require high participation rates. In the United States, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention have set clear participation objectives – next to quality targets – which are measured and evaluated over time (National Center for Health Statistics, 2012). For example, the 2010 pa...

  16. Guidelines for Preventing Workplace Violence for Health Care and Social Service Workers

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    1998-01-01

    .... OSHA s new violence prevention guidelines provide the agency s recommendations for reducing workplace violence developed following a careful review of workplace violence studies, public and private...

  17. Receipt of preventive oral health care by U.S. children: a population-based study of the 2005-2008 medical expenditure panel surveys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huebner, Colleen E; Bell, Janice F; Reed, Sarah C

    2013-11-01

    This study provides estimates of the annual use of preventive oral health care by U.S. children ages 6 months-17 years. We estimated the annual use of preventive oral health care with data from the Medical Expenditure Panel Survey for the years 2005 through 2008 (n = 18,218). Additionally, we tested associations between use of preventive oral health care and predisposing factors, enabling factors and health need within three age groups: young children, school-age children and youth. Overall, 21 % of the sample was reported to have received preventive oral health care in the prior year. More school-age children received preventive care than did young children or youth regardless of gender, race/ethnicity, health status, residence, or family size. Among the youngest children, low parental education and lack of health insurance were associated with lower odds of receiving preventive care. School-age children of racial and ethnic minority groups had a higher odds of receiving preventive care than did non-Hispanic Whites. Youth with special health care needs were less likely to receive care than their peers. Within each age group, use of preventive care increased significantly from 2005 to 2008. In the U.S. there has been an increase in use of pediatric preventive dental care. Continued effort is needed to achieve primary prevention. Outreach and education should include all parents and especially parents with low levels of education, parents of children with special health care needs and those without health insurance.

  18. Cancer preventive services, socioeconomic status, and the Affordable Care Act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Gregory S; Kou, Tzuyung Doug; Dor, Avi; Koroukian, Siran M; Schluchter, Mark D

    2017-05-01

    Out-of-pocket expenditures are thought to be an important barrier to the receipt of cancer preventive services, especially for those of a lower socioeconomic status (SES). The Affordable Care Act (ACA) eliminated out-of-pocket expenditures for recommended services, including mammography and colonoscopy. The objective of this study was to determine changes in the uptake of mammography and colonoscopy among fee-for-service Medicare beneficiaries before and after ACA implementation. Using Medicare claims data, this study identified women who were 70 years old or older and had not undergone mammography in the previous 2 years and men and women who were 70 years old or older, were at increased risk for colorectal cancer, and had not undergone colonoscopy in the past 5 years. The receipt of procedures in the 2-year period before the ACA's implementation (2009-2010) and after its implementation (2011 to September 2012) was also identified. Multivariate generalized estimating equation models were used to determine the independent association and county-level quartile of median income and education with the receipt of testing. For mammography, a lower SES quartile was associated with less uptake, but the post-ACA disparities were smaller than those in the pre-ACA period. In addition, mammography rates increased from the pre-ACA period to the post-ACA period in all SES quartiles. For colonoscopy, in both the pre- and post-ACA periods, there was an association between uptake and educational level and, to some extent, income. However, there were no appreciable changes in colonoscopy and SES after implementation of the ACA. The removal of out-of-pocket expenditures may overcome a barrier to the receipt of recommended preventive services, but for colonoscopy, other procedural factors may remain as deterrents. Cancer 2017;123:1585-1589. © 2017 American Cancer Society. © 2017 American Cancer Society.

  19. Continuity of care for children with complex chronic health conditions: parents' perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaw Nicola

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Continuity of care has been explored largely from academic and service provider perspectives, and in relation to adult patient/client groups. We interviewed parents of children with complex chronic health conditions to examine how their experiences and perceptions of continuity of care fit with these perspectives; and to identify the salient factors in the experience of, and factors contributing to, continuity in this population. Methods Parents of 47 elementary school-aged children with spina bifida, Down syndrome, attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, Duchenne muscular dystrophy or cystic fibrosis participated in semi-structured interviews. Parents described and mapped the pattern of their interactions with service providers over time in all domains relevant to their child's health, well-being, and development (medical, rehabilitational, educational, and social supportive services, with particular attention paid to their perceptions of connectedness or coherency in these interactions. Verbatim transcripts were analyzed thematically using a framework approach to impose structure regarding parents' perspectives on continuity of care. Results Existing academic concepts of relational, informational and management continuity were all discernable in parents' narratives. A thorough knowledge of the child on the part of service providers emerged as extremely important to parents; such knowledge was underpinned by continuity of personal relationships, principally, and also by written information. For this population, notions of continuity extend to the full range of service providers these children and families need to achieve optimal health status, and are not limited to physicians and nurses. Communication among providers was seen as integral to perceived continuity. Compartmentalization of services and information led to parents assuming a necessary, though at times, uncomfortable, coordinating role. Geographic factors

  20. Continuous flow left ventricular assist devices: shared care goals of monitoring and treating patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estep, Jerry D; Trachtenberg, Barry H; Loza, Laurie P; Bruckner, Brian A

    2015-01-01

    Continuous-flow left ventricular assist devices (CF-LVADs) have been clinically adopted as a long-term standard of care therapy option for patients with end-stage heart failure. For many patients, shared care between the care providers at the implanting center and care providers in the community in which the patient resides is a clinical necessity. The aims of this review are to (1) provide a rationale for the outpatient follow-up exam and surveillance testing used at our center to monitor patients supported by the HeartMate II(®) CF-LVAD (Thoratec Corporation, Pleasanton, CA) and (2) provide the protocol/algorithms we use for blood pressure, driveline exit site, LVAD alarm history, surveillance blood work, and echocardiography monitoring in this patient population. In addition, we define our partnership outpatient follow-up protocol and the "shared care" specific responsibilities we use with referring health care providers to best manage many of our patients.

  1. A tool for assessing continuity of care across care levels: an extended psychometric validation of the CCAENA questionnaire

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Beatriz Aller

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: The CCAENA questionnaire was developed to assess care continuity across levels from the patients’ perspective. The aim is to provide additional evidence on the psychometric properties of the scales of this questionnaire. Methods: Cross-sectional study by means of a survey of a random sample of 1500 patients attended in primary and secondary care in three healthcare areas of the Catalan healthcare system. Data were collected in 2010 using the CCAENA questionnaire. To assess psychometric properties, an exploratory factor analysis was performed (construct validity and the item-rest correlations and Cronbach’s alpha were calculated (internal consistency. Spearman correlation coefficients were calculated (multidimensionality and the ability to discriminate between groups was tested. Results: The factor analysis resulted in 21 items grouped into three factors: patient-primary care provider relationship, patient-secondary care provider relationship and continuity across care levels. Cronbach’s alpha indicated good internal consistency (0.97, 0.93, 0.80 and the correlation coefficients indicated that dimensions can be interpreted as separated scales. Scales discriminated patients according to healthcare area, age and educational level. Conclusion: The CCAENA questionnaire has proved to be a valid and reliable tool for measuring patients’ perceptions of continuity. Providers and researchers could apply the questionnaire to identify areas for healthcare improvement.

  2. Development and pilot testing of a patient-participatory pressure ulcer prevention care bundle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillespie, Brigid M; Chaboyer, Wendy; Sykes, Mark; O'Brien, Jennifer; Brandis, Susan

    2014-01-01

    This study developed and piloted a patient-centered pressure ulcer prevention care bundle for adult hospitalized patients to promote patient participation in prevention. The care bundle had 3 core messages: (1) keep moving, (2) care for your skin, and (3) ensure a good diet. A brief video, combined brochure/checklist, and poster were developed as training resources. Patient evaluation identified benefits of the care bundle; however, the combined checklist/brochure was rarely used.

  3. Urban-rural disparity in utilization of preventive care services in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiang; Li, Ningxiu; Liu, Chaojie; Ren, Xiaohui; Liu, Danping; Gao, Bo; Liu, Yuanyuan

    2016-09-01

    Preventive care service is considered pivotal on the background of demographic ageing and a rise in chronic diseases in China. The disparity in utilization of preventive care services between urban and rural in China is a serious issue. In this paper, we explored factors associated with urban-rural disparity in utilization of preventive care services in China, and determined how much of the urban-rural disparity was attributable to each determinant of utilization in preventive care services. Using representative sample data from China Health and Nutrition Survey in 2011 (N = 12,976), the present study performed multilevel logistic model to examine the factors that affected utilization of preventive care services in last 4 weeks. Blinder-Oaxaca decomposition method was applied to divide the utilization of preventive care disparity between urban and rural residents into a part that can be explained by differences in observed covariates and unobserved part. The percentage of rural residents utilizing preventive care service in last 4 weeks was lower than that of urban residents (5.1% vs 9.3%). Female, the aged, residents with higher education level and household income, residents reporting self-perceived illness in last 4 weeks and physician-diagnosed chronic disease had higher likelihood of utilizing preventive care services. Household income was the most important factor accounting for 26.6% of urban-rural disparities in utilization of preventive care services, followed by education (21.5%), self-perceived illness in last 4 weeks (7.8%), hypertension (4.4%), diabetes (3.3%), other chronic diseases (0.8%), and health insurance (-1.0%). Efforts to reduce financial barriers for low-income individuals who cannot afford preventive services, increasing awareness of the importance of obtaining preventive health services and providing more preventive health services covered by health insurance, may help to reduce the gap of preventive care services utilization between

  4. Addressing the Concerns Surrounding Continuous Deep Sedation in Singapore and Southeast Asia: A Palliative Care Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishna, Lalit Kumar Radha

    2015-09-01

    The application of continuous deep sedation (CDS) in the treatment of intractable suffering at the end of life continues to be tied to a number of concerns that have negated its use in palliative care. Part of the resistance towards use of this treatment option of last resort has been the continued association of CDS with physician-associated suicide and/or euthanasia (PAS/E), which is compounded by a lack clinical guidelines and a failure to cite this treatment under the aegis of a palliative care approach. I argue that reinstituting a palliative care-inspired approach that includes a holistic review of the patient's situation and the engagement of a multidisciplinary team (MDT) guided by clearly defined practice requirements that have been lacking amongst many prevailing guidelines will overcome prevailing objections to this practice and allow for the legitimization of this process.

  5. The facilitators’ point of view regarding the primary health care planning as a continuing education program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kênia Lara Silva

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available This is a qualitative study that aims at analyzing the Primary Health Care Strategic Planning in a continuing education process, as well as the professional’s formation to work as facilitators in it. Data was obtained through interviews with 11 nurses that had acted as the plan’s facilitators in a municipality within Belo Horizonte. The results indicate that the experience as facilitators allowed them to reflect on the work process and this practice contributed to the incorporation of new tools to the primary health care system. The participants reported the difficulties faced when conducting the experience and the gap in the professionals’ formation to act in the PHC and to put into practice the processes of continuing education on a day to day basis. In conclusion, the Planning represents an important continuing education strategy and it is significance to transform processes and practices in the primary health care service.

  6. [Innovations in continuing/permanent education methods for the intensive care nurses].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vázquez Guillamet, B; Guillamet Lloveras, A; Martínez Estalella, G; Pérez Ramírez, F

    2014-01-01

    Intensive care nursing is carried out in a dynamic environment characterized by the continuous incorporation of new technologies, approaches to care and a request for safety, participation and transparency by the public. Continuing/permanent intensive care nursing training in the acquisition of new competencies is key in this setting. In order to achieve this goal, simulation and problem based learning should be incorporated as essential methodologies to teach these skills. At the same time research should be done on which attitudes, competences, and knowledge are necessary to increase their intellectual knowledge. The core characteristics of ICU and its nursing should allow a deep change in their approach to continuing/permanent nursing education. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. y SEEIUC. All rights reserved.

  7. Preventing compulsory admission to psychiatric inpatient care through psycho-education and crisis focused monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lay, Barbara; Salize, Hans Joachim; Dressing, Harald; Rüsch, Nicolas; Schönenberger, Thekla; Bühlmann, Monika; Bleiker, Marco; Lengler, Silke; Korinth, Lena; Rössler, Wulf

    2012-09-05

    The high number of involuntary placements of people with mental disorders in Switzerland and other European countries constitutes a major public health issue. In view of the ethical and personal relevance of compulsory admission for the patients concerned and given the far-reaching effects in terms of health care costs, innovative interventions to improve the current situation are much needed. A number of promising approaches to prevent involuntary placements have been proposed that target continuity of care by increasing self-management skills of patients. However, the effectiveness of such interventions in terms of more robust criteria (e.g., admission rates) has not been sufficiently analysed in larger study samples. The current study aims to evaluate an intervention programme for patients at high risk of compulsory admission to psychiatric hospitals. Effectiveness will be assessed in terms of a reduced number of psychiatric hospitalisations and days of inpatient care in connection with involuntary psychiatric admissions as well as in terms of cost-containment in inpatient mental health care. The intervention furthermore intends to reduce the degree of patients' perceived coercion and to increase patient satisfaction, their quality of life and empowerment. This paper describes the design of a randomised controlled intervention study conducted currently at four psychiatric hospitals in the Canton of Zurich. The intervention programme consists of individualised psycho-education focusing on behaviours prior to and during illness-related crisis, the distribution of a crisis card and, after inpatient admission, a 24-month preventive monitoring of individual risk factors for compulsory re-admission to hospital. All measures are provided by a mental health care worker who maintains permanent contact to the patient over the course of the study. In order to prove its effectiveness the intervention programme will be compared with standard care procedures (control group

  8. Preventing compulsory admission to psychiatric inpatient care through psycho-education and crisis focused monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lay Barbara

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The high number of involuntary placements of people with mental disorders in Switzerland and other European countries constitutes a major public health issue. In view of the ethical and personal relevance of compulsory admission for the patients concerned and given the far-reaching effects in terms of health care costs, innovative interventions to improve the current situation are much needed. A number of promising approaches to prevent involuntary placements have been proposed that target continuity of care by increasing self-management skills of patients. However, the effectiveness of such interventions in terms of more robust criteria (e.g., admission rates has not been sufficiently analysed in larger study samples. The current study aims to evaluate an intervention programme for patients at high risk of compulsory admission to psychiatric hospitals. Effectiveness will be assessed in terms of a reduced number of psychiatric hospitalisations and days of inpatient care in connection with involuntary psychiatric admissions as well as in terms of cost-containment in inpatient mental health care. The intervention furthermore intends to reduce the degree of patients’ perceived coercion and to increase patient satisfaction, their quality of life and empowerment. Methods/Design This paper describes the design of a randomised controlled intervention study conducted currently at four psychiatric hospitals in the Canton of Zurich. The intervention programme consists of individualised psycho-education focusing on behaviours prior to and during illness-related crisis, the distribution of a crisis card and, after inpatient admission, a 24-month preventive monitoring of individual risk factors for compulsory re-admission to hospital. All measures are provided by a mental health care worker who maintains permanent contact to the patient over the course of the study. In order to prove its effectiveness the intervention programme will be

  9. Preventive-care practices among adults with diabetes--Puerto Rico, 2000-2002.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-11-12

    Preventive-care practices among persons with diabetes can prevent or delay complications such as eye disease, kidney disease, or nerve damage that is a precursor to disabling foot disease. However, the level of diabetes-related preventive care is inadequate in the United States, and little has been reported about preventive care in Puerto Rico, where an estimated 10% of adults have diagnosed diabetes. CDC analyzed data from 2000, 2001, and 2002 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) surveys to assess the percentage of adults with diabetes in Puerto Rico who engaged in five selected preventive-care practices. This report summarizes the results of that analysis, which indicated that, with the exception of hemoglobin A1c testing, the percentages of adults engaging in preventive-care practices were lower than the target percentages set by U.S. national health objectives for 2010.

  10. The Preventable Admissions Care Team (PACT): A Social Work-Led Model of Transitional Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basso Lipani, Maria; Holster, Kathleen; Bussey, Sarah

    2015-10-01

    In 2010, the Preventable Admissions Care Team (PACT), a social work-led transitional care model, was developed at Mount Sinai to reduce 30-day readmissions among high-risk patients. PACT begins with a comprehensive bedside assessment to identify the psychosocial drivers of readmission. In partnership with the patient and family, a patient-centered action plan is developed and carried out through phone calls, accompaniments, navigations and home visits, as needed, in the first 30 days following discharge. 620 patients were enrolled during the pilot from September 2010-August 2012. Outcomes demonstrated a 43% reduction in inpatient utilization and a 54% reduction in emergency department visits among enrollees. In addition, 93% of patients had a follow-up appointment within 7-10 days of discharge and 90% of patients attended the appointment. The success of PACT has led to additional funding from the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services under the Community-based Care Transitions Program and several managed care companies seeking population health management interventions for high risk members.

  11. Phenomenological perspectives of self-care in healthcare professionals' continuing education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniele Bruzzone

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Healthcare professionals, daily confronted with existential failty, feel themselves emotionally vulnerable too. For this reason, they need knowledge and tools in order to take care for themselves. Phenomenology provides an epistemological model that includes subjective and affective dimensions and legitimates lived experience as a source of cognition. In the undergraduate and continuing education of healthcare professionals, the phenomenological approach can represent a way of promoting self-care through personal narrative and reflection.

  12. Efficacy of continuous versus intermittent subglottic secretion drainage in preventing ventilator-associated pneumonia in patients requiring mechanical ventilation: A single-center randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujimoto, Hiroko; Yamaguchi, Osamu; Hayami, Hajime; Shimosaka, Mika; Tsuboi, Sayaka; Sato, Mitsunori; Takebayashi, Shigeo; Morita, Satoshi; Saito, Mari; Goto, Takahisa; Kurahashi, Kiyoyasu

    2018-03-23

    Aspiration of subglottic secretion is a widely used intervention to prevent ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP). This study aimed to compare the efficacy of continuous and intermittent subglottic secretion drainage (SSD) in preventing VAP. A single-center randomized controlled trial was conducted on adult postoperative patients who were expected to undergo mechanical ventilation for more than 48 hours. Primary outcome measure was incidence of VAP and secondary outcome measures were length of mechanical ventilation and intensive-care unit (ICU) stay. Fifty-nine patients received continuous SSD, while 60 patients received intermittent SSD. Of these 119 patients, 88 (74%) were excluded and 15 and 16 patients were allocated to receive continuous and intermittent SSD, respectively. VAP was detected in 4 (26.7%) and 7 (43.8%) patients in the continuous and intermittent groups, respectively, (p=0.320). The length of mechanical ventilation was significantly shorter (p=0.034) in the continuous group (99.5±47.1 h) than in the intermittent group (159.9±94.5 h). The length of ICU stay was also shorter (p=0.0097) in the continuous group (6.3±2.1 days) than the intermittent group (9.8±4.8 days). Although continuous SSD did not reduce the incidence of VAP, it reduced the length of mechanical ventilation and ICU stay when compared to intermittent SSD.

  13. Exploring family physicians' reasons to continue or discontinue providing intrapartum care: Qualitative descriptive study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dove, Marion; Dogba, Maman Joyce; Rodríguez, Charo

    2017-08-01

    To examine the reasons why family physicians continue or discontinue providing intrapartum care in their clinical practice. Qualitative descriptive study. Two hospitals located in a multicultural area of Montreal, Que, in November 2011 to June 2012. Sixteen family physicians who were current or former providers of obstetric care. Data were collected using semistructured qualitative interviews. Thematic analysis was used to analyze the interview transcripts. Three overarching themes that help create understanding of why family doctors continue to provide obstetric care were identified: their attraction, often initiated by role models early in their careers, to practising complete continuity of care and accompanying patients in a special moment in their lives; the personal, family, and organizational pressures experienced while pursuing a family medicine career that includes obstetrics; and their ongoing reflection about continuing to practise obstetrics. The practice of obstetrics was very attractive to family physician participants whether they provided intrapartum care or decided to stop. More professional support and incentives might help keep family doctors practising obstetrics. Copyright© the College of Family Physicians of Canada.

  14. Continuity of care as experienced by mental health service users - a qualitative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Biringer

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background People who struggle with mental health problems can provide valuable insight into understanding and improving the coordination of mental health and welfare services. The aims of the study were to explore service users’ experiences and perceptions of continuity of care within and across services relevant to personal recovery, to elicit which dimensions of continuity of care are most essential to service users, and to generate ideas for improving service users’ experiences of continuity of care. Methods In the context of a hermeneutic-phenomenological approach, ten service users at a community mental health centre were interviewed about their experiences of continuity of care in and across services. Eight of these were re-interviewed two years later. A collaborative research approach was adopted. Data were analysed by means of a data-driven stepwise approach in line with thematic analysis. Results Following the analysis five themes representing experiences of continuity of care were developed. Each theme ranged from poor to good experiences of continuity of care: Relationship – from experiencing frequent setbacks and anxiety due to breaks in relationships, to feeling safe in an ongoing personal relationship; Timeliness – from experiencing frustrating waiting times with worsening of problems, to getting help when needed; Mutuality – from having a one-sided struggle, to a situation in which both professionals and service users take initiatives; Choice – from not having the opportunity to make practical arrangements within the context of one’s everyday life, to having an array of support options to choose from; Knowledge – from feeling confused and insecure because one does not know what is happening, to feeling safe because one is informed about what is going to happen. Participants provided a range of suggestions for improving experiences of continuity of care. Conclusions A discrepancy between aspects of

  15. Continuity in care of older people chronically ill patients in a battlefield of competing rationales

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjerholt, Mette; Wagner, Lis; Delmar, Charlotte

    2014-01-01

    professionals' communication concerning older patients, leading to lack of continuity and integration of the patient perspective in care and treatment. In spite of these problems being well investigated, they continue to prevail. OBJECTIVES: To examine conditions for continuity and integration of the patient...... perspective in older, chronically ill patients' care as reflected in nursing staff's communication about the patients. DESIGN: Explorative Participatory Action Research (PAR). SETTING: An acute, general medical ward at a Danish university hospital. PARTICIPANTS: Hospital and municipality nurses (n = 29......). Nursing records (n = 12). METHOD: Field studies: observations, interviews, nursing records audits and logs. Data were subject to manifest and latent content analysis. RESULTS: Participants were aware of the importance of ensuring continuity, a comprehensive approach and integration of the patient...

  16. The Importance of and the Complexities Associated With Measuring Continuity of Care During Resident Training: Possible Solutions Do Exist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carney, Patricia A; Conry, Colleen M; Mitchell, Karen B; Ericson, Annie; Dickinson, W Perry; Martin, James C; Carek, Peter J; Douglass, Alan B; Eiff, M Patrice

    2016-04-01

    Evolutions in care delivery toward the patient-centered medical home have influenced important aspects of care continuity. Primary responsibility for a panel of continuity patients is a foundational requirement in family medicine residencies. In this paper we characterize challenges in measuring continuity of care in residency training in this new era of primary care. We synthesized the literature and analyzed information from key informant interviews and group discussions with residency faculty and staff to identify the challenges and possible solutions for measuring continuity of care during family medicine training. We specifically focused on measuring interpersonal continuity at the patient level, resident level, and health care team level. Challenges identified in accurately measuring interpersonal continuity of care during residency training include: (1) variability in empanelment approaches for all patients, (2) scheduling complexity in different types of visits, (3) variability in ability to attain continuity counts at the level of the resident, and (4) shifting make-up of health care teams, especially in residency training. Possible solutions for each challenge are presented. Philosophical issues related to continuity are discussed, including whether true continuity can be achieved during residency training and whether qualitative rather than quantitative measures of continuity are better suited to residencies. Measuring continuity of care in residency training is challenging but possible, though improvements in precision and assessment of the comprehensive nature of the relationships are needed. Definitions of continuity during training and the role continuity measurement plays in residency need further study.

  17. Preventing maternal and early childhood obesity: the fetal flaw in Australian perinatal care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Margaret; Hearn, Lydia; van der Pligt, Paige; Wilcox, Jane; Campbell, Karen J

    2014-01-01

    Almost half of Australian women of child-bearing age are overweight or obese, with a rate of 30-50% reported in early pregnancy. Maternal adiposity is a costly challenge for Australian obstetric care, with associated serious maternal and neonatal complications. Excess gestational weight gain is an important predictor of offspring adiposity into adulthood and higher maternal weight later in life. Current public health and perinatal care approaches in Australia do not adequately address excess perinatal maternal weight or gestational weight gain. This paper argues that the failure of primary health-care providers to offer systematic advice and support regarding women's weight and related lifestyle behaviours in child-bearing years is an outstanding 'missed opportunity' for prevention of inter-generational overweight and obesity. Barriers to action could be addressed through greater attention to: clinical guidelines for maternal weight management for the perinatal period, training and support of maternal health-care providers to develop skills and confidence in raising weight issues with women, a variety of weight management programs provided by state maternal health services, and clear referral pathways to them. Attention is also required to service systems that clearly define roles in maternal weight management and ensure consistency and continuity of support across the perinatal period.

  18. Screening and prevention of breast cancer in primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tice, Jeffrey A; Kerlikowske, Karla

    2009-09-01

    Mammography remains the mainstay of breast cancer screening. There is little controversy that mammography reduces the risk of dying from breast cancer by about 23% among women between the ages of 50 and 69 years, although the harms associated with false-positive results and overdiagnosis limit the net benefit of mammography. Women in their 70s may have a small benefit from screening mammography, but overdiagnosis increases in this age group as do competing causes of death. While new data support a 16% reduction in breast cancer mortality for 40- to 49-year-old women after 10 years of screening, the net benefit is less compelling in part because of the lower incidence of breast cancer in this age group and because mammography is less sensitive and specific in women younger than 50 years. Digital mammography is more sensitive than film mammography in young women with similar specificity, but no improvements in breast cancer outcomes have been demonstrated. Magnetic resonance imaging may benefit the highest risk women. Randomized trials suggest that self-breast examination does more harm than good. Primary prevention with currently approved medications will have a negligible effect on breast cancer incidence. Public health efforts aimed at increasing mammography screening rates, promoting regular exercise in all women, maintaining a healthy weight, limiting alcohol intake, and limiting postmenopausal hormone therapy may help to continue the recent trend of lower breast cancer incidence and mortality among American women.

  19. Mechanism and prevention of edge over coating in continuous hot-dip galvanizing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takeishi, Y.

    2000-11-01

    In order to clarify the mechanism of edge over coating (EOC) for continuous hot-dip galvanizing, a visualization test of the gas flow on strip and a cold model test to measure the profile of the coating thickness at the strip edge were carried out. Outward deflected gas flow was observed at the strip edge and EOC developed in the absence of gas wiping. With gas wiping, EOC developing below the wiping position is reduced by the impinging pressure of the gas wiping jet, and the film thickness becomes approximately uniform at the gas wiping position. However, upward of the gas wiping position. EOC increases again and the outward deflected gas flow on the strip edge sweeps the liquid film to the strip edge. EOC is considered to develop at the location where the dynamic pressure of the outward deflected gas flow balances with the surface tension. For the prevention of EOC, edge masking was devised and the effects which reduce EOC were measured in the cold model test and on a commercial line test. The edge mask which can be kept farther away from the strip edge is more effective for preventing EOC than the edge plates. The optimum dimension of the edge mask is 30mm in width and 75-100 mm in depth, and installing it at 4-10mm away from the strip edge is most effective. It was confirmed by the commercial line test that the edge mask can reduce EOC from 45% to less than 10%. (author)

  20. Care provision to prevent chronic disease by community mental health clinicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartlem, Kate M; Bowman, Jennifer A; Freund, Megan; Wye, Paula M; McElwaine, Kathleen M; Wolfenden, Luke; Campbell, Elizabeth M; Gillham, Karen E; Wiggers, John H

    2014-12-01

    People with a mental illness have higher prevalence of behavioral risks for chronic disease than the general population. Despite recommendations regarding the provision of preventive care by mental health services, limited research has examined the extent to which such care is provided. To examine mental health clinician provision of care for preventable chronic disease risks, and whether such care was associated with the availability of practice support strategies. A cross-sectional survey was undertaken of 151 community mental health clinicians in New South Wales, Australia regarding the provision of three elements of preventive care (i.e., assessment, brief advice, and referral/follow-up) for four health risk behaviors (i.e., tobacco smoking, inadequate fruit and vegetable consumption, harmful alcohol consumption, and inadequate physical activity). Clinicians reported the availability of 16 strategies to support such care delivery. Data were collected in 2010 and analyzed in 2012-2013. Preventive care provision varied by both care element and risk behavior. Optimal care (each care element provided to at least 80% of clients for all health behaviors) was provided by few clinicians: assessment (8.6%), brief advice (24.5%), and referral/follow-up (9.9%). Less than half of clinicians reported more than four support strategies were available (44.4%). The availability of five or more strategies was associated with increased optimal preventive care. The provision of preventive care focused on chronic disease prevention in community mental health services is suboptimal. Interventions to increase the routine provision of such care should involve increasing the availability of evidence-based strategies to support care provision. Copyright © 2014 American Journal of Preventive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Design of a continuous quality improvement program to prevent falls among community-dwelling older adults in an integrated healthcare system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yano Elizabeth M

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Implementing quality improvement programs that require behavior change on the part of health care professionals and patients has proven difficult in routine care. Significant randomized trial evidence supports creating fall prevention programs for community-dwelling older adults, but adoption in routine care has been limited. Nationally-collected data indicated that our local facility could improve its performance on fall prevention in community-dwelling older people. We sought to develop a sustainable local fall prevention program, using theory to guide program development. Methods We planned program development to include important stakeholders within our organization. The theory-derived plan consisted of 1 an initial leadership meeting to agree on whether creating a fall prevention program was a priority for the organization, 2 focus groups with patients and health care professionals to develop ideas for the program, 3 monthly workgroup meetings with representatives from key departments to develop a blueprint for the program, 4 a second leadership meeting to confirm that the blueprint developed by the workgroup was satisfactory, and also to solicit feedback on ideas for program refinement. Results The leadership and workgroup meetings occurred as planned and led to the development of a functional program. The focus groups did not occur as planned, mainly due to the complexity of obtaining research approval for focus groups. The fall prevention program uses an existing telephonic nurse advice line to 1 place outgoing calls to patients at high fall risk, 2 assess these patients' risk factors for falls, and 3 triage these patients to the appropriate services. The workgroup continues to meet monthly to monitor the progress of the program and improve it. Conclusion A theory-driven program development process has resulted in the successful initial implementation of a fall prevention program.

  2. Information management for aged care provision in Australia: development of an aged care minimum dataset and strategies to improve quality and continuity of care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Jenny; Morgans, Amee; Burgess, Stephen

    2016-04-01

    Efficient information systems support the provision of multi-disciplinary aged care and a variety of organisational purposes, including quality, funding, communication and continuity of care. Agreed minimum data sets enable accurate communication across multiple care settings. However, in aged care multiple and poorly integrated data collection frameworks are commonly used for client assessment, government reporting and funding purposes. To determine key information needs in aged care settings to improve information quality, information transfer, safety, quality and continuity of care to meet the complex needs of aged care clients. Modified Delphi methods involving five stages were employed by one aged care provider in Victoria, Australia, to establish stakeholder consensus for a derived minimum data set and address barriers to data quality. Eleven different aged care programs were identified; with five related data dictionaries, three minimum data sets, five program standards or quality frameworks. The remaining data collection frameworks related to diseases classification, funding, service activity reporting, and statistical standards and classifications. A total of 170 different data items collected across seven internal information systems were consolidated to a derived set of 60 core data items and aligned with nationally consistent data collection frameworks. Barriers to data quality related to inconsistencies in data items, staff knowledge, workflow, system access and configuration. The development an internal aged care minimum data set highlighted the critical role of primary data quality in the upstream and downstream use of client information; and presents a platform to build national consistency across the sector.

  3. Compliance With Infection Prevention Guidelines By Health Care ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    the health workers' curricular, provision of in-service training in infection ... cheaper infection prevention and control methods7. In Zambia ... Zambia Infection Prevention Guidelines in 2003. This ..... Control (IPC) Policies and Guidelines or.

  4. Disparities in the Use of Preventive Health Care among Children with Disabilities in Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Wen-Chen; Kung, Pei-Tseng; Wang, Jong-Yi

    2012-01-01

    Children with disabilities face more barriers accessing preventive health services. Prior research has documented disparities in the receipt of these services. However, most are limited to specific types of disability or care. This study investigates disparities in the use of preventive health care among children with disabilities in Taiwan. Three…

  5. The emotional and professional wellbeing of Australian midwives: A comparison between those providing continuity of midwifery care and those not providing continuity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenwick, Jennifer; Sidebotham, Mary; Gamble, Jenny; Creedy, Debra K

    2018-02-01

    Continuity of midwifery care contributes to significant positive outcomes for women and babies. There is a perception that providing continuity of care may negatively impact on the wellbeing and professional lives of midwives. To compare the emotional and professional wellbeing as well as satisfaction with time off and work-life balance of midwives providing continuity of care with midwives not providing continuity. Online survey. Measures included; Copenhagen Burnout Inventory (CBI); Depression, Anxiety and Stress Scale-21; and Perceptions of Empowerment in Midwifery Scale (PEMS-Revised). The sample (n=862) was divided into two groups; midwives working in continuity (n=214) and those not working in continuity (n=648). Mann Whitney U tests were used to compare the groups. The continuity group had significantly lower scores on each of the burnout subscales (CBI Personal p=.002; CBI Work pwork-life balance. Our results indicate that providing continuity of midwifery care is also beneficial for midwives. Conversely, midwives working in shift-based models providing fragmented care are at greater risk of psychological distress. Maternity service managers should feel confident that re-orientating care to align with the evidence is likely to improve workforce wellbeing and is a sustainable way forward. Copyright © 2017 Australian College of Midwives. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Prevention and treatment of periodontal diseases in primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, Debora C

    2014-09-01

    The aim of this guidance is to support the dental team to; manage patients with periodontal diseases in primary care appropriately; improve the quality of decision making for referral to secondary care; improve the overall oral health of the population. It focuses on the prevention and non-surgical treatment of periodontal diseases and implant diseases in primary care. The surgical treatment of periodontal and implant diseases and the management of patients by periodontal specialists or in a secondary care setting are outwith the scope of this guidance and are not discussed in detail. The guidance is based on existing guidelines, including those from the British Society of Periodontology, relevant systematic reviews, research evidence and the opinion of experts and experienced practitioners. The methodological approach is based on the international standards set out by the Appraisal of Guidelines Research and Evaluation (AGREE) Collaboration (www.agreetrust.org). The guiding principle for developing guidance within SDCEP is to first source existing guidelines, policy documents, legislation or other recommendations. Similarly, relevant systematic reviews are also initially identified. These documents are appraised for their quality of development, evidence base and applicability to the remit of the guidance under development. In the absence of these documents or when supplementary information is required, other published literature and unpublished work may be sought.Review and updating. The guidance will be reviewed in three years and updated accordingly. Recommendations are provided for assessment and diagnosis; changing patient behaviour; treatment of gingival conditions; periodontal conditions; long term maintenance; management of patients with dental implants; referral and record keeping. The key recommendations highlighted are: Assess and explain risk factors for periodontal diseases to patients. Screen all patients for periodontal diseases at every routine

  7. [Psychological effects of preventive voice care training in student teachers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nusseck, M; Richter, B; Echternach, M; Spahn, C

    2017-07-01

    Studies on the effectiveness of preventive voice care programs have focused mainly on voice parameters. Psychological parameters, however, have not been investigated in detail so far. The effect of a voice training program for German student teachers on psychological health parameters was investigated in a longitudinal study. The sample of 204 student teachers was divided into the intervention group (n = 123), who participated in the voice training program, and the control group (n = 81), who received no voice training. Voice training contained ten 90-min group courses and an individual visit by the voice trainer in a teaching situation with feedback afterwards. Participants were asked to fill out questionnaires (self-efficacy, Short-Form Health Survey, self-consciousness, voice self-concept, work-related behaviour and experience patterns) at the beginning and the end of their student teacher training period. The training program showed significant positive influences on psychological health, voice self-concept (i.e. more positive perception and increased awareness of one's own voice) and work-related coping behaviour in the intervention group. On average, the mental health status of all participants reduced over time, whereas the status in the trained group diminished significantly less than in the control group. Furthermore, the trained student teachers gained abilities to cope with work-related stress better than those without training. The training program clearly showed a positive impact on mental health. The results maintain the importance of such a training program not only for voice health, but also for wide-ranging aspects of constitutional health.

  8. Continuous glucose and exhaled breath analysis in the Intensive Care Unit

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leopold, J.H.

    2017-01-01

    This thesis covers several topics including studies on the accuracy of continuous glucose measurement (CGM) devices in the Intensive Care Unit (ICU). In addition, it is investigated whether an electronic nose (eNose) can be used to predict blood glucose levels in mechanically ventilated ICU

  9. Association between Continuing Education and Job Satisfaction of Nurses Employed in Long-Term Care Facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Ethel M.; Higgins, Leslie; Rozmus, Cathy; Robinson, James P.

    1999-01-01

    Continuing-education participation and job satisfaction of 85 licensed practical nurses and 25 registered nurses in long-term care were compared. There were no differences between full- and part-time staff. Nurses with higher family incomes participated more frequently. Registered nurses participated more and had greater job satisfaction. (SK)

  10. Predictors of change and continuity in home care for dementia patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vernooy-Dassen, M.J.F.J.; Felling, A.J.A.; Persoon, J.M.G.

    1997-01-01

    Objective. To investigate predictors of change in the sense of competence of primary caregivers and continuity in home care for dementia patients. Design. A prospective longitudinal study with a follow-up period of 10 months. Setting. Dementia patients living in the community selected by Dutch

  11. The mentoring experiences of new graduate midwives working in midwifery continuity of care models in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cummins, Allison M; Denney-Wilson, E; Homer, C S E

    2017-05-01

    The aim of this paper was to explore the mentoring experiences of new graduate midwives working in midwifery continuity of care models in Australia. Most new graduates find employment in hospitals and undertake a new graduate program rotating through different wards. A limited number of new graduate midwives were found to be working in midwifery continuity of care. The new graduate midwives in this study were mentored by more experienced midwives. Mentoring in midwifery has been described as being concerned with confidence building based through a personal relationship. A qualitative descriptive study was undertaken and the data were analysed using continuity of care as a framework. We found having a mentor was important, knowing the mentor made it easier for the new graduate to call their mentor at any time. The new graduate midwives had respect for their mentors and the support helped build their confidence in transitioning from student to midwife. With the expansion of midwifery continuity of care models in Australia mentoring should be provided for transition midwives working in this way. Crown Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Exploring Continuity of Care in Patients with Alcohol Use Disorders Using Time-Variant Measures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.C. de Vries (Sjoerd); A.I. Wierdsma (André)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractBackground/Aims: We used time-variant measures of continuity of care to study fluctuations in long-term treatment use by patients with alcohol-related disorders. Methods: Data on service use were extracted from the Psychiatric Case Register for the Rotterdam Region, The Netherlands.

  13. [Equivalent continuous noise level in neonatal intensive care unit associated to burnout syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrido Galindo, A P; Camargo Caicedo, Y; Vélez-Pereira, A M

    2015-01-01

    Noise levels in neonatal intensive care units allow the appearance of symptoms associated with burnout such as stress, irritability, fatigue and emotional instability on health care personnel. The aim of this study was to evaluate the equivalent continuous noise levels in the neonatal intensive care unit and compare the results with noise levels associated with the occurrence of burnout syndrome on the care team. Continuous sampling was conducted for 20 days using a type I sound level meter on the unit. The maximum, the ninetieth percentile and the equivalent continuous noise level (Leq) values were recorded. Noise level is reported in the range of 51.4-77.6 decibels A (dBA) with an average of 64 dBA, 100.6 dBA maximum, and average background noise from 57.9 dBA. Noise levels exceed the standards suggested for neonatal intensive care units, are close to maximum values referred for noise exposure in the occupational standards and to noise levels associated with the onset of burnout; thus allowing to infer the probability of occurrence of high levels of noise present in the unit on the development of burnout in caregivers. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y SEEIUC. All rights reserved.

  14. Improvement of pressure ulcer prevention care in private for-profit residential care homes: an action research study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwong, Enid Wy; Hung, Maria Sy; Woo, Kevin

    2016-11-25

    A need exits to develop a protocol for preventing pressure ulcers (PUs) in private for-profit nursing homes in Hong Kong, where the incidence of PUs is relatively high and which have high proportion of non-professional care staff. The implementation of such protocol would involve changes in the practice of care, likely evoking feelings of fear and uncertainty that may become a barrier to staff adherence. We thus adopted the Systems Model of Action Research in this study to manage the process of change for improving PU prevention care and to develop a pressure ulcer prevention protocol for private for-profit nursing homes. A total of 474 residents and care staff who were health workers, personal care workers, and/or nurses from four private, for-profit nursing homes in Hong Kong participated in this study. Three cyclic stages and steps, namely, unfreezing (planning), changing (action), and refreezing (results) were carried out. During each cycle, focus group interviews, field observations of the care staff's practices and inspections of the skin of the residents for pressure ulcers were conducted to evaluate the implementation of the protocol. Qualitative content analysis was adopted to analyse the data. The data and methodological triangulation used in this study increased the credibility and validity of the results. The following nine themes emerged from this study: prevention practices after the occurrence of PUs, the improper use of pressure ulcer prevention materials, non-compliance with several prevention practices, improper prevention practices, the perception that the preventive care was being performed correctly, inadequate readiness to use the risk assessment tool, an undesirable environment, the supplying of unfavorable resources, and various management styles in the homes with or without nurses. At the end of the third cycle, the changes that were identified included improved compliance with the revised risk assessment method, the timely and appropriate

  15. Improvement of pressure ulcer prevention care in private for-profit residential care homes: an action research study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enid WY Kwong

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A need exits to develop a protocol for preventing pressure ulcers (PUs in private for-profit nursing homes in Hong Kong, where the incidence of PUs is relatively high and which have high proportion of non-professional care staff. The implementation of such protocol would involve changes in the practice of care, likely evoking feelings of fear and uncertainty that may become a barrier to staff adherence. We thus adopted the Systems Model of Action Research in this study to manage the process of change for improving PU prevention care and to develop a pressure ulcer prevention protocol for private for-profit nursing homes. Methods A total of 474 residents and care staff who were health workers, personal care workers, and/or nurses from four private, for-profit nursing homes in Hong Kong participated in this study. Three cyclic stages and steps, namely, unfreezing (planning, changing (action, and refreezing (results were carried out. During each cycle, focus group interviews, field observations of the care staff’s practices and inspections of the skin of the residents for pressure ulcers were conducted to evaluate the implementation of the protocol. Qualitative content analysis was adopted to analyse the data. The data and methodological triangulation used in this study increased the credibility and validity of the results. Results The following nine themes emerged from this study: prevention practices after the occurrence of PUs, the improper use of pressure ulcer prevention materials, non-compliance with several prevention practices, improper prevention practices, the perception that the preventive care was being performed correctly, inadequate readiness to use the risk assessment tool, an undesirable environment, the supplying of unfavorable resources, and various management styles in the homes with or without nurses. At the end of the third cycle, the changes that were identified included improved compliance with the

  16. Cumulative Risk and Continuity in Nonparental Care from Infancy to Early Adolescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colwell, Malinda J; Pettit, Gregory S; Meece, Darrell; Bates, John E; Dodge, Kenneth A

    2001-04-01

    Variations in amounts of nonparental care across infancy, preschool, early elementary school, and early adolescence were examined in a longitudinal sample (N = 438). Of interest was (a) continuity in use of the different arrangements, (b) whether the arrangements were additively and cumulatively associated with children's externalizing behavior problems, and (c) whether predictive relations were accounted for by social-ecological (socioeconomic status, mothers' employment status, marital status) and social-experiential (parenting quality, exposure to aggressive peers) factors. Correlations among overall amounts of care provided little evidence of cross-time continuity. Consistent with the cumulative risk perspective, Grade 1 self-care and Grade 6 unsupervised peer contact incrementally predicted Grade 6 externalizing problems. Most of the predictive associations were accounted for by family background and social relationship factors.

  17. Expanding Continuous Quality Improvement Capacity in the Medical Intensive Care Unit: Prehealth Volunteers as a Solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priest, Kelsey C; Lobingier, Hannah; McCully, Nancy; Lombard, Jackie; Hansen, Mark; Uchiyama, Makoto; Hagg, Daniel S

    2016-01-01

    Health care delivery systems are challenged to support the increasing demands for improving patient safety, satisfaction, and outcomes. Limited resources and staffing are common barriers for making significant and sustained improvements. At Oregon Health & Science University, the medical intensive care unit (MICU) leadership team faced internal capacity limitations for conducting continuous quality improvement, specifically for the implementation and evaluation of the mobility portion of an evidence-based care bundle. The MICU team successfully addressed this capacity challenge using the person power of prehealth volunteers. In the first year of the project, 52 trained volunteers executed an evidence-based mobility intervention for 305 critically ill patients, conducting more than 200 000 exercise repetitions. The volunteers contributed to real-time evaluation of the project, with the collection of approximately 26 950 process measure data points. Prehealth volunteers are an untapped resource for effectively expanding internal continuous quality improvement capacity in the MICU and beyond.

  18. Preventive care utilization: Association with individual- and workgroup-level policy and practice perceptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabbath, Erika L; Sparer, Emily H; Boden, Leslie I; Wagner, Gregory R; Hashimoto, Dean M; Hopcia, Karen; Sorensen, Glorian

    2018-06-01

    Preventive medical care may reduce downstream medical costs and reduce population burden of disease. However, although social, demographic, and geographic determinants of preventive care have been studied, there is little information about how the workplace affects preventive care utilization. This study examines how four types of organizational policies and practices (OPPs) are associated with individual workers' preventive care utilization. We used data collected in 2012 from 838 hospital patient care workers, grouped in 84 patient care units at two hospitals in Boston. Via survey, we assessed individuals' perceptions of four types of OPPs on their work units. We linked the survey data to a database containing detailed information on medical expenditures. Using multilevel models, we tested whether individual-level perceptions, workgroup-average perceptions, and their combination were associated with individual workers' preventive care utilization (measured by number of preventive care encounters over a two-year period). Adjusting for worker characteristics, higher individual-level perceptions of workplace flexibility were associated with greater preventive care utilization. Higher average unit-level perceptions of people-oriented culture, ergonomic practices, and flexibility were associated with greater preventive care utilization. Overall, we find that workplace policies and practices supporting flexibility, ergonomics, and people-oriented culture are associated with positive preventive care-seeking behavior among workers, with some policies and practices operating at the individual level and some at the group level. Improving the work environment could impact employers' health-related expenditures and improve workers' health-related quality of life. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Intervention to Prevent Mental Ill-Health Among Health Care Workers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hans Michélsen

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Psychological strain in working life is gaining ever more attention. Health care workers are often under extreme emotional stress, which can become so overwhelming that they show signs of mental ill-health. This project aimed to develop a model for sustainable psychological support within a hospital clinic to prevent mental ill-health among employees. Mental strains at work and mental ill-health among clinic employees were mapped out, after which interventions for psychological support were designed in collaboration with employees. The interventions were conducted over one year and evaluated. Throughout the process the clinic received continuous feedback. Both questionnaires and interviews were used. The results of identifying mental strains and conducting interventions showed that employees experienced mental strain at work and perceived a need for support. Intervention evaluations showed that the project provided support, new insights, and an increased acceptance for long-term prevention of mental strain. Quantitative and qualitative methodologies supported the results. The conclusion was that increased legitimacy for mental strain at work and continuous feedback between clinic management and employees, as well as organizational circumstances are important factors when developing long-term intervention programs with various forms of psychological support.

  20. Evaluation of a Continuing Educational Intervention for Primary Health Care Professionals about Nutritional Care of Patients at Home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berggren, E; Orrevall, Y; Olin, A Ödlund; Strang, P; Szulkin, R; Törnkvist, L

    2016-04-01

    Evaluate the effectiveness of a continuing educational intervention on primary health care professionals' familiarity with information important to nutritional care in a palliative phase, their collaboration with other caregivers, and their level of knowledge about important aspects of nutritional care. Observational cohort study. 10 primary health care centers in Stockholm County, Sweden. 140 district nurses/registered nurses and general practitioners/physicians working with home care. 87 professionals participated in the intervention group (IG) and 53 in the control group (CG). The intervention consisted of a web-based program offering factual knowledge; a practical exercise linking existing and new knowledge, abilities, and skills; and a case seminar facilitating reflection. The intervention's effects were measured by a computer-based study-specific questionnaire before and after the intervention, which took approximately 1 month. The CG completed the questionnaire twice (1 month between response occasions). The intervention effects, odds ratios, were estimated by an ordinal logistic regression. In the intra-group analyses, statistically significant changes occurred in the IG's responses to 28 of 32 items and the CG's responses to 4 of 32 items. In the inter-group analyses, statistically significant effects occurred in 20 of 32 statements: all 14 statements that assessed familiarity with important concepts and all 4 statements about collaboration with other caregivers but only 2 of the 14 statements concerning level of knowledge. The intervention effect varied between 2.5 and 12.0. The intervention was effective in increasing familiarity with information important to nutritional care in a palliative phase and collaboration with other caregivers, both of which may create prerequisites for better nutritional care. However, the intervention needs to be revised to better increase the professionals' level of knowledge about important aspects of nutritional care.

  1. Continuous Palliative Sedation for Existential Distress? A Survey of Canadian Palliative Care Physicians' Views.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voeuk, Anna; Nekolaichuk, Cheryl; Fainsinger, Robin; Huot, Ann

    2017-01-01

    Palliative sedation can be used for refractory symptoms during end-of-life care. However, continuous palliative sedation (CPS) for existential distress remains controversial due to difficulty determining when this distress is refractory. The aim was to determine the opinions and practices of Canadian palliative care physicians regarding CPS for existential distress. A survey focusing on experience and views regarding CPS for existential distress was sent to 322 members of the Canadian Society of Palliative Care Physicians. Eighty-one surveys returned (accessible target, 314), resulting in a response rate of 26%. One third (31%) of the respondents reported providing CPS for existential distress. On a 5-point Likert-type scale, 40% of participants disagreed, while 43% agreed that CPS could be used for existential distress alone. Differing opinions exist regarding this complex and potentially controversial issue, necessitating the education of health-care professionals and increased awareness within the general public.

  2. Preventable hospitalization and the role of primary care: a comparison between Italy and Germany.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rosano, A.; Peschel, P.; Kugler, J.; Zee, J. van der; Ricciardi, W.; Guasticchi, G.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Hospitalization may often be prevented by timely and effective outpatient care. For Italy we found that the type and density of primary-care facilities, among other factors, influence admission rates. However, results from Italy may not be valid for other types of health-care systems,

  3. Policy environment for prevention, control and management of cardiovascular diseases in primary health care in Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asiki, Gershim; Shao, Shuai; Wainana, Carol; Khayeka-Wandabwa, Christopher; Haregu, Tilahun N; Juma, Pamela A; Mohammed, Shukri; Wambui, David; Gong, Enying; Yan, Lijing L; Kyobutungi, Catherine

    2018-05-09

    In Kenya, cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) accounted for more than 10% of total deaths and 4% of total Disability-Adjusted Life Years (DALYs) in 2015 with a steady increase over the past decade. The main objective of this paper was to review the existing policies and their content in relation to prevention, control and management of CVDs at primary health care (PHC) level in Kenya. A targeted document search in Google engine using keywords "Kenya national policy on cardiovascular diseases" and "Kenya national policy on non-communicable diseases (NCDs)" was conducted in addition to key informant interviews with Kenyan policy makers. Relevant regional and international policy documents were also included. The contents of documents identified were reviewed to assess how well they aligned with global health policies on CVD prevention, control and management. Thematic content analysis of the key informant interviews was also conducted to supplement the document reviews. A total of 17 documents were reviewed and three key informants interviewed. Besides the Tobacco Control Act (2007), all policy documents for CVD prevention, control and management were developed after 2013. The national policies were preceded by global initiatives and guidelines and were similar in content with the global policies. The Kenya health policy (2014-2030), The Kenya Health Sector Strategic and Investment Plan (2014-2018) and the Kenya National Strategy for the Prevention and Control of Non-communicable diseases (2015-2020) had strategies on NCDs including CVDs. Other policy documents for behavioral risk factors (The Tobacco Control Act 2007, Alcoholic Drinks Control (Licensing) Regulations (2010)) were available. The National Nutrition Action Plan (2012-2017) was available as a draft. Although Kenya has a tiered health care system comprising primary healthcare, integration of CVD prevention and control at PHC level was not explicitly mentioned in the policy documents. This review revealed

  4. Prescribing tamoxifen in primary care for the prevention of breast cancer: a national online survey of GPs' attitudes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Samuel G; Foy, Robbie; McGowan, Jennifer A; Kobayashi, Lindsay C; DeCensi, Andrea; Brown, Karen; Side, Lucy; Cuzick, Jack

    2017-06-01

    The cancer strategy for England (2015-2020) recommends GPs prescribe tamoxifen for breast cancer primary prevention among women at increased risk. To investigate GPs' attitudes towards prescribing tamoxifen. In an online survey, GPs in England, Northern Ireland, and Wales ( n = 928) were randomised using a 2 × 2 between-subjects design to read one of four vignettes describing a healthy patient seeking a tamoxifen prescription. In the vignette, the hypothetical patient's breast cancer risk (moderate versus high) and the clinician initiating the prescription (GP prescriber versus secondary care clinician [SCC] prescriber) were manipulated in a 1:1:1:1 ratio. Outcomes were willingness to prescribe, comfort discussing harms and benefits, comfort managing the patient, factors affecting the prescribing decision, and awareness of tamoxifen and the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) guideline CG164. Half (51.7%) of the GPs knew tamoxifen can reduce breast cancer risk, and one-quarter (24.1%) were aware of NICE guideline CG164. Responders asked to initiate prescribing (GP prescriber) were less willing to prescribe tamoxifen than those continuing a prescription initiated in secondary care (SCC prescriber) (68.9% versus 84.6%, P preventive therapy in secondary care before asking GPs to continue the patient's care may overcome some prescribing barriers. © British Journal of General Practice 2017.

  5. Perspectives on Providing And Receiving Preventive Health Care From Primary Care Providers and Their Patients With Mental Illnesses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stumbo, Scott P; Yarborough, Bobbi Jo H; Yarborough, Micah T; Green, Carla A

    2018-01-01

    Individuals with mental illnesses have higher morbidity rates and reduced life expectancy compared to the general population. Understanding how patients and providers perceive the need for prevention, as well as the barriers and beliefs that may contribute to insufficient care, are important for improving service delivery tailored to this population. Cross-sectional; mixed methods. An integrated health system and a network of federally qualified health centers and safety net clinics. Interviews (n = 30) and surveys (n = 249) with primary care providers. Interviews (n = 158) and surveys (n = 160) with patients diagnosed with schizophrenia, bipolar, anxiety, or major depressive disorders. Semi-structured interviews and surveys. Thematic analysis for qualitative data; frequencies for quantitative data. More than half (n = 131, 53%) of clinicians believed patients with mental illnesses care less about preventive care than the general population, yet 88% (n = 139) of patients reported interest in improving health. Most providers (n = 216, 88%) lacked confidence that patients with mental illnesses would follow preventive recommendations; 82% (n = 129) of patients reported they would try to change lifestyles if their doctor recommended. Clinicians explained that their perception of patients' chaotic lives and lack of interest in preventive care contributed to their fatalistic attitudes on care delivery to this population. Clinicians and patients agreed on substantial need for additional support for behavior changes. Clinicians reported providing informational support by keeping messages simple; patients reported a desire for more detailed information on reasons to complete preventive care. Patients also detailed the need for assistive and tangible support to manage behavioral health changes. Our results suggest a few clinical changes could help patients complete preventive care recommendations and improve health behaviors: improving clinician-patient collaboration on

  6. Communication and interoperability for serial comparison in continuous health care--the new challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zywietz, Christoph

    2004-01-01

    The evolution of information technology and of telematics and increasing efforts to establish an electronic health record stimulate the development and introduction of new concepts in health care. However, compared to other application areas, e.g., tourism, banking, commerce etc. the use of information technology in health care is still of limited success. In hospitals as well in ambulatory medicine (General Practitioner systems) computers are often only used for administrative purposes. Fully operational Hospital Information Systems (HIS) are rare and often island solutions. The situation is somewhat better for department systems (DIS), e.g., where image analysis, processing of biochemical data or of biosignals is in the clinical focus. Even before we have solved the various problems in health care data processing and management within the "conventional" care institutions new challenges are coming up with concepts of telemedicine for assisted and non-assisted home care for patients with chronic diseases or people at high risk. The major challenges for provision of tele-monitoring and alarming services are improvement of communication and interoperability of devices and care providers. A major obstacle in achieving such goals are lack of standards for devices as well for procedures and a lack of databases with information on "normal" variability of many medical parameters to be monitored by serial comparison in continuous medical care. Some of these aspects will be discussed in more detail.

  7. Continuing medical education, continuing professional development, and knowledge translation: improving care of older patients by practicing physicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, David C; Johnston, Bree; Dunn, Kathel; Sullivan, Gail M; Brett, Belle; Matzko, Marilyn; Levine, Sharon A

    2006-10-01

    Many community-based internists and family physicians lack familiarity with geriatrics knowledge and best practices, but they face overwhelming fiscal and time barriers to expanding their skills and improving their behavior in the care of older people. Traditional lecture-and-slide-show continuing medical education (CME) programs have been shown to be relatively ineffective in changing this target group's practice. The challenge for geriatrics educators, then, is to devise CME programs that are highly accessible to practicing physicians, that will have an immediate and significant effect on practitioners' behavior, and that are financially viable. Studies of CME have shown that the most effective programs for knowledge translation in these circumstances involve what is known as active-mode learning, which relies on interactive, targeted, and multifaceted techniques. A systematic literature review, supplemented by structured interviews, was performed to inventory active-mode learning techniques for geriatrics knowledge and skills in the United States. Thirteen published articles met the criteria, and leaders of 28 active-mode CME programs were interviewed. This systematic review indicates that there is a substantial experience in geriatrics training for community-based physicians, much of which is unpublished and incompletely evaluated. It appears that the most effective methods to change behaviors involved multiple educational efforts such as written materials or toolkits combined with feedback and strong communication channels between instructors and learners.

  8. Achieving continuity of care: facilitators and barriers in community mental health teams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belling, Ruth; Whittock, Margaret; McLaren, Susan; Burns, Tom; Catty, Jocelyn; Jones, Ian Rees; Rose, Diana; Wykes, Til

    2011-03-18

    The integration of mental health and social services for people diagnosed with severe mental illness (SMI) has been a key aspect of attempts to reform mental health services in the UK and aims to minimise user and carer distress and confusion arising from service discontinuities. Community mental health teams (CMHTs) are a key component of UK policy for integrated service delivery, but implementing this policy has raised considerable organisational challenges. The aim of this study was to identify and explore facilitators and barriers perceived to influence continuity of care by health and social care professionals working in and closely associated with CMHTs. This study employed a survey design utilising in-depth, semi-structured interviews with a proportionate, random sample of 113 health and social care professionals and representatives of voluntary organisations. Participants worked in two NHS Mental Health Trusts in greater London within eight adult CMHTs and their associated acute in-patient wards, six local general practices, and two voluntary organisations. Team leadership, decision making, and experiences of teamwork support were facilitators for cross boundary and team continuity; face-to-face communication between teams, managers, general practitioners, and the voluntary sector were facilitators for information continuity. Relational, personal, and longitudinal continuity were facilitated in some local areas by workforce stability. Barriers for cross boundary and team continuity were specific leadership styles and models of decision making, blurred professional role boundaries, generic working, and lack of training for role development. Barriers for relational, personal, and longitudinal continuity were created by inadequate staffing levels, high caseloads, and administrative duties that could limit time spent with users. Incompatibility of information technology systems hindered information continuity. Flexible continuity was challenged by the

  9. Achieving Continuity of Care: Facilitators and Barriers in Community Mental Health Teams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jones Ian Rees

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The integration of mental health and social services for people diagnosed with severe mental illness (SMI has been a key aspect of attempts to reform mental health services in the UK and aims to minimise user and carer distress and confusion arising from service discontinuities. Community mental health teams (CMHTs are a key component of UK policy for integrated service delivery, but implementing this policy has raised considerable organisational challenges. The aim of this study was to identify and explore facilitators and barriers perceived to influence continuity of care by health and social care professionals working in and closely associated with CMHTs. Methods This study employed a survey design utilising in-depth, semi-structured interviews with a proportionate, random sample of 113 health and social care professionals and representatives of voluntary organisations. Participants worked in two NHS Mental Health Trusts in greater London within eight adult CMHTs and their associated acute in-patient wards, six local general practices, and two voluntary organisations. Results Team leadership, decision making, and experiences of teamwork support were facilitators for cross boundary and team continuity; face-to-face communication between teams, managers, general practitioners, and the voluntary sector were facilitators for information continuity. Relational, personal, and longitudinal continuity were facilitated in some local areas by workforce stability. Barriers for cross boundary and team continuity were specific leadership styles and models of decision making, blurred professional role boundaries, generic working, and lack of training for role development. Barriers for relational, personal, and longitudinal continuity were created by inadequate staffing levels, high caseloads, and administrative duties that could limit time spent with users. Incompatibility of information technology systems hindered information

  10. Falls prevention among older people and care providers: protocol for an integrative review

    OpenAIRE

    Cuesta Benjumea, Carmen de la; Henriques, Maria Adriana; Abad Corpa, Eva; Roe, Brenda; Orts-Cortés, María Isabel; Lidón-Cerezuela, Beatriz; Avendaño-Céspedes, Almudena; Oliver-Carbonell, José Luis; Sánchez Ardila, Carmen

    2017-01-01

    Aim. To review the evidence about the role of care providers in fall prevention in older adults aged ≥ 65 years, this includes their views, strategies, and approaches on falls prevention and effectiveness of nursing interventions. Background. Some fall prevention programmes are successfully implemented and led by nurses and it is acknowledged the vital role they play in developing plans for fall prevention. Nevertheless, there has not been a systematic review of the literature that describes ...

  11. Continuous Care Units: a response to aging and dependency in Portugal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Carolina Monteiro

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The Portuguese population is undergoing an irreversible aging process and must deal with this demographic issue. Many influencing factors have been identified, including biological, psychological and social changes which have led to this new social stratification. The increasing prevalence of chronic and debilitating illnesses as a direct result of human aging has increased the demand for answers on both a health and social level. Life expectancy at birth in Portugal is almost 81 years, one year above the OECD mean. Life expectancy for women is 84 years, compared to 78 years for men. The National Network for Continuous Care (REDE was formed in response to this new issue. The implementation of Continuous Care Units (UCCI provide an alternative to hospitalization for dependent people needing special care but who do not require the specific care of an acute unit. The UCCI present a model of multidisciplinary intervention that covers all aspects of a health, social and economic nature and, consists of multidisciplinary teams. Due to the characteristics of the elderly and / or their situation of dependency, the intervention from specialized professionals of UCCI must be carefully prepared. Focused training and team expertise are key factors of the REDE’s success.

  12. A survey of primary care resident attitudes toward continuity clinic patient handover

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor O. Kolade

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Transfer of clinic patients from graduating residents to interns or junior residents occurs every year, affecting large numbers of patients. Breaches in care continuity may occur, with potential for risk to patient safety. Several guidelines have been developed for implementing standardized inpatient sign-outs, but no specific guidelines exist for outpatient handover. Methods: Residents in primary care programs – internal medicine, family medicine, and pediatrics – at a US academic medical center were invited to participate in an online survey. The invitation was extended approximately 2 years after electronic medical record (EMR rollout began at the institution. Results: Of 71 eligible residents, 22 (31% responded to the survey. Of these, 18 felt that handover of ambulatory patients was at least moderately important – but only one affirmed the existence of a system for handover. IM residents perceived that they had the highest proportion of high-risk patients (p=0.042; transition-of-care letters were more important to IM residents than other respondents (p=0.041. Conclusion: There is room for improvement in resident acknowledgement of handover processes in continuity clinics. In this study, IM residents attached greater importance to a specific handover tool than other primary care residents. Thus, the different primary care specialties may need to have different handover tools available to them within a shared EMR system.

  13. Prevention of respiratory complications of the surgical patient: actionable plan for continued process improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruscic, Katarina J; Grabitz, Stephanie D; Rudolph, Maíra I; Eikermann, Matthias

    2017-06-01

    Postoperative respiratory complications (PRCs) increase hospitalization time, 30-day mortality and costs by up to $35 000. These outcomes measures have gained prominence as bundled payments have become more common. Results of recent quantitative effectiveness studies and clinical trials provide a framework that helps develop center-specific treatment guidelines, tailored to minimize the risk of PRCs. The implementation of those protocols should be guided by a local, respected, and visible facilitator who leads proper implementation while inviting center-specific input from surgeons, anesthesiologists, and other perioperative stakeholders. Preoperatively, patients should be risk-stratified for PRCs to individualize intraoperative choices and postoperative pathways. Laparoscopic compared with open surgery improves respiratory outcomes. High-risk patients should be treated by experienced providers based on locally developed bundle-interventions to optimize intraoperative treatment and ICU bed utilization. Intraoperatively, lung-protective ventilation (procedure-specific positive end-expiratory pressure utilization, and low driving pressure) and moderately restrictive fluid therapy should be used. To achieve surgical relaxation, high-dose neuromuscular blocking agents (and reversal agents) as well as high-dose opioids should be avoided; inhaled anesthetics improve surgical conditions while protecting the lungs. Patients should be extubated in reverse Trendelenburg position. Postoperatively, continuous positive airway pressure helps prevent airway collapse and protocolized, early mobilization improves cognitive and respiratory function.

  14. Home and community care services: a major opportunity for preventive health care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lujic Sanja

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In Australia, the Home and Community Care (HACC program provides services in the community to frail elderly living at home and their carers. Surprisingly little is known about the health of people who use these services. In this study we sought to describe health-related factors associated with use of HACC services, and to identify potential opportunities for targeting preventive services to those at high risk. Methods We obtained questionnaire data from the 45 and Up Study for 103,041 men and women aged 45 years and over, sampled from the general population of New South Wales, Australia in 2006-2007, and linked this with administrative data about HACC service use. We compared the characteristics of HACC clients and non-clients according to a range of variables from the 45 and Up Study questionnaire, and estimated crude and adjusted relative risks for HACC use with generalized linear models. Results 4,978 (4.8% participants used HACC services in the year prior to completing the questionnaire. Increasing age, female sex, lower pre-tax household income, not having a partner, not being in paid work, Indigenous background and living in a regional or remote location were strongly associated with HACC use. Overseas-born people and those speaking languages other than English at home were significantly less likely to use HACC services. People who were underweight, obese, sedentary, who reported falling in the past year, who were current smokers, or who ate little fruit or vegetables were significantly more likely to use HACC services. HACC service use increased with decreasing levels of physical functioning, higher levels of psychological distress, and poorer self-ratings of health, eyesight and memory. HACC clients were more likely to report chronic health conditions, in particular diabetes, stroke, Parkinson's disease, anxiety and depression, cancer, heart attack or angina, blood clotting problems, asthma and osteoarthritis

  15. Vaccines for preventing hepatitis B in health-care workers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Weikeng; Gluud, C

    2005-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) causes acute and chronic liver diseases. Hepatitis B vaccination is recommended for health-care workers.......Hepatitis B virus (HBV) causes acute and chronic liver diseases. Hepatitis B vaccination is recommended for health-care workers....

  16. Prevention of nosocomial infections in intensive care unit and nursing practices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sevilay Yüceer

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Nosocomial infections which are considered as the primary indicator of the quality of care in hospitals, cause to prolong hospitalization at intensive care unit and hospital, increase morbidity, mortality, and the cost of treatment. Although only 5-10% of the patients are treated in the intensive care units, 20-25% of all nosocomial infections are seen in these units. Preventing nosocomial infections in intensive care units is a process started at the patient acceptance to unit that requires an interdisciplinary team approach of intensive care staffs’ and Infection Control Committee members.Intensive care nurses who are in constant contact with patients have important responsibilities in preventing nosocomial infections. Intensive care nurses should be aware that the nosocomial infections can be prevented. They should have current knowledge about universal precautions related to prevention and control of infections, which are accepted by the entire world and they reinforce this knowledge by practice and should provide the most effective care to patients.In this article, nursing practices for prevention of nosocomial infections in intensive care units are discussed based on universal precautions.

  17. Adopting new models for continuity of care: what are the needs?

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, P R

    1975-09-01

    There are glaring, almost universal deficiencies in the organization of community resources for treating and rehabilitating the mentally ill, particularly psychotic patients, the author says. The deficiencies could be partly remedied by reorganizing psychiatric hospitals to play a key role in outpatient service delivery, and by paying more attention to the principles of continuity of care for psychotic patients. One way of doing both is through the model of a mini-mental-health-center adopted at a Veterans Administration hospital: the same terms provide active, continual care for patients regardless of whether they are in or out of the hospital. The program developed on one ward is described further in the next paper, written by ward staff members and others.

  18. The Value Proposition of Prevention: The Impacts of Pure North S’Energy Foundation’s Preventive Care Program on Acute Care Utilization in Alberta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.C. Herbert Emery

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available This analysis of Pure North S’Energy Foundation’s preventive health services shows that the acute health care cost savings of being pro-active, rather than reactive, and averting chronic disease, are significant, immediate and worth pursuing further. Chronic disease, such as cardiovascular maladies, diabetes, cancer and other long-term illnesses, represents the leading cause of disability and death in Canada. An estimated 25 per cent of expenditures in the public health system go towards treating these frequently avoidable diseases. This health-care cost curve, which sees more money expended on fighting the increase of chronic disease, can be bent, so to speak, through prevention services that offer long-term benefits to people’s health. Preventing disease is not just good for individuals, but for the health system in general, as prevention frees up acute care beds for more timely access by those who need them. The concern for health care decision makers struggling to find dollars to meet current health care needs is that investment in prevention is risky compared spending on medical treatment. It is often expressed that the health cost savings of prevention are too far off in the future and there is a lack of convincing evidence that preventive services and interventions will achieve the health gains expected. Pure North offers participants in its eight-year-old program access to a variety of healthcare practitioners, including doctors, naturopaths, nurses, nurse practitioners and dentists. Participants receive lifestyle counselling and dietary supplements aimed at combating vitamin D insufficiency, obesity, insulin resistance and other problems that can lead to chronic disease. Our study found that participants who stay with the program for two years demonstrate significant reductions in their number of visits to emergency rooms and hospitals. Indeed, after just one year in the program, the number of hospital visits was down 27 per cent

  19. Standardized nomenclatures: keys to continuity of care, nursing accountability and nursing effectiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keenan, G; Aquilino, M L

    1998-01-01

    Standardized nursing nomenclatures must be included in clinical documentation systems to generate data that more accurately represent nursing practice than outcomes-related measures currently used to support important policy decisions. NANDA, NIC, and NOC--comprehensive nomenclatures for the needed variables of nursing diagnoses, interventions, and outcomes--are described. Added benefits of using NANDA, NIC, and NOC in everyday practice are outlined, including facilitation of the continuity of care of patients in integrated health systems.

  20. A Study to Determine the Correlation between Continuity of Care and Patient Medication Compliance

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-08-01

    U (III FILE ’Y TO DETERMINE THE CORRELATION BETWEEN CONTINUITY OF CARE AND PATIENT MEDICATION COMPLIANCE IA Graduate Research Project Submitted to...43 APPENDIX A. PATIENT MEDICATION COMPLIANCE QUESTIONNAIRE . . . . . 45 B. COMPUTER CODED INPUT FORMAT . . . . . . . ...... 48 C. RESEARCH DATA...and that adhered to by the patient . This failure to comply with medical recommendations results in a waste of health resources, frustration to the

  1. Cumulative Risk and Continuity in Nonparental Care from Infancy to Early Adolescence

    OpenAIRE

    Colwell, Malinda J.; Pettit, Gregory S.; Meece, Darrell; Bates, John E.; Dodge, Kenneth A.

    2001-01-01

    Variations in amounts of nonparental care across infancy, preschool, early elementary school, and early adolescence were examined in a longitudinal sample (N = 438). Of interest was (a) continuity in use of the different arrangements, (b) whether the arrangements were additively and cumulatively associated with children’s externalizing behavior problems, and (c) whether predictive relations were accounted for by social-ecological (socioeconomic status, mothers’ employment status, marital stat...

  2. The effects of nursing turnover on continuity of care in isolated First Nation communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minore, Bruce; Boone, Margaret; Katt, Mae; Kinch, Peggy; Birch, Stephen; Mushquash, Christopher

    2005-03-01

    Many of Canada's northern First Nation communities experience difficulty recruiting and retaining appropriate nursing staff and must rely on relief nurses for short-term coverage. The latter often are not adequately prepared for the demanding nature of the practice. This study examined the consequences of nursing turnover on the continuity of care provided to residents of three Ojibway communities in northern Ontario. The findings are based on a review of 135 charts of oncology, diabetes, and mental health clients, and on interviews with 30 professional and paraprofessional health-care providers who served the communities. Nursing turnover is shown to detrimentally affect communications, medications management, and the range of services offered; it also results in compromised follow-up, client disengagement, illness exacerbation, and an added burden of care for family and community members.

  3. The continuing care retirement community executive: a manager for all seasons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurley, R E; Brewer, K P

    1991-01-01

    The continuing care retirement community industry is a growing source of residential and health care services for the elderly population. It is also a relatively new and expanding career path for both health care and hospitality managers. Using in-depth interviews with executives in a sample of 26 communities, this study provides one of the most complete portraits to date of the nature of managing these communities. The findings indicate that these organizations are complex and multifaceted, demanding versatile skills and abilities. Most critical are those skills that enable a manager to interact effectively with residents and staff to build and maintain a hospitable, accommodating community environment. As competition in the industry intensifies, community viability may become synonymous with customer satisfaction. Management training and development will need to be highly attentive to the distinctive features of these intriguing organizations.

  4. National survey of practices to prevent health care-associated infections in Thailand: The role of prevention bundles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apisarnthanarak, Anucha; Ratz, David; Greene, M Todd; Khawcharoenporn, Thana; Weber, David J; Saint, Sanjay

    2017-07-01

    We evaluated the practices used in Thai hospitals to prevent catheter-associated urinary tract infection (CAUTI), central line-associated bloodstream infection (CLABSI), and ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP). From January 1, 2014-November 30, 2014, we surveyed all Thai hospitals with an intensive care unit and at least 250 beds. The use of prevention practices for CAUTI, CLABSI, and VAP was assessed. High compliance (≥75%) with all components of the CLABSI and VAP prevention bundles were determined. CAUTI, CLABSI, and VAP infection rates before and after implementing infection control practices are reported. Multivariable regression was used to examine associations between infection prevention bundle compliance and infection rate changes. Out of 245 eligible hospitals, 212 (86.5%) responded. A total of 120 (56.6%) and 115 hospitals (54.2%) reported ≥75% compliance for all components of the CLABSI and VAP prevention bundles, respectively, and 91 hospitals (42.9%) reported using ≥ 4 recommended CAUTI-prevention practices. High compliance with all of the CLABSI and VAP bundle components was associated with significant infection rate reductions (CLABSI, 38.3%; P Hospitals regularly using ≥ 4 CAUTI-prevention practices did not have greater reductions in CAUTI (0.02%; P = .99). Compliance with practices to prevent hospital infections was suboptimal. Policies and interventions promoting bundled approaches may help reduce hospital infections for Thai hospitals. Copyright © 2017 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Partnership for fragility bone fracture care provision and prevention program (P4Bones: study protocol for a secondary fracture prevention pragmatic controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaboury Isabelle

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Fractures associated with bone fragility in older adults signal the potential for secondary fracture. Fragility fractures often precipitate further decline in health and loss of mobility, with high associated costs for patients, families, society and the healthcare system. Promptly initiating a coordinated, comprehensive pharmacological bone health and falls prevention program post-fracture may improve osteoporosis treatment compliance; and reduce rates of falls and secondary fractures, and associated morbidity, mortality and costs. Methods/design This pragmatic, controlled trial at 11 hospital sites in eight regions in Quebec, Canada, will recruit community-dwelling patients over age 50 who have sustained a fragility fracture to an intervention coordinated program or to standard care, according to the site. Site study coordinators will identify and recruit 1,596 participants for each study arm. Coordinators at intervention sites will facilitate continuity of care for bone health, and arrange fall prevention programs including physical exercise. The intervention teams include medical bone specialists, primary care physicians, pharmacists, nurses, rehabilitation clinicians, and community program organizers. The primary outcome of this study is the incidence of secondary fragility fractures within an 18-month follow-up period. Secondary outcomes include initiation and compliance with bone health medication; time to first fall and number of clinically significant falls; fall-related hospitalization and mortality; physical activity; quality of life; fragility fracture-related costs; admission to a long term care facility; participants’ perceptions of care integration, expectations and satisfaction with the program; and participants’ compliance with the fall prevention program. Finally, professionals at intervention sites will participate in focus groups to identify barriers and facilitating factors for the integrated

  6. Structure for Success: 30 Preventive Discipline Techniques. Caring for the Little Ones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Karen

    2000-01-01

    Presents 30 suggestions for preventing behavior problems among infants and toddlers in child care settings. The suggestions are in four areas: (1) environment; (2) caregiver style; (3) organization and routines; and (4) child to child: as situations happen. (KB)

  7. Working conditions and parents' ability to care for children's preventive health needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Earle, Alison; Heymann, Jody

    2014-04-01

    To determine whether workplace flexibility policies influence parents' ability to meet their children's preventive primary health care needs. Study sample included 917 employed adults with at least 1 child younger than 18 years in their household from a nationally representative survey of US adults. Multivariate logistic regression analyses of factors influencing parental ability to meet their children's preventive primary health care needs were conducted. Analyses assessed the effect of having access to schedule flexibility, a supervisor who is accommodating about work adjustments when family issues arise, and the ability to make personal calls without consequences on the odds of a parents' being unable to meet their child's preventive health care needs. Being able to make a personal phone call at work was associated with a 56% (P flexibility at work could make a substantial difference in parents' ability to obtain preventive care for their children.

  8. Preventive youth health care in 11 European countries: An exploratory analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wieske, R.C.N.; Nijnuis, M.G.; Carmiggelt, B.C.; Wagenaar-Fischer, M.M.; Boere-Boonekamp, M.M.

    2012-01-01

    Objective To systematically identify similarities and differences in the way preventive youth health care (YHC) is organized in 11 European countries. Method Questionnaire survey to EUSUHM (European Union for School and University Health and Medicine) representatives. Results The greatest

  9. Diabetes: Good Diabetes Management and Regular Foot Care Help Prevent Severe Foot Sores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amputation and diabetes: How to protect your feet Good diabetes management and regular foot care help prevent severe foot sores that ... and may require amputation. By Mayo Clinic Staff Diabetes complications can include nerve damage and poor blood ...

  10. Patient safety, resident well-being and continuity of care with different resident duty schedules in the intensive care unit: a randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parshuram, Christopher S; Amaral, Andre C K B; Ferguson, Niall D; Baker, G Ross; Etchells, Edward E; Flintoft, Virginia; Granton, John; Lingard, Lorelei; Kirpalani, Haresh; Mehta, Sangeeta; Moldofsky, Harvey; Scales, Damon C; Stewart, Thomas E; Willan, Andrew R; Friedrich, Jan O

    2015-03-17

    Shorter resident duty periods are increasingly mandated to improve patient safety and physician well-being. However, increases in continuity-related errors may counteract the purported benefits of reducing fatigue. We evaluated the effects of 3 resident schedules in the intensive care unit (ICU) on patient safety, resident well-being and continuity of care. Residents in 2 university-affiliated ICUs were randomly assigned (in 2-month rotation-blocks from January to June 2009) to in-house overnight schedules of 24, 16 or 12 hours. The primary patient outcome was adverse events. The primary resident outcome was sleepiness, measured by the 7-point Stanford Sleepiness Scale. Secondary outcomes were patient deaths, preventable adverse events, and residents' physical symptoms and burnout. Continuity of care and perceptions of ICU staff were also assessed. We evaluated 47 (96%) of 49 residents, all 971 admissions, 5894 patient-days and 452 staff surveys. We found no effect of schedule (24-, 16- or 12-h shifts) on adverse events (81.3, 76.3 and 78.2 events per 1000 patient-days, respectively; p = 0.7) or on residents' sleepiness in the daytime (mean rating 2.33, 2.61 and 2.30, respectively; p = 0.3) or at night (mean rating 3.06, 2.73 and 2.42, respectively; p = 0.2). Seven of 8 preventable adverse events occurred with the 12-hour schedule (p = 0.1). Mortality rates were similar for the 3 schedules. Residents' somatic symptoms were more severe and more frequent with the 24-hour schedule (p = 0.04); however, burnout was similar across the groups. ICU staff rated residents' knowledge and decision-making worst with the 16-hour schedule. Our findings do not support the purported advantages of shorter duty schedules. They also highlight the trade-offs between residents' symptoms and multiple secondary measures of patient safety. Further delineation of this emerging signal is required before widespread system change. ClinicalTrials.gov, no. NCT00679809. © 2015 Canadian Medical

  11. Patients' assessments of the continuity of primary care in Finland: a 15-year follow-up questionnaire survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raivio, Risto; Holmberg-Marttila, Doris; Mattila, Kari J

    2014-10-01

    Continuity of care is an essential aspect of quality in general practice. This study is the first systematic follow-up of Finnish primary care patients' assessments with regard to personal continuity of care. To ascertain whether patient-reported longitudinal personal continuity of care is related to patient characteristics and their consultation experiences, and how this had changed over the study period. A 15-year follow-up questionnaire survey that took place at Tampere University Hospital catchment area, Finland. The survey was conducted among patients attending health centres in the Tampere University Hospital catchment area from 1998 until 2013. From a sample of 363 464 patients, a total of 157 549 responded. The responses of patients who had visited a doctor during the survey weeks (n = 97 468) were analysed. Continuity of care was assessed by asking the question: 'When visiting the health centre, do you usually see the same doctor?'; patients could answer 'yes' or 'no'. Approximately half of the responders had met the same doctor when visiting the healthcare centre. Personal continuity of care decreased by 15 percentage points (from 66% to 51%) during the study years. The sense of continuity was linked to several patients' experiences of the consultation. The most prominent factor contributing to the sense of continuity of care was having a doctor who was specifically appointed (odds ratio 7.28, 95% confidence interval = 6.65 to 7.96). Continuity of care was proven to enhance the experienced quality of primary care. Patients felt that continuity of care was best realised when they could consult a doctor who had been specifically appointed to them. Despite efforts of the authorities, over the past 15 years patient-reported continuity of care has declined in Finland. © British Journal of General Practice 2014.

  12. Promoting CARE: including parents in youth suicide prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooven, Carole; Walsh, Elaine; Pike, Kenneth C; Herting, Jerald R

    2012-01-01

    This study evaluated the effectiveness of augmenting a youth suicide-preventive intervention with a brief, home-based parent program. A total of 615 high school youth and their parents participated. Three suicide prevention protocols, a youth intervention, a parent intervention, and a combination of youth and parent intervention, were compared with an "intervention as usual" (IAU) group. All groups experienced a decline in risk factors and an increase in protective factors during the intervention period, and sustained these improvements over 15 months. Results reveal that the youth intervention and combined youth and parent intervention produced significantly greater reductions in suicide risk factors and increases in protective factors than IAU comparison group.

  13. Role of the primary health care team in preventing accidents to children.

    OpenAIRE

    Kendrick, D

    1994-01-01

    Accidents are the most common cause of mortality in children and account for considerable childhood morbidity. The identification of risk factors for childhood accidents suggests that many are predictable and therefore preventable. Numerous interventions have been found to be effective in reducing the morbidity and mortality from childhood accidents. The scope for accident prevention within the primary care setting and the roles of the members of the primary health care team are discussed. Fi...

  14. [Participation as Target of Social Medicine and Nursing Care: - Legal Definition of Long-Term Care Dependency - Strategies to Prevent Long-Term Care Dependency].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nüchtern, Elisabeth; Gansweid, Barbara; Gerber, Hans; von Mittelstaedt, Gert

    2017-01-01

    Objective: By the "Second Bill to Strengthen Long-Term Care", a new concept of long-term care dependency will be introduced, valid from 2017. Long-term care dependency according to Social Code XI will be defined covering more aspects than today. Therefore, the working group "Nursing Care" of the division "Social Medicine in Practice and Rehabilitation" in the German Society for Social Medicine and Prevention presents their results after working on the social medicine perspective of the definition and prevention of long-term care dependency. Methods: Both the definition and strategies to prevent long-term care dependency are systematically taken into consideration from the point of view of social medicine on the basis of the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF), as long-term care dependency means a defined condition of disability. Results: Both the current and the new concept of long-term care dependency focus activity limitations. The perspective of social medicine considers the interactions of health condition, its effects on daily activities and personal as well as environmental factors. From this point of view approaches for social benefits concerning prevention and rehabilitation can be identified systematically so as to work against the development and progression of long-term care dependency. The reference to the ICF can facilitate the communication between different professions. The new "graduation" of long-term care dependency would allow an international "translation" referring to the ICF. Conclusion: Experts from the field of social medicine as well as those of nursing care, care-givers and nursing researchers have in common the objective that persons in need of nursing care can participate in as many aspects of life of importance to them in an autonomous and self-determined way. The point of view of social medicine on long-term care dependency is fundamental for all occupational groups that are involved and for their

  15. Breaking Boundaries: Complementary and Alternative Medicine Provider Framing of Preventive Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Vinita

    2017-11-01

    This textual examination extends understandings of how complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) providers constitute preventive care in their discourse by identifying the frame of breaking boundaries referencing relational, structural, and philosophical orientations in their practice with their clients. Analysis of semistructured, in-depth interviews with CAM providers ( n = 17) reveals that the frame of breaking boundaries was comprised of three themes: finding one's own strength; I don't prescribe, so I'm exploring; and ground yourself, and have an escape route. The themes describe preventive care by identifying how CAM providers negotiate their relational positionality in connecting with clients, structural positionality within the field of health care, and philosophical positionality within the ontological understandings that guide how health is defined and conceptualized. The study contributes toward enhancing diverse understandings of constituting preventive care in practice and suggests pragmatic implications for addressing biomedical provider communication with their patients seeking CAM care alongside conventional treatments.

  16. Where do youth in foster care receive information about preventing unplanned pregnancy and sexually transmitted infections?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudson, Angela L

    2012-10-01

    Adolescents in foster care are at risk for unplanned pregnancy and sexually transmitted infections, including HIV infection. A study using a qualitative method was conducted to describe how and where foster youth receive reproductive health and risk reduction information to prevent pregnancy and sexually transmitted infections. Participants also were asked to describe their relationship with their primary health care provider while they were in foster care. Nineteen young adults, recently emancipated from foster care, participated in individual interviews. Using grounded theory as the method of analysis, three thematic categories were generated: discomfort visiting and disclosing, receiving and not receiving the bare essentials, and learning prevention from community others. Recommendations include primary health care providers providing a confidential space for foster youth to disclose sexual activity and more opportunities for foster youth to receive reproductive and risk prevention information in the school setting. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. [The effectiveness of continuing care models in patients with chronic diseases: a systematic review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hsiao-Mei; Han, Tung-Chen; Chen, Ching-Min

    2014-04-01

    Population aging has caused significant rises in the prevalence of chronic diseases and the utilization of healthcare services in Taiwan. The current healthcare delivery system is fragmented. Integrating medical services may increase the quality of healthcare, enhance patient and patient family satisfaction with healthcare services, and better contain healthcare costs. This article introduces two continuing care models: discharge planning and case management. Further, the effectiveness and essential components of these two models are analyzed using a systematic review method. Articles included in this systematic review were all original articles on discharge-planning or case-management interventions published between February 1999 and March 2013 in any of 6 electronic databases (Medline, PubMed, Cinahl Plus with full Text, ProQuest, Cochrane Library, CEPS and Center for Chinese Studies electronic databases). Of the 70 articles retrieved, only 7 were randomized controlled trial studies. Three types of continuity-of-care models were identified: discharge planning, case management, and a hybrid of these two. All three models used logical and systematic processes to conduct assessment, planning, implementation, coordination, follow-up, and evaluation activities. Both the discharge planning model and the case management model were positively associated with improved self-care knowledge, reduced length of stay, decreased medical costs, and better quality of life. This study cross-referenced all reviewed articles in terms of target clients, content, intervention schedules, measurements, and outcome indicators. Study results may be referenced in future implementations of continuity-care models and may provide a reference for future research.

  18. Patient-centred communication intervention study to evaluate nurse-patient interactions in complex continuing care

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Communication impairment is a frequent consequence of stroke. Patients who cannot articulate their needs respond with frustration and agitation, resulting in poor optimization of post-stroke functions. A key component of patient-centred care is the ability of staff to communicate in a way that allows them to understand the patient’s needs. We developed a patient-centred communication intervention targeting registered and unregulated nursing staff caring for complex continuing care patients with communication impairments post stroke. Research objectives include 1) examining the effects of the intervention on patients’ quality of life, depression, satisfaction with care, and agitation; and (2) examining the extent to which the intervention improves staff’s attitudes and knowledge in caring for patients with communication impairments. The intervention builds on a previous pilot study. Methods/design A quasi-experimental repeated measures non-equivalent control group design in a complex continuing care facility is being used. Patients with a communication impairment post-stroke admitted to the facility are eligible to participate. All staff nurses are eligible. Baseline data are collected from staff and patients. Follow-up will occur at 1 and 3 months post-intervention. Subject recruitment and data collection from 60 patients and 30 staff will take approximately 36 months. The Patient-Centred Communication Intervention consists of three components: (1) development of an individualized patient communication care plan; (2) a one-day workshop focused on communication and behavioural management strategies for nursing staff; and (3) a staff support system. The intervention takes comprehensive patient assessments into account to inform the development of communication and behavioural strategies specifically tailored to each patient. Discussion The Patient-Centred Communication Intervention will provide staff with strategies to facilitate interactions with

  19. Patient-centred communication intervention study to evaluate nurse-patient interactions in complex continuing care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McGilton Katherine S

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Communication impairment is a frequent consequence of stroke. Patients who cannot articulate their needs respond with frustration and agitation, resulting in poor optimization of post-stroke functions. A key component of patient-centred care is the ability of staff to communicate in a way that allows them to understand the patient’s needs. We developed a patient-centred communication intervention targeting registered and unregulated nursing staff caring for complex continuing care patients with communication impairments post stroke. Research objectives include 1 examining the effects of the intervention on patients’ quality of life, depression, satisfaction with care, and agitation; and (2 examining the extent to which the intervention improves staff’s attitudes and knowledge in caring for patients with communication impairments. The intervention builds on a previous pilot study. Methods/design A quasi-experimental repeated measures non-equivalent control group design in a complex continuing care facility is being used. Patients with a communication impairment post-stroke admitted to the facility are eligible to participate. All staff nurses are eligible. Baseline data are collected from staff and patients. Follow-up will occur at 1 and 3 months post-intervention. Subject recruitment and data collection from 60 patients and 30 staff will take approximately 36 months. The Patient-Centred Communication Intervention consists of three components: (1 development of an individualized patient communication care plan; (2 a one-day workshop focused on communication and behavioural management strategies for nursing staff; and (3 a staff support system. The intervention takes comprehensive patient assessments into account to inform the development of communication and behavioural strategies specifically tailored to each patient. Discussion The Patient-Centred Communication Intervention will provide staff with strategies to

  20. Orthopedic Health: Joint Health and Care: Prevention, Symptoms, Diagnosis & Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... version of this page please turn Javascript on. Prevention Regular exercise, a balanced diet, and a healthful weight can help you reduce your risk of developing osteoarthritis, especially in the hips and knees, or suffering sports injuries. Exercise helps bone density, improves muscle strength and ...

  1. Compliance With Infection Prevention Guidelines By Health Care ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    revealed varied levels of compliance on different components of infection prevention. The highest level of compliance (100%) was with single use of needles and syringes while the lowest (35.1) was with decontamination of needles and syringes with 0.5% chlorine solution prior to disposal. Compliance with hand hygiene ...

  2. Does antenatal care attendance prevent anemia in pregnancy at term?

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Anemia in pregnancy is one of the public health problems in the developed and developing world. If uncontrolled it is a major indirect cause of maternal and perinatal morbidity and mortality. This is worst in settings with poor prenatal practices. Quality prenatal interventions therefore are expected to prevent or ...

  3. Preventive risk assessment in forensic child and youth care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Assink, M.

    2017-01-01

    Risk assessment is central to the work of forensic mental health professionals, since it serves as a guide for prevention and intervention strategies. For effective risk assessment, knowledge on risk factors and their effects as well as the availability of valid and reliable instruments for risk

  4. Perceived barriers to preventive dental care among Libyan dentists

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2014-04-23

    Apr 23, 2014 ... Settings and design: A cross-sectional, questionnaire-based survey was .... Table 3 reports comparison of barriers by to preventive .... and customer needs, and have less control at work, which ... needs and contributes to job satisfaction (21). .... received any funding or benefits from industry or else- where to ...

  5. Child/Youth Homelessness: housing affordability, early intervention, and preventive care in Australia

    OpenAIRE

    Shiga, Fumiya

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to explore the child/youth homelessness including its preventive care.This paper explores the housing support program implemented across Australia in brief at first, and then profile child/youth homelessness and housing policy. Based on that, it discusses early intervention and preventive methods followed by the conclusion.

  6. The surgical care improvement project and prevention of post-operative infection, including surgical site infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenberger, Laura H; Politano, Amani D; Sawyer, Robert G

    2011-06-01

    In response to inconsistent compliance with infection prevention measures, the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services collaborated with the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention on the Surgical Infection Prevention (SIP) project, introduced in 2002. Quality improvement measures were developed to standardize processes to increase compliance. In 2006, the Surgical Care Improvement Project (SCIP) developed out of the SIP project and its process measures. These initiatives, published in the Specifications Manual for National Inpatient Quality Measures, outline process and outcome measures. This continually evolving manual is intended to provide standard quality measures to unify documentation and track standards of care. Seven of the SCIP initiatives apply to the peri-operative period: Prophylactic antibiotics should be received within 1 h prior to surgical incision (1), be selected for activity against the most probable antimicrobial contaminants (2), and be discontinued within 24 h after the surgery end-time (3); (4) euglycemia should be maintained, with well-controlled morning blood glucose concentrations on the first two post-operative days, especially in cardiac surgery patients; (6) hair at the surgical site should be removed with clippers or by depilatory methods, not with a blade; (9) urinary catheters are to be removed within the first two post-operative days; and (10) normothermia should be maintained peri-operatively. There is strong evidence that implementation of protocols that standardize practices reduce the risk of surgical infection. The SCIP initiative targets complications that account for a significant portion of preventable morbidity as well as cost. One of the goals of the SCIP guidelines was a 25% reduction in the incidence of surgical site infections from implementation through 2010. Process measures are becoming routine, and as we practice more evidence-based medicine, it falls to us, the surgeons and scientists, to be active

  7. Continuity of care: what matters to women when they are referred from primary to secondary care during labour? a qualitative interview study in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jonge, J.; Stuijt, R.; Eijke, I.; Westerman, M.J.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Continuity of care during labour is important for women. Women with an intrapartum referral from primary to secondary care look back more negatively on their birh experience compared to those who are not referred. It is not clear which aspects of care contribute to this negative birth

  8. Continuity of care in dermatology residency programs in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loh, Tiffany; Vazirnia, Aria; Afshar, Maryam; Dorschner, Robert; Paravar, Taraneh

    2017-05-15

    As established by the AccreditationCouncil for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME),dermatology residents in the United States must participate in continuity clinic. This requirement may be achieved through multiple means, allowing for program variation. To better assess continuity clinic's role in resident learning, more data on this component of graduate medical education is needed. An anonymous online survey was distributed via the American Board of Dermatology list serv to all U.S. dermatology residents. Continuity clinic organization, setting, frequency, and patient and preceptor characteristics were assessed; resident satisfaction and learning were compared. Of 231 responses, 7.8% reported continuity clinic daily, 77.1% weekly, 9.1% every other week, 3.0%monthly, 0.4% once every several months, and 2.2%only during certain blocks. Of the clinics reported,80.1% were "resident-run with attending" and 11.3%were attending-run. The rest were "resident-run with no attending" (0.9%), both resident and attending run(3.0%), or "other" (4.8%). Trainees in resident-run clinics (with attendings) reported greater continuity of care than those in attending-run clinics (p<0.001).Residents reported better teaching with attending presence during patient encounters than when attendings were present only if concerns were raised(p<0.01).

  9. Preventive care delivered within Public Dental Service after caries risk assessment of young adults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hänsel Petersson, G; Ericson, E; Twetman, S

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To study preventive care provided to young adults in relation to their estimated risk category over a 3-year period. METHODS: The amount and type of preventive treatment during 3 years was extracted from the digital dental records of 982 patients attending eight public dental clinics...... adults attending public dental service. Further research is needed how to reach those with the greatest need of primary and secondary prevention....

  10. Preventative foot care in people with diabetes: Quality patient ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Foot ulceration and amputation cause extensive burden on individuals and health care systems. One of the reasons for the poor outcome of foot complications in developing countries is the lack of patient education. Due to the multi-factorial pathology of diabetic foot ulceration, the person with diabetes should receive health ...

  11. Infections in Neonatal Intensive Care: Prevalence, Prevention and Antibiotic use

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Hoogen, A.

    2009-01-01

    Neonatal infections are an important cause of morbidity in neonatal intensive care units (NICUs). Prematurity or very low birth weight is an important predisposing factor for neonatal infection. In addition, preterm infants have a compromized immune system and they often require invasive procedures

  12. Veterans Affairs methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus prevention initiative associated with a sustained reduction in transmissions and health care-associated infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Martin E; Kralovic, Stephen M; Simbartl, Loretta A; Freyberg, Ron W; Obrosky, D Scott; Roselle, Gary A; Jain, Rajiv

    2013-11-01

    Implementation of a methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) Prevention Initiative was associated with significant declines in MRSA transmission and MRSA health care-associated infection rates in Veterans Affairs acute care facilities nationwide in the 33-month period from October 2007 through June 2010. Here, we show continuing declines in MRSA transmissions (P = .004 for trend, Poisson regression) and MRSA health care-associated infections (P < .001) from July 2010 through June 2012. The Veterans Affairs Initiative was associated with these effects, sustained over 57 months, in a large national health care system. Published by Mosby, Inc.

  13. Incorporating Multifaceted Mental Health Prevention Services in Community Sectors-of-Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gewirtz, Abigail H.; August, Gerald J.

    2008-01-01

    This article proposes a framework for embedding prevention services into community sectors-of-care. Community sectors-of-care include both formal and grassroot organizations distributed throughout a community that provide various resources and services to at-risk children and their families. Though the child population served by these…

  14. [Knowledge about AIDS prevention among professionals and students in health care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira, A D; Viegas, C R; Sabka, E; Guerra, M; Baltazar, R

    1996-07-01

    This work is a exploratory research based on the analysis of the answers to the questionnaires of 52 students and health care professionals knowledge about AIDS sexual prevention, biosecurity, diagnosis tests, patients and workers rights and the modifications of nursing and medical care to this kind of disease.

  15. Sustained participation in annual continuous quality improvement activities improves quality of care for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAullay, Daniel; McAuley, Kimberley; Bailie, Ross; Mathews, Veronica; Jacoby, Peter; Gardner, Karen; Sibthorpe, Beverly; Strobel, Natalie; Edmond, Karen

    2018-02-01

    To determine whether participation in the continuous quality improvement (CQI) Audit and Best Practice for Chronic Disease programme improved care and outcomes for Indigenous children. Data were collected from 59 Australian primary health-care centres providing services to Indigenous people and participating in the programme (February 2008 and December 2013). Indigenous children aged less than 2 years and centres that completed three or more consecutive annual audits within the 6-year study period were included. Crude and adjusted logistic generalised estimating equation models were used to examine the effect of year of audit on the delivery of care. Odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence interval (CI) were calculated. Outcomes were related to age-relevant health issues, including prevention and early intervention. These included administrative, health check, anticipatory guidance and specific health issues. During the audit period, there were 2360 files from 59 centres. Those that had a recall recorded, improved from 84 to 95% (OR 2.44, 95% CI 1.44-4.11). Hearing assessments improved from 52 to 89% (OR 1.37, 95% CI 1.22-1.54). Improvement in anticipatory guidance, treatment and follow-up of medical conditions was almost universal. We documented significant improvements in quality of care of Indigenous children. Outcomes and their corresponding treatment and follow-ups improved over time. This appears to be related to services participating in annual CQI activities. However, these services may be more committed to CQI than others and therefore possibly better performing. © 2017 Paediatrics and Child Health Division (The Royal Australasian College of Physicians).

  16. Integrating Quality Improvement and Continuing Professional Development: A Model From the Mental Health Care System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sockalingam, Sanjeev; Tehrani, Hedieh; Lin, Elizabeth; Lieff, Susan; Harris, Ilene; Soklaridis, Sophie

    2016-04-01

    To explore the perspectives of leaders in psychiatry and continuing professional development (CPD) regarding the relationship, opportunities, and challenges in integrating quality improvement (QI) and CPD. In 2013-2014, the authors interviewed 18 participants in Canada: 10 psychiatrists-in-chief, 6 CPD leaders in psychiatry, and 2 individuals with experience integrating these domains in psychiatry who were identified through snowball sampling. Questions were designed to identify participants' perspectives about the definition, relationship, and integration of QI and CPD in psychiatry. Interviews were recorded and transcribed. An iterative, inductive method was used to thematically analyze the transcripts. To ensure the rigor of the analysis, the authors performed member checking and sampling until theoretical saturation was achieved. Participants defined QI as a concept measured at the individual, hospital, and health care system levels and CPD as a concept measured predominantly at the individual and hospital levels. Four themes related to the relationship between QI and CPD were identified: challenges with QI training, adoption of QI into the mental health care system, implementation of QI in CPD, and practice improvement outcomes. Despite participants describing QI and CPD as mutually beneficial, they expressed uncertainty about the appropriateness of aligning these domains within a mental health care context because of the identified challenges. This study identified challenges with aligning QI and CPD in psychiatry and yielded a framework to inform future integration efforts. Further research is needed to determine the generalizability of this framework to other specialties and health care professions.

  17. Hospitalized Patients' Perceptions of Resident Fatigue, Duty Hours, and Continuity of Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drolet, Brian C; Hyman, Charles H; Ghaderi, Kimeya F; Rodriguez-Srednicki, Joshua; Thompson, Jordan M; Fischer, Staci A

    2014-12-01

    Physicians' perceptions of duty hour regulations have been closely examined, yet patient opinions have been largely unstudied to date. We studied patient perceptions of residency duty hours, fatigue, and continuity of care following implementation of the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education 2011 Common Program Requirements. A cross-sectional survey was administered between June and August 2013 to inpatients at a large academic medical center and an affiliated community hospital. Adult inpatients on teaching medical and surgical services were eligible for inclusion in the study. Survey response rate was 71.3% (513 of 720). Most respondents (57.1%, 293 of 513) believed residents should not be assigned to shifts longer than 12 hours, and nearly half (49.7%, 255 of 513) wanted to be notified if a resident caring for them had worked longer than 12 hours. Most patients (63.2%, 324 of 513) believed medical errors commonly occurred because of fatigue, and fewer (37.4%, 192 of 513; odds ratio, 0.56; P care. Given the choice between a familiar physician who "may be tired from a long shift" or a "fresh" physician who had received sign-out, more patients chose the fresh but unfamiliar physician (57.1% [293 of 513] versus 42.7% [219 of 513], P care.

  18. The new health-care quality: value, outcomes, and continuous improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connor, S J; Lanning, J A

    1991-01-01

    No longer convinced that their viewpoint on quality is the only one, different stakeholders in the health-care arena are sharing perspectives to piece together the quality picture. Although still preoccupied with the cost of health care, purchasers are concerned about value--efficiency, appropriateness, and effectiveness--as well as price. Faced with evidence of medically unnecessary procedures and unexamined medical theory, practitioners are searching for appropriateness guidelines, useful outcome measures, and methods to elicit informed patient preferences about elective surgeries. Underlying this search for reliable indicators of quality--now expanded to include patient satisfaction--is a new interest in the Japanese notion of "Kaizen" or continuous quality improvement. The end product of this ferment may determine whether good medicine drives out the bad--or vice versa.

  19. What are the roles involved in establishing and maintaining informational continuity of care within family practice? A systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agarwal Gina

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Central to establishing continuity of care is the development of a relationship between doctor and patient/caregiver. Transfer of information between these parties facilitates the development of continuity in general; and specifically informational continuity of care. We conducted a systematic review of published literature to gain a better understanding of the roles that different parties – specifically doctors, patients, family caregivers, and technology – play in establishing and maintaining informational continuity of care within family practice. Methods Relevant published articles were sought from five databases. Accepted articles were reviewed and appraised in a consistent way. Fifty-six articles were retained following title and abstract reviews. Of these, 28 were accepted for this review. Results No articles focused explicitly on the roles involved in establishing or maintaining informational continuity of care within family practice. Most informational continuity of care literature focused on the transfer of information between settings and not at the first point of contact. Numerous roles were, however, were interpreted using the data extracted from reviewed articles. Doctors are responsible for record keeping, knowing patients' histories, recalling accumulated knowledge, and maintaining confidentiality. Patients are responsible for disclosing personal and health details, transferring information to other practitioners (including new family doctors, and establishing trust. Both are responsible for developing a relationship of trust. Technology is an important tool of informational continuity of care through holding important information, providing search functions, and providing a space for recorded information. There is a significant gap in our knowledge about the roles that family caregivers play. Conclusion The number of roles identified and the interrelationships between them indicates that establishing and

  20. Relationship Between Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder Care and Medication Continuity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brinkman, William B; Baum, Rebecca; Kelleher, Kelly J; Peugh, James; Gardner, William; Lichtenstein, Phil; Langberg, Joshua; Epstein, Jeffery N

    2016-04-01

    To describe the relationships between attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) care practices and subsequent medication use. A retrospective cohort from a random sample of medical records in 50 pediatric practices with 188 providers, including 1,352 children who started ADHD medication, was studied. Independent variables included physician behaviors related to medication titration and monitoring of treatment response. Primary outcomes were number of days covered with ADHD medication during the first year of treatment and time from starting medicine to the first 30-day gap in medication supply. Multilevel modeling and Cox proportional hazards regression models were conducted. Children had an average medication supply of 217 days in the first year. Half experienced a 30-day gap in medication supply in the first 3 months. Nearly three-fourths had a medication adjustment in the first year with the first adjustment usually being a dosage change. The average time to the first medication adjustment was over 3 months. Physician's first contact with parents occurred in the first month of treatment for less than half, with the average time being over 2 months. Little variation related to ADHD care quality was accounted for at the physician level. Early titration and early contact were related to greater medication supply and continuity of treatment. Earlier physician-delivered ADHD care (e.g., contact with parent after starting medication and medication adjustment) is related to greater medication supply and continuity. It remains to be determined whether interventions that improve the quality of titration and monitoring practices for children with ADHD would also improve medication continuity. Copyright © 2016 American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Oncologic prevention and suggested working standards in primary health care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konstantinović Dejan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available On the ground of the available data, this paper presents the problem of malignant diseases in Central Serbia, and most common carcinogens. Division of carcinogens, cancerogenesis and natural history of disease, early detection of cancer and palliative management are explained. The role and capacities of primary health care doctors in treatment of patients with suspect malignant disease are presented. Authors are suggesting standards for medical tasks and contemporary principles in approach to patients with malignant diseases in everyday practice.

  2. Urinary tract infections in extended care facilities: preventive management strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regal, Randolph E; Pham, Co Q D; Bostwick, Thomas R

    2006-05-01

    To provide health care professionals with an overview of interventions that may be done to reduce the incidence of urinary tract infections (UTIs) in elderly patients, especially those residing in extended care facilities. A Medline search of the English literature was performed from 1980 to January 2006 to find literature relevant to urinary tract prophylaxis. Further references were hand-searched from relevant sources. When assessing the effectiveness of various clinical interventions for reducing the incidence of UTIs in the elderly, preference was given to more recent, double-blind, placebo-controlled randomized studies, but studies of less robust design also were included in the discussions when the former were lacking. Where possible, recent publications were favored over older studies. References were all reviewed by the authors and chosen to present key citations. Data selection was prioritized to address specific subtopics. Though still frequent in occurrence and quite costly in terms of morbidity, mortality, and cost to the health care system, numerous measures may be taken to ameliorate the incidence of UTIs in elderly, institutionalized residents. First and foremost, establishing and adhering to good infection-control practices by health care givers and minimizing the use of indwelling catheters are essential. Adequate staffing and training are germane to this effort. Reasonably well-designed clinical studies also give credence to the use of topical estrogens and lactobacillus "probiotics" for female subgroups and cranberry juice for a wider array of patients. Vitamin C is of no proven benefit. With regard to antibiotics, with the relative paucity of data available for this patient population, concerns for resistance proliferation must be balanced against perceived gains in UTI reduction.

  3. Attitudes About and Practices of Health Promotion and Prevention Among Primary Care Providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luquis, Raffy R; Paz, Harold L

    2015-09-01

    The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act's emphasis on health promotion and prevention activities required an examination of the current practices of primary care providers in these areas. A total of 196 primary care providers completed a survey to assess current health promotion and prevention attitudes, practices, and barriers. Results of this study showed that family physicians in Pennsylvania recognize the importance of and their role in providing health promotion and prevention and offer advice in key behavioral and disease prevention areas. Results from the study suggest that their ability to provide these services is hindered by a lack of time and the heavy workload. Although most family physicians provided advice to patients in several health promotion and prevention areas, few participants reported that they referred patients to other health professionals. Finally, when it comes to preventive services, participants ranked blood pressure screening, tobacco use screening, and tobacco use cessation interventions as the most important services. Effective implementation of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act will require necessary resources and support of primary care providers to help patients achieve healthier lives. © 2014 Society for Public Health Education.

  4. Development of STEADI: a fall prevention resource for health care providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Judy A; Phelan, Elizabeth A

    2013-09-01

    Falls among people aged ≥65 years are the leading cause of both injury deaths and emergency department visits for trauma. Research shows that many falls are preventable. In the clinical setting, an effective fall intervention involves assessing and addressing an individual's fall risk factors. This individualized approach is recommended in the American and British Geriatrics Societies' (AGS/BGS) practice guideline. This article describes the development of STEADI (Stopping Elderly Accidents, Deaths, and Injuries), a fall prevention tool kit that contains an array of health care provider resources for assessing and addressing fall risk in clinical settings. As researchers at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Injury Center, we reviewed relevant literature and conducted in-depth interviews with health care providers to determine current knowledge and practices related to older adult fall prevention. We developed draft resources based on the AGS/BGS guideline, incorporated provider input, and addressed identified knowledge and practice gaps. Draft resources were reviewed by six focus groups of health care providers and revised. The completed STEADI tool kit, Preventing Falls in Older Patients-A Provider Tool Kit, is designed to help health care providers incorporate fall risk assessment and individualized fall interventions into routine clinical practice and to link clinical care with community-based fall prevention programs.

  5. Patient perspectives on continuity of care: adaption and preliminary psychometric assessment of a Norwegian version of the Nijmegen Continuity Questionnaire (NCQ-N

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Øystein Hetlevik

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Continuity of care is regarded as a core quality element in healthcare. Continuity can be related to one or more specific caregivers but also applies to collaboration within a team or across boundaries of healthcare. Measuring continuity is important to identify problems and evaluate quality improvement of interventions. This study aimed to assess the feasibility and psychometric properties of a Norwegian version of the Nijmegen Continuity Questionnaire (NCQ. Methods The NCQ was developed in The Netherlands. It measures patients’ experienced continuity of care across multiple care settings and as a multidimensional concept regardless of morbidity. The NCQ comprises 28 items categorised into three subscales; two personal continuity scales, “care giver knows me” and “shows commitment”, asked regarding the patient’s general practitioner (GP and the most important specialist; and one “team/cross boundary continuity” scale, asked regarding primary care, specialised care and cooperation between GP and specialist, with a total of seven factors. The NCQ was translated and adapted to Norwegian (NCQ-N and distributed among patients referred to somatic rehabilitation (N = 984, response rate 34.5%. Confirmatory factor analyses (CFA, Cronbach’s alpha, intra-class correlation (ICC and Bland–Altman plots were used to assess psychometric properties. Results All patients (N = 375 who had responded to all parts of the NCQ-N were included in CFA. The CFA fit indices (CFI 0.941, RMSEA 0.064 (95% CI 0.059–0.070, SRMR 0.041 support a seven-factor structure in the NCQ-N based on the three subscales of the original NCQ. Cronbach’s alpha showed internal consistency (0.84–0.97, and was highest for the team/cross-boundary subscales. The NCQ-N showed overall high reliability with ICC 0.84–91 for personal continuity factors and 0.67–0.91 for team factors, with the lowest score for team continuity within primary care

  6. RoVi: Continuous transport infrastructure monitoring framework for preventive maintenance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Seraj, Fatjon; Meratnia, Nirvana; Havinga, Paul J.M.

    2017-01-01

    Ground transport infrastructures require in-situ monitoring to evaluate their condition and deterioration and to design appropriate preventive maintenance strategies. Current monitoring practices provide accurate and detailed spatial measurements but often lack the required temporal resolution. This

  7. Surrogate decision makers' perspectives on preventable breakdowns in care among critically ill patients: A qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Kimberly A; Ahmad, Sumera; Jackson, Madeline; Mazor, Kathleen M

    2016-10-01

    To describe surrogate decision makers' (SDMs) perspectives on preventable breakdowns in care among critically ill patients. We screened 70 SDMs of critically ill patients for those who identified a preventable breakdown in care, defined as an event where the SDM believes something "went wrong", that could have been prevented, and resulted in harm. In-depth interviews were conducted with SDMs who identified an eligible event. 32 of 70 participants (46%) identified at least one preventable breakdown in care, with a total of 75 discrete events. Types of breakdowns involved medical care (n=52), communication (n=59), and both (n=40). Four additional breakdowns were related to problems with SDM bedside access to the patient. Adverse consequences of breakdowns included physical harm, need for additional medical care, emotional distress, pain, suffering, loss of trust, life disruption, impaired decision making, and financial expense. 28 of 32 SDMs raised their concerns with clinicians, yet only 25% were satisfactorily addressed. SDMs of critically ill patients frequently identify preventable breakdowns in care which result in harm. An in-depth understanding of the types of events SDMs find problematic and the associated harms is an important step towards improving the safety and patient-centeredness of healthcare. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Plasma concentrations of midazolam during continuous subcutaneous administration in palliative care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bleasel, M D; Peterson, G M; Dunne, P F

    1994-01-01

    We have investigated the steady-state plasma concentrations of midazolam during continuous subcutaneous administration in palliative care. Using a sensitive gas chromatography with electron capture detector assay, plasma concentrations of midazolam were measured in 11 patients (median age 68 years; range 47-82 years; six females) receiving the drug by continuous subcutaneous infusion (median rate 20 mg/day; range 10-60 mg/day). While not significant, the infusion rate tended to decrease with increasing age of the patient (Spearman's p = -0.51; p = 0.11). The steady-state plasma concentration range was 10-147 ng/ml, with a median of 30 ng/ml. Infusion rates and plasma concentrations of midazolam were correlated (Spearman's p = 0.71; p < 0.05). No other significant relationships were found between plasma concentrations and the variables of age, sex and liver function.

  9. Medicaid Primary Care Physician Fees and the Use of Preventive Services among Medicaid Enrollees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atherly, Adam; Mortensen, Karoline

    2014-01-01

    Objective The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA) increases Medicaid physician fees for preventive care up to Medicare rates for 2013 and 2014. The purpose of this paper was to model the relationship between Medicaid preventive care payment rates and the use of U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF)–recommended preventive care use among Medicaid enrollees. Data Sources/Study Session We used data from the 2003 and 2008 Medical Expenditure Panel Survey (MEPS), a national probability sample of the U.S. civilian, noninstitutionalized population, linked to Kaiser state Medicaid benefits data, including the state Medicaid-to-Medicare physician fee ratio in 2003 and 2008. Study Design Probit models were used to estimate the probability that eligible individuals received one of five USPSF-recommended preventive services. A difference-in-difference model was used to separate out the effect of changes in the Medicaid payment rate and other factors. Data Collection/Extraction Methods Data were linked using state identifiers. Principal Findings Although Medicaid enrollees had a lower rate of use of the five preventive services in univariate analysis, neither Medicaid enrollment nor changes in Medicaid payment rates had statistically significant effects on meeting screening recommendations for the five screenings. The results were robust to a number of different sensitivity tests. Individual and state characteristics were significant. Conclusions Our results suggest that although temporary changes in primary care provider payments for preventive services for Medicaid enrollees may have other desirable effects, they are unlikely to substantially increase the use of these selected USPSTF-recommended preventive care services among Medicaid enrollees. PMID:24628495

  10. Youth Violence Prevention and Safety: Opportunities for Health Care Providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duke, Naomi Nichele; Borowsky, Iris Wagman

    2015-10-01

    Violence involvement remains a leading cause of morbidity and mortality for youth and young adults in the United States. The impact of adverse childhood experiences on violence involvement can be translated to the cellular level, including alterations in brain structure and function responsible for stress reactivity and coping. This knowledge is counterbalanced by a growing understanding of what works in the realm of youth violence prevention. Incorporating a resilience framework, with its focus on building developmental assets and resources at individual, family, and community levels, offers a renewed approach to fostering healthy behaviors and coping strategies. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Migraine-preventive prescription patterns by physician specialty in ambulatory care settings in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takaki, Hiroko; Onozuka, Daisuke; Hagihara, Akihito

    2018-03-01

    Many adults with migraine who require preventive therapy are often not prescribed the proper medications. The most likely reason is that primary care physicians are unacquainted with preventive medications for migraine. The present study assessed the migraine-preventive prescription patterns in office visits using data from the National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey from 2006 to 2009 in the United States. Patients who were 18 years or older and diagnosed with migraine were included in the analysis. In accordance with the recommendations of the headache guidelines, we included beta-blockers, antidepressants, triptans for short-term prevention of menstrual migraine, and other triptans for acute treatment. Weighted visits of adults with migraine prescribed with preventive medication ranged from 32.8% in 2006 to 38.6% in 2009. Visits to primary care physicians accounted for 72.6% of the analyzed adult migraine visits. Anticonvulsants (odds ratio [OR] 0.29, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.14-0.57, p  < 0.001) and triptans for menstrual migraine (OR 0.50, 95% CI 0.28-0.91, p  = 0.025) were less frequently prescribed by primary care physicians compared with specialty care physicians, such as neurologists and psychiatrists. There were no significant differences in the prescription patterns of antidepressants and beta-blockers between primary and specialty care physicians. Beta-blockers were prescribed to patients with comorbidity of hypertension, and antidepressants were used by patients with comorbidity of depression. There are differences in the prescription patterns of certain type of preventive medications between primary care physicians and specialty care physicians.

  12. Migraine-preventive prescription patterns by physician specialty in ambulatory care settings in the United States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroko Takaki

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Many adults with migraine who require preventive therapy are often not prescribed the proper medications. The most likely reason is that primary care physicians are unacquainted with preventive medications for migraine. The present study assessed the migraine-preventive prescription patterns in office visits using data from the National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey from 2006 to 2009 in the United States. Patients who were 18 years or older and diagnosed with migraine were included in the analysis. In accordance with the recommendations of the headache guidelines, we included beta-blockers, antidepressants, triptans for short-term prevention of menstrual migraine, and other triptans for acute treatment. Weighted visits of adults with migraine prescribed with preventive medication ranged from 32.8% in 2006 to 38.6% in 2009. Visits to primary care physicians accounted for 72.6% of the analyzed adult migraine visits. Anticonvulsants (odds ratio [OR] 0.29, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.14–0.57, p < 0.001 and triptans for menstrual migraine (OR 0.50, 95% CI 0.28–0.91, p = 0.025 were less frequently prescribed by primary care physicians compared with specialty care physicians, such as neurologists and psychiatrists. There were no significant differences in the prescription patterns of antidepressants and beta-blockers between primary and specialty care physicians. Beta-blockers were prescribed to patients with comorbidity of hypertension, and antidepressants were used by patients with comorbidity of depression. There are differences in the prescription patterns of certain type of preventive medications between primary care physicians and specialty care physicians.

  13. What factors influence the provision of preventive care by general dental practitioners?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sbaraini, A

    2012-06-08

    What factors influence a general dental practitioner to offer preventive care to patients? A potential answer to this question is presented based on the findings of a qualitative study recently undertaken in general dental practice in Australia. A model of how practices come to be oriented towards preventive or restorative care is described, condensing all of the findings of the study into a single framework. Eight practices were studied and highlighted the interaction between two factors: leadership in practice and prioritisation of cultural, social and economic resources. In this model, dentists' leadership to reorient the prioritisation of resources towards preventive care was crucial. Ideally a whole practice changed to preventive philosophy, but change was also possible in a single dentist within a practice. Prioritisation of resources was also key and interacted with dentist leadership. Prioritisation could be seen in the reorganisation of space, routines and fee schedules. During this process, one key support factor for dentists was their external networks of trusted peers and respected practicing dentists. These peers were crucial for transferring preventive knowledge within small networks of dentists who trusted one another; their influence was reportedly more important than centrally produced guidelines or academic advice. In order to help dentists change their practices towards preventive care, the findings from our study suggest that it is important to intervene in these local networks by identifying local dental opinion leaders. During this study, the key conditions needed for practices to reorient to preventive care included the presence of a committed leader with a prevention-supportive peer network, and the reorientation of space, routines and fee schedules to support preventive practice.

  14. Obstacles to preventive care for individuals with disability: Implications for nurse practitioners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marrocco, Anna; Krouse, Helene J

    2017-05-01

    Individuals with disabilities have been identified as a population with a significantly lower usage of preventive services. Nurse practitioners (NPs) provide a key access point in the healthcare delivery system for preventive services for vulnerable populations such as those with disabilities. It is essential to understand existing barriers that prohibit access to effective preventive care for this vulnerable population. Systematic search and review of Cumulative Index of Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL), Medline, PubMed, Google Scholar, and government reports and World Health Organizations reports. Twenty-six articles were included in the review. This literature review confirmed previous notions that people with disabilities are receiving much fewer preventive services than the general population. The studies reviewed identified four major barriers that contributed to the lack of preventive care. These barriers included physical environment and system, transportation, provider knowledge and attitude, and financial. Recognition of the obstacles that this subpopulation faces in accessing preventive care services is the first step to effectively remedying this problem. Preventive services have been identified as one of the cornerstones to improving health and quality of life. By understanding the circumstances that restrict those with disabilities from accessing preventive services, NPs can provide meaningful and effective solutions. ©2017 American Association of Nurse Practitioners.

  15. Up-to-Date on Preventive Care Services Under Affordable Care Act: A Trend Analysis From MEPS 2007-2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Young-Rock; Jo, Ara; Mainous, Arch G

    2017-08-01

    The utilization of preventive care services has been less than optimal. As part of an effort to address this, the Affordable Care Act (ACA) mandated that private health insurance plans cover evidence-based preventive services. To evaluate whether the provisions of ACA have increased being up-to-date on recommended preventive care services among privately insured individuals aged 18-64. Multivariate linear regression models were used to examine trends in prevalence of being up-to-date on selected preventive services, diagnosis of health conditions, and health expenditures between pre-ACA (2007-2010) and post-ACA (2011-2014). Adjusted difference-in-difference analyses were used to estimate changes in those outcomes in the privately insured that differed from changes in the uninsured (control group). After the passage of ACA, up-to-date rates of routine checkup (2.7%; 95% confidence interval, 0.8%-4.7%; P=0.007) and flu vaccination (5.9%; 95% confidence interval, 4.2%-7.6%; Ppreventive care services. Additional efforts may be required to take full advantage of the elimination of cost-sharing under the ACA.

  16. HALOTHERAPY FOR PREVENTION AND MEDICAL REHABILITATION IN PEDIATRIC HEALTH CARE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alina V. Chervinskaya

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The primary focus of medical rehabilitation is the approach of model simulation of natural environment. Halotherapy is one of the nonpharmacological methods widely used in Russian public health care delivery including prophylaxis and rehabilitation in children. This method is based on the recreation of the air environment of a natural underground salt mine. The article presents an innovative method using a next generation of equipment for halotherapy: a guided halocomplex where the control on dosage regiments and aerodisperse medium parameters is implemented. The mechanisms of the effect of halotherapy are considered, the data of the clinical effectiveness for various paediatric diseases are outlined. 

  17. The dual impact of "appeal" and "researcher credibility" on mail survey response rate in the context of preventive health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angur, M G; Nataraajan, R; Chawla, S K

    1994-01-01

    Health and fitness centers are becoming increasingly aware of their importance in the realm of preventive health care. Many hospitals have begun to open and run fitness centers, a trend that seems very likely to continue. In a competitive environment, every center would desire to obtain maximum valid customer information at minimum cost, and this paper addresses this issue. The authors investigate the confluence of both appeal and researcher credibility on mail questionnaire response rates from a metropolitan membership of a large fitness center. Personal appeal with high researcher credibility was found to generate significantly higher response rate followed by the hybrid appeal with low researcher credibility.

  18. Continuous bedside pressure mapping and rates of hospital-associated pressure ulcers in a medical intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behrendt, Robert; Ghaznavi, Amir M; Mahan, Meredith; Craft, Susan; Siddiqui, Aamir

    2014-03-01

    Critically ill patients are vulnerable to the development of hospital-associated pressure ulcers (HAPUs). Positioning of patients is an essential component of pressure ulcer prevention because it off-loads areas of high pressure. However, the effectiveness of such positioning is debatable. A continuous bedside pressure mapping (CBPM) device can provide real-time feedback of optimal body position though a pressure-sensing mat that displays pressure images at a patient's bedside, allowing off-loading of high-pressure areas and possibly preventing HAPU formation. A prospective controlled study was designed to determine if CBPM would reduce the number of HAPUs in patients treated in our medical intensive care unit. In 2 months, 422 patients were enrolled and assigned to beds equipped with or without a CBPM device. Patients' skin was assessed daily and weekly to determine the presence and progress of HAPUs. All patients were turned every 2 hours. CBPM patients were repositioned to off-load high-pressure points during turning, according to a graphic display. The number of newly formed HAPUs was the primary outcome measured. A χ(2) test was then used to compare the occurrence of HAPUs between groups. HAPUs developed in 2 of 213 patients in the CBPM group (0.9%; both stage II) compared with 10 of 209 in the control group (4.8%; all stage II; P = .02). Significantly fewer HAPUs occurred in the CBPM group than the control group, indicating the effectiveness of real-time visual feedback in repositioning of patients to prevent the formation of new HAPUs.

  19. The dentist's care-taking perspective of dental fear patients - a continuous and changing challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gyllensvärd, K; Qvarnström, M; Wolf, E

    2016-08-01

    The aim was to analyse the care taking of dental fear patients from the perspective of the dentist, using a qualitative methodology. In total, 11 dentists from both the private and public dental service were selected through a purposive sampling according to their experience of treating dental fear patients, their gender, age, service affiliation and location of undergraduate education. Data were obtained using one semi-structured interview with each informant. The interviews were taped and verbatim transcribed. The text was analysed using qualitative content analysis. The theme, 'The transforming autodidactic process of care taking', covering the interpretative level of data content was identified. The first main category covering the descriptive level of data was 'The continuous and changing challenge', with the subcategories 'The emotional demand' and 'The financial stress'. The second main category identified was 'The repeated collection of experience', with the subcategories 'The development of resources' and 'The emotional change'. The dentists' experience of treating dental fear patients was considered a challenging self-taught process under continuous transformation. The competence and routine platform expanded over time, parallel to a change of connected emotions from frustration towards safety, although challenges remained. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Intraocular 6-hydroxydopamine prevents the persistent estrus induced by continuous light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, K; Hokano, M

    1985-01-15

    Following the intraocular injection of 6-hydroxydopamine, which can destroy the retinal dopaminergic neurons, female rats showed a normal estrous cycle in LD 12:12 but not a persistent estrus in continuous light.

  1. Comparing Dental and Pharmacy Students’ Perceptions on Public Health and Preventive Health Care Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandiracioglu, Aliye; Dogan, Fethi

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: A Public health course has an important role in the undergraduate education of pharmacy and dentistry in terms of emphasizing preventive care. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the views of pharmacy and dentistry students on a public health course and preventive health care. Methods: 173 students enrolled at Ege University, Faculties of Pharmacy and Dentistry completed a SWOT (Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities, and Threats) analysis and replied to 18 Likert type question to determine their perceptions on a public health course and preventive health care. The comments of the students were reviewed and categorized into key themes. Results: SWOT analysis and the results of quantitative Likert type questions supported each other. According to the quantitative results, there was no significant difference between the scores of students from both schools in terms of their statements about the public health course and preventive care. Both groups of students mentioned the contribution of the public health course to their professions in the future. They also appreciated the importance of preventive care in the health services. PMID:22347604

  2. [Multicenter survey on ventilator-associated pneumonia prevention in intensive care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, M-O; Garreau, N; Jarno, P; Villers, D; Dufour Trivini, M; Gérard, J-L; Fellahi, J-L; Hanouz, J-L; Parienti, J-J

    2013-12-01

    Ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) is the most common hospital-acquired infection in intensive care unit (ICU). The aim of the study was to evaluate the follow-up of the guidelines for VAP prevention. Retrospective, observational and multicenter study. During one year, all patients with mechanical ventilation over 48 hours were included in the CCLIN-Ouest Network. The demographic characteristics of the patients, the use of specific protocol for VAP prevention and the density of incidence of VAP were recorded. The use of a protocol for preventing VAP (absence, incomplete, complete and care bundle (i.e. complete prevention of VAP with weaning mechanical protocol and sedation protocol)) was collected. 26 ICU with 5742 patients were included. Ten ICU (38%; 2595 patients) had no protocol for VAP prevention, eight ICU (31%; 1821 patients) had an incomplete protocol, five ICU (19%; 561 patients) had a complete protocol and three ICU (12%; 765 patients) had a care bundle. The density of incidence of VAP was 14.8‰ (Interquartile range [IQR]: 10.2-0.1) for no protocol group, 15.6‰ [IQR: 12.6-6.2] for incomplete protocol group, 11.0‰ [IQR: 9.1-14.0] for complete protocol group and 12.9‰ [5-7,7-9,9-12] for care bundle group (P=0.742). The compliance to prevention of VAP was poor. Proposals for improving practice are discussed. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier SAS.

  3. Suicide Prevention Training: Policies for Health Care Professionals Across the United States as of October 2017.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graves, Janessa M; Mackelprang, Jessica L; Van Natta, Sara E; Holliday, Carrie

    2018-06-01

    To identify and compare state policies for suicide prevention training among health care professionals across the United States and benchmark state plan updates against national recommendations set by the surgeon general and the National Action Alliance for Suicide Prevention in 2012. We searched state legislation databases to identify policies, which we described and characterized by date of adoption, target audience, and duration and frequency of the training. We used descriptive statistics to summarize state-by-state variation in suicide education policies. In the United States, as of October 9, 2017, 10 (20%) states had passed legislation mandating health care professionals complete suicide prevention training, and 7 (14%) had policies encouraging training. The content and scope of policies varied substantially. Most states (n = 43) had a state suicide prevention plan that had been revised since 2012, but 7 lacked an updated plan. Considerable variation in suicide prevention training for health care professionals exists across the United States. There is a need for consistent polices in suicide prevention training across the nation to better equip health care providers to address the needs of patients who may be at risk for suicide.

  4. Nursing Care Model Based on Knowledge Management in Preventing Nosocomial Infection After Caesarean Section in Hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahsan Ahsan

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Nosocomial infection is one indicator of the quality of health services in the community, which also determines the image of health care institutions becauseit was a major cause of morbidityand death rate (mortality in hospital. Nursing care based on knowledge management is established from identification knowledge which is required, prevention performance of nosocomial infections post section caesarea. Nosocomial infections component consists of wound culture result. Method: This study was an observational study with a quasi experimental design. The population was all of nursing staff who working in obstetrics installation in hospitals A and B as much as 46 people. Sample was the total population. Data was collected through questionnaire, observation sheets and examination of the wound culture. Data was analyzed using t test B 1.274 dan p=0.028 Result: The result showed that 1 there was difference in knowledge management implementation before and after training; 2 there was difference in nurse’s performance in preventing nosocomial infection before and after training; 3 there is significant relationship between nurse’s performance in preventing nosocomial infection and infection incidence; 4 there is no significant difference of nursing care impementation on nosocomial incidence. Discussion: In conclusion, the development of nursing care based on knowledge management as a synthesis or induction of findings directed at 1 nurses’ knowledge does not affect the performance of the prevention of nosocomial infections; 2 knowledge management has a positive effect on the performance of the prevention of nosocomial infections; 3 implementation of infection prevention is integrated capabilities between knowledge, skills and attitudes of nurses in implementing performance in care. Keywords: model prevention, nosocomial infections, nursing care, knowledge management, sectio Caesarea

  5. A story of success: continuous quality improvement in cystic fibrosis care in the USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quon, Bradley S; Goss, Christopher H

    2011-12-01

    Continuous quality improvement (CQI) in healthcare can be described as a reiterative approach to improving processes to reduce unexpected variation in health outcomes. CQI represents one model to achieve quality improvement (QI) and has long been recognized as a key to success in the manufacturing industry with companies like Toyota leading the way. Healthcare, and specifically pulmonary, critical care and sleep medicine represent ideal settings for the application of CQI. This opinion piece will describe QI and CQI initiatives in the US Cystic fibrosis (CF) population. QI in CF care in the United States has been ongoing since inception of the US CF Foundation (CFF) in 1955. This effort has included work to improve the quality of clinical care provided at CF centers and work to improve clinical outcomes in CF. More recently, QI methods have been applied to the conduct of clinical research. The CF community has become a leader in the area of QI and has pointed out the opportunities for others to follow in the area of lung diseases.

  6. Observations of infection prevention and control practices in primary health care, Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedoya, Guadalupe; Dolinger, Amy; Rogo, Khama; Mwaura, Njeri; Wafula, Francis; Coarasa, Jorge; Goicoechea, Ana; Das, Jishnu

    2017-07-01

    To assess compliance with infection prevention and control practices in primary health care in Kenya. We used an observational, patient-tracking tool to assess compliance with infection prevention and control practices by 1680 health-care workers during outpatient interactions with 14 328 patients at 935 health-care facilities in 2015. Compliance was assessed in five domains: hand hygiene; protective glove use; injections and blood sampling; disinfection of reusable equipment; and waste segregation. We calculated compliance by dividing the number of correct actions performed by the number of indications and evaluated associations between compliance and the health-care worker's and facility's characteristics. Across 106 464 observed indications for an infection prevention and control practice, the mean compliance was 0.318 (95% confidence interval, CI: 0.315 to 0.321). The compliance ranged from 0.023 (95% CI: 0.021 to 0.024) for hand hygiene to 0.871 (95% CI: 0.866 to 0.876) for injection and blood sampling safety. Compliance was weakly associated with the facility's characteristics (e.g. public or private, or level of specialization) and the health-care worker's knowledge of, and training in, infection prevention and control practices. The observational tool was effective for assessing compliance with infection prevention and control practices across multiple domains in primary health care in a low-income country. Compliance varied widely across infection prevention and control domains. The weak associations observed between compliance and the characteristics of health-care workers and facilities, such as knowledge and the availability of supplies, suggest that a broader focus on behavioural change is required.

  7. Intergenerational Continuity in Child Maltreatment: Mediating Mechanisms and Implications for Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berlin, Lisa J.; Appleyard, Karen; Dodge, Kenneth A.

    2011-01-01

    In the interest of improving child maltreatment prevention, this prospective, longitudinal, community-based study of 499 mothers and their infants examined (a) direct associations between mothers' experiences of childhood maltreatment and their offspring's maltreatment, and (b) mothers' mental health problems, social isolation, and social…

  8. CREATING AND AUDITING A NEW ELECTRONIC CONTINUOUS INFUSION PRESCRIPTION CHART FOR A PAEDIATRIC CRITICAL CARE UNIT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siu, Emily; Sadasivam, Kalaimaran; Christiansen, Nanna

    2016-09-01

    Prescription errors, including continuous infusion prescriptions are one major source of concern in the paediatric population. Evidence suggests that use of an electronic or web-based calculator could minimise these errors. In our paediatric critical care unit (PCCU) we have created an electronic continuous infusion prescription chart to target errors in this area and conducted an audit to assess its effect on error reduction. To create an electronic continuous infusion prescription chart and audit its effect on prescription errors. Similar electronic continuous infusion prescription charts were evaluated. A Choice of electronic formats were considered and excel was chosen for its simplicity and flexibility. The choice of medications to be included, dilution method, and dosage range was agreed between PCCU consultant, pharmacy and nursing staff. Formulas for calculating each medication infusion was created and validated for different age and weight ranges by at least 2 PCCU trained pharmacists, accounting for capping at certain age and weight bands as appropriate for the medication. These were programmed into the spreadsheet for automatic calculation using inputted age and weight for the selected medications. Continuous infusion prescriptions were audited 6 months before and after implementation in April 2015 of this electronic chart. Parameters audited include medication dose, infusion rate, concentration, route, legibility, and missing or incorrect patient details. A trial period of 4 weeks preceded implementation. The electronic continuous infusion prescription form was created and used on PCCU. Hand written prescriptions had higher error rate (30.7%) as compared to electronic charts (0.7%) with a p-value <0.002. No errors were found in electronic prescriptions in regards to dose, volume and rate calculation. The use of an electronic continuous infusion prescription chart has been successfully set up and used on PCCU. Its use has significantly reduced continuous

  9. Evidence of effectiveness of preventive dental care in reducing dental treatment use and related expenditures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pourat, Nadereh; Choi, Moonkyung Kate; Chen, Xiao

    2018-02-06

    Preventive dental health services are intended to reduce the likelihood of development of tooth decay and the need for more intensive treatment overtime. The evidence on the effectiveness of preventive dental care in reducing treatment services and expenditures is lagging for adults, particularly those with lower incomes and chronic conditions. We assessed the impact of preventive dental services on dental treatment service use and expenditures overall and by category of service. We calculated the annual numbers of preventive (periodic diagnostic and prophylactic procedures) and treatment (restorative, surgery, prosthodontic, endodontic, and periodontic) services per beneficiary using Medicaid enrollment and claims data for beneficiaries with three categories of conditions (diabetes, heart disease, and respiratory disease) from 10 largest California counties. We used Cragg hurdle exponential regression models controlling for past service use, demographics, length of enrollment, and county. We found that using preventive services in 2005-2007 was associated with higher likelihood and number of treatment dental services used, but associated with lower treatment expenditures in 2008. The reduction in expenditures was noted only in restorative, prosthodontics, and periodontic services. The findings provide much needed evidence of the contribution of preventive dental care in maintaining oral health of low-income adults with chronic conditions and potential for savings to the Medicaid program. Providing lower cost preventive dental care to the individuals with chronic conditions would achieve better oral health and lower treatment expenditures. © 2018 American Association of Public Health Dentistry.

  10. High-intensity interval training vs. moderate-intensity continuous training in the prevention/management of cardiovascular disease

    OpenAIRE

    Hussain, S; Macaluso, A; Pearson, S

    2016-01-01

    Moderate-intensity continuous training (MICT) has long been considered the most effective exercise treatment modality for the prevention and management of cardiovascular disease, but more recently high-intensity interval training (HIIT) has emerged into the clinical environment has been viewed as a potential alternative to MICT in accruing such benefits. HIIT was initially found to induce significant improvements in numerous physiological and health-related indices, to a similar if not superi...

  11. Improving prehospital trauma care in Rwanda through continuous quality improvement: an interrupted time series analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, John W; Nyinawankusi, Jeanne D'Arc; Enumah, Samuel; Maine, Rebecca; Uwitonze, Eric; Hu, Yihan; Kabagema, Ignace; Byiringiro, Jean Claude; Riviello, Robert; Jayaraman, Sudha

    2017-07-01

    Injury is a major cause of premature death and disability in East Africa, and high-quality pre-hospital care is essential for optimal trauma outcomes. The Rwandan pre-hospital emergency care service (SAMU) uses an electronic database to evaluate and optimize pre-hospital care through a continuous quality improvement programme (CQIP), beginning March 2014. The SAMU database was used to assess pre-hospital quality metrics including supplementary oxygen for hypoxia (O2), intravenous fluids for hypotension (IVF), cervical collar placement for head injuries (c-collar), and either splinting (splint) or administration of pain medications (pain) for long bone fractures. Targets of >90% were set for each metric and daily team meetings and monthly feedback sessions were implemented to address opportunities for improvement. These five pre-hospital quality metrics were assessed monthly before and after implementation of the CQIP. Met and unmet needs for O2, IVF, and c-collar were combined into a summative monthly SAMU Trauma Quality Scores (STQ score). An interrupted time series linear regression model compared the STQ score during 14 months before the CQIP implementation to the first 14 months after. During the 29-month study period 3,822 patients met study criteria. 1,028 patients needed one or more of the five studied interventions during the study period. All five endpoints had a significant increase between the pre-CQI and post-CQI periods (pRwanda. This programme may be used as an example for additional efforts engaging frontline staff with real-time data feedback in order to rapidly translate data collection efforts into improved care for the injured in a resource-limited setting. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Manual therapy, physical therapy, or continued care by a general practitioner for patients with neck pain: a randomized, controlled trial.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoving, J.L.; Koes, B.W.; Vet, H.C.W. de; Windt, D.A.W.M. van der; Assendelft, W.J.J.; Mameren, H. van; Devillé, W.L.J.M.; Pool, J.J.M.; Scholten, R.J.P.M.; Bouter, L.M.

    2002-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Neck pain is a common problem, but the effectiveness of frequently applied conservative therapies has never been directly compared. OBJECTIVE: To determine the effectiveness of manual therapy, physical therapy, and continued care by a general practitioner. DESIGN: Randomized, controlled

  13. Manual therapy, physical therapy, or continued care by a general practitioner for patients with neck pain. A randomized, controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoving, Jan Lucas; Koes, Bart W.; de Vet, Henrica C. W.; van der Windt, Danielle A. W. M.; Assendelft, Willem J. J.; van Mameren, Henk; Devillé, Walter L. J. M.; Pool, Jan J. M.; Scholten, Rob J. P. M.; Bouter, Lex M.

    2002-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Neck pain is a common problem, but the effectiveness of frequently applied conservative therapies has never been directly compared. OBJECTIVE: To determine the effectiveness of manual therapy, physical therapy, and continued care by a general practitioner. DESIGN: Randomized, controlled

  14. Systemic tobramycin concentrations during selective decontamination of the digestive tract in intensive care unit patients on continuous venovenous hemofiltration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mol, Meriel; van Kan, H. J. M.; Schultz, Marcus J.; de Jonge, Evert

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To study whether selective decontamination of the digestive tract (SDD) results in detectable serum tobramycin concentrations in intensive care unit (ICU) patients with acute renal failure treated with continuous venovenous hemofiltration (CVVH). DESIGN AND SETTING: Prospective,

  15. A randomized controlled trial to prevent glycemic relapse in longitudinal diabetes care: Study protocol (NCT00362193

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davis Dianne

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Diabetes is a common disease with self-management a key aspect of care. Large prospective trials have shown that maintaining glycated hemoglobin less than 7% greatly reduces complications but translating this level of control into everyday clinical practice can be difficult. Intensive improvement programs are successful in attaining control in patients with type 2 diabetes, however, many patients experience glycemic relapse once returned to routine care. This early relapse is, in part, due to decreased adherence in self-management behaviors. Objective This paper describes the design of the Glycemic Relapse Prevention study. The purpose of this study is to determine the optimal frequency of maintenance intervention needed to prevent glycemic relapse. The primary endpoint is glycemic relapse, which is defined as glycated hemoglobin greater than 8% and an increase of 1% from baseline. Methods The intervention consists of telephonic contact by a nurse practitioner with a referral to a dietitian if indicated. This intervention was designed to provide early identification of self-care problems, understanding the rationale behind the self-care lapse and problem solve to find a negotiated solution. A total of 164 patients were randomized to routine care (least intensive, routine care with phone contact every three months (moderate intensity or routine care with phone contact every month (most intensive. Conclusion The baseline patient characteristics are similar across the treatment arms. Intervention fidelity analysis showed excellent reproducibility. This study will provide insight into the important but poorly understood area of glycemic relapse prevention.

  16. Rural-Urban Differences in Access to Preventive Health Care Among Publicly Insured Minnesotans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loftus, John; Allen, Elizabeth M; Call, Kathleen Thiede; Everson-Rose, Susan A

    2018-02-01

    Reduced access to care and barriers have been shown in rural populations and in publicly insured populations. Barriers limiting health care access in publicly insured populations living in rural areas are not understood. This study investigates rural-urban differences in system-, provider-, and individual-level barriers and access to preventive care among adults and children enrolled in a public insurance program in Minnesota. This was a secondary analysis of a 2008 statewide, cross-sectional survey of publicly insured adults and children (n = 4,388) investigating barriers associated with low utilization of preventive care. Sampling was stratified with oversampling of racial/ethnic minorities. Rural enrollees were more likely to report no past year preventive care compared to urban enrollees. However, this difference was no longer statistically significant after controlling for demographic and socioeconomic factors (OR: 1.37, 95% CI: 1.00-1.88). Provider- and system-level barriers associated with low use of preventive care among rural enrollees included discrimination based on public insurance status (OR: 2.26, 95% CI: 1.34-2.38), cost of care concerns (OR: 1.72, 95% CI: 1.03-2.89) and uncertainty about care being covered by insurance (OR: 1.70, 95% CI: 1.01-2.85). These and additional provider-level barriers were also identified among urban enrollees. Discrimination, cost of care, and uncertainty about insurance coverage inhibit access in both the rural and urban samples. These barriers are worthy targets of interventions for publicly insured populations regardless of residence. Future studies should investigate additional factors associated with access disparities based on rural-urban residence. © 2017 National Rural Health Association.

  17. Determinants and gaps in preventive care for Indigenous Australians: a cross sectional analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ross Stewart Bailie

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundPotentially preventable chronic diseases are the greatest contributor to the health gap between Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples and non-Indigenous Australians. Preventive care is important for earlier detection and control of chronic disease, and a number of recent policy initiatives have aimed to enhance delivery of preventive care. We examined documented delivery of recommended preventive services for Indigenous peoples across Australia, and investigated the influence of health center and client level factors on adherence to best practice guidelines. MethodsClinical audit data from 2012-2014 for 3623 well adult clients (aged 15-54 of 101 health centers from four Australian states and territories were analyzed to determine adherence to delivery of 26 recommended preventive services classified into five different modes of care on the basis of the way in which they are delivered (eg. basic measurement; laboratory tests and imaging; assessment and brief interventions, eye, ear and oral checks; follow-up of abnormal findings. Summary statistics were used to describe the delivery of each service item across jurisdictions. Multilevel regression models were used to quantify the variation in service delivery attributable to health center and client level factors and to identify factors associated with higher quality care.ResultsDelivery of recommended preventive care varied widely between service items, with good delivery of most basic measurements but poor follow-up of abnormal findings. Health center characteristics were associated with most variation. Higher quality care was associated with Northern Territory location, urban services and smaller service population size. Client factors associated with higher quality care included age between 25-34 years, female sex and more regular attendance. ConclusionsWide variation in documented preventive care delivery, poor follow-up of abnormal findings, and system factors that

  18. Implementation of pressure ulcer prevention best practice recommendations in acute care: an observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barker, Anna Lucia; Kamar, Jeannette; Tyndall, Tamara Jane; White, Lyn; Hutchinson, Anastasia; Klopfer, Nicole; Weller, Carolina

    2013-06-01

    Pressure ulcers are a common but preventable problem in hospitals. Implementation of best practice guideline recommendations can prevent ulcers from occurring. This 9-year cohort study reports prevalence data from point prevalence surveys during the observation period, and three practice metrics to assess implementation of best practice guideline recommendations: (i) nurse compliance with use of a validated pressure ulcer risk assessment and intervention checklist; (ii) accuracy of risk assessment scoring in usual-care nurses and experienced injury prevention nurses; and (iii) use of pressure ulcer prevention strategies. The prevalence of hospital-acquired pressure ulcers decreased following implementation of an evidence-based prevention programme from 12·6% (2 years preprogramme implementation) to 2·6% (6 years postprogramme implementation) (P pressure ulcer prevention documentation according to best practice guidelines was high (>84%). A sample of 270 patients formed the sample for the study of risk assessment scoring accuracy and use of prevention strategies. It was found usual-care nurses under-estimated patients' risk of pressure ulcer development and under-utilised prevention strategies compared with experienced injury prevention nurses. Despite a significant reduction in prevalence of hospital-acquired pressure ulcers and high documentation compliance, use of prevention strategies could further be improved to achieve better patient outcomes. Barriers to the use of prevention strategies by nurses in the acute hospital setting require further examination. This study provides important insights into the knowledge translation of pressure ulcer prevention best practice guideline recommendations at The Northern Hospital. © 2012 The Authors. International Wound Journal © 2012 John Wiley & Sons Ltd and Medicalhelplines.com Inc.

  19. Spillover Effects of Drug Safety Warnings on Preventive Health Care Use

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Daysal, N. Meltem; Orsini, Chiara

    2015-01-01

    We examine how new medical information on drug safety impacts preventive health care use. We exploit the release of the findings of the Women’s Health Initiative Study (WHIS) – the largest randomized controlled trial of women’s health – which demonstrated in 2002 the health risks associated...... with the long-term use of hormone replacement therapy (HRT). We first show that, after the release of the WHIS findings, HRT use dropped sharply among post-menopausal women. We then estimate the spillover effects of the WHIS findings on preventive care by means of a difference-in-differences methodology...... comparing changes in preventive care use among 60 to 69 year-old women (who have high rates of HRT use) with the change among women aged 75 and above (who have much lower rates of HRT use). Using data from the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System for the period 1998–2007, we find that women aged 60...

  20. The failure of suicide prevention in primary care: family and GP perspectives - a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leavey, Gerard; Mallon, Sharon; Rondon-Sulbaran, Janeet; Galway, Karen; Rosato, Michael; Hughes, Lynette

    2017-11-21

    Although Primary care is crucial for suicide prevention, clinicians tend to report completed suicides in their care as non-preventable. We aimed to examine systemic inadequacies in suicide prevention from the perspectives of bereaved family members and GPs. Qualitative study of 72 relatives or close friends bereaved by suicide and 19 General Practitioners who have experienced the suicide of patients. Relatives highlight failures in detecting symptoms and behavioral changes and the inability of GPs to understand the needs of patients and their social contexts. A perceived overreliance on anti-depressant treatment is a major source of criticism by family members. GPs tend to lack confidence in the recognition and management of suicidal patients, and report structural inadequacies in service provision. Mental health and primary care services must find innovative and ethical ways to involve families in the decision-making process for patients at risk of suicide.

  1. Primary care in the prevention, treatment and control of cardiovascular disease in sub-Saharan Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ojji, Dike B; Ojji, Dike B Ojji; Lamont, Kim; Sliwa, Karen; Ojji, Olubunmi I; Egenti, Bibiana Nonye; Sliwa, Karen

    2017-01-01

    Summary Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the frontrunner in the disease spectrum of sub-Saharan Africa, with stroke and ischaemic heart disease ranked seventh and 14th as leading causes of death, respectively, on this sub-continent. Unfortunately, this region is also grappling with many communicable, maternal, neonatal and nutritional disorders. Limited resources and the high cost of CVD treatment necessitate that primary prevention should have a high priority for CVD control in sub- Saharan Africa. One major challenge of such an approach is how to equip primary care to respond promptly and effectively to this burden. We present a practical approach on how primary care in sub-Saharan Africa could effectively address the prevention, treatment and control of CVD on the subcontinent. For effective prevention, control and treatment of CVD in sub-Saharan Africa, there should be strategic plans to equip primary care clinics with well-trained allied healthcare workers who are supervised by physicians. PMID:28752890

  2. Faith-Based HIV Care and Prevention in Chinese Immigrant Communities: Rhetoric or Reality?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Ezer; Chin, John J.; Behar, Elana

    2012-01-01

    Ethnic churches attended by first generation Chinese immigrants are uniquely positioned to address emerging HIV prevention and care needs within the Chinese community at-large. Efforts to develop faith-based HIV programs necessitate identifying how HIV intersects with the sinicization of Christianity within Chinese churches. This paper will review the process of contextualizing HIV within theological and cultural frameworks that are meaningful for ethnic Chinese church leaders and members. The authors specifically propose two points of integration between public health and ecclesial functions: (1) HIV stigma-mitigation initiatives as informed by Christo-centric teachings of compassion and justice, and (2) HIV prevention and care reframed as social responsibility and informed by the Christian tradition of evangelism. Systems and practices that hinder and promote the involvement of Chinese churches in HIV prevention, care, and stigma-reduction will be discussed. PMID:23483037

  3. Estimated hospital costs associated with preventable health care-associated infections if health care antiseptic products were unavailable

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schmier JK

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Jordana K Schmier,1 Carolyn K Hulme-Lowe,1 Svetlana Semenova,2 Juergen A Klenk,3 Paul C DeLeo,4 Richard Sedlak,5 Pete A Carlson6 1Health Sciences, Exponent, Inc., Alexandria, VA, 2EcoSciences, Exponent, Inc., Maynard, MA, 3Health Sciences, Exponent, Inc., Alexandria, VA, 4Environmental Safety, 5Technical and International Affairs, American Cleaning Institute, Washington, DC, 6Regulatory Affairs, Ecolab, Saint Paul, MN, USA Objectives: Health care-associated infections (HAIs pose a significant health care and cost burden. This study estimates annual HAI hospital costs in the US avoided through use of health care antiseptics (health care personnel hand washes and rubs; surgical hand scrubs and rubs; patient preoperative and preinjection skin preparations. Methods: A spreadsheet model was developed with base case inputs derived from the published literature, supplemented with assumptions when data were insufficient. Five HAIs of interest were identified: catheter-associated urinary tract infections, central line-associated bloodstream infections, gastrointestinal infections caused by Clostridium difficile, hospital- or ventilator-associated pneumonia, and surgical site infections. A national estimate of the annual potential lost benefits from elimination of these products is calculated based on the number of HAIs, the proportion of HAIs that are preventable, the proportion of preventable HAIs associated with health care antiseptics, and HAI hospital costs. The model is designed to be user friendly and to allow assumptions about prevention across all infections to vary or stay the same. Sensitivity analyses provide low- and high-end estimates of costs avoided. Results: Low- and high-end estimates of national, annual HAIs in hospitals avoided through use of health care antiseptics are 12,100 and 223,000, respectively, with associated hospital costs avoided of US$142 million and US$4.25 billion, respectively. Conclusion: The model presents a novel

  4. Communication strategies in acute health care: evaluation within the context of infection prevention and control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, R; Sevdalis, N; Vincent, C; Holmes, A

    2012-09-01

    Communication in healthcare settings has recently received significant attention in the literature. However, there continues to be a large gap in current understanding of the effectiveness of different communication channels used in acute healthcare settings, particularly in the context of infection prevention and control (IPC). To explore and evaluate the main communication channels used within hospitals to communicate with healthcare workers (HCWs) and to propose practical recommendations. Critical review of the main communication channels used within acute health care to communicate information to HCWs, and analysis of their impact on practice. The analysis covers verbal communications, standardization via guidelines, education and training, electronic communications and marketing strategies. Traditional communication channels have not been successful in changing and sustaining best practice in IPC, but newer approaches (electronic messages and marketing) also have pitfalls. A few simple recommendations are made in relation to the development, implementation and evaluation of communications to HCWs; top-down vs bottom-up communications; and the involvement of HCWs, particularly ward personnel. Copyright © 2012 The Healthcare Infection Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. A program for sustained improvement in preventing ventilator associated pneumonia in an intensive care setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caserta Raquel A

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP is a common infection in the intensive care unit (ICU and associated with a high mortality. Methods A quasi-experimental study was conducted in a medical-surgical ICU. Multiple interventions to optimize VAP prevention were performed from October 2008 to December 2010. All of these processes, including the Institute for Healthcare Improvement’s (IHI ventilator bundle plus oral decontamination with chlorhexidine and continuous aspiration of subglottic secretions (CASS, were adopted for patients undergoing mechanical ventilation. Results We evaluated a total of 21,984 patient-days, and a total of 6,052 ventilator-days (ventilator utilization rate of 0.27. We found VAP rates of 1.3 and 2.0 per 1,000 ventilator days respectively in 2009 and 2010, achieving zero incidence of VAP several times during 12 months, whenever VAP bundle compliance was over 90%. Conclusion These results suggest that it is possible to reduce VAP rates to near zero and sustain these rates, but it requires a complex process involving multiple performance measures and interventions that must be permanently monitored.

  6. A program for sustained improvement in preventing ventilator associated pneumonia in an intensive care setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caserta, Raquel A; Marra, Alexandre R; Durão, Marcelino S; Silva, Cláudia Vallone; Pavao dos Santos, Oscar Fernando; Neves, Henrique Sutton de Sousa; Edmond, Michael B; Timenetsky, Karina Tavares

    2012-09-29

    Ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) is a common infection in the intensive care unit (ICU) and associated with a high mortality. A quasi-experimental study was conducted in a medical-surgical ICU. Multiple interventions to optimize VAP prevention were performed from October 2008 to December 2010. All of these processes, including the Institute for Healthcare Improvement's (IHI) ventilator bundle plus oral decontamination with chlorhexidine and continuous aspiration of subglottic secretions (CASS), were adopted for patients undergoing mechanical ventilation. We evaluated a total of 21,984 patient-days, and a total of 6,052 ventilator-days (ventilator utilization rate of 0.27). We found VAP rates of 1.3 and 2.0 per 1,000 ventilator days respectively in 2009 and 2010, achieving zero incidence of VAP several times during 12 months, whenever VAP bundle compliance was over 90%. These results suggest that it is possible to reduce VAP rates to near zero and sustain these rates, but it requires a complex process involving multiple performance measures and interventions that must be permanently monitored.

  7. A program for sustained improvement in preventing ventilator associated pneumonia in an intensive care setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) is a common infection in the intensive care unit (ICU) and associated with a high mortality. Methods A quasi-experimental study was conducted in a medical-surgical ICU. Multiple interventions to optimize VAP prevention were performed from October 2008 to December 2010. All of these processes, including the Institute for Healthcare Improvement’s (IHI) ventilator bundle plus oral decontamination with chlorhexidine and continuous aspiration of subglottic secretions (CASS), were adopted for patients undergoing mechanical ventilation. Results We evaluated a total of 21,984 patient-days, and a total of 6,052 ventilator-days (ventilator utilization rate of 0.27). We found VAP rates of 1.3 and 2.0 per 1,000 ventilator days respectively in 2009 and 2010, achieving zero incidence of VAP several times during 12 months, whenever VAP bundle compliance was over 90%. Conclusion These results suggest that it is possible to reduce VAP rates to near zero and sustain these rates, but it requires a complex process involving multiple performance measures and interventions that must be permanently monitored. PMID:23020101

  8. Sustaining Transfers through Affordable Research Translation (START): study protocol to assess knowledge translation interventions in continuing care settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slaughter, Susan E; Estabrooks, Carole A; Jones, C Allyson; Wagg, Adrian S; Eliasziw, Misha

    2013-10-26

    Bridging the research-practice gap is an important research focus in continuing care facilities, because the population of older adults (aged 65 years and over) requiring continuing care services is the fastest growing demographic among countries in the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD). Unlicensed practitioners, known as health care aides, provide the majority of care for residents living in continuing care facilities. However, little research examines how to sustain health care aide behavior change following initial adoption of current research evidence. We will conduct a phase III, multicentre, cluster randomized controlled trial (RCT) using a stratified 2 × 2 additive factorial design, including an embedded process evaluation, in 24 supportive living facilities within the health zone of Edmonton, AB, Canada. We will determine which combination of frequency and intensity of reminders most effectively sustains the completion of the sit-to-stand activity by health care aides with residents. Frequency refers to how often a reminder is implemented; intensity refers to whether a reminder is social or paper-based. We will compare monthly reminders with reminders implemented every 3 months, and we will compare low intensity, paper-based reminders and high intensity reminders provided by a health care aide peer.Using interviews, questionnaires, and observations, Sustaining Transfers through Affordable Research Translation (START) will evaluate the processes that inhibit or promote the mobility innovation's sustainability among health care aides in daily practice. We will examine how the reminders are implemented and perceived by health care aides and licensed practical nurses, as well as how health care aides providing peer reminders are identified, received by their peers, and supported by their supervisors. START will connect up-to-date innovation research with the practice of health care aides providing direct care to a growing population

  9. Effect of continuous versus intermittent turning on nursing and non-nursing care time for acute spinal cord injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bugaresti, J M; Tator, C H; Szalai, J P

    1991-06-01

    The present study was conducted to determine whether automated, continuous turning beds would reduce the nursing care time for spinal cord injured (SCI) patients by freeing hospital staff from manual turning of patients every 2 hours. Seventeen patients were randomly assigned to continuous or intermittent turning and were observed during the 8 hour shift for 1 to 18 days following injury. Trained observers recorded the time taken for patient contact activities performed by the nursing staff (direct nursing care) and other hospital staff. The mean direct nursing care time per dayshift per patient was 130 +/- 22 (mean +/- SD) minutes for 9 patients managed with continuous turning and 115 +/- 41 (mean +/- SD) minutes for 8 patients managed with intermittent turning. The observed difference in care time between the two treatment groups was not significant (p greater than 0.05). Numerous factors including neurological level, time following injury, and medical complications appeared to affect the direct nursing care time. Although continuous turning did not reduce nursing care time it offered major advantages for the treatment of selected cases of acute SCI. Some major advantages of continuous turning treatment were observed. Spinal alignment was easier to maintain during continuous turning in patients with injuries of the cervical spine. Continuous turning allowed radiological procedures on the spine, chest and abdomen to be more easily performed without having to alter the patients' position in bed. Therapy and nursing staff indicated that the continuous turning bed facilitated patient positioning for such activities as chest physiotherapy. With continuous turning, one nurse was sufficient to provide care for an individual SCI patient without having to rely on the assistance of other nurses on the ward for patient turning every 2 hours.

  10. Readability of pediatric health materials for preventive dental care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riedy Christine A

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This study examined the content and general readability of pediatric oral health education materials for parents of young children. Methods Twenty-seven pediatric oral health pamphlets or brochures from commercial, government, industry, and private nonprofit sources were analyzed for general readability ("usability" according to several parameters: readability, (Flesch-Kincaid grade level, Flesch Reading Ease, and SMOG grade level; thoroughness, (inclusion of topics important to young childrens' oral health; textual framework (frequency of complex phrases, use of pictures, diagrams, and bulleted text within materials; and terminology (frequency of difficult words and dental jargon. Results Readability of the written texts ranged from 2nd to 9th grade. The average Flesch-Kincaid grade level for government publications was equivalent to a grade 4 reading level (4.73, range, 2.4 – 6.6; F-K grade levels for commercial publications averaged 8.1 (range, 6.9 – 8.9; and industry published materials read at an average Flesch-Kincaid grade level of 7.4 (range, 4.7 – 9.3. SMOG readability analysis, based on a count of polysyllabic words, consistently rated materials 2 to 3 grade levels higher than did the Flesch-Kincaid analysis. Government sources were significantly lower compared to commercial and industry sources for Flesch-Kincaid grade level and SMOG readability analysis. Content analysis found materials from commercial and industry sources more complex than government-sponsored publications, whereas commercial sources were more thorough in coverage of pediatric oral health topics. Different materials frequently contained conflicting information. Conclusion Pediatric oral health care materials are readily available, yet their quality and readability vary widely. In general, government publications are more readable than their commercial and industry counterparts. The criteria for usability and results of the analyses

  11. Cost assessment of a new oral care program in the intensive care unit to prevent ventilator-associated pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ory, Jérôme; Mourgues, Charline; Raybaud, Evelyne; Chabanne, Russell; Jourdy, Jean Christophe; Belard, Fabien; Guérin, Renaud; Cosserant, Bernard; Faure, Jean Sébastien; Calvet, Laure; Pereira, Bruno; Guelon, Dominique; Traore, Ousmane; Gerbaud, Laurent

    2018-06-01

    Ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) is the most frequent hospital-acquired infections in intensive care units (ICU). In the bundle of care to prevent the VAP, the oral care is very important strategies, to decrease the oropharyngeal bacterial colonization and presence of causative bacteria of VAP. In view of the paucity of medical economics studies, our objective was to determine the cost of implementing this oral care program for preventing VAP. In five ICUs, during period 1, caregivers used a foam stick for oral care and, during period 2, a stick and tooth brushing with aspiration. Budgetary effect of the new program from the hospital's point of view was analyzed for both periods. The costs avoided were calculated from the incidence density of VAP (cases per 1000 days of intubation). The cost study included device cost, benefit lost, and ICU cost (medication, employer and employee contributions, blood sample analysis…). A total of 2030 intubated patients admitted to the ICUs benefited from oral care. The cost of implementing the study protocol was estimated to be €11,500 per year. VAP rates decreased significantly between the two periods (p1 = 12.8% and p2 = 8.5%, p = 0.002). The VAP revenue was ranged from €28,000 to €45,000 and the average cost from €39,906 to €42,332. The total cost assessment calculated was thus around €1.9 million in favor of the new oral care program. Our study showed that the implementation of a simple strategy improved the quality of patient care is economically viable. NCT02400294.

  12. Secondary prevention after minor stroke and TIA - usual care and development of a support program.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefanie Leistner

    Full Text Available Effective methods of secondary prevention after stroke or TIA are available but adherence to recommended evidence-based treatments is often poor. The study aimed to determine the quality of secondary prevention in usual care and to develop a stepwise modeled support program.Two consecutive cohorts of patients with acute minor stroke or TIA undergoing usual outpatient care versus a secondary prevention program were compared. Risk factor control and medication adherence were assessed in 6-month follow-ups (6M-FU. Usual care consisted of detailed information concerning vascular risk factor targets given at discharge and regular outpatient care by primary care physicians. The stepwise modeled support program additionally employed up to four outpatient appointments. A combination of educational and behavioral strategies was employed.168 patients in the observational cohort who stated their openness to participate in a prevention program (mean age 64.7 y, admission blood pressure (BP: 155/84 mmHg and 173 patients participating in the support program (mean age 67.6 y, BP: 161/84 mmHg were assessed at 6 months. Proportions of patients with BP according to guidelines were 50% in usual-care and 77% in the support program (p<0.01. LDL<100 mg/dl was measured in 62 versus 71% (p = 0.12. Proportions of patients who stopped smoking were 50 versus 79% (p<0.01. 72 versus 89% of patients with atrial fibrillation were on oral anticoagulation (p = 0.09.Risk factor control remains unsatisfactory in usual care. Targets of secondary prevention were met more often within the supported cohort. Effects on (cerebro-vascular recurrence rates are going to be assessed in a multicenter randomized trial.

  13. Gender Differentials in Preventive Health Care: Incidences and Determinants among Pakistani Children

    OpenAIRE

    Faham Masud; Shujaat Farooq

    2012-01-01

    In this study, an attempt has been made to estimate gender health differential with a focus on preventive health care. Using the Pakistan Demographic Health Survey (PDHS) of 2006-07, the study has targeted the children of age 12-23 months and found substantialsex differences in the immunization status of children where boys are more immunized than girls, reflecting gender biasness over preventive health provision. Through bi-variate and multi-variate analysis, the study found that a variety o...

  14. Social network approaches to recruitment, HIV prevention, medical care, and medication adherence

    OpenAIRE

    Latkin, Carl A.; Davey-Rothwell, Melissa A.; Knowlton, Amy R.; Alexander, Kamila A.; Williams, Chyvette T.; Boodram, Basmattee

    2013-01-01

    This article reviews current issues and advancements in social network approaches to HIV prevention and care. Social network analysis can provide a method to understand health disparities in HIV rates and treatment access and outcomes. Social network analysis is a value tool to link social structural factors to individual behaviors. Social networks provide an avenue for low cost and sustainable HIV prevention interventions that can be adapted and translated into diverse populations. Social ne...

  15. Access to Employee Wellness Programs and Use of Preventive Care Services Among U.S. Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isehunwa, Oluwaseyi O; Carlton, Erik L; Wang, Yang; Jiang, Yu; Kedia, Satish; Chang, Cyril F; Fijabi, Daniel; Bhuyan, Soumitra S

    2017-12-01

    There is little research at the national level on access to employee wellness programs and the use of preventive care services. This study examined the use of seven preventive care services among U.S working adults with access to employee wellness programs. The study population comprised 17,699 working adults aged ≥18 years, obtained from the 2015 National Health Interview Survey. Multivariate logistic regression models examined the relationship between access to employee wellness programs and use of seven preventive care services: influenza vaccination, blood pressure check, diabetes check, cholesterol check, Pap smear test, mammogram, and colon cancer screening. Data analysis began in Fall 2016. Overall, 46.6% of working adults reported having access to employee wellness programs in 2015. Working adults with access to employee wellness programs had higher odds of receiving influenza vaccination (OR=1.57, 95% CI=1.43, 1.72, pemployee wellness programs and the use of Pap smear test and colon cancer screening services. Using a nationally representative sample of individuals, this study found a positive association between access to employee wellness programs and the use of preventive care services. The results support favorable policies to encourage implementing wellness programs in all worksites, especially those with employees. Copyright © 2017 American Journal of Preventive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Geriatrics and the triple aim: defining preventable hospitalizations in the long-term care population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouslander, Joseph G; Maslow, Katie

    2012-12-01

    Reducing preventable hospitalizations is fundamental to the "triple aim" of improving care, improving health, and reducing costs. New federal government initiatives that create strong pressure to reduce such hospitalizations are being or will soon be implemented. These initiatives use quality measures to define which hospitalizations are preventable. Reducing hospitalizations could greatly benefit frail and chronically ill adults and older people who receive long-term care (LTC) because they often experience negative effects of hospitalization, including hospital-acquired conditions, morbidity, and loss of functional abilities. Conversely, reducing hospitalizations could mean that some people will not receive hospital care they need, especially if the selected measures do not adequately define hospitalizations that can be prevented without jeopardizing the person's health and safety. An extensive literature search identified 250 measures of preventable hospitalizations, but the measures have not been validated in the LTC population and generally do not account for comorbidity or the capacity of various LTC settings to provide the required care without hospitalization. Additional efforts are needed to develop measures that accurately differentiate preventable from necessary hospitalizations for the LTC population, are transparent and fair to providers, and minimize the potential for gaming and unintended consequences. As the new initiatives take effect, it is critical to monitor their effect and to develop and disseminate training and resources to support the many community- and institution-based healthcare professionals and emergency department staff involved in decisions about hospitalization for this population. © 2012, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2012, The American Geriatrics Society.

  17. Strategies for the prevention of hospital-acquired infections in the neonatal intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borghesi, A; Stronati, M

    2008-04-01

    Nosocomial infections are among the leading causes of mortality and morbidity in neonatal intensive care units. Prevention of healthcare-associated infections is based on strategies that aim to limit susceptibility to infections by enhancing host defences, interrupting transmission of organisms by healthcare workers and by promoting the judicious use of antimicrobials. Several strategies are available and include: hand hygiene practices; prevention of central venous catheter-related bloodstream infections; judicious use of antimicrobials for therapy and prophylaxis; enhancement of host defences; skin care; and early enteral feeding with human milk.

  18. Essential competencies in nursing education for prevention and care related to unintended pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hewitt, Caroline; Cappiello, Joyce

    2015-01-01

    To identify the essential competencies for prevention and care related to unintended pregnancy to develop program outcomes for nursing curricula. Modified Delphi study. National. Eighty-five nurse experts, including academic faculty and advanced practice nurses providing sexual and reproductive health care in primary or specialty care settings. Expert panelists completed a three-round Delphi study using an electronic survey. Eighty-five panelists completed the first round survey, and 72 panelists completed all three rounds. Twenty-seven items achieved consensus of at least 75% of the experts by the third round to comprise the educational competencies. Through an iterative process, experts in prevention and care related to unintended pregnancy reached consensus on 27 core educational competencies for nursing education. The competencies provide a framework for curricular development in an important area of nursing education. © 2015 AWHONN, the Association of Women's Health, Obstetric and Neonatal Nurses.

  19. Distress among women taking part in surgical continuity of care for breast cancer - a mixed methods study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Lone

    during breast cancer trajectory. Overall, distress has been linked to suffering, and lower quality of life, increased admission rates, and greater health care costs. This thesis uses mixed methods to investigate the prevalence of distress among women taking part in surgical continuity of care at time...

  20. Dementia-Related Work Activities of Home Care Nurses and Aides: Frequency, Perceived Competence, and Continuing Education Priorities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Debra G.; Kosteniuk, Julie G.; O'Connell, Megan E.; Dal Bello-Haas, Vanina; Stewart, Norma J.; Karunanayake, Chandima

    2016-01-01

    An understanding of the specific dementia learning needs of home care staff is needed to plan relevant continuing education (CE) programs and supports. The study's objective was to examine frequency and perceived competence in performing 20 dementia-related work activities, and identify CE priorities among home care staff. A cross-sectional survey…

  1. Determinants of and opportunities for continuing education among health care professionals in public health care institutions in Jimma township, Southwest Ethiopia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fentahun N

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Netsanet Fentahun,1 Ashagre Molla21Department of Health Education and Behavioral Sciences, 2Department of Nursing, Jimma University, Jimma, EthiopiaBackground: An effectively prepared and continually updated workforce of health professionals is essential to maintenance and improvement in patient care. The major goal of continuing education is to improve and promote quality care. Continuing education is also important to an organization's strategic plan because of its positive influence on the quality of care provided. The purpose of this study was to identify the determinants of and opportunities for continuing education among health care professionals at public health facilities in Jimma township.Methods: A cross-sectional study of 319 health care professionals working in the public health facilities of Jimma township was conducted from January 10, 2012 to February 28, 2012. A self-administered questionnaire was used to collect the data. First, descriptive analysis was done to describe the characteristics of the study participants. Finally logistic regression was then used to determine the independent predictors of continuing education.Results: Only 70 (25% of the study participants were participating in continuing education. As working experience increased, participation in continuing education did not steadily increase. The working hours per week were higher for diploma holders than for those with any other qualification. One hundred and fifty-three (71.8% participants mentioned lack of support from their current employer as the reason for not participating in continuing education. Health care professionals with a lack of support from management were 2.4 times more likely not to participate in advanced education. Health care professionals with lack of funding were 0.3 times less likely to participate in advanced education. Health care professionals with lack of resources other than financial were 2.2 times more likely not to participate in

  2. Prevention of violence in prison - The role of health care professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pont, Jörg; Stöver, Heino; Gétaz, Laurent; Casillas, Alejandra; Wolff, Hans

    2015-08-01

    The World Health Organization (WHO) classifies violence prevention as a public health priority. In custodial settings, where violence is problematic, administrators and custodial officials are usually tasked with the duty of addressing this complicated issue-leaving health care professionals largely out of a discussion and problem-solving process that should ideally be multidisciplinary in approach. Health care professionals who care for prisoners are in a unique position to help identify and prevent violence, given their knowledge about health and violence, and because of the impartial position they must sustain in the prison environment in upholding professional ethics. Thus, health care professionals working in prisons should be charged with leading violence prevention efforts in custodial settings. In addition to screening for violence and detecting violent events upon prison admission, health care professionals in prison must work towards uniform in-house procedures for longitudinal and systemized medical recording/documentation of violence. These efforts will benefit the future planning, implementation, and evaluation of focused strategies for violence prevention in prisoner populations. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  3. Knowledge levels of intensive care nurses on prevention of ventilator-associated pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akın Korhan, Esra; Hakverdioğlu Yönt, Gülendam; Parlar Kılıç, Serap; Uzelli, Derya

    2014-01-01

    Ventilator-associated pneumonia constitutes a significant concern for ventilated patients in the intensive care unit. This study was planned to evaluate the knowledge of nurses working in general intensive care units concerning evidence-based measures for the prevention of ventilator-associated pneumonia. This study design is cross-sectional. It was carried out on nurses working in the general intensive care units of anesthiology and re-animation clinics. Collection of research data was performed by means of a Nurse Identification Form and a Form of Evidence-Based Knowledge concerning the Prevention of Ventilator-Associated Pneumonia. Characterization statistics were shown by percentage, median and interquartile range. Chi-square and Wilcoxon tests and Kruskal-Wallis tests were used as appropriate. The median value of total points scored by nurses on the questionnaire was 4.00 ± 2.00. The difference between the nurses' education levels, duration of work experience and participation in in-service training programmes on ventilator-associated pneumonia prevention and the median value of their total scores on the questionnaire was found to be statistically significant (p < 0.05). The conclusion of the study was that critical care nurses' knowledge about ventilator-associated pneumonia prevention is poor. © 2013 British Association of Critical Care Nurses.

  4. Enhancing the role of private practitioners in tuberculosis prevention and care activities in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanu Anand

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available India accounts for the highest number of incident tuberculosis (TB cases globally. Hence, to impact the TB incidence world over, there is an urgent need to address and accelerate TB control activities in the country. Nearly, half of the TB patients first seek TB care in private sector. However, the participation of private practitioners (PPs has been patchy in TB prevention and care and distrust exists between public and private sector. PPs usually have varied diagnostic and treatment practices that are inadequate and amplify the risk of drug resistance. Hence, their regulation and involvement as key stakeholders are important in TB prevention and care in India if we are to achieve TB control at global level. However, there remain certain barriers and gaps, which are preventing their upscaling. The current paper aims to discuss the status of private sector involvement in TB prevention and care in India. The paper also discusses the strategies and initiatives taken by the government in this regard as evidence shows that the involvement of private sector in co-opting directly observed treatment short-course (DOTS helps to enhance case finding and treatment outcomes; it improves the accessibility of quality TB care with greater geographic coverage. Besides public-private mix, DOTS has been found more cost-effective and reduces financial burden of patients. The paper also offers to present some more solutions both at policy and program level for upscaling the engagement of PPs in the national TB control program.

  5. Stakeholder views of ethical guidance regarding prevention and care in HIV vaccine trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background South Africa is a major hub of HIV prevention trials, with plans for a licensure trial to start in 2015. The appropriate standards of care and of prevention in HIV vaccine trials are complex and debated issues and ethical guidelines offer some direction. However, there has been limited empirical exploration of South African stakeholders’ perspectives on ethical guidance related to prevention and care in HIV vaccine trials. Methods Site staff, Community Advisory Board members and Research Ethics Committee members involved with current HIV vaccine trials in South Africa were invited to participate in an exploration of their views. A questionnaire listed 10 care and 10 prevention recommendations drawn from two widely available sets of ethical guidelines for biomedical HIV prevention trials. Respondents (n = 98) rated each recommendation on five dimensions: “Familiarity with”, “Ease of Understanding”, “Ease of Implementing”, “Perceived Protection”, and “Agreement with” each ethical recommendation. The ratings were used to describe stakeholder perspectives on dimensions for each recommendation. Dimension ratings were averaged across the five dimensions and used as an indication of overall merit for each recommendation. Differences were explored across dimensions, between care-oriented and prevention-oriented recommendations, and between stakeholder groups. Results Both care and prevention recommendations were rated highly overall, with median ratings well above the scale midpoint. In general, informed consent recommendations were most positively rated. Care-related recommendations were rated significantly more positively than prevention-related recommendations, with the five lowest-rated recommendations being prevention-related. The most problematic dimension across all recommendations was “Ease of Implementing,” and the least problematic was “Agreement with,” suggesting the most pressing stakeholder concerns are practical

  6. Stakeholder views of ethical guidance regarding prevention and care in HIV vaccine trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moorhouse, Rika; Slack, Catherine; Quayle, Michael; Essack, Zaynab; Lindegger, Graham

    2014-06-30

    South Africa is a major hub of HIV prevention trials, with plans for a licensure trial to start in 2015. The appropriate standards of care and of prevention in HIV vaccine trials are complex and debated issues and ethical guidelines offer some direction. However, there has been limited empirical exploration of South African stakeholders' perspectives on ethical guidance related to prevention and care in HIV vaccine trials. Site staff, Community Advisory Board members and Research Ethics Committee members involved with current HIV vaccine trials in South Africa were invited to participate in an exploration of their views. A questionnaire listed 10 care and 10 prevention recommendations drawn from two widely available sets of ethical guidelines for biomedical HIV prevention trials. Respondents (n = 98) rated each recommendation on five dimensions: "Familiarity with", "Ease of Understanding", "Ease of Implementing", "Perceived Protection", and "Agreement with" each ethical recommendation. The ratings were used to describe stakeholder perspectives on dimensions for each recommendation. Dimension ratings were averaged across the five dimensions and used as an indication of overall merit for each recommendation. Differences were explored across dimensions, between care-oriented and prevention-oriented recommendations, and between stakeholder groups. Both care and prevention recommendations were rated highly overall, with median ratings well above the scale midpoint. In general, informed consent recommendations were most positively rated. Care-related recommendations were rated significantly more positively than prevention-related recommendations, with the five lowest-rated recommendations being prevention-related. The most problematic dimension across all recommendations was "Ease of Implementing," and the least problematic was "Agreement with," suggesting the most pressing stakeholder concerns are practical rather than theoretical; that is, respondents agree with

  7. Continuous versus intermittent endotracheal cuff pressure control for the prevention of ventilator-associated respiratory infections in Vietnam: study protocol for a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dat, Vu Quoc; Geskus, Ronald B; Wolbers, Marcel; Loan, Huynh Thi; Yen, Lam Minh; Binh, Nguyen Thien; Chien, Le Thanh; Mai, Nguyen Thi Hoang; Phu, Nguyen Hoan; Lan, Nguyen Phu Huong; Hao, Nguyen Van; Long, Hoang Bao; Thuy, Tran Phuong; Kinh, Nguyen Van; Trung, Nguyen Vu; Phu, Vu Dinh; Cap, Nguyen Trung; Trinh, Dao Tuyet; Campbell, James; Kestelyn, Evelyne; Wertheim, Heiman F L; Wyncoll, Duncan; Thwaites, Guy Edward; van Doorn, H Rogier; Thwaites, C Louise; Nadjm, Behzad

    2018-04-04

    Ventilator-associated respiratory infection (VARI) comprises ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) and ventilator-associated tracheobronchitis (VAT). Although their diagnostic criteria vary, together these are the most common hospital-acquired infections in intensive care units (ICUs) worldwide, responsible for a large proportion of antibiotic use within ICUs. Evidence-based strategies for the prevention of VARI in resource-limited settings are lacking. Preventing the leakage of oropharyngeal secretions into the lung using continuous endotracheal cuff pressure control is a promising strategy. The aim of this study is to investigate the efficacy of automated, continuous endotracheal cuff pressure control in preventing the development of VARI and reducing antibiotic use in ICUs in Vietnam. This is an open-label randomised controlled multicentre trial. We will enrol 600 adult patients intubated for ≤ 24 h at the time of enrolment. Eligible patients will be stratified according to admission diagnosis (180 tetanus, 420 non-tetanus) and site and will be randomised in a 1:1 ratio to receive either (1) automated, continuous control of endotracheal cuff pressure or (2) intermittent measurement and control of endotracheal cuff pressure using a manual cuff pressure meter. The primary outcome is the occurrence of VARI, defined as either VAP or VAT during the ICU admission up to a maximum of 90 days after randomisation. Patients in both groups who are at risk for VARI will receive a standardised battery of investigations if their treating physician feels a new infection has occurred, the results of which will be used by an endpoint review committee, blinded to the allocated arm and independent of patient care, to determine the primary outcome. All enrolled patients will be followed for mortality and endotracheal tube cuff-related complications at 28 days and 90 days after randomisation. Other secondary outcomes include antibiotic use; days ventilated, in ICU and in hospital

  8. Advancing obstetric and neonatal care in a regional hospital in Ghana via continuous quality improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srofenyoh, Emmanuel; Ivester, Thomas; Engmann, Cyril; Olufolabi, Adeyemi; Bookman, Laurel; Owen, Medge

    2012-01-01

    To reduce maternal and neonatal death at a large regional hospital through the use of quality improvement methodologies. In 2007, Kybele and the Ghana Health Service formed a partnership to analyze systems and patient care processes at a regional hospital in Accra, Ghana. A model encompassing continuous assessment, implementation, advocacy, outputs, and outcomes was designed. Key areas for improvement were grouped into "bundles" based on personnel, systems management, and service quality. Primary outcomes included maternal and perinatal mortality, and case fatality rates for hemorrhage and hypertensive disorders. Implementation and outcomes were evaluated tri-annually between 2007 and 2009. During the study period, there was a 34% decrease in maternal mortality despite a 36% increase in patient admission. Case fatality rates for pre-eclampsia and hemorrhage decreased from 3.1% to 1.1% (Pcontinuous quality improvement were developed and employed. Copyright © 2011 International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Intergenerational Perspectives on Autonomy Following a Transition to a Continuing Care Retirement Community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayalon, Liat

    2016-02-01

    The study evaluated the concept of autonomy from the perspective of older adults and their adult children following a transition of the older adult to a continuing care retirement community (CCRC). Overall, 70 interviews (with older adults and their adult children; 34 dyads) were analyzed, using a line-by-line open coding, followed by dyadic analysis. Autonomy was not portrayed as a uniform, homogenous construct, but rather encompassed four different domains: (a) the focus of one's attention or concerns: on others, on self, or not at all; (b) the ability to exercise decisions and make independent choices; (c) the degree of physical functioning and ability of the older adult; and (d) the financial ability of the older adult. The duality in the relationships between older adults and their adult children is discussed in relation to the give and take of autonomy that occur following a transition to a CCRC. © The Author(s) 2015.

  10. Changing disease profile and preventive health care in India: Issues of economy, equity and effectiveness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salma Kaneez

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The importance of preventive health care practices has increasingly been recognized in the wake of changing disease profile in India. The disease burden has been shifting from communicable to non-communicable diseases as a result of greater focus on achieving competitiveness in a fast globalizing economy. The rapid pace of social and technological changes has led to adverse life style choices resulting in higher incidence of heart diseases, diabetes, obesity, cancer, and deteriorating inter-personal relations and psychological well-being among individuals. Most of these health risks can considerably be reduced through disseminating science-based information on health promotion and disease prevention including exercise, nutrition, smoking and tobacco cessation, immunization, counseling, fostering good habits of health and hygiene, disease screening and preventive medicine. Prior evidences indicate that preventive health interventions can improve health outcomes in a great deal. In a regressive health delivery system of India where major health expenses on curative health is met by out-of-pocket money, preventive health services hold promise to be cost efficient, clinically effective and equity promoting. This article, therefore, examines in depth the issues and prospects of preventive and promotive health care services in realizing optimum health care needs of the people.

  11. Prevention of Post Traumatic Stress Disorder among Military Health Care Workers: A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Post Traumatic Stress Disorder among Military Health Care Workers: A Systematic Review Christopher A. Orsello, MD Resident, Aerospace Medicine...00-00-2012 to 00-00-2012 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Prevention of Post Traumatic Stress Disorder among Military Health Care Workers: A Systematic Review...analysis of risk factors for post - traumatic stress disorder in trauma-exposed adults. Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 68(5), 748–66

  12. Impact of remuneration and organizational factors on completing preventive manoeuvres in primary care practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahrouge, Simone; Hogg, William E; Russell, Grant; Tuna, Meltem; Geneau, Robert; Muldoon, Laura K; Kristjansson, Elizabeth; Fletcher, John

    2012-02-07

    Several jurisdictions attempting to reform primary care have focused on changes in physician remuneration. The goals of this study were to compare the delivery of preventive services by practices in four primary care funding models and to identify organizational factors associated with superior preventive care. In a cross-sectional study, we included 137 primary care practices in the province of Ontario (35 fee-for-service practices, 35 with salaried physicians [community health centres], 35 practices in the new capitation model [family health networks] and 32 practices in the established capitation model [health services organizations]). We surveyed 288 family physicians. We reviewed 4108 randomly selected patient charts and assigned prevention scores based on the proportion of eligible preventive manoeuvres delivered for each patient. A total of 3284 patients were eligible for at least one of six preventive manoeuvres. After adjusting for patient profile and contextual factors, we found that, compared with prevention scores in practices in the new capitation model, scores were significantly lower in fee-for-service practices (β estimate for effect on prevention score = -6.3, 95% confidence interval [CI] -11.9 to -0.6) and practices in the established capitation model (β = -9.1, 95% CI -14.9 to -3.3) but not for those with salaried remuneration (β = -0.8, 95% CI -6.5 to 4.8). After accounting for physician characteristics and organizational structure, the type of funding model was no longer a statistically significant factor. Compared with reference practices, those with at least one female family physician (β = 8.0, 95% CI 4.2 to 11.8), a panel size of fewer than 1600 patients per full-time equivalent family physician (β = 6.8, 95% CI 3.1 to 10.6) and an electronic reminder system (β = 4.6, 95% CI 0.4 to 8.7) had superior prevention scores. The effect of these three factors was largely but not always consistent across the funding models; it was largely

  13. Quality indicators of continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT) care in critically ill patients: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rewa, Oleksa G; Villeneuve, Pierre-Marc; Lachance, Philippe; Eurich, Dean T; Stelfox, Henry T; Gibney, R T Noel; Hartling, Lisa; Featherstone, Robin; Bagshaw, Sean M

    2017-06-01

    Renal replacement therapy is increasingly utilized in the intensive care unit (ICU), of which continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT) is most common. Despite CRRT being a relatively invasive and resource intensive technology, there remains wide practice variation in its application. This systematic review appraised the evidence for quality indicators (QIs) of CRRT care in critically ill patients. A comprehensive search strategy was developed and performed in five citation databases (Medline, Embase, CINAHL, Cochrane Library, and PubMed) and select grey literature sources. Two reviewers independently screened, selected, and extracted data using standardized forms. Each retrieved citation was appraised for quality using the Newcastle-Ottawa Scale (NOS) and Cochrane risk of bias tool. Data were summarized narratively. Our search yielded 8374 citations, of which 133 fulfilled eligibility. This included 97 cohort studies, 24 randomized controlled trials, 10 case-control studies, and 2 retrospective medical audits. The quality of retrieved studies was generally good. In total, 18 QIs were identified that were mentioned in 238 instances. Identified QIs were classified as related to structure (n = 4, 22.2 %), care processes (n = 9, 50.0 %), and outcomes (n = 5, 27.8 %). The most commonly mentioned QIs focused on filter lifespan (n = 98), small solute clearance (n = 46), bleeding (n = 30), delivered dose (n = 19), and treatment interruption (n = 5). Across studies, the definitions used for QIs evaluating similar constructs varied considerably. When identified, QIs were most commonly described as important (n = 144, 48.3 %), scientifically acceptable (n = 32, 10.7 %), and useable and/or feasible (n = 17, 5.7 %) by their primary study authors. We identified numerous potential QIs of CRRT care, characterized by heterogeneous definitions, varying quality of derivation, and limited evaluation. Further study is needed to prioritize a concise

  14. Using Data Mining to Determine the Impact Continuity of Care Has on the Air Force’s Healthcare System

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-12-26

    continuity of care by requiring compliance with the standards and guidelines of the Patient Centered Medical Home 3 (PCMH) model requiring the continuity...back  Rheumatism – Pain associated with joints and connective tissues (back pain, neck pain and osteoarthritis )  Osteopathies, chondropathies, and...pain, neck pain and osteoarthritis )  Osteopathies, chondropathies, and acquired musculoskeletal deformities – Diseases associated with bones or

  15. When health care workers perceive high-commitment HRM will they be motivated to continue working in health care? It may depend on their supervisor and intrinsic motivation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    drs Limke Schopman; dr Corine Boon; dr Karianne Kalshoven

    2015-01-01

    In this health care field study, we examined the link between human resource management (HRM), transformational leadership, intrinsic motivation and motivation to continue to work. Based on the social exchange theory, we proposed a mediation model linking HRM to motivation to continue to work in

  16. When health care workers perceive high-commitment HRM will they be motivated to continue working in health care? It may depend on their supervisor and intrinsic motivation.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schopman, L.M.; Kalshoven, K.; Boon, C.

    2017-01-01

    In this health care field study, we examined the link between human resource management (HRM), transformational leadership, intrinsic motivation and motivation to continue to work. Based on the social exchange theory, we proposed a mediation model linking HRM to motivation to continue to work in

  17. Needing smart home technologies: the perspectives of older adults in continuing care retirement communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courtney, Karen L; Demiris, George; Rantz, Marilyn; Skubic, Marjorie

    2008-01-01

    At present, the vast majority of older adults reside in the community. Though many older adults live in their own homes, increasing numbers are choosing continuing care retirement communities (CCRCs), which range from independent apartments to assisted living and skilled-nursing facilities. With predictions of a large increase in the segment of the population aged 65 and older, a subsequent increase in demand on CCRCs can be anticipated. With these expectations, researchers have begun exploring the use of smart home information-based technologies in these care facilities to enhance resident quality of life and safety, but little evaluation research exists on older adults' acceptance and use of these technologies. This study investigated the factors that influence the willingness of older adults living in independent and assisted living CCRCs to adopt smart home technology. Participants (n = 14) were recruited from community-dwelling older adults, aged 65 or older, living in one of two mid-western US CCRC facilities (independent living and assisted living type facilities). This study used a qualitative, descriptive approach, guided by principles of grounded theory research. Data saturation (or when no new themes or issues emerged from group sessions) occurred after four focus groups (n = 11 unique respondents) and was confirmed through additional individual interviews (n = 3). The findings from this study indicate that although privacy can be a barrier for older adults' adoption of smart home technology their own perception of their need for the technology can override their privacy concerns. Factors influencing self-perception of need for smart home technology, including the influence of primary care providers, are presented. Further exploration of the factors influencing older adults' perceptions of smart home technology need and the development of appropriate interventions is necessary.

  18. Reconciling disparate information in continuity of care documents: Piloting a system to consolidate structured clinical documents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseini, Masoud; Jones, Josette; Faiola, Anthony; Vreeman, Daniel J; Wu, Huanmei; Dixon, Brian E

    2017-10-01

    Due to the nature of information generation in health care, clinical documents contain duplicate and sometimes conflicting information. Recent implementation of Health Information Exchange (HIE) mechanisms in which clinical summary documents are exchanged among disparate health care organizations can proliferate duplicate and conflicting information. To reduce information overload, a system to automatically consolidate information across multiple clinical summary documents was developed for an HIE network. The system receives any number of Continuity of Care Documents (CCDs) and outputs a single, consolidated record. To test the system, a randomly sampled corpus of 522 CCDs representing 50 unique patients was extracted from a large HIE network. The automated methods were compared to manual consolidation of information for three key sections of the CCD: problems, allergies, and medications. Manual consolidation of 11,631 entries was completed in approximately 150h. The same data were automatically consolidated in 3.3min. The system successfully consolidated 99.1% of problems, 87.0% of allergies, and 91.7% of medications. Almost all of the inaccuracies were caused by issues involving the use of standardized terminologies within the documents to represent individual information entries. This study represents a novel, tested tool for de-duplication and consolidation of CDA documents, which is a major step toward improving information access and the interoperability among information systems. While more work is necessary, automated systems like the one evaluated in this study will be necessary to meet the informatics needs of providers and health systems in the future. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. The importance of continuing surveillance of risk factors for prevention of cardiovascular diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaetano Lanza

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available After peaking in the 1960s’, cardiovascular diseases (CVDs have shown a consistent decline in western countries in recent decades [1].Despite this,CVDs remain the major cause of mortality and morbidity in industrialized populations, with relevant associated socio-economical issues, while their incidence is increasing in developing countries. Several factors have likely contributed to the reduced incidence of CVDs in industrialized societies, including an increase in education and attention to health issues, lifestyle changes and improvement in diagnostic facilities and therapeutic tools. Epidemiologic studies have played an outstanding role in the decline of CVDs. Indeed, they have allowed for the identification of habits and conditions which expose healthy subjects to an increased risk of development of atherosclerosis and its complications They have also led to the implementation of appropriate programs and campaigns aimed at fighting the identified risk factors by means of changes in diet and lifestyle and the use of specific drug treatments. In particular, tight control and prevention of hypertension, smoking and hypercholesterolemia has largely contributed to the reduction of CVDs, accounting for more than 50% of the reduction of mortality from the 1960s’ to the 1990s’ [2].This approach was also crucial in improving the clinical outcomes of secondary prevention for CVDs.

  20. A controlled investigation of continuing pain education for long-term care staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghandehari, Omeed O; Hadjistavropoulos, Thomas; Williams, Jaime; Thorpe, Lilian; Alfano, Dennis P; Dal Bello-Haas, Vanina; Malloy, David C; Martin, Ronald R; Rahaman, Omar; Zwakhalen, Sandra M G; Carleton, R N; Hunter, Paulette V; Lix, Lisa M

    2013-01-01

    The underassessment and undertreatment of pain in residents of long-term care (LTC) facilities has been well documented. Gaps in staff knowledge and inaccurate beliefs have been identified as contributors. To investigate the effectiveness of an expert-based continuing education program in pain assessment⁄management for LTC staff. Participants included 131 LTC staff members who were randomly assigned to either an interactive pain education (PE) program, which addressed gaps in knowledge such as medication management, or an interactive control program consisting of general dementia education without a specific clinical focus. Participants attended three sessions, each lasting 3 h, and completed measures of pain-related knowledge and attitudes⁄beliefs before, immediately after and two weeks following the program. Focus groups were conducted with a subset of participants to gauge perception of the training program and barriers to implementing pain-related strategies. Analysis using ANOVA revealed that PE participants demonstrated larger gains compared with control participants with regard to pain knowledge and pain beliefs. Barriers to implementing pain-related strategies certainly exist. Nonetheless, qualitative analyses demonstrated that PE participants reported that they overcame many of these barriers and used pain management strategies four times more frequently than control participants. Contrary to previous research, the present study found that the interactive PE program was effective in changing pain beliefs and improving knowledge. Continuing PE in LTC has the potential to address knowledge gaps among front-line LTC providers.

  1. Racial/Ethnic and social class differences in preventive care practices among persons with diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barnett Elizabeth

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Diabetes is the sixth leading cause of death in the United States. Persons with diabetes are at increased risk for serious complications including CVD, stroke, retinopathy, amputation, and nephropathy. Minorities have the highest incidence and prevalence of diabetes and related complications compared to other racial groups. Preventive care practices such as smoking cessation, eye examinations, feet examinations, and yearly checkups can prevent or delay the incidence and progression of diabetes related complications. The purpose of this study was to examine racial/ethnic differences in diabetes preventive care practices by several socio-demographic characteristics including social class. Methods Data from the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance Survey for 1998–2001 were used for analyses. The study population consisted of persons who indicated having diabetes on the BRFSS, 35 yrs and older, and Non-Hispanic Black, non-Hispanic White, or Hispanic persons. Logistic regression was used in analyses. Results Contrary to our hypotheses, Blacks and Hispanics engaged in preventive care more frequently than Whites. Whites were less likely to have seen a doctor in the previous year, less likely to have had a foot exam, more likely to smoke, and less likely to have attempted smoking cessation. Persons of lower social class were at greatest risk for not receiving preventive care regardless of race/ethnicity. Persons with no health care coverage were twice as likely to have not visited the doctor in the previous year and twice as likely to have not had an eye exam, 1.5 times more likely to have not had a foot exam or attempted smoking cessation. Conclusion This study showed that persons of lower social class and persons with no health insurance are at greatest risk for not receiving preventive services.

  2. Frequent Use of Emergency Departments by the Elderly Population When Continuing Care Is Not Well Established.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacopo M Legramante

    Full Text Available The elderly, who suffer from multiple chronic diseases, represent a substantial proportion of Emergency Department (ED frequent users, thus contributing to ED overcrowding, although they could benefit from other health care facilities, if those were available. The aim of this study was to evaluate and characterize hospital visits of older patients (age 65 or greater to the ED of a university teaching hospital in Rome from the 1st of January to the 31st of December 2014, in order to identify clinical and social characteristics potentially associated with "elderly frequent users".A retrospective study was performed during the calendar year 2014 (1st January 2014 - 31st December 2014 analyzing all ED admissions to the University Hospital of Rome Tor Vergata. Variables collected included age, triage code, arrival data, discharge diagnosis, and visit outcome. We performed a risk analysis using univariate binary logistic regression models.A total number of 38,016 patients accessed the ED, generating 46,820 accesses during the study period, with an average of 1.23 accesses for patient. The elderly population represented a quarter of the total ED population and had an increased risk of frequent use (OR 1.5: CI 1.4-1.7 and hospitalization (OR 3.8: CI 3.7-4. Moreover, they showed a greater diagnostic complexity, as demonstrated by the higher incidence of yellow and red priority codes compared to other ED populations (OR 3.1: CI 2.9-3.2.Older patients presented clinical and social characteristics related to the definition of "elderly frail frequent users". The fact that a larger number of hospitalizations occurred in such patients is indirect evidence of frailty in this specific population, suggesting that hospital admissions may be an inappropriate response to frailty, especially when continued care is not established.Enhancement of continuity of care, establishment of a tracking system for those who are at greater risk of visiting the ED and evaluating

  3. Frequent Use of Emergency Departments by the Elderly Population When Continuing Care Is Not Well Established.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legramante, Jacopo M; Morciano, Laura; Lucaroni, Francesca; Gilardi, Francesco; Caredda, Emanuele; Pesaresi, Alessia; Coscia, Massimo; Orlando, Stefano; Brandi, Antonella; Giovagnoli, Germano; Di Lecce, Vito N; Visconti, Giuseppe; Palombi, Leonardo

    2016-01-01

    The elderly, who suffer from multiple chronic diseases, represent a substantial proportion of Emergency Department (ED) frequent users, thus contributing to ED overcrowding, although they could benefit from other health care facilities, if those were available. The aim of this study was to evaluate and characterize hospital visits of older patients (age 65 or greater) to the ED of a university teaching hospital in Rome from the 1st of January to the 31st of December 2014, in order to identify clinical and social characteristics potentially associated with "elderly frequent users". A retrospective study was performed during the calendar year 2014 (1st January 2014 - 31st December 2014) analyzing all ED admissions to the University Hospital of Rome Tor Vergata. Variables collected included age, triage code, arrival data, discharge diagnosis, and visit outcome. We performed a risk analysis using univariate binary logistic regression models. A total number of 38,016 patients accessed the ED, generating 46,820 accesses during the study period, with an average of 1.23 accesses for patient. The elderly population represented a quarter of the total ED population and had an increased risk of frequent use (OR 1.5: CI 1.4-1.7) and hospitalization (OR 3.8: CI 3.7-4). Moreover, they showed a greater diagnostic complexity, as demonstrated by the higher incidence of yellow and red priority codes compared to other ED populations (OR 3.1: CI 2.9-3.2). Older patients presented clinical and social characteristics related to the definition of "elderly frail frequent users". The fact that a larger number of hospitalizations occurred in such patients is indirect evidence of frailty in this specific population, suggesting that hospital admissions may be an inappropriate response to frailty, especially when continued care is not established. Enhancement of continuity of care, establishment of a tracking system for those who are at greater risk of visiting the ED and evaluating fragile

  4. Journey to confidence: women's experiences of pain in labour and relational continuity of care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leap, Nicky; Sandall, Jane; Buckland, Sara; Huber, Ulli

    2010-01-01

    An evaluation carried out at King's College Hospital Foundation National Health Service Trust in London identified that women who received continuity of carer from the Albany Midwifery Practice were significantly less likely to use pharmacological pain relief when comparisons were made with eight other midwifery group practices and the local maternity service as a whole. This study was designed to explore women's views of this phenomenon. We conducted a thematic analysis of semistructured, audiotaped, in-depth interviews with 10 women who reflected on their experiences of preparation and support for pain in labour and midwifery continuity of carer with Albany midwives, using a qualitative descriptive methodological approach. Women reflected positively on how, throughout pregnancy and labour, their midwives promoted a sense of their ability to cope with the challenge of labour pain. This building of confidence was enabled through a relationship of trust that developed with their midwives and the value of hearing other women's stories during antenatal groups. These experiences enhanced women's ability to overcome fears and self-doubt about coping with pain and led to feelings of pride, elation, and empowerment after birth. Women valued being encouraged and supported to labour without using pharmacological pain relief by midwives with whom they developed a trusting relationship throughout pregnancy. Features of midwifery approaches to pain in labour and relational continuity of care have important implications for promoting normal birth and a positive experience of pregnancy, labour, and birth for women. Copyright (c) 2010 American College of Nurse-Midwives. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Early identification and preventive care for elevated cardiovascular disease risk within a remote Australian Aboriginal primary health care service

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O'Dea Kerin

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cardiovascular disease (CVD is the single greatest contributor to the gap in life expectancy between Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians. Our objective is to determine if holistic CVD risk assessment, introduced as part of the new Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Adult Health Check (AHC, results in better identification of elevated CVD risk, improved delivery of preventive care for CVD and improvements in the CVD risk profile for Aboriginal adults in a remote community. Methods Interrupted time series study over six years in a remote primary health care (PHC service involving Aboriginal adults identified with elevated CVD risk (N = 64. Several process and outcome measures were audited at 6 monthly intervals for three years prior to the AHC (the intervention and three years following: (i the proportion of guideline scheduled CVD preventive care services delivered, (ii mean CVD medications prescribed and dispensed, (iii mean PHC consultations, (iv changes in participants' CVD risk factors and estimated absolute CVD risk and (v mean number of CVD events and iatrogenic events. Results Twenty-five percent of AHC participants were identified as having elevated CVD risk. Of these, 84% had not been previously identified during routine care. Following the intervention, there were significant improvements in the recorded delivery of preventive care services for CVD (30% to 53%, and prescription of CVD related medications (28% to 89% (P P = 0.004 following the intervention. However, there were no significant changes in the mean number of PHC consultations or mean number of CVD events or iatrogenic events. Conclusions Holistic CVD risk assessment during an AHC can lead to better and earlier identification of elevated CVD risk, improvement in the recorded delivery of preventive care services for CVD, intensification of treatment for CVD, and improvements in participants' CVD risk profile. Further research is required on

  6. Midwifery students׳ experiences of an innovative clinical placement model embedded within midwifery continuity of care in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Amanda G; Wilkes, Elizabeth; Gamble, Jenny; Sidebotham, Mary; Creedy, Debra K

    2015-08-01

    midwifery continuity of care experiences can provide high quality clinical learning for students but can be challenging to implement. The Rural and Private Midwifery Education Project (RPMEP) is a strategic government funded initiative to (1) grow the midwifery workforce within private midwifery practice and rural midwifery, by (2) better preparing new graduates to work in private midwifery and rural continuity of care models. this study evaluated midwifery students׳ experience of an innovative continuity of care clinical placement model in partnership with private midwifery practice and rural midwifery group practices. a descriptive cohort design was used. All students in the RPMEP were invited to complete an online survey about their experiences of clinical placement within midwifery continuity models of care. Responses were analysed using descriptive statistics. Correlations between total scale scores were examined. Open-ended responses were analysed using content analysis. Internal reliability of the scales was assessed using Cronbach׳s alpha. sixteen out of 17 completed surveys were received (94% response rate). Scales included in the survey demonstrated good internal reliability. The majority of students felt inspired by caseload approaches to care, expressed overall satisfaction with the mentoring received and reported a positive learning environment at their placement site. Some students reported stress related to course expectations and demands in the clinical environment (e.g. skill acquisition and hours required for continuity of care). There were significant correlations between scales on perceptions of caseload care and learning culture (r=.87 pflexible academic programme enabled students to access learning at any time and prioritise continuity of care experiences. Strategies are needed to better support students achieve a satisfactory work-life balance. Crown Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Continuous palliative sedation for patients with advanced cancer at a tertiary care cancer center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prado, Bernard Lobato; Gomes, Diogo Bugano Diniz; Usón Júnior, Pedro Luiz Serrano; Taranto, Patricia; França, Monique Sedlmaier; Eiger, Daniel; Mariano, Rodrigo Coutinho; Hui, David; Del Giglio, Auro

    2018-01-04

    Palliative sedation (PS) is an intervention to treat refractory symptoms and to relieve suffering at the end of life. Its prevalence and practice patterns vary widely worldwide. The aim of our study was to evaluate the frequency, clinical indications and outcomes of PS in advanced cancer patients admitted to our tertiary comprehensive cancer center. We retrospectively studied the use of PS in advanced cancer patients who died between March 1st, 2012 and December 31st, 2014. PS was defined as the use of continuous infusion of midazolam or neuroleptics for refractory symptoms in the end of life. This study was approved by the Research Ethics Committee of our institution (project number 2481-15). During the study period, 552 cancer patients died at the institution and 374 met the inclusion criteria for this study. Main reason for exclusion was death in the Intensive Care Unit. Among all included patients, 54.2% (n = 203) received PS. Patients who received PS as compared to those not sedated were younger (67.8 vs. 76.4 years-old, p sedation were dyspnea (55%) and delirium (19.7%) and the most common drugs used were midazolam (52.7%) or midazolam and a neuroleptic (39.4%). Median initial midazolam infusion rate was 0.75 mg/h (interquartile range - IQR - 0.6-1.5) and final rate was 1.5 mg/h (IQR 0.9-3.0). Patient survival (length of hospital stay from admission to death) of those who had PS was more than the double of those who did not (33.6 days vs 16 days, p palliative care team was involved in the care of 12% (n = 25) of sedated patients. PS is a relatively common practice in the end-of-life of cancer patients at our hospital and it is not associated with shortening of hospital stay. Involvement of a dedicated palliative care team is strongly recommended if this procedure is being considered. Further research is needed to identify factors that may affect the frequency and outcomes associated with PS.

  8. Hand disinfection in a neonatal intensive care unit: continuous electronic monitoring over a one-year period.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helder, Onno K; van Goudoever, Johannes B; Hop, Wim C J; Brug, Johannes; Kornelisse, René F

    2012-10-08

    Good hand hygiene compliance is essential to prevent nosocomial infections in healthcare settings. Direct observation of hand hygiene compliance is the gold standard but is time consuming. An electronic dispenser with built-in wireless recording equipment allows continuous monitoring of its usage. The purpose of this study was to monitor the use of alcohol-based hand rub dispensers with a built-in electronic counter in a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) setting and to determine compliance with hand hygiene protocols by direct observation. A one-year observational study was conducted at a 27 bed level III NICU at a university hospital. All healthcare workers employed at the NICU participated in the study. The use of bedside dispensers was continuously monitored and compliance with hand hygiene was determined by random direct observations. A total of 258,436 hand disinfection events were recorded; i.e. a median (interquartile range) of 697 (559-840) per day. The median (interquartile range) number of hand disinfection events performed per healthcare worker during the day, evening, and night shifts was 13.5 (10.8 - 16.7), 19.8 (16.3 - 24.1), and 16.6 (14.2 - 19.3), respectively. In 65.8% of the 1,168 observations of patient contacts requiring hand hygiene, healthcare workers fully complied with the protocol. We conclude that the electronic devices provide useful information on frequency, time, and location of its use, and also reveal trends in hand disinfection events over time. Direct observations offer essential data on compliance with the hand hygiene protocol. In future research, data generated by the electronic devices can be supplementary used to evaluate the effectiveness of hand hygiene promotion campaigns.

  9. Public Health Investment in Team Care: Increasing Access to Clinical Preventive Services in Los Angeles County

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tony Kuo

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available As part of federal and local efforts to increase access to high quality, clinical preventive services (CPS in underserved populations, the Los Angeles County Department of Public Health (DPH partnered with six local health system and community organization partners to promote the use of team care for CPS delivery. Although these partners were at different stages of organizational capacity, post-program review suggests that each organization advanced team care in their clinical or community environments, potentially affecting >250,000 client visits per year. Despite existing infrastructure and DPH’s funding support of CPS integration, partner efforts faced several challenges. They included lack of sustainable funding for prevention services; limited access to community resources that support disease prevention; and difficulties in changing health-care provider behavior. Although team care can serve as a catalyst or vehicle for delivering CPS, downstream sustainability of this model of practice requires further state and national policy changes that prioritize prevention. Public health is well positioned to facilitate these policy discussions and to assist health system and community organizations in strengthening CPS integration.

  10. Business model innovation for value and technology based preventive health care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Linner, T.; Solcanu, G.; van den Boom, C.B.; Lingegard, H.; Istamto, T.; Proctor, G.M.; Lu, Y.; Steenbakkers, J.J.H.

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, a structured approach for the development of an initial business strategy blueprint for a complicated, multi-partner, multidisciplinary, early-stage research project focusing on valuebased and preventive health care technology, is presented. Based on an in-depth analysis of the

  11. Obesity Prevention Interventions in Early Childhood Education and Care Settings with Parental Involvement: A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Heather; Skouteris, Helen; Edwards, Susan; Rutherford, Leonie

    2015-01-01

    Partnering early childhood education and care (ECEC) and the home together may be more effective in combating obesogenic risk factors in preschool children. Thus, an evaluation of ECEC obesity prevention interventions with a parental component was conducted, exploring parental engagement and its effect on obesity and healthy lifestyle outcomes. A…

  12. Long-Term Outcomes for the Promoting CARE Suicide Prevention Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooven, Carole; Herting, Jerald R.; Snedker, Karen A.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives: To provide a long-term look at suicide risk from adolescence to young adulthood for former participants in Promoting CARE, an indicated suicide prevention program. Methods: Five hundred ninety-three suicide-vulnerable high school youth were involved in a long-term follow-up study. Latent class growth models identify patterns of change…

  13. National Suicide Prevention Lifeline: Enhancing Mental Health Care for Suicidal Individuals and Other People in Crisis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gould, Madelyn S.; Munfakh, Jimmie L. H.; Kleinman, Marjorie; Lake, Alison M.

    2012-01-01

    Linking at-risk callers to ongoing mental health care is a key goal of crisis hotline interventions that has not often been addressed in evaluations of hotlines' effectiveness. We conducted telephone interviews with 376 suicidal and 278 nonsuicidal crisis callers to the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline (Lifeline) to assess rates of mental…

  14. Identification of children with psychosocial problems differed between preventive child health care professionals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vogels, A.G.C.; Jacobusse, G.W.; Hoekstra, F.; Brugman, E.; Crone, M.; Reijneveld, S.A.

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To assess whether differences between individual Preventive Child Health Care (PCH) professionals in the percentage of children they identify as having psychosocial problems are larger than expected based on chance and whether such differences can be explained by differences in

  15. Process evaluation of a lifestyle intervention to prevent diabetes and cardiovascular diseases in primary care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lakerveld, J.; Bot, S.D.M.; Chin A Paw, M.J.M.; van Tulder, M.W.; Kingo, L.; Nijpels, G.

    2012-01-01

    Effective, cost-effective, safe, and feasible interventions to improve lifestyle behavior in at-risk populations are needed in primary care. In the Hoorn Prevention Study, the authors implemented a theory-based lifestyle intervention in which trained practice nurses used an innovative combination of

  16. Randomized clinical trial comparing two options for postoperative incisional care to prevent poststernotomy surgical site infections

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Segers, Patrique; de Jong, Antonius P.; Spanjaard, Lodewijk; Ubbink, Dirk T.; de Mol, Bas A. J. M.

    2007-01-01

    Surgical site infection (SSI) remains an important complication of cardiac surgery. Prevention is important, as SSI is associated with high mortality and morbidity rates. Incisional care is an important daily issue for surgeons. However, there is still scant scientific evidence on which guidelines

  17. Risks for depression onset in primary care elderly patients: potential targets for preventive interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyness, Jeffrey M; Yu, Qin; Tang, Wan; Tu, Xin; Conwell, Yeates

    2009-12-01

    Prevention of late-life depression, a common, disabling condition with often poor outcomes in primary care, requires identification of seniors at highest risk of incident episodes. The authors examined a broad range of clinical, functional, and psychosocial predictors of incident depressive episodes in a well-characterized cohort of older primary care patients. In this observational cohort study, patients age >/=65 years without current major depression, recruited from practices in general internal medicine, geriatrics, and family medicine, received annual follow-up assessments over a period of 1 to 4 years. Of 617 enrolled subjects, 405 completed the 1-year follow-up evaluation. The Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV (SCID) determined incident major depressive episodes. Each risk indicator's predictive utility was examined by calculating the risk exposure rate, incident risk ratio, and population attributable fraction, leading to determination of the number needed to treat in order to prevent incident depression. A combination of risks, including minor or subsyndromal depression, impaired functional status, and history of major or minor depression, identified a group in which fully effective treatment of five individuals would prevent one new case of incident depression. Indicators routinely assessed in primary care identified a group at very high risk for onset of major depressive episodes. Such markers may inform current clinical care by fostering the early detection and intervention critical to improving patient outcomes and may serve as the basis for future studies refining the recommendations for screening and determining the effectiveness of preventive interventions.

  18. Preventing aggressive incidents and seclusions in forensic care by means of the 'Early Recognition Method'

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fluttert, F.A.J.; Meijel, B.K.G. van; Nijman, H.L.I.; Björkly, S.; Grypdonck, M.H.F.

    2010-01-01

    Objective. The Early Recognition Method aims at improving collaboration between nurses and patients to prevent aggression in forensic psychiatric care. To achieve this goal, Early Recognition Method strongly focuses on early signs of aggression. In the current study, we investigated whether

  19. Adult Learners' Preferred Methods of Learning Preventative Heart Disease Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alavi, Nasim

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the preferred method of learning about heart disease by adult learners. This research study also investigated if there was a statistically significant difference between race/ethnicity, age, and gender of adult learners and their preferred method of learning preventative heart disease care. This…

  20. Patient experienced continuity of care in the psychiatric healthcare system-a study including immigrants, refugees and ethnic danes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Natasja Koitzsch; Johansen, Katrine Schepelern; Kastrup, Marianne; Krasnik, Allan; Norredam, Marie

    2014-09-17

    The purpose of this study was to investigate continuity of care in the psychiatric healthcare system from the perspective of patients, including vulnerable groups such as immigrants and refugees. The study is based on 19 narrative interviews conducted with 15 patients with diverse migration backgrounds (immigrants, descendents, refugees, and ethnic Danes). Patients were recruited from a community psychiatric centre situated in an area with a high proportion of immigrants and refugees. Data were analysed through the lens of a theoretical framework of continuity of care in psychiatry, developed in 2004 by Joyce et al., which encompasses four domains: accessibility, individualised care, relationship base and service delivery. Investigating continuity of care, we found issues of specific concern to immigrants and refugees, but also commonalities across the groups. For accessibility, areas pertinent to immigrants and refugees include lack of knowledge concerning mental illness and obligations towards children. In terms of individualised care, trauma, additional vulnerability, and taboo concerning mental illness were of specific concern. In the domain of service delivery, social services included assistance with immigration papers for immigrants and refugees. In the relationship base domain, no differences were identified. Implications for priority area: The treatment courses of patients in the psychiatric field are complex and diverse and the patient perspective of continuity of care provides important insight into the delivery of care. The study highlights the importance of person-centred care irrespective of migration background though it may be beneficial to have an awareness of areas that may be of more specific concern to immigrants and refugees. The study sheds light on concerns specific to immigrants and refugees in a framework of continuity of care, but also commonalities across the patient groups.

  1. Social network approaches to recruitment, HIV prevention, medical care, and medication adherence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latkin, Carl A; Davey-Rothwell, Melissa A; Knowlton, Amy R; Alexander, Kamila A; Williams, Chyvette T; Boodram, Basmattee

    2013-06-01

    This article reviews the current issues and advancements in social network approaches to HIV prevention and care. Social network analysis can provide a method to understand health disparities in HIV rates, treatment access, and outcomes. Social network analysis is a valuable tool to link social structural factors to individual behaviors. Social networks provide an avenue for low-cost and sustainable HIV prevention interventions that can be adapted and translated into diverse populations. Social networks can be utilized as a viable approach to recruitment for HIV testing and counseling, HIV prevention interventions, optimizing HIV medical care, and medication adherence. Social network interventions may be face-to-face or through social media. Key issues in designing social network interventions are contamination due to social diffusion, network stability, density, and the choice and training of network members. There are also ethical issues involved in the development and implementation of social network interventions. Social network analyses can also be used to understand HIV transmission dynamics.

  2. Strategies to Prevent Surgical Site Infections in Acute Care Hospitals: 2014 Update

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Deverick J.; Podgorny, Kelly; Berríos-Torres, Sandra I.; Bratzler, Dale W.; Dellinger, E. Patchen; Greene, Linda; Nyquist, Ann-Christine; Saiman, Lisa; Yokoe, Deborah S.; Maragakis, Lisa L.; Kaye, Keith S.

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE Previously published guidelines are available that provide comprehensive recommendations for detecting and preventing healthcare-associated infections (HAIs). The intent of this document is to highlight practical recommendations in a concise format designed to assist acute care hospitals in implementing and prioritizing their surgical site infection (SSI) prevention efforts. This document updates “Strategies to Prevent Surgical Site Infections in Acute Care Hospitals,”1 published in 2008. This expert guidance document is sponsored by the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America (SHEA) and is the product of a collaborative effort led by SHEA, the Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA), the American Hospital Association (AHA), the Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology (APIC), and The Joint Commission, with major contributions from representatives of a number of organizations and societies with content expertise. The list of endorsing and supporting organizations is presented in the introduction to the 2014 updates.2 PMID:24799638

  3. Adherence of preventive oral care products in the Syrian market to evidence-based international recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habes, D; Mahzia, R; Nakhleh, K; Joury, E

    2016-09-25

    No study has investigated the availability and adherence of preventive oral care products on the Syrian market to evidence-based international recommendations. Data were collected in 2012, and updated in 2016, in terms of availability, characteristics and adherence to evidence-based international recommendations. Few preventive products adhered to the recommendations. Despite the large decrease in the number of oral care products on the Syrian market, due to the Syrian crisis, nonadherence of some of the available products is still present. A multisectorial approach at a policy level is needed to address such important limitations. The Syrian Ministry of Health should reform regulations for fluoride products to become subject to drug monitoring systems; the Syrian Arab Committee for Measurements and Standards needs to update its standards; and the Syrian General Dental Association should distribute a preventive booklet to dental practitioners.

  4. Malnutrition in Dutch health care: prevalence, prevention, treatment, and quality indicators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meijers, Judith M M; Halfens, Ruud J G; van Bokhorst-de van der Schueren, Marian A E; Dassen, Theo; Schols, Jos M G A

    2009-05-01

    In most health care organizations there is still insufficient awareness for recognizing and treating malnourished patients. To gain more insight into nutritional care policies in Dutch health care organizations, this study investigated screening, treatment, and other quality indicators of nutritional care. In 2007 a cross-sectional multicenter study was performed that included 20 255 patients (hospitals, n = 6021; nursing homes, n = 11 902; home care, n = 2332). A standardized questionnaire was used to study nutritional screening and treatment at the patient level and quality indicators at institutional and ward levels (e.g., malnutrition guidelines/protocols, nutritional education, and weighing policy). Nutritional screening was performed more often in nursing homes (60.2%) than in hospitals (40.3%) and home care (13.9%, P hospitals, and home care. At ward level nursing homes focused more on the quality of nutritional care than did hospitals and home care, especially with respect to controlling the use of nutritional guidelines (54.6%, P malnutrition is still a considerable problem in one of every five patients in all participating health care settings. It furthermore demonstrates that recognizing and treating malnutrition continues to be problematic. To target the problem of malnutrition adequately, more awareness is needed of the importance of nutritional screening, appropriate treatment, and other nutritional quality indicators.

  5. How Peru introduced a plan for comprehensive HIV prevention and care for transwomen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salazar, Ximena; Núnez-Curto, Arón; Villayzán, Jana; Castillo, Regina; Benites, Carlos; Caballero, Patricia; Cáceres, Carlos F

    2016-01-01

    As a group, transwomen in Peru have the highest prevalence of HIV (>20%) in the country, but they have little access to HIV prevention, testing and care services. Until recently, Peru's national HIV programme did not recognize transwomen and had remained essentially static for decades. This changed in December 2014, when the Ministry of Health expressed its commitment to improve programming for transwomen and to involve transwomen organizations by prioritizing the development of a "Targeted Strategy Plan of STIs/HIV/AIDS Prevention and Comprehensive Care for Transwomen." A policy dialogue between key stakeholders - Peru's Ministry of Health, academic scientists, civil society, transgender leaders and international agencies - created the conditions for a change in Peru's national HIV policy for transwomen. Supported by the effective engagement of all sectors, the Ministry of Health launched a plan to provide comprehensive HIV prevention and care for transwomen. The five-year plan includes new national guidelines for HIV prevention, care and support, and country-level investments in infrastructure and equipment. In addition to new biomedical strategies, the plan also incorporates several strategies to address structural factors that contribute to the vulnerability of transwomen. We identified three key factors that created the right conditions for this change in Peru's HIV policy. These factors include (1) the availability of solid evidence, based on scientific research; (2) ongoing efforts within the transwomen community to become better advocates of their own rights; and (3) a dialogue involving honest discussions between stakeholders about possibilities of changing the nation's HIV policy. The creation of Peru's national plan for HIV prevention and care for transwomen shows that long-term processes, focused on human rights for transwomen in Peru, can lead to organizational and public-policy change.

  6. Application of Pulse Spark Discharges for Scale Prevention and Continuous Filtration Methods in Coal-Fired Power Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Young; Fridman, Alexander

    2012-06-30

    The overall objective of the present work was to develop a new scale-prevention technology by continuously precipitating and removing dissolved mineral ions (such as calcium and magnesium) in cooling water while the COC could be doubled from the present standard value of 3.5. The hypothesis of the present study was that if we could successfully precipitate and remove the excess calcium ions in cooling water, we could prevent condenser-tube fouling and at the same time double the COC. The approach in the study was to utilize pulse spark discharges directly in water to precipitate dissolved mineral ions in recirculating cooling water into relatively large suspended particles, which could be removed by a self-cleaning filter. The present study began with a basic scientific research to better understand the mechanism of pulse spark discharges in water and conducted a series of validation experiments using hard water in a laboratory cooling tower. Task 1 of the present work was to demonstrate if the spark discharge could precipitate the mineral ions in water. Task 2 was to demonstrate if the selfcleaning filter could continuously remove these precipitated calcium particles such that the blowdown could be eliminated or significantly reduced. Task 3 was to demonstrate if the scale could be prevented or minimized at condenser tubes with a COC of 8 or (almost) zero blowdown. In Task 1, we successfully completed the validation study that confirmed the precipitation of dissolved calcium ions in cooling water with the supporting data of calcium hardness over time as measured by a calcium ion probe. In Task 2, we confirmed through experimental tests that the self-cleaning filter could continuously remove precipitated calcium particles in a simulated laboratory cooling tower such that the blowdown could be eliminated or significantly reduced. In addition, chemical water analysis data were obtained which were used to confirm the COC calculation. In Task 3, we conducted a series

  7. The Military Health Care System May Have the Potential to Prevent Health Care Disparities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierre-Louis, Bosny J; Moore, Angelo D; Hamilton, Jill B

    2015-09-01

    The existence of health disparities in military populations has become an important topic of research. However, to our knowledge, this is the first study to examine health disparities, as related to access to care and health status, among active duty soldiers and their families. Specifically, the purpose of this analysis was to evaluate whether health disparities exist in access to care and health outcomes of patient satisfaction, physical health status, and mental health status according to race, gender, and sponsor rank in the population of active duty soldiers and their family members. In this cross-sectional study, active duty army soldiers and family members were recruited from either one particular army health clinic where they received their health care or from an adjacent shopping center frequented by eligible participants. Data were collected using validated measures to assess concepts of access to care and health status. Statistical analysis, including one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) was performed to investigate differences in study outcome measures across four key demographic subgroups: race, gender, sponsor rank, and component (active soldier or family member). A total of 200 participants completed the study questionnaires. The sample consisted of 45.5 % soldiers and 54.5 % family members, with 88.5 % reporting a sponsor rank in the category of junior or senior enlisted rank. Mean scores for access to care did not differ significantly for the groups race/ethnicity (p = 0.53), gender (p = 0.14), and sponsor rank (p = 0.10). Furthermore, no significant differences were observed whether respondents were active soldiers or their family members (p = 0.36). Similarly, there were no statistically significant subgroup (race/ethnicity, gender, sponsor rank, or component) differences in mean patient satisfaction, physical health, and mental health scores. In a health equity system of care such as the military health care system, active duty

  8. Pediatric Primary Care-Based Obesity Prevention for Parents of Preschool Children: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherwood, Nancy E; JaKa, Meghan M; Crain, A Lauren; Martinson, Brian C; Hayes, Marcia G; Anderson, Julie D

    2015-12-01

    The Healthy Homes/Healthy Kids Preschool (HHHK-Preschool) pilot program is an obesity prevention intervention integrating pediatric care provider counseling and a phone-based program to prevent unhealthy weight gain among 2- to 4-year-old children at risk for obesity (BMI percentile between the 50th and 85th percentile and at least one overweight parent) or currently overweight (85th percentile ≤ BMI pediatric primary care clinics were randomized to: (1) the Busy Bodies/Better Bites Obesity Prevention Arm or the (2) Healthy Tots/Safe Spots safety/injury prevention Contact Control Arm. Baseline and 6-month data were collected, including measured height and weight, accelerometry, previous day dietary recalls, and parent surveys. Intervention process data (e.g., call completion) were also collected. High intervention completion and satisfaction rates were observed. Although a statistically significant time by treatment interaction was not observed for BMI percentile or BMI z-score, post-hoc examination of baseline weight status as a moderator of treatment outcome showed that the Busy Bodies/Better Bites obesity prevention intervention appeared to be effective among children who were in the overweight category at baseline relative to those who were categorized as at risk for obesity (p = 0.04). HHHK-Preschool pilot study results support the feasibility, acceptability, and potential efficacy in already overweight children of a pediatric primary care-based obesity prevention intervention integrating brief provider counseling and parent-targeted phone coaching. What's New: Implementing pediatric primary care-based obesity interventions is challenging. Previous interventions have primarily involved in-person sessions, a barrier to sustained parent involvement. HHHK-preschool pilot study results suggest that integrating brief provider counseling and parent-targeted phone coaching is a promising approach.

  9. Review and analysis of existing mobile phone applications for health care-associated infection prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnall, Rebecca; Iribarren, Sarah J

    2015-06-01

    The expanding number of mobile health applications (apps) holds potential to reduce and eliminate health care-associated infections (HAIs) in clinical practice. The purpose of this review was to identify and provide an overview of the apps available to support prevention of HAIs and to assess their functionality and potential uses in clinical care. We searched 3 online mobile app stores using the following terms: infection prevention, prevention, hand hygiene, hand washing, and specific HAI terms (catheter-associated urinary tract infection [CAUTI], central line-associated bloodstream infections, surgical site infection, and ventilator associated pneumonia [VAP]). Search queries yielded a total of 2,646 potentially relevant apps, of which 17 met our final inclusion criteria. The areas of focus were CAUTI (n = 1, 5.9%), VAP (n = 1, 5.9%), environmental monitoring (n = 2, 11.8%), and hand hygiene (n = 2, 11.8%); the remainder (n = 11, 64.7%) were focused on >1 area (eg, multiple infection prevention bundles, infection prevention guidelines). Almost all of the apps (70.6%) had a maximum of two functions. Mobile apps may help reduce HAI by providing easy access to guidelines, hand hygiene monitoring support, or step-by-step procedures aimed at reducing infections at the point of clinical care. Given the dearth of available apps and the lack of functionality with those that are available, there is a need for further development of mobile apps for HAI prevention at the point of care. Copyright © 2015 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. The Union Health Center: a working model of clinical care linked to preventive occupational health services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbert, R; Plattus, B; Kellogg, L; Luo, J; Marcus, M; Mascolo, A; Landrigan, P J

    1997-03-01

    As health care provision in the United States shifts to primary care settings, it is vital that new models of occupational health services be developed that link clinical care to prevention. The model program described in this paper was developed at the Union Health Center (UHC), a comprehensive health care center supported by the International Ladies Garment Workers Union (now the Union of Needletrades, Industrial and Textile Employees) serving a population of approximately 50,000 primarily minority, female garment workers in New York City. The objective of this paper is to describe a model occupational medicine program in a union-based comprehensive health center linking accessible clinical care with primary and secondary disease prevention efforts. To assess the presence of symptoms suggestive of occupational disease, a health status questionnaire was administered to female workers attending the UHC for routine health maintenance. Based on the results of this survey, an occupational medicine clinic was developed that integrated direct clinical care with worker and employer education and workplace hazard abatement. To assess the success of this new approach, selected cases of sentinel health events were tracked and a chart review was conducted after 3 years of clinic operation. Prior to initiation of the occupational medicine clinic, 64% (648) of the workers surveyed reported symptoms indicative of occupational illnesses. However, only 42 (4%) reported having been told by a physician that they had an occupational illness and only 4 (.4%) reported having field a workers' compensation claim for an occupational disease. In the occupational medicine clinic established at the UHC, a health and safety specialist acts as a case manager, coordinating worker and employer education as well as workplace hazard abatement focused on disease prevention, ensuring that every case of occupational disease is treated as a potential sentinel health event. As examples of the success

  11. Does participation in preventive child health care at the general practitioner minimise social differences in the use of specialist care outside the hospital system?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mårtensson, Solvej; Hansen, KH; Olsen, KR

    2012-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The primary purposes of preventive child health care in Denmark are to help ensure a healthy childhood and to create preconditions for a healthy adult life. The aim of this study is to examine whether participation in age-appropriate preventative child health care affects...... the number of contacts with a specialist in 2006 was related to participation in preventive child health care between 2002 and 2005. To control for the potential effect of difference in GP behaviour the data were analysed using a multilevel Poisson model linking each child to the GP with whom he or she...... was listed. RESULTS: If the children attended any preventive child health care visits, they had the same probability of contact with a specialist regardless of the parents' income. However, children from low-income families not participating in any preventive care had a lower probability of contact...

  12. Continuity of care: what matters to women when they are referred from primary to secondary care during labour? a qualitative interview study in the Netherlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Jonge, Ank; Stuijt, Rosan; Eijke, Iva; Westerman, Marjan J

    2014-03-17

    Continuity of care during labour is important for women. Women with an intrapartum referral from primary to secondary care look back more negatively on their birh experience compared to those who are not referred. It is not clear which aspects of care contribute to this negative birth experience. This study aimed to explore in-depth the experiences of women who were referred during labour from primary to secondary care with regard to the different aspects of continuity of care. A qualitative interview study was conducted in the Netherlands among women who were in primary care at the onset of labour and were referred to secondary care before the baby was born. Through purposive sampling 27 women were selected. Of these, nine women planned their birth at home, two in an alongside midwifery unit and 16 in hospital. Thematic analysis was used. Continuity of care was a very important issue for women because it contributed to their feeling of safety during labour. Important details were sometimes not handed over between professionals within and between primary and secondary care, in particular about women's personal preferences. In case of referral of care from primary to secondary care, it was important for women that midwives handed over the care in person and stayed until they felt safe with the hospital team. Personal continuity of care, in which case the midwife stayed until the end of labour, was highly appreciated but not always expected.Fear of transportion during or after labour was a reason for women to choose hospital birth but also to opt for home birth. Choice of place of birth emerged as a fluid concept; most women planned their place of birth during pregnancy and were aware that they would spend some time at home and possibly some time in hospital. In case of referral from primary to secondary care during labour, midwives should hand over their care in person and preferrably stay with women throughout labour. Planned place of birth should be regarded as a

  13. Perceptions of Oral Health, Preventive Care, and Care-Seeking Behaviors among Rural Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodd, Virginia J.; Logan, Henrietta; Brown, Cameron D.; Calderon, Angela; Catalanotto, Frank

    2014-01-01

    Background: An asymmetrical oral disease burden is endured by certain population subgroups, particularly children and adolescents. Reducing oral health disparities requires understanding multiple oral health perspectives, including those of adolescents. This qualitative study explores oral health perceptions and dental care behaviors among rural…

  14. Management of obesity: improvement of health-care training and systems for prevention and care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietz, William H; Baur, Louise A; Hall, Kevin; Puhl, Rebecca M; Taveras, Elsie M; Uauy, Ricardo; Kopelman, Peter

    2015-06-20

    Although the caloric deficits achieved by increased awareness, policy, and environmental approaches have begun to achieve reductions in the prevalence of obesity in some countries, these approaches are insufficient to achieve weight loss in patients with severe obesity. Because the prevalence of obesity poses an enormous clinical burden, innovative treatment and care-delivery strategies are needed. Nonetheless, health professionals are poorly prepared to address obesity. In addition to biases and unfounded assumptions about patients with obesity, absence of training in behaviour-change strategies and scarce experience working within interprofessional teams impairs care of patients with obesity. Modalities available for the treatment of adult obesity include clinical counselling focused on diet, physical activity, and behaviour change, pharmacotherapy, and bariatric surgery. Few options, few published reports of treatment, and no large randomised trials are available for paediatric patients. Improved care for patients with obesity will need alignment of the intensity of therapy with the severity of disease and integration of therapy with environmental changes that reinforce clinical strategies. New treatment strategies, such as the use of technology and innovative means of health-care delivery that rely on health professionals other than physicians, represent promising options, particularly for patients with overweight and patients with mild to moderate obesity. The co-occurrence of undernutrition and obesity in low-income and middle-income countries poses unique challenges that might not be amenable to the same strategies as those that can be used in high-income countries. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Time to address continued poor vegetable intake in Australia for prevention of chronic disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, Kathryn; Havill, Michelle; Watson, Wendy L; Wellard, Lyndal; Hughes, Clare; Bauman, Adrian; Allman-Farinelli, Margaret

    2016-12-01

    Australian and most international Dietary Guidelines recommend people consume more fruits and vegetables (F&V) to maintain a healthy weight and reduce chronic disease risk. Previous Australian and international surveys have shown sub-optimal consumption of F&V. This study aimed to assess adults' F&V consumption, knowledge of recommended servings, readiness to change, barriers/enabling factors, so that this knowledge might be used for campaigns that support improved consumption. An online survey of a representative sample of adults living in New South Wales, Australia (n = 2474) measuring self-reported F&V consumption; attitudes towards F&V consumption; stage of change for increasing F&V; barriers to consumption; and knowledge of cancer-health benefits. F&V consumption was below recommendations, with vegetable consumption notably low. Only 10% of participants ate at least five servings of vegetables/day (median intake was two daily servings), and 57% consumed two servings fruit/day. There was poor recognition that intake of vegetables was inadequate and this was a barrier to improving vegetable consumption; with preferences for other foods, habit and cost also important barriers. Key barriers to increasing fruit intake were habit, preferences for other foods, perishability, and cost. For vegetable consumption, 49% of participants were in the pre-contemplation stage of change, whereas for fruits 56% were in the action/maintenance stage. Sixty-four percent of respondents believed that eating F&V would protect against cancer, with 56% reporting they thought not eating enough F&V would cause cancer. Understanding what motivates and prevents people from consuming F&V is important for developing effective health promotion programs. Similar to previous surveys, there has been little shift in F&V consumption. Social marketing campaigns have been shown to improve health-related behaviours, and this study may assist in identifying audience segmentation for better targeted

  16. Child Care and Development Block Grant (CCDBG) Participation Continues to Fall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, Hannah; Schmit, Stephanie

    2014-01-01

    Child care subsidies help make quality child care affordable for low-income parents, allowing them to attend work or school to support their families while ensuring their children's healthy development. The Child Care and Development Block Grant (CCDBG) is the primary source of federal funding for child care subsidies for low-income working…

  17. The continued use of sunscreen prevents the development of actinic keratosis in aged Japanese subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunimoto, Kayo; Furukawa, Fukumi; Uede, Mikiko; Mizuno, Makoto; Yamamoto, Yuki

    2016-08-01

    It is well known that the trigger for actinic keratosis (AK) mainly depends on UV exposure. We evaluated the effects of long-term use of sunscreen on the histopathological and dermoscopic changes of AK in aged patients. Eighteen months use of sunscreen produced no change in the number of actinic keratoses or the advancement of histological grade. Although a significant decrease was not observed in the number of positive cells of p53, Ki-67 and COX-2 of the subjects who used sunscreen for 18 months, the downward tendencies of these proteins were observed. The continued use of sunscreen decreased the number of CD31-positive vessels significantly using the Chalkley method, and a significant improvement in scaling and vessel dots was found by dermoscopic study. Moreover, a relationship was found in the amount of sunscreen use and the number of actinic keratoses. Considering these results, it was thought that application of sunscreen reduces the risk of advancement of AK to higher grade AK and squamous cell carcinoma. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Do slums matter? Location and early childhood preventive care choices among urban residents of Bangladesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heller, Lauren R

    2013-10-01

    Upward trends in the relative proportions of slum residents in developing countries have led to widespread concern regarding the impact of slum residency on health behaviors. Measurement of these impacts requires recognizing that unobservable household characteristics that affect the location decision may also affect health care choices and outcomes. To address the potential for bias, this paper models the location decision and the household's demand for maternal and child health services simultaneously using a flexible, semi-parametric approach. It uses a unique urban data set from Bangladesh that incorporates sophisticated geographical mapping techniques to carefully delineate between slum and non-slum areas at a particular point in time. The results suggest that accounting for the endogenous location decision of a family substantially reduces bias in estimated marginal effects of slum residence on preventive care demand. While community infrastructure variables appear correlated with preventive care demand, the causal effect of the availability of primary health care facilities is indistinguishable from zero when unobserved heterogeneity is taken into account. The findings suggest that improvements in community infrastructure in urban areas of developing countries are a more favorable health policy solution at the margin than the construction of additional health care facilities. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Prevention of Skin Tears in the Dependent Older Person: Contribution of the Humanitude Care Methodology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosa Cândida Melo

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Aging is characterized by a decline in physical and cognitive functioning, increasing the older person’s vulnerability to dependence. The age factor and the associated physiological skin changes contribute to the occurrence of skin tears. This type of wounds is common in older people and often results from care delivery, hence the importance of caring with Humanitude and avoiding the use of force during interventions. Objectives: This study aims to identify and analyze the current scientific evidence on the contribution of the Humanitude care methodology toward reducing the agitation and preventing skin tears in dependent older people. Methods: Integrative literature review of articles published between 2011 and 2016, available in full text and written in Portuguese and English, in the EBSCOhost and Google Scholar databases. Results: Of a total of 75 articles, five articles were obtained after applying the inclusion and exclusion criteria. Conclusions: The studies showed that the application of the Humanitude care methodology, by using gentle caring techniques, is particularly effective in dependent older people by reducing their pathological agitation behaviors and opposition to treatment/refusal of care and preventing shearing, friction, and bruising.

  20. Rural Indonesian health care workers' constructs of infection prevention and control knowledge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marjadi, Brahmaputra; McLaws, Mary-Louise

    2010-06-01

    Understanding the constructs of knowledge behind clinical practices in low-resource rural health care settings with limited laboratory facilities and surveillance programs may help in designing resource-appropriate infection prevention and control education. Multiple qualitative methods of direct observations, individual and group focus discussions, and document analysis were used to examine health care workers' knowledge of infection prevention and control practices in intravenous therapy, antibiotic therapy, instrument reprocessing, and hand hygiene in 10 rural Indonesian health care facilities. Awareness of health care-associated infections was low. Protocols were in the main based on verbal instructions handed down through the ranks of health care workers. The evidence-based knowledge gained across professional training was overridden by empiricism, nonscientific modifications, and organizational and societal cultures when resources were restricted or patients demanded inappropriate therapies. This phenomenon remained undetected by accreditation systems and clinical educators. Rural Indonesian health care workers would benefit from a formal introduction to evidence-based practice that would deconstruct individual protocols that include nonscientific knowledge. To achieve levels of acceptable patient safety, protocols would have to be both evidence-based and resource-appropriate. Copyright 2010 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Internal Medicine Residents' Perceptions of Team-Based Care and its Educational Value in the Continuity Clinic: A Qualitative Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soones, Tacara N; O'Brien, Bridget C; Julian, Katherine A

    2015-09-01

    In order to teach residents how to work in interprofessional teams, educators in graduate medical education are implementing team-based care models in resident continuity clinics. However, little is known about the impact of interprofessional teams on residents' education in the ambulatory setting. To identify factors affecting residents' experience of team-based care within continuity clinics and the impact of these teams on residents' education. This was a qualitative study of focus groups with internal medicine residents. Seventy-seven internal medicine residents at the University of California San Francisco at three continuity clinic sites participated in the study. Qualitative interviews were audiotaped and transcribed. The authors used a general inductive approach with sensitizing concepts in four frames (structural, human resources, political and symbolic) to develop codes and identify themes. Residents believed that team-based care improves continuity and quality of care. Factors in four frames affected their ability to achieve these goals. Structural factors included communication through the electronic medical record, consistent schedules and regular team meetings. Human resources factors included the presence of stable teams and clear roles. Political and symbolic factors negatively impacted team-based care, and included low staffing ratios and a culture of ultimate resident responsibility, respectively. Regardless of the presence of these factors or resident perceptions of their teams, residents did not see the practice of interprofessional team-based care as intrinsically educational. Residents' experiences practicing team-based care are influenced by many principles described in the interprofessional teamwork literature, including understanding team members' roles, good communication and sufficient staffing. However, these attributes are not correlated with residents' perceptions of the educational value of team-based care. Including residents in

  2. Continuing professional development for volunteers working in palliative care in a tertiary care cancer institute in India: A cross-sectional observational study of educational needs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jayita Kedar Deodhar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Training programs for volunteers prior to their working in palliative care are well-established in India. However, few studies report on continuing professional development programs for this group. Aims: To conduct a preliminary assessment of educational needs of volunteers working in palliative care for developing a structured formal continuing professional development program for this group. Settings and Design: Cross-sectional observational study conducted in the Department of Palliative Medicine of a tertiary care cancer institute in India. Materials and Methods: Participant volunteers completed a questionnaire, noting previous training, years of experience, and a comprehensive list of topics for inclusion in this program, rated in order of importance according to them. Statistical Analysis Used: Descriptive statistics for overall data and Chi-square tests for categorical variables for group comparisons were applied using Statistical Package for Social Sciences version 18. Results: Fourteen out of 17 volunteers completed the questionnaire, seven having 5-10-years experience in working in palliative care. A need for continuing professional development program was felt by all participants. Communication skills, more for children and elderly specific issues were given highest priority. Spiritual-existential aspects and self-care were rated lower in importance than psychological, physical, and social aspects in palliative care. More experienced volunteers (>5 years of experience felt the need for self-care as a topic in the program than those with less (<5-years experience ( P < 0.05. Conclusions: Understanding palliative care volunteers′ educational needs is essential for developing a structured formal continuing professional development program and should include self-care as a significant component.

  3. Vitamin D: considerations in the continued development as an agent for cancer prevention and therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trump, Donald L; Deeb, Kristin K; Johnson, Candace S

    2010-01-01

    numbers of caplets and the poor "bioavailability" of calcitriol (the most carefully studied analogue) at these high doses. Preclinical data suggest that high exposures to calcitriol are necessary for the antitumor effects. Clinical data do indicate that high doses of calcitriol (>100 mcg weekly, intravenously, and 0.15 microg /kg weekly, orally) can be given safely. The maximum tolerated dose of calcitriol is unclear. While a 250-patient trial in men with castration-resistant prostate cancer comparing docetaxel (36 mg/sqm weekly) +/- calcitriol 0.15 microg/kg indicated that calcitriol was very safe may have reduced to death rate, an adequately powered (1000 patients) randomized study of weekly docetaxel + calcitriol versus q3 week docetaxel was negative. The limitations of this trial were the unequal chemotherapy arms compared in this study and the failure to use an optimal biologic dose or maximum-tolerated dose of calcitriol. In view of the substantial preclinical and epidemiologic data supporting the potential role of vitamin D in cancer, careful studies to evaluate the impact of vitamin D replacement on the frequency of cancer and the impact of an appropriate dose and schedule of calcitriol or other active vitamin D analogue on the treatment of established cancer are indicated.

  4. Preventive home care of frail older people: a review of recent case management studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallberg, Ingalill Rahm; Kristensson, Jimmie

    2004-09-01

    Preventive actions targeting community-dwelling frail older people will be increasingly important with the growing number of very old and thereby also frail older people. This study aimed to explore and summarize the empirical literature on recent studies of case/care management interventions for community-dwelling frail older people and especially with regard to the content of the interventions and the nurse's role and outcome of it. Very few of the interventions took either a preventive or a rehabilitative approach using psycho-educative interventions focusing, for instance, on self-care activities, risk prevention, health complaints management or how to preserve or strengthen social activities, community involvement and functional ability. Moreover, it was striking that very few included a family-oriented approach also including support and education for informal caregivers. Thus it seems that the content of case/care management needs to be expanded and more influenced by a salutogenic health care perspective. Targeting frail older people seemed to benefit from a standardized two-stage strategy for inclusion and for planning the interventions. A comprehensive geriatric assessment seemed useful as a base. Nurses, preferably trained in gerontological practice, have a key role in case/care management for frail older people. This approach calls for developing the content of case/care management so that it involves a more salutogenic, rehabilitative and family-oriented approach. To this end it may be useful for nurses to strengthen their psychosocial skills or develop close collaboration with social workers. The outcome measures examined in this study represented one of three perspectives: the consumer's perspective, the perspective of health care consumption or the recipient's health and functional ability. Perhaps effects would be expected in all three areas and thus these should be included in evaluative studies in addition to measures for family and/or informal

  5. [General practice has to contribute to the continuous improvement of quality of care and integrate health promotion].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanmeerbeek, Marc

    2009-09-01

    Quality of care in general practice is mainly based on effectiveness of clinical and inter-personal care, and access to care. Assessment has to focus on structures and processes, more than on outcomes. The sets of clinical indicators used in some european countries, though good starting points are still incomplete to encompass the complexity of activity. Assessment of care quality by the public authorities must be acceptable to the doctors who are the object of this assessment; otherwise its conclusions will be rejected. Continuous quality improvement can maintain quality of care at a high level and maintain costs under control. Health has to be managed, and doctors have a collective responsibility towards their patients. The procedures of the quality cycle are applicable in general practice for the development of community-based projects of health promotion, within the network of care. The discipline can find in it a new lease of life and perhaps curb the loss of interest among young doctors.

  6. Workplace violence prevention policies in home health and hospice care agencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Nathan; Peek-Asa, Corinne; Nocera, Maryalice; Casteel, Carri

    2013-01-31

    Workplace violence in the home health industry is a growing concern, but little is known about the content of existing workplace violence prevention programs. The authors present the methods for this study that examined workplace violence prevention programs in a sample of 40 California home health and hospice agencies. Data was collected through surveys that were completed by the branch managers of participating facilities. Programs were scored in six different areas, including general workplace violence prevention components; management commitment and employee involvement; worksite analysis; hazard prevention and control; safety and health training; and recordkeeping and program evaluation. The results and discussion sections consider these six areas and the important gaps that were found in existing programs. For example, although most agencies offered workplace violence training, not every worker performing patient care was required to receive the training. Similarly, not all programs were written or reviewed and updated regularly. Few program differences were observed between agency characteristics, but nonetheless several striking gaps were found.

  7. Professional flash continuous glucose monitoring as a supplement to A1C in primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirsch, Irl B

    2017-11-01

    Decreasing glycated hemoglobin (A1C) is the primary goal of current diabetes management due to intervention studies in type 1 and type 2 diabetes associating levels <7.0% (53 mmol/mol) with lower complication risk. Strategic self-monitoring of blood glucose (SMBG) is also recommended to achieve greater time in range, with fewer extremes of hypo- or hyperglycemia. Unlike A1C, SMBG can distinguish among fasting, prandial, and postprandial hyperglycemia; uncover glycemic variability, including potentially dangerous hypoglycemia; and provide feedback to patients about the effects of behavior and medication on glycemic control. However, it has the drawback of capturing only static glucose readings and users are often dependent on time-pressed clinicians to interpret numerous data points. A novel flash continuous glucose monitoring (FCGM) device used for a single 2-week period with a readily interpretable data report know as the ambulatory glucose profile (AGP) has the potential to overcome limitations of conventional technologies, with less cost and greater convenience. This review summarizes the rationale for using intermittent FCGM as a supplement to A1C in primary care, and provides a stepwise approach to interpreting the AGP visual display for efficient individualized therapy.

  8. Effects of continued psychological care toward brain tumor patients and their family members' negative emotions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Ning; Zhu, Dan; Xiao, Shuiyuan

    2018-01-01

    Numerous studies have confirmed that brain tumor patients and their family members frequently exhibit negative emotional reactions, such as anxiety and depression, during diagnosis and treatment of the disease. Family members experience increasing pressure as the year of survival of patient progress. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of the continued psychological care (CPC) toward the brain tumor patients and their family members' emotions. The asynchronous clinical control trial was performed, and 162 brain tumor patients and their family members were divided into the control group and the intervention group. The control group was only performed the telephone follow-up toward the patients. Beside this way, the intervention group was performed the CPC toward the patients and their family member. The self-rating anxiety scale (SAS) and the self-rating depression scale (SDS) were used to measure the negative emotions of the patients and their family members, and the patients' treatment compliance and the incidence of seizures were compared. The SAS and SDS scores of the intervention group on the 14 days, 28 days and 3 months of the CPC were significantly lower than the control group (P family members.

  9. Pediatrician-parent communication in a continuity-of-care setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arntson, P H; Philipsborn, H F

    1982-05-01

    This study investigated pediatrician-parent communication by content, analyzing medical encounters in a setting providing continuity of care. Thirty-eight encounters between middle class families and three senior pediatricians were audio-taped, transcribed, and analyzed for content. The categories of medical communication coded from the interactions were related to each family's medical and demographic characteristics. Five patterns of results emerged: (1) There was a highly stylizied active-passive role relationship, with doctors asking twice as many questions and making twice as many commands as the parent did. (2) A strong reciprocity norm existed between pediatricians and parents for the communication of affect. (3) The higher the experience, income, and educational levels of the parents, the shorter the encounters were, the less frequently symptoms were discussed, and the more frequently medication and professional treatment were mentioned. (4) Parents discussed health more in terms of organicity of causes than did pediatricians who, more frequently, raised environmental factors. (5) The more the family had a history of past illnesses, the more frequently the doctors made affect comments during the encounters. Comparing the results to findings drawn from an emergency clinic documented the importance of sustained relationships between practitioners and patients.

  10. Childhood diarrhoea management practices in Bangladesh: private sector dominance and continued inequities in care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, Charles P; Saha, Unnati Rani; Islam, Rafiqul; Roy, Nikhil

    2006-12-01

    Monitoring for disparities in health and services received based upon gender, income, and geography should continue as renewed efforts to reduce under-five mortality are made in response to millennium development goal #4. The purpose of this survey was to provide a nationally representative description of current childhood diarrhoea management practices and disparities in Bangladesh. A nationally representative, cross-sectional, cluster-sample survey was carried out in randomly selected rural and urban populations across Bangladesh. The survey was completed over an 8 month period between November 2003 and June 2004. A total of 7308 children with a prevalent diarrhoeal illness episode within 560 clusters were identified and enrolled in the survey. In 61% of the cases help was sought from a health care provider, with over 90% practicing in the private sector. Caretaker practice disparities favouring males and higher income households were identified. Significant trends (P gender disparities were limited to females being less likely to receive an antibiotic, adj OR 0.74 (95% CI 0.65, 0.86). Households seeking help from a health provider overwhelmingly utilize the private sector in Bangladesh. Gender inequities in the utilization of licensed providers and purchase of antibiotics, favouring males were identified. Findings suggest that higher income, urban households tend to practice greater gender discrimination. In order to better understand health dynamics in urban populations, in particular slum-dwellers, there is a need to disaggregate survey data by household location.

  11. Parents-CARE: a suicide prevention program for parents of at-risk youth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooven, Carole

    2013-02-01

    Families play an important role in youth suicide prevention, as both a source of protection and a source of risk, and thus are an important target for adolescent suicide prevention programs. This article describes in detail Parents-CARE, a brief youth suicide prevention program for parents, for which effectiveness has been demonstrated. Engaging parents in preventive intervention can be challenging; therefore, the feasibility, acceptability, and relevance of the program to parents are examined. A total of 289 households participated in Parents-CARE. Parent attendance data and parent and interventionist process data are utilized to demonstrate the positive response by parents to the program. The Parents-CARE program was highly attended, and ratings demonstrate that parents were engaged in the program. Ratings show parents found the program both acceptable and relevant. Hence, the program described is promising for clinicians working with at-risk youth as they seek brief, accessible, and effective interventions that include parents in order to amplify the effects of an individual intervention approach. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Behavioral counseling to prevent childhood obesity – study protocol of a pragmatic trial in maternity and child health care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustila Taina

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Prevention is considered effective in combating the obesity epidemic. Prenatal environment may increase offspring's risk for obesity. A child starts to adopt food preferences and other behavioral habits affecting weight gain during preschool years. We report the study protocol of a pragmatic lifestyle intervention aiming at primary prevention of childhood obesity. Methods/Design A non-randomized controlled pragmatic trial in maternity and child health care clinics. The control group was recruited among families who visited the same clinics one year earlier. Eligibility criteria was mother at risk for gestational diabetes: body mass index ≥ 25 kg/m2, macrosomic newborn in any previous pregnancy, immediate family history of diabetes and/or age ≥ 40 years. All maternity clinics in town involved in recruitment. The gestational intervention consisted of individual counseling on diet and physical activity by a public health nurse, and of two group counseling sessions. Intervention continues until offspring’s age of five years. An option to participate a group counseling at child’s age 1 to 2 years was offered. The intervention includes advice on healthy diet, physical activity, sedentary behavior and sleeping pattern. The main outcome measure is offspring BMI z-score and its changes by the age of six years. Discussion Early childhood is a critical time period for prevention of obesity. Pragmatic trials targeting this period are necessary in order to find effective obesity prevention programs feasible in normal health care practice. Trial registration Clinical Trials gov NCT00970710

  13. Vietnamese Oral Health Beliefs and Practices: Impact on the Utilization of Western Preventive Oral Health Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Kim Yen T; Smallidge, Dianne L; Boyd, Linda D; Rainchuso, Lori

    2017-02-01

    Purpose: Infrequent use of the Western health care by the Vietnamese may be explained by deeply-rooted traditional oral health beliefs and practices unique to the Asian culture. This study investigated Vietnamese oral health beliefs and practices and their relationship to the utilization of Western preventive oral health care services among Vietnamese-Americans. Methods: An exploratory, cross-sectional survey design with a convenience sample of 140 par-ticipants (n = 140) was used for this study. Participants were recruited on site of a Vietnamese-owned business, with questionnaires consisting of 28 questions that were distributed in hard copy by the principal investigator (PI) on multiple occasions and at various times of the day. Results: Spearman Rank Correlations tests showed participants who agreed with the statement, "Regular dental visits will help prevent dental problems," were more likely to utilize medical health services (pissues. No statistical significance was found between age, gender, pri-mary language, years spent in the United States, education level, religion and the Vietnamese survey participants' individual oral beliefs and practices. Conclusion: The results suggest that Vietnamese Americans holding the belief that dental visits help prevent oral health problems, were more likely to utilize Western health care services. The study also supports existing literature that Vietnamese oral health beliefs and practices impact the use of Western health care services. Copyright © 2017 The American Dental Hygienists’ Association.

  14. Can community care workers deliver a falls prevention exercise program? A feasibility study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burton E

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Elissa Burton,1 Gill Lewin,2 Hilary O’Connell,3 Mark Petrich,4,5 Eileen Boyle,1 Keith D Hill1 1School of Physiotherapy and Exercise Science, Faculty of Health Sciences, Curtin University, Perth, Western Australia, Australia; 2School of Nursing, Midwifery and Paramedicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, Curtin University, Perth, Western Australia, Australia; 3Independent Living Centre Western Australia, Perth, Western Australia, Australia; 4Western Australian Department of Health, Perth, Western Australia, Australia; 5School of Public Health, Faculty of Health Sciences, Curtin University, Perth, Western Australia, Australia Background: Almost half of older people receiving community care fall each year and this rate has not improved in the last decade. Falls prevention programs targeted at this group are uncommon, and expensively delivered by university trained allied health professionals. Purpose: To investigate the feasibility of community care workers delivering a falls prevention exercise program to older clients, at low or medium risk of falling, as part of an existing service provision. Patients and methods: Community care workers from 10 community care organizations participated in the training for, and delivery to their clients of, an 8-week evidence-based falls prevention exercise program. Community care workers included assessment staff (responsible for identifying the need for community care services through completing an assessment and support workers (responsible for providing support in the home. Clients were surveyed anonymously at the completion of the intervention and workers participated in a semi-structured interview. Results: Twenty-five community care workers participated in the study. The falls prevention program was delivered to 29 clients, with an average age of 82.7 (SD: 8.72 years and consisting of 65.5% female. The intervention was delivered safely with no adverse events recorded, and the eligibility and assessment tools

  15. Transition of care for acute stroke and myocardial infarction patients: from hospitalization to rehabilitation, recovery, and secondary prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, DaiWai M; Bettger, Janet Prvu; Alexander, Karen P; Kendrick, Amy S; Irvine, Julian R; Wing, Liz; Coeytaux, Remy R; Dolor, Rowena J; Duncan, Pamela W; Graffagnino, Carmelo

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVES To review the available published literature to assess whether evidence supports a beneficial role for coordinated transition of care services for the postacute care of patients hospitalized with first or recurrent stroke or myocardial infarction (MI). This review was framed around five areas of investigation: (1) key components of transition of care services, (2) evidence for improvement in functional outcomes, morbidity, mortality, and quality of life, (3) associated risks or potential harms, (4) evidence for improvement in systems of care, and (5) evidence that benefits and harms vary by patient-based or system-based characteristics. DATA SOURCES MEDLINE(®), CINAHL(®), Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, and Embase(®). REVIEW METHODS We included studies published in English from 2000 to 2011 that specified postacute hospitalization transition of care services as well as prevention of recurrent stroke or MI. RESULTS A total of 62 articles representing 44 studies were included for data abstraction. Transition of care interventions were grouped into four categories: (1) hospital -initiated support for discharge was the initial stage in the transition of care process, (2) patient and family education interventions were started during hospitalization but were continued at the community level, (3) community-based models of support followed hospital discharge, and (4) chronic disease management models of care assumed the responsibility for long-term care. Early supported discharge after stroke was associated with reduced total hospital length of stay without adverse effects on functional recovery, and specialty care after MI was associated with reduced mortality. Because of several methodological shortcomings, most studies did not consistently demonstrate that any specific intervention resulted in improved patient-or system -based outcomes. Some studies included more than one intervention, which made it difficult to determine the effect of individual

  16. Transition of care for acute stroke and myocardial infarction patients: from hospitalization to rehabilitation, recovery, and secondary prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, DaiWai M; Bettger, Janet Prvu; Alexander, Karen P; Kendrick, Amy S; Irvine, Julian R; Wing, Liz; Coeytaux, Remy R; Dolor, Rowena J; Duncan, Pamela W; Graffagnino, Carmelo

    2011-10-01

    To review the available published literature to assess whether evidence supports a beneficial role for coordinated transition of care services for the postacute care of patients hospitalized with first or recurrent stroke or myocardial infarction (MI). This review was framed around five areas of investigation: (1) key components of transition of care services, (2) evidence for improvement in functional outcomes, morbidity, mortality, and quality of life, (3) associated risks or potential harms, (4) evidence for improvement in systems of care, and (5) evidence that benefits and harms vary by patient-based or system-based characteristics. MEDLINE(®), CINAHL(®), Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, and Embase(®). We included studies published in English from 2000 to 2011 that specified postacute hospitalization transition of care services as well as prevention of recurrent stroke or MI. A total of 62 articles representing 44 studies were included for data abstraction. Transition of care interventions were grouped into four categories: (1) hospital -initiated support for discharge was the initial stage in the transition of care process, (2) patient and family education interventions were started during hospitalization but were continued at the community level, (3) community-based models of support followed hospital discharge, and (4) chronic disease management models of care assumed the responsibility for long-term care. Early supported discharge after stroke was associated with reduced total hospital length of stay without adverse effects on functional recovery, and specialty care after MI was associated with reduced mortality. Because of several methodological shortcomings, most studies did not consistently demonstrate that any specific intervention resulted in improved patient-or system -based outcomes. Some studies included more than one intervention, which made it difficult to determine the effect of individual components on clinical outcomes. There was

  17. Evaluation of the diabetes health plan to improve diabetes care and prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duru, O Kenrik; Mangione, Carol M; Chan, Charles; Keckhafer, Abigail; Kimbro, Lindsay; Kirvan, K Anya; Turk, Norman; Luchs, Robert; Li, Jinnan; Ettner, Susan

    2013-01-01

    Investigators from the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), and members of the leadership and data analysis teams at UnitedHealthcare (UHC) are partnering to evaluate the Diabetes Health Plan (DHP), an innovative disease-specific insurance product designed by UHC specifically for patients with prediabetes or diabetes. The DHP provides improved access to care management, telephone coaching, and enhanced Internet-based communication with enrollees. The evaluation will use a quasi-experimental design, comparing patients from employer groups that offer the DHP with patients from groups that do not, to determine the effect of the DHP on incidence of diabetes, adherence to metformin, and costs of care among patients with prediabetes. Other factors studied will be cardiovascular risk factor control, adherence to preventive services, health care use, and costs of care among patients with existing diabetes.

  18. Preventing pressure ulcers in long-term care: a cost-effectiveness analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, Ba'; Stern, Anita; Chen, Wendong; Sander, Beate; John-Baptiste, Ava; Thein, Hla-Hla; Gomes, Tara; Wodchis, Walter P; Bayoumi, Ahmed; Machado, Márcio; Carcone, Steven; Krahn, Murray

    2011-11-14

    Pressure ulcers are common in many care settings, with adverse health outcomes and high treatment costs. We evaluated the cost-effectiveness of evidence-based strategies to improve current prevention practice in long-term care facilities. We used a validated Markov model to compare current prevention practice with the following 4 quality improvement strategies: (1) pressure redistribution mattresses for all residents, (2) oral nutritional supplements for high-risk residents with recent weight loss, (3) skin emollients for high-risk residents with dry skin, and (4) foam cleansing for high-risk residents requiring incontinence care. Primary outcomes included lifetime risk of stage 2 to 4 pressure ulcers, quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs), and lifetime costs, calculated according to a single health care payer's perspective and expressed in 2009 Canadian dollars (Can$1 = US$0.84). Strategies cost on average $11.66 per resident per week. They reduced lifetime risk; the associated number needed to treat was 45 (strategy 1), 63 (strategy 4), 158 (strategy 3), and 333 (strategy 2). Strategy 1 and 4 minimally improved QALYs and reduced the mean lifetime cost by $115 and $179 per resident, respectively. The cost per QALY gained was approximately $78 000 for strategy 3 and $7.8 million for strategy 2. If decision makers are willing to pay up to $50 000 for 1 QALY gained, the probability that improving prevention is cost-effective is 94% (strategy 4), 82% (strategy 1), 43% (strategy 3), and 1% (strategy 2). The clinical and economic evidence supports pressure redistribution mattresses for all long-term care residents. Improving prevention with perineal foam cleansers and dry skin emollients appears to be cost-effective, but firm conclusions are limited by the available clinical evidence.

  19. Born too soon: care before and between pregnancy to prevent preterm births: from evidence to action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dean, Sohni V; Mason, Elizabeth; Howson, Christopher P; Lassi, Zohra S; Imam, Ayesha M; Bhutta, Zulfiqar A

    2013-01-01

    Providing care to adolescent girls and women before and between pregnancies improves their own health and wellbeing, as well as pregnancy and newborn outcomes, and can also reduce the rates of preterm birth. This paper has reviewed the evidence-based interventions and services for preventing preterm births, reported the findings from research priority exercise, and prescribed actions for taking this call further. Certain factors in the preconception period have been shown to increase the risk for prematurity and, therefore, preconception care services for all women of reproductive age should address these risk factors through preventing adolescent pregnancy, preventing unintended pregnancies, promoting optimal birth spacing, optimizing pre-pregnancy weight and nutritional status (including a folic acid-containing multivitamin supplement) and ensuring that all adolescent girls have received complete vaccination. Preconception care must also address risk factors that may be applicable to only some women. These include screening for and management of chronic diseases, especially diabetes; sexually-transmitted infections; tobacco and smoke exposure; mental health disorders, notably depression; and intimate partner violence. The approach to research in preconception care to prevent preterm births should include a cycle of development and delivery research that evaluates how best to scale up coverage of existing evidence-based interventions, epidemiologic research that assesses the impact of implementing these interventions and discovery science that better elucidates the complex causal pathway of preterm birth and helps to develop new screening and intervention tools. In addition to research, policy and financial investment is crucial to increasing opportunities to implement preconception care, and rates of prematurity should be included as a tracking indicator in global and national maternal child health assessments.

  20. The effectiveness of holistic diabetic management between Siriraj Continuity of Care clinic and medical out-patient department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chalermsri, Chalobol; Paisansudhi, Supalerg; Kantachuvesiri, Pitchaporn; Pramyothin, Pornpoj; Washirasaksiri, Chaiwat; Srivanichakorn, Weerachai; Nopmaneejumruslers, Cherdchai; Chouriyagune, Charoen; Pandejpong, Denla; Phisalprapa, Pochamana

    2014-03-01

    Diabetes mellitus is one of the most common diseases in the Thai population, and it is well known that diabetic complications could be prevented with appropriate management. Despite published guidelines, most Thai patients with diabetes do not achieve treatment goals. Siriraj Continuity of Care clinic (CC clinic) was recently established in order to provide training for medical students and internal medicine residents. It is possible that the training component in the CC clinic may contribute to better overall outcomes in type 2 diabetes mellitus (type 2 DM) patients when compared with usual care at the medical out-patient department (OPD). To compare the effectiveness of diabetic management in type 2 diabetes mellitus patients who attended the CC clinic and the medical OPD. Retrospective chart review was performed in type 2 diabetes mellitus patients who were treated at either clinic at Siriraj Hospital in 2007-2011. Baseline demographics, treatment strategies and outcomes, and participation in an appropriate health maintenance program were assessed in both groups. Seven hundred and fifty seven medical records were reviewed, including 383 patients in the CC clinic group and 374 in the OPD group. Mean HbA1c was significantly lower in the CC clinic group compared with the OPD group (7.3 +/- 0.9% and 7.8 +/- 1.3%, respectively, < 0.001). The number of patients who achieved goal HbA1c of less than 7% in CC clinic group was 123 (32.1%) compared with 91 (24.3%) in the OPD group (p = 0.039). More patients were screened for diabetic complications in the CC clinic group compared with the OPD group, including screening for diabetic neuropathy (57.4% vs. 2.1%, p < 0.001), diabetic retinopathy (56.7% vs. 36.6%, p < 0.001), and diabetic nephropathy (80.9% vs. 36.9%, p < 0.001). Patients in the CC clinic group had a higher rate of age-appropriate cancer screening than those in the OPD group (54.2% vs. 13.3%, p < 0.001 for breast cancer; 24.0% vs. 0.9%, p < 0.001 for cervical

  1. Well Baby Group Care: Evaluation of a Promising Intervention for Primary Obesity Prevention in Toddlers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machuca, Hildred; Arevalo, Sandra; Hackley, Barbara; Applebaum, Jo; Mishkin, Arielle; Heo, Moonseong; Shapiro, Alan

    2016-06-01

    Nationally, approximately 24% of preschool children are overweight or obese, with low-income communities disproportionately affected. Few interventions to prevent obesity in children at greatest risk have demonstrated positive results. Therefore, we evaluated the effectiveness of a novel group well-child care intervention for primary obesity prevention at age 2 years. Well Baby Group (WBG) is an alternative to traditional well-child care offered at a federally qualified health center in the South Bronx. Facilitated by a pediatrician and nutritionist, WBG fosters positive dietary behaviors, responsive parenting and feeding practices, and peer support during the first 18 months of life. Multivariable logistic regression was conducted to test the effect of WBG on rates of overweight/obesity at 2 years (BMI-for-age ≥85th percentile) using a nonrandomized comparison group of children receiving traditional care at our center over the same period. Characteristics of mothers and infants were comparable between intervention (n = 47) and comparison (n = 140) groups. Children enrolled in WBG were significantly less likely to be overweight/obese at 2 years than children receiving traditional well-child care (2.1% vs. 15.0%; OR 0.12; 95% CI 0.02-0.94; p = 0.02). In multivariable regression analysis, WBG remained a significant independent protective factor (OR 0.12; 95% CI 0.02-0.93; p = 0.04), adjusting for birthweight and parity. WBG, a replicable model integrated into primary care visits, affords a unique opportunity to intervene consistently and early, providing families in at-risk communities with increased provider time, intensive education, and ongoing support. Further study of group well-child care for primary obesity prevention is warranted to confirm the effectiveness of the model.

  2. Implementing a pressure ulcer prevention bundle in an adult intensive care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tayyib, Nahla; Coyer, Fiona; Lewis, Peter A

    2016-12-01

    The incidence of pressure ulcers (PUs) in intensive care units (ICUs) is high and numerous strategies have been implemented to address this issue. One approach is the use of a PU prevention bundle. However, to ensure success care bundle implementation requires monitoring to evaluate the care bundle compliance rate, and to evaluate the effectiveness of implementation strategies in facilitating practice change. The aims of this study were to appraise the implementation of a series of high impact intervention care bundle components directed at preventing the development of PUs, within ICU, and to evaluate the effectiveness of strategies used to enhance the implementation compliance. An observational prospective study design was used. Implementation strategies included regular education, training, audit and feed-back and the presence of a champion in the ICU. Implementation compliance was measured along four time points using a compliance checklist. Of the 60 registered nurses (RNs) working in the critical care setting, 11 participated in this study. Study participants demonstrated a high level of compliance towards the PU prevention bundle implementation (78.1%), with 100% participant acceptance. No significant differences were found between participants' demographic characteristics and the compliance score. There was a significant effect for time in the implementation compliance (Wilks Lambda=0.29, F (3, 8)=6.35, p<0.016), indicating that RNs needed time to become familiar with the bundle and routinely implement it into their practice. PU incidence was not influenced by the compliance level of participants. The implementation strategies used showed a positive impact on compliance. Assessing and evaluating implementation compliance is critical to achieve a desired outcome (reduction in PU incidence). This study's findings also highlighted that while RNs needed time to familiarise themselves with the care bundle elements, their clinical practice was congruent with the

  3. Bridging the gap between public health and primary care in prevention of cardiometabolic diseases: background of and experiences with the Prevention Consultation in The Netherlands.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Assendelft, W.J.J.; Nielen, M.M.J.; Hettinga, D.M.; Meer, V. van der; Vliet, M. van; Drenthen, A.J.M.; Schellevis, F.G.; Oosterhout, M.J.W. van

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: There is an increasing need for programmatic prevention of cardiometabolic diseases (cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes and chronic kidney disease). Therefore, in the Netherlands, a prevention programme linked to primary care has been developed. This initiative was supported by the

  4. STEADI: CDC's approach to make older adult fall prevention part of every primary care practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarmiento, Kelly; Lee, Robin

    2017-12-01

    Primary care providers play a critical role in protecting older adult patients from one of the biggest threats to their health and independence-falls. A fall among an older adult patient cannot only be fatal or cause a devastating injury, but can also lead to problems that can effect a patient's overall quality of life. In response, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) developed the STEADI initiative to give health care providers the tools they need to help reduce their older adult patient's risk of a fall. CDC's STEADI resources have been distributed widely and include practical materials and tools for health care providers and their patients that are designed to be integrated into every primary care practice. As the population ages, the need for fall prevention efforts, such as CDC's STEADI, will become increasingly critical to safeguard the health of Americans. STEADI's electronic health records (EHRs), online trainings, assessment tools, and patient education materials are available at no-cost and can be downloaded online at www.cdc.gov/STEADI. Health care providers should look for opportunities to integrate STEADI materials into their practice, using a team-based approach, to help protect their older patients. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  5. Beyond UHC: monitoring health and social protection coverage in the context of tuberculosis care and prevention.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Knut Lönnroth

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Tuberculosis (TB remains a major global public health problem. In all societies, the disease affects the poorest individuals the worst. A new post-2015 global TB strategy has been developed by WHO, which explicitly highlights the key role of universal health coverage (UHC and social protection. One of the proposed targets is that "No TB affected families experience catastrophic costs due to TB." High direct and indirect costs of care hamper access, increase the risk of poor TB treatment outcomes, exacerbate poverty, and contribute to sustaining TB transmission. UHC, conventionally defined as access to health care without risk of financial hardship due to out-of-pocket health care expenditures, is essential but not sufficient for effective and equitable TB care and prevention. Social protection interventions that prevent or mitigate other financial risks associated with TB, including income losses and non-medical expenditures such as on transport and food, are also important. We propose a framework for monitoring both health and social protection coverage, and their impact on TB epidemiology. We describe key indicators and review methodological considerations. We show that while monitoring of general health care access will be important to track the health system environment within which TB services are delivered, specific indicators on TB access, quality, and financial risk protection can also serve as equity-sensitive tracers for progress towards and achievement of overall access and social protection.

  6. Patient Continued Use of Online Health Care Communities: Web Mining of Patient-Doctor Communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Bing

    2018-04-16

    In practice, online health communities have passed the adoption stage and reached the diffusion phase of development. In this phase, patients equipped with knowledge regarding the issues involved in health care are capable of switching between different communities to maximize their online health community activities. Online health communities employ doctors to answer patient questions, and high quality online health communities are more likely to be acknowledged by patients. Therefore, the factors that motivate patients to maintain ongoing relationships with online health communities must be addressed. However, this has received limited scholarly attention. The purpose of this study was to identify the factors that drive patients to continue their use of online health communities where doctor-patient communication occurs. This was achieved by integrating the information system success model with online health community features. A Web spider was used to download and extract data from one of the most authoritative Chinese online health communities in which communication occurs between doctors and patients. The time span analyzed in this study was from January 2017 to March 2017. A sample of 469 valid anonymous patients with 9667 posts was obtained (the equivalent of 469 respondents in survey research). A combination of Web mining and structural equation modeling was then conducted to test the research hypotheses. The results show that the research framework for integrating the information system success model and online health community features contributes to our understanding of the factors that drive patients' relationships with online health communities. The primary findings are as follows: (1) perceived usefulness is found to be significantly determined by three exogenous variables (ie, social support, information quality, and service quality; R 2 =0.88). These variables explain 87.6% of the variance in perceived usefulness of online health communities; (2

  7. The Benefits of Continuous Leisure Participation in Relocation Adjustment Among Residents of Long-Term Care Facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Li-Jung; Yen, Hsin-Yen

    2018-03-19

    The rising population of older adults is transforming Taiwan society. Although many long-term care facilities now operate for older adults, the transition from the home environment to long-term facilities may cause multiple issues, including relocation stress syndrome, for new residents. Autonomy is a critical element of the human experience. Leisure, as an expression of autonomy, has been shown to enhance self-image and promote feelings of competence and mastery. The aim of this study was to assess the relationship between participation in leisure activities and adjustment to residential care using the continuity theory. One hundred sixty-three qualified individuals from 11 long-term care institutions were recruited and completed the questionnaire. The sampling criteria for the study were age (55+ years), appropriate cognitive skills, and residency (less than 5 years). Interviews conducted by trained interviewers were used to collect data. Measured outcomes included leisure participation; physical, psychological, and social adjustments; and background information. Cluster analysis, descriptive analysis, multivariate analysis of variance, and least significant difference test were used in analysis. Type of admission (voluntary/mandated) and type of leisure participation significantly affected the level of relocation adjustment success. Four leisure behavior categories were identified, including reduced participation, expanded participation, active participation, and continuing participation. The participants in the active and continuing participation categories had significantly higher psychological adjustment than their peers in the reduced participation category. Moreover, the continuing participation category had a significantly better level of social adjustment than their expanded participation category peers. Continuous and active participation categories had a beneficial outcome in relocation adjustment. The findings support that, in general, residents of

  8. Booming Economy Fuels Continued Expansion of For-Profit Child Care--Annual Status Report #13.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neugebauer, Roger

    2000-01-01

    Discusses growth of North America's 40 largest for- profit child care centers. Identifies current threats, including staffing shortage and increasing competition from public schools and among chains. Identifies current opportunities to include employer and franchise child care, upscale child care, elementary school services, and flexible hours.…

  9. Hand disinfection in a neonatal intensive care unit: continuous electronic monitoring over a one-year period

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Helder, O.K.; van Goudoever, J.B.; Hop, W.C.J.; Brug, J.; Kornelisse, R.F.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Good hand hygiene compliance is essential to prevent nosocomial infections in healthcare settings. Direct observation of hand hygiene compliance is the gold standard but is time consuming. An electronic dispenser with built-in wireless recording equipment allows continuous monitoring of

  10. Relationship between continuity of care and adverse outcomes varies by number of chronic conditions among older adults with diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva H. DuGoff

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Follow us on Twitter Co-Editors-in-Chief Martin Fortin Jane Gunn Stewart W. Mercer Susan Smith Marjan van den Akker Society for Academic Primary Care Journal Help USER You are logged in as... avalster My Profile Log Out JOURNAL CONTENT Search Search Scope Search Browse By Issue By Author By Title By Sections By Identify Types OPEN JOURNAL SYSTEMS FONT SIZE Make font size smallerMake font size defaultMake font size larger INFORMATION For Readers For Authors For Librarians ARTICLE TOOLS Print this article Indexing metadata How to cite item Supplementary files Finding References Email this article Email the author Post a Comment NOTIFICATIONS View (378 new Manage IRCMO NEWS ‘Addressing the global challenge of... Publications on multimorbidity... The CARE Plus study Prevalence of multimorbidity in the... Multimorbidity in adults from a... CURRENT ISSUE Atom logo RSS2 logo RSS1 logo HOSTED BY Part of the PKP Publishing Services Network HOME ABOUT USER HOME SEARCH CURRENT ARCHIVES ANNOUNCEMENTS PUBLISHER AUTHOR GUIDELINES SUBMISSIONS WHY PUBLISH WITH US? Home > Vol 6, No 2 (2016 >\tDuGoff Relationship between continuity of care and adverse outcomes varies by number of chronic conditions among older adults with diabetes Eva H. DuGoff, Karen Bandeen-Roche, Gerard F. Anderson Abstract Background: Continuity of care is a basic tenant of primary care practice. However, the evidence on the importance of continuity of care for older adults with complex conditions is mixed. Objective: To assess the relationship between measurement of continuity of care, number of chronic conditions, and health outcomes. Design: We analyzed data from a cohort of 1,600 US older adults with diabetes and ≥1 other chronic condition in a private Medicare health plan from July 2010 to December 2011. Multivariate regression models were used to examine the association of baseline continuity (the first 6 months and the composite outcome of any emergency room use or inpatient

  11. Health care-associated infection prevention in Japan: the role of safety culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakamoto, Fumie; Sakihama, Tomoko; Saint, Sanjay; Greene, M Todd; Ratz, David; Tokuda, Yasuharu

    2014-08-01

    Limited data exist on the use of infection prevention practices in Japan. We conducted a nationwide survey to examine the use of recommended infection prevention strategies and factors affecting their use in Japanese hospitals. Between April 1, 2012, and January 31, 2013, we surveyed 971 hospitals in Japan. The survey instrument assessed general hospital and infection prevention program characteristics and use of infection prevention practices, including practices specific to preventing catheter-associated urinary tract infection (CAUTI), central line-associated bloodstream infection (CLABSI), and ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP). Logistic regression models were used to examine multivariable associations between hospital characteristics and the u